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Sample records for klystron output cavity

  1. Design of a C-band relativistic extended interaction klystron with coaxial output cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wu; Zhao, De-Kui; Chen, Yong-Dong

    2015-07-01

    In order to overcome the disadvantages of conventional high frequency relativistic klystron amplifiers in power capability and RF conversion efficiency, a C-band relativistic extended interaction klystron amplifier with coaxial output cavity is designed with the aid of PIC code MAGIC. In the device, disk-loaded cavities are introduced in the input and intermediate cavity to increase the beam modulation depth, and a coaxial disk-loaded cavity is employed in the output cavity to enhance the RF conversion efficiency. In PIC simulation, when the beam voltage is 680 kV and current is 4 kA, the device can generate 1.11 GW output power at 5.64 GHz with an efficiency of 40.8%.

  2. Three-dimensional evaluation of energy extraction in output cavities of klystron amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G.; Albers, L. U.

    1973-01-01

    Description of an accurate three-dimensional mathematical model and computer program for calculating electronic interaction, electron trajectories, beam interception, and efficiency in the output cavity of a klystron amplifier. The highest computed efficiency for an optimally bunched beam was 80.3% with 6% ideal interception. Efficiency is shown to increase initially with interception.

  3. Nonlinear, nonlaminar - 3D computation of electron motion through the output cavity of a klystron.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, L. U.; Kosmahl, H. G.

    1971-01-01

    The accurate computation is discussed of electron motion throughout the output cavity of a klystron amplifier. The assumptions are defined whereon the computation is based, and the equations of motion are reviewed, along with the space charge fields derived from a Green's function potential of a solid cylinder. The integration process is then examined with special attention to its most difficult and important aspect - namely, the accurate treatment of the dynamic effect of space charge forces on the motion of individual cell rings of equal volume and charge. The correct treatment is demonstrated upon four specific examples, and a few comments are given on the results obtained.-

  4. Nonlinear, nonlaminar-3D computation of electron motion through the output cavity of a klystron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, L. U.; Kosmahl, H. G.

    1971-01-01

    The equations of motion used in the computation are discussed along with the space charge fields and the integration process. The following assumptions were used as a basis for the computation: (1) The beam is divided into N axisymmetric discs of equal charge and each disc into R rings of equal charge. (2) The velocity of each disc, its phase with respect to the gap voltage, and its radius at a specified position in the drift tunnel prior to the interaction gap is known from available large signal one dimensional programs. (3) The fringing rf fields are computed from exact analytical expressions derived from the wave equation assuming a known field shape between the tunnel tips at a radius a. (4) The beam is focused by an axisymmetric magnetic field. Both components of B, that is B sub z and B sub r, are taken into account. (5) Since this integration does not start at the cathode but rather further down the stream prior to entering the output cavity it is assumed that each electron moved along a laminar path from the cathode to the start of integration.

  5. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC KLYSTRON TO CAVITY MISMATCH EFFECTS AND COMPENSATION*

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Mike; Kim, Sang-Ho; Crofford, Mark T

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Observations of several of the 81 klystron output waveforms into their respective superconducting cavities do not correspond with their rectangular klystron inputs in open loop mode. This can't be completely explained by a drooping high voltage power supply especially when the waveform is parabolic. Some possible causes and effects of these anomalies are presented.

  6. Anomalous electron loading in SLAC 5045 klystron and relativistic klystron input cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, R.F.; Fowkes, R.W.; Lavine, T.L.; Miller, R.H.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1989-03-01

    Recent studies of RF breakup and instability in the SLAC 5045 klystrons have revealed that many production klystrons show loading of the input cavity by low energy electrons even under cold cathode no beam conditions. Sometime after the onset of the RF drive pulse, the input cavity absorbs a portion of the incident RF drive that would otherwise be reflected from the not-beam-loaded cavity. This power absorption is a function of drive level, and of axial magnetic field surrounding the cavity. No power absorption is present when the axial magnetic field is zero. This same phenomenon has been observed in the input cavity of relativistic klystron experiments being conducted as part of the SLAC-LBL-LLNL development program. The phenomenon may be associated with RF breakup and RF instability in SLAC 5045 klystrons, and with unstable pulse shortening in the relativistic klystron experiments. This paper outlines some old and new observations of microwave beam device malfunctions that probably are associated with low energy electron fluxes in the vacuum environments of microwave power devices. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  7. High-Q toroidal cavities for high frequency klystrons.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branch, G. M.

    1972-01-01

    A toroidal cavity developed for a 4-KW 12 GHz satellite-borne television transmitter klystron is described. The cavity has an internal Q 40% higher than that of a conventional cylindrical doubly reentrant cavity, thus yielding higher circuit efficiency and conserving energy which cannot be recovered in multistage depressed potential beam collectors. As a result of optimization studies with a digital computer program for obtaining cavity field distributions by a relaxation method and for computing the intrinsic cavity parameters, a particular cavity configuration with conical reentrant tunnel tips and toroidal walls is shown to provide good thermal characteristics and mechanical rigidity as well as low internal losses.

  8. High efficiency coaxial klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator with a premodulation cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Renzhen; Teng Yan; Chen Changhua; Sun Jun

    2011-11-15

    The klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) combines the transition radiation with Cerenkov radiation and has demonstrated microwave output of high power and high efficiency. The coaxial slow wave structure device can produce microwave with a lower frequency in a smaller cross section. For the purpose of high efficiency, low frequency, and miniaturization, a coaxial klystron-like RBWO with a premodulation cavity is presented. Particle-in-cell simulations show that a microwave with power of 1.15 GW and frequency of 2.1 GHz is generated with conversion efficiency of 48%, whereas for the device with a reflector, the efficiency is 38%.

  9. Study of nonlinear interaction between bunched beam and intermediate cavities in a relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Li, Z. H.; Tang, C. X.

    2012-07-15

    In intermediate cavities of a relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA) driven by intense relativistic electron beam, the equivalent circuit model, which is widely adopted to investigate the interaction between bunched beam and the intermediate cavity in a conventional klystron design, is invalid due to the high gap voltage and the nonlinear beam loading in a RKA. According to Maxwell equations and Lorentz equation, the self-consistent equations for beam-wave interaction in the intermediate cavity are introduced to study the nonlinear interaction between bunched beam and the intermediate cavity in a RKA. Based on the equations, the effects of modulation depth and modulation frequency of the beam on the gap voltage amplitude and its phase are obtained. It is shown that the gap voltage is significantly lower than that estimated by the equivalent circuit model when the beam modulation is high. And the bandwidth becomes wider as the beam modulation depth increases. An S-band high gain relativistic klystron amplifier is designed based on the result. And the corresponding experiment is carried out on the linear transformer driver accelerator. The peak output power has achieved 1.2 GW with an efficiency of 28.6% and a gain of 46 dB in the corresponding experiment.

  10. A study on the high-order mode oscillation in a four-cavity intense relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying-Hui; Niu, Xin-Jian; Jia, Nan; Li, Zheng-Hong; Wang, Hui; Cheng, Hui; Yang, Xiao-Chuan; Duan, Yaoyong

    2016-07-01

    The high-order mode oscillation is studied in designing a four-cavity intense relativistic klystron amplifier. The reason for the oscillation caused by high-order modes and a method to suppress these kinds of spurious modes are found through theoretical analyses and the study on the influence of major parameters of a high frequency structure (such as the oscillation frequency of cavities, the cavity Q value, the length of drift tube section, and the characteristic impedance). Based on much simulation, a four-cavity intense relativistic klystron amplifier with a superior performance has been designed, built, and tested. An output power of 2.22 GW corresponding to 27.4% efficiency and 61 dB gain has been obtained. Moreover, the high-order mode oscillation is suppressed effectively, and an output power of 1.95 GW corresponding to 26% efficiency and 62 dB gain has been obtained in our laboratory.

  11. Design of inductively detuned RF extraction cavities for the Relativistic Klystron Two Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Li, H.

    1995-04-01

    An inductively detuned traveling wave cavity for the Relativistic Klystron Two Beam Accelerator expected to extract high RF power at 11. 424 GHz for the 1 TeV Center of Mass Next Linear Collider has been designed. Longitudinal beam dynamics studies led to the following requirements on cavity design: (a) Extraction of 360 MW of RF power with RF component of the current being 1.15 kAmps at 11.424 GHz, (b) Inductively detuned traveling wave cavity with wave phase velocity equal to 4/3 the speed of light, (c) Output cavity with appropriate Q{sub ext} and eigenfrequency for proper matching. Furthermore, transverse beam dynamics require low shunt impedances to avoid the beam break-up instability. We describe the design effort to meet these criteria based on frequency-domain and time-domain computations using 2D- and 3D- electromagnetic codes.

  12. Multibeam klystron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vancil, Bernard K. (Inventor); Wintucky, Edwin G. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A multibeam, electrostatically focused klystron includes a plurality of conductive members, ones of which are recessed to provide input and output sections of microwave cavities, wherein focusing voltage is applied between those sections. The conductive members are either spaced along the path of multiple beams, or stacked in insulated relation, in either case being supported by glass rods within a glass envelope.

  13. Computer control of the energy output of a klystron in the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Jobe, R.K.; Browne, M.J.; Flores, M.; Phinney, N.; Schwarz, H.D.; Sheppard, J.C.

    1987-02-01

    Hardware and software have been developed to permit computer control of the output of high power klystrons on a pulsed basis. Control of the klystron output is accomplished by varying the input drive via a pulsed rf attenuator. Careful power calibrations permit accurate calculation of the available energy, as seen by the beam, over the full range of the klystron output. The ability to control precisely the energy output allows for energy feed-forward as well as energy feedback applications. Motivation for this work has been the need to adjust the energy of beams launched into various regions of the SLC. Vernier klystrons play a crucial role in the energy delivered from the SLC injector, linac, and positron source. This paper discusses the hardware development, energy calculations, and software implementation. Operational results are presented.

  14. Relativistic klystron afterburner simulation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.D.; Jong, R.A.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    1990-01-24

    We are developing computer codes for the numerical simulations of relativistic klystrons and relativistic klystron afterburners''. The purpose of this note is to discuss the main features of our numerical model. A relativistic klystron afterburner'' is a scheme to extract power from a spent FEL electron beam. Power is extracted from the beam by passing it through klystron output cavities. To study the feasibility of this concept, we are developing computer codes for the numerical simulation of relativistic klystrons and afterburners. The purpose of this note is to discuss the main features of our numerical model.

  15. Design of a multi beam klystron cavity from its single beam parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kant, Deepender; Joshi, L. M.; Janyani, Vijay

    2016-03-01

    The klystron is a well-known microwave amplifier which uses kinetic energy of an electron beam for amplification of the RF signal. There are some limitations of conventional single beam klystron such as high operating voltage, low efficiency and bulky size at higher power levels, which are very effectively handled in Multi Beam Klystron (MBK) that uses multiple low purveyance electron beams for RF interaction. Each beam propagates along its individual transit path through a resonant cavity structure. Multi-Beam klystron cavity design is a critical task due to asymmetric cavity structure and can be simulated by 3D code only. The present paper shall discuss the design of multi beam RF cavities for klystrons operating at 2856 MHz (S-band) and 5 GHz (C-band) respectively. The design approach uses some scaling laws for finding the electron beam parameters of the multi beam device from their single beam counter parts. The scaled beam parameters are then used for finding the design parameters of the multi beam cavities. Design of the desired multi beam cavity can be optimized through iterative simulations in CST Microwave Studio.

  16. A novel technique for tuning of co-axial cavity of multi-beam klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Sukalyan; Bandyopadhyay, Ayan Kumar; Pal, Debashis; Kant, Deepender; Joshi, Lalit Mohan; Kumar, Bijendra; Meena, Rakesh; Rawat, Vikram

    2016-03-01

    Multi-beam Klystrons (MBKs) have gained wide acceptances in the research sector for its inherent advantages. But developing a robust tuning technique for an MBK cavity of coaxial type has still remained a challenge as these designs are very prone to suffer from asymmetric field distribution with inductive tuning of the cavity. Such asymmetry leads to inhomogeneous beam-wave interaction, an undesirable phenomenon. Described herein is a new type of coaxial cavity that has the ability to suppress the asymmetry, thereby allowing tuning of the cavity with a single tuning post.

  17. RF Feedback Analysis for 4 cavities per klystron in PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, P.; Tighe, R.

    1994-06-01

    Lattice changes in the PEP-II high energy ring have made the concept of driving four cavities with a single klystron an attractive option. This paper examines the topology from a RF feedback point of view. Sources of error are identified and their magnitudes are estimated. The effect on the performance of the longitudinal impedance reducing feedback loops is calculated using control theory and Mathematica.

  18. Klystron beam-bunching lecture

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.

    1996-10-01

    Electron beam current modulation in a klystron is the key phenomenon that accounts for klystron gain and rf power generation. Current modulation results from the beams` interaction with the rf fields in a cavity, and in turn is responsible for driving modulation in the next rf cavity. To understand the impact of the current modulation in a klystron, we have to understand both the mechanism leading to the generation of the current modulation and the interaction of a current-modulated electron beam with an rf cavity. The cavity interaction is subtle, because the fields in the cavity modify the bunching of the beam within the cavity itself (usually very dramatically). We will establish the necessary formalism to understand klystron bunching phenomena which can be used to describe rf accelerator cavity/beam interactions. This formalism is strictly steady-state; no transient behavior will be considered. In particular, we will discuss the following: general description of klystron operation; beam harmonic current; how beam velocity modulation induced by an rf cavity leads to current modulation in both the ballistic and space-charge dominated regimes; use of Ramo`s theorem to define the power transfer between a bunched electron beam and the cavity; general cavity model with external coupling (including an external generator if needed), used to describe the input cavity, idler cavities, and the output cavity, including the definition of beam loaded-cavity impedance. Although all these are conceptually straight-forward, they represent a fair amount of physics, and to derive some elements of the formalism from first principles requires excessive steps. Our approach will be to present a self-consistent set of equations to provide a mechanism that leads to a quantifiable description of klystron behavior; derivations for moderately complex formulas will be outlined, and a relatively complex derivation of the self-consistent set of equations can be found in the Appendix. 6 figs.

  19. CONDOR simulation of an 11.4-GHz traveling wave output cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Goren, Y.; Yu, D.

    1991-12-31

    The CONDOR code is used to simulate the cold test and the beam-induced microwave amplification of an 11.4-GHz, six-cell, disk-loaded, traveling wave cavity. Cold test simulation results are in agreement with a modified Slater`s theory. Power extraction at the output port is calculated by launching a train of Gaussian electron bunches through the structure. Results are consistent with recent relativistic klystron experiments using a similar TW output cavity. It is further shown that, depending on operating beam parameters, the power extraction efficiency can be maximized by modification of various cells in the TW structure.

  20. The Klynac: An Integrated Klystron and Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J. M.; Schwellenbach, D.

    2013-04-01

    The Klynac concept integrates an electron gun, a radio frequency (RF) power source, and a coupled-cavity linear accelerator into a single resonant system. The klystron is essentially a conventional klystron structure with an input cavity, some number of intermediate cavities and an output cavity. The accelerator structure is, likewise, a conventional on-axis coupled structure. The uniqueness is the means of coupling the klystron output cavity to the accelerator. The coupler is a resonant coupler rather than an ordinary transmission line. The geometry of such a system need not be coaxial. However, if the klystron and accelerator are coaxial we can eliminate the need for a separate cathode for the accelerator by injecting some of the klystron beam into the accelerator. Such a device can be made cylindrical which is ideal for some applications.

  1. The Klynac: An integrated klystron and linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, James M.; Schwellenbach, David; Meidinger, Alfred

    2013-04-19

    The Klynac concept integrates an electron gun, a radio frequency (RF) power source, and a coupled-cavity linear accelerator into a single resonant system. The klystron is essentially a conventional klystron structure with an input cavity, some number of intermediate cavities and an output cavity. The accelerator structure is, likewise, a conventional on-axis coupled structure. The uniqueness is the means of coupling the klystron output cavity to the accelerator. The coupler is a resonant coupler rather than an ordinary transmission line. The geometry of such a system need not be coaxial. However, if the klystron and accelerator are coaxial we can eliminate the need for a separate cathode for the accelerator by injecting some of the klystron beam into the accelerator. Such a device can be made cylindrical which is ideal for some applications.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Transient and Steady State Nonlinear Beam-Cavity Dynamics in High Power Klystrons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambre, Yadunath Bhagvantrao

    1988-03-01

    A 2-1over2 dimensional analysis of klystrons, assuming cylindrical space symmetry but retaining all velocity effects, is presented. The model handles all relativistic, electromagnetic, and non-linear effects. The klystron geometry is viewed as a conducting cylinder (the tube) to which are attached a number of resonant cavities at various locations. Within this tube, particle in cell plasma simulation techniques are used to model the electron beam dynamics and electromagnetic fields. The effects of the cavities are then "patched in" by the use of eigenmode expansions over the cavity geometries. These expansions reduce the effects of the cavity fields into relatively simple time varying boundary conditions on the tube. The plasma simulation in the tube is carried out using a number of "macroparticles," each representing many electrons and each obeying the equations of motion for an electron. A time centered cycloid fitting algorithm is used to move the particles. A time centered spectral method using Fourier series in z and Chebyschev polynomials in r is used to advance the fields. A non-uniform grid permits the use of FFT's to carry out the Chebyschev expansions. A method for finding time periodic solutions is also presented. This method will compute a qualitatively correct transient solution and yield a quantitatively correct steady state solution.

  3. Remote coupling between a probe and a superconducting klystron cavity for use in gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paula, L. A. N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Oliveira, N. F., Jr.

    2013-08-01

    In this work the main task was to measure the remote coupling between a probe and some niobium superconducting reentrant cavities for use in parametric transducers of gravitational wave detectors. The cavities were manufactured from RRR300 niobium and cryogenically tested to determine the electromagnetic coupling among other parameters. These cavities were also closed using a RRR300 niobium cover forming a narrow axial gap with the post top. A hole was made at the base opposite the cover in order to the probe reach the cavity. Generally, the critical coupling (β ≈ 1) is achieved with the probe inside the cavity. The mechanical connection of the probe with the transducer and the external circuit introduces an unwanted seismic noise in the transducer. The microstrip antennas have been traditionally employed to make a wireless connection. However, this study has demonstrated coupling factor β ≈ 1 with the probe moved away 4.0 mm from the cavity with a 3.0 mm diameter hole. Couplings with the probe moved away 1.0 mm and 7.0 mm from cavities with 1.5 mm and 3.5 mm diameter holes, respectively, have also been obtained. These results have revealed the influence of the hole diameter with the remote coupling between an electric field probe and the klystron mode of a superconducting reentrant cavity. Due to the practicalities, this effect may replace the microstrip antennas making it possible to implement high sensitivity parametric transducers.

  4. Design and 3D simulation of a two-cavity wide-gap relativistic klystron amplifier with high power injection

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Xianchen; Yang Jianhua; Zhang Jiande

    2012-08-15

    By using an electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code, an S-band two-cavity wide-gap klystron amplifier (WKA) loaded with washers/rods structure is designed and investigated for high power injection application. Influences of the washers/rods structure on the high frequency characteristics and the basic operation of the amplifier are presented. Generally, the rod structure has great impacts on the space-charge potential depression and the resonant frequency of the cavities. Nevertheless, if only the resonant frequency is tuned to the desired operation frequency, effects of the rod size on the basic operation of the amplifier are expected to be very weak. The 3-dimension (3-D) PIC simulation results show an output power of 0.98 GW corresponding to an efficiency of 33% for the WKA, with a 594 keV, 5 kA electron beam guided by an external magnetic field of 1.5 Tesla. Moreover, if a conductive plane is placed near the output gap, such as the electron collector, the beam potential energy can be further released, and the RF power can be increased to about 1.07 GW with the conversion efficiency of about 36%.

  5. Design and 3D simulation of a two-cavity wide-gap relativistic klystron amplifier with high power injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xianchen; Yang, Jianhua; Zhang, Jiande

    2012-08-01

    By using an electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code, an S-band two-cavity wide-gap klystron amplifier (WKA) loaded with washers/rods structure is designed and investigated for high power injection application. Influences of the washers/rods structure on the high frequency characteristics and the basic operation of the amplifier are presented. Generally, the rod structure has great impacts on the space-charge potential depression and the resonant frequency of the cavities. Nevertheless, if only the resonant frequency is tuned to the desired operation frequency, effects of the rod size on the basic operation of the amplifier are expected to be very weak. The 3-dimension (3-D) PIC simulation results show an output power of 0.98 GW corresponding to an efficiency of 33% for the WKA, with a 594 keV, 5 kA electron beam guided by an external magnetic field of 1.5 Tesla. Moreover, if a conductive plane is placed near the output gap, such as the electron collector, the beam potential energy can be further released, and the RF power can be increased to about 1.07 GW with the conversion efficiency of about 36%.

  6. Large-signal klystron simulations using KLSC

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Ferguson, P.

    1997-10-01

    The authors describe large-signal klystron simulations using the particle-in-cell code KLSC. This code uses the induced-current model to describe the steady-state cavity modulations and resulting rf fields, and advances the space-charge fields through maxwell`s equations. In this paper, an eight-cavity, high-power S-band klystron simulation is used to highlight various aspects of this simulation technique. In particular, there are specific issues associated with modeling the input cavity, the gain circuit, and the large-signal circuit (including the output cavities), that have to be treated carefully.

  7. Relativistic klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Azuma, O.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.

    1989-03-01

    Experimental work is underway by a SLAC-LLNL-LBL collaboration to investigate the feasibility of using relativistic klystrons as a power source for future high gradient accelerators. Two different relativistic klystron configurations have been built and tested to date: a high grain multicavity klystron at 11.4 GHz and a low gain two cavity subharmonic buncher driven at 5.7 GHz. In both configurations power is extracted at 11.4 GHz. In order to understand the basic physics issues involved in extracting RF from a high power beam, we have used both a single resonant cavity and a multi-cell traveling wave structure for energy extraction. We have learned how to overcome our previously reported problem of high power RF pulse shortening, and have achieved peak RF power levels of 170 MW with the RF pulse of the same duration as the beam current pulse. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Experimental Study of a Gyrotron with a Sectioned Klystron-Type Cavity Operated at Higher Cyclotron Harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandurkin, I. V.; Kalynov, Yu. K.; Savilov, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    We are planning to use extended cavities in order to excite gyrotrons with large electron orbits, which are operated at higher cyclotron harmonics in the terahertz frequency range. This is determined by both the weakness of the electron-wave interaction, and relatively low operating currents. Since the diffraction Q-factor of such cavities is high, a significant part of the highfrequency power produced by the electron beam is lost due to the ohmic loss in the cavity walls. As a way to solve this problem, we proposed a sectioned klystron-type cavity, where an extended length of the electron-wave interaction region can be combined with a relatively low diffraction Q-factor of the system. This work presents the results of the first experiment on a gyrotron with a sectioned cavity, where selective excitation of higher (second and third) cyclotron harmonics was observed in the terahertz frequency range (0 .55 and 0 .74 THz).

  9. Investigation of the effects of returning electrons on klystron performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roybal, William Thomas

    The klystron, as part of an RF distribution system for an accelerator, is one of the most important components contributing to the cost, reliability, and longevity of the overall system. Operating cost is one of the primary concerns for klystrons. Achieving high direct current (DC) to radio frequency (RF) conversion efficiency, free of instabilities is very important. There is uncertainty concerning the effects of returning electrons within the klystron and the impact that they have on klystron performance. The effects of reverse traveling electrons on klystron performance, such as efficiency, are poorly defined. Classical and even modern klystron design avoids the consideration of return electrons, and thus the effects have not been numerically analyzed and quantified. A better understanding of the electron beam-to-RF conversion process and the effects of return electrons within the klystron output circuit is needed. Accurate klystron modeling and simulation of return electron effects are required to better understand the implications of the problem. This analysis identifies the influence that returning electrons have on the overall beam dynamics and self-consistent cavity voltages. Closer examination of the harmonic content within the reverse beam current, along with comparison to the nominal klystron design, reveals the effects that reverse flowing electrons can have on klystron performance and design. The results of this work include a description of the electron beam dynamics for a beam decelerated in the output cavity, with separation occurring between forward and reverse electrons. Varying the output parameter of the klystron causes an unexpected response in return current quantity and bunching quality, yielding periodic correlations and responses to two-stream interaction.

  10. MM-wave cavity/klystron developments using deep x-ray lithography at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.J.; Decarlo, F.; Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.L.; Mancini, D.c.; Nassiri, A.; Lai, B.; Caryotakis, G.; Jongewaard, E.N.; Feinerman, A.D.; White, V.

    1998-03-31

    Recent microfabrication technologies based on LIGA (German acronym for Li thographe, G alvanoformung, und A bformung) have been applied to build high-aspect-ratio, metallic or dielectric, planar structures suitable for high frequency rf cavity structures. The cavity structures would be used as parts of linear accelerators, microwave undulators, and mm-wave amplifiers. The microfabrication process includes manufacturing of precision x-ray masks, exposure of positive resist by x-rays through the mask, resist development, and electroforming of the final microstructure. Prototypes of a 32-cell, 108-GHz constant impedance cavity and a 66-cell, 94-GHz constant-gradient cavity were fabricated using the synchrotron radiation sources at APS. Preliminary design parameters for a 91- GHz modulator klystron along with an overview of the new technology are discussed.

  11. MM-Wave Cavity/Klystron Developments Using Deep X-Ray Lithography at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.J.; Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.L.; Mancini, D.C.; Nassiri, A.; Lai, B.; Jongwaard, E.N.; Caryotakis, G.; Feinerman, A.D.; White, V.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-10-25

    Recent microfabrication technologies based on LIGA (German acronym for Lithographe, Galvanoformung, und Abformung) have been applied to build high-aspect-ratio, metallic or dielectric, planar structures suitable for high-frequency rf cavity structures. The cavity structures would be used as parts of linear accelerators, microwave undulators, and mm-wave amplifiers. The microfabrication process includes manufacturing of precision x-ray masks, exposure of positive resist by x-rays through the mask, resist development, and electroforming of the final microstructure. Prototypes of a 32-cell, 108-GHz constant impedance cavity and a 66-cell, 94-GHz constant-gradient cavity were fabricated using the synchrotron radiation sources at APS. Preliminary design parameters for a 91-GHz modulator klystron along with an overview of the new technology are discussed.

  12. Investigation of ultra-high sensitivity klystron cavity transducers for broadband resonant-mass gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, G. L.; Aguiar, O. D.; Barroso, J. J.; Tobar, M. E.

    2008-07-01

    Since the Stanford pioneering work of Paik in the 1970s, cryogenic resonant-mass gravitational wave detectors have used resonant transducers, which have the effect of increasing both the detector sensitivity and bandwidth. Now nanotechnology is opening new possibilities towards the construction of ultra-high sensitivity klystron cavity transducers. It might be feasible to construct TeraHz/micron parametric transducers in a near future. They would be so sensitive that there would be no need for multimode resonant transducers. The resonant-antenna would act as a broadband detector for gravitational waves. A spherical antenna, such as Schenberg or Mini-Grail, could add to this quality the advantage of wave position and polarity determination. Here we propose an extreme geometry for a re-entrant klystron cavity (df/dg ~ 1018 Hz/m, where f stands for the microwave pump frequency and g for variations in the cavity gap), obtaining a frequency response for the strain sensitivity of the Schenberg gravitational wave detector such that its bandwidth increases from 50 Hz (using the so-called resonant mode coupling) to ~4000 Hz when operating @ 20 mK, and, when compared to LIGO experimental curve, shows a competitive band of about 2000 Hz. We also study some of the technological complications that can be foreseen to design such a resonant cavity.

