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1

Hospital Development Guide for King County.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A hospital development guide for King County, Washington is described that involved a cooperative venture of the King County Comprehensive Health Planning Council, Puget Sound Health Planning Council, Seattle Area Hospital Council, and the King County Med...

1973-01-01

2

Charging Up in King County, Washington  

SciTech Connect

King County, Washington is spearheading a regional effort to develop a network of electric vehicle charging stations. It is also improving its vehicle fleet and made significant improvements to a low-income senior housing development.

Constantine, Dow; Oliver, LeAnn; Inslee, Jay; Sahandy, Sheida; Posthuma, Ron; Morrison, David

2011-01-01

3

Primary Care Development Guide for King County. Initial Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The improvement of primary care services rendered in private physician offices, hospital emergency rooms, and community clinics in King County, Washington is addressed. Health planning councils in four Washington counties (King, Kitsap, Pierce, and Snohom...

1975-01-01

4

King County Division of Parks and Recreation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented are duplications of the responses given by the King County Division of Parks and Recreation (Seattle, Washington) as part of a project to collect, share, and compile information about, and techniques in the operation of 18 community action models for recreation services to the disabled. Model programs are categorized as consumer, client…

Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Recreation Education Program.

5

King County Earthworks: Land Reclamation as Sculpture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Can land reclamation be public art? It most certainly can and large scale installations can be found in abundance from California to Maine. This rather wonderful project appeared in Washington's King County in the summer of 1979. The King County Archives brought together original interviews, photos, and other documents for this marvelous exploration of a unique and trend-setting endeavor. The intent of the project was to have artists create various earthworks on land that had been environmentally damaged. The first phase was a demonstration project, then other artists moved on to create six different sites. The first demonstration project was crafted by well-known artist Robert Morris and there are a number of videos, explanatory essays, and diagrams documenting this crafty and fascinating experiment in public art.

2013-11-04

6

Social Media Guidelines: King County ? 1  

E-print Network

The role of technology in the 21st century workplace is constantly expanding and now includes social media communication tools that facilitate interactive information sharing and collaboration. Many of these websites and tools have large, loyal user bases and are, thus, increasingly important outreach and communication tools for government entities from the federal to the local level. Social networking can improve interactivity between government agencies and the public, and often reaches new and different populations from traditional media. King County agencies should have communication plans that include social media strategies. In doing so, however, county agencies should take care to choose a combination of traditional methods and social media that provide tools that distribute information across multiple outlets to the broadest audience. All agency communication tools should be used in ways that provide clear communication, maximize transparency, maintain the security of the county network, and are appropriately professional. Social media is no exception. Therefore, the application of social media within King County agencies must be done thoughtfully and in a manner that will minimize risk. Social media users should be aware that these types of communications are considered public records and must be kept for a certain period of time in compliance with the public records law.

unknown authors

7

King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Buses: Final Evaluation Results  

SciTech Connect

Final technical report compares and evaluates new diesel and diesel hybrid-electric articulated buses operated as part of the King County Metro Transit (KC Metro) fleet in Seattle, Washington. The evaluation lasted 12 months.

Chandler, K.; Walkowicz, K.

2006-12-01

8

Third Annual Report: 2006 Pre-Construction Eelgrass Monitoring and Propagation for King County Outfall Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

King County proposes to build a new sewer outfall discharging to Puget Sound near Point Wells, Washington. Construction is scheduled for 2008. The Point Wells site was selected to minimize effects on the nearshore marine environment, but unavoidable impacts to eelgrass (Zostera marina) beds are anticipated during construction. To mitigate for these impacts and prepare for post-construction restoration, King County began implementation of a multi-year eelgrass monitoring and restoration program in 2004, with the primary goal of returning intertidal and shallow subtidal habitat and eelgrass to pre-construction conditions. Major program elements are a) pre-construction monitoring, i.e., documenting initial eelgrass conditions and degree of fluctuation over 5 years prior to construction, b) eelgrass transplanting, including harvesting, offsite propagating and stockpiling of local plantstock, and post-construction planting, and c) post-construction monitoring. The program is detailed in the Eelgrass Restoration and Biological Resources Implementation Workplan (King County 2006). This report describes calendar year 2006 pre-construction activities conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of King County. Activities included continued propagation of eelgrass shoots and monitoring of the experimental harvest plots in the marine outfall corridor area to evaluate recovery rates relative to harvest rates. Approximately 1500 additional shoots were harvested from the marine outfall corridor in August 2006 to supplement the plants in the propagation tank at the PNNL Marine Sciences Laboratory in Sequim, Washington, bringing the total number of shoots to 4732. Eelgrass densities were monitored in the five experimental harvest plots established in the marine outfall corridor. Changes in eelgrass density were evaluated in year-to-year comparisons with initial harvest rates. Net eelgrass density decreased from 2004 post-harvest to 2006 in all plots, despite density increases observed in 2005 in some plots and at some harvest rates. Eelgrass densities within individual subplots were highly variable from year to year, and the change in density in any interannual period did not correlate to the initial 2004 harvest rate. Continued monitoring should help project managers determine an optimum harvest rate that supports rapid recovery of donor eelgrass beds.

Woodruff, Dana L.; Southard, Susan S.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Anderson, Michael G.; Vavrinec, John

2007-02-01

9

HIV Intertest Interval among MSM in King County, Washington  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES We examined temporal trends and correlates of HIV testing frequency among men who have sex with men (MSM) in King County, WA. METHODS We evaluated data from MSM testing for HIV at the Public Health - Seattle & King County (PHSKC) STD Clinic and Gay City Health Project (GCHP) and testing history data from MSM in PHSKC HIV surveillance. The intertest interval (ITI) was defined as the number of days between the last negative HIV test and the current testing visit or first positive test. Correlates of the log10-transformed ITI were determined using GEE linear regression. RESULTS Between 2003 and 2010, the median ITI among MSM seeking HIV testing at the STD Clinic and GCHP were 215 (IQR: 124–409) and 257 (IQR: 148–503) days, respectively. In multivariate analyses, younger age, having only male partners, and reporting ?10 male sex partners in the last year were associated with shorter ITIs at both testing sites (p<0.05). Among GCHP attendees, having a regular healthcare provider, seeking a test as part of a regular schedule, and inhaled nitrite use in the last year were also associated with shorter ITIs (p<0.001). Compared to MSM testing HIV-negative, MSM newly diagnosed with HIV had longer ITIs at the STD Clinic (median of 213 versus 278 days; p=0.01) and GCHP (median 255 versus 359 days; p=0.02). CONCLUSIONS Although MSM in King County appear to be testing at frequent intervals, further efforts are needed to reduce the time that HIV-infected persons are unaware of their status. PMID:22563016

Katz, David A.; Dombrowski, Julia C.; Swanson, Fred; Buskin, Susan; Golden, Matthew R.; Stekler, Joanne D.

2012-01-01

10

Fourth Annual Report: 2007 Pre-Construction Eelgrass Monitoring and Propagation for King County Outfall Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

King County proposes to build a new sewer outfall discharging to Puget Sound near Point Wells, Washington. Construction is scheduled for 2008. The Point Wells site was selected to minimize effects on the nearshore marine environment, but unavoidable impacts to eelgrass (Zostera marina) beds are anticipated during construction. To mitigate these impacts and prepare for post-construction restoration, King County began implementing a multiyear eelgrass monitoring and restoration program in 2004, with the primary goal of returning intertidal and shallow subtidal habitat and eelgrass to pre-construction conditions. Major program elements related to eelgrass are (a) pre-construction monitoring, i.e., documenting initial eelgrass conditions and degree of fluctuation over 5 years prior to construction, (b) eelgrass transplanting, including harvesting, offsite propagating, and stockpiling of local plants for post-construction planting, and (c) post-construction planting and subsequent monitoring. The program is detailed in the Eelgrass Restoration and Biological Resources Implementation Workplan (King County 2006). This report describes calendar year 2007 pre-construction activities conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for King County. Activities included continued propagation of eelgrass shoots at the PNNL Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) in Sequim, Washington, and monitoring of the experimental harvest plots in the marine outfall corridor area to evaluate recovery rates relative to harvest rates. In addition, 490 eelgrass shoots were also harvested from the Marine Outfall Corridor in July 2007 to supplement the plants in the propagation tank at the MSL, bringing the total number of shoots to 1464. Eelgrass densities were monitored in four of five experimental harvest plots established in the Marine Outfall Corridor. Changes in eelgrass density were evaluated in year-to-year comparisons with initial harvest rates. A net increase in eelgrass density from 2004 post-harvest to 2007 was observed in all plots, despite density decreases observed in 2006 in all plots and at most harvest rates. Eelgrass densities within individual subplots were highly variable from year to year, and the change in density in any interannual period was not related to initial 2004 harvest rate. Harvest rates of neighboring subplots did not appear to affect subplot eelgrass density (Woodruff et al. 2007). Three years post-harvest, eelgrass shoot densities were not significantly different from pre-harvest shoot densities at any harvest level. Additional plans are being discussed with King County to harvest all eelgrass from the construction corridor and hold in the propagation tanks at the MSL for post-construction planting. Under this plan, plants that would have been lost to construction will be held offsite until construction is completed. This strategy reduces and possibly eliminates the need to harvest eelgrass from donor beds located south of the construction area, allowing them to remain undisturbed. However, if eelgrass is harvested from donor beds, the monitoring of eelgrass growth at different harvest rates should help determine an optimum harvest rate that supports rapid recovery of donor eelgrass beds.

Woodruff, Dana L.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Southard, Susan S.; Vavrinec, John

2007-10-04

11

Characterization of the marine fish assemblage associated with the nearshore hardbottom of Broward County, Florida, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Some shallow (<7 m, water depth) nearshore hardbottom areas of southeast Florida have been reported to function as important juvenile fish habitat. Much of this area has been impacted by one or more local beach renourishments (sand fill to offset erosion). We characterized the nearshore fish communities and compared the fish assemblages adjacent to renourished beach to those adjacent to never-renourished beach along a 30-km stretch of coastline, primarily in Broward County, using three visual census methods. Two hundred transect-counts, 100 point-counts and 98 rover-diver counts were completed during June-August 2001. In transect- and point-counts, abundance of all fish species and their sizes were recorded; the rover-diver counts consisted of a simple species list. In total, 164 species and over 72,000 fish were recorded. The highest number of species (145) was recorded with the rover-diver counts. The transects-counts had 118 species and 109 species were recorded on the point-counts. With either all the sites adjacent to renourished beach pooled and compared to the pooled never-renourished sites or individual comparisons amongst renourished and neighboring never-renourished sites, no consistent differences were noted in fish abundance or species richness (ANOVA) or among fish assemblage structure (MDS plot of Bray-Curtis dissimilarity indices). However, although the data show no obvious distinct difference between the renourished and never-renourished sites, due to several important confounding factors (e.g., census methodology, longshore movement of sand fill) and the absence of baseline data prior to any renourishment, it would be premature to translate these results into management strategies. The assemblage structure, in terms of percentage of juvenile fish (<5 cm) as well as percent contributions by family, was similar for the point-counts and transect-counts. However, in mean density per m 2 of substrate, greater abundance and greater species richness values were recorded with the transect-counts than with the point-counts. Newly settled and early juveniles were the dominant component (>84%) of the inshore fish community, consisting primarily (>90%) of grunts (Haemulidae). After the grunts, the wrasses (Labridae) at about 5%, and damselfish (Pomacentridae) at roughly 2% were the predominant families. It is clear from this study and others that the nearshore hardbottom of Broward County is an important juvenile fish habitat, especially for grunts. However, the nearshore hardbottom does not appear to be obligate habitat for these fishes as fishes associated with this area are, apparently, not unique to the nearshore hardbottom either in species or ontogenic stage.

Baron, Robert M.; Jordan, Lance K. B.; Spieler, Richard E.

2004-07-01

12

WATER QUALITY NEAR AGRICULTURAL LAND IN THE SNOQUALMIE WATERSHED, KING COUNTY, WASHINGTON  

Microsoft Academic Search

Land use in the Snoqualmie Watershed is 92.6% agricultural or rural residential. The King Conservation District (KCD) educates farmers on best management practices (BMPs) to protect water quality and salmon habitat. Under contract to the KCD, the King County Water and Land Resources Division monitored water quality at a total of 13 sites near agricultural land in five salmon-bearing tributaries

F. P. Solomon

13

Radiological Risk Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

SciTech Connect

Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document develops plausible and/or likely scenarios, including the identification of likely radioactive materials and quantities of those radioactive materials to be involved. These include 60Co, 90Sr, 137Cs, 192Ir, 226Ra, plutonium, and 241Am. Two broad categories of scenarios are considered. The first category includes events that may be suspected from the outset, such as an explosion of a "dirty bomb" in downtown Seattle. The explosion would most likely be heard, but the type of explosion (e.g., sewer methane gas or RDD) may not be immediately known. Emergency first responders must be able to quickly detect the radioisotopes previously listed, assess the situation, and deploy a response to contain and mitigate (if possible) detrimental effects resulting from the incident. In such scenarios, advance notice of about an hour or two might be available before any contaminated wastewater reaches a treatment plant. The second category includes events that could go initially undetected by emergency personnel. Examples of such a scenario would be the inadvertent or surreptitious introduction of radioactive material into the sewer system. Intact rogue radioactive sources from industrial radiography devices, well-logging apparatus, or moisture density gages may get into wastewater and be carried to a treatment plant. Other scenarios might include a terrorist deliberately putting a dispersible radioactive material into wastewater. Alternatively, a botched terrorism preparation of an RDD may result in radioactive material entering wastewater without anyone's knowledge. Drinking water supplies may also be contaminated, with the result that some or most of the radioactivity ends up in wastewater.

Strom, Daniel J.

2005-08-05

14

Evaluation of a drowning prevention campaign in King County, Washington  

PubMed Central

Objectives—A three year drowning prevention campaign focused on increasing the use of life vests among children 1–14 years old. An evaluation was conducted to determine campaign awareness, change in ownership and use of life vests by children, and predictors of life vest use. Setting—King County, Washington. Methods—Four telephone surveys were conducted with parents before, during, and after the campaign. Results—The campaign was recalled by 50% of families surveyed. From before to after the campaign, reported life vest use by children on docks, beaches, or at pools increased from 20% to 29% (p<0.01) and life vest ownership for children increased from 69% to 75% (p=0.06). Among parents aware of the campaign, reported child life vest use increased from 20% to 34% (p<0.001) and ownership increased from 69% to 80% (p<0.01). Among families unaware of the campaign, neither life vest use nor ownership changed significantly. Children were more often reported to wear life vests if a parent knew of the campaign, was confident fitting the vest, was younger than 40 years, felt the child could not swim well, and owned a life vest for the child. Conclusions—A community-wide drowning prevention campaign resulted in a significant, although modest, increase in reported life vest use and ownership among children. PMID:10385829

Bennett, E.; Cummings, P.; Quan, L.; Lewis, F. M.

1999-01-01

15

Declines in student obesity prevalence associated with a prevention initiative - King County, Washington, 2012.  

PubMed

The United States has invested heavily, through public and private sector initiatives, in actions to prevent youth obesity by promoting healthy eating and physical activity. This report documents recent trends in youth obesity in King County, Washington, which implemented a Communities Putting Prevention to Work (CPPW) obesity prevention initiative during 2010-2012, including a school-based component. Similar large-scale obesity prevention initiatives did not occur elsewhere in Washington. Beginning in 2004, the Washington State Department of Health began monitoring youth obesity through the biennially administered Washington State Healthy Youth Survey (HYS). Based on data from this survey, neither King County nor the rest of Washington showed statistically significant changes in obesity prevalence in 2006, 2008, and 2010, relative to 2004. In 2012, however, King County youth obesity prevalence showed a statistically significant decrease, while no change occurred in the remainder of the state. Within King County, CPPW was implemented only in low-income school districts to address geographic inequities in obesity rates. Analysis within King County comparing CPPW and non-CPPW school districts before and after the intervention (2010 versus 2012) revealed a statistically significant decline in obesity prevalence in CPPW schools yet no change in non-CPPW schools. This decline in CPPW schools was significantly different than in non-CPPW schools. These findings suggest that school-based policy, systems, and environment changes might help reduce youth obesity, warranting further evaluation of short- and long-term impacts on population health. PMID:24553199

Kern, Eli; Chan, Nadine L; Fleming, David W; Krieger, James W

2014-02-21

16

Radiological Instrumentation Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

SciTech Connect

The King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into its combined sanitary and storm sewer system. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material. Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. Volume 2 of PNNL-15163 assesses the radiological instrumentation needs for detection of radiological or nuclear terrorism, in support of decisions to treat contaminated wastewater or to bypass the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP), and in support of radiation protection of the workforce, the public, and the infrastructure of the WPTP. Fixed radiation detection instrumentation should be deployed in a defense-in-depth system that provides 1) early warning of significant radioactive material on the way to the WPTP, including identification of the radionuclide(s) and estimates of the soluble concentrations, with a floating detector located in the wet well at the Interbay Pump Station and telemetered via the internet to all authorized locations; 2) monitoring at strategic locations within the plant, including 2a) the pipe beyond the hydraulic ram in the bar screen room; 2b) above the collection funnels in the fine grit facility; 2c) in the sampling tank in the raw sewage pump room; and 2d) downstream of the concentration facilities that produce 6% blended and concentrated biosolids. Engineering challenges exist for these applications. It is necessary to deploy both ultra-sensitive detectors to provide early warning and identification and detectors capable of functioning in high-dose rate environments that are likely under some scenarios, capable of functioning from 10 microrems per hour (background) up to 1000 rems per hour. Software supporting fixed spectroscopic detectors is needed to provide prompt, reliable, and simple interpretations of spectroscopic outputs that are of use to operators and decision-makers. Software to provide scientists and homeland security personnel with sufficient technical detail for identification, quantification, waste management decisions, and for the inevitable forensic and attribution needs must be developed. Computational modeling using MCNP software has demonstrated that useful detection capabilities can be deployed. In particular, any of the isotopes examined can be detected at levels between 0.01 and 0.1 ?Ci per gallon. General purpose instruments that can be used to determine the nature and extent of radioactive contamination and measure radiation levels for purposes of protecting personnel and members of the public should be available. One or more portable radioisotope identifiers (RIIDs) should be available to WTD personnel. Small, portable battery-powered personal radiation monitors should be widely available WTD personnel. The personal monitors can be used for personal and group radiation protection decisions, and to alert management to the need to get expert backup. All considerations of radiological instrumentation require considerations of training and periodic retraining of personnel, as well as periodic calibration and maintenance of instruments. Routine “innocent” alarms will occur due to medical radionuclides that are legally discharged into sanitary sewers on a daily basis.

Strom, Daniel J.; McConn, Ronald J.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.

2005-05-19

17

Geology and ground-water resources of northwestern King County, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

King County, in the west-central part of the State of Washington, includes about 2,135 square miles. The eastern part of the county lies in the Sierra-Cascade Mountains province and the remainder is in the Puget Trough of the Pacific Border province. The area covered by the present investigation is almost entirely within the Puget Trough and includes about 450 square miles.

Liesch, Bruce A.; Price, Charles E.; Walters, Kenneth L.

1963-01-01

18

Arterial roads and area socioeconomic status are predictors of fast food restaurant density in King County, WA  

PubMed Central

Background Fast food restaurants reportedly target specific populations by locating in lower-income and in minority neighborhoods. Physical proximity to fast food restaurants has been associated with higher obesity rates. Objective To examine possible associations, at the census tract level, between area demographics, arterial road density, and fast food restaurant density in King County, WA, USA. Methods Data on median household incomes, property values, and race/ethnicity were obtained from King County and from US Census data. Fast food restaurant addresses were obtained from Public Health-Seattle & King County and were geocoded. Fast food density was expressed per tract unit area and per capita. Arterial road density was a measure of vehicular and pedestrian access. Multivariate logistic regression models containing both socioeconomic status and road density were used in data analyses. Results Over one half (53.1%) of King County census tracts had at least one fast food restaurant. Mean network distance from dwelling units to a fast food restaurant countywide was 1.40 km, and 1.07 km for census tracts containing at least one fast food restaurant. Fast food restaurant density was significantly associated in regression models with low median household income (p < 0.001) and high arterial road density (p < 0.001) but not with percent of residents who were nonwhite. Conclusion No significant association was observed between census tract minority status and fast food density in King County. Although restaurant density was linked to low household incomes, that effect was attenuated by arterial road density. Fast food restaurants in King County are more likely to be located in lower income neighborhoods and higher traffic areas. PMID:19630979

Hurvitz, Philip M; Moudon, Anne V; Rehm, Colin D; Streichert, Laura C; Drewnowski, Adam

2009-01-01

19

Geohydrology and ground-water quality of east King County, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

East King County is a 250-square-mile area east of Seattle underlain by as much as 1,200 feet of unconsolidated deposits of glacial and nonglacial origin. A surficial geology map and 12 geohydrologic sections were constructed and used to delineate 10 geohydrologic units, 4 of which are major aquifers. Annual precipitation over the study area averages 57 inches, of which 31 inches, or 413,000 acre-feet, enter the ground-water system as recharge. Some 98,500 acre-feet of ground water is estimated to discharge to surface water bodies each year, 9,540 acre-feet is discharged through springs, and 4,270 acre-feet is withdrawn from wells. The chemical quality of the ground water in east King County is typical of that in other areas of western Washington. The median dissolved-solids concen- tration of 124 samples analyzed was 115 milligrams per liter, and 95 percent of the water samples were classified as soft or moderately hard. The median nitrate concentration was 0.07 milligrams per liter, and no widespread nitrate contamination was apparent.

Turney, G. L.; Kahle, S. C.; Dion, N. P.

1995-01-01

20

2009 Pandemic Influenza A Vaccination of Pregnant Women--King County, Washington State, 2009-2010  

PubMed Central

Objectives. Our objectives were to estimate 2009 pandemic influenza A (pH1N1) vaccination coverage among pregnant women and identify associated factors. Methods. We distributed a multimodal survey to 5341 women who gave birth between November 1, 2009, and January 31, 2010, identified by hospitals in King County, Washington State, with maternity services (n?=?11). Results. Of 4205 respondents, 3233 (76.9%) reported that they had received pH1N1 vaccine during pregnancy or within 2 weeks after delivery. Women whose prenatal care provider recommended vaccine had a higher vaccination prevalence than women whose provider did not (81.5% vs 29.6%; adjusted prevalence ratio?=?2.1; 95% confidence interval?=?1.72, 2.58). Vaccination prevalence was lower among women who had received prenatal care from a midwife only compared with women who had received care from other providers (62.9% vs 78.8%; adjusted prevalence ratio?=?0.89; 95% confidence interval?=?0.83, 0.96). Conclusions. Among pregnant women in King County, pH1N1 vaccination coverage was high. To improve coverage during nonpandemic seasons, influenza vaccine should be recommended routinely by prenatal care providers and vaccination provided where prenatal care is received. Barriers to midwives providing vaccination recommendations to patients should be explored. PMID:22690973

Koelemay, Kathryn G.; Kwan-Gett, Tao Sheng; Cadwell, Betsy L.; Duchin, Jeffrey S.

2012-01-01

21

The Impact of a Community-Based Chronic Disease Prevention Initiative: Evaluation Findings from "Steps to Health King County"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Steps to Health King County" ("Steps KC"; Seattle, Washington) was one of 40 community-level initiatives funded in 2003 as part of the "Steps to a HealthierUS" initiative. "Steps KC" goals included reducing the impact of chronic diseases through a comprehensive, coordinated approach and reducing health disparities due to chronic illness. "Steps…

Cheadle, Allen; Bourcier, Emily; Krieger, James; Beery, William; Smyser, Michael; Vinh, Diana V.; Lessler, Dan; Alfonsi, Lorrie

2011-01-01

22

Arterial roads and area socioeconomic status are predictors of fast food restaurant density in King County, WA  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Fast food restaurants reportedly target specific populations by locating in lower-income and in minority neighborhoods. Physical proximity to fast food restaurants has been associated with higher obesity rates. OBJECTIVE: To examine possible associations, at the census tract level, between area demographics, arterial road density, and fast food restaurant density in King County, WA, USA. METHODS: Data on median household

Philip M Hurvitz; Anne V Moudon; Colin D Rehm; Laura C Streichert; Adam Drewnowski

2009-01-01

23

COMPILATON OF REPORT AND DATA SUPPORTING THE EPA STUDY, "ASIAN AND PACIFIC ISLANDER SEAFOOD CONSUMPTION STUDY IN KING COUNTY, WASHINGTON".  

EPA Science Inventory

In 1996 and 1999, EPA published the results of a community-centered approach for documenting the seafood consumption patterns of Asian American and Pacific Islanders (API) in the King County area of Washington state. Summary statistics were included in the project reports, but n...

24

An isonymic study of the population structure of early Kings County, NY.  

PubMed

Isonymy has proven a useful method for studying the genetic structure of historical populations. In the United States, the populations studied have been of predominantly British origin. Many of the early settlers in this country, however, came from different cultural backgrounds, which may have affected their settlement patterns and genetic structure. The first European settlers of Kings County, New York, were Dutch, and Dutch was still spoken there in the 19th century. In the early Colonial period, it was an isolated agricultural area, but it was increasingly drawn into the larger metropolis of New York City, a process that culminated at the end of the 19th century. This paper uses census data from 1698, 1738, 1790, and 1810 to assess synchronic and diachronic isonymy patterns within the county. These censuses subdivide the county into six towns, five founded by the Dutch (Brooklyn, Bushwick, Flatbush, Flatlands, and New Utrecht) and one by the English (Gravesend). All were founded at least a generation before 1698. Values of Iii, FST, and RST increased from 1698 to 1738, a period when Kings County received few immigrants, and decreased thereafter as the influence of the metropolis grew. Most new immigrants settled in Brooklyn, so the lowest levels of isonymy occurred there [Iii (1810) = 0.0029]. The highest levels occurred in Flatlands [Iii (1738) = 0.0838]. FST increased from 0.0050 to 0.0076, and then fell to 0.0052 and 0.0032; RST was approximately two-thirds as high, at 0.0033, 0.0053, 0.0033, and 0.0022. These values are more than twice as high as those reported from 19th-century Massachusetts or Pennsylvania, and are comparable to those found in rural European populations. The towns can be divided into two groups: Brooklyn, Bushwick, and Flatbush, with an average Iii of 0.01570, and Flatlands, Gravesend, and New Utrecht, with an average value of 0.03963. The three latter towns were geographically more distant from New York City and remained more isolated both culturally and biologically. PMID:11236858

Christensen, A F

2000-12-01

25

HTLV-2 infection in injection drug users in King County, Washington  

PubMed Central

Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 2 (HTLV-2) is endemic in injection drug users (IDU), and native American populations in the Americas. Transmission is associated with high-risk injection and sexual practices. A cohort of 2561 IDU in King County, Washington completed 2 study visits over 1 y. HTLV-2 infection was detected in 190 (7.4%) of 2561 IDU, and 13 (7.8 cases per 1000 person-y) incident infections occurred during the study. Prevalent infection was associated with female gender, non-white race, longer duration as IDU, having a tattoo, combined injection of heroin and cocaine, and with serologic evidence of hepatitis B and C infection. Seroconversion was more common in women, and was associated with African American race, heterosexual identity and longer duration as IDU. In conclusion, increased risk of HTLV-2 infection was associated with non-white race, and injection drug of choice, suggesting injection networks may play an important role in transmission of HTLV-2. The high correlation of HTLV-2 infection with HCV infection suggests the major route of transmission in IDU is via injection practices. Additional studies are needed to examine the clinical manifestations of HTLV-2 infection, as well as the clinical and virological manifestations of HTLV-2/HCV coinfection. PMID:16857611

ZUNT, JOSEPH R.; TAPIA, KEN; THIEDE, HANNE; LEE, RONG; HAGAN, HOLLY

2009-01-01

26

HTLV-2 infection in injection drug users in King County, Washington.  

PubMed

Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 2 (HTLV-2) is endemic in injection drug users (IDU), and native American populations in the Americas. Transmission is associated with high-risk injection and sexual practices. A cohort of 2561 IDU in King County, Washington completed 2 study visits over 1 y. HTLV-2 infection was detected in 190 (7.4%) of 2561 IDU, and 13 (7.8 cases per 1000 person-y) incident infections occurred during the study. Prevalent infection was associated with female gender, non-white race, longer duration as IDU, having a tattoo, combined injection of heroin and cocaine, and with serologic evidence of hepatitis B and C infection. Seroconversion was more common in women, and was associated with African American race, heterosexual identity and longer duration as IDU. In conclusion, increased risk of HTLV-2 infection was associated with non-white race, and injection drug of choice, suggesting injection networks may play an important role in transmission of HTLV-2. The high correlation of HTLV-2 infection with HCV infection suggests the major route of transmission in IDU is via injection practices. Additional studies are needed to examine the clinical manifestations of HTLV-2 infection, as well as the clinical and virological manifestations of HTLV-2/HCV coinfection. PMID:16857611

Zunt, Joseph R; Tapia, Ken; Thiede, Hanne; Lee, Rong; Hagan, Holly

2006-01-01

27

Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience  

SciTech Connect

The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the ``normal`` municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan`s programs. Focusing on the Plan`s household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

Not Available

1991-10-01

28

Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience  

SciTech Connect

The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the normal'' municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan's programs. Focusing on the Plan's household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

Not Available

1991-10-01

29

Public health assessment for Pacific Sound Resources, Seattle, King County, Washington, Region 10. Cerclis No. WAD009248287. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Sound Resources (PSR) was a wood preserving facility located in King County, Washington, on the southern shore of Elliott Bay near the city of Seattle. Wood preserving activities have occurred on the PSR property since 1909 and have resulted in releases of contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), pentachlorophenol (PCP), and metal solutions into on-site surface soil, subsurface soil, groundwater, and Elliott Bay sediments. The PSR site is presently considered an indeterminate public health hazard because existing environmental data is not sufficient to document human exposure. There is potential for human exposure to have occurred in the past, to be presently occurring, or to occur in the future, to contaminant levels which may be expected to result in adverse health effects. Contaminants of concern at the PSR site include: arsenic, PAHs, lead, mercury, and pentachlorophenol.

Not Available

1994-11-23

30

Average daily withdrawals of water for public supply in Kings, Queens, and Nassau Counties, New York  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Since 1932 the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the New York Water Power and Control Commission, the Nassau County Department of Public Works, the Suffolk County Water Authority, and the Suffolk County Board of Supervisors has conducted studies dealing with the occurrence, movement, quantity, quality, and temperature of ground water on Long Island. Also, as a part of three investigations, data on the withdrawals by pumpage for public water supply are assembled an analyzed. Previously, pumpage records for periods from 1904 through 1946 have been released.

Brashears, M. L., Jr.

1950-01-01

31

The University of Washington's Community-Oriented Public Health Practice program and Public Health-Seattle & King County partnership.  

PubMed

The Community-Oriented Public Health Practice (COPHP) program, a 2-year in-residence MPH degree program in the University of Washington School of Public Health, has partnered with Public Health-Seattle & King County (PHSKC) since 2002 to create a mutually beneficial set of programs to improve teaching and address community-based public health problems in a practice setting. The COPHP program uses a problem-based learning approach that puts students in small groups to work on public health problems. Both University of Washington-based and PHSKC-based faculty facilitate the classroom work. In the first year for students, COPHP, in concert with PHSKC, places students in practicum assignments at PHSKC; in the second year, students undertake a master's project (capstone) in a community or public health agency. The capstone project entails taking on a problem in a community-based agency to improve either the health of a population or the capacity of the agency to improve population health. Both the practicum and the capstone projects emphasize applying classroom learning in actual public health practice work for community-based organizations. This partnership brings PHSKC and COPHP together in every aspect of teaching. In essence, PHSKC acts as the "academic health department" for COPHP. There are detailed agreements and contracts that guide all aspects of the partnership. Both the practicum and capstone projects require written contracts. The arrangements for getting non-University of Washington faculty paid for teaching and advising also include formal contracts. PMID:24667188

House, Peter J; Hartfield, Karen; Nicola, Bud; Bogan, Sharon L

2014-01-01

32

Understanding Barriers to Routine HIV Screening: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Healthcare Providers in King County, Washington  

PubMed Central

Objective In 2006, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended routine HIV screening in healthcare settings for persons between 13 and 64 years old. In 2010, the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) was changed to align testing rules with these recommendations. We designed this survey to ascertain the current state of HIV testing and barriers to routine screening in King County, Washington. Methods Between March 23 and April 16, 2010, a convenience sample of healthcare providers completed an online survey. Providers answered true-false and multiple choice questions about national recommendations and the WAC, policies in their primary clinical settings, and their personal HIV testing practices. Providers were asked to agree or disagree whether commonly reported barriers limited their implementation of routine HIV screening. Results Although 76% of the 221 respondents knew that the CDC recommended routine HIV screening for persons regardless of their risk, 99 (45%) providers reported that their primary clinical setting had a policy to target testing based on patient risk factors. Forty-four (20%) providers reported that their primary clinical setting had a policy of routine HIV screening, 54 (25%) reported no official policy, and 15 (7%) did not know whether a policy existed. Only 11 (5%) providers offer HIV testing to all patients at initial visits. When asked about barriers to routine screening, 57% of providers agreed that perception that their patient population is low risk limits the number of HIV tests they perform. Only 26 (13%) providers agreed that concern about reimbursement posed a barrier to testing. Conclusions Most providers participating in this survey continue to target HIV testing, despite knowledge of national recommendations. Efforts are still needed to educate providers and policymakers, clarify the recent WAC revisions, and implement structural changes in order to increase HIV testing in Washington State. PMID:22970215

Shirreffs, Alexandra; Lee, David P.; Henry, Jsani; Golden, Matthew R.; Stekler, Joanne D.

2012-01-01

33

Asthma and the home environment of low-income urban children: Preliminary findings from the seattle-king county healthy homes project  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives  Childhood asthma is a growing public health concern in low-income urban communities. Indoor exposure to asthma triggers has\\u000a emerged as an important cause of asthma exacerbations. We describe indoor environmental conditions related to asthma triggers\\u000a among a low-income urban population in Seattle\\/King County, Washington, as well as caregiver knowledge and resources related\\u000a to control of these triggers.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Data are obtained

James W. Krieger; Lin Song; Timothy K. Takaro; James Stout

2000-01-01

34

Lidar-revised geologic map of the Olalla 7.5' quadrangle, King, Kitsap, and Pierce Counties, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Olalla 7.5' quadrangle, which lies almost in the center of the Puget Lowland, displays the broad range of geologic environments typical of the region. The upland plain is fluted by the passage of the great continental ice sheet that last covered the area about 17,000 (14,000 radiocarbon) years ago. The plain is cut by channel deposits, both late glacial and postglacial in age, and it is cleaved even more deeply by one of the major arms of Puget Sound, Colvos Passage, which here separates the west coast of Vashon Island from the Kitsap Peninsula. Beneath the deposits of the last ice sheet is a complex sequence of older Quaternary-age sediments that extends about 400 m below the modern ground surface. These older sediments are best exposed along the shorelines and beach cliffs of Puget Sound, where wave action and landslides maintain relatively fresh exposures. The older sediments typically are compact, having been loaded by ice during one or more episodes of glaciation subsequent to their deposition. Locally these sediments are also cemented by iron and manganese oxides and hydroxides, a consequence of many tens or hundreds of thousands of years of weathering and groundwater movement. Our map is an interpretation of a 6-ft resolution lidar-derived digital elevation model combined with the geology depicted on the "Geologic map of the Olalla 7.5' quadrangle, King, Kitsap, and Pierce Counties, Washington," by Booth and Troost (2005), which was described, interpreted, and located on the 1953 1:24,000-scale topographic map of the Olalla 7.5-minute quadrangle. The original topographic base map, derived from 1951 aerial photographs, has 20-ft contours, nominal horizontal resolution of circa 40 ft (12 m), and nominal mean vertical accuracy of circa 13 ft (4 m). This new DEM has a horizontal resolution of 6 ft (2 m) and mean vertical accuracy circa 1 ft (0.3 m). The greater resolution and accuracy of the lidar DEM facilitated a much-improved interpretation of many aspects of the surficial geology, especially the distribution and relative age of landforms and the materials inferred to comprise them.

Tabor, Rowland W.; Haugerud, Ralph A.; Booth, Derek B.; Troost, Kathy Goetz

2013-01-01

35

Estuarine water-quality and sediment data, and surface-water and ground-water-quality data, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Camden County, Georgia, January 1999  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In January 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey collected estuarine-water, estuarine-sediment, surface-water, and ground-water quality samples in the vicinity of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Camden County, Georgia. Data from these samples are used by the U.S. Navy to monitor the impact of submarine base activities on local water resources. Estuarine water and sediment data were collected from five sites on the Crooked River, Kings Bay, and Cumberland Sound. Surface-water data were collected from seven streams that discharge from Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay. Ground-water data were collected from six ground-water monitoring wells completed in the water-table zone of the surficial aquifer at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Samples were analyzed for nutrients, total and dissolved trace metals, total and dissolved organic carbon, oil and grease, total organic halogens, biological and chemical oxygen demand, and total and fecal coliform. Trace metals in ground and surface waters did not exceed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Drinking Water Standards; and trace metals in surface water also did not exceed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Surface Water Standards. These trace metals included arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, selenium, silver, tin, and zinc. Barium was detected in relatively high concentrations in ground water (concentrations ranged from 18 to 264 micrograms per liter). Two estuarine water samples exceeded the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Environmental Protection Division standards for copper (concentrations of 6.2 and 3.0 micrograms per liter).

Leeth, David C.; Holloway, Owen G.

2000-01-01

36

Geologic map of southwestern Sequoia National Park and vicinity, Tulare County, California, including the Mineral King metamorphic pendant  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

From the late 1940s to the early 1990s, scientists of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) mapped the geology of most of Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, California, and published the results as a series of 15-minute (1:62,500 scale) Geologic Quadrangles. The southwest corner of Sequoia National Park, encompassing the Mineral King and eastern edge of the Kaweah 15-minute topographic quadrangles, however, remained unfinished. At the request of the National Park Service's Geologic Resources Division (NPS-GRD), the USGS has mapped the geology of that area using 7.5-minute (1:24,000 scale) topographic bases and high-resolution ortho-imagery. With partial support from NPS-GRD, the major plutons in the map area were dated by the U-Pb zircon method with the Stanford-USGS SHRIMP-RG ion microprobe. Highlights include: (1) Identification of the Early Cretaceous volcano-plutonic suite of Mineral King (informally named), consisting of three deformed granodiorite plutons and the major metarhyolite tuffs of the Mineral King metamorphic pendant. Members of the suite erupted or intruded at 130-140 Ma (pluton ages: this study; rhyolite ages: lower-intercept concordia from zircon results of Busby-Spera, 1983, Princeton Ph.D. thesis, and from Klemetti et al., 2011, AGU abstract) during the pause of igneous activity between emplacement of the Jurassic and Cretaceous Sierran batholiths. (2) Some of the deformation of the Mineral King metamorphic pendant is demonstrably Cretaceous, with evidence including map-scale folding of Early Cretaceous metarhyolite tuff, and an isoclinally folded aplite dike dated at 98 Ma, concurrent with the large 98-Ma granodiorite of Castle Creek that intruded the Mineral King pendant on the west. (3) A 21-km-long magmatic synform within the 99-100 Ma granite of Coyote Pass that is defined both by inward-dipping mafic inclusions (enclaves) and by sporadic, cm-thick, sharply defined mineral layering. The west margin of the granite of Coyote Pass overlies parts of the adjacent Mineral King pendant, and the pluton probably had an upward-flaring shape, with synformal layering and foliation resulting from compaction and mineral deposition (or flow sorting) at the floor of an elongate, melt-rich magma lens. The NPS-GRD has digitized the published USGS geologic quadrangles for Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, and a goal is to jointly release a geologic map of the combined Parks region.

Sisson, T. W.; Moore, J. G.

2012-12-01

37

Rip Currents: Nearshore Fundamentals  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This module provides insight into how nearshore circulation and wave dynamics are involved in rip current formation. Topics covered in this module include: nearshore terminology, circulation and waves, rip current characteristics, and rip current forcing mechanisms. This module is the second of three modules covering the forecasting of rip currents.

Comet

2004-12-13

38

An unusual Middle Permian flora from the Blaine Formation (Pease River Group: Leonardian-Guadalupian Series) of King County, West Texas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A new Middle Permian plant assemblage from South Ash Pasture in King County, Texas, may be the youngest and is certainly the most unusual flora known from the Permian of either West Texas or adjoining north-central Texas. Found serendipitously in the evaporite-rich upper Blaine Formation (Pease River Group, Guadalupian Series), the flora is of very low diversity despite intensive collecting efforts, and the affinities of nearly all taxa are enigmatic. The most common elements are parallel-veined leaves that resemble cordaites but that could be isolated pinnules of a pinnate leaf. Gigantopterid foliage is present but not assignable to any known taxon. A single foliar conifer specimen is too incomplete for assignment. Numerous reproductive organs, however, and an abundance of axes may represent conifers. Conchostracans, palaeoniscoid fish scales, and small heteropolar coprolites also occur in the deposit, which originated as a small, claystone-dominated channel fill in a coastal plain setting.

DiMichele, W.A.; Hook, R.W.; Nelson, W.J.; Chaney, D.S.

2004-01-01

39

Depositional facies and hydrocarbon reservoir compartmentalization of the Mississippian Aux Vases Formation at King Field, Jefferson County, Illinois  

SciTech Connect

King field has produced over 4 million bbl of oil from the Mississippian Aux Vases Formation along a north-south-trending anticlinal structure 3 mi long and 1.5 mi wide. The porous and permeable quartz sandstone, which comprises the principal hydrocarbon reservoir, can grade laterally into nonporous calcareous sandstone, siltstone, shale, or limestone within one well location (660 ft). The Aux Vases Formation at King field was deposited in an intertidal to subtidal, mixed siliciclastic-carbonate environment, and the resulting mosaic of depositional facies significantly affects reservoirs continuity. Impermeable to only slightly permeable siltstones, shales, and limestones of the various offshore facies, and shales and siltstones of the tidal-flat facies separate the producing sandstones of a tidal channel-offshore bar facies into distinct reservoir compartments. This reservoir heterogeneity results in an oil-water contact at various depths across the field. Lateral compartmentalization of the reservoir has allowed large sections of the Aux Vases reservoir to remain unswept by waterflooding. Volumetric analyses suggest that untapped reservoir compartments may contain an additional 1-2 million bbl of oil recoverable by primary and waterflood methods.

Leetaru, H.E. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States))

1991-08-01

40

Data and statistical summaries of background concentrations of metals in soils and streambed sediments in part of Big Soos Creek drainage basin, King County, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Twenty-nine soil samples from 14 holes at 9 sites in part of the Big Soos Creek drainage basin in southwest King County, Washington, were collected and analyzed to obtain data on the magnitude and variability of background concentrations of metals in soils. Seven streambed-sediment samples and three streamwater samples from three sites also were collected and analyzed. These data are needed by regulating government agencies to determine if soils at sites of suspected contamination have elevated concentrations of metals, and to evaluate the effectiveness of remediation at sites with known contamination. Concentrations of 43 metals were determined by a total method, and concentrations of 17 metals were determined by a total-recoverable method and two different leaching methods. Metals analyzed for by all methods included most of those on the U.S. Environmental Protection agency list of priority pollutants, plus alluminum, iron, and manganese. Ranges of concentrations of metals determined by the total method are within ranges found by others for the conterminous United States. Concentrations of mercury, manganese, phosphorus, lead, selenium, antimony, and zinc as determined by the total method, and of some of these plus other metals as determined by the other methods were larger in shallow soil (less than 12 inches deep) than in deep soil (greater than 12 inches). Concentrations of metals in streambed sediments were more typical of shallow than deep soils.

Prych, E.A.; Kresch, D.L.; Ebbert, J.C.; Turney, G.L.

