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1

Charging Up in King County, Washington  

ScienceCinema

King County, Washington is spearheading a regional effort to develop a network of electric vehicle charging stations. It is also improving its vehicle fleet and made significant improvements to a low-income senior housing development.

Constantine, Dow; Oliver, LeAnn; Inslee, Jay; Sahandy, Sheida; Posthuma, Ron; Morrison, David;

2013-05-29

2

Charging Up in King County, Washington  

SciTech Connect

King County, Washington is spearheading a regional effort to develop a network of electric vehicle charging stations. It is also improving its vehicle fleet and made significant improvements to a low-income senior housing development.

Constantine, Dow; Oliver, LeAnn; Inslee, Jay; Sahandy, Sheida; Posthuma, Ron; Morrison, David

2011-01-01

3

Charging Up in King County, Washington  

ScienceCinema

King County, Washington is spearheading a regional effort to develop a network of electric vehicle charging stations. It is also improving its vehicle fleet and made significant improvements to a low-income senior housing development.

4

Educational and Demographic Profile: Kings County.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for Kings County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced communication…

California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

2004-01-01

5

Primary Care Development Guide for King County. Initial Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The improvement of primary care services rendered in private physician offices, hospital emergency rooms, and community clinics in King County, Washington is addressed. Health planning councils in four Washington counties (King, Kitsap, Pierce, and Snohom...

1975-01-01

6

Radiological Risk Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

Microsoft Academic Search

Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include \\

Strom; Daniel J

2005-01-01

7

King County Metro Transit Hydrid Articulated Buses: Interim Evaluation Results.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document is an interim technical report on a comparison and evaluation of new diesel and diesel hybrid-electric articulated buses operated as part of the King County Metro Transit (KC Metro) fleet in Seattle, Washington. This interim report covers th...

K. Chandler K. Waklowicz

2006-01-01

8

Radiological Risk Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

SciTech Connect

Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document develops plausible and/or likely scenarios, including the identification of likely radioactive materials and quantities of those radioactive materials to be involved. These include 60Co, 90Sr, 137Cs, 192Ir, 226Ra, plutonium, and 241Am. Two broad categories of scenarios are considered. The first category includes events that may be suspected from the outset, such as an explosion of a "dirty bomb" in downtown Seattle. The explosion would most likely be heard, but the type of explosion (e.g., sewer methane gas or RDD) may not be immediately known. Emergency first responders must be able to quickly detect the radioisotopes previously listed, assess the situation, and deploy a response to contain and mitigate (if possible) detrimental effects resulting from the incident. In such scenarios, advance notice of about an hour or two might be available before any contaminated wastewater reaches a treatment plant. The second category includes events that could go initially undetected by emergency personnel. Examples of such a scenario would be the inadvertent or surreptitious introduction of radioactive material into the sewer system. Intact rogue radioactive sources from industrial radiography devices, well-logging apparatus, or moisture density gages may get into wastewater and be carried to a treatment plant. Other scenarios might include a terrorist deliberately putting a dispersible radioactive material into wastewater. Alternatively, a botched terrorism preparation of an RDD may result in radioactive material entering wastewater without anyone's knowledge. Drinking water supplies may also be contaminated, with the result that some or most of the radioactivity ends up in wastewater.

Strom, Daniel J.

2005-08-05

9

Interim Evaluations Results from New Flyer/Allison Hybrid Buses at King County Metro. Preprint.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper prepared for the 2005 American Public Transportation Association Bus & Paratransit Conference discusses NREL/DOE evaluation of hybrid electric articulated transit buses operated by King County Metro.

K. Chandler E. Eberts L. Eudy

2005-01-01

10

Interim Evaluation Results from New Flyer/Allison Hybrid Buses at King County Metro: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper prepared for the 2005 American Public Transportation Association Bus & Paratransit Conference discusses NREL/DOE evaluation of hybrid electric articulated transit buses operated by King County Metro.

Chandler, K.; Eberts, E.; Eudy, L.

2005-05-01

11

Evaluation of a drowning prevention campaign in King County, Washington  

PubMed Central

Objectives—A three year drowning prevention campaign focused on increasing the use of life vests among children 1–14 years old. An evaluation was conducted to determine campaign awareness, change in ownership and use of life vests by children, and predictors of life vest use. Setting—King County, Washington. Methods—Four telephone surveys were conducted with parents before, during, and after the campaign. Results—The campaign was recalled by 50% of families surveyed. From before to after the campaign, reported life vest use by children on docks, beaches, or at pools increased from 20% to 29% (p<0.01) and life vest ownership for children increased from 69% to 75% (p=0.06). Among parents aware of the campaign, reported child life vest use increased from 20% to 34% (p<0.001) and ownership increased from 69% to 80% (p<0.01). Among families unaware of the campaign, neither life vest use nor ownership changed significantly. Children were more often reported to wear life vests if a parent knew of the campaign, was confident fitting the vest, was younger than 40 years, felt the child could not swim well, and owned a life vest for the child. Conclusions—A community-wide drowning prevention campaign resulted in a significant, although modest, increase in reported life vest use and ownership among children.

Bennett, E.; Cummings, P.; Quan, L.; Lewis, F. M.

1999-01-01

12

Geology and ground-water resources of northwestern King County, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

King County, in the west-central part of the State of Washington, includes about 2,135 square miles. The eastern part of the county lies in the Sierra-Cascade Mountains province and the remainder is in the Puget Trough of the Pacific Border province. The area covered by the present investigation is almost entirely within the Puget Trough and includes about 450 square miles.

Liesch, Bruce A.; Price, Charles E.; Walters, Kenneth L.

1963-01-01

13

Upper Strawn (Desmoinesian) carbonte and clastic depositional environments, southeastern King County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Pennsylvanian upper Strawn Group of southeastern King County, Texas, provides a unique setting to study interactions between coeval carbonate and clastic deposition during the Desmoinesian. One of the most perplexing problems is the relationship of massive Pennsylvanian platform carbonates to shallow-water terrigenous clastic sediments. Within the study area, carbonate facies were deposited along the northern edge of the Knox-Baylor

Todd H. Boring

1990-01-01

14

Upper Strawn (Desmoinesian) carbonate and clastic depositional environments, SE King County, TX  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Pennsylvanian upper Strawn Group of southeast King County, Texas, provides a unique setting to study interactions between coeval carbonate and clastic deposition during the Desmoinesian. One of the most perplexing problems is the relationship of massive Pennsylvanian platform carbonates to shallow-water marine and deltaic sediments. Within the study area carbonate facies were deposited along the northern edge of the

Todd H. Boring

1990-01-01

15

Trends in suicide by carbon monoxide inhalation in King County, Washington: 1996-2009.  

PubMed

Carbon monoxide (CO) inhalation is one of the leading methods of suicide in the United States. A sharp increase in suicide by inhaling the CO produced from burning charcoal has been reported in parts of Asia; however, the incidence of this method has not been determined in a U.S. population. Thus, we determined trends of CO suicide in the ethnically diverse population of King County, Washington, U.S.A. During the period 1996-2009, we identified 158 cases of suicide by CO poisoning, with 125 because of automotive exhaust, 26 because of charcoal burning, and seven from other CO sources. While historical U.S. data indicate >99% of CO suicides in the United States occurring by automobile exhaust inhalation, in the most recent years analyzed, c. 40% of CO-related suicides in King County, Washington, were because of charcoal burning, indicating a possible shift in suicide trends that warrants further scrutiny in additional populations. PMID:21291470

Schmitt, Michael W; Williams, Timothy L; Woodard, Kristinza R; Harruff, Richard C

2011-05-01

16

Upper Strawn (Desmoinesian) carbonte and clastic depositional environments, southeastern King County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Pennsylvanian upper Strawn Group of southeastern King County, Texas, provides a unique setting to study interactions between coeval carbonate and clastic deposition during the Desmoinesian. One of the most perplexing problems is the relationship of massive Pennsylvanian platform carbonates to shallow-water terrigenous clastic sediments. Within the study area, carbonate facies were deposited along the northern edge of the Knox-Baylor trough on the Spur platform, and terrigenous clastics were carried toward the Midland basin through the Knox-Baylor trough. Based on the analysis of subsurface cores, five carbonate lithofacies and four clastic lithofacies were recognized in southeastern King County, Texas. The distribution and geometry of these lithofacies are related to variations in the rate of subsidence in the Knox-Baylor trough, Pennsylvanian tectonics, deltaic progradation, avulsion, and compaction. The platform carbonates within the northern region of southeastern King County record environments within the carbonate platform complex, including middle platform, outer platform, algal mound, and platform margin. The quartzarenitic sandstones within the southern region of southeastern King County occur in a variety of complex depositional geometries, including distributary-bar fingers, lobate deltas, and offshore bars. Cores of these sandstones represent mainly the uppermost portion of the various sandstone bodies. The upper Strawn Group provides an attractive area for exploration geology. Both carbonates and clastics provide excellent reservoirs from a depth of approximately 5,000-6,000 ft. Total production within the area is over 100 million bbl of oil since the early 1940s. Multiple pay zones within a 600-ft interval also provide an added incentive for exploration. Areas within and around the Knox-Baylor trough deserve a detailed study due to these relatively shallow, unexplored, multiple pay zones.

Boring, T.H. (Oryx Energy Co., Oklahoma City, OK (USA))

1990-02-01

17

Monitoring the Air for the Presence of 2,4-D in Kern County, Kings County and San Luis Obispo County: A Cooperative California Study. Spring, 1980.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Environmental Hazards Assessment Program of the California Department of Food and Agriculture conducted a study during 1980 to investigate reports of phenoxy damage to crops in Kern and Kings Counties. The herbicide 2,4-D was not detected in any of th...

S. W. Simpson L. A. Neher T. M. Mischke R. J. Oshima

1989-01-01

18

Regional Hydraulic Geometry Curves of the Northern Cascade Mountains, Chelan and King Counties, Washington State, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service has developed regional hydraulic geometry curves relating drainage area to bankfull top width, mean depth and cross-sectional area for the east and west sides of the northern Cascade Mountains in Chelan and King Counties, Washington. NRCS surveyed 10 channel reaches with drainage areas from 1 to 1000 square miles within the Wenatchee River drainage of Chelan County and 10 channel reaches with drainage areas of 1 to 100 square miles within the Cedar and Green River drainages of King County. Selection criteria for stream reaches required a minimum of 20 years of USGS stream gage discharge records, unregulated flows and safe access. Survey data were collected with a Sokkia Total Station during low flow conditions from August 2004 to September 2005. NRCS measured a channel cross-section at each of the USGS stream gage sites and two or three additional cross-sections up and downstream. The authors also collected samples of bed material for gradation analysis and estimation of Manning's roughness coefficient, n. Bankfull elevations were estimated based on visual identification of field indicators and USGS flood discharges for the 50% exceedance probability event. Field data were evaluated with the Ohio DNR Reference Reach spreadsheet to determine bankfull top width, mean depth and cross-sectional area. We applied a simple linear regression to the data following USGS statistical methods to evaluate the closeness of fit between drainage area and bankfull channel dimensions. The resulting R2 values of 0.83 to 0.93 for the eastern Cascade data of Chelan County and 0.71 to 0.88 for the western Cascade data of King County indicate a close association between drainage area and bankfull channel dimensions for these two sets of data.

Gasperi, J. T.; McClung, J. M.; Hanson, D. L.

2006-12-01

19

2009 Pandemic Influenza A Vaccination of Pregnant Women--King County, Washington State, 2009-2010  

PubMed Central

Objectives. Our objectives were to estimate 2009 pandemic influenza A (pH1N1) vaccination coverage among pregnant women and identify associated factors. Methods. We distributed a multimodal survey to 5341 women who gave birth between November 1, 2009, and January 31, 2010, identified by hospitals in King County, Washington State, with maternity services (n?=?11). Results. Of 4205 respondents, 3233 (76.9%) reported that they had received pH1N1 vaccine during pregnancy or within 2 weeks after delivery. Women whose prenatal care provider recommended vaccine had a higher vaccination prevalence than women whose provider did not (81.5% vs 29.6%; adjusted prevalence ratio?=?2.1; 95% confidence interval?=?1.72, 2.58). Vaccination prevalence was lower among women who had received prenatal care from a midwife only compared with women who had received care from other providers (62.9% vs 78.8%; adjusted prevalence ratio?=?0.89; 95% confidence interval?=?0.83, 0.96). Conclusions. Among pregnant women in King County, pH1N1 vaccination coverage was high. To improve coverage during nonpandemic seasons, influenza vaccine should be recommended routinely by prenatal care providers and vaccination provided where prenatal care is received. Barriers to midwives providing vaccination recommendations to patients should be explored.

Koelemay, Kathryn G.; Kwan-Gett, Tao Sheng; Cadwell, Betsy L.; Duchin, Jeffrey S.

2012-01-01

20

COMPILATON OF REPORT AND DATA SUPPORTING THE EPA STUDY, "ASIAN AND PACIFIC ISLANDER SEAFOOD CONSUMPTION STUDY IN KING COUNTY, WASHINGTON".  

EPA Science Inventory

In 1996 and 1999, EPA published the results of a community-centered approach for documenting the seafood consumption patterns of Asian American and Pacific Islanders (API) in the King County area of Washington state. Summary statistics were included in the project reports, but n...

21

Upper Strawn (Desmoinesian) carbonate and clastic depositional environments, SE King County, TX  

SciTech Connect

The Pennsylvanian upper Strawn Group of southeast King County, Texas, provides a unique setting to study interactions between coeval carbonate and clastic deposition during the Desmoinesian. One of the most perplexing problems is the relationship of massive Pennsylvanian platform carbonates to shallow-water marine and deltaic sediments. Within the study area carbonate facies were deposited along the northern edge of the Knox-Baylor trough on the Spur platform, and terrigenous clastics were carried toward the Midland basin through the Knox-Baylor trough. Based on the analysis of subsurface cores, five carbonate lithofacies and four clastic lithofacies were recognized in southeast King County, Texas. The distribution and geometry of these lithofacies are related to variations in the rate of subsidence in the Knox-Baylor trough, Pennsylvanian tectonics, deltaic progradation, avulsion and compaction. The platform carbonates within the northern region record environments within the carbonate platform complex, including middle platform, outer platform, algal mound, and platform margin. The quartzarenitic sandstones within the southern region occur in a variety of complex depositional geometries, including distributary bar fingers, lobate deltas, and offshore bars. The upper Strawn Group provides an attractive area for exploration geology. Both carbonates and clastics provide excellent reservoirs from a depth of approximately 5,000 to 6,000 ft. Total production since the early 1940s, within the area is over 100,000,000 bbl of oil. Multiple pay zones within a 600-ft interval also provide an added incentive for exploration. Areas within and around the Knox-Baylor trough deserve additional study due to these relatively shallow, unexplored, multiple pay zones.

Boring, T.H. (Oryx Energy Co., Oklahoma City, OK (USA))

1990-05-01

22

Residential property values are associated with obesity among women in King County, WA, USA  

PubMed Central

Studies of social determinants of weight and health in the US have typically relied on self-reported education and incomes as the two primary measures of socioeconomic status (SES). The assessed value of one’s home, an important component of wealth, may be a better measure of the underlying SES construct and a better predictor of obesity. The Seattle Obesity Study (SOS), conducted in 2008-9, was a cross-sectional random digit dial telephone survey of 2001 adults in King County, Washington State, US. Participants’ addresses were geo-coded and residential property values for each tax parcel were obtained from the county tax assessor’s database. Prevalence ratios of obesity by property values, education, and household income were estimated separately for women and men, after adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, household size, employment status and home ownership. Among women, the inverse association between property values and obesity was very strong and independent of other SES factors. Women in the bottom quartile of property values were 3.4 times more likely to be obese than women in the top quartile. No association between property values and obesity was observed for men. The present data strengthen the evidence for a social gradient in obesity among women. Property values may represent a novel and objective measure of SES at the individual level in the US. Measures based on tax assessment data will provide a valuable resource for future health studies.

Rehm, Colin D; Moudon, Anne V; Hurvitz, Philip M; Drewnowski, Adam

2012-01-01

23

A health and environmental profile of the dry cleaning industry in King County, Washington.  

PubMed

Workers in the dry cleaning industry are exposed to a variety of harmful solvents, and poor work practices can result in extensive environmental contamination. Of particular concern is perchloroethylene (PERC), which is the most commonly used cleaning solvent. This chlorinated hydrocarbon is a pervasive environmental contaminant and a probable human carcinogen. PERC is also a neurotoxin and is toxic to the liver and kidneys. The study described here was comprised of key informant interviews, site visits, and a countywide business survey. The 64% response rate to the survey suggests that the results are likely representative of King County's dry cleaning industry. Dry cleaning was determined to be dominated by small, Korean-owned, family-run businesses. Although the use of PERC as the primary dry cleaning agent has decreased in recent years, this solvent is still used by the majority of businesses. This industry would benefit from regulatory intervention in concert with an educational campaign and enhanced technical and financial assistance. For any intervention to be effective, however, it must account for the unique financial and demographic characteristics of this industry. PMID:23858662

Whittaker, Stephen G; Johanson, Chantrelle A

2013-06-01

24

Descriptive epidemiology of unintentional residential fire injuries in King County, WA, 1984 and 1985.  

PubMed Central

Although most studies have concentrated on fatal residential fire injuries, which are a leading cause of fatal injuries in the United States, few investigators have examined in detail nonfatal injuries as a consequence of residential fires. This population-based study used the Washington State Fire Incident Reporting System to assess the incidence and descriptive epidemiology of fatal and nonfatal burns or respiratory tract damage resulting from unintentional residential fires. For the 2-year period 1984-85 in King County, WA, the mortality rate due to injury in a residential fire was 0.7 per 100,000 per year, and the incidence of nonfatal injuries was 5.6 per 100,000 per year. Of 17 fatalities, 59 percent of the deaths occurred at the scene of the fire. Of 128 persons with nonfatal injuries, 19 percent were hospitalized; although the 55 percent seen as outpatients and the 26 percent treated by the fire department or paramedics at the fire scene usually had minor injuries, they would not have been captured if only traditional data sources had been employed. Those injured averaged 2.8 days of restricted activity, but the range was from less than 1 day to 1 year. Injuries were more common in the households with a low socioeconomic status and among nonwhites, especially American Indians. Variation in incidence by age, sex, and source of ignition for deaths and nonfatal injuries suggests appropriate targets for future fire injury prevention programs.

Ballard, J E; Koepsell, T D; Rivara, F P; Van Belle, G

1992-01-01

25

Tuberculosis risk factors in adults in King County, Washington, 1988 through 1990.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES. Tuberculosis has become a resurgent public health problem in the United States. Because resources are limited, control programs frequently must target populations at greatest risk. The purpose of the study was to examine risk factors for tuberculosis in adults. METHODS. In King County, Washington State, from 1988 through 1990, the characteristics of patients with tuberculosis were compared with census data, and a case-control study was conducted. Self-administered questionnaires were completed by 151 patients with active tuberculosis and 545 control subjects. RESULTS. Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus, non-White race/ethnicity, and foreign birthplace were each associated with a sixfold or greater increase in risk. Each of the following was associated with at least a doubled risk: history of selected underlying medical conditions; low weight for height; low socioeconomic status; and age 70 years or older. Men had 1.9 times the risk of women, smokers of 20 years' or more duration had 2.6 times the risk of nonsmokers, and heavy alcohol consumers had 2.0 times the risk of nondrinkers. CONCLUSIONS. Intervention targeting easily identified groups may be an effective way to reduce the incidence of tuberculosis.

Buskin, S E; Gale, J L; Weiss, N S; Nolan, C M

1994-01-01

26

Benthic megafauna of the nearshore zone of Martel Inlet (King George Island, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica): depth zonation and underwater observations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The benthic megafauna from the soft bottoms of the shallow coastal zone of Martel Inlet (Admiralty Bay, King George Island,\\u000a South Shetland Islands, Antarctica) was studied during three austral summers (1989\\/1990, 1990\\/1991 and 1994\\/1995) in relation\\u000a to the bathymetric features. Surveying and sampling, based on specimen counting and underwater observations, were undertaken\\u000a by scuba-diving at depths down to 25?m. The

Edmundo Ferraz Nonato; Tânia A. S. Brito; Paulo Cesar De Paiva; Monica A. V. Petti; Thais N. Corbisier

2000-01-01

27

Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience  

SciTech Connect

The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the ``normal`` municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan`s programs. Focusing on the Plan`s household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

Not Available

1991-10-01

28

Estimated agricultural ground-water pumpage in parts of Fresno, Kings, and Madera Counties, San Joaquin Valley, California, 1974-77  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Agricultural ground-water pumpage data are presented for 1974-77 for the area on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley in parts of Fresno, Kings, and Madera Counties, Calif., which has approximately the boundaries of the Westlands Water District. The method of estimating pumpage was based on electric-power consumption at the agricultual wells. (Woodard-USGS)

Mitten, Hugh T.

1978-01-01

29

Public health assessment for Pacific Sound Resources, Seattle, King County, Washington, Region 10. Cerclis No. WAD009248287. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Sound Resources (PSR) was a wood preserving facility located in King County, Washington, on the southern shore of Elliott Bay near the city of Seattle. Wood preserving activities have occurred on the PSR property since 1909 and have resulted in releases of contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), pentachlorophenol (PCP), and metal solutions into on-site surface soil, subsurface soil, groundwater, and Elliott Bay sediments. The PSR site is presently considered an indeterminate public health hazard because existing environmental data is not sufficient to document human exposure. There is potential for human exposure to have occurred in the past, to be presently occurring, or to occur in the future, to contaminant levels which may be expected to result in adverse health effects. Contaminants of concern at the PSR site include: arsenic, PAHs, lead, mercury, and pentachlorophenol.

Not Available

1994-11-23

30

Use of medical services during a 2-month period in the Seattle-King County (Washington) jail.  

PubMed Central

Total health care utilization in the Seattle-King County jail over a 2-month period in spring 1979 was studied. The annualized visit rate for men was 48 per prisoner per year, 2.6 times the rate for men studied in a long-term prison and almost 20 times the rate for men studied in the general population. The annualized rate for female prisoners was three times that of male prisoners. For all prisoners, the most common problems seen were skin conditions (9.7 percent), musculoskeletal (8.3 percent), and psychiatric (8.2 percent). An examination of practitioners' patterns in providing care demonstrated the primary role of registered nurses, who saw 70 percent of the patients. During the study period, 125 transfers were made to a hospital; 48.8 percent were for medical problems, 41.6 percent for trauma, and 9.6 percent for psychosocial problems.

Demers, R; Walsh, K

1981-01-01

31

The geographic distribution of obesity by census tract among 59?767 insured adults in King County, WA.  

PubMed

Objective:To evaluate the geographic concentration of adult obesity prevalence by census tract (CT) in King County, WA, in relation to social and economic factors.Methods and design:Measured heights and weights from 59?767 adult men and women enrolled in the Group Health (GH) healthcare system were used to estimate obesity prevalence at the CT level. CT-level measures of socioeconomic status (SES) were median home values of owner-occupied housing units, percent of residents with a college degree and median household incomes, all drawn from the 2000 Census. Spatial regression models were used to assess the relation between CT-level obesity prevalence and socioeconomic variables.Results:Smoothed CT obesity prevalence, obtained using an Empirical Bayes tool, ranged from 16.2-43.7% (a 2.7-fold difference). The spatial pattern of obesity was non-random, showing a concentration in south and southeast King County. In spatial regression models, CT-level home values and college education were more strongly associated with obesity than household incomes. For each additional $100?000 in median home values, CT obesity prevalence was 2.3% lower. The three SES factors together explained 70% of the variance in CT obesity prevalence after accounting for population density, race/ethnicity, age and spatial dependence.Conclusions:To our knowledge, this is the first report to show major social disparities in adult obesity prevalence at the CT scale that is based, moreover, on measured heights and weights. Analyses of data at sufficiently fine geographic scale are needed to guide targeted local interventions to stem the obesity epidemic. PMID:24037278

Drewnowski, A; Rehm, C D; Arterburn, D

2014-06-01

32

Heluma and King Mountain fields, back-thrusted structures, Upton County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Heluma field was discovered and initially developed in 1956 as a four-well Ellenburger pool with some marginal Devonian reserves up-hole. For fifteen years it was reasonable to map the field as a tilted fault block at the Ellenburger level. In 1971, a field extension well proved that the supposed bounding high-angle normal fault was instead a low-angle backthrust, which overrides and does not cut the Ellenburger. The Devonian came in 500 ft structurally high to the older wells and has since produced nearly 4 million bbl of oil. Eighteen additional Ellenburger locations were also drilled beneath the backthrust. The present spacing shows that some structurally low Ellenburger tops were due to drilling into Ordovician sinkholes. King Mountain field is a long narrow anticline that has produced 5.5 million bbl of oil from the Ellenburger. This field was more completely developed than Heluma during the late 1950s and the same style of backthrust so prolific at Heluma is also present here, yet with a lesser throw. During the 1950s, all faults easily may have been interpreted as very high-angle normal faults. Similarly, one can easily conclude they are flower structures created by wrench tectonics. These oil fields lie in an ancillary direction to the Big Lake fault. The key to the backthrusts, however, is the compression of the intervening asymmetric synclines. The thick section of Devonian limestone and chert could not be tightly folded so it rode up the flank of the syncline until the limb was higher than the adjacent anticline.

Turmelle, J.M. (Columbia Gas Development Corp., Houston, TX (United States))

1992-04-01

33

Understanding Barriers to Routine HIV Screening: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Healthcare Providers in King County, Washington  

PubMed Central

Objective In 2006, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended routine HIV screening in healthcare settings for persons between 13 and 64 years old. In 2010, the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) was changed to align testing rules with these recommendations. We designed this survey to ascertain the current state of HIV testing and barriers to routine screening in King County, Washington. Methods Between March 23 and April 16, 2010, a convenience sample of healthcare providers completed an online survey. Providers answered true-false and multiple choice questions about national recommendations and the WAC, policies in their primary clinical settings, and their personal HIV testing practices. Providers were asked to agree or disagree whether commonly reported barriers limited their implementation of routine HIV screening. Results Although 76% of the 221 respondents knew that the CDC recommended routine HIV screening for persons regardless of their risk, 99 (45%) providers reported that their primary clinical setting had a policy to target testing based on patient risk factors. Forty-four (20%) providers reported that their primary clinical setting had a policy of routine HIV screening, 54 (25%) reported no official policy, and 15 (7%) did not know whether a policy existed. Only 11 (5%) providers offer HIV testing to all patients at initial visits. When asked about barriers to routine screening, 57% of providers agreed that perception that their patient population is low risk limits the number of HIV tests they perform. Only 26 (13%) providers agreed that concern about reimbursement posed a barrier to testing. Conclusions Most providers participating in this survey continue to target HIV testing, despite knowledge of national recommendations. Efforts are still needed to educate providers and policymakers, clarify the recent WAC revisions, and implement structural changes in order to increase HIV testing in Washington State.

Shirreffs, Alexandra; Lee, David P.; Henry, Jsani; Golden, Matthew R.; Stekler, Joanne D.

2012-01-01

34

Rip Currents: Nearshore Fundamentals  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Rip Currents: Nearshore Fundamentals module provides insight into how nearshore circulation and wave dynamics are involved in rip current formation. Topics covered in this module include: nearshore terminology, circulation and waves, rip current characteristics, and rip current forcing mechanisms. This module is the second of three modules covering the forecasting of rip currents.

Spangler, Tim

2004-12-13

35

Sensitivity analysis of the FEMA HAZUS-MH MR4 Earthquake Model using seismic events affecting King County Washington  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

HAZUS-MH MR4 (HAZards U. S. Multi-Hazard Maintenance Release 4) is a risk-estimation software developed by FEMA to calculate potential losses due to natural disasters. Federal, state, regional, and local government use the HAZUS-MH Earthquake Model for earthquake risk mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery planning (FEMA, 2003). In this study, we examine several parameters used by the HAZUS-MH Earthquake Model methodology to understand how modifying the user-defined settings affect ground motion analysis, seismic risk assessment and earthquake loss estimates. This analysis focuses on both shallow crustal and deep intraslab events in the American Pacific Northwest. Specifically, the historic 1949 Mw 6.8 Olympia, 1965 Mw 6.6 Seattle-Tacoma and 2001 Mw 6.8 Nisqually normal fault intraslab events and scenario large-magnitude Seattle reverse fault crustal events are modeled. Inputs analyzed include variations of deterministic event scenarios combined with hazard maps and USGS ShakeMaps. This approach utilizes the capacity of the HAZUS-MH Earthquake Model to define landslide- and liquefaction- susceptibility hazards with local groundwater level and slope stability information. Where Shakemap inputs are not used, events are run in combination with NEHRP soil classifications to determine site amplification effects. The earthquake component of HAZUS-MH applies a series of empirical ground motion attenuation relationships developed from source parameters of both regional and global historical earthquakes to estimate strong ground motion. Ground motion and resulting ground failure due to earthquakes are then used to calculate, direct physical damage for general building stock, essential facilities, and lifelines, including transportation systems and utility systems. Earthquake losses are expressed in structural, economic and social terms. Where available, comparisons between recorded earthquake losses and HAZUS-MH earthquake losses are used to determine how region coordinators can most effectively utilize their resources for earthquake risk mitigation. This study is being conducted in collaboration with King County, WA officials to determine the best model inputs necessary to generate robust HAZUS-MH models for the Pacific Northwest.

Neighbors, C.; Noriega, G. R.; Caras, Y.; Cochran, E. S.

2010-12-01

36

Field, petrologic and detrital zircon study of the Kings sequence and Calaveras complex, Southern Lake Kaweah Roof Pendant, Tulare County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

U-Pb dating of detrital zircon grains separated from elastic sedimentary rocks is combined with field, petrographic and geochemical data to reconstruct the geologic history of Mesozoic rocks exposed at the southern end of the Lake Kaweah metamorphic pendant, western Sierra Nevada. Identification of rocks exposed at Limekiln Hill, Kern County, CA, as belonging to the Calaveras complex and Kings sequence was confirmed. Detrital zircon populations from two Calaveras complex samples provide Permo-Triassic maximum depositional ages (MDA) and reveal a Laurentian provenance indicating that continental accretion of the northwest-trending Kings-Kaweah ophiolite belt was in process prior to the Jurassic Period. Rock types including radiolarian metachert, metachert-argillite, and calc-silicate rocks with marble lenses are interpreted as formed in a hemipelagic environment of siliceous radiolarian deposition, punctuated by extended episodes of lime-mud gravity flows mixing with siliceous ooze forming cafe-silicate protoliths and limestone olistoliths forming marble lenses. Two samples of the overlying Kings sequence turbidites yield detrital zircons with an MDA of 181.4 +/-3.0 Ma and an interpreted provenance similar to other Jurassic metasediments found in the Yokohl Valley, Sequoia and Boyden Cave roof pendants. Age peaks indicative of Jurassic erg heritage are also present. In contrast, detrital zircon samples from the Sequoia and Slate Mountain roof pendants bear age-probability distributions interpreted as characteristic of the Snow Lake block, a tectonic sliver offset from the Paleozoic miogeocline.

Buchen, Christopher T.

37

Geologic map of the Kings Mountain and Grover quadrangles, Cleveland and Gaston Counties, North Carolina, and Cherokee and York Counties, South Carolina  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This geologic map of the Kings Mountain and Grover 7.5-minute quadrangles, N.C.-S.C., straddles a regional geological boundary between the Inner Piedmont and Carolina terranes. The Kings Mountain sequence (informal name) on the western flank of the Carolina terrane in this area includes the Neoproterozoic Battleground and Blacksburg Formations. The Battleground Formation has a lower part consisting of metavolcanic rocks and interlayered schist, and an upper part consisting of quartz-sericite phyllite and schist interlayered with quartz-pebble metaconglomerate, aluminous quartzite, micaceous quartzite, manganiferous rock, and metavolcanic rocks. The Blacksburg Formation consists of phyllitic metasiltstone interlayered with thinner units of marble, laminated micaceous quartzite, hornblende gneiss, and amphibolite. Layered metamorphic rocks of the Inner Piedmont terrane include muscovite-biotite gneiss, muscovite schist, and amphibolite. The Kings Mountain sequence has been intruded by metatonalite and metatrondhjemite (Neoproterozoic), metadiorite and metagabbro (Paleozoic), and High Shoals Granite (Pennsylvanian). Layered metamorphic rocks of the Inner Piedmont in this area have been intruded by Toluca Granite (Ordovician?), Cherryville Granite and associated pegmatite (Mississippian), and spodumene pegmatite (Mississippian). Diabase dikes (early Jurassic) are locally present throughout the area. Ductile fault zones of regional scale include the Kings Mountain and Kings Creek shear zones. In this area, the Kings Mountain shear zone forms the boundary between the Inner Piedmont and Carolina terranes, and the Kings Creek shear zone separates the Battleground Formation from the Blacksburg Formation. Structural styles change across the Kings Mountain shear zone from steeply-dipping layers, foliations, and folds on the southeast to gently- and moderately-dipping layers, foliations, and recumbent folds on the northwest. Mineral assemblages in the Kings Mountain sequence show a westward decrease from upper amphibolite facies (sillimanite zone) near the High Shoals Granite on the east side of the map to greenschist (epidote-amphibolite) facies in the south-central part of the area near the Kings Mountain shear zone. Amphibolite-facies mineral assemblages in the Inner Piedmont terrane increase in grade from the kyanite zone near the Kings Mountain shear zone to the sillimanite zone in the northwest part of the map. Surficial deposits include alluvium in the stream valleys and colluvium along ridges and steep slopes. These quadrangles are unusual in their richness and variety of mineral deposits, which include spodumene (lithium), cassiterite (tin), mica, feldspar, silica, clay, marble, kyanite and sillimanite, barite, manganese, sand and gravel, gold, pyrite, and iron. (Abstract from pamphlet.)

Horton, J. Wright, Jr.

2006-01-01

38

Geologic Map of the Kings Mountain and Grover Quadrangles, Cleveland and Gaston Counties, North Carolina, and Cherokee and York Counties, South Carolina  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This geologic map of the Kings Mountain and Grover 7.5-min quadrangles, N.C.-S.C., straddles a regional geological boundary between the Inner Piedmont and Carolina terranes. The Kings Mountain sequence (informal name) on the western flank of the Carolina terrane in this area includes the Neoproterozoic Battleground and Blacksburg Formations. The Battleground Formation has a lower part consisting of metavolcanic rocks and interlayered schist and an upper part consisting of quartz-sericite phyllite and schist interlayered with quartz-pebble metaconglomerate, aluminous quartzite, micaceous quartzite, manganiferous rock, and metavolcanic rocks. The Blacks-burg Formation consists of phyllitic metasiltstone interlayered with thinner units of marble, laminated micaceous quartzite, hornblende gneiss, and amphibolite. Layered metamorphic rocks of the Inner Piedmont terrane include muscovite-biotite gneiss, muscovite schist, and amphibolite. The Kings Mountain sequence has been intruded by metatonalite and metatrondhjemite (Neoproterozoic), metagabbro and metadiorite (Paleozoic?), and the High Shoals Granite (Pennsylvanian). Layered metamorphic rocks of the Inner Piedmont in this area have been intruded by the Toluca Granite (Ordovician?), the Cherryville Granite and associated pegmatite (Mississippian), and spodumene pegmatite (Mississippian). Diabase dikes (early Jurassic) are locally present throughout the area. Ductile fault zones of regional scale include the Kings Mountain and Kings Creek shear zones. In this area, the Kings Mountain shear zone forms the boundary between the Inner Piedmont and Carolina terranes, and the Kings Creek shear zone separates the Battleground Formation from the Blacksburg Formation. Structural styles change across the Kings Mountain shear zone from steeply dipping layers, foliations, and folds on the southeast to gently and moderately dipping layers, foliations, and recumbent folds on the northwest. Mineral assemblages in the Kings Mountain sequence show a westward decrease from upper amphibolite facies (sillimanite zone) near the High Shoals Granite in the eastern side of the map area to upper greenschist (epidote-amphibolite) facies in the south-central part of the area near the Kings Mountain shear zone. Amphibolite-facies mineral assemblages in the Inner Piedmont terrane increase in grade from the kyanite zone near the Kings Mountain shear zone to the sillimanite zone in the northwestern part of the map area. Surficial deposits include alluvium in the stream valleys and colluvium along ridges and steep slopes. These quadrangles are unusual in the richness and variety of the mineral deposits that they contain, which include spodumene (lithium), cassiterite (tin), mica, feldspar, silica, clay, marble, kyanite and sillimanite, barite, manganese, sand and gravel, gold, pyrite, and iron.

Horton, J. Wright, Jr.

2008-01-01

39

Estuarine water-quality and sediment data, and surface-water and ground-water-quality data, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Camden County, Georgia, January 1999  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In January 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey collected estuarine-water, estuarine-sediment, surface-water, and ground-water quality samples in the vicinity of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Camden County, Georgia. Data from these samples are used by the U.S. Navy to monitor the impact of submarine base activities on local water resources. Estuarine water and sediment data were collected from five sites on the Crooked River, Kings Bay, and Cumberland Sound. Surface-water data were collected from seven streams that discharge from Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay. Ground-water data were collected from six ground-water monitoring wells completed in the water-table zone of the surficial aquifer at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. Samples were analyzed for nutrients, total and dissolved trace metals, total and dissolved organic carbon, oil and grease, total organic halogens, biological and chemical oxygen demand, and total and fecal coliform. Trace metals in ground and surface waters did not exceed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Drinking Water Standards; and trace metals in surface water also did not exceed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Surface Water Standards. These trace metals included arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, selenium, silver, tin, and zinc. Barium was detected in relatively high concentrations in ground water (concentrations ranged from 18 to 264 micrograms per liter). Two estuarine water samples exceeded the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Environmental Protection Division standards for copper (concentrations of 6.2 and 3.0 micrograms per liter).

Leeth, David C.; Holloway, Owen G.

2000-01-01

40

Geologic map of southwestern Sequoia National Park and vicinity, Tulare County, California, including the Mineral King metamorphic pendant  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

From the late 1940s to the early 1990s, scientists of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) mapped the geology of most of Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, California, and published the results as a series of 15-minute (1:62,500 scale) Geologic Quadrangles. The southwest corner of Sequoia National Park, encompassing the Mineral King and eastern edge of the Kaweah 15-minute topographic quadrangles, however, remained unfinished. At the request of the National Park Service's Geologic Resources Division (NPS-GRD), the USGS has mapped the geology of that area using 7.5-minute (1:24,000 scale) topographic bases and high-resolution ortho-imagery. With partial support from NPS-GRD, the major plutons in the map area were dated by the U-Pb zircon method with the Stanford-USGS SHRIMP-RG ion microprobe. Highlights include: (1) Identification of the Early Cretaceous volcano-plutonic suite of Mineral King (informally named), consisting of three deformed granodiorite plutons and the major metarhyolite tuffs of the Mineral King metamorphic pendant. Members of the suite erupted or intruded at 130-140 Ma (pluton ages: this study; rhyolite ages: lower-intercept concordia from zircon results of Busby-Spera, 1983, Princeton Ph.D. thesis, and from Klemetti et al., 2011, AGU abstract) during the pause of igneous activity between emplacement of the Jurassic and Cretaceous Sierran batholiths. (2) Some of the deformation of the Mineral King metamorphic pendant is demonstrably Cretaceous, with evidence including map-scale folding of Early Cretaceous metarhyolite tuff, and an isoclinally folded aplite dike dated at 98 Ma, concurrent with the large 98-Ma granodiorite of Castle Creek that intruded the Mineral King pendant on the west. (3) A 21-km-long magmatic synform within the 99-100 Ma granite of Coyote Pass that is defined both by inward-dipping mafic inclusions (enclaves) and by sporadic, cm-thick, sharply defined mineral layering. The west margin of the granite of Coyote Pass overlies parts of the adjacent Mineral King pendant, and the pluton probably had an upward-flaring shape, with synformal layering and foliation resulting from compaction and mineral deposition (or flow sorting) at the floor of an elongate, melt-rich magma lens. The NPS-GRD has digitized the published USGS geologic quadrangles for Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, and a goal is to jointly release a geologic map of the combined Parks region.

Sisson, T. W.; Moore, J. G.

2012-12-01

41

Support Services for Exceptional Students: Fresno, Inyo, Kern, Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Mono, San Luis Obispo, and Tulare Counties.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intended for use by vocational administrators responsible for mainstreaming handicapped students into vocational education classes, the resource guide lists and describes governmental and private agencies that provide vocational programs and support services for the handicapped on a local and statewide basis in the California counties of Fresno,…

Hampel, Angelica; And Others

42

Water-quality and sediment-chemistry data of drain water and evaporation ponds from Tulare Lake Drainage District, Kings County, California, March 1985 to March 1986  

SciTech Connect

Trace element and major ion concentrations were measured in water samples collected monthly between March 1985 and March 1986 at the MD-1 pumping station at the Tulare Lake Drainage District evaporation ponds, Kings County, California. Samples were analyzed for selected pesticides several times during the year. Salinity, as measured by specific conductance, ranged from 11,500 to 37,600 microsiemens/centimeter; total recoverable boron ranged from 4,000 to 16,000 micrg/L; and total recoverable molybdenum ranged from 630 to 2,600 microg/L. Median concentrations of total arsenic and total selenium were 97 and 2 microg/L. Atrazine, prometone, propazine, and simazine were the only pesticides detected in water samples collected at the MD-1 pumping station. Major ions, trace elements, and selected pesticides also were analyzed in water and bottom-sediment samples from five of the southern evaporation ponds at Tulare Lake Drainage District. The water samples increased in specific conductance and concentrations of total arsenic, total recoverable boron and total recoverable molybdenum going from pond 1 to pond 10, respectively. Median concentrations of total arsenic and total selenium in the bottom sediments were 4.0 and 0.9 microg/g, respectively. 6 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

Fujii, R.

1988-01-01

43

Data and statistical summaries of background concentrations of metals in soils and streambed sediments in part of Big Soos Creek drainage basin, King County, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Twenty-nine soil samples from 14 holes at 9 sites in part of the Big Soos Creek drainage basin in southwest King County, Washington, were collected and analyzed to obtain data on the magnitude and variability of background concentrations of metals in soils. Seven streambed-sediment samples and three streamwater samples from three sites also were collected and analyzed. These data are needed by regulating government agencies to determine if soils at sites of suspected contamination have elevated concentrations of metals, and to evaluate the effectiveness of remediation at sites with known contamination. Concentrations of 43 metals were determined by a total method, and concentrations of 17 metals were determined by a total-recoverable method and two different leaching methods. Metals analyzed for by all methods included most of those on the U.S. Environmental Protection agency list of priority pollutants, plus alluminum, iron, and manganese. Ranges of concentrations of metals determined by the total method are within ranges found by others for the conterminous United States. Concentrations of mercury, manganese, phosphorus, lead, selenium, antimony, and zinc as determined by the total method, and of some of these plus other metals as determined by the other methods were larger in shallow soil (less than 12 inches deep) than in deep soil (greater than 12 inches). Concentrations of metals in streambed sediments were more typical of shallow than deep soils.

Prych, E. A.; Kresch, D. L.; Ebbert, J. C.; Turney, G. L.

1995-01-01

44

The risk of pedestrian injury and fatality in collisions with motor vehicles, a social ecological study of state routes and city streets in King County, Washington.  

PubMed

This study examined the correlates of injury severity using police records of pedestrian-motor-vehicle collisions on state routes and city streets in King County, Washington. Levels of influence on collision outcome considered (1) the characteristics of individual pedestrians and drivers and their actions; (2) the road environment; and (3) the neighborhood environment. Binary logistic regressions served to estimate the risk of a pedestrian being severely injured or dying versus suffering minor or no injury. Significant individual-level influences on injury severity were confirmed for both types of roads: pedestrians being older or younger; the vehicle moving straight on the roadway. New variables associated with increased risk of severe injury or death included: having more than two pedestrians involved in a collision; and on city streets, the driver being inebriated. Road intersection design was significant only in the state route models, with pedestrians crossing at intersections without signals increasing the risk of being injured or dying. Adjusting for pedestrians' and drivers' characteristics and actions, neighborhood medium home values and higher residential densities increased the risk of injury or death. No other road or neighborhood environment variable remained significant, suggesting that pedestrians were not safer in areas with high pedestrian activity. PMID:21094292

Moudon, Anne Vernez; Lin, Lin; Jiao, Junfeng; Hurvitz, Philip; Reeves, Paula

2011-01-01

45

Biostratigraphy of the San Joaquin Formation in borrow-source area B-17, Kettleman Hills landfill, North Dome, Kettleman Hills, Kings County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The stratigraphic occurrences and interpreted biostratigraphy of invertebrate fossil taxa in the upper San Joaquin Formation and lower-most Tulare Formation encountered at the Chemical Waste Management Kettleman Hills waste disposal facility on the North Dome of the Kettleman Hills, Kings County, California are documented. Significant new findings include (1) a detailed biostratigraphy of the upper San Joaquin Formation; (2) the first fossil occurrence of Modiolus neglectus; (3) distinguishing Ostrea sequens from Myrakeena veatchii (Ostrea vespertina of authors) in the Central Valley of California; (4) differentiating two taxa previously attributed to Pteropurpura festivus; (5) finding a stratigraphic succession between Caesia coalingensis (lower in the section) and Catilon iniquus (higher in the section); and (6) recognizing Pliocene-age fossils from around Santa Barbara. In addition, the presence of the bivalves Anodonta and Gonidea in the San Joaquin Formation, both restricted to fresh water and common in the Tulare Formation, confirm periods of fresh water or very close fresh-water environments during deposition of the San Joaquin Formation.

Powell, Charles L., II; Fisk, Lanny H.; Maloney, David F.; Haasl, David M.

2010-01-01

46

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): King of Prussia Technical Corporation site, Winslow Township, Camden County, NJ. (First remedial action), September 1990  

SciTech Connect

The 10-acre King of Prussia (KOP) site is an abandoned waste disposal and recycling facility in Winslow Township, Camden County, New Jersey. Past waste handling and disposal practices at the facility, as well as suspected illegal dumping of trash and hazardous materials after the facility closed, have resulted in organic and inorganic contamination of site soil, sediment, and ground water. Soil and ground water contamination were detected by the State in 1976, and subsequently confirmed by EPA during site investigations conducted from 1978 to 1982. As a result of these investigations, buried plastic containers and visibly contaminated soil west of the lagoons were excavated and removed in late 1989 or 1990. However, several additional discrete areas of contamination have been identified including: metal-contaminated soil adjacent to the lagoons, lagoon sludges, swale sediment, and soil near the tankers; VOC-contaminated soil in the drum disposal area; organic- and metal-contaminated ground water; and possible contamination of the surface water and sediment in the river. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses the first operable unit for the site, including the contaminated ground water, soil, sediment, sludges, drums and tankers. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sediment, sludge, debris, and ground water are VOCs including benzene, PCE, and TCE; and metals including chromium and lead.

