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1

King County Nearshore Habitat Mapping Data Report: Picnic Point to Shilshole Bay Marina  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to provide accurate, georeferenced maps of benthic habitats to assist in the siting of a new wastewater treatment plant outfall and the assessment of habitats of endangered, threatened, and economically important species. The mapping was conducted in the fall of 1999 using two complementary techniques: side-scan sonar and underwater videography. Products derived from these techniques include geographic information system (GIS) compatible polygon data of substrate type and vegetation cover, including eelgrass and kelp. Additional GIS overlays include underwater video track line data of total macroalgae, selected macroalgal species, fish, and macroinvertebrates. The combined tools of geo-referenced side-scan sonar and underwater video is a powerful technique for assessing and mapping of nearshore habitat in Puget Sound. Side-scan sonar offers the ability to map eelgrass with high spatial accuracy and resolution, and provides information on patch size, shape, and coverage. It also provides information on substrate change and location of specific targets (e.g., piers, docks, pilings, large boulders, debris piles). The addition of underwater video is a complementary tool providing both groundtruthing for the sonar and additional information on macro fauna and flora. As a groundtruthing technique, the video was able to confirm differences between substrate types, as well as detect subtle spatial changes in substrate. It also verified information related to eelgrass, including the density classification categories and the type of substrate associated with eelgrass, which could not be determined easily with side- scan sonar. Video is also a powerful tool for mapping the location of macroalgae, (including kelp and Ulva), fish and macroinvertebrates. The ability to geo-locate these resources in their functional habitat provides an added layer of information and analytical potential.

Woodruff, Dana L.; Farley, Paul J.; Borde, Amy B.; Southard, John A.; Thom, Ronald M.

2000-12-31

2

Transit Rider Information King County Metro Transit  

E-print Network

Transit Rider Information King County Metro Transit Rider Information (206) 553-3000 http://www.kingcounty.gov/metro and after a storm make it easier and safer to clear streets. · Use the bus. SDOT works closely with Metro closely with King County Metro Transit, the Seattle School District, local universities, hospitals

Queitsch, Christine

3

King County Earthworks: Land Reclamation as Sculpture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Can land reclamation be public art? It most certainly can and large scale installations can be found in abundance from California to Maine. This rather wonderful project appeared in Washington's King County in the summer of 1979. The King County Archives brought together original interviews, photos, and other documents for this marvelous exploration of a unique and trend-setting endeavor. The intent of the project was to have artists create various earthworks on land that had been environmentally damaged. The first phase was a demonstration project, then other artists moved on to create six different sites. The first demonstration project was crafted by well-known artist Robert Morris and there are a number of videos, explanatory essays, and diagrams documenting this crafty and fascinating experiment in public art.

2013-11-04

4

PECIAL REPORS T Public Health: Seattle and King County's  

E-print Network

in land use plan ning and smart growth issues. Data from a King County study makes the answer clear sionals can provide added value by giv ing planners strong health data to support "smart growth" designs control but pre vent diseases such as tuberculosis (Wir ka, 1996). Similarly, prominent planners as late

5

Productivity of Great Blue Herons in King County, Washington  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied productivity of great blue herons (Ardea herodias) at their nesting colonies in King County, western Washington in the 2000 breeding season. Rapid urbanization has been hypothesized to have limited heron population growth in recent years. Of the 354 active nests in 2000, 260 (74%) nests produced fledglings. Mean productivity for all active nests was 1.77 (SD = 1.37).

Kenneth J. Raedeke; David A. Manuwal

2006-01-01

6

Third Annual Report: 2006 Pre-Construction Eelgrass Monitoring and Propagation for King County Outfall Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

King County proposes to build a new sewer outfall discharging to Puget Sound near Point Wells, Washington. Construction is scheduled for 2008. The Point Wells site was selected to minimize effects on the nearshore marine environment, but unavoidable impacts to eelgrass (Zostera marina) beds are anticipated during construction. To mitigate for these impacts and prepare for post-construction restoration, King County began implementation of a multi-year eelgrass monitoring and restoration program in 2004, with the primary goal of returning intertidal and shallow subtidal habitat and eelgrass to pre-construction conditions. Major program elements are a) pre-construction monitoring, i.e., documenting initial eelgrass conditions and degree of fluctuation over 5 years prior to construction, b) eelgrass transplanting, including harvesting, offsite propagating and stockpiling of local plantstock, and post-construction planting, and c) post-construction monitoring. The program is detailed in the Eelgrass Restoration and Biological Resources Implementation Workplan (King County 2006). This report describes calendar year 2006 pre-construction activities conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of King County. Activities included continued propagation of eelgrass shoots and monitoring of the experimental harvest plots in the marine outfall corridor area to evaluate recovery rates relative to harvest rates. Approximately 1500 additional shoots were harvested from the marine outfall corridor in August 2006 to supplement the plants in the propagation tank at the PNNL Marine Sciences Laboratory in Sequim, Washington, bringing the total number of shoots to 4732. Eelgrass densities were monitored in the five experimental harvest plots established in the marine outfall corridor. Changes in eelgrass density were evaluated in year-to-year comparisons with initial harvest rates. Net eelgrass density decreased from 2004 post-harvest to 2006 in all plots, despite density increases observed in 2005 in some plots and at some harvest rates. Eelgrass densities within individual subplots were highly variable from year to year, and the change in density in any interannual period did not correlate to the initial 2004 harvest rate. Continued monitoring should help project managers determine an optimum harvest rate that supports rapid recovery of donor eelgrass beds.

Woodruff, Dana L.; Southard, Susan S.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Anderson, Michael G.; Vavrinec, John

2007-02-01

7

Fourth Annual Report: 2007 Pre-Construction Eelgrass Monitoring and Propagation for King County Outfall Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

King County proposes to build a new sewer outfall discharging to Puget Sound near Point Wells, Washington. Construction is scheduled for 2008. The Point Wells site was selected to minimize effects on the nearshore marine environment, but unavoidable impacts to eelgrass (Zostera marina) beds are anticipated during construction. To mitigate these impacts and prepare for post-construction restoration, King County began implementing a multiyear eelgrass monitoring and restoration program in 2004, with the primary goal of returning intertidal and shallow subtidal habitat and eelgrass to pre-construction conditions. Major program elements related to eelgrass are (a) pre-construction monitoring, i.e., documenting initial eelgrass conditions and degree of fluctuation over 5 years prior to construction, (b) eelgrass transplanting, including harvesting, offsite propagating, and stockpiling of local plants for post-construction planting, and (c) post-construction planting and subsequent monitoring. The program is detailed in the Eelgrass Restoration and Biological Resources Implementation Workplan (King County 2006). This report describes calendar year 2007 pre-construction activities conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for King County. Activities included continued propagation of eelgrass shoots at the PNNL Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) in Sequim, Washington, and monitoring of the experimental harvest plots in the marine outfall corridor area to evaluate recovery rates relative to harvest rates. In addition, 490 eelgrass shoots were also harvested from the Marine Outfall Corridor in July 2007 to supplement the plants in the propagation tank at the MSL, bringing the total number of shoots to 1464. Eelgrass densities were monitored in four of five experimental harvest plots established in the Marine Outfall Corridor. Changes in eelgrass density were evaluated in year-to-year comparisons with initial harvest rates. A net increase in eelgrass density from 2004 post-harvest to 2007 was observed in all plots, despite density decreases observed in 2006 in all plots and at most harvest rates. Eelgrass densities within individual subplots were highly variable from year to year, and the change in density in any interannual period was not related to initial 2004 harvest rate. Harvest rates of neighboring subplots did not appear to affect subplot eelgrass density (Woodruff et al. 2007). Three years post-harvest, eelgrass shoot densities were not significantly different from pre-harvest shoot densities at any harvest level. Additional plans are being discussed with King County to harvest all eelgrass from the construction corridor and hold in the propagation tanks at the MSL for post-construction planting. Under this plan, plants that would have been lost to construction will be held offsite until construction is completed. This strategy reduces and possibly eliminates the need to harvest eelgrass from donor beds located south of the construction area, allowing them to remain undisturbed. However, if eelgrass is harvested from donor beds, the monitoring of eelgrass growth at different harvest rates should help determine an optimum harvest rate that supports rapid recovery of donor eelgrass beds.

Woodruff, Dana L.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Southard, Susan S.; Vavrinec, John

2007-10-04

8

Bus Fleet Type and Age Replacement Optimization: A case study utilizing King County Metro fleet data  

E-print Network

1 Bus Fleet Type and Age Replacement Optimization: A case study utilizing King County Metro fleet and a hybrid bus. Employing real-world bus fleet data from King County Metro (Washington State, USA) multiple Metro (Washington State, USA) operates about 1,300 vehicles with multiple bus technologies (electric

Bertini, Robert L.

9

Interim Evaluation Results from New Flyer/Allison Hybrid Buses at King County Metro: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper prepared for the 2005 American Public Transportation Association Bus & Paratransit Conference discusses NREL/DOE evaluation of hybrid electric articulated transit buses operated by King County Metro.

Chandler, K.; Eberts, E.; Eudy, L.

2005-05-01

10

The environment of deposition of the Oligocene Burbank sandstone, Tulare Lake field, Kings County, California  

E-print Network

THE ENVIRONMENT OF DEPOSITION OF THE OLIGOCENE BURBANK SANDSTONE, TULARE LAKE FIELD, KINGS COUNTY, CALIFORNIA A Thesis by WILLIAM HAACK GOULET Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE DECEMBER 1986 Major Subject: Geology THE ENVIRONMENT OF DEPOSITION OF THE OLIGOCENE BURBANK SANDSTONE, TULARE LAKE PIELD, KINGS COUNTY, CALIFORNIA A Thesis by WILLIAM HAACK GODLET Approved as to style...

Goulet, William Haack

2012-06-07

11

Radiological Risk Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

SciTech Connect

Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document develops plausible and/or likely scenarios, including the identification of likely radioactive materials and quantities of those radioactive materials to be involved. These include 60Co, 90Sr, 137Cs, 192Ir, 226Ra, plutonium, and 241Am. Two broad categories of scenarios are considered. The first category includes events that may be suspected from the outset, such as an explosion of a "dirty bomb" in downtown Seattle. The explosion would most likely be heard, but the type of explosion (e.g., sewer methane gas or RDD) may not be immediately known. Emergency first responders must be able to quickly detect the radioisotopes previously listed, assess the situation, and deploy a response to contain and mitigate (if possible) detrimental effects resulting from the incident. In such scenarios, advance notice of about an hour or two might be available before any contaminated wastewater reaches a treatment plant. The second category includes events that could go initially undetected by emergency personnel. Examples of such a scenario would be the inadvertent or surreptitious introduction of radioactive material into the sewer system. Intact rogue radioactive sources from industrial radiography devices, well-logging apparatus, or moisture density gages may get into wastewater and be carried to a treatment plant. Other scenarios might include a terrorist deliberately putting a dispersible radioactive material into wastewater. Alternatively, a botched terrorism preparation of an RDD may result in radioactive material entering wastewater without anyone's knowledge. Drinking water supplies may also be contaminated, with the result that some or most of the radioactivity ends up in wastewater.

Strom, Daniel J.

2005-08-05

12

Fifth Annual Report: 2008 Pre-Construction Eelgrass Monitoring and Propagation for King County Outfall Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

This is the fifth and final report in a series documenting progress of the pre-construction eelgrass restoration and mitigation activities for the proposed King County Brightwater marine outfall, discharging to Puget Sound near Point Wells, Washington. King County began implementing a multiyear eelgrass monitoring and restoration program in 2004, with the primary goal of returning intertidal and shallow subtidal habitat and eelgrass to pre-construction conditions, after construction of the outfall. Major eelgrass mitigation program elements include: a) pre-construction monitoring, i.e., documenting initial eelgrass conditions and degree of fluctuation over a 5 year period prior to construction, b) eelgrass transplanting, including harvesting, offsite propagation and stockpiling of local plants for post-construction planting, and c) post-construction planting and subsequent monitoring, occurring in 2009 and beyond. The overall program is detailed in the Eelgrass Restoration and Biological Resources Implementation Workplan (King County 2008).

Woodruff, Dana L.; Judd, Chaeli; Thom, Ronald M.; Sather, Nichole K.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.

2010-01-01

13

Radiological Instrumentation Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

SciTech Connect

The King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into its combined sanitary and storm sewer system. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material. Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. Volume 2 of PNNL-15163 assesses the radiological instrumentation needs for detection of radiological or nuclear terrorism, in support of decisions to treat contaminated wastewater or to bypass the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP), and in support of radiation protection of the workforce, the public, and the infrastructure of the WPTP. Fixed radiation detection instrumentation should be deployed in a defense-in-depth system that provides 1) early warning of significant radioactive material on the way to the WPTP, including identification of the radionuclide(s) and estimates of the soluble concentrations, with a floating detector located in the wet well at the Interbay Pump Station and telemetered via the internet to all authorized locations; 2) monitoring at strategic locations within the plant, including 2a) the pipe beyond the hydraulic ram in the bar screen room; 2b) above the collection funnels in the fine grit facility; 2c) in the sampling tank in the raw sewage pump room; and 2d) downstream of the concentration facilities that produce 6% blended and concentrated biosolids. Engineering challenges exist for these applications. It is necessary to deploy both ultra-sensitive detectors to provide early warning and identification and detectors capable of functioning in high-dose rate environments that are likely under some scenarios, capable of functioning from 10 microrems per hour (background) up to 1000 rems per hour. Software supporting fixed spectroscopic detectors is needed to provide prompt, reliable, and simple interpretations of spectroscopic outputs that are of use to operators and decision-makers. Software to provide scientists and homeland security personnel with sufficient technical detail for identification, quantification, waste management decisions, and for the inevitable forensic and attribution needs must be developed. Computational modeling using MCNP software has demonstrated that useful detection capabilities can be deployed. In particular, any of the isotopes examined can be detected at levels between 0.01 and 0.1 ?Ci per gallon. General purpose instruments that can be used to determine the nature and extent of radioactive contamination and measure radiation levels for purposes of protecting personnel and members of the public should be available. One or more portable radioisotope identifiers (RIIDs) should be available to WTD personnel. Small, portable battery-powered personal radiation monitors should be widely available WTD personnel. The personal monitors can be used for personal and group radiation protection decisions, and to alert management to the need to get expert backup. All considerations of radiological instrumentation require considerations of training and periodic retraining of personnel, as well as periodic calibration and maintenance of instruments. Routine “innocent” alarms will occur due to medical radionuclides that are legally discharged into sanitary sewers on a daily basis.

Strom, Daniel J.; McConn, Ronald J.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.

2005-05-19

14

Workplace Skills Enhancement Project, Seattle-King County Private Industry Council (PIC). Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evaluative information is provided on 18 completed workplace literacy classes conducted in the Seattle-King County, Washington, area for 218 limited English proficient workers. The programs were operated by the Employment Opportunities Center and the Refugee Service Federation. Participants were members of the following ethnic groups: Vietnamese,…

Snedeker, David M.

15

NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACYERIA SPP ISOLATED FROM RESIDENTS OF KING COUNTY, WASHINGTON, 1999-2002  

EPA Science Inventory

Background: Pathogenic nontuberculous Mycobacteria spp. (NTM) are not known to be transmitted among persons, but may be acquired from exposure to contaminated media such as soil, food and water. We examined the spectrum of NTM isolated from human specimens in King County, WA. ...

16

Trends in suicide by carbon monoxide inhalation in King County, Washington: 1996-2009.  

PubMed

Carbon monoxide (CO) inhalation is one of the leading methods of suicide in the United States. A sharp increase in suicide by inhaling the CO produced from burning charcoal has been reported in parts of Asia; however, the incidence of this method has not been determined in a U.S. population. Thus, we determined trends of CO suicide in the ethnically diverse population of King County, Washington, U.S.A. During the period 1996-2009, we identified 158 cases of suicide by CO poisoning, with 125 because of automotive exhaust, 26 because of charcoal burning, and seven from other CO sources. While historical U.S. data indicate >99% of CO suicides in the United States occurring by automobile exhaust inhalation, in the most recent years analyzed, c. 40% of CO-related suicides in King County, Washington, were because of charcoal burning, indicating a possible shift in suicide trends that warrants further scrutiny in additional populations. PMID:21291470

Schmitt, Michael W; Williams, Timothy L; Woodard, Kristinza R; Harruff, Richard C

2011-05-01

17

Arterial roads and area socioeconomic status are predictors of fast food restaurant density in King County, WA  

PubMed Central

Background Fast food restaurants reportedly target specific populations by locating in lower-income and in minority neighborhoods. Physical proximity to fast food restaurants has been associated with higher obesity rates. Objective To examine possible associations, at the census tract level, between area demographics, arterial road density, and fast food restaurant density in King County, WA, USA. Methods Data on median household incomes, property values, and race/ethnicity were obtained from King County and from US Census data. Fast food restaurant addresses were obtained from Public Health-Seattle & King County and were geocoded. Fast food density was expressed per tract unit area and per capita. Arterial road density was a measure of vehicular and pedestrian access. Multivariate logistic regression models containing both socioeconomic status and road density were used in data analyses. Results Over one half (53.1%) of King County census tracts had at least one fast food restaurant. Mean network distance from dwelling units to a fast food restaurant countywide was 1.40 km, and 1.07 km for census tracts containing at least one fast food restaurant. Fast food restaurant density was significantly associated in regression models with low median household income (p < 0.001) and high arterial road density (p < 0.001) but not with percent of residents who were nonwhite. Conclusion No significant association was observed between census tract minority status and fast food density in King County. Although restaurant density was linked to low household incomes, that effect was attenuated by arterial road density. Fast food restaurants in King County are more likely to be located in lower income neighborhoods and higher traffic areas. PMID:19630979

Hurvitz, Philip M; Moudon, Anne V; Rehm, Colin D; Streichert, Laura C; Drewnowski, Adam

2009-01-01

18

Analysis of fatal pedestrian injuries in King County, WA, and prospects for prevention.  

PubMed Central

Pedestrian fatalities caused by motor vehicles in King County, WA, over a 12-month period were reviewed to examine the potential for prevention by various strategies. Cases were identified through the King County Medical Examiner's Office. Between April 1, 1985, and March 31, 1986, a total of 38 pedestrians died of motor vehicle injuries. The victims were generally children (N = 11), the elderly (N = 13), or intoxicated adults (N = 9). Supervision of the child was inadequate in 64 percent of the children's deaths. The driver was at fault in deaths of seven children, five adults, and three elderly persons. None of the children and only one of the elderly victims was injured at night. The majority of injuries occurred on major thorough-fares; only 16 percent occurred on residential streets. Possible strategies for prevention appear to include improved enforcement of pedestrian right-of-way laws, changes in vehicle design, modification of the environment (particularly in urban areas), and improved training programs for children. PMID:2498980

Rivara, F P; Reay, D T; Bergman, A B

1989-01-01

19

Arterial roads and area socioeconomic status are predictors of fast food restaurant density in King County, WA  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Fast food restaurants reportedly target specific populations by locating in lower-income and in minority neighborhoods. Physical proximity to fast food restaurants has been associated with higher obesity rates. OBJECTIVE: To examine possible associations, at the census tract level, between area demographics, arterial road density, and fast food restaurant density in King County, WA, USA. METHODS: Data on median household

Philip M Hurvitz; Anne V Moudon; Colin D Rehm; Laura C Streichert; Adam Drewnowski

2009-01-01

20

76 FR 10938 - Notice To Rescind a Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement: King County, WA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Statement (EIS) for improvements that were proposed for Forest Road 56 in King County, Washington northeast of the city of North Bend. The NOI was published in the Federal Register on April 27, 2001. This rescission is based on a reduction in the scope...

2011-02-28

21

Hydrographs showing groundwater levels for selected wells in the Puyallup River watershed and vicinity, Pierce and King Counties, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Hydrographs of groundwater levels for selected wells in and adjacent to the Puyallup River watershed in Pierce and King Counties, Washington, are presented using an interactive Web-based map of the study area to illustrate changes in groundwater levels on a monthly and seasonal basis. The interactive map displays well locations that link to the hydrographs, which in turn link to the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System, Groundwater Site Inventory System.

Lane, R.C.; Julich, R.J.; Justin, G.B.

2013-01-01

22

A health and environmental profile of the dry cleaning industry in King County, Washington.  

PubMed

Workers in the dry cleaning industry are exposed to a variety of harmful solvents, and poor work practices can result in extensive environmental contamination. Of particular concern is perchloroethylene (PERC), which is the most commonly used cleaning solvent. This chlorinated hydrocarbon is a pervasive environmental contaminant and a probable human carcinogen. PERC is also a neurotoxin and is toxic to the liver and kidneys. The study described here was comprised of key informant interviews, site visits, and a countywide business survey. The 64% response rate to the survey suggests that the results are likely representative of King County's dry cleaning industry. Dry cleaning was determined to be dominated by small, Korean-owned, family-run businesses. Although the use of PERC as the primary dry cleaning agent has decreased in recent years, this solvent is still used by the majority of businesses. This industry would benefit from regulatory intervention in concert with an educational campaign and enhanced technical and financial assistance. For any intervention to be effective, however, it must account for the unique financial and demographic characteristics of this industry. PMID:23858662

Whittaker, Stephen G; Johanson, Chantrelle A

2013-06-01

23

Descriptive epidemiology of unintentional residential fire injuries in King County, WA, 1984 and 1985.  

PubMed

Although most studies have concentrated on fatal residential fire injuries, which are a leading cause of fatal injuries in the United States, few investigators have examined in detail nonfatal injuries as a consequence of residential fires. This population-based study used the Washington State Fire Incident Reporting System to assess the incidence and descriptive epidemiology of fatal and nonfatal burns or respiratory tract damage resulting from unintentional residential fires. For the 2-year period 1984-85 in King County, WA, the mortality rate due to injury in a residential fire was 0.7 per 100,000 per year, and the incidence of nonfatal injuries was 5.6 per 100,000 per year. Of 17 fatalities, 59 percent of the deaths occurred at the scene of the fire. Of 128 persons with nonfatal injuries, 19 percent were hospitalized; although the 55 percent seen as outpatients and the 26 percent treated by the fire department or paramedics at the fire scene usually had minor injuries, they would not have been captured if only traditional data sources had been employed. Those injured averaged 2.8 days of restricted activity, but the range was from less than 1 day to 1 year. Injuries were more common in the households with a low socioeconomic status and among nonwhites, especially American Indians. Variation in incidence by age, sex, and source of ignition for deaths and nonfatal injuries suggests appropriate targets for future fire injury prevention programs. PMID:1641436

Ballard, J E; Koepsell, T D; Rivara, F P; Van Belle, G

1992-01-01

24

Combined geological and surface geochemical methods discover King Sand production, Concho County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

From December, 1987 to September, 1990, 16 prospects within the current confines of the Lower King (Upper Pennsylvanian Cisco age) Sand Play in Concho County, Texas, were tested by several operators on locations found by various combinations of subsurface geology, reconnaissance surface radiometrics, and soil gas hydrocarbon leads A 37.5% exploratory success rate has resulted in six new field discoveries or extensions with a total exploration and development cost of less than $0.50 per barrel of proven oil reserves. The average recoverable reserves per new field discovery are estimated to be 2.6 Mbbl of oil, and the average recoverable reserves per well are estimated to be 285,000 bbl at a depth of 2200 ft. Five of the six new field discoveries were based primarily on surface geochemical data. The sixth discovery, a southeast extension to the Lonesome Dove II field, was found on the basis of subsurface geology. The Agaritta field is one of the two largest of the new field discoveries with estimated proven (producing and undeveloped) recoverable reserves of 6 Mbbl of oil as of September, 1990. Its discovery was based on a combination of (1) detailed interstitial soil gas hydrocarbon data, (2) soil magnetic susceptibility measurements, and (3) surface potassium and uranium concentrations measured by gamma-ray spectrometry applied over two leads based on reconnaissance radiometrics. What initially appeared to be two separate prospects spaced over 7000 ft apart has since developed into one large field.

Thompson, C.K; Burson, K.R.; Saunders, D.F. (Recon Exploration, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)); Brown, J.J. (Indigo Oil, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States))

1991-03-01

25

Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience  

SciTech Connect

The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the ``normal`` municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan`s programs. Focusing on the Plan`s household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

Not Available

1991-10-01

26

Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience  

SciTech Connect

The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the normal'' municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan's programs. Focusing on the Plan's household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

Not Available

1991-10-01

27

Tidal-flow, circulation, and flushing characteristics of Kings Bay, Citrus County, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Kings Bay is an estuary on the gulf coast of peninsular Florida with a surface area of less than one square mile. It is a unique estuarine system with no significant inflowing rivers or streams. As much as 99 percent of the freshwater entering the bay originates from multiple spring vents at the bottom of the estuary. The circulation and flushing characteristics of Kings Bay were evaluated by applying SIMSYS2D, a two-dimensional numerical model. Field data were used to calibrate and verify the model. Lagrangian particle simulations were used to determine the circulation characteristics for three hydrologic conditions: low inflow, typical inflow, and low inflow with reduced friction from aquatic vegetation. Spring discharge transported the particles from Kings Bay through Crystal River and out of the model domain. Tidal effects added an oscillatory component to the particle paths. The mean particle residence time was 59 hours for low inflow with reduced friction; therefore, particle residence time is affected more by spring discharge than by bottom friction. Circulation patterns were virtually identical for the three simulated hydroloigc conditions. Simulated particles introduced in the southern part of Kings Bay traveled along the eastern side of Buzzard Island before entering Crystal River and existing the model domain. The flushing characteristics of Kings Bay for the three hydrodynamic conditions were determined by simulating the injection of conservative dye constituents. The average concentration of dye initially injected in Kings Bay decreased asymptotically because of spring discharge, and the tide caused some oscillation in the average dye concentration. Ninety-five percent of the injected dye exited Kings Bay and Crystal River with 94 hours for low inflow, 71 hours for typical inflow, and 94 hours for low inflow with reduced bottom friction. Simulation results indicate that all of the open waters of Kings Bay are flushed by the spring discharge. Reduced bottom friction has little effect on flushing.

Hammett, K.M.; Goodwin, C.R.; Sanders, G.L.

1996-01-01

28

Changes in awareness and use of calorie information after mandatory menu labeling in restaurants in king county, washington.  

PubMed

Objectives. We examined population-level impact on customer awareness and use and explored potential disparities in outcomes regarding the King County, Washington, regulation requiring chain restaurants to provide calorie information. Methods. We analyzed 2008 to 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data from 3132 English-speaking King County residents aged 18 years and older who reported eating at a regulated chain. We used regression models to assess changes in calorie information awareness and use from prepolicy to postpolicy implementation by customer demographics, health status, and restaurant type. Results. Calorie information awareness and use increased significantly from 2008 to 2010. Unadjusted analyses indicated that the proportion who saw and used calorie information tripled, from 8.1% to 24.8%. Fully adjusted analyses confirmed significant increases. After policy implementation, White, higher income, and obese respondents had greater odds of seeing calorie information. Women, higher income groups, and those eating at a fast-food versus a sit-down chain restaurant were more likely to use this information. Conclusions. Significant increases in calorie information awareness and use following regulation support the population-wide value of this policy. However, improvements varied across race, income, and gender. PMID:25602868

Chen, Roxana; Smyser, Michael; Chan, Nadine; Ta, Myduc; Saelens, Brian E; Krieger, James

2015-03-01

29

Estimated agricultural ground-water pumpage in parts of Fresno, Kings, and Madera Counties, San Joaquin Valley, California, 1974-77  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Agricultural ground-water pumpage data are presented for 1974-77 for the area on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley in parts of Fresno, Kings, and Madera Counties, Calif., which has approximately the boundaries of the Westlands Water District. The method of estimating pumpage was based on electric-power consumption at the agricultual wells. (Woodard-USGS)

Mitten, Hugh T.

1978-01-01

30

Public health assessment for Pacific Sound Resources, Seattle, King County, Washington, Region 10. Cerclis No. WAD009248287. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Sound Resources (PSR) was a wood preserving facility located in King County, Washington, on the southern shore of Elliott Bay near the city of Seattle. Wood preserving activities have occurred on the PSR property since 1909 and have resulted in releases of contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), pentachlorophenol (PCP), and metal solutions into on-site surface soil, subsurface soil, groundwater, and Elliott Bay sediments. The PSR site is presently considered an indeterminate public health hazard because existing environmental data is not sufficient to document human exposure. There is potential for human exposure to have occurred in the past, to be presently occurring, or to occur in the future, to contaminant levels which may be expected to result in adverse health effects. Contaminants of concern at the PSR site include: arsenic, PAHs, lead, mercury, and pentachlorophenol.

Not Available

1994-11-23

31

Factors Associated With the Adoption of a Patient Education Intervention Among First Responders, King County, Washington, 2010–2011  

PubMed Central

Introduction This study investigated facilitators and barriers to adoption of an at-scene patient education program by firefighter emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in King County, Washington. Methods We consulted providers of emergency medical services (EMS) to develop a patient education pamphlet in the form of a tear-off sheet that could be attached to the EMT medical incident report. The pamphlet included resources for at-scene patient education on high blood pressure, blood glucose, falls, and social services. The program was launched in 29 fire departments in King County, Washington, on January 1, 2010, and a formal evaluation was conducted in late 2011. We developed a survey based on diffusion theory to assess 1) awareness of the pamphlet, 2) evaluation of the pamphlet attributes, 3) encouragement by peers and superiors for handing out the pamphlet, 4) perceived behavioral norms, and 5) demographic variables associated with self-reported adoption of the at-scene patient education program. The survey was completed by 822 (40.1%) of 2,047 firefighter emergency medical technicians. We conducted bivariate and multivariable analyses to assess associations between independent variables and self-reported adoption of the program. Results Adoption of the at-scene patient education intervention was significantly associated with positive evaluation of the pamphlet, encouragement from peers and superiors, and perceived behavioral norms. EMS providers reported they were most likely to hand out the pamphlet to patients in private residences who were treated and left at the scene. Conclusion Attributes of chronic disease prevention programs and encouragement from peers and supervisors are necessary in diffusion of patient education interventions in the prehospital care setting. PMID:24480631

Stubbs, Benjamin; Fahrenbruch, Carol; Phelan, Elizabeth

2014-01-01

32

The geographic distribution of obesity by census tract among 59 767 insured adults in King County, WA  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate the geographic concentration of adult obesity prevalence by census tract (CT) in King County, WA, in relation to social and economic factors. Methods and Design Measured heights and weights from 59 767 adult men and women enrolled in the Group Health (GH) health care system were used to estimate obesity prevalence at the CT level. CT-level measures of socioeconomic status (SES) were median home values of owner-occupied housing units, percent of residents with a college degree, and median household incomes, all drawn from the 2000 Census. Spatial regression models were used to assess the relation between CT-level obesity prevalence and socio-economic variables. Results Smoothed CT obesity prevalence, obtained using an Empirical Bayes tool, ranged from 16.2% to 43.7% (a 2.7-fold difference). The spatial pattern of obesity was non-random, showing a concentration in south and southeast King County. In spatial regression models, CT-level home values and college education were more strongly associated with obesity than household incomes. For each additional $100 000 in median home values, CT obesity prevalence was 2.3% lower. The three SES factors together explained 70% of the variance in CT obesity prevalence after accounting for population density, race/ethnicity, age and spatial dependence. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report to show major social disparities in adult obesity prevalence at the CT scale that is based, moreover, on measured heights and weights. Analyses of data at sufficiently fine geographic scale are needed to guide targeted local interventions to stem the obesity epidemic. PMID:24037278

Drewnowski, Adam; Rehm, Colin D; Arterburn, David

2013-01-01

33

Average daily withdrawals of water for public supply in Kings, Queens, and Nassau Counties, New York  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Since 1932 the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the New York Water Power and Control Commission, the Nassau County Department of Public Works, the Suffolk County Water Authority, and the Suffolk County Board of Supervisors has conducted studies dealing with the occurrence, movement, quantity, quality, and temperature of ground water on Long Island. Also, as a part of three investigations, data on the withdrawals by pumpage for public water supply are assembled an analyzed. Previously, pumpage records for periods from 1904 through 1946 have been released.

Brashears, M.L., Jr.

1950-01-01

34

AN UNUSUAL MIDDLE PERMIAN FLORA FROM THE BLAINE FORMATION (PEASE RIVER GROUP: LEONARDIAN-GUADALUPIAN SERIES) OF KING COUNTY, WEST TEXAS  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT—A new Middle Permian plant assemblage from South Ash Pasture in King County, Texas, may be the youngest and is certainly the most unusual flora known,from the Permian of either West Texas or adjoining north-central Texas. Found serendipitously in the evaporite-rich upper Blaine Formation (Pease River Group, Guadalupian Series), the flora is of very low diversity despite intensive collecting efforts,

WILLIAM A. DiMICHELE; ROBERT W. HOOK; W. JOHN NELSON; DAN S. CHANEY

2004-01-01

35

Lidar-revised geologic map of the Olalla 7.5' quadrangle, King, Kitsap, and Pierce Counties, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Olalla 7.5' quadrangle, which lies almost in the center of the Puget Lowland, displays the broad range of geologic environments typical of the region. The upland plain is fluted by the passage of the great continental ice sheet that last covered the area about 17,000 (14,000 radiocarbon) years ago. The plain is cut by channel deposits, both late glacial and postglacial in age, and it is cleaved even more deeply by one of the major arms of Puget Sound, Colvos Passage, which here separates the west coast of Vashon Island from the Kitsap Peninsula. Beneath the deposits of the last ice sheet is a complex sequence of older Quaternary-age sediments that extends about 400 m below the modern ground surface. These older sediments are best exposed along the shorelines and beach cliffs of Puget Sound, where wave action and landslides maintain relatively fresh exposures. The older sediments typically are compact, having been loaded by ice during one or more episodes of glaciation subsequent to their deposition. Locally these sediments are also cemented by iron and manganese oxides and hydroxides, a consequence of many tens or hundreds of thousands of years of weathering and groundwater movement. Our map is an interpretation of a 6-ft resolution lidar-derived digital elevation model combined with the geology depicted on the "Geologic map of the Olalla 7.5' quadrangle, King, Kitsap, and Pierce Counties, Washington," by Booth and Troost (2005), which was described, interpreted, and located on the 1953 1:24,000-scale topographic map of the Olalla 7.5-minute quadrangle. The original topographic base map, derived from 1951 aerial photographs, has 20-ft contours, nominal horizontal resolution of circa 40 ft (12 m), and nominal mean vertical accuracy of circa 13 ft (4 m). This new DEM has a horizontal resolution of 6 ft (2 m) and mean vertical accuracy circa 1 ft (0.3 m). The greater resolution and accuracy of the lidar DEM facilitated a much-improved interpretation of many aspects of the surficial geology, especially the distribution and relative age of landforms and the materials inferred to comprise them.

Tabor, Rowland W.; Haugerud, Ralph A.; Booth, Derek B.; Troost, Kathy Goetz

2013-01-01

36

Sensitivity analysis of the FEMA HAZUS-MH MR4 Earthquake Model using seismic events affecting King County Washington  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

HAZUS-MH MR4 (HAZards U. S. Multi-Hazard Maintenance Release 4) is a risk-estimation software developed by FEMA to calculate potential losses due to natural disasters. Federal, state, regional, and local government use the HAZUS-MH Earthquake Model for earthquake risk mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery planning (FEMA, 2003). In this study, we examine several parameters used by the HAZUS-MH Earthquake Model methodology to understand how modifying the user-defined settings affect ground motion analysis, seismic risk assessment and earthquake loss estimates. This analysis focuses on both shallow crustal and deep intraslab events in the American Pacific Northwest. Specifically, the historic 1949 Mw 6.8 Olympia, 1965 Mw 6.6 Seattle-Tacoma and 2001 Mw 6.8 Nisqually normal fault intraslab events and scenario large-magnitude Seattle reverse fault crustal events are modeled. Inputs analyzed include variations of deterministic event scenarios combined with hazard maps and USGS ShakeMaps. This approach utilizes the capacity of the HAZUS-MH Earthquake Model to define landslide- and liquefaction- susceptibility hazards with local groundwater level and slope stability information. Where Shakemap inputs are not used, events are run in combination with NEHRP soil classifications to determine site amplification effects. The earthquake component of HAZUS-MH applies a series of empirical ground motion attenuation relationships developed from source parameters of both regional and global historical earthquakes to estimate strong ground motion. Ground motion and resulting ground failure due to earthquakes are then used to calculate, direct physical damage for general building stock, essential facilities, and lifelines, including transportation systems and utility systems. Earthquake losses are expressed in structural, economic and social terms. Where available, comparisons between recorded earthquake losses and HAZUS-MH earthquake losses are used to determine how region coordinators can most effectively utilize their resources for earthquake risk mitigation. This study is being conducted in collaboration with King County, WA officials to determine the best model inputs necessary to generate robust HAZUS-MH models for the Pacific Northwest.

Neighbors, C.; Noriega, G. R.; Caras, Y.; Cochran, E. S.

2010-12-01

37

Field, petrologic and detrital zircon study of the Kings sequence and Calaveras complex, Southern Lake Kaweah Roof Pendant, Tulare County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

U-Pb dating of detrital zircon grains separated from elastic sedimentary rocks is combined with field, petrographic and geochemical data to reconstruct the geologic history of Mesozoic rocks exposed at the southern end of the Lake Kaweah metamorphic pendant, western Sierra Nevada. Identification of rocks exposed at Limekiln Hill, Kern County, CA, as belonging to the Calaveras complex and Kings sequence was confirmed. Detrital zircon populations from two Calaveras complex samples provide Permo-Triassic maximum depositional ages (MDA) and reveal a Laurentian provenance indicating that continental accretion of the northwest-trending Kings-Kaweah ophiolite belt was in process prior to the Jurassic Period. Rock types including radiolarian metachert, metachert-argillite, and calc-silicate rocks with marble lenses are interpreted as formed in a hemipelagic environment of siliceous radiolarian deposition, punctuated by extended episodes of lime-mud gravity flows mixing with siliceous ooze forming cafe-silicate protoliths and limestone olistoliths forming marble lenses. Two samples of the overlying Kings sequence turbidites yield detrital zircons with an MDA of 181.4 +/-3.0 Ma and an interpreted provenance similar to other Jurassic metasediments found in the Yokohl Valley, Sequoia and Boyden Cave roof pendants. Age peaks indicative of Jurassic erg heritage are also present. In contrast, detrital zircon samples from the Sequoia and Slate Mountain roof pendants bear age-probability distributions interpreted as characteristic of the Snow Lake block, a tectonic sliver offset from the Paleozoic miogeocline.

Buchen, Christopher T.

38

Nearshore sticky waters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wind- and current-driven flotsam, oil spills, pollutants, and nutrients, approaching the nearshore will frequently appear to slow down/park just beyond the break zone, where waves break. Moreover, the portion of these tracers that beach will do so only after a long time. Explaining why these tracers park and at what rate they reach the shore has important implications on a variety of different nearshore environmental issues, including the determination of what subscale processes are essential in computer models for the simulation of pollutant transport in the nearshore. Using a simple model we provide an explanation for the underlying mechanism responsible for the parking of tracers, not subject to inertial effects, the role played by the bottom topography, and the non-uniform dispersion which leads, in some circumstances, to the eventual landing of all or a portion of the tracers. We refer to the parking phenomenon in this environment as nearshore sticky waters.

Restrepo, Juan M.; Venkataramani, Shankar C.; Dawson, Clint

2014-08-01

39

An unusual Middle Permian flora from the Blaine Formation (Pease River Group: Leonardian-Guadalupian Series) of King County, West Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A new Middle Permian plant assemblage from South Ash Pasture in King County, Texas, may be the youngest and is certainly the most unusual flora known from the Permian of either West Texas or adjoining north-central Texas. Found serendipitously in the evaporite-rich upper Blaine Formation (Pease River Group, Guadalupian Series), the flora is of very low diversity despite intensive collecting efforts, and the affinities of nearly all taxa are enigmatic. The most common elements are parallel-veined leaves that resemble cordaites but that could be isolated pinnules of a pinnate leaf. Gigantopterid foliage is present but not assignable to any known taxon. A single foliar conifer specimen is too incomplete for assignment. Numerous reproductive organs, however, and an abundance of axes may represent conifers. Conchostracans, palaeoniscoid fish scales, and small heteropolar coprolites also occur in the deposit, which originated as a small, claystone-dominated channel fill in a coastal plain setting.

DiMichele, W.A.; Hook, R.W.; Nelson, W.J.; Chaney, D.S.

2004-01-01

40

The Geography of Diabetes by Census Tract in a Large Sample of Insured Adults in King County, Washington, 2005–2006  

PubMed Central

Introduction Identifying areas of high diabetes prevalence can have an impact on public health prevention and intervention programs. Local health practitioners and public health agencies lack small-area data on obesity and diabetes. Methods Clinical data from the Group Health Cooperative health care system were used to estimate diabetes prevalence among 59,767 adults by census tract. Area-based measures of socioeconomic status and the Modified Retail Food Environment Index were obtained at the census-tract level in King County, Washington. Spatial analyses and regression models were used to assess the relationship between census tract–level diabetes and area-based socioeconomic status and food environment variables. The mediating effect of obesity on the geographic distribution of diabetes was also examined. Results In this population of insured adults, diabetes was concentrated in south and southeast King County, with smoothed diabetes prevalence ranging from 6.9% to 21.2%. In spatial regression models, home value and college education were more strongly associated with diabetes than was household income. For each 50% increase in median home value, diabetes prevalence was 1.2 percentage points lower. The Modified Retail Food Environment Index was not related to diabetes at the census-tract level. The observed associations between area-based socioeconomic status and diabetes were largely mediated by obesity (home value, 58%; education, 47%). Conclusion The observed geographic disparities in diabetes among insured adults by census tract point to the importance of area socioeconomic status. Small-area studies can help health professionals design community-based programs for diabetes prevention and control. PMID:25058671

Rehm, Colin D.; Moudon, Anne V.; Arterburn, David

2014-01-01

41

Support Services for Exceptional Students: Fresno, Inyo, Kern, Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Mono, San Luis Obispo, and Tulare Counties.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intended for use by vocational administrators responsible for mainstreaming handicapped students into vocational education classes, the resource guide lists and describes governmental and private agencies that provide vocational programs and support services for the handicapped on a local and statewide basis in the California counties of Fresno,…

Hampel, Angelica; And Others

42

Lake Ontario: Nearshore Variability  

EPA Science Inventory

We conducted a high-resolution survey with towed electronic instrumentation along the Lake Ontario nearshore (720 km) at a 20 meter contour. The survey was conducted September 6-10, 2008 with a shorter 300 km survey conducted August 14-15 for comparing of temporal variability. ...

43

Risk factors for HIV infection among injection drug users: results of blinded surveys in drug treatment centers, King County, Washington 1988-1991.  

PubMed

Among injection drug users (IDUs) entering drug treatment in King County, Washington between 1988 and 1991, we investigated HIV seroprevalence in relationship to demographic, sexual, and drug-use characteristics. Eighty-two of 3,039 (2.7%) IDUs tested HIV positive. Gay or bisexual men had the highest HIV prevalence (37.1%), followed by lesbian or bisexual women (8.3%), heterosexual men (2.3%), and heterosexual women (1.5%). American Indians were more likely to be infected with HIV than were whites. Those with no permanent address were more likely to be infected than those with an address. Unexpectedly, the prevalence of HIV infection among amphetamine injectors (13.1% of 168) was higher than among those who did not report using amphetamines. After adjustment for sexual orientation, HIV prevalence was four times higher among primary amphetamine injectors and three times higher among secondary amphetamine injectors than among injectors of other drugs. The basis for the strong association observed between HIV infection and a history of injection of amphetamines is not known and should be clarified through further research that obtains more detailed information on IDUs. PMID:8229659

Harris, N V; Thiede, H; McGough, J P; Gordon, D

1993-11-01

44

Biostratigraphy of the San Joaquin Formation in borrow-source area B-17, Kettleman Hills landfill, North Dome, Kettleman Hills, Kings County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The stratigraphic occurrences and interpreted biostratigraphy of invertebrate fossil taxa in the upper San Joaquin Formation and lower-most Tulare Formation encountered at the Chemical Waste Management Kettleman Hills waste disposal facility on the North Dome of the Kettleman Hills, Kings County, California are documented. Significant new findings include (1) a detailed biostratigraphy of the upper San Joaquin Formation; (2) the first fossil occurrence of Modiolus neglectus; (3) distinguishing Ostrea sequens from Myrakeena veatchii (Ostrea vespertina of authors) in the Central Valley of California; (4) differentiating two taxa previously attributed to Pteropurpura festivus; (5) finding a stratigraphic succession between Caesia coalingensis (lower in the section) and Catilon iniquus (higher in the section); and (6) recognizing Pliocene-age fossils from around Santa Barbara. In addition, the presence of the bivalves Anodonta and Gonidea in the San Joaquin Formation, both restricted to fresh water and common in the Tulare Formation, confirm periods of fresh water or very close fresh-water environments during deposition of the San Joaquin Formation.

Powell, Charles L.; Fisk, Lanny H.; Maloney, David F.; Haasl, David M.

2010-01-01

45

Water-quality and sediment-chemistry data of drain water and evaporation ponds from Tulare Lake Drainage District, Kings County, California, March 1985 to March 1986  

SciTech Connect

Trace element and major ion concentrations were measured in water samples collected monthly between March 1985 and March 1986 at the MD-1 pumping station at the Tulare Lake Drainage District evaporation ponds, Kings County, California. Samples were analyzed for selected pesticides several times during the year. Salinity, as measured by specific conductance, ranged from 11,500 to 37,600 microsiemens/centimeter; total recoverable boron ranged from 4,000 to 16,000 micrg/L; and total recoverable molybdenum ranged from 630 to 2,600 microg/L. Median concentrations of total arsenic and total selenium were 97 and 2 microg/L. Atrazine, prometone, propazine, and simazine were the only pesticides detected in water samples collected at the MD-1 pumping station. Major ions, trace elements, and selected pesticides also were analyzed in water and bottom-sediment samples from five of the southern evaporation ponds at Tulare Lake Drainage District. The water samples increased in specific conductance and concentrations of total arsenic, total recoverable boron and total recoverable molybdenum going from pond 1 to pond 10, respectively. Median concentrations of total arsenic and total selenium in the bottom sediments were 4.0 and 0.9 microg/g, respectively. 6 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

Fujii, R.

1988-01-01

46

The Seattle-King County healthy homes project: implementation of a comprehensive approach to improving indoor environmental quality for low-income children with asthma.  

PubMed Central

Pediatric asthma is a growing public health issue, disproportionately affecting low-income people and people of color. Exposure to indoor asthma triggers plays an important role in the development and exacerbation of asthma. We describe the implementation of the Seattle-King County Healthy Homes Project, a randomized, controlled trial of an outreach/education intervention to improve asthma-related health status by reducing exposure to allergens and irritants in the home. We randomly assigned 274 low-income children with asthma ages 4-12 to either a high- or a low-intensity group. In the high-intensity group, community health workers called Community Home Environmental Specialists (CHES) conducted initial home environmental assessments, provided individualized action plans, and made additional visits over a 12-month period to provide education and social support, encouragement of participant actions, provision of materials to reduce exposures (including bedding encasements), assistance with roach and rodent eradication, and advocacy for improved housing conditions. Members of the low-intensity group received the initial assessment, home action plan, limited education during the assessment visit, and bedding encasements. We describe the recruitment and training of CHES and challenges they faced and explain the assessment and exposure reduction protocols addressing dust mites, mold, tobacco smoke, pets, cockroaches, rodents, dust, moisture, and toxic or hazardous chemicals. We also discuss the gap between the practices recommended in the literature and what is feasible in the home. We accomplished home interventions and participants found the project very useful. The project was limited in resolving structural housing quality issues that contributed to exposure to indoor triggers. PMID:11929743

Krieger, James K; Takaro, Tim K; Allen, Carol; Song, Lin; Weaver, Marcia; Chai, Sanders; Dickey, Phillip

2002-01-01

47

Water-quality and sediment-chemistry data of drain water and evaporation ponds from Tulare Lake Drainage District, Kings County, California March 1985 to March 1986  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Trace element and major ion concentrations were measured in water samples collected monthly between March 1985 and March 1986 at the MD-1 pumping station at the Tulare Lake Drainage District evaporation ponds, Kings County, California. Samples were analyzed for selected pesticides several times during the year. Salinity, as measured by specific conductance, ranged from 11,500 to 37,600 microsiemens/centimeter; total recoverable boron ranged from 4,000 to 16,000 micrg/L; and total recoverable molybdenum ranged from 630 to 2,600 microg/L. Median concentrations of total arsenic and total selenium were 97 and 2 microg/L. Atrazine, prometone, propazine, and simazine were the only pesticides detected in water samples collected at the MD-1 pumping station. Major ions, trace elements, and selected pesticides also were analyzed in water and bottom-sediment samples from five of the southern evaporation ponds at Tulare Lake Drainage District. Water enters the ponds from the MD-1 pumping station at pond 1 and flows through the system terminating at pond 10. The water samples increased in specific conductance (21,700 to 90,200 microsiemens/centimeter) and concentrations of total arsenic (110 to 420 microg/L), total recoverable boron (12,000 to 80,000 microg/L) and total recoverable molybdenum (1,200 to 5,500 microg/L) going from pond 1 to pond 10, respectively. Pesticides were not detected in water from any of the ponds sampled. Median concentrations of total arsenic and total selenium in the bottom sediments were 4.0 and 0.9 microg/g, respectively. The only pesticides detected in bottom sediment samples from the evaporation ponds were DDD and DDE, with maximum concentration of 0.8 microg/kilogram. (Author 's abstract)

Fujii, Roger

1988-01-01

48

Nearshore Wave Modeling  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Ocean waves near shore impact public safety, commerce, navigation, and, of course recreation. Predicting these waves has driven efforts to model them for more than two decades. This module introduces forecasters to different nearshore wave models, including phase-resolving and 1- and 2-dimensional spectral models. It describes the processes that wave models simulate, the assumptions they make, the initial and boundary conditions required to run the models, and potential sources of error in model forecasts. While focusing on SWAN, the module also examines the Navy Standard surf Model and Bouss-2D.

