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Sample records for kluyveromyces lactis pheromone

  1. The Gα subunit signals through the Ste50 protein during the mating pheromone response in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Paredes, Edith; Kawasaki, Laura; Ongay-Larios, Laura; Coria, Roberto

    2011-04-01

    Yeast mating signal transduction pathways require a heterotrimeric G protein composed of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits connected to a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) module. While in Saccharomyces cerevisiae elimination of Gα induces constitutive activation of the mating pathway, in Kluyveromyces lactis it produces partial sterility, which indicates that K. lactis Gα (KlGα) is required to positively activate mating. We use physical interaction experiments to determine that KlGα interacts with the adaptor protein KlSte50p. The Ras association (RA) domain of KlSte50p favored interaction with the GDP-bound KlGα subunit, and when the KlGα protein is constitutively activated, the interaction drops significantly. Additionally, KlSte50p strongly associates with the MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK) KlSte11p through its sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain. Genetic experiments placed KlSte50p downstream of the G protein α subunit, indicating that KlGα may stimulate the mating pathway via KlSte50p. Fusion of KlSte50p to the KlGβ subunit partially eliminated the requirement of KlGα for mating, indicating that one contribution of KlGα to the mating pathway is to facilitate plasma membrane anchoring of KlSte50p. PMID:21335532

  2. Genome-wide metabolic (re-) annotation of Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Even before having its genome sequence published in 2004, Kluyveromyces lactis had long been considered a model organism for studies in genetics and physiology. Research on Kluyveromyces lactis is quite advanced and this yeast species is one of the few with which it is possible to perform formal genetic analysis. Nevertheless, until now, no complete metabolic functional annotation has been performed to the proteins encoded in the Kluyveromyces lactis genome. Results In this work, a new metabolic genome-wide functional re-annotation of the proteins encoded in the Kluyveromyces lactis genome was performed, resulting in the annotation of 1759 genes with metabolic functions, and the development of a methodology supported by merlin (software developed in-house). The new annotation includes novelties, such as the assignment of transporter superfamily numbers to genes identified as transporter proteins. Thus, the genes annotated with metabolic functions could be exclusively enzymatic (1410 genes), transporter proteins encoding genes (301 genes) or have both metabolic activities (48 genes). The new annotation produced by this work largely surpassed the Kluyveromyces lactis currently available annotations. A comparison with KEGG’s annotation revealed a match with 844 (~90%) of the genes annotated by KEGG, while adding 850 new gene annotations. Moreover, there are 32 genes with annotations different from KEGG. Conclusions The methodology developed throughout this work can be used to re-annotate any yeast or, with a little tweak of the reference organism, the proteins encoded in any sequenced genome. The new annotation provided by this study offers basic knowledge which might be useful for the scientific community working on this model yeast, because new functions have been identified for the so-called metabolic genes. Furthermore, it served as the basis for the reconstruction of a compartmentalized, genome-scale metabolic model of Kluyveromyces lactis, which is

  3. [Finding of dairy yeasts Kluyveromyces lactis var. lactis in natural habitats].

    PubMed

    Naumov, G I; Naumova, E S; Glushakova, A M; Kachalkin, A V; Chernov, I Y

    2014-01-01

    Well-known yeasts Kluyveromyces lactis var. lactis, which are usually associated with dairy prod- ucts, were discovered in nature (in woodland park soil under Impatiens glandulifera Royle plants). Reliable identification of the yeasts was carried out using physiological criteria (lactose and maltose utilization) and molecular markers (nucleotide sequence of the 5.8S-ITS rDNA fragment, pulsed-field electrophoresis, and Southern hybridization of chromosomal DNA with the LAC4 probe). Ecology of KI. lactis var. lactis is discussed. PMID:25941717

  4. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1388 Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis. (a) This enzyme preparation is derived from the nonpathogenic, nontoxicogenic yeast Kluyveromyces...

  5. Kluyveromyces lactis genome harbours a functional linker histone encoding gene.

    PubMed

    Staneva, Dessislava; Georgieva, Milena; Miloshev, George

    2016-06-01

    Linker histones are essential components of chromatin in eukaryotes. Through interactions with linker DNA and nucleosomes they facilitate folding and maintenance of higher-order chromatin structures and thus delicately modulate gene activity. The necessity of linker histones in lower eukaryotes appears controversial and dubious. Genomic data have shown that Schizosaccharomyces pombe does not possess genes encoding linker histones while Kluyveromyces lactis has been reported to have a pseudogene. Regarding this controversy, we have provided the first direct experimental evidence for the existence of a functional linker histone gene, KlLH1, in K. lactis genome. Sequencing of KlLH1 from both genomic DNA and copy DNA confirmed the presence of an intact open reading frame. Transcription and splicing of the KlLH1 sequence as well as translation of its mRNA have been studied. In silico analysis revealed homology of KlLH1p to the histone H1/H5 protein family with predicted three domain structure characteristic for the linker histones of higher eukaryotes. This strongly proves that the yeast K. lactis does indeed possess a functional linker histone gene thus entailing the evolutionary preservation and significance of linker histones. The nucleotide sequences of KlLH1 are deposited in the GenBank under accession numbers KT826576, KT826577 and KT826578. PMID:27189369

  6. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1388 Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis. (a) This enzyme preparation is derived from the...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1388 Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis. (a) This enzyme preparation is derived from the...

  8. Heterologous expression of Aspergillus terreus fructosyltransferase in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Spohner, Sebastian C; Czermak, Peter

    2016-06-25

    Fructo-oligosaccharides are prebiotic and hypocaloric sweeteners that are usually extracted from chicory. They can also be produced from sucrose using fructosyltransferases, but the only commercial enzyme suitable for this purpose is Pectinex Ultra, which is produced with Aspergillus aculeatus. Here we used the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis to express a secreted recombinant fructosyltransferase from the inulin-producing fungus Aspergillus terreus. A synthetic codon-optimised version of the putative β-fructofuranosidase ATEG 04996 (XP 001214174.1) from A. terreus NIH2624 was secreted as a functional protein into the extracellular medium. At 60°C, the purified A. terreus enzyme generated the same pattern of oligosaccharides as Pectinex Ultra, but at lower temperatures it also produced oligomers with up to seven units. We achieved activities of up to 986.4U/mL in high-level expression experiments, which is better than previous reports of optimised Aspergillus spp. fermentations. PMID:27084521

  9. Expression and secretion of a thermostable bacterial xylanase in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, D J; Bergquist, P L

    1997-01-01

    The xynA structural gene from the extremely thermophilic anaerobe Dictyoglomus thermophilum Rt46B.1 was fused in frame with the secretion signal of the Kluyveromyces lactis killer toxin in episomal expression vectors based on the Kluyveromyces plasmid pKD1. XynA was secreted predominantly as an unglycosylated 35-kDa protein which comprised up to 90% of the total extracellular proteins and reached a concentration of 130 micrograms/ml in shake-flask cultures grown under selective conditions. PMID:9251219

  10. Yeast on the milky way: genetics, physiology and biotechnology of Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Rodicio, Rosaura; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2013-05-01

    The milk yeast Kluyveromyces lactis has a life cycle similar to that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and can be employed as a model eukaryote using classical genetics, such as the combination of desired traits, by crossing and tetrad analysis. Likewise, a growing set of vectors, marker cassettes and tags for fluorescence microscopy are available for manipulation by genetic engineering and investigating its basic cell biology. We here summarize these applications, as well as the current knowledge regarding its central metabolism, glucose and extracellular stress signalling pathways. A short overview on the biotechnological potential of K. lactis concludes this review. PMID:23576126

  11. The organization and transcription of the galactose gene cluster of Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, T D; Dickson, R C

    1988-01-01

    The yeast Kluyveromyces lactis grows on galactose by inducing the Leloir pathway enzymes-kinase, epimerase, and transferase. To investigate the molecular mechanism for regulating expression of this metabolic pathway we isolated GAL1, GAL7, GAL10, which code for kinase, transferase, and epimerase, respectively, and characterized their size, organization, and transcriptional regulation. Our results indicate that induction of the Leloir pathway in K. lactis occurs at the level of transcription and that the organization and regulation of the GAL gene cluster in K. lactis is closely related to the homologous gene cluster in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Likewise, the Upstream Activator Sequences that regulate induction of the GAL genes are similar in base sequence, number and relative location in the two yeasts. Images PMID:3047676

  12. Sugar metabolism, redox balance and oxidative stress response in the respiratory yeast Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    González-Siso, M Isabel; García-Leiro, Ana; Tarrío, Nuria; Cerdán, M Esperanza

    2009-01-01

    A lot of studies have been carried out on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an yeast with a predominant fermentative metabolism under aerobic conditions, which allows exploring the complex response induced by oxidative stress. S. cerevisiae is considered a eukaryote model for these studies. We propose Kluyveromyces lactis as a good alternative model to analyse variants in the oxidative stress response, since the respiratory metabolism in this yeast is predominant under aerobic conditions and it shows other important differences with S. cerevisiae in catabolic repression and carbohydrate utilization. The knowledge of oxidative stress response in K. lactis is still a developing field. In this article, we summarize the state of the art derived from experimental approaches and we provide a global vision on the characteristics of the putative K. lactis components of the oxidative stress response pathway, inferred from their sequence homology with the S. cerevisiae counterparts. Since K. lactis is also a well-established alternative host for industrial production of native enzymes and heterologous proteins, relevant differences in the oxidative stress response pathway and their potential in biotechnological uses of this yeast are also reviewed. PMID:19715615

  13. Deletion of the PDR16 gene influences the plasma membrane properties of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Toth Hervay, Nora; Goffa, Eduard; Svrbicka, Alexandra; Simova, Zuzana; Griac, Peter; Jancikova, Iva; Gaskova, Dana; Morvova, Marcela; Sikurova, Libusa; Gbelska, Yvetta

    2015-04-01

    The plasma membrane is the first line of cell defense against changes in external environment, thus its integrity and functionality are of utmost importance. The plasma membrane properties depend on both its protein and lipid composition. The PDR16 gene is involved in the control of Kluyveromyces lactis susceptibility to drugs and alkali metal cations. It encodes the homologue of the major K. lactis phosphatidylinositol transfer protein Sec14p. Sec14p participates in protein secretion, regulation of lipid synthesis, and turnover in vivo. We report here that the plasma membrane of the Klpdr16Δ mutant is hyperpolarized and its fluidity is lower than that of the parental strain. In addition, protoplasts prepared from the Klpdr16Δ cells display decreased stability when subjected to hypo-osmotic conditions. These changes in membrane properties lead to an accumulation of radiolabeled fluconazole and lithium cations inside mutant cells. Our results point to the fact that the PDR16 gene of K. lactis (KlPDR16) influences the plasma membrane properties in K. lactis that lead to subsequent changes in susceptibility to a broad range of xenobiotics. PMID:25742422

  14. Recyclable Strategy for the Production of High-Purity Galacto-oligosaccharides by Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huaisheng; You, Shengping; Wang, Mengfan; Qi, Wei; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2016-07-20

    A recyclable strategy for the production of high-purity (>95%) galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) was developed using Kluyveromyces lactis in both the synthesis and purification steps. For the synthesis of GOS, ethanol-permeabilized cells (p-cells) of K. lactis were used because the enhanced permeability facilitated the mass transfer of the substrate and the release of oligosaccharide products. For the purification of GOS, non-permeabilized K. lactis cells (np-cells) were preferred as a result of their intrinsic cell membrane barrier toward GOS, which led to the selective consumption of carbohydrate. In this way, undesired glucose, galactose, and lactose in the raw GOS solution can be completely removed. This strategy is recyclable not only because of the high stability and reusability of p-cells and np-cells but also because the ethanol, which is simultaneously generated during the purification, can be reused for the preparation of p-cells. The strategy proposed in this study is a promising candidate for the efficient production of high-purity GOS. PMID:27366924

  15. Yeast Kluyveromyces lactis as host for expression of the bacterial lipase: cloning and adaptation of the new lipase gene from Serratia sp.

    PubMed

    Šiekštelė, Rimantas; Veteikytė, Aušra; Tvaska, Bronius; Matijošytė, Inga

    2015-10-01

    Many microbial lipases have been successfully expressed in yeasts, but not in industrially attractive Kluyveromyces lactis, which among other benefits can be cultivated on a medium supplemented with whey--cheap and easily available industrial waste. A new bacterial lipase from Serratia sp. was isolated and for the first time expressed into the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis by heterologous protein expression system based on a strong promoter of Kluyveromyces marxianus triosephosphate isomerase gene and signal peptide of Kluyveromyces marxianus endopolygalacturonase gene. In addition, the bacterial lipase gene was synthesized de novo by taking into account a codon usage bias optimal for K. lactis and was expressed into the yeast K. lactis also. Both resulting strains were characterized by high output level of the target protein secreted extracellularly. Secreted lipases were characterized for activity and stability. PMID:26254038

  16. Glycolic acid production in the engineered yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glycolic acid is a C2 hydroxy acid that is a widely used chemical compound. It can be polymerised to produce biodegradable polymers with excellent gas barrier properties. Currently, glycolic acid is produced in a chemical process using fossil resources and toxic chemicals. Biotechnological production of glycolic acid using renewable resources is a desirable alternative. Results The yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis are suitable organisms for glycolic acid production since they are acid tolerant and can grow in the presence of up to 50 g l-1 glycolic acid. We engineered S. cerevisiae and K. lactis for glycolic acid production using the reactions of the glyoxylate cycle to produce glyoxylic acid and then reducing it to glycolic acid. The expression of a high affinity glyoxylate reductase alone already led to glycolic acid production. The production was further improved by deleting genes encoding malate synthase and the cytosolic form of isocitrate dehydrogenase. The engineered S. cerevisiae strain produced up to about 1 g l-1 of glycolic acid in a medium containing d-xylose and ethanol. Similar modifications in K. lactis resulted in a much higher glycolic acid titer. In a bioreactor cultivation with d-xylose and ethanol up to 15 g l-1 of glycolic acid was obtained. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of engineering yeast to produce glycolic acid. Prior to this work glycolic acid production through the glyoxylate cycle has only been reported in bacteria. The benefit of a yeast host is the possibility for glycolic acid production also at low pH, which was demonstrated in flask cultivations. Production of glycolic acid was first shown in S. cerevisiae. To test whether a Crabtree negative yeast would be better suited for glycolic acid production we engineered K. lactis in the same way and demonstrated it to be a better host for glycolic acid production. PMID:24053654

  17. Metabolic engineering of Kluyveromyces lactis for L-ascorbic acid (vitamin C) biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background L-ascorbic acid (L-AA) is naturally synthesized in plants from D-glucose by 10 steps pathway. The pathway branch to synthesize L-galactose, the key intermediate for L-ascorbic acid biosynthesis, has been recently elucidated. Budding yeast produces an 5-carbon ascorbic acid analogue Dehydro-D-arabinono 1,4-lactone (D-DAL), which is synthesized from D-arabinose. Yeast is able to synthesize L-ascorbic acid only if it is cultivated in the presence of one of its precursors: L-galactose, L-galactono 1,4-lactone, or L-gulono 1,4-lactone extracted from plants or animals. To avoid feeding the yeast culture with this “L” enantiomer, we engineered Kluyveromyces lactis with L-galactose biosynthesis pathway genes: GDP-mannose 3,5-epimerase (GME), GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (VTC2) and L-galactose-1-phosphate phosphatase (VTC4) isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Plasmids were constructed and modified such that the cloned plant genes were targeted to the K. lactis LAC4 Locus by homologous recombination and that the expression was associated to the growth on D-galactose or lactose. Upon K. lactis transformation, GME was under the control of the native LAC4 promoter whereas VTC2 and VTC4 were expressed from the S. cerevisiae promoters GPD1 and ADH1 respectively. The expression in K. lactis, of the L-galactose biosynthesis genes was determined by Reverse Transcriptase-PCR and western blotting. The recombinant yeasts were capable to produce about 30 mg.L-1 of L-ascorbic acid in 48 hours of cultivation when cultured on rich medium with 2% (w/v) D-galactose. We also evaluated the L-AA production culturing recombinant recombinant strains in cheese whey, a waste product during cheese production, as an alternative source of lactose. Conclusions This work is the first attempt to engineer K. lactis cells for L-ascorbic acid biosynthesis by a fermentation process without any trace of “L” isomers precursors in the culture medium. We have engineered K. lactis

  18. Secretion and properties of a hybrid Kluyveromyces lactis-Aspergillus niger β-galactosidase

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Ángel Pereira; Leiro, Rafael Fernández; Trillo, M Cristina; Cerdán, M Esperanza; Siso, M Isabel González; Becerra, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Background The β-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis is a protein of outstanding biotechnological interest in the food industry and milk whey reutilization. However, due to its intracellular nature, its industrial production is limited by the high cost associated to extraction and downstream processing. The yeast-system is an attractive method for producing many heterologous proteins. The addition of a secretory signal in the recombinant protein is the method of choice to sort it out of the cell, although biotechnological success is not guaranteed. The cell wall acting as a molecular sieve to large molecules, culture conditions and structural determinants present in the protein, all have a decisive role in the overall process. Protein engineering, combining domains of related proteins, is an alternative to take into account when the task is difficult. In this work, we have constructed and analyzed two hybrid proteins from the β-galactosidase of K. lactis, intracellular, and its Aspergillus niger homologue that is extracellular. In both, a heterologous signal peptide for secretion was also included at the N-terminus of the recombinant proteins. One of the hybrid proteins obtained has interesting properties for its biotechnological utilization. Results The highest levels of intracellular and extracellular β-galactosidase were obtained when the segment corresponding to the five domain of K. lactis β-galactosidase was replaced by the corresponding five domain of the A. niger β-galactosidase. Taking into account that this replacement may affect other parameters related to the activity or the stability of the hybrid protein, a thoroughly study was performed. Both pH (6.5) and temperature (40°C) for optimum activity differ from values obtained with the native proteins. The stability was higher than the corresponding to the β-galactosidase of K. lactis and, unlike this, the activity of the hybrid protein was increased by the presence of Ni2+. The affinity for

  19. Promoter and signal sequence from filamentous fungus can drive recombinant protein production in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, Aravind; Sukumaran, Rajeev K

    2014-08-01

    Cross-recognition of promoters from filamentous fungi in yeast can have important consequences towards developing fungal expression systems, especially for the rapid evaluation of their efficacy. A truncated 510bp inducible Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I (cbh1) promoter was tested for the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in Kluyveromyces lactis after disrupting its native β-galactosidase (lac4) promoter. The efficiency of the CBH1 secretion signal was also evaluated by fusing it to the lac4 promoter of the yeast, which significantly increased the secretion of recombinant protein in K. lactis compared to the native α-mating factor secretion signal. The fungal promoter is demonstrated to have potential to drive heterologous protein production in K. lactis; and the small sized T. reesei cbh1 secretion signal can mediate the protein secretion in K. lactis with high efficiency. PMID:24661814

  20. Statistical investigation of Kluyveromyces lactis cells permeabilization with ethanol by response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    de Faria, Janaína T.; Rocha, Pollyana F.; Converti, Attilio; Passos, Flávia M.L.; Minim, Luis A.; Sampaio, Fábio C.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to select the optimal operating conditions to permeabilize Kluyveromyces lactis cells using ethanol as a solvent as an alternative to cell disruption and extraction. Cell permeabilization was carried out by a non-mechanical method consisting of chemical treatment with ethanol, and the results were expressed as β-galactosidase activity. Experiments were conducted under different conditions of ethanol concentration, treatment time and temperature according to a central composite rotatable design (CCRD), and the collected results were then worked out by response surface methodology (RSM). Cell permeabilization was improved by an increase in ethanol concentration and simultaneous decreases in the incubation temperature and treatment time. Such an approach allowed us to identify an optimal range of the independent variables within which the β-galactosidase activity was optimized. A maximum permeabilization of 2,816 mmol L−1 oNP min−1 g−1 was obtained by treating cells with 75.0% v/v of ethanol at 20.0 °C for 15.0 min. The proposed methodology resulted to be effective and suited for K. lactis cells permeabilization at a lab-scale and promises to be of possible interest for future applications mainly in the food industry. PMID:24688494

  1. Biotransformation of monoterpene alcohols by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Torulaspora delbrueckii and Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    King, A; Richard Dickinson, J

    2000-04-01

    Monoterpenoids are important flavour compounds produced by many plant species, including grapes (Vitis vinifera) and hops (Humulus lupulus). Biotransformation reactions involving monoterpenoids have been characterized in filamentous fungi, but few examples have been observed in yeasts. As monoterpenoids are in contact with yeasts during beer and wine production, biotransformation reactions may occur during the fermentation of these beverages. This paper describes the biotransformation of monoterpene alcohols, of significance in the alcoholic beverage industries, by three yeast species. All three species analysed had the ability to convert monoterpenoids. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis reduced geraniol into citronellol, whilst all three yeasts produced linalool from both geraniol and nerol. Monocyclic alpha-terpineol was formed from both linalool and nerol, by all three yeasts. alpha-Terpineol was then converted into the diol cis-terpin hydrate. K. lactis and Torulaspora delbrueckii also had the ability to form geraniol from nerol. Finally, the stereospecificity of terpenoid formation was analysed. Both (+) and (-) enantiomers of linalool and alpha-terpineol were formed in roughly equal quantities, from either geraniol or nerol. PMID:10790686

  2. KlROM2 encodes an essential GEF homologue in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Lorberg, Anja; Schmitz, Hans-Peter; Gengenbacher, Ute; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2003-05-01

    Cellular integrity in yeasts is ensured by a rigid cell wall whose synthesis is controlled by a MAP kinase signal transduction cascade. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae upstream regulatory components of this MAP kinase pathway involve a single protein kinase C, which is regulated in part by interaction with the small GTPase Rho1p. This small G protein is in turn rendered inactive (GDP-bound) or is activated (GTP-bound) by the influence of GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) and the GDP/GTP exchange factors (GEFs), respectively. We report here on the isolation of a gene from Kluyveromyces lactis, KlROM2, which encodes a member of the latter protein family. The nucleotide sequence contains an open reading frame of 1227 amino acids, with an overall identity of 57% to the Rom2 protein of S. cerevisiae. Four conserved sequence motifs could be identified: a RhoGEF domain, a DEP sequence, a CNH domain and a less conserved pleckstrin homology (PH) sequence. Klrom2 null mutants show a lethal phenotype, which indicates that the gene may encode the only functional GEF regulating the cellular integrity pathway in K. lactis. Conditional genomic expression of KlROM2 resulted in sensitivity towards caffeine and Calcofluor white as typical phenotypes of mutants defective in this pathway. Overexpression of KIROM2 from multicopy plasmids under the control of the ScGAL1 promoter severely impaired growth in both S. cerevisiae and in K. lactis. The fact that the lethal phenotype was not prevented in mpk1 deletion mutants indicates that growth inhibition is not simply caused by hyperactivation of the Pkc1p signal transduction pathway. PMID:12734799

  3. The GDI1 genes from Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia pastoris: cloning and functional expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Brummer, M H; Richard, P; Sundqvist, L; Väänänen, R; Keränen, S

    2001-07-01

    The nucleotide sequences of 2.8 kb and 2.9 kb fragments containing the Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia pastoris GDI1 genes, respectively, were determined. K. lactis GDI1 was found during sequencing of a genomic library clone, whereas the P. pastoris GDI1 was obtained from a genomic library by complementing a Saccharomyces cerevisiae sec19-1 mutant strain. The sequenced DNA fragments contain open reading frames of 1338 bp (K.lactis) and 1344 bp (P. pastoris), coding for polypeptides of 445 and 447 residues, respectively. Both sequences fully complement the S. cerevisiae sec19-1 mutation. They have high degrees of homology with known GDP dissociation inhibitors from yeast species and other eukaryotes. PMID:11447595

  4. How recombinant swollenin from Kluyveromyces lactis affects cellulosic substrates and accelerates their hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In order to generate biofuels, insoluble cellulosic substrates are pretreated and subsequently hydrolyzed with cellulases. One way to pretreat cellulose in a safe and environmentally friendly manner is to apply, under mild conditions, non-hydrolyzing proteins such as swollenin - naturally produced in low yields by the fungus Trichoderma reesei. To yield sufficient swollenin for industrial applications, the first aim of this study is to present a new way of producing recombinant swollenin. The main objective is to show how swollenin quantitatively affects relevant physical properties of cellulosic substrates and how it affects subsequent hydrolysis. Results After expression in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, the resulting swollenin was purified. The adsorption parameters of the recombinant swollenin onto cellulose were quantified for the first time and were comparable to those of individual cellulases from T. reesei. Four different insoluble cellulosic substrates were then pretreated with swollenin. At first, it could be qualitatively shown by macroscopic evaluation and microscopy that swollenin caused deagglomeration of bigger cellulose agglomerates as well as dispersion of cellulose microfibrils (amorphogenesis). Afterwards, the effects of swollenin on cellulose particle size, maximum cellulase adsorption and cellulose crystallinity were quantified. The pretreatment with swollenin resulted in a significant decrease in particle size of the cellulosic substrates as well as in their crystallinity, thereby substantially increasing maximum cellulase adsorption onto these substrates. Subsequently, the pretreated cellulosic substrates were hydrolyzed with cellulases. Here, pretreatment of cellulosic substrates with swollenin, even in non-saturating concentrations, significantly accelerated the hydrolysis. By correlating particle size and crystallinity of the cellulosic substrates with initial hydrolysis rates, it could be shown that the swollenin

  5. Evaluation of the performance of Torulaspora delbrueckii, Williopsis saturnus, and Kluyveromyces lactis in lychee wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dai; Yap, Zhi Yin; Liu, Shao-Quan

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of three non-Saccharomyces yeasts, namely Torulaspora delbrueckii PRELUDE, Williopsis saturnus NCYC22, and Kluyveromyces lactis KL71 on lychee juice fermentation. The fermentation performance of these non-Saccharomyces yeasts was significantly different. T. delbrueckii PRELUDE had the fastest rate of growth and high sugar consumption. W. saturnus NCYC22 used the lowest amount of sugars, but consumed the highest amount of nitrogen. Correspondingly, strain PRELUDE produced the highest level of ethanol (7.6% v/v), followed by strain KL71 (3.4% v/v) and strain NCYC22 (0.8% v/v). Aroma character-impact terpenes and terpenoids could be partially retained in all lychee wines, with higher odour activity values (OAVs) of geraniol and citronellol in strain KL71. However, strain KL71 and strain NCYC22 over-produced ethyl acetate. Strain PRELUDE had a better ability to generate high levels of ethanol, isoamyl alcohol, 2-phenylethyl alcohol, ethyl octanoate, and ethyl decanoate and retained high OAVs of lychee aroma-character compounds cis-rose oxide (16.5) and linalool (3.5). Thus, it is deemed to be a promising non-Saccharomyces yeast for lychee wine fermentation. PMID:25955287

  6. Activity improvement of a Kluyveromyces lactis aldo-keto reductase KlAKR via rational design.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xi; Wang, Ya-Jun; Shen, Wei; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2016-04-20

    Optically pure t-butyl 6-cyano-(3R, 5R)-dihydroxyhexanoate ((R)-1b) is the key chiral precursor for atorvastatin calcium, the most widely used cholesterol-lowering drug. Wild-type aldo-keto reductase KlAKR from Kluyveromyces lactis has ideal diastereoselectivity toward t-butyl 6-cyano-(5R)-hydroxy-3-oxohexanoate (1a, dep>99.5%) but poor activity. A rational engineering was used to improve the KlAKR activity. Based on homology modeling and molecular docking, two amino acid residues (295 and 296) were selected as mutation sites, and two rounds of site-saturation mutagenesis were performed. Among the mutants, KlAKR-Y295W/W296L exhibited the highest catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) toward 1a up to 12.37s(-1)mM(-1), which was 11.25-fold higher than that of wild-type KlAKR. Moreover, the majority of mutations have no negative impact on stereoselectivity. Using KlAKR-Y295W/W296L coupled with Exiguobacterium sibiricum glucose dehydrogenase (EsGDH) for cofactor regeneration, (R)-1b was accumulated up to 162.7mM with dep value above 99.5%. KlAKR-Y295W/W296L represents a robust tool for (R)-1b synthesis. PMID:26959479

  7. Production of orotic acid by a Klura3Δ mutant of Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Nuno; Coelho, Eduardo; Gales, Luís; Costa, Vítor; Teixeira, José António; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrated that a Klura3Δ, mutant of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis is able to produce and secrete into the growth medium considerable amounts of orotic acid. Using yeast extract-peptone-glucose (YPD) based media we optimized production conditions in flask and bioreactor cultures. With cells grown in YPD 5% glucose medium, the best production in flask was obtained with a 1:12.5 ratio for flask: culture volume, 180 rpm, 28°C and 200 mM MOPS for pH stabilization at neutral values (initial culture pH at 8.0). The best production in a 2 L bioreactor was achieved at 500 rpm with 1 vvm aeration, 28°C and pH 7.0. Under these optimum conditions, similar rates of orotic acid production were obtained and maximum concentration achieved after 96 h was 6.7 g/L in flask and bioreactor cultures. These results revealed an excellent reproducibility between both systems and provided evidence for the biotechnological potential of Klura3Δ strain to produce orotic acid since the amounts obtained are comparable to the production in flask using a similar mutant of the industrially valuable Corynebacterium glutamicum. PMID:26707627

  8. Protective vaccination against infectious bursal disease virus with whole recombinant Kluyveromyces lactis yeast expressing the viral VP2 subunit.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Marina; Durairaj, Vijay; Mundt, Egbert; Schulze, Katja; Breunig, Karin D; Behrens, Sven-Erik

    2012-01-01

    Here we report on vaccination approaches against infectious bursal disease (IBD) of poultry that were performed with complete yeast of the species Kluyveromyces lactis (K. lactis). Employing a genetic system that enables the rapid production of stably transfected recombinant K. lactis, we generated yeast strains that expressed defined quantities of the virus capsid forming protein VP2 of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). Both, subcutaneous as well as oral vaccination regiments with the heat-inactivated but otherwise untreated yeast induced IBDV-neutralizing antibodies in mice and chickens. A full protection against a subsequent IBDV infection was achieved by subcutaneous inoculation of only milligram amounts of yeast per chicken. Oral vaccination also generated protection: while mortality was observed in control animals after virus challenge, none of the vaccinees died and ca. one-tenth were protected as indicated by the absence of lesions in the bursa of Fabricius. Recombinant K. lactis was thus indicated as a potent tool for the induction of a protective immune response by different applications. Subcutaneously applied K. lactis that expresses the IBDV VP2 was shown to function as an efficacious anti-IBD subunit vaccine. PMID:23024743

  9. Protective Vaccination against Infectious Bursal Disease Virus with Whole Recombinant Kluyveromyces lactis Yeast Expressing the Viral VP2 Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Marina; Durairaj, Vijay; Mundt, Egbert; Schulze, Katja; Breunig, Karin D.; Behrens, Sven-Erik

    2012-01-01

    Here we report on vaccination approaches against infectious bursal disease (IBD) of poultry that were performed with complete yeast of the species Kluyveromyces lactis (K. lactis). Employing a genetic system that enables the rapid production of stably transfected recombinant K. lactis, we generated yeast strains that expressed defined quantities of the virus capsid forming protein VP2 of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). Both, subcutaneous as well as oral vaccination regiments with the heat-inactivated but otherwise untreated yeast induced IBDV-neutralizing antibodies in mice and chickens. A full protection against a subsequent IBDV infection was achieved by subcutaneous inoculation of only milligram amounts of yeast per chicken. Oral vaccination also generated protection: while mortality was observed in control animals after virus challenge, none of the vaccinees died and ca. one-tenth were protected as indicated by the absence of lesions in the bursa of Fabricius. Recombinant K. lactis was thus indicated as a potent tool for the induction of a protective immune response by different applications. Subcutaneously applied K. lactis that expresses the IBDV VP2 was shown to function as an efficacious anti-IBD subunit vaccine. PMID:23024743

  10. Investigation of the role of four mitotic septins and chitin synthase 2 for cytokinesis in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Rippert, Dorthe; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2016-09-01

    Septins are key components of the cell division machinery from yeast to humans. The model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has five mitotic septins, Cdc3, Cdc10, Cdc11, Cdc12, and Shs1. Here we characterized the five orthologs from the genetically less-redundant milk yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. We found that except for KlSHS1 all septin genes are essential. Klshs1 deletions displayed temperature-sensitive growth and morphological defects. Heterologous complementation analyses revealed that all five K. lactis genes encode functional orthologs of their S. cerevisiae counterparts. Fluorophore-tagged versions of the K. lactis septins localized to a ring at the incipient bud site and split into two separate rings at the bud neck later in cytokinesis. One of the key proteins recruited to the bud neck by septins in S. cerevisiae is the chitin synthase Chs2, which synthesizes the primary septum. KlCHS2 was found to be essential and deletions showed cytokinetic defects upon spore germination. KlChs2-GFP also localized to the bud neck and to punctate structures in K. lactis. We conclude that cytokinesis in K. lactis is similar to S. cerevisiae and chimeric septin complexes are fully functional in both yeasts. In contrast to some S. cerevisiae strains, KlChs2 and KlCdc10 were found to be essential. PMID:27422440

  11. Kluyveromyces lactis: A Suitable Yeast Model to Study Cellular Defense Mechanisms against Hypoxia-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    González Siso, M. Isabel; Cerdán, M. Esperanza

    2012-01-01

    Studies about hypoxia-induced oxidative stress in human health disorders take advantage from the use of unicellular eukaryote models. A widely extended model is the fermentative yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this paper, we describe an overview of the molecular mechanisms induced by a decrease in oxygen availability and their interrelationship with the oxidative stress response in yeast. We focus on the differential characteristics between S. cerevisiae and the respiratory yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, a complementary emerging model, in reference to multicellular eukaryotes. PMID:22928082

  12. Proteomic and functional consequences of hexokinase deficiency in glucose-repressible Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Mates, Nadia; Kettner, Karina; Heidenreich, Falk; Pursche, Theresia; Migotti, Rebekka; Kahlert, Günther; Kuhlisch, Eberhard; Breunig, Karin D; Schellenberger, Wolfgang; Dittmar, Gunnar; Hoflack, Bernard; Kriegel, Thomas M

    2014-03-01

    The analysis of glucose signaling in the Crabtree-positive eukaryotic model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae has disclosed a dual role of its hexokinase ScHxk2, which acts as a glycolytic enzyme and key signal transducer adapting central metabolism to glucose availability. In order to identify evolutionarily conserved characteristics of hexokinase structure and function, the cellular response of the Crabtree-negative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis to rag5 null mutation and concomitant deficiency of its unique hexokinase KlHxk1 was analyzed by means of difference gel electrophoresis. In total, 2,851 fluorescent spots containing different protein species were detected in the master gel representing all of the K. lactis proteins that were solubilized from glucose-grown KlHxk1 wild-type and mutant cells. Mass spectrometric peptide analysis identified 45 individual hexokinase-dependent proteins related to carbohydrate, short-chain fatty acid and tricarboxylic acid metabolism as well as to amino acid and protein turnover, but also to general stress response and chromatin remodeling, which occurred as a consequence of KlHxk1 deficiency at a minimum 3-fold enhanced or reduced level in the mutant proteome. In addition, three proteins exhibiting homology to 2-methylcitrate cycle enzymes of S. cerevisiae were detected at increased concentrations, suggesting a stimulation of pyruvate formation from amino acids and/or fatty acids. Experimental validation of the difference gel electrophoresis approach by post-lysis dimethyl labeling largely confirmed the abundance changes detected in the mutant proteome via the former method. Taking into consideration the high proportion of identified hexokinase-dependent proteins exhibiting increased proteomic levels, KlHxk1 is likely to have a repressive function in a multitude of metabolic pathways. The proteomic alterations detected in the mutant classify KlHxk1 as a multifunctional enzyme and support the view of evolutionary conservation of

  13. Proteomic and Functional Consequences of Hexokinase Deficiency in Glucose-repressible Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Mates, Nadia; Kettner, Karina; Heidenreich, Falk; Pursche, Theresia; Migotti, Rebekka; Kahlert, Günther; Kuhlisch, Eberhard; Breunig, Karin D.; Schellenberger, Wolfgang; Dittmar, Gunnar; Hoflack, Bernard; Kriegel, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of glucose signaling in the Crabtree-positive eukaryotic model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae has disclosed a dual role of its hexokinase ScHxk2, which acts as a glycolytic enzyme and key signal transducer adapting central metabolism to glucose availability. In order to identify evolutionarily conserved characteristics of hexokinase structure and function, the cellular response of the Crabtree-negative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis to rag5 null mutation and concomitant deficiency of its unique hexokinase KlHxk1 was analyzed by means of difference gel electrophoresis. In total, 2,851 fluorescent spots containing different protein species were detected in the master gel representing all of the K. lactis proteins that were solubilized from glucose-grown KlHxk1 wild-type and mutant cells. Mass spectrometric peptide analysis identified 45 individual hexokinase-dependent proteins related to carbohydrate, short-chain fatty acid and tricarboxylic acid metabolism as well as to amino acid and protein turnover, but also to general stress response and chromatin remodeling, which occurred as a consequence of KlHxk1 deficiency at a minimum 3-fold enhanced or reduced level in the mutant proteome. In addition, three proteins exhibiting homology to 2-methylcitrate cycle enzymes of S. cerevisiae were detected at increased concentrations, suggesting a stimulation of pyruvate formation from amino acids and/or fatty acids. Experimental validation of the difference gel electrophoresis approach by post-lysis dimethyl labeling largely confirmed the abundance changes detected in the mutant proteome via the former method. Taking into consideration the high proportion of identified hexokinase-dependent proteins exhibiting increased proteomic levels, KlHxk1 is likely to have a repressive function in a multitude of metabolic pathways. The proteomic alterations detected in the mutant classify KlHxk1 as a multifunctional enzyme and support the view of evolutionary conservation of

  14. Ethanol production by Kluyveromyces lactis immobilized cells in copolymer carriers produced by radiation polymerization.

