Science.gov

Sample records for knee chondral lesions

  1. Reduced Anterior Cruciate Ligament Vascularization Is Associated With Chondral Knee Lesions.

    PubMed

    Hetsroni, Iftach; Manor, Amir; Finsterbush, Alex; Lowe, Joseph; Mann, Gideon; Palmanovich, Ezequiel

    2016-07-01

    This study tested the association between periligamentous vascularization of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the presence of chondral knee lesions via retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from 702 consecutive knee arthroscopic procedures. In each case, the ACL periligamentous envelope was documented as follows: (1) vascular, where the ACL was covered with blood vessels along its entire length; (2) centrally avascular, where the central third of the ACL was not covered but peripheral vascularized coverage was present; and (3) avascular, where there was no blood vessel coverage of the ACL. Inclusion criteria for the study were as follows: (1) age older than 18 years and (2) normal knee ligament laxity. Univariate analysis and multiple logistic regression were used to test the association between chondral lesions and each of the variables: sex, age, meniscus tear, decreased ACL vascularity, and concomitant chondral lesion in another knee compartment. The cohort included 516 knees. In the univariate analysis, all variables were associated with a chondral lesion, but only older age and decreased ACL vascularity were associated with chondral lesions in each knee compartment. In the regression model, only decreased ACL vascularity was associated with chondral lesions in each knee compartment. For avascular knees, the odds ratio was 2.84 for medial femoral condyle lesions (95% confidence interval, 1.73-4.68; P=.000), 2.44 for lateral femoral condyle lesions (95% confidence interval, 1.19-5.03; P=.015), and 2.48 for patellofemoral lesions (95% confidence interval, 1.55-3.97; P=.000). The findings showed that decreased ACL periligamentous vascularization is associated with chondral lesions of the femoral condyles in knees with preserved ACL laxity. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e737-e743.]. PMID:27111071

  2. ASSESSMENT OF THE REPRODUCIBILITY OF THE OUTERBRIDGE AND FSA CLASSIFICATIONS FOR CHONDRAL LESIONS OF THE KNEE

    PubMed Central

    Lasmar, Neylor Pace; Lasmar, Rodrigo Campos Pace; Vieira, Rodrigo Barreiros; de Oliveira, Juraci Rosa; Scarpa, André Campos

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the reproducibility of the Outerbridge and the French Society of Arthroscopy classifications between different observers, and to establish a comparison between them. Method: Thirty videos on randomly selected knee arthroscopy procedures demonstrating chondral lesions were used. These were classified by six observers: two third-year orthopedics residents and four orthopedic surgeons, of whom two were knee surgery specialists. The intraobserver and interobserver reliability was evaluated by means of the kappa index. Results: The result from the complete evaluation on the Outerbridge classification with all the observers gave a kappa index of 0.434411. For the classification proposed by the French Society of Arthroscopy, the kappa index was 0.45166. Conclusion: The Outerbridge and French Society of Arthroscopy classifications for chondral lesions are moderately reproducible between observers. Comparing the two classifications, the proposal from the French Society of Arthroscopy was shown to be more reproducible, and the authors suggest that this classification should be used preferentially in clinical practice for evaluations on chondral lesions of the knee. PMID:27047818

  3. Interobserver Reliability among Radiologists and Orthopaedists in Evaluation of Chondral Lesions of the Knee by MRI.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Fábio; Izadi, Anela; Ferreira, Ana Paula R B; Braga, Larissa; Braga-Baiak, Andresa; Schueda, Marco Antonio; Gandhi, Mihir; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate interobserver reliability in the presence of chondral injuries of the knee among radiologists, orthopaedic surgeons, radiologists, and orthopaedic surgeons. Methods. This was a prospective, web-based multi-institutional survey, consisting of 6 magnetic resonance exams of knee chondral injuries and a questionnaire to be completed by the participants. Two radiologists and two orthopaedic surgeons were enrolled, with more than 5 years of clinical experience. Kappa statistics test was used to calculate interobserver reliability between participants. Results. Kappa ranged from -0.13 through 0.29 between orthopaedists; from 0.06 through 0.78 between radiologists; from -0.10 through 0.24 between orthopaedists and radiologists. Cases 3 and 6 had skewed results among radiologists: with Kappa scores of 0.78 and 0.53, respectively. Conclusions. Our study reveals that the interobserver agreement between radiologists is higher than among orthopaedists in the evaluation of chondral knee lesions by MRI. PMID:21991421

  4. UPDATING ON DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF CHONDRAL LESION OF THE KNEE

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha Cavalcanti, Filho Marcantonio Machado; Doca, Daniel; Cohen, Moisés; Ferretti, Mário

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTS The treatment of chondral knee injuries remains a challenge for the orthopedic surgeon, mainly owing to the characteristics of the cartilage tissue, which promote low potential for regeneration. Chondral lesions can be caused by metabolic stimulation, or by genetic, vascular and traumatic events, and are classified according to the size and thickness of the affected cartilage. Clinical diagnosis can be difficult, especially due to insidious symptoms. Additional tests, as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), may be needed. The treatment of these lesions usually starts with non-operative management. Surgery should be reserved for patients with detached chondral fragments, blocked range of motion, or the failure of non-operative treatment. The surgical techniques used for the treatment of partial thickness defects are Debridement and Ablation. These techniques aim to improve symptoms, since they do not restore normal structure and function of the cartilage. For full-thickness defects (osteochondral lesion), available treatments are Abrasion, Drilling, Microfracture, Osteochondral Autologous and Allogeneic Transplantation, and biological techniques such as the use of Autologous Chondrocyte Transplantation, Minced Cartilage and stem cells. PMID:27027078

  5. Adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell therapy in the treatment of isolated knee chondral lesions: design of a randomised controlled pilot study comparing arthroscopic microfracture versus arthroscopic microfracture combined with postoperative mesenchymal stem cell injections

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Julien; Ford, Jon; Bates, Dan; Boyd, Richard; Hahne, Andrew; Wang, Yuanyuan; Cicuttini, Flavia; Huguenin, Leesa; Norsworthy, Cameron; Shah, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The management of intra-articular chondral defects in the knee remains a challenge. Inadequate healing in areas of weight bearing leads to impairment in load transmission and these defects predispose to later development of osteoarthritis. Surgical management of full thickness chondral defects include arthroscopic microfracture and when appropriate autologous chondrocyte implantation. This latter method however is technically challenging, and may not offer significant improvement over microfracture. Preclinical and limited clinical trials have indicated the capacity of mesenchymal stem cells to influence chondral repair. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology of a pilot randomised controlled trial comparing arthroscopic microfracture alone for isolated knee chondral defects versus arthroscopic microfracture combined with postoperative autologous adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell injections. Methods and analysis A pilot single-centre randomised controlled trial is proposed. 40 participants aged 18–50 years, with isolated femoral condyle chondral defects and awaiting planned arthroscopic microfracture will be randomly allocated to a control group (receiving no additional treatment) or treatment group (receiving postoperative adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell treatment). Primary outcome measures will include MRI assessment of cartilage volume and defects and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. Secondary outcomes will include further MRI assessment of bone marrow lesions, bone area and T2 cartilage mapping, a 0–10 Numerical Pain Rating Scale, a Global Impression of Change score and a treatment satisfaction scale. Adverse events and cointerventions will be recorded. Initial outcome follow-up for publication of results will be at 12 months. Further annual follow-up to assess long-term differences between the two group will occur. Ethics and dissemination This trial has received prospective ethics approval through

  6. Chondral Lesions of the Hip.

    PubMed

    Logan, Zachariah S; Redmond, John M; Spelsberg, Sarah C; Jackson, Timothy J; Domb, Benjamin G

    2016-07-01

    The treatment of chondral hip injuries is challenging. However, for young patients with hip disorders, orthopedic surgeons now have the opportunity to intervene early in the development of debilitating joint disease. As understanding of the hip joint continues to evolve, more effective treatment strategies are emerging. There are several reportedly successful options for surgical treatment. This article reviews the clinical presentation of chondral injuries and the surgical modalities, arthroscopic and open, available to treat them. PMID:27343390

  7. OSTEOCHONDRAL AUTOLOGOUS TRANSPLANTATION FOR TREATING CHONDRAL LESIONS IN THE PATELLA

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Moises; Amaro, Joicemar Tarouco; Fernandes, Ricardo de Souza Campos; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Astur, Diego da Costa; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Skaf, Abdalla

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The primary aim of this study was to assess the clinical and functional evolution of patients with total-thickness symptomatic cartilaginous injury of the patellar joint surface, treated by means of osteochondral autologous transplantation. Methods: This prospective study was conducted from June 2008 to March 2011 and involved 17 patients. The specific questionnaires of Lysholm, Kujala and Fulkerson were completed preoperatively and one year postoperatively in order to assess the affected knee, and SF-36 was used to assess these patients’ general quality of life. The nonparametric paired Wilcoxon test was used for statistical analysis on the pre and postoperative questionnaires. The data were analyzed using the SPSS for Windows software, version 16.0, and a significance level of 5% was used. Results: The Lysholm preoperative and postoperative average scores were 54.59 and 75.76 points (p < 0.05). The Fulkerson pre and postoperative average scores were 52.53 and 78.41 points (p < 0.05). Conclusions: We believe that autologous osteochondral transplantation is a good treatment method for total-thickness symptomatic chondral lesions of the joint surface of the patella. PMID:27042645

  8. Association Between Previous Meniscal Surgery and the Incidence of Chondral Lesions at Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Brophy, Robert H.; Wright, Rick W.; David, Tal S.; McCormack, Robert G.; Sekiya, Jon K.; Svoboda, Steven J.; Huston, Laura J.; Haas, Amanda K.; Steger-May, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Background Knees undergoing revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction typically have more intra-articular injuries than do knees undergoing primary reconstruction. Hypothesis Previous partial meniscectomy (PM) is associated with a higher rate of chondral lesions at revision ACL reconstruction, whereas previous meniscal repair (MR) is not associated with a higher rate of chondral lesions at revision ACL reconstruction, compared with knees undergoing revision ACL with no previous meniscal surgery. Study design Cohort study (Prevalence); Level of evidence, 2. Methods Data from a multicenter cohort was reviewed to determine the history of prior meniscal surgery (PM/MR) and the presence of grade II/III/IV chondral lesions at revision ACL reconstruction. The association between previous meniscal surgery and the incidence of chondral lesions was examined. Patient age was included as a covariate to determine if surgery type contributes predictive information independent of patient age. Results The cohort included 725 ACL revision surgeries. Chondrosis was associated with patient age (P < .0001) and previous meniscal surgery (P < .0001). After adjusting for patient age, knees with previous PM were more likely to have chondrosis than knees with previous MR (P = .003) or no previous meniscal surgery (P < .0001). There was no difference between knees without previous meniscal surgery and knees with previous MR (P = .7). Previous partial meniscectomy was associated with a higher rate of chondrosis in the same compartment compared with knees without previous meniscal surgery (P < .0001) and knees with previous MR (P ≤ .03). Conclusion The status of articular cartilage at the time of revision ACL reconstruction relates to previous meniscal surgery independent of the effect of patient age. Previous partial meniscectomy is associated with a higher incidence of articular cartilage lesions, whereas previous meniscal repair is not. Although this association may

  9. Pilot Study of Cartilage Repair in the Knee Joint with Multiply Incised Chondral Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Vancsodi, Jozsef; Farkas, Boglarka; Fazekas, Adam; Nagy, Szilvia Anett; Bogner, Peter; Vermes, Csaba; Than, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Focal cartilage lesions in the knee joint have limited capacity to heal. Current animal experiments show that incisions of the deep zone of a cartilage allograft allow acceptable integration for the graft. Questions/Purposes We performed this clinical study to determine (1) if the multiply incised cartilage graft is surgically applicable for focal cartilage lesions, (2) whether this allograft has a potential to integrate to the repair site, and (3) if patients show clinical improvement. Patients and Methods Seven patients with 8 chondral lesions were enrolled into the study. Symptomatic lesions between 2 and 8 cm2 were accepted. Additional injuries were allowed but were addressed simultaneously. Grafts were tailored to match and the deep zone of the cartilage was multiply incised to augment the basal integration before securing in place. Rigorous postoperative physiotherapy followed. At 12 and 24 months the patients’ satisfaction were measured and serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 6 patients. Results Following the implantations no adverse reaction occurred. MRI evaluation postoperatively showed the graft in place in 5 out of 6 patients. In 1 patient, MRI suggested partial delamination at 1 year and graft degeneration at 2 years. Short Form–36 health survey and the Lysholm knee score demonstrated a significant improvement in the first year; however, by 2 years there was a noticeable drop in the scores. Conclusions. Multiply incised pure chondral allograft used for cartilage repair appears to be a relatively safe method. Further studies are necessary to assess its potential in cartilage repair before its clinical use. PMID:26069710

  10. Validity of Musculoskeletal Ultrasound for Identification of Humeroradial Joint Chondral Lesions: A Preliminary Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Lohman, Chelsea M.; Smith, Michael P.; Dedrick, Gregory S.; Brismée, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Context: Epicondylalgia is a common condition involving pain-generating structures such as tendon, neural, and chondral tissue. The current noninvasive reference standard for identifying chondral lesions is magnetic resonance imaging. Musculoskeletal ultrasound (MUS) may be an inexpensive and effective alternative. Objective: To determine the intrarater reliability and validity of MUS for identifying humeroradial joint (HRJ) chondral lesions. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Clinical anatomy research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-eight embalmed cadavers (14 women, 14 men; mean age = 79.5 ± 8.5 years). Main Outcome Measure(s): An athletic trainer performed MUS evaluation of each anterior and distal-posterior capitellum and radial head to identify chondral lesions. The reference standard was identification of chondral lesions by gross macroscopic examination. Intrarater reliability for reproducing an image was calculated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (3,k) for measurements of the articular surface using 2 images. Intrarater reliability to evaluate a single image was calculated using the Cohen κ for agreement as to the presence of chondral lesions. Validity was calculated using the agreement of MUS images and gross macroscopic examination. Results: Intrarater reliability was 0.88 (95% confidence interval = 0.77, 0.94) for reproducing an image and 0.93 (95% confidence interval = 0.80, 1.06) for evaluating a single image. Identifying chondral lesions on all HRJ surfaces with MUS demonstrated sensitivity = 0.93, specificity = 0.28, positive predictive value = 0.58, negative predictive value = 0.77, positive likelihood ratio = 1.28, and negative likelihood ratio = 0.27. Conclusions: Musculoskeletal ultrasound is a reliable and sensitive tool for a clinician with relatively little experience and training to rule out HRJ chondral lesions. These results may assist with clinical assessment and decision making in patients with

  11. Concentrated Bone Marrow Aspirate for the Treatment of Chondral Injuries and Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Serra Cruz, Raphael; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) has emerged as a novel treatment for pathology of the knee. Despite containing a limited number of stem cells, BMAC serves as a source of growth factors that are thought to play an important role as a result of their anabolic and anti-inflammatory effects. To our knowledge, there is no systematic review regarding the outcomes of bone marrow aspirate concentrate used for the treatment of chondral defects and osteoarthritis of the knee. Purpose: To perform a systematic review on the outcomes of bone marrow aspirate concentrate for the treatment of chondral defects and osteoarthritis of the knee. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was performed using the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, and MEDLINE from 1980 to present. Inclusion criteria were as follows: use of BMAC for treatment of chondral defects and osteoarthritis of the knee, English language, and human studies. We excluded cadaveric studies, animal studies, basic science articles, editorial articles, surveys, and studies that did not include the knee. After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, studies were evaluated for efficacy and safety of BMAC for treatment of articular cartilage knee pathologies. Results: Eleven studies were considered. Of these, 5 were prospective studies, 1 was a retrospective study, 2 were case series, and 3 were case reports. Three comparative studies (2 with level 2 evidence, 1 with level 3 evidence) were found in our search; none of them were randomized. Three studies investigated the clinical efficacy of BMAC in the treatment of osteoarthritis, and 8 studies evaluated the efficacy of BMAC on focal cartilage injuries. All 3 studies regarding osteoarthritis and all 8 studies regarding focal chondral defects reported good to excellent overall outcomes with the use of BMAC. Conclusion: Although a

  12. [Arthroscopic treatment of chondral lesions of the ankle joint. Evidence-based therapy].

    PubMed

    Thomas, M; Jordan, M; Hamborg-Petersen, E

    2016-02-01

    Ankle sprains are the most relevant injuries of the lower extremities and can lead to damage to ligaments and osteochondral lesions. Up to 50 % of patients with a sprained ankle later develop a lesion of the cartilage in the ankle joint or an osteochondral lesion of the talus. This can lead to osteoarthritis of the injured ankle joint. Spontaneous healing is possible in all age groups in cases of a bone bruise in the subchondral bone but in isolated chondral injuries is only useful in pediatric patients. In many cases chondral and osteochondral injuries lead to increasing demarcation of the affected area and can result in progressive degeneration of the joint if not recognized in time. There also exist a certain number of osteochondral changes of the articular surface of the talus without any history of relevant trauma, which are collectively grouped under the term osteochondrosis dissecans. Perfusion disorders are discussed as one of many possible causes of these alterations. Nowadays, chondral and osteochondral defects can be treated earlier due to detection using very sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) techniques. The use of conservative treatment only has a chance of healing in pediatric patients. Conservative measures for adults should only be considered as adjuvant treatment to surgery.Based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature, this article gives an overview and critical analysis of the current concepts for treatment of chondral and osteochondral injuries and lesions of the talus. With arthroscopic therapy curettage and microfracture of talar lesions are the predominant approaches or retrograde drilling of the defect is another option when the chondral coating is retained. Implantation of autologous chondral cells or homologous juvenile cartilage tissue is also possible with arthroscopic techniques. Osteochondral fractures (flake fracture) are usually performed as a mini-open procedure supported by

  13. Chondral Injury in Patellofemoral Instability

    PubMed Central

    Lustig, Sébastien; Servien, Elvire; Neyret, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Patellofemoral instability is common and affects a predominantly young age group. Chondral injury occurs in up to 95%, and includes osteochondral fractures and loose bodies acutely and secondary degenerative changes in recurrent cases. Biomechanical abnormalities, such as trochlear dysplasia, patella alta, and increased tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distance, predispose to both recurrent dislocations and patellofemoral arthrosis. Design: In this article, we review the mechanisms of chondral injury in patellofemoral instability, diagnostic modalities, the distribution of lesions seen in acute and episodic dislocation, and treatments for articular cartilage lesions of the patellofemoral joint. Results: Little specific evidence exists for cartilage treatments in patellofemoral instability. In general, the results of reparative and restorative procedures in the patellofemoral joint are inferior to those observed in other compartments of the knee. Conclusion: Given the increased severity of chondral lesions and progression to osteoarthritis seen with recurrent dislocations, careful consideration should be given to early stabilisation in patients with predisposing factors. PMID:26069693

  14. Editorial Commentary: Risk Factors for Chondral Lesions in the Hip-There Is More to It Than Cam and Pincer.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Erik

    2016-08-01

    Age has been cited in a recent article as the largest predictor of both chondral and labral lesions in patients with hip dysplasia. But it was not surprising that there is also a direct relation between a small lateral center-edge angle, acetabular head index, and cartilage degeneration and an increased acetabular index and labral tears in patients with hip dysplasia. The severity of the congenital disease determines the severity of the intra-articular lesions. PMID:27495863

  15. Timing of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Incidence of Meniscal and Chondral Injury within the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Razi, Mohammad; Salehi, Shahin; Dadgostar, Haleh; Cherati, Afsaneh Safar; Moghaddam, Ahmad Bagheri; Tabatabaiand, Seyyed Mehdi; Dodaran, Masoud Solaymani

    2013-01-01

    Background: To review a single-surgeon series of 616 athletic patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions in order to evaluate the relationship between the timing of the reconstruction and the incidence of meniscal and chondral injuries. Methods: Six group of patients were categorized based on the time interval from their injury to surgery in the following manner: <3 months, 3-6 months, 6-9 months, 9-18 months, 18-36 months, and >36 months. The presence of meniscal tears was documented and chondral pathology was scored based on the Outerbridge classification. Results: Incidence of medial meniscus tear was significantly higher in patients undergoing reconstruction after 3 months from their injury (P = 0.032). The opportunity of patients with chondral pathology was recorded to be significantly higher in the groups operated on after 6 months from their injuries time (P = 0.008). Conclusions: Considering the effect of time on the rate of having meniscus injury and chondral pathology, reducing the time between the injury and surgery could improve the long-term health outcomes in this population. PMID:23717779

  16. Broken bioabsorbable femoral cross-pin as a cause of a chondral lesion after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Papastergiou, Stergios G; Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Ziogas, Evangelos; Dimitriadis, Theofilos; Voulgaropoulos, Harilaos

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of a chondral lesion after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction caused by femoral cross-pin breakage and intra-articular migration of the fragment. A 20-year-old man initially underwent ACL reconstruction using a hamstring autograft. The RigidFix bioabsorbable cross-pin (DePuy Mitek) was used for the femoral fixation. The patient returned to a pre-injury level of activity (professional soccer player) 6 months postoperatively. However, 20 months postoperatively, the patient presented with effusion and lateral joint-line pain after practice, without signs of instability in clinical examination. Conservative treatment failed and at re-arthroscopy a chondral lesion of the lateral femoral and tibial condyle was found, which had been caused by the broken femoral cross-pin. The fragment was removed and the symptoms resolved. Orthopaedic surgeons should be aware of this complication when using a bioabsorbable cross-pin for femoral fixation in ACL reconstruction. PMID:21686583

  17. Broken bioabsorbable femoral cross-pin as a cause of a chondral lesion after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Papastergiou, Stergios G; Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Ziogas, Evangelos; Dimitriadis, Theofilos; Voulgaropoulos, Harilaos

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of a chondral lesion after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction caused by femoral cross-pin breakage and intra-articular migration of the fragment. A 20-year-old man initially underwent ACL reconstruction using a hamstring autograft. The RigidFix bioabsorbable cross-pin (DePuy Mitek) was used for the femoral fixation. The patient returned to a pre-injury level of activity (professional soccer player) 6 months postoperatively. However, 20 months postoperatively, the patient presented with effusion and lateral joint-line pain after practice, without signs of instability in clinical examination. Conservative treatment failed and at re-arthroscopy a chondral lesion of the lateral femoral and tibial condyle was found, which had been caused by the broken femoral cross-pin. The fragment was removed and the symptoms resolved. Orthopaedic surgeons should be aware of this complication when using a bioabsorbable cross-pin for femoral fixation in ACL reconstruction. PMID:21686583

  18. Impact of Lesion Location on the Progression of Osteoarthritis in a Rat Knee Model

    PubMed Central

    Knapik, Derrick M.; Harrison, Ryan K.; Siston, Robert A.; Agarwal, Sudha; Flanigan, David C.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate how surgically created acute full-thickness cartilage defects of similar size and location created on the medial versus lateral femoral condyle influence progression of spontaneous cartilage lesions in a rat model. Full-thickness cartilage defects of 1 mm were surgically created on the medial or lateral femoral condyles on the right leg of 20 rats (n =10/group). Ten rats served as controls. Spontaneous lesion progression on the ipsilateral and contralateral surfaces was examined using a high-resolution digital camera along with H&E and Safranin-O staining. Chondral defects were scored grossly and histologically. Control femur displayed no cartilage disruption. Surgically treated knees exhibited created and spontaneous cartilage defects with no evidence of healing unless subchondral bone was penetrated. Ipsilateral spontaneous lesions on the lateral condyle were significantly more severe on average (p =0.009) compared to medial lesions on gross examination. Histological examination found contralateral lesions on the lateral surface following surgically created medial lesions to be more severe (p =0.057) compared to contralateral lesions. A trend toward more susceptible chondral damage to the lateral condyle was observed following acute lesion creation on either medial or lateral condyles. Mechanisms behind this pattern of spontaneous lesion development are unclear, requring further investigation. PMID:25376614

  19. Arthroscopic retrograde osteochondral autologous transplantation to chondral lesion in femoral head.

    PubMed

    Cetinkaya, Sarper; Toker, Berkin; Taser, Omer

    2014-06-01

    This report describes the treatment of 2 cases of full-thickness cartilage defect of the femoral head. The authors performed osteochondral autologous transplantation with a different technique that has not been reported to date. One patient was 37 years old, and the other was 42 years old. Both presented with hip pain. In both patients, radiograph and magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a focal chondral defect on the weight-bearing area of the femoral head and acetabular impingement. A retrograde osteochondral autologous transplantation technique combined with hip arthroscopy and arthroscopic impingement treatment was performed. After a 2-month recovery period, the symptoms were resolved. In the first year of follow-up, Harris Hip scores improved significantly (case 1, 56.6 to 87.6; case 2, 58.6 to 90). The technique described yielded good short- and midterm clinical and radiologic outcomes. To the authors' knowledge, this report is the first to describe a retrograde osteochondral transplantation technique performed with hip arthroscopy in the femoral head. PMID:24972445

  20. Adolescent Femoral Chondral Fragment Fixation With Poly-L-Lactic Acid Chondral Darts.

    PubMed

    Morris, John K; Weber, Alexander E; Morris, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Large chondral injuries without attached bone are uncommon. This report describes a 14-year-old boy who had a unique stress reaction between the bone and the overlying cartilage, predominantly of the anterior lateral femoral condyle, during a week-long basketball camp, resulting in complete displacement of a 2.5 × 2.5-cm full-thickness articular cartilage lesion. There was a 6-day interval from the time of the injury to the first office appointment. Scheduling of magnetic resonance imaging and insurance approval took another week, and then surgery scheduling, including insurance approval and arranging for surgical supplies, took another week. Three weeks after the initial injury, the patient underwent diagnostic arthroscopy and open arthrotomy, and the cartilage-free fragment was returned to the donor site and fixed with poly-L-lactic acid chondral darts. Considerable delamination of the shoulders of the defect was noted on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and at the time of surgery, suggesting an unusual prodromal stress reaction. Although there was no underlying subchondral bone on the free cartilage fragment, the injury healed. The patient had return of full knee range of motion and strength. Magnetic resonance imaging performed 3 months postoperatively showed healed cartilage. At 1 year of clinical follow-up, the patient had no clinical sequelae from the initial injury and had returned to competitive basketball. Prompt recognition of this injury pattern and subsequent surgical repair are necessary because the window of opportunity closes as fibrous healing occurs and the cartilage fragment deforms. The poly-L-lactic acid chondral dart system was instrumental to the success of this case. PMID:26840696

  1. T2 black lesions on routine knee MRI: differential considerations.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Vibhor; Cho, Gina; Moore, Daniel; Pezeshk, Parham; Coyner, Katherine; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2016-07-01

    The majority of abnormal findings or lesions on T2-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are hyperintense due to increased perfusion or fluid content, such as infections, tumours or synovitis. Hypointense lesions on T2-weighted images (both fat-suppressed and non-fat-suppressed) are less common and can sometimes be overlooked. Such lesions have limited differential diagnostic possibilities, and include vacuum phenomenon, loose body, tenosynovial giant cell tumour, rheumatoid arthritis, haemochromatosis, gout, amyloid, chondrocalcinosis, hydroxyapetite deposition disease, lipoma arborescens, arthrofibrosis and iatrogenic lesions. These lesions often show characteristic appearances and predilections in the knee. In this article, the authors describe the MRI features of hypointense T2 lesions on routine knee MRI and outline a systematic diagnostic approach towards their evaluation. Key Points • Hypointense lesions on T2 images (T2 Dark Lesions) encompass limited diagnostic possibilities. • T2 Dark lesions often show characteristic appearances and predilections in the knee. • A systematic diagnostic approach will help radiologists make the correct diagnosis. PMID:26420500

  2. Treatment of articular cartilage lesions of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Falah, Mazen; Nierenberg, Gabreil; Soudry, Michael; Hayden, Morris

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of articular cartilage lesions in the knee remains a challenge for the practising orthopaedic surgeon. A wide range of options are currently practised, ranging from conservative measures through various types of operations and, recently, use of growth factors and emerging gene therapy techniques. The end result of these methods is usually a fibrous repair tissue (fibrocartilage), which lacks the biomechanical characteristics of hyaline cartilage that are necessary to withstand the compressive forces distributed across the knee. The fibrocartilage generally deteriorates over time, resulting in a return of the original symptoms and occasionally reported progression to osteoarthritis. Our purpose in this study was to review the aetiology, pathogenesis and treatment options for articular cartilage lesions of the knee. At present, autologous cell therapies, growth factor techniques and biomaterials offer more promising avenues of research to find clinical answers. PMID:20162416

  3. Cartilage Injuries in the Adult Knee

    PubMed Central

    Moyad, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    Cartilage injuries are frequently recognized as a source of significant morbidity and pain in patients with previous knee injuries. The majority of patients who undergo routine knee arthroscopy have evidence of a chondral defect. These injuries represent a continuum of pathology from small, asymptomatic lesions to large, disabling defects affecting a major portion of one or more compartments within the knee joint. In comparison to patients with osteoarthritis, individuals with isolated chondral surface damage are often younger, significantly more active, and usually less willing to accept limitations in activities that require higher impact. At the present time, a variety of surgical procedures exist, each with their unique indications. This heterogeneity of treatment options frequently leads to uncertainty regarding which techniques, if any, are most appropriate for patients. The purpose of this review is to describe the workup and discuss the management techniques for cartilage injuries within the adult knee. PMID:26069581

  4. Arthroscopic repair of acetabular chondral delamination with fibrin adhesive.

    PubMed

    Tzaveas, Alexandros P; Villar, Richard N

    2010-01-01

    Acetabular chondral delamination is a frequent finding at hip arthroscopy. The cartilage is macroscopically normal but disrupted from the subchondral bone. Excision of chondral flaps is the usual procedure for this type of lesion. However, we report 19 consecutive patients in whom the delaminated chondral flap was re-attached to the underlying subchondral bone with fibrin adhesive. We used the modified Harris hip score for assessment of pain and function. Improvement in pain and function was found to be statistically significant six months and one year after surgery. No local or general complications were noted. Three patients underwent further surgery for unrelated reasons. In each, the area of fibrin repair appeared intact and secure. Our results suggest that fibrin is a safe agent to use for acetabular chondral delamination. PMID:20235074