Comet

2009-05-19

49

NEARSHORE MARINE TRACE METAL GEOCHEMISTRY  

EPA Science Inventory

The report summarizes a number of studies on several aspects of the nearshore geochemistry of trace metals which give information on consequences of trace metal pollution attending nearshore waste disposal. The author has studied the distribution of dissolved and particulate trac...

50

The Nearshore Canyon Experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Observations collected in Fall 2003 during the Nearshore Canyon Experiment (NCEX) will be used to test hypotheses about the effect of complex continental-shelf bathymetry on surface gravity waves and on wave-driven circulation. Refraction, diffraction, reflection, scattering, and trapping by abrupt shelf bathymetry can result in dramatic alongshore variations in wave height and direction. Onshore of the irregular bathymetry, alongcoast changes in breaking waves can force complicated circulation, including alongshore flows that reverse direction across the surf zone and along the shoreline, and strong offshore-directed rip currents that may be an important mechanism for transport of water, sediment, and pollution between the surf zone and inner shelf. Observations for NCEX will be obtained along the southern California coast near two steep submarine canyons (separated alongshore by a few km) that cross the shelf from about 300-m water depth to just seaward of the surfzone near Black's Beach (famous for large waves) and La Jolla Shores (well known as a calm area with small waves). Frequency-directional spectra of incident waves estimated from observations offshore of the canyons will be used to initialize models that predict the effect of the canyons on infragravity waves, swell, sea, and wave-driven circulation. Model predictions will be tested with observations from alongshore arrays deployed near, between, and onshore (including the surf and swash zones) of the canyons. Arrays also will be deployed to investigate wave reflection and scattering from the steep canyon walls, and cross-shore changes in surf and swash zone circulation. Additional instrumentation will be used to study alongcoast changes in wave breaking and set-up, details of surface currents in the surf and swash, and breaking-induced turbulence and dissipation. The NCEX instrument arrays will be designed in collaboration with modelers, and near-real time data will be used to initialize and test model predictions. In addition, model forecasts will be used to guide placement of movable sensors, allowing predictions of nearshore waves and currents to be tested during the observational period. NCEX~team~members~are~listed~on http://science.whoi.edu/PVLAB/NCEX/ncex.html. Funding for NCEX is provided by the US Office of Naval Research and the National Science Foundation.

Elgar, S.

2002-12-01

51

Approval of the Lemoore Center of the West Hills Community College District. A Report to the Governor and Legislature in Response to a Request from the Board of Governors to Recognize the Center as the Official Community College Center for the Lemoore/Hanford Area of Kings County.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Lemoore Center of the West Hills Community College District serves the Lemoore/Hanford area of Kings and Fresno Counties--an area lying within both the West Hills and the College of the Sequoias Community College Districts. Jurisdictional problems between the districts prompted the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges to…

California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

52

Average daily withdrawals of water for public supply from Kings, Queens, and Nassau Counties in Long Island, New York, from 1904 through 1953  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the New York State Water Power and Control Commission, the Nassau County Department of Public Works, the Suffolk County Board of Supervisors, and the Suffolk County Water Authority has been conducting continuing investigations since 1932 on the ground-water resources in Long Island, N. Y. One of the several phases of these studies is the collection and tabulation of data on the withdrawals by pumpage for public supply.

Lusczynski, N.J.; Spiegel, S.J.

1954-01-01

53

Wave Reflection from Nearshore Depressions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study employs an existing finite-difference model based on the hyperbolic form of the modified mild slope equation MMSE to investigate wave reflection near bathymetric depressions such as dredged borrow pits and nearshore canyons. First, the model is tested for numerical limitations on the higher order bottom slope and curvature terms using idealized cases of a simple depth transition and

David R. Michalsen; Merrick C. Haller; Kyung Duck Suh

2008-01-01

54

3. FIRST FLOOR, FRONT ROOM (WHERE MARTIN LUTHER KING MADE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. FIRST FLOOR, FRONT ROOM (WHERE MARTIN LUTHER KING MADE PLANS FOR HIS MOVEMENT) - Penn School Historic District, Arnett House, SC Route 37, 1 mile South of Frogmore, St. Helena Island, Frogmore, Beaufort County, SC

55

California coast nearshore processes study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. This report contains the techniques used for enhancing and analyzing nearshore processes from ERTS-1 and aircraft data. Four California nearshore sites are used as test cells including the San Francisco area, Monterey Bay, Santa Barbara Channel, and Los Angeles area. Techniques used for analyzing the test cells included direct photographic processing, computer compatible tape gain change enhancement, discrete point density analysis and plotting, and densitometer enhancement. Using these methods, it is possible to measure the seaward extent of the suspended sediment transport and to differentiate sediment levels within the individual sediment lobes. The movement of riverine discharged suspensates and coastal sediments by currents was an intricate part of the sediment transport analysis. The larger estuaries in the test cell areas were also studied for flushing characteristics.

Pirie, D. M.; Steller, D. D. (principal investigators)

1973-01-01

56

Nearshore Fish Atlas of Alaska INTRODUCTION  

E-print Network

(North Pacific Fishery Management Council 2002). Two types of submerged vegetation, eelgrass (Zostera of the shallow, nearshore environment. Nearshore habitats with and without submerged vegetation provide food and inlets with freshwater influence. Relative to MLLW, eelgrass occupies areas of the lower intertidal

57

Public health assessment for Wyckoff Company/Eagle Harbor, Eagle Harbor Operable Units, Bainbridge Island, King County, Washington, Region 10. Cerclis No. WAD009248295. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Wyckoff/Eagle Harbor site is a National Priorities List (NPL) site located on the east side of Bainbridge Island, Kitsap County, Washington. The harbor has become contaminated with heavy metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the many years of ship repair and painting as well as from the application of creosote, pentachlorophenol, and other wood preservatives to pilings. The Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS) states that the major human health concern is consumption of clam meat contaminated with PAHs. The public health assessment has determined that exposure to contaminants found in Eagle Harbor sediments, shellfish, fish, and crab is a health hazard for those people who ignore warnings.

Not Available

1994-01-06

58

Dr. Martin Luther King  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Dr. Martin Luther King shared his insight, goals, and knowledge with the American people. Use this information to learn more about him as we honor Dr. Martin Luther King and the dreams he had for achieving equality for all Americans. Hello 4D! Celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King Day by learning more about him and what he did to help Americans achieve their goals. As you do your work and review the documents and answer this question- How did Dr. Martin Luther King change society? Please complete Steps 1 and 2. Step 1 1. ...

Mrs. Flagg

2011-12-10

59

75 FR 18235 - Paiute Cutthroat Trout Restoration Project, Alpine County, CA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...historical range within the Silver King Creek watershed, Alpine County, California. To accomplish...now present in the Silver King Creek watershed between Llewellyn Falls and Silver King...streams outside the Silver King Creek watershed, including the North Fork of...

2010-04-09

60

King's Last March  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Martin Luther King Jr.'s last year of life was complex, and prior to his assassination he was involved in a number of ambitious projects. This compelling and thoughtful documentary produced by Kate Ellis and Stephen Smith of American RadioWorks (in cooperation with the Martin Luther King Jr. Research and Education Institute at Stanford University) closely examines this period of King's life. The documentary is divided into five parts, which include "Beyond Vietnam", "King's Last March", "The FBI's War on King", and "From the Pulpit to the Heart". Interested parties can download the entire radio documentary, listen online, or read the transcript. Overall, it's a rather fine piece of documentary work, and visitors with an interest in this pivotal 20th century leader will want to pass this site along to friends.

2008-01-01

61

Filtering Properties of a Nearshore Process Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The nearshore process model, Delft3D, is capable of predicting both the wave evolution across the nearshore region as well as the associated wave (and wind) driven nearshore currents. Required input to this model includes estimates of water levels, wind and a spectral description of the waves on the open boundaries as well as the bathymetry at all modeled locations. Our ability to describe these inputs is only as good as the measurement technology used to do so. Specifically, bathymetry must, typically, be surveyed at discrete spatial locations and times before being interpolated to the model domain. There is a potential (if not certain) mismatch between the scales that we wish to resolve with the nearshore process model (e.g., beach cusps, crescentic bars, and rip channels) and the scales that are resolved by the survey data (which may be higher or lower resolution than required). It is not clear that this mismatch should be resolved through treatment of the data (interpolation) or the model (grid resolution). Here, we present an analysis of wave and current predictions from Delft3D that seeks to optimize the prerequisite interpolation and domain resolution design associated with nearshore modeling. We take a model-driven approach that accepts a fixed model resolution and determines the optimal survey resolution that minimizes prediction errors. We try to find the optimal survey resolution that varies spatially and reflects both physical process sensitivity and model-dependent sensitivity to bathymetric variability.

Plant, N. G.; Holland, K. T.; Hsu, L.; Kaihatu, J. M.

2006-12-01

62

AirMSPI King's County Hanford, CA  

... The DOLP expresses the fraction of the reflected light that is polarized relative to the overall intensity.  In this image, ... to provide insights into the composition of clouds and air pollution particles, as well as information about land and water surfaces.  ...

2013-08-02

63

The William King Server  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Named in honor of the Reverend William King, Roger A. McCain, Drexel University, aims to promote a discussion of the ideal of a Cooperative Commonwealth at the William King Server site. McCain's views on capitalism, socialist economic systems, democracy, and game theory are provided in addition to background information on cooperative commonwealth. Instructional material (discussed in the September 25, 1997 Scout Report for Business & Economics), game theory examples, and working papers by Roger McCain are provided.

Mccain, Roger A.

1999-01-01

64

Bible: King James Version  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Website from the Electronic Text Center at the University of Virginia offers a complete, browseable, online version of the King James Bible, including all the texts of the apocrypha. Users may search by key words or phrases and group results by match or individual books. Perhaps most appealing to religious scholars and amateur devotees of biblical textual history is a feature that allows users to view the King James translation side-by-side with the Revised Standard Version for comparison.

65

LAKE MICHIGAN'S TRIBUTARY AND NEARSHORE FISH HABITATS  

E-print Network

7 LAKE MICHIGAN'S TRIBUTARY AND NEARSHORE FISH HABITATS Edward S. Rutherford1 Background, the Lake Michigan LaMP was developed to comply with provisions in the GLWQA and to guide management-ranging, cooperative effort to design and implement a strategy for the 1 E.S. Rutherford. University of Michigan School

66

Nearshore carbonate deposits in Lake Tanganyika  

Microsoft Academic Search

An exceptionally wide variety of carbonate fades, dominated by high-magnesian calcite, occurs along the littoral and shallow sublittoral zones (<50 m) of Lake Tanganyika in central Africa. These facies include exposed and submerged, calcite-cemented ridges of nearshore terrigenous sand, ooid sand shoals, and lithified oolite ridges, Chara meadows of bioturbated calcareous silts, gastropod shell blankets and related coquinas, and extensive

Andrew S. Cohen; Catherine Thouin

1987-01-01

67

Lake Michigan Green Bay: Nearshore Variability  

EPA Science Inventory

We conducted a high-resolution survey in the nearshore of Lake Michigan?s Green Bay at a 15 meter contour using towed electronic instrumentation. The 365 km survey was conducted Aug 18-21, 2010. We also conducted four cross-contour tows. Along the survey tracks we sampled fixe...

68

Perspective view of Post and King Saloon, 129 North E ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Perspective view of Post and King Saloon, 129 North E Street (corner of E and North 2nd Streets), view looking southwest - Lakeview Downtown Historic District, E, F & G Streets between Second Street North & First Street South, Lakeview, Lake County, OR

69

Dr. King's Dream. [Lesson Plan].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This lesson plan teaches students about the life and work of Martin Luther King, Jr. Students listen to a brief biography, view photographs of the March on Washington, hear a portion of King's "I Have a Dream" speech, and discuss what King's words mean to them. Finally, they will create picture books about their own dreams of freedom for Americans…

National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.

70

Nearshore internal bores increase hypoxia risk  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the coastal ocean, internal waves that break on the continental shelf can send pulses of water, known as bores, into the shallows. These internal bores can cause dramatic and rapid changes in the density of the water and the concentration of dissolved oxygen when they transport cold, low-oxygen waters from the deeper parts of the ocean into the nearshore coastal environment. Such a rapid, shock-like decrease in oxygen concentration can have serious ecological consequences.

Schultz, Colin

2014-11-01

71

Congratulations to Carey King  

Microsoft Academic Search

I first came across Carey King when, out of the blue, he invited me to a special session of the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (the largest and most prestigious US scientific meeting) where he was developing a special session on energy return on investment (EROI). At that meeting and since, I have found

Charles A S Hall

2012-01-01

72

Interview with Peter King  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dr. Peter King has been active in digital documents and hypertext for almost thirty years. He was one of the founders of the Electronic Publishing conference series and of the ACM Symposium on Document Engineering, whose Steering Committee he now chairs. He holds the position of Professor Emeritus of Computer Science at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada. He

Claus Atzenbeck

2011-01-01

73

An evaluation of effects of groundwater exchange on nearshore habitats and water quality of western Lake Erie  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Historically, the high potentiometric surface of groundwater in the Silurian/Devonian carbonate aquifer in Monroe County, MI resulted in discharge of highly mineralized, SO4-rich groundwater to the Lake Erie shoreline near both Erie State Game Area (ESGA) and Pointe Mouillee State Game Area (PMSGA). Recently, regional groundwater levels near PMSGA have been drawn down as much as 45 m below lake level in apparent response to quarry dewatering. From August to November of 2003, we conducted preliminary studies of groundwater flow dynamics and chemistry, shallow lake water chemistry, and fish and invertebrate communities at both sites. Consistent with regional observations, groundwater flow direction in the nearshore at ESGA was upward, or toward Lake Erie, and shallow nearshore groundwater chemistry was influenced by regional groundwater chemistry. In contrast, at PMSGA, the groundwater flow potential was downward and lake water, influenced by quarry discharge seeping downward into nearshore sediments, produced a different lake and shallow groundwater chemistry than at ESGA. Although the invertebrate and young fish community was similar at the two sites, taxonomic groups tolerant of degraded water quality were more prevalent at PMSGA. Sensitive taxa were more prevalent at ESGA. We propose a conceptual model, based on well-described models of groundwater/seawater interaction along coastal margins, to describe the interconnection among geologic, hydrologic, chemical, and biological processes in the different nearshore habitats of Lake Erie, and we identify processes that warrant further detailed study in the Great Lakes.

Haack, Sheridan K.; Neff, Brian P.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; Savino, Jacqueline F.; Lundstrom, Scott C.

2005-01-01

74

Lake Ontario: Nearshore Conditions and Variability in Water Quality Parameters  

EPA Science Inventory

Interest in recent years has increased regarding conditions in the nearshore of the Great Lakes. We conducted a high-resolution survey of the Lake Ontario nearshore along the 20 m contour using towed electronic instrumentation. The 720 km survey was conducted September 6-10, 20...

75

Fish Assemblages in Shallow, Nearshore Habitats of the Bering Sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Bering Sea provides over one-half of U.S. fishery production, yet knowledge of the use of its shallow (<5 m), nearshore (<20 m from shore) waters by fish is limited. In June 2005, we sampled shallow, nearshore waters of the Bering Sea at three Aleutian islands with a beach seine to estimate the relative abundance and species distribution of fish.

John F. Thedinga; Scott W. Johnson; A. Darcie Neff; Mandy R. Lindeberg

2008-01-01

76

Martin Luther King Scavenger Hunt  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

On the third Monday in January, we celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday. Scroll down to questions that will help you learn more about Dr. M. L. King. Follow the links in each section to find the answers. Open a word document, title it "MLK Scavenger Hunt," name and date in RH corner, and answer each question in a complete sentence. 1. Click on the link below to read letters from first graders to MLK. What does Noel, age 7, think Martin Luther King wanted? Letters to Martin Luther King, Jr. 2. Click on the timeline and write down what happened to Martin Luther King in 1935. Timeline 3. Get your earphones on! Click on this link to hear Dr. King's famous "I Have ...

Mrs. Devitry

2011-01-05

77

11. VIEW FROM JUST AFT OF THE KING POST IN ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

11. VIEW FROM JUST AFT OF THE KING POST IN THE FOC'S'LE OF THE EVELINA M. GOULART. FIRE EXTINGUISHER IS MOUNTED ON STUB OF FOREMAST. OBJECT AT LOWER LEFT IS A FOLDING MESS TABLE. LADDER LEADS TO DECK. CABINET AT RIGHT CENTER HOUSED SINK FOR CLEAN-UP AND COOKING. A SMALL CHINA SINK AT RIGHT CENTER SERVED FOR PERSONAL CLEAN-UP AND SHAVING. - Auxiliary Fishing Schooner "Evelina M. Goulart", Essex Shipbuilding Museum, 66 Main Street, Essex, Essex County, MA

78

KING DAY 2008 ESSAY COMPETITION  

E-print Network

KING DAY 2008 ESSAY COMPETITION "Building the Community: Making the Dream a Reality" Theme share. Naomi Tutu, in her address at the 2007 Indiana University King Day Celebration, gave her audience to build community, to "improve the world for those who come after us" 3) make choices in every day life

Indiana University

79

Modeling nearshore morphological evolution at seasonal scale  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A process-based model is compared with field measurements to test and improve our ability to predict nearshore morphological change at seasonal time scales. The field experiment, along the dissipative beaches adjacent to Grays Harbor, Washington USA, successfully captured the transition between the high-energy erosive conditions of winter and the low-energy beach-building conditions typical of summer. The experiment documented shoreline progradation on the order of 20 m and as much as 175 m of onshore bar migration. Significant alongshore variability was observed in the morphological response of the sandbars over a 4 km reach of coast. A detailed sensitivity analysis suggests that the model results are more sensitive to adjusting the sediment transport associated with asymmetric oscillatory wave motions than to adjusting the transport due to mean currents. Initial results suggest that alongshore variations in the initial bathymetry are partially responsible for the observed alongshore variable morphological response during the experiment. Copyright ASCE 2006.

Walstra, D.-J.R.; Ruggiero, P.; Lesser, G.; Gelfenbaum, G.

2006-01-01

80

Recognition of beach and nearshore depositional features of Chesapeake Bay  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Beach and nearshore depositional features are being mapped with the objectives of determining a quick-look analysis of littoral drift and sedimentation patterns in areas of little or no data. Evaluation of beach and nearshore features aid in the selection of small boat harbors, shoreline protective structures, and general coastal zone development. Through ERTS-1 aircraft support imagery, beach depositional features mapped are cuspate forelands, welded beach ridges, and recurved spits. The nearshore depositional features exhibit a bar and trough topography with three distinct types of sedimentary structures; longshore, transverse, and reticulated bars. Synoptic coverage of beach and nearshore depositional features by ERTS-1 data help in determining the general sedimentation patterns, growth of the beach features and stability of the bar and trough topography.

Kerhin, R. T.

1973-01-01

81

UNCORRECTEDPROOF Hydrogeology and geochemistry of near-shore submarine  

E-print Network

UNCORRECTEDPROOF Hydrogeology and geochemistry of near-shore submarine groundwater discharge rates based on tidal signal and hydraulic gradient analysis indicate a fresh submarine groundwater discharge in this high rainfall region. Ã? 2007 Published by Elsevier Ltd. Keywords: submarine groundwater

82

Biogeography of Nearshore Subtidal Invertebrates in the Gulf of Maine  

EPA Science Inventory

The biogeography of nearshore benthic invertebrates in the Gulf of Maine was studied to compare recent data with historical biogeographic studies, define physical-chemical factors affecting species distributions, and provide information needed to calibrate benthic indices of envi...

83

Kinging in Hungarian lesbian culture.  

PubMed

This article looks at the position of the drag king in Hungarian lesbian culture. It focuses on Bandage, Socks and Facial Hair (2006), a documentary about a drag king workshop. The film documents the historical moment when the Hungarian workshop participants encounter the drag king as a lesbian tool for parodying and repoliticizing mainstream masculinity. I examine the ways in which the participants interpret their performances of masculinity and the film negotiates heteronormativity. I argue that the political merits of the film can be spelled out by reading the participants' (trans)gender politics from the perspective of the cultural specificities of post-socialist Hungary. PMID:21774598

Balogh, Andrea P

2011-01-01

84

Integration of Different Wave Forcing Formulations with Nearshore Circulation Models  

E-print Network

. In this study, we examine nearshore circulation in a variety of coastal environments exposed to waves. To explain the mechanism of nearshore circulation, the concept of the radiation stress tensor was first introduced by Longuet-Higgins and Stewart (1964... (Longuet-Higgins and Stewart (1964)) valid for a forward propagating wave over a flat bottom; (2) a generalized expression for the radiation stress (Bettess and Bettess (1982)) applicable to an arbitrary linear wave field and (3) a direct expression...

Sharma, Abhishek

2012-02-14

85

Reading backscatter from near-shore ocean waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wave dynamics in near-shore environments play an important role in oceanic processes and shoreline change, but the breaking waves in these regions make it difficult for scientists to collect data and quantify wave behavior. Catalán et al. point out that looking at the radar wave scattering properties of these near-shore ocean waves can help scientists monitor surf zones at a safe distance from the hazardous waves.

Wendel, JoAnna

2014-11-01

86

A spatial framework for representing nearshore ecosystems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The shallow, coastal regions of the world's oceans are highly productive ecosystems providing important habitat for commercial, forage, endangered, and iconic species. Given the diversity of ecosystem services produced or supported by this ecosystem, a better understanding of its structure and function is central to developing an ecosystem-based approach to management. However this region - termed the ‘white strip' by marine geologists because of the general lack of high-resolution bathymetric data - is dynamic, highly variable, and difficult to access making data collection challenging and expensive. Since substrate is a key indicator of habitat in this important ecosystem, our objective was to create a continuous substrate map from the best available bottom type data. Such data are critical to assessments of species distributions and anthropogenic risk. Using the Strait of Georgia in coastal British Columbia, Canada, as a case study, we demonstrate how such a map can be created from a diversity of sources. Our approach is simple, quantitative, and transparent making it amenable to iterative improvement as data quality and availability improve. We evaluated the ecological performance of our bottom patches using observed shellfish distributions. We found that observations of geoduck clam, an infaunal species, and red urchins, a species preferentially associated with hard bottom, were strongly and significantly associated with our soft and hard patches respectively. Our description of bottom patches also corresponded well with a more traditional, morphological classification of a portion of the study area. To provide subsequent analyses (such as habitat models) with some confidence in the defined bottom type values, we developed a corresponding confidence surface based on the agreement of, and distance between observations. Our continuous map of nearshore bottom patches thus provides a spatial framework to which other types of data, both abiotic (e.g., energy) and biotic, can be attached. As more data are associated with the bottom patches, we anticipate they will become increasingly useful for representing and developing species-habitat relationships, ultimately leading to a comprehensive representation of the nearshore ecosystem.

Gregr, Edward J.; Lessard, Joanne; Harper, John

2013-08-01

87

Impacts of Cyclone Yasi on nearshore, terrigenous sediment-dominated reefs of the central Great Barrier Reef, Australia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tropical Cyclone (TC) Yasi (Category 5) was a large (~ 700 km across) cyclone that crossed Australia's Queensland coast on the 3rd of February 2011. TC Yasi was one of the region's most powerful recorded cyclones, with winds gusting to 290 km/h and wave heights exceeding 7 m. Here we describe the impacts of TC Yasi on a number of nearshore, turbid-zone coral reefs, that include several in the immediate vicinity of the cyclone's landfall path (King Reef, Lugger Shoal and Dunk Island), as well as a more distally located reef (Paluma Shoals) ~ 150 km to the south in Halifax Bay. These reefs were the focus of recent (between 2006 and 2009) pre-Yasi studies into their geomorphology, sedimentology and community structure, and here we discuss data from a recent (August 2011) post-Yasi re-assessment. This provided a unique opportunity to identify and describe the impacts of an intense tropical cyclone on nearshore reefs, which are often assumed to be vulnerable to physical disturbance and reworking due to their poorly lithified framework. Observed impacts of TC Yasi were site specific and spatially highly heterogeneous, but appear to have been strongly influenced by the contemporary evolutionary stage and ecological make-up of the individual reefs, with site setting (i.e. exposure to prevailing wave action) apparently more important than proximity to the landfall path. The most significant ecological impacts occurred at King Reef (probably a result of freshwater bleaching) and at Paluma Shoals, where widespread physical destruction of branched Acropora occurred. New coral recruits are, however, common at all sites and colony re-growth clearly evident at King Reef. Only localised geomorphic change was evident, mainly in the form of coral fracturing, rubble deposition, and sediment movement, but again these impacts were highly site specific. The dominant impact at Paluma Shoals was localised storm ridge/shingle sheet deposition, at Lugger Shoal major offshore fine sediment flushing, and at Dunk Island major onshore coarse sand deposition. There was little geomorphic change evident at King Reef. Thus whilst small-scale and taxa specific impacts from Cyclone Yasi are clearly evident, geomorphological changes appear minor and ecological impacts highly variable between sites, and there is no observed evidence for major reef structural change. The study suggests that the vulnerability of reefs to major physical disturbance events can be extremely site specific and determined by interacting factors of location relative to storm path and pre-event geomorphology and ecology.

Perry, C. T.; Smithers, S. G.; Kench, P. S.; Pears, B.

2014-10-01

88

Nearshore Operational Model for Rip Current Predictions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A coastal operational model system can serve as a tool in order to monitor and predict coastal hazards, and to acquire up-to-date information on coastal state indicators. The objective of this research is to develop a nearshore operational model system for the Dutch coast focusing on swimmer safety. For that purpose, an operational model system has been built which can predict conditions up to 48 hours ahead. The model system consists of three different nested model domain covering The North Sea, The Dutch coastline, and one local model which is the area of interest. Three different process-based models are used to simulate physical processes within the system: SWAN to simulate wave propagation, Delft3D-Flow for hydraulics flow simulation, and XBeach for the nearshore models. The SWAN model is forced by wind fields from operational HiRLAM, as well as two dimensional wave spectral data from WaveWatch 3 Global as the ocean boundaries. The Delft3D Flow model is forced by assigning the boundaries with tidal constants for several important astronomical components as well as HiRLAM wind fields. For the local XBeach model, up-to-date bathymetry will be obtained by assimilating model computation and Argus video data observation. A hindcast is carried out on the Continental Shelf Model, covering the North Sea and nearby Atlantic Ocean, for the year 2009. Model skills are represented by several statistical measures such as rms error and bias. In general the results show that the model system exhibits a good agreement with field data. For SWAN results, integral significant wave heights are predicted well by the model for all wave buoys considered, with rms errors ranging from 0.16 m for the month of May with observed mean significant wave height of 1.08 m, up to rms error of 0.39 m for the month of November, with observed mean significant wave height of 1.91 m. However, it is found that the wave model slightly underestimates the observation for the period of June, especially waves with peak period greater than 7 seconds and propagate relatively from the North. Further investigations will focus on these findings in order to improve model skill during swimming season. The flow model results are analyzed for the dominant tidal constituents. The results show that for tidal amplitude, differences between observation and modeled are in range of 2 cm to maximum 14 cm. For the tidal phase, all stations considered along the Dutch coastline give differences less than 10 degrees between observations and predictions. A local XBeach model for the Egmond aan Zee resort is constructed in order to predict rip currents events. This model is applied during the August 2011 period, where the bathymetry produced by model-data assimilation is compared against surveyed bathymetry. In general, this method is able to produce bathymetry converging towards the observations. An offshore bar exists in the field data can be reproduced by this method. Moreover, it shows a potential ability of depicting rip channels features near the shoreline. Rip currents flow fields simulated over measured and modeled bathymetries are compared in order to assess the performance of the proposed forecast system in terms of offshore rip current strength, location and duration, which are all important information for local life guards. Keywords: operational model, SWAN, Delft3D, bathymetry, Argus, rip currents, XBeach

Sembiring, L. E.; Van Dongeren, A. R.; Van Ormondt, M.; Winter, G.; Roelvink, J.

2012-12-01

89

Who is Martin Luther King Jr.  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Today you will use the links below to research Martin Luther King Jr. Synergize with your partners to discover more interesting facts about Dr. King! First, watch this video about Dr. King. BrainPOPJr.Martin Luther King Jr. Video Next, click on this biography link Who is Martin Luther King Jr.? to find even more information. Then, see if you can answer any questions you still have by using KidRex Last, watch this video and see if you can learn anything new BrainPOP Martin Luther King Jr. Video number 2 ...

Miss McGahey

2014-01-22

90

J. King 2014 James King, Ph.D.  

E-print Network

emissions, Salton Sea California, USA.' Soil Science Society of America Journal, doi:10.2136/sssaj2011., V. Etyemezian, M. Sweeney, B. Buck, and G. Nikolich. 2011. `Dust emission variability at the Salton Sea, California, USA.' Aeolian Research, doi:10.1016/j.aeolia.2011.03.005 12. Buck, B.J., J. King

Roy Chowdhury, Rinku

91

Nearshore Restoration in Puget Sound: Understanding Stakeholder Values and Potential Coalitions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Restoration of nearshore ecosystems presents many challenges for stakeholder involvement. Using surveys and interviews we examined stakeholder values, preferences, and potential coalitions surrounding nearshore restoration in the Whidbey sub-basin of Puget Sound. Most stakeholders in our study believe that Puget Sound nearshore problems are severe and urgent, and that it is worth investing in restoration. They do not agree on

Rachel S. Lipsky; Clare M. Ryan

2011-01-01

92

Utilizing microcomputer-based models to simulate changes in the nearshore environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper demonstrates that changes in the dynamic nearshore environment could be successfully simulated by utilizing a combination of appropriate wave and sediment models. With the use of two microcomputer-based simulation models (WAVE and NSCWIS), nearshore sedimentary fluxes, and eventual beach and nearshore changes have been simulated. The ‘WAVE’ model was modified by the Canada Center for Inland Waters, and

P. D. LaValle; V. C. Lakhan

1997-01-01

93

Multiple Sand Bar Formation in the Nearshore Zone  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sand bars are prominent features on many beaches, and can represent a major source of morphologic change in the cross-shore profile. The breaking waves are concentrated at the bar crests, resulting in reduced energy in the landward zone. Bars respond to different wave energy conditions, slowly moving shoreward with low waves and rapidly moving offshore with higher waves. However the formation and evolution of bars on multiple barred beaches is poorly understood. The presentation will describe preliminary efforts to predict the location of sand bars in the cross-shore profile, to quantify the number of sand bars under different hydrodynamic conditions and to illustrate the capability to predict profile evolution. A wave height transformation model (Dally model), a sediment transport model and conservation model are applied. The two-dimensional wave height model establishes wave height across the nearshore zone due to wave shoaling and breaking, including wave setup and bottom stress. This model utilizes two threshold values to predict the breaking position and after breaking, in the deeper water of the bar trough, the position where the waves stabilize and start to shoal again (stability criterion). Both criteria depend on the local water depth. At present, the sediment transport model consists of three components. First, the moment of momentum due to breaking waves is transferred to the bottom as a seaward shear stress concentrated somewhat landward of the bar crest. Secondly, the onshore shear stress is due to the nonlinearity of the breaking waves. Finally, the onshore transport is magnified by the proximity of turbulence to the bottom in shallow water. This model is of the "open loop" type, thus there is no guarantee of convergence to a stable profile. The capability of the model to predict bar locations on an actual profile is illustrated as follows. A profile consisting of three bars is selected from Volusia County along the northeast Florida Atlantic coastline. In the first step, the inshore and middle bars were smoothed leaving only the outer bar. The model was applied with an offshore wave height of 1.5 m which shoaled to 2.1 m where it broke on the outer bar. It was determined that the breaking on the outer bar and reformation and breaking landward of the outer bar could predict the approximate location of the middle bar. The process is repeated, now inserting the actual middle bar to verify that the model can predict the approximate correct location of the inner bar. The results obtained from this simulation and other profiles with two and three bars from Volusia County, showed similar results and are promising for the application of this model to calculate the number of inner bars. A second illustration of the model is a comparison with data of profile evolution from large wave tank experiments. Comparison of predicted profiles by the model with the measured profiles will be presented for various times during the profile evolution.

Absalonsen, L.; Dean, R.

2011-12-01

94

King cobra genome supporting information SUPPORTING INFORMATION  

E-print Network

King cobra genome supporting information 1 SUPPORTING INFORMATION 1. SI MATERIALS AND METHODS 1.1 King cobra tissue acquisitions and processing All animal procedures complied with local king cobra that originated from Bali, Indonesia. Blood was obtained by caudal puncture and frozen

Castoe, Todd A.

95

Wednesday, January 04, 2012 5:30 PM 6:00 PM King Aquatics King Aquatics -Dry Land  

E-print Network

Wednesday, January 04, 2012 5:30 PM 6:00 PM King Aquatics King Aquatics - Dry Land Practice Connolly Squash Court Monday, January 09, 2012 5:30 PM 6:00 PM King Aquatics King Aquatics - Dry Land - Dry Land Practice Connolly Squash Court Wednesday, January 18, 2012 5:30 PM 6:00 PM King Aquatics King

Carter, John

96

Richard B. King Department of  

E-print Network

. Natural History #12;Western Lake Erie Islands · 18 islands · 1-4000 hectares · 1-30 km from mainlandRichard B. King Department of Biological Sciences Lake Erie Watersnakes and Round Gobies:Lake Erie of a Threatened Predator to Invasive Preyof a Threatened Predator to Invasive Prey #12;I. Lake Erie Watersnakes A

King, Richard B.

97

ENHANCED HYDRODYNAMICAL-NUMERICAL MODEL FOR NEAR-SHORE PROCESSES  

EPA Science Inventory

An optimized version of a multilayer Hansen type Hydrodynamical-Numerical (HN) model is presented and discussed here as the basis for the following experimental extensions and enhancements developed to more appropriately handle near-shore processes: Non-linear term extension to f...

98

SOME EFFECTS OF PETROLEUM ON NEARSHORE ALASKAN MARINE ORGANISMS  

EPA Science Inventory

The overall objective of this project was to better understand the effects of chronic, low-level oil pollution on nearshore Alaskan marine organisms. The bivalve mollusc Macoma balthica accumulated hydrocarbons during 180 days of continuous exposure to Prudhoe Bay crude oil in fl...

99

Marine palynology and its use for studying nearshore environments  

E-print Network

Marine palynology and its use for studying nearshore environments Anne de Vernal GEOTOP, Université : devernal.anne@uqam.ca Abstract. Palynology is the study of microfossils composed of highly resistant) or the freshwater biota (chlorococcales). Marine palynology is thus used for characterizing the type of sedimentary

Long, Bernard

100

Barnacle reproductive hotspots linked to nearshore ocean conditions  

E-print Network

Barnacle reproductive hotspots linked to nearshore ocean conditions Heather M. Leslie*, Erin N significant marine invertebrate, the intertidal barnacle Balanus glandula. Greater larval production in both cm2 in natural barnacle populations in the region of higher primary productivity was almost 5

Leslie, Heather

101

Ocean waves, nearshore ecology, and natural selection Mark W. Denny*  

E-print Network

-1 Ocean waves, nearshore ecology, and natural selection Mark W. Denny* Stanford University and Helmuth 2002). At high tide, ocean waves break on the shore, imposing large hydrodynamic forces, Intertidal communities, Lift, Wave theory Abstract Although they are subjected to one of the most stressful

Denny, Mark

102

Wave Reflection from Nearshore Depressions David R. Michalsen1  

E-print Network

of existing and proposed borrow pits and a submarine canyon are gathered and analyzed for whether wave such as dredged borrow pits and nearshore canyons. First, the model is tested for numerical limitations depressions or obstacles, and can be natural or manmade. Examples of depressions/ obstacles include submarine

Haller, Merrick

103

Congratulations to Carey King  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I first came across Carey King when, out of the blue, he invited me to a special session of the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (the largest and most prestigious US scientific meeting) where he was developing a special session on energy return on investment (EROI). At that meeting and since, I have found Carey to be a refreshing new colleague, extremely intelligent, very knowledgeable about many diverse aspects of energy and other things, able to take criticism and to dish it out, and very ambitious, which is mostly a good thing. He is becoming a leader in thinking about EROI and its implications, and I am delighted to see him honored by Environmental Research Letters. This is important because in the US, there is little insight about energy or, especially, its potential physical limitations except when gas prices increase. There is also little awareness of the very strong historical connection in both the US and the world between increased affluence and increased use of energy, especially petroleum. It is not understood by all that many of the economic problems we have now (such as the budgetary problems faced by most of our State governments, pension plans and universities) have substantial origin in the fact that oil and other energy production no longer increase reliably year after year, as they once did (Murphy and Hall 2011). Many economists have argued in the past that energy is not important because it constituted only 5 per cent or so of GDP, or because they believe that market forces and innovations will substitute for any shortage (e.g. Barnett and Morse 1963, Passell et al 1972, Solow 1974, Denison 1989). One problem with that view is that if you remove that five per cent the economy comes to a dead stop, as Cuba found out in 1989 when Russia removed its oil subsidy. Additionally if that five per cent goes up to 10 or 15 per cent, as it did in the early 1980s, and again in 2008, recession steps in (Murphy and Hall 2011). In fact, the US economy and our energy use increased almost lockstep from 1900 until 1984 (Cleveland et al 1984). The economy has grown more rapidly than energy use since 1984. Most economists think that this is due to our cleverness at increasing efficiency, but Robert Kaufmann (2004) and others find that instead most of the increase has been due to, essentially, the outsourcing of our heavy industry (think steel imported from Korea or Brazil, petroleum refined in Trinidad etc). An additional issue is that there is considerable evidence (e.g. Shadow Government Statistics) that the official US government inflation corrections have been deliberately underestimated since about 1985. If this is true then GDP growth has been exaggerated and there has been little or no increase in efficiency. Thus our gain in actual national energy efficiency is probably much less than most economists believe, and may be close to zero. Obviously some few of us think a great deal about energy, and for those who are willing to undertake some personal research (for example on the ASPO (aspo-usa.com) or The Oil Drum (www.theoildrum.com) websites), there is much to be concerned about. First on the list of concerns is 'peak oil'; the concept that there comes a time over the life cycle of the extraction of a non-renewable resource when there will be maximum production. This concept, derived by geologist M K Hubbert in the 1950s, assumes that this peak will occur when roughly 50 per cent of the resource has been exploited. Hubbert famously predicted in 1955 that this would occur for the United States in 1970. Initially he was derided by most in the oil industry, but in fact peak oil for the US did occur in 1970, just as he had predicted. Oil production has declined essentially every year since then. 'Peak oil' has now occurred for something like three quarters of all oil producing nations, although not yet for most of the largest producers. Second on my list of energy concerns is declining EROI. EROI is a term I had developed in the early 1980s based on the net energy concepts of

Hall, Charles A. S.

2012-03-01

104

Geological development of the Lonesome Dove II King Sand field  

SciTech Connect

In March of 1989, Marshall and Winston, Inc., drilled Petro-West Corporation's Brady Creek prospect, 5 mi southwest of Eden, Concho County, Texas, along the southern part of the eastern shelf of the Permian basin. The prospect was drilled on the basis of a subsurface, geological anomaly mapped on the lower King Sandstone. The anomaly was confirmed and enhanced by soil gas geochemistry. The McMurtrey No.1 well encountered 38 ft of sandstone, and has an estimated potential of 79 BOPD (pumping). The lower King Sandstone at Lonesome Dove II field is part of a larger northeast-southwest-trending Cisco depositional system. Data from subsequent drilling at Lonesome Dove II (including two conventional cores, samples, sidewall cores, dipmeters, and electric logs) indicates that the lower King Sandstone may have been deposited during a regressive cycles of fluvial-deltaic sedimentation. Characteristics of both fluvial point bar and distributary channel facies have been noted and the development of a distributary model of deposition led to the extension of the field beyond the limits of the original subsurface and geochemical picture. The presence of two or more separate channels or channel systems is indicated by isopach maps and by significant oil gravity, field pressure, and grain size differences. These channel systems may have been deposited on a relatively flat-lying deltaic plain as indicated by cross sections showing only slight channel downcutting.

Powers, D.H.; Watters, G. (Marshall and Winston, Inc., Midland, TX (United States))

1992-04-01

105

The King of Crustaceans: Lobsters  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the north Atlantic, the American Lobster is the undisputed king of crustaceans. Itâs also a tremendously important commercial catch. While all the other fisheries are collapsing, why are lobsters resisting the trend? In this video, Jonathan goes out with a Maine lobsterman to learn why, and he dives down below to find the biggest lobsters he has ever seen. This segment won a New England Emmy Award! Please see the accompanying study guide for educational objectives and discussion points.

Productions, Jonathan B.

2011-01-18

106

Autiobiography of Philip B. King  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Philip Burke King's interests and methods of scientific inquiry were those of a field geologist who obtains his data from the rocks exposed at the Earth's surface and from them derives inferences as to the history and behavior of the Earth. He was especially interested in the sedimentary rocks, and interpreted the environments in which they were originally laid down and the relation of these environments to tectonic movements that were taking place in the Earth's crust.

King, Philip Burke

2000-01-01

107

Carbon Monoxide Epidemic Among Immigrant Populations: King County, Washington, 2006  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We investigated an outbreak of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning after a power outage to determine its extent, identify risk factors, and develop prevention measures. Methods. We reviewed medical records and medical examiner reports of patients with CO poisoning or related symptoms during December 15 to 24, 2006. We grouped patients into households exposed concurrently to a single source of CO. Results. Among 259 patients with CO poisoning, 204 cases were laboratory confirmed, 37 were probable, 10 were suspected, and 8 were fatal. Of 86 households studied, 58% (n = 50) were immigrant households from Africa (n = 21), Asia (n = 15), Latin America (n = 10), and the Middle East (n = 4); 34% (n = 29) were US-born households. One percent of households was European (n = 1), and the origin for 7% (n = 6) was unknown. Charcoal was the most common fuel source used among immigrant households (82%), whereas liquid fuel was predominant among US-born households (34%). Conclusions. Educational campaigns to prevent CO poisoning should consider immigrants’ cultural practices and languages and specifically warn against burning charcoal indoors and incorrect ventilation of gasoline- or propane-powered electric generators. PMID:19608962

Kwan-Gett, Tao; Hampson, Neil B.; Baer, Atar; Shusterman, Dennis; Shandro, Jamie R.; Duchin, Jeffrey S.

2009-01-01

108

Nearshore wave forecasting and hindcasting by dynamical and statistical downscaling  

Microsoft Academic Search

A high-resolution nested WAM\\/SWAN wave model suite aimed at rapidly establishing nearshore wave forecasts as well as a climatology and return values of the local wave conditions with Rapid Environmental Assessment (REA) in mind is described. The system is targeted at regions where local wave growth and partial exposure to complex open-ocean wave conditions makes diagnostic wave modelling difficult.SWAN is

Øyvind Breivik; Yvonne Gusdal; Birgitte R. Furevik; Ole Johan Aarnes; Magnar Reistad

2009-01-01

109

Scour and Burial Mechanics of Objects in the Nearshore  

Microsoft Academic Search

A process-based, numerical, hydrodynamic vortex lattice mine scour\\/burial model (VORTEX) is presented that simulates scour and burial of objects of arbitrary shape resting on a granular bed in the nearshore. There are two domains in the model formulation: a far-field where burial and exposure occur due to changes in the elevation of the seabed and a near-field involving scour and

Scott A. Jenkins; Douglas L. Inman; Michael D. Richardson; Thomas F. Wever; Joseph Wasyl

2007-01-01

110

Turbulence observations of the nearshore wave bottom boundary layer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Field observations of turbulence and sediment suspension in the nearshore wave bottom boundary layer obtained during the Duck94 field experiment on the North Carolina coast showed the generation of near-bed turbulence to be highly intermittent. The intermittent nature of the flow was examined by applying homogeneous isotropic turbulence laws over small windows of data. The time-varying estimates of turbulent kinetic

D. L. Foster; R. A. Beach; R. A. Holman

2006-01-01

111

at King's 2014 Welcomefrom the Principal  

E-print Network

OF PARLIAMENT STAMFORD STREET APARTMENTS 4 SUMMER AT KING'S #12;FINANCIAL DISTRICT SHAKESPEARE'S GLOBE THEATRE contribution to modern society through collaboration, academia and research. With a distinguished history

112

The Words of Martin Luther King, Jr.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Excerpts from speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., are reprinted. Topics discussed include discrimination, the South, education, nonviolent resistance, poverty, economic opportunity, and world peace. (LH)

Today's Education, 1979

1979-01-01

113

The True Lion King of Africa: The Epic History of Sundiata, King of Old Mali.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

David Wisniewski's 1992 picture book version of the African epic of "Sundiata, Lion King of Mali" and the actual historical account of the 13th century Lion King, Sundiata, are both badly served by Disney's "The Lion King." Disney has been praised for using African animals as story characters; for using the African landscape as a story setting;…

Paterno, Domenica R.

114

King's Health Partners Clinical Trials Office Supporting Clinical Research in King's Health Partners  

E-print Network

King's Health Partners Clinical Trials Office Supporting Clinical Research in King's Health are we? Used to be called Joint Clinical Trials Office (JCTO) A department of King's College London · JDP to KHP-CTO Board CTIMP Clinical Trial of an Investigational Medicinal Product Regulated: · EU Directives

Applebaum, David

115

Becoming King: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Making of a National Leader  

Microsoft Academic Search

Without question, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is the face of the civil rights revolution that reshaped the social and political landscape of the United States. Although many biographers and historians have examined Dr. King's activism, few have recognized the pivotal role that the people of Montgomery, Alabama, played in preparing him for leadership. King arrived in Montgomery as a

Troy Jackson

2008-01-01

116

77 FR 2905 - Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2012  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Proclamation 8773 of January 13, 2012 Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2012...Memorial, the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. inspired a movement that...is within our reach. On the Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday,...

2012-01-20

117

76 FR 3819 - Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2011  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Proclamation 8624 of January 14, 2011 Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2011...history. The Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. devoted his life to the...security of justice.'' On Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday,...

2011-01-20

118

Age, Growth, and Reproduction of the King  

E-print Network

Age, Growth, and Reproduction of the King Mackerel Scomberomorus cavalla (CuvierJ in Trinidad cavalla in Trinidad waters captured by hook-and-line and drift gillnets. Ages, estimated from otolith Affairs. P.O. Box 3 J60 Carenage Post Office. Trinidad. West Indies The king mackerel Scomberomorus

119

Clinical Trials Unit King's College London  

E-print Network

Clinical Trials Unit King's College London Caroline Murphy, CTU Manager History of the Clinical's · The Clinical Trials Unit has been awarded full registration by the UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC) and is the only fully UKCRC registered Clinical Trials Unit across King's Health Partners (KHP) UKCRC Registration

Applebaum, David

120

Culture at King's Overture / the first year  

E-print Network

Culture at King's Overture / the first year Contents #12;Foreword I n March 2012 I joined King's College London as Director, Cultural Partnerships, to build on the College's longstanding connections across arts and culture, extending and enriching its collaborations with the sector of which I had been

Applebaum, David

121

The case of King Richard III.  

PubMed

In this short essay we will discuss the possible diseases of King Richard III according to the descriptions in Shakespeare's plays King Richard III and Henry VI. Furthermore, it is shown that the description of the defeated enemy as physically and mentally deformed is part of a long tradition which has its roots in Ancient Greece. PMID:22089046

Skrziepietz, A

2011-11-01

122

Martin Luther King Assassination Conspiracy Verdict  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Thirty-five years ago, on December 10, 1964, Dr. Martin Luther King Junior received the prestigious Nobel Peace Prize. This week, Dr. King has again been very much in the news. On December 9th, a Memphis jury handed down a verdict that the 1968 assassination of the civil rights leader was a conspiracy rather than the act of lone gunman James Earl Ray. The verdict was the conclusion of a wrongful death suit brought by King's family against businessman Lloyd Jowers, who admitted on network television in 1993 that he was given $100,000 to arrange King's murder. King's relatives have long argued that the crime was never fully examined by the courts, and brought the lawsuit in an attempt to learn the truth. The family accepted a token settlement of $100 in damages from Jowers.

Shapiro, Debra S.