    PubMed

    El-Batal, A I; Farahat, L M; El-Rehim, H A

    2000-01-01

    The conditions for batch and continuous production of ethanol, using immobilized growing yeast cells of Kluyveromyces lactis, have been optimized. Yeast cells have been immobilized in hydrogel copolymer carriers composed of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) with various hydrophilic monomers, using radiation copolymerization technique. Yeast cells were immobilized through adhesion and multiplication of yeast cells themselves. The ethanol production of immobilized growing yeast cells with these hydrogel carriers was related to the monomer composition of the copolymers and the optimum monomer composition was hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). In this case by using batch fermentation, the superior ethanol production was 32.9 g L(-1) which was about 4 times higher than that of cells in free system. The relation between the activity of immobilized yeast cells and the water content of the copolymer carriers was also discussed. Immobilized growing yeast cells in PVA: HEMA (7%: 10%, w/w) hydrogel copolymer carrier, were used in a packed-bed column reactor for the continuous production of ethanol from lactose at different levels of concentrations (50, 100 and 150) g L(-1). For all lactose feed concentrations, an increase in dilution rates from 0.1 h(-1) to 0.3 h(-1) lowered ethanol concentration in fermented broth, but the volumetric ethanol productivity and volumetric lactose uptake rate were improved. The fermentation efficiency was lowered with the increase in dilution rate and also at higher lactose concentration in feed medium and a maximum of 70.2% was obtained at the lowest lactose concentration 50 g L(-1). PMID:11093678

  15. Crystal Structure of Hexokinase KlHxk1 of Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Kuettner, E. Bartholomeus; Kettner, Karina; Keim, Antje; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Volke, Daniela; Singer, David; Hoffmann, Ralf; Müller, Eva-Christina; Otto, Albrecht; Kriegel, Thomas M.; Sträter, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Crystal structures of the unique hexokinase KlHxk1 of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis were determined using eight independent crystal forms. In five crystal forms, a symmetrical ring-shaped homodimer was observed, corresponding to the physiological dimer existing in solution as shown by small-angle x-ray scattering. The dimer has a head-to-tail arrangement such that the small domain of one subunit interacts with the large domain of the other subunit. Dimer formation requires favorable interactions of the 15 N-terminal amino acids that are part of the large domain with amino acids of the small domain of the opposite subunit, respectively. The head-to-tail arrangement involving both domains of the two KlHxk1 subunits is appropriate to explain the reduced activity of the homodimer as compared with the monomeric enzyme and the influence of substrates and products on dimer formation and dissociation. In particular, the structure of the symmetrical KlHxk1 dimer serves to explain why phosphorylation of conserved residue Ser-15 may cause electrostatic repulsions with nearby negatively charged residues of the adjacent subunit, thereby inducing a dissociation of the homologous dimeric hexokinases KlHxk1 and ScHxk2. Two complex structures of KlHxk1 with bound glucose provide a molecular model of substrate binding to the open conformation and the subsequent classical domain closure motion of yeast hexokinases. The entirety of the novel data extends the current concept of glucose signaling in yeast and complements the induced-fit model by integrating the events of N-terminal phosphorylation and dissociation of homodimeric yeast hexokinases. PMID:20943665

  16. An alternative, arginase-independent pathway for arginine metabolism in Kluyveromyces lactis involves guanidinobutyrase as a key enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, G; Verhoeven, M D; Mans, R; Fleury Rey, Y; Bel-Rhlid, R; van den Broek, M; Maleki Seifar, R; Ten Pierick, A; Thompson, M; Müller, V; Wahl, S A; Pronk, J T; Daran, J M

    2014-01-01

    Most available knowledge on fungal arginine metabolism is derived from studies on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which arginine catabolism is initiated by releasing urea via the arginase reaction. Orthologues of the S. cerevisiae genes encoding the first three enzymes in the arginase pathway were cloned from Kluyveromyces lactis and shown to functionally complement the corresponding deletion in S. cerevisiae. Surprisingly, deletion of the single K. lactis arginase gene KlCAR1 did not completely abolish growth on arginine as nitrogen source. Growth rate of the deletion mutant strongly increased during serial transfer in shake-flask cultures. A combination of RNAseq-based transcriptome analysis and 13C-15N-based flux analysis was used to elucidate the arginase-independent pathway. Isotopic 13C15N-enrichment in γ-aminobutyrate revealed succinate as the entry point in the TCA cycle of the alternative pathway. Transcript analysis combined with enzyme activity measurements indicated increased expression in the Klcar1Δ mutant of a guanidinobutyrase (EC.3.5.3.7), a key enzyme in a new pathway for arginine degradation. Expression of the K. lactis KLLA0F27995g (renamed KlGBU1) encoding guanidinobutyrase enabled S. cerevisiae to use guanidinobutyrate as sole nitrogen source and its deletion in K. lactis almost completely abolish growth on this nitrogen source. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that this enzyme activity is widespread in fungi. PMID:24912400

  17. Homologous expression and biochemical characterization of the arylsulfatase from Kluyveromyces lactis and its relevance in milk processing.

    PubMed

    Stressler, Timo; Leisibach, Desirée; Lutz-Wahl, Sabine; Kuhn, Andreas; Fischer, Lutz

    2016-06-01

    The industrial manufacturing process of lactose-free milk products depends on the application of commercial β-galactosidase (lactase) preparations. These preparations are often obtained from Kluyveromyces lactis. There is a gene present in the genome of K. lactis which should encode for an enzyme called arylsulfatase (EC 3.1.6.1). Therefore, this enzyme could also be present in β-galactosidase preparations. The arylsulfatase is suspected of being responsible for an unpleasant "cowshed-like" off-flavor resulting from the release of p-cresol from milk endogenous alkylphenol sulfuric esters. So far, no gene/functionality relationship is described. In addition, no study is available which has shown that arylsulfatase from K. lactis is truly responsible for the flavor generation. In this study, we cloned the putative arylsulfatase gene from K. lactis GG799 into the commercially available vector pKLAC2. The cloning strategy chosen resulted in a homologous, secretory expression of the arylsulfatase. We showed that the heretofore putative arylsulfatase has the desired activity with the synthetic substrate p-nitrophenyl sulfate and with the natural substrate p-cresol sulfate. The enzyme was biochemically characterized and showed an optimum temperature of 45-50 °C and an optimum pH of 9-10. Additionally, the arylsulfatase was activated by Ca(2+) ions and was inactivated by Zn(2+) ions. Moreover, the arylsulfatase was inhibited by p-cresol and sulfate ions. Finally, the enzyme was added to ultra-heat treated (UHT) milk and a sensory triangle test verified that the arylsulfatase from K. lactis can cause an unpleasant "cowshed-like" off-flavor. PMID:26875879

  18. Secretory expression of a phospholipase A2 from Lactobacillus casei DSM20011 in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Liang; Shi, Guiyang

    2015-12-01

    The pla2 gene encoding a phospholipase A2 (EC 3.1.1.4) of Lactobacillus casei DSM20011 was cloned and expressed in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis GG799 successfully for the first time. The structural pla2 gene fused in frame with the K. lactis secretion signal α-mating factor was integrated into the LAC4 locus and expressed under the control of the LAC4 promoter. sPLA2 activity was detected in the culture supernatant during shake flask culture of K. lactis/pKLAC1-pla2. In comparison with the control strain K. lactis/pKLAC1, SDS-PAGE analysis revealed a 17-kDa recombinant protein band in K. lactis/pKLAC1-pla2, which was consistent with the predicted molecular weight of the mature protein. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that the copy number of the integrated pla2 gene ranged from 2 to 6 and positively correlated with sPLA2 activity. When the inducer galactose was used as the carbon source, the sPLA2 activity in the culture supernatant of the recombinant that harbored six pla2 gene copies reached 1.96 ± 0.15 U/mL. The influence of the culture composition and conditions on the recombinant sPLA2 activity in shake flask culture were also studied. When the recombinant was cultured at 30°C in a YPD medium culture volume of 70 mL in a 250-mL shake flask with an initial pH of 7.0, the sPLA2 activity reached 2.16 ± 0.18 U/mL. PMID:26108160

  19. A set of aspartyl protease-deficient strains for improved expression of heterologous proteins in Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Ganatra, Mehul B; Vainauskas, Saulius; Hong, Julia M; Taylor, Troy E; Denson, John-Paul M; Esposito, Dominic; Read, Jeremiah D; Schmeisser, Hana; Zoon, Kathryn C; Hartley, James L; Taron, Christopher H

    2011-01-01

    Secretion of recombinant proteins is a common strategy for heterologous protein expression using the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. However, a common problem is degradation of a target recombinant protein by secretory pathway aspartyl proteases. In this study, we identified five putative pfam00026 aspartyl proteases encoded by the K. lactis genome. A set of selectable marker-free protease deletion mutants was constructed in the prototrophic K. lactis GG799 industrial expression strain background using a PCR-based dominant marker recycling method based on the Aspergillus nidulans acetamidase gene (amdS). Each mutant was assessed for its secretion of protease activity, its health and growth characteristics, and its ability to efficiently produce heterologous proteins. In particular, despite having a longer lag phase and slower growth compared with the other mutants, a Δyps1 mutant demonstrated marked improvement in both the yield and the quality of Gaussia princeps luciferase and the human chimeric interferon Hy3, two proteins that experienced significant proteolysis when secreted from the wild-type parent strain. PMID:21166768

  20. Optimization of process parameters for the continuous ethanol production by Kluyveromyces lactis immobilized cells in hydrogel copolymer carrier.

    PubMed

    Deriase, S F; Farahat, L M; El-Batal, A I

    2001-01-01

    In the present study the optimized parameters for highest ethanol productivity by Kluyveromyces lactis immobilized cells bioreactor were obtained using the method of Lagrange multipliers. Immobilized growing yeast cells in PVA: HEMA (7%: 10%, w/w) hydrogel copolymer carrier produced by radiation polymerization were used in a packed-bed column reactor for the continuous production of ethanol from lactose at different levels of concentrations (50, 100 and 150) gL(-1). The results indicate that volumetric ethanol productivity is influenced by substrate concentration and dilution rate. The highest value 7.17 gL(-1) h(-1) is obtained at higher lactose concentration (150 gL(-1)) in feed medium and 0.3 h(-1) dilution rate. The same results have been obtained through the application of "LINGO" software for mathematical optimization. PMID:11518393

  1. Accurate initiation of mRNA synthesis in extracts from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Kluyveromyces lactis and Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Woontner, M; Jaehning, J A

    1993-12-01

    We demonstrate the successful adaptation to other yeast species of a protocol previously described for production of transcriptionally active whole cell extracts from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Woontner and Jaehning, 1990, J. Biol. Chem. 265, 8979-8982). Extracts prepared from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Kluyveromyces lactis and Candida glabrata were all capable of initiating transcription from a template containing the S. cerevisiae CYC1 TATA box fused to a G-less cassette. Transcription in all of the extracts was sensitive to inhibition by alpha-amanitin, indicating that it was catalysed by RNA polymerase II, and was dramatically stimulated by the chimeric activator GAL4/VP16. The different extracts used different subsets of a group of three initiation sites. PMID:8154183

  2. In vivo phosphorylation and in vitro autophosphorylation-inactivation of Kluyveromyces lactis hexokinase KlHxk1.

    PubMed

    Kettner, Karina; Kuettner, E Bartholomeus; Otto, Albrecht; Lilie, Hauke; Golbik, Ralph P; Sträter, Norbert; Kriegel, Thomas M

    2013-05-31

    The bifunctional hexokinase KlHxk1 is a key component of glucose-dependent signal transduction in Kluyveromyces lactis. KlHxk1 is phosphorylated in vivo and undergoes ATP-dependent autophosphorylation-inactivation in vitro. This study identifies serine-15 as the site of in vivo phosphorylation and serine-157 as the autophosphorylation-inactivation site. X-ray crystallography of the in vivo phosphorylated enzyme indicates the existence of a ring-shaped symmetrical homodimer carrying two phosphoserine-15 residues. In contrast, small-angle X-ray scattering and equilibrium sedimentation analyses reveal the existence of monomeric phosphoserine-15 KlHxk1 in solution. While phosphorylation at serine-15 and concomitant homodimer dissociation are likely to be involved in glucose signalling, mechanism and putative physiological significance of KlHxk1 inactivation by autophosphorylation at serine-157 remain to be established. PMID:23583397

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of hexokinase KlHxk1 from Kluyveromyces lactis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuettner, E. Bartholomeus; Kriegel, Thomas M.; Keim, Antje; Naumann, Manfred; Sträter, Norbert

    2007-05-01

    Crystals of the enzyme hexokinase 1 from the yeast K. lactis (KlHxk1) suitable for X-ray analysis were obtained in various space groups. Glucose acts as both a carbon source and a hormone-like regulator of gene expression in eukaryotic organisms from yeast to man. Phosphorylation of glucose is executed by hexokinases, which represent a class of multifunctional enzymes that, in addition to their contribution to the uptake and initiation of metabolism of glucose, fructose and mannose, are involved in glucose signalling. The genome of the budding yeast Kluyveromyces lactis encodes a single hexokinase (KlHxk1) and a single glucokinase (KlGlk1). KlHxk1 exists in a monomer–homodimer equilibrium which is presumed to play a role in metabolic regulation. In order to evaluate the physiological significance of KlHxk1 dimerization on a molecular level, the enzyme was crystallized and subjected to X-ray structure analysis. Crystallization employing ammonium sulfate, diammonium phosphate or polyethylene glycol 6000 at pH values of 8.0–9.5 gave seven different crystal forms of KlHxk1. Crystallographic data to 1.66 Å resolution were obtained using synchrotron radiation. Structure determination of KlHxk1 in various packing environments will reveal the full architecture of the homodimeric enzyme and complete our mechanistic understanding of the catalytic and regulatory functions of the enzyme.

  4. Simplified feeding strategies for the fed-batch cultivation of Kluyveromyces lactis GG799 for enhanced recombinant xylanase production.

    PubMed

    Fuzi, Siti Fatimah Zaharah Mohamad; Razali, Firdausi; Jahim, Jamaliah Md; Rahman, Roshanida A; Illias, Rosli Md

    2014-09-01

    A xylanase gene (xyn2) from Trichoderma reesei ATCC 58350 was previously cloned and expressed in Kluyveromyces lactis GG799. The production of the recombinant xylanase was conducted in a developed medium with an optimised batch and with fed-batches that were processed with glucose. The glucose served as a carbon source for cell growth and as an inducer for xylanase production. In a 1-L batch system, a glucose concentration of 20 g L(-1) and 80 % dissolved oxygen were found to provide the best conditions for the tested ranges. A xylanase activity of 75.53 U mL(-1) was obtained. However, in the batch mode, glucose depletions reduced the synthesis of recombinant xylanase by K. lactis GG799. To maximise the production of xylanase, further optimisation was performed using exponential feeding. We investigated the effects of various nitrogen sources combined with the carbon to nitrogen (C/N) molar ratio on the production of xylanase. Of the various nitrogen sources, yeast extract was found to be the most useful for recombinant xylanase production. The highest xylanase production (110.13 U mL(-1)) was measured at a C/N ratio of 50.08. These conditions led to a 45.8 % increase in xylanase activity compared with the batch cultures. Interestingly, the further addition of 500 g L(-1) glucose led to a 6.2-fold increase (465.07 U mL(-1)) in recombinant xylanase activity. These findings, together with those of the exponential feeding strategy, indicate that the composition of the C/N molar ratio has a substantial impact on recombinant protein production in K. lactis. PMID:24633311

  5. Role of Snf1p in regulation of intracellular sorting of the lactose and galactose transporter Lac12p in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Wiedemuth, Christian; Breunig, Karin D

    2005-04-01

    The protein kinase Snf1/AMPK plays a central role in carbon and energy homeostasis in yeasts and higher eukaryotes. To work out which aspects of the Snf1-controlled regulatory network are conserved in evolution, the Snf1 requirement in galactose metabolism was analyzed in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. Whereas galactose induction was only delayed, K. lactis snf1 mutants failed to accumulate the lactose/galactose H+ symporter Lac12p in the plasma membran,e as indicated by Lac12-green fluorescent protein fusions. In contrast to wild-type cells, the fusion protein was mostly intracellular in the mutant. Growth on galactose and galactose uptake could be restored by the KHT3 gene, which encodes a new transporter of the HXT subfamily of major facilitators These findings indicate a new role of Snf1p in regulation of sugar transport in K. lactis. PMID:15821131

  6. Kluyveromyces lactis cells entrapped in Ca-alginate beads for the continuous production of a heterologous glucoamylase.

    PubMed

    de Alteriis, Elisabetta; Silvestro, Giovanni; Poletto, Massimo; Romano, Vittorio; Capitanio, Daniele; Compagno, Concetta; Parascandola, Palma

    2004-04-01

    Viable cells of Kluyveromyces lactis, transformed with the glucoamylase gene from Arxula adeninivorans, were entrapped in beads of Ca-alginate and employed on a lab scale in a continuous stirred and a fluidised bed reactor (FBR), both fed with a rich medium (YEP) containing lactose as carbon source. Experiments with freely suspended cells in batch and chemostat had demonstrated that glucoamylase production was favoured in the presence of lactose and YEP medium. Employing controlled-sized beads having a 2.13 mm diameter, specific glucoamylase productivity was higher in the stirred reactor (CSTR) than in the FBR; in the latter a higher volumetric productivity was achieved, due to the lower void degree. The performance of the immobilised cell systems, in terms of specific glucoamylase productivity, was strongly affected by mass transfer limitations occurring throughout the gel due to the high molecular weight of the product. In the perspective to improve and scale-up the immobilised cell system proposed, a mathematical model, which takes into account substrate transfer limitations throughout the gel, has been developed. The effective lactose diffusivity was related to the bead reactive efficiency by means of the Thiele modulus. The regression of the model parameters on the experimental data of substrate consumption obtained both in the CSTR and in the FBR allowed to estimate lactose diffusivity and the kinetic parameters of the immobilised yeast. PMID:15063616

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of hexokinase KlHxk1 from Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Kuettner, E. Bartholomeus; Kriegel, Thomas M.; Keim, Antje; Naumann, Manfred; Sträter, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    Glucose acts as both a carbon source and a hormone-like regulator of gene expression in eukaryotic organisms from yeast to man. Phosphorylation of glucose is executed by hexokinases, which represent a class of multifunctional enzymes that, in addition to their contribution to the uptake and initiation of metabolism of glucose, fructose and mannose, are involved in glucose signalling. The genome of the budding yeast Kluyveromyces lactis encodes a single hexokinase (KlHxk1) and a single glucokinase (KlGlk1). KlHxk1 exists in a monomer–homodimer equilibrium which is presumed to play a role in metabolic regulation. In order to evaluate the physiological significance of KlHxk1 dimerization on a molecular level, the enzyme was crystallized and subjected to X-ray structure analysis. Crystallization employing ammonium sulfate, diammonium phosphate or polyethylene glycol 6000 at pH values of 8.0–9.5 gave seven different crystal forms of KlHxk1. Crystallographic data to 1.66 Å resolution were obtained using synchrotron radiation. Structure determination of KlHxk1 in various packing environments will reveal the full architecture of the homodimeric enzyme and complete our mechanistic understanding of the catalytic and regulatory functions of the enzyme. PMID:17565189

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of hexokinase KlHxk1 from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Kuettner, E Bartholomeus; Kriegel, Thomas M; Keim, Antje; Naumann, Manfred; Sträter, Norbert

    2007-05-01

    Glucose acts as both a carbon source and a hormone-like regulator of gene expression in eukaryotic organisms from yeast to man. Phosphorylation of glucose is executed by hexokinases, which represent a class of multifunctional enzymes that, in addition to their contribution to the uptake and initiation of metabolism of glucose, fructose and mannose, are involved in glucose signalling. The genome of the budding yeast Kluyveromyces lactis encodes a single hexokinase (KlHxk1) and a single glucokinase (KlGlk1). KlHxk1 exists in a monomer-homodimer equilibrium which is presumed to play a role in metabolic regulation. In order to evaluate the physiological significance of KlHxk1 dimerization on a molecular level, the enzyme was crystallized and subjected to X-ray structure analysis. Crystallization employing ammonium sulfate, diammonium phosphate or polyethylene glycol 6000 at pH values of 8.0-9.5 gave seven different crystal forms of KlHxk1. Crystallographic data to 1.66 A resolution were obtained using synchrotron radiation. Structure determination of KlHxk1 in various packing environments will reveal the full architecture of the homodimeric enzyme and complete our mechanistic understanding of the catalytic and regulatory functions of the enzyme. PMID:17565189

  9. KTI11 and KTI13, Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes controlling sensitivity to G1 arrest induced by Kluyveromyces lactis zymocin.

    PubMed

    Fichtner, Lars; Schaffrath, Raffael

    2002-05-01

    The Kluyveromyces lactis zymocin and its gamma-toxin subunit inhibit cell cycle progression of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To identify S. cerevisiae genes conferring zymocin sensitivity, we complemented the unclassified zymocin-resistant kti11 and kti13 mutations using a single-copy yeast library. Thus, we identified yeast open reading frames (ORFs) YBL071w-A and YAL020c/ATS1 as KTI11 and KTI13 respectively. Disruption of KTI11 and KTI13 results in the complex tot phenotype observed for the gamma-toxin target site mutants, tot1-7, and includes zymocin resistance, thermosensitivity, hypersensitivity to drugs and slow growth. Both loci, KTI11 and KTI13, are actively transcribed protein-encoding genes as determined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in vivo HA epitope tagging. Kti11p is highly conserved from yeast to man, and Kti13p/Ats1p is related to yeast Prp20p and mammalian RCC1, components of the Ran-GTP/GDP cycle. Combining disruptions in KTI11 or KTI13 with a deletion in TOT3/ELP3 coding for the RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) Elongator histone acetyltransferase (HAT) yielded synthetic effects on slow growth phenotype expression. This suggests genetic interaction and possibly links KTI11 and KTI13 to Elongator function. PMID:11994165

  10. Growth kinetics and physiological behavior of co-cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis, fermenting carob sugars extracted with whey.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, B; Lima-Costa, M E; Constantino, A; Raposo, S; Felizardo, C; Gonçalves, D; Fernandes, T; Dionísio, L; Peinado, J M

    2016-10-01

    Alcoholic fermentation of carob waste sugars (sucrose, glucose and fructose) extracted with cheese whey, by co-cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis has been analyzed. Growth and fermentation of S. cerevisiae in the carob-whey medium showed an inhibition of about 30% in comparison with water-extracted carob. The inhibition of K. lactis on carob-whey was greater (70%) when compared with the whey medium alone, due to osmolarity problems. Oxygen availability was a very important factor for K. lactis, influencing its fermentation performance. When K. lactis was grown alone on carob-whey medium, lactose was always consumed first, and glucose and fructose were consumed afterwards, only at high aeration conditions. In co-culture with S. cerevisiae, K. lactis was completely inhibited and, at low aeration, died after 3 days; at high aeration this culture could survive but growth and lactose fermentation were only recovered after S. cerevisiae became stationary. To overcome the osmolarity and K. lactis' oxygen problems, the medium had to be diluted and a sequential fermentative process was designed in a STR-3l reactor. K. lactis was inoculated first and, with low aeration (0.13vvm), consumed all the lactose in 48h. Then S. cerevisiae was inoculated, consuming the total of the carob sugars, and producing ethanol in a fed-batch regime. The established co-culture with K. lactis increased S. cerevisiae ethanol tolerance. This fermentation process produced ethanol with good efficiency (80g/l final concentration and a conversion factor of 0.4g ethanol/g sugar), eliminating all the sugars of the mixed waste. These efficient fermentative results pointed to a new joint treatment of agro-industrial wastes which may be implemented successfully, with economic and environmental sustainability for a bioethanol industrial proposal. PMID:27542743

  11. Fermentation and aerobic metabolism of cellodextrins by yeasts. [Candida wickerhamii; C. guiliermondii; C. molischiana; Debaryomyces polymorphus; Pichia guilliermondii; Clavispora lusitaniae; Kluyveromyces lactis; Brettanomyces claussenii; Rhodotorula minuta; Dekkera intermedia

    SciTech Connect

    Freer, S.N. )

    1991-03-01

    The fermentation and aerobic metabolism of cellodextrins by 14 yeast species or strains was monitored. When grown aerobically, Candida wickerhamii, C. guilliermondii, and C. molischiana metabolized cellodextrins of degree of polymerization 3 to 6. C. wicherhamii and C. molischiana also fermented these substrates, while C. guilliermondii fermented only cellodextrins of degree of polymerization {<=} 3. Debaryomyces polymorphus, Pichia guilliermondii, Clavispora lusitaniae, and one of two strains of Kluyveromyces lactis metabolized glucose, cellobiose, and cellotriose when grown aerobically. These yeasts also fermented these substrates, except for K. lactis, which fermented only glucose and cellobiose. The remaining species/strains tested, K. lactis, Brettanomyces claussenii, Brettanomyces anomalus, Kluyveromyces dobzhanskii, Rhodotorula minuta, and Dekkera intermedia, both fermented and aerobically metabolized glucose and cellobiose. Crude enzyme preparations from all 14 yeast species or strains were tested for ability to hydrolyze cellotriose and cellotretose. Most of the yeasts produced an enzyme(s) capable of hydrolyzing cellotriose. However, with two exceptions, R. minuta and P. guilliermondii, only the yeasts that metabolized cellodextrins of degree of polymerization >3 produced an enzyme(s) that hydrolyzed cellotretose.

  12. Trehalose-Mediated Inhibition of the Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase from Kluyveromyces lactis: Dependence on Viscosity and Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Sampedro, José G.; Muñoz-Clares, Rosario A.; Uribe, Salvador

    2002-01-01

    The effect of increasing trehalose concentrations on the kinetics of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase from Kluyveromyces lactis was studied at different temperatures. At 20°C, increasing concentrations of trehalose (0.2 to 0.8 M) decreased Vmax and increased S0.5 (substrate concentration when initial velocity equals 0.5 Vmax), mainly at high trehalose concentrations (0.6 to 0.8 M). The quotient Vmax/S0.5 decreased from 5.76 μmol of ATP mg of protein−1 min−1 mM−1 in the absence of trehalose to 1.63 μmol of ATP mg of protein−1 min−1 mM−1 in the presence of 0.8 M trehalose. The decrease in Vmax was linearly dependent on solution viscosity (η), suggesting that inhibition was due to hindering of protein domain diffusional motion during catalysis and in accordance with Kramer's theory for reactions in solution. In this regard, two other viscosity-increasing agents, sucrose and glycerol, behaved similarly, exhibiting the same viscosity-enzyme inhibition correlation predicted. In the absence of trehalose, increasing the temperature up to 40°C resulted in an exponential increase in Vmax and a decrease in enzyme cooperativity (n), while S0.5 was not modified. As temperature increased, the effect of trehalose on Vmax decreased to become negligible at 40°C, in good correlation with the temperature-mediated decrease in viscosity. The trehalose-mediated increase in S0.5 was similar at all temperatures tested, and thus, trehalose effects on Vmax/S0.5 were always observed. Trehalose increased the activation energy for ATP hydrolysis. Trehalose-mediated inhibition of enzymes may explain why yeast rapidly hydrolyzes trehalose when exiting heat shock. PMID:12142408

  13. Structure–activity relationships in Kluyveromyces lactis γ-toxin, a eukaryal tRNA anticodon nuclease

    PubMed Central

    Keppetipola, Niroshika; Jain, Ruchi; Meineke, Birthe; Diver, Melinda; Shuman, Stewart

    2009-01-01

    tRNA anticodon damage inflicted by secreted ribotoxins such as Kluyveromyces lactis γ-toxin and bacterial colicins underlies a rudimentary innate immune system that distinguishes self from nonself species. The intracellular expression of γ-toxin (a 232-amino acid polypeptide) arrests the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by incising a single RNA phosphodiester 3′ of the modified wobble base of tRNAGlu. Fungal γ-toxin bears no primary structure similarity to any known nuclease and has no plausible homologs in the protein database. To gain insight to γ-toxin's mechanism, we tested the effects of alanine mutations at 62 basic, acidic, and polar amino acids on ribotoxin activity in vivo. We thereby identified 22 essential residues, including 10 lysines, seven arginines, three glutamates, one cysteine, and one histidine (His209, the only histidine present in γ-toxin). Structure–activity relations were gleaned from the effects of 44 conservative substitutions. Recombinant tag-free γ-toxin, a monomeric protein, incised an oligonucleotide corresponding to the anticodon stem–loop of tRNAGlu at a single phosphodiester 3′ of the wobble uridine. The anticodon nuclease was metal independent. RNA cleavage was abolished by ribose 2′-H and 2′-F modifications of the wobble uridine. Mutating His209 to alanine, glutamine, or asparagine abolished nuclease activity. We propose that γ-toxin catalyzes an RNase A-like transesterification reaction that relies on His209 and a second nonhistidine side chain as general acid–base catalysts. PMID:19383764

  14. KlSEC53 is an essential Kluyveromyces lactis gene and is homologous with the SEC53 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Staneva, Dessislava; Uccelletti, Daniela; Farina, Francesca; Venkov, Pencho; Palleschi, Claudio

    2004-01-15

    Phosphomannomutase (PMM) is a key enzyme, which catalyses one of the first steps in the glycosylation pathway, the conversion of D-mannose-6-phosphate to D-mannose-1-phosphate. The latter is the substrate for the synthesis of GDP-mannose, which serves as the mannosyl donor for the glycosylation reactions in eukaryotic cells. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae PMM is encoded by the gene SEC53 (ScSEC53) and the deficiency of PMM activity leads to severe defects in both protein glycosylation and secretion. We report here on the isolation of the Kluyveromyces lactis SEC53 (KlSEC53) gene from a genomic library by virtue of its ability to complement a Saccharomyces cerevisiae sec53 mutation. The sequenced DNA fragment contained an open reading frame of 765 bp, coding for a predicted polypeptide, KlSec53p, of 254 amino acids. The KlSec53p displays a high degree of homology with phosphomannomutases from other yeast species, protozoans, plants and humans. Our results have demonstrated that KlSEC53 is the functional homologue of the ScSEC53 gene. Like ScSEC53, the KlSEC53 gene is essential for K. lactis cell viability. Phenotypic analysis of a K. lactis strain overexpressing the KlSEC53 gene revealed defects expected for impaired cell wall integrity. PMID:14745781

  15. Galactokinase encoded by GAL1 is a bifunctional protein required for induction of the GAL genes in Kluyveromyces lactis and is able to suppress the gal3 phenotype in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J; Walker-Jonah, A; Hollenberg, C P

    1991-11-01

    We have analyzed a GAL1 mutant (gal1-r strain) of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis which lacks the induction of beta-galactosidase and the enzymes of the Leloir pathway in the presence of galactose. The data show that the K. lactis GAL1 gene product has, in addition to galactokinase activity, a function required for induction of the lactose system. This regulatory function is not dependent on galactokinase activity, as it is still present in a galactokinase-negative mutant (gal1-209). Complementation studies in Saccharomyces cervisiae show that K. lactis GAL1 and gal1-209, but not gal1-r, complement the gal3 mutation. We conclude that the regulatory function of GAL1 in K. lactis soon after induction is similar to the function of GAL3 in S. cerevisiae. PMID:1922058

  16. KlGcr1 controls glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and responses to H2O2, cadmium and arsenate in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Lamas-Maceiras, Mónica; Rodríguez-Belmonte, Esther; Becerra, Manuel; González-Siso, Ma Isabel; Cerdán, Ma Esperanza

    2015-09-01

    It has been previously reported that Gcr1 differentially controls growth and sugar utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis, although the regulatory mechanisms causing activation of glycolytic genes are conserved (Neil et al., 2004). We have found that KlGCR1 deletion diminishes glucose consumption and ethanol production, but increases resistance to oxidative stress caused by H2O2, cadmium and arsenate, glucose 6P dehydrogenase activity, and the NADPH/NADP(+) and GSH/GSSG ratios in K. lactis. The gene KlZWF1 that encodes for glucose 6P dehydrogenase, the first enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway, is transcriptionally regulated by KlGcr1. The high resistance to oxidative stress observed in the ΔKlgcr1 mutant strain, could be explained as a consequence of an increased flux of glucose through the pentose phosphate pathway. Since mitochondrial respiration decreases in the ΔKlgcr1 mutant (García-Leiro et al., 2010), the reoxidation of the NADPH, produced through the pentose phosphate pathway, has to be achieved by the reduction of other molecules implied in the defense against oxidative stress, like GSSG. The higher GSH/GSSG ratio in the mutant would explain its phenotype of increased resistance to oxidative stress. PMID:26164373

  17. The Inactivation of KlNOT4, a Kluyveromyces lactis Gene Encoding a Component of the CCR4-NOT Complex, Reveals New Regulatory Functions

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoni, Cristina; Serafini, Agnese; Falcone, Claudio

    2005-01-01

    We have isolated the KlNOT4 gene of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, which encodes a component of the evolutionarily conserved CCR4-NOT complex. We show that inactivation of the gene leads to pleiotropic defects that were differentially suppressed by the NOT4 gene of S. cerevisiae, indicating that these genes have overlapping, but not identical, functions. K. lactis strains lacking Not4p are defective in fermentation and show reduced transcription of glucose transporter and glycolytic genes, which are phenotypes that are not found in the corresponding mutant of S. cerevisiae. We also show that Not4 proteins control the respiratory pathway in both yeasts, although with some differences. They activate transcription of KlACS2 and KlCYC1, but repress KlICL1, ScICL1, ScACS1, and ScCYC1. Altogether, our results indicate that Not4p is a pivotal factor involved in the regulation of carbon metabolism in yeast.

