Sample records for king county nearshore

  1. King County Snapshots

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This fine photographic archive serves as both a great repository of visual historical documentation of the King County area (which includes Seattle) in the state of Washington, as a good example of a collaborative partnership between various organizations. The partnership includes bringing together the visual collections of ten small historical organizations in tandem with the University of Washington and Seattle's Museum of History and Industry. Visitors can read about the working relationship between the organizations, view training materials from three workshops (such as one on image selection), and examine a list of online resources on subjects such as scanning digital images and metadata guidelines. Lest one forget the extensive visual materials (over 12,000 items as of the last count), visitors may search across each distinct collection, or elect to browse through each one individually. To get visitors started with using the archive, a number of sample searches are provided here as well.

  2. Fourth Annual Report: 2007 PreConstruction Eelgrass Monitoring and Propagation for King County Outfall Mitigation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dana L. Woodruff; Nancy P. Kohn; Valerie I. Cullinan; Susan S. Southard; John Vavrinec

    2007-01-01

    King County proposes to build a new sewer outfall discharging to Puget Sound near Point Wells, Washington. Construction is scheduled for 2008. The Point Wells site was selected to minimize effects on the nearshore marine environment, but unavoidable impacts to eelgrass (Zostera marina) beds are anticipated during construction. To mitigate these impacts and prepare for post-construction restoration, King County began

  3. King County Earthworks: Land Reclamation as Sculpture

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2013-11-04

    Can land reclamation be public art? It most certainly can and large scale installations can be found in abundance from California to Maine. This rather wonderful project appeared in Washington's King County in the summer of 1979. The King County Archives brought together original interviews, photos, and other documents for this marvelous exploration of a unique and trend-setting endeavor. The intent of the project was to have artists create various earthworks on land that had been environmentally damaged. The first phase was a demonstration project, then other artists moved on to create six different sites. The first demonstration project was crafted by well-known artist Robert Morris and there are a number of videos, explanatory essays, and diagrams documenting this crafty and fascinating experiment in public art.

  4. King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Buses: Final Evaluation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Walkowicz, K.

    2006-12-01

    Final technical report compares and evaluates new diesel and diesel hybrid-electric articulated buses operated as part of the King County Metro Transit (KC Metro) fleet in Seattle, Washington. The evaluation lasted 12 months.

  5. Productivity of Great Blue Herons in King County, Washington

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth J. Raedeke; David A. Manuwal

    2006-01-01

    We studied productivity of great blue herons (Ardea herodias) at their nesting colonies in King County, western Washington in the 2000 breeding season. Rapid urbanization has been hypothesized to have limited heron population growth in recent years. Of the 354 active nests in 2000, 260 (74%) nests produced fledglings. Mean productivity for all active nests was 1.77 (SD = 1.37).

  6. Third Annual Report: 2006 Pre-Construction Eelgrass Monitoring and Propagation for King County Outfall Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, Dana L.; Southard, Susan S.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Anderson, Michael G.; Vavrinec, John

    2007-02-01

    King County proposes to build a new sewer outfall discharging to Puget Sound near Point Wells, Washington. Construction is scheduled for 2008. The Point Wells site was selected to minimize effects on the nearshore marine environment, but unavoidable impacts to eelgrass (Zostera marina) beds are anticipated during construction. To mitigate for these impacts and prepare for post-construction restoration, King County began implementation of a multi-year eelgrass monitoring and restoration program in 2004, with the primary goal of returning intertidal and shallow subtidal habitat and eelgrass to pre-construction conditions. Major program elements are a) pre-construction monitoring, i.e., documenting initial eelgrass conditions and degree of fluctuation over 5 years prior to construction, b) eelgrass transplanting, including harvesting, offsite propagating and stockpiling of local plantstock, and post-construction planting, and c) post-construction monitoring. The program is detailed in the Eelgrass Restoration and Biological Resources Implementation Workplan (King County 2006). This report describes calendar year 2006 pre-construction activities conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of King County. Activities included continued propagation of eelgrass shoots and monitoring of the experimental harvest plots in the marine outfall corridor area to evaluate recovery rates relative to harvest rates. Approximately 1500 additional shoots were harvested from the marine outfall corridor in August 2006 to supplement the plants in the propagation tank at the PNNL Marine Sciences Laboratory in Sequim, Washington, bringing the total number of shoots to 4732. Eelgrass densities were monitored in the five experimental harvest plots established in the marine outfall corridor. Changes in eelgrass density were evaluated in year-to-year comparisons with initial harvest rates. Net eelgrass density decreased from 2004 post-harvest to 2006 in all plots, despite density increases observed in 2005 in some plots and at some harvest rates. Eelgrass densities within individual subplots were highly variable from year to year, and the change in density in any interannual period did not correlate to the initial 2004 harvest rate. Continued monitoring should help project managers determine an optimum harvest rate that supports rapid recovery of donor eelgrass beds.

  7. Fourth Annual Report: 2007 Pre-Construction Eelgrass Monitoring and Propagation for King County Outfall Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, Dana L.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Southard, Susan S.; Vavrinec, John

    2007-10-04

    King County proposes to build a new sewer outfall discharging to Puget Sound near Point Wells, Washington. Construction is scheduled for 2008. The Point Wells site was selected to minimize effects on the nearshore marine environment, but unavoidable impacts to eelgrass (Zostera marina) beds are anticipated during construction. To mitigate these impacts and prepare for post-construction restoration, King County began implementing a multiyear eelgrass monitoring and restoration program in 2004, with the primary goal of returning intertidal and shallow subtidal habitat and eelgrass to pre-construction conditions. Major program elements related to eelgrass are (a) pre-construction monitoring, i.e., documenting initial eelgrass conditions and degree of fluctuation over 5 years prior to construction, (b) eelgrass transplanting, including harvesting, offsite propagating, and stockpiling of local plants for post-construction planting, and (c) post-construction planting and subsequent monitoring. The program is detailed in the Eelgrass Restoration and Biological Resources Implementation Workplan (King County 2006). This report describes calendar year 2007 pre-construction activities conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for King County. Activities included continued propagation of eelgrass shoots at the PNNL Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) in Sequim, Washington, and monitoring of the experimental harvest plots in the marine outfall corridor area to evaluate recovery rates relative to harvest rates. In addition, 490 eelgrass shoots were also harvested from the Marine Outfall Corridor in July 2007 to supplement the plants in the propagation tank at the MSL, bringing the total number of shoots to 1464. Eelgrass densities were monitored in four of five experimental harvest plots established in the Marine Outfall Corridor. Changes in eelgrass density were evaluated in year-to-year comparisons with initial harvest rates. A net increase in eelgrass density from 2004 post-harvest to 2007 was observed in all plots, despite density decreases observed in 2006 in all plots and at most harvest rates. Eelgrass densities within individual subplots were highly variable from year to year, and the change in density in any interannual period was not related to initial 2004 harvest rate. Harvest rates of neighboring subplots did not appear to affect subplot eelgrass density (Woodruff et al. 2007). Three years post-harvest, eelgrass shoot densities were not significantly different from pre-harvest shoot densities at any harvest level. Additional plans are being discussed with King County to harvest all eelgrass from the construction corridor and hold in the propagation tanks at the MSL for post-construction planting. Under this plan, plants that would have been lost to construction will be held offsite until construction is completed. This strategy reduces and possibly eliminates the need to harvest eelgrass from donor beds located south of the construction area, allowing them to remain undisturbed. However, if eelgrass is harvested from donor beds, the monitoring of eelgrass growth at different harvest rates should help determine an optimum harvest rate that supports rapid recovery of donor eelgrass beds.

  8. Fifth Annual Report: 2008 PreConstruction Eelgrass Monitoring and Propagation for King County Outfall Mitigation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dana L. Woodruff; Chaeli Judd; Ronald M. Thom; Nichole K. Sather; Ronald M. Kaufmann

    2010-01-01

    This is the fifth and final report in a series documenting progress of the pre-construction eelgrass restoration and mitigation activities for the proposed King County Brightwater marine outfall, discharging to Puget Sound near Point Wells, Washington. King County began implementing a multiyear eelgrass monitoring and restoration program in 2004, with the primary goal of returning intertidal and shallow subtidal habitat

  9. Bus Fleet Type and Age Replacement Optimization: A case study utilizing King County Metro fleet data

    E-print Network

    Bertini, Robert L.

    1 Bus Fleet Type and Age Replacement Optimization: A case study utilizing King County Metro fleet and a hybrid bus. Employing real-world bus fleet data from King County Metro (Washington State, USA) multiple Metro (Washington State, USA) operates about 1,300 vehicles with multiple bus technologies (electric

  10. Interim Evaluation Results from New Flyer/Allison Hybrid Buses at King County Metro: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Eberts, E.; Eudy, L.

    2005-05-01

    This paper prepared for the 2005 American Public Transportation Association Bus & Paratransit Conference discusses NREL/DOE evaluation of hybrid electric articulated transit buses operated by King County Metro.

  11. Declines in student obesity prevalence associated with a prevention initiative - King County, Washington, 2012.

    PubMed

    Kern, Eli; Chan, Nadine L; Fleming, David W; Krieger, James W

    2014-02-21

    The United States has invested heavily, through public and private sector initiatives, in actions to prevent youth obesity by promoting healthy eating and physical activity. This report documents recent trends in youth obesity in King County, Washington, which implemented a Communities Putting Prevention to Work (CPPW) obesity prevention initiative during 2010-2012, including a school-based component. Similar large-scale obesity prevention initiatives did not occur elsewhere in Washington. Beginning in 2004, the Washington State Department of Health began monitoring youth obesity through the biennially administered Washington State Healthy Youth Survey (HYS). Based on data from this survey, neither King County nor the rest of Washington showed statistically significant changes in obesity prevalence in 2006, 2008, and 2010, relative to 2004. In 2012, however, King County youth obesity prevalence showed a statistically significant decrease, while no change occurred in the remainder of the state. Within King County, CPPW was implemented only in low-income school districts to address geographic inequities in obesity rates. Analysis within King County comparing CPPW and non-CPPW school districts before and after the intervention (2010 versus 2012) revealed a statistically significant decline in obesity prevalence in CPPW schools yet no change in non-CPPW schools. This decline in CPPW schools was significantly different than in non-CPPW schools. These findings suggest that school-based policy, systems, and environment changes might help reduce youth obesity, warranting further evaluation of short- and long-term impacts on population health. PMID:24553199

  12. Fifth Annual Report: 2008 Pre-Construction Eelgrass Monitoring and Propagation for King County Outfall Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, Dana L.; Judd, Chaeli; Thom, Ronald M.; Sather, Nichole K.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.

    2010-01-01

    This is the fifth and final report in a series documenting progress of the pre-construction eelgrass restoration and mitigation activities for the proposed King County Brightwater marine outfall, discharging to Puget Sound near Point Wells, Washington. King County began implementing a multiyear eelgrass monitoring and restoration program in 2004, with the primary goal of returning intertidal and shallow subtidal habitat and eelgrass to pre-construction conditions, after construction of the outfall. Major eelgrass mitigation program elements include: a) pre-construction monitoring, i.e., documenting initial eelgrass conditions and degree of fluctuation over a 5 year period prior to construction, b) eelgrass transplanting, including harvesting, offsite propagation and stockpiling of local plants for post-construction planting, and c) post-construction planting and subsequent monitoring, occurring in 2009 and beyond. The overall program is detailed in the Eelgrass Restoration and Biological Resources Implementation Workplan (King County 2008).

  13. Geology and ground-water resources of northwestern King County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liesch, Bruce A.; Price, Charles E.; Walters, Kenneth L.

    1963-01-01

    King County, in the west-central part of the State of Washington, includes about 2,135 square miles. The eastern part of the county lies in the Sierra-Cascade Mountains province and the remainder is in the Puget Trough of the Pacific Border province. The area covered by the present investigation is almost entirely within the Puget Trough and includes about 450 square miles.

  14. King County Nearshore Habitat Mapping Data Report: Picnic Point to Shilshole Bay Marina

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dana L. Woodruff; Paul J. Farley; Amy B. Borde; John A. Southard; Ronald M. Thom

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study is to provide\\u000aaccurate, georeferenced maps of benthic habitats\\u000ato assist in the siting of a new wastewater\\u000atreatment plant outfall and the assessment of\\u000ahabitats of endangered, threatened, and\\u000aeconomically important species. The mapping was\\u000aconducted in the fall of 1999 using two\\u000acomplementary techniques: side-scan sonar and\\u000aunderwater videography. Products derived from\\u000athese

  15. Upper Strawn (Desmoinesian) carbonte and clastic depositional environments, southeastern King County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Boring, T.H. (Oryx Energy Co., Oklahoma City, OK (USA))

    1990-02-01

    The Pennsylvanian upper Strawn Group of southeastern King County, Texas, provides a unique setting to study interactions between coeval carbonate and clastic deposition during the Desmoinesian. One of the most perplexing problems is the relationship of massive Pennsylvanian platform carbonates to shallow-water terrigenous clastic sediments. Within the study area, carbonate facies were deposited along the northern edge of the Knox-Baylor trough on the Spur platform, and terrigenous clastics were carried toward the Midland basin through the Knox-Baylor trough. Based on the analysis of subsurface cores, five carbonate lithofacies and four clastic lithofacies were recognized in southeastern King County, Texas. The distribution and geometry of these lithofacies are related to variations in the rate of subsidence in the Knox-Baylor trough, Pennsylvanian tectonics, deltaic progradation, avulsion, and compaction. The platform carbonates within the northern region of southeastern King County record environments within the carbonate platform complex, including middle platform, outer platform, algal mound, and platform margin. The quartzarenitic sandstones within the southern region of southeastern King County occur in a variety of complex depositional geometries, including distributary-bar fingers, lobate deltas, and offshore bars. Cores of these sandstones represent mainly the uppermost portion of the various sandstone bodies. The upper Strawn Group provides an attractive area for exploration geology. Both carbonates and clastics provide excellent reservoirs from a depth of approximately 5,000-6,000 ft. Total production within the area is over 100 million bbl of oil since the early 1940s. Multiple pay zones within a 600-ft interval also provide an added incentive for exploration. Areas within and around the Knox-Baylor trough deserve a detailed study due to these relatively shallow, unexplored, multiple pay zones.

  16. Arterial roads and area socioeconomic status are predictors of fast food restaurant density in King County, WA

    PubMed Central

    Hurvitz, Philip M; Moudon, Anne V; Rehm, Colin D; Streichert, Laura C; Drewnowski, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Background Fast food restaurants reportedly target specific populations by locating in lower-income and in minority neighborhoods. Physical proximity to fast food restaurants has been associated with higher obesity rates. Objective To examine possible associations, at the census tract level, between area demographics, arterial road density, and fast food restaurant density in King County, WA, USA. Methods Data on median household incomes, property values, and race/ethnicity were obtained from King County and from US Census data. Fast food restaurant addresses were obtained from Public Health-Seattle & King County and were geocoded. Fast food density was expressed per tract unit area and per capita. Arterial road density was a measure of vehicular and pedestrian access. Multivariate logistic regression models containing both socioeconomic status and road density were used in data analyses. Results Over one half (53.1%) of King County census tracts had at least one fast food restaurant. Mean network distance from dwelling units to a fast food restaurant countywide was 1.40 km, and 1.07 km for census tracts containing at least one fast food restaurant. Fast food restaurant density was significantly associated in regression models with low median household income (p < 0.001) and high arterial road density (p < 0.001) but not with percent of residents who were nonwhite. Conclusion No significant association was observed between census tract minority status and fast food density in King County. Although restaurant density was linked to low household incomes, that effect was attenuated by arterial road density. Fast food restaurants in King County are more likely to be located in lower income neighborhoods and higher traffic areas. PMID:19630979

  17. The Impact of a Community-Based Chronic Disease Prevention Initiative: Evaluation Findings from "Steps to Health King County"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheadle, Allen; Bourcier, Emily; Krieger, James; Beery, William; Smyser, Michael; Vinh, Diana V.; Lessler, Dan; Alfonsi, Lorrie

    2011-01-01

    "Steps to Health King County" ("Steps KC"; Seattle, Washington) was one of 40 community-level initiatives funded in 2003 as part of the "Steps to a HealthierUS" initiative. "Steps KC" goals included reducing the impact of chronic diseases through a comprehensive, coordinated approach and reducing health disparities due to chronic illness. "Steps…

  18. Uranium in the Copper King Mine, Black Hawk No. 1 Claim, Larimer County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granger, Harry Clifford; King, Robert Ugstad

    1951-01-01

    Radioactive rock was discovered on the dump of the Copper King mine, sec. 8, T. 10 N., R. 72 W., Larirrier County, Colo., in the summer of 1949. The mine had been prospected intermittently for copper and zinc since 1,916, but there is no record that ore was produced. The country rock is pre-Cambrian granite containing many schist inclusions and narrow pegmatite dikes. Pitchblende disseminated in chlorite and sulfides was deposited in an obscure vein system during an intermediate stage of mineralization. This stage was preceded by biotitic alteration of amphiboles and sulfide deposition. The latest stage of mineralization is represented-by the limonitic dense quartz vein followed during mining. The uranium-bearing vein is about 2-3 feet wide and the dense quartz vein is less than 6 inches wide. Both veins are bordered by 1-3 feet of biotite- and sulfide-bearing granite and arriphibole schist. The uranium content of 26 samples taken in the mine and on the dump ranges from 0.002 to 1.40 percent. These samples contained as much as 2.97 percent copper and 5.96 percent zinc. The general outlook for further prospecting near the Copper King shaft is not favorable, because much of the 'immediately surrounding area has been thoroughly investigated without finding abnormal radioactivity. The most favorable environment for concentration of uranium minerals appears to have been in or near schist inclusions in granite, and further exploration in nearby prospects may result in the discovery of other uranium-bearing deposits. In the Copper King mine, additional exploration would aid in determining the extent of the uranium-bearing material.

  19. Numerical model of the salt-wedge reach of the Duwamish River estuary, King County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prych, Edmund A.; Haushild, W.L.; Stoner, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical model of a salt-wedge estuary developed by Fischer (1974) has been expanded and used to calculate the distributions of salinity, temperature, chlorophyll a concentration, biochemical oxygen demand, and dissolved-oxygen concentration in the Duwamish River estuary, King County, Wash. The model was used to predict the dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the Duwamish River estuary when the Renton Treatment Plant sewage-effluent discharge is increased to its proposed maximum of 223 cubic feet per second. The computed monthly average dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the estuary decreased by a maximum of 2 milligrams per liter when compared with computations for the summer of 1971, when the effluent discharge averaged 37 cubic feet per second. The increase in effluent discharge is not expected to cause large changes in phytoplankton concentrations in the estuary. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. Upper Strawn (Desmoinesian) carbonate and clastic depositional environments, SE King County, TX

    SciTech Connect

    Boring, T.H. (Oryx Energy Co., Oklahoma City, OK (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The Pennsylvanian upper Strawn Group of southeast King County, Texas, provides a unique setting to study interactions between coeval carbonate and clastic deposition during the Desmoinesian. One of the most perplexing problems is the relationship of massive Pennsylvanian platform carbonates to shallow-water marine and deltaic sediments. Within the study area carbonate facies were deposited along the northern edge of the Knox-Baylor trough on the Spur platform, and terrigenous clastics were carried toward the Midland basin through the Knox-Baylor trough. Based on the analysis of subsurface cores, five carbonate lithofacies and four clastic lithofacies were recognized in southeast King County, Texas. The distribution and geometry of these lithofacies are related to variations in the rate of subsidence in the Knox-Baylor trough, Pennsylvanian tectonics, deltaic progradation, avulsion and compaction. The platform carbonates within the northern region record environments within the carbonate platform complex, including middle platform, outer platform, algal mound, and platform margin. The quartzarenitic sandstones within the southern region occur in a variety of complex depositional geometries, including distributary bar fingers, lobate deltas, and offshore bars. The upper Strawn Group provides an attractive area for exploration geology. Both carbonates and clastics provide excellent reservoirs from a depth of approximately 5,000 to 6,000 ft. Total production since the early 1940s, within the area is over 100,000,000 bbl of oil. Multiple pay zones within a 600-ft interval also provide an added incentive for exploration. Areas within and around the Knox-Baylor trough deserve additional study due to these relatively shallow, unexplored, multiple pay zones.

  1. Increased mortality associated with extreme-heat exposure in King County, Washington, 1980-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaksen, Tania Busch; Fenske, Richard A.; Hom, Elizabeth K.; Ren, You; Lyons, Hilary; Yost, Michael G.

    2015-05-01

    Extreme heat has been associated with increased mortality, particularly in temperate climates. Few epidemiologic studies have considered the Pacific Northwest region in their analyses. This study quantified the historical (May to September, 1980-2010) heat-mortality relationship in the most populous Pacific Northwest County, King County, Washington. A relative risk (RR) analysis was used to explore the relationship between heat and all-cause mortality on 99th percentile heat days, while a time series analysis, using a piece-wise linear model fit, was used to estimate the effect of heat intensity on mortality, adjusted for temporal trends. For all ages, all causes, we found a 10 % (1.10 (95 % confidence interval (CI), 1.06, 1.14)) increase in the risk of death on a heat day versus non-heat day. When considering the intensity effect of heat on all-cause mortality, we found a 1.69 % (95 % CI, 0.69, 2.70) increase in the risk of death per unit of humidex above 36.0 °C. Mortality stratified by cause and age produced statistically significant results using both types of analyses for: all-cause, non-traumatic, circulatory, cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and diabetes causes of death. All-cause mortality was statistically significantly modified by the type of synoptic weather type. These results demonstrate that heat, expressed as humidex, is associated with increased mortality on heat days, and that risk increases with heat's intensity. While age was the only individual-level characteristic found to modify mortality risks, statistically significant increases in diabetes-related mortality for the 45-64 age group suggests that underlying health status may contribute to these risks.

  2. Benthic megafauna of the nearshore zone of Martel Inlet (King George Island, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica): depth zonation and underwater observations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edmundo Ferraz Nonato; Tânia A. S. Brito; Paulo Cesar De Paiva; Monica A. V. Petti; Thais N. Corbisier

    2000-01-01

    The benthic megafauna from the soft bottoms of the shallow coastal zone of Martel Inlet (Admiralty Bay, King George Island,\\u000a South Shetland Islands, Antarctica) was studied during three austral summers (1989\\/1990, 1990\\/1991 and 1994\\/1995) in relation\\u000a to the bathymetric features. Surveying and sampling, based on specimen counting and underwater observations, were undertaken\\u000a by scuba-diving at depths down to 25?m. The

  3. Health assessment for Pacific Car and Foundry, Renton, King County, Washington, Region 10. CERCLIS No. WAD009249210. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-21

    Pacific Car and Foundry Company, Inc. (PACCAR), a National Priorities List site, is located in Renton, King County, Washington. The company manufactured railroad cars, trucks, military vehicles, and other industrial goods. Wastes from these manufacturing concerns were disposed of on-site in a landfill. During routine monitoring, contaminants were detected in environmental media including soils and groundwater. The contaminants were heavy metals, aromatic hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated hydrocarbons including biphenyls. Based upon the information reviewed, this site is of potential health concern because of the potential risk of exposure to contaminated groundwater and the exposure to dusts which may be generated during site remediation.

  4. Estimated agricultural ground-water pumpage in parts of Fresno, Kings, and Madera Counties, San Joaquin Valley, California, 1974-77

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitten, Hugh T.

    1978-01-01

    Agricultural ground-water pumpage data are presented for 1974-77 for the area on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley in parts of Fresno, Kings, and Madera Counties, Calif., which has approximately the boundaries of the Westlands Water District. The method of estimating pumpage was based on electric-power consumption at the agricultual wells. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. EDUCATING SHORELINE LANDOWNERS: EXAMPLES FROM KING, WHATCOM, KITSAP, JEFFERSON, MASON AND PIERCE COUNTIES A Perspective on Approaches and Effectiveness in eliciting on-the-ground change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathy Taylor; Hilary Culverwell; John Cambalik

    2005-01-01

    From 2001 to the present date, the Puget Sound Action Team (PSAT), a state entity charged with protecting and preserving the Sound, partnered with a large number of public and private entities, citizen's groups and universities to coordinate a series of educational workshops targeted at marine shoreline landowners in Jefferson, King, Kitsap, Pierce, Mason and Whatcom counties. The purpose of

  6. Average daily withdrawals of water for public supply in Kings, Queens, and Nassau Counties, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brashears, M.L., Jr.

    1950-01-01

    Since 1932 the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the New York Water Power and Control Commission, the Nassau County Department of Public Works, the Suffolk County Water Authority, and the Suffolk County Board of Supervisors has conducted studies dealing with the occurrence, movement, quantity, quality, and temperature of ground water on Long Island. Also, as a part of three investigations, data on the withdrawals by pumpage for public water supply are assembled an analyzed. Previously, pumpage records for periods from 1904 through 1946 have been released.

  7. Ten-year study of pediatric drownings and near-drownings in King County, Washington: lessons in injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Quan, L; Gore, E J; Wentz, K; Allen, J; Novack, A H

    1989-06-01

    The factors associated with submersion events among less than 20-year-old persons that occurred in King County from 1974 to 1983 were studied to focus prevention efforts. Near-drowning (n = 103) and drowning (n = 96) victims were identified from medical examiners' reports, paramedics' reports, and hospital discharge registers. Annual incidence was 5.5; the mortality rate was 2.6 per 100,000 children. Although preschool-aged children had the largest incidence (12.8), followed by older adolescents (4.9), adolescents had the largest case fatality rate, 77%. Lake and river victims had the largest incidence, mortality, and case fatality rate; swimming pools, the smallest case fatality rate (25%). A total of 89% of all victims had absent or no supervision; victims supervised by lifeguards had a 42% case fatality rate. Prior seizures were part of the history of 7.5% of all victims; 25% of fatal submersions by adolescents were associated with alcohol. Bathtub submersions were associated with child abuse in three of 16 preschool-aged children and epilepsy in four of five older children. Certain age groups and sites combined had the greatest incidence: preschool-aged children in swimming pools, infants in bathtubs, teenagers in lakes and rivers. Incidence decreased in public and semipublic pools coincident with fencing regulations. These findings suggest prevention strategies: extending fencing requirements to private pools, discouraging alcohol consumption during water sports, changing bathing practices of epileptics, and improving lifeguard efficacy. PMID:2726330

  8. Geologic Map of the Kings Mountain and Grover Quadrangles, Cleveland and Gaston Counties, North Carolina, and Cherokee and York Counties, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horton, J. Wright, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This geologic map of the Kings Mountain and Grover 7.5-min quadrangles, N.C.-S.C., straddles a regional geological boundary between the Inner Piedmont and Carolina terranes. The Kings Mountain sequence (informal name) on the western flank of the Carolina terrane in this area includes the Neoproterozoic Battleground and Blacksburg Formations. The Battleground Formation has a lower part consisting of metavolcanic rocks and interlayered schist and an upper part consisting of quartz-sericite phyllite and schist interlayered with quartz-pebble metaconglomerate, aluminous quartzite, micaceous quartzite, manganiferous rock, and metavolcanic rocks. The Blacks-burg Formation consists of phyllitic metasiltstone interlayered with thinner units of marble, laminated micaceous quartzite, hornblende gneiss, and amphibolite. Layered metamorphic rocks of the Inner Piedmont terrane include muscovite-biotite gneiss, muscovite schist, and amphibolite. The Kings Mountain sequence has been intruded by metatonalite and metatrondhjemite (Neoproterozoic), metagabbro and metadiorite (Paleozoic?), and the High Shoals Granite (Pennsylvanian). Layered metamorphic rocks of the Inner Piedmont in this area have been intruded by the Toluca Granite (Ordovician?), the Cherryville Granite and associated pegmatite (Mississippian), and spodumene pegmatite (Mississippian). Diabase dikes (early Jurassic) are locally present throughout the area. Ductile fault zones of regional scale include the Kings Mountain and Kings Creek shear zones. In this area, the Kings Mountain shear zone forms the boundary between the Inner Piedmont and Carolina terranes, and the Kings Creek shear zone separates the Battleground Formation from the Blacksburg Formation. Structural styles change across the Kings Mountain shear zone from steeply dipping layers, foliations, and folds on the southeast to gently and moderately dipping layers, foliations, and recumbent folds on the northwest. Mineral assemblages in the Kings Mountain sequence show a westward decrease from upper amphibolite facies (sillimanite zone) near the High Shoals Granite in the eastern side of the map area to upper greenschist (epidote-amphibolite) facies in the south-central part of the area near the Kings Mountain shear zone. Amphibolite-facies mineral assemblages in the Inner Piedmont terrane increase in grade from the kyanite zone near the Kings Mountain shear zone to the sillimanite zone in the northwestern part of the map area. Surficial deposits include alluvium in the stream valleys and colluvium along ridges and steep slopes. These quadrangles are unusual in the richness and variety of the mineral deposits that they contain, which include spodumene (lithium), cassiterite (tin), mica, feldspar, silica, clay, marble, kyanite and sillimanite, barite, manganese, sand and gravel, gold, pyrite, and iron.

  9. Rip Currents: Nearshore Fundamentals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-14

    This module provides insight into how nearshore circulation and wave dynamics are involved in rip current formation. Topics covered in this module include: nearshore terminology, circulation and waves, rip current characteristics, and rip current forcing mechanisms. This module is the second of three modules covering the forecasting of rip currents.

  10. Geologic map of southwestern Sequoia National Park and vicinity, Tulare County, California, including the Mineral King metamorphic pendant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisson, T. W.; Moore, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    From the late 1940s to the early 1990s, scientists of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) mapped the geology of most of Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, California, and published the results as a series of 15-minute (1:62,500 scale) Geologic Quadrangles. The southwest corner of Sequoia National Park, encompassing the Mineral King and eastern edge of the Kaweah 15-minute topographic quadrangles, however, remained unfinished. At the request of the National Park Service's Geologic Resources Division (NPS-GRD), the USGS has mapped the geology of that area using 7.5-minute (1:24,000 scale) topographic bases and high-resolution ortho-imagery. With partial support from NPS-GRD, the major plutons in the map area were dated by the U-Pb zircon method with the Stanford-USGS SHRIMP-RG ion microprobe. Highlights include: (1) Identification of the Early Cretaceous volcano-plutonic suite of Mineral King (informally named), consisting of three deformed granodiorite plutons and the major metarhyolite tuffs of the Mineral King metamorphic pendant. Members of the suite erupted or intruded at 130-140 Ma (pluton ages: this study; rhyolite ages: lower-intercept concordia from zircon results of Busby-Spera, 1983, Princeton Ph.D. thesis, and from Klemetti et al., 2011, AGU abstract) during the pause of igneous activity between emplacement of the Jurassic and Cretaceous Sierran batholiths. (2) Some of the deformation of the Mineral King metamorphic pendant is demonstrably Cretaceous, with evidence including map-scale folding of Early Cretaceous metarhyolite tuff, and an isoclinally folded aplite dike dated at 98 Ma, concurrent with the large 98-Ma granodiorite of Castle Creek that intruded the Mineral King pendant on the west. (3) A 21-km-long magmatic synform within the 99-100 Ma granite of Coyote Pass that is defined both by inward-dipping mafic inclusions (enclaves) and by sporadic, cm-thick, sharply defined mineral layering. The west margin of the granite of Coyote Pass overlies parts of the adjacent Mineral King pendant, and the pluton probably had an upward-flaring shape, with synformal layering and foliation resulting from compaction and mineral deposition (or flow sorting) at the floor of an elongate, melt-rich magma lens. The NPS-GRD has digitized the published USGS geologic quadrangles for Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, and a goal is to jointly release a geologic map of the combined Parks region.

  11. An unusual Middle Permian flora from the Blaine Formation (Pease River Group: Leonardian-Guadalupian Series) of King County, West Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DiMichele, W.A.; Hook, R.W.; Nelson, W.J.; Chaney, D.S.

    2004-01-01

    A new Middle Permian plant assemblage from South Ash Pasture in King County, Texas, may be the youngest and is certainly the most unusual flora known from the Permian of either West Texas or adjoining north-central Texas. Found serendipitously in the evaporite-rich upper Blaine Formation (Pease River Group, Guadalupian Series), the flora is of very low diversity despite intensive collecting efforts, and the affinities of nearly all taxa are enigmatic. The most common elements are parallel-veined leaves that resemble cordaites but that could be isolated pinnules of a pinnate leaf. Gigantopterid foliage is present but not assignable to any known taxon. A single foliar conifer specimen is too incomplete for assignment. Numerous reproductive organs, however, and an abundance of axes may represent conifers. Conchostracans, palaeoniscoid fish scales, and small heteropolar coprolites also occur in the deposit, which originated as a small, claystone-dominated channel fill in a coastal plain setting.

  12. Nearshore Sticky Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Juan; Vankataramani, Shankar; Dawson, Clint

    2015-04-01

    Wind- and current-driven flotsam, oil spills, pollutants, and nutrients, approaching the nearshore will frequently appear to park just beyond the break zone, where waves break. Moreover, the portion of these tracers that beach will do so only after a long time. In this environment we refer to the parking phenomenon as nearshore sticky waters, for which we offer a model when buoyant tracers are not subject to inertial effects. The solution to an asymptotic approximation to the model yields an explanation for the phenomenon and the conditions whereby it is expected to occur.

  13. Support Services for Exceptional Students: Fresno, Inyo, Kern, Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Mono, San Luis Obispo, and Tulare Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampel, Angelica; And Others

    Intended for use by vocational administrators responsible for mainstreaming handicapped students into vocational education classes, the resource guide lists and describes governmental and private agencies that provide vocational programs and support services for the handicapped on a local and statewide basis in the California counties of Fresno,…

  14. Lake Michigan: Nearshore Variability

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a high-resolution survey in the nearshore of Lake Michigan at a 20 meter contour using towed electronic instrumentation. The nearly 1200 km survey was conducted Sep 8-15, 2010. We also conducted six cross-contour tows. Along the survey tracks we sampled fixed stat...

  15. Lake Ontario: Nearshore Variability

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a high-resolution survey with towed electronic instrumentation along the Lake Ontario nearshore (720 km) at a 20 meter contour. The survey was conducted September 6-10, 2008 with a shorter 300 km survey conducted August 14-15 for comparing of temporal variability. ...

  16. Data and statistical summaries of background concentrations of metals in soils and streambed sediments in part of Big Soos Creek drainage basin, King County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prych, E.A.; Kresch, D.L.; Ebbert, J.C.; Turney, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-nine soil samples from 14 holes at 9 sites in part of the Big Soos Creek drainage basin in southwest King County, Washington, were collected and analyzed to obtain data on the magnitude and variability of background concentrations of metals in soils. Seven streambed-sediment samples and three streamwater samples from three sites also were collected and analyzed. These data are needed by regulating government agencies to determine if soils at sites of suspected contamination have elevated concentrations of metals, and to evaluate the effectiveness of remediation at sites with known contamination. Concentrations of 43 metals were determined by a total method, and concentrations of 17 metals were determined by a total-recoverable method and two different leaching methods. Metals analyzed for by all methods included most of those on the U.S. Environmental Protection agency list of priority pollutants, plus alluminum, iron, and manganese. Ranges of concentrations of metals determined by the total method are within ranges found by others for the conterminous United States. Concentrations of mercury, manganese, phosphorus, lead, selenium, antimony, and zinc as determined by the total method, and of some of these plus other metals as determined by the other methods were larger in shallow soil (less than 12 inches deep) than in deep soil (greater than 12 inches). Concentrations of metals in streambed sediments were more typical of shallow than deep soils.

  17. Nearshore Wave Modeling

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-14

    Ocean waves near shore impact public safety, commerce, navigation, and, of course recreation. Predicting these waves has driven efforts to model them for more than two decades. This module introduces forecasters to different nearshore wave models, including phase-resolving and 1- and 2-dimensional spectral models. It describes the processes that wave models simulate, the assumptions they make, the initial and boundary conditions required to run the models, and potential sources of error in model forecasts. While focusing on SWAN, the module also examines the Navy Standard surf Model and Bouss-2D.

  18. Average daily withdrawals of water for public supply from Kings, Queens, and Nassau Counties in Long Island, New York, from 1904 through 1953

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lusczynski, N.J.; Spiegel, S.J.

    1954-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the New York State Water Power and Control Commission, the Nassau County Department of Public Works, the Suffolk County Board of Supervisors, and the Suffolk County Water Authority has been conducting continuing investigations since 1932 on the ground-water resources in Long Island, N. Y. One of the several phases of these studies is the collection and tabulation of data on the withdrawals by pumpage for public supply.

  19. Innovation @ King's Innovation: King's strategic purpose

    E-print Network

    Applebaum, David

    Innovation @ King's Innovation: King's strategic purpose To work openly with others to create that matter to us To establish innovative behaviour as a quality recognised in career progression at King's. Innovation is not limited to business; it is at the heart of all vibrant public and private sector activity

  20. Predictability of nearshore sandbar behavior

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Pape

    2010-01-01

    Nearshore sandbars are ridges of sand that are commonly observed along sandy coasts in water depths less than 10 m. Sandbars are the last natural line of defense against the attack of storm waves on the coast and, accordingly, human measures to combat coastal erosion often involve changes in sandbar height or position by means of sand nourishments. Over time,

  1. 2. Photocopy of photograph (from Moses King, Philadelphia and Notable ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of photograph (from Moses King, Philadelphia and Notable Philadelphians , 1902, p. 260) OBLIQUE VIEW, SHOWING SOUTH (FRONT) AND EAST(SIDE) ELEVATIONS - Old U.S. Mint, Chestnut & Juniper Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  2. Summary Report of a Study to Assist in the Development of a Regional Occupational Center System in Tulare and Kings Counties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tadlock, Max; And Others

    A study by Management and Economic Research, Inc. (MERI) of the occupational education in a 2-county area analyzed employer and student needs and existing facilities. To reduce wasteful competition, it recommended a change from local to area planning and the organization of a Regional Occupational Center (ROC) System with subsystems in contiguous…

  3. The King and I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Mary Grace

    2009-01-01

    This year marks the 40th anniversary of the first Coretta Scott King Book Award, which encourages "the artistic expression of the black experience via literature and the graphic arts." The award, which began honoring illustrators in 1974, added the John Steptoe Award for New Talent in 1995. No doubt, past King award winners like Sharon Flake,…

  4. The King's anaesthetic.

    PubMed

    Conacher, I D

    2015-08-01

    King George VI underwent an operation for pneumonectomy in September 1951. Part of the operation anaesthetic record has survived. With conjecture, on a typical scenario of a 55-year-old male undergoing pulmonary resection for carcinoma in the early 1950s and other facts in the public domain, the King's anaesthetic has been reconstructed to give an approximation of the events that in the last few months of his life caused his speech to change from that achieved by his personal voice coach and recently portrayed on celluloid in the film 'The King's Speech'. The popularity and success of the film 'The King's Speech' brought to mind that King George VI died of bronchogenic carcinoma, a result, not recognised at the time, of the cigarette smoking habit that is a prominent feature of the story in celluloid. PMID:24585602

  5. 75 FR 18235 - Paiute Cutthroat Trout Restoration Project, Alpine County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ...historical range within the Silver King Creek watershed, Alpine County, California. To accomplish...now present in the Silver King Creek watershed between Llewellyn Falls and Silver King...streams outside the Silver King Creek watershed, including the North Fork of...

  6. Rethinking Exotic Plants: Using Citizen Observations in a Restoration Proposal for Kings Bay, Florida

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason M. Evans; Ann C. Wilkie; Jeffrey Burkhardt; Richard P. Haynes

    2007-01-01

    The Kings Bay, Crystal River complex, located in Citrus County, Florida, is one of the world's largest spring-fed ecosystems and a critical warm-water refuge for endangered Florida manatees. Unfortunately, large areas of Kings Bay are currently in a state of ecological degradation characterized by smothering mats of the filamentous cyanobacterium Lyngbya wollei. The causes of this ecosystem shift are not

  7. The William King Server

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    McCain, Roger A.

    Named in honor of the Reverend William King, Roger A. McCain, Drexel University, aims to promote a discussion of the ideal of a Cooperative Commonwealth at the William King Server site. McCain's views on capitalism, socialist economic systems, democracy, and game theory are provided in addition to background information on cooperative commonwealth. Instructional material (discussed in the September 25, 1997 Scout Report for Business & Economics), game theory examples, and working papers by Roger McCain are provided.

  8. AirMSPI King's County Hanford, CA

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-04-29

    ... grounds for algae that make the surface green.  The water surface reflects highly polarized light at this particular viewing angle ... pollution particles, as well as information about land and water surfaces.  More information on the PODEX campaign, including an ...

  9. Nearshore carbonate deposits in Lake Tanganyika

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew S. Cohen; Catherine Thouin

    1987-01-01

    An exceptionally wide variety of carbonate fades, dominated by high-magnesian calcite, occurs along the littoral and shallow sublittoral zones (<50 m) of Lake Tanganyika in central Africa. These facies include exposed and submerged, calcite-cemented ridges of nearshore terrigenous sand, ooid sand shoals, and lithified oolite ridges, Chara meadows of bioturbated calcareous silts, gastropod shell blankets and related coquinas, and extensive

  10. Monitoring landscape influence on nearshore condition

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major source of stress to the Great Lakes comes from tributary and landscape run-off. The large number of watersheds and the disparate landuse within them create variability in the tributary input along the extent of the nearshore. Identifying the local or regional response t...

  11. Lake Michigan Green Bay: Nearshore Variability

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a high-resolution survey in the nearshore of Lake Michigan?s Green Bay at a 15 meter contour using towed electronic instrumentation. The 365 km survey was conducted Aug 18-21, 2010. We also conducted four cross-contour tows. Along the survey tracks we sampled fixe...

  12. On the complexity of kings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edith Hemaspaandra; Till Tantau; Osamu Watanabe

    2010-01-01

    A king in a directed graph is a vertex from which each vertex in the graph can be reached through paths of length at most two. There is a broad literature on tournaments (completely oriented digraphs), and it has been known for more than half a century that all tournaments have at least one king. Recently, kings have proven useful

  13. An evaluation of effects of groundwater exchange on nearshore habitats and water quality of western Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haack, Sheridan K.; Neff, Brian P.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; Savino, Jacqueline F.; Lundstrom, Scott C.

    2005-01-01

    Historically, the high potentiometric surface of groundwater in the Silurian/Devonian carbonate aquifer in Monroe County, MI resulted in discharge of highly mineralized, SO4-rich groundwater to the Lake Erie shoreline near both Erie State Game Area (ESGA) and Pointe Mouillee State Game Area (PMSGA). Recently, regional groundwater levels near PMSGA have been drawn down as much as 45 m below lake level in apparent response to quarry dewatering. From August to November of 2003, we conducted preliminary studies of groundwater flow dynamics and chemistry, shallow lake water chemistry, and fish and invertebrate communities at both sites. Consistent with regional observations, groundwater flow direction in the nearshore at ESGA was upward, or toward Lake Erie, and shallow nearshore groundwater chemistry was influenced by regional groundwater chemistry. In contrast, at PMSGA, the groundwater flow potential was downward and lake water, influenced by quarry discharge seeping downward into nearshore sediments, produced a different lake and shallow groundwater chemistry than at ESGA. Although the invertebrate and young fish community was similar at the two sites, taxonomic groups tolerant of degraded water quality were more prevalent at PMSGA. Sensitive taxa were more prevalent at ESGA. We propose a conceptual model, based on well-described models of groundwater/seawater interaction along coastal margins, to describe the interconnection among geologic, hydrologic, chemical, and biological processes in the different nearshore habitats of Lake Erie, and we identify processes that warrant further detailed study in the Great Lakes.

  14. On the Complexity of Kings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edith Hemaspaandra; Till Tantau; Osamu Watanabe

    2007-01-01

    A k-king in a directed graph is a node from which each node in the graph can be reached via paths of length at most k. Recently, kings have proven useful in theoretical computer science, in particular in the study of the complexity of reachability\\u000a problems and semifeasible sets. In this paper, we study the complexity of recognizing k-kings. For each

  15. Lake Michigan: Nearshore variability and a nearshore-offshore distinction in water quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a high-resolution survey of the Lake Michigan nearshore using towed electronic instrumentation and fixed station sampling (1049 km at the approximate 20-m depth contour and grab samples at 15 sites). The principal variability in the alongshore reach was generally re...

  16. Spatial dynamics of a nearshore, micronekton sound-scattering layer

    E-print Network

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.

    ; accepted 5 March 2003. K. J. Benoit-Bird: Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology and Department of ZoologySpatial dynamics of a nearshore, micronekton sound-scattering layer Kelly J. Benoit-Bird and Whitlow W. L. Au Benoit-Bird, K. J., and Au, W. W. L. 2003. Spatial dynamics of a nearshore, micronekton

  17. Coastal and Nearshore An introduction to the basics

    E-print Network

    Pym, David J.

    SCIENCE and MANAGEMENT #12;Coastal and Nearshore Processes An introduction to the basics C oastal of society in the coastal zone has never been greater. In response the University of Aberdeen has developed a course designed to provide an introduction to coastal and nearshore processes important in the management

  18. .. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in nearshore marine sediments of Australia*

    E-print Network

    Canberra, University of

    143 . .. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in nearshore marine sediments of Australia* W.A. Maher and J. Aislabiet Water Research Centre, University of Canberra, PO Box /, Belconnen,ACT 26/6, Australia aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in nearshore marine sediments of Australia isdiscussed. Available information

  19. Community structure in nearshore Permian environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kaesler, R.L.; Denver, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    The lower part of the Americus Limestone in the Midcontinent was deposited near shore. Environments ranged from tidal flats to open-marine settings and included lagoons and carbonate shoals. Tabular cryptalgal structures that show subtle morphological variations with environment are the dominant sedimentary feature of the rocks. The fossilized part of benthic marine communities associated with the cyanobacteria comprised attached foraminifera, Spirorbis worms, several species of immature gastropods too small to identify, rare clams of the genus Orthomyalina, and abundant ostracodes. A low-diversity, characteristically near-shore ostracode fauna was extracted from the cryptalgal limestone by crushing the rock and then following standard micropaleontological procedures. The most abundant species are Paraparchites humerosus, Sansabella bolliabormis, Bairdia beedei, and Cavellina nebrascensis, all of which are typical throughout the Midcontinent of rocks deposited in near-shore environments. The distribution and diversity of the ostracode fauna support paleoenvironmental interpretations based on carbonate petrology and the morphology and microstratigraphy of the cryptalgal structures. In general, rocks deposited on the tidal flat have lowest species diversity, whereas the faunas from rocks of the open-marine environment are more diverse. Distributions of ostracodes and morphology of cryptalgal structures were both sufficiently controlled by environment of deposition to permit discrimination of paleoenvironments in cores from the subsurface.

  20. 77 FR 15617 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Establishing a Manatee Refuge in Kings Bay, Citrus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ...result in the taking of one or more manatees and that certain waterborne...prevent the taking of one or more manatees in Kings Bay. In making...registered in Citrus County, 3,975 more than the 12,926 vessels registered...area come to Citrus County to enjoy water-based activities...

  1. DEEPWATER AND NEARSHORE FOOD WEB CHARACTERIZATIONS IN LAKE SUPERIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the difficulty associated with sampling deep aquatic systems, food web relationships among deepwater fauna are often poorly known. We are characterizing nearshore versus offshore habitats in the Great Lakes and investigating food web linkages among profundal, pelagic, and ...

  2. LIMNOLOGY OF MICHIGAN'S NEARSHORE WATERS OF LAKES SUPERIOR AND HURON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Limnological assessments, including water and sediment chemistry, bacterial densities, zoo- and phyto-plankton and benthic macroinvertebrate community structure, and fish contaminants, were performed at 24 locations in Michigan's nearshore waters of Lakes Superior and Huron in 19...

  3. Biogeography of Nearshore Subtidal Invertebrates in the Gulf of Maine

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biogeography of nearshore benthic invertebrates in the Gulf of Maine was studied to compare recent data with historical biogeographic studies, define physical-chemical factors affecting species distributions, and provide information needed to calibrate benthic indices of envi...

  4. Scaled herrings, Harengula jaguana (Clupeidae), inhabit nearshore (40-m

    E-print Network

    , 1985). They are an important link in the nearshore neritic food web as pred- ators of zooplankton-specific weight-length relation- ships were computed for each coast. Weight-length regressions from log10

  5. F. King Alexander ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

    E-print Network

    Harms, Kyle E.

    CHANCELLOR F. King Alexander ACADEMIC AFFAIRS EXECUTIVE VICE CHANCELLOR & PROVOST Stuart R. Bell, AND MATHEMATICAL LITERACY EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Randy Duran ACADEMIC CENTER FOR-- STUDENT ATHLETES EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, LEARNING, AND LEADERSHIP DIRECTOR Marybeth Lima CONTINUING EDUCATION-- EXECUTIVE DIRETOR Doug Weimer

  6. Reading backscatter from near-shore ocean waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-11-01

    Wave dynamics in near-shore environments play an important role in oceanic processes and shoreline change, but the breaking waves in these regions make it difficult for scientists to collect data and quantify wave behavior. Catalán et al. point out that looking at the radar wave scattering properties of these near-shore ocean waves can help scientists monitor surf zones at a safe distance from the hazardous waves.