  13. A non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity with suppression of transverse-electromagnetic mode leakage in the triaxial klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Zumin; Zhang, Jun Zhong, Huihuang; Zhu, Danni; Qiu, Yongfeng

    2014-01-15

    The triaxial klystron amplifier is an efficient high power relativistic klystron amplifier operating at high frequencies due to its coaxial structure with large radius. However, the coaxial structures result in coupling problems among the cavities as the TEM mode is not cut-off in the coaxial tube. Therefore, the suppression of the TEM mode leakage, especially the leakage from the buncher cavity to the input cavity, is crucial in the design of a triaxial klystron amplifier. In this paper, a non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity is proposed to suppress the TEM mode leakage. The cold cavity analysis shows that the non-uniform three-gap buncher cavity can significantly suppress the TEM mode generation compared to a uniform three-gap buncher cavity. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the power leakage to the input cavity is less than 1.5‰ of the negative power in the buncher cavity and the buncher cavity can efficiently modulate an intense relativistic electron beam free of self-oscillations. A fundamental current modulation depth of 117% is achieved by employing the proposed non-uniform buncher cavity into an X-band triaxial amplifier, which results in the high efficiency generation of high power microwave.

  14. Self-consistent klystron simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Tallerico, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical analysis of large-signal klystron behavior based on general wave-particle interaction theory is presented. The computer code presented is tailored for the minimum amount of complexity needed in klystron simulation. The code includes self-consistent electron motion, space-charge fields, and intermediate and output fields. It also includes use of time periodicity to simplify the problem, accurate representation of the space-charge fields, accurate representation of the cavity standing-wave fields, and a sophisticated particle-pushing routine. In the paper, examples are given that show the effects of cavity detunings, of varying the magnetic field profile, of electron beam asymmetries from the gun, and of variations in external load impedance. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Development of a 50 MW Multiple Beam Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R Lawrence; Ferguson, Patrick; Read, Michael; Collins, George

    2007-10-31

    The goal of this program was to develop a 50 MW, multiple beam klystron at 11.424 GHz. The device uses eight electron guns and beam lines to achieve the required power level at a beam voltage of 190 kV, consistent with solid state power supplies. The electron gun operates with confined flow focusing, which is unique among current multiple beam sources, and allows operation at power levels consistent with producing 10s of MWs of pulsed RF power. The circuit consists of a ring resonator input cavity, eight sets of buncher cavities, and a ring resonator output cavity. The RF output power is coupled into four rectangular waveguides equally spaced around the klystron. Eight individual collectors absorb the spent beam power in each beam. The klystron operates in a solenoid. The principle challenges in the design included development of the beam optics using confined flow focusing, shaping of the magnetic field in the gun region to avoid beam spiraling, coupling input power equally to all eight beam lines from a single input, and obtaining the required frequency and Q in the output cavity. The mechanical design was particularly complex due to the large parts count, number of braze and weld joints, and close proximity of the beam lines that limited access. Addressing vacuum leaks and cold testing the complex structures was particularly troublesome. At the conclusion of the program, the klystron is experiencing several vacuum leaks that are under repair. Efforts will continue to seal and test the klystron.

  16. High efficiency SPS klystron design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalos, E. J.

    1980-01-01

    The most likely compact configuration to realize both high efficiency and high gain is a 5-6 cavity design focused by an electromagnet. An outline of a potential klystron configuration is given. The selected power output of 70 kW CW resulted from a maximum assumed operating voltage of 40 kV. The basic klystron efficiency cannot be expected to exceed 70-75% without collector depression. Although impressive gains were achieved in raising the basic efficiency from 50% to 70% or so with a multi-stage collector, the estimated efficiency improvement due to 5-stage collector at the 75% level is only about 8% resulting in an overall efficiency of about 83%.

  17. A ppM-focused klystron at X-band with a travelling-wave output structure

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.

    1994-10-01

    We have developed algorithms for designing disk-loaded travelling-wave output structures for X-band klystrons to be used in the SLAC NLC. We use either a four- or five-cell structure in a {pi}/2 mode. The disk radii are tapered to produce an approximately constant gradient. The matching calculation is not performed on the tapered structure, but rather on a coupler whose input and output cells are the same as the final cell of the tapered structure, and whose interior cells are the same as the penultimate cell in the tapered structure. 2-D calculations using CONDOR model the waveguide as a radial transmission line of adjustable impedance. 3-D calculations with MAFIA model the actual rectangular waveguide and coupling slot. A good match is obtained by adjusting the impedance of the final cell. In 3D, this requires varying both the radius of the cell and the width of the aperture. When the output cell with the best match is inserted in the tapered structure, we obtain excellent cold-test agreement between the 2-D and 3-D models. We use hot-test simulations with CONDOR to design a structure with maximum efficiency and minimum surface fields. We have designed circuits at 11.424 GHz for different perveances. At 440 kV, microperveance 1.2, we calculated 81 MW, 53 percent efficiency, with peak surface field 76 MV/m. A microperveance 0.6 design was done using a ppM stack for focusing. At 470 kV, 193 amps, we calculated 58.7 MW, 64.7 percent efficiency, peak surface field 62.3 MV/m. At 500 kV, 212 amps, we calculated 67.1 MW, 63.3 percent efficiency, peak surface field 66.0 MV/m.

  18. Klystron 'efficiency loop' for the ALS storage ring RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Julian, Jim; Baptiste, Kenneth

    2002-05-20

    The recent energy crisis in California has led us to investigate the high power RF systems at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in order to decrease the energy consumption and power costs. We found the Storage Ring Klystron Power Amplifier system operating as designed but with significant power waste. A simple proportional-integrator (PI) analog loop, which controls the klystron collector beam current, as a function of the output RF power, has been designed and installed. The design considerations, besides efficiency improvement, were to interface to the existing system without major expense. They were to also avoid the klystron cathode power supply filter's resonance in the loop's dynamics, and prevent a conflict with the existing Cavity RF Amplitude Loop dynamics. This efficiency loop will allow us to save up to 700 MW-hours of electrical energy per year and increase the lifetime of the klystron.

  19. A 12 GHZ 50 MW Klystron for Support of Accelerator Research

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, Daryl; Haase, Andrew; Jensen, Aaron; Jongewaard, Erik; Nantista, Christopher; Vlieks, Arnold; /SLAC

    2011-05-31

    A 12 GHz 50MW X-band klystron is under development at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Klystron Department. The klystron will be fabricated to support programs currently underway at three European Labs; CERN, PSI, and INFN Trieste. The choice of frequency selection was due to the CLIC RF frequency changing from 30 GHz to the European X-band frequency of 11.99 GHz in 2008. Since the Klystron Department currently builds 50MW klystrons at 11.424 GHz known collectively as the XL4 klystrons, it was deemed cost-effective to utilize many XL4 components by leaving the gun, electron beam transport, solenoid magnet and collector unchanged. To realize the rf parameters required, the rf cavities and rf output hardware were necessarily altered. Some improvements to the rf design have been made to reduce operating gradients and increase reliability. Changes in the multi-cell output structure, waveguide components, and the window will be discussed along with testing of the devices. Five klystrons known as XL5 klystrons are scheduled for production over the next two years.

  20. Triggering Klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Kelton D.; /Purdue U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    To determine if klystrons will perform to the specifications of the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) project, a new digital trigger controller is needed for the Klystron/Microwave Department Test Laboratory. The controller needed to be programmed and Windows based user interface software needed to be written to interface with the device over a USB (Universal Serial Bus). Programming the device consisted of writing logic in VHDL (VHSIC (Very High Speed Integrated Circuits) hardware description language), and the Windows interface software was written in C++. Xilinx ISE (Integrated Software Environment) was used to compile the VHDL code and program the device, and Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 was used to compile the C++ based Windows software. The device was programmed in such a way as to easily allow read/write operations to it using a simple addressing model, and Windows software was developed to interface with the device over a USB connection. A method of setting configuration registers in the trigger device is absolutely necessary to the development of a new triggering system, and the method developed will fulfill this need adequately. More work is needed before the new trigger system is ready for use. The configuration registers in the device need to be fully integrated with the logic that will generate the RF signals, and this system will need to be tested extensively to determine if it meets the requirements for low noise trigger outputs.

  1. An X-band overmoded relativistic klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Renzhen; Chen, Changhua; Deng, Yuqun; Li, Jiawei; Bai, Xianchen

    2014-11-01

    An X-band overmoded relativistic klystron is proposed, the operation mode of which is the TM02 mode. The drift tube could not cut off the TM01 mode; isolating the buncher cavity from the input cavity is achieved by introducing a sectional RF lossy material. Microwaves are extracted from the modulated electron beam using a cylindrical waveguide, rather than a coaxial waveguide; thereby, the output structure is significantly simplified. Particle-in-cell simulations show that microwaves with power of 1.28 GW and frequency of 9.30 GHz can be obtained, corresponding to an efficiency of 32% and relative bandwidth of about 8%.

  2. Klystron equalization for RF feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, P.

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of colliding beam storage rings support higher luminosities by significantly increasing the number of bunches and decreasing the spacing between respective bunches. The heavy beam loading requires large RF cavity detuning which drives several lower coupled bunch modes very strongly. One technique which has proven to be very successful in reducing the coupled bunch mode driving impedance is RF feedback around the klystron-cavity combination. The gain and bandwidth of the feedback loop is limited by the group delay around the feedback loop. Existing klystrons on the world market have not been optimized for this application and contribute a large portion of the total loop group delay. This paper describes a technique to reduce klystron group delay by adding an equalizing filter to the klystron RF drive. Such a filter was built and tested on a 500 kill klystron as part of the on going PEP-II R D effort here at SLAC.

  3. Klystron equalization for RF feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, P.

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of colliding beam storage rings support higher luminosities by significantly increasing the number of bunches and decreasing the spacing between respective bunches. The heavy beam loading requires large RF cavity detuning which drives several lower coupled bunch modes very strongly. One technique which has proven to be very successful in reducing the coupled bunch mode driving impedance is RF feedback around the klystron-cavity combination. The gain and bandwidth of the feedback loop is limited by the group delay around the feedback loop. Existing klystrons on the world market have not been optimized for this application and contribute a large portion of the total loop group delay. This paper describes a technique to reduce klystron group delay by adding an equalizing filter to the klystron RF drive. Such a filter was built and tested on a 500 kill klystron as part of the on going PEP-II R&D effort here at SLAC.

  4. Klystron-like cavity with mode transformation for high-harmonic terahertz gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandurkin, I. V.; Kalynov, Yu. K.; Savilov, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    A novel cavity scheme of a gyrotron is proposed and investigated. As it provides low Ohmic losses and high mode selectivity, it can be especially prospective for realization in gyrotrons operating in the THz frequency range. Numerical simulations show that it allows three-fold increase in the efficiency of the low-relativistic 500 GHz fourth-harmonic gyrotron as compared to conventional two-section scheme with modes transformation.

  5. Klystron-like cavity with mode transformation for high-harmonic terahertz gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bandurkin, I. V.; Kalynov, Yu. K.; Savilov, A. V.

    2013-01-15

    A novel cavity scheme of a gyrotron is proposed and investigated. As it provides low Ohmic losses and high mode selectivity, it can be especially prospective for realization in gyrotrons operating in the THz frequency range. Numerical simulations show that it allows three-fold increase in the efficiency of the low-relativistic 500 GHz fourth-harmonic gyrotron as compared to conventional two-section scheme with modes transformation.

  6. An improved suppression method of the transverse-electromagnetic mode leakage with two reflectors in the triaxial klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Zumin; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Huihuang; Zhang, Qiang; Zhu, Danni

    2014-07-15

    Suppression of the transverse-electromagnetic (TEM) mode leakage is crucial in the design of a triaxial klystron amplifier with high gain, because a small microwave leakage from the buncher or the output cavity could overwhelm the input signal with low power. In this paper, a specially designed reflector is proposed to suppress the TEM mode leakage, whose axial electric field is approximately zero at the beam radial position. Theoretical analysis indicates that the reflector introduces little influence on the normal modulation of the beam while keeping a high reflection coefficient. By using two such reflectors with different eigen frequencies located in front of the buncher cavity and the output cavity, respectively, an improved triaxial klystron amplifier is presented. The simulation results show that the reflectors substantially decrease the TEM mode leakage power and achieve very good isolation among the cavities. The improved triaxial klystron amplifier can operate normally with 10's kW microwave injection without self-oscillations.

  7. An improved suppression method of the transverse-electromagnetic mode leakage with two reflectors in the triaxial klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zumin; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Huihuang; Zhang, Qiang; Zhu, Danni

    2014-07-01

    Suppression of the transverse-electromagnetic (TEM) mode leakage is crucial in the design of a triaxial klystron amplifier with high gain, because a small microwave leakage from the buncher or the output cavity could overwhelm the input signal with low power. In this paper, a specially designed reflector is proposed to suppress the TEM mode leakage, whose axial electric field is approximately zero at the beam radial position. Theoretical analysis indicates that the reflector introduces little influence on the normal modulation of the beam while keeping a high reflection coefficient. By using two such reflectors with different eigen frequencies located in front of the buncher cavity and the output cavity, respectively, an improved triaxial klystron amplifier is presented. The simulation results show that the reflectors substantially decrease the TEM mode leakage power and achieve very good isolation among the cavities. The improved triaxial klystron amplifier can operate normally with 10's kW microwave injection without self-oscillations.

  8. 100 MW klystron development at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, A.E.; Callin, R.S.; Caryotakis, G.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Lee, T.G.; Wright, E.L.

    1991-05-01

    A klystron designed to operate at 11.4 GHz and 440 kV is presently SLAC's strongest rf power source candidate for the Next Linear Collider. It is expected to provide 100 MW of rf power with a pulse width of 1 microsecond. Many of the conventional tube technologies are being pushed to their limits. High electron beam power densities, rf electric gradients in cavity gaps and stresses on the ceramic rf output windows are among the most severe problems to be dealt with. This paper describes progress in the development of this device including results from single and double gap output cavities and various styles of rf output windows. 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Solar power satellite 50 kW VKS-7773 cw klystron evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larue, A. D.

    1977-01-01

    A test program for evaluating the electrical characteristics of a cw, 50 kW power output klystron at 2.45 GHz is described. The tube tested was an 8-cavity klystron, the VKS-7773 which had been in storage for seven years. Tests included preliminary testing of the tube, cold tests of microwave components, tests of the electromagnet, and first and second hot tests of the tube. During the second hot test, the tuner in the fifth cavity went down to air, preventing any further testing. Cause of failure is not known, and recommendations are to repair and modify the tube, then proceed with testing as before to meet program objectives.

  10. Analytical investigation of efficiency and performance limits in klystron amplifiers using multidimensional computer programs; multi-stage depressed collectors; and thermionic cathode life studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G.

    1980-01-01

    An extensive parametric investigation was performed of the extraction of energy in output gaps of klystron amplifiers, using 3-D computer programs. Due to complexity of the program which used a hydrodynamic, axially and radially deformable disk ring model and the resulting long computing time, the investigation was limited to the output gap, by far the most important and difficult part of the klystron interaction. Results show that, for a confined flow focused beam throughout the penultimate cavity, radial velocities remain very small and the beam is highly laminar. It was, therefore, concluded that possible errors resulting from treating only the output cavity in 3-D would remain small.

  11. Analysis of the SERSE Ion Output by Using Klystron-based or TWT-based Microwave generators

    SciTech Connect

    Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Consoli, F.; Galata, A.

    2005-03-15

    A set of measurements has been carried out in order to confirm the previously observed enhancement of the SERSE source performances, when microwaves are fed by means of a TWT generator instead of a Klystron generator, which has been commonly used. An increase in the extracted currents takes place for the highest charge states by using a TWT at 14 GHz, while higher extracted currents were obtained for every charge state by using a TWT at 18 GHz. A description of the experimental set-up and of the obtained results is given in the following. The data will be analysed and a qualitative explanation in terms of ECRIS plasma model will be proposed.

  12. The long-pulse, high-current relativistic klystron at 500 MW and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Fazio, M.V.; Haynes, W.B.; Carlsten, B.E.; Stringfield, R.M.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes the development of an L-band annular beam, high-current relativistic klystron for producing a peak power of 1 GW at a pulse length of 1 {mu}s. The tube consists of three cavities: the input cavity driven by a 300 kW magnetron, an idler cavity, and an output cavity. The tube has produced 475 MW and an energy per pulse of 160 J. The microwave output pulse terminates prematurely, before the peak power in the electron beam pulse is reached. The pulse shortening is believed to be caused by too high a voltage across the gap of the output cavity. The result is electron reflection in the output gap leading to beam disruption and high voltage breakdown across the gap. Current experimental results are presented with an emphasis on the design of output cavities for coupling microwave power from high current, very low impedance modulated electron beams.

  13. High power W-band klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, George; Scheitrum, Glenn; Jongewaard, Erik; Vlieks, Arnold; Fowkes, Randy; Li, Jeff

    1999-05-01

    The development of W-band klystrons is discussed. Modeling of the klystron performance predicts 100 kW output power from a single klystron. The permanent magnet focusing and small size of the circuit permit combination of multiple klystrons in a module. A six-klystron module in a single vacuum envelope is expected to produce 500 kW peak power and up to 5 kW average power. The critical issues in the W-band klystron development are the electron beam transport and the fabrication of the klystron circuit. Two microfabrication techniques, EDM and LIGA, are being evaluated to produce the W-band circuit. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. METHOD FOR STABILIZING KLYSTRONS

    DOEpatents

    Magnuson, D.W.; Smith, D.F.

    1959-04-14

    High-frequency oscillators for the generation of microwaves, particularly a system for stabilizing frequency-modulated klystron oscillators of the reflex type, are described. The system takos advantage of the fact that a change in oscillator frequency will alter the normal phase displacement between the cavity and its modulator, creating an error voltage which is utilized to regulate the frequency of the oscillator and stabilize it.

  15. 3-D simulations of multiple beam klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Smithe, David N.; Bettenhausen, Mike; Ludeking, Larry; Caryotakis, G.; Sprehn, Daryl; Scheitrum, Glenn

    1999-05-07

    The MAGIC3D simulation code is being used to assess the multi-dimensional physics issues relating to the design and operation of multiple beam klystrons. Investigations, to date, include a detailed study of the mode structure of the cavities in the 19-beam hexagonally packed geometry and a study of the velocity spread caused by the cavity mode's field profile. Some attempts to minimize this effect are investigated. Additional simulations have provided quantification of the beam loading Q in a dual input cavity, and optimization of a dual output cavity. An important goal of the simulations is an accurate picture of beam transport along the length of the MBK. We have quantified the magnitude and spatial variation of the beam-line space charge interactions within a cavity gap. Present simulations have demonstrated the transport of the beam through three cavities (the present limits of our simulation size) without difficulty; additional length simulations are expected. We have also examined unbalanced beam-line scenarios, e.g., one beam-line suppressed, and find little disturbance to the transport in individual cavity tests, with results for multiple cavity transport expected.

  16. Low Beam Voltage, 10 MW, L-Band Cluster Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Teryaev, V.; Yakovlev, V.P.; Kazakov, S.; Hirshfield, J.L.; /Yale U. /Omega-P, New Haven

    2009-05-01

    Conceptual design of a multi-beam klystron (MBK) for possible ILC and Project X applications is presented. The chief distinction between this MBK design and existing 10-MW MBK's is the low operating voltage of 60 kV. There are at least four compelling reasons that justify development at this time of a low-voltage MBK, namely (1) no pulse transformer; (2) no oil tank for high-voltage components and for the tube socket; (3) no high-voltage cables; and (4) modulator would be a compact 60-kV IGBT switching circuit. The proposed klystron consists of four clusters containing six beams each. The tube has common input and output cavities for all 24 beams, and individual gain cavities for each cluster. A closely related optional configuration, also for a 10 MW tube, would involve four totally independent cavity clusters with four independent input cavities and four 2.5 MW output ports, all within a common magnetic circuit. This option has appeal because the output waveguides would not require a controlled atmosphere, and because it would be easier to achieve phase and amplitude stability as required in individual SC accelerator cavities.

  17. Amplification studies of a two-cavity second harmonic gyroklystron with a mixed-mode output cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Calame, J.P.; Cheng, J.; Latham, P.E.; Lawson, W.; Hogan, B.; Matthews, H.W.; Flaherty, M.K.E.; Striffler, C.D. )

    1994-05-01

    The performance of a two-cavity second harmonic gyroklystron employing a short, mixed-mode output cavity with stepped radial transitions is described. The short cavity was employed to prevent low frequency spurious oscillations that can compete with the harmonic signal. The radial rf field profile in the cavity and the output radiation consisted of both the TE[sub 01] and TE[sub 02] circular waveguide modes. This device produced a peak output power of 20 MW at 19.782 GHz, with an efficiency of 23% and a gain of 26 dB. The nominal mode mixture of the radiated power during optimal operation was found to be about 60% TE[sub 02] and 40% TE[sub 01]. Variations from this ratio are observed at lower powers and are attributed to shifts in the cavity rf field profiles. Systematic studies of amplifier performance as a function of beam parameters and magnetic field profile are described. The sensitivities of output power production to changes in operating parameters are compared to results from earlier harmonic and fundamental gyroklystrons. The present device is found to be more stable to parasitic oscillations and less sensitive to variations in beam current and output cavity magnetic field than previous harmonic gyroklystrons that employed longer, smoothly transitioned cavities. However, both the peak power and efficiency in the present device are lower than the 30 MW at 28% efficiency obtained with the final smooth-cavity tube. The tradeoffs between the two output cavity concepts will be discussed.

  18. Theoretical and experimental research on multi-beam klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Yaogen; Peng Jun; Zhu Yunshu; Shi Shaoming

    1999-05-07

    Theoretical and experimental research work on multi-beam klystron (MBK) conducted in Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IECAS) is described in this paper. Research progress on Interaction between multi-electron beam and microwave electric field, multi-beam cavity, filter loaded double gap cavity broadband output circuit, multi-beam electron gun, and periodic reversal focusing system is presented. Performance and measurement results of five types of MBK are also given out. The key technical problems for present MBK are discussed in this paper.

  19. An X-band overmoded relativistic klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Renzhen; Chen, Changhua; Li, Jiawei; Bai, Xianchen; Deng, Yuqun

    2014-11-15

    An X-band overmoded relativistic klystron is proposed, the operation mode of which is the TM{sub 02} mode. The drift tube could not cut off the TM{sub 01} mode; isolating the buncher cavity from the input cavity is achieved by introducing a sectional RF lossy material. Microwaves are extracted from the modulated electron beam using a cylindrical waveguide, rather than a coaxial waveguide; thereby, the output structure is significantly simplified. Particle-in-cell simulations show that microwaves with power of 1.28 GW and frequency of 9.30 GHz can be obtained, corresponding to an efficiency of 32% and relative bandwidth of about 8%.

  20. The Triaxial Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Pasour, J.; Smithe, D.; Friedman, M.

    1999-05-01

    We describe a high-power, annular beam klystron, the Triaxial Klystron, that promises high efficiency at GW power levels and frequencies up to X band. Higher frequency operation should be possible at reduced power levels. The device consists of a thin annular electron beam propagating in an annular drift region, with cavity structures located inside and outside the beam. So long as the width of the drift region is less than half a wavelength (to cut off TM modes), the beam diameter can be as large as necessary to accommodate the required current and to reduce the RF surface fields to tolerable levels. Beam transport and stability are also facilitated in the annular channel. Simulations at X-band (using MRC{close_quote}s particle-in-cell code, MAGIC) show strong beam bunching and efficient energy extraction from specially designed radial cavity structures. Initial experiments at the Naval Research Laboratory have demonstrated transport of a 16-kA, 400-keV beam over a distance of {approximately}1 m with no evidence of instability or asymmetry. Strong bunching of such a beam has been produced at X band using a coaxially-driven input cavity and a multi-gap buncher cavity structure. The peak-to-peak modulated current amplitude from this simple structure exceeds the injected current amplitude and is stable throughout the 150 nsec pulse. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. W-band sheet beam klystron simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.R.; Caryotakis, G.; Fowkes, W.R.; Smithe, D.N.

    1999-05-01

    With the development of ever higher energy particle accelerators comes the need for compactness and high gradient, which in turn require very high frequency high power rf sources. Recent development work in W-band accelerating techniques has spurred the development of a high-power W-band source. Axisymmetric sources suffer from fundamental power output limitations (P{sub sat}{approximately}{lambda}{sup 2}) brought on by the conflicting requirements of small beam sizes and high beam current. The sheet beam klystron allows for an increase in beam current without substantial increase in the beam current density, allowing for reduced cathode current densities and focussing field strengths. Initial simulations of a 20:1 aspect ratio sheet beam/cavity interaction using the 3 dimensional particle-in-cell code Magic3D have demonstrated a 35{percent} beam-power to RF power extraction efficiency. Calculational work and numerical simulations leading to a prototype W-band sheet beam klystron will be presented, together with preliminary cold test structure studies of a proposed RF cavity geometry. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. W-Band Sheet Beam Klystron Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.R.; Caryotakis, G.; Fowkes, W.R.; Smithe, D.N.; /Mission Res., Newington

    2005-09-12

    With the development of ever higher energy particle accelerators comes the need for compactness and high gradient, which in turn require very high frequency high power rf sources. Recent development work in W-band accelerating techniques has spurred the development of a high-power W-band source. Axisymmetric sources suffer from fundamental power output limitations (P{sub sat} {approx} {lambda}{sup 2}) brought on by the conflicting requirements of small beam sizes and high beam current. The sheet beam klystron allows for an increase in beam current without substantial increase in the beam current density, allowing for reduced cathode current densities and focusing field strengths. Initial simulations of a 20:1 aspect ratio sheet beam/cavity interaction using the 3 dimensional particle-in-cell code Magic3D have demonstrated a 35% beam-power to RF power extraction efficiency. Calculational work and numerical simulations leading to a prototype W-band sheet beam klystron will be presented, together with preliminary cold test structure studies of a proposed RF cavity geometry.

  3. High power radial klystron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Arman, M.J.

    1995-11-01

    The advantages of the radial klystron amplifier over the conventional klystron amplifier have been reported by Arman et al. Briefly, the radial structure of this design allows for much smaller impedances and thus higher power, the beam-cavity coupling is stronger because the beam travels inside the cavity, and the source is much more compact because there is no need for external magnetic fields. Here the author reports on possible advantages of the radial klystron oscillator over the radial klystron amplifier. The amplifying nature of certain HPM sources is often mandated by the requirement for synchronization and phase-locking of a number of sources in specific applications. In situations where amplification is solely adhered to for the purpose of achieving higher powers, the oscillator will be a better choice if a mechanism can be found to grow the desired mode at the required frequency. By switching to the oscillator mode there will be no need for priming the cavity or maintaining the phase. This simplifies the design and reduces the operational and maintenance cost of the source. Here he reports that an oscillator version of the radial klystron is possible and in fact more suitable for many applications. The mechanism for exciting and growing the mode will be transit-time effects thus providing all the beneficial features of the transit-time oscillators. The complications due to the presence of thin foils in the radial design still persist and will be dealt with in subsequent works. Numerical simulations using the PIC codes MAGIC and SOS indicate the radial klystron oscillator is a viable and efficient means of rf generation.