123

Towards an Operational Nearshore Wave Data Assimilation System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For Navy operations, the model used for wave predictions in the nearshore is SWAN, which solves the spectral action balance equation to estimate the wave state. Boundary conditions for local (nearshore) model domains are generally obtained from regional model simulations that use either SWAN or WAVEWATCH III, which in turn gets boundary conditions from global simulations with WAVEWATCH III forced by the meteorological models. Inaccuracies in meteorological forcing and the coarse grid resolutions for the global model can lead to significant errors in SWAN's spectral estimates, particularly in shallow water. To improve the model's performance, especially for the small nearshore domains, we have developed a 4DVAR data assimilation system based on a tangent linear code and the corresponding adjoint from the numerical SWAN model. The system utilizes point measurements of 2D wave spectra, such as from a wave buoy, to improve the solution in the whole domain. Given a set of observations measured at different times and locations in the model domain, the assimilation system minimizes a cost function (representing overall error between the model and observations) and generates corrected boundary and initial conditions that optimize the fit of SWAN's output to the measurements. In addition to time dependence, the system accounts for nonlinear triad and quadruplet interactions, depth-limited breaking, wind forcing, bottom friction, and whitecapping as well as the influence of currents on waves. This presentation will review the current status of the system using simulations with data from Duck, North Carolina and the 2012 RIMPAC exercises held by the Commander, US Pacific Fleet in and around the Hawaiian Islands. Examples shown will include analysis of effects of using different background fields, and of assimilating different instruments simultaneously. Adjoint-generated sensitivity maps, which can be generated using the adjoint, will be used to demonstrate the optimal locations for deployment of instruments under varying wave conditions.

Veeramony, J.; Orzech, M.; Ngodock, H. E.; Flampouris, S.

2012-12-01

124

Adjoint-Based Sensitivity Maps for the Nearshore  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The wave model SWAN (Booij et al., 1999) solves the spectral action balance equation to produce nearshore wave forecasts and climatologies. It is widely used by the coastal modeling community and is part of a variety of coupled ocean-wave-atmosphere model systems. A variational data assimilation system (Orzech et al., 2013) has recently been developed for SWAN and is presently being transitioned to operational use by the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office. This system is built around a numerical adjoint to the fully nonlinear, nonstationary SWAN code. When provided with measured or artificial "observed" spectral wave data at a location of interest on a given nearshore bathymetry, the adjoint can compute the degree to which spectral energy levels at other locations are correlated with - or "sensitive" to - variations in the observed spectrum. Adjoint output may be used to construct a sensitivity map for the entire domain, tracking correlations of spectral energy throughout the grid. When access is denied to the actual locations of interest, sensitivity maps can be used to determine optimal alternate locations for data collection by identifying regions of greatest sensitivity in the mapped domain. The present study investigates the properties of adjoint-generated sensitivity maps for nearshore wave spectra. The adjoint and forward SWAN models are first used in an idealized test case at Duck, NC, USA, to demonstrate the system's effectiveness at optimizing forecasts of shallow water wave spectra for an inaccessible surf-zone location. Then a series of simulations is conducted for a variety of different initializing conditions, to examine the effects of seasonal changes in wave climate, errors in bathymetry, and variations in size and shape of the inaccessible region of interest. Model skill is quantified using two methods: (1) a more traditional correlation of observed and modeled spectral statistics such as significant wave height, and (2) a recently developed RMS spectral skill score summed over all frequency-directional bins. The relative advantages and disadvantages of these two methods are considered. References: Booij, N., R.C. Ris, and L.H. Holthuijsen, 1999: A third-generation wave model for coastal regions: 1. Model description and validation. J. Geophys. Res. 104 (C4), 7649-7666. Orzech, M.D., J. Veeramony, and H.E. Ngodock, 2013: A variational assimilation system for nearshore wave modeling. J. Atm. & Oc. Tech., in press.

Orzech, Mark; Veeramony, Jay; Ngodock, Hans

2013-04-01

125

NEARSHORE FISH AND MACROINVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES ALONG THE STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA INCLUDING FOOD HABITS OF THE COMMON NEARSHORE FISH: FINAL REPORT OF THREE YEARS' SAMPLING, 1976-1979  

EPA Science Inventory

A seasonal survey of nearshore fishes was made in the Strait of Juan de Fuca from May 1976 to June 1979. A beach seine was used for sampling nearshore demersal fishes and a townet for nearshore pelagic fishes; intertidal fishes were sampled with the use of anesthetic and a hand n...

126

The effect of bathymetric filtering on nearshore process model results  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Nearshore wave and flow model results are shown to exhibit a strong sensitivity to the resolution of the input bathymetry. In this analysis, bathymetric resolution was varied by applying smoothing filters to high-resolution survey data to produce a number of bathymetric grid surfaces. We demonstrate that the sensitivity of model-predicted wave height and flow to variations in bathymetric resolution had different characteristics. Wave height predictions were most sensitive to resolution of cross-shore variability associated with the structure of nearshore sandbars. Flow predictions were most sensitive to the resolution of intermediate scale alongshore variability associated with the prominent sandbar rhythmicity. Flow sensitivity increased in cases where a sandbar was closer to shore and shallower. Perhaps the most surprising implication of these results is that the interpolation and smoothing of bathymetric data could be optimized differently for the wave and flow models. We show that errors between observed and modeled flow and wave heights are well predicted by comparing model simulation results using progressively filtered bathymetry to results from the highest resolution simulation. The damage done by over smoothing or inadequate sampling can therefore be estimated using model simulations. We conclude that the ability to quantify prediction errors will be useful for supporting future data assimilation efforts that require this information.

Plant, N.G.; Edwards, K.L.; Kaihatu, J.M.; Veeramony, J.; Hsu, L.; Holland, K.T.

2009-01-01

127

The Coretta Scott King Book Awards  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Coretta Scott King Book Award was founded in 1969 in honor of the late Mrs. Coretta Scott King, wife of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., for her passion and dedication to working for peace. The awards are given to â??outstanding African American authors and illustrators of books for children and young adults that demonstrate an appreciation of African American culture and universal human values.â? Created by the American Library Association, this page provides a variety of resources, including a section on the history of the award and a list of all past award winners. Another great facet of this page is the Coretta Scott King Book Awards Donation Grant. The goal of this program is to increase childrenâ??s access to books by building the libraries of nontraditional institutions that provide services to children. Within Resources and Bibliographies, a series of educational materials related to multicultural and diversity resources and collections are also available.

128

Combining Monads David J. King Philip Wadler  

E-print Network

Combining Monads David J. King Philip Wadler functional programs. Most real applications require a combination of primitive monads. Here we describe how some monads may be combined with others to yield a combined monad. 1 Introduction

Wadler, Philip

129

The Seattle Times: Martin Luther King Jr.  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Seattle Times commemorates the life and legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. with a Web site including sections on the man, the movement, the legacy, and the holiday. Timed to coincide with the 10th anniversary of the national King holiday, the site also offers a photo tour of key events in the fight for civil rights, dialogue between students in Alabama and Washington states, a quiz study guide, and sound clips from his speeches.

130

Caliphs & Kings -- Freer & Sackler Galleries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Part of the continuing series of online exhibitions from the Smithsonian's Freer & Sackler Galleries, Caliphs & Kings provides a sample of the rich history of Islamic Spain, called al-Adalus, from the 8th to the 15th centuries. Online visitors can closely examine ten artworks selected from about ninety on display at the museum through October 2004. A featured work is a 10th century ivory pyxis, or cylindrical container, probably made as a special gift for the favorite concubine of the Umayyad caliph, that includes a poetic inscription in which the container speaks in the first person and describes its function as "a vessel for musk and camphor and ambergris." There are also examples of lusterware; textiles, both carpets and bed coverings; a walnut and ivory chest from Barcelona; an illuminated Hebrew bible from the second half of the 15th century; a gold coin for 50 excelentes issued in about 1497, and a map of the world drawn by Florentine cartographer Juan Vespucci, nephew of Amerigo Vespucci, in 1526 that shows Spain as a superpower at the center of all things.

131

Connecting wind-driven upwelling and offshore stratification to nearshore internal bores and oxygen variability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

study utilizes field observations in southern Monterey Bay, CA, to examine how regional-scale upwelling and changing offshore (shelf) conditions influence nearshore internal bores. We show that the low-frequency wind forcing (e.g., upwelling/relaxation time scales) modifies the offshore stratification and thermocline depth. This in turn alters the strength and structure of observed internal bores in the nearshore. An internal bore strength index is defined using the high-pass filtered potential energy density anomaly in the nearshore. During weak upwelling favorable conditions and wind relaxations, the offshore thermocline deepens. In this case, both the amplitude of the offshore internal tide and the strength of the nearshore internal bores increase. In contrast, during strong upwelling conditions, the offshore thermocline shoals toward the surface, resulting in a decrease in the offshore internal tide amplitude. As a result, cold water accumulates in the nearshore (nearshore pooling), and the internal bore strength index decreases. Empirical orthogonal functions are utilized to support the claim that the bore events contribute to the majority of the variance in cross-shelf exchange and transport in the nearshore. Observed individual bores can drive shock-like drops in dissolved oxygen (DO) with rapid onset times, while extended upwelling periods with reduced bore activity produce longer duration, low DO events.

Walter, Ryan K.; Woodson, C. Brock; Leary, Paul R.; Monismith, Stephen G.

2014-06-01

132

[King Jung-jo's medical philosophy].  

PubMed

King Jungjo who introduced the advent of cultural renaissance of Chosun Dynasty as little been known about his work in medicine. With a wide knowledge in medicine, he was the only one among the kings who wrote a book on medicine, called "SueMinMyoJeon". In this paper, his perspective on medicine will be looked into based on "The Annals of the Chosun Dynasty", "Seungjeongwon Ilgi", "Hong Je jun Se", "KukGoBoGam", "Ildkrok", "JeJungShinPyun", "SueMinMyoJeon" etc. King Jungo valued empiricism in the field of medicine. He deepened understandings in medicine while taking care of King Youngjo, the late king. And it led him to author "SueMinMyoJeon" himself, and further ordered the publications of "JeJungShinPyun" "MaGuaHeoiTong". These two books were conducted to include empirical cases of folklore remedy. King Jungjo's medical philosophy can be epitomized in filial piety and realization of people-serving politics, which are the essentials of Confucianism. His filial piety towards the late king, Youngjo and his mother is shown in his devotion when taking care of them. Especially the way he examined the differentiation of diseases and corresponding treatments is well described in "The Annals of the Chosun Dynasty". "JeJungShinPyun" was also published and it came handy for folk villagers in times of medical needs. Later this book influenced "BangYakHaepPyun" by Hwang Do Yeon. King Jungjo emphasized pragmatism in spreading medical knowledges, thus removing the theoretical contents that are related to Taoism, especially the ones on alchemy from "DongEuiBoGam", when publishing "SueMinMyoJeon". Even the excerpts from "SoMun" were taken out, if not practical. King Jungjo, however, discussed the importance of healthy regimen and mentioned himself practicing it from the book "IlDeukLok", which seems to be the only book that derailed from the pragmatistic track. King Jungjo put emphasis on consistency between diagnosis and treatment. In diagnosing, Meridian pulse was taken important as a means of finding the origin of disease, while deploring how doctors then neglected to study. PMID:20098054

Kim, Sun Hyung; Kim, Dal Rae

2009-12-01

133

Evolution of basic equations for nearshore wave field  

PubMed Central

In this paper, a systematic, overall view of theories for periodic waves of permanent form, such as Stokes and cnoidal waves, is described first with their validity ranges. To deal with random waves, a method for estimating directional spectra is given. Then, various wave equations are introduced according to the assumptions included in their derivations. The mild-slope equation is derived for combined refraction and diffraction of linear periodic waves. Various parabolic approximations and time-dependent forms are proposed to include randomness and nonlinearity of waves as well as to simplify numerical calculation. Boussinesq equations are the equations developed for calculating nonlinear wave transformations in shallow water. Nonlinear mild-slope equations are derived as a set of wave equations to predict transformation of nonlinear random waves in the nearshore region. Finally, wave equations are classified systematically for a clear theoretical understanding and appropriate selection for specific applications. PMID:23318680

ISOBE, Masahiko

2013-01-01

134

A Moored Airborne Video System with Nearshore Applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the past two decades researchers have developed video-based remote sensing techniques to measure relevant nearshore variables. Measurements made include spatial patterns in sand bar morphology, run-up oscillations, wave breaking distributions, phase speed and wave angle, and most recently, surface currents within the surf zone and swash. In general, vertical (i.e., downward oriented) photography or videography is preferred to high-oblique land-based systems. However, although aircraft-mounted video systems have been under development for several years, the relatively high cost and short dwell time has limited its widespread application. Thus, most video measurements for research applications are obtained through methods whereby arrays of video cameras are fixed on land and oriented obliquely to the surf zone region of interest. The typically high-oblique imagery is limited in spatial ground coverage by rapidly degrading resolution in the far field, as well as lay-over problems associated with a fluctuating sea surface and high incidence look-angle. In order to alleviate these problems, researchers have attempted mounting video (or photographic) sensors on tethered balloons where long time series can be obtained over large regions of the surf zone without limiting resolution in the far field. In our research we have developed a technique for mounting a video system onboard a tethered helikite, a combination kite and helium-filled blimp (Allsopp Helikites, Ltd.). The video system consists of a downward-looking video camera in a custom weather-proof housing mounted on the keel of the helikite. Also included are a differential GPS receiver, tilt and heading sensor for accurate geometrical transformation, micro-processor, onboard power supply, and wireless data link. In this presentation, we will discuss the system in more detail, the image resolution and accuracies, and the expected applications to nearshore processes research. This work is sponsored by the Office of Naval Research.

Smith, G.; Lippmann, T.

2004-12-01

135

Evaluation of nearshore wave models in steep reef environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To provide coastal engineers and scientists with a quantitative evaluation of nearshore numerical wave models in reef environments, we review and compare three commonly used models with detailed laboratory observations. These models are the following: (1) SWASH (Simulating WAves till SHore) (Zijlema et al. 2011), a phase-resolving nonlinear shallow-water wave model with added nonhydrostatic terms; (2) SWAN (Simulating WAve Nearshore) (Booij et al. 1999), a phase-averaged spectral wave model; and (3) XBeach (Roelvink et al. 2009), a coupled phase-averaged spectral wave model (applied to modeling sea-swell waves) and a nonlinear shallow-water model (applied to modeling infragravity waves). A quantitative assessment was made of each model's ability to predict sea-swell (SS) wave height, infragravity (IG) wave height, wave spectra, and wave setup () at five locations across the laboratory fringing reef profile of Demirbilek et al. (2007). Simulations were performed with the "recommended" empirical coefficients as documented for each model, and then the key wave-breaking parameter for each model ( ? in SWASH and ? in both SWAN and XBeach) was optimized to most accurately reproduce the observations. SWASH, SWAN, and XBeach were found to be capable of predicting SS wave height variations across the steep fringing reef profile with reasonable accuracy using the default coefficients. Nevertheless, tuning of the key wave-breaking parameter improved the accuracy of each model's predictions. SWASH and XBeach were also able to predict IG wave height and spectral transformation. Although SWAN was capable of modeling the SS wave height, in its current form, it was not capable of modeling the spectral transformation into lower frequencies, as evident in the underprediction of the low-frequency waves.

Buckley, Mark; Lowe, Ryan; Hansen, Jeff

2014-06-01

136

Uncertainty Analysis and Parameter Estimation For Nearshore Hydrodynamic Models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Numerical models represent deterministic approaches used for the relevant physical processes in the nearshore. Complexity of the physics of the model and uncertainty involved in the model inputs compel us to apply a stochastic approach to analyze the robustness of the model. The Bayesian inverse problem is one powerful way to estimate the important input model parameters (determined by apriori sensitivity analysis) and can be used for uncertainty analysis of the outputs. Bayesian techniques can be used to find the range of most probable parameters based on the probability of the observed data and the residual errors. In this study, the effect of input data involving lateral (Neumann) boundary conditions, bathymetry and off-shore wave conditions on nearshore numerical models are considered. Monte Carlo simulation is applied to a deterministic numerical model (the Delft3D modeling suite for coupled waves and flow) for the resulting uncertainty analysis of the outputs (wave height, flow velocity, mean sea level and etc.). Uncertainty analysis of outputs is performed by random sampling from the input probability distribution functions and running the model as required until convergence to the consistent results is achieved. The case study used in this analysis is the Duck94 experiment, which was conducted at the U.S. Army Field Research Facility at Duck, North Carolina, USA in the fall of 1994. The joint probability of model parameters relevant for the Duck94 experiments will be found using the Bayesian approach. We will further show that, by using Bayesian techniques to estimate the optimized model parameters as inputs and applying them for uncertainty analysis, we can obtain more consistent results than using the prior information for input data which means that the variation of the uncertain parameter will be decreased and the probability of the observed data will improve as well. Keywords: Monte Carlo Simulation, Delft3D, uncertainty analysis, Bayesian techniques, MCMC

Ardani, S.; Kaihatu, J. M.

2012-12-01

137

Mythopoeic Quest for the Racial Bridge: The Radiance of the King and Henderson the Rain King.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compares the treatment of race in two novels set in Africa with white protagonists, "The Radiance of the King" by Camara Laye and "Henderson the Rain King" by Saul Bellow. Argues that both novels, proceeding differently, create literary myths of racial harmony to replace undesirable, fallacious racist myths. (KH)

Balogun, F. Odun

1985-01-01

138

Dr. Max King: the sad life and early death of Mackenzie King's physician brother  

PubMed Central

While researching her best-selling biography, Mrs. King: The Life and Times of Isabel Mackenzie King, CMAJ contributing editor Charlotte Gray discovered a wealth of information about Dr. Dougal Macdougall (Max) King. Although he never became as famous as his older brother Mackenzie, Gray presents a convincing argument that Dr. Max King's life and early death speak volumes about medicine and the medical profession at the turn of the century. She also argues that Mackenzie King's own life would have been much different had his brother not died at the too young age of 42. Gray's book was nominated for the Viacom Award, which honours the best nonfiction book published annually in Canada. PMID:9580741

Gray, C

1998-01-01

139

Short Communication Vertical distribution of barnacle larvae at a fixed nearshore station in southern  

E-print Network

Short Communication Vertical distribution of barnacle larvae at a fixed nearshore station Keywords: Barnacle larvae Chthamalus Balanus vertical distribution stage-specific southern California among populations. We present observations on the vertical distribution of barnacle larvae from southern

Pineda, Jesús

140

Factors influencing Kemp's ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys kempii) distribution in nearshore waters and implications for management  

E-print Network

Post-pelagic juvenile and subadult Kemp's ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempii) (20-40 cm straight carapace length) utilize nearshore waters of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico as nursery or developmental feeding grounds. This study utilizes 10...

Metz, Tasha Lynn

2004-11-15

141

Fringing and Nearshore Coral Reefs of the Great Barrier Reef: Episodic Holocene Development and Future Prospects  

Microsoft Academic Search

SMITHERS, S.G.; HOPLEY, D., and PARNELL, K.E., 2006. Fringing and nearshore coral reefs of the Great Barrier Reef: episodic Holocene development and future prospects. Journal of Coastal Research, 22(1), 175-187. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. The Holocene growth of fringing and nearshore reefs on the GBR is examined. A review of data from 21 reefs indicates that most grow

S. G. Smithers; D. Hopley; K. E. Parnell

2006-01-01

142

Roughness and the Dynamics of Waves, Turbulence and Currents on Nearshore Reefs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nearshore coral reefs appear to be one of the roughest surfaces in the nearshore region and have evolved to harness the turbulent energy of breaking waves for ecological purposes. They maintain their roughness by a growth process that compensates for the very high rates of erosion induced by their extreme roughness. The roughness of coral reefs exists on spatial scales extending from individual polyps (few centimeters) to the larger-scale complex topography of complete reefs (100's of meters) and so the idea of a `smoothly-varying bathymetry' used in conventional nearshore theory is nowhere applicable to reefs; not even at scales of 100's of meters. This paper will survey the methods of assessing roughness, and turbulence, and discuss the spatial scales on which roughness controls wave-forced currents using examples from a variety of nearshore environments. The roughness length varies not only with spatial scale but with bottom type, e.g. sand, rubble or living-coral. The paper presents a model of a reef, which is forced by radiation stress, in which the roughness length varies both spatially, and with spatial scale; friction is included in the model through the wave-current interaction. The model shows the comparative importance of bottom type and depth in controlling nearshore dynamics. The paper also examines the extent to which the advective current is a proxy for the parameters of the water column that control the turbulent energy dissipation in these nearshore systems.

Hearn, C. J.; Hearn, C. J.

2001-12-01

143

EDITORIAL: King of the elements? King of the elements?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Throughout the history of science, carbon-based research has played a defining role in the development of a range of fundamental and technological fields. It was used in Avagadro's definition of the mole in the early 18th century, it provides the 'backbone' of molecules in organic compounds, and in the environmental debate currently raging in the press and international government discussions, the 'carbon footprint' has become the metric of our species' impact on our planet. Also in nanotechnology, with the discovery of various wonder materials, carbon is once again asserting its claim as king of the elements. Until the 1980s the only known forms of carbon were diamond, graphite and amorphous carbon, as in soot or charcoal. In 1985 Robert Curl, Harold Kroto and Richard Smalley reported the existence of fullerenes, spherical structures comprising hexagonal carbon rings [1], work for which they won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1996 [2]. The discovery of fullerenes was followed in 1991 by Sumio Ijima with the discovery of rolled graphite sheets, the carbon nanotube [3]. The discovery of these novel carbon nanostructures inspired researchers in a range of fields, largely as a result of the extraordinary capacity for investigations of these structures to reveal ever more intriguing properties. One of the fascinating properties attributed to carbon nanotubes is their phenomenal strength, with a Young's modulus of single walled carbon nanotubes approaching a terapascal [4]. Ingenious methods of harnessing this strength have since been developed, including bucky paper, a term used to refer to a mat of randomly self-entangled carbon nanotubes. Steven Crannford and Markus Buehler have recently reported a novel computational technique for probing the mechanical properties of these structures and show that the Young's modulus of bucky paper can be tuned by manipulation of the carbon nanotube type and density [5]. The electrical properties of carbon nanotubes, which depend on the chirality or wrapping angle of the graphite sheet with respect to the tube axis [6], have captured the imagination of researchers working in nanoelectronics. Carbon nanotubes also revealed interesting thermal properties that could lend them to the next generation of nanoscale devices. In 2000, researchers at the California Institute of Technology published the results of molecular dynamics simulations of thermal conductivity in carbon nanotubes [7]. The thermal properties predicted from this work added further promise to the potential of carbon nanotubes in micro- and nanoelectromechanical devices. More recently, researchers from the University of Columbia have studied how to exploit the thermal properties of carbon nanotubes in nanofluids. They report enhancement of heat transfer properties of carbon-nanotube-based nanofluids using a plasma treatment to aid stable dispersion of the nanotubes in water [8]. Eric Pop in Illinois has reported on the role of electrical and thermal contact resistance in Joule breakdown of single-walled carbon nanotubes, including analysis of several published data sets [9]. The work finds universal scaling rules, whereby the breakdown scales linearly with length for carbon nanotubes above a certain length, below which the breakdown is entirely limited by contact resistance. In 2004 another form of carbon came to the fore when researchers at the University of Manchester and the Institute of Microelectronics Technology isolated a single plane of graphite, that is, graphene, using a kind of scotch tape [10]. As with other forms of carbon, investigation of graphene has also revealed fascinating properties that lend the material to a number of applications, such as sensing. The electronic properties of graphene are highly sensitive to the adsorption of molecules such as CO, NO, NO2 and NH3, and a collaboration of researchers from Lanzhou University in China and the University of Sheffield in the UK have further reported on how this sensitivity can be enhanced by two orders of magnitude when the graphene is doped with an impurity s

Demming, Anna

2010-07-01

144

The Newest Monument: The Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article features the newest monument, the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial. The memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. will be an engaging landscape experience to convey four fundamental and recurring themes throughout Dr. King's life--democracy, justice, hope, and love. Natural…

Social Studies and the Young Learner, 2011

2011-01-01

145

The Legend of King Arthur. [Lesson Plan].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on characters in the Arthurian legend, this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that many writers have told the tale of King Arthur and the people around him, including Guinevere, Lancelot, Merlin, and Mordred. The main activity of the lesson involves students writing a dramatic monologue supposedly composed…

Soderquist, Alisa

146

"King Corn": Teaching the Food Crisis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"King Corn" is in so many ways the story of how government food policy has entirely remade the food landscape in the United States over the last 40 years. From the massive expansion of the number of acres of corn grown across the country, to the ever-increasing ways that corn is incorporated into the food production process, to the industrial…

Swinehart, Tim

2012-01-01

147

King Oedipus and the Problem Solving Process.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An analysis of the problem solving process reveals at least three options: (1) finding the cause, (2) solving the problem, and (3) anticipating potential problems. These methods may be illustrated by examining "Oedipus Tyrannus," a play in which a king attempts to deal with a problem that appears to be beyond his ability to solve, and applying…

Borchardt, Donald A.

148

Your Guide to King Albert Hall  

E-print Network

University Housing Office (503) 725-4375 Montgomery Help Desk (503) 725-4385 Residence Life Office (503) 725 with a shower. Carbon Monoxide detectors Each unit of King Albert has a carbon monoxide detector because each unit has a gas oven and stove top. There is one carbon monoxide detector in each apartment, generally

Latiolais, M. Paul

149

Tribute to Julie Taymor's Lion King Costumes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Julie Taymor's costumes and masks for the stage version of "The Lion King" were stunning in the way they combined the dual images of human and animal forms. Taymor visually incorporated the human form of a dancer into the simplified form of the animal character so both are equally visible. This visible duality of human form and animal…

Carter, Mary C.; Beaty, Ben

2011-01-01

150

Combining Monads David J. King Philip Wadler  

E-print Network

Combining Monads David J. King Philip Wadler University of Glasgow \\Lambda Abstract Monads provide a way of structuring functional programs. Most real applications require a combination of primitive monads. Here we describe how some monads may be combined with others to yield a combined monad. 1

Wadler, Philip

151

Vegetation of Barton Peninsula in the neighbourhood of King Sejong Station (King George Island, maritime Antarctic)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plant communities were studied on Barton Peninsula around King Sejong Station on King George Island, maritime Antarctic. The\\u000a objective of this study was to document the occurrence and distribution of plant assemblages to provide the bases for monitoring\\u000a the effects of environmental changes and human impact on the vegetation of this area. Approximately 47% of the investigated\\u000a area was covered

Ji Hee Kim; In-Young Ahn; Kyu Song Lee; Hosung Chung; Han-Gu Choi

2007-01-01

152

MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. AND CHRISTIAN WITNESS: AN INTERPRETATION OF KING BASED ON A THEOLOGICAL MODEL OF PROPHETIC WITNESS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Martin Luther King, Jr., has often been called a prophet or prophetic by theologians and popular writers. The purpose of this dissertation is to test the theological interpretation of Dr. King as prophetic. The role and theology of the classical Hebrew prophets are the norm by which the work of Dr. King is evaluated. The dissertation is a theological experiment.

JOSEPH MILBURN THOMPSON

1981-01-01

153

cBathy: A robust algorithm for estimating nearshore bathymetry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A three-part algorithm is described and tested to provide robust bathymetry maps based solely on long time series observations of surface wave motions. The first phase consists of frequency-dependent characterization of the wave field in which dominant frequencies are estimated by Fourier transform while corresponding wave numbers are derived from spatial gradients in cross-spectral phase over analysis tiles that can be small, allowing high-spatial resolution. Coherent spatial structures at each frequency are extracted by frequency-dependent empirical orthogonal function (EOF). In phase two, depths are found that best fit weighted sets of frequency-wave number pairs. These are subsequently smoothed in time in phase 3 using a Kalman filter that fills gaps in coverage and objectively averages new estimates of variable quality with prior estimates. Objective confidence intervals are returned. Tests at Duck, NC, using 16 surveys collected over 2 years showed a bias and root-mean-square (RMS) error of 0.19 and 0.51 m, respectively but were largest near the offshore limits of analysis (roughly 500 m from the camera) and near the steep shoreline where analysis tiles mix information from waves, swash and static dry sand. Performance was excellent for small waves but degraded somewhat with increasing wave height. Sand bars and their small-scale alongshore variability were well resolved. A single ground truth survey from a dissipative, low-sloping beach (Agate Beach, OR) showed similar errors over a region that extended several kilometers from the camera and reached depths of 14 m. Vector wave number estimates can also be incorporated into data assimilation models of nearshore dynamics.

Holman, Rob; Plant, Nathaniel; Holland, Todd

2013-05-01

154

cBathy: A robust algorithm for estimating nearshore bathymetry  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A three-part algorithm is described and tested to provide robust bathymetry maps based solely on long time series observations of surface wave motions. The first phase consists of frequency-dependent characterization of the wave field in which dominant frequencies are estimated by Fourier transform while corresponding wave numbers are derived from spatial gradients in cross-spectral phase over analysis tiles that can be small, allowing high-spatial resolution. Coherent spatial structures at each frequency are extracted by frequency-dependent empirical orthogonal function (EOF). In phase two, depths are found that best fit weighted sets of frequency-wave number pairs. These are subsequently smoothed in time in phase 3 using a Kalman filter that fills gaps in coverage and objectively averages new estimates of variable quality with prior estimates. Objective confidence intervals are returned. Tests at Duck, NC, using 16 surveys collected over 2 years showed a bias and root-mean-square (RMS) error of 0.19 and 0.51 m, respectively but were largest near the offshore limits of analysis (roughly 500?m from the camera) and near the steep shoreline where analysis tiles mix information from waves, swash and static dry sand. Performance was excellent for small waves but degraded somewhat with increasing wave height. Sand bars and their small-scale alongshore variability were well resolved. A single ground truth survey from a dissipative, low-sloping beach (Agate Beach, OR) showed similar errors over a region that extended several kilometers from the camera and reached depths of 14 m. Vector wave number estimates can also be incorporated into data assimilation models of nearshore dynamics.

Plant, Nathaniel G.; Holman, Rob; Holland, K. Todd

2013-01-01

155

A High Resolution Hydrodynamic Model of Puget Sound to Support Nearshore Restoration Feasibility Analysis and Design  

SciTech Connect

Estuarine and coastal hydrodynamic processes are sometimes neglected in the design and planning of nearshore restoration actions. Despite best intentions, efforts to restore nearshore habitats can result in poor outcomes if circulation and transport which also affect freshwater-saltwater interactions are not properly addressed. Limitations due to current land use can lead to selection of sub-optimal restoration alternatives that may result in undesirable consequences, such as flooding, deterioration of water quality, and erosion, requiring immediate remedies and costly repairs. Uncertainty with achieving restoration goals, such as recovery of tidal exchange, supply of sediment and nutrients, and establishment of fish migration pathways, may be minimized by using numerical models designed for application to the nearshore environment. A high resolution circulation and transport model of the Puget Sound, in the state of Washington, was developed to assist with nearshore habitat restoration design and analysis, and to answer the question “can we achieve beneficial restoration outcomes at small local scale, as well as at a large estuary-wide scale?” The Puget Sound model is based on an unstructured grid framework to define the complex Puget Sound shoreline using a finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM). The capability of the model for simulating the important nearshore processes, such as circulation in complex multiple tidal channels, wetting and drying of tide flats, and water quality and sediment transport as part of restoration feasibility, are illustrated through examples of restoration projects in Puget Sound.

Khangaonkar, Tarang; Yang, Zhaoqing

2011-01-01

156

Psychological aftermath of the King's Cross fire.  

PubMed Central

The King's Cross fire occurred at the end of the evening rush hour, on 18 November 1987. King's Cross station is within the department's health district and we felt a responsibility to respond to the psychological aftermath. The unique features of our intervention were the degree of inter agency coordination, the use of a systematic outreach and screening programme, the collection of psychotherapy outcome measures and the development of an ongoing clinic. The work represents a sustained attempt to assess the nature and prevalence of post-traumatic reactions and the most medically and economically effective form of intervention. In this paper we describe the way our team responded to the high level of psychological distress that we found, we present some preliminary results, outline two therapeutic trials, and refer to the longterm consequences for the work of our department. PMID:1994013

Rosser, R; Dewar, S; Thompson, J

1991-01-01

157

Optimal management of a Hawaiian Coastal aquifer with nearshore marine ecological interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We optimize groundwater management in the presence of marine consequences of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). Concern for marine biota increases the optimal steady-state head level of the aquifer. The model is discussed in general terms for any coastal groundwater resource where SGD has a positive impact on valuable nearshore resources. Our application focuses on the Kona Coast of Hawai`i, where SGD is being actively studied and where both nearshore ecology and groundwater resources are serious sociopolitical issues. To incorporate the consequences of water extraction on nearshore resources, we impose a safe minimum standard for the quantity of SGD. Efficient pumping rates fluctuate according to various growth requirements on the keystone marine algae and different assumptions regarding recharge rates. Desalination is required under average recharge conditions and a strict minimum standard and under low recharge conditions regardless of minimum standards of growth.

Duarte, Thomas Kaeo; Pongkijvorasin, Sittidaj; Roumasset, James; Amato, Daniel; Burnett, Kimberly

2010-11-01

158

Detecting Land-based Signals in the Near-shore Zone of Lake Erie During Summer 2009  

EPA Science Inventory

We conducted two styles of nearshore surveys in Lake Erie during August to mid-September 2009. The first used a spatially-balanced probability survey (SBS) design to establish discrete stations within a GIS-defined target populationthe nearshore zone extending approximately 5 km...

159

A High-Resolution Hydrodynamic Model of Puget Sound to Support Nearshore Restoration Feasibility Analysis and Design  

Microsoft Academic Search

:Estuarine and coastal hydrodynamic processes are sometimes neglected in the design and planning of nearshore restoration actions. Despite best intentions, efforts to restore nearshore habitats can result in poor outcomes if water circulation and transport are not properly addressed. Land use constraints can lead to selection of suboptimal restoration alternatives that may result in undesirable consequences, such as flooding, deterioration

Zhaoqing Yang; Tarang Khangaonkar

2011-01-01

160

A High-Resolution Hydrodynamic Model of Puget Sound to Support Nearshore Restoration Feasibility Analysis and Design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Estuarine and coastal hydrodynamic processes are sometimes neglected in the design and planning of nearshore restoration actions. Despite best intentions, efforts to restore nearshore habitats can result in poor outcomes if circulation and transport which also affect freshwater-saltwater interactions are not properly addressed. Limitations due to current land use can lead to selection of sub-optimal restoration alternatives that may result

Zhaoqing Yang; Tarang Khangaonkar

2011-01-01

161

A High-Resolution Hydrodynamic Model of Puget Sound to Support Nearshore Restoration Feasibility Analysis and Design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Estuarine and coastal hydrodynamic processes are sometimes neglected in the design and planning of nearshore restoration actions. Despite best intentions, efforts to restore nearshore habitats can result in poor outcomes if water circulation and transport are not properly addressed. Land use constraints can lead to selection of suboptimal restoration alternatives that may result in undesirable consequences, such as flooding, deterioration

Zhaoqing Yang; Tarang Khangaonkar

2011-01-01

162

August 2001 / Vol. 51 No. 8 BioScience 633 Nearshore estuarine and marine ecosystems--e.g.,  

E-print Network

August 2001 / Vol. 51 No. 8 · BioScience 633 Articles Nearshore estuarine and marine ecosystems of macrofauna, these estuarine and marine ecosystems are often referred to as nurseries in nu- merous papers). Indeed, the role of these nearshore ecosystems as nurseries is an established ecological concept accepted

Halpern, Benjamin S.

163

A Comparison of Total Phosphorus, Chlorophyll a, and Zooplankton in Embayment, Nearshore, and Offshore Habitats of Lake Ontario  

E-print Network

, and Offshore Habitats of Lake Ontario Spencer R. Hall1,4, Nijole K. Pauliukonis1,5, Edward L. Mills1,*, Lars G were compared in embayment, nearshore, and offshore habitats of Lake Ontario, 1995 to 1997 to erosion and/or resuspension of sediments. INDEX WORDS: Dreissenids, embayments, Lake Ontario, nearshore

Hall, Spencer

164

Characterization of tropical near-shore fish communities by coastal habitat status on spatially complex island systems  

E-print Network

Characterization of tropical near-shore fish communities by coastal habitat status on spatially, variability Synopsis We present a protocol for characterizing near-shore fish habitat as well as fish variability affected fish community composition, indicating that attempts to characterize a fish community

Sealey, Kathleen Sullivan

165

Seasonal Variation in Fish Assemblage Structure and Habitat Structure in the Nearshore Littoral Zone of Wisconsin Lakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

To evaluate whether fish abundance, fish habitat, and fish–habitat associations vary across seasons in nearshore littoral zones of five northern Wisconsin lakes, we assessed fish abundances and quantified habitat characteristics in littoral zones across three seasons (spring, summer, and fall) during 1996. Seasonal responses of the fish community in the nearshore littoral zone were taxa specific and guild specific. In

Gene R. Hatzenbeler; Michael A. Bozek; Martin J. Jennings; Edward E. Emmons

2000-01-01

166

Seasonal Variation in Fish Assemblage Structure and Habitat Structure in the Nearshore Littoral Zone of Wisconsin Lakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

To evaluate whether fish abundance, fish habitat, and fish-habitat associations vary across seasons in nearshore littoral zones of five northern Wisconsin lakes, we assessed fish abundances and quantified habitat characteristics in littoral zones across three seasons (spring, summer, and fall) during 1996. Seasonal responses of the fish community in the nearshore littoral zone were taxa specific and guild specific. In

Gene R. Hatzenbeler; Michael A. Bozek; Martin J. Jennings; Edward E. Emmons

2000-01-01

167

Land-use planning for nearshore ecosystem services—the Puget Sound Ecosystem Portfolio Model  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The 2,500 miles of shoreline and nearshore areas of Puget Sound, Washington, provide multiple benefits to people—"ecosystem services"—including important fishing, shellfishing, and recreation industries. To help resource managers plan for expected growth in coming decades, the U.S. Geological Survey Western Geographic Science Center has developed the Puget Sound Ecosystem Portfolio Model (PSEPM). Scenarios of urban growth and shoreline modifications serve as model inputs to develop alternative futures of important nearshore features such as water quality and beach habitats. Model results will support regional long-term planning decisions for the Puget Sound region.

Byrd, Kristin

2011-01-01

168

Unionid mussels from nearshore zones of Lake Erie Todd D. Crail a,  

E-print Network

Notes Unionid mussels from nearshore zones of Lake Erie Todd D. Crail a, , Robert A. Krebs b f o Article history: Received 8 July 2010 Accepted 3 December 2010 Available online 13 January 2011 Communicated by David Barton Index words: Unionidae Dreissena Refugia Seiche Great Lakes Lake Erie Concern

Toledo, University of

169

Water Quality and Plankton in the United States Nearshore Waters of Lake Huron  

EPA Science Inventory

We conducted an intensive survey for the US nearshore of Lake Huron along a continuous segment (523 km) from Port Huron Michigan to Detour Passage. A depth contour of 20 m was towed with a CTD, fluorometer, transmissometer, and laser optical plankton counter (LOPC). The continu...

170

Experimental study of nearshore dynamics on a barred beach with rip channels  

E-print Network

Experimental study of nearshore dynamics on a barred beach with rip channels Merrick C. Haller1 performed on a fixed barred beach with periodically spaced rip channels using a range of incident wave-directed flows called rip currents. These currents have been observed on a wide range of beach types

Haller, Merrick

171

MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN  

E-print Network

MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN disposal was performed during the summer of 2005 at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA, a high energy tidal the subsequent beach response was inconclusive, after one year the peak of the disposal mound had migrated ~100 m

172

Great Lakes Beach Recreational Water-Quality Decisionmaking Nearshore Health and Watershed Protection Projects  

E-print Network

Great Lakes Beach Recreational Water-Quality Decisionmaking Nearshore Health and Watershed instrumental in providing beach managers with the tools to make beach closure and advisory decisions at some of the 500 beaches along 11,000 miles of coastline in the Great Lakes. As they broaden the understanding

173

Determination of dominant nearshore hydrodynamic forcing adjacent to a tidal inlet and submerged artificial reef  

Microsoft Academic Search

An 18 month field monitoring program was conducted to determine the impact of a submerged narrow crested artificial reef, located seaward of the surf zone and immediately adjacent to a tidal inlet, on nearshore beach profile evolution. Observed structure settlement and scour zones adjacent to the structure are analyzed though the use of wind, wave, current, and tidal measurements obtained

Thomas Oliver Herrington Jr.

1997-01-01

174

Environmental characterization of the north Aleutian shelf nearshore region: characterization, processes, and vulnerability to development  

Microsoft Academic Search

The specific objectives of the study are as follows: Describe the present status of knowledge concerning the biotic communities and organic productivity of the nearshore zone along the entire North Aleutian Basin lease area, (Unimak Pass to Cape Newenham), with particular reference to the area adjacent to Izembek Lagoon; Describe the ecological processes which might be causing the observed distributions,

Pace

1984-01-01

175

Modeling and Understanding Remotely Forced Rip Current Systems at the Nearshore Canyon Experiment (NCEX)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evaluation of data collected during the Nearshore Canyon Experiment, has shown that our time-dependent circulation model (OK-Model; Özkan-Haller and Kirby, JGR, 1999), forced using radiation stress gradients derived from spectral wave models, can predict the spatial location of large offshore directed flows (rip currents). The locations of these transient rip currents, which are not controlled by the local nearshore bathymetry, are visible in remote sensing time exposure and variance images due to the advection of foam on the water surface (Eos Trans. AGU, 84(46), Ocean Sci. Meet. Suppl., Abstract OS21I-04, 2003). Further investigation has indicated that optical measurements of circulation patterns coincide with the numerical predictions. With this validation, the numerical models are being used to evaluate the sensitivity of the dynamic rip current system at the NCEX site to changes in wave conditions and nearshore bathymetry. Additionally, the walls of the offshore submarine canyon contain an undulating pattern that may be important in generating small-scale variations in waveheight, thereby driving rip currents where the water surface is at a local minimum, even in regions where the wave height is generally high. Theoretical tests using bottom boundaries with anomalies in intermediate and deep water are being performed to determine the effect these offshore contours can have in dictating nearshore circulation patterns. These results will provide insight regarding the role of patterns along canyon walls in prescribing the spatial location of the rip currents.

Long, J. W.; Özkan-Haller, H. T.; Holman, R. A.

2004-12-01

176

Analysis of near-shore sea surface temperatures in the Northern Pacific  

EPA Science Inventory

Recent studies report a warming trend in Pacific Ocean temperatures over the last 50 years. However, much less is known about temperature change in the near-coastal environment, which is particularly sensitive to climatic change. In near-shore regions in situ sea surface temper...

177

Optics, Acoustics, and Stress in a Nearshore Bottom Nepheloid Layer Emmanuel Boss  

E-print Network

Optics, Acoustics, and Stress in a Nearshore Bottom Nepheloid Layer Emmanuel Boss School of Marine this packaging of sediment affects optical and acoustical properties in the water column. OBJECTIVES 1. Quantify. Quantify how changes in particle packaging affect the optical and acoustical properties of the water column

Boss, Emmanuel S.

178

Optics, Acoustics, and Stress in a Nearshore Bottom Nepheloid Layer Emmanuel Boss  

E-print Network

Optics, Acoustics, and Stress in a Nearshore Bottom Nepheloid Layer Emmanuel Boss School of Marine stresses and how this packaging of sediment affects optical and acoustical properties in the water column and acoustical properties of the water column. 3. Develop models describing the associations between particle

Boss, Emmanuel S.

179

Predator-prey interactions of salmon in the plume and near-shore ocean  

E-print Network

Predator-prey interactions of salmon in the plume and near-shore ocean: implications for density), Elizabeth Daly, Jim Ruzicka (OSU), and Beth Phillips (UW) CRBF & W Ocean Workshop, February 14, 2013 #12;Presentation Outline · Background on competition involving salmon in the ocean · Interactions between wild

180

Macroinvertebrate Community Structure and Sediment Bioassay Results from Nearshore Areas of North American Great Lakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Benthic invertebrate communities of 50 nearshore reference sites in the North American Great Lakes were evaluated by replicate (n=5), quantitative sampling. Also, sediments collected at the 50 sites were used in eight, replicated (n=3), lethal and sublethal bioassays in the laboratory. We quantified the magnitude of variation and the proportion of variation among sites, as opposed to among replicates within

Robert C. Bailey; Kristin E. Day; Richard H. Norris; Trefor B. Reynoldson

1995-01-01

181

Evaluating a Lake Tahoe nearshore assessment strategy: A circumnavigation survey, August 2011  

EPA Science Inventory

We had the opportunity to apply a high-resolution nearshore sampling strategy, developed in the US/Canadian Laurentian Great Lakes, to Lake Tahoe. The strategy uses towed in situ sensors (physico-chemistry and biology) oscillated from near surface to near bottom while a vessel i...

182

Fate and effects of drilling fluid and cutting discharges in shallow, nearshore waters  

SciTech Connect

The relationships between selected environmental parameters (sedimentology, trace metals, and hydrocarbons) and macroinfaunal assemblages were studied to determine the fate and effects of drilling fluid and cutting discharges from a multiple well site in a shallow nearshore environment. Results are presented.

Not Available

1989-01-01

183

Research papers Natural intrusions of hypoxic, low pH water into nearshore marine  

E-print Network

-pH water. During these episodes, oxygen can drop to physiologically stressful levels, and pH can reach experience a general decline of temperature, oxygen and pH with depth. Analysis of the durations of exposureResearch papers Natural intrusions of hypoxic, low pH water into nearshore marine environments

Denny, Mark

184

The Nearshore Fish Assemblage of the Scripps Coastal Reserve, San Diego, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marine reserves are quickly becoming a primary tool in the management of coastal resources worldwide. With a growing demand for appropriate management strategies and enforcement of existing regulations, an urgent need has developed to obtain baseline data for regional faunal assemblages. In an attempt to develop a comprehensive list of fishes for one of California's southernmost marine reserves, nearshore marine

MATTHEW T. CRAIG; F. JOEL FODRIE; PHILIP A. HASTINGS

2004-01-01

185

Wave-Induced Mass Transport Affects Daily Escherichia coli Fluctuations in Nearshore Water  

E-print Network

: Characterization of diel variability of fecal indicator bacteria concentration in nearshore waters is of particular of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) is critical to understanding and predicting microbial water quality.01%) for E. coli at a nearly constant temperature of 23 ± 1 °C after UV disinfection.5 Therefore, m

186

Calculating shoreline erosion potential using nearshore stratigraphy and sediment volume: Outer Banks, North Carolina  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the acknowledged influence of coastal geological framework on the behavior of beaches and barrier islands and a wealth of geological and bathymetric observations from the inner shelf, quantitatively connecting those observations to shoreline behavior has been difficult. Nearshore geologic and morphologic variability described by recent research is not well represented by conventional geologic parameters, such as mean grain size

Jennifer L. Miselis; Jesse E. McNinch

2006-01-01

187

Martin Luther King, Jr.: In the beginning at Montgomery  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article is a brief account of the events that led to the inauguration of Martin Luther King, Jr., as leader of the Montgomery (Alabama) bus boycott. The writer analyzes the address Dr. King gave on the night he became the chief spokesman for the movement.

Donald H. Smith

1968-01-01

188

Author! Author! The Gallant Children's Author: Dick King-Smith  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This column presents a brief biography of Dick King-Smith. Born on March 27, 1922 and raised in Gloucestershire, England, he grew up with animals of all kinds. King-Smith was a farmer for twenty years and then became a school teacher. He was also a soldier during wartime, a traveling salesman, shoe factory worker, and television presenter. He…

Brodie, Carolyn S.

2005-01-01

189

Martin Luther King, Jr.: The Dream of Peaceful Revolution.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This biography for younger readers depicts the life of Martin Luther King, Jr., the Nobel Peace Prize winner who dedicated himself to the struggle for equal rights for African Americans while embracing the principle of nonviolent resistance. The book presents an overview of the civil rights movement and chronicles King's role as national leader…

Rowland, Della

190

Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. Lesson Plan.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a five-lesson, high school instructional unit on the ideas and activities of Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. Includes student objectives, step-by-step instructional procedures, and discussion questions. Provides quotations by Thoreau and King. (CFR)

Powell, Brent

1995-01-01

191

Ethical Communication and the Leadership of Martin Luther King, Jr  

Microsoft Academic Search

Martin Luther King, Jr was the most recognisable face of the African American civil rights movement whose message of racial equality helped to end the generations of legal discrimination against blacks in the American South. Apart from his political achievements King is best known as a communicator and orator whose message of equality and peace was most famously expressed in

Nick Sharman

2007-01-01

192

NATURAL GEOGRAPHY IN NEARSHORE AREAS (NaGISA): THE NEARSHORE COMPONENT OF THE CENSUS OF MARINE LIFE GEOGRAFIA NATURAL EN AREAS COSTERAS (NaGISA): EL COMPONENTE COSTERO DEL CENSO DE LA VIDA MARINA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Natural Geography in Shore Areas (NaGISA, the Japanese word for beach) project is the nearshore component of the Census of Marine Life program. NaGISA targets nearshore marine biodiversity in large macrophyte communities (hard bottom macroalgal communities and soft sediment sea grass beds) in a depth zonation from high intertidal to 15 m water depth. The overall goal of NaGISA

Katrin Iken; Brenda Konar

193

Nearshore Areas Used by Fry Chinook Salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, in the Northwestern Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California  

E-print Network

San Joaquin Delta in winter 2001 Catch Rate (number/minute)rates of Chinook salmon fry, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, in different substrata and nearshore zones in the northwestern Sacramento- San Joaquin Delta

McLain, Jeff; Castillo, Gonzalo

2009-01-01

194

INTRODUCTION Nearshore placement of sand is becoming a more popular option in two related types of coastal  

E-print Network

of coastal engineering projects: beach nourishment and inlet dredging. Placing the sand in the nearshore nourishment, and what is the certainty that a constructed submerged feature will move onshore or remain

US Army Corps of Engineers

195

Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains Near-shore wave dynamics Conclusions Tsunamis and ocean waves  

E-print Network

Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains Near-shore wave dynamics Conclusions Tsunamis and ocean waves Walter Craig Department of Mathematics & Statistics AAAS waves #12;Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains Near

Craig, Walter

196

Sandy beaches contamination by arsenic, a result of nearshore sediment diagenesis and transport (Brazilian coastline)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We studied the distribution of As, Fe, Ca and Al in beach sands and near-shore surface sediments along the Brazilian coast from the equatorial zone to Rio de Janeiro state. High concentrations of As (up to 120 mg kg-1) exceeding the environmentally acceptable thresholds were found in the beach sands and near-shore surface sediment in several segments of the studied coast. That increased from north to south. The significant positive correlation (R2 = 0.58) between As and calcium carbonate in the beach sands corroborated the hypothesis that calcareous bioclasts participate in metalloid retention and its accumulation in beach sediments. Most likely, enrichment of As occurs in the oxic horizon of sediments caused by the diagenetic redistribution of various elements. Enrichment of As in beach sands occurs in the coast of Bahia and Espirito Santo states. That is facilitated by clastic material of calcareous algae.