  5. Diagnosis of Knee Osteochondral Lesions With Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Penttilä, Pekko; Liukkonen, Jukka; Joukainen, Antti; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Töyräs, Juha; Kröger, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of articular cartilage and subchondral bone is essential in the diagnosis of joint diseases and injuries. Interobserver and intraobserver reproducibilities of arthroscopic grading are only poor to moderate. Thus, for quantitative and objective evaluation of cartilage and subchondral bone, ultrasound arthroscopy (UA) has been introduced to clarify this dilemma. Assessment of the clinical feasibility of high-frequency ultrasonography (US) during 6 knee arthroscopies was conducted, and the surgical technique is presented. US imaging was conducted with a flexible 9-MHz US catheter inserted into the joint through conventional portals. US and arthroscopy videos were synchronously recorded, and US parameters for cartilage and subchondral bone characteristics were measured. Arthroscopy and US imaging were combined to perform cartilage grading. UA produced quantitative data on lesion size, as well as cartilage quality, and showed subchondral bone changes. Visualization of an osteochondritis dissecans lesion not detected by conventional arthroscopy and US-guided retrograde drilling were possible with UA. To conclude, UA proved to be clinically feasible and aided in the diagnosis when assessing knee osteochondral lesions. PMID:26697300

  6. Bone marrow lesions and subchondral bone pathology of the knee.

    PubMed

    Kon, Elizaveta; Ronga, Mario; Filardo, Giuseppe; Farr, Jack; Madry, Henning; Milano, Giuseppe; Andriolo, Luca; Shabshin, Nogah

    2016-06-01

    Bone marrow lesions (BMLs) around the knee are a common magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) finding. However, despite the growing interest on BMLs in multiple pathological conditions, they remain controversial not only for the still unknown role in the etiopathological processes, but also in terms of clinical impact and treatment. The differential diagnosis includes a wide range of conditions: traumatic contusion and fractures, cyst formation and erosions, hematopoietic and infiltrated marrow, developmental chondroses, disuse and overuse, transient bone marrow oedema syndrome and, lastly, subchondral insufficiency fractures and true osteonecrosis. Regardless the heterogeneous spectrum of these pathologies, a key factor for patient management is the distinction between reversible and irreversible conditions. To this regard, MRI plays a major role, leading to the correct diagnosis based on recognizable typical patterns that have to be considered together with coexistent abnormalities, age, and clinical history. Several treatment options have been proposed, from conservative to surgical approaches. In this manuscript the main lesion patterns and their management have been analysed to provide the most updated evidence for the differential diagnosis and the most effective treatment. PMID:27075892

  7. Cysts and cystic-appearing lesions of the knee: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Telischak, Nicholas A; Wu, Jim S; Eisenberg, Ronald L

    2014-01-01

    Cysts and cystic-appearing lesions around the knee are common and can be divided into true cysts (synovial cysts, bursae, ganglia, and meniscal cysts) and lesions that mimic cysts (hematomas, seromas, abscesses, vascular lesions, and neoplasms). The specific anatomic location of the cystic lesion often permits the correct diagnosis. In difficult cases, identifying a cystic mass in an atypical location and/or visualizing internal solid contrast enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) should raise concern for a neoplasm and the need for further evaluation and intervention. PMID:25024531

  8. Significance of Pre-Radiographic MRI Lesions in Persons at Higher Risk for Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Leena; Chmiel, Joan S.; Almagor, Orit; Dunlop, Dorothy; Guermazi, Ali; Bathon, Joan; Eaton, Charles; Hochberg, Marc; Jackson, Rebecca; Kwoh, Kent; Mysiw, W. Jerry; Crema, Michel; Roemer, Frank; Nevitt, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective Little is known about early knee osteoarthritis (OA). The significance of MRI lesions in older persons without radiographic OA is unclear. Our objectives were to determine extent of tissue pathology by MRI and evaluate its significance by testing the hypotheses: cartilage damage, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), and meniscal damage are associated with prevalent frequent knee symptoms and incident persistent symptoms; BMLs and meniscal damage are associated with incident tibiofemoral cartilage damage; BMLs are associated with incident patellofemoral cartilage damage. Methods In a cohort study of 849 OAI (Osteoarthritis Initiative) participants who had bilateral K/L 0, we assessed cartilage, BMLs, and meniscal damage using MOAKS, as well as prevalent frequent knee symptoms, incident persistent symptoms, and incident cartilage damage. Multiple logistic regression (one knee/person) was used to evaluate associations between MRI lesions and each of these outcomes. Results 76% had cartilage damage, 61% BMLs, 21% meniscal tears, and 14% meniscal extrusion. Cartilage damage (any; tibiofemoral and patellofemoral), BMLs (any; tibiofemoral and patellofemoral), meniscal extrusion, and BMI were associated with prevalent frequent symptoms. Cartilage damage (isolated patellofemoral; tibiofemoral and patellofemoral), BMLs (any; isolated patellofemoral; tibiofemoral and patellofemoral), meniscal tears, and BMI were associated with incident persistent symptoms. Hand OA but no individual lesion type was associated with incident tibiofemoral cartilage damage, and BMLs (any; any patellofemoral) with incident patellofemoral damage. Having more lesion types was associated with a greater risk of outcomes. Conclusions MRI-detected lesions are not incidental and may represent early disease in persons at higher risk for knee OA. PMID:24974824

  9. Knee cartilage defect: marrow stimulating techniques.

    PubMed

    Mirza, M Zain; Swenson, Richard D; Lynch, Scott A

    2015-12-01

    Painful chondral defects of the knee are very difficult problems. The incidence of these lesions in the general population is not known since there is likely a high rate of asymptomatic lesions. The rate of lesions found during arthroscopic exam is highly variable, with reports ranging from 11 to 72 % Aroen (Aroen Am J Sports Med 32: 211-5, 2004); Curl(Arthroscopy13: 456-60, 1997); Figueroa(Arthroscopy 23(3):312-5, 2007;); Hjelle(Arthroscopy 18: 730-4, 2002). Examples of current attempts at cartilage restoration include marrow stimulating techniques, ostochondral autografts, osteochondral allografts, and autologous chondrocyte transplantation. Current research in marrow stimulating techniques has been focused on enhancing and guiding the biology of microfracture and other traditional techniques. Modern advances in stem cell biology and biotechnology have provided many avenues for exploration. The purpose of this work is to review current techniques in marrow stimulating techniques as it relates to chondral damage of the knee. PMID:26411978

  10. Non-operative Treatment Outcomes of Stable Juvenile Osteochondritis Dissecans Lesions of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Tepolt, Frances; Heyworth, Benton E.; Kocher, Mininder S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee most commonly occurs in skeletally-immature pre-adolescent or adolescent patients. Stable juvenile OCD lesions are initially treated via non-operative methods, with varying rates of successful healing reported in the literature. Unloader bracing has been introduced as a relatively new method designed to reduce weight-bearing stress and promote healing for femoral condyle lesions, although the outcomes of unloader bracing compared to other forms of non-operative treatment have not been established. Methods: A retrospective case series was designed to include all patients initially treated non-operatively for stable juvenile OCD of the femoral condyle at a single institution from 2002-2014. Following IRB approval, patient medical records were reviewed for demographic and clinical data, including symptom duration, prior conservative treatment, non-operative treatment modality prescribed and clinical outcome. Results: 223 knees of 196 patients (146/196 (74%) male) underwent non-operative treatment for stable OCD of the medial or lateral femoral condyle. Mean age at presentation 11.5 +/- 1.7 years (range 6-16 years). 27/196 patients (14%) were diagnosed with bilateral OCD at presentation, while 169/196 (86%) presented with unilateral OCD. 180/223 knees (81%) were medial femoral condyle lesions, while 39/223 (17%) were lateral femoral condyle lesions and 4/223 (2%) bicondylar. Reported symptom duration was 10.4 +/- 8.8 months (range 0.1 - 38 months). 222/223 (99.6%) knees presented with knee pain, 68/223 (30%) with one or more mechanical symptoms (swelling, giving-way, locking, clicking). 87/223 (39%) had undergone previous non-operative treatment for an average of 2.1 months. On exam at presentation, 130/223 (58%) had tenderness to palpation noted over the associated femoral condyle or ipsilateral joint line. Treatment was based on physician preference. 121/223 (54%) were treated with unloader bracing with activity

  11. Differences in Injury Pattern and Prevalence of Cartilage Lesions in Knee and Ankle Joints: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Aurich, Matthias; Hofmann, Gunther O.; Rolauffs, Bernd; Gras, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is more common in the knee compared to the ankle joint. This can not be explained exclusively by anatomical and biomechanical differences. The aim of this study is to analyze and compare the injury pattern (clinically) and the cartilage lesions (arthroscopically) of knee and ankle joints in a cohort of patients from the same catchment area. A retrospective study of the clinical data of 3122 patients (2139 outpatients and 983 inpatients) was performed, who were treated due to an injury of the knee and ankle joint. Statistical analysis was performed using SigmaStat 3.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, USA). There is a higher prevalence of injuries in the ankle as compared to the knee joint in this population from the same catchment area. In contrast, high-grade cartilage lesions are more prevalent in the knee, whereas low grade cartilage lesions are equally distributed between knee and ankle. From this data it can be concluded that the frequency of injuries and the injury pattern of knee versus ankle joints do not correlate with the severity of cartilage lesions and may therefore have no direct influence on the differential incidence of OA in those two joints. PMID:25568732

  12. Differences in injury pattern and prevalence of cartilage lesions in knee and ankle joints: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Aurich, Matthias; Hofmann, Gunther O; Rolauffs, Bernd; Gras, Florian

    2014-10-27

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is more common in the knee compared to the ankle joint. This can not be explained exclusively by anatomical and biomechanical differences. The aim of this study is to analyze and compare the injury pattern (clinically) and the cartilage lesions (arthroscopically) of knee and ankle joints in a cohort of patients from the same catchment area. A retrospective study of the clinical data of 3122 patients (2139 outpatients and 983 inpatients) was performed, who were treated due to an injury of the knee and ankle joint. Statistical analysis was performed using SigmaStat 3.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, USA). There is a higher prevalence of injuries in the ankle as compared to the knee joint in this population from the same catchment area. In contrast, high-grade cartilage lesions are more prevalent in the knee, whereas low grade cartilage lesions are equally distributed between knee and ankle. From this data it can be concluded that the frequency of injuries and the injury pattern of knee versus ankle joints do not correlate with the severity of cartilage lesions and may therefore have no direct influence on the differential incidence of OA in those two joints. PMID:25568732

  13. Morel-Lavallée Lesion of the Knee in a Recreational Frisbee Player

    PubMed Central

    Shmerling, Alison; Bravman, Jonathan T.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic swelling/effusion in the knee region is a relatively common presenting complaint among athletes and nonathletes. Due to its broad differential diagnosis, a comprehensive evaluation beginning with history and physical examination are recommended. Knee joint effusion can be differentiated from other types of swelling by careful physical examination. Imaging, including plain radiography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), is preferred modality. Aspiration of a local fluctuating mass may help with the diagnosis and management of some of these conditions. We present a case of a 26-year-old gentleman with superomedial Morel-Lavallée lesion (MLL) of the knee with history of a fall during a Frisbee game. His MLL was successfully treated with therapeutic aspiration and compression wrap without further sequelae. MLL is a rare condition consisting of a closed degloving injury caused by pressure and shear stress between the subcutaneous tissue and the superficial fascia or bone. Most commonly, MLL is found over the greater trochanter and sacrum but in rare cases can occur in other regions of the body. In most cases, concurrent severe injury mechanisms and concomitant fractures are present. MLL due to sports injuries are very rare. Therapeutic strategies may vary from compression wraps and aspiration to surgical evacuation. PMID:27493817

  14. Morel-Lavallée Lesion of the Knee in a Recreational Frisbee Player.

    PubMed

    Shmerling, Alison; Bravman, Jonathan T; Khodaee, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic swelling/effusion in the knee region is a relatively common presenting complaint among athletes and nonathletes. Due to its broad differential diagnosis, a comprehensive evaluation beginning with history and physical examination are recommended. Knee joint effusion can be differentiated from other types of swelling by careful physical examination. Imaging, including plain radiography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), is preferred modality. Aspiration of a local fluctuating mass may help with the diagnosis and management of some of these conditions. We present a case of a 26-year-old gentleman with superomedial Morel-Lavallée lesion (MLL) of the knee with history of a fall during a Frisbee game. His MLL was successfully treated with therapeutic aspiration and compression wrap without further sequelae. MLL is a rare condition consisting of a closed degloving injury caused by pressure and shear stress between the subcutaneous tissue and the superficial fascia or bone. Most commonly, MLL is found over the greater trochanter and sacrum but in rare cases can occur in other regions of the body. In most cases, concurrent severe injury mechanisms and concomitant fractures are present. MLL due to sports injuries are very rare. Therapeutic strategies may vary from compression wraps and aspiration to surgical evacuation. PMID:27493817

  15. CAN OSTEOCHONDRAL GRAFTING BE AUGMENTED WITH MICROFRACTURE IN AN EXTENDED SIZED LESION OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE

    PubMed Central

    Lane, JG; Healey, RM; Sah, RL; Chen, AC-S; Amiel, D

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Both microfracture and osteochondral autografting procedures have been useful in treating osteochondral lesions. HYPOTHESIS Combining microfracture and osteochondral autografting procedures can extend the size of lesions which can be treated with either technique. STUDY DESIGN Descriptive laboratory study. METHODS Eight adult goats underwent osteochondral autograft transfer of a 4.5mm femoral trochlea plug into an 8mm full thickness chondral defect in the weight bearing portion of the medial femoral condyle. In the gap region surrounding the autograft, microfracture was performed. The animals were allowed normal activity until the end of the experiment at 6 months, at which time the knees were harvested. At harvest the knees were assessed grossly, and then evaluation was performed by histology and histomorphometry, biochemistry and biomechanics. One animal died at 6 wks from gastroenteritis. RESULTS The osteochondral plugs healed well, with integration of the bone and preservation of the chondral cap. The chondral gap between the host site articular cartilage and the transferred plug had decreased from 3 mm at implant to less than 0.1 mm. Histological analysis demonstrated regions of variable cartilage repair, with integration of the cartilage layer at some sites but incomplete healing at others. Histomorphometry demonstrated filling of the chondral gap to 75–85% of the normal volume. Biochemical analysis revealed greater than 90% type II collagen at most sites with some areas containing 80% type II collagen. Biomechanical indentation testing, indicated that the repaired area had variable thickness and stiffness, with a trend of increased stiffness in the bulk graft and decreased softness at the proximal microfracture interface site. CONCLUSIONS The performance of a combined microfracture and osteochondral autograft transfer (OATS) procedure to resurface a large chondral defect appears promising. Transferred cartilage tissue can successfully be

  16. Articular Cartilage Repair Using Marrow Stimulation Augmented with a Viable Chondral Allograft: 9-Month Postoperative Histological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, James K.; Geraghty, Sandra; Protzman, Nicole M.

    2015-01-01

    Marrow stimulation is frequently employed to treat focal chondral defects of the knee. However, marrow stimulation typically results in fibrocartilage repair tissue rather than healthy hyaline cartilage, which, over time, predisposes the repair to failure. Recently, a cryopreserved viable chondral allograft was developed to augment marrow stimulation. The chondral allograft is comprised of native viable chondrocytes, chondrogenic growth factors, and extracellular matrix proteins within the superficial, transitional, and radial zones of hyaline cartilage. Therefore, host mesenchymal stem cells that infiltrate the graft from the underlying bone marrow following marrow stimulation are provided with the optimal microenvironment to undergo chondrogenesis. The present report describes treatment of a trochlear defect with marrow stimulation augmented with this novel chondral allograft, along with nine month postoperative histological results. At nine months, the patient demonstrated complete resolution of pain and improvement in function, and the repair tissue consisted of 85% hyaline cartilage. For comparison, a biopsy obtained from a patient 8.2 months after treatment with marrow stimulation alone contained only 5% hyaline cartilage. These outcomes suggest that augmenting marrow stimulation with the viable chondral allograft can eliminate pain and improve outcomes, compared with marrow stimulation alone. PMID:25628907

  17. Articular cartilage repair using marrow stimulation augmented with a viable chondral allograft: 9-month postoperative histological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, James K; Geraghty, Sandra; Protzman, Nicole M

    2015-01-01

    Marrow stimulation is frequently employed to treat focal chondral defects of the knee. However, marrow stimulation typically results in fibrocartilage repair tissue rather than healthy hyaline cartilage, which, over time, predisposes the repair to failure. Recently, a cryopreserved viable chondral allograft was developed to augment marrow stimulation. The chondral allograft is comprised of native viable chondrocytes, chondrogenic growth factors, and extracellular matrix proteins within the superficial, transitional, and radial zones of hyaline cartilage. Therefore, host mesenchymal stem cells that infiltrate the graft from the underlying bone marrow following marrow stimulation are provided with the optimal microenvironment to undergo chondrogenesis. The present report describes treatment of a trochlear defect with marrow stimulation augmented with this novel chondral allograft, along with nine month postoperative histological results. At nine months, the patient demonstrated complete resolution of pain and improvement in function, and the repair tissue consisted of 85% hyaline cartilage. For comparison, a biopsy obtained from a patient 8.2 months after treatment with marrow stimulation alone contained only 5% hyaline cartilage. These outcomes suggest that augmenting marrow stimulation with the viable chondral allograft can eliminate pain and improve outcomes, compared with marrow stimulation alone. PMID:25628907

  18. Advancements in Orthopedic Intervention: Retrograde Drilling and Bone Grafting of Osteochondral Lesions of the Knee Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Seebauer, Christian J.; Bail, Hermann J.; Rump, Jens C. Walter, Thula Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M.

    2010-12-15

    Computer-assisted surgery is currently a novel challenge for surgeons and interventional radiologists. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided procedures are still evolving. In this experimental study, we describe and assess an innovative passive-navigation method for MRI-guided treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the knee. A navigation principle using a passive-navigation device was evaluated in six cadaveric knee joint specimens for potential applicability in retrograde drilling and bone grafting of osteochondral lesions using MRI guidance. Feasibility and accuracy were evaluated in an open MRI scanner (1.0 T Philips Panorama HFO MRI System). Interactive MRI navigation allowed precise drilling and bone grafting of osteochondral lesions of the knee. All lesions were hit with an accuracy of 1.86 mm in the coronal plane and 1.4 mm the sagittal plane. Targeting of all lesions was possible with a single drilling. MRI allowed excellent assessment of correct positioning of the cancellous bone cylinder during bone grafting. The navigation device and anatomic structures could be clearly identified and distinguished throughout the entire drilling procedure. MRI-assisted navigation method using a passive navigation device is feasible for the treatment of osteochondral lesions of the knee under MRI guidance and allows precise and safe drilling without exposure to ionizing radiation. This method may be a viable alternative to other navigation principles, especially for pediatric and adolescent patients. This MRI-navigated method is also potentially applicable in many other MRI-guided interventions.

  19. A spectroscopic approach to imaging and quantification of cartilage lesions in human knee joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, A.; Sundqvist, T.; Kuiper, J.-H.; Öberg, P. Å.

    2011-03-01

    We have previously described a technology based on diffuse reflectance of broadband light for measuring joint articular cartilage thickness, utilizing that optical absorption is different in cartilage and subchondral bone. This study is the first evaluation of the technology in human material. We also investigated the prospects of cartilage lesion imaging, with the specific aim of arthroscopic integration. Cartilage thickness was studied ex vivo in a number of sites (n = 87) on human knee joint condyles, removed from nine patients during total knee replacement surgery. A reflectance spectrum was taken at each site and the cartilage thickness was estimated using the blue, green, red and near-infrared regions of the spectrum, respectively. Estimated values were compared with reference cartilage thickness values (taken after sample slicing) using an exponential model. Two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations were performed in a theoretical analysis of the experimental results. The reference cartilage thickness of the investigated sites was 1.60 ± 1.30 mm (mean ± SD) in the range 0-4.2 mm. Highest correlation coefficients were seen for the calculations based on the near-infrared region after normalization to the red region (r = 0.86) and for the green region (r = 0.80).

  20. [Capsular ligament lesions of the knee joint. Conservative and surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Gradinger, R; Haller, W; Rodammer, G; Rechl, H

    1989-02-28

    On the basis of our experience with more than 600 reconstructed capsular ligament injuries of the knee joint, we conclude that conservative functional treatment should be preserved for patients with capsular ligament lesions with no loss of stability. On an individual basis, it must be decided whether, in the event of a more or less large degree of instability presenting, conservative mobilising treatment (patients older than 45 years), or surgical reconstructive treatment should be provided. Surgical procedures aim at achieving anatomical reconstruction, which is only approximately possible with secondary reconstruction in the presence of chronic instability. For the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament, the use of the semitendinosus tendon for reinforcement with possible reattachment of the cruciate ligament can be recommended. Otherwise, the free patellar ligament transplant, as far as possible with additional synovialisation--which permits better revitalisation of the ligament--should be employed. PMID:2703203

  1. Chondral Rib Fractures in Professional American Football

    PubMed Central

    McAdams, Timothy R.; Deimel, Jay F.; Ferguson, Jeff; Beamer, Brandon S.; Beaulieu, Christopher F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although a recognized and discussed injury, chondral rib fractures in professional American football have not been previously reported in the literature. There currently exists no consensus on how to identify and treat these injuries or the expected return to play for the athlete. Purpose: To present 2 cases of chondral rib injuries in the National Football League (NFL) and discuss the current practice patterns for management of these injuries among the NFL team physicians. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Two cases of NFL players with chondral rib injuries are presented. A survey regarding work-up and treatment of these injuries was completed by team physicians at the 2014 NFL Combine. Our experience in identifying and treating these injuries is presented in conjunction with a survey of NFL team physicians’ experiences. Results: Two cases of rib chondral injuries were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) and treated with rest and protective splinting. Return to play was 2 to 4 weeks. NFL Combine survey results show that NFL team physicians see a mean of 4 costal cartilage injuries per 5-year period, or approximately 1 case per year per team. Seventy percent of team physicians use CT scanning and 43% use magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis of these injuries. An anesthetic block is used acutely in 57% and only electively in subsequent games by 39%. Conclusion: A high index of suspicion is necessary to diagnose chondral rib injuries in American football. CT scan is most commonly used to confirm diagnosis. Return to play can take up to 2 to 4 weeks with a protective device, although anesthetic blocks can be used to potentially expedite return. Clinical Relevance: Chondral rib injuries are common among NFL football players, while there is no literature to support proper diagnosis and treatment of these injuries or expected duration of recovery. These injuries are likely common in other contact sports and levels of

  2. [Biomechanics of the knee joint].

    PubMed

    Witzel, U

    1993-01-01

    The capsular and ligamentous structures as control system of a healthy knee-joint supported by the muscular system are responsible for the rolling and gliding motion of the femoral condyles on the tibial plateau. Both the condyles and the tibial plateau have individually developed but to each other adjusted shapes and fine structures thereby. These structures consist of hyaline cartilage at their three-dimensional surfaces and of closely packed fibrils (lamina splendens) as the final gliding zone for tensile load. The orientation of the collagenous fibres can be made visible by split lines. The chondral surfaces are indirectly in contact to each other and orthogonally stressed at the particular point of contact. The indirect contact of the cartilaginous surfaces happens under interposition of the menisci. The meniscus serves to reduce and equalize the surface pressure by its own projected surface on the one hand and by maintaining of a hydraulic pressure of the synovial fluid on the other hand. Deviations of the condylar position as a result on ligamentous instabilities or ruptures with a following occurring loss of congruence, meniscal lesions or traumatic ruptures lead to a rapid discharge of the synovial fluid under load. The result is a hydraulic head loss with direct contact of the chondral surfaces under stress leading to arthrotic deformations. Severe arthrotic deformations or very much every meniscectomy produce intraarticular lumped loads resulting in a hyper-physiologic chondral pressure and malnutrition thereby. Further on there develop subchondral stress concentrations (caused by the lumped loads) leading to osseous damages, too. MR-pictures can make visible these damages. Chondromalacia, fissure or even chondrolysis are arthroscopically detectable sometimes. As after-effects of deficient knee ligaments occur pathological deviations of the femoral condyles and resulting destructions of the articular surfaces under stress enormously intensified by

  3. MRI EVALUATION OF KNEE CARTILAGE

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Marcelo Bordalo; Camanho, Gilberto Luís

    2015-01-01

    Through the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to characterize soft tissue noninvasively, it has become an excellent method for evaluating cartilage. The development of new and faster methods allowed increased resolution and contrast in evaluating chondral structure, with greater diagnostic accuracy. In addition, physiological techniques for cartilage assessment that can detect early changes before the appearance of cracks and erosion have been developed. In this updating article, the various techniques for chondral assessment using knee MRI will be discussed and demonstrated. PMID:27022562

  4. The Kinematic Control During the Backward Gait and Knee Proprioception: Insights from Lesions of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Viggiano, Davide; Corona, Katia; Cerciello, Simone; Vasso, Michele; Schiavone-Panni, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    An already existing large volume of work on kinematics documents a reduction of step length during unusual gaits, such as backward walking. This is mainly explained in terms of modifications of some biomechanical properties. In the present study, we propose that the proprioceptive information from the knee may be involved in this change of motor strategy. Specifically, we show that a non-automated condition such as backward walking can elicit different motor strategies in subjects with reduced proprioceptive feedback after anterior cruciate ligament lesion (ACL). For this purpose, the kinematic parameters during forward and backward walking in subjects with ACL deficit were compared to two control groups: a group with intact ACL and a group with surgically reconstructed ACL. The knee proprioception was tested measuring the threshold for detection of passive knee motion. Subjects were asked to walk on a level treadmill at five different velocities (1–5km/h) in forward and backward direction, thereby calculating the cadence and step length. Results showed that forward walking parameters were largely unaffected in subjects with ACL damage. However, they failed to reduce step length during backward walking, a correction that was normally observed in all control subjects and in subjects with normal proprioceptive feedback after ACL reconstruction. The main result of the present study is that knee proprioception is an important signal used by the brain to reduce step length during the backward gait. This can have a significant impact on clinical evaluation and rehabilitation. PMID:25114731

  5. Midterm Results of a Combined Biological and Mechanical Approach for the Treatment of a Complex Knee Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Filardo, G.; Di Martino, A.; Delcogliano, M.; Marcacci, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Complex fractures of the tibial plateau are difficult to treat and present a high complication rate. The goal of this report is to describe a combined biological and mechanical approach to restore all morphological and functional knee properties. Methods: We treated a 50-year-old woman, who was affected by a posttraumatic osteochondral lesion and depression of the lateral tibial plateau with knee valgus deviation. The mechanical axis was corrected with a lateral tibial plateau elevation osteotomy, the damaged joint surface was replaced by a recently developed biomimetic osteochondral scaffold, and a hinged dynamic external fixator was applied to protect the graft and at the same time to allow postoperative joint mobilization. Results: A marked clinical improvement was documented at 12 months and further improved up to 5 years, with pain-free full range of motion and return to previous activities. The MRI evaluation at 12 and 24 months showed that the implant remained in site with a hyaline-like signal and restoration of the articular surface. Conclusion: This case report describes a combined surgical approach for complex knee lesions that could represent a treatment option to avoid or at least delay posttraumatic osteoarthritis and more invasive procedures. PMID:26069639

  6. Anchor-induced chondral damage in the hip

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Dean K.; Bharam, Srino; White, Brian J.; Matsuda, Nicole A.; Safran, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the outcomes from anchor-induced chondral damage of the hip, both with and without frank chondral penetration. A multicenter retrospective case series was performed of patients with chondral deformation or penetration during initial hip arthroscopic surgery. Intra-operative findings, post-surgical clinical courses, hip outcome scores and descriptions of arthroscopic treatment in cases requiring revision surgery and anchor removal are reported. Five patients (three females) of mean age 32 years (range, 16–41 years) had documented anchor-induced chondral damage with mean 3.5 years (range, 1.5–6.0 years) follow-up. The 1 o'clock position (four cases) and anterior and mid-anterior portals (two cases each) were most commonly implicated. Two cases of anchor-induced acetabular chondral deformation without frank penetration had successful clinical and radiographic outcomes, while one case progressed from deformation to chondral penetration with clinical worsening. Of the cases that underwent revision hip arthroscopy, all three had confirmed exposed hard anchors which were removed. Two patients have had clinical improvement and one patient underwent early total hip arthroplasty. Anchor-induced chondral deformation without frank chondral penetration may be treated with close clinical and radiographic monitoring with a low threshold for revision surgery and anchor removal. Chondral penetration should be treated with immediate removal of offending hard anchor implants. Preventative measures include distal-based portals, small diameter and short anchors, removable hard anchors, soft suture-based anchors, curved drill and anchor insertion instrumentation and attention to safe trajectories while visualizing the acetabular articular surface. PMID:27011815

  7. Anchor-induced chondral damage in the hip.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Dean K; Bharam, Srino; White, Brian J; Matsuda, Nicole A; Safran, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the outcomes from anchor-induced chondral damage of the hip, both with and without frank chondral penetration. A multicenter retrospective case series was performed of patients with chondral deformation or penetration during initial hip arthroscopic surgery. Intra-operative findings, post-surgical clinical courses, hip outcome scores and descriptions of arthroscopic treatment in cases requiring revision surgery and anchor removal are reported. Five patients (three females) of mean age 32 years (range, 16-41 years) had documented anchor-induced chondral damage with mean 3.5 years (range, 1.5-6.0 years) follow-up. The 1 o'clock position (four cases) and anterior and mid-anterior portals (two cases each) were most commonly implicated. Two cases of anchor-induced acetabular chondral deformation without frank penetration had successful clinical and radiographic outcomes, while one case progressed from deformation to chondral penetration with clinical worsening. Of the cases that underwent revision hip arthroscopy, all three had confirmed exposed hard anchors which were removed. Two patients have had clinical improvement and one patient underwent early total hip arthroplasty. Anchor-induced chondral deformation without frank chondral penetration may be treated with close clinical and radiographic monitoring with a low threshold for revision surgery and anchor removal. Chondral penetration should be treated with immediate removal of offending hard anchor implants. Preventative measures include distal-based portals, small diameter and short anchors, removable hard anchors, soft suture-based anchors, curved drill and anchor insertion instrumentation and attention to safe trajectories while visualizing the acetabular articular surface. PMID:27011815

  8. Indian Hedgehog in Synovial Fluid Is a Novel Marker for Early Cartilage Lesions in Human Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Congming; Wei, Xiaochun; Chen, Chongwei; Cao, Kun; Li, Yongping; Jiao, Qiang; Ding, Juan; Zhou, Jingming; Fleming, Braden C.; Chen, Qian; Shang, Xianwen; Wei, Lei

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether there is a correlation between the concentration of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) in synovial fluid (SF) and the severity of cartilage damage in the human knee joints, the knee cartilages from patients were classified using the Outer-bridge scoring system and graded using the Modified Mankin score. Expression of Ihh in cartilage and SF samples were analyzed with immunohistochemistry (IHC), western blot, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Furthermore, we detected and compared Ihh protein levels in rat and mice cartilages between normal control and surgery-induced osteoarthritis (OA) group by IHC and fluorescence molecular tomography in vivo respectively. Ihh expression was increased 5.2-fold in OA cartilage, 3.1-fold in relative normal OA cartilage, and 1.71-fold in OA SF compared to normal control samples. The concentrations of Ihh in cartilage and SF samples was significantly increased in early-stage OA samples when compared to normal samples (r = 0.556; p < 0.001); however, there were no significant differences between normal samples and late-stage OA samples. Up-regulation of Ihh protein was also an early event in the surgery-induced OA models. Increased Ihh is associated with the severity of OA cartilage damage. Elevated Ihh content in human knee joint synovial fluid correlates with early cartilage lesions. PMID:24786088