Not Available

1990-09-28

47

Lake Ontario: Nearshore Variability  

EPA Science Inventory

We conducted a high-resolution survey with towed electronic instrumentation along the Lake Ontario nearshore (720 km) at a 20 meter contour. The survey was conducted September 6-10, 2008 with a shorter 300 km survey conducted August 14-15 for comparing of temporal variability. ...

48

King Day.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study details the history of efforts by the Arizona Republic and the Phoenix Gazette, and to a lesser extent the Arizona Business Gazette, to support the creation of a paid state holiday in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in Arizona. It outlines ...

L. J. Hockman

1991-01-01

49

NEARSHORE MARINE TRACE METAL GEOCHEMISTRY  

EPA Science Inventory

The report summarizes a number of studies on several aspects of the nearshore geochemistry of trace metals which give information on consequences of trace metal pollution attending nearshore waste disposal. The author has studied the distribution of dissolved and particulate trac...

50

Health Consultation: US Department of Agriculture Fremont National Forest, White King Lucky Lass Uranium Mines, Lakeview, Lake County, Oregon. EPA Facility ID: OR7122307658.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Fremont National Forest in south-central Oregon was the site of uranium mining from 1955 to 1965. The two mines in the area, White King Mine and Luck Lass Mine, are approximately 12 miles from the nearest permanent residential area and 17 miles from L...

2007-01-01

51

The Nearshore Canyon Experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Observations collected in Fall 2003 during the Nearshore Canyon Experiment (NCEX) will be used to test hypotheses about the effect of complex continental-shelf bathymetry on surface gravity waves and on wave-driven circulation. Refraction, diffraction, reflection, scattering, and trapping by abrupt shelf bathymetry can result in dramatic alongshore variations in wave height and direction. Onshore of the irregular bathymetry, alongcoast changes in breaking waves can force complicated circulation, including alongshore flows that reverse direction across the surf zone and along the shoreline, and strong offshore-directed rip currents that may be an important mechanism for transport of water, sediment, and pollution between the surf zone and inner shelf. Observations for NCEX will be obtained along the southern California coast near two steep submarine canyons (separated alongshore by a few km) that cross the shelf from about 300-m water depth to just seaward of the surfzone near Black's Beach (famous for large waves) and La Jolla Shores (well known as a calm area with small waves). Frequency-directional spectra of incident waves estimated from observations offshore of the canyons will be used to initialize models that predict the effect of the canyons on infragravity waves, swell, sea, and wave-driven circulation. Model predictions will be tested with observations from alongshore arrays deployed near, between, and onshore (including the surf and swash zones) of the canyons. Arrays also will be deployed to investigate wave reflection and scattering from the steep canyon walls, and cross-shore changes in surf and swash zone circulation. Additional instrumentation will be used to study alongcoast changes in wave breaking and set-up, details of surface currents in the surf and swash, and breaking-induced turbulence and dissipation. The NCEX instrument arrays will be designed in collaboration with modelers, and near-real time data will be used to initialize and test model predictions. In addition, model forecasts will be used to guide placement of movable sensors, allowing predictions of nearshore waves and currents to be tested during the observational period. NCEX~team~members~are~listed~on http://science.whoi.edu/PVLAB/NCEX/ncex.html. Funding for NCEX is provided by the US Office of Naval Research and the National Science Foundation.

Elgar, S.

2002-12-01

52

3. FIRST FLOOR, FRONT ROOM (WHERE MARTIN LUTHER KING MADE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. FIRST FLOOR, FRONT ROOM (WHERE MARTIN LUTHER KING MADE PLANS FOR HIS MOVEMENT) - Penn School Historic District, Arnett House, SC Route 37, 1 mile South of Frogmore, St. Helena Island, Frogmore, Beaufort County, SC

53

3. Photocopy of architectural rendering, ca. 1902, from Moses King, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. Photocopy of architectural rendering, ca. 1902, from Moses King, Philadelphia and Notable Philadelphians, (1902), page 24 D. - Drexel Institute, Thirty-second & Chestnut Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

54

Influence of the sardine run on selected nearshore predatory teleosts in KwaZulu-Natal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationships between shore-angling catch rates of nearshore predatory teleosts in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, and the timing of the sardine run were examined using a multiple regression model. Results showed that catch rates of five (elf Pomatomus saltatrix, garrick Lichia amia, king mackerel Scomberomorus commerson, blacktip kingfish Caranx heberi and kingfish Caranx spp.) of the nine teleost predators selected for

S T Fennessy; P Pradervand; P A de Bruyn

2010-01-01

55

Public health assessment for Wyckoff Company/Eagle Harbor, Eagle Harbor Operable Units, Bainbridge Island, King County, Washington, Region 10. Cerclis No. WAD009248295. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Wyckoff/Eagle Harbor site is a National Priorities List (NPL) site located on the east side of Bainbridge Island, Kitsap County, Washington. The harbor has become contaminated with heavy metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the many years of ship repair and painting as well as from the application of creosote, pentachlorophenol, and other wood preservatives to pilings. The Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS) states that the major human health concern is consumption of clam meat contaminated with PAHs. The public health assessment has determined that exposure to contaminants found in Eagle Harbor sediments, shellfish, fish, and crab is a health hazard for those people who ignore warnings.

Not Available

1994-01-06

56

Cumulative Habitat Impacts of Nearshore Engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

A multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional research team evaluated a broad range of physical and biological characteristics at six Great Lakes nearshore sites in order to develop and test a conceptual modeling framework to assess linkages between bluff erosion, sediment supply, coastal processes, and biological utilization of nearshore and coastal habitats. The sites were chosen to represent a broad range of hydrogeomorphic conditions,

Guy A. Meadows; Scudder D. Mackey; Reuben R. Goforth; David M. Mickelson; Tuncer B. Edil; Jonathan Fuller; Donald E. Guy Jr; Lorelle A. Meadows; Elizabeth Brown; Stephanie M. Carman; Dale L. Liebenthal

2005-01-01

57

The William King Server  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Named in honor of the Reverend William King, Roger A. McCain, Drexel University, aims to promote a discussion of the ideal of a Cooperative Commonwealth at the William King Server site. McCain's views on capitalism, socialist economic systems, democracy, and game theory are provided in addition to background information on cooperative commonwealth. Instructional material (discussed in the September 25, 1997 Scout Report for Business & Economics), game theory examples, and working papers by Roger McCain are provided.

Mccain, Roger A.

1999-01-01

58

Bible: King James Version  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Website from the Electronic Text Center at the University of Virginia offers a complete, browseable, online version of the King James Bible, including all the texts of the apocrypha. Users may search by key words or phrases and group results by match or individual books. Perhaps most appealing to religious scholars and amateur devotees of biblical textual history is a feature that allows users to view the King James translation side-by-side with the Revised Standard Version for comparison.

59

Modeling Nearshore Waves for Hurricane Katrina.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Modeling of nearshore waves under extreme events presents challenges, including the interaction of waves with storm surge, wave generation by complex wind files, and wave dissipation in wetlands. The purpose of this technical note is to demonstrate the ap...

J. M. Smith

2007-01-01

60

Field and Modeling Studies of Nearshore Morphology.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Field and modeling studies of nearshore morphology aims to understand and predict sediment-transport mechanisms and their morphologic expression in the coastal marine environment, with particular emphasis on surf zone evolution. Principal goals are to eff...

T. G. Drake

2000-01-01

61

Nearshore Suspended Sediment Variations, Central Surinam Coast.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Nearshore suspended sediment concentration along the muddy Surinam coast is highly variable; maximum values are many times greater than on other muddy coasts. Water samples taken at four field stations during various stages of the tide range in concentrat...

J. T. Wells J. M. Coleman

1977-01-01

62

AirMSPI King's County Hanford, CA  

...   The left image is “true color” with the red, green, and blue channels in the image corresponding to the 445, 555, and 660 nm ... is caused by the large amount of vegetation in the scene.  Green plants reflect light at 865 nm, which is a wavelength of light in the ...

2013-08-02

63

Dr. King's Dream. [Lesson Plan].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This lesson plan teaches students about the life and work of Martin Luther King, Jr. Students listen to a brief biography, view photographs of the March on Washington, hear a portion of King's "I Have a Dream" speech, and discuss what King's words mean to them. Finally, they will create picture books about their own dreams of freedom for Americans…

National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.

64

20. Photo copy of photograph, (original owned by John King, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

20. Photo copy of photograph, (original owned by John King, Berea, KY), photographer unknown, ca. 1935. VIEW SOUTH, CCC CAMP PARSONS IN BACKGROUND, BLACKSMITH SHOP ON LEFT, TRUCK STORAGE GARAGE IN FOREGROUND. - Parsons Nursery, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

65

Perspective view of Post and King Saloon, 129 North E ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Perspective view of Post and King Saloon, 129 North E Street (corner of E and North 2nd Streets), view looking southwest - Lakeview Downtown Historic District, E, F & G Streets between Second Street North & First Street South, Lakeview, Lake County, OR

66

Peace at Storm King  

SciTech Connect

Energy and environmental interests clashed for two decades before agreement was reached on a proposed Storm King Mountain pumped storage plant on the Hudson River. Intervenors argued that scenic beauty, fishing interests, and other environmental qualities were in jeopardy. A compromise settlement mediated by Russel Train, former EPA administrator, required concession on both sides. The utilities will halt construction on the Hudson, take specific steps to protect fish, and endow a foundation to study power plant impacts. Consolidated Edison will donate the Storm King site as a park. In compensation, cooling towers will not be required on closed-cell systems. The compromise has economic as well as environmental benefits. It illustrates how negotiation and mediation can lead to effective and acceptable alternatives. (DCK)

Temple, T.

1981-02-01

67

Martin Luther King Scavenger Hunt  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

On the third Monday in January, we celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday. Scroll down to questions that will help you learn more about Dr. M. L. King. Follow the links in each section to find the answers. Open a word document, title it "MLK Scavenger Hunt," name and date in RH corner, and answer each question in a complete sentence. 1. Click on the link below to read letters from first graders to MLK. What does Noel, age 7, think Martin Luther King wanted? Letters to Martin Luther King, Jr. 2. Click on the timeline and write down what happened to Martin Luther King in 1935. Timeline 3. Get your earphones on! Click on this link to hear Dr. King's famous "I Have ...

Devitry, Mrs.

2011-01-05

68

Nearshore carbonate deposits in Lake Tanganyika  

Microsoft Academic Search

An exceptionally wide variety of carbonate fades, dominated by high-magnesian calcite, occurs along the littoral and shallow sublittoral zones (<50 m) of Lake Tanganyika in central Africa. These facies include exposed and submerged, calcite-cemented ridges of nearshore terrigenous sand, ooid sand shoals, and lithified oolite ridges, Chara meadows of bioturbated calcareous silts, gastropod shell blankets and related coquinas, and extensive

Andrew S. Cohen; Catherine Thouin

1987-01-01

69

Nearshore krill distribution around Livingston Island, Antarctica  

Microsoft Academic Search

The near-shore regions of Livingston Island, Antarctica were studied during the austral summers of 2002 and 2004 to measure the Antarctic krill population and factors which control their distribution. These waters serve as the main feeding grounds for the seasonally resident fur seal and penguin populations of Cape Shirreff. Shallow and highly variable bathymetry in this area precludes surveying from

Joseph D. Warren; David A. Demer

2001-01-01

70

Microwave radar observations of nearshore ocean dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The relationship between microwave imaging radar measurements of the nearshore ocean region and nearshore dynamics is studied. Normalized radar cross section and Doppler velocity are estimated from radar measurements of nearshore waves at near-grazing angles. Radar scattering is classified using joint histograms of radar cross section and Doppler velocities. Scattering in these distributions is investigated through comparisons with theoretical wave predictions, video particle image velocimetry (PIV), and in situ acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) measurements. This analysis shows that shoaling and breaking waves measured through radar grating lobes significantly affect Doppler velocities near the edges of the images and also scattering from the back faces of waves. Doppler velocities from breaking waves are found to agree well with wave phase velocity predictions in the surf zone (the rms difference is 0.14 m/s), and large radar cross section features are correlated with breaking waves and the motion of surf-zone bores in video imagery. Differences in inter-bore velocities are expected, since the measurements are not collocated. However; Doppler inter-bore velocities are found to correlate well with fluid velocities (the correlation coefficient is 0.65), but are offset by around 0.8 m/s. This offset may be due to a combination of the Bragg wave phase velocities, radar sensitivity to short wavelength waves in the nearshore which is limited by the spatial resolution of the radar, and inherent biasing of Doppler velocities towards velocities of large NRCS scattering. In low-wind conditions, radar measurements of the nearshore show patches of increased backscatter. Animation of sequences of the images shows movement of these patches. A feature-tracking algorithm based on PIV is presented to quantify the velocities of the observed features. The nature of the patches is also investigated through comparison with video images. It is concluded that the patches of backscatter are due to low-grazing angle scattering from streaks of foam, however contributions from mechanically-generated surface roughness are not ruled out. Comparisons between surface velocities derived from the feature-tracking algorithm and subsurface velocities measured by in situ current meters show best agreement for sensors beyond the surf zone. It is concluded that the estimated velocity fields are related to nearshore flows such as wave-induced cell circulations and longshore currents.

Farquharson, Gordon

2005-12-01

71

'King George Island' Brushed  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

[figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Version

This mosaic was made from frames acquired by the microscopic imager on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during Spirit's 1,031 Martian day, or sol, on the red planet (Nov. 27, 2006). It shows a rock target called 'King George Island' after the target was brushed by the rover's rock abrasion tool. The mosaic covers approximately 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across and shows the granular nature of the rock exposure. The grains are typically about 1 millimeter (.04 inches) wide. Data from the rover's Moessbauer spectrometer provides evidence that they have an enhanced amount of the mineral hematite relative to surrounding soils.

2006-01-01

72

Peace at Storm King  

SciTech Connect

A 20 year struggle between energy and environmental interests concerning a proposed pumped storage plant near Storm King Mountain, N.Y., has ended in a compromise that will hopefully protect the Hudson River's fish and scenic beauty. Consolidated Edison has agreed to halt construction of the pumped storage power plant and, along with other utilities operating power generating units on the Hudson River, has agreed to undertake appropriate measures to reduce destruction of fish and other aquatic life. These utilities will also set up a $12 million endowment to fund independent research on ways to lessen power plant impacts on aquatic ecosystems. In exchange for these commitments, the utilities will not be required to build cooling towers at operating power plant sites, and all lawsuits and administrative proceedings against them will be dropped.

Temple, T.

1981-02-01

73

Kinging in Hungarian lesbian culture.  

PubMed

This article looks at the position of the drag king in Hungarian lesbian culture. It focuses on Bandage, Socks and Facial Hair (2006), a documentary about a drag king workshop. The film documents the historical moment when the Hungarian workshop participants encounter the drag king as a lesbian tool for parodying and repoliticizing mainstream masculinity. I examine the ways in which the participants interpret their performances of masculinity and the film negotiates heteronormativity. I argue that the political merits of the film can be spelled out by reading the participants' (trans)gender politics from the perspective of the cultural specificities of post-socialist Hungary. PMID:21774598

Balogh, Andrea P

2011-01-01

74

Community structure in nearshore Permian environments  

SciTech Connect

The lower part of the Americus Limestone in the Midcontinent was deposited near shore. Environments ranged from tidal flats to open-marine settings and included lagoons and carbonate shoals. Tabular cryptalgal structures that show subtle morphological variations with environment are the dominant sedimentary feature of the rocks. The fossilized part of benthic marine communities associated with the cyanobacteria comprised attached foraminifera, Spirorbis worms, several species of immature gastropods too small to identify, rare clams of the genus Orthomyalina, and abundant ostracodes. A low-diversity, characteristically near-shore ostracode fauna was extracted from the cryptalgal limestone by crushing the rock and then following standard micropaleontological procedures. The most abundant species are Paraparchites humerosus, Sansabella bolliabormis, Bairdia beedei, and Cavellina nebrascensis, all of which are typical throughout the Midcontinent of rocks deposited in near-shore environments. The distribution and diversity of the ostracode fauna support paleoenvironmental interpretations based on carbonate petrology and the morphology and microstratigraphy of the cryptalgal structures. In general, rocks deposited on the tidal flat have lowest species diversity, whereas the faunas from rocks of the open-marine environment are more diverse. Distributions of ostracodes and morphology of cryptalgal structures were both sufficiently controlled by environment of deposition to permit discrimination of paleoenvironments in cores from the subsurface.

Kaesler, R.L.; Denver, L.E.

1985-01-01

75

Who is Martin Luther King Jr.  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Today you will use the links below to research Martin Luther King Jr. Synergize with your partners to discover more interesting facts about Dr. King! First, watch this video about Dr. King. BrainPOPJr.Martin Luther King Jr. Video Next, click on this biography link Who is Martin Luther King Jr.? to find even more information. Then, see if you can answer any questions you still have by using KidRex Last, watch this video and see if you can learn anything new BrainPOP Martin Luther King Jr. Video number 2 ...

Mcgahey, Miss

2014-01-22

76

Congratulations to Carey King  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I first came across Carey King when, out of the blue, he invited me to a special session of the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (the largest and most prestigious US scientific meeting) where he was developing a special session on energy return on investment (EROI). At that meeting and since, I have found Carey to be a refreshing new colleague, extremely intelligent, very knowledgeable about many diverse aspects of energy and other things, able to take criticism and to dish it out, and very ambitious, which is mostly a good thing. He is becoming a leader in thinking about EROI and its implications, and I am delighted to see him honored by Environmental Research Letters. This is important because in the US, there is little insight about energy or, especially, its potential physical limitations except when gas prices increase. There is also little awareness of the very strong historical connection in both the US and the world between increased affluence and increased use of energy, especially petroleum. It is not understood by all that many of the economic problems we have now (such as the budgetary problems faced by most of our State governments, pension plans and universities) have substantial origin in the fact that oil and other energy production no longer increase reliably year after year, as they once did (Murphy and Hall 2011). Many economists have argued in the past that energy is not important because it constituted only 5 per cent or so of GDP, or because they believe that market forces and innovations will substitute for any shortage (e.g. Barnett and Morse 1963, Passell et al 1972, Solow 1974, Denison 1989). One problem with that view is that if you remove that five per cent the economy comes to a dead stop, as Cuba found out in 1989 when Russia removed its oil subsidy. Additionally if that five per cent goes up to 10 or 15 per cent, as it did in the early 1980s, and again in 2008, recession steps in (Murphy and Hall 2011). In fact, the US economy and our energy use increased almost lockstep from 1900 until 1984 (Cleveland et al 1984). The economy has grown more rapidly than energy use since 1984. Most economists think that this is due to our cleverness at increasing efficiency, but Robert Kaufmann (2004) and others find that instead most of the increase has been due to, essentially, the outsourcing of our heavy industry (think steel imported from Korea or Brazil, petroleum refined in Trinidad etc). An additional issue is that there is considerable evidence (e.g. Shadow Government Statistics) that the official US government inflation corrections have been deliberately underestimated since about 1985. If this is true then GDP growth has been exaggerated and there has been little or no increase in efficiency. Thus our gain in actual national energy efficiency is probably much less than most economists believe, and may be close to zero. Obviously some few of us think a great deal about energy, and for those who are willing to undertake some personal research (for example on the ASPO (aspo-usa.com) or The Oil Drum (www.theoildrum.com) websites), there is much to be concerned about. First on the list of concerns is 'peak oil'; the concept that there comes a time over the life cycle of the extraction of a non-renewable resource when there will be maximum production. This concept, derived by geologist M K Hubbert in the 1950s, assumes that this peak will occur when roughly 50 per cent of the resource has been exploited. Hubbert famously predicted in 1955 that this would occur for the United States in 1970. Initially he was derided by most in the oil industry, but in fact peak oil for the US did occur in 1970, just as he had predicted. Oil production has declined essentially every year since then. 'Peak oil' has now occurred for something like three quarters of all oil producing nations, although not yet for most of the largest producers. Second on my list of energy concerns is declining EROI. EROI is a term I had developed in the early 1980s based on the net energy concepts of

Hall, Charles A. S.

2012-03-01

77

DEEPWATER AND NEARSHORE FOOD WEB CHARACTERIZATIONS IN LAKE SUPERIOR  

EPA Science Inventory

Due to the difficulty associated with sampling deep aquatic systems, food web relationships among deepwater fauna are often poorly known. We are characterizing nearshore versus offshore habitats in the Great Lakes and investigating food web linkages among profundal, pelagic, and ...

78

Zooplankton Community Composition in Nearshore Waters of Southern Lake Michigan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Zooplankton samples collected in 1977 in the nearshore waters of southern Lake Michigan (0.4 km from shore) were analyzed to provide a bench mark on zooplankton community composition for comparison with future studies. Species composition, abundance, and ...

J. E. Gannon F. J. Bricker K. S. Bricker

1983-01-01

79

Biogeography of Nearshore Subtidal Invertebrates in the Gulf of Maine  

EPA Science Inventory

The biogeography of nearshore benthic invertebrates in the Gulf of Maine was studied to compare recent data with historical biogeographic studies, define physical-chemical factors affecting species distributions, and provide information needed to calibrate benthic indices of envi...

80

A Selected Bibliography of the Nearshore Environment: Florida West Coast.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A collection of over 2,900 references on ecological and coastal engineering subjects related to the nearshore environment of the Florida west coast. References are grouped by subject and alphabetized by author within each subject heading.

C. H. Saloman

1975-01-01

81

A spatial framework for representing nearshore ecosystems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The shallow, coastal regions of the world’s oceans are highly productive ecosystems providing important habitat for commercial, forage, endangered, and iconic species. Given the diversity of ecosystem services produced or supported by this ecosystem, a better understanding of its structure and function is central to developing an ecosystem-based approach to management. However this region - termed the ‘white strip’ by marine geologists because of the general lack of high-resolution bathymetric data - is dynamic, highly variable, and difficult to access making data collection challenging and expensive. Since substrate is a key indicator of habitat in this important ecosystem, our objective was to create a continuous substrate map from the best available bottom type data. Such data are critical to assessments of species distributions and anthropogenic risk. Using the Strait of Georgia in coastal British Columbia, Canada, as a case study, we demonstrate how such a map can be created from a diversity of sources. Our approach is simple, quantitative, and transparent making it amenable to iterative improvement as data quality and availability improve. We evaluated the ecological performance of our bottom patches using observed shellfish distributions. We found that observations of geoduck clam, an infaunal species, and red urchins, a species preferentially associated with hard bottom, were strongly and significantly associated with our soft and hard patches respectively. Our description of bottom patches also corresponded well with a more traditional, morphological classification of a portion of the study area. To provide subsequent analyses (such as habitat models) with some confidence in the defined bottom type values, we developed a corresponding confidence surface based on the agreement of, and distance between observations. Our continuous map of nearshore bottom patches thus provides a spatial framework to which other types of data, both abiotic (e.g., energy) and biotic, can be attached. As more data are associated with the bottom patches, we anticipate they will become increasingly useful for representing and developing species-habitat relationships, ultimately leading to a comprehensive representation of the nearshore ecosystem.

Gregr, Edward J.; Lessard, Joanne; Harper, John

2013-08-01

82

The King of Crustaceans: Lobsters  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the north Atlantic, the American Lobster is the undisputed king of crustaceans. Itâs also a tremendously important commercial catch. While all the other fisheries are collapsing, why are lobsters resisting the trend? In this video, Jonathan goes out with a Maine lobsterman to learn why, and he dives down below to find the biggest lobsters he has ever seen. This segment won a New England Emmy Award! Please see the accompanying study guide for educational objectives and discussion points.

Productions, Jonathan B.

2011-01-18

83

Interpreting and analyzing King Tide in Tuvalu  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spatial and temporal distribution of sea-level rise has the potential to cause regional flooding in certain areas, and low-lying island countries are severely at risk. Tuvalu, an atoll country located in the southwest Pacific Ocean, has been inundated by this regional flooding for decades. Tuvaluans call this regional flooding phenomenon King Tide, a term not clearly defined, blaming it for loss of life and property in announcing their intention to migrate. In this study, we clarified and interpreted King Tide, and analyzed the factors of King Tide in Tuvalu. Using tide gauge and topographical data, we estimated that 3.2 m could be considered the threshold of King Tide, which implied half of the island of Tuvalu was flooded with seawater. This threshold is consistent with the finding of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration that King Tide events occur once or twice a year. We surveyed 28 King Tide events to analyze the factors of regional flooding. Tide gauge and satellite altimeter data from 1993 to 2012 were cross-validated and indicated that the King Tide phenomenon is significantly related to the warm-water effect. Warm water contributed to the King Tide phenomenon by an average of 5.1% and a maximum of 7.8%. The height of King Tide is affected by the combined factors of spring tide, storm surge, climate variability, and, significantly, by the warm-water effect.

Lin, C.-C.; Ho, C.-R.; Cheng, Y.-H.

2014-02-01

84

Becoming King: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Making of a National Leader  

Microsoft Academic Search

Without question, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is the face of the civil rights revolution that reshaped the social and political landscape of the United States. Although many biographers and historians have examined Dr. King's activism, few have recognized the pivotal role that the people of Montgomery, Alabama, played in preparing him for leadership. King arrived in Montgomery as a

Troy Jackson

2008-01-01

85

Oligocene early Miocene Antarctic nearshore diatom biostratigraphy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lower Oligocene (ca. 31 Ma) to lower Miocene (ca. 18.5 Ma) biosiliceous microfossils recovered from the Cape Roberts Project (CRP-2/2A) drill cores provide both paleoenvironmental and biostratigraphic information, enhancing our understanding of the geological history of the Victoria Land Basin, Antarctica. The biochronostratigraphic record obtained provides key data with which time-space-facies models may be developed. Assemblages of neritic and pelagic microfossils such as those from the CRP-2/2A drill cores provide links between the primarily pelagic microfossil-derived chronostratigraphy of the Southern Ocean and the facies models of the neritic zone. The CRP-2/2A holes drilled in the Victoria Land Basin, Antarctica during 1998 [Barrett, P.J., et al. (Eds.), 2001. Studies from the Cape Roberts Project, Ross Sea, Antarctica, Scientific Results of CRP-2/2A, Parts I and II: Terra Antartica, vol. 7(4/5), 665pp] include several sections that contain well-preserved and relatively abundant biosiliceous microfossils. Scherer et al. [2001. Oligocene and Lower Miocene Siliceous Microfossil Biostratigraphy of Cape Roberts Project Core CRP-2/2A, Victoria Land Basin, Antarctica. In: Barrett, P.J., Ricci, C.A. (Eds.) Studies from the Cape Roberts Project, Ross Sea, Antarctica, Scientific Report of CRP-2/2A, Terra Antartica, vol. 7(4), pp. 417-442] produced a biostratigraphic zonal framework consisting of 10 biozones; two of the zonal boundaries were correlated with the magnetostratigraphically calibrated Southern Ocean diatom biozonation. Many of the taxa observed and utilized in the above framework could not be assigned categorically to existing taxa, leading to use of informal nomenclature. We present an updated biostratigraphy and zonation scheme based on the latest taxonomic concepts and on new quantitative and qualitative siliceous microfossil data from the CRP-2/2A drill core, including formal description of four new diatom taxa used in the definition of Antarctic nearshore diatom zonal boundaries. New taxa formally proposed are Fragilariopsis truncata, Cymatosira palpebraforma, Rhizosolenia fidicularis, and Hemiaulus angustobrachiatus.

Olney, Matthew P.; Scherer, Reed P.; Harwood, David M.; Bohaty, Steven M.

2007-10-01

86

California nearshore processes - ERTS 1. [coastal currents and sediments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The detectability of many nearshore processes from ERTS is made possible due to the suspended sediment present in the coastal waters. From viewing and analyzing the California coastal imagery collected during the last year and a half, the overall current patterns and their changes have become evident. It is now possible to map monthly and seasonal changes that occur throughout the year. The original objectives of detecting currents, sediment transport, estuaries and river discharge have now been expanded to include the use of ERTS information in operational problems of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. This incorporates the detected nearshore features into planning and organizing shore protection facilities.

Steller, D. D.; Pirie, D. M.

1974-01-01

87

Nutrients and the Great Lakes Nearshore, Circa 2002-2007  

EPA Science Inventory

Nearshore nutrient impressions were largely limited to observations of local spatial trends from a few site-specific studies and some temporal trends at a set of Canadian water intake locations (later summarized in Nicholls et al. 1999). Lacking a systematic information base fo...

88

A new estimator for directional properties of nearshore waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

The infragravity wave (periods between roughly 20 and 200 s) energy balance in shallow, nearshore waters is believed to be effected by generation by groups of sea and swell, dissipation, shoreline reflection, and refractive trapping. Observations obtained with alongshore oriented arrays of current meters or pressure gauges have been previously used to identify concentrations of energy at the frequency-alongshore wavenumbers

A. Sheremet; R. T. Guza; T. H. C. Herbers

2005-01-01

89

Expert system for computer interpretation of beach and nearshore facies  

Microsoft Academic Search

A user-friendly, rule-based expert system has been designed for interpretation of lithofacies characteristics of beach and nearshore depositional environments. Recently, similar expert systems have been widely applied in medicine, business, and mineral exploration. The expert system runs on a VAX 780 (trade name). By incorporating knowledge and understanding of an expert, the system can interact with a user the way

K. B. Krystinik; H. E. Clifton

1985-01-01

90

Bathymetry Estimation From Single-Frame Images of Nearshore Waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

Existing methods for determining bathymetry from remotely sensed images of nearshore waves exploit only information on the magnitude of wavenumber (k = 2pi\\/L), ignoring spatial changes in wave direction thetas that can provide information about bathymetry gradients. These methods also require wave period information, so they can only be used when time series imagery is available. We present an algorithm

Kristen D. Splinter; Robert A. Holman

2009-01-01

91

Ecology of Lake Superior: Linking Landscape to Nearshore Condition  

EPA Science Inventory

High spatial variation is well known to exist in water quality parameters of the Great Lakes nearshore, however strong patterns for extended reaches are also observed and found to be robust across a seasonal time frame. Less is known about robustness of inter-annual variation wi...

92

ENHANCED HYDRODYNAMICAL-NUMERICAL MODEL FOR NEAR-SHORE PROCESSES  

EPA Science Inventory

An optimized version of a multilayer Hansen type Hydrodynamical-Numerical (HN) model is presented and discussed here as the basis for the following experimental extensions and enhancements developed to more appropriately handle near-shore processes: Non-linear term extension to f...

93

76 FR 73761 - Notice to Rescind the Notice of Intent to Develop the Environmental Impact Statement: Kings...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...This segment of the BQE extends from Atlantic Avenue to Sands Street and encompasses 21 structures including a unique 0...Brooklyn Queens Expressway in Kings County, New York, from Sands Street on the east to Atlantic Avenue on the west. The...

2011-11-29

94

An Airport Study for Vigo County, Indiana.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Airport Study is basically an inventory and evaluation of the airports in Vigo County. It first discusses the historical functioning of aviation in the planning area. Thereby following Hulman Field and later Sky King Airport from their inception to th...

1970-01-01

95

Monitoring in the nearshore: A process for making reasoned decisions  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Over the past several years, a conceptual framework for the GEM nearshore monitoring program has been developed through a series of workshops. However, details of the proposed monitoring program, e.g. what to sample, where to sample, when to sample and at how many sites, have yet to be determined. In FY 03 we were funded under Project 03687 to outline a process whereby specific alternatives to monitoring are developed and presented to the EVOS Trustee Council for consideration. As part of this process, two key elements are required before reasoned decisions can be made. These are: 1) a comprehensive historical perspective of locations and types of past studies conducted in the nearshore marine communities within Gulf of Alaska, and 2) estimates of costs for each element of a proposed monitoring program. We have developed a GIS database that details available information from past studies of selected nearshore habitats and species in the Gulf of Alaska and provide a visual means of selecting sites based (in part) on the locations for which historical data of interest are available. We also provide cost estimates for specific monitoring plan alternatives and outline several alternative plans that can be accomplished within reasonable budgetary constraints. The products that we will provide are: 1) A GIS database and maps showing the location and types of information available from the nearshore in the Gulf of Alaska; 2) A list of several specific monitoring alternatives that can be conducted within reasonable budgetary constraints; and 3) Cost estimates for proposed tasks to be conducted as part of the nearshore program. Because data compilation and management will not be completed until late in FY03 we are requesting support for close-out of this project in FY 04.

Bodkin, J. L.; Dean, T. A.

2003-01-01

96

Tenth Center Director David A. King  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mr. David A. King has been named the tenth Director of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Appointed to take Director's office June 15, 2003, King has been serving as Deputy Director of MSFC since November 2002. With 20 years experience in spacecraft and high-technology systems, Mr. King began his NASA career at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Florida in 1983 as a main propulsion system engineer. He later served as flow director for the Space Shuttle Discovery and then as the acting deputy director of the installation Operations Directorate. He was appointed deputy director of Shuttle Processing in 1996, Launch Director in 1997, and director of Shuttle Processing in 1999.

1998-01-01

97

The King College Individual Development Center (IDC)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article contains an overview of the IDC-a learning laboratory initiated in September, 1973, at King College, Bristol, Tennessee. The article is focused upon the idea of developing such a Center, its goals, its services and conclusions. (Author)

DiSibio, Robert A.

1976-01-01

98

The Coretta Scott King Book Awards  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Coretta Scott King Book Award was founded in 1969 in honor of the late Mrs. Coretta Scott King, wife of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., for her passion and dedication to working for peace. The awards are given to âÂÂoutstanding African American authors and illustrators of books for children and young adults that demonstrate an appreciation of African American culture and universal human values.â Created by the American Library Association, this page provides a variety of resources, including a section on the history of the award and a list of all past award winners. Another great facet of this page is the Coretta Scott King Book Awards Donation Grant. The goal of this program is to increase childrenâÂÂs access to books by building the libraries of nontraditional institutions that provide services to children. Within Resources and Bibliographies, a series of educational materials related to multicultural and diversity resources and collections are also available.

99

A Transforming Response: Martin Luther King Jr.'s \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essay examines the rhetorical situation of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail.” It argues that King’s “Letter” was an essential response for civil rights to continue as a mass movement in Birmingham and beyond. At a broader level, King’s “Letter” demonstrated the enactment of rhetorical transformation. By creative use of kairos and pathos the letter rebutted the

John H. Patton

2004-01-01

100

The Seattle Times: Martin Luther King Jr.  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Seattle Times commemorates the life and legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. with a Web site including sections on the man, the movement, the legacy, and the holiday. Timed to coincide with the 10th anniversary of the national King holiday, the site also offers a photo tour of key events in the fight for civil rights, dialogue between students in Alabama and Washington states, a quiz study guide, and sound clips from his speeches.

1996-01-01

101

Caliphs & Kings -- Freer & Sackler Galleries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Part of the continuing series of online exhibitions from the Smithsonian's Freer & Sackler Galleries, Caliphs & Kings provides a sample of the rich history of Islamic Spain, called al-Adalus, from the 8th to the 15th centuries. Online visitors can closely examine ten artworks selected from about ninety on display at the museum through October 2004. A featured work is a 10th century ivory pyxis, or cylindrical container, probably made as a special gift for the favorite concubine of the Umayyad caliph, that includes a poetic inscription in which the container speaks in the first person and describes its function as "a vessel for musk and camphor and ambergris." There are also examples of lusterware; textiles, both carpets and bed coverings; a walnut and ivory chest from Barcelona; an illuminated Hebrew bible from the second half of the 15th century; a gold coin for 50 excelentes issued in about 1497, and a map of the world drawn by Florentine cartographer Juan Vespucci, nephew of Amerigo Vespucci, in 1526 that shows Spain as a superpower at the center of all things.

102

California nearshore surface currents. [monitoring by remote sensing techniques  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the oceanic period from July to November, the southward flowing California current dominates the nearshore current patterns. Commencing about the middle of November and extending to mid-February, the Davidson current, a northward moving countercurrent, is the dominant inshore transporter of water and suspensates. The phenomenon of upwelling is prevalent during the period from the middle of February to the end of July. Thus, every year along the coast of California, there are three successive current seasons: the oceanic, the Davidson, and the upwelling. This paper is a discussion of the nature of these nearshore currents. In addition, the capabilities of various remote sensing platforms and systems for providing methods of monitoring the coastal processes associated with the current seasons of California are demonstrated herein.

Pirie, D. M.; Murphy, M. J.; Edmisten, J. R.

1975-01-01

103

Nearshore subtidal bathymetry from time-exposure video images  

Microsoft Academic Search

Time-averaged (over many wave periods) nearshore video observations show the process of wave breaking as one or more white alongshore bands of high intensity. Across a known depth profile, similar bands of dissipation can be predicted with a model describing the time-averaged cross-shore evolution of organized wave and roller energy. This close correspondence between observed and modeled dissipation proxies is

S. G. J. Aarninkhof; B. G. Ruessink; J. A. Roelvink

2005-01-01

104

A numerical model of nearshore waves, currents, and sediment transport  

Microsoft Academic Search

A two-dimensional numerical model of nearshore waves, currents, and sediment transport was developed. The multi-directional random wave transformation model formulated by Mase [Mase, H., 2001. Multi-directional random wave transformation model based on energy balance equation. Coastal Engineering Journal 43(4), 317-337.] based on an energy balance equation was employed with an improved description of the energy dissipation due to breaking. In

Pham Thanh Nam; Magnus Larson; Hans Hanson; Le Xuan Hoan

2009-01-01

105

Environmental impacts on the benthic foraminiferal fauna in nearshore ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review presents data on how natural and anthropogenic factors affect species composition, abundance, and test morphology\\u000a of benthic foraminifera of the world oceans. Major emphasis is placed on high sensitivity of foraminifera to changes in the\\u000a state of the environment, particularly in nearshore zones under anthropogenic impact. It is shown that benthic foraminifera\\u000a can provide indicators of environmental conditions

T. S. Tarasova

2006-01-01

106

Practical use of video imagery in nearshore oceanographic field studies  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An approach was developed for using video imagery to quantify, in terms of both spatial and temporal dimensions, a number of naturally occurring (nearshore) physical processes. The complete method is presented, including the derivation of the geometrical relationships relating image and ground coordinates, principles to be considered when working with video imagery and the two-step strategy for calibration of the camera model. The techniques are founded on the principles of photogrammetry, account for difficulties inherent in the use of video signals, and have been adapted to allow for flexibility of use in field studies. Examples from field experiments indicate that this approach is both accurate and applicable under the conditions typically experienced when sampling in coastal regions. Several applications of the camera model are discussed, including the measurement of nearshore fluid processes, sand bar length scales, foreshore topography, and drifter motions. Although we have applied this method to the measurement of nearshore processes and morphologic features, these same techniques are transferable to studies in other geophysical settings.

Holland, K. T.; Holman, R. A.; Lippmann, T. C.; Stanley, J.; Plant, N.

1997-01-01

107

[King Jung-jo's medical philosophy].  

PubMed

King Jungjo who introduced the advent of cultural renaissance of Chosun Dynasty as little been known about his work in medicine. With a wide knowledge in medicine, he was the only one among the kings who wrote a book on medicine, called "SueMinMyoJeon". In this paper, his perspective on medicine will be looked into based on "The Annals of the Chosun Dynasty", "Seungjeongwon Ilgi", "Hong Je jun Se", "KukGoBoGam", "Ildkrok", "JeJungShinPyun", "SueMinMyoJeon" etc. King Jungo valued empiricism in the field of medicine. He deepened understandings in medicine while taking care of King Youngjo, the late king. And it led him to author "SueMinMyoJeon" himself, and further ordered the publications of "JeJungShinPyun" "MaGuaHeoiTong". These two books were conducted to include empirical cases of folklore remedy. King Jungjo's medical philosophy can be epitomized in filial piety and realization of people-serving politics, which are the essentials of Confucianism. His filial piety towards the late king, Youngjo and his mother is shown in his devotion when taking care of them. Especially the way he examined the differentiation of diseases and corresponding treatments is well described in "The Annals of the Chosun Dynasty". "JeJungShinPyun" was also published and it came handy for folk villagers in times of medical needs. Later this book influenced "BangYakHaepPyun" by Hwang Do Yeon. King Jungjo emphasized pragmatism in spreading medical knowledges, thus removing the theoretical contents that are related to Taoism, especially the ones on alchemy from "DongEuiBoGam", when publishing "SueMinMyoJeon". Even the excerpts from "SoMun" were taken out, if not practical. King Jungjo, however, discussed the importance of healthy regimen and mentioned himself practicing it from the book "IlDeukLok", which seems to be the only book that derailed from the pragmatistic track. King Jungjo put emphasis on consistency between diagnosis and treatment. In diagnosing, Meridian pulse was taken important as a means of finding the origin of disease, while deploring how doctors then neglected to study. PMID:20098054

Kim, Sun Hyung; Kim, Dal Rae

2009-12-01

108

Mythopoeic Quest for the Racial Bridge: The Radiance of the King and Henderson the Rain King.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compares the treatment of race in two novels set in Africa with white protagonists, "The Radiance of the King" by Camara Laye and "Henderson the Rain King" by Saul Bellow. Argues that both novels, proceeding differently, create literary myths of racial harmony to replace undesirable, fallacious racist myths. (KH)

Balogun, F. Odun

1985-01-01

109

Martin Luther King Jr. Revisited: A Black Power Feminist Pays Homage to the King  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this part memoir–part historical reflection on the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Gwendolyn Simmons recounts her association with Dr. King during the 1960s—the heyday of the civil rights and Black Power era—as a college student, field-secretary (organizer)-turned–Black Power revolutionary in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC)—the \\

Gwendolyn Zoharah Simmons

2008-01-01

110

Standing up with the King:: A critical look at Stephen King's epic  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this dissertation, it is my intention to show how Stephen King transcends genre, creates and maintains a viable Secondary Reality, and treats capably those literary techniques that critics expect of a serious writer. In addition, I will discuss the ways in which King has secured the loyalty of his Constant Reader. The primary means of my analysis will be

Jenifer Michelle DElia

2007-01-01

111

77 FR 24459 - Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 226 Under Alternative Site Framework Merced County, CA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...filed 12/23/2011) for authority to reorganize under the ASF with a service area which includes portions of Fresno, Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Stanislaus and Tulare Counties, California as its service area, as described in the application,...

2012-04-24

112

Towards an Operational Nearshore Wave Data Assimilation System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For Navy operations, the model used for wave predictions in the nearshore is SWAN, which solves the spectral action balance equation to estimate the wave state. Boundary conditions for local (nearshore) model domains are generally obtained from regional model simulations that use either SWAN or WAVEWATCH III, which in turn gets boundary conditions from global simulations with WAVEWATCH III forced by the meteorological models. Inaccuracies in meteorological forcing and the coarse grid resolutions for the global model can lead to significant errors in SWAN's spectral estimates, particularly in shallow water. To improve the model's performance, especially for the small nearshore domains, we have developed a 4DVAR data assimilation system based on a tangent linear code and the corresponding adjoint from the numerical SWAN model. The system utilizes point measurements of 2D wave spectra, such as from a wave buoy, to improve the solution in the whole domain. Given a set of observations measured at different times and locations in the model domain, the assimilation system minimizes a cost function (representing overall error between the model and observations) and generates corrected boundary and initial conditions that optimize the fit of SWAN's output to the measurements. In addition to time dependence, the system accounts for nonlinear triad and quadruplet interactions, depth-limited breaking, wind forcing, bottom friction, and whitecapping as well as the influence of currents on waves. This presentation will review the current status of the system using simulations with data from Duck, North Carolina and the 2012 RIMPAC exercises held by the Commander, US Pacific Fleet in and around the Hawaiian Islands. Examples shown will include analysis of effects of using different background fields, and of assimilating different instruments simultaneously. Adjoint-generated sensitivity maps, which can be generated using the adjoint, will be used to demonstrate the optimal locations for deployment of instruments under varying wave conditions.

Veeramony, J.; Orzech, M.; Ngodock, H. E.; Flampouris, S.

2012-12-01

113

Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial, Washington, DC. Environmental Assessment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The National Park Service (NPS) and the Washington, DC Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial Project Foundation, Inc. (Foundation) have proposed to establish and operate a national memorial to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on an approved site in Washing...

2005-01-01

114

Atlas of Historical County Boundaries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

So you'd like to know the boundaries of Washington's King County in the early 20th century? Or perhaps you'd like to know more about the shape of Nassau County in New York back in the 19th century? The Atlas of Historical County Boundaries can provide you such details. The project is housed at the William M. Scholl Center for American History and Culture at The Newberry Library in Chicago and it was completed in 2010. The Atlas includes such features as all boundary changes in states and countries, non-county areas, separate map or polygon files for every different county configuration, and other helpful features. Users can get started by clicking on different states of interest and just exploring as they see fit. It's also useful to read over the Using the Atlas area for additional assistance. Finally, visitors can also look at the Publications section for more information on the source material for these county boundaries.

115

Martin Luther King's “Letter from Birmingham Jail” as Pauline epistle  

Microsoft Academic Search

Martin Luther King's “Letter from Birmingham Jail” is an apostolic epistle in the Pauline tradition. Following the conventions of black American Protestantism, King discovered in St. Paul a type for himself and in St. Paul's letters a literary form that he could apply to modern situations. Like the Pauline letters, King's “Letter” depends heavily on scriptual allusions and may be

Malinda Snow

1985-01-01

116

The Newest Monument: The Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article features the newest monument, the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial. The memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. will be an engaging landscape experience to convey four fundamental and recurring themes throughout Dr. King's life--democracy, justice, hope, and love. Natural…

Social Studies and the Young Learner, 2011

2011-01-01

117

Depositional environment of Leo Sands, middle Minnelusa Formation, Niobrara County, Wyoming  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Upper Pennsylvanian middle Minnelusa Formation Leo Sands in the north half of Niobrara County, Wyoming, and southwestern South Dakota, may have been deposited in a nearshore eolian sabkha environment. Cores reveal sedimentary features which support this hypothesis, such as deflation lags, avalanche-produced strata, probable interdune deposits, and nodular anhydrites. The Leo Sands have proven to be excellent reservoir rocks.

J. D. McBane; R. P. Swinehart

1983-01-01

118

King Carol II: Patron of the Arts?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

King Carol II of Rumania, who ruled from 1930-40, is generally regarded as a failure, but one area in which he succeeded was cultural activities. He established a cultural foundation and consolidated several others which concentrated their efforts on studying and improving village life, scientific research, and publishing. (IS)

Quinlan, Paul D.

1983-01-01

119

King Oedipus and the Problem Solving Process.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An analysis of the problem solving process reveals at least three options: (1) finding the cause, (2) solving the problem, and (3) anticipating potential problems. These methods may be illustrated by examining "Oedipus Tyrannus," a play in which a king attempts to deal with a problem that appears to be beyond his ability to solve, and applying…

Borchardt, Donald A.