  18. Molecular analysis of UAS(E), a cis element containing stress response elements responsible for ethanol induction of the KlADH4 gene of Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, C; Santori, F; Saliola, M; Falcone, C

    2000-01-01

    KlADH4 is a gene of Kluyveromyces lactis encoding a mitochondrial alcohol dehydrogenase activity, which is specifically induced by ethanol and insensitive to glucose repression. In this work, we report the molecular analysis of UAS(E), an element of the KlADH4 promoter which is essential for the induction of KlADH4 in the presence of ethanol. UAS(E) contains five stress response elements (STREs), which have been found in many genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae involved in the response of cells to conditions of stress. Whereas KlADH4 is not responsive to stress conditions, the STREs present in UAS(E) seem to play a key role in the induction of the gene by ethanol, a situation that has not been observed in the related yeast S. cerevisiae. Gel retardation experiments showed that STREs in the KlADH4 promoter can bind factor(s) under non-inducing conditions. Moreover, we observed that the RAP1 binding site present in UAS(E) binds KlRap1p. PMID:10724480

  19. Enolase and Glycolytic Flux Play a Role in the Regulation of the Glucose Permease Gene RAG1 of Kluyveromyces lactis

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Marc; Wésolowski-Louvel, Micheline

    2004-01-01

    We isolated a mutant, rag17, which is impaired in glucose induction of expression of the major glucose transporter gene RAG1. The RAG17 gene encodes a protein 87% identical to S. cerevisiae enolases (Eno1 and Eno2). The Kleno null mutant showed no detectable enolase enzymatic activity and has severe growth defects on glucose and gluconeogenic carbon sources, indicating that K. lactis has a single enolase gene. In addition to RAG1, the transcription of several glycolytic genes was also strongly reduced in the ΔKleno mutant. Moreover, the defect in RAG1 expression was observed in other mutants of the glycolytic pathway (hexokinase and phosphoglycerate kinase). Therefore, it seems that the enolase and a functional glycolytic flux are necessary for induction of expression of the Rag1 glucose permease in K. lactis. PMID:15514048

  20. Crystal structure of hexokinase KlHxk1 of Kluyveromyces lactis: a molecular basis for understanding the control of yeast hexokinase functions via covalent modification and oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Kuettner, E Bartholomeus; Kettner, Karina; Keim, Antje; Svergun, Dmitri I; Volke, Daniela; Singer, David; Hoffmann, Ralf; Müller, Eva-Christina; Otto, Albrecht; Kriegel, Thomas M; Sträter, Norbert

    2010-12-24

    Crystal structures of the unique hexokinase KlHxk1 of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis were determined using eight independent crystal forms. In five crystal forms, a symmetrical ring-shaped homodimer was observed, corresponding to the physiological dimer existing in solution as shown by small-angle x-ray scattering. The dimer has a head-to-tail arrangement such that the small domain of one subunit interacts with the large domain of the other subunit. Dimer formation requires favorable interactions of the 15 N-terminal amino acids that are part of the large domain with amino acids of the small domain of the opposite subunit, respectively. The head-to-tail arrangement involving both domains of the two KlHxk1 subunits is appropriate to explain the reduced activity of the homodimer as compared with the monomeric enzyme and the influence of substrates and products on dimer formation and dissociation. In particular, the structure of the symmetrical KlHxk1 dimer serves to explain why phosphorylation of conserved residue Ser-15 may cause electrostatic repulsions with nearby negatively charged residues of the adjacent subunit, thereby inducing a dissociation of the homologous dimeric hexokinases KlHxk1 and ScHxk2. Two complex structures of KlHxk1 with bound glucose provide a molecular model of substrate binding to the open conformation and the subsequent classical domain closure motion of yeast hexokinases. The entirety of the novel data extends the current concept of glucose signaling in yeast and complements the induced-fit model by integrating the events of N-terminal phosphorylation and dissociation of homodimeric yeast hexokinases. PMID:20943665

  1. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bat1 and Bat2 Aminotransferases Have Functionally Diverged from the Ancestral-Like Kluyveromyces lactis Orthologous Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Colón, Maritrini; Hernández, Fabiola; López, Karla; Quezada, Héctor; González, James; López, Geovani; Aranda, Cristina; González, Alicia

    2011-01-01

    Background Gene duplication is a key evolutionary mechanism providing material for the generation of genes with new or modified functions. The fate of duplicated gene copies has been amply discussed and several models have been put forward to account for duplicate conservation. The specialization model considers that duplication of a bifunctional ancestral gene could result in the preservation of both copies through subfunctionalization, resulting in the distribution of the two ancestral functions between the gene duplicates. Here we investigate whether the presumed bifunctional character displayed by the single branched chain amino acid aminotransferase present in K. lactis has been distributed in the two paralogous genes present in S. cerevisiae, and whether this conservation has impacted S. cerevisiae metabolism. Principal Findings Our results show that the KlBat1 orthologous BCAT is a bifunctional enzyme, which participates in the biosynthesis and catabolism of branched chain aminoacids (BCAAs). This dual role has been distributed in S. cerevisiae Bat1 and Bat2 paralogous proteins, supporting the specialization model posed to explain the evolution of gene duplications. BAT1 is highly expressed under biosynthetic conditions, while BAT2 expression is highest under catabolic conditions. Bat1 and Bat2 differential relocalization has favored their physiological function, since biosynthetic precursors are generated in the mitochondria (Bat1), while catabolic substrates are accumulated in the cytosol (Bat2). Under respiratory conditions, in the presence of ammonium and BCAAs the bat1Δ bat2Δ double mutant shows impaired growth, indicating that Bat1 and Bat2 could play redundant roles. In K. lactis wild type growth is independent of BCAA degradation, since a Klbat1Δ mutant grows under this condition. Conclusions Our study shows that BAT1 and BAT2 differential expression and subcellular relocalization has resulted in the distribution of the biosynthetic and catabolic

  2. Kluyveromyces contains a functional ABF1-homologue.

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, P M; Maurer, K; Mager, W H; Planta, R J

    1992-01-01

    ABF1 is a multifunctional protein present in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, involved in transcription-activation and -repression as well as in DNA-replication. Several lines of evidence indicate the occurrence in the related species Kluyveromyces lactis of a protein having similar properties to those of ABF1 in S. cerevisiae. In order to identify conserved functional domains in ABF1, we have cloned and sequenced the gene encoding the ABF1-homologue from K. lactis. KIABF1 is much smaller than ScABF1 (54.6 vs. 81.7 kD). It exhibits extensive homology with its S. cerevisiae counterpart in the N-terminal region. The C-terminal domain however, is divergent, with the striking exception of a stretch of 20 amino acids, which is virtually identical in the two proteins. KIABF1 can substitute ABF1 in S. cerevisiae, emphasizing the conservation of the multiple functions of this protein. Images PMID:1594441

  3. Pheromone Signalling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Adam G.

    2011-01-01

    Pheromones are chemicals used to communicate with members of the same species. First described in insects, pheromones are often used to attract mates but in social insects, such as ants and bees, pheromone use is much more sophisticated. For example, ants use pheromones to make foraging trails and the chemical and physical properties of the…

  4. Heterologous expression of glucose oxidase in the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In spite of its advantageous physiological properties for bioprocess applications, the use of the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus as a host for heterologous protein production has been very limited, in constrast to its close relative Kluyveromyces lactis. In the present work, the model protein glucose oxidase (GOX) from Aspergillus niger was cloned into K. marxianus CBS 6556 and into K. lactis CBS 2359 using three different expression systems. We aimed at verifying how each expression system would affect protein expression, secretion/localization, post-translational modification, and biochemical properties. Results The highest GOX expression levels (1552 units of secreted protein per gram dry cell weight) were achieved using an episomal system, in which the INU1 promoter and terminator were used to drive heterologous gene expression, together with the INU1 prepro sequence, which was employed to drive secretion of the enzyme. In all cases, GOX was mainly secreted, remaining either in the periplasmic space or in the culture supernatant. Whereas the use of genetic elements from Saccharomyces cerevisiae to drive heterologous protein expression led to higher expression levels in K. lactis than in K. marxianus, the use of INU1 genetic elements clearly led to the opposite result. The biochemical characterization of GOX confirmed the correct expression of the protein and showed that K. marxianus has a tendency to hyperglycosylate the protein, in a similar way as already observed for other yeasts, although this tendency seems to be smaller than the one of e.g. K. lactis and S. cerevisiae. Hyperglycosylation of GOX does not seem to affect its affinity for the substrate, nor its activity. Conclusions Taken together, our results indicate that K. marxianus is indeed a good host for the expression of heterologous proteins, not only for its physiological properties, but also because it correctly secretes and folds these proteins. PMID:20092622

  5. Mammalian pheromones.

    PubMed

    Liberles, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian pheromones control a myriad of innate social behaviors and acutely regulate hormone levels. Responses to pheromones are highly robust, reproducible, and stereotyped and likely involve developmentally predetermined neural circuits. Here, I review several facets of pheromone transduction in mammals, including (a) chemosensory receptors and signaling components of the main olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ involved in pheromone detection; (b) pheromone-activated neural circuits subject to sex-specific and state-dependent modulation; and (c) the striking chemical diversity of mammalian pheromones, which range from small, volatile molecules and sulfated steroids to large families of proteins. Finally, I review (d) molecular mechanisms underlying various behavioral and endocrine responses, including modulation of puberty and estrous; control of reproduction, aggression, suckling, and parental behaviors; individual recognition; and distinguishing of own species from predators, competitors, and prey. Deconstruction of pheromone transduction mechanisms provides a critical foundation for understanding how odor response pathways generate instinctive behaviors. PMID:23988175

  6. Mammalian Pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Liberles, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian pheromones control a myriad of innate social behaviors and acutely regulate hormone levels. Responses to pheromones are highly robust, reproducible, and stereotyped and likely involve developmentally predetermined neural circuits. Here, I review several facets of pheromone transduction in mammals, including (a) chemosensory receptors and signaling components of the main olfactory epithelium and vomeronasal organ involved in pheromone detection; (b) pheromone-activated neural circuits subject to sex-specific and state-dependent modulation; and (c) the striking chemical diversity of mammalian pheromones, which range from small, volatile molecules and sulfated steroids to large families of proteins. Finally, I review (d ) molecular mechanisms underlying various behavioral and endocrine responses, including modulation of puberty and estrous; control of reproduction, aggression, suckling, and parental behaviors; individual recognition; and distinguishing of own species from predators, competitors, and prey. Deconstruction of pheromone transduction mechanisms provides a critical foundation for understanding how odor response pathways generate instinctive behaviors. PMID:23988175

  7. Kefir-isolated Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis inhibits the cytotoxic effect of Clostridium difficile in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bolla, Patricia Araceli; Carasi, Paula; Serradell, María de los Angeles; De Antoni, Graciela Liliana

    2013-02-01

    Kefir is a dairy product obtained by fermentation of milk with a complex microbial population and several health-promoting properties have been attributed to its consumption. In this work, we tested the ability of different kefir-isolated bacterial and yeast strains (Lactobacillus kefir, Lb. plantarum, Lactococcus lactis subps. lactis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces marxianus) or a mixture of them (MM) to antagonise the cytopathic effect of toxins from Clostridium difficile (TcdA and TcdB). Cell detachment assays and F-actin network staining using Vero cell line were performed. Although incubation with microbial cells did not reduce the damage induced by C. difficile spent culture supernatant (SCS), Lc. lactis CIDCA 8221 and MM supernatants were able to inhibit the cytotoxicity of SCS to Vero cells. Fraction of Lc. lactis CIDCA 8221 supernatant containing components higher than 10 kDa were responsible for the inhibitory activity and heating of this fraction for 15 min at 100 °C completely abrogated this ability. By dot-blot assay with anti-TcdA or anti-TcdB antibodies, concentration of both toxins seems to be reduced in SCS treated with Lc. lactis CIDCA 8221 supernatant. However, protective effect was not affected by treatment with proteases or proteases-inhibitors tested. In conclusion, we demonstrated that kefir-isolated Lc. lactis CIDCA 8221 secreted heat-sensitive products able to protect eukaryotic cells from cytopathic effect of C. difficile toxins in vitro. Our findings provide new insights into the probiotic action of microorganisms isolated from kefir against virulence factors from intestinal pathogens. PMID:23217732

  8. Aphid pheromones.

    PubMed

    Dewhirst, Sarah Y; Pickett, John A; Hardie, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Aphids are the main insect pests of agricultural crops in temperate regions causing major economic losses. Although broad-spectrum insecticides are available for control, alternative and more targeted methods are needed due to insecticide resistance and increasing environmental pressures. An alternative control method for aphids is to exploit their pheromones, which have been extensively studied in recent years. For example, aphids release alarm pheromones in response to natural enemy attack and these could be used to deter aphids from the crops. Sex pheromones have also been identified which could be used to interfere males locating conspecific females (oviparae), as well as for manipulating natural enemies. Several hypotheses relating to how species integrity is maintained via the aphid sex pheromone have been proposed. The composition and behavioral activity of these pheromones, and how their use could be implemented in integrated pest management systems to control aphids, is discussed. PMID:20831961

  9. Production of lactulose oligosaccharides by isomerisation of transgalactosylated cheese whey permeate obtained by β-galactosidases from dairy Kluyveromyces.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Beatriz; Frau, Florencia; Ruiz-Matute, Ana Isabel; Montilla, Antonia; Belloch, Carmela; Manzanares, Paloma; Corzo, Nieves

    2015-08-01

    β-Galactosidases from Kluyveromyces lactis and Kluyveromyces marxianus isolated from artisanal ewes' milk cheeses, were used to transgalactosylate lactose from cheese whey permeate (WP). The content of galactooligosaccharides (GOS) obtained by transgalactosylation was comparable with that formed using pure lactose as substrate. In order to obtain a mixture with higher prebiotic oligosaccharide content, isomerisation of the transgalactosylated WP was carried out using sodium aluminate as catalyst. The transgalactosylated mixtures at 6 h of reaction contained amounts of prebiotic carbohydrates (tagatose, lactulose, GOS and oligosaccharides derived from lactulose, OsLu) close to 50 g/100 g of total carbohydrates for all the strains tested, corresponding to 322 g prebiotics/kg whey permeate. Thus, the suitability of this methodology to produce mixtures of dietary non-digestible carbohydrates with prebiotic properties from WP has been demonstrated, which is interesting for the food industry since it increases the value and the applicability of this by-product from cheese manufacture. PMID:26004434

  10. Nisin production from Lactococcus lactis A.T.C.C. 7962 using supplemented whey permeate.

    PubMed

    Flôres, S H; Alegre, R M

    2001-10-01

    The influence of pH control and aeration (20% dissolved oxygen) on nisin production in a supplemented cheese whey permeate was examined during batch fermentation with Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis A.T.C.C. 7962. A maximum nisin activity of 5280 i.u./ml of medium was observed in the raw extract of nisin after 9 h of fermentation with a constant pH at 4.9. However, the fermentation was continued until 24 h, when a decrease in the nisin activity was observed. The pH control did not influence the nisin production and aeration of the culture medium increased cell growth (biomass) but not nisin activity. The yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus, used as an alternative method to control pH, has not been efficient. PMID:11592916

  11. The pheromone emergency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Female moths utilize sex pheromones to attract mates across a potentially long geographic distance. The biochemical basis of how moth female sex pheromones are synthesized has been elucidated in a number of species, and a particularly large amount of effort has been expended on the agricultural pes...

  12. Stereochemical studies on pheromonal communications

    PubMed Central

    MORI, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Pheromonal communications are heavily dependent on the stereochemistry of pheromones. Their enantioselective syntheses could establish the absolute configuration of the naturally occurring pheromones, and clarified the unique relationships between absolute configuration and bioactivity. For example, neither the (R)- nor (S)-enantiomer of sulcatol, the aggregation pheromone of an ambrosia beetle, is behaviorally active, while their mixture is bioactive. Recent results as summarized in the present review further illustrate the unique and diverse relationships between stereochemistry and bioactivity of pheromones. PMID:25504227

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Strain YF11

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yuhui; Song, Lifu; Feng, Wenjing; Pei, Guangsheng; Zheng, Ping; Yu, Zhichao; Sun, Jibin

    2013-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strain YF11 is a food preservative bacterium with a high capacity to produce nisin. Here, we announce the draft genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis YF11 (2,527,433 bp with a G+C content of 34.81%). PMID:23929487

  14. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-galactoside galactohydrase (CAS Reg. No. CBS 683), which converts lactose to glucose and galactose. It is... in § 170.3(o)(9) of this chapter to convert lactose to glucose and galactose. (2) The ingredient...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-galactoside galactohydrase (CAS Reg. No. CBS 683), which converts lactose to glucose and galactose. It is... in § 170.3(o)(9) of this chapter to convert lactose to glucose and galactose. (2) The ingredient...

  16. Enhancement of Nisin Production by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    PubMed

    Dussault, Dominic; Vu, Khanh Dang; Lacroix, Monique

    2016-09-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp lactis BSA (L. lactis BSA) was isolated from a commercial fermented product (BSA Food Ingredients, Montreal, Canada) containing mixed bacteria that are used as starter for food fermentation. In order to increase the bacteriocin production by L. lactis BSA, different fermentation conditions were conducted. They included different volumetric combinations of two culture media (the Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS) broth and skim milk), agitation level (0 and 100 rpm) and concentration of commercial nisin (0, 0.15, and 0.30 µg/ml) added into culture media as stimulant agent for nisin production. During fermentation, samples were collected and used for antibacterial evaluation against Lactobacillus sakei using agar diffusion assay. Results showed that medium containing 50 % MRS broth and 50 % skim milk gave better antibacterial activity as compared to other medium formulations. Agitation (100 rpm) did not improve nisin production by L. lactis BSA. Adding 0.15 µg/ml of nisin into the medium-containing 50 % MRS broth and 50 % skim milk caused the highest nisin activity of 18,820 AU/ml as compared to other medium formulations. This activity was 4 and ~3 times higher than medium containing 100 % MRS broth without added nisin (~4700 AU/ml) and 100 % MRS broth with 0.15 µg/ml of added nisin (~6650 AU/ml), respectively. PMID:27147536

  17. Pheromone Transduction in Moths

    PubMed Central

    Stengl, Monika

    2010-01-01

    Calling female moths attract their mates late at night with intermittent release of a species-specific sex-pheromone blend. Mean frequency of pheromone filaments encodes distance to the calling female. In their zig-zagging upwind search male moths encounter turbulent pheromone blend filaments at highly variable concentrations and frequencies. The male moth antennae are delicately designed to detect and distinguish even traces of these sex pheromones amongst the abundance of other odors. Its olfactory receptor neurons sense even single pheromone molecules and track intermittent pheromone filaments of highly variable frequencies up to about 30 Hz over a wide concentration range. In the hawkmoth Manduca sexta brief, weak pheromone stimuli as encountered during flight are detected via a metabotropic PLCβ-dependent signal transduction cascade which leads to transient changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. Strong or long pheromone stimuli, which are possibly perceived in direct contact with the female, activate receptor-guanylyl cyclases causing long-term adaptation. In addition, depending on endogenous rhythms of the moth's physiological state, hormones such as the stress hormone octopamine modulate second messenger levels in sensory neurons. High octopamine levels during the activity phase maximize temporal resolution cAMP-dependently as a prerequisite to mate location. Thus, I suggest that sliding adjustment of odor response threshold and kinetics is based upon relative concentration ratios of intracellular Ca2+ and cyclic nucleotide levels which gate different ion channels synergistically. In addition, I propose a new hypothesis for the cyclic nucleotide-dependent ion channel formed by insect olfactory receptor/coreceptor complexes. Instead of being employed for an ionotropic mechanism of odor detection it is proposed to control subthreshold membrane potential oscillation of sensory neurons, as a basis for temporal encoding of odors. PMID:21228914

  18. Laboratory Syntheses of Insect Pheromones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cormier, Russell A.; Hoban, James N.

    1984-01-01

    Provides background information and procedures for the multi-step synthesis of tiger moth and boll weevil pheromones (sex attractants). These syntheses require several laboratory periods. The tiger moth pheromone synthesis is suitable for introductory organic chemistry while the boll weevil pheromone is recommended for an advanced laboratory…

  19. Volatile Hydrocarbon Pheromones from Beetles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter reviews literature about hydrocarbons from beetles that serve as long-range pheromones. The most thoroughly studied beetles that use volatile hydrocarbon pheromones belong to the family Nitidulidae in the genera Carpophilus and Colopterus. Published pheromone research deals with behav...

  20. Exploring the Genome of Cheese Starter Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CECT 4433

    PubMed Central

    Tschoeke, Diogo Antonio; Moreira, Ana Paula B.; Chimetto Tonon, Luciane A.; de Mesquita, Milene Miranda A.; Gregoracci, Gustavo B.; Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Valle, Rogério; Thompson, Cristiane C.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequences of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CECT 4433, a cheese fermentation starter strain. The genome provides further insight into the genomic plasticity, biocomplexity (including gene strain specifics), and evolution of these genera. PMID:25395632

  1. Exploring the Genome of Cheese Starter Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CECT 4433.

    PubMed

    Tschoeke, Diogo Antonio; Moreira, Ana Paula B; Chimetto Tonon, Luciane A; de Mesquita, Milene Miranda A; Gregoracci, Gustavo B; Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Valle, Rogério; Thompson, Cristiane C; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequences of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CECT 4433, a cheese fermentation starter strain. The genome provides further insight into the genomic plasticity, biocomplexity (including gene strain specifics), and evolution of these genera. PMID:25395632

  2. Pheromone production in bark beetles.

    PubMed

    Blomquist, Gary J; Figueroa-Teran, Rubi; Aw, Mory; Song, Minmin; Gorzalski, Andrew; Abbott, Nicole L; Chang, Eric; Tittiger, Claus

    2010-10-01

    The first aggregation pheromone components from bark beetles were identified in 1966 as a mixture of ipsdienol, ipsenol and verbenol. Since then, a number of additional components have been identified as both aggregation and anti-aggregation pheromones, with many of them being monoterpenoids or derived from monoterpenoids. The structural similarity between the major pheromone components of bark beetles and the monoterpenes found in the host trees, along with the association of monoterpenoid production with plant tissue, led to the paradigm that most if not all bark beetle pheromone components were derived from host tree precursors, often with a simple hydroxylation producing the pheromone. In the 1990 s there was a paradigm shift as evidence for de novo biosynthesis of pheromone components began to accumulate, and it is now recognized that most bark beetle monoterpenoid aggregation pheromone components are biosynthesized de novo. The bark beetle aggregation pheromones are released from the frass, which is consistent with the isoprenoid aggregation pheromones, including ipsdienol, ipsenol and frontalin, being produced in midgut tissue. It appears that exo-brevocomin is produced de novo in fat body tissue, and that verbenol, verbenone and verbenene are produced from dietary α-pinene in fat body tissue. Combined biochemical, molecular and functional genomics studies in Ips pini yielded the discovery and characterization of the enzymes that convert mevalonate pathway intermediates to pheromone components, including a novel bifunctional geranyl diphosphate synthase/myrcene synthase, a cytochrome P450 that hydroxylates myrcene to ipsdienol, and an oxidoreductase that interconverts ipsdienol and ipsdienone to achieve the appropriate stereochemistry of ipsdienol for pheromonal activity. Furthermore, the regulation of these genes and their corresponding enzymes proved complex and diverse in different species. Mevalonate pathway genes in pheromone producing male I. pini

  3. Pheromone Autodetection: Evidence and Implications.

    PubMed

    Holdcraft, Robert; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Stelinski, Lukasz L

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory communication research with insects utilizing sex pheromones has focused on the effects of pheromones on signal receivers. Early pheromone detection studies using the silkworm moth, Bombyx mori L., and Saturniids led to the assumption that emitters, especially females, are unable to detect their own pheromone. Pheromone anosmia, i.e., the inability of females to detect their conspecific sex pheromone, was often assumed, and initially little attention was paid to female behaviors that may result from autodetection, i.e., the ability of females to detect their sex pheromone. Detection of conspecific pheromone plumes from nearby females may provide information to improve chances of mating success and progeny survival. Since the first documented example in 1972, numerous occurrences of autodetection have been observed and verified in field and laboratory studies. We summarize here a significant portion of research relating to autodetection. Electrophysiological and behavioral investigations, as well as expression patterns of proteins involved in pheromone autodetection are included. We discuss problems inherent in defining a boundary between sex and aggregation pheromones considering the occurrence of autodetection, and summarize hypothesized selection pressures favoring autodetection. Importance of including autodetection studies in future work is emphasized by complications arising from a lack of knowledge combined with expanding the use of pheromones in agriculture. PMID:27120623

  4. Pheromone Autodetection: Evidence and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Holdcraft, Robert; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Stelinski, Lukasz L.

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory communication research with insects utilizing sex pheromones has focused on the effects of pheromones on signal receivers. Early pheromone detection studies using the silkworm moth, Bombyx mori L., and Saturniids led to the assumption that emitters, especially females, are unable to detect their own pheromone. Pheromone anosmia, i.e., the inability of females to detect their conspecific sex pheromone, was often assumed, and initially little attention was paid to female behaviors that may result from autodetection, i.e., the ability of females to detect their sex pheromone. Detection of conspecific pheromone plumes from nearby females may provide information to improve chances of mating success and progeny survival. Since the first documented example in 1972, numerous occurrences of autodetection have been observed and verified in field and laboratory studies. We summarize here a significant portion of research relating to autodetection. Electrophysiological and behavioral investigations, as well as expression patterns of proteins involved in pheromone autodetection are included. We discuss problems inherent in defining a boundary between sex and aggregation pheromones considering the occurrence of autodetection, and summarize hypothesized selection pressures favoring autodetection. Importance of including autodetection studies in future work is emphasized by complications arising from a lack of knowledge combined with expanding the use of pheromones in agriculture. PMID:27120623

  5. Characterization of N-deoxyribosyltransferase from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yukiko; Masaki, Takeharu; Chohnan, Shigeru

    2007-10-01

    A nucleoside N-deoxyribosyltransferase-homologous gene was detected by homological search in the genomic DNA of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. The gene yejD is composed of 477 nucleotides encoding 159 amino acids with only 25% identity, which is low in comparison to the amino acid sequences of the N-deoxyribosyltransferases from other lactic acid bacteria, i.e. Lactobacillus leichmannii and Lactobacillus helveticus. The residues responsible for catalytic and substrate-binding sites in known enzymes are conserved at Gln49, Asp73, Asp93 (or Asp95), and Glu101, respectively. The recombinant YejD expressed in Escherichia coli shows a 2-deoxyribosyl transfer activity to and from both bases of purine and pyrimidine, showing that YejD should be categorized as a class II N-deoxyribosyltransferase. Interestingly, the base-exchange activity as well as the heat stability of YejD was enhanced by the presence of monovalent cations such as K(+), NH(4)(+), and Rb(+), indicating that the Lactococcus enzyme is a K(+)-activated Type II enzyme. However, divalent cations including Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) significantly inhibit the activity. Whether or not the yejD gene product actually participates in the nucleoside salvage pathway of Lc. lactis remains unclear, but the lactic acid bacterium possesses the gene coding for the nucleoside N-deoxyribosyltransferase activated by K(+) on its genome. PMID:17881307

  6. Endless versatility in the biotechnological applications of Kluyveromyces LAC genes.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Texeira, Marta

    2006-01-01

    Most microorganisms adapted to life in milk owe their ability to thrive in this habitat to the evolution of mechanisms for the use of the most abundant sugar present on it, lactose, as a carbon source. Because of their lactose-assimilating ability, Kluyveromyces yeasts have long been used in industrial processes involved in the elimination of this sugar. The identification of the genes conferring Kluyveromyces with a system for permeabilization and intracellular hydrolysis of lactose (LAC genes), along with the current possibilities for their transfer into alternative organisms through genetic engineering, has significantly broadened the industrial profitability of lactic yeasts. This review provides an updated overview of the general properties of Kluyveromyces LAC genes, and the multiple techniques involving their biotechnological utilization. Emphasis is also made on the potential that some of the latest technologies, such as the generation of transgenics, will have for a further benefit in the use of these and related genes. PMID:16289464

  7. Microbiota of Minas cheese as influenced by the nisin producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis GLc05.