  9. Fresh osteochondral allografts in the knee: only a salvage procedure?

    PubMed

    Gobbi, Alberto; Scotti, Celeste; Lane, John G; Peretti, Giuseppe M

    2015-07-01

    The role of fresh allogeneic osteochondral allograft transplantation (OCA) in the cartilage repair algorithm has been long debated and this procedure is primarily considered as a salvage procedure, to be used when other, simple, techniques have failed. Gracitelli et al. in a retrospective comparison of patients who received OCA as primary treatment or as a salvage procedure, demonstrates that the outcome of this procedure is minimally influenced by a previous failed treatment and that OCA represents an effective solution for both primary and revision surgery of chondral and osteochondral lesions of the knee. In particular, optimal indications for OCA seem to be revision of previously failed bone marrow stimulation techniques with an impaired subchondral bone plate and primary treatment of large osteochondral defects. PMID:26261835

  10. Knee salvage procedures: The indications, techniques and outcomes of large osteochondral allografts

    PubMed Central

    Chui, Karen; Jeys, Lee; Snow, Martyn

    2015-01-01

    The overall incidence of osteochondral defect in the general population is estimated to be 15 to 30 per 100000 people. These lesions can become symptomatic causing pain, swelling and decreased function of the knee, and may eventually progress to osteoarthritis. In the young and active population, partial or total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is rarely the treatment of choice due to risk of early failure. Osteochondral allograft transplantation has been demonstrated to be a safe and effective treatment of large osteochondral and chondral defects of the knee in appropriately selected patients. The treatment reduces pain, improves function and is a viable limb salvage procedure for patients, especially young and active patients for whom TKA is not recommended. Either large dowels generated with commercially available equipment or free hand shell allografts can be implanted in more posterior lesions. Current recommendations for fresh allografts stored at 4C advise implantation within 21-28 d of procurement for optimum chondrocyte viability, following screening and testing protocols. Higher rates of successful allograft transplantation are observed in younger patients, unipolar lesions, normal or corrected malalignment, and defects that are treated within 12 mo of symptom onset. Patients with bipolar lesions, uncorrectable malalignment, advanced osteoarthritis, and those over 40 tend to have less favourable outcomes. PMID:25893177

  11. Arthroscopic verification of objectivity of the orthopaedic examination and magnetic resonance imaging in intra-articular knee injury. Retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Skowronek, Michał; Skowronek, Paweł; Dutka, Łukasz

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Arthroscopy of the knee joint is regarded as the most objective diagnostic method in intra-articular knee joint lesions. Aim The purpose of this study was to assess the objectivity and diagnostic value of orthopaedic examination (OE) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in reference to the arthroscopic result. Material and methods In a group of 113 patients treated by arthroscopic surgery for post-traumatic knee pathology between 2008 and 2010 in our department, accuracy of clinical and MRI findings that preceded surgery were studied retrospectively using a statistical method. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and predictive negative and positive values were the subject of analysis. Results In the presented trial, sensitivity values of the orthopaedic examination for injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), meniscus medialis (MM), meniscus lateralis (ML) and chondral injuries (ChI) were 86%, 65%, 38% and 51%, respectively. Specificity values were 90%, 65%, 100% and 100%, respectively. The MR sensitivity and specificity values were 80%, 88%, 44% and 32%, and 86%, 64%, 93% and 97%, respectively. Conclusions Assessment of intra-articular knee joint lesions is a difficult diagnostic problem. In making a decision about arthroscopy of the knee joint, an appropriate sequence of examinations should be carried out: OE, MRI and arthroscopy. The improvement in the effectiveness of the orthopaedic examination and MRI can limit the too high frequency of diagnostic arthroscopies, which generates the risk of operation treatment and costs. PMID:23255995

  12. Evaluation of bone marrow lesion volume as a knee osteoarthritis biomarker - longitudinal relationships with pain and structural changes: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Bone marrow lesion (BML) size may be an important imaging biomarker for osteoarthritis-related clinical trials and reducing BML size may be an important therapeutic goal. However, data on the interrelationships between BML size, pain, and structural progression are inconsistent and rarely examined in the same cohort. Therefore, we evaluated the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of BML volume with knee pain and joint space narrowing (JSN). Methods A BML volume assessment was performed on magnetic resonance images of the knee collected at the 24- and 48-month Osteoarthritis Initiative visits from a convenience sample of 404 participants in the progression cohort. During the same visits, knee pain was assessed with WOMAC pain scores and knee radiographs were acquired and scored for JSN. BML volume was summed to generate a total knee volume and an index tibiofemoral compartment volume (compartment with greater baseline JSN). Primary analyses included multiple linear regressions (outcome = pain, predictor = total knee BML volume) and logistic regressions (outcome = JSN, predictor = index tibiofemoral compartment BML volume). Results This sample was 49% female with a mean age of 63 (9.2 standard deviation (SD)) years, and 71% had radiographic osteoarthritis in the study knee. Larger baseline BMLs were associated with greater baseline knee pain (P = 0.01), the presence of JSN at baseline (odds ratio (OR) = 1.50, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.23 to 1.83), and JSN progression (OR = 1.27, 95%CI = 1.11 to 1.46). Changes in total knee BML volume had a positive association with changes in knee pain severity (P = 0.004) and this association may be driven by knees that were progressing from no or small baseline BMLs to larger BMLs. In contrast, we found no linear positive relationship between BML volume change and JSN progression. Instead, regression of medial tibiofemoral BML volume was associated with JSN progression compared to knees with no or

  13. PHYSICAL THERAPY INTERVENTION FOR A FORMER POWER LIFTER AFTER ARTHROSCOPIC MICROFRACTURE PROCEDURE FOR GRADE IV GLENOHUMERAL CHONDRAL DEFECTS

    PubMed Central

    Sum, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Power lifting places the shoulder complex at risk for injury. Microfracture is a relatively new procedure for chondral defects of the glenohumeral joint and is not well described in the literature. Objectives: The purpose of this case report is to describe the post-operative rehabilitation used with a power lifter who underwent a microfracture procedure to address glenoid and humeral chondral defects, debridement of type I superior labral anterior-posterior lesion, and a subacromial decompression. Case Description: The patient was a 46 year-old male who was evaluated nine weeks status-post arthroscopic microfracture procedure for glenoid and humeral chondral defects, debridement of superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesion, and subacromial decompression. Rehabilitation consisted of postural education, manual therapy, rotator cuff and scapular strengthening, dynamic stabilization, weightbearing exercises, and weight training over nine weeks (24 sessions). Lifting modifications were addressed. Outcomes: Results of the QuickDASH indicate that activities of daily living (ADLs), work, and sports modules all improved significantly, and the patient was able to return to recreational power lifting with limited discomfort or restrictions. Discussion: A structured post-operative physical therapy treatment program allowed this patient to return to recreational power lifting while restoring independent function for work-related activities and ADLs. PMID:21655454

  14. Bone Marrow Aspirate in the Treatment of Chondral Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Holton, James; Imam, Mohamed A.; Snow, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to transdifferentiate into a desired cell lineage has captured the imagination of scientists and clinicians alike. The limited ability for chondrocytes to regenerate in chondral injuries has raised the concept of using MSCs to help regenerate and repair damaged tissue. The expansion of cells in a laboratory setting to be delivered back to the patient is too costly for clinical use in the present tough economic climate. This process is slow with due to the complexity of trying to imitate the natural environment and biological stimulation of chondral cell replication and proliferation. Bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) has the potential to provide an easily accessible and readily available source of MSCs with key growth factors that can be used in treating chondral injuries. This review summarizes the underlying basic science of MSCs and the therapeutic potential of BMAC. PMID:27379241

  15. A Rapid, Novel Method of Volumetric Assessment of MRI-Detected Subchondral Bone Marrow Lesions in Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ratzlaff, C.; Guermazi, A.; Collins, J.; Katz, J.N.; Losina, E.; Vanwyngaarden, C.; Russell, R.; Iranpour, T.; Duryea, J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess reliability and validity of a semi-automated quantitative method for osteoarthritis (OA)-related bone marrow lesion (BML) assessment in the femur and tibia. Methods In a cross-sectional study of subjects with knee OA, we examined concurrent criterion and clinical validation of a novel method of semi-automated quantitative BML measurement. The primary outcome was total segmented BML volume in femoral and tibial medial and lateral knee compartments. Criterion validation was examined through comparison of BML volumes with Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (WORMS) scoring. Clinical validation was examined via associations of tibial and femoral BML volume with the Western Ontario and McMaster University OA Index weight-bearing pain questions. Results Among the 115 subjects, mean age was 62 years, mean BMI 30.4 (kg/m2), 84% were white and 52% male. The ICC for intra-reader reliability was 0.96 and 0.97 for inter-reader reliability. Significant Spearman's correlations were found between segmented BML volume and WORMS BML scoring for tibial medial (0.75) and lateral (0.73) compartments, and for femoral medial (0.72) and lateral (0.88) compartments. Significant positive associations were found between weight-bearing pain and total femoral BML volume (p<0.003), but not total tibial BML (p<0.101) Conclusion We have documented a moderately strong correlation between a novel measurement method of femoral and tibial BML volume and semi-quantitative WORMS scores, providing evidence of criterion validity. The hypothesis that weight-bearing pain was associated with BML volume was confirmed for total femoral BML volume but not total tibial BML volume. The lack of association between tibial BML volume and pain requires further investigation. PMID:23518154

  16. Huge Subchondral Cyst Communicating with Medulary Canal of Femur in OA Knee-Treated by Extension Stem and Bone Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Rajani, Amyn M; Kumar, Ritesh; Shyam, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We report an osteoarthritic patient with huge sub-chondral cyst-like lesions in the Anterior part of distal femur. Deep and large bone defects and severe lateral laxity due to Advanced osteoarthritis was successfully treated with semi-constrained type total knee arthroplasty with long stem. Case Report: A 70yrs old Female was admitted in our institution diagnosed with severe bilateral Osteoarthritis. The x-rays showed bone on bone Tricompartment OA Knee with Varus Malalignment. She was posted for Single Stage Bilateral Total Knee Replacement and as planned the Left Knee Was Operated first. After exposure, Proximal Tibial, Distal Femoral Cuts and measurement of extension gaps the synovium from the anterior Femur was removed and sizing was done. The AP cut was then proceeded with. We spotted a small Osteochondral Cyst in the Anterior Femur which was curretted to remove the cystic material, which is when we realised that the cyst was large and communicating with the medulary canal. The remaining Femoral preparations was done keeping in mind the risk of iatrogenic fracture and extension Stem was used in the femur. The defect was then packed cancellous bone graft. Conclusion: If suspected a Preoperative MRI should be done to exclude any sub-chondral cysts osteochondral defects and any surprise during surgery. Usually one should keep extension stems ready for difficult cases. Operating surgeon should know his implants very well, as in many standard implants extension stems can only be used when distal femur cuts are taken accordingly as 5° Valgus. Mini incision should be avoided because it may fail to reveal such surprises and may land into periprosthetic fractures. PMID:27298967

  17. Subjects with Higher Physical Activity Levels Have More Severe Focal Knee lesions diagnosed with 3T MRI: Analysis of a Non Symptomatic Cohort of the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Stehling, Christoph; Lane, Nancy E.; Nevitt, Michael C.; Lynch, John; McCulloch, Charles E.; Link, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the prevalence of focal knee abnormalities using 3 Tesla (T) MR studies in relation to physical activity levels in asymptomatic, middle-aged subjects from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI). Material and Methods We analyzed baseline data from 236 45–55 years old individuals (136 women, 100 men) without knee pain (based on WOMAC scores) and a BMI of 19–27 kg/m2. Physical activity levels were determined in all subjects using the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE). MRI at 3T was performed using coronal intermediate-weighted (IW) 2D fast spin-echo (FSE), sagittal 3D dual-echo in steady state (DESS) and 2D IW fat-suppressed (fs) FSE sequences of the right knee. All images were analyzed by two musculoskeletal radiologists identifying and grading cartilage, meniscal, ligamentous and other knee abnormalities using the WORMS MRI OA scoring method. Statistical significances between subjects with different activity levels were determined using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), chi-square tests and a multivariate regression model adjusted for gender, age, BMI, KL-Score and OA risk factors. Results Meniscal lesions were found in 47% of the 236 subjects, cartilage lesions in 74.6%, bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP) in 40.3% and ligament lesions in 17%. Stratification of subjects by physical activity resulted in an increasing incidence of cartilage, meniscus and ligament abnormalities, BMEP and joint effusion according to activity levels (PASE). The severity grade of cartilage lesions was also associated with PASE levels and presence of other knee abnormalities was also significantly associated with cartilage defects. Conclusion Asymptomatic middle-aged individuals from the OAI incidence cohort had a high prevalence of knee abnormalities; more physically active individuals had significantly more and more severe knee abnormalities independently of gender, age, BMI, KL-Score and OA risk factors. This data therefore also suggests that subjects

  18. Combined effect of subchondral drilling and hyaluronic acid with/without diacerein in full-thickness articular cartilage lesion in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Suwannaloet, Wanwisa; Laupattarakasem, Wiroon; Sukon, Peerapol; Ong-Chai, Siriwan; Laupattarakasem, Pisamai

    2012-01-01

    The osteochondral healing potential of hyaluronic acid (HA) plus diacerein was evaluated in subchondral-drilling- (SCD-) induced fibrocartilage generation in rabbits. A full-thickness chondral defect was created along the patellar groove of both knees and then SCD was subsequently performed only in the left knee. A week later, the rabbits were allocated into 3 groups to receive weekly intra-articular (IA) injection for 5 weeks with normal saline solution (NSS) (group 1) or with HA (group 2 and group 3). Starting at the first IA injection, rabbits were also gavaged daily for 9 weeks with NSS (group 1 and group 2) or with diacerein (group 3). The animals were then sacrificed for evaluation. The newly formed tissue in SCD lesions showed significantly better histological grading scale and had higher content of type II collagen in HA-treated group compared to NSS control. In addition, adding oral diacerein to HA injection enhanced healing potential of HA. PMID:22666105

  19. The Morel-Lavallée Lesion as a Rare Differential Diagnosis for Recalcitrant Bursitis of the Knee: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Vanhegan, Ivor S.; Dala-Ali, B.; Verhelst, L.; Mallucci, P.; Haddad, Fares S.

    2012-01-01

    A 72 year-old-male was referred to our institution with recalcitrant prepatellar bursitis. The injury was sustained after striking his right knee against a post whilst horse riding 9 months ago. Previous treatments included repeated aspiration and excision of the bursa with elastic compression bandaging. A diagnosis of a Morel-Lavallée internal degloving injury was made, and the lesion was satisfactorily managed by an internal quilting procedure to eliminate the potential dead space. A review of the literature reveals 29 published reports of Morel-Lavallée lesions with sufficient information for inclusion. These came from 14 separate countries with a total of 204 lesions in 195 patients. The most common anatomical location was the greater trochanter/hip (36%), followed by the thigh (24%) and the pelvis (19%). Most were managed surgically with evacuation of the haematoma and necrotic tissue followed by debridement, which was often repeated (36%). Conservative treatment with percutaneous aspiration and compression bandaging was the next most common treatment (23%). The knee was the fourth most common region affected (16%), and only 3 other lesions in the literature have been managed with a quilting procedure. PMID:23320230

  20. Treatment of Articular Cartilage Defects of the Knee With Microfracture and Enhanced Microfracture Techniques.

    PubMed

    Case, Jordan M; Scopp, Jason M

    2016-06-01

    Chondral injuries in the knee are a common source of pain and morbidity. Treatment of symptomatic chondral defects is challenging due to the limited healing capacity of articular cartilage. Microfracture is the most common surgical technique used to treat chondral defects in the knee and utilizes marrow stimulation to generate a fibrocartilage repair. Microfracture has demonstrated good short-term postoperative outcomes. Long-term outcomes following microfracture are variable, with loss of improvement attributed to the poor mechanical qualities of the fibrous repair tissue. Current research is focusing on ways to optimize the repair environment after microfracture using biological scaffolds (enhanced microfracture) to facilitate chondrogenic differentiation and proliferation to improve the quality of repair tissue. PMID:27135288

  1. Subchondral Cystlike Lesions Develop Longitudinally in Areas of Bone Marrow Edema–like Lesions in Patients with or at Risk for Knee Osteoarthritis: Detection with MR Imaging—The MOST Study1

    PubMed Central

    Roemer, Frank W.; Zhu, Yanyan; Marra, Monica D.; Niu, Jingbo; Zhang, Yuqing; Lynch, John A.; Javaid, M. Kassim; Lewis, Cora E.; El-Khoury, George Y.; Felson, David T.; Guermazi, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the association of prevalent bone marrow edema–like lesions (BMLs) and full-thickness cartilage loss with incident subchondral cyst–like lesions (SCs) in the knee to evaluate the bone contusion versus synovial fluid intrusion theories of SC formation. Materials and Methods: The Multicenter Osteoarthritis study is a longitudinal study of individuals who have or are at risk for knee osteoarthritis. The HIPAA-compliant protocol was approved by the institutional review boards of all participating centers, and written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Magnetic resonance images were acquired at baseline and 30-month follow-up and read semiquantitatively by using the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score system. The tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints were subdivided into 14 subregions. BMLs and SCs were scored from 0 to 3. Cartilage morphology was scored from 0 to 6. The association of prevalent BMLs and full-thickness cartilage loss with incident SCs in the same subregion was assessed by using logistic regression with mutual adjustment for both predictors. Results: A total of 1283 knees were included. After adjustment for full-thickness cartilage loss, prevalent BMLs showed a strong and significant association with incident SCs in the same subregion, with an odds ratio of 12.9 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.9, 18.6). After adjustment for BMLs, prevalent full-thickness cartilage loss showed a significant but much less important association with incident SCs in the same subregion (odds ratio, 1.4; 95% CI: 1.0, 2.0). There was no apparent relationship between severity of full-thickness cartilage loss at baseline and incident SCs. Conclusion: Prevalent BMLs strongly predict incident SCs in the same subregion, even after adjustment for full-thickness cartilage loss, which supports the bone contusion theory of SC formation. © RSNA, 2010 PMID:20530753

  2. Platelet Rich Plasma and Knee Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Mikel; Sánchez, Pello; Orive, Gorka; Anitua, Eduardo; Padilla, Sabino

    2014-01-01

    In orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine, the knee joint has traditionally been considered the workhorse. The reconstruction of every damaged element in this joint is crucial in achieving the surgeon's goal to restore the knee function and prevent degeneration towards osteoarthritis. In the last fifteen years, the field of regenerative medicine is witnessing a boost of autologous blood-derived platelet rich plasma products (PRPs) application to effectively mimic and accelerate the tissue healing process. The scientific rationale behind PRPs is the delivery of growth factors, cytokines, and adhesive proteins present in platelets and plasma, as well as other biologically active proteins conveyed by the plasma such as fibrinogen, prothrombin, and fibronectin; with this biological engineering approach, new perspectives in knee surgery were opened. This work describes the use of PRP to construct and repair every single anatomical structure involved in knee surgery, detailing the process conducted in ligament, meniscal, and chondral surgery. PMID:25302310

  3. Bridging Suture Repair for Acetabular Chondral Carpet Delamination

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Mitsunori; Hirose, Toshiaki; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Acetabular chondral carpet delamination is a frequent finding at hip arthroscopy. The cartilage is macroscopically normal but deboned from the subchondral bone, without a disruption at the chondrolabral junction. Arthroscopic anatomic repair of delaminated cartilage is challenging. We propose that a combination of microfracture and use of stitches to press the delaminated cartilage against the subchondral bone using a suture limb offers an effective method to provide an environment for cartilage repair. This article describes the technique of bridging suture repair for carpet delamination in detail; the technique enables the surgeon to stabilize the delaminated acetabular cartilage. Intra-articular soft anchors and an acetabular rim knotless anchor footprint provide a stable repair for delaminated cartilage. This technique is especially helpful in cases with acetabular cartilage carpet delamination. PMID:26759774

  4. Does Ligamentous Laxity Protect Against Chondral Injury in Patients with Patellofemoral Instability?

    PubMed Central

    Redler, Lauren H.; Mayer, Gabrielle M.; Kalbian, Irene L.; Nguyen, Joseph; Stein, Beth E. Shubin; Strickland, Sabrina M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Hypermobility may be a risk factor for musculoskeletal injuries during sports participation. However, we have seen a low incidence of chondral injuries requiring treatment in patients undergoing medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction for patellofemoral instability. It is unknown if patients with ligamentous laxity, who are at an increased risk for patellofemoral instability, are somewhat protected from chondral injury. We hypothesize in patients undergoing MPFL reconstruction for patellofemoral instability, patients with ligamentous laxity will be less likely to have chondral defects requiring surgical intervention. Methods: 171 patients (32 male, 139 female) average age 22 years (range 11-57) with patellofemoral instability were rated with the Beighton-Horan (BH) scale for constitutional ligamentous laxity (0-9). Preoperative MRIs were evaluated (chondral injury present/absent, size of chondral injury, Outerbridge grade) and intra-operative arthroscopic findings noted (chondral injury present/absent, size of chondral injury, Outerbridge grade, surgical intervention yes/no, type of surgical intervention) of 79 non-lax (BH<6) and 92 ligamentously lax patients (BH≥6) (LAX) undergoing MPFL reconstruction. Anatomic measurements were documented for each patient including: tibial tubercle-trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance, Caton-Deschamps (C/D) ratio for patellar height, and the Dejour classification of trochlear dysplasia. Surgical interventions included chondroplasty, microfracture, particulated juvenile cartilage implantation (DeNovo, Zimmer, Warsaw, IN), osteochondral fracture fixation or osteochondral allograft transplantation (OATS). Results: 58/171 (33.9%) required a surgical intervention for a chondral defect: chondroplasty 29/58 (50%), microfracture 16/58 (27.6%), particulated juvenile cartilage implantation 18/58 (31%), osteochondral fracture fixation 2/58 (3.5%), and OATS 2/58 (3.5%). There was no difference in the proportion of

  5. Treatment for cartilage injuries of the knee with a new treatment algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ozmeriç, Ahmet; Alemdaroğlu, Kadir Bahadır; Aydoğan, Nevres Hürriyet

    2014-11-18

    Treatment of articular cartilage injuries to the knee remains a considerable challenge today. Current procedures succeed in providing relief of symptoms, however damaged articular tissue is not replaced with new tissue of the same biomechanical properties and long-term durability as normal hyaline cartilage. Despite many arthroscopic procedures that often manage to achieve these goals, results are far from perfect and there is no agreement on which of these procedures are appropriate, particularly when full-thickness chondral defects are considered.Therefore, the search for biological solution in long-term functional healing and increasing the quality of wounded cartilage has been continuing. For achieving this goal and apply in wide defects, scaffolds are developed.The rationale of using a scaffold is to create an environment with biodegradable polymers for the in vitro growth of living cells and their subsequent implantation into the lesion area. Previously a few numbers of surgical treatment algorithm was described in reports, however none of them contained one-step or two -steps scaffolds. The ultimate aim of this article was to review various arthroscopic treatment options for different stage lesions and develop a new treatment algorithm which included the scaffolds. PMID:25405097

  6. The Meniscus-Deficient Knee

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Allison J.; Erickson, Brandon J.; Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Yanke, Adam B.; Bach, Bernard R.; Cole, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Meniscal tears are the most common knee injury, and partial meniscectomies are the most common orthopaedic surgical procedure. The injured meniscus has an impaired ability to distribute load and resist tibial translation. Partial or complete loss of the meniscus promotes early development of chondromalacia and osteoarthritis. The primary goal of treatment for meniscus-deficient knees is to provide symptomatic relief, ideally to delay advanced joint space narrowing, and ultimately, joint replacement. Surgical treatments, including meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT), high tibial osteotomy (HTO), and distal femoral osteotomy (DFO), are options that attempt to decrease the loads on the articular cartilage of the meniscus-deficient compartment by replacing meniscal tissue or altering joint alignment. Clinical and biomechanical studies have reported promising outcomes for MAT, HTO, and DFO in the postmeniscectomized knee. These procedures can be performed alone or in conjunction with ligament reconstruction or chondral procedures (reparative, restorative, or reconstructive) to optimize stability and longevity of the knee. Complications can include fracture, nonunion, patella baja, compartment syndrome, infection, and deep venous thrombosis. MAT, HTO, and DFO are effective options for young patients suffering from pain and functional limitations secondary to meniscal deficiency. PMID:26779547

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Osteophytic, Chondral, and Subchondral Structures in a Surgically-Induced Osteoarthritis Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Lang; Chen, Jinyun; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yingjiang; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Wenzhi

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess changes in osteophytic, chondral, and subchondral structures in a surgically-induced osteoarthritis (OA) rabbit model in order to correlate MRI findings with the macroscopic progress of OA and to define the timepoint for disease status in this OA model. Methods The OA model was constructed by surgery in thirty rabbits with ten normal rabbits serving as controls (baseline). High-resolution three-dimensional MRI using a 1.5-T coil was performed at baseline, two, four, and eight weeks post-surgery. MRIs of cartilage lesions, subchondral bone lesions, and osteophyte formations were independently assessed by two blinded radiologists. Ten rabbits were sacrificed at baseline, two, four, and eight weeks post-surgery, and macroscopic evaluation was independently performed by two blinded orthopedic surgeons. Results The signal intensities and morphologies of chondral and subchondral structures by MRI accurately reflected the degree of OA. Cartilage defects progressed from a grade of 0.05–0.15 to 1.15–1.30 to 1.90–1.97 to 3.00–3.35 at each successive time point, respectively (p<0.05). Subchondral bone lesions progressed from a grade of 0.00 to 0.78–0.90 to 1.27–1.58 to 1.95–2.23 at each successive time point, respectively (p = 0.000). Osteophytes progressed from a size (mm) of 0.00 to 0.87–1.06 to 1.24–1.87 to 2.21–3.21 at each successive time point, respectively (p = 0.000). Conclusions Serial observations revealed that MRI can accurately detect the progression of cartilage lesions and subchondral bone edema over an eight-week period but may not be accurate in detecting osteophyte sizes. Week four post-surgery was considered the timepoint between OA-negative and OA-positive status in this OA model. The combination of this OA model with MRI evaluation should provide a promising tool for the pre-clinical evaluation of new disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs. PMID:25438155

  8. Bone bruises in anterior cruciate ligament injured knee and long-term outcomes. A review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Papalia, Rocco; Torre, Guglielmo; Vasta, Sebastiano; Zampogna, Biagio; Pedersen, Douglas R; Denaro, Vincenzo; Amendola, Annunziato

    2015-01-01

    Background Bone bruises are frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears as a result of trauma or direct shear stress of the bone. Purpose To review the evidence regarding the characteristics of the bone bruise associated with ACL tears, its relevance on clinical outcomes, and its progression over time. In particular, the long-term effects of the bone bruise on the knee osteochondral architecture and joint function were evaluated. Study design Review; level of evidence: 4. Methods An electronic search was performed on PubMed. Combinations of keywords included: “bone bruise AND knee”; “bone bruise AND anterior cruciate ligament”; “bone bruise AND osteo-chondral defects”. Any level of evidence studies concerning bone bruises in patients with partial or complete ACL tears were retrieved. Results A total of 25 studies were included; three of them investigated biomechanical parameters, seven were concerned with clinical outcomes, and 15 were radiological studies. Evaluation of the bone bruise is best performed using a fat-saturated T2-weighted fast spin echo exam or a short tau inversion recovery sequence where fat saturation is challenging. The location of the injury has been demonstrated to be more frequent in the lateral compartment of the joint (lateral femoral condyle and lateral tibial plateau). It is associated with ACL tears in approximately 70% of cases, often with collateral ligament or meniscal tears. Mid- and long-term outcomes demonstrated a complete healing of the marrow lesions at magnetic resonance imaging, but chondral defects detected with T1ρ sequences are still present 1 year after the ACL injury. Functional examination of the knee, through clinical International Knee Documentation Committee scores, did not show any correlation with the bone bruise. Conclusion Although bone bruise presence yields to higher pain levels, no correlation with functional outcomes was reported. Most studies have a short-term follow-up (<2

  9. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... the front of your knee around the kneecap Torn ligament. An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, or ... into your knee, swelling, or an unstable knee. Torn cartilage (a meniscus tear ). Pain felt on the ...

  10. Use of collagen scaffold and autologous bone marrow concentrate as a one-step cartilage repair in the knee: histological results of second-look biopsies at 1 year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Gigante, A; Calcagno, S; Cecconi, S; Ramazzotti, D; Manzotti, S; Enea, D

    2011-01-01

    Chondral articular defects are a key concern in orthopaedic surgery. To overcome the disadvantages of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and to improve the outcomes of autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC), the latter technique is currently augmented with bone marrow concentrate injected under or seeded onto the scaffold. However, to date, only a little is known about histological outcomes of either the AMIC technique or AMIC associated with bone marrow concentrate. This study aimed to evaluate the quality of the repair tissue obtained from biopsies harvested during second-look arthroscopy after arthroscopic AMIC augmented with bone marrow concentrate. We analysed five second-look core biopsies harvested at 12 months follow-up. At the time of biopsy the surgeon reported the quality of the repair tissue using the standard ICRS Cartilage Repair Assessment (CRA). Every biopsy together with patient data was sent to our centre to undergo blind histological evaluation (ICRS II Visual Histological Assessment Scale) and data analysis. Five asymptomatic patients (mean age 43.4 years) had isolated lesions (mean size was 3.7 cm2) at the medial femoral condyle. All the implants appeared nearly normal (ICRS CRA) at arthroscopic evaluation and had a mean overall histological (ICRS II) of 59.8±14,5. Hyaline-like matrix was found in only one case, a mixture of hyaline/fibrocartilage was found in one case and fibrocartilage was found three cases. Our clinical and histological data suggest that this procedure achieved a nearly normal arthroscopic appearance and a satisfactory repair tissue, which was possibly still maturing at 12 months follow-up. Further studies are needed to understand the true potential of one-step procedures in the repair of focal chondral lesions in the knee. PMID:21669141

  11. Knee Bracing: What Works?

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Knee Bracing: What Works? Knee Bracing: What Works? What are knee braces? Knee braces are supports ... have arthritis in their knees. Do knee braces work? Maybe. Companies that make knee braces claim that ...