120

"King Corn": Teaching the Food Crisis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"King Corn" is in so many ways the story of how government food policy has entirely remade the food landscape in the United States over the last 40 years. From the massive expansion of the number of acres of corn grown across the country, to the ever-increasing ways that corn is incorporated into the food production process, to the industrial…

Swinehart, Tim

2012-01-01

121

SHAKESPEARE--KING OF INFINITE SPACE.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGISTS LOOK FOR SUBSTANTIAL CONNECTIONS BETWEEN A WRITER'S LITERARY WORK AND THE EXTERNALS OF HIS LIFE, A PRACTICE THAT ENGLISH SCHOLARS ESCHEW. HOWEVER, A USEFUL KIND OF AUTOBIOGRAPHY MAY BE FOUND IN THE WORKINGS OF SHAKESPEARE'S IMAGINATION THROUGHOUT MOST OF HIS PLAYS. SHAKESPEARE, IN HAMLET'S WORDS, CAN BE CONCEIVED AS "A KING

MCCURDY, HAROLD

122

Implementation of Johnson-King turbulence model.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The non-equilibrium turbulence model developed by Johnson and King, 1985, is implemented in the general purpose flow solver EllipSys2D. this model involves solution of an ordinary differential equation, along the line of maximum Reynolds shear stress and ...

J. Johansen

1996-01-01

123

The influence of pollution on pelagic larvae of bottom invertebrates in marine nearshore and estuarine waters  

Microsoft Academic Search

At present, human activities on marine shores, nearshore waters and estuaries, as well as in rivers which discharge into the seas, are influencing nearshore and estuarine waters so strongly that the resultant changes affect the breeding and spawning of bottom invertebrates which inhabit these waters. The majority of bottom invertebrate species from the shallow shelf of all seas and oceans,

S. A. Mileikovsky

1970-01-01

124

Air-water two-phase flow approach to simulate nearshore wave motion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wave breaking and wave runup have a major influence on nearshore hydrodynamics. Hydrodynamic characteristics of wave motions in the nearshore zone play a key role on the beach profile changes and their evolution. In the case of wave breaking, there is significant mixing of air and water at the wave crest, along with relatively high kinetic energy, so prediction of

Roham Bakhtyar; Amir Mehdi Razmi; David Andrew Barry

2010-01-01

125

Expert system for computer interpretation of beach and nearshore facies  

SciTech Connect

A user-friendly, rule-based expert system has been designed for interpretation of lithofacies characteristics of beach and nearshore depositional environments. Recently, similar expert systems have been widely applied in medicine, business, and mineral exploration. The expert system runs on a VAX 780 (trade name). By incorporating knowledge and understanding of an expert, the system can interact with a user the way an expert consultant would. Interaction consists of a series of questions about lithology, sedimentary structures, and bioturbation of the lithofacies observed in outcrop or core. Uncertain responses are allowed and incorporated into the reasoning. Dialogue varies in different consultations because questions asked by the system depend on users' responses to previous questions. The result is an evaluation of the likelihood that the deposit under consideration is actually a beach or nearshore deposit. Significant lithofacies characteristics, the reasoning used in reaching the conclusion, and pertinent references are provided. Expert systems for other depositional environments are being designed. As their availability increases, geologists without easy access to experts on a particular depositional environment will have expert consultants as close as a computer terminal. Also the ability of the system to explain its reasoning and provide references lends the system to instructional uses.

Krystinik, K.B.; Clifton, H.E.

1985-02-01

126

The effect of bathymetric filtering on nearshore process model results  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Nearshore wave and flow model results are shown to exhibit a strong sensitivity to the resolution of the input bathymetry. In this analysis, bathymetric resolution was varied by applying smoothing filters to high-resolution survey data to produce a number of bathymetric grid surfaces. We demonstrate that the sensitivity of model-predicted wave height and flow to variations in bathymetric resolution had different characteristics. Wave height predictions were most sensitive to resolution of cross-shore variability associated with the structure of nearshore sandbars. Flow predictions were most sensitive to the resolution of intermediate scale alongshore variability associated with the prominent sandbar rhythmicity. Flow sensitivity increased in cases where a sandbar was closer to shore and shallower. Perhaps the most surprising implication of these results is that the interpolation and smoothing of bathymetric data could be optimized differently for the wave and flow models. We show that errors between observed and modeled flow and wave heights are well predicted by comparing model simulation results using progressively filtered bathymetry to results from the highest resolution simulation. The damage done by over smoothing or inadequate sampling can therefore be estimated using model simulations. We conclude that the ability to quantify prediction errors will be useful for supporting future data assimilation efforts that require this information.

Plant, N. G.; Edwards, K. L.; Kaihatu, J. M.; Veeramony, J.; Hsu, L.; Holland, K. T.

2009-01-01

127

MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. AND CHRISTIAN WITNESS: AN INTERPRETATION OF KING BASED ON A THEOLOGICAL MODEL OF PROPHETIC WITNESS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Martin Luther King, Jr., has often been called a prophet or prophetic by theologians and popular writers. The purpose of this dissertation is to test the theological interpretation of Dr. King as prophetic. The role and theology of the classical Hebrew prophets are the norm by which the work of Dr. King is evaluated. The dissertation is a theological experiment.

JOSEPH MILBURN THOMPSON

1981-01-01

128

Nearshore bars and the break-point hypothesis  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The set of hypotheses calling for bar formation at the break point was tested with field data. During two different experiments, waves were measured across the surf zone coincident with the development of a nearshore bar. We use a criterion, based on the wave height to depth ratio, to determine the offshore limit of the inner surf zone. During the first experiment, the bar became better developed and migrated offshore while remaining well within the inner surf zone. During the second experiment, the surf zone was narrower and we cannot rule out the possibility of break point processes contributing to bar development. We conclude that bars are not necessarily coupled with the break point and can become better developed and migrate offshore while being in the inner surf zone landward from initial wave breaking in the outer surf zone. ?? 1989.

Sallenger, Jr. , A. H.; Howd, P. A.

1989-01-01

129

Psychological aftermath of the King's Cross fire.  

PubMed Central

The King's Cross fire occurred at the end of the evening rush hour, on 18 November 1987. King's Cross station is within the department's health district and we felt a responsibility to respond to the psychological aftermath. The unique features of our intervention were the degree of inter agency coordination, the use of a systematic outreach and screening programme, the collection of psychotherapy outcome measures and the development of an ongoing clinic. The work represents a sustained attempt to assess the nature and prevalence of post-traumatic reactions and the most medically and economically effective form of intervention. In this paper we describe the way our team responded to the high level of psychological distress that we found, we present some preliminary results, outline two therapeutic trials, and refer to the longterm consequences for the work of our department.

Rosser, R; Dewar, S; Thompson, J

1991-01-01

130

A Moored Airborne Video System with Nearshore Applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the past two decades researchers have developed video-based remote sensing techniques to measure relevant nearshore variables. Measurements made include spatial patterns in sand bar morphology, run-up oscillations, wave breaking distributions, phase speed and wave angle, and most recently, surface currents within the surf zone and swash. In general, vertical (i.e., downward oriented) photography or videography is preferred to high-oblique land-based systems. However, although aircraft-mounted video systems have been under development for several years, the relatively high cost and short dwell time has limited its widespread application. Thus, most video measurements for research applications are obtained through methods whereby arrays of video cameras are fixed on land and oriented obliquely to the surf zone region of interest. The typically high-oblique imagery is limited in spatial ground coverage by rapidly degrading resolution in the far field, as well as lay-over problems associated with a fluctuating sea surface and high incidence look-angle. In order to alleviate these problems, researchers have attempted mounting video (or photographic) sensors on tethered balloons where long time series can be obtained over large regions of the surf zone without limiting resolution in the far field. In our research we have developed a technique for mounting a video system onboard a tethered helikite, a combination kite and helium-filled blimp (Allsopp Helikites, Ltd.). The video system consists of a downward-looking video camera in a custom weather-proof housing mounted on the keel of the helikite. Also included are a differential GPS receiver, tilt and heading sensor for accurate geometrical transformation, micro-processor, onboard power supply, and wireless data link. In this presentation, we will discuss the system in more detail, the image resolution and accuracies, and the expected applications to nearshore processes research. This work is sponsored by the Office of Naval Research.

Smith, G.; Lippmann, T.

2004-12-01

131

Probabilistic Climate Change Projections of Nearshore Wave Climate  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The characterization of local wave climate in a particular location is of paramount importance for the estimation of coastal flooding. Downscaling is the method to obtain wave climate information at high spatial resolution from relatively coarse resolution. Dynamic downscaling, based on the use of numerical wave generation and propagation models, is perhaps the most widely used methodology. An alternative approach is statistical downscaling that can be conducted by means of regression methods or weather pattern-based approaches. The main advantages of the statistical against the dynamical approach are the ease of implementation and the low computational requirements. Moreover, the statistical downscaling allows the reconstruction of local wave climates from multiple runs of several Climate Models. Therefore, the estimation of a multi-model local wave climate for a probabilistic climate change projection is possible. We propose a statistical downscaling method, Y=f(x), based on the local wave characteristics (predictand ) which are conditioned to a particular synoptic-scale weather type (predictor ). The selected predictor is the n-days-averaged sea level pressure anomaly (SLP). The downscaling relies on the correspondence between local sea-state parameters and weather types (Menendez et al., 2011). The method has been validated by using a high-resolution near-shore wave reanalysis in the Spanish Coast. The near-shore reanalysis is achieved by means of a hybrid approach based on statistical (calibration procedures, selection algorithms and multidimensional interpolation schemes) and dynamic downscaling (SWAN propagations), following Camus et al (2011) methodology. Finally, multivariate wave climate parameters (significant wave height, mean period, mean direction and energy flux) for a specific location under several scenarios have been projected by using an ensemble approach.

Menendez, M.; Perez, J.; Mendez, F. J.; Losada, I. J.

2012-04-01

132

Uncertainty Analysis and Parameter Estimation For Nearshore Hydrodynamic Models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Numerical models represent deterministic approaches used for the relevant physical processes in the nearshore. Complexity of the physics of the model and uncertainty involved in the model inputs compel us to apply a stochastic approach to analyze the robustness of the model. The Bayesian inverse problem is one powerful way to estimate the important input model parameters (determined by apriori sensitivity analysis) and can be used for uncertainty analysis of the outputs. Bayesian techniques can be used to find the range of most probable parameters based on the probability of the observed data and the residual errors. In this study, the effect of input data involving lateral (Neumann) boundary conditions, bathymetry and off-shore wave conditions on nearshore numerical models are considered. Monte Carlo simulation is applied to a deterministic numerical model (the Delft3D modeling suite for coupled waves and flow) for the resulting uncertainty analysis of the outputs (wave height, flow velocity, mean sea level and etc.). Uncertainty analysis of outputs is performed by random sampling from the input probability distribution functions and running the model as required until convergence to the consistent results is achieved. The case study used in this analysis is the Duck94 experiment, which was conducted at the U.S. Army Field Research Facility at Duck, North Carolina, USA in the fall of 1994. The joint probability of model parameters relevant for the Duck94 experiments will be found using the Bayesian approach. We will further show that, by using Bayesian techniques to estimate the optimized model parameters as inputs and applying them for uncertainty analysis, we can obtain more consistent results than using the prior information for input data which means that the variation of the uncertain parameter will be decreased and the probability of the observed data will improve as well. Keywords: Monte Carlo Simulation, Delft3D, uncertainty analysis, Bayesian techniques, MCMC

Ardani, S.; Kaihatu, J. M.

2012-12-01

133

Evaluation of nearshore wave models in steep reef environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To provide coastal engineers and scientists with a quantitative evaluation of nearshore numerical wave models in reef environments, we review and compare three commonly used models with detailed laboratory observations. These models are the following: (1) SWASH (Simulating WAves till SHore) (Zijlema et al. 2011), a phase-resolving nonlinear shallow-water wave model with added nonhydrostatic terms; (2) SWAN (Simulating WAve Nearshore) (Booij et al. 1999), a phase-averaged spectral wave model; and (3) XBeach (Roelvink et al. 2009), a coupled phase-averaged spectral wave model (applied to modeling sea-swell waves) and a nonlinear shallow-water model (applied to modeling infragravity waves). A quantitative assessment was made of each model's ability to predict sea-swell (SS) wave height, infragravity (IG) wave height, wave spectra, and wave setup ( overline{?} ) at five locations across the laboratory fringing reef profile of Demirbilek et al. (2007). Simulations were performed with the "recommended" empirical coefficients as documented for each model, and then the key wave-breaking parameter for each model (? in SWASH and ? in both SWAN and XBeach) was optimized to most accurately reproduce the observations. SWASH, SWAN, and XBeach were found to be capable of predicting SS wave height variations across the steep fringing reef profile with reasonable accuracy using the default coefficients. Nevertheless, tuning of the key wave-breaking parameter improved the accuracy of each model's predictions. SWASH and XBeach were also able to predict IG wave height and spectral transformation. Although SWAN was capable of modeling the SS wave height, in its current form, it was not capable of modeling the spectral transformation into lower frequencies, as evident in the underprediction of the low-frequency waves.

Buckley, Mark; Lowe, Ryan; Hansen, Jeff

2014-05-01

134

Evaluation of nearshore wave models in steep reef environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To provide coastal engineers and scientists with a quantitative evaluation of nearshore numerical wave models in reef environments, we review and compare three commonly used models with detailed laboratory observations. These models are the following: (1) SWASH (Simulating WAves till SHore) (Zijlema et al. 2011), a phase-resolving nonlinear shallow-water wave model with added nonhydrostatic terms; (2) SWAN (Simulating WAve Nearshore) (Booij et al. 1999), a phase-averaged spectral wave model; and (3) XBeach (Roelvink et al. 2009), a coupled phase-averaged spectral wave model (applied to modeling sea-swell waves) and a nonlinear shallow-water model (applied to modeling infragravity waves). A quantitative assessment was made of each model's ability to predict sea-swell (SS) wave height, infragravity (IG) wave height, wave spectra, and wave setup () at five locations across the laboratory fringing reef profile of Demirbilek et al. (2007). Simulations were performed with the "recommended" empirical coefficients as documented for each model, and then the key wave-breaking parameter for each model ( ? in SWASH and ? in both SWAN and XBeach) was optimized to most accurately reproduce the observations. SWASH, SWAN, and XBeach were found to be capable of predicting SS wave height variations across the steep fringing reef profile with reasonable accuracy using the default coefficients. Nevertheless, tuning of the key wave-breaking parameter improved the accuracy of each model's predictions. SWASH and XBeach were also able to predict IG wave height and spectral transformation. Although SWAN was capable of modeling the SS wave height, in its current form, it was not capable of modeling the spectral transformation into lower frequencies, as evident in the underprediction of the low-frequency waves.

Buckley, Mark; Lowe, Ryan; Hansen, Jeff

2014-06-01

135

Drag kings in the new wave: gender performance and participation.  

PubMed

In an examination of Midwestern drag king performers and communities that have emerged since the study by Volcano and Halberstam of king cultures in London, New York, and San Francisco, this article considers traditional and alternative ways of "doing drag," both performative and participatory, as a means of interrogating the proximity of a "new wave" of king culture to academic theory. Tracing the evolution of drag king performance in the Twin Cities from the 1996 workshop by Diane Torr to the formation of two distinct king troupes in the late 1990s demonstrates a particular trajectory in kinging that reflects a new consciousness and enactment of gender theory through artistic praxis. Participation plays a key role in breaking down the distance between spectator and performer in venues such as the First International Drag King Extravaganza in Columbus, Ohio, and Melinda Hubman's art installation "Performing Masculinities: Take a Chance on Gender" in Minneapolis. By engaging the "audience" in drag, the Extravaganza "Science Fair" successfully referenced drag kings' shared history with early American freak shows in a clever and critical way. Moving beyond the contest framework of early king shows, new drag king troupes like Minneapolis' Dykes Do Drag are "mixing it up" in an attempt to complicate notions of butch/femme gender roles, sexuality, and drag stereotypes. PMID:12769278

Surkan, Kim

2002-01-01

136

Stick balancing, falls and Dragon-Kings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The extent to which the occurrence of falls, the dominant feature of human attempts to balance a stick at their fingertip, can be predicted is examined in the context of the "Dragon-King" hypothesis. For skilled stick balancers, fluctuations in the controlled variable, namely the vertical displacement angle ?, exhibit power law behaviors. When stick balancing is made less stable by either decreasing the length of the stick or by requiring the subject to balance the stick on the surface of a table tennis racket, systematic departures from the power law behaviors are observed in the range of large ?. This observation raises the possibility that the presence of departures from the power law in the large length scale region, possibly Dragon-Kings, may identify situations in which the occurrence of a fall is more imminent. However, whether or not Dragon-Kings are observed, there is a Weibull-type survival function for stick falling. The possibility that increased risk of falling can, at least to some extent, be predicted from fluctuations in the controlled variable before the event occurs has important implications for the development of preventative strategies for the management of phenomena ranging from earthquakes to epileptic seizures to falls in the elderly.

Cabrera, J. L.; Milton, J. G.

2012-05-01

137

Moderate-Resolution Sea Surface Temperature Data for the Nearshore North Pacific  

EPA Science Inventory

Coastal sea surface temperature (SST) is an important environmental characteristic defining habitat suitability for nearshore marine and estuarine organisms. The purpose of this publication is to provide access to an easy-to-use coastal SST dataset for ecologists, biogeographers...

138

Spatial Patterns of Subtidal Benthic Invertebrates and Environmental Factors in the Nearshore Gulf of Maine  

EPA Science Inventory

The spatial patterns of subtidal benthic invertebrates and physical-chemical variables in the nearshore Gulf of Maine (Acadian Biogeographic Province) were studied to provide information needed to calibrate benthic indices of environmental condition, determine physical-chemical f...

139

A Meta-Analysis of Contingent Valuation Studies in Coastal and NearShore Marine Ecosystems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ecosystem services provided by coastal and near-shore marine systems contribute significantly to human welfare. However, studies that document values of these services are widely scattered in the peer-reviewed literature. We collected 39 contingent valuation papers with 120 observations to conduct the first meta-analysis of the ecosystem service values provided by the coastal and near-shore marine systems. Our results show

Shuang Liu; David I. Stern

2008-01-01

140

Analyzing and Predicting Interannual Variability in Nearshore Topographic Field on Large Scales by EOF and ANN  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOF) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) are performed for investigating and predicting interannual\\u000a variability in nearshore topographic field around the Yellow River Delta. EOF and ANN are particularly effective at reproducing\\u000a the observed topographic features around either modern or historical river mouths where the nearshore topography has experienced\\u000a significantly intense interannual changes during the last thirty decades.

Jin-dong Wang; Xiao-gong Sun

141

Nearshore Processes, Currents and Directional Wave Spectra Monitoring Using Coherent and Non-coherent Imaging Radars  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two new radar systems have been developed for real-time measurement of near-shore processes, and results are presented for measurements of ocean wave spectra, near-shore sand bar structure, and ocean currents. The first is a non-coherent radar based on a modified version of the Sitex radar family, with a data acquisition system designed around an ISR digital receiver card. The card

D. Trizna; K. Hathaway

2007-01-01

142

36 CFR 7.8 - Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. 7.8 Section 7... § 7.8 Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. (a) Dogs and cats...lands within Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. (i)...

2010-07-01

143

36 CFR 7.8 - Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-07-01 false Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. 7.8 Section 7... § 7.8 Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. (a) Dogs and cats...lands within Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. (i)...

2009-07-01

144

75 FR 57478 - Accreditation and Approval of King Laboratories, Inc., as a Commercial Gauger and Laboratory  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Border Protection Accreditation and Approval of King Laboratories, Inc., as...Notice of accreditation and approval of King Laboratories, Inc., as...DATES: The accreditation and approval of King Laboratories, Inc.,...

2010-09-21

145

3 CFR 8340 - Proclamation 8340 of January 15, 2009. Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2009  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Proclamation 8340 of January 15, 2009. Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2009...January 15, 2009 Proc. 8340 Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday...America A Proclamation On the Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal...

2010-01-01

146

Thermography of the New River Inlet plume and nearshore currents  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As part of the DARLA and RIVET experiments, thermal imaging systems mounted on a tower and in an airplane captured water flow in the New River Inlet, NC, USA. Kilometer-scale, airborne thermal imagery of the inlet details the ebb flow of the estuarine plume water mixing with ocean water. Multiple fronts, corresponding to the preferred channels through the ebb tidal delta, are imaged in the aerial data. A series of internal fronts suggest discreet sources of the tidal plume that vary with time. Focused thermal measurements made from a tower on the south side of the inlet viewed an area within a radius of a few hundred meters. Sub-meter resolution video from the tower revealed fine-scale flow features and the interaction of tidal exchange and wave-forced surfzone currents. Using the tower and airborne thermal image data we plan to provide geophysical information to compare with numerical models and in situ measurements made by other investigators. From the overflights, we will map the spatial and temporal extent of the estuarine plume to correlate with tidal phase and local wind conditions. From the tower data, we will investigate the structure of the nearshore flow using a thermal particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique, which is based on tracking motion of the surface temperature patterns. Long term variability of the mean and turbulent two-dimensional PIV currents will be correlated to local wave, tidal, and wind forcing parameters.

Chickadel, C.; Jessup, A.

2012-12-01

147

Distribution of actinomycetes in near-shore tropical marine sediments.  

PubMed Central

Actinomycetes were isolated from near-shore marine sediments collected at 15 island locations throughout the Bahamas. A total of 289 actinomycete colonies were observed, and all but 6 could be assigned to the suprageneric groups actinoplanetes and streptomycetes. A bimodal distribution in the actinomycete population in relation to depth was recorded, with the maximum numbers occurring in the shallow and deep sampling sites. This distribution can be accounted for by a rapid decrease in streptomycetes and an increase in actinoplanetes with increasing depth and does not conform to the theory that actinomycetes isolated from marine sources are of terrestrial origin. Sixty-three of the isolated actinomycetes were tested for the effects of seawater on growth. Streptomycete growth in nonsaline media was reduced by 39% compared with that in seawater. The actinoplanetes had a near obligate requirement of seawater for growth, and this is presented as evidence that actinomycetes can be physiologically active in the marine environment. Problems encountered with the enumeration of actinomycetes in marine sediments are also discussed.

Jensen, P R; Dwight, R; Fenical, W

1991-01-01

148

A wave-resolving model for nearshore suspended sediment transport  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a wave-resolving sediment transport model, which is capable of simulating sediment suspension in the field-scale surf zone. The surf zone hydrodynamics is modeled by the non-hydrostatic model NHWAVE (Ma et al., 2012). The turbulent flow and suspended sediment are simulated in a coupled manner. Three effects of suspended sediment on turbulent flow field are considered: (1) baroclinic forcing effect; (2) turbulence damping effect and (3) bottom boundary layer effect. Through the validation with the laboratory measurements of suspended sediment under nonbreaking skewed waves and surfzone breaking waves, we demonstrate that the model can reasonably predict wave-averaged sediment profiles. The model is then utilized to simulate a rip current field experiment (RCEX) and nearshore suspended sediment transport. The offshore sediment transport by rip currents is captured by the model. The effects of suspended sediment on self-suspension are also investigated. The turbulence damping and bottom boundary layer effects are significant on sediment suspension. The suspended sediment creates a stably stratified water column, damping fluid turbulence and reducing turbulent diffusivity. The suspension of sediment also produces a stably stratified bottom boundary layer. Thus, the drag coefficient and bottom shear stress are reduced, causing less sediment pickup from the bottom. The cross-shore suspended sediment flux is analyzed as well. The mean Eulerian suspended sediment flux is shoreward outside the surf zone, while it is seaward in the surf zone.

Ma, Gangfeng; Chou, Yi-Ju; Shi, Fengyan

2014-05-01

149

Development of Kings Pointer Maneuvering Model from Sea Trials Data.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The T. V. KINGS POINTER conducted maneuvering trials from 31 July to 7 August of 1987. KINGS POINTER executed 150 individual maneuvers, of which 89 were performed for the purpose of collection of data for hydrodynamic system identification and 61 were for...

T. L. Trankle

1988-01-01

150

Geochemical interpretation of Kings Mountain, North Carolina, orientation area  

Microsoft Academic Search

An orientation study has been made of uranium occurrences in the area of Kings Mountain, North Carolina. This is one of the orientation studies of known uranium occurrences that are being conducted in several geologic provinces and under various climatic (weathering) conditions to provide the technical basis for design and interpretation of NURE geochemical reconnaissance programs. The Kings Mountain area

V. Price; R. B. Ferguson

1977-01-01

151

77 FR 2905 - Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2012  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...King, Jr., Federal Holiday, we celebrate the man who fought for the America he knew was possible. Dr. King's faith in a God who loves all His children and a Nation grounded in the promise of equality would not let him rest until victory was won....

2012-01-20

152

Author! Author! The Gallant Children's Author: Dick King-Smith  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This column presents a brief biography of Dick King-Smith. Born on March 27, 1922 and raised in Gloucestershire, England, he grew up with animals of all kinds. King-Smith was a farmer for twenty years and then became a school teacher. He was also a soldier during wartime, a traveling salesman, shoe factory worker, and television presenter. He…

Brodie, Carolyn S.

2005-01-01

153

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Health Center's Community Management System  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents the case of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Health Center's unique community management system in which neighborhood workers have been developed to assume managerial responsibilities and are directing the Center. The Martin Luther King Center experience is instructive because the Center was able to achieve significant community control by focusing primarily on the internal dimension of

Noel M. Tichy; June Irmiger Taylor

1976-01-01

154

Ethical Communication and the Leadership of Martin Luther King, Jr  

Microsoft Academic Search

Martin Luther King, Jr was the most recognisable face of the African American civil rights movement whose message of racial equality helped to end the generations of legal discrimination against blacks in the American South. Apart from his political achievements King is best known as a communicator and orator whose message of equality and peace was most famously expressed in

Nick Sharman

2007-01-01

155

Martin Luther King, Jr.: In the beginning at Montgomery  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article is a brief account of the events that led to the inauguration of Martin Luther King, Jr., as leader of the Montgomery (Alabama) bus boycott. The writer analyzes the address Dr. King gave on the night he became the chief spokesman for the movement.

Donald H. Smith

1968-01-01

156

King Tone's Journey: From the Barrio to the SHU.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the life of King Tone, president of the Almighty Latin King and Queen Nation gang from 1996-99, analyzing his moral and political careers and noting contexts behind his choices and values and the "working out of a culture and social system that is often obscured in a typified account." The paper emphasizes the "dialectics of violence,"…

Brotherton, Dave

2002-01-01

157

The Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In celebration of one of the most foundational African American figures in history, The King Center Imaging Project has undergone an intense process of digitization to allow universal access to the lifeâÂÂs work of Martin Luther King Jr. Users can sift through a dynamic collection of one million archived documents, images, letters, notes, and speeches, presented via a convenient mosaic interface. Along with the archive, the site provides background information and a glossary for Dr. KingâÂÂs message of nonviolence. Apart from the historical value of the site, users are prompted to follow in Dr. KingâÂÂs work, submitting their own âÂÂdreamsâ for careers, human rights, and world peace. This input is collected into a growing base of nearly five-thousand âÂÂdreamsâ that can be searched via theme or geographic location, true evidence of Dr. KingâÂÂs influential humanitarian message.

158

Nearshore energy subsidies support Lake Michigan fishes and invertebrates following major changes in food web structure.  

PubMed

Aquatic food webs that incorporate multiple energy channels (e.g., nearshore benthic and pelagic) with varying productivity and turnover rates convey stability to biological communities by providing independent energy sources. Within the Lake Michigan food web, invasive dreissenid mussels have caused rapid changes to food web structure and potentially altered the channels through which consumers acquire energy. We used stable C and N isotopes to determine how Lake Michigan food web structure has changed in the past decade, coincident with the expansion of dreissenid mussels, decreased pelagic phytoplankton production, and increased nearshore benthic algal production. Fish and invertebrate samples collected from sites around Lake Michigan were analyzed to determine taxa-specific 13C:12C (delta13C) and 15N:14N (delta15N) ratios. Sampling took place during two distinct periods, 2002-2003 and 2010-2012, that spanned the period of dreissenid expansion, and included nearshore, pelagic and profundal fish and invertebrate taxa. The magnitude and direction of the delta13C shift indicated significantly greater reliance upon nearshore benthic energy sources among nearly all fish taxa as well as profundal invertebrates following dreissenid expansion. Although the mechanisms underlying this delta13C shift likely varied among species, possible causes include the transport of benthic algal production to offshore waters and increased feeding on nearshore prey items by pelagic and profundal species. delta15N shifts were more variable and of smaller magnitude across taxa, although declines in delta15N among some pelagic fishes suggest a shift to alternative prey resources. Lake Michigan fishes and invertebrates appear to have responded to dreissenid-induced changes in nutrient and energy pathways by switching from pelagic to alternative nearshore energy subsidies. Although large shifts in energy allocation (i.e., pelagic to nearshore benthic) resulting from invasive species appear to affect total production at upper trophic levels, changes in trophic structure and utilization of novel energy pathways may help to stabilize food webs following species invasions. PMID:25000756

Turschak, Benjamin A; Bunnell, David; Czesny, Sergiusz; Höök, Tomas O; Janssen, John; Warner, David; Bootsma, Harvey A

2014-05-01

159

Water Quality and Plankton in the United States Nearshore Waters of Lake Huron  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our goal in the development of a nearshore monitoring method has been to evaluate and refine an in situ mapping approach to assess the nearshore waters across the Great Lakes. The report here for Lake Huron is part of a broader effort being conducted across all five Great Lakes. We conducted an intensive survey for the United States nearshore of Lake Huron along a continuous shoreline transect (523 km) from Port Huron, Michigan, to Detour Passage. A depth contour of 20 m was towed with a conductivity-temperature depth profiler, fluorometer, transmissometer, and laser optical plankton counter. Multiple cross-contour tows (10-30 m) on the cruise dates were used to characterize the variability across a broader range of the nearshore. The cross-contour tows were comparable with the alongshore contour indicating that the 20-m contour does a good job of representing the nearshore region (10-30 m). Strong correlations were observed between water quality and spatially associated watershed land use. A repeat tow separated by several weeks investigated temporal variability in spatial patterns within a summer season. Strong correlations were observed across each variable for the temporal repeat across broad- and fine-scale spatial dimensions. The survey results for Lake Huron nearshore are briefly compared with a similar nearshore survey in Lake Superior. The biomass concentrations of lower food web components of Lake Huron were notably approximately 54-59 % of those in Lake Superior. The towed instrumentation survey supported the recent view of a change in Lake Huron to an ultra-oligotrophic state, which has been uncharacteristic in recent history.

Yurista, Peder M.; Kelly, John R.; Miller, Samuel E.; Van Alstine, Jon D.

2012-10-01

160

Modeling crude oil droplet-sediment aggregation in nearshore waters.  

PubMed

This paper describes a modeling approach that simulates changes in particle size distribution and density due to aggregation by extending the Smoluchowski aggregation kinetic model to particles of different density. Batch flocculation studies were conducted for clay, colloidal silica, crude oil, clay-crude oil, and silica-crude oil systems. A parameter estimation algorithm was used to estimate homogeneous collision efficiencies (alphaHOMO) for single-particle-type systems and heterogeneous collision efficiencies (alphaHET) for two-particle-type systems. Homogeneous collision efficiency values (alphaHOMO) were greater for clay (0.7) and for crude oil (0.3) than for silica (0.01). Thus, clay and crude oil were classified as cohesive particles while silica was classified as noncohesive. Heterogeneous collision efficiencies were similar for oil-clay (0.4) and oil-silica (0.3) systems. Thus, crude oil increases the aggregation of noncohesive particles. Data from the calibrated aggregation model were used to estimate apparent first-order flocculation rates (K') for oil, clay, and silica and apparent second-order flocculation rates (K'') for oil and clay in oil-clay systems and for oil and silica in oil-silica systems. For oil or clay systems, aggregation Damköhler numbers ranged from 0.1 to 1.0, suggesting that droplet coalescence and clay aggregation can occur on the same time scales as oil resurfacing and clay settling, respectively. For mixed oil-clay systems, the relative time scales of clay settling and clay-oil aggregation were also within an order of magnitude. Thus, oil-clay aggregation should be considered when modeling crude oil transport in nearshore waters. PMID:15461172

Sterling, Michael C; Bonner, James S; Page, Cheryl A; Fuller, Christopher B; Ernest, Andrew N S; Autenrieth, Robin L

2004-09-01

161

Nearshore wave-induced cyclical flexing of sea cliffs  

USGS Publications Warehouse

[1] Evolution of a tectonically active coast is driven by geomorphically destructive energy supplied by ocean waves. Wave energy is episodic and concentrated; sea cliffs are battered by the geomorphic wrecking ball every 4-25 s. We measure the response of sea cliffs to wave assault by sensing the ground motion using near-coastal seismometers. Sea cliffs respond to waves in two distinct styles. High-frequency motion (20 Hz) reflects the natural frequency of the sea cliff as it rings in response to direct wave impact. Low-frequency motion in the 0.1-0.05 Hz (10-20 s) band consistently agrees with the dominant nearshore wave period. Integrating microseismic velocities suggests 50 ??m and 10 ??m displacements in horizontal and vertical directions, respectively. Displacement ellipsoids exhibit simultaneous downward and seaward sea cliff motion with each wave. Video footage corroborates the downward sea cliff flex in response to the imposed water load on the wave cut platform. Gradients in displacement amplitudes documented using multiple seismometers suggest longitudinal and shear strain of the flexing sea cliff on the order of 0.5-4 ?? strains during each wave loading cycle. As this sea cliff flexure occurs approximately 3 million times annually, it has the potential to fatigue the rock through cyclical loading. Local sea cliff retreat rates of 10 cm/yr imply that a given parcel of rock is flexed through roughly 109 cycles of increasing amplitude before exposure to direct wave attack at the cliff face. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

Adams, P. N.; Storlazzi, C. D.; Anderson, R. S.

2005-01-01

162

Influence of Wave Energetics on Nearshore Storms and Adjacent Shoreline Morphology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Large-scale climatic forcings (such as NAO and ENSO) are known to induce fluctuations in regional storm frequency and intensity. Morphology-based studies have traditionally focused on individual storms and their influence on the nearshore coastal wave regime and shoreline response. Few studies have attempted to link long-term observed changes in shoreline position, beach, and nearshore morphology with large-scale climatic forcings that influence regional storm patterns. In order to predict the response of coastlines to future sea level rise and climate change, we need to understand how changes in the frequency of storms affecting nearshore regions (nearshore storms) may influence trends in shoreline position and nearshore morphology. Nearly 30 years of wave data (deep and shallow) collected off of Duck, NC are examined for trends in storm frequency and/or intensity. Changes in shoreline position and shoreface elevation, as observed from monthly beach transects over the same period, are also investigated in light of the observed trends in hydrodynamic forcings. Our preliminary analysis was unable to identify any consistent linear trends (increases or decreases) in frequency or intensity over the ~30-year time period in either the offshore wave heights or the nearshore storm record. These data might suggest that previous observations of recent increases in storm intensity and frequency, speculated to be due to climate change, might be spatially limited. Future analyses will partition the contributions from individual wind sea and swell events in order to better identify long-term trends in wave energetics from the various wave generation regions in the Atlantic. At this location, offshore wave height and the nearshore storm record are dominated by seasonal fluctuations and a strong interdecadal- to decadal periodicity. Previous research in Duck, NC has suggested that changes in shoreline position and shoreface elevations are related both to seasonal trends as well as "storm groupiness". Our analyses support these findings, but also identify interdecadal- to decadal trends in the nearshore morphology. Despite these fluctuations, the overall position of the shoreline and elevation of the shoreface shows little net change over the 30 years investigated. We hypothesize that the interdecadal- to decadal periodicity in the morphology is driven largely by the influences of large-scale climatic forcings on the nearshore wave regime as reflected in the storm record. We also explore the relationship between morphological periodicity, storm and wave height periodicity, and climatic fluctuations.

Wadman, H. M.; McNinch, J. E.; Hanson, J.

2008-12-01

163

A High Resolution Hydrodynamic Model of Puget Sound to Support Nearshore Restoration Feasibility Analysis and Design  

SciTech Connect

Estuarine and coastal hydrodynamic processes are sometimes neglected in the design and planning of nearshore restoration actions. Despite best intentions, efforts to restore nearshore habitats can result in poor outcomes if circulation and transport which also affect freshwater-saltwater interactions are not properly addressed. Limitations due to current land use can lead to selection of sub-optimal restoration alternatives that may result in undesirable consequences, such as flooding, deterioration of water quality, and erosion, requiring immediate remedies and costly repairs. Uncertainty with achieving restoration goals, such as recovery of tidal exchange, supply of sediment and nutrients, and establishment of fish migration pathways, may be minimized by using numerical models designed for application to the nearshore environment. A high resolution circulation and transport model of the Puget Sound, in the state of Washington, was developed to assist with nearshore habitat restoration design and analysis, and to answer the question “can we achieve beneficial restoration outcomes at small local scale, as well as at a large estuary-wide scale?” The Puget Sound model is based on an unstructured grid framework to define the complex Puget Sound shoreline using a finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM). The capability of the model for simulating the important nearshore processes, such as circulation in complex multiple tidal channels, wetting and drying of tide flats, and water quality and sediment transport as part of restoration feasibility, are illustrated through examples of restoration projects in Puget Sound.

Khangaonkar, Tarang; Yang, Zhaoqing

2011-01-01

164

Genetic differentiation between parapatric 'nearshore' and 'offshore' populations of the bottlenose dolphin.  

PubMed Central

The existence of nearshore and offshore populations of the bottlenose dolphin has been documented throughout its range. In several cases the two regional forms have been shown to be morphologically distinct, although there is considerable overlap for most characters. The populations off the eastern coast of North America have been the subject of a long-term programme of research on their distribution and movements. In this study, we compare mitochondrial and nuclear genetic markers between dolphins classified as either nearshore or offshore type. These putative populations were found to be distinct at both nuclear and mitochondrial genetic markers. Further, the level of variation among the nearshore dolphins was reduced compared with the offshore population. A broader geographical comparison suggests a shared lineage between offshore dolphins from the western North Atlantic and both offshore and nearshore dolphins from the eastern Atlantic. These results are consistent with local differentiation based on habitat or resource specialization in the western North Atlantic, and suggest differences in the character of the nearshore/offshore distinction in different parts of the world.

Hoelzel, A R; Potter, C W; Best, P B

1998-01-01

165

Oil & War: Revisiting M. King Hubbert's predictions.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oil is, unlike almost any other natural resource on earth, not only finite but also irreversibly consumed. At the same time worldwide data shows that at least at present and for the foreseeable future oil consumption rate is directly proportional to the national standard of living. In 1956 and again in 1962, M. King Hubbert predicted, using a simple model based on the logistic equation, that oil production in the lower 48 United States will follow a bell shaped curve with a production peak around the year 1971 and a production level of ~ 3 billion barrels per year, followed by a rapid decline. While his model approach was ridiculed at the time production data to date reveals a remarkable agreement with this prediction: US oil production did peak in 1971 at a level of 3.2.10 barrels a day and has been declining ever since. M. King Hubbert similarly estimated also the future of oil production worldwide - predicting peak production sometime between 1995-2010 (now!) at a level of 25 to 35 billion barrels per year. Current worldwide production is ~ 27 billion barrels per year. Thus because about half of the oil in earth has already been discovered, the world is destined to face more and bigger conflicts over the control of global supplies. Although many economists and political scientists tend to dismiss the significance of Hubbert's thinking about the finiteness of recoverable oil as well as the consequent implications, it appears that without careful management these conflicts could turn into wars much bigger than in Kuwait in 1991 or in Iraq in 2003. It is therefore imperative for us as earth scientist to try to educate the public and our leaders about the basic geological reality of finite fossil energy resources, and the serious consequences of this fact.

Nur, A. M.

2003-12-01

166

Depositional environment of Leo Sands, middle Minnelusa Formation, Niobrara County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Pennsylvanian middle Minnelusa Formation Leo Sands in the north half of Niobrara County, Wyoming, and southwestern South Dakota, may have been deposited in a nearshore eolian sabkha environment. Cores reveal sedimentary features which support this hypothesis, such as deflation lags, avalanche-produced strata, probable interdune deposits, and nodular anhydrites. The Leo Sands have proven to be excellent reservoir rocks. Associated anhydrites provide the seal for hydrocarbons which may have been generated from organic-rich interdunal shales.

McBane, J.D.; Swinehart, R.P.

1983-08-01

167

An assessment of the health and historical changes of the nearshore fish community of the St. Marys River  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the nearshore fish community in the St. Marys River using a standardized boat electrofishing protocol to (1) compare the current nearshore fish community of the river to previous surveys, (2) compare the status of fish communities from four distinct areas of the river (the upper river above the compensating gates, the main river, Lake George, and the lower

Thomas C. Pratt; Lisa M. O'Connor

2011-01-01

168

An Integrated Set of Observations to Link Conditions of Great Lakes Nearshore Waters to their Coastal Watersheds  

EPA Science Inventory

We combine three elements for a comprehensive characterization that links nearshore conditions with coastal watershed disturbance metrics. The three elements are: 1) a shore-parallel, high-resolution nearshore survey using continuous in situ towed sensors; 2) a spatially-balanc...

169

Detecting Land-based Signals in the Near-shore Zone of Lake Erie During Summer 2009  

EPA Science Inventory

We conducted two styles of nearshore surveys in Lake Erie during August to mid-September 2009. The first used a spatially-balanced probability survey (SBS) design to establish discrete stations within a GIS-defined target populationthe nearshore zone extending approximately 5 km...

170

Land-use planning for nearshore ecosystem services—the Puget Sound Ecosystem Portfolio Model  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The 2,500 miles of shoreline and nearshore areas of Puget Sound, Washington, provide multiple benefits to people—"ecosystem services"—including important fishing, shellfishing, and recreation industries. To help resource managers plan for expected growth in coming decades, the U.S. Geological Survey Western Geographic Science Center has developed the Puget Sound Ecosystem Portfolio Model (PSEPM). Scenarios of urban growth and shoreline modifications serve as model inputs to develop alternative futures of important nearshore features such as water quality and beach habitats. Model results will support regional long-term planning decisions for the Puget Sound region.

Byrd, Kristin

2011-01-01

171

Impacts of Risk and Service Type on Nearshore and Offshore Investment Location Decisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

• \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Offshoring of services has gained considerable attention in management circles. However, little empirical research has explored\\u000a the emerging sourcing alternative of nearshoring, despite the fact that firms situate about one out of five projects abroad\\u000a in a nearshore location as opposed to an offshore location.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a We empirically assess the impact of economic and risk factors regarding firms’ services

Eugene D. Hahn; Kraiwinee Bunyaratavej; Jonathan P. Doh

2011-01-01

172

Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks Action Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As participants in the Climate Friendly Parks program, Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks belong to a network of parks that are putting climate friendly behavior at the forefront of sustainability planning in national parks. By conducting an emission...

2013-01-01

173

Dragon-kings: Mechanisms, statistical methods and empirical evidence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This introductory article presents the special Discussion and Debate volume "From black swans to dragon-kings, is there life beyond power laws?" We summarize and put in perspective the contributions into three main themes: (i) mechanisms for dragon-kings, (ii) detection of dragon-kings and statistical tests and (iii) empirical evidence in a large variety of natural and social systems. Overall, we are pleased to witness significant advances both in the introduction and clarification of underlying mechanisms and in the development of novel efficient tests that demonstrate clear evidence for the presence of dragon-kings in many systems. However, this positive view should be balanced by the fact that this remains a very delicate and difficult field, if only due to the scarcity of data as well as the extraordinary important implications with respect to hazard assessment, risk control and predictability.

Sornette, D.; Ouillon, G.

2012-05-01

174

Making Sense of the Senseless: The Murder of Lawrence King  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On Feb. 12, 2008, 15-year-old Lawrence King was shot twice in the head in front of other students, in Oxnard, California. When Larry King was murdered allegedly due to a classmate's prejudice, some pundits asked if adults were to blame for encouraging him to come out. One can't be sure what adults did or didn't do in this case, but the question…

Reis, Beth

2008-01-01

175

Efficiency Tools In The Speeches Of Martin Luther King, Jr  

Microsoft Academic Search

This thesis represents the results of a computer-aided analysis of aspects of speeches of the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. Specifically, the analysis has investigated the occurrence of indicators of the efficiency function--tools facilitating the comprehension of a discourse by a hearer or reader--in four speeches of Dr. King.Contrary to the expectations of many who anticipate complex grammatical structures in

M. Cassandra Foster Smith

1980-01-01

176

76 FR 20087 - CSX Transportation, Inc.-Discontinuance of Service Exemption-in Pinellas County, Fla.  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...milepost ARE 897.55 near 16th Street North and milepost ARE 898.00 at the junction of 1st Avenue South and Dr. Martin Luther King Street in St. Petersburg, Pinellas County, Fla. The line traverses United States Postal Service Zip Code...

2011-04-11

177

Drag king magic: performing/becoming the other.  

PubMed

This chapter seeks to theorize drag king practice through the lenses of alterity, liminality, and performance theory, while attempting to complicate and reinvigorate discussions of identity raised by drag. I examine the ways in which drag king performance plumbs the concept of "the Other," and forces confrontation with a complex field of desire. Contemporary "queergirl" existence negotiates a range of desirable and desiring Others, from the polarities (i.e., butch-femme) unique to queer structures of desire, to the desire of those on the cultural margins for the power of those at the center, and vice versa. I employ anthropological theories of performance, mimesis, and liminality to establish a framework through which drag kings may be viewed as crucibles of this desire and agents of this power exchange. By performing maleness, drag kings expand and redraw the definitional boundaries of the male, interfere with the cultural power of mainstream maleness, and simultaneously transfer some of this power to themselves as queer women. At the same time, drag king existence forces a renegotiation of queergirl desire to encompass a range of masculinities. By performing/becoming the Other, drag kings engage in a practice of magic which transforms both margin and center. PMID:12769281

Rosenfeld, Kathryn

2002-01-01

178

Historic Furnishings Report: Martin Luther King, Jr., Birth Home, Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site, Georgia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Since the Martin Luther King, Jr., Birth Home has already been partially restored and refurnished, it is important to summarize the available information on the goals of that restoration and the procedures followed by those who carried out the refurnishin...

1989-01-01

179

Interference in Atomic Absorption with a King Graphite Furnace (Interferences en Absorption Atomique avec un Four King en Graphite).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During the use of a graphite King furnace for analysis through atomic absorption, a certain number of interferences are found. Four types have been studied: physical effects like variations in the distillation of elements: formation of molecular compounds...