  7. A spatial framework for representing nearshore ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregr, Edward J.; Lessard, Joanne; Harper, John

    2013-08-01

    The shallow, coastal regions of the world's oceans are highly productive ecosystems providing important habitat for commercial, forage, endangered, and iconic species. Given the diversity of ecosystem services produced or supported by this ecosystem, a better understanding of its structure and function is central to developing an ecosystem-based approach to management. However this region - termed the ‘white strip' by marine geologists because of the general lack of high-resolution bathymetric data - is dynamic, highly variable, and difficult to access making data collection challenging and expensive. Since substrate is a key indicator of habitat in this important ecosystem, our objective was to create a continuous substrate map from the best available bottom type data. Such data are critical to assessments of species distributions and anthropogenic risk. Using the Strait of Georgia in coastal British Columbia, Canada, as a case study, we demonstrate how such a map can be created from a diversity of sources. Our approach is simple, quantitative, and transparent making it amenable to iterative improvement as data quality and availability improve. We evaluated the ecological performance of our bottom patches using observed shellfish distributions. We found that observations of geoduck clam, an infaunal species, and red urchins, a species preferentially associated with hard bottom, were strongly and significantly associated with our soft and hard patches respectively. Our description of bottom patches also corresponded well with a more traditional, morphological classification of a portion of the study area. To provide subsequent analyses (such as habitat models) with some confidence in the defined bottom type values, we developed a corresponding confidence surface based on the agreement of, and distance between observations. Our continuous map of nearshore bottom patches thus provides a spatial framework to which other types of data, both abiotic (e.g., energy) and biotic, can be attached. As more data are associated with the bottom patches, we anticipate they will become increasingly useful for representing and developing species-habitat relationships, ultimately leading to a comprehensive representation of the nearshore ecosystem.

  8. Impacts of Cyclone Yasi on nearshore, terrigenous sediment-dominated reefs of the central Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, C. T.; Smithers, S. G.; Kench, P. S.; Pears, B.

    2014-10-01

    Tropical Cyclone (TC) Yasi (Category 5) was a large (~ 700 km across) cyclone that crossed Australia's Queensland coast on the 3rd of February 2011. TC Yasi was one of the region's most powerful recorded cyclones, with winds gusting to 290 km/h and wave heights exceeding 7 m. Here we describe the impacts of TC Yasi on a number of nearshore, turbid-zone coral reefs, that include several in the immediate vicinity of the cyclone's landfall path (King Reef, Lugger Shoal and Dunk Island), as well as a more distally located reef (Paluma Shoals) ~ 150 km to the south in Halifax Bay. These reefs were the focus of recent (between 2006 and 2009) pre-Yasi studies into their geomorphology, sedimentology and community structure, and here we discuss data from a recent (August 2011) post-Yasi re-assessment. This provided a unique opportunity to identify and describe the impacts of an intense tropical cyclone on nearshore reefs, which are often assumed to be vulnerable to physical disturbance and reworking due to their poorly lithified framework. Observed impacts of TC Yasi were site specific and spatially highly heterogeneous, but appear to have been strongly influenced by the contemporary evolutionary stage and ecological make-up of the individual reefs, with site setting (i.e. exposure to prevailing wave action) apparently more important than proximity to the landfall path. The most significant ecological impacts occurred at King Reef (probably a result of freshwater bleaching) and at Paluma Shoals, where widespread physical destruction of branched Acropora occurred. New coral recruits are, however, common at all sites and colony re-growth clearly evident at King Reef. Only localised geomorphic change was evident, mainly in the form of coral fracturing, rubble deposition, and sediment movement, but again these impacts were highly site specific. The dominant impact at Paluma Shoals was localised storm ridge/shingle sheet deposition, at Lugger Shoal major offshore fine sediment flushing, and at Dunk Island major onshore coarse sand deposition. There was little geomorphic change evident at King Reef. Thus whilst small-scale and taxa specific impacts from Cyclone Yasi are clearly evident, geomorphological changes appear minor and ecological impacts highly variable between sites, and there is no observed evidence for major reef structural change. The study suggests that the vulnerability of reefs to major physical disturbance events can be extremely site specific and determined by interacting factors of location relative to storm path and pre-event geomorphology and ecology.

  9. King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals

    E-print Network

    Al-Ghadhban, Samir

    King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Summer Training Report 2010 Abdul-Aziz Al ...........................................................................................13 #12;2 1. Introduction King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM) give an opportunity

  10. Word Art with King's Words OurStory: Martin Luther King Jr. and Nonviolence

    E-print Network

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    Word Art with King's Words OurStory: Martin Luther King Jr. and Nonviolence Read the "Directions or more composition by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., identify meaningful words and phrases, and create word Read Martin's Big Words together. Martin's Big Words is a biography of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr

  11. Assessing the Impact of Groundwater Pollution from Marine Caves on Nearshore Seagrass Beds in Bermuda 

    E-print Network

    Cate, Jenipher R.

    2010-01-14

    This investigation characterized karstic and nearshore environments of Bermuda to describe 1) behavior and periodicity of cave springs; 2) submarine spring water quality; and 3) nearshore marine seagrass density. Caves can be conduits...

  12. Evidence for distinct stocks of king mackerel,

    E-print Network

    Evidence for distinct stocks of king mackerel, Scomberomorus cavalla, in the Gulf of Mexico Allyn G.-Evidence support- ing a two stock hypothesis for king mackerel, Scomberornorus cavalla, in the Gulf of Mexico Nacional de la Pesca Mexico City. Mexico The king mackerel, Scomber- omorus cavalla, is a widely distrib

  13. [King Injo's disease and burnt needle therapy].

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Sook

    2004-12-01

    This paper investigates an interrelationship between burnt needle therapy and King Injo's disease. From 1633 (Year 11 in King Injo's reign) to May 5, 1649 (Year 27 in King Injo's reign), right before his death, King Injo was treated with burnt needles by Yi Hyeongik, an acupuncturist when the king had health problems. This study arises from two questions: why was King Injo often treated with burnt needles? and what effect did burnt needles have?Burnt needle therapy is a combined form of acupuncture and moxibustion. Yi Hyeongik was famous for eradicating pathogenic factors. He was appointed as a doctor in the Royal Hospital. The medical definition for pathogenic factors is that they are disease-causing factors. Understanding the pathogenic factor for King Injo's disease could make it possible to find the interrelationship between burnt needles and the king's disease. In the Joseon ear, the prevalent belief about diseases was that diseases could be caused by homeopathic magic. Some people thought homeopathic magic caused King Injo's disease. The actual reasons for King Injo's disease were the participation in the excessive rites of Queen Mother Inmok's funeral and the constant oppression from the Ching Dynasty after disgraceful defeat in the war. When King Injo started to be sick, homeopathic magic cases were found in the royal palace. The king's incurable disease was believed to have happened as a result of homeopathic magic. King Injo's suspicion toward Princess Jeongmyeong derived from her mother, Queen Mother Inmok. Moral justification for King Injo's coup was Gwanghaegun or Prince Gwanghae's immoral conduct toward Queen Mothe Inmok. After he was installed, King Injo obeyed the Queen Mother and showed her every attention. Meanwhile, he treated Princess Jeongmyeong with respect, maximized the moral justification for the coup, and solidified the royal authority. However, constant rebellions and treasons threatened King Injo. The king suspected that Queen Mother Inmok and Princess Jeongmyeong were involved in homeopathic magic cases because both figures could affect major rebellions and treasons. Homeopathic magic is a kind of ideological belief and psychological suspicion. Accordingly, burnt needle therapy could have an actual effect on treating the diseases of the body. It could have a psychological effect in treating pathogenic factors as well. As burnt needles were often used for the king's disease, remarkable development of acupuncture and moxibustion during the King Injo's era was a characteristic in the history of medical science in the Joseon Dynasty. PMID:15726754

  14. ENHANCED HYDRODYNAMICAL-NUMERICAL MODEL FOR NEAR-SHORE PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An optimized version of a multilayer Hansen type Hydrodynamical-Numerical (HN) model is presented and discussed here as the basis for the following experimental extensions and enhancements developed to more appropriately handle near-shore processes: Non-linear term extension to f...

  15. Bathymetry Estimation From Single-Frame Images of Nearshore Waves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristen D. Splinter; Robert A. Holman

    2009-01-01

    Existing methods for determining bathymetry from remotely sensed images of nearshore waves exploit only information on the magnitude of wavenumber (k = 2pi\\/L), ignoring spatial changes in wave direction thetas that can provide information about bathymetry gradients. These methods also require wave period information, so they can only be used when time series imagery is available. We present an algorithm

  16. South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study Myrtle Beach Nearshore Experiment

    E-print Network

    Voulgaris, George

    South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study Myrtle Beach Nearshore Experiment Dec. 10 to Dec. 15, 2003 Savannah Campus Savannah, Ga. Technical Report University of South Carolina CPSD Technical Report: CPSD/04 with the collection of offshore wave and current data as part of the U.S. Geological Survey South Carolina Coastal

  17. Ecology of Lake Superior: Linking Landscape to Nearshore Condition

    EPA Science Inventory

    High spatial variation is well known to exist in water quality parameters of the Great Lakes nearshore, however strong patterns for extended reaches are also observed and found to be robust across a seasonal time frame. Less is known about robustness of inter-annual variation wi...

  18. Phytoplankton community composition in nearshore coastal waters of Louisiana

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phytoplankton community compositions within near-shore coastal and estuarine waters of Louisiana were characterized by relative abundance, biovolume, and taxonomic identification to genus and species when possible. The range of total nitrogen was 0.5 to 1.3 mg L-1 and total phos...

  19. Monitoring in the nearshore: A process for making reasoned decisions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodkin, J.L.; Dean, T.A.

    2003-01-01

    Over the past several years, a conceptual framework for the GEM nearshore monitoring program has been developed through a series of workshops. However, details of the proposed monitoring program, e.g. what to sample, where to sample, when to sample and at how many sites, have yet to be determined. In FY 03 we were funded under Project 03687 to outline a process whereby specific alternatives to monitoring are developed and presented to the EVOS Trustee Council for consideration. As part of this process, two key elements are required before reasoned decisions can be made. These are: 1) a comprehensive historical perspective of locations and types of past studies conducted in the nearshore marine communities within Gulf of Alaska, and 2) estimates of costs for each element of a proposed monitoring program. We have developed a GIS database that details available information from past studies of selected nearshore habitats and species in the Gulf of Alaska and provide a visual means of selecting sites based (in part) on the locations for which historical data of interest are available. We also provide cost estimates for specific monitoring plan alternatives and outline several alternative plans that can be accomplished within reasonable budgetary constraints. The products that we will provide are: 1) A GIS database and maps showing the location and types of information available from the nearshore in the Gulf of Alaska; 2) A list of several specific monitoring alternatives that can be conducted within reasonable budgetary constraints; and 3) Cost estimates for proposed tasks to be conducted as part of the nearshore program. Because data compilation and management will not be completed until late in FY03 we are requesting support for close-out of this project in FY 04.

  20. Autiobiography of Philip B. King

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Philip Burke

    2000-01-01

    Philip Burke King's interests and methods of scientific inquiry were those of a field geologist who obtains his data from the rocks exposed at the Earth's surface and from them derives inferences as to the history and behavior of the Earth. He was especially interested in the sedimentary rocks, and interpreted the environments in which they were originally laid down and the relation of these environments to tectonic movements that were taking place in the Earth's crust.

  1. The King of Crustaceans: Lobsters

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-07-28

    In the north Atlantic, the American Lobster is the undisputed king of crustaceans. It’s also a tremendously important commercial catch. While all the other fisheries are collapsing, why are lobsters resisting the trend? In this video, Jonathan goes out with a Maine lobsterman to learn why, and he dives down below to find the biggest lobsters he has ever seen. This segment won a New England Emmy Award! Please see the accompanying study guide for educational objectives and discussion points.

  2. California coast nearshore processes study. [nearshore currents, sediment transport, estuaries, and river discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirie, D. M.; Steller, D. D. (principal investigators)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Large scale sediment plumes from intermittent streams and rivers form detectable seasonal patterns on ERTS-1 imagery. The ocean current systems, as plotted from three California coast ERTS mosaics, were identified. Offshore patterns of sediment in areas such as the Santa Barbara Channel are traceable. These patterns extend offshore to heretofore unanticipated ranges as shown on the ERTS-1 imagery. Flying spot scanner enhancements of NASA tapes resulted in details of subtle and often invisible (to the eye) nearshore features. The suspended sediments off San Francisco and in Monterey Bay are emphasized in detail. These are areas of extremely changeable offshore sediment transport patterns. Computer generated contouring of radiance levels resulted in maps that can be used in determining surface and nearsurface suspended sediment distribution. Tentative calibrations of ERTS-1 spectral brightness against sediment load have been made using shipboard measurements. Information from the combined enhancement and interpretation techniques is applicable to operational coastal engineering programs.

  3. 76 FR 73761 - Notice to Rescind the Notice of Intent to Develop the Environmental Impact Statement: Kings...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ...This segment of the BQE extends from Atlantic Avenue to Sands Street and encompasses 21 structures including a unique 0...Brooklyn Queens Expressway in Kings County, New York, from Sands Street on the east to Atlantic Avenue on the west. The...

  4. 78 FR 59414 - Environmental Impact Statement; King County, Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ...I-405, which is in the Cross-Lake Washington Corridor, and (2) contribute...project . . . '' The Cross-Lake Washington Corridor includes the I-90...employment and population centers over Lake Washington, a 22-mile-long body...

  5. Nearshore oscillating wave surge converters and the development of Oyster.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Trevor; Folley, Matt

    2012-01-28

    Oscillating wave surge converters (OWSCs) are a class of wave power technology that exploits the enhanced horizontal fluid particle movement of waves in the nearshore coastal zone with water depths of 10-20 m. OWSCs predominantly oscillate horizontally in surge as opposed to the majority of wave devices, which oscillate vertically in heave and usually are deployed in deeper water. The characteristics of the nearshore wave resource are described along with the hydrodynamics of OWSCs. The variables in the OWSC design space are discussed together with a presentation of some of their effects on capture width, frequency bandwidth response and power take-off characteristics. There are notable differences between the different OWSCs under development worldwide, and these are highlighted. The final section of the paper describes Aquamarine Power's 315?kW Oyster 1 prototype, which was deployed at the European Marine Energy Centre in August 2009. Its place in the OWSC design space is described along with the practical experience gained. This has led to the design of Oyster 2, which was deployed in August 2011. It is concluded that nearshore OWSCs are serious contenders in the mix of wave power technologies. The nearshore wave climate has a narrower directional spread than the offshore, the largest waves are filtered out and the exploitable resource is typically only 10-20% less in 10 m depth compared with 50 m depth. Regarding the devices, a key conclusion is that OWSCs such as Oyster primarily respond in the working frequency range to the horizontal fluid acceleration; Oyster is not a drag device responding to horizontal fluid velocity. The hydrodynamics of Oyster is dominated by inertia with added inertia being a very significant contributor. It is unlikely that individual flap modules will exceed 1?MW in installed capacity owing to wave resource, hydrodynamic and economic constraints. Generating stations will be made up of line arrays of flaps with communal secondary power conversion every 5-10 units. PMID:22184665

  6. A numerical model of nearshore waves, currents, and sediment transport

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pham Thanh Nam; Magnus Larson; Hans Hanson; Le Xuan Hoan

    2009-01-01

    A two-dimensional numerical model of nearshore waves, currents, and sediment transport was developed. The multi-directional random wave transformation model formulated by Mase [Mase, H., 2001. Multi-directional random wave transformation model based on energy balance equation. Coastal Engineering Journal 43(4), 317-337.] based on an energy balance equation was employed with an improved description of the energy dissipation due to breaking. In

  7. Scour and Burial Mechanics of Objects in the Nearshore

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott A. Jenkins; Douglas L. Inman; Michael D. Richardson; Thomas F. Wever; Joseph Wasyl

    2007-01-01

    A process-based, numerical, hydrodynamic vortex lattice mine scour\\/burial model (VORTEX) is presented that simulates scour and burial of objects of arbitrary shape resting on a granular bed in the nearshore. There are two domains in the model formulation: a far-field where burial and exposure occur due to changes in the elevation of the seabed and a near-field involving scour and

  8. Simulation of laboratory rip current experiments using nearshore POM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newberger, P. A.; Allen, J. S.

    2002-12-01

    A hydrostatic primitive equation model, the Princeton Ocean Model (POM), has been adapted for studies of three-dimensional wave-averaged circulation in the nearshore surf zone. The model is applied here to studies of the generation and instablilities of rip currents forced by waves normal to a beach with an alongshore bar interrupted by rip channels. The rip-current system modeled is that generated in the Directional Wave Basin located in the Ocean Engineering Laboratory at the University of Delaware. POM has been modified for application to nearshore flows by incorporating forcing from gradients in the radiation stress tensor and by including the effects of wave-induced mass flux through appropriate boundary conditions on the vertical velocity at the surface. The wave-driver REF/DIF (Kirby and Dalrymple, 1983) has been embedded as a subroutine of nearshore POM so that modification of the forcing by wave-current interaction can be included. The model results are compared with laboratory measurements of currents and surface elevation (Haller and Dalrymple, 1999; Haas and Svendsen, 2002). Instantaneous and time-mean momentum balances of both the three-dimensional and depth-averaged flows are calculated. Emphasis is placed on the variations of the currents with depth. The sensitivity of the rip current system to changes in the strength of the forcing and to details of the topography is examined.

  9. Practical use of video imagery in nearshore oceanographic field studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, K.T.; Holman, R.A.; Lippmann, T.C.; Stanley, J.; Plant, N.

    1997-01-01

    An approach was developed for using video imagery to quantify, in terms of both spatial and temporal dimensions, a number of naturally occurring (nearshore) physical processes. The complete method is presented, including the derivation of the geometrical relationships relating image and ground coordinates, principles to be considered when working with video imagery and the two-step strategy for calibration of the camera model. The techniques are founded on the principles of photogrammetry, account for difficulties inherent in the use of video signals, and have been adapted to allow for flexibility of use in field studies. Examples from field experiments indicate that this approach is both accurate and applicable under the conditions typically experienced when sampling in coastal regions. Several applications of the camera model are discussed, including the measurement of nearshore fluid processes, sand bar length scales, foreshore topography, and drifter motions. Although we have applied this method to the measurement of nearshore processes and morphologic features, these same techniques are transferable to studies in other geophysical settings.

  10. 21st Annual Martin Luther King Jr.

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    King's 1963 March on Washington. King presented a vision of an America that lives up to its ideals statistics gathered for its Uniform Crime Reporting Program, hate crimes against LGBTQ, Latino, Latina, the University of New Hampshire will examine some of the reasons behind this rise in hate acts, including racism

  11. 77 FR 24459 - Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 226 Under Alternative Site Framework Merced County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ...filed 12/23/2011) for authority to reorganize under the ASF with a service area which includes portions of Fresno, Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Stanislaus and Tulare Counties, California as its service area, as described in the application,...

  12. Atlas of Historical County Boundaries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    So you'd like to know the boundaries of Washington's King County in the early 20th century? Or perhaps you'd like to know more about the shape of Nassau County in New York back in the 19th century? The Atlas of Historical County Boundaries can provide you such details. The project is housed at the William M. Scholl Center for American History and Culture at The Newberry Library in Chicago and it was completed in 2010. The Atlas includes such features as all boundary changes in states and countries, non-county areas, separate map or polygon files for every different county configuration, and other helpful features. Users can get started by clicking on different states of interest and just exploring as they see fit. It's also useful to read over the Using the Atlas area for additional assistance. Finally, visitors can also look at the Publications section for more information on the source material for these county boundaries.

  13. Growth and Mortality of King Mackerel Scomberomorus cavalla

    E-print Network

    Growth and Mortality of King Mackerel Scomberomorus cavalla Tagged in the Southeastern United and Atlantic king mackerel groups. Table 1 Number of king mackerel Scomberomorus cavalla tag releases off Total 6416 2594 2674 809 Methods King mackerel captured by hook- and-line were marked with internal

  14. Towards an Operational Nearshore Wave Data Assimilation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeramony, J.; Orzech, M.; Ngodock, H. E.; Flampouris, S.

    2012-12-01

    For Navy operations, the model used for wave predictions in the nearshore is SWAN, which solves the spectral action balance equation to estimate the wave state. Boundary conditions for local (nearshore) model domains are generally obtained from regional model simulations that use either SWAN or WAVEWATCH III, which in turn gets boundary conditions from global simulations with WAVEWATCH III forced by the meteorological models. Inaccuracies in meteorological forcing and the coarse grid resolutions for the global model can lead to significant errors in SWAN's spectral estimates, particularly in shallow water. To improve the model's performance, especially for the small nearshore domains, we have developed a 4DVAR data assimilation system based on a tangent linear code and the corresponding adjoint from the numerical SWAN model. The system utilizes point measurements of 2D wave spectra, such as from a wave buoy, to improve the solution in the whole domain. Given a set of observations measured at different times and locations in the model domain, the assimilation system minimizes a cost function (representing overall error between the model and observations) and generates corrected boundary and initial conditions that optimize the fit of SWAN's output to the measurements. In addition to time dependence, the system accounts for nonlinear triad and quadruplet interactions, depth-limited breaking, wind forcing, bottom friction, and whitecapping as well as the influence of currents on waves. This presentation will review the current status of the system using simulations with data from Duck, North Carolina and the 2012 RIMPAC exercises held by the Commander, US Pacific Fleet in and around the Hawaiian Islands. Examples shown will include analysis of effects of using different background fields, and of assimilating different instruments simultaneously. Adjoint-generated sensitivity maps, which can be generated using the adjoint, will be used to demonstrate the optimal locations for deployment of instruments under varying wave conditions.

  15. Estimation of nearshore groundwater discharge and its potential effects on a fringing coral reef.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Ariel C; Watanabe, Atsushi; Nadaoka, Kazuo; Motooka, Shunsuke; Herrera, Eugene C; Yamamoto, Takahiro

    2011-04-01

    Radon (²²²Rn) measurements were conducted in Shiraho Reef (Okinawa, Japan) to investigate nearshore submarine groundwater discharge (SGD(nearshore)) dynamics. Estimated average groundwater flux was 2-3 cm/h (maximum 7-8 cm/h). End-member radon concentration and gas transfer coefficient were identified as major factors influencing flux estimation accuracy. For the 7-km long reef, SGD(nearshore) was 0.39-0.58 m³/s, less than 30% of Todoroki River's baseflow discharge. SGD(nearshore) was spatially and temporally variable, reflecting the strong influence of subsurface geology, tidal pumping, groundwater recharge, and hydraulic gradient. SGD(nearshore) elevated nearshore nitrate concentrations (0.8-2.2 mg/l) to half of Todoroki River's baseflow NO??-N (2-4 mg/L). This increased nearshore Chl-? from 0.5-2 ?g/l compared to the typically low Chl-? (< 0.1-0.4 ?g/l) in the moat. Diatoms and cyanobacteria concentrations exhibited an increasing trend. However, the percentage contributions of diatoms and cyanobacteria significantly decreased and increased, respectively. SGD may significantly induce the proliferation of cyanobacteria in nearshore reef areas. PMID:21295316

  16. Nearshore, seasonally persistent fronts in sea surface temperature on Red Sea tropical reefs

    E-print Network

    Pineda, Jesús

    Nearshore, seasonally persistent fronts in sea surface temperature on Red Sea tropical reefs. 2011. Nearshore, seasonally persistent fronts in sea surface temperature on Red Sea tropical reefs in sea surface temperature (SST) were observed, including cold fronts (colder inshore) during winter

  17. New Lower Permian fusulinids from Culberson County, Texas

    E-print Network

    Skinner, J. W.

    1971-06-30

    THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS June 30, 1971 Paper 53 NEW LOWER PERMIAN FUSULINIDS FROM CULBERSON COUNTY, TEXAS JOHN W. SKINNER Humble Oil & Refining Company, Midland, Texas ABSTRACT Six collections from the lower part... of the Baylor Mountains, Culberson County, of ledges is a relatively smooth slope, terminated by the cliff-forming limestone which caps the hill. According to P. B. KING & J. B. KNIGHT (U.S.C.. Oil and Gas Investigations Preliminary Map 2), the relatively smooth...

  18. Adjoint-Based Sensitivity Maps for the Nearshore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzech, Mark; Veeramony, Jay; Ngodock, Hans

    2013-04-01

    The wave model SWAN (Booij et al., 1999) solves the spectral action balance equation to produce nearshore wave forecasts and climatologies. It is widely used by the coastal modeling community and is part of a variety of coupled ocean-wave-atmosphere model systems. A variational data assimilation system (Orzech et al., 2013) has recently been developed for SWAN and is presently being transitioned to operational use by the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office. This system is built around a numerical adjoint to the fully nonlinear, nonstationary SWAN code. When provided with measured or artificial "observed" spectral wave data at a location of interest on a given nearshore bathymetry, the adjoint can compute the degree to which spectral energy levels at other locations are correlated with - or "sensitive" to - variations in the observed spectrum. Adjoint output may be used to construct a sensitivity map for the entire domain, tracking correlations of spectral energy throughout the grid. When access is denied to the actual locations of interest, sensitivity maps can be used to determine optimal alternate locations for data collection by identifying regions of greatest sensitivity in the mapped domain. The present study investigates the properties of adjoint-generated sensitivity maps for nearshore wave spectra. The adjoint and forward SWAN models are first used in an idealized test case at Duck, NC, USA, to demonstrate the system's effectiveness at optimizing forecasts of shallow water wave spectra for an inaccessible surf-zone location. Then a series of simulations is conducted for a variety of different initializing conditions, to examine the effects of seasonal changes in wave climate, errors in bathymetry, and variations in size and shape of the inaccessible region of interest. Model skill is quantified using two methods: (1) a more traditional correlation of observed and modeled spectral statistics such as significant wave height, and (2) a recently developed RMS spectral skill score summed over all frequency-directional bins. The relative advantages and disadvantages of these two methods are considered. References: Booij, N., R.C. Ris, and L.H. Holthuijsen, 1999: A third-generation wave model for coastal regions: 1. Model description and validation. J. Geophys. Res. 104 (C4), 7649-7666. Orzech, M.D., J. Veeramony, and H.E. Ngodock, 2013: A variational assimilation system for nearshore wave modeling. J. Atm. & Oc. Tech., in press.

  19. The Coretta Scott King Book Awards

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Coretta Scott King Book Award was founded in 1969 in honor of the late Mrs. Coretta Scott King, wife of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., for her passion and dedication to working for peace. The awards are given to â??outstanding African American authors and illustrators of books for children and young adults that demonstrate an appreciation of African American culture and universal human values.â? Created by the American Library Association, this page provides a variety of resources, including a section on the history of the award and a list of all past award winners. Another great facet of this page is the Coretta Scott King Book Awards Donation Grant. The goal of this program is to increase childrenâ??s access to books by building the libraries of nontraditional institutions that provide services to children. Within Resources and Bibliographies, a series of educational materials related to multicultural and diversity resources and collections are also available.

  20. Caliphs & Kings -- Freer & Sackler Galleries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Part of the continuing series of online exhibitions from the Smithsonian's Freer & Sackler Galleries, Caliphs & Kings provides a sample of the rich history of Islamic Spain, called al-Adalus, from the 8th to the 15th centuries. Online visitors can closely examine ten artworks selected from about ninety on display at the museum through October 2004. A featured work is a 10th century ivory pyxis, or cylindrical container, probably made as a special gift for the favorite concubine of the Umayyad caliph, that includes a poetic inscription in which the container speaks in the first person and describes its function as "a vessel for musk and camphor and ambergris." There are also examples of lusterware; textiles, both carpets and bed coverings; a walnut and ivory chest from Barcelona; an illuminated Hebrew bible from the second half of the 15th century; a gold coin for 50 excelentes issued in about 1497, and a map of the world drawn by Florentine cartographer Juan Vespucci, nephew of Amerigo Vespucci, in 1526 that shows Spain as a superpower at the center of all things.

  1. King's Health Partners Clinical Trials Office Supporting Clinical Research in King's Health Partners

    E-print Network

    Applebaum, David

    King's Health Partners Clinical Trials Office Supporting Clinical Research in King's Health patients · Follow protocol CONTRACT RESEARCH #12;The KHP-CTO What is a Non-commercial Clinical Trial ·Clinicians ·Clinical Research ·Routine Treatment Services ·Patients ·Clinicians ·Clinical Research ·Routine

  2. Dr. Max King: the sad life and early death of Mackenzie King's physician brother

    PubMed Central

    Gray, C

    1998-01-01

    While researching her best-selling biography, Mrs. King: The Life and Times of Isabel Mackenzie King, CMAJ contributing editor Charlotte Gray discovered a wealth of information about Dr. Dougal Macdougall (Max) King. Although he never became as famous as his older brother Mackenzie, Gray presents a convincing argument that Dr. Max King's life and early death speak volumes about medicine and the medical profession at the turn of the century. She also argues that Mackenzie King's own life would have been much different had his brother not died at the too young age of 42. Gray's book was nominated for the Viacom Award, which honours the best nonfiction book published annually in Canada. PMID:9580741

  3. The South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study: Nearshore Hydrodynamics Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, K. A.; Voulgaris, G.; Demir, H.; Work, P. A.; Hanes, D. M.

    2004-12-01

    As part of the South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study (SCCES) a nearshore field experiment was carried out for five days in December 2003 just north of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, providing measurements of the waves, currents and morphological evolution. This experiment occurred concurrently with an extensive field campaign several kilometers offshore which included measurements of the waves and currents on and near a significant sand shoal. The purpose of the nearshore experiment was to aid in the identification of the effect of the offshore shoal on the nearshore processes. The resulting dataset will be used for verification of numerical models being used to investigate the hydrodynamics of the region. The experiment was carried out from December 10 to December 15 and consisted of measurements of the waves and currents, extensive surveys of the bathymetry every day, grab samples of the sediments, and video imagery. The hydrodynamics were measured using two Sontek Triton downward-looking Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters and two Nortek AquaDopp profilers arranged in a cross-shore line from inside the swash to several surf zone widths past the breakers. The bathymetric surveying was accomplished using both a differential GPS system and a total station. Surveying was performed each day in order to capture the morphological changes. On the last day, seven sediment samples were taken along a single cross-section to determine the sediment characteristics across the beach. Additionally, a video camera was located on a balcony of the top floor of a nearby hotel providing an excellent field of view of the entire experimental area. Digital video was captured directly onto a computer during all daylight hours and many control points were surveyed in each day to facilitate rectification of the imagery. A variety of conditions were encountered during the experiment, including two storm fronts which passed through, generating wind speeds up to 15 m/s. The first storm generated waves from the south driving a longshore current towards the north. After several relatively calm days with nearly normal incident waves the second front passed through the area with strong wind and waves approaching the shore with a large angle of incidence from the north. This drove an extremely strong longshore current in excess of 1.4 m/s and caused significant morphological changes.

  4. Application of autonomous robotized systems for the collection of nearshore topographic changing and hydrodynamic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyakov, Vladimir; Makarov, Vladimir; Zezyulin, Denis; Kurkin, Andrey; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2015-04-01

    Hazardous phenomena in the coastal zone lead to the topographic changing which are difficulty inspected by traditional methods. It is why those autonomous robots are used for collection of nearshore topographic and hydrodynamic measurements. The robot RTS-Hanna is well-known (Wubbold, F., Hentschel, M., Vousdoukas, M., and Wagner, B. Application of an autonomous robot for the collection of nearshore topographic and hydrodynamic measurements. Coastal Engineering Proceedings, 2012, vol. 33, Paper 53). We describe here several constructions of mobile systems developed in Laboratory "Transported Machines and Transported Complexes", Nizhny Novgorod State Technical University. They can be used in the field surveys and monitoring of wave regimes nearshore.

  5. The role of wetlands as nearshore habitat in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilcox, Douglas A.

    1995-01-01

    Wetlands are generally considered to be among the most productive habitats on earth. As the landscape connection between upland and aquatic ecosystems, they posess many of the attributes of both systems and perform functions that extend beyond the wetland boundary into both systems. In Lake Huron, wetlands comprise a small fraction of the total area, but they provide nearshore habitat for many plant and animal species that are deemed important for the lake as a whole. Thus, their role is an important one. In this paper, after describing the general functions and types of wetlands, I will explore the importance of wetland habitat in Lake Huron by defining its extent, describing physical and biological processes, summarizing biological uses, and detailing management problems.

  6. Evolution of basic equations for nearshore wave field.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a systematic, overall view of theories for periodic waves of permanent form, such as Stokes and cnoidal waves, is described first with their validity ranges. To deal with random waves, a method for estimating directional spectra is given. Then, various wave equations are introduced according to the assumptions included in their derivations. The mild-slope equation is derived for combined refraction and diffraction of linear periodic waves. Various parabolic approximations and time-dependent forms are proposed to include randomness and nonlinearity of waves as well as to simplify numerical calculation. Boussinesq equations are the equations developed for calculating nonlinear wave transformations in shallow water. Nonlinear mild-slope equations are derived as a set of wave equations to predict transformation of nonlinear random waves in the nearshore region. Finally, wave equations are classified systematically for a clear theoretical understanding and appropriate selection for specific applications.(Communicated by Kiyoshi HORIKAWA, M.J.A.). PMID:23318680

  7. Evaluation of nearshore wave models in steep reef environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Mark; Lowe, Ryan; Hansen, Jeff

    2014-06-01

    To provide coastal engineers and scientists with a quantitative evaluation of nearshore numerical wave models in reef environments, we review and compare three commonly used models with detailed laboratory observations. These models are the following: (1) SWASH (Simulating WAves till SHore) (Zijlema et al. 2011), a phase-resolving nonlinear shallow-water wave model with added nonhydrostatic terms; (2) SWAN (Simulating WAve Nearshore) (Booij et al. 1999), a phase-averaged spectral wave model; and (3) XBeach (Roelvink et al. 2009), a coupled phase-averaged spectral wave model (applied to modeling sea-swell waves) and a nonlinear shallow-water model (applied to modeling infragravity waves). A quantitative assessment was made of each model's ability to predict sea-swell (SS) wave height, infragravity (IG) wave height, wave spectra, and wave setup () at five locations across the laboratory fringing reef profile of Demirbilek et al. (2007). Simulations were performed with the "recommended" empirical coefficients as documented for each model, and then the key wave-breaking parameter for each model ( ? in SWASH and ? in both SWAN and XBeach) was optimized to most accurately reproduce the observations. SWASH, SWAN, and XBeach were found to be capable of predicting SS wave height variations across the steep fringing reef profile with reasonable accuracy using the default coefficients. Nevertheless, tuning of the key wave-breaking parameter improved the accuracy of each model's predictions. SWASH and XBeach were also able to predict IG wave height and spectral transformation. Although SWAN was capable of modeling the SS wave height, in its current form, it was not capable of modeling the spectral transformation into lower frequencies, as evident in the underprediction of the low-frequency waves.

  8. Uncertainty Analysis and Parameter Estimation For Nearshore Hydrodynamic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardani, S.; Kaihatu, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Numerical models represent deterministic approaches used for the relevant physical processes in the nearshore. Complexity of the physics of the model and uncertainty involved in the model inputs compel us to apply a stochastic approach to analyze the robustness of the model. The Bayesian inverse problem is one powerful way to estimate the important input model parameters (determined by apriori sensitivity analysis) and can be used for uncertainty analysis of the outputs. Bayesian techniques can be used to find the range of most probable parameters based on the probability of the observed data and the residual errors. In this study, the effect of input data involving lateral (Neumann) boundary conditions, bathymetry and off-shore wave conditions on nearshore numerical models are considered. Monte Carlo simulation is applied to a deterministic numerical model (the Delft3D modeling suite for coupled waves and flow) for the resulting uncertainty analysis of the outputs (wave height, flow velocity, mean sea level and etc.). Uncertainty analysis of outputs is performed by random sampling from the input probability distribution functions and running the model as required until convergence to the consistent results is achieved. The case study used in this analysis is the Duck94 experiment, which was conducted at the U.S. Army Field Research Facility at Duck, North Carolina, USA in the fall of 1994. The joint probability of model parameters relevant for the Duck94 experiments will be found using the Bayesian approach. We will further show that, by using Bayesian techniques to estimate the optimized model parameters as inputs and applying them for uncertainty analysis, we can obtain more consistent results than using the prior information for input data which means that the variation of the uncertain parameter will be decreased and the probability of the observed data will improve as well. Keywords: Monte Carlo Simulation, Delft3D, uncertainty analysis, Bayesian techniques, MCMC

  9. CHANGES IN THE NEARSHORE AND OFFSHORE ZOOPLANKTON COMMUNITIES OF SOUTHEASTERN LAKE MICHIGAN

    E-print Network

    CHANGES IN THE NEARSHORE AND OFFSHORE ZOOPLANKTON COMMUNITIES OF SOUTHEASTERN LAKE MICHIGAN Scientist Thomas H. Johengen #12;ABSTRACT Zooplankton populations in southeastern Lake Michigan were a monthly basis from 1998through 2000. Zooplankton density and biomass were significantly different among

  10. Development of environmental and oceanographic real-time assessment system for the near-shore environment 

    E-print Network

    Ojo, Temitope O.

    2006-08-16

    -augmented diffusion processes in shallow embayment and near-shore waters are investigated in order to develop algorithms for obtaining a shear diffusion coefficient, Ke from shear-current measurements and turbulent diffusion-coefficient, Kz measured by the auto...

  11. Factors influencing Kemp's ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys kempii) distribution in nearshore waters and implications for management 

    E-print Network

    Metz, Tasha Lynn

    2004-11-15

    Post-pelagic juvenile and subadult Kemp's ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempii) (20-40 cm straight carapace length) utilize nearshore waters of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico as nursery or developmental feeding grounds. ...

  12. Moderate-Resolution Sea Surface Temperature Data for the Nearshore North Pacific

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal sea surface temperature (SST) is an important environmental characteristic defining habitat suitability for nearshore marine and estuarine organisms. The purpose of this publication is to provide access to an easy-to-use coastal SST dataset for ecologists, biogeographers...

  13. THE SIZE AT SEXUAL MATURITY OF BLUE KING CRAB, PARAUTHODES

    E-print Network

    NOTES THE SIZE AT SEXUAL MATURITY OF BLUE KING CRAB, PARAUTHODES PLATYPUS, IN ALASKAI The blue king of a male 3 yr after reaching sexual maturity in an attempt to assure that each male will have at least one 1981). For blue king crab, however, the size at maturity is not well known, and in some areas

  14. King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Electrical Engineering Department

    E-print Network

    Al-Ghadhban, Samir

    King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Electrical Engineering Department EE399 Summer Tra Advisor Examiner King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Electrical Engineering Department EE399-Shafie ID: 200669580 King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals #12;2 · TAPLE OF CONNTENT - Introduction

  15. University of south Carolina Martin Luther King, Jr., Day

    E-print Network

    Almor, Amit

    University of south Carolina Martin Luther King, Jr., Day Celebration History The commemoration of the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., has a rich history at the University of South Carolina. The Martin Luther King, Jr., Holiday Committee is pleased that these activities have evolved

  16. SAN JOS STATE UNIVERSITY DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. LIBRARY

    E-print Network

    Su, Xiao

    of the transformational change. JOINT LIBRARY The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library is a joint university and public of the university community and the general public. Most service desks in the King Library are merged service units1 SAN JOSÉ STATE UNIVERSITY DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. LIBRARY VISION-STRATEGY STATEMENT

  17. Sulfur and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Sulfate in the Fresh Water, King Sejong Station, King George Island, Antarctica

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Kim; I. Lee; J. Lee; B. Mayer; A. J. Kaufman; G. Kim; K. Lee

    2008-01-01

    Isotopic compositions of sulfur (delta34S) and oxygen (delta18O) were measured for the sulfate of the fresh water near the King Sejong Station, King George Island, Antarctica. Sejong station is located in the Barton peninsular of the King George Island. The geology around King Sejong station mainly composed of basalt-andesite, quart monzodiorite, and granodiorite. Lapilli tuff, conglomerate, sandstone, and siltstone occur

  18. CFD for Flames Jack King (Selwyn College)

    E-print Network

    CFD for Flames by Jack King (Selwyn College) Fourth-year undergraduate project in Group A, 2009 to real ames. For a detailed investigation into ame structure, a numerical simulation is more appropriate the structure of ames near the lean ammability limit. In this work, a numerical simulation of a one

  19. Fulfillment Hermeneutics in the Books of Kings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pang, Philip K.

    2012-01-01

    The concern for the realization of a prophetic announcement in the books of Kings is evident from the frequent fulfillment claims. Fulfillment details are often included in the formulaic notice to highlight its miraculous nature. However, as one correlates the prediction with the fulfillment details, there are noticeable discrepancies. This study…

  20. "King Corn": Teaching the Food Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinehart, Tim

    2012-01-01

    "King Corn" is in so many ways the story of how government food policy has entirely remade the food landscape in the United States over the last 40 years. From the massive expansion of the number of acres of corn grown across the country, to the ever-increasing ways that corn is incorporated into the food production process, to the industrial…

  1. The King under the Car Park

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirza, Ather

    2015-01-01

    In February 2013, the University of Leicester staged what The Guardian described as "The most extraordinary press conference ever held at any UK university." This was part of a media and communications campaign that brought worldwide attention to the discovery of King Richard III by the University's archaeologists. How do you manage a…

  2. Removing GC Synchronisation Andy C. King

    E-print Network

    Kent, University of

    Removing GC Synchronisation Andy C. King Computing Laboratory University of Kent at Canterbury Kent, CT2 7NF, UK ak32@ukc.ac.uk 1. INTRODUCTION Garbage collection (GC) is a technique for automatically of this often error­prone task. GC has long been e#ectively employed in functional and object­oriented languages

  3. Vegetation of Barton Peninsula in the neighbourhood of King Sejong Station (King George Island, maritime Antarctic)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ji Hee Kim; In-Young Ahn; Kyu Song Lee; Hosung Chung; Han-Gu Choi

    2007-01-01

    Plant communities were studied on Barton Peninsula around King Sejong Station on King George Island, maritime Antarctic. The\\u000a objective of this study was to document the occurrence and distribution of plant assemblages to provide the bases for monitoring\\u000a the effects of environmental changes and human impact on the vegetation of this area. Approximately 47% of the investigated\\u000a area was covered

  4. N E A R S H O R E F I S H E R I E S Nearshore Fisheries

    E-print Network

    and the inverte- brate resources described in earlier chapters. Because the composition of the nearshore fauna Southwest Fisheries Science Center Honolulu Laboratory Honolulu Hawaii 1997 dockside revenue from

  5. Barnacle reproductive hotspots linked to nearshore ocean conditions.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Heather M; Breck, Erin N; Chan, Francis; Lubchenco, Jane; Menge, Bruce A

    2005-07-26

    Coastal marine ecosystems provide important ecosystem services to human populations worldwide. Understanding the contexts in which a species has markedly higher reproductive output is vital for effective management and conservation of these valuable and highly impacted systems. We documented reproductive hotspots along the Oregon coast for an ecologically significant marine invertebrate, the intertidal barnacle Balanus glandula. Greater larval production in both natural and experimental populations was associated with higher primary productivity in the adjacent nearshore ocean, providing strong evidence for bottom-up forcing. Mean cumulative larval production per 100 cm2 in natural barnacle populations in the region of higher primary productivity was almost 5x that of populations in the less productive region. Mean estimated larval production per individual in experimental populations in the region of higher primary productivity was >2x that of populations in the region of lower productivity, and mean larval production per 100 cm2 was >120x greater in the region of higher productivity. Our results highlight the importance of spatial heterogeneity in reproduction and other ecological processes in the marine environment and provide a mechanistic basis for evaluating the relative contributions of different sites when designing marine reserves and other protected areas. Our findings also advance the understanding of the role of bottom-up influences on population and community dynamics and contribute data for the next generation of models of marine community dynamics. PMID:16027356

  6. Optical Remote Sensing of the Nearshore: The Argus Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, R.

    2004-12-01

    The past decade has seen much increased interest in the development and deployment of environmental sensor networks or observatories. A part of the interest is due to technological developments, including high-bandwidth communications, that make multi-user common-access sampling programs feasible and cost-effective. However, an important component of the interest is due to recent discoveries in nonlinear dynamics systems and chaos, and the recognition that long time series observations can reveal physics that could not be observed from their short time series predecessors. In the field of nearshore processes, the study of the beach area out to 10 m water depth, the Coastal Imaging Lab at Oregon State University has developed and operated a long-term observing system called the Argus Program, based on shore-based optical imaging. Beginning in 1992, collections have been made hourly of a range of beach bathymetry, morphology and fluid dynamic measurements. The program includes twelve stations, sited around the world, and an archive that currently includes 77 site-years of data. This talk will address issues of developing and operating the Argus Program and of dealing with a widely distributed user group.

  7. Nearshore dynamics of artificial sand and oil agglomerates.

    PubMed

    Dalyander, P Soupy; Plant, Nathaniel G; Long, Joseph W; McLaughlin, Molly

    2015-07-15

    Weathered oil can mix with sediment to form heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates (SOAs) that can cause beach re-oiling for years after a spill. Few studies have focused on the physical dynamics of SOAs. In this study, artificial SOAs (aSOAs) were created and deployed in the nearshore, and shear stress-based mobility formulations were assessed to predict SOA response. Prediction sensitivity to uncertainty in hydrodynamic conditions and shear stress parameterizations were explored. Critical stress estimates accounting for large particle exposure in a mixed bed gave the best predictions of mobility under shoaling and breaking waves. In the surf zone, the 10-cm aSOA was immobile and began to bury in the seafloor while smaller size classes dispersed alongshore. aSOAs up to 5cm in diameter were frequently mobilized in the swash zone. The uncertainty in predicting aSOA dynamics reflects a broader uncertainty in applying mobility and transport formulations to cm-sized particles. PMID:25956438

  8. A High Resolution Hydrodynamic Model of Puget Sound to Support Nearshore Restoration Feasibility Analysis and Design

    SciTech Connect

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Yang, Zhaoqing

    2011-01-01

    Estuarine and coastal hydrodynamic processes are sometimes neglected in the design and planning of nearshore restoration actions. Despite best intentions, efforts to restore nearshore habitats can result in poor outcomes if circulation and transport which also affect freshwater-saltwater interactions are not properly addressed. Limitations due to current land use can lead to selection of sub-optimal restoration alternatives that may result in undesirable consequences, such as flooding, deterioration of water quality, and erosion, requiring immediate remedies and costly repairs. Uncertainty with achieving restoration goals, such as recovery of tidal exchange, supply of sediment and nutrients, and establishment of fish migration pathways, may be minimized by using numerical models designed for application to the nearshore environment. A high resolution circulation and transport model of the Puget Sound, in the state of Washington, was developed to assist with nearshore habitat restoration design and analysis, and to answer the question “can we achieve beneficial restoration outcomes at small local scale, as well as at a large estuary-wide scale?” The Puget Sound model is based on an unstructured grid framework to define the complex Puget Sound shoreline using a finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM). The capability of the model for simulating the important nearshore processes, such as circulation in complex multiple tidal channels, wetting and drying of tide flats, and water quality and sediment transport as part of restoration feasibility, are illustrated through examples of restoration projects in Puget Sound.

  9. Impact of Shoreline Stabilization Structures on Chesapeake Bay Nearshore Habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palinkas, C. M.; Sanford, L. P.; Koch, E.; Stevenson, J. C.; Ortt, R.; Lorie, S.; Booth, D.

    2014-12-01

    Currently 69% of Maryland's shoreline is eroding and 12% is hardened with increasing rates of hardening occurring as development progresses. Shoreline erosion rates are likely to increase, and community needs for shoreline protection are likely to become more important as rates of sea-level rise increase with climate change, constituting a serious coastal hazard. However, the effects of different shoreline stabilization structures on erosion and nearshore water quality and habitat are complex. A variety of stabilization techniques are used in the Maryland Chesapeake Bay, and while the qualitative effects of the different techniques are generally known, there is little quantitative, long-term information available. This study has developed a comprehensive data set comparing long-term impacts of different shoreline stabilization techniques on both the physical environment and habitat. These data include shoreline and bathymetric surveys for comparison to pre-installation information, comparison of pre- and post-construction submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) coverage, field surveys of SAV and marshes, and collection of cores to determine changes in sediment characteristics and accumulation rates. We have also assembled available estimates of wave and tides near each site to construct wave-sea level climatologies for use in a semi-empirical model of erosion potential. Statistical tests are used to explore relationships among variables. Preliminary results suggest that sediment characteristics depend on the source of material - shoreline type and estuarine salinity zone (proxy for fine sediment availability) - whereas sedimentation rate depends on structure geometry and the pre-construction sedimentation, which generally reflects physical processes controlling sediment transport. Also, sediment type, rather than structure type, seems to influence SAV (plants need sand).