Mirlean, N.; Garcia, F.; Baisch, P.; Quintana, G. C.; Agnes, F.

2013-12-01

197

Techniques developed for geologic analysis of hyperspectral data applied to near-shore hyperspectral ocean data  

SciTech Connect

Imaging spectrometers or {open_quotes}Hyperspectral Sensors{close_quotes} simultaneously collect spectral data as both images and as individual spectra. A broad range of techniques have been examined, refined, and put into operational practice for analysis of geologic problems. This paper describes a successful geologic case history using an end-to-end approach on Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data, including data calibration to reflectance, use of a linear transformation to minimize noise and determine data dimensionality, location of the most spectrally pure pixels, extraction of end member spectra, and spatial mapping of specific end members. Several supporting case studies using AVIRIS data of near-shore marine environments demonstrate the viability of these methods for studying the coastal zone. The methods described provide a starting point for image segmentation, material identification, and mapping of marine processes in the near-shore environment.

Kruse, F.A. [Analytical Imaging and Geophysics LLC, Boulder, CO (United States); Richardson, L.L. [Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States); Ambrosia, V.G. [JCWS, Inc., Moffett Field, CA (United States)

1997-06-01

198

Nearshore Satellite Data as Relative Indicators of Intertidal Organism Physiological Stress  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The physiological performance of intertidal and shallow subtidal invertebrates and algae is significantly affected by water temperature, and so the ability to measure and model onshore water temperatures is critical for ecological and biogeographic studies. Because of the localized influences of processes such as upwelling, mixing, and surface heating from solar radiation, nearshore water temperatures can differ from those measured directly offshore by buoys and satellites. It remains an open question what the magnitude of the differences in these temperatures are, and whether "large pixel" measurements can serve as an effective proxy for onshore processes, particularly when extrapolating from laboratory physiological studies to field conditions. We compared 9 years of nearshore (~10km) MODIS (Terra and Aqua overpasses) SST data against in situ measurements of water temperature conducted at two intertidal sites in central Oregon- Boiler Bay and Strawberry Hill. We collapsed data into increasingly longer temporal averages to address the correlation and absolute differences between onshore and nearshore temperatures over daily, weekly and monthly timescales. Results indicate that nearshore SST is a reasonable proxy for onshore water temperature, and that the strength of the correlation increases with decreasing temporal resolution. Correlations between differences in maxima are highest, followed by average and minima, and were lower at a site with regular upwelling. While average differences ranged from ~0.199-1.353°C, absolute differences across time scales were ~0.446-6.906°C, and were highest for cold temperatures. The results suggest that, at least at these two sites, SST can be used as a relative proxy for general trends only, especially over longer time scales.

Matzelle, A.; Helmuth, B.; Lakshmi, V.

2011-12-01

199

Carolinas Coastal Change Processes Project data report for nearshore observations at Cape Hatteras, North Carolina  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An oceanographic field study conducted in February 2010 investigated processes that control nearshore flow and sediment transport dynamics at Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. This report describes the project background, field program, instrumentation setup, and locations of the sensor deployments. The data collected, and supporting meteorological and streamflow observations, are presented as time-series plots for data visualization. Additionally, the data are available as part of this report.

Armstrong, Brandy N.; Warner, John C.; Voulgaris, George; List, Jeffrey H.; Thieler, Robert; Martini, Marinna A.; Montgomery, Ellyn T.; McNinch, Jesse E.; Book, Jeffrey W.; Haas, Kevin

2013-01-01

200

The seasonal cycle of phytoplankton, macronutrients, and the microbial community in a nearshore Antarctic marine ecosystem  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seawater chlorophyll a concentration (size-fractionated at 20, 2, and 0.2 pm) and temperature have been measured weekly from December 1988 to August 1994 at a nearshore shallow-water station at Signy Island in the maritime Antarctic. Macronutrients (N, P, Si) were measured monthly, and the microbial community enumerated during a 15-month period. The duration of winter sea-ice, summer seawater temperature, and

Andrew Clarke; Raymond J. G. Leakey

201

Porewater acid\\/base chemistry in near-shore regions of an acidic lake  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sediment porewaters in the near-shore region (within 1 m of the shoreline) of an acidic lake (Dart's Lake) were monitored during the summer of 1983 to investigate whether spatial variations in porewater acid\\/base chemistry were significant in this region of the lake. Previous investigations of Dart's Lake porewaters have indicated that within deeper waters (>2m depth), sediment porewaters are elevated

Garry C. Schafran; Charles T. Driscoll

1990-01-01

202

Environmental characterization of the north Aleutian shelf nearshore region: characterization, processes, and vulnerability to development  

SciTech Connect

The specific objectives of the study are as follows: Describe the present status of knowledge concerning the biotic communities and organic productivity of the nearshore zone along the entire North Aleutian Basin lease area, (Unimak Pass to Cape Newenham), with particular reference to the area adjacent to Izembek Lagoon; Describe the ecological processes which might be causing the observed distributions, densities, and interrelationships; Discuss potential vulnerability of this region to impacts from offshore oil and gas development; Identify significant data and information needs.

Pace, S.

1984-03-01

203

Health evaluation of western arctic King Eiders (Somateria spectabilis).  

PubMed

The western arctic population of King Eiders (Somateria spectabilis) has declined by >50% in recent years. A health assessment was conducted for adult King Eiders breeding on the north slope of Alaska, USA, to evaluate body condition (n=90, 2002-2006) and baseline biochemical and hematologic values (n=20-30, 2005-2006). Body condition for males and females was excellent. Total protein, calcium, alkaline phosphatase, amylase, and globulin were significantly higher in females than in males, likely because of differences in reproductive physiology. These baseline health data can be used to promote conservation of King Eiders and other closely related species of concern. PMID:20966282

Scott, Cheryl A; Mazet, Jonna A K; Powell, Abby N

2010-10-01

204

The Contribution of Nearshore Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs) to Food Security and Livelihoods in Solomon Islands  

PubMed Central

Fish aggregating devices, or FADs, are used widely in developing countries to concentrate pelagic fish, making them easier to catch. Nearshore FADs anchored close to the coast allow access for rural communities, but despite their popularity among policy makers, there is a dearth of empirical analysis of their contributions to the supply of fish and to fisheries management. In this paper we demonstrate that nearshore FADs increased the supply of fish to four communities in Solomon Islands. Estimated total annual fish catch ranged from 4300 to 12 000 kg across the study villages, with nearshore FADs contributing up to 45% of the catch. While it is clear that FADs increased the supply of fish, FAD catch rates were not consistently higher than other fishing grounds. Villages with limited access to diverse or productive fishing grounds seemingly utilized FADs to better effect. Villagers believed FADs increased household income and nutrition, as well as providing a source of fish for community events. FADs were also perceived to increase intra-household conflict and reduce fishers' participation in community activities. FADs need to be placed within a broader rural development context and treated as another component in the diversified livelihoods of rural people; as with other livelihood options they bring trade-offs and risks. PMID:25513808

Albert, Joelle A.; Beare, Doug; Schwarz, Anne-Maree; Albert, Simon; Warren, Regon; Teri, James; Siota, Faye; Andrew, Neil L.

2014-01-01

205

Terrestrial and marine trophic pathways support young-of-year growth in a nearshore Arctic fish  

USGS Publications Warehouse

River discharge supplies nearshore communities with a terrestrial carbon source that is often reflected in invertebrate and fish consumers. Recent studies in the Beaufort Sea have documented widespread terrestrial carbon use among invertebrates, but only limited use among nearshore fish consumers. Here, we examine the carbon source and diet of rapidly growing young-of-year Arctic cisco (Coregonus autumnalis) using stable isotope values (?13C and ?15N) from muscle and diet analysis (stomach contents) during a critical and previously unsampled life stage. Stable isotope values (?15N and ?13C) may differentiate between terrestrial and marine sources and integrate over longer time frames (weeks). Diet analysis provides species-specific information, but only from recent foraging (days). Average ?13C for all individuals was ?25.7 ‰, with the smallest individuals possessing significantly depleted ?13C values indicative of a stronger reliance of terrestrial carbon sources as compared to larger individuals. Average ?15N for all individuals was 10.4 ‰, with little variation among individuals. As fish length increased, the proportion of offshore Calanus prey and neritic Mysis prey increased. Rapid young-of-year growth in Arctic cisco appears to use terrestrial carbon sources obtained by consuming a mixture of neritic and offshore zooplankton. Shifts in the magnitude or phenology of river discharge and the delivery of terrestrial carbon may alter the ecology of nearshore fish consumers.

von Biela, Vanessa R.; Zimmerman, Christian E.; Cohn, Brian R.; Welker, Jeffrey M.

2013-01-01

206

A user-friendly quantitative approach to classifying nearshore marine habitats along a heterogeneous coast  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A scheme, which can be readily used by fisheries and environmental managers and ecologists, has been developed for quantitatively classifying the different habitats found in nearshore marine waters along the heterogeneous lower west coast of Australia. Initially, 25 beach sites, representing a wide range of nearshore environments, were separated into six a priori habitat types on the basis of characteristics that could readily be observed and were likely to influence the extent to which a particular (fish) species occupies a particular habitat. Focus was thus placed on such features as the degree of exposure to wave activity and whether or not seagrass and/or reefs were present in the nearshore vicinity. Subsequently, quantitative data for 27 environmental variables, considered likely to characterise the six habitat types, were obtained for each of the 25 sites from readily accessible sources. When the latter data were subjected to multidimensional scaling (MDS) ordination, the points for the sites representing only three of those six habitat types formed discrete groups. The BVSTEP routine in the PRIMER v5.0 statistical package (Clarke & Gorley, Primer v5.0: User Manual/Tutorial, Primer-E Ltd, Plymouth, 2001) was thus used to select a subset of the 27 environmental variables that would provide a better resolution of the six a priori habitat types. This process involved matching the distance matrix constructed from the quantitative environmental data with a matrix constructed from scored data that reflected the criteria for the initial a priori classification scheme. A subset of seven environmental variables gave the best correlation between the two matrices ( ?=0.823), and thus provided the optimal set of quantitative data for discriminating between the six a priori habitat types. These variables comprised both the direct and north-westerly fetches, the minimum distance from the shoreline to the 2 m depth contour, the distance from the shoreline to the first offshore reef chain along a south-westerly transect, and the relative contributions of bare sand, subtidal reef and seagrass. Data for these characteristics at any nearshore site along the coastline can readily be recorded by managers and ecologists and subjected to the 'nearest-replicate' classification procedure developed in this study to ascertain the habitat type to which that site should be assigned. Current work is using MDS ordination, in conjunction with associated statistical tests and the BVSTEP routine, to elucidate the extent to which the compositions of assemblages of fish, benthic macroinvertebrates, meiofauna and zooplankton in nearshore waters along the lower west coast of Australia are related to habitat type(s).

Valesini, F. J.; Clarke, K. R.; Eliot, I.; Potter, I. C.

2003-05-01

207

The Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystems Project: Inception, Objectives,  

E-print Network

administrative study involving extensive and intensive collaboration between Forest Service managers Ecosystems Project involves a formal administrative study and associated research, with joint leadershipThe Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystems Project: Inception, Objectives, and Progress1 Jared

Standiford, Richard B.

208

The Martin Luther King, Jr. Research and Education Institute  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Stanford University has been the home of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Papers Project for over twenty years, and they also have the Martin Luther King, Jr. Research and Education Institute. On their website, visitors can learn about their work, which includes sponsoring conferences, providing research fellowships, and developing the Liberation curriculum for educators interested in nonviolent movements. The Liberation Curriculum section is actually a fine place to start exploring the site, as it contains lesson plans and other online resources (such as transcripts of Kingâ??s speeches) that will assist teachers in crafting valuable classroom experiences. Visitors will also want to make sure and visit the King Papers Project section of the site as well. Here they can find transcripts of some of King's most important works and a number of audio recordings of his sermons and speeches.

209

James Clerk Maxwell's inaugural lecture at King's College London  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this inaugural lecture given at King's College London in 1871, James Clerk Maxwell (1831-79) reviews the current state of Natural Philosophy (Mechanics and Physics) and lays the foundation for the development of electromagnetic field theory.(AIP)

James C. Maxwell

1979-01-01

210

SUMMER TRAINING REPORT KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM &  

E-print Network

SUMMER TRAINING REPORT KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM & MINERALS COLLEGE OF SCIENCE ENGINEERING ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT Summer Training Report by Ahmed ALgahtani 200651040 Advisor Dr. Ahmed Yamani #12;SUMMER TRAINING REPORT INTRODUCTION: The college of science engineering gives a chance

Al-Ghadhban, Samir

211

KinG: a database of protein kinases in genomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The KinG database is a comprehensive collection of serine\\/threonine\\/tyrosine-specific kinases and their homologues identified in various completed genomes using sequence and profile search methods. The database hosted at http:\\/\\/hodgkin. mbu.iisc.ernet.in\\/~king provides the amino acid sequences, functional domain assignments and classification of gene products containing protein kinase domains. A search tool enabling the retrieval of protein kinases with specified subfamily and

A. Krupa; K. R. Abhinandan; N. Srinivasan

2004-01-01

212

Cloning and purification of ?-neurotoxins from king cobra ( Ophiophagus hannah)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thirteen complete and three partial cDNA sequences were cloned from the constructed king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom gland cDNA library. Phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences of king cobra with those from other snake venoms revealed that obtained cDNAs are highly homologous to snake venom ?-neurotoxins. Alignment of deduced mature peptide sequences of the obtained clones with those of other reported

Ying-Ying He; Wei-Hui Lee; Yun Zhang

2004-01-01

213

Balance : Lancaster County's tragedy  

E-print Network

Lancaster County, Pennsylvania residents are proud of their agricultural heritage. They do not want to see their farmland disappear. But the County continues to be developed into residential subdivisions. This thesis ...

Gingrich, Valerie (Valerie J.)

2007-01-01

214

Percent Uninsured by County  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a county by county visualization of the percentage of residents that are uninsured. The data are from a set available here: http://www-958.ibm.com/software/data/cognos/manyeyes/datasets/percent-uninsured-by-county/versions/1

Manyeyes

215

Nearshore larval retention in a region of strong upwelling and recruitment limitation.  

PubMed

The ability of miniscule larvae to control their fate and replenish populations in dynamic marine environments has been a long-running topic of debate of central importance for managing resources and understanding the ecology and evolution of life in the sea. Larvae are considered to be highly susceptible to offshore transport in productive upwelling regions, thereby increasing dispersal, limiting onshore recruitment, and reducing the intensity of community interactions. We show that 45 species of nearshore crustaceans were not transported far offshore in a recruitment-limited region characterized by strong upwelling. To the contrary, 92% of these larvae remained within 6 km from shore in high densities throughout development along two transects sampled four times during the peak upwelling season. Larvae of most species remained nearshore by remaining below a shallow Ekman layer of seaward-flowing surface waters throughout development. Larvae of other species migrated farther offshore by occurring closer to the surface early in development. Postlarvae evidently returned to nearshore adult habitats either by descending to shoreward-flowing upwelled waters or rising to the sea surface where they can be transported shoreward by wind relaxation events or internal waves. Thus wind-driven offshore transport should not limit recruitment, even in strong upwelling regions, and larvae are more likely to recruit closer to natal populations than is widely believed. This study poses a new challenge to determine the true cause and extent of recruitment limitation for a more diverse array of species along upwelling coasts, and thus to further advance our understanding of the connectivity, dynamics, and structure of coastal populations. PMID:20120816

Morgan, Steven G; Fisher, Jennifer L; Miller, Seth H; McAfee, Skyli T; Largier, John L

2009-12-01

216

Seabird use of discards from a nearshore shrimp fishery in the South Atlantic Bight, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Shrimp trawling is common throughout the southeastern and Gulf of Mexico coasts of the USA and is the primary contributor to fisheries discards in these regions. Tens of thousands of nearshore seabirds nest near shrimp trawling grounds in the USA, but to date, there has been no assessment of the relationship between seabirds and shrimp trawlers. We examined the taxonomic composition of bycatch, rate at which seabirds scavenged bycatch, and energy density of discarded bycatch in a nearshore commercial shrimp fishery. Bycatch was primarily comprised of demersal fish that are not typically accessible to the plunge-diving and surface-feeding seabirds that occur in the area. Hence, seabird diets in the region appear to be broadened taxonomically by the availability of discards. Results from discard experiments indicated that 70% of the nearly 5,500 items discarded by hand were scavenged by seabirds and that the fate of a discarded item was most strongly predicted by its taxonomic order. Laughing gulls scavenged the greatest proportion of discards, although brown pelicans were the only species to scavenge more discards than predicted based upon their abundance. Because this is the first such study in the region, it is difficult to ascertain the extent or intensity of the impact that discards have on nearshore seabirds. Nonetheless, our results suggest that it will be difficult for managers to clearly understand fluctuations in local seabird population dynamics without first understanding the extent to which these species rely upon discards. This may be especially problematic in situations where seabird populations are recovering following natural or anthropogenic stressors. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag.

Jodice, P.G.R.; Wickliffe, L.C.; Sachs, E.B.

2011-01-01

217

Modeling near-shore subsea permafrost degradation in the Laptev Sea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most subsea permafrost in the Arctic Ocean shelf regions is relict terrestrial permafrost that was inundated by sea water by rising sea levels after the last glacial period. Permafrost usually degrades offshore under the influence of sea-bottom temperatures, salt infiltration and a wide range of near-shore coastal processes. Subsea permafrost instability has important potential implications due to the release of methane to the atmosphere and by increasing coastal erosion rates. Our objectives are to employ meso-scale numerical calculations (from meter to kilometer, 1000s of years) in connection with borehole data from the Laptev Sea to model the transition of permafrost from onshore to offshore conditions. The goal is to identify key processes driving permafrost degradation in the near-shore zone of the shelf. The heat transfer equation is solved numerically taking into account freeze-thaw processes in a three-phase heat capacity / conductivity model. Sediment composition and initial temperature profiles are derived from field and laboratory analysis of the borehole data. Our approach neglects some processes such as solute diffusion, but includes the effect of pore water salinity on phase state and thermal properties. Measured temperature profiles are compared to the modeled subsea soil temperature evolution over the course of the 2500 year transgression of the farthest offshore borehole in the transect. The degradation of the ice-bearing permafrost table or thaw depth is of special interest due to its direct relation to sediment stability and as the most readily discernible feature in the field observations. Temperature profiles generally agree well with model calculations reproducing the almost isothermal permafrost profiles currently observed, but show more variation potentially partially caused by drilling disturbances. The thaw depth is mainly driven by salt contamination and infiltration into deeper pore water with time. Complicating near-shore processes discussed include the occurrence of bottom-fast sea ice and marine sedimentation rates.

Kneier, F.; Langer, M.; Overduin, P. P.

2012-12-01

218

NEARSHORE SAND SOURCES FOR AMERICAN SAMOA: AN ALTERNATIVE TO USING BEACH SAND.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a combination of geophysical techniques, in situ observations, and sampling by scuba divers, we investigated along the south shore of Tutuila Island, American Samoa, for nearshore sand deposits. To minimize the impact of future sand dredging on the island's littoral sediments, the search took place in a narrow zone between the outside of the fringing reef and the 30-m bathymetric contour. Because the sand will be used by the Samoans in a variety of ways, an area high in siliciclastic sand - Nua-Se'etaga Bay - and two areas containing only carbonate sand - Faga'itua Bay and Nafanua Bank - were inspected in detail. Results of the exploration program are discussed.

Dingler, John R.; Reiss, Thomas E.

1987-01-01

219

Uranium in the Near-shore Aquatic Food Chain: Studies on Periphyton and Asian Clams  

SciTech Connect

The benthic aquatic organisms in the near-shore environment of the Columbia River are the first biological receptors that can be exposed to groundwater contaminants coming from the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The primary contaminant of concern in the former nuclear fuels processing area at the Site, known as the 300 Area, is uranium. Currently, there are no national clean up criteria for uranium and ecological receptors. This report summarizes efforts to characterize biological uptake of uranium in the food chain of the benthic aquatic organisms and provide information to be used in future assessments of uranium and the ecosystem.

Bunn, Amoret L.; Miley, Terri B.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Brandt, Charles A.; Napier, Bruce A.

2007-12-31

220

Nearshore habitat and fish community associations of coaster brook trout in Isle Royale, Lake Superior  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We characterized the nearshore habitat and fish community composition of approximately 300 km of shoreline within and adjacent to the major embayments of Isle Royale, Lake Superior. Sampling yielded 17 species, of which 12 were widespread and represented a common element of the Lake Superior fish community, including cisco Coregonus artedi, lake whitefish C. clupeaformis, round whitefish Prosopium cylindraceum, lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax, lake chub Couesius plumbeus, longnose sucker Catostomus catostomus, white sucker C. commersonii, trout-perch Percopsis omiscomaycus, ninespine stickleback Pungitius pungitius, burbot Lota lota, and slimy sculpin Cottus cognatus. The presence of brook trout S. fontinalis in an embayment was associated with the common species of the Isle Royale nearshore fish community, particularly cisco, longnose sucker, and round whitefish. However, brook trout were present in only five embayments and were common only in Tobin Harbor. Most Isle Royale embayments had broadly overlapping ranges of nearshore habitats. Within embayments, fish were distributed along a habitat gradient from less-protected rocky habitat near the mouth to highly protected habitat with mixed and finer substrates at the head. Embayments with brook trout had greater mean protection from the open lake, greater variation in depth, greater mean cover, and higher mean frequencies of large substrates (cobble, boulder, and bedrock). Within those embayments, brook trout were associated with habitat patches with higher mean frequencies of small substrates (particularly sand and coarse gravel). Within Tobin Harbor, brook trout were associated with midembayment habitat and species assemblages, especially those locations with a mixture of sand, gravel, and cobble substrates, an absence of bedrock, and the presence of round whitefish, white sucker, and trout-perch. Comparison of embayments with the model, Tobin Harbor, showed that six embayments without brook trout had very similar arrays of habitat. However, four embayments with brook trout had relatively different arrays of habitat from Tobin Harbor. These results suggest that there is potential for further recovery of brook trout populations across Isle Royale nearshore habitats. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

Gorman, O.T.; Moore, S.A.; Carlson, A.J.; Quinlan, H.R.

2008-01-01

221

Ecological monitoring for assessing the state of the nearshore and open waters of the Great Lakes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement stipulates that the Governments of Canada and the United States are responsible for restoring and maintaining the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the waters of the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem. Due to varying mandates and areas of expertise, monitoring to assess progress towards this objective is conducted by a multitude of Canadian and U.S. federal and provincial/state agencies, in cooperation with academia and regional authorities. This paper highlights selected long-term monitoring programs and discusses a number of documented ecological changes that indicate the present state of the open and nearshore waters of the Great Lakes.

Neilson, Melanie A.; Painter, D. Scott; Warren, Glenn; Hites, Ronald A.; Basu, Ilora; Weseloh, D.V. Chip; Whittle, D. Michael; Christie, Gavin; Barbiero, Richard; Tuchman, Marc; Johannsson, Ora E.; Nalepa, Thomas F.; Edsall, Thomas A.; Fleischer, Guy; Bronte, Charles; Smith, Stephen B.; Baumann, Paul C.

2003-01-01

222

Latitudinal Discontinuity in Thermal Conditions along the Nearshore of Central-Northern Chile  

PubMed Central

Over the past decade, evidence of abrupt latitudinal changes in the dynamics, structure and genetic variability of intertidal and subtidal benthic communities along central-northern Chile has been found consistently at 30–32°S. Changes in the advective and thermal environment in nearshore waters have been inferred from ecological patterns, since analyses of in situ physical data have thus far been missing. Here we analyze a unique set of shoreline temperature data, gathered over 4–10 years at 15 sites between 28–35°S, and combine it with satellite-derived winds and sea surface temperatures to investigate the latitudinal transition in nearshore oceanographic conditions suggested by recent ecological studies. Our results show a marked transition in thermal conditions at 30–31°S, superimposed on a broad latitudinal trend, and small-scale structures associated with cape-and-bay topography. The seasonal cycle dominated temperature variability throughout the region, but its relative importance decreased abruptly south of 30–31°S, as variability at synoptic and intra-seasonal scales became more important. The response of shoreline temperatures to meridional wind stress also changed abruptly at the transition, leading to a sharp drop in the occurrence of low-temperature waters at northern sites, and a concurrent decrease in corticated algal biomass. Together, these results suggest a limitation of nitrate availability in nearshore waters north of the transition. The localized alongshore change results from the interaction of latitudinal trends (e.g., wind stress, surface warming, inertial period) with a major headland-bay system (Punta Lengua de Vaca at 30.25°S), which juxtaposes a southern stretch of coast characterized by upwelling with a northern stretch of coast characterized by warm surface waters and stratification. This transition likely generates a number of latitude-dependent controls on ecological processes in the nearshore that can explain species-specific effects, and add strength to the suggestion of an oceanography-driven, major spatial transition in coastal communities at 30–31°S. PMID:25334020

Tapia, Fabian J.; Largier, John L.; Castillo, Manuel; Wieters, Evie A.; Navarrete, Sergio A.

2014-01-01

223

Survey of radiological contaminants in the near-shore environment at the Hanford Site 100-N Area reactor  

SciTech Connect

Past operations at the Hanford Site 100-N Area reactor resulted in the release of radiological contaminants to the soil column, local groundwater, and ultimately to the near-shore environment of the Columbia River. In September 1997, the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) and the Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) initiated a special study of the near-shore vicinity at the Hanford Site`s retired 100-N Area reactor. Environmental samples were collected and analyzed for radiological contaminants ({sup 3}H, {sup 90}Sr, and gamma/ emitters), with both the WDOH and SESP analyzing a portion of the samples. Samples of river water, sediment, riverbank springs, periphyton, milfoil, flying insects, clam shells, and reed canary grass were collected. External exposure rates were also measured for the near-shore environment in the vicinity of the 100-N Area. In addition, samples were collected at background locations above Vernita Bridge.

Van Verst, S.P.; Albin, C.L. [Washington State Dept. of Health, Olympia, WA (United States); Patton, G.W.; Blanton, M.L.; Poston, T.M.; Cooper, A.T.; Antonio, E.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1998-09-01

224

Variations in Nearshore Bar Morphology: Implications for Rip Current Development at Pensacola Beach, Florida from 1951 to 2004  

E-print Network

wave set-up landward of the breaking zone. This creates a longshore pressure gradient that generates a wave-induced momentum flux that funnels water through breaks or low points in the nearshore bars, also termed radiation stress (Longuet-Higgins... the wave energy dissipated on the inner bar creating greater wave set-up (Longuet-Higgins and Stewart, 1964) and therefore an increased offshore transport rate that cause the next nearshore bar in the sequence to migrate offshore at an increased rate...

Barrett, Gemma Elizabeth

2012-10-19

225

Queen Conch (Strombus gigas) Testis Regresses during the Reproductive Season at Nearshore Sites in the Florida Keys  

PubMed Central

Background Queen conch (Strombus gigas) reproduction is inhibited in nearshore areas of the Florida Keys, relative to the offshore environment where conchs reproduce successfully. Nearshore reproductive failure is possibly a result of exposure to environmental factors, including heavy metals, which are likely to accumulate close to shore. Metals such as Cu and Zn are detrimental to reproduction in many mollusks. Methodology/Principal Findings Histology shows gonadal atrophy in nearshore conchs as compared to reproductively healthy offshore conchs. In order to determine molecular mechanisms leading to tissue changes and reproductive failure, a microarray was developed. A normalized cDNA library for queen conch was constructed and sequenced using the 454 Life Sciences GS-FLX pyrosequencer, producing 27,723 assembled contigs and 7,740 annotated transcript sequences. The resulting sequences were used to design the microarray. Microarray analysis of conch testis indicated differential regulation of 255 genes (p<0.01) in nearshore conch, relative to offshore. Changes in expression for three of four transcripts of interest were confirmed using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis indicated changes in biological processes: respiratory chain (GO:0015992), spermatogenesis (GO:0007283), small GTPase-mediated signal transduction (GO:0007264), and others. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis indicated that Zn and possibly Cu were elevated in some nearshore conch tissues. Conclusions/Significance Congruence between testis histology and microarray data suggests that nearshore conch testes regress during the reproductive season, while offshore conch testes develop normally. Possible mechanisms underlying the testis regression observed in queen conch in the nearshore Florida Keys include a disruption of small GTPase (Ras)-mediated signaling in testis development. Additionally, elevated tissue levels of Cu (34.77 ng/mg in testis) and Zn (831.85 ng/mg in digestive gland, 83.96 ng/mg in testis) nearshore are similar to reported levels resulting in reproductive inhibition in other gastropods, indicating that these metals possibly contribute to NS conch reproductive failure. PMID:20856805

Spade, Daniel J.; Griffitt, Robert J.; Liu, Li; Brown-Peterson, Nancy J.; Kroll, Kevin J.; Feswick, April; Glazer, Robert A.; Barber, David S.; Denslow, Nancy D.

2010-01-01

226

Physical, chemical, and biological aspects of the Duwamish River Estuary, King County, Washington, 1963-67  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report describes the significant results to 1967 of a comprehensive study that began in 1963 to evaluate what changes take place in an estuary as the loads .of raw and partially treated industrial and municipal wastes are replaced by effluent from a secondary treatment plant. The study area is the Duwamish River estuary, about 18.3 river kilometers long. At mean sea level the estuary has a water-surface area of about 1 square mile and a mean width of 440 feet. At the lowest and highest recorded tides, the volume of the estuary is about 205 and 592 million cubic feet, respectively. The estuary is well stratified (salt-wedge type) at fresh-water inflows greater than 1,000 cfs (cubic feet per second), but when inflow rates are less than 1,000 cfs the lower 5.6 kilometers of the estuary grades into the partly mixed type. The crosschannel salinity distribution is uniform for a given location and depth. Salinity migration is controlled by tides and fresh-water inflow. At fresh-water inflow rates greater than 1,000 cfs, water in the upper 8.4 kilometers of the estuary is always fresh regardless of tide. At inflow rates less than 600 cfs and tide heights greater than 10 feet; some salinity has been detected 16.1 kilometers above the mouth of the estuary. Studies using a fluorescent dye show that virtually no downward mixing into the salt wedge occurs; soluble pollutants introduced at the upper end of the estuary stay in the surface layer (5-15 ft thick). On the basis of dye studies when fresh-water inflow is less than 400 cfs, it is estimated that less than 10 percent of a pollutant will remain in the estuary a minimum of 7 days. Longitudinal dispersion coefficients for the surface layer have been determined to be on the order of 100-400 square feet per second. Four water-quality stations automatically monitor DO (dissolved oxygen), water temperature, pH, and specific conductance; at one station solar radiation also is measured. DO concentration in the surface layer decreases almost linearly in a downstream direction. Minimum DO concentration in the surface layer is usually greater than 4 rag/1 (milligrams per liter). The smallest DO values are consistently recorded in the bottom layer at the station 7.7 kilometers above the mouth; monthly means of less than 3 mg/1 of DO have occurred at this point. Manual sampling shows that the DO sag in the bottom layer oscillates between 7.7 and 10.4 kilometers above the mouth of the estuary. Multiple-regression analysis shows that the surface DO content can be estimated from the fresh-water inflow and water temperature. Tidal exchange and fresh-water inflow indirectly control the bottom DO content. Information available from previous studies failed to indicate a progressive decrease in DO content during the period 1949-56, but data from the present study suggest a slight general decrease in the annual minimum DO concentrations in both the upper and lower layers. Average nitrate concentration in fresh water at station 16.2 has increased progressively since 1964, by amounts greater than those which can be attributed to the Renton Treatment Plant, 4.3 kilometers upstream from station 16.2. The BOD (biochemical oxygen demand) in both surface and bottom layers is generally less than 4 rag/1 of oxygen, but values greater than 6 rag/1 have been measured during a period of phytoplankton bloom. Phytoplankton blooms can occur during periods of minimum tidal exchange and fresh-water inflows of less than 300 cfs if solar radiation and water temperature are optimum. Nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus compounds) do not control the occurrence of a bloom, because sufficient quantities of these nutrients are always present. Nutrients in the treated effluent may increase the biomass of the bloom. Trace-element studies have not defined any role that these elements may play in algal growth. The inflowing fresh water contains principally calcium and bicarbonate and has a dissolved-solids content ra

Santos, John F.; Stoner, J.D.

1972-01-01

227

Evaluation of seepage from Chester Morse Lake and Masonry Pool, King County, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Hydrologic data collected in the Cedar and Snoqualmie River basins on the west slope of the Cascade Range have been analyzed to determine the amount of water lost by seepage from Chester Morse Lake and Masonry Pool and the. consequent gain by seepage to the Cedar and South Fork Snoqualmie Rivers. For water years 1957-64, average losses were about 220 cfs (cubic feet per second) while average gains were about 180 cfs in the Cedar River and 50 cfs in the South Fork Snoqualmie River. Streamflow and precipitation data for water years 1908-26 and 1930-F2 indicate that a change in runoff regimen occurred in Cedar and South Fork Snoqualmie Rivers after the Boxley Creek washout in December 1918. For water years 1919-26 and 1930-32, the flow of Cedar River near Landsburg averaged about 80 cfs less than it would have if the washout had not occurred. In contrast, the flow of South Fork Snoqualmie River at North Bend averaged about 60 cfs more than it would have.

Hidaka, F.T.; Garrett, Arthur Angus

1967-01-01

228

AIR POLLUTION, POLLENS AND RESPIRATORY ADMISSIONS FOR CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE IN KING COUNTY. (R827355)  

EPA Science Inventory

The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

229

AIR POLLUTION, POLLENS, AND ADMISSIONS FOR CHRONIC RESPIRATORY DISEASE IN KING COUNTY, WASHINGTON. (R825266)  

EPA Science Inventory

The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

230

Geologic Map of the Poverty Bay 7.5' quadrangle, King and Pierce counties, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Poverty Bay quadrangle lies near the center of the region?s intensively developing urban core. Less than 20 km north lies the city of Seattle; downtown Tacoma lies just southwest of the quadrangle. The map area expresses much of the tremendous range of Quaternary environments and deposits found throughout the central Puget Lowland. Much of the ground surface is mantled by a rolling surface of glacial till deposited during the last occupation of the Puget Lowland by a great continental ice sheet about 14,000 years ago. A complex sequence of older unconsolidated sediments extends far below sea level across most of the quadrangle, with no bedrock exposures at all.

Booth, Derek B.; Waldron, H.H.; Troost, K.G.

2004-01-01

231

Geology and metallization of the White River Area, King and Pierce Counties, Washington  

SciTech Connect

Bedrock of the White River area is dominated by Miocene age volcanics of andesite to rhyolite composition, which may be in part coeval with plutonic phases of the nearby 26 - 14 m.y. Tatoosh batholith. These volcanic rocks host two spatially distinct and gold-bearing epithermal deposits of the acid-sulfate type that are structurally, temporally, and genetically related to the formation and resurgent magmatic activity at the margin of an early Miocene caldera (22.6 - 19.1 m.y.). The age of hydrothermal activity is 20.4 +/- 0.1 m.y. based on UAr/TZAr analysis of hypogene alunite from the mineralized zone. Hydrothermal alteration and metallization of both deposits is chemically and mineralogically similar and consists of a central core of pervasive silicification that grades outward into zones of advanced argillic, argillic, and propylitic alteration. The largest of the two target areas is defined by a silica capping. Sulfur isotope analyses of cogenetic alunite-pyrite-enargite demonstrate a (34)S of +28.8 per thousand for the alunite-pyrite mineral pair. This large fractionation corroborates other field and mineralogic evidence for the hypogene origin of the alunite, and provides a geologically reasonable isotopic temperature estimate of 190 C for this epithermal deposit. Fold was introduced in at least 3 distinct episodes of structural-hydrothermal activity. The highest concentration of gold is within a zone measuring 1600 by 300-600 feet, and is localized in parts of the similar capping that contain outcrops of matrix-supported explosion breccias and veins having anomalous concentrations of up to 480 ppb Au, 13.7 ppm Ag, 1900 ppm As, 213 ppm Sb, 7.5 ppm Hg, and 10 ppm Mo.

McCulla, M.S.

1986-01-01

232

Environmental features, general hydrology, and external sources of nutrients affecting Wilderness Lake, King County, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A water budget prepared for Wilderness Lake, a candidate for lake-quality restoration, indicates that of the 530 acre-feet of water that enters the lake each year, 170 acre-feet is from precipitation and 360 acre-feet is from groundwater inflow. An equal amount leaves the lake, and of this, 380 acre-feet is by surface runoff, 8 acre-feet is by groundwater seepage, and 140 acre-feet is by evaporation. Based on these amounts of inflow and outflow, the theoretical water-renewal time of the lake is calculated to be 2.6 years. The annual contributions of nitrogen and phosphorus to the lake from precipitation, natural ground water, and septic-tank leachate are about 920 kilograms nitrogen and 38 kilograms phosphorus. Nitrogen and phosphorus contributions from other sources were not assessed but could be significant. (Woodard-USGS)

Dion, N.P.

1979-01-01

233

Determination of dominant nearshore hydrodynamic forcing adjacent to a tidal inlet and submerged artificial reef  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An 18 month field monitoring program was conducted to determine the impact of a submerged narrow crested artificial reef, located seaward of the surf zone and immediately adjacent to a tidal inlet, on nearshore beach profile evolution. Observed structure settlement and scour zones adjacent to the structure are analyzed though the use of wind, wave, current, and tidal measurements obtained over two independent time periods, each of one week duration. Complex interactions of wind, wave, and tidal elevation were found to generate a flood dominated current structure in the vicinity of the reef. Due to the complexity of the forcing mechanisms a qualitative analysis of the impact of the structure on nearshore hydrodynamics was performed. The structure was found to reduce the magnitude of the near bottom cross-shore currents. However, structure-induced vertical currents combined with flood dominant tidal currents provides a mechanism to initiate near-structure scour and settlement. In an effort to quantitatively analyze the fluid-structure interactions, a methodology was developed to determine the relative magnitudes of the measured wind, wave, and tidal forcings. The frequency distribution of energy density in the tidal elevation and current records provides insight into nonlinear interactions present in the data set. Decomposing the record into independent forcing terms allowed the development of an empirical model which indicates that linear and nonlinear interactions between the wave amplitude and water depth were found to dominate the forcing of the observed currents.

Herrington, Thomas Oliver, Jr.

234

Monitoring and modeling nearshore dredge disposal for indirect beach nourishment, Ocean Beach, San Francisco  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Nearshore dredge disposal was performed during the summer of 2005 at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA, a high energy tidal and wave environment. This trial run was an attempt to provide a buffer to a reach of coastline where wave attack during the winter months has had a severe impact on existing sewage infrastructure. Although the subsequent beach response was inconclusive, after one year the peak of the disposal mound had migrated ~100 m toward the shore, providing evidence that annual dredge disposal at this site could be beneficial over the long-term by at the very least providing: 1) additional wave dissipation during storms 2) compatible sediment to feed nearshore bars, 3) sediment cover on an exposed sewage outfall pipe, and 4) a viable alternative to the shoaling offshore disposal site. Numerical modeling suggests that despite the strong tidal currents in the region, wave forcing is the dominant factor moving the sediment slowly toward shore, and placing sediment at just slightly shallower depths (e.g. 9 m) in the future would have a more immediate impact.

Barnard, Patrick L.; Hanes, Daniel M.; Lescinski, Jamie; Elias, Edwin

2007-01-01

235

Two-Way Coupled Watershed-Nearshore Modeling Using DBuilder and ESMF  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since 2005, the DoD High Performance Modernization Program has sponsored the Battlespace Enivronment Institute (BEI) to migrate existing DoD climate/weather/ocean modeling and simulation, environmental quality modeling and simulation and space weather applications to the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF). One task in the BEI is to perform the coupling of two finite element models---a watershed model (pWASH123D) and a nearshore model (ADCIRC)---with the ESMF and DBuilder (a parallel data management toolkit) to provide the software architecture and parallel data management including all the functional support for data exchange between two models. The coupler component leverages the provision of the "nodes to elements" mapping along the coupling interface of these two models. On the coupling interface, the water level that ADCIRC simulates is imposed as the boundary condition for pWASH123D, while the nodal fluxes computed from pWASH123D serves as source/sink terms to ADCIRC. This presentation will include (1) the ESMF framework for control of the models, (2) DBuilder coupler interface, (3) parallel algorithms in DBuilder for couplers, and (4) two test examples for demonstration. One demonstration example presents the watershed and nearshore storm surge simulation around the Biloxi Bay area during the Hurricane Katrina in August 2005.

Cheng, H.; Cheng, J. C.; Hunter, R. M.; Campbell, T.

2008-12-01

236

Trophic connections in Lake Superior Part II: the nearshore fish community  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We use detailed diet analyses of the predominant planktivorous, benthivorous and piscivorous fish species from Lake Superior to create a nearshore (bathymetric depths Mysis diluviana and Diporeia spp). Although the piscivorous fishes like lean lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) fed to a lesser extent on Diporeia and Mysis, they were still strongly connected to these macroinvertebrates, which were consumed by their primary prey species (sculpin spp., rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax, and coregonines). The addition of Bythotrephes to summer/fall cisco and lake whitefish diets, and the decrease in rainbow smelt in lean lake trout diets (replaced by coregonines) were the largest observed differences relative to historic Lake Superior diet studies. Although the offshore food web of Lake Superior was simpler than nearshore in terms of number of fish species present, the two areas had remarkably similar food web structures, and both fish communities were primarily supported by Mysis and Diporeia. We conclude that declines in Mysis or Diporeia populations would have a significant impact on energy flow in Lake Superior. The food web information we generated can be used to better identify management strategies for Lake Superior.

Gamble, A.E.; Hrabik, T.R.; Yule, D.L.; Stockwell, J.D.

2011-01-01

237

A system for measuring bottom profile, waves and currents in the high-energy nearshore environment  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A new data-acquisition system capable of measuring waves, currents and the nearshore profile in breaking waves as high as 5 m has been developed and successfully field-tested. Components of the mechanical system are a sled carrying a vertical mast, a double-drum winch placed landward of the beach, and a line that runs from one drum of the winch around three blocks, which are the corners of a right triangle, to the other drum of the winch. The sled is attached to the shore-normal side of the triangular line arrangement and is pulled offshore by one drum of the winch and onshore by the other. The profile is measured as the sled is towed along the shore-normal transect using an infrared rangefinder mounted landward of the winch and optical prisms mounted on top of the sled's mast. A pressure sensor and two-axis electromagnetic current meter are mounted on the frame of the sled. These data are encoded on the sled and telemetered to a receiving/recording station onshore. Preliminary results suggest that near-bottom offshore-flowing currents during periods of high-energy swell are important in forcing changes to the configuration of the nearshore profile. ?? 1983.

Sallenger, A.H., Jr.; Howard, P.C.; Fletcher, C. H., III; Howd, P.A.

1983-01-01

238

Error Evaluation of Near-shore Bathymetry Using the Single Beam Echo Sounder  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By using the single-beam echo sounder or the multi-beam echo sounder to investigate the near-shore bathymetry, its measurement has been limited by a series of errors caused by positioning, vehicle's attitude, acoustic speed variation, and some others. The main problem of bathymetry by using single-beam echo sounder is from lack of full coverage of the sounding beams illuminating the survey area of interesting. In addition, in the every ends of the survey lines especially when approaching the coast line, the turning will cause ship tilt to one side making a predicted but uncorrectable error. It is the reason that surveyors will choose a multi-beam echo sounder for the measurement when bathymetry coverage and accuracy are considered. However, at shallow depths less than 5 meters, as example, the high risk of multi-beam's transducers colliding with the ocean bottom will lower the willingness in using a multi-beam sounder due to high-priced of the transducers. Therefore, the single beam sounders have been the main instrument to measure near-shore under water topography in the industry. This study is to understand sounding deviation causing by the turning of the survey ship, such that we can analyze and control the errors to improve the accuracy of measurement using the single beam echo sounder in the shallow waters.

Hsu, M.; Song, G.

2013-12-01

239

Stratified turbulence in the nearshore coastal ocean: Dynamics and evolution in the presence of internal bores  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

measurements of stratified turbulence throughout the water column were collected over a 2 week period in the nearshore environment of southern Monterey Bay, CA, using a cabled observatory system and an underwater turbulence flux tower. The tower contained a vertical array of acoustic Doppler velocimeters and fast-response conductivity-temperature sensors, providing a nearly continuous data set of turbulent velocity and density fluctuations and a unique look into the stratified turbulence field. The evolution of various turbulence quantities and direct measurements of the vertical turbulent diffusivity is examined in the presence of nearshore internal bores, both in the near-bed region and in the stratified interior. We show that individual bores can drive substantial changes in local turbulence and mixing dynamics, with considerable differences between the leading and trailing edges of the bores. Using direct observations of the flux Richardson number, our measurements confirm previous observations that show the highest mixing efficiencies (?) occurring in regions of buoyancy-controlled turbulence. Parameterizations of the flux Richardson number as a function of the turbulence activity number are also presented. Finally, we demonstrate that the commonly used assumption of a constant mixing efficiency (? = 0.2) for calculating turbulent diffusivities leads to significant overestimates compared to diffusivity values calculated using the directly measured mixing efficiency. Implications of the results are discussed.

Walter, Ryan K.; Squibb, Michael E.; Woodson, C. Brock; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Monismith, Stephen G.

2014-12-01

240

Moderate-resolution sea surface temperature data for the nearshore North Pacific  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Coastal sea surface temperature (SST) is an important environmental characteristic in determining the suitability of habitat for nearshore marine and estuarine organisms. This publication describes and provides access to an easy-to-use coastal SST dataset for ecologists, biogeographers, oceanographers, and other scientists conducting research on nearshore marine habitats or processes. The data cover the Temperate Northern Pacific Ocean as defined by the 'Marine Ecosystems of the World' (MEOW) biogeographic schema developed by The Nature Conservancy. The spatial resolution of the SST data is 4-km grid cells within 20 km of the shore. The data span a 29-year period - from September 1981 to December 2009. These SST data were derived from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument measurements compiled into monthly means as part of the Pathfinder versions 5.0 and 5.1 (PFSST V50 and V51) Project. The processing methods used to transform the data from their native Hierarchical Data Format Scientific Data Set (HDF SDS) to georeferenced, spatial datasets capable of being read into geographic information systems (GIS) software are explained. In addition, links are provided to examples of scripts involved in the data processing steps. The scripts were written in the Python programming language, which is supported by ESRI's ArcGIS version 9 or later. The processed data files are also provided in text (.csv) and Access 2003 Database (.mdb) formats. All data except the raster files include attributes identifying realm, province, and ecoregion as defined by the MEOW classification schema.

Payne, Meredith C.; Reusser, Deborah A.; Lee, Henry, II; Brown, Cheryl A.

2011-01-01

241

Naval submarine base Kings Bay and Bangor soil evaluations.  

SciTech Connect

This report provides soil evaluation and characterization testing for the submarine bases at Kings Bay, Georgia, and Bangor, Washington, using triaxial testing at high confining pressures with different moisture contents. In general, the samples from the Bangor and Kings Bay sites appeared to be stronger than a previously used reference soil. Assuming the samples of the material were representative of the material found at the sites, they should be adequate for use in the planned construction. Since soils can vary greatly over even a small site, a soil specification for the construction contractor would be needed to insure that soil variations found at the site would meet or exceed the requirements. A suggested specification for the Bangor and Kings Bay soils was presented based on information gathered from references plus data obtained from this study, which could be used as a basis for design by the construction contractor.

Holcomb, David Joseph; Patteson, Raymond; Wesenberg, Donald L.; Attaway, Stephen W.

2004-08-01

242

The Martin Luther King, Jr. Papers Project at Stanford University  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Located at Stanford University, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Papers Project is producing what will almost certainly become the definitive collection of the great civil rights leader's writings. When completed, the fourteen-volume The Papers of Martin Luther King, Jr. will serve as an indispensable reference tool for historians of the civil rights movement. In the meantime, teachers and students can make use of the resources offered at this site. These include a number of full-text primary documents (including the "I Have a Dream" speech and the "I've Been To The Mountaintop" sermon), a general biography, a chronology of King's life, a recommended reading section, and scholarly articles produced by Project staff members (under construction). The Project plans to continually add new documents to the site as they are digitized. Free registration is required to view the papers, and registered users may choose to be informed about future site updates and related events.