G. Baudin L. Feve M. Chaput

1972-01-01

180

The comparative fate of chemically dispersed and untreated oils in an Arctic nearshore environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The distribution and environmental fate of petroleum hydrocarbons introduced into the nearshore environment of Cape Hatt, Baffin Island, Canada, during two controlled experimental discharges of a Venezuelan (Lagomedio) crude oil have been studied. An analytical program based on a combination of ultraviolet\\/fluorescence studies, high resolution gas chromatography, and computer-assisted gas chromatographic mass spectrometry has been used to examine several hundred

1982-01-01

181

Interaction of nearshore, beach and dune systems: implications for barrier island morphology (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Improvements and advances in technology permit the measurement of sediment transport and fluid dynamics at increasingly smaller temporal and spatial scales. While these studies provide greater insight about small-scale processes, it remains unclear how to transfer this improved understanding of these processes to the convergences and divergences of transport that are ultimately responsible for the evolution of nearshore, beach and dune environments. A series of field experiments are used to examine how small-scale processes and the exchange of sediment amongst the nearshore, beach and dune is dependent on the antecedent morphology. Specifically, the transport of sediment from beach to dune is shown to depend on the synchronization of sediment supply and transport potential that vary as the beach and backshore evolve. The evolution of the beach and backshore in turn depends on the transformation of the incident wave field over the nearshore profile, which is dependent on the bathymetry of the inner-shelf. In this respect, the interaction of nearshore, beach and dune systems is self-reinforcing and evidence is presented to show this interaction is responsible for the alongshore variation in barrier island morphology. It is argued that the dependency of process on morphology creates new opportunities for research in which changes in process vary with changes morphology in both space and time.

Houser, C.; Weymer, B. A.; Trimble, S. M.; Barrineau, C. P.

2011-12-01

182

Interaction of nearshore, beach and dune systems: implications for barrier island morphology (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Improvements and advances in technology permit the measurement of sediment transport and fluid dynamics at increasingly smaller temporal and spatial scales. While these studies provide greater insight about small-scale processes, it remains unclear how to transfer this improved understanding of these processes to the convergences and divergences of transport that are ultimately responsible for the evolution of nearshore, beach and dune environments. A series of field experiments are used to examine how small-scale processes and the exchange of sediment amongst the nearshore, beach and dune is dependent on the antecedent morphology. Specifically, the transport of sediment from beach to dune is shown to depend on the synchronization of sediment supply and transport potential that vary as the beach and backshore evolve. The evolution of the beach and backshore in turn depends on the transformation of the incident wave field over the nearshore profile, which is dependent on the bathymetry of the inner-shelf. In this respect, the interaction of nearshore, beach and dune systems is self-reinforcing and evidence is presented to show this interaction is responsible for the alongshore variation in barrier island morphology. It is argued that the dependency of process on morphology creates new opportunities for research in which changes in process vary with changes morphology in both space and time.

Houser, C.; Weymer, B. A.; Trimble, S. M.; Barrineau, C. P.

2013-12-01

183

Application of remote sensing to study nearshore circulation. [and the continental shelf  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The research to use remote sensing techniques for studying the continental shelf is reported. The studies reported include: (1) nearshore circulation in the vincinity of a natural tidal inlet; (2) identification of indicators of biological activity; (3) remote navigation system for tracking free drifting buoys; (4) experimental design of an estuaring tidal circulation; and (5) Skylab support work.

Zeigler, J.; Lobecker, R.; Stauble, D.; Welch, C.; Haas, L.; Fang, C. S.

1974-01-01

184

Lake Superior: Nearshore Variability and a Landscape Driver Concept (journal article)  

EPA Science Inventory

Spatial variation is well known to exist in water quality parameters of the Great Lakes nearshore, however strong patterns for extended reaches also have been observed and found to be robust across seasonal time frames. Less is known about robustness of inter-annual variation wi...

185

50 CFR 697.26 - EEZ Nearshore Management Area 5 Trap Waiver.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...4(a)(1) and limited access black sea bass permits under § 648.4...section may engage in trap fishing for black sea bass in EEZ Nearshore Management...regulations applicable to lobster and black sea bass fishing. (1) A...

2013-10-01

186

Macroinvertebrate Community Structure and Sediment Bioassay Results from Nearshore Areas of North American Great Lakes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Benthic invertebrate communities of 50 nearshore reference sites in the North American Great Lakes were evaluated by replicate (n=5), quantitative sampling. Also, sediments collected at the 50 sites were used in eight, replicated (n=3), lethal and sublethal bioassays in the laboratory. We quantified the magnitude of variation and the proportion of variation among sites, as opposed to among replicates within

Robert C. Bailey; Kristin E. Day; Richard H. Norris; Trefor B. Reynoldson

1995-01-01

187

FINDING AND READING ECOLOGICAL SIGNALS IN THE NEARSHORE OF THE GREAT LAKES  

EPA Science Inventory

Adjunct UMD faculty make annual presentations on research interest to IBS graduate students and faculty. Talks engage students in research and application to environmental problems. This presentation discusses the ecology of the nearshore areas of the Great Lakes, and ways to fi...

188

Nearshore Habitat and Fish Community Associations of Coaster Brook Trout in Isle Royale, Lake Superior  

Microsoft Academic Search

We characterized the nearshore habitat and fish community composition of approximately 300 km of shoreline within and adjacent to the major embayments of Isle Royale, Lake Superior. Sampling yielded 17 species, of which 12 were widespread and represented a common element of the Lake Superior fish community, including cisco Coregonus artedi, lake whitefish C. clupeaformis, round whitefish Prosopium cylindraceum, lake

Owen T. Gorman; Seth A. Moore; Andrew J. Carlson; Henry R. Quinlan

2008-01-01

189

The Benthic Fauna and Sediments of the Nearshore Zone Off Panama City Beach, Florida.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study presents: (1) basic data on the benthic fauna and surface sediments of the nearshore zone of Panama City Beach, Fla., before restoration of the beach, and (2) the results of a study on the effect of Hurricane Eloise on the benthic fauna in the ...

C. H. Saloman

1976-01-01

190

Analysis of near-shore sea surface temperatures in the Northern Pacific  

EPA Science Inventory

Recent studies report a warming trend in Pacific Ocean temperatures over the last 50 years. However, much less is known about temperature change in the near-coastal environment, which is particularly sensitive to climatic change. In near-shore regions in situ sea surface temper...

191

Evaluating a Lake Tahoe nearshore assessment strategy: A circumnavigation survey, August 2011  

EPA Science Inventory

We had the opportunity to apply a high-resolution nearshore sampling strategy, developed in the US/Canadian Laurentian Great Lakes, to Lake Tahoe. The strategy uses towed in situ sensors (physico-chemistry and biology) oscillated from near surface to near bottom while a vessel i...

192

Fate and effects of drilling fluid and cutting discharges in shallow, nearshore waters  

SciTech Connect

The relationships between selected environmental parameters (sedimentology, trace metals, and hydrocarbons) and macroinfaunal assemblages were studied to determine the fate and effects of drilling fluid and cutting discharges from a multiple well site in a shallow nearshore environment. Results are presented.

Not Available

1989-01-01

193

Assessing the Suitability of Video Imaging for Studying the Dynamics of Nearshore Sandbars in Tideless Beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nearshore sandbars, an important natural defense mechanism of the beaches, can be monitored using shore-based video systems. Before studying bar dynamics with video images, we must establish the relationship between the real bar positions and the videoed bar positions (detected by the preferential wave breaking on the shallows). This analysis becomes essential in the two studied tideless beaches of Barcelona

Francesca Ribas; Elena Ojeda; Timothy D. Price; Jorge Guillen

2010-01-01

194

Naval submarine base Kings Bay and Bangor soil evaluations.  

SciTech Connect

This report provides soil evaluation and characterization testing for the submarine bases at Kings Bay, Georgia, and Bangor, Washington, using triaxial testing at high confining pressures with different moisture contents. In general, the samples from the Bangor and Kings Bay sites appeared to be stronger than a previously used reference soil. Assuming the samples of the material were representative of the material found at the sites, they should be adequate for use in the planned construction. Since soils can vary greatly over even a small site, a soil specification for the construction contractor would be needed to insure that soil variations found at the site would meet or exceed the requirements. A suggested specification for the Bangor and Kings Bay soils was presented based on information gathered from references plus data obtained from this study, which could be used as a basis for design by the construction contractor.

Holcomb, David Joseph; Patteson, Raymond; Wesenberg, Donald L.; Attaway, Stephen W.

2004-08-01

195

The Martin Luther King, Jr. Papers Project at Stanford University  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Located at Stanford University, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Papers Project is producing what will almost certainly become the definitive collection of the great civil rights leader's writings. When completed, the fourteen-volume The Papers of Martin Luther King, Jr. will serve as an indispensable reference tool for historians of the civil rights movement. In the meantime, teachers and students can make use of the resources offered at this site. These include a number of full-text primary documents (including the "I Have a Dream" speech and the "I've Been To The Mountaintop" sermon), a general biography, a chronology of King's life, a recommended reading section, and scholarly articles produced by Project staff members (under construction). The Project plans to continually add new documents to the site as they are digitized. Free registration is required to view the papers, and registered users may choose to be informed about future site updates and related events.

196

A Procedure for Using Polychaete Annelids for Environmental Monitoring and Assessment in the Nearshore Panama City, Florida Area.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents a new methodology for averaging and summarizing large volumes of data resulting from polychaete annelid worm sampling studies into a simple, comprehensible form useful in nearshore environmental monitoring and assessment. The result i...

H. G. Loftin . M. Tuovila

1981-01-01

197

Physical, Chemical, and Biological Characteristics of Nearshore Zone of Sand Key, Florida, Prior to Beach Restoration. Volume 2.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study defines some of the major physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of the nearshore zone off Sand Key, Florida before restoration by dredging. Results of a supplemental study on the effects of hydraulic dredging for emergency restorati...

C. H. Saloman

1974-01-01

198

Dragon-Kings, Black-Swans and Prediction (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Extreme fluctuations or events are often associated with power law statistics. Indeed, it is a popular belief that "wild randomness'' is deeply associated with distributions with power law tails characterized by small exponents. In other words, power law tails are often seen as the epitome of extreme events (the "Black Swan'' story). Here, we document in very different systems that there is life beyond power law tails: power laws can be superseded by "dragon-kings'', monster events that occur beyond (or changing) the power law tail. Dragon-kings reveal hidden mechanisms that are only transiently active and that amplify the normal fluctuations (often described by the power laws of the normal regime). The goal of this lecture is to catalyze the interest of the community of geophysicists across all fields of geosciences so that the "invisible gorilla" fallacy may be avoided. Our own research illustrates that new statistics or representation of data are often necessary to identify dragon-kings, with strategies guided by the underlying mechanisms. Paradoxically, the monsters may be ignored or hidden by the use of inappropriate analysis or statistical tools that amount to cut a mamooth in small pieces, so as to lead to the incorrect belief that only mice exist. In order to stimulate further research, we will document and discuss the dragon-king phenomenon on the statistics of financial losses, economic geography, hydrodynamic turbulence, mechanical ruptures, avalanches in complex heterogeneous media, earthquakes, and epileptic seizures. The special status of dragon-kings open a new research program on their predictability, based on the fact that they belong to a different class of their own and express specific mechanisms amplifying the normal dynamics via positive feedbacks. We will present evidence of these claims for the predictions of material rupture, financial crashes and epileptic seizures. As a bonus, a few remarks will be offered at the end on how the dragon-king phenomenon allows us to understand the present World financial crisis as underpinned in two decades of successive financial and economic bubbles, inflating the mother of all bubbles with new monster dragon-kings at the horizon. The consequences in terms of a new "normal" are eye-opening. Ref: D. Sornette, Dragon-Kings, Black Swans and the Prediction of Crises, International Journal of Terraspace Science and Engineering 1(3), 1-17 (2009) (http://arXiv.org/abs/0907.4290) and (http://ssrn.com/abstract=1470006)

Sornette, D.

2010-12-01

199

Survey of radiological contaminants in the near-shore environment at the Hanford Site 100-N Area reactor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Past operations at the Hanford Site 100-N Area reactor resulted in the release of radiological contaminants to the soil column, local groundwater, and ultimately to the near-shore environment of the Columbia River. In September 1997, the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) and the Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) initiated a special study of the near-shore vicinity at

S. P. Van Verst; C. L. Albin; G. W. Patton; M. L. Blanton; T. M. Poston; A. T. Cooper; E. J. Antonio

1998-01-01

200

Data summary for the near-shore sediment characterization task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents the results of the Near-Shore Sediment Characterization Task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). The goals of the task were to (1) determine the extent to which near-shore surface sediments are contaminated by releases from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and (2) provide data for the Watts Bar Reservoir Interagency Permitting Group (WBRIPG) to evaluate

D. A. Levine; W. W. Hargrove; K. R. Campbell; M. A. Wood; C. D. Rash

1994-01-01

201

Storm-driven variability of the beach-nearshore profile at Duck, North Carolina, USA, 1981–1991  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US Army Corps of Engineers' Field Research Facility (FRF) at Duck, North Carolina, has collected approximately biweekly beach-nearshore profile data to 8-m depth and associated wave data since 1981. Sediment budget analysis was used to examine the medium-scale (years to a decade) variability of the beach-nearshore profile from 1981 to 1991. Significant changes occurred during four groups of energetic

Guan-hong Lee; Robert J. Nicholls; William A. Birkemeier

1998-01-01

202

Queen Conch (Strombus gigas) Testis Regresses during the Reproductive Season at Nearshore Sites in the Florida Keys  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundQueen conch (Strombus gigas) reproduction is inhibited in nearshore areas of the Florida Keys, relative to the offshore environment where conchs reproduce successfully. Nearshore reproductive failure is possibly a result of exposure to environmental factors, including heavy metals, which are likely to accumulate close to shore. Metals such as Cu and Zn are detrimental to reproduction in many mollusks.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsHistology

Daniel J. Spade; Robert J. Griffitt; Li Liu; Nancy J. Brown-Peterson; Kevin J. Kroll; April Feswick; Robert A. Glazer; David S. Barber; Nancy D. Denslow; Laszlo Orban

2010-01-01

203

Sensitivity of the Northern Humboldt Current System nearshore modeled circulation to initial and boundary conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The influence of the eastern Paci?c equatorial circulation on the dynamics of the Northern Humboldt Current System is studied using an eddy-resolving regional circulation model forced by boundary conditions from three distinct ocean general circulation models. The seasonal variability of the modeled nearshore circulation and the mesoscale activity are contrasted in order to evaluate the role of the density forcing. The seasonal variability of the surface and subsurface alongshore currents strongly depends on the amplitude and timing of the seasonal eastward propagating equatorial waves. The equatorward flow and upwelling intensity are also impacted by nonlinear processes, such as the seasonal generation of nearshore mesoscale eddies, which create alongshore pressure gradients modulating the surface current. Boundary conditions affect differently the intensity and phase of the eddy kinetic energy, as baroclinic instability is triggered by coastal waves during austral summer and fall, whereas it is sustained by the wind-driven upwelling during austral winter.

Echevin, Vincent; Colas, Francois; Chaigneau, Alexis; Penven, Pierrick

2011-07-01

204

Provenance of Corexit-related chemical constituents found in nearshore and inland Gulf Coast waters.  

PubMed

The dispersants Corexit 9527 and Corexit 9500 were extensively used during the response to the Deepwater Horizon accident in 2010. In addition to the monitoring programs established by federal and state governments, local communities also conducted studies to determine if chemical constituents from these dispersants impacted nearshore and inland waters. One community (the City of Orange Beach, Alabama) collected water samples between September, 2010 and January, 2011, and found the dispersant-related chemicals propylene glycol, 2-butoxyethanol, and dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate at nearshore and inland water sampling sites. In this paper, we examine their dataset in an attempt to discern the origin of these chemicals. Our assessment indicates that these compounds are unlikely to be present as a result of the use of Corexit dispersants; rather, they are likely related to point and non-point source stormwater discharge. PMID:22959174

Hayworth, Joel S; Clement, T Prabakhar

2012-10-01

205

Nearshore Satellite Data as Relative Indicators of Intertidal Organism Physiological Stress  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The physiological performance of intertidal and shallow subtidal invertebrates and algae is significantly affected by water temperature, and so the ability to measure and model onshore water temperatures is critical for ecological and biogeographic studies. Because of the localized influences of processes such as upwelling, mixing, and surface heating from solar radiation, nearshore water temperatures can differ from those measured directly offshore by buoys and satellites. It remains an open question what the magnitude of the differences in these temperatures are, and whether "large pixel" measurements can serve as an effective proxy for onshore processes, particularly when extrapolating from laboratory physiological studies to field conditions. We compared 9 years of nearshore (~10km) MODIS (Terra and Aqua overpasses) SST data against in situ measurements of water temperature conducted at two intertidal sites in central Oregon- Boiler Bay and Strawberry Hill. We collapsed data into increasingly longer temporal averages to address the correlation and absolute differences between onshore and nearshore temperatures over daily, weekly and monthly timescales. Results indicate that nearshore SST is a reasonable proxy for onshore water temperature, and that the strength of the correlation increases with decreasing temporal resolution. Correlations between differences in maxima are highest, followed by average and minima, and were lower at a site with regular upwelling. While average differences ranged from ~0.199-1.353°C, absolute differences across time scales were ~0.446-6.906°C, and were highest for cold temperatures. The results suggest that, at least at these two sites, SST can be used as a relative proxy for general trends only, especially over longer time scales.

Matzelle, A.; Helmuth, B.; Lakshmi, V.

2011-12-01

206

Discrete particle model for sheet flow sediment transport in the nearshore  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fully three-dimensional discrete particle computer simulations of high-concentration sheet flow transport in oscillatory flows quantify the effect of fluid acceleration on bed load transport in highly unsteady flows typical of nearshore marine environments. A simple impulse-momentum approach explains simulation results and forms the basis for adding an acceleration-related term to widely used energetics sediment transport formulas. Transport predicted by the

Thomas G. Drake; Joseph Calantoni

2001-01-01

207

A Management Strategy for Sedentary Nearshore Species that Uses Marine Protected Areas as a Reference  

Microsoft Academic Search

Classical approaches to fisheries stock assessment rely on methods that are not conducive to managing data-poor stocks. Moreover, many nearshore rocky reef species exhibit spatial variation in harvest pressure and demographic rates, further limiting traditional stock assessment approaches. Novel management strategies to overcome data limitations and account for spatial variability are needed. With the ever-increasing implementation of no-take marine protected

Jono R. Wilson; Jeremy D. Prince; Hunter S. Lenihan

2010-01-01

208

Environmental characterization of the north Aleutian shelf nearshore region: characterization, processes, and vulnerability to development  

SciTech Connect

The specific objectives of the study are as follows: Describe the present status of knowledge concerning the biotic communities and organic productivity of the nearshore zone along the entire North Aleutian Basin lease area, (Unimak Pass to Cape Newenham), with particular reference to the area adjacent to Izembek Lagoon; Describe the ecological processes which might be causing the observed distributions, densities, and interrelationships; Discuss potential vulnerability of this region to impacts from offshore oil and gas development; Identify significant data and information needs.

Pace, S.

1984-03-01

209

Changes in the nearshore and offshore zooplankton communities in Lake Ontario: 1981-88  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We examined trends and factors influencing changes in nearshore and offshore zooplankton abundance and composition in Lake Ontario between 1981 and 1988. In the nearshore (southshore and eastern basin), zooplankton abundance decreased and shifts occurred in the relative abundances of Bosmina longirostris and Daphnia retrocurva (eastern basin) and Daphnia retrocurva and Daphnia galeata mendotae (southshore). These changes could have resulted from increased vertebrate predation or reduced food resources which intensified the effects of predation. In the offshore, the first appearance (FA) of the larger, less common cladoceran species occurred earlier in the season as of 1985. FA was correlated with cumulative epilimnetic temperature (CET) and the catch per unit effort (CPUE) of alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) a?Y165 mm caught in U.S. waters in the spring. In 1987, when CET was high and CPUE of alewife a?Y165 mm was low, large populations of these cladocerans developed in June and July. Bythotrephes cederstroemi, a recent invader in the Great Lakes, was abundant only in 1987 when the CPUE of alewife was lowest. Changes in zooplankton abundance, development, and composition along the nearshore-offshore gradient reflected effects of temperature, habitat, and planktivory on the community.

Johannsson, Ora E.; Mills, Edward L.; O'Gorman, Robert

1991-01-01

210

Reading Stephen King: Issues of Censorship, Student Choice, and Popular Literature.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of essays grew out of the "Reading Stephen King Conference" held at the University of Maine in 1996. Stephen King's books have become a lightning rod for the tensions around issues of including "mass market" popular literature in middle and high school English classes and of who chooses what students read. King's fiction is among…

Power, Brenda Miller, Ed.; Wilhelm, Jeffrey D., Ed.; Chandler, Kelly, Ed.

211

The Inaccuracies in the Reprintings of Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" Speech.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Identifies the additions, deletions, and changes in the reprinted versions of King's classic speech. (Serves both as a warning that published speeches cannot be depended upon to preserve the original text and as a source of reference for teachers using Dr. King.s speech in classroom study.) (PD)

Bosmajian, Haig

1982-01-01

212

Ugiuvangmiut Quliapyuit = King Island Tales. Eskimo History and Legends from Bering Strait.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The collection of native tales from King Island, Alaska, contains tales told originally in Inupiaq Eskimo by seven native elders. Introductory sections provide background information on the storytellers, King Island Village and its people, traditional life there, and the language of the King Islanders. The 25 tales are divided into groups: "The…

Kaplan, Lawrence D., Ed.

213

Surveillance and Identity Performance: Some Thoughts Inspired by Martin Luther King  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essay applies Judith Butler’s theory of identity performance – the idea that we create our identities by acting in ways designed to leave a particular impression – to the Fourth Amendment. As a jumping off point for that analysis, it details the FBI’s extensive surveillance of Martin Luther King, JR. That surveillance may have altered King’s behavior. It thus

Frank R Cooper

2009-01-01

214

Portrait of a transformational leader: the legacy of Dr Martin Luther King Jr  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the leadership of Dr Martin Luther King Jr in relation to four characteristics of transformational leadership Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper draws upon excerpts from archival sources of personal correspondence and statements by Dr Martin Luther King Jr stored at the King Center, Atlanta, Georgia. Findings – The research finds that

David McGuire; Kate Hutchings

2007-01-01

215

The Kingdom of God in the Thought of Martin Luther King, Jr  

Microsoft Academic Search

This thesis is written primarily to show the strong foundation which King's religious thought gives to his social activism and his nonviolent resistance. To do so the thesis first shows how King's religious thought can be most fully seen within the context of the religious concept of the Kingdom of God. As the outline of King's religious thought develops, it

Duane Eugene Hix

1974-01-01

216

Let Freedom Ring: The Life & Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. [Lesson Plan].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This lesson plan teaches students about the life and work of Martin Luther King, Jr. Students listen to a brief biography, view photographs of the March on Washington, and read a portion of King's "I Have a Dream" speech. After studying Dr. King's use of imagery and allusion, students create original poetic phrases about freedom and illustrate…

National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.

217

A new modified king-werner method solving nonlinear equations  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, a new method for solving nonlinear equations f(x) = 0 is presented. Analysis of the convergence shows that the asymptotic convergence order of this method is 1 + .J3. Some numerical results are given to demonstrate its efficiency. Keywords-Nonlinear equations , Secant method , Iterative method, Root-finding, King-Werner method

Liang Chen; Chuanqing Gu

2011-01-01

218

Forest Restoration in Campgrounds at Kings Canyon National Park, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intensive campground use at the Grant Grove area of Kings Canyon National Park, California, has compacted the soil and left areas without understory vegetation or tree recruitment. To better inform the restoration of these sites after closure, we tested natural regeneration potential and planting and soil restoration methods. The tested methods included plant- ing with container stock and direct seeding,

Susan B. Infalt; Truman P. Young

2008-01-01

219

Population dynamics of king eiders breeding in northern Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The North American population of king eiders (Somateria spectabilis) has declined by more than 50% since the late 1970s for unknown reasons. King eiders spend most of their lives in remote areas, forcing managers to make regulatory and conservation decisions based on very little information. We incorporated available published estimates of vital rates with new estimates to build a female, stage-based matrix population model for king eiders and examine the processes underlying population dynamics of king eiders breeding at 2 sites, Teshekpuk and Kuparuk, on the coastal plain of northern Alaska and wintering around the Bering Sea (2001–2010). We predicted a decreasing population (? = 0.981, 95% CI: 0.978–0.985), and that population growth was most sensitive to changes in adult female survival (sensitivity = 0.92). Low duckling survival may be a bottleneck to productivity (variation in ducking survival accounted for 66% of retrospective variation in ?). Adult survival was high (0.94) and invariant (? = 0.0002, 95% CI: 0.0000–0.0007); however, catastrophic events could have a major impact and we need to consider how to mitigate and manage threats to adult survival. A hypothetical oil spill affecting breeding females in a primary spring staging area resulted in a severe population decline; although, transient population dynamics were relatively stable. However, if no catastrophic events occur, the more variable reproductive parameters (duckling and nest survival) may be more responsive to management actions.

Bentzen, Rebecca L.; Powell, Abby N.

2012-01-01

220

Lest We Forget: Tribute to Martin Luther King, Jr.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The civil rights accomplishments and precepts of Dr. King are reviewed and parallels are drawn to the present problems of public education. It is argued that a belief such as his, in people of good will, must be reawakened to force the schools to be passionate and compassionate institutions. (Author/CM)

Lawton, Rudy

1983-01-01

221

Escape of King Crab, 'Paralithodes camtschatica', from Derelict Pots.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Loss of 10% per season of pots (traps) in the Alaskan fishery for the king crab, Paralithodes camtschatica, has raised the question of possible loss of crabs and fishes to the derelict, or lost, pots which continue to fish. A series of experiments were co...

W. L. High D. D. Worlung

1979-01-01

222

Making Sense of the Senseless: The Murder of Lawrence King  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When Larry King was murdered, allegedly due to a classmate's prejudice, some pundits asked if adults were to blame for encouraging him to come out. They can't be sure what adults did or didn't do, but the question remains: Should adults encourage LGBT [lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered] youth to come out? No. They shouldn't push a young…

Reis, Beth

2009-01-01

223

Lesbian Drag Kings and the Feminine Embodiment of the Masculine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Part of an ongoing ethnography of an imperial sovereign court I am undertaking, this chapter explores the world of the lesbian drag king and the gendered performance she undertakes in this realm. Taking a relational, situational approach to understanding gender, the lesbian drag queen of the court is also examined in terms of how “her” image and actions give gendered

Steven P. Schacht

2003-01-01

224

Martin Luther King Jr.: The Crozer Seminary Years.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As an undergraduate at Morehouse College, Martin Luther King Jr. was not a strong student, although he excelled in oratory, but in his years at Crozer Theological Seminary in Pennsylvania he applied himself to become a straight-A student. The development of his theological perspective is described. (SLD)

Carson, Clayborne

1997-01-01

225

A “City at War”: Commemorating Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study uses fantasy theme analysis to examine public discourse that emerged from a Midwestern town's attempt to commemorate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The essay examines “Letters to the Editor” to (a) reveal the fantasy themes that represent the writers' consciousness and possibly that of the larger community and (b) to discuss the themes' rhetorical implications for public memory

Beth A. Messner; Mark T. Vail

2009-01-01

226

LEGENDS OF KING ARTHUR. LITERATURE CURRICULUM III, STUDENT VERSION.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A STUDENT VERSION OF A CURRICULUM GUIDE ON THE "LEGENDS OF KING ARTHUR" WAS DEVELOPED. SELECTED LEGENDS ARE REPRODUCED ALONG WITH AN INTRODUCTION, STUDY QUESTIONS, AND A PASSAGE FROM MALORY'S "LE MORTE D'ARTHUR" IN THE ORIGINAL LANGUAGE OF THE FIRST EDITION (1485). THE TEACHER VERSION IS ED 010 814. RELATED REPORTS ARE ED 010 129 THROUGH ED 010…

KITZHABER, ALBERT R.

227

Evolution of king crabs from hermit crab ancestors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

KING crabs (Family Lithodidae) are among the world's largest arthropods, having a crab-like morphology and a strongly calcified exoskeleton1-6. The hermit crabs, by contrast, have depended on gastropod shells for protection for over 150 million years5,7. Shell-living has constrained the morphological evolution of hermit crabs by requiring a decalcified asymmetrical abdomen capable of coiling into gastropod shells and by preventing crabs from growing past the size of the largest available shells1-6. Whereas reduction in shell-living and acquisition of a crab-like morphology (carcinization) has taken place independently in several hermit crab lineages, and most dramatically in king crabs1-6, the rate at which this process has occurred was entirely unknown2,7. We present molecular evidence that king crabs are not only descended from hermit crabs, but are nested within the hermit crab genus Pagurus. We estimate that loss of the shell-living habit and the complete carcinization of king crabs has taken between 13 and 25 million years.

Cunningham, C. W.; Blackstone, N. W.; Buss, L. W.

1992-02-01

228

Pattern and persistence of a nearshore planktonic ecosystem off Southern California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Three related data sets from a baseline environmental survey on the continental shelf at San Onofre, California, consisting of: (1) zooplankton pumped from discrete depths on transects between the 8- and 30-m contours, sampled from 1976 to 1980; (2) zooplankton from oblique net hauls on a transect from 8 to 100 m sampled at 2-week intervals for 1 y, 1978-1979; and (3) vertical profiles of temperature, nutrients and plant pigments corresponding closely in time and space to the oblique net hauls, are used to describe cross-shelf zooplankton abundance patterns, community composition, and seasonal and shorter-term variations in cross-shelf zonation and their relation to variations in physical and chemical measures. Of 15 taxa tested for multiyear average patterns, three—the copepods Acartia clausi and Oithona oculata, and barnacle larvae—had centers of abundance shoreward of the 30-m contour and near the bottom. No differences were detected in the cross-shelf pattern between San Onofre and a transect 12 km southeast. Throughout the year, nearshore and offshore assemblages were distinguishable, the change occurring at about the 30-m contour. The offshore one, represented by the copepods Calanus pacificus, Eucalanus californicus and Rhincalanus nasutus, occupied water having less chlorophyll and less near-surface nutrient, i.e. of more oceanic character. In spring and summer, most nearshore taxa shifted slightly seaward, leaving a third assemblage, characterized by a very high abundance of Acartia spp. copepodids and maximum abundances of A. clausi and O. oculata near the beach. Three upwelling episodes resulted in marked increases in chlorophyll and nutrients, but not in cross-shelf gradients of these properties, as were noted at most other times. Maximum disturbance of cross-shelf zooplankton zonation was observed during a wintertime intrusion of offshore surface water, but the zonation was never obliterated. Nearshore zooplankton patterns appear to be protected from dislocation by the shallow shelf and sustained by phytoplankton distributed in a manner peculiar to the nearshore zone. Typically, shallow nearshore waters were richer in chlorophyll and nutrients than offshore waters of the same depth. The cross-shelf chlorophyll and nutrient profiles, in turn, appear to result from increased eddy diffusion and nutrient recycling in shallow waters, perhaps augmented by longshore transport from quasi-permanent, local upwelling nodes.

Barnett, Arthur M.; Jahn, Andrew E.

1987-01-01

229

Percent Uninsured by County  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a county by county visualization of the percentage of residents that are uninsured. The data are from a set available here: http://manyeyes.alphaworks.ibm.com/manyeyes/datasets/percent-uninsured-by-county/versions/1

Manyeyes

230

DRAFT LANDSAT DATA MOSAIC: MONTGOMERY COUNTY, TEXAS; HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS; FORT BEND COUNTY, TEXAS; BRAZORIA COUNTY, TEXAS; GALVESTON COUNTY, TEXAS  

EPA Science Inventory

This is a draft Landsat Data Mosaic, which contains remote sensing information for Montgomery County, Texas Harris County, Texas Fort Bend County, Texas Brazoria County, Texas Galveston County, and Texas Imagery dates on the following dates: October 6, 1999 and September 29, 200...

231

Prevalence and restrictiveness of smoking policies in King County, Washington, manufacturing worksites.  

PubMed Central

This study examined prevalence of smoking policies and of significant smoking restrictions in a 1988 random sample of 1,528 manufacturing companies in the Seattle, Washington area, and related these characteristics to worksite size and industry type. Sixty-nine percent of companies had formal smoking policies and 85 percent regulated smoking to some degree. Workforce size was directly related to prevalence of significant smoking restrictions, but when type of industry was controlled, the linear trend in the size/prevalence relationship was sustained in only three of the 18 industry groupings.

Kinne, S

1990-01-01

232

Environmental features, general hydrology, and external sources of nutrients affecting Wilderness Lake, King County, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A water budget prepared for Wilderness Lake, a candidate for lake-quality restoration, indicates that of the 530 acre-feet of water that enters the lake each year, 170 acre-feet is from precipitation and 360 acre-feet is from groundwater inflow. An equal amount leaves the lake, and of this, 380 acre-feet is by surface runoff, 8 acre-feet is by groundwater seepage, and 140 acre-feet is by evaporation. Based on these amounts of inflow and outflow, the theoretical water-renewal time of the lake is calculated to be 2.6 years. The annual contributions of nitrogen and phosphorus to the lake from precipitation, natural ground water, and septic-tank leachate are about 920 kilograms nitrogen and 38 kilograms phosphorus. Nitrogen and phosphorus contributions from other sources were not assessed but could be significant. (Woodard-USGS)

Dion, N. P.

1979-01-01

233

Geologic Map of the Poverty Bay 7.5' quadrangle, King and Pierce counties, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Poverty Bay quadrangle lies near the center of the region?s intensively developing urban core. Less than 20 km north lies the city of Seattle; downtown Tacoma lies just southwest of the quadrangle. The map area expresses much of the tremendous range of Quaternary environments and deposits found throughout the central Puget Lowland. Much of the ground surface is mantled by a rolling surface of glacial till deposited during the last occupation of the Puget Lowland by a great continental ice sheet about 14,000 years ago. A complex sequence of older unconsolidated sediments extends far below sea level across most of the quadrangle, with no bedrock exposures at all.

Booth, Derek B.; Waldron, H. H.; Troost, K. G.

2004-01-01

234

AIR POLLUTION, POLLENS, AND ADMISSIONS FOR CHRONIC RESPIRATORY DISEASE IN KING COUNTY, WASHINGTON. (R825266)  

EPA Science Inventory

The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

235

AIR POLLUTION, POLLENS AND RESPIRATORY ADMISSIONS FOR CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE IN KING COUNTY. (R827355)  

EPA Science Inventory

The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

236

Determination of mass balance and entrainment in the stratified Duwamish River Estuary, King County, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During a study of the effects of waste-water input on the stratified Duwamish River estuary, intensive water-velocity and salinity measurements were made in both the lower salt wedge and the upper fresher water layer for tidal-cycle periods. The net movement of water and salt mass past a cross section during a tidal cycle was determined from integration of the measured rates of movement of water and salt past the section. The net volume of water that moved downstream past the section during the cycle agreed with the volume of fresh-water inflow at the head of the estuary within (1) 3.8 and 7.2 percent, respectively, for two studies made during periods of maximum and minimum tidal-prism thickness and identical inflow rates .of 312 cfs (cubic feet per second), and (2) 15 percent for one study made during a period of average tidal-prism thickness and an inflow rate of 1,280 cfs. For the three studies, the difference between salt mass transported upstream and downstream during the cycles ranged from 0.8 to 19 percent of the respective mean salt-mass transport. Water was entrained from the .salt-water wedge into the overlying layer of mixed fresh and salt water at tidal-cycle-average rates of 30 and 69 cfs per million square feet of interface for the inflow rates of 312 cfs, and 99 cfs per million square feet of interface for an inflow rate of 1,280 cfs. At a constant inflow rate, the rate of entrainment of salt-wedge water in the Duwamish River estuary more than doubled for a doubling of tidal-prism thickness. It also doubled for a quadrupling of inflow rate at about constant tidal-prism thickness.

Stoner, J. D.

1972-01-01

237

The Seattle/King County Commuter Pool Program -- Paratransit and Rush Hour Congestion.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is one of five paratransit agency case studies. The purpose was to develop basic instructional materials to support university classroom and professional short course training in local paratransit planning. Each case study documents a leading ...

C. E. Barb

1978-01-01

238

Spatial pattern of current-driven hits to the nearshore from a major marine fairway in the Gulf of Finland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spatial pattern of hits to the nearshore by tracers originating in a major fairway in the Gulf of Finland and transported by surface currents is analysed based on Lagrangian trajectories of water parcels reconstructed using the TRACMASS model from three-dimensional velocity fields by the Rossby Centre circulation model RCO for 1987-1996. The probabilities for a hit to different parts of the nearshore and the ability of different sections of the fairway to serve as starting points of tracers (equivalently, certain type of nearshore pollution) have extensive seasonal variability. The potential of the fairway to impact the nearshore in this manner is roughly inversely proportional to its distance from the nearest coast. A short section of the fairway to the south of Vyborg and a segment to the west of Tallinn are the most probable starting points of tracers. The most frequently hit nearshore areas are short fragments between Hanko and Helsinki, the north-eastern coast of the gulf to the south of Vyborg, and longer segments from Tallinn to Hiiumaa on the southern coast of the gulf.

Viikmäe, Bert; Soomere, Tarmo

2014-01-01

239

Large-scale spatial distribution patterns of echinoderms in nearshore rocky habitats.  

PubMed

This study examined echinoderm assemblages from nearshore rocky habitats for large-scale distribution patterns with specific emphasis on identifying latitudinal trends and large regional hotspots. Echinoderms were sampled from 76 globally-distributed sites within 12 ecoregions, following the standardized sampling protocol of the Census of Marine Life NaGISA project (www.nagisa.coml.org). Sample-based species richness was overall low (<1-5 species per site), with a total of 32 asteroid, 18 echinoid, 21 ophiuroid, and 15 holothuroid species. Abundance and species richness in intertidal assemblages sampled with visual methods (organisms >2 cm in 1 m(2) quadrats) was highest in the Caribbean ecoregions and echinoids dominated these assemblages with an average of 5 ind m(-2). In contrast, intertidal echinoderm assemblages collected from clearings of 0.0625 m(2) quadrats had the highest abundance and richness in the Northeast Pacific ecoregions where asteroids and holothurians dominated with an average of 14 ind 0.0625 m(-2). Distinct latitudinal trends existed for abundance and richness in intertidal assemblages with declines from peaks at high northern latitudes. No latitudinal trends were found for subtidal echinoderm assemblages with either sampling technique. Latitudinal gradients appear to be superseded by regional diversity hotspots. In these hotspots echinoderm assemblages may be driven by local and regional processes, such as overall productivity and evolutionary history. We also tested a set of 14 environmental variables (six natural and eight anthropogenic) as potential drivers of echinoderm assemblages by ecoregions. The natural variables of salinity, sea-surface temperature, chlorophyll a, and primary productivity were strongly correlated with echinoderm assemblages; the anthropogenic variables of inorganic pollution and nutrient contamination also contributed to correlations. Our results indicate that nearshore echinoderm assemblages appear to be shaped by a network of environmental and ecological processes, and by the differing responses of various echinoderm taxa, making generalizations about the patterns of nearshore rocky habitat echinoderm assemblages difficult. PMID:21079760

Iken, Katrin; Konar, Brenda; Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro; Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Knowlton, Ann; Pohle, Gerhard; Mead, Angela; Miloslavich, Patricia; Wong, Melisa; Trott, Thomas; Mieszkowska, Nova; Riosmena-Rodriguez, Rafael; Airoldi, Laura; Kimani, Edward; Shirayama, Yoshihisa; Fraschetti, Simonetta; Ortiz-Touzet, Manuel; Silva, Angelica

2010-01-01

240

Wave-induced mass transport affects daily Escherichia coli fluctuations in nearshore water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Characterization of diel variability of fecal indicator bacteria concentration in nearshore waters is of particular importance for development of water sampling standards and protection of public health. Significant nighttime increase in Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentration in beach water, previously observed at marine sites, has also been identified in summer 2000 from fixed locations in waist- and knee-deep waters at Chicago 63rd Street Beach, an embayed, tideless, freshwater beach with low currents at night (approximately 0.015 m s–1). A theoretical model using wave-induced mass transport velocity for advection was developed to assess the contribution of surface waves to the observed nighttime E. coli replenishment in the nearshore water. Using average wave conditions for the summer season of year 2000, the model predicted an amount of E. coli transported from water of intermediate depth, where sediment resuspension occurred intermittently, that would be sufficient to have elevated E. coli concentration in the surf and swash zones as observed. The nighttime replenishment of E. coli in the surf and swash zones revealed here is an important phase in the cycle of diel variations of E. coli concentration in nearshore water. According to previous findings in Ge et al. (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2010, 44, 6731–6737), enhanced current circulation in the embayment during the day tends to displace and deposit material offshore, which partially sets up the system by the early evening for a new period of nighttime onshore movement. This wave-induced mass transport effect, although facilitating a significant base supply of material shoreward, can be perturbed or significantly influenced by high currents (orders of magnitude larger than a typical wave-induced mass transport velocity), current-induced turbulence, and tidal forcing.

Ge, Zhongfu; Whitman, Richard L.; Nevers, Meredith B.; Phanikumar, Mantha S.

2012-01-01

241

Modeling near-shore subsea permafrost degradation in the Laptev Sea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most subsea permafrost in the Arctic Ocean shelf regions is relict terrestrial permafrost that was inundated by sea water by rising sea levels after the last glacial period. Permafrost usually degrades offshore under the influence of sea-bottom temperatures, salt infiltration and a wide range of near-shore coastal processes. Subsea permafrost instability has important potential implications due to the release of methane to the atmosphere and by increasing coastal erosion rates. Our objectives are to employ meso-scale numerical calculations (from meter to kilometer, 1000s of years) in connection with borehole data from the Laptev Sea to model the transition of permafrost from onshore to offshore conditions. The goal is to identify key processes driving permafrost degradation in the near-shore zone of the shelf. The heat transfer equation is solved numerically taking into account freeze-thaw processes in a three-phase heat capacity / conductivity model. Sediment composition and initial temperature profiles are derived from field and laboratory analysis of the borehole data. Our approach neglects some processes such as solute diffusion, but includes the effect of pore water salinity on phase state and thermal properties. Measured temperature profiles are compared to the modeled subsea soil temperature evolution over the course of the 2500 year transgression of the farthest offshore borehole in the transect. The degradation of the ice-bearing permafrost table or thaw depth is of special interest due to its direct relation to sediment stability and as the most readily discernible feature in the field observations. Temperature profiles generally agree well with model calculations reproducing the almost isothermal permafrost profiles currently observed, but show more variation potentially partially caused by drilling disturbances. The thaw depth is mainly driven by salt contamination and infiltration into deeper pore water with time. Complicating near-shore processes discussed include the occurrence of bottom-fast sea ice and marine sedimentation rates.

Kneier, F.; Langer, M.; Overduin, P. P.

2012-12-01

242

[Neurology in the court of the Learned King].  

PubMed

During the reign of Alfonso X of Castile one of the most flourishing cultural periods of European history was reached. The so-called Learned King contributed to this development by promoting the use of Castilian as the language of scientific discovery instead of Latin, and favoring the recovery of Arabic origin manuscripts in the Toledo Translators' School. Where the wise men from the "three cultures" (Christian, Islamic and Jewish) worked together in harmony to perpetuate classical knowledge. The aim of this paper is to analyze neurological pathology in the period concerned. The Learned King suffered from several neurologic syndromes including delirium and coma. He also showed chronic maxillary sinusitis with orbital involvement, trigeminal neuralgia and visual loss. Furthermore, in the "Cantigas" he described miraculous treatments of several disorders including seizures, leprous neuropathy, dementia, rabies, and ergotism. PMID:15815954

Martin Araguz, A

2005-04-01

243

Nearshore temperature findings for the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona: possible implications for native fish  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Since the completion of Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona, in 1963, downstream water temperatures in the main channel of the Colorado River in Glen, Marble, and Grand Canyons are much colder in summer. This has negatively affected humpback chub (Gila cypha) and other native fish adapted to seasonally warm water, reducing main-channel spawning activity and impeding the growth and development of larval and juvenile fish. Recently published studies by U.S. Geological Survey scientists found that under certain conditions some isolated nearshore environments in Grand Canyon allow water to become separated from the main-channel current and to warm, providing refuge areas for the development of larval and juvenile fish.

Ross, Robert P.; Vernieu, William S.

2013-01-01

244

NEARSHORE SAND SOURCES FOR AMERICAN SAMOA: AN ALTERNATIVE TO USING BEACH SAND.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using a combination of geophysical techniques, in situ observations, and sampling by scuba divers, we investigated along the south shore of Tutuila Island, American Samoa, for nearshore sand deposits. To minimize the impact of future sand dredging on the island's littoral sediments, the search took place in a narrow zone between the outside of the fringing reef and the 30-m bathymetric contour. Because the sand will be used by the Samoans in a variety of ways, an area high in siliciclastic sand - Nua-Se'etaga Bay - and two areas containing only carbonate sand - Faga'itua Bay and Nafanua Bank - were inspected in detail. Results of the exploration program are discussed.

Dingler, John, R.; Reiss, Thomas, E.

1987-01-01

245

Ecological monitoring for assessing the state of the nearshore and open waters of the Great Lakes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement stipulates that the Governments of Canada and the United States are responsible for restoring and maintaining the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the waters of the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem. Due to varying mandates and areas of expertise, monitoring to assess progress towards this objective is conducted by a multitude of Canadian and U.S. federal and provincial/state agencies, in cooperation with academia and regional authorities. This paper highlights selected long-term monitoring programs and discusses a number of documented ecological changes that indicate the present state of the open and nearshore waters of the Great Lakes.

Neilson, Melanie A.; Painter, D. Scott; Warren, Glenn; Hites, Ronald A.; Basu, Ilora; Weseloh, D.V. Chip; Whittle, D. Michael; Christie, Gavin; Barbiero, Richard; Tuchman, Marc; Johannsson, Ora E.; Nalepa, Thomas F.; Edsall, Thomas A.; Fleischer, Guy; Bronte, Charles; Smith, Stephen B.; Baumann, Paul C.

2003-01-01

246

Fishery-Independent Recruitment Indices for King and Spanish Mackerels  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated whether the abundance of age-0 mackerels in a fishery-independent trawl survey could be used to predict abundance at age 1 for king mackerel Scomberomorus cavalla and Spanish mackerel S. maculatus. After deletion of inappropriate length-classes and partitioning by season, depth, and stratum, subsets of the data set were compared to landings data and stock assessment results from the

Mark R. Collins; Patrick J. Harris; Philip P. Maier

1998-01-01

247

KINGS RIVER, RANCHERIA, AGNEW, AND OAT MOUNTAIN ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

On the basis of a mineral survey the Kings River, Rancheria, Agnew, and Oat Mountain Roadless Areas, California were found to have several areas with probable mineral-resource potential for tungsten in tactite, and one area with probable mineral-resource potential for lode gold in quartz veins. The extreme relief and inaccessibility in most of the roadless areas make exploration and mining very difficult. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of energy resources.

Nokleberg, Warren, J.; Longwell, Warren, D.

1984-01-01

248

G.MG Archimedes and the King's crown  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important asects of the task and its potential use. Here are the first few lines of the commentary for this task: The King of Syracuse reportedly requested Archimedes' advice for determining if a crown was made with the appropriate mixture of gold and silver. Archi...