  12. Femoral condyle curvature is correlated with knee walking kinematics in ungulates.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Adam D

    2015-12-01

    The knee has been the focus of many studies linking mammalian postcranial form with locomotor behaviors and animal ecology. A more difficult task has been linking joint morphology with joint kinematics during locomotor tasks. Joint curvature represents one opportunity to link postcranial morphology with walking kinematics because joint curvature develops in response to mechanical loading. As an initial examination of mammalian knee joint curvature, the curvature of the medial femoral condyle was measured on femora representing 11 ungulate species. The position of a region of low curvature was measured using a metric termed the "angle to low curvature". This low-curvature region is important because it provides the greatest contact area between femoral and tibial condyles. Kinematic knee angles during walking were derived from the literature and kinematic knee angles across the gait cycle were correlated with angle to low curvature values. The highest correlation between kinematic knee angle and the angle to low curvature metric occurred at 20% of the walking gait cycle. This early portion of the walking gait cycle is associated with a peak in the vertical ground reaction force for some mammals. The chondral modeling theory predicts that frequent and heavy loading of particular regions of a joint surface during ontogeny will result in these regions being flatter than the surrounding joint surface. The locations of flatter regions of the femoral condyles of ungulates, and their association with knee angles used during the early stance phase of walking provides support for the chondral modeling theory. PMID:26414648

  13. Outcomes of Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation in the Knee following Failed Microfracture

    PubMed Central

    Riff, Andrew Joseph; Yanke, Adam Blair; Tilton, Annemarie K.; Cole, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Marrow stimulation techniques such as drilling or microfracture are first-line treatment options for symptomatic cartilage defects of the knee. For young patients who have failed microfracture, cartilage restoration techniques such as autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), OATS, and osteochondral allograft and are frequently employed. Nevertheless, there a few reports in the literature evaluating the results of ACI following failed microfracture and those available suggest inferior outcomes compared to primary ACI. This study was performed to evaluate the clinical outcomes of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) following failed microfracture in the knee and compare these outcomes to those of primary ACI. Methods: Patients were identified who underwent autologous chondrocyte implantation for symptomatic chondral lesions of the knee refractory to previous microfracture. Postoperative data were collected using several subjective scoring systems (Noyes, Tegner, Lysholm, IKDC, KOOS, SF12). An age-matched cohort of 103 patients who underwent primary ACI of the knee was used as a control group. Statistics were performed in a paired manner using a Student’s t-test for ordinal data and chi-square test for categorical data. Results: Ninety-two patients met the inclusion criteria. The average patient age was 30.1 years (range, 14-49 years) at the time of ACI. The average duration from microfracture to ACI was 21.2 months (range, 1-88 months). ACI was performed in the tibiofemoral compartment in 42 patients, the patellofemoral compartments in 38 patients, and in both in 12 patients. The primary lesion treated with ACI involved the MFC in 38 patients, the trochlea in 25 patients, the patella in 19 patients, and the LFC in 10 patients. The lesions averaged 467mm3 in the trochlea, 445mm3 in the LFC, 265mm3 in the patella, and 295mm3 in the patella. Nineteen patients underwent concurrent ACI to multiple lesions. Thirty-one patients underwent concomitant

  14. The effects of laparoscopic mesh fixation device on bone, costo-chondral junction and tendon site.

    PubMed

    Ekçi, Baki; Altinli, Ediz; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Demir, Mustafa; Tasci, Ihsan

    2011-01-01

    Osteitis pubis is one of the important complications of inguinal hernia repair surgery occurring with the placement of sutures through the periosteum. The aim of this study is to evaluate scintigraphic and histopathological alterations associated with the use of mesh fixation device on pelvic bone, cartilage and tendons in an experimental animal model. Twenty New-Zealand young male rabbits were used. A mesh fixation device was inserted at each animal's costa-chondral junction, superior anterior iliac crest, and achiles tendon. One week prior to the surgery and 16 weeks after the operation, scintigraphic evaluation was performed. Histopathological evaluation was performed at the end of study. No nuclear activity or pathological change was found at bone site (p > 0.05). Foreign body reaction was evident at the tendon and costa-chondral site (p = 0.001). In conclusion; the mesh fixation device leads to foreign body reaction in costa-chondral junction and tendon. It does not cause any nuclear activity increase. PMID:21657163

  15. Description of an evaluation system for knee kinematics in ligament lesions, by means of optical tracking and 3D tomography☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tiago Lazzaretti; Ribeiro, Douglas Badillo; da Rocha, Diogo Cristo; Albuquerque, Cyro; Pereira, César Augusto Martins; Pedrinelli, André; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe and demonstrate the viability of a method for evaluating knee kinematics, by means of a continuous passive motion (CPM) machine, before and after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Methods This study was conducted on a knee from a cadaver, in a mechanical pivot-shift simulator, with evaluations using optical tracking, and also using computed tomography. Results This study demonstrated the viability of a protocol for measuring the rotation and translation of the knee, using reproducible and objective tools (error < 0.2 mm). The mechanized provocation system of the pivot-shift test was independent of the examiner and always allowed the same angular velocity and traction of 20 N throughout the movement. Conclusion The clinical relevance of this method lies in making inferences about the in vivo behavior of a knee with an ACL injury and providing greater methodological quality in future studies for measuring surgical techniques with grafts in relatively close positions. PMID:26229854

  16. Knee Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not helping you anymore. When you have a total knee replacement, the surgeon removes damaged cartilage and bone ...

  17. Knee Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... cartilage, a tough, elastic material that helps absorb shock and allows the knee joint to move smoothly. ... The two menisci in each knee act as shock absorbers, cushioning the lower part of the leg ...

  18. Knee Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sprains A sprain means you've stretched or torn a ligament. Common knee sprains usually involve damage ... A strain means you've partly or completely torn a muscle or tendon. With knee strains, you ...

  19. Osteonecrosis of the knee: review

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Ammar R.; Cherian, Jeffrey J.; Jauregui, Julio J.; Pierce, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is a devastating disease that can lead to end-stage arthritis of various joint including the knee. There are three categories of osteonecrosis that affect the knee: spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SONK), secondary, and post-arthroscopic. Regardless of osteonecrosis categories, the treatment of this disease aims to halt further progression or delay the onset of end-stage arthritis of the knee. However, once substantial joint surface collapse has occurred or there are sign of degenerative arthritis, joint arthroplasty is the most appropriate treatment option. Currently, the non-operative treatment options consist of observation, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), protected weight bearing, and analgesia as needed. Operative interventions include joint preserving surgery, unilateral knee arthroplasty (UKA), or total knee arthroplasty (TKA) depending on the extent and type of disease. Joint preserving procedures (i.e., arthroscopy, core decompression, osteochondral autograft, and bone grafting) are usually attempted in pre-collapse and some post-collapse lesions, when the articular cartilage is generally intact with only the underlying subchondral bone being affected. Conversely, after severe subchondral collapse has occurred, procedures that attempt to salvage the joint are rarely successful and joint arthroplasty are necessary to relieve pain. The purpose of this article is to highlight the recent evidence concerning the treatment options across the spectrum of management of osteonecrosis of the knee including lesion observation, medications, joint preserving techniques, and total joint arthroplasties. PMID:25705638

  20. Knee arthroscopy - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... knee problems such as: a torn knee disc (meniscus) a damaged knee bone (patella) a damaged ligament ... surgeon can see the ligaments, the knee disc (meniscus), the knee bone (patella), the lining of the ...

  1. Intraarticular osteochondroma of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Morey, Vivek Morey; Jalan, Divesh; Mittal, Ravi; Gamangatti, Shivanand

    2014-01-01

    Osteochondromas are usually extra articular and grow away from the joint towards the diaphysis. Intraarticular osteochondromas are very rare and often misdiagnosed. We report a case of 16-year-old boy who presented with pain and clicking sound in the right knee for last 6 months. On examination, click was felt at the terminal flexion of the knee. The lateral radiograph of the right knee showed a radio opaque shadow at the posterior aspect of the distal end of femur, which was further evaluated with an MRI. Arthroscopy showed a hard lesion arising from the roof of the intercondylar notch of femur. It was excised arthroscopically. Histopathology revealed it to be an osteochondroma. Thus, intraarticular osteochondroma of the knee can be considered as a rare cause of pain in young patients. PMID:24932044

  2. [Imaging strategies for knee injuries].

    PubMed

    Hegenscheid, K; Puls, R; Rosenberg, C

    2012-11-01

    Injuries of the knees are common. The Ottawa knee rule provides decisional support to determine whether radiographs are indicated or not. With the use of ultrasound it is possible to detect defects of the extensor ligaments and the anterior cruciate ligament. Furthermore, it is possible to detect indirect signs of an intra-articular fracture, e.g. lipohemarthrosis. In complex fractures, e.g. tibial plateau fractures, further diagnostic procedures with multislice computed tomography (CT) are needed for accurate classification and preoperative planning. Multislice CT with CT angiography enables three-dimensional reconstruction of the knee and non-invasive vascular imaging for detection of vascular injury. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the gold standard for detection of occult fractures and injuries of the ligaments and menisci. Higher field strengths can be used to improve the diagnostics of cartilage lesions. Virtual MR arthrography is superior to conventional MRI for detection of cartilage lesions especially after meniscus surgery. PMID:23154845

  3. Implantation of scaffold-free engineered cartilage constructs in a rabbit model for chondral resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Jillian M; Ventura, Nicole M; Tse, M Yat; Winterborn, Andrew; Bardana, Davide D; Pang, Stephen C; Hurtig, Mark B; Waldman, Stephen D

    2014-02-01

    Joint resurfacing techniques offer an attractive treatment for damaged or diseased cartilage, as this tissue characteristically displays a limited capacity for self-repair. While tissue-engineered cartilage constructs have shown efficacy in repairing focal cartilage defects in animal models, a substantial number of cells are required to generate sufficient quantities of tissue for the repair of larger defects. In a previous study, we developed a novel approach to generate large, scaffold-free cartilaginous constructs from a small number of donor cells (20 000 cells to generate a 3-cm(2) tissue construct). As comparable thicknesses to native cartilage could be achieved, the purpose of the present study was to assess the ability of these constructs to survive implantation as well as their potential for the repair of critical-sized chondral defects in a rabbit model. Evaluated up to 6 months post-implantation, allogenic constructs survived weight bearing without a loss of implant fixation. Implanted constructs appeared to integrate near-seamlessly with the surrounding native cartilage and also to extensively remodel with increasing time in vivo. By 6 months post-implantation, constructs appeared to adopt both a stratified (zonal) appearance and a biochemical composition similar to native articular cartilage. In addition, constructs that expressed superficial zone markers displayed higher histological scores, suggesting that transcriptional prescreening of constructs prior to implantation may serve as an approach to achieve superior and/or more consistent reparative outcomes. As the results of this initial animal study were encouraging, future studies will be directed toward the repair of chondral defects in more mechanically demanding anatomical locations. PMID:24571514

  4. Debridement of cartilage lesions before autologous chondrocyte implantation by open or transarthroscopic techniques: a comparative study using post-mortem materials.

    PubMed

    Drobnic, M; Radosavljevic, D; Cör, A; Brittberg, M; Strazar, K

    2010-04-01

    We compared the quality of debridement of chondral lesions performed by four arthroscopic (SH, shaver; CU, curette; SHCU, shaver and curette; BP, bipolar electrodes) and one open technique (OPEN, scalpel and curette) which are used prior to autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). The ex vivo simulation of all five techniques was carried out on six juvenile equine stifle joints. The OPEN, SH and SHCU techniques were tested on knees harvested from six adult human cadavers. The most vertical walls with the least adjacent damage to cartilage were obtained with the OPEN technique. The CU and SHCU methods gave inferior, but still acceptable results whereas the SH technique alone resulted in a crater-like defect and the BP method undermined the cartilage wall. The subchondral bone was severely violated in all the equine samples which might have been peculiar to this model. The predominant depth of the debridement in the adult human samples was at the level of the calcified cartilage. Some minor penetrations of the subchondral end-plate were induced regardless of the instrumentation used. Our study suggests that not all routine arthroscopic instruments are suitable for the preparation of a defect for ACI. We have shown that the preferred debridement technique is either open or arthroscopically-assisted manual curettage. The use of juvenile equine stifles was not appropriate for the study of the cartilage-subchondral bone interface. PMID:20357342

  5. Runner's Knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... Over the summer he bought a pair of running shoes and took up jogging. He started with ... bending the knee — when walking, kneeling, squatting, or running, for example. Walking or running downhill or even ...

  6. Knee arthroscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... is cartilage that cushions the space between the bones in the knee. Surgery is done to repair or remove it. Torn or damaged anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) or posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) Torn or damaged collateral ligament Swollen (inflamed) or ...

  7. Knee Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your knee joint is made up of bone, cartilage, ligaments and fluid. Muscles and tendons help the knee joint move. When any of these structures is hurt or diseased, you have knee problems. Knee problems can cause pain and difficulty ...

  8. Knee Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Schenck, Robert C.; Richter, Dustin L.; Wascher, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Traumatic knee dislocation is becoming more prevalent because of improved recognition and increased exposure to high-energy trauma, but long-term results are lacking. Purpose: To present 2 cases with minimum 20-year follow-up and a review of the literature to illustrate some of the fundamental principles in the management of the dislocated knee. Study Design: Review and case reports. Methods: Two patients with knee dislocations who underwent multiligamentous knee reconstruction were reviewed, with a minimum 20-year follow-up. These patients were brought back for a clinical evaluation using both subjective and objective measures. Subjective measures include the following scales: Lysholm, Tegner activity, visual analog scale (VAS), Short Form–36 (SF-36), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), and a psychosocial questionnaire. Objective measures included ligamentous examination, radiographic evaluation (including Telos stress radiographs), and physical therapy assessment of function and stability. Results: The mean follow-up was 22 years. One patient had a vascular injury requiring repair prior to ligament reconstruction. The average assessment scores were as follows: SF-36 physical health, 52; SF-36 mental health, 59; Lysholm, 92; IKDC, 86.5; VAS involved, 10.5 mm; and VAS uninvolved, 2.5 mm. Both patients had excellent stability and were functioning at high levels of activity for their age (eg, hiking, skydiving). Both patients had radiographic signs of arthritis, which lowered 1 subject’s IKDC score to “C.” Conclusion: Knee dislocations have rare long-term excellent results, and most intermediate-term studies show fair to good functional results. By following fundamental principles in the management of a dislocated knee, patients can be given the opportunity to function at high levels. Hopefully, continued advances in the evaluation and treatment of knee dislocations will improve the long-term outcomes for these patients in the

  9. The Meniscus-Deficient Knee: Biomechanics, Evaluation, and Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Rao, Allison J; Erickson, Brandon J; Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Yanke, Adam B; Bach, Bernard R; Cole, Brian J

    2015-10-01

    Meniscal tears are the most common knee injury, and partial meniscectomies are the most common orthopaedic surgical procedure. The injured meniscus has an impaired ability to distribute load and resist tibial translation. Partial or complete loss of the meniscus promotes early development of chondromalacia and osteoarthritis. The primary goal of treatment for meniscus-deficient knees is to provide symptomatic relief, ideally to delay advanced joint space narrowing, and ultimately, joint replacement. Surgical treatments, including meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT), high tibial osteotomy (HTO), and distal femoral osteotomy (DFO), are options that attempt to decrease the loads on the articular cartilage of the meniscus-deficient compartment by replacing meniscal tissue or altering joint alignment. Clinical and biomechanical studies have reported promising outcomes for MAT, HTO, and DFO in the postmeniscectomized knee. These procedures can be performed alone or in conjunction with ligament reconstruction or chondral procedures (reparative, restorative, or reconstructive) to optimize stability and longevity of the knee. Complications can include fracture, nonunion, patella baja, compartment syndrome, infection, and deep venous thrombosis. MAT, HTO, and DFO are effective options for young patients suffering from pain and functional limitations secondary to meniscal deficiency. PMID:26779547

  10. Total knee arthroplasty in a rheumatoid arthritic knee with large geode: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shih, H N; Hsu, K Y; Tan, C F; Hsueh, S; Hsu, R W

    1997-09-01

    Geodes (subchondral cysts) are a well-known manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis. Solitary cysts or cysts larger than 2 cm are not generally found in the knee joint of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We report a case of RA involving both knees with a giant geode over the right proximal tibia. Surgical treatment was performed including synovectomy, cyst enucleation and packing of autogenous bone chips followed by primary total knee arthroplasty. The postsurgical result was excellent with the knee restored to good function and complete healing of the cystic lesion. PMID:9397618

  11. Early osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Madry, Henning; Kon, Elizaveta; Condello, Vincenzo; Peretti, Giuseppe M; Steinwachs, Matthias; Seil, Romain; Berruto, Massimo; Engebretsen, Lars; Filardo, Giuseppe; Angele, Peter

    2016-06-01

    There is an increasing awareness on the importance in identifying early phases of the degenerative processes in knee osteoarthritis (OA), the crucial period of the disease when there might still be the possibility to initiate treatments preventing its progression. Early OA may show a diffuse and ill-defined involvement, but also originate in the cartilage surrounding a focal lesion, thus necessitating a separate assessment of these two entities. Early OA can be considered to include a maximal involvement of 50 % of the cartilage thickness based on the macroscopic ICRS classification, reflecting an OARSI grade 4. The purpose of this paper was to provide an updated review of the current status of the diagnosis and definition of early knee OA, including the clinical, radiographical, histological, MRI, and arthroscopic definitions and biomarkers. Based on current evidence, practical classification criteria are presented. As new insights and technologies become available, they will further evolve to better define and treat early knee OA. PMID:27000393

  12. [Jumper's knee].

    PubMed

    Hagner, W; Sosnowski, S; Kaziński, W; Frankowski, S

    1993-01-01

    A series of 30 athletes aged about 16 years on an average, exposed to activities putting a strain on the patellar tendon during training has been examined. They were involved in competitive sports for 3 years on an average. In 27 per cent of them jumpers knee symptoms have been found. PMID:7671664

  13. Technique of Arthroscopically Assisted Transtrochanteric Drilling for Femoral Head Chondral Defects.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Sivashankar; Lindner, Dror; Martin, Timothy J; Lodhia, Parth; Suarez-Ahedo, Carlos; Domb, Benjamin G

    2015-08-01

    Microfracture is a marrow-stimulation technique in which damaged cartilage is drilled or punched, perforating the subchondral bone and generating a blood clot within the defect that matures into fibrocartilage. Microfracture for the treatment of small cartilage defects of the hip has shown good results. Arthroscopic procedures are less invasive than open procedures and have a reduced incidence of complications such as infection or avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Furthermore, arthroscopic procedures allow for a shorter recovery time, resulting in not only lower overall treatment costs but also higher patient satisfaction. Medial and parafoveal cartilage defects of the femoral head can be challenging to effectively microfracture using standard arthroscopy portals because of the acute angles required for instrument manipulation. This report describes a technique for microfracturing these challenging areas of the femoral head using a 2.7-mm K-wire and drilling in a transtrochanteric direction using arthroscopic and imaging guidance to target the area of chondral damage. PMID:26759764

  14. Technique of Arthroscopically Assisted Transtrochanteric Drilling for Femoral Head Chondral Defects

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Sivashankar; Lindner, Dror; Martin, Timothy J.; Lodhia, Parth; Suarez-Ahedo, Carlos; Domb, Benjamin G.

    2015-01-01

    Microfracture is a marrow-stimulation technique in which damaged cartilage is drilled or punched, perforating the subchondral bone and generating a blood clot within the defect that matures into fibrocartilage. Microfracture for the treatment of small cartilage defects of the hip has shown good results. Arthroscopic procedures are less invasive than open procedures and have a reduced incidence of complications such as infection or avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Furthermore, arthroscopic procedures allow for a shorter recovery time, resulting in not only lower overall treatment costs but also higher patient satisfaction. Medial and parafoveal cartilage defects of the femoral head can be challenging to effectively microfracture using standard arthroscopy portals because of the acute angles required for instrument manipulation. This report describes a technique for microfracturing these challenging areas of the femoral head using a 2.7-mm K-wire and drilling in a transtrochanteric direction using arthroscopic and imaging guidance to target the area of chondral damage. PMID:26759764

  15. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection. PMID:27004193

  16. Major vascular injuries complicating knee arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bancu, Serban; Muresan, Mircea; Sala, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Starting with a case report, we made a detailed review of the literature, with the purpose of identifying and analyzing the type of iatrogenic vascular lesion following knee arthroscopy and the method of vascular repair. A PubMed literature search was undertaken to locate all reported cases of major vascular iatrogenic injuries during arthroscopic knee procedures. We identified 39 papers which report a total of 62 cases of major iatrogenic popliteal lesions after knee arthroscopy, between 1985 and 2014. The type of arthroscopic intervention performed, the type of iatrogenic vascular lesion encountered, the time passed until its discovery and treatment, the method of vascular reconstruction, and the postoperative course are presented. Postarthroscopy vascular complications are infrequent but potentially disastrous for the condition of the affected inferior limb. An early diagnosis and reintervention are mandatory for a good postoperative outcome. PMID:26240627

  17. Current Concepts of Articular Cartilage Restoration Techniques in the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Christopher L.; Stuart, Michael J.; Krych, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Articular cartilage injuries are common in patients presenting to surgeons with primary complaints of knee pain or mechanical symptoms. Treatment options include comprehensive nonoperative management, palliative surgery, joint preservation operations, and arthroplasty. Evidence Acquisition: A MEDLINE search on articular cartilage restoration techniques of the knee was conducted to identify outcome studies published from 1993 to 2013. Special emphasis was given to Level 1 and 2 published studies. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Results: Current surgical options with documented outcomes in treating chondral injuries in the knee include the following: microfracture, osteochondral autograft transfer, osteochondral allograft transplant, and autologous chondrocyte transplantation. Generally, results are favorable regarding patient satisfaction and return to sport when proper treatment algorithms and surgical techniques are followed, with 52% to 96% of patients demonstrating good to excellent clinical outcomes and 66% to 91% returning to sport at preinjury levels. Conclusion: Clinical, functional, and radiographic outcomes may be improved in the majority of patients with articular cartilage restoration surgery; however, some patients may not fully return to their preinjury activity levels postoperatively. In active and athletic patient populations, biological techniques that restore the articular surface may be options that provide symptom relief and return patients to their prior levels of function. PMID:24790697

  18. Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis in the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Suzer, Ferzan; Thermann, Hajo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) is a 1-step cartilage restoration technique that combines microfracture with the use of an exogenous scaffold. This matrix covers and mechanically stabilizes the clot. There have been an increasing number of studies performed related to the AMIC technique and an update of its use and results is warranted. Design and methods: Using the PubMed database, a literature search was performed using the terms “AMIC” or “Autologous Matrix Induced Chondrogenesis.” A total of 19 basic science and clinical articles were identified. Results: Ten studies that were published on the use of AMIC for knee chondral defects were identified and the results of 219 patients were analyzed. The improvements in Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective, Lysholm and Tegner scores at 2 years were comparable to the published results from autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and matrix ACI techniques for cartilage repair. Conclusions: Our systematic review of the current state of the AMIC technique suggests that it is a promising 1-stage cartilage repair technique. The short-term clinical outcomes and magnetic resonance imaging results are comparable to other cell-based methods. Further studies with AMIC in randomized studies versus other repair techniques such as ACI are needed in the future. PMID:26069694

  19. Knee joint replacement - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... than 3 blocks because of knee pain Loose knee prosthesis Some knee fractures ... an incision over the affected knee. The patella (knee cap) is moved ... helps the prosthesis to adhere better. The two parts of the ...

  20. Knee microfracture surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Cartilage regeneration - knee ... Three types of anesthesia may be used for knee arthroscopy surgery: Medicine to relax you, and shots of painkillers to numb the knee Spinal (regional) anesthesia General anesthesia (you will be ...

  1. Knee CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - knee; Computed axial tomography scan - knee; Computed tomography scan - knee ... Saunders; 2015:chap 93. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  2. Knee joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002974.htm Knee joint replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Knee joint replacement is a surgery to replace a knee ...

  3. Knee pain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... front of the knee can be due to bursitis, arthritis, or softening of the patella cartilage as ... knee. Overall knee pain can be due to bursitis, arthritis, tears in the ligaments, osteoarthritis of the ...

  4. Knee bone tumors: findings on conventional radiology*

    PubMed Central

    Andrade Neto, Francisco; Teixeira, Manuel Joaquim Diógenes; Araújo, Leonardo Heráclio do Carmo; Ponte, Carlos Eduardo Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    The knee is a common site for bone tumors, whether clinically painful or not. Conventional radiology has been established as the first line of investigation in patients with knee pain and can reveal lesions that often generate questions not only for the generalist physician but also for the radiologist or general orthopedist. History, image examination, and histopathological analysis compose the essential tripod of the diagnosis of bone tumors, and conventional radiology is an essential diagnostic tool in patients with knee pain. This pictorial essay proposes to depict the main conventional radiography findings of the most common bone tumors around the knee, including benign and malignant tumors, as well as pseudo-tumors. PMID:27403019

  5. Knee bone tumors: findings on conventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Andrade Neto, Francisco; Teixeira, Manuel Joaquim Diógenes; Araújo, Leonardo Heráclio do Carmo; Ponte, Carlos Eduardo Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    The knee is a common site for bone tumors, whether clinically painful or not. Conventional radiology has been established as the first line of investigation in patients with knee pain and can reveal lesions that often generate questions not only for the generalist physician but also for the radiologist or general orthopedist. History, image examination, and histopathological analysis compose the essential tripod of the diagnosis of bone tumors, and conventional radiology is an essential diagnostic tool in patients with knee pain. This pictorial essay proposes to depict the main conventional radiography findings of the most common bone tumors around the knee, including benign and malignant tumors, as well as pseudo-tumors. PMID:27403019

  6. Risk Factors at Time of Primary ACL Reconstruction that Contribute to Significant Chondral Surface Change at Time of Revision ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kaeding, Christopher C.; Group, Mars

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Articular cartilage health is an important issue following primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). It is not clear what risk factors at the time of primary reconstruction affect future articular cartilage health. The purpose of this study was to examine risk factors affecting chondral surface change in a cohort from the time of primary ACLR to revision ACLR. Methods: Subjects who had both primary and revision data contained in the MOON and MARS registries were included. Data included chondral surface status (grade and size) at time of primary and revision, meniscal status (no treatment/repair, ≤33% excision, >33% excision) at time of primary, time from primary to revision ACLR, and age, sex, BMI, Marx, KOOS, and IKDC at time of revision. Significant chondral surface change was defined as >25% deterioration between time of primary and revision in the femoral condyle, tibial plateau, patella, or trochlea. Logistic regression was used to test each variable’s contribution to significant chondral surface change in the medial compartment, lateral compartment, and patellofemoral compartment. Results: 134 subjects met our inclusion criteria. 34/134 (25.4%) had significant lateral compartment chondral surface change, 32/134 (23.9%) had significant medial compartment chondral surface change, and 31/134 (23.1%) had significant patellofemoral chondral surface change. Median age at time of revision was 19.5 years [IQ range 17-25] and median time from primary to revision was 462.5 days [IQ range 292-1049]. KOOS and IKDC at revision were not associated with significant chondral surface change in any compartment. Patients with >33% of their lateral meniscus excised had 13.5 times the odds of having significant lateral compartment surface change compared to subjects who either did not have lateral meniscal damage, had it repaired, or had an excision of ≤33% controlling for age (p<0.001). Patients with ≤33% excision of their medial meniscus had

  7. Tissue engineering techniques for the treatment of a complex knee injury.

    PubMed

    Ronga, Mario; Grassi, Federico Alberto; Manelli, Alessandro; Bulgheroni, Paolo

    2006-05-01

    We report and discuss the use of and rationale for tissue engineering techniques in a 40-year-old sportsman who suffered simultaneous anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, irreparable medial meniscal tear, and chondral lesion of the medial femoral condyle. A 2-step treatment was adopted to address all lesions. The first procedures consisted of ACL reconstruction and collagen meniscus implant (CMI), followed 6 months later by autologous chondrocyte implantation on a collagen membrane (MACI). A CMI biopsy was performed 6 months after implantation. Histologic and ultrastructural analysis documented scaffold invasion by cells and newly synthesized connective tissue. At 2-year follow up, the clinical and functional results were good and magnetic resonance imaging showed integration of the meniscal and cartilage implants. In this patient, each lesion needed to be addressed to achieve an optimal outcome. The primary goal was to restore normal joint biomechanics by performing CMI and ACL reconstruction. MACI was an adequate solution for the management of the large (5 cm(2)) chondral defect. PMID:16651180

  8. The Relationship between Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury and Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Simon, David; Saltzman, Bryan M.; Rollins, Meaghan; Bach, Bernard R.; MacDonald, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are a common injury, particularly in the athletic and youth populations. The known association between ACL injury and subsequent osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee merits a more in-depth understanding of the relationship between the ACL-injured knee and osteoarthritis. ACL injury, especially with concomitant meniscal or other ligamentous pathology, predisposes the knee to an increased risk of osteoarthritis. ACL insufficiency results in deterioration of the normal physiologic knee bending culminating in increased anterior tibial translation and increased internal tibial rotation. This leads to increased mean contact stresses in the posterior medial and lateral compartments under anterior and rotational loading. However, surgical reconstruction of the ACL has not been shown to reduce the risk of future OA development back to baseline and has variability based on operative factors of graft choice, timing of surgery, presence of meniscal and chondral abnormalities, and surgical technique. Known strategies to prevent OA development are applicable to patients with ACL deficiency or after ACL reconstruction and include weight management, avoidance of excessive musculoskeletal loading, and strength training. Reconstruction of the ACL does not necessarily prevent osteoarthritis in many of these patients and may depend on several external variables. PMID:25954533

  9. Ultrasonographic scan in knee pain in athletes.

    PubMed Central

    Maffulli, N; Regine, R; Carrillo, F; Minelli, S; Beaconsfield, T

    1992-01-01

    Fifty-two knees were examined using real-time high-definition ultrasonography with a 7.5 MHz probe. The extra-articular structures were easily visualized and diagnosis of patellar tendon lesions and Baker's cysts formulated. While the meniscal cartilages were shown as a homogeneous triangular structure between the femoral condyle and the tibial plateau, no lesions were detected. Deeper intra-articular structures, such as the cruciate ligaments, were not shown by the scan, thus their evaluation was not possible. Given its low cost, wide availability, non-invasiveness and patients' acceptability of the technique, ultrasonography may play an important role in the diagnosis of soft tissue lesions in and around the knee joint. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:1623366

  10. Knee arthroscopy - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100117.htm Knee arthroscopy - series To use the sharing features on ... 5 out of 5 Normal anatomy Overview The knee is a complex joint made up of the ...