    PubMed

    Perin, Luana Martins; Dal Bello, Barbara; Belviso, Simona; Zeppa, Giuseppe; de Carvalho, Antônio Fernandes; Cocolin, Luca; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2015-12-01

    Minas cheese is a popular dairy product in Brazil that is traditionally produced using raw or pasteurized cow milk. This study proposed an alternative production of Minas cheese using raw goat milk added of a nisin producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis GLc05. An in situ investigation was carried on to evaluate the interactions between the L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 and the autochthonous microbiota of a Minas cheese during the ripening; production of biogenic amines (BAs) was assessed as a safety aspect. Minas cheese was produced in two treatments (A, by adding L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05, and B, without adding this strain), in three independent repetitions (R1, R2, and R3). Culture dependent (direct plating) and independent (rep-PCR and PCR-DGGE) methods were employed to characterize the microbiota and to assess the possible interferences caused by L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05. BA amounts were measured using HPLC. A significant decrease in coagulase-positive cocci was observed in the cheeses produced by adding L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 (cheese A). The rep-PCR and PCR-DGGE highlighted the differences in the microbiota of both cheeses, separating them into two different clusters. Lactococcus sp. was found as the main microorganism in both cheeses, and the microbiota of cheese A presented a higher number of species. High concentrations of tyramine were found in both cheeses and, at specific ripening times, the BA amounts in cheese B were significantly higher than in cheese A (p<0.05). The interaction of nisin producer L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 was demonstrated in situ, by demonstration of its influence in the complex microbiota naturally present in a raw goat milk cheese and by controlling the growth of coagulase-positive cocci. L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 influenced also the production of BA determining that their amounts in the cheeses were maintained at acceptable levels for human consumption. PMID:26310130

  8. Characterizing yeast promoters used in Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Hu, Shenglin; Zhu, Songli; Wang, Dongmei; Gao, Xiaolian; Hong, Jiong

    2015-10-01

    Fermentation at higher temperatures can potentially reduce the cooling cost in large-scale fermentation and reduce the contamination risk. Thus, the thermotolerant yeast, Kluyveromyces marxianus, which can grow and ferment at elevated temperatures, is a promising biotechnological tool for future applications. However, the promoters used in K. marxianus are not well characterized, especially at elevated temperatures, which is important in efficient metabolic pathway construction. In this study, six constitutive promoters (P(TDH3), P(PGK), and P(ADH1) from both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and K. marxianus) were evaluated in K. marxianus through the heterologous expression of the KlLAC4, GUSA, and SH BLE genes at various temperatures, with various carbon sources and oxygen conditions. The expression was evaluated at the transcription and protein level using real-time PCR and protein activity determination to eliminate the effect of heterologous protein stability. While the transcription of all the promoters decreased at higher temperatures, the order of their promoting strength at various temperatures with glucose as the carbon source was P(KmPGK) > P(KmTDH3) > P(ScPGK) > P(ScTDH3) > P(KmADH1) > P(ScADH1). When glycerol or xylose was supplied as the carbon source at 42 °C, the order of promoter strength was P(KmPGK) > P(ScPGK) > P(KmADH1) > P(ScADH1) > P(ScTDH3) > P(KmTDH3). The promoter activity of P TDH3 decreased significantly, while the promoter activity of both of the P(ADH1) promoters increased. Oxygen conditions had non-significant effect. The results of this study provide important information for fine-tuned pathway construction for the metabolic engineering of K. marxianus. PMID:26164057

  9. The evolution of pheromonal communication.

    PubMed

    Swaney, William T; Keverne, Eric B

    2009-06-25

    Small-brained rodents have been the principle focus for pheromonal research and have provided comprehensive insights into the chemosensory mechanisms that underpin pheromonal communication and the hugely important roles that pheromones play in behavioural regulation. However, pheromonal communication does not start or end with the mouse and the rat, and work in amphibians reveals much about the likely evolutionary origins of the chemosensory systems that mediate pheromonal effects. The dual olfactory organs (the main olfactory epithelium and the vomeronasal organ), their receptors and their separate projection pathways appear to have ancient evolutionary origins, appearing in the aquatic ancestors of all tetrapods during the Devonian period and so pre-dating the transition to land. While the vomeronasal organ has long been considered an exclusively pheromonal organ, accumulating evidence indicates that it is not the sole channel for the transduction of pheromonal information and that both olfactory systems have been co-opted for the detection of different pheromone signals over the course of evolution. This has also led to great diversity in the vomeronasal and olfactory receptor families, with enormous levels of gene diversity and inactivation of genes in different species. Finally, the evolution of trichromacy as well as huge increases in social complexity have minimised the role of pheromones in the lives of primates, leading to the total inactivation of the vomeronasal system in catarrhine primates while the brain increased in size and behaviour became emancipated from hormonal regulation. PMID:18977248

  10. TICK PHEROMONES AND USES THEREOF

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The subject invention provides materials and methods for tick control. The tick control methods of the subject invention are particularly advantageous because they utilize natural chemical signals (pheromones) in combination with an acaricide. The use of environmentally friendly pheromones makes i...

  11. A plant factory for moth pheromone production.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bao-Jian; Hofvander, Per; Wang, Hong-Lei; Durrett, Timothy P; Stymne, Sten; Löfstedt, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Moths depend on pheromone communication for mate finding and synthetic pheromones are used for monitoring or disruption of pheromone communication in pest insects. Here we produce moth sex pheromone, using Nicotiana benthamiana as a plant factory, by transient expression of up to four genes coding for consecutive biosynthetic steps. We specifically produce multicomponent sex pheromones for two species. The fatty alcohol fractions from the genetically modified plants are acetylated to mimic the respective sex pheromones of the small ermine moths Yponomeuta evonymella and Y. padella. These mixtures are very efficient and specific for trapping of male moths, matching the activity of conventionally produced pheromones. Our long-term vision is to design tailor-made production of any moth pheromone component in genetically modified plants. Such semisynthetic preparation of sex pheromones is a novel and cost-effective way of producing moderate to large quantities of pheromones with high purity and a minimum of hazardous waste. PMID:24569486

  12. Oxygen-Dependent Transcriptional Regulator Hap1p Limits Glucose Uptake by Repressing the Expression of the Major Glucose Transporter Gene RAG1 in Kluyveromyces lactis▿

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Wei-Guo; Guiard, Bernard; Fang, Zi-An; Donnini, Claudia; Gervais, Michel; Passos, Flavia M. Lopes; Ferrero, Iliana; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Bolotin-Fukuhara, Monique

    2008-01-01

    The HAP1 (CYP1) gene product of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is known to regulate the transcription of many genes in response to oxygen availability. This response varies according to yeast species, probably reflecting the specific nature of their oxidative metabolism. It is suspected that a difference in the interaction of Hap1p with its target genes may explain some of the species-related variation in oxygen responses. As opposed to the fermentative S. cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces lactis is an aerobic yeast species which shows different oxygen responses. We examined the role of the HAP1-equivalent gene (KlHAP1) in K. lactis. KlHap1p showed a number of sequence features and some gene targets (such as KlCYC1) in common with its S. cerevisiae counterpart, and KlHAP1 was capable of complementing the hap1 mutation. However, the KlHAP1 disruptant showed temperature-sensitive growth on glucose, especially at low glucose concentrations. At normal temperature, 28°C, the mutant grew well, the colony size being even greater than that of the wild type. The most striking observation was that KlHap1p repressed the expression of the major glucose transporter gene RAG1 and reduced the glucose uptake rate. This suggested an involvement of KlHap1p in the regulation of glycolytic flux through the glucose transport system. The ΔKlhap1 mutant showed an increased ability to produce ethanol during aerobic growth, indicating a possible transformation of its physiological property to Crabtree positivity or partial Crabtree positivity. Dual roles of KlHap1p in activating respiration and repressing fermentation may be seen as a basis of the Crabtree-negative physiology of K. lactis. PMID:18806211

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of the Putrescine-Producing Strain Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 1AA59.

    PubMed

    Ladero, Victor; Del Rio, Beatriz; Linares, Daniel M; Fernandez, María; Mayo, Baltasar; Martín, M Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    We report here the 2,576,542-bp genome annotated draft assembly sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 1AA59. This strain-isolated from a traditional cheese-produces putrescine, one of the most frequently biogenic amines found in dairy products. PMID:26089428

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of the Putrescine-Producing Strain Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 1AA59

    PubMed Central

    Ladero, Victor; del Rio, Beatriz; Linares, Daniel M.; Fernandez, María; Mayo, Baltasar; Martín, M. Cruz

    2015-01-01

    We report here the 2,576,542-bp genome annotated draft assembly sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 1AA59. This strain—isolated from a traditional cheese—produces putrescine, one of the most frequently biogenic amines found in dairy products. PMID:26089428

  15. Comparative Phenotypic and Molecular Genetic Profiling of Wild Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Strains of the L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris Genotypes, Isolated from Starter-Free Cheeses Made of Raw Milk▿

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Elena; Alegría, Ángel; Delgado, Susana; Martín, M. Cruz; Mayo, Baltasar

    2011-01-01

    Twenty Lactococcus lactis strains with an L. lactis subsp. lactis phenotype isolated from five traditional cheeses made of raw milk with no added starters belonging to the L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris genotypes (lactis and cremoris genotypes, respectively; 10 strains each) were subjected to a series of phenotypic and genetic typing methods, with the aims of determining their phylogenetic relationships and suitability as starters. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of intact genomes digested with SalI and SmaI proved that all strains were different except for three isolates of the cremoris genotype, which showed identical PFGE profiles. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis using internal sequences of seven loci (namely, atpA, rpoA, pheS, pepN, bcaT, pepX, and 16S rRNA gene) revealed considerable intergenotype nucleotide polymorphism, although deduced amino acid changes were scarce. Analysis of the MLST data for the present strains and others from other dairy and nondairy sources showed that all of them clustered into the cremoris or lactis genotype group, by using both independent and combined gene sequences. These two groups of strains also showed distinctive carbohydrate fermentation and enzyme activity profiles, with the strains in the cremoris group showing broader profiles. However, the profiles of resistance/susceptibility to 16 antibiotics were very similar, showing no atypical resistance, except for tetracycline resistance in three identical cremoris genotype isolates. The numbers and concentrations of volatile compounds produced in milk by the strains belonging to these two groups were clearly different, with the cremoris genotype strains producing higher concentrations of more branched-chain, derived compounds. Together, the present results support the idea that the lactis and cremoris genotypes of phenotypic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis actually represent true subspecies. Some strains of the two subspecies

  16. The joy of sex pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Diaz, Carolina; Benton, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Sex pheromones provide an important means of communication to unite individuals for successful reproduction. Although sex pheromones are highly diverse across animals, these signals fulfil common fundamental roles in enabling identification of a mating partner of the opposite sex, the appropriate species and of optimal fecundity. In this review, we synthesize both classic and recent investigations on sex pheromones in a range of species, spanning nematode worms, insects and mammals. These studies reveal comparable strategies in how these chemical signals are produced, detected and processed in the brain to regulate sexual behaviours. Elucidation of sex pheromone communication mechanisms both defines outstanding models to understand the molecular and neuronal basis of chemosensory behaviours, and reveals how similar evolutionary selection pressures yield convergent solutions in distinct animal nervous systems. EMBO reports advance online publication 13 September 2013; doi:10.1038/embor.2013.140 PMID:24030282

  17. Neurogenic and Neuroendocrine Effects of Goldfish Pheromones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Goldfish (Carassius auratus) use reproductive hormones as endocrine signals to synchronize sexual behavior with gamete maturation, and as exogenous signals (pheromones) to mediate spawning interactions between conspecifics. We examined the differential effects of two hormonal pheromones, prostagland...

  18. Alcohol from whey permeate: strain selection, temperature, and medium optimization. [Candida pseudotropicalis, Kluyveromyces fragilis, and K. lactis

    SciTech Connect

    Vienne, P.; Von Stockar, U.

    1983-01-01

    A comparative study of shaken flask cultures of some yeast strains capable of fermenting lactose showed no significant differences in alcohol yield among the four best strains. Use of whey permeate concentrated three times did not affect the yields. An optimal growth temperature of 38/sup 0/C was determined for K. fragilis NRRL 665. Elemental analysis of both the permeate and the dry cell mass of two strains indicated the possibility of a stoichiometric limitation by nitrogen. Batch cultures in laboratory fermentors confirmed this finding and revealed in addition the presence of a limitation due to growth factors. Both types of limitations could be overcome by adding yeast extract. The maximum productivity of continuous cultures could thus be improved to 5.1 g/l-h. The maximum specific growth rate was of the order of 0.310 h/sup -1/. 15 references, 10 figures, 9 tables.

  19. Genome Sequence of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161, Isolated from a Nonscalded Curd Pressed Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Velly, H.; Abraham, A.-L.; Loux, V.; Delacroix-Buchet, A.; Fonseca, F.; Bouix, M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a lactic acid bacterium used in the production of many fermented foods, such as dairy products. Here, we report the genome sequence of L. lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161, isolated from nonscalded curd pressed cheese. This genome sequence provides information in relation to dairy environment adaptation. PMID:25377704

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis CRL264, a Citrate-Fermenting Strain

    PubMed Central

    Zuljan, Federico; Espariz, Martín; Blancato, Victor S.; Esteban, Luis; Alarcón, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis CRL264, a natural strain isolated from artisanal cheese from northwest Argentina. L. lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis is one of the most important microorganisms used as starter culture around the world. The CRL264 strain constitutes a model microorganism in the studies on the generation of aroma compounds (diacetyl, acetoin, and 2,3-butanediol) by lactic acid bacteria. Our genome analysis shows similar genetic organization to other available genomes of L. lactis bv. diacetylactis strains. PMID:26847906

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis CRL264, a Citrate-Fermenting Strain.

    PubMed

    Zuljan, Federico; Espariz, Martín; Blancato, Victor S; Esteban, Luis; Alarcón, Sergio; Magni, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis CRL264, a natural strain isolated from artisanal cheese from northwest Argentina. L. lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis is one of the most important microorganisms used as starter culture around the world. The CRL264 strain constitutes a model microorganism in the studies on the generation of aroma compounds (diacetyl, acetoin, and 2,3-butanediol) by lactic acid bacteria. Our genome analysis shows similar genetic organization to other available genomes of L. lactis bv. diacetylactis strains. PMID:26847906

  2. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: characterization of the bacteriocin.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Danielle N; Todorov, Svetoslav D; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T; Franco, Bernadette D G M

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria capable of producing bacteriocins and presenting probiotic potential open innovative technological applications in the dairy industry. In this study, a bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi) was isolated from goat milk, and studied for its antimicrobial activity. The bacteriocin presented a broad spectrum of activity, was sensitive to proteolytic enzymes, resistant to heat and pH extremes, and not affected by the presence of SDS, Tween 20, Tween 80, EDTA or NaCl. Bacteriocin production was dependent on the components of the culture media, especially nitrogen source and salts. When tested by PCR, the bacteriocin gene presented 100% homology to nisin Z gene. These properties indicate that this L. lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi can be used for enhancement of dairy foods safety and quality. PMID:25763065

  3. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: Characterization of the bacteriocin

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, Danielle N.; Todorov, Svetoslav D.; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T.; Franco, Bernadette D.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria capable of producing bacteriocins and presenting probiotic potential open innovative technological applications in the dairy industry. In this study, a bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi) was isolated from goat milk, and studied for its antimicrobial activity. The bacteriocin presented a broad spectrum of activity, was sensitive to proteolytic enzymes, resistant to heat and pH extremes, and not affected by the presence of SDS, Tween 20, Tween 80, EDTA or NaCl. Bacteriocin production was dependent on the components of the culture media, especially nitrogen source and salts. When tested by PCR, the bacteriocin gene presented 100% homology to nisin Z gene. These properties indicate that this L. lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi can be used for enhancement of dairy foods safety and quality. PMID:25763065

  4. Sex Pheromone of Anastrepha striata.

    PubMed

    Cruz-López, Leopoldo; Malo, Edi A; Rojas, Julio C

    2015-05-01

    The guava fruit fly, Anastrepha striata, is a pest of several cultivated species of Myrtaceae in the American tropics and subtropics. During calling, A. striata males release numerous volatiles. This study was conducted to identify which of the male volatiles function as the A. striata sex pheromone and to investigate the effects of age and time of day on the emission of pheromone components. Analysis of the volatiles from males collected by solid phase microextraction using gas chromatography coupled to electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD) showed that three volatile compounds elicited repeatable responses from the antennae of females. The EAD-active compounds were identified by GC/mass spectrometry as ethyl hexanoate, linalool, and ethyl octanoate. In two-choice tests using Multilure traps placed in field cages, traps baited with live males, ethyl hexanoate, or the three-component blend captured more females than unbaited traps. However, there was no difference in catches when traps baited with live males were compared against traps baited with ethyl hexanoate. Although traps baited with the three-component blend caught more females than traps baited with live males, the difference was not significant. Analyses of pheromonal components released by A. striata males 8 to 26 days old showed that there was an effect of age on pheromone production and also a significant effect of time of day on pheromone emission. Release of the volatile compounds occurred from 14.00 to 18.00 hr, although traces of linalool were detected from 08.00 hr. Peak emission of pheromone compounds occurred at 14.00 hr. PMID:25912228

  5. Production of inulinase from Kluyveromyces marxianus using dahlia tuber extract

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sumat Chand; Jain, P.C.; Kango, Naveen

    2012-01-01

    Various carbon sources were evaluated for production of inulinase by yeast, Kluyveromyces marxianus MTCC 3995. Highest inulinase activity was observed with Dahlia extract (25.3 nkat mL-1) as carbon source. The enzyme activity was 1.4 folds higher than that observed in media containing pure chicory inulin (17.8 nkat mL-1). The yeast showed good growth on a simple medium containing dahlia extract (20% w/v) and yeast extract (2%w/v) as carbon and nitrogen source respectively, in 96 h. at 28°C and 120 rpm. Lowest inulinase yield (4.8 nkat mL-1) was seen in the medium containing glucose as C-source. Although varied inulinase levels were noticed on different C- sources, Inulinase: Sucrase (I/S) ratios were noticed to be similar. Among various protein sources tested, yeast extract was found to be the best source followed by beef extract (17.9 nkat mL-1) and peptone (13.8 nkat mL-1). The enzyme was optimally active at pH (4.0) and 50°C. TLC analysis of end product revealed that inulinase hydrolyzed inulin exclusively into fructose. Results suggest that the dahlia extract induced exoinulinase synthesis in Kluyveromyces marxianus and can be utilized as a potential substrate for inulinase production. PMID:24031804

  6. Identifying the C. cactorum Pheromone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg), is an invasive pest of Opuntia spp. Since its arrival in the Florida Keys in 1989, it has moved rapidly up the east and west coasts of Florida, threatening to invade the southwestern United States and Mexico. Female moths produce a sex pheromone that ...

  7. Volatile pheromone signalling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dean P

    2012-03-01

    Once captured by the antenna, 11-cis vaccenyl acetate (cVA) binds to an extracellular binding protein called LUSH that undergoes a conformational shift upon cVA binding. The stable LUSH-cVA complex is the activating ligand for pheromone receptors present on the dendrites of the aT1 neurones, comprising the only neurones that detect cVA pheromone. This mechanism explains the single molecule sensitivity of insect pheromone detection systems. The receptor that recognizes activated LUSH consists of a complex of several proteins, including Or67d, a member of the tuning odourant receptor family, Orco, a co-receptor ion channel, and SNMP, a CD36 homologue that may be an inhibitory subunit. In addition, genetic screens and reconstitution experiments reveal additional factors that are important for pheromone detection. Identification and functional dissection of these factors in Drosophila melanogaster Meigen should permit the identification of homologous factors in pathogenic insects and agricultural pests, which, in turn, may be viable candidates for novel classes of compounds to control populations of target insect species without impacting beneficial species. PMID:24347807

  8. Pheromones and exocrine glands in Isoptera.

    PubMed

    Costa-Leonardo, Ana Maria; Haifig, Ives

    2010-01-01

    Termites are eusocial insects that have a peculiar and intriguing system of communication using pheromones. The termite pheromones are composed of a blend of chemical substances and they coordinate different social interactions or activities, including foraging, building, mating, defense, and nestmate recognition. Some of these sociochemicals are volatile, spreading in the air, and others are contact pheromones, which are transmitted by trophallaxis and grooming. Among the termite semiochemicals, the most known are alarm, trail, sex pheromones, and hydrocarbons responsible for the recognition of nestmates. The sources of the pheromones are exocrine glands located all over the termite body. The principal exocrine structures considered pheromone-producing glands in Isoptera are the frontal, mandibular, salivary or labial, sternal, and tergal glands. The frontal gland is the source of alarm pheromone and defensive chemicals, but the mandibular secretions have been little studied and their function is not well established in Isoptera. The secretion of salivary glands involves numerous chemical compounds, some of them without pheromonal function. The worker saliva contains a phagostimulating pheromone and probably a building pheromone, while the salivary reservoir of some soldiers contains defensive chemicals. The sternal gland is the only source of trail-following pheromone, whereas sex pheromones are secreted by two glandular sources, the sternal and tergal glands. To date, the termite semiochemicals have indicated that few molecules are involved in their chemical communication, that is, the same compound may be secreted by different glands, different castes and species, and for different functions, depending on the concentration. In addition to the pheromonal parsimony, recent studies also indicate the occurrence of a synergic effect among the compounds involved in the chemical communication of Isoptera. PMID:20831960

  9. Hormones and pheromones in regulation of insect behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both pheromones and hormones are well recognized regulators of insect biology. However, the interactions between hormones and pheromones in coordinating insect biology are less well understood. We have studied the interactions between juvenile hormone, its precursor methyl farnesoate, and pheromon...

  10. Evaporation rate of emulsion and oil-base emulsion pheromones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of pheromone evaporation rate is critical to distribute pheromone containers effectively in the forest, orchard and field. There are several factors influencing the pheromone evaporation rate that include wind speed, container size and porosity, release area, temperature, humidity, pherom...

  11. Complete genome sequence of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BLC1.

    PubMed

    Bottacini, Francesca; Dal Bello, Fabio; Turroni, Francesca; Milani, Christian; Duranti, Sabrina; Foroni, Elena; Viappiani, Alice; Strati, Francesco; Mora, Diego; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2011-11-01

    Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BLC1 is a probiotic bacterium that is widely exploited by food industries as the active ingredient of various functional foods. Here we report the complete genome sequence of B. animalis subsp. lactis BLC1, which is expected to provide insights into the biology of this health-promoting microorganism and improve our understanding of its phylogenetic relatedness with other members of the B. animalis subsp. lactis taxon. PMID:22038957

  12. Novel antibacterial activity of lactococcus lactis subspecies lactis z11 isolated from zabady.

    PubMed

    Enan, Gamal; Abdel-Shafi, Seham; Ouda, Sahar; Negm, Sally

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to select and characterize a probiotic bacterium with distinctive antimicrobial activities. In this respect, Lactococcus lactis subspecies lactis Z11 (L. lactis Z11) isolated from Zabady (Arabian yoghurt) inhibited other strains of lactic acid bacteria and some food-born pathogens including Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus and staphylococcus aureus. The inhibitory activity of cell free supernatant (CFS) of L. lactis Z11 isolated from zabady was lost by proteolytic enzymes, heat resistant. Consequently, the active substance(s) of CFS was characterized as a bacteriocin. This bacteriocin has been shown to consist of protein but has no lipidic or glucidic moieties in its active molecule. Its activity was stable in the pH range 2.0 to 7.0 and was not affected by organic solvents. The L. lactis Z11 bacteriocin was produced in CFS throughout the mide to the late exponential phase of growth of the producer organism and maximum bacteriocin production was obtained at initial pH 6.5 at incubation temperature of about 30°C. PMID:24151453

  13. Novel Antibacterial Activity of Lactococcus Lactis Subspecies Lactis Z11 Isolated from Zabady

    PubMed Central

    Enan, Gamal; Abdel-Shafi, Seham; Ouda, Sahar; Negm, Sally

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to select and characterize a probiotic bacterium with distinctive antimicrobial activities. In this respect, Lactococcus lactis subspecies lactis Z11 (L. lactis Z11) isolated from Zabady (Arabian yoghurt) inhibited other strains of lactic acid bacteria and some food-born pathogens including Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus and staphylococcus aureus. The inhibitory activity of cell free supernatant (CFS) of L. lactis Z11 isolated from zabady was lost by proteolytic enzymes, heat resistant. Consequently, the active substance(s) of CFS was characterized as a bacteriocin. This bacteriocin has been shown to consist of protein but has no lipidic or glucidic moieties in its active molecule. Its activity was stable in the pH range 2.0 to 7.0 and was not affected by organic solvents. The L. lactis Z11 bacteriocin was produced in CFS throughout the mide to the late exponential phase of growth of the producer organism and maximum bacteriocin production was obtained at initial pH 6.5 at incubation temperature of about 30°C. PMID:24151453

  14. Antimicrobial potential of immobilized Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454 against selected bacteria.

    PubMed

    Millette, M; Smoragiewicz, W; Lacroix, M

    2004-06-01

    Immobilization of living cells of lactic acid bacteria could be an alternative or complementary method of immobilizing organic acids and bacteriocins and inhibit undesirable bacteria in foods. This study evaluated the inhibition potential of immobilized Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454 on selected bacteria by a modified method of the agar spot test. L. lactis was immobilized in calcium alginate (1 to 2%)-whey protein concentrate (0 and 1%) beads. The antimicrobial potential of immobilized L. lactis was evaluated in microbiological media against pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli, Salmonella, and Staphylococcus aureus) or Pseudomonas putida, a natural meat contaminant, and against seven gram-positive bacteria used as indicator strains. Results obtained in this study indicated that immobilized L. lactis inhibited the growth of S. aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Lactobacillus curvatus, Lactobacillus sakei, Kocuria varians, and Pediococcus acidilactici. Only 4 h of incubation at 35 degrees C resulted in a clear inhibition zone around the beads that increased with time. With the addition of 10 mM of a chelating agent (EDTA) to the media, results showed growth inhibition of E. coli; however, P. putida and Salmonella Typhi were unaffected by this treatment. These results indicate that immobilized lactic acid bacteria strains can be successfully used to produce nisin and inhibit bacterial growth in semisolid synthetic media. PMID:15222547

  15. Kluyveromyces marxianus as a host for heterologous protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gombert, Andreas K; Madeira, José Valdo; Cerdán, María-Esperanza; González-Siso, María-Isabel

    2016-07-01

    The preferentially respiring and thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus is an emerging host for heterologous protein synthesis, surpassing the traditional preferentially fermenting yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in some important aspects: K . marxianus can grow at temperatures 10 °C higher than S. cerevisiae, which may result in decreased costs for cooling bioreactors and reduced contamination risk; has ability to metabolize a wider variety of sugars, such as lactose and xylose; is the fastest growing eukaryote described so far; and does not require special cultivation techniques (such as fed-batch) to avoid fermentative metabolism. All these advantages exist together with a high secretory capacity, performance of eukaryotic post-translational modifications, and with a generally regarded as safe (GRAS) status. In the last years, replication origins from several Kluyveromyces spp. have been used for the construction of episomal vectors, and also integrative strategies have been developed based on the tendency for non-homologous recombination displayed by K. marxianus. The recessive URA3 auxotrophic marker and the dominant Kan(R) are mostly used for selection of transformed cells, but other markers have been made available. Homologous and heterologous promoters and secretion signals have been characterized, with the K. marxianus INU1 expression and secretion system being of remarkable functionality. The efficient synthesis of roughly 50 heterologous proteins has been demonstrated, including one thermophilic enzyme. In this mini-review, we summarize the physiological characteristics of K. marxianus relevant for its use in the efficient synthesis of heterologous proteins, the efforts performed hitherto in the development of a molecular toolbox for this purpose, and some successful examples. PMID:27260286

  16. Synthesis and metabolism of pheromones and pheromone analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.S.

    1987-01-01

    (9, 10-/sup 3/H/sub 2/)Z9-14:Ac was synthesized at high specific activity (/sup 3/H, 58 Ci/mmole) by partial tritiation of the corresponding alkyne and was converted to the labeled Z9-14:OH and Z9-14:Al to study tissue specificity of acetate esterase (E), alcohol oxidase (OX), and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in male and female Heliothis virescens. Soluble and membrane-associated enzyme activities were determined by radio-TLC assays. Compounds of the tritium-labeled Z11-16 series were synthesized and their in vitro fates examined as well. In order to achieve an alternative approach in which (1) pheromone receptor proteins would be stoichiometrically and irreversibly modified, or (2) pheromone-catabolizing enzymes are inactivated by tight-binding or irreversible inhibitors, we have designed analogues of pheromones of lepidopterous insect pests and assayed their biological activity in vitro and in vivo. Various fluorinated molecules such as acyl fluorides, fluoroolefins, 2-fluoro aldehydes, 2,2-difluoro aldehydes and trifluoromethyl ketones were synthesized. The synthesis of some other functional groups such as cyclopropanones, cyclopropanols, cyclopropyl carbinols, cyclopropyl aldehydes and Michael acceptors will also be discussed.

  17. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: evaluation of the probiotic potential.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Danielle N; Todorov, Svetoslav D; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T; Franco, Bernadette D G M

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria capable of producing bacteriocins and presenting probiotic potential open innovative technological applications in the dairy industry. In this study, a bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi) was isolated from goat milk, and studied for its probiotic potential. Lc. lactis DF4Mi was resistant to acidic pH and oxbile, presented co-aggregation with Listeria monocytogenes, and was not affected by several drugs from different generic groups, being sensitive to most tested antibiotics. These properties indicate that this Lc. lactis strain can be used for enhancement of dairy foods safety and quality, in combination with potential probiotic properties. PMID:25477942

  18. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: Evaluation of the probiotic potential

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, Danielle N.; Todorov, Svetoslav D.; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T.; Franco, Bernadette D.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria capable of producing bacteriocins and presenting probiotic potential open innovative technological applications in the dairy industry. In this study, a bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi) was isolated from goat milk, and studied for its probiotic potential. Lc. lactis DF4Mi was resistant to acidic pH and oxbile, presented co-aggregation with Listeria monocytogenes, and was not affected by several drugs from different generic groups, being sensitive to most tested antibiotics. These properties indicate that this Lc. lactis strain can be used for enhancement of dairy foods safety and quality, in combination with potential probiotic properties. PMID:25477942

  19. Olfactory adventures of elephantine pheromones.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, L E; Lazar, J; Greenwood, D R

    2003-02-01

    Understanding the linkage between behaviour of mammals in their natural environment and the molecular basis of their sensory modalities presents challenges to biologists. Our olfactory investigations that involve the largest extant land mammal, the elephant, offer some clues of how these events mesh in sequence. Proboscideans have developed a sophisticatedly organized society and they rank with primates and cetaceans with respect to cognitive abilities. Our studies of discrete, quantifiable pheromone-elicited behaviours demonstrate that Asian elephants utilize their olfactory senses during fundamental, life-strategy decisions, including mate choice, female bonding and male hierarchical sorting. How biologically relevant odorants traverse mucous interfaces to interact with cognate odorant receptors remains a basic question in vertebrate olfaction. We have partially tracked the molecular odour reception trail of behaviourally distinct pheromones, ( Z )-7-dodecenyl acetate and frontalin (1,5-dimethyl-6,8-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane), using approaches developed for insect studies and taking advantage of the extensive, highly mucoidal olfactory and vomeronasal systems that permit detailed investigations of pheromone-binding proteins. We have combined studies of quantifiable responses and behaviours with biochemical and biophysical investigations of the properties of protein-ligand complexes, their sequential pathways and associated protein-ligand fluxes. In the delineation of these sequential integrations of behavioural, biochemical and molecular events, we have discovered novel spatial and temporal adaptations in both the main olfactory and vomeronasal systems. PMID:12546671

  20. Pheromone disruption of Argentine ant trail integrity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suckling, D.M.; Peck, R.W.; Manning, L.M.; Stringer, L.D.; Cappadonna, J.; El-Sayed, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Disruption of Argentine ant trail following and reduced ability to forage (measured by bait location success) was achieved after presentation of an oversupply of trail pheromone, (Z)-9-hexadecenal. Experiments tested single pheromone point sources and dispersion of a formulation in small field plots. Ant walking behavior was recorded and digitized by using video tracking, before and after presentation of trail pheromone. Ants showed changes in three parameters within seconds of treatment: (1) Ants on trails normally showed a unimodal frequency distribution of walking track angles, but this pattern disappeared after presentation of the trail pheromone; (2) ants showed initial high trail integrity on a range of untreated substrates from painted walls to wooden or concrete floors, but this was significantly reduced following presentation of a point source of pheromone; (3) the number of ants in the pheromone-treated area increased over time, as recruitment apparently exceeded departures. To test trail disruption in small outdoor plots, the trail pheromone was formulated with carnuba wax-coated quartz laboratory sand (1 g quartz sand/0.2 g wax/1 mg pheromone). The pheromone formulation, with a half-life of 30 h, was applied by rotary spreader at four rates (0, 2.5, 7.5, and 25 mg pheromone/m2) to 1- and 4-m2 plots in Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii. Ant counts at bait cards in treated plots were significantly reduced compared to controls on the day of treatment, and there was a significant reduction in ant foraging for 2 days. These results show that trail pheromone disruption of Argentine ants is possible, but a much more durable formulation is needed before nest-level impacts can be expected. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  1. Pheromone disruption of Argentine ant trail integrity.

    PubMed

    Suckling, D M; Peck, R W; Manning, L M; Stringer, L D; Cappadonna, J; El-Sayed, A M

    2008-12-01

    Disruption of Argentine ant trail following and reduced ability to forage (measured by bait location success) was achieved after presentation of an oversupply of trail pheromone, (Z)-9-hexadecenal. Experiments tested single pheromone point sources and dispersion of a formulation in small field plots. Ant walking behavior was recorded and digitized by using video tracking, before and after presentation of trail pheromone. Ants showed changes in three parameters within seconds of treatment: (1) Ants on trails normally showed a unimodal frequency distribution of walking track angles, but this pattern disappeared after presentation of the trail pheromone; (2) ants showed initial high trail integrity on a range of untreated substrates from painted walls to wooden or concrete floors, but this was significantly reduced following presentation of a point source of pheromone; (3) the number of ants in the pheromone-treated area increased over time, as recruitment apparently exceeded departures. To test trail disruption in small outdoor plots, the trail pheromone was formulated with carnuba wax-coated quartz laboratory sand (1 g quartz sand/0.2 g wax/1 mg pheromone). The pheromone formulation, with a half-life of 30 h, was applied by rotary spreader at four rates (0, 2.5, 7.5, and 25 mg pheromone/m(2)) to 1- and 4-m(2) plots in Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii. Ant counts at bait cards in treated plots were significantly reduced compared to controls on the day of treatment, and there was a significant reduction in ant foraging for 2 days. These results show that trail pheromone disruption of Argentine ants is possible, but a much more durable formulation is needed before nest-level impacts can be expected. PMID:19034574

  2. Isolation of strong constitutive promoters from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis N8.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Duolong; Liu, Fulu; Xu, Haijin; Bai, Yanling; Zhang, Xiuming; Saris, Per Erik Joakim; Qiao, Mingqiang

    2015-08-01

    The synthesis of heterologous proteins in Lactococcus lactis is strongly influenced by the promoter selected for the expression. The nisin A promoter is commonly used for induced expression of proteins in L. lactis, whereas few constitutive promoters (P45 and the weaker P32) have been used for protein expression studies. In this study, eight different putative strong constitutive promoters were identified through transcriptional analysis of L. lactis N8 and were investigated for their capability to drive nisZ gene expression with promoters P45 and P32 as control. Four strong promoters (P8, P5, P3 and P2) were identified as having a transcriptional activity that was higher than that of P45 through RT-qPCR and agar-diffusion experiments. In addition, these four promoters were fused to the erythromycin resistant gene (ermC) with promoter P45 as control and inserted into the backbone of the pNZ8048 vector. The transcriptional efficiencies of promoters P8, P5, P2 and P3 were all higher than promoter P45 based on the obtained MIC50 values and they all showed different activity levels. In conclusion, four strong constitutive promoters with a wide range of promoter activities were identified and are suitable for protein production in L. lactis. PMID:26156144

  3. A Deficiency in Aspartate Biosynthesis in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C2 Causes Slow Milk Coagulation†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Yu, Weizhu; Coolbear, Tim; O’Sullivan, Dan; McKay, Larry L.