  4. Sheet Beam Klystron Instability Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Jensen, A.; Li, Z.; Stupakov, G.; Adolphsen, C.; /SLAC

    2009-05-08

    Using the principle of energy balance we develop a 2D theory for calculating growth rates of instability in a two-cavity model of a sheet beam klystron. An important ingredient is a TE-like mode in the gap that also gives a longitudinal kick to the beam. When compared with a self-consistent particle-in-cell calculation, with sheet beam klystron-type parameters, agreement is quite good up to half the design current, 65 A; at full current, however, other, current-dependent effects come in and the results deviate significantly.

  5. Highly efficient and high output power of erbium doped fiber laser in a linear cavity configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awang, N. A.; Zulkifli, M. Z.; Norizan, S. F.; Harun, S. W.; Ghani, Z. A.; Ahmad, H.

    2010-10-01

    A simple Erbium Doped Fiber Laser (EDFL) in linear cavity configuration is reported. The cavity design is based on an FBG as a back reflector, and a loop back optical circulator with an output coupler as the front reflector. Different coupling ratios of the coupler are tested and 50: 50 provides the highest coupling output power of 22.06 dBm (160.7 mW). The pump power conversion efficiency is about 95% when pumping with two pump lasers at 1460 and 1490 nm with combined pumping power of 545 mW. The laser output has a measured linewidth of 0.0179 nm.

  6. Study of Cavity and Output Window for High Power Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaria, M. K.; Mukherjee, P.; Das, S.; Sinha, A. K.

    2011-02-01

    In this paper Eigen mode analysis has been carried out using Ansoft HFSS for high frequency 42, 120 and 140 GHz Gyrotron cavity. The design of RF window for 42 GHz, 200 kW Gyrotron has also been carried out using the Ansoft HFSS and CST microwave studio. In 42 GHz gyrotron double disc of diameter 85 mm and thickness 3.2 mm sapphire window and spacing (Coolant FC-75) of discs 2.5 mm has been used in the simulation. The return loss (S11) and transmission loss (S21) of the 42 GHz gyrotron window have been found -47.3 and -0.04 dB, respectively. The return loss and transmission loss of the S-band single disc sapphire window have also been found -27.3 and -0.07 dB, respectively at cylindrical waveguide length 33 mm. The simulated result has been validated through experimental results for pill-box S-band sapphire window.

  7. Periodic permanent magnet focused klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Patrick; Read, Michael; Ives, R Lawrence

    2015-04-21

    A periodic permanent magnet (PPM) klystron has beam transport structures and RF cavity structures, each of which has permanent magnets placed substantially equidistant from a beam tunnel formed about the central axis, and which are also outside the extent of a cooling chamber. The RF cavity sections also have permanent magnets which are placed substantially equidistant from the beam tunnel, but which include an RF cavity coupling to the beam tunnel for enhancement of RF carried by an electron beam in the beam tunnel.

  8. A simple method using MAFIA to calculate external Q values of waveguide-loaded cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageyama, Tatsuya

    1989-06-01

    A fundamental theory on waveguide-loaded cavities in the book of Microwave Electronics by Slater was applied to numerical calculation with MAFIA of the external Q value of a klystron output cavity. This method is also applicable to accelerating structures with slots for damping out higher modes as proposed for future linear colliders.

  9. Seeing Wave-Particle Superposition with Cavity Input-Output Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Rui

    2016-06-01

    We present an experimental protocol to implement quantum delay-choice experiment in the context of cavity input-output process. In our protocol, the single-atom is employed as ancillary qubit to test the wave-particle feature of a single photon. With the cavity input-output process, we show that the controlled phase shift gate between single-atom and single-photon can be naturally used to generate the controlled Hadamard gate, which thus allows us to construct the quantum circuit for realizing the quantum delay-choice experiment. We also demonstrate the photonic wavelike and particlelike states can be simultaneously observed in our platform. Our protocol may open a new prospect using cavity quantum electrodynamics system to study some counterintuitive fundamental phenomenons in quantum mechanics.

  10. Design of a wiggler-focused, sheet beam X band klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Miller, R.H.

    1987-02-01

    An X band klystron using a sheet beam and wiggler focusing was simulated using the 2 + 1/2 dimensional particle in cell code MASK. Simulation of the rf cavities was by means of the port approximation used in modelling of standard klystrons. The wigglers, which would need permanent magnets to achieve the required field strengths, were modelled using an idealized analytic expression with an exponential rise and a linear taper superimposed on a sinusoidal variation. Cavity locations and tunings were varied for maximum output power. Beam voltage and current were also varied to explore the effect on efficiency. Both an idealized laminar beam and a more realistic beam from a gun design code were studied. For a voltage of 200 kV and current of 20 amp per linear cm efficiencies of approximately 50% were calculated.

  11. Suppression of higher mode excitation in a high gain relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Jin, X.; Li, Z. H.; Tang, C. X.

    2012-02-01

    Suppressing higher mode excitation is very important in the high gain relativistic klystron amplifier because higher mode can seriously degrade klystron performance and cause pulse shortening. The mechanism of higher mode self-excitation is explored in the PIC simulation, and it is shown the coupling between cavities is the main cause of higher mode self-excitation. The coupling forms the positive feedback loop for higher mode to be excited just like that in the oscillator circuit. The formula for startup current of higher mode self-excitation is developed based on the coupling between cavities. And the corresponding methods are taken to avoid higher mode self-excitation. Finally, mode control is realized in the RKA with output power up to 1.02 GW when driven power is only few kilowatts.

  12. Apparatus makes klystron operating frequency adjustable from remote point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauss, R. C.

    1967-01-01

    Apparatus makes possible proper frequency adjustment in a receiver using a pump klystron for a traveling-wave master. It incorporates a tunable overcoupled cavity with irises of appropriate size to accomplish frequency spread over the desired range and to maintain the Q of the klystron circuit at the optimum value.

  13. High power operation of an X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhenbang; Huang, Hua; Jin, Xiao; Zhao, Yucong; He, Hu; Lei, Lurong; Chen, Zhaofu

    2013-11-15

    An X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier is designed in order to increase output microwave power and operating frequency of the amplifier tube. The experiment is performed on a Tesla-type accelerator. The amplifier is driven by an electron beam of 2.8 kA at 720 kV, and a microwave power of 30 kW and frequency of 9.384 GHz is injected into an input cavity by means of an external source, then a microwave power of over 800 MW is extracted, the amplifier gain is about 44 dB, and conversion efficiency is 40%. The experiment proves that output power of nearly GWs can be generated with the X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier driven by a kW-level input power.

  14. High power operation of an X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenbang; Huang, Hua; Jin, Xiao; Zhao, Yucong; He, Hu; Lei, Lurong; Chen, Zhaofu

    2013-11-01

    An X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier is designed in order to increase output microwave power and operating frequency of the amplifier tube. The experiment is performed on a Tesla-type accelerator. The amplifier is driven by an electron beam of 2.8 kA at 720 kV, and a microwave power of 30 kW and frequency of 9.384 GHz is injected into an input cavity by means of an external source, then a microwave power of over 800 MW is extracted, the amplifier gain is about 44 dB, and conversion efficiency is 40%. The experiment proves that output power of nearly GWs can be generated with the X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier driven by a kW-level input power.

  15. APS linac klystron and accelerating structure gain measurements and klystron PFN voltage regulation requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Sereno, N.S.

    1997-07-01

    This note details measurements of the APS positron linac klystron and accelerating structure gain and presents an analysis of the data using fits to simple mathematical models. The models are used to investigate the sensitivity of the energy dependence of the output positron beam to klystron parameters. The gain measurements are separated into two parts: first, the energy gains of the accelerating structures of the positron linac are measured as a function of output power of the klystron; second, the klystron output power is measured as a function of input drive power and pulse forming network (PFN) voltage. This note concentrates on the positron linac rf and its performance as it directly affects the energy stability of the positron beam injected into the positron accumulator ring (PAR). Ultimately it is important to be able to minimize beam energy variations to maximize the PAR accumulation efficiency.

  16. Controlled Phase Flip Gate and Its Application in Low-Q Cavities by Single-Photon Input-Output Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Qiong; Yang, Wan-Li; Kou, Su-Peng

    2012-08-01

    By employing an auxiliary cavity, we investigate the possibility to implement the conditional phase flip (CPF) gate on two atoms confined in separate low-Q cavities by single-photon input-output process, based on the Faraday rotation. This indicates a universal quantum computing available with sophisticated cavity QED techniques. As examples, we carry out generation of cluster states of distant atomic qubits and accomplish a teleportation based on Bell-state measurement in low-Q cavities.

  17. Halo formation in high-power klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Pakter, R.; Chen, C.

    1999-07-01

    Beam losses and radio-frequency (rf) pulse shortening are important issues in the development of high-power microwave (HPM) sources such as high-power klystrons and relativistic magnetrons. In this paper, the authors explore the formation and characteristics of halos around intense relativistic electron beams in a Periodic Permanent Magnet focusing klystron as well as in a uniform solenoidal focusing klystron. A self-consistent electrostatic model is used to investigate intense relativistic electron beam transport as an rf field induced mismatch between the electron beam and the focusing field develops. To model the effect of such mismatch in the PPM klystron experiment, they initialize the beam with an envelope mismatch. For zero canonical angular momentum and an initial mismatch of 100 percent, for example, the preliminary results show halo particles with a maximum radius extending up to several core radii at the rf output section. Transient effects and the influence of finite canonical angular momentum are being studied.

  18. Design and Construction of a 500 KW CW, 400 MHZ Klystron To Be Used As RF Power Source For LHC/RF Component Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Chris

    2003-05-05

    A 500 kW cw klystron operating at 400 MHz was developed and constructed jointly by CERN and SLAC for use as a high-power source at CERN for testing LHC/RF components such as circulators, RF absorbers and superconducting cavities with their input couplers. The design is a modification of the 353 MHz SLAC PEP-I klystron. More than 80% of the original PEP-I tube parts could thus be incorporated in the LHC test klystron which resulted in lower engineering costs as well as reduced development and construction time. The physical length between cathode plane and upper pole plate was kept unchanged so that a PEP-I tube focusing solenoid, available at CERN, could be re-used. With the aid of the klystron simulation codes JPNDISK and CONDOR, the design of the LHC tube was accomplished, which resulted in a tube with noticeably higher efficiency than its predecessor, the PEP-I klystron. The integrated cavities were redesigned using SUPERFISH and the output coupling circuit, which also required redesigning, was done with the aid of MAFIA. Details of the tube development and test results are presented.

  19. Design and Construction of a 500 kW CW, 400 MHz Klystron to be used as RF Power Source for LHC/RF Component Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frischholz, H.; Fowkes, W. R.; Pearson, C.

    1997-05-01

    A 500 kW CW klystron operating at 400 MHz was jointly developed and constructed by CERN and SLAC for use as a high power source at CERN for testing LHC/RF components such as circulators, RF absorbers and superconducting cavities with their input couplers. The design is a modification of the 353 MHz SLAC PEP-I klystron which resulted in lower engineering costs as well as reduced development and construction time. More than 80% of the original PEP-I tube parts could be incorporated in the LHC test klystron. The physical length between cathode plane and upper pole plate was kept unchanged so that a PEP-I tube focusing frame, available at CERN, could be re-used. With the aid of the klystron simulation codes JPNDISK and CONDOR, the design of the LHC tube was accomplished, which resulted in a tube with noticeably higher efficiency than its predecessor, the PEP-I klystron. The integrated cavities were redesigned by using SUPERFISH and the output coupling circuit, which also required redesigning, was done with the aid of MAFIA. Details of the tube development and test results are presented. Finally the set-up of the LHC/RF test stand and the features of its auxiliary high-power RF equipment, such as circulator and absorber, are described.

  20. Simulation of conditions for the maximal efficiency of decimeter-wave klystrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baikov, A. Yu.; Grushina, O. A.; Strikhanov, M. N.

    2014-03-01

    Using the mathematical model of electron beam transformation in a narrow tube developed by the authors and the KlypWin program suite, conditions for the maximal efficiency of decimeter-wave klystrons having from three to six amplification stages are simulated. Simulation is based on a real electron-optical system and real parameters of the cavities. It is shown that the maximal efficiency (across the load) is 83% for a four-cavity klystron, 86% for a five-cavity klystron, 88% for a six-cavity klystron, and 90% for a seven-cavity one. The electronic efficiency of the simulated seven-cavity klystron equals 94%, which implies the achievement of a global extremum.

  1. A high efficiency Ku-band radial line relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Fangchao; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhong, Huihuang; Zhang, Jun; Ju, Jinchuan

    2016-07-01

    To achieve the gigawatt-level microwave amplification output at Ku-band, a radial-line relativistic klystron amplifier is proposed and investigated in this paper. Different from the annular electron beam in conventional axial relativistic klystron amplifiers, a radial-radiated electron beam is employed in this proposed klystron. Owing to its radially spreading speciality, the electron density and space charge effect are markedly weakened during the propagation in the radial line drift tube. Additionally, the power capacity, especially in the output cavity, is enhanced significantly because of its large volume, which is profitable for the long pulse operation. Particle-in-cell simulation results demonstrate that a high power microwave with the power of 3 GW and the frequency of 14.25 GHz is generated with a 500 kV, 12 kA electron beam excitation and the 30 kW radio-frequency signal injection. The power conversion efficiency is 50%, and the gain is about 50 dB. Meanwhile, there is insignificant electron beam self-excitation in the proposed structure by the adoption of two transverse electromagnetic reflectors. The relative phase difference between the injected signals and output microwaves keeps stable after the amplifier saturates.

  2. Optimum signal-to-noise ratio in off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dyroff, Christoph

    2011-04-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) is investigated and compared to direct absorption spectroscopy using multipass absorption cells [tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS)]. Applying measured noise characteristics of a near-IR tunable diode laser and detector, it is shown that the optimum SNR is not generally reached at the highest effective absorption path length. Simulations are used to determine the parameters for maximized SNR of OA-ICOS. PMID:21478999

  3. Blue resonant-cavity light-emitting diode with half milliwatt output power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Pinghui S.; Chang, Chi-Chieh; Chen, Yu-Ting; Lin, Da-Wei; Wu, Chun Chia; He, Jhao Hang; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2016-03-01

    GaN-based resonant-cavity light-emitting diode (RCLED) has a circular output beam with superior directionality than conventional LED and has power scalability by using two-dimensional-array layout. In this work, blue RCLEDs with a top reflector of approximately 50% reflectance were fabricated and characterized. An output power of more than 0.5 mW per diode was achieved before packaging under room-temperature continuous-wave (CW) operation. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the emission spectrum was approximately 3.5 and 4.5 nm for 10- and 20-μm-diameter devices, respectively. And the peak wavelength as well as the FWHM remained stable at various currents and temperatures.

  4. High efficiency SPS klystron design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalos, E. J.

    1980-01-01

    The most likely compact configuration to realize both high efficiency and high gain (approx. 40 dB) is a 5-6 cavity design focused by an electromagnet. The basic klystron efficiency cannot be expected to exceed 70-75% without collector depression. It was estimated that the net benefit of a 5 stage collector over a 2 stage collector is between 1.5 and 3.5 kW per tube. A modulating anode is incorporated in the design to enable rapid shutoff of the beam current in case the r.f. drive should be removed.

  5. Spatial Resolution of Combined Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy with Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy for Atomic Oxygen Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Makoto; Nakajima, Daisuke

    2015-09-01

    For developments of thermal protection system, atomic oxygen plays important role. However, its measurement method has not been established because the pressure in front of TPS test materials is as high as a few kPa. Our group proposed combined wavelength modulation and integrated output spectroscopies based on the forbidden transition at OI 636 nm to measure the ground-state number densities. In this study, WM-ICOS system is developed and applied to a microwave oxygen plasma to evaluate measurable region. As a result, the estimated number density by ICOS could be measured as low as 1021 m21. For the condition, WM-ICOS was applied. The signal to noise ratio of the 2f signal was 40.4. Then, the sensitivity was improved about 26. This result corresponding to the measurement limit of the partial atomic oxygen pressure of 250 Pa. The sensitivity of WM-ICOS was found to enough to diagnose the shock layer in high enthalpy flows. However, the spatial resolution was as large as 8 mm. The size of the beam pattern depends on the cavity length, robust ness of the cavity and accuracy of the cavity alignment. In this presentation, the relationship among these parameters will be discussed.

  6. Klystron-linac combination

    DOEpatents

    Stein, W.E.

    1980-04-24

    A combination klystron-linear accelerator which utilizes anti-bunch electrons generated in the klystron section as a source of electrons to be accelerated in the accelerator section. Electron beam current is controlled by second harmonic bunching, constrictor aperture size and magnetic focusing. Rf coupling is achieved by internal and external coupling.

  7. Analytic investigation of efficiency and performance limits in klystron amplifiers using multidimensional computer programs; multi-stage depressed collectors; and thermionic cathode life studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G.

    1980-01-01

    Due to complexity of the program which used a hydrodynamic, axially and radially deformable disk-ring model and the resulting long computing time only the output gap was investigated. Results from independent studies were used to initiate the starting conditions for the electrons and the RF voltage using our program. Although this method of computation is less exact than processing the entire klystron interaction in 3-Dimensions it is shown that, for a confined flow focused throughout the penultimate cavity, radial velocities remain very small and the beam is highly laminar. It is concluded that possible errors resulting from treating only the output cavity in 3-D would remain small.

  8. A second report on the experimental progress of the one microsecond, one kilojoule per pulse L-band relativistic klystron at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, W.B.; Carlsten, B.E.; Faehl, R.J.; Fazio, M.V.; Kwan, T.J.T.; Stringfield, R.M.

    1994-02-01

    Work is continuing on a high-current relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA) with the goal of producing 1 kJ per pulse with a 1 {mu}s pulsewidth and a peak power of 1 GW. The three cavity tube has already produced pulses with more than 150 J and over 450 MW peak power. The original output cavity was thought to be limiting the performance, and a new cavity has been designed, built, and is now on-line and being conditioned up towards high power. Current experimental results are presented.

  9. Recent experimental results from a long-pulse J-band relativistic klystron amplifier developmental effort

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, K.G.; Crouch, D.D.; Sar, D.R.; Speciale, R.A.; Carlsten, B.E.; Fazio, M.V.; Haynes, W.B.; Stringfield, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    Recent experimental results, supporting simulations, and design modeling are presented from a developmental effort to a produce a long pulse ({approximately}1{mu}s) J-band (5.85-8.2 GHz) relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA) of the high current NRL genealogy. This RKA is designed to operate at approximately 6.6 GHz, with a desired RF output {approximately}700 MW. Conversion of electron beam energy to microwave energy is obtained by a mock magnetically insulated coaxial converter which, in various incarnations, can be made to be either a cavity gap extractor or an inverse cathode.

  10. 250-kW CW klystron amplifier for planetary radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, Reginald A.; Mizuhara, Albert

    1992-01-01

    The design, construction, and performance testing is described of two Varian klystrons, model VKX-7864A, which replaced the aging and less efficient VA-949J klystrons in the X band planetary radar transmitter on the Goldstone, CA, 70 meter antenna. The project was carried out jointly by the JPL and Varian Assoc. Output power was increased from 200 to 250 kW continuous wave per klystron, and full dc beam power is dissipated in the collector (it was not possible to operate the VA-949J klystrons without RF drive because of limited collector dissipation capability). Replacement were made with a minimum of transmitter modifciations. The planetary radar transmitter is now operating successfully with these two klystrons.

  11. Performance of a 150-MW S-band klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, D.; Phillips, R.M.; Caryotakis, G.

    1994-09-01

    As part of an international collaboration, the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) klystron group has designed, fabricated, and tested a 60-Hz, 3-{mu}s, 150-MW S-band klystron built for Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY). A test diode with a 535-kV, 700-A electron beam was constructed to verify the gun operation. The first klystron was built and successfully met design specifications. The 375-MW electron beam represents a new record for SLAC accelerator klystrons in terms of voltage, current, energy, and ruggedness of design. The rf output power is a 150% increase over the S-band tubes currently used in the two-mile-long linear accelerator at SLAC. This paper discusses design issues and experimental results of the diode and klystron.

  12. Mean life of klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sands, M.

    1985-10-30

    It would be useful to have the best possible estimate of this mean life-time of our new klystrons based on the most recent, available operating experience. A simple formula is given for this best estimate, based on the maximum likelihood method. This method also provides an indication of the reliability of the estimated lifetime. The results given here apply uniquely to a uniform klystron population for which we can assume that deaths occur randomly, and independently of the previous history (operating time) of any one klystron.

  13. Design and Operation of a 100 kW CW X-band Klystron for Spacecraft Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balkcum, Adam; Mizuhara, Al; Stockwell, Brad; Begum, Rasheda; Cox, Lydia; Forrest, Scott; Perrin, Mark; Zitelli, Lou; Hoppe, Dan; Britcliffe, Mike; Vodonos, Yakov; Liou, R. Roland; Stone, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    A 7.19 GHz klystron producing 100 kW CW of output power over 90 MHz of bandwidth has been designed and three klystrons manufactured for use in a new JPL/NASA transmitter for spacecraft communications. The klystron was fully characterized including its phase pushing figures.

  14. Adaptive control system for pulsed megawatt klystrons

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, Victor W.

    1992-01-01

    The invention provides an arrangement for reducing waveform errors such as errors in phase or amplitude in output pulses produced by pulsed power output devices such as klystrons by generating an error voltage representing the extent of error still present in the trailing edge of the previous output pulse, using the error voltage to provide a stored control voltage, and applying the stored control voltage to the pulsed power output device to limit the extent of error in the leading edge of the next output pulse.

  15. Phase noise and squeezing spectra of the output field of an optical cavity containing an interacting Bose–Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalafi, A.; Naderi, M. H.

    2016-07-01

    We present a theoretical study of the phase noise, intensity and quadrature squeezing power spectra of the transmitted field of a driven optical cavity containing an interacting one-dimensional Bose–Einstein condensate. We show how the pattern of the output power spectrum of the cavity changes due to the nonlinear effect of atomic collisions. Furthermore, it is shown that due to a one-to-one correspondence between the splitting of the peaks in the phase noise power spectrum of the cavity output field and the s-wave scattering frequency of the atom–atom interaction, one can measure the strength of interatomic interaction. In addition, we show how the atomic collisions affect the squeezing behavior of the output field.

  16. Effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on radio frequency output of a photonic band gap cavity gyrotron oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashutosh; Jain, P. K.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on the RF behavior of a metallic photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating at 35 GHz with TE041-like mode have been theoretically demonstrated. PBG cavity is used here to achieve a single mode operation of the overmoded cavity. The nonlinear time-dependent multimode analysis has been used to observe the beam-wave interaction behavior of the PBG cavity gyrotron, and a commercially available PIC code "CST Particle Studio" has been reconfigured to obtain 3D simulation results in order to validate the analytical values. The output power for this typical PBG gyrotron has been obtained ˜108 kW with ˜15.5% efficiency in a well confined TE041-like mode, while all other competing modes have significantly low values of power output. The output power and efficiency of a gyrotron depend highly on the electron beam parameters and velocity spread. The influence of several electron beam parameters, e.g., beam voltage, beam current, beam velocity pitch factor, and DC magnetic field, on the PBG gyrotron operations has been investigated. This study would be helpful in optimising the electron beam parameters and estimating accurate RF output power of the high frequency PBG cavity based gyrotron oscillators.

  17. Effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on radio frequency output of a photonic band gap cavity gyrotron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ashutosh; Jain, P. K.

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on the RF behavior of a metallic photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating at 35 GHz with TE{sub 041}–like mode have been theoretically demonstrated. PBG cavity is used here to achieve a single mode operation of the overmoded cavity. The nonlinear time-dependent multimode analysis has been used to observe the beam-wave interaction behavior of the PBG cavity gyrotron, and a commercially available PIC code “CST Particle Studio” has been reconfigured to obtain 3D simulation results in order to validate the analytical values. The output power for this typical PBG gyrotron has been obtained ∼108 kW with ∼15.5% efficiency in a well confined TE{sub 041}–like mode, while all other competing modes have significantly low values of power output. The output power and efficiency of a gyrotron depend highly on the electron beam parameters and velocity spread. The influence of several electron beam parameters, e.g., beam voltage, beam current, beam velocity pitch factor, and DC magnetic field, on the PBG gyrotron operations has been investigated. This study would be helpful in optimising the electron beam parameters and estimating accurate RF output power of the high frequency PBG cavity based gyrotron oscillators.

  18. The space-dependent model and output characteristics of intra-cavity pumped dual-wavelength lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jin-Qi; Dong, Yuan; Zhang, Feng-Dong; Yu, Yong-Ji; Jin, Guang-Yong; Liu, Li-Da

    2016-01-01

    The intra-cavity pumping scheme which is used to simultaneously generate dual-wavelength lasers was proposed and published by us and the space-independent model of quasi-three-level and four-level intra-cavity pumped dual-wavelength lasers was constructed based on this scheme. In this paper, to make the previous study more rigorous, the space-dependent model is adopted. As an example, the output characteristics of 946 nm and 1064 nm dual-wavelength lasers under the conditions of different output mirror transmittances are numerically simulated by using the derived formula and the results are nearly identical to what was previously reported.

  19. Tunable ultraviolet output from an intracavity frequency-doubled red vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastie, Jennifer E.; Morton, Lynne G.; Kemp, Alan J.; Dawson, Martin D.; Krysa, Andrey B.; Roberts, John S.

    2006-08-01

    An optically pumped red vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser with an AlInGaP gain region produced more than 1W of continuous-wave output power at a wavelength of 675nm. Frequency doubling in a beta-barium borate crystal placed at an intracavity beam waist generated 120mW of total output power at 338nm. Using an intracavity birefringent filter a second harmonic tuning range of ˜5nm was achieved.

  20. Development and Production of a 201 MHz, 5.0 MW Peak Power Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Aymar, Galen; Eisen, Edward; Stockwell, Brad; Begum, rasheda; Lenci, Steve; Eisner, Rick; Cesca, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Communications & Power Industries LLC has designed and manufactured the VKP-8201A, a high peak power, high gain, VHF band klystron. The klystron operates at 201.25 MHz, with 5.0 MW peak output power, 34 kW average output power, and a gain of 36 dB. The klystron is designed to operate between 1.0 MW and 4.5 MW in the linear range of the transfer curve. The klystron utilizes a unique magnetic field which enables the use of a proven electron gun design with a larger electron beam requirement. Experimental and predicted performance data are compared.

  1. FPGA-based klystron linearization implementations in scope of ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omet, M.; Michizono, S.; Matsumoto, T.; Miura, T.; Qiu, F.; Chase, B.; Varghese, P.; Schlarb, H.; Branlard, J.; Cichalewski, W.