249

Contested memory in the birthplace of a king: a case study of Auburn Avenue and the Martin Luther King Jr. National Park  

Microsoft Academic Search

A critical element in the process of racializing place is the construction of memorial landscapes. Using the Martin Luther King Jr National Historic Site and the surrounding Auburn Avenue community as a case study this paper argues that the sites dedicated to Dr King along Auburn Avenue embody a normative Civil Rights discourse which emphasizes national unity and non-violence and

Joshua F. J. Inwood

2009-01-01

250

Strategies for nest-site selection by king eiders  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Nest site selection is a critical component of reproduction and has presumably evolved in relation to predation, local resources, and microclimate. We investigated nest-site choice by king eiders (Somateria spectabilis) on the coastal plain of northern Alaska, USA, 2003-2005. We hypothesized that nest-site selection is driven by predator avoidance and that a variety of strategies including concealment, seclusion, and conspecific or inter-specific nest defense might lead to improved nesting success. We systematically searched wetland basins for king eider nests and measured habitat and social variables at nests (n = 212) and random locations (n = 493). King eiders made use of both secluded and concealed breeding strategies; logistic regression models revealed that females selected nests close to water, on islands, and in areas with high willow (Salix spp.) cover but did not select sites near conspecific or glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus) nests. The most effective nest-placement strategy may vary depending on density and types of nest predators; seclusion is likely a mammalian-predator avoidance tactic whereas concealment may provide protection from avian predators. We recommend that managers in northern Alaska attempt to maintain wetland basins with islands and complex shorelines to provide potential nest sites in the vicinity of water. ?? The Wildlife Society.

Bentzen, R. L.; Powell, A. N.; Suydam, R. S.

2009-01-01

251

Data summary for the near-shore sediment characterization task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the Near-Shore Sediment Characterization Task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). The goals of the task were to (1) determine the extent to which near-shore surface sediments are contaminated by releases from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and (2) provide data for the Watts Bar Reservoir Interagency Permitting Group (WBRIPG) to evaluate the human health risks from exposure to sediments during and following dredging operations. The data collected for this task are also to be used in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RLTS) for the CR-ERP operable units (Lower Watts Bar and Clinch River) to characterize the human health risk associated with exposure to near-shore sediments throughout the Watts Bar Reservoir.

Levine, D.A.; Hargrove, W.W.; Campbell, K.R.; Wood, M.A.; Rash, C.D.

1994-10-01

252

Survey of radiological contaminants in the near-shore environment at the Hanford Site 100-N Area reactor  

SciTech Connect

Past operations at the Hanford Site 100-N Area reactor resulted in the release of radiological contaminants to the soil column, local groundwater, and ultimately to the near-shore environment of the Columbia River. In September 1997, the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) and the Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) initiated a special study of the near-shore vicinity at the Hanford Site`s retired 100-N Area reactor. Environmental samples were collected and analyzed for radiological contaminants ({sup 3}H, {sup 90}Sr, and gamma/ emitters), with both the WDOH and SESP analyzing a portion of the samples. Samples of river water, sediment, riverbank springs, periphyton, milfoil, flying insects, clam shells, and reed canary grass were collected. External exposure rates were also measured for the near-shore environment in the vicinity of the 100-N Area. In addition, samples were collected at background locations above Vernita Bridge.

Van Verst, S.P.; Albin, C.L. [Washington State Dept. of Health, Olympia, WA (United States); Patton, G.W.; Blanton, M.L.; Poston, T.M.; Cooper, A.T.; Antonio, E.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1998-09-01

253

Air-sea CO2 fluxes in the near-shore and intertidal zones influenced by the California Current  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The study of air-sea CO2 fluxes (FCO2) in the coastal region is needed to better understand the processes that influence the direction and magnitude of FCO2 and to constrain the global carbon budget. We implemented a 1 year (January through December 2009) paired study to measure FCO2 in the intertidal zone (the coastline to 1.6 km offshore) and the near-shore (˜3 km offshore) off the north-western coast of Baja California (Mexico); a region influenced by year-round upwelling. FCO2 was determined in the intertidal zone via eddy covariance; while in the near-shore using mooring buoy sensors then calculated with the bulk method. The near-shore region was a weak annual net source of CO2 to the atmosphere (0.043 mol CO2 m-2 y-1); where 91% of the outgassed FCO2 was contributed during the upwelling season. Sea surface temperature (SST) and ?pCO2 (from upwelling) showed the strongest relationship with FCO2 in the near-shore, suggesting the importance of meso-scale processes (upwelling). FCO2 in the intertidal zone were up to four orders of magnitude higher than FCO2 in the near-shore. Wind speed showed the strongest relationship with FCO2 in the intertidal zone, suggesting the relevance of micro-scale processes. Results show that there are substantial spatial and temporal differences in FCO2 between the near-shore and intertidal zone; likely a result of heterogeneity. We suggest that detailed spatial and temporal measurements are needed across the coastal oceans and continental margins to better understand the mechanisms which control FCO2, as well as reduce uncertainties and constrain regional and global ocean carbon balances.

Reimer, Janet J.; Vargas, Rodrigo; Smith, Stephen V.; Lara-Lara, Ruben; Gaxiola-Castro, Gilberto; Martín Hernández-Ayón, J.; Castro, Angel; Escoto-Rodriguez, Martin; Martínez-Osuna, Juan

2013-10-01

254

Long-Term Monitoring in the Nearshore Ocean: Designing a Program to Detect Change and Determine Cause. GEM Project 02395. EXXON VALDEZ Oil Spill Gulf Ecosystem Monitoring and Research Project. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The primary goal of the nearshore monitoring program the Gulf Ecosystem Monitoring Program (GEM) is to understand the interaction of the nearshore oceanographic environment with coastal marine communities over the Gulf of Alaska region. This includes quan...

G. C. Schoch G. C. Eckert T. A. Dean

2002-01-01

255

Data Summary for the Near-Shore Sediment Characterization Task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Near-Shore Sediment Characterization Task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) was to quantify potential human health risks associated with Department of Energy (DOE)-related contamination of surface sediments in Watts Bar Reservoir (WBR). An estimated 700 Ci of {sup 137}Cs and 325 Ci of {sup 60}Co were released from White Oak Lake into the Clinch River between 1949 and 1992 (DOE, 1988). A number of previous studies have documented sediment contamination in the deep-water sediments but no study specifically targeted the near-shore environment, which has the most potential for exposure to humans.

Levine, D.A.

1994-01-01

256

Microbial Populations in Surface Films: Amino Acid Dynamics in Nearshore and Offshore Waters Off Southern California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microbial biomass and utilization (incorporation plus respiration) of dissolved free amino acids (DFAA) were studied in sea surface films or microlayers in nearshore and offshore waters off the coast of southern California during 1988 (September) and 1989 (October). Microbial biomass (bacterial numbers via cell counts and total microbial biomass via adenosine triphosphate concentrations), DFAA, and dissolved combined amino acids (DCAA) were always enriched in films compared with subsurface waters, with enrichment factors (ratio of microlayer value compared to 10-cm control value) often exceeding those measured previously in microlayers from diverse Atlantic and Pacific coastal and island environments. Higher enrichment factors were generally obtained for offshore stations than for nearshore sites. Glutamic acid utilization was greater in microlayers than in control waters at 9 of 13 stations. At those sites where higher utilization occurred in the 10-cm waters, the microbial populations were highly active and had been subjected to substantial wind mixing prior to sampling. Glutamic acid concentrations were increased in subsurface waters at these sites relative to other stations, apparently by the input of dissolved film constituents. Calculated turnover times were longer for films than for 10-cm waters, in large pan because of the substantially larger glutamic acid pools in the films. Individual amino acids were not enriched in films compared with 10-cm waters to the same degree in both the DFAA and DCAA. The relative levels of the individual amino acids in the free and combined pools may have been influenced by their differential production or preferential utilization.

Carlucci, A. F.; Wolgast, D. M.; Craven, D. B.

1992-04-01

257

Error Evaluation of Near-shore Bathymetry Using the Single Beam Echo Sounder  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By using the single-beam echo sounder or the multi-beam echo sounder to investigate the near-shore bathymetry, its measurement has been limited by a series of errors caused by positioning, vehicle's attitude, acoustic speed variation, and some others. The main problem of bathymetry by using single-beam echo sounder is from lack of full coverage of the sounding beams illuminating the survey area of interesting. In addition, in the every ends of the survey lines especially when approaching the coast line, the turning will cause ship tilt to one side making a predicted but uncorrectable error. It is the reason that surveyors will choose a multi-beam echo sounder for the measurement when bathymetry coverage and accuracy are considered. However, at shallow depths less than 5 meters, as example, the high risk of multi-beam's transducers colliding with the ocean bottom will lower the willingness in using a multi-beam sounder due to high-priced of the transducers. Therefore, the single beam sounders have been the main instrument to measure near-shore under water topography in the industry. This study is to understand sounding deviation causing by the turning of the survey ship, such that we can analyze and control the errors to improve the accuracy of measurement using the single beam echo sounder in the shallow waters.

Hsu, M.; Song, G.

2013-12-01

258

A system for measuring bottom profile, waves and currents in the high-energy nearshore environment  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A new data-acquisition system capable of measuring waves, currents and the nearshore profile in breaking waves as high as 5 m has been developed and successfully field-tested. Components of the mechanical system are a sled carrying a vertical mast, a double-drum winch placed landward of the beach, and a line that runs from one drum of the winch around three blocks, which are the corners of a right triangle, to the other drum of the winch. The sled is attached to the shore-normal side of the triangular line arrangement and is pulled offshore by one drum of the winch and onshore by the other. The profile is measured as the sled is towed along the shore-normal transect using an infrared rangefinder mounted landward of the winch and optical prisms mounted on top of the sled's mast. A pressure sensor and two-axis electromagnetic current meter are mounted on the frame of the sled. These data are encoded on the sled and telemetered to a receiving/recording station onshore. Preliminary results suggest that near-bottom offshore-flowing currents during periods of high-energy swell are important in forcing changes to the configuration of the nearshore profile. ?? 1983.

Sallenger, Jr. , A. H.; Howard, P. C.; Fletcher, III, C. H.; Howd, P. A.

1983-01-01

259

Trophic connections in Lake Superior Part II: the nearshore fish community  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We use detailed diet analyses of the predominant planktivorous, benthivorous and piscivorous fish species from Lake Superior to create a nearshore (bathymetric depths Mysis diluviana and Diporeia spp). Although the piscivorous fishes like lean lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) fed to a lesser extent on Diporeia and Mysis, they were still strongly connected to these macroinvertebrates, which were consumed by their primary prey species (sculpin spp., rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax, and coregonines). The addition of Bythotrephes to summer/fall cisco and lake whitefish diets, and the decrease in rainbow smelt in lean lake trout diets (replaced by coregonines) were the largest observed differences relative to historic Lake Superior diet studies. Although the offshore food web of Lake Superior was simpler than nearshore in terms of number of fish species present, the two areas had remarkably similar food web structures, and both fish communities were primarily supported by Mysis and Diporeia. We conclude that declines in Mysis or Diporeia populations would have a significant impact on energy flow in Lake Superior. The food web information we generated can be used to better identify management strategies for Lake Superior.

Gamble, A. E.; Hrabik, T. R.; Yule, D. L.; Stockwell, J. D.

2011-01-01

260

Rapid mass wasting following nearshore submarine volcanism on Kilauea volcano, Hawaii  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The rapid mass wasting of shallow submarine basalts was documented during SCUBA dives along the flanks of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii during the Kii lava entry of the current eruption (19°20.5'N, 154°59.8'W). Lava entered the ocean at this site from mid-February to late March 1990, with several pauses. Dives on 19-20 March 1990 confirmed the widespread formation of lava pillows at this site over a water depth range of 20-40 m, and visual observations suggested that the resulting volcanic deposits were generally stable, despite the steep (˜40°) incline of the seafloor. (The pre-eruptive nearshore seafloor slope was ˜14°.) However, dives on 2 April 1990 revealed that nearly all submarine volcanic features had been subject to mass wasting, as the offshore area had been transformed into a debris field composed of material ranging in size from fine sand to boulder fragments. This generally featureless seascape extended uniformly to beyond the visual range of divers (˜60 m water depth). High-resolution multibeam bathymetry and sidescan imaging indicate that steeply sloped coarse sediment extends down the flanks of Kilauea in this area to abyssal depths, implying a linkage between nearshore submarine volcanism and deep-water deposits.

Sansone, Francis J.; Smith, John R.

2006-03-01

261

Influence of the sea-ice edge on the Arctic nearshore environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Coasts form the dynamic interface of the terrestrial and oceanic systems. In the Arctic, and in much of the world, the coast is a zone of relatively high population, infrastructure, biodiversity, and ecosystem services. A significant difference between Arctic and temperate coasts is the presence of sea ice. Sea ice influences Arctic coasts in two main ways: (1) the length of the sea ice-free season controls the length of time over which nearshore water can interact with the land, and (2) the sea ice edge controls the fetch over which storm winds can blow over open water, resulting in changes in nearshore water level and wave field. The resulting nearshore hydrodynamic environment impacts all aspects of the coastal system. Here, we use satellite records of sea ice along with a simple model for wind-driven storm surge and waves to document how changes in the length and character of the sea ice-free season have impacted the nearshore hydrodynamic environment. For our sea ice analysis we primarily use the Bootstrap Sea Ice Concentrations from Nimbus-7 SMMR and DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS. We make whole-Arctic maps of sea ice change in the coastal zone. In addition to evaluating changes in length of the sea ice-free season at the coast, we look at changes segmented by azimuth. This allows us to consider changes in the sea ice in the context of the wind field. For our storm surge and wave field analysis we focus on the Beaufort Sea region. This region has experienced some of the greatest changes in both sea ice cover and coastal erosion rates in the Arctic and is anticipated to experience significant change in the future. In addition, the NOAA ESRL GMD has observed the wind field at Barrow since extends to 1977. In our past work on the rapid and accelerating coastal erosion, we have shown that one may model storm surge with a 2D numerical bathystrophic model, and that waves are well represented by the Shore Protection Manual methods for shallow-water fetch-limited waves. We use these models to explore the effect of increasing fetch on water level set up and wave generation. As increasing the fetch is one of the main effects of the changing sea ice cover, this allows us to connect changes in the sea ice cover to changes in the nearshore hydrodynamic environment. The long wind record allows for us to investigate changes in extreme wind and associated storm events. Preliminary analysis of Barrow and Drew Point indicate that at Drew Point the sea ice-free season has expanded by ˜17 days/decade while at Barrow it has expanded by ˜22 days/decade. We find the increase in the number of days when the sea ice edge is far away from the coast makes up a large proportion of the total increase in the duration of the sea ice-free season. For these days the sea ice edge does not provide a limit on the fetch over which water level set up and waves are generated.

Barnhart, K. R.; Overeem, I.; Anderson, R. S.

2013-12-01

262

“Jobs for all”: Another dream of the rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote extensively on economic matters, especially unemployment policy. King supported\\u000a a federal job guarantee for anyone ready and willing to work. He believed it would provide employment and income security,\\u000a as well as increased public and community services. Dr. King's writings on employment are reviewed and discussed. His policy\\u000a proposals are just as

Mathew Forstater

2002-01-01

263

High-Resolution Topographic, Bathymetric, and Oceanographic Data for the Pleasure Point Area, Santa Cruz County, California: 2005-2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The County of Santa Cruz Department of Public Works and the County of Santa Cruz Redevelopment Agency requested the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Western Coastal and Marine Geology Team (WCMG) to provide baseline geologic and oceanographic information on the coast and inner shelf at Pleasure Point, Santa Cruz County, California. The rationale for this proposed work is a need to better understand the environmental consequences of a proposed bluff stabilization project on the beach, the nearshore and the surf at Pleasure Point, Santa Cruz County, California. To meet these information needs, the USGS-WCMG Team collected baseline scientific information on the morphology and waves at Pleasure Point. This study provided high-resolution topography of the coastal bluffs and bathymetry of the inner shelf off East Cliff Drive between 32nd Avenue and 41st Avenue. The spatial and temporal variation in waves and their breaking patterns at the study site were documented. Although this project did not actively investigate the impacts of the proposed bluff stabilization project, these data provide the baseline information required for future studies directed toward predicting the impacts of stabilization on the sea cliffs, beach and nearshore sediment profiles, natural rock reef structures, and offshore habitats and resources. They also provide a basis for calculating potential changes to wave transformations into the shore at Pleasure Point.

Storlazzi, Curt D.; Barnard, Patrick L.; Collins, Brian D.; Finlayson, David P.; Golden, Nadine E.; Hatcher, Gerry A.; Kayen, Robert E.; Ruggiero, Peter

2007-01-01

264

Pre-college Workshop Programme at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the objectives, development, program, and supporting laboratories of a preparatory year workshop program (PWP) at King Fahd University. Lists five PWP topics with historical brief descriptions. (YP)

Abualhamayel, H. I.; Shuaib, A. N.

1988-01-01

265

Outliers and Extremes: Dragon-Kings or Dragon-Fools?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geophysics seems full of monsters like Victor Hugo's Court of Miracles and monstrous extremes have been statistically considered as outliers with respect to more normal events. However, a characteristic magnitude separating abnormal events from normal ones would be at odd with the generic scaling behaviour of nonlinear systems, contrary to "fat tailed" probability distributions and self-organized criticality. More precisely, it can be shown [1] how the apparent monsters could be mere manifestations of a singular measure mishandled as a regular measure. Monstrous fluctuations are the rule, not outliers and they are more frequent than usually thought up to the point that (theoretical) statistical moments can easily be infinite. The empirical estimates of the latter are erratic and diverge with sample size. The corresponding physics is that intense small scale events cannot be smoothed out by upscaling. However, based on a few examples, it has also been argued [2] that one should consider "genuine" outliers of fat tailed distributions so monstrous that they can be called "dragon-kings". We critically analyse these arguments, e.g. finite sample size and statistical estimates of the largest events, multifractal phase transition vs. more classical phase transition. We emphasize the fact that dragon-kings are not needed in order that the largest events become predictable. This is rather reminiscent of the Feast of Fools picturesquely described by Victor Hugo. [1] D. Schertzer, I. Tchiguirinskaia, S. Lovejoy et P. Hubert (2010): No monsters, no miracles: in nonlinear sciences hydrology is not an outlier! Hydrological Sciences Journal, 55 (6) 965 - 979. [2] D. Sornette (2009): Dragon-Kings, Black Swans and the Prediction of Crises. International Journal of Terraspace Science and Engineering 1(3), 1-17.

Schertzer, D. J.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Lovejoy, S.

2012-12-01

266

King penguin population threatened by Southern Ocean warming  

PubMed Central

Seabirds are sensitive indicators of changes in marine ecosystems and might integrate and/or amplify the effects of climate forcing on lower levels in food chains. Current knowledge on the impact of climate changes on penguins is primarily based on Antarctic birds identified by using flipper bands. Although flipper bands have helped to answer many questions about penguin biology, they were shown in some penguin species to have a detrimental effect. Here, we present for a Subantarctic species, king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus), reliable results on the effect of climate on survival and breeding based on unbanded birds but instead marked by subcutaneous electronic tags. We show that warm events negatively affect both breeding success and adult survival of this seabird. However, the observed effect is complex because it affects penguins at several spatio/temporal levels. Breeding reveals an immediate response to forcing during warm phases of El Niño Southern Oscillation affecting food availability close to the colony. Conversely, adult survival decreases with a remote sea-surface temperature forcing (i.e., a 2-year lag warming taking place at the northern boundary of pack ice, their winter foraging place). We suggest that this time lag may be explained by the delay between the recruitment and abundance of their prey, adjusted to the particular 1-year breeding cycle of the king penguin. The derived population dynamic model suggests a 9% decline in adult survival for a 0.26°C warming. Our findings suggest that king penguin populations are at heavy extinction risk under the current global warming predictions.

Le Bohec, Celine; Durant, Joel M.; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel; Stenseth, Nils C.; Park, Young-Hyang; Pradel, Roger; Gremillet, David; Gendner, Jean-Paul; Le Maho, Yvon

2008-01-01

267

Sediment transport characteristics of the nearshore zone between Hilton Head and Ossabaw Islands, Georgia as determined by heavy mineral analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective was to understand sediment transport processes in the nearshore zone between Hilton Head and Ossabaw Islands along the coast of Georgia. The heavy mineral composition of the sediments was used to map the distribution of sediments from the Savannah and Ogeechee Rivers of Georgia, the Santee and Coosawatchie\\/Broad Rivers of South Carolina, and the adjacent continental shelf. (ACR)

Schmitter

1986-01-01

268

Biostratigraphic and Paleoecologic Potential of Calcareous Nannofossils in Nearshore Environments: IODP Expedition 313 New Jersey Shallow Shelf  

Microsoft Academic Search

Calcareous nannofossils are one of the primary microfossil groups used for biostratigraphic applications due to their abundance in marine sediments and cosmopolitan nature, particularly in open ocean conditions. On the nearshore continental shelf, their biostratigraphic utility may be somewhat limited due to reduced abundances or environmental exclusion; however, nannofossils have been successfully used for biostratigraphy in these settings by the

D. K. Kulhanek; B. Huang; F. M. McCarthy; K. G. Miller; J. A. Barron; E. Scienceparty

2010-01-01

269

COASTAL WETLAND-NEARSHORE FOOD WEB LINKAGES ALONG A TROPHIC GRADIENT IN GREEN BAY: A FISH-EYE VIEW  

EPA Science Inventory

To identify ecological interactions among Green Bay coastal wetlands and lake habitats we analyzed stable isotope signatures of organismsa from wetland and adjacent nearshore food webs in Green Bay, Lake Michigan. We were interested in the influence of nutrient loading/trophic st...

270

Phosphorus regeneration and burial in near-shore marine sediments (the Gulf of Trieste, northern Adriatic Sea)  

Microsoft Academic Search

According to bioassay studies and high dissolved nutrient N\\/P ratios in the seawater column, phosphorus (P) is thought to control marine productivity in the northern Adriatic Sea. P in near-shore marine sediments of the Gulf of Trieste, the northernmost part of the Adriatic Sea, was investigated using pore water P distributions, and benthic P flux studies under oxic and anoxic

N. Ogrinc; J. Faganeli

2006-01-01

271

Physiography, surficial sediments and Quaternary stratigraphy of the inner continental shelf and nearshore region of the Gulf of Maine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The western margin of the Gulf of Maine is a bedrock-framed, glaciated continental shelf that has only recently been geologically mapped. The bathymetry is divisible into four physiographic areas: nearshore basins, shelf valleys, rocky zones, and outer basins. The nearshore basins are largely floored by mud except near rock outcrops where shelly gravel occurs. Shelf valleys extend seaward from nearshore basins and estuaries and generally possess less sediment than nearshore basins. Abundant exposures of Pleistocene sediment with rippled substrates suggest that contemporary reworking is occurring. Rocky zones are the most abundant physiographic area and include both exposed bedrock and glacial gravel outcrops. Shell material produced by organisms living on or near rocks is common both in the rocky zones and in abutting environments. The outer basin begins at a depth of about 60 m and extends beyond the 100 m isobath. This area is occasionally bordered on its landward side by the late Quaternary lowstand shoreline. Below this shoreline thicker deposits of sediment exist, while all environments landward were reworked by a regression and transgression of the sea.

Kelley, Joseph T.; Belknap, Daniel F.

1991-08-01

272

Seafloor Video Footage and Still-Frame Grabs from U.S. Geological Survey Cruises in Hawaiian Nearshore Waters.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Underwater video footage was collected in nearshore waters (<60-meter depth) off the Hawaiian Islands from 2002 to 2011 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Programs Pacific Coral Reef Project, to improve seafloor charac...

A. E. Gibbs P. W. Tierney S. A. Cochran

2013-01-01

273

Percent Uninsured by County  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a county by county visualization of the percentage of residents that are uninsured. The data are from a set available here: http://www-958.ibm.com/software/data/cognos/manyeyes/datasets/percent-uninsured-by-county/versions/1

Manyeyes

274

Reviewing County Extension Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A review of the effectiveness of extension education programs in Douglas County, Kansas is presented. Data were collected through a review of program data, interviews, and questionnaires sent to county residents. The results indicate a general knowledge and acceptance of the county's extension services among the respondents. (EC)

Prawl, Warren L.; Jorns, William J.

1976-01-01

275

On the warm nearshore bias in Pathfinder monthly SST products over Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using in situ sea surface temperature (SST) data and MODIS/TERRA SST, the monthly AVHRR Pathfinder (version 5.0 and 5.2) SST product was evaluated within the four main Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems. A warm bias in the monthly Pathfinder data (previous to version 5.2) was systematically found during summer months in nearshore regions where high SST gradients exist. Based on a climatological average spanning 2000-2009, this summertime bias reached up to 3-5 °C in the California, Humboldt, Canary, and Benguela Upwelling Systems. This warm bias could at least partly explain the cold bias often found in numerical models of coastal upwelling. The last release of Pathfinder (version 5.2, September 2011) clearly improved the bias found on the previous Pathfinder version.

Dufois, François; Penven, Pierrick; Peter Whittle, Christo; Veitch, Jennifer

276

Effects of nearshore recharge on groundwater interactions with a lake in mantled karst terrain  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The recharge and discharge of groundwater were investigated for a lake basin in the mantled karst terrain of central Florida to determine the relative importance of transient groundwater inflow to the lake water budget. Variably saturated groundwater flow modeling simulated water table responses observed beneath two hillsides radiating outward from the groundwater flow-through lake. Modeling results indicated that transient water table mounding and groundwater flow reversals in the nearshore region following large daily rainfall events generated most of the net groundwater inflow to the lake. Simulated daily groundwater inflow was greatest following water table mounding near the lake, not following subsequent peaks in the water level of upper basin wells. Transient mounding generated net groundwater inflow to the lake, that is, groundwater inflow in excess of the outflow occurring through the deeper lake bottom. The timing of the modeled net groundwater inflow agreed with an independent lake water budget; however, the quantity was considerably less than the budge-derived value.

Lee, T. M.

2000-01-01

277

Feeding ecology of marine birds in the nearshore waters of Kodiak Island  

SciTech Connect

The feeding habits of marine birds in the nearshore waters of Kodiak Island were studied during winter 1976-1977 and February 1978 and during summer 1977 and 1978. The authors' goals were to determine which prey were important to each species of bird and to define geographic, seasonal, and annual patterns of prey use. A total of 1,167 birds of 10 species were collected during the two-year study. During both winters, oldsquaws and Steller's elders ate a broad range of invertebrate prey, and common murres ate primarily gadids. Marbled murrelet feeding habits varied between the two winters. Due to the complexity of the fate and effects of petroleum, it is difficult to predict the impacts of a spill.

Krasnow, L.D.; Sanger, G.A.

1982-09-01

278

The Performance of Nearshore Dredge Disposal at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California, 2005-2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ocean Beach, California, contains an erosion hot spot in the shadow of the San Francisco ebb tidal delta that threatens valuable public infrastructure as well as the safe recreational use of the beach. In an effort to reduce the erosion at this location a new plan for the management of sediment dredged annually from the main shipping channel at the mouth of San Francisco Bay was implemented in May 2005 by the United States Army Corps of Engineers, San Francisco District (USACE). The USACE designated a temporary nearshore dredge disposal site for the annual disposal of about 230,000 m3 (300,000 yd3) of sand about 750 m offshore and slightly south of the erosion hot spot, in depths between approximately 9 and 14 m. The site has now been used three times for a total sediment disposal of about 690,000 m3 (about 900,000 yds3). The disposal site was chosen because it is in a location where strong tidal currents and open-ocean waves can potentially feed sediment toward the littoral zone in the reach of the beach that is experiencing critical erosion, as well as prevent further scour on an exposed outfall pipe. The onshore migration of sediment from the target disposal location might feed the primary longshore bar or the nearshore zone, and provide a buffer to erosion that peaks during winter months when large waves impact the region. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) has been monitoring and modeling the bathymetric evolution of the test dredge disposal site and the adjacent coastal region since inception in May 2005. This paper reports on the first 2.5 years of this monitoring program effort (May 2005 to December 2007) and assesses the short-term coastal response. Here are the key findings of this report: *Approximately half of the sediment that has been placed in the nearshore dredge-disposal site during the 2.5 years of this study remains within the dredge focus area. *In the winter of 2006-7, large waves transported the dredge-mound material onshore. *High rates of seasonal cross-shore sediment transport mask any potential profile change in the Coastal Profiling System data due to dredge placement. *Pockets of accretion have been recorded by topographic surveying adjacent to the dredge site, but it is unclear if the accretion is linked to the nourishment. *Cross-shore profile modeling suggests that dredge material must be placed in water depths no greater than 5 m to drive a positive shoreline response. *Area modeling demonstrates that the new dredge site increases wave dissipation and modifies local sediment-transport patterns, although the effect on the nearshore morphology is largely negligible. *Any increase in beach width or wave energy-dissipation related to the nourishment is likely to be realized only in the vicinity directly onshore of the nourishment site, which is several hundred meters south of the area of critical erosion. *Larger waves from the northwest and smaller waves from the west or southwest contribute most to the sediment transport from the dredge mound onshore.

Barnard, Patrick L.; Erikson, Li H.; Hansen, Jeff E.; Elias, Edwin

2009-01-01

279

The nearshore benthic community of Kasatochi Island, one year after the 2008 volcanic eruption  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A description is presented of the nearshore benthic community of Kasatochi Island 1012 months after a catastrophic volcanic eruption in 2008. The eruption extended the coastline of the island approximately 400 m offshore, mainly along the south, southeast, and southwest shores, to roughly the 20 m isobath. Existing canopy kelp of Eualaria (Alaria) fistulosa, as well as limited understory algal species and associated fauna (e.g., urchin barrens) on the hard substratum were apparently buried following the eruption. Samples and observations revealed the substrate around the island in 2009 was comprised almost entirely of medium and coarse sands with a depauperate benthic community, dominated by opportunistic pontogeneiid amphipods. Comparisons of habitat and biological communities with other nearby Aleutian Islands, as well as with the Icelandic volcanic island of Surtsey, confirm dramatic reductions in flora and fauna consistent with an early stage of recovery from a large-scale disturbance event. ?? 2010 Regents of the University of Colorado.

Jewett, S. C.; Bodkin, J. L.; Chenelot, H.; Esslinger, G. G.; Hoberg, M. K.

2010-01-01

280

Issues in Ecology, Issue 11: The Role of Nearshore Ecosystems as Fish and Shellfish Nurseries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This report defines the role of nearshore ecosystems, such as wetlands and seagrass meadows, as nurseries for populations of fish and shellfish that may be of commercial value to humans. The ecological value of nursery habitats in relation to the life cycle of many species of fish and invertebrates is mentioned as the nursery-role hypothesis is discussed. Biological, physical, chemical, and landscape factors that contribute to site-specific variation of nurseries are listed. Implications for research, conservation, management and restoration are listed, while highlighting key threats to coastal ecosystems. Issues in Ecology is an ongoing series of reports designed to present major ecological issues in an easy-to-read manner. This Issue summarizes the consensus of a panel of scientific experts based on the information that was current and available at the time of its publication in 2003.

Minello, Thomas

2010-02-16

281

Sea-Floor Mapping and Benthic Habitat GIS for the Elwha River Delta Nearshore, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

From March 1531, 2005, more than 252 km (19.5 km2) of seafloor offshore of the Elwha River Delta in the central Strait of Juan de Fuca was mapped by the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program. The purpose of this nearshore mapping was to (1) obtain high resolution bathymetry and acoustic reflectance properties of the seabed, (2) examine and record geologic characteristics of the seafloor, and (3) construct maps of sea-floor geomorphology and habitat. Substrate distribution was characterized with video-supervised statistical classification of the sonar data. Substrate of the survey was dominated by mixed sand-gravel and sand. Numerous boulder reefs were observed west of the river mouth within Freshwater Bay, whereas the sea-floor immediately adjacent to the river mouth was dominated by sand.

Cochrane, Guy R.; Warrick, Jonathan A.; Sagy, Yael; Finlayson, David; Harney, Jodi

2008-01-01

282

Multi-disciplinary investigation into the role of regional event beds in near-shore landslides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Near-shore landslides in fjords are a widely observed geohazard with a potential for causing damage through tsunami generation and the removal of near-shore infrastructure. Often these events cross the border between terrestrial and submarine landslides, involving the failure of material on the shoreline and foreshore slope. Here we focus on a multi-disciplinary investigation of the 1996 landslide near Finneidfjord, Norway. This event back-stepped 100-150 m inland, removing a 250 m long section of the main north-south highway and several houses, at a cost of four human lives. Acquisition of an extensive and multidisciplinary data set, including high-resolution swath bathymetry, 2D/3D seismic data, multiple short (up to 6 m) and two long (12 m and 14 m, respectively) sediment cores and in situ Free-Fall Piezocone Penetrometer (FF-CPTU) profiles complemented with geotechnical laboratory data, has provided a detailed analysis of both the landslide morphology and stratigraphic controls. Correlating the geophysical (include remote physical properties inverted from seismic reflection profiles), geological and geotechnical data identifies the landslide glide plane as a thin (< 0.5 m), laminated, clay-rich bed with high pore water content (45 - 65 %) and low shear strength (4 - 8 kPa), deposited as a result of terrestrial quick-clay landslides in the hinterland. The relative weakness of the layer is thought to be a result of both the rapid deposition and excess pore pressure caused by artesian groundwater flow. Together, these act as preconditioning factors for failure, controlling the failure depth and probability if not the exact timing of the event.

Vardy, M. E.; L'Heureux, J.; Vanneste, M. W.; Longva, O.; Forsberg, C. F.; Steiner, A.

2012-12-01

283

Neutrophilic Iron-Oxidizing "Zetaproteobacteria" and Mild Steel Corrosion in Nearshore Marine Environments ? †  

PubMed Central

Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of mild steel in seawater is an expensive and enduring problem. Little attention has been paid to the role of neutrophilic, lithotrophic, iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) in MIC. The goal of this study was to determine if marine FeOB related to Mariprofundus are involved in this process. To examine this, field incubations and laboratory microcosm experiments were conducted. Mild steel samples incubated in nearshore environments were colonized by marine FeOB, as evidenced by the presence of helical iron-encrusted stalks diagnostic of the FeOB Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, a member of the candidate class “Zetaproteobacteria.” Furthermore, Mariprofundus-like cells were enriched from MIC biofilms. The presence of Zetaproteobacteria was confirmed using a Zetaproteobacteria-specific small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene primer set to amplify sequences related to M. ferrooxydans from both enrichments and in situ samples of MIC biofilms. Temporal in situ incubation studies showed a qualitative increase in stalk distribution on mild steel, suggesting progressive colonization by stalk-forming FeOB. We also isolated a novel FeOB, designated Mariprofundus sp. strain GSB2, from an iron oxide mat in a salt marsh. Strain GSB2 enhanced uniform corrosion from mild steel in laboratory microcosm experiments conducted over 4 days. Iron concentrations (including precipitates) in the medium were used as a measure of corrosion. The corrosion in biotic samples (7.4 ± 0.1 mM) was significantly higher than that in abiotic controls (5.0 ± 0.1 mM). These results have important implications for the role of FeOB in corrosion of steel in nearshore and estuarine environments. In addition, this work shows that the global distribution of Zetaproteobacteria is far greater than previously thought.

McBeth, Joyce M.; Little, Brenda J.; Ray, Richard I.; Farrar, Katherine M.; Emerson, David

2011-01-01

284

Neutrophilic iron-oxidizing "zetaproteobacteria" and mild steel corrosion in nearshore marine environments.  

PubMed

Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of mild steel in seawater is an expensive and enduring problem. Little attention has been paid to the role of neutrophilic, lithotrophic, iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) in MIC. The goal of this study was to determine if marine FeOB related to Mariprofundus are involved in this process. To examine this, field incubations and laboratory microcosm experiments were conducted. Mild steel samples incubated in nearshore environments were colonized by marine FeOB, as evidenced by the presence of helical iron-encrusted stalks diagnostic of the FeOB Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, a member of the candidate class "Zetaproteobacteria." Furthermore, Mariprofundus-like cells were enriched from MIC biofilms. The presence of Zetaproteobacteria was confirmed using a Zetaproteobacteria-specific small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene primer set to amplify sequences related to M. ferrooxydans from both enrichments and in situ samples of MIC biofilms. Temporal in situ incubation studies showed a qualitative increase in stalk distribution on mild steel, suggesting progressive colonization by stalk-forming FeOB. We also isolated a novel FeOB, designated Mariprofundus sp. strain GSB2, from an iron oxide mat in a salt marsh. Strain GSB2 enhanced uniform corrosion from mild steel in laboratory microcosm experiments conducted over 4 days. Iron concentrations (including precipitates) in the medium were used as a measure of corrosion. The corrosion in biotic samples (7.4 ± 0.1 mM) was significantly higher than that in abiotic controls (5.0 ± 0.1 mM). These results have important implications for the role of FeOB in corrosion of steel in nearshore and estuarine environments. In addition, this work shows that the global distribution of Zetaproteobacteria is far greater than previously thought. PMID:21131509

McBeth, Joyce M; Little, Brenda J; Ray, Richard I; Farrar, Katherine M; Emerson, David

2011-02-01

285

Comparing a quasi-3D to a full 3D nearshore circulation model: SHORECIRC and ROMS  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Predictions of nearshore and surf zone processes are important for determining coastal circulation, impacts of storms, navigation, and recreational safety. Numerical modeling of these systems facilitates advancements in our understanding of coastal changes and can provide predictive capabilities for resource managers. There exists many nearshore coastal circulation models, however they are mostly limited or typically only applied as depth integrated models. SHORECIRC is an established surf zone circulation model that is quasi-3D to allow the effect of the variability in the vertical structure of the currents while maintaining the computational advantage of a 2DH model. Here we compare SHORECIRC to ROMS, a fully 3D ocean circulation model which now includes a three dimensional formulation for the wave-driven flows. We compare the models with three different test applications for: (i) spectral waves approaching a plane beach with an oblique angle of incidence; (ii) monochromatic waves driving longshore currents in a laboratory basin; and (iii) monochromatic waves on a barred beach with rip channels in a laboratory basin. Results identify that the models are very similar for the depth integrated flows and qualitatively consistent for the vertically varying components. The differences are primarily the result of the vertically varying radiation stress utilized by ROMS and the utilization of long wave theory for the radiation stress formulation in vertical varying momentum balance by SHORECIRC. The quasi-3D model is faster, however the applicability of the fully 3D model allows it to extend over a broader range of processes, temporal, and spatial scales. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

Haas, K. A.; Warner, J. C.

2009-01-01

286

BOREAS AFM-2 Wyoming King Air 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The BOREAS AFM-2 team used the University of Wyoming King Air aircraft during IFCs 1, 2, and 3 in 1994 to collected pass-by-pass fluxes (and many other statistics) for the large number of level (constant altitude), straight-line passes used in a variety of flight patterns over the SSA and NSA and areas along the transect between these study areas. The data described here form a second set, namely soundings that were incorporated into nearly every research flight by the King Air in 1994. These soundings generally went from near the surface to above the inversion layer. Most were flown immediately after takeoff or immediately after finishing the last flux pattern of that particular day's flights. The parameters that were measured include wind direction, wind speed, west wind component (u), south wind component (v), static pressure, air dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and CO2 concentration. Data on the aircraft's location, attitude, and altitude during data collection are also provided. These data are stored in tabular ASCH files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

Kelly, Robert D.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

287

Surface Flux Measurements at King Sejong Station in West Antarctica  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Antarctic Peninsula is important in terms of global warming research due to pronounced increase of air temperature over the last century. The first eddy covariance system was established and turbulent fluxes of heat, water vapor, CO2 and momentum have been measured at King Sejong Station (62 \\deg 13øØS, 58 \\deg 47øØW) located in the northern edge of the Antarctic Peninsula since December in 2002. Our objectives are to better understand the interactions between the Antarctic land surface and the atmosphere and to test the feasibility of the long-term operation of eddy covariance system under extreme weather conditions. Various lichens cover the study area and the dominant species is Usnea fasciata-Himantormia. Based on the analyses on turbulent statistics such as integral turbulence characteristics of vertical velocity (w) and heat (T), stationarity test and investigation of correlation coefficient, they follow the Monin-Obukhov similarity and eddy covariance flux data were reliable. About 50 % of total retrieved sensible heat flux data could be used for further analysis. We will report on seasonal variations of energy and mass fluxes and environmental variables. In addition, factors controlling these fluxes will be presented. Acknowledgement: This study was supported by ¡rEnvironmental Monitoring on Human Impacts at the King Sejong Station, Antarctica¡_ (Project PP04102 of Korea Polar Research Institute) and ¡rEco-technopia 21 project¡_ (Ministry of Environment of Korea).

Choi, T.; Lee, B.; Lee, H.; Shim, J.

2004-12-01

288

78 FR 39599 - Safety Zone; Independence Day Fireworks, Kings Beach, CA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Independence Day Fireworks, Kings Beach, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice...Independence Day Fireworks, Kings Beach, CA in the Captain of the Port, San Francisco...Tahoe Keys Marina in South Lake Tahoe, CA in approximate position 38[deg]...

2013-07-02

289

Children's Books on Martin Luther King, Jr. Offer a One-Dimensional View.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews children's books, teacher references, mini-plays, and curriculum resources that relate to the life of Martin Luther King, Jr. Reports that most of these sources ignore growth and changes within King's life and thought, the role models who shaped his philosophy, or his participation in issues such as the Vietnam War and poverty. (KH)

Banfield, Beryle

1985-01-01

290

The Agronomy and Economy of Black Pepper ( Piper nigrum L.) —The “King of Spices”  

Microsoft Academic Search

Black pepper, popularly known as the “King of Spices”, has a very checkered history dating back to the times of Queen Sheeba and King Solomon (BC 1015–BC 66) and has influenced the destiny of nations and their people, spread across the world, both economically and culturally. Today pepper commands the leading position among the different spices as the spice of

K. P. Prabhakaran Nair

2004-01-01

291

The lichen genus Cladonia of King George Island, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents the results of taxonomical investigation of the genus Clado? nia Hill ex P. Browne from King George Island. Individuals belonging to this lichen genus were studied using methods of classical herbarium taxonomy supported by chemical analy? sis. Fourteen species have been recognized in the study area, with C. asahinae J.W. Thomson being reported from King George Island

Piotr OSYCZKA; Maria OLECH

292

Reaffirmation of God's anointed prophet: The use of chiasm in Martin Luther King's “Mountaintop” speech  

Microsoft Academic Search

This textual analysis of Martin Luther King's “Mountaintop” speech shows how form and message work together to create meaning. The chiastic form reveals a logical and well planned narrative style. King's purpose was to revitalize his movement at a time of crisis through the reaffirmation of his leadership. Because he did not so much want the audience to see him

Christopher Lynch

1995-01-01

293

Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Power of Nonviolence. [Lesson Plan].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This lesson plan introduces students in grades 6-8 to Martin Luther King Jr.'s philosophy of nonviolence and the teachings of Mohandas K. Gandhi that influenced King's views. After considering the political impact of this philosophy, students explore its relevance to personal life. In these 6 lessons students will: (1) examine the philosophy of…

National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.

294

‘Remaining awake through a great revolution’: The rhetorical strategies of Martin Luther King Jr  

Microsoft Academic Search

Martin Luther King, Jr is the most recognisable face of the black Civil Rights movement in America in the 1950s and 1960s. His ‘I’ have a Dream’ speech, given in 1963 as part of the march on Washington, has been identified as a key moment in American history, beyond just its importance to the Civil Rights movement. King's lasting place

Nick Sharman

1999-01-01

295

FROM IDENTIFICATION TO CONFRONTATION: A RHETORICAL ANALYSIS OF MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR'S \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Martin Luther King, Jr.'s success as a civil rights activist was based, to a significant extent, on his skills as an orator. By successfully identifying the civil rights cause with key symbols from American civil religion, such as the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, as well as well-known religious homilies King was able to get a significant proportion of

Nick Sharman

296

The inaccuracies in the reprintings of Martin Luther King's “I have a dream” speech  

Microsoft Academic Search

The reprintings of Martin Luther King's “I Have A Dream” speech appearing in textbooks, tradebooks, and periodicals contain errors, some more serious than others, distorting what King actually said in his now classic speech. Some reprintings have omitted words and phrases he delivered, other reprintings have added words and phrases he never included in his presentation; in still other cases,

Haig Bosmajian

1982-01-01

297

Inventing authority: Bill Clinton, Martin Luther King, Jr., and the orchestration of rhetorical traditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

On November 13, 1993, President Clinton addressed five thousand African American ministers at the site of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. ‘s last speech in Memphis, Tennessee and, to open a dialogue on race relations, spoke in King's voice. This essay develops a critical orientation revolving around the concepts of tradition, invention, and authority as a means of exploring Clinton's

John M. Murphy

1997-01-01

298

The rhetoric of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: Comedy and context in tragic collision  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several critics of the rhetoric of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., have noted changes in the content and style of his address toward the end of his career. None, though, have made a systematic generic assessment of those changes, nor have they linked such generic transformations to King's altered situation, the new type of movement he was then leading, the

Edward C. Appel

1997-01-01

299

77 FR 34798 - Safety Zone; USMMA Fireworks, Long Island Sound, Kings Point, NY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Safety Zone; USMMA Fireworks, Long Island Sound, Kings Point, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard...on the navigable waters of Long Island Sound in the vicinity of Kings Point, NY for...all vessels from a portion of Long Island Sound before, during, and immediately...

2012-06-12

300

Martin Luther King, the American dream and Vietnam: A collision of rhetorical trajectories  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essay explores the rhetorical complexity of Martin Luther King's dual role as political and moral leader, particularly during his last years when he was attacked for his opposition to the Vietnam War. By: 1) discussing and developing the theoretical value and critical possibilities associated with the term “rhetorical trajectories,”; 2) tracing the trajectories present in King's rhetoric in order

George N. Dionisopoulos; Victoria J. Gallagher; Steven R. Goldzwig; David Zarefsky

1992-01-01

301

50 CFR Figure 11 to Part 679 - Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA)  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) 11 Figure 11 to Part 679...ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 11 Figure 11 to Part 679âRed King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) ER15NO99.009 [64...

2013-10-01

302

50 CFR 622.372 - Limited access system for king mackerel gillnet permits applicable in the southern Florida west...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...for king mackerel gillnet permits applicable in the southern Florida west coast subzone. 622.372 Section 622.372 Wildlife...for king mackerel gillnet permits applicable in the southern Florida west coast subzone. (a) Except for applications...

2013-10-01

303

Shared genetic material between humans and chimps, Mary-Claire KingSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Interviewee: Mary-Claire King DNAi Location:Applications>Human Origins>Comparisons>DNA Geneticist Mary-Claire King talks about her discovery that chimps and humans are extremely similar at a molecular level.

2008-03-26

304

76 FR 5326 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; King and Spanish Mackerel Coastal...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Mexico, and South Atlantic; King and Spanish Mackerel Coastal Migratory Pelagic Fishery...control future access to the king and Spanish mackerel components of the coastal migratory...of September 17, 2010, for king and Spanish mackerel. The Council requested a...