1995-01-01

41

Biostratigraphy of the San Joaquin Formation in borrow-source area B-17, Kettleman Hills landfill, North Dome, Kettleman Hills, Kings County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The stratigraphic occurrences and interpreted biostratigraphy of invertebrate fossil taxa in the upper San Joaquin Formation and lower-most Tulare Formation encountered at the Chemical Waste Management Kettleman Hills waste disposal facility on the North Dome of the Kettleman Hills, Kings County, California are documented. Significant new findings include (1) a detailed biostratigraphy of the upper San Joaquin Formation; (2) the first fossil occurrence of Modiolus neglectus; (3) distinguishing Ostrea sequens from Myrakeena veatchii (Ostrea vespertina of authors) in the Central Valley of California; (4) differentiating two taxa previously attributed to Pteropurpura festivus; (5) finding a stratigraphic succession between Caesia coalingensis (lower in the section) and Catilon iniquus (higher in the section); and (6) recognizing Pliocene-age fossils from around Santa Barbara. In addition, the presence of the bivalves Anodonta and Gonidea in the San Joaquin Formation, both restricted to fresh water and common in the Tulare Formation, confirm periods of fresh water or very close fresh-water environments during deposition of the San Joaquin Formation.

Powell, Charles L.; Fisk, Lanny H.; Maloney, David F.; Haasl, David M.

2010-01-01

42

Simulating nearshore processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer procedures are presented that simulate sediment transport in coastal environments. More specifically, these procedures simulate erosion, transport, and deposition by waves. A principal objective is to show how nearshore processes can be described mathematically and translated into computer procedures for simulating the formation of sedimentary deposits. The computer procedures, incorporated into a FORTRAN 77 program called [open quotes]WAVE,[close quotes

1992-01-01

43

Nearshore waste disposal  

SciTech Connect

This book presents papers on the marine disposal of wastes. Topics considered include the impact of waste disposal in nearshore environments, bioavailability and the effects of heavy metals in marine deposits, bioaccumulation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons dams, hydrocarbons in Southern California municipal wastes and their input to coastal waters, geochemical processes, and physical processes.

Ketchum, B.H.; Capuzzo, J.M.; Burt, W.V.; Duedall, I.W.; Park, P.K.; Kester, D.R.

1985-01-01

44

Water-quality and sediment-chemistry data of drain water and evaporation ponds from Tulare Lake Drainage District, Kings County, California March 1985 to March 1986  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Trace element and major ion concentrations were measured in water samples collected monthly between March 1985 and March 1986 at the MD-1 pumping station at the Tulare Lake Drainage District evaporation ponds, Kings County, California. Samples were analyzed for selected pesticides several times during the year. Salinity, as measured by specific conductance, ranged from 11,500 to 37,600 microsiemens/centimeter; total recoverable boron ranged from 4,000 to 16,000 micrg/L; and total recoverable molybdenum ranged from 630 to 2,600 microg/L. Median concentrations of total arsenic and total selenium were 97 and 2 microg/L. Atrazine, prometone, propazine, and simazine were the only pesticides detected in water samples collected at the MD-1 pumping station. Major ions, trace elements, and selected pesticides also were analyzed in water and bottom-sediment samples from five of the southern evaporation ponds at Tulare Lake Drainage District. Water enters the ponds from the MD-1 pumping station at pond 1 and flows through the system terminating at pond 10. The water samples increased in specific conductance (21,700 to 90,200 microsiemens/centimeter) and concentrations of total arsenic (110 to 420 microg/L), total recoverable boron (12,000 to 80,000 microg/L) and total recoverable molybdenum (1,200 to 5,500 microg/L) going from pond 1 to pond 10, respectively. Pesticides were not detected in water from any of the ponds sampled. Median concentrations of total arsenic and total selenium in the bottom sediments were 4.0 and 0.9 microg/g, respectively. The only pesticides detected in bottom sediment samples from the evaporation ponds were DDD and DDE, with maximum concentration of 0.8 microg/kilogram. (Author 's abstract)

Fujii, Roger

1988-01-01

45

Simulating nearshore processes  

SciTech Connect

Computer procedures are presented that simulate sediment transport in coastal environments. More specifically, these procedures simulate erosion, transport, and deposition by waves. A principal objective is to show how nearshore processes can be described mathematically and translated into computer procedures for simulating the formation of sedimentary deposits. The computer procedures, incorporated into a FORTRAN 77 program called [open quotes]WAVE,[close quotes] are in many ways unique because they provide a three-dimensional simulation model that involves multiple grain types, records ages and compositions of sediments, operates at a variety of scales, and simulates the passing of a few seconds or a few thousand years. WAVE simulates wave refraction, oscillatory wave motion, longshore currents, rip currents, and nearshore sediment transport, and is dynamic in that the effects of wave energy on an evolving coastline are simulated through time. WAVE employs equations based on the principles of fluid dynamics to describe hydrodynamic characteristics of shoaling wave and to calculate wave-induced currents within a grid network. The equations assume that mass and momentum are conserved as waves shoal towards shore. A finite-difference scheme provides solutions for wave equations at each cell in the grid. Once characteristics of shoaling waves are represented, sediment transport is initiated using empirical relationships that are effective in predicting rates of littoral transport. WAVE is tested with data from modern beaches, where experiments span hundreds or thousands of meters, and involve days, weeks, or a few years. WAVE is also used to simulate larger areas where experiments span tens or hundreds of kilometers and involve hundreds to thousands of years. Results of experiments are displayed with contour maps and three-dimensional color displays that can be compared with actual nearshore environments.

Martinez, P.A.

1992-01-01

46

Nearshore Wave Modeling  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Ocean waves near shore impact public safety, commerce, navigation, and, of course recreation. Predicting these waves has driven efforts to model them for more than two decades. This module introduces forecasters to different nearshore wave models, including phase-resolving and 1- and 2-dimensional spectral models. It describes the processes that wave models simulate, the assumptions they make, the initial and boundary conditions required to run the models, and potential sources of error in model forecasts. While focusing on SWAN, the module also examines the Navy Standard surf Model and Bouss-2D.

Comet

2009-05-19

47

Approval of the Lemoore Center of the West Hills Community College District. A Report to the Governor and Legislature in Response to a Request from the Board of Governors to Recognize the Center as the Official Community College Center for the Lemoore/Hanford Area of Kings County.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Lemoore Center of the West Hills Community College District serves the Lemoore/Hanford area of Kings and Fresno Counties--an area lying within both the West Hills and the College of the Sequoias Community College Districts. Jurisdictional problems between the districts prompted the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges to…

California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

48

3. FIRST FLOOR, FRONT ROOM (WHERE MARTIN LUTHER KING MADE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. FIRST FLOOR, FRONT ROOM (WHERE MARTIN LUTHER KING MADE PLANS FOR HIS MOVEMENT) - Penn School Historic District, Arnett House, SC Route 37, 1 mile South of Frogmore, St. Helena Island, Frogmore, Beaufort County, SC

49

The King's Foot [Editorial  

E-print Network

The King's Foot [Editorial] Stephen E. Schwartz Atmospheric Sciences Division, Brookhaven National are still back in the day of the King's Foot, the length of which differed from one realm to the next, and even with time as the king was succeeded by his son. "Oh, no," you say, "we are beyond that stage. We

Schwartz, Stephen E.

50

Public health assessment for Wyckoff Company/Eagle Harbor, Eagle Harbor Operable Units, Bainbridge Island, King County, Washington, Region 10. Cerclis No. WAD009248295. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Wyckoff/Eagle Harbor site is a National Priorities List (NPL) site located on the east side of Bainbridge Island, Kitsap County, Washington. The harbor has become contaminated with heavy metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the many years of ship repair and painting as well as from the application of creosote, pentachlorophenol, and other wood preservatives to pilings. The Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS) states that the major human health concern is consumption of clam meat contaminated with PAHs. The public health assessment has determined that exposure to contaminants found in Eagle Harbor sediments, shellfish, fish, and crab is a health hazard for those people who ignore warnings.

Not Available

1994-01-06

51

The King and I  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This year marks the 40th anniversary of the first Coretta Scott King Book Award, which encourages "the artistic expression of the black experience via literature and the graphic arts." The award, which began honoring illustrators in 1974, added the John Steptoe Award for New Talent in 1995. No doubt, past King award winners like Sharon Flake,…

Gallagher, Mary Grace

2009-01-01

52

King's Last March  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Martin Luther King Jr.'s last year of life was complex, and prior to his assassination he was involved in a number of ambitious projects. This compelling and thoughtful documentary produced by Kate Ellis and Stephen Smith of American RadioWorks (in cooperation with the Martin Luther King Jr. Research and Education Institute at Stanford University) closely examines this period of King's life. The documentary is divided into five parts, which include "Beyond Vietnam", "King's Last March", "The FBI's War on King", and "From the Pulpit to the Heart". Interested parties can download the entire radio documentary, listen online, or read the transcript. Overall, it's a rather fine piece of documentary work, and visitors with an interest in this pivotal 20th century leader will want to pass this site along to friends.

2008-01-01

53

Forty Four Years a King.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum unit contains guidelines for Martin Luther King Jr. Day, January 15th. Items included in the guide are: a list of suggested activities, a short biography of Dr. King, excerpts from some of his speeches including the famous, "I Have A Dream" speech, a play, study questions, "A King's Journey", a game, and a story about King which…

Minneapolis Public Schools, Minn. Dept. of Intergroup Education.

54

AirMSPI King's County Hanford, CA  

... the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft flying targets over the California Central Valley and off the coast of Southern California.  The goals ... light is more likely to be scattered by molecules in the air, which is called Rayleigh scattering, and is the reason the sky appears ...

2013-08-02

55

Perspective view of Post and King Saloon, 129 North E ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Perspective view of Post and King Saloon, 129 North E Street (corner of E and North 2nd Streets), view looking southwest - Lakeview Downtown Historic District, E, F & G Streets between Second Street North & First Street South, Lakeview, Lake County, OR

56

Dr. King's Dream. [Lesson Plan].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This lesson plan teaches students about the life and work of Martin Luther King, Jr. Students listen to a brief biography, view photographs of the March on Washington, hear a portion of King's "I Have a Dream" speech, and discuss what King's words mean to them. Finally, they will create picture books about their own dreams of freedom for Americans…

National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.

57

KING DAY 2008 ESSAY COMPETITION  

E-print Network

This year's theme is drawn from Dr. King's notion of the "beloved community," and how we as citizens can of Dr. King. Length 1,000­1,500 words (4­5 pages) Eligibility All IUB graduate and undergraduateKING DAY 2008 ESSAY COMPETITION "Building the Community: Making the Dream a Reality" Theme

Indiana University

58

About Kings Area Rural Transit The Kings County Area Public Transit Agency operates the Kings  

E-print Network

's activity. KART's original radio tracking system often lost connection with vehicles in California's vastTech GPS/Telematics Locator that is connected through the AT&T mobile broadband network and an in-vehicle transportation system, uninsured drivers, dangerously modified vehicles, crowded roads and harmful emissions

Greenberg, Albert

59

Nearshore carbonate deposits in Lake Tanganyika  

Microsoft Academic Search

An exceptionally wide variety of carbonate fades, dominated by high-magnesian calcite, occurs along the littoral and shallow sublittoral zones (<50 m) of Lake Tanganyika in central Africa. These facies include exposed and submerged, calcite-cemented ridges of nearshore terrigenous sand, ooid sand shoals, and lithified oolite ridges, Chara meadows of bioturbated calcareous silts, gastropod shell blankets and related coquinas, and extensive

Andrew S. Cohen; Catherine Thouin

1987-01-01

60

Eelgrass Mapping Along The Elwha Nearshore  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of this project was to gather pre-dam removal nearshore habitat data along the Elwha drift cell (west end of Freshwater Bay to the tip of Ediz Hook) and an adjacent drift cell (mouth of Morse Creek to the tip of Dungeness Spit) by mapping the location of eelgrass (Zostera marina) beds and estimating parameters describing each bed (areal

James Norris; Ian Fraser

2007-01-01

61

Chapter 6Chapter 6 Nearshore Biological  

E-print Network

and Processes Prior to Dam Removal Introduction Two dams on the Elwha River have reduced sediment transport from on the Elwha River, Washington, potentially increasing sediment deposition on the seafloor and suspendedChapter 6Chapter 6 6 Chapter Nearshore Biological Communities Prior to Removal of the Elwha River

62

40 CFR 52.226 - Control strategy and regulations: Particulate matter, San Joaquin Valley and Mountain Counties...  

...strategy and regulations: Particulate matter, San Joaquin Valley and Mountain Counties...strategy and regulations: Particulate matter, San Joaquin Valley and Mountain Counties...Air Quality Standards for particulate matter: (1) Kings County APCD....

2014-07-01

63

Martin Luther King Scavenger Hunt  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

On the third Monday in January, we celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday. Scroll down to questions that will help you learn more about Dr. M. L. King. Follow the links in each section to find the answers. Open a word document, title it "MLK Scavenger Hunt," name and date in RH corner, and answer each question in a complete sentence. 1. Click on the link below to read letters from first graders to MLK. What does Noel, age 7, think Martin Luther King wanted? Letters to Martin Luther King, Jr. 2. Click on the timeline and write down what happened to Martin Luther King in 1935. Timeline 3. Get your earphones on! Click on this link to hear Dr. King's famous "I Have ...

Devitry, Mrs.

2011-01-05

64

King Tide floods in Tuvalu  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spatial and temporal distributions of sea level rise present regional floods in some certain areas. The low-lying island countries are obviously the spots affected severely. Tuvalu, an atoll island country located in the south-west Pacific Ocean, is suffering the devastating effects of losing life, property, and intending migration caused by floods. They blame the regional flooding to King Tide, a term used but not clearly identified by Pacific islanders. In this study, we clarify what King Tide is first. By the tide gauge and topography data, we estimated the reasonable value of 3.2 m as the threshold of King Tide. This definition also fits to the statement by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of King Tide occurring once or twice a year. In addition, We cross validate the 19 yr data of tide gauge and satellite altimeter (1993-2012), the correlation coefficient indicates King Tide phenomenon is considerable connected to warm water mass. The 28 King Tide events revealed the fact that flooding can be referenced against spring tide levels, so can it be turned up by warm water mass. The warm water mass pushes up sea level; once spring tide, storm surge, or other climate variability overlaps it, the rising sea level might overflow and so has been called "King Tide" for the floods in Tuvalu. This study provides more understanding of the signals of King Tide and an island country case study of regional sea level rise.

Lin, C.-C.; Ho, C.-R.; Cheng, Y.-H.

2013-05-01

65

Near-Shore and Bottom Fish Tahoe sucker  

E-print Network

Phytoplankton Pea clam Curlyleaf pondweed Eurasian watermilfoil Periphyton (Gomphoneis) Blind amphipod Tahoe stoney Catsh Rainbow troutBrown trout Chironomid Coontail Near-Shore Plants & Algae Filamentous algae

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

66

11. VIEW FROM JUST AFT OF THE KING POST IN ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

11. VIEW FROM JUST AFT OF THE KING POST IN THE FOC'S'LE OF THE EVELINA M. GOULART. FIRE EXTINGUISHER IS MOUNTED ON STUB OF FOREMAST. OBJECT AT LOWER LEFT IS A FOLDING MESS TABLE. LADDER LEADS TO DECK. CABINET AT RIGHT CENTER HOUSED SINK FOR CLEAN-UP AND COOKING. A SMALL CHINA SINK AT RIGHT CENTER SERVED FOR PERSONAL CLEAN-UP AND SHAVING. - Auxiliary Fishing Schooner "Evelina M. Goulart", Essex Shipbuilding Museum, 66 Main Street, Essex, Essex County, MA

67

An evaluation of effects of groundwater exchange on nearshore habitats and water quality of western Lake Erie  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Historically, the high potentiometric surface of groundwater in the Silurian/Devonian carbonate aquifer in Monroe County, MI resulted in discharge of highly mineralized, SO4-rich groundwater to the Lake Erie shoreline near both Erie State Game Area (ESGA) and Pointe Mouillee State Game Area (PMSGA). Recently, regional groundwater levels near PMSGA have been drawn down as much as 45 m below lake level in apparent response to quarry dewatering. From August to November of 2003, we conducted preliminary studies of groundwater flow dynamics and chemistry, shallow lake water chemistry, and fish and invertebrate communities at both sites. Consistent with regional observations, groundwater flow direction in the nearshore at ESGA was upward, or toward Lake Erie, and shallow nearshore groundwater chemistry was influenced by regional groundwater chemistry. In contrast, at PMSGA, the groundwater flow potential was downward and lake water, influenced by quarry discharge seeping downward into nearshore sediments, produced a different lake and shallow groundwater chemistry than at ESGA. Although the invertebrate and young fish community was similar at the two sites, taxonomic groups tolerant of degraded water quality were more prevalent at PMSGA. Sensitive taxa were more prevalent at ESGA. We propose a conceptual model, based on well-described models of groundwater/seawater interaction along coastal margins, to describe the interconnection among geologic, hydrologic, chemical, and biological processes in the different nearshore habitats of Lake Erie, and we identify processes that warrant further detailed study in the Great Lakes.

Haack, Sheridan K.; Neff, Brian P.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; Savino, Jacqueline F.; Lundstrom, Scott C.

2005-01-01

68

Nearshore internal bores and turbulent mixing in southern Monterey Bay  

E-print Network

Nearshore internal bores and turbulent mixing in southern Monterey Bay Ryan K. Walter,1 C. Brock and mixing events associated with nearshore internal bores in southern Monterey Bay using an array of instruments with high spatial and temporal resolution. The arrival of the bores is characterized by surging

Fringer, Oliver B.

69

Lake Ontario: Nearshore Conditions and Variability in Water Quality Parameters  

EPA Science Inventory

Interest in recent years has increased regarding conditions in the nearshore of the Great Lakes. We conducted a high-resolution survey of the Lake Ontario nearshore along the 20 m contour using towed electronic instrumentation. The 720 km survey was conducted September 6-10, 20...

70

Celebrating Dr. King. Poetry Pages.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Poetry that relates to the beliefs and actions of Martin Luther King, Jr. can be used to help students appreciate the civil rights leader's contributions, examine their own aspirations, and critically analyze poems. A reproducible poetry page is included. (IAH)

Fina, Allan de

1992-01-01

71

Conversation with M King Hubbert  

SciTech Connect

The video presents Dr M King Hubbert, scholar and federal authority on fuel and energy, explaining the limits of the fossil fuel supply and the impact of coming energy problems on health care institutions.

NONE

1994-12-31

72

Free-Living and Associated Bacteria in the Coastal Waters ofArdley Cove (King George Island, Antarctica): Quantitative Changes from February to October  

Microsoft Academic Search

We determined the numbers of free-living and associated (aggre­ gated 01' bonded with particles) bacteria in the coastal water of King George Island at an offshore (St. I) and a nearshore station (St. 2) as a function of physico-chemical parameters. Water sampIes were collected between March and October at St. land between April and October at St. 2. Direct counts

Vladimir V Ilinskiy; Alexander N. Gorshkov

2004-01-01

73

Who is Martin Luther King Jr.  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Today you will use the links below to research Martin Luther King Jr. Synergize with your partners to discover more interesting facts about Dr. King! First, watch this video about Dr. King. BrainPOPJr.Martin Luther King Jr. Video Next, click on this biography link Who is Martin Luther King Jr.? to find even more information. Then, see if you can answer any questions you still have by using KidRex Last, watch this video and see if you can learn anything new BrainPOP Martin Luther King Jr. Video number 2 ...

Mcgahey, Miss

2014-01-22

74

Modeling of nearshore hydrodynamics for sediment transport calculations  

E-print Network

This thesis analyzes and improves Tajima's (2004) nearshore hydrodynamic model. Tajima's simple model accurately predicts long-shore sediment transport along long, straight beaches, while cross-shore transport predictions ...

Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01

75

Zooplankton Community Composition in Nearshore Waters of Southern Lake Michigan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Zooplankton samples collected in 1977 in the nearshore waters of southern Lake Michigan (0.4 km from shore) were analyzed to provide a bench mark on zooplankton community composition for comparison with future studies. Species composition, abundance, and ...

J. E. Gannon, F. J. Bricker, K. S. Bricker

1983-01-01

76

Biogeography of Nearshore Subtidal Invertebrates in the Gulf of Maine  

EPA Science Inventory

The biogeography of nearshore benthic invertebrates in the Gulf of Maine was studied to compare recent data with historical biogeographic studies, define physical-chemical factors affecting species distributions, and provide information needed to calibrate benthic indices of envi...

77

DEEPWATER AND NEARSHORE FOOD WEB CHARACTERIZATIONS IN LAKE SUPERIOR  

EPA Science Inventory

Due to the difficulty associated with sampling deep aquatic systems, food web relationships among deepwater fauna are often poorly known. We are characterizing nearshore versus offshore habitats in the Great Lakes and investigating food web linkages among profundal, pelagic, and ...

78

THE KING SALMON OF COOK INLET, ALASKA  

E-print Network

, Alaska ABSTRACT Runs of king salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in Cook Inlet, Alaska, are de- clining for spawning. INTRODUCTION Historically, the king salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) is one of the most

79

Views of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses views of Martin Luther King, Jr., including concepts of human rights, related counseling approaches, and ethics. Claims King's views provide helpful insights for counselors and clients. Concludes King invited individuals to view challenging life situations as moral opportunities. (Author/ABL)

Davis, Alan H.

1990-01-01

80

Martin Luther King, Jr. Teacher's Resource Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Connecticut teachers' manual on Martin Luther King, Jr. includes: (1) teacher background information; (2) five excerpts from King's speeches; (3) four themes for lesson plans; and (4) sample lesson plans. The teacher's background information provides biographical sketches of King and his precursors. The five speeches reproduced here are "I've…

Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford.

81

Drag Kings in the New Wave  

Microsoft Academic Search

In an examination of Midwestern drag king performers and communities that have emerged since the study by Volcano and Halberstam of king cultures in London, New York, and San Francisco, this article considers traditional and alternative ways of “doing drag,” both performative and participatory, as a means of interrogating the proximity of a “new wave” of king culture to academic

Kim Surkan

2003-01-01

82

King cobra genome supporting information SUPPORTING INFORMATION  

E-print Network

King cobra genome supporting information 1 SUPPORTING INFORMATION 1. SI MATERIALS AND METHODS 1.1 King cobra tissue acquisitions and processing All animal procedures complied with local king cobra that originated from Bali, Indonesia. Blood was obtained by caudal puncture and frozen

Castoe, Todd A.

83

King John and St Wulfstan  

Microsoft Academic Search

In accordance with the terms of his will, King John was buried near to the shrine of St Wulfstan in Worcester cathedral despite his apparent intention earlier in the reign to be buried in a Cistercian house. When and why John might have developed his particular interest in Wulfstan, the last Anglo-Saxon bishop, are considered and attention is drawn to

Peter Draper

1984-01-01

84

A Dream of King Marapaka  

Microsoft Academic Search

This story is the first chapter of an unfinished book, The Seven Dreams of King Marapaka, based on the life of Z. K. Oloruntoba, as told to Dr. Michael Peplow. Dr. Peplow transcribed and edited the tale. Gretchen Dihoff wrote narrative interludes presenting a wider view of the Egungun festival and its effects on village life. Mr. Oloruntoba illustrated the

Z. K. Oloruntoba; Gretchen Dihoff; Michael W. Peplow

1970-01-01

85

Impacts of Cyclone Yasi on nearshore, terrigenous sediment-dominated reefs of the central Great Barrier Reef, Australia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tropical Cyclone (TC) Yasi (Category 5) was a large (~ 700 km across) cyclone that crossed Australia's Queensland coast on the 3rd of February 2011. TC Yasi was one of the region's most powerful recorded cyclones, with winds gusting to 290 km/h and wave heights exceeding 7 m. Here we describe the impacts of TC Yasi on a number of nearshore, turbid-zone coral reefs, that include several in the immediate vicinity of the cyclone's landfall path (King Reef, Lugger Shoal and Dunk Island), as well as a more distally located reef (Paluma Shoals) ~ 150 km to the south in Halifax Bay. These reefs were the focus of recent (between 2006 and 2009) pre-Yasi studies into their geomorphology, sedimentology and community structure, and here we discuss data from a recent (August 2011) post-Yasi re-assessment. This provided a unique opportunity to identify and describe the impacts of an intense tropical cyclone on nearshore reefs, which are often assumed to be vulnerable to physical disturbance and reworking due to their poorly lithified framework. Observed impacts of TC Yasi were site specific and spatially highly heterogeneous, but appear to have been strongly influenced by the contemporary evolutionary stage and ecological make-up of the individual reefs, with site setting (i.e. exposure to prevailing wave action) apparently more important than proximity to the landfall path. The most significant ecological impacts occurred at King Reef (probably a result of freshwater bleaching) and at Paluma Shoals, where widespread physical destruction of branched Acropora occurred. New coral recruits are, however, common at all sites and colony re-growth clearly evident at King Reef. Only localised geomorphic change was evident, mainly in the form of coral fracturing, rubble deposition, and sediment movement, but again these impacts were highly site specific. The dominant impact at Paluma Shoals was localised storm ridge/shingle sheet deposition, at Lugger Shoal major offshore fine sediment flushing, and at Dunk Island major onshore coarse sand deposition. There was little geomorphic change evident at King Reef. Thus whilst small-scale and taxa specific impacts from Cyclone Yasi are clearly evident, geomorphological changes appear minor and ecological impacts highly variable between sites, and there is no observed evidence for major reef structural change. The study suggests that the vulnerability of reefs to major physical disturbance events can be extremely site specific and determined by interacting factors of location relative to storm path and pre-event geomorphology and ecology.

Perry, C. T.; Smithers, S. G.; Kench, P. S.; Pears, B.

2014-10-01

86

Congratulations to Carey King  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I first came across Carey King when, out of the blue, he invited me to a special session of the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (the largest and most prestigious US scientific meeting) where he was developing a special session on energy return on investment (EROI). At that meeting and since, I have found Carey to be a refreshing new colleague, extremely intelligent, very knowledgeable about many diverse aspects of energy and other things, able to take criticism and to dish it out, and very ambitious, which is mostly a good thing. He is becoming a leader in thinking about EROI and its implications, and I am delighted to see him honored by Environmental Research Letters. This is important because in the US, there is little insight about energy or, especially, its potential physical limitations except when gas prices increase. There is also little awareness of the very strong historical connection in both the US and the world between increased affluence and increased use of energy, especially petroleum. It is not understood by all that many of the economic problems we have now (such as the budgetary problems faced by most of our State governments, pension plans and universities) have substantial origin in the fact that oil and other energy production no longer increase reliably year after year, as they once did (Murphy and Hall 2011). Many economists have argued in the past that energy is not important because it constituted only 5 per cent or so of GDP, or because they believe that market forces and innovations will substitute for any shortage (e.g. Barnett and Morse 1963, Passell et al 1972, Solow 1974, Denison 1989). One problem with that view is that if you remove that five per cent the economy comes to a dead stop, as Cuba found out in 1989 when Russia removed its oil subsidy. Additionally if that five per cent goes up to 10 or 15 per cent, as it did in the early 1980s, and again in 2008, recession steps in (Murphy and Hall 2011). In fact, the US economy and our energy use increased almost lockstep from 1900 until 1984 (Cleveland et al 1984). The economy has grown more rapidly than energy use since 1984. Most economists think that this is due to our cleverness at increasing efficiency, but Robert Kaufmann (2004) and others find that instead most of the increase has been due to, essentially, the outsourcing of our heavy industry (think steel imported from Korea or Brazil, petroleum refined in Trinidad etc). An additional issue is that there is considerable evidence (e.g. Shadow Government Statistics) that the official US government inflation corrections have been deliberately underestimated since about 1985. If this is true then GDP growth has been exaggerated and there has been little or no increase in efficiency. Thus our gain in actual national energy efficiency is probably much less than most economists believe, and may be close to zero. Obviously some few of us think a great deal about energy, and for those who are willing to undertake some personal research (for example on the ASPO (aspo-usa.com) or The Oil Drum (www.theoildrum.com) websites), there is much to be concerned about. First on the list of concerns is 'peak oil'; the concept that there comes a time over the life cycle of the extraction of a non-renewable resource when there will be maximum production. This concept, derived by geologist M K Hubbert in the 1950s, assumes that this peak will occur when roughly 50 per cent of the resource has been exploited. Hubbert famously predicted in 1955 that this would occur for the United States in 1970. Initially he was derided by most in the oil industry, but in fact peak oil for the US did occur in 1970, just as he had predicted. Oil production has declined essentially every year since then. 'Peak oil' has now occurred for something like three quarters of all oil producing nations, although not yet for most of the largest producers. Second on my list of energy concerns is declining EROI. EROI is a term I had developed in the early 1980s based on the net energy concepts of

Hall, Charles A. S.

2012-03-01

87

BBR -Bristol Bay red king crab BSS -Bering Sea snow crab (C. opilio)  

E-print Network

/blue king crab SMB - St. Matthew blue king crab EAG - Eastern Aleutian Islands golden king crab WAG - Pribilof Islands red/blue king crab SMB - St. Matthew blue king crab SMB - St. Matthew blue king crab EAG

88

Assessing the Impact of Groundwater Pollution from Marine Caves on Nearshore Seagrass Beds in Bermuda  

E-print Network

This investigation characterized karstic and nearshore environments of Bermuda to describe 1) behavior and periodicity of cave springs; 2) submarine spring water quality; and 3) nearshore marine seagrass density. Caves can be conduits...

Cate, Jenipher R.

2010-01-14

89

The Words of Martin Luther King, Jr.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Excerpts from speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., are reprinted. Topics discussed include discrimination, the South, education, nonviolent resistance, poverty, economic opportunity, and world peace. (LH)

Today's Education, 1979

1979-01-01

90

Nearshore Berm Discussion Hosted by US Army Corps of Engineers (ERDC and Jacksonville District)  

E-print Network

and migrate onshore. Questions as to whether fines migrate onshore or disturb subaqueous habitat during:30 - 9:00 1. Benefits of nearshore placement 9:00 - 9:50 Break 9:50 � 10:05 2. Nearshore berm migration to further our common understanding of nearshore berms. #12;

US Army Corps of Engineers

91

Trophic connections in Lake Superior Part II: The nearshore fish community  

Microsoft Academic Search

We use detailed diet analyses of the predominant planktivorous, benthivorous and piscivorous fish species from Lake Superior to create a nearshore (bathymetric depths <80m) fish community food web. The food web was based on analysis of 5125 fish stomachs collected seasonally (spring, summer, fall) from 9 nearshore sites in 2005. Based on mass of prey items, nearshore diets across all

Allison E. Gamble; Thomas R. Hrabik; Daniel L. Yule; Jason D. Stockwell

2011-01-01

92

Abiotic and biotic influences on the composition of nearshore marine communities of The Bahamas  

Microsoft Academic Search

This multi-year study examined the nature of relationships between various abiotic and biotic components of Bahamian nearshore marine communities. This project suggests that composition of nearshore marine communities of The Bahamas is determined by a highly complex system of interactions between various abiotic and biotic components. Accurate predictions about a site's nearshore marine community composition can likely be made if

Vanessa Lynn Nero

2005-01-01

93

King's Health Partners Clinical Trials Office Supporting Clinical Research in King's Health Partners  

E-print Network

King's Health Partners Clinical Trials Office Supporting Clinical Research in King's Health are we? Used to be called Joint Clinical Trials Office (JCTO) A department of King's College London · JDP to KHP-CTO Board CTIMP Clinical Trial of an Investigational Medicinal Product Regulated: · EU Directives

Applebaum, David

94

Word Art with King's Words OurStory: Martin Luther King Jr. and Nonviolence  

E-print Network

or more composition by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., identify meaningful words and phrases, and create word reading skills by encouraging them to think carefully about the words Dr. King used in speeches Read Martin's Big Words together. Martin's Big Words is a biography of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr

Mathis, Wayne N.

95

Becoming King: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Making of a National Leader  

Microsoft Academic Search

Without question, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is the face of the civil rights revolution that reshaped the social and political landscape of the United States. Although many biographers and historians have examined Dr. King's activism, few have recognized the pivotal role that the people of Montgomery, Alabama, played in preparing him for leadership. King arrived in Montgomery as a

Troy Jackson

2008-01-01

96

The South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study: Nearshore Hydrodynamics Field Experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study (SCCES) a nearshore field experiment was carried out for five days in December 2003 just north of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, providing measurements of the waves, currents and morphological evolution. This experiment occurred concurrently with an extensive field campaign several kilometers offshore which included measurements of the waves and currents on

K. A. Haas; G. Voulgaris; H. Demir; P. A. Work; D. M. Hanes

2004-01-01

97

South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study Myrtle Beach Nearshore Experiment  

E-print Network

South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study Myrtle Beach Nearshore Experiment Dec. 10 to Dec. 15, 2003 Coastal Processes Sediment Dynamics Laboratory Department of Geological Sciences University of South with the collection of offshore wave and current data as part of the U.S. Geological Survey South Carolina Coastal

Voulgaris, George

98

Coastal Dynamics 2013 NEARSHORE WAVE PROCESSES IN THE IROISE SEA  

E-print Network

zone. Keywords Numerical modeling, flood hazards, coastal erosion, infra-gravity waves, Brittany. 1Coastal Dynamics 2013 605 NEARSHORE WAVE PROCESSES IN THE IROISE SEA: FIELD MEASUREMENTS. Introduction Coastal communities and ecosystems in low-lying areas are vulnerable to impacts resulting from

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

99

Nearshore coastal currents on the South Carolina continental shelf  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous current, sea level, wind and atmospheric pressure data from the South Carolina nearshore shelf during the summer are analyzed and compared. The current record was taken in the nearshore region at 10 m depth, an area where the current regime has not been well studied. Most of the variance in the series is concentrated in two frequency bands; 2-12 days (meterological) and 12-25 hours (tidal and daily). The variance of the two bands is approximately equal in both the alongshore and the cross-shore current components, but net flow is primarily due to low frequency events. The nearshore current flows predominantly to the northeast, possibly an Ekman response to the northerly blowing wind regime. Current reversals occur in response to frontal passages approximately every 6 days. Low frequency alongshore currents and winds are highly coherent at 2-12 days, with the currents having a phase lag of about 3 hours. Cross-shore currents are not coherent with cross-shore winds, but have a statistically significant 7 hour lag to alongshore currents. Coastal sea level is also coherent with alongshore currents, lagging by 15 hours at 4.4 days, indicating that the nearshore current may drive sea level changes. The reason for the significant lag in sea level is not clearly understood. 14 figures, 2 tables.

Schwing, F.B.; Kjerfve, B.; Sneed, J.E.

1983-05-30

100

Phytoplankton community composition in nearshore coastal waters of Louisiana  

EPA Science Inventory

Phytoplankton community compositions within near-shore coastal and estuarine waters of Louisiana were characterized by relative abundance, biovolume, and taxonomic identification to genus and species when possible. The range of total nitrogen was 0.5 to 1.3 mg L-1 and total phos...

101

Ocean waves, nearshore ecology, and natural selection Mark W. Denny*  

E-print Network

-1 Ocean waves, nearshore ecology, and natural selection Mark W. Denny* Stanford University and Helmuth 2002). At high tide, ocean waves break on the shore, imposing large hydrodynamic forces, Intertidal communities, Lift, Wave theory Abstract Although they are subjected to one of the most stressful

Denny, Mark

102

Agile Offsharing: Using Pair Work to Overcome Nearshoring Difficulties  

E-print Network

Agile Offsharing: Using Pair Work to Overcome Nearshoring Difficulties Lutz Prechelt Freie@inf.fu-berlin.de Abstract--A major problem in distributed development sit- uations, in particular offshoring situations work at an engineering level, such as pair programming, may be a method for solving this problem

Prechelt, Lutz

103

A SYSTEM FOR VIDEO OBSERVATION OF NEARSHORE PROCESSES  

E-print Network

A SYSTEM FOR VIDEO OBSERVATION OF NEARSHORE PROCESSES BY TODD J. DEMUNDA AND JAMES T. KIRBY RESEARCH REPORT NO. CACR-06-07 FALL 2006 This study was supported by the Delaware Sea Grant Program Project was funded by the Delaware Sea Grant Program, Project Number NOAA SG0507 R/ETE-5, Award Number NA05OAR4171041

Kirby, James T.

104

Ecology of Lake Superior: Linking Landscape to Nearshore Condition  

EPA Science Inventory

High spatial variation is well known to exist in water quality parameters of the Great Lakes nearshore, however strong patterns for extended reaches are also observed and found to be robust across a seasonal time frame. Less is known about robustness of inter-annual variation wi...

105

ENHANCED HYDRODYNAMICAL-NUMERICAL MODEL FOR NEAR-SHORE PROCESSES  

EPA Science Inventory

An optimized version of a multilayer Hansen type Hydrodynamical-Numerical (HN) model is presented and discussed here as the basis for the following experimental extensions and enhancements developed to more appropriately handle near-shore processes: Non-linear term extension to f...

106

PECIAL REPORS T Public Health: Seattle and King County's  

E-print Network

, and lead healthier life styles (Frank, 2005). But long before this study was completed, the Environmental lifestyles. Lack of physical activity causes overweight problems in adults and children, increases the risk and zoning and initiatives that promote a healthier envi ronment and improved quality of life for all

107

Carbon Monoxide Epidemic Among Immigrant Populations: King County, Washington, 2006  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We investigated an outbreak of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning after a power outage to determine its extent, identify risk factors, and develop prevention measures. Methods. We reviewed medical records and medical examiner reports of patients with CO poisoning or related symptoms during December 15 to 24, 2006. We grouped patients into households exposed concurrently to a single source of CO. Results. Among 259 patients with CO poisoning, 204 cases were laboratory confirmed, 37 were probable, 10 were suspected, and 8 were fatal. Of 86 households studied, 58% (n = 50) were immigrant households from Africa (n = 21), Asia (n = 15), Latin America (n = 10), and the Middle East (n = 4); 34% (n = 29) were US-born households. One percent of households was European (n = 1), and the origin for 7% (n = 6) was unknown. Charcoal was the most common fuel source used among immigrant households (82%), whereas liquid fuel was predominant among US-born households (34%). Conclusions. Educational campaigns to prevent CO poisoning should consider immigrants’ cultural practices and languages and specifically warn against burning charcoal indoors and incorrect ventilation of gasoline- or propane-powered electric generators. PMID:19608962

Kwan-Gett, Tao; Hampson, Neil B.; Baer, Atar; Shusterman, Dennis; Shandro, Jamie R.; Duchin, Jeffrey S.

2009-01-01

108

78 FR 59414 - Environmental Impact Statement; King County, Washington  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

The Federal Highway Administration is issuing this notice to advise the public that an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) will be prepared for a proposed project to (1) manage congestion and traffic flow on I-90 between I-5 and I-405, which is in the Cross-Lake Washington Corridor, and (2) contribute revenue to the sustainable, long-term funding for timely completion of the SR 520 Bridge......

2013-09-26

109

Monitoring in the nearshore: A process for making reasoned decisions  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Over the past several years, a conceptual framework for the GEM nearshore monitoring program has been developed through a series of workshops. However, details of the proposed monitoring program, e.g. what to sample, where to sample, when to sample and at how many sites, have yet to be determined. In FY 03 we were funded under Project 03687 to outline a process whereby specific alternatives to monitoring are developed and presented to the EVOS Trustee Council for consideration. As part of this process, two key elements are required before reasoned decisions can be made. These are: 1) a comprehensive historical perspective of locations and types of past studies conducted in the nearshore marine communities within Gulf of Alaska, and 2) estimates of costs for each element of a proposed monitoring program. We have developed a GIS database that details available information from past studies of selected nearshore habitats and species in the Gulf of Alaska and provide a visual means of selecting sites based (in part) on the locations for which historical data of interest are available. We also provide cost estimates for specific monitoring plan alternatives and outline several alternative plans that can be accomplished within reasonable budgetary constraints. The products that we will provide are: 1) A GIS database and maps showing the location and types of information available from the nearshore in the Gulf of Alaska; 2) A list of several specific monitoring alternatives that can be conducted within reasonable budgetary constraints; and 3) Cost estimates for proposed tasks to be conducted as part of the nearshore program. Because data compilation and management will not be completed until late in FY03 we are requesting support for close-out of this project in FY 04.

Bodkin, J.L.; Dean, T.A.

2003-01-01

110

Opportunity Captures 'Lion King' Panorama  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

[figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Opportunity Captures 'Lion King' Panorama (QTVR)

This approximate true-color panorama, dubbed 'Lion King,' shows 'Eagle Crater' and the surrounding plains of Meridiani Planum. It was obtained by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera on sols 58 and 60 using infrared (750-nanometer), green (530-nanometer) and blue (430-nanometer) filters.

This is the largest panorama obtained yet by either rover. It was taken in eight segments using six filters per segment, for a total of 558 images and more than 75 megabytes of data. Additional lower elevation tiers were added to ensure that the entire crater was covered in the mosaic.

This panorama depicts a story of exploration including the rover's lander, a thorough examination of the outcrop, a study of the soils at the near-side of the lander, a successful exit from Eagle Crater and finally the rover's next desination, the large crater dubbed 'Endurance'.

2004-01-01

111

King in a maverick style.  

PubMed

This article features Maurice King, who is advocating a one-child world. King was born in 1927 in Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) and studied at Trinity Hall, Cambridge, and St. Thomas Hospital, London. He first worked as a pathologist, moving to Africa in 1956. He was always willing to fight injustice, objecting to not being allowed to train black Africans. He authored ¿Medical Care in Developing Countries,¿ considered the ¿Bible¿ of the primary health care movement. By 1985, he was teaching public health medicine at Leeds University, having spent most of his time in Africa working on various projects for the WHO, and was focusing on primary health care. His other great cause then was nuclear disarmament. His lecture to the Royal Society of Medicine on health of Africa in 1988 ignited his interest in demography. He had then championed ideas, which initially provoked outrage, such as the case with ¿entrapment,¿ the hardinian taboo, and now his concept of the lockstep. He had claimed that the US State Department, together with UN, the World Bank and the Roman Catholic Church, is actively preventing population issues being discussed fully. He may appear on the surface as obsessed with imposing a one-child world and paranoid about the role of the US; but a closer analysis reveals a deep affection for Africa and a missionary zeal to surmount the problems of overpopulation. PMID:10514154

Abbasi, K

1999-10-01

112

Clinical Trials Unit King's College London  

E-print Network

Clinical Trials Unit King's College London Caroline Murphy, CTU Manager History of the Clinical's · The Clinical Trials Unit has been awarded full registration by the UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC) and is the only fully UKCRC registered Clinical Trials Unit across King's Health Partners (KHP) UKCRC Registration

Applebaum, David

113

Culture at King's Overture / the first year  

E-print Network

Culture at King's Overture / the first year Contents #12;Foreword I n March 2012 I joined King's College London as Director, Cultural Partnerships, to build on the College's longstanding connections across arts and culture, extending and enriching its collaborations with the sector of which I had been

Applebaum, David

114

King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Electrical Engineering Department  

E-print Network

King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Electrical Engineering Department EE399 Summer Tra Advisor Examiner King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Electrical Engineering Department EE399

Al-Ghadhban, Samir

115

Martin Luther King Assassination Conspiracy Verdict  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Thirty-five years ago, on December 10, 1964, Dr. Martin Luther King Junior received the prestigious Nobel Peace Prize. This week, Dr. King has again been very much in the news. On December 9th, a Memphis jury handed down a verdict that the 1968 assassination of the civil rights leader was a conspiracy rather than the act of lone gunman James Earl Ray. The verdict was the conclusion of a wrongful death suit brought by King's family against businessman Lloyd Jowers, who admitted on network television in 1993 that he was given $100,000 to arrange King's murder. King's relatives have long argued that the crime was never fully examined by the courts, and brought the lawsuit in an attempt to learn the truth. The family accepted a token settlement of $100 in damages from Jowers.

Shapiro, Debra S.

116

Trophic relationships in the nearshore zone of Martel Inlet (King George Island, Antarctica): d13C stable-isotope analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Carbon isotopic composition was used to assess the linkage between three different potential sources of energy and the community in the shallow coastal zone of Martel Inlet. Stable d 13C ratios ranged from -28.7‰ for the zooplankton plus phytoplankton to -14.4‰ for the grazer Nacella concinna. Microphytobenthos (-16.7‰) was considerably more enriched in 13C than were suspended particulate matter (SPM)

Thaïs N. Corbisier; Monica A. V. Petti; Rodrigo S. P. Skowronski; Tania A. S. Brito

2004-01-01

117

Nearshore oscillating wave surge converters and the development of Oyster.  