243

Inbreeding, eugenics, and Helen Dean King (1869-1955).  

PubMed

Helen Dean King's scientific work focused on inbreeding using experimental data collected from standardized laboratory rats to elucidate problems in human heredity. The meticulous care with which she carried on her inbreeding experiments assured that her results were dependable and her theoretical explanations credible. By using her nearly homozygous rats as desired commodities, she also was granted access to venues and people otherwise unavailable to her as a woman. King's scientific career was made possible through her life experiences. She earned a doctorate from Bryn Mawr College under Thomas Hunt Morgan and spent a productive career at the Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology in Philadelphia where she had access to the experimental subjects which made her career possible. In this paper I examine King's work on inbreeding, her participation in the debates over eugenics, her position at the Wistar Institute, her status as a woman working with mostly male scientists, and her involvement with popular science. PMID:18348398

Ogilvie, Marilyn Bailey

2007-01-01

244

3 CFR 8624 - Proclamation 8624 of January 14, 2011. Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2011  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...united people of all backgrounds in a noble quest for freedom and basic civil rights. Inspired by Dr. King’s legacy, brave souls have marched fearlessly, organized relentlessly, and devoted their lives to the unending task of perfecting our...

2012-01-01

245

76 FR 2438 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Kings, Queens, and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Kings, Queens, and Courtiers: Art in Early Renaissance France'' SUMMARY: Notice...Kings, Queens, and Courtiers: Art in Early Renaissance France'' imported from abroad...of the exhibit objects at The Art Institute of Chicago,...

2011-01-13

246

Bounds for DNA codes with constant GC-content Oliver D. King  

E-print Network

Bounds for DNA codes with constant GC-content Oliver D. King Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA oliver king@hms.harvard.edu Submitted: June

Roth, Frederick

247

Dragon-Kings, Black-Swans and Prediction (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Extreme fluctuations or events are often associated with power law statistics. Indeed, it is a popular belief that "wild randomness'' is deeply associated with distributions with power law tails characterized by small exponents. In other words, power law tails are often seen as the epitome of extreme events (the "Black Swan'' story). Here, we document in very different systems that there is life beyond power law tails: power laws can be superseded by "dragon-kings'', monster events that occur beyond (or changing) the power law tail. Dragon-kings reveal hidden mechanisms that are only transiently active and that amplify the normal fluctuations (often described by the power laws of the normal regime). The goal of this lecture is to catalyze the interest of the community of geophysicists across all fields of geosciences so that the "invisible gorilla" fallacy may be avoided. Our own research illustrates that new statistics or representation of data are often necessary to identify dragon-kings, with strategies guided by the underlying mechanisms. Paradoxically, the monsters may be ignored or hidden by the use of inappropriate analysis or statistical tools that amount to cut a mamooth in small pieces, so as to lead to the incorrect belief that only mice exist. In order to stimulate further research, we will document and discuss the dragon-king phenomenon on the statistics of financial losses, economic geography, hydrodynamic turbulence, mechanical ruptures, avalanches in complex heterogeneous media, earthquakes, and epileptic seizures. The special status of dragon-kings open a new research program on their predictability, based on the fact that they belong to a different class of their own and express specific mechanisms amplifying the normal dynamics via positive feedbacks. We will present evidence of these claims for the predictions of material rupture, financial crashes and epileptic seizures. As a bonus, a few remarks will be offered at the end on how the dragon-king phenomenon allows us to understand the present World financial crisis as underpinned in two decades of successive financial and economic bubbles, inflating the mother of all bubbles with new monster dragon-kings at the horizon. The consequences in terms of a new "normal" are eye-opening. Ref: D. Sornette, Dragon-Kings, Black Swans and the Prediction of Crises, International Journal of Terraspace Science and Engineering 1(3), 1-17 (2009) (http://arXiv.org/abs/0907.4290) and (http://ssrn.com/abstract=1470006)

Sornette, D.

2010-12-01

248

The Archaeology of Smuggling and the Falmouth King's Pipe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article demonstrates the potential of an historical archaeology of smuggling and the value of an interdisciplinary approach to the study of smuggling and its prevention. By exploring the previously unstudied history of the King’s Pipe in Falmouth, a large chimney used for the destruction of tobacco, a rare survivor of many that once existed in England’s port cities, it demonstrates that archaeology could transform our understanding of smuggling and its prevention, and more broadly the history of crime and punishment in eighteenth century England.

Willis, Sam

2009-06-01

249

Checkmating patterns Name: ___________________ To win a game of chess, you need to checkmate the opposing king. It helps to practice setting up pieces in a  

E-print Network

of these and write your answers on this sheet. Checkmate with a king and a rook First, put the black king on the board to put the black king in checkmate? Answer: _________. Next, put the black king on the edge of the board, not in a corner. Can you use the white king and rook to put the black king in checkmate? Answer

Zirbel, Craig L.

250

Reading Stephen King: Issues of Censorship, Student Choice, and Popular Literature.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of essays grew out of the "Reading Stephen King Conference" held at the University of Maine in 1996. Stephen King's books have become a lightning rod for the tensions around issues of including "mass market" popular literature in middle and high school English classes and of who chooses what students read. King's fiction is among…

Power, Brenda Miller, Ed.; Wilhelm, Jeffrey D., Ed.; Chandler, Kelly, Ed.

251

Commemoration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., January 15, 1929-April 4, 1968. Revised.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developed in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., this is a short collection of suggested activities to teach black awareness in the elementary and secondary grades through King's philosophy. An introductory biographical sketch of King and an article about his accomplishments are provided. Activities are divided into grade-level ranges for the…

Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD.

252

http://www.sil.si.edu/SILpublications/MLKBibliography.pdf1 MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.  

E-print Network

Carson and Kris Shepard. King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968. Imprint: New York: IPM (Intellectualhttp://www.sil.si.edu/SILpublications/MLKBibliography.pdf1 MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. A BIBLIOGRAPHY, but for us: Martin Luther King, Jr. and the state / / Michael G. Long. Imprint: Macon, Ga.: Mercer University

Mathis, Wayne N.

253

UCSF School of Pharmacy and King's College London embark on international partnership  

E-print Network

UCSF School of Pharmacy and King's College London embark on international partnership March 21, 2014 The UC San Francisco School of Pharmacy and the King's College London Institute of Pharmaceutical at the UCSF School of Pharmacy · Professor Clive Page at the King's College London Institute of Pharmaceutical

Soloveichik, David

254

Antihemorrhagin in the blood serum of king cobra ( Ophiophagus hannah): purification and characterization  

Microsoft Academic Search

King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) serum was found to possess antihemorrhagic activity against king cobra hemorrhagin. The activity was stronger than that in commercial king cobra antivenom. An antihemorrhagin has been purified by ion exchange chromatography, affinity chromatography and gel filtration with a 22-fold purification and an overall yield of 12% of the total antihemorrhagic activity contained in crude serum. The

Lawan Chanhome; Orawan Khow; Tamotsu Omori-Satoh; Visith Sitprija

2003-01-01

255

DIMER MODELS AND CLUSTER CATEGORIES OF GRASSMANNIANS KARIN BAUR, ALASTAIR KING, AND ROBERT J. MARSH  

E-print Network

DIMER MODELS AND CLUSTER CATEGORIES OF GRASSMANNIANS KARIN BAUR, ALASTAIR KING, AND ROBERT J. MARSH the cluster structure of Gr(k, n) by Jensen-King-Su. It follows that B can be realised as the bound- ary picture. In Jensen-King-Su [17], a new categorification of this cluster structure, resolving this problem

Marsh, Robert J.

256

Let Freedom Ring: The Life & Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. [Lesson Plan].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This lesson plan teaches students about the life and work of Martin Luther King, Jr. Students listen to a brief biography, view photographs of the March on Washington, and read a portion of King's "I Have a Dream" speech. After studying Dr. King's use of imagery and allusion, students create original poetic phrases about freedom and illustrate…

National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.

257

Ugiuvangmiut Quliapyuit = King Island Tales. Eskimo History and Legends from Bering Strait.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The collection of native tales from King Island, Alaska, contains tales told originally in Inupiaq Eskimo by seven native elders. Introductory sections provide background information on the storytellers, King Island Village and its people, traditional life there, and the language of the King Islanders. The 25 tales are divided into groups: "The…

Kaplan, Lawrence D., Ed.

258

Mark R. Burge, MD, University of New Mexico Clinical & Translational Science Center "King of the Roadmap"  

E-print Network

roadblocks that arise Never fluster or surprise. I'm a man of genes and epi-genes, King of the Roadmap. Big spill! Ah, but... Extracellular RNA, PROMIS web, CTSAs. I'm a man of genes and epi-genes. King... Key roadblocks that arise Never fluster or surprise. I'm a man of genes and epi-genes, King

Rau, Don C.

259

Henry David Thoreau, Martin Luther King Jr., and the American Tradition of Protest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Maintains that Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. fundamentally altered the tradition of protest and reform. Compares and contrasts the role of each man in U.S. social and constitutional history. Concludes that while Thoreau lacked the broad influence of King, his writings influenced both King and Mohandas Gandhi. (CFR)

Powell, Brent

1995-01-01

260

The Black Power Movement, Democracy, and America in the King Years  

Microsoft Academic Search

TAYLOR BRANCH'S AMERICA IN THE KING YEARS stands as a singular achievement in civil rights historiography. Collectively, the trilogy covers the years 1954 -1968, the time in which Martin Luther King, Jr. became a national civil rights leader and a global icon for human rights and racial justice. For Branch, King was nothing less than a heroic, race-transcending political leader

2009-01-01

261

Surveillance and Identity Performance: Some Thoughts Inspired by Martin Luther King  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essay applies Judith Butler’s theory of identity performance – the idea that we create our identities by acting in ways designed to leave a particular impression – to the Fourth Amendment. As a jumping off point for that analysis, it details the FBI’s extensive surveillance of Martin Luther King, JR. That surveillance may have altered King’s behavior. It thus

Frank R Cooper

2009-01-01

262

Day Versus Night Electrofishing Catches from NearShore Waters of the Ohio and Muskingum Rivers1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Day and night electrofishing catches were compared for sampling effectiveness and diel movements offish to and from near-shore waters of the Ohio and Muskingum rivers. Standardized methods were used to collect same-day paired samples by sampling during the day, displacing the catch, and resampling after twilight. Night catches contained significantly higher numbers of species, individuals (excluding Dorosoma cepedianum), weight, and

RANDALL E. SANDERS

1992-01-01

263

Effects of Hydropeaking on Nearshore Habitat Use and Growth of Age0 Rainbow Trout in a Large Regulated River  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluated the effects of hourly variation in flow caused by power load following at Glen Canyon Dam (“hydropeaking”) on the nearshore habitat use and growth of age-0 rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss downstream from the dam in the Colorado River, Arizona. Reduction in the extent of hydropeaking is a common element of restoration efforts in regulated rivers, but empirical support

Josh Korman; Steven E. Campana

2009-01-01

264

Occurrence of Escherichia coli and Enterococci in Cladophora (Chlorophyta) in Nearshore Water and Beach Sand of Lake Michigan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Each summer, the nuisance green alga Cladophora (mostly Cladophora glomerata) amasses along Lake Michigan beaches, creating nearshore anoxia and unsightly, malodorous mats that can attract problem animals and detract from visitor enjoyment. Traditionally, elevated counts of Escherichia coli are presumed to indicate the presence of sewage, mostly derived from nearby point sources. The relationship between fecal indicator bacteria and Cladophora

Richard L. Whitman; Dawn A. Shively; Heather Pawlik; Meredith B. Nevers; Muruleedhara N. Byappanahalli

2003-01-01

265

CREPUSCULAR AND NOCTURNAL ACTIVITIES OF CALIFORNIAN NEARSHORE FISHES, WITH CONSIDERATION OF THEIR SCOTOPIC VISUAL PIGMENTS AND THE PHOTIC ENVIRONMENT1  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACf Activities in 27 of the major southern Californian nearshore fish species, with emphasis on trophic relationships, were studied between 1972 and 1975 at Santa Catalina Island. Because these fishes orient primarily by vision, they are strongly influenced by the underwater photic environment, which we define with representative spectra. We center on crepuscular and nocturnal events, but also describe daytime

EDMUND S. HOBSON; WILLIAM N. McFARLAND; JAMES R. CHESS

266

COASTAL WETLAND-NEARSHORE FOOD WEB LINKAGES ALONG A TROPHIC GRADIENT IN GREEN BAY: A FISH-EYE VIEW  

EPA Science Inventory

To identify ecological interactions among Green Bay coastal wetlands and lake habitats we analyzed stable isotope signatures of organismsa from wetland and adjacent nearshore food webs in Green Bay, Lake Michigan. We were interested in the influence of nutrient loading/trophic st...

267

A nearshore–offshore trend in acritarch distribution from the Early–Middle Ordovician of the Yangtze Platform, South China  

Microsoft Academic Search

The stratigraphical interval of the late Early Ordovician Didymograptus deflexus and the early Middle Ordovician Azygograptus suecicus graptolite Biozones was investigated from seven sections from the upper Yangtze Platform, southern China. These are located on different parts of the platform, between the nearshore environments of the Kunming area, Yunnan Province, and the offshore carbonate shelf of the Yichang area, Hubei

Jun Li; Thomas Servais; Kui Yan; Huaicheng Zhu

2004-01-01

268

Spatial Structure and Biophysical Coupling in Pelagic Food Webs connecting the Nearshore Shunt and Offshore Desert with the Laser  

E-print Network

Spatial Structure and Biophysical Coupling in Pelagic Food Webs­ connecting the Nearshore Shunt and Offshore Desert with the Laser Plankton Survey System (LPSS) Primary Investigator: Hank Vanderploeg - NOAA It is increasingly obvious from our projects in Lake Michigan and Erie that spatial coupling in pelagic food webs

269

LIMNETIC LARVAL FISH IN THE NEARSHORE ZONE OF THE SOUTH SHORE OF THE CENTRAL BASIN OF LAKE ERIE  

EPA Science Inventory

This report presents the results of a survey of larval fish in the nearshore zone of the central basin of Lake Erie from Conneaut to Sandusky, Ohio. Larval fish were sampled at 10 transects during each of 8 cruise periods between 2 May and 9 August 1978. Concentrations of fish la...

270

Fusing data from near-shore and long-range sensors in a multi-layered network  

E-print Network

and track vessels transiting near shore and within harbors is vital for port security. Technologies or by environmental factors, a multi sensor network is required for uninterrupted coverage of waterways. A simplified of Technology (Port of New York). Vessels were tracked using near-shore and long-range sensors and loosely

Frandsen, Jannette B.

271

SNAIL DISTRIBUTIONS IN LAKE ERIE: THE INFLUENCE OF ANOXIA IN THE SOUTHERN CENTRAL BASIN NEARSHORE ZONE1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The distributions and abundances of gastropods collected in sediment grab samples in 1978 and 1979 in the southern nearshore zone of the central basin of Lake Erie were compared with earlier gastropod records from throughout the lake. Since the 1920s, 34 species in eight families have been reported for the lake proper. Sixteen species have been reported only once, 13

KENNETH A. KRIEGER

1985-01-01

272

LECTURA Y DISCUSIN DE UN ARTCULO CIENTFICO "Killer Whale Predation on Sea Otters Linking Oceanic and Nearshore Ecosystems"  

E-print Network

LECTURA Y DISCUSI�N DE UN ARTÍCULO CIENTÍFICO "Killer Whale Predation on Sea Otters Linking Oceanic que aquí se presenta? #12;Killer Whale Predation on Sea Otters Linking Oceanic and Nearshore overhunting, sea otter populations are in abrupt decline over large areas of western Alaska. Increased killer

Seoane, Javier

273

Southwest Washington littoral drift restoration—Beach and nearshore morphological monitoring  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A morphological monitoring program has documented the placement and initial dispersal of beach nourishment material (280,000 m3) placed between the Mouth of the Columbia River (MCR) North Jetty and North Head, at the southern end of the Long Beach Peninsula in southwestern Washington State. A total of 21 topographic surveys and 8 nearshore bathymetric surveys were performed between July 11, 2010, and November 4, 2011. During placement, southerly alongshore transport resulted in movement of nourishment material to the south towards the MCR North Jetty. Moderate wave conditions (significant wave height around 4 m) following the completion of the nourishment resulted in cross-shore sediment transport, with most of the nourishment material transported into the nearshore bars. The nourishment acted as a buffer to the more severe erosion, including dune overtopping and retreat, that was observed at the northern end of the study area throughout the winter. One year after placement of the nourishment, onshore transport and beach recovery were most pronounced within the permit area and to the south toward the MCR North Jetty. This suggests that there is some long-term benefit of the nourishment for reducing erosion rates locally, although the enhanced recovery also could be due to natural gradients in alongshore transport causing net movement of the sediment from north to south. Measurements made during the morphological monitoring program documented the seasonal movement and decay of nearshore sand bars. Low-energy conditions in late summer resulted in onshore bar migration early in the monitoring program. Moderate wave conditions in the autumn resulted in offshore movement of the middle bar and continued onshore migration of the outer bar. High-energy wave conditions early in the winter resulted in strong cross-shore transport and creation of a 3-bar system along portions of the coast. More southerly wave events occurred later in the winter and early spring and coincided with the complete loss of the outer bar and net loss of sediment from the study area. These data suggest that bar decay may be an important mechanism for exporting sediment from Benson Beach north to the Long Beach Peninsula. The measurements presented in this report represent one component of a broader monitoring program designed to track the movement of nourishment material on the beach and shoreface at this location, including continuous video monitoring (Argus), in situu measurements of hydrodynamics, and a physical tracer experiment. Field data from the monitoring program will be used to test numerical models of hydrodynamics and sediment transport and to improve the capability of numerical models to support regional sediment management.

Stevens, Andrew W.; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Ruggiero, Peter; Kaminsky, George M.

2012-01-01

274

Influence of tides and waves on the fate of nutrients in a nearshore aquifer: Numerical simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A numerical investigation is presented that demonstrates the influence of tides and waves on the transport and transformation of nutrients (NO3-, NH4+, PO43-) in a homogeneous unconfined nearshore aquifer and subsequent fluxes to the sea. Simulations of an aquifer subject to semi-diurnal tides and constant waves acting on a sloping beach face were conducted using SEAWAT-2005 combined with PHT3D v2.10. Tidal amplitude (A) and wave height (Hrms) varying from 0.25 to 0.75 m and 1 to 2 m, respectively, were examined. Results show that tides and waves modify the subsurface discharge pathway of land-derived nutrients by changing the nearshore groundwater flow dynamics. More importantly, the oceanic forcing impacts nutrient cycling as it causes significant seawater exchange (along with dissolved O2 and organic matter) across the aquifer-ocean interface. Although steady wave forcing caused higher seawater influx, tides led to greater seawater-freshwater mixing in the nearshore aquifer and subsequently greater transformation of land-derived nutrients. Nutrient processing was strongly controlled by the availability and reactivity of marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) as its degradation consumed O2, released inorganic N and P, and altered redox conditions in the salt-freshwater mixing zones. For the conditions and reaction network simulated, nutrient regeneration by marine DOM degradation was independent of the seawater-freshwater mixing intensity, and therefore was greatest for the wave case due to the high seawater influx. For simulations without marine DOM considered, NO3- discharge to the sea increased by 32% for the tidal case (A = 0.5 m) compared to only 13% and 8% for the wave (Hrms = 1 m) and no oceanic forcing cases. With labile marine DOM considered, the NO3- discharge decreased by 90% relative to the land-derived flux for the tidal case (A = 0.5 m). For all simulations PO43- removal was high due to its adsorption to Fe oxide minerals. The model enables evaluation of the complex coupled physical-biogeochemical processes controlling nutrient loading to the sea via submarine groundwater discharge in dynamic coastal environments.

Anwar, N.; Robinson, C.; Barry, D. A.

2014-11-01

275

A Quick Response Forecasting Model of Pathogen Transport and Inactivation in Near-shore Regions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Modeling methods supporting water quality assessments play a critical role by facilitating people to understand and promptly predict the potential threat of waterborne bacterial pathogens pose to human health. A mathematical model to describe and predict bacterial levels can provide foundation for water managers in making decisions on whether a water system is safe to open to the public. The inactivation (decay or die-off) rate of bacteria is critical in a bacterial model by controlling bacterial concentration in waters and depends on numerous factors of hydrodynamics, meteorology, geology, chemistry and biology. Transport and fate of waterborne pathogens in fresh water systems is an essentially three-dimensional problem, which requires a coupling of hydrodynamic equations and transport equations that describe the pathogen and suspended sediment dynamics. However, such an approach could be very demanding and time consuming from a practical point of view due to excess computational efforts. Long computation time may lead people unintentionally drinking or swimming in the contaminated water during the period before the predictive results of water quality come out. Therefore, it is very necessary to find a quick-response model to forecast bacterial concentration instantly to protect human health without any delay. Nearshore regions are the most commonly and directly used area for people in a huge water system. The prior multi-dimensional investigations of E. Coli and Enterococci inactivation in literature indicate that along-shore current predominated the nearshore region. Consequently, the complex dynamic conditions may be potentially simplified to one-dimensional scenario. In this research, a one-dimensional model system coupling both hydrodynamic and bacterial transport modules is constructed considering different complex processes to simulate the transport and fate of pathogens in nearshore regions. The quick-response model mainly focuses on promptly forecasting purpose and will be verified and calibrated with the available data collected from southern Lake Michigan. The modeling results will be compared with those from prior multi-dimensional models. This model is specifically effective for the outfall-controlled waters, where pathogens are primarily predominated by loadings from nearby tributaries and tend to show wide variations in concentrations.

Liu, L.; Fu, X.

2011-12-01

276

How to Comment like a King--or Queen  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Blogging, if you truly inhale its essence, will give you a calling, renewal, and purpose as you have never seen before. Here, the author shows how to blog like a king or a queen. These techniques include: (1) Write a meaningful comment; (2) If you have written about it, hyperlink to your post; (3) If you have a blog, share some information about…

Davis, Vicki

2007-01-01

277

The Institute of Epileptology of King's College, University of London.  

PubMed

The Institute of Epileptology of King's College, London has arisen from need and from opportunity. The need is due to the relative neglect nationally and internationally of the most common serious brain disorder with important physical, psychological, and social complications. The relative neglect is reflected in services, research, charitable donations, public profile, and stigma and in a serious lack of professional education. The opportunity arose because of the existence in several medical institutions at Denmark Hill, London, of a group of medical and related colleagues with a special interest covering almost every aspect of this multidisciplinary disorder who agreed to combine their expertise in this initiative. The idea was born and developed in 1991-1992 and was supported by all the parent institutions: The Maudsley and King's College Hospitals, St. Piers Lingfield, The Institute of Psychiatry, King's College School of Medicine and Dentistry, and the School of Life, Basic Medical and Health Sciences, all under the umbrella of King's College, University of London. Further stimulus and help came from a group of dedicated supporters in private and public life. There are three strands to this initiative: (a) a charity, The Fund for Epilepsy; (b) the clinical Centre for Epilepsy, which was formally opened at the Maudsley Hospital in July 1994; and (c) the academic Institute of Epileptology for research and teaching, which was launched on November 15, 1994. PMID:23057103

Reynolds, E H

1995-01-01

278

Her civilising mission: discovering Hannah King through her textiles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hannah King occupies a unique place in missionary and colonial history, the history of education, cross-cultural relations and material culture in New Zealand. She was the only woman from the first 1814 Missionary settlement of the Church Missionary Society (CMS) in New Zealand to remain in New Zealand for the rest of her life, yet she does not have an

Vivien Caughley

2009-01-01

279

[Eau de mille-fleurs which made Kings' cat dance].  

PubMed

King Louis XV had a cat and some of his courtiers forced it to dance using eau de mille-fleurs (thousand flowers water). This name was given both to cow urine and to the distilled water obtained from cow dung. In this case, the medicine used was George Bate's eau de mille-fleurs, which contained alcohol. PMID:11625557

Lafont, O

1999-01-01

280

Skull Size and Intelligence, and King Robert Bruce's IQ  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An estimate of someone's IQ is a potentially informative personal datum. This study examines the association between external skull measurements and IQ scores, and uses the resulting regression equation to provide an estimate of the IQ of King Robert I of Scotland (Robert Bruce, 1274-1329). Participants were 48 relatively healthy Caucasian men…

Deary, Ian J.; Ferguson, Karen J.; Bastin, Mark E.; Barrow, Geoffrey W. S.; Reid, Louise M.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; MacLullich, Alasdair M. J.

2007-01-01

281

Martin Luther King Jr.: The Crozer Seminary Years.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As an undergraduate at Morehouse College, Martin Luther King Jr. was not a strong student, although he excelled in oratory, but in his years at Crozer Theological Seminary in Pennsylvania he applied himself to become a straight-A student. The development of his theological perspective is described. (SLD)

Carson, Clayborne

1997-01-01

282

Kings of the road V.S. Sunder  

E-print Network

Kings of the road by V.S. Sunder The prize for exclusivity easily goes to the roadways authorities. I shall substantiate the foregoing claim with evidence from one of the model roads in Chennai, since easily identify the analogous models in her citiy. Consider what used to be a lazy one-lane road called

Sunder, V S

283

Probing Nanotube-Nanopore Interactions G. M. King1  

E-print Network

Probing Nanotube-Nanopore Interactions G. M. King1 and J. A. Golovchenko1,2 1 Department of Physics) We demonstrate a new nanoscale system consisting of a nanotube threaded through a nanopore in aqueous conformational changes on sub-Angstrom length scales. Ionic current transport through a nanopore is significantly

Golovchenko, Jene A.

284

Unilateral congenital elbow luxation in a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel  

PubMed Central

Abstract A 7-week-old, intact female, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel was evaluated for nonweight bearing lameness of the right forelimb. Type III unilateral congenital elbow luxation was diagnosed radiographically. After surgical reduction, temporary placement of a transarticular pin, and external splinting of the joint, full weight bearing was achieved. Radial head subluxation persisted. PMID:15600161

2004-01-01

285

LEGENDS OF KING ARTHUR. LITERATURE CURRICULUM III, STUDENT VERSION.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A STUDENT VERSION OF A CURRICULUM GUIDE ON THE "LEGENDS OF KING ARTHUR" WAS DEVELOPED. SELECTED LEGENDS ARE REPRODUCED ALONG WITH AN INTRODUCTION, STUDY QUESTIONS, AND A PASSAGE FROM MALORY'S "LE MORTE D'ARTHUR" IN THE ORIGINAL LANGUAGE OF THE FIRST EDITION (1485). THE TEACHER VERSION IS ED 010 814. RELATED REPORTS ARE ED 010 129 THROUGH ED 010…

KITZHABER, ALBERT R.

286

Modeling the impacts of wildfire on runoff and pollutant transport from coastal watersheds to the nearshore environment.  

PubMed

Wildfire is a common disturbance that can significantly alter vegetation in watersheds and affect the rate of sediment and nutrient transport to adjacent nearshore oceanic environments. Changes in runoff resulting from heterogeneous wildfire effects are not well-understood due to both limitations in the field measurement of runoff and temporally-limited spatial data available to parameterize runoff models. We apply replicable, scalable methods for modeling wildfire impacts on sediment and nonpoint source pollutant export into the nearshore environment, and assess relationships between wildfire severity and runoff. Nonpoint source pollutants were modeled using a GIS-based empirical deterministic model parameterized with multi-year land cover data to quantify fire-induced increases in transport to the nearshore environment. Results indicate post-fire concentration increases in phosphorus by 161 percent, sediments by 350 percent and total suspended solids (TSS) by 53 percent above pre-fire years. Higher wildfire severity was associated with the greater increase in exports of pollutants and sediment to the nearshore environment, primarily resulting from the conversion of forest and shrubland to grassland. This suggests that increasing wildfire severity with climate change will increase potential negative impacts to adjacent marine ecosystems. The approach used is replicable and can be utilized to assess the effects of other types of land cover change at landscape scales. It also provides a planning and prioritization framework for management activities associated with wildfire, including suppression, thinning, and post-fire rehabilitation, allowing for quantification of potential negative impacts to the nearshore environment in coastal basins. PMID:25549866

Morrison, Katherine D; Kolden, Crystal A

2015-03-15

287

Dynamics of oxygen depletion in the nearshore of a coastal embayment of the southern Benguela upwelling system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

of high resolution time series of water column and bottom dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations inform the dynamics of oxygen depletion in St Helena Bay in the southern Benguela upwelling system at several scales of variability. The bay is characterized by seasonally recurrent hypoxia (<1.42 ml l-1) associated with a deep pool of oxygen-depleted water and episodic anoxia (<0.02 ml l-1) driven by the nearshore (<20 m isobath) decay of red tide. Coastal wind forcing influences DO concentrations in the nearshore through its influence on bay productivity and the development of red tides; through shoreward advection of the bottom pool of oxygen-depleted water as determined by the upwelling-downwelling cycle; and through its control of water column stratification and mixing. A seasonal decline in bottom DO concentrations of ˜1.2 ml l-1 occurs with a concurrent expansion of the bottom pool of oxygen depleted water in St Helena Bay. Upwelling of this water into the nearshore causes severe drops in DO concentration (<0.2 ml l-1), particularly during end-of-season upwelling, resulting in a significant narrowing of the habitable zone. Episodic anoxia through the entire water column is caused by localized degradation of red tides within the confines of the shallow nearshore environment. Oxygenation of the nearshore is achieved by ventilation of the water column particularly with the onset of winter mixing. No notable changes are evident in comparing recent measures of bottom DO concentrations in St Helena Bay to data collected in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

Pitcher, Grant C.; Probyn, Trevor A.; du Randt, Andre; Lucas, Andrew. J.; Bernard, Stewart; Evers-King, Haley; Lamont, Tarron; Hutchings, Larry

2014-04-01

288

LANDSAT survey of near-shore ice conditions along the Arctic coast of Alaska  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. Winter and spring near-shore ice conditions were analyzed for the Beaufort Sea 1973-77, and the Chukchi Sea 1973-76. LANDSAT imagery was utilized to map major ice features related to regional ice morphology. Significant features from individual LANDSAT image maps were combined to yield regional maps of major ice ridge systems for each year of study and maps of flaw lead systems for representative seasons during each year. These regional maps were, in turn, used to prepare seasonal ice morphology maps. These maps showed, in terms of a zonal analysis, regions of statistically uniform ice behavior. The behavioral characteristics of each zone were described in terms of coastal processes and bathymetric configuration.

Stringer, W. J. (principal investigator); Barrett, S. A.

1978-01-01

289

The Performance of Nearshore Dredge Disposal at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California, 2005-2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ocean Beach, California, contains an erosion hot spot in the shadow of the San Francisco ebb tidal delta that threatens valuable public infrastructure as well as the safe recreational use of the beach. In an effort to reduce the erosion at this location a new plan for the management of sediment dredged annually from the main shipping channel at the mouth of San Francisco Bay was implemented in May 2005 by the United States Army Corps of Engineers, San Francisco District (USACE). The USACE designated a temporary nearshore dredge disposal site for the annual disposal of about 230,000 m3 (300,000 yd3) of sand about 750 m offshore and slightly south of the erosion hot spot, in depths between approximately 9 and 14 m. The site has now been used three times for a total sediment disposal of about 690,000 m3 (about 900,000 yds3). The disposal site was chosen because it is in a location where strong tidal currents and open-ocean waves can potentially feed sediment toward the littoral zone in the reach of the beach that is experiencing critical erosion, as well as prevent further scour on an exposed outfall pipe. The onshore migration of sediment from the target disposal location might feed the primary longshore bar or the nearshore zone, and provide a buffer to erosion that peaks during winter months when large waves impact the region. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) has been monitoring and modeling the bathymetric evolution of the test dredge disposal site and the adjacent coastal region since inception in May 2005. This paper reports on the first 2.5 years of this monitoring program effort (May 2005 to December 2007) and assesses the short-term coastal response. Here are the key findings of this report: *Approximately half of the sediment that has been placed in the nearshore dredge-disposal site during the 2.5 years of this study remains within the dredge focus area. *In the winter of 2006-7, large waves transported the dredge-mound material onshore. *High rates of seasonal cross-shore sediment transport mask any potential profile change in the Coastal Profiling System data due to dredge placement. *Pockets of accretion have been recorded by topographic surveying adjacent to the dredge site, but it is unclear if the accretion is linked to the nourishment. *Cross-shore profile modeling suggests that dredge material must be placed in water depths no greater than 5 m to drive a positive shoreline response. *Area modeling demonstrates that the new dredge site increases wave dissipation and modifies local sediment-transport patterns, although the effect on the nearshore morphology is largely negligible. *Any increase in beach width or wave energy-dissipation related to the nourishment is likely to be realized only in the vicinity directly onshore of the nourishment site, which is several hundred meters south of the area of critical erosion. *Larger waves from the northwest and smaller waves from the west or southwest contribute most to the sediment transport from the dredge mound onshore.

Barnard, Patrick L.; Erikson, Li H.; Hansen, Jeff E.; Elias, Edwin

2009-01-01

290

Benthic status of near-shore fishing grounds in the central Philippines and associated seahorse densities.  

PubMed

Benthic status of 28 near-shore, artisanal, coral reef fishing grounds in the central Philippines was assessed (2000-2002) together with surveys of the seahorse, Hippocampus comes. Our measures of benthic quality and seahorse densities reveal some of the most degraded coral reefs in the world. Abiotic structure dominated the fishing grounds: 69% of the benthos comprised rubble (32%), sand/silt (28%) and dead coral (9%). Predominant biotic structure included live coral (12%) and Sargassum (11%). Rubble cover increased with increasing distance from municipal enforcement centers and coincided with substantial blast fishing in this region of the Philippines. Over 2 years, we measured a significant decrease in benthic 'heterogeneity' and a 16% increase in rubble cover. Poor benthic quality was concomitant with extremely low seahorse densities (524 fish per km(2)). Spatial management, such as marine reserves, may help to minimize habitat damage and to rebuild depleted populations of seahorses and other reef fauna. PMID:17645896

Marcus, J E; Samoilys, M A; Meeuwig, J J; Villongco, Z A D; Vincent, A C J

2007-09-01

291

Southwest Washington Littoral Drift Restoration Project: Beach and Nearshore Morphological Monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Shoreline change along the southwest Washington and northwest Oregon coast responds to both natural and anthropogenic drivers at a range of temporal and spatial scales. Within the last century, human interventions, primarily the construction of large jetties at the entrance to the Columbia River, have been the dominant driver of nearshore morphology and shoreline change in this area. These jetties caused the inlet to narrow and deepen, the ebb-tidal delta to migrate offshore into deeper water, and adjacent shorelines to first accrete then erode over distances of tens of kilometers and time scales of decades. Shoreline change modeling suggests that reduced local sediment supply owing to these morphological changes is causing a deficit of sand feeding the shoreline, especially in the region of Benson Beach, just north of the mouth of the Columbia River. One of the goals of the Southwest Washington Littoral Drift Restoration (SW LDR) project is to assess the long-term viability of placing dredged material from the mouth of the Columbia River (MCR) directly on Benson Beach to supplement the littoral sediment budget. The SW LDR will be one of the largest beach nourishment projects in the Pacific Northwest, with approximately 200,000 - 400,000 m3 of dredged material being placed on Benson Beach during the summer of 2010. Extensive monitoring and modeling efforts are underway to evaluate the effectiveness of the project and to develop morphodynamic modeling tools to inform future Regional Sediment Management decisions. Overall project components include Argus beach monitoring, measurements of nearshore waves and currents, deployment of a sand tracer, morphodynamic modeling, and a morphological monitoring program. The primary purpose of the morphological monitoring program, and the focus for this presentation, is to track the response of beach and nearshore areas during and after the sand placement. Bathymetric data, collected using Personal Watercraft (PWCs) equipped with Real-time Kinematic (RTK) GPS and single-beam sonar systems, are merged with topographic measurements made with RTK GPS mounted on backpacks and on an all-terrain vehicle. A baseline survey was performed on July 11-12, 2010 to characterize beach and nearshore morphology prior to sand placement that began on July 31, 2010. The baseline survey reveals a large outer sand bar (~ 2 m amplitude) at -5 m depth, numerous shallow sand bars and swash bars, and a broad low-sloping dissipative beach. Two subsequent surveys, collected August 10th and 25th have begun to detect both background change (onshore migration of the outer bar) and movement of the placed sand. The majority of observed changes occur on the beach and in shallow areas (> -5 m), with no significant changes offshore of the outer bar. Initial analysis suggests southerly longshore transport of the nourishment sand driven by waves predominantly from the NW during the first phase of the monitoring. Additional surveys in the fall will continue to monitor the fate of the nourishment and help to assess whether anticipated changes in wave direction and magnitude force sediment offshore and northward as expected.

Gelfenbaum, G. R.; Stevens, A. W.; Ruggiero, P.; Kaminsky, G. M.

2010-12-01

292

Sea-Floor Mapping and Benthic Habitat GIS for the Elwha River Delta Nearshore, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

From March 1531, 2005, more than 252 km (19.5 km2) of seafloor offshore of the Elwha River Delta in the central Strait of Juan de Fuca was mapped by the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program. The purpose of this nearshore mapping was to (1) obtain high resolution bathymetry and acoustic reflectance properties of the seabed, (2) examine and record geologic characteristics of the seafloor, and (3) construct maps of sea-floor geomorphology and habitat. Substrate distribution was characterized with video-supervised statistical classification of the sonar data. Substrate of the survey was dominated by mixed sand-gravel and sand. Numerous boulder reefs were observed west of the river mouth within Freshwater Bay, whereas the sea-floor immediately adjacent to the river mouth was dominated by sand.

Cochrane, Guy R.; Warrick, Jonathan A.; Sagy, Yael; Finlayson, David; Harney, Jodi

2008-01-01

293

Neutrophilic iron-oxidizing "zetaproteobacteria" and mild steel corrosion in nearshore marine environments.  

PubMed

Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of mild steel in seawater is an expensive and enduring problem. Little attention has been paid to the role of neutrophilic, lithotrophic, iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) in MIC. The goal of this study was to determine if marine FeOB related to Mariprofundus are involved in this process. To examine this, field incubations and laboratory microcosm experiments were conducted. Mild steel samples incubated in nearshore environments were colonized by marine FeOB, as evidenced by the presence of helical iron-encrusted stalks diagnostic of the FeOB Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, a member of the candidate class "Zetaproteobacteria." Furthermore, Mariprofundus-like cells were enriched from MIC biofilms. The presence of Zetaproteobacteria was confirmed using a Zetaproteobacteria-specific small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene primer set to amplify sequences related to M. ferrooxydans from both enrichments and in situ samples of MIC biofilms. Temporal in situ incubation studies showed a qualitative increase in stalk distribution on mild steel, suggesting progressive colonization by stalk-forming FeOB. We also isolated a novel FeOB, designated Mariprofundus sp. strain GSB2, from an iron oxide mat in a salt marsh. Strain GSB2 enhanced uniform corrosion from mild steel in laboratory microcosm experiments conducted over 4 days. Iron concentrations (including precipitates) in the medium were used as a measure of corrosion. The corrosion in biotic samples (7.4 ± 0.1 mM) was significantly higher than that in abiotic controls (5.0 ± 0.1 mM). These results have important implications for the role of FeOB in corrosion of steel in nearshore and estuarine environments. In addition, this work shows that the global distribution of Zetaproteobacteria is far greater than previously thought. PMID:21131509

McBeth, Joyce M; Little, Brenda J; Ray, Richard I; Farrar, Katherine M; Emerson, David

2011-02-01

294

Wind-driven nearshore sediment resuspension in a deep lake during winter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

public concern over declining water quality at Lake Tahoe, California-Nevada (USA) led to an investigation of wind-driven nearshore sediment resuspension that combined field measurements and modeling. Field data included: wind speed and direction, vertical profiles of water temperature and currents, nearbed velocity, lakebed sediment characteristics, and suspended sediment concentration and particle size distribution. Bottom shear stress was computed from ADV-measured nearbed velocity data, adapting a turbulent kinetic energy method to lakes, and partitioned according to its contributions attributed to wind-waves, mean currents, and random motions. When the total shear stress exceeded the critical shear stress, the contribution to overall shear stress was about 80% from wind-waves and 10% each from mean currents and random motions. Therefore, wind-waves were the dominant mechanism resulting in sediment resuspension as corroborated by simultaneous increases in shear stress and total measured sediment concentration. The wind-wave model STWAVE was successfully modified to simulate wind-wave-induced sediment resuspension for viscous-dominated flow typical in lakes. Previous lake applications of STWAVE have been limited to special instances of fully turbulent flow. To address the validity of expressions for sediment resuspension in lakes, sediment entrainment rates were found to be well represented by a modified 1991 García and Parker formula. Last, in situ measurements of suspended sediment concentration and particle size distribution revealed that the predominance of fine particles (by particle count) that most negatively impact clarity was unchanged by wind-related sediment resuspension. Therefore, we cannot assume that wind-driven sediment resuspension contributes to Lake Tahoe's declining nearshore clarity.

Reardon, Kristin E.; Bombardelli, Fabián. A.; Moreno-Casas, Patricio A.; Rueda, Francisco J.; Schladow, S. Geoffrey

2014-11-01

295

Correlation of nearshore ice movement with seabed ice gouges near Barrow, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nearshore patterns of ice motion near Barrow, Alaska, were monitored between 1973 and 1979 with a sea ice radar system. Side scan sonar surveys of the seafloor were made at the same location during the summers of 1977 and 1978. The two data sets provide information on ice motion, ice gouging, and the rate and character of seabed deformation by ice. Four ice stages (open water, freeze-up, winter, and breakup) can be defined on the basis of the frequency and patterns of ice motion and ice cover processes as recorded by the radar system. In all four ice stages the dominant ice motion was nearly parallel to the coast. Side scan sonar surveys show that the principal ice gouge directions nearshore were at a high angle to the coast and to the predominant direction of ice drift in both years. Gouge density was greatest in a narrow zone centered about the 10-m isobath which reflects the distribution of deep ice keels and the pattern of reworking of the seafloor by waves and currents. We believe the majority of observed gouges were formed by keels of multiyear ice floes during an event that occurred in July 1975, 2 years before the first seabed survey. Persistence of the gouge pattern from 1975 until 1977 is attributed to persistence of the ice cover and limited reworking by waves and currents, or additional gouging. The observed decrease in gouge density between 1977 and 1978 is attributed to (1) seafloor reworking and gouge infilling by storms and (2) the absence of ice conditions that were conducive to creating fresh gouges.

Shapiro, Lewis H.; Barnes, Peter W.

1991-09-01

296

Coral bleaching: one disturbance too many for near-shore reefs of the Great Barrier Reef  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dynamic nature of coral communities can make it difficult to judge whether a reef system is resilient to the current disturbance regime. To address this question of resilience for near-shore coral communities of the Great Barrier Reef (Australia) a data set consisting of 350 annual observations of benthic community change was compiled from existing monitoring data. These data spanned the period 1985-2007 and were derived from coral reefs within 20 km of the coast. During years without major disturbance events, cover increase of the Acroporidae was much faster than it was for other coral families; a median of 11% per annum compared to medians of less than 4% for other coral families. Conversely, Acroporidae were more severely affected by cyclones and bleaching events than most other families. A simulation model parameterised with these observations indicated that while recovery rates of hard corals were sufficient to compensate for impacts associated with cyclones and crown-of-thorns starfish, the advent of mass bleaching has lead to a significant change in the composition of the community and a rapid decline in hard coral cover. Furthermore, if bleaching events continue to occur with the same frequency and severity as in the recent past, the model predicts that the cover of Acroporidae will continue to decline. Although significant cover of live coral remains on near-shore reefs, and recovery is observed during inter-disturbance periods, it appears that this system will not be resilient to the recent disturbance regime over the long term. Conservation strategies for coral reefs should focus on both mitigating local factors that act synergistically to increase the susceptibility of Acroporidae to climate change while promoting initiatives that maximise the recovery potential from inevitable disturbances.

Thompson, A. A.; Dolman, A. M.

2010-09-01

297

Ecoregional analysis of nearshore sea-surface temperature in the North Pacific  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The quantification and description of sea surface temperature (SST) is critically important because it can influence the distribution, migration, and invasion of marine species; furthermore, SSTs are expected to be affected by climate change. To better understand present temperature regimes, we assembled a 29-year nearshore time series of mean monthly SSTs along the North Pacific coastline using remotely-sensed satellite data collected with the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument. We then used the dataset to describe nearshore (&20 km offshore) SST patterns of 16 North Pacific ecoregions delineated by the Marine Ecoregions of the World (MEOW) hierarchical schema. Annual mean temperature varied from 3.8??C along the Kamchatka ecoregion to 24.8??C in the Cortezian ecoregion. There are smaller annual ranges and less variability in SST in the Northeast Pacific relative to the Northwest Pacific. Within the 16 ecoregions, 31-94% of the variance in SST is explained by the annual cycle, with the annual cycle explaining the least variation in the Northern California ecoregion and the most variation in the Yellow Sea ecoregion. Clustering on mean monthly SSTs of each ecoregion showed a clear break between the ecoregions within the Warm and Cold Temperate provinces of the MEOW schema, though several of the ecoregions contained within the provinces did not show a significant difference in mean seasonal temperature patterns. Comparison of these temperature patterns shared some similarities and differences with previous biogeographic classifications and the Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs). Finally, we provide a web link to the processed data for use by other researchers.

Payne, M.C.; Brown, C.A.; Reusser, D.A.; Lee, H., II

2012-01-01

298

Neutrophilic Iron-Oxidizing “Zetaproteobacteria” and Mild Steel Corrosion in Nearshore Marine Environments ? †  

PubMed Central

Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of mild steel in seawater is an expensive and enduring problem. Little attention has been paid to the role of neutrophilic, lithotrophic, iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) in MIC. The goal of this study was to determine if marine FeOB related to Mariprofundus are involved in this process. To examine this, field incubations and laboratory microcosm experiments were conducted. Mild steel samples incubated in nearshore environments were colonized by marine FeOB, as evidenced by the presence of helical iron-encrusted stalks diagnostic of the FeOB Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, a member of the candidate class “Zetaproteobacteria.” Furthermore, Mariprofundus-like cells were enriched from MIC biofilms. The presence of Zetaproteobacteria was confirmed using a Zetaproteobacteria-specific small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene primer set to amplify sequences related to M. ferrooxydans from both enrichments and in situ samples of MIC biofilms. Temporal in situ incubation studies showed a qualitative increase in stalk distribution on mild steel, suggesting progressive colonization by stalk-forming FeOB. We also isolated a novel FeOB, designated Mariprofundus sp. strain GSB2, from an iron oxide mat in a salt marsh. Strain GSB2 enhanced uniform corrosion from mild steel in laboratory microcosm experiments conducted over 4 days. Iron concentrations (including precipitates) in the medium were used as a measure of corrosion. The corrosion in biotic samples (7.4 ± 0.1 mM) was significantly higher than that in abiotic controls (5.0 ± 0.1 mM). These results have important implications for the role of FeOB in corrosion of steel in nearshore and estuarine environments. In addition, this work shows that the global distribution of Zetaproteobacteria is far greater than previously thought. PMID:21131509

McBeth, Joyce M.; Little, Brenda J.; Ray, Richard I.; Farrar, Katherine M.; Emerson, David

2011-01-01

299

Pontotoc County Government Summer  

E-print Network

Pontotoc County Government Summer Youth Internship Program June 17 - 21, 2013 Sponsored By Government Summer Youth Internship Program June 17-21, 2013 Who: Youth ages 14-19 who attend a Pontotoc 24, 2013. What: Learn About YOUR Pontotoc County Government. Youth will spend time in each

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

300

Allegheny County Economic Trends  

E-print Network

. In 2005, economic activity in Allegheny County is estimated to produce over $77 billion in value added product. This value added production, called Gross Regional Product, accounts for over 72% of whatAllegheny County Economic Trends Prepared by: University Center for Social and Urban Research

Sibille, Etienne

301

Continuing Education for County Officials The duties and responsibilities of county government  

E-print Network

Continuing Education for County Officials The duties and responsibilities of county government, the V.G. Young Institute of County Government provides continuing education programs for local government officials, including county judges and commissioners, county treasurers, county and district

302

76 FR 12306 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County, Kern County, and Ventura...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...County, and Ventura County; Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Kern County Air Pollution Control District...

2011-03-07

303

76 FR 12280 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, for Imperial County, Kern County, and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...County, and Ventura County; Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Kern County Air Pollution Control District...

2011-03-07

304

The Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In celebration of one of the most foundational African American figures in history, The King Center Imaging Project has undergone an intense process of digitization to allow universal access to the lifeâ??s work of Martin Luther King Jr. Users can sift through a dynamic collection of one million archived documents, images, letters, notes, and speeches, presented via a convenient mosaic interface. Along with the archive, the site provides background information and a glossary for Dr. Kingâ??s message of nonviolence. Apart from the historical value of the site, users are prompted to follow in Dr. Kingâ??s work, submitting their own â??dreamsâ? for careers, human rights, and world peace. This input is collected into a growing base of nearly five-thousand â??dreamsâ? that can be searched via theme or geographic location, true evidence of Dr. Kingâ??s influential humanitarian message.