  11. Knee braces - unloading

    MedlinePlus

    ... most people talk about the arthritis in their knees, they are referring to a type of arthritis ... is caused by wear and tear inside your knee joints. Cartilage, the firm, rubbery tissue that cushions ...

  12. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series To use the sharing features on ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  13. Osteotomy of the knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... is not affected unless you have had a knee injury in the past. Osteotomy surgery works by shifting ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Arthritis Knee Injuries and Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  14. Knee joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    The results of a total knee replacement are often excellent. The operation relieves pain for most people. Most people do not need help walking after they fully recover. Most artificial knee joints last 10 ...

  15. Partial knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    Most people recover quickly and have much less pain than they did before surgery. People who have a partial knee replacement recover faster than those who have a total knee replacement. Many people are able to walk ...

  16. Knee joint replacement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100088.htm Knee joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... of 4 Overview The knee is a complex joint. It contains the distal end of the femur ( ...

  17. [CHARACTERISTICS OF OSTEOCYTE CELL LINES FROM BONES FORMED AS A RESULT OF MEMBRANOUS (SKULL BONES) AND CHONDRAL (LONG BONES) OSSIFICATION].

    PubMed

    Avrunin, A S; Doktorov, A A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the literature data and the results of authors' own research, to answer the question--if the osteocytes of bone tissues resulting from membranous and chondral ossification, belong to one or to different cell lines. The differences between the cells of osteocyte lines derived from bones resulting from membranous and chondral ossification were established in: 1) the magnitude of the mechanical signal, initiating the development of the process of mechanotransduction; 2) the nature of the relationship between the magnitude of the mechanical signal that initiates the reorganization of the architecture of bone structures and the resource of their strength; in membranous bones significantly lower mechanical signal caused a substantially greater increment of bone strength resource; 3) the biological activity of bone structures, bone fragments formed from membranous tissue were more optimal for transplantation; 4) the characteristics of expression of functional markers of bone cells at different stages of their differentiation; 5) the nature of the reaction of bone cells to mechanical stress; 6) the sensitivity of bone cells to one of the factors controlling the process of mechanotransduction (PGI2); 7) the functioning of osteocytes during lactation. These differences reflect the functional requirements to the bones of the skeleton--the supporting function in the bones of the limbs and the shaping and protection in the bones of the cranial vault. These data suggest that the results of research conducted on the bones of the skull, should not be transferred to the entire skeleton as a whole. PMID:27487656

  18. External Knee Adduction and Flexion Moments during Gait and Medial Tibiofemoral Disease Progression in Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alison H.; Moisio, Kirsten C.; Chmiel, Joan S.; Eckstein, Felix; Guermazi, Ali; Prasad, Pottumarthi V.; Zhang, Yunhui; Almagor, Orit; Belisle, Laura; Hayes, Karen; Sharma, Leena

    2015-01-01

    Objective Test the hypothesis that greater baseline peak external knee adduction moment (KAM), KAM impulse, and peak external knee flexion moment (KFM) during the stance phase of gait are associated with baseline-to-2-year medial tibiofemoral cartilage damage and bone marrow lesion progression, and cartilage thickness loss. Methods Participants all had knee OA in at least one knee. Baseline peak KAM, KAM impulse, and peak KFM (normalized to body weight and height) were captured and computed using a motion analysis system and 6 force plates. Participants underwent MRI of both knees at baseline and two years later. To assess the association between baseline moments and baseline-to-2-year semiquantitative cartilage damage and bone marrow lesion progression and quantitative cartilage thickness loss, we used logistic regression with generalized estimating equations (GEE), adjusting for gait speed, age, gender, disease severity, knee pain severity, and medication use. Results The sample consisted of 391 knees (204 persons): mean age 64.2 years (SD 10.0); BMI 28.4 kg/m2 (5.7); 156 (76.5%) women. Greater baseline peak KAM and KAM impulse were each associated with worsening of medial bone marrow lesions, but not cartilage damage. Higher baseline KAM impulse was associated with 2-year medial cartilage thickness loss assessed both as % loss and as a threshold of loss, whereas peak KAM was related only to % loss. There was no relationship between baseline peak KFM and any medial disease progression outcome measures. Conclusion Findings support targeting KAM parameters in an effort to delay medial OA disease progression. PMID:25677110

  19. Knee braces - unloading

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by wear and tear inside your knee joints. Cartilage, the firm, rubbery tissue that cushions all of your bones and joints, lets the bones glide over one another. If ... the knee become weaker. Over time, your whole knee becomes ...

  20. Total Knee Replacement as a Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Raynauld, Jean-Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Dorais, Marc; Haraoui, Boulos; Choquette, Denis; Abram, François; Beaulieu, André; Bessette, Louis; Morin, Frédéric; Wildi, Lukas M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To predict, using clinical and qMRI data, the incidence of total knee replacement (TKR) during the long-term follow-up of knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients who formerly received chondroitin sulfate (CS) or placebo treatment. Design. A post hoc intention-to-treat analysis to evaluate the incidence of TKR was done on knee OA patients who had participated in a 12-month trial evaluating the impact of CS (800 mg/d) versus placebo for 6 months, followed by a 6-month open-phase in which all patients received CS. Additionally, the clinical and qMRI predictors of TKR were determined. Results. Thirteen TKRs were performed in the population after a 4-year follow-up. More TKRs were performed in the placebo group than in the CS group (69% vs. 31%, P = 0.150, logistic regression). The statistically significant predictors of TKRs were, at baseline, higher WOMAC pain and function scores, presence of bone marrow lesions (BMLs), and higher C-reactive protein levels. Loss of medial cartilage volume and increase in WOMAC pain and function at one-year were also predictors of TKR. Multivariate analyses revealed that baseline presence of BML and higher WOMAC pain score were independent predictors. Time to occurrence of the TKR also favored the CS group versus placebo (log-rank, P = 0.094). Conclusion. Symptoms such as knee pain and function, presence of BML, and cartilage volume loss predict the long-term occurrence of a “hard” outcome such as TKR. PMID:26069668

  1. Effects of surgically induced instability on rat knee articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J M; Felten, D L; Peterson, R G; O'Connor, B L

    1982-01-01

    Degenerative lesions in the articular cartilage were present following transection of the anterior cruciate ligament in the rat. These lesions included surface disruptions, a reduction in matrix proteoglycans, and cellular changes and therefore were similar to lesions seen in dogs following transection of the anterior cruciate ligament as well as lesions seen in other mechanical derangement models. Lesions were more frequently encountered in animals that had been exercised on a treadmill. This suggests that the rat knee joint may be a useful small animal model in studying the effect of mechanical derangement on articular tissues. Images Figs. 1-2 Figs. 3-4 Figs. 5-6 PMID:7076535

  2. Early knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Favero, Marta; Ramonda, Roberta; Goldring, Mary B; Goldring, Steven R; Punzi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Concepts regarding osteoarthritis, the most common joint disease, have dramatically changed in the past decade thanks to the development of new imaging techniques and the widespread use of arthroscopy that permits direct visualisation of intra-articular tissues and structure. MRI and ultrasound allow the early detection of pre-radiographic structural changes not only in the peri-articular bone but also in the cartilage, menisci, synovial membrane, ligaments and fat pad. The significance of MRI findings such as cartilage defects, bone marrow lesions, synovial inflammation/effusions and meniscal tears in patients without radiographic signs of osteoarthritis is not fully understood. Nevertheless, early joint tissue changes are associated with symptoms and, in some cases, with progression of disease. In this short review, we discuss the emerging concept of early osteoarthritis localised to the knee based on recently updated knowledge. We highlight the need for a new definition of early osteoarthritis that will permit the identification of patients at high risk of osteoarthritis progression and to initiate early treatment interventions. PMID:26557380

  3. Posterolateral Corner of the Knee: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Moatshe, Gilbert; Dean, Chase S.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to the posterolateral corner (PLC) comprise a significant portion of knee ligament injuries. A high index of suspicion is necessary when evaluating the injured knee to detect these sometimes occult injuries. Moreover, a thorough physical examination and a comprehensive review of radiographic studies are necessary to identify these injuries. In this sense, stress radiographs can help to objectively determine the extent of these lesions. Non-operative and operative treatment options have been reported depending on the extent of the injury. Complete PLC lesions rarely heal with non-operative treatment, and are therefore most often treated surgically. The purpose of this article was to review the anatomy and clinically relevant biomechanics, diagnosis algorithms, treatment and rehabilitation protocols for PLC injuries. PMID:27200384

  4. Day case arthroscopy and arthroscopic surgery of the knee.

    PubMed Central

    Allum, R. L.; Ribbans, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    A Day Case Unit was opened at Wexham Park Hospital in October 1985 and this paper describes the first year's experience in arthroscopy and arthroscopic surgery. Ninety nine knees in 96 patients were examined. The predominant diagnoses were lesions of the medial meniscus (33%), ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (30%) and lesions of the lateral meniscus (20%). Fourteen knees (14%) were normal. There was one postoperative infection, 3 patients had troublesome effusions and one patient developed a synovial fistula. Two patients required overnight admission. The waiting list was reduced from 14.7 weeks to 3.0 weeks. The advantages and limitations of this technique is discussed. PMID:3674684

  5. Preventing Knee Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... to tearing. Growth Plate Injuries, Fractures, and Dislocations Knee fractures rarely occur in childhood sports, but with any ... is the bump on the front of the knee where the patellar tendon attaches. Fractures to the growth plate in this area often ...

  6. Bicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Giachino, Matteo; Risitano, Salvatore; Atzori, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most worldwide practiced surgery for knee osteoarthritis and its efficacy is mightily described by literature. Concerns about the invasiveness of TKA let the introduction of segmental resurfacing of the joint for younger patients with localized osteoarthritis. Bone stock sparing and ligaments preservation are the essence of both unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA). Advantages related to BKA are the respect of knee biomechanics, lower complications rates, shorter hospital stay, faster rehabilitation. Moreover, in case of failure of the first implant the conversion to TKA is undemanding and can be compared to a standard prosthesis. Our experience suggest that BKA is a reliable technique in selected cases and especially younger people with higher functional requests can favourably profit from it. Although those results are encouraging, we still need further prospective, randomized, long-term studies to finally assess BKA indications and outcomes. PMID:26855941

  7. Bicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Luigi; Giachino, Matteo; Risitano, Salvatore; Atzori, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most worldwide practiced surgery for knee osteoarthritis and its efficacy is mightily described by literature. Concerns about the invasiveness of TKA let the introduction of segmental resurfacing of the joint for younger patients with localized osteoarthritis. Bone stock sparing and ligaments preservation are the essence of both unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA). Advantages related to BKA are the respect of knee biomechanics, lower complications rates, shorter hospital stay, faster rehabilitation. Moreover, in case of failure of the first implant the conversion to TKA is undemanding and can be compared to a standard prosthesis. Our experience suggest that BKA is a reliable technique in selected cases and especially younger people with higher functional requests can favourably profit from it. Although those results are encouraging, we still need further prospective, randomized, long-term studies to finally assess BKA indications and outcomes. PMID:26855941

  8. Use of chondral fragments for one stage cartilage repair: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Marmotti, Antongiulio; Rosso, Federica; Collo, Gianluca; Rossi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the state of the art regarding Cartilage Autograft Implantation System (CAIS) or Particulated Juvenile Allograft Cartilage (PJAC). METHODS: The authors searched the English literature regarding CAIS and PJAC. The search strategy was: (particulated cartilage) OR autologous cartilage fragments. All basic science articles were included. Clinical articles with less than 10 patients treated and less than 6 mo of follow-up were excluded. With these criteria, a total of 17 articles were available for the present review. RESULTS: PJAC and CAIS are relatively novel techniques for cartilage repair. Good basic science evidence was described to support the concept. Although the preliminary clinical reports show encouraging results, clinical data are still limited, especially for CAIS. The indications for both techniques need to be precisely defined (age of the patients, size of the lesion, and involvement of the subchondral bone), together with other debated issues. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, the authors can state that encouraging preliminary results are available for both techniques. However, further studies are necessary to precisely determine the indications, surgical techniques, and long term outcomes for PJAC and CAIS. PMID:26716098

  9. Anterior knee pain following total knee replacement correlates with the OARSI score of the cartilage of the patella

    PubMed Central

    Vorobjov, Sigrid; Lepik, Katrin; Märtson, Aare

    2014-01-01

    Background Attempts to relate patellar cartilage involvement to anterior knee pain (AKP) have yielded conflicting results. We determined whether the condition of the cartilage of the patella at the time of knee replacement, as assessed by the OARSI score, correlates with postsurgical AKP. Patients and methods We prospectively studied 100 patients undergoing knee arthroplasty. At surgery, we photographed and biopsied the articular surface of the patella, leaving the patella unresurfaced. Following determination of the microscopic grade of the patellar cartilage lesion and the stage by analyzing the intraoperative photographs, we calculated the OARSI score. We interviewed the patients 1 year after knee arthroplasty using the HSS patella score for diagnosis of AKP. Results 57 of 95 patients examined had AKP. The average OARSI score of painless patients was 13 (6–20) and that of patients with AKP was 15 (6–20) (p = 0.04). Patients with OARSI scores of 13–24 had 50% higher risk of AKP (prevalence ratio = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.0–2.3) than patients with OARSI scores of 0–12. Interpretation The depth and extent of the cartilage lesion of the knee-cap should be considered when deciding between the various options for treatment of the patella during knee replacement. PMID:24954482

  10. Treating Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... osteotomy may need knee replacement surgery in the future. Arthroplasty is also called joint or knee replacement therapy. A surgeon removes the part of the knee damaged by osteoarthritis and replaces it with an artificial joint made from metals and plastic. All or part of the knee joint may ...

  11. Direct nerve suture and knee immobilization in 90° flexion as a technique for treatment of common peroneal, tibial and sural nerve injuries in complex knee trauma.

    PubMed

    Döring, Robert; Ciritsis, Bernhard; Giesen, Thomas; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Giovanoli, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    There are different ways to treat peripheral nerve injuries with concomitant defects in the lower extremity. One option is a direct nerve suture followed by immobilization of the knee in flexion as it is described for gunshot wounds that lead to lesions of the sciatic nerve and its terminal branches as well as isolated nerve lesions. We used this technique to treat a case of multiple nerve injuries of the lower extremity combined with a complex knee trauma including a lesion of both bones and the posterior capsule. To our knowledge, this technique has not yet been described for such a combined injury in literature. PMID:24968417

  12. Advanced concepts in knee arthrodesis

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Jennifer H; Conway, Janet D

    2015-01-01

    The aim is to describe advanced strategies that can be used to diagnose and treat complications after knee arthrodesis and to describe temporary knee arthrodesis to treat infected knee arthroplasty. Potential difficult complications include nonunited knee arthrodesis, limb length discrepancy after knee arthrodesis, and united but infected knee arthrodesis. If a nonunited knee arthrodesis shows evidence of implant loosening or failure, then bone grafting the nonunion site as well as exchange intramedullary nailing and/or supplemental plate fixation are recommended. If symptomatic limb length discrepancy cannot be satisfactorily treated with a shoe lift, then the patient should undergo tibial lengthening over nail with a monolateral fixator or exchange nailing with a femoral internal lengthening device. If a united knee arthrodesis is infected, the nail must be removed. Then the surgeon has the option of replacing it with a long, antibiotic cement-coated nail. The authors also describe temporary knee arthrodesis for infected knee arthroplasty in patients who have the potential to undergo insertion of a new implant. The procedure has two goals: eradication of infection and stabilization of the knee. A temporary knee fusion can be accomplished by inserting both an antibiotic cement-coated knee fusion nail and a static antibiotic cement-coated spacer. These advanced techniques can be helpful when treating difficult complications after knee arthrodesis and treating cases of infected knee arthroplasty. PMID:25793160

  13. An Update on Methods for Revascularization and Expansion of the TASC Lesion Classification to Include Below-the-Knee Arteries: A Supplement to the Inter-Society Consensus for the Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease (TASC II)

    PubMed Central

    Jaff, *Michael R.; White, Christopher J.; Hiatt, William R.; Fowkes, Gerry R.; Dormandy, John; Razavi, Mahmood; Reekers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    The Inter-Society Consensus for the Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease (TASC) guidelines were last updated in 2007 (TASC II) and represented the collaboration of international vascular specialties involved in the management of patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Since the publication of TASC II, there have been innovations in endovascular revascularization strategies for patients with PAD. The intent of this publication is to provide a complete anatomic lower limb TASC lesion classification, including the infrapopliteal segment, and an updated literature review of new endovascular techniques and practice patterns employed by vascular specialists today. PMID:26730266

  14. An Update on Methods for Revascularization and Expansion of the TASC Lesion Classification to Include Below-the-Knee Arteries: A Supplement to the Inter-Society Consensus for the Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease (TASC II).

    PubMed

    Jaff, Michael R; White, Christopher J; Hiatt, William R; Fowkes, Gerry R; Dormandy, John; Razavi, Mahmood; Reekers, Jim; Norgren, Lars

    2015-10-01

    The Inter-Society Consensus for the Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease (TASC) guidelines were last updated in 2007 (TASC II) and represented the collaboration of international vascular specialties involved in the management of patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Since the publication of TASC II, there have been innovations in endovascular revascularization strategies for patients with PAD. The intent of this publication is to provide a complete anatomic lower limb TASC lesion classification, including the infrapopliteal segment, and an updated literature review of new endovascular techniques and practice patterns employed by vascular specialists today. PMID:26239796

  15. Bilateral pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Samir H.; Porrino, Jack A.; Green, John R.; Chew, Felix S.

    2015-01-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis is a disorder resulting in a villous, nodular, or villonodular proliferation of the synovium, with pigmentation related to the presence of hemosiderin. These lesions are almost exclusively benign with rare reports of malignancy. Pigmented villonodular synovitis can occur in a variety of joints and at any age but most often occurs within the knee in the young adult. Pigmented villonodular synovitis is a rare disease entity, and bilateral synchronous or metachronous involvement of a joint is even more uncommon, with few reports previously described in the literature. We present a case of pigmented villonodular synovitis involving both the right and left knee in the same patient, with radiographic imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, photograph and video intraoperative imaging, and pathologic correlation. PMID:26649121

  16. Knee MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the knee joint and ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  17. Anterior knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... places extra stress on the kneecap (such as running, jumping or twisting, skiing, or playing soccer). You ... noticeable with: Deep knee bends Going down stairs Running downhill Standing up after sitting for awhile

  18. Total Knee Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... as anti- inflammatory medications, cortisone injections, lubricating injections, physical therapy, or other surgeries A knee that has become ... your function. Other treatment options — including medications, injections, physical therapy, or other types of surgery — will also be ...

  19. Tourniquetless Total Knee Arthroplasty

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Tourniquetless Total Knee Arthroplasty You must have Javascript enabled in your web browser. View Program Transcript Click Here to view the OR-Live, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2010 OR- ...

  20. Knee arthroscopy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... is cartilage that cushions the space between the bones in the knee. Surgery is done to repair or remove it. Torn or damaged anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) or posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) Inflamed or damaged lining of the joint. This ...

  1. Knee arthroscopy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... knee arthroscopy). You may have been checked for: Torn meniscus. Meniscus is cartilage that cushions the space ... Surgery is done to repair or remove it. Torn or damaged anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) or posterior ...

  2. Taking care of your new knee joint

    MedlinePlus

    Knee arthroplasty - precautions; Knee replacement - precautions ... After you have knee replacement surgery , you will need to be careful about how you move your knee, especially for the first few months after ...

  3. Reading Knee-Deep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewett, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    Freire told his audience at a seminar at the University of Massachusetts, "You need to read knee-deep in texts, for deeper than surface meanings, and you need to know the words to be able to do it" (quoted in Cleary, 2003). In a children's literature class, fifteen teachers and I traveled along a path that moved us toward reading knee-deep as we…

  4. Dashboard (in the) knee.

    PubMed

    Patel, M S; Qureshi, A A; Green, T P

    2015-03-01

    We present the case of a 19-year-old individual presenting to an orthopaedic outpatient clinic several months following a dashboard knee injury during a road traffic accident with intermittent mechanical symptoms. Despite unremarkable examination findings and normal magnetic resonance imaging, the patient was identified subsequently as having an intra-articular plastic foreign body consistent with a piece of dashboard on arthroscopic knee assessment, the retrieval of which resulted in a complete resolution of symptoms. PMID:25723676

  5. Single-step scaffold-based cartilage repair in the knee: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Stefan; Kisser, Agnes

    2016-12-01

    Chondral lesions are difficult-to-treat entities that often affect young and active people. Moreover, cartilage has limited intrinsic healing potential. The purpose of this systematic literature review was to analyse whether the single-step scaffold-based cartilage repair in combination with microfracturing (MFx) is more effective and safe in comparison to MFx alone. From the three identified studies, it seems that the single-step scaffold-assisted cartilage repair in combination with MFx leads to similar short- to medium-term (up to five years follow-up) results, compared to MFx alone. All of the studies have shown improvements regarding joint functionality, pain and partly quality of life. PMID:27408497

  6. Unique Anatomic Feature of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament in Knees Associated With Osteochondritis Dissecans

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masakazu; Adachi, Nobuo; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Nakamae, Atsuo; Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Ikuta, Yasunari; Hayashi, Seiju; Deie, Masataka; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee is a disorder in juveniles and young adults; however, its etiology still remains unclear. For OCD at the medial femoral condyle (MFC), it is sometimes observed that the lesion has a connection with fibers of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Although this could be important information related to the etiology of MFC OCD, there is no report examining an association between the MFC OCD and the PCL anatomy. Purpose: To investigate the anatomic features of knees associated with MFC OCD, focusing especially on the femoral attachment of the PCL, and to compare them with knees associated with lateral femoral condyle (LFC) OCD and non-OCD lesions. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 39 patients (46 knees) with OCD lesions who had undergone surgical treatment. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, the PCL attachment at the lateral wall of the MFC was measured on the coronal sections, and the knee flexion angle was also measured on the sagittal sections. As with non-OCD knees, we reviewed and analyzed 25 knees with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and 16 knees with meniscal injuries. Results: MRIs revealed that the femoral PCL footprint was located in a significantly more distal position in the patients with MFC OCD compared with patients with LFC OCD and ACL and meniscal injuries. There was no significant difference in knee flexion angle among the 4 groups. Conclusion: The PCL in patients with MFC OCD attached more distally at the lateral aspect of the MFC compared with knees with LFC OCD and ACL and meniscal injuries. PMID:27294170

  7. Unusual Appearance of an Osteochondral Lesion Accompanying Medial Meniscus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mine, Takatomo; Ihara, Koichiro; Kawamura, Hiroyuki; Date, Ryo; Chagawa, Kazuki

    2014-01-01

    An osteochondral lesion in the knee joint is caused by a focal traumatic osteochondral defect, osteochondritis dissecans, an isolated degenerative lesion, or diffuse degenerative disease. An osteochondral lesion with a cleft-like appearance accompanying medial meniscus injury is rare without trauma. We report the case of a 13-year-old boy who complained of right knee pain and swelling, with radiographic findings of an osteochondral defect. Arthroscopic inspection showed an osteochondral lesion in the medial condyle of the femur and tibial plateau accompanying a partial medial meniscus discoid tear. Partial meniscectomy was performed, and a microfracture procedure was carried out on the osteochondral defect. The patient was asymptomatic at 2 years' follow-up. This technique is a relatively easy, completely arthroscopic procedure that spares the bone and cartilage and has yielded a good clinical outcome in a skeletally immature patient who had an osteochondral lesion with a cleft-like appearance. PMID:24749028

  8. Rehabilitation following Microfracture of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, Kevin E.; Macrina, Leonard C.; Reinold, Michael M.

    2010-01-01

    Postoperative rehabilitation programs following articular cartilage repair procedures will vary greatly among patients and need to be individualized based on the nature of the lesion, the unique characteristics of the patient, and the type and detail of each surgical procedure. These programs are based on knowledge of the basic science, anatomy, and biomechanics of articular cartilage as well as the biological course of healing following surgery. The goal is to restore full function in each patient as quickly as possible by facilitating a healing response without overloading the healing articular cartilage. The purpose of this article is to overview the principles of rehabilitation following microfracture procedures of the knee. PMID:26069540

  9. The relation of MRI-detected structural damage in the medial and lateral patellofemoral joint to knee pain: The Multicenter and Framingham Osteoarthritis Studies

    PubMed Central

    Stefanik, Joshua J.; Gross, K. Douglas; Guermazi, Ali; Felson, David T.; Roemer, Frank W.; Zhang, Yuquing; Niu, Jingbo; Segal, Neil A.; Lewis, Cora E.; Nevitt, Michael; Neogi, Tuhina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the relation of cartilage loss and bone marrow lesions (BMLs) in the medial and lateral patellofemoral joint (PFJ) to knee pain. Methods We categorized the location of full-thickness cartilage loss and BMLs in the PFJ on knee MRIs from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis (MOST) and Framingham Osteoarthritis (FOA) Studies as no damage, isolated medial, isolated lateral, or both medial and lateral (mixed). We determined the relation of MRI lesions in each PFJ region to prevalent knee pain. Differences in knee pain severity were compared among categories of PFJ full-thickness cartilage loss and BMLs using quantile regression. Results In MOST (n=1137 knees), compared with knees without full-thickness cartilage loss, knees with isolated lateral or mixed PFJ full-thickness cartilage loss had 1.9 (1.3, 2.8) and 1.9 (1.2, 2.9) times the odds of knee pain, respectively, while isolated medial cartilage loss had no association with knee pain.. BMLs in both the medial and lateral PFJ had 1.5 (1.1, 2.0) times the odds of knee pain compared with knees without BMLs. Knee pain severity was lowest in knees with isolated medial PFJ cartilage loss or BMLs. In FOA (n=934 knees), neither isolated medial nor lateral cartilage loss was associated with knee pain, whereas isolated BMLs in either region were associated with pain. Conclusions Results were not completely concordant but suggest that knee pain risk and severity is greatest with cartilage loss isolated to (MOST) or inclusive of (MOST and FOA) the lateral PFJ. While BMLs in either the medial or lateral PFJ are related to pain. PMID:25575967

  10. Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Marla N

    2016-08-01

    Vascular lesions in childhood are comprised of vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular tumors encompass neoplasms of the vascular system, of which infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common. Vascular malformations, on the other hand, consist of lesions due to anomalous development of the vascular system, including the capillary, venous, arterial, and lymphatic systems. Capillary malformations represent the most frequent type of vascular malformation. IHs and vascular malformations tend to follow relatively predictable growth patterns in that IHs grow then involute during early childhood, whereas vascular malformations tend to exhibit little change. Both vascular tumors and vascular malformations can demonstrate a wide range of severity and potential associated complications necessitating specialist intervention when appropriate. Evaluation and treatment of the most common types of vascular lesions are discussed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e299-e305.]. PMID:27517358

  11. [Musculoskeletal disorders of the knee of workers].

    PubMed

    Caubet, Alain

    2009-11-20

    50% of workers have been or will be affected by knee pains and complaints will be more frequent as the population ages and careers will be longer. The increase in prevalence depends on mechanical or morphological causes as well as psychosocial state and work organization. Lesions of the meniscus, well known for a long time, seem to be stable in the statistics of Social Security as well as the hygroma; the use of knee-pads (overalls with built-in cushions) is strongly recommended while working in kneeling or squatting position, even DIY activities. Are particularly dangerous: the squatting or kneeling position extended for longer than one hour a day, often recovering from these two positions (more than 30 times a day), lifting or carrying heavy loads, often climbing (around 30 times per day) stairs or ladders. These gestures and postures are unavoidable in some jobs; in those cases, advices given by the specialist of occupational medicine and the ergonomist may improve or alter the habits of the worker or of his entire team. The prevention of overweight and the habit of carrying heavy loads must be amplified, for all the usual positions of work. Consulting to decide about the return to work after surgery for knee replacement will be more frequent. Then, as each time work can interfere with health, it is logical that the family doctor have (via the patient) links with the specialist of occupational medicine, which holds valuable information for quality of life of employees. PMID:19961084

  12. Cementless total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Salvatore; Sabatini, Luigi; Giachino, Matteo; Agati, Gabriele; Massè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Interest for uncemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has greatly increased in recent years. This technique, less used than cemented knee replacement in the last decades, sees a revival thanks an advance in prosthetic design, instrumentation and operative technique. The related literature in some cases shows conflicting data on survival and on the revision’s rate, but in most cases a success rate comparable to cemented TKA is reported. The optimal fixation in TKA is a subject of debate with the majority of surgeons favouring cemented fixation. PMID:27162779

  13. Association between abnormal kinematics and degenerative change in knees of people with chronic anterior cruciate ligament deficiency: a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Scarvell, Jennifer M; Smith, Paul N; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Galloway, Howard R; Woods, Kevin R

    2005-01-01

    Progressive degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficient knee may be partly due to chondral trauma at the time of ACL rupture and repeat episodes of subluxation, but also due to aberrant kinematics altering the wear pattern at the tibiofemoral interface. The hypothesis that altered kinematics, represented by the tibiofemoral contact pattern, would be associated with articular cartilage degeneration in ACL-deficient knees was tested in a cross-sectional study of 23 subjects with a history of > 10 years ACL deficiency without knee reconstruction. Subjects were aged 31 to 67 years. Eleven were male, 12 were female. Sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans enabled tibiofemoral contact mapping as subjects performed a closed-chain leg-press. Images were acquired at 15 degree intervals from 0 degrees to 90 degrees knee flexion. Articular cartilage degeneration was assessed by diagnostic MRI and where possible, arthroscopy. The ACL-deficient knees had a posterior tibiofemoral contact pattern on the tibial plateau compared to the healthy knees (F((1,171)) = 9.2, p = 0.003). The difference appeared to be seen in the medial compartment (F((1,171)) = 3.2, p = 0.07), though this failed to reach significance. Articular cartilage degeneration in the medial compartment was related to the variation of the tibiofemoral contact pattern (r = -0.53, p = 0.01). Articular cartilage degeneration was not related to time since injury (r = -0.16, p = 0.65). The association between aberrant kinematics and degenerative change may stimulate thinking on the role of dynamic stability and neuromuscular co-ordination in joint protection. PMID:16321130

  14. Calcific tendinitis of biceps femoris: an unusual site and cause for lateral knee pain.

    PubMed

    Chan, Warwick; Chase, Helen Emily; Cahir, John G; Walton, Neil Patrick

    2016-01-01

    A 37-year-old man presented to the acute knee and sports medicine clinic with atraumatic lateral knee pain. He had point tenderness over the lateral aspect of his knee which had not settled with anti-inflammatory medications. Imaging revealed a large opaque lesion lateral to the knee and although there was no clear mechanism, injury to the posterolateral corner was considered. An MRI subsequently revealed a rare case of calcific tendinitis to the biceps femoris tendon insertion. This condition was self-limiting and did not require interventions such as steroid injections. This is the first reported case of calcific tendinitis of biceps femoris as a cause of acute knee pain. PMID:27473032

  15. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (164). Morel-Lavallée lesion

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Sook Chuei Wendy; Wong, Bak Siew Steven

    2016-01-01

    A 31-year-old male motorcyclist presented with prepatellar swelling of the left knee after a collision with a car. Magnetic resonance imaging of the knee showed no bony or ligamentous injury to the knee. Instead, a well-defined, thin-walled, T2-weighted hyperintense fluid collection with internal septations was identified in a prefascial location overlying the left patella and patellar tendon. The findings were in keeping with those of a Morel-Lavallée lesion, a closed internal degloving injury. Morel-Lavallée lesions are occasionally encountered after a blunt soft-tissue trauma. The presentation and imaging features are discussed. PMID:26831317

  16. Lipoma arborescens of the knee: report of a case managed by arthroscopic synovectomy.

    PubMed

    Franco, Michel; Puch, J M; Carayon, M J; Bortolotti, D; Albano, Laetitia; Lallemand, A

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of lipoma arborescens treated with an arthroscopic procedure. Lipoma arborescens is an uncommon pseudo-tumoral synovial lesion usually located in the suprapatellar pouch of the knee. This diagnosis should be considered, particularly in patients with chronic joint effusion. Magnetic resonance imaging confirms the lipomatous nature of the synovial proliferation. When limited to the anterior compartment of the knee, lipoma arborescens can be treated by arthroscopic synovectomy. PMID:14769527

  17. Hypermobility and Knee Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Mark E.

    1987-01-01

    A review of research on the effect of hypermobility on knee injury indicates that greater than normal joint flexibility may be necessary for some athletic endeavors and that it may be possible to change one's underlying flexibility through training. However, for most athletes, inherited flexibility probably plays only a small role, if any, in…

  18. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  19. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.136 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly (refer to §§ 572.130(a)(1)(v) and (vi)) for the purpose of...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  1. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly is part of the leg assembly (drawing 127-4000-1 and -2). (b) When the...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  3. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.136 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly (refer to §§ 572.130(a)(1)(v) and (vi)) for the purpose of...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  5. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly is part of the leg assembly (drawing 127-4000-1 and -2). (b) When the...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  7. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly is part of the leg assembly (drawing 127-4000-1 and -2). (b) When the...