PubMed

Oscillating wave surge converters (OWSCs) are a class of wave power technology that exploits the enhanced horizontal fluid particle movement of waves in the nearshore coastal zone with water depths of 10-20 m. OWSCs predominantly oscillate horizontally in surge as opposed to the majority of wave devices, which oscillate vertically in heave and usually are deployed in deeper water. The characteristics of the nearshore wave resource are described along with the hydrodynamics of OWSCs. The variables in the OWSC design space are discussed together with a presentation of some of their effects on capture width, frequency bandwidth response and power take-off characteristics. There are notable differences between the different OWSCs under development worldwide, and these are highlighted. The final section of the paper describes Aquamarine Power's 315?kW Oyster 1 prototype, which was deployed at the European Marine Energy Centre in August 2009. Its place in the OWSC design space is described along with the practical experience gained. This has led to the design of Oyster 2, which was deployed in August 2011. It is concluded that nearshore OWSCs are serious contenders in the mix of wave power technologies. The nearshore wave climate has a narrower directional spread than the offshore, the largest waves are filtered out and the exploitable resource is typically only 10-20% less in 10 m depth compared with 50 m depth. Regarding the devices, a key conclusion is that OWSCs such as Oyster primarily respond in the working frequency range to the horizontal fluid acceleration; Oyster is not a drag device responding to horizontal fluid velocity. The hydrodynamics of Oyster is dominated by inertia with added inertia being a very significant contributor. It is unlikely that individual flap modules will exceed 1?MW in installed capacity owing to wave resource, hydrodynamic and economic constraints. Generating stations will be made up of line arrays of flaps with communal secondary power conversion every 5-10 units. PMID:22184665

Whittaker, Trevor; Folley, Matt

2012-01-28

118

Practical use of video imagery in nearshore oceanographic field studies  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An approach was developed for using video imagery to quantify, in terms of both spatial and temporal dimensions, a number of naturally occurring (nearshore) physical processes. The complete method is presented, including the derivation of the geometrical relationships relating image and ground coordinates, principles to be considered when working with video imagery and the two-step strategy for calibration of the camera model. The techniques are founded on the principles of photogrammetry, account for difficulties inherent in the use of video signals, and have been adapted to allow for flexibility of use in field studies. Examples from field experiments indicate that this approach is both accurate and applicable under the conditions typically experienced when sampling in coastal regions. Several applications of the camera model are discussed, including the measurement of nearshore fluid processes, sand bar length scales, foreshore topography, and drifter motions. Although we have applied this method to the measurement of nearshore processes and morphologic features, these same techniques are transferable to studies in other geophysical settings.

Holland, K.T.; Holman, R.A.; Lippmann, T.C.; Stanley, J.; Plant, N.

1997-01-01

119

Oedipus the King: Readers' Theater  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students will create and perform an updated, modern version of the play Oedipus the King by Sophocles in order to have a better understanding of the plot, characters, and to connect the story to today's society.

Nc, Learn

2012-04-10

120

Your Guide to King Albert Hall  

E-print Network

; more information is available from the Transportation & Parking Student Parking Page. Due to the size floor of King Albert is home of the Meetro ­ a homey coffee shop and a great place to study. #12

Latiolais, M. Paul

121

A conversation with M King Hubbert  

SciTech Connect

The video presents Dr. M. King Hubbert, who is a scholar and federal authority on fuel and energy, explaining the limits of the fossil fuel supply and the impact of coming energy problems on health care institutions.

NONE

1994-12-31

122

A conversation with M King Hubbert  

SciTech Connect

The video presents Dr. M. King Hubbert, who is a scholar and federal authority on fuel and energy, explaining the limits of the fossil fuel supply and the impact of coming energy problems on health care institutions.

Not Available

1994-01-01

123

Impact of Synoptic Meteorological Variations on Nearshore Hydrodynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Passage of low pressure atmospheric frontal systems over the Southeast US introduces synoptic variation in meteorological parameters. Nearshore wave climate in this region is influenced by locally generated winds, showing a strong response to moving frontal systems. Accurate prediction of surf-zone response to wave forcing and wind forcing in general and atmospheric fronts in particular is important in quantifying sediment mobility and changes in beach morphodynamics. Energetic wave conditions can be attributed to three atmospheric front systems: 1) Cold Fronts, 2) Warm Fronts, and 3) Tropical Storms. Low pressure systems associated with cold fronts moving from west to east-northeast, change the wind direction from northeast to southwest. Conversely, warm fronts are accompanied by an opposite change in wind direction. Tropical storms moving nearshore rotate the wind direction slowly from southwest to southeast. Long term (2004- 2007) nearshore wind, wave and current information is analyzed from a station located at mean water depth of 5 meters on the coast of SC (Springmaid Pier) to examine the relationship between meteorological forcing and nearshore hydrodynamic conditions. Atmospheric pressure, temperature and wind velocity from the same station were used to identify, 24 cold fronts, 18 warm fronts and 14 tropical storms on average for each year from 2004-2007. In this contribution, a 2-D wave propagation model, Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN), coupled with the coastal-circulation model Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS v 3.0) is being used to predict longshore current and sediment transport in the surf zone in response to different types of fronts. The performance of the wave propagation model is evaluated with in-situ measurements collected as a part of South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study (SCCES) along the coast. Synthetic atmospheric fronts and tropical storms, developed from the climatic analysis, are used as input to the coupled models. The results are used to examine the overall impact of the different type of atmospheric fronts and tropical storms over a year in terms of net alongshelf sediment transport in surf zone.

Kumar, N.; Voulgaris, G.; Warner, J. C.

2008-12-01

124

The Seattle Times: Martin Luther King Jr.  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Seattle Times commemorates the life and legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. with a Web site including sections on the man, the movement, the legacy, and the holiday. Timed to coincide with the 10th anniversary of the national King holiday, the site also offers a photo tour of key events in the fight for civil rights, dialogue between students in Alabama and Washington states, a quiz study guide, and sound clips from his speeches.

1996-01-01

125

Capital Drag: kinging in Washington, DC.  

PubMed

Through individual interviews with three DC drag kings and detailed, first-person accounts of their performances, I examine the role the kings play within the lesbian community at Club Chaos in Dupont Circle. My interviews address how and why the kings started performing, how their drag characters relate to their everyday personalities and experiences as lesbian women, why performing in drag is important to them, why drag performances are important to the women who attend their shows, and how gay men and drag queens have responded to their performances. My descriptions of the kings' performances, the audience response, and the atmosphere they create at the club reflect my viewpoint as a lesbian audience participant who has much appreciation for drag queens and much curiosity about the burgeoning drag king scene. I conclude that drag kings provide a valuable service to lesbian communities by creating a safe, supportive environment in which lesbian performers and audience members can celebrate and explore their relationships to female masculinities and queer sexualities. PMID:12769275

Patterson, Jennifer Lyn

2002-01-01

126

SCORE Science: Humboldt County Office of Education  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

SCORE, a cooperative project of the California County Superintendent's Educational Services Association, has made K-12 teacher and student resources in four major subject areas available at sites in Humboldt County (Science), San Diego County (Language Arts), Kings County (Mathematics), and San Bernardino and Butte Counties (Social Studies). While each site has its own personality and delivery style, they all make an attempt to break out teacher and/or student resources by grade level. In some cases (Science, Social Studies) this is done through a search interface. In others (Language Arts, Mathematics) it is done via a browsable interface. It is this categorization, plus the fact that resources are selected, evaluated, and annotated by teachers, that is the both the power and unifying theme of the sites. Depending on the site, assessment and teacher development sections may also be available.

1996-01-01

127

Martin Luther King Jr. Revisited: A Black Power Feminist Pays Homage to the King  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this part memoir–part historical reflection on the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Gwendolyn Simmons recounts her association with Dr. King during the 1960s—the heyday of the civil rights and Black Power era—as a college student, field-secretary (organizer)-turned–Black Power revolutionary in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC)—the \\

Gwendolyn Zoharah Simmons

2008-01-01

128

Towards an Operational Nearshore Wave Data Assimilation System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For Navy operations, the model used for wave predictions in the nearshore is SWAN, which solves the spectral action balance equation to estimate the wave state. Boundary conditions for local (nearshore) model domains are generally obtained from regional model simulations that use either SWAN or WAVEWATCH III, which in turn gets boundary conditions from global simulations with WAVEWATCH III forced by the meteorological models. Inaccuracies in meteorological forcing and the coarse grid resolutions for the global model can lead to significant errors in SWAN's spectral estimates, particularly in shallow water. To improve the model's performance, especially for the small nearshore domains, we have developed a 4DVAR data assimilation system based on a tangent linear code and the corresponding adjoint from the numerical SWAN model. The system utilizes point measurements of 2D wave spectra, such as from a wave buoy, to improve the solution in the whole domain. Given a set of observations measured at different times and locations in the model domain, the assimilation system minimizes a cost function (representing overall error between the model and observations) and generates corrected boundary and initial conditions that optimize the fit of SWAN's output to the measurements. In addition to time dependence, the system accounts for nonlinear triad and quadruplet interactions, depth-limited breaking, wind forcing, bottom friction, and whitecapping as well as the influence of currents on waves. This presentation will review the current status of the system using simulations with data from Duck, North Carolina and the 2012 RIMPAC exercises held by the Commander, US Pacific Fleet in and around the Hawaiian Islands. Examples shown will include analysis of effects of using different background fields, and of assimilating different instruments simultaneously. Adjoint-generated sensitivity maps, which can be generated using the adjoint, will be used to demonstrate the optimal locations for deployment of instruments under varying wave conditions.

Veeramony, J.; Orzech, M.; Ngodock, H. E.; Flampouris, S.

2012-12-01

129

Adjoint-Based Sensitivity Maps for the Nearshore  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The wave model SWAN (Booij et al., 1999) solves the spectral action balance equation to produce nearshore wave forecasts and climatologies. It is widely used by the coastal modeling community and is part of a variety of coupled ocean-wave-atmosphere model systems. A variational data assimilation system (Orzech et al., 2013) has recently been developed for SWAN and is presently being transitioned to operational use by the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office. This system is built around a numerical adjoint to the fully nonlinear, nonstationary SWAN code. When provided with measured or artificial "observed" spectral wave data at a location of interest on a given nearshore bathymetry, the adjoint can compute the degree to which spectral energy levels at other locations are correlated with - or "sensitive" to - variations in the observed spectrum. Adjoint output may be used to construct a sensitivity map for the entire domain, tracking correlations of spectral energy throughout the grid. When access is denied to the actual locations of interest, sensitivity maps can be used to determine optimal alternate locations for data collection by identifying regions of greatest sensitivity in the mapped domain. The present study investigates the properties of adjoint-generated sensitivity maps for nearshore wave spectra. The adjoint and forward SWAN models are first used in an idealized test case at Duck, NC, USA, to demonstrate the system's effectiveness at optimizing forecasts of shallow water wave spectra for an inaccessible surf-zone location. Then a series of simulations is conducted for a variety of different initializing conditions, to examine the effects of seasonal changes in wave climate, errors in bathymetry, and variations in size and shape of the inaccessible region of interest. Model skill is quantified using two methods: (1) a more traditional correlation of observed and modeled spectral statistics such as significant wave height, and (2) a recently developed RMS spectral skill score summed over all frequency-directional bins. The relative advantages and disadvantages of these two methods are considered. References: Booij, N., R.C. Ris, and L.H. Holthuijsen, 1999: A third-generation wave model for coastal regions: 1. Model description and validation. J. Geophys. Res. 104 (C4), 7649-7666. Orzech, M.D., J. Veeramony, and H.E. Ngodock, 2013: A variational assimilation system for nearshore wave modeling. J. Atm. & Oc. Tech., in press.

Orzech, Mark; Veeramony, Jay; Ngodock, Hans

2013-04-01

130

NearCoM-TVD --A quasi-3D nearshore circulation and sediment transport model  

E-print Network

deviation of wave-induced horizontal velocities. The modeled beach profile evolution for two off- shore for predicting nearshore waves and wave- induced nearshore processes, basically the region between the shore such as storm-induced coastal inundation, beach and dune erosion, and wave�current interaction in inlet systems

Kirby, James T.

131

MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN  

E-print Network

MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN FRANCISCO Patrick L. Barnard1 , Daniel M. Hanes1 , Jamie Lescinski1 and Edwin Elias2 Nearshore dredge toward the shore, providing evidence that annual dredge disposal at this site could be beneficial over

132

Characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter in the nearshore waters of the western Taiwan Strait  

E-print Network

Characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter in the nearshore waters of the western Keywords: CDOM absorption coefficient fluorescence remote sensing coastal waters Western Taiwan Strait a b s t r a c t Absorption and fluorescence of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the nearshore

133

LINKING NEARSHORE PROCESSES AND MORPHOLOGY MEASUREMENTS TO UNDERSTAND LARGE SCALE COASTAL CHANGE  

E-print Network

LINKING NEARSHORE PROCESSES AND MORPHOLOGY MEASUREMENTS TO UNDERSTAND LARGE SCALE COASTAL CHANGE and morphology change. For the first time, process and nearshore bottom change measurements are being coupled to progradational conditions (Spring 2001 experiment). Process-based morphological models are tested with field

134

Nearshore, seasonally persistent fronts in sea surface temperature on Red Sea tropical reefs  

E-print Network

Nearshore, seasonally persistent fronts in sea surface temperature on Red Sea tropical reefs. 2011. Nearshore, seasonally persistent fronts in sea surface temperature on Red Sea tropical reefs in sea surface temperature (SST) were observed, including cold fronts (colder inshore) during winter

Pineda, Jesús

135

Effects of shoreline development on the nearshore environment in large deep oligotrophic lakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY 1. In large deep oligotrophic lakes, the shallow nearshore waters may provide the most important habitat for animals to feed and breed, and it is this area of the lake where humans are most likely to have initial impacts as the shoreline is developed. Nutrients in fertilizers, sediments and sewage effluents are likely to be rapidly intercepted by nearshore

ELIZABETH E. R OSENBERGER; E. H AMPTON; S TEVEN C. F RADKIN

2008-01-01

136

NEARSHORE FISH AND MACROINVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES ALONG THE STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA INCLUDING FOOD HABITS OF THE COMMON NEARSHORE FISH: FINAL REPORT OF THREE YEARS' SAMPLING, 1976-1979  

EPA Science Inventory

A seasonal survey of nearshore fishes was made in the Strait of Juan de Fuca from May 1976 to June 1979. A beach seine was used for sampling nearshore demersal fishes and a townet for nearshore pelagic fishes; intertidal fishes were sampled with the use of anesthetic and a hand n...

137

EDITORIAL: King of the elements? King of the elements?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Throughout the history of science, carbon-based research has played a defining role in the development of a range of fundamental and technological fields. It was used in Avagadro's definition of the mole in the early 18th century, it provides the 'backbone' of molecules in organic compounds, and in the environmental debate currently raging in the press and international government discussions, the 'carbon footprint' has become the metric of our species' impact on our planet. Also in nanotechnology, with the discovery of various wonder materials, carbon is once again asserting its claim as king of the elements. Until the 1980s the only known forms of carbon were diamond, graphite and amorphous carbon, as in soot or charcoal. In 1985 Robert Curl, Harold Kroto and Richard Smalley reported the existence of fullerenes, spherical structures comprising hexagonal carbon rings [1], work for which they won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1996 [2]. The discovery of fullerenes was followed in 1991 by Sumio Ijima with the discovery of rolled graphite sheets, the carbon nanotube [3]. The discovery of these novel carbon nanostructures inspired researchers in a range of fields, largely as a result of the extraordinary capacity for investigations of these structures to reveal ever more intriguing properties. One of the fascinating properties attributed to carbon nanotubes is their phenomenal strength, with a Young's modulus of single walled carbon nanotubes approaching a terapascal [4]. Ingenious methods of harnessing this strength have since been developed, including bucky paper, a term used to refer to a mat of randomly self-entangled carbon nanotubes. Steven Crannford and Markus Buehler have recently reported a novel computational technique for probing the mechanical properties of these structures and show that the Young's modulus of bucky paper can be tuned by manipulation of the carbon nanotube type and density [5]. The electrical properties of carbon nanotubes, which depend on the chirality or wrapping angle of the graphite sheet with respect to the tube axis [6], have captured the imagination of researchers working in nanoelectronics. Carbon nanotubes also revealed interesting thermal properties that could lend them to the next generation of nanoscale devices. In 2000, researchers at the California Institute of Technology published the results of molecular dynamics simulations of thermal conductivity in carbon nanotubes [7]. The thermal properties predicted from this work added further promise to the potential of carbon nanotubes in micro- and nanoelectromechanical devices. More recently, researchers from the University of Columbia have studied how to exploit the thermal properties of carbon nanotubes in nanofluids. They report enhancement of heat transfer properties of carbon-nanotube-based nanofluids using a plasma treatment to aid stable dispersion of the nanotubes in water [8]. Eric Pop in Illinois has reported on the role of electrical and thermal contact resistance in Joule breakdown of single-walled carbon nanotubes, including analysis of several published data sets [9]. The work finds universal scaling rules, whereby the breakdown scales linearly with length for carbon nanotubes above a certain length, below which the breakdown is entirely limited by contact resistance. In 2004 another form of carbon came to the fore when researchers at the University of Manchester and the Institute of Microelectronics Technology isolated a single plane of graphite, that is, graphene, using a kind of scotch tape [10]. As with other forms of carbon, investigation of graphene has also revealed fascinating properties that lend the material to a number of applications, such as sensing. The electronic properties of graphene are highly sensitive to the adsorption of molecules such as CO, NO, NO2 and NH3, and a collaboration of researchers from Lanzhou University in China and the University of Sheffield in the UK have further reported on how this sensitivity can be enhanced by two orders of magnitude when the graphene is doped with an impurity s

Demming, Anna

2010-07-01

138

The Martin Luther King Library and Archives at the Crossroads.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the collection of the Martin Luther King Library and Archives and examines recent problems that have developed. Topics discussed include a lack of adequate funding and personnel; the lawsuit concerning papers given to Boston University by Dr. King; and an interview with Coretta Scott King. (LRW)

Chepesiuk, Ron; Kelley-Palmer, Gloria

1994-01-01

139

Honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Upcoming events  

E-print Network

Honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Upcoming events News You Can Use A publication of OSU the legacy of Dr. King by coordinating events to edu- cate and bring people together for fellowship. Some in honor of Dr. King, please visit OSU's MLK week information page: http

Escher, Christine

140

Submitted for Dr. Valarie G. King by Carmen I. Afonso  

E-print Network

Submitted for Dr. Valarie G. King by Carmen I. Afonso January 26, 2012 The Office of Diversity and Friday, August 16 and 17, from 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Valarie Greene King, Ph.D. Director, Office 823-6479 Fax: 407 823-6480 valarie.king@ucf.edu www.diversity.ucf.edu ( http

Van Stryland, Eric

141

SAN JOS STATE UNIVERSITY DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. LIBRARY  

E-print Network

of the transformational change. JOINT LIBRARY The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library is a joint university and public of the university community and the general public. Most service desks in the King Library are merged service units1 SAN JOSÃ? STATE UNIVERSITY DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. LIBRARY VISION-STRATEGY STATEMENT

Su, Xiao

142

FEDERALISM ASSESSMENT COMMERCIAL KING AND TANNER CRAB FISHERIES  

E-print Network

FEDERALISM ASSESSMENT FOR THE COMMERCIAL KING AND TANNER CRAB FISHERIES IN THE BERING SEA OF THE DOCUMENT . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2.0 AN OVERVIEW OF MANAGEMENT OF KING AND TANNER CRAB IN THE BERING SEA AND ALEUTIAN ISLANDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 3.0 AN OVERVIEW OF THE KING AND TANNER CRAB FISHERIES

143

Martin Luther King, Jr. Resource Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This resource guide was developed to commemorate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday by providing school personnel with background information and hands-on activities for use with students in Grades K-12. The activities in the guide can be implemented throughout the school year to help students become aware of the social, economic, and…

New York State Education Dept., Albany. Div. of Civil Rights and Intercultural Relations.

144

A New Reading of Shakespeare's King John  

Microsoft Academic Search

Shakespeare wrote King John c.1594, six years after the defeat of the Spanish Armada, and ~ 50 years after publication of the Copernican heliocentric hypothesis. It is said to be the most unhistorical of the History Plays, ``anomalous'', ``puzzling'', and ``odd'', and as such it has engendered far more than the customary range of interpretive opinion. I suggest that the

Peter D. Usher

1995-01-01

145

King Hassan II: Morocco's Messenger of Peace  

E-print Network

into an alliance with Israel guided the way for a mutually beneficial relationship that was cultivated for decades. King Hassan II was a key player in the development of relations between the Arab states and Israel. His actions illustrate a belief in peace...

Cross, Megan

2007-12-17

146

KING'S HALL AND COLLEGE OF BRASENOSE  

E-print Network

by William Smyth, Bishop of Lincoln, and Sir Richard Sutton, Knight, under a Charter of King Henry the Eighth of the Statutes given by Sir Richard Sutton, dated the lst day of February in the thirteenth year of the same of its powers (except those of electing to the office of Principal or to any Fellowship or of alienating

Oxford, University of

147

KINGS, SAINTS, AND MONASTERIES IN PRE  

Microsoft Academic Search

From the first, men and women of royal birth formed a distinctive, indeed preponderant, class among Anglo-Saxon saints. At first sight it would appear that Mercia, whose royal family was converted relatively late, lacked early royal cults of the distinction of those of Northumbria, Kent, and East Anglia. Nevertheless, a considerable number of Mercian kings, princes, and princesses achieved sainthood

VIKING MERCIA; ALAN THACKER

148

"King Corn": Teaching the Food Crisis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"King Corn" is in so many ways the story of how government food policy has entirely remade the food landscape in the United States over the last 40 years. From the massive expansion of the number of acres of corn grown across the country, to the ever-increasing ways that corn is incorporated into the food production process, to the industrial…

Swinehart, Tim

2012-01-01

149

MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. AND CHRISTIAN WITNESS: AN INTERPRETATION OF KING BASED ON A THEOLOGICAL MODEL OF PROPHETIC WITNESS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Martin Luther King, Jr., has often been called a prophet or prophetic by theologians and popular writers. The purpose of this dissertation is to test the theological interpretation of Dr. King as prophetic. The role and theology of the classical Hebrew prophets are the norm by which the work of Dr. King is evaluated. The dissertation is a theological experiment.

JOSEPH MILBURN THOMPSON

1981-01-01

150

Evolution of basic equations for nearshore wave field  

PubMed Central

In this paper, a systematic, overall view of theories for periodic waves of permanent form, such as Stokes and cnoidal waves, is described first with their validity ranges. To deal with random waves, a method for estimating directional spectra is given. Then, various wave equations are introduced according to the assumptions included in their derivations. The mild-slope equation is derived for combined refraction and diffraction of linear periodic waves. Various parabolic approximations and time-dependent forms are proposed to include randomness and nonlinearity of waves as well as to simplify numerical calculation. Boussinesq equations are the equations developed for calculating nonlinear wave transformations in shallow water. Nonlinear mild-slope equations are derived as a set of wave equations to predict transformation of nonlinear random waves in the nearshore region. Finally, wave equations are classified systematically for a clear theoretical understanding and appropriate selection for specific applications. PMID:23318680

ISOBE, Masahiko

2013-01-01

151

Connecting wind-driven upwelling and offshore stratification to nearshore internal bores and oxygen variability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

study utilizes field observations in southern Monterey Bay, CA, to examine how regional-scale upwelling and changing offshore (shelf) conditions influence nearshore internal bores. We show that the low-frequency wind forcing (e.g., upwelling/relaxation time scales) modifies the offshore stratification and thermocline depth. This in turn alters the strength and structure of observed internal bores in the nearshore. An internal bore strength index is defined using the high-pass filtered potential energy density anomaly in the nearshore. During weak upwelling favorable conditions and wind relaxations, the offshore thermocline deepens. In this case, both the amplitude of the offshore internal tide and the strength of the nearshore internal bores increase. In contrast, during strong upwelling conditions, the offshore thermocline shoals toward the surface, resulting in a decrease in the offshore internal tide amplitude. As a result, cold water accumulates in the nearshore (nearshore pooling), and the internal bore strength index decreases. Empirical orthogonal functions are utilized to support the claim that the bore events contribute to the majority of the variance in cross-shelf exchange and transport in the nearshore. Observed individual bores can drive shock-like drops in dissolved oxygen (DO) with rapid onset times, while extended upwelling periods with reduced bore activity produce longer duration, low DO events.

Walter, Ryan K.; Woodson, C. Brock; Leary, Paul R.; Monismith, Stephen G.

2014-06-01

152

Evaluation of nearshore wave models in steep reef environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To provide coastal engineers and scientists with a quantitative evaluation of nearshore numerical wave models in reef environments, we review and compare three commonly used models with detailed laboratory observations. These models are the following: (1) SWASH (Simulating WAves till SHore) (Zijlema et al. 2011), a phase-resolving nonlinear shallow-water wave model with added nonhydrostatic terms; (2) SWAN (Simulating WAve Nearshore) (Booij et al. 1999), a phase-averaged spectral wave model; and (3) XBeach (Roelvink et al. 2009), a coupled phase-averaged spectral wave model (applied to modeling sea-swell waves) and a nonlinear shallow-water model (applied to modeling infragravity waves). A quantitative assessment was made of each model's ability to predict sea-swell (SS) wave height, infragravity (IG) wave height, wave spectra, and wave setup () at five locations across the laboratory fringing reef profile of Demirbilek et al. (2007). Simulations were performed with the "recommended" empirical coefficients as documented for each model, and then the key wave-breaking parameter for each model ( ? in SWASH and ? in both SWAN and XBeach) was optimized to most accurately reproduce the observations. SWASH, SWAN, and XBeach were found to be capable of predicting SS wave height variations across the steep fringing reef profile with reasonable accuracy using the default coefficients. Nevertheless, tuning of the key wave-breaking parameter improved the accuracy of each model's predictions. SWASH and XBeach were also able to predict IG wave height and spectral transformation. Although SWAN was capable of modeling the SS wave height, in its current form, it was not capable of modeling the spectral transformation into lower frequencies, as evident in the underprediction of the low-frequency waves.

Buckley, Mark; Lowe, Ryan; Hansen, Jeff

2014-06-01

153

Neural-network predictability experiments for nearshore sandbar migration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cross-shore migratory behavior of nearshore sandbars is commonly studied with nearshore bathymetric-evolution models that represent underlying processes of hydrodynamics and sediment transport. These models, however, struggle to reproduce natural cross-shore sandbar behavior on timescales of a few days to weeks and have uncertain skill on longer scales of months to years. One particular concern for the use of models on prediction timescales that far exceed the timescale of the modeled processes is the exponential accumulation of errors in the nonlinear model equations. The relation between cross-shore sandbar migration, sandbar location and wave height has previously been demonstrated to be weakly nonlinear on timescales of several days, but it is unknown how this nonlinearity affects the predictability of long-term (months to years) cross-shore sandbar behavior. Here we study the role of nonlinearity in the predictability of sandbar behavior on timescales of a few days to several months with data-driven neural network models. Our analyses are based on over 5600 daily-observed cross-shore sandbar locations and daily-averaged wave forcings from the Gold Coast, Australia, and Hasaki, Japan. We find that neural network models are able to hindcast many aspects of cross-shore sandbar behavior, such as rapid offshore migration during storms, slower onshore return during quiet periods, seasonal cycles and annual to interannual offshore-directed trends. Although the relation between sandbar migration, sandbar location and wave height is nonlinear, sandbar behavior can be hindcasted accurately over the entire lifespan of the sandbars at the Gold Coast. Contrastingly, it is difficult to hindcast the long-term offshore-directed trends in sandbar behavior at Hasaki because of exponential accumulation of errors over time. Our results further reveal that during periods with low-wave conditions it becomes increasingly difficult to predict sandbar locations, while during high waves predictions become increasingly accurate.

Pape, L.; Ruessink, B. G.

2011-06-01

154

Uncertainty Analysis and Parameter Estimation For Nearshore Hydrodynamic Models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Numerical models represent deterministic approaches used for the relevant physical processes in the nearshore. Complexity of the physics of the model and uncertainty involved in the model inputs compel us to apply a stochastic approach to analyze the robustness of the model. The Bayesian inverse problem is one powerful way to estimate the important input model parameters (determined by apriori sensitivity analysis) and can be used for uncertainty analysis of the outputs. Bayesian techniques can be used to find the range of most probable parameters based on the probability of the observed data and the residual errors. In this study, the effect of input data involving lateral (Neumann) boundary conditions, bathymetry and off-shore wave conditions on nearshore numerical models are considered. Monte Carlo simulation is applied to a deterministic numerical model (the Delft3D modeling suite for coupled waves and flow) for the resulting uncertainty analysis of the outputs (wave height, flow velocity, mean sea level and etc.). Uncertainty analysis of outputs is performed by random sampling from the input probability distribution functions and running the model as required until convergence to the consistent results is achieved. The case study used in this analysis is the Duck94 experiment, which was conducted at the U.S. Army Field Research Facility at Duck, North Carolina, USA in the fall of 1994. The joint probability of model parameters relevant for the Duck94 experiments will be found using the Bayesian approach. We will further show that, by using Bayesian techniques to estimate the optimized model parameters as inputs and applying them for uncertainty analysis, we can obtain more consistent results than using the prior information for input data which means that the variation of the uncertain parameter will be decreased and the probability of the observed data will improve as well. Keywords: Monte Carlo Simulation, Delft3D, uncertainty analysis, Bayesian techniques, MCMC

Ardani, S.; Kaihatu, J. M.

2012-12-01

155

Psychological aftermath of the King's Cross fire.  

PubMed Central

The King's Cross fire occurred at the end of the evening rush hour, on 18 November 1987. King's Cross station is within the department's health district and we felt a responsibility to respond to the psychological aftermath. The unique features of our intervention were the degree of inter agency coordination, the use of a systematic outreach and screening programme, the collection of psychotherapy outcome measures and the development of an ongoing clinic. The work represents a sustained attempt to assess the nature and prevalence of post-traumatic reactions and the most medically and economically effective form of intervention. In this paper we describe the way our team responded to the high level of psychological distress that we found, we present some preliminary results, outline two therapeutic trials, and refer to the longterm consequences for the work of our department. PMID:1994013

Rosser, R; Dewar, S; Thompson, J

1991-01-01

156

50 CFR 697.26 - EEZ Nearshore Management Area 5 Trap Waiver.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...4(a)(1) and limited access black sea bass permits under § 648.4...section may engage in trap fishing for black sea bass in EEZ Nearshore Management...regulations applicable to lobster and black sea bass fishing. (1) A...

2013-10-01

157

50 CFR 697.26 - EEZ Nearshore Management Area 5 Trap Waiver.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...4(a)(1) and limited access black sea bass permits under § 648.4...section may engage in trap fishing for black sea bass in EEZ Nearshore Management...regulations applicable to lobster and black sea bass fishing. (1) A...

2010-10-01

158

50 CFR 697.26 - EEZ Nearshore Management Area 5 Trap Waiver.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...4(a)(1) and limited access black sea bass permits under § 648.4...section may engage in trap fishing for black sea bass in EEZ Nearshore Management...regulations applicable to lobster and black sea bass fishing. (1) A...

2011-10-01

159

50 CFR 697.26 - EEZ Nearshore Management Area 5 Trap Waiver.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...4(a)(1) and limited access black sea bass permits under § 648.4...section may engage in trap fishing for black sea bass in EEZ Nearshore Management...regulations applicable to lobster and black sea bass fishing. (1) A...

2012-10-01

160

The Influence of Nearshore Bars on Infragravity Energy at the Shoreline  

E-print Network

the shoreline. To determine the influence of the bathymetric features on infragravity energy, the numerical nearshore processes model XBeach was used to simulate infragravity energy at the shoreline. Numerical simulations were completed for three types...

Cox, Nicholas Carroll

2012-02-14

161

Coastal Zone Management Section 309 Grant: 2001 Nearshore Rocky Reef Assessment  

E-print Network

Coastal Zone Management Section 309 Grant: 2001 Nearshore Rocky Reef Assessment ROV Survey Final ........................................................................................................... 18 List of Figures 1.1.1 2001 ROV survey sites. ..............................................................................................2 2.3.1 A simplified illustration of our ROV configuration

Goldfinger, Chris

162

Stick balancing, falls and Dragon-Kings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The extent to which the occurrence of falls, the dominant feature of human attempts to balance a stick at their fingertip, can be predicted is examined in the context of the "Dragon-King" hypothesis. For skilled stick balancers, fluctuations in the controlled variable, namely the vertical displacement angle ?, exhibit power law behaviors. When stick balancing is made less stable by either decreasing the length of the stick or by requiring the subject to balance the stick on the surface of a table tennis racket, systematic departures from the power law behaviors are observed in the range of large ?. This observation raises the possibility that the presence of departures from the power law in the large length scale region, possibly Dragon-Kings, may identify situations in which the occurrence of a fall is more imminent. However, whether or not Dragon-Kings are observed, there is a Weibull-type survival function for stick falling. The possibility that increased risk of falling can, at least to some extent, be predicted from fluctuations in the controlled variable before the event occurs has important implications for the development of preventative strategies for the management of phenomena ranging from earthquakes to epileptic seizures to falls in the elderly.

Cabrera, J. L.; Milton, J. G.

2012-05-01

163

Larval fish variability in response to oceanographic features in a nearshore nursery area.  

PubMed

The influence of oceanographic features on ichthyoplankton assemblages in the warm temperate nearshore region of Algoa Bay, South Africa, was assessed. The nearshore ichthyoplankton comprised 88 taxa from 34 families. Samples were collected at six stations between August 2010 and July 2012 using a plankton ring net of 750 mm diameter and 500 µm mesh aperture. The majority of larvae collected were in a preflexion stage, indicating the potential importance of the nearshore for newly hatched larvae. Engraulidae dominated the catch (38·4%), followed by Cynoglossidae (28·1%) and Sparidae (8·4%). Larval fish abundance was highest during austral spring and summer (September to February). Unique patterns in responses of each dominant fish species to oceanographic features in the nearshore indicate the sensitivity of the early developmental stage to environmental variables. Using generalized linear models, ichthyoplankton abundance responded positively to upwelling and when warm water plumes originating from an Agulhas Current meander entered Algoa Bay. Highest abundances of Engraulis encrasicolus and Sardinops sagax were observed during Agulhas Plume intrusions into Algoa Bay. When a mixed and stratified water column persisted in the nearshore region of Algoa Bay, larval fish abundance decreased. The nearshore region of Algoa Bay appears to serve as a favourable environment for the accumulation of ichthyoplankton. PMID:25082168

Pattrick, P; Strydom, N A

2014-09-01

164

A New Reading of Shakespeare's King John.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Shakespeare wrote King John c.1594, six years after the defeat of the Spanish Armada, and ~ 50 years after publication of the Copernican heliocentric hypothesis. It is said to be the most unhistorical of the History Plays, ``anomalous'', ``puzzling'', and ``odd'', and as such it has engendered far more than the customary range of interpretive opinion. I suggest that the play alerts Elizabethans not just to military and political threats, but to a changing cosmic world view, all especially threatening as they arise in Catholic countries. (a) Personification characterizes the play. John personifies the old order, while Arthur and the Dauphin's armies personify the new. I suggest that Shakespeare decenters King John just as Copernicus decentered the world. (b) Hubert menaces Arthur's eyes for a whole scene (4.1), but the need for such cruelty is not explained and is especially odd as Arthur is already under sentence of death (3.3.65-66). This hitherto unexplained anomaly suggests that the old order fears what the new might see. (c) Eleanor's confession is made only to Heaven and to her son the King (1.1.42-43), yet by echoing and word play the Messenger from France later reveals to John that he is privy to it (4.2.119-124). This circumstance has not been questioned heretofore. I suggest that the Messenger is like the wily Hermes (Mercury), chief communicator of the gods and patron of the sciences; by revealing that he moves in the highest circles, he tells John that he speaks with an authority that transcends even that of a king. The message from on high presages more than political change; it warns of a new cosmic and religious world order (d) Most agree that John is a weak king, so Shakespeare must have suspected flaws in the old ways. He would have known that Tycho Brahe's new star of 1572, the comet of 1577, and the 1576 model of his compatriot Thomas Digges, were shattering old ideas. (e) The tensions of the play are not resolved because in 1594 the new order was not yet generally accepted. Instead, the new world view is announced subtly, and thereby perhaps prudently, for the onset of persecution of its advocates is only a few years away.

Usher, Peter D.

1995-12-01

165

Optical signature utilization of remote sensing of nearshore waters  

SciTech Connect

Existing satellite sensors lack the spectral capabilities to discriminate phytoplankton pigments in water bodies. New satellite sensors (EOS planned for 1998 and SeaWIFS forthcoming) with narrow bandwidths can provide detailed spectral resolution necessary to distinguish optical properties of nearshore waters provided calibrated seatruth data are available. This will facilitate utility of spaceborne water color sensors for discrimination of bloom forming phytoplankton species and support oceanographic/coastal zone remote sensing missions of NASA, Navy and other agencies. The objective of the research was to develop a library of absorption spectra for the most common phytoplankton found locally within the Hudson/Raritan Estuary. Both culture grown and field samples of phytoplankton were concentrated and analyzed using standard techniques. Chlorophyll-a and phaeopigment concentrations were determined based on spectrometric analysis, producing characteristic absorption spectra. To further refine and discriminate pigment compositions which affect remote color sensing recorded by sensors, spectral derivative and polynomial regression analysis were applied to the absorption spectra. Using these models, it was possible to identify optimum wavelengths characterizing pigment compositions of phytoplankton species in the estuary. Future work will integrate the spectral library into GenIsis--hyperspectral image processing to establish correlation with remotely sensed data.

Bagheri, S.; Dios, R.A.; Pan, Zhengxiang [New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01

166

Electrical Engineering Department King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals  

E-print Network

Electrical Engineering Department King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals Course Number: EE analyzer for basic microwave device simulation and testing. Prepared by Dr. Sheikh Sharif Iqbal, November 5

Iqbal, Sheikh Sharif

167

Nearshore energy subsidies support Lake Michigan fishes and invertebrates following major changes in food web structure.  

PubMed

Aquatic food webs that incorporate multiple energy channels (e.g., nearshore benthic and pelagic) with varying productivity and turnover rates convey stability to biological communities by providing independent energy sources. Within the Lake Michigan food web, invasive dreissenid mussels have caused rapid changes to food web structure and potentially altered the channels through which consumers acquire energy. We used stable C and N isotopes to determine how Lake Michigan food web structure has changed in the past decade, coincident with the expansion of dreissenid mussels, decreased pelagic phytoplankton production, and increased nearshore benthic algal production. Fish and invertebrate samples collected from sites around Lake Michigan were analyzed to determine taxa-specific 13C:12C (delta13C) and 15N:14N (delta15N) ratios. Sampling took place during two distinct periods, 2002-2003 and 2010-2012, that spanned the period of dreissenid expansion, and included nearshore, pelagic and profundal fish and invertebrate taxa. The magnitude and direction of the delta13C shift indicated significantly greater reliance upon nearshore benthic energy sources among nearly all fish taxa as well as profundal invertebrates following dreissenid expansion. Although the mechanisms underlying this delta13C shift likely varied among species, possible causes include the transport of benthic algal production to offshore waters and increased feeding on nearshore prey items by pelagic and profundal species. delta15N shifts were more variable and of smaller magnitude across taxa, although declines in delta15N among some pelagic fishes suggest a shift to alternative prey resources. Lake Michigan fishes and invertebrates appear to have responded to dreissenid-induced changes in nutrient and energy pathways by switching from pelagic to alternative nearshore energy subsidies. Although large shifts in energy allocation (i.e., pelagic to nearshore benthic) resulting from invasive species appear to affect total production at upper trophic levels, changes in trophic structure and utilization of novel energy pathways may help to stabilize food webs following species invasions. PMID:25000756

Turschak, Benjamin A; Bunnell, David; Czesny, Sergiusz; Höök, Tomas O; Janssen, John; Warner, David; Bootsma, Harvey A

2014-05-01

168

Hacking KiNG This document is intended to provide a field guide to the code for KiNG and its  

E-print Network

Hacking KiNG This document is intended to provide a field guide to the code for KiNG and its made it in, though. All the structural biology-specific tools that used to be in the king.tool to build KiNG and the various macromolecular modeling tools. Most of the classes have few dependencies

Richardson, David

169

Habitat Suitability Index Models: Red King Crab  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop a Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) model for evaluating habitat of different life stages of red king crab (Paralithodes camtschatica). A model consolidates habitat use information into a framework appropriate for field application, and is scaled to produce an index between 0.0 (unsuitable habitat) and 1.0 (optimum habitat) in Alaskan coastal waters, especially in the Gulf of Alaska and the southeastern Bering Sea. HSI models are designed to be used with Habitat Evaluation Procedures previously developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Jewett, Stephen C.; Onuf, Christopher P.

1988-01-01

170

Stephen Ashford, King's College London & Regional Rehabilitation Unit, Northwick Park Hospital, London. 1 Arm Activity Measure  

E-print Network

Stephen Ashford, King's College London & Regional Rehabilitation Unit, Northwick Park Hospital, London. 1 Arm Activity Measure #12;Stephen Ashford, King's College London & Regional Rehabilitation Unit(s)............................ #12;Stephen Ashford, King's College London & Regional Rehabilitation Unit, Northwick Park Hospital

Kühn, Reimer

171

cBathy: A robust algorithm for estimating nearshore bathymetry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A three-part algorithm is described and tested to provide robust bathymetry maps based solely on long time series observations of surface wave motions. The first phase consists of frequency-dependent characterization of the wave field in which dominant frequencies are estimated by Fourier transform while corresponding wave numbers are derived from spatial gradients in cross-spectral phase over analysis tiles that can be small, allowing high-spatial resolution. Coherent spatial structures at each frequency are extracted by frequency-dependent empirical orthogonal function (EOF). In phase two, depths are found that best fit weighted sets of frequency-wave number pairs. These are subsequently smoothed in time in phase 3 using a Kalman filter that fills gaps in coverage and objectively averages new estimates of variable quality with prior estimates. Objective confidence intervals are returned. Tests at Duck, NC, using 16 surveys collected over 2 years showed a bias and root-mean-square (RMS) error of 0.19 and 0.51 m, respectively but were largest near the offshore limits of analysis (roughly 500 m from the camera) and near the steep shoreline where analysis tiles mix information from waves, swash and static dry sand. Performance was excellent for small waves but degraded somewhat with increasing wave height. Sand bars and their small-scale alongshore variability were well resolved. A single ground truth survey from a dissipative, low-sloping beach (Agate Beach, OR) showed similar errors over a region that extended several kilometers from the camera and reached depths of 14 m. Vector wave number estimates can also be incorporated into data assimilation models of nearshore dynamics.

Holman, Rob; Plant, Nathaniel; Holland, Todd

2013-05-01

172

A High Resolution Hydrodynamic Model of Puget Sound to Support Nearshore Restoration Feasibility Analysis and Design  

SciTech Connect

Estuarine and coastal hydrodynamic processes are sometimes neglected in the design and planning of nearshore restoration actions. Despite best intentions, efforts to restore nearshore habitats can result in poor outcomes if circulation and transport which also affect freshwater-saltwater interactions are not properly addressed. Limitations due to current land use can lead to selection of sub-optimal restoration alternatives that may result in undesirable consequences, such as flooding, deterioration of water quality, and erosion, requiring immediate remedies and costly repairs. Uncertainty with achieving restoration goals, such as recovery of tidal exchange, supply of sediment and nutrients, and establishment of fish migration pathways, may be minimized by using numerical models designed for application to the nearshore environment. A high resolution circulation and transport model of the Puget Sound, in the state of Washington, was developed to assist with nearshore habitat restoration design and analysis, and to answer the question “can we achieve beneficial restoration outcomes at small local scale, as well as at a large estuary-wide scale?” The Puget Sound model is based on an unstructured grid framework to define the complex Puget Sound shoreline using a finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM). The capability of the model for simulating the important nearshore processes, such as circulation in complex multiple tidal channels, wetting and drying of tide flats, and water quality and sediment transport as part of restoration feasibility, are illustrated through examples of restoration projects in Puget Sound.