    2015-04-01

    We report the development and implementation of four FPGA-based predistortion-type klystron linearization algorithms. Klystron linearization is essential for the realization of ILC, since it is required to operate the klystrons 7% in power below their saturation. The work presented was performed in international collaborations at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), USA and the Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Germany. With the newly developed algorithms, the generation of correction factors on the FPGA was improved compared to past algorithms, avoiding quantization and decreasing memory requirements. At FNAL, three algorithms were tested at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA), demonstrating a successful implementation for one algorithm and a proof of principle for two algorithms. The functionality of the algorithm implemented at DESY was demonstrated successfully in a simulation. Besides this, a proof of principle of an FPGA-based klystron and cavity simulator implemented at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Japan was demonstrated. Its purpose is to allow the development and test of digital LLRF control systems including klystron linearization algorithms when no actual klystron and cavity are available.

  2. FPGA-based klystron linearization implementations in scope of ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omet, M.; Michizono, S.; Matsumoto, T.; Miura, T.; Qiu, F.; Chase, B.; Varghese, P.; Schlarb, H.; Branlard, J.; Cichalewski, W.

    2014-12-01

    We report the development and implementation of four FPGA-based predistortion-type klystron linearization algorithms. Klystron linearization is essential for the realization of ILC, since it is required to operate the klystrons 7% in power below their saturation. The work presented was performed in international collaborations at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), USA and the Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Germany. With the newly developed algorithms, the generation of correction factors on the FPGA was improved compared to past algorithms, avoiding quantization and decreasing memory requirements. At FNAL, three algorithms were tested at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA), demonstrating a successful implementation for one algorithm and a proof of principle for two algorithms. The functionality of the algorithm implemented at DESY was demonstrated successfully in a simulation. Besides this, a proof of principle of an FPGA-based klystron and cavity simulator implemented at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Japan, was demonstrated. Its purpose is to allow the development and test of digital LLRF control systems including klystron linearization algorithms when no actual klystron and cavity are available.

  3. The 5K70SK automatically tuned, high power, S-band klystron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfinger, A.

    1977-01-01

    Primary objectives include delivery of 44 5K70SK klystron amplifier tubes and 26 remote tuner assemblies with spare parts kits. Results of a reliability demonstration on a klystron test cavity are discussed, along with reliability tests performed on a remote tuning unit. Production problems and one design modification are reported and discussed. Results of PAT and DVT are included.

  4. Quantum cascade laser-based integrated cavity output spectroscopy of exhaled nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurdy, M. R.; Bakhirkin, Y. A.; Tittel, F. K.

    2006-11-01

    A nitric oxide (NO) sensor employing a thermoelectrically cooled, continuous-wave, distributed feedback quantum cascade laser operating at 5.47 μm (1828 cm-1) and off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy was used to measure NO concentrations in exhaled breath. A minimum measurable concentration (3σ) of 3.6 parts-per-billion by volume (ppbv) of NO with a data-acquisition time of 4 s was demonstrated. Five prepared gas mixtures and 15 exhaled breath samples were measured with both the NO sensor and for intercomparison with a chemiluminescence-based NO analyzer and were found to be in agreement within 0.6 ppbv. Exhaled NO flow-independent parameters, which may provide diagnostic and therapeutic information in respiratory diseases where single-breath measurements are equivocal, were estimated from end-tidal NO concentration measurements collected at various flow rates. The results of this work indicate that a laser-based exhaled NO sensor can be used to measure exhaled nitric oxide at a range of exhalation flow rates to determine flow-independent parameters in human clinical trials.

  5. W-band LiGA fabricated klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Liqun

    2002-01-01

    Klystrino-W-band klystron was proposed by scientists at SLAC to satisfy recent applications in advanced accelerators, medical treatment, radars and communications. LiGA (a German acronym for lithographe, galvanoformung, and abformung) is introduced in the fabrication of klystrino for the first time in the history of microwave tube fabrication. The cold test experiments show that LiGA fabrication yields best surface smoothness compared with an alternative way EDM (Electrical Discharge Machining). Resultantly LiGA fabricated klystrino has the smallest wall loss which maximizes the circuit efficiency of the output structure. A multiple-gap coupled cavity is motivated to be employed as the klystrino output cavity for maximizing the efficiency. Klytrino is simulated by 1-D, 2-D and 3-D simulation codes. Particularly a complete klystrino is simulated intensively using 2-D MAGIC Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code either for beam absence or beam presence. Many simulation techniques are developed such as model transformation from 3-D to 2-D, circuit parameter simulation, dispersion characteristic analysis, pre bunched electron beam mode and so on. Klystrino, as a 3-D structure, is modeled by 3-D MAFIA for analyzing the cold circuit properties. 3-D MAGIC is explored to simulate klystrino for the actual structure analysis and actual beam interaction process observation.

  6. Spectral contaminant identifier for off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy measurements of liquid water isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Leen, J.; Berman, Elena S. F.; Gupta, Manish; Liebson, Lindsay

    2012-04-15

    Developments in cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry have made it possible to measure water isotopes using faster, more cost-effective field-deployable instrumentation. Several groups have attempted to extend this technology to measure water extracted from plants and found that other extracted organics absorb light at frequencies similar to that absorbed by the water isotopomers, leading to {delta}{sup 2}H and {delta}{sup 18}O measurement errors ({Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O). In this note, the off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) spectra of stable isotopes in liquid water is analyzed to determine the presence of interfering absorbers that lead to erroneous isotope measurements. The baseline offset of the spectra is used to calculate a broadband spectral metric, m{sub BB}, and the mean subtracted fit residuals in two regions of interest are used to determine a narrowband metric, m{sub NB}. These metrics are used to correct for {Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O. The method was tested on 14 instruments and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O was found to scale linearly with contaminant concentration for both narrowband (e.g., methanol) and broadband (e.g., ethanol) absorbers, while {Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H scaled linearly with narrowband and as a polynomial with broadband absorbers. Additionally, the isotope errors scaled logarithmically with m{sub NB}. Using the isotope error versus m{sub NB} and m{sub BB} curves, {Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O resulting from methanol contamination were corrected to a maximum mean absolute error of 0.93 per mille and 0.25 per mille respectively, while {Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O from ethanol contamination were corrected to a maximum mean absolute error of 1.22 per mille and 0.22 per mille . Large variation between instruments indicates that the sensitivities must be calibrated for each individual isotope analyzer. These results suggest that the

  7. Spectral contaminant identifier for off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy measurements of liquid water isotopes.

    PubMed

    Brian Leen, J; Berman, Elena S F; Liebson, Lindsay; Gupta, Manish

    2012-04-01

    Developments in cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry have made it possible to measure water isotopes using faster, more cost-effective field-deployable instrumentation. Several groups have attempted to extend this technology to measure water extracted from plants and found that other extracted organics absorb light at frequencies similar to that absorbed by the water isotopomers, leading to δ(2)H and δ(18)O measurement errors (Δδ(2)H and Δδ(18)O). In this note, the off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) spectra of stable isotopes in liquid water is analyzed to determine the presence of interfering absorbers that lead to erroneous isotope measurements. The baseline offset of the spectra is used to calculate a broadband spectral metric, m(BB), and the mean subtracted fit residuals in two regions of interest are used to determine a narrowband metric, m(NB). These metrics are used to correct for Δδ(2)H and Δδ(18)O. The method was tested on 14 instruments and Δδ(18)O was found to scale linearly with contaminant concentration for both narrowband (e.g., methanol) and broadband (e.g., ethanol) absorbers, while Δδ(2)H scaled linearly with narrowband and as a polynomial with broadband absorbers. Additionally, the isotope errors scaled logarithmically with m(NB). Using the isotope error versus m(NB) and m(BB) curves, Δδ(2)H and Δδ(18)O resulting from methanol contamination were corrected to a maximum mean absolute error of 0.93 [per thousand] and 0.25 [per thousand] respectively, while Δδ(2)H and Δδ(18)O from ethanol contamination were corrected to a maximum mean absolute error of 1.22 [per thousand] and 0.22 [per thousand]. Large variation between instruments indicates that the sensitivities must be calibrated for each individual isotope analyzer. These results suggest that the properly calibrated interference metrics can be used to correct for polluted samples and extend off-axis ICOS measurements of liquid water to include plant

  8. Spectral contaminant identifier for off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy measurements of liquid water isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brian Leen, J.; Berman, Elena S. F.; Liebson, Lindsay; Gupta, Manish

    2012-04-01

    Developments in cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry have made it possible to measure water isotopes using faster, more cost-effective field-deployable instrumentation. Several groups have attempted to extend this technology to measure water extracted from plants and found that other extracted organics absorb light at frequencies similar to that absorbed by the water isotopomers, leading to δ2H and δ18O measurement errors (Δδ2H and Δδ18O). In this note, the off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) spectra of stable isotopes in liquid water is analyzed to determine the presence of interfering absorbers that lead to erroneous isotope measurements. The baseline offset of the spectra is used to calculate a broadband spectral metric, mBB, and the mean subtracted fit residuals in two regions of interest are used to determine a narrowband metric, mNB. These metrics are used to correct for Δδ2H and Δδ18O. The method was tested on 14 instruments and Δδ18O was found to scale linearly with contaminant concentration for both narrowband (e.g., methanol) and broadband (e.g., ethanol) absorbers, while Δδ2H scaled linearly with narrowband and as a polynomial with broadband absorbers. Additionally, the isotope errors scaled logarithmically with mNB. Using the isotope error versus mNB and mBB curves, Δδ2H and Δδ18O resulting from methanol contamination were corrected to a maximum mean absolute error of 0.93 ‰ and 0.25 ‰ respectively, while Δδ2H and Δδ18O from ethanol contamination were corrected to a maximum mean absolute error of 1.22 ‰ and 0.22 ‰. Large variation between instruments indicates that the sensitivities must be calibrated for each individual isotope analyzer. These results suggest that the properly calibrated interference metrics can be used to correct for polluted samples and extend off-axis ICOS measurements of liquid water to include plant waters, soil extracts, wastewater, and alcoholic beverages. The general technique

  9. Scalable quantum computation via a coherent state input-output process in a low-Q cavity in the atom-cavity intermediate coupling region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Cong; Wang, Chuan; Wang, Tie-Jun; Zhang, Ru

    2013-12-01

    We propose a basic scheme to construct a hybrid controlled phase-flip (CPF) gate between a flying pulse qubit and a stationary atomic qubit, assisted by a cavity input-output process for a low-Q cavity in the atom-cavity intermediate coupling region. The qubits can be encoded on the coherent states and ground states of the single-trapped L-level atom, respectively. We present a theoretical model of the hybrid CPF gate, whose basic strategy is to control the reflectivity of the input coherent optical pulse to obtain a phase shift conditioned by the different internal atomic states by adjusting the parameters of the cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) system. The resulting basic scheme can be used to construct nonlocal gates between remote atomic qubits confined in spatially separated cavities, and also for the generation of an atomic cluster state. The performance and experimental feasibilities of the proposed scheme indicate that it is robust against practical noise and feasible with current technologies. Thus, our scheme is applicable for use in large-scale quantum computation.

  10. Dual-cavity mode converter for a fundamental mode output in an over-moded relativistic backward-wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jiawei; Huang, Wenhua; Xiao, Renzhen; Bai, Xianchen; Zhang, Yuchuan; Zhang, Xiaowei; Shao, Hao; Chen, Changhua; Zhu, Qi

    2015-03-16

    A dual-cavity TM{sub 02}–TM{sub 01} mode converter is designed for a dual-mode operation over-moded relativistic backward-wave oscillator. With the converter, the fundamental mode output is achieved. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the efficiency of beam-wave conversion was over 46% and a pureTM{sub 01} mode output was obtained. Effects of end reflection provided by the mode converter were studied. Adequate TM{sub 01} mode feedback provided by the converter enhances conversion efficiency. The distance between the mode converter and extraction cavity critically affect the generation of microwaves depending on the reflection phase of TM{sub 01} mode feedback.

  11. Mechanism of phase control in a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator by an input signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Renzhen; Song, Zhimin; Deng, Yuqun; Chen, Changhua

    2014-09-01

    Theoretical analyses and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are carried out to understand the mechanism of microwave phase control realized by the external RF signal in a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO). Theoretical calculations show that a modulated electron beam can lead the microwave field with an arbitrary initial phase to the same equilibrium phase, which is determined by the phase factor of the modulated current, and the difference between them is fixed. Furthermore, PIC simulations demonstrate that the phase of input signal has a close relation to that of modulated current, which initiates the phase of the irregularly microwave during the build-up of oscillation. Since the microwave field is weak during the early time of starting oscillation, it is easy to be induced, and a small input signal is sufficient to control the phase of output microwave. For the klystron-like RBWO with two pre-modulation cavities and a reentrant input cavity, an input signal with 100 kW power and 4.21 GHz frequency can control the phase of 5 GW output microwave with relative phase difference less than 6% when the diode voltage is 760 kV, and beam current is 9.8 kA, corresponding to a power ratio of output microwave to input signal of 47 dB.

  12. Mechanism of phase control in a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator by an input signal

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Renzhen; Song, Zhimin; Deng, Yuqun; Chen, Changhua

    2014-09-15

    Theoretical analyses and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are carried out to understand the mechanism of microwave phase control realized by the external RF signal in a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO). Theoretical calculations show that a modulated electron beam can lead the microwave field with an arbitrary initial phase to the same equilibrium phase, which is determined by the phase factor of the modulated current, and the difference between them is fixed. Furthermore, PIC simulations demonstrate that the phase of input signal has a close relation to that of modulated current, which initiates the phase of the irregularly microwave during the build-up of oscillation. Since the microwave field is weak during the early time of starting oscillation, it is easy to be induced, and a small input signal is sufficient to control the phase of output microwave. For the klystron-like RBWO with two pre-modulation cavities and a reentrant input cavity, an input signal with 100 kW power and 4.21 GHz frequency can control the phase of 5 GW output microwave with relative phase difference less than 6% when the diode voltage is 760 kV, and beam current is 9.8 kA, corresponding to a power ratio of output microwave to input signal of 47 dB.

  13. Continuous measurements of water vapor isotopic compositions using an integrated cavity output spectrometer: calibrations and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Caylor, K.; Dragoni, D.

    2009-04-01

    The 18O and 2H of water vapor can be used to investigate couplings between biological processes (e.g., photosynthesis or transpiration) and hydrologic processes (e.g., evaporation) and therefore serve as powerful tracers in hydrological cycles. A typical method for determining δ18O and δ2H fluxes in landscapes is a "Keeling Plot" approach, which uses field-collected vapor samples coupled with a traditional isotope ratio mass spectrometer to infer the isotopic composition of evapotranspiration. However, fractionation accompanying inefficient vapor trapping can lead to large measurement uncertainty and the intensive laboring involved in cold-trap make it almost impossible for continuous measurements. Over the last 3-4 years a few groups have developed continuous approaches for measuring δ18O and δ2H that use laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) to achieve accuracy levels similar to lab-based mass spectrometry methods. Unfortunately, most LAS systems need cryogenic cooling, constant calibration to a reference gas, and substantial power requirements, which make them unsuitable for long-term field deployment at remote field sites. In this research, we tested out a new LAS-based water vapor isotope analyzer (WVIA, Los Gatos Research, Inc, Mountain View, CA) based on Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (ICOS) and coupled this instrument with a flux gradient system. The WVIA was calibrated bi-weekly using a dew point generator and water with known δ18O and δ2H signatures. The field work was performed at Morgan-Monroe State Forest Ameriflux tower site (central Indiana) between August 8 and August 27, 2008. The combination method was able to produce hourly δ18O and δ2H fluxes data with reproducibility similar to lab-based mass spectrometry methods. Such high temporal resolution data were also able to capture signatures of canopy and bare soil evaporation to individual rainfall events. The use of the ICOS water vapor analyzer within a gradient system has the

  14. Generation of dissipative temporal solitons in ring self-oscillating systems with amplifier klystrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishin, S. V.; Dmitriev, B. S.; Skorokhodov, V. N.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P.

    2015-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental results are presented that show the possibility of forming periodic pulsed signal sequences with a profile similar to that of bright solitons in a ring self-oscillating system with an amplifier klystron. The generated pulse sequences are dissipative temporal solitons formed in the ring due to the establishment of balance both between gain and loss and between time dispersion and cubic nonlinearity of the klystron. Analytical solutions have been obtained for a generator model with a two-cavity amplifier klystron and an additional cavity resonator, which confirm the possibility of forming these dissipative structures.

  15. Relativistic klystrons for high-gradient accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G.A.; Aalberts, D.P.; Boyd, J.K.; Deis, G.A.; Houck, T.L.; Orzechowski, T.J.; Ryne, R.D.; Yu, S.S. ); Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.; Lavine, T.L.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Ruth, R.D.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W. ); Haimson, J.; Mecklen

    1990-09-05

    Experimental work is being performed by collaborators at LLNL, SLAC, and LBL to investigate relativistic klystrons as a possible rf power source for future high-gradient accelerators. We have learned how to overcome or previously reported problem of high power rf pulse shortening and have achieved peak rf power levels of 330 MW using an 11.4-GHz high-gain tube with multiple output structures. In these experiments the rf pulse is of the same duration as the beam current pulse. In addition, experiments have been performed on two short sections of a high-gradient accelerator using the rf power from a relativistic klystron. An average accelerating gradient of 84 MV/m has been achieved with 80-MW of rf power.

  16. High Power Amplifier Harmonic Output Level Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, R. M.; Hoppe, D. J.; Khan, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    A method is presented for the measurement of the harmonic output power of high power klystron amplifiers, involving coherent hemispherical radiation pattern measurements of the radiated klystron output. Results are discussed for the operation in saturated and unsaturated conditions, and with a waveguide harmonic filter included.

  17. CARM-klystron amplifier for accelerator applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Steven H.; Fliflet, Arne W.

    2001-05-01

    We consider the possibility of a cyclotron-autoresonance-maser (CARM) klystron configuration for accelerator applications as an alternative to the gyroklystron amplifier. The potential advantages, compared to gyroklystrons, include: 1) comparable efficiencies at lower values of the electron beam pitch ratio α, which should improve the beam quality and make the device substantially more stable against the excitation of parasitic mode, 2) operation far from cutoff, which should reduce the fields at cavity walls, allowing higher power operation, and 3) operation at lower magnetic fields for the same cyclotron harmonic number. However, there are two significant issues associated with the design of efficient, high-power CARMs. First, because of the higher value of kZ, compared to gyroklystrons, CARMs are substantially more sensitive to parallel velocity spread (pitch-angle spread). Second, conventional cavities support a variety of near-cutoff modes, which can compete with the CARM interaction. Therefore, one must consider either Bragg resonators or quasioptical cavity configurations.

  18. High-current relativistic klystron research at Physics International

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.S.; Harteneck, B.D.; Lam, S.K.; Parks, C.W.

    1994-12-31

    The authors are developing an L-band (1.3 GHz) high-current relativistic klystron (5 kA, 500 kV) for repetitive (200 pps) pulsing. They have designed and tested an extraction cavity that removes energy from the modulated electron beam and radiates it into an anechoic chamber in the TM{sub 01} mode. Peak power in excess of 450 MW has been measured for a single shot and 275 MW for a sustained burst producing 3.3 kW of average power. This klystron is now being transitioned to a long pulse (> 500 ns), single shot facility.

  19. W-Band Sheet Beam Klystron Design

    SciTech Connect

    Scheitrum, G.; Caryotakis, G.; Burke, A.; Jensen, A.; Jongewaard, E.a Krasnykh, A.; Neubauer, M.; Phillips, R.; Rauenbuehler, K.; /SLAC

    2011-11-11

    Sheet beam devices provide important advantages for very high power, narrow bandwidth RF sources like accelerator klystrons [1]. Reduced current density and increased surface area result in increased power capabi1ity, reduced magnetic fields for focusing and reduced cathode loading. These advantages are offset by increased complexity, beam formation and transport issues and potential for mode competition in the ovennoded cavities and drift tube. This paper will describe the design issues encountered in developing a 100 kW peak and 2 kW average power sheet beam k1ystron at W-band including beam formation, beam transport, circuit design, circuit fabrication and mode competition.

  20. Periodic permanent magnet development for linear collider X-band klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Jongewaard, E.; Phillips, R.

    1999-05-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) klystron group is currently designing, fabricating and testing 11.424 GHz klystrons with peak output powers from 50 to 75 MW at 1 to 2 {mu}s rf pulsewidths as part of an effort to realize components necessary for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). In order to eliminate the projected operational-year energy bill for klystron solenoids, Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing has been employed on our latest X-band klystron designs. A PPM beam tester has operated at the same repetition rate, voltage and average beam power required for a 75-MW NLC klystron. Prototype 50 and 75-MW PPM klystrons were built and tested during 1996 and 1997 which operate from 50 to 70 MW at efficiencies greater than 55{percent}. Construction and testing of 75-MW research klystrons will continue while the design and reliability is perfected. This paper will discuss the design of these PPM klystrons and the results of testing to date along with future plans for the development of a low-cost Design for Manufacture (DFM) 75-MW klystron and invitation for industry participation. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Periodic permanent magnet development for linear collider X-band klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Jongewaard, E.; Phillips, R.

    1999-05-07

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) klystron group is currently designing, fabricating and testing 11.424 GHz klystrons with peak output powers from 50 to 75 MW at 1 to 2 {mu}s rf pulsewidths as part of an effort to realize components necessary for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). In order to eliminate the projected operational-year energy bill for klystron solenoids, Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing has been employed on our latest X-band klystron designs. A PPM beam tester has operated at the same repetition rate, voltage and average beam power required for a 75-MW NLC klystron. Prototype 50 and 75-MW PPM klystrons were built and tested during 1996 and 1997 which operate from 50 to 70 MW at efficiencies greater than 55%. Construction and testing of 75-MW research klystrons will continue while the design and reliability is perfected. This paper will discuss the design of these PPM klystrons and the results of testing to date along with future plans for the development of a low-cost Design for Manufacture (DFM) 75-MW klystron and invitation for industry participation.

  2. FPGA Trigger System to Run Klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Darius; /Texas A-M /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    The Klystron Department is in need of a new trigger system to update the laboratory capabilities. The objective of the research is to develop the trigger system using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology with a user interface that will allow one to communicate with the FPGA via a Universal Serial Bus (USB). This trigger system will be used for the testing of klystrons. The key materials used consists of the Xilinx Integrated Software Environment (ISE) Foundation, a Programmable Read Only Memory (Prom) XCF04S, a Xilinx Spartan 3E 35S500E FPGA, Xilinx Platform Cable USB II, a Printed Circuit Board (PCB), a 100 MHz oscillator, and an oscilloscope. Key considerations include eight triggers, two of which have variable phase shifting capabilities. Once the project was completed the output signals were able to be manipulated via a Graphical User Interface by varying the delay and width of the signal. This was as planned; however, the ability to vary the phase was not completed. Future work could consist of being able to vary the phase. This project will give the operators in the Klystron Department more flexibility to run various tests.

  3. HIGH POWER RF DISTRIBUTION AND CONTROL FOR MULTI-CAVITY CRYOMODULE TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoon W; Broyles, Michael R; Crofford, Mark T; Geng, Xiaosong; Kim, Sang-Ho; Lee, Sung-Woo; Phibbs, Curtis L; Shin, Ki; Strong, William Herb

    2011-01-01

    Qualification of the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities in the cryomodules for the accelerating performance needs to be done through high power processing. A four-way waveguide power distribution system with independent control of power outputs has been being developed for testing the multi-cavity cryomodules for the SNS linac. SNS is employing two types of cryomodules: one type with three medium beta six-cell cavities and the other with four high beta six-cell cavities. The cryomodule that is being manufactured as a spare and the new crymodules for the future power upgrade project (PUP) of SNS will be high beta types. The four-way power distribution with independently controlled power outputs was considered useful for powering all cavities at the same time with a klystron amplifier since the SNS test facility was configured for a single klystron operation. Since certain interaction between the cavities under severe field emission was suspected in existing cryomodules, this type of high power test can be valuable for characterization of SRF cavities. By implementing a vector modulator at each arm of the splitting system, the amplitudes and the phases of RF outputs can be controlled independently. This paper discusses the present status of the development.

  4. Investigation of the operating characteristics of a 12-cavity rising-sun relativistic magnetron with diffraction output using particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Huang, Z.; Fuks, M. I.; Jiang, W.; Schamiloglu, E.; Liu, C.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the performance of a 12-cavity rising-sun relativistic magnetron with diffraction output (12-cavity rising-sun RMDO). Particle-in-cell simulations show an electronic efficiency of 70% for a gigawatt output power 12-cavity rising-sun RMDO with a transparent cathode operating in the π mode for an applied voltage of U ˜400 kV ±50 kV. When the RMDO is driven by the "F" transparent cathode, which is a coaxial transparent cathode, the axial leakage current can be reduced by about 50%.

  5. High sensitivity detection of NO2 employing off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy coupled with multiple line integrated spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Gottipaty N.; Karpf, Andreas

    2011-05-01

    We report on the development of a new sensor for NO2 with ultrahigh sensitivity of detection. This has been accomplished by combining off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) (which can provide large path lengths of the order of several km in a small volume cell) with multiple line integrated absorption spectroscopy (MLIAS) (where we integrate the absorption spectra over a large number of rotational-vibrational transitions of the molecular species to further improve the sensitivity). Employing an external cavity tunable quantum cascade laser operating in the 1601 - 1670 cm-1 range and a high-finesse optical cavity, the absorption spectra of NO2 over 100 transitions in the R-band have been recorded. From the observed linear relationship between the integrated absorption vs. concentration of NO2, we report an effective sensitivity of detection of 10 ppt for NO2. To the best of our knowledge, this is among the most sensitive levels of detection of NO2 to date. A sensitive sensor for the detection of NO2 will be helpful to monitor the ambient air quality, combustion emissions from the automobiles, power plants, aircraft and for the detection of nitrate based explosives (which are commonly used in improvised explosives (IEDs)). Additionally such a sensor would be valuable for the study of complex chemical reactions that undergo in the atmosphere resulting in the formation of photochemical smog, tropospheric ozone and acid rain.

  6. Wavelength switching in an optical klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, K.W.; Smith, T.I.

    1995-12-31

    A symmetric optical klystron consists of two identical undulator sections separated a dispersive section. For a device of a given length, an optical klystron is capable of producing much more bunching, and therefore more gain, than a traditional undulator. Another consequence of introducing dispersion between two undulator sections is that the overall spontaneous radiation pattern results from the interference between the two undulator sections, and as such resembles a standard undulator radiation pattern modulated by a sinusoidal interference term. The presence of several wavelength peaks in the spontaneous lineshape implies an equal number of peaks in the gain spectrum. If the strength of the dispersion section is adjusted to provide nearly equal gain on the two largest of these peaks, then they will compete, and the FEL may switch wavelengths based on noise, cavity length, or other perturbations. We provide the first observations of this behavior, using the FIREFLY system at the Stanford Picosecond FEL Center. In FIREFLY, relative wavelength switching by more than 3%--more than twice the laser linewidth-has been observed by varying dispersion section strength, while at intermediate points stable switching has also been observed as a function of cavity length.

  7. 1.2 MW klystron for Asymmetric Storage Ring B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Fowkes, W.R.; Caryotakis, G.; Doyle, E.

    1995-03-01

    A cw klystron operating at 476 MHz has been developed jointly by SLAC and Varian Associates. The unique set of characteristics of this tube were strongly guided by requirements of the fast feedback necessary to prevent oscillations of the storage ring beams caused by the detuned accelerating cavity. This requires a combination of bandwidth and short group delay within the klystron. The RF feedback stabilization scheme also requires amplitude modulation making it necessary to operate the klystron about 10% below saturation. Performance specifications and initial operating results are presented.