  10. Modeling crude oil droplet-sediment aggregation in nearshore waters.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Michael C; Bonner, James S; Page, Cheryl A; Fuller, Christopher B; Ernest, Andrew N S; Autenrieth, Robin L

    2004-09-01

    This paper describes a modeling approach that simulates changes in particle size distribution and density due to aggregation by extending the Smoluchowski aggregation kinetic model to particles of different density. Batch flocculation studies were conducted for clay, colloidal silica, crude oil, clay-crude oil, and silica-crude oil systems. A parameter estimation algorithm was used to estimate homogeneous collision efficiencies (alphaHOMO) for single-particle-type systems and heterogeneous collision efficiencies (alphaHET) for two-particle-type systems. Homogeneous collision efficiency values (alphaHOMO) were greater for clay (0.7) and for crude oil (0.3) than for silica (0.01). Thus, clay and crude oil were classified as cohesive particles while silica was classified as noncohesive. Heterogeneous collision efficiencies were similar for oil-clay (0.4) and oil-silica (0.3) systems. Thus, crude oil increases the aggregation of noncohesive particles. Data from the calibrated aggregation model were used to estimate apparent first-order flocculation rates (K') for oil, clay, and silica and apparent second-order flocculation rates (K'') for oil and clay in oil-clay systems and for oil and silica in oil-silica systems. For oil or clay systems, aggregation Damköhler numbers ranged from 0.1 to 1.0, suggesting that droplet coalescence and clay aggregation can occur on the same time scales as oil resurfacing and clay settling, respectively. For mixed oil-clay systems, the relative time scales of clay settling and clay-oil aggregation were also within an order of magnitude. Thus, oil-clay aggregation should be considered when modeling crude oil transport in nearshore waters. PMID:15461172

  11. cBathy: A robust algorithm for estimating nearshore bathymetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Holman, Rob; Holland, K. Todd

    2013-01-01

    A three-part algorithm is described and tested to provide robust bathymetry maps based solely on long time series observations of surface wave motions. The first phase consists of frequency-dependent characterization of the wave field in which dominant frequencies are estimated by Fourier transform while corresponding wave numbers are derived from spatial gradients in cross-spectral phase over analysis tiles that can be small, allowing high-spatial resolution. Coherent spatial structures at each frequency are extracted by frequency-dependent empirical orthogonal function (EOF). In phase two, depths are found that best fit weighted sets of frequency-wave number pairs. These are subsequently smoothed in time in phase 3 using a Kalman filter that fills gaps in coverage and objectively averages new estimates of variable quality with prior estimates. Objective confidence intervals are returned. Tests at Duck, NC, using 16 surveys collected over 2 years showed a bias and root-mean-square (RMS) error of 0.19 and 0.51 m, respectively but were largest near the offshore limits of analysis (roughly 500?m from the camera) and near the steep shoreline where analysis tiles mix information from waves, swash and static dry sand. Performance was excellent for small waves but degraded somewhat with increasing wave height. Sand bars and their small-scale alongshore variability were well resolved. A single ground truth survey from a dissipative, low-sloping beach (Agate Beach, OR) showed similar errors over a region that extended several kilometers from the camera and reached depths of 14 m. Vector wave number estimates can also be incorporated into data assimilation models of nearshore dynamics.

  12. cBathy: A robust algorithm for estimating nearshore bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Rob; Plant, Nathaniel; Holland, Todd

    2013-05-01

    A three-part algorithm is described and tested to provide robust bathymetry maps based solely on long time series observations of surface wave motions. The first phase consists of frequency-dependent characterization of the wave field in which dominant frequencies are estimated by Fourier transform while corresponding wave numbers are derived from spatial gradients in cross-spectral phase over analysis tiles that can be small, allowing high-spatial resolution. Coherent spatial structures at each frequency are extracted by frequency-dependent empirical orthogonal function (EOF). In phase two, depths are found that best fit weighted sets of frequency-wave number pairs. These are subsequently smoothed in time in phase 3 using a Kalman filter that fills gaps in coverage and objectively averages new estimates of variable quality with prior estimates. Objective confidence intervals are returned. Tests at Duck, NC, using 16 surveys collected over 2 years showed a bias and root-mean-square (RMS) error of 0.19 and 0.51 m, respectively but were largest near the offshore limits of analysis (roughly 500 m from the camera) and near the steep shoreline where analysis tiles mix information from waves, swash and static dry sand. Performance was excellent for small waves but degraded somewhat with increasing wave height. Sand bars and their small-scale alongshore variability were well resolved. A single ground truth survey from a dissipative, low-sloping beach (Agate Beach, OR) showed similar errors over a region that extended several kilometers from the camera and reached depths of 14 m. Vector wave number estimates can also be incorporated into data assimilation models of nearshore dynamics.

  13. Characterization of the complete mitochondrial genome of the king pigeon (Columba livia breed king).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui-Hua; He, Wen-Xiao; Xu, Tong

    2015-06-01

    The king pigeon is a breed of pigeon developed over many years of selective breeding primarily as a utility breed. In the present work, we report the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of king pigeon for the first time. The total length of the mitogenome was 17,221?bp with the base composition of 30.14% for A, 24.05% for T, 31.82% for C, and 13.99% for G and an A-T (54.22 %)-rich feature was detected. It harbored 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, and one non-coding control region (D-loop region). The arrangement of all genes was identical to the typical mitochondrial genomes of pigeon. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of king pigeon would serve as an important data set of the germplasm resources for further study. PMID:25648922

  14. A New Reading of Shakespeare's King John.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, Peter D.

    1995-12-01

    Shakespeare wrote King John c.1594, six years after the defeat of the Spanish Armada, and ~ 50 years after publication of the Copernican heliocentric hypothesis. It is said to be the most unhistorical of the History Plays, ``anomalous'', ``puzzling'', and ``odd'', and as such it has engendered far more than the customary range of interpretive opinion. I suggest that the play alerts Elizabethans not just to military and political threats, but to a changing cosmic world view, all especially threatening as they arise in Catholic countries. (a) Personification characterizes the play. John personifies the old order, while Arthur and the Dauphin's armies personify the new. I suggest that Shakespeare decenters King John just as Copernicus decentered the world. (b) Hubert menaces Arthur's eyes for a whole scene (4.1), but the need for such cruelty is not explained and is especially odd as Arthur is already under sentence of death (3.3.65-66). This hitherto unexplained anomaly suggests that the old order fears what the new might see. (c) Eleanor's confession is made only to Heaven and to her son the King (1.1.42-43), yet by echoing and word play the Messenger from France later reveals to John that he is privy to it (4.2.119-124). This circumstance has not been questioned heretofore. I suggest that the Messenger is like the wily Hermes (Mercury), chief communicator of the gods and patron of the sciences; by revealing that he moves in the highest circles, he tells John that he speaks with an authority that transcends even that of a king. The message from on high presages more than political change; it warns of a new cosmic and religious world order (d) Most agree that John is a weak king, so Shakespeare must have suspected flaws in the old ways. He would have known that Tycho Brahe's new star of 1572, the comet of 1577, and the 1576 model of his compatriot Thomas Digges, were shattering old ideas. (e) The tensions of the play are not resolved because in 1594 the new order was not yet generally accepted. Instead, the new world view is announced subtly, and thereby perhaps prudently, for the onset of persecution of its advocates is only a few years away.

  15. An Integrated Set of Observations to Link Conditions of Great Lakes Nearshore Waters to their Coastal Watersheds

    EPA Science Inventory

    We combine three elements for a comprehensive characterization that links nearshore conditions with coastal watershed disturbance metrics. The three elements are: 1) a shore-parallel, high-resolution nearshore survey using continuous in situ towed sensors; 2) a spatially-balanc...

  16. Seasonal Variation in Fish Assemblage Structure and Habitat Structure in the Nearshore Littoral Zone of Wisconsin Lakes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gene R. Hatzenbeler; Michael A. Bozek; Martin J. Jennings; Edward E. Emmons

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate whether fish abundance, fish habitat, and fish-habitat associations vary across seasons in nearshore littoral zones of five northern Wisconsin lakes, we assessed fish abundances and quantified habitat characteristics in littoral zones across three seasons (spring, summer, and fall) during 1996. Seasonal responses of the fish community in the nearshore littoral zone were taxa specific and guild specific. In

  17. Breakpoint-forced and bound long waves in the nearshore: A model comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    List, Jeffrey H.

    1993-01-01

    A finite-difference model is used to compare long wave amplitudes arising from two-group forced generation mechanisms in the nearshore: long waves generated at a time-varying breakpoint and the shallow-water extension of the bound long wave. Plane beach results demonstrate that the strong frequency selection in the outgoing wave predicted by the breakpoint-forcing mechanism may not be observable in field data due to this wave's relatively small size and its predicted phase relation with the bound wave. Over a bar/trough nearshore, it is shown that a strong frequency selection in shoreline amplitudes is not a unique result of the time-varying breakpoint model, but a general result of the interaction between topography and any broad-banded forcing of nearshore long waves.

  18. Influence of Cladophora-Quagga Mussel Assemblages on Nearshore Methylmercury Production in Lake Michigan.

    PubMed

    Lepak, Ryan F; Krabbenhoft, David P; Ogorek, Jacob M; Tate, Michael T; Bootsma, Harvey A; Hurley, James P

    2015-07-01

    Recent spread of invasive mussels in Lake Michigan has altered primary productivity in the nearshore zone, resulting in proliferation of filamentous benthic green algae (Cladophora glomerata). In areas of dense Cladophora and quagga mussel (Dreissena bugensis) assemblages, as well as in regions where sloughed Cladophora accumulates, methylmercury (MeHg) production is enhanced. A shoreline transect from a river mouth through waters overlying Cladophora/quagga-rich zones showed that aqueous MeHg concentrations increased, despite river dilution. Cladophora, as primary producers, ranged from 0.6 to 7.5 ng g(-1) MeHg [4-47% of total mercury (Hg) as MeHg], and were higher than MeHg concentrations in offshore-collected seston. Concentrations of MeHg in decaying Cladophora accumulated onshore ranged from 2.6 to 18.0 ng g(-1) MeHg (18-41% as MeHg) and from 0.1 to 3.0 ng g(-1) MeHg (2-21% as MeHg) in deposits of recently sloughed and accumulated Cladophora in a nearshore topographical depression. Relative to offshore open waters, interstitial waters within decaying Cladophora from onshore and nearshore deposits were elevated in MeHg concentration, 1000- and 10-fold, respectively. Percent Hg as MeHg was also elevated (65-75% and 9-19%, respectively for onshore interstitial water and nearshore interstitial water, compared to 0.2-3.3% as MeHg for open water). Quagga mussels collected within growing Cladophora beds in the nearshore zone were significantly higher in MeHg than offshore counterparts. Our combined results suggest that recent changes in nearshore primary production contributes to MeHg production and bioaccumulation in Lake Michigan. PMID:26007285

  19. February 22, 2010 Economic Impact of Mining on Levy County, Florida

    E-print Network

    Demers, Nora Egan

    -08. Appendix Table D.2 Levy County Hurricane Evacuation Zones and Evacuation Routes. Appendix Table E.2r for job creation. #12;3 King Road Mine, Test Quarry Pit, May 2009 Crystal River Nuclear Plant in population and purchasing power, and (3) rural. A comparison of Levy with its regional neighbors

  20. Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the Brevard County, Florida Mid-

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ) and Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) by Battelle 505 King Avenue Columbus, OH 46201 Integrated General Re-evaluation Report (GRR) and Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS, Florida. In the Feasibility Report with the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Brevard County

  1. A Folk Tale of an Evil King

    E-print Network

    Bkra shis bzang po

    2009-11-17

    Township, Nyag rong County, Dkar mdzes Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Si khron Province Name(s), age, sex, place of birth of performer(s) Pad ma rgyal mtshan (male, born 1964) Bang smad Village, Bang smad Toownship, Nyag rong County, Dkar mdzes... Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Si khron Province Language of recording Mi nyag Performer(s)’s first / native language Mi nyag Performer(s)’s ethnic group Tibetan Musical instruments and / or other objects used in performance Level of public...

  2. Hacking KiNG This document is intended to provide a field guide to the code for KiNG and its

    E-print Network

    Richardson, David

    Hacking KiNG This document is intended to provide a field guide to the code for KiNG and its made it in, though. All the structural biology-specific tools that used to be in the king.tool to build KiNG and the various macromolecular modeling tools. Most of the classes have few dependencies

  3. 50 CFR 622.371 - Limited access system for commercial vessel permits for king mackerel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...commercial vessel permits for king mackerel. 622.371 Section 622.371...commercial vessel permits for king mackerel. (a) No applications for additional...commercial vessel permits for king mackerel will be accepted....

  4. 50 CFR 622.371 - Limited access system for commercial vessel permits for king mackerel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...commercial vessel permits for king mackerel. 622.371 Section 622.371...commercial vessel permits for king mackerel. (a) No applications for additional...commercial vessel permits for king mackerel will be accepted....

  5. Limits to Size: Could King Kong Exist?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Amy R. Taylor

    2007-01-01

    Why can't spiders be ten feet tall? Can an ape grow to the size of King Kong? Surface area-to-volume relationships help shed light on the question of the size limits of organisms. At the nanoscale, things are so small that surface area effects impact the behavior of materials. For example, things tend to stick together and gravity plays a minor role. This activity gives students the opportunity to explore the sizes of things and scale as they investigate questions like "Could an egg ever grow to be the size of a beach ball?"

  6. MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN

    E-print Network

    MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN disposal was performed during the summer of 2005 at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA, a high energy tidal attack during the winter months has had a severe impact on existing sewage infrastructure. Although

  7. VARIABILITY, PATTERN, AND SENSITIVITY OF ECOLOGICAL INDICAORS FOR NEARSHORE REGIONS OF THE GREAT LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Associated with the Great Lakes Environmental Indicators (GLEI) project of the EaGLe program, we are evaluating a suite of indicators of ecological condition for the nearshore region of U.S. shorelines of the Great Lakes. The evaluation includes sampling conducted at limited fix...

  8. FINDING AND READING ECOLOGICAL SIGNALS IN THE NEARSHORE OF THE GREAT LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adjunct UMD faculty make annual presentations on research interest to IBS graduate students and faculty. Talks engage students in research and application to environmental problems. This presentation discusses the ecology of the nearshore areas of the Great Lakes, and ways to fi...

  9. Fish Assemblages and Environmental Variables Associated with Gobiids in Nearshore Areas of the Lower Great Lakes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Silvia N. Dopazo; Lynda D. Corkum; Nicholas E. Mandrak

    2008-01-01

    We investigated which fish species and environmental variables were associated with the invasive round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) and tubenose goby (Proterorhinus marmoratus) in nearshore Canadian waters of the Huron-Erie corridor of the lower Great Lakes. We measured a suite of environmental variables and used triplicate beach seine samples to collect fishes in summer 2006. Thirty sites were sampled in the

  10. Great Lakes Beach Recreational Water-Quality Decisionmaking Nearshore Health and Watershed Protection Projects

    E-print Network

    Great Lakes Beach Recreational Water-Quality Decisionmaking Nearshore Health and Watershed Protection Projects for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Research by USGS scientists has been of the 500 beaches along 11,000 miles of coastline in the Great Lakes. As they broaden the understanding

  11. Effects of nutrient subsidies from groundwater to nearshore marine ecosystems off the island of Hawaii

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. J. Dollar; M. J. Atkinson

    1992-01-01

    Nonconservative fluxes of dissolved nutrients (Si, N and P) in groundwater and nearshore ocean water off two golf courses (Keauhou and Waikoloa) on the west coast of Hawaii were estimated using a one-dimensional mixing model. Groundwater flowing under the Keauhou course discharges into a semi-enclosed embayment with restricted circulation. Leaching of 10% of the N from golf course fertilizer accounted

  12. Optics, Acoustics, and Stress in a Nearshore Bottom Nepheloid Layer Emmanuel Boss

    E-print Network

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    Optics, Acoustics, and Stress in a Nearshore Bottom Nepheloid Layer Emmanuel Boss School of Marine stresses and how this packaging of sediment affects optical and acoustical properties in the water column and acoustical properties of the water column. 3. Develop models describing the associations between particle

  13. Optics, Acoustics, and Stress in a Nearshore Bottom Nepheloid Layer Emmanuel Boss

    E-print Network

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    Optics, Acoustics, and Stress in a Nearshore Bottom Nepheloid Layer Emmanuel Boss School of Marine this packaging of sediment affects optical and acoustical properties in the water column. OBJECTIVES 1. Quantify. Quantify how changes in particle packaging affect the optical and acoustical properties of the water column

  14. Predator-prey interactions of salmon in the plume and near-shore ocean

    E-print Network

    Predator-prey interactions of salmon in the plume and near-shore ocean: implications for density), Elizabeth Daly, Jim Ruzicka (OSU), and Beth Phillips (UW) CRBF & W Ocean Workshop, February 14, 2013 #12;Presentation Outline · Background on competition involving salmon in the ocean · Interactions between wild

  15. Hierarchical multi-scale classification of nearshore aquatic habitats of the Great Lakes: Western Lake Erie

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James E. McKenna; Chris Castiglione

    2010-01-01

    Classification is a valuable conservation tool for examining natural resource status and problems and is being developed for coastal aquatic habitats. We present an objective, multi-scale hydrospatial framework for nearshore areas of the Great Lakes. The hydrospatial framework consists of spatial units at eight hierarchical scales from the North American Continent to the individual 270-m spatial cell. Characterization of spatial

  16. Measurement and Modeling of Wave-induced Sediment Resuspension in Nearshore Water

    E-print Network

    Measurement and Modeling of Wave-induced Sediment Resuspension in Nearshore Water Primary deployed during the unstratified period at various locations in southern Lake Michigan to measure the heights and periods of surface waves. Measurements of bottom current velocity and suspended sediment

  17. Energy density directional spectra of a nearshore wave field measured by interferometric synthetic aperture radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Marom; L. Shemer; E. B. Thornton

    1991-01-01

    The nearshore wave field within Monterey Bay, California, is studied using remote sensing imaging by an interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) and simultaneous ground-based measurements. It is shown that INSAR imagery of the ocean surface offers some advantages over conventional synthetic aperture radar. Because of the direct imaging mechanism of INSAR, quantitative information about the complicated wave field can be

  18. Evaluating the Contribution of Nearshore Offshore Exchange to Lake Superior Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, P. J.; Matsumoto, K.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Superior is one of the largest lakes in the world and provides important benefits such as clean water, recreation, and waterway transportation between neighboring communities in the U.S. and Canada. Temperatures recorded at mid-lake buoys indicate the date of annual summer stratification is arriving earlier and surface temperatures are increasing. In this study, we use a realistically configured, 3D model of Lake Superior to characterize the exchange of nearshore waters with offshore waters and evaluate the hypothesis that warmer coastal waters, transported offshore, contribute to warming the surface waters of the central lake basin. There are relatively few studies on Superior's circulation and it is unclear how long nearshore waters remain along the coast, an important timescale influencing the lake's water quality and biogeochemistry. Preliminary results indicate that nearshore waters have months-long residence time in select locations along the southern coast where coastline and bottom slope seem to favor sluggish circulation. Nearshore-offshore exchange occurs rapidly when counterclockwise coastal circulation sets in during the summer stratified period. We assess the contribution of this exchange to lake-wide surface temperatures and biogeochemistry.

  19. Nearshore Versus Offshore Copper Loading in Lake Superior Sediments: Implications for Transport and Cycling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan J. Kolak; David T. Long; W. Charles Kerfoot; Tina M. Beals; Steven J. Eisenreich

    1999-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the fate and transport of metals in Lake Superior is necessary in order to predict the ability of Lake Superior to recover from anthropogenic perturbations (copper mining). Sediment cores were collected from nearshore and offshore sites in Lake Superior and used to evaluate spatial and temporal variations in copper loading associated with mining-related activities. Although both

  20. Analysis of near-shore sea surface temperatures in the Northern Pacific

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies report a warming trend in Pacific Ocean temperatures over the last 50 years. However, much less is known about temperature change in the near-coastal environment, which is particularly sensitive to climatic change. In near-shore regions in situ sea surface temper...

  1. Variability in Long-Wave Runup as a Function of Nearshore Bathymetric Features

    E-print Network

    Dunkin, Lauren M.

    2011-08-08

    . I would also like to thank the sponsor, Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetric Center of Expertise, for allowing me to work on this interesting project. I am also very grateful to Jordan Schaefer who spent countless hours running codes. I must also... Features and the Use of Lidar Data...................................................... 6? 2.3 Nearshore Hydrodynamics ..................................................................................... 10? 2.4 Wave Runup...

  2. Application of remote sensing to study nearshore circulation. [and the continental shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, J.; Lobecker, R.; Stauble, D.; Welch, C.; Haas, L.; Fang, C. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research to use remote sensing techniques for studying the continental shelf is reported. The studies reported include: (1) nearshore circulation in the vincinity of a natural tidal inlet; (2) identification of indicators of biological activity; (3) remote navigation system for tracking free drifting buoys; (4) experimental design of an estuaring tidal circulation; and (5) Skylab support work.

  3. Fate and effects of drilling fluid and cutting discharges in shallow, nearshore waters

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The relationships between selected environmental parameters (sedimentology, trace metals, and hydrocarbons) and macroinfaunal assemblages were studied to determine the fate and effects of drilling fluid and cutting discharges from a multiple well site in a shallow nearshore environment. Results are presented.

  4. The nearshore phosphorus shunt: a consequence of ecosystem engineering by dreissenids in the Laurentian Great Lakes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. E. Hecky; R. E. H. Smith; D. R. Barton; S. J. Guildford; W. D. Taylor; M. N. Charlton; T. Howell

    2004-01-01

    Dreissenid mussels have been exceptionally successful invaders in North American lakes and rivers, espe- cially in the lower Laurentian Great Lakes. As benthic filter feeders capable of attaching to hard substrates, the magni- tudes of their biomass and filtering activity in nearshore waters are without precedent. The dreissenid colonization has implications for the removal and fate of materials filtered from

  5. Pressuregradientdriven nearshore circulation on a beach influenced by a large inlettidal shoal system

    E-print Network

    Kirby, James T.

    that wave refraction over the ebb tidal shoal causes wave focusing toward a narrow region at Ocean Beach system F. Shi,1 D. M. Hanes,2 J. T. Kirby,1 L. Erikson,2 P. Barnard,2 and J. Eshleman2 Received 9 model, it is found that the nearshore circulation is significantly affected by the heterogeneous wave

  6. NEARSHORE-OFFSHORE PATTERNS IN FOOD WEB CHARACTERISTICS IN LAKE SUPERIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    We are exploring the use of food web properties to characterize nearshore and offshore habitats in the Great lakes. We analyzed the stable isotope signatures of benthos (predominantly Diporeia hoyi) and plankton from Lake Superior habitats ranging from 20m to 300m depth......

  7. Lake Superior: Nearshore Variability and a Landscape Driver Concept (journal article)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spatial variation is well known to exist in water quality parameters of the Great Lakes nearshore, however strong patterns for extended reaches also have been observed and found to be robust across seasonal time frames. Less is known about robustness of inter-annual variation wi...

  8. Evaluating a Lake Tahoe nearshore assessment strategy: A circumnavigation survey, August 2011

    EPA Science Inventory

    We had the opportunity to apply a high-resolution nearshore sampling strategy, developed in the US/Canadian Laurentian Great Lakes, to Lake Tahoe. The strategy uses towed in situ sensors (physico-chemistry and biology) oscillated from near surface to near bottom while a vessel i...

  9. Arsenic Occurrence and Species in Near-Shore Macroalgae-Feeding

    E-print Network

    Canberra, University of

    Arsenic Occurrence and Species in Near-Shore Macroalgae-Feeding Marine Animals J . K I R B Y of arsenic species and their pathways of formation in marine animals: fish (Odax cyanomelas), abalone these arsenic species, are to some degree accumulated directly from their diets without degradation

  10. A book, the king and the 2006 coup

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin Hewison

    2008-01-01

    This article involves an assessment of Paul Handley's important book, The King Never Smiles. A Biography of Thailand's Bhumibol Adulyadej. The article begins with a discussion of the supposed threat the book posed to the monarchy and outlines the attempts to prevent publication. It then outlines Handley's evaluation of the involvement of King Bhumibol Adulyadej's palace in Thailand's modern politics.

  11. Geochemical interpretation of Kings Mountain, North Carolina, orientation area

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Price; R. B. Ferguson

    1977-01-01

    An orientation study has been made of uranium occurrences in the area of Kings Mountain, North Carolina. This is one of the orientation studies of known uranium occurrences that are being conducted in several geologic provinces and under various climatic (weathering) conditions to provide the technical basis for design and interpretation of NURE geochemical reconnaissance programs. The Kings Mountain area

  12. AUGMENTED REALITY VISUALIZATION TOOL FOR KINGS STORMWATER BRIDGE

    E-print Network

    Bailey, Mike

    AUGMENTED REALITY VISUALIZATION TOOL FOR KINGS STORMWATER BRIDGE Matthew Clothier Mike Bailey Stormwater Bridge structure. Unfortunately, since AR is still in its infancy, much of the research devoted Monitoring of Structures, Applications 1. Introduction: Kings Stormwater Bridge Over the past few years, our

  13. National Association of Counties

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-01-01

    With 3066 U.S. counties, the National Association of Counties (NACo) has the arduous task of making sure the nations counties are acknowledged and understood in the halls of the White House and Congress. NACo, the only national government organization devoted to highlighting and improving the understanding of county issues, "collects, researches, publishes and disseminates a variety of different information for, on and about counties." On their Web site, viewers have access to a comprehensive and in-depth database of county information including county population; census bureau quick facts; elected county officials; county codes and ordinances; county policies; links to Capitolimpact.com, which provides nationwide county statistics such as economic and demographic data; and much more. This site is easily navigable, has counties arranged alphabetically by state, and would be of value to anyone living inside a county domain --- which is just about everyone.

  14. Effect of Cutting Heights on Productivity and Quality of King Napier Grass (Pennisetum purpureum cv. King Grass) under Irrigation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sumran Wijitphan; Pornchai Lorwilai; Chutipong Arkaseang

    2009-01-01

    2 Abstract: An experiment to study the effect of cutting heights on yield and nutritive values of King napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum cv. King grass) was conducted on sandy loam, Korat soil series (Oxic Paleustults) under irrigation during June 2006 to November 2007 at Khon Kaen Animal Nutrition Development Research Center, Thailand. Four treatments of cutting height at 0 (T1),

  15. NATURAL GEOGRAPHY IN NEARSHORE AREAS (NaGISA): THE NEARSHORE COMPONENT OF THE CENSUS OF MARINE LIFE GEOGRAFIA NATURAL EN AREAS COSTERAS (NaGISA): EL COMPONENTE COSTERO DEL CENSO DE LA VIDA MARINA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katrin Iken; Brenda Konar

    The Natural Geography in Shore Areas (NaGISA, the Japanese word for beach) project is the nearshore component of the Census of Marine Life program. NaGISA targets nearshore marine biodiversity in large macrophyte communities (hard bottom macroalgal communities and soft sediment sea grass beds) in a depth zonation from high intertidal to 15 m water depth. The overall goal of NaGISA

  16. Oil & War: Revisiting M. King Hubbert's predictions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur, A. M.

    2003-12-01

    Oil is, unlike almost any other natural resource on earth, not only finite but also irreversibly consumed. At the same time worldwide data shows that at least at present and for the foreseeable future oil consumption rate is directly proportional to the national standard of living. In 1956 and again in 1962, M. King Hubbert predicted, using a simple model based on the logistic equation, that oil production in the lower 48 United States will follow a bell shaped curve with a production peak around the year 1971 and a production level of ~ 3 billion barrels per year, followed by a rapid decline. While his model approach was ridiculed at the time production data to date reveals a remarkable agreement with this prediction: US oil production did peak in 1971 at a level of 3.2.10 barrels a day and has been declining ever since. M. King Hubbert similarly estimated also the future of oil production worldwide - predicting peak production sometime between 1995-2010 (now!) at a level of 25 to 35 billion barrels per year. Current worldwide production is ~ 27 billion barrels per year. Thus because about half of the oil in earth has already been discovered, the world is destined to face more and bigger conflicts over the control of global supplies. Although many economists and political scientists tend to dismiss the significance of Hubbert's thinking about the finiteness of recoverable oil as well as the consequent implications, it appears that without careful management these conflicts could turn into wars much bigger than in Kuwait in 1991 or in Iraq in 2003. It is therefore imperative for us as earth scientist to try to educate the public and our leaders about the basic geological reality of finite fossil energy resources, and the serious consequences of this fact.

  17. Correlation of Sub-Aerial Beach Change with Numerical Model Derived Nearshore Wave Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J. E.; Erikson, L.; Barnard, P. L.; Eshleman, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    Wave-induced sediment transport on and off of beaches is difficult to understand and predict without thorough knowledge of the nearshore wave conditions. Wave data is commonly provided by a buoy located offshore in deep water that measures waves prior to shoaling and refraction. Irregular bathymetry causes dissimilar refraction and shoaling and can lead to variable wave conditions in the nearshore environment. To account for wave propagation over varying bathymetry, numerical wave models are good tools for estimating the nearshore wave climate from offshore wave data. Ocean Beach in San Francisco, CA is an energetic, intermediately sloping beach that was the subject of frequent sub-aerial topographic surveys in 2005 and 2006, with some surveys being as close as two days apart. Sediment volume change derived from these surveys was correlated to nearshore wave heights estimated from offshore buoy measurements and the application of the numerical wave model SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore). The SWAN model was used to create a "look-up" table of nearshore wave heights from over 4500 combinations of offshore wave heights, periods, and directions. The model was run using a nested grid scheme using three separate spatial resolutions, with the finest being closest to shore. Correlations between the sub-aerial beach volume data at five morphologically different reaches of Ocean Beach and the SWAN derived wave heights from just outside of the surf zone (in 5, 7.5, or 10 m of water depending on wave height) are generally low, with R2 values less than 0.5, with the highest being 0.61. Although the coefficients of determination are low in most instances the significance exceeds 90%. The reason for the low coefficients of determination is not known but is currently being investigated; some possible reasons are improper characterization of the lengthy time series of wave data between surveys (up to 28 days), or the ignored effect of strong along-shore directed tidal currents (O(~1m/s)) on breaking waves in the surf zone.

  18. DRAFT LANDSAT DATA MOSAIC: MONTGOMERY COUNTY, TEXAS; HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS; FORT BEND COUNTY, TEXAS; BRAZORIA COUNTY, TEXAS; GALVESTON COUNTY, TEXAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a draft Landsat Data Mosaic, which contains remote sensing information for Montgomery County, Texas Harris County, Texas Fort Bend County, Texas Brazoria County, Texas Galveston County, and Texas Imagery dates on the following dates: October 6, 1999 and September 29, 200...

  19. Counties with Established Counties without Established

    E-print Network

    Counties with Established Burn Bans Counties without Established Burn Bans Outdoor Burn Bans:http://www.srh.noaa.gov/data/index.php Burn Ban RSS feed available at http://tfsfrp.tamu.edu/wildfires/BurnBan.xml County Burn Ban Orders is not responsible for establishing or removing burning bans. The Texas A&M Forest Service is only displaying

  20. Sandy beaches contamination by arsenic, a result of nearshore sediment diagenesis and transport (Brazilian coastline)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirlean, N.; Garcia, F.; Baisch, P.; Quintana, G. C.; Agnes, F.

    2013-12-01

    We studied the distribution of As, Fe, Ca and Al in beach sands and near-shore surface sediments along the Brazilian coast from the equatorial zone to Rio de Janeiro state. High concentrations of As (up to 120 mg kg-1) exceeding the environmentally acceptable thresholds were found in the beach sands and near-shore surface sediment in several segments of the studied coast. That increased from north to south. The significant positive correlation (R2 = 0.58) between As and calcium carbonate in the beach sands corroborated the hypothesis that calcareous bioclasts participate in metalloid retention and its accumulation in beach sediments. Most likely, enrichment of As occurs in the oxic horizon of sediments caused by the diagenetic redistribution of various elements. Enrichment of As in beach sands occurs in the coast of Bahia and Espirito Santo states. That is facilitated by clastic material of calcareous algae.

  1. Advancing from pattern to process in Hawaii's near-shore pelagic ecosystem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kelly Benoit-Bird; Margaret McManus

    2005-01-01

    Micronekton comprising a near-shore sound-scattering layer around the Hawaiian Islands have been shown to exhibit diel horizontal migrations, moving onshore until midnight and them moving offshore into deep waters where they remain in the day. The reasons for this daily movement pattern have remained unexamined. Moored echosounders were used to describe micronekton migration over a 5-week period. A moored acoustic

  2. Rapid environmental assessment of nearshore METOC fields using motion imaging techniques applied to surrogate UAV data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Dugan; C. C. Piotrowski; J. Z. Williams

    2002-01-01

    Information needed by the warfighter on the highly variable littoral environment can be obtained on a timely basis using motion imaging techniques working on data that will be available from near-future USN\\/USMC UAVs. Algorithms are available for accurately calculating nearshore bathymetry, currents, surf characteristics and beach topography using space-time, electro-optical data collected from standoff ranges exceeding typical small arms ground

  3. Nearshore Satellite Data as Relative Indicators of Intertidal Organism Physiological Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzelle, A.; Helmuth, B.; Lakshmi, V.

    2011-12-01

    The physiological performance of intertidal and shallow subtidal invertebrates and algae is significantly affected by water temperature, and so the ability to measure and model onshore water temperatures is critical for ecological and biogeographic studies. Because of the localized influences of processes such as upwelling, mixing, and surface heating from solar radiation, nearshore water temperatures can differ from those measured directly offshore by buoys and satellites. It remains an open question what the magnitude of the differences in these temperatures are, and whether "large pixel" measurements can serve as an effective proxy for onshore processes, particularly when extrapolating from laboratory physiological studies to field conditions. We compared 9 years of nearshore (~10km) MODIS (Terra and Aqua overpasses) SST data against in situ measurements of water temperature conducted at two intertidal sites in central Oregon- Boiler Bay and Strawberry Hill. We collapsed data into increasingly longer temporal averages to address the correlation and absolute differences between onshore and nearshore temperatures over daily, weekly and monthly timescales. Results indicate that nearshore SST is a reasonable proxy for onshore water temperature, and that the strength of the correlation increases with decreasing temporal resolution. Correlations between differences in maxima are highest, followed by average and minima, and were lower at a site with regular upwelling. While average differences ranged from ~0.199-1.353°C, absolute differences across time scales were ~0.446-6.906°C, and were highest for cold temperatures. The results suggest that, at least at these two sites, SST can be used as a relative proxy for general trends only, especially over longer time scales.

  4. Pb-210 and Pu-239,240 in nearshore Gulf of Mexico sediments 

    E-print Network

    Rotter, Richard Joseph

    1985-01-01

    Scott Pb-210, Ra-226, and Pu-239, 240 activities have been measured in nearshore Gulf of Mexico sediments. Sediment cores were collected from two distinctly differing regions; the Mississippi delta, and the western Gulf of Mexico shelf. Cores... Percent Water Analysis 29 30 RESULTS. 31 River Suspended Particles ACCUMULATION AND MIXING RATES 47 52 DISCUSSION. 77 Pb-210 and Pu Inventories 80 Pb-210 and Pu Removal from Seawater 100 The Mississippi Delta versus the Western Gulf of Mexico...

  5. Effects of stormwater nutrient discharges on eutrophication processes in nearshore waters of the Florida keys

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian E. Lapointe; William R. Matzie

    1996-01-01

    Rainfall events cause episodic discharges of groundwaters contaminated with septic tank effluent into nearshore waters of\\u000a the Florida keys, enhancing eutrophication in sensitive coral reef communities. Our study characterized the effects of stormwater\\u000a discharges by continuously (30-min intervals) measuring salinity, temperature, tidal stage, and dissolved oxygen (DO) along\\u000a an offshore eutrophication gradient prior to and following heavy rainfall at the

  6. Rare earth elements in the pore waters of reducing nearshore sediments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Elderfield; E. R. Sholkovitz

    1987-01-01

    The REE are mobile during early diagenesis in reducing nearshore sediments of Buzzards Bay leading to greatly enhanced concentrations in pore waters, e.g. 815 pmol kg-1 Nd and 1910 pmol kg-1 Ce within 30 cm of the sediment-seawater interface, about 10-50 times local seawater values. Two principal diagenetic reactions have been identified. Preferential Ce enrichment (positive Ce anomalies) and preferential

  7. On cross-shore migration and equilibrium states of nearshore sandbars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Pape; N. G. Plant; B. G. Ruessink

    2010-01-01

    The location of submerged sandbars in the nearshore zone changes over time in response to variability in wave conditions. Here, cross-shore sandbar migration is studied with an empirical model consisting of a differential equation relating cross-shore sandbar migration to wave forcing. Model parameters are fitted to data sets containing multiple years of daily-observed positions of five sandbars at three field

  8. NEARSHORE HABITAT USE BY JUVENILE CHINOOK SALMON IN LENTIC SYSTEMS OF THE LAKE WASHINGTON BASIN

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roger A. Tabor; Richard M. Piaskowski

    ABSTRACT Nearshore areas of Lake Washington, Lake Sammamish, and the Ship Canal\\/Lake Union area were surveyed for juvenile chinook salmon (Oncoryhnchus,tshawytscha ) during the winter and spring of 2001 to provide information on habitat use and its relationship to shoreline development. All three systems are highly altered environments,with extensive development along the shoreline. Juvenile chinook salmon are found in Lake

  9. James Clerk Maxwell's inaugural lecture at King's College London

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James C. Maxwell

    1979-01-01

    In this inaugural lecture given at King's College London in 1871, James Clerk Maxwell (1831-79) reviews the current state of Natural Philosophy (Mechanics and Physics) and lays the foundation for the development of electromagnetic field theory.(AIP)

  10. Influence of humic substances on the geochemistry of iodine in nearshore and hemipelagic marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Francois, R.

    1987-09-01

    Iodine is characteristically enriched at the surface of hemipelagic and nearshore sediments deposited under oxygenated conditions. In such sediments, bulk IC/sub org/ ratios usually decrease with depth to values which are characteristic of anoxic sediments, reflecting a preferential release of I during early diagenesis. There is some debate as to whether sedimentary I is associated with the iron oxyhydroxide phase or with the organic fraction, and whether the decrease in IC/sub org/ with depth is due to the dissolution of the iron oxyhydroxides or the decomposition of labile organic matter. It is shown that in a surficial hemipelagic sediment sample and in a nearshore sediment core I is mainly associated with the organic fraction and, moreover, that humic substances are involved in the surficial iodine enrichment. Laboratory experiments on the uptake and release of I by and from sedimentary humic substances also suggest a mechanism whereby humic materials reduce iodate at the sedimentwater interface to an electrophilic I species which further reacts with the organic matter to produce iodinated organic molecules. During burial, this excess I could be displaced from the organic matrix by nucleophiles such as sulfide ions of thiosulfate, thus providing a possible explanation for the decrease in IC/sub org/ ratio with depth observed in many nearshore and hemipelagic sediments.

  11. A nearshore observatory for Antarctic krill: Analysis of the spatial variability in their distribution and abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Joseph D.; Demer, David A.

    2005-04-01

    Annual surveys of the distribution and abundance of Antarctic krill are conducted by the United States Antarctic Marine Living Resources Program in order to assist fishery managers in conserving this economic and ecologic resource. These surveys utilize a large vessel which does not sample close (within 10 km) to the South Shetland Islands. These islands are home to many krill predators (fur seals and penguins) who often forage in these nearshore waters. In order to better understand the abundance and distribution of the krill in these waters and to determine the physical and biological factors affecting the krill, a nearshore observatory has been created that combines multiple sensors and platforms to provide improved spatial and temporal coverage of the nearshore region of Livingston Island. This study utilizes a large research vessel, a small inflatable vessel, an array of instrumented buoys, and a pilot project involving an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle. This presentation will discuss acoustic backscatter measurements made from both large and small vessels. Results from the most recent field season (Jan-Feb 2005) will be presented as well as data from previous years (2002, 2004). [Work supported by the NSF Office of Polar Programs and NOAA.

  12. The Contribution of Nearshore Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs) to Food Security and Livelihoods in Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Joelle A.; Beare, Doug; Schwarz, Anne-Maree; Albert, Simon; Warren, Regon; Teri, James; Siota, Faye; Andrew, Neil L.

    2014-01-01

    Fish aggregating devices, or FADs, are used widely in developing countries to concentrate pelagic fish, making them easier to catch. Nearshore FADs anchored close to the coast allow access for rural communities, but despite their popularity among policy makers, there is a dearth of empirical analysis of their contributions to the supply of fish and to fisheries management. In this paper we demonstrate that nearshore FADs increased the supply of fish to four communities in Solomon Islands. Estimated total annual fish catch ranged from 4300 to 12 000 kg across the study villages, with nearshore FADs contributing up to 45% of the catch. While it is clear that FADs increased the supply of fish, FAD catch rates were not consistently higher than other fishing grounds. Villages with limited access to diverse or productive fishing grounds seemingly utilized FADs to better effect. Villagers believed FADs increased household income and nutrition, as well as providing a source of fish for community events. FADs were also perceived to increase intra-household conflict and reduce fishers' participation in community activities. FADs need to be placed within a broader rural development context and treated as another component in the diversified livelihoods of rural people; as with other livelihood options they bring trade-offs and risks. PMID:25513808

  13. Terrestrial and marine trophic pathways support young-of-year growth in a nearshore Arctic fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    von Biela, Vanessa R.; Zimmerman, Christian E.; Cohn, Brian R.; Welker, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    River discharge supplies nearshore communities with a terrestrial carbon source that is often reflected in invertebrate and fish consumers. Recent studies in the Beaufort Sea have documented widespread terrestrial carbon use among invertebrates, but only limited use among nearshore fish consumers. Here, we examine the carbon source and diet of rapidly growing young-of-year Arctic cisco (Coregonus autumnalis) using stable isotope values (?13C and ?15N) from muscle and diet analysis (stomach contents) during a critical and previously unsampled life stage. Stable isotope values (?15N and ?13C) may differentiate between terrestrial and marine sources and integrate over longer time frames (weeks). Diet analysis provides species-specific information, but only from recent foraging (days). Average ?13C for all individuals was ?25.7 ‰, with the smallest individuals possessing significantly depleted ?13C values indicative of a stronger reliance of terrestrial carbon sources as compared to larger individuals. Average ?15N for all individuals was 10.4 ‰, with little variation among individuals. As fish length increased, the proportion of offshore Calanus prey and neritic Mysis prey increased. Rapid young-of-year growth in Arctic cisco appears to use terrestrial carbon sources obtained by consuming a mixture of neritic and offshore zooplankton. Shifts in the magnitude or phenology of river discharge and the delivery of terrestrial carbon may alter the ecology of nearshore fish consumers.

  14. Changes in the nearshore and offshore zooplankton communities in Lake Ontario: 1981-88

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johannsson, Ora E.; Mills, Edward L.; O'Gorman, Robert

    1991-01-01

    We examined trends and factors influencing changes in nearshore and offshore zooplankton abundance and composition in Lake Ontario between 1981 and 1988. In the nearshore (southshore and eastern basin), zooplankton abundance decreased and shifts occurred in the relative abundances of Bosmina longirostris and Daphnia retrocurva (eastern basin) and Daphnia retrocurva and Daphnia galeata mendotae (southshore). These changes could have resulted from increased vertebrate predation or reduced food resources which intensified the effects of predation. In the offshore, the first appearance (FA) of the larger, less common cladoceran species occurred earlier in the season as of 1985. FA was correlated with cumulative epilimnetic temperature (CET) and the catch per unit effort (CPUE) of alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) a?Y165 mm caught in U.S. waters in the spring. In 1987, when CET was high and CPUE of alewife a?Y165 mm was low, large populations of these cladocerans developed in June and July. Bythotrephes cederstroemi, a recent invader in the Great Lakes, was abundant only in 1987 when the CPUE of alewife was lowest. Changes in zooplankton abundance, development, and composition along the nearshore-offshore gradient reflected effects of temperature, habitat, and planktivory on the community.

  15. The contribution of nearshore fish aggregating devices (FADs) to food security and livelihoods in Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Albert, Joelle A; Beare, Doug; Schwarz, Anne-Maree; Albert, Simon; Warren, Regon; Teri, James; Siota, Faye; Andrew, Neil L

    2014-01-01

    Fish aggregating devices, or FADs, are used widely in developing countries to concentrate pelagic fish, making them easier to catch. Nearshore FADs anchored close to the coast allow access for rural communities, but despite their popularity among policy makers, there is a dearth of empirical analysis of their contributions to the supply of fish and to fisheries management. In this paper we demonstrate that nearshore FADs increased the supply of fish to four communities in Solomon Islands. Estimated total annual fish catch ranged from 4300 to 12,000 kg across the study villages, with nearshore FADs contributing up to 45% of the catch. While it is clear that FADs increased the supply of fish, FAD catch rates were not consistently higher than other fishing grounds. Villages with limited access to diverse or productive fishing grounds seemingly utilized FADs to better effect. Villagers believed FADs increased household income and nutrition, as well as providing a source of fish for community events. FADs were also perceived to increase intra-household conflict and reduce fishers' participation in community activities. FADs need to be placed within a broader rural development context and treated as another component in the diversified livelihoods of rural people; as with other livelihood options they bring trade-offs and risks. PMID:25513808

  16. A user-friendly quantitative approach to classifying nearshore marine habitats along a heterogeneous coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valesini, F. J.; Clarke, K. R.; Eliot, I.; Potter, I. C.

    2003-05-01

    A scheme, which can be readily used by fisheries and environmental managers and ecologists, has been developed for quantitatively classifying the different habitats found in nearshore marine waters along the heterogeneous lower west coast of Australia. Initially, 25 beach sites, representing a wide range of nearshore environments, were separated into six a priori habitat types on the basis of characteristics that could readily be observed and were likely to influence the extent to which a particular (fish) species occupies a particular habitat. Focus was thus placed on such features as the degree of exposure to wave activity and whether or not seagrass and/or reefs were present in the nearshore vicinity. Subsequently, quantitative data for 27 environmental variables, considered likely to characterise the six habitat types, were obtained for each of the 25 sites from readily accessible sources. When the latter data were subjected to multidimensional scaling (MDS) ordination, the points for the sites representing only three of those six habitat types formed discrete groups. The BVSTEP routine in the PRIMER v5.0 statistical package (Clarke & Gorley, Primer v5.0: User Manual/Tutorial, Primer-E Ltd, Plymouth, 2001) was thus used to select a subset of the 27 environmental variables that would provide a better resolution of the six a priori habitat types. This process involved matching the distance matrix constructed from the quantitative environmental data with a matrix constructed from scored data that reflected the criteria for the initial a priori classification scheme. A subset of seven environmental variables gave the best correlation between the two matrices ( ?=0.823), and thus provided the optimal set of quantitative data for discriminating between the six a priori habitat types. These variables comprised both the direct and north-westerly fetches, the minimum distance from the shoreline to the 2 m depth contour, the distance from the shoreline to the first offshore reef chain along a south-westerly transect, and the relative contributions of bare sand, subtidal reef and seagrass. Data for these characteristics at any nearshore site along the coastline can readily be recorded by managers and ecologists and subjected to the 'nearest-replicate' classification procedure developed in this study to ascertain the habitat type to which that site should be assigned. Current work is using MDS ordination, in conjunction with associated statistical tests and the BVSTEP routine, to elucidate the extent to which the compositions of assemblages of fish, benthic macroinvertebrates, meiofauna and zooplankton in nearshore waters along the lower west coast of Australia are related to habitat type(s).

  17. Pattern and persistence of a nearshore planktonic ecosystem off Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Arthur M.; Jahn, Andrew E.

    1987-01-01

    Three related data sets from a baseline environmental survey on the continental shelf at San Onofre, California, consisting of: (1) zooplankton pumped from discrete depths on transects between the 8- and 30-m contours, sampled from 1976 to 1980; (2) zooplankton from oblique net hauls on a transect from 8 to 100 m sampled at 2-week intervals for 1 y, 1978-1979; and (3) vertical profiles of temperature, nutrients and plant pigments corresponding closely in time and space to the oblique net hauls, are used to describe cross-shelf zooplankton abundance patterns, community composition, and seasonal and shorter-term variations in cross-shelf zonation and their relation to variations in physical and chemical measures. Of 15 taxa tested for multiyear average patterns, three—the copepods Acartia clausi and Oithona oculata, and barnacle larvae—had centers of abundance shoreward of the 30-m contour and near the bottom. No differences were detected in the cross-shelf pattern between San Onofre and a transect 12 km southeast. Throughout the year, nearshore and offshore assemblages were distinguishable, the change occurring at about the 30-m contour. The offshore one, represented by the copepods Calanus pacificus, Eucalanus californicus and Rhincalanus nasutus, occupied water having less chlorophyll and less near-surface nutrient, i.e. of more oceanic character. In spring and summer, most nearshore taxa shifted slightly seaward, leaving a third assemblage, characterized by a very high abundance of Acartia spp. copepodids and maximum abundances of A. clausi and O. oculata near the beach. Three upwelling episodes resulted in marked increases in chlorophyll and nutrients, but not in cross-shelf gradients of these properties, as were noted at most other times. Maximum disturbance of cross-shelf zooplankton zonation was observed during a wintertime intrusion of offshore surface water, but the zonation was never obliterated. Nearshore zooplankton patterns appear to be protected from dislocation by the shallow shelf and sustained by phytoplankton distributed in a manner peculiar to the nearshore zone. Typically, shallow nearshore waters were richer in chlorophyll and nutrients than offshore waters of the same depth. The cross-shelf chlorophyll and nutrient profiles, in turn, appear to result from increased eddy diffusion and nutrient recycling in shallow waters, perhaps augmented by longshore transport from quasi-permanent, local upwelling nodes.

  18. C. Judson King of UC Berkeley

    SciTech Connect

    Prausnitz, John

    2005-06-01

    In the middle of the UC Berkeley campus, next to the Main Library, South Hall is the last surviving building from the original campus, founded about 135 years ago. A tiny tree-shaded appendix to this venerated classical building houses Berkeley's Center for Studies in Higher Education, directed by C. Judson King, former Provost and Senior Vice President--Academic Affairs of the ten-campus University of California and long-time Professor of Chemical Engineering at Berkeley. Jud came to Berkeley in 1963 as assistant professor of chemical engineering, following receipt of a doctor's degree from MIT and a subsequent short appointment as director of the MIT chemical engineering practice school station at what was then Esso (now Exxon) in New Jersey. His undergraduate degree is from Yale. Starting with his MIT doctoral dissertation on gas absorption, Jud has devoted much of his professional career to separation processes. His teaching and research activities have been primarily concerned with separation of mixtures with emphasis on liquid-liquid extraction and drying. As a consultant to Procter and Gamble, he contributed to the technology of making instant coffee. His life-long activities in hiking and camping stimulated Jud's interest in the manufacture of freeze-dried foods (e.g. turkey meat) to minimize the weight of his hiking back-pack. Jud is internationally known not only for his many research publications but even more, for his acclaimed textbook ''Separation Processses'' (McGraw-Hill, second edition 1980) that is used in standard chemical engineering courses in the US and abroad.