305

Wisconsin County Histories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Whether you're interested in Reedsburg, Rhinelander, or Rubicon, the Wisconsin County Histories website will not fail those keen on the history of the Badger State. Created by the Wisconsin Historical Society, this archive provides access to more than 80 standard histories of Wisconsin counties, most of which were published between 1850 and 1920. The majority of the volumes are over several hundred pages long, and they include detailed passages on cities within their respective counties, along with sketches of prominent leaders. Visitors can use the drop-down menu available on the homepage to find specific volumes, or they can also perform a full text search across all of the histories.

306

KING DAY 2009 ESSAY COMPETITION: "Times of Challenge and Controversy" This year's theme is drawn from Dr. King's reminder that we are not to be measured by  

E-print Network

KING DAY 2009 ESSAY COMPETITION: "Times of Challenge and Controversy" This year's theme is drawn Mackie, in his address at the 2008 IU King Day Celebration, spoke of his disappointment in many leaders their potential 3) Promoting and saving causes that benefit humankind The MLK Day Essay Committee invites graduate

Indiana University

307

Contested memory in the birthplace of a king: a case study of Auburn Avenue and the Martin Luther King Jr. National Park  

Microsoft Academic Search

A critical element in the process of racializing place is the construction of memorial landscapes. Using the Martin Luther King Jr National Historic Site and the surrounding Auburn Avenue community as a case study this paper argues that the sites dedicated to Dr King along Auburn Avenue embody a normative Civil Rights discourse which emphasizes national unity and non-violence and

Joshua F. J. Inwood

2009-01-01

308

Queen of kings: Kleopatra VII and the donations of Alexandria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite Antonius’ defeat by Octavianus his reorganisation of the east proved to be successful.\\u000aAfter Actium, Octavianus did not replace the vassal kings installed by Antonius, nor support new civic\\u000aoligarchies. With the Ptolemaic kingdom abolished, and Ptolemaios XV murdered, the problem of\\u000arepublican rule over a monarchical world was now solved by the gradual monarchisation of Octavianus’\\u000aown person,

Rolf Strootman

2010-01-01

309

Disulfide Isomers of ?-Neurotoxins from King Cobra ( Ophiophagus hannah) Venom  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two novel ?-neurotoxins, Oh-6A and Oh-6B, isolated from the king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom, consist of 70 amino acid residues with 10 cysteine residues and share the same amino acid sequences as determined by Edman degradation on the peptide fragments generated from the proteolytic hydrolysates. Their sequences share 46–53% homology with Oh-4, Oh-5, Toxin a, and Toxin b from the

Shinne-Ren Lin; Long-Sen Chang; Chun-Chang Chang

1999-01-01

310

Structure–function relationship of king cobra cathelicidin  

Microsoft Academic Search

King cobra cathelicidin (OH-CATH) is composed of 34 amino acid residues having strong antibacterial and very weak hemolytic activities as reported by us recently. OH-CATH can be served as a valuable template to develop novel therapeutic drugs. In this study, OH-CATH and six of its analogs were synthesized to explore their structure–function relationships based on their bactericidal and hemolytic activities.

Yong Zhang; Hui Zhao; Guo-Yu Yu; Xiao-Dong Liu; Ji-Hong Shen; Wen-Hui Lee; Yun Zhang

2010-01-01

311

KINGS RIVER, RANCHERIA, AGNEW, AND OAT MOUNTAIN ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

On the basis of a mineral survey the Kings River, Rancheria, Agnew, and Oat Mountain Roadless Areas, California were found to have several areas with probable mineral-resource potential for tungsten in tactite, and one area with probable mineral-resource potential for lode gold in quartz veins. The extreme relief and inaccessibility in most of the roadless areas make exploration and mining very difficult. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of energy resources.

Nokleberg, Warren J.; Longwell, Warren D.

1984-01-01

312

G.MG Archimedes and the King's crown  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: The King of Syracuse reportedly requested Archimedes' advice for determining if a crown was made with the appropriate mixture of gold and silver. Archi...

313

STS-57 Earth observation of King Sound in northwest Australia  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

STS-57 Earth observation taken aboard Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, is of King Sound in northwest Australia. Roebuck Bay with the city of Broom on its northern shore is south of King Sound. Sediment in the sound is deposited by the Fitzroy River, which is the major body draining the Kimberley Plateau about 200 miles to the west. The extent of the tidal flats around the Sound is indicated by the large white areas covered with a salty residue. According to NASA scientists studying the STS-57 Earth photos, northwest wind gusts are ruffling areas of the water's surface at the mouth of King Sound and in neighboring Collier Bay. Therefore the water is less reflective and dark. The higher reflectance on the brightest areas is caused by biological oils floating on the surface and reducing the capillary wave action. The scientists point out that the oils take the forms of the currents and eddies in the picture. These eddies indicate that the water offshore is moving at a different speed

1993-01-01

314

Holocene sedimentation in the shallow nearshore zone off Nauset Inlet, Cape Cod, Massachusetts  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Present conditions and sedimentary evolution of the shallow offshore region near Nauset Inlet on Cape Cod, Massachusetts were clarified using high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, sidescan-sonar records, surface grab samples and current meter measurements. The study area contains three provinces: (1) a nearshore province (shallower than 18 m) with a relatively steep slope (0.6??) and a cover of medium sand; (2) a northern offshore province covered with coarse sand, gravel, and boulders, interpreted to be glacial drift; and (3) a southern offshore province with a gentle seaward-dipping slope (0.3??) and a surface sediment of coarse sand. The glacial drift exposed in the northern offshore province can be traced southward under the coarse sand province. The overlying fill is comprised of either outwash sediment derived from the Pleistocene South Channel ice lobe to the east or Holocene-aged marine sediments eroded from seacliffs to the north. Latest Holocene sediment appears to be limited to the zone shoreward of 18 m where the medium sand occurs. Near-bottom mean flows (measured over two winter months in 10 m water depth) average 6 cm sec-1 to the south. Mean flows exceeded 20 cm sec-1 approx. 23% of the time. Ninety percent of the flows exceeding 20 cm sec-1 were directed to the south, reflecting the dominant atmospheric forcing during these winter months. Waves had an average variance of 650 cm2 with variance exceeding 5000 cm2, 3% of the time, indicating moderate wave activity. Present processes are actively reshaping the nearshore province, which is characterized by many east to northeast-trending shore-oblique channels that do not extend seaward of the 18-m contour. Coarse sand in the floors of these channels suggests they may be erosional features, and the presence of megaripples oriented perpendicular to the channel axes indicates active transport in these channels. Megaripple orientation and the current and wave regime of the study area support a rip-current origin for these channels. ?? 1982.

Aubrey, D.G.; Twichell, D.C.; Pfirman, S.L.

1982-01-01

315

A description of the nearshore fish communities in the Huron-Erie Corridor using multiple gear types  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Great Lakes coastal wetlands provide a critical habitat for many fish species throughout their life cycles. Once home to one of the largest wetland complexes in the Great Lakes, coastal wetlands in the Huron–Erie Corridor (HEC) have decreased dramatically since the early 1900s. We characterized the nearshore fish communities at three different wetland complexes in the HEC using electrofishing, seines, and fyke nets. Species richness was highest in the Detroit River (63), followed by the St. Clair Delta (56), and Western Lake Erie (47). The nearshore fish communities in the Detroit River and St. Clair Delta consisted primarily of shiners, bluntnose minnow, centrarchids, and brook silverside, while the Western Lake Erie sites consisted of high proportions of non-native taxa including common carp, gizzard shad, goldfish, and white perch. Species richness estimates using individual-based rarefaction curves were higher when using electrofishing data compared to fyke nets or seine hauls at each wetland. Twelve fish species were captured exclusively during electrofishing assessments, while one species was captured exclusively in fyke nets, and none exclusively during seine hauls. Western Lake Erie wetlands were more indicative of degraded systems with lower species richness, lower proportion of turbidity intolerant species, and increased abundance of non-native taxa. This work highlights the importance of coastal wetlands in the HEC by capturing 69 different fish species utilizing these wetlands to fulfill life history requirements and provides insight when selecting gears to sample nearshore littoral areas.

Francis, James T.; Chiotti, Justin A.; Boase, James C.; Thomas, Mike V.; Manny, Bruce A.; Roseman, Edward F.

2013-01-01

316

Doppler spectra of electromagnetic fields scattered from two-dimensional fetch- and depth-limited nearshore sea surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Doppler spectral signatures of sea echoes from two-dimensional (2-D) fetch- and depth-limited sea surfaces are investigated using the second-order small-slope approximation (SSA-II) model. For the description of 2-D nearshore sea surface, the revised choppy wave model (RCWM) is applied, which takes into account the wind fetch effect and water depth effect in nearshore marine environment. Comparisons of computed results in co-polarizations and cross polarization at various incident angles show that Doppler shift and spectral bandwidth can be greatly influenced by hydrodynamic modulation of waves in the large wind fetch and small water depth marine environment, which indicates that the hydrodynamic modulation induced by shoaling effect would be greatly enhanced in the situation of the nearshore shallow sea with a long wind fetch. The differences in variation trend between results in co-polarizations and cross polarization also reflect varying degrees of influence of aforementioned hydrodynamic modulation on different scattering mechanisms.

Nie, Ding; Zhang, Min; Li, Ning; Jiang, Wangqiang

2014-11-01

317

Composition and dynamics of the Black Sea benthopelagic plankton and its contribution to the near-shore plankton communities.  

PubMed

At a shallow (7 m) near-shore sampling site in the Black Sea we analyzed composition, abundance, and biomass of benthopelagic organisms and the contribution these animals make to the total plankton. The site was monitored across several years (1996-2001; 2006-2007) whilst for 1999-2000 the seasonal variations were analysed. A total of 321 samples from Golubaja Bay near Novorossiysk (44°34'31.04? N, 37°58'45.11? E) in 1996-2007 were taken with a Judey net. The benthopelagic fauna was represented by 69 taxa, a diversity comparable to similar shelf areas. The benthopelagic component played an important role in near-shore plankton communities in the Black Sea accounting for 50% of the total zooplankton biomass at night during all seasons. Abundance and biomass of the benthopelagic animals showed seasonal fluctuations, the highest biomass being recorded during winter (>75% of the total zooplankton biomass) and early spring due to large amphipods, whilst the highest abundances occur during late summer because of numerous young stages of various taxa. Amphipods, mysids, and decapods are the main contributors to the plankton biomass and abundances. Both night and daytime samples are strongly recommended for the adequate description of the near-shore plankton communities. PMID:24945680

Vereshchaka, Alexander L; Anokhina, Ludmila L

2014-01-01

318

Composition and Dynamics of the Black Sea Benthopelagic Plankton and Its Contribution to the Near-Shore Plankton Communities  

PubMed Central

At a shallow (7 m) near-shore sampling site in the Black Sea we analyzed composition, abundance, and biomass of benthopelagic organisms and the contribution these animals make to the total plankton. The site was monitored across several years (1996–2001; 2006–2007) whilst for 1999–2000 the seasonal variations were analysed. A total of 321 samples from Golubaja Bay near Novorossiysk (44°34?31.04? N, 37°58?45.11? E) in 1996–2007 were taken with a Judey net. The benthopelagic fauna was represented by 69 taxa, a diversity comparable to similar shelf areas. The benthopelagic component played an important role in near-shore plankton communities in the Black Sea accounting for 50% of the total zooplankton biomass at night during all seasons. Abundance and biomass of the benthopelagic animals showed seasonal fluctuations, the highest biomass being recorded during winter (>75% of the total zooplankton biomass) and early spring due to large amphipods, whilst the highest abundances occur during late summer because of numerous young stages of various taxa. Amphipods, mysids, and decapods are the main contributors to the plankton biomass and abundances. Both night and daytime samples are strongly recommended for the adequate description of the near-shore plankton communities. PMID:24945680

Vereshchaka, Alexander L.; Anokhina, Ludmila L.

2014-01-01

319

Trace Elements in King Eiders and Common Eiders in the Canadian Arctic  

Microsoft Academic Search

We determined concentrations of selected trace elements in tissues of king and common eiders at three locations in the Canadian\\u000a arctic. Renal and hepatic cadmium concentrations in king eiders at a location in the eastern arctic were among the highest\\u000a ever recorded in eider ducks: there, they were higher in king eiders than in common eiders. Cadmium concentrations were lower

M. Wayland; H. G. Gilchrist; D. L. Dickson; T. Bollinger; C. James; R. A. Carreno; J. Keating

2001-01-01

320

Mapping of Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Using Autonomous Underwater Vehicles in Nearshore Regions  

SciTech Connect

The use of an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) equipped with sidescan sonar was investigated for determining the boundaries of nearshore submerged aquatic vegetation beds, specifically eelgrass (Zostera marina). Shifts in eelgrass bed morphology, size, and distribution are used as indicators in monitoring programs to measure the impacts of coastal development and environmental stressors on eelgrass and to establish the efficacy of restoration programs. However, many monitoring programs necessarily extend over multiple-year time periods. Therefore, techniques that are easily reproducible, accurate, and cost-effective can demonstrate distinct advantages over some of the more traditional and labor-intensive methods, such as diver assessments and transects of shoot counts. Remote monitoring of eelgrass beds using satellite and aerial imagery has been demonstrated with moderate success, but requires groundtruthing, which can be costly and which frequently cannot delineate the deeper boundaries of eelgrass beds. One possible means for low-cost mapping is the use of AUVs equipped with acoustic imaging hardware. AUVs provide an ideal platform, because they can be deployed by small teams (two people), they are highly maneuverable, they can cover large areas over a relatively short time period (3knot operational speed), and they are equipped with multiple oceanographic instruments for correlated data collection. This paper describes the use of sidescan-equipped AUV technology deployed over multiple time periods at the same location where imagery of eelgrass beds was obtained and analyzed for comparative purposes.

Jones, Mark E.; Miller, Lee M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Ewert, Daniel W.

2007-10-02

321

An efficient mode-splitting method for a curvilinear nearshore circulation model  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A mode-splitting method is applied to the quasi-3D nearshore circulation equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The gravity wave mode and the vorticity wave mode of the equations are derived using the two-step projection method. Using an implicit algorithm for the gravity mode and an explicit algorithm for the vorticity mode, we combine the two modes to derive a mixed difference–differential equation with respect to surface elevation. McKee et al.'s [McKee, S., Wall, D.P., and Wilson, S.K., 1996. An alternating direction implicit scheme for parabolic equations with mixed derivative and convective terms. J. Comput. Phys., 126, 64–76.] ADI scheme is then used to solve the parabolic-type equation in dealing with the mixed derivative and convective terms from the curvilinear coordinate transformation. Good convergence rates are found in two typical cases which represent respectively the motions dominated by the gravity mode and the vorticity mode. Time step limitations imposed by the vorticity convective Courant number in vorticity-mode-dominant cases are discussed. Model efficiency and accuracy are verified in model application to tidal current simulations in San Francisco Bight.

Shi, Fengyan; Kirby, James T.; Hanes, Daniel M.

2007-01-01

322

Establishment of two invasive crustaceans (Copepoda: Harpacticoida) on the nearshore sands of Lake Michigan  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Benthic copepods (Copepoda: Harpacticoida) in the nearshore sediments of southern Lake Michigan appear to be dominated by two new invasive species. We report the first occurrence in North America of Schizopera borutzkyi Montschenko, a native to the Danube River delta, and Heteropsyllus nr. nunni, likely a new species that is morphologically similar to the marine species Heteropsyllus nunni and represents the first occurrence of this genus in freshwater. Schizopera borutzkyi is a euryhaline species occurring in shallow sands in its native habitat and in deeper sands (6-15 m) in southern Lake Michigan. Based on the absence of these species from previous studies, we suggest that they are recent introductions. Heteropsyllus nr. nunni dominated (55-100%) the harpacticoid abundance to depths of 9 m, but S. borutzkyi comprised 75% of the harpacticoid abundance at 15 m. Native harpacticoids were always greatly outnumbered by invasive harpacticoids in our samples, which suggests that the natives are being replaced rapidly or that the invasive species are finding unused resources. The ecological implications of these introductions are not known, but these invasions may represent continued 'invasional meltdown' in Lake Michigan.

Horvath, Thomas G.; Whitman, Richard L.; Last, Laurel L.

2001-01-01

323

Seasonal-scale nearshore morphological evolution: Field observations and numerical modeling  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A coupled waves-currents-bathymetric evolution model (DELFT-3D) is compared with field measurements to test hypotheses regarding the processes responsible for alongshore varying nearshore morphological changes at seasonal time scales. A 2001 field experiment, along the beaches adjacent to Grays Harbor, Washington, USA, captured the transition between the high-energy erosive conditions of winter and the low-energy beach-building conditions typical of summer. The experiment documented shoreline progradation on the order of 10-20 m and on average approximately 70 m of onshore sandbar migration during a four-month period. Significant alongshore variability was observed in the morphological response of the sandbar over a 4 km reach of coast with sandbar movement ranging from 20 m of offshore migration to over 175 m of onshore bar migration, the largest seasonal-scale onshore migration event observed in a natural setting. Both observations and model results suggest that, in the case investigated here, alongshore variations in initial bathymetry are primarily responsible for the observed alongshore variable morphological changes. Alongshore varying incident hydrodynamic forcing, occasionally significant in this region due to a tidal inlet and associated ebb-tidal delta, was relatively minor during the study period and appears to play an insignificant role in the observed alongshore variability in sandbar behavior at kilometer-scale. The role of fully three-dimensional cell circulation patterns in explaining the observed morphological variability also appears to be minor, at least in the case investigated here. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

Ruggiero, P.; Walstra, D.-J.R.; Gelfenbaum, G.; van, Ormondt M.

2009-01-01

324

Diversity and population structure of a near-shore marine-sediment viral community.  

PubMed

Viruses, most of which are phage, are extremely abundant in marine sediments, yet almost nothing is known about their identity or diversity. We present the metagenomic analysis of an uncultured near-shore marine-sediment viral community. Three-quarters of the sequences in the sample were not related to anything previously reported. Among the sequences that could be identified, the majority belonged to double-stranded DNA phage. Temperate phage were more common than lytic phage, suggesting that lysogeny may be an important lifestyle for sediment viruses. Comparisons between the sediment sample and previously sequenced seawater viral communities showed that certain phage phylogenetic groups were abundant in all marine viral communities, while other phage groups were under-represented or absent. This 'marineness' suggests that marine phage are derived from a common set of ancestors. Several independent mathematical models, based on the distribution of overlapping shotgun sequence fragments from the library, were used to show that the diversity of the viral community was extremely high, with at least 10(4) viral genotypes per kilogram of sediment and a Shannon index greater than 9 nats. Based on these observations we propose that marine-sediment viral communities are one of the largest unexplored reservoirs of sequence space on the planet. PMID:15156913

Breitbart, Mya; Felts, Ben; Kelley, Scott; Mahaffy, Joseph M; Nulton, James; Salamon, Peter; Rohwer, Forest

2004-03-22

325

Geochemical controls on the production and distribution of methylmercury in near-shore marine sediments.  

PubMed

We examined temporal differences in sedimentary production of monomethylmercury (MMHg) at three sites in Long Island Sound (LIS). Sediment-phase concentrations of Hg species decreased from west to east in LIS surface sediments, following the trend of organic matter. However, Hg methylation potentials, measured by incubation with an isotopic tracer (200Hg), increased from west to east. 200Hg methylation potentials were enhanced in August relative to March and June, attributable to differences in activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Organic matter and acid-volatile sulfide influenced the distribution coefficient (KD) of inorganic Hg (Hg(II) = total Hg - MMHg) and inhibited 200Hg methylation in surface sediments. 200Hg methylation varied inversely with the KD of Hg(II) and positively with the concentration of Hg(II), mostly as HgS0, in LIS pore waters. Accordingly, we posit that a principal control on MMHg production in low-sulfide, coastal marine sediments is partitioning of Hg(II) between particle and dissolved phases, which regulates availability of Hg substrate to methylating bacteria. Most of the partitioning in LIS sediments is due to Hg-organic associations. This suggests that reductions in the organic content of coastal sediment, a potential result of nutrient abatement programs intended to inhibit eutrophication of near-shore waters, could enhance MMHg production by increasing the bioavailability of the large reservoir of "legacy Hg" buried within the sediment. PMID:15046351

Hammerschmidt, Chad R; Fitzgerald, William F

2004-03-01

326

Organic priority pollutants in nearshore fish from 14 Lake Michigan tributaries and embayments, 1983  

SciTech Connect

Composite, nearshore, whole fish samples of selected species, collected in fall 1983 from 13 Lake Michigan tributaries and Grand Traverse Bay, were analyzed for a wide range of pesticides and priority pollutants using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This study was carried out to identify existing source areas for known and previously unrecognized toxic substances. The authors strategy was to analyze those resident fish with the highest likely levels of contaminant. All fish analyzed exceeded the 2 mg/kg FDA action levels for PCBs, while 50% of the samples exceeded the DDTr IJC objective of 1 mg/kg. St. Joseph River common carp (Cyprinus carpio) carried the heaviest contaminant burden of all fish examined for PCBs (27.6 mg/kg), DDTr (10.2 kg/mg), and toxaphene (3.3 mg/kg); chlordane levels (0.85 mg/kg) were second highest to those in Kalamazoo River common carp (0.87 mg/kg). Concentrations of PCBs, toxaphene, DDT, DDE, and other pesticides were higher in bottom-feeding fish, such as common carp, than in top predators, e.g., northern pike (Esox lucius). Bottom feeders are relatively fatty fish, and live and feed near contaminated sediments, which increases their potential to bioaccumulate fat-soluble contaminants. Pesticides were also present in elevated concentrations in fish from sites with higher industrial and agricultural development. 31 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

Camanzo, J.; Rice, C.P.; Jude, D.J.; Rossmann, R.

1987-01-01

327

Delayed upwelling alters nearshore coastal ocean ecosystems in the northern California current  

PubMed Central

Wind-driven coastal ocean upwelling supplies nutrients to the euphotic zone near the coast. Nutrients fuel the growth of phytoplankton, the base of a very productive coastal marine ecosystem [Pauly D, Christensen V (1995) Nature 374:255–257]. Because nutrient supply and phytoplankton biomass in shelf waters are highly sensitive to variation in upwelling-driven circulation, shifts in the timing and strength of upwelling may alter basic nutrient and carbon fluxes through marine food webs. We show how a 1-month delay in the 2005 spring transition to upwelling-favorable wind stress in the northern California Current Large Marine Ecosystem resulted in numerous anomalies: warm water, low nutrient levels, low primary productivity, and an unprecedented low recruitment of rocky intertidal organisms. The delay was associated with 20- to 40-day wind oscillations accompanying a southward shift of the jet stream. Early in the upwelling season (May–July) off Oregon, the cumulative upwelling-favorable wind stress was the lowest in 20 years, nearshore surface waters averaged 2°C warmer than normal, surf-zone chlorophyll-a and nutrients were 50% and 30% less than normal, respectively, and densities of recruits of mussels and barnacles were reduced by 83% and 66%, respectively. Delayed early-season upwelling and stronger late-season upwelling are consistent with predictions of the influence of global warming on coastal upwelling regions. PMID:17360419

Barth, John A.; Menge, Bruce A.; Lubchenco, Jane; Chan, Francis; Bane, John M.; Kirincich, Anthony R.; McManus, Margaret A.; Nielsen, Karina J.; Pierce, Stephen D.; Washburn, Libe

2007-01-01

328

Nearshore and alluvial facies in the Sant Llorenç del Munt depositional system: recognition and development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Eocene Sant Llorenç del Munt fan-delta complex forms a part of the coarse-grained foreland basin fill of the southeastern margin of the Ebro Basin. It was sourced from the rising Catalan Coastal Range in the SE and shows an overall northwesterly progradation during a time period of approximately six million years. Coarse clastic deposits (coarse sands and gravels) dominated this fan delta, whereas finer-grained sands, silts, and muds were deposited laterally off active sedimentation sites or in the more marine area. Depositional processes were clearly influenced by the high sediment input, giving a dominance of sediment gravity flow deposits. The sediments studied have been grouped into four distinct facies belts including coastal plain, proximal fan-delta front, distal fan-delta front and fan-delta slope sediments, respectively. The facies belts combine to form the nearshore and coastal alluvial reaches of the fan-delta system, developed during a transgressive phase lasting some 50,000 years.

Rasmussen, H.

2000-12-01

329

Estimating the status of nearshore rockfish (Sebastes spp.) populations with length frequency data.  

PubMed

Ecologists often point to excessive truncation of a population's size-structure as a deleterious effect of exploitation, yet the effect of this truncation on population persistence is seldom quantified. While persistence of marine populations requires maintenance of a sufficient level of lifetime reproduction, fishing reduces lifetime reproduction by increasing the total mortality rate, preventing individuals from growing old, large, and highly fecund. We employ a new method of estimating changes in lifetime egg production (LEP) using two samples of the size structure, one in the past and one current, to assess persistence of five species of nearshore rockfish (Sebastes spp.) in California and Oregon, U.S.A. Using length frequency data from catch in the recreational fishery, we estimate that since 1980, four of the five rockfish species considered have experienced declines in LEP to levels that suggest that persistence is impaired. When changes in LEP were estimated for subsets of the data corresponding to neighboring geographical regions, differences in LEP levels were apparent in the neighboring regions, implying that the effects of fishing mortality are not evenly distributed over space. We conclude by discussing the use of this estimation approach to assess the status of other species in data-poor situations. PMID:16826996

O'Farrell, Michael R; Botsford, Louis W

2006-06-01

330

Molecular Characterization of Potential Microcystin-Producing Cyanobacteria in Lake Ontario Embayments and Nearshore Waters?  

PubMed Central

The distribution and genotypic variation of potential microcystin (MC) producers along the southern and eastern shores of Lake Ontario in 2001 and 2003 were examined using a suite of PCR primers. Cyanobacterial, Microcystis sp., and Microcystis-specific toxin primer sets identified shoreline distribution of cyanobacterial DNA (in 97% of the stations) and MC synthetase genes (in 50% of the stations). Sequence analysis of a partial mcyA amplicon targeting Microcystis, Anabaena, and Planktothrix species indicated that the Microcystis sp. genotype was the dominant MC genotype present and revealed a novel Microcystis-like sequence containing a 6-bp insert. Analysis of the same samples with genus-specific mcyE primers confirmed that the Microcystis sp. genotype was the dominant potential MC producer. Genotype compositions within embayments were relatively homogenous compared to those for shoreline and tributary samples. MC concentrations along the shoreline exhibited both temporal and spatial differences as evidenced by the protein phosphatase inhibition assay, at times exceeding the World Health Organization guideline value for drinking water of 1.0 ?g MC-LReq liter?1. MC genotypes are widespread along the New York State shoreline of Lake Ontario, appear to originate nearshore, and can be carried through the lake via wind and surface water current patterns. PMID:17526791

Hotto, A. M.; Satchwell, M. F.; Boyer, G. L.

2007-01-01

331

Effects of a nearshore wastewater discharge: Water column and sediment pore water toxicity  

SciTech Connect

The relationship between water column and sediment pore water toxicity was investigated near a municipal-industrial wastewater discharge in southern Texas. Toxicity associated with effluent distributions in the water column are known to vary in both time and space. Toxicity of sediment, however, is often more stable over time. Sediment can serve as a long-term integrator of toxicity in areas subject to chronic exposure of effluents. This study addressed the relationship between water column toxicity and that found in the sediments on both spatial and temporal scales. Four 2 Km transacts were established around a nearshore wastewater outfall. Eight stations along each transact were sampled for both surface waters and sediment pore water toxicity. Toxicity was determined using a modified sea urchin fertilization test. Surface waters were sampled and tested for eight consecutive months, while sediment pore waters were sampled on three occasions over the length of this study. Results have shown that toxicity in receiving waters was a good indicator to trace movements of the highly variable effluent plume. The distribution of effluent in the water column, and hence water column toxicity, was primarily driven by local wind conditions. Toxicity in sediment porewater was, much less variable and more evenly distributed over the study site. Sediment pore water toxicity was also a good predictor of the distribution of benthic infaunal invertebrates over much of the study site.

Krause, P.R. [MEC Analytical Systems, Inc., Tiburon, CA (United States); Carr, R.S. [National Biological Survey, Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

1995-12-31

332

Evaluation of the physical process controlling beach changes adjacent to nearshore dredge pits  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Numerical modeling of a beach nourishment project is conducted to enable a detailed evaluation of the processes associated with the effects of nearshore dredge pits on nourishment evolution and formation of erosion hot spots. A process-based numerical model, Delft3D, is used for this purpose. The analysis is based on the modification of existing bathymetry to simulate "what if" scenarios with/without the bathymetric features of interest. Borrow pits dredged about 30??years ago to provide sand for the nourishment project have a significant influence on project performance and formation of erosional hot spots. It was found that the main processes controlling beach response to these offshore bathymetric features were feedbacks between wave forces (roller force or alongshore component of the radiation stress), pressure gradients due to differentials in wave set-up/set-down and bed shear stress. Modeling results also indicated that backfilling of selected borrow sites showed a net positive effect within the beach fill limits and caused a reduction in the magnitude of hot spot erosion. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Benedet, L.; List, J.H.

2008-01-01

333

Population structure of Cladophora-borne Escherichia coli in nearshore water of Lake Michigan  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We previously reported that the macrophytic green alga Cladophora harbors high densities (up to 106 colony-forming units/g dry weight) of the fecal indicator bacteria, Escherichia coli and enterococci, in shoreline waters of Lake Michigan. However, the population structure and genetic relatedness of Cladophora-borne indicator bacteria remain poorly understood. In this study, 835 E. coli isolates were collected from Cladophora tufts (mats) growing on rocks from a breakwater located within the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore in northwest Indiana. The horizontal fluorophore enhanced rep-PCR (HFERP) DNA fingerprinting technique was used to determine the genetic relatedness of the isolates to each other and to those in a library of E. coli DNA fingerprints. While the E. coli isolates from Cladophora showed a high degree of genetic relatedness (???92% similarity), in most cases, however, the isolates were genetically distinct. The Shannon diversity index for the population was very high (5.39). Both spatial and temporal influences contributed to the genetic diversity. There was a strong association of isolate genotypes by location (79% and 80% for lake- and ditch-side samplings, respectively), and isolates collected from 2002 were distinctly different from those obtained in 2003. Cladophora-borne E. coli isolates represented a unique group, which was distinct from other E. coli isolates in the DNA fingerprint library tested. Taken together, these results indicate that E. coli strains associated with Cladophora may be a recurring source of indicator bacteria to the nearshore beach. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Byappanahalli, M.N.; Whitman, R.L.; Shively, D.A.; Ferguson, J.; Ishii, S.; Sadowsky, M.J.

2007-01-01

334

Population structure of Cladophora-borne Escherichia coli in nearshore water of Lake Michigan.  

PubMed

We previously reported that the macrophytic green alga Cladophora harbors high densities (up to 10(6) colony-forming units/g dry weight) of the fecal indicator bacteria, Escherichia coli and enterococci, in shoreline waters of Lake Michigan. However, the population structure and genetic relatedness of Cladophora-borne indicator bacteria remain poorly understood. In this study, 835 E. coli isolates were collected from Cladophora tufts (mats) growing on rocks from a breakwater located within the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore in northwest Indiana. The horizontal fluorophore enhanced rep-PCR (HFERP) DNA fingerprinting technique was used to determine the genetic relatedness of the isolates to each other and to those in a library of E. coli DNA fingerprints. While the E. coli isolates from Cladophora showed a high degree of genetic relatedness (92% similarity), in most cases, however, the isolates were genetically distinct. The Shannon diversity index for the population was very high (5.39). Both spatial and temporal influences contributed to the genetic diversity. There was a strong association of isolate genotypes by location (79% and 80% for lake- and ditch-side samplings, respectively), and isolates collected from 2002 were distinctly different from those obtained in 2003. Cladophora-borne E. coli isolates represented a unique group, which was distinct from other E. coli isolates in the DNA fingerprint library tested. Taken together, these results indicate that E. coli strains associated with Cladophora may be a recurring source of indicator bacteria to the nearshore beach. PMID:17451778

Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N; Whitman, Richard L; Shively, Dawn A; Ferguson, John; Ishii, Satoshi; Sadowsky, Michael J

2007-08-01

335

Diversity and population structure of a near-shore marine-sediment viral community.  

PubMed Central

Viruses, most of which are phage, are extremely abundant in marine sediments, yet almost nothing is known about their identity or diversity. We present the metagenomic analysis of an uncultured near-shore marine-sediment viral community. Three-quarters of the sequences in the sample were not related to anything previously reported. Among the sequences that could be identified, the majority belonged to double-stranded DNA phage. Temperate phage were more common than lytic phage, suggesting that lysogeny may be an important lifestyle for sediment viruses. Comparisons between the sediment sample and previously sequenced seawater viral communities showed that certain phage phylogenetic groups were abundant in all marine viral communities, while other phage groups were under-represented or absent. This 'marineness' suggests that marine phage are derived from a common set of ancestors. Several independent mathematical models, based on the distribution of overlapping shotgun sequence fragments from the library, were used to show that the diversity of the viral community was extremely high, with at least 10(4) viral genotypes per kilogram of sediment and a Shannon index greater than 9 nats. Based on these observations we propose that marine-sediment viral communities are one of the largest unexplored reservoirs of sequence space on the planet. PMID:15156913

Breitbart, Mya; Felts, Ben; Kelley, Scott; Mahaffy, Joseph M.; Nulton, James; Salamon, Peter; Rohwer, Forest

2004-01-01

336

Mechanisms of nearshore retention and offshore export of mussel larvae over the Agulhas Bank  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ecological connectivity is critical for population dynamics but in many benthic species it is complicated by a planktonic larval phase, whose dispersal remains poorly understood. Using a plankton pump, we examine the distribution of intertidal mussel larvae along three axes: alongshore, cross-shelf and by depth during a large scale (600 km) cruise over the Agulhas Bank off southern Africa in August/September 2010. As a general pattern, higher veliger abundances were found close to the coast. Our analyses of the nearshore flow, estimated from ADCP data and the vertical distribution of larvae, show that onshore larval retention may be mediated by active vertical swimming through the water column guided by light and wind-induced turbulence. A massive offshore export of larvae off St Francis Bay was, however, observed during an Agulhas Current meander which influenced inner shelf waters. We hypothesize that, by increasing and homogenizing flow, the Agulhas Current may erase the effects of larval vertical positioning on onshore retention and transport larvae offshore. Our study highlights the need to integrate the effects of complex, region-specific physical dynamics with the swimming behaviour of larvae in order to explain their spatial distribution, population connectivity and the consequences for population dynamics.

Weidberg, Nicolás; Porri, Francesca; Von der Meden, Charles E. O.; Jackson, Jennifer M.; Goschen, Wayne; McQuaid, Christopher D.

2015-04-01

337

Sources of fecal indicator bacteria to groundwater, Malibu Lagoon and the near-shore ocean, Malibu, California, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS) used to treat residential and commercial sewage near Malibu, California have been implicated as a possible source of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) to Malibu Lagoon and the near-shore ocean. For this to occur, treated wastewater must first move through groundwater before discharging to the Lagoon or ocean. In July 2009 and April 2010, ?18O and ?D data showed that some samples from water-table wells contained as much as 70% wastewater; at that time FIB concentrations in those samples were generally less than the detection limit of 1 Most Probable Number (MPN) per 100 milliliters (mL). In contrast, Malibu Lagoon had total coliform, Escherichia coli, and enterococci concentrations as high as 650,000, 130,000, and 5,500 MPN per 100 mL, respectively, and as many as 12% of samples from nearby ocean beaches exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency single sample enterococci standard for marine recreational water of 104 MPN per 100 mL. Human-associated Bacteroidales, an indicator of human-fecal contamination, were not detected in water from wells, Malibu Lagoon, or the near-shore ocean. Similarly, microarray (PhyloChip) data show Bacteroidales and Fimicutes Operational Taxanomic Units (OTUs) present in OWTS were largely absent in groundwater; in contrast, 50% of Bacteroidales and Fimicutes OTUs present in the near-shore ocean were also present in gull feces. Terminal-Restriction Length Fragment Polymorphism (T-RFLP) and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) data showed that microbial communities in groundwater were different and less abundant than communities in OWTS, Malibu Lagoon, or the near-shore ocean. However, organic compounds indicative of wastewater (such as fecal sterols, bisphenol-A and cosmetics) were present in groundwater having a high percentage of wastewater and were present in groundwater discharging to the ocean. FIB in the near-shore ocean varied with tides, ocean swells, and waves. Movement of water from Malibu Lagoon through the sand berm at the mouth of the Lagoon contributed FIB to the adjacent beach at low tide. Similar increases in FIB concentrations did not occur at beaches adjacent to unsewered residential development, although wastewater indicator compounds and radon-222 (indicative of groundwater discharge) were present. High FIB concentrations at high tide were not related to groundwater discharge, but may be related to FIB associated with debris accumulated along the high-tide line.

Izbicki, John A.; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Burton, Carmen A.; Van De Werfhorst, Laurie; Holden, Patricia A.; Dubinsky, Eric A.

2012-01-01

338

AFSCME, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the 1968 Memphis Sanitation Strike  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. traveled to Memphis to support striking sanitation workers. On the evening of April 3, King delivered his "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speech to strikers and their supporters. The very next day, he was assassinated. This site takes visitors through the experiences of those who were there and also through the words of Dr. King during his time in Memphis. Visitors can find video clips, a chronology of the 1968 strike, and a transcript of King's famous speech.

2008-01-01

339

Outliers and Extremes: Dragon-Kings or Dragon-Fools?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geophysics seems full of monsters like Victor Hugo's Court of Miracles and monstrous extremes have been statistically considered as outliers with respect to more normal events. However, a characteristic magnitude separating abnormal events from normal ones would be at odd with the generic scaling behaviour of nonlinear systems, contrary to "fat tailed" probability distributions and self-organized criticality. More precisely, it can be shown [1] how the apparent monsters could be mere manifestations of a singular measure mishandled as a regular measure. Monstrous fluctuations are the rule, not outliers and they are more frequent than usually thought up to the point that (theoretical) statistical moments can easily be infinite. The empirical estimates of the latter are erratic and diverge with sample size. The corresponding physics is that intense small scale events cannot be smoothed out by upscaling. However, based on a few examples, it has also been argued [2] that one should consider "genuine" outliers of fat tailed distributions so monstrous that they can be called "dragon-kings". We critically analyse these arguments, e.g. finite sample size and statistical estimates of the largest events, multifractal phase transition vs. more classical phase transition. We emphasize the fact that dragon-kings are not needed in order that the largest events become predictable. This is rather reminiscent of the Feast of Fools picturesquely described by Victor Hugo. [1] D. Schertzer, I. Tchiguirinskaia, S. Lovejoy et P. Hubert (2010): No monsters, no miracles: in nonlinear sciences hydrology is not an outlier! Hydrological Sciences Journal, 55 (6) 965 - 979. [2] D. Sornette (2009): Dragon-Kings, Black Swans and the Prediction of Crises. International Journal of Terraspace Science and Engineering 1(3), 1-17.

Schertzer, D. J.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Lovejoy, S.

2012-12-01

340

Dermatophilus chelonae in a king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah).  

PubMed

A mass was removed from the left flank of a 10-yr-old male king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah), and histologic examination revealed granulomatous dermatitis with intralesional gram-positive cocci and filamentous bacteria. Fourteen months later, a histologically similar subcutaneous mass was removed from a different site. One year later, a large subcutaneous mass at the first surgical site was removed, and histopathologic examination revealed multiloculated granulomas with intralesional gram-positive cocci. An organism was cultured and identified by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing as Dermatophilus chelonae. After a course of antibiotic therapy, no further lesions were seen for 5 mo. PMID:15732601

Wellehan, James F X; Turenne, Christine; Heard, Darryl J; Detrisac, Carol J; O'Kelley, Jeffrey J

2004-12-01

341

Lippi Brandolini on King Mathias or on Deterioration of Health  

E-print Network

of these, other very many tribes, used to follow those being born with lamentation and tears but on the other hand used to follow the dying with laughter and song, thinking that the former were entering into everlasting misery, but the latter were departing... to many, are of benefit to themselves alone, or only to a few by their counsel and their virtues, but for Kings and Princes it is necessary to look to the safety of all and to take upon their shoulders the whole of the common weal by doing which...

Horvath, Agnes

2012-01-18

342

Primary secretory otitis media in Cavalier King Charles spaniels.  

PubMed

Primary secretory otitis media (PSOM) is a disease that has been described in the Cavalier King Charles spaniel (CKCS). A large, bulging pars flaccida identified on otoscopic examination confirms the diagnosis. However, in many CKCS with PSOM the pars flaccida is flat, and radiographic imaging is needed to confirm the diagnosis. Current treatment for PSOM includes performing a myringotomy into the caudal-ventral quadrant of the pars tensa with subsequent flushing of the mucus out of the bulla using a video otoscope. Repeat myringotomies and flushing of the middle ear are necessary to keep the middle ear free of mucus. PMID:23122173

Cole, Lynette K

2012-11-01

343

Snohomish County Biodiesel Project  

SciTech Connect

Snohomish County in western Washington State began converting its vehicle fleet to use a blend of biodiesel and petroleum diesel in 2005. As prices for biodiesel rose due to increased demand for this cleaner-burning fuel, Snohomish County looked to its farmers to ���¢��������grow���¢������� this fuel locally. Suitable seed crops that can be crushed to extract oil for use as biodiesel feedstock include canola, mustard, and camelina. The residue, or mash, has high value as an animal feed. County farmers began with 52 acres of canola and mustard crops in 2006, increasing to 250 acres and 356 tons in 2008. In 2009, this number decreased to about 150 acres and 300 tons due to increased price for mustard seed.

Terrill Chang; Deanna Carveth

2010-02-01

344

Jasper County Comprehensive Plan Adoption Draft  

E-print Network

Jasper County Comprehensive Plan Adoption Draft Comprehensive Plan Jasper County, IN #12;#12;Table Mandate.......................................vii Jasper County's Fulfillment of the Mandate of Major Needs for Jasper County ...............5 Additional Opportunities

345

Petroleum County Secondary Data Analysis  

E-print Network

Petroleum County Secondary Data Analysis July 23, 2012 1 Community Health Data, MT Dept American Diabetes Association (2012) Region 3 (South Central) ­ Judith Basin, Fergus, Petroleum* #12; Petroleum County Secondary Data Analysis July 23, 2012 2 Socioeconomic Measures1

Maxwell, Bruce D.

346

Dynamics of a nearshore bar system in the northern Adriatic: A video-based morphological classification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this paper is to define a simplified morphodynamic classification suitable for low energy beaches exposed to microtidal conditions. The study site is located in the northern Adriatic (in Italy), it is an almost 2 km-long rectilinear beach bordered at the northern edge by coastal structures and at the southern end by a small river inlet. The mechanisms related to the evolution of the submerged part of the beach were derived from video-monitoring using Argus technology. The morphodynamic evolution of the system was studied using an automatic procedure on images for the characterisation of nearshore bars that showed good correspondence with hand-based (visual) interpretation. To apply this automatic procedure, the bar's plan crest shape was mapped using cross-shore pixel luminosity transects traced on time-averaged video images. A careful sensitivity analysis was undertaken to determine the best spacing between transects for the correct tracing of the shape of the bar crest. The error associated to a transect spacing every 25 m resulted in being comparable with the pixel resolution in the area and with the error found comparing the video interpretation with bathymetric surveys. From the study of a four and a half year dataset (February 2003-May 2007), the submerged beach was found to be characterised by the presence of a single bar in the area next to coastal protection structures. However, moving southwards of these, inner and outer bars were present. The morphodynamics of the outer bar and its plan shape modifications were dominated by rhythmic forms. Occasionally, after high energy events, the bar became rectilinear but during the following lower energy periods rhythmicity was re-established, supporting the hypothesis of self-organization mechanisms. The cross-shore position of the bar's crests only showed limited cross-shore mobility through time.

Armaroli, Clara; Ciavola, Paolo

2011-03-01

347

210Po and 210Pb distributions and residence times in the nearshore region of Lake Superior  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The naturally occurring radionuclide, 210Pb, and its decay daughter, 210Po, were measured in the Keweenaw Peninsula region of Lake Superior. Water, suspended particles, sediment trap material (settling particles), and sediment cores and grab samples were collected along three transects that stretched from 1 to 20 km from shore. Departures from secular equilibrium (activity ratio of 210Po:210Pb = 1) were observed for most samples. 210Po-deficiency was observed in both suspended particles (TSP) with a ratio of 0.43 ± 0.05 (±95% confidence interval (CI)) and settling particles with a ratio of 0.57 ± 0.04; higher ratios in the settling particles resulted from an admixture of resuspended sediments. Ratios in the dissolved phase were 0.45 ± 0.12. Approximately 83% and 85% of total 210Po and 210Pb in the water column was in the particulate phase. No evidence of biological uptake of Po was found. Seasonal and spatial variability in activities and ratios was small. Using steady state solutions to the mass balance equations for both isotopes, similar residence times in the water column were calculated for 210Po and 210Pb (55 ˜ 75 days in a 150-m-deep water column). It was possible to calibrate a one-box model for the paired isotopes so that the model output closely matched rates of sediment and isotope resuspension estimated from sediment traps. However, this calibration required a fractionation of the isotopes during resuspension. The particle settling velocity was estimated to be 2.3 m d-1, which also is in agreement with the estimate (2.4 ± 2.2 m d-1) from sediment traps. These results indicate rapid fluxes of radioisotopes and sediments through the water column largely driven by resuspension of sediments in nearshore areas.

Chai, Yingtao; Urban, Noel R.

2004-10-01

348

Estimation of wave phase speed and nearshore bathymetry from video imagery  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A new remote sensing technique based on video image processing has been developed for the estimation of nearshore bathymetry. The shoreward propagation of waves is measured using pixel intensity time series collected at a cross-shore array of locations using remotely operated video cameras. The incident band is identified, and the cross-spectral matrix is calculated for this band. The cross-shore component of wavenumber is found as the gradient in phase of the first complex empirical orthogonal function of this matrix. Water depth is then inferred from linear wave theory's dispersion relationship. Full bathymetry maps may be measured by collecting data in a large array composed of both cross-shore and longshore lines. Data are collected hourly throughout the day, and a stable, daily estimate of bathymetry is calculated from the median of the hourly estimates. The technique was tested using 30 days of hourly data collected at the SandyDuck experiment in Duck, North Carolina, in October 1997. Errors calculated as the difference between estimated depth and ground truth data show a mean bias of -35 cm (rms error = 91 cm). Expressed as a fraction of the true water depth, the mean percent error was 13% (rms error = 34%). Excluding the region of known wave nonlinearities over the bar crest, the accuracy of the technique improved, and the mean (rms) error was -20 cm (75 cm). Additionally, under low-amplitude swells (wave height H ???1 m), the performance of the technique across the entire profile improved to 6% (29%) of the true water depth with a mean (rms) error of -12 cm (71 cm). Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

Stockdon, H.F.; Holman, R.A.

2000-01-01

349

Coral Colonisation of an Artificial Reef in a Turbid Nearshore Environment, Dampier Harbour, Western Australia  

PubMed Central

A 0.6 hectare artificial reef of local rock and recycled concrete sleepers was constructed in December 2006 at Parker Point in the industrial port of Dampier, western Australia, with the aim of providing an environmental offset for a nearshore coral community lost to land reclamation. Corals successfully colonised the artificial reef, despite the relatively harsh environmental conditions at the site (annual water temperature range 18-32°C, intermittent high turbidity, frequent cyclones, frequent nearby ship movements). Coral settlement to the artificial reef was examined by terracotta tile deployments, and later stages of coral community development were examined by in-situ visual surveys within fixed 25 x 25 cm quadrats on the rock and concrete substrates. Mean coral density on the tiles varied from 113 ± 17 SE to 909 ± 85 SE per m2 over five deployments, whereas mean coral density in the quadrats was only 6.0 ± 1.0 SE per m2 at eight months post construction, increasing to 24.0 ± 2.1 SE per m2 at 62 months post construction. Coral taxa colonising the artificial reef were a subset of those on the surrounding natural reef, but occurred in different proportions—Pseudosiderastreatayami, Mycediumelephantotus and Leptastreapurpurea being disproportionately abundant on the artificial reef. Coral cover increased rapidly in the later stages of the study, reaching 2.3 ± 0.7 SE % at 62 months post construction. This study indicates that simple materials of opportunity can provide a suitable substrate for coral recruitment in Dampier Harbour, and that natural colonisation at the study site remains sufficient to initiate a coral community on artificial substrate despite ongoing natural and anthropogenic perturbations. PMID:24040405

Blakeway, David; Byers, Michael; Stoddart, James; Rossendell, Jason

2013-01-01

350

Tectonic controls on nearshore sediment accumulation and submarine canyon morphology offshore La Jolla, Southern California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

CHIRP seismic and swath bathymetry data acquired offshore La Jolla, California provide an unprecedented three-dimensional view of the La Jolla and Scripps submarine canyons. Shore-parallel patterns of tectonic deformation appear to control nearshore sediment thickness and distribution around the canyons. These shore-parallel patterns allow the impact of local tectonic deformation to be separated from the influence of eustatic sea-level fluctuations. Based on stratal geometry and acoustic character, we identify a prominent angular unconformity inferred to be the transgressive surface and three sedimentary sequences: an acoustically laminated estuarine unit deposited during early transgression, an infilling or "healing-phase" unit formed during the transgression, and an upper transparent unit. Beneath the transgressive surface, steeply dipping reflectors with several dip reversals record faulting and folding along the La Jolla margin. Scripps Canyon is located at the crest of an antiform, where the rocks are fractured and more susceptible to erosion. La Jolla Canyon is located along the northern strand of the Rose Canyon Fault Zone, which separates Cretaceous lithified rocks to the south from poorly cemented Eocene sands and gravels to the north. Isopach and structure contour maps of the three sedimentary units reveal how their thicknesses and spatial distributions relate to regional tectonic deformation. For example, the estuarine unit is predominantly deposited along the edges of the canyons in paleotopographic lows that may have been inlets along barrier beaches during the Holocene sea-level rise. The distribution of the infilling unit is controlled by pre-existing relief that records tectonic deformation and erosional processes. The thickness and distribution of the upper transparent unit are controlled by long-wavelength, tectonically induced relief on the transgressive surface and hydrodynamics. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

Le, Dantec N.; Hogarth, L.J.; Driscoll, N.W.; Babcock, J.M.; Barnhardt, W.A.; Schwab, W.C.