    1998-01-01

    A mutant of fast milk-coagulating (Fmc+) Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C2, designated L. lactis KB4, was identified. Although possessing the known components essential for utilizing casein as a nitrogen source, which include functional proteinase (PrtP) activity and oligopeptide, di- and tripeptide, and amino acid transport systems, KB4 exhibited a slow milk coagulation (Fmc−) phenotype. When the amino acid requirements of L. lactis C2 were compared with those of KB4 by use of a chemically defined medium, it was found that KB4 was unable to grow in the absence of aspartic acid. This aspartic acid requirement could also be met by aspartate-containing peptides. The addition of aspartic acid to milk restored the Fmc+ phenotype of KB4. KB4 was found to be defective in pyruvate carboxylase and thus was deficient in the ability to form oxaloacetate and hence aspartic acid from pyruvate and carbon dioxide. The results suggest that when lactococci are propagated in milk, aspartate derived from casein is unable to meet fully the nutritional demands of the lactococci, and they become dependent upon aspartate biosynthesis. PMID:9572935

  4. Dual role of alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Goupil-Feuillerat, N; Cocaign-Bousquet, M; Godon, J J; Ehrlich, S D; Renault, P

    1997-01-01

    The alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase gene aldB is clustered with the genes for the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. It can be transcribed with BCAA genes under isoleucine regulation or independently of BCAA synthesis under the control of its own promoter. The product of aldB is responsible for leucine sensibility under valine starvation. In the presence of more than 10 microM leucine, the alpha-acetolactate produced by the biosynthetic acetohydroxy acid synthase IlvBN is transformed to acetoin by AldB and, consequently, is not available for valine synthesis. AldB is also involved in acetoin formation in the 2,3-butanediol pathway, initiated by the catabolic acetolactate synthase, AlsS. The differences in the genetic organization, the expression, and the kinetics parameters of these enzymes between L. lactis and Klebsiella terrigena, Bacillus subtilis, or Leuconostoc oenos suggest that this pathway plays a different role in the metabolism in these bacteria. Thus, the alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase from L. lactis plays a dual role in the cell: (i) as key regulator of valine and leucine biosynthesis, by controlling the acetolactate flux by a shift to catabolism; and (ii) as an enzyme catalyzing the second step of the 2,3-butanediol pathway. PMID:9335274

  5. Detection and Viability of Lactococcus lactis throughout Cheese Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Cocolin, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidences highlighted the presence of Lactococcus lactis during late cheese ripening. For this reason, the role of this microorganism, well known as dairy starter, should be reconsidered throughout cheese manufacturing and ripening. Thus, the main objective of this study was to develop a RT-qPCR protocol for the detection, quantification and determination of the viability of L. lactis in ripened cheese samples by direct analysis of microbial nucleic acids. Standard curves were constructed for the specific quantification of L. lactis in cheese matrices and good results in terms of selectivity, correlation coefficient and efficiency were obtained. Thirty-three ripened cheeses were analyzed and, on the basis of RNA analysis, twelve samples showed 106 to 108 CFU of L. lactis per gram of product, thirteen from 103 to 105 CFU/g, and in eight cheeses, L. lactis was not detected. Traditional plating on M17 medium led to loads ranging from 105 to 109 CFU/g, including the cheese samples where no L. lactis was found by RT-qPCR. From these cheeses, none of the colonies isolated on M17 medium was identified as L. lactis species. These data could be interpreted as a lack of selectivity of M17 medium where colony growth is not always related to lactococcal species. At the same time, the absence or low abundance of L. lactis isolates on M17 medium from cheese where L. lactis was detected by RT-qPCR support the hypothesis that L. lactis starter populations are mainly present in viable but not culturable state during ripening and, for this reason, culture-dependent methods have to be supplemented with direct analysis of cheese. PMID:25503474

  6. Pheromone 4 gene of Euplotes octocarinatus.

    PubMed

    Meyer, F; Schmidt, H J; Heckmann, K

    1992-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a 1.7 kb macronuclear chromosome encoding the pheromone 4 gene of Euplotes octocarinatus. The sequence of the secreted pheromone is preceded by a 42 amino acid leader peptide, which ends with a lysine residue. The sequence coding for the leader peptide contains information for a putative signal peptide and is interrupted by a 772 bp intron as shown by comparison with a cDNA clone. A 64 bp intron and a 145 bp intron interrupt the sequence coding for the secreted pheromone. The three introns contain typical 5' and 3' splice junctions and a putative branch point site. The small introns have a low GC content. The large intron has a GC content similar to that of the pheromone 4 gene exons. The amino acid sequence of pheromone 4, deduced from both the genomic DNA and the cDNA of pheromone 4, shows that the secreted pheromone consists of 85 amino acids. One of its amino acids is encoded by a UGA codon. Since it has been shown for pheromone 3 of E. octocarinatus that UGA is translated as cysteine, it is assumed that the UGA codon encodes cysteine in pheromone 4 as well. The 164 bp noncoding region upstream of the leader peptide is AT-rich and contains an inverted repeat capable of forming a stem-loop structure with a stem of 11 bp. The 151 bp noncoding region at the 3' end of the chromosome contains a putative polyadenylation sequence and an inverted repeat. The macronuclear molecule is flanked by telomeres and carries the pentanucleotide motif TTGAA, located at a distance of 17 nucleotides from the telomeres. This motif has been suggested to be involved in the formation of macronuclear chromosomes. PMID:1395137

  7. Membrane protein expression in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    King, Martin S; Boes, Christoph; Kunji, Edmund R S

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis has many properties that are ideal for the overproduction of membrane proteins in a functional form. Growth of lactococci is rapid, proceeds to high cell densities, and does not require aeration, which facilitates large-scale fermentation. The available promoter systems are strong and tightly regulated, allowing expression of toxic gene products in a controlled manner. Expressed membrane proteins are targeted exclusively to the cytoplasmic membrane, allowing the use of ionophores, ligands, and inhibitors to study activity of the membrane protein in whole cells. Constructed plasmids are stable and expression levels are highly reproducible. The relatively small genome size of the organism causes little redundancy, which facilitates complementation studies and allows for easier purification. The produced membrane proteins are often stable, as the organism has limited proteolytic capability, and they are readily solubilized from the membrane with mild detergents. Lactococci are multiple amino acid auxotrophs, allowing the incorporation of labels, such as selenomethionine. Among the few disadvantages are the low transformation frequency, AT-rich codon usage, and resistance to lysis by mechanical means, but these problems can be overcome fairly easily. We will describe in detail the protocols used to express membrane proteins in L. lactis, from cloning of the target gene to the isolation of membrane vesicles for the determination of expression levels. PMID:25857778

  8. Ornithine transport and exchange in Streptococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J

    1987-01-01

    Resting cells of Streptococcus lactis 133 appeared to accumulate [14C]ornithine to a high concentration in the absence of an exogenous energy source. However, analysis of intracellular amino acid pool constituents and results of transport experiments revealed that the accumulation of ornithine represented a homoexchange between extracellular [14C]ornithine and unlabeled ornithine in the cell. The energy-independent exchange of ornithine was not inhibited by proton-conducting uncouplers or by metabolic inhibitors. Intracellular [14C]ornithine was retained by resting cells after suspension in a buffered medium. However, addition of unlabeled ornithine to the suspension elicited rapid exit of labeled amino acid. The initial rate of exit of [14C]ornithine was dependent on the concentration of unlabeled ornithine in the medium, but this accelerative exchange diffusion process caused no net loss of amino acid. By contrast, the presence of a fermentable energy source caused a rapid expulsion of and net decrease in the concentration of intracellular ornithine. Kinetic analyses of amino acid transport demonstrated competitive inhibition between lysine and ornithine, and data obtained by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography established the heteroexchange of these basic amino acids. The effects of amino acids and of ornithine analogs on both entry and exit of [14C]ornithine have been examined. The data suggest that a common carrier mediates the entry and exchange of lysine, arginine, and ornithine in cells of S. lactis. Images PMID:3114235

  9. Ornithine transport and exchange in Streptococcus lactis

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.

    1987-09-01

    Resting cells of Streptococcus lactis 133 appeared to accumulate (/sup 14/C)ornithine to a high concentration in the absence of an exogenous energy source. However, analysis of intracellular amino acid pool constituents and results of transport experiments revealed that the accumulation of ornithine represented a homoexchange between extracellular (/sup 14/C)ornithine and unlabeled ornithine in the cell. The energy-independent exchange of ornithine was not inhibited by proton-conducting uncouplers or by metabolic inhibitors. Intracellular (/sup 14/C)ornithine was retained by resting cells after suspension in a buffered medium. However, addition of unlabeled ornithine to the suspension elicited rapid exit of labeled amino acid. The initial rate of exist of (/sup 14/C)ornithine was dependent on the concentration of unlabeled ornithine in the medium, but this accelerative exchange diffusion process caused no net loss of amino acid. By contrast, the presence of a fermentable energy source caused a rapid expulsion of and new decrease in the concentration of intracellular ornithine. Kinetic analyses of amino acid transport demonstrated competitive inhibition between lysine and ornithine, and data obtained by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography established the heteroexchange of these basic amino acids. The effects of amino acids and of ornithine analogs on both entry and exit of (/sup 14/C)ornithine have been examined. The data suggest that common carrier mediates the entry and exchange of lysine, arginine, and ornithine in cells of S. lactis.

  10. Cutaneous abscess caused by Corynebacterium lactis in a companion dog.

    PubMed

    Antunes, João Marcelo Azevedo de Paula; Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Demoner, Larissa de Castro; Ramos, Juliana Nunes; Baio, Paulo Victor Pereira; Simpson-Louredo, Liliane; Santos, Cíntia Silva; Hirata, Raphael; Ferioli, Raquel Beneton; Romera, Adriana Resmond Cruz; Vieira, Verônica Viana; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luíza

    2015-07-01

    Many new, emerging and re-emerging diseases of humans are caused by pathogens which originate from animals or products of animal origin. Corynebacterium lactis, a recently described species of the genus Corynebacterium, was first isolated from milk of asymptomatic cows. In the present study a cutaneous abscess caused by C. lactis in a dog was recognized by cytologic and histologic examination in addition to 16S rRNA gene analysis of the microorganism. Therefore, C. lactis should be included among other bacterial species recognized as emerging pathogens for companion animals. PMID:25937144

  11. Sex pheromone and trail pheromone of the sand termite Psammotermes hybostoma.

    PubMed

    Sillam-Dussès, David; Hanus, Robert; Abd El-Latif, Ashraf Oukasha; Jiroš, Pavel; Krasulová, Jana; Kalinová, Blanka; Valterová, Irena; Sobotník, Jan

    2011-02-01

    Within the complex network of chemical signals used by termites, trail pheromones and sex pheromones are among the best known. Numerous recent papers map the chemical identity and glandular origin of these pheromones in nearly all major isopteran taxa. In this study, we aimed to describe the sex pheromone and the trail pheromone of a poorly known sand termite, Psammotermes hybostoma. We identified (3Z,6Z,8E)-dodeca-3,6,8-trien-1-ol (dodecatrienol) as the sex pheromone released by tergal and sternal glands of female imagos and, at the same time, as the trail pheromone secreted from the sternal gland of workers. We conclude that chemical communication in Psammotermes does not differ from that of most other Rhinotermitidae, such as Reticulitermes, despite the presence of a diterpene as a major component of the trail pheromone of Prorhinotermes to which Psammotermes is presumed to be phylogenetically close. Our findings underline once again the conservative nature of chemical communication in termites, with dodecatrienol being a frequent component of pheromonal signals in trail following and sex attraction and, at the same time, a tight evolutionary relationship between the trail following of working castes and the sex attraction of imagos. PMID:21318399

  12. Activation of pheromone-sensitive neurons is mediated by conformational activation of pheromone-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, John D; Ha, Tal Soo; Jones, David N M; Smith, Dean P

    2008-06-27

    Detection of volatile odorants by olfactory neurons is thought to result from direct activation of seven-transmembrane odorant receptors by odor molecules. Here, we show that detection of the Drosophila pheromone, 11-cis vaccenyl acetate (cVA), is instead mediated by pheromone-induced conformational shifts in the extracellular pheromone-binding protein, LUSH. We show that LUSH undergoes a pheromone-specific conformational change that triggers the firing of pheromone-sensitive neurons. Amino acid substitutions in LUSH that are predicted to reduce or enhance the conformational shift alter sensitivity to cVA as predicted in vivo. One substitution, LUSH(D118A), produces a dominant-active LUSH protein that stimulates T1 neurons through the neuronal receptor components Or67d and SNMP in the complete absence of pheromone. Structural analysis of LUSH(D118A) reveals that it closely resembles cVA-bound LUSH. Therefore, the pheromone-binding protein is an inactive, extracellular ligand converted by pheromone molecules into an activator of pheromone-sensitive neurons and reveals a distinct paradigm for detection of odorants. PMID:18585358

  13. Identification and characteristics of nisin Z-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis isolated from Kimchi.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Hee; Itoh, Kikuji; Kikuchi, Eisaku; Niwa, Hidekazu; Fujisawa, Tomohiko

    2003-05-01

    We isolated bacteriocin-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis from Kimchi. The bacteriocin inhibited strains of Clostridium perfringens, C. difficile, Listeria monocytogenes, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, and one out of four methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains, as well as some closely related lactic acid bacteria. In tricine-SDS-PAGE, the bacteriocin migrated with an apparent molecular weight of about 4 kDa to the same location as nisin A and crude nisin Z. The gene encoding this bacteriocin was found to be identical to that of nisin Z with direct PCR sequence methods. The inhibitory activity was stable against heat and pH, but it was lost at 100 degrees C for 1 h and at 121 degrees C for 15 min. The bacteriocin was inactivated by proteolytic enzymes, but was not affected by lysozyme, lipase, catalase, or beta-glucosidase. There were some differences in characteristics from those of nisins described previously. PMID:12732968

  14. Pheromonal control: reconciling physiological mechanism with signalling theory.

    PubMed

    Peso, Marianne; Elgar, Mark A; Barron, Andrew B

    2015-05-01

    Pheromones are intraspecific chemical signals. They can have profound effects on the behaviour and/or physiology of the receiver, and it is still common to hear pheromones described as controlling of the behaviour of the receiver. The discussion of pheromonal control arose initially from a close association between hormones and pheromones in the comparative physiological literature, but the concept of a controlling pheromone is at odds with contemporary signal evolution theory, which predicts that a manipulative pheromonal signal negatively affecting the receiver's fitness should not be stable over evolutionary time. Here we discuss the meaning of pheromonal control, and the ecological circumstances by which it might be supported. We argue that in discussing pheromonal control it is important to differentiate between control applied to the effects of a pheromone on a receiver's physiology (proximate control), and control applied to the effects of a pheromone on a receiver's fitness (ultimate control). Critically, a pheromone signal affecting change in the receiver's behaviour or physiology need not necessarily manipulate the fitness of a receiver. In cases where pheromonal signalling does lead to a reduction in the fitness of the receiver, the signalling system would be stable if the pheromone were an honest signal of a social environment that disadvantages the receiver, and the physiological and behavioural changes observed in the receiver were an adaptive response to the new social circumstances communicated by the pheromone. PMID:24925630

  15. Pheromone detection by a pheromone emitter: a small sex pheromone-specific processing system in the female American cockroach.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Hiroshi; Iwasaki, Masazumi; Mizunami, Makoto

    2011-03-01

    Many animals depend on pheromone communication for successful mating. Sex pheromone in insects is usually released by females to attract males. In American cockroaches, the largest glomerulus (B-glomerulus) in the male antennal lobe (first-order olfactory center) processes the major component of sex pheromone. Using intracellular recordings combined with fine neuroanatomical techniques, we provide evidence that the female homolog of the male B-glomerulus also acts as a sex pheromone-specific detector. Whereas ordinary glomeruli that process normal environmental odors are innervated by single projection neurons (PNs), the B-glomerulus in both sexes is innervated by multiple PNs, one of which possesses a thicker axon, termed here B-PN. Both soma size and axon diameter were smaller on B-PNs from females compared with B-PNs from males. The female B-PNs also produce fewer terminal arborizations in the protocerebrum than male B-PNs. Termination fields in the lateral protocerebrum of the female B-PN are mostly segregated from those formed by other uniglomerular PNs innervating ordinary glomeruli. Female B-PN activity was greatest in response to sex pheromone but lower than that in the male B-PN. This specific detection system suggests that sex pheromone affects the behavior and/or endocrine system of female cockroaches. PMID:21098584

  16. Pheromone Static Routing Strategy for Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Mao-Bin; Henry, Y. K. Lau; Ling, Xiang; Jiang, Rui

    2012-12-01

    We adopt the concept of using pheromones to generate a set of static paths that can reach the performance of global dynamic routing strategy [Phys. Rev. E 81 (2010) 016113]. The path generation method consists of two stages. In the first stage, a pheromone is dropped to the nodes by packets forwarded according to the global dynamic routing strategy. In the second stage, pheromone static paths are generated according to the pheromone density. The output paths can greatly improve traffic systems' overall capacity on different network structures, including scale-free networks, small-world networks and random graphs. Because the paths are static, the system needs much less computational resources than the global dynamic routing strategy.

  17. Current research in canine and feline pheromones.

    PubMed

    Pageat, Patrick; Gaultier, Emmanuel

    2003-03-01

    Pheromonotherapy seems to be a new therapeutic approach allowing practitioners to tackle the treatment of behavioral disorders in a natural, specific, and safe way. Although the efficacy of pheromones has been assessed in some specific behavioral problems, it seems that their range of action could cover the wide field of reduction of stress. Therefore, the use of pheromones should not be reduced to treatment of behavioral disorders (potentially associated with psychotropes or a behavioral modification program) but should be included in a strategy of improving the welfare of pets in veterinary structures (during examination and hospitalization) and in breeding networks (separation from the mother and transport). Moreover, further studies may allow the veterinary practitioner to use pheromone analogues in the field of diagnostics to determine the behavioral status of a pet (e.g., anxious or not, dominant or not). Pheromonotherapy is at its beginning, and the use of pheromones in various fields of medicine is heartening. PMID:12701508

  18. Bed bug aggregation pheromone finally identified.

    PubMed

    Gries, Regine; Britton, Robert; Holmes, Michael; Zhai, Huimin; Draper, Jason; Gries, Gerhard

    2015-01-19

    Bed bugs have become a global epidemic and current detection tools are poorly suited for routine surveillance. Despite intense research on bed bug aggregation behavior and the aggregation pheromone, which could be used as a chemical lure, the complete composition of this pheromone has thus far proven elusive. Here, we report that the bed bug aggregation pheromone comprises five volatile components (dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl trisulfide, (E)-2-hexenal, (E)-2-octenal, 2-hexanone), which attract bed bugs to safe shelters, and one less-volatile component (histamine), which causes their arrestment upon contact. In infested premises, a blend of all six components is highly effective at luring bed bugs into traps. The trapping of juvenile and adult bed bugs, with or without recent blood meals, provides strong evidence that this unique pheromone bait could become an effective and inexpensive tool for bed bug detection and potentially their control. PMID:25529634

  19. PRACTICAL SYNTHESES OF SELECTED INSECT PHEROMONES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Practical examples of insect pheromone synthesis, from our laboratory will be presented. Examples of key reactions in synthetic pathways include: Regiospecific epoxidation (cereal leaf beetle), kinetic vs. thermodynamic control of cycloheptanone dimethylation (Aphthona flea beetles), in situ oxida...

  20. Genetic transformation of intact Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis by high-voltage electroporation

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, D.A.; Harlander, S.K. )

    1989-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a system for electroporating intact cells of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis LM0230 (previously designated Streptococcus lactis LM0230) with a commercially available electroporation unit. Parameters which influenced the efficiency of transformation included growth phase and final concentration of cells, ionic strength of the suspending medium, concentration of plasmid DNA, and the amplitude and duration of the pulse. Washed suspensions of intact cells suspended in deionized distilled water were subjected to one high-voltage electric pulse varying in voltage (300 to 900 V corresponding to field strengths of 5 to 17 kV/cm) and duration (100 {mu}s to 1 s). Transformation efficiencies of 10{sup 3} transformants per {mu}g of DNA were obtained when dense suspensions (final concentration, 5 {times} 10{sup 10} CFU/ml) of stationary-phase cells were subjected to one pulse with a peak voltage of 900 V (field strength, 17 kV/cm) and a pulse duration of 5 ms in the presence of plasmid DNA. Dilution of porated cells in broth medium followed by an expression period of 2 h at 30{degree}C was beneficial in enhancing transformation efficiencies. Plasmids ranging in size from 9.8 to 30.0 kilobase pairs could be transformed by this procedure.

  1. Pheromone orientation: role of internal control mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tobin, T R

    1981-12-01

    Male American cockroaches walk a zigzag path upwind toward a source of female sex pheromone. Although the maximum width of the pathway is regulated by the width of an odor plume, many turns are made before the edge of a wide plume is encountered. In addition to the pheromone regulation of the insect's orientation movements, an internal mechanism appears to influence the zigzag turning pattern. PMID:17755899

  2. Identification and Characterization of Pheromone Receptors and Interplay between Receptors and Pheromone Binding Proteins in the Diamondback Moth, Plutella xyllostella

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mengjing; Liu, Yang; Walker, William B.; Liu, Chengcheng; Lin, Kejian; Gu, Shaohua; Zhang, Yongjun; Zhou, Jingjiang; Wang, Guirong

    2013-01-01

    Moths depend on olfactory cues such as sex pheromones to find and recognize mating partners. Pheromone receptors (PRs) and Pheromone binding proteins (PBPs) are thought to be associated with olfactory signal transduction of pheromonal compounds in peripheral olfactory reception. Here six candidate pheromone receptor genes in the diamondback moth, Plutella xyllostella were identified and cloned. All of the six candidate PR genes display male-biased expression, which is a typical characteristic of pheromone receptors. In the Xenopus-based functional study and in situ hybridization, PxylOR4 is defined as another pheromone receptor in addition to the previously characterized PxylOR1. In the study of interaction between PRs and PBPs, PxylPBPs could increase the sensitivity of the complex expressing oocyte cells to the ligand pheromone component while decreasing the sensitivity to pheromone analogs. We deduce that activating pheromone receptors in olfactory receptor neurons requires some role of PBPs to pheromone/PBP complex. If the chemical signal is not the pheromone component, but instead, a pheromone analog with a similar structure, the complex would have a decreased ability to activate downstream pheromone receptors. PMID:23626773

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of the Probiotic Yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus fragilis B0399

    PubMed Central

    Quarella, Sara; Lovrovich, Paola; Scalabrin, Simone; Campedelli, Ilenia; Backovic, Ana; Gatto, Veronica; Cattonaro, Federica; Turello, Alessandro; Felis, Giovanna E.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Kluyveromyces marxianus fragilis B0399, the first yeast approved as a probiotic for human consumption not belonging to the genus Saccharomyces. The genome is composed of 8 chromosomes, with a total size of 11.44 Mb, including mitochondrial DNA. PMID:27587830

  4. Ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers (Helianthus tuberosus). Using Kluyveromyces marxcianus and Saccharomyces rosei

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritis, A.; Bajpai, P.

    1982-04-01

    This article examines the potential of Jerusalem artichoke as a source for ethanol and single-cell protein SCP. In addition, experimental results are presented on batch fermentation kinetics employing two strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus and one strain of Saccharomyces rosei grown on the extract derived from the tubers of Jerusalem artichoke. Of the three cultures examined, Kluyveromyces marxianus UCD (FST) 55-82 was found to be the best producer of ethanol grown in a simple medium at 35 degrees C. The ethanol production was found to be growth-associated having a mu max = 0.41/h and the ethanol and biomass yields were determined to be Y p/s = 0.45 (88% of the theoretical) and Y x/s = 0.04 with 92% of the original sugars utilized. On the basis of carbohydrate yields of Jerusalem artichoke reported in the literature and these batch kinetic studies with Kluyveromyces marxianus, the calculated ethanol yields were found to range from 1400 kg ethanol/acre/yr to a maximum of 2700 kg ethanol/acre/yr. The SCP yields for Kluyveromyces marxianus were calculated to range between 130 to 250 kg dry wt cell/acre/yr. The potential for developing an integrated process to produce ethanol and SCP is also discussed. (Refs. 27).

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of the Probiotic Yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus fragilis B0399.

    PubMed

    Quarella, Sara; Lovrovich, Paola; Scalabrin, Simone; Campedelli, Ilenia; Backovic, Ana; Gatto, Veronica; Cattonaro, Federica; Turello, Alessandro; Torriani, Sandra; Felis, Giovanna E

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Kluyveromyces marxianus fragilis B0399, the first yeast approved as a probiotic for human consumption not belonging to the genus Saccharomyces The genome is composed of 8 chromosomes, with a total size of 11.44 Mb, including mitochondrial DNA. PMID:27587830

  6. Two different dihydroorotate dehydrogenases in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, P S; Jansen, P J; Hammer, K

    1994-01-01

    The pyrimidine de novo biosynthesis pathway has been characterized for a number of organisms. The general pathway consists of six enzymatic steps. In the characterization of the pyrimidine pathway of Lactococcus lactis, two different pyrD genes encoding dihydroorotate dehydrogenase were isolated. The nucleotide sequences of the two genes, pyrDa and pyrDb, have been determined. One of the deduced amino acid sequences has a high degree of homology to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, and the other resembles the dihydroorotate dehydrogenase from Bacillus subtilis. It is possible to distinguish between the two enzymes in crude extracts by using different electron acceptors. We constructed mutants containing a mutated form of either one or the other or both of the pyrD genes. Only the double mutant is pyrimidine auxotrophic. Images PMID:8021180

  7. Aggregation Pheromone System: A Real-parameter Optimization Algorithm using Aggregation Pheromones as the Base Metaphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Shigeyosi

    This paper proposes an aggregation pheromone system (APS) for solving real-parameter optimization problems using the collective behavior of individuals which communicate using aggregation pheromones. APS was tested on several test functions used in evolutionary computation. The results showed APS could solve real-parameter optimization problems fairly well. The sensitivity analysis of control parameters of APS is also studied.

  8. Characterization of two nisin-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strains isolated from a commercial sauerkraut fermentation.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, L J; Fleming, H P; Klaenhammer, T R

    1992-01-01

    Two Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strains, NCK400 and LJH80, isolated from a commercial sauerkraut fermentation were shown to produce nisin. LJH80 was morphologically unstable and gave rise to two stable, nisin-producing (Nip+) derivatives, NCK318-2 and NCK318-3. NCK400 and derivatives of LJH80 exhibited identical morphological and metabolic characteristics, but could be distinguished on the basis of plasmid profiles and genomic hybridization patterns to a DNA probe specific for the iso-ISS1 element, IS946. NCK318-2 and NCK318-3 harbored two and three plasmids, respectively, which hybridized with IS946. Plasmid DNA was not detected in NCK400, and DNA from this strain failed to hybridize with IS946. Despite the absence of detectable plasmid DNA in NCK400, nisin-negative derivatives (NCK402 and NCK403) were isolated after repeated transfer in broth at 37 degrees C. Nisin-negative derivatives concurrently lost the ability to ferment sucrose and became sensitive to nisin. A 4-kbp HindIII fragment containing the structural gene for nisin (spaN), cloned from L. lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454, was used to probe genomic DNA of NCK318-2, NCK318-3, NCK400, and NCK402 digested with EcoRI or HindIII. The spaN probe hybridized to an 8.8-kbp EcoRI fragment and a 10-kbp HindIII fragment in the Nip+ sauerkraut isolates, but did not hybridize to the Nip- derivative, NCK402. A different hybridization pattern was observed when the same probe was used against Nip+ L. lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454 and ATCC 7962. These phenotypic and genetic data confirmed that unique Nip+ L. lactis subsp. lactis strains were isolated from fermenting sauerkraut. Images PMID:1622214

  9. Ant trail pheromone biosynthesis is triggered by a neuropeptide hormone.

    PubMed

    Choi, Man-Yeon; Vander Meer, Robert K

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of insect chemical communication including pheromone identification, synthesis, and their role in behavior has advanced tremendously over the last half-century. However, endocrine regulation of pheromone biosynthesis has progressed slowly due to the complexity of direct and/or indirect hormonal activation of the biosynthetic cascades resulting in insect pheromones. Over 20 years ago, a neurohormone, pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) was identified that stimulated sex pheromone biosynthesis in a lepidopteran moth. Since then, the physiological role, target site, and signal transduction of PBAN has become well understood for sex pheromone biosynthesis in moths. Despite that PBAN-like peptides (∼200) have been identified from various insect Orders, their role in pheromone regulation had not expanded to the other insect groups except for Lepidoptera. Here, we report that trail pheromone biosynthesis in the Dufour's gland (DG) of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, is regulated by PBAN. RNAi knock down of PBAN gene (in subesophageal ganglia) or PBAN receptor gene (in DG) expression inhibited trail pheromone biosynthesis. Reduced trail pheromone was documented analytically and through a behavioral bioassay. Extension of PBAN's role in pheromone biosynthesis to a new target insect, mode of action, and behavioral function will renew research efforts on the involvement of PBAN in pheromone biosynthesis in Insecta. PMID:23226278

  10. Ant Trail Pheromone Biosynthesis Is Triggered by a Neuropeptide Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Man-Yeon; Vander Meer, Robert K.

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of insect chemical communication including pheromone identification, synthesis, and their role in behavior has advanced tremendously over the last half-century. However, endocrine regulation of pheromone biosynthesis has progressed slowly due to the complexity of direct and/or indirect hormonal activation of the biosynthetic cascades resulting in insect pheromones. Over 20 years ago, a neurohormone, pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) was identified that stimulated sex pheromone biosynthesis in a lepidopteran moth. Since then, the physiological role, target site, and signal transduction of PBAN has become well understood for sex pheromone biosynthesis in moths. Despite that PBAN-like peptides (∼200) have been identified from various insect Orders, their role in pheromone regulation had not expanded to the other insect groups except for Lepidoptera. Here, we report that trail pheromone biosynthesis in the Dufour's gland (DG) of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, is regulated by PBAN. RNAi knock down of PBAN gene (in subesophageal ganglia) or PBAN receptor gene (in DG) expression inhibited trail pheromone biosynthesis. Reduced trail pheromone was documented analytically and through a behavioral bioassay. Extension of PBAN's role in pheromone biosynthesis to a new target insect, mode of action, and behavioral function will renew research efforts on the involvement of PBAN in pheromone biosynthesis in Insecta. PMID:23226278

  11. Neuropeptide-mediated stimulation of pheromone biosynthesis in an ant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pheromones are well known to initiate behavioral or physiological responses in members of the same species. The chemistry and behaviors elicited by pheromones have advanced tremendously in the 50+ years since the first pheromone identification from the silkworm moth. However, the regulation of phero...