  8. The 250-kW CW klystron amplifier for planetary radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, R.; Mizuhara, A.

    1992-01-01

    The design, construction, and performance testing is described of two Varian klystrons, model VKX-7864A, which replaced the aging and less efficient VA-949J klystrons in the X band planetary radar transmitter on the Goldstone, CA, 70 meter antenna. The project was carried out jointly by the JPL and Varian Assoc. Output power was increased from 200 to 250 kW continuous wave per klystron, and full dc beam power is dissipated in the collector (it was not possible to operate the VA-949J klystrons without RF drive because of limited collector dissipation capability). Replacements were made with a minimum of transmitter modifications. The planetary radar transmitter is now operating successfully with these two klystrons.

  9. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of 300 GHz reflex klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, S. G.; Jin, Y. S.; Kim, J. I.; Kim, G. J.; Shon, C. H.

    2007-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell simulations of 300 GHz reflex klystrons are presented. 300 GHz electromagnetic wave generation in a resonant cavity is analyzed by using a 3D simulation model in which all the geometric parameters (such as the grid thickness, repeller shape, beam radius, etc.) are described. When an electron beam of an energy of 1.0 keV and a net current of 8.9 mA is used, the maximum electronic efficiency of energy transfer is observed when the gap transit angle is 0.7{pi} rad, and the efficiency saturates when the beam current is over 10 mA. Space charge forces produce a shift in the optimum repeller voltage. It is also shown that the effect of the beam temperature is not critical, even though the bunching wavelength of the electron beam is several times smaller than that in conventional vacuum electron devices. Our simulation results show that a microfabricated 300 GHz reflex klystron can directly generate electromagnetic waves with output power levels of several tens of milliwatts.

  10. Refocusing of the spent axisymmetric beam in klystron tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branch, G. M.; Neugebauer, W.

    1972-01-01

    Analytic methods were developed and employed to optimize the magnetic field transition region between the output interaction gap of a klystron and a multi-stage depressed potential electrostatic beam collector, in order to enhance the power conversion efficiency of satellite-borne broadcast transmitters. Permanent magnet structures were designed to provide the magnetic field distributions required to expand and recollimate the spent electron beam of the power amplifier klystron for proper entry into the beam collector. These design criteria for magnetic field distributions for expanding and recollimating spent-beam electrons for optimal entry into a multi-stage depressed potential collector are generally applicable to traveling-wave tubes as well as klystrons.

  11. 50-MW X-band klystron sources for the next generation of linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G.; Eppley, K.; Fant, K.; Fowkes, R.; Phillips, R.; Tantawi, S.; Vlieks, A.; Wright, E.

    1994-06-01

    The first in a new series of high-power pulsed klystrons has been tested with the following results: Frequency = 11.4 GHz, beam voltage = 415 kV, power output = 51 MW, pulse length = 1.5 {mu}s, and efficiency = 37%. Several tubes of this type will be used in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC. The rf performance of the klystron, which employs a standing-wave extended-interaction output circuit, is closely approximated by simulations performed with the SLAC CONDOR code. The same code predicts considerably higher efficiency, using a traveling-wave output circuit. A klystron with such a circuit will be constructed in the future. Another klystron is also planned in which beam confinement is accomplished by a periodic permanent magnet (PPM) stack, for which simulations also predict good performance.

  12. Development of X-band klystron technology at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G.

    1997-05-01

    The SLAC design for a 1-TeV collider (NLC) requires klystrons with a performance which is well beyond the state-of-the-art for microwave tubes in the United States or abroad. The electrical specifications for the NLC klystrons are not fully established, but they are approximately as follows: Frequency, 11.4 GHz; Peak Power, 75 MW; Pulse Length, 1.5 {mu}s; Repetition Rate, 180 Hz; Gain, 50 dB; Efficiency, (including beam focusing) 50%. SLAC is in the seventh year of a program to develop these klystrons. The choice of X-band as the operating frequency, along with the sheer size of the NLC, have resulted in some new, most demanding standards for the klystrons which may power this future machine. These are related to the overall efficiency required, to the high rf gradients that must be supported at the output circuit without vacuum breakdown, and to the manufacturing cost of the 5,000-10,000 klystrons needed for the collider.

  13. Klystron Linearizer for Use with 1.2 MW 476 MHz Klystrons in PEP-II RF Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.; Mastorides, T.; Teytelman, D.; Van Winkle, D.; Zhou, Y.; Gallo, A.; /Frascati

    2005-06-15

    The direct and comb loop feedback around the RF cavities in PEP-II is critical in reducing longitudinal instabilities driven by the cavity impedance. The non-linear 1.2 MW klystron is in the signal path for these feedback loops. As a result, the effective small-signal gain of the klystron at 85% saturation reduces the impedance control by factors of 5 to 20 as compared to a linear power amplifier. A klystron linearizer circuit has been developed which operates in series with the power amplifier and acts to equalize the small and large signal gains through the combination. The technique must implement a 1 MHz linear control bandwidth over roughly 15 dB of RF signal level variation. The dynamics of this system is operating point dependent, and the channel must have dynamic gain compensation to keep the linearity compensation loop stable over changes in operating point. The design of this non-linear signal processing channel (incorporating RF and DSP techniques) and measured results from full-power klystron testing are presented.

  14. High-peak-power optically-pumped AlGaInAs eye-safe laser with a silicon wafer as an output coupler: comparison between the stack cavity and the separate cavity.

    PubMed

    Wen, C P; Tuan, P H; Liang, H C; Tsou, C H; Su, K W; Huang, K F; Chen, Y F

    2015-11-30

    An intrinsic silicon wafer is exploited as an output coupler to develop a high-peak-power optically-pumped AlGaInAs laser at 1.52 μm. The gain chip is sandwiched with the diamond heat spreader and the silicon wafer to a stack cavity. It is experimentally confirmed that not only the output stability but also the conversion efficiency are considerably enhanced in comparison with the separate cavity in which the silicon wafer is separated from other components. The average output power obtained with the stack cavity was 2.02 W under 11.5 W average pump power, corresponding to an overall optical-to-optical efficiency of 17.5%; the slope efficiency was 18.6%. The laser operated at 100 kHz repetition rate and the pulse peak power was 0.4 kW. PMID:26698707

  15. Simulation of pulse shortening in a relativistic klystron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Verboncoeur, J.P.; Mardahl, P.J.; Cartwright, K.L.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1996-12-31

    The relativistic klystron is a strong candidate for a high power microwave source for a number of applications, including accelerators and electronic warfare. In this work, the authors simulate a high power, high perveance relativistic klystron oscillator using a 2d PIC-MCC code. The experimental klystron is currently operating as an injection-locked oscillator at 1.25--1.35 GHz, with up to 1 GW rms output power for a 100 ns pulse. The beam voltage is 500 kV, with current of 10 kA, and a beam pulse length of 300 ns. Experimental evidence indicates the klystron behavior is azimuthally symmetric. Of particular interest for this device is the shortening of the rf pulse compared to the current pulse, which may be related to plasma formation near the extractor gap. Various gases liberated form the porous graphite beam dump may reach substantial pressures locally. The authors investigate the formation of plasma due to photoionization and electron impact ionization of the gas constituents, and its impact on the rf power output. The simulations are compared to the experimental data where available.

  16. Advanced Klystrons for High Efficiency Accelerator Systems - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Read, Michael; Ives, Robert Lawrence

    2014-03-26

    This program explored tailoring of RF pulses used to drive accelerator cavities. Simulations indicated that properly shaping the pulse risetime to match accelerator cavity characteristics reduced reflected power and increased total efficiency. Tailoring the pulse requires a high power, gridded, klystron to shape the risetime while also controlling the beam current. The Phase I program generated a preliminary design of a gridded electron gun for a klystron producing 5-10 MW of RF power. This required design of a segmented cathode using Controlled Porosity Reservoir cathodes to limit power deposition on the grid. The program was successful in computationally designing a gun producing a high quality electron beam with grid control. Additional analysis of pulse tailoring indicated that technique would only be useful for cavity drive pulses that were less than approximately 2-3 times the risetime. Otherwise, the efficiency gained during the risetime of the pulse became insignificant when considering the efficiency over the entire pulse. Consequently, it was determined that a Phase II program would not provide sufficient return to justify the cost. Never the less, other applications for a high power gridded gun are currently being pursued. This klystron, for example, would facilitate development inverse Comptom x-ray sources by providing a high repetition rate (10 -100 kHz) RF source.

  17. Multi-stage Depressed Collectors (MDC) for efficiency improvements of UHF broadcast klystrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G.

    1982-01-01

    The consumed primary power is reduced and the efficiency of traveling wave tubes is raised through the use of depressed collectors which passively convert potential energy into electric energy. Efficiency was kept with constant within a 3 dB range while the output power varied by 10 dB. Aspects to be considered in transferring this technology to UHF klystrons are the electron energy spectrum of the klystron and the magnitude of the injection angle required.

  18. Cavities

    MedlinePlus

    ... The tooth may hurt even without stimulation (spontaneous toothache). If irreversible damage to the pulp occurs and ... To detect cavities early, a dentist inquires about pain, examines the teeth, probes the teeth with dental instruments, and may take x-rays. People should ...

  19. Optical klystron SASE at FERMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penco, G.; Allaria, E. M.; De Ninno, G.; Ferrari, E.; Giannessi, L.

    2015-05-01

    The optical klystron enhancement to a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free electron laser (FEL) has been deeply studied in theory and in simulations. In this FEL scheme, a relativistic electron beam passes through two undulators, separated by a dispersive section. The latter converts the electron-beam energy modulation produced in the first undulator in density modulation, thus enhancing the free-electron laser gain. We report the first experiment that has been carried out at the FERMI facility in Trieste, of enhancement to a SASE FEL by using the optical klystron scheme. XUV photons have been produced with an intensity several orders of magnitude larger than in pure SASE mode. The impact of the uncorrelated energy spread of the electron beam on the optical klystron SASE performance has been also investigated.

  20. Mid-Infrared Quantum Cascade Laser Based Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy for Biogenic Nitric Oxide Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhirkin, Yury A.; Kosterev, Anatoliy A.; Roller, Chad; Curl, Robert F.; Tittel, Frank K.

    2004-04-01

    Tunable-laser absorption spectroscopy in the mid-IR spectral region is a sensitive analytical technique for trace-gas quantification. The detection of nitric oxide (NO) in exhaled breath is of particular interest in the diagnosis of lower-airway inflammation associated with a number of lung diseases and illnesses. A gas analyzer based on a continuous-wave mid-IR quantum cascade laser operating at ~5.2 µm and on off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) has been developed to measure NO concentrations in human breath. A compact sample cell, 5.3 cm in length and with a volume of less than 80 cm3, that is suitable for on-line and off-line measurements during a single breath cycle, has been designed and tested. A noise-equivalent (signal-to-noise ratio of 1) sensitivity of 10 parts in 10 9 by volume (ppbv) of NO was achieved. The combination of ICOS with wavelength modulation resulted in a 2-ppbv noise-equivalent sensitivity. The total data acquisition and averaging time was 15 s in both cases. The feasibility of detecting NO in expired human breath as a potential noninvasive medical diagnostic tool is discussed.

  1. Quantum input-output theory for optical cavities with arbitrary coupling strength: Application to two-photon wave-packet shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymer, M. G.; McKinstrie, C. J.

    2013-10-01

    We develop quantum-optical input-output theory for resonators with arbitrary coupling strength, and for input fields whose spectrum can be wider than the cavity free-spectral range, while ensuring that the field-operator commutator relations in space-time variables are correct. The cavity-field commutator exhibits a series of space-time “echoes,” representing causal connections of certain space-time points by light propagation. We apply the theory to two-photon wave-packet shaping by cavity reflection, which displays a remarkable illustration of dispersion cancellation. We also show that the theory is amenable to inclusion of intracavity absorbing and emitting atoms, allowing, for example, dissipative losses within the cavity to be incorporated in a quantum mechanically correct way.

  2. Tm3+-doped silica fiber laser output at 1.94μm with multi-mode FBG as cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hanbin; Jing, Tao; Zhang, Yunjun

    2008-11-01

    An all-fiber LD-clad-pumped Tm-doped fiber laser was reported, and the CW maximal output power reached 24W at nearly 1.94µm. The homemade double-clad Tm3+-doped fiber had a demission of 25/250µm with the core NA 0.13 and inner-clad NA 0.46. A matched passive multi-mode FBG acted as the front cavity. The cavity was build-up by the high reflectivity FBG and fiber end Fresnel reflectivity. The all-fiber scheme was build-up by splicing the pigtail fiber, FBG fiber and Tm3+-doped fiber. Cooling by the water, the 56% high slope efficiency was achieved and threshold was 6.4W, respected to the launched pump power. When the output power was less-than 3W, the output laser was single-peak operating at 1936.4 nm with a very narrow linewidth (50 pm) laser output. Increasing the launched pump power, the output laser wavelength grew to 3~4 peaks. The multimode fiber Bragg grating (FBG) transmission spectrum was also measured with a matched 82cm Nufern Tm3+-doped fiber as fluorescent sources. With the dichroic and the FBG building up cavity, the output laser characteristics were also investigated. Because the multi-mode FBG reflectivity was not very high, both ends of the fiber laser had laser output power, and the ratio was nearly 10:1. As we know, it was the first time to report the multi-mode FBG all-fiber laser. Under this simple Tm3+-doped fiber laser scheme, we estimated that the maximal output power could reach several ten watts.

  3. Design of a Ku band miniature multiple beam klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Ayan Kumar; Pal, Debasish; Saini, Anil; Kant, Deepender; Saha, Sukalyan; Joshi, Lalit Mohan

    2016-03-01

    The design of a miniature multiple beam klystron (MBK) working in the Ku-band frequency range is presented in this article. Starting from the main design parameters, design of the electron gun, the input and output couplers and radio frequency section (RF-section) are presented. The design methodology using state of the art commercial electromagnetic design tools, analytical formulae as well as noncommercial design tools are briefly presented in this article.

  4. PPM focused X-band klystron development at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Eppley, K.; Phillips, R.M.

    1996-07-01

    X-band klystrons capable of 50 MW and utilizing Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing are undergoing design and fabrication at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The klystron development is part of an effort to realize components necessary for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The first klystron to be tested this year has a 0.6 microK beam at 465 kV, a 5 cells traveling wave output structure and a predicted efficiency of 63%. A 465 kV, 190 A beam stick with 12 periods of PPM focusing has recently operated to verify the gun optics and transmission of the beam in the absence of rf bunching. Beam transmission greater than 99.8% has been measured. Design and simulation of the beam stick and klystron are discussed, along with performance of the beam stick under confined flow and shielded conditions.

  5. Experimental study on parasitic mode suppression using FeSiAl in relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zehai

    2015-03-01

    Experimental study of parasitic mode suppression using electromagnetic attenuate material FeSiAl in an S-band Relativistic Klystron Amplifier (RKA) is presented in this paper. The FeSiAl powder is coated and sintered onto the inner surface of a drift tube which locates between the input and the middle cavity of the RKA. Cold tests show that the attenuate rate of the tube against parasitic mode TE11 is about 50%. Experiments carried out on the Torch-01 accelerator present that the tube is effective in suppressing the parasitic mode. Two typical outputs are obtained. When the diode voltage is on a moderate level, the RKA operates well and the parasitic mode is totally suppressed. The pulse length of the High Power Microwave (HPM) almost equals the electron beam pulse length and the HPM average output power is about 300 MW, with a power efficiency of 10%. When the diode voltage is on a higher level, the output power and efficiency rise but the parasitic mode oscillation occurred and the pulse length is shortened. By contrast, the parasitic mode oscillation is too strong for the RKA to operate normally with un-sintered drift tube. The experimental study implies that FeSiAl is effective in suppressing the parasitic mode oscillation in a certain extent. However, total suppression needs a deeper attenuate rate and further investigation.

  6. Experimental study on parasitic mode suppression using FeSiAl in Relativistic Klystron Amplifier.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zehai

    2015-03-01

    Experimental study of parasitic mode suppression using electromagnetic attenuate material FeSiAl in an S-band Relativistic Klystron Amplifier (RKA) is presented in this paper. The FeSiAl powder is coated and sintered onto the inner surface of a drift tube which locates between the input and the middle cavity of the RKA. Cold tests show that the attenuate rate of the tube against parasitic mode TE11 is about 50%. Experiments carried out on the Torch-01 accelerator present that the tube is effective in suppressing the parasitic mode. Two typical outputs are obtained. When the diode voltage is on a moderate level, the RKA operates well and the parasitic mode is totally suppressed. The pulse length of the High Power Microwave (HPM) almost equals the electron beam pulse length and the HPM average output power is about 300 MW, with a power efficiency of 10%. When the diode voltage is on a higher level, the output power and efficiency rise but the parasitic mode oscillation occurred and the pulse length is shortened. By contrast, the parasitic mode oscillation is too strong for the RKA to operate normally with un-sintered drift tube. The experimental study implies that FeSiAl is effective in suppressing the parasitic mode oscillation in a certain extent. However, total suppression needs a deeper attenuate rate and further investigation. PMID:25832258

  7. Experimental study on parasitic mode suppression using FeSiAl in relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zehai

    2015-03-15

    Experimental study of parasitic mode suppression using electromagnetic attenuate material FeSiAl in an S-band Relativistic Klystron Amplifier (RKA) is presented in this paper. The FeSiAl powder is coated and sintered onto the inner surface of a drift tube which locates between the input and the middle cavity of the RKA. Cold tests show that the attenuate rate of the tube against parasitic mode TE{sub 11} is about 50%. Experiments carried out on the Torch-01 accelerator present that the tube is effective in suppressing the parasitic mode. Two typical outputs are obtained. When the diode voltage is on a moderate level, the RKA operates well and the parasitic mode is totally suppressed. The pulse length of the High Power Microwave (HPM) almost equals the electron beam pulse length and the HPM average output power is about 300 MW, with a power efficiency of 10%. When the diode voltage is on a higher level, the output power and efficiency rise but the parasitic mode oscillation occurred and the pulse length is shortened. By contrast, the parasitic mode oscillation is too strong for the RKA to operate normally with un-sintered drift tube. The experimental study implies that FeSiAl is effective in suppressing the parasitic mode oscillation in a certain extent. However, total suppression needs a deeper attenuate rate and further investigation.

  8. Klystron Gun Arcing and Modulator Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S

    2004-05-04

    The demand for 500 kV and 265 amperes peak to power an X-Band klystron brings up protection issues for klystron faults and the energy dumped into the arc from the modulator. This situation is made worse when more than one klystron will be driven from a single modulator, such as the existing schemes for running two and eight klystrons. High power pulsed klystrons have traditionally be powered by line type modulators which match the driving impedance with the load impedance and therefore current limit at twice the operating current. Multiple klystrons have the added problems of a lower modulator source impedance and added stray capacitance, which converts into appreciable energy at high voltages like 500kV. SLAC has measured the energy dumped into klystron arcs in a single and dual klystron configuration at the 400 to 450 kV level and found interesting characteristics in the arc formation. The author will present measured data from klystron arcs powered from line-type modulators in several configurations. The questions arise as to how the newly designed solid-state modulators, running multiple tubes, will react to a klystron arc and how much energy will be dumped into the arc.

  9. Watt-level, mid-infrared output from a BaWO(4) external-cavity Raman laser at 2.6  μm.

    PubMed

    Kuzucu, Onur

    2015-11-01

    An external-cavity Raman laser with a BaWO(4) crystal is reported to generate a high-brightness, mid-infrared output at 2.6 μm. An actively Q-switched Ho:YAG laser at 2.097 μm is used as the pump source. The first Stokes output from the Raman laser reached 1.35 W with a near-diffraction-limited beam quality. Pulse widths as short as 8.5 ns are measured at a repetition rate of 5 kHz. Maximum conversion efficiency with respect to the incident pump power is measured as 14%. This simplified external-cavity configuration facilitates the realization of Raman-shifted sources within the water absorption window, using fixed and tunable Tm- and Ho-doped solid-state and fiber lasers. PMID:26512523

  10. A theory of the two-beam klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Han S.

    1993-08-01

    A theoretical model is developed for the two-beam klystron, where two concentric annular electron beams propagate through a grounded conducting tube. The beams premodulated at the first cavity enter the second cavity, exciting it. The induced voltage at the second cavity returns a part of the inner beam toward the first cavity, establishing a mutual communication between two cavities. The in-phase condition of the return current is obtained in terms of the intercavity distance. The maximum current-modulation condition at the second cavity is also obtained. These two conditions determine an optimum intercavity distance. The oscillation behavior of the first cavity is investigated, including influence of the intercavity distance on the induced gap voltage appearing on the cavity opening. The relationship between the induced voltage and the modulated return current in the opening is found from an equivalent circuit representation of the cavity impedance. The boundary between the oscillator and amplifier regions is described in the parameter space defined by the normalized return-current strength h and intercavity distance represented by the phase angle α. In the amplifier region (h sin α<1), the amplification occurs only for a narrow range of the phase angle α. The induced voltage grows exponentially in the oscillator region satisfying h sin α≳1. Introducing a nonlinear saturation term into the return current, the induced voltage is bounded in the oscillator operation.

  11. The two-beam accelerator and the relativistic klystron power source

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1988-04-01

    This paper discusses the concept of a two-beam accelerator. Two versions are discussed; one employing a free electron laser, the second employing a branched beam sent through ''transfer cavities'' as in a klystron. 14 refs., 26 figs., 1 tab. (LSP)

  12. Measuring hourly 18O and 2H fluxes in a mixed hardwood forest using an integrated cavity output spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Caylor, K.; Dragoni, D.

    2008-12-01

    The 18O and 2H of water vapor can be used to investigate couplings between biological processes (e.g., photosynthesis or transpiration) and hydrologic processes (e.g., evaporation) and therefore serve as powerful tracers in hydrological cycles. A typical method for determining δ18O and δ2H fluxes in landscapes is a 'Keeling Plot' approach, which uses field-collected vapor samples coupled with a traditional isotope ratio mass spectrometer to infer the isotopic composition of evapotranspiration. However, fractionation accompanying inefficient vapor trapping can lead to large measurement uncertainty and the intensive laboring involved in cold-trap make it almost impossible for continuous measurements. Over the last 3-4 years a few groups have developed continuous approaches for measuring δ18O and δ2H that use laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) to achieve accuracy levels similar to lab-based mass spectrometry methods. Unfortunately, most LAS systems need cryogenic cooling, constant calibration to a reference gas, and substantial power requirements, which make them unsuitable for long-term field deployment at remote field sites. In this research, we tested out a new LAS--based water vapor isotope analyzer (WVIA, Los Gatos Research, Inc, Mountain View, CA) based on Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (ICOS) and coupled this instrument with a flux gradient system. The WVIA was calibrated bi- weekly using a dew point generator and water with known δ18O and δ2H signatures. The field work was performed at Morgan-Monroe State Forest Ameriflux tower site (central Indiana) between August 8 and August 27, 2008. The combination method was able to produce hourly δ18O and δ2H fluxes data with reproducibility similar to lab-based mass spectrometry methods. Such high temporal resolution data were also able to capture signatures of canopy and bare soil evaporation to individual rainfall events. The use of the ICOS water vapor analyzer within a gradient system has the

  13. Current Status of the Next Linear Collider X-Band Klystron Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G.; Haase, A.A.; Jongewaard, E.N.; Pearson, C.; Sprehn, D.W.; /SLAC

    2005-05-09

    Klystrons capable of driving accelerator sections in the Next Linear Collider (NLC) have been developed at SLAC during the last decade. In addition to fourteen 50 MW solenoid-focused devices and a 50 MW Periodic Permanent Magnet focused (PPM) klystron, a 500 kV 75 MW PPM klystron was tested in 1999 to 80 MW with 3 {micro}s pulses, but very low duty. Subsequent 75 MW prototypes aimed for low-cost manufacture by employing reusable focusing structures external to the vacuum, similar to a solenoid electromagnet. During the PPM klystron development, several partners (CPI, EEV and Toshiba) have participated by constructing partial or complete PPM klystrons. After early failures during testing of the first two devices, SLAC has recently tested this design (XP3-3) to the full NLC specifications of 75 MW, 1.6 {micro}s pulse length, and 120 Hz. This 14.4 kW average power operation came with an efficiency of 50%. The XP3-3 average and peak output power, together with the focusing method, arguably makes it the most advanced high power klystron ever built anywhere in the world. Design considerations and test results for these latest prototypes will be presented.

  14. Final Report 200 MW L-Band Annular Beam Klystron for Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Read, Michael; Ferguson, Patrick; Ives, Lawrence; Song, Liqun; Carlsten, Bruce; Fazio, Michael

    2009-02-11

    This program developed a 200 MW, 1.3 GHz, Annular Beam Klystron (ABK) for accelerator systems. An ABK provides lower impedance than a conventional klystron, making it possible to produce higher RF powers with lower voltages. With a higher power per unit, fewer klystrons would be required for a large accelerator. Lower voltage also simplifies and reduces the cost of the power supply system. Both features will significantly lower the cost of an RF system. This device operates at 475 kV. The klystron uses a magnetron injection gun producing 1100 A in one microsecond pulses. Power is extracted into fundamental rectangular waveguide through two output windows. The predicted gain is approximately 45 dB with estimated efficiency of 45%. The klystron was assembled, but no facility was available for testing. Consequently, no high power performance measurements are available. Because the assembled klystron is approximately 15 feet long, it was disassembled for storage. It can be reassembled should a use materialize.

  15. Simultaneous 13C/12C and (18)O/(16)O isotope ratio measurements on CO2 based on off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jost, Hans-Jürg; Castrillo, Antonio; Wilson, H William

    2006-03-01

    A prototype off-axis integrated cavity output spectrometer (OA-ICOS) utilizing two identical cavities together with a near-infrared (1.63 microm) external cavity tunable diode laser is described. The two-cavity design-one for a reference gas and one for a sample gas-takes advantage of classical double-beam infrared spectrometer characteristics in reducing uncertainties due to laser scan or power instabilities and major temperature variations by a factor of three or better compared with a single-cavity scheme. This is the first OA-ICOS instrument designed to determine 13C/12C and (18)O/(16)O ratios from CO2 rotation/vibration fine structure in three different combination bands. Preliminary results indicate that at 0.8 Hz a precision of 3.3 and 2.8 per thousand is obtained for delta13C and delta(18)O, respectively, over a period of 10 h and a pure CO2 gas sample at 26 hPa. By averaging 100 spectra over a subset of the data, we achieved a precision of 1.6 and 0.8 \\permil\\ for delta13C and delta(18)O, respectively. PMID:16500753

  16. An immersed field cluster klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Eppley, K.R.

    1989-08-01

    Future linear colliders have a need for high power, high frequency, and short-pulse radio frequency sources. The proposed ''cluster klystron'' should give over 1 GW of 12 GHz radio frequency power, can employ direct current or a long high-voltage pulse, but can be gated to give pulses down to a few tens of nanoseconds. The device consists of 42 parallel 100 A channels. Each channel is fed from an individual magnetron-type gun employing a common 50 kV mod-anode. The beams are accelerated to 400 kV in common dc accelerating gaps and fed into the 42 separate klystron channels. Focusing of all channels is achieved by a single overall 4 kG magnetic field. Simulations of expected performance suggest that the efficiency could be above 70%. 10 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Hardware upgrade for klystrons in the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Jobe, R.K.; Browne, M.J.; Slattery, K.P.