2011-01-31

305

What's in a virus? Folk understandings of hepatitis C infection and infectiousness among injecting drug users in Kings Cross, Sydney  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: To explore folk understandings of blood borne virus infection and infectiousness among injecting drug users in Kings Cross, Sydney. METHODS: Observational fieldwork was conducted in Kings Cross over a four month period. In-depth interviews with 24 current injectors and 4 key informants recruited from King Cross were undertaken. RESULTS: Hepatitis C (HCV) generated different meanings from HIV. HIV was

Erica Southgate; Anne Maree Weatherall; Carolyn Day; Kate A Dolan

2005-01-01

306

Biological activities and phytochemicals of Swietenia macrophylla King.  

PubMed

Swietenia macrophylla King (Meliaceae) is an endangered and medicinally important plant indigenous to tropical and subtropical regions of the World. S. macrophylla has been widely used in folk medicine to treat various diseases. The review reveals that limonoids and its derivatives are the major constituents of S. macrophylla. There are several data in the literature indicating a great variety of pharmacological activities of S. macrophylla, which exhibits antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant effects, antimutagenic, anticancer, antitumor and antidiabetic activities. Various other activities like anti-nociceptive, hypolipidemic, antidiarrhoeal, anti-infective, antiviral, antimalarial, acaricidal, antifeedant and heavy metal phytoremediation activity have also been reported. In view of the immense medicinal importance of S. macrophylla, this review aimed at compiling all currently available information on its ethnomedicinal uses, phytochemistry and biological activities of S. macrophylla, showing its importance. PMID:23999722

Moghadamtousi, Soheil Zorofchian; Goh, Bey Hing; Chan, Chim Kei; Shabab, Tara; Kadir, Habsah Abdul

2013-01-01

307

Multiple brain abscesses at King Khalid University Hospital.  

PubMed

The authors reviewed six cases of multiple brain abscesses that were treated at King Khalid University Hospital (KKUH) over an eight year period. This represented 22% of the total brain abscesses treated during the same period. The series is unusual in that the infective pathogens were fungi (Fonsecaea pedrosoi) in two patients (33%) and an aerobic actinomycete (Nocardia asteroides) in one patient (16%). Two patients treated elsewhere with antibiotics empirically for one month died at three and 28 days following admission. The poor outcome was probably related t the delay in obtaining a microbiological diagnosis and commencing the appropriate antimicrobial therapy. The importance of early identification of the pathogen in patients with multiple brain abscesses is stressed. PMID:17589050

Jamjoom, A; Jamjoom, Z A; Shameena, A; Al-Hedaithy, S; Tahan, A; Ur Rahman, N

1994-01-01

308

Are Regional Operational Wind-Waves Models Usable to Predict Coastal and Nearshore Wave Climate?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Estuary and Gulf of Saint-Lawrence (EGSL) shores are subjected to strong erosion linked to storminess. Due to the likely presence of sea ice and to the high tidal range affecting the north shores of the EGSL, it is impossible to measure wave parameters at depth lesser than 10m from November to April, i.e. the storm period. Winter waves can be forecasted by the operational Regional Deterministic Wave Prediction System (RDWPS) from the Canadian Meteorological Center (CMC). However, spatial resolution of the RDWPS in the EGSL is 0.04°x0.06° (5x5km @ 49°N), which theoretically limits its application to areas of low bathymetric gradients and does neither destined it to the prediction of coastal nor nearshore waves. Nevertheless, given the lack of nearshore wave measurements during the late fall and winter period, it might seem wise to use the RDWPS data for operational purposes of warning and coastal structure design. This research thus evaluates the performance of the RDWPS for this period, both in the coastal and nearshore areas of a complex bathymetric domain. Our method is based on: 1. A direct comparison of RDWPS wave parameters time series to those produced from two instruments berthed in front of Sept-Iles, North Shore, Quebec (50° 10.3' N 66° 13.5' W). M1 mooring is deployed permanently throughout the year at -32m MSL, while M2 is deployed from April to November at -8m MSL. These comparisons are made from 01/10/2010 to 31/12/2011 (winter period). 2. A high-resolution (0.2x0.2km) coastal wind-wave model (SWAN v.40.85) is locally nested in the EGSL RDWPS domain in order to propagate waves from quasi-infinite depth to the shore at the site location, including moorings positions. Our implementation uses the same source terms, physics and inputs as in the RDWPS implementation of WAM. This allows producing reference time series for the winter at the M2 location. RDWPS data are thus also compared with these model outputs for the same period as 1. Our results show that the RDWPS predicted the wave parameters with a very good sensitivity, but with a strong linear overestimation of Hm02 (+45% ± 10%) and Tm0 (+45% ± 30%) at M1 location. A first implementation of SWAN (SI1) using the RDWPS wave data as boundary conditions shows that 55% of this overestimation at M1 is related to the bathymetric grid's coarse resolution. A second implementation of SWAN (SI2) with a linear reduction of 20% of the RDWPS Hm02 boundary condition and using the 10m wind components rather than the 40m as in the RDWPS shows a very good agreement with M1 measured values, demonstrating that remaining overestimation is linked to winds too strong. The comparison of SWAN SI2 results at M2 position vs. M2 measured data shows a very good fit, without overestimation. The comparison for the winter period of SWAN SI2 results at M2 position vs. RDWPS data at the three closest grid points shows that Hm02 can be reasonably assessed at this depth for operational purposes taking into account a linear reduction factor, estimated 0.6 for our site.

Lambert, A. P.; Neumeier, U.; Jacob, D.; Savard, J.

2012-12-01

309

Large-scale movements and habitat characteristics of king eiders throughout the nonbreeding period  

USGS Publications Warehouse

King Eiders (Somateria spectabilis) breeding in western Canada and Alaska molt wing feathers and spend the winter in remote areas of the Bering Sea, precluding direct observation. To characterize timing of migration and habitat used by King Eiders during the nonbreeding period, we collected location data for 60 individuals (27 females and 33 males) over three years from satellite telemetry and utilized oceanographic information obtained by remote sensing. Male King Eiders dispersed from breeding areas, arrived at wing molt sites, and dispersed from wing molt sites earlier than females in all years. Males arriving earlier at wing molt sites molted flight feathers at higher latitudes. Distributions of molt and winter locations did not differ by sex or among years. Of the variables considered for analysis, distance to shore, water depth, and salinity appeared to best describe King Eider habitat throughout the nonbreeding period. King Eiders were located closer to shore, in shallower water with lower salinity than random locations. During the winter, lower ice concentrations were also associated with King Eider locations. This study provides some of the first large-scale descriptions of King Eider migration and habitat outside the breeding season. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2006.

Phillips, L. M.; Powell, A. N.; Rexstad, E. A.

2006-01-01

310

Holocene sedimentation in the shallow nearshore zone off Nauset Inlet, Cape Cod, Massachusetts  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Present conditions and sedimentary evolution of the shallow offshore region near Nauset Inlet on Cape Cod, Massachusetts were clarified using high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, sidescan-sonar records, surface grab samples and current meter measurements. The study area contains three provinces: (1) a nearshore province (shallower than 18 m) with a relatively steep slope (0.6??) and a cover of medium sand; (2) a northern offshore province covered with coarse sand, gravel, and boulders, interpreted to be glacial drift; and (3) a southern offshore province with a gentle seaward-dipping slope (0.3??) and a surface sediment of coarse sand. The glacial drift exposed in the northern offshore province can be traced southward under the coarse sand province. The overlying fill is comprised of either outwash sediment derived from the Pleistocene South Channel ice lobe to the east or Holocene-aged marine sediments eroded from seacliffs to the north. Latest Holocene sediment appears to be limited to the zone shoreward of 18 m where the medium sand occurs. Near-bottom mean flows (measured over two winter months in 10 m water depth) average 6 cm sec-1 to the south. Mean flows exceeded 20 cm sec-1 approx. 23% of the time. Ninety percent of the flows exceeding 20 cm sec-1 were directed to the south, reflecting the dominant atmospheric forcing during these winter months. Waves had an average variance of 650 cm2 with variance exceeding 5000 cm2, 3% of the time, indicating moderate wave activity. Present processes are actively reshaping the nearshore province, which is characterized by many east to northeast-trending shore-oblique channels that do not extend seaward of the 18-m contour. Coarse sand in the floors of these channels suggests they may be erosional features, and the presence of megaripples oriented perpendicular to the channel axes indicates active transport in these channels. Megaripple orientation and the current and wave regime of the study area support a rip-current origin for these channels. ?? 1982.

Aubrey, D. G.; Twichell, D. C.; Pfirman, S. L.

1982-01-01

311

The KwaZulu-Natal sardine run: shoal distribution in relation to nearshore environmental conditions, 1997–2007  

Microsoft Academic Search

The nearshore presence of sardine Sardinops sagax on the KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) coast was investi-gated using sightings data collected by the KZN Sharks Board from 1997 to 2007. The spatio-temporal distribution of sardine was described in relation to that of their predators and to environmental conditions, and subjected to generalised linear model (GLM) and generalised additive model (GAM) analyses. Variables describing

S H O’Donoghue; L Drapeau; S FJ Dudley; V M Peddemors

2010-01-01

312

Nutrient couplings between on-site sewage disposal systems, groundwaters, and nearshore surface waters of the Florida Keys  

Microsoft Academic Search

We performed a one-year study to determine the effects of on-site sewage disposal systems (OSDS, septic tanks) on the nutrient\\u000a relations of limestone groundwaters and nearshore surface waters of the Florida Keys. Monitor wells were installed on canal\\u000a residences with OSDS and a control site in the Key Deer National Wildlife Refuge on Big Pine Key. Groundwater and surface\\u000a water

Brian E. Lapointe; Julie D. O'Connell; George S. Garrett

1999-01-01

313

Composition and Dynamics of the Black Sea Benthopelagic Plankton and Its Contribution to the Near-Shore Plankton Communities  

PubMed Central

At a shallow (7 m) near-shore sampling site in the Black Sea we analyzed composition, abundance, and biomass of benthopelagic organisms and the contribution these animals make to the total plankton. The site was monitored across several years (1996–2001; 2006–2007) whilst for 1999–2000 the seasonal variations were analysed. A total of 321 samples from Golubaja Bay near Novorossiysk (44°34?31.04? N, 37°58?45.11? E) in 1996–2007 were taken with a Judey net. The benthopelagic fauna was represented by 69 taxa, a diversity comparable to similar shelf areas. The benthopelagic component played an important role in near-shore plankton communities in the Black Sea accounting for 50% of the total zooplankton biomass at night during all seasons. Abundance and biomass of the benthopelagic animals showed seasonal fluctuations, the highest biomass being recorded during winter (>75% of the total zooplankton biomass) and early spring due to large amphipods, whilst the highest abundances occur during late summer because of numerous young stages of various taxa. Amphipods, mysids, and decapods are the main contributors to the plankton biomass and abundances. Both night and daytime samples are strongly recommended for the adequate description of the near-shore plankton communities.

Vereshchaka, Alexander L.; Anokhina, Ludmila L.

2014-01-01

314

Composition and dynamics of the black sea benthopelagic plankton and its contribution to the near-shore plankton communities.  

PubMed

At a shallow (7 m) near-shore sampling site in the Black Sea we analyzed composition, abundance, and biomass of benthopelagic organisms and the contribution these animals make to the total plankton. The site was monitored across several years (1996-2001; 2006-2007) whilst for 1999-2000 the seasonal variations were analysed. A total of 321 samples from Golubaja Bay near Novorossiysk (44°34'31.04? N, 37°58'45.11? E) in 1996-2007 were taken with a Judey net. The benthopelagic fauna was represented by 69 taxa, a diversity comparable to similar shelf areas. The benthopelagic component played an important role in near-shore plankton communities in the Black Sea accounting for 50% of the total zooplankton biomass at night during all seasons. Abundance and biomass of the benthopelagic animals showed seasonal fluctuations, the highest biomass being recorded during winter (>75% of the total zooplankton biomass) and early spring due to large amphipods, whilst the highest abundances occur during late summer because of numerous young stages of various taxa. Amphipods, mysids, and decapods are the main contributors to the plankton biomass and abundances. Both night and daytime samples are strongly recommended for the adequate description of the near-shore plankton communities. PMID:24945680

Vereshchaka, Alexander L; Anokhina, Ludmila L

2014-01-01

315

Brood rearing ecology of king eiders on the north slope of Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We examined King Eider (Somateria spectabilis) brood survival in the Kuparak oil field in northern Alaska in 2002 and 2003 by monitoring hens with broods using radiotelemetry. We observed complete brood loss in eight of 10 broods. Broods survived less than 2 weeks on average, and most mortality occurred within 10 days of hatch. Distance hens traveled overland did not affect brood survival. Apparent King Eider brood survival in our study area was lower than reported for eider species in other areas. We recommend future studies examine if higher densities of predators in oil fields reduces King Eider duckling survival. Received 26 September 2008. Accepted 18 January 2009.

Phillips, L. M.; Powell, A. N.

2009-01-01

316

Photogeology: Part N: ejecta blankets of large craters exemplified by King Crater  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Details of the ejecta blankets of large, fresh craters provide insight into the mechanics of deposition and the sequence of emplacement of impact debris. King Crater is the freshest of the three large, rayed craters photographed from Apollo 16; the others are Theophilus and Langrenus Craters. King Crater is comparable in youth to Tycho Crater, and the details of its ejecta blanket help to interpret degraded equivalents at older craters. The clarity of detail and the occurrence of new types of lunar landforms rank King Crater among the most significant targets photographed from orbit in the Apollo Program (part M of this section).

Howard, Keith A.

1972-01-01

317

Martin Luther King, Jr. East Busway in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Port Authority of Allegheny County (PAT), the primary public transit operator in Pittsburgh, PA, built an exclusive roadway for buses which opened for service in February 1983. The two-lane, 6.8-mile facility serves the eastern suburbs via a right-of-...

S. Pultz D. Koffman

1987-01-01

318

Molecular characterization of potential microcystin-producing cyanobacteria in Lake Ontario embayments and nearshore waters.  

PubMed

The distribution and genotypic variation of potential microcystin (MC) producers along the southern and eastern shores of Lake Ontario in 2001 and 2003 were examined using a suite of PCR primers. Cyanobacterial, Microcystis sp., and Microcystis-specific toxin primer sets identified shoreline distribution of cyanobacterial DNA (in 97% of the stations) and MC synthetase genes (in 50% of the stations). Sequence analysis of a partial mcyA amplicon targeting Microcystis, Anabaena, and Planktothrix species indicated that the Microcystis sp. genotype was the dominant MC genotype present and revealed a novel Microcystis-like sequence containing a 6-bp insert. Analysis of the same samples with genus-specific mcyE primers confirmed that the Microcystis sp. genotype was the dominant potential MC producer. Genotype compositions within embayments were relatively homogenous compared to those for shoreline and tributary samples. MC concentrations along the shoreline exhibited both temporal and spatial differences as evidenced by the protein phosphatase inhibition assay, at times exceeding the World Health Organization guideline value for drinking water of 1.0 microg MC-LReq liter(-1). MC genotypes are widespread along the New York State shoreline of Lake Ontario, appear to originate nearshore, and can be carried through the lake via wind and surface water current patterns. PMID:17526791

Hotto, A M; Satchwell, M F; Boyer, G L

2007-07-01

319

The comparative fate of chemically dispersed and untreated oils in an Arctic nearshore environment  

SciTech Connect

The distribution and environmental fate of petroleum hydrocarbons introduced into the nearshore environment of Cape Hatt, Baffin Island, Canada, during two controlled experimental discharges of a Venezuelan (Lagomedio) crude oil have been studied. An analytical program based on a combination of ultraviolet/fluorescence studies, high resolution gas chromatography, and computer-assisted gas chromatographic mass spectrometry has been used to examine several hundred oil, seawater, sediment, sediment trap, surface floc, and benthic animal (seven species) samples to determine the distribution, transport, and weathering of oil spilled in two scenarios: as untreated oil on the surface and as chemically dispersed oil discharged below the surface. Conclusions are drawn about the weathering of oil in the two scenarios, transport of low and high molecular weight hydrocarbons into the water column and their persistence, the sedimentation of oil, the incorporation of oil into the sediment via sedimentation onto the surface floc and direct penetration of the sediment/ water interface, and the uptake and depuration of untreated and chemically dispersed oils by seven species of filter feeders and deposit feeders in the subtidal benthos.

Boehm, P.D.

1982-10-01

320

Application of the implicit particle filter to a model of nearshore circulation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

implicit particle filter is applied to a stochastically forced shallow water model of nearshore flow, and found to produce reliable state estimates with tens of particles. The state vector of this model consists of a height anomaly and two horizontal velocity components at each point on a 128 × 98 regular rectangular grid, making for a state dimension O(104). The particle filter was applied to the model with two parameter choices representing two distinct dynamical regimes, and performed well in both. Demands on computing resources were manageable. Simulations with as many as a hundred particles ran overnight on a modestly configured workstation. In this case of observations defined by a linear function of the state vector, taken every time step of the numerical model, the implicit particle filter is equivalent to the optimal importance filter, i.e., at each step any given particle is drawn from the density of the system conditioned jointly upon observations and the state of that particle at the previous time. Even in this ideal case, the sample occasionally collapses to a single particle, and resampling is necessary. In those cases, the sample rapidly reinflates, and the analysis never loses track. In both dynamical regimes, the ensembles of particles deviated significantly from normality.

Miller, R. N.; Ehret, L. L.

2014-04-01

321

Organic priority pollutants in nearshore fish from 14 Lake Michigan tributaries and embayments, 1983  

SciTech Connect

Composite, nearshore, whole fish samples of selected species, collected in fall 1983 from 13 Lake Michigan tributaries and Grand Traverse Bay, were analyzed for a wide range of pesticides and priority pollutants using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This study was carried out to identify existing source areas for known and previously unrecognized toxic substances. The authors strategy was to analyze those resident fish with the highest likely levels of contaminant. All fish analyzed exceeded the 2 mg/kg FDA action levels for PCBs, while 50% of the samples exceeded the DDTr IJC objective of 1 mg/kg. St. Joseph River common carp (Cyprinus carpio) carried the heaviest contaminant burden of all fish examined for PCBs (27.6 mg/kg), DDTr (10.2 kg/mg), and toxaphene (3.3 mg/kg); chlordane levels (0.85 mg/kg) were second highest to those in Kalamazoo River common carp (0.87 mg/kg). Concentrations of PCBs, toxaphene, DDT, DDE, and other pesticides were higher in bottom-feeding fish, such as common carp, than in top predators, e.g., northern pike (Esox lucius). Bottom feeders are relatively fatty fish, and live and feed near contaminated sediments, which increases their potential to bioaccumulate fat-soluble contaminants. Pesticides were also present in elevated concentrations in fish from sites with higher industrial and agricultural development. 31 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

Camanzo, J.; Rice, C.P.; Jude, D.J.; Rossmann, R.

1987-01-01

322

Population structure of Cladophora-borne Escherichia coli in nearshore water of Lake Michigan  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We previously reported that the macrophytic green alga Cladophora harbors high densities (up to 106 colony-forming units/g dry weight) of the fecal indicator bacteria, Escherichia coli and enterococci, in shoreline waters of Lake Michigan. However, the population structure and genetic relatedness of Cladophora-borne indicator bacteria remain poorly understood. In this study, 835 E. coli isolates were collected from Cladophora tufts (mats) growing on rocks from a breakwater located within the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore in northwest Indiana. The horizontal fluorophore enhanced rep-PCR (HFERP) DNA fingerprinting technique was used to determine the genetic relatedness of the isolates to each other and to those in a library of E. coli DNA fingerprints. While the E. coli isolates from Cladophora showed a high degree of genetic relatedness (???92% similarity), in most cases, however, the isolates were genetically distinct. The Shannon diversity index for the population was very high (5.39). Both spatial and temporal influences contributed to the genetic diversity. There was a strong association of isolate genotypes by location (79% and 80% for lake- and ditch-side samplings, respectively), and isolates collected from 2002 were distinctly different from those obtained in 2003. Cladophora-borne E. coli isolates represented a unique group, which was distinct from other E. coli isolates in the DNA fingerprint library tested. Taken together, these results indicate that E. coli strains associated with Cladophora may be a recurring source of indicator bacteria to the nearshore beach. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Byappanahalli, M. N.; Whitman, R. L.; Shively, D. A.; Ferguson, J.; Ishii, S.; Sadowsky, M. J.

2007-01-01

323

Hierarchical multi-scale classification of nearshore aquatic habitats of the Great Lakes: Western Lake Erie  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Classification is a valuable conservation tool for examining natural resource status and problems and is being developed for coastal aquatic habitats. We present an objective, multi-scale hydrospatial framework for nearshore areas of the Great Lakes. The hydrospatial framework consists of spatial units at eight hierarchical scales from the North American Continent to the individual 270-m spatial cell. Characterization of spatial units based on fish abundance and diversity provides a fish-guided classification of aquatic areas at each spatial scale and demonstrates how classifications may be generated from that framework. Those classification units then provide information about habitat, as well as biotic conditions, which can be compared, contrasted, and hierarchically related spatially. Examples within several representative coastal or open water zones of the Western Lake Erie pilot area highlight potential application of this classification system to management problems. This classification system can assist natural resource managers with planning and establishing priorities for aquatic habitat protection, developing rehabilitation strategies, or identifying special management actions.

McKenna, J. E.; Castiglione, C.

2010-01-01

324

Morphological response of a double nearshore bar system under oblique waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sète beach (Mediterranean Sea - France) is characterized by two nearshore bars which are generally considered to run parallel to the shore. However in-situ wave/current/bathymetry measurements have shown the possible reorganization of this double bar system during storms associated with oblique waves. Two situations are studied. During the field campaign in 1999, the bar system was submitted to moderately oblique stormy waves. At the end of the campaign, the inner bar was divided in segments which were oriented parallel to the wave crests and to the current. During the field campaign in 1994, the stormy waves were strongly oblique. The response of the bar system led to the appearance of rhythmic features along both bars. The nonlinear surf zone model MORFO55 is used to understand the mechanisms which govern the bar reorganization under energetic wave conditions. This model is based on a wave and depth averaged shallow water equations solver with wave driver, sediment transport and bed updating (Garnier et al. 2006, J. Fluid Mech.). Modeling shows that the main characteristics of the bar response can be simulated from self-organization processes. The wave incidence has a tremendous influence on the bar response. Particularly, in agreement with the observations, the outer bar is stable for moderate obliquity while it is unstable for strongly oblique waves.

Thiebot, J.; Robin, N.; Garnier, R.; Certain, R.; Idier, D.; Calvete, D.; Falques, A.; Levoy, F.

2009-04-01

325

Hancock County Awards Gala  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gene Goldman (left), deputy director of NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center, accepts an Award of Excellence from Jack Zink, executive director of the Hancock County Port and Harbor Commission, during the 2008 Annual Hancock County Awards Gala. The Award of Excellence was presented to recognize Stennis Space Center's contribution to NASA's 50 years of excellence in space exploration.

2008-01-01

326

County Government Employment: 1990.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report provides national statistics on county government employment and payrolls for the month of October 1990. Statistics are based on a mail canvass survey that includes a sample of 2,026 county governments. The survey measures the number of governm...

1991-01-01

327

Sources of fecal indicator bacteria to groundwater, Malibu Lagoon and the near-shore ocean, Malibu, California, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS) used to treat residential and commercial sewage near Malibu, California have been implicated as a possible source of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) to Malibu Lagoon and the near-shore ocean. For this to occur, treated wastewater must first move through groundwater before discharging to the Lagoon or ocean. In July 2009 and April 2010, ?18O and ?D data showed that some samples from water-table wells contained as much as 70% wastewater; at that time FIB concentrations in those samples were generally less than the detection limit of 1 Most Probable Number (MPN) per 100 milliliters (mL). In contrast, Malibu Lagoon had total coliform, Escherichia coli, and enterococci concentrations as high as 650,000, 130,000, and 5,500 MPN per 100 mL, respectively, and as many as 12% of samples from nearby ocean beaches exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency single sample enterococci standard for marine recreational water of 104 MPN per 100 mL. Human-associated Bacteroidales, an indicator of human-fecal contamination, were not detected in water from wells, Malibu Lagoon, or the near-shore ocean. Similarly, microarray (PhyloChip) data show Bacteroidales and Fimicutes Operational Taxanomic Units (OTUs) present in OWTS were largely absent in groundwater; in contrast, 50% of Bacteroidales and Fimicutes OTUs present in the near-shore ocean were also present in gull feces. Terminal-Restriction Length Fragment Polymorphism (T-RFLP) and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) data showed that microbial communities in groundwater were different and less abundant than communities in OWTS, Malibu Lagoon, or the near-shore ocean. However, organic compounds indicative of wastewater (such as fecal sterols, bisphenol-A and cosmetics) were present in groundwater having a high percentage of wastewater and were present in groundwater discharging to the ocean. FIB in the near-shore ocean varied with tides, ocean swells, and waves. Movement of water from Malibu Lagoon through the sand berm at the mouth of the Lagoon contributed FIB to the adjacent beach at low tide. Similar increases in FIB concentrations did not occur at beaches adjacent to unsewered residential development, although wastewater indicator compounds and radon-222 (indicative of groundwater discharge) were present. High FIB concentrations at high tide were not related to groundwater discharge, but may be related to FIB associated with debris accumulated along the high-tide line.

Izbicki, John A.; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Burton, Carmen A.; Van De Werfhorst, Laurie; Holden, Patricia A.; Dubinsky, Eric A.

2012-01-01

328

Scientific Research in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks: An Annotated Bibliography.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This bibliography contains selected technical reports and publications resulting from scientific research and resources management studies carried out entirely or partly within Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks in the southern Sierra Nevada of Calif...

D. J. Parsons V. V. King

1980-01-01

329

Adaptation of the King Armstrong Method for Alkaline Phosphatase to the Auto Analyzer II System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study covers the use of the Auto Analyzer II system and modified King Armstrong techniques to reduce both the operation time and volume of reagents required in determining alkaline phosphate activity in laboratory animals.

R. C. Andrews

1975-01-01

330

Health Hazard Evaluation Report No. HE-79-011-1011, King Sooper's Meat Plant, Denver, Colorado.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Between November 1978 and November 1979, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted a health hazard evaluation of King Sooper's Meat Plant in Denver, CO., to evaluate reports of respiratory symptoms and illness among emplo...

L. Frederick T. Wilcox C. Moseley

1981-01-01

331

Benthic foraminiferal communities: distribution and ecology in Admiralty Bay, King George Island, West Antarctica  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the austral summer of 2002\\/2003 the author collected 38 marine and\\/or glacio?marine sediment samples from Admiralty Bay on King George Island (South Shet? land Islands, West Antarctica). Recent \\

Wojciech MAJEWSKI

332

Inventory of Significant Structures, Architectural Character Guidelines: Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The architectural Character Guidelines project for Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks will serve as a source book for designers, and it will guide the architectural future of those park areas. The document provides a capsule history of building desig...

L. S. Harrison

1989-01-01

333

On Jesus, Pharaohs, and the Chosen People: Martin Luther King as Biblical Interpreter and Humanist  

Microsoft Academic Search

King assumed that exodus is an archetypal experience; it supplied him with the metaphorical language for interpreting the black experience in America—but always with agape informing his interpretation at every point along the way.

James H. Smylie

1970-01-01

334

Solution to the mean king's problem with mutually unbiased bases for arbitrary levels  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mean king’s problem with mutually unbiased bases is reconsidered for arbitrary d -level systems. Hayashi [Phys. Rev. A 71, 052331 (2005)] related the problem to the existence of a maximal set of d-1 mutually orthogonal Latin squares, in their restricted setting that allows only measurements of projection-valued measures. However, we then cannot find a solution to the problem when, e.g., d=6 or d=10 . In contrast to their result, we show that the king’s problem always has a solution for arbitrary levels if we also allow positive operator-valued measures. In constructing the solution, we use orthogonal arrays in combinatorial design theory.

Kimura, Gen; Tanaka, Hajime; Ozawa, Masanao

2006-05-01

335

78 FR 6828 - Accreditation and Approval of King Laboratories, Inc., as a Commercial Gauger and Laboratory  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...regulation, that King Laboratories, Inc., has been approved to gauge and accredited to test petroleum and petroleum products, organic...223rd St. 401, Carson, CA 90745, has been approved to gauge and accredited to test petroleum and petroleum products,...

2013-01-31

336

Natural Resource Condition Assessment for Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. Appendix 2. Air Quality.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The condition of air quality in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks (SEKI) is a consequence of its geographic location relative to significant sources of air pollution. The Parks are downwind of numerous major urban areas with associated industrial ac...

A. Esperanza D. Saah J. Panek

2013-01-01

337

Energy Sources for First-Feeding Zoeae of King Crab 'Paralithodes camtschatica' (Tilesius) (Decapoda, Lithodidae).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The occurrence of first zoeae of king crab Paralithodes camtschatica (Tilesius) and potential phytoplankton food was monitored during April 1987 in Auke Bay, Alaska. The most abundant phytoplankton were Thalassiosira spp. and Skeletonema costatum (Grevill...

A. J. Paul J. M. Paul K. O. Coyle

1989-01-01

338

International importance of the eastern Chukchi Sea as a staging area for migrating king eiders  

Microsoft Academic Search

The evaluation of habitats used by arctic birds on migration is crucial for their conservation. We explored the importance\\u000a of the eastern Chukchi Sea (ECS) as a staging area for king eiders (Somateria spectabilis) migrating between breeding areas in Siberia and western North America and wintering areas in the Bering Sea. We tracked\\u000a 190 king eiders with satellite transmitters between

Steffen Oppel; D. Lynne Dickson; Abby N. Powell

2009-01-01

339

Mean king's problem with mutually unbiased bases and orthogonal Latin squares  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mean king’s problem with maximal mutually unbiased bases (MUB’s) in general dimension d is investigated. It is shown that a solution of the problem exists if and only if the maximal number (d+1) of orthogonal Latin squares exists. This implies that there is no solution in d=6 or d=10 dimensions even if the maximal number of MUB’s exists in these dimensions.

Hayashi, A.; Horibe, M.; Hashimoto, T.

2005-05-01

340

The late Neoproterozoic Grassy Group of King Island, Tasmania: correlation and palaeogeographic significance  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a very strong lithostratigraphic and ?13C-chemostratigraphic resemblance between the well-exposed diamictite–cap dolostone–shale succession on eastern King Island, and the Marinoan glacials and lowermost Wilpena Group of the Adelaide Rift Complex. The strength of the resemblance suggests original lateral continuity of sedimentation between King Island and the Adelaide Rift Complex together with the contiguous central Australian Neoproterozoic epicratonic basins.

C. R. Calver; M. R. Walter

2000-01-01

341

Environmental impact of coal ash on tributary streams and nearshore water or Lake Erie. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The environmental impact of coal ash disposal at a landfill site in north-central Chautauqua County, New York was studied from June 1975 through July 1977. Water samples taken from wells, ponds, and streams at 67 sites were analyzed for specific conductance, pH, alkalinity, arsenic, calcium, cadmium, chloride, chromium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, selenium, sodium, sulfate and zinc. Evidence suggests

Wood

1978-01-01

342

Use of the Beaufort Sea by king eiders breeding on the North Slope of Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We estimated areas used by king eiders (Somateria spectabilis) in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea, how distributions of used areas varied, and characteristics that explained variation in the number of days spent at sea, to provide regulatory agencies with baseline data needed to minimize impacts of potential offshore oil development. We implanted sixty king eiders with satellite transmitters at nesting areas on the North Slope of Alaska, USA, in 2002-2004. More than 80% of marked eiders spent >2 weeks staging offshore prior to beginning a postbreeding molt migration. During postbreeding staging and migration, male king eiders had much broader distributions in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea than female eiders, which were concentrated in Harrison and Smith Bays. Distribution did not vary by sex during spring migration in the year after marking. Shorter residence times of eiders and deeper water at locations used during spring migration suggest the Alaskan Beaufort Sea might not be as critical a staging area for king eiders during prebreeding as it is postbreeding. Residence time in the Beaufort Sea varied by sex, with female king eiders spending more days at sea than males in spring and during postbreeding. We conclude the Alaskan Beaufort Sea is an important staging area for king eiders during postbreeding, and eider distribution should be considered by managers when mitigating for future offshore development. We recommend future studies examine the importance of spring staging areas outside the Alaskan Beaufort Sea.

Phillips, L. M.; Powell, A. N.; Taylor, E. J.; Rexstad, E. A.

2007-01-01

343

Seeing double, thinking twice: the Toronto drag kings and (re-) articulations of masculinity.  

PubMed

Through a close reading of the performances of masculinity by the Toronto drag kings, this chapter argues that drag king shows parody the hyper-masculine star at his most contradictory and dialogic. Given that drag king performances parody both the contradictions of masculinity on stage, and the productive technologies of the star, king performances are essentially both meta-theatrical (performances about performing where lights, music, body language, dance all make the man) and meta-performative (performances which are at once conditioned by the performative reiterations which enable a fiction of identity in the first place). Finally, I explore the rather abstracted question of what cultural work the category of "drag king" does. I argue that it is a term which articulates a series of productive but necessary slippages in and through the contradictory and dialogic practices of identification. The bottom line is this: drag kings are situated in and play with the ironic no man's land between "lesbian," "butch," "transman" and "bio-boy" where the sell evident is neither. PMID:12769283

Noble, Jean Bobby

2002-01-01

344

A preliminary appraisal of sediment sources and transport in Kings Bay and vicinity, Georgia and Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-quality, bottom-material, suspended-sediment, and current-velocity data were collected during November 1981 in Kings Bay and vicinity to provide information on the sources and transport of estuarine sediments. Kings Bay and Cumberland Sound , the site of the Poseidon Submarine Base in southeast Georgia, are experiencing high rates of sediment deposition and accumulation, which are causing serious navigational and operational problems. Velocity, bathymetry, turbidity, and bottom-material data suggest that the area in the vicinity of lower Kings Bay is accumulating deposits of suspended sediment transported from Cumberland Sound on the floodtide and from upper Kings Bay and the tidal marsh drained by Marianna Creek on the ebbtide. Suspended-sediment discharges computed for consecutive 13-hour ebbtides and floodtides showed that a net quantity of suspended sediment was transported seaward from upper Kings Bay and Marianna Creek. A net landward transport of suspended sediment computed at the St. Marys Entrance indicated areas seaward of St. Marys Entrance may be supplying sediment to the shoaling areas of the estuary, including lower Kings Bay. (USGS)

McConnell, J. B.; Radtke, D. B.; Hale, T. W.; Buell, G. R.

1983-01-01

345

Seasonal aspects of the biology and diet of nearshore nototheniid fish at Potter Cove, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica  

Microsoft Academic Search

Approximately 1000 specimens belonging to eight fish species were collected at Potter Cove, King George Island, South Shetland Islands, from August 1985 to May 1986. This study deals with the dominant species Notothenia neglecta, Notothenia gibberifrons, Trematomus newnesi and Notothenia rossii marmorata. Age and size structure of the fish were analyzed using scale and otolith readings. Notothenia neglecta was the

R. J. Casaux; A. S. Mazzotta; E. R. Barrera-Oro

1990-01-01

346

Late Pleistocene vegetation of Kings Canyon, Sierra Nevada, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seven packrat midden samples make possible a comparison between the modern and late Pleistocene vegetation in Kings Canyon on the western side of the southern Sierra Nevada. One modern sample contains macrofossils and pollen derived from the present-day oak-chaparral vegetation. Macrofossils from the six late Pleistocene samples record a mixed coniferous forest dominated by the xerophytic conifers Juniperus occidentalis, Pinus cf. ponderosa, and P. monophylla. The pollen spectra of these Pleistocene middens are dominated by Pinus sp., Taxodiaceae-Cupressaceae-Taxaceae (TCT), and Artemisia sp. Mesophytic conifers are represented by low macrofossil concentrations. Sequoiadendron giganteum is represented by a few pollen grains in the full glacial. Edaphic control and snow dispersal are the most likely causes of these mixed assemblages. The dominant macrofossils record a more xeric plant community than those that now occur on similar substrates at higher elevations or latitudes in the Sierra Nevada. These assemblages suggest that late Wisconsin climates were cold with mean annual precipitation not necessarily greater than modern values. This conclusion supports a model of low summer ablation allowing for the persistence of the glaciers at higher elevations during the late Wisconsin. The records in these middens also suggest that S. giganteum grew at lower elevations along the western side of the range and that P. monophylla was more widely distributed in cismontane California during the Pleistocene.

Cole, Kenneth

1983-01-01

347

Radiological survey of Kings Bay Submarine Support Facility  

SciTech Connect

Since 1963, the Eastern Environmental Radiation Facility (EERF), US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), in cooperation with the US Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) has surveyed facilities serving nuclear-powered warships on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts and the Gulf of Mexico. These surveys assess whether the operation of nuclear-powered warships, during construction, maintenance, overhaul, or refueling, have created elevated levels of radioactivity. The surveys emphasize sampling those areas and pathways that could expose the public. In 1984, NAVSEA requested that all active facilities servicing nuclear-powered warships be resurveyed over the next three years. Kings Bay Submarine Support Facility (KBSSF), located adjacent to St. Marys, Georgia and approximately 10 miles east of Kingsland, Georgia, was surveyed by EERF personnel in August 1985. The KBSSF has not been previously surveyed by the EERF or its predecessor (the US Public Health Service) since the area had not been visited by nuclear-powered warships until approximately 1980. 2 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Windham, S.T.

1987-10-01

348

Histopathological investigation of syringomyelia in the Cavalier King Charles spaniel.  

PubMed

Syringomyelia (SM) in Cavalier King Charles spaniels (CKCSs) is identified commonly on magnetic resonance images and is sometimes associated with clinical signs of pain and cervical hyperaesthesia. However, the mechanism by which SM develops in this breed has not been fully elucidated and the associated effects on spinal cord structure have not been reported previously. The aims of this study were to describe changes found in the spinal cord of CKCSs, to compare findings between symptomatic and asymptomatic dogs and to determine whether syrinx formation was associated with tissue destruction. Anomalies of the central canal were found in all specimens and many dogs had grossly visible fluid-filled cavities within the spinal cord. Prominent microscopical findings were spongy degenerative changes associated with neuronal necrosis and Wallerian degeneration. The ependyma was discontinuous in many specimens, notably in symptomatic individuals, and there was evidence of angiogenesis and fibrous tissue proliferation around blood vessels adjacent to syrinx cavities. Compared with two different samples of the normal dog population, dogs with syrinxes had significantly less grey matter, although this decrease was associated with generalized loss of spinal cord area. Therefore, SM is associated with degenerative changes in the spinal cord and may develop through primary disruption of ependymal integrity followed by vascular hypertrophy and proliferation. Glial and fibrous proliferation appears to be associated with expression of clinical signs. PMID:21889166

Hu, H Z; Rusbridge, C; Constantino-Casas, F; Jeffery, N

2012-01-01

349

Nonshivering thermogenesis and adaptation to fasting in king penguin chicks.  

PubMed

The ability to develop nonshivering thermogenesis (NST) and the effect of fasting on thermogenic response to cold were studied in winter-acclimatized king penguin chicks. Metabolic rate (MR) and integrated electrical muscle activity were measured at different ambient temperatures. In cold-acclimatized (5 degrees C) fed chicks, shivering threshold temperature (STT) was 9.4 degrees C lower than lower critical temperature (LCT), indicating that NST (0.7 W/kg) occurs at moderate cold, whereas in control chicks fed and reared at 25 degrees C for 3 wk, LCT and STT were similar. Chicks reared in the cold and fasting for 3 wk or 4-5 mo (natural winter fast) developed an NST of 0.8 and 2.4 W/kg, respectively, despite the fast. In fasting chicks, the intercept of the metabolic curve with the abscissa at zero MR was far below body temperature, contrasting with the classic model for heat loss. Their low LCT indicates the capacity of a large reduction in convective conductance characteristic of diving animals and allows energy sparing in moderate cold. Below LCT, conductance reincreases progressively, leading to a steeper than expected slope of the metabolic curve and allowing preservation of a threshold temperature in the shell. These results show for the first time in a wild young bird the development of NST after cold acclimatization. Further, at the temperature of cold acclimatization, an energy-sparing mechanism is shown in response to long-term fast adaptation. PMID:2801995

Duchamp, C; Barre, H; Delage, D; Rouanet, J L; Cohen-Adad, F; Minaire, Y

1989-10-01

350

Magnetometry at Uruk (Iraq): The city of King Gilgamesh  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Uruk (Tell Warka) is one of the most famous sites for the early cultural development at Mesopotamia. The Sumerian city state was also important for the origin of writing and Uruk was the scene of action of mans oldest epic, the famous Epic of Gilgamesh (2600 B.C). During the time of the Sassanides, 400 A.D. the city was given up completely. Today the ruin is dominated by shallow hills and wadis, covered by pottery, mudbricks and slags. The area is totally free of modern buildings and far away from the modern village of Warka. Therefore it is an ideal place for uncompensated cesium magnetometry. The most sensational find was the discovery of a canal system inside the city. Furthermore the magnetogram shows the remains of buildings of the Babylonian type as well as garden structures, a middle Babylonian graveyard and the so called "New Years Temple" of the God Anu or Godess Ischtar. The city wall, which we prospected in a length of more than one kilometer, includes a water gate and is nearly 40 meters broad. From magnetometry it is evident that it was build by burned mudbricks as it was described by the Epic. In the west of the "New Years Temple" in the middle of the former Euphrates river we detected the remains of a building which may be interpreted as a burial. But if this building is the grave of the famous King Gilgamesh as it was described by the Epic of Gilgamesh it must remain speculative.

Fassbinder, J.; Becker, H.; van Ess, M.

2003-04-01

351

Nearshore Processes, Currents and Directional Wave Spectra Monitoring Using Coherent and Non-coherent Imaging Radars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two new radar systems have been developed for real-time measurement of near-shore processes, and results are presented for measurements of ocean wave spectra, near-shore sand bar structure, and ocean currents. The first is a non-coherent radar based on a modified version of the Sitex radar family, with a data acquisition system designed around an ISR digital receiver card. The card operates in a PC computer with inputs from a Sitex radar modified for extraction of analogue signals for digitization. Using a 9' antenna and 25 kW transmit power system, data were collected during 2007 at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Field Research Facility (FRF), Duck, NC during winter and spring of 2007. The directional wave spectrum measurements made are based on using a sequence of 64 to 640 antenna rotations to form a snapshot series of radar images of propagating waves. A square window is extracted from each image, typically 64 x 64 pixels at 3-m resolution. Then ten sets of 64 windows are submitted to a three-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform process to generate radar image spectra in the frequency-wavenumber space. The relation between the radar image spectral intensity and wave spectral intensity derived from the FRF pressure gauge array was used for a test set of data, in order to establish a modulation transfer function (MTF) for each frequency component. For 640 rotations, 10 of such spectra are averaged for improved statistics. The wave spectrum so generated was compared for extended data sets beyond those used to establish the MTF, and those results are presented here. Some differences between the radar and pressure sensor data that are observed are found to be due to the influence of the wind field, as the radar echo image weakens for light winds. A model is developed to account for such an effect to improve the radar estimate of the directional wave spectrum. The radar ocean wave imagery is severely influenced only by extremely heavy rain-fall rates, so that acceptable quality were assured for most weather conditions on a diurnal basis using a modest tower height. A new coherent microwave radar has recently been developed by ISR and preliminary testing was conducted in the spring of 2007. The radar is based on the Quadrapus four-channel transceiver card, mixed up to microwave frequencies for pulse transmission and back down to base-band for reception. We use frequency-modulated pulse compression methods to obtain 3-m spatial resolution. A standard marine radar pedestal is used to house the microwave components, and rotating radar PPI images similar to marine radar images are obtained. Many of the methods used for the marine radar system have been transferred to the coherent imaging radar. New processing methods applied to the coherent data allow summing of radial velocity images to map mean currents in the near shore zone, such as rip currents. A pair of such radars operating with a few hundred meter separation can be used to map vector currents continuously in the near shore zone and in harbors on a timely basis. Results of preliminary testing of the system will be presented.

Trizna, D.; Hathaway, K.

2007-05-01

352

Infrared measurements of surface renewal and subsurface vortices in nearshore breaking waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When ocean waves reach a surf zone, jets projecting from the breakers splash sequentially, producing horizontal roller vortices beneath the jets and longitudinal counterrotating vortices behind the rollers; these vortices organize into three-dimensional structures that evolve into a turbulent bore with wave propagation. This disrupts any uniform temperature distributions on the surface, creating heterogeneous patterns of surface temperatures. In this study, we extracted surface temperature distributions from infrared measurements in small- and large-scale wave flumes, then used those data to study the renewed surfaces created by subsurface vortices beneath spilling and plunging breakers. In our large-scale experiments, temporal and spatial scales of surface renewal and surface recovery were consistent with earlier work; however, in our small-scale experiments, the spatial scales showed significant deviations from earlier in situ observations. These inconsistencies may be attributed to scale effects for subsurface vortices, and we show that the Froude number (Fr) can be used to characterize the initial formation of longitudinal counterrotating vortices. Further, for turbulent flows fully developed by wave breaking in a bore region, the frequency of surface renewal correlates exponentially with Reynolds number (Re). The computed vorticity on the breaking wave surface exhibits local patterns which correlate strongly with the gravity induced counterrotating vortices, which in turn renew the rear-facing surface of the breaking waves. In contrast the turbulent bore which precedes the wave crest rapidly disturbs and renews the surface in front of the crest. These two different mechanisms for surface renewal, during the nearshore breaking process, lead to modulations in the surface temperature distribution and changes in thermal diffusivity during the propagation of the breaking wave.

Watanabe, Yasunori; Mori, Nobuhito

2008-07-01

353

Linear Scour Depressions or Bedforms? Using Interferometric Sonar to Investigate Nearshore Sediment Transport  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A series of ambiguous features on the seafloor off the coast of Provincetown, Massachusetts USA has been identified in two bathymetric lidar surveys (2007, 2010) conducted by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Similar features in the area have been described as linear scour depressions by other investigators, but at deeper water depths. These features exhibit some of the characteristics of bedforms, they have migrated tens of meters and maintained similar 3 dimensional morphologies. However, what would be described as the slipface more closely resembles the updrift face of a linear scour depression. The features are in relatively shallow water (9 - 15 m), are 150 - 200 m long, have spacings of 100 - 150 m and are 5-6 m in height. Further investigations are being undertaken to better understand these features and nearshore sediment transport in the area. The features appear along a high energy, accreting coast with both strong wave-driven sediment flux and tidal currents. Mapping of the study area with an interferometric sonar system, which collects coincident swath bathymetry and acoustic backscatter imagery, is ongoing. Interferometric sonar increases bathymetric swath width to depth ratios, in comparison to multibeam systems, and expedites data collection by reducing costs, vessel-time and hazards associated with navigating shallow waters. In addition, sediment grab samples and a series of seismic reflection profiles will also be collected in the area to ground-truth acoustic imagery and provide a subsurface framework for the features, respectively. These datasets will allow investigators to better document bottom conditions, estimate flow velocities needed to create these features and improve our understanding of sediment transport processes and pathways in the area.