  8. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.136 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly (refer to §§ 572.130(a)(1)(v) and (vi)) for the purpose of...

  9. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly is part of the leg assembly (drawing 127-4000-1 and -2). (b) When the...

  10. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly is part of the leg assembly (drawing 127-4000-1 and -2). (b) When the...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  12. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.136 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly (refer to §§ 572.130(a)(1)(v) and (vi)) for the purpose of...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  15. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.136 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly (refer to §§ 572.130(a)(1)(v) and (vi)) for the purpose of...

  16. Osteochondritis dissecans of the lateral femoral condyle of the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Mitsuoka, T; Shino, K; Hamada, M; Horibe, S

    1999-01-01

    Differences in the features of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) affecting the lateral and medial femoral condyles were investigated in 13 patients (14 knees) treated from 1991 to 1994. OCD affected the lateral femoral condyle in 6 knees (lateral group) and the medial condyle in 8 knees (medial group). The lateral group was younger (mean age, 14 v. 20 years). The radiological stage (Brückl) of the lateral group was stage 2 in 3 knees and stage 3 in 3. The lateral menisci were all discoid and the condylar articular surface of the lesions was normal in two knees, softened in 3 and detached in 1. The medial group comprised 1 knee in stage 2, 1 in stage 3, 1 in stage 4, and 5 in stage 5. The OCD lesion showed softening in 2 knees and detachment in 6. Repetitive abnormal stress on weaker osteochondral structures in the growing period produced by a discoid meniscus during growth may cause OCD of the lateral femoral condyle. PMID:10024029

  17. Physicians’ accuracy and interrator reliability for the diagnosis of unstable meniscal tears in patients having osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Dervin, Geoffrey F.; Stiell, Ian G.; Wells, George A.; Rody, Kelly; Grabowski, Jenny

    2001-01-01

    Objective To determine clinicians’ accuracy and reliability for the clinical diagnosis of unstable meniscus tears in patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee. Design A prospective cohort study. Setting A single tertiary care centre. Patients One hundred and fifty-two patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee refractory to conservative medical treatment were selected for prospective evaluation of arthroscopic débridement. Intervention Arthroscopic débridement of the knee, including meniscal tear and chondral flap resection, without abrasion arthroplasty. Outcome measures A standardized assessment protocol was administered to each patient by 2 independent observers. Arthroscopic determination of unstable meniscal tears was recorded by 1 observer who reviewed a video recording and was blinded to preoperative data. Those variables that had the highest interobserver agreement and the strongest association with meniscal tear by univariate methods were entered into logistic regression to model the best prediction of resectable tears. Results There were 92 meniscal tears (77 medial, 15 lateral). Interobserver agreement between clinical fellows and treating surgeons was poor to fair (κ < 0.4) for all clinical variables except radiographic measures, which were good. Fellows and surgeons predicted unstable meniscal tear preoperatively with equivalent accuracy of 60%. Logistic regression modelling revealed that a history of swelling and a ballottable effusion were negative predictors. A positive McMurray test was the only positive predictor of unstable meniscal tear. “Mechanical” symptoms were not reliable predictors in this prospective study. The model was 69% accurate for all patients and 76% for those with advanced medial compartment osteoarthritis defined by a joint space height of 2 mm or less. Conclusions This study underscored the difficulty in using clinical variables to predict unstable medial meniscal tears in patients with pre

  18. What is the clinical and ethical importance of incidental abnormalities found by knee MRI?

    PubMed Central

    Grainger, Rebecca; Stuckey, Stephen; O'Sullivan, Richard; Davis, Susan R; Ebeling, Peter R; Wluka, Anita E

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to examine joints for research purposes. It may detect both suspected and unsuspected abnormalities. This raises both clinical and ethical issues, especially when incidental abnormalities are detected. The prevalence of incidental, potentially clinically significant abnormalities identified by MRI and their clinical significance in a population undergoing knee MRI in research studies are unknown. Methods We examined the prevalence of such lesions in healthy asymptomatic adults and those with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) undergoing knee MRI with limited sequences for the purpose of research. The MRI findings in 601 asymptomatic subjects and 132 with knee OA who underwent at least one limited knee MRI scan for cartilage volume measurement were examined by an MRI radiologist for the presence of potentially clinically significant abnormalities. Results These were present in 2.3% of healthy and 2.3% of OA subjects. All required further investigation to exclude non-benign disease, including four with bone marrow expansion (0.7%), requiring further investigation and management. A single potentially life-threatening lesion, a myeloma lesion, was identified in a subject with symptomatic knee OA on their second MRI scan in a longitudinal study. Conclusion As musculoskeletal MRI is increasingly used clinically and for research purposes, the potential for detecting unsuspected abnormalities that require further investigation should be recognized. Incorporating a system to detect these, to characterize unexpected findings, and to facilitate appropriate medical follow-up when designing studies using this technology should be considered ethical research practice. PMID:18252003

  19. [Foot lesions].

    PubMed

    Stelzner, C; Schellong, S; Wollina, U; Machetanz, J; Unger, L

    2013-11-01

    The foot is the target organ of a variety of internal diseases. Of upmost importance is the diabetic foot syndrome (DFS). Its complex pathophysiology is driven by the diabetic neuropathy, a vastly worsening effect is contributed by infection and ischemia. Seemingly localised lesions have the potential for phlegmone and septicaemia if not diagnosed and drained early. The acral lesions of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) have unique features as well. However, their life-threatening potential is lower than that of DFS even if the limb is critical. Notably, isolated foot lesions with a mere venous cause may arise from insufficient perforator veins; the accompanying areas of haemosiderosis will lead the diagnostic path. Cholesterol embolization (blue toe syndrome, trash foot) elicits a unique clinical picture and will become more frequent with increasing numbers of catheter-based procedures. Finally, descriptions are given of podagra and of foot mycosis as disease entities not linked to perfusion. The present review focuses on the depiction of disease and its diagnosis, leaving therapeutic considerations untouched. PMID:24114468

  20. A 5-Year Follow-Up After Cartilage Repair in the Knee Using a Platelet-Rich Plasma-Immersed Polymer-Based Implant

    PubMed Central

    Siclari, Alberto; Mascaro, Gennaro; Kaps, Christian; Boux, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to analyze the clinical outcome after repair of cartilage defects of the knee with subchondral drilling and resorbable polymer-based implants immersed with autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Fifty-two patients with focal chondral defects were treated with subchondral drilling, followed by covering with a polyglycolic acid - hyaluronan (PGA-HA) implant (chondrotissue®) immersed with autologous PRP. At 5-year follow-up, patients’ situation was assessed using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and compared to the pre-operative situation. The KOOS showed clinically meaningful and significant (p < 0.05) improvement in all subcategories compared to baseline. Subgroup analysis showed that there were no differences in the clinical outcome regarding defect size and localization as well as degenerative condition of the knee. Cartilage repair was complete in 20 out of 21 patients at 4-year follow-up as shown by magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) scoring. Covering of focal cartilage defects with the PGA-HA implant and PRP after bone marrow stimulation leads to a lasting improvement of the patients’ situation. PMID:25352927

  1. Influence of MRI field strength on clinical decision making in knee cartilage injury – A case study

    PubMed Central

    Cashman, Glenn; Attariwala, Raj

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To increase clinicians’ awareness of the differences in image resolution and potential diagnostic accuracy between small and large-field MR Scanners. To present an example of a clinical decision making challenge in how to proceed when knee MRI and clinical findings don’t agree. Clinical Features: A 38 year old female mountain biker presented with knee pain and clinical features strongly suggestive of a torn meniscus or loose bodies. An initial MRI using a small field strength (0.18T) scanner was reported as normal. Her clinical presentation was suspicious enough that a repeat MRI on a high-field (1.5T) scanner was ordered. The second MRI included high resolution 3D volumetric imaging which revealed cartilage damage and loose bodies. Intervention and Outcome: The patient was treated with arthroscopic surgery which confirmed the presence of meniscal and chondral injury and resulted in notable improvement in the patient’s symptoms. Conclusion: Clinicians should consider scanner quality and diagnostic accuracy before discounting strongly suggestive clinical history and examination findings when MRIs are reported as normal. PMID:25550664

  2. The role of arthroscopy in the management of low-velocity gunshot wounds of the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Parisien, J S; Esformes, I

    1984-05-01

    Eight patients with low-velocity civilian gunshot wounds of the knee were examined and evaluated by arthroscopy. Three of these patients were also treated by surgical arthroscopy and underwent limited arthrotomy for bullet removal. In two patients small arthrotomy incisions were made following arthroscopic exploration for removal of bullets. Two patients underwent diagnostic arthroscopy. One underwent internal fixation for a chondral fracture of the femoral condyle. The majority of patients sustained intra-articular damage and retained foreign materials (denim flecks and metallic shards) and osteochondral fragments. There were no postoperative infections after a minimum follow-up period of one year. Arthroscopy is highly effective in the diagnosis and surgical management of low-velocity gunshot wounds of the knee both alone and in combination with limited arthrotomy depending on the severity of the condylar damage. The length of the hospital stay is reduced (length of stay exceeded 3-4 days only as a result of intravenous antibiotic coverage). Physical therapy requirements are minimal. Active mobility and a full range of motion are regained more rapidly with arthroscopy than with surgical exposure of multiple exploratory incisions or conventional standard arthrotomy. PMID:6705381

  3. Spontaneous Knee Ankylosis through Heterotopic Ossification after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Boulezaz, Samuel; Gibon, Emmanuel; Loriaut, Philippe; Casabianca, Laurent; Rousseau, Romain; Dallaudiere, Benjamin; Pascal-Moussellard, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a case of total ankylosis of the knee after a cruciate-sacrificing cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA). An 82-year-old female patient previously underwent primary TKA for osteoarthritis twenty years ago in our institution. She had recovered uneventfully and returned to her regular activities. There was no history of postsurgical trauma; however, she progressively lost knee range of motion. Radiographs revealed severe bridging heterotopic ossification. PMID:27119034

  4. Pain in the knee associated with osteoporosis of the patella.

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, M; Colston, J R; Tucker, A K

    1977-01-01

    Four patients, all of whom complained of pain in the knee, were found to have radiological evidence of osteoporosis particularly marked in the patella. In 3 a neurological lesion at the appropriate spinal segment was present, and the fourth patient, who was frankly hysterical, had an autonomic disturbance. If radiological porosis is isolated to the patella a distant cause such as nerve irritation should be sought. Images PMID:856068

  5. Irreducible posterolateral dislocation of the knee: a case report

    PubMed Central

    SOLARINO, GIUSEPPE; NOTARNICOLA, ANGELA; MACCAGNANO, GIUSEPPE; PIAZZOLLA, ANDREA; MORETTI, BIAGIO

    2015-01-01

    Irreducible posterolateral dislocations of the knee are rare lesions, generally caused by high-energy trauma inducing rotational stress and a posterior and lateral displacement of the tibia. In these conditions, the interposition of abundant soft tissue inside the enlarged medial joint space prevents spontaneous reduction or non-surgical treatment by manipulation of the dislocation. Surgical treatment is therefore compulsory. We report the clinical case of a woman who suffered a subluxation of the knee while jogging. The case we describe is of interest because it shows that even less severe knee dislocations, like this subluxation caused by a low-velocity sports trauma, may present in an irreducible form requiring open surgery. Clinical-instrumental monitoring did not reveal any signs of vascular or nerve injury. Owing to the irreducibility of the lesion we were obliged to perform open surgery in order to free the joint from the interposed muscle tissue and repair medial capsule-ligament lesions. Repair of the damaged cruciate ligaments was deferred to a second stage, but ultimately rendered necessary by the persistence of joint instability and the need to address the patient’s functional needs. In the literature, different one- and two-step surgical options, performed by arthroscopy or arthrotomy, are reported for such related problems. The Authors discuss these various options and examine and discuss their own decision taken during the surgical work-up of this case. PMID:26605258

  6. Intra-Articular Giant Synovial Osteochondroma: Case Reports of the Ankle and Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Fornaciari, Paolo; Schai, Pascal A.; Niehaus, Richard; Exner, Ulrich G.

    2015-01-01

    Two cases of giant intra-articular osteochondromas (knee and ankle joint) are reported; pathologically they are rare representations of synovial chondromatosis. A 17-year-old man presented with a tumorous mass which had been localized in his left ankle for many years, increasing in volume during the last months. The lesion was removed by posteromedial ankle arthrotomy. The second case was observed in a 39-year-old woman with a slow-growing mass in her right knee joint. The lesion was removed from the Hoffa fat pad by open anteromedial arthrotomy. PMID:25785214

  7. Intra-articular giant synovial osteochondroma: case reports of the ankle and knee joint.

    PubMed

    Fornaciari, Paolo; Schai, Pascal A; Niehaus, Richard; Exner, Ulrich G

    2015-01-01

    Two cases of giant intra-articular osteochondromas (knee and ankle joint) are reported; pathologically they are rare representations of synovial chondromatosis. A 17-year-old man presented with a tumorous mass which had been localized in his left ankle for many years, increasing in volume during the last months. The lesion was removed by posteromedial ankle arthrotomy. The second case was observed in a 39-year-old woman with a slow-growing mass in her right knee joint. The lesion was removed from the Hoffa fat pad by open anteromedial arthrotomy. PMID:25785214

  8. Synovial plicae of the knee

    SciTech Connect

    Apple, J.S.; Martinez, S.; Daffner, R.H.; Gehweiler, J.A.; Hardaker, W.T.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the anatomy, patho-physiology, clinical, and radiographic findings, and treatment of the synovial plicae of the knee joint. The suprapatellar plica is a synovial fold present in the suprapatellar pouch of the knee joint in approximately 20% of the population. This fold may become symptomatic after injury and cause symptoms similar to other common internal derangements of the knee. Double contrast arthrography of the knee can be used to identify the presence of plicae. Although arthrography can identify the presence of a plica, its clinical significance requires close correlation with symptoms and an accurate clinical examination.

  9. Multiligamentous injuries and knee dislocations.

    PubMed

    Gimber, Lana H; Scalcione, Luke R; Rowan, Andrew; Hardy, Jolene C; Melville, David M; Taljanovic, Mihra S

    2015-11-01

    Complex capsular ligamentous structures contribute to stability of the knee joint. Simultaneous injury of two or more knee ligaments, aside from concurrent tears involving the anterior cruciate and medial collateral ligaments, is considered to be associated with femorotibial knee dislocations. Proximal tibiofibular joint dislocations are not always easily recognized and may be overlooked or missed. Patellofemoral dislocations can be transient with MR imaging sometimes required to reach the diagnosis. In this article, the authors describe the mechanism of injury, ligamentous disruptions, imaging, and treatment options of various types of knee dislocations including injuries of the femorotibial, proximal tibiofibular, and patellofemoral joints. PMID:26002747

  10. Knee stabilization in patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lewek, Michael D.; Ramsey, Dan K.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Rudolph, Katherine S.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis (MKOA) experience knee laxity and instability. Muscle stabilization strategies may influence the long term integrity of the joint. In this study we determined how individuals with medial knee OA respond to a rapid valgus knee movement to investigate the relationship between muscle stabilization strategies and knee instability. METHODS Twenty one subjects with MKOA and genu varum, and 19 control subjects were tested. Subjects stood with the test limb on a moveable platform that translated laterally to rapidly stress the knee’s medial periarticular structures and create a potentially destabilizing feeling at the knee joint. Knee motion and muscle responses were recorded. Subjects rated their knee instability with a self-report questionnaire about knee instability during daily activities. RESULTS Prior to plate movement the OA subjects demonstrated more medial muscle co-contraction (p=0.014). Following plate movement the OA subjects shifted less weight off the test limb (p = 0.013) and had more medial co-contraction (p=0.037). Those without instability had higher VMMH co-contraction than those who reported more instability (p=0.038). Knee stability correlated positively with VMMH co-contraction prior to plate movement (r = 0.459; p = 0.042). CONCLUSION This study demonstrates that individuals with MKOA attempt to stabilize the knee with greater medial muscle co-contraction in response to laxity that appears on only the medial side of the joint. This strategy presumably contributes to higher joint compression and could exacerbate joint destruction and needs to be altered to slow or stop the progression of the OA disease process. PMID:16142714

  11. Selectively Lockable Knee Brace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael D. (Inventor); Forbes, John C. (Inventor); Baker, Kevin J. (Inventor); Rice, Darron C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A knee brace for aiding in rehabilitation of damaged leg muscles includes upper and lower housings normally pivotable one relative to the other about the knee joint axis of a patient. The upper housing is attachable to the thigh of the patient above the knee joint while the lower housing is secured to a stirrup which extends downwardly along the patient's leg and is attached to the patient's shoe. An actuation rod is carried within the lower housing and is coupled to a cable. The upper and lower housings carry cooperative clutch/brake elements which normally are disengaged to permit relative movement between the upper and lower housings. When the cable is extended the clutch/brake elements engage and lock the housings together. A heel strike mechanism fastened to the stirrup and the heel of the shoe is connected to the cable to selectively extend the cable and lock the brace in substantially any position when the patient places weight on the heel.

  12. Selectively lockable knee brace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Neill (Inventor); Shadoan, Mike (Inventor); Forbes, John (Inventor); Baker, Kevin (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A knee brace for aiding in rehabilitation of damaged leg muscles includes upper and lower housings, normally pivotable, one relative to the other about the knee joint axis of a patient. The upper housing is attachable to the thigh of the patient above the knee joint, while the lower housing is secured to a stirrup which extends downwardly along the patient's leg and is attached to the patient's shoe. An actuation rod is carried within the lower housing and is coupled to a cable. The upper and lower housings carry cooperative clutch/brake elements which normally are disengaged to permit relative movement between the upper and lower housings. When the cable is extended, the clutch/brake elements engage and lock the housings together. A heel strike mechanism fastened to the stirrup and the heel of the shoe is connected to the cable to selectively extend the cable and lock the brace in substantially any position when the patient places weight on the heel.

  13. Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee in Children and Adolescents: Our Experience with Transchondral Drilling.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Hasour Hassan; Vícha, Jan; Proček, Tomáš; Pavlata, Jaroslav; Kučera, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans(OCD) of the knee is identified with increasing frequency in the adolescent patient. Left untreated, OCD can cause significant impairment and restriction in physical activity and development of osteoarthritis at an early age. The diagnosis of lesions of OCD can be confirmed on plain radiographs. MRI has emerged as the gold standard to evaluate the stability of the lesion and the integrity of the overlying articular cartilage. Treatment of OCD lesions depend on the stability of the lesion. Stable lesions can be treated conservatively by physical activity modification and immobilization. Unstable lesions and stable lesions not responding to conservative measures should be treated surgically. Surgical options range from arthroscopic drilling, either transarticular or extra-articular drilling for stable lesions or salvage procedures such as autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT), mosaicplasty to restore joint and cartilage congruency. PMID:26686950

  14. Can Structural Joint Damage Measured with MR Imaging Be Used to Predict Knee Replacement in the Following Year?

    PubMed Central

    Kwoh, C. Kent; Hannon, Michael J.; Hunter, David J.; Eckstein, Felix; Wang, Zhijie; Boudreau, Robert M.; John, Markus R.; Nevitt, Michael C.; Guermazi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess whether magnetic resonance (MR) imaging–based cross-sectional measures of structural joint damage can be used to predict knee replacement during the following year. Materials and Methods Participants were drawn from the Osteoarthritis Initiative, a longitudinal observational study that includes 4796 participants who have knee osteoarthritis or are at risk. The HIPAA-compliant protocol was approved by the institutional review boards of all participating centers, and written informed consent was obtained from all participants. During the 5 years of follow-up, 199 knees underwent knee replacement and were matched with 199 control knees that did not undergo knee replacement. Knees were matched according to radiographic disease stage and patient sex and age. All knees that underwent knee replacement and had MR images available from the year before surgery were included. MR images were assessed for cartilage damage, bone marrow lesions, meniscal damage, meniscal extrusion, synovitis, and effusion prior to reported knee replacement. Conditional logistic regression was applied to assess the risk of knee replacement. Analyses were performed on a compartmental and knee level. Results Participants had a mean age ± standard deviation of 64.2 years ± 8.4 (range, 47–82 years) and were predominantly women (232 of 398 participants, 58.3%). Risk for knee replacement was significantly increased for knees that exhibited two or more subregions with severe cartilage loss (odds ratio [OR], 16.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.96, 68.76), more than two subregions with bone marrow lesions (OR, 4.00; 95% CI: 1.75, 9.16), medial meniscal maceration (OR, 1.84; 95% CI: 1.13, 2.99), effusion (OR, 4.75; 95% CI: 2.55, 8.85), or synovitis (OR, 2.17; 95% CI: 1.33, 3.56), but not extrusion (OR, 1.00; 95% CI: 0.60,1.67), when compared with knees that did not exhibit these features as the reference standard. Conclusion Apart from meniscal extrusion, all features of tissue

  15. Automatic locking orthotic knee device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An articulated tang in clevis joint for incorporation in newly manufactured conventional strap-on orthotic knee devices or for replacing such joints in conventional strap-on orthotic knee devices is discussed. The instant tang in clevis joint allows the user the freedom to extend and bend the knee normally when no load (weight) is applied to the knee and to automatically lock the knee when the user transfers weight to the knee, thus preventing a damaged knee from bending uncontrollably when weight is applied to the knee. The tang in clevis joint of the present invention includes first and second clevis plates, a tang assembly and a spacer plate secured between the clevis plates. Each clevis plate includes a bevelled serrated upper section. A bevelled shoe is secured to the tank in close proximity to the bevelled serrated upper section of the clevis plates. A coiled spring mounted within an oblong bore of the tang normally urges the shoes secured to the tang out of engagement with the serrated upper section of each clevic plate to allow rotation of the tang relative to the clevis plate. When weight is applied to the joint, the load compresses the coiled spring, the serrations on each clevis plate dig into the bevelled shoes secured to the tang to prevent relative movement between the tang and clevis plates. A shoulder is provided on the tang and the spacer plate to prevent overextension of the joint.

  16. Exercise and the Knee Joint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    This report by the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports examines the effects of various forms of physical exercise on the knee joint which, because of its vulnerability, is especially subject to injury. Discussion centers around the physical characteristics of the joint, commonly used measurements for determining knee stability,…

  17. New Generation Lockable Knee Brace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A knee brace that uses Space Shuttle propulsion technology has moved a step closer to being available to help knee injury and stroke patients and may possibly benefit patients with birth defects, spinal cord injuries, and post-polio conditions. After years of hard work, inventors at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, have turned over the final design and prototype to industry partners at Horton's Orthotic Lab in Little Rock, Arkansas for further clinical testing. The device, called the Selectively Lockable Knee Brace, may mean faster, less painful rehabilitation for patients by allowing the knee to move when weight is not on the heel. Devices currently on the market lock the knee in a rigid, straight-leg position, or allow continuous free motion. Pictured here is a knee brace prototype being tested and fitted at Horton's Orthotic Lab. The knee brace is just one example of how space technology is being used to improve the lives of people on Earth. NASA's MSFC inventors Michael Shadoan and Neill Myers are space propulsion engineers who use the same mechanisms and materials to build systems for rockets that they used to design and develop the knee brace.

  18. Lipoma arborescens arising in the extra-articular bursa of the knee joint

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Shinji; Miyake, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    Lipoma arborescens arising in the extra-articular bursa of the knee joint is extremely rare. We describe an 11-year-old boy who complained of a gradual swelling mass of the lateral knee joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a high signal intensity tumor on T1- and T2-weighted images with a thickened septa and nodular lesion that showed low signal intensity. The radiologist suggested the possible differential diagnosis of well-differentiated liposarcoma. At operation, the tumor was found under the iliotibial tract and was not in contact with the knee joint. Histopathologically, this lesion was diagnosed as lipoma arborescens arising in the extra-articular bursa of the knee joint. On MRI, the appearance of lipoma arborescens arising in the extra-articular bursa of the knee joint differed from that of conventional intra-articular lipoma arborescens. In this report, we describe a case of extra-articular lipoma arborescens of the knee joint bursa and discuss the diagnosis and etiology. PMID:27382924

  19. [Anatomic incidence of meniscochondrocalcinosis of the knee].

    PubMed

    Mitrovic, D; Stankovic, A; Morin, J; Borda-Iriarte, O; Uzan, M; Quintero, M; Memin, Y; Bard, M; de Sèze, S; Richewaert, A

    1982-06-01

    The authors have studied the incidence of menisco-calcinosis (MC) and that of menisco-chondrocalcinosis (MCC) of knee joints of 108 non selected cadavera. The mean age of the subjects was 71.8 +/- 13.8 years. The study was performed by radiographic examination of the menisci and cartilagineous fragments of femoral condyles using high contrast films. The incidence of MC or MCC was found to be 18.5 per cent. It was slightly higher in females (21.5 p. cent) than in males (15.8 p. cent) subjects but this difference failed to reach the level of statistical significance. No positive case was detected before the age of 60 years. For the age groups of: 60-69, 70-79, 80-89 and over 90 years, its incidence was: 11.7; 26.9; 21.2 and 50 (4 subjects out of 8) per cent respectively. Approximately 40 per cent of all positive cases had meniscocalcinosis without associated chondrocalcinosis. No single case of chondrocalcinosis without meniscocalcinosis was observed. Six out of 8 cases with MC calcinosis and 2 out of 12 cases with MCC were unilateral. The external menisci were more frequently and more heavily affected than internal ones. Eighty per cent of the knees affected by either MC or MCC were at the same time associated to an osteoarthrotic lesion compared to 35 p. cent of the knees without MC or MCC matched for age: a result which appeared to be highly significant difference. PMID:6896928

  20. 49 CFR 572.176 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.176... Hybrid III 10-Year-Old Child Test Dummy (HIII-10C) § 572.176 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) The knee assembly for the purpose of this test is the part of the leg assembly shown in drawing...

  1. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  2. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  3. 49 CFR 572.176 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.176... Hybrid III 10-Year-Old Child Test Dummy (HIII-10C) § 572.176 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) The knee assembly for the purpose of this test is the part of the leg assembly shown in drawing...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  5. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  6. 49 CFR 572.176 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.176... Hybrid III 10-Year-Old Child Test Dummy (HIII-10C) § 572.176 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) The knee assembly for the purpose of this test is the part of the leg assembly shown in drawing...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  8. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  9. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  10. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  11. Prosthetic knee design by simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K; Hollister, A

    1999-07-30

    Although 150,000 total knee replacement surgeries are performed annually in North America, current designs of knee prostheses have mechanical problems that include a limited range of motion, abnormal gait patterns, patellofemoral joint dysfunction, implant loosening or subsidence, and excessive wear. These problems fall into three categories: failure to reproduce normal joint kinematics, which results in altered limb function; bone-implant interface failure; and material failure. Modern computer technology can be used to design, prototype, and test new total knee implants. The design team uses the full range of CAD-CAM to design and produce implant prototypes for mechanical and clinical testing. Closer approximation of natural knee kinematics and kinetics is essential for improved patient function and diminished implant loads. Current knee replacement designs are based on 19th Century theories that the knee moves about a variable axis of rotation. Recent research has shown, however, that knee motion occurs about two fixed, offset axes of rotation. These aces are not perpendicular to the long axes of the bones or to each other, and the axes do not intersect. Bearing surfaces of mechanisms that move about axes of rotation are surfaces of revolution of those axes which advanced CAD technology can produce. Solids with surfaces of revolution for the two axes of rotation for the knee have been made using an HP9000 workstation and Structural Ideas Master Series CAD software at ArthroMotion. The implant's CAD model should closely replicate movements of the normal knee. The knee model will have a range of flexion-extension (FE) from -5 to 120 degrees. Movements include varus, valgus, internal and external rotation, as well as flexion and extension. The patellofemoral joint is aligned perpendicular to the FE axis and replicates the natural joint more closely than those of existing prostheses. The bearing surfaces will be more congruent than current designs and should

  12. Queen Alexandra's Knee.

    PubMed

    Pinals, Robert S

    2016-06-01

    In 1867, Alexandra, the 22-year-old Princess of Wales, late in her third pregnancy, had sudden onset of a febrile illness. There was a brief period of migratory arthritis, followed by persistent, severe inflammation in 1 knee. A diagnosis of rheumatic fever was made by her physicians, but the course of her illness differed greatly from the expected one. In this report reviewing her disorder, the suggestion is made that she more likely had gonococcal arthritis and that the infection was transmitted to her by her husband, the future King Edward VII, then known as "The Playboy Prince." PMID:27219308

  13. Lipoma Arborescens of both Knees - Case report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Liddle, A; Spicer, DDM; Somashekar, N; Chirag, Thonse

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Lipoma arborescens (LA) is a rare, benign intra-articular lesion most commonly found in the knee, characterised by villous proliferation of the synovium. It generally presents as a longstanding, slowly progressive swelling of one or more joints associated which may or may not be associated with pain. MRI is the investigation of choice, with images clearest on fat-supressed or STIR sequences. Case Report: We present a 35 year old male patient, who presented with a three year history of bilateral knee pain and swelling. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of his knee showed the characteristic features of lipoma arborescens. A 99technetium bone scan revealed increased uptake in both knees. The patient underwent bilateral arthroscopic synovectomies and made an uneventful recovery. The samples sent for histology were reported as being characteristic of lipoma arborescens. Conclusions: Lipoma arborescens is a rare, benign intra-articular tumour which may mimic a number of other diagnoses. MRI should be considered to exclude this pathology as well as other uncommon intra-articular pathology. Treatment with synovectomy is frequently curative.