  12. Utilization of pheromones in the population management of moth pests.

    PubMed Central

    Cardé, R T

    1976-01-01

    Pheromones are substances emitted by one individual of a species and eliciting a specific response in a second individual of the same species. In moths (Lepidoptera) generally females lure males for mating by emission of a sex attractant pheromone comprised of either one or more components. Since 1966 the identification of the pheromone blends of many moth pests has allowed investigations into the use of these messengers for population manipulation. Pheromone-baited traps may be used both to detect pest presence and to estimate population density, so that conventional control tactics can be employed only as required and timed precisely for maximum effectiveness. Attractant traps also can be utilized for direct population suppression when the traps are deployed at a density effective in reducing mating success sufficiently to achieve control. A third use pattern of pheromones and related compounds is disruption of pheromone communication via atmospheric permeation with synthetic disruptants. The behavioral modifications involved in disruption of communication may include habituation of the normal response sequence (alteration of the pheromone response threshold) and "confusion" (inability of the organism to perceive and orient to the naturally emitted lure). Disruption of communication employing the natural pheromone components as the disruptant has been most successful, although nonattractant behavioral modifiers structurally similar to the pheromone components also may prove useful. Possible future resistance to direct pheromone manipulation may be expected to involve the evolution of behavioral and sensory changes that minimize the informational overlap between the natural pheromone system and the pheromone control technique. PMID:789060

  13. Peptide pheromone signaling in Streptococcus and Enterococcus

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Laura C.; Federle, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular chemical signaling in bacteria, commonly referred to as quorum sensing (QS), relies on the production and detection of compounds known as pheromones to elicit coordinated responses among members of a community. Pheromones produced by Gram-positive bacteria are comprised of small peptides. Based on both peptide structure and sensory system architectures, Gram-positive bacterial signaling pathways may be classified into one of four groups with a defining hallmark: cyclical peptides of the Agr type, peptides that contain Gly-Gly processing motifs, sensory systems of the RNPP family, or the recently characterized Rgg-like regulatory family. The recent discovery that Rgg family members respond to peptide pheromones increases substantially the number of species in which QS is likely a key regulatory component. These pathways control a variety of fundamental behaviors including conjugation, natural competence for transformation, biofilm development, and virulence factor regulation. Overlapping QS pathways found in multiple species and pathways that utilize conserved peptide pheromones provide opportunities for interspecies communication. Here we review pheromone signaling identified in the genera Enterococcus and Streptococcus, providing examples of all four types of pathways. PMID:24118108

  14. A flux capacitor for moth pheromones.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Shannon B; Hansson, Bill S

    2012-05-01

    In this issue of Chemical Senses, Baker et al. propose a provocative and intriguing explanation for a commonly observed phenomenon in moth chemocommunication. Sex pheromones in moths typically consist of mixtures of long-chain unsaturated compounds in specific ratios. These ratios are correspondingly detected by male moths using separate olfactory sensory neurons for each pheromone component housed singly or multiply in long trichoid sensilla on the antennal surface. These neurons are often present in different proportions, typically with the neuron responding to the highest ratio component present in greatest abundance or with the largest dendritic diameter. In their article, Baker et al. postulate that these physical differences in neuron magnitudes arise to compensate for the higher molecular flux present with the most abundant pheromone components. Such a suggestion raises several questions concerning the physiological and behavioral nature of pheromone communication. Specifically, is the flux in a natural pheromone plume high enough to warrant increased flux detection for the most abundant components? Second, how can changes in neuronal number or size lead to increased flux detection? And finally, how would this increased flux detection be accomplished at molecular, cellular, and ultimately network scales? We address each of these questions and propose future experiments that could offer insight into the stimulating proposition raised by Baker et al. PMID:22334600

  15. Sensing odorants and pheromones with chemosensory receptors.

    PubMed

    Touhara, Kazushige; Vosshall, Leslie B

    2009-01-01

    Olfaction is a critical sensory modality that allows living things to acquire chemical information from the external world. The olfactory system processes two major classes of stimuli: (a) general odorants, small molecules derived from food or the environment that signal the presence of food, fire, or predators, and (b) pheromones, molecules released from individuals of the same species that convey social or sexual cues. Chemosensory receptors are broadly classified, by the ligands that activate them, into odorant or pheromone receptors. Peripheral sensory neurons expressing either odorant or pheromone receptors send signals to separate odor- and pheromone-processing centers in the brain to elicit distinct behavioral and neuroendocrinological outputs. General odorants activate receptors in a combinatorial fashion, whereas pheromones activate narrowly tuned receptors that activate sexually dimorphic neural circuits in the brain. We review recent progress on chemosensory receptor structure, function, and circuitry in vertebrates and invertebrates from the point of view of the molecular biology and physiology of these sensory systems. PMID:19575682

  16. Pheromone gland development and pheromone production in lutzomyia longipalpis (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae).

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Carolina N; Batista-Pereira, Luciane G; Bretas, Jorge A C; Eiras, Alvaro E; Hooper, Antony M; Peixoto, Alexandre A; Soares, Maurilio J

    2011-05-01

    The sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis (Lutz & Neiva) (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) is the main vector of American visceral leishmaniasis. Adult males produce a terpenoid sex pheromone that in some cases also acts as male aggregation pheromone. We have analyzed the correlation between male pheromone production levels and pheromone gland cell morphogenesis after adult emergence from pupae. The abdominal tergites of L. longipalpis males were dissected and fixed in glutaraldehyde for transmission electron microscopy, or the pheromone was extracted in analytical grade hexane. Pheromone chemical analysis was carried out at 3- to 6-h intervals during the first 24 h after emergence and continued daily until the seventh day. All extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography. For the morphological analysis, we used insects collected at 0-6, 9-12, 12-14, and 96 h after emergence. Ultrastructural data from 0- to 6-h-old adult males revealed smaller pheromone gland cells with small microvilli at the end apparatus. Lipid droplets and peroxisomes were absent or very rare, but a large number of mitochondria could be seen. Lipid droplets started to appear in the gland cells cytoplasm approximately 9 h after adult emergence, and their number and size increased with age, together with the presence of several peroxisomes, suggesting a role for these organelles in pheromone biosynthesis. At 12-15 h after emergence, the lipid droplets were mainly distributed near the microvilli but were smaller than those in mature older males (4 d old). Pheromone biosynthesis started around 12 h after emergence and increased continuously during the first 3 d, stabilizing thereafter, coinciding with the period when males are more able to attract females. PMID:21661306

  17. Unraveling the pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) signal transduction cascade that regulates sex pheromone production in moths

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies over the past three decades have demonstrated that female moths usually produce sex pheromones as multi-component blends in which the ratios of the individual components are precisely controlled, making it possible to generate species-specific pheromone blends. Most moth pheromone component...

  18. Impact of osmotic stress on protein diffusion in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Mika, Jacek T; Schavemaker, Paul E; Krasnikov, Victor; Poolman, Bert

    2014-11-01

    We measured translational diffusion of proteins in the cytoplasm and plasma membrane of the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis and probed the effect of osmotic upshift. For cells in standard growth medium the diffusion coefficients for cytosolic proteins (27 and 582 kDa) and 12-transmembrane helix membrane proteins are similar to those in Escherichia coli. The translational diffusion of GFP in L. lactis drops by two orders of magnitude when the medium osmolality is increased by ∼ 1.9 Osm, and the decrease in mobility is partly reversed in the presence of osmoprotectants. We find a large spread in diffusion coefficients over the full population of cells but a smaller spread if only sister cells are compared. While in general the diffusion coefficients we measure under normal osmotic conditions in L. lactis are similar to those reported in E. coli, the decrease in translational diffusion upon osmotic challenge in L. lactis is smaller than in E. coli. An even more striking difference is that in L. lactis the GFP diffusion coefficient drops much more rapidly with volume than in E. coli. We discuss these findings in the light of differences in turgor, cell volume, crowding and cytoplasmic structure of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25244659

  19. Trail formation based on directed pheromone deposition.

    PubMed

    Boissard, Emmanuel; Degond, Pierre; Motsch, Sebastien

    2013-05-01

    We propose an Individual-Based Model of ant-trail formation. The ants are modeled as self-propelled particles which deposit directed pheromone particles and interact with them through alignment interaction. The directed pheromone particles intend to model pieces of trails, while the alignment interaction translates the tendency for an ant to follow a trail when it meets it. Thanks to adequate quantitative descriptors of the trail patterns, the existence of a phase transition as the ant-pheromone interaction frequency is increased can be evidenced. We propose both kinetic and fluid descriptions of this model and analyze the capabilities of the fluid model to develop trail patterns. We observe that the development of patterns by fluid models require extra trail amplification mechanisms that are not needed at the Individual-Based Model level. PMID:22526837

  20. Pheromones: a new ergogenic aid in sport?

    PubMed

    Papaloucas, Marios; Kyriazi, Kyriaki; Kouloulias, Vassilis

    2015-10-01

    Nowadays, antidoping laboratories are improving detection methods to confirm the use of forbidden substances. These tests are based both on direct identification of new substances or their metabolites and on indirect evaluation of changes in gene, protein, or metabolite patterns (genomics, proteomics, or metabolomics). The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) officially monitors anabolic steroids, hormones, growth factors, β-agonists, hormone and metabolic modulators, masking agents, street drugs, manipulation of blood and blood components, chemical and physical manipulation, gene doping, stimulants, narcotics, glucocorticosteroids, and β-blockers. However, several other substances are under review by WADA. Pheromones accomplish the structure and function of life from its first step, while they have an impact on the body's performance. Both testosterone and pheromones have an ergogenic effect that could potentially affect an athlete's performance. The authors share their questions concerning the potential impact of pheromones in sports. PMID:25710097

  1. Variable volume fed-batch fermentation for nisin production by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis W28.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhaoliang; Wang, Lin; Jing, Yingjun; Li, Xueliang; Zhao, Yanli

    2009-03-01

    A feeding technology that was suitable for improving the nisin production by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis W28 was established. The effects of initial sucrose concentration (ISC) in the fermentation broth, feeding time, and feeding rate on the fermentation were studied. It was observed that a fed-batch culture (ISC = 10 g l(-1)) with 100 ml sucrose solution (190 g l(-1)) being evenly fed (9-10 ml h(-1)) into the fermenter after 3-h fermentation gave the best performance in terms of biomass and nisin yield. Under these conditions, the total biomass and the total nisin yield were approximately 23% and 51% higher than those in batch fermentation, respectively. When the sucrose concentration was controlled at 5-10 g l(-1) in variable volume intermittent fed-batch fermentation (VVIF) with ISC = 10 g l(-1), the total biomass and the total nisin yield were 29% and 60% above those in batch fermentation, respectively. The VVIF proved to be effective to eliminate the substrate inhibition by maintaining sucrose at appropriate levels. It is also easy to be scaled up, since various parameters involved in industrial production were taken into account. PMID:18712289

  2. Probiotic characterization of potential hydrolases producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis isolated from pickled yam.

    PubMed

    Bhanwar, Seema; Singh, Arashdeep; Ganguli, Abhijit

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize potential probiotic strain co-producing α-amylase and β-galactosidase. Sixty-three strains, isolated from pickle samples were screened for their hydrolase producing capacity by utilizing different starches as carbon source. One out of 63 strains, isolated from traditionally fermented pickled yam showing maximum hydrolase activity (α-amylase (36.9 U/ml) and β-galactosidase (42.6 U/ml)) within a period of 48 hours was identified as Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. Further, it was assessed for the probiotic characteristics under gastrointestinal conditions like acidic, alkaline, proteolytic enzymes, bile stress and found to exhibit tolerance to these stresses. The therapeutic potential of the isolate is implicated because of its antagonistic effect against enteric foodborne pathogens (Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli 0157:H7, Staphylococcus aureus, Yersinia enterocolitica and Aeromonas hydrophila). The results of this study entail a potential applicability of the isolate in developing future probiotic foods besides the production of industrially significant hydrolases. PMID:24020495

  3. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis IL1403

    PubMed Central

    Bolotin, Alexander; Wincker, Patrick; Mauger, Stéphane; Jaillon, Olivier; Malarme, Karine; Weissenbach, Jean; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Sorokin, Alexei

    2001-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a nonpathogenic AT-rich gram-positive bacterium closely related to the genus Streptococcus and is the most commonly used cheese starter. It is also the best-characterized lactic acid bacterium. We sequenced the genome of the laboratory strain IL1403, using a novel two-step strategy that comprises diagnostic sequencing of the entire genome and a shotgun polishing step. The genome contains 2,365,589 base pairs and encodes 2310 proteins, including 293 protein-coding genes belonging to six prophages and 43 insertion sequence (IS) elements. Nonrandom distribution of IS elements indicates that the chromosome of the sequenced strain may be a product of recent recombination between two closely related genomes. A complete set of late competence genes is present, indicating the ability of L. lactis to undergo DNA transformation. Genomic sequence revealed new possibilities for fermentation pathways and for aerobic respiration. It also indicated a horizontal transfer of genetic information from Lactococcus to gram-negative enteric bacteria of Salmonella-Escherichia group. [The sequence data described in this paper has been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession no. AE005176.] PMID:11337471

  4. Lactococcus lactis release from calcium alginate beads.

    PubMed Central

    Champagne, C P; Gaudy, C; Poncelet, D; Neufeld, R J

    1992-01-01

    Cell release during milk fermentation by Lactococcus lactis immobilized in calcium alginate beads was examined. Numbers of free cells in the milk gradually increased from 1 x 10(6) to 3 x 10(7) CFU/ml upon successive reutilization of the beads. Rinsing the beads between fermentations did not influence the numbers of free cells in the milk. Cell release was not affected by initial cell density within the beads or by alginate concentration, although higher acidification rates were achieved with increased cell loading. Coating alginate beads with poly-L-lysine (PLL) did not significantly reduce the release of cells during five consecutive fermentations. A double coating of PLL and alginate reduced cell release by a factor of approximately 50. However, acidification of milk with beads having the PLL-alginate coating was slower than that with uncoated beads. Immersing the beads in ethanol to kill cells on the periphery reduced cell release, but acidification activity was maintained. Dipping the beads in aluminum nitrate or a hot CaCl2 solution was not as effective as dipping them in ethanol. Ethanol treatment or heating of the beads appears to be a promising method for maintaining acidification activity while minimizing viable cell release due to loosely entrapped cells near the surface of the alginate beads. PMID:1622208

  5. Pheromones in marine algae: A technical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassmann, G.; Müller, D. G.; Fritz, P.

    1995-03-01

    It is now well known that many marine organisms use low-molecular volatile substances as signals, in order to coordinate activities between different individuals. The study of such pheromones requires the isolation and enrichment of the secretions from undisturbed living cells or organisms over extended periods of time. The Grob-Hersch extraction device, which we describe here, avoids adverse factors for the biological materials such as strong water currents, rising gas bubbles or chemical solvents. Furthermore, the formation of sea-water spray is greatly reduced. The application of this technique for the isolation of pheromones of marine algae and animals is described.

  6. [Biosynthesis and endocrine regulation of sex pheromones in moth].

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Lin, Xin-da; Du, Yong-jun

    2015-10-01

    The crucial importance of sex pheromones in driving mating behaviors in moths has been well demonstrated in the process of sexual communication between individuals that produce and recognize species specific pheromones. Sex-pheromone molecules from different moth species are chemically characteristic, showing different terminal functional groups, various carbon chain lengths, different position and configuration of double bond system. This review summarized information on the biosynthetic pathways and enzymes involved in producing pheromone molecules in different moths. Then we listed the components and their ratios in the sex pheromones of 15 moth species belonging to different subfamilies in Noctuidae. We also discussed the various viewpoints regarding how sex pheromones with specific ratios are produced. In the discussion we attempted to classify the pheromone molecules based on their producers, characteristics of their functional groups and carbon chain lengths. In particular, composition and ratio variations of pheromones in closely related species or within a species were compared, and the possible molecular mechanisms for these variations and their evolutionary significance were discussed. Finally, we reviewed the endocrine regulation and signal transduction pathways, in which the pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) is involved. Comparing the biosynthetic pathways of sex pheromones among different species, this article aimed to reveal the common principles in pheromone biosynthesis among moth species and the characteristic features associated with the evolutionary course of individual species. Subsequently, some future research directions were proposed. PMID:26995936

  7. Characterization of a cadmium resistance Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strain by antioxidant assays and proteome profiles methods.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Yao; Yang, Xuan; Lian, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Boyang; He, Xiaoyun; Xu, Wentao; Huang, Kunlun

    2016-09-01

    Heavy metal contamination poses a major threat to the environment and human health for their potential toxicity and non-biodegradable properties. At present, some probiotics bacteria are reported to have great potential to eliminate heavy metals from food and water. In this study, resistance properties of a newly isolated Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis for cadmium were studied by antioxidant assays and proteomics analysis. Antioxidant capacity of this strain was significantly activated under cadmium stress indicated by Fenton reaction, DPPH assay, SOD assay and GSH assay. Intracellular antioxidant enzyme systems, such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and catalase were suggested to play vital roles in the activated antioxidant capacity. The up-regulated cadA was associated with the activated P-type ATPases that plays an important role in cadmium resistance. Proteomics analysis identified 12 over-expressed proteins under 50mg/L cadmium stress and these proteins are abundant in oxidative stress response and energy metabolism regulation, which were considered as consequences as cadmium resistance of the strain. Thus, the probiotics Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis may resist cadmium stress through antioxidant approach and enhanced energy metabolism. The food grade lactis strain may be applied in metal decontamination in environment and food/feed. PMID:27522548

  8. Secretory expression of a heterologous nattokinase in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Lixin; Zhong, Jin; Huan, Liandong

    2007-05-01

    Nattokinase has been reported as an oral health product for the prevention of atherosclerosis. We developed a novel strategy to express a nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis in a live delivery vehicle, Lactococcus lactis. Promoter P( nisZ) and signal peptide SP(Usp) were used for inducible and secretory expression of nattokinase in L. lactis. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that nattokinase was successfully expressed, and about 94% of the enzyme was secreted to the culture. The recombinant nattokinase showed potent fibrinolytic activity, equivalent to 41.7 urokinase units per milliliter culture. Expression and delivery of such a fibrinolytic enzyme in the food-grade vehicle L. lactis would facilitate the widespread application of nattokinase in the control and prevention of thrombosis diseases. PMID:17225095

  9. Sex pheromones in mate assessment: analysis of nutrient cost of sex pheromone production by females of the moth Heliothis virescens.

    PubMed

    Foster, Stephen P; Anderson, Karin G

    2015-04-15

    It has been postulated that sex pheromones, in addition to their role in mate recognition and/or finding, may also serve a role in assessment of mate quality. For this, a sex pheromone must give honest information about a signaler's quality, with honesty ensured by a direct metabolic or indirect fitness cost to the signaler. Using a stable isotope tracer-tracee method, we characterized the nutrient pools that fuel sex pheromone production in females of the moth Heliothis virescens, as well as the relative importance of larval- and adult-acquired nutrients to this process. Females used three pools for de novo biosynthesis of sex pheromone, hemolymph trehalose, glycogen (via trehalose) and fat, and produced ca. 25% of pheromone directly from stored (previously synthesized) precursor fatty acids. Pheromone was produced roughly equally from carbohydrate and fat. Adult feeding was very important for pheromone biosynthesis, with a maximum of 65% of de novo biosynthesized pheromone produced from a single adult feed (carbohydrate). Although these nutrient pools are shared with other reproductive physiologies, notably oocyte production, it is unlikely that pheromone production imposes a significant metabolic cost on females, because (i) the amount of nutrients used for pheromone production is negligible compared with that available, (ii) the hemolymph trehalose pool is readily replaceable throughout the adult life, and (iii) in mated females, carbohydrate shortages result in reduced allocation to pheromone. PMID:25722008

  10. A new class of mealybug pheromones: a hemiterpene ester in the sex pheromone of Crisicoccus matsumotoi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabata, Jun; Narai, Yutaka; Sawamura, Nobuo; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Sugie, Hajime

    2012-07-01

    Mealybugs, which include several agricultural pests, are small sap feeders covered with a powdery wax. They exhibit clear sexual dimorphism; males are winged but fragile and short lived, whereas females are windless and less mobile. Thus, sex pheromones emitted by females facilitate copulation and reproduction by serving as a key navigation tool for males. Although the structures of the hitherto known mealybug pheromones vary among species, they have a common structural motif; they are carboxylic esters of monoterpene alcohols with irregular non-head-to-tail linkages. However, in the present study, we isolated from the Matsumoto mealybug, Crisicoccus matsumotoi (Siraiwa), a pheromone with a completely different structure. Using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we identified the pheromone as 3-methyl-3-butenyl 5-methylhexanoate. Its attractiveness to males was confirmed in a series of field trapping experiments involving comparison between the isolated natural product and a synthetic sample. This is the first report of a hemiterpene mealybug pheromone. In addition, the acid moiety (5-methylhexanoate) appears to be rare in insect pheromones.

  11. Pheromone binding proteins enhance the sensitivity of olfactory receptors to sex pheromones in Chilo suppressalis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hetan; Liu, Yang; Yang, Ting; Pelosi, Paolo; Dong, Shuanglin; Wang, Guirong

    2015-01-01

    Sexual communication in moths offers a simplified scenario to model and investigate insect sensory perception. Both PBPs (pheromone-binding proteins) and PRs (pheromone receptors) are involved in the detection of sex pheromones, but the interplay between them still remains largely unknown. In this study, we have measured the binding affinities of the four recombinant PBPs of Chilo suppressalis (CsupPBPs) to pheromone components and analogs and characterized the six PRs using the Xenopus oocytes expression system. Interestingly, when the responses of PRs were recorded in the presence of PBPs, we measured in several combinations a dramatic increase in signals as well as in sensitivity of such combined systems. Furthermore, the discrimination ability of appropriate combinations of PRs and PBPs was improved compared with the performance of PBPs or PRs alone. Besides further supporting a role of PBPs in the pheromone detection and discrimination, our data shows for the first time that appropriate combinations of PRs and PBPs improved the discrimination ability of PBPs or PRs alone. The variety of responses measured with different pairing of PBPs and PRs indicates the complexity of the olfaction system, which, even for the relatively simple task of detecting sex pheromones, utilises a highly sophisticated combinatorial approach. PMID:26310773

  12. Rapid PCR-Based Method Which Can Determine Both Phenotype and Genotype of Lactococcus lactis Subspecies

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Masaru; Kobayashi, Miho; Okamoto, Takashi

    2002-01-01

    A highly efficient, rapid, and reliable PCR-based method for distinguishing Lactococcus lactis subspecies (L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris) is described. Primers complementary to positions in the glutamate decarboxylase gene have been constructed. PCR analysis with extracted DNA or with cells of different L. lactis strains resulted in specific fragments. The length polymorphism of the PCR fragments allowed a clear distinction of the L. lactis subspecies. The amplified fragment length polymorphism with the primers and the restriction fragment length polymorphism of the amplified products agreed perfectly with the identification based on genotypic and phenotypic analyses, respectively. Isolates from cheese starters were investigated by this method, and amplified fragments of genetic variants were found to be approximately 40 bp shorter than the typical L. lactis subsp. cremoris fragments. PMID:11976090

  13. Insect Control (1): Use of Pheromones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Jean L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses current research relating to the use of pheromones as a means of controlling insect pests. These chemicals, which are secreted by insects to affect the behavior of other individuals of the same species, may be used to eliminate pests without destroying their predators and other beneficial insects. (JR)

  14. Moth pheromone receptors and deceitful parapheromones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The insect’s olfactory system is so selective that male moths, for example, can discriminate female-produced sex pheromones from compounds with minimal structural modifications. Yet, there is an exception for this “lock-and-key” tight selectivity. Formate analogs can be used as replacement for less ...

  15. Evolution of Moth Sex Pheromone Desaturases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Moth sex pheromone communication has evolved to make use of complex blends of relatively simple long-chain fatty acid precursors. Species specificity is derived from the unique stereochemistry of double bonds introduced into exact locations along the hydrocarbon backbone of fatty acids, which are r...

  16. On-site airborne pheromone sensing.

    PubMed

    Wehrenfennig, Christoph; Schott, Matthias; Gasch, Tina; Düring, Rolf Alexander; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Kohl, Claus-Dieter

    2013-08-01

    Pheromones and other semiochemicals play an important role in the natural world by influencing the behavior of plants, mammals, and insects. In the latter case, species-dependent pheromone communication has numerous applications, including the detection, trapping, monitoring and guiding of insects, as well as pest management in agriculture. On-site sensors are desirable when volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are used as semiochemicals. Insects have evolved highly selective sensors for such compounds, so biosensors comprising complete insects, isolated organs or individual proteins can be highly effective. However, isolated insect organs have a limited lifetime as biosensor, so biomimetic approaches are needed for prolonged monitoring, novel applications, or measurements in challenging environments. We discuss the development of on-site biosensors and biomimetic approaches for airborne-pheromone sensing, together with biomimetic VOC sensor systems. Furthermore, the infochemical effect describing the anthropogenic contamination of the ecosystem through semiochemicals, will be considered in the context of novel on-site pheromone sensing-systems. PMID:23842897

  17. Alarm pheromone processing in the ant brain: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Mizunami, Makoto; Yamagata, Nobuhiro; Nishino, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Social insects exhibit sophisticated communication by means of pheromones, one example of which is the use of alarm pheromones to alert nestmates for colony defense. We review recent advances in the understanding of the processing of alarm pheromone information in the ant brain. We found that information about formic acid and n-undecane, alarm pheromone components, is processed in a set of specific glomeruli in the antennal lobe of the ant Camponotus obscuripes. Alarm pheromone information is then transmitted, via projection neurons (PNs), to the lateral horn and the calyces of the mushroom body of the protocerebrum. In the lateral horn, we found a specific area where terminal boutons of alarm pheromone-sensitive PNs are more densely distributed than in the rest of the lateral horn. Some neurons in the protocerebrum responded specifically to formic acid or n-undecane and they may participate in the control of behavioral responses to each pheromone component. Other neurons, especially those originating from the mushroom body lobe, responded also to non-pheromonal odors and may play roles in integration of pheromonal and non-pheromonal signals. We found that a class of neurons receive inputs in the lateral horn and the mushroom body lobe and terminate in a variety of premotor areas. These neurons may participate in the control of aggressive behavior, which is sensitized by alarm pheromones and is triggered by non-pheromonal sensory stimuli associated with a potential enemy. We propose that the alarm pheromone processing system has evolved by differentiation of a part of general odor processing system. PMID:20676235

  18. Subdural empyema due to Lactococcus lactis cremoris: case report.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Mizuho; Saito, Atsushi; Kon, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Hiroki; Koyama, Shinya; Haryu, Shinya; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Nishijima, Michiharu

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis cremoris (L. lactis cremoris) infections are very rare in humans. Only three case reports of brain abscess have been reported and the infectious routes and pathological features are still unknown. We experienced a subdural empyema due to L. lactis cremoris in an immunocompetent adult. A 33-year-old man was admitted with fever, right facial pain, left hemiparesis, and left hemianopsia. Computed tomography demonstrated low density fluid collection in the right falcotentorial subdural space. Magnetic resonance (MR) images revealed a high signal lesion on a diffusion-weighted image (DWI) and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images in the right paratentorial and parafalcine subdural space, right maxillary sinus, and bilateral ethmoidal sinus. He underwent two sequential open surgeries for removal and drainage of empyema and was treated with antibiotics including meropenem and ampicillin. To our knowledge, this is the first report of subdural empyema caused by L. lactis cremoris infection. We report the case and discuss the pathological features with the previous literature. PMID:24257498

  19. Targeted disruption of a single sex pheromone receptor gene completely abolishes in vivo pheromone response in the silkmoth

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Takeshi; Mitsuno, Hidefumi; Mikami, Akihisa; Uchino, Keiro; Tabuchi, Masashi; Zhang, Feng; Sezutsu, Hideki; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2015-01-01

    Male moths use species-specific sex pheromones to identify and orientate toward conspecific females. Odorant receptors (ORs) for sex pheromone substances have been identified as sex pheromone receptors in various moth species. However, direct in vivo evidence linking the functional role of these ORs with behavioural responses is lacking. In the silkmoth, Bombyx mori, female moths emit two sex pheromone components, bombykol and bombykal, but only bombykol elicits sexual behaviour in male moths. A sex pheromone receptor BmOR1 is specifically tuned to bombykol and is expressed in specialized olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in the pheromone sensitive long sensilla trichodea of male silkmoth antennae. Here, we show that disruption of the BmOR1 gene, mediated by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), completely removes ORN sensitivity to bombykol and corresponding pheromone-source searching behaviour in male moths. Furthermore, transgenic rescue of BmOR1 restored normal behavioural responses to bombykol. Our results demonstrate that BmOR1 is required for the physiological and behavioural response to bombykol, demonstrating that it is the receptor that mediates sex pheromone responses in male silkmoths. This study provides the first direct evidence that a member of the sex pheromone receptor family in moth species mediates conspecific sex pheromone information for sexual behaviour. PMID:26047360

  20. Lactose-mediated carbon catabolite repression of putrescine production in dairy Lactococcus lactis is strain dependent.

    PubMed

    del Rio, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Linares, Daniel M; Fernández, Maria; Martín, Maria Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-06-01

    Lactococcus lactis is the lactic acid bacterial (LAB) species most widely used as a primary starter in the dairy industry. However, several strains of L. lactis produce the biogenic amine putrescine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. We previously reported the putrescine biosynthesis pathway in L. lactis subsp. cremoris GE2-14 to be regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) via glucose but not lactose (Linares et al., 2013). The present study shows that both these sugars repress putrescine biosynthesis in L. lactis subsp. lactis T3/33, a strain isolated from a Spanish artisanal cheese. Furthermore, we demonstrated that both glucose and lactose repressed the transcriptional activity of the aguBDAC catabolic genes of the AGDI route. Finally, a screening performed in putrescine-producing dairy L. lactis strains determined that putrescine biosynthesis was repressed by lactose in all the L. lactis subsp. lactis strains tested, but in only one L. lactis subsp. cremoris strain. Given the obvious importance of the lactose-repression in cheese putrescine accumulation, it is advisable to consider the diversity of L. lactis in this sense and characterize consequently the starter cultures to select the safest strains. PMID:25791004

  1. Radar detection of drones responding to honeybee queen pheromone.

    PubMed

    Loper, G M; Wolf, W W; Taylor, O R

    1993-09-01

    The response of honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) drones to queen pheromone(s) (either natural from a mated queen, or synthetic from a lure) was recorded using an X-band, ground-based radar. The distribution of drones (insect targets on the radar screen) changed from a scattered distribution to a line concentration (downwind) when the pheromone was released. Displacement within the line concentration was toward the pheromone. This response was seen as far as 800±15 m downwind from a lure with 10 mg of synthetic 9-oxodec-trans-2-enoic acid (9-ODA) and as far as 420±15 m from a mated queen. These studies demonstrate that queen pheromone can be detected by drones at much greater distances than previously believed and illustrate how X-band radar may be used to establish the distances at which insects of similar or larger size respond to pheromones. PMID:24249369

  2. State-dependent responses to sex pheromones in mouse.

    PubMed

    Stowers, Lisa; Liberles, Stephen D

    2016-06-01

    A single sensory cue can evoke different behaviors that vary by recipient. Responses may be influenced by sex, internal state, experience, genotype, and coincident environmental stimuli. Pheromones are powerful inducers of mouse behavior, yet pheromone responses are not always stereotyped. For example, male and female mice respond differently to sex pheromones while mothers and virgin females respond differently to pup cues. Here, we review the origins of variability in responses to reproductive pheromones. Recent advances have indicated how response variability may arise through modulation at different levels of pheromone-processing circuitry, from sensory neurons in the periphery to central neurons in the vomeronasal amygdala. Understanding mechanisms underlying conditional pheromone responses should reveal how neural circuits can be flexibly sculpted to alter behavior. PMID:27093585

  3. Molecular switches for pheromone release from a moth pheromone-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Wei; Leal, Walter S.

    2008-08-08

    Pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs) are involved in the uptake of pheromones from pores on the antennae, transport through an aqueous environment surrounding the olfactory receptor neurons, and fast delivery to pheromone receptors. We tested the hypothesis that a C-terminal segment and a flexible loop are involved in the release of pheromones to membrane-bound receptors. We expressed in Escherichia coli 11 mutants of the PBP from the silkworm moth, BmorPBP, taking into consideration structural differences between the forms with high and low binding affinity. The N-terminus was truncated and His-69, His-70 and His-95 at the base of a flexible loop, and a cluster of acidic residues at the C-terminus were mutated. Binding assays and circular dichroism analyses support a mechanism involving protonation of acidic residues Asp-132 and Glu-141 at the C-terminus and histidines, His-70 and His-95, in the base of a loop covering the binding pocket. The former leads to the formation of a new {alpha}-helix, which competes with pheromone for the binding pocket, whereas positive charge repulsion of the histidines opens the opposite side of the binding pocket.

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of the Moderately Heat-Tolerant Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis Strain GL2 from Algerian Dromedary Milk

    PubMed Central

    Gabed, Noujoud; Yang, Manli; Bey Baba Hamed, Mohamed; Drici, Habiba; Gross, Roy; Dandekar, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis GL2 is a moderately thermotolerant lactic acid bacterium isolated from dromedary raw milk. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of this potential new dairy starter strain, which combines thermotolerance and the capacity to metabolize lactose, casein, and citrate. PMID:26586883

  5. Mating pheromones of Nematoda: olfactory signaling with physiological consequences.

    PubMed

    Leighton, Daniel Hw; Sternberg, Paul W

    2016-06-01

    Secreted pheromones have long been known to influence mating in the phylum Nematoda. The study of nematode sexual behavior has greatly benefited in the last decade from the genetic and neurobiological tools available for the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, as well as from the chemical identification of many pheromones secreted by this species. The discovery that nematodes can influence one another's physiological development and stress responsiveness through the sharing of pheromones, in addition to simply triggering sexual attraction, is particularly striking. Here we review recent research on nematode mating pheromones, which has been conducted predominantly on C. elegans, but there are beginning to be parallel studies in other species. PMID:27213246

  6. The trail pheromone of the venomous samsum ant, Pachycondyla sennaarensis.

    PubMed

    Mashaly, Ashraf Mohamed Ali; Ahmed, Ashraf Mohamed; Al-Abdullah, Mosa Abdullah; Al-Khalifa, Mohamed Saleh

    2011-01-01

    Ant species use branching networks of pheromone trails for orientation between nest and resources. The current study demonstrated that workers of the venomous samsum ant, Pachycondyla sennaarensis (Mayr) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Ponerinae), employ recruitment trail pheromones discharged from the Dufour's gland. Secretions of other abdomen complex glands, as well as hindgut gland secretions, did not evoke trail following. The optimum concentration of trail pheromone was found to be 0.1 gland equivalent/40 cm trail. This concentration demonstrated effective longevity for about one hour. This study also showed that P. sennaarensis and Tapinoma simrothi each respond to the trail pheromones of the other species as well as their own. PMID:21529253

  7. Identification of a pheromone regulating caste differentiation in termites.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Kenji; Himuro, Chihiro; Yokoi, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Yuuka; Vargo, Edward L; Keller, Laurent

    2010-07-20

    The hallmark of social insects is their caste system: reproduction is primarily monopolized by queens, whereas workers specialize in the other tasks required for colony growth and survival. Pheromones produced by reigning queens have long been believed to be the prime factor inhibiting the differentiation of new reproductive individuals. However, there has been very little progress in the chemical identification of such inhibitory pheromones. Here we report the identification of a volatile inhibitory pheromone produced by female neotenics (secondary queens) that acts directly on target individuals to suppress the differentiation of new female neotenics and identify n-butyl-n-butyrate and 2-methyl-1-butanol as the active components of the inhibitory pheromone. An artificial pheromone blend consisting of these two compounds had a strong inhibitory effect similar to live neotenics. Surprisingly, the same two volatiles are also emitted by eggs, playing a role both as an attractant to workers and an inhibitor of reproductive differentiation. This dual production of an inhibitory pheromone by female reproductives and eggs probably reflects the recruitment of an attractant pheromone as an inhibitory pheromone and may provide a mechanism ensuring honest signaling of reproductive status with a tight coupling between fertility and inhibitory power. Identification of a volatile pheromone regulating caste differentiation in a termite provides insights into the functioning of social insect colonies and opens important avenues for elucidating the developmental pathways leading to reproductive and nonreproductive castes. PMID:20615972

  8. Odor and pheromone sensing via chemoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Ma, Minghong

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionally, chemosensation is an ancient but yet enigmatic sense. All organisms ranging from the simplest unicellular form to the most advanced multicellular creature possess the capability to detect chemicals in the surroundings. Conversely, all living things emit some forms of smells, either as communicating signals or as by-products of metabolism. Many species (from worms, insects to mammals) rely on the olfactory systems which express a large number of chemoreceptors to locate food and mates and to avoid danger. Most chemoreceptors expressed in olfactory organs are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and can be classified into two major categories: odorant receptors (ORs) and pheromone receptors, which principally detect general odors and pheromones, respectively. In vertebrates, these two types of receptors are often expressed in two distinct apparatuses: The main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and the vomeronasal organ (VNO), respectively. Each olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) in the MOE typically expresses one type of OR from a large repertoire. General odors activate ORs and their host OSNs (ranging from narrowly- to broadly-tuned) in a combinatorial manner and the information is sent to the brain via the main olfactory system leading to perception of smells. In contrast, pheromones stimulate relatively narrowly-tuned receptors and their host VNO neurons and the information is sent to the brain via the accessory olfactory system leading to behavioral and endocrinological changes. Recent studies indicate that the functional separation between these two systems is blurred in some cases and there are more subsystems serving chemosensory roles. This chapter focuses on the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying odor and pheromone sensing in rodents, the best characterized vertebrate models. PMID:22399397

  9. How much is a pheromone worth?

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Jose Mauricio S.; Parra, Jose Roberto P.; de Miranda, Silvia H. G.; Adami, Andrea C. O.; Vilela, Evaldo F.; Leal, Walter S.