Khangaonkar, Tarang; Yang, Zhaoqing

2011-01-01

173

Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. Lesson Plan.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a five-lesson, high school instructional unit on the ideas and activities of Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. Includes student objectives, step-by-step instructional procedures, and discussion questions. Provides quotations by Thoreau and King. (CFR)

Powell, Brent

1995-01-01

174

Parasite local adaptation: Red Queen versus Suicide King  

E-print Network

Parasite local adaptation: Red Queen versus Suicide King Mark F. Dybdahl and Andrew Storfer School will continue to improve through studies of the genetic basis of infectivity, research on spatial variation driving themselves or their hosts extinct (`Suicide King'). In general, little is known about virulence

Storfer, Andrew

175

Martin Luther King's Birthday--A Teacher Resource Unit  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dr. Martin Luther King's birthday has been made a legal holiday in New Jersey. NJEA believes his work in fighting the injustice of racial discrimination and for the civil rights of all people merits a special day of public recognition. Teachers are encouraged to refer to this guide, developed from a background of information about Dr. King and the…

NJEA Review, 1978

1978-01-01

176

Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Resilin Raymond John King  

E-print Network

Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Resilin by Raymond John King Thesis submitted to the Faculty of Resilin Raymond John King Abstract Resilin is an almost perfect elastic protein found in many insects wing during flight. #12;iii Acknowledgements I am grateful to Dr. Greg S. Sawicki for an in depth

Dudek, Daniel M.

177

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Health Center's Community Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents the case of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Health Center's unique community management system in which neighborhood workers have been developed to assume managerial responsibilities and are directing the Center. The Martin Luther King Center experience is instructive because the Center was able to achieve significant community control by focusing primarily on the internal dimension of

Noel M. Tichy; June Irmiger Taylor

1976-01-01

178

Keeping the Dream Alive. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents activities for teaching elementary students about Dr. Martin Luther King's life, the civil rights movement, and King's accomplishments. Suggestions include shoebox dioramas, acronym games, oral histories, multicultural awareness activities, pledge cards, community service projects, special commemorative ceremonies, and a book of dreams.…

Cassells, Linda; And Others

1993-01-01

179

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Washington State Resource Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Washington State Resource Guide on Martin Luther King, Jr., supplies a wide variety of materials for use with all grade levels in classroom and assembly presentations in public schools. The goal is for every child enrolled in Washington State schools to learn about Dr. King during the days of January 15 to January 17. Resolutions supporting an…

Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia, WA. Div. of Instructional Programs and Services.

180

Author! Author! The Gallant Children's Author: Dick King-Smith  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This column presents a brief biography of Dick King-Smith. Born on March 27, 1922 and raised in Gloucestershire, England, he grew up with animals of all kinds. King-Smith was a farmer for twenty years and then became a school teacher. He was also a soldier during wartime, a traveling salesman, shoe factory worker, and television presenter. He…

Brodie, Carolyn S.

2005-01-01

181

Geochemical interpretation of Kings Mountain, North Carolina, orientation area  

Microsoft Academic Search

An orientation study has been made of uranium occurrences in the area of Kings Mountain, North Carolina. This is one of the orientation studies of known uranium occurrences that are being conducted in several geologic provinces and under various climatic (weathering) conditions to provide the technical basis for design and interpretation of NURE geochemical reconnaissance programs. The Kings Mountain area

V. Price; R. B. Ferguson

1977-01-01

182

Charles Bolden, NASA Administrator Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Service  

E-print Network

space on this special day. As a former pilot and astronaut, I have had a few out-of-this world, and their daughters, Malia and Sasha. #12;2 Like me, they are all proud children of Dr. King's sacrifice and they have raised their four children. The King children are testament to their parents' love and commitment

Waliser, Duane E.

183

Martin Luther King, Jr.: The Dream of Peaceful Revolution.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This biography for younger readers depicts the life of Martin Luther King, Jr., the Nobel Peace Prize winner who dedicated himself to the struggle for equal rights for African Americans while embracing the principle of nonviolent resistance. The book presents an overview of the civil rights movement and chronicles King's role as national leader…

Rowland, Della

184

Columbia University 1754 Royal Charter establishes King's College  

E-print Network

Columbia University FACTS 2013 1 Timeline 1754 Royal Charter establishes King's College under King George II of England. 1784 Renamed Columbia College by New York State Legislature. 1857 College moves from Park Place, near the present City Hall, to 49th and Madison. 1864 Students enter the School

Yang, Junfeng

185

The Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In celebration of one of the most foundational African American figures in history, The King Center Imaging Project has undergone an intense process of digitization to allow universal access to the lifeâÂÂs work of Martin Luther King Jr. Users can sift through a dynamic collection of one million archived documents, images, letters, notes, and speeches, presented via a convenient mosaic interface. Along with the archive, the site provides background information and a glossary for Dr. KingâÂÂs message of nonviolence. Apart from the historical value of the site, users are prompted to follow in Dr. KingâÂÂs work, submitting their own âÂÂdreamsâ for careers, human rights, and world peace. This input is collected into a growing base of nearly five-thousand âÂÂdreamsâ that can be searched via theme or geographic location, true evidence of Dr. KingâÂÂs influential humanitarian message.

186

Counties with Established Counties without Established  

E-print Network

Counties with Established Burn Bans Counties without Established Burn Bans Outdoor Burn Bans For More Information Please Contact Your Local County Judge's Office or County Website Email updates to: burnban@tfs.tamu.edu Link to see if your county is under a RED FLAG WARNING

187

Rev. Bernice A. King Minister, Lawyer, Author, Civil Rights Activist, Daughter of Coretta Scott King and Dr. Martin Luther  

E-print Network

, securing a foundation of hope, and serving a God who is able. Rev. Bernice A. King Bernice A. King on television shows such as Oprah, Rolanda, Late Night with Tom Snyder, Eye-to-Eye with Connie Chung, and a live helping us see what issues need to be addressed through nonviolent social change in the world today. She

188

Estimation of Nearshore Waves from Buoy Directional Spectra using SWAN  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An inverse modeling study has been conducted for North Carolina's Onslow Bay with a goal of using wave directional spectra from nearshore buoys to estimate offshore boundary conditions for SWAN model computations. The computational domain extended 300 km alongshore, encompassing the bay and adjacent capes, and roughly 120 km offshore, to just beyond the shelf break; the time period examined was the month of May 2012. The spatial grid spacing was 500m, while 48 directions (7.5 degree resolution) and 50 frequencies were used. Wave directional spectra were obtained hourly from waverider buoys moored in 12-16m of water, accessed via the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC buoys 41109 and 41110). Using a strong constraint variational approach, a spatially uniform incident spectrum was estimated for a given observation time, assuming stationary conditions. The estimation algorithm used an analytical adjoint solved in discrete form using a modified version of the SWAN code. Wave directional spectrum data were used directly in the form of the five directional Fourier series coefficients for each frequency component, as computed by NDBC. Results to be presented are based on estimates using 12 directional spectrum observations per day on 2 days per week during May 2012 (96 total cases). During that time, the significant wave height varied from 0.5-2m, the dominant wave period varied from 5-12s and the wave direction varied +/-40 degrees from cross-shore, representing a broad range of conditions. At the locations of the observations used in the algorithm, the computed wave spectra had RMS errors of 0.10m, 1.1s, and 16 degrees for wave height, period, and direction, respectively. Comparison to independent data from an NDBC discus buoy (41036) moored in 30m of water yields RMS errors of 0.23m, 1.3 s, and 26 degrees, respectively. Comparison of our estimated offshore boundary spectra to those from the US Navy Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center (FNMOC) global operational Wavewatch 3 shows RMS differences in wave height and direction comparable to the observed errors in our estimates; however, the FNMOC wave periods were biased 2.2 seconds low for the time period examined.

Walker, D. T.; Masarik, M.; Almeida, T. G.

2012-12-01

189

Detecting Land-based Signals in the Near-shore Zone of Lake Erie During Summer 2009  

EPA Science Inventory

We conducted two styles of nearshore surveys in Lake Erie during August to mid-September 2009. The first used a spatially-balanced probability survey (SBS) design to establish discrete stations within a GIS-defined target populationthe nearshore zone extending approximately 5 km...

190

Seasonal Variation in Fish Assemblage Structure and Habitat Structure in the Nearshore Littoral Zone of Wisconsin Lakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

To evaluate whether fish abundance, fish habitat, and fish-habitat associations vary across seasons in nearshore littoral zones of five northern Wisconsin lakes, we assessed fish abundances and quantified habitat characteristics in littoral zones across three seasons (spring, summer, and fall) during 1996. Seasonal responses of the fish community in the nearshore littoral zone were taxa specific and guild specific. In

Gene R. Hatzenbeler; Michael A. Bozek; Martin J. Jennings; Edward E. Emmons

2000-01-01

191

Seasonal Variation in Fish Assemblage Structure and Habitat Structure in the Nearshore Littoral Zone of Wisconsin Lakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

To evaluate whether fish abundance, fish habitat, and fish–habitat associations vary across seasons in nearshore littoral zones of five northern Wisconsin lakes, we assessed fish abundances and quantified habitat characteristics in littoral zones across three seasons (spring, summer, and fall) during 1996. Seasonal responses of the fish community in the nearshore littoral zone were taxa specific and guild specific. In

Gene R. Hatzenbeler; Michael A. Bozek; Martin J. Jennings; Edward E. Emmons

2000-01-01

192

Gout: no longer the disease of kings.  

PubMed

Once described as the disease of kings, gout has developed a much greater incidence and prevalence. The incidence of gout is on the rise predominantly in the elderly. There appears to be a greater risk of developing gout with hyperuricemia, hypertension, and renal disease. High fructose drinks, red meat, organ meats, fatty seafood, and beer or liquor also appear to increase the risk of developing gout. Gout can lead to inflammation and damage to cartilage, bone, bursa, tendons, heart, or kidneys. Patients with gout will have many years of asymptomatic hyperuricemia followed by episodes of acute gouty inflammation and asymptomatic periods. Some people with gout will progress to chronic gout with tophi deposits, pain, deformity, and bone and cartilage destruction. PMID:21934587

Zychowicz, Michael E

2011-01-01

193

76 FR 20087 - CSX Transportation, Inc.-Discontinuance of Service Exemption-in Pinellas County, Fla.  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...milepost ARE 897.55 near 16th Street North and milepost ARE 898.00 at the junction of 1st Avenue South and Dr. Martin Luther King Street in St. Petersburg, Pinellas County, Fla. The line traverses United States Postal Service Zip Code...

2011-04-11

194

Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the Brevard County, Florida Mid-  

E-print Network

) and Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) by Battelle 505 King Avenue Columbus, OH 46201 Integrated General Re-evaluation Report (GRR) and Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS, Florida. In the Feasibility Report with the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Brevard County

US Army Corps of Engineers

195

Oil & War: Revisiting M. King Hubbert's predictions.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oil is, unlike almost any other natural resource on earth, not only finite but also irreversibly consumed. At the same time worldwide data shows that at least at present and for the foreseeable future oil consumption rate is directly proportional to the national standard of living. In 1956 and again in 1962, M. King Hubbert predicted, using a simple model based on the logistic equation, that oil production in the lower 48 United States will follow a bell shaped curve with a production peak around the year 1971 and a production level of ~ 3 billion barrels per year, followed by a rapid decline. While his model approach was ridiculed at the time production data to date reveals a remarkable agreement with this prediction: US oil production did peak in 1971 at a level of 3.2.10 barrels a day and has been declining ever since. M. King Hubbert similarly estimated also the future of oil production worldwide - predicting peak production sometime between 1995-2010 (now!) at a level of 25 to 35 billion barrels per year. Current worldwide production is ~ 27 billion barrels per year. Thus because about half of the oil in earth has already been discovered, the world is destined to face more and bigger conflicts over the control of global supplies. Although many economists and political scientists tend to dismiss the significance of Hubbert's thinking about the finiteness of recoverable oil as well as the consequent implications, it appears that without careful management these conflicts could turn into wars much bigger than in Kuwait in 1991 or in Iraq in 2003. It is therefore imperative for us as earth scientist to try to educate the public and our leaders about the basic geological reality of finite fossil energy resources, and the serious consequences of this fact.

Nur, A. M.

2003-12-01

196

20th Anniversary of the Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration at UNH featuring Nikki Giovanni  

E-print Network

the life, work, service, and sacrifice of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. This anniversary's musical tribute to Dr. King, a piece first performed for Coretta Scott King in 1997; to the lyrical only be articulated by the inaudible language of the heart." Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. #12;Events

New Hampshire, University of

197

Black Swans, Dragons-Kings and Prediction Black Swan (Cygnus atratus)  

E-print Network

Black Swans, Dragons-Kings and Prediction Black Swan (Cygnus atratus) www.er.ethz.ch Didier;12 2008 FINANCIAL CRISIS #12;Crises are not but "Dragon-kings" Dragon-king hypothesis #12;Black Swan story strategy · Weak versus global signals Dragon-king hypothesis Michael Mandelhttp

198

BBR -Bristol Bay red king crab BSS -Bering Sea snow crab (C. opilio)  

E-print Network

BBR - Bristol Bay red king crab BSS - Bering Sea snow crab (C. opilio) EBT - Eastern Bearing Sea Tanner crab (C. bairdi) WBT - Western Bearing Sea Tanner crab (C. bairdi) PIK - Pribilof Islands red/blue king crab SMB - St. Matthew blue king crab EAG - Eastern Aleutian Islands golden king crab WAG

199

BBR -Bristol Bay red king crab BSS -Bering Sea snow crab (C. opilio)  

E-print Network

BBR - Bristol Bay red king crab BSS - Bering Sea snow crab (C. opilio) EBT - Eastern Bering Sea Tanner crab (C. bairdi) WBT - Western Bering Sea Tanner crab (C. bairdi) PIK - Pribilof Islands red/blue king crab SMB - St. Matthew blue king crab EAG - Eastern Aleutian Islands golden king crab WAG

200

23 11 4 16:3017:30 Prof. Stephen M. King  

E-print Network

COE 23 11 4 16:3017:30 2 4 Prof. Stephen M. King Department of Molecular, Microbial regulatory input onto outer arm dynein. [1] King. SM (2010) Axonemal dyneins winch the cilium. Nat Struct Mol Biol. 17(6):673-4. [2] Patel-King RS, King SM. (2009) An outer arm dynein light chain acts

Miyashita, Yasushi

201

Bathymetry correction using an adjoint component of a coupled nearshore1 wave-circulation model2  

E-print Network

with an alongshore varying bar, the22 adjoint wave model contribution was mainly to determine the cross-shore applications, including wave and circulation forecasting and beach erosion monitoring. In33 response to storms1 Bathymetry correction using an adjoint component of a coupled nearshore1 wave-circulation model2

Kurapov, Alexander

202

Nearshore wave-induced cyclical flexing of sea cliffs Peter N. Adams  

E-print Network

along tectonically active coastal land- scapes are the product of wave-induced erosion. Rock uplift, we have yet to fully understand the processes by which waves impart their energy to the shore and howNearshore wave-induced cyclical flexing of sea cliffs Peter N. Adams Department of Earth Sciences

203

Unionid mussels from nearshore zones of Lake Erie Todd D. Crail a,  

E-print Network

Notes Unionid mussels from nearshore zones of Lake Erie Todd D. Crail a, , Robert A. Krebs b Communicated by David Barton Index words: Unionidae Dreissena Refugia Seiche Great Lakes Lake Erie Concern exists that the introduction of dreissenid mussels following long-term effects of pollution may have

Toledo, University of

204

Establishment of two invasive crustaceans (Copepoda: Harpacticoida) in the nearshore sands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Benthic copepods (Copepoda: Harpacticoida) in the nearshore sediments of southern Lake Michigan appear to be dominated by two new invasive species. We report the first occurrence in North America of Schizopera borutzkyi Montschenko, a native to the Danube River delta, and Heteropsyllus nr. nunni, likely a new species that is morphologi- cally similar to the marine species Heteropsyllus nunni and

Thomas G. Horvath; Richard L. Whitman; Laurel L. Last

205

Fate and effects of drilling fluid and cutting discharges in shallow, nearshore waters  

SciTech Connect

The relationships between selected environmental parameters (sedimentology, trace metals, and hydrocarbons) and macroinfaunal assemblages were studied to determine the fate and effects of drilling fluid and cutting discharges from a multiple well site in a shallow nearshore environment. Results are presented.

Not Available

1989-01-01

206

Application of remote sensing to study nearshore circulation. [and the continental shelf  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The research to use remote sensing techniques for studying the continental shelf is reported. The studies reported include: (1) nearshore circulation in the vincinity of a natural tidal inlet; (2) identification of indicators of biological activity; (3) remote navigation system for tracking free drifting buoys; (4) experimental design of an estuaring tidal circulation; and (5) Skylab support work.

Zeigler, J.; Lobecker, R.; Stauble, D.; Welch, C.; Haas, L.; Fang, C. S.

1974-01-01

207

Nearshore Habitat and Fish Community Associations of Coaster Brook Trout in Isle Royale, Lake Superior  

Microsoft Academic Search

We characterized the nearshore habitat and fish community composition of approximately 300 km of shoreline within and adjacent to the major embayments of Isle Royale, Lake Superior. Sampling yielded 17 species, of which 12 were widespread and represented a common element of the Lake Superior fish community, including cisco Coregonus artedi, lake whitefish C. clupeaformis, round whitefish Prosopium cylindraceum, lake

Owen T. Gorman; Seth A. Moore; Andrew J. Carlson; Henry R. Quinlan

2008-01-01

208

Characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter in the nearshore waters of the western Taiwan Strait  

E-print Network

Characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter in the nearshore waters of the western 2010 Keywords: CDOM absorption coefficient fluorescence remote sensing coastal waters Western Taiwan Strait a b s t r a c t Absorption and fluorescence of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM

Meyers, Steven D.

209

Arsenic Occurrence and Species in Near-Shore Macroalgae-Feeding  

E-print Network

Arsenic Occurrence and Species in Near-Shore Macroalgae-Feeding Marine Animals J . K I R B Y of arsenic species and their pathways of formation in marine animals: fish (Odax cyanomelas), abalone these arsenic species, are to some degree accumulated directly from their diets without degradation

Canberra, University of

210

Analysis of near-shore sea surface temperatures in the Northern Pacific  

EPA Science Inventory

Recent studies report a warming trend in Pacific Ocean temperatures over the last 50 years. However, much less is known about temperature change in the near-coastal environment, which is particularly sensitive to climatic change. In near-shore regions in situ sea surface temper...

211

Great Lakes Beach Recreational Water-Quality Decisionmaking Nearshore Health and Watershed Protection Projects  

E-print Network

Great Lakes Beach Recreational Water-Quality Decisionmaking Nearshore Health and Watershed Protection Projects for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Research by USGS scientists has been of the 500 beaches along 11,000 miles of coastline in the Great Lakes. As they broaden the understanding

212

Nearshore wind power—Protected seascapes, environmentalists’ attitudes, and the technocratic planning perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

In contested wind farm developments, the dominant issue concerns scenic impact and the landscape at the proposed site. The number of large wind power schemes that have failed is growing. The case analysed here is a near-shore wind farm in the Dutch part of the Wadden Sea, in 2001 the largest wind project (278MW) ever proposed in the Netherlands. The

Maarten Wolsink

2010-01-01

213

Wave-Induced Mass Transport Affects Daily Escherichia coli Fluctuations in Nearshore Water  

E-print Network

of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) is critical to understanding and predicting microbial water quality: Characterization of diel variability of fecal indicator bacteria concentration in nearshore waters is of particular increase in Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentration in beach water, previously observed at marine sites

214

Optics, Acoustics, and Stress in a Nearshore Bottom Nepheloid Layer Emmanuel Boss  

E-print Network

Optics, Acoustics, and Stress in a Nearshore Bottom Nepheloid Layer Emmanuel Boss School of Marine stresses and how this packaging of sediment affects optical and acoustical properties in the water column and acoustical properties of the water column. 3. Develop models describing the associations between particle

Boss, Emmanuel S.

215

Optics, Acoustics, and Stress in a Nearshore Bottom Nepheloid Layer Emmanuel Boss  

E-print Network

Optics, Acoustics, and Stress in a Nearshore Bottom Nepheloid Layer Emmanuel Boss School of Marine dynamics on the distribution of particles in the bottom boundary layer; · Understand how the properties depth of 15 m as part of the Coupled Boundary Layers and Air-Sea Transfer (CBLAST) program, sponsored

Boss, Emmanuel S.

216

Optics, Acoustics, and Stress in a Nearshore Bottom Nepheloid Layer Emmanuel Boss  

E-print Network

Optics, Acoustics, and Stress in a Nearshore Bottom Nepheloid Layer Emmanuel Boss School of Marine the effects of aggregation dynamics on the size distribution of particles in the bottom boundary layer; 2 in the bottom boundary layer. The #12;instrumentation is mounted on bottom tripods and includes a 9-wavelength

Boss, Emmanuel S.

217

Tracking Changes in Coastal and Nearshore Morphology in the Southern Beaufort Sea Using Synthetic Aperture Radar  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nearshore morphology in the Mackenzie Delta region of the Beaufort Sea is poorly known because much of the region is very shallow (5 m has occurred. The BFI imagery suggests that there is sufficient room beneath the sea ice cover to permit river discharge to reach the shelf without requiring extensive networks of sub- ice channels. The distribution of bottomfast

S. M. Solomon; P. Fraser; D. Whalen

2007-01-01

218

NEARSHORE-OFFSHORE PATTERNS IN FOOD WEB CHARACTERISTICS IN LAKE SUPERIOR  

EPA Science Inventory

We are exploring the use of food web properties to characterize nearshore and offshore habitats in the Great lakes. We analyzed the stable isotope signatures of benthos (predominantly Diporeia hoyi) and plankton from Lake Superior habitats ranging from 20m to 300m depth......

219

Horizontal spatial and temporal distribution patterns of nearshore larval fish assemblages at a temperate rocky shore  

E-print Network

Horizontal spatial and temporal distribution patterns of nearshore larval fish assemblages distribution patterns of larval fish assemblages and their temporal dynamics near a rocky reef at depths shallower than 13 m (inshore) and at two miles (3.70 km) from shore (offshore), as well as along transects

Borges, Rita

220

Horizontal spatial and temporal distribution patterns of nearshore larval fish assemblages at a temperate rocky shore  

Microsoft Academic Search

There have been no previous studies of the composition of nearshore larval fish assemblages along the coast of Portugal. We aimed to describe the composition and horizontal distribution patterns of larval fish assemblages and their temporal dynamics near a rocky reef at depths shallower than 13m (inshore) and at two miles (3.70km) from shore (offshore), as well as along transects

Rita Borges; Radhouan Ben-Hamadou; M. Alexandra Chícharo; Pedro Ré; Emanuel J. Gonçalves

2007-01-01

221

TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL PATTERNS OF NEARSHORE DISTRIBUTION AND ABUNDANCE OF THE PELAGIC FISHES  

E-print Network

TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL PATTERNS OF NEARSHORE DISTRIBUTION AND ABUNDANCE OF THE PELAGIC FISHES OFF SAN). These sources have provided general information on com- position, distribution, and behavior of the offshore pattern exhibited by the common species in the assemblage involved a marked shift in depth over adiel

222

KING FAHAD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM AND MIERALS ELECTRICAL ENGENEERING DEPARTMENT  

E-print Network

1 KING FAHAD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM AND MIERALS ELECTRICAL ENGENEERING DEPARTMENT Summer Training Report In Saudi Electricity Company Done for: Dr. Ahmad Masoud Done by: Shabnan Al-Dossari ID # 263518

Al-Ghadhban, Samir

223

Dragon-kings: mechanisms, statistical methods and empirical evidence  

E-print Network

This introductory article presents the special Discussion and Debate volume "From black swans to dragon-kings, is there life beyond power laws?" published in Eur. Phys. J. Special Topics in May 2012. We summarize and put in perspective the contributions into three main themes: (i) mechanisms for dragon-kings, (ii) detection of dragon-kings and statistical tests and (iii) empirical evidence in a large variety of natural and social systems. Overall, we are pleased to witness significant advances both in the introduction and clarification of underlying mechanisms and in the development of novel efficient tests that demonstrate clear evidence for the presence of dragon-kings in many systems. However, this positive view should be balanced by the fact that this remains a very delicate and difficult field, if only due to the scarcity of data as well as the extraordinary important implications with respect to hazard assessment, risk control and predictability.

Sornette, D; 10.1140/epjst/e2012-01559-5

2012-01-01

224

Dragon-Kings, Black Swans and the Prediction of Crises  

E-print Network

We develop the concept of ``dragon-kings'' corresponding to meaningful outliers, which are found to coexist with power laws in the distributions of event sizes under a broad range of conditions in a large variety of systems. These dragon-kings reveal the existence of mechanisms of self-organization that are not apparent otherwise from the distribution of their smaller siblings. We present a generic phase diagram to explain the generation of dragon-kings and document their presence in six different examples (distribution of city sizes, distribution of acoustic emissions associated with material failure, distribution of velocity increments in hydrodynamic turbulence, distribution of financial drawdowns, distribution of the energies of epileptic seizures in humans and in model animals, distribution of the earthquake energies). We emphasize the importance of understanding dragon-kings as being often associated with a neighborhood of what can be called equivalently a phase transition, a bifurcation, a catastrophe ...

Sornette, Didier

2009-01-01

225

Christ the King Episcopal Church Endowed Scholarship Fund  

E-print Network

: ________________________________________________________ _____________________________________ Telephone: ( ) ________________ E-Mail_________________ City State Zip Code EDUCATIONAL INFORMATION Are you the Christ the King Episcopal Church Endowed Scholarship at UCF. Finaid.ucf.edu UCF Television Friend

Van Stryland, Eric

226

76 FR 3819 - Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2011  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...united people of all backgrounds in a noble quest for freedom and basic civil rights. Inspired by Dr. King's legacy, brave souls have marched fearlessly, organized relentlessly, and devoted their lives to the unending task of perfecting our Union....

2011-01-20

227

75 FR 3839 - Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2010  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...marred by division and injustice, the movement he built...promise of economic and social justice because we stand...opportunity by correcting social injustice, breaking the cycle...let us ask ourselves what Dr. King believed...

2010-01-22

228

Mental disorder that afflicted King David the Great.  

PubMed

This research uses the tools of modern medical science to study ancient descriptions of the symptoms suffered by King David. Biblical texts were examined, with a close study of verses relating to the mental disorder that afflicted King David, the second and greatest King of Israel, who ruled more than 3525 years ago. We include no commentaries, but refer only to the words of the Bible exactly as written. Evaluation of the passages referring to King David indicated that he was afflicted by some mental disorder, and among the many possibilities major depression, dysthymia and minor depression are the most likely. Of these diagnoses, major depression seems the most acceptable. This report suggests that the roots of contemporary psychiatry can be traced back to Biblical times. PMID:15628039

Ben-Noun, Liubov

2004-12-01

229

SUMMER TRAINING REPORT KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM &  

E-print Network

SUMMER TRAINING REPORT KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM & MINERALS COLLEGE OF SCIENCE ENGINEERING ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT Summer Training Report by Ahmed ALgahtani 200651040 Advisor Dr. Ahmed Yamani #12;SUMMER TRAINING REPORT INTRODUCTION: The college of science engineering gives a chance

Al-Ghadhban, Samir

230

KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM AND MINERALS DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS  

E-print Network

-requisite: MATH 102 3) Textbook: "Fundamentals of Physics", by Halliday, Resnick and Walker, Eighth Edition, JohnKING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM AND MINERALS DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 102 - General Physics

Mekki, Abdelkarim

231

JANUARY 2007 MINNESOTA COUNTIES 5 helps counties  

E-print Network

JANUARY 2007 MINNESOTA COUNTIES 5 Extension workshop helps counties communicate their contributions to the common good By Laura Kalambokidis and Ryan Pesch County government service providers can readily provide services. While participants who directly benefit from county programs are a source of crucial political

Amin, S. Massoud

232

Making Sense of the Senseless: The Murder of Lawrence King  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On Feb. 12, 2008, 15-year-old Lawrence King was shot twice in the head in front of other students, in Oxnard, California. When Larry King was murdered allegedly due to a classmate's prejudice, some pundits asked if adults were to blame for encouraging him to come out. One can't be sure what adults did or didn't do in this case, but the question…

Reis, Beth

2008-01-01

233

Efficiency Tools In The Speeches Of Martin Luther King, Jr  

Microsoft Academic Search

This thesis represents the results of a computer-aided analysis of aspects of speeches of the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. Specifically, the analysis has investigated the occurrence of indicators of the efficiency function--tools facilitating the comprehension of a discourse by a hearer or reader--in four speeches of Dr. King.Contrary to the expectations of many who anticipate complex grammatical structures in

M. Cassandra Foster Smith

1980-01-01

234

Washington County Kit Carson County Phillips County Yuma County Sedgwick County 181 Birch Ave 251 16th  

E-print Network

Washington County Kit Carson County Phillips County Yuma County Sedgwick County 181 Birch Ave 251://goldenplains.colostate.edu Colorado State University, U.S. Department of Agriculture and Kit Carson, Phillips, Sedgwick, Washington Edgar at 970-522-3200, extension 276. Golden Plains Area Washington County #12;

235

National Association of Counties  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With 3066 U.S. counties, the National Association of Counties (NACo) has the arduous task of making sure the nations counties are acknowledged and understood in the halls of the White House and Congress. NACo, the only national government organization devoted to highlighting and improving the understanding of county issues, "collects, researches, publishes and disseminates a variety of different information for, on and about counties." On their Web site, viewers have access to a comprehensive and in-depth database of county information including county population; census bureau quick facts; elected county officials; county codes and ordinances; county policies; links to Capitolimpact.com, which provides nationwide county statistics such as economic and demographic data; and much more. This site is easily navigable, has counties arranged alphabetically by state, and would be of value to anyone living inside a county domain --- which is just about everyone.

2002-01-01

236

Photometric study of distant open clusters in the second quadrant: NGC 7245, King 9, King 13 and IC 166  

E-print Network

We present a UBV CCD photometric study of four open clusters, NGC 7245, King 9, IC 166 and King 13, located between $l = 90^o - 135^o$. All are embedded in a rich galactic field. NGC 7245 and King 9 are close together in the sky and have similar reddenings. The distances and ages are: NGC 7245, 3.8$\\pm$0.35 kpc and 400 Myr; King 9 (the most distant cluster in this quadrant) 7.9$\\pm$1.1 kpc and 3.0 Gyr. King 13 is 3.1$\\pm$0.3 kpc distant and 300 Myr old. King 9 and IC 166 (4.8$\\pm$0.5 kpc distant & 1 Gyr old) may be metal poor clusters (Z=0.008), as estimated from isochrone fitting. The average value of the distance of young clusters from the galactic plane in the above longitude range and beyond 2 kpc ($-47\\pm$16 pc, for 64 clusters), indicates that the young disk bends towards the southern latitudes.

Annapurni Subramaniam; Bhuwan Chandra Bhatt

2007-03-05

237

Correlation of Sub-Aerial Beach Change with Numerical Model Derived Nearshore Wave Conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wave-induced sediment transport on and off of beaches is difficult to understand and predict without thorough knowledge of the nearshore wave conditions. Wave data is commonly provided by a buoy located offshore in deep water that measures waves prior to shoaling and refraction. Irregular bathymetry causes dissimilar refraction and shoaling and can lead to variable wave conditions in the nearshore environment. To account for wave propagation over varying bathymetry, numerical wave models are good tools for estimating the nearshore wave climate from offshore wave data. Ocean Beach in San Francisco, CA is an energetic, intermediately sloping beach that was the subject of frequent sub-aerial topographic surveys in 2005 and 2006, with some surveys being as close as two days apart. Sediment volume change derived from these surveys was correlated to nearshore wave heights estimated from offshore buoy measurements and the application of the numerical wave model SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore). The SWAN model was used to create a "look-up" table of nearshore wave heights from over 4500 combinations of offshore wave heights, periods, and directions. The model was run using a nested grid scheme using three separate spatial resolutions, with the finest being closest to shore. Correlations between the sub-aerial beach volume data at five morphologically different reaches of Ocean Beach and the SWAN derived wave heights from just outside of the surf zone (in 5, 7.5, or 10 m of water depending on wave height) are generally low, with R2 values less than 0.5, with the highest being 0.61. Although the coefficients of determination are low in most instances the significance exceeds 90%. The reason for the low coefficients of determination is not known but is currently being investigated; some possible reasons are improper characterization of the lengthy time series of wave data between surveys (up to 28 days), or the ignored effect of strong along-shore directed tidal currents (O(~1m/s)) on breaking waves in the surf zone.

Hansen, J. E.; Erikson, L.; Barnard, P. L.; Eshleman, J. L.

2007-12-01

238

C. Judson King of UC Berkeley  

SciTech Connect

In the middle of the UC Berkeley campus, next to the Main Library, South Hall is the last surviving building from the original campus, founded about 135 years ago. A tiny tree-shaded appendix to this venerated classical building houses Berkeley's Center for Studies in Higher Education, directed by C. Judson King, former Provost and Senior Vice President--Academic Affairs of the ten-campus University of California and long-time Professor of Chemical Engineering at Berkeley. Jud came to Berkeley in 1963 as assistant professor of chemical engineering, following receipt of a doctor's degree from MIT and a subsequent short appointment as director of the MIT chemical engineering practice school station at what was then Esso (now Exxon) in New Jersey. His undergraduate degree is from Yale. Starting with his MIT doctoral dissertation on gas absorption, Jud has devoted much of his professional career to separation processes. His teaching and research activities have been primarily concerned with separation of mixtures with emphasis on liquid-liquid extraction and drying. As a consultant to Procter and Gamble, he contributed to the technology of making instant coffee. His life-long activities in hiking and camping stimulated Jud's interest in the manufacture of freeze-dried foods (e.g. turkey meat) to minimize the weight of his hiking back-pack. Jud is internationally known not only for his many research publications but even more, for his acclaimed textbook ''Separation Processses'' (McGraw-Hill, second edition 1980) that is used in standard chemical engineering courses in the US and abroad.

Prausnitz, John

2005-06-01

239

Multi-Dimensional Error Analysis of Nearshore Wave Modeling Tools, with Application Toward Data-Driven Boundary Correction  

E-print Network

As the forecasting models become more sophisticated in their physics and possible depictions of the nearshore hydrodynamics, they also become increasingly sensitive to errors in the inputs. These input errors include: mis-specification of the input...

Jiang, Boyang

2012-02-14

240

Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains Near-shore wave dynamics Conclusions Tsunamis and ocean waves  

E-print Network

Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains Near-shore wave dynamics Conclusions Tsunamis and ocean waves Walter Craig Department of Mathematics & Statistics AAAS waves #12;Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains Near

Craig, Walter

241

Diel variation in near-shore great lakes fish assemblages and implications for assessment sampling and coastal management  

USGS Publications Warehouse

I compared fish assemblages captured in three different microhabitats (shoreline, pelagic near-shore, and benthic near-shore) during day and night fishing in different protection (inside bay or tributary vs. outside in Lake Ontario proper) and turbidity regimes of four near-shore areas of Lake Ontario. The effects of diel movement and availability to gear were clearly evident. Fish assemblages were consistently and significantly more diverse at night than during the day, with nighttime assemblages often being supersets of daytime assemblages. Evidence for a turbidity effect was much weaker than the effects of nocturnal movements and changes in availability to the gear associated with darkness. Nighttime sampling is more likely to capture the full array of species in near-shore areas of the Great Lakes than daytime sampling.

McKenna, J.E., Jr.

2008-01-01

242

Geologic control in the nearshore: shore-oblique sandbars and shoreline erosional hotspots, Mid-Atlantic Bight, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Beach and nearshore morphology, defined primarily by slope and sandbar development, is very dynamic and is largely controlled by waves, currents and regional sediment characteristics. Results presented here challenge this long-established concept and suggest that underlying, framework geology may also exert a first-order control on nearshore morphology by influencing the stability and\\/or persistent re-establishment of large-scale sandbar morphology and position

Jesse E. McNinch

2004-01-01

243

Rare earth elements in the pore waters of reducing nearshore sediments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The REE are mobile during early diagenesis in reducing nearshore sediments of Buzzards Bay leading to greatly enhanced concentrations in pore waters, e.g. 815 pmol kg-1 Nd and 1910 pmol kg-1 Ce within 30 cm of the sediment-seawater interface, about 10-50 times local seawater values. Two principal diagenetic reactions have been identified. Preferential Ce enrichment (positive Ce anomalies) and preferential

H. Elderfield; E. R. Sholkovitz

1987-01-01

244

Nearshore Fish Distributions in an Alaskan Estuary in Relation to Stratification, Temperature and Salinity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fish were sampled with beach seines and small-meshed beam trawls in nearshore (<1km) and shallow (<25m) habitats on the southern coast of Kachemak Bay, Cook Inlet, Alaska, from June to August, 1996–1998. Fish distributions among habitats were analysed for species composition, catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) and frequency of occurrence. Two oceanographically distinct areas of Kachemak Bay were sampled and compared: the Outer

A. A. Abookire; J. F. Piatt; M. D. Robards

2000-01-01

245

Establishment of two invasive crustaceans (Copepoda: Harpacticoida) in the nearshore sands of Lake Michigan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract: Benthic copepods,(Copepoda: Harpacticoida) in the nearshore sediments,of southern Lake Michigan appear to be dominated,by two new,invasive species. We report the first occurrence in North America of Schizopera borutzkyi Montschenko, a native to the Danube River delta, and Heteropsyllus nr. nunni, likely a new species that is morphologi- cally similar to the marine species Heteropsyllus nunni and represents the first

Thomas G. Horvath; Richard L. Whitman; Laurel L. Last

246

Air-Sea Particle Exchange at a NearShore Oceanic Site  

Microsoft Academic Search

Field measurements of particle covariance (eddy flux) have been made at a nearshore marine location by using an active scattering aerosol spectrometer interfaced with analog signal processing. A classic interpretation of results identifies a predominant particle upflux in the diameter size range 0.2

H. Sievering; J. Eastman; J. A. Schmidt

1982-01-01

247

Vertical structure of very nearshore larval fish assemblages in a temperate rocky coast  

Microsoft Academic Search

Small-scale vertical patterns of larval distribution were studied at a very nearshore larval fish assemblage, during the spring–summer\\u000a period of several years, at two depth strata (surface and bottom) using sub-surface and bottom trawls. A total of 4,589 larvae\\u000a (2,016 from surface samples and 2,573 from bottom samples) belonging to 62 taxa included in 22 families were collected. Most\\u000a larvae

Rita Borges; Ricardo Beldade; Emanuel J. Gonçalves

2007-01-01

248

Coral bleaching: one disturbance too many for near-shore reefs of the Great Barrier Reef  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dynamic nature of coral communities can make it difficult to judge whether a reef system is resilient to the current disturbance\\u000a regime. To address this question of resilience for near-shore coral communities of the Great Barrier Reef (Australia) a data\\u000a set consisting of 350 annual observations of benthic community change was compiled from existing monitoring data. These data\\u000a spanned

A. A. Thompson; A. M. Dolman

2010-01-01

249

Effect of surficial disturbance on exchange between groundwater and surface water in nearshore margins  

Microsoft Academic Search

Low-permeability sediments situated at or near the sediment-water interface can influence seepage in nearshore margins, particularly where wave energy or currents are minimal. Seepage meters were used to quantify flow across the sediment-water interface at two lakes where flow was from surface water to groundwater. Disturbance of the sediment bed substantially increased seepage through the sandy sediments of both lakes.

Donald O. Rosenberry; Laura Toran; Jonathan E. Nyquist

2010-01-01

250

Nearshore Satellite Data as Relative Indicators of Intertidal Organism Physiological Stress  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The physiological performance of intertidal and shallow subtidal invertebrates and algae is significantly affected by water temperature, and so the ability to measure and model onshore water temperatures is critical for ecological and biogeographic studies. Because of the localized influences of processes such as upwelling, mixing, and surface heating from solar radiation, nearshore water temperatures can differ from those measured directly offshore by buoys and satellites. It remains an open question what the magnitude of the differences in these temperatures are, and whether "large pixel" measurements can serve as an effective proxy for onshore processes, particularly when extrapolating from laboratory physiological studies to field conditions. We compared 9 years of nearshore (~10km) MODIS (Terra and Aqua overpasses) SST data against in situ measurements of water temperature conducted at two intertidal sites in central Oregon- Boiler Bay and Strawberry Hill. We collapsed data into increasingly longer temporal averages to address the correlation and absolute differences between onshore and nearshore temperatures over daily, weekly and monthly timescales. Results indicate that nearshore SST is a reasonable proxy for onshore water temperature, and that the strength of the correlation increases with decreasing temporal resolution. Correlations between differences in maxima are highest, followed by average and minima, and were lower at a site with regular upwelling. While average differences ranged from ~0.199-1.353°C, absolute differences across time scales were ~0.446-6.906°C, and were highest for cold temperatures. The results suggest that, at least at these two sites, SST can be used as a relative proxy for general trends only, especially over longer time scales.

Matzelle, A.; Helmuth, B.; Lakshmi, V.

2011-12-01

251

Seabird use of discards from a nearshore shrimp fishery in the South Atlantic Bight, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Shrimp trawling is common throughout the southeastern and Gulf of Mexico coasts of the USA and is the primary contributor\\u000a to fisheries discards in these regions. Tens of thousands of nearshore seabirds nest near shrimp trawling grounds in the USA,\\u000a but to date, there has been no assessment of the relationship between seabirds and shrimp trawlers. We examined the taxonomic

Patrick G. R. JodiceLisa; Lisa C. Wickliffe; Elena B. Sachs

252

Comparison of a Quasi-Three Dimensional and a Fully Three Dimensional Nearshore Circulation Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Early numerical models simulating nearshore circulation generally were wave-averaged and depth integrated and therefore solved in the two-dimensional horizontal plane (2DH). However, it has been shown that the depth variation of currents can lead to a momentum mixing mechanism which is an order of magnitude larger than the mixing induced by turbulence. To simulate this effect from the depth varying

K. A. Haas; J. C. Warner

2006-01-01

253

Naval submarine base Kings Bay and Bangor soil evaluations.  

SciTech Connect

This report provides soil evaluation and characterization testing for the submarine bases at Kings Bay, Georgia, and Bangor, Washington, using triaxial testing at high confining pressures with different moisture contents. In general, the samples from the Bangor and Kings Bay sites appeared to be stronger than a previously used reference soil. Assuming the samples of the material were representative of the material found at the sites, they should be adequate for use in the planned construction. Since soils can vary greatly over even a small site, a soil specification for the construction contractor would be needed to insure that soil variations found at the site would meet or exceed the requirements. A suggested specification for the Bangor and Kings Bay soils was presented based on information gathered from references plus data obtained from this study, which could be used as a basis for design by the construction contractor.

Holcomb, David Joseph; Patteson, Raymond; Wesenberg, Donald L.; Attaway, Stephen W.