  14. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Murray, D. W.; Liddle, A. D.; Dodd, C. A. F.; Pandit, H.

    2015-01-01

    There is a large amount of evidence available about the relative merits of unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty (UKA and TKA). Based on the same evidence, different people draw different conclusions and as a result, there is great variability in the usage of UKA. The revision rate of UKA is much higher than TKA and so some surgeons conclude that UKA should not be performed. Other surgeons believe that the main reason for the high revision rate is that UKA is easy to revise and, therefore, the threshold for revision is low. They also believe that UKA has many advantages over TKA such as a faster recovery, lower morbidity and mortality and better function. They therefore conclude that UKA should be undertaken whenever appropriate. The solution to this argument is to minimise the revision rate of UKA, thereby addressing the main disadvantage of UKA. The evidence suggests that this will be achieved if surgeons use UKA for at least 20% of their knee arthroplasties and use implants that are appropriate for these broad indications. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B(10 Suppl A):3–8. PMID:26430080

  15. New Generation Lockable Knee Brace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A knee brace that uses Space Shuttle propulsion technology has moved a step closer to being available to help knee injury and stroke patients and may possibly benefit patients with birth defects, spinal cord injuries, and post-polio conditions. After years of hard work, inventors at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, have turned over the final design and prototype to industry partners at Horton's Orthotic Lab in Little Rock, Arkansas for further clinical testing. The device, called the Selectively Lockable Knee Brace, may mean faster, less painful rehabilitation for patients by allowing the knee to move when weight is not on the heel. Devices currently on the market lock the knee in a rigid, straight-leg position, or allow continuous free motion. The knee brace is just one example of how space technology is being used to improve the lives of people on Earth. NASA's MSFC inventors Michael Shadoan and Neill Myers are space propulsion engineers who use the same mechanisms and materials to build systems for rockets that they used to design and develop the knee brace.

  16. Symptomatic torn discoid lateral meniscus in adults.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin Hwan; Choi, Sang-Hee; Lee, Yong Seuk; Yoo, Jae Chul; Chang, Moon Jong; Bae, Sooho; Bae, Young Ryeol

    2011-02-01

    The purposes of this study were to report degenerative changes that coexist with a symptomatic torn discoid lateral meniscus in adults and to analyze the factors associated with the accompanied degenerative changes. From 1997 to 2008, 329 knees in the 305 patients were included. Associations between the status of the meniscus and the coexisting degenerative changes on the images and the arthroscopic findings were statistically analyzed. Marginal osteophyte was seen on conventional radiography in 118 patients (36%). Ninety patients (27%) had arthroscopically confirmed chondral lesion. Age, duration of symptoms, the type of meniscus, the type of tear and the magnetic resonance image classification were associated with the formation of the marginal osteophyte and chondral lesion on univariate analysis (P < 0.05). After conducting multivariate analysis, the type of tear and magnetic resonance image classification had a statistically significant association with the severity of marginal osteophyte and chondral lesion (P < 0.05). PMID:20143046

  17. Comparison of hip and knee muscle moments in subjects with and without knee pain.

    PubMed

    Manetta, Jennifer; Franz, Laura Hayden; Moon, Chris; Perell, Karen L; Fang, Meika

    2002-12-01

    Elderly subjects with and without knee pain walked at a comfortable pace during gait analysis. Comparison of peak hip and knee internal extensor generalized muscle moments (GMMs) during loading response was made between groups. Walking velocity, peak hip internal extensor GMM, and knee range of motion (ROM) were significantly less for the group with knee pain than for the group without pain. Peak hip internal extensor GMM was strongly correlated with velocity, but peak knee internal extensor GMM was not. Knee ROM limitations may account for the increased peak knee internal extensor GMM in the knee pain group. PMID:12443949

  18. Cosmetic effect of knee joint in a knee disarticulation prosthesis.

    PubMed

    de Laat, Fred A; van der Pluijm, Mark J; van Kuijk, Annette A; Geertzen, Jan H; Roorda, Leo D

    2014-01-01

    Despite numerous advantages, knee disarticulations (KDs) are rarely performed because of the anticipated KD prosthesis fitting problems that include the positioning of the knee joint distally from the KD socket. This results in lengthening of the thigh and subsequent shortening of the shank. The objective of this study was to assess the cosmetic effect of the knee joint in a KD prosthesis by determining the extent of the lengthening of the thigh and the shortening of the shank. This lengthening and shortening were measured through an experimental setup using laser techniques. These measurements were made of 18 knee joints used in KD prostheses. Lengthening of the thigh varied between 23 and 92 mm, and shortening of the shank varied between 3 and 50 mm. The polycentric knees Medi KH6 and Medi KHF1 showed the least lengthening of the thigh, and the polycentric knees Teh Lin Prosthetic & Orthotic Co. Ltd Graph-Lite and Medi KP5 showed the least shortening of the shank. PMID:25856500

  19. Study of Imaging Pattern in Bone Marrow Oedema in MRI in Recent Knee Injuries and its Correlation with Type of Knee Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Kulamani; Saha, Pramod; Dodia, Jainesh Valjibhai; Raj, Vinay Rajappa; Bhairagond, Shweta Jagadish

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The knee is a major weight bearing joint that provides mobility and stability during physical activity as well as balance while standing. If the knee is exposed to forces beyond its physiologic range, risk of injury to bone or soft tissue structures increases. A thorough understanding of knee injury patterns and their mechanisms may help in achieving more accurate assessment of injuries. Aim To identify imaging pattern in bone marrow oedema and to correlate the pattern of bone marrow oedema retrospectively with type of knee injury from clinical history. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was done on all patients referred to Krishna Hospital, Karad for MRI knee with history of recent (< 6 weeks) knee injury. Study was conducted between May 2014 to September 2015 with a sample size of 200 patients. Plain radiograph of knee was done in all patients and they were scanned using 1.5 Tesla Seimens Avanto (Tim + Dot) with Tx/Rx 15 channel knee coil # Tim. Results Among the 200 cases, bone marrow contusion was noted in 138 cases (69%) and absent contusion in 62 cases (31%). Bone marrow contusion showed five patterns (according to Sanders classification) i.e., Clip injury in 39 cases (28.3%), Pivot shift injury in 78 cases (56.5%), Dashboard injury in eight cases (5.8%), Hyperextension injury in four cases (2.9%), Lateral patellar dislocation in three cases (2.2%). In six cases (4.3%) no pattern of bone marrow contusion could be explained and was categorized as unclassified pattern. Conclusion Pivot shift pattern is most common contusion pattern and the most common type/mode of sports related injury. By analysing bone marrow contusion pattern, type/mode can be determined in most of the cases. By applying a biomechanical approach in MR interpretation, it is possible to detect lesions like ligament rupture and osseous contusion, to predict subtle but it might overlook important abnormalities. PMID:27190914

  20. Anterior Knee Pain (Chondromalacia Patellae).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrick, James G.

    1989-01-01

    This article presents a pragmatic approach to the definition, diagnosis, and management of anterior knee pain. Symptoms and treatment are described. Emphasis is on active involvement of the patient in the rehabilitation exercise program. (IAH)

  1. Knee injuries in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, M R; Ireland, M L

    1995-04-01

    Female athletes are at increased risk for certain sports-related injuries, particularly those involving the knee. Factors that contribute to this increased risk are the differences in sports undertaken and in gender anatomy and structure. Gender differences include baseline level of conditioning, lower extremity alignment, physiological laxity, pelvis width, tibial rotation and foot alignment. Sports like gymnastics and cheerleading create a noncontact environment, but can result in significant knee injuries. In quick stopping and cutting sports, females have an increased incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury by noncontact mechanisms. Patellofemoral (PF) disorders are also very common in female athletes. Awareness of these facts helps the sports medicine professional make an accurate diagnosis and institute earlier treatment-focused rehabilitation with or without surgery. Further prospective and retrospective research is needed in areas of epidemiology, mechanisms, severity and types of knee injuries. The goal is to lessen the severity of certain knee injuries and to prevent others. PMID:7604201

  2. Minimally Invasive Total Knee Arthroplasty

    MedlinePlus

    ... and drill her. And how much are you rotating there? This rotates 3 degrees externally with respect ... femoral components that can be used. With the rotating knee system, a class III device at this ...

  3. Knee Brace Would Lock And Unlock Automatically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Neill; Forbes, John; Shadoan, Mike; Baker, Kevin

    1995-01-01

    Proposed knee brace designed to aid rehabilitation of person who suffered some muscle damage in leg. Not limited to locking in straight-leg position and, instead, locks at any bend angle. Does not prevent knee from bearing weight. Instead, knee brace allows knee to bear weight and locks only when foot and lower leg bear weight. Thus, brace prevents flexion that wearer desired to prevent but could not prevent because of weakened muscles. Knee bends freely to exercise knee-related muscles. Knee brace strapped at upper end to leg above knee, and anchored at lower end by stirrup under foot. Joint mechanism (identical mechanisms used in left and right assemblies) allows knee joint to flex freely except when weight applied to heel.

  4. Analysis of Joint Sounds in the Diagnosis of Knee Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-22

    Healthy Patients; No Knee Complaints; No Knee Injuries; No Knee Surgeries; No Neurological Problems; Patients Undergoing Knee Arthroscopy, Who Has a Pre-op MRI; Age Groups of 20,40 and 60 Years of Age.

  5. A Cohort Study on Meniscal Lesions among Airport Baggage Handlers.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Brauer, Charlotte; Pedersen, Ellen Bøtker; Alkjær, Tine; Koblauch, Henrik; Simonsen, Erik Bruun; Helweg-Larsen, Karin; Thygesen, Lau Caspar

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal lesions are common and may contribute to the development of knee arthrosis. A few case-control and cross-sectional studies have identified knee-straining work as risk factors for meniscal lesions, but exposure-response relations and the role of specific exposures are uncertain, and previous results may be sensitive to reporting and selection bias. We examined the relation between meniscal lesions and cumulative exposure to heavy lifting in a prospective register-based study with complete follow-up and independent information on exposure and outcome. We established a cohort of unskilled men employed at Copenhagen Airport or in other companies in the metropolitan Copenhagen area from 1990 to 2012 (the Copenhagen Airport Cohort). The cohort at risk included 3,307 airport baggage handlers with heavy lifting and kneeling or squatting work tasks and 63,934 referents with a similar socioeconomic background and less knee-straining work. Baggage handlers lifted suitcases with an average weight of approximately 15 kg, in total approximately five tonnes during a 9-hour workday. The cohort was followed in the National Patient Register and Civil Registration System. The outcome was a first time hospital diagnosis or surgery of a meniscal lesion. Baggage handlers had a higher incidence of meniscal lesions than the referents. Within baggage handlers spline regression showed that the incidence rate ratio was 1.91 (95% confidence interval: 1.29-2.84) after five years as a baggage handler and then decreased slowly to reach unity after approximately 30 years, adjusted for effects of potential confounders. This relation between baggage handling and meniscal lesions was present for work on the apron which involves lifting in a kneeling or squatting position, but not in the baggage hall, which only involves lifting in standing positions. The results support that long-term heavy lifting in a kneeling or squatting position is a risk factor for the development of symptomatic

  6. A Cohort Study on Meniscal Lesions among Airport Baggage Handlers

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Brauer, Charlotte; Pedersen, Ellen Bøtker; Alkjær, Tine; Koblauch, Henrik; Simonsen, Erik Bruun; Helweg-Larsen, Karin; Thygesen, Lau Caspar

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal lesions are common and may contribute to the development of knee arthrosis. A few case-control and cross-sectional studies have identified knee-straining work as risk factors for meniscal lesions, but exposure-response relations and the role of specific exposures are uncertain, and previous results may be sensitive to reporting and selection bias. We examined the relation between meniscal lesions and cumulative exposure to heavy lifting in a prospective register-based study with complete follow-up and independent information on exposure and outcome. We established a cohort of unskilled men employed at Copenhagen Airport or in other companies in the metropolitan Copenhagen area from 1990 to 2012 (the Copenhagen Airport Cohort). The cohort at risk included 3,307 airport baggage handlers with heavy lifting and kneeling or squatting work tasks and 63,934 referents with a similar socioeconomic background and less knee-straining work. Baggage handlers lifted suitcases with an average weight of approximately 15 kg, in total approximately five tonnes during a 9-hour workday. The cohort was followed in the National Patient Register and Civil Registration System. The outcome was a first time hospital diagnosis or surgery of a meniscal lesion. Baggage handlers had a higher incidence of meniscal lesions than the referents. Within baggage handlers spline regression showed that the incidence rate ratio was 1.91 (95% confidence interval: 1.29–2.84) after five years as a baggage handler and then decreased slowly to reach unity after approximately 30 years, adjusted for effects of potential confounders. This relation between baggage handling and meniscal lesions was present for work on the apron which involves lifting in a kneeling or squatting position, but not in the baggage hall, which only involves lifting in standing positions. The results support that long-term heavy lifting in a kneeling or squatting position is a risk factor for the development of symptomatic

  7. Extra-Articular Ganglion Cysts around the Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Eun; Panchal, Karnav; Kim, Young-Yul; Ji, Jong-Hun; Park, Sung-Ryeoll; Park, Min-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to report clinical results of open excision of extra-articular ganglion cysts around the knee joint combined with arthroscopic management of intra-articular pathologies if present. Materials and Methods Of the total 107 cases of cystic lesions around the knee, 23 cases of extra-articular ganglion cysts were reviewed between January 2006 and July 2011. There were 13 males and 10 females with a mean age of 48 years (range, 30 to 73 years). The mean follow-up duration was 40 months (range, 30 to 60 months). Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan was done in all cases. Open surgical excision of the cyst was performed after arthroscopic management of intra-articular pathologies in all but 1 case. At the last follow-up, Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores were evaluated and MRI was conducted to detect recurrence. Results The mean Lysholm and IKDC scores showed significant improvement (p=0.005 and 0.013, respectively).The location of the cysts was anterior in 9, lateral in 7, medial in 6, and posterosuperior in 1. Intra-articular pathologies were found in 16/23 cases (69.6%). In 10/23 cases (43%), the cyst was connected to the knee joint. Three months postoperative MRI did not show any recurrence of ganglion cysts except for 1 case. Conclusions In the treatment of extra-articular ganglion cysts, MRI can be useful for detecting intra-articular lesions and connecting orifices, and arthroscopic management of intra-articular pathologies with open excision of the cyst should be considered as a viable treatment option. PMID:26672721

  8. The arthroscopic anatomy of symptomatic meniscal lesions.

    PubMed

    Dandy, D J

    1990-07-01

    The anatomy of 1000 symptomatic meniscus lesions is described and related to the age of the patients. All symptomatic lesions found during the study period were treated by arthroscopic surgery. Meniscal lesions were commoner in the right knee (56.5%) and 81% of the patients were men. Of the medial meniscus tears, 75% were vertical and 23% horizontal. Vertical tears of the medial meniscus occurred most often in the fourth decade and horizontal tears in the fifth. There were 22% type I, 37% type II and 31% type III vertical tears; 62% of type I tears and 23% of type II tears had locked fragments. Superior flaps were six times more common than inferior flaps. Of all medial meniscus fragments, 6% were inverted; 51% of these were flaps and the rest ruptured bucket-handle fragments. Of the lateral meniscus lesions 54% were vertical tears, 15% oblique, 15% myxoid, 4% were inverted and 5% were lesions of discoid menisci. The commonest pattern of tear in the lateral compartment (27%) was a vertical tear involving half the length and half the width of the meniscus. PMID:2380218

  9. Osteolytic lesion of the tibial diaphysis after cementless TKA.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Brian A; Bollinger, Alexander J; Garvin, Kevin L; McGarry, Sean V

    2011-03-01

    Biomaterial wear debris is a known contributing factor in aseptic loosening of total joint prostheses, particularly when cementless tibial trays are used in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Local inflammatory response can lead to osteolysis and aseptic loosening of implants. The resulting lesions require careful clinical evaluation. This article presents a case of a 76-year old man with a remote history of prostate cancer and cigarette smoking who presented with acute onset left knee and tibia pain 15 years after TKA. Radiographs showed an osteolytic lesion in the distal tibial diaphysis and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic lesion with evidence concerning for pathologic mid-shaft fracture. Biopsy of the lesion confirmed a foreign body reaction and revision TKA was performed. The patient was seen at 3-year follow-up without complication. The existing literature presents cases reporting osteolytic lesions of the distal femur and proximal tibial metaphysis due to polyethylene wear debris and foreign body reaction following TKA. We are unaware of case reports involving osteolysis of this etiology extending into the distal tibial diaphysis. We conclude that polyethylene wear debris with foreign body reaction should be considered in the differential diagnosis of an osteolytic lesion extending into the tibial diaphysis following TKA. PMID:21410114

  10. Changes in knee kinematics following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Akbari Shandiz, Mohsen; Boulos, Paul; Saevarsson, Stefan Karl; Yoo, Sam; Miller, Stephen; Anglin, Carolyn

    2016-04-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) changes the knee joint in both intentional and unintentional, known and unknown, ways. Patellofemoral and tibiofemoral kinematics play an important role in postoperative pain, function, satisfaction and revision, yet are largely unknown. Preoperative kinematics, postoperative kinematics or changes in kinematics may help identify causes of poor clinical outcome. Patellofemoral kinematics are challenging to record since the patella is obscured by the metal femoral component in X-ray and moves under the skin. The purpose of this study was to determine the kinematic degrees of freedom having significant changes and to evaluate the variability in individual changes to allow future study of patients with poor clinical outcomes. We prospectively studied the 6 degrees of freedom patellofemoral and tibiofemoral weightbearing kinematics, tibiofemoral contact points and helical axes of rotation of nine subjects before and at least 1 year after total knee arthroplasty using clinically available computed tomography and radiographic imaging systems. Normal kinematics for healthy individuals were identified from the literature. Significant differences existed between pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics, with the post-TKA kinematics being closer to normal. While on average the pre-total knee arthroplasty knees in this group displayed no pivoting (only translation), individually only five knees displayed this behaviour (of these, two showed lateral pivoting, one showed medial pivoting and one showed central pivoting). There was considerable variability postoperatively as well (five central, two lateral and two medial pivoting). Both preop and postop, flexion behaviour was more hinge-like medially and more rolling laterally. Helical axes were more consistent postop for this group. An inclusive understanding of the pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics and changes in kinematics due to total knee arthroplasty could improve implant design, patient diagnosis and

  11. The natural history of the anterior knee instability by stress radiography

    PubMed Central

    de Rezende, Márcia Uchôa; Hernandez, Arnaldo José; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the anteroposterior displacement of the knee by means of stress radiography in individuals with unilateral anterior knee instability and relate to time of instability. METHODS: Sixty individuals with intact knees (control group) and 125 patients with unilateral anterior instability (AI group) agreed to participate in the study. Gender, age, weight, height, age at injury, time between injury and testing, and surgical findings are studied. Both groups are submitted to anterior and posterior stress radiographies of both knees. Anterior (ADD) and posterior displacement difference (PDD) were calculated between sides. RESULTS: In the control group ADD and PDD are in average, zero, whereas in the AI group ADD averaged 9.8mm and PDD, 1.92mm. Gender, age, weight, height, age at trauma and presence of menisci's lesions do not intervene in the values of ADD and PDD. Meniscal injuries increase with time. ADD and PDD do not relate with the presence or absence of associated menisci's lesions. The ADD and the PDD are related to each other and increase with time. CONCLUSION: There is a permanent anterior subluxation of the injured knee that is related to the amount of anterior displacement that increases with time. Level of Evidence III, Study Types Case-control study. PMID:25246846

  12. Knee and hip radiographic osteoarthritis features: differences on pain, function and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Duarte; Severo, Milton; Santos, Rui A; Barros, Henrique; Branco, Jaime; Lucas, Raquel; Costa, Lúcia; Ramos, Elisabete

    2016-06-01

    The association between radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) and symptoms is inconsistent and variable according to each joint. The purpose of this study is to understand the relation between radiographic OA features, pain, function and quality of life, in knee and hip joints. A cross-sectional study was performed using information from EPIPorto cohort. Data was obtained by interview using a structured questionnaire on social, demographic, behavioural and clinical data. Pain was assessed using a pain frequency score (regarding ever having knee pain, pain in the last year, in the last 6 months and in the last month). Quality of life was evaluated with Short Form 36 (SF-36) and function disability with the Lequesne knee and hip indexes. Radiographic knees and hips were classified using the Kellgren-Lawrence score (KL 0-4). Linear regression and proportional odds ratios estimated the association between radiographic features, pain, function and quality of life. In our study, symptomatic OA (KL ≥ 2 plus joint pain) was 26.0 % in knee and 7.0 % hip joints. In knee, the increase on radiographic score increased the odds to have a higher pain frequency score [1.58 (95 % CI = 1.27, 1.97)] and was associated [adjusted β (95 % CI)] with worst general health [-3.05 (-5.00, -1.09)], physical function [-4.92 (-7.03, -2.80)], role-physical [-4.10 (-8.08, -0.11)], bodily pain [-2.96 (-5.45, -0.48)] and limitations in activities of daily living [0.48 (0.08, 0.89)]. Regarding hip, no significant associations were found between the severity of radiographic lesions and these measures. Radiographic lesions in knee were associated with higher complaints, as far as pain and functional limitations are concerned, compared with hip. PMID:26445941

  13. Quadriceps intramuscular fat fraction rather than muscle size is associated with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepak; Karampinos, Dimitrios C.; MacLeod, Toran D.; Lin, Wilson; Nardo, Lorenzo; Li, Xiaojuan; Link, Thomas M; Majumdar, Sharmila; Souza, Richard B

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare thigh muscle intramuscular fat (intraMF) fractions and area between people with and without knee radiographic osteoarthritis (ROA); and to evaluate the relationships of quadriceps adiposity and area with strength, function and knee MRI lesions. Methods Ninety six subjects (ROA: KL >1; n = 30, control: KL = 0,1; n = 66) underwent 3-Tesla MRI of the thigh muscles using chemical shift-based water/fat MR imaging (fat fractions) and the knee (clinical grading). Subjects were assessed for isometric/isokinetic quadriceps/hamstrings strength, function (KOOS, stair climbing test [SCT], and 6-minute walk test [(6MWT]. Thigh muscle intraMF fractions, muscle area and strength, and function were compared between controls and ROA subjects, adjusting for age. Relationships between measures of muscle fat/area with strength, function, KL and lesion scores were assessed using regression and correlational analyses. Results The ROA group had worse KOOS scores but SCT and 6MWT were not different. The ROA group had greater quadriceps intraMF fraction but not for other muscles. Quadriceps strength was lower in ROA group but the area was not different. Quadriceps intraMF fraction but not area predicted self-reported disability. Aging, worse KL, and cartilage and meniscus lesions were associated with higher quadriceps intraMF fraction. Conclusion Quadriceps intraMF is higher in people with knee OA and is related to symptomatic and structural severity of knee OA, where as the quadriceps area is not. Quadriceps fat fraction from chemical shift-based water/fat MR imaging may have utility as a marker of structural and symptomatic severity of knee OA disease process. PMID:24361743

  14. Will 'Unloading' Shoes Help Your Arthritic Knees?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160406.html Will 'Unloading' Shoes Help Your Arthritic Knees? Study puts specially designed footwear to the test ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For reducing pain from arthritic knees, "unloading" shoes don't offer a leg up ...

  15. Knee joint forces: prediction, measurement, and significance

    PubMed Central

    D’Lima, Darryl D.; Fregly, Benjamin J.; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Colwell, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    Knee forces are highly significant in osteoarthritis and in the survival and function of knee arthroplasty. A large number of studies have attempted to estimate forces around the knee during various activities. Several approaches have been used to relate knee kinematics and external forces to internal joint contact forces, the most popular being inverse dynamics, forward dynamics, and static body analyses. Knee forces have also been measured in vivo after knee arthroplasty, which serves as valuable validation of computational predictions. This review summarizes the results of published studies that measured knee forces for various activities. The efficacy of various methods to alter knee force distribution, such as gait modification, orthotics, walking aids, and custom treadmills are analyzed. Current gaps in our knowledge are identified and directions for future research in this area are outlined. PMID:22468461

  16. Deciding to have knee or hip replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... patientinstructions/000368.htm Deciding to have knee or hip replacement To use the sharing features on this page, ... make a decision. Who Benefits From Knee or hip Replacement Surgery? The most common reason to have a ...

  17. Risks of hip and knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... is normal to lose blood during and after hip or knee replacement surgery. Some people need a blood transfusion during ... clot form are higher during and soon after hip or knee replacement surgery. Sitting or lying down for long periods ...

  18. Knee joint forces: prediction, measurement, and significance.

    PubMed

    D'Lima, Darryl D; Fregly, Benjamin J; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Colwell, Clifford W

    2012-02-01

    Knee forces are highly significant in osteoarthritis and in the survival and function of knee arthroplasty. A large number of studies have attempted to estimate forces around the knee during various activities. Several approaches have been used to relate knee kinematics and external forces to internal joint contact forces, the most popular being inverse dynamics, forward dynamics, and static body analyses. Knee forces have also been measured in vivo after knee arthroplasty, which serves as valuable validation of computational predictions. This review summarizes the results of published studies that measured knee forces for various activities. The efficacy of various methods to alter knee force distribution, such as gait modification, orthotics, walking aids, and custom treadmills are analyzed. Current gaps in our knowledge are identified and directions for future research in this area are outlined. PMID:22468461

  19. Knee arthroscopy after yttrium or osmic acid injection

    SciTech Connect

    Guaydier-Souquieres, C.; Beguin, J.; Ollivier, D.; Loyau, G.

    1989-01-01

    This study presents the macroscopic and histologic results of 35 knee arthroscopies performed on patients with rheumatoid arthritis, some months after an yttrium or osmic acid intraarticular injection. The procedure was most often performed after a failure of the injection or a relapse of synovitis. Arthroscopy provides an understanding of the cause of synoviorthesis failure--insufficient action of the product on the synovitis or its poor diffusion, fibri-nonecrotic deposits, or cartilaginous lesions--and may be used both diagnostically and therapeutically.

  20. Sciatic Neuroma Presenting Forty Years After Above-Knee Amputation

    PubMed Central

    Kitcat, M; Hunter, J.E; Malata, C.M

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of a sciatic neuroma presenting forty years after above knee amputation. Patients developing neuroma following a limb amputation can present with stump pain which is commonly resistant to medical intervention. The length of interval from the initial injury to presentation is widely variable. Diagnosis relies on clinical suspicion and accurate assessment, radiological imaging and, if indicated, surgical exploration. MRI provides a better soft tissue definition than CT and is more accurate in identifying small lesions than ultrasound. The aim of treatment for symptomatic neuroma is pain relief and improvement of function. This is often achieved by surgical excision. PMID:20224738

  1. Predicting Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Bruce S; Woodhouse, Francis G; Besier, Thor F; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Lloyd, David G; Zhang, Lihai; Smith, David W

    2016-01-01

    Treatment options for osteoarthritis (OA) beyond pain relief or total knee replacement are very limited. Because of this, attention has shifted to identifying which factors increase the risk of OA in vulnerable populations in order to be able to give recommendations to delay disease onset or to slow disease progression. The gold standard is then to use principles of risk management, first to provide subject-specific estimates of risk and then to find ways of reducing that risk. Population studies of OA risk based on statistical associations do not provide such individually tailored information. Here we argue that mechanistic models of cartilage tissue maintenance and damage coupled to statistical models incorporating model uncertainty, united within the framework of structural reliability analysis, provide an avenue for bridging the disciplines of epidemiology, cell biology, genetics and biomechanics. Such models promise subject-specific OA risk assessment and personalized strategies for mitigating or even avoiding OA. We illustrate the proposed approach with a simple model of cartilage extracellular matrix synthesis and loss regulated by daily physical activity. PMID:26206679

  2. TOTAL KNEE REPLACEMENT IN PATIENTS WITH BELOW-KNEE AMPUTATION

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Matthew D; Willey, Michael; Shurr, Donald G

    2010-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is reserved for patients with severe and disabling arthritis that is non-responsive to conservative measures. Based on existing data, total knee replacement is a safe and cost-effective treatment for alleviating pain and improving physical function in patients who do not respond to conservative therapy. Despite the large variation in health status of patients and types of prosthesis implanted, total knee replacement has proven to be a relatively low risk and successful operation. Each year in the United States surgeons perform approximately 300,000 TKR.1 Likewise, lower extremity amputation is commonly performed in the United States with an annual incidence of 110,000 per year.2 Nearly 70% of all lower extremity amputations are performed as the result of chronic vascular disease, followed by trauma (22%), congenital etiology and tumor (4% each).3 Approximately 50% of all lower extremity amputations are performed secondary to complications from Diabetes Mellitus. Norvell et al. demonstrated that patients who have previously undergone transtibial amputation and ambulate with a prosthesis are more likely to develop degenerative joint disease in the con-tralateral extremity than the ipsilateral extremity.4 Further, radiographic changes consistent with osteoporosis have been demonstrated in up to 88% of limbs that have undergone transtibial amputation.8 To our knowledge, there have been only three reported cases of total knee replacement in patients with ipsilateral transtibial amputation.5,7 The purpose of the present study is to review the existing data on total knee replacement in patients who have undergone transtibial amputation. Further we present a patient with a transtibial amputation who underwent contralateral total knee replacement. PMID:21045987

  3. Self-reported previous knee injury and low knee function increase knee injury risk in adolescent female football.

    PubMed

    Clausen, M B; Tang, L; Zebis, M K; Krustrup, P; Hölmich, P; Wedderkopp, N; Andersen, L L; Christensen, K B; Møller, M; Thorborg, K

    2016-08-01

    Knee injuries are common in adolescent female football. Self-reported previous knee injury and low Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) are proposed to predict future knee injuries, but evidence regarding this in adolescent female football is scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate self-reported previous knee injury and low KOOS subscale score as risk factors for future knee injuries in adolescent female football. A sample of 326 adolescent female football players, aged 15-18, without knee injury at baseline, were included. Data on self-reported previous knee injury and KOOS questionnaires were collected at baseline. Time-loss knee injuries and football exposures were reported weekly by answers to standardized text-message questions, followed by injury telephone interviews. A priori, self-reported previous knee injury and low KOOS subscale scores (< 80 points) were chosen as independent variables in the risk factor analyses. The study showed that self-reported previous knee injury significantly increased the risk of time-loss knee injury [relative risk (RR): 3.65, 95% confidence (CI) 1.73-7.68; P < 0.001]. Risk of time-loss knee injury was also significantly increased in players with low KOOS subscale scores (< 80 points) in Activities of Daily Living (RR: 5.0), Sport/Recreational (RR: 2.2) and Quality of Life (RR: 3.0) (P < 0.05). In conclusion, self-reported previous knee injury and low scores in three KOOS subscales significantly increase the risk of future time-loss knee injury in adolescent female football. PMID:26179111

  4. Snapping knee caused by symptomatic fabella in a native knee.

    PubMed

    Hire, Justin M; Oliver, David L; Hubbard, Ryan C; Fontaine, Michelle L; Bojescul, John A

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of a 31-year-old man with a 5-year history of snapping knee syndrome secondary to a single, large symptomatic fabella of the knee. On physical examination, the patient was able to reproduce an audible and palpable snapping with active range of motion. His condition was refractory to physical therapy. He had undergone a prior iliotibial band release at an outside facility. After excision of the fabella, measuring 15 × 8 × 9 mm, the patient's snapping and pain with activity were resolved. PMID:25136872

  5. Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    Proposed orthotic knee joint locks and unlocks automatically, at any position within range of bend angles, without manual intervention by wearer. Includes tang and clevis, locks whenever wearer transfers weight to knee and unlocks when weight removed. Locking occurs at any angle between 45 degrees knee bend and full extension.