    2016-01-01

    Pheromone-baited traps have been widely used in integrated pest management programs, but their economic value for growers has never been reported.  We analyzed the economic benefits of long-term use of traps baited with the citrus fruit borer Gymnandrosoma aurantianum sex pheromone in Central-Southern Brazil. Our analysis show that from 2001 to 2013 citrus growers avoided accumulated pest losses of 132.7 million to 1.32 billion USD in gross revenues, considering potential crop losses in the range of 5 to 50%. The area analyzed, 56,600 to 79,100 hectares of citrus (20.4 to 29.4 million trees), corresponds to 9.7 to 13.5% of the total area planted with citrus in the state of São Paulo. The data show a benefit-to-cost ratio of US$ 2,655 to US$ 26,548 per dollar spent on research with estimated yield loss prevented in the range of 5-50%, respectively. This study demonstrates that, in addition to the priceless benefits for the environment, sex pheromones are invaluable tools for growers as their use for monitoring populations allows rational and reduced use of insecticides, a win-win situation. PMID:27583133

  10. Hydroquinone: a general phagostimulating pheromone in termites.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Judith; Lacey, Michael J; Ibarra, Fernando; Schroeder, Frank C; Kaib, Manfred; Lenz, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The organization of termite societies depends predominantly on intraspecific chemical signals (pheromones) produced by exocrine glands, which induce and modulate individual behavioral responses. Here, the saliva-producing labial glands of termites were investigated with respect to their pheromonal role in communal food exploitation of termite colonies. From these glands, we identified for the first time hydroquinone (1,4-dihydroxybenzene) as a phagostimulating pheromone in the Australian termite species Mastotermes darwiniensis. Hydroquinone is released from the labial glands of termite workers and applied onto the food. It stimulates nestmates to feed at the spot of application and is, thus, employed to mark feeding sites. No synergistic effect with other identified labial gland compounds, such as glucose, inositol, and arbutin, was evident. Significantly, we show that termite species from all over the world, irrespective of taxonomic position and biological traits, produce and employ hydroquinone as phagostimulating signal. The use of the same chemical signal throughout an order is a unique phenomenon, not reported before in animals. Its possible biosynthetic pathway, ecological significance, and evolution are discussed. PMID:11868667

  11. Chirality determines pheromone activity for flour beetles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, H. Z.; Mori, K.

    1983-04-01

    Olfactory perception and orientation behaviour of female and male flour beetles ( Tribolium castaneum, T. confusum) to single stereoisomers of their aggregation pheromone revealed maximal receptor potentials and optimal attraction in response to 4R,8R-(-)-dimethyldecanal, whereas its optical antipode 4S,8S-(+)-dimethyldecanal was found to be inactive in this respect. Female flour beetles of both species were ≈ 103 times less attracted to 4R,8S-(+)- and 4S,8R-(-)-dimethyldecanal than to 4R,8R-(-)-dimethyldecanal, while male flour beetles failed to respond to the R,S-(+)- and S,R-(-)-stereoisomers. Pheromone extracts of prothoracic femora from unmated male flour beetles elicited higher receptor potentials in the antennae of females than in those of males. The results suggest that the aggregation pheromone emitted by male T. castaneum as well as male T. confusum has the stereochemical structure of 4R,8R-(-)-dimethyl-decanal, which acts as sex attractant for the females and as aggregant for the males of both species.

  12. Cell Wall Anchoring of the Campylobacter Antigens to Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Kobierecka, Patrycja A.; Olech, Barbara; Książek, Monika; Derlatka, Katarzyna; Adamska, Iwona; Majewski, Paweł M.; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elżbieta K.; Wyszyńska, Agnieszka K.

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most frequent cause of human food-borne gastroenteritis and chicken meat is the main source of infection. Recent studies showed that broiler chicken immunization against Campylobacter should be the most efficient way to lower the number of human infections by this pathogen. Induction of the mucosal immune system after oral antigen administration should provide protective immunity to chickens. In this work we tested the usefulness of Lactococcus lactis, the most extensively studied lactic acid bacterium, as a delivery vector for Campylobacter antigens. First we constructed hybrid protein – CjaA antigen presenting CjaD peptide epitopes on its surface. We showed that specific rabbit anti-rCjaAD serum reacted strongly with both CjaA and CjaD produced by a wild type C. jejuni strain. Next, rCjaAD and CjaA were fused to the C-terminus of the L. lactis YndF containing the LPTXG motif. The genes expressing these proteins were transcribed under control of the L. lactis Usp45 promoter and their products contain the Usp45 signal sequences. This strategy ensures a cell surface location of both analyzed proteins, which was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. In order to evaluate the impact of antigen location on vaccine prototype efficacy, a L. lactis strain producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD was also generated. Animal experiments showed a decrease of Campylobacter cecal load in vaccinated birds as compared with the control group and showed that the L. lactis harboring the surface-exposed rCjaAD antigen afforded greater protection than the L. lactis producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to employ Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) strains as a mucosal delivery vehicle for chicken immunization. Although the observed reduction of chicken colonization by Campylobacter resulting from vaccination was rather moderate, the experiments showed that LAB strains can be considered as an alternative vector to

  13. Cell Wall Anchoring of the Campylobacter Antigens to Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Kobierecka, Patrycja A; Olech, Barbara; Książek, Monika; Derlatka, Katarzyna; Adamska, Iwona; Majewski, Paweł M; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elżbieta K; Wyszyńska, Agnieszka K

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most frequent cause of human food-borne gastroenteritis and chicken meat is the main source of infection. Recent studies showed that broiler chicken immunization against Campylobacter should be the most efficient way to lower the number of human infections by this pathogen. Induction of the mucosal immune system after oral antigen administration should provide protective immunity to chickens. In this work we tested the usefulness of Lactococcus lactis, the most extensively studied lactic acid bacterium, as a delivery vector for Campylobacter antigens. First we constructed hybrid protein - CjaA antigen presenting CjaD peptide epitopes on its surface. We showed that specific rabbit anti-rCjaAD serum reacted strongly with both CjaA and CjaD produced by a wild type C. jejuni strain. Next, rCjaAD and CjaA were fused to the C-terminus of the L. lactis YndF containing the LPTXG motif. The genes expressing these proteins were transcribed under control of the L. lactis Usp45 promoter and their products contain the Usp45 signal sequences. This strategy ensures a cell surface location of both analyzed proteins, which was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. In order to evaluate the impact of antigen location on vaccine prototype efficacy, a L. lactis strain producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD was also generated. Animal experiments showed a decrease of Campylobacter cecal load in vaccinated birds as compared with the control group and showed that the L. lactis harboring the surface-exposed rCjaAD antigen afforded greater protection than the L. lactis producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to employ Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) strains as a mucosal delivery vehicle for chicken immunization. Although the observed reduction of chicken colonization by Campylobacter resulting from vaccination was rather moderate, the experiments showed that LAB strains can be considered as an alternative vector to

  14. Growth and by-product profiles of Kluyveromyces marxianus cells immobilized in foamed alginate.

    PubMed

    Wilkowska, Agnieszka; Kregiel, Dorota; Guneser, Onur; Karagul Yuceer, Yonca

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to study how the yeast cell immobilization technique influences the growth and fermentation profiles of Kluyveromyces marxianus cultivated on apple/chokeberry and apple/cranberry pomaces. Encapsulation of the cells was performed by droplet formation from a foamed alginate solution. The growth and metabolic profiles were evaluated for both free and immobilized cells. Culture media with fruit waste produced good growth of free as well as immobilized yeast cells. The fermentation profiles of K. marxianus were different with each waste material. The most varied aroma profiles were noted for immobilized yeast cultivated on apple/chokeberry pomace. PMID:25277269

  15. Direct fermentation of d-xylose to ethanol by Kluyveromyces marxianus strains

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritis, A.; Bajpai, P.

    1982-11-01

    Eight strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus were screened, and all of them were found to ferment the aldopentose D-xylose directly to ethanol under aerobic conditions. One of these strains, K. marxianus SUB-80-S, was grown in a medium containing 20 g of D-xylose per liter, and the following results were obtained: maximum ethanol concentration, 5.6 g/liter; ethanol yield, 0.28 g of ethanol per g of D-xylose (55% of theoretical); maximum specific growth rate, 0.12/hour; 100% D-xylose utilization was completed in 48 hours. (Refs. 12).

  16. Effect of Sugar Concentration in Jerusalem Artichoke Extract on Kluyveromyces marxianus Growth and Ethanol Production

    PubMed Central

    Margaritis, Argyrios; Bajpai, Pratima

    1983-01-01

    The effect of inulin sugars concentration on the growth and ethanol production by Kluyveromyces marxianus UCD (FST) 55-82 was studied. A maximum ethanol concentration of 102 g/liter was obtained from 250 g of sugars per liter initial concentration. The maximum specific growth rate varied from 0.44 h−1 at 50 g of sugar per liter to 0.13 h−1 at 300 g of sugar per liter, whereas the ethanol yield remained almost constant at 0.45 g of ethanol per g of sugars utilized. PMID:16346222

  17. Effect of sugar concentration in Jerusalem artichoke extract on Kluyveromyces marxianus growth and ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritis, A.; Bajpai, P.

    1983-02-01

    The effect of inulin sugars concentration on the growth and ethanol production by Kluyveromyces marxianus UCD (FST) 55-82 was studied. A maximum ethanol concentration of 102 g/liter was obtained from 250 g of sugars per liter initial concentration. The maximum specific growth rate varied from 0.44 h/sup -1/ at 50 g of sugar per liter to 0.13 h/sup -1/ at 300 g of sugar per liter, whereas the ethanol yield remained almost constant at 0.45 g of ethanol per g of sugars utilized.

  18. Generation of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV-inhibiting peptides from β-lactoglobulin secreted by Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Shigemori, Suguru; Oshiro, Kazushi; Wang, Pengfei; Yamamoto, Yoshinari; Wang, Yeqin; Sato, Takashi; Uyeno, Yutaka; Shimosato, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies showed that hydrolysates of β-lactoglobulin (BLG) prepared using gastrointestinal proteases strongly inhibit dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) activity in vitro. In this study, we developed a BLG-secreting Lactococcus lactis strain as a delivery vehicle and in situ expression system. Interestingly, trypsin-digested recombinant BLG from L. lactis inhibited DPP-IV activity, suggesting that BLG-secreting L. lactis may be useful in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:25157356

  19. Cloning in Streptococcus lactis of plasmid-mediated UV resistance and effect on prophage stability

    SciTech Connect

    Chopin, M.C.; Chopin, A.; Rouault, A.; Simon, D.

    1986-02-01

    Plasmid pIL7 (33 kilobases) from Streptococcus lactis enhances UV resistance and prophage stability. A 5.4-kilobase pIL7 fragment carrying genes coding for both characters was cloned into S. lactis, using plasmid pHV1301 as the cloning vector. The recombinant plasmid was subsequently transferred to three other S. lactis strains by transformation or protoplast fusion. Cloned genes were expressed in all tested strains.

  20. Characterization of a Wild, Novel Nisin A-Producing Lactococcus Strain with an L. lactis subsp. cremoris Genotype and an L. lactis subsp. lactis Phenotype, Isolated from Greek Raw Milk

    PubMed Central

    Parapouli, Maria; Delbès-Paus, Céline; Kakouri, Athanasia; Koukkou, Anna-Irini; Montel, Marie-Christine

    2013-01-01

    Several molecular taxonomic studies have revealed that many natural (wild) Lactococcus lactis strains of dairy origin which are phenotypically representative of the L. lactis subspecies lactis cluster genotypically within subspecies cremoris and vice versa. Recently, we isolated two wild nisin-producing (Nis+) L. lactis strains, M78 and M104, of the lactis phenotype from Greek raw milk (J. Samelis, A. Lianou, A. Kakouri, C. Delbès, I. Rogelj, B. B. Matijašic, and M. C. Montel, J. Food Prot. 72:783–790, 2009); strain M78 possess a novel nisin A sequence (GenBank accession number HM219853). In this study, the actual subspecies identity of M78 and M104 isolates was elucidated, using 16S rRNA and acmA (encoding lactococcal N-acetylmuramidase) gene and histidine biosynthesis operon polymorphisms and 16S rRNA and ldh (encoding lactate dehydrogenase) gene phylogenies. Except the acmA gene analysis, molecular tools revealed that isolates M78 and M104 clustered with strains of the cremoris genotype, including the LMG 6897T strain, while they were distant from strains of the lactis genotype, including the LMG 6890T strain. The two wild isolates had identical repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR), randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), plasmid, and whole-cell protein profiles and shared high 16S rRNA (99.9%) and ldh (100%) gene sequence homologies. In contrast, they exhibited identical sugar fermentation and enzymatic patterns which were similar to those of the subspecies lactis LMG 6890T strain. To our knowledge, this is the first complete identification report on a wild L. lactis subsp. cremoris genotype of the lactis phenotype which is capable of nisin A production and, thus, has strong potential for use as a novel dairy starter and/or protective culture. PMID:23542625

  1. Evolved differences in larval social behavior mediated by novel pheromones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pheromones, chemical signals that convey social information, mediate many insect social behaviors in both adult and immature stages. Multiple pheromones and neural pathways that underlie adult social behavior have been described in the genetic model organism, Drosophila melanogaster, but there is no...

  2. A Predictive Model for Yeast Cell Polarization in Pheromone Gradients.

    PubMed

    Muller, Nicolas; Piel, Matthieu; Calvez, Vincent; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gonçalves-Sá, Joana; Guo, Chin-Lin; Jiang, Xingyu; Murray, Andrew; Meunier, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Budding yeast cells exist in two mating types, a and α, which use peptide pheromones to communicate with each other during mating. Mating depends on the ability of cells to polarize up pheromone gradients, but cells also respond to spatially uniform fields of pheromone by polarizing along a single axis. We used quantitative measurements of the response of a cells to α-factor to produce a predictive model of yeast polarization towards a pheromone gradient. We found that cells make a sharp transition between budding cycles and mating induced polarization and that they detect pheromone gradients accurately only over a narrow range of pheromone concentrations corresponding to this transition. We fit all the parameters of the mathematical model by using quantitative data on spontaneous polarization in uniform pheromone concentration. Once these parameters have been computed, and without any further fit, our model quantitatively predicts the yeast cell response to pheromone gradient providing an important step toward understanding how cells communicate with each other. PMID:27077831

  3. Evolved differences in larval social behavior mediated by novel pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Joshua D; De Moraes, Consuelo M; Alborn, Hans T; Lavis, Luke D; Stern, David L

    2014-01-01

    Pheromones, chemical signals that convey social information, mediate many insect social behaviors, including navigation and aggregation. Several studies have suggested that behavior during the immature larval stages of Drosophila development is influenced by pheromones, but none of these compounds or the pheromone-receptor neurons that sense them have been identified. Here we report a larval pheromone-signaling pathway. We found that larvae produce two novel long-chain fatty acids that are attractive to other larvae. We identified a single larval chemosensory neuron that detects these molecules. Two members of the pickpocket family of DEG/ENaC channel subunits (ppk23 and ppk29) are required to respond to these pheromones. This pheromone system is evolving quickly, since the larval exudates of D. simulans, the sister species of D. melanogaster, are not attractive to other larvae. Our results define a new pheromone signaling system in Drosophila that shares characteristics with pheromone systems in a wide diversity of insects. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04205.001 PMID:25497433

  4. Brood pheromone regulates foraging activity of honey bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    PubMed

    Pankiw, Tanya

    2004-06-01

    Brood pheromone modulated the foraging behavior of commercial honey bee, Apis mellifera L., colonies pollinating a 10-ha market garden of cucumber, Cucurbita pepo L., and zucchini, Cucumis saticus L., in Texas in late autumn. Six colonies were randomly selected to receive 2000 larval equivalents of brood pheromone and six received a blank control. The ratio of pollen to nonpollen foragers entering colonies was significantly greater in pheromone-treated colonies 1 h after treatment. Pheromone-treated foragers returned with pollen load weights that were significantly heavier than controls. Pollen returned by pheromone-treated foragers was 43% more likely to originate from the target crop. Number of pollen grains washed from the bodies of nonpollen foragers from pheromone-treated colonies was significantly greater than controls and the pollen was 54% more likely to originate from the target crop. Increasing the foraging stimulus environment with brood pheromone increased colony-level foraging and individual forager efforts. Brood pheromone is a promising technology for increasing the pollination activity and efficiency of commercial honey bee colonies. PMID:15279247

  5. Anatomical localization and stereoisomeric composition of Tribolium castaneum aggregation pheromones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report that the abdomen and associated tissues are the predominant sources of male-produced pheromones in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, and for the first time describe the stereoisomeric composition of the natural blend of isomers of the aggregation pheromone 4,8-dimethyldecanal (DMD...

  6. A Predictive Model for Yeast Cell Polarization in Pheromone Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Calvez, Vincent; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gonçalves-Sá, Joana; Guo, Chin-Lin; Jiang, Xingyu; Murray, Andrew; Meunier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Budding yeast cells exist in two mating types, a and α, which use peptide pheromones to communicate with each other during mating. Mating depends on the ability of cells to polarize up pheromone gradients, but cells also respond to spatially uniform fields of pheromone by polarizing along a single axis. We used quantitative measurements of the response of a cells to α-factor to produce a predictive model of yeast polarization towards a pheromone gradient. We found that cells make a sharp transition between budding cycles and mating induced polarization and that they detect pheromone gradients accurately only over a narrow range of pheromone concentrations corresponding to this transition. We fit all the parameters of the mathematical model by using quantitative data on spontaneous polarization in uniform pheromone concentration. Once these parameters have been computed, and without any further fit, our model quantitatively predicts the yeast cell response to pheromone gradient providing an important step toward understanding how cells communicate with each other. PMID:27077831

  7. Mating disruption of oriental beetle with sprayable sex pheromone formulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The feasibility of mating disruption in the oriental beetle (OB), Anomala orientalis, with microencapsulated sprayable formulations of the major component of its sex pheromone, was evaluated in turfgrass. The effect of the applications was measured by monitoring male OB captures in pheromone-baited ...

  8. Proteomic Signature of Lactococcus lactis NCDO763 Cultivated in Milk†

    PubMed Central

    Gitton, Christophe; Meyrand, Mickael; Wang, Juhui; Caron, Christophe; Trubuil, Alain; Guillot, Alain; Mistou, Michel-Yves

    2005-01-01

    We have compared the proteomic profiles of L. lactis subsp. cremoris NCDO763 growing in the synthetic medium M17Lac, skim milk microfiltrate (SMM), and skim milk. SMM was used as a simple model medium to reproduce the initial phase of growth of L. lactis in milk. To widen the analysis of the cytoplasmic proteome, we used two different gel systems (pH ranges of 4 to 7 and 4.5 to 5.5), and the proteins associated with the cell envelopes were also studied by two-dimensional electrophoresis. In the course of the study, we analyzed about 800 spots and identified 330 proteins by mass spectrometry. We observed that the levels of more than 50 and 30 proteins were significantly increased upon growth in SMM and milk, respectively. The large redeployment of protein synthesis was essentially associated with an activation of pathways involved in the metabolism of nitrogenous compounds: peptidolytic and peptide transport systems, amino acid biosynthesis and interconversion, and de novo biosynthesis of purines. We also showed that enzymes involved in reactions feeding the purine biosynthetic pathway in one-carbon units and amino acids have an increased level in SMM and milk. The analysis of the proteomic data suggested that the glutamine synthetase (GS) would play a pivotal role in the adaptation to SMM and milk. The analysis of glnA expression during growth in milk and the construction of a glnA-defective mutant confirmed that GS is an essential enzyme for the development of L. lactis in dairy media. This analysis thus provides a proteomic signature of L. lactis, a model lactic acid bacterium, growing in its technological environment. PMID:16269754

  9. Genes but Not Genomes Reveal Bacterial Domestication of Lactococcus Lactis

    PubMed Central

    Passerini, Delphine; Beltramo, Charlotte; Coddeville, Michele; Quentin, Yves; Ritzenthaler, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Background The population structure and diversity of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, a major industrial bacterium involved in milk fermentation, was determined at both gene and genome level. Seventy-six lactococcal isolates of various origins were studied by different genotyping methods and thirty-six strains displaying unique macrorestriction fingerprints were analyzed by a new multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme. This gene-based analysis was compared to genomic characteristics determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Methodology/Principal Findings The MLST analysis revealed that L. lactis subsp. lactis is essentially clonal with infrequent intra- and intergenic recombination; also, despite its taxonomical classification as a subspecies, it displays a genetic diversity as substantial as that within several other bacterial species. Genome-based analysis revealed a genome size variability of 20%, a value typical of bacteria inhabiting different ecological niches, and that suggests a large pan-genome for this subspecies. However, the genomic characteristics (macrorestriction pattern, genome or chromosome size, plasmid content) did not correlate to the MLST-based phylogeny, with strains from the same sequence type (ST) differing by up to 230 kb in genome size. Conclusion/Significance The gene-based phylogeny was not fully consistent with the traditional classification into dairy and non-dairy strains but supported a new classification based on ecological separation between “environmental” strains, the main contributors to the genetic diversity within the subspecies, and “domesticated” strains, subject to recent genetic bottlenecks. Comparison between gene- and genome-based analyses revealed little relationship between core and dispensable genome phylogenies, indicating that clonal diversification and phenotypic variability of the “domesticated” strains essentially arose through substantial genomic flux within the dispensable genome

  10. Production of functionalized biopolyester granules by recombinant Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Mifune, Jun; Grage, Katrin; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2009-07-01

    Many bacteria are naturally capable of accumulating biopolyesters composed of 3-hydroxy fatty acids as intracellular inclusions, which serve as storage granules. Recently, these inclusions have been considered as nano-/microbeads with surface-attached proteins, which can be engineered to display various protein-based functions that are suitable for biotechnological and biomedical applications. In this study, the food-grade, generally-regarded-as-safe gram-positive organism Lactococcus lactis was engineered to recombinantly produce the biopolyester poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and the respective intracellular inclusions. The codon-optimized polyhydroxybutyrate biosynthesis operon phaCAB from Cupriavidus necator was expressed using the nisin-controlled gene expression system. Recombinant L. lactis accumulated up to 6% (wt/wt) poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) of cellular dry weight. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) granules were isolated and analyzed with respect to bound proteins using biochemical methods and with respect to shape/size using transmission electron microscopy. The immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding ZZ domain of Staphylococcus aureus protein A was chosen as an exemplary functionality to be displayed at the granule surface by fusing it to the N terminus of the granule-associated poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) synthase. The presence of the fusion protein at the surface of isolated granules was confirmed by peptide fingerprinting using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (mass spectrometry). The functionality of the ZZ domain-displaying granules was demonstrated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and IgG affinity purification. In both assays, the ZZ beads from recombinant L. lactis performed at least equally to ZZ beads from Escherichia coli. Overall, in this study it was shown that recombinant L. lactis can be used to manufacture endotoxin-free poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) beads with surface functionalities that are suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:19465535

  11. Mobile CRISPR/Cas-Mediated Bacteriophage Resistance in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Millen, Anne M.; Horvath, Philippe; Boyaval, Patrick; Romero, Dennis A.

    2012-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a biotechnological workhorse for food fermentations and potentially therapeutic products and is therefore widely consumed by humans. It is predominantly used as a starter microbe for fermented dairy products, and specialized strains have adapted from a plant environment through reductive evolution and horizontal gene transfer as evidenced by the association of adventitious traits with mobile elements. Specifically, L. lactis has armed itself with a myriad of plasmid-encoded bacteriophage defensive systems to protect against viral predation. This known arsenal had not included CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins), which forms a remarkable microbial immunity system against invading DNA. Although CRISPR/Cas systems are common in the genomes of closely related lactic acid bacteria (LAB), none was identified within the eight published lactococcal genomes. Furthermore, a PCR-based search of the common LAB CRISPR/Cas systems (Types I and II) in 383 industrial L. lactis strains proved unsuccessful. Here we describe a novel, Type III, self-transmissible, plasmid-encoded, phage-interfering CRISPR/Cas discovered in L. lactis. The native CRISPR spacers confer resistance based on sequence identity to corresponding lactococcal phage. The interference is directed at phages problematic to the dairy industry, indicative of a responsive system. Moreover, targeting could be modified by engineering the spacer content. The 62.8-kb plasmid was shown to be conjugally transferrable to various strains. Its mobility should facilitate dissemination within microbial communities and provide a readily applicable system to naturally introduce CRISPR/Cas to industrially relevant strains for enhanced phage resistance and prevention against acquisition of undesirable genes. PMID:23240053

  12. Ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers (Helianthus tuberosus) using Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces rosei

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritis, A.; Bajpai, P.

    1982-04-01

    This article examines the potential of Jerusalem artichoke as a source for ethanol and single-cell protein SCP. In addition, experimental results are presented on batch fermentation kinetics employing two strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus and one strain of Saccharomyces rosei grown in the extract derived from the tubers of Jeusalem artichoke. Of the three cultures examined, Kluyveromyces marxianus UCD (EST) 55-82 was found to be the best producer of ethanol grown in a simple medium at 35/sup 0/C. The ethanol production was found to be growth-associated haveing a ..mu../sub max/ = 0.41 h/sup -1/ and the ethanol and biomass yields were determined to be Y/sub p///sub = 0.45 (88% of the theoretical) and Y/sub x///sub s/ = 0.04 with 92% of the original sugars utilized. On the basis of carbohydrate yields of Jerusalem artichoke reported in the literature and these batch kinetic studies with K. marxianus, the calculated ethanol yields were found to range from 1400 kg ethanol acre/sup -1/ yr /sup -1/ to a maximum of 2700 kg ethanol acre/sup -1/ yr/sup -1/. The SCP yields for K. marxianus were calculated to range between 130 to 250 kg dry wt cell acre/sup -1/ yr/sup -1/. The potential for developing an integrated process to produce ethanol and SCP is also discussed.

  13. Continuous ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers. I. Use of free cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritis, A.; Bajpai, P.

    1982-07-01

    The continuous fermentation of Jerusalem artichoke juice to ethanol by free cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus UCD (FST) 55-82 has been studied in a continuous-stirred tank bioreactor at 35 degrees C and pH 4.6. A maximum ethanol yield of 90% of the theoretical was obtained at a dilution rate of 0.05/h. About 95% of the sugars were utilized at dilution rates lower than 0.15/h. Volumetric ethanol productivity and volumetric biomass productivity reached maximum values of 7 g EtOH/L/h and 0.6 g dry wt/L/h, respectively, at a dilution rate of 0.2h. The maintenance energy coefficient for Kluyveromyces marxianus culture was found to be 0.46 g sugar/g biomass/h. Oscillatory behavior was observed following a change in dilution rate from a previous steady state and from batch to continuous culture. Values of specific ethanol production rate and specific sugar uptake were found to increase almost linearly with the increase of the dilution rate. The maximum specific ethanol production rate and maximum specific sugar uptake rate were found to be 2.6 g ethanol/g cell/h and 7.9 sugars/g cell/h, respectively. Washout occurred at a dilution rate of 0.41/h. (Refs. 21).

  14. Continuous ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers. II. Use of immobilized cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritis, A.; Bajpai, P.

    1982-07-01

    Kluyveromyces marxianus UCD (FST) 55-82 cells were immobilized in Na alginate beads and used in a packed-bed bioreactor system for the continuous production of ethanol from the extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers. Volumetric ethanol productivities of 104 and 80 g ethanol/L/h were obtained at 80 and 92% sugar utilization, respectively. The maximum volumetric ethanol productivity of the immobilized cell bioreactor system was found to be 15 times higher than that of an ordinary continuous-stirred-tank (CST) bioreactor using free cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus. The immobilized cell bioreactor system was operated continuously at a constant dilution rate of 0.66/h for 12 days resulting in only an 8% loss of the original immobilized cell activity, which corresponds to an estimated half-life of ca. 72 days. The maximum specific ethanol productivity and maximum specific sugar uptake rate of the immobilized cells were found to be 0.55 g ethanol/g biomass/h and 1.21 g sugars/g biomass/h, respectively. (Refs. 27).

  15. Effect of binary combinations of selected toxic compounds on growth and fermentation of Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Jose M; Ballesteros, Ignacio; Negro, M José; Manzanares, Paloma; Cabañas, Araceli; Ballesteros, Mercedes

    2004-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of various lignocellulose degradation products on glucose fermentation by the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus were studied in batch cultures. The toxicity of the aromatic alcohol catechol and two aromatic aldehydes (4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and vanillin) was investigated in binary combinations. The aldehyde furfural that usually is present in relatively high concentration in hydrolyzates from pentose degradation was also tested. Experiments were conducted by combining agents at concentrations that individually caused 25% inhibition of growth. Compared to the relative toxicity of the individual compounds, combinations of furfural with catechol and 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde were additive (50% inhibition of growth). The other binary combinations assayed (catechol with 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, and vanillin with catechol, furfural, or 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde) showed synergistic effect on toxicity and caused a 60-90% decrease in cell mass production. The presence of aldehydes in the fermentation medium strongly inhibited cell growth and ethanol production. Kluyveromyces marxianus reduces aldehydes to their corresponding alcohols to mitigate the toxicity of these compounds. The total reduction of aldehydes was needed to start ethanol production. Vanillin, in binary combination, was dramatically toxic and was the only compound for which inhibition could not be overcome by yeast strain assimilation, causing a 90% reduction in both cell growth and fermentation. PMID:15176873

  16. Acquisition of the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus from unpasteurised milk by a kefir grain enhances kefir quality.

    PubMed

    Gethins, Loughlin; Rea, Mary C; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul; Kilcawley, Kieran; O'Sullivan, Maurice; Crotty, Suzanne; Morrissey, John P

    2016-08-01

    Kefir is a fermented milk beverage consumed for nutritional and health tonic benefits in many parts of the world. It is produced by the fermentation of milk with a consortium of bacteria and yeast embedded within a polysaccharide matrix. This consortium is not well defined and can vary substantially between kefir grains. There are little data on the microbial stability of kefir grains, nor on interactions between microbes in the grain and in the milk. To study this, a grain was split, with one half of each stored at -20°C and the other half passaged repeatedly in whole unpasteurised milk. Grains passaged in the unpasteurised milk recovered vigour and acquired the yeast Kluyveromyces marxainus from the milk which was confirmed to be the same strain by molecular typing. Furthermore, these passaged grains produced kefir that was distinguished chemically and organoleptically from the stored grains. Some changes in ultrastructure were also observed by scanning electron microscopy. The study showed that kefir grains can acquire yeast from their environment and the final product can be influenced by these newly acquired yeasts. Kluyveromyces marxianus is considered to be responsible for some of the most important characteristics of kefir so the finding that this yeast is part of the less stable microbiota is significant. PMID:27369085

  17. Uncoupling primer and releaser responses to pheromone in honey bees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grozinger, Christina M.; Fischer, Patrick; Hampton, Jacob E.

    2007-05-01

    Pheromones produce dramatic behavioral and physiological responses in a wide variety of species. Releaser pheromones elicit rapid responses within seconds or minutes, while primer pheromones produce long-term changes which may take days to manifest. Honeybee queen mandibular pheromone (QMP) elicits multiple distinct behavioral and physiological responses in worker bees, as both a releaser and primer, and thus produces responses on vastly different time scales. In this study, we demonstrate that releaser and primer responses to QMP can be uncoupled. First, treatment with the juvenile hormone analog methoprene leaves a releaser response (attraction to QMP) intact, but modulates QMP’s primer effects on sucrose responsiveness. Secondly, two components of QMP (9-ODA and 9-HDA) do not elicit a releaser response (attraction) but are as effective as QMP at modulating a primer response, downregulation of foraging-related brain gene expression. These results suggest that different responses to a single pheromone may be produced via distinct pathways.