    1985-05-01

    The control and monitoring of the klystrons in the first third of the SLAC linear accelerator has been commissioned, and a program to complete installation by summer 1985 is in progress. A general overview of the new control system for SLAC klystrons is presented along with a detailed description of the Modulator Klystron Support Unit. The MKSU contains all the devices necessary to interface klystron monitoring and control to the SLC control system through a dedicated intelligent CAMAC module. Controlled devices include RF phase and drive controls, the high power modulator status, associated RF signals, waterflow and magnet controls.

  18. Mid-infrared, external cavity BaWO4 Raman laser at 2602 nm with 1.25-W output power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzucu, Onur

    2016-03-01

    An external cavity BaWO4 Raman source pumped by a Q-switched Ho:YAG laser is demonstrated. Watt-level average output power is generated at the first Stokes wavelength of 2602 nm. Output pulse width as short as 8.5 ns was measured at a repetition rate of 5 kHz. Near-diffraction limited beam quality is observed (M2≈1.2). This simplified Raman laser configuration can harness the high average power levels offered by Thulium- and Holmium-doped solid-state and fiber lasers to generate fixed-wavelength and tunable output at 2.3-2.8 μm interval.

  19. Lasing-Polarization-Dependent Output from Orthogonal Waveguides in High-Index-Contrast Subwavelength Grating Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunemi, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Kawaguchi, Hitoshi

    2013-09-01

    We propose a high-index-contrast subwavelength grating vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (HCG-VCSEL) incorporating a polarization-independent HCG coupled with two orthogonal in-plane output waveguides and numerically investigate the optical output characteristics from the waveguides using a three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method. The light coupled more strongly to the waveguide in the direction perpendicular to the polarization of the resonant mode than to that in the parallel direction. The extinction ratio between the waveguides was 11.9, indicating that the output waveguide can be switched by changing the lasing polarization. The propagating modes in the strongly and weakly coupled waveguides were the TE and TM modes, respectively.

  20. Increasing output power of an 850 MHz tetrode with a floating-deck modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, D.; Friedrichs, C.

    1990-01-01

    Designers of high-power amplifiers generally regard the region above 300 MHz as a domain dominated by velocity-modulated (klystron/TWT) devices. However, as the power requirements diminish, there are attractive alternatives. The high-power 850-MHz requirements of the ground test accelerator (GTA) program can be filled by 1-MW klystrons, but it would be more efficient to use a lower-power device for a 50-kW requirement. To meet the 850-MHz medium-power requirements, Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing an 850-MHz tetrode amplifier. These amplifiers will provide rf power to the momentum compactor and bunch rotator cavities of the GTA. Available tubes provide only a limited safety margin for a low-risk design at the power levels and duty factor required for GTA cavities. At 850 MHz, the output power capability of available tubes is reduced because of transit time effects and limited anode voltage holdoff. Pulsing the anode of the output tetrode amplifier will allow higher output power with minimum design risk. A floating-deck modulator acts as a high-voltage/high-current switch, so voltage is applied to the anode of the gridded tube only during the rf pulse. The anode voltage holdoff capability of the tube is substantially enhanced by operating in this mode. This paper will describe the design of the floating deck modulator and its impact on the design risk of the 850-MHz tetrode amplifier.

  1. Design and development of a 6 MW peak, 24 kW average power S-band klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, L.M.; Meena, Rakesh; Nangru, Subhash; Kant, Deepender; Pal, Debashis; Lamba, O.S.; Jindal, Vishnu; Jangid, Sushil Kumar; Chakravarthy, D.P.; Dixit, Kavita

    2011-07-01

    A 6 MW peak, 24 kW average power S-band Klystron is under development at CEERI, Pilani under an MoU between BARC and CEERI. The design of the klystron has been completed. The electron gun has been designed using TRAK and MAGIC codes. RF cavities have been designed using HFSS and CST Microwave Studio while the complete beam wave interaction simulation has been done using MAGIC code. The thermal design of collector and RF window has been done using ANSYS code. A Gun Collector Test Module (GCTM) was developed before making actual klystron to validate gun perveance and thermal design of collector. A high voltage solid state pulsed modulator has been installed for performance valuation of the tube. The paper will cover the design aspects of the tube and experimental test results of GCTM and klystron. (author)

  2. Development of a 402.5 MHz 140 kW Inductive Output Tube

    SciTech Connect

    R. Lawrence Ives; Michael Read, Robert Jackson

    2012-05-09

    This report contains the results of Phase I of an SBIR to develop a Pulsed Inductive Output Tube (IOT) with 140 kW at 400 MHz for powering H-proton beams. A number of sources, including single beam and multiple beam klystrons, can provide this power, but the IOT provides higher efficiency. Efficiencies exceeding 70% are routinely achieved. The gain is typically limited to approximately 24 dB; however, the availability of highly efficient, solid state drivers reduces the significance of this limitation, particularly at lower frequencies. This program initially focused on developing a 402 MHz IOT; however, the DOE requirement for this device was terminated during the program. The SBIR effort was refocused on improving the IOT design codes to more accurately simulate the time dependent behavior of the input cavity, electron gun, output cavity, and collector. Significant improvement was achieved in modeling capability and simulation accuracy.

  3. Klystron Cluster Scheme for ILC High Power RF Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, Christopher; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2009-07-06

    We present a concept for powering the main linacs of the International Linear Collider (ILC) by delivering high power RF from the surface via overmoded, low-loss waveguides at widely spaced intervals. The baseline design employs a two-tunnel layout, with klystrons and modulators evenly distributed along a service tunnel running parallel to the accelerator tunnel. This new idea eliminates the need for the service tunnel. It also brings most of the warm heat load to the surface, dramatically reducing the tunnel water cooling and HVAC requirements. In the envisioned configuration, groups of 70 klystrons and modulators are clustered in surface buildings every 2.5 km. Their outputs are combined into two half-meter diameter circular TE{sub 01} mode evacuated waveguides. These are directed via special bends through a deep shaft and along the tunnel, one upstream and one downstream. Each feeds approximately 1.25 km of linac with power tapped off in 10 MW portions at 38 m intervals. The power is extracted through a novel coaxial tap-off (CTO), after which the local distribution is as it would be from a klystron. The tap-off design is also employed in reverse for the initial combining.

  4. Development status of an intense beam klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, P.D.; Lemke, R.W.; Hendricks, K.J.; Arman, M.J.; Bowers, L.A.

    1994-10-01

    Investigations are being performed on a high current (16 kA), mildly relativistic (400kV), L-band klystron source. Experiments are in an early stage, and thus far have progressed to beam modulation studies. This paper discusses general klystron design considerations, beam propagation results, initial modulation results, and various extraction techniques being considered.

  5. Pulse to pulse klystron diagnosis system

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, J.; Davidson, V.; Genova, L.; Johnson, R.; Reagan, D.

    1981-03-01

    This report describes a system used to study the behavior of SLAC high powered klystrons operating with a twice normal pulse width of 5 ..mu..s. At present, up to eight of the klystrons installed along the accelerator can be operated with long pulses and monitored by this system. The report will also discuss some of the recent findings and investigations.

  6. A theoretical model of phase changes of a klystron due to variation of operating parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kupiszewski, A.

    1980-01-01

    A mathematical model for phase changes of the VA-876 CW klystron amplifier output is presented and variations of several operating parameters are considered. The theoretical approach to the problem is based upon a gridded gap modeling with inclusion of a second order correction term so that actual gap geometry is reflected in the formulation. Physical measurements are contrasted to theoretical calculations.

  7. Type-II vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser with Watt level output powers at 1.2 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, C.; Fuchs, C.; Berger, C.; Ruiz Perez, A.; Koch, M.; Hader, J.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, S. W.; Stolz, W.

    2016-02-01

    Semiconductor laser characteristics based on type-II band-aligned quantum well heterostructures for the emission at 1.2 μm are presented. Ten "W"-quantum wells consisting of GaAs/(GaIn)As/Ga(AsSb)/(GaIn)As/GaAs are arranged as resonant periodic gain in a vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser. Its structure is analyzed by X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and reflectance measurements. The laser's power curves and spectra are investigated. Output powers at Watt level are achieved, with a maximum output power of 4 W. It is confirmed that laser operation only involves the type-II transition. A blue shift of the material gain is observed while the modal gain exhibits a red shift.

  8. Fifty megawatt klystron for the Stanford Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.G.; Lebacqz, J.V.; Konrad, G.T.

    1983-09-01

    The proposed Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) has been designed to provide 50 on 50 GeV electron-positron collisions. The performance of the 240 klystrons driving the two-mile long linac must be upgraded to achieve at least 50 Megawatts of peak power output at a pulse of 5 ..mu..sec and a pulse repetition frequency of 180 pulses per second. The operating frequency of the upgraded linac will continue to be 2856 MHz. A klystron amplifier meeting these new requirements has been designed to operate at 315 kV, ..mu..k = 2, with a computed efficiency of slightly greater than 50%. Initial tests indicate the achievement of the basic power objectives; however, observed parasitic instabilities make beam focusing, RF drive frequency and drive level extremely critical. High electric fields in the electron gun, output gap and output window are all potential problems. Steps taken in the design to overcome these problems are discussed and test results are presented.

  9. Reliability and lifetime predictions of SLC klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Lee, T.G.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1989-03-01

    The energy upgrade of SLAC, with the first of the new 67 MW SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) klystrons, began over four years ago. Today there are over 200 of these klystrons in operation. As a result, there is a wealth klystron performance and failure information that enables reasonable predictions to be made on life expectancy and reliability. Data from initial tests, follow-up tests and daily operation monitoring on the accelerator is stores for analysis. Presented here are life expectancy predictions with particular emphasis on cathode life. Also, based on this data, we will discuss some of the principal modes of failure. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Relativistic klystron research for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Higo, T.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.

    1988-09-01

    Relativistic klystrons are being developed as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications which include large linear electron-positron colliders, compact accelerators, and FEL sources. We have attained 200 MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here on the design of our relativistic klystrons, the results of our experiments so far, and some of our plans for the near future. 5 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Relativistic klystron research for high gradient accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Higo, T.; Hoag, H.A.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.

    1988-06-01

    Relativistic klystrons are being developed as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications which include large linear electron--positron colliders, compact accelerators, and FEL sources. We have attained 200MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here on the design of our first klystrons, the results of our experiments so far, and some of our plans for the near future. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Mode suppression means for gyrotron cavities

    DOEpatents

    Chodorow, Marvin; Symons, Robert S.

    1983-08-09

    In a gyrotron electron tube of the gyro-klystron or gyro-monotron type, having a cavity supporting an electromagnetic mode with circular electric field, spurious resonances can occur in modes having noncircular electric field. These spurious resonances are damped and their frequencies shifted by a circular groove in the cavity parallel to the electric field.

  13. Design And Construction of a W-Band Sheet Beam Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Scheitrum, G.; /SLAC

    2006-02-14

    The design and construction of a 100 kW peak power, 2% duty, PCM focused, Wband sheet beam klystron is discussed. The elliptical cross section beam is produced by a new electron gun design using a cylindrical cathode and a racetrack shaped focus electrode. The multi-gap cavities produce acceptable values of R/Q and are designed to produce a uniform electric field over the width of the 12:1 aspect ratio beam. The prototype cavities are produced using normal machining however, LIGA will be used to fabricate the cavities in production versions.

  14. Design study of longitudinal dynamics of the drive beam in 1 TeV relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Yu, S.S.; Sessler, A.M.

    1994-10-01

    In this paper the authors present a design study on the longitudinal dynamics of a relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA) scheme which has been proposed as a power source candidate for a 1 TeV next linear collider (NLC). They address the issue of maintaining stable power output at desired level for a 300-m long TBA with 150 extraction cavities and present their simulation results to demonstrate that it can be achieved by inductively detuning the extraction cavities to counter the space charge debunching effect on the drive beam. They then carry out simulation study to show that the beam bunches desired by the RK-TBA can be efficiently obtained by first chopping an initially uniform beam of low energy into a train of beam bunches with modest longitudinal dimension and then using the {open_quotes}adiabatic capture{close_quotes} scheme to bunch and accelerate these beam bunches into tight bunches at the operating energy of the drive beam. The authors have also examined the {open_quotes}after burner{close_quotes} scheme which is implemented in their RK-TBA design for efficiency enhancement.

  15. Relativistic klystron research at SLAC and LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Higo, T.; Hoag, H.A.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Morton, P.L.; Palmer, R.B.; Paterson, J.M.; Ruth, R.D.; Schwarz, H.D.; Takeuchi, Y.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B.; Hopkins, D.B.; Sessler, A.M.; Barletta, W.A.; Birx, D.L.; Boyd, J.K.; Houck, T.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.

    1988-06-01

    We are developing relativistic klystrons as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications such as large linear electron-positron colliders and compact accelerators. We have attained 200 MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here briefly on our experiments so far. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. X-BAND KLYSTRON DEVELOPMENT AT SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, Arnold E.; /SLAC

    2009-08-03

    The development of X-band klystrons at SLAC originated with the idea of building an X-band Linear Collider in the late 1980's. Since then much effort has been expended in developing a reliable X-band Power source capable of delivering >50 MW RF power in pulse widths >1.5 {micro}s. I will report on some of the technical issues and design strategies which have led to the current SLAC klystron designs.

  17. A new sensor for detection of coolant leakage in nuclear power plants using off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Lim; Park, Hyunmin; Kim, Taek-Soo; Ko, Kwang-Hoon; Jeong, Do-Young

    2012-06-01

    A new sensor based on laser absorption spectroscopy was developed for the detection of coolant leakage which may happen in pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR). Off-axis integrated output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) technique was adopted for developing a simple and robust sensor with sufficient sensitivity. Leak events could be monitored by detecting a small change in semi-heavy water (HDO) concentration induced by the exchange reaction of leaked heavy water (D2O) with light water (H2O). From the results of feasibility tests, we have shown that the measured area of absorption features was linearly correlated with HDO concentration, and the minimum detectable change of HDO concentration with the developed sensor was evaluated as 3.2 ppm. This new sensor is expected to be a reliable and promising device for the detection of coolant leakage since it has some advantages on real-time monitoring and early detection for nuclear safety.

  18. In-situ unsaturated zone stable water isotope (2H and 18O) measurements in semi-arid environments using tunable off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaj, M.; Beyer, M.; Koeniger, P.; Wanke, H.; Hamutoko, J.; Himmelsbach, T.

    2015-06-01

    Stable isotopes (deuterium, 2H, and oxygen-18, 18O) of soil pore water were measured directly in the field using tunable off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) and commercially available soil gas probes in a semi-arid region of the Cuvelai-Etosha-Basin, Namibia. High spatial and temporal resolution was achieved in the study area with reasonable accuracy and measurements were in agreement with laboratory-based cryogenic vacuum extraction and subsequent cavity ring down laser spectroscopic isotope analysis (CRDS). After drift correction of the isotope data, mean precision for over 140 measurements of two consecutive field campaigns in June and November 2014 were 1.8 and 0.46 ‰ for δ2H and 18O, respectively. Mean Accuracy using quality check standards was 5 and 0.3 ‰ for δ2H and δ18O, respectively. Results support the applicability of an in-situ measurement system for the determination of stable isotopes in soil pore water. Spatio-temporal variability could be deduced with the observed data in an extremely dry evaporation dominated environment which was sporadically affected by intermittent rainfall.

  19. Investigation of a 94 GHz Pseudospark-Sourced Klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowes, David; Yin, Huabi; Cross, Adrian; He, Wenlong; Phelps, Alan; Ronald, Kevin; Chen, Xiaodong; Li, Daohui

    2010-11-01

    Work is ongoing at the University of Strathclyde to design, construct and test a klystron amplifier with an operating frequency of 94 GHz using a pseudospark discharge beam source. A pseudospark is a form of low-pressure, high-current discharge which produces an electron beam possessing high brightness and self-focusing properties during the final stages of the discharge. Single-gap pseudospark experiments were performed in order to assess the feasibility of scaling down in size previous work carried out at the University of Strathclyde. Using 1mm cathode and anode apertures with 3mm separation, a 10kV voltage applied at a pressure of 100mTorr resulted in a 4 A beam current, which compares favourably with previous discharges. A 3-cavity 94 GHz klystron has been simulated with the particle-in-cell code MAGIC-2D with pulsed voltage and current inputs in keeping with possible pseudospark discharge traces. Efficiency and gain were simulated at 7.38% and 16.5 dB respectively.

  20. Using traveling wave structures to extract power from relativistic klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.D.; Yu, S.S.

    1990-09-19

    The purpose of this note is to analyze the excitation of traveling wave (TW) output structures by an RF current. Such structures are being used in relativistic klystron experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. First we will preset a set of difference equations that describes the excitation of the cells of a TW structure. Next we will restrict our attention to structures that have identical cells, except possibly for the first and last cells. Under these circumstances one can obtain difference equations that have constant coefficients, and we will present the general solution of these equations. Lastly we will apply our results to the analysis of a TW output structure. We will show that, by appropriate choice of the quality factors (Qs) and eigenfrequencies of the first and last cells, it is possible to obtain a traveling wave solution for which there is no reflected wave and where the excitation grows linearly with cell number.

  1. Suppression of beam induced pulse shortening modes in high power RF generator TW output structures

    SciTech Connect

    Haimson, J.; Mecklenburg, B.

    1992-12-31

    Several different style 11.4 GHz relativistic klystrons, operating with beam pulse widths of 50 ns and using large aperture, tapered phase-velocity TW structures,` have recently demonstrated output RF power levels in the range of 100 to 300 MW without breakdown or pulse shortening. To extend this performance into the long pulse regime (1 {mu}s) or to demonstrate a threefold increase in output power by using higher currents, the existing TW circuit designs must be modified (a) to reduce the cavity maximum surface E-fields by a factor of 2 to 3, and (b) to elevate the current threshold values of the beam induced higher order modes (HOM) to ensure avoidance of RF pulse shortening and associated instabilities. A technique for substantially elevating this threshold current is described, and microwave data and photographs are presented showing the degree of HOM damping achieved in a recently constructed 11.4 GHz TW structure.

  2. Studies of beam dynamics in relativistic klystron two-beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, Steven M.

    1999-11-01

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) based upon free-electron lasers (FELs) or relativistic klystrons (RK-TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band ({approximately}8-12 GHz) through Ka band ({approximately} 30-35 GHz) frequency regions. Provided that further prototyping shows stable beam propagation with minimal current loss and production of good quality, high-power rf fields, this technology is compatible with current schemes for electron-positron colliders in the multi-TeV center-of-mass scale. A new method of simulating the beam dynamics in accelerators of this type has been developed in this dissertation. There are three main components to this simulation. The first is a tracking algorithm to generate nonlinear transfer maps for pushing noninteracting particles through the external fields. The second component is a 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) algorithm that solves a set of Helmholtz equations for the self-fields, including the conducting boundary condition, and generates impulses that are interleaved with the nonlinear maps by means of a split-operation algorithm. The Helmholtz equations are solved by a multi-grid algorithm. The third component is an equivalent circuit equation solver that advances the modal rf cavity fields in time due to excitation by the modulated beam. The RTA project is described, and the simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed. A beamline design is presented that will generate nearly 1.2 GW of power from 40 input, gain, and output rv cavities over a 10 m distance. The simulations show that beam current losses are acceptable, and that longitudinal and transverse focusing techniques are sufficient capable of maintaining a high degree of beam quality along the entire beamline. Additional

  3. A new high-power klystron for the DSN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfinger, A.; Gregg, M. A.; Hartop, R.

    1982-01-01

    A very high reliability 100 kW klystron for the Deep Space Network (DSN) high power transmitters in support of spacecrafts to the distant planets was studied. The last phases included electron gun fabrication and beam analyzer evaluation and klystron prototype fabrication, mechanical and electrical design improvements resulted in the delivery of a prototype klystron meeting all requirements. It is concluded that the development of a new high power klystron for the DSN was very successful as demonstrated by the prototype results.

  4. Computer aided design of three-dimensional waveguide loaded cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Goren, Y.; Yu, D.U.L.

    1989-02-01

    We have developed two simple methods to calculate the power transport through an external waveguide of a loaded cavity utilizing the RF parameters obtained from the frequency domain codes. In the first method the external power loss through an open waveguide is expressed in terms of equivalent circuit coupling parameters between a closed waveguide and a cavity to which it is connected. As we shall see, this equivalent circuit approach is limited in it applicability only to structures with high loaded Q values, say Q/sub L/ < 200. In the second method, the power flow through an external waveguide is calculated from an analysis of the electromagnetic field components of the standing waves in the closed waveguide-cavity structure. Our models make use of the MAFIA code to obtain values of structural parameters and fields when an external waveguide is abruptly terminated with a metal surface. A typical model consists of an output cavity attached via an iris to a short waveguide section ended with a conducting cap. Our methodologies of calculating the loaded Q/sub L/ in terms of the parameters of the closed waveguide-cavity model are described in the following sections. We have obtained reasonable and encouraging results for several loaded cavities whose values of Q/sub L/ have been experimentally measured. Of particular interest is the application to low-Q structures such as the relativistic klystron output cavities. The electromagnetic field method yields good agreement with experimental measurements. This method has also been successfully applied to high gradient accelerating structures with slots for damping out higher modes as recently proposed by Palmer. 5 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Electron Gun For Multiple Beam Klystron Using Magnetic Focusing

    DOEpatents

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Miram, George; Krasnykh, Anatoly

    2004-07-27

    An RF device comprising a plurality of drift tubes, each drift tube having a plurality of gaps defining resonant cavities, is immersed in an axial magnetic field. RF energy is introduced at an input RF port at one of these resonant cavities and collected at an output RF port at a different RF cavity. A plurality of electron beams passes through these drift tubes, and each electron beam has an individual magnetic shaping applied which enables confined beam transport through the drift tubes.

  6. High power rf klystrons for linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Konrad, G.T.

    1984-04-01

    Recent klystron developments at SLAC are described. The standard 40 MW klyston, which typically operates at 35 MW on the SLAC linac, is the starting point for the push to higher peak and average power. The standard tube is capable of a 2.5 ..mu..s rf pulse width at 360 pps. For the SLC a 50 MW klystron capable of 5 ..mu..s pulse width at 180 pps is under development. Another tube currently being worked on is a 150 MW klystron capable of 1 ..mu..s rf and 180 pps. Design criteria and actual operating experience for both developmental tubes are described. 10 references, 11 figures, 3 tables.

  7. Calibration of δ13C and δ18O measurements in CO2 using Off-axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectrometer (ICOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Jobin; Külls, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    The δ13C and δ18O of CO2 has enormous potential as tracers to study and quantify the interaction between the water and carbon cycles. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) being the conventional method for stable isotopic measurements, has many limitations making it impossible for deploying them in remote areas for online or in-situ sampling. New laser based absorption spectroscopy approaches like Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (ICOS) have been developed for online measurements of stable isotopes at an expense of considerably less power requirement but with precision comparable to IRMS. In this research project, we introduce a new calibration system for an Off- Axis ICOS (Los Gatos Research CCIA-36d) for a wide range of varying concentrations of CO2 (800ppm - 25,000ppm), a typical CO2 flux range at the plant-soil continuum. The calibration compensates for the concentration dependency of δ13C and δ18O measurements, and was performed using various CO2 standards with known CO2 concentration and δC13 and δO18 values. A mathematical model was developed after the calibration procedure as a correction factor for the concentration dependency of δ13C and δ18O measurements. Temperature dependency of δ13C and δ18O measurements were investigated and no significant influence was found. Simultaneous calibration of δ13C and δ18O is achieved using this calibration system with an overall accuracy of (~ 0.75±0.24 ‰ for δ13C, ~ 0.81 ±0.26‰ for δ18O). This calibration procedure is found to be appropriate for making Off-Axis ICOS suitable for measuring CO2 concentration and δ13C and δ18O measurements at atmosphere-plant-soil continuum.

  8. A 75 MW S-Band Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Patrick; Read, Michael; Ives, Robert Lawrence; Marsden, David

    2013-12-16

    This program performed computational and preliminary mechanical design for a klystron producing 75 MW at 2.856 GHz using periodic permanent magnet (PPM) focusing. The performance specifications achieved were those for the Matter-Radiation Interactions in the Extremes (MaRIE) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The klystron is designed to provide 10 microsecond pulses at 60 Hz with 56 dB gain. The PPM-Focusing eliminates requirements for solenoids and their associated power supplies, cooling systems, interlocks, control and diagnostic instrumentation, and maintenance. The represents a significant in both acquisition and operating costs. It also increases reliability by eliminating many potential failure modes.

  9. Recent progress in relativistic klystron research

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.; Lavine, T.L.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Ruth, R.D.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W.; Aalberts, D.P.; Boyd, J.K.; Houck, T.; Ryne, R.D.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S.; Hopkins, D.B.; Sessler, A.M.; Haimson, J.; Mecklenburg, B.; Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (US

    1989-08-01

    Experimental work is now under way by collaborators at LLNL, SLAC, and LBL to investigate relativistic klystrons as a possible rf power source for future high-gradient accelerators. We have learned how to overcome our previously reported problem of high-power rf pulse shortening and have achieved peak rf power levels of 290 MW. We have used the rf from a relativistic klystron to power a short, 11.4-GHz high-gradient accelerator. The measured momentum spectrum of the accelerated electron beam corresponds to an accelerating gradient of 84 MV/m. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Investigation of an X-band gigawatt long pulse multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenbang; Huang, Hua; Lei, Lurong; Jin, Xiao; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Ganping; He, Hu; Wu, Yao; Ge, Yi; Yuan, Huan; Chen, Zhaofu

    2015-09-01

    To achieve a gigawatt-level long pulse radiation power in X-band, a multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier is proposed and studied experimentally. By introducing 18 electron drift tubes and extended interaction cavities, the power capacity of the device is increased. A radiation power of 1.23 GW with efficiency of 41% and amplifier gain of 46 dB is obtained in the particle-in-cell simulation. Under conditions of a 10 Hz repeat frequency and an input RF power of 30 kW, a radiation power of 0.9 GW, frequency of 9.405 GHz, pulse duration of 105 ns, and efficiency of 30% is generated in the experiment, and the amplifier gain is about 45 dB. Both the simulation and the experiment prove that the multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier can generate a long pulse GW-level radiation power in X-band.

  11. Inductive Output Tubes -- Status and Future Direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlen, Heinz

    2002-08-01

    Invented in 1938, at the same time as the klystron, it took the Inductive Output Tube (IOT) more than 40 years to surface as a useful device. Its progress after that event was rapid. Though plagued by teething problems in the beginning, it has since replaced the klystron as a TV amplifier in UHF, and it holds its own against the solid-state competition in that application. The IOT also shows much promise as a high-power amplifier, but early developments in this direction have remained solitary events so far. The paper discusses the causes and the potential of the device for future high-power applications.