2004-08-01

254

A user-friendly quantitative approach to classifying nearshore marine habitats along a heterogeneous coast  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A scheme, which can be readily used by fisheries and environmental managers and ecologists, has been developed for quantitatively classifying the different habitats found in nearshore marine waters along the heterogeneous lower west coast of Australia. Initially, 25 beach sites, representing a wide range of nearshore environments, were separated into six a priori habitat types on the basis of characteristics that could readily be observed and were likely to influence the extent to which a particular (fish) species occupies a particular habitat. Focus was thus placed on such features as the degree of exposure to wave activity and whether or not seagrass and/or reefs were present in the nearshore vicinity. Subsequently, quantitative data for 27 environmental variables, considered likely to characterise the six habitat types, were obtained for each of the 25 sites from readily accessible sources. When the latter data were subjected to multidimensional scaling (MDS) ordination, the points for the sites representing only three of those six habitat types formed discrete groups. The BVSTEP routine in the PRIMER v5.0 statistical package (Clarke & Gorley, Primer v5.0: User Manual/Tutorial, Primer-E Ltd, Plymouth, 2001) was thus used to select a subset of the 27 environmental variables that would provide a better resolution of the six a priori habitat types. This process involved matching the distance matrix constructed from the quantitative environmental data with a matrix constructed from scored data that reflected the criteria for the initial a priori classification scheme. A subset of seven environmental variables gave the best correlation between the two matrices ( ?=0.823), and thus provided the optimal set of quantitative data for discriminating between the six a priori habitat types. These variables comprised both the direct and north-westerly fetches, the minimum distance from the shoreline to the 2 m depth contour, the distance from the shoreline to the first offshore reef chain along a south-westerly transect, and the relative contributions of bare sand, subtidal reef and seagrass. Data for these characteristics at any nearshore site along the coastline can readily be recorded by managers and ecologists and subjected to the 'nearest-replicate' classification procedure developed in this study to ascertain the habitat type to which that site should be assigned. Current work is using MDS ordination, in conjunction with associated statistical tests and the BVSTEP routine, to elucidate the extent to which the compositions of assemblages of fish, benthic macroinvertebrates, meiofauna and zooplankton in nearshore waters along the lower west coast of Australia are related to habitat type(s).

Valesini, F. J.; Clarke, K. R.; Eliot, I.; Potter, I. C.

2003-05-01

255

Impact of sea-breeze activity on nearshore and foreshore processes in southwestern Australia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In coastal regions sheltered from the direct impact of swell- and storm-wave activity, locally generated wind waves, particularly those associated with strong sea-breeze activity, play a dominant role in controlling nearshore and foreshore processes. Field data collected from the Perth Metropolitan Coast (western Australia) during a typical summer sea-breeze cycle, are presented. It is demonstrated that the nearshore environment responds rapidly to an increase in wind speed (up to 12 m s -1) during the sea breeze, resulting in considerable changes to the nearshore hydrodynamics and morphology. Incident wave energy increased during the sea breeze and was associated with development of a wind-wave field with significant wave heights up to 0.9 m. Nearshore currents responded to this change in wave climate with the development of net offshore near-bed currents and a rapid increase in the mean longshore current from < 0.05 m s -1 to 1.0 m s -1 A 10-fold increase in suspended sediment concentration and a 100-fold increase in the longshore sand transport resulted from the effects of the sea-breeze system. Erosion of the beachface was coincident with the development of the wind-wave field. Sea breeze wave-driven water circulation also completely eroded beach cusps (wavelength 20-30 m), overwhelmed the rip current system associated with the beach cusps and suppressed the infra-gravity wave frequencies in the incident wave and swash record. The beach cusps reformed after the cessation of the sea breeze. It is demonstrated that the beachface is in a constant stage of adjustment to the incident wave energy through the diurnal sea-breeze cycle alternating between dissipative and reflective morphodynamic regimes. The results may be used to determine the impact of a medium-sized storm on the beachface. It is clear that the sea-breeze system plays a major role in controlling the nearshore and foreshore processes not only in this region, but also on other geographic locations where strong sea breezes are present.

Pattiaratchi, Charitha; Hegge, Bruce; Gould, John; Eliot, Ian

1997-11-01

256

Pattern and persistence of a nearshore planktonic ecosystem off Southern California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Three related data sets from a baseline environmental survey on the continental shelf at San Onofre, California, consisting of: (1) zooplankton pumped from discrete depths on transects between the 8- and 30-m contours, sampled from 1976 to 1980; (2) zooplankton from oblique net hauls on a transect from 8 to 100 m sampled at 2-week intervals for 1 y, 1978-1979; and (3) vertical profiles of temperature, nutrients and plant pigments corresponding closely in time and space to the oblique net hauls, are used to describe cross-shelf zooplankton abundance patterns, community composition, and seasonal and shorter-term variations in cross-shelf zonation and their relation to variations in physical and chemical measures. Of 15 taxa tested for multiyear average patterns, three—the copepods Acartia clausi and Oithona oculata, and barnacle larvae—had centers of abundance shoreward of the 30-m contour and near the bottom. No differences were detected in the cross-shelf pattern between San Onofre and a transect 12 km southeast. Throughout the year, nearshore and offshore assemblages were distinguishable, the change occurring at about the 30-m contour. The offshore one, represented by the copepods Calanus pacificus, Eucalanus californicus and Rhincalanus nasutus, occupied water having less chlorophyll and less near-surface nutrient, i.e. of more oceanic character. In spring and summer, most nearshore taxa shifted slightly seaward, leaving a third assemblage, characterized by a very high abundance of Acartia spp. copepodids and maximum abundances of A. clausi and O. oculata near the beach. Three upwelling episodes resulted in marked increases in chlorophyll and nutrients, but not in cross-shelf gradients of these properties, as were noted at most other times. Maximum disturbance of cross-shelf zooplankton zonation was observed during a wintertime intrusion of offshore surface water, but the zonation was never obliterated. Nearshore zooplankton patterns appear to be protected from dislocation by the shallow shelf and sustained by phytoplankton distributed in a manner peculiar to the nearshore zone. Typically, shallow nearshore waters were richer in chlorophyll and nutrients than offshore waters of the same depth. The cross-shelf chlorophyll and nutrient profiles, in turn, appear to result from increased eddy diffusion and nutrient recycling in shallow waters, perhaps augmented by longshore transport from quasi-permanent, local upwelling nodes.

Barnett, Arthur M.; Jahn, Andrew E.

1987-01-01

257

Dragon-Kings, Black-Swans and Prediction (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Extreme fluctuations or events are often associated with power law statistics. Indeed, it is a popular belief that "wild randomness'' is deeply associated with distributions with power law tails characterized by small exponents. In other words, power law tails are often seen as the epitome of extreme events (the "Black Swan'' story). Here, we document in very different systems that there is life beyond power law tails: power laws can be superseded by "dragon-kings'', monster events that occur beyond (or changing) the power law tail. Dragon-kings reveal hidden mechanisms that are only transiently active and that amplify the normal fluctuations (often described by the power laws of the normal regime). The goal of this lecture is to catalyze the interest of the community of geophysicists across all fields of geosciences so that the "invisible gorilla" fallacy may be avoided. Our own research illustrates that new statistics or representation of data are often necessary to identify dragon-kings, with strategies guided by the underlying mechanisms. Paradoxically, the monsters may be ignored or hidden by the use of inappropriate analysis or statistical tools that amount to cut a mamooth in small pieces, so as to lead to the incorrect belief that only mice exist. In order to stimulate further research, we will document and discuss the dragon-king phenomenon on the statistics of financial losses, economic geography, hydrodynamic turbulence, mechanical ruptures, avalanches in complex heterogeneous media, earthquakes, and epileptic seizures. The special status of dragon-kings open a new research program on their predictability, based on the fact that they belong to a different class of their own and express specific mechanisms amplifying the normal dynamics via positive feedbacks. We will present evidence of these claims for the predictions of material rupture, financial crashes and epileptic seizures. As a bonus, a few remarks will be offered at the end on how the dragon-king phenomenon allows us to understand the present World financial crisis as underpinned in two decades of successive financial and economic bubbles, inflating the mother of all bubbles with new monster dragon-kings at the horizon. The consequences in terms of a new "normal" are eye-opening. Ref: D. Sornette, Dragon-Kings, Black Swans and the Prediction of Crises, International Journal of Terraspace Science and Engineering 1(3), 1-17 (2009) (http://arXiv.org/abs/0907.4290) and (http://ssrn.com/abstract=1470006)

Sornette, D.

2010-12-01

258

77 FR 34798 - Safety Zone; USMMA Fireworks, Long Island Sound, Kings Point, NY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Safety Zone; USMMA Fireworks, Long Island Sound, Kings Point, NY AGENCY...zone on the navigable waters of Long Island Sound in the vicinity of Kings Point...all vessels from a portion of Long Island Sound before, during, and...

2012-06-12

259

The king cobra genome reveals dynamic gene evolution and adaptation in the snake venom system  

E-print Network

The king cobra genome reveals dynamic gene evolution and adaptation in the snake venom system Freek. To examine venom evolution, we sequenced and interrogated the genome of a venomous snake, the king cobra

Dalang, Robert C.

260

Henry David Thoreau, Martin Luther King Jr., and the American Tradition of Protest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Maintains that Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr. fundamentally altered the tradition of protest and reform. Compares and contrasts the role of each man in U.S. social and constitutional history. Concludes that while Thoreau lacked the broad influence of King, his writings influenced both King and Mohandas Gandhi. (CFR)

Powell, Brent

1995-01-01

261

Let Freedom Ring: The Life & Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. [Lesson Plan].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This lesson plan teaches students about the life and work of Martin Luther King, Jr. Students listen to a brief biography, view photographs of the March on Washington, and read a portion of King's "I Have a Dream" speech. After studying Dr. King's use of imagery and allusion, students create original poetic phrases about freedom and illustrate…

National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.

262

Commemoration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., January 15, 1929-April 4, 1968. Revised.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developed in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., this is a short collection of suggested activities to teach black awareness in the elementary and secondary grades through King's philosophy. An introductory biographical sketch of King and an article about his accomplishments are provided. Activities are divided into grade-level ranges for the…

Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD.

263

The Inaccuracies in the Reprintings of Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" Speech.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Identifies the additions, deletions, and changes in the reprinted versions of King's classic speech. (Serves both as a warning that published speeches cannot be depended upon to preserve the original text and as a source of reference for teachers using Dr. King.s speech in classroom study.) (PD)

Bosmajian, Haig

1982-01-01

264

Portrait of a transformational leader: the legacy of Dr Martin Luther King Jr  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the leadership of Dr Martin Luther King Jr in relation to four characteristics of transformational leadership Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper draws upon excerpts from archival sources of personal correspondence and statements by Dr Martin Luther King Jr stored at the King Center, Atlanta, Georgia. Findings – The research finds that

David McGuire; Kate Hutchings

2007-01-01

265

Northwestern University Chicago Campus Martin Luther King Commemoration Art Contest Entry Form  

E-print Network

and pertain to Dr. King's statement that "Anyone can be great because anyone can serve." We encourage art work that expresses what Dr. King's legacy of service means to the artist. 6. A completed, legible entry form mustNorthwestern University Chicago Campus Martin Luther King Commemoration Art Contest Entry Form 2013

Chisholm, Rex L.

266

DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION-2013 $1,000-$2, 500 Scholarships  

E-print Network

Page | 1 DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION- 2013 $1,000-$2, 500 Scholarships Applications for the 2013 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Scholarships ("MLK Scholarships") may now be submitted society comparable to the impact of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.? The theme provides latitude for expansion

Loudon, Catherine

267

Ugiuvangmiut Quliapyuit = King Island Tales. Eskimo History and Legends from Bering Strait.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The collection of native tales from King Island, Alaska, contains tales told originally in Inupiaq Eskimo by seven native elders. Introductory sections provide background information on the storytellers, King Island Village and its people, traditional life there, and the language of the King Islanders. The 25 tales are divided into groups: "The…

Kaplan, Lawrence D., Ed.

268

UCSF School of Pharmacy and King's College London embark on international partnership  

E-print Network

UCSF School of Pharmacy and King's College London embark on international partnership March 21, 2014 The UC San Francisco School of Pharmacy and the King's College London Institute of Pharmaceutical at the UCSF School of Pharmacy · Professor Clive Page at the King's College London Institute of Pharmaceutical

Soloveichik, David

269

THE 2001 ALABAMA SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL PRODUCTIONS OF KING JOHN AND JULIUS CAESAR  

Microsoft Academic Search

n its thirtieth anniversary season, the Alabama Shakespeare Festival produced one play never before performed at the Festival, Shakespeare's King John; and Julius Caesar, last performed in 1991. King John was performed in the 250-seat Octagon Theatre, while Julius Caesar was performed in the larger 750-seat Festival Stage. While Howard Jensen of Indiana University directed King John and Kent Thompson,

Craig Barrow

270

Reading Stephen King: Issues of Censorship, Student Choice, and Popular Literature.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of essays grew out of the "Reading Stephen King Conference" held at the University of Maine in 1996. Stephen King's books have become a lightning rod for the tensions around issues of including "mass market" popular literature in middle and high school English classes and of who chooses what students read. King's fiction is among…

Power, Brenda Miller, Ed.; Wilhelm, Jeffrey D., Ed.; Chandler, Kelly, Ed.

271

AMENDMENT 7 to the Fishery Management Plan for the Commercial King and Tanner Crab Fisheries in  

E-print Network

AMENDMENT 7 to the Fishery Management Plan for the Commercial King and Tanner Crab Fisheries the MSST, MSY, OY and MSY control rule estimates for the BSAI king and Tanner crab stocks. The MSY is defined for king and Tanner crab stocks in the BSAI management area as any rate of fishing mortality

272

Making Sense of the Senseless: The Murder of Lawrence King  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When Larry King was murdered, allegedly due to a classmate's prejudice, some pundits asked if adults were to blame for encouraging him to come out. They can't be sure what adults did or didn't do, but the question remains: Should adults encourage LGBT [lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered] youth to come out? No. They shouldn't push a young…

Reis, Beth

2009-01-01

273

Population dynamics of king eiders breeding in northern Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The North American population of king eiders (Somateria spectabilis) has declined by more than 50% since the late 1970s for unknown reasons. King eiders spend most of their lives in remote areas, forcing managers to make regulatory and conservation decisions based on very little information. We incorporated available published estimates of vital rates with new estimates to build a female, stage-based matrix population model for king eiders and examine the processes underlying population dynamics of king eiders breeding at 2 sites, Teshekpuk and Kuparuk, on the coastal plain of northern Alaska and wintering around the Bering Sea (2001–2010). We predicted a decreasing population (? = 0.981, 95% CI: 0.978–0.985), and that population growth was most sensitive to changes in adult female survival (sensitivity = 0.92). Low duckling survival may be a bottleneck to productivity (variation in ducking survival accounted for 66% of retrospective variation in ?). Adult survival was high (0.94) and invariant (? = 0.0002, 95% CI: 0.0000–0.0007); however, catastrophic events could have a major impact and we need to consider how to mitigate and manage threats to adult survival. A hypothetical oil spill affecting breeding females in a primary spring staging area resulted in a severe population decline; although, transient population dynamics were relatively stable. However, if no catastrophic events occur, the more variable reproductive parameters (duckling and nest survival) may be more responsive to management actions.

Bentzen, Rebecca L.; Powell, Abby N.

2012-01-01

274

The Tragedy of Good Friday: Sacrificial Violence in King Lear  

Microsoft Academic Search

:In this article I claim that the presentation of sacrificial or persecutory violence in William Shakespeare's King Lear is heavily influenced by ambivalence in Reformation England towards acts of religious violence. I begin by arguing that the crowds attending the execution of martyrs manifested what can be understood as a Girardian sacrificial crisis, where the unifying force of the deaths

David K. Anderson

2011-01-01

275

The Tragedy of Good Friday: Sacrificial Violence in King Lear  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article I claim that the presentation of sacrificial or persecutory violence in William Shakespeare's King Lear is heavily influenced by ambivalence in Reformation England towards acts of religious violence. I begin by arguing that the crowds attending the execution of martyrs manifested what can be understood as a Girardian sacrificial crisis, where the unifying force of the deaths

David K. Anderson

2011-01-01

276

Barbara King, PhD, RN Assistant Professor  

E-print Network

to walk when they leave, too. King also studies transitions in care and the process of people being experience and the outcomes associated with variations in the quality of transitions from one facility to another, and the continuum of care. She is a former special advanced fellow at the William S. Middleton

Sheridan, Jennifer

277

Lest We Forget: Tribute to Martin Luther King, Jr.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The civil rights accomplishments and precepts of Dr. King are reviewed and parallels are drawn to the present problems of public education. It is argued that a belief such as his, in people of good will, must be reawakened to force the schools to be passionate and compassionate institutions. (Author/CM)

Lawton, Rudy

1983-01-01

278

A “City at War”: Commemorating Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study uses fantasy theme analysis to examine public discourse that emerged from a Midwestern town's attempt to commemorate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The essay examines “Letters to the Editor” to (a) reveal the fantasy themes that represent the writers' consciousness and possibly that of the larger community and (b) to discuss the themes' rhetorical implications for public memory

Beth A. Messner; Mark T. Vail

2009-01-01

279

A Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Curriculum: Playing the Dream.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses curriculum for young children centered around the beliefs and teachings of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. His works are interpreted in a human rights context in which children find their voice in the peaceable resolution of everyday conflicts. Describes the Child of the Day program. (Author/RWB)

Clemens, Sydney Gurewitz

1988-01-01

280

King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals Collage of Electrical Engineering  

E-print Network

King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals Collage of Electrical Engineering Summer Training Advisor: Dr. ALDr. ALDr. ALDr. ALAhmadi,SaadAhmadi,SaadAhmadi,SaadAhmadi,Saad Done by: Saleh Mohammad Training adviser Dr. Saad Al- Ahmadi for his valuable assistance to me in order to complete this document

Al-Ghadhban, Samir

281

Dr. Martin Luther King: A Unit for Primary Grades.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a unit consisting of 4 lessons which focus on Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s childhood, his adult life and family, his civil rights work, and the national holiday which commemorates his birthday. Each lesson features specific objectives, learning activities, and instructional guidelines for the teacher. (TRS)

Sweet, Kelli

1986-01-01

282

The King's College laboratory scanning x-ray microscope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The King's College laboratory scanning x-ray microscope has been used on the laser plasma source at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, which has been extensively characterized. Resolution and contrast in the initial images are limited by electrical noise in the detector system.

Michette, A. G.; Buckley, C. J.; Pfauntsch, S. J.; Arnot, N. R.; Wilkinson, J.; Wang, Z.; Khaleque, N. I.; Dermody, G. S.

2000-05-01

283

LEGENDS OF KING ARTHUR. LITERATURE CURRICULUM III, STUDENT VERSION.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A STUDENT VERSION OF A CURRICULUM GUIDE ON THE "LEGENDS OF KING ARTHUR" WAS DEVELOPED. SELECTED LEGENDS ARE REPRODUCED ALONG WITH AN INTRODUCTION, STUDY QUESTIONS, AND A PASSAGE FROM MALORY'S "LE MORTE D'ARTHUR" IN THE ORIGINAL LANGUAGE OF THE FIRST EDITION (1485). THE TEACHER VERSION IS ED 010 814. RELATED REPORTS ARE ED 010 129 THROUGH ED 010…

KITZHABER, ALBERT R.

284

Andrew J. King The auditory areas of the brain  

E-print Network

Andrew J. King The auditory areas of the brain are potentially responsive not only to sounds an animal's own vocalizations have on central auditory processing. While studies in a range of species have shown that activity in the auditory system is modulated during vocal production, a recent report [1] has

Oxford, University of

285

San Jos State University Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library  

E-print Network

partnership between the SJSU Library and the SJ public library has just completed its fifth year of operation joining a university and public library operates in a context of unusual organizational complexity. While José State University Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library University Library Program Review June 2009

Su, Xiao

286

GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY CLYDE JR & JOHN KING LOAN FUND  

E-print Network

GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY CLYDE JR & JOHN KING LOAN FUND PROMISSORY NOTE/STATEMENT OF RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES SSN:___________________ I, promise to pay to Georgia Institute of Technology (hereinafter called advanced to me under this loan agreement on the dates indicated: STUDENT: DO NOT WRITE IN THIS BOX UNTIL

Li, Mo

287

KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM & MINERALS Dhahran, Saudi Arabia  

E-print Network

KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM & MINERALS Dhahran, Saudi Arabia Basic Properties of Reservoir Rocks By Dr. Sidqi A. Abu-Khamsin Professor, Department of Petroleum Engineering © Copyright by Dr in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying

Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi

288

King mackerel (Scomberomorus cavalla) are large coastal pelagic  

E-print Network

Massachu- setts to Brazil in the western Atlantic Ocean, including the Caribbean Sea (Mc of Mexico (GOM) and in the Atlantic Ocean (Atlantic) off the southeastern United States. King mackerel) and Atlantic Ocean (Atlantic). Separate migra- tory groups, or stocks, migrate from eastern GOM

289

Department of Electrical Engineering King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals  

E-print Network

1 Department of Electrical Engineering King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals EE399 Summer to spend 8 weeks of training in any of the field of the electrical engineering this report will represent of the field of the electrical engineering. The training has a lot of objective such as enhance the group work

Al-Ghadhban, Samir

290

Publication List for Carey W. King November 17, 2013  

E-print Network

@mail.utexas.edu careyking.com Ph: (512) 471-5468 Books 2014: King, Carey W. (ed.) (2014 ­ in press) Thermal Power Plant as of November, 2013: Google Scholar) --- Referenced in The Economist, April 21-27, 2012, Buttonwood: "Feeling to reduce emissions and water use at power plants in the Texas grid. Environmental Research Letters, 6

Yang, Zong-Liang

291

Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections in King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) can cause infections in both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and HIV-noninfected patients. The incidence of NTM infections has been increasing since the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemics. However, the epidemiologic and clinical data of NTM infections in Thailand are limited. Objective: Determine the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, treatment, and outcome of NTM infections in King Chulalongkorn Memorial

Nibhondh Udomsantisook; Chusana Suankratay

292

STOMACH CONTENTS OF THE BERING SEA KING CRAB  

E-print Network

OF THE BERING SEA KING CRAB by Patsy A. McLaughlin and James F. Hebard Fishery Research Biologists Bureau for this publication is as follows: McLaughlin, Patsy A Sloniacli contents of the Bei'inp Sea kinp ci'ab, by Patsy A. McLaughlin and James F. Hebard. Washington, I^. S. Dept. of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service

293

AUGMENTED REALITY VISUALIZATION TOOL FOR KINGS STORMWATER BRIDGE  

E-print Network

AUGMENTED REALITY VISUALIZATION TOOL FOR KINGS STORMWATER BRIDGE Matthew Clothier Mike Bailey Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093-0505 ABSTRACT Augmented Reality (AR) is an emerging visualization. When such technology is made available to scientists and engineers, Augmented Reality can provide them

Bailey, Mike

294

Free workshops at King's Museum and the Special Collections Centre  

E-print Network

@abdn.ac.uk Website: www.abdn.ac.uk/kingsmuseum Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/ Kings-Museum/139642292752093: scc.learning@abdn.ac.uk Website: www.abdn.ac.uk/library/about/ special/learning-and-outreach Blog are activity packed, hands-on and designed to compliment your class topics. Bring learning to life

Levi, Ran

295

Teaching about Martin Luther King, Jr.: To What End?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues that the celebration of Martin Luther King's birthday provides an opportunity to reaffirm his principles of social justice and positive social change. Outlines a teaching-learning unit (G4-12) based on his writings and speeches. Describes materials needed; teacher preparation; objectives; concepts to be explored; skills to be developed and…

Banfield, Beryle

1985-01-01

296

University of south Carolina Martin Luther King, Jr., Day  

E-print Network

on the legal aspects of Dr. King's life and the Civil Rights Movement, and this event is open to the public in 1962 to join the civil rights movement. In 1968 he was the only person arrested as a result), Sellers decided to complete his education and fight for civil rights as an educator. He earned a master

Almor, Amit

297

Parts of Antarctica's King George Island are littered with trash  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A report released 7 February by ecologists from Germany's Friedrich Schiller University Jena reveals that parts of King George Island, a logistical hub for international research in Antarctica, are home to open pits of trash, decaying field huts, and other forms of pollution.

Kumar, Mohi

2013-02-01

298

King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals College of Engineering Science  

E-print Network

1 King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals College of Engineering Science Electrical As part of the Bachelor degree for the Science Engineering students, a summer training program for 8 weeks Engineering Department EE 399 Summer Training At Final Report Student Name: Mamdouh Al Harbi ID#: 200624160

Al-Ghadhban, Samir

299

Skull Size and Intelligence, and King Robert Bruce's IQ  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An estimate of someone's IQ is a potentially informative personal datum. This study examines the association between external skull measurements and IQ scores, and uses the resulting regression equation to provide an estimate of the IQ of King Robert I of Scotland (Robert Bruce, 1274-1329). Participants were 48 relatively healthy Caucasian men…

Deary, Ian J.; Ferguson, Karen J.; Bastin, Mark E.; Barrow, Geoffrey W. S.; Reid, Louise M.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; MacLullich, Alasdair M. J.

2007-01-01

300

King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals Electrical Engineering Department  

E-print Network

and negligible thickness of the copper conductor. Assume the filter has highest practical line impedance is 120 to implement a '50 ' device. Neglect the thickness of the copper conductor. Given: 0= 8.854e-12 unit µ0=1.2566eKing Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals Electrical Engineering Department EE-407; Exam-2 Prob

Iqbal, Sheikh Sharif

301

ContextKing: Virtual Kingdoms in Real Life  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mondial pervasive games feature the earth's surface as the game board on top of which players travel around the globe like virtual pawns in the game. ContextKing is a game that makes extensive use of sensory inputs from the real world to create a whole new game experience within a user's social network. We discuss the management and utilization of

Johan Koolwaaij; Martin Wibbels; Sebastian Böhm; Marko Luther

2009-01-01

302

KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM AND MINERALS DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS  

E-print Network

101 Textbook: "Fundamentals of Physics", by Halliday, Resnick and Walker, Eighth Edition, John WileyKING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM AND MINERALS DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 101 - General Physics: http://www.kfupm.edu.sa/phys/101 Please see the next pages for Schedule and Exam Dates #12;Physics 101

Mekki, Abdelkarim

303

KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM AND MINERALS DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS  

E-print Network

-requisite: MATH 102 3) Textbook: "Fundamentals of Physics", by Halliday, Resnick and Walker, Ninth Edition, JohnKING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM AND MINERALS DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 102 - General Physics. Please make a request to carry your previous lab score by seeing the Physics secretary within three weeks

Mekki, Abdelkarim

304

KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM AND MINERALS DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS  

E-print Network

: "Fundamentals of Physics", by Halliday, Resnick and Walker, Eighth Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc (2008KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM AND MINERALS DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 201 - General Physics and physical optics; relativity, introduction to quantum physics; atomic and molecular physics, nuclear physics

Mekki, Abdelkarim

305

Fractal and Chaotic Dynamics in Nervous Systems Chris C. King  

E-print Network

Fractal and Chaotic Dynamics in Nervous Systems Chris C. King Department of Mathematics & Statistics, University of Auckland. Abstract : This paper presents a review of fractal and chaotic dynamics distributed processing models and their relation to chaos and overviews reasons why chaotic and fractal

King, Chris

306

Evaluation of seepage from Chester Morse Lake and Masonry Pool, King County, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Hydrologic data collected in the Cedar and Snoqualmie River basins on the west slope of the Cascade Range have been analyzed to determine the amount of water lost by seepage from Chester Morse Lake and Masonry Pool and the. consequent gain by seepage to the Cedar and South Fork Snoqualmie Rivers. For water years 1957-64, average losses were about 220 cfs (cubic feet per second) while average gains were about 180 cfs in the Cedar River and 50 cfs in the South Fork Snoqualmie River. Streamflow and precipitation data for water years 1908-26 and 1930-F2 indicate that a change in runoff regimen occurred in Cedar and South Fork Snoqualmie Rivers after the Boxley Creek washout in December 1918. For water years 1919-26 and 1930-32, the flow of Cedar River near Landsburg averaged about 80 cfs less than it would have if the washout had not occurred. In contrast, the flow of South Fork Snoqualmie River at North Bend averaged about 60 cfs more than it would have.

Hidaka, F. T.; Garrett, Arthur Angus.

1967-01-01

307

AIR POLLUTION, POLLENS AND RESPIRATORY ADMISSIONS FOR CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE IN KING COUNTY. (R827355)  

EPA Science Inventory

The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

308

The environment of deposition of the Oligocene Burbank sandstone, Tulare Lake field, Kings County, California  

E-print Network

al JJ JJ cd JJ al JJ 0 C W~ I C aa 4 ac 't$ 0 ld al cd dl 5 ld ~ lie conformably under the Temblor (Lindblom, 1985). Table 1 is a stratigraphic summery of the Tulare Lake area. Previous Work Research on the Tulare Lake oil field has been... BOPD 36' API from Burbank Fm. perforations 13, 165-273 (4051-84 m) (Lindblom, 1985). By this time, Husky had already completed two additional wells, 00 A 608 X c61 oo )o 0 54-8 ~, ei ~ ~ 10 7 22 S c) 0 %&y oo %dI 18 0 677 71-17 I I...

Goulet, William Haack

2012-06-07

309

AIR POLLUTION, POLLENS, AND ADMISSIONS FOR CHRONIC RESPIRATORY DISEASE IN KING COUNTY, WASHINGTON. (R825266)  

EPA Science Inventory

The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

310

Kings County Observed Species Richness: Jamaica Bay BioBlitz 2009  

E-print Network

18 25 41 66 Plumb Beach Zone Dead Horse Bay Zone Jobs Corps Zone Grassland Zone North Forty Zone Carnarsie Pier Zone ROCKAWAY INLET SHEEPSHEAD BAY MILL BASIN PAERDEGAT BASIN EAST MILL BASIN DEAD HORSE BAY data collected in the 2009 Jamaica Bay BioBlitz on September 11th , and 12th , 2009. Observation Zones

Columbia University

311

Notes from the field: measles in a micronesian community - king county, washington, 2014.  

PubMed

Measles is a highly contagious viral disease that can lead to complications and death. The United States achieved measles elimination (interruption of continuous transmission lasting ?12 months) in 2000. Despite elimination, 592 measles cases were reported in the United States during January 1?August 22, 2014, the highest number since 1994, primarily among unvaccinated travelers and their unvaccinated contacts. Measles remains endemic outside the Western Hemisphere, with outbreaks affecting communities in the Philippines, Vietnam, and China. An ongoing measles outbreak with approximately 350 measles cases and one death in the Federated States of Micronesia during January-July 2014 also has been reported. PMID:25211546

Wendorf, Kristen

2014-09-12

312

Geologic Map of the Poverty Bay 7.5' quadrangle, King and Pierce counties, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Poverty Bay quadrangle lies near the center of the region?s intensively developing urban core. Less than 20 km north lies the city of Seattle; downtown Tacoma lies just southwest of the quadrangle. The map area expresses much of the tremendous range of Quaternary environments and deposits found throughout the central Puget Lowland. Much of the ground surface is mantled by a rolling surface of glacial till deposited during the last occupation of the Puget Lowland by a great continental ice sheet about 14,000 years ago. A complex sequence of older unconsolidated sediments extends far below sea level across most of the quadrangle, with no bedrock exposures at all.

Booth, Derek B.; Waldron, H. H.; Troost, K. G.

2004-01-01

313

Spatial pattern of current-driven hits to the nearshore from a major marine fairway in the Gulf of Finland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spatial pattern of hits to the nearshore by tracers originating in a major fairway in the Gulf of Finland and transported by surface currents is analysed based on Lagrangian trajectories of water parcels reconstructed using the TRACMASS model from three-dimensional velocity fields by the Rossby Centre circulation model RCO for 1987-1996. The probabilities for a hit to different parts of the nearshore and the ability of different sections of the fairway to serve as starting points of tracers (equivalently, certain type of nearshore pollution) have extensive seasonal variability. The potential of the fairway to impact the nearshore in this manner is roughly inversely proportional to its distance from the nearest coast. A short section of the fairway to the south of Vyborg and a segment to the west of Tallinn are the most probable starting points of tracers. The most frequently hit nearshore areas are short fragments between Hanko and Helsinki, the north-eastern coast of the gulf to the south of Vyborg, and longer segments from Tallinn to Hiiumaa on the southern coast of the gulf.

Viikmäe, Bert; Soomere, Tarmo

2014-01-01

314

Large-Scale Spatial Distribution Patterns of Echinoderms in Nearshore Rocky Habitats  

PubMed Central

This study examined echinoderm assemblages from nearshore rocky habitats for large-scale distribution patterns with specific emphasis on identifying latitudinal trends and large regional hotspots. Echinoderms were sampled from 76 globally-distributed sites within 12 ecoregions, following the standardized sampling protocol of the Census of Marine Life NaGISA project (www.nagisa.coml.org). Sample-based species richness was overall low (<1–5 species per site), with a total of 32 asteroid, 18 echinoid, 21 ophiuroid, and 15 holothuroid species. Abundance and species richness in intertidal assemblages sampled with visual methods (organisms >2 cm in 1 m2 quadrats) was highest in the Caribbean ecoregions and echinoids dominated these assemblages with an average of 5 ind m?2. In contrast, intertidal echinoderm assemblages collected from clearings of 0.0625 m2 quadrats had the highest abundance and richness in the Northeast Pacific ecoregions where asteroids and holothurians dominated with an average of 14 ind 0.0625 m?2. Distinct latitudinal trends existed for abundance and richness in intertidal assemblages with declines from peaks at high northern latitudes. No latitudinal trends were found for subtidal echinoderm assemblages with either sampling technique. Latitudinal gradients appear to be superseded by regional diversity hotspots. In these hotspots echinoderm assemblages may be driven by local and regional processes, such as overall productivity and evolutionary history. We also tested a set of 14 environmental variables (six natural and eight anthropogenic) as potential drivers of echinoderm assemblages by ecoregions. The natural variables of salinity, sea-surface temperature, chlorophyll a, and primary productivity were strongly correlated with echinoderm assemblages; the anthropogenic variables of inorganic pollution and nutrient contamination also contributed to correlations. Our results indicate that nearshore echinoderm assemblages appear to be shaped by a network of environmental and ecological processes, and by the differing responses of various echinoderm taxa, making generalizations about the patterns of nearshore rocky habitat echinoderm assemblages difficult. PMID:21079760

Iken, Katrin; Konar, Brenda; Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro; Cruz-Motta, Juan Jose; Knowlton, Ann; Pohle, Gerhard; Mead, Angela; Miloslavich, Patricia; Wong, Melisa; Trott, Thomas; Mieszkowska, Nova; Riosmena-Rodriguez, Rafael; Airoldi, Laura; Kimani, Edward; Shirayama, Yoshihisa; Fraschetti, Simonetta; Ortiz-Touzet, Manuel; Silva, Angelica

2010-01-01

315

Atmospheric NO2 dynamics and impact on ocean color retrievals in urban nearshore regions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

nearshore regions are characterized by strong variability in atmospheric composition, associated with anthropogenic emissions and meteorological processes that influence the circulation and accumulation of atmospheric pollutants at the land-water interface. If not adequately corrected in satellite retrievals of ocean color, this atmospheric variability can impose a false impression of diurnal and seasonal changes in nearshore water quality and biogeochemical processes. Consideration of these errors is important for measurements from polar orbiting ocean color sensors but becomes critical for geostationary satellite missions having the capability for higher frequency and higher spatial resolution observations of coastal ocean dynamics. We examined variability in atmospheric NO2 over urban nearshore environments in the Eastern US, Europe, and Korea, using a new network of ground-based Pandora spectrometers and Aura-OMI satellite observations. Our measurements in the US and in Europe revealed clear diurnal and day-of-the-week patterns in total column NO2 (TCNO2), temporal changes as large as 0.8 DU within 4 h, and spatial variability as large as 0.7 DU within an area often covered by just a single OMI pixel. TCNO2 gradients were considerably stronger over the coastal cities of Korea. With a coarse resolution and an overpass at around 13:30 local time, OMI cannot detect this strong variability in NO2, missing pollution peaks from industrial and rush hour activities. Observations were combined with air quality model simulations and radiative transfer calculations to estimate the impact of atmospheric NO2 variability on satellite retrievals of coastal ocean remote sensing reflectance and biogeochemical variables (i.e., chlorophyll and CDOM).

Tzortziou, Maria; Herman, Jay R.; Ahmad, Ziauddin; Loughner, Christopher P.; Abuhassan, Nader; Cede, Alexander

2014-06-01

316

Modeling near-shore subsea permafrost degradation in the Laptev Sea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most subsea permafrost in the Arctic Ocean shelf regions is relict terrestrial permafrost that was inundated by sea water by rising sea levels after the last glacial period. Permafrost usually degrades offshore under the influence of sea-bottom temperatures, salt infiltration and a wide range of near-shore coastal processes. Subsea permafrost instability has important potential implications due to the release of methane to the atmosphere and by increasing coastal erosion rates. Our objectives are to employ meso-scale numerical calculations (from meter to kilometer, 1000s of years) in connection with borehole data from the Laptev Sea to model the transition of permafrost from onshore to offshore conditions. The goal is to identify key processes driving permafrost degradation in the near-shore zone of the shelf. The heat transfer equation is solved numerically taking into account freeze-thaw processes in a three-phase heat capacity / conductivity model. Sediment composition and initial temperature profiles are derived from field and laboratory analysis of the borehole data. Our approach neglects some processes such as solute diffusion, but includes the effect of pore water salinity on phase state and thermal properties. Measured temperature profiles are compared to the modeled subsea soil temperature evolution over the course of the 2500 year transgression of the farthest offshore borehole in the transect. The degradation of the ice-bearing permafrost table or thaw depth is of special interest due to its direct relation to sediment stability and as the most readily discernible feature in the field observations. Temperature profiles generally agree well with model calculations reproducing the almost isothermal permafrost profiles currently observed, but show more variation potentially partially caused by drilling disturbances. The thaw depth is mainly driven by salt contamination and infiltration into deeper pore water with time. Complicating near-shore processes discussed include the occurrence of bottom-fast sea ice and marine sedimentation rates.

Kneier, F.; Langer, M.; Overduin, P. P.

2012-12-01

317

Nearshore habitat and fish community associations of coaster brook trout in Isle Royale, Lake Superior  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We characterized the nearshore habitat and fish community composition of approximately 300 km of shoreline within and adjacent to the major embayments of Isle Royale, Lake Superior. Sampling yielded 17 species, of which 12 were widespread and represented a common element of the Lake Superior fish community, including cisco Coregonus artedi, lake whitefish C. clupeaformis, round whitefish Prosopium cylindraceum, lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax, lake chub Couesius plumbeus, longnose sucker Catostomus catostomus, white sucker C. commersonii, trout-perch Percopsis omiscomaycus, ninespine stickleback Pungitius pungitius, burbot Lota lota, and slimy sculpin Cottus cognatus. The presence of brook trout S. fontinalis in an embayment was associated with the common species of the Isle Royale nearshore fish community, particularly cisco, longnose sucker, and round whitefish. However, brook trout were present in only five embayments and were common only in Tobin Harbor. Most Isle Royale embayments had broadly overlapping ranges of nearshore habitats. Within embayments, fish were distributed along a habitat gradient from less-protected rocky habitat near the mouth to highly protected habitat with mixed and finer substrates at the head. Embayments with brook trout had greater mean protection from the open lake, greater variation in depth, greater mean cover, and higher mean frequencies of large substrates (cobble, boulder, and bedrock). Within those embayments, brook trout were associated with habitat patches with higher mean frequencies of small substrates (particularly sand and coarse gravel). Within Tobin Harbor, brook trout were associated with midembayment habitat and species assemblages, especially those locations with a mixture of sand, gravel, and cobble substrates, an absence of bedrock, and the presence of round whitefish, white sucker, and trout-perch. Comparison of embayments with the model, Tobin Harbor, showed that six embayments without brook trout had very similar arrays of habitat. However, four embayments with brook trout had relatively different arrays of habitat from Tobin Harbor. These results suggest that there is potential for further recovery of brook trout populations across Isle Royale nearshore habitats. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

Gorman, O.T.; Moore, S.A.; Carlson, A.J.; Quinlan, H.R.

2008-01-01

318

Latitudinal Discontinuity in Thermal Conditions along the Nearshore of Central-Northern Chile.  

PubMed

Over the past decade, evidence of abrupt latitudinal changes in the dynamics, structure and genetic variability of intertidal and subtidal benthic communities along central-northern Chile has been found consistently at 30-32°S. Changes in the advective and thermal environment in nearshore waters have been inferred from ecological patterns, since analyses of in situ physical data have thus far been missing. Here we analyze a unique set of shoreline temperature data, gathered over 4-10 years at 15 sites between 28-35°S, and combine it with satellite-derived winds and sea surface temperatures to investigate the latitudinal transition in nearshore oceanographic conditions suggested by recent ecological studies. Our results show a marked transition in thermal conditions at 30-31°S, superimposed on a broad latitudinal trend, and small-scale structures associated with cape-and-bay topography. The seasonal cycle dominated temperature variability throughout the region, but its relative importance decreased abruptly south of 30-31°S, as variability at synoptic and intra-seasonal scales became more important. The response of shoreline temperatures to meridional wind stress also changed abruptly at the transition, leading to a sharp drop in the occurrence of low-temperature waters at northern sites, and a concurrent decrease in corticated algal biomass. Together, these results suggest a limitation of nitrate availability in nearshore waters north of the transition. The localized alongshore change results from the interaction of latitudinal trends (e.g., wind stress, surface warming, inertial period) with a major headland-bay system (Punta Lengua de Vaca at 30.25°S), which juxtaposes a southern stretch of coast characterized by upwelling with a northern stretch of coast characterized by warm surface waters and stratification. This transition likely generates a number of latitude-dependent controls on ecological processes in the nearshore that can explain species-specific effects, and add strength to the suggestion of an oceanography-driven, major spatial transition in coastal communities at 30-31°S. PMID:25334020

Tapia, Fabian J; Largier, John L; Castillo, Manuel; Wieters, Evie A; Navarrete, Sergio A

2014-01-01

319

Latitudinal Discontinuity in Thermal Conditions along the Nearshore of Central-Northern Chile  

PubMed Central

Over the past decade, evidence of abrupt latitudinal changes in the dynamics, structure and genetic variability of intertidal and subtidal benthic communities along central-northern Chile has been found consistently at 30–32°S. Changes in the advective and thermal environment in nearshore waters have been inferred from ecological patterns, since analyses of in situ physical data have thus far been missing. Here we analyze a unique set of shoreline temperature data, gathered over 4–10 years at 15 sites between 28–35°S, and combine it with satellite-derived winds and sea surface temperatures to investigate the latitudinal transition in nearshore oceanographic conditions suggested by recent ecological studies. Our results show a marked transition in thermal conditions at 30–31°S, superimposed on a broad latitudinal trend, and small-scale structures associated with cape-and-bay topography. The seasonal cycle dominated temperature variability throughout the region, but its relative importance decreased abruptly south of 30–31°S, as variability at synoptic and intra-seasonal scales became more important. The response of shoreline temperatures to meridional wind stress also changed abruptly at the transition, leading to a sharp drop in the occurrence of low-temperature waters at northern sites, and a concurrent decrease in corticated algal biomass. Together, these results suggest a limitation of nitrate availability in nearshore waters north of the transition. The localized alongshore change results from the interaction of latitudinal trends (e.g., wind stress, surface warming, inertial period) with a major headland-bay system (Punta Lengua de Vaca at 30.25°S), which juxtaposes a southern stretch of coast characterized by upwelling with a northern stretch of coast characterized by warm surface waters and stratification. This transition likely generates a number of latitude-dependent controls on ecological processes in the nearshore that can explain species-specific effects, and add strength to the suggestion of an oceanography-driven, major spatial transition in coastal communities at 30–31°S. PMID:25334020

Tapia, Fabian J.; Largier, John L.; Castillo, Manuel; Wieters, Evie A.; Navarrete, Sergio A.

2014-01-01

320

Uranium in the Near-shore Aquatic Food Chain: Studies on Periphyton and Asian Clams  

SciTech Connect

The benthic aquatic organisms in the near-shore environment of the Columbia River are the first biological receptors that can be exposed to groundwater contaminants coming from the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The primary contaminant of concern in the former nuclear fuels processing area at the Site, known as the 300 Area, is uranium. Currently, there are no national clean up criteria for uranium and ecological receptors. This report summarizes efforts to characterize biological uptake of uranium in the food chain of the benthic aquatic organisms and provide information to be used in future assessments of uranium and the ecosystem.

Bunn, Amoret L.; Miley, Terri B.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Brandt, Charles A.; Napier, Bruce A.

2007-12-31

321

Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. EAD Subcommittee Report: An Analysis of Big Ten University 2009 MLK, Jr. Celebrations  

E-print Network

1 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. EAD Subcommittee Report: An Analysis of Big Ten, and Diversity Committee (EAD) created the EAD Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Subcommittee, or "MLK Calendar," "MLK Day of Service," as well as "Martin Luther King, Jr.," Martin Luther King, Jr. Events

Thomas, David D.