Borrelli, M.; Giese, G. S.; Dingman, S. L.; Gontz, A. M.; Adams, M. B.; Norton, A. R.; Brown, T. L.

2011-12-01

354

Seismic-core integration of nearshore-onshore New Jersey early Miocene sequences  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lower Miocene sequences on the New Jersey margin provide excellent examples of prograding seismic clinoform geometry. Drilling both onshore and offshore has sampled updip and downdip locations 10's of km from intervening clinoform rollover points observed in high-resolution MCS profiles. This unsampled interval, where sequences are thickest and best developed, has been imaged using Lamont-Doherty's HiRes MCS seismic system aboard the R/V Cape Hatteras during cruise CH0698, and is the target for a future IODP Mission Specific Platform Expedition. The CH0698 profiles reveal clinoform geometries dominated by deltaic sedimentation that varies along strike. Distribution of seismic sequences is illustrated by 10 isopachs maps and agrees with the wave-dominated deltaic coasts implied by the lithologic character of onshore drillcores. Seismic data indicates variations in accommodation space caused localized sequence cutout and amalgamation such that all seismic sequences do not project to each onshore well. Seismic data further outlines more sequences than were initially detected in onshore wells. Detailed well analysis recently completed by Browning et al (in press) has resulted in close agreement between the nature and number of sequences implied by onshore core lithology and offshore seismic geometry. Using borehole geophysical logs we have tied the onshore wells into older, poorly sampled offshore wells within the nearshore seismic grid. All well data has been converted from depth to travel time and tied to the seismic data. This has led to our predicting the age and facies of features within well-developed lower Miocene clinoforms that we expect will be sampled by a soon-to-be-scheduled IODP expedition.

Monteverde, D. H.; Miller, K. G.; Mountain, G. S.; Browning, J. V.

2005-12-01

355

Exploring the nearshore marine wind profile from field measurements and numerical hindcast  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wind power is the predominant offshore renewable energy resource. In the last years, offshore wind farms have become a technically feasible source of electrical power. The economic feasibility of offshore wind farms depends on the quality of the offshore wind conditions compared to that of onshore sites. Installation and maintenance costs must be balanced with more hours and a higher quality of the available resources. European offshore wind development has revealed that the optimum offshore sites are those in which the distance from the coast is limited with high available resource. Due to the growth in the height of the turbines and the complexity of the coast, with interactions between inland wind/coastal orography and ocean winds, there is a need for field measurements and validation of numerical models to understand the marine wind profile near the coast. Moreover, recent studies have pointed out that the logarithmic law describing the vertical wind profile presents limitations. The aim of this work is to characterize the nearshore vertical wind profile in the medium atmosphere boundary layer. Instrumental observations analyzed in this work come from the Idermar project (www.Idermar.es). Three floating masts deployed at different locations on the Cantabrian coast provide wind measurements from a height of 20 to 90 meters. Wind speed and direction are measured as well as several meteorological variables at different heights of the profile. The shortest wind time series has over one year of data. A 20 year high-resolution atmospheric hindcast, using the WRF-ARW model and focusing on hourly offshore wind fields, is also analyzed. Two datasets have been evaluated: a European reanalysis with a ~15 Km spatial resolution, and a hybrid downscaling of wind fields with a spatial resolution of one nautical mile over the northern coast of Spain.. These numerical hindcasts have been validated based on field measurement data. Several parameterizations of the vertical wind profile are evaluated and, based on this work, a particular parameterization of the wind profile is proposed.

del Jesus, F.; Menendez, M.; Guanche, R.; Losada, I.

2012-12-01

356

Estimation of wave phase speed and nearshore bathymetry from video imagery  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A new remote sensing technique based on video image processing has been developed for the estimation of nearshore bathymetry. The shoreward propagation of waves is measured using pixel intensity time series collected at a cross-shore array of locations using remotely operated video cameras. The incident band is identified, and the cross-spectral matrix is calculated for this band. The cross-shore component of wavenumber is found as the gradient in phase of the first complex empirical orthogonal function of this matrix. Water depth is then inferred from linear wave theory's dispersion relationship. Full bathymetry maps may be measured by collecting data in a large array composed of both cross-shore and longshore lines. Data are collected hourly throughout the day, and a stable, daily estimate of bathymetry is calculated from the median of the hourly estimates. The technique was tested using 30 days of hourly data collected at the SandyDuck experiment in Duck, North Carolina, in October 1997. Errors calculated as the difference between estimated depth and ground truth data show a mean bias of -35 cm (rms error = 91 cm). Expressed as a fraction of the true water depth, the mean percent error was 13% (rms error = 34%). Excluding the region of known wave nonlinearities over the bar crest, the accuracy of the technique improved, and the mean (rms) error was -20 cm (75 cm). Additionally, under low-amplitude swells (wave height H ???1 m), the performance of the technique across the entire profile improved to 6% (29%) of the true water depth with a mean (rms) error of -12 cm (71 cm). Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

Stockdon, H. F.; Holman, R. A.

2000-01-01

357

Influence of beach grain size and bed slope on nearshore hydro- and morpho-dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two major parameters that determine the beach type are sediment grain size and beach slope. Intermediate beaches normally have steep slopes and are associated with coarse-grained sands and narrow surf zones, while dissipative beaches generally have mild slopes and are related to fine sands and wider surf zones. In the numerical experiments, the Delft3D and Xbeach models were combined and used to resolve the 3D Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flow and the beach morphology. The sediment transport module supports both bed-load and suspended load transport of non-cohesive sediments. Numerical simulations were run for different hydrodynamic conditions, but with a focus on different beach slopes and grain sizes, and considering hydrodynamic processes, sediment transport in cross- and alongshore directions, as well as foreshore bathymetry changes. Coarsening of the grain size tends to generate a more complex nearshore hydrodynamic pattern. The transformation of incoming waves as they reach shallow water occurs closer the shoreline for steeper profiles. Consistently, the peaks in eddy viscosity, turbulence dissipation rate (TDR), turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and wave set-up are shifted onshore for steeper slopes. High values of eddy viscosity, TKE and wave set-up are spread offshore for coarser grain sizes. The TDR is an order of magnitude smaller for the coarsest grains compared with other cases. The numerical results showed that TKE, sediment concentrations and sediment transport rate are greater on steep beach than on mild slope beaches. The beach morphology exhibits different erosive characteristics depending on grain size (e.g., foreshore profile evolutions are erosive and accretionary on the fine and coarse sand beaches; respectively). The results confirmed that wave energy, beach grain size and bed slope are the main factors influencing sediment transport and beach morphodynamics.

Bakhtyar, R.; Dastgheib, A.; Barry, D. A.; Roelvink, J.

2012-12-01

358

Comparing quality of estuarine and nearshore intertidal habitats for Carcinus maenas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Estuarine and nearshore marine areas are vital habitats for several fish and benthic invertebrates. The shore crab Carcinus maenas (Crustacea: Brachyura: Portunidae) inhabits a variety of coastal, estuarine and lagoon habitats. At low tide, habitat structural complexity may be most important for crabs in the intertidal, providing refuge from predation and desiccation. The quality of different vegetated and nonvegetated estuarine and rocky shore habitats in SW Portugal and SW England was evaluated for intertidal C. maenas populations. We estimated population density, size-structure, and potential growth (RNA/DNA ratios) to investigate habitat quality. Vegetated estuarine habitats supported higher crab densities, than nonvegetated estuarine and rocky shore habitats. Investigation of population size-structure revealed that all habitats seem important recruitment and nursery areas although estuarine habitats in SW Portugal appeared to support higher densities of new recruits than equivalent habitats in SW England. Significant variation was found in RNA/DNA ratios among habitats. Ratios were highest in the rocky shore suggesting a high quality habitat where growth potential is high. We speculate that competition from other top-predators ( Pachygrapsus spp.) rather than low habitat quality may limit the occurrence of C. maenas in intertidal rocky shore habitats in SW Portugal. In estuarine environments RNA/DNA ratios were significantly higher in the vegetated than in the nonvegetated estuarine habitats in SW Portugal but not in SW England, suggesting geographic differences in the extent to which highly structure habitats represent high quality. Our results challenge the current paradigm that structured habitats are necessarily those of higher quality for C. maenas.

Amaral, Valter; Cabral, Henrique N.; Jenkins, Stuart; Hawkins, Stephen; Paula, José

2009-06-01

359

Assessment and prediction of the nearshore wave propagation in the case of mv prestige accident  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Integrated into the process of implementing the SWAN spectral model on the Portuguese coast of the Atlantic Ocean, was devised an interface with capacities both for pre and post processing. This tool, developed using the Matlab environment, allows either a rapid implementation of the model in a specific area, as well as, a better evaluation of its output. The Prestige breakdown in November 2002, close to the NW Spanish coast, was an unhappy opportunity to test the viability and effectiveness of such a system based on numerical wave models able to provide the nearshore wave forecast, as well as, the utility of the computational environment developed. In this case SWAN was implemented using the spherical coordinates first in a coarse area covering the entire coastal environment in the NW of the Iberian Peninsula. Inside this domain, were nested two high-resolution areas, concerning respectively the western coast (between Figueira da Foz and Santiago de Compostela) and the NW side (located in the vicinity of A Coruña). For the coarse area the SWAN model was nested in WW3, being used also the NOGAPS wind field as a forcing factor. In the high-resolution simulations, when the boundary conditions were generated by the previous SWAN runs, for the wind forcing was given as input the high resolution Aladdin data field (provided by the Portuguese Institute of Meteorology). It was also given as input the current data field as a result of simulations with the HOPS model. The SWAN simulations were performed in the non-stationary mode and some results will be made available on the Internet in the web page of Instituto Hidrografico http://www.ih.marinha.pt/hidrografico/ (related to the project MOCASSIM). Finally was made also a systematic comparison with the measurements coming from two buoys (Silleiro and Leixões both located on the western coast of the Iberian Peninsula) that gave in general a good agreement.

Rusu, E.; Silva, R.; Pinto, J.; Rusu, L.; Soares, C.; Vitorino, J.

2003-04-01

360

Aspects of Benthic Decapod Diversity and Distribution from Rocky Nearshore Habitat at Geographically Widely Dispersed Sites  

PubMed Central

Relationships of diversity, distribution and abundance of benthic decapods in intertidal and shallow subtidal waters to 10 m depth are explored based on data obtained using a standardized protocol of globally-distributed samples. Results indicate that decapod species richness overall is low within the nearshore, typically ranging from one to six taxa per site (mean?=?4.5). Regionally the Gulf of Alaska decapod crustacean community structure was distinguishable by depth, multivariate analysis indicating increasing change with depth, where assemblages of the high and mid tide, low tide and 1 m, and 5 and 10 m strata formed three distinct groups. Univariate analysis showed species richness increasing from the high intertidal zone to 1 m subtidally, with distinct depth preferences among the 23 species. A similar depth trend but with peak richness at 5 m was observed when all global data were combined. Analysis of latitudinal trends, confined by data limitations, was equivocal on a global scale. While significant latitudinal differences existed in community structure among ecoregions, a semi-linear trend in changing community structure from the Arctic to lower latitudes did not hold when including tropical results. Among boreal regions the Canadian Atlantic was relatively species poor compared to the Gulf of Alaska, whereas the Caribbean and Sea of Japan appeared to be species hot spots. While species poor, samples from the Canadian Atlantic were the most diverse at the higher infraordinal level. Linking 11 environmental variables available for all sites to the best fit family-based biotic pattern showed a significant relationship, with the single best explanatory variable being the level of organic pollution and the best combination overall being organic pollution and primary productivity. While data limitations restrict conclusions in a global context, results are seen as a first-cut contribution useful in generating discussion and more in-depth work in the still poorly understood field of biodiversity distribution.

Pohle, Gerhard; Iken, Katrin; Clarke, K. Robert; Trott, Thomas; Konar, Brenda; Cruz-Motta, Juan Jose; Wong, Melisa; Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro; Mead, Angela; Miloslavich, Patricia; Mieszkowska, Nova; Milne, Rebecca; Tamburello, Laura; Knowlton, Ann; Kimani, Edward; Shirayama, Yoshihisa

2011-01-01

361

Nearshore Fish Distributions in an Alaskan Estuary in Relation to Stratification, Temperature and Salinity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fish were sampled with beach seines and small-meshed beam trawls in nearshore (<1 km) and shallow (<25 m) habitats on the southern coast of Kachemak Bay, Cook Inlet, Alaska, from June to August, 1996-1998. Fish distributions among habitats were analysed for species composition, catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) and frequency of occurrence. Two oceanographically distinct areas of Kachemak Bay were sampled and compared: the Outer Bay and the Inner Bay. Outer Kachemak Bay is exposed and receives oceanic, upwelled water from the Gulf of Alaska, whereas the Inner Bay is more estuarine. Thermohaline properties of bottom water in the Outer and Inner Bay were essentially the same, whereas the Inner Bay water-column was stratified with warmer, less saline waters near the surface. Distribution and abundance of pelagic schooling fish corresponded with area differences in stratification, temperature and salinity. The Inner Bay supported more species and higher densities of schooling and demersal fish than the Outer Bay. Schooling fish communities sampled by beach seine differed between the Outer and Inner Bays. Juvenile and adult Pacific sand lance ( Ammodytes hexapterus), Pacific herring ( Clupea harengus pallasi), osmerids (Osmeridae) and sculpins (Cottidae) were all more abundant in the Inner Bay. Gadids (Gadidae) were the only schooling fish taxa more abundant in the Outer Bay. Thermohaline characteristics of bottom water were similar throughout Kachemak Bay. Correspondingly, bottom fish communities were similar in all areas. Relative abundances (CPUE) were not significantly different between areas for any of the five demersal fish groups: flatfishes (Pleuronectidae), ronquils (Bathymasteridae), sculpins (Cottidae), gadids (Gadidae) and pricklebacks (Stichaeidae).

Abookire, A. A.; Piatt, J. F.; Robards, M. D.

2000-07-01

362

76 FR 12280 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, for Imperial County, Kern County, and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...County, and Ventura County; Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Kern County Air Pollution Control District...

2011-03-07

363

76 FR 12306 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County, Kern County, and Ventura...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...County, and Ventura County; Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Kern County Air Pollution Control District...

2011-03-07

364

Development of two-dimensional models to estimate nearshore bathymetry and sediment transport  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We examine the interactions and feedbacks between bathymetry, waves, currents, and sediment transport. Utilizing remotely-sensed wave refraction patterns of nearshore waves, we estimate bathymetry gradients in the nearshore through the 2D irrotationality of the wave number equation. The model, discussed in Chapter 2, uses an augmented form of the refraction equation that relates gradients in bathymetry to gradients in wavenumber and wave angle through the chain rule. The equations are cast in a form that is independent of wave period, so can be solved using wavenumber and direction data from a single snapshot rather than the normally-required time series of images. Secondly, remotely sensed images of wave breaking over complex bathymetry are used to study the nonlinear feedbacks between two-dimensional (horizontal), 2DH, morphology and cross-shore migration rates of the alongshore averaged bar. We first test a linear model on a subset of 4 years of data at Palm Beach, Australia. The results are discussed in Chapter 3. The model requires eight free parameters, solved for using linear regression of the data to model the relationship between alongshore averaged bar position, x, alongshore sinuosity of the bar, a, and wave forcing, F = H2o. The linear model suggests that 2DH bathymetry is linked to cross-shore bar migration rates. Nevertheless, the primary limitation is that variations in bar position and variability are required to be temporally uncorrelated with forcing in order to achieve meaningful results. In Chapter 4 a nonlinear model is subsequently developed and tested on the same data set. Initial equations for cross-shore sediment transport are formulated from commonly accepted theory using energetics-type equations. Cross-shore transport is based on the deviations around an equilibrium amount of roller contribution with the nonlinearity of the model forcing sediment transport to zero in the absence of wave breaking. The extension to 2DH is based on parameterizations of bar variability and the associated 2DH circulation. The model has five free parameters used to describe the relation between alongshore averaged bar position, x, 2DH bar variability, a, and wave characteristics (wave height, H, wave period, T, and wave angle, theta. The model is able to span multiple storms, accurately predicting bar migration for both onshore and offshore events. The longest individual data set tested is approximately 6 months. Using manually determined values for the coefficients, bar position is predicted with an R2 value of 0.42 over this time period. The effect of including a 2D dependency both increased rates of onshore migration and prevented highly 2D systems from migrating offshore under moderate wave heights. The model is also compared against a 1DH version by setting the 2D dependency term to unity and using the same values for the five free parameters. The last project (Chapter 5) explored the utilization of changes in bathymetry, Delta h/Deltat, to gain further understanding of the feedbacks between 2D sediment transport patterns, Qx and Qy, with respect to existing bathymetry in the nearshore. The model is based on the 2D continuity equation that relates changes in bathymetry to gradients in the cross-shore, ?Q x/?x, and the alongshore, ?Qy/?y, directions. The problem is under-determined, having two unknowns (Qy and Qx) and only one known (Deltah/Deltat) such that a series of constraints must be applied in order to solve for transport. We assume that that the cross-shore integral of Qx is closed, such that no sand enters or exits the system in this direction. By conservation of mass, this requires changes in volume of the cross-shore transect to be due to longshore gradients in Qy. We test six rules for distributing Qy: three rules describing the initial longshore transport ( Qry ) and three describing the cross-shore distribution of the excess volume component ( Qey ). Initial results suggest that requiring sediment to travel down slope ( Qrh=fBy ) is an intuitive choice for describing transport of distinct p

Splinter, Kristen D. M.

365

The effect of surficial disturbance on exchange between groundwater and surface water in near-shore margins  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Low-permeability sediments situated at or near the sediment-water interface can influence seepage in nearshore margins, particularly where wave energy or currents are minimal. Seepage meters were used to quantify flow across the sediment-water interface at two lakes where flow was from surface water to groundwater. Disturbance of the sediment bed substantially increased seepage through the sandy sediments of both lakes. Seepage increased by factors of 2.6 to 7.7 following bed disturbance at seven of eight measurement locations at Mirror Lake, New Hampshire, where the sediment representing the greatest restriction to flow was situated at the sediment-water interface. Although the veneer of low-permeability sediment was very thin and easily disturbed, accumulation on the bed surface was aided by a physical setting that minimized wind-generated waves and current. At Lake Belle Taine, Minnesota, where pre-disturbance downward seepage was smaller than at Mirror Lake, but hydraulic gradients were very large, disturbance of a 20 to 30 cm thick medium sand layer resulted in increases in seepage of 2 to 3 orders of magnitude. Exceptionally large seepage rates, some exceeding 25,000 cm/d, were recorded following bed disturbance. Since it is common practice to walk on the bed while installing or making seepage measurements, disruption of natural seepage rates may be a common occurrence in nearshore seepage studies. Disturbance of the bed should be avoided or minimized when utilizing seepage meters in shallow, nearshore settings, particularly where waves or currents are infrequent or minimal.

Rosenberry, Donald O.; Toran, Laura; Nyquist, Jonathan E.

2010-01-01

366

Review article: Plagiarism, preaching and prophecy: The legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. and the persistence of racism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clayborne Carson, et al. (eds), THE PAPERS OF MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.: VOLUME TWO: REDISCOVERING PRECIOUS VALUES, JULY 1951?NOVEMBER 1955, Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1995, xxv + 645pp., $35.00.Richard Lischer, THE PREACHER KING: MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. AND THE WORD THAT MOVED AMERICA, New York: Oxford University Press, 1995, xiv + 344pp., £16.95.Robert C. Smith, RACISM IN THE

Peter Ling

1996-01-01

367

Analysis of the impacts of Wave Energy Converter arrays on the nearshore wave climate in the Pacific Northwest  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As concerns over the use of fossil fuels increase, more and more effort is being put into the search for renewable and reliable sources of energy. Developments in ocean technologies have made the extraction of wave energy a promising alternative. Commercial exploitation of wave energy would require the deployment of arrays of Wave Energy Converters (WECs) that include several to hundreds of individual devices. Interactions between WECs and ocean waves result in both near-field and far-field changes in the incident wave field, including a significant decrease in wave height and a redirection of waves in the lee of the array, referred to as the wave shadow. Nearshore wave height and direction are directly related to the wave radiation stresses that drive longshore currents, rip currents and nearshore sediment transport, which suggests that significant far-field changes in the wave field due to WEC arrays could have an impact on littoral processes. The goal of this study is to investigate the changes in nearshore wave conditions and radiation stress forcing as a result of an offshore array of point-absorber type WECs using a nested SWAN model, and to determine how array size, configuration, spacing and distance from shore influence these changes. The two sites of interest are the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC) test sites off the coast of Newport Oregon, the North Energy Test Site (NETS) and the South Energy Test Site (SETS). NETS and SETS are permitted wave energy test sites located approximately 4 km and 10 km offshore, respectively. Twenty array configurations are simulated, including 5, 10, 25, 50 and 100 devices in two and three staggered rows in both closely spaced (three times the WEC diameter) and widely spaced (ten times the WEC diameter) arrays. Daily offshore wave spectra are obtained from a regional WAVEWATCH III hindcast for 2011, which are then propagated across the continental shelf using SWAN. Arrays are represented in SWAN through the external modification of the wave spectra at the device locations, based on a new experimentally determined Power Transfer Function established in an earlier WEC-array laboratory study. Changes in nearshore forcing conditions for each array size and configuration are compared in order to determine the scale of the far-field effects of WEC arrays and which array sizes and configurations could have the most significant impacts on coastal processes.

O'Dea, A.; Haller, M. C.

2013-12-01

368

Residency Training: The King-Devick test and sleep deprivation  

PubMed Central

Objective: The current study investigates the effect of sleep deprivation on the speed and accuracy of eye movements as measured by the King-Devick (K-D) test, a <1-minute test that involves rapid number naming. Methods: In this cohort study, neurology residents and staff from the University of Pennsylvania Health System underwent baseline followed by postcall K-D testing (n = 25); those not taking call (n = 10) also completed baseline and follow-up K-D testing. Differences in the times and errors between baseline and follow-up K-D scores were compared between the 2 groups. Results: Residents taking call had less improvement from baseline K-D times when compared to participants not taking call (p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon rank sum test). For both groups, the change in K-D time from baseline was correlated to amount of sleep obtained (rs = ?0.50, p = 0.002) and subjective evaluation of level of alertness (rs = 0.33, p = 0.05) but had no correlation to time since last caffeine consumption (rs = ?0.13, p = 0.52). For those residents on their actual call night, the duration of sleep obtained did not correlate with change in K-D scores from baseline (rs = 0.13, p = 0.54). Conclusions: The K-D test is sensitive to the effects of sleep deprivation on cognitive functioning, including rapid eye movements, concentration, and language function. As with other measures of sleep deprivation, K-D performance demonstrated significant interindividual variability in vulnerability to sleep deprivation. Severe fatigue appears to reduce the degree of improvement typically observed in K-D testing.

Davies, Emma C.; Henderson, Sam; Galetta, Steven L.

2012-01-01

369

Neovascular Glaucoma at King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital - Etiologic Considerations  

PubMed Central

Background: Neovascular glaucoma (NVG) is a severe form of secondary glaucoma caused by the growth of new vessels over the trabecular meshwork. The principal causes are associated with retinal ischemia. Ablative treatment of the retina can prevent, halt, and even reverse the growth of new vessels on the iris and angle. It is an essential part of the management in most cases. Aims: To determine the causes of NVG among Saudi patients, presented at the King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital. Methods: A retrospective review of 337 Saudi patients with NVG was obtained. All cases were reviewed for the evidence and causes of the disease, and their basic demographic information. A subset of 100 diabetic patients with PDR was further studied in greater detail for clinical findings and treatment history. Results: The most common primary etiologic associations for NVG included diabetic retinopathy (DR) (56.06%), retinal venous obstruction (26.40%), and chronic retinal detachment (03.56%). A history of diabetes mellitus was reported in 65.04%, systemic arterial hypertension was noted in 61.00%, and evidence of renal impairment was documented in 22.00%. Vision was markedly reduced in most eyes with NVG (median: hand motion). The median best visual acuity in the fellow eye was 20/160. Among the 100 cases, with DR as a cause of NVG, 43 patients had bilateral neovascularization of the iris (NVI) and 72 had bilateral PDR. Sixty-one patients had no previous laser treatment before the diagnosis of NVG. Among these, who received treatment, the median number of total laser spots was 1,003. Conclusions: Diabetes is a major cause of NVG presented to this tertiary eye care center in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia followed by retinal venous obstruction. Close monitoring and full pan-retinal photocoagulation (PRP) were absent in most of the diabetic cases. It is important to recognize that the “unaffected” fellow eye, particularly in diabetic patients, may require fairly urgent treatment as well.

Al-Shamsi, Hanan N.; Dueker, David K.; Nowilaty, Sawsan R.; Al-Shahwan, Sami A.

2009-01-01

370

40 CFR 81.133 - Amarillo-Lubbock Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...County, Floyd County, Garza County, Gray County, Hale County, Hall County, Hansford County, Hartley County, Hemphill County, Hockley County, Hutchinson County, King County, Lamb County, Lipscomb County, Lubbock County, Lynn...

2010-07-01

371

40 CFR 81.133 - Amarillo-Lubbock Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...County, Floyd County, Garza County, Gray County, Hale County, Hall County, Hansford County, Hartley County, Hemphill County, Hockley County, Hutchinson County, King County, Lamb County, Lipscomb County, Lubbock County, Lynn...

2009-07-01

372

Investigation of Coastal Hydrogeology Utilizing Geophysical and Geochemical Tools along the Broward County Coast, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geophysical (CHIRP, boomer, and continuous direct-current resistivity) and geochemical tracer studies (continuous and time-series 222Radon) were conducted along the Broward County coast from Port Everglades to Hillsboro Inlet, Florida. Simultaneous seismic, direct-current resistivity, and radon surveys in the coastal waters provided information to characterize the geologic framework and identify potential groundwater-discharge sites. Time-series radon at the Nova Southeastern University National Coral Reef Institute (NSU/NCRI) seawall indicated a very strong tidally modulated discharge of ground water with 222Rn activities ranging from 4 to 10 disintegrations per minute per liter depending on tidal stage. CHIRP seismic data provided very detailed bottom profiles (i.e., bathymetry); however, acoustic penetration was poor and resulted in no observed subsurface geologic structure. Boomer data, on the other hand, showed features that are indicative of karst, antecedent topography (buried reefs), and sand-filled troughs. Continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) data showed slight variability in the subsurface along the coast. Subtle changes in subsurface resistivity between nearshore (higher values) and offshore (lower values) profiles may indicate either a freshening of subsurface water nearshore or a change in sediment porosity or lithology. Further lithologic and hydrologic controls from sediment or rock cores or well data are needed to constrain the variability in CRP data.

Reich, Christopher D.; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Greenwood, W. Jason; Wiese, Dana S.

2008-01-01

373

Coupling of fog and marine microbial content in the near-shore coastal environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microbes in the atmosphere (microbial aerosols) play an important role in climate and provide an ecological and biogeochemical connection between oceanic, atmospheric, and terrestrial environments. However, the sources and environmental factors controlling the concentration, diversity, transport, and viability of microbial aerosols are poorly understood. This study examined culturable microbial aerosols from a coastal environment in Maine (USA) and determined the effect of onshore wind speed and fog presence on deposition rate, source, and community composition. During fog events with low onshore winds (< 2 m s-1) the near-shore deposition of microbial aerosols (microbial fallout) decreased with increasing wind speeds, whereas microbial fallout rates under clear conditions and comparable low wind speeds showed no wind speed dependence. Mean aerosol particle size also increased with onshore wind speed when fog was present, indicating increased shoreward transport of larger aerosol particles. 16S rRNA sequencing of culturable ocean surface bacteria and microbial aerosols deposited onshore resulted in the detection of 31 bacterial genera, with 5 dominant genera (Vibrio, Bacillus, Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter, Salinibacterium) making up 66% of all sequences. The microbial aerosol sequence library, as with libraries found in other coastal/marine aerosol studies, was dominated at the phylum level by Proteobacteria, with additional representation from Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Seventy-five percent of the viable microbial aerosols falling out under foggy conditions were most similar to GenBank-published sequences detected in marine environments. Using a 97% similarity cut-off, ocean surface and fog sequence libraries shared eight operational taxonomic units (OTU's) in total, three of which were the most dominant OTU's in the library, representing large fractions of the ocean (28%) and fog (21%) libraries. The fog and ocean surface libraries were significantly more similar in microbial community composition than clear (non-foggy) and ocean surface libraries, according to both Jaccard and Sorenson indices. These findings provide the first evidence of a difference in community composition and microbial viability (culturability) of aerosols associated with fog compared to clear conditions. The data support a dual role for fog in enhancing the fallout of viable (culturable) microbial aerosols via increased gravitational settling rates and decreased aerosolization stress on the organisms, which may include relief from UV inactivation, desiccation, and oligotrophic microconditions. This study provides a strong case for ocean to terrestrial transport of microbes and a potential connection between water quality and air quality at coastal sites.

Dueker, M. E.; O'Mullan, G. D.; Weathers, K. C.; Juhl, A. R.; Uriarte, M.

2011-09-01

374

Coupling of fog and marine microbial content in the near-shore coastal environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microbes in the atmosphere (microbial aerosols) play an important role in climate and provide an ecological and biogeochemical connection between oceanic, atmospheric, and terrestrial environments. However, the sources and environmental factors controlling the concentration, diversity, transport, and viability of microbial aerosols are poorly understood. This study examined culturable microbial aerosols from a coastal environment in Maine (USA) and determined the effect of onshore wind speed and fog presence on deposition rate, source, and community composition. During fog events with low onshore winds (<2 m s-1) the near-shore deposition of microbial aerosols (microbial fallout) decreased with increasing wind speeds, whereas microbial fallout rates under clear conditions and comparable low wind speeds showed no wind speed dependence. Mean aerosol particle size also increased with onshore wind speed when fog was present, indicating increased shoreward transport of larger aerosol particles. 16S rRNA sequencing of culturable ocean surface bacteria and microbial aerosols deposited onshore resulted in the detection of 31 bacterial genera, with 5 dominant genera (Vibrio, Bacillus, Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter, Salinibacterium) making up 66 % of all sequences. The sequence library from microbial aerosol isolates, as with libraries found in other coastal/marine aerosol studies, was dominated at the phylum level by Proteobacteria, with additional representation from Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Seventy-five percent of the culturable microbial aerosols falling out under foggy conditions were most similar to GenBank-published sequences detected in marine environments. Using a 97 % similarity cut-off, sequence libraries from ocean surface and fog isolates shared eight operational taxonomic units (OTU's) in total, three of which were the most dominant OTU's in the library, representing large fractions of the ocean (28 %) and fog (21 %) libraries. The fog and ocean surface libraries were significantly more similar in microbial community composition than clear (non-foggy) and ocean surface libraries, according to both Jaccard and Sorenson indices. These findings provide the first evidence of a difference in community composition and microbial culturability of aerosols associated with fog compared to clear conditions. The data support a dual role for fog in enhancing the fallout of viable microbial aerosols via increased gravitational settling rates and decreased aerosolization stress on the organisms, which may include relief from UV inactivation, desiccation, and oligotrophic microconditions. This study provides a strong case for ocean to terrestrial transport of microbes and a potential connection between water quality and air quality at coastal sites.

Dueker, M. E.; O'Mullan, G. D.; Weathers, K. C.; Juhl, A. R.; Uriarte, M.

2012-02-01

375

Evidence for wing molt and breeding site fidelity in King Eiders  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fidelity of King Eiders (Somateria spectabilis) to breeding and wing molt sites was examined using satellite telemetry data obtained opportunistically when battery life of transmitters provided locations in a second year. Consecutive breeding locations were obtained for eleven female and 23 male King Eiders. All females exhibited breeding site fidelity by returning to sites within 15 km of first year breeding areas on the North Slope of Alaska. Breeding locations of males in a subsequent year were located on average >1000 km from their prior breeding sites and were primarily outside Alaska, on the coasts of Russia and Canada. Second-year wing molt locations were obtained for two female and six male King Eiders. Wing molt sites of males were located 6.2 ?? 3.1 km apart on average in successive years, while female wing molt locations averaged almost 50 km apart. Our results demonstrate site fidelity of female King Eiders to a breeding area on the North Slope of Alaska, document the dispersal of male King Eiders between breeding seasons, and present the first evidence for wing molt site fidelity in males.

Phillips, L. M.; Powell, A. N.

2006-01-01

376

Lenke and King classification systems for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: interobserver agreement and postoperative results  

PubMed Central

Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the interobserver agreement of the Lenke and King classifications for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, and to compare the results of surgery performed based on classification of the scoliosis according to each of these classification systems. Methods The study was conducted in Shohada Hospital in Tabriz, Iran, between 2009 and 2010. First, a reliability assessment was undertaken to assess interobserver agreement of the Lenke and King classifications for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Second, postoperative efficacy and safety of surgery performed based on the Lenke and King classifications were compared. Kappa coefficients of agreement were calculated to assess the agreement. Outcomes were compared using bivariate tests and repeated measures analysis of variance. Results A low to moderate interobserver agreement was observed for the King classification; the Lenke classification yielded mostly high agreement coefficients. The outcome of surgery was not found to be substantially different between the two systems. Conclusion Based on the results, the Lenke classification method seems advantageous. This takes into consideration the Lenke classification’s priority in providing details of curvatures in different anatomical surfaces to explain precise intensity of scoliosis, that it has higher interobserver agreement scores, and also that it leads to noninferior postoperative results compared with the King classification method.

Hosseinpour-Feizi, Hojjat; Soleimanpour, Jafar; Sales, Jafar Ganjpour; Arzroumchilar, Ali

2011-01-01

377

International importance of the eastern Chukchi Sea as a staging area for migrating king eiders  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The evaluation of habitats used by arctic birds on migration is crucial for their conservation. We explored the importance of the eastern Chukchi Sea (ECS) as a staging area for king eiders (Somateria spectabilis) migrating between breeding areas in Siberia and western North America and wintering areas in the Bering Sea. We tracked 190 king eiders with satellite transmitters between 1997 and 2007. In late summer, 74% of satellite-tracked king eiders migrating south staged in the ECS for 13 ?? 13 (SD) days between late June and early November. During spring migration, king eiders staged in the ECS between mid-April and early June for 21 ?? 10 days. All instrumented birds migrating to breeding grounds in western North America (n = 62), and 6 of 11 males migrating to breeding grounds in Siberia, used this area for at least 1 week during spring migration. The importance of this staging area renders it possible that industrial development could adversely affect king eider populations in both Siberia and North America. ?? 2009 US Government.

Oppel, S.; Dickson, D. L.; Powell, A. N.

2009-01-01

378

Insights into High-Resolution Physico-Biogeochemical Processes in Nearshore Environments of Lake Erie Using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The goal of this project is to gain a better understanding of the physico-chemical-biological dynamics in nearshore areas of Lake Erie as a function of environmental and climate change. Nearshore processes in the Great Lakes are complex and drive many efforts in remediating areas of concern (AoCs). Long term studies of the processes and the dynamics of these environments are necessary to determine the success of management strategies and the application of policies. A network of monitoring buoys can provide an insight into long term temporal changes in the system, however, the spatial resolution is rather coarse. As part of a nearshore buoy observations study on the long-term impacts of climate and environmental change on Lake Erie the deployment of an automated underwater vehicle (AUV) compliments and augments the data obtained by the buoys by providing direct high spatial resolution observations. The high resolution data will be used to improve parameter estimates of water circulation and water quality parameters for models (FVCOM) that often cannot accurately predict nearshore surface and subsurface dynamics. An AUV equipped with water quality instrumentation as well as an acoustic doppler current profiler and side scan sonar was deployed in a gridded pattern at multiple locations along the shoreline of Lake Erie throughout the summer of 2012. The data presented here describe and capture at, high spatial resolution, the nearshore-offshore characteristics and inter-relationships of lake bottom morphology, water quality and current patterns and provide an insight into the complex processes and dynamics of these regions. These data will provide a better understanding of nearshore lake processes that can be used to improve current model parameters and inform both science at large and management strategies.

Roehm, C. L.; Vermette, S.; Perrelli, M.; Bauer, K.; Jerla, B.

2012-12-01

379

Geohydrology and ground-water quality on Shelter Island, Suffolk County, New York, 1983-84  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Shelter Island, with an area of about 11 sq mi, lies between the north and south forks of eastern Long Island in Suffolk County. The thin upper glacial (water table) aquifer contains the lens-shaped freshwater body that is the sole source of freshwater for the Town 's population of about 2,200 year-round and 10,000 summer residents. Chloride concentrations in groundwater above the freshwater/saltwater interface, defined as 40 mg/L Cl-, are relatively constant with depth. Below the interface, however, chloride concentrations increase rapidly--as much as an order of magnitude within 10 ft--until they reach 19 ,000 mg/L, the chloride concentration of seawater. Chloride concentrations in shallow groundwater from wells screened in or near the zone of diffusion may range over two orders of magnitude in response to variations in recharge and groundwater withdrawal. After the summer season of relatively low recharge and peak water demand, the thickness of the freshwater lens is < 20 ft in many nearshore areas. A map showing the configuration of the water table in December 1983 indicates freshwater mounds in the center of the island, in the Mashomack Preserve, on the Dering Harbor-Hay Beach peninsula, and in the area between Shelter Island Heights and West Neck Bay. Areas in which the supply of fresh groundwater is severely limited include all coastal areas, the southernmost part of the West Neck peninsula, and Little Ram Island. Water levels in most locations are < 6 ft above sea level. During 1974-83, seasonal water table fluctuations were greater than variations that occurred from year to year. Groundwater quality on Shelter Island is generally good and usually meets Federal and State drinking water standards. However, many wells contain water that has excessive concentrations of dissolved iron and manganese (up to 5.0 mg/L and 3.0 mg/L, respectively), and elevated chloride and dissolved solids concentrations (up to 310 mg/L and 585 mg/L, respectively) have been found in some nearshore wells. Increased withdrawal of fresh groundwater in nearshore areas will cause further landward movement of saline groundwater; in other areas, excessive pumping may cause upconing. A system of widely spaced pumping wells that avoid nearshore areas would minimize these effects. (Lantz-PTT)

Simmons, D. L.

1986-01-01

380

Facies evolution of nearshore marine clastic deposits during the Tortonian transgression—Granada Basin, Betic Cordilleras, Spain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 35-meter-thick succession of nearshore coastal deposits near Alhama de Granada represents the first evidence of the Tortonian transgression on the Betic orogenic basement in the southeastern part of the Granada Basin. The transgressive sequence is represented by the following facies units in ascending order: (1) A basal marine facies-unit, deposited on a shelf. (2) An estuarine facies-unit, comprising coarse sand and gravel in which three subfacies can be distinguished: a channel subfacies, a shoal or bar subfacies, and a bioturbated estuarine subfacies. (3) A beach facies-unit in which backshore, foreshore and shoreface subfacies can be distinguished. (4) A sandwaves facies-unit, comprising sand with gravel and bioclastic lenses. (5) A shelf facies-unit consisting of bioclastic calcarenites which overlie all other facies units. The nearshore facies evolution representing a gradual (Tortonian) marine transgression also displays a change from predominantly siliciclastic sedimentation to predominantly bioclastic sedimentation. This change reflects a gradual reduction in tectonic uplift in the source area.

Fernández, J.; Rodríguez-Fernández, J.

1991-04-01

381

Molecular typing of Escherichia coli strains associated with threatened sea ducks and near-shore marine habitats of southwest Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In Alaska, sea ducks winter in coastal habitats at remote, non-industrialized areas, as well as in proximity to human communities and industrial activity. We evaluated prevalence and characteristics of Escherichia coli strains in faecal samples of Steller's eiders (Polysticta stelleri; n = 122) and harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus; n = 21) at an industrialized site and Steller's eiders (n = 48) at a reference site, and compared these strains with those isolated from water samples from near-shore habitats of ducks. The overall prevalence of E. coli was 16% and 67% in Steller's eiders and harlequin ducks, respectively, at the industrialized study site, and 2% in Steller's eiders at the reference site. Based on O and H antigen subtyping and genetic characterization by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus polymerase chain reaction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we found evidence of avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) strains associated with both species and detected E. coli strains carrying virulence genes associated with mammals in harlequin ducks. Steller's eiders that carried APEC had lower serum total protein and albumin concentrations, providing further evidence of pathogenicity. The genetic profile of two E. coli strains from water matched an isolate from a Steller's eider providing evidence of transmission between near-shore habitats and birds.

Schamber, Jason L.

2011-01-01

382

Nearshore thermal gradients of the Colorado River near the Little Colorado River confluence, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Construction and operation of Glen Canyon Dam has dramatically impacted the flow of the Colorado River through Glen, Marble, and Grand Canyons. Extremes in both streamflow and water temperature have been suppressed by controlled releases from the dam. Trapping of sediment in Lake Powell, the reservoir formed by Glen Canyon Dam, has also dramatically reduced the supply of suspended sediment entering the system. These changes have altered the riverine ecosystem and the habitat of native species, including fish such as the endangered humpback chub (Gila cypha). Most native fish are adapted to seasonally warm water, and the continuous relatively cold water released by the dam is one of the factors that is believed to limit humpback chub growth and survival. While average mainstem temperatures in the Colorado River are well documented, there is limited understanding of temperatures in the nearshore environments that fish typically occupy. Four nearshore geomorphic unit types were studied between the confluence of the Colorado and Little Colorado Rivers and Lava Canyon in the summer and fall of 2010, for study periods of 10 to 27 days. Five to seven sites were studied during each interval. Persistent thermal gradients greater than the 0.2 °C accuracy of the instruments were not observed in any of the sampled shoreline environments. Temperature gradients between the shoreline and mainstem on the order of 4 °C, believed to be important to the habitat-seeking behavior of native or nonnative fishes, were not detected.

Ross, Rob; Grams, Paul E.

2013-01-01

383

Availability of water from the alluvial aquifer in part of the Green River Valley, King County, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Muckleshoot Indian Tribe plans (1982) to build a fish hatchery in part of a 1.56-square-mile area in the Green River valley, Washington, and use groundwater to operate it. Groundwater data were collected in the area and used in a U.S. Geological Survey two-dimensional groundwater-flow model calibrated to simulate the groundwater-flow system in the study area. Measured water levels in the alluvial aquifer were simulated to within 1 foot at 7 of 12 observation wells, and within 2 feet at all 12 wells. When pumping from the aquifer was simulated with the model, it was found that all water pumped from wells was derived from induced leakage from the Green River into the alluvium and reduced leakage through the alluvium to the Green River. Pumping from the alluvium may also reduce the flow of a tributary to the Green River. (USGS)

Lum, W. E., II; Alvord, R. C.; Drost, B. W.

1984-01-01

384

75 FR 53735 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on East Lake Sammamish Master Plan Trail in King County, WA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...starting at Gilman Boulevard in Issaquah, Washington and ending at Bear Creek Trail in Redmond, Washington. Those actions grant licenses...side of Lake Sammamish from Gilman Boulevard in Issaquah, WA to Bear Creek Trail in Redmond, WA. The project will be an...

2010-09-01

385

Geologic Map of Northeastern Seattle (Part of the Seattle North 7.5' x 15' Quadrangle), King County, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This geologic map, approximately coincident with the east half of the Seattle North 7.5 x 15' quadrangle (herein, informally called the 'Seattle NE map'), covers nearly half of the City of Seattle and reaches from Lake Washington across to the Puget Sound shoreline. Land uses are mainly residential, but extensive commercial districts are located in the Northgate neighborhood, adjacent to the University of Washington, and along the corridors of Aurora Avenue North and Lake City Way. Industrial activity is concentrated along the Lake Washington Ship Canal and around Lake Union. One small piece of land outside of the quadrangle boundaries, at the west edge of the Bellevue North quadrangle, is included on this map for geographic continuity. Conversely, a small area in the northeast corner of the Seattle North quadrangle, on the eastside of Lake Washington, is excluded from this map. Within the boundaries of the map area are two large urban lakes, including the most heavily visited park in the State of Washington (Green Lake Park); a stream (Thornton Creek) that still hosts anadromous salmon despite having its headwaters in a golfcourse and a shopping center; parts of three cities, with a combined residential population of about 300,000 people; and the region's premier research institution, the University of Washington. The north boundary of the map is roughly NE 168th Street in the cities of Shoreline and Lake Forest Park, and the south boundary corresponds to Mercer Street in Seattle. The west boundary is 15th Avenue W (and NW), and the east boundary is formed by Lake Washington. Elevations range from sea level to a maximum of 165 m (541 ft), the latter on a broad till-covered knob in the city of Shoreline near the northwest corner of the map. Previous geologic maps of this area include those of Waldron and others (1962), Galster and Laprade (1991), and Yount and others (1993). Seattle lies within the Puget Lowland, an elongate structural and topographic basin between the Cascade Range and Olympic Mountains. The Seattle area has been glaciated repeatedly during the past two million years by coalescing glaciers that advanced southward from British Columbia. The landscape we see today was molded by cyclic glacial scouring and deposition and later modified by landsliding and stream erosion. The last ice sheet reached the central Puget Sound region about 14,500 years ago, as measured by 14C dating, and it had retreated from this area by 13,650 14C yr B.P. (equivalent calendar years are about 17,600 and 16,600 years ago; Porter and Swanson, 1998). Seattle now sits atop a complex and incomplete succession of interleaved glacial and nonglacial deposits that overlie an irregular bedrock surface. These glacial and nonglacial deposits vary laterally in both texture and thickness, and they contain many local unconformities. In addition, they have been deformed by faults and folds, at least as recently as 1,100 years ago, and this deformation further complicates the geologic record. The landforms and near-surface deposits that cover much of the Seattle NE map area record a relatively brief, recent interval of the region's geologic history. The topography is dominated in the north by a broad, fluted, and south-sloping upland plateau, which gives way to a more complex set of elongated hills in the map's southern half. The valleys of Pipers Creek, Green Lake, and Thornton Creek mark the transition between these two topographic areas. Most of the uplands are mantled by a rolling surface of sand (unit Qva) and till (unit Qvt) deposited during the last occupation of the Puget Lowland by a continental ice sheet. Beneath these ice sheet deposits is a complex succession of older sediments that extends far below sea level across most of the map area. These older sediments are now locally exposed where modern erosion and landslides have sliced through the edge of the upland, and where subglacial processes apparently left these older sedimen

Booth, Derek B.; Troost, Kathy Goetz; Shimel, Scott A.