  12. High-Efficiency Klystron For Television Transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramins, Peter; Dayton, James; Mccune, Earl, Sr.; Kosmahl, Henry

    1990-01-01

    Improved klystron designed for use as final amplifier in ultrahigh-frequency (UHF) television transmitter. New device incorporates multistage depressed collector (MSDC) of advanced design to increase efficiency by recovering, from spent electron beam, some of residual kinetic energy otherwise dissipated as heat. Concept applied to increase efficiencies of microwave communication, equipment, radar systems, and particle-beam accelerators.

  13. Retrofitting the 5045 Klystron for Higher Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Aaron; Fazio, Michael; Haase, Andy; Jongewaard, Erik; Kemp, Mark; Neilson, Jeff

    2015-04-15

    The 5045 klystron has been in production and accelerating particles at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory for over 25 years. Although the design has undergone some changes there are still significant opportunities for improvement in performance. Retrofitting the 5045 for higher efficiencies and a more mono-energetic spent beam profile is presented.

  14. Klystron control software in the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Jobe, R.K.; Thompson, K.; Phinney, N.

    1985-05-01

    Triggering, control, and monitoring of 240 high-power klystrons will be supported by the SLC control system this summer. The control software is distributed among a VAX host computer, a local microprocessor cluster, and a dedicated intelligent CAMAC module. The functions performed by these three components and the algorithms used are discussed.

  15. High efficiency klystron for the SPS application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larue, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    The enhancement of klystron efficiency through the use of collector depression, that is by recovering energy from the spent electron beam after microwave amplification, was investigated. Design considerations included noise, harmonics, cooling, and service life. The mod anode, to be employed for beam control, and the depressed collector, used in spent electron beam energy recovery, are described.

  16. Progress Toward a Gigawatt-Class Annular Beam Klystron with a Thermionic Electron Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, M.; Carlsten, B.; Farnham, J.; Habiger, K.; Haynes, W.; Myers, J.; Nelson, E.; Smith, J.; Arfin, B.; Haase, A.

    2002-08-01

    In an effort to reach the gigawatt power level in the microsecond pulse length regime Los Alamos, in collaboration with SLAC, is developing an annular beam klystron (ABK) with a thermionic electron gun. We hope to address the causes of pulse shortening in very high peak power tubes by building a "hard-vacuum" tube in the 10-10 Torr range with a thermionic electron gun producing a constant impedance electron-beam. The ABK has been designed to operate at 5 Hz pulse repetition frequency to allow for RF conditioning. The electron gun has a magnetron injection gun configuration and uses a dispenser cathode running at 1100 degC to produce a 4 kA electron beam at 800 kV. The cathode is designed to run in the temperature-limited mode to help maintain beam stability in the gun. The beam-stick consisting of the electron gun, an input cavity, an idler cavity, and drift tube, and the collector has been designed collaboratively, fabricated at SLAC, then shipped to Los Alamos for testing. On the test stand at Los Alamos a low voltage emission test was performed, but unfortunately as we prepared for high voltage testing a problem with the cathode heater was encountered that prevented the cathode from reaching a high enough temperature for electron emission. A post-mortem examination will be done shortly to determine the exact cause of the heater failure. The RF design has been proceeding and is almost complete. The output cavity presents a challenging design problem in trying to efficiently extract energy from the low impedance beam while maintaining a gap voltage low enough to avoid breakdown and a Q high enough to maintain mode purity. In the next iteration, the ABK will have a new cathode assembly installed along with the remainder of the RF circuit. This paper will discuss the electron gun and the design of the RF circuit along with a report on the status of the work.

  17. On the calibration of continuous, high-precision delta18O and delta2H measurements using an off-axis integrated cavity output spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lixin; Caylor, Kelly K; Dragoni, Danilo

    2009-02-01

    The (18)O and (2)H of water vapor serve as powerful tracers of hydrological processes. The typical method for determining water vapor delta(18)O and delta(2)H involves cryogenic trapping and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Even with recent technical advances, these methods cannot resolve vapor composition at high temporal resolutions. In recent years, a few groups have developed continuous laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) approaches for measuring delta(18)O and delta(2)H which achieve accuracy levels similar to those of lab-based mass spectrometry methods. Unfortunately, most LAS systems need cryogenic cooling and constant calibration to a reference gas, and have substantial power requirements, making them unsuitable for long-term field deployment at remote field sites. A new method called Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) has been developed which requires extremely low-energy consumption and neither reference gas nor cryogenic cooling. In this report, we develop a relatively simple pumping system coupled to a dew point generator to calibrate an ICOS-based instrument (Los Gatos Research Water Vapor Isotope Analyzer (WVIA) DLT-100) under various pressures using liquid water with known isotopic signatures. Results show that the WVIA can be successfully calibrated using this customized system for different pressure settings, which ensure that this instrument can be combined with other gas-sampling systems. The precisions of this instrument and the associated calibration method can reach approximately 0.08 per thousand for delta(18)O and approximately 0.4 per thousand for delta(2)H. Compared with conventional mass spectrometry and other LAS-based methods, the OA-ICOS technique provides a promising alternative tool for continuous water vapor isotopic measurements in field deployments. PMID:19142848

  18. Direct analysis of δ2H and δ18O in natural and enriched human urine using laser-based, off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Berman, Elena S F; Fortson, Susan L; Snaith, Steven P; Gupta, Manish; Baer, Douglas S; Chery, Isabelle; Blanc, Stephane; Melanson, Edward L; Thomson, Peter J; Speakman, John R

    2012-11-20

    The stable isotopes of hydrogen (δ(2)H) and oxygen (δ(18)O) in human urine are measured during studies of total energy expenditure by the doubly labeled water method, measurement of total body water, and measurement of insulin resistance by glucose disposal among other applications. An ultrasensitive laser absorption spectrometer based on off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy was demonstrated for simple and inexpensive measurement of stable isotopes in natural isotopic abundance and isotopically enriched human urine. Preparation of urine for analysis was simple and rapid (approximately 25 samples per hour), requiring no decolorizing or distillation steps. Analysis schemes were demonstrated to address sample-to-sample memory while still allowing analysis of 45 natural or 30 enriched urine samples per day. The instrument was linear over a wide range of water isotopes (δ(2)H = -454 to +1702 ‰ and δ(18)O = -58.3 to +265 ‰). Measurements of human urine were precise to better than 0.65 ‰ 1σ for δ(2)H and 0.09 ‰ 1σ for δ(18)O for natural urines, 1.1 ‰ 1σ for δ(2)H and 0.13 ‰ 1σ for δ(18)O for low enriched urines, and 1.0 ‰ 1σ for δ(2)H and 0.08 ‰ 1σ for δ(18)O for high enriched urines. Furthermore, the accuracy of the isotope measurements of human urines was verified to better than ±0.81 ‰ in δ(2)H and ±0.13 ‰ in δ(18)O (average deviation) against three independent isotope-ratio mass spectrometry laboratories. The ability to immediately and inexpensively measure the stable isotopes of water in human urine is expected to increase the number and variety of experiments which can be undertaken. PMID:23075099

  19. Direct analysis of δ2H and δ18O in natural and enriched human urine using laser-based, Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Elena S.F.; Fortsona, Susan L.; Snaith, Steven P.; Gupta, Manish; Baer, Douglas S.; Chery, Isabelle; Blanc, Stephane; Melanson, Edward L.; Thomson, Peter J; Speakman, John R.

    2012-01-01

    The stable isotopes of hydrogen (δ2H) and oxygen (δ18O) in human urine are measured during studies of total energy expenditure by the doubly labeled water method, measurement of total body water, and measurement of insulin resistance by glucose disposal among other applications. An ultrasensitive laser absorption spectrometer based on off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy was demonstrated for simple and inexpensive measurement of stable isotopes in natural isotopic abundance and isotopically enriched human urine. Preparation of urine for analysis was simple and rapid (approx. 25 samples per hour), requiring no decolorizing or distillation steps. Analysis schemes were demonstrated to address sample-to-sample memory while still allowing analysis of 45 natural or 30 enriched urine samples per day. The instrument was linear over a wide range of water isotopes (δ2H = −454 to +1702 ‰ and δ18O= −58.3 to +265 ‰). Measurements of human urine were precise to better than 0.65 ‰ 1σ for δ2H and 0.09 ‰ 1σ for δ18O for natural urines, 1.1 ‰ 1σ for δ2H and 0.13 ‰ 1σ for δ18O for low enriched urines, and 1.0 ‰ 1σ for δ2H and 0.08 ‰ 1σ for δ18O for high enriched urines. Furthermore, the accuracy of the isotope measurements of human urines was verified to better than ±0.81 ‰ in δ2H and ±0.13 ‰ in δ18O (average deviation) against three independent IRMS laboratories. The ability to immediately and inexpensively measure the stable isotopes of water in human urine is expected to increase the number and variety of experiments which can be undertaken. PMID:23075099

  20. Environmental influences contributing to window failure of the SLAC 50 MW klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Krienen, F.

    1984-03-01

    The additional heating of the klystron window is due to the intense x-ray level, produced inside the klystron, illuminating the entrance of the output wave guide. Photo-electric effect, although of low efficiency, produces enough electrons at the right location and right phase to start multipactor, which progresses with increasing intensity towards the window. The intercepted charge and the concomitant x-radiation heat the window, but the heating is not the cause of the breakdown per se. The accumulated charge on the window creates electric stress, which comes in addition to the RF stress. It could therefore be a major cause of electrical breakdown. The coating, which is intended to carry this charge off, should have a relaxation time constant small compared to the pulse duration. Unfortunately the coating can not be made conducting enough because it conflicts with the Joule heating in the RF field.

  1. Progress on a particle-in-cell model of a W-band klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardahl, Peter J.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Birdsall, C. K.

    1999-11-01

    Design and initial implementation of an extension from two to three dimensions (x-y-z and r-θ-z) is described for the XOOPIC( J. P. Verboncoeur, A. B. Langdon, and N. T. Gladd, ``An object-oriented electromagnetic PIC code.'' Computer Physics Communications 87) (1995) 199-211. code. The klystron ( G. Caryotakis, E. Jongewaard, G. Schietrum, A. Vlieks, R.L. Kustom, N.C. Luhmann, M.I. Petelin, ``W-Band Micro-fabricated Modular Klystrons.'' --Private communication) of interest is to operate at 91GHz, with a 125kW peak power, 120kV, 2.5A, 1us pulse, and 0.8mm drift tube diameter. This klystron uses periodic permanent magnetic focussing to contain the beam within the drift tube. Initially, the device will be modelled in 2d, and this will be extended to a 3d model. A 3d model is preferred because the drift tube is circular, while the cavities are rectangular. The circular drift tube will be modelled using stair-stepped boundaries.

  2. Klystron having electrostatic quadrupole focusing arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, Alfred W.

    1983-08-30

    A klystron includes a source for emitting at least one electron beam, and an accelerator for accelarating the beam in a given direction through a number of drift tube sections successively aligned relative to one another in the direction of the beam. A number of electrostatic quadrupole arrays are successively aligned relative to one another along at least one of the drift tube sections in the beam direction for focusing the electron beam. Each of the electrostatic quadrupole arrays forms a different quadrupole for each electron beam. Two or more electron beams can be maintained in parallel relationship by the quadrupole arrays, thereby enabling space charge limitations encountered with conventional single beam klystrons to be overcome.

  3. Klystron having electrostatic quadrupole focusing arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Maschke, A.W.

    1983-08-30

    A klystron includes a source for emitting at least one electron beam, and an accelerator for accelerating the beam in a given direction through a number of drift tube sections successively aligned relative to one another in the direction of the beam. A number of electrostatic quadrupole arrays are successively aligned relative to one another along at least one of the drift tube sections in the beam direction for focusing the electron beam. Each of the electrostatic quadrupole arrays forms a different quadrupole for each electron beam. Two or more electron beams can be maintained in parallel relationship by the quadrupole arrays, thereby enabling space charge limitations encountered with conventional single beam klystrons to be overcome. 4 figs.

  4. A crowbarless power supply for klystrons.

    PubMed

    Kozu, H; Jumonji, Y; Yamazaki, C; Shoji, Y; Hashimoto, S; Ando, A

    1998-05-01

    A new crowbarless power supply is to be installed at the New SUBARU storage ring. A high-power switching inverter unit eliminates the need for expensive and unstable crowbar circuits for the klystron power supply. It also realizes a very small voltage ripple in the low-frequency region. This is an important characteristic, especially in a quasi-isochronous storage ring such as New SUBARU. PMID:15263515

  5. Measurement of OCS, CO2, CO and H2O aboard NASA's WB-57 High Altitude Platform Using Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leen, J. B.; Owano, T. G.; Du, X.; Gardner, A.; Gupta, M.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is the most abundant sulfur gas in the atmosphere and has been implicated in controlling the sulfur budget and aerosol loading of the stratosphere. In the troposphere, OCS is irreversibly consumed during photosynthesis and may serve as a tracer for gross primary production (GPP). Its primary sources are ocean outgassing, industrial processes, and biomass burning. Its primary sinks are vegetation and soils. Despite the importance of OCS in atmospheric processes, the OCS atmospheric budget is poorly determined and has high uncertainty. OCS is typically monitored using either canisters analyzed by gas chromatography or integrated atmospheric column measurements. Improved in-situ terrestrial flux and airborne measurements are required to constrain the OCS budget and further elucidate its role in stratospheric aerosol formation and as a tracer for biogenic volatile organics and photosynthesis. Los Gatos Research has developed a flight capable mid-infrared Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) analyzer to simultaneously quantify OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O in ambient air at up to 2 Hz. The prototype was tested on diluted, certified samples and found to be precise (OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O to better than ±4 ppt, ±0.2 ppm, ±0.31 ppb, and ±3.7 ppm respectively, 1s in 1 sec) and linear (R2 > 0.9997 for all gases) over a wide dynamic range (OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O ranging from 0.2 - 70 ppb, 500 - 3000 ppm, 150 - 480 ppb, and 7000 - 21000 ppm respectively). Cross-interference measurements showed no appreciable change in measured OCS concentration with variations in CO2 (500 - 3500 ppm) or CO. We report on high altitude measurements made aboard NASA's WB-57 research aircraft. Two research flights were conducted from Houston, TX. The concentration of OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O were continuously recorded from sea level to approximately 60,000 feet. The concentration of OCS was observed to increase with altitude through the troposphere due to the

  6. Measurement of δ18O, δ17O, and 17O-excess in water by off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy and isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Berman, Elena S F; Levin, Naomi E; Landais, Amaelle; Li, Shuning; Owano, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Stable isotopes of water have long been used to improve understanding of the hydrological cycle, catchment hydrology, and polar climate. Recently, there has been increasing interest in measurement and use of the less-abundant (17)O isotope in addition to (2)H and (18)O. Off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) is demonstrated for accurate and precise measurements δ(18)O, δ(17)O, and (17)O-excess in liquid water. OA-ICOS involves no sample conversion and has a small footprint, allowing measurements to be made by researchers collecting the samples. Repeated (514) high-throughput measurements of the international isotopic reference water standard Greenland Ice Sheet Precipitation (GISP) demonstrate the precision and accuracy of OA-ICOS: δ(18)OVSMOW-SLAP = -24.74 ± 0.07‰ (1σ) and δ(17)OVSMOW-SLAP = -13.12 ± 0.05‰ (1σ). For comparison, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) value for δ(18)OVSMOW-SLAP is -24.76 ± 0.09‰ (1σ) and an average of previously reported values for δ(17)OVSMOW-SLAP is -13.12 ± 0.06‰ (1σ). Multiple (26) high-precision measurements of GISP provide a (17)O-excessVSMOW-SLAP of 23 ± 10 per meg (1σ); an average of previously reported values for (17)O-excessVSMOW-SLAP is 22 ± 11 per meg (1σ). For all these OA-ICOS measurements, precision can be further enhanced by additional averaging. OA-ICOS measurements were compared with two independent isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) laboratories and shown to have comparable accuracy and precision as the current fluorination-IRMS techniques in δ(18)O, δ(17)O, and (17)O-excess. The ability to measure accurately δ(18)O, δ(17)O, and (17)O-excess in liquid water inexpensively and without sample conversion is expected to increase vastly the application of δ(17)O and (17)O-excess measurements for scientific understanding of the water cycle, atmospheric convection, and climate modeling among others. PMID:24032448

  7. Continuous measurement of methane and carbon dioxide concentrations in surface waters based on off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülzow, W.; Rehder, G. J.; Schneider von Deimling, J.; Sadkowiak, B.; Schneider, B.

    2010-12-01

    Though systems to assess the sea surface concentrations of climate-relevant trace gases were first designed three decades ago, only for carbon dioxide the technology has advanced far enough to allow quasi non-maintained data acquisition based on ships of opportunity. One of the reasons for this is the fact that until now, only for carbon dioxide the concentrations in surface waters are high enough to allow the use of non gas-consuming, IR-spectroscopy-based detection of the gas, usually provided by a LICOR gas detector. This causes problems to estimate the marine fluxes of other important trace gases such as methane or nitrous oxide, which are usually strongly bound to coastal and estuarine zones, and thus would require long-term, spatio-temporal data acquisition for a robust marine source assessment. Here, we present a new system which allows to measure methane and carbon dioxide in surface waters autonomously and continuously using a non-gas consuming optical detection system. The analytical setup consists of a CH4/CO2- Analyzer (MCA; Los Gatos Research) joint with a bubble-type equilibration system. The analyzer uses off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) which combines two highly specific band lasers with a set of strongly reflective mirrors to obtain an effective laser path length of several kilometers. While a first system was installed in November 2009 on the cargo ship Finnmaid (Finnpartner) that commutes regularly between Travemünde (Germany) and Helsinki (Finnland) in the Baltic Sea, a 2nd system was build to be used on board of research vessels and successfully monitored the gas concentrations along the ship track during a 3,5 week long research cruise of RV Maria S. Merian (MSM16/1) in the Baltic Sea in August, 2010. Very low post-bloom surface pCO2 values and distinct patterns of surface methane concentrations pointing to local sources were amongst the results of the surface survey. During the expedition, the system was also linked to

  8. In Situ Stable Isotopic Detection of Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane in Monterey Bay Cold Seeps Via Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wankel, S. D.; Gupta, M.; Leen, J.; Provencal, R. A.; Parsotam, V.; Girguis, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) plays an important role in global climate change by governing the release of methane from anoxic sediments into the global ocean and ultimately the atmosphere. Thus, gaining an accurate understanding of both the distribution of methane sources and the occurrence of AOM as well as the spatial and temporal variability of cycling pathways is critical. Environmental analyses of methane stable isotopic composition (δ13C-CH4) provide just such an indicator of methane source, whether biogenic or thermogenic, as well as a spatial and temporal integrator of microbial cycling pathways, such as AOM. Here we present results from several deployments of a newly developed in situ methane stable isotope analyzer capable of measuring δ13C-CH4 to full ocean depths. The instrument consisted of a miniaturized Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (Off-Axis ICOS) analyzer housed in a cylindrical titanium pressure vessel for deep sea deployment. Dissolved gas was extracted from seawater using a Teflon AF diffusion membrane inlet. The instrument had an operating wavelength of 1647 nm and used chemometric spectral decomposition to determine the relative concentrations of 13CH4 and 12CH4 with a sensitivity of ± 0.2‰. Deployments to cold seep environments revealed a distinct separation in carbon isotopic composition between methane in advecting fluids as compared with methane from sediment pore fluids. During multiple visits to two different sites at Extrovert Cliff in Monterey Bay (960m), methane in advecting fluids ranged from -70.2‰ to -63.8‰. In contrast, methane-rich fluids sampled directly from pushcore holes taken through seep sediments contained methane with substantially higher δ13C values ranging from -64.2‰ to -50.2‰. These data implicate the influence of anaerobic oxidation of methane within these seep sediments. While the advective flux of methane to the seafloor from the central orifice of the seep is substantial, using

  9. Hyperbolic chaos in the klystron-type microwave vacuum tube oscillator.

    PubMed

    Emel'yanov, V V; Kuznetsov, S P; Ryskin, N M

    2010-12-01

    The ring-loop oscillator consisting of two coupled klystrons which is capable of generating hyperbolic chaotic signal in the microwave band is considered. The system of delayed-differential equations describing the dynamics of the oscillator is derived. This system is further reduced to the two-dimensional return map under the assumption of the instantaneous build-up of oscillations in the cavities. The results of detailed numerical simulation for both models are presented showing that there exists large enough range of control parameters where the sustained regime corresponds to the structurally stable hyperbolic chaos. PMID:21198074

  10. Hyperbolic chaos in the klystron-type microwave vacuum tube oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emel'yanov, V. V.; Kuznetsov, S. P.; Ryskin, N. M.

    2010-12-01

    The ring-loop oscillator consisting of two coupled klystrons which is capable of generating hyperbolic chaotic signal in the microwave band is considered. The system of delayed-differential equations describing the dynamics of the oscillator is derived. This system is further reduced to the two-dimensional return map under the assumption of the instantaneous build-up of oscillations in the cavities. The results of detailed numerical simulation for both models are presented showing that there exists large enough range of control parameters where the sustained regime corresponds to the structurally stable hyperbolic chaos.

  11. Design, construction and evaluation of a 12.2 GHz, 4.0 kW-CW high efficiency klystron amplifier. [for satellite-borne TV broadcast transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishida, J. M.; Brodersen, L. K.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical and experimental program is described, for studying design techniques for optimizing the conversion efficiency of klystron amplifiers, and to utilize these techniques in the development and fabrication of an X-band 4 kW cw klystron, for use in satellite-borne television broadcast transmitters. The design is based on a technique for increasing the RF beam current by using the second harmonic space charge forces in the bunched beam. Experimental analysis was also made of a method to enhance circuit efficiency in the klystron cavities. The design incorporates a collector which is demountable from the tube to facilitate multistage depressed collector experiments employing an axisymmetric, electrostatic collector for linear beam microwave tubes.

  12. Design of a 50 MW klystron at X-band

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, E.; Callin, R.; Caryotakis, G.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of the XL-1 klystron; a 50 MW klystron operating at a frequency of 11.424 GHz for use on the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA). Problems associated with the development of high-power rf sources for NLC, and the solutions implemented on XL-1 are discussed.

  13. Modification of the control modulator (for a klystron)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, Eric

    The modulators of the klystron units for pulse injection into an accelerator were modified in order to increase the peak power of the klystrons. The modulators were modified from 4 MW RF power out and 50 micro pulses to 10 MW RF power out and 5 microsec. The required modifications of the operator interface programming are explained.

  14. Three-dimensional relativistic field-electron interaction in a multicavity high-power klystron. Part 2: Working Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G.

    1982-01-01

    A high power multicavity klystron amplifier was designed and a computation package containing all equations and procedures needed is presented. The rigorously derived three dimensional relativistic axisymmetric equations of motion are used to compute the bunched current and the induced RF gap voltage for all interaction cavities except the input and second cavities, where the linear space charge wave theory data are employed in order to reduce the computation time. Both distance step and time step integration methods are used to compute the Fourier coefficients of both the beam current and induced current.

  15. Nonlinear harmonic generation in distributed optical klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    H.P. Freund; George R. Neil

    2001-12-01

    A distributed optical klystron has the potential for dramatically shortening the total interaction length in high-gain free-electron lasers (INP 77-59, Novosibirsk, 1977; Nucl. Instr. and Meth A 304 (1991) 463) in comparison to a single-wiggler-segment configuration. This shortening can be even more dramatic if a nonlinear harmonic generation mechanism is used to reach the desired wavelength. An example operating at a 4.5{angstrom} fundamental and a 1.5{angstrom} harmonic is discussed.

  16. Multichannel vector field control module for LLRF control of superconducting cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Varghese, P; Chase, B.; Barnes, B.; Branlard, J.; Joireman, P.W.; Klepec, D.; Mavric, U.; Tupikov, V.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The field control of multiple superconducting RF cavities with a single Klystron, such as the proposed RF scheme for the ILC, requires high density (number of RF channels) signal processing hardware so that vector control may be implemented with minimum group delay. The MFC (Multichannel Field Control) module is a 33-channel, FPGA based down-conversion and signal processing board in a single VXI slot, with 4 channels of high speed DAC outputs. A 32-bit, 400MHz floating point DSP provides additional computational and control capability for calibration and implementation of more complex control algorithms. Multiple high speed serial transceivers on the front panel and the backplane bus allow a flexible architecture for inter-module real time data exchanges. An interface CPLD supports the VXI bus protocol for communication to a Slot0 CPU, with Ethernet connections for remote in system programming of the FPGA and DSP as well as data acquisition.

  17. 2.5 W continuous wave output at 665 nm from a multipass and quantum-well-pumped AlGaInP vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Cherry May N; Brauch, Uwe; Kahle, Hermann; Schwarzbäck, Thomas; Jetter, Michael; Abdou Ahmed, Marwan; Michler, Peter; Graf, Thomas

    2016-03-15

    An output power of 2.5 W at a wavelength of 665 nm was obtained from a quantum-well (QW) and multipass-pumped AlGaInP-based vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser operated at a heat sink temperature of 10°C. Intracavity frequency doubling resulted in an output power of 820 mW at a wavelength of 333 nm. To the best of our knowledge, these are the highest continuous wave output powers from this type of laser both at the fundamental wavelength and in frequency-doubled operation. In fundamental wavelength operation, further power scaling by increasing the pump-spot size increased the output power to 3.3 W. However, at this power level, the laser was highly unstable. When the laser was operated at 50% pump duty cycle, a reproducible and stable peak output power of 3.6 W was obtained. These results demonstrate the potential of optical QW pumping combined with multipass pumping for the operation of AlGaInP-based semiconductor disk lasers. PMID:26977680

  18. Utilization of a Vircator to drive a High Power Relativistic Klystron Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardelle, J.; Bardy, J.; Cassany, B.; Desanlis, T.; Eyl, P.; Galtié, A.; Modin, P.; Voisin, L.; Balleyguier, P.; Gouard, P.; Donohue, J.

    2002-11-01

    At CESTA, we have been producing electron beams for some fifteen years by using induction accelerators and pulse diodes. First we had performed Frre-Electron Lasers experiments and we are currently studying the production of High-Power microwaves in the S-band. Among the possible sources we have chosen to perform Relativistic Klystron (RK) experiments with a pulse diode capable of generating a 700kV, 15 kA, 100 ns annular electron beam. In an amplifier configuration, we are testing the idea of using a Vircator as the driver for the first cavity of the klystron. This Vircator uses a simple electrical generator (Marx capacitor bank) which operates in the S-band in the GW class. By reducing the power level to about 100 MW, a 200 ns reliable and reproducible input driver pulse is obtained. First, we present the results of a preliminary experiment for which a coaxial cavity has been built in order to be fed by the Vircator emission at 2.45 GHz. Secondly, we give the experimental results in an oscillator configuration which corresponds to the fisrt step of our RK studies. Comparisons with the results of numerical simulations performed with MAGIC and MAFIA will be given for both experiments.

  19. FEL and Optical Klystron Gain for an Electron Beam with Oscillatory Energy Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; Ding, Y.; Huang, Z.; /SLAC

    2009-12-09

    If the energy spread of a beam is larger then the Pierce parameter, the FEL gain length increases dramatically and the FEL output gets suppressed. We show that if the energy distribution of such a beam is made oscillatory on a small scale, the gain length can be considerably decreased. Such an oscillatory energy distribution is generated by first modulating the beam energy with a laser via the mechanism of inverse FEL, and then sending it through a strong chicane. We show that this approach also works for the optical klystron enhancement scheme. Our analytical results are corroborated by numerical simulations.