322

Human Progress Never Rolls in on Wheels of Inevitability: Biographies of Martin Luther King, Jr., in the Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents resources for teaching about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Outlines criteria for selecting biographies for children and young adults. Identifies problems in certain biographies of King, and recommends high quality biographies of King. Discusses exercises for integrating themes from King's life into the classroom. (RW)

Kazemek, Francis E.

1990-01-01

323

Survey of radiological contaminants in the near-shore environment at the Hanford Site 100-N Area reactor  

SciTech Connect

Past operations at the Hanford Site 100-N Area reactor resulted in the release of radiological contaminants to the soil column, local groundwater, and ultimately to the near-shore environment of the Columbia River. In September 1997, the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) and the Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) initiated a special study of the near-shore vicinity at the Hanford Site`s retired 100-N Area reactor. Environmental samples were collected and analyzed for radiological contaminants ({sup 3}H, {sup 90}Sr, and gamma/ emitters), with both the WDOH and SESP analyzing a portion of the samples. Samples of river water, sediment, riverbank springs, periphyton, milfoil, flying insects, clam shells, and reed canary grass were collected. External exposure rates were also measured for the near-shore environment in the vicinity of the 100-N Area. In addition, samples were collected at background locations above Vernita Bridge.

Van Verst, S.P.; Albin, C.L. [Washington State Dept. of Health, Olympia, WA (United States); Patton, G.W.; Blanton, M.L.; Poston, T.M.; Cooper, A.T.; Antonio, E.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1998-09-01

324

Data summary for the near-shore sediment characterization task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the Near-Shore Sediment Characterization Task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). The goals of the task were to (1) determine the extent to which near-shore surface sediments are contaminated by releases from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and (2) provide data for the Watts Bar Reservoir Interagency Permitting Group (WBRIPG) to evaluate the human health risks from exposure to sediments during and following dredging operations. The data collected for this task are also to be used in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RLTS) for the CR-ERP operable units (Lower Watts Bar and Clinch River) to characterize the human health risk associated with exposure to near-shore sediments throughout the Watts Bar Reservoir.

Levine, D.A.; Hargrove, W.W.; Campbell, K.R.; Wood, M.A.; Rash, C.D.

1994-10-01

325

Regional Lead Agents and County Coordinators 2011 RESPONSIBILITY NAME COUNTY  

E-print Network

#12;Regional Lead Agents and County Coordinators 2011 RESPONSIBILITY NAME COUNTY REGION 1 Regional Lead Millie Davenport HGIC County Coordinator Matt Burns Pickens County Coordinator Marty Watt Anderson County Coordinator Morris Warner Oconee REGION 2 Regional Lead Danny Howard Greenville County Coordinator

Bolding, M. Chad

326

Balance : Lancaster County's tragedy  

E-print Network

Lancaster County, Pennsylvania residents are proud of their agricultural heritage. They do not want to see their farmland disappear. But the County continues to be developed into residential subdivisions. This thesis ...

Gingrich, Valerie (Valerie J.)

2007-01-01

327

County by County in Ohio Genealogy. Revised.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The State Library of Ohio's genealogy collection of over 8,000 items is listed by county. Within each county listing the sources are designated as atlases, cemetery and death records, census records (the majority from the 1800's), family-church-Bible reco...

P. Khouw

1978-01-01

328

Monitoring and modeling nearshore dredge disposal for indirect beach nourishment, Ocean Beach, San Francisco  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Nearshore dredge disposal was performed during the summer of 2005 at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA, a high energy tidal and wave environment. This trial run was an attempt to provide a buffer to a reach of coastline where wave attack during the winter months has had a severe impact on existing sewage infrastructure. Although the subsequent beach response was inconclusive, after one year the peak of the disposal mound had migrated ~100 m toward the shore, providing evidence that annual dredge disposal at this site could be beneficial over the long-term by at the very least providing: 1) additional wave dissipation during storms 2) compatible sediment to feed nearshore bars, 3) sediment cover on an exposed sewage outfall pipe, and 4) a viable alternative to the shoaling offshore disposal site. Numerical modeling suggests that despite the strong tidal currents in the region, wave forcing is the dominant factor moving the sediment slowly toward shore, and placing sediment at just slightly shallower depths (e.g. 9 m) in the future would have a more immediate impact.

Barnard, Patrick L.; Hanes, Daniel M.; Lescinski, Jamie; Elias, Edwin

2007-01-01

329

Moderate-resolution sea surface temperature data for the nearshore North Pacific  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Coastal sea surface temperature (SST) is an important environmental characteristic in determining the suitability of habitat for nearshore marine and estuarine organisms. This publication describes and provides access to an easy-to-use coastal SST dataset for ecologists, biogeographers, oceanographers, and other scientists conducting research on nearshore marine habitats or processes. The data cover the Temperate Northern Pacific Ocean as defined by the 'Marine Ecosystems of the World' (MEOW) biogeographic schema developed by The Nature Conservancy. The spatial resolution of the SST data is 4-km grid cells within 20 km of the shore. The data span a 29-year period - from September 1981 to December 2009. These SST data were derived from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument measurements compiled into monthly means as part of the Pathfinder versions 5.0 and 5.1 (PFSST V50 and V51) Project. The processing methods used to transform the data from their native Hierarchical Data Format Scientific Data Set (HDF SDS) to georeferenced, spatial datasets capable of being read into geographic information systems (GIS) software are explained. In addition, links are provided to examples of scripts involved in the data processing steps. The scripts were written in the Python programming language, which is supported by ESRI's ArcGIS version 9 or later. The processed data files are also provided in text (.csv) and Access 2003 Database (.mdb) formats. All data except the raster files include attributes identifying realm, province, and ecoregion as defined by the MEOW classification schema.

Payne, Meredith C.; Reusser, Deborah A.; Lee, Henry, II; Brown, Cheryl A.

2011-01-01

330

Trophic connections in Lake Superior Part II: the nearshore fish community  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We use detailed diet analyses of the predominant planktivorous, benthivorous and piscivorous fish species from Lake Superior to create a nearshore (bathymetric depths Mysis diluviana and Diporeia spp). Although the piscivorous fishes like lean lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) fed to a lesser extent on Diporeia and Mysis, they were still strongly connected to these macroinvertebrates, which were consumed by their primary prey species (sculpin spp., rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax, and coregonines). The addition of Bythotrephes to summer/fall cisco and lake whitefish diets, and the decrease in rainbow smelt in lean lake trout diets (replaced by coregonines) were the largest observed differences relative to historic Lake Superior diet studies. Although the offshore food web of Lake Superior was simpler than nearshore in terms of number of fish species present, the two areas had remarkably similar food web structures, and both fish communities were primarily supported by Mysis and Diporeia. We conclude that declines in Mysis or Diporeia populations would have a significant impact on energy flow in Lake Superior. The food web information we generated can be used to better identify management strategies for Lake Superior.

Gamble, A.E.; Hrabik, T.R.; Yule, D.L.; Stockwell, J.D.

2011-01-01

331

Could CO2-induced land-cover feedbacks alter near-shore upwelling regimes?  

PubMed Central

The response of marine and terrestrial environments to global changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations will likely be governed by both responses to direct environmental forcing and responses to Earth-system feedbacks induced by that forcing. It has been proposed that anthropogenic greenhouse forcing will intensify coastal upwelling in eastern boundary current regions [Bakun, A. (1990) Science 247, 198–201]. Focusing on the California Current, we show that biophysical land-cover–atmosphere feedbacks induced by CO2 radiative forcing enhance the radiative effects of CO2 on land–sea thermal contrast, resulting in changes in eastern boundary current total seasonal upwelling and upwelling seasonality. Specifically, relative to CO2 radiative forcing, land-cover–atmosphere feedbacks lead to a stronger increase in peak- and late-season near-shore upwelling in the northern limb of the California Current and a stronger decrease in peak- and late-season near-shore upwelling in the southern limb. Such changes will impact both marine and terrestrial communities [Bakun, A. (1990) Science 247, 198–201; Soto, C. G. (2001) Rev. Fish Biol. Fish. 11, 181–195; and Agostini, V. N. & Bakun, A. (2002) Fish. Oceanogr. 11, 129–142], and these and other Earth-system feedbacks should be expected to play a substantial role in shaping the response of eastern boundary current regions to CO2 radiative forcing. PMID:14691256

Diffenbaugh, Noah S.; Snyder, Mark A.; Sloan, Lisa C.

2004-01-01

332

Hydrodynamics and sediment-transport in the nearshore of Poverty Bay, New Zealand: Observations of nearshore sediment segregation and oceanic storms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nearshore regions act as an interface between the terrestrial environment and deeper waters. As such, they play important roles in the dispersal of fluvial sediment and the transport of sand to and from the shoreline. This study focused on the nearshore of Poverty Bay, New Zealand, and the processes controlling the dispersal of sediment from the main source, the Waipaoa River. Hydrodynamics and sediment-transport in water shallower than 15 m were observed from April through mid-September 2006. This deployment afforded observations during 3-4 periods of elevated river discharge and 5 dry storms. Similar wind, river discharge, wave, current, and turbidity patterns were characterized during three of the wet storms. At the beginning of each event, winds blew shoreward, increasing wave heights to 2-3 m within Poverty Bay. As the cyclonic storms moved through the system the winds reversed direction and became seaward, reducing the local wave height and orbital velocity while river discharge remained elevated. At these times, high river discharge and relatively small waves enabled fluvially derived suspended sediment to deposit in shallow water. Altimetry measurements indicated that at least 7 cm was deposited at a 15 m deep site during a single discharge event. Turbidity and seabed observations showed this deposition to be removed, however, as large swell waves from the Southern Ocean triggered resuspension of the material within three weeks of deposition. Consequently, two periods of dispersal were associated with each discharge pulse, one coinciding with fluvial delivery, and a second driven by wave resuspension a few weeks later. These observations of nearfield sediment deposition contradict current hypotheses of very limited sediment deposition in shallow water offshore of small mountainous rivers when floods and high-energy, large wave and fast current, oceanic conditions coincide. Consistently shoreward near-bed currents, observed along the 10 m isobath of Poverty Bay, were attributed to a combination of estuarine circulation, Stokes drift, and wind driven upwelling. Velocities measured at the 15 m isobath, however, were directed more alongshore and diverged from those at the 10 m isobath. The divergence in the currents observed at the 10 and 15 m locations seemed to facilitate segregation of coarse and fine sediment, with sand transported near-bed toward the beach, while suspended silts and clays were exported to deeper water.

Bever, Aaron J.; McNinch, Jesse E.; Harris, Courtney K.

2011-04-01

333

Washington County Comprehensive plan  

E-print Network

Washington County Comprehensive plan October 2010 #12;This page is intentionally blank. #12;Table of ConTenTs #12;ii Washington County Comprehensive plan · 2010 #12;iii Table of ConTenTs Table of Con Washington County Comprehensive plan · 2010 4. makIng The Case for PlannIng 17 Collective vs. Individual

334

Percent Uninsured by County  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a county by county visualization of the percentage of residents that are uninsured. The data are from a set available here: http://www-958.ibm.com/software/data/cognos/manyeyes/datasets/percent-uninsured-by-county/versions/1

Manyeyes

335

Contested memory in the birthplace of a king: a case study of Auburn Avenue and the Martin Luther King Jr. National Park  

Microsoft Academic Search

A critical element in the process of racializing place is the construction of memorial landscapes. Using the Martin Luther King Jr National Historic Site and the surrounding Auburn Avenue community as a case study this paper argues that the sites dedicated to Dr King along Auburn Avenue embody a normative Civil Rights discourse which emphasizes national unity and non-violence and

Joshua F. J. Inwood

2009-01-01

336

“Anticipating” Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ : The controversy over Cecil B. De Mille’s The King of Kings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cecil. B. De. Mille’s epic production The King of Kings (1927), though not the first to recreate a Passion Play, raised first a quiet and then a more public Jewish outcry, which lead to rancor and, eventually, changes, if minor, in the film. The Anti-Defamation League also reached an agreement with the Motion Picture Producers Association allowing it to preview

Yael Ohad-Karny

2005-01-01

337

The Beating of Rodney King: The Dynamics of Backfire  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 1991 beating of Rodney King by Los Angeles police provides rich case material in how an attack perceived as unjust can\\u000a backfire. Drawing on nonviolence theory, an original framework is developed to analyze attacks as potential backfires that\\u000a are usually, but not always, inhibited. Attackers can use a variety of methods to inhibit backfires, including covering up\\u000a the attack,

Brian Martin

2005-01-01

338

Editing kinemages with KiNG 28th February 2003  

E-print Network

prompt or click the big purple K on the button bar at the bottom of the screen. While you can test out file. This is due to a security restriction that web browsers place on Java applets, and there's written in Java and can run under Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux. If you'd like your own copy of KiNG, talk

Richardson, David

339

(King James Version) Chapter 1 (the creation of the world)  

E-print Network

Genesis (King James Version) Chapter 1 (the creation of the world) 1 In the beginning God created of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. 3 And God said, Let there be light: and there was light. 4 And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness. 5 And God

O'Laughlin, Jay

340

KINGS RIVER, RANCHERIA, AGNEW, AND OAT MOUNTAIN ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

On the basis of a mineral survey the Kings River, Rancheria, Agnew, and Oat Mountain Roadless Areas, California were found to have several areas with probable mineral-resource potential for tungsten in tactite, and one area with probable mineral-resource potential for lode gold in quartz veins. The extreme relief and inaccessibility in most of the roadless areas make exploration and mining very difficult. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of energy resources.

Nokleberg, Warren J.; Longwell, Warren D.

1984-01-01

341

Use of morphometric measurements to differentiate between species and sex of king and clapper rails  

USGS Publications Warehouse

King Rails (Rallus elegans) and Clapper Rails (Rallus longirostris) are large, secretive waterbirds whose ranges overlap in brackish marshes along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts. King and Clapper Rails are difficult to separate by physical appearance and there is currently no reliable method to distinguish between the two species. Here, the relative effectiveness of using discriminant analysis of morphometric measurements to identify and sex King and Clapper Rails was examined. Mean measurements of wing, tarsus, and weight were different between male King and Clapper Rails and between female King and Clapper Rails. However, for all measurements except culmen, male Clapper Rails and female King Rails were not different. Discriminate analysis of morphometric measurements revealed that wing, tarsus, and culmen measurements differentiated between King and Clapper Rails, but cross-validation results for male Clapper Rails were only 73%. Male King Rails were larger than female King Rails for all morphometric measurements and male Clapper Rails were larger than female Clapper Rails for all morphometric measurements except for the tail. Wing and tarsus measurements differentiated between male and female King Rails and wing, tarsus, and culmen measurements differentiated between male and female Clapper Rails.

Perkins, M.; King, S. L.; Travis, S. E.; Linscombe, J.

2009-01-01

342

Strategies for nest-site selection by king eiders  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Nest site selection is a critical component of reproduction and has presumably evolved in relation to predation, local resources, and microclimate. We investigated nest-site choice by king eiders (Somateria spectabilis) on the coastal plain of northern Alaska, USA, 2003-2005. We hypothesized that nest-site selection is driven by predator avoidance and that a variety of strategies including concealment, seclusion, and conspecific or inter-specific nest defense might lead to improved nesting success. We systematically searched wetland basins for king eider nests and measured habitat and social variables at nests (n = 212) and random locations (n = 493). King eiders made use of both secluded and concealed breeding strategies; logistic regression models revealed that females selected nests close to water, on islands, and in areas with high willow (Salix spp.) cover but did not select sites near conspecific or glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus) nests. The most effective nest-placement strategy may vary depending on density and types of nest predators; seclusion is likely a mammalian-predator avoidance tactic whereas concealment may provide protection from avian predators. We recommend that managers in northern Alaska attempt to maintain wetland basins with islands and complex shorelines to provide potential nest sites in the vicinity of water. ?? The Wildlife Society.

Bentzen, R. L.; Powell, A. N.; Suydam, R. S.

2009-01-01

343

COASTAL WETLAND-NEARSHORE FOOD WEB LINKAGES ALONG A TROPHIC GRADIENT IN GREEN BAY: A FISH-EYE VIEW  

EPA Science Inventory

To identify ecological interactions among Green Bay coastal wetlands and lake habitats we analyzed stable isotope signatures of organismsa from wetland and adjacent nearshore food webs in Green Bay, Lake Michigan. We were interested in the influence of nutrient loading/trophic st...

344

Day Versus Night Electrofishing Catches from NearShore Waters of the Ohio and Muskingum Rivers1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Day and night electrofishing catches were compared for sampling effectiveness and diel movements offish to and from near-shore waters of the Ohio and Muskingum rivers. Standardized methods were used to collect same-day paired samples by sampling during the day, displacing the catch, and resampling after twilight. Night catches contained significantly higher numbers of species, individuals (excluding Dorosoma cepedianum), weight, and

RANDALL E. SANDERS

1992-01-01

345

Spatial Structure and Biophysical Coupling in Pelagic Food Webs connecting the Nearshore Shunt and Offshore Desert with the Laser  

E-print Network

Spatial Structure and Biophysical Coupling in Pelagic Food Webs­ connecting the Nearshore Shunt and Offshore Desert with the Laser Plankton Survey System (LPSS) Primary Investigator: Hank Vanderploeg - NOAA It is increasingly obvious from our projects in Lake Michigan and Erie that spatial coupling in pelagic food webs

346

Sediment delivery from the Fly River tidally dominated delta to the nearshore marine environment and the impact of El Niño  

Microsoft Academic Search

In tidally dominated deltas, sediment discharged from the river sources must transit through an estuarine region located within the distributary channels, where particle pathways can undergo significant transformations. Water column profiles and time series data were collected in the distributaries and shallow nearshore region offshore of the Fly River, Papua New Guinea, during monsoon conditions of 2003 and 2004. Within

Andrea S. Ogston; Richard W. Sternberg; Charles A. Nittrouer; D. Preston Martin; Miguel A. Goñi; John S. Crockett

2008-01-01

347

Journal of Marine Research, 52, 427-458,1994 Internal tidal bores in the nearshore: Warm-water fronts,  

E-print Network

Journal of Marine Research, 52, 427-458,1994 Internal tidal bores in the nearshore: Warm internal tidal bores, and it is concluded that the sudden increases in temperature and cross-shore advection are epiphenomena of internal tidal bores. Internal tidal bores have been invoked previously

Pineda, Jesús

348

Relative Abundance, Length Frequency, Age, and Maturity of Dolly Varden in Nearshore Waters of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

Uncertainty about the environmental effects of oil development prompted a study of Dolly Varden Salvelinus malma in the nearshore waters of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska. Abundance of fish less than 400 mm fork length (FL), as indexed by tyke net catch per unit effort (CPUE), was significantly different among years, with the highest daily catch rates occurring in

Tevis J. Underwood; Michael J. Millard; Laura A. Thorpe

1996-01-01

349

Nearshore, temperate, carbonate depositional systems (lower Tortonian, Agua Amarga Basin, southern Spain): implications for carbonate sequence stratigraphy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The bryozoan-rich lower Tortonian carbonates of the Agua Amarga Basin in southern Spain (Province of Almeria) provide an example of sediments formed in a nearshore, non-tropical depositional setting. Based on data derived from logging of sections and from field mapping, these lower Tortonian carbonates form a depositional sequence, which is subdivided into several depositional systems. A lowstand systems tract, which

C. Betzler; T. C. Brachert; J.-C. Braga; J. M. Martin

1997-01-01

350

SNAIL DISTRIBUTIONS IN LAKE ERIE: THE INFLUENCE OF ANOXIA IN THE SOUTHERN CENTRAL BASIN NEARSHORE ZONE1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The distributions and abundances of gastropods collected in sediment grab samples in 1978 and 1979 in the southern nearshore zone of the central basin of Lake Erie were compared with earlier gastropod records from throughout the lake. Since the 1920s, 34 species in eight families have been reported for the lake proper. Sixteen species have been reported only once, 13

KENNETH A. KRIEGER

1985-01-01

351

Development of an Integrated Assessment of Great Lakes Using Towed in situ Sensor Technologies: Linking Nearshore Conditions with Adjacent Watersheds  

EPA Science Inventory

Coastal and nearshore regions of the US/Canadian Great Lakes have not been included in monitoring efforts in any regular, consistent, or comprehensive fashion. To address this need, we have been developing a survey strategy using towed in situ sensors to provide spatially-compreh...

352

A nearshore–offshore trend in acritarch distribution from the Early–Middle Ordovician of the Yangtze Platform, South China  

Microsoft Academic Search

The stratigraphical interval of the late Early Ordovician Didymograptus deflexus and the early Middle Ordovician Azygograptus suecicus graptolite Biozones was investigated from seven sections from the upper Yangtze Platform, southern China. These are located on different parts of the platform, between the nearshore environments of the Kunming area, Yunnan Province, and the offshore carbonate shelf of the Yichang area, Hubei

Jun Li; Thomas Servais; Kui Yan; Huaicheng Zhu

2004-01-01

353

LECTURA Y DISCUSIN DE UN ARTCULO CIENTFICO "Killer Whale Predation on Sea Otters Linking Oceanic and Nearshore Ecosystems"  

E-print Network

in the offshore oceanic ecosystem. Apex predators often initiate forces that cas- cade across successively lower-known example of this pattern (3). After being protected from overhunting, recovering otter populations transformed nearshore reefs from two- to three-trophic- level systems by limiting the distribution

Seoane, Javier

354

Influence of tides and waves on the fate of nutrients in a nearshore aquifer: Numerical simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A numerical investigation is presented that demonstrates the influence of tides and waves on the transport and transformation of nutrients (NO3-,NH4+,PO43-) in a homogeneous unconfined nearshore aquifer and subsequent fluxes to the sea. Simulations of an aquifer subject to semi-diurnal tides and constant waves acting on a sloping beach face were conducted using SEAWAT-2005 combined with PHT3D v2.10. Tidal amplitude (A) and wave height (Hrms) varying from 0.25 to 0.75 m and 1 to 2 m, respectively, were examined. Results show that tides and waves modify the subsurface discharge pathway of land-derived nutrients by changing the nearshore groundwater flow dynamics. More importantly, the oceanic forcing impacts nutrient cycling as it causes significant seawater exchange (along with dissolved O2 and organic matter) across the aquifer-ocean interface. Although steady wave forcing caused higher seawater influx, tides led to greater seawater-freshwater mixing in the nearshore aquifer and subsequently greater transformation of land-derived nutrients. Nutrient processing was strongly controlled by the availability and reactivity of marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) as its degradation consumed O2, released inorganic N and P, and altered redox conditions in the salt-freshwater mixing zones. For the conditions and reaction network simulated, nutrient regeneration by marine DOM degradation was independent of the seawater-freshwater mixing intensity, and therefore was greatest for the wave case due to the high seawater influx. For simulations without marine DOM considered, NO3- discharge to the sea increased by 32% for the tidal case (A = 0.5 m) compared to only 13% and 8% for the wave (Hrms = 1 m) and no oceanic forcing cases. With labile marine DOM considered, the NO3- discharge decreased by 90% relative to the land-derived flux for the tidal case (A = 0.5 m). For all simulations PO43-removal was high due to its adsorption to Fe oxide minerals. The model enables evaluation of the complex coupled physical-biogeochemical processes controlling nutrient loading to the sea via submarine groundwater discharge in dynamic coastal environments.

Anwar, N.; Robinson, C.; Barry, D. A.

2014-11-01

355

A hybrid level set/volume-of-fluid approach for simulation of nearshore hydrodynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wave breaking can play an important role in hydrodynamics near the coast and subsequently can be a factor in beach morphodynamics. However, an accurate understanding of the wave breaking and mixing of water and air at the free surface has yet to be achieved. Numerical models, based on single phase flow, have been used to study the nearshore hydrodynamics, but air-water two-phase flow is not well understood, and so there is a need for additional investigation into the details of this type of flow. The main objective of this study was to de¬velop further understanding of surf-swash zone hydrodynamics under a variety of wave forcing conditions. The main tool used was a com-prehensive two-phase numerical model - combining two-dimensional wave solver with the state-of-the-art 'Eulerian' technique for free surface modeling- of nearshore hydrodynamics. Surf-swash zone hydrodynamics were modeled using the Navier-Stokes equations, combined with turbulence closure model and a hybrid level set/volume-of-fluid approach. The hybrid level set/volume-of-fluid approach combines the accuracy and conceptual simplicity of front-tracking using level set methods with the conservation properties of volume-of fluid methods. The solver was discretized using a finite element method. The model's grid convergence and refinement were investigated in order to obtain high accuracy at an acceptable computational cost while retain robustness. The numerical set-up was tested against the well-known experimental data, with good agreement found. The numerical results showed that the maximum turbulent kinetic energy, turbulence dissipation rate, and velocity components are located near the free surface in the wave breaking area. The model is appropriate for the simulation of air-water mixing flow, undertow distribution, and turbulence characteristics in the nearshore zone. Generally, the analysis shows that, with reasonable hypotheses, it is possible to simulate the surf-swash zone hydrodynamics under wave breaking, consistent with existing understanding of this area.

Bakhtyar, R.; Kees, C. E.; Miller, C. T.; Farthing, M. W.

2013-12-01

356

Human Computation in Social Computing Irwin King, First ACM Forum on Cyberspace and Social Computing (CyberSocialCom2009), November 9, 2009  

E-print Network

Human Computation in Social Computing Irwin King, First ACM Forum on Cyberspace and Social Computing (CyberSocialCom2009), November 9, 2009 Human Computation in Social Computing Irwin King Department://www.cse.cuhk.edu.hk/~king ©2009 Irwin King. All rights reserved. #12;Human Computation in Social Computing Irwin King, First ACM

King, Kuo Chin Irwin

357

“Jobs for all”: Another dream of the rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote extensively on economic matters, especially unemployment policy. King supported\\u000a a federal job guarantee for anyone ready and willing to work. He believed it would provide employment and income security,\\u000a as well as increased public and community services. Dr. King's writings on employment are reviewed and discussed. His policy\\u000a proposals are just as

Mathew Forstater

2002-01-01

358

Trace Elements in King Eiders and Common Eiders in the Canadian Arctic  

Microsoft Academic Search

We determined concentrations of selected trace elements in tissues of king and common eiders at three locations in the Canadian\\u000a arctic. Renal and hepatic cadmium concentrations in king eiders at a location in the eastern arctic were among the highest\\u000a ever recorded in eider ducks: there, they were higher in king eiders than in common eiders. Cadmium concentrations were lower

M. Wayland; H. G. Gilchrist; D. L. Dickson; T. Bollinger; C. James; R. A. Carreno; J. Keating

2001-01-01

359

The Performance of Nearshore Dredge Disposal at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California, 2005-2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ocean Beach, California, contains an erosion hot spot in the shadow of the San Francisco ebb tidal delta that threatens valuable public infrastructure as well as the safe recreational use of the beach. In an effort to reduce the erosion at this location a new plan for the management of sediment dredged annually from the main shipping channel at the mouth of San Francisco Bay was implemented in May 2005 by the United States Army Corps of Engineers, San Francisco District (USACE). The USACE designated a temporary nearshore dredge disposal site for the annual disposal of about 230,000 m3 (300,000 yd3) of sand about 750 m offshore and slightly south of the erosion hot spot, in depths between approximately 9 and 14 m. The site has now been used three times for a total sediment disposal of about 690,000 m3 (about 900,000 yds3). The disposal site was chosen because it is in a location where strong tidal currents and open-ocean waves can potentially feed sediment toward the littoral zone in the reach of the beach that is experiencing critical erosion, as well as prevent further scour on an exposed outfall pipe. The onshore migration of sediment from the target disposal location might feed the primary longshore bar or the nearshore zone, and provide a buffer to erosion that peaks during winter months when large waves impact the region. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) has been monitoring and modeling the bathymetric evolution of the test dredge disposal site and the adjacent coastal region since inception in May 2005. This paper reports on the first 2.5 years of this monitoring program effort (May 2005 to December 2007) and assesses the short-term coastal response. Here are the key findings of this report: *Approximately half of the sediment that has been placed in the nearshore dredge-disposal site during the 2.5 years of this study remains within the dredge focus area. *In the winter of 2006-7, large waves transported the dredge-mound material onshore. *High rates of seasonal cross-shore sediment transport mask any potential profile change in the Coastal Profiling System data due to dredge placement. *Pockets of accretion have been recorded by topographic surveying adjacent to the dredge site, but it is unclear if the accretion is linked to the nourishment. *Cross-shore profile modeling suggests that dredge material must be placed in water depths no greater than 5 m to drive a positive shoreline response. *Area modeling demonstrates that the new dredge site increases wave dissipation and modifies local sediment-transport patterns, although the effect on the nearshore morphology is largely negligible. *Any increase in beach width or wave energy-dissipation related to the nourishment is likely to be realized only in the vicinity directly onshore of the nourishment site, which is several hundred meters south of the area of critical erosion. *Larger waves from the northwest and smaller waves from the west or southwest contribute most to the sediment transport from the dredge mound onshore.

Barnard, Patrick L.; Erikson, Li H.; Hansen, Jeff E.; Elias, Edwin

2009-01-01

360

LANDSAT survey of near-shore ice conditions along the Arctic coast of Alaska  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. Winter and spring near-shore ice conditions were analyzed for the Beaufort Sea 1973-77, and the Chukchi Sea 1973-76. LANDSAT imagery was utilized to map major ice features related to regional ice morphology. Significant features from individual LANDSAT image maps were combined to yield regional maps of major ice ridge systems for each year of study and maps of flaw lead systems for representative seasons during each year. These regional maps were, in turn, used to prepare seasonal ice morphology maps. These maps showed, in terms of a zonal analysis, regions of statistically uniform ice behavior. The behavioral characteristics of each zone were described in terms of coastal processes and bathymetric configuration.

Stringer, W. J. (principal investigator); Barrett, S. A.

1978-01-01

361

Detection of breaking waves using X-band pulse radar in the nearshore region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An X-band pulsed Doppler microwave radar has been used to determine the characteristics of breaking waves. Field experiments were conducted at the Shuang-Si estuary in the north of Taiwan in the winter of 2005. Analyses on maxima radar cross section and Doppler frequency shift are done to characterize wave breaking zones. Based on observations of breaking waves, the wave breaking zones are shown to be located at water depths of 1.8 to 2.2 m in the experimental site. In general, the results indicate that a radar system has the potential to delineate the spatial variation of breaking waves clearly and that this is sufficient to achieve a measurement operation for near-shore air-sea interaction events.

Lin, Y. C.; Chang, C. C.; Lee, M. C.; Chan, H. C.; Leu, J. M.

2013-08-01

362

LANDSAT survey of near-shore ice conditions along the Arctic coast of Alaska  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results. On the basis of analysis of late winter 1973, 1974, and 1975 LANDSAT imagery of the Beaufort Sea coast of Alaska, the following conclusions regarding near-shore ice conditions were made: (1) by March, the seaward limit of contiguous ice is often beyond the 10 fathom contour. (2) During March, shearing can and does take place along a line roughly coincident with the 10 fathom contour. (3) Ice motions during these shearing events are not extremely great, generally on the order of 10 km. (4) Many large ice features have already been formed by late February. (5) Based on look-ahead at later LANDSAT imagery, it seems apparent that Beaufort Seas shore-fast ice was already formed by late February and may well be safe for exploratory activities from this data forward until the melt season.

Stringer, W. J. (principal investigator)

1975-01-01

363

The nearshore benthic community of Kasatochi Island, one year after the 2008 volcanic eruption  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A description is presented of the nearshore benthic community of Kasatochi Island 1012 months after a catastrophic volcanic eruption in 2008. The eruption extended the coastline of the island approximately 400 m offshore, mainly along the south, southeast, and southwest shores, to roughly the 20 m isobath. Existing canopy kelp of Eualaria (Alaria) fistulosa, as well as limited understory algal species and associated fauna (e.g., urchin barrens) on the hard substratum were apparently buried following the eruption. Samples and observations revealed the substrate around the island in 2009 was comprised almost entirely of medium and coarse sands with a depauperate benthic community, dominated by opportunistic pontogeneiid amphipods. Comparisons of habitat and biological communities with other nearby Aleutian Islands, as well as with the Icelandic volcanic island of Surtsey, confirm dramatic reductions in flora and fauna consistent with an early stage of recovery from a large-scale disturbance event. ?? 2010 Regents of the University of Colorado.

Jewett, S. C.; Bodkin, J. L.; Chenelot, H.; Esslinger, G. G.; Hoberg, M. K.

2010-01-01

364

Dept of Mathematics and Statistics King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals  

E-print Network

Seminar Dept of Mathematics and Statistics King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Presenter Dr. Raja Mohammad Latif Dept of Mathematics and Statistics KFUPM Title Topological Characterizations

Omar, Mohammad H.

365

AFSCME, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the 1968 Memphis Sanitation Strike  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. traveled to Memphis to support striking sanitation workers. On the evening of April 3, King delivered his "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speech to strikers and their supporters. The very next day, he was assassinated. This site takes visitors through the experiences of those who were there and also through the words of Dr. King during his time in Memphis. Visitors can find video clips, a chronology of the 1968 strike, and a transcript of King's famous speech.

2008-01-01

366

[Archeology in medicine: digging up into the tophi of Popes, Dukes and Kings].  

PubMed

According to an Anglo-Saxon pun, "gout is the king of diseases and the disease of Kings". In fact, it is well-known that in past times a quantity of famous persons, including Kings and Popes, were affected with this rheumatic disorder. In this paper biographical anecdotes on several Popes (Pius III, Julius II, Julius III, Clement VIII, Innocent XI, Clement XII and Pius VIII), King George IV and Queen Anne of England, as well as on some members of the Lorraine lineage, all suffering from gout, are sketched out. These historical data are briefly discussed in relation to the celebrated Hippocrates's aphorisms on gout. PMID:12874648

Ceccarelli, G

2003-01-01

367

Coral bleaching: one disturbance too many for near-shore reefs of the Great Barrier Reef  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dynamic nature of coral communities can make it difficult to judge whether a reef system is resilient to the current disturbance regime. To address this question of resilience for near-shore coral communities of the Great Barrier Reef (Australia) a data set consisting of 350 annual observations of benthic community change was compiled from existing monitoring data. These data spanned the period 1985-2007 and were derived from coral reefs within 20 km of the coast. During years without major disturbance events, cover increase of the Acroporidae was much faster than it was for other coral families; a median of 11% per annum compared to medians of less than 4% for other coral families. Conversely, Acroporidae were more severely affected by cyclones and bleaching events than most other families. A simulation model parameterised with these observations indicated that while recovery rates of hard corals were sufficient to compensate for impacts associated with cyclones and crown-of-thorns starfish, the advent of mass bleaching has lead to a significant change in the composition of the community and a rapid decline in hard coral cover. Furthermore, if bleaching events continue to occur with the same frequency and severity as in the recent past, the model predicts that the cover of Acroporidae will continue to decline. Although significant cover of live coral remains on near-shore reefs, and recovery is observed during inter-disturbance periods, it appears that this system will not be resilient to the recent disturbance regime over the long term. Conservation strategies for coral reefs should focus on both mitigating local factors that act synergistically to increase the susceptibility of Acroporidae to climate change while promoting initiatives that maximise the recovery potential from inevitable disturbances.

Thompson, A. A.; Dolman, A. M.

2010-09-01

368

Multi-disciplinary investigation into the role of regional event beds in near-shore landslides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Near-shore landslides in fjords are a widely observed geohazard with a potential for causing damage through tsunami generation and the removal of near-shore infrastructure. Often these events cross the border between terrestrial and submarine landslides, involving the failure of material on the shoreline and foreshore slope. Here we focus on a multi-disciplinary investigation of the 1996 landslide near Finneidfjord, Norway. This event back-stepped 100-150 m inland, removing a 250 m long section of the main north-south highway and several houses, at a cost of four human lives. Acquisition of an extensive and multidisciplinary data set, including high-resolution swath bathymetry, 2D/3D seismic data, multiple short (up to 6 m) and two long (12 m and 14 m, respectively) sediment cores and in situ Free-Fall Piezocone Penetrometer (FF-CPTU) profiles complemented with geotechnical laboratory data, has provided a detailed analysis of both the landslide morphology and stratigraphic controls. Correlating the geophysical (include remote physical properties inverted from seismic reflection profiles), geological and geotechnical data identifies the landslide glide plane as a thin (< 0.5 m), laminated, clay-rich bed with high pore water content (45 - 65 %) and low shear strength (4 - 8 kPa), deposited as a result of terrestrial quick-clay landslides in the hinterland. The relative weakness of the layer is thought to be a result of both the rapid deposition and excess pore pressure caused by artesian groundwater flow. Together, these act as preconditioning factors for failure, controlling the failure depth and probability if not the exact timing of the event.

Vardy, M. E.; L'Heureux, J.; Vanneste, M. W.; Longva, O.; Forsberg, C. F.; Steiner, A.

2012-12-01

369

Neutrophilic Iron-Oxidizing "Zetaproteobacteria" and Mild Steel Corrosion in Nearshore Marine Environments ? †  

PubMed Central

Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of mild steel in seawater is an expensive and enduring problem. Little attention has been paid to the role of neutrophilic, lithotrophic, iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) in MIC. The goal of this study was to determine if marine FeOB related to Mariprofundus are involved in this process. To examine this, field incubations and laboratory microcosm experiments were conducted. Mild steel samples incubated in nearshore environments were colonized by marine FeOB, as evidenced by the presence of helical iron-encrusted stalks diagnostic of the FeOB Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, a member of the candidate class “Zetaproteobacteria.” Furthermore, Mariprofundus-like cells were enriched from MIC biofilms. The presence of Zetaproteobacteria was confirmed using a Zetaproteobacteria-specific small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene primer set to amplify sequences related to M. ferrooxydans from both enrichments and in situ samples of MIC biofilms. Temporal in situ incubation studies showed a qualitative increase in stalk distribution on mild steel, suggesting progressive colonization by stalk-forming FeOB. We also isolated a novel FeOB, designated Mariprofundus sp. strain GSB2, from an iron oxide mat in a salt marsh. Strain GSB2 enhanced uniform corrosion from mild steel in laboratory microcosm experiments conducted over 4 days. Iron concentrations (including precipitates) in the medium were used as a measure of corrosion. The corrosion in biotic samples (7.4 ± 0.1 mM) was significantly higher than that in abiotic controls (5.0 ± 0.1 mM). These results have important implications for the role of FeOB in corrosion of steel in nearshore and estuarine environments. In addition, this work shows that the global distribution of Zetaproteobacteria is far greater than previously thought. PMID:21131509

McBeth, Joyce M.; Little, Brenda J.; Ray, Richard I.; Farrar, Katherine M.; Emerson, David

2011-01-01

370

Nearshore shore-oblique bars, gravel outcrops, and their correlation to shoreline change  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This study demonstrates the physical concurrence of shore-oblique bars and gravel outcrops in the surf zone along the northern Outer Banks of North Carolina. These subaqueous features are spatially correlated with shoreline change at a range of temporal and spatial scales. Previous studies have noted the existence of beach-surf zone interactions, but in general, relationships between nearshore geological features and coastal change are poorly understood. These new findings should be considered when exploring coastal zone dynamics and developing predictive engineering models. The surf zone and nearshore region of the Outer Banks is predominantly planar and sandy, but there are several discrete regions with shore-oblique bars and interspersed gravel outcrops. These bar fields have relief up to 3??m, are several kilometers wide, and were relatively stationary over a 1.5??year survey period; however, the shoreward component of the bar field does exhibit change during this time frame. All gravel outcrops observed in the study region, a 40??km longshore length, were located adjacent to a shore-oblique bar, in a trough that had width and length similar to that of the associated bar. Seismic surveys show that the outcrops are part of a gravel stratum underlying the active surface sand layer. Cross-correlation analyses demonstrate high correlation of monthly and multi-decadal shoreline change rates with the adjacent surf-zone bathymetry and sediment distribution. Regionally, areas with shore-oblique bars and gravel outcrops are correlated with on-shore areas of high short-term shoreline variability and high long-term shoreline change rates. The major peaks in long-term shoreline erosion are onshore of shore-oblique bars, but not all areas with high rates of long-term shoreline change are associated with shore-oblique bars and troughs. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Schupp, C.A.; McNinch, J.E.; List, J.H.

2006-01-01

371

Ecoregional Analysis of Nearshore Sea-Surface Temperature in the North Pacific  

PubMed Central

The quantification and description of sea surface temperature (SST) is critically important because it can influence the distribution, migration, and invasion of marine species; furthermore, SSTs are expected to be affected by climate change. To better understand present temperature regimes, we assembled a 29-year nearshore time series of mean monthly SSTs along the North Pacific coastline using remotely-sensed satellite data collected with the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument. We then used the dataset to describe nearshore (<20 km offshore) SST patterns of 16 North Pacific ecoregions delineated by the Marine Ecoregions of the World (MEOW) hierarchical schema. Annual mean temperature varied from 3.8°C along the Kamchatka ecoregion to 24.8°C in the Cortezian ecoregion. There are smaller annual ranges and less variability in SST in the Northeast Pacific relative to the Northwest Pacific. Within the 16 ecoregions, 31–94% of the variance in SST is explained by the annual cycle, with the annual cycle explaining the least variation in the Northern California ecoregion and the most variation in the Yellow Sea ecoregion. Clustering on mean monthly SSTs of each ecoregion showed a clear break between the ecoregions within the Warm and Cold Temperate provinces of the MEOW schema, though several of the ecoregions contained within the provinces did not show a significant difference in mean seasonal temperature patterns. Comparison of these temperature patterns shared some similarities and differences with previous biogeographic classifications and the Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs). Finally, we provide a web link to the processed data for use by other researchers. PMID:22253893

Payne, Meredith C.; Brown, Cheryl A.; Reusser, Deborah A.; Lee, Henry

2012-01-01

372

Ecoregional analysis of nearshore sea-surface temperature in the North Pacific.  

PubMed

The quantification and description of sea surface temperature (SST) is critically important because it can influence the distribution, migration, and invasion of marine species; furthermore, SSTs are expected to be affected by climate change. To better understand present temperature regimes, we assembled a 29-year nearshore time series of mean monthly SSTs along the North Pacific coastline using remotely-sensed satellite data collected with the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument. We then used the dataset to describe nearshore (<20 km offshore) SST patterns of 16 North Pacific ecoregions delineated by the Marine Ecoregions of the World (MEOW) hierarchical schema. Annual mean temperature varied from 3.8°C along the Kamchatka ecoregion to 24.8°C in the Cortezian ecoregion. There are smaller annual ranges and less variability in SST in the Northeast Pacific relative to the Northwest Pacific. Within the 16 ecoregions, 31-94% of the variance in SST is explained by the annual cycle, with the annual cycle explaining the least variation in the Northern California ecoregion and the most variation in the Yellow Sea ecoregion. Clustering on mean monthly SSTs of each ecoregion showed a clear break between the ecoregions within the Warm and Cold Temperate provinces of the MEOW schema, though several of the ecoregions contained within the provinces did not show a significant difference in mean seasonal temperature patterns. Comparison of these temperature patterns shared some similarities and differences with previous biogeographic classifications and the Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs). Finally, we provide a web link to the processed data for use by other researchers. PMID:22253893

Payne, Meredith C; Brown, Cheryl A; Reusser, Deborah A; Lee, Henry

2012-01-01

373

King penguin population threatened by Southern Ocean warming  

PubMed Central

Seabirds are sensitive indicators of changes in marine ecosystems and might integrate and/or amplify the effects of climate forcing on lower levels in food chains. Current knowledge on the impact of climate changes on penguins is primarily based on Antarctic birds identified by using flipper bands. Although flipper bands have helped to answer many questions about penguin biology, they were shown in some penguin species to have a detrimental effect. Here, we present for a Subantarctic species, king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus), reliable results on the effect of climate on survival and breeding based on unbanded birds but instead marked by subcutaneous electronic tags. We show that warm events negatively affect both breeding success and adult survival of this seabird. However, the observed effect is complex because it affects penguins at several spatio/temporal levels. Breeding reveals an immediate response to forcing during warm phases of El Niño Southern Oscillation affecting food availability close to the colony. Conversely, adult survival decreases with a remote sea-surface temperature forcing (i.e., a 2-year lag warming taking place at the northern boundary of pack ice, their winter foraging place). We suggest that this time lag may be explained by the delay between the recruitment and abundance of their prey, adjusted to the particular 1-year breeding cycle of the king penguin. The derived population dynamic model suggests a 9% decline in adult survival for a 0.26°C warming. Our findings suggest that king penguin populations are at heavy extinction risk under the current global warming predictions. PMID:18268328

Le Bohec, Celine; Durant, Joel M.; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel; Stenseth, Nils C.; Park, Young-Hyang; Pradel, Roger; Gremillet, David; Gendner, Jean-Paul; Le Maho, Yvon

2008-01-01

374

STUDIES ON SOME PHARMACOGNOSTIC PROFILES OF SWIETENIA MACROPHYLLA. King.  