2010-01-01

351

Coral colonisation of an artificial reef in a turbid nearshore environment, Dampier Harbour, western Australia.  

PubMed

A 0.6 hectare artificial reef of local rock and recycled concrete sleepers was constructed in December 2006 at Parker Point in the industrial port of Dampier, western Australia, with the aim of providing an environmental offset for a nearshore coral community lost to land reclamation. Corals successfully colonised the artificial reef, despite the relatively harsh environmental conditions at the site (annual water temperature range 18-32°C, intermittent high turbidity, frequent cyclones, frequent nearby ship movements). Coral settlement to the artificial reef was examined by terracotta tile deployments, and later stages of coral community development were examined by in-situ visual surveys within fixed 25 x 25 cm quadrats on the rock and concrete substrates. Mean coral density on the tiles varied from 113 ± 17 SE to 909 ± 85 SE per m(2) over five deployments, whereas mean coral density in the quadrats was only 6.0 ± 1.0 SE per m(2) at eight months post construction, increasing to 24.0 ± 2.1 SE per m(2) at 62 months post construction. Coral taxa colonising the artificial reef were a subset of those on the surrounding natural reef, but occurred in different proportions--Pseudosiderastrea tayami, Mycedium elephantotus and Leptastrea purpurea being disproportionately abundant on the artificial reef. Coral cover increased rapidly in the later stages of the study, reaching 2.3 ± 0.7 SE % at 62 months post construction. This study indicates that simple materials of opportunity can provide a suitable substrate for coral recruitment in Dampier Harbour, and that natural colonisation at the study site remains sufficient to initiate a coral community on artificial substrate despite ongoing natural and anthropogenic perturbations. PMID:24040405

Blakeway, David; Byers, Michael; Stoddart, James; Rossendell, Jason

2013-01-01

352

VIDEO SUMMARIZATION BY SPATIAL-TEMPORAL GRAPH OPTIMIZATION Shi Lu, Michael R. Lyu, Irwin King  

E-print Network

VIDEO SUMMARIZATION BY SPATIAL-TEMPORAL GRAPH OPTIMIZATION Shi Lu, Michael R. Lyu, Irwin King SAR {slu, lyu, king}@cse.cuhk.edu.hk ABSTRACT In this paper we present a novel approach for video sum-temporal content cov- erage and visual coherence of the video summary. The ap- proach has three stages. First

King, Kuo Chin Irwin

353

50 CFR Figure 11 to Part 679 - Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA)  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) 11 Figure 11 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION...THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 11 Figure 11 to Part 679—Red King Crab Savings...

2010-10-01

354

The lichen genus Cladonia of King George Island, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents the results of taxonomical investigation of the genus Clado? nia Hill ex P. Browne from King George Island. Individuals belonging to this lichen genus were studied using methods of classical herbarium taxonomy supported by chemical analy? sis. Fourteen species have been recognized in the study area, with C. asahinae J.W. Thomson being reported from King George Island

Piotr OSYCZKA; Maria OLECH

355

OCCURRENCE OF YOUNG-OF-THE-YEAR KING, SCOMBEROMORUS CAVALLA, AND SPANISH,  

E-print Network

OCCURRENCE OF YOUNG-OF-THE-YEAR KING, SCOMBEROMORUS CAVALLA, AND SPANISH, S. MACULATUS. MACKERELS IN COMMERCIAL-lYPE SHRIMP TRAWLS ALONG THE ATLANTIC COAST OF THE SOUTHEAST UNITED STATES1 King mackerel (September- October 1986). Tongue nets, also known as bib, falcon, cobra, or mongoose trawl nets, have become

356

The King Tide Photo Initiative is an international project which aims to  

E-print Network

The King Tide Photo Initiative is an international project which aims to document areas flooded: Coastalatlas.net/kingtides 2. CLICK: Take the photos. The most striking photos show water next to something and orientation of your photo. 3. SHARE: Post your photos on OR's King Tide Flickr group. See our website to learn

Tullos, Desiree

357

Photo credit: http://saharaforestproject.com King Abdullah II Award for Excellence  

E-print Network

Photo credit: http://saharaforestproject.com King Abdullah II Award for Excellence Taking University| Spring 2012 The Client | KACE Photo credit: Digital Production Me The role of the King Abdullah Management | Columbia University| Spring 2012 The Project | Purpose Photo credit: Dicoecolo The current

Qian, Ning

358

Movements of King Mackerel, Scomberomoru5 cavalla, Tagged in Southeast Louisiana, 1983-85  

E-print Network

Movements of King Mackerel, Scomberomoru5 cavalla, Tagged in Southeast Louisiana, 1983-85 WILLIAM A. FABLE, Jr., LEE TRENT, GILBERT W. BANE, and STEVEN W. ELLSWORTH Introduction The king mackere of previous mark- William A. Fable. Jr.. and Lee Trem are with the NMFS Southeast Fisheries Center's Panama

359

The Agronomy and Economy of Black Pepper ( Piper nigrum L.) —The “King of Spices”  

Microsoft Academic Search

Black pepper, popularly known as the “King of Spices”, has a very checkered history dating back to the times of Queen Sheeba and King Solomon (BC 1015–BC 66) and has influenced the destiny of nations and their people, spread across the world, both economically and culturally. Today pepper commands the leading position among the different spices as the spice of

K. P. Prabhakaran Nair

2004-01-01

360

Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Power of Nonviolence. [Lesson Plan].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This lesson plan introduces students in grades 6-8 to Martin Luther King Jr.'s philosophy of nonviolence and the teachings of Mohandas K. Gandhi that influenced King's views. After considering the political impact of this philosophy, students explore its relevance to personal life. In these 6 lessons students will: (1) examine the philosophy of…

National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.

361

Connect the Book. Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, this month's featured book is "Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." The book was written by Doreen Rappaport and illustrated by Bryan Collier (Jump at the Sun, 2001. 40p. ISBN 0786807148). This pictorial biography of the world-renowned civil rights leader has one of the most striking…

Brodie, Carolyn S.

2005-01-01

362

50 CFR Figure 11 to Part 679 - Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA)  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) 11 Figure 11 to Part 679...ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 11 Figure 11 to Part 679—Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) ER15NO99.009 [64...

2013-10-01

363

50 CFR Figure 11 to Part 679 - Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA)  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) 11 Figure 11 to Part 679...ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 11 Figure 11 to Part 679—Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) ER15NO99.009 [64...

2012-10-01

364

50 CFR Figure 11 to Part 679 - Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA)  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) 11 Figure 11 to Part 679...ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 11 Figure 11 to Part 679—Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) ER15NO99.009 [64...

2011-10-01

365

RHIZOCEPHALAN INFECfION IN BLUE KING CRABS, PARALITHODES PLATYPUS, FROM  

E-print Network

RHIZOCEPHALAN INFECfION IN BLUE KING CRABS, PARALITHODES PLATYPUS, FROM OLGA BA~ KODIAK ISLAND crabs, Paralithodes platypus. in Olga B~ Kodiak Island, was sampled quarterly during 1980.lithodR.s camtschatica, and biennially in blue king crabs, P. platypus. Because embryos of both species hatch within

366

Gregory King, Robert Malthus and the Origins of English Social Realism  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article I compare King and Malthus in respect of their ability to penetrate what is here called social opacity, the resistance of all social structures to objective analysis by contemporaries, demographic and other forms of analysis. It accords to King the distinction to have been the first person ever to have recognized the issue, to have set out

Peter Laslett

1985-01-01

367

Love, Justice, and Natural Law: On Martin Luther King, Jr. and Human Rights  

E-print Network

in theory is human rights as ideology, and King is concerned with the only sort of human rights that matters of human rights as first world ideology that is supported by and supports that bifurcation. Taking King -- at least until recently. Under the ideology of secularism, the only logical possibility is that religious

Doyle, Robert

368

The rhetoric of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: Comedy and context in tragic collision  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several critics of the rhetoric of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., have noted changes in the content and style of his address toward the end of his career. None, though, have made a systematic generic assessment of those changes, nor have they linked such generic transformations to King's altered situation, the new type of movement he was then leading, the

Edward C. Appel

1997-01-01

369

Inventing authority: Bill Clinton, Martin Luther King, Jr., and the orchestration of rhetorical traditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

On November 13, 1993, President Clinton addressed five thousand African American ministers at the site of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. ‘s last speech in Memphis, Tennessee and, to open a dialogue on race relations, spoke in King's voice. This essay develops a critical orientation revolving around the concepts of tradition, invention, and authority as a means of exploring Clinton's

John M. Murphy

1997-01-01

370

Martin Luther King, the American dream and Vietnam: A collision of rhetorical trajectories  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essay explores the rhetorical complexity of Martin Luther King's dual role as political and moral leader, particularly during his last years when he was attacked for his opposition to the Vietnam War. By: 1) discussing and developing the theoretical value and critical possibilities associated with the term “rhetorical trajectories,”; 2) tracing the trajectories present in King's rhetoric in order

George N. Dionisopoulos; Victoria J. Gallagher; Steven R. Goldzwig; David Zarefsky

1992-01-01

371

FROM IDENTIFICATION TO CONFRONTATION: A RHETORICAL ANALYSIS OF MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR'S \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Martin Luther King, Jr.'s success as a civil rights activist was based, to a significant extent, on his skills as an orator. By successfully identifying the civil rights cause with key symbols from American civil religion, such as the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, as well as well-known religious homilies King was able to get a significant proportion of

Nick Sharman

372

Importance of genetic maps, Mary-Claire KingSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Interviewee: Mary-Claire King DNAi Location:Applications>Genes and medicine>gene hunting>Markers Moving slowly Mary-Claire King talks about the tedious process of hunting for genes in the days before genetic maps (based on thousands of markers) were readily available.

2008-03-26

373

BOREAS AFM-2 Wyoming King Air 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The BOREAS AFM-2 team used the University of Wyoming King Air aircraft during IFCs 1, 2, and 3 in 1994 to collected pass-by-pass fluxes (and many other statistics) for the large number of level (constant altitude), straight-line passes used in a variety of flight patterns over the SSA and NSA and areas along the transect between these study areas. The data described here form a second set, namely soundings that were incorporated into nearly every research flight by the King Air in 1994. These soundings generally went from near the surface to above the inversion layer. Most were flown immediately after takeoff or immediately after finishing the last flux pattern of that particular day's flights. The parameters that were measured include wind direction, wind speed, west wind component (u), south wind component (v), static pressure, air dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and CO2 concentration. Data on the aircraft's location, attitude, and altitude during data collection are also provided. These data are stored in tabular ASCH files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

Kelly, Robert D.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

374

This is an electronic version of an article published in Journal of Insect Behavior: King, B.H., and R.B. King. 1995. Sibmating and its fitness consequences in the parasitoid wasp Spalangia  

E-print Network

.H., and R.B. King. 1995. Sibmating and its fitness consequences in the parasitoid wasp Spalangia cameroni in the Parasitoid Wasp Spalangia cameroni (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) B. H. King1 and R. B. King1 Department in the Parasitoid Wasp Spalangia cameroni Key Words: mating, inbreeding, Spalangia cameroni, parasitoid wasp

King, Bethia H.

375

Wasp Watchers Albany County  

E-print Network

{ Wasp Watchers Albany County Finding the Wasp that hunts the Emerald Ash Borer #12;Cerceris fumipennis is a solitary ground nesting wasp. The female wasp stocks her nest with Buprestid beetles ,this as 80% of the Cerceris fumipennis colonies daily catch. · This wasp is very wide spread in the United

Walter, M.Todd

376

Meigu County Yi Tone.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One dialect of Yi spoken in Meigu County in the southern part of China's Sichuan Province is analyzed for its tone patterns, based on data provided by a bilingual native speaker. Consonant and vowel inventories are provided. Three contrastive tones are found. One has three allophones, which are conditioned by the preceding tone. Tonal allophony is…

Eatough, Andy

377

STATE/COUNTY BORDERS  

EPA Science Inventory

This data is available for the entire region. The level of detail is primarily suited for region/state/county/basin sized maps. The borders are not accurate enough for small areas like sub-basins and site areas. We use this coverage for general backgrounds and borders only. T...

378

Antihemorrhagin in the blood serum of king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah): purification and characterization.  

PubMed

King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) serum was found to possess antihemorrhagic activity against king cobra hemorrhagin. The activity was stronger than that in commercial king cobra antivenom. An antihemorrhagin has been purified by ion exchange chromatography, affinity chromatography and gel filtration with a 22-fold purification and an overall yield of 12% of the total antihemorrhagic activity contained in crude serum. The purified antihemorrhagin was homogeneous in disc-PAGE and SDS-PAGE. Its apparent molecular weight determined by SDS-PAGE was 120 kDa. The antihemorrhagin was also active against other hemorrhagic snake venoms obtained in Thailand and Japan such as Calloselasma rhodostoma, Trimeresurus albolabris, Trimeresurus macrops and Trimeresurus flavoviridis (Japanese Habu). It inhibited the proteolytic activity of king cobra venom. It is an acid- and thermolabile protein and does not form precipitin lines against king cobra venom. PMID:12875876

Chanhome, Lawan; Khow, Orawan; Omori-Satoh, Tamotsu; Sitprija, Visith

2003-06-01

379

A Past Hero: Reading and Writing about Martin Luther King, Jr.  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson uses the nonfiction texts Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by Doreen Rappaport and Martin Luther King Day by Linda Lowery to give students the opportunity to understand the life of Martin Luther King, Jr. and why we still honor him today. Using the second book, they will answer who, what, when, where, how, and why questions about the text. Students will create a graphic organizer that uses adjectives to describe Martin Luther King, Jr. and they will use the information gained from reading this text to support their descriptions. For their final assessment, students will write an opinion piece describing Martin Luther King, Jr. and use supporting details from the text. They will use the linking word "because" in their writing and also include opening and closing statements. Teachers also have the option to give students a multiple choice/short answer comprehension test as another way to assess their understanding of the text.

2013-02-18

380

Analysis of the impacts of Wave Energy Converter arrays on the nearshore wave climate in the Pacific Northwest  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As concerns over the use of fossil fuels increase, more and more effort is being put into the search for renewable and reliable sources of energy. Developments in ocean technologies have made the extraction of wave energy a promising alternative. Commercial exploitation of wave energy would require the deployment of arrays of Wave Energy Converters (WECs) that include several to hundreds of individual devices. Interactions between WECs and ocean waves result in both near-field and far-field changes in the incident wave field, including a significant decrease in wave height and a redirection of waves in the lee of the array, referred to as the wave shadow. Nearshore wave height and direction are directly related to the wave radiation stresses that drive longshore currents, rip currents and nearshore sediment transport, which suggests that significant far-field changes in the wave field due to WEC arrays could have an impact on littoral processes. The goal of this study is to investigate the changes in nearshore wave conditions and radiation stress forcing as a result of an offshore array of point-absorber type WECs using a nested SWAN model, and to determine how array size, configuration, spacing and distance from shore influence these changes. The two sites of interest are the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC) test sites off the coast of Newport Oregon, the North Energy Test Site (NETS) and the South Energy Test Site (SETS). NETS and SETS are permitted wave energy test sites located approximately 4 km and 10 km offshore, respectively. Twenty array configurations are simulated, including 5, 10, 25, 50 and 100 devices in two and three staggered rows in both closely spaced (three times the WEC diameter) and widely spaced (ten times the WEC diameter) arrays. Daily offshore wave spectra are obtained from a regional WAVEWATCH III hindcast for 2011, which are then propagated across the continental shelf using SWAN. Arrays are represented in SWAN through the external modification of the wave spectra at the device locations, based on a new experimentally determined Power Transfer Function established in an earlier WEC-array laboratory study. Changes in nearshore forcing conditions for each array size and configuration are compared in order to determine the scale of the far-field effects of WEC arrays and which array sizes and configurations could have the most significant impacts on coastal processes.

O'Dea, A.; Haller, M. C.

2013-12-01

381

Wikis for Building a Collaborative Education Environment by Irwin King, CUHK, 2008.10.17 Wikis for Building a  

E-print Network

Wikis for Building a Collaborative Education Environment by Irwin King, CUHK, 2008.10.17 Wikis Science & Engineering The Chinese University of Hong Kong http://www.cse.cuhk.edu.hk/~king #12;Wikis for Building a Collaborative Education Environment by Irwin King, CUHK, 2008.10.17 Today's Outline · Wikis

King, Kuo Chin Irwin

382

1. Zool., Lond. (A) (1986) 209, 573-578 Inheritance of the king coat colour pattern in cheetahs Acinonyxjubatus  

E-print Network

1. Zool., Lond. (A) (1986) 209, 573-578 Inheritance of the king coat colour pattern in cheetahs 1985) (With 1 plate and 1 figure in the text) The paper describes the pedigree of nine King cheetahs Discussion 577 Summary .. .. . . . . 578 References 578 Introduction King cheetahs have been recorded

Pretoria, University of

383

To address President Obama's call to action to restore the Great Lakes, NOAA has funded projects within the Nearshore Health and Nonpoint Source Pollution priority area of the Great  

E-print Network

To address President Obama's call to action to restore the Great Lakes, NOAA has funded projects within the Nearshore Health and Nonpoint Source Pollution priority area of the Great Lakes Restoration Lakes. Nearshore and Non-Point Source Pollution funded by the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

384

Pliocene-Pleistocene diatom biostratigraphy of nearshore Antarctica from the AND-1B drillcore, McMurdo Sound  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The near-shore open-marine diatom record recovered in the ANtarctic geological DRILLing (ANDRILL) McMurdo Ice Shelf Project (MIS) AND-1B drillcore, McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, advances our understanding of the marine conditions present in the southern Ross Sea during the Pliocene and early Pleistocene. This diatom history is recorded within alternating diamictite and diatomite that reflect alternating glacial activity and high marine primary productivity. The diatomite units were deposited in a continental shelf open-marine setting during periods of reduced ice cover in West Antarctica. A new diatom biostratigraphic scheme spanning the last ca. 5 Ma is proposed for the Antarctic near-shore area, based on prior work from high latitude drillcores. Four new zones are proposed for the Pliocene/Pleistocene, with eight in total for the new zonal scheme, utilizing Actinocylus fasciculatus, Actinocyclus maccollumii, Fragilariopsis bohatyii, Rouxia antarctica, and Thalassiosira fasciculata as new zonal markers. The early Pliocene shares the most assemblage commonality with that of the Southern Ocean with greater numbers of endemic species observed in the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene; a group of related Fragilaripsis species characterizes much of this later part of the time column. Two new species are proposed, Fragilariopsis tigris sp. nov. Riesselman and Thalassiosira teres sp. nov. Winter; a formal name is also proposed for another species, Rhizosolenia harwoodii sp. nov. Winter. The new zonation is tied to a robust chronology utilizing diatom biostratigraphy, volcanic 40Ar/39Ar ages and magnetostratigraphy.

Winter, D.; Sjunneskog, C.; Scherer, R.; Maffioli, P.; Riesselman, C.; Harwood, D.

2012-10-01

385

Simple and effective monitoring of historic changes in nearshore environments using the free archive of Landsat imagery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recently released archive of Landsat imagery can be used to detect historic changes in nearshore environments. We used a series of free Landsat images spanning the years from 1984 to 2009 to detect changes in the spatial extent of dominant substrate types, coral, algae, and seagrass, around Bawe and Chumbe islands in Zanzibar, and we compared the use of true-colour composites and supervised classifications. Results indicate temporal changes in the spatial extent of seagrass meadows are easily mapped with Landsat imagery, whereas temporal changes in algae cover and particularly coral cover pose greater challenges because of the similarities in spectral reflectance properties between the relevant substrate types. Supervised classification requires substantially more processing than the simple display of true-colour composites, but does not improve interpretation in our study. We suggest that historic Landsat imagery, obtained at no cost and processed minimally with free software, is the best available data source for studies of historic changes in the nearshore environments of East Africa.

Knudby, Anders; Newman, Candace; Shaghude, Yohanna; Muhando, Christopher

386

Nearshore thermal gradients of the Colorado River near the Little Colorado River confluence, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Construction and operation of Glen Canyon Dam has dramatically impacted the flow of the Colorado River through Glen, Marble, and Grand Canyons. Extremes in both streamflow and water temperature have been suppressed by controlled releases from the dam. Trapping of sediment in Lake Powell, the reservoir formed by Glen Canyon Dam, has also dramatically reduced the supply of suspended sediment entering the system. These changes have altered the riverine ecosystem and the habitat of native species, including fish such as the endangered humpback chub (Gila cypha). Most native fish are adapted to seasonally warm water, and the continuous relatively cold water released by the dam is one of the factors that is believed to limit humpback chub growth and survival. While average mainstem temperatures in the Colorado River are well documented, there is limited understanding of temperatures in the nearshore environments that fish typically occupy. Four nearshore geomorphic unit types were studied between the confluence of the Colorado and Little Colorado Rivers and Lava Canyon in the summer and fall of 2010, for study periods of 10 to 27 days. Five to seven sites were studied during each interval. Persistent thermal gradients greater than the 0.2 °C accuracy of the instruments were not observed in any of the sampled shoreline environments. Temperature gradients between the shoreline and mainstem on the order of 4 °C, believed to be important to the habitat-seeking behavior of native or nonnative fishes, were not detected.

Ross, Rob; Grams, Paul E.

2013-01-01

387

Molecular typing of Escherichia coli strains associated with threatened sea ducks and near-shore marine habitats of southwest Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In Alaska, sea ducks winter in coastal habitats at remote, non-industrialized areas, as well as in proximity to human communities and industrial activity. We evaluated prevalence and characteristics of Escherichia coli strains in faecal samples of Steller's eiders (Polysticta stelleri; n = 122) and harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus; n = 21) at an industrialized site and Steller's eiders (n = 48) at a reference site, and compared these strains with those isolated from water samples from near-shore habitats of ducks. The overall prevalence of E. coli was 16% and 67% in Steller's eiders and harlequin ducks, respectively, at the industrialized study site, and 2% in Steller's eiders at the reference site. Based on O and H antigen subtyping and genetic characterization by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus polymerase chain reaction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we found evidence of avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) strains associated with both species and detected E. coli strains carrying virulence genes associated with mammals in harlequin ducks. Steller's eiders that carried APEC had lower serum total protein and albumin concentrations, providing further evidence of pathogenicity. The genetic profile of two E. coli strains from water matched an isolate from a Steller's eider providing evidence of transmission between near-shore habitats and birds.

Schamber, Jason L.

2011-01-01

388

Establishing backcountry use quotas: an example from Mineral King, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Increasing levels of visitor use and consequent resource damage have necessitated that backcountry use restrictions be established in the Mineral King area of Sequoia National Park, California. In this paper we review the steps taken in developing a trailhead quota system. The availability of acceptable campsites, based on a detailed inventory of site distribution and impact, was used to quantitatively derive use capacities for each camp area. Wilderness permit data on visitor dispersal patterns from the major trailheads, including length of stay at each camp area, were then used to translate the area capacities into daily trailhead quotas that would assure that these capacities were not surpassed. The general approach is applicable to any backcountry area, although large complex areas may require the use of available computer simulation models.

Parsons, David J.; Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Fodor, Paul A.

1981-01-01

389

78 FR 43827 - Irish Potatoes Grown in Modoc and Siskiyou Counties, California, and in All Counties in Oregon...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Siskiyou Counties, California, and in All Counties in Oregon, Except Malheur County...Siskiyou Counties, California, and in all counties in Oregon, except Malheur County...at: http://www.regulations.gov. All comments submitted in response to this...

2013-07-22

390

Purchasing in Texas Counties.  

E-print Network

delivery in the most economical manner. Perhaps the manner in which delivery is taken deserves addi- tional attention. For example, this study indicates that all counties taking delivery of gasoline in tank wagon lots, can secure approximately the same... recog- nizes that some one person or board should he responsible for a high per- centage of the purchasing. Otherwise each employee must become an ex- pert in order to secure good prices. Further, such a system recognizes that bids must be secured...

Hervey, E. J.; Bradshaw, H. C.

1944-01-01

391

VizieR Online Data Catalog: King 5 and Berkeley 20 UBVRI photometry (Durgapal+, 2001)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present multicolour CCD photometry for two poorly studied open clusters (King 5 and Be 20). Photometry for a field near King 5 was also carried out to estimate the contamination by field stars. The colour magnitude diagrams (CMD) of the clusters show a well defined main sequence extending to the limit of the photometry, V~=20mag. The reddening for King 5, estimated from the colour-colour diagram, is ~0.82, whereas that for Be 20 as estimated by comparing theoretical main-sequence (MS) with the observed MS is 0.10. The morphology of the CMDs indicates that these clusters are old. The CMD of Be 20 shows a globular cluster-like horizontal branch. In case of King 5 the comparison of observational CMDs with the standard isochrones of VandenBerg (1985ApJS...58..711V) indicates an apparent discrepancy between the shape of the turnoff and isochrones. The CMDs of King 5 seem to be better understood in terms of stellar models with convective overshoot. The comparison of the CMDs with the stellar models by Bertelli et al. (1985A&A...150...33B) with convective overshoot produces a good fit for a metallicity Z=0.008 and an age of 1Gyr for King 5 and 5Gyr for Be 20. An apparent distance modulus (m-M)=14.0 and 15.1 has been estimated for King 5 and Be 20 respectively. They correspond to a distance of 1900+/-100pc and 9026+/-480pc, respectively. The radial density distribution in King 5 indicates that there is an excess of low mass stars in the outer region of the cluster, whereas the density distribution in Be 20 shows a good fit with the empirical King (1962AJ.....67..471K) model. For both clusters, observations have also been carried out to search for variable stars. (3 data files).

Durgapal, A. K.; Pandey, A. K.; Mohan, V.

2001-05-01

392

Synchronization and an application of a novel fractional order King Cobra chaotic system.  

PubMed

In this paper, we design a new three dimensional King Cobra face shaped fractional order chaotic system. The multi-scale synchronization scheme of two fractional order chaotic systems is described. The necessary conditions for the multi-scale synchronization of two identical fractional order King Cobra chaotic systems are derived through feedback control. A new cryptosystem is proposed for an image encryption and decryption by using synchronized fractional order King Cobra chaotic systems with the supports of multiple cryptographic assumptions. The security of the proposed cryptosystem is analyzed by the well known algebraic attacks. Numerical simulations are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed theoretical results. PMID:25273185

Muthukumar, P; Balasubramaniam, P; Ratnavelu, K

2014-09-01

393

Synchronization and an application of a novel fractional order King Cobra chaotic system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we design a new three dimensional King Cobra face shaped fractional order chaotic system. The multi-scale synchronization scheme of two fractional order chaotic systems is described. The necessary conditions for the multi-scale synchronization of two identical fractional order King Cobra chaotic systems are derived through feedback control. A new cryptosystem is proposed for an image encryption and decryption by using synchronized fractional order King Cobra chaotic systems with the supports of multiple cryptographic assumptions. The security of the proposed cryptosystem is analyzed by the well known algebraic attacks. Numerical simulations are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed theoretical results.

Muthukumar, P.; Balasubramaniam, P.; Ratnavelu, K.

2014-09-01

394

Brood rearing ecology of king eiders on the north slope of Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We examined King Eider (Somateria spectabilis) brood survival in the Kuparak oil field in northern Alaska in 2002 and 2003 by monitoring hens with broods using radiotelemetry. We observed complete brood loss in eight of 10 broods. Broods survived less than 2 weeks on average, and most mortality occurred within 10 days of hatch. Distance hens traveled overland did not affect brood survival. Apparent King Eider brood survival in our study area was lower than reported for eider species in other areas. We recommend future studies examine if higher densities of predators in oil fields reduces King Eider duckling survival. Received 26 September 2008. Accepted 18 January 2009.

Phillips, L.M.; Powell, A.N.

2009-01-01

395

King and rook endgames Many chess games end with very few pieces left on the board. If you have even a small advantage over your  

E-print Network

opponent (black) has just a king. You should definitely be able to win in this case. You should be able to avoid stalemate by checkmating the black king before you each move 50 times. You should avoid the black king capturing your rook. And you should avoid putting the black king in stalemate, where he

Zirbel, Craig L.

396

78 FR 29202 - Environmental Impact Statement: Grand Forks County, North Dakota and Polk County, Minnesota  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Statement: Grand Forks County, North Dakota and Polk County, Minnesota AGENCY...project in Grand Forks County, North Dakota and Polk County, Minnesota. FOR...Federal Highway Administration, North Dakota Division Office, 1471...

2013-05-17

397

77 FR 72968 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, for Imperial County, Placer County and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Placer County and Ventura County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD)...

2012-12-07

398

77 FR 73005 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County, Placer County, and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Placer County, and Ventura County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD)...

2012-12-07

399

Deep Genetic Divergence between Disjunct Refugia in the Arctic-Alpine King’s Crown, Rhodiola integrifolia (Crassulaceae)  

PubMed Central

Despite the strength of climatic variability at high latitudes and upper elevations, we still do not fully understand how plants in North America that are distributed between Arctic and alpine areas responded to the environmental changes of the Quaternary. To address this question, we set out to resolve the evolutionary history of the King’s Crown, Rhodiola integrifolia using multi-locus population genetic and phylogenetic analyses in combination with ecological niche modeling. Our population genetic analyses of multiple anonymous nuclear loci revealed two major clades within R. integrifolia that diverged from each other ~ 700 kya: one occurring in Beringia to the north (including members of subspecies leedyi and part of subspecies integrifolia), and the other restricted to the Southern Rocky Mountain refugium in the south (including individuals of subspecies neomexicana and part of subspecies integrifolia). Ecological niche models corroborate our hypothesized locations of refugial areas inferred from our phylogeographic analyses and revealed some environmental differences between the regions inhabited by its two subclades. Our study underscores the role of geographic isolation in promoting genetic divergence and the evolution of endemic subspecies in R. integrifolia. Furthermore, our phylogenetic analyses of the plastid spacer region trnL-F demonstrate that among the native North American species, R. integrifolia and R. rhodantha are more closely related to one another than either is to R. rosea. An understanding of these historic processes lies at the heart of making informed management decisions regarding this and other Arctic-alpine species of concern in this increasingly threatened biome. PMID:24282505

DeChaine, Eric G.; Forester, Brenna R.; Schaefer, Hanno; Davis, Charles C.

2013-01-01

400

Digital Atlas of Texas Counties  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by the Center for Geosptial Technology at Texas Tech University, this digital atlas is a fantastic find. It brings together information about all of Texas's counties, including satellite relief maps and data sets about the roads, rivers, lakes, and other features in each area. Visitors can use the interactive map to click on a county of interest, or use the drop down menu to select a region. Once users select a county, they can download information about it for future use. The site also contains a number of Featured Links to resources from the U.S. Census Bureau, the Texas Association of Counties, and several tourism agencies.

401

FINDING THE SCALES OF ECOLOGICAL RESPONSE TO LANDSCAPE CHARACTER AND TRIBUTARY INPUTS TO OPEN NEARSHORE WATERS, A GREAT LAKES COAST-WIDE EXPERIENCE  

EPA Science Inventory

In 2002 we sampled over 40 stretches of open coastline across the US portion of the Great Lakes with an equal effort planned for 2003. Sites were selected to represent an intended gradient of landscape disturbance in watersheds hydrologically-connected to nearshore waters. Half t...

402

Harmful algal blooms (HABs), dissolved organic matter (DOM), and planktonic microbial community dynamics at a near-shore and a harbour station influenced by upwelling (SW Iberian Peninsula)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The surface microalgal community, including harmful species, dissolved organic matter (DOM), and bacterial and viral populations were studied during an annual cycle (November 2007–October 2008) in a Near-shore (NS) and a Harbour (H) station located in an upwelling area (Sagres, SW Iberian Peninsula). The higher water residence time, water stability and shallowness of harbours in comparison with open waters likely

Sofia Loureiro; Albert Reñé; Esther Garcés; Jordi Camp; Dolors Vaqué

2011-01-01

403

A new depositional model for the buried 4000 yr BP New Orleans barrier: implications for sea-level £uctuations and onshore transport from a nearshore shelf source  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Holocene New Orleans Barrier Complex, now buried by the St. Bernard delta of the Mississippi River, provides an excellent example of barrier deposition fed by a nearshore sediment source. This reworking and onshore transport was initiated by a sudden change in the shelf equilibrium profile caused by a sea-level fall about 4100 yr BP. Here we present a new

Frank W. Stapor Jr; Gregory W. Stone

404

Landing Marine-derived Renewable Energy: Optimising Power Cable Routing in the Nearshore Environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Numerous studies have demonstrated that a vast unexploited source of energy can be derived from the marine environment. Recent evolution of the energy market and looming EU renewable energy uptake targets for 2020 have driven a huge explosion of interest in exploiting this resource, triggering both governments and industry to move forward in undertaking feasibility assessments and demonstration projects for wave, tidal and offshore wind farms across coastlines. The locations which naturally lend themselves to high yield energy capture, are by definition, exposed and may be remote, located far from the end user of the electricity generated. A fundamental constraint to successfully exploiting these resources will be whether electricity generated in high energy, variable and constantly evolving environments can be brought safely and reliably to shore without the need for constant monitoring and maintenance of the subsea cables and landfall sites. In the case of riverine cable crossings superficial sediments would typically be used to trench and bury the cable. High energy coastal environments may be stripped of soft sediments. Any superficial sediments present at the site may be highly mobile and subject to re-suspension throughout the tidal cycle or under stormy conditions. EirGrid Plc. and Mott MacDonald Ireland Ltd. have been investigating the potential for routing a cable across the exposed Shannon estuary in Ireland. Information regarding the geological ground model, meteo-oceanographic and archaeological conditions of the proposed site was limited, necessitating a clear investigation strategy. The investigation included gathering site information on currents, bathymetry and geology through desk studies, hydrographic and geophysical surveys, an intrusive ground investigation and coastal erosion assessments at the landfall sites. The study identified a number of difficulties for trenching and protecting a cable through an exposed environment such as the Shannon estuary. Such difficulties include limited availability of superficial sediments for cable trenching and protection; where sediments were present there were indications that the sediments were either mobile sands, or difficult to trench glacial tills. Areas of the estuary feature steep side slopes and rocky outcrops, which also provide a challenge for cable installation and long-term protection. Difficult ground conditions were set against an aggressive meteo-oceanographic environment, tidal currents reached 5-7 knots on the ebb tide with reverse eddies around the landfalls coupled with an active wave climate. These conditions pose implications on the working time, installation vessels and methodology. The estuary is also a designated Special Area of Conservation for the protection of bottlenose dolphins, therefore, the cable installation methodology needed to consider ecological sensitivities. Additionally, an area near to the southern landfall has historically been an area of strategic significance and has a number of fortifications adding archaeological constraints for the cable route. The increasing need and importance of investigation and planning for submarine cable routes will be discussed alongside potential methods for installation in the aggressive nearshore environment, this paper will summarise findings and observations of working in a high energy environment, will consider options for installation and protection of cables, will discuss the key lessons learned and look at potential implications for offshore electricity generation.

Turner, Rosalind, ,, Dr.; Keane, Tom; Mullins, Brian; Phipps, Peter

2010-05-01

405

Development of a Hydrodynamic and Transport model of Bellingham Bay in Support of Nearshore Habitat Restoration  

SciTech Connect

In this study, a hydrodynamic model based on the unstructured-grid finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) was developed for Bellingham Bay, Washington. The model simulates water surface elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity in a three-dimensional domain that covers the entire Bellingham Bay and adjacent water bodies, including Lummi Bay, Samish Bay, Padilla Bay, and Rosario Strait. The model was developed using Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s high-resolution Puget Sound and Northwest Straits circulation and transport model. A sub-model grid for Bellingham Bay and adjacent coastal waters was extracted from the Puget Sound model and refined in Bellingham Bay using bathymetric light detection and ranging (LIDAR) and river channel cross-section data. The model uses tides, river inflows, and meteorological inputs to predict water surface elevations, currents, salinity, and temperature. A tidal open boundary condition was specified using standard National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predictions. Temperature and salinity open boundary conditions were specified based on observed data. Meteorological forcing (wind, solar radiation, and net surface heat flux) was obtained from NOAA real observations and National Center for Environmental Prediction North American Regional Analysis outputs. The model was run in parallel with 48 cores using a time step of 2.5 seconds. It took 18 hours of cpu time to complete 26 days of simulation. The model was calibrated with oceanographic field data for the period of 6/1/2009 to 6/26/2009. These data were collected specifically for the purpose of model development and calibration. They include time series of water-surface elevation, currents, temperature, and salinity as well as temperature and salinity profiles during instrument deployment and retrieval. Comparisons between model predictions and field observations show an overall reasonable agreement in both temporal and spatial scales. Comparisons of root mean square error values for surface elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity time series are 0.11 m, 0.10 m/s, 1.28oC, and 1.91 ppt, respectively. The model was able to reproduce the salinity and temperature stratifications inside Bellingham Bay. Wetting and drying processes in tidal flats in Bellingham Bay, Samish Bay, and Padilla Bay were also successfully simulated. Both model results and observed data indicated that water surface elevations inside Bellingham Bay are highly correlated to tides. Circulation inside the bay is weak and complex and is affected by various forcing mechanisms, including tides, winds, freshwater inflows, and other local forcing factors. The Bellingham Bay model solution was successfully linked to the NOAA oil spill trajectory simulation model “General NOAA Operational Modeling Environment (GNOME).” Overall, the Bellingham Bay model has been calibrated reasonably well and can be used to provide detailed hydrodynamic information in the bay and adjacent water bodies. While there is room for further improvement with more available data, the calibrated hydrodynamic model provides useful hydrodynamic information in Bellingham Bay and can be used to support sediment transport and water quality modeling as well as assist in the design of nearshore restoration scenarios.

Wang, Taiping; Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang

2010-04-22

406

Distribution and thickness of sedimentary facies in the coastal dune, beach and nearshore sedimentary system at Maspalomas, Canary Islands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Numerous studies have shown that most beaches and coastal dune systems of the world are currently eroding but very few have investigated the combined sediment budgets of subaerial and nearshore submarine systems. In the case of the dune field of the Maspalomas Natural Special Reserve (in the south of Gran Canaria), the adjacent Maspalomas and El Inglés beaches and the adjacent submarine platform, the sediment budgets have been severely affected by erosion over the past few decades. The objectives of this study were to investigate the availability of sand within the modern sedimentary system, including the coastal dunes, the beaches and the submerged shelf, but also to assess local sediment sinks. An isopach map generated on the basis of topo-bathymetric data and seismic-reflection profiles revealed that sediment thickness varies from 0-22 m in the study area. Expanses of relatively low sediment thickness were identified in the south-western sector of the coastal dune field along Maspalomas beach, and in the nearshore region to the south of this beach. These localized sediment-deficit areas earmark Maspalomas beach as the most vulnerable shore strip threatened by erosion. The shallow seismic data also revealed that the submarine platform south of Maspalomas represents a marine terrace cut into an ancient alluvial fan, thus documenting an influence of the geomorphological heritage on the present-day morphodynamics. A side-scan sonar mosaic of this nearshore platform enabled the delimitation of areas covered by rock, boulders and gravel, vegetated sand patches and a mobile sand facies, the latter including ripple and megaripple fields. The megaripple field in a valley close to the talus of the marine terrace has been identified as a major sediment sink of the Maspalomas sedimentary system. It is fed by south-westerly storm-wave events. The sediment deficit in the coastal dune field and along Maspalomas beach can therefore only be explained by a currently faster loss of sediment to an offshore sink than can be compensated by the supply of sand from outside the system.

Fontán Bouzas, Angela; Alcántara-Carrió, Javier; Montoya Montes, Isabel; Barranco Ojeda, Andrés; Albarracín, Silvia; Rey Díaz de Rada, Jorge; Rey Salgado, Jorge

2013-04-01

407

"BECAUSE SOME STORIES DO LIVE FOREVER": STEPHEN KING'S THE DARK TOWER SERIES AS MODERN ROMANCE  

E-print Network

Stephen King's Dark Tower series is a seven-volume work that contains elements from myths, fairy tales, American westerns, legends, popular culture, Gothic literature, and medieval romance. Few scholars have engaged with this series, most likely due...

McMurray, Rachel Elizabeth

2012-05-31

408

The Household and Court of King James VI of Scotland, 1567-1603   

E-print Network

This thesis examines the household and court of King James VI from the household establishment of his infancy until his departure for London in 1603 and the resulting end of a court culture in Scotland. It depends substantially ...

Juhala, Amy L

2000-01-01

409

Automating Open Science for Big Data Merc Crosas, Gary King, James Honaker, Latanya Sweeney  

E-print Network

1 Automating Open Science for Big Data Mercè Crosas, Gary King, James the published results. The trend towards Big Data -- including large scale streaming challenges so that the social sciences can realize the potential of Big Data. #12

410

UNH Cooperative Extension Educators, Forest Resources County Offices Belknap County  

E-print Network

.nute@unh.edu 603-641-6060 FAX: 603-645-5252 Hillsborough County Mary Tebo Davis Community Forestry Field Specialist 329 Mast Rd., Suite 101 Goffstown, NH 03045 mary.tebo@unh.edu 641-6060 FAX: 645-5252 Merrimack County

New Hampshire, University of

411

Taiwan Nantou County earthquake 0327 Taiwan Nantou County earthquake  

E-print Network

Taiwan Nantou County earthquake 20130327 1 #12;0327 Taiwan Nantou County earthquake Source, Intensity 5 #12;I II III IV V VI VII Intensity Shake map of the March 27 Earthquake The peak ground and Technology Center for Disaster Reduction (NCDR) #12;Earthquake Response and Evacuation are a Part of Students

412

Ohanin, a novel protein from king cobra venom: Its cDNA and genomic organization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ohanin, from king cobra venom, is a novel protein which induces hypolocomotion and hyperalgesia in mice [Pung, Y.F., Wong, P.T.H., Kumar, P.P., Hodgson W.C., Kini, R.M., 2005. Ohanin, a novel protein from king cobra venom induces hypolocomotion and hyperalgesia in mice. J. Biol. Chem. 280, 13137–13147.]. It is weakly similar to PRY-SPRY domains (B30.2-like domain). Here we report the complete

Yuh Fen Pung; Sanjeed Vijaya Kumar; Nandhakishore Rajagopalan; Bryan G. Fry; Prakash P. Kumar; R. Manjunatha Kini

2006-01-01

413

A review of "Foxe's Book of Martyrs and Early Modern Print Culture" by John N. King  

E-print Network

compilation. King highlights the interaction Foxe had with other collaborators, such as John Aylmer, Henry Bull, and others. The fact was that Foxe was part of a large community of writers, printers, and religious thinkers, many of whom had a hand... that are made by Findlay are sophisticated and complex. This book provides highly stimulating and rewarding reading for students and scholars of women?s drama. John N. King. Foxe?s Book of Martyrs and Early Modern Print Culture. Cambridge: Cambridge...

Blevins, Jacob

2007-01-01

414

King Eider (Somateria spectabilis) Nesting in Association with Long-tailed Skua (Stercorarius longicaudus)  

Microsoft Academic Search

In High Arctic Northeast Greenland King Eiders (Somuteria spscfabilis) were found nesting in association with solitarily breeding Long-tailed Skuas (Stercorarius longicaudus). The association is demonstrated using spatial statistics analyses and timing of clutch initiations. Long-tailed Skuas' nests were evenly spaced in the 6.1 km2 census area, whereas nine out of ten King Eider nests were located close to five different

SVEN BLOMQVIST; MAGNUS ELANDER

1988-01-01

415

Middle Jurassic incised valley fill (eolian/estuarine) and nearshore marine petroleum reservoirs, Powder River basin  

SciTech Connect

Paleovalleys incised into the Triassic Spearfish Formation (Chugwater equivalent) are filled with a vertical sequence of eolian, estuarine, and marine sandstones of the Middle Jurassic (Bathonian age) Canyon Springs Sandstone Member of the Sundance Formation. An outcrop exemplifying this is located at Red Canyon in the southern Black Hills, Fall River County, South Dakota. These paleovalleys locally have more than 300 ft of relief and are as much as several miles wide. Because they slope in a westerly direction, and Jurassic seas transgressed into the area from the west there was greater marine-influence and more stratigraphic complexity in the subsurface, to the west, as compared to the Black Hills outcrops. In the subsurface two distinctive reservoir sandstone beds within the Canyon Springs Sandstone Member fill the paleovalleys. These are the eolian lower Canyon Springs unit (LCS) and the estuarine upper Canyon Springs unit (UCS), separated by the marine {open_quotes}Limestone Marker{close_quotes} and estuarine {open_quotes}Brown Shale{close_quotes}. The LCS and UCS contain significant proven hydrocarbon reservoirs in Wyoming (about 500 MMBO in-place in 9 fields, 188 MMBO produced through 1993) and are prospective in western South Dakota, western Nebraska and northern Colorado. Also prospective is the Callovian-age Hulett Sandstone Member which consists of multiple prograding shoreface to foreshore parasequences, as interpreted from the Red Canyon locality. Petrographic, outcrop and subsurface studies demonstrate the viability of both the Canyon Springs Sandstone and Hulett Sandstone members as superior hydrocarbon reservoirs in both stratigraphic and structural traps. Examples of fields with hydrocarbon production from the Canyon Springs in paleovalleys include Lance Creek field (56 MMBO produced) and the more recently discovered Red Bird field (300 MBO produced), both in Niobrara County, Wyoming.

Ahlbrandt, T.S. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Fox, J.E. [South Dakota School of Mines, Rapid City, SD (United States)

1997-07-01

416

A preliminary appraisal of sediment sources and transport in Kings Bay and vicinity, Georgia and Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-quality, bottom-material, suspended-sediment, and current-velocity data were collected during November 1981 in Kings Bay and vicinity to provide information on the sources and transport of estuarine sediments. Kings Bay and Cumberland Sound , the site of the Poseidon Submarine Base in southeast Georgia, are experiencing high rates of sediment deposition and accumulation, which are causing serious navigational and operational problems. Velocity, bathymetry, turbidity, and bottom-material data suggest that the area in the vicinity of lower Kings Bay is accumulating deposits of suspended sediment transported from Cumberland Sound on the floodtide and from upper Kings Bay and the tidal marsh drained by Marianna Creek on the ebbtide. Suspended-sediment discharges computed for consecutive 13-hour ebbtides and floodtides showed that a net quantity of suspended sediment was transported seaward from upper Kings Bay and Marianna Creek. A net landward transport of suspended sediment computed at the St. Marys Entrance indicated areas seaward of St. Marys Entrance may be supplying sediment to the shoaling areas of the estuary, including lower Kings Bay. (USGS)

McConnell, J.B.; Radtke, D.B.; Hale, T.W.; Buell, G.R.

1983-01-01

417

Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Near-shore Wave Fields: Model Generation Validation and Evaluation - Kaneohe Bay HI.  

SciTech Connect

The numerical model, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore) , was used to simulate wave conditions in Kaneohe Bay, HI in order to determine the effects of wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices on the propagation of waves into shore. A nested SWAN model was validated then used to evaluate a range of initial wave conditions: significant wave heights (H s ) , peak periods (T p ) , and mean wave directions ( MWD) . Differences between wave height s in the presence and absence of WEC device s were assessed at locations in shore of the WEC array. The maximum decrease in wave height due to the WEC s was predicted to be approximately 6% at 5 m and 10 m water depths. Th is occurred for model initiation parameters of H s = 3 m (for 5 m water depth) or 4 m (10 m water depth) , T p = 10 s, and MWD = 330deg . Subsequently, bottom orbital velocities were found to decrease by about 6%.

Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Jones, Craig

2014-09-01

418

Sensitivity analysis of the FEMA HAZUS-MH MR4 Earthquake Model using seismic events affecting King County Washington  

Microsoft Academic Search

HAZUS-MH MR4 (HAZards U. S. Multi-Hazard Maintenance Release 4) is a risk-estimation software developed by FEMA to calculate potential losses due to natural disasters. Federal, state, regional, and local government use the HAZUS-MH Earthquake Model for earthquake risk mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery planning (FEMA, 2003). In this study, we examine several parameters used by the HAZUS-MH Earthquake Model methodology

C. Neighbors; G. R. Noriega; Y. Caras; E. S. Cochran

2010-01-01

419

Lidar-revised geologic map of the Poverty Bay 7.5' quadrangle, King and Pierce Counties, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2003, the Puget Sound Lidar Consortium obtained a lidar-derived digital elevation model (DEM) for the Puget Sound region including all of the Poverty Bay 7.5' quadrangle. For a brief description of lidar (LIght Detection And Ranging) and this data acquisition program, see Haugerud and others (2003). This new DEM has a horizontal resolution and accuracy of 6 ft (2 m) and vertical accuracy of approximately 1 ft (0.3 m). The greater resolution and accuracy of the lidar DEM have facilitated a new interpretation of the geology, especially the distribution and relative age of some surficial deposits.