  6. Knee Replacement - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Knee Replacement (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Total Knee Replacement Potpuna zamjena koljena - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Total Knee Replacement 全膝关节置换 - 简体中文 ( ...

  7. Robotic-assisted knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Elmallah, Randa K; Jauregui, Julio J; Pierce, Todd P; Mont, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Robotics in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has undergone vast improvements. Although some of the systems have fallen out of favor due to safety concerns, there has been recent increased interest for semi-active haptic robotic systems that provide intraoperative tactile feedback to the surgeon. The potential advantages include improvements in radiographic outcomes, reducing the incidence of mechanical axis malalignment of the lower extremity and better tissue balance. Proponents of robotic technology believe that these improvements may lead to superior functional outcomes and implant survivorship. We aim to discuss robotic technology development, outcomes of unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty and the future outlook. Short-term follow-up studies on robotic-assisted knee arthroplasty suggest that, although some alignment objectives may have been achieved, more studies regarding functional outcomes are needed. Furthermore, studies evaluating the projected cost-benefit analyses of this new technology are needed before widespread adoption. Nevertheless, the short-term results warrant further evaluation. PMID:26365088

  8. Arthroscopic surgery of the knee.

    PubMed Central

    Dandy, D J; O'Carroll, P F

    1982-01-01

    In the first 1000 arthroscopic operations performed by one surgeon 136 patients had two or more procedures, making a total of 1168 during the 1000 operations. The indications for operation were internal mechanical derangements in 565 patients, anterior knee pain in 246, disorders of the synovium in 77, ligament injuries in 63, and degenerative joint disease in 49. Complications included fracture of instruments in the knee in five patients, haemarthrosis in 10, deep vein thrombosis in three, and synovial fistula in one. In no patient was the wound infected. A total of 26 different operations was performed. PMID:6812832

  9. [Revision after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Mohr, G; Martin, J; Clarius, M

    2014-10-01

    Unicompartmental arthroplasty is an efficient and approved treatment option of unicompartmental arthritis of the knee, being performed with increasing frequency worldwide. Compared to total knee replacement, there are several advantages such as faster recovery, lower blood loss, better functional outcome and lower infection rates. However, higher revision rates are a frequent argument against the use of unicompartmental arthroplasty. The following article gives an overview of failure mechanisms and strategies for revision arthroplasty. This article is based on a selective literature review including PubMed and relevant print media. Our own clinical experience is considered as well. PMID:25209015

  10. A conceptual framework for a sports knee injury performance profile (SKIPP) and return to activity criteria (RTAC)

    PubMed Central

    Logerstedt, David; Arundale, Amelia; Lynch, Andrew; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Injuries to the knee, including intra-articular fractures, ligamentous ruptures, and meniscal and articular cartilage lesions, are commonplace within sports. Despite advancements in surgical techniques and enhanced rehabilitation, athletes returning to cutting, pivoting, and jumping sports after a knee injury are at greater risk of sustaining a second injury. The clinical utility of objective criteria presents a decision-making challenge to ensure athletes are fully rehabilitated and safe to return to sport. A system centered on specific indicators that can be used to develop a comprehensive profile to monitor rehabilitation progression and to establish return to activity criteria is recommended to clear athletes to begin a progressive and systematic approach to activities and sports. Integration of a sports knee injury performance profile with return to activity criteria can guide clinicians in facilitating an athlete's safe return to sport, prevention of subsequent injury, and life-long knee joint health. PMID:26537805

  11. Early Knee Changes in Dancers Identified by Ultra High Field 7 Tesla MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Gregory; Diamond, Matthew; Nevsky, Gregory; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Weiss, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to determine whether a unique, ultra high-field 7 Tesla (T) MRI scanner could detect occult cartilage and meniscal injuries in asymptomatic female dancers. Materials and Methods This study had institutional review board approval. We recruited eight pre-professional female dancers and nine non-athletic, female controls. We scanned the dominant knee on a 7T MRI scanner using a 3D-FLASH sequence and a proton density, fast spin-echo sequence to evaluate cartilage and menisci, respectively. Two radiologists scored cartilage (International Cartilage Repair Society classification) and meniscal (Stoller classification) lesions. We applied two-tailed z- and t-tests to determine statistical significance. Results There were no cartilage lesions in dancers or controls. For the medial meniscus, the dancers compared to controls demonstrated higher mean MRI score (2.38±0.61 vs. 1.0±0.97, p<0.0001) and higher frequency of mean grade 2 lesions (88% vs. 11%, p<0.01). For the lateral meniscus, there was no difference in score (0.5±0.81 vs. 0.5±0.78, p=0.78) in dancers compared to controls. Discussion Asymptomatic dancers demonstrate occult medial meniscal lesions. Because this has been described in early osteoarthritis, close surveillance of dancers’ knee symptoms and function with appropriate activity modification may help maintain their long-term knee health. PMID:23346987

  12. Trabecular bone strength at the knee.

    PubMed

    Hvid, I

    1988-02-01

    The axial strength of trabecular bone at the knee is critical for the maintenance of support and fixation of the prosthetic components after total surface knee arthroplasty. The resistance of trabecular bone to penetration was measured posteriorly, centrally, and anteriorly in each of the tibial and femoral condyles in 150 consecutive total knee arthroplasties. Forty-seven rheumatoid knees and 88 osteoarthritic knees were evaluated. The correlation of bone strength with selected clinical parameters was found to be too poor to predict bone strength. Tibial bone strength was lower in rheumatoid than in osteoarthritic knees. Steroid medication did not influence tibial bone strength in rheumatoid arthritis. The distribution of bone strength between the medial and lateral condyles was closely dependent on knee alignment, with high medial strength in varus knees. At the unloaded condyle, strength was reduced relative to the findings for normally aligned knees. At the tibia, strength decreased with depth from the resection surface, while at the femur the converse was true. Tibial bone strength, both condylar and overall average, was lower than values reported in studies of normal cadaver knees. Evaluation of the absolute bone strength at the tibial condyles suggested that the values too low to meet load-bearing requirements after well-aligned knee replacement were infrequent. PMID:3276421

  13. Deprivation and outcome of total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Murray, James R D; Birdsall, Paul D; Sher, J Lester; Deehan, David J

    2006-03-01

    Deprivation correlates with poor health and psychosocial variables can affect the symptoms of knee arthritis. Our aim was to determine the effect of deprivation on the level of knee function and health-related quality of life at the time of arthroplasty and 12 months after total knee replacement. From our database of over 2500 knee replacements, we analysed both clinical and quality of life outcome measures. We analysed the relationship between deprivation (by Townsend score), knee function (Knee Society Score) and health-related quality of life (Nottingham Health Profile) before total knee replacement (TKR) and at 12 months post-operation. There was no significant correlation between Townsend score, Knee Society Score and Nottingham Health Profile preoperatively or at 12 months after knee replacement, thus showing that there was no association between deprivation and the severity of knee arthritis at the time of joint replacement nor was there a relationship between deprivation and the short-term outcome from total knee replacement. PMID:16469499

  14. Biomechanics of knee joint — A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madeti, Bhaskar Kumar; Chalamalasetti, Srinivasa Rao; Bolla Pragada, S. K. Sundara siva rao

    2015-06-01

    The present paper is to know how the work is carried out in the field of biomechanics of knee. Various model formulations are discussed and further classified into mathematical model, two-dimensional model and three-dimensional model. Knee geometry is a crucial part of human body movement, in which how various views of knee is shown in different planes and how the forces act on tibia and femur are studied. It leads to know the forces acting on the knee joint. Experimental studies of knee geometry and forces acting on knee shown by various researchers have been discussed, and comparisons of results are made. In addition, static and dynamic analysis of knee has been also discussed respectively to some extent.

  15. Open Knee: Open Source Modeling and Simulation in Knee Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Erdemir, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Virtual representations of the knee joint can provide clinicians, scientists, and engineers the tools to explore mechanical functions of the knee and its tissue structures in health and disease. Modeling and simulation approaches such as finite element analysis also provide the possibility to understand the influence of surgical procedures and implants on joint stresses and tissue deformations. A large number of knee joint models are described in the biomechanics literature. However, freely accessible, customizable, and easy-to-use models are scarce. Availability of such models can accelerate clinical translation of simulations, where labor-intensive reproduction of model development steps can be avoided. Interested parties can immediately utilize readily available models for scientific discovery and clinical care. Motivated by this gap, this study aims to describe an open source and freely available finite element representation of the tibiofemoral joint, namely Open Knee, which includes the detailed anatomical representation of the joint's major tissue structures and their nonlinear mechanical properties and interactions. Three use cases illustrate customization potential of the model, its predictive capacity, and its scientific and clinical utility: prediction of joint movements during passive flexion, examining the role of meniscectomy on contact mechanics and joint movements, and understanding anterior cruciate ligament mechanics. A summary of scientific and clinically directed studies conducted by other investigators are also provided. The utilization of this open source model by groups other than its developers emphasizes the premise of model sharing as an accelerator of simulation-based medicine. Finally, the imminent need to develop next-generation knee models is noted. These are anticipated to incorporate individualized anatomy and tissue properties supported by specimen-specific joint mechanics data for evaluation, all acquired in vitro from varying age

  16. Identification of factors associated with the development of knee osteoarthritis in a young to middle-aged cohort of patients with knee complaints.

    PubMed

    Huétink, Kasper; Stoel, Berend C; Watt, Iain; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Bloem, Johan L; Malm, Steve H; Van't Klooster, Ronald; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA) development in a young to middle-aged population with sub-acute knee complaints. This, in order to define high risk patients who may benefit from early preventive or future disease modifying therapies. Knee OA development visible on radiographs and MR in 319 patients (mean age 41.5 years) 10 years after sub-acute knee complaints and subjective knee function (KOOS score) was studied. Associations between OA development and age, gender, activity level, BMI, meniscal or anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) lesions, OA in first-degree relatives and radiographic hand OA were determined using multivariable logistic regression analysis. OA on radiographs and MR in the TFC is associated with increased age (OR: 1.10, 95 % 1.04-1.16 and OR: 1.07, 95 % 1.02-1.13). TFC OA on radiographs only is associated with ACL and/or meniscal lesions (OR: 5.01, 95 % 2.14-11.73), presence of hand OA (OR: 4.69, 95 % 1.35-16.32) and higher Tegner activity scores at baseline before the complaints (OR: 1.20, 95 % 1.01-1.43). The presence of OA in the TFC diagnosed only on MRI is associated with a family history of OA (OR: 2.44, 95 % 1.18-5.06) and a higher BMI (OR: 1.13, 95 % 1.04-1.23). OA in the PFC diagnosed on both radiographs and MR is associated with an increased age (OR: 1.06, 95 % 1.02-1.12 and OR: 1.05, 95 % 1.00-1.09). PFC OA diagnosed on radiographs only is associated with a higher BMI (OR: 1.12, 95 % 1.02-1.22). The presence of OA in the PFC diagnosed on MR only is associated with the presence of hand OA (OR: 3.39, 95 % 1.10-10.50). Compared to normal reference values, the study population had significantly lower KOOS scores in the different subscales. These results show that knee OA development in young to middle aged patients with a history of sub-acute knee complaints is associated with the presence of known risk factors for knee OA. OA is already visible on radiographs and MRI after 10

  17. Arthroscopic excision of giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath in the knee mimicking patellar tendinopathy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    GAO, KAI; CHEN, JIWU; CHEN, SHIYI; LI, YUNXIA

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) predominantly occurs in the tendon sheaths of the hand, but rarely in those of the knee. The current study reports the case of a 36-year-old male patient presenting with anterior knee pain. The patient was ultimately diagnosed with GCTTS in the knee mimicking patellar tendinopathy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of its kind. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a well-defined oval intra-articular lesion located at the proximal segment of the infrapatellar fat pad. The lesion was completely excised under arthroscopy and pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of GCTTS. There was no evidence of recurrence at the 2-year follow-up examination. The findings of the present study suggest that, despite its rarity, GCTTS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patellar tendinopathy. PMID:27123148

  18. Example based lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2014-03-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  19. Imaging of traumatic injury and impingement of anterior knee fat.

    PubMed

    Lapègue, F; Sans, N; Brun, C; Bakouche, S; Brucher, N; Cambon, Z; Chiavassa, H; Larbi, A; Faruch, M

    2016-01-01

    Fat is not just used by the body as bulk tissue. In addition to its role in storing energy and regulating hormone action, fat is used in some parts of the body for its mechanical properties. The anatomy of anterior knee fat is more complex than it appears at first sight and is capable of withstanding considerable compressive and shear stress. Specific lesions occur when such mechanical stress exceeds the physiological limits and are yet little known. Superficial fat can be the site of either acute injury by closed degloving called the Morel-Lavallée lesion or chronic injury, when subject to repeat excessive shear forces, due to more complex and less well-defined disruptions that result in pseudo-bursitis. There are three main anterior, intracapsular and extrasynovial fat pads in the knee joint, which are the infrapatellar fat pad (IFP) or Hoffa's fat pad, the quadriceps fat pad and the prefemoral fat pad. The IFP plays an important role as a mechanical shock absorber and guides the patella tendon and even the patella itself during flexion-extension movements. In response to repeated excessive stress, an inflammatory reaction and swelling of the IFP is first observed, followed by a fibrotic reaction with metaplastic transformation into fibrous, cartilaginous or bone tissue. More rarely, the two other deep fat pads (quadriceps and prefemoral) can, if subject to repeated stress, undergo similar restructuring inflammatory reactions with metaplasia resulting in tissue hardening, anterior pain and partial loss of function. PMID:27118690

  20. Gap Balanced Total Knee Arthroplasty

    MedlinePlus

    Gap Balanced Total Knee Arthroplasty – SIGMA® with AOX™ You must have Javascript enabled in your web browser. View Program Transcript Click Here to view the OR-Live, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2010 OR-Live, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Petriellidium boydii infection of knee

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, H.B.S.; Bedford, A.F.; Fincham, W.J.

    1982-12-01

    A case of Petriellidium boydii (synonym: Allescheria boydii) infection of the knee joint is described. It followed a penetrating soft tissue injury with a pitchfork. Such infections are rare in this country and bone involvement has not been recorded previously except in maduramycosis contracted in tropical areas.

  2. Knee joint replacement prosthesis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A prosthesis is a device designed to replace a missing part of the body, or to make a part of the body work better. The metal prosthetic device in knee joint replacement surgery replaces cartilage and bone which is damaged from disease or aging.

  3. Phaeohyphomycosis infection in the knee.

    PubMed

    Sadigursky, David; Nogueira E Ferreira, Luisa; Moreno de Oliveira Corrêa, Liz

    2016-01-01

    Phaeohyphomycosis is caused by cutaneous fungi and rarely affects large joints. This is a case report on phaeohyphomycosis in the left knee of an elderly individual without immunosuppression. It was accompanied by pain and swelling the anterior knee. The case was first suspected to be suprapatellar bursitis, and was treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, without remission of symptoms. Surgical treatment was performed, with resection of the suprapatellar bursa and anterior region of the quadriceps tendon. The material was sent for anatomopathological examination and culturing. The pathological examination showed phaeohyphomycosis. The treatment instituted consisted of itraconazole, 200 mg/day for six weeks, and complete remission of symptoms was achieved. The physical examination remained normal after one year of follow-up. This is the first published case of phaeohyphomycosis infection in the suprapatellar region of the knee. Although almost all the cases reported have been associated with immunosuppressed patients, this was an exception. It is important to suspect phaeohyphomycosis in cases of knee infection, in the area of the suprapatellar bursa, when the symptoms do not resolve after clinical treatment. PMID:27069894

  4. Revision of the Gunston polycentric knee arthroplasty with total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Memişoğlu, Kaya; Müezzinoğlu, U Sefa; Kesemenli, Cumhur Cevdet

    2010-01-01

    The Gunston polycentric knee arthroplasty, first designed and performed by Frank Gunston in 1971, is the first prosthesis considering the natural knee biomechanics. Although the polycentric knee arthroplasty showed encouraging results to relieve pain and to preserve the preoperative range of motion and joint instability, the improvements in prosthesis design and arthroplasty technology rapidly made the polycentric knee prosthesis obsolete. Herein, we report a 58-year old male patient who had revision of the Gunston polycentric knee arthroplasty with total knee arthroplasty performed 32 years after the initial operation. PMID:21343693

  5. A three-dimensional anatomy of the posterolateral compartment of the knee: the use of a new technology in the study of musculoskeletal anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Astur, Diego Costa; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Jalikjian, Wahy; Golano, Pau; Cohen, Moises

    2012-01-01

    Background Recently, an interest has developed in understanding the anatomy of the posterior and posterolateral knee. The posterolateral compartment of the knee corresponds to a complex arrangement of ligaments and myotendinous structures. Undiagnosed lesions in this compartment are the main reason for failure of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. Understanding the anatomy of these structures is essential to assist in the diagnosis and treatment of these lesions. The aim of this study was to better understand the relationship between these structures of the knee using three-dimensional technology. Methods Ten knees were included from cadaver lower limbs of adult patients. The skin and subcutaneous tissue were removed leaving only the muscle groups and ligaments. The neurovascular bundles and their ramifications were preserved. Images were acquired from the dissections using a Nikon D40 camera with AF-S Nikkor 18–55 mm (1:3.5 5.6 GII ED) and Micro Nikkor 105 mm (1:2.8) lenses. The pair of images were processed using Callipyan 3D and AnaBuilder software, which transforms the two images into one anaglyphic image. Results During the dissection of the knees, twelve pictures were acquired and transformed into anaglyphic images. Conclusion The use of three-dimensional images in this study demonstrates that this technique is useful to improve the knowledge in anatomy of the knee as well as for knee reconstruction surgery. PMID:24198580

  6. Knee joint examinations by magnetic resonance imaging: The correlation of pathology, age, and sex

    PubMed Central

    Avcu, Serhat; Altun, Ersan; Akpinar, Ihsan; Bulut, Mehmet Deniz; Eresov, Kemal; Biren, Tugrul

    2010-01-01

    Aims: The aim of our study was to investigate the incidence and coexistence of multiple knee joint pathologies and the distribution of knee joint pathologies according to age and sex. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed using the clinical data of patients evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee joint. Data from 308 patients examined between August 2002 and July 2003 were included into this study. A Pearson correlation analysis was performed to examine the relationship between the pathological findings and the age and sex of the patients. Results: The ages of the patients ranged between 1 and 74 years (mean: 43.3 years). Age was significantly correlated with meniscal degeneration and tears, medial collateral ligament degeneration, parameniscal cyst, and chondromalacia patellae. There was a significant correlation between male gender and anterior cruciate ligament injury. Meniscal injury was significantly correlated with bursitis, as well as medial collateral ligament injury. Bone bruise was significantly correlated with medial collateral ligament injury, lateral collateral ligament injury, Baker's cyst, and anterior cruciate ligament injury. Chondromalacia patellae was significantly correlated with anterior cruciate ligament injury, patellae alta, and osteochondral lesion. Bursitis (in 53.2% of the patients) followed by grade-II meniscal degeneration (in 43% of the patients) were the most common knee pathologies observed by MRI. Conclusions: MRI findings of select knee pathologies are significantly correlated with each other and the age and sex of the patient. PMID:22624141

  7. Giant Cell Tumor of the Patella Tendon Sheath Presenting as a Painful Locked Knee

    PubMed Central

    Panagopoulos, Andreas; Tsoumpos, Pantelis; Tatani, Irini; Iliopoulos, Ilias; Papachristou, Dionysios

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 26 Final Diagnosis: Giant cell tumor of the patella tendon seath Symptoms: Efusion • locking knee • pain Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Arthroscopy and open resection of the tumor Specialty: Orthopedics and Traumatology Objective: Rare disease Background: The giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCT-TS) is a benign proliferative synovial tumor manifesting as an intra-articular solitary nodule. When it involves the infrapatellar fat pad it can present acutely as a painful locked knee. Case Report: A 26-year-old white male presented with a 2-week history of painful locking in his right knee. Clinical examination revealed lack of extension by approximately 20°. To help establish the diagnosis, an MRI scan of the right knee was performed, showing a large (5×4×2 cm), oval, well-circumscribed mass with a low-intensity homogenous signal. The size of the mass prohibited the removal by arthroscopy and we therefore proceeded with an open arthrotomy. Histological examination showed a tendosynovial giant cell tumor of the patella tendon sheath. At the latest follow-up, 2 years postoperatively, there was no local tumor recurrence. Conclusions: These rare tumorous lesions should be included in the differential diagnosis of painful locking knee, especially in the absence of definite traumatic history. PMID:26302970

  8. Intraosseous infiltration of platelet-rich plasma for severe knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Mikel; Fiz, Nicolás; Guadilla, Jorge; Padilla, Sabino; Anitua, Eduardo; Sánchez, Pello; Delgado, Diego

    2014-12-01

    We describe a new technique of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) infiltration for the treatment of severe knee osteoarthritis. PRP intra-articular infiltration is a promising treatment for knee osteoarthritis, but it still has some limitations in high-degree osteoarthritis. Diagnosis of osteoarthritis is based on clinical and radiographic findings, and patients with grade III or IV knee tibiofemoral osteoarthritis based on the Ahlbäck scale are considered candidates for this technique. The technique consists of performing intraosseous infiltration of PRP into the subchondral bone, which acts on this tissue and consequently on cartilage-bone communication. Although the intraosseous injection hinders the conventional knee intra-articular infiltration, it allows an extension of the range of action of the PRP, which acts directly on the subchondral bone, which is involved in the progression of osteoarthritis. Thus this technique involves a new administration of PRP that can delay knee arthroplasty; moreover, it can be applied for not only severe osteoarthritis but also other pathologies in which the subchondral bone is critical in the etiology, such as necrosis and osteochondral lesions. PMID:25685680

  9. Matching osteochondritis dissecans lesions in identical twin brothers.

    PubMed

    Richie, Lucas B; Sytsma, Mark J

    2013-09-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans is a disorder of unknown etiology that can result in fragmentation of osteochondral surfaces, most commonly of the knee, shoulder, elbow, and ankle. This may lead to sequelae of pain and an inability to participate in desired activities. Multiple theories exist as to the true cause of the disorder, but none have been fully proven. One such proposed etiology is genetic causation. Familial cases of osteochondritis dissecans are rare, yet these cases offer support to growing evidence that may support a genetic link. This article describes osteochondritis dissecans lesions of the femoral trochlea in monozygotic (identical) twins. Both twins presented with similar symptoms 1 year apart. Neither twin had any clear inciting trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed osteochondral lesions in similar positions of the lateral trochlear of the same knee in both brothers. Osteochondral autograft transfer and tibial tubercle anteromedialization were performed on both patients. An identical postoperative protocol was followed, and recovery with full return to sport was comparable for the brothers. To the authors' knowledge, only 1 other case report exists of osteochondritis dissecans lesions in monozygotic twins. Although debate continues regarding the true etiology of this disorder, cases of identical twins presenting with a similar disease process are highly suggestive of a genetic component and may lead to early identification and treatment of these lesions. Continued research in the area of osteochondritis dissecans and its genetic basis is needed to completely understand this disorder. PMID:24025016

  10. Retrospective Cohort Study of 207 Cases of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Green, Daniel W.; Arbucci, John; Silberman, Jason; Luderowski, Eva; Uppstrom, Tyler J.; Nguyen, Joseph; Tuca, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Describe the clinical characteristics, image findings, and outcomes of patients with juvenile osteochondritis dissecans (JOCD) of the knee. To our knowledge, this is the largest single-surgeon cohort of JOCD patients. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of knee JOCD patients assessed by a single pediatric orthopaedic surgeon at a tertiary care center between 2005-2015. All diagnoses were confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients with patellar dislocations or osteochondral fractures were excluded. Demographic data, sports played, comorbidities, surgical procedures, and clinical data were extracted from charts. Images were analyzed to identify the location and size of lesions. Chi-square or Fisher’s exact tests were used to compare discrete variables, and Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal Wallis tests to compare continuous variables between groups. P-values of <0.05 were considered significant. Results: Sample consisted of 180 patients (207 knees), 124 boys and 56 girls. Average age at diagnosis was 12.8 years (7.5-17.5). Majority were active in sports (80.8%), primary soccer (36.7%) and basketball (29.4%). JOCD was present bilaterally in 27 patients (15%), 14 knees had bifocal OCD (6.8%), and only 1 patient had bifocal lesions in both knees. Most common location was medial femoral condyle (56.3%) followed by lateral femoral condyle (23.1%), trochlea (11.4%), patella (9%), and tibia (0.5%). In the sagittal view, most common location was the middle third of the condyles (48.7%). Surgery was performed in 72 knees (34.8%), with an average age at surgery of 14.1 years (9.3-18.1). Bilateral JOCD was present in 13 surgical patients (18.8%), but only 3 patients had bilateral surgery. Two operative patients had bifocal JOCD (2.7%) and surgery on both lesions. Location distribution did not differ between surgical and non-surgical lesions. The average normalized area of non-surgical JOCD lesions was 6.8 (0.1-18), whereas surgical lesions averaged a

  11. Native Chondrocyte Viability during Cartilage Lesion Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Kumkum; McRury, Ian D.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Morgan, Roy E.; Augé, Wayne K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Early surgical intervention for articular cartilage disease is desirable before full-thickness lesions develop. As early intervention treatments are designed, native chondrocyte viability at the treatment site before intervention becomes an important parameter to consider. The purpose of this study is to evaluate native chondrocyte viability in a series of specimens demonstrating the progression of articular cartilage lesions to determine if the chondrocyte viability profile changes during the evolution of articular cartilage disease to the level of surface fibrillation. Design: Osteochondral specimens demonstrating various degrees of articular cartilage damage were obtained from patients undergoing knee total joint replacement. Three groups were created within a patient harvest based on visual and tactile cues commonly encountered during surgical intervention: group 1, visually and tactilely intact surfaces; group 2, visually intact, tactilely soft surfaces; and group 3, surface fibrillation. Confocal laser microscopy was performed following live/dead cell viability staining. Results: Groups 1 to 3 demonstrated viable chondrocytes in all specimens, even within the fibrillated portions of articular cartilage, with little to no evidence of dead chondrocytes. Chondrocyte viability profile in articular cartilage does not appear to change as disease lesion progresses from normal to surface fibrillation. Conclusions: Fibrillated partial-thickness articular cartilage lesions are a good therapeutic target for early intervention. These lesions retain a high profile of viable chondrocytes and are readily diagnosed by visual and tactile cues during surgery. Early intervention should be based on matrix failure rather than on more aggressive procedures that further corrupt the matrix and contribute to chondrocyte necrosis of contiguous untargeted cartilage. PMID:26069561

  12. Editorial Commentary: Platelet-Rich Plasma Improves Knee Pain and Function in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-11-01

    Systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses shows that platelet-rich plasma improves knee pain and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Ultimately, biologics hold promise for chondroprotection in addition to symptomatic relief. PMID:26542203

  13. Adjustable hinge permits movement of knee in plaster cast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maley, W. E.

    1967-01-01

    Metal knee hinge with an adjustable sleeve worn on the outside of a leg cast facilitates movement of the knee joint. This helps eliminate stiffness of the knee and eliminates bulkiness and adjustment difficulty.

  14. [Is knee osteotomy still indicated in knee osteoarthritis?].

    PubMed

    Antonescu, D N

    2000-12-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate whether high tibial osteotomy (HTO) still had a role in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee joint. The author has performed photoelasticity studies which confirmed abnormal stress distribution over the joint, as soon as its mechanical axis was deviated and the joint line had an obliquity over 10 degrees. High tibial osteotomy to correct varus or valgus deformity restores a symmetrical stress distribution and represents the only etiological treatment of secondary osteoarthritis of the knee. Two hundred and fifty HTO's were performed between 1971 and 1985 for osteoarthritis of the knee. The short-term result was good or very good in 75%, fair in 20% and poor in 5%. Fair and poor results were related to insufficient correction, to infection or mostly to incorrect indications. In 152 cases with a good or very good short term result, a further evaluation was made between 8 years and 15 years after operation. It was noted that osteoarthritis had been arrested in 105 cases (69%) whereas it had deteriorated in 47 cases. The main factors associated with further deterioration were insufficient correction and persistence of joint line obliquity. Provided on optimal correction is achieved (3 degrees to 6 degrees hypercorrection in valgus osteotomy, 0 degree in varus osteotomy) and provided a horizontal joint line is restored, HTO performed in good indications (Ahlback grade I or II) may provide good results for at least 10 to 15 years. PMID:11196365

  15. Anterior knee pain following primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shervin, David; Pratt, Katelyn; Healey, Travis; Nguyen, Samantha; Mihalko, William M; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2015-01-01

    Despite improvements in technique and technology for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), anterior knee pain impacts patient outcomes and satisfaction. Addressing