  19. 50 CFR 622.372 - Limited access system for king mackerel gillnet permits applicable in the southern Florida west...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...false Limited access system for king mackerel gillnet permits applicable in the southern...372 Limited access system for king mackerel gillnet permits applicable in the southern...for applications for renewals of king mackerel gillnet permits, no applications...

  20. 50 CFR 622.372 - Limited access system for king mackerel gillnet permits applicable in the southern Florida west...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...false Limited access system for king mackerel gillnet permits applicable in the southern...372 Limited access system for king mackerel gillnet permits applicable in the southern...for applications for renewals of king mackerel gillnet permits, no applications...

  1. Regional Lead Agents and County Coordinators 2011 RESPONSIBILITY NAME COUNTY

    E-print Network

    Bolding, M. Chad

    #12;Regional Lead Agents and County Coordinators 2011 RESPONSIBILITY NAME COUNTY REGION 1 Regional Lead Millie Davenport HGIC County Coordinator Matt Burns Pickens County Coordinator Marty Watt Anderson County Coordinator Morris Warner Oconee REGION 2 Regional Lead Danny Howard Greenville County Coordinator

  2. Wave-induced mass transport affects daily Escherichia coli fluctuations in nearshore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ge, Zhongfu; Whitman, Richard L.; Nevers, Meredith B.; Phanikumar, Mantha S.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of diel variability of fecal indicator bacteria concentration in nearshore waters is of particular importance for development of water sampling standards and protection of public health. Significant nighttime increase in Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentration in beach water, previously observed at marine sites, has also been identified in summer 2000 from fixed locations in waist- and knee-deep waters at Chicago 63rd Street Beach, an embayed, tideless, freshwater beach with low currents at night (approximately 0.015 m s–1). A theoretical model using wave-induced mass transport velocity for advection was developed to assess the contribution of surface waves to the observed nighttime E. coli replenishment in the nearshore water. Using average wave conditions for the summer season of year 2000, the model predicted an amount of E. coli transported from water of intermediate depth, where sediment resuspension occurred intermittently, that would be sufficient to have elevated E. coli concentration in the surf and swash zones as observed. The nighttime replenishment of E. coli in the surf and swash zones revealed here is an important phase in the cycle of diel variations of E. coli concentration in nearshore water. According to previous findings in Ge et al. (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2010, 44, 6731–6737), enhanced current circulation in the embayment during the day tends to displace and deposit material offshore, which partially sets up the system by the early evening for a new period of nighttime onshore movement. This wave-induced mass transport effect, although facilitating a significant base supply of material shoreward, can be perturbed or significantly influenced by high currents (orders of magnitude larger than a typical wave-induced mass transport velocity), current-induced turbulence, and tidal forcing.

  3. Large-Scale Spatial Distribution Patterns of Echinoderms in Nearshore Rocky Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Iken, Katrin; Konar, Brenda; Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro; Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Knowlton, Ann; Pohle, Gerhard; Mead, Angela; Miloslavich, Patricia; Wong, Melisa; Trott, Thomas; Mieszkowska, Nova; Riosmena-Rodriguez, Rafael; Airoldi, Laura; Kimani, Edward; Shirayama, Yoshihisa; Fraschetti, Simonetta; Ortiz-Touzet, Manuel; Silva, Angelica

    2010-01-01

    This study examined echinoderm assemblages from nearshore rocky habitats for large-scale distribution patterns with specific emphasis on identifying latitudinal trends and large regional hotspots. Echinoderms were sampled from 76 globally-distributed sites within 12 ecoregions, following the standardized sampling protocol of the Census of Marine Life NaGISA project (www.nagisa.coml.org). Sample-based species richness was overall low (<1–5 species per site), with a total of 32 asteroid, 18 echinoid, 21 ophiuroid, and 15 holothuroid species. Abundance and species richness in intertidal assemblages sampled with visual methods (organisms >2 cm in 1 m2 quadrats) was highest in the Caribbean ecoregions and echinoids dominated these assemblages with an average of 5 ind m?2. In contrast, intertidal echinoderm assemblages collected from clearings of 0.0625 m2 quadrats had the highest abundance and richness in the Northeast Pacific ecoregions where asteroids and holothurians dominated with an average of 14 ind 0.0625 m?2. Distinct latitudinal trends existed for abundance and richness in intertidal assemblages with declines from peaks at high northern latitudes. No latitudinal trends were found for subtidal echinoderm assemblages with either sampling technique. Latitudinal gradients appear to be superseded by regional diversity hotspots. In these hotspots echinoderm assemblages may be driven by local and regional processes, such as overall productivity and evolutionary history. We also tested a set of 14 environmental variables (six natural and eight anthropogenic) as potential drivers of echinoderm assemblages by ecoregions. The natural variables of salinity, sea-surface temperature, chlorophyll a, and primary productivity were strongly correlated with echinoderm assemblages; the anthropogenic variables of inorganic pollution and nutrient contamination also contributed to correlations. Our results indicate that nearshore echinoderm assemblages appear to be shaped by a network of environmental and ecological processes, and by the differing responses of various echinoderm taxa, making generalizations about the patterns of nearshore rocky habitat echinoderm assemblages difficult. PMID:21079760

  4. Observation of wave celerity evolution in the nearshore using digital video imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, J.; Fritz, H. M.; Haas, K. A.; Work, P. A.; Barnes, C. F.; Cho, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Celerity of incident waves in the nearshore is observed from oblique video imagery collected at Myrtle Beach, S.C.. The video camera covers the field view of length scales O(100) m. Celerity of waves propagating in shallow water including the surf zone is estimated by applying advanced image processing and analysis methods to the individual video images sampled at 3 Hz. Original image sequences are processed through video image frame differencing, directional low-pass image filtering to reduce the noise arising from foam in the surf zone. The breaking wave celerity is computed along a cross-shore transect from the wave crest tracks extracted by a Radon transform-based line detection method. The observed celerity from the nearshore video imagery is larger than the linear wave celerity computed from the measured water depths over the entire surf zone. Compared to the nonlinear shallow water wave equation (NSWE)-based celerity computed using the measured depths and wave heights, in general, the video-based celerity shows good agreements over the surf zone except the regions across the incipient wave breaking locations. In the regions across the breaker points, the observed wave celerity is even larger than the NSWE-based celerity due to the transition of wave crest shapes. The observed celerity using the video imagery can be used to monitor the nearshore geometry through depth inversion based on the nonlinear wave celerity theories. For this purpose, the exceeding celerity across the breaker points needs to be corrected accordingly compared to a nonlinear wave celerity theory applied.

  5. Sulfur and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Sulfate in the Fresh Water, King Sejong Station, King George Island, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M.; Lee, I.; Lee, J.; Park, B.; Mayer, B.; Kaufman, A. J.; Park, S.; Kim, G.; Lee, K.

    2008-12-01

    Isotopic compositions of sulfur (?34S) and oxygen (?18O) were measured for the sulfate of the fresh water near the King Sejong Station, King George Island, Antarctica. Sejong station is located in the Barton peninsular of the King George Island. The geology around King Sejong station mainly composed of basalt-andesite, quart monzodiorite, and granodiorite. Lapilli tuff, conglomerate, sandstone, and siltstone occur along the southern and eastern shore of the Barton peninsula. Lapilli tuff also occurs on the highland located on southeastern part of the Barton peninsula. The ?34S values of sulfate extracted from fresh water samples at King Sejong Station range from 13.7 to 16.3 per mil excluding 1 sample. These sulfur values are very narrow in their range compared with those from anthropogenic sources. These sulfur values are 5 to 7 per mil lower than those of typical present seawater. Considering the rocks occurring near the King Sejong station, these sulfur isotopic values do not seem to be related to any evaporites of certain age. In Antarctic region the natural source of sulfate dissolved in water could be originated from marine biogenic source (DMS), sea-salt, volcanic source, or other continental sources. Most of the ?34S values of sulfate at King Sejong station seems to indicate the dominance of marine biogenic origin for the source of sulfur. The ?18O values of sulfate extracted from fresh water samples at King Sejong Station range from 1.9 to 6.4 per mil excluding 1 sample. These oxygen isotope values are lower than those of the sulfate in the present seawater by 6 per mil. However, both sulfur and oxygen isotope values strongly represent the influence of the seawater sulfate. One sample have 2.6 and -1.1 per mil in its ?34S and ?18O values, respectively, that are quite different from the isotopic values of other samples. This sample was collected in the highland far from the King Sejong station. Therefore this sample might reflect the composition of rather pure precipitation not affected by seawater sulfate. The atmospheric deposition might have been the major source of dissolved sulfate but it is not clear whether the source materials are from natural and/or anthropogenic origin.

  6. APPLICATION OF THE PARTICLE TRACKING MODEL TO PREDICT FAR-FIELD FATE OF SEDIMENT SUSPENDED BY NEARSHORE DREDGING AND PLACEMENT, BRUNSWICK GA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph Z. Gailani; Tahirih C. Lackey; S. Jarrell Smith

    The Engineering Research and Development Center (ERDC) is supporting the USACE Savannah District in conducting a multi-year study to evaluate and validate numerical models for predicting dredged material transport at nearshore and open-water sites (Smith et al,. 2007). Accurate predictive models are necessary for selecting and managing nearshore placement sites. An example of this procedure is dredging performed at Brunswick,

  7. Survey of radiological contaminants in the near-shore environment at the Hanford Site 100-N Area reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Van Verst, S.P.; Albin, C.L. [Washington State Dept. of Health, Olympia, WA (United States); Patton, G.W.; Blanton, M.L.; Poston, T.M.; Cooper, A.T.; Antonio, E.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Past operations at the Hanford Site 100-N Area reactor resulted in the release of radiological contaminants to the soil column, local groundwater, and ultimately to the near-shore environment of the Columbia River. In September 1997, the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) and the Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) initiated a special study of the near-shore vicinity at the Hanford Site`s retired 100-N Area reactor. Environmental samples were collected and analyzed for radiological contaminants ({sup 3}H, {sup 90}Sr, and gamma/ emitters), with both the WDOH and SESP analyzing a portion of the samples. Samples of river water, sediment, riverbank springs, periphyton, milfoil, flying insects, clam shells, and reed canary grass were collected. External exposure rates were also measured for the near-shore environment in the vicinity of the 100-N Area. In addition, samples were collected at background locations above Vernita Bridge.

  8. Patterns and processes of population change in selected nearshore vertebrate predators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodkin, J.L.; Ballachey, B.E.; Dean, T.A.; Esler, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Sea otters and harlequin ducks have not fully recovered from the oil spill. This project will explore links between oil exposure and the lack of population recovery, with the intent of understanding constraints to recovery of these species and the nearshore environment. In FY 02, sea otter work will include aerial surveys of distribution and abundance and estimates of age-specific survival rates. Harlequin duck field studies will examine the relationship between survival and CYP1A. Captive experiments on harlequin ducks will examine the relationships between oil exposure and CYP1A induction, and metabolic and behavioral consequences of exposure.

  9. NEARSHORE SAND SOURCES FOR AMERICAN SAMOA: AN ALTERNATIVE TO USING BEACH SAND.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dingler, John R.; Reiss, Thomas E.

    1987-01-01

    Using a combination of geophysical techniques, in situ observations, and sampling by scuba divers, we investigated along the south shore of Tutuila Island, American Samoa, for nearshore sand deposits. To minimize the impact of future sand dredging on the island's littoral sediments, the search took place in a narrow zone between the outside of the fringing reef and the 30-m bathymetric contour. Because the sand will be used by the Samoans in a variety of ways, an area high in siliciclastic sand - Nua-Se'etaga Bay - and two areas containing only carbonate sand - Faga'itua Bay and Nafanua Bank - were inspected in detail. Results of the exploration program are discussed.

  10. Nearshore habitat and fish community associations of coaster brook trout in Isle Royale, Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorman, O.T.; Moore, S.A.; Carlson, A.J.; Quinlan, H.R.

    2008-01-01

    We characterized the nearshore habitat and fish community composition of approximately 300 km of shoreline within and adjacent to the major embayments of Isle Royale, Lake Superior. Sampling yielded 17 species, of which 12 were widespread and represented a common element of the Lake Superior fish community, including cisco Coregonus artedi, lake whitefish C. clupeaformis, round whitefish Prosopium cylindraceum, lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax, lake chub Couesius plumbeus, longnose sucker Catostomus catostomus, white sucker C. commersonii, trout-perch Percopsis omiscomaycus, ninespine stickleback Pungitius pungitius, burbot Lota lota, and slimy sculpin Cottus cognatus. The presence of brook trout S. fontinalis in an embayment was associated with the common species of the Isle Royale nearshore fish community, particularly cisco, longnose sucker, and round whitefish. However, brook trout were present in only five embayments and were common only in Tobin Harbor. Most Isle Royale embayments had broadly overlapping ranges of nearshore habitats. Within embayments, fish were distributed along a habitat gradient from less-protected rocky habitat near the mouth to highly protected habitat with mixed and finer substrates at the head. Embayments with brook trout had greater mean protection from the open lake, greater variation in depth, greater mean cover, and higher mean frequencies of large substrates (cobble, boulder, and bedrock). Within those embayments, brook trout were associated with habitat patches with higher mean frequencies of small substrates (particularly sand and coarse gravel). Within Tobin Harbor, brook trout were associated with midembayment habitat and species assemblages, especially those locations with a mixture of sand, gravel, and cobble substrates, an absence of bedrock, and the presence of round whitefish, white sucker, and trout-perch. Comparison of embayments with the model, Tobin Harbor, showed that six embayments without brook trout had very similar arrays of habitat. However, four embayments with brook trout had relatively different arrays of habitat from Tobin Harbor. These results suggest that there is potential for further recovery of brook trout populations across Isle Royale nearshore habitats. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  11. Ecological monitoring for assessing the state of the nearshore and open waters of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neilson, Melanie A.; Painter, D. Scott; Warren, Glenn; Hites, Ronald A.; Basu, Ilora; Weseloh, D.V. Chip; Whittle, D. Michael; Christie, Gavin; Barbiero, Richard; Tuchman, Marc; Johannsson, Ora E.; Nalepa, Thomas F.; Edsall, Thomas A.; Fleischer, Guy; Bronte, Charles; Smith, Stephen B.; Baumann, Paul C.

    2003-01-01

    The Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement stipulates that the Governments of Canada and the United States are responsible for restoring and maintaining the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the waters of the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem. Due to varying mandates and areas of expertise, monitoring to assess progress towards this objective is conducted by a multitude of Canadian and U.S. federal and provincial/state agencies, in cooperation with academia and regional authorities. This paper highlights selected long-term monitoring programs and discusses a number of documented ecological changes that indicate the present state of the open and nearshore waters of the Great Lakes.

  12. Latitudinal discontinuity in thermal conditions along the nearshore of central-northern Chile.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Fabian J; Largier, John L; Castillo, Manuel; Wieters, Evie A; Navarrete, Sergio A

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, evidence of abrupt latitudinal changes in the dynamics, structure and genetic variability of intertidal and subtidal benthic communities along central-northern Chile has been found consistently at 30-32°S. Changes in the advective and thermal environment in nearshore waters have been inferred from ecological patterns, since analyses of in situ physical data have thus far been missing. Here we analyze a unique set of shoreline temperature data, gathered over 4-10 years at 15 sites between 28-35°S, and combine it with satellite-derived winds and sea surface temperatures to investigate the latitudinal transition in nearshore oceanographic conditions suggested by recent ecological studies. Our results show a marked transition in thermal conditions at 30-31°S, superimposed on a broad latitudinal trend, and small-scale structures associated with cape-and-bay topography. The seasonal cycle dominated temperature variability throughout the region, but its relative importance decreased abruptly south of 30-31°S, as variability at synoptic and intra-seasonal scales became more important. The response of shoreline temperatures to meridional wind stress also changed abruptly at the transition, leading to a sharp drop in the occurrence of low-temperature waters at northern sites, and a concurrent decrease in corticated algal biomass. Together, these results suggest a limitation of nitrate availability in nearshore waters north of the transition. The localized alongshore change results from the interaction of latitudinal trends (e.g., wind stress, surface warming, inertial period) with a major headland-bay system (Punta Lengua de Vaca at 30.25°S), which juxtaposes a southern stretch of coast characterized by upwelling with a northern stretch of coast characterized by warm surface waters and stratification. This transition likely generates a number of latitude-dependent controls on ecological processes in the nearshore that can explain species-specific effects, and add strength to the suggestion of an oceanography-driven, major spatial transition in coastal communities at 30-31°S. PMID:25334020

  13. Uranium in the Near-shore Aquatic Food Chain: Studies on Periphyton and Asian Clams

    SciTech Connect

    Bunn, Amoret L.; Miley, Terri B.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Brandt, Charles A.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2007-12-31

    The benthic aquatic organisms in the near-shore environment of the Columbia River are the first biological receptors that can be exposed to groundwater contaminants coming from the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The primary contaminant of concern in the former nuclear fuels processing area at the Site, known as the 300 Area, is uranium. Currently, there are no national clean up criteria for uranium and ecological receptors. This report summarizes efforts to characterize biological uptake of uranium in the food chain of the benthic aquatic organisms and provide information to be used in future assessments of uranium and the ecosystem.

  14. Naval submarine base Kings Bay and Bangor soil evaluations.

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Joseph; Patteson, Raymond; Wesenberg, Donald L.; Attaway, Stephen W.

    2004-08-01

    This report provides soil evaluation and characterization testing for the submarine bases at Kings Bay, Georgia, and Bangor, Washington, using triaxial testing at high confining pressures with different moisture contents. In general, the samples from the Bangor and Kings Bay sites appeared to be stronger than a previously used reference soil. Assuming the samples of the material were representative of the material found at the sites, they should be adequate for use in the planned construction. Since soils can vary greatly over even a small site, a soil specification for the construction contractor would be needed to insure that soil variations found at the site would meet or exceed the requirements. A suggested specification for the Bangor and Kings Bay soils was presented based on information gathered from references plus data obtained from this study, which could be used as a basis for design by the construction contractor.

  15. Air-sea CO2 fluxes in the near-shore and intertidal zones influenced by the California Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, Janet J.; Vargas, Rodrigo; Smith, Stephen V.; Lara-Lara, Ruben; Gaxiola-Castro, Gilberto; Martín Hernández-Ayón, J.; Castro, Angel; Escoto-Rodriguez, Martin; Martínez-Osuna, Juan

    2013-10-01

    The study of air-sea CO2 fluxes (FCO2) in the coastal region is needed to better understand the processes that influence the direction and magnitude of FCO2 and to constrain the global carbon budget. We implemented a 1 year (January through December 2009) paired study to measure FCO2 in the intertidal zone (the coastline to 1.6 km offshore) and the near-shore (˜3 km offshore) off the north-western coast of Baja California (Mexico); a region influenced by year-round upwelling. FCO2 was determined in the intertidal zone via eddy covariance; while in the near-shore using mooring buoy sensors then calculated with the bulk method. The near-shore region was a weak annual net source of CO2 to the atmosphere (0.043 mol CO2 m-2 y-1); where 91% of the outgassed FCO2 was contributed during the upwelling season. Sea surface temperature (SST) and ?pCO2 (from upwelling) showed the strongest relationship with FCO2 in the near-shore, suggesting the importance of meso-scale processes (upwelling). FCO2 in the intertidal zone were up to four orders of magnitude higher than FCO2 in the near-shore. Wind speed showed the strongest relationship with FCO2 in the intertidal zone, suggesting the relevance of micro-scale processes. Results show that there are substantial spatial and temporal differences in FCO2 between the near-shore and intertidal zone; likely a result of heterogeneity. We suggest that detailed spatial and temporal measurements are needed across the coastal oceans and continental margins to better understand the mechanisms which control FCO2, as well as reduce uncertainties and constrain regional and global ocean carbon balances.

  16. Copyright: King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals; http://www.kfupm.edu.sa

    E-print Network

    El-Alfy, El-Sayed

    © Copyright: King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals; http://www.kfupm.edu.sa A Learning Communications, IEEE Transactions on;Publication Date: July2006;Vol: 5,Issue: 7 King Fahd University of Petroleum

  17. 76 FR 2438 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Kings, Queens, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ...Determinations: ``Kings, Queens, and Courtiers: Art in Early Renaissance France'' SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the following...exhibition ``Kings, Queens, and Courtiers: Art in Early Renaissance France'' imported from abroad for temporary...

  18. Lymphosarcoma in an Eastern king snake and a rhinoceros viper.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, E; Calderwood, M B; French, T W; Iverson, W; Page, D; Raphael, B

    1981-12-01

    An antemortem diagnosis of lymphosarcoma was made in a captive Eastern king snake and a rhinoceros viper. The Eastern king snake died on the 1st day after biopsy of a liver nodule, and necropsy revealed multiple tumor nodules throughout all major organ systems. The rhinoceros viper died after chemotherapy with cytosine arabinoside. The major gross lesion was a large paracolonic coelomic tumor that extended into the adjacent musculature and subcutaneous tissue of the lateral abdominal wall. The immediate cause of death of the rhinoceros viper was believed to be severe renal tubular necrosis. PMID:6895746

  19. King's theory of goal attainment: exploring functional status.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Billy A

    2015-04-01

    Imogene King's Theory of Goal Attainment provides a schema for nurses interested in functional status. However, the lack of a uniform definition for functional status has hindered development of a concise understanding of this phenomenon. Functional status is particularly important to nurses who are concerned with the safety and wellbeing of clients. With healthcare's increased focus on client-family-centered care it is important to develop innovative approaches for evaluating functional status that incorporate the client-family perspective. King's focus on mutual decision-making is an underutilized resource that can provide great insight into the study and understanding of functional status. PMID:25805388

  20. Percent Uninsured by County

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    ManyEyes

    This is a county by county visualization of the percentage of residents that are uninsured. The data are from a set available here: http://www-958.ibm.com/software/data/cognos/manyeyes/datasets/percent-uninsured-by-county/versions/1

  1. Data Summary for the Near-Shore Sediment Characterization Task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the Near-Shore Sediment Characterization Task of the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) was to quantify potential human health risks associated with Department of Energy (DOE)-related contamination of surface sediments in Watts Bar Reservoir (WBR). An estimated 700 Ci of {sup 137}Cs and 325 Ci of {sup 60}Co were released from White Oak Lake into the Clinch River between 1949 and 1992 (DOE, 1988). A number of previous studies have documented sediment contamination in the deep-water sediments but no study specifically targeted the near-shore environment, which has the most potential for exposure to humans.

  2. Queen Conch (Strombus gigas) Testis Regresses during the Reproductive Season at Nearshore Sites in the Florida Keys

    PubMed Central

    Spade, Daniel J.; Griffitt, Robert J.; Liu, Li; Brown-Peterson, Nancy J.; Kroll, Kevin J.; Feswick, April; Glazer, Robert A.; Barber, David S.; Denslow, Nancy D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Queen conch (Strombus gigas) reproduction is inhibited in nearshore areas of the Florida Keys, relative to the offshore environment where conchs reproduce successfully. Nearshore reproductive failure is possibly a result of exposure to environmental factors, including heavy metals, which are likely to accumulate close to shore. Metals such as Cu and Zn are detrimental to reproduction in many mollusks. Methodology/Principal Findings Histology shows gonadal atrophy in nearshore conchs as compared to reproductively healthy offshore conchs. In order to determine molecular mechanisms leading to tissue changes and reproductive failure, a microarray was developed. A normalized cDNA library for queen conch was constructed and sequenced using the 454 Life Sciences GS-FLX pyrosequencer, producing 27,723 assembled contigs and 7,740 annotated transcript sequences. The resulting sequences were used to design the microarray. Microarray analysis of conch testis indicated differential regulation of 255 genes (p<0.01) in nearshore conch, relative to offshore. Changes in expression for three of four transcripts of interest were confirmed using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis indicated changes in biological processes: respiratory chain (GO:0015992), spermatogenesis (GO:0007283), small GTPase-mediated signal transduction (GO:0007264), and others. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis indicated that Zn and possibly Cu were elevated in some nearshore conch tissues. Conclusions/Significance Congruence between testis histology and microarray data suggests that nearshore conch testes regress during the reproductive season, while offshore conch testes develop normally. Possible mechanisms underlying the testis regression observed in queen conch in the nearshore Florida Keys include a disruption of small GTPase (Ras)-mediated signaling in testis development. Additionally, elevated tissue levels of Cu (34.77 ng/mg in testis) and Zn (831.85 ng/mg in digestive gland, 83.96 ng/mg in testis) nearshore are similar to reported levels resulting in reproductive inhibition in other gastropods, indicating that these metals possibly contribute to NS conch reproductive failure. PMID:20856805

  3. Physical, chemical, and biological aspects of the Duwamish River Estuary, King County, Washington, 1963-67

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Santos, John F.; Stoner, J.D.

    1972-01-01

    This report describes the significant results to 1967 of a comprehensive study that began in 1963 to evaluate what changes take place in an estuary as the loads .of raw and partially treated industrial and municipal wastes are replaced by effluent from a secondary treatment plant. The study area is the Duwamish River estuary, about 18.3 river kilometers long. At mean sea level the estuary has a water-surface area of about 1 square mile and a mean width of 440 feet. At the lowest and highest recorded tides, the volume of the estuary is about 205 and 592 million cubic feet, respectively. The estuary is well stratified (salt-wedge type) at fresh-water inflows greater than 1,000 cfs (cubic feet per second), but when inflow rates are less than 1,000 cfs the lower 5.6 kilometers of the estuary grades into the partly mixed type. The crosschannel salinity distribution is uniform for a given location and depth. Salinity migration is controlled by tides and fresh-water inflow. At fresh-water inflow rates greater than 1,000 cfs, water in the upper 8.4 kilometers of the estuary is always fresh regardless of tide. At inflow rates less than 600 cfs and tide heights greater than 10 feet; some salinity has been detected 16.1 kilometers above the mouth of the estuary. Studies using a fluorescent dye show that virtually no downward mixing into the salt wedge occurs; soluble pollutants introduced at the upper end of the estuary stay in the surface layer (5-15 ft thick). On the basis of dye studies when fresh-water inflow is less than 400 cfs, it is estimated that less than 10 percent of a pollutant will remain in the estuary a minimum of 7 days. Longitudinal dispersion coefficients for the surface layer have been determined to be on the order of 100-400 square feet per second. Four water-quality stations automatically monitor DO (dissolved oxygen), water temperature, pH, and specific conductance; at one station solar radiation also is measured. DO concentration in the surface layer decreases almost linearly in a downstream direction. Minimum DO concentration in the surface layer is usually greater than 4 rag/1 (milligrams per liter). The smallest DO values are consistently recorded in the bottom layer at the station 7.7 kilometers above the mouth; monthly means of less than 3 mg/1 of DO have occurred at this point. Manual sampling shows that the DO sag in the bottom layer oscillates between 7.7 and 10.4 kilometers above the mouth of the estuary. Multiple-regression analysis shows that the surface DO content can be estimated from the fresh-water inflow and water temperature. Tidal exchange and fresh-water inflow indirectly control the bottom DO content. Information available from previous studies failed to indicate a progressive decrease in DO content during the period 1949-56, but data from the present study suggest a slight general decrease in the annual minimum DO concentrations in both the upper and lower layers. Average nitrate concentration in fresh water at station 16.2 has increased progressively since 1964, by amounts greater than those which can be attributed to the Renton Treatment Plant, 4.3 kilometers upstream from station 16.2. The BOD (biochemical oxygen demand) in both surface and bottom layers is generally less than 4 rag/1 of oxygen, but values greater than 6 rag/1 have been measured during a period of phytoplankton bloom. Phytoplankton blooms can occur during periods of minimum tidal exchange and fresh-water inflows of less than 300 cfs if solar radiation and water temperature are optimum. Nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus compounds) do not control the occurrence of a bloom, because sufficient quantities of these nutrients are always present. Nutrients in the treated effluent may increase the biomass of the bloom. Trace-element studies have not defined any role that these elements may play in algal growth. The inflowing fresh water contains principally calcium and bicarbonate and has a dissolved-solids content ra

  4. Determination of mass balance and entrainment in the stratified Duwamish River Estuary, King County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoner, J.D.

    1972-01-01

    During a study of the effects of waste-water input on the stratified Duwamish River estuary, intensive water-velocity and salinity measurements were made in both the lower salt wedge and the upper fresher water layer for tidal-cycle periods. The net movement of water and salt mass past a cross section during a tidal cycle was determined from integration of the measured rates of movement of water and salt past the section. The net volume of water that moved downstream past the section during the cycle agreed with the volume of fresh-water inflow at the head of the estuary within (1) 3.8 and 7.2 percent, respectively, for two studies made during periods of maximum and minimum tidal-prism thickness and identical inflow rates .of 312 cfs (cubic feet per second), and (2) 15 percent for one study made during a period of average tidal-prism thickness and an inflow rate of 1,280 cfs. For the three studies, the difference between salt mass transported upstream and downstream during the cycles ranged from 0.8 to 19 percent of the respective mean salt-mass transport. Water was entrained from the .salt-water wedge into the overlying layer of mixed fresh and salt water at tidal-cycle-average rates of 30 and 69 cfs per million square feet of interface for the inflow rates of 312 cfs, and 99 cfs per million square feet of interface for an inflow rate of 1,280 cfs. At a constant inflow rate, the rate of entrainment of salt-wedge water in the Duwamish River estuary more than doubled for a doubling of tidal-prism thickness. It also doubled for a quadrupling of inflow rate at about constant tidal-prism thickness.

  5. Geologic map of the Vashon 7.5' quadrangle and selected areas, King County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Booth, Derek B.; Troost, Kathy Goetz; Tabor, Rowland W.

    2015-01-01

    This map, the Vashon quadrangle and selected adjacent areas, encompasses most of Vashon Island, Maury Island, and Three Tree Point in the south-central Puget Sound. One small area in the Vashon quadrangle on the east side of Puget Sound is excluded from this map but included on the adjacent Seattle quadrangle (Booth and others, 2005). The map displays a wide variety of surficial geologic deposits, which reflect many geologic environments and processes. Multiple ice-sheet glaciations and intervening nonglacial intervals have constructed a complexly layered sequence of deposits that underlie both islands to a depth of more than 300 m below sea level. These deposits not only record glacial and nonglacial history but also control the flow and availability of ground water, determine the susceptibility of the slopes to landslides, and provide economic reserves of sand and gravel. The islands are surrounded by channels of Puget Sound, some as deep as the islands are high (>600 ft (~200 m)). The shorelines provide many kilometers of well-exposed coastal outcrops that reveal abundant lithologic and stratigraphic details not ordinarily displayed in the heavily vegetated Puget Lowland.

  6. AIR POLLUTION, POLLENS AND RESPIRATORY ADMISSIONS FOR CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE IN KING COUNTY. (R827355)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  7. Historical Changes to Lake Washington and Route of the Lake Washington Ship Canal, King County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chrzastowski, Michael J.

    1983-01-01

    Historical shoreline changes to hydrologic characteristics were studied for Lake Washington and the route of Lake Washington Ship Canal. The study is based on comparison of maps made during the period 1875-1907 and modern topographic maps, supplemented with historical documents that describe the once-natural setting of the lakes and streams in the Lake Washington drainage basin. The observed shoreline changes range from minor to substantial. The water-surface area has been historically reduced by about 6 square kilometers, and total shoreline has been reduced by 20 kilometers. Approximately 4 square kilometers of the historical wetland area has been eliminated, or about 93 percent of the natural wetland extent. The changes have resulted from construction of the Lake Washington Ship Canal and accompanying water-level adjustments, shoreline modification from urban growth of the area, and limited natural processes. The map comparison documents (1) extent of shoreline changes (2) historical loss of wetlands area, (3) loss of small streams that historically entered the lakes and bays, and (4) historical vegetation and land-use patterns around the lakeshore and canal route. The identification of historical shorelines, wetlands, and small streams that have no expression on today 's landscape is information of value to land-use planning and local engineering activities. (USGS)

  8. General hydrology and external sources of nutrients affecting Pine Lake, King County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dion, N.P.; Sumioka, S.S.; Winter, T.C.

    1983-01-01

    An adjusted water budget prepared for Pine Lake, a candidate for lake-quality restoration, indicates that of approximately 790 acre-feet of water that enters the lake in a typical year, 410 acre-feet is from precipitation, 350 acre-feet is from surface inflow, and 30 acre-feet is from ground-water seepage. A nearly equal amount of water leaves the lake and of this, 130 acre-feet is by evaporation, 659 acre-feet is by surface runoff, and less than one acre-foot is by ground-water seepage. Based on these amounts of inflow and outflow, the theoretical water-renewal time of the lake is calculated to be 2.2 years. The contributions of inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus to the lake in a typical year from precipitation, surface inflow, and ground-water inflow is about 2,500 pounds of nitrogen and 49 pounds of phosphorus. (USGS)

  9. Evaluation of seepage from Chester Morse Lake and Masonry Pool, King County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hidaka, F.T.; Garrett, Arthur Angus

    1967-01-01

    Hydrologic data collected in the Cedar and Snoqualmie River basins on the west slope of the Cascade Range have been analyzed to determine the amount of water lost by seepage from Chester Morse Lake and Masonry Pool and the. consequent gain by seepage to the Cedar and South Fork Snoqualmie Rivers. For water years 1957-64, average losses were about 220 cfs (cubic feet per second) while average gains were about 180 cfs in the Cedar River and 50 cfs in the South Fork Snoqualmie River. Streamflow and precipitation data for water years 1908-26 and 1930-F2 indicate that a change in runoff regimen occurred in Cedar and South Fork Snoqualmie Rivers after the Boxley Creek washout in December 1918. For water years 1919-26 and 1930-32, the flow of Cedar River near Landsburg averaged about 80 cfs less than it would have if the washout had not occurred. In contrast, the flow of South Fork Snoqualmie River at North Bend averaged about 60 cfs more than it would have.

  10. Red king crab ( Paralithodes camtschaticus) early post-settlement habitat choice: Structure, food, and ontogeny

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jodi L. Pirtle; Allan W. Stoner

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about nursery habitat function for red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus), a commercially important species that associates with complex benthic habitats from settlement through the first two years of life. During settlement, the red king crab actively seeks complex benthic habitats, with high availability of vertical structure and crevice space. Habitat choice for early juvenile red king crab

  11. Effect of fasting on the V O2-fh relationship in king penguins, Aptenodytes patagonicus

    E-print Network

    Fahlman, Andreas

    Effect of fasting on the V O2-fh relationship in king penguins, Aptenodytes patagonicus A. Fahlman. Butler. Effect of fasting on the V O2-fh relationship in king penguins, Aptenodytes patagonicus. Am J) and heart rate (fH), five male king penguins were exercised at various speeds on repeated occasions during

  12. Solution to the mean king's problem using quantum error-correcting codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Masakazu; Kimura, Gen; Miyadera, Takayuki; Imai, Hideki; Cheng, Jun

    2015-05-01

    We discuss the so-called mean king's problem, a retrodiction problem among noncommutative observables, in the context of error detection. Describing the king's measurement effectively by a single error operation, we give a solution of the mean king's problem using quantum error-correcting codes. The existence of a quantum error-correcting code from a solution is also presented.

  13. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Body size determines rates of seed dispersal by giant king crickets

    E-print Network

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Body size determines rates of seed dispersal by giant king crickets Peter King June 2010 Ó The Society of Population Ecology and Springer 2010 Abstract New Zealand is home to giant king crickets called weta, which are the only insects known to consume fleshy-fruits and disperse seeds

  14. Commemoration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., January 15, 1929-April 4, 1968. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD.

    Developed in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., this is a short collection of suggested activities to teach black awareness in the elementary and secondary grades through King's philosophy. An introductory biographical sketch of King and an article about his accomplishments are provided. Activities are divided into grade-level ranges for the…

  15. Copyright: King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals; http://www.kfupm.edu.sa

    E-print Network

    El-Alfy, El-Sayed

    © Copyright: King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals; http://www.kfupm.edu.sa A Neural Network-BASED EDUCATION; pp: 505-510; Vol: ## King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals http://www.kfupm.edu.sa Summary: King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals; http://www.kfupm.edu.sa 3. BISHOP C, 1995, NEURAL

  16. Copyright: King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals; http://www.kfupm.edu.sa

    E-print Network

    El-Alfy, El-Sayed

    © Copyright: King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals; http://www.kfupm.edu.sa On Optimal SYSTEMS AND APPLICATIONS, VOLS 1 AND 2; pp: 819-824; Vol: ## King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals: King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals; http://www.kfupm.edu.sa 15. YU F, 2004, EFFICIENT MULTI

  17. THE 2001 ALABAMA SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL PRODUCTIONS OF KING JOHN AND JULIUS CAESAR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig Barrow

    n its thirtieth anniversary season, the Alabama Shakespeare Festival produced one play never before performed at the Festival, Shakespeare's King John; and Julius Caesar, last performed in 1991. King John was performed in the 250-seat Octagon Theatre, while Julius Caesar was performed in the larger 750-seat Festival Stage. While Howard Jensen of Indiana University directed King John and Kent Thompson,

  18. Northwestern University Chicago Campus Martin Luther King Commemoration Art Contest Entry Form

    E-print Network

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    Northwestern University Chicago Campus Martin Luther King Commemoration Art Contest Entry Form 2013 Campus Martin Luther King Commemoration Art Contest. I understand that Northwestern University retains Martin Luther King Commemoration Art Contest Rules and Regulations 1. All entries must be submitted

  19. DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION-2013 $1,000-$2, 500 Scholarships

    E-print Network

    Loudon, Catherine

    Page | 1 DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION- 2013 $1,000-$2, 500 Scholarships Applications for the 2013 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Scholarships ("MLK Scholarships") may now be submitted society comparable to the impact of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.? The theme provides latitude for expansion

  20. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parade & Freedom Through Education University of California, San Diego

    E-print Network

    Russell, Lynn

    Martin Luther King, Jr. Parade & Freedom Through Education · University of California, San Diego the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. · Bus transportation to/from campus will be provided · Meet at Sun God______________________________ Please Print UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Name of Class or Activity: _Martin Luther King Jr

  1. 20th Anniversary of the Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration at UNH featuring Nikki Giovanni

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    20th Anniversary of the Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration at UNH featuring Nikki Giovanni January Hampshire's 2010 Martin Luther King Celebration Committee, I welcome you to our annual events honoring the life, work, service, and sacrifice of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. This anniversary

  2. The king mackerel (Scomberomorus ca-valla),a westernAtlantic member of the

    E-print Network

    684 The king mackerel (Scomberomorus ca- valla),a westernAtlantic member of the family ScombridaeVries and Grimes, 1997). King mackerel sup- port valuable commercial and recre- ational fisheries by quota was implemented in the 1985­86 fishing year. The current management regime for king mackerel

  3. AbstractA total of 1006 king mack erel (Scomberomorus cavalla) repre

    E-print Network

    satellites revealed two weakly divergent "genetic" subpopulations or stocks of king mackerel in Florida boundaries used currently for stock assessment and allocation of the king mackerel resource, were nonsig with either geographic or spatial-temporal boundaries. King mackerel sampled from the Florida Keys could

  4. SIZE, SEX RATIO, AND RECRUITMENT IN VARIOUS FISHERIES OF KING MACKEREL, SCOMBEROMORUS CA VALLA, IN

    E-print Network

    SIZE, SEX RATIO, AND RECRUITMENT IN VARIOUS FISHERIES OF KING MACKEREL, SCOMBEROMORUS CA VALLA. MANOOCH III' ABSTRACT Data from over 54,000 king mackerel, Scomberomorus cavalla, were analyzed selective for particular sizes of king mackerel. Size composition in each area varied considerably among

  5. Ugiuvangmiut Quliapyuit = King Island Tales. Eskimo History and Legends from Bering Strait.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Lawrence D., Ed.

    The collection of native tales from King Island, Alaska, contains tales told originally in Inupiaq Eskimo by seven native elders. Introductory sections provide background information on the storytellers, King Island Village and its people, traditional life there, and the language of the King Islanders. The 25 tales are divided into groups: "The…

  6. Geologic map of southwestern Sequoia National Park, Tulare County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sisson, Thomas W.; Moore, James G.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the geology of 675 km2 (260 mi2) on the west slope of the Sierra Nevada, California, mainly in Sequoia National Park and Sequoia National Forest. It was produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at the request of the National Park Service to complete the geologic map coverage of Kings Canyon and Sequoia National Parks. The area includes the Mineral King 15’ topographic quadrangle (sheet 1) and strips along the east and northeast edges of the Kaweah 15’ topographic quadrangle (sheet 2), both in Tulare County. Mapping was performed mainly on the 1:24,000-scale Mineral King, Silver City, Quinn Peak, Moses Mountain, Case Mountain, and Dennison Peak 7.5’ topographic quadrangle bases. Rocks within the study area are chiefly Cretaceous granites and granodiorites of the Sierra Nevada batholith that intruded coherent masses of Mesozoic metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks. Quaternary till and talus are the principal surficial deposits, with the exception of a large bouldery alluvial apron near the southwest corner of the map area. The study area includes the headwaters of the Kaweah River (East and South Forks), Tule River (North Fork and North Fork of the Middle Fork), and the Little Kern River. Relief is considerable, with elevations spanning from 1,500 feet along the Middle Fork Kaweah River to 12,432 feet at the summit of Florence Peak along the crest of the Great Western Divide.

  7. Distribution and abundance of larval fish in the nearshore waters of western Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Gorman, Robert

    1983-01-01

    Ichthyoplankton was collected at 17 nearshore (bottom depth greater than or equal to 5 m but less than or equal to 10 m) sites in western Lake Huron during 1973-75 with a 0.5-m net of 351-micron mesh towed at 99 m/min. Larvae of rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) dominated late spring and early summer catches and larvae of alewives (Alosa pseudoharengus) the midsummer catches. Larval yellow perch (Perca flavescens) were caught in early summer but were rarely the dominant species. The time of spawning and hatching, and thus occurrence of larvae, differed between areas but was less variable for alewives than for yellow perch. The appearance of larvae in Saginaw Bay was followed successively by their appearance in southern, central, and northern Lake Huron. Rainbow smelt were most abundant in northern Lake Huron and yellow perch and alewives in inner Saginaw Bay. Densities of either rainbow smelt or alewives occasionally exceeded 1/mA?, whereas those of yellow perch never exceeded 0.1/mA?. Abundance of alewives was usually highest 1 to 3 m beneath the surface and that of rainbow smelt 2 to at least 6 m beneath the surface. Important nursery areas of rainbow smelt were in bays and off irregular coastlines and those of yellow perch were in bays. All nearshore waters seemed equally important as nursery areas of alewives.

  8. Trophic connections in Lake Superior Part II: the nearshore fish community

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gamble, A.E.; Hrabik, T.R.; Yule, D.L.; Stockwell, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    We use detailed diet analyses of the predominant planktivorous, benthivorous and piscivorous fish species from Lake Superior to create a nearshore (bathymetric depths Mysis diluviana and Diporeia spp). Although the piscivorous fishes like lean lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) fed to a lesser extent on Diporeia and Mysis, they were still strongly connected to these macroinvertebrates, which were consumed by their primary prey species (sculpin spp., rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax, and coregonines). The addition of Bythotrephes to summer/fall cisco and lake whitefish diets, and the decrease in rainbow smelt in lean lake trout diets (replaced by coregonines) were the largest observed differences relative to historic Lake Superior diet studies. Although the offshore food web of Lake Superior was simpler than nearshore in terms of number of fish species present, the two areas had remarkably similar food web structures, and both fish communities were primarily supported by Mysis and Diporeia. We conclude that declines in Mysis or Diporeia populations would have a significant impact on energy flow in Lake Superior. The food web information we generated can be used to better identify management strategies for Lake Superior.

  9. Moderate-resolution sea surface temperature data for the nearshore North Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Payne, Meredith C.; Reusser, Deborah A.; Lee, Henry, II; Brown, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Coastal sea surface temperature (SST) is an important environmental characteristic in determining the suitability of habitat for nearshore marine and estuarine organisms. This publication describes and provides access to an easy-to-use coastal SST dataset for ecologists, biogeographers, oceanographers, and other scientists conducting research on nearshore marine habitats or processes. The data cover the Temperate Northern Pacific Ocean as defined by the 'Marine Ecosystems of the World' (MEOW) biogeographic schema developed by The Nature Conservancy. The spatial resolution of the SST data is 4-km grid cells within 20 km of the shore. The data span a 29-year period - from September 1981 to December 2009. These SST data were derived from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument measurements compiled into monthly means as part of the Pathfinder versions 5.0 and 5.1 (PFSST V50 and V51) Project. The processing methods used to transform the data from their native Hierarchical Data Format Scientific Data Set (HDF SDS) to georeferenced, spatial datasets capable of being read into geographic information systems (GIS) software are explained. In addition, links are provided to examples of scripts involved in the data processing steps. The scripts were written in the Python programming language, which is supported by ESRI's ArcGIS version 9 or later. The processed data files are also provided in text (.csv) and Access 2003 Database (.mdb) formats. All data except the raster files include attributes identifying realm, province, and ecoregion as defined by the MEOW classification schema.

  10. Error Evaluation of Near-shore Bathymetry Using the Single Beam Echo Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, M.; Song, G.

    2013-12-01

    By using the single-beam echo sounder or the multi-beam echo sounder to investigate the near-shore bathymetry, its measurement has been limited by a series of errors caused by positioning, vehicle's attitude, acoustic speed variation, and some others. The main problem of bathymetry by using single-beam echo sounder is from lack of full coverage of the sounding beams illuminating the survey area of interesting. In addition, in the every ends of the survey lines especially when approaching the coast line, the turning will cause ship tilt to one side making a predicted but uncorrectable error. It is the reason that surveyors will choose a multi-beam echo sounder for the measurement when bathymetry coverage and accuracy are considered. However, at shallow depths less than 5 meters, as example, the high risk of multi-beam's transducers colliding with the ocean bottom will lower the willingness in using a multi-beam sounder due to high-priced of the transducers. Therefore, the single beam sounders have been the main instrument to measure near-shore under water topography in the industry. This study is to understand sounding deviation causing by the turning of the survey ship, such that we can analyze and control the errors to improve the accuracy of measurement using the single beam echo sounder in the shallow waters.

  11. Parts of Antarctica's King George Island are littered with trash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2013-02-01

    A report released 7 February by ecologists from Germany's Friedrich Schiller University Jena reveals that parts of King George Island, a logistical hub for international research in Antarctica, are home to open pits of trash, decaying field huts, and other forms of pollution.

  12. Evolution of king crabs from hermit crab ancestors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, C. W.; Blackstone, N. W.; Buss, L. W.

    1992-02-01

    KING crabs (Family Lithodidae) are among the world's largest arthropods, having a crab-like morphology and a strongly calcified exoskeleton1-6. The hermit crabs, by contrast, have depended on gastropod shells for protection for over 150 million years5,7. Shell-living has constrained the morphological evolution of hermit crabs by requiring a decalcified asymmetrical abdomen capable of coiling into gastropod shells and by preventing crabs from growing past the size of the largest available shells1-6. Whereas reduction in shell-living and acquisition of a crab-like morphology (carcinization) has taken place independently in several hermit crab lineages, and most dramatically in king crabs1-6, the rate at which this process has occurred was entirely unknown2,7. We present molecular evidence that king crabs are not only descended from hermit crabs, but are nested within the hermit crab genus Pagurus. We estimate that loss of the shell-living habit and the complete carcinization of king crabs has taken between 13 and 25 million years.