2009-01-01

386

From Neurons to King County Neighborhoods: Partnering to Promote Policies Based on the Science of Early Childhood Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

A diverse community part- nership in the Seattle area developed a policy agenda based on science, organized community support, and committed to monitor policy changes. It found that public health agencies are well po- sitioned to develop a com- mon knowledge base on early childhood development and to initiate community coalitions promoting policies to strengthen environments. It was challenging to

Kathryn Horsley; Sandra J. Ciske

2005-01-01

387

Hydrogeology of the surficial aquifer in the vicinity of a former landfill, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Camden County, Georgia  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Neogene and Quaternary sediments constitute the surficial aquifer beneath the study area; in descending order from youngest to oldest these include-the Quaternary undifferentiated surficial sand and Satilla Formation; the Pliocene(?) Cypresshead Formation; and the middle Miocene Coosawhatchie Formation. Beneath the surficial aquifer, the upper Brunswick aquifer consists of part of the lower Miocene Marks Head Formation. The surficial aquifer is divided into three water-bearing zones on the basis of lithologic and geophysical properties of sediments, hydraulic-head differences between zones, and differences in ground-water chemistry. The shallowest zone-the water-table zone-consists of medium to fine sand and clayey sand and is present from land surface to a depth of about 77 feet. Below the water-table zone, the confined upper water-bearing zone consists of medium to very coarse sand and is present from a depth of about 110 to 132 feet. Beneath the upper water-bearing zone, the confined lower water-bearing zone consists of coarse sand and very fine gravel and is present from a depth of about 195 to 237 feet. Hydraulic separation is suggested by differences in water chemistry between the water-table zone and upper water-bearing zone. The sodium chloride type water in the water-table zone differs from the calcium bicarbonate type water in the upper water-bearing zone. Hydraulic separation also is indicated by hydraulic head differences of more than 6.5 feet between the water-table zone and the upper water-bearing zone. Continuous and synoptic water-level measurements in the water-table zone, from October 1995 to April 1997, indicate the presence of a water-table high beneath and adjacent to the former landfill-the surface of which varies about 5 feet with time because of recharge and discharge. Water-level data from clustered wells also suggest that restriction of vertical ground-water flow begins to occur at an altitude of about 5 to 10 feet below sea level (35 to 40 feet below land surface) in the water-table zone because of the increasing clay content of the Cypresshead Formation.

Leeth, David C.

1999-01-01

388

Modern sedimentation patterns in Potter Cove, King George Island, Antarctica  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

IMCOAST among a number of other initiatives investigates the modern and the late Holocene environmental development of south King George Island with a strong emphasis on Maxwell Bay and its tributary fjord Potter Cove (maximum water depth: about 200 m). In this part of the project we aim at reconstructing the modern sediment distribution in the inner part of Potter Cove using an acoustic ground discrimination system (RoxAnn) and more than136 ground-truth samples. Over the past 20 years the air temperatures in the immediate working area increased by more than 0.6 K (Schloss et al. 2012) which is less than in other parts of the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) but it is still in the range of the recovery of temperatures from the Little Ice Age maximum to the beginning of the 20th century. Potter Cove is a small fjord characterized by a series of moraine ridges produced by a tidewater glacier (Fourcade Glacier). Presumably, the farthest moraine is not much older than about 500 years (LIA maximum), hence the sediment cover is rather thin as evidenced by high resolution seismic data. Since a few years at least the better part of the tidewater glacier retreated onto the island's mainland. It is suggested that such a fundamental change in the fjord's physiography has also changed sedimentation patterns in the area. Potter Cove is characterized by silty-clayey sediments in the deeper inner parts of the cove. Sediments are coarser (fine to coarse sands and boulders) in the shallower areas; they also coarsen from the innermost basin to the mouth of the fjord. Textural structures follow the seabed morphology, i.e. small v-shaped passages through the moraine ridges. The glacier still produces large amounts of turbid melt waters that enter the cove at various places. We presume that very fine-grained sediments fall out from the meltwater plumes and are distributed by mid-depth or even bottom currents, thus suggesting an anti-estuarine circulation pattern. Older sediments that are more distal to the glacier front and sediments in shallower places (e.g. on top of the moraine ridges) become increasingly overprinted by coarser sediments from the shallow areas of the fjord. These areas are prone to wave induced winnowing effects as well as disturbances by ploughing icebergs. It can be concluded that coarsening of the fjord sediments will continue while the supply of fine-grained meltwater sediments might cease due to exhaustion of the reservoirs.

Hass, H. Christian; Kuhn, Gerhard; Wölfl, Anne-Cathrin; Wittenberg, Nina; Betzler, Christian

2013-04-01

389

County Waterford Image Archive  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Using volunteer help and a locally written image management system, the Waterford County Museum in Ireland has created this collection of close to 3,000 historical images that document Waterford County and its parishes from the late 1890s to the present. The Web interface to the collection includes a number of helpful features - for those familiar with Waterford county and its place and family names, there is a search box, but for those less familiar there are several ways to browse the collection, by selecting photographer, location, image format, or subjects from drop down lists, as well as selecting parishes from a map to see the pictures associated with each. A photo of the week is posted on the site, and visitors can sign up to receive an RSS feed or, alternatively, an email message when new images are added. There are also easy ways to submit photographs for inclusion in the archive, and for locals to contribute identifying information.

390

Statistical outliers and dragon-kings as Bose-condensed droplets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A theory of exceptional extreme events, characterized by their abnormal sizes compared with the rest of the distribution, is presented. Such outliers, called "dragon-kings", have been reported in the distribution of financial drawdowns, city-size distributions (e.g., Paris in France and London in the UK), in material failure, epileptic seizure intensities, and other systems. Within our theory, the large outliers are interpreted as droplets of Bose-Einstein condensate: the appearance of outliers is a natural consequence of the occurrence of Bose-Einstein condensation controlled by the relative degree of attraction, or utility, of the largest entities. For large populations, Zipf's law is recovered (except for the dragon-king outliers). The theory thus provides a parsimonious description of the possible coexistence of a power law distribution of event sizes (Zipf's law) and dragon-king outliers.

Yukalov, V. I.; Sornette, D.

2012-05-01

391

King penguin population on Macquarie Island recovers ancient DNA diversity after heavy exploitation in historic times  

PubMed Central

Historically, king penguin populations on Macquarie Island have suffered greatly from human exploitation. Two large colonies on the island were drastically reduced to a single small colony as a result of harvesting for the blubber oil industry. However, recent conservation efforts have resulted in the king penguin population expanding in numbers and range to recolonize previous as well as new sites. Ancient DNA methods were used to estimate past genetic diversity and combined with studies of modern populations, we are now able to compare past levels of variation with extant populations on northern Macquarie Island. The ancient and modern populations are closely related and show a similar level of genetic diversity. These results suggest that the king penguin population has recovered past genetic diversity in just 80 years owing to conservation efforts, despite having seen the brink of extinction.

Heupink, Tim H.; van den Hoff, John; Lambert, David M.

2012-01-01

392

Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the Washington-Oregon Planning Area (Puget Sound Area, Washington). Part 1. Volume 2 of 2. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents socio-economic profiles of the counties in the Puget Sound Area of the Washington-Oregon Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service. The Puget Sound Area includes Whatcom, Skagit, Snohomish, King, Pierce, Thurston, Mason, and Kitsap counties. It presents baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in Washington, Oregon, and California which may be potentially affected by offshore oil and gas development. Each profile includes socio-economic characteristics organized under the following eight headings: demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and other characteristics. The focus of each socio-economic profile is 1980, but the time period 1970 to 2000 is covered, to the extent possible with existing data, to provide a historical context and an understanding of expected trends. Each county's socio-economic profile was prepared using time-series data from secondary sources obtained primarily from federal, state, and local government agencies.

Not Available

1988-12-01

393

Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the Washington-Oregon Planning Area (Puget Sound Area, Washington) Part 1. Volume 1 of 2. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents socio-economic profiles of the counties in the Puget Sound Area of the Washington-Oregon Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service. The Puget Sound Area includes Whatcom, Skagit, Snohomish, King, Pierce, Thurston, Mason, and Kitsap counties. It presents baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in Washington, Oregon, and California which may be potentially affected by offshore oil and gas development. Each profile includes socio-economic characteristics organized under the following eight headings: demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and other characteristics. The focus of each socio-economic profile is 1980, but the time period 1970 to 2000 is covered, to the extent possible with existing data, to provide a historical context and an understanding of expected trends. Each county's socio-economic profile was prepared using time-series data from secondary sources obtained primarily from federal, state, and local government agencies.

Not Available

1988-12-01

394

Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the Washington-Oregon Planning Area (Puget Sound Area, Washington) Part 2. Volume 1 of 2. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents socio-economic profiles of the counties in the Puget Sound Area of the Washington-Oregon Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service. The Puget Sound Area includes Whatcom, Skagit, Snohomish, King, Pierce, Thurston, Mason, and Kitsap counties. It presents baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in Washington, Oregon, and California which may be potentially affected by offshore oil and gas development. Each profile includes socio-economic characteristics organized under the following eight headings: demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and other characteristics. The focus of each socio-economic profile is 1980, but the time period 1970 to 2000 is covered, to the extent possible with existing data, to provide a historical context and an understanding of expected trends. Each county's socio-economic profile was prepared using time-series data from secondary sources obtained primarily from federal, state, and local government agencies.

Not Available

1988-12-01

395

Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the Washington-Oregon Planning Area (Puget Sound Area, Washington). Part 2. Volume 2 of 2. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents socio-economic profiles of the counties in the Puget Sound Area of the Washington-Oregon Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service. The Puget Sound Area includes Whatcom, Skagit, Snohomish, King, Pierce, Thurston, Mason, and Kitsap counties. It presents baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in Washington, Oregon, and California which may be potentially affected by offshore oil and gas development. Each profile includes socio-economic characteristics organized under the following eight headings: demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and other characteristics. The focus of each socio-economic profile is 1980, but the time period 1970 to 2000 is covered, to the extent possible with existing data, to provide a historical context and an understanding of expected trends. Each county's socio-economic profile was prepared using time-series data from secondary sources obtained primarily from federal, state, and local government agencies.

Not Available

1988-12-01

396

Pierce County Hospital Development Guide.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A hospital development guide that was developed for Pierce County, Washington is presented. Planning for communitywide hospital development in Pierce County was initiated in 1971, based on a draft report and passage of State certificate of need legislatio...

1974-01-01

397

Better treatment for breast cancer, Mary-Claire KingSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Interviewee: Mary-Claire King DNAi Location:Applications>Genes and medicine>gene hunting>The finish line Possible treatments Mary-Claire King reflects on how knowledge gained from the identification of BRCA1 and BRCA2 could lead to improved cancer treatments.

2008-03-26

398

"A Creative Psalm of Brotherhood": The (De)Constructive Play in Martin Luther King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scholars have celebrated the spoken word in King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail," but they have overlooked the significance of the Letter's writing. In this essay I closely read King's act of writing the Letter, along with the figures of speech he employs in it, and I show how both--by enacting the mass media's ability to cross contexts--are…

Gaipa, Mark

2007-01-01

399

Dark Cloud Rising from the East: Indian Sovereignty and the Coming of King William's War in New England  

Microsoft Academic Search

King William's War (168997) has long been overshadowed by the wars bracketing it, but it was pivotal to English-Indian relations. As the English violated the treaty promises concluding King Philip's War and ignored Indian sovereignty, Indians turned to the French, establishing an alliance that would characterize the French and Indian Wars to come.

Jenny Hale Pulsipher

2007-01-01

400

Housing: Dutchess County.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

One of the most crucial responsibilities of any fast-growing area is that of providing housing for all segments of its population. As pressures for growth are increasingly exerted on Dutchess County, it will be all the more important for the area to know ...

1972-01-01

401

Reviewing County Extension Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An evaluation of the Douglas County (Kansas) Extension Program to determine clientele's level of awareness and acceptance of the program and program strengths and weaknesses, to establish new program directions and a base line for future evaluation efforts, and to develop methodology and materials to be used in evaluation. Procedures, findings,…

Prawl, Warren L.; Jorns, William J.

1976-01-01

402

The nearshore western Beaufort Sea ecosystem: Circulation and importance of terrestrial carbon in arctic coastal food webs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The nearshore shelf of the Beaufort Sea is defined by extreme physical and biological gradients that have a distinctive influence on its productivity and trophic structure. Massive freshwater discharge from the Mackenzie River, along with numerous smaller rivers and streams elsewhere along the coast, produce an environment that is decidedly estuarine in character, especially in late spring and summer. Consequently, the Beaufort coast provides a critical habitat for several species of amphidromous fishes, some of which are essential to the subsistence lifestyle of arctic native populations. Because of its low in situ productivity, allochthonous inputs of organic carbon, identifiable on the basis of isotopic composition, are important to the functioning of this arctic estuarine system. Coastal erosion and river discharge are largely responsible for introducing high concentrations of suspended sediment from upland regions into the nearshore zone. The depletion in the 13C content of invertebrate and vertebrate consumers, which drops about 4-5‰ eastward along the eastern Alaskan Beaufort Sea coast, may reflect the assimilation of this terrestrial organic matter into local food webs. In addition, the large range in 13C values of fauna collected in the eastern Beaufort (nearly 8‰) compared to the same species in the northeastern Chukchi (3‰), indicate a lower efficiency of carbon transfer between trophic levels in the eastern Beaufort. The wider spread in stable isotope values in the eastern Beaufort may also reflect a decoupling between benthic and pelagic components. Isotopic tracer studies of amphidromous fishes in the Simpson Island barrier island lagoon revealed that terrestrial (peat) carbon may contribute as much as 30-50% of their total dietary requirements. On the eastern Alaska Beaufort Sea coast, the ?13C values of arctic cod collected in semi-enclosed lagoons were more depleted, by 3-4‰, compared to fish collected in the coastal Beaufort Sea. Calculations from isotopic mixing equations indicate cod from lagoons may derive 70% of their carbon from terrestrial sources. The ?15N values of lagoon fish were also 4‰ lower than coastal specimens, reflective of the lower ?15N values of terrestrially derived nitrogen (0-1.5‰ compared to 5-7‰ for phytoplankton). The role of terrestrial carbon in arctic estuarine food webs is especially important in view of the current warming trend in the arctic environment and the role of advective processes that transport carbon along the nearshore shelf. Biogeochemical studies of the arctic coastal estuarine environment may provide more insights into the function of these biologically complex ecosystems.

Dunton, Kenneth H.; Weingartner, Thomas; Carmack, Eddy C.

2006-10-01

403

Dramatic beach and nearshore morphological changes due to extreme flooding at a wave-dominated river mouth (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Direct observations of major floods which input large volumes of sediment into littoral systems generally are rare due to the scarcity of large events and the difficulty of obtaining appropriate data. To understand the importance of infrequent, high-discharge river floods on the long-term morphodynamics of a coastal system, we combine 16 years of pre-flood survey data with three years of post-flood data to characterize morphologic changes at a wave-dominated river mouth. This study provides in-depth morphological analysis of coastal response to an extremely rare flooding event; the highest discharge on record for the Santa Clara River (CA, USA) which occurred in January 2005. This event injected ~5 million m3 of littoral-grade sediment into the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell (SBLC), producing rapid and extreme beach and nearshore morphologic evolution. The sediment load produced by the event is an order of magnitude larger than both the average annual river loads and the annual alongshore littoral transport in this portion of the SBLC. Over 170 m of local shoreline (mean high water (MHW)) progradation was observed as result of the flood, followed by 3 years of rapid local shoreline retreat. Linear regression-determined shoreline change rates of up to -45 m a-1 were observed on the subaerial beach (MHW) and -114 m a-1 on the submarine delta (6 m isobath). Starting approximately 1 km downdrift of the river mouth, shoreline progradation persisted throughout the three-year post-flood monitoring period, with rates of up to +19 m a-1. Post-flood bathymetric surveys show nearshore (0 to 12 m depth) erosion on the delta exceeding 400 m3/m a-1, more than an order of magnitude higher than mean seasonal cross-shore sediment transport rates in the region. Changes were not constant with depth, however; sediment accumulation and subsequent erosion on the delta were greatest at -5 to -8 m, and accretion in downdrift areas was greatest above -2 m. Simple “one-line” shoreline modeling techniques can reproduce the observed patterns of subaerial shoreline change, but they do not address significant cross-shore variations in the rates of change. This study illustrates the importance of low-frequency, high-volume sediment discharge events in understanding short- and long-term sediment supply, littoral transport, and beach and nearshore evolution in affected coastal systems. Debris accumulation downdrift of the Santa Clara River mouth resulting from the 2005 flood event. The protruding shoreline at the river mouth is visible in the background. (Photo by Dave Hubbard, University of California, Santa Barbara).

Barnard, P. L.; Warrick, J. A.

2009-12-01

404

Distribution and thickness of sedimentary facies in the coastal dune, beach and nearshore sedimentary system at Maspalomas, Canary Islands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Numerous studies have shown that most beaches and coastal dune systems of the world are currently eroding but very few have investigated the combined sediment budgets of subaerial and nearshore submarine systems. In the case of the dune field of the Maspalomas Natural Special Reserve (in the south of Gran Canaria), the adjacent Maspalomas and El Inglés beaches and the adjacent submarine platform, the sediment budgets have been severely affected by erosion over the past few decades. The objectives of this study were to investigate the availability of sand within the modern sedimentary system, including the coastal dunes, the beaches and the submerged shelf, but also to assess local sediment sinks. An isopach map generated on the basis of topo-bathymetric data and seismic-reflection profiles revealed that sediment thickness varies from 0-22 m in the study area. Expanses of relatively low sediment thickness were identified in the south-western sector of the coastal dune field along Maspalomas beach, and in the nearshore region to the south of this beach. These localized sediment-deficit areas earmark Maspalomas beach as the most vulnerable shore strip threatened by erosion. The shallow seismic data also revealed that the submarine platform south of Maspalomas represents a marine terrace cut into an ancient alluvial fan, thus documenting an influence of the geomorphological heritage on the present-day morphodynamics. A side-scan sonar mosaic of this nearshore platform enabled the delimitation of areas covered by rock, boulders and gravel, vegetated sand patches and a mobile sand facies, the latter including ripple and megaripple fields. The megaripple field in a valley close to the talus of the marine terrace has been identified as a major sediment sink of the Maspalomas sedimentary system. It is fed by south-westerly storm-wave events. The sediment deficit in the coastal dune field and along Maspalomas beach can therefore only be explained by a currently faster loss of sediment to an offshore sink than can be compensated by the supply of sand from outside the system.

Fontán Bouzas, Angela; Alcántara-Carrió, Javier; Montoya Montes, Isabel; Barranco Ojeda, Andrés; Albarracín, Silvia; Rey Díaz de Rada, Jorge; Rey Salgado, Jorge

2013-04-01

405

FINDING THE SCALES OF ECOLOGICAL RESPONSE TO LANDSCAPE CHARACTER AND TRIBUTARY INPUTS TO OPEN NEARSHORE WATERS, A GREAT LAKES COAST-WIDE EXPERIENCE  

EPA Science Inventory

In 2002 we sampled over 40 stretches of open coastline across the US portion of the Great Lakes with an equal effort planned for 2003. Sites were selected to represent an intended gradient of landscape disturbance in watersheds hydrologically-connected to nearshore waters. Half t...

406

A new depositional model for the buried 4000 yr BP New Orleans barrier: implications for sea-level £uctuations and onshore transport from a nearshore shelf source  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Holocene New Orleans Barrier Complex, now buried by the St. Bernard delta of the Mississippi River, provides an excellent example of barrier deposition fed by a nearshore sediment source. This reworking and onshore transport was initiated by a sudden change in the shelf equilibrium profile caused by a sea-level fall about 4100 yr BP. Here we present a new

Frank W. Stapor Jr; Gregory W. Stone

407

A new depositional model for the buried 4000 yr BP New Orleans barrier: implications for sea-level fluctuations and onshore transport from a nearshore shelf source  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Holocene New Orleans Barrier Complex, now buried by the St. Bernard delta of the Mississippi River, provides an excellent example of barrier deposition fed by a nearshore sediment source. This reworking and onshore transport was initiated by a sudden change in the shelf equilibrium profile caused by a sea-level fall about 4100 yr BP. Here we present a new

Frank W. Stapor Jr.; Gregory W. Stone

2004-01-01

408

Replacement of Zebra Mussels by Quagga Mussels in the Canadian Nearshore of Lake Ontario: the Importance of Substrate, Round Goby Abundance, and Upwelling Frequency  

Microsoft Academic Search

The invasion of the Great Lakes by zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) and quagga mussels (Dreissena bugensis) has been accompanied by tremendous ecological change. In this paper we characterize the extent to which dreissenids dominate the nearshore of the Canadian shoreline of Lake Ontario and examine mussel distribution in relation to environmental factors. We surveyed 27 5-m sites and 25 20-m

Karen A. Wilson; E. Todd Howell; Donald A. Jackson

2006-01-01

409

Spatial patterns of water quality and plankton from high-resolution continuous in situ sensing along a 537-km nearshore transect of western Lake Superior, 2004  

Microsoft Academic Search

We conducted an extensive survey of the nearshore waters in western Lake Superior along a continuous segment (537 km) from Grand Marais, Minnesota to near Eagle Harbor, Michigan on the Keweenaw peninsula. A depth contour of 20 m was targeted using a towed CTD, fluorometer, transmissometer, and laser optical plankton counter (LOPC) to gather data on temperature, conductivity, fluorescence, light

Peder M. Yurista; John R. Kelly

410

Environmental determinants and ecologic selectivity of benthic faunas from nearshore to bathyal zones in the end-Permian mass extinction: Brachiopod evidence from South China  

Microsoft Academic Search

In South China the Changhsingian brachiopods are extraordinarily abundant and diverse, comprising 447 species in 143 genera. They were widespread in nearshore, shallow sea, reef, carbonate platform, shelf basin, and bathyal zones. Brachiopod attachment modes were also highly diversified and include burrowing, body cementation, pedicle attaching on substratum, body spines anchoring on substratum, pedicle attaching on objects, and clasping spines

Jing Chen; Zhong-Qiang Chen; Jinnan Tong

2011-01-01

411

The Invisible Work of Managing Visibility for Social ChangeInsights From the Leadership of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, we introduce the concept of tempered visibility as a lens through which to view Martin Luther King Jr.'s civil rights leadership. First, we review the academic literature on visibility and its implications for leadership. Second, we outline key moral and sociopolitical factors that enabled King to become visible. Third, we provide examples of how King intentionally increased

Darryl D. Roberts; Laura Morgan Roberts; Regina M. ONeill; Stacy D. Blake-Beard

2008-01-01

412

Effects of Renewable Resource Harvest Disruptions on Community Socioeconomic and Sociocultural Systems: King Cove. Social and Economic Studies Program Technical Report Number 123.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The goals of the research effort were twofold: first, to develop a thorough ethnographic baseline of the Alaska Peninsula community of King Cove; and second, to evaluate the affects upon King Cove of two hypothetical harvest disruptions. King Cove is esse...

D. C. Burnham L. Hale L. Moorehead R. H. Hagenstein S. R. Braund

1985-01-01

413

Sources of land-derived runoff to a coral reef-fringed embayment identified using geochemical tracers in nearshore sediment traps  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geochemical tracers, including Ba, Co, Th, 7Be, 137Cs and 210Pb, and magnetic properties were used to characterize terrestrial runoff collected in nearshore time-series sediment traps in Hanalei Bay, Kauai, during flood and dry conditions in summer 2006, and to fingerprint possible runoff sources in the lower watershed. In combination, the tracers indicate that runoff during a flood in August could have come from cultivated taro fields bordering the lower reach of the river. Land-based runoff associated with summer floods may have a greater impact on coral reef communities in Hanalei Bay than in winter because sediment persists for several months. During dry periods, sediment carried by the Hanalei River appears to have been mobilized primarily by undercutting of low 7Be, low 137Cs riverbanks composed of soil weathered from tholeiitic basalt with low Ba and Co concentrations. Following a moderate rainfall event in September, high 7Be sediment carried by the Hanalei River was probably mobilized by overland flow in the upper watershed. Ba-desorption in low-salinity coastal water limited its use to a qualitative runoff tracer in nearshore sediment. 210Pb had limited usefulness as a terrestrial tracer in the nearshore due to a large dissolved oceanic source and scavenging onto resuspended bottom sediment. 210Pb-scavenging does, however, illustrate the role resuspension could play in the accumulation of particle-reactive contaminants in nearshore sediment. Co and 137Cs were not affected by desorption or geochemical scavenging and showed the greatest potential as quantitative sediment provenance indicators in material collected in nearshore sediment traps.

Takesue, Renee K.; Bothner, Michael H.; Reynolds, Richard L.

2009-11-01

414

The use of customised probiotics in the cultivation of western king prawns (Penaeus latisulcatus Kishinouye, 1896).  

PubMed

This study presents a comprehensive review of probiotics usage in aquaculture with a specific emphasis on our research series on the effectiveness of the customised probiotics, Pseudomonas synxantha and Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the cultivation of western king prawns, Penaeus latisulcatus. These customised probiotics resulted from tests using five inhibition test methods between the bacteria isolated from two commercial probiotic products and Vibrio spp. isolated from western king prawns and other aquatic animals. The results proved the suitability and safety of these probiotics in the cultivation of western king prawns as they conclusively met all the essential requirements for appropriate probiotics. These probiotics have shown similar beneficial effects as the common prebiotics, Bio-Mos and beta-1,3-d-glucan on the growth, survival and immune responses of the prawns. The supplementation of probiotics with the formulated feed was more efficacious and more practical than direct application into the rearing media. The prawns exposed to the combined probiotics were healthier than those exposed to the individual probiotics. P. aeruginosa was more effective for improving prawn health than P. synxantha. The probiotic-fed prawns were not influenced by Vibrio harveyi at 10(3) CFU ml(-1) for 36 h of challenge. In conclusion, these customised probiotics can be used as appropriate probiotics and as a suitable replacement of antibiotics, for disease control in western king prawn aquaculture. PMID:19463955

Van Hai, Ngo; Buller, Nicky; Fotedar, Ravi

2009-08-01

415

Patient transport via private vehicle in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveEmergency medical service providers frequently encounter patients with low acuity. Because of liability and safety concerns, emergency medical service systems often prohibit privately owned vehicle (POV) transport. Thus, prehospital resources are used with questionable benefit. In Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, our primary objective was to determine the feasibility of POV. We assessed patient compliance, satisfaction, and safety. Our

Albert Sae; Stephen Haverly; Jeffery Uller; Marc Shalit; Geoff Stroh

2005-01-01

416

Backpacker use of bear-resistant canisters and lockers at Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Throughout North America, when American black bears (Ursus americanus) enter backcountry campsites to obtain human food, undesirable and potentially dangerous incidents occur. This problem is minimized if overnight users of the backcountry ('backpackers') carry their food in bear-resistant canisters or use metal storage lockers. I surveyed 242 backpacking groups in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks (SEKI), during the summer

Rachel Mazur

2008-01-01

417

Fire History in the Yellow Pine Forest of Kings Canyon National Park1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Preliminary results of an on-going fire scar study in the yellow pine forest of Kings Canyon National Park indicate a mean fire frequency per individual tree of approximately 11 years for the period 1775 until 1909, the date of the last recorded fire scar on sampled trees. For the entire area sampled (approximately 400 acres) there was a fire on

Thomas E. Warner

1980-01-01

418

Prescribed Fire Monitoring in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prescribed fire monitoring program in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks is designed to document and predict fire behavior and fire effects. Data are collected before the burn and for 10 years after on vegetation (trees and shrubs), pests and diseases, and fuel loadings. Fire effects are related to observed fire behavior. This paper describes the purpose of the

Diane M. Ewell; H. Thomas Nichols

419

Evolution of the Natural Fire Management Program at Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks' natural fire management program is the oldest of its kind in the United States. Past fire suppression practices had produced an unnatural accumulation of fuel, increasing the risk of high-intensity fires. Subsequent research showed fire was important to many park ecosystems and that fire could be reintroduced without harm under prescribed conditions. Each

Larry Bancroft; Thomas Nichols; David Parsons; David Graber; Boyd Evison

420

3 CFR 8773 - Proclamation 8773 of January 13, 2012. Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2012  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...King, Jr., Federal Holiday, we celebrate the man who fought for the America he knew was possible. Dr. Kingâs faith in a God who loves all His children and a Nation grounded in the promise of equality would not let him rest until victory was won. As...

2013-01-01

421

King Latin Grammar Magnet Middle School: 1990-1991. Formative Evaluation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An evaluation of the first year of the Martin Luther King, Jr., Latin Grammar Magnet Middle School in Kansas City, Missouri, is reported. The program is evaluated in terms of enrollment and program capacity, implementation, perceptions and achievement. Findings indicate that certain instructional goals (i.e., computer application, public speaking,…

Robinson-Lewis, G.

422

RIPARIAN PLANT WATER RELATIONS ALONG THE NORTH FORK KINGS RIVER, CALIFORNIA1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plant water relations of five obligate ripar- ian species were studied along California's North Fork Kings River. Diurnal stomatal conductance, transpi- ration, and xylem pressure potentials were measured throughout the 1986 growing season and in mid-season in 1987. Patterns were similar for all species although absolute values varied considerably. Maximum stomatal conductance occurred early in the day and season during

Janet L. Nachlinger; Stanley D. Smith; Roland J. Risser

1989-01-01

423

Making E-Learning Invisible: Experience at King Khalid University, Saudi Arabia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors describe progress at King Khalid University (KKU) in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in developing and implementing a user-centered road map for teaching and learning, with pervasive e-learning as a core element. They named the approach "Invisible" e-learning. As part of it, they are investigating ways to capture and share expertise, as in…

Alwalidi, Abdullah; Lefrere, Paul

2010-01-01

424

Pulpit Responses to Contemporary Issues: The On-Going Rhetoric of Dr. Martin Luther King.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many theoreticians have indicated that a major task of the nonpresumptive rhetor is to gain presumption, thereby shifting the burden of proof to the opposition. Rhetorically, Martin Luther King, Jr., sought to effect this shift in the burden of proof through the use of hierarchies of values. At the top of his value system was the love of God. The…

Fadely, Dean; Greene, Ronald W.

425

Faint open clusters with 2MASS: BH 63, Lyngå 2, Lyngå 12 and King 20  

Microsoft Academic Search

Context: .Structural and dynamical parameters of faint open clusters are probed with quality 2MASS-photometry and analytical procedures developed for bright clusters. Aims: .We derive fundamental parameters of the faint open clusters Lyngå 2, BH 63, Lyngå 12 and King 20, the last three of which have no prior determinations. We also focus on the structure and dynamical state of these

E. Bica; C. Bonatto; R. Blumberg

2006-01-01

426

Real Companion and Friend: The Diary of William Lyon Mackenzie King, 1893-1950  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Despite his rather distinguished name, noted Canadian politician William Lyon Mackenzie King was generally just referred to as "William King". During his long career he served three terms as the prime minister of Canada, and he also found time to be a lawyer, economist, and professor. For over fifty years, starting with his time as an undergraduate at the University of Toronto, he kept a detailed personal diary which only concluded with his passing in 1950. The Library and Archives of Canada has created this website to introduce King's diary to contemporary readers, and they do so through explanatory essays, substantive excerpts from his writings, and a chronology of his life. First-time visitors will want to look at the two background essays titled " 'Dear Diary': Diary Writing as a Genre" and "The Political Man of Letters: Mackenzie King as Writer and Bookman". Visitors can continue on to read excerpts from the diary and even peer into the homes that he inhabited during his life.

427

"[W]hat I Would Fain Call Master": Challenging "King Lear's" Heritage.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Speculates about the performative aspect of Charles Marowitz's generalization regarding academically based and performance based usage of canonical or non canonical text. Defines what makes a canonical text and uses Shakespeare's "King Lear" as a vehicle for addressing ways in which performance might challenge, and seek to open out, canonical…

Kelly, Philippa

2002-01-01

428

Microbial Activity In The Peerless Jenny King Sulfate Reducing Bioreactor System (Presentation)  

EPA Science Inventory

The Peerless Jenny King treatment system is a series of four sulfate reducing bioreactor cells installed to treat acid mine drainage in the Upper Tenmile Creek Superfund Site located in the Rimini Mining District, near Helena MT. The system consists of a wetland pretreatment fol...

429

Microbial Activity In The Peerless Jenny King Sulfate Reducing Bioreactors System  

EPA Science Inventory

The Peerless Jenny King treatment system is a series of four sulfate reducing bioreactor cells installed to treat acid mine drainage in the Upper Tenmile Creek Superfund Site located in the Rimini Mining District, near Helena, MT. The system consists of a wetland pretreatment fo...

430

In Search of a Realistic Research Perspective: A Response to Fein, and Walsh and King.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Responds to commentaries in this issue by Greta Fein and by Daniel Walsh and Gary King on criticisms of quantitative research. Argues that the data-driven nature of child development research has an impact not only on how research questions are answered but on what questions are asked in the first place. (MDM)

Zimiles, Herbert

1993-01-01

431

36 CFR 7.8 - Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.8 Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. (a) Dogs and cats. Dogs and cats are prohibited on any park land or trail except within one-fourth mile of developed areas which are...

2013-07-01

432

Natural Resource Condition Assessment for Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. Appendix 8. Alpine Environments.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks protect most of the subalpine and alpine environment of the southern Sierra Nevada of California. With over 48% of the parks occurring above 3,048 meters (10,000 feet), they are dominated by high elevation habitats....

S. Haultain

2013-01-01

433

FRESHWATER ALGAE OF RAE LAKES BASIN, KINGS CANYON NATIONAL PARK (CALIFORNIA)  

EPA Science Inventory

This report illustrates and characterizes algae (exclusive of diatoms) found in Kings Canyon National Park, California and describes their distribution among the Rae Lakes within. It is the first taxonomic study of the freshwater algae for the southern Sierra Nevada and the most ...

434

Endotracheal Intubation Using the Macintosh Laryngoscope or KingVision Video Laryngoscope during Uninterrupted Chest Compression  

PubMed Central

Objective. Advanced airway management, endotracheal intubation (ETI), during CPR is more difficult than, for example, during anesthesia. However, new devices such as video laryngoscopes should help in such circumstances. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of the KingVision video laryngoscopes in a manikin cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) scenario. Methods. Thirty students enrolled in the third year of paramedic school took part in the study. The simulated CPR scenario was ETI using the standard laryngoscope with a Macintosh blade (MCL) and ETI using the KingVision video laryngoscope performed during uninterrupted chest compressions. The primary endpoints were the time needed for ETI and the success ratio. Results. The mean time required for intubation was similar for both laryngoscopes: 16.6 (SD 5.11, median 15.64, range 7.9–27.9) seconds versus 17.91 (SD 5.6, median 16.28, range 10.6–28.6) seconds for the MCL and KingVision, respectively (P = 0.1888). On the first attempt at ETI, the success rate during CPR was comparable between the evaluated laryngoscopes: P = 0.9032. Conclusion. The KingVision video laryngoscope proves to be less superior when used for endotracheal intubation during CPR compared to the standard laryngoscope with a Mackintosh blade. This proves true in terms of shortening the time needed for ETI and increasing the success ratio.

Gaszynska, Ewelina

2014-01-01

435

BOREAS AFM-2 King Air 1994 Aircraft Flux and Moving Window Data.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The BOREAS AFM-2 team collected pass-by-pass fluxes (and many other statistics) for a large number of level (constant altitude), straight-line passes used in a variety of flight patterns. The data were collected by the University of Wyoming King Air in 19...

R. D. Kelly

2000-01-01

436

Students' Attitudes and Perceptions towards the Effectiveness of Mobile Learning in King Saud University, Saudi Arabia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The main aim of this research study is to better understand and measure students' attitudes and perceptions towards the effectiveness of mobile learning. This paper reports on the results of a survey of one hundred eighty six undergraduate female students at King Saud University about their attitude and perception to the use of mobile technology…

Al-Fahad, Fahad N.

2009-01-01

437

Incest, Incorporation, and "King Lear" in Jane Smiley's "A Thousand Acres."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggests that Jane Smiley's "A Thousand Acres" is a faithful and a "profoundly subversive" revision of Shakespeare's "King Lear." Argues that the terms in which the novel have been most frequently praised, no less than the case made for banning it, raise important questions about the relationship between the novel's secret and the source of…

Leslie, Marina

1998-01-01

438

The rhetorical construction of time in Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “letter from Birmingham jail”  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essay explores the rhetorical use of time in Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail” and offers an explanation of the ideological heritage that temporally unifies the discourse. The essay describes the “Letter's” recent, historical, and spiritual time frames, accounts for the ideological purpose each serves, and explains on what ground they unite.

Ronald E. Lee

1991-01-01

439

Martin Luther King, Jr.: A Lesson with Interdisciplinary Connections for Middle-Level Music Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This lesson begins with a very brief biography of Martin Luther King, Jr. The lesson identifies its educational objectives; addresses National Standards for Music Education; lists materials needed; details six step-by-step classroom procedures for lesson implementation; and provides curriculum connections for language arts, visual art, physical…

Early, Mary Frances; Terry, Cynthia

440

Political tolerance hypotheses and white opposition to a Martin Luther King holiday in Arizona  

Microsoft Academic Search

On November 2, 1983, President Reagan signed into law national legislation designating the third Monday in January a national holiday in memory of Martin Luther King Jr. (MLK). At the end of 1992, except for New Hampshire that had a Civil Rights Day that did not mention MLK specifically, every state and the District of Columbia (including the U.S. territories

Nicholas O. Alozie

1995-01-01

441

Narrative in Martin Luther King's I've been to the mountaintop  

Microsoft Academic Search

Martin Luther King's I've Been to the Mountaintop oration is examined as a significant instance of the rhetorical use of existing narrative as an inventional and argumentative strategy. The narrative functions both as a redescription of situation and as an example for political action. These functions correspond to formal characteristics of narrative form, and suggest that such narratives simultaneously display

Thomas Rosteck

1992-01-01

442

Preparation, Pedagogy, Policy, and Power: "Brown," the "King" Case, and the Struggle for Equal Language Rights  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For scholars of literacy and educational linguistics, the years 2004 and beyond have given them cause to not only revisit racial issues 50 years after "Brown v. Board of Education," but also to revisit 25 years of language and racial politics since "the Martin Luther King Black English case." This chapter discusses what needs to happen now--with…

Ball, Arnetha F.; Alim, H. Samy

2006-01-01

443

If Dr. King Were a Principal: Building the "Beloved Community" in Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors offer a more humanistic vision of educational community, one that is substantive in content yet flexible in its application to the diverse contexts in which American schooling occurs. In doing so, the authors turn specifically to the nonviolent philosophy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and consider what a school…

Hillis, Michael; Woolworth, Stephen

2008-01-01

444

The Brotherhood Symphony: A musical analysis of Martin Luther King, Jr's. \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Martin Luther King, Jr's. “I Have a Dream” sermon is a masterpiece within the African-American sermonic tradition. As part of this affective-sermonic tradition, “I Have a Dream” contains sonic features that function much like musical elements within a symphony. Representing the sermon, or, “The Brotherhood Symphony,” in an analytical notation completely absent of text meaning, reveals how sound parallels text

Scott R Walter

2011-01-01

445

Branded: The Economic Geographies of Streets Named in Honor of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate the economic geographies of streets named for Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (MLK Streets), which are an increasingly common means by which various community members across the United States are attempting to commemorate the slain civil rights leader. It is our intent to characterize these negatively \\

Matthew L. Mitchelson; Derek H. Alderman; E. Jeffrey Popke

2007-01-01

446

Giving Peace a Chance: Gandhi and King in the English Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes how one high school English teacher developed and taught a unit that would give students the opportunity to see how violence and nonviolence affects their lives. Notes the unit involves discussing the lives and careers of Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr., viewing film clips and film, reading, writing in journals, and writing a…

Gill, David

2000-01-01

447

Inventing Authority: Bill Clinton, Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Orchestration of Rhetorical Traditions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines President Clinton's address to 5,000 African Americans at the site of Martin Luther King's last speech in Memphis. Develops a critical orientation revolving around the concepts of tradition, invention, and authority to explore Clinton's performance. Shows how he interanimated the black church and liberal traditions in American politics.…

Murphy, John M.

1997-01-01

448

STUDENTS' ATTITUDES AND PERCEPTIONS TOWARDS THE EFFECTIVENESS OF MOBILE LEARNING IN KING SAUD UNIVERSITY, SAUDI ARABIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main aim of this research study is to better understand and measure students' attitudes and perceptions towards the effectiveness of mobile learning. This paper reports on the results of a survey of one hundred eighty six undergraduate female students at King Saud University about their attitude and perception to the use of mobile technology in education. An analysis of

Fahad N. Al-FAHAD

449

A study of PDA and Smartphone adoption rates at King Saud Medical City Hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The estimate of adoption rates of Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) and Smart phones among physicians and dentists is required to accurately determine how much PDA devices can improve the quality of care, save patients' lives, increase productivity and ultimately reduce health-care cost. This research worked towards finding Prevalence rates of PDA and Smartphone among the physicians and dentists at King

Basema Saddik; Deena M Barakah; Bakheet Aldosari

2012-01-01

450

King Cotton's Lasting Legacy of Poverty and Southern Region Contemporary Conditions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One hundred fifty years ago, cotton was considered as the king of all United States' agricultural exports. Cotton's dollar value far exceeded that of any other mid-19th-century United States trade item, much more than tobacco, fish, forest products, raw materials for manufacturing, or manufactured items. Indeed, in the mid-19th century, cotton was…

Guthrie, James W.; Peevely, Gary

2010-01-01

451

Survival in king penguins Aptenodytes patagonicus : temporal and sex-specific effects of environmental variability  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated annual adult survival rates of king penguins Aptenodytes patagonicus breeding at South Georgia during 6 years in relation to age\\/breeding experience, sex, and food availability. During the first 3 years of the study, when food availability was good, survival was 97.7% for experienced breeders, which confirmed the very high survival rates observed in penguins in general. In these

Olof Olsson; Henk P. van der Jeugd

2002-01-01

452

“The Fall of the House Usher”: Poe’s perverted perspective on the “Maimed King  

Microsoft Academic Search

The themes of medieval literature had a profound effect on the works that would follow in later generations regardless of the writer’s recognition of this influence, and one can see the way Poe leaves traces of the popular medieval motif of the “Maimed King” in his short story, “The Fall of the House of Usher. ” This thematic device, which

Forrest C. Helvie

2009-01-01

453

"I Have a Dream, Too!": The American Dream in Coretta Scott King Award-Winning Books  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Coretta Scott King (CSK) Award, instituted in 1969 and recognized as an official award by the American Library Association (ALA) in 1982, is conferred annually to an African American author and an illustrator for their outstanding contributions to literature about the Black experience for children and young adults. A partial impetus for the…

Parsons, Linda T.; Castleman, Michele

2011-01-01

454

Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 83-409-1450, King Kwik Minit Market, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

On August 30, 1983, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a request from King Kwik Minit Markets Inc. to identify the cause of the itching reported by data processing workers occurring while working in the computer roo...

S. H. Ahrenholz P. Lichty

1984-01-01

455

Distribution and source of heavy metals in the surface sediments from the near-shore area, north Jiangsu Province, China.  

PubMed

Samples of surface sediment and vibrocore were collected in the near-shore area of north Jiangsu Province for grain size, elements, (210)Pbexcess and (137)Cs analyses. In our study area, the diversity of metal concentration was controlled not by the grain size, but by the source. The element content of the old Yellow River Delta was used as baseline for our study area. Geoaccumulation indexes indicate that no station was polluted by Cu, Pb, Zn and As, but the Igeo values of As were close to zero in some stations. Slight pollution caused by Cd was observed in some stations. Correlation and enrichment factors suggest that Cu, Pb and Zn are lithogenic in origin, while As and Cd are mixed in origin. Especially, in some polluted stations Cd was obviously anthropogenic in origin. PMID:24766897

Xu, Gang; Liu, Jian; Pei, Shaofeng; Kong, Xianghuai; Hu, Gang

2014-06-15

456

Cross-shelf transport into nearshore waters due to shoaling internal tides in San Pedro Bay, CA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the summer of 2001, a coastal ocean measurement program in the southeastern portion of San Pedro Bay, CA, was designed and carried out. One aim of the program was to determine the strength and effectiveness of local cross-shelf transport processes. A particular objective was to assess the ability of semidiurnal internal tidal currents to move suspended material a net distance across the shelf. Hence, a dense array of moorings was deployed across the shelf to monitor the transport patterns associated with fluctuations in currents, temperature and salinity. An associated hydrographic program periodically monitored synoptic changes in the spatial patterns of temperature, salinity, nutrients and bacteria. This set of measurements show that a series of energetic internal tides can, but do not always, transport subthermocline water, dissolved and suspended material from the middle of the shelf into the surfzone. Effective cross-shelf transport occurs only when (1) internal tides at the shelf break are strong and (2) subtidal currents flow strongly downcoast. The subtidal downcoast flow causes isotherms to tilt upward toward the coast, which allows energetic, nonlinear internal tidal currents to carry subthermocline waters into the surfzone. During these events, which may last for several days, the transported water remains in the surfzone until the internal tidal current pulses and/or the downcoast subtidal currents disappear. This nonlinear internal tide cross-shelf transport process was capable of carrying water and the associated suspended or dissolved material from the mid-shelf into the surfzone, but there were no observation of transport from the shelf break into the surfzone. Dissolved nutrients and suspended particulates (such as phytoplankton) transported from the mid-shelf into the nearshore region by nonlinear internal tides may contribute to nearshore algal blooms, including harmful algal blooms that occur off local beaches.

Noble, M.; Jones, B.; Hamilton, P.; Xu, J.; Robertson, G.; Rosenfeld, L.; Largier, J.

2009-01-01

457

Shoreline migration and beach-nearshore sand balance over the last 200 years in Haifa Bay (SE Mediterranean)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several researchers have investigated morphological changes on the south-eastern Mediterranean coast during the late Holocene. However, very few of these studies include quantitative data covering the last 200 years. In this study, topographical maps, nautical charts and aerial photographs are used to estimate the shoreline migrations and beach-nearshore sand balance over the last 200 years in Haifa Bay, Israel, the northernmost final depositional sink of the Nile littoral cell. The findings reflect two main periods. During the first period, between 1799 and 1928, human intervention along the bay's coast was negligible, a significant coastal expansion of ˜50 to 150 m (averages of 0.4-1.2 m/year) was measured, and sand accumulation was estimated at ˜70,000 m3 annually in the beach-nearshore area. A dramatic change in the sedimentological pattern was observed during the second period, between 1928 and 2006, following the completion of Haifa Port's main breakwater (1929-1933). During this period, most of the bay's coast was in a steady state, with seasonal fluctuations of less than about ±20 m, and slight erosion of ˜7,000 m3 annually. These findings are consistent with previous studies which conclude that from approximately 4,000 years ago until the construction of Haifa Port, sea level remained relatively stable, and a continuous accumulation of Nile-derived sand dried up the Zevulun Plain and shifted the Haifa Bay shoreline westwards to its present location. This long-term trend ceased after completion of the Haifa Port main breakwater.

Zviely, Dov; Kit, Eliezer; Rosen, Baruch; Galili, Ehud; Klein, Micha

2009-04-01</