Tabor, Rowland W.; Booth, Derek B.; Troost, Kathy Goetz

2014-01-01

420

Geologic Map of Northeastern Seattle (Part of the Seattle North 7.5' x 15' Quadrangle), King County, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This geologic map, approximately coincident with the east half of the Seattle North 7.5 x 15' quadrangle (herein, informally called the 'Seattle NE map'), covers nearly half of the City of Seattle and reaches from Lake Washington across to the Puget Sound shoreline. Land uses are mainly residential, but extensive commercial districts are located in the Northgate neighborhood, adjacent to the University of Washington, and along the corridors of Aurora Avenue North and Lake City Way. Industrial activity is concentrated along the Lake Washington Ship Canal and around Lake Union. One small piece of land outside of the quadrangle boundaries, at the west edge of the Bellevue North quadrangle, is included on this map for geographic continuity. Conversely, a small area in the northeast corner of the Seattle North quadrangle, on the eastside of Lake Washington, is excluded from this map. Within the boundaries of the map area are two large urban lakes, including the most heavily visited park in the State of Washington (Green Lake Park); a stream (Thornton Creek) that still hosts anadromous salmon despite having its headwaters in a golfcourse and a shopping center; parts of three cities, with a combined residential population of about 300,000 people; and the region's premier research institution, the University of Washington. The north boundary of the map is roughly NE 168th Street in the cities of Shoreline and Lake Forest Park, and the south boundary corresponds to Mercer Street in Seattle. The west boundary is 15th Avenue W (and NW), and the east boundary is formed by Lake Washington. Elevations range from sea level to a maximum of 165 m (541 ft), the latter on a broad till-covered knob in the city of Shoreline near the northwest corner of the map. Previous geologic maps of this area include those of Waldron and others (1962), Galster and Laprade (1991), and Yount and others (1993). Seattle lies within the Puget Lowland, an elongate structural and topographic basin between the Cascade Range and Olympic Mountains. The Seattle area has been glaciated repeatedly during the past two million years by coalescing glaciers that advanced southward from British Columbia. The landscape we see today was molded by cyclic glacial scouring and deposition and later modified by landsliding and stream erosion. The last ice sheet reached the central Puget Sound region about 14,500 years ago, as measured by 14C dating, and it had retreated from this area by 13,650 14C yr B.P. (equivalent calendar years are about 17,600 and 16,600 years ago; Porter and Swanson, 1998). Seattle now sits atop a complex and incomplete succession of interleaved glacial and nonglacial deposits that overlie an irregular bedrock surface. These glacial and nonglacial deposits vary laterally in both texture and thickness, and they contain many local unconformities. In addition, they have been deformed by faults and folds, at least as recently as 1,100 years ago, and this deformation further complicates the geologic record. The landforms and near-surface deposits that cover much of the Seattle NE map area record a relatively brief, recent interval of the region's geologic history. The topography is dominated in the north by a broad, fluted, and south-sloping upland plateau, which gives way to a more complex set of elongated hills in the map's southern half. The valleys of Pipers Creek, Green Lake, and Thornton Creek mark the transition between these two topographic areas. Most of the uplands are mantled by a rolling surface of sand (unit Qva) and till (unit Qvt) deposited during the last occupation of the Puget Lowland by a continental ice sheet. Beneath these ice sheet deposits is a complex succession of older sediments that extends far below sea level across most of the map area. These older sediments are now locally exposed where modern erosion and landslides have sliced through the edge of the upland, and where subglacial processes apparently left these older sedimen

Booth, Derek B.; Troost, Kathy Goetz; Shimel, Scott A.

2009-01-01

421

75 FR 53735 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on East Lake Sammamish Master Plan Trail in King County, WA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...starting at Gilman Boulevard in Issaquah, Washington and ending at Bear Creek Trail in Redmond, Washington. Those actions grant licenses...side of Lake Sammamish from Gilman Boulevard in Issaquah, WA to Bear Creek Trail in Redmond, WA. The project will be an...

2010-09-01

422

The area of North King County was once forested with deep woods and braided with creeks, where wild-  

E-print Network

fate of the early territory, bringing with them hopeful settlers to name the communities of Woodinville time to drive by and visit every site on this map. Take pleasure in the welcoming, cohesive nature, yet

Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha

423

Cross-shelf transport into nearshore waters due to shoaling internal tides in San Pedro Bay, CA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the summer of 2001, a coastal ocean measurement program in the southeastern portion of San Pedro Bay, CA, was designed and carried out. One aim of the program was to determine the strength and effectiveness of local cross-shelf transport processes. A particular objective was to assess the ability of semidiurnal internal tidal currents to move suspended material a net distance across the shelf. Hence, a dense array of moorings was deployed across the shelf to monitor the transport patterns associated with fluctuations in currents, temperature and salinity. An associated hydrographic program periodically monitored synoptic changes in the spatial patterns of temperature, salinity, nutrients and bacteria. This set of measurements show that a series of energetic internal tides can, but do not always, transport subthermocline water, dissolved and suspended material from the middle of the shelf into the surfzone. Effective cross-shelf transport occurs only when (1) internal tides at the shelf break are strong and (2) subtidal currents flow strongly downcoast. The subtidal downcoast flow causes isotherms to tilt upward toward the coast, which allows energetic, nonlinear internal tidal currents to carry subthermocline waters into the surfzone. During these events, which may last for several days, the transported water remains in the surfzone until the internal tidal current pulses and/or the downcoast subtidal currents disappear. This nonlinear internal tide cross-shelf transport process was capable of carrying water and the associated suspended or dissolved material from the mid-shelf into the surfzone, but there were no observation of transport from the shelf break into the surfzone. Dissolved nutrients and suspended particulates (such as phytoplankton) transported from the mid-shelf into the nearshore region by nonlinear internal tides may contribute to nearshore algal blooms, including harmful algal blooms that occur off local beaches.

Noble, M.; Jones, B.; Hamilton, P.; Xu, J.; Robertson, G.; Rosenfeld, L.; Largier, J.

2009-01-01

424

Carbon County Secondary Data Analysis  

E-print Network

Carbon County Secondary Data Analysis July 23, 2012 1 1 Community Health Data, MT Dept, Wheatland, Golden Valley, Musselshell, Sweet Grass, Stillwater, Yellowstone, Big Horn, and Carbon. CLRD* #12; Carbon County Secondary Data Analysis July 23, 2012 2 Socioeconomic Measures1

Maxwell, Bruce D.

425

Frederick County Community Perception Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1997, Frederick Community College (FCC) in Maryland conducted a telephone survey of a random sample of 466 Frederick County residents to identify their perceptions of the college. In particular, the survey examined Frederick County residents' image of FCC, level of awareness of services and programs offered by FCC, and the types of services…

Frederick Community Coll., MD.

426

Ravalli County Secondary Data Analysis  

E-print Network

,914 Unemployment Rate 7 8.1% 6.3% 7.7% Persons Below Poverty Level 1 14.0% 14.0% 13.8% Uninsured Adults (Age (%) Education Level County Montana 10 Indicators Northwest, Imp. Graph (2011) #12;Ravalli County Secondary Data.7 Not relevant Age 1 Gender 1 Male Female

Maxwell, Bruce D.

427

Lincoln County Secondary Data Analysis  

E-print Network

,000 $51,914 Unemployment Rate7 14.5% 6.3% 7.7% Persons Below Poverty Level1 19.0% 14.0% 13 (%) Education Level County Montana 10 Indicators Northwest, Imp. Graph (2011) #12; Lincoln County Secondary+ Gender1 Male Female Male Female Male Female

Maxwell, Bruce D.

428

Lake County Secondary Data Analysis  

E-print Network

,914 Unemployment Rate 7 8.9% 6.3% 7.7% Persons Below Poverty Level 1 18.0% 14.0% 13.8% Uninsured Adults (Age (%) Education Level County Montana 10 Indicators Northwest, Imp. Graph (2011) #12;Lake County Secondary Data-64 65+ Gender 1 Male Female Male Female Male Female 49

Maxwell, Bruce D.

429

Identification of the remains of King Richard III  

PubMed Central

In 2012, a skeleton was excavated at the presumed site of the Grey Friars friary in Leicester, the last-known resting place of King Richard III. Archaeological, osteological and radiocarbon dating data were consistent with these being his remains. Here we report DNA analyses of both the skeletal remains and living relatives of Richard III. We find a perfect mitochondrial DNA match between the sequence obtained from the remains and one living relative, and a single-base substitution when compared with a second relative. Y-chromosome haplotypes from male-line relatives and the remains do not match, which could be attributed to a false-paternity event occurring in any of the intervening generations. DNA-predicted hair and eye colour are consistent with Richard’s appearance in an early portrait. We calculate likelihood ratios for the non-genetic and genetic data separately, and combined, and conclude that the evidence for the remains being those of Richard III is overwhelming. PMID:25463651

King, Turi E.; Fortes, Gloria Gonzalez; Balaresque, Patricia; Thomas, Mark G.; Balding, David; Delser, Pierpaolo Maisano; Neumann, Rita; Parson, Walther; Knapp, Michael; Walsh, Susan; Tonasso, Laure; Holt, John; Kayser, Manfred; Appleby, Jo; Forster, Peter; Ekserdjian, David; Hofreiter, Michael; Schürer, Kevin

2014-01-01

430

Magnetometry at Uruk (Iraq): The city of King Gilgamesh  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Uruk (Tell Warka) is one of the most famous sites for the early cultural development at Mesopotamia. The Sumerian city state was also important for the origin of writing and Uruk was the scene of action of mans oldest epic, the famous Epic of Gilgamesh (2600 B.C). During the time of the Sassanides, 400 A.D. the city was given up completely. Today the ruin is dominated by shallow hills and wadis, covered by pottery, mudbricks and slags. The area is totally free of modern buildings and far away from the modern village of Warka. Therefore it is an ideal place for uncompensated cesium magnetometry. The most sensational find was the discovery of a canal system inside the city. Furthermore the magnetogram shows the remains of buildings of the Babylonian type as well as garden structures, a middle Babylonian graveyard and the so called "New Years Temple" of the God Anu or Godess Ischtar. The city wall, which we prospected in a length of more than one kilometer, includes a water gate and is nearly 40 meters broad. From magnetometry it is evident that it was build by burned mudbricks as it was described by the Epic. In the west of the "New Years Temple" in the middle of the former Euphrates river we detected the remains of a building which may be interpreted as a burial. But if this building is the grave of the famous King Gilgamesh as it was described by the Epic of Gilgamesh it must remain speculative.

Fassbinder, J.; Becker, H.; van Ess, M.

2003-04-01

431

Maternal telomere length inheritance in the king penguin.  

PubMed

Telomeres are emerging as a biomarker for ageing and survival, and are likely important in shaping life-history trade-offs. In particular, telomere length with which one starts in life has been linked to lifelong survival, suggesting that early telomere dynamics are somehow related to life-history trajectories. This result highlights the importance of determining the extent to which telomere length is inherited, as a crucial factor determining early life telomere length. Given the scarcity of species for which telomere length inheritance has been studied, it is pressing to assess the generality of telomere length inheritance patterns. Further, information on how this pattern changes over the course of growth in individuals living under natural conditions should provide some insight on the extent to which environmental constraints also shape telomere dynamics. To fill this gap partly, we followed telomere inheritance in a population of king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus). We tested for paternal and maternal influence on chick initial telomere length (10 days old after hatching), and how these relationships changed with chick age (at 70, 200 and 300 days old). Based on a correlative approach, offspring telomere length was positively associated with maternal telomere length early in life (at 10 days old). However, this relationship was not significant at older ages. These data suggest that telomere length in birds is maternally inherited. Nonetheless, the influence of environmental conditions during growth remained an important factor shaping telomere length, as the maternal link disappeared with chicks' age. PMID:25052413

Reichert, S; Rojas, E R; Zahn, S; Robin, J-P; Criscuolo, F; Massemin, S

2015-01-01

432

Late Pleistocene vegetation of Kings Canyon, Sierra Nevada, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seven packrat midden samples make possible a comparison between the modern and late Pleistocene vegetation in Kings Canyon on the western side of the southern Sierra Nevada. One modern sample contains macrofossils and pollen derived from the present-day oak-chaparral vegetation. Macrofossils from the six late Pleistocene samples record a mixed coniferous forest dominated by the xerophytic conifers Juniperus occidentalis, Pinus cf. ponderosa, and P. monophylla. The pollen spectra of these Pleistocene middens are dominated by Pinus sp., Taxodiaceae-Cupressaceae-Taxaceae (TCT), and Artemisia sp. Mesophytic conifers are represented by low macrofossil concentrations. Sequoiadendron giganteum is represented by a few pollen grains in the full glacial. Edaphic control and snow dispersal are the most likely causes of these mixed assemblages. The dominant macrofossils record a more xeric plant community than those that now occur on similar substrates at higher elevations or latitudes in the Sierra Nevada. These assemblages suggest that late Wisconsin climates were cold with mean annual precipitation not necessarily greater than modern values. This conclusion supports a model of low summer ablation allowing for the persistence of the glaciers at higher elevations during the late Wisconsin. The records in these middens also suggest that S. giganteum grew at lower elevations along the western side of the range and that P. monophylla was more widely distributed in cismontane California during the Pleistocene.

Cole, Kenneth

1983-01-01

433

Multicolour CCD photometry of old open clusters:. King 5 and Be 20  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present multicolour CCD photometry for two poorly studied open clusters (King 5 and Be 20). Photometry for a field near King 5 was also carried out to estimate the contamination by field stars. The colour magnitude diagrams (CMD) of the clusters show a well defined main sequence extending to the limit of the photometry, V ~20 mag. The reddening for King 5, estimated from the colour-colour diagram, is ~ 0.82, whereas that for Be 20 as estimated by comparing theoretical main-sequence (MS) with the observed MS is 0.10. The morphology of the CMDs indicates that these clusters are old. The CMD of Be 20 shows a globular cluster-like horizontal branch. In case of King 5 the comparison of observational CMDs with the standard isochrones of VandenBerg (\\cite{VandenBerg85}) indicates an apparent discrepancy between the shape of the turnoff and isochrones. The CMDs of King 5 seem to be better understood in terms of stellar models with convective overshoot. The comparison of the CMDs with the stellar models by Bertelli et al. (\\cite{Bertelli94}) with convective overshoot produces a good fit for a metallicity Z = 0.008 and an age = 1 Gyr for King 5 and 5 Gyr for Be 20. An apparent distance modulus (m-M) = 14.0 and 15.1 has been estimated for King 5 and Be 20 respectively. They correspond to a distance of 1900 +/-100 pc and 9026 +/- 480 pc, respectively. The radial density distribution in King 5 indicates that there is an excess of low mass stars in the outer region of the cluster, whereas the density distribution in Be 20 shows a good fit with the empirical King (\\cite{King62}) model. For both clusters, observations have also been carried out to search for variable stars. Tables 2 to 4 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/372/71

Durgapal, A. K.; Pandey, A. K.; Mohan, V.

2001-06-01

434

P1: FZZ/FZZ P2: FZZ CB658-FMDVR CB654-KING-Sample CB658-KING-Sample.cls June 25, 2004 6:14  

E-print Network

in marketing research, and by governments in policy analysis. Gary King is the David Florence Professor individual behavior from aggregate data. The uncertainties and the information lost in aggregation make and as a member of the steering committee of Harvard's Center for Basic Research in the Social Sciences. He

Chen, Yiling

435

7 CFR 301.52-2a - Regulated areas; suppressive and generally infested areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...area. Fresno County. The entire county. Kern County. The entire county. Kings County. The entire county. Madera County. The entire county. Merced County. The entire county. San Benito County. The entire county....

2010-01-01

436

Structure-function relationship of king cobra cathelicidin.  

PubMed

King cobra cathelicidin (OH-CATH) is composed of 34 amino acid residues having strong antibacterial and very weak hemolytic activities as reported by us recently. OH-CATH can be served as a valuable template to develop novel therapeutic drugs. In this study, OH-CATH and six of its analogs were synthesized to explore their structure-function relationships based on their bactericidal and hemolytic activities. Experimental results of OH-CATH(3-34) and OH-CATH(5-34) indicated that the N-terminal 4 amino acid residues of OH-CATH played an important role on its hemolytic activity but had weak effects on its bactericidal activity. Among OH-CATH and its analogs, OH-CATH(5-34) had the lowest hemolytic activity while maintained strong antimicrobial activity. To evaluate its potential usage, the biological activities of OH-CATH(5-34) were compared with those of pexiganan. The bactericidal activity of OH-CATH(5-34) against 5 different species (11 laboratory strains) was 2-4 times stronger than that of pexiganan (4-16 microg/ml vs 8-32 microg/ml). Hemolytic activity of OH-CATH(5-34) against human erythrocytes was 0.69% while that of pexiganan was 16.5% at the dosage of 200 microg/ml. OH-CATH(5-34) showed very weak cytotoxic activities against primary rabbit ventricular endothelial cells and four human cancer cell lines whereas pexiganan showed strong cytotoxic activity against these five cell lines (IC(50)=20-90 microg/ml). The intravenous LD(50) value of OH-CATH(5-34) on mice was 7-fold higher than that of pexiganan (175 mg/kg vs 25mg/kg). Taken together, our results suggested that OH-CATH(5-34) should be considered as an excellent candidate for developing therapeutic drugs. PMID:20576537

Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Hui; Yu, Guo-Yu; Liu, Xiao-Dong; Shen, Ji-Hong; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yun

2010-08-01

437

Tennessee Higher Education County Profiles, 2008  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents a localized perspective on Tennessee higher education, including: (1) county demographic and economic data; (2) information on public and private colleges and universities located in the county; (3) number of county residents enrolled in Tennessee public institutions; and (4) number of county residents participating in the…

Tennessee Higher Education Commission, 2008

2008-01-01

438

Evidence for wing molt and breeding site fidelity in King Eiders  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fidelity of King Eiders (Somateria spectabilis) to breeding and wing molt sites was examined using satellite telemetry data obtained opportunistically when battery life of transmitters provided locations in a second year. Consecutive breeding locations were obtained for eleven female and 23 male King Eiders. All females exhibited breeding site fidelity by returning to sites within 15 km of first year breeding areas on the North Slope of Alaska. Breeding locations of males in a subsequent year were located on average >1000 km from their prior breeding sites and were primarily outside Alaska, on the coasts of Russia and Canada. Second-year wing molt locations were obtained for two female and six male King Eiders. Wing molt sites of males were located 6.2 ?? 3.1 km apart on average in successive years, while female wing molt locations averaged almost 50 km apart. Our results demonstrate site fidelity of female King Eiders to a breeding area on the North Slope of Alaska, document the dispersal of male King Eiders between breeding seasons, and present the first evidence for wing molt site fidelity in males.

Phillips, L.M.; Powell, A.N.

2006-01-01

439

Fault Trace: Marin County, California  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This photograph shows the trace of a fault (in trench phase) as it passes beneath a barn. The trace developed during the April 18, 1906 San Francisco Earthquake. The location is the Skinner Ranch, near Olema, Marin County, California.

440

Geothermal development plan: Yuma county  

SciTech Connect

One hot spring and 33 wells drilled in the county discharge water at temperatures sufficient for direct-use geothermal applications such as process heat and space heating and cooling. Currently, one industry within the county has been identified which may be able to use geothermal energy for its process heat requirements. Also, a computer simulation model was used to predict geothermal energy on line as a function of time under both private and city-owned utility development of the resource.

White, D.H.

1981-01-01

441

Exposure to hydrocarbons 10 years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill: evidence from cytochrome P4501A expression and biliary FACs in nearshore demersal fishes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three biomarkers of hydrocarbon exposure, CYP1A in liver vascular endothelium, liver ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD), and biliary fluorescent aromatic compounds (FACs), were examined in the nearshore fishes, masked greenling (Hexagrammos octogrammus) and crescent gunnel (Pholis laeta), collected in Prince William Sound, Alaska, 7–10 years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS). All biomarkers were elevated in fish collected from sites originally

Stephen C. Jewett; Thomas A. Dean; Bruce R. Woodin; Max K. Hoberg; John J. Stegeman

2002-01-01

442

Advances in Shallow-Water, High-Resolution Seafloor Mapping: Integrating an Autonomous Surface Vessel (ASV) Into Nearshore Geophysical Studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been heavily involved in geological mapping of the seafloor since the 1970s. Early mapping efforts such as GLORIA provided broad-scale imagery of deep waters (depths > 400 meters) within the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). In the early 1990's, the USGS research emphasis shifted from deep- to shallow-water environments (inner continental shelf, nearshore, estuaries) to address pertinent coastal issues such as erosion, sediment availability, sediment transport, vulnerability of coastal areas to natural and anthropogenic hazards, and resource management. Geologic framework mapping in these shallow- water environments has provided valuable data used to 1) define modern sediment distribution and thickness, 2) determine underlying stratigraphic and structural controls on shoreline behavior, and 3) enable onshore-to- offshore geologic mapping within the coastal zone when coupled with subaerial techniques such as GPR and topographic LIDAR. Research in nearshore areas presents technological challenges due to the dynamics of the environment, high volume of data collected, and the geophysical limitations of operating in very shallow water. In 2004, the USGS, in collaboration with NOAA's Coastal Services Center, began a multi-year seafloor mapping effort to better define oyster habitats within Apalachicola Bay, Florida, a shallow water estuary along the northern Gulf of Mexico. The bay poses a technological challenge due to its shallow depths (< 4-m) and high turbidity that prohibits the use of bathymetric LIDAR. To address this extreme shallow water setting, the USGS incorporated an Autonomous Surface Vessel (ASV) into seafloor mapping operations, in June 2006. The ASV is configured with a chirp sub-bottom profiler (4 24 kHz), dual-frequency chirp sidescan-sonar (100/500 kHz), single-beam echosounder (235 kHz), and forward-looking digital camera, and will be used to delineate the distribution and thickness of surficial sediment, presence of oyster beds, and sea bed morphology in water depths less than 5-m. The ASV is a catamaran-based platform, 10 feet in length, 4 feet in width, and approximately 260 lbs in weight. The vehicle is operated remotely through a wireless modem network enabling real-time monitoring of data acquisition. The ASV is navigated using RTK, and heave, pitch and roll are recorded with onboard motion sensors. Additional sensors, such as ADCPs, can also be housed within the vehicle. The ASV is able to operate in previously inaccessible areas, and will not only augment existing shallow-water research capabilities, but will also improve our understanding of the geologic controls to modern beach behavior and coastal evolution.

Denny, J. F.; O'Brien, T. F.; Bergeron, E.; Twichell, D.; Worley, C. R.; Danforth, W. W.; Andrews, B. A.; Irwin, B.

2006-12-01

443

Dramatic beach and nearshore morphological changes due to extreme flooding at a wave-dominated river mouth  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Record flooding on the Santa Clara River of California (USA) during January 2005 injected ? 5 million m3 of littoral-grade sediment into the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell, approximately an order of magnitude more than both the average annual river loads and the average annual alongshore littoral transport in this portion of the cell. This event appears to be the largest sediment transport event on record for a Southern California river. Over 170 m of local shoreline (mean high water (MHW)) progradation was observed as a result of the flood, followed by 3 years of rapid local shoreline recession. During this post-flood stage, linear regression-determined shoreline change rates are up to ?45 m a? 1 on the subaerial beach (MHW) and ? 114 m a? 1 on the submarine delta (6 m isobath). Starting approximately 1 km downdrift of the river mouth, shoreline progradation persisted throughout the 3-year post-flood monitoring period, with rates up to + 19 m a? 1. Post-flood bathymetric surveys show nearshore (0 to 12 m depth) erosion on the delta exceeding 400 m3/m a? 1, more than an order of magnitude higher than mean seasonal cross-shore sediment transport rates in the region. Changes were not constant with depth, however; sediment accumulation and subsequent erosion on the delta were greatest at ? 5 to ? 8 m, and accretion in downdrift areas was greatest above –2 m. Thus, this research shows that the topographic bulge (or “wave”) of sediment exhibited both advective and diffusive changes with time, although there were significant variations in the rates of change with depth. The advection and diffusion of the shoreline position was adequately reproduced with a simple “one line” model, although these modeling techniques miss the important cross-shore variations observed in this area. This study illustrates the importance of understanding low-frequency, high volume coastal discharge events for understanding short- and long-term sediment supply, littoral transport, and beach and nearshore evolution in coastal systems adjacent to river mouths.

Barnard, P.L.; Warrick, J.A.

2010-01-01

444

This is an electronic version of an article published as King, B.H. and R.B. King. 1994. Sex ratio manipulation in response to host size in the parasitoid wasp Spalangia  

E-print Network

ratio manipulation in response to host size in the parasitoid wasp Spalangia cameroni: is it adaptive? Behavioral Ecology 5:448-454. Sex ratio manipulation in response to host size in the parasitoid wasp, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115-2861 USA Running title: King and King _ Parasitoid wasp sex

King, Bethia H.

445

San Bernardino County Museum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The San Bernardino County Museum is a regional museum with exhibits and collections in cultural and natural history. Special exhibits, the Exploration Station live animal discovery center, extensive research collections, and public programs for adults, families, students, and children are all part of the museum experience. The Museum is surrounded by citrus groves, and orange blossoms perfume the air. The Zimmerman Citrus Kiosk explores citrus agricultural history in Southern California. Death Valley Alive! is a new traveling exhibit, available for rent, where visitors can explore the natural history and culture of the Death Valley region from its geologic beginnings 1.3 billion years ago. Online exhibits include The Importance of Museum Collections, The Barstow Fossil Beds, Motherlode of the Miocene, The Etiwanda Fan, and for kids, Mimicry, a study in camouflage and adaptation. Teacher Resources include professional development and workshops, and Trading Places, where 21 hours of time spent volunteering in the Museum earns a free program for your class. Sample opportunities include writing activities for study kits, developing post-visit activities, creating a museum gallery guide, translating student materials into Spanish, or developing an independent idea. There are programs for youth, Scouts, and adults, as well as various publications available in anthropology, archeology, biology, geology and history.

446

Habitat coupling in a large lake system: delivery of an energy subsidy by an offshore planktivore to the nearshore zone of Lake Superior  

USGS Publications Warehouse

1. We hypothesised that the autumn spawning migration of Lake Superior cisco (Coregonus artedi) provides a resource subsidy, in the form of energy-rich cisco eggs, from the offshore pelagic to the nearshore benthic community over winter, when alternate prey production is likely to be low. 2. We tested this hypothesis using fish and macroinvertebrate surveys, fish population demographics, diet and stable isotope analyses, and bioenergetics modelling. 3. The benthic, congeneric lake whitefish (C. clupeaformis) was a clear beneficiary of cisco spawning. Cisco eggs represented 16% of lake whitefish annual consumption in terms of biomass, but 34% of energy (because of their high energy density: >10 kJ g wet mass?1). Stable isotope analyses were consistent with these results and suggest that other nearshore fish species may also rely on cisco eggs. 4. The lipid content of lake whitefish liver almost doubled from 26 to 49% between November and March, while that of muscle increased from 14 to 26% over the same period, suggesting lake whitefish were building, rather than depleting, lipid reserves during winter. 5. In the other Laurentian Great Lakes, where cisco populations remain very low and rehabilitation efforts are underway, the offshore-to-nearshore ecological link apparent in Lake Superior has been replaced by non-native planktivorous species. These non-native species spawn in spring have smaller eggs and shorter incubation periods. The rehabilitation of cisco in these systems should reinstate the onshore subsidy as it has in Lake Superior.

Stockwell, Jason D.; Yule, Daniel L.; Hrabik, Thomas R.; Sierszen, Michael E.; Isaac, Edmund J.

2014-01-01

447

Heavy metals and POPs in red king crab from the Barents Sea.  

PubMed

The aim of this paper is to evaluate the food safety of the red king crab from Norwegian waters and obtain information on possible geographical and gender differences. Samples of claw and leg meat of 185 red king crabs (Paralithodes camtschaticus), collected from 23 positions in the Barents Sea, were analysed for dioxins, furans, non-ortho and mono-ortho PCBs, non dioxin-like PCBs, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, and perfluorinated alkyl substances and elements, such as arsenic, cadmium, mercury and lead. The concentrations of persistent organic pollutants and metals were low compared to maximum levels laid down in European regulations. Hence, red king crab is a safe food. Significant differences in the concentrations of metals among different areas, and between male and female crabs, were found. Positive correlations were found between carapace length and mercury, methylmercury and cadmium concentrations, and between fat and arsenic and inorganic arsenic concentrations. PMID:25149005

Julshamn, Kaare; Valdersnes, Stig; Duinker, Arne; Nedreaas, Kjell; Sundet, Jan H; Maage, Amund

2015-01-15

448

75 FR 25308 - Environmental Impact Statement: Winnebago County, IL and Rock County, WI  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Winnebago County, IL and Rock County, WI AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA...Wisconsin Route 213 and Nye School Road northwest of Beloit, Rock County, Wisconsin to the interchange of Rockton Road and...

2010-05-07

449

What to look for in the hunt for BRCA1, Mary-Claire KingSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Interviewee: Mary-Claire King DNAi Location:Applications>Genes and medicine>gene hunting Starting out Mary-Claire King talks about her first steps toward finding the gene responsible for certain kinds of inherited breast cancer.

2008-03-26

450

Using pedigress in the hunt for BRCA1, Mary-Claire KingSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Interviewee: Mary-Claire King DNAi Location:Applications>Genes and medicine>gene hunting Families and pedigrees Mary-Claire King talks about the value of using the centuries-old tool of family pedigrees to gain insight into patterns of inheritance of genetic disorders.

2008-03-26

451

Treatment of the first known case of king cobra envenomation in the United Kingdom, complicated by severe anaphylaxis.  

PubMed

We report the first known case of envenomation following snake bite by a king cobra in the UK. The patient required tracheal intubation and ventilation. Treatment with king cobra antivenom resulted in anaphylaxis (bronchospasm and hypotension), requiring adrenaline infusion. The patient's trachea was extubated 11 h after administration of antivenom. PMID:17156231

Veto, T; Price, R; Silsby, J F; Carter, J A

2007-01-01

452

A Review of "Images Wars: Promoting Kings and Commonwealth in England, 1603-1660" by Kevin Sharpe  

E-print Network

Atlantic studies. Kevin Sharpe. Images Wars: Promoting Kings and Commonwealth in England, 1603-1660. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2010. xvii + 665 pp. $55.00. Review by tillman w. nechtman, skidmore college. Kevin Sharpe?s Image Wars: Promoting Kings...

Nechtman, Tillman

2011-01-01

453

"A Creative Psalm of Brotherhood": The (De)Constructive Play in Martin Luther King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scholars have celebrated the spoken word in King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail," but they have overlooked the significance of the Letter's writing. In this essay I closely read King's act of writing the Letter, along with the figures of speech he employs in it, and I show how both--by enacting the mass media's ability to cross contexts--are…

Gaipa, Mark

2007-01-01

454

Better treatment for breast cancer, Mary-Claire KingSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Interviewee: Mary-Claire King DNAi Location:Applications>Genes and medicine>gene hunting>The finish line Possible treatments Mary-Claire King reflects on how knowledge gained from the identification of BRCA1 and BRCA2 could lead to improved cancer treatments.

2008-03-26

455

Multiple-mineral inclusions in diamonds from the Snap Lake/King Lake kimberlite dike, Slave craton, Canada  

E-print Network

Multiple-mineral inclusions in diamonds from the Snap Lake/King Lake kimberlite dike, Slave craton the Snap Lake/King Lake kimberlites of the southeastern Slave craton in Canada have been analyzed for trace the ``epicenter'' of diamond ex- ploration and mining, including a series of kimberlite dikes; one such dike

456

Archimedes and the Kings Crown Despite his mathematical prowess, Archimedes is perhaps best remembered for an incident involving  

E-print Network

Archimedes and the Kings Crown Despite his mathematical prowess, Archimedes is perhaps best for an equivalent amount of gold, thereby devaluing the crown and defrauding the king. Archimedes the story: While Archimedes was considering the matter, he happened to go to the baths. When he went down

Bahrami, Majid

457

Age-0 Lost River sucker and shortnose sucker nearshore habitat use in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon: A patch occupancy approach  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We examined habitat use by age-0 Lost River suckers Deltistes luxatus and shortnose suckers Chasmistes brevirostris over six substrate classes and in vegetated and nonvegetated areas of Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon. We used a patch occupancy approach to model the effect of physical habitat and water quality conditions on habitat use. Our models accounted for potential inconsistencies in detection probability among sites and sampling occasions as a result of differences in fishing gear types and techniques, habitat characteristics, and age-0 fish size and abundance. Detection probability was greatest during mid- to late summer, when water temperatures were highest and age-0 suckers were the largest. The proportion of sites used by age-0 suckers was inversely related to depth (range = 0.4-3.0 m), particularly during late summer. Age-0 suckers were more likely to use habitats containing small substrate (64 mm) and habitats with vegetation than those without vegetation. Relatively narrow ranges in dissolved oxygen, temperature, and pH prevented us from detecting effects of these water quality features on age-0 sucker nearshore habitat use.

Burdick, S.M.; Hendrixson, H.A.; VanderKooi, S.P.

2008-01-01

458

Additions of nutrients and major ions by the atmosphere and tributaries to nearshore waters of northwestern Lake Huron  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Nutrient additions by the atmosphere and six tributaries to nearshore waters of northwestern Lake Huron were measured at weekly intervals from August 1975 to July 1976. The atmosphere contributed 43% of the nitrogen (N) and 10% of the phosphorus (P) that was added during the year. The 1975-76 atmospheric loading rate of total N to this area (11 kg/ha/yr) was one of the highest found to date in the United States. N was conserved more efficiently than P in the tributary drainage basins. Of the N and P that fell annually on the watersheds under study, 2 to 37% of the N and 31 to 84% of the P was carried with runoff to the lake. From a basin where ditching and clear-cutting occurred, water, P, silica (SiO2), N, and sodium were lost at higher rates than from five other basins. Most of the N in bulk atmospheric samples (23%) and tributary waters (56%) was dissolved organic N, a form of N not often measured.

Manny, Bruce A.; Owens, R.W.

1983-01-01

459

Occurrence of Escherichia coli and enterococci in Cladophora (Clorophyta) in nearshore water and beach sand of Lake Michigan  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Each summer, the nuisance green alga Cladophora (mostly Cladophora glomerata) amasses along Lake Michigan beaches, creating nearshore anoxia and unsightly, malodorous mats that can attract problem animals and detract from visitor enjoyment. Traditionally, elevated counts of Escherichia coli are presumed to indicate the presence of sewage, mostly derived from nearby point sources. The relationship between fecal indicator bacteria and Cladophora remains essentially unstudied. This investigation describes the local and regional density of Escherichia coli and enterococci in Cladophora mats along beaches in the four states (Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan) bordering Lake Michigan. Samples of Cladophora strands collected from 10 beaches (n = 41) were assayed for concentrations of E. coli and enterococci during the summer of 2002. Both E. coli and enterococci were ubiquitous (up to 97% occurrence), with overall log mean densities (± standard errors) of 5.3 (± 4.8) and 4.8 (± 4.5) per g (dry weight). E. coli and enterococci were strongly correlated in southern Lake Michigan beaches (P R2 = 0.73, n = 17) but not in northern beaches (P = 0.892, n = 16). Both E. coli and enterococci survived for over 6 months in sun-dried Cladophora mats stored at 4°C; the residual bacteria in the dried alga readily grew upon rehydration. These findings suggest that Cladophora amassing along the beaches of Lake Michigan may be an important environmental source of indicator bacteria and call into question the reliability of E. coli and enterococci as indicators of water quality for freshwater recreational beaches.

Whitman, Richard L.; Shively, Dawn A.; Pawlik, Heather; Nevers, Meredith B.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.

2003-01-01

460

Identifying Rhodamine Dye Plume Sources in Near-Shore Oceanic Environments by Integration of Chemical and Visual Sensors  

PubMed Central

This article presents a strategy for identifying the source location of a chemical plume in near-shore oceanic environments where the plume is developed under the influence of turbulence, tides and waves. This strategy includes two modules: source declaration (or identification) and source verification embedded in a subsumption architecture. Algorithms for source identification are derived from the moth-inspired plume tracing strategies based on a chemical sensor. The in-water test missions, conducted in November 2002 at San Clemente Island (California, USA) in June 2003 in Duck (North Carolina, USA) and in October 2010 at Dalian Bay (China), successfully identified the source locations after autonomous underwater vehicles tracked the rhodamine dye plumes with a significant meander over 100 meters. The objective of the verification module is to verify the declared plume source using a visual sensor. Because images taken in near shore oceanic environments are very vague and colors in the images are not well-defined, we adopt a fuzzy color extractor to segment the color components and recognize the chemical plume and its source by measuring color similarity. The source verification module is tested by images taken during the CPT missions. PMID:23507823

Tian, Yu; Kang, Xiaodong; Li, Yunyi; Li, Wei; Zhang, Aiqun; Yu, Jiangchen; Li, Yiping

2013-01-01

461

Population substructure in Cache County, Utah: the Cache County study  

PubMed Central

Background Population stratification is a key concern for genetic association analyses. In addition, extreme homogeneity of ethnic origins of a population can make it difficult to interpret how genetic associations in that population may translate into other populations. Here we have evaluated the genetic substructure of samples from the Cache County study relative to the HapMap Reference populations and data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Results Our findings show that the Cache County study is similar in ethnic diversity to the self-reported "Whites" in the ADNI sample and less homogenous than the HapMap CEU population. Conclusions We conclude that the Cache County study is genetically representative of the general European American population in the USA and is an appropriate population for conducting broadly applicable genetic studies. PMID:25078123

2014-01-01

462

The Invisible Work of Managing Visibility for Social ChangeInsights From the Leadership of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, we introduce the concept of tempered visibility as a lens through which to view Martin Luther King Jr.'s civil rights leadership. First, we review the academic literature on visibility and its implications for leadership. Second, we outline key moral and sociopolitical factors that enabled King to become visible. Third, we provide examples of how King intentionally increased

Darryl D. Roberts; Laura Morgan Roberts; Regina M. ONeill; Stacy D. Blake-Beard

2008-01-01

463

Geothermal development plan: Yuma County  

SciTech Connect

The Yuma County Area Development Plan evaluated the county-wide market potential for utilizing geothermal energy. The study identified four potential geothermal resource areas with temperatures less than 90/sup 0/C (194/sup 0/F), and in addition, two areas are inferred to contain geothermal resources with intermediate (90/sup 0/C to 150/sup 0/C, 194/sup 0/F to 300/sup 0/F) temperature potential. The resource areas are isolated, although one resource area is located near Yuma, Arizona. One resource site is inferred to contain a hot dry rock resource. Anticipated population growth in the county is expected to be 2 percent per year over the next 40 years. The primary employment sector is agriculture, though some light industry is located in the county. Water supplies are found to be adequate to support future growth without advese affect on agriculture. Six firms were found in Yuma County which may be able to utilize geothermal energy for process heat needs. In addition, several agricultural processors were found, concentrated in citrus processing and livestock raising. Geothermal energy utilization projections suggest that by the year 2000, geothermal energy may economically provide the energy equivalent of 53,000 barrels of oil per year to the industrial sector if developed privately. Geothermal utilization projections increase to 132,000 barrels of oil per year by 2000 if a municipal utility developed the resource.

White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

1982-08-01

464

Combined geological and surface geochemical methods discovered Agaritta and Brady Creek Fields, Concho County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

From December 1987 to March 1991, 25 prospects in the lower King sand (Upper Pennsylvanian Cisco) play in Concho County, Texas, were tested by several operators. They used combinations of subsurface geology, reconnaissance airborne gas sensing, surface radiometrics, soil magnetic susceptibility, and soil-gas hydrocarbon measurements to define prospects. Six new King sand discoveries or extensions and three deeper Goen discoveries resulted in a 36% exploratory success rate. The total exploration and development cost was approximately $0.67/bbl of proven producing oil reserves. Final locations for the discovery wells on each of the nine successful prospects were selected primarily on the basis of combined subsurface geology and surface geochemical data. As examples, we present information about the discovery of Brady Creek and Agaritta fields. Agaritta field is one of the two largest of the new-field discoveries, with estimated proven producing recoverable reserves of 6 million bbl of oil. Its discovery was based on a combination of (1) regional subsurface geologic projection, (2) airborne hydrocarbon sensing, (3) interstitial soil-gas hydrocarbon data, (4) soil magnetic-susceptibility measurements, and (5) surface potassium and uranium concentrations measured by gamma-ray spectrometry.

Saunders, D.F.; Burson, K.R.; Thompson, C.K. (Recon Explorations Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)); Brown, J.J. (Indigo Oil, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States))

1993-07-01

465

Combined geological and surface geochemical methods discover Agaritta and Brady Creek fields, Concho County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

From December 1987 to March 1991, 25 prospects in the lower King Sandstone (Upper Pennsylvanian Cisco) play in Concho County, Texas, were tested by several operators. They used combinations of subsurface geology, reconnaissance airborne gas sensing, surface radiometrics, soil magnetic susceptibility, and soil gas hydrocarbon measurements to define prospects. Six new King Sandstone field discoveries or extensions and three deeper pay Goen Limestone field discoveries resulted in a 36% exploratory success rate. The total exploration and development cost was approximately $0.67 per bbl of proven producing oil reserves. As examples, the authors present the discovery of Brady Creek and Agaritta fields. Agaritta field is one of the two largest of the new field discoveries with estimated proven producing recoverable reserves of 6,000,000 BO. Its discovery was based on a combination of (1) airborne hydrocarbon sensing, (2) interstitial soil gas hydrocarbon data, (3) soil magnetic susceptibility measurements, and (4) surface potassium and uranium concentrations measured by gamma-ray spectrometry. Interstitial soil gas hydrocarbon anomalies combined with soil magnetic susceptibility anomalies provided the best detailed surface guidance to Agaritta field. These were supported locally by radiometric anomalies. The Brady Creek field is interpreted to be a possible crevasse splay deposit. The Aggaritta field is interpreted to be a point bar deposit. Both fields are stratigraphic traps.

Saunders, D.F.; Burson, K.R.; Thompson, C.K. (Recon Exploration, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)); Brown, J.J. (Indigo Oil, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States))

1992-04-01

466

Archuleta County CO Lineaments  

SciTech Connect

Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Publication Date: 2012 Title: Archuleta Lineaments Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Reno Nevada Publisher: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Description: This layer traces apparent topographic and air-photo lineaments in the area around Pagosa springs in Archuleta County, Colorado. It was made in order to identify possible fault and fracture systems that might be conduits for geothermal fluids. Geothermal fluids commonly utilize fault and fractures in competent rocks as conduits for fluid flow. Geothermal exploration involves finding areas of high near-surface temperature gradients, along with a suitable “plumbing system” that can provide the necessary permeability. Geothermal power plants can sometimes be built where temperature and flow rates are high. To do this, georeferenced topographic maps and aerial photographs were utilized in an existing GIS, using ESRI ArcMap 10.0 software. The USA_Topo_Maps and World_Imagery map layers were chosen from the GIS Server at server.arcgisonline.com, using a UTM Zone 13 NAD27 projection. This line shapefile was then constructed over that which appeared to be through-going structural lineaments in both the aerial photographs and topographic layers, taking care to avoid manmade features such as roads, fence lines, and right-of-ways. These lineaments may be displaced somewhat from their actual location, due to such factors as shadow effects with low sun angles in the aerial photographs. Note: This shape file was constructed as an aid to geothermal exploration in preparation for a site visit for field checking. We make no claims as to the existence of the lineaments, their location, orientation, and nature. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4132831.990103 m Left: 311979.997741 m Right: 331678.289280 m Bottom: 4116067.165795 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Contact Person: Richard “Rick” Zehner Address: 3740 Barron Way City: Reno State: NV Postal Code: 89511 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 775-737-7806 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

Zehner, Richard E.

2012-01-01

467

Geothermal development plan: Maricopa county  

SciTech Connect

Maricopa county is the area of Arizona receiving top priority since it contains over half of the state's population. The county is located entirely within the Basin and Range physiographic region in which geothermal resources are known to occur. Several approaches were taken to match potential users to geothermal resources. One approach involved matching some of the largest facilities in the county to nearby geothermal resources. Other approaches involved identifying industrial processes whose heat requirements are less than the average assessed geothermal reservoir temperature of 110/sup 0/C (230/sup 0/F). Since many of the industries are located on or near geothermal resources, geothermal energy potentially could be adapted to many industrial processes.

White, D.H.

1981-01-01

468

Keck/HIRES Spectroscopy of Four Candidate Solar Twins Jeremy R. King  

E-print Network

Keck/HIRES Spectroscopy of Four Candidate Solar Twins Jeremy R. King Department of Physics­0978 sschule@ces.clemson.edu ABSTRACT We use high S/N, high­resolution Keck/HIRES spectroscopy of 4 solar twin the photometric temperatures are too cool at solar T e# . At the same time, our abundances for the 3 solar twin

King, Jeremy

469

Collapsing Closures Xuan Li 1 , Andy King 2 and Lunjin Lu 1  

E-print Network

Collapsing Closures Xuan Li 1 , Andy King 2 and Lunjin Lu 1 1 Oakland University, Rochester, MI in terms of an operation, called closure under union, that is also exponential. This paper shows how abstract unification can be reformulated so that closures can be collapsed in two senses. Firstly, one

Kent, University of

470

Summer diet of king penguins ( Aptenodytes patagonicus ) at the Falkland Islands, southern Atlantic Ocean  

Microsoft Academic Search

The diet of king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) brooding chicks was investigated during February 2001 at the Falkland Islands, where a small but increasing population is located at the limit of the breeding range of this species. Fish was the most important food source by number (98.0%) and reconstituted mass (97.8%), squids accounting for the remainder. Myctophid fishes represented the main

Yves Cherel; Klemens Pütz; Keith A. Hobson

2002-01-01

471

On the initial stages of cement hydration S. J. Preece, J. Billingham and A. C. King  

E-print Network

On the initial stages of cement hydration S. J. Preece, J. Billingham and A. C. King School the initial mixing of cement, an induction period occurs during which its consistency remains constant- stituent of cement, which is believed to be responsible for the initial development of its strength. Our

Billingham, John

472

Service Delivery Standards King's College London Library Services is committed to ensuring your needs are the  

E-print Network

. http://www.kcl.ac.uk/library/visiting/hours/index.aspx Customer Satisfaction · We aim to receive a satisfaction rating of 90% from our `Ask a Librarian' enquiry service. · We aim for over 80% of students in the National Student Survey to express overall satisfaction with their experience at King's College London

Applebaum, David

473

Fault attacks on "secure" Smart Card Jie Ling and Brian King  

E-print Network

Fault attacks on "secure" Smart Card Jie Ling and Brian King Department of Electrical and Computer that they continue to swipe your card in a manner to purposely induce faults and record all the faulty, and construct a clone of your card, using it for their needs at your expense. This technique, based on fault

Zhou, Yaoqi

474

Effect of fasting on the V O2-fh relationship in king penguins, Aptenodytes patagonicus  

E-print Network

of Biosciences and 3 School of Mathematics and Statistics, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B all conditions. The relation- ship may be affected by several factors, such as gender (15), type changes (23). In king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus), the relationship was significantly different

Fahlman, Andreas

475

The future of venoms-based drug discovery: an interview with Glenn King.  

PubMed

Interview by Hannah Coaker (Commissioning Editor, Future Science Group). Glenn King secured a PhD from the University of Sydney before doing his postdoctoral studies at the University of Oxford. After academic stints at the University of Sydney and the University of Connecticut Health Center, he joined the Institute for Molecular Bioscience at The University of Queensland in 2007, where he is currently an NHMRC Principal Research Fellow. The current focus of King's research is venom-based drug discovery, in particular the development of analgesics and anti-stroke therapies. Several molecules discovered in his lab have already progressed to preclinical studies. King currently serves on the Scientific Advisory Board of three companies and the Editorial Board of four journals. He is a former President of the Australian Society for Biophysics, current President of the Australian & New Zealand Society for Magnetic Resonance and a member of the Executive Council of the International Society for Toxinology. In addition, King is a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, and in 2013, he received the Sir Bob Robertson Award from the Australian Society for Biophysics and the Beckman Coulter Discovery Science Award from the Australian Society for Biochemistry & Molecular Biology. PMID:25406002

King, Glenn F

2014-10-01

476

A Well-Defined Terminal Vanadium(III) Oxo Complex Amanda E. King,,,  

E-print Network

A Well-Defined Terminal Vanadium(III) Oxo Complex Amanda E. King,,,§ Michael Nippe,,,§ Mihail Information ABSTRACT: The ubiquity of vanadium oxo complexes in the V+ and IV+ oxidation states has-defined terminal mononuclear vanadium(III) oxo complex has remained elusive. We present the synthesis

477

The K King Problem, an Abstract Model for Computing Aircraft Landing Trajectories  

E-print Network

which safety is not granted. Our objective is to determine the order in which aircraft land as wellThe K King Problem, an Abstract Model for Computing Aircraft Landing Trajectories: On Modeling.Mattioli@thalesgroup.com Motivated by the problem of computing trajectories of