  20. Design, construction, system integration, and test results of the 1 MW CW RF system for the e-gun cavity in the energy recovery LINAC at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lenci,S.J.; Eisen, E. L.; Dickey, D. L.; Sainz, J. E.; Utay, P. F.; Zaltsman, A.; Lambiase, R.

    2009-05-04

    Brookhaven's ERL (Energy Recovery LINAC) requires a 1 MW CW RF system for the superconducting electron gun cavity. The system consists primarily of a klystron tube, transmitter, and High-Voltage Power Supply (HVPS). The 703.75 MHz klystron made by CPl, Inc. provides RF power of 1MW CW with efficiency of 65%. It has a single output window, diode-type electron gun, and collector capable of dissipating the entire beam power. It was fully factory tested including 24-hour heat run at 1.1 MW CWo The solid state HVPS designed by Continental Electronics provides up to 100 kV at low ripple and 2.1 MW CW with over 95% efficiency. With minimal stored energy and a fast shut-down mode no crowbar circuit is needed. Continental 's transmitter includes PLC based user interface and monitoring, RF pre-amplifier, magnet and Vac-Ion pump supplies, cooling water instrumentation, and integral safety interlock system. BNL installed the klystron, HVPS, and transmitter along with other items, such as circulator, water load, and waveguide components. The collaboration of BNL, CPI, and Continental in the design, installation, and testing was essential to the successful operation of the 1MW system.

  1. Development of a four cavity second-harmonic gyroklystron as driver for a linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouveia, Emmanuel Steve

    Gyroklystrons are microwave amplifiers that combine the multi-cavity configuration of a klystron with the energy extraction mechanism of the cyclotron maser instability. These devices have been studied at the University of Maryland for several years. This work is focused on the development of a 17.14 GHz four-cavity frequency-doubling gyroklystron circuit. This device was designed specifically to drive a high gradient linear accelerator recently developed by the Haimson Corporation. The gyroklystron was designed using the code MAGYKL, yielding a predicted output power of 87 MW for an input drive power of 250 W, with a velocity pitch ratio (alpha) of 1.4. The tube was later fabricated, and underwent a series of experimental tests to evaluate its performance. The highest peak power observed was 18.5 +/- 1.7 MW, corresponding to an efficiency of 7.0% and a gain of 24.0 dB. This result fell short of the theoretical design, yet it was consistent with the low value of the velocity pitch ratio (alpha = 0.85) realized in the experiments. This limitation on alpha was linked to the onset of instabilities in the input cavity. The ultimate cause of these instabilities was the thermal non-uniformity in the emitter of our electron gun, which led to a significant variation (approximately 50%) of the current density across the beam. In order to remedy this problem, we have radically redesigned the input cavity, changing both its geometry and Q factor. These measures should dramatically reduce the probability of instabilities, thus allowing us to remove the experimental limitations imposed on alpha. This new design is presented here. We also describe advanced designs of an output cavity with radial power extraction, and a compact circular to rectangular mode converter. A detailed description of the present experimental setup is given, along with an overview of the power transport system necessary to feed the accelerator with output power from the gyroklystron.

  2. Method and apparatus for varying accelerator beam output energy

    DOEpatents

    Young, Lloyd M.

    1998-01-01

    A coupled cavity accelerator (CCA) accelerates a charged particle beam with rf energy from a rf source. An input accelerating cavity receives the charged particle beam and an output accelerating cavity outputs the charged particle beam at an increased energy. Intermediate accelerating cavities connect the input and the output accelerating cavities to accelerate the charged particle beam. A plurality of tunable coupling cavities are arranged so that each one of the tunable coupling cavities respectively connect an adjacent pair of the input, output, and intermediate accelerating cavities to transfer the rf energy along the accelerating cavities. An output tunable coupling cavity can be detuned to variably change the phase of the rf energy reflected from the output coupling cavity so that regions of the accelerator can be selectively turned off when one of the intermediate tunable coupling cavities is also detuned.

  3. A Unique Power Supply for the PEPII Klystron at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassel, R. L.; Nguyen, M. N.

    1997-05-01

    Each of the eight 1.2 MW RF klystrons for the PEP-II storage rings require a 2.5 MVA DC power supply of 83 kv at 23 amps. The design for the supply was base on three factors low cost, small size to fit existing substation pads, and good protection against damage to the klystron including klystron gun arcs. The supply uses a 12 pulse 12.5 KV primary thyristor ``star point controller'' with primary filter inductor to provide rapid voltage control, good voltage regulation, and fast turn off during klystron tube faults. The supply also uses a unique secondary rectifier, filter capacitor configuration to minimize the energy available under a klystron fault. The voltage control is from 0-90 KV with a regulation of < 0.1 % and voltage ripple of < 1 % P-P, (< 0.2 % RMS.) above 60 KV. The supply utilizes a thyristor crowbar, which under a klystron tube arc limits the energy in the klystron arc to < 5 joules. If the thyristor crowbar is disabled the energy supplied is < 40 joules into the arc. The size of the supply was reduced small enough to fit the existing PEP transformer yard pads. The cost of the power supply was < $ 140 per KVA.

  4. Phase locking of an S-band wide-gap klystron amplifier with high power injection driven by a relativistic backward wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Xianchen; Zhang Jiande; Yang Jianhua; Jin Zhenxing

    2012-12-15

    Theoretical analyses and preliminary experiments on the phase-locking characteristics of an inductively loaded 2-cavity wide-gap klystron amplifier (WKA) with high power injection driven by a GW-class relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) are presented. Electric power of the amplifier and oscillator is supplied by a single accelerator being capable of producing dual electron beams. The well phase-locking effect of the RBWO-WKA system requires the oscillator have good frequency reproducibility and stability from pulse to pulse. Thus, the main switch of the accelerator is externally triggered to stabilize the diode voltage and then the working frequency. In the experiment, frequency of the WKA is linearly locked by the RBWO. With a diode voltage of 530 kV and an input power of {approx}22 MW, an output power of {approx}230 MW with the power gain of {approx}10.2 dB is obtained from the WKA. As the main switch is triggered, the relative phase difference between the RBWO and the WKA is less than {+-}15 Degree-Sign in a single shot, and phase jitter of {+-}11 Degree-Sign is obtained within a series of shots with duration of about 40 ns.

  5. Phase locking of an S-band wide-gap klystron amplifier with high power injection driven by a relativistic backward wave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xianchen; Zhang, Jiande; Yang, Jianhua; Jin, Zhenxing

    2012-12-01

    Theoretical analyses and preliminary experiments on the phase-locking characteristics of an inductively loaded 2-cavity wide-gap klystron amplifier (WKA) with high power injection driven by a GW-class relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) are presented. Electric power of the amplifier and oscillator is supplied by a single accelerator being capable of producing dual electron beams. The well phase-locking effect of the RBWO-WKA system requires the oscillator have good frequency reproducibility and stability from pulse to pulse. Thus, the main switch of the accelerator is externally triggered to stabilize the diode voltage and then the working frequency. In the experiment, frequency of the WKA is linearly locked by the RBWO. With a diode voltage of 530 kV and an input power of ˜22 MW, an output power of ˜230 MW with the power gain of ˜10.2 dB is obtained from the WKA. As the main switch is triggered, the relative phase difference between the RBWO and the WKA is less than ±15° in a single shot, and phase jitter of ±11° is obtained within a series of shots with duration of about 40 ns.

  6. Recent Upgrade of the Klystron Modulator at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, M.N.; Burkhart, C.P.; Lam, B.K.; Morris, B.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory employs 244 klystron modulators on its two-mile-long linear accelerator that has been operational since the early days of the SLAC establishment in the sixties. Each of these original modulators was designed to provide 250 kV, 262 A and 3.5 {mu}S at up to 360 pps using an inductance-capacitance resonant charging system, a modified type-E pulse-forming network (PFN), and a pulse transformer. The modulator internal control comprised of large step-start resistor-contactors, vacuum-tube amplifiers, and 120 Vac relays for logical signals. A major, power-component-only upgrade, which began in 1983 to accommodate the required beam energy of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) project, raised the modulator peak output capacity to 360 kV, 420 A and 5.0 {mu}S at a reduced pulse repetition rate of 120 pps. In an effort to improve safety, performance, reliability and maintainability of the modulator, this recent upgrade focuses on the remaining three-phase AC power input and modulator controls. The upgrade includes the utilization of primary SCR phase control rectifiers, integrated fault protection and voltage regulation circuitries, and programmable logic controllers (PLC) -- with an emphasis on component physical layouts for safety and maintainability concerns. In this paper, we will describe the design and implementation of each upgraded component in the modulator control system. We will also report the testing and present status of the modified modulators.

  7. The klystron: A microwave source of surprising range and endurance

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G.

    1998-04-01

    This year marks the 60th anniversary of the birth of the klystron at Stanford University. The tube was the first practical source of microwaves and its invention initiated a search for increasingly more powerful sources, which continues to this day. This paper reviews the scientific uses of the klystron and outlines its operating principles. The history of the device is traced, from its scientific beginnings, to its role in World War II and the Cold War, and to its current resurgence as the key component in a major accelerator project. Finally, the paper describes the development of a modular klystron, which may someday power future accelerators at millimeter wavelengths.

  8. Phase synchronization of multiple klystrons in RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, S.; Regan, A.; Wang, Y.M.; Rohlev, T.

    1998-12-31

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory will serve as the prototype for the low energy section of the Acceleration Production of Tritium (APT) accelerator. The first LEDA RF system includes three, 1.2 MW, 350 MHz, continuous wave, klystrons driving a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ). A phase control loop is necessary for each individual klystron in order to guarantee the phase matching of these klystrons. To meet this objective, they propose adaptive PI controllers which are based on simple adaptive control. These controllers guarantee not only phase matching but also amplitude matching.

  9. Engineering Features: Klystron Tubes and Utilidors Clear Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Engineering Features: Klystron Tubes and Utilidors - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  10. Optical Klystron Enhancement to SASE X-ray FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yuantao; Emma, Paul; Huang, Zhirong; Kumar, Vinit

    2006-04-07

    The optical klystron enhancement to self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free electron lasers (FELs) is studied in theory and in simulations. In contrast to a seeded FEL, the optical klystron gain in a SASE FEL is not sensitive to any phase mismatch between the radiation and the microbunched electron beam. The FEL performance with the addition of four optical klystrons located at the undulator long breaks in the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) shows significant improvement if the uncorrelated energy spread at the undulator entrance can be controlled to a very small level. In addition, FEL saturation at shorter x-ray wavelengths (around 1.0 A) within the LCLS undulator length becomes possible. We also discuss the application of the optical klystron in a compact x-ray FEL design that employs relatively low electron beam energy together with a shorter-period undulator.

  11. 66. Building 102, view of Klystron tubes located in test ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    66. Building 102, view of Klystron tubes located in test systems located at first floor level with top of tubes protruding through second floor and ready to be lit and installed through top of Klystron tube vaults to ready position. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  12. A 1 MEGAWATT POLYPHASE BOOST CONVERTER-MODULATOR FOR KLYSTRON PULSE APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    W.A. REASS; J.D. DOSS; R.F. GRIBBLE

    2001-06-01

    This paper describes electrical design criteria and first operational results a 140 kV, 1 MW average, 11 MW peak, zero-voltage-switching 20 kHz polyphase bridge, boost converter/modulator for klystron pulse application. The DC-DC converter derives the buss voltages from a standard 13.8 kV to 2300 Y substation cast-core transformer. Energy storage and filtering is provided by self-clearing metallized hazy polypropylene traction capacitors. Three ''H-Bridge'' Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switching networks are used to generate the polyphase 20 kHz transformer primary drive waveforms. The 20 kHz drive waveforms are chirped the appropriate duration to generate the desired klystron pulse width. PWM (pulse width modulation) of the individual 20 kHz pulses is utilized to provide regulated output waveforms with adaptive feedforward and feedback techniques. The boost transformer design utilizes amorphous nanocrystalline material that provides the required low core loss at design flux levels and switching frequencies. Resonant shunt-peaking is used on the transformer secondary to boost output voltage and resonate transformer leakage inductance. With the appropriate transformer leakage inductance and peaking capacitance, zero-voltage-switching of the IGBT's is attained, minimizing switching losses. A review of these design parameters and the first results of the performance characteristics will be presented.

  13. Spontaneous emission and spectral properties of radiation by relativistic electrons in a gyro-klystron and optical-klystron undulator.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Bramha; Mishra, Ganeswar; Khullar, Roma

    2016-03-01

    In this paper spontaneous emission of radiation by relativistic electrons in a gyro-klystron is studied. The scheme consists of two solenoid sections separated by a dispersive section. In the dispersive section the electrons are made non-resonant with the radiation. The dispersive section transforms a small change of the velocity into changes of the phases of the electrons. This leads to enhanced radiation due to klystron-type modulation as compared with a conventional gyrotron-type device driven by cyclotron maser interaction. It is shown that the klystron-modulated spectrum depends on the dispersive field strength, finite perpendicular velocity component and length of the solenoids but is independent of the axial magnetic field strength. A simple scheme to design a gyro-klystron is discussed. PMID:26917129

  14. Investigation of an X-band gigawatt long pulse multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhenbang; Huang, Hua; Lei, Lurong; Jin, Xiao; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Ganping; He, Hu; Wu, Yao; Ge, Yi; Yuan, Huan; Chen, Zhaofu

    2015-09-15

    To achieve a gigawatt-level long pulse radiation power in X-band, a multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier is proposed and studied experimentally. By introducing 18 electron drift tubes and extended interaction cavities, the power capacity of the device is increased. A radiation power of 1.23 GW with efficiency of 41% and amplifier gain of 46 dB is obtained in the particle-in-cell simulation. Under conditions of a 10 Hz repeat frequency and an input RF power of 30 kW, a radiation power of 0.9 GW, frequency of 9.405 GHz, pulse duration of 105 ns, and efficiency of 30% is generated in the experiment, and the amplifier gain is about 45 dB. Both the simulation and the experiment prove that the multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier can generate a long pulse GW-level radiation power in X-band.

  15. Intra-cavity frequency-doubled Cr:LiCAF laser with 265 mW continuous-wave blue (395-405 nm) output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirbas, Umit; Uecker, Reinhard; Klimm, Detlef; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz

    2014-06-01

    We describe continuous-wave (cw) intracavity frequency-doubling experiments performed with a Cr:LiCAF laser. The Cr:LiCAF crystal is home-grown and had passive losses below 0.15% per cm. The laser is pumped by two recently-developed high-brightness tapered diodes, providing a total pump power of 2 W at 680 nm. The Cr:LiCAF laser generated up to 585 mW of cw output power around 800 nm with 43% slope efficiency at an absorbed pump power of 1.4 W. The low passive losses of the crystal enabled storage of up to 380 W of intracavity laser power using a 0.07% transmitting output coupler, demonstrating suitability of Cr:LiCAF gain media for intracavity nonlinear conversion experiments. By performing intracavity frequency doubling with a BBO crystal, cw second-harmonic powers as high as 265 mW around 400 nm have been realized with optical-to-optical conversion efficiencies as high as 13.3%. To our knowledge, these are the highest cw frequency-doubled laser powers and conversion efficiencies obtained from Cr:Colquiriites to date. Moreover, obtained efficiencies are superior compared to what have been achieved with similar Ti:Sapphire systems, due to lower passive losses of Cr:LiCAF crystal. These results demonstrate the appropriateness of Cr:LiCAF gain media as a high-power tunable cw radiation generator in 375-435 nm region.

  16. Generalized representation of electric fields in interaction gaps of klystrons and traveling wave tubes with axial symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    Analytic expressions for axial and radial electric fields in axisymmetric interaction gaps of klystrons and coupled cavity traveling wave tubes are derived. Introduction of the field shape parameter m results in both limiting cases of the field at the tunnel tips, that is, E equal to a constant and E approaching infinity as well as a continuous transition between these two limits. The transition represents actual, practical fields. This representation may be used to replace the somewhat arbitrary expressions being applied by various researchers to describe the fields.

  17. The X-band klystron program at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G.

    1996-04-01

    The X-band rf source development at SLAC can be considered a qualified success. A total of twelve klystrons were built. Six of them are still in use. The latest tube, XL4, produced 75 MW at an efficiency of 47.5 percent. However, victory cannot be declared as yet, since an NLC prototype has not been fully designed and the decision between permanent magnet focusing and a super-conducting solenoid has not been formally made. Daryl Sprehn`s paper will present the status of the PPM klystron development. The authors believe that a PPM X-band source will work, at 50 as well as at 75 megawatts. But they are prepared to adapt the XL4 design to a super-conducting solenoid, should the PPM klystron develop unexpected problems. The SLAC program is now in its seventh year. It may well be the longest and most expensive microwave tube development on record, in a government laboratory or in industry. Direct and related costs for the total effort are probably of the order of $10 million. In these circumstances it is perhaps not surprising that it has been possible to produce a klystron with the performance of XL4. At the same time, it must be said that the necessary leap in technology from the SLAC 60-megawatt S-band production klystrons to a klystron of comparable performance at four times the frequency could not be realized without some very careful experimentation and, most importantly, without the infrastructure for tube fabrication and testing available at SLAC. The design of an 11.4 GHz 50--100 MW klystron, with microsecond pulses and a pulse repetition frequency of 180 Hz presents a number of technical challenges which are listed here.

  18. Latest Results in SLAC 75-MW PPM Klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Haase, A.; Jongewaard, E.; Laurent, L.; Pearson, C.; Phillips, R.; /SLAC

    2006-03-06

    75 MW X-band klystrons utilizing Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing have been undergoing design, fabrication and testing at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) for almost nine years. The klystron development has been geared toward realizing the necessary components for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The PPM devices built to date which fit this class of operation consist of a variety of 50 MW and 75 MW devices constructed by SLAC, KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) and industry. All these tubes follow from the successful SLAC design of a 50 MW PPM klystron in 1996. In 2004 the latest two klystrons were constructed and tested with preliminary results reported at EPAC2004. The first of these two devices was tested to the full NLC specifications of 75 MW, 1.6 microseconds pulse length, and 120 Hz. This 14.4 kW average power operation came with a tube efficiency >50%. The most recent testing of these last two devices will be presented here. Design and manufacturing issues of the latest klystron, due to be tested by the Fall of 2005, are also discussed.

  19. Ultra Stable Capacitor charging Power Supply of Klystron-Modulator for PAL XFEL

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Y. G.; Kwon, S. J.; Jang, S. D.; Suh, J. H.; Oh, J. S.

    2007-01-19

    The PAL (Pohang Accelerator Laboratory) 2.5-GeV linac is planed to be converted to a SASE-XFEL facility (PAL XFEL) that supplies coherent X-rays down to 0.3-nm wavelength. The electron beams has to have an emittance of 1.0 mm-mrad, a peak current of 3 kA, and a low energy spread of 1.0 MeV. In order to provide reasonably stable SASE output, the RF stability of 0.02% rms is required for both RF phase and amplitude. This stability is mainly determined by a low level RF drive system and klystron-modulators. The stability level of the modulator has to be improved 10 times better to meet the pulse stability of 0.02%. This is a technologically challenging issue for PAL XFEL. An inverter technology is to be applied to charge the PFN of a new modulator. Therefore, a new inverter system should provide very stable charging performances. This paper presents the development of an ultra stable klystron-modulator with an inverter power.

  20. Concept and Theory of Clustered-Cavity Gyroklystrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusinovich, G. S.; Guo, H.; Antonsen, T. M.; Granatstein, V. L.

    2002-12-01

    The concept of clustered cavities was originally proposed by R. Symons for use in linear-beam klystrons operating in TM-modes. It was proven experimentally that the use of this concept allows developers to double the instantaneous bandwidth of klystrons without changing their overall dimensions or sacrificing gain and bandwidth. Recently, H. Guo suggested applying this concept to gyroklystrons operating in TE-modes. In the present paper this concept is formulated and a simple analytical theory describing qualitatively the performance of clustered-cavity gyroklystrons is developed. Results of the analysis of a simple two-stage gyroklystron indicate that the clustered-cavity concept has potential for improving the performance of gyroklystrons.

  1. FPGA-based Klystron linearization implementations in scope of ILC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Omet, M.; Michizono, S.; Matsumoto, T.; Miura, T.; Qiu, F.; Chase, B.; Varghese, P.; Schlarb, H.; Branlard, J.; Cichalewski, W.

    2015-01-23

    We report the development and implementation of four FPGA-based predistortion-type klystron linearization algorithms. Klystron linearization is essential for the realization of ILC, since it is required to operate the klystrons 7% in power below their saturation. The work presented was performed in international collaborations at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), USA and the Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Germany. With the newly developed algorithms, the generation of correction factors on the FPGA was improved compared to past algorithms, avoiding quantization and decreasing memory requirements. At FNAL, three algorithms were tested at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA), demonstrating a successfulmore » implementation for one algorithm and a proof of principle for two algorithms. Furthermore, the functionality of the algorithm implemented at DESY was demonstrated successfully in a simulation.« less

  2. The klystron: A microwave source of surprising range and endurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caryotakis, George

    1998-05-01

    This year marks the 60th anniversary of the birth of the klystron at Stanford University. The tube was the first practical source of microwaves and its invention initiated a search for increasingly more powerful sources, which continues to this day. This paper reviews the scientific uses of the klystron and outlines its operating principles. The history of the device is traced from its scientific beginnings to its role in WWII and the Cold War, its subsequent decline in use for military systems, and to its current resurgence as the key component in a major accelerator project. Finally, the paper describes the development of a modular klystron, which may someday power future accelerators at millimeter wavelengths.

  3. FPGA-based Klystron linearization implementations in scope of ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Omet, M.; Michizono, S.; Varghese, P.; Schlarb, H.; Branlard, J.; Cichalewski, W.

    2015-01-23

    We report the development and implementation of four FPGA-based predistortion-type klystron linearization algorithms. Klystron linearization is essential for the realization of ILC, since it is required to operate the klystrons 7% in power below their saturation. The work presented was performed in international collaborations at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), USA and the Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Germany. With the newly developed algorithms, the generation of correction factors on the FPGA was improved compared to past algorithms, avoiding quantization and decreasing memory requirements. At FNAL, three algorithms were tested at the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA), demonstrating a successful implementation for one algorithm and a proof of principle for two algorithms. Furthermore, the functionality of the algorithm implemented at DESY was demonstrated successfully in a simulation.

  4. A Solid State Modulator for Driving SLAC 5045 Klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lamare, Jeffrey E

    2002-09-19

    A test is ongoing at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) where a solid state induction modulator is driving a SLAC 5045 klystron. The modulator generates 22 kV, 6 kA pulses that are stepped up by a 15.1 transformer that is a part of the klystron's pulse tank. The modulator's pulse duration is adjustable up to the volt-second limit of its cores, and it is capable of a pulse repetition frequency up to 120 Hz. The modulator's design, construction, and experimental results are the focus of this paper.

  5. High Power Klystrons: Theory and Practice at the Stanford Linear Accelerator CenterPart I

    SciTech Connect

    Caryotakis, G.

    2004-12-15

    This is Part I of a two-part report on design and manufacturing methods used at SLAC to produce accelerator klystrons. Chapter 1 begins with the history and applications for klystrons, in both of which Stanford University was extensively involved. The remaining chapters review the theory of klystron operation, derive the principal formulae used in their design, and discuss the assumptions that they involve. These formulae are subsequently used in small-signal calculations of the frequency response of a particular klystron, whose performance is also simulated by two different computer codes. The results of calculations and simulations are compared to the actual performance of the klystron.

  6. Factors influencing the microwave pulse duration in a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Renzhen; Zhang Xiaowei; Zhang Ligang; Li Xiaoze; Zhang Lijun

    2012-07-15

    In this paper, we analyze the factors that affect the microwave pulse duration in a klystron-like relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO), including the diode voltage, the guiding magnetic field, the electron beam collector, the extraction cavity, and the gap between the electron beam and the slow wave structure (SWS). The results show that the microwave pulse duration increases with the diode voltage until breakdown occurs on the surface of the extraction cavity. The pulse duration at low guiding magnetic field is generally 5-10 ns smaller than that at high magnetic field due to the asymmetric electron emission and the larger energy spread of the electron beam. The electron beam collector can affect the microwave pulse duration significantly because of the anode plasma generated by bombardment of the electron beam on the collector surface. The introduction of the extraction cavity only slightly changes the pulse duration. The decrease of the gap between the electron beam and the SWS can increase the microwave pulse duration greatly.

  7. Gigawatt peak power generation in a relativistic klystron amplifier driven by 1 kW seed-power

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Xie, H. Q.; Li, Z. H.; Zhang, Y. J.; Ma, Q. S.

    2013-11-15

    An S-band high gain relativistic klystron amplifier driven by kW-level RF power is proposed and studied experimentally. In the device, the RF lossy material is introduced to suppress higher mode excitation. An output power of 1.95 GW with a gain of 62.8 dB is obtained in the simulation. Under conditions of an input RF power of 1.38 kW, a microwave pulse with power of 1.9 GW, frequency of 2.86 GHz, and duration of 105 ns is generated in the experiment, and the corresponding gain is 61.4 dB.

  8. Parametric analysis of micromachined reflex klystrons for operation at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-García, J.; Martín, F.; Miles, R. E.; Steenson, D. P.; Chamberlain, J. M.; Fletcher, J. R.; Thorpe, J. R.

    2002-12-01

    A tool for the simulation of high frequency reflex klystrons is presented. Based on the Monte Carlo technique, this simulation includes loss mechanisms (due to the opacity of the grids) and takes into account the main peculiarities expected for device operation at millimeter and submillimeter wave frequencies. The tool has been used to study the effects of device parameters which are critical to the optimization of output power in a prototype 100 GHz micromachined structure based on a field emission electron source, namely, the electric field in the drift region and the grid distance. The results also show that this device can be used for direct generation of useful amounts of power at these frequencies.

  9. Start-to-end modelling of a mode-locked optical klystron free electron laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, D. J.; Thompson, N. R.; Mc Neil, B. W. J.; Williams, P. H.

    2011-07-15

    A free electron laser (FEL) in a mode-locked optical klystron (MLOK) configuration is modelled using start-to-end simulations that simulate realistic electron beam acceleration and transport before input into a full three-dimensional FEL simulation code. These simulations demonstrate that the MLOK scheme is compatible with the present generation of radiofrequency accelerator designs. A train of few-optical cycle pulses is predicted with peak powers similar to those of the equivalent conventional FEL amplifier. The role of electron beam energy modulation in these results is explained and the limitations of some simulation codes discussed. It is shown how seeding the FEL interaction using a High Harmonic seed laser can improve the coherence properties of the output.

  10. An S-band high gain relativistic klystron amplifier with high phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Xu, Z.; Ma, Q. S.; Xie, H. Q.

    2014-11-15

    For the purpose of coherent high power microwave combining, an S-band high gain relativistic klystron amplifier with high phase stability is presented and studied. By the aid of 3D particle-in-cell code and circuit simulation software, the mechanism of parasitic oscillation in the device is investigated. And the RF lossy material is adopted in the simulation and experiment to suppress the oscillation. The experimental results show that with an input RF power of 10 kW, a microwave pulse with power of 1.8 GW is generated with a gain of 52.6 dB. And the relative phase difference fluctuation between output microwave and input RF signal is less than ±10° in 90 ns.