PubMed

The aerial parts and seeds of Swietenia macrophylla King (Meliaceae) are used in exotic medicine systems. In the present study, a preliminary phytochemical and few pharmacological profiles were under taken. The physical constans, extractive and ash values were examined. The presence of secondary metabolites in the aerial parts and seeds showed that Swietenia macrophylla is a good source of active principles. TLC studies were done by treating dry treating dry powder of Swietenia macrophylla with various acids, iodine and ferric chloride solution and UV and Visible light. PMID:22557161

Arumugasamy, K; Latha, K V; Kumar, N H Sathish

2004-10-01

375

County Staff or Area Staff?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

McIntryre explores the questions of county-based extention and increased specialization in Indiana. He compares the multi-county with individual county systems using variables including clientele's reactions to the two systems. (NL)

McIntyre, William J.

1970-01-01

376

BOREAS AFM-2 Wyoming King Air 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The BOREAS AFM-2 team used the University of Wyoming King Air aircraft during IFCs 1, 2, and 3 in 1994 to collected pass-by-pass fluxes (and many other statistics) for the large number of level (constant altitude), straight-line passes used in a variety of flight patterns over the SSA and NSA and areas along the transect between these study areas. The data described here form a second set, namely soundings that were incorporated into nearly every research flight by the King Air in 1994. These soundings generally went from near the surface to above the inversion layer. Most were flown immediately after takeoff or immediately after finishing the last flux pattern of that particular day's flights. The parameters that were measured include wind direction, wind speed, west wind component (u), south wind component (v), static pressure, air dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and CO2 concentration. Data on the aircraft's location, attitude, and altitude during data collection are also provided. These data are stored in tabular ASCH files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

Kelly, Robert D.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

377

Mutualism and evolutionary multiplayer games: revisiting the Red King  

PubMed Central

Coevolution of two species is typically thought to favour the evolution of faster evolutionary rates helping a species keep ahead in the Red Queen race, where ‘it takes all the running you can do to stay where you are’. In contrast, if species are in a mutualistic relationship, it was proposed that the Red King effect may act, where it can be beneficial to evolve slower than the mutualistic species. The Red King hypothesis proposes that the species which evolves slower can gain a larger share of the benefits. However, the interactions between the two species may involve multiple individuals. To analyse such a situation, we resort to evolutionary multiplayer games. Even in situations where evolving slower is beneficial in a two-player setting, faster evolution may be favoured in a multiplayer setting. The underlying features of multiplayer games can be crucial for the distribution of benefits. They also suggest a link between the evolution of the rate of evolution and group size. PMID:22977149

Gokhale, Chaitanya S.; Traulsen, Arne

2012-01-01

378

Brecht and the courtroom: Alienating evidence in the “Rodney King” trials  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines narrative strategies in the State and Federal trials of the four Los Angeles Police Department officers who beat motorist Rodney King. Brecht's theory of alienation provides the analytic framework. Alienation distances viewers from their “natural” response to social phenomena. Similarly, attorneys in the Rodney King trials distanced jurors from their “natural” response to the Holliday videotape. They

Oliver Gerland

1994-01-01

379

Department of Palliative Care and Policy Guy's, King's and St Thomas' School of Medicine  

E-print Network

Department of Palliative Care and Policy Guy's, King's and St Thomas' School of Medicine King Supporting informal carers in palliative care: The 90 Minute Group 17 2.1.5 Publications 18 2.2 NON 2000 - 2003 28 2.2.4 IN FOCUS Developing and evaluating a palliative care service for people affected

Kühn, Reimer

380

[The diseases of King Richard III. according to their descriptions in Shakespeare's works].  

PubMed

In this short essay we will discuss the possible diseases of king Richard III according to the descriptions in Shakespeare's plays King Richard III and Henry VI. Furthermore it is shown that the description of the defeated enemy as physically and mentally deformed is part of a long tradition which has its roots in ancient Greece. PMID:20013547

Skrziepietz, A

2009-12-01

381

A Bayesian analysis of NSW eastern king prawn stocks ( Melicertus plebejus) using multiple model structures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The eastern king prawn (Melicertus plebejus) is a valuable target species for commercial fisheries operating on the Australian east coast. The Bayesian analysis presented here aims to determine the current state and productivity of the NSW component of the eastern king prawn stock and analyse the possible consequences of altering commercial catches in the future. The Bayesian approach is well

Matthew C. Ives; James P. Scandol

2007-01-01

382

Sent to Govindjee by a distinguished member of the photosynthesis community. KING OF THE CHLOROPLAST  

E-print Network

OF THE CHLOROPLAST As presented by the Photosynthetic Four, at the final party of the Second Gatlinburg Conference and discovered ATP. Chorus: Danny, Danny Arnon, King of the Chloroplast. II He saw some green things that seemed, Called up the Times and filled it full of guff. Chorus: Danny, Danny Arnon, King of the Chloroplast III

Govindjee "Gov"

383

The lichen genus Cladonia of King George Island, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents the results of taxonomical investigation of the genus Clado? nia Hill ex P. Browne from King George Island. Individuals belonging to this lichen genus were studied using methods of classical herbarium taxonomy supported by chemical analy? sis. Fourteen species have been recognized in the study area, with C. asahinae J.W. Thomson being reported from King George Island

Piotr OSYCZKA; Maria OLECH

384

Effects of ghost fishing on the population of red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) in  

E-print Network

101 Effects of ghost fishing on the population of red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA. Abstract--Ghost fishing, the capture and killing of marine organisms. In this study, we quantify the rate of ghost fishing on the population of red king crab (Paralithodes

385

Inventing authority: Bill Clinton, Martin Luther King, Jr., and the orchestration of rhetorical traditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

On November 13, 1993, President Clinton addressed five thousand African American ministers at the site of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. ‘s last speech in Memphis, Tennessee and, to open a dialogue on race relations, spoke in King's voice. This essay develops a critical orientation revolving around the concepts of tradition, invention, and authority as a means of exploring Clinton's

John M. Murphy

1997-01-01

386

50 CFR Figure 11 to Part 679 - Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA)  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) 11 Figure 11 to Part 679 Wildlife...ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 11 Figure 11 to Part 679—Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) ER15NO99.009 [64 FR 61998,...

2010-10-01

387

50 CFR Figure 11 to Part 679 - Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA)  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) 11 Figure 11 to Part 679 Wildlife...ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 11 Figure 11 to Part 679—Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) ER15NO99.009 [64 FR 61998,...

2011-10-01

388

50 CFR Figure 11 to Part 679 - Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA)  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) 11 Figure 11 to Part 679 Wildlife...ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 11 Figure 11 to Part 679—Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) ER15NO99.009 [64 FR 61998,...

2012-10-01

389

50 CFR Figure 11 to Part 679 - Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA)  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) 11 Figure 11 to Part 679 Wildlife...ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 11 Figure 11 to Part 679—Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) ER15NO99.009 [64 FR 61998,...

2013-10-01

390

The Agronomy and Economy of Black Pepper ( Piper nigrum L.) —The “King of Spices”  

Microsoft Academic Search

Black pepper, popularly known as the “King of Spices”, has a very checkered history dating back to the times of Queen Sheeba and King Solomon (BC 1015–BC 66) and has influenced the destiny of nations and their people, spread across the world, both economically and culturally. Today pepper commands the leading position among the different spices as the spice of

K. P. Prabhakaran Nair

2004-01-01

391

TREATMENT OF GUNSHOT OPEN FRACTURES BY EXTERNAL FIXATOR: EXPERIENCE AT KING HUSSEIN MEDICAL CENTER  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To report the clinical efficacy of external fixator used for the management of gunshot induced open fractures and to report our experience at King Hussein Medical Center. Methods: The medical records of 60 patients with open gunshot extremity fractures, treated at King Hussein Medical Center from January 1999 to January 2004, were reviewed retrospectively. Only patients with diaphyseal comminuted

Issam A. Dahabra; Issa S. Sawaqed; Munther N. Soudi

392

Responses by king snakes ( Lampropeltis getulus ) to chemicals from colubrid and crotaline snakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four litters of king snakes (Lampropeltis getulus), a snake-eating species, were tested for responses to chemicals from colubrid and crotaline snakes. King snakes presented with swabs rubbed against the dorsal skin of living snakes and with swabs treated with methylene chloride extracts of shed snake skins tongue-flicked more to swabs from a northern copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix), a crotaline, than to

Paul J. Weldon; Fred M. Schell

1984-01-01

393

In A World Set Apart: The Dalton Dynasty at King Alfred School, 1920-62.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains that Helen Parkhurst's Dalton Laboratory Plan disappeared quickly in many British schools but remained for over 40 years in the King Alfred School in London (England). Explores the development of the Dalton Plan at King Alfred, why this educational innovation thrived at the school, and the causes for its disappearance. (CMK)

Brooks, Ron

1998-01-01

394

Importance of genetic maps, Mary-Claire KingSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Interviewee: Mary-Claire King DNAi Location:Applications>Genes and medicine>gene hunting>Markers Moving slowly Mary-Claire King talks about the tedious process of hunting for genes in the days before genetic maps (based on thousands of markers) were readily available.

2008-03-26

395

Examples of Mechanism Design: from King Solomon to eBay  

E-print Network

Book of Kings, chapter 3. At some point two women come to king Solomon with a child, because they are ghting over which one of them is the real mother of this child. One of them claims the other has swapped the children overnight because hers has died. Solomon listens to their story and then orders a soldier to cut

de Weerdt, Mathijs

396

VIDEO SUMMARIZATION BY SPATIAL-TEMPORAL GRAPH OPTIMIZATION Shi Lu, Michael R. Lyu, Irwin King  

E-print Network

VIDEO SUMMARIZATION BY SPATIAL-TEMPORAL GRAPH OPTIMIZATION Shi Lu, Michael R. Lyu, Irwin King SAR {slu, lyu, king}@cse.cuhk.edu.hk ABSTRACT In this paper we present a novel approach for video sum-temporal content cov- erage and visual coherence of the video summary. The ap- proach has three stages. First

King, Kuo Chin Irwin

397

Martin Luther King, the American dream and Vietnam: A collision of rhetorical trajectories  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essay explores the rhetorical complexity of Martin Luther King's dual role as political and moral leader, particularly during his last years when he was attacked for his opposition to the Vietnam War. By: 1) discussing and developing the theoretical value and critical possibilities associated with the term “rhetorical trajectories,”; 2) tracing the trajectories present in King's rhetoric in order

George N. Dionisopoulos; Victoria J. Gallagher; Steven R. Goldzwig; David Zarefsky

1992-01-01

398

MLK & Brother Lawrence Hanks Lawrence Hanks & Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  

E-print Network

his life, and death, changed the lives of millions of people in the past, present, and future of the work of Dr. King, there are many who have taken actions that exemplify his work and legacy. I admire understand the impact of Dr. Hanks' work and how it is truly in the legacy of Dr. King, it is critical

Indiana University

399

Breeding Biology of King Eiders Nesting on Karrak Lake, Northwest Territories  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied various aspects of the breeding biology of king eiders (Somateria spectabilis) nesting at Karrak Lake, south of Queen Maud Gulf in the central Canadian Arctic. We found 41 nests distributed among 10 islands in Karrak Lake; to our knowledge, this represents the largest number of king eider nests studied at one site. We suspect that island nesting by

DANA K. KELLETT; RAY T. ALISAUSKAS

1997-01-01

400

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Legacy: An Economic Justice Imperative  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this Essay, I will explore the ways in which Dr. King’s legacy demands that lawyers work to abolish poverty and homelessness and the ways that lawyers can help to advance economic opportunity for low-income people. I will do this by discussing legislation that promotes the abolition of poverty and the ways in which nonprofit groups and progressive corporations can

Susan R. Jones

2005-01-01

401

RHIZOCEPHALAN INFECfION IN BLUE KING CRABS, PARALITHODES PLATYPUS, FROM  

E-print Network

RHIZOCEPHALAN INFECfION IN BLUE KING CRABS, PARALITHODES PLATYPUS, FROM OLGA BA~ KODIAK ISLAND crabs, Paralithodes platypus. in Olga B~ Kodiak Island, was sampled quarterly during 1980.lithodR.s camtschatica, and biennially in blue king crabs, P. platypus. Because embryos of both species hatch within

402

Fisher Research and the Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystems Project: Current Results and Future Efforts 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystems Project was initiated on the Kings River Ranger District of the Sierra National Forest, California, in 1993, with fieldwork beginning in 1994. Knowledge of the ecology of the fisher (Martes pennanti) in the Project area, and in the Sierra Nevada of California in general, is insufficient to develop empirically based management strategies or to

Brian B. Boroski; Richard T. Golightly

2002-01-01

403

In-Water Reflectance Spectra Measured On Board a Jet-Ski Across a Complex Nearshore Zone of Case-2 Waters during the ECORS Experiment  

E-print Network

In-Water Reflectance Spectra Measured On Board a Jet-Ski Across a Complex Nearshore Zone of Case-2 in a complex coastal zone of moderately turbid waters and to test inversion algorithms for mapping bathymetry

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

404

Shared genetic material between humans and chimps, Mary-Claire KingSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Interviewee: Mary-Claire King DNAi Location:Applications>Human Origins>Comparisons>DNA Geneticist Mary-Claire King talks about her discovery that chimps and humans are extremely similar at a molecular level.

2008-03-26

405

Continuity in Canadian Immigration Policy 1947 to Present: Taking a Fresh Look at Mackenzie King’s 1947 Immigration Policy Statement  

Microsoft Academic Search

An examination of the major policy decisions in Canadian immigration history since the end of the Second World War, up to\\u000a and including the present day, reveals a remarkable consistency in overall approach to this area of public policy. This paper\\u000a identifies these important milestones and demonstrates how they relate to Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King’s 1947\\u000a statement on

Robert Vineberg

2011-01-01

406

Too Many Counties?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Every state in the United States is divided into smaller units of local government. For example, Georgia has 159 counties. Proponents of reducing the number of counties argue for consolidation on the basis of efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Activities are suggested to help secondary students explore this issue. (RM)

Williams, Elmer D.

1985-01-01

407

Sheridan County Recreation Plan.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A pilot project investigating the feasibility of year-round recreational programs in rural counties of populations of less than 10,000 is described in this report. (Sheridan County, Kansas, was chosen as the project site.) Part I, the introductory section, briefly defines recreation and its relation to human needs. Part II provides a geographic…

Webster, Elaine

408

Hancock County Awards Gala  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gene Goldman (left), deputy director of NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center, accepts an Award of Excellence from Jack Zink, executive director of the Hancock County Port and Harbor Commission, during the 2008 Annual Hancock County Awards Gala. The Award of Excellence was presented to recognize Stennis Space Center's contribution to NASA's 50 years of excellence in space exploration.

2008-01-01

409

Survey of Radiological and Chemical Contaminants in the Near-Shore Environment at the Hanford Site 300 Area  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an environmental surveillance study of the near-shore of the Columbia River at the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The study was conducted in August - October, 2001 to coincide with expected low river stage. The low river stage facilitated locating and sampling riverbank spring water and other media along the Columbia River shoreline. River water, riverbank spring water, near shore groundwater, riparian and aquatic biota samples were collected. Contaminants of concern included radionuclides, metals, organics, and anions. A survey of the external radiation levels along the near-shore area was also conducted. The report presents the objectives and regulatory drivers for this study, a description of the sample collection process, analytical results and discussion for both radiological and non-radiological (chemical) samples. In addition, human and ecological dose/risk assessments based upon the analytical results are presented.

Patton, Gregory W.; Tiller, Brett L.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Poston, Ted M.; Van Verst, Scott P.

2002-09-27

410

Evaluation of bacteriological and nutrient concerns in nearshore waters of a barrier island community in SW Florida.  

PubMed

To determine if local onsite treatment systems affect nearshore water quality, seasonal and rain event monitoring of bacteria and nitrogen was conducted on the Gulf and estuary sides of Captiva Island. Monitoring wells were used to examine the relationship between surface water and groundwater quality. Nitrates were found to be significantly greater in ground water samples from the areas of Captiva using onsite treatment compared to areas with sewer. However, groundwater enterococci were no greater in areas with onsite treatment. Surface water nitrogen was significantly greater near onsite systems than areas with sewer, linking groundwater and surface water quality. Surface water enterococci increased significantly after rain events. Study results indicated stormwater runoff disperses indicator bacteria from diffuse terrestrial sources into nearshore waters, elevating the concentrations. This study reveals local onsite treatment systems produce elevated surface water nitrogen levels but do not contribute to elevated indicator bacteria concentrations in this system. PMID:22607848

Thompson, Mark; Milbrandt, Eric; Bartleson, Richard; Rybak, Alex

2012-07-01

411

Wind-induced nearshore sediment resuspension in a lake during a winter storm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sediment resuspension is the process by which sediment is entrained into the water column at the sediment-water interface. It occurs when the bottom shear stress exceeds the critical shear stress and has the potential to negatively impact water quality. Wind-induced sediment resuspension could be a factor contributing to the declining clarity of the nearshore at Lake Tahoe, California-Nevada and is therefore the subject of this study. An observational experiment included vertical profiles of water temperature using a thermistor chain; vertical profiles of water currents as well as surface wave periods and significant wave heights using a Nortek AWAC; high-frequency, near-bed measurements of water velocity using a Nortek Vector and a Sontek ADVOcean Probe; and suspended sediment concentrations using a LISST-100X. During a winter storm event we observed simultaneous peaks in wind speed, significant wave height and wave period, and suspended sediment concentration. Coincident peaks in suspended sediment concentration and wind speed strongly suggested wind-driven resuspension. During this same stormy period currents shifted to align with the wind. Total bottom shear stress was computed from the high-frequency, near-bed velocity data. During this winter storm, measured estimates of total bottom shear stress exceeded the critical shear stress for incipient motion corresponding to an average grain size of 400 ?m. Bottom shear stress was also partitioned according to its provenance (wind-waves; mean currents; and random motions). We implemented the wind-wave model STWAVE to simulate nearshore wind-wave growth and propagation, from which we derived the bottom orbital velocity to estimate bottom shear stress due to wind-waves. When wind directions favored a larger fetch, promoting full development of the wave field, the simulated bottom shear stress from STWAVE was in good agreement with the measured bottom shear stress attributed to wind-waves. We estimated bottom shear stress due to currents as a percentage of the total wind-induced shear stress at the surface of the lake, which was in turn derived from the wind record and the quadratic drag law. Simulated and measured bottom shear stress attributed to mean currents were in good agreement and remained small, which was to be expected. The wind-waves contributed far more to the development of the bottom shear stress during critical periods. For those times when the total bottom shear stress was in excess of the critical shear stress, the sediment entrainment rates were well represented by the 1991 Garcia and Parker formula.

Reardon, K. E.; Moreno, P. A.; Schladow, S. G.; Bombardelli, F. A.

2012-12-01

412

Advances in Shallow-Water, High-Resolution Seafloor Mapping: Integrating an Autonomous Surface Vessel (ASV) Into Nearshore Geophysical Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been heavily involved in geological mapping of the seafloor since the 1970s. Early mapping efforts such as GLORIA provided broad-scale imagery of deep waters (depths > 400 meters) within the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). In the early 1990's, the USGS research emphasis shifted from deep- to shallow-water environments (inner continental shelf, nearshore, estuaries) to

J. F. Denny; T. F. O'Brien; E. Bergeron; D. Twichell; C. R. Worley; W. W. Danforth; B. A. Andrews; B. Irwin

2006-01-01

413

Organic enrichment of submarine-canyon and continental-shelf benthic communities by macroalgal drift imported from nearshore kelp forests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) surveys were conducted over a 3-year period to evaluate the importance of macroalgal drift exported from nearshore forests of giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) to adjacent submarine-canyon and continental-shelf benthic habitats. Abundant macroalgal drift was found in the Carmel Submarine Canyon (153- 454-m depth) but was rare at Pt. Joe, a continental shelf habitat 9 km away

Christopher Harrold; Karen Light; Susan Lisin

1998-01-01

414

An internal tidal bore regime at nearshore stations along western U.S.A.: Predictable upwelling within the lunar cycle  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nearshore upwelling due to predictable large internal bores may be a widespread phenomenon along the west coast of North America. Internal tidal bores (breaking internal tidal waves) cause drops in surface water temperature that last for 2–9 days. Negative surface water temperature anomalies (anomaly = daily datum minus day-of-the-year average) often reflect large internal tidal bores. These anomalies are predictable

Jesús Pineda

1995-01-01

415

Signals from the benthos: Development and evaluation of a benthic index for the nearshore Gulf of Maine  

Microsoft Academic Search

We developed a benthic index for the nearshore Gulf of Maine to provide researchers and environmental managers a way to make spatial and year-to-year comparisons of benthic condition. The data set used included 248 stations sampled for physical, chemical, and biological variables by the National Coastal Assessment in 2000–2003. We used logistic regression with 49 candidate measures of benthic species

Stephen S. Hale; James F. Heltshe

2008-01-01

416

How Social Computing Impacts Society, Irwin King,Asia Society, March 11, 2010, Hong Kong How Social Computing  

E-print Network

How Social Computing Impacts Society, Irwin King,Asia Society, March 11, 2010, Hong Kong How Social Computing Impacts Society Irwin King Department of Computer Science and Engineering The Chinese University. #12;How Social Computing Impacts Society, Irwin King,Asia Society, March 11, 2010, Hong Kong Sand from

King, Kuo Chin Irwin

417

Lectured at Siena on January 15, 1991 "In a Different Voice:Ruby Dee Reflects on Dr. King's Legacy"  

E-print Network

Ruby Dee Lectured at Siena on January 15, 1991 "In a Different Voice:Ruby Dee Reflects on Dr. King of the Shrew," "King Lear" and "The World of Sholem Aleichem." In film, she acted in "A Raisin in the Sun." They presented the PBS special, "Martin Luther King: The Dream and the Drum," and for three years co

418

Realizing King's Dream in the "Fierce Urgency of Now": Establishing Inter (and Intra) Group Dialogue, Forging Alliances,  

E-print Network

from across and within. In his "I Have a Dream" speech, Dr. King stated that the marvelous new bound to our freedom. We cannot walk alone. Dr. King sought to establish long-term, trusting alliances, and peaceful relations across diverse communities. While Dr. King specifically referenced the importance

Indiana University

419

King's College London Student Residences Information GETITTOGETHERNOT LONG TILLYOU MOVE IN.THINK YOU'RE READY?  

E-print Network

King's College London Student Residences Information GETITTOGETHERNOT LONG TILLYOU MOVE IN payment here, Go here for details of all the T&Cs on fees. 4 Get it Together King's College London #12;Do, electric heaters or air conditioners because we don't allow them. 5 Get it Together King's College London

Kühn, Reimer

420

LEON COUNTY 4-H County Events 2012  

E-print Network

, friendly environment and to develop self confidence and poise. Participation also counts toward county'ers experience in the preparation and delivery of a show-and-tell presentation, with confidence in a public members Categories - Animal Science Individual/Family Resources Citizenship, Leadership, & Communication

Watson, Craig A.

421

Doppler spectra of electromagnetic fields scattered from two-dimensional fetch- and depth-limited nearshore sea surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Doppler spectral signatures of sea echoes from two-dimensional (2-D) fetch- and depth-limited sea surfaces are investigated using the second-order small-slope approximation (SSA-II) model. For the description of 2-D nearshore sea surface, the revised choppy wave model (RCWM) is applied, which takes into account the wind fetch effect and water depth effect in nearshore marine environment. Comparisons of computed results in co-polarizations and cross polarization at various incident angles show that Doppler shift and spectral bandwidth can be greatly influenced by hydrodynamic modulation of waves in the large wind fetch and small water depth marine environment, which indicates that the hydrodynamic modulation induced by shoaling effect would be greatly enhanced in the situation of the nearshore shallow sea with a long wind fetch. The differences in variation trend between results in co-polarizations and cross polarization also reflect varying degrees of influence of aforementioned hydrodynamic modulation on different scattering mechanisms.

Nie, Ding; Zhang, Min; Li, Ning; Jiang, Wangqiang

2014-11-01

422

Composition and dynamics of the Black Sea benthopelagic plankton and its contribution to the near-shore plankton communities.  

PubMed

At a shallow (7 m) near-shore sampling site in the Black Sea we analyzed composition, abundance, and biomass of benthopelagic organisms and the contribution these animals make to the total plankton. The site was monitored across several years (1996-2001; 2006-2007) whilst for 1999-2000 the seasonal variations were analysed. A total of 321 samples from Golubaja Bay near Novorossiysk (44°34'31.04? N, 37°58'45.11? E) in 1996-2007 were taken with a Judey net. The benthopelagic fauna was represented by 69 taxa, a diversity comparable to similar shelf areas. The benthopelagic component played an important role in near-shore plankton communities in the Black Sea accounting for 50% of the total zooplankton biomass at night during all seasons. Abundance and biomass of the benthopelagic animals showed seasonal fluctuations, the highest biomass being recorded during winter (>75% of the total zooplankton biomass) and early spring due to large amphipods, whilst the highest abundances occur during late summer because of numerous young stages of various taxa. Amphipods, mysids, and decapods are the main contributors to the plankton biomass and abundances. Both night and daytime samples are strongly recommended for the adequate description of the near-shore plankton communities. PMID:24945680

Vereshchaka, Alexander L; Anokhina, Ludmila L

2014-01-01

423

A description of the nearshore fish communities in the Huron-Erie Corridor using multiple gear types  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Great Lakes coastal wetlands provide a critical habitat for many fish species throughout their life cycles. Once home to one of the largest wetland complexes in the Great Lakes, coastal wetlands in the Huron–Erie Corridor (HEC) have decreased dramatically since the early 1900s. We characterized the nearshore fish communities at three different wetland complexes in the HEC using electrofishing, seines, and fyke nets. Species richness was highest in the Detroit River (63), followed by the St. Clair Delta (56), and Western Lake Erie (47). The nearshore fish communities in the Detroit River and St. Clair Delta consisted primarily of shiners, bluntnose minnow, centrarchids, and brook silverside, while the Western Lake Erie sites consisted of high proportions of non-native taxa including common carp, gizzard shad, goldfish, and white perch. Species richness estimates using individual-based rarefaction curves were higher when using electrofishing data compared to fyke nets or seine hauls at each wetland. Twelve fish species were captured exclusively during electrofishing assessments, while one species was captured exclusively in fyke nets, and none exclusively during seine hauls. Western Lake Erie wetlands were more indicative of degraded systems with lower species richness, lower proportion of turbidity intolerant species, and increased abundance of non-native taxa. This work highlights the importance of coastal wetlands in the HEC by capturing 69 different fish species utilizing these wetlands to fulfill life history requirements and provides insight when selecting gears to sample nearshore littoral areas.

Francis, James T.; Chiotti, Justin A.; Boase, James C.; Thomas, Mike V.; Manny, Bruce A.; Roseman, Edward F.

2013-01-01

424

Composition and Dynamics of the Black Sea Benthopelagic Plankton and Its Contribution to the Near-Shore Plankton Communities  

PubMed Central

At a shallow (7 m) near-shore sampling site in the Black Sea we analyzed composition, abundance, and biomass of benthopelagic organisms and the contribution these animals make to the total plankton. The site was monitored across several years (1996–2001; 2006–2007) whilst for 1999–2000 the seasonal variations were analysed. A total of 321 samples from Golubaja Bay near Novorossiysk (44°34?31.04? N, 37°58?45.11? E) in 1996–2007 were taken with a Judey net. The benthopelagic fauna was represented by 69 taxa, a diversity comparable to similar shelf areas. The benthopelagic component played an important role in near-shore plankton communities in the Black Sea accounting for 50% of the total zooplankton biomass at night during all seasons. Abundance and biomass of the benthopelagic animals showed seasonal fluctuations, the highest biomass being recorded during winter (>75% of the total zooplankton biomass) and early spring due to large amphipods, whilst the highest abundances occur during late summer because of numerous young stages of various taxa. Amphipods, mysids, and decapods are the main contributors to the plankton biomass and abundances. Both night and daytime samples are strongly recommended for the adequate description of the near-shore plankton communities. PMID:24945680

Vereshchaka, Alexander L.; Anokhina, Ludmila L.

2014-01-01

425

Walton County Coastal Storm Damage Reduction Project Walton County, FL  

E-print Network

to reduce coastal storm damages by constructing berms and dunes along 18.8 miles of Walton County shorelineWalton County Coastal Storm Damage Reduction Project Walton County, FL 13 December 2012 ABSTRACT, several coastal storms have eroded the coastline of Walton County, resulting in recession

US Army Corps of Engineers

426

40 CFR 81.133 - Amarillo-Lubbock Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

...Garza County, Gray County, Hale County, Hall County, Hansford County, Hartley County, Hemphill County, Hockley County, Hutchinson County, King County, Lamb County, Lipscomb County, Lubbock County, Lynn County, Moore County, Motley County,...

2014-07-01

427

The presence and near-shore transport of human fecal pollution in Lake Michigan beaches  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Great Lakes are a source of water for municipal, agricultural and industrial use, and support significant recreation, commercial and sport fishing industries. Every year millions of people visit the 500 plus recreational beaches in the Great Lakes. An increasing public health risk has been suggested with increased evidence of fecal contamination at the shoreline. To investigate the transport and fate of fecal pollution at Great Lakes beaches and the health risk associated with swimming at these beaches, the near-shore waters of Mt Baldy Beach, Lake Michigan and Trail Creek, a tributary discharging into the lake were examined for fecal pollution indicators. A model of surf zone hydrodynamics coupled with a transport model with first-order inactivation of pollutant was used to understand the relative importance of different processes operating in the surf zone (e.g. physical versus biological processes). The Enterococcus human fecal pollution marker, which targets a putative virulence factor, the enterococcal surface protein (esp) in Enterococcus faecium, was detected in 2/28 samples (7%) from the tributaries draining into Lake Michigan and in 6/30 samples (20%) from Lake Michigan beaches. Preliminary analysis suggests that the majority of fecal indicator bactateria variation and water quality changes at the beaches can be explained by inputs from the influential stream and hydrometeorological conditions. Using modeling methods to predict impaired water quality may help reduce potential health threats to recreational visitors.

Molloy, S.L.; Liu, L.B.; Phanikumar, M.S.; Jenkins, T.M.; Wong, M.V.; Rose, J.B.; Whitman, R.L.; Shively, D.A.; Nevers, M.B.

2005-01-01

428

Evaluation of the physical process controlling beach changes adjacent to nearshore dredge pits  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Numerical modeling of a beach nourishment project is conducted to enable a detailed evaluation of the processes associated with the effects of nearshore dredge pits on nourishment evolution and formation of erosion hot spots. A process-based numerical model, Delft3D, is used for this purpose. The analysis is based on the modification of existing bathymetry to simulate "what if" scenarios with/without the bathymetric features of interest. Borrow pits dredged about 30??years ago to provide sand for the nourishment project have a significant influence on project performance and formation of erosional hot spots. It was found that the main processes controlling beach response to these offshore bathymetric features were feedbacks between wave forces (roller force or alongshore component of the radiation stress), pressure gradients due to differentials in wave set-up/set-down and bed shear stress. Modeling results also indicated that backfilling of selected borrow sites showed a net positive effect within the beach fill limits and caused a reduction in the magnitude of hot spot erosion. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Benedet, L.; List, J. H.

2008-01-01

429

Establishment of two invasive crustaceans (Copepoda: Harpacticoida) on the nearshore sands of Lake Michigan  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Benthic copepods (Copepoda: Harpacticoida) in the nearshore sediments of southern Lake Michigan appear to be dominated by two new invasive species. We report the first occurrence in North America of Schizopera borutzkyi Montschenko, a native to the Danube River delta, and Heteropsyllus nr. nunni, likely a new species that is morphologically similar to the marine species Heteropsyllus nunni and represents the first occurrence of this genus in freshwater. Schizopera borutzkyi is a euryhaline species occurring in shallow sands in its native habitat and in deeper sands (6-15 m) in southern Lake Michigan. Based on the absence of these species from previous studies, we suggest that they are recent introductions. Heteropsyllus nr. nunni dominated (55-100%) the harpacticoid abundance to depths of 9 m, but S. borutzkyi comprised 75% of the harpacticoid abundance at 15 m. Native harpacticoids were always greatly outnumbered by invasive harpacticoids in our samples, which suggests that the natives are being replaced rapidly or that the invasive species are finding unused resources. The ecological implications of these introductions are not known, but these invasions may represent continued 'invasional meltdown' in Lake Michigan.

Horvath, Thomas G.; Whitman, Richard L.; Last, Laurel L.

2001-01-01

430

Organic priority pollutants in nearshore fish from 14 Lake Michigan tributaries and embayments, 1983  

SciTech Connect

Composite, nearshore, whole fish samples of selected species, collected in fall 1983 from 13 Lake Michigan tributaries and Grand Traverse Bay, were analyzed for a wide range of pesticides and priority pollutants using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This study was carried out to identify existing source areas for known and previously unrecognized toxic substances. The authors strategy was to analyze those resident fish with the highest likely levels of contaminant. All fish analyzed exceeded the 2 mg/kg FDA action levels for PCBs, while 50% of the samples exceeded the DDTr IJC objective of 1 mg/kg. St. Joseph River common carp (Cyprinus carpio) carried the heaviest contaminant burden of all fish examined for PCBs (27.6 mg/kg), DDTr (10.2 kg/mg), and toxaphene (3.3 mg/kg); chlordane levels (0.85 mg/kg) were second highest to those in Kalamazoo River common carp (0.87 mg/kg). Concentrations of PCBs, toxaphene, DDT, DDE, and other pesticides were higher in bottom-feeding fish, such as common carp, than in top predators, e.g., northern pike (Esox lucius). Bottom feeders are relatively fatty fish, and live and feed near contaminated sediments, which increases their potential to bioaccumulate fat-soluble contaminants. Pesticides were also present in elevated concentrations in fish from sites with higher industrial and agricultural development. 31 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

Camanzo, J.; Rice, C.P.; Jude, D.J.; Rossmann, R.

1987-01-01

431

Assessment of the changes induced by a wave energy farm in the nearshore wave conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Starting from the observation that an important next stage in exploiting the ocean energy is to install large arrays of several identical devices in order to raise their overall electricity production, the present work has as objective to assess the local and coastal impact of a large wave farm that would operate in the Portuguese coastal environment. The target area is the Portuguese maritime pilot zone, São Pedro de Moel, which is located in the central part of the Portuguese continental nearshore. A generic wave farm was considered and various transmission situations were analyzed. The study started with the situation without wave farm (zero absorption) and subsequently different scenarios were considered by gradually increasing the conditions to the hypothetic case of the total absorption. For each case study, model simulations were performed covering the entire year 2009 using a wave prediction system based on Wave Watch 3, for the wave generation at the level of the entire North Atlantic Ocean, and on SWAN, for the coastal wave transformation. In this way, a comprehensive picture of the possible impact of the wave farm is provided. The results show that the presence of a wave farm operating offshore has a strong influence on the wave conditions immediately down wave. Although this influence is usually attenuated at the level of the coastline, it appears as obvious a general decrease in terms of significant wave height due to the wave farm, but also some other wave parameters are modified.

Bento, A. Rute; Rusu, Eugen; Martinho, Paulo; Guedes Soares, C.

2014-10-01

432

Tidal area dispersant project: Fate of dispersed and undispersed oil in two nearshore test spills  

SciTech Connect

In 1981, an oil spill field experiment was done in Maine to assess the effects to the benthos of dispersant used in nearshore oil spills. Three test plots, each 60 by 100 m, were set up, each with an upper and a lower intertidal sampling area. There were also five subtidal sampling stations in water depths from 5 to 20 m. One plot was exposed to 945 L (250 gal) of Murban crude oil released on an ebbing tide withincontainment booms and cleaned up by conventional mechanical methods 24 h later. A second plot was exposed to 945 L of Murban crude oil premixed with 94 L (25 gal)of a widely available self-mix nonionic dispersant. The dispersant-treated oil was discharged over a 2-h period around high water slack tide. Dispersed oil in water reaching the bottom had lost most of the hydrocarbons more volatile than n-C/sub 17/ compared with dispersed oil in water sampled at the same time near the surface. Petroleum retention by intertidal sediments and bivalves measured one week postspill was less in areas exposed to dispersed oil than in areas exposed to untreated oil.

Page, D.S.; Foster, J.C.; Gerber, R.P.; Gilfillan, E.S.; Hanson, S.A.; Hotham, J.R.; Vallas, D.

1982-10-01

433

The comparative fate of chemically dispersed and untreated oils in an Arctic nearshore environment  

SciTech Connect

The distribution and environmental fate of petroleum hydrocarbons introduced into the nearshore environment of Cape Hatt, Baffin Island, Canada, during two controlled experimental discharges of a Venezuelan (Lagomedio) crude oil have been studied. An analytical program based on a combination of ultraviolet/fluorescence studies, high resolution gas chromatography, and computer-assisted gas chromatographic mass spectrometry has been used to examine several hundred oil, seawater, sediment, sediment trap, surface floc, and benthic animal (seven species) samples to determine the distribution, transport, and weathering of oil spilled in two scenarios: as untreated oil on the surface and as chemically dispersed oil discharged below the surface. Conclusions are drawn about the weathering of oil in the two scenarios, transport of low and high molecular weight hydrocarbons into the water column and their persistence, the sedimentation of oil, the incorporation of oil into the sediment via sedimentation onto the surface floc and direct penetration of the sediment/ water interface, and the uptake and depuration of untreated and chemically dispersed oils by seven species of filter feeders and deposit feeders in the subtidal benthos.

Boehm, P.D.

1982-10-01

434

Diversity and population structure of a near-shore marine-sediment viral community.  

PubMed Central

Viruses, most of which are phage, are extremely abundant in marine sediments, yet almost nothing is known about their identity or diversity. We present the metagenomic analysis of an uncultured near-shore marine-sediment viral community. Three-quarters of the sequences in the sample were not related to anything previously reported. Among the sequences that could be identified, the majority belonged to double-stranded DNA phage. Temperate phage were more common than lytic phage, suggesting that lysogeny may be an important lifestyle for sediment viruses. Comparisons between the sediment sample and previously sequenced seawater viral communities showed that certain phage phylogenetic groups were abundant in all marine viral communities, while other phage groups were under-represented or absent. This 'marineness' suggests that marine phage are derived from a common set of ancestors. Several independent mathematical models, based on the distribution of overlapping shotgun sequence fragments from the library, were used to show that the diversity of the viral community was extremely high, with at least 10(4) viral genotypes per kilogram of sediment and a Shannon index greater than 9 nats. Based on these observations we propose that marine-sediment viral communities are one of the largest unexplored reservoirs of sequence space on the planet. PMID:15156913

Breitbart, Mya; Felts, Ben; Kelley, Scott; Mahaffy, Joseph M.; Nulton, James; Salamon, Peter; Rohwer, Forest

2004-01-01

435

An efficient mode-splitting method for a curvilinear nearshore circulation model  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A mode-splitting method is applied to the quasi-3D nearshore circulation equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The gravity wave mode and the vorticity wave mode of the equations are derived using the two-step projection method. Using an implicit algorithm for the gravity mode and an explicit algorithm for the vorticity mode, we combine the two modes to derive a mixed difference–differential equation with respect to surface elevation. McKee et al.'s [McKee, S., Wall, D.P., and Wilson, S.K., 1996. An alternating direction implicit scheme for parabolic equations with mixed derivative and convective terms. J. Comput. Phys., 126, 64–76.] ADI scheme is then used to solve the parabolic-type equation in dealing with the mixed derivative and convective terms from the curvilinear coordinate transformation. Good convergence rates are found in two typical cases which represent respectively the motions dominated by the gravity mode and the vorticity mode. Time step limitations imposed by the vorticity convective Courant number in vorticity-mode-dominant cases are discussed. Model efficiency and accuracy are verified in model application to tidal current simulations in San Francisco Bight.

Shi, Fengyan; Kirby, James T.; Hanes, Daniel M.

2007-01-01

436

Clark county monitoring program  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Since 1988, Clark County has been one of the counties designated by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) as an 'Affected Unit of Local Government' (AULG). The AULG designation is an acknowledgement by the federal government that could be negatively impacted to a considerable degree by activities associated with the Yucca Mountain High Level Nuclear Waste Repository. These negative effects would have an impact on residents as individuals and the community as a whole. As an AULG, Clark County is authorized to identify 'any potential economic, social, public health and safety, and environmental impacts' of the potential repository (42 USC Section 10135(C)(1)(B)(1)). Toward this end, Clark County has conducted numerous studies of potential impacts, many of which are summarized in the Clark County's Impact Assessment Report that was submitted by the DOE and the president of the United States in February 2002. Given the unprecedented magnitude and duration of the DoE's proposal, as well as the many unanswered questions about the number of shipments and the modal mix, the estimate of impacts described in these studies are preliminary. In order to refine these estimates, Clark County Comprehensive Planning Department's Nuclear Waste Division is continuing to assess potential impacts. In addition, the County has implemented a Monitoring Program designed to capture changes to the social, environmental, and economic well-being of its residents resulting from the Yucca Mountain project and other significant events within the County. The Monitoring Program acts as an 'early warning system' that allows Clark County decision makers to proactive respond to impacts from the Yucca Mountain Project. (authors)

Conway, Sheila [Urban Environmental Research, 10100 W. Charleston Boulevard Las Vegas, 89135 (United States); Auger, Jeremy [Applied Analysis, 10100 West Charleston Blvd, Suite 200, Las Vegas, Nevada 89135 (United States); Navies, Irene [Clark County, Department of Comprehensive Planning, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

2007-07-01

437

76 FR 12280 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, for Imperial County, Kern County, and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...County, and Ventura County; Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Kern County Air Pollution Control District...

2011-03-07

438

76 FR 12306 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County, Kern County, and Ventura...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...County, and Ventura County; Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Kern County Air Pollution Control District...

2011-03-07

439

Wisconsin County Histories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Whether you're interested in Reedsburg, Rhinelander, or Rubicon, the Wisconsin County Histories website will not fail those keen on the history of the Badger State. Created by the Wisconsin Historical Society, this archive provides access to more than 80 standard histories of Wisconsin counties, most of which were published between 1850 and 1920. The majority of the volumes are over several hundred pages long, and they include detailed passages on cities within their respective counties, along with sketches of prominent leaders. Visitors can use the drop-down menu available on the homepage to find specific volumes, or they can also perform a full text search across all of the histories.

440

Biological activities and phytochemicals of Swietenia macrophylla King.  