  18. Evidence that insect herbivores are deterred by ant pheromones.

    PubMed

    Offenberg, Joachim; Nielsen, Mogens Gissel; MacIntosh, Donald J; Havanon, Sopon; Aksornkoae, Sanit

    2004-12-01

    It is well documented that ants can protect plants against insect herbivores, but the underlying mechanisms remain almost undocumented. We propose and test the pheromone avoidance hypothesis--an indirect mechanism where insect herbivores are repelled not only by ants but also by ant pheromones. Herbivores subjected to ant predation will experience a selective advantage if they evolve mechanisms enabling them to avoid feeding within ant territories. Such a mechanism could be based on the ability to detect and evade ant pheromones. Field observations and data from the literature showed that the ant Oecophylla smaragdina distributes persistent pheromones throughout its territory. In addition, a laboratory test showed that the beetle Rhyparida wallacei, which this ant preys on, was reluctant to feed on leaves sampled within ant territories compared with leaves sampled outside territories. Thus, this study provides an example of an ant-herbivore system conforming to the pheromone avoidance hypothesis. PMID:15801596

  19. Roles of sex and gonadal steroids in mammalian pheromonal communication.

    PubMed

    Baum, Michael J; Bakker, Julie

    2013-10-01

    A brain circuit (the accessory olfactory system) that originates in the vomeronasal organ (VNO) and includes the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) plus additional forebrain regions mediates many of the effects of pheromones, typically comprised of a variety of non-volatile and volatile compounds, on aspects of social behavior. A second, parallel circuit (the main olfactory system) that originates in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and includes the main olfactory bulb (MOB) has also been shown to detect volatile pheromones from conspecifics. Studies are reviewed that point to specific roles of several different steroids and their water-soluble metabolites as putative pheromones. Other studies are reviewed that establish an adult, 'activational' role of circulating sex hormones along with sex differences in the detection and/or processing of non-steroidal pheromones by these two olfactory circuits. Persisting questions about the role of sex steroids in pheromonal processing are posed for future investigation. PMID:23872334

  20. Efficient Management of Fruit Pests by Pheromone Nanogels

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, Deepa; Samanta, Suman K.; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2013-01-01

    Environment-friendly management of fruit flies involving pheromones is useful in reducing the undesirable pest populations responsible for decreasing the yield and the crop quality. A nanogel has been prepared from a pheromone, methyl eugenol (ME) using a low-molecular mass gelator. This was very stable at open ambient conditions and slowed down the evaporation of pheromone significantly. This enabled its easy handling and transportation without refrigeration, and reduction in the frequency of pheromone recharging in the orchard. Notably the involvement of the nano-gelled pheromone brought about an effective management of Bactrocera dorsalis, a prevalent harmful pest for a number of fruits including guava. Thus a simple, practical and low cost green chemical approach is developed that has a significant potential for crop protection, long lasting residual activity, excellent efficacy and favorable safety profiles. This makes the present invention well-suited for pest management in a variety of crops. PMID:23416455

  1. Efficient management of fruit pests by pheromone nanogels.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Deepa; Samanta, Suman K; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2013-01-01

    Environment-friendly management of fruit flies involving pheromones is useful in reducing the undesirable pest populations responsible for decreasing the yield and the crop quality. A nanogel has been prepared from a pheromone, methyl eugenol (ME) using a low-molecular mass gelator. This was very stable at open ambient conditions and slowed down the evaporation of pheromone significantly. This enabled its easy handling and transportation without refrigeration, and reduction in the frequency of pheromone recharging in the orchard. Notably the involvement of the nano-gelled pheromone brought about an effective management of Bactrocera dorsalis, a prevalent harmful pest for a number of fruits including guava. Thus a simple, practical and low cost green chemical approach is developed that has a significant potential for crop protection, long lasting residual activity, excellent efficacy and favorable safety profiles. This makes the present invention well-suited for pest management in a variety of crops. PMID:23416455

  2. Kluyveromyces aestuarii, a potential environmental quality indicator yeast for mangroves in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, F.V.; Hagler, A. N.

    2011-01-01

    Kluyveromyces aestuarii was found in sediments from 7 of 8 mangroves in Rio de Janeiro; and absent only at one site with heavy plastic bag pollution. Its presence suggests influence in other habitats from a mangrove and its absence in a mangrove suggests some non- fecal pollution or other habitat alteration. PMID:24031711

  3. Isolation of a respiratory-deficient Kluyveromyces fragilis mutant for the production of ethanol from Jerusalem artichoke

    SciTech Connect

    Guiraud, J.P.; Bourgi, J.; Stervinou, M.; Claisse, M.; Galzy, P.

    1987-05-01

    A respiratory-deficient mutant of Kluyveromyces fragilis was isolated using a ethidium bromide mutagenesis. It was characterized by a loss of cytochromes a + a3 and by an improvement of its inulinase activity. Under anaerobic conditions this mutant was always better than the wild strain for ethanol production especially from Jerusalem artichoke extracts containing large amounts of high polyfructosans (early extracts).

  4. Isolation of a pyrazine alarm pheromone component from the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alarm pheromones in social insects are an essential part of a complex of pheromone interactions that contribute to the maintenance of colony integrity and sociality. The alarm pheromones of ants were among the first chemical ecology examples, primarily due to the large amount of pheromone produced a...

  5. Production, active staining and gas chromatography assay analysis of recombinant aminopeptidase P from Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis DSM 20481

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The aminopeptidase P (PepP, EC 3.4.11.9) gene from Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis DSM 20481 was cloned, sequenced and expressed recombinantly in E. coli BL21 (DE3) for the first time. PepP is involved in the hydrolysis of proline-rich proteins and, thus, is important for the debittering of protein hydrolysates. For accurate determination of PepP activity, a novel gas chromatographic assay was established. The release of L-leucine during the hydrolysis of L-leucine-L-proline-L-proline (LPP) was examined for determination of PepP activity. Sufficient recombinant PepP production was achieved via bioreactor cultivation at 16 °C, resulting in PepP activity of 90 μkatLPP Lculture-1. After automated chromatographic purification by His-tag affinity chromatography followed by desalting, PepP activity of 73.8 μkatLPP Lculture-1 was achieved. This was approximately 700-fold higher compared to the purified native PepP produced by Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis NCDO 763 as described in literature. The molecular weight of PepP was estimated to be ~ 40 kDa via native-PAGE together with a newly developed activity staining method and by SDS-PAGE. Furthermore, the kinetic parameters Km and Vmax were determined for PepP using three different tripeptide substrates. The purified enzyme showed a pH optimum between 7.0 and 7.5, was most active between 50°C and 60°C and exhibited reasonable stability at 0°C, 20°C and 37°C over 15 days. PepP activity could be increased 6-fold using 8.92 mM MnCl2 and was inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline and EDTA. PMID:22853547

  6. Transcriptome analysis of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis during milk acidification as affected by dissolved oxygen and the redox potential.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Nadja; Moslehi-Jenabian, Saloomeh; Werner, Birgit Brøsted; Jensen, Maiken Lund; Garrigues, Christel; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; Jespersen, Lene

    2016-06-01

    Performance of Lactococcus lactis as a starter culture in dairy fermentations depends on the levels of dissolved oxygen and the redox state of milk. In this study the microarray analysis was used to investigate the global gene expression of L. lactis subsp. lactis DSM20481(T) during milk acidification as affected by oxygen depletion and the decrease of redox potential. Fermentations were carried out at different initial levels of dissolved oxygen (dO2) obtained by milk sparging with oxygen (high dO2, 63%) or nitrogen (low dO2, 6%). Bacterial exposure to high initial oxygen resulted in overexpression of genes involved in detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidation-reduction processes, biosynthesis of trehalose and down-regulation of genes involved in purine nucleotide biosynthesis, indicating that several factors, among them trehalose and GTP, were implicated in bacterial adaptation to oxidative stress. Generally, transcriptional changes were more pronounced during fermentation of oxygen sparged milk. Genes up-regulated in response to oxygen depletion were implicated in biosynthesis and transport of pyrimidine nucleotides, branched chain amino acids and in arginine catabolic pathways; whereas genes involved in salvage of nucleotides and cysteine pathways were repressed. Expression pattern of genes involved in pyruvate metabolism indicated shifts towards mixed acid fermentation after oxygen depletion with production of specific end-products, depending on milk treatment. Differential expression of genes, involved in amino acid and pyruvate pathways, suggested that initial oxygen might influence the release of flavor compounds and, thereby, flavor development in dairy fermentations. The knowledge of molecular responses involved in adaptation of L. lactis to the shifts of redox state and pH during milk fermentations is important for the dairy industry to ensure better control of cheese production. PMID:27015296

  7. Sex and Aggregation-Sex Pheromones of Cerambycid Beetles: Basic Science and Practical Applications.

    PubMed

    Hanks, Lawrence M; Millar, Jocelyn G

    2016-07-01

    Research since 2004 has shown that the use of volatile attractants and pheromones is widespread in the large beetle family Cerambycidae, with pheromones now identified from more than 100 species, and likely pheromones for many more. The pheromones identified to date from species in the subfamilies Cerambycinae, Spondylidinae, and Lamiinae are all male-produced aggregation-sex pheromones that attract both sexes, whereas all known examples for species in the subfamilies Prioninae and Lepturinae are female-produced sex pheromones that attract only males. Here, we summarize the chemistry of the known pheromones, and the optimal methods for their collection, analysis, and synthesis. Attraction of cerambycids to host plant volatiles, interactions between their pheromones and host plant volatiles, and the implications of pheromone chemistry for invasion biology are discussed. We also describe optimized traps, lures, and operational parameters for practical applications of the pheromones in detection, sampling, and management of cerambycids. PMID:27501814

  8. Neurogenic and neuroendocrine effects of goldfish pheromones.

    PubMed

    Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Rees, Christopher Benjamin; Bryan, Mara Beth; Li, Weiming

    2008-12-31

    Goldfish (Carassius auratus) use reproductive hormones as endocrine signals to synchronize sexual behavior with gamete maturation and as exogenous signals (pheromones) to mediate spawning interactions between conspecifics. We examined the differential effects of two hormonal pheromones, prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha)) and 17alpha,20beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17,20beta-P) on neurogenesis, neurotransmission, and neuronal activities, and on plasma androstenedione (AD) levels. Exposure to waterborne PGF(2alpha) induced a multitude of changes in male goldfish brain. Histological examination indicated an increase in the number of dividing cells in male diencephalon (p < 0.05, Kruskal-Wallis test). Real-time quantitative PCR tests showed elevated levels of transcripts for the salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in the male telencephalon and cerebellum (p < 0.005, one-way ANOVA) and for ChAT (choline acetyltransferase) in the male vagal lobe and the brainstem underneath the vagal lobe (p < 0.05, one-way ANOVA). Therefore, PGF(2alpha) seemed to modulate male brain plasticity that coincided with behavioral changes during spawning season. Exposure to waterborne 17,20beta-P, however, increased circulatory levels of immunoreactive AD in males and the transcripts of androgen receptor and cGnRH-II (chicken-II GnRH) in the female cerebellum (p < 0.05, one-way ANOVA). PGF(2alpha) and 17,20beta-P thereby seemed to act through distinct pathways to elicit different responses in the neuroendocrine system. This is the first finding that links a specific pheromone molecule (PGF(2alpha)) to neurogenesis in a vertebrate animal. PMID:19118184

  9. Inactivation of the panE Gene in Lactococcus lactis Enhances Formation of Cheese Aroma Compounds

    PubMed Central

    de Cadiñanos, Luz P. Gómez; García-Cayuela, Tomás; Yvon, Mireille; Martinez-Cuesta, M. Carmen; Peláez, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyacid dehydrogenases limit the conversion of α-keto acids into aroma compounds. Here we report that inactivation of the panE gene, encoding the α-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase activity in Lactococcus lactis, enhanced the formation of 3-methylbutanal and 3-methylbutanol. L. lactis IFPL953ΔpanE was an efficient strain producing volatile compounds related to cheese aroma. PMID:23524675

  10. Genome Sequence of a Lactococcus lactis Strain Isolated from Salmonid Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Opazo, Rafael; Gajardo, Felipe; Ruiz, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a common inhabitant of the intestinal microbiota of salmonids, especially those in aquaculture systems. Here, we present a genome sequence of a Lactococcus lactis strain isolated from the intestinal contents of rainbow trout reared in Chile. PMID:27563049

  11. Genome Sequence of a Lactococcus lactis Strain Isolated from Salmonid Intestinal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Opazo, Rafael; Gajardo, Felipe; Ruiz, Mauricio; Romero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a common inhabitant of the intestinal microbiota of salmonids, especially those in aquaculture systems. Here, we present a genome sequence of a Lactococcus lactis strain isolated from the intestinal contents of rainbow trout reared in Chile. PMID:27563049

  12. Increasing the heme-dependent respiratory efficiency of Lactococcus lactis by inhibition of lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Arioli, Stefania; Zambelli, Daniele; Guglielmetti, Simone; De Noni, Ivano; Pedersen, Martin B; Pedersen, Per Dedenroth; Dal Bello, Fabio; Mora, Diego

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of heme-induced respiration in Lactococcus lactis has radically improved the industrial processes used for the biomass production of this species. Here, we show that inhibition of the lactate dehydrogenase activity of L. lactis during growth under respiration-permissive conditions can stimulate aerobic respiration, thereby increasing not only growth efficiency but also the robustness of this organism. PMID:23064338

  13. Encapsulated Lactococcus lactis with enhanced gastrointestinal survival for the development of folate enriched functional foods.

    PubMed

    Divya, Jayakumar Beena; Nampoothiri, Kesavan Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    Two lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from cow's milk were identified as Lactococcus lactis strains and designated as L. lactis CM22 and L. lactis CM28. They were immobilised by co-encapsulation using alginate and mannitol and by hybrid entrapment with skim milk, glycerol, CaCO3 and alginate. The encapsulated cells survived better in simulated gastrointestinal conditions compared to the free cells. The percentage survival of probiotics encapsulated by hybrid entrapment method was 62.74% for L. lactis CM22 and 68% for L. lactis CM28. Studies to check their efficacy in fermentative fortification of skim milk and ice cream revealed an enhancement in folate level. PMID:25686721

  14. The role of multiple pheromones in food recruitment by ants.

    PubMed

    Dussutour, A; Nicolis, S C; Shephard, G; Beekman, M; Sumpter, D J T

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we investigate the foraging activity of an invasive ant species, the big headed ant Pheidole megacephala. We establish that the ants' behavior is consistent with the use of two different pheromone signals, both of which recruit nestmates. Our experiments suggest that during exploration the ants deposit a long-lasting pheromone that elicits a weak recruitment of nestmates, while when exploiting food the ants deposit a shorter lasting pheromone eliciting a much stronger recruitment. We further investigate experimentally the role of these pheromones under both static and dynamic conditions and develop a mathematical model based on the hypothesis that exploration locally enhances exploitation, while exploitation locally suppresses exploration. The model and the experiments indicate that exploratory pheromone allows the colony to more quickly mobilize foragers when food is discovered. Furthermore, the combination of two pheromones allows colonies to track changing foraging conditions more effectively than would a single pheromone. In addition to the already known causes for the ecological success of invasive ant species, our study suggests that their opportunistic strategy of rapid food discovery and ability to react to changes in the environment may have strongly contributed to their dominance over native species. PMID:19617426

  15. Hydrolysis of Agave fourcroydes Lemaire (henequen) leaf juice and fermentation with Kluyveromyces marxianus for ethanol production

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Carbon sources for biofuel production are wide-ranging and their availability depends on the climate and soil conditions of the land where the production chain is located. Henequen (Agave fourcroydes Lem.) is cultivated in Yucatán, Mexico to produce natural fibers from the leaves, and a juice containing fructans is produced during this process. Fructans can be hydrolyzed to fructose and glucose and metabolized into ethanol by appropriate yeasts. In Mexico, different Agave species provide the carbon source for (distilled and non-distilled) alcoholic beverage production using the stem of the plant, whilst the leaves are discarded. In this work, we investigated the effect of thermal acid and enzymatic hydrolysis of the juice on the amount of reducing sugars released. Growth curves were generated with the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces marxianus and fermentations were then carried out with Kluyveromyces marxianus to determine alcohol yields. Results With thermal acid hydrolysis, the greatest increase in reducing sugars (82.6%) was obtained using 5% H2SO4 at 100°C with a 30 min reaction time. Statistically similar results can be obtained using the same acid concentration at a lower temperature and with a shorter reaction time (60°C, 15 min), or by using 1% H2SO4 at 100°C with a 30 min reaction time. In the case of enzymatic hydrolysis, the use of 5.75, 11.47 and 22.82 U of enzyme did not produce significant differences in the increase in reducing sugars. Although both hydrolysis processes obtained similar results, the difference was observed after fermentation. Ethanol yields were 50.3 ± 4 and 80.04 ± 5.29% of the theoretical yield respectively. Conclusions Final reducing sugars concentrations obtained with both thermal acid and enzymatic hydrolysis were similar. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a good ethanol producer, did not grow in the hydrolysates. Only Kluyveromyces marxianus was able to grow in them, giving a higher ethanol

  16. Palm Weevil Pheromones - Discovery and Use.

    PubMed

    Oehlschlager, A C

    2016-07-01

    Male-produced aggregation pheromones of seven major pest species of weevils in the subfamily Rhynchophorinae have been identified as a closely related set of methyl-branched secondary alcohols. Although the weevils produce only one stereoisomer of these alcohols, no instances of isomeric inhibition have been observed, enabling stereoisomeric mixtures to be used in traps. Addition of fermenting plant material to traps synergizes attraction of weevils to the pheromones. The weevils are large, have long life cycles, and are strong fliers. These characteristics make mass trapping a suitable tactic to add to existing management strategies. When coupled with good phytosanitary practices, mass trapping of Rhynchophorus palmarum at 1 trap/5-ha significantly lowered the incidence of red ring nematode infection vectored by the weevil in commercial oil palm plantations in the Americas. Similarly, trap densities of 1-10 traps/ha have significantly lowered R. ferrugineus infestation of date palm throughout the Middle East. Although management of R. ferrugineus in urban areas is more problematic, trapping is an integral part of most programs aimed at protection of ornamental Canary palms in Europe. Overall, semiochemically-based management of these large weevils is now a mature and usually economically feasible control technology. PMID:27430563

  17. Pheromones in birds: myth or reality?

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Samuel P.; Balthazart, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Birds are anosmic or at best microsmatic… This misbelief persisted until very recently and has strongly influenced the outcome of communication studies in birds, with olfaction remaining neglected as compared to acoustic and visual channels. However, there is now clear empirical evidence showing that olfaction is perfectly functional in birds and birds use olfactory information in a variety of ethological contexts. Although the existence of pheromones has never been formally demonstrated in this vertebrate class, different groups of birds, such as petrels, auklets and ducks have been shown to produce specific scents that could play a significant role in within-species social interactions. Behavioral experiments have indeed demonstrated that these odors influence the behavior of conspecifics. Additionally, in quail, deprivation of olfactory inputs decreases neuronal activation induced by sexual interactions with a female. It seems therefore well established that birds enjoy a functional sense of smell and a fast growing body of experimental evidence suggests that they use this channel of olfactory communication to control their social life. The unequivocal identification of an avian pheromone is, however, still ahead of us but there are now many exciting opportunities to unravel the behavioral and physiological particularities of chemical communication in birds. PMID:20490809

  18. Suppression pheromone and cockroach rank formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Rong; Chang, Huan-Wen; Chen, Shu-Chun; Ho, Hsiao-Yung

    2009-06-01

    Although agonistic behaviors in the male lobster cockroach ( Nauphoeta cinerea) are well known, the formation of an unstable hierarchy has long been a puzzle. In this study, we investigate how the unstable dominance hierarchy in N. cinerea is maintained via a pheromone signaling system. In agonistic interactions, aggressive posture (AP) is an important behavioral index of aggression. This study showed that, during the formation of a governing hierarchy, thousands of nanograms of 3-hydroxy-2-butanone (3H-2B) were released by the AP-adopting dominant in the first encounter fight, then during the early domination period and that this release of 3H-2B was related to rank maintenance, but not to rank establishment. For rank maintenance, 3H-2B functioned as a suppression pheromone, which suppressed the fighting capability of rivals and kept them in a submissive state. During the period of rank maintenance, as the dominant male gradually decreased his 3H-2B release, the fighting ability of the subordinate gradually developed, as shown by the increasing odds of a subordinate adopting an AP (OSAP). The OSAP was negatively correlated with the amount of 3H-2B released by the dominant and positively correlated with the number of domination days. The same OSAP could be achieved earlier by reducing the amount of 3H-2B released by the dominant indicates that whether the subordinate adopts an offensive strategy depends on what the dominant is doing.

  19. Pheromonal influences on sociosexual behavior in young women.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Norma L; Pitino, Lisa

    2002-03-01

    A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of a synthesized putative female pheromone was conducted with regularly menstruating, university women (N=36, mean age=27.8). The pheromone formula was derived from earlier work investigating the underarm secretions of fertile, sexually active, heterosexual women. A vial of either synthesized pheromone or placebo was selected blindly and added to a subject's perfume. Subjects recorded seven sociosexual behaviors and reported them weekly across three menstrual cycles. Beginning with Day 8 of each cycle, the first cycle contained a 2-week baseline period followed by an experimental period of as many as 3 weeks each from the next two cycles for a maximum of 6 weeks. The 19 pheromone and 17 placebo subjects did not differ significantly in age, weight, body mass index, dating status or ethnicity nor in reported accuracy, back-filling data, perception of a positive effect or perfume use. Placebo subjects were significantly taller than pheromone subjects. Except for male approaches, subjects did not differ significantly at baseline in average weekly sociosexual behaviors. A significantly greater proportion of pheromone users compared with placebo users increased over baseline in frequency of sexual intercourse, sleeping next to a partner, formal dates and petting/affection/kissing but not in frequency of male approaches, informal dates or masturbation. Three or more sociosexual behaviors increased over baseline for 74% of pheromone users compared with 23% of placebo users. We conclude that this synthesized pheromone formula acted as a sex attractant pheromone and increased the sexual attractiveness of women to men. PMID:11897264

  20. Worker honey bee pheromone regulation of foraging ontogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankiw, Tanya

    The evolution of sociality has configured communication chemicals, called primer pheromones, which play key roles in regulating the organization of social life. Primer pheromones exert relatively slow effects that fundamentally alter developmental, physiological, and neural systems. Here, I demonstrate how substances extracted from the surface of foraging and young pre-foraging worker bees regulated age at onset of foraging, a developmental process. Hexane-extractable compounds washed from foraging workers increased foraging age compared with controls, whereas extracts of young pre-foraging workers decreased foraging age. This represents the first known direct demonstration of primer pheromone activity derived from adult worker bees.

  1. The rhinophores sense pheromones regulating multiple behaviors in Aplysia fasciata.

    PubMed

    Levy, M; Blumberg, S; Susswein, A J

    1997-04-01

    Pheromones released during mating and egg laying in Aplysia facilitate various aspects of behavior. We now show that the chemosensory rhinophores sense these pheromones. Ablating the rhinophores causes a significant decrease in the time spent mating. In addition, the lesion blocks the increases of feeding in response to pheromones released by egg cordons and by mating conspecifics. Respiratory pumping is significantly increased in response to egg cordons, mating conspecifics and egg laying hormone (ELH). The increase in response to egg cordons is blocked by ablating the rhinophores, but not by lesioning the osphradium, a second chemosensory organ. PMID:9147387

  2. Alcohol and single-cell protein production by Kluyveromyces in concentrated whey permeates with reduced ash

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoud, M.M.; Kosikowski, F.V.

    1982-01-01

    Five Kluyveromyces yeasts were grown in concentrated whey permeates under aerobic and anaerobic conditions to produce single-cell protein and ethanol. K. fragilis NRRL Y2415 produced the highest yield of alcohol, 9.1%, and K. bulgaricus ATCC 1605 gave the highest yield of biomass, 13.5 mg/mL. High ash, apparently through Na and K effects, inhibited production of biomass and alcohol. A 0.77% ash was optimum. Lactose utilization was more rapid under aerobic than anaerobic conditions. (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and urea supplementation were without effect on yeast growth or were slightly inhibitory. A 1% peptone inclusion gave the highest biomass yield with minimum alcohol production.

  3. Biosynthesis of 2-phenylethanol from glucose with genetically engineered Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Yeon; Lee, Sang-Woo; Oh, Min-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    2-Phenylethanol (2-PE) is an aromatic alcohol with a rose scent, which is used in the cosmetics, fragrance and food industries. 2-PE is produced in a few yeast strains by Ehrlich pathway. In this study, Kluyveromyces marxianus was genetically engineered for overproduction of 2-PE from glucose. About 1.0g/L of 2-PE was produced by overexpressing phenylpyruvate decarboxylase (ARO10) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH2) genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A similar level of 2-PE was also produced from evolved K. marxianus, which was resistant to the phenylalanine analog, p-fluorophenylalanine. aroG(fbr) from Klebsiella pneumoniae encoding a feedback resistant mutant of 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate (DHAP) synthase was overexpressed in the evolved K. marxianus. Finally, 1.3g/L of 2-PE was produced from 20g/L glucose without addition of phenylalanine in the medium. PMID:24910335

  4. Enhanced Xylitol Production by Mutant Kluyveromyces marxianus 36907-FMEL1 Due to Improved Xylose Reductase Activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Seong; Park, Jae-Bum; Jang, Seung-Won; Ha, Suk-Jin

    2015-08-01

    A directed evolution and random mutagenesis were carried out with thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus ATCC 36907 for efficient xylitol production. The final selected strain, K. marxianus 36907-FMEL1, exhibited 120 and 39 % improvements of xylitol concentration and xylitol yield, respectively, as compared to the parental strain, K. marxianus ATCC 36907. According to enzymatic assays for xylose reductase (XR) activities, XR activity from K. marxianus 36907-FMEL1 was around twofold higher than that from the parental strain. Interestingly, the ratios of NADH-linked and NADPH-linked XR activities were highly changed from 1.92 to 1.30 when K. marxianus ATCC 36907 and K. marxianus 36907-FMEL1 were compared. As results of KmXYL1 genes sequencing, it was found that cysteine was substituted to tyrosine at position 36 after strain development which might cause enhanced XR activity from K. marxianus 36907-FMEL1. PMID:26043853

  5. Purification and partial characterization of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase from Kluyveromyces marxianus yeast.

    PubMed

    Nedeva, Trayana; Dolashka-Angelova, Pavlina; Moshtanska, Vesela; Voelter, Wolfgang; Petrova, Ventzislava; Kujumdzieva, Anna

    2009-11-01

    A new thermostable Cu/Zn SOD from a thermotolerant yeast strain Kluyveromyces marxianus NBIMCC 1984 has been purified and characterized. The purification procedure comprises thermal treatment and dialysis, ion-exchange chromatography and chromatofocusing. The methodology is a rapid, efficient and highly specific, generating pure preparation (specific activity 996 U mg of protein(-1)) with a yield of 53%. The purified enzyme is a homodimer with Mw of 34,034 Da and has high N-terminal homology with other yeasts' Cu/Zn SOD enzymes. The protein is characterized with some unique features such as-thermostability (t(1/2) at 70 degrees C=30 min), pH stability in the alkaline range (7.5-8.5) and resistance to inhibitors and variety of chemicals. These characteristics reveal possibilities for wide practical application of K. marxianus Cu/Zn SOD enzyme. PMID:19758847

  6. Lactococcal 936-species phage attachment to surface of Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Geller, B L; Ngo, H T; Mooney, D T; Su, P; Dunn, N

    2005-03-01

    The interactions of the 936-species phages sk1, jj50, and 64 with the cell surface of Lactococcus lactis LM0230 were analyzed. Cell envelopes (walls + plasma membrane), cell wall, or plasma membrane from L. lactis ssp. lactis LM0230 each inactivated the phages in vitro. However, other 936-species phages kh and P008, which do not infect strain LM0230, were not inactivated by any of the subcellular fractions. Treating cell walls or plasma membrane with the cell wall hydrolase mutanolysin eliminated inactivation of phage sk1. This suggested that intact cell wall fragments were required for inactivation. A role for plasma membrane in phage sk1 inactivation was further investigated. Boiling, washing in 2 M KCl, 8 M urea, or 0.1 M Na(2)CO(3)/pH 11, or treating the plasma membrane with proteases did not reduce adsorption or inactivation of phage. Adding lipoteichoic acid or antibodies to lipoteichoic acid did not reduce inactivation of phage in a mixture with membrane, suggesting that lipoteichoic acid was not involved. Inactivation by envelopes or cell wall correlated with ejection of DNA from the phage sk1 capsid. Although calcium is required for plaque formation, it was not required for adsorption, inactivation, or ejection of phage DNA by envelopes or cell wall. The results suggest that at least for phages sk1, jj50, and 64, adsorption and phage DNA injection into the host does not require a host membrane protein or lipoteichoic acid, and that cell wall components are sufficient for these initial steps of phage infection. PMID:15738223

  7. Rapid Fluorescence Assessment of the Viability of Stressed Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Bunthof, Christine J.; van den Braak, Sabina; Breeuwer, Pieter; Rombouts, Frank M.; Abee, Tjakko

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the use of the fluorescent probes carboxyfluorescein (cF) and propidium iodide (PI) for rapid assessment of viability, using Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis ML3 exposed to different stress treatments. The cF labeling indicated the reproductive capacity of mixtures of nontreated cells and cells killed at 70°C very well. However, after treatment up to 60°C the fraction of cF-labeled cells remained high, whereas the survival decreased for cells treated at above 50°C and was completely lost for those treated at 60°C. In an extended series of experiments, cell suspensions were exposed to heating, freezing, low pH, or bile salts, after which the colony counts, acidification capacity, glycolytic activity, PI exclusion, cF labeling, and cF efflux were measured and compared. The acidification capacity corresponded with the number of CFU. The glycolytic activity, which is an indicator of vitality, was more sensitive to the stress conditions than the reproduction, acidification, and fluorescence parameters. The cF labeling depended on membrane integrity, as was confirmed by PI exclusion. The fraction of cF-labeled cells was not a general indicator of reproduction or acidification, nor was PI exclusion or cF labeling capacity (the internal cF concentration). When the cells were labeled by cF, a subsequent lactose-energized efflux assay was needed for decisive viability assessment. This novel assay proved to be a good and rapid indicator of the reproduction and acidification capacities of stressed L. lactis and has potential for physiological research and dairy applications related to lactic acid bacteria. PMID:10427066

  8. Unisex pheromone detectors and pheromone-binding proteins in scarab beetles.

    PubMed

    Nikonov, Alexander Alexeevich; Peng, Guihong; Tsurupa, Galina; Leal, Walter Soares

    2002-07-01

    Olfaction was studied in two species of scarab beetle, Anomala octiescostata and Anomala cuprea (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Rutelinae), which are temporarily isolated and use the same sex pheromone compounds, (R)-buibuilactone and (R)-japonilure. Single sensillum recordings in A. octiescostata revealed highly sensitive olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) (threshold <1 pg) that were tuned to the detection of the green leaf volatile compound (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate. As opposed to similar ORNs in another scarab species, Phyllopertha diversa, in A. octiescostata a diazo analogue elicited much lower neuronal responses than the natural ligand. Detectors for other floral and leaf compounds were also characterized. Extremely stereoselective ORNs tuned to sex pheromone were identified in male and female antennae. Biochemical investigations showed that, in A. octiescostata and A. cuprea, the pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs) isolated from male antennae were identical to PBPs obtained from female antennae. AoctPBP and AcupPBP had seven different amino acid residues. Binding of AoctPBP to (R)-japonilure is shown. PdivOBP1, which is also known to bind to (R)-japonilure, differed from AcupPBP in only two amino acid residues, one at the N-terminus and the other near the C-terminus. The structural features of the Bombyx mori PBP are compared with the sequences of eight known scarab odorant-binding proteins. PMID:12142325

  9. Three pheromone-binding proteins help segregation between two Helicoverpa species utilizing the same pheromone components.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hao; Huang, Ling-Qiao; Pelosi, Paolo; Wang, Chen-Zhu

    2012-09-01

    The two sibling species Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa assulta utilise the same two aldehydes as their sex pheromones, but in opposite ratios. In both species three odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) can be classified as pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs). To investigate the role of these three PBPs in chemical communication between sexes and their mode of action, we have expressed the proteins in bacteria and prepared mutants lacking their C-terminal regions. Using polyclonal antibodies we found that the expression of the three PBPs is basically confined to the antennae of both sexes and both species. Binding experiments with the fluorescent probe N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine across a pH range indicated that, the affinity of wild-type proteins decreases at low pH, while that of the mutants is not or less affected, suggesting that a conformational change of the C-terminus occurs in these proteins, as reported for other lepidopteran OBPs. All three proteins bind with similar strength both pheromone components, as well as their corresponding alcohols and acetates. However, they exhibit significant selectivity to linear alcohols and aldehydes of different length, with optimal affinities to the ligand of 13-15 carbon atoms for PBP1 and 12-14 carbon atoms for PBP2. We suggest that all three PBPs might cooperate to build a unique olfactory image, that could help avoiding cross-mating between the two species and with other noctuids. PMID:22750167

  10. Kinetics of male pheromone production by Amblyomma variegatum (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Pavis, C; Barré, N

    1993-11-01

    Males of Amblyomma variegatum (F.), when attached on their host, produce a pheromonal blend composed of methyl salicylate, ortho-nitrophenol, and nonanoic acid, which acts as an aggregation-attachment pheromone. Using olfactometry assays, assays on hosts, and quantification of the compounds by capillary gas chromatography, the kinetics of pheromone production has been studied. Males engorged for at least 10 d elicit attachment from most of the tested females. Attractiveness of males for females is significant only between days 14 and 23 of engorgement. Before 10 d of attachment, the amounts of pheromones detected in hexanic male body extracts are very low (< 10 ng); they then increase to a maximum of 2 micrograms for the major compound per male. Large amounts can be detected until 80 d of engorgement. The inter-individual variation is very large throughout the engorgement period. The interest and the limitations of the different techniques used are discussed. PMID:8271253