  13. STOMACH CONTENTS OF THE BERING SEA KING CRAB

    E-print Network

    I STOMACH CONTENTS OF THE BERING SEA KING CRAB SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT-FISHERIES Na 291 UNITED A. Seaton, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Arnie J. Suoraela, Commissioner STOMACH CONTENTS. Fish and Wildlife Service Seattle, Washington ABSTRACT This preliminary study of the stomach contents

  14. Obtuse Triangle Suppression in Anisotropic Meshes , Yi-King Choia

    E-print Network

    Obtuse Triangle Suppression in Anisotropic Meshes Feng Suna , Yi-King Choia , Wenping Wanga , Dong, No.49, Zhichun Road, Haidian District, Beijing, 100190, China Abstract Anisotropic triangle meshes, and in these applications it is desirable to have as few obtuse triangles as possible to reduce the discretization error. We

  15. King mackerel (Scomberomorus cavalla) are large coastal pelagic

    E-print Network

    Massachu- setts to Brazil in the western Atlantic Ocean, including the Caribbean Sea (Mc of Mexico (GOM) and in the Atlantic Ocean (Atlantic) off the southeastern United States. King mackerel) and Atlantic Ocean (Atlantic). Separate migra- tory groups, or stocks, migrate from eastern GOM

  16. Welcome to King's An overview of student support services

    E-print Network

    Applebaum, David

    of student support services Advice & guidance We hope that your time with us will be stress and problem freeWelcome to King's An overview of student support services #12;Life & living London is a vibrant city in which to study and student life here is exciting and diverse. We want to ensure that you make

  17. GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY CLYDE JR & JOHN KING LOAN FUND

    E-print Network

    Li, Mo

    GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY CLYDE JR & JOHN KING LOAN FUND PROMISSORY NOTE/STATEMENT OF RIGHTS advanced to me under this loan agreement on the dates indicated: STUDENT: DO NOT WRITE IN THIS BOX UNTIL of this Note must be interpreted in accordance with the Loan Guidelines established by the Institute, copies

  18. Avermectin induced inflammation damage in king pigeon brain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Jie; Sun, Bao-Hong; Qu, Jian Ping; Xu, Shiwen; Li, Shu

    2013-11-01

    To determine the effect of Avermectin (AVM) on inflammation damage in king pigeon brain, eighty two-month-old American king pigeons were randomly divided into four groups, and were fed with either commercial diet or AVM-supplemented diet containing 20 mg kg(-1)diet, 40 mg kg(-1)diet, and 60 mg kg(-1)diet AVM for 30, 60 and 90 d, respectively. Then, the expression level of inflammatory factors (iNOS, PTGEs, NF-?B), histological damage, and ultra-structural damage were examined. It showed that AVM caused higher expressions (P<0.05) of iNOS, PTGEs, NF-?B with disorganized histological and ultra-structural structures in cerebrum, cerebellum, and optic lobe. Meanwhile, inflammatory and histopathological damage were induced by AVM in king pigeon brains. In addition, the main targeted organelle in nervous system was mitochondria, which indicated that mitochondria may be relevant to the process of inflammation induced by AVM. To our best knowledge, this is the first report to study the toxic effect of AVM on inflammatory damage in king pigeon. Thus, the information presented in this study is believed to be helpful in supplementing data for further AVM toxicity study. PMID:24134892

  19. Fractal and Chaotic Dynamics in Nervous Systems Chris C. King

    E-print Network

    King, Chris

    Fractal and Chaotic Dynamics in Nervous Systems Chris C. King Department of Mathematics & Statistics, University of Auckland. Abstract : This paper presents a review of fractal and chaotic dynamics distributed processing models and their relation to chaos and overviews reasons why chaotic and fractal

  20. KING FAHAD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM AND MIERALS ELECTRICAL ENGENEERING DEPARTMENT

    E-print Network

    Al-Ghadhban, Samir

    1 KING FAHAD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM AND MIERALS ELECTRICAL ENGENEERING DEPARTMENT Summer Training Report In Saudi Electricity Company Done for: Dr. Ahmad Masoud Done by: Shabnan Al-Dossari ID # 263518 ................................................... #12;3 Chapter 4: Overhead Lines: .......................................... 21 4.1 Over view

  1. Important Issues on Statistical Confidentiality Ph. Nanopoulos and John King

    E-print Network

    Malerba, Donato

    Important Issues on Statistical Confidentiality Methods Ph. Nanopoulos and John King Eurostat. This paper sets out, in the context of official statistics, some of the key issues of confidentiality and the methods developed to maintain confidentiality. The relevance of the issues and methods to data mining

  2. KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM & MINERALS Dhahran, Saudi Arabia

    E-print Network

    Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi

    KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM & MINERALS Dhahran, Saudi Arabia Basic Properties of Reservoir Rocks By Dr. Sidqi A. Abu-Khamsin Professor, Department of Petroleum Engineering © Copyright by Dr. INTRODUCTION 1 1.1 The nature of petroleum 1 1.2 The petroleum reservoir 1 1.3 Significance of rock properties

  3. Statistical Security for Social Security Samir Soneji & Gary King

    E-print Network

    Chen, Yiling

    . Keywords Forecasting . Mortality. Obesity. Smoking . Social Security Introduction Social Security, formallyStatistical Security for Social Security Samir Soneji & Gary King # Population Association of America 2012 Abstract The financial viability of Social Security, the single largest U.S. govern- ment

  4. San Jos State University Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library

    E-print Network

    Su, Xiao

    partnership between the SJSU Library and the SJ public library has just completed its fifth year of operation joining a university and public library operates in a context of unusual organizational complexity. While José State University Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library University Library Program Review June 2009

  5. Search for variables in the open cluster King 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunzen, E.; Netopil, M.; Rode-Paunzen, M.; Bozic, H.

    2015-06-01

    We present the time series analysis of CCD photometry from the 1 m telescope at the Hvar Observatory (Croatia) for 54 stars in the area of the young open clusters King 12. We found no new variable but list upper detection limits.

  6. Skull Size and Intelligence, and King Robert Bruce's IQ

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deary, Ian J.; Ferguson, Karen J.; Bastin, Mark E.; Barrow, Geoffrey W. S.; Reid, Louise M.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; MacLullich, Alasdair M. J.

    2007-01-01

    An estimate of someone's IQ is a potentially informative personal datum. This study examines the association between external skull measurements and IQ scores, and uses the resulting regression equation to provide an estimate of the IQ of King Robert I of Scotland (Robert Bruce, 1274-1329). Participants were 48 relatively healthy Caucasian men…

  7. How to Comment like a King--or Queen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Vicki

    2007-01-01

    Blogging, if you truly inhale its essence, will give you a calling, renewal, and purpose as you have never seen before. Here, the author shows how to blog like a king or a queen. These techniques include: (1) Write a meaningful comment; (2) If you have written about it, hyperlink to your post; (3) If you have a blog, share some information about…

  8. Effects of OsteoKing on osteoporotic rabbits

    PubMed Central

    DAI, LIFEN; WU, HAIYING; YU, SHAN; ZHAO, HONGBIN; XUE, LANJIE; XU, MING; SHEN, ZHIQIANG; HU, MIN

    2015-01-01

    Heng-Gu-Gu-Shang-Yu-He-Ji, also known as OsteoKing, is used as a herbal Traditional Chinese Medicine for the treatment of bone disease, including femoral head necrosis and osteoarthritis. However, whether OsteoKing has anti-osteoporotic properties has remained to be elucidated. The purpose of the present study was therefore to investigate the effects of OsteoKing on ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis in rabbits. Female New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into an ovariectomized (OVX) group and a sham-surgery group. The rabbits in the OVX group were subjected to an ovariectomy, while the rabbits in the sham group were subjected to the removal of an area of fat near the two ovaries. Bone mineral density, mechanical properties, serum biochemical parameters and micro-architecture were examined at 150 days post-OVX to characterize the experimental animal model. Once the osteoporotic rabbit model had been established, the rabbits in the OVX group were divided into the following groups: Model group, nilestriol group and 300 and 600 mg/kg OsteoKing groups, containing 16 rabbits in each group. OsteoKing and nilestriol were administered orally. The bone mineral density, mechanical properties, serum biochemical parameters, histology and micro-architecture were examined using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometric analysis, mechanical assessments, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, histopathological evaluation and micro-computerized tomography examination following 60 days and 120 days of treatment, respectively. Treatment with OsteoKing led to an elevation in the bone mineral density of the vertebra and serum phosphorus levels, reduced serum concentrations of osteocalcin, procollagen type I N-terminal peptide, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b and cross-linked N-telopeptide of type I collagen, improved mechanical properties (maximum load, stiffness and energy absorption capacity), and micro-architecture of the lumbar vertebra in the OVX osteoporotic rabbit model following treatment for 120 days. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that OsteoKing is effective in the prevention of estrogen deficiency-associated bone loss and may be a promising drug for the treatment of post-menopausal osteoporosis. PMID:25815520

  9. The Blue Green Algal Bloom in the Nearshore Waters of Cukai Bay Facing the South China Sea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lokman Shamsudin

    1999-01-01

    Since the early 1990's, large areas of mangrove forest along the nearshore waters of Cukai bay had been cleared to give way for the development of aquaculture activities, human settlement and setting up of new small scale fish processing industries. The Cukai bay, facing the South China Sea, has inflows from the Cukai river estuaries and other numerous small river

  10. SNAIL DISTRIBUTIONS IN LAKE ERIE: THE INFLUENCE OF ANOXIA IN THE SOUTHERN CENTRAL BASIN NEARSHORE ZONE1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KENNETH A. KRIEGER

    1985-01-01

    The distributions and abundances of gastropods collected in sediment grab samples in 1978 and 1979 in the southern nearshore zone of the central basin of Lake Erie were compared with earlier gastropod records from throughout the lake. Since the 1920s, 34 species in eight families have been reported for the lake proper. Sixteen species have been reported only once, 13

  11. Setting of and mixed carbonate-siliciclastic facies associated with Holocene nearshore sabellid worm reefs, northern Belize

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. J. Mazzullo; C. D. Burke; R. K. Dunn; W. D. bischoff

    1990-01-01

    Communities of sabellid worms (Polychaeta) in northern Belize (mouth of Northern River Lagoon) occur as areally discontinuous, unlithified patch reefs cresting positive features on an irregular depositional topography of Holocene and older sediments. They are found in nearshore marine, moderate energy, tidally influenced environments (intertidal to 60-cm depths) of normal salinity (36%) adjoining subtidal deposits. These colonies, as much as

  12. Development of an Integrated Assessment of Great Lakes Using Towed in situ Sensor Technologies: Linking Nearshore Conditions with Adjacent Watersheds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal and nearshore regions of the US/Canadian Great Lakes have not been included in monitoring efforts in any regular, consistent, or comprehensive fashion. To address this need, we have been developing a survey strategy using towed in situ sensors to provide spatially-compreh...

  13. Use of coastal zone color scanner imagery to identify nearshore ocean areas affected by land-based pollutants. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. F. LaPointe; D. J. Basta

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of the analysis was to use remotely sensed satellite imagery to determine the spatial boundaries of nearshore areas or zones likely to be affected by pollutants from land-based sources, so that data collected on the presence or absence of living marine resources could be combined with information on land-based pollutant discharges in a preliminary relative assessment of potential

  14. Near?shore distribution and abundance of dolphins along the West Coast of the South Island, New Zealand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefan Brager; Karsten Schneider

    1998-01-01

    Compared to other stretches of the New Zealand coast, very little is known about the cetacean fauna off the West Coast of the South Island. The purpose of this paper is to describe the near?shore distribution and abundance of dolphins in that area by summarising the results of two major studies. Between February 1995 and February 1997, 97 day trips

  15. Prepared in cooperation with the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District Circulation, Mixing, and Transport in Nearshore Lake Erie

    E-print Network

    and living resources, natural hazards, and the environment, visit http://www.usgs.gov or call 1­888­ASK, and Transport in Nearshore Lake Erie in the Vicinity of Villa Angela Beach and Euclid Creek, Cleveland, Ohio Angela Beach and Euclid Creek, Cleveland, Ohio, September 11­12, 2012 By P.R. Jackson Prepared

  16. Recent advances in modeling swash zone dynamics: Influence of surf-swash interaction on nearshore hydrodynamics and morphodynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Brocchini; T. E. Baldock

    2008-01-01

    The role of the swash zone in influencing the whole nearshore dynamics is reviewed with a focus on the interaction between surf and swash zone processes. Local and global hydromorphodynamic phenomena are discussed in detail, and a description of the overall swash zone operation is given. The effects of swash zone boundary conditions are highlighted, together with the importance of

  17. FACTORS IN THE DETERMINATION OF SELECTED TRACE ELEMENTS IN NEAR-SHORE U. S. WATERS OF LAKES SUPERIOR AND HURON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determinations of total As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Pb in acidified unfiltered water samples from 48 stations representing the near-shore U.S. waters of Lake Superior, Lake Huron, and selected incoming streams gave overall mean concentrations and standard deviations (microgram/L) of ...

  18. Exchange rates of yellowfin and bigeye tunas and fishery interaction between Cross seamount and near-shore FADs in Hawaii

    E-print Network

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    and near-shore FADs in Hawaii John Siberta *, Kim Hollandb , David Itanoa a Pelagic Fisheries Research are a major component of catches at inshore FADs in Hawaii. The rate of immigration from Cross Seamount to the inshore FADs is very low for both species. The fishing mortality at Cross seamount is substantial

  19. Island biogeography of bats in Baja California, Mexico: patterns of bat species richness in a near-shore archipelago

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Winifred F. Frick; John P. Hayes; Paul A. Heady III

    2007-01-01

    Aim We studied the relationship between the size and isolation of islands and bat species richness in a near-shore archipelago to determine whether communities of vagile mammals conform to predictions of island biogeography theory. We compared patterns of species richness in two subarchipelagos to determine whether area per se or differences in habitat diversity explain variations in bat species richness.

  20. Physiography, surficial sediments and Quaternary stratigraphy of the inner continental shelf and nearshore region of the Gulf of Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelley, J.T.; Belknap, D.F.

    1991-01-01

    The western margin of the Gulf of Maine is a bedrock-framed, glaciated continental shelf that has only recently been geologically mapped. The bathymetry is divisible into four physiographic areas: nearshore basins, shelf valleys, rocky zones, and outer basins. The nearshore basins are largely floored by mud except near rock outcrops where shelly gravel occurs. Shelf valleys extend seaward from nearshore basins and estuaries and generally possess less sediment than nearshore basins. Abundant exposures of Pleistocene sediment with rippled substrates suggest that contemporary reworking is occurring. Rocky zones are the most abundant physiographic area and include both exposed bedrock and glacial gravel outcrops. Shell material produced by organisms living on or near rocks is common both in the rocky zones and in abutting environments. The outer basin begins at a depth of about 60 m and extends beyond the 100 m isobath. This area is occasionally bordered on its landward side by the late Quaternary lowstand shoreline. Below this shoreline thicker deposits of sediment exist, while all environments landward were reworked by a regression and transgression of the sea. ?? 1991.

  1. COASTAL WETLAND-NEARSHORE FOOD WEB LINKAGES ALONG A TROPHIC GRADIENT IN GREEN BAY: A FISH-EYE VIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    To identify ecological interactions among Green Bay coastal wetlands and lake habitats we analyzed stable isotope signatures of organismsa from wetland and adjacent nearshore food webs in Green Bay, Lake Michigan. We were interested in the influence of nutrient loading/trophic st...

  2. A Quick Response Forecasting Model of Pathogen Transport and Inactivation in Near-shore Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Fu, X.

    2011-12-01

    Modeling methods supporting water quality assessments play a critical role by facilitating people to understand and promptly predict the potential threat of waterborne bacterial pathogens pose to human health. A mathematical model to describe and predict bacterial levels can provide foundation for water managers in making decisions on whether a water system is safe to open to the public. The inactivation (decay or die-off) rate of bacteria is critical in a bacterial model by controlling bacterial concentration in waters and depends on numerous factors of hydrodynamics, meteorology, geology, chemistry and biology. Transport and fate of waterborne pathogens in fresh water systems is an essentially three-dimensional problem, which requires a coupling of hydrodynamic equations and transport equations that describe the pathogen and suspended sediment dynamics. However, such an approach could be very demanding and time consuming from a practical point of view due to excess computational efforts. Long computation time may lead people unintentionally drinking or swimming in the contaminated water during the period before the predictive results of water quality come out. Therefore, it is very necessary to find a quick-response model to forecast bacterial concentration instantly to protect human health without any delay. Nearshore regions are the most commonly and directly used area for people in a huge water system. The prior multi-dimensional investigations of E. Coli and Enterococci inactivation in literature indicate that along-shore current predominated the nearshore region. Consequently, the complex dynamic conditions may be potentially simplified to one-dimensional scenario. In this research, a one-dimensional model system coupling both hydrodynamic and bacterial transport modules is constructed considering different complex processes to simulate the transport and fate of pathogens in nearshore regions. The quick-response model mainly focuses on promptly forecasting purpose and will be verified and calibrated with the available data collected from southern Lake Michigan. The modeling results will be compared with those from prior multi-dimensional models. This model is specifically effective for the outfall-controlled waters, where pathogens are primarily predominated by loadings from nearby tributaries and tend to show wide variations in concentrations.

  3. Experimental Monitoring of Mixed Sand and Mud Sediment in the Nearshore Area of Santa Cruz, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, S. G.; Greene, H. G.

    2001-12-01

    An experiment conducted in late March of 2001 along the beaches and nearshore of Santa Cruz, California consisted of three phases: pre-experiment, experiment, and post-experiment. In the pre- and post-experimental phases, high-resolution side scan sonar and multibeam bathymetry data were collected to produce maps describing surface sediments and depth changes of the seafloor near the Santa Cruz Harbor. Offshore and beach sediment samples were collected three weeks prior to and after the experiment to analyze for changes in grain size and to provide physical evidence of seafloor substrate. Experimental monitoring consisted of daily beach and offshore sediment sampling. Oceanographic data including swell direction, height, and period were obtained from buoys offshore. Rainfall and stream flow data from the nearby San Lorenzo River were recorded during all phases of the project. Our sedimentological studies of materials dredged from the upper Santa Cruz Harbor, California suggest that sediment containing approximately 40% sand and 60% mud can be disposed in the surf zone without adversely affecting the quality of neighboring beaches or offshore rocky habitats while simultaneously replenishing sand to eroding beaches downcoast. A small amount of the mud-rich material (about 2300 m3) was placed into the surf-zone during the winter of 2000-2001 to determine the retention of sands in the nearshore zone and the impact that fine-grain (mud) sediment may have on rocky habitats. The beaches and other nearshore environments near the disposal site of the Santa Cruz Small Craft Harbor appear to be unchanged by the disposed harbor sediments. The data indicates that little change in sediment grain size or distribution has occurred. This is most likely due to the high-energy nature of this coastline, which results in suspension of silts and clays until they reach lower energy, deeper water offshore outside of the study area. The sand fraction of the disposed sediment was likely transported to the southeast in littoral drift and may replenish downcoast beaches.

  4. Southwest Washington littoral drift restoration—Beach and nearshore morphological monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Andrew W.; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Ruggiero, Peter; Kaminsky, George M.

    2012-01-01

    A morphological monitoring program has documented the placement and initial dispersal of beach nourishment material (280,000 m3) placed between the Mouth of the Columbia River (MCR) North Jetty and North Head, at the southern end of the Long Beach Peninsula in southwestern Washington State. A total of 21 topographic surveys and 8 nearshore bathymetric surveys were performed between July 11, 2010, and November 4, 2011. During placement, southerly alongshore transport resulted in movement of nourishment material to the south towards the MCR North Jetty. Moderate wave conditions (significant wave height around 4 m) following the completion of the nourishment resulted in cross-shore sediment transport, with most of the nourishment material transported into the nearshore bars. The nourishment acted as a buffer to the more severe erosion, including dune overtopping and retreat, that was observed at the northern end of the study area throughout the winter. One year after placement of the nourishment, onshore transport and beach recovery were most pronounced within the permit area and to the south toward the MCR North Jetty. This suggests that there is some long-term benefit of the nourishment for reducing erosion rates locally, although the enhanced recovery also could be due to natural gradients in alongshore transport causing net movement of the sediment from north to south. Measurements made during the morphological monitoring program documented the seasonal movement and decay of nearshore sand bars. Low-energy conditions in late summer resulted in onshore bar migration early in the monitoring program. Moderate wave conditions in the autumn resulted in offshore movement of the middle bar and continued onshore migration of the outer bar. High-energy wave conditions early in the winter resulted in strong cross-shore transport and creation of a 3-bar system along portions of the coast. More southerly wave events occurred later in the winter and early spring and coincided with the complete loss of the outer bar and net loss of sediment from the study area. These data suggest that bar decay may be an important mechanism for exporting sediment from Benson Beach north to the Long Beach Peninsula. The measurements presented in this report represent one component of a broader monitoring program designed to track the movement of nourishment material on the beach and shoreface at this location, including continuous video monitoring (Argus), in situu measurements of hydrodynamics, and a physical tracer experiment. Field data from the monitoring program will be used to test numerical models of hydrodynamics and sediment transport and to improve the capability of numerical models to support regional sediment management.

  5. Extraordinarily high coral cover on a nearshore, high-latitude reef in south-west Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, D. P.; Frisch, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Photographic line transects were used to quantify the benthic community at Hall Bank, a small, nearshore, high-latitude reef in south-west Australia. On one of the seven transects, the coral cover was 72.5% (mean = 52.6 ± 0.45%), which is the highest ever recorded coral cover at or beyond 32°S. There were no macro-algae, possibly due to the high density of herbivorous sea-urchins (mean = 5.0 ± 0.8 m-2). Fourteen species of scleractinian corals dominated the benthos, seven of which were from the family Faviidae. Given that Hall Bank is at the limit of environmental tolerance for reef formation, it represents a valuable research opportunity for understanding the factors that build and maintain coral reef biodiversity and resilience.

  6. Effects of nearshore recharge on groundwater interactions with a lake in mantled karst terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, T.M.

    2000-01-01

    The recharge and discharge of groundwater were investigated for a lake basin in the mantled karst terrain of central Florida to determine the relative importance of transient groundwater inflow to the lake water budget. Variably saturated groundwater flow modeling simulated water table responses observed beneath two hillsides radiating outward from the groundwater flow-through lake. Modeling results indicated that transient water table mounding and groundwater flow reversals in the nearshore region following large daily rainfall events generated most of the net groundwater inflow to the lake. Simulated daily groundwater inflow was greatest following water table mounding near the lake, not following subsequent peaks in the water level of upper basin wells. Transient mounding generated net groundwater inflow to the lake, that is, groundwater inflow in excess of the outflow occurring through the deeper lake bottom. The timing of the modeled net groundwater inflow agreed with an independent lake water budget; however, the quantity was considerably less than the budge-derived value.

  7. Ecoregional analysis of nearshore sea-surface temperature in the North Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Payne, M.C.; Brown, C.A.; Reusser, D.A.; Lee, H., II

    2012-01-01

    The quantification and description of sea surface temperature (SST) is critically important because it can influence the distribution, migration, and invasion of marine species; furthermore, SSTs are expected to be affected by climate change. To better understand present temperature regimes, we assembled a 29-year nearshore time series of mean monthly SSTs along the North Pacific coastline using remotely-sensed satellite data collected with the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument. We then used the dataset to describe nearshore (&20 km offshore) SST patterns of 16 North Pacific ecoregions delineated by the Marine Ecoregions of the World (MEOW) hierarchical schema. Annual mean temperature varied from 3.8??C along the Kamchatka ecoregion to 24.8??C in the Cortezian ecoregion. There are smaller annual ranges and less variability in SST in the Northeast Pacific relative to the Northwest Pacific. Within the 16 ecoregions, 31-94% of the variance in SST is explained by the annual cycle, with the annual cycle explaining the least variation in the Northern California ecoregion and the most variation in the Yellow Sea ecoregion. Clustering on mean monthly SSTs of each ecoregion showed a clear break between the ecoregions within the Warm and Cold Temperate provinces of the MEOW schema, though several of the ecoregions contained within the provinces did not show a significant difference in mean seasonal temperature patterns. Comparison of these temperature patterns shared some similarities and differences with previous biogeographic classifications and the Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs). Finally, we provide a web link to the processed data for use by other researchers.

  8. Multi-disciplinary investigation into the role of regional event beds in near-shore landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardy, M. E.; L'Heureux, J.; Vanneste, M. W.; Longva, O.; Forsberg, C. F.; Steiner, A.

    2012-12-01

    Near-shore landslides in fjords are a widely observed geohazard with a potential for causing damage through tsunami generation and the removal of near-shore infrastructure. Often these events cross the border between terrestrial and submarine landslides, involving the failure of material on the shoreline and foreshore slope. Here we focus on a multi-disciplinary investigation of the 1996 landslide near Finneidfjord, Norway. This event back-stepped 100-150 m inland, removing a 250 m long section of the main north-south highway and several houses, at a cost of four human lives. Acquisition of an extensive and multidisciplinary data set, including high-resolution swath bathymetry, 2D/3D seismic data, multiple short (up to 6 m) and two long (12 m and 14 m, respectively) sediment cores and in situ Free-Fall Piezocone Penetrometer (FF-CPTU) profiles complemented with geotechnical laboratory data, has provided a detailed analysis of both the landslide morphology and stratigraphic controls. Correlating the geophysical (include remote physical properties inverted from seismic reflection profiles), geological and geotechnical data identifies the landslide glide plane as a thin (< 0.5 m), laminated, clay-rich bed with high pore water content (45 - 65 %) and low shear strength (4 - 8 kPa), deposited as a result of terrestrial quick-clay landslides in the hinterland. The relative weakness of the layer is thought to be a result of both the rapid deposition and excess pore pressure caused by artesian groundwater flow. Together, these act as preconditioning factors for failure, controlling the failure depth and probability if not the exact timing of the event.

  9. Wind-driven nearshore sediment resuspension in a deep lake during winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, Kristin E.; Bombardelli, Fabián. A.; Moreno-Casas, Patricio A.; Rueda, Francisco J.; Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    2014-11-01

    Ongoing public concern over declining water quality at Lake Tahoe, California-Nevada (USA) led to an investigation of wind-driven nearshore sediment resuspension that combined field measurements and modeling. Field data included: wind speed and direction, vertical profiles of water temperature and currents, nearbed velocity, lakebed sediment characteristics, and suspended sediment concentration and particle size distribution. Bottom shear stress was computed from ADV-measured nearbed velocity data, adapting a turbulent kinetic energy method to lakes, and partitioned according to its contributions attributed to wind-waves, mean currents, and random motions. When the total shear stress exceeded the critical shear stress, the contribution to overall shear stress was about 80% from wind-waves and 10% each from mean currents and random motions. Therefore, wind-waves were the dominant mechanism resulting in sediment resuspension as corroborated by simultaneous increases in shear stress and total measured sediment concentration. The wind-wave model STWAVE was successfully modified to simulate wind-wave-induced sediment resuspension for viscous-dominated flow typical in lakes. Previous lake applications of STWAVE have been limited to special instances of fully turbulent flow. To address the validity of expressions for sediment resuspension in lakes, sediment entrainment rates were found to be well represented by a modified 1991 García and Parker formula. Last, in situ measurements of suspended sediment concentration and particle size distribution revealed that the predominance of fine particles (by particle count) that most negatively impact clarity was unchanged by wind-related sediment resuspension. Therefore, we cannot assume that wind-driven sediment resuspension contributes to Lake Tahoe's declining nearshore clarity.

  10. KING'S COLLEGE LONDON MATHEMATICS SCHOOL -ADMISSIONS POLICY The King's College London Mathematics School is a new Academy for 16-19 year olds

    E-print Network

    Applebaum, David

    Mathematics School is a new Academy for 16-19 year olds specialising in mathematics. Our curriculum is highly London Mathematics School offers a highly specialist, academically rigorous curriculum. A largeKING'S COLLEGE LONDON MATHEMATICS SCHOOL - ADMISSIONS POLICY OVERVIEW The King's College London

  11. Continuing Education for County Officials The duties and responsibilities of county government

    E-print Network

    Continuing Education for County Officials The duties and responsibilities of county government, the V.G. Young Institute of County Government provides continuing education programs for local government officials, including county judges and commissioners, county treasurers, county and district

  12. KINGS RIVER, RANCHERIA, AGNEW, AND OAT MOUNTAIN ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nokleberg, Warren J.; Longwell, Warren D.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey the Kings River, Rancheria, Agnew, and Oat Mountain Roadless Areas, California were found to have several areas with probable mineral-resource potential for tungsten in tactite, and one area with probable mineral-resource potential for lode gold in quartz veins. The extreme relief and inaccessibility in most of the roadless areas make exploration and mining very difficult. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of energy resources.

  13. Ultraviolet reflecting photonic microstructures in the King Penguin beak

    PubMed Central

    Dresp, Birgitta; Jouventin, Pierre; Langley, Keith

    2005-01-01

    King and emperor penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus and Aptenodytes forsteri) are the only species of marine birds so far known to reflect ultraviolet (UV) light from their beaks. Unlike humans, most birds perceive UV light and several species communicate using the near UV spectrum. Indeed, UV reflectance in addition to the colour of songbird feathers has been recognized as an important signal when choosing a mate. The king penguin is endowed with several highly coloured ornaments, notably its beak horn and breast and auricular plumage, but only its beak reflects UV, a property considered to influence its sexual attraction. Because no avian UV-reflecting pigments have yet been identified, the origin of such reflections is probably structural. In an attempt to identify the structures that give rise to UV reflectance, we combined reflectance spectrophotometry and morphological analysis by both light and electron microscopy, after experimental removal of surface layers of the beak horn. Here, we characterize for the first time a multilayer reflector photonic microstructure that produces the UV reflections in the king penguin beak. PMID:17148195

  14. Strategies for nest-site selection by king eiders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bentzen, R.L.; Powell, A.N.; Suydam, R.S.

    2009-01-01

    Nest site selection is a critical component of reproduction and has presumably evolved in relation to predation, local resources, and microclimate. We investigated nest-site choice by king eiders (Somateria spectabilis) on the coastal plain of northern Alaska, USA, 2003-2005. We hypothesized that nest-site selection is driven by predator avoidance and that a variety of strategies including concealment, seclusion, and conspecific or inter-specific nest defense might lead to improved nesting success. We systematically searched wetland basins for king eider nests and measured habitat and social variables at nests (n = 212) and random locations (n = 493). King eiders made use of both secluded and concealed breeding strategies; logistic regression models revealed that females selected nests close to water, on islands, and in areas with high willow (Salix spp.) cover but did not select sites near conspecific or glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus) nests. The most effective nest-placement strategy may vary depending on density and types of nest predators; seclusion is likely a mammalian-predator avoidance tactic whereas concealment may provide protection from avian predators. We recommend that managers in northern Alaska attempt to maintain wetland basins with islands and complex shorelines to provide potential nest sites in the vicinity of water. ?? The Wildlife Society.

  15. Human Computation in Social Computing Irwin King, First ACM Forum on Cyberspace and Social Computing (CyberSocialCom2009), November 9, 2009

    E-print Network

    King, Kuo Chin Irwin

    Human Computation in Social Computing Irwin King, First ACM Forum on Cyberspace and Social Computing (CyberSocialCom2009), November 9, 2009 Human Computation in Social Computing Irwin King Department://www.cse.cuhk.edu.hk/~king ©2009 Irwin King. All rights reserved. #12;Human Computation in Social Computing Irwin King, First ACM

  16. Individual-based models of copepod populations in coastal upwelling regions: implications of physiologically and environmentally influenced diel vertical migration on demographic success and nearshore retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelder, Harold P.; Edwards, Christopher A.; Powell, Thomas M.

    We link a two-dimension coastal upwelling circulation hydrodynamic-ecosystem (NPZ) model with an individual-based model (IBM) for an intermediate sized (ca. 2.5 mm) copepod capable of diel vertical migration (DVM) at larger sizes. The NPZ model is that of Franks, Wroblewski and Flierl (1986), with the zooplankton state variable parameterized for macrozooplankton. IBM simulations are done with different scenarios for behavioral responses; the interaction of the organisms with the circulation is evaluated by examining growth/development, reproduction, survival and distribution. Since ocean productivity in coastal upwelling systems is greatest nearshore, zooplankton production is favored by nearshore retention. Model results, using an idealized, intermittently wind-forced, upwelling circulation, indicate that non-migrating copepods are flushed from the nearshore system in offshore zonal surface flow; highest population abundances occur offshore, in a region of relatively low food resources. Conversely, migrating copepods interact with the stratified zonal flow within the upwelling system and are retained nearshore when the amplitude of the DVM is sufficient to place the individuals in near-bottom onshore flow during the day. Environmental features, like deep-extending food resources, and physiological controls, like satiation or body size, that permit copepods to remain deeper, or spend more time away from the surface, favor nearshore retention. Diel vertical migration is one mechanism, which may permit animals to exploit favorable habitats located nearshore in upwelling systems.

  17. Survey of Radiological and Chemical Contaminants in the Near-Shore Environment at the Hanford Site 300 Area

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, Gregory W.; Tiller, Brett L.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Poston, Ted M.; Van Verst, Scott P.

    2002-09-27

    This report describes an environmental surveillance study of the near-shore of the Columbia River at the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The study was conducted in August - October, 2001 to coincide with expected low river stage. The low river stage facilitated locating and sampling riverbank spring water and other media along the Columbia River shoreline. River water, riverbank spring water, near shore groundwater, riparian and aquatic biota samples were collected. Contaminants of concern included radionuclides, metals, organics, and anions. A survey of the external radiation levels along the near-shore area was also conducted. The report presents the objectives and regulatory drivers for this study, a description of the sample collection process, analytical results and discussion for both radiological and non-radiological (chemical) samples. In addition, human and ecological dose/risk assessments based upon the analytical results are presented.

  18. Trace Elements in King Eiders and Common Eiders in the Canadian Arctic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Wayland; H. G. Gilchrist; D. L. Dickson; T. Bollinger; C. James; R. A. Carreno; J. Keating

    2001-01-01

    We determined concentrations of selected trace elements in tissues of king and common eiders at three locations in the Canadian\\u000a arctic. Renal and hepatic cadmium concentrations in king eiders at a location in the eastern arctic were among the highest\\u000a ever recorded in eider ducks: there, they were higher in king eiders than in common eiders. Cadmium concentrations were lower

  19. County by County in Ohio Genealogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khouw, Petta; And Others

    This comprehensive sourcebook and bibliography lists Ohio genealogical materials available at the State Library of Ohio for each county in the state. It serves as a guide to Ohio genealogical resources, including 14,000 volumes and 15,000 microforms in the non-circulating genealogy collection. The library's genealogy collection consists of a broad…

  20. Advances in Shallow-Water, High-Resolution Seafloor Mapping: Integrating an Autonomous Surface Vessel (ASV) Into Nearshore Geophysical Studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. F. Denny; T. F. O'Brien; E. Bergeron; D. Twichell; C. R. Worley; W. W. Danforth; B. A. Andrews; B. Irwin

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been heavily involved in geological mapping of the seafloor since the 1970s. Early mapping efforts such as GLORIA provided broad-scale imagery of deep waters (depths > 400 meters) within the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). In the early 1990's, the USGS research emphasis shifted from deep- to shallow-water environments (inner continental shelf, nearshore, estuaries) to

  1. Changes in the abundance of blue-green algae related to nutrient loadings in the nearshore of Lake Michigan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William Y. B. Chang; Ronald Rossmann

    1988-01-01

    Nutrient loadings to the nearshore of southeastern Lake Michigan have undergone a remarkable reduction. This reduction can affect the nutrient supply and result in biological changes. Changes in phytoplankton community, particularly the blue-green algae, can be related to nutrient changes. After thermal stratification, sudden increases in the blue-green algae population were significantly correlated to soluble reactive phosphorus concentrations. Phosphorus-stimulated low

  2. Are Regional Operational Wind-Waves Models Usable to Predict Coastal and Nearshore Wave Climate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, A. P.; Neumeier, U.; Jacob, D.; Savard, J.

    2012-12-01

    Estuary and Gulf of Saint-Lawrence (EGSL) shores are subjected to strong erosion linked to storminess. Due to the likely presence of sea ice and to the high tidal range affecting the north shores of the EGSL, it is impossible to measure wave parameters at depth lesser than 10m from November to April, i.e. the storm period. Winter waves can be forecasted by the operational Regional Deterministic Wave Prediction System (RDWPS) from the Canadian Meteorological Center (CMC). However, spatial resolution of the RDWPS in the EGSL is 0.04°x0.06° (5x5km @ 49°N), which theoretically limits its application to areas of low bathymetric gradients and does neither destined it to the prediction of coastal nor nearshore waves. Nevertheless, given the lack of nearshore wave measurements during the late fall and winter period, it might seem wise to use the RDWPS data for operational purposes of warning and coastal structure design. This research thus evaluates the performance of the RDWPS for this period, both in the coastal and nearshore areas of a complex bathymetric domain. Our method is based on: 1. A direct comparison of RDWPS wave parameters time series to those produced from two instruments berthed in front of Sept-Iles, North Shore, Quebec (50° 10.3' N 66° 13.5' W). M1 mooring is deployed permanently throughout the year at -32m MSL, while M2 is deployed from April to November at -8m MSL. These comparisons are made from 01/10/2010 to 31/12/2011 (winter period). 2. A high-resolution (0.2x0.2km) coastal wind-wave model (SWAN v.40.85) is locally nested in the EGSL RDWPS domain in order to propagate waves from quasi-infinite depth to the shore at the site location, including moorings positions. Our implementation uses the same source terms, physics and inputs as in the RDWPS implementation of WAM. This allows producing reference time series for the winter at the M2 location. RDWPS data are thus also compared with these model outputs for the same period as 1. Our results show that the RDWPS predicted the wave parameters with a very good sensitivity, but with a strong linear overestimation of Hm02 (+45% ± 10%) and Tm0 (+45% ± 30%) at M1 location. A first implementation of SWAN (SI1) using the RDWPS wave data as boundary conditions shows that 55% of this overestimation at M1 is related to the bathymetric grid's coarse resolution. A second implementation of SWAN (SI2) with a linear reduction of 20% of the RDWPS Hm02 boundary condition and using the 10m wind components rather than the 40m as in the RDWPS shows a very good agreement with M1 measured values, demonstrating that remaining overestimation is linked to winds too strong. The comparison of SWAN SI2 results at M2 position vs. M2 measured data shows a very good fit, without overestimation. The comparison for the winter period of SWAN SI2 results at M2 position vs. RDWPS data at the three closest grid points shows that Hm02 can be reasonably assessed at this depth for operational purposes taking into account a linear reduction factor, estimated 0.6 for our site.

  3. Factors affecting the accumulation of phytoplankton biomass in Irish estuaries and nearshore coastal waters: A conceptual model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Boyle, Shane; Wilkes, Robert; McDermott, Georgina; Ní Longphuirt, Sorcha; Murray, Clare

    2015-03-01

    A multivariate statistical approach was used to investigate the response of phytoplankton in Irish estuaries and nearshore coastal waters to nutrient enrichment and to examine the factors which modulate this response. The analysis suggests that while many estuaries are nutrient-enriched, relatively few display phytoplankton-related symptoms of eutrophication as the response to nutrients is primarily affected by insufficient retention time, in some by inadequate light availability, and only rarely by both factors acting together. Nearshore coastal waters are nitrogen (N) and silica (Si) limited in summer, but in some nearshore waters along the south coast, where N is elevated, phosphorus (P) is potentially limiting. The reduction in P loadings to estuarine waters is likely to lead to an improvement in the eutrophication status of these mainly P-limited waters. The disproportionate reduction in loadings of P compared to N (52% versus 24%, since the early 1990s), and the potential weakening of the estuarine N filter, as eutrophication symptoms lessen, may result in the downstream movement of nitrogen to N-limited coastal waters. These findings support the view that an integrated dual-nutrient reduction strategy is required to address eutrophication along the freshwater-marine continuum. The outcome of the analysis is a conceptual model which is of direct value and use to water managers in determining the relative susceptibility of these waters to nutrient enrichment. This understanding can in turn be used to develop informed programmes of measures which are targeted and ultimately cost effective.

  4. Nearshore sediment characteristics and formation of mudbanks along the Kerala coast, southwest India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana, A. C.; Jago, C. F.; Manojkumar, P.; Tatavarti, R.

    2008-06-01

    In order to gain insight into the formation dynamics of mudbanks off the Kerala coast of India, extensive surveying of the nearshore bathymetry along with sediment characterization was undertaken. The textural and geotechnical properties of the surficial sediments of a mudbank were determined during pre-monsoon, monsoon, and post-monsoon periods. The mudbank sediments were clayey silts with high water and organic carbon contents, high Atterberg limits, and low bulk density, and therefore very susceptible to entrainment. During the monsoon, the mudbank regime was characterised by enhanced turbidity and a benthic fluff layer, triggered by the increasing swell of the early monsoon period. Re-suspension exposed a more consolidated, previously sub-bottom, layer which exhibited lower water content and greater shear strength than the pre-monsoon seabed. Texturally, the monsoon seabed was similar to the pre-monsoon seabed, with the same modal grain size, but the proportions of sand and coarse silt increased nearshore, while the proportions of fine and very fine silt increased offshore. There was a seaward-fining textural gradient at all times, but this became pronounced during the monsoon period. Paradoxically, the monsoonal seabed displayed greatly reduced wet bulk density. It is hypothesized that this was due to the presence of gas, probably methane, in the sediments (while the pre-monsoon sediments were fully saturated, the monsoon sediments were only 83% saturated). We speculate that the gas was forced into the surficial sediments either by wave pumping (at the onset of the monsoon) or by seaward-flowing subbottom freshwater (derived from monsoonal rains). With the waning of the monsoon, the benthic fluid mud layer rapidly disappeared and the seabed returned to its pre-monsoon state as suspended sediments were redeposited. The mudbank regime is therefore essentially an in situ phenomenon. It is suggested that the mudbanks are palimpsest, marshy, lagoonal deposits, rich in organic matter and derived gas, that were submerged after a marine transgression. The surficial sediment is annually entrained during the monsoon, but erosion is limited by the formation of the benthic fluid mud layer, which attenuates wave generated turbulence. Although some fine sediment disperses alongshore and offshore, most is returned to the seabed as the monsoon declines.

  5. A Folk Tale of a Man and King

    E-print Network

    Bkra shis bzang po

    2009-11-05

    from collector) Bkra shis bzang po (Carver) Date of recording 05 November 2009 Place of recording Bang smad Village, Bang smad Township, Nyag rong County, Dkar mdzes Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Si khron Province Name(s), age, sex, place... of birth of performer(s) U rgyan dbang phyung (male) was born in 1957 in Bang smad Village, Bang smad Township, Nyag rong County, Dkar mdzes Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Si khron Province. Language of recording Mi nyag Performer(s)’s first...

  6. Outliers and Extremes: Dragon-Kings or Dragon-Fools?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schertzer, D. J.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Lovejoy, S.

    2012-12-01

    Geophysics seems full of monsters like Victor Hugo's Court of Miracles and monstrous extremes have been statistically considered as outliers with respect to more normal events. However, a characteristic magnitude separating abnormal events from normal ones would be at odd with the generic scaling behaviour of nonlinear systems, contrary to "fat tailed" probability distributions and self-organized criticality. More precisely, it can be shown [1] how the apparent monsters could be mere manifestations of a singular measure mishandled as a regular measure. Monstrous fluctuations are the rule, not outliers and they are more frequent than usually thought up to the point that (theoretical) statistical moments can easily be infinite. The empirical estimates of the latter are erratic and diverge with sample size. The corresponding physics is that intense small scale events cannot be smoothed out by upscaling. However, based on a few examples, it has also been argued [2] that one should consider "genuine" outliers of fat tailed distributions so monstrous that they can be called "dragon-kings". We critically analyse these arguments, e.g. finite sample size and statistical estimates of the largest events, multifractal phase transition vs. more classical phase transition. We emphasize the fact that dragon-kings are not needed in order that the largest events become predictable. This is rather reminiscent of the Feast of Fools picturesquely described by Victor Hugo. [1] D. Schertzer, I. Tchiguirinskaia, S. Lovejoy et P. Hubert (2010): No monsters, no miracles: in nonlinear sciences hydrology is not an outlier! Hydrological Sciences Journal, 55 (6) 965 - 979. [2] D. Sornette (2009): Dragon-Kings, Black Swans and the Prediction of Crises. International Journal of Terraspace Science and Engineering 1(3), 1-17.

  7. King penguin population threatened by Southern Ocean warming

    PubMed Central

    Le Bohec, Céline; Durant, Joël M.; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel; Stenseth, Nils C.; Park, Young-Hyang; Pradel, Roger; Grémillet, David; Gendner, Jean-Paul; Le Maho, Yvon

    2008-01-01

    Seabirds are sensitive indicators of changes in marine ecosystems and might integrate and/or amplify the effects of climate forcing on lower levels in food chains. Current knowledge on the impact of climate changes on penguins is primarily based on Antarctic birds identified by using flipper bands. Although flipper bands have helped to answer many questions about penguin biology, they were shown in some penguin species to have a detrimental effect. Here, we present for a Subantarctic species, king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus), reliable results on the effect of climate on survival and breeding based on unbanded birds but instead marked by subcutaneous electronic tags. We show that warm events negatively affect both breeding success and adult survival of this seabird. However, the observed effect is complex because it affects penguins at several spatio/temporal levels. Breeding reveals an immediate response to forcing during warm phases of El Niño Southern Oscillation affecting food availability close to the colony. Conversely, adult survival decreases with a remote sea-surface temperature forcing (i.e., a 2-year lag warming taking place at the northern boundary of pack ice, their winter foraging place). We suggest that this time lag may be explained by the delay between the recruitment and abundance of their prey, adjusted to the particular 1-year breeding cycle of the king penguin. The derived population dynamic model suggests a 9% decline in adult survival for a 0.26°C warming. Our findings suggest that king penguin populations are at heavy extinction risk under the current global warming predictions. PMID:18268328

  8. Mapping of Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Using Autonomous Underwater Vehicles in Nearshore Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Mark E.; Miller, Lee M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Ewert, Daniel W.

    2007-10-02

    The use of an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) equipped with sidescan sonar was investigated for determining the boundaries of nearshore submerged aquatic vegetation beds, specifically eelgrass (Zostera marina). Shifts in eelgrass bed morphology, size, and distribution are used as indicators in monitoring programs to measure the impacts of coastal development and environmental stressors on eelgrass and to establish the efficacy of restoration programs. However, many monitoring programs necessarily extend over multiple-year time periods. Therefore, techniques that are easily reproducible, accurate, and cost-effective can demonstrate distinct advantages over some of the more traditional and labor-intensive methods, such as diver assessments and transects of shoot counts. Remote monitoring of eelgrass beds using satellite and aerial imagery has been demonstrated with moderate success, but requires groundtruthing, which can be costly and which frequently cannot delineate the deeper boundaries of eelgrass beds. One possible means for low-cost mapping is the use of AUVs equipped with acoustic imaging hardware. AUVs provide an ideal platform, because they can be deployed by small teams (two people), they are highly maneuverable, they can cover large areas over a relatively short time period (3knot operational speed), and they are equipped with multiple oceanographic instruments for correlated data collection. This paper describes the use of sidescan-equipped AUV technology deployed over multiple time periods at the same location where imagery of eelgrass beds was obtained and analyzed for comparative purposes.

  9. Application of the implicit particle filter to a model of nearshore circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. N.; Ehret, L. L.

    2014-04-01

    The implicit particle filter is applied to a stochastically forced shallow water model of nearshore flow, and found to produce reliable state estimates with tens of particles. The state vector of this model consists of a height anomaly and two horizontal velocity components at each point on a 128 × 98 regular rectangular grid, making for a state dimension O(104). The particle filter was applied to the model with two parameter choices representing two distinct dynamical regimes, and performed well in both. Demands on computing resources were manageable. Simulations with as many as a hundred particles ran overnight on a modestly configured workstation. In this case of observations defined by a linear function of the state vector, taken every time step of the numerical model, the implicit particle filter is equivalent to the optimal importance filter, i.e., at each step any given particle is drawn from the density of the system conditioned jointly upon observations and the state of that particle at the previous time. Even in this ideal case, the sample occasionally collapses to a single particle, and resampling is necessary. In those cases, the sample rapidly reinflates, and the analysis never loses track. In both dynamical regimes, the ensembles of particles deviated significantly from normality.

  10. Seasonal occurrence of larval fishes in the nearshore Southern California Bight off San Onofre, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, H. J.; Watson, William; Barnett, Arthur M.

    1987-07-01

    Larval fishes were sampled from the nearshore region of the Southern California Bight off San Onofre for 29 months and analyzed with a Curtis-Bray Cluster Analysis to determine temporal assemblages and species associations. Two major assemblages of larvae were found: members of the winter-spring (December-May) assemblage were most abundant from January to May; members of the summer-fall (June-November) assemblage were most abundant from July to September. The winter-spring assemblage was composed primarily of Engraulis mordax, Genyonemus lineatus, Sebastes spp. and Paralichthys californicus; some abundant taxa in the summer-fall assemblage were Seriphus politus, Paralabrax spp., and Hypsoblennius spp., although E. mordax again predominated. Demersal spawners tended to have spawning seasons of longer duration than pelagic spawners; winter-spring spawners generally had longer spawning seasons than summer-fall spawners. We suggest that temperature is an important determinant in the seasonal pattern of larval fish occurrence. The annual ocean temperature cycle near San Onofre was a good indicator of the seasonal occurrence of fish larvae in this area. Larvae found in the cooler months were generally offspring of adults whose northern ranges extend to Canada. Warm-water larvae were offspring of adults whose northern ranges extend to Point Conception or northern California.

  11. Tidal area dispersant project: Fate of dispersed and undispersed oil in two nearshore test spills

    SciTech Connect

    Page, D.S.; Foster, J.C.; Gerber, R.P.; Gilfillan, E.S.; Hanson, S.A.; Hotham, J.R.; Vallas, D.

    1982-10-01

    In 1981, an oil spill field experiment was done in Maine to assess the effects to the benthos of dispersant used in nearshore oil spills. Three test plots, each 60 by 100 m, were set up, each with an upper and a lower intertidal sampling area. There were also five subtidal sampling stations in water depths from 5 to 20 m. One plot was exposed to 945 L (250 gal) of Murban crude oil released on an ebbing tide withincontainment booms and cleaned up by conventional mechanical methods 24 h later. A second plot was exposed to 945 L of Murban crude oil premixed with 94 L (25 gal)of a widely available self-mix nonionic dispersant. The dispersant-treated oil was discharged over a 2-h period around high water slack tide. Dispersed oil in water reaching the bottom had lost most of the hydrocarbons more volatile than n-C/sub 17/ compared with dispersed oil in water sampled at the same time near the surface. Petroleum retention by intertidal sediments and bivalves measured one week postspill was less in areas exposed to dispersed oil than in areas exposed to untreated oil.

  12. Morphological response of a double nearshore bar system under oblique waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiebot, J.; Robin, N.; Garnier, R.; Certain, R.; Idier, D.; Calvete, D.; Falques, A.; Levoy, F.

    2009-04-01

    The Sète beach (Mediterranean Sea - France) is characterized by two nearshore bars which are generally considered to run parallel to the shore. However in-situ wave/current/bathymetry measurements have shown the possible reorganization of this double bar system during storms associated with oblique waves. Two situations are studied. During the field campaign in 1999, the bar system was submitted to moderately oblique stormy waves. At the end of the campaign, the inner bar was divided in segments which were oriented parallel to the wave crests and to the current. During the field campaign in 1994, the stormy waves were strongly oblique. The response of the bar system led to the appearance of rhythmic features along both bars. The nonlinear surf zone model MORFO55 is used to understand the mechanisms which govern the bar reorganization under energetic wave conditions. This model is based on a wave and depth averaged shallow water equations solver with wave driver, sediment transport and bed updating (Garnier et al. 2006, J. Fluid Mech.). Modeling shows that the main characteristics of the bar response can be simulated from self-organization processes. The wave incidence has a tremendous influence on the bar response. Particularly, in agreement with the observations, the outer bar is stable for moderate obliquity while it is unstable for strongly oblique waves.

  13. Population structure of Cladophora-borne Escherichia coli in nearshore water of Lake Michigan.

    PubMed

    Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N; Whitman, Richard L; Shively, Dawn A; Ferguson, John; Ishii, Satoshi; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2007-08-01

    We previously reported that the macrophytic green alga Cladophora harbors high densities (up to 10(6) colony-forming units/g dry weight) of the fecal indicator bacteria, Escherichia coli and enterococci, in shoreline waters of Lake Michigan. However, the population structure and genetic relatedness of Cladophora-borne indicator bacteria remain poorly understood. In this study, 835 E. coli isolates were collected from Cladophora tufts (mats) growing on rocks from a breakwater located within the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore in northwest Indiana. The horizontal fluorophore enhanced rep-PCR (HFERP) DNA fingerprinting technique was used to determine the genetic relatedness of the isolates to each other and to those in a library of E. coli DNA fingerprints. While the E. coli isolates from Cladophora showed a high degree of genetic relatedness (92% similarity), in most cases, however, the isolates were genetically distinct. The Shannon diversity index for the population was very high (5.39). Both spatial and temporal influences contributed to the genetic diversity. There was a strong association of isolate genotypes by location (79% and 80% for lake- and ditch-side samplings, respectively), and isolates collected from 2002 were distinctly different from those obtained in 2003. Cladophora-borne E. coli isolates represented a unique group, which was distinct from other E. coli isolates in the DNA fingerprint library tested. Taken together, these results indicate that E. coli strains associated with Cladophora may be a recurring source of indicator bacteria to the nearshore beach. PMID:17451778

  14. Establishment of two invasive crustaceans (Copepoda: Harpacticoida) on the nearshore sands of Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horvath, Thomas G.; Whitman, Richard L.; Last, Laurel L.

    2001-01-01

    Benthic copepods (Copepoda: Harpacticoida) in the nearshore sediments of southern Lake Michigan appear to be dominated by two new invasive species. We report the first occurrence in North America of Schizopera borutzkyi Montschenko, a native to the Danube River delta, and Heteropsyllus nr. nunni, likely a new species that is morphologically similar to the marine species Heteropsyllus nunni and represents the first occurrence of this genus in freshwater. Schizopera borutzkyi is a euryhaline species occurring in shallow sands in its native habitat and in deeper sands (6-15 m) in southern Lake Michigan. Based on the absence of these species from previous studies, we suggest that they are recent introductions. Heteropsyllus nr. nunni dominated (55-100%) the harpacticoid abundance to depths of 9 m, but S. borutzkyi comprised 75% of the harpacticoid abundance at 15 m. Native harpacticoids were always greatly outnumbered by invasive harpacticoids in our samples, which suggests that the natives are being replaced rapidly or that the invasive species are finding unused resources. The ecological implications of these introductions are not known, but these invasions may represent continued 'invasional meltdown' in Lake Michigan.

  15. An efficient mode-splitting method for a curvilinear nearshore circulation model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shi, Fengyan; Kirby, James T.; Hanes, Daniel M.

    2007-01-01

    A mode-splitting method is applied to the quasi-3D nearshore circulation equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The gravity wave mode and the vorticity wave mode of the equations are derived using the two-step projection method. Using an implicit algorithm for the gravity mode and an explicit algorithm for the vorticity mode, we combine the two modes to derive a mixed difference–differential equation with respect to surface elevation. McKee et al.'s [McKee, S., Wall, D.P., and Wilson, S.K., 1996. An alternating direction implicit scheme for parabolic equations with mixed derivative and convective terms. J. Comput. Phys., 126, 64–76.] ADI scheme is then used to solve the parabolic-type equation in dealing with the mixed derivative and convective terms from the curvilinear coordinate transformation. Good convergence rates are found in two typical cases which represent respectively the motions dominated by the gravity mode and the vorticity mode. Time step limitations imposed by the vorticity convective Courant number in vorticity-mode-dominant cases are discussed. Model efficiency and accuracy are verified in model application to tidal current simulations in San Francisco Bight.

  16. Molecular Characterization of Potential Microcystin-Producing Cyanobacteria in Lake Ontario Embayments and Nearshore Waters?

    PubMed Central

    Hotto, A. M.; Satchwell, M. F.; Boyer, G. L.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution and genotypic variation of potential microcystin (MC) producers along the southern and eastern shores of Lake Ontario in 2001 and 2003 were examined using a suite of PCR primers. Cyanobacterial, Microcystis sp., and Microcystis-specific toxin primer sets identified shoreline distribution of cyanobacterial DNA (in 97% of the stations) and MC synthetase genes (in 50% of the stations). Sequence analysis of a partial mcyA amplicon targeting Microcystis, Anabaena, and Planktothrix species indicated that the Microcystis sp. genotype was the dominant MC genotype present and revealed a novel Microcystis-like sequence containing a 6-bp insert. Analysis of the same samples with genus-specific mcyE primers confirmed that the Microcystis sp. genotype was the dominant potential MC producer. Genotype compositions within embayments were relatively homogenous compared to those for shoreline and tributary samples. MC concentrations along the shoreline exhibited both temporal and spatial differences as evidenced by the protein phosphatase inhibition assay, at times exceeding the World Health Organization guideline value for drinking water of 1.0 ?g MC-LReq liter?1. MC genotypes are widespread along the New York State shoreline of Lake Ontario, appear to originate nearshore, and can be carried through the lake via wind and surface water current patterns. PMID:17526791

  17. Nearshore transects of surface wind and wind stress in the Atlantic eastern boundary upwelling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlundt, Michael; Dengler, Marcus; Brandt, Peter; Bumke, Karl

    2015-04-01

    The two large eastern boundary upwelling systems (EBUSs) in the Atlantic (Canary upwelling system and Benguela upwelling system) are both strikingly affected by the equatorward trades. The equatorward alongshore component of the wind stress leads to a coastal Ekman divergence, while a nearshore cyclonic wind stress curl results in Ekman suction. Therefore both processes are related to the upwelling and impact its intensity. Several satellite radiometer and scatterometer products have been used for years to estimate the horizontal structures of wind speed, wind stress and wind stress curl in the EBUSs in order to relate them to upwelling intensity and ocean-atmosphere energy fluxes. But an investigation of well known features of the EBUSs, as strong wind gradients at sea surface temperature fronts or the drop off zone in wind speed near the coast, based on satellite observations is difficult, because satellite retrievals give actually no reliable estimates within 25 km from the shore due to land contamination. Here we show a comparison of shipboard observations of wind speed, direction, and subsequently estimated stress and stress curl along transects close to the coast with available satellite observations for the period from 2000 until 2014. The data are from German and international research vessels which are frequently present in the near coastal region. Estimates of turbulent heat fluxes between the ocean and the atmosphere, strongly affected by the wind speed, are also given and compared with commonly used satellite products.

  18. Geohydrology and ground-water quality on Shelter Island, Suffolk County, New York, 1983-84

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Shelter Island, with an area of about 11 sq mi, lies between the north and south forks of eastern Long Island in Suffolk County. The thin upper glacial (water table) aquifer contains the lens-shaped freshwater body that is the sole source of freshwater for the Town 's population of about 2,200 year-round and 10,000 summer residents. Chloride concentrations in groundwater above the freshwater/saltwater interface, defined as 40 mg/L Cl-, are relatively constant with depth. Below the interface, however, chloride concentrations increase rapidly--as much as an order of magnitude within 10 ft--until they reach 19 ,000 mg/L, the chloride concentration of seawater. Chloride concentrations in shallow groundwater from wells screened in or near the zone of diffusion may range over two orders of magnitude in response to variations in recharge and groundwater withdrawal. After the summer season of relatively low recharge and peak water demand, the thickness of the freshwater lens is < 20 ft in many nearshore areas. A map showing the configuration of the water table in December 1983 indicates freshwater mounds in the center of the island, in the Mashomack Preserve, on the Dering Harbor-Hay Beach peninsula, and in the area between Shelter Island Heights and West Neck Bay. Areas in which the supply of fresh groundwater is severely limited include all coastal areas, the southernmost part of the West Neck peninsula, and Little Ram Island. Water levels in most locations are < 6 ft above sea level. During 1974-83, seasonal water table fluctuations were greater than variations that occurred from year to year. Groundwater quality on Shelter Island is generally good and usually meets Federal and State drinking water standards. However, many wells contain water that has excessive concentrations of dissolved iron and manganese (up to 5.0 mg/L and 3.0 mg/L, respectively), and elevated chloride and dissolved solids concentrations (up to 310 mg/L and 585 mg/L, respectively) have been found in some nearshore wells. Increased withdrawal of fresh groundwater in nearshore areas will cause further landward movement of saline groundwater; in other areas, excessive pumping may cause upconing. A system of widely spaced pumping wells that avoid nearshore areas would minimize these effects. (Lantz-PTT)

  19. Shared genetic material between humans and chimps, Mary-Claire KingSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-03-26

    Interviewee: Mary-Claire King DNAi Location:Applications>Human Origins>Comparisons>DNA Geneticist Mary-Claire King talks about her discovery that chimps and humans are extremely similar at a molecular level.

  20. Gregory King, Robert Malthus and the Origins of English Social Realism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Laslett

    1985-01-01

    In this article I compare King and Malthus in respect of their ability to penetrate what is here called social opacity, the resistance of all social structures to objective analysis by contemporaries, demographic and other forms of analysis. It accords to King the distinction to have been the first person ever to have recognized the issue, to have set out

  1. South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Boca Raton residents commemorate King's legacy in Pearl

    E-print Network

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Boca Raton residents commemorate King's legacy in Pearl City and Sing" rang through Pearl City, where early Monday the community celebrated Martin Luther King Jr's important to let our young people know how we got to this place." #12;Pearl City, Boca Raton's historically

  2. 78 FR 39599 - Safety Zone; Independence Day Fireworks, Kings Beach, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ...Independence Day Fireworks, Kings Beach, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice...Independence Day Fireworks, Kings Beach, CA in the Captain of the Port, San Francisco...Tahoe Keys Marina in South Lake Tahoe, CA in approximate position 38[deg]...

  3. Fisher Research and the Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystems Project: Current Results and Future Efforts 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian B. Boroski; Richard T. Golightly

    2002-01-01

    The Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystems Project was initiated on the Kings River Ranger District of the Sierra National Forest, California, in 1993, with fieldwork beginning in 1994. Knowledge of the ecology of the fisher (Martes pennanti) in the Project area, and in the Sierra Nevada of California in general, is insufficient to develop empirically based management strategies or to

  4. The lichen genus Cladonia of King George Island, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Piotr OSYCZKA; Maria OLECH

    The paper presents the results of taxonomical investigation of the genus Clado? nia Hill ex P. Browne from King George Island. Individuals belonging to this lichen genus were studied using methods of classical herbarium taxonomy supported by chemical analy? sis. Fourteen species have been recognized in the study area, with C. asahinae J.W. Thomson being reported from King George Island

  5. The Agronomy and Economy of Black Pepper ( Piper nigrum L.) —The “King of Spices”

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. P. Prabhakaran Nair

    2004-01-01

    Black pepper, popularly known as the “King of Spices”, has a very checkered history dating back to the times of Queen Sheeba and King Solomon (BC 1015–BC 66) and has influenced the destiny of nations and their people, spread across the world, both economically and culturally. Today pepper commands the leading position among the different spices as the spice of

  6. OCCURRENCE OF YOUNG-OF-THE-YEAR KING, SCOMBEROMORUS CAVALLA, AND SPANISH,

    E-print Network

    OCCURRENCE OF YOUNG-OF-THE-YEAR KING, SCOMBEROMORUS CAVALLA, AND SPANISH, S. MACULATUS. MACKERELS IN COMMERCIAL-lYPE SHRIMP TRAWLS ALONG THE ATLANTIC COAST OF THE SOUTHEAST UNITED STATES1 King mackerel, Scomberomorus caualla, and Spanish mackerel, S. maculatus, are migratory scombrids that support large

  7. REPRODUCTIVE BIOWGY OF KING MACKEREL, SCOMBEROMORUS CAVALLA, FROM THE SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    REPRODUCTIVE BIOWGY OF KING MACKEREL, SCOMBEROMORUS CAVALLA, FROM THE SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES biology ofking mackerel, Scomberomon18 cawJla, was studied from specimens collected off Texas, Louisiana examined from 1,163 females and 595 males obtained in 1977-78. Spawning was prolonged. Most'king mackerel

  8. King Mackerel, Scomberomorus caval/a, Mark-Recapture Studies Off Florida's East Coast

    E-print Network

    King Mackerel, Scomberomorus caval/a, Mark-Recapture Studies Off Florida's East Coast H. CHARLES SCHAEFER and WILLIAM A. FABLE, JR. Introduction King mackerel, Scomberomorus cav alla, is a coastal mackerel had exceeded H. Charles Schaefer is with the Statistics Office, Coastal Resources Division

  9. Abundance of King Mackerel, Scomberomorus caval/a, in the Southeastern United States Based on

    E-print Network

    Abundance of King Mackerel, Scomberomorus caval/a, in the Southeastern United States Based. BRUSHER Introduction The king mackerel fisheries of the southeastern United States are presently being Councils (1983, 1985). Basic to the for mulation and use of the mackerel FMP are various commercial

  10. Breeding Biology of King Eiders Nesting on Karrak Lake, Northwest Territories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DANA K. KELLETT; RAY T. ALISAUSKAS

    1997-01-01

    We studied various aspects of the breeding biology of king eiders (Somateria spectabilis) nesting at Karrak Lake, south of Queen Maud Gulf in the central Canadian Arctic. We found 41 nests distributed among 10 islands in Karrak Lake; to our knowledge, this represents the largest number of king eider nests studied at one site. We suspect that island nesting by

  11. The King James Bible and the Politics of Religious Education: Secular State and Sacred Scripture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gearon, Liam

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an outline historical-educational analysis of the King James Bible from its 1611 publication through to its four-hundredth anniversary commemoration in 2011. With particular focus on England, the article traces the educational impact of the King James Bible and charts, in the country of its origin, its progressive decline in…

  12. 50 CFR Figure 11 to Part 679 - Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) 11 Figure 11 to Part 679...ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 11 Figure 11 to Part 679—Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) ER15NO99.009 [64...

  13. 50 CFR Figure 11 to Part 679 - Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) 11 Figure 11 to Part 679...ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 11 Figure 11 to Part 679—Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) ER15NO99.009 [64...

  14. 50 CFR Figure 11 to Part 679 - Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) 11 Figure 11 to Part 679...ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 11 Figure 11 to Part 679—Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) ER15NO99.009 [64...

  15. 50 CFR Figure 11 to Part 679 - Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) 11 Figure 11 to Part 679...ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 11 Figure 11 to Part 679—Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) ER15NO99.009 [64...

  16. 50 CFR Figure 11 to Part 679 - Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) 11 Figure 11 to Part 679...ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 11 Figure 11 to Part 679—Red King Crab Savings Area (RKCSA) ER15NO99.009 [64...

  17. The King Tide Photo Initiative is an international project which aims to

    E-print Network

    Tullos, Desiree

    The King Tide Photo Initiative is an international project which aims to document areas flooded by the most extreme winter high tides. These high water events allow us to visualize now how sea level rise. Then visit Oregon's King Tide website and pick a day and time to photograph high water levels. Website

  18. Of Gods and Kings: Natural Philosophy and Politics in the Leibniz-Clarke Disputes Steven Shapin

    E-print Network

    Shapin, Steven

    Of Gods and Kings: Natural Philosophy and Politics in the Leibniz-Clarke Disputes Steven Shapin #12;Of Gods and Kings: Natural Philosophy and Politics in the Leibniz-Clarke Disputes By Steven a series of five letters with the Reverend Samuel Clarke concerning metaphysics, natural religion, God

  19. BOREAS AFM-2 Wyoming King Air 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Robert D.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-2 team used the University of Wyoming King Air aircraft during IFCs 1, 2, and 3 in 1994 to collected pass-by-pass fluxes (and many other statistics) for the large number of level (constant altitude), straight-line passes used in a variety of flight patterns over the SSA and NSA and areas along the transect between these study areas. The data described here form a second set, namely soundings that were incorporated into nearly every research flight by the King Air in 1994. These soundings generally went from near the surface to above the inversion layer. Most were flown immediately after takeoff or immediately after finishing the last flux pattern of that particular day's flights. The parameters that were measured include wind direction, wind speed, west wind component (u), south wind component (v), static pressure, air dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and CO2 concentration. Data on the aircraft's location, attitude, and altitude during data collection are also provided. These data are stored in tabular ASCH files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  20. 75 FR 24944 - Adequacy Status of the Milwaukee-Racine, Door County, Manitowoc County, and Sheboygan County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ...Manitowoc County, and Sheboygan County, Wisconsin Areas Submitted 8-Hour Ozone Redesignation...Manitowoc County, and Sheboygan County, Wisconsin ozone nonattainment areas are adequate...transportation conformity determinations. Wisconsin submitted a redesignation request...

  1. Copyright Simon King, University of Edinburgh, 2014. Personal use only. Not for re-use or redistribution. Speech synthesis

    E-print Network

    Millar, Andrew J.

    © Copyright Simon King, University of Edinburgh, 2014. Personal use only. Not for re-use or redistribution. Speech synthesis needs YOU ! #12;© Copyright Simon King, University of Edinburgh, 2014. Personal others funders collaborators projects people #12;© Copyright Simon King, University of Edinburgh, 2014

  2. Wikis for Building a Collaborative Education Environment by Irwin King, CUHK, 2008.10.17 Wikis for Building a

    E-print Network

    King, Kuo Chin Irwin

    Wikis for Building a Collaborative Education Environment by Irwin King, CUHK, 2008.10.17 Wikis Science & Engineering The Chinese University of Hong Kong http://www.cse.cuhk.edu.hk/~king #12;Wikis for Building a Collaborative Education Environment by Irwin King, CUHK, 2008.10.17 Today's Outline · Wikis

  3. APROXIMACIN SISTMICO FUNCIONAL DEL DISCURSO DE MARTIN LUTHER KING `I HAVE A DREAM': RELACIONES ENTRE LA LXICO-

    E-print Network

    Escolano, Francisco

    APROXIMACIÓN SISTÉMICO FUNCIONAL DEL DISCURSO DE MARTIN LUTHER KING `I HAVE A DREAM': RELACIONES artículo analiza el discurso de Martin Luther King `I have a dream' siguiendo los principios de la Estados Unidos. Palabras clave Gramática Sistémica Funcional, análisis del discurso, Martin Luther King

  4. AGE AND GROWTH OF KING MACKEREL, SCOMBEROMORUS CAVALLA, FROM THE ATLANTIC COAST OF THE UNITED STATES1

    E-print Network

    AGE AND GROWTH OF KING MACKEREL, SCOMBEROMORUS CAVALLA, FROM THE ATLANTIC COAST OF THE UNITED larval (2-7 nun SL) and 69 young-of-the-year (79-320 mm FL) king mackerel. were ex- amined. All fish were examined was age 21. The daily nature of rings on lapilli of age 0 king mackerel was not validated

  5. Budgeting in Texas Counties, 1931-1940.

    E-print Network

    Bradshaw, H. C.

    1941-01-01

    the ~arions associations of county officers, particularly the county judges and commissioners, the county auditors, and the county dmlcs. CONTENTS Introduction 5 Purpose of Study 6 Procedure 6 Legal Provisions 9 The Budget Form 11 Number of Budgets...

  6. Nearshore Processes, Currents and Directional Wave Spectra Monitoring Using Coherent and Non-coherent Imaging Radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trizna, D.; Hathaway, K.

    2007-05-01

    Two new radar systems have been developed for real-time measurement of near-shore processes, and results are presented for measurements of ocean wave spectra, near-shore sand bar structure, and ocean currents. The first is a non-coherent radar based on a modified version of the Sitex radar family, with a data acquisition system designed around an ISR digital receiver card. The card operates in a PC computer with inputs from a Sitex radar modified for extraction of analogue signals for digitization. Using a 9' antenna and 25 kW transmit power system, data were collected during 2007 at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Field Research Facility (FRF), Duck, NC during winter and spring of 2007. The directional wave spectrum measurements made are based on using a sequence of 64 to 640 antenna rotations to form a snapshot series of radar images of propagating waves. A square window is extracted from each image, typically 64 x 64 pixels at 3-m resolution. Then ten sets of 64 windows are submitted to a three-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform process to generate radar image spectra in the frequency-wavenumber space. The relation between the radar image spectral intensity and wave spectral intensity derived from the FRF pressure gauge array was used for a test set of data, in order to establish a modulation transfer function (MTF) for each frequency component. For 640 rotations, 10 of such spectra are averaged for improved statistics. The wave spectrum so generated was compared for extended data sets beyond those used to establish the MTF, and those results are presented here. Some differences between the radar and pressure sensor data that are observed are found to be due to the influence of the wind field, as the radar echo image weakens for light winds. A model is developed to account for such an effect to improve the radar estimate of the directional wave spectrum. The radar ocean wave imagery is severely influenced only by extremely heavy rain-fall rates, so that acceptable quality were assured for most weather conditions on a diurnal basis using a modest tower height. A new coherent microwave radar has recently been developed by ISR and preliminary testing was conducted in the spring of 2007. The radar is based on the Quadrapus four-channel transceiver card, mixed up to microwave frequencies for pulse transmission and back down to base-band for reception. We use frequency-modulated pulse compression methods to obtain 3-m spatial resolution. A standard marine radar pedestal is used to house the microwave components, and rotating radar PPI images similar to marine radar images are obtained. Many of the methods used for the marine radar system have been transferred to the coherent imaging radar. New processing methods applied to the coherent data allow summing of radial velocity images to map mean currents in the near shore zone, such as rip currents. A pair of such radars operating with a few hundred meter separation can be used to map vector currents continuously in the near shore zone and in harbors on a timely basis. Results of preliminary testing of the system will be presented.

  7. Coral colonisation of an artificial reef in a turbid nearshore environment, Dampier Harbour, western Australia.

    PubMed

    Blakeway, David; Byers, Michael; Stoddart, James; Rossendell, Jason

    2013-01-01

    A 0.6 hectare artificial reef of local rock and recycled concrete sleepers was constructed in December 2006 at Parker Point in the industrial port of Dampier, western Australia, with the aim of providing an environmental offset for a nearshore coral community lost to land reclamation. Corals successfully colonised the artificial reef, despite the relatively harsh environmental conditions at the site (annual water temperature range 18-32°C, intermittent high turbidity, frequent cyclones, frequent nearby ship movements). Coral settlement to the artificial reef was examined by terracotta tile deployments, and later stages of coral community development were examined by in-situ visual surveys within fixed 25 x 25 cm quadrats on the rock and concrete substrates. Mean coral density on the tiles varied from 113 ± 17 SE to 909 ± 85 SE per m(2) over five deployments, whereas mean coral density in the quadrats was only 6.0 ± 1.0 SE per m(2) at eight months post construction, increasing to 24.0 ± 2.1 SE per m(2) at 62 months post construction. Coral taxa colonising the artificial reef were a subset of those on the surrounding natural reef, but occurred in different proportions--Pseudosiderastrea tayami, Mycedium elephantotus and Leptastrea purpurea being disproportionately abundant on the artificial reef. Coral cover increased rapidly in the later stages of the study, reaching 2.3 ± 0.7 SE % at 62 months post construction. This study indicates that simple materials of opportunity can provide a suitable substrate for coral recruitment in Dampier Harbour, and that natural colonisation at the study site remains sufficient to initiate a coral community on artificial substrate despite ongoing natural and anthropogenic perturbations. PMID:24040405

  8. Methane concentrations and oxidation in nearshore waters of the Lena River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joye, S. B.; Samarkin, V.; Shakhova, N. E.; Semiletov, I. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic is warming dramatically, with potentially catastrophic impacts on climate change through rapid mobilization of labile carbon reservoirs sequestered presently in permafrost. Increasingly, Arctic feedbacks are recognized as key contributors to climate change, including cycles associated with the powerful greenhouse gas methane, whose atmospheric concentration has more than doubled since the pre-industrial epoch. Sustained methane release to the atmosphere from thawing Arctic permafrost and delivery to the coastal ocean through groundwater or riverine discharge or expulsion from the seabed is a positive and likely highly significant feedback to climate warming. Microbially-mediated methane oxidation provides a key sink and effective biofilter that can limit methane fluxes from coastal environments to the atmosphere. We examined methane dynamics on the East Siberian Arctic Shelf by determining concentrations and oxidation rates at a series of stations near the Lena River Delta and moving offshore. Methane concentrations and oxidation rates were highly elevated in and near the river mouth compared to offshore waters, except when the offshore waters were impacted by seabed methane seepage. The regulation of methane oxidation in Arctic waters appears two-fold: first, rates are strongly related to methane availability and second, in the presence of methane, nutrient availability strongly regulates methane consumption. Along the Lena river delta, elevated concentrations of both nutrients and methane create ideal conditions to support high rates of pelagic methanotrophy. Offshore, where nutrient concentrations are lower and more limiting, methane oxidation rates are considerably lower. These data suggest that, at present, nearshore waters are fairly efficient methane sinks while in offshore waters, pelagic methanotrophy is inefficient, allowing methane to escape to the atmosphere.

  9. Coral Colonisation of an Artificial Reef in a Turbid Nearshore Environment, Dampier Harbour, Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    Blakeway, David; Byers, Michael; Stoddart, James; Rossendell, Jason

    2013-01-01

    A 0.6 hectare artificial reef of local rock and recycled concrete sleepers was constructed in December 2006 at Parker Point in the industrial port of Dampier, western Australia, with the aim of providing an environmental offset for a nearshore coral community lost to land reclamation. Corals successfully colonised the artificial reef, despite the relatively harsh environmental conditions at the site (annual water temperature range 18-32°C, intermittent high turbidity, frequent cyclones, frequent nearby ship movements). Coral settlement to the artificial reef was examined by terracotta tile deployments, and later stages of coral community development were examined by in-situ visual surveys within fixed 25 x 25 cm quadrats on the rock and concrete substrates. Mean coral density on the tiles varied from 113 ± 17 SE to 909 ± 85 SE per m2 over five deployments, whereas mean coral density in the quadrats was only 6.0 ± 1.0 SE per m2 at eight months post construction, increasing to 24.0 ± 2.1 SE per m2 at 62 months post construction. Coral taxa colonising the artificial reef were a subset of those on the surrounding natural reef, but occurred in different proportions—Pseudosiderastreatayami, Mycediumelephantotus and Leptastreapurpurea being disproportionately abundant on the artificial reef. Coral cover increased rapidly in the later stages of the study, reaching 2.3 ± 0.7 SE % at 62 months post construction. This study indicates that simple materials of opportunity can provide a suitable substrate for coral recruitment in Dampier Harbour, and that natural colonisation at the study site remains sufficient to initiate a coral community on artificial substrate despite ongoing natural and anthropogenic perturbations. PMID:24040405

  10. Linear Scour Depressions or Bedforms? Using Interferometric Sonar to Investigate Nearshore Sediment Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrelli, M.; Giese, G. S.; Dingman, S. L.; Gontz, A. M.; Adams, M. B.; Norton, A. R.; Brown, T. L.

    2011-12-01

    A series of ambiguous features on the seafloor off the coast of Provincetown, Massachusetts USA has been identified in two bathymetric lidar surveys (2007, 2010) conducted by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Similar features in the area have been described as linear scour depressions by other investigators, but at deeper water depths. These features exhibit some of the characteristics of bedforms, they have migrated tens of meters and maintained similar 3 dimensional morphologies. However, what would be described as the slipface more closely resembles the updrift face of a linear scour depression. The features are in relatively shallow water (9 - 15 m), are 150 - 200 m long, have spacings of 100 - 150 m and are 5-6 m in height. Further investigations are being undertaken to better understand these features and nearshore sediment transport in the area. The features appear along a high energy, accreting coast with both strong wave-driven sediment flux and tidal currents. Mapping of the study area with an interferometric sonar system, which collects coincident swath bathymetry and acoustic backscatter imagery, is ongoing. Interferometric sonar increases bathymetric swath width to depth ratios, in comparison to multibeam systems, and expedites data collection by reducing costs, vessel-time and hazards associated with navigating shallow waters. In addition, sediment grab samples and a series of seismic reflection profiles will also be collected in the area to ground-truth acoustic imagery and provide a subsurface framework for the features, respectively. These datasets will allow investigators to better document bottom conditions, estimate flow velocities needed to create these features and improve our understanding of sediment transport processes and pathways in the area.

  11. Determination of Nearshore Surface Slope Field and Wave Heights Using Optical Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotto, R. D.; Holman, R. A.; Stanley, J.; Palmsten, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    In order to gain an accurate, predictive modeling capability for nearshore dynamics, it is necessary to be able to measure the heights of waves. We are developing a technique to do this remotely, by exploiting the polarization properties of light reflected from the ocean surface. A polarization camera was built for the purposes of laboratory testing, and was calibrated to determine filter orientations and to correct for gain differences between pixels, lens distortion, and slightly varying fields of view of the four component cameras before being used in laboratory tests. The camera’s ability to determine degree and azimuth of linear polarization (DOLP and AOLP), from which sea surface slope and, in turn, wave height can be determined, was then tested by comparing calculated polarization parameters to known conditions created by an external polarizer. While error in DOLP could not be precisely quantified without further tests, we found that we could determine AOLP to within one degree. Following this, the camera was used to make measurements of known wave conditions at the Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory at Oregon State University. Incident band waves were isolated from noise and high-frequency chop using spectral processing of time series of AOLP values at individual pixels. The processed signals were then used to make estimates of surface slope and wave amplitude, which were compared to ground-truth data from electric and acoustic wave height sensors installed at the wave tank. While further analysis is necessary to fully demonstrate and quantify the accuracy of this technique, we have confidence in our ability to measure wave height based on the preliminary results obtained.

  12. Nearshore fish distributions in an Alaskan estuary in relation to stratification, temperature, and salinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abookire, A.A.; Piatt, J.F.; Robards, M.D.

    2000-01-01

    Fish were sampled with beach seines and small-meshed beam trawls in nearshore (<1 km) and shallow (<25 m) habitats on the southern coast of Kachemak Bay, Cook Inlet, Alaska, from June to August, 1996-1998. Fish distributions among habitats were analysed for species composition, catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) and frequency of occurrence. Two oceanographically distinct areas of Kachemak Bay were sampled and compared: the Outer Bay and the Inner Bay. Outer Kachemak Bay is exposed and receives oceanic, upwelled water from the Gulf of Alaska, whereas the Inner Bay is more estuarine. Thermohaline properties of bottom water in the Outer and Inner Bay were essentially the same, whereas the Inner Bay water-column was stratified with warmer, less saline waters near the surface. Distribution and abundance of pelagic schooling fish corresponded with area differences in stratification, temperature and salinity. The Inner Bay supported more species and higher densities of schooling and demersal fish than the Outer Bay. Schooling fish communities sampled by beach seine differed between the Outer and Inner Bays. Juvenile and adult Pacific sand lance (Ammodytes hexapterus), Pacific herring (Clupea harengus pallasi), osmerids (Osmeridae) and sculpins (Cottidae) were all more abundant in the Inner Bay. Gadids (Gadidae) were the only schooling fish taxa more abundant in the Outer Bay. Thermohaline characteristics of bottom water were similar throughout Kachemak Bay. Correspondingly, bottom fish communities were similar in all areas. Relative abundances (CPUE) were not significantly different between areas for any of the five demersal fish groups: flatfishes (Pleuronectidae), ronquils (Bathymasteridae), sculpins (Cottidae), gadids (Gadidae) and pricklebacks (Stichaeidae).

  13. Exploring the nearshore marine wind profile from field measurements and numerical hindcast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Jesus, F.; Menendez, M.; Guanche, R.; Losada, I.

    2012-12-01

    Wind power is the predominant offshore renewable energy resource. In the last years, offshore wind farms have become a technically feasible source of electrical power. The economic feasibility of offshore wind farms depends on the quality of the offshore wind conditions compared to that of onshore sites. Installation and maintenance costs must be balanced with more hours and a higher quality of the available resources. European offshore wind development has revealed that the optimum offshore sites are those in which the distance from the coast is limited with high available resource. Due to the growth in the height of the turbines and the complexity of the coast, with interactions between inland wind/coastal orography and ocean winds, there is a need for field measurements and validation of numerical models to understand the marine wind profile near the coast. Moreover, recent studies have pointed out that the logarithmic law describing the vertical wind profile presents limitations. The aim of this work is to characterize the nearshore vertical wind profile in the medium atmosphere boundary layer. Instrumental observations analyzed in this work come from the Idermar project (www.Idermar.es). Three floating masts deployed at different locations on the Cantabrian coast provide wind measurements from a height of 20 to 90 meters. Wind speed and direction are measured as well as several meteorological variables at different heights of the profile. The shortest wind time series has over one year of data. A 20 year high-resolution atmospheric hindcast, using the WRF-ARW model and focusing on hourly offshore wind fields, is also analyzed. Two datasets have been evaluated: a European reanalysis with a ~15 Km spatial resolution, and a hybrid downscaling of wind fields with a spatial resolution of one nautical mile over the northern coast of Spain.. These numerical hindcasts have been validated based on field measurement data. Several parameterizations of the vertical wind profile are evaluated and, based on this work, a particular parameterization of the wind profile is proposed.

  14. (Dengue Fever reported in Osceola County) OSCEOLA COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT

    E-print Network

    Watson, Craig A.

    (Dengue Fever reported in Osceola County) OSCEOLA COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT ISSUES PUBLIC HEALTH of two cases of dengue fever in Osceola County. Dengue is one of several mosquito-borne illnesses was not acquired locally. Symptoms of dengue fever vary according to the age of the patient. Infants and young

  15. Snohomish County Biodiesel Project

    SciTech Connect

    Terrill Chang; Deanna Carveth

    2010-02-01

    Snohomish County in western Washington State began converting its vehicle fleet to use a blend of biodiesel and petroleum diesel in 2005. As prices for biodiesel rose due to increased demand for this cleaner-burning fuel, Snohomish County looked to its farmers to ���¢��������grow���¢������� this fuel locally. Suitable seed crops that can be crushed to extract oil for use as biodiesel feedstock include canola, mustard, and camelina. The residue, or mash, has high value as an animal feed. County farmers began with 52 acres of canola and mustard crops in 2006, increasing to 250 acres and 356 tons in 2008. In 2009, this number decreased to about 150 acres and 300 tons due to increased price for mustard seed.

  16. County Waterford Image Archive

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Using volunteer help and a locally written image management system, the Waterford County Museum in Ireland has created this collection of close to 3,000 historical images that document Waterford County and its parishes from the late 1890s to the present. The Web interface to the collection includes a number of helpful features - for those familiar with Waterford county and its place and family names, there is a search box, but for those less familiar there are several ways to browse the collection, by selecting photographer, location, image format, or subjects from drop down lists, as well as selecting parishes from a map to see the pictures associated with each. A photo of the week is posted on the site, and visitors can sign up to receive an RSS feed or, alternatively, an email message when new images are added. There are also easy ways to submit photographs for inclusion in the archive, and for locals to contribute identifying information.

  17. To address President Obama's call to action to restore the Great Lakes, NOAA has funded projects within the Nearshore Health and Nonpoint Source Pollution priority area of the Great

    E-print Network

    To address President Obama's call to action to restore the Great Lakes, NOAA has funded projects within the Nearshore Health and Nonpoint Source Pollution priority area of the Great Lakes Restoration Lakes. Nearshore and Non-Point Source Pollution funded by the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

  18. Nearshore benthic habitat GIS for the Channel Islands National Sanctuary and southern California State Fisheries Reserves. Volume 1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Nasby, Nicole M.; Reid, Jane A.; Waltenberger, Ben; Lee, Kristen M.

    2003-01-01

    The nearshore benthic habitat of the Santa Barbara coast and Channel Islands supports diverse marine life that is commercially, recreationally, and intrinsically valuable. Some of these resources are known to be endangered including a variety of rockfish and the white abalone. Agencies of the state of California and the United States have been mandated to preserve and enhance these resources. Data from sidescan sonar, bathymetry, video and dive observations, and physical samples are consolidated in a geographic information system (GIS). The GIS provides researchers and policymakers a view of the relationship among data sets to assist scienctific research and to help with economic and social policy-making decisions regarding this protected environment.

  19. Multi-Dimensional Error Analysis of Nearshore Wave Modeling Tools, with Application Toward Data-Driven Boundary Correction 

    E-print Network

    Jiang, Boyang

    2012-02-14

    environmental conditions at a given area is of great importance for naval exercises and operations. This capability has progressed beyond simple reduced-dimension models (e.g., Navy Standard Surf Model; Earle 1989) to more sophisticated comprehensive three... where the use of a one-dimensional nearshore model (e.g. the Navy Standard Surf Model) would be inappropriate (Morris 2001). In this study we will use data from the Duck94 experiment to establish the accuracy of the basic model. 2.1 Model Parameters...

  20. Purchasing in Texas Counties.

    E-print Network

    Hervey, E. J.; Bradshaw, H. C.

    1944-01-01

    8 r3' L \\, & #5, CnLpL"; 3' --%I k? TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, Director College Station, Texas BULLETIN NO. 653 JULY 1944 PURCHASING IN TEXAS COUNTIES H. C. BRADSEAW and E. J, HERVEY Division of Farm and Ranch... Economics 00.: .*- AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS GIBB GILCHRIST, President D-21-744-4500 The use of good purchasing procedures in a number of Texas counties is reducing the cost price of materials, supplies and equipment by 15 to 20 per...

  1. 2013 County Commissioner Satisfaction Survey

    E-print Network

    commissioner is expected to complete the CSU Extension survey. Per-county responses (N = 56) are calculated surveys was 84, for an overall response rate of 39%. The per-county response rate was excellent, with 562013 County Commissioner Satisfaction Survey: CSU Extension Services in Colorado Survey Results

  2. Insights into High-Resolution Physico-Biogeochemical Processes in Nearshore Environments of Lake Erie Using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehm, C. L.; Vermette, S.; Perrelli, M.; Bauer, K.; Jerla, B.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this project is to gain a better understanding of the physico-chemical-biological dynamics in nearshore areas of Lake Erie as a function of environmental and climate change. Nearshore processes in the Great Lakes are complex and drive many efforts in remediating areas of concern (AoCs). Long term studies of the processes and the dynamics of these environments are necessary to determine the success of management strategies and the application of policies. A network of monitoring buoys can provide an insight into long term temporal changes in the system, however, the spatial resolution is rather coarse. As part of a nearshore buoy observations study on the long-term impacts of climate and environmental change on Lake Erie the deployment of an automated underwater vehicle (AUV) compliments and augments the data obtained by the buoys by providing direct high spatial resolution observations. The high resolution data will be used to improve parameter estimates of water circulation and water quality parameters for models (FVCOM) that often cannot accurately predict nearshore surface and subsurface dynamics. An AUV equipped with water quality instrumentation as well as an acoustic doppler current profiler and side scan sonar was deployed in a gridded pattern at multiple locations along the shoreline of Lake Erie throughout the summer of 2012. The data presented here describe and capture at, high spatial resolution, the nearshore-offshore characteristics and inter-relationships of lake bottom morphology, water quality and current patterns and provide an insight into the complex processes and dynamics of these regions. These data will provide a better understanding of nearshore lake processes that can be used to improve current model parameters and inform both science at large and management strategies.

  3. Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the Washington-Oregon Planning Area (Puget Sound Area, Washington) Part 2. Volume 1 of 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    This report presents socio-economic profiles of the counties in the Puget Sound Area of the Washington-Oregon Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service. The Puget Sound Area includes Whatcom, Skagit, Snohomish, King, Pierce, Thurston, Mason, and Kitsap counties. It presents baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in Washington, Oregon, and California which may be potentially affected by offshore oil and gas development. Each profile includes socio-economic characteristics organized under the following eight headings: demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and other characteristics. The focus of each socio-economic profile is 1980, but the time period 1970 to 2000 is covered, to the extent possible with existing data, to provide a historical context and an understanding of expected trends. Each county's socio-economic profile was prepared using time-series data from secondary sources obtained primarily from federal, state, and local government agencies.

  4. Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the Washington-Oregon Planning Area (Puget Sound Area, Washington) Part 1. Volume 1 of 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    This report presents socio-economic profiles of the counties in the Puget Sound Area of the Washington-Oregon Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service. The Puget Sound Area includes Whatcom, Skagit, Snohomish, King, Pierce, Thurston, Mason, and Kitsap counties. It presents baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in Washington, Oregon, and California which may be potentially affected by offshore oil and gas development. Each profile includes socio-economic characteristics organized under the following eight headings: demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and other characteristics. The focus of each socio-economic profile is 1980, but the time period 1970 to 2000 is covered, to the extent possible with existing data, to provide a historical context and an understanding of expected trends. Each county's socio-economic profile was prepared using time-series data from secondary sources obtained primarily from federal, state, and local government agencies.

  5. Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the Washington-Oregon Planning Area (Puget Sound Area, Washington). Part 1. Volume 2 of 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    This report presents socio-economic profiles of the counties in the Puget Sound Area of the Washington-Oregon Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service. The Puget Sound Area includes Whatcom, Skagit, Snohomish, King, Pierce, Thurston, Mason, and Kitsap counties. It presents baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in Washington, Oregon, and California which may be potentially affected by offshore oil and gas development. Each profile includes socio-economic characteristics organized under the following eight headings: demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and other characteristics. The focus of each socio-economic profile is 1980, but the time period 1970 to 2000 is covered, to the extent possible with existing data, to provide a historical context and an understanding of expected trends. Each county's socio-economic profile was prepared using time-series data from secondary sources obtained primarily from federal, state, and local government agencies.

  6. Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the Washington-Oregon Planning Area (Puget Sound Area, Washington). Part 2. Volume 2 of 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    This report presents socio-economic profiles of the counties in the Puget Sound Area of the Washington-Oregon Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service. The Puget Sound Area includes Whatcom, Skagit, Snohomish, King, Pierce, Thurston, Mason, and Kitsap counties. It presents baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in Washington, Oregon, and California which may be potentially affected by offshore oil and gas development. Each profile includes socio-economic characteristics organized under the following eight headings: demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and other characteristics. The focus of each socio-economic profile is 1980, but the time period 1970 to 2000 is covered, to the extent possible with existing data, to provide a historical context and an understanding of expected trends. Each county's socio-economic profile was prepared using time-series data from secondary sources obtained primarily from federal, state, and local government agencies.

  7. King v. Burwell: Desperately Seeking Ambiguity in Clear Statutory Text.

    PubMed

    Adler, Jonathan H; Cannon, Michael F

    2015-06-01

    Does the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010 authorize tax credits within the thirty-six states that failed to establish health insurance exchanges? That is the question presented in Pruitt v. Burwell, Halbig v. Burwell, King v. Burwell, and Indiana v. IRS. The plaintiffs argue that the statute is clear and forecloses any possibility of tax credits in federal exchanges. The government argues that the statute plainly authorizes tax credits in federal exchanges, or is at least ambiguous on the question. Mere disagreement is not evidence of ambiguity. Reaching the truth requires wading deep into each side's arguments. Whether the relevant text is viewed in isolation or in its full statutory context, the ACA authorizes tax credits only in exchanges established by the states. PMID:25425084

  8. Measurements and theories of the King-Perkins-Chudakov effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, H. D.; Uggerhøj, U. I.

    2011-09-01

    We discuss the available experimental results, based on cosmic rays as well as laboratory measurements, for the King-Perkins-Chudakov (KPC) effect where pairs - when detected close to the creation vertex - suffer a reduced energy loss due to the internal screening of the charges constituting the pair. It is shown that the overall best description of data is obtained from the original theoretical expression by Chudakov based on classical electrodynamics, or the semi-classical extension by Burkhardt. The expression used in some textbooks, based on the theory of Berestetskii and Geshkenbain, provides a somewhat poorer description of data, but - contrary to those of Chudakov and Burkhardt - is applicable in the limit of large distances to the creation vertex.

  9. [The vicissitude of Huangjing (rhizome of king solomonseal) germplasm].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ming-en; Wang, De-qun

    2009-01-01

    Huangjing (rhizome of king solomonseal), originally recorded in Ming yi bie lu involved several kinds of Polygonatum plant. The Huangjing of Northern and Southern dynasties was derived from rhizome nodular groups of Polygonatum plant. In Tang and Song dynasties, the verticillate leaf group of Polygonatum plant was enthroned especially the Polygonati sibiricum Delar. ex Redoute and formed the genuine productive area: Songshan and Maoshan. Such situation continued until Ming dynasty. After Qing dynasty, alternate leaf group together with verticillate leaf group became the main variety of Polygonatum herb. In the period of republic of China, the Polygonatum cyrtonema Hua of alternate leaf group developed into the main stream of Medicinal Huangjing and finally formed the medicated situation of two kinds of groups of this time. PMID:19824357

  10. Establishing backcountry use quotas: an example from Mineral King, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, David J.; Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Fodor, Paul A.

    1981-01-01

    Increasing levels of visitor use and consequent resource damage have necessitated that backcountry use restrictions be established in the Mineral King area of Sequoia National Park, California. In this paper we review the steps taken in developing a trailhead quota system. The availability of acceptable campsites, based on a detailed inventory of site distribution and impact, was used to quantitatively derive use capacities for each camp area. Wilderness permit data on visitor dispersal patterns from the major trailheads, including length of stay at each camp area, were then used to translate the area capacities into daily trailhead quotas that would assure that these capacities were not surpassed. The general approach is applicable to any backcountry area, although large complex areas may require the use of available computer simulation models.

  11. i MARIN COUNTY~ ....-_.-"".~

    E-print Network

    : Initiate an amendment to the Building Code updating the County's green building requirements by taking by requiring green building through the building permit review Progess. The adopted Green Building Ordinance that Title 24, Part 6 of the California Building Code are the minimum energy efficiency requirements

  12. Wasp Watchers Albany County

    E-print Network

    Walter, M.Todd

    { Wasp Watchers Albany County Finding the Wasp that hunts the Emerald Ash Borer #12;Cerceris fumipennis is a solitary ground nesting wasp. The female wasp stocks her nest with Buprestid beetles ,this as 80% of the Cerceris fumipennis colonies daily catch. · This wasp is very wide spread in the United

  13. 7 CFR 7.11 - County committee members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...county executive director, other employee of the county committee, or the county agricultural extension agent for the county. If the county agricultural extension agent is not selected as secretary to the county committee, that person...

  14. Pliocene-Pleistocene diatom biostratigraphy of nearshore Antarctica from the AND-1B drillcore, McMurdo Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, D.; Sjunneskog, C.; Scherer, R.; Maffioli, P.; Riesselman, C.; Harwood, D.

    2012-10-01

    The near-shore open-marine diatom record recovered in the ANtarctic geological DRILLing (ANDRILL) McMurdo Ice Shelf Project (MIS) AND-1B drillcore, McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, advances our understanding of the marine conditions present in the southern Ross Sea during the Pliocene and early Pleistocene. This diatom history is recorded within alternating diamictite and diatomite that reflect alternating glacial activity and high marine primary productivity. The diatomite units were deposited in a continental shelf open-marine setting during periods of reduced ice cover in West Antarctica. A new diatom biostratigraphic scheme spanning the last ca. 5 Ma is proposed for the Antarctic near-shore area, based on prior work from high latitude drillcores. Four new zones are proposed for the Pliocene/Pleistocene, with eight in total for the new zonal scheme, utilizing Actinocylus fasciculatus, Actinocyclus maccollumii, Fragilariopsis bohatyii, Rouxia antarctica, and Thalassiosira fasciculata as new zonal markers. The early Pliocene shares the most assemblage commonality with that of the Southern Ocean with greater numbers of endemic species observed in the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene; a group of related Fragilaripsis species characterizes much of this later part of the time column. Two new species are proposed, Fragilariopsis tigris sp. nov. Riesselman and Thalassiosira teres sp. nov. Winter; a formal name is also proposed for another species, Rhizosolenia harwoodii sp. nov. Winter. The new zonation is tied to a robust chronology utilizing diatom biostratigraphy, volcanic 40Ar/39Ar ages and magnetostratigraphy.

  15. Nearshore thermal gradients of the Colorado River near the Little Colorado River confluence, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, Rob; Grams, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    Construction and operation of Glen Canyon Dam has dramatically impacted the flow of the Colorado River through Glen, Marble, and Grand Canyons. Extremes in both streamflow and water temperature have been suppressed by controlled releases from the dam. Trapping of sediment in Lake Powell, the reservoir formed by Glen Canyon Dam, has also dramatically reduced the supply of suspended sediment entering the system. These changes have altered the riverine ecosystem and the habitat of native species, including fish such as the endangered humpback chub (Gila cypha). Most native fish are adapted to seasonally warm water, and the continuous relatively cold water released by the dam is one of the factors that is believed to limit humpback chub growth and survival. While average mainstem temperatures in the Colorado River are well documented, there is limited understanding of temperatures in the nearshore environments that fish typically occupy. Four nearshore geomorphic unit types were studied between the confluence of the Colorado and Little Colorado Rivers and Lava Canyon in the summer and fall of 2010, for study periods of 10 to 27 days. Five to seven sites were studied during each interval. Persistent thermal gradients greater than the 0.2 °C accuracy of the instruments were not observed in any of the sampled shoreline environments. Temperature gradients between the shoreline and mainstem on the order of 4 °C, believed to be important to the habitat-seeking behavior of native or nonnative fishes, were not detected.

  16. Molecular typing of Escherichia coli strains associated with threatened sea ducks and near-shore marine habitats of southwest Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schamber, Jason L.

    2011-01-01

    In Alaska, sea ducks winter in coastal habitats at remote, non-industrialized areas, as well as in proximity to human communities and industrial activity. We evaluated prevalence and characteristics of Escherichia coli strains in faecal samples of Steller's eiders (Polysticta stelleri; n = 122) and harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus; n = 21) at an industrialized site and Steller's eiders (n = 48) at a reference site, and compared these strains with those isolated from water samples from near-shore habitats of ducks. The overall prevalence of E. coli was 16% and 67% in Steller's eiders and harlequin ducks, respectively, at the industrialized study site, and 2% in Steller's eiders at the reference site. Based on O and H antigen subtyping and genetic characterization by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus polymerase chain reaction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we found evidence of avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) strains associated with both species and detected E. coli strains carrying virulence genes associated with mammals in harlequin ducks. Steller's eiders that carried APEC had lower serum total protein and albumin concentrations, providing further evidence of pathogenicity. The genetic profile of two E. coli strains from water matched an isolate from a Steller's eider providing evidence of transmission between near-shore habitats and birds.

  17. Investigating Terrain Effects on Nearshore Cloud Evolution in Deepwave through Time-Lapse Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, T. C.; Billings, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Stereo images of cloud patterns and nearshore waves upstream of the Southern Alps during the DEEPWAVE field campaign are presented through photogrammetric analysis. The photos highlighted in this case were taken in the afternoon of Friday, 13 June 2014. These photos were chosen because they may allow for focused analysis of terrain effects on cloud evolution. Stratocumulus and other cumuliform, as well as cirrus clouds were captured as the sun set over the Tasman Sea, one of the South Pacific Ocean's marginal seas. Breaks in the thin band of stratocumulus along the shoreline, as well as the total time for cloud layer dissipation are also of interest. A possible barrier jet causing the southward motion of the stratocumulus layer is also investigated. Views look northwest from Serpentine Road in Kumara Junction, South Island, New Zealand. An Integrated Sounding System (ISS) located at the Hokitika Airport was the primary source of vertical profiles. The upper air sounding closest to the shoot time and location, plotted from Hokitika's 11:05 UTC upsonde data, shows 10 mph NE winds near the surface. Images were taken on days with research flights over New Zealand from 2 June to 23 June 2014 to match DEEPWAVE objectives. On the night of 13 June 2014, NSF/NCAR's HIAPER GV research aircraft completed a flight from Christchurch over the South Island. This flight became known as Intensive Observing Period 3 (IOP 3) Sensitivity Flight. Methods applied in the Terrain-Induced Rotor Experiment (T-REX) by Grubiši? and Grubiši? (2007) were closely followed while capturing stereo photographic images. Two identical cameras were positioned with a separation baseline near 270 meters. Each camera was tilted upward approximately seven degrees and carefully positioned to capture parallel fields of view of the site. Developing clouds were captured using synchronized camera timers on a five second interval. Ultimately, cloud locations and measurements can be determined using the recorded GPS locations of the cameras. The Camera Calibration Toolbox available for MATLAB was used in order to perform these elaborate triangulation calculations.

  18. Physics of nearshore bed pattern formation under regular or random waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Sonja M.; Dodd, Nicholas; Calvete, Daniel; FalquéS, Albert

    2006-03-01

    We present an investigation into the growth of nearshore, rhythmic patterns. A comprehensive linear stability model of the surf and shoaling zones is used to examine which type of pattern, transverse or crescentic bar, is likely to form under different wave conditions. In contrast to earlier studies we examine normal and near-normal incidence on a plane beach. In doing so we reproduce results of earlier, more restricted studies and thereby identify the physical mechanisms leading to the growth of different patterns. This paper also focuses on the role of random wave height distribution compared with regular waves and identifies conditions likely to lead to pattern growth. To this end, an amended wave height dissipation function is presented, which allows us to move between random and regular regimes. It is found that a sharply defined surf breakpoint leads to larger growth rates and crescentic-bar-type features. In contrast, a large spread in breaking gives rise to transverse bar patterns with reduced growth rates. Transverse bar alongshore spacing is typically about 1/4 to 1/2 the width of the surf zone, while crescentic bar spacing is larger, up to twice this width. It is also shown that pattern types are influenced by the wave height to depth ratio in the surf zone. This indicates that sites with substantial inner surf zone wave energy and thus greater energy available to move sediment will give rise to transverse bar patterns. A new, propagating mode is identified in such cases, which exists for normal wave incidence. Finally, the role of wave shoaling and wave refraction, either on the bed or on the currents is examined. Crescentic bars seem to be a very robust feature as they stem from the model even if those three effects are ignored. Thus the only essential feedback for their formation is the coupling between depth-controlled breaking and the evolving bathymetry. In contrast, transverse bar formation is very sensitive to wave refraction being enhanced by refraction over the bed and weakened by refraction over the current.

  19. Regional and Nearshore Bathymetry of American Samoa: Implications for Tsunami Run-Up and Public Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, D. J.; Hogrefe, K. R.; Naar, D.; Roberts, J.; Miller, J. E.; Ferguson, S.; Koppers, A. A.; Battista, T.; Lim, E.; Taylor, L. A.; Anderson, P.

    2009-12-01

    We report on past compilations of deep and shallow-water multibeam bathymetry surveys, bathymetric derivations from high-resolution satellite imagery, and submersible dives conducted around Tutuila, American Samoa. Initial multibeam bathymetric surveys were conducted in 2001-2005 to support the Fagatele Bay National Marine Sanctuary, but subsequent data gathering, derivation, and compilation have been conducted and distributed by a variety of partners. In the nearshore (~15-250 m), a major objective has been to develop high-resolution maps to characterize reefs and associated habitats to meet the coral reef conservation goals of NOAA and the American Samoa government. At depths of 0-15 m, bathymetry has been derived from high-resolution, multispectral Ikonos satellite imagery, by gauging the relative attenuation of blue and green spectral radiance as a function of depth. This effort was also in support of NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program goals. In deeper environments (250 m or greater), the goal has been to describe and interpret the geomorphology of mid- to deep- water flanks surrounding Tutuila, and to compile regional bathymetry for geomorphological studies of the Eastern Samoa Volcanic Province, including the identification and shape characterization of previously undocumented seamounts and considerations of age-progressions based on arrangements of volcanic lineaments. These data sets can also serve as critical inputs to tsunami inundation models and subsequent simulations and data sets. To wit, the National Geophysical Data Center has just released 10- and 30-m integrated bathymetric-topographic digital elevation models (DEMs) of Tutuila, American Samoa, primarily for the NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory Center for Tsunami Research. The best available digital data were compiled from various sources, shifted to common horizontal and vertical datums, with final edits before preparation of the DEMs. Such datasets are important to further build the capacity for disaster preparation and response of local authorities, and will feed into the territory-wide GIS infrastructure used by various agencies of the American Samoa Government, the American Samoa Coastal Zone Management Program, the American Samoa Power Authority, and U.S. federal agencies in the region.

  20. Nearshore Coastal Dynamics on a Sea-Breeze Dominated Micro-Tidal Beach (NCSAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Freyermuth, A.; Puleo, J. A.; Ruiz de Alegría-Arzaburu, A.; Figlus, J.; Mendoza, T.; Pintado-Patino, J. C.; Pieterse, A.; Chardon-Maldonado, P.; DiCosmo, N. R.; Wellman, N.; Garcia-Nava, H.; Palemón-Arcos, L.; Roberts, T.; López-González, J.; Bravo, M.; Ojeda, E.; Medellín, G.; Appendini, C. M.; Figueroa, B.; González-Leija, M.; Enriquez, C.; Pedrozo-Acuña, A.; Salles, P.

    2014-12-01

    A comprehensive field experiment devoted to the study of coastal processes on a micro-tidal beach was conducted from March 30th to April 12th 2014 in Sisal, Yucatán México. Wave conditions in the study area are controlled by local (i.e., sea-breezes) and meso-scale (i.e., Nortes) meteorological events. Simultaneous measurements of waves, tides, winds, currents, sediment transport, runup, and beach morphology were obtained in this experiment. Very dense nearshore instrumentation arrays allow us the study of the cross-/along- shore variability of surf/swash zone dynamics during different forcing conditions. Strong sea-breeze wind events produced a diurnal cycle with a maximum wind speed of 14 m/s. The persistent sea-breeze system forces small-amplitude (Hs<1 m) short-period (Tp<4 s) NE waves approaching with a high incidence wave angle. These wave conditions drive westward alongshore currents of up to 0.6 m/s in the inner surf zone and hence produce an active sediment transport in the swash zone. On the other hand, the more energetic (Hs>1 m) Norte event, lasting 48 hours, reached the coast on April 8th generating a long-period swell (Tp>10 s) arriving from the NNW. This event induced an eastward net sediment transport across a wide surf zone. However, long-term observations of sand impoundment at a groin located near the study area suggests that the net sediment transport in the northern Yucatan peninsula is controlled by sea-breeze events and hence swash zone dynamics play an important role in the net sediment budget of this region. A comparative study of surf and swash zone dynamics during both sea-breeze and Norte events will be presented. The Institute of Engineering of UNAM, throughout an International Collaborative Project with the University of Delaware, and CONACYT (CB-167692) provided financial support. The first author acknowledges ONR Global for providing financial support throughout the Visiting Scientist Program.

  1. A Lagrangian description of nearshore hydrodynamics and rip currents forced by a random wave field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leandro, S.; Cienfuegos, R.; Escauriaza, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    Nonlinear processes become important for waves propagating in the shoaling and surf zones. Wave shape changes when approaching the coast under the influence of bathymetry, becoming increasingly asymmetric until reaching the breaking limit. In the shoaling zone, non-linearities induce a net velocity in the direction of wave propagation, a phenomenon called Stokes drift, while in the surf zone, currents are mainly driven by spatio-temporal variations in energy dissipation gradients. In this work we aim at investigating and characterizing the nearshore circulation forced by a random wave field propagating over a variable bathymetry. We carry out numerical simulations over a laboratory experiment conducted in a wave basin over a realistic bathymetry [Michallet et al. 2010]. For the hydrodynamics, we use a 2D shock-capturing finite-volume model that solves the non-linear shallow water equations, taking into account energy dissipation by breaking, friction, bed-slope variations, and an accurate description for the moving shoreline in the swash zone [Marche et al. 2007;Guerra et al. 2010]. Model predictions are compared and validated against experimental data giving confidence for its use in the description of wave propagation in the surf/swash zone, together with mean eulerian velocities. The resulting wave propagation and circulation provided by the 2D model will then be used to describe drifter's patterns in the surf zone and construct Lagrangian particle tracking. The chosen experimental configuration is of great interest due to the random wave forcing (slowly modulated), the beach non-uniformities, and the existence of several bar-rip channels that enhance quasi-periodic rip instabilities. During the experiment, balloons filled with water, with a diameter between 5 and 10 cm, were placed in the surf zone in order to characterize circulation in a Lagrangian framework [Castelle et al. 2010]. The time-location of the balloons was continuously tracked by a shore-mounted video camera, and the images were processed to obtain the trajectories and mean velocities. The Lagrangian description provided by the numerical model will be thus confronted to experimental data, and then used to characterize circulation patterns, rip instabilities and infragravity wave pulsations.

  2. 78 FR 43827 - Irish Potatoes Grown in Modoc and Siskiyou Counties, California, and in All Counties in Oregon...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ...Siskiyou Counties, California, and in All Counties in Oregon, Except Malheur County...Siskiyou Counties, California, and in all counties in Oregon, except Malheur County...at: http://www.regulations.gov. All comments submitted in response to this...

  3. Burleson County State of the Community Report 

    E-print Network

    Jiang, Ying; Thapa, Jeewasmi; Safarova, Bara

    2015-01-01

    County. Title page image courtesy of: http://www.burlesoncountytx.com State of the Community Report: Burleson County Ying Jiang | Jeewasmi Thapa | Bara Safarova 3 1. Introduction 1.1. Basic information Burleson County is located in east central... of the county. Figure 5.3: Critical facilities distribution in Burleson County (Source: Burleson County Hazard Mitigation, 2013) 5.5. Oil and gas wells and pipes The petroleum in Burleson County is embedded in the Austin...

  4. "BECAUSE SOME STORIES DO LIVE FOREVER": STEPHEN KING'S THE DARK TOWER SERIES AS MODERN ROMANCE

    E-print Network

    McMurray, Rachel Elizabeth

    2012-05-31

    Stephen King's Dark Tower series is a seven-volume work that contains elements from myths, fairy tales, American westerns, legends, popular culture, Gothic literature, and medieval romance. Few scholars have engaged with this series, most likely due...

  5. Model Driven Approach for Programme Ravinder Singh Zandu, King's College London

    E-print Network

    Lano, Kevin Charles

    Model Driven Approach for Programme Management Ravinder Singh Zandu, King's College London #12;Programme (Program) Management · According to PMI, Program Management is defined as the centralised coordinated management of a program to achieve the program's strategic objectives and benefits. · Projects

  6. Copyright: King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals; http://www.kfupm.edu.sa

    E-print Network

    El-Alfy, El-Sayed

    © Copyright: King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals; http://www.kfupm.edu.sa A Heuristic of Petroleum & Minerals http://www.kfupm.edu.sa Summary A primary goal of this paper is to develop a heuristic

  7. Automating Open Science for Big Data Merc Crosas, Gary King, James Honaker, Latanya Sweeney

    E-print Network

    1 Automating Open Science for Big Data Mercè Crosas, Gary King, James the published results. The trend towards Big Data -- including large scale streaming challenges so that the social sciences can realize the potential of Big Data. #12

  8. 76 FR 23335 - Wilderness Stewardship Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, Sequoia and Kings Canyon National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-26

    ...sekiwild. You may request to be added to the project mailing list by mailing or faxing your request to: Superintendent Karen F. Taylor-Goodrich, Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, Attn: Wilderness Stewardship Plan, 47050 Generals Highway, Three...

  9. Use of stable isotopes to assess king and Spanish mackerel groups 

    E-print Network

    Roelke, Lynn Ann

    1995-01-01

    , NMFS, Panama City, FL) for his assistance in obtaining samples. Special thanks to Barbara Palko (NMFS, Panama City, FL), for coordinating the collection from NMFS, and all the individuals at NMFS who assisted in the collection. Individuals in John... of nitrogen (A) and carbon (B) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 6 13 Fry's (1983) stable isotope data compared to this king mackerel data set. . . . . . . 5 1 14 All king mackerel sample sites are normalized to Panama City, FL. 52 LIST OF TABLES Table...

  10. The late Neoproterozoic Grassy Group of King Island, Tasmania: correlation and palaeogeographic significance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. R. Calver; M. R. Walter

    2000-01-01

    There is a very strong lithostratigraphic and ?13C-chemostratigraphic resemblance between the well-exposed diamictite–cap dolostone–shale succession on eastern King Island, and the Marinoan glacials and lowermost Wilpena Group of the Adelaide Rift Complex. The strength of the resemblance suggests original lateral continuity of sedimentation between King Island and the Adelaide Rift Complex together with the contiguous central Australian Neoproterozoic epicratonic basins.

  11. Lichen flora around the Korean Antarctic Scientific Station, King George Island, Antarctic.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hee; Ahn, In-Young; Hong, Soon Gyu; Andreev, Mikhail; Lim, Kwang-Mi; Oh, Mi Jin; Koh, Young Jin; Hur, Jae-Seoun

    2006-10-01

    As part of the long-term monitoring projects on Antarctic terrestrial vegetation in relation to global climate change, a lichen floristical survey was conducted around the Korean Antarctic Station (King Sejong Station), which is located on Barton Peninsula, King George Island, in January and February of 2006. Two hundred and twenty-five lichen specimens were collected and sixty-two lichen species in 38 genera were identified by morphological characteristics, chemical constituents, TLC analysis and ITS nucleotide sequence analysis. PMID:17082741

  12. Carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of vegetation on King George Island, maritime Antarctic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yong Il Lee; Hyoun Soo Lim; Ho Il Yoon

    2009-01-01

    We report abundance of 13C and 15N contents in terrestrial plants (mosses, lichens, liverworts, algae and grasses) from the area of Barton Peninsula (King\\u000a George Island, maritime Antarctic). The investigated plants show a wide range of ?13C and ?15N values between ?29.0 and ?20.0‰ and between ?15.3 and 22.8‰, respectively. The King George Island terrestrial plants show\\u000a species specificity of

  13. Distribution and habitat use of king rails in the Illinois and Upper Mississippi River valleys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darrah, Abigail J.; Krementz, David G.

    2009-01-01

    The migratory population of the king rail (Rallus elegans) has declined dramatically during the past 40 years, emphasizing the need to identify habitat requirements of this species to help guide conservation efforts. To assess distribution and habitat use of king rails along the Illinois and Upper Mississippi valleys, USA, we conducted repeated call-broadcast surveys at 83 locations in 2006 and 114 locations in 2007 distributed among 21 study sites. We detected king rails at 12 survey locations in 2006 and 14 locations in 2007, illustrating the limited distribution of king rails in this region. We found king rails concentrated at Clarence Cannon National Wildlife Refuge, an adjacent private Wetlands Reserve program site, and B. K. Leach Conservation Area, which were located in the Mississippi River floodplain in northeast Missouri. Using Program PRESENCE, we estimated detection probabilities and built models to identify habitat covariates that were important in king rail site occupancy. Habitat covariates included percentage of cover by tall (> 1 m) and short (<= 1 m) emergent vegetation, percentage of cover of woody vegetation, and interspersion of water and vegetation ( 2007 only) within 50 m of the survey location. Detection probability was 0.43 (SE = 0.12) in 2006 and 0.35 (SE = 0.03) in 2007 and was influenced by observer identity and percentage of cover by tall herbaceous vegetation. Site occupancy was 0.11 (SE = 0.04) in 2006 and 0.14 (SE = 0.04) in 2007 and was negatively influenced most by percentage of cover by woody vegetation. In addition, we found that interspersion of vegetation and water was positively related to occupancy in 2007. Thus, nesting king rails used wetlands that were characterized by high water-vegetation interspersion and little or no cover by woody vegetation. Our results suggest that biologists can improve king rail habitat by implementing management techniques that reduce woody cover and increase vegetation-water interspersion in wetlands.

  14. Austin-Area Hotel Map E Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

    E-print Network

    Hofmann, Hans A.

    14 35 45 42 44 36 33 37 18 19 5 11 15 13 8 6 4 10 3 A #B E Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Airport The University of Texas at Austin Undergraduate Admissions Center Southeast corner of Martin Luther King Blvd E. 4th St., 78701 512-482-8000 or 800-445-8667 9. The Club Hotel by Doubletree 1617 IH 35 at Martin

  15. Student Competition: Demographic trends around Martin Luther King Jr. Streets in United States Cities

    E-print Network

    Butler, RaeLynn

    2007-11-14

    Demographic Trends around Martin Luther King Jr. Streets in United States Cities RaeLynn Butler Haskell Indian Nations University 2007 GIS Day November 14, 2007 Introduction • Does the name of a public street provide more than just a name...? • Could a toponym actually influence socio- economic trends within a place? The objective of this research is to observe patterns in demographics collected from U.S. Census Bureau Blocks adjacent to Martin Luther King Jr. Streets (Boulevards, Lanes...

  16. Reproductive and carcass characteristics of nilgai antelope on the King Ranch

    E-print Network

    Schulze, Steve Ray

    1985-01-01

    REPRODUCTIVE AND CARCASS CHARACTERISTICS OF NILGAI ANTELOPE ON THE KING RANCH A Thesis STEVE RAY SCHULZE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of RASTER OF SC IENCE... December 1985 l1ajor Subject: Wildlife Science REPRODUCTIVE AND CARCASS CHARACTERISTICS OF NILGAI ANTELOPE ON THE KING RANCH A Thesis by STEVE RAY SCHULZE Approved as to sty ie and content by: &am H. Kie r. (Chair of Committee) Fred . Smeins...

  17. The impact of King James II on the departments of the royal household

    E-print Network

    Barclay, Andrew Peter

    1994-01-25

    Humfrey in the Bodleian, and the Royal Archives. In their various ways, Professor Aylmer, Tony Claydon, Thomas Cocke, Edward Corp, Neil Cuddy, Peter le Fevre, Mary Geiter, Mark Goldie, Arnold Hunt, Craig Rose, Jonathan Scott, Professor Speck, David... Alymer, G.E., The King's Servants. 1961. Beddard, R. (ed.), A Kingdom without a King. Oxford, 1988. Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research British Library Bloxam, J.R. (ed.), Magdalen College and James Il, 1686-1688. Oxford Historical...

  18. 75 FR 49016 - County of Greenville, S.C.-Acquisition Exemption-Greenville County Economic Development Corporation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ...Exemption--Greenville County Economic Development Corporation The County of...acquire from Greenville County Economic Development Corporation (GCEDC) approximately...See Greenville County Economic Development...

  19. The Distribution of Nearshore Fishes in Kelp and Eelgrass Communities in Prince William Sound, Alaska: Associations with Vegetation and Physical Habitat Characteristics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas A. Dean; Lewis Haldorson; David R. Laur; Stephen C. Jewett; Arny Blanchard

    2000-01-01

    The nearshore (less than 20?m depth) demersal fish community in Prince William Sound, Alaska, is dominated by Pacific cod, Gadus macrocephalus, pricklebacks (mostly Arctic shanny Stichaeus punctatus), gunnels (mostly crescent gunnels Pholis laeta), a variety of greenlings (Hexagrammidae) and sculpins (Cottidae). During summer, the spatial distribution of fishes, over scales of 100's of m to 10's of km, varied by

  20. Prediction and application of wave kinematics for near-shore structures subject to irregular seas with comparison to measured field data

    E-print Network

    Sweetman, Bert

    , predicted wave loading based on the new method is compared with full-scale measured field dataPrediction and application of wave kinematics for near-shore structures subject to irregular seas with comparison to measured field data MyoungKeun Choi, Bert Sweetman Texas A&M University Abstract A new hybrid

  1. FINDING THE SCALES OF ECOLOGICAL RESPONSE TO LANDSCAPE CHARACTER AND TRIBUTARY INPUTS TO OPEN NEARSHORE WATERS, A GREAT LAKES COAST-WIDE EXPERIENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2002 we sampled over 40 stretches of open coastline across the US portion of the Great Lakes with an equal effort planned for 2003. Sites were selected to represent an intended gradient of landscape disturbance in watersheds hydrologically-connected to nearshore waters. Half t...

  2. Habitat Use by Juvenile Chinook Salmon in the Nearshore Areas of Lake Washington: Effects of Depth, Lakeshore Development, Substrate, and Vegetation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roger A. Tabor; Kurt L. Fresh; Richard M. Piaskowski; Howard A. Gearns; Daniel B. Hayes

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in nearshore areas of Lake Washington, Washington, were studied to determine their depth distribution, substrate associations, and use of overhanging vegetation (OHV) and shoreline armoring. From March to May, juvenile Chinook salmon progressively shifted to deeper waters as they increased in size. At night, they were associated with small substrates, whereas no association with a

  3. Lake County Paratransit Survey Final Report Prepared for the Lake County Coordinated Transportation Services Committee

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Lake County Paratransit Survey Final Report Prepared for the Lake County Coordinated Transportation............................................................................25 4. Appendix A: Lake County Paratransit Survey Instrument.................................27 #12;2 Lake County Paratransit Survey Final Report Executive Summary The Urban Transportation Center

  4. A preliminary appraisal of sediment sources and transport in Kings Bay and vicinity, Georgia and Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McConnell, J.B.; Radtke, D.B.; Hale, T.W.; Buell, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    Water-quality, bottom-material, suspended-sediment, and current-velocity data were collected during November 1981 in Kings Bay and vicinity to provide information on the sources and transport of estuarine sediments. Kings Bay and Cumberland Sound , the site of the Poseidon Submarine Base in southeast Georgia, are experiencing high rates of sediment deposition and accumulation, which are causing serious navigational and operational problems. Velocity, bathymetry, turbidity, and bottom-material data suggest that the area in the vicinity of lower Kings Bay is accumulating deposits of suspended sediment transported from Cumberland Sound on the floodtide and from upper Kings Bay and the tidal marsh drained by Marianna Creek on the ebbtide. Suspended-sediment discharges computed for consecutive 13-hour ebbtides and floodtides showed that a net quantity of suspended sediment was transported seaward from upper Kings Bay and Marianna Creek. A net landward transport of suspended sediment computed at the St. Marys Entrance indicated areas seaward of St. Marys Entrance may be supplying sediment to the shoaling areas of the estuary, including lower Kings Bay. (USGS)

  5. County Business Patterns 1995

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The US Census Bureau has made available the state publications for the 1995 version of its annual County Business Patterns 1995 series (Adobe Acrobat [.pdf] format only). Data available include employment, payroll, and number of establishments by Standard Industrial Code category. Establishments are further broken down by nine employment size classes ranging from 1-4 to 1,000 or more. The US volume is forthcoming. Complete 1993 and 1994 (also .pdf format) series are available at the site.

  6. Distribution and thickness of sedimentary facies in the coastal dune, beach and nearshore sedimentary system at Maspalomas, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontán Bouzas, Angela; Alcántara-Carrió, Javier; Montoya Montes, Isabel; Barranco Ojeda, Andrés; Albarracín, Silvia; Rey Díaz de Rada, Jorge; Rey Salgado, Jorge

    2013-04-01

    Numerous studies have shown that most beaches and coastal dune systems of the world are currently eroding but very few have investigated the combined sediment budgets of subaerial and nearshore submarine systems. In the case of the dune field of the Maspalomas Natural Special Reserve (in the south of Gran Canaria), the adjacent Maspalomas and El Inglés beaches and the adjacent submarine platform, the sediment budgets have been severely affected by erosion over the past few decades. The objectives of this study were to investigate the availability of sand within the modern sedimentary system, including the coastal dunes, the beaches and the submerged shelf, but also to assess local sediment sinks. An isopach map generated on the basis of topo-bathymetric data and seismic-reflection profiles revealed that sediment thickness varies from 0-22 m in the study area. Expanses of relatively low sediment thickness were identified in the south-western sector of the coastal dune field along Maspalomas beach, and in the nearshore region to the south of this beach. These localized sediment-deficit areas earmark Maspalomas beach as the most vulnerable shore strip threatened by erosion. The shallow seismic data also revealed that the submarine platform south of Maspalomas represents a marine terrace cut into an ancient alluvial fan, thus documenting an influence of the geomorphological heritage on the present-day morphodynamics. A side-scan sonar mosaic of this nearshore platform enabled the delimitation of areas covered by rock, boulders and gravel, vegetated sand patches and a mobile sand facies, the latter including ripple and megaripple fields. The megaripple field in a valley close to the talus of the marine terrace has been identified as a major sediment sink of the Maspalomas sedimentary system. It is fed by south-westerly storm-wave events. The sediment deficit in the coastal dune field and along Maspalomas beach can therefore only be explained by a currently faster loss of sediment to an offshore sink than can be compensated by the supply of sand from outside the system.

  7. Video Based Observations of Event-Driven Behavior of Double Barred Nearshore Bathymetry at Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, S. W.; Adams, P. N.; Plant, N. G.; MacKenzie, R. A.; Jaeger, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    The link between external forcing (i.e. waves, tides) and nearshore geomorphology has been extensively studied along bathymetrically simple coasts, resulting in models that tie geomorphic response to physical processes. However, the mechanisms controlling nearshore beach and bar morphodynamics are poorly understood when spatial complexities, such as inner shelf shoals, are present. At Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Cape Canaveral, Florida, a series of surfzone sand bars occur in an area that also includes shore-oblique storm ridges as well as cape-associated shoals. These features transform the incoming deep-water swell, redistributing the spatial pattern of wave energy delivery alongshore. The resulting longshore sediment transport gradients cause erosional hotspots to emerge under specific offshore wave conditions. Further, the deep-water wave climate itself varies in magnitude between typical winter (monthly mean HS = ~2 m) and summer (monthly mean HS = ~1 m) conditions as well as individual storm events (hourly mean HS up to 10 m) lasting hours or days. An autonomous camera has been collecting hourly beach images at KSC since April 2010. Georectified images are used to observe beach and sandbar morphology and have been compared to monthly differential GPS surveys to calibrate the camera-derived spatial measurements and quantify potential systematic errors. Comparison of extracted hourly shoreline and bar positions and their movement reveal that the nearshore bathymetry responds to varied forcing over both seasonal (months to years) and event (hours to days) time scales. A stable double bar system with ~25 to 50 m spacing between crests was found over the observation period, even in response to large (hourly mean HS = ~5 m) deep-water wave events and typically elevated winter waves (monthly mean HS = ~2 m). The shoreline responded to inner bar oscillations with in-phase movement of the same magnitude. The outer bar migrated further shoreward than the inner bar (~100 m versus ~50 m cross-shore fluctuations) and repeatedly, albeit temporarily, welded to the inner bar. Interestingly, the alongshore location of these welds tends to coincide with a dune overwash area that has been a critical erosion hotspot over the last decade. This finding suggests that the bars control onshore morphology by 1) focusing wave energy to provide consistent wave break locations and/or 2) interrupting alongshore currents between the bars that transport sediment. The association of these bar patterns and the larger-scale offshore features will be discussed.

  8. The nearshore zone during coastal upwelling: Daily variability and coupling between primary and secondary production off central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, William T.; Arcos, Dagoberto F.; McManus, George B.; Dam, Hans; Bellantoni, Diane; Johnson, Thomas; Tiselius, Peter

    The nearshore region of central Chile is important for spawning of sardine ( Sardinops sagax) anchovy ( Engraulis ringens) and jack mackerel ( Trachurus murphyii) and the importance of fisheries for these species has led to an interest in factors controlling the area's productivity. We studied daily variations in productivity at a nearshore station (25m depth) off Dichato, Chile (36°30?S) during January 1986 to understand how wind-driven variability in the hydrography is translated into pulses of primary and secondary production of the plankton. During the study period, we observed three complete cycles of upwelling favourable/unfavourable winds. Water column destratification, as indicated by the surface-to-bottom gradient of sigma-t, lagged the wind by about one day. During active upwelling, cold water (<11.5°C) of high nitrate and low oxygen concentration (20-25?M and 1-2ml 1 -1 respectively) was found near the surface. During subsequent relaxation of upwelling, the water column became stratified as temperature, oxygen and chlorophyll increased. The size and taxonomic composition of the phytoplankton varied from one event to the next. Over the course of the study, from 15-100% of the chlorophyll could pass a 20?m mesh screen. Chain-forming diatoms, microflagellates, and the autotrophic ciliate Mesodinium rubrum dominated the first, second and third events, respectively. In rank order of abundance, Paracalanus parvus, Centropages brachiatus, Oithona spp., Acartia tonsa, Oncaea spp., Calanoides patagoniensis and Calanus chilensis dominated the copepod community. Changes in abundance of most species did not closely follow the upwelling cycle. Possibly, vertical movements or other behavioural responses caused zooplankton distributions to be uncorrelated with movements of the surface Ekman layer. Fecundity of several of the important copepod species was measured using the egg ratio and bottle incubation techniques. Compared to values reported in the literature, egg production was usually suboptimal, despite high nutritional quality of the phytoplankton, as indicated by protein/carbohydrate ratios. Food availability, due to either small phytoplankton size or spatial and temporal uncoupling of phyto- and zooplankton populations, was probably most important in limiting copepod production. Event-scale advection, both zonal and alongshore, can be important in uncoupling primary and secondary production and probably determines the degree to which upwelling-generated pulses of phytoplankton production are utilized by herbivorous plankton in the nearshore zone.

  9. Identification of the remains of King Richard III

    PubMed Central

    King, Turi E.; Fortes, Gloria Gonzalez; Balaresque, Patricia; Thomas, Mark G.; Balding, David; Delser, Pierpaolo Maisano; Neumann, Rita; Parson, Walther; Knapp, Michael; Walsh, Susan; Tonasso, Laure; Holt, John; Kayser, Manfred; Appleby, Jo; Forster, Peter; Ekserdjian, David; Hofreiter, Michael; Schürer, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, a skeleton was excavated at the presumed site of the Grey Friars friary in Leicester, the last-known resting place of King Richard III. Archaeological, osteological and radiocarbon dating data were consistent with these being his remains. Here we report DNA analyses of both the skeletal remains and living relatives of Richard III. We find a perfect mitochondrial DNA match between the sequence obtained from the remains and one living relative, and a single-base substitution when compared with a second relative. Y-chromosome haplotypes from male-line relatives and the remains do not match, which could be attributed to a false-paternity event occurring in any of the intervening generations. DNA-predicted hair and eye colour are consistent with Richard’s appearance in an early portrait. We calculate likelihood ratios for the non-genetic and genetic data separately, and combined, and conclude that the evidence for the remains being those of Richard III is overwhelming. PMID:25463651

  10. Medical students’ assessment preferences at King Faisal University, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Tarek Tawfik; Kaliyadan, Feroze; Al-Muhaidib, Nouria Saab

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the preferred methods for assessment among medical students at both preclinical and clinical stages of medical education and the possible correlates that promote these preferences. Subjects and methods All medical students from the third year onwards were surveyed. A self-administered anonymous questionnaire was designed to gather information on the preferred assessment method for course achievement. The preferred methods were also evaluated in relation to cognitive functions. Preference for specific exam format, in the form of multiple choices, short essay questions, or both, and the stated reasons for that preference, was also included in the questionnaire. Results Out of 310 questionnaires distributed, 238 were returned. Written tests, projects, portfolios, and take home exams were the preferred modes for assessing students’ achievements in a course; oral tests including a viva voce were the least preferred type of assessment. Questions that tested the domains of ‘understanding’ and ‘application’ were the most preferred type while those entailing ‘analysis’ were the least preferred. Multiple choice question format was the most preferred type of question (68.7%) at both pre- and clinical stages. Conclusion Students’ assessments at the College of Medicine, King Faisal University, Saudi Arabia, do not use the full range of cognitive domains. The emphasis on higher domains for medical students’ assessment incorporating critical thinking should increase as the students’ progress through their medical courses. PMID:23745080

  11. Maternal telomere length inheritance in the king penguin.

    PubMed

    Reichert, S; Rojas, E R; Zahn, S; Robin, J-P; Criscuolo, F; Massemin, S

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres are emerging as a biomarker for ageing and survival, and are likely important in shaping life-history trade-offs. In particular, telomere length with which one starts in life has been linked to lifelong survival, suggesting that early telomere dynamics are somehow related to life-history trajectories. This result highlights the importance of determining the extent to which telomere length is inherited, as a crucial factor determining early life telomere length. Given the scarcity of species for which telomere length inheritance has been studied, it is pressing to assess the generality of telomere length inheritance patterns. Further, information on how this pattern changes over the course of growth in individuals living under natural conditions should provide some insight on the extent to which environmental constraints also shape telomere dynamics. To fill this gap partly, we followed telomere inheritance in a population of king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus). We tested for paternal and maternal influence on chick initial telomere length (10 days old after hatching), and how these relationships changed with chick age (at 70, 200 and 300 days old). Based on a correlative approach, offspring telomere length was positively associated with maternal telomere length early in life (at 10 days old). However, this relationship was not significant at older ages. These data suggest that telomere length in birds is maternally inherited. Nonetheless, the influence of environmental conditions during growth remained an important factor shaping telomere length, as the maternal link disappeared with chicks' age. PMID:25052413

  12. Cocktail-party effect in king penguin colonies

    PubMed Central

    Aubin, T.; Jouventin, P.

    1998-01-01

    The king penguin, Aptenodytes patagonicus, breeds without a nest in colonies of several thousands of birds. To be fed, the chick must recognize the parents in a particularly noisy environment using only vocal cues. The call an adult makes when seeking the chick is emitted at a high amplitude level. Nevertheless, it is transmitted in a colonial context involving the noise generated by the colony and the screening effect of the bodies, both factors reducing the signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, the adult call is masked by a background noise with similar amplitude and spectral and temporal characteristics, enhancing the difficulty for the chick in finding its parents. We calculate that the maximum distance from the caller at which its signal can be differentiated from the background noise (signal-to-noise ratio equal to 1) should not exceed 8 to 9 m in a feeding area. But our tests show that, in fact, chicks can discriminate between the parental call and calls from other adults at a greater distance, even when call intensity is well below that of the noise of simultaneous calls produced by other adults. This capacity to perceive and extract the call of the parent from the ambient noise and particularly from the calls of other adults, termed the 'cocktail-party effect' in speech intelligibility tests, enhances the chick's ability to find its parents.

  13. Magnetometry at Uruk (Iraq): The city of King Gilgamesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassbinder, J.; Becker, H.; van Ess, M.

    2003-04-01

    Uruk (Tell Warka) is one of the most famous sites for the early cultural development at Mesopotamia. The Sumerian city state was also important for the origin of writing and Uruk was the scene of action of mans oldest epic, the famous Epic of Gilgamesh (2600 B.C). During the time of the Sassanides, 400 A.D. the city was given up completely. Today the ruin is dominated by shallow hills and wadis, covered by pottery, mudbricks and slags. The area is totally free of modern buildings and far away from the modern village of Warka. Therefore it is an ideal place for uncompensated cesium magnetometry. The most sensational find was the discovery of a canal system inside the city. Furthermore the magnetogram shows the remains of buildings of the Babylonian type as well as garden structures, a middle Babylonian graveyard and the so called "New Years Temple" of the God Anu or Godess Ischtar. The city wall, which we prospected in a length of more than one kilometer, includes a water gate and is nearly 40 meters broad. From magnetometry it is evident that it was build by burned mudbricks as it was described by the Epic. In the west of the "New Years Temple" in the middle of the former Euphrates river we detected the remains of a building which may be interpreted as a burial. But if this building is the grave of the famous King Gilgamesh as it was described by the Epic of Gilgamesh it must remain speculative.

  14. Identification of the remains of King Richard III.

    PubMed

    King, Turi E; Fortes, Gloria Gonzalez; Balaresque, Patricia; Thomas, Mark G; Balding, David; Maisano Delser, Pierpaolo; Neumann, Rita; Parson, Walther; Knapp, Michael; Walsh, Susan; Tonasso, Laure; Holt, John; Kayser, Manfred; Appleby, Jo; Forster, Peter; Ekserdjian, David; Hofreiter, Michael; Schürer, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, a skeleton was excavated at the presumed site of the Grey Friars friary in Leicester, the last-known resting place of King Richard III. Archaeological, osteological and radiocarbon dating data were consistent with these being his remains. Here we report DNA analyses of both the skeletal remains and living relatives of Richard III. We find a perfect mitochondrial DNA match between the sequence obtained from the remains and one living relative, and a single-base substitution when compared with a second relative. Y-chromosome haplotypes from male-line relatives and the remains do not match, which could be attributed to a false-paternity event occurring in any of the intervening generations. DNA-predicted hair and eye colour are consistent with Richard's appearance in an early portrait. We calculate likelihood ratios for the non-genetic and genetic data separately, and combined, and conclude that the evidence for the remains being those of Richard III is overwhelming. PMID:25463651

  15. Nonshivering thermogenesis and adaptation to fasting in king penguin chicks.

    PubMed

    Duchamp, C; Barre, H; Delage, D; Rouanet, J L; Cohen-Adad, F; Minaire, Y

    1989-10-01

    The ability to develop nonshivering thermogenesis (NST) and the effect of fasting on thermogenic response to cold were studied in winter-acclimatized king penguin chicks. Metabolic rate (MR) and integrated electrical muscle activity were measured at different ambient temperatures. In cold-acclimatized (5 degrees C) fed chicks, shivering threshold temperature (STT) was 9.4 degrees C lower than lower critical temperature (LCT), indicating that NST (0.7 W/kg) occurs at moderate cold, whereas in control chicks fed and reared at 25 degrees C for 3 wk, LCT and STT were similar. Chicks reared in the cold and fasting for 3 wk or 4-5 mo (natural winter fast) developed an NST of 0.8 and 2.4 W/kg, respectively, despite the fast. In fasting chicks, the intercept of the metabolic curve with the abscissa at zero MR was far below body temperature, contrasting with the classic model for heat loss. Their low LCT indicates the capacity of a large reduction in convective conductance characteristic of diving animals and allows energy sparing in moderate cold. Below LCT, conductance reincreases progressively, leading to a steeper than expected slope of the metabolic curve and allowing preservation of a threshold temperature in the shell. These results show for the first time in a wild young bird the development of NST after cold acclimatization. Further, at the temperature of cold acclimatization, an energy-sparing mechanism is shown in response to long-term fast adaptation. PMID:2801995

  16. Sources of land-derived runoff to a coral reef-fringed embayment identified using geochemical tracers in nearshore sediment traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takesue, Renee K.; Bothner, Michael H.; Reynolds, Richard L.

    2009-11-01

    Geochemical tracers, including Ba, Co, Th, 7Be, 137Cs and 210Pb, and magnetic properties were used to characterize terrestrial runoff collected in nearshore time-series sediment traps in Hanalei Bay, Kauai, during flood and dry conditions in summer 2006, and to fingerprint possible runoff sources in the lower watershed. In combination, the tracers indicate that runoff during a flood in August could have come from cultivated taro fields bordering the lower reach of the river. Land-based runoff associated with summer floods may have a greater impact on coral reef communities in Hanalei Bay than in winter because sediment persists for several months. During dry periods, sediment carried by the Hanalei River appears to have been mobilized primarily by undercutting of low 7Be, low 137Cs riverbanks composed of soil weathered from tholeiitic basalt with low Ba and Co concentrations. Following a moderate rainfall event in September, high 7Be sediment carried by the Hanalei River was probably mobilized by overland flow in the upper watershed. Ba-desorption in low-salinity coastal water limited its use to a qualitative runoff tracer in nearshore sediment. 210Pb had limited usefulness as a terrestrial tracer in the nearshore due to a large dissolved oceanic source and scavenging onto resuspended bottom sediment. 210Pb-scavenging does, however, illustrate the role resuspension could play in the accumulation of particle-reactive contaminants in nearshore sediment. Co and 137Cs were not affected by desorption or geochemical scavenging and showed the greatest potential as quantitative sediment provenance indicators in material collected in nearshore sediment traps.

  17. Development of a Hydrodynamic and Transport model of Bellingham Bay in Support of Nearshore Habitat Restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Taiping; Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang

    2010-04-22

    In this study, a hydrodynamic model based on the unstructured-grid finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) was developed for Bellingham Bay, Washington. The model simulates water surface elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity in a three-dimensional domain that covers the entire Bellingham Bay and adjacent water bodies, including Lummi Bay, Samish Bay, Padilla Bay, and Rosario Strait. The model was developed using Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s high-resolution Puget Sound and Northwest Straits circulation and transport model. A sub-model grid for Bellingham Bay and adjacent coastal waters was extracted from the Puget Sound model and refined in Bellingham Bay using bathymetric light detection and ranging (LIDAR) and river channel cross-section data. The model uses tides, river inflows, and meteorological inputs to predict water surface elevations, currents, salinity, and temperature. A tidal open boundary condition was specified using standard National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predictions. Temperature and salinity open boundary conditions were specified based on observed data. Meteorological forcing (wind, solar radiation, and net surface heat flux) was obtained from NOAA real observations and National Center for Environmental Prediction North American Regional Analysis outputs. The model was run in parallel with 48 cores using a time step of 2.5 seconds. It took 18 hours of cpu time to complete 26 days of simulation. The model was calibrated with oceanographic field data for the period of 6/1/2009 to 6/26/2009. These data were collected specifically for the purpose of model development and calibration. They include time series of water-surface elevation, currents, temperature, and salinity as well as temperature and salinity profiles during instrument deployment and retrieval. Comparisons between model predictions and field observations show an overall reasonable agreement in both temporal and spatial scales. Comparisons of root mean square error values for surface elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity time series are 0.11 m, 0.10 m/s, 1.28oC, and 1.91 ppt, respectively. The model was able to reproduce the salinity and temperature stratifications inside Bellingham Bay. Wetting and drying processes in tidal flats in Bellingham Bay, Samish Bay, and Padilla Bay were also successfully simulated. Both model results and observed data indicated that water surface elevations inside Bellingham Bay are highly correlated to tides. Circulation inside the bay is weak and complex and is affected by various forcing mechanisms, including tides, winds, freshwater inflows, and other local forcing factors. The Bellingham Bay model solution was successfully linked to the NOAA oil spill trajectory simulation model “General NOAA Operational Modeling Environment (GNOME).” Overall, the Bellingham Bay model has been calibrated reasonably well and can be used to provide detailed hydrodynamic information in the bay and adjacent water bodies. While there is room for further improvement with more available data, the calibrated hydrodynamic model provides useful hydrodynamic information in Bellingham Bay and can be used to support sediment transport and water quality modeling as well as assist in the design of nearshore restoration scenarios.

  18. Heritage Awareness in County Wicklow

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Dagg

    2008-01-01

    This research project investigated the community’s current level of heritage awareness in County Wicklow. The study was initiated by Wicklow County Council and the Heritage Council in response to objective 1, action 1.2 of the County Wicklow heritage plan 2004-2008, which pointed to the need to undertake a study to determine public attitudes towards heritage and to gauge the current

  19. Retrofit Savings for Brazos County 

    E-print Network

    Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Shao, X.; Claridge, D. E.

    2001-01-01

    &M University System BRAZOS COUNTY SumarySav2000m.xls 10/23/2001 BRAZOS COUNTY SumarySav2000(kW)m.xls 10/23/2001 Summary of energy savings from May 2000 to April 2001 Individual Reports BRAZOS COUNTY ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Texas Engineering Experiment Station... ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University System SummaryModeling.xls 10/20/01 Summary of the electricity use and demand final modeling for Brazos County ...

  20. Digital Atlas of Texas Counties

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Created by the Center for Geosptial Technology at Texas Tech University, this digital atlas is a fantastic find. It brings together information about all of Texas's counties, including satellite relief maps and data sets about the roads, rivers, lakes, and other features in each area. Visitors can use the interactive map to click on a county of interest, or use the drop down menu to select a region. Once users select a county, they can download information about it for future use. The site also contains a number of Featured Links to resources from the U.S. Census Bureau, the Texas Association of Counties, and several tourism agencies.

  1. 7 CFR 301.52-2a - Regulated areas; suppressive and generally infested areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...area. Fresno County. The entire county. Kern County. The entire county. Kings County. The entire county. Madera County. The entire county. Merced County. The entire county. San Benito County. The entire county....

  2. Bull. U S. F.C.1889.-(To faca page 363.) Smith. King Crab Fishery. PLATECXXI. 19.-NOTES ON THE KING-CRAB FISHERY OF DELAWARE BAY.

    E-print Network

    vitality of which is low or has been exhausted. The king-crab, therefore, notwithstanding it has the crabs seek the sandy shores in Pairs, the male riding on the back of the female ; SOmetim08, however of the tides on the movements of crabs has come to bo fully realized. The wind is also held to increase

  3. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Near-shore Wave Fields: Model Generation Validation and Evaluation - Kaneohe Bay HI.

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01

    The numerical model, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore) , was used to simulate wave conditions in Kaneohe Bay, HI in order to determine the effects of wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices on the propagation of waves into shore. A nested SWAN model was validated then used to evaluate a range of initial wave conditions: significant wave heights (H s ) , peak periods (T p ) , and mean wave directions ( MWD) . Differences between wave height s in the presence and absence of WEC device s were assessed at locations in shore of the WEC array. The maximum decrease in wave height due to the WEC s was predicted to be approximately 6% at 5 m and 10 m water depths. Th is occurred for model initiation parameters of H s = 3 m (for 5 m water depth) or 4 m (10 m water depth) , T p = 10 s, and MWD = 330deg . Subsequently, bottom orbital velocities were found to decrease by about 6%.

  4. Intertidal and nearshore Nereididae (Annelida) of the Falkland Islands, southwestern Atlantic, including a new species of Gymnonereis

    PubMed Central

    Darbyshire, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The intertidal and nearshore Nereididae of the Falkland Islands are detailed and a new species of Gymnonereis described. The new species, Gymnonereis tenera sp. n., is the first record of the genus for the Falkland Islands. It is, so far, only known from a few intertidal locations in fine and muddy sands. Main distinguishing characters are: jaw teeth absent (in adults), 3 papillae in Area V–VI, falcigers absent, second ventral cirrus present throughout. Nereis atlantica McIntosh, 1885, known only from the description of a single specimen and one doubtful record from the Falkland Islands, is reviewed and transferred to Perinereis on the basis of the presence of shield-shaped bars in Area VI of the proboscis and the absence of notopodial falcigers. A key to all seven species discussed is provided. PMID:25147465

  5. Intertidal and nearshore Nereididae (Annelida) of the Falkland Islands, southwestern Atlantic, including a new species of Gymnonereis.

    PubMed

    Darbyshire, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The intertidal and nearshore Nereididae of the Falkland Islands are detailed and a new species of Gymnonereis described. The new species, Gymnonereis tenera sp. n., is the first record of the genus for the Falkland Islands. It is, so far, only known from a few intertidal locations in fine and muddy sands. Main distinguishing characters are: jaw teeth absent (in adults), 3 papillae in Area V-VI, falcigers absent, second ventral cirrus present throughout. Nereis atlantica McIntosh, 1885, known only from the description of a single specimen and one doubtful record from the Falkland Islands, is reviewed and transferred to Perinereis on the basis of the presence of shield-shaped bars in Area VI of the proboscis and the absence of notopodial falcigers. A key to all seven species discussed is provided. PMID:25147465

  6. Hydrogeologic framework, groundwater movement, and water budget in the Puyallup River Watershed and vicinity, Pierce and King Counties, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, Wendy B.; Johnson, Kenneth H.; Savoca, Mark E.; Lane, Ron C.; Fasser, Elisabeth T.; Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Marshall, Cameron; Clothier, Burt G.; Knoedler, Eric N.

    2015-01-01

    The water-budget area received about 1,428,000 acre-feet or about 52 inches of precipitation per year (January 1, 2011, to December 31, 2012). About 41 percent of precipitation enters the groundwater system as recharge. Seven percent of this recharge is withdrawn from wells and the remainder leaves the groundwater system as discharge to rivers, discharge to springs, or submarine discharge to Puget Sound, or exits the study area through subsurface flow in the Green River valley.

  7. Geologic Map of Northeastern Seattle (Part of the Seattle North 7.5' x 15' Quadrangle), King County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Booth, Derek B.; Troost, Kathy Goetz; Shimel, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    This geologic map, approximately coincident with the east half of the Seattle North 7.5 x 15' quadrangle (herein, informally called the 'Seattle NE map'), covers nearly half of the City of Seattle and reaches from Lake Washington across to the Puget Sound shoreline. Land uses are mainly residential, but extensive commercial districts are located in the Northgate neighborhood, adjacent to the University of Washington, and along the corridors of Aurora Avenue North and Lake City Way. Industrial activity is concentrated along the Lake Washington Ship Canal and around Lake Union. One small piece of land outside of the quadrangle boundaries, at the west edge of the Bellevue North quadrangle, is included on this map for geographic continuity. Conversely, a small area in the northeast corner of the Seattle North quadrangle, on the eastside of Lake Washington, is excluded from this map. Within the boundaries of the map area are two large urban lakes, including the most heavily visited park in the State of Washington (Green Lake Park); a stream (Thornton Creek) that still hosts anadromous salmon despite having its headwaters in a golfcourse and a shopping center; parts of three cities, with a combined residential population of about 300,000 people; and the region's premier research institution, the University of Washington. The north boundary of the map is roughly NE 168th Street in the cities of Shoreline and Lake Forest Park, and the south boundary corresponds to Mercer Street in Seattle. The west boundary is 15th Avenue W (and NW), and the east boundary is formed by Lake Washington. Elevations range from sea level to a maximum of 165 m (541 ft), the latter on a broad till-covered knob in the city of Shoreline near the northwest corner of the map. Previous geologic maps of this area include those of Waldron and others (1962), Galster and Laprade (1991), and Yount and others (1993). Seattle lies within the Puget Lowland, an elongate structural and topographic basin between the Cascade Range and Olympic Mountains. The Seattle area has been glaciated repeatedly during the past two million years by coalescing glaciers that advanced southward from British Columbia. The landscape we see today was molded by cyclic glacial scouring and deposition and later modified by landsliding and stream erosion. The last ice sheet reached the central Puget Sound region about 14,500 years ago, as measured by 14C dating, and it had retreated from this area by 13,650 14C yr B.P. (equivalent calendar years are about 17,600 and 16,600 years ago; Porter and Swanson, 1998). Seattle now sits atop a complex and incomplete succession of interleaved glacial and nonglacial deposits that overlie an irregular bedrock surface. These glacial and nonglacial deposits vary laterally in both texture and thickness, and they contain many local unconformities. In addition, they have been deformed by faults and folds, at least as recently as 1,100 years ago, and this deformation further complicates the geologic record. The landforms and near-surface deposits that cover much of the Seattle NE map area record a relatively brief, recent interval of the region's geologic history. The topography is dominated in the north by a broad, fluted, and south-sloping upland plateau, which gives way to a more complex set of elongated hills in the map's southern half. The valleys of Pipers Creek, Green Lake, and Thornton Creek mark the transition between these two topographic areas. Most of the uplands are mantled by a rolling surface of sand (unit Qva) and till (unit Qvt) deposited during the last occupation of the Puget Lowland by a continental ice sheet. Beneath these ice sheet deposits is a complex succession of older sediments that extends far below sea level across most of the map area. These older sediments are now locally exposed where modern erosion and landslides have sliced through the edge of the upland, and where subglacial processes apparently left these older sedimen

  8. Developing local board of health guidelines to promote healthy food access - King County, Washington, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Emilee; Johnson, Donna B; Krieger, James; MacDougall, Erin; Payne, Elizabeth; Chan, Nadine L

    2015-01-01

    Policies that change environments are important tools for preventing chronic diseases, including obesity. Boards of health often have authority to adopt such policies, but few do so. This study assesses 1) how one local board of health developed a policy approach for healthy food access through vending machine guidelines (rather than regulations) and 2) the impact of the approach. Using a case study design guided by "three streams" policy theory and RE-AIM, we analyzed data from a focus group, interviews, and policy documents. The guidelines effectively supported institutional policy development in several settings. Recognition of the problem of chronic disease and the policy solution of vending machine guidelines created an opening for the board to influence nutrition environments. Institutions identified a need for support in adopting vending machine policies. Communities could benefit from the study board's approach to using nonregulatory evidence-based guidelines as a policy tool. PMID:25927606

  9. 75 FR 53735 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on East Lake Sammamish Master Plan Trail in King County, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ...starting at Gilman Boulevard in Issaquah, Washington and ending at Bear Creek Trail in Redmond, Washington. Those actions grant licenses...side of Lake Sammamish from Gilman Boulevard in Issaquah, WA to Bear Creek Trail in Redmond, WA. The project will be an...

  10. Preliminary Results of Light Transmission under Residential Piers in Lake Washington, King County, Washington: A Comparison between Prisms and Grating

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Perry F. Gayaldo; Kitty Nelson

    2006-01-01

    During the summers of 2003 and 2004, 11 piers (two public and nine private) were evaluated for their ability to transmit light through the decking to the water surface below. Solid decking produces distinct shading that migrating juvenile Chinook salmon appear to avoid by swimming into deeper water where more potential predators live. Two new types of surface treatments (acrylic

  11. Accumulation and bioconcentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a nearshore estuarine environment near a Pensacola (Florida) creosote contamination site.

    PubMed

    Elder, J F; Dresler, P V

    1988-01-01

    Long-term accumulation of creosote wastes at a wood-preserving facility near Pensacola, Florida, has produced high levels of organic contamination of groundwaters near Pensacola Bay. Impacts of this contamination on the nearshore environment of the bay were examined by analysis of water, sediment and tissues of two mollusc species. One of the species (Thais haemastoma) was native to the study area. Individuals of the other test species (Crassostrea virginica) were placed in cages at the test sites for a 6-week period. Contamination at the nearshore estuarine sites was assessed by comparison to a control site in an uncontaminated area of the bay, as well as a small stream which forms a direct surface-water link between the creosote storage ponds and the bay. The study focused on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), the primary components of creosote. Very little PAH in water or in the surface layer of estuarine sediments was detected, despite heavy pollution of the stream sediments. This is attributed to various degradation processes which attack the PAH compounds once they discharge into the estuary, and to the likelihood of intermittent and localised release of contaminants to the estuary. Examination of sediment cores and mollusc tissues, which provide a record integrated over time and space, revealed some accumulation of a few PAH, notably fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene and phenanthrene. In the sediments, the highest concentrations of these compounds appeared below the surface, within a depth range of 8-13 cm. Bioaccumulation of fluoranthene, pyrene and phenanthrene in both mollusc species was up to ten times greater at test sites than at the control site. This contrasts with naphthalene, the bioaccumulation of which was no greater at test sites than at the control site. These differences in bioaccumulation factors relate to structural chemistry of the compounds which control their solubility, bioavailability, susceptibility to degradation and capacity for depuration by the organism. PMID:15092667

  12. Cross-shelf transport into nearshore waters due to shoaling internal tides in San Pedro Bay, CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, Marlene A.; Burt Jones; Peter Hamilton; Xu, Jingping; George Robertson; Leslie Rosenfeld; John Largier

    2009-01-01

    In the summer of 2001, a coastal ocean measurement program in the southeastern portion of San Pedro Bay, CA, was designed and carried out. One aim of the program was to determine the strength and effectiveness of local cross-shelf transport processes. A particular objective was to assess the ability of semidiurnal internal tidal currents to move suspended material a net distance across the shelf. Hence, a dense array of moorings was deployed across the shelf to monitor the transport patterns associated with fluctuations in currents, temperature and salinity. An associated hydrographic program periodically monitored synoptic changes in the spatial patterns of temperature, salinity, nutrients and bacteria. This set of measurements show that a series of energetic internal tides can, but do not always, transport subthermocline water, dissolved and suspended material from the middle of the shelf into the surfzone. Effective cross-shelf transport occurs only when (1) internal tides at the shelf break are strong and (2) subtidal currents flow strongly downcoast. The subtidal downcoast flow causes isotherms to tilt upward toward the coast, which allows energetic, nonlinear internal tidal currents to carry subthermocline waters into the surfzone. During these events, which may last for several days, the transported water remains in the surfzone until the internal tidal current pulses and/or the downcoast subtidal currents disappear. This nonlinear internal tide cross-shelf transport process was capable of carrying water and the associated suspended or dissolved material from the mid-shelf into the surfzone, but there were no observation of transport from the shelf break into the surfzone. Dissolved nutrients and suspended particulates (such as phytoplankton) transported from the mid-shelf into the nearshore region by nonlinear internal tides may contribute to nearshore algal blooms, including harmful algal blooms that occur off local beaches.

  13. Middle Jurassic incised valley fill (eolian/estuarine) and nearshore marine petroleum reservoirs, Powder River basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlbrandt, T.S. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Fox, J.E. [South Dakota School of Mines, Rapid City, SD (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Paleovalleys incised into the Triassic Spearfish Formation (Chugwater equivalent) are filled with a vertical sequence of eolian, estuarine, and marine sandstones of the Middle Jurassic (Bathonian age) Canyon Springs Sandstone Member of the Sundance Formation. An outcrop exemplifying this is located at Red Canyon in the southern Black Hills, Fall River County, South Dakota. These paleovalleys locally have more than 300 ft of relief and are as much as several miles wide. Because they slope in a westerly direction, and Jurassic seas transgressed into the area from the west there was greater marine-influence and more stratigraphic complexity in the subsurface, to the west, as compared to the Black Hills outcrops. In the subsurface two distinctive reservoir sandstone beds within the Canyon Springs Sandstone Member fill the paleovalleys. These are the eolian lower Canyon Springs unit (LCS) and the estuarine upper Canyon Springs unit (UCS), separated by the marine {open_quotes}Limestone Marker{close_quotes} and estuarine {open_quotes}Brown Shale{close_quotes}. The LCS and UCS contain significant proven hydrocarbon reservoirs in Wyoming (about 500 MMBO in-place in 9 fields, 188 MMBO produced through 1993) and are prospective in western South Dakota, western Nebraska and northern Colorado. Also prospective is the Callovian-age Hulett Sandstone Member which consists of multiple prograding shoreface to foreshore parasequences, as interpreted from the Red Canyon locality. Petrographic, outcrop and subsurface studies demonstrate the viability of both the Canyon Springs Sandstone and Hulett Sandstone members as superior hydrocarbon reservoirs in both stratigraphic and structural traps. Examples of fields with hydrocarbon production from the Canyon Springs in paleovalleys include Lance Creek field (56 MMBO produced) and the more recently discovered Red Bird field (300 MBO produced), both in Niobrara County, Wyoming.

  14. Taiwan Nantou County earthquake 0327 Taiwan Nantou County earthquake

    E-print Network

    Taiwan Nantou County earthquake 20130327 1 #12;0327 Taiwan Nantou County earthquake Source, Intensity 5 #12;I II III IV V VI VII Intensity Shake map of the March 27 Earthquake The peak ground and Technology Center for Disaster Reduction (NCDR) #12;Earthquake Response and Evacuation are a Part of Students

  15. Rosebud County Secondary Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    prevalence (Heart Attack) 4.6% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 472.3 (Region 1) 455.5 543.2 1 Community County1 Montana1,2 Nation2 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3. Unintentional Injuries** 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Rosebud County Secondary Data Analysis

  16. Orange County Medical Association Headquarters

    E-print Network

    Cramer, Karina

    Anaphylaxis" Michael Ritter, MD Mission Hospital and Medical Center Assistant Clinical Professor UniversityOrange County Medical Association Headquarters 17322 Murphy Avenue Irvine, CA 92614 happelbaum@ocma.org 949) 398-8100 In partnership with the Orange County Medical Association and the UC Irvine School

  17. Treasure County Secondary Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    of Death County1 Montana1,2 Nation2 1. Cancer 2. Cerebrovascular Disease 3. Heart Disease, Pneumonia, CLRD* 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Treasure County Dept of Health and Human Services (2010) 2 Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National

  18. This is an electronic version of an article published as King, B.H. and R.B. King. 1994. Sex ratio manipulation in response to host size in the parasitoid wasp Spalangia

    E-print Network

    King, Bethia H.

    ratio manipulation in response to host size in the parasitoid wasp Spalangia cameroni: is it adaptive? Behavioral Ecology 5:448-454. Sex ratio manipulation in response to host size in the parasitoid wasp, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115-2861 USA Running title: King and King _ Parasitoid wasp sex

  19. King penguin population on Macquarie Island recovers ancient DNA diversity after heavy exploitation in historic times

    PubMed Central

    Heupink, Tim H.; van den Hoff, John; Lambert, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Historically, king penguin populations on Macquarie Island have suffered greatly from human exploitation. Two large colonies on the island were drastically reduced to a single small colony as a result of harvesting for the blubber oil industry. However, recent conservation efforts have resulted in the king penguin population expanding in numbers and range to recolonize previous as well as new sites. Ancient DNA methods were used to estimate past genetic diversity and combined with studies of modern populations, we are now able to compare past levels of variation with extant populations on northern Macquarie Island. The ancient and modern populations are closely related and show a similar level of genetic diversity. These results suggest that the king penguin population has recovered past genetic diversity in just 80 years owing to conservation efforts, despite having seen the brink of extinction. PMID:22357937

  20. King penguin population on Macquarie Island recovers ancient DNA diversity after heavy exploitation in historic times.

    PubMed

    Heupink, Tim H; van den Hoff, John; Lambert, David M

    2012-08-23

    Historically, king penguin populations on Macquarie Island have suffered greatly from human exploitation. Two large colonies on the island were drastically reduced to a single small colony as a result of harvesting for the blubber oil industry. However, recent conservation efforts have resulted in the king penguin population expanding in numbers and range to recolonize previous as well as new sites. Ancient DNA methods were used to estimate past genetic diversity and combined with studies of modern populations, we are now able to compare past levels of variation with extant populations on northern Macquarie Island. The ancient and modern populations are closely related and show a similar level of genetic diversity. These results suggest that the king penguin population has recovered past genetic diversity in just 80 years owing to conservation efforts, despite having seen the brink of extinction. PMID:22357937

  1. Modern sedimentation patterns in Potter Cove, King George Island, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hass, H. Christian; Kuhn, Gerhard; Wölfl, Anne-Cathrin; Wittenberg, Nina; Betzler, Christian

    2013-04-01

    IMCOAST among a number of other initiatives investigates the modern and the late Holocene environmental development of south King George Island with a strong emphasis on Maxwell Bay and its tributary fjord Potter Cove (maximum water depth: about 200 m). In this part of the project we aim at reconstructing the modern sediment distribution in the inner part of Potter Cove using an acoustic ground discrimination system (RoxAnn) and more than136 ground-truth samples. Over the past 20 years the air temperatures in the immediate working area increased by more than 0.6 K (Schloss et al. 2012) which is less than in other parts of the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) but it is still in the range of the recovery of temperatures from the Little Ice Age maximum to the beginning of the 20th century. Potter Cove is a small fjord characterized by a series of moraine ridges produced by a tidewater glacier (Fourcade Glacier). Presumably, the farthest moraine is not much older than about 500 years (LIA maximum), hence the sediment cover is rather thin as evidenced by high resolution seismic data. Since a few years at least the better part of the tidewater glacier retreated onto the island's mainland. It is suggested that such a fundamental change in the fjord's physiography has also changed sedimentation patterns in the area. Potter Cove is characterized by silty-clayey sediments in the deeper inner parts of the cove. Sediments are coarser (fine to coarse sands and boulders) in the shallower areas; they also coarsen from the innermost basin to the mouth of the fjord. Textural structures follow the seabed morphology, i.e. small v-shaped passages through the moraine ridges. The glacier still produces large amounts of turbid melt waters that enter the cove at various places. We presume that very fine-grained sediments fall out from the meltwater plumes and are distributed by mid-depth or even bottom currents, thus suggesting an anti-estuarine circulation pattern. Older sediments that are more distal to the glacier front and sediments in shallower places (e.g. on top of the moraine ridges) become increasingly overprinted by coarser sediments from the shallow areas of the fjord. These areas are prone to wave induced winnowing effects as well as disturbances by ploughing icebergs. It can be concluded that coarsening of the fjord sediments will continue while the supply of fine-grained meltwater sediments might cease due to exhaustion of the reservoirs.

  2. Historical changes in trace metals and hydrocarbons in nearshore sediments, Alaskan Beaufort Sea, prior and subsequent to petroleum-related industrial development: Part I. Trace metals.

    PubMed

    Naidu, A Sathy; Blanchard, Arny L; Misra, Debasmita; Trefry, John H; Dasher, Douglas H; Kelley, John J; Venkatesan, M Indira

    2012-10-01

    Concentrations of Fe, As, Ba, Cd, Cu, Cr, Pb, Mn, Ni, Sn, V and Zn in mud (<63?m size), and total and methyl Hg in gross sediment are reported for Arctic Alaska nearshore. Multivariate-PCA analysis discriminated seven station clusters defined by differences in metal concentrations, attributed to regional variations in granulometry and, as in Elson Lagoon, to focused atmospheric fluxes of contaminants from Eurasia. In Colville Delta-Prudhoe Bay, V increase was noted in 1985 and 1997 compared to 1977, and Ba increase from 1985 to 1997. Presumably the source of increased V is the local gas flaring plant, and the elevated Ba is due to barite accumulation from oil drilling effluents. In Prudhoe Bay, concentration spikes of metals in ?1988 presumably reflect enhanced metals deposition following maximum oil drilling in 1980s. In summary, the Alaskan Arctic nearshore has remained generally free of metal contamination despite petroleum-related activities in past 40 years. PMID:22901961

  3. A herpes-like virus in king crabs: Characterization and transmission under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Ryazanova, T V; Eliseikina, M G; Kalabekov, I M; Odintsova, N A

    2015-05-01

    A herpes-like virus was found infecting the antennal gland and bladder epithelium in the blue king crab Paralithodes platypus from the eastern area of the Sea of Okhotsk. Electron microscopic analysis of antennal gland samples from blue king crabs with histologically confirmed signs of disease revealed virus particles, which were mostly hexagonal in shape and located primarily in the nucleus; these particles were rarely observed in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Most virus particles ranged in size from 115 to 125nm. Hemocytes of the red king crab Paralithodes camtschaticus in cell culture could be experimentally infected with virus from thawed antennal gland samples of the blue king crabs with histologically confirmed signs of viral infection. Clear signs of infection were observed in hemocyte cultures at 3-4days post-inoculation as small foci of highly vacuolated formations. These formations included several nuclei and were surrounded by a halo of small cytoplasmic bubbles containing actin and tubulin. As demonstrated by electron microscopic studies, no virus-like particles were found in the cells 1day post-inoculation, but particles become abundant at 7days post-inoculation. We developed a consensus primer PCR method for amplification of a region of the herpesviral DNA-directed DNA polymerase. Primers were designed to target sequences encoding highly conserved amino acid motifs covering a region of approximately 800bp. Thus, macroscopic, histological and ultra-structural examinations of blue king crabs infected with a virus and the molecular identification of the pathogen revealed the presence of herpesviruses. The frequency of the herpes-like viral infection in natural populations of blue king crabs in the Sea of Okhotsk ranged from 0% to 3% in different years. PMID:25712900

  4. What to look for in the hunt for BRCA1, Mary-Claire KingSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-03-26

    Interviewee: Mary-Claire King DNAi Location:Applications>Genes and medicine>gene hunting Starting out Mary-Claire King talks about her first steps toward finding the gene responsible for certain kinds of inherited breast cancer.

  5. NOAA Form 88-129 (8/94) OMB No. 0648-0013, exp. 8/31/2004 MONTHLY DEALER REPORT OF KING AND SPANISH MACKEREL

    E-print Network

    MACKEREL LANDINGS FOR THE COASTAL MIGRATORY PELAGIC RESOURCES ___________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ KING MACKEREL SPANISH MACKEREL GEAR Round Wt. Gutted Wt. Round Wt. Gutted Wt. Hook & Line ____________ ____________ ____________ ___________ Gill Net ____________ ____________ ____________ ___________ No King or Spanish Mackerel were purchased

  6. Using pedigress in the hunt for BRCA1, Mary-Claire KingSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-03-26

    Interviewee: Mary-Claire King DNAi Location:Applications>Genes and medicine>gene hunting Families and pedigrees Mary-Claire King talks about the value of using the centuries-old tool of family pedigrees to gain insight into patterns of inheritance of genetic disorders.

  7. About the Work of Art Initially trained in stained glass, Philadelphia artist Ray King has been designing, creating and

    E-print Network

    Mayfield, John

    About the Work of Art Initially trained in stained glass, Philadelphia artist Ray King has been designing, creating and installing site-specific sculptures throughout the United States since the 1970s Building in February 1997. King's second public art project at Iowa State is Light River, installed

  8. "Beyond Vietnam" Four years after American involvement in Vietnam began, King boldly issued his first statement against

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    "Beyond Vietnam" Four years after American involvement in Vietnam began, King boldly issued his on civil rights instead, King decided to approach the issue of Vietnam with some reticence. Yet, when President Johnson announced his plan to divert funds from the War on Poverty to Vietnam in December of 1966

  9. Tennessee Higher Education County Profiles, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Higher Education Commission, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This report presents a localized perspective on Tennessee higher education, including: (1) county demographic and economic data; (2) information on public and private colleges and universities located in the county; (3) number of county residents enrolled in Tennessee public institutions; and (4) number of county residents participating in the…

  10. A pillar in our Indian work: Daniel Gookin, the praying Indians, and King Philip's War

    E-print Network

    Bane, Steven Kirk

    1989-01-01

    "A PILLAR IN OUR INDIAN WORK": DANIEL GODKIN, THE PRAYING INDIANS, AND KING PHILIP'S WAR A Thesis by STEVEN KIRK BANE Submitted to the Off1ce of Graduate Stud1es of Texas ASM University 1n partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS August 1989 Major Subject: H1story "A PILLAR IN OUR INDIAN WORK": DANIEL GODKIN, THE PRAYING INDIANS, AND KING PHILIP'S WAR A Thesis by STEVEN KIRK BANE Approved as to style and content by: John Canup (Chair...

  11. Impacts of two invasive mollusks, Rapana venosa (Gastropoda) and Corbicula fluminea (Bivalvia), on the food web structure of the Río de la Plata estuary and nearshore oceanic ecosystem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Diego Lercari; Leandro Bergamino

    This paper quantifies the impacts of two invasive species, Rapana venosa (Gastropoda, Muricidae) and Corbicula fluminea (Bivalvia, Corbiculidae), in the food web of the Río de la Plata estuary and adjacent nearshore oceanic ecosystem. We analyzed\\u000a certain functional traits of these mollusks assessed by a mass balance trophic model previously constructed for the years\\u000a 2005–2007. This model incorporates 37 functional

  12. Exposure to hydrocarbons 10 years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill: evidence from cytochrome P4501A expression and biliary FACs in nearshore demersal fishes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen C. Jewett; Thomas A. Dean; Bruce R. Woodin; Max K. Hoberg; John J. Stegeman

    2002-01-01

    Three biomarkers of hydrocarbon exposure, CYP1A in liver vascular endothelium, liver ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD), and biliary fluorescent aromatic compounds (FACs), were examined in the nearshore fishes, masked greenling (Hexagrammos octogrammus) and crescent gunnel (Pholis laeta), collected in Prince William Sound, Alaska, 7–10 years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS). All biomarkers were elevated in fish collected from sites originally

  13. On the Use of Excitation-Emission Matrix Spectroscopy (EEMs) to Detect Dissolved\\/Dispersed Oil in the Nearshore and Offshore Waters of the Louisiana Coast

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. J. D'Sa; E. Overton; A. M. Freeman

    2010-01-01

    The massive amount of oil and dispersants in seawater due to the Deepwater Horizon oil rig accident impacted both nearshore and offshore waters of the Louisiana coast and neighboring states. Processes that the spilled oil undergoes include dispersion and dissolution in seawater. Excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy (EEMs) along with gas-chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) have been shown to be effective in detecting

  14. Isolation, gene detection and solvent tolerance of benzene, toluene and xylene degrading bacteria from nearshore surface water and Pacific Ocean sediment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lin Wang; Nan Qiao; Fengqin Sun; Zongze Shao

    2008-01-01

    BTX (benzene, toluene and xylene) degrading bacteria were isolated from Pacific Ocean sediment and nearshore surface water.\\u000a In the seawater near a ferry dock, degrading bacteria of a relatively wide diversity were detected, including species of Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, Exiguobacterium and Bacillus; while species of Bacillus only have been detected from the deep-sea sediment. Most of the isolates showed degradation to

  15. Habitat coupling in a large lake system: delivery of an energy subsidy by an offshore planktivore to the nearshore zone of Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stockwell, Jason D.; Yule, Daniel L.; Hrabik, Thomas R.; Sierszen, Michael E.; Isaac, Edmund J.

    2014-01-01

    1. We hypothesised that the autumn spawning migration of Lake Superior cisco (Coregonus artedi) provides a resource subsidy, in the form of energy-rich cisco eggs, from the offshore pelagic to the nearshore benthic community over winter, when alternate prey production is likely to be low. 2. We tested this hypothesis using fish and macroinvertebrate surveys, fish population demographics, diet and stable isotope analyses, and bioenergetics modelling. 3. The benthic, congeneric lake whitefish (C. clupeaformis) was a clear beneficiary of cisco spawning. Cisco eggs represented 16% of lake whitefish annual consumption in terms of biomass, but 34% of energy (because of their high energy density: >10 kJ g wet mass?1). Stable isotope analyses were consistent with these results and suggest that other nearshore fish species may also rely on cisco eggs. 4. The lipid content of lake whitefish liver almost doubled from 26 to 49% between November and March, while that of muscle increased from 14 to 26% over the same period, suggesting lake whitefish were building, rather than depleting, lipid reserves during winter. 5. In the other Laurentian Great Lakes, where cisco populations remain very low and rehabilitation efforts are underway, the offshore-to-nearshore ecological link apparent in Lake Superior has been replaced by non-native planktivorous species. These non-native species spawn in spring have smaller eggs and shorter incubation periods. The rehabilitation of cisco in these systems should reinstate the onshore subsidy as it has in Lake Superior.

  16. Advances in Shallow-Water, High-Resolution Seafloor Mapping: Integrating an Autonomous Surface Vessel (ASV) Into Nearshore Geophysical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, J. F.; O'Brien, T. F.; Bergeron, E.; Twichell, D.; Worley, C. R.; Danforth, W. W.; Andrews, B. A.; Irwin, B.

    2006-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been heavily involved in geological mapping of the seafloor since the 1970s. Early mapping efforts such as GLORIA provided broad-scale imagery of deep waters (depths > 400 meters) within the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). In the early 1990's, the USGS research emphasis shifted from deep- to shallow-water environments (inner continental shelf, nearshore, estuaries) to address pertinent coastal issues such as erosion, sediment availability, sediment transport, vulnerability of coastal areas to natural and anthropogenic hazards, and resource management. Geologic framework mapping in these shallow- water environments has provided valuable data used to 1) define modern sediment distribution and thickness, 2) determine underlying stratigraphic and structural controls on shoreline behavior, and 3) enable onshore-to- offshore geologic mapping within the coastal zone when coupled with subaerial techniques such as GPR and topographic LIDAR. Research in nearshore areas presents technological challenges due to the dynamics of the environment, high volume of data collected, and the geophysical limitations of operating in very shallow water. In 2004, the USGS, in collaboration with NOAA's Coastal Services Center, began a multi-year seafloor mapping effort to better define oyster habitats within Apalachicola Bay, Florida, a shallow water estuary along the northern Gulf of Mexico. The bay poses a technological challenge due to its shallow depths (< 4-m) and high turbidity that prohibits the use of bathymetric LIDAR. To address this extreme shallow water setting, the USGS incorporated an Autonomous Surface Vessel (ASV) into seafloor mapping operations, in June 2006. The ASV is configured with a chirp sub-bottom profiler (4 24 kHz), dual-frequency chirp sidescan-sonar (100/500 kHz), single-beam echosounder (235 kHz), and forward-looking digital camera, and will be used to delineate the distribution and thickness of surficial sediment, presence of oyster beds, and sea bed morphology in water depths less than 5-m. The ASV is a catamaran-based platform, 10 feet in length, 4 feet in width, and approximately 260 lbs in weight. The vehicle is operated remotely through a wireless modem network enabling real-time monitoring of data acquisition. The ASV is navigated using RTK, and heave, pitch and roll are recorded with onboard motion sensors. Additional sensors, such as ADCPs, can also be housed within the vehicle. The ASV is able to operate in previously inaccessible areas, and will not only augment existing shallow-water research capabilities, but will also improve our understanding of the geologic controls to modern beach behavior and coastal evolution.

  17. Dramatic beach and nearshore morphological changes due to extreme flooding at a wave-dominated river mouth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, P.L.; Warrick, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Record flooding on the Santa Clara River of California (USA) during January 2005 injected ? 5 million m3 of littoral-grade sediment into the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell, approximately an order of magnitude more than both the average annual river loads and the average annual alongshore littoral transport in this portion of the cell. This event appears to be the largest sediment transport event on record for a Southern California river. Over 170 m of local shoreline (mean high water (MHW)) progradation was observed as a result of the flood, followed by 3 years of rapid local shoreline recession. During this post-flood stage, linear regression-determined shoreline change rates are up to ?45 m a? 1 on the subaerial beach (MHW) and ? 114 m a? 1 on the submarine delta (6 m isobath). Starting approximately 1 km downdrift of the river mouth, shoreline progradation persisted throughout the 3-year post-flood monitoring period, with rates up to + 19 m a? 1. Post-flood bathymetric surveys show nearshore (0 to 12 m depth) erosion on the delta exceeding 400 m3/m a? 1, more than an order of magnitude higher than mean seasonal cross-shore sediment transport rates in the region. Changes were not constant with depth, however; sediment accumulation and subsequent erosion on the delta were greatest at ? 5 to ? 8 m, and accretion in downdrift areas was greatest above –2 m. Thus, this research shows that the topographic bulge (or “wave”) of sediment exhibited both advective and diffusive changes with time, although there were significant variations in the rates of change with depth. The advection and diffusion of the shoreline position was adequately reproduced with a simple “one line” model, although these modeling techniques miss the important cross-shore variations observed in this area. This study illustrates the importance of understanding low-frequency, high volume coastal discharge events for understanding short- and long-term sediment supply, littoral transport, and beach and nearshore evolution in coastal systems adjacent to river mouths.

  18. Retrofit Savings for Brazos County

    E-print Network

    Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Shao, X.; Claridge, D. E.

    2001-01-01

    &M University System BRAZOS COUNTY SumarySav2000m.xls 10/23/2001 BRAZOS COUNTY SumarySav2000(kW)m.xls 10/23/2001 Summary of energy savings from May 2000 to April 2001 Individual Reports BRAZOS COUNTY ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Texas Engineering Experiment Station... COUNTY ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University System SAV-AGEXT JWCMMUUW W27/01 11:05 AM SAV-AGEXT 9/27/01 11:05 AM SAV-ARENAHALL 9/27/01 11:08 AM SAV-ARENAHALL 9/27/01 11:06 AM SAV-B2CENTER1 M7/01 1123 AM SAV...

  19. VERMONT COUNTY HEALTH DATA2

    EPA Science Inventory

    This datalayer contains Vermont Population and Health data describing public health (1986-2000), by county, extracted from various sources, such as; the Vermont Department of Health, the Vermont Center for Justice Research, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholis...

  20. 75 FR 25308 - Environmental Impact Statement: Winnebago County, IL and Rock County, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ...Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Winnebago County, IL and Rock County, WI AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA...Wisconsin Route 213 and Nye School Road northwest of Beloit, Rock County, Wisconsin to the interchange of Rockton Road and...

  1. Toole County Secondary Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Infarction prevalence (Heart Attack) 4.4% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 461.9 455.5 543.2 1 Community) Leading Causes of Death County1 Montana1,2 Nation2 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Toole County Secondary Data

  2. Hill County Secondary Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    prevalence (Heart Attack) 4.0% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 461.9 (Region 2) 455.5 543.2 1 Community) Leading Causes of Death County1 Montana1,2 Nation2 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. Unintentional Injuries** 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Hill County

  3. Lincoln County Secondary Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    prevalence (Heart Attack) 5.0% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 466.5 (Region 5) 455.5 543.2 1 Community of Death County1 Montana1,2 Nation2 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3. CLRD* 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Lincoln County Secondary Data Analysis July 23

  4. Wibaux County Secondary Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Infarction prevalence (Heart Attack) 5.5% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 472.3 455.5 543.2 1 Community County1 Montana1,2 Nation2 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Wibaux County Secondary Data Analysis July 23, 2012 2

  5. Dawson County Secondary Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Infarction prevalence (Heart Attack) 5.5% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 472.3 455.5 543.2 1 Community of Death County1 Montana1,2 Nation2 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3. CLRD* 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Dawson County Secondary Data Analysis July 23

  6. Teton County Secondary Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    prevalence (Heart Attack) 4.4% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 461.9 455.5 543.2 1 Community Health Data, MT County1 Montana1,2 Nation2 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Teton County Secondary Data Analysis July 23, 2012 2

  7. Phillips County Secondary Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Myocardial Infarction prevalence (Heart Attack) 5.5% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 472.3 455.5 543.2 1 of Death County1 Montana1,2 Nation2 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3. CLRD* 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Phillips County Secondary Data Analysis July 23

  8. Glacier County Secondary Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    prevalence (Heart Attack) 4.5% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 461.9 (Region 2) 455.5 543.2 1 Community) Leading Causes of Death County1 Montana1,2 Nation2 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. Unintentional Injuries** 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Glacier County

  9. Pondera County Secondary Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    prevalence (Heart Attack) 4.4% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 461.9 455.5 543.2 1 Community Health Data, MT County1 Montana1,2 Nation2 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3. Unintentional Injuries** 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Pondera County Secondary Data Analysis

  10. Automatic Information Discovery from the "Invisible Web" King-Ip Lin, Hui Chen

    E-print Network

    Lin, King-Ip "David"

    that is untouched by the traditional search engines. Known as the "invisible web" or "deep web", it representsAutomatic Information Discovery from the "Invisible Web" King-Ip Lin, Hui Chen Division of Computer@memphis.edu Abstract A large amount of on-line information resides on the invisible web ­ web pages generated

  11. King Cotton's Lasting Legacy of Poverty and Southern Region Contemporary Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, James W.; Peevely, Gary

    2010-01-01

    One hundred fifty years ago, cotton was considered as the king of all United States' agricultural exports. Cotton's dollar value far exceeded that of any other mid-19th-century United States trade item, much more than tobacco, fish, forest products, raw materials for manufacturing, or manufactured items. Indeed, in the mid-19th century, cotton was…

  12. Cluster Base Network: A Neighborhood Watch Approach Saharnaz ZareAfifi, Brian King

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Cluster Base Network: A Neighborhood Watch Approach Saharnaz ZareAfifi, Brian King Department/or faulty sensors. A mechanism that we have used in our research is a cluster-based approach. Here the ad-hoc network is partitioned into small clusters. Data collection, communications and processing can be observed

  13. Inventing Authority: Bill Clinton, Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Orchestration of Rhetorical Traditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, John M.

    1997-01-01

    Examines President Clinton's address to 5,000 African Americans at the site of Martin Luther King's last speech in Memphis. Develops a critical orientation revolving around the concepts of tradition, invention, and authority to explore Clinton's performance. Shows how he interanimated the black church and liberal traditions in American politics.…

  14. "I Have a Dream, Too!": The American Dream in Coretta Scott King Award-Winning Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Linda T.; Castleman, Michele

    2011-01-01

    The Coretta Scott King (CSK) Award, instituted in 1969 and recognized as an official award by the American Library Association (ALA) in 1982, is conferred annually to an African American author and an illustrator for their outstanding contributions to literature about the Black experience for children and young adults. A partial impetus for the…

  15. Radon spectroscopy of inter-packet delay Andre Broido, Ryan King, Evi Nemeth, kc claffy

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    Radon spectroscopy of inter-packet delay Andre Broido, Ryan King, Evi Nemeth, kc claffy CAIDA, San is then converted by a coarse- grained Radon transform to a family of 1D marginals. Each marginal has semantics it closest to a delta function. As an application of Radon transform technique, we de- termine the target

  16. Schooling and economic growth: A King–Rebelo experiment with human capital

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Rangazas

    2000-01-01

    Education is added to the standard Neoclassical growth model by calibrating a human capital technology to the empirical evidence on schooling. Simulation experiments patterned after King and Rebelo (1993. American Economic Review 83, 908–931) are conducted. When agents act as if they are infinitely lived, interest rates are too high and the rise in school spending is too weak over

  17. KING FAHD UNIVERCITY OF PETROLUEM AND MINIRALS DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

    E-print Network

    Al-Ghadhban, Samir

    Basic Operating Rules Exits - Designated Path Electrical Safety - Accident Prevention Hearing0 KING FAHD UNIVERCITY OF PETROLUEM AND MINIRALS DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING Summer to the summer training work 3 Safety instructions 4 Trading and Contracts tutorial 5 Behavior 5 Basic Principles

  18. Tapir: the Evolution of an Agent Control Language Gary W. King

    E-print Network

    Southern California, University of

    Tapir: the Evolution of an Agent Control Language Gary W. King University of Massachusetts 140 Governor's Lane Amherst, MA 01003 westy@cs.umass.edu ABSTRACT Tapir is a general purpose, semi]. Tapir incorporates the lessons learned from de- veloping HAC and makes it easier and faster to create

  19. Metabolic response to lipid infusion in fasting winter-acclimatized king penguin chicks (Aptenodytes patagonicus).

    PubMed

    Teulier, Loïc; Tornos, Jérémy; Rouanet, Jean-Louis; Rey, Benjamin; Roussel, Damien

    2013-05-01

    During the cold austral winter, king penguin chicks are infrequently fed by their parents and thus experience severe nutritional deprivation under harsh environmental conditions. These energetic constraints lead to a range of energy sparing mechanisms balanced by the maintenance of efficient thermogenic processes. The present work investigated whether the high thermogenic capacities exhibited by winter-acclimatized king penguin chicks could be related to an increase in lipid substrate supply and oxidation in skeletal muscle, the main site of thermogenesis in birds. To test this hypothesis, we examined i) the effect of an experimental rise in plasma triglyceride on the whole metabolic rate in winter-acclimatized (WA) and de-acclimatized king penguin chicks kept at thermoneutrality (TN), and ii) investigated the fuel preference of muscle mitochondria. In vivo, a perfusion of a lipid emulsion induced a small 10% increase of metabolic rate in WA chicks but not in TN group. In vitro, the oxidation rate of muscle mitochondria respiring on lipid-derived substrate was +40% higher in WA chicks than in TN, while no differences were found between groups when mitochondria oxidized carbohydrate-derived substrate or succinate. Despite an enhanced fuel selection towards lipid oxidation in skeletal muscle, a rise of circulating lipids per se was not sufficient to fully unravel the thermogenic capacity of winter-acclimatized king penguin chicks. PMID:23428720

  20. Ash-flow deposits of the central king country, New Zealand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Richard Blank Jr

    1965-01-01

    Late Cenozoic ash-flow deposits in the central King Country, New Zealand, are divided on the basis of field observations, photogeology, and mineralogy into the following successively younger formations: Rangitoto Ignimbrite, Ongatiti Ignimbrite, Waipari Ignimbrite, Ahuroa Ignimbrite, Rocky Hill Ignimbrite, Whakamaru Ignimbrite. Fourteen member sheets are identified and seven unconformities are recognised or inferred.The Rangitoto Ignimbrite (new formation) consists of at

  1. The king cobra genome reveals dynamic gene evolution and adaptation in the snake venom system

    E-print Network

    Dalang, Robert C.

    The king cobra genome reveals dynamic gene evolution and adaptation in the snake venom system Freek, and approved October 22, 2013 (received for review August 2, 2013) Snakes are limbless predators, and many species use venom to help overpower relatively large, agile prey. Snake venoms are complex protein

  2. Alkali-Activity Correlations in Open Clusters Jeremy R. King and Simon C. Schuler

    E-print Network

    King, Jeremy

    Alkali-Activity Correlations in Open Clusters Jeremy R. King and Simon C. Schuler Department a census of correlations between activity measures and neutral resonance lines of the alkali elements Li I of a few ×106 to 4×107 years. Alkali- alkali and/or -activity correlations are newly noted within IC 2391

  3. Fault attacks on "secure" Smart Card Jie Ling and Brian King

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Fault attacks on "secure" Smart Card Jie Ling and Brian King Department of Electrical and Computer that they continue to swipe your card in a manner to purposely induce faults and record all the faulty, and construct a clone of your card, using it for their needs at your expense. This technique, based on fault

  4. WHO POACHED THE KING'S DEER? A STUDY IN THIRTEENTH CENTURY CRIME

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JEAN BIRRELL

    Robin Hood, poaching the king's deer and feasting on venison with his merry men in their forest hideouts, must colour everybody's picture of medieval deer poachers. And we may still see Robin as typical even though we can no longer believe in his historical existence.' Recent research is telling us more about medieval crime and criminals; in particular, the existence

  5. Making E-Learning Invisible: Experience at King Khalid University, Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alwalidi, Abdullah; Lefrere, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe progress at King Khalid University (KKU) in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in developing and implementing a user-centered road map for teaching and learning, with pervasive e-learning as a core element. They named the approach "Invisible" e-learning. As part of it, they are investigating ways to capture and share expertise, as in…

  6. Coretta Scott King Award Books: Using Great Literature with Children and Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Claire Gatrell

    First presented in 1970, the Coretta Scott King Award has become one of the most prestigious honors bestowed on authors and illustrators of children's literature. This book provides information on the award and award winners, and ideas for using selected award-winning titles in the classroom. The first part of the book "The Award," offers a…

  7. Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London Research Strategy, 2010-2015

    E-print Network

    Applebaum, David

    1 Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London Research Strategy, 2010-2015 1. Introduction The Institute of Psychiatry (IoP) is the premier centre for mental health and related neurosciences research in Europe. We are Europe's topmost and the world's second most cited institution carrying out psychiatry

  8. The confrontation of Yahwehism and Baalism as illustrated in I Kings 18

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip J. Kneier

    1972-01-01

    This thesis has been written for the purpose of investigating the confrontation of Baalism and Yahwehism, particularly in I Kings 18. The coexistence of Baalism and Yahwehism was impossible; sooner or later there had to be a confrontation which would defeat the one and show the other to be the victor. The collision with Baalism would prove to the sinful

  9. The K King Problem, an Abstract Model for Computing Aircraft Landing Trajectories

    E-print Network

    which safety is not granted. Our objective is to determine the order in which aircraft land as wellThe K King Problem, an Abstract Model for Computing Aircraft Landing Trajectories: On Modeling.Mattioli@thalesgroup.com Motivated by the problem of computing trajectories of a set of aircraft in their final descent, we introduce

  10. Jifclipse: Development Tools for Security-Typed Languages Boniface Hicks Dave King Patrick McDaniel

    E-print Network

    Yener, Aylin

    . In a secure email system, 1) the principals could include all those who will send and receive emails, alongJifclipse: Development Tools for Security-Typed Languages Boniface Hicks Dave King Patrick McDaniel Penn State {phicks,dhking,mcdaniel}@cse.psu.edu Abstract Security-typed languages such as Jif require

  11. Demonstration of a Medical Device Integration and Coordination Framework Andrew King, Sam Procter

    E-print Network

    Huth, Michael

    the software engineering re- searchers/practitioners, industrial medical device developers, and governmentDemonstration of a Medical Device Integration and Coordination Framework Andrew King, Sam Procter and coordinating the activities of medical devices. The framework uses a publish-subscribe framework for com

  12. Survival in king penguins Aptenodytes patagonicus : temporal and sex-specific effects of environmental variability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olof Olsson; Henk P. van der Jeugd

    2002-01-01

    We investigated annual adult survival rates of king penguins Aptenodytes patagonicus breeding at South Georgia during 6 years in relation to age\\/breeding experience, sex, and food availability. During the first 3 years of the study, when food availability was good, survival was 97.7% for experienced breeders, which confirmed the very high survival rates observed in penguins in general. In these

  13. Students' Attitudes and Perceptions towards the Effectiveness of Mobile Learning in King Saud University, Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Fahad, Fahad N.

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of this research study is to better understand and measure students' attitudes and perceptions towards the effectiveness of mobile learning. This paper reports on the results of a survey of one hundred eighty six undergraduate female students at King Saud University about their attitude and perception to the use of mobile technology…

  14. Portraits of the Postmodern Person in "Taxi Driver,""Raging Bull," and "The King of Comedy."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortimer, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    Argues that a postmodern theory of identity (i.e., the subject as coherent, integrated, discoverable self is a fiction of modernity) links Martin Scorsese's major films. Examines "Taxi Driver,""Raging Bull," and "King of Comedy." Concludes that these films articulate a major cultural shift and chronicle a distinctively masculine identity crisis,…

  15. Preparation, Pedagogy, Policy, and Power: "Brown," the "King" Case, and the Struggle for Equal Language Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Arnetha F.; Alim, H. Samy

    2006-01-01

    For scholars of literacy and educational linguistics, the years 2004 and beyond have given them cause to not only revisit racial issues 50 years after "Brown v. Board of Education," but also to revisit 25 years of language and racial politics since "the Martin Luther King Black English case." This chapter discusses what needs to happen now--with…

  16. KFUPM Library E-Services King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals

    E-print Network

    Maghrabi, Talal H.

    1 KFUPM Library E-Services King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals Deanship of Library Affairs.) Main Library ­ Introduction Historical Background The KFUPM Library was established in 1964 and began and Orbit search services in 1970. First University in the Kingdom to install a Computerized Library System

  17. Soil microbial community and bacterial functional diversity at Machu Picchu, King George Island, Antarctica

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Lahav Lavian; S. Vishnevetsky; G. Barness; Y. Steinberger

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential contribution of the soil microbial community in the vicinity of two plant covers, Sanionia uncinata and Deschampsia antarctica, at Machu Picchu Station, King George Island, Antarctica. Soil samples were collected at the study site during the southern (pole) summer period from 0-5 cm and 5-10 cm depths, for chemical and

  18. An Open Test Bed for Medical Device Integration and Coordination Andrew King, Sam Procter

    E-print Network

    Huth, Michael

    An Open Test Bed for Medical Device Integration and Coordination Andrew King, Sam Procter Dan.Spees,Raoul.Jetley,PaulL.Jones, Sandy.Weininger}@fda.hhs.gov Abstract Medical devices historically have been monolithic units ­ de- veloped, validated, and approved by regulatory authorities as stand-alone entities. Modern medical devices

  19. An Open Test Bed for Medical Device Integration and Coordination Andrew King, Sam Procter

    E-print Network

    Huth, Michael

    of device data into medical records. In addition, large-scale research projects such as the Medical DeviceAn Open Test Bed for Medical Device Integration and Coordination Andrew King, Sam Procter Dan.Spees,Raoul.Jetley,PaulL.Jones, Sandy.Weininger}@fda.hhs.gov March 7, 2009 Abstract Medical devices historically have been monolithic

  20. Whose drag is it anyway? Drag kings and monarchy in the UK.

    PubMed

    Willox, Annabelle

    2002-01-01

    This chapter will show that the term "drag" in drag queen has a different meaning, history and value to the term "drag" in drag king. By exposing this basic, yet fundamental, difference this paper will expose the problems inherent in the assumption of parity between the two forms of drag. An exposition of how camp has been used to comprehend and theorise drag queens will facilitating an understanding of the parasitic interrelationship between camp and drag queen performances, while a critique of "Towards a Butch-Femme Aesthetic," by Sue Ellen Case, will point out the problematic assumptions made about camp when attributed to a cultural location different to the drag queen. By interrogating the historical, cultural and theoretical similarities and differences between drag kings, butches, drag queens and femmes this paper will expose the flawed assumption that camp can be attributed to all of the above without proviso, and hence expose why drag has a fundamentally different contextual meaning for kings and queens. This chapter will conclude by examining the work of both Judith Halberstam and Biddy Martin and the practical examples of drag king and queen performances provided at the UK drag contest held at The Fridge in Brixton, London on 23 June 1999. PMID:12769284