PubMed

Swietenia macrophylla King (Meliaceae) is an endangered and medicinally important plant indigenous to tropical and subtropical regions of the World. S. macrophylla has been widely used in folk medicine to treat various diseases. The review reveals that limonoids and its derivatives are the major constituents of S. macrophylla. There are several data in the literature indicating a great variety of pharmacological activities of S. macrophylla, which exhibits antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant effects, antimutagenic, anticancer, antitumor and antidiabetic activities. Various other activities like anti-nociceptive, hypolipidemic, antidiarrhoeal, anti-infective, antiviral, antimalarial, acaricidal, antifeedant and heavy metal phytoremediation activity have also been reported. In view of the immense medicinal importance of S. macrophylla, this review aimed at compiling all currently available information on its ethnomedicinal uses, phytochemistry and biological activities of S. macrophylla, showing its importance. PMID:23999722

Moghadamtousi, Soheil Zorofchian; Goh, Bey Hing; Chan, Chim Kei; Shabab, Tara; Kadir, Habsah Abdul

2013-01-01

441

Establishing backcountry use quotas: An example from Mineral King, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Increasing levels of visitor use and consequent resource damage have necessitated that backcountry use restrictions be established in the Mineral King area of Sequoia National Park, California. In this paper we review the steps taken in developing a trailhead quota system. The availability of acceptable campsites, based on a detailed inventory of site distribution and impact, was used to quantitatively derive use capacities for each camp area. Wilderness permit data on visitor dispersal patterns from the major trailheads, including length of stay at each camp area, were then used to translate the area capacities into daily trailhead quotas that would assure that these capacities were not surpassed. The general approach is applicable to any backcountry area, although large complex areas may require the use of available computer simulation models.

Parsons, David J.; Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Fodor, Paul A.

1981-07-01

442

Establishing backcountry use quotas: an example from Mineral King, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Increasing levels of visitor use and consequent resource damage have necessitated that backcountry use restrictions be established in the Mineral King area of Sequoia National Park, California. In this paper we review the steps taken in developing a trailhead quota system. The availability of acceptable campsites, based on a detailed inventory of site distribution and impact, was used to quantitatively derive use capacities for each camp area. Wilderness permit data on visitor dispersal patterns from the major trailheads, including length of stay at each camp area, were then used to translate the area capacities into daily trailhead quotas that would assure that these capacities were not surpassed. The general approach is applicable to any backcountry area, although large complex areas may require the use of available computer simulation models.

Parsons, David J.; Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Fodor, Paul A.

1981-01-01

443

Sources of fecal indicator bacteria to groundwater, Malibu Lagoon and the near-shore ocean, Malibu, California, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS) used to treat residential and commercial sewage near Malibu, California have been implicated as a possible source of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) to Malibu Lagoon and the near-shore ocean. For this to occur, treated wastewater must first move through groundwater before discharging to the Lagoon or ocean. In July 2009 and April 2010, ?18O and ?D data showed that some samples from water-table wells contained as much as 70% wastewater; at that time FIB concentrations in those samples were generally less than the detection limit of 1 Most Probable Number (MPN) per 100 milliliters (mL). In contrast, Malibu Lagoon had total coliform, Escherichia coli, and enterococci concentrations as high as 650,000, 130,000, and 5,500 MPN per 100 mL, respectively, and as many as 12% of samples from nearby ocean beaches exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency single sample enterococci standard for marine recreational water of 104 MPN per 100 mL. Human-associated Bacteroidales, an indicator of human-fecal contamination, were not detected in water from wells, Malibu Lagoon, or the near-shore ocean. Similarly, microarray (PhyloChip) data show Bacteroidales and Fimicutes Operational Taxanomic Units (OTUs) present in OWTS were largely absent in groundwater; in contrast, 50% of Bacteroidales and Fimicutes OTUs present in the near-shore ocean were also present in gull feces. Terminal-Restriction Length Fragment Polymorphism (T-RFLP) and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) data showed that microbial communities in groundwater were different and less abundant than communities in OWTS, Malibu Lagoon, or the near-shore ocean. However, organic compounds indicative of wastewater (such as fecal sterols, bisphenol-A and cosmetics) were present in groundwater having a high percentage of wastewater and were present in groundwater discharging to the ocean. FIB in the near-shore ocean varied with tides, ocean swells, and waves. Movement of water from Malibu Lagoon through the sand berm at the mouth of the Lagoon contributed FIB to the adjacent beach at low tide. Similar increases in FIB concentrations did not occur at beaches adjacent to unsewered residential development, although wastewater indicator compounds and radon-222 (indicative of groundwater discharge) were present. High FIB concentrations at high tide were not related to groundwater discharge, but may be related to FIB associated with debris accumulated along the high-tide line.

Izbicki, John A.; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Burton, Carmen A.; Van De Werfhorst, Laurie; Holden, Patricia A.; Dubinsky, Eric A.

2012-01-01

444

Large-scale movements and habitat characteristics of king eiders throughout the nonbreeding period  

USGS Publications Warehouse

King Eiders (Somateria spectabilis) breeding in western Canada and Alaska molt wing feathers and spend the winter in remote areas of the Bering Sea, precluding direct observation. To characterize timing of migration and habitat used by King Eiders during the nonbreeding period, we collected location data for 60 individuals (27 females and 33 males) over three years from satellite telemetry and utilized oceanographic information obtained by remote sensing. Male King Eiders dispersed from breeding areas, arrived at wing molt sites, and dispersed from wing molt sites earlier than females in all years. Males arriving earlier at wing molt sites molted flight feathers at higher latitudes. Distributions of molt and winter locations did not differ by sex or among years. Of the variables considered for analysis, distance to shore, water depth, and salinity appeared to best describe King Eider habitat throughout the nonbreeding period. King Eiders were located closer to shore, in shallower water with lower salinity than random locations. During the winter, lower ice concentrations were also associated with King Eider locations. This study provides some of the first large-scale descriptions of King Eider migration and habitat outside the breeding season. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2006.

Phillips, L.M.; Powell, A.N.; Rexstad, E.A.

2006-01-01

445

VizieR Online Data Catalog: King 5 and Berkeley 20 UBVRI photometry (Durgapal+, 2001)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present multicolour CCD photometry for two poorly studied open clusters (King 5 and Be 20). Photometry for a field near King 5 was also carried out to estimate the contamination by field stars. The colour magnitude diagrams (CMD) of the clusters show a well defined main sequence extending to the limit of the photometry, V~=20mag. The reddening for King 5, estimated from the colour-colour diagram, is ~0.82, whereas that for Be 20 as estimated by comparing theoretical main-sequence (MS) with the observed MS is 0.10. The morphology of the CMDs indicates that these clusters are old. The CMD of Be 20 shows a globular cluster-like horizontal branch. In case of King 5 the comparison of observational CMDs with the standard isochrones of VandenBerg (1985ApJS...58..711V) indicates an apparent discrepancy between the shape of the turnoff and isochrones. The CMDs of King 5 seem to be better understood in terms of stellar models with convective overshoot. The comparison of the CMDs with the stellar models by Bertelli et al. (1985A&A...150...33B) with convective overshoot produces a good fit for a metallicity Z=0.008 and an age of 1Gyr for King 5 and 5Gyr for Be 20. An apparent distance modulus (m-M)=14.0 and 15.1 has been estimated for King 5 and Be 20 respectively. They correspond to a distance of 1900+/-100pc and 9026+/-480pc, respectively. The radial density distribution in King 5 indicates that there is an excess of low mass stars in the outer region of the cluster, whereas the density distribution in Be 20 shows a good fit with the empirical King (1962AJ.....67..471K) model. For both clusters, observations have also been carried out to search for variable stars. (3 data files).

Durgapal, A. K.; Pandey, A. K.; Mohan, V.

2001-05-01

446

Pontotoc County Government Summer  

E-print Network

, disability, or status as a veteran in any of its policies, practices or procedures #12;Pontotoc County Zip Home Phone Cell Phone Email School Grade Completed Date Of Birth Parent/Guardian Home Phone Cell

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

447

Chronicle of the King Asoka: As Depicted in the History of Buddhism in India  

E-print Network

heing incurred. Ashamed of his act, the king enquired ahout this miracle. 23 He was told of the virtue of Arhathood. attained from seven days of contemplation. Lamenting over the sinful acts. accumulated over a long time. the king sought from... ,000 times, That evening, the King carried on the shoulders of powerful gNod-sbyin, went to see the stu pas with his retinue and in seven days had circumambulated all the stupa.." of precious relics in the world and had offered prayers more than ten times...

1999-01-01

448

"BECAUSE SOME STORIES DO LIVE FOREVER": STEPHEN KING'S THE DARK TOWER SERIES AS MODERN ROMANCE  

E-print Network

by no means set in stone, the most well-known works in this genre usually include the complete romances of Chrétien de Troyes, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and Sir Thomas Malory’s Morte D’Arthur. These are the works that King would have been most familiar..., and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight to analyze in relation to the Dark Tower series because of the motifs, themes, and structural similarities they share with King’s epic.32 Moreover, these constitute the texts that have defined the Arthurian narrative...

McMurray, Rachel Elizabeth

2012-05-31

449

Synchronization and an application of a novel fractional order King Cobra chaotic system.  

PubMed

In this paper, we design a new three dimensional King Cobra face shaped fractional order chaotic system. The multi-scale synchronization scheme of two fractional order chaotic systems is described. The necessary conditions for the multi-scale synchronization of two identical fractional order King Cobra chaotic systems are derived through feedback control. A new cryptosystem is proposed for an image encryption and decryption by using synchronized fractional order King Cobra chaotic systems with the supports of multiple cryptographic assumptions. The security of the proposed cryptosystem is analyzed by the well known algebraic attacks. Numerical simulations are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed theoretical results. PMID:25273185

Muthukumar, P; Balasubramaniam, P; Ratnavelu, K

2014-09-01

450

Exploring the nearshore marine wind profile from field measurements and numerical hindcast  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wind power is the predominant offshore renewable energy resource. In the last years, offshore wind farms have become a technically feasible source of electrical power. The economic feasibility of offshore wind farms depends on the quality of the offshore wind conditions compared to that of onshore sites. Installation and maintenance costs must be balanced with more hours and a higher quality of the available resources. European offshore wind development has revealed that the optimum offshore sites are those in which the distance from the coast is limited with high available resource. Due to the growth in the height of the turbines and the complexity of the coast, with interactions between inland wind/coastal orography and ocean winds, there is a need for field measurements and validation of numerical models to understand the marine wind profile near the coast. Moreover, recent studies have pointed out that the logarithmic law describing the vertical wind profile presents limitations. The aim of this work is to characterize the nearshore vertical wind profile in the medium atmosphere boundary layer. Instrumental observations analyzed in this work come from the Idermar project (www.Idermar.es). Three floating masts deployed at different locations on the Cantabrian coast provide wind measurements from a height of 20 to 90 meters. Wind speed and direction are measured as well as several meteorological variables at different heights of the profile. The shortest wind time series has over one year of data. A 20 year high-resolution atmospheric hindcast, using the WRF-ARW model and focusing on hourly offshore wind fields, is also analyzed. Two datasets have been evaluated: a European reanalysis with a ~15 Km spatial resolution, and a hybrid downscaling of wind fields with a spatial resolution of one nautical mile over the northern coast of Spain.. These numerical hindcasts have been validated based on field measurement data. Several parameterizations of the vertical wind profile are evaluated and, based on this work, a particular parameterization of the wind profile is proposed.

del Jesus, F.; Menendez, M.; Guanche, R.; Losada, I.

2012-12-01

451

Coral colonisation of an artificial reef in a turbid nearshore environment, Dampier Harbour, western Australia.  

PubMed

A 0.6 hectare artificial reef of local rock and recycled concrete sleepers was constructed in December 2006 at Parker Point in the industrial port of Dampier, western Australia, with the aim of providing an environmental offset for a nearshore coral community lost to land reclamation. Corals successfully colonised the artificial reef, despite the relatively harsh environmental conditions at the site (annual water temperature range 18-32°C, intermittent high turbidity, frequent cyclones, frequent nearby ship movements). Coral settlement to the artificial reef was examined by terracotta tile deployments, and later stages of coral community development were examined by in-situ visual surveys within fixed 25 x 25 cm quadrats on the rock and concrete substrates. Mean coral density on the tiles varied from 113 ± 17 SE to 909 ± 85 SE per m(2) over five deployments, whereas mean coral density in the quadrats was only 6.0 ± 1.0 SE per m(2) at eight months post construction, increasing to 24.0 ± 2.1 SE per m(2) at 62 months post construction. Coral taxa colonising the artificial reef were a subset of those on the surrounding natural reef, but occurred in different proportions--Pseudosiderastrea tayami, Mycedium elephantotus and Leptastrea purpurea being disproportionately abundant on the artificial reef. Coral cover increased rapidly in the later stages of the study, reaching 2.3 ± 0.7 SE % at 62 months post construction. This study indicates that simple materials of opportunity can provide a suitable substrate for coral recruitment in Dampier Harbour, and that natural colonisation at the study site remains sufficient to initiate a coral community on artificial substrate despite ongoing natural and anthropogenic perturbations. PMID:24040405

Blakeway, David; Byers, Michael; Stoddart, James; Rossendell, Jason

2013-01-01

452

Nearshore Fish Distributions in an Alaskan Estuary in Relation to Stratification, Temperature and Salinity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fish were sampled with beach seines and small-meshed beam trawls in nearshore (<1 km) and shallow (<25 m) habitats on the southern coast of Kachemak Bay, Cook Inlet, Alaska, from June to August, 1996-1998. Fish distributions among habitats were analysed for species composition, catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) and frequency of occurrence. Two oceanographically distinct areas of Kachemak Bay were sampled and compared: the Outer Bay and the Inner Bay. Outer Kachemak Bay is exposed and receives oceanic, upwelled water from the Gulf of Alaska, whereas the Inner Bay is more estuarine. Thermohaline properties of bottom water in the Outer and Inner Bay were essentially the same, whereas the Inner Bay water-column was stratified with warmer, less saline waters near the surface. Distribution and abundance of pelagic schooling fish corresponded with area differences in stratification, temperature and salinity. The Inner Bay supported more species and higher densities of schooling and demersal fish than the Outer Bay. Schooling fish communities sampled by beach seine differed between the Outer and Inner Bays. Juvenile and adult Pacific sand lance ( Ammodytes hexapterus), Pacific herring ( Clupea harengus pallasi), osmerids (Osmeridae) and sculpins (Cottidae) were all more abundant in the Inner Bay. Gadids (Gadidae) were the only schooling fish taxa more abundant in the Outer Bay. Thermohaline characteristics of bottom water were similar throughout Kachemak Bay. Correspondingly, bottom fish communities were similar in all areas. Relative abundances (CPUE) were not significantly different between areas for any of the five demersal fish groups: flatfishes (Pleuronectidae), ronquils (Bathymasteridae), sculpins (Cottidae), gadids (Gadidae) and pricklebacks (Stichaeidae).

Abookire, A. A.; Piatt, J. F.; Robards, M. D.

2000-07-01

453

Comparing quality of estuarine and nearshore intertidal habitats for Carcinus maenas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Estuarine and nearshore marine areas are vital habitats for several fish and benthic invertebrates. The shore crab Carcinus maenas (Crustacea: Brachyura: Portunidae) inhabits a variety of coastal, estuarine and lagoon habitats. At low tide, habitat structural complexity may be most important for crabs in the intertidal, providing refuge from predation and desiccation. The quality of different vegetated and nonvegetated estuarine and rocky shore habitats in SW Portugal and SW England was evaluated for intertidal C. maenas populations. We estimated population density, size-structure, and potential growth (RNA/DNA ratios) to investigate habitat quality. Vegetated estuarine habitats supported higher crab densities, than nonvegetated estuarine and rocky shore habitats. Investigation of population size-structure revealed that all habitats seem important recruitment and nursery areas although estuarine habitats in SW Portugal appeared to support higher densities of new recruits than equivalent habitats in SW England. Significant variation was found in RNA/DNA ratios among habitats. Ratios were highest in the rocky shore suggesting a high quality habitat where growth potential is high. We speculate that competition from other top-predators ( Pachygrapsus spp.) rather than low habitat quality may limit the occurrence of C. maenas in intertidal rocky shore habitats in SW Portugal. In estuarine environments RNA/DNA ratios were significantly higher in the vegetated than in the nonvegetated estuarine habitats in SW Portugal but not in SW England, suggesting geographic differences in the extent to which highly structure habitats represent high quality. Our results challenge the current paradigm that structured habitats are necessarily those of higher quality for C. maenas.

Amaral, Valter; Cabral, Henrique N.; Jenkins, Stuart; Hawkins, Stephen; Paula, José

2009-06-01

454

Dynamic temporal patterns of nearshore seepage flux in a headwater Adirondack lake  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although seepage in lakes is known to vary as a function of precipitation and watershed characteristics, temporal patterns of seepage flux over daily and weekly time scales have not been extensively studied with a concentrated effort of direct measurement of seepage in nearshore areas. In this study, seepage was intensively measured with seepage meters over two summers and during snowmelt in Lower Sylvan Pond, a small lake in the Adirondack Mountains region of New York State, USA. A consistent pattern of slight discharge (never exceeding 105 mL m -2 h -1) was observed at three stations along a segment of the shoreline near the inlet stream. A distinct temporal pattern of seepage was observed at three stations along another portion of the shoreline. Seepage discharged (>400 mL m -2 h -1) for a portion of the summer in 1998 and then shifted to recharge (<-500 mL m -2 h -1) for the remainder of the summer. A similar temporal pattern was observed again in 1999 but the transition to recharge occurred earlier and higher rates of discharge (610 mL m -2 h -1) and recharge (-608 mL m -2 h -1) were recorded. Additionally, seepage at these three stations increased after large rainfall events and a pronounced episodic increase of seepage was measured during snowmelt. Distinct seepage patterns along portions of the shoreline show that seepage can vary considerably within seasons and suggests a need to consider changes of seepage over time periods of days to weeks as well as among seasons and years. This study demonstrates that the resolution of temporal seepage data can be important to the understanding of water fluxes to aquatic ecosystems.

Sebestyen, Stephen D.; Schneider, Rebecca L.

2001-07-01

455

Survey of the state of the art in near-shore pipeline location and burial assessment  

SciTech Connect

Project's objective is to evaluate state-of-the-art methods for locating pipelines in shallow (less than 15 ft) water and for determining and monitoring their burial depths. The following recommendations are made on the research needed in three areas for locating near-shore, shallowly buried pipelines: (1) Sensors: The pipeline industry has selected the magnetic gradiometer array (GA) as a preferred sensor method. Other potential methods exist as backups. No additional research is recommended. (2) Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs): The Pipeline Research Committee is pursuing development of a prototype ROV is deliver the GA or other similar equipment to pipeline locations. (3) Phenomena: The data being collected from research on the phenomena affecting seabed conditions and the bathymetric data being collected along the Gulf Coast should be synthesized. This new effort should focus on identifying erosion-prone areas with respect to present and potential future pipeline locations. Technical approach is to get the broadest perspective on the concerns related to the determination of burial conditions for offshore pipelines, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) contacted individuals and organizations from the gas and petroleum industries, hardware and software vendors, academicians, and representatives from the government. A literature survey yielded the names of persons within academia who are presently working on similar applications with sensors. In the oil and gas industry, individuals and organizations involved in the Pipeline Research Committee made extensive contributions to the review and also provided the names of meaningful contacts from among their vendors. Discussions were held with the various persons both on the telephone and face to face. Vendors provided background materials and overview presentations on their capabilities for ANL to review.

Wilkey, P.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1991-11-01

456

Development of two-dimensional models to estimate nearshore bathymetry and sediment transport  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We examine the interactions and feedbacks between bathymetry, waves, currents, and sediment transport. Utilizing remotely-sensed wave refraction patterns of nearshore waves, we estimate bathymetry gradients in the nearshore through the 2D irrotationality of the wave number equation. The model, discussed in Chapter 2, uses an augmented form of the refraction equation that relates gradients in bathymetry to gradients in wavenumber and wave angle through the chain rule. The equations are cast in a form that is independent of wave period, so can be solved using wavenumber and direction data from a single snapshot rather than the normally-required time series of images. Secondly, remotely sensed images of wave breaking over complex bathymetry are used to study the nonlinear feedbacks between two-dimensional (horizontal), 2DH, morphology and cross-shore migration rates of the alongshore averaged bar. We first test a linear model on a subset of 4 years of data at Palm Beach, Australia. The results are discussed in Chapter 3. The model requires eight free parameters, solved for using linear regression of the data to model the relationship between alongshore averaged bar position, x, alongshore sinuosity of the bar, a, and wave forcing, F = H2o. The linear model suggests that 2DH bathymetry is linked to cross-shore bar migration rates. Nevertheless, the primary limitation is that variations in bar position and variability are required to be temporally uncorrelated with forcing in order to achieve meaningful results. In Chapter 4 a nonlinear model is subsequently developed and tested on the same data set. Initial equations for cross-shore sediment transport are formulated from commonly accepted theory using energetics-type equations. Cross-shore transport is based on the deviations around an equilibrium amount of roller contribution with the nonlinearity of the model forcing sediment transport to zero in the absence of wave breaking. The extension to 2DH is based on parameterizations of bar variability and the associated 2DH circulation. The model has five free parameters used to describe the relation between alongshore averaged bar position, x, 2DH bar variability, a, and wave characteristics (wave height, H, wave period, T, and wave angle, theta. The model is able to span multiple storms, accurately predicting bar migration for both onshore and offshore events. The longest individual data set tested is approximately 6 months. Using manually determined values for the coefficients, bar position is predicted with an R2 value of 0.42 over this time period. The effect of including a 2D dependency both increased rates of onshore migration and prevented highly 2D systems from migrating offshore under moderate wave heights. The model is also compared against a 1DH version by setting the 2D dependency term to unity and using the same values for the five free parameters. The last project (Chapter 5) explored the utilization of changes in bathymetry, Delta h/Deltat, to gain further understanding of the feedbacks between 2D sediment transport patterns, Qx and Qy, with respect to existing bathymetry in the nearshore. The model is based on the 2D continuity equation that relates changes in bathymetry to gradients in the cross-shore, ?Q x/?x, and the alongshore, ?Qy/?y, directions. The problem is under-determined, having two unknowns (Qy and Qx) and only one known (Deltah/Deltat) such that a series of constraints must be applied in order to solve for transport. We assume that that the cross-shore integral of Qx is closed, such that no sand enters or exits the system in this direction. By conservation of mass, this requires changes in volume of the cross-shore transect to be due to longshore gradients in Qy. We test six rules for distributing Qy: three rules describing the initial longshore transport ( Qry ) and three describing the cross-shore distribution of the excess volume component ( Qey ). Initial results suggest that requiring sediment to travel down slope ( Qrh=fBy ) is an intuitive choice for describing transport of distinct p

Splinter, Kristen D. M.

457

Investigation of Coastal Hydrogeology Utilizing Geophysical and Geochemical Tools along the Broward County Coast, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geophysical (CHIRP, boomer, and continuous direct-current resistivity) and geochemical tracer studies (continuous and time-series 222Radon) were conducted along the Broward County coast from Port Everglades to Hillsboro Inlet, Florida. Simultaneous seismic, direct-current resistivity, and radon surveys in the coastal waters provided information to characterize the geologic framework and identify potential groundwater-discharge sites. Time-series radon at the Nova Southeastern University National Coral Reef Institute (NSU/NCRI) seawall indicated a very strong tidally modulated discharge of ground water with 222Rn activities ranging from 4 to 10 disintegrations per minute per liter depending on tidal stage. CHIRP seismic data provided very detailed bottom profiles (i.e., bathymetry); however, acoustic penetration was poor and resulted in no observed subsurface geologic structure. Boomer data, on the other hand, showed features that are indicative of karst, antecedent topography (buried reefs), and sand-filled troughs. Continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) data showed slight variability in the subsurface along the coast. Subtle changes in subsurface resistivity between nearshore (higher values) and offshore (lower values) profiles may indicate either a freshening of subsurface water nearshore or a change in sediment porosity or lithology. Further lithologic and hydrologic controls from sediment or rock cores or well data are needed to constrain the variability in CRP data.

Reich, Christopher D.; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Greenwood, W. Jason; Wiese, Dana S.

2008-01-01

458

Dept of Mathematics and Statistics King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals  

E-print Network

Seminar Dept of Mathematics and Statistics King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Presenter Dr. Anwar H. Joarder Mathematics and Statistics Dept KFUPM Title A Bivariate Chi-Square Distribution

Omar, Mohammad H.

459

THE CHAPEL OF ST HUGH AND ST CHAD IN THE KING'S HALL AND COLLEGE OF  

E-print Network

THE CHAPEL OF ST HUGH AND ST CHAD IN THE KING'S HALL AND COLLEGE OF BRASENOSE MUSIC LIST, TRINITY Blessing - Chilcott Chaplain: Rev. Dr. Reynaud de la Bat Smit Director of College Music: Jonathan Newell

Oxford, University of

460

The Construction of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Malcolm X in Composition Textbooks: Rereading Readers  

E-print Network

While scholars have written about the use of textbooks in writing courses, little attention is paid to how textbooks anthologize writers, especially women and people of color. This study examines the portrayal of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr...

Burrows, Cedric Dewayne

2011-12-31

461

Dept of Mathematics and Statistics King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals  

E-print Network

Seminar Dept of Mathematics and Statistics King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Presenter Dr. Mohammad H. Omar Mathematics and Statistics Dept KFUPM Title Permutation-based Actuarial Present

Omar, Mohammad H.

462

Responses by king snakes (Lampropeltis getulus) to chemicals from colubrid and crotaline snakes.  

PubMed

Four litters of king snakes (Lampropeltis getulus), a snake-eating species, were tested for responses to chemicals from colubrid and crotaline snakes. King snakes presented with swabs rubbed against the dorsal skin of living snakes and with swabs treated with methylene chloride extracts of shed snake skins tongue-flicked more to swabs from a northern copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix), a crotaline, than to swabs from some colubrid snakes or to blank swabs. Six out of 10 king snakes in one litter attacked and attempted to ingest swabs treated with snake skin chemicals, implicating these chemicals as feeding stimuli for these ophiophagous snakes. Ingestively naive king snakes presented with plain air and snake odors in an olfactometer tongue-flicked more to snake odors. This study and others suggest that crotaline and colubrid snakes can be distinguished by chemical cues. PMID:24318350

Weldon, P J; Schell, F M

1984-10-01

463

3 CFR 8473 - Proclamation 8473 of January 15, 2010. Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2010  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...marred by division and injustice, the movement he...promise of economic and social justice because we...opportunity by correcting social injustice, breaking the cycle...let us ask ourselves what Dr. King believed to...

2011-01-01

464

The Design and Evaluation of a Vibrotactile Progress Bar Stephen A Brewster and Alison King  

E-print Network

The Design and Evaluation of a Vibrotactile Progress Bar Stephen A Brewster and Alison King Glasgow-mail: stephen@dcs.gla.ac.uk Web: www.dcs.gla.ac.uk/~stephen Abstract We present an investigation into the use

Williamson, John

465

Conodont biostratigraphy of the Hueco Mountains, El Paso County, west Texas  

E-print Network

of Helms West Well U. S. G, S. 7. 5 Minute Topographic Map 55 LIST OF PLATES Plate Stratigraphic Sections and Range Chart of the Hueco Mountains, El Paso County, Texas Page . (in pocket) 2. A. Oolitic and Skeletal Lithologies 2. B. Skeletal...). King and others (1945) divided the Magdalena Group into three informal divisions in the Hueco Mountains. The lower division is composed of 450 feet of dark-gray, thick- bedded skeletal wackestone. The middle division is composed of 300 feet of marl...

McLerran, Richard Dennis

2012-06-07

466

Knowledge on the Horizon: A Phenomenological Inquiry into the “Framing” of Rodney King  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using the 1991 police beating of Rodney King as case study, this paper draws on Husserlian phenomenology to establish a coherentist\\u000a account of knowledge as situated with respect to its concrete circumstances of production (e.g., social, cultural, historical,\\u000a political). I take as my point of departure Gail Weiss’s phenomenological investigation into the jury’s assessment of evidence\\u000a in the “Rodney King

Ian Gerrie

2006-01-01

467

Student Competition: Demographic trends around Martin Luther King Jr. Streets in United States Cities  

E-print Network

Demographic Trends around Martin Luther King Jr. Streets in United States Cities RaeLynn Butler Haskell Indian Nations University 2007 GIS Day November 14, 2007 Introduction • Does the name of a public street provide more than just a name...? • Could a toponym actually influence socio- economic trends within a place? The objective of this research is to observe patterns in demographics collected from U.S. Census Bureau Blocks adjacent to Martin Luther King Jr. Streets (Boulevards, Lanes...

Butler, RaeLynn

2007-11-14

468

A review of "Foxe's Book of Martyrs and Early Modern Print Culture" by John N. King  

E-print Network

new balanced, sophisticated class of research that looks into what 170 SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY NEWS physical books mean to ideologically-rooted cultures and how those cultures influence the production of texts. John N. King searches for such a balance... social posi- tions and ideological beliefs? (161). REVIEWS 171 Chapter 3 looks at the vast iconography of Book of Marytrs. King makes a strong case that Foxe did not exert heavy serious control over the printers? inclusions of images. Both...

Blevins, Jacob

2007-01-01

469

The late Neoproterozoic Grassy Group of King Island, Tasmania: correlation and palaeogeographic significance  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a very strong lithostratigraphic and ?13C-chemostratigraphic resemblance between the well-exposed diamictite–cap dolostone–shale succession on eastern King Island, and the Marinoan glacials and lowermost Wilpena Group of the Adelaide Rift Complex. The strength of the resemblance suggests original lateral continuity of sedimentation between King Island and the Adelaide Rift Complex together with the contiguous central Australian Neoproterozoic epicratonic basins.

C. R. Calver; M. R. Walter

2000-01-01

470

Neogene stratigraphic architecture and tectonic evolution of Wanganui, King Country, and eastern Taranaki Basins, New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analysis of the stratigraphic architecture of the fills of Wanganui, King Country, and eastern Taranaki Basins reveals the occurrence of five 2nd order Late Paleocene and Neogene sequences of tectonic origin. The oldest is the late Eocene?Oligocene Te Kuiti Sequence, followed by the early?early Miocene (Otaian) Mahoenui Sequence, followed by the late?early Miocene (Altonian) Mokau Sequence, all three in King

Peter J. J. Kamp; Adam J. Vonk; Kyle J. Bland; Rochelle J. Hansen; Austin J. W. Hendy; Avon P. McIntyre; Melodie Ngatai; Stuart J. Cartwright; Shaun Hayton; Campbell S. Nelson

2004-01-01

471

King Eider (Somateria spectabilis) Nesting in Association with Long-tailed Skua (Stercorarius longicaudus)  

Microsoft Academic Search

In High Arctic Northeast Greenland King Eiders (Somuteria spscfabilis) were found nesting in association with solitarily breeding Long-tailed Skuas (Stercorarius longicaudus). The association is demonstrated using spatial statistics analyses and timing of clutch initiations. Long-tailed Skuas' nests were evenly spaced in the 6.1 km2 census area, whereas nine out of ten King Eider nests were located close to five different

SVEN BLOMQVIST; MAGNUS ELANDER

1988-01-01

472

Use of the Beaufort Sea by king eiders breeding on the North Slope of Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We estimated areas used by king eiders (Somateria spectabilis) in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea, how distributions of used areas varied, and characteristics that explained variation in the number of days spent at sea, to provide regulatory agencies with baseline data needed to minimize impacts of potential offshore oil development. We implanted sixty king eiders with satellite transmitters at nesting areas on the North Slope of Alaska, USA, in 2002-2004. More than 80% of marked eiders spent >2 weeks staging offshore prior to beginning a postbreeding molt migration. During postbreeding staging and migration, male king eiders had much broader distributions in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea than female eiders, which were concentrated in Harrison and Smith Bays. Distribution did not vary by sex during spring migration in the year after marking. Shorter residence times of eiders and deeper water at locations used during spring migration suggest the Alaskan Beaufort Sea might not be as critical a staging area for king eiders during prebreeding as it is postbreeding. Residence time in the Beaufort Sea varied by sex, with female king eiders spending more days at sea than males in spring and during postbreeding. We conclude the Alaskan Beaufort Sea is an important staging area for king eiders during postbreeding, and eider distribution should be considered by managers when mitigating for future offshore development. We recommend future studies examine the importance of spring staging areas outside the Alaskan Beaufort Sea.

Phillips, L.M.; Powell, A.N.; Taylor, E.J.; Rexstad, E.A.

2007-01-01

473

A preliminary appraisal of sediment sources and transport in Kings Bay and vicinity, Georgia and Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-quality, bottom-material, suspended-sediment, and current-velocity data were collected during November 1981 in Kings Bay and vicinity to provide information on the sources and transport of estuarine sediments. Kings Bay and Cumberland Sound , the site of the Poseidon Submarine Base in southeast Georgia, are experiencing high rates of sediment deposition and accumulation, which are causing serious navigational and operational problems. Velocity, bathymetry, turbidity, and bottom-material data suggest that the area in the vicinity of lower Kings Bay is accumulating deposits of suspended sediment transported from Cumberland Sound on the floodtide and from upper Kings Bay and the tidal marsh drained by Marianna Creek on the ebbtide. Suspended-sediment discharges computed for consecutive 13-hour ebbtides and floodtides showed that a net quantity of suspended sediment was transported seaward from upper Kings Bay and Marianna Creek. A net landward transport of suspended sediment computed at the St. Marys Entrance indicated areas seaward of St. Marys Entrance may be supplying sediment to the shoaling areas of the estuary, including lower Kings Bay. (USGS)

McConnell, J.B.; Radtke, D.B.; Hale, T.W.; Buell, G.R.

1983-01-01

474

KING (Kinemage, Next Generation): A versatile interactive molecular and scientific visualization program  

PubMed Central

Proper visualization of scientific data is important for understanding spatial relationships. Particularly in the field of structural biology, where researchers seek to gain an understanding of the structure and function of biological macromolecules, it is important to have access to visualization programs which are fast, flexible, and customizable. We present KiNG, a Java program for visualizing scientific data, with a focus on macromolecular visualization. KiNG uses the kinemage graphics format, which is tuned for macromolecular structures, but is also ideal for many other kinds of spatially embedded information. KiNG is written in cross-platform, open-source Java code, and can be extended by end users through simple or elaborate “plug-in” modules. Here, we present three such applications of KiNG to problems in structural biology (protein backbone rebuilding), bioinformatics of high-dimensional data (e.g., protein sidechain chi angles), and classroom education (molecular illustration). KiNG is a mature platform for rapidly creating and capitalizing on scientific visualizations. As a research tool, it is invaluable as a test bed for new methods of visualizing scientific data and information. It is also a powerful presentation tool, whether for structure browsing, teaching, direct 3D display on the web, or as a method for creating pictures and videos for publications. KiNG is freely available for download at http://kinemage.biochem.duke.edu. PMID:19768809

Chen, Vincent B; Davis, Ian W; Richardson, David C

2009-01-01

475

Storm-Driven Shoreface Morphodynamics on a Low-Wave Energy Delta: The Role of Nearshore Topography and Shoreline Orientation  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKSTROM, J.T.; JACKSON, D.W.T.; COOPER, J.A.G., and MALVAREZ, G.C., 2008. Storm-driven shoreface mor- phodynamics on a low-wave energy delta: the role of nearshore topography and shoreline orientation. Journal of Coastal Research, 24(6), 1379-1387. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. An analysis of storm-driven sedimentary changes on the shoreface of a low-wave-energy cuspate delta on the southern coast of Spain is

J. T. Backstrom; D. W. T. Jackson; J. A. G. Cooper; G. C. Malvárez

2008-01-01

476

Survey of Radiological and Chemical Contaminants in the Near-Shore Environment at the Hanford Site 300 Area  

SciTech Connect

This updates the original report by correcting some errors and adding new information. This assessment of the 300 Area was completed to identify any contamination present and determine if it could present a risk to humans and plant and animal life. The assessment characterized the radiological and chemical conditions existing in the near-shore environment of the Columbia River at the 300 Area by collecting water, biota, and sediment samples and measuring radiation levels during a time when the effects of riverbank spring discharges and groundwater upwelling into the river was likely to be present.

Patton, Gregory W. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Van Verst, Scott P. (Washington State Department of Health); Tiller, Brett L. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Antonio, Ernest J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Poston, Ted M. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2003-04-01

477

Behavior of red king crab larvae: phototaxis, geotaxis and rheotaxis.  

PubMed

Zoeae of Paralithodes camtschatica were positively phototactic to white light intensities above 1 x 10(13) q cm-2 s-1. Negative phototaxis occurred at low (1 x 10(12) q cm-2 s-1), but not high intensities (2.2 x 10(16) q cm-2 s-1). Phototactic response was directly related to light intensity. Zoeae also responded to red, green and blue light. Zoeae were negatively geotactic, but geotaxis was dominated by phototaxis. Horizontal swimming speed of stage 1 zoeae < 4 d old was 2.4 +/- 0.1 (SE) cm s-1 and decreased to 1.7 +/- 0.1 cm s-1 in older zoeae (P < 0.01). Horizontal swimming speed of stage 2 zoeae was not significantly different from > or = 4 d old stage 1 zoeae. Vertical swimming speed, 1.6 +/- 0.1 cm s-1, and sinking rate, 0.7 +/- 0.1 cm s-1, did not change with ontogeny. King crab zoeae were positively rheotactic and maintained position in horizontal currents less than 1.4 cm s-1. Starvation reduced swimming and sinking rates and phototactic response. PMID:11539849

Shirley, S M; Shirley, T C

1988-01-01

478

Cocktail-party effect in king penguin colonies  

PubMed Central

The king penguin, Aptenodytes patagonicus, breeds without a nest in colonies of several thousands of birds. To be fed, the chick must recognize the parents in a particularly noisy environment using only vocal cues. The call an adult makes when seeking the chick is emitted at a high amplitude level. Nevertheless, it is transmitted in a colonial context involving the noise generated by the colony and the screening effect of the bodies, both factors reducing the signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, the adult call is masked by a background noise with similar amplitude and spectral and temporal characteristics, enhancing the difficulty for the chick in finding its parents. We calculate that the maximum distance from the caller at which its signal can be differentiated from the background noise (signal-to-noise ratio equal to 1) should not exceed 8 to 9 m in a feeding area. But our tests show that, in fact, chicks can discriminate between the parental call and calls from other adults at a greater distance, even when call intensity is well below that of the noise of simultaneous calls produced by other adults. This capacity to perceive and extract the call of the parent from the ambient noise and particularly from the calls of other adults, termed the 'cocktail-party effect' in speech intelligibility tests, enhances the chick's ability to find its parents.

Aubin, T.; Jouventin, P.

1998-01-01

479

Magnetometry at Uruk (Iraq): The city of King Gilgamesh  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Uruk (Tell Warka) is one of the most famous sites for the early cultural development at Mesopotamia. The Sumerian city state was also important for the origin of writing and Uruk was the scene of action of mans oldest epic, the famous Epic of Gilgamesh (2600 B.C). During the time of the Sassanides, 400 A.D. the city was given up completely. Today the ruin is dominated by shallow hills and wadis, covered by pottery, mudbricks and slags. The area is totally free of modern buildings and far away from the modern village of Warka. Therefore it is an ideal place for uncompensated cesium magnetometry. The most sensational find was the discovery of a canal system inside the city. Furthermore the magnetogram shows the remains of buildings of the Babylonian type as well as garden structures, a middle Babylonian graveyard and the so called "New Years Temple" of the God Anu or Godess Ischtar. The city wall, which we prospected in a length of more than one kilometer, includes a water gate and is nearly 40 meters broad. From magnetometry it is evident that it was build by burned mudbricks as it was described by the Epic. In the west of the "New Years Temple" in the middle of the former Euphrates river we detected the remains of a building which may be interpreted as a burial. But if this building is the grave of the famous King Gilgamesh as it was described by the Epic of Gilgamesh it must remain speculative.

Fassbinder, J.; Becker, H.; van Ess, M.

2003-04-01

480

32 CFR 1602.10 - County.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false County. 1602.10 Section 1602.10 National Defense...SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.10 County. The word county includes, where applicable, counties,...

2011-07-01

481

32 CFR 1602.10 - County.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false County. 1602.10 Section 1602.10 National Defense...SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.10 County. The word county includes, where applicable, counties,...

2012-07-01

482

32 CFR 1602.10 - County.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false County. 1602.10 Section 1602.10 National Defense...SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.10 County. The word county includes, where applicable, counties,...

2010-07-01

483

Activities and preliminary results of nearshore benthic habitat mapping in southern California, 1998  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The nearshore benthic habitat of the Santa Barbara coast and Channel Islands supports a diversity of marine life that are commercially, recreationally, and intrinsically valuable. Some of these resources are known to be endangered including a variety of rockfish and the White Abalone. State and National agencies have been mandated to preserve and enhance these resources and require detailed habitat characterization in order to do so. This project will characterize and map the benthic habitat in areas that have been selected because they have been set aside as National Sanctuaries or State Preserves, or are areas of ongoing or planned fish population studies. Various management strategies are being developed to protect marine resources in the Santa Barbara Channel Islands Region. One approach under investigation is to implement no-take marine reserves (Agardy, T., 1997; Bohnsack, 1998; Roberts, 1997). One small reserve presently exists on Anacapa Island and there is a growing momentum to add additional reserves to form a reserve network (Lafferty et al., 2000). Reserves may provide relatively pristine marine communities in a wild state for study and appreciation. In addition, they may buffer some species from over-fishing. A key feature of marine reserve design is to protect a representation of the existing habitats in a region (Roberts, 1997). Unfortunately, the distribution of habitats is not well known in this area since the underwater equivalent of soils and vegetation maps that are widely available for terrestrial systems do not yet exist. Managers need habitat maps to help determine the most appropriate boundaries for reserves in a network in order to meet various criteria and goals (such as habitat representation, reserve size, habitat heterogeneity, reserve spacing, inclusion of sensitive habitats, etc.). Another use for habitat mapping is to better understand the distribution of those habitats that are particularly important to fished species or sensitive species. Combining habitat mapping with ongoing studies of egg and larval fish counts by the National Marine Fisheries Service (Russell Vetter), rockfish population studies by the California Department of Fish and Game (Dave VenTresca), and white abalone (Kevin Lafferty and others, USGS) will extend the ability to predict the distribution of these species and identify areas with appropriate habitat that might be suitable for restoration. Additional uses for habitat mapping include managing visitor use, kelp distribution, and archeological resources.

Cochrane, Guy R.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

2000-01-01

484

Coupling of fog and marine microbial content in the near-shore coastal environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microbes in the atmosphere (microbial aerosols) play an important role in climate and provide an ecological and biogeochemical connection between oceanic, atmospheric, and terrestrial environments. However, the sources and environmental factors controlling the concentration, diversity, transport, and viability of microbial aerosols are poorly understood. This study examined culturable microbial aerosols from a coastal environment in Maine (USA) and determined the effect of onshore wind speed and fog presence on deposition rate, source, and community composition. During fog events with low onshore winds (< 2 m s-1) the near-shore deposition of microbial aerosols (microbial fallout) decreased with increasing wind speeds, whereas microbial fallout rates under clear conditions and comparable low wind speeds showed no wind speed dependence. Mean aerosol particle size also increased with onshore wind speed when fog was present, indicating increased shoreward transport of larger aerosol particles. 16S rRNA sequencing of culturable ocean surface bacteria and microbial aerosols deposited onshore resulted in the detection of 31 bacterial genera, with 5 dominant genera (Vibrio, Bacillus, Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter, Salinibacterium) making up 66% of all sequences. The microbial aerosol sequence library, as with libraries found in other coastal/marine aerosol studies, was dominated at the phylum level by Proteobacteria, with additional representation from Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Seventy-five percent of the viable microbial aerosols falling out under foggy conditions were most similar to GenBank-published sequences detected in marine environments. Using a 97% similarity cut-off, ocean surface and fog sequence libraries shared eight operational taxonomic units (OTU's) in total, three of which were the most dominant OTU's in the library, representing large fractions of the ocean (28%) and fog (21%) libraries. The fog and ocean surface libraries were significantly more similar in microbial community composition than clear (non-foggy) and ocean surface libraries, according to both Jaccard and Sorenson indices. These findings provide the first evidence of a difference in community composition and microbial viability (culturability) of aerosols associated with fog compared to clear conditions. The data support a dual role for fog in enhancing the fallout of viable (culturable) microbial aerosols via increased gravitational settling rates and decreased aerosolization stress on the organisms, which may include relief from UV inactivation, desiccation, and oligotrophic microconditions. This study provides a strong case for ocean to terrestrial transport of microbes and a potential connection between water quality and air quality at coastal sites.

Dueker, M. E.; O'Mullan, G. D.; Weathers, K. C.; Juhl, A. R.; Uriarte, M.

2011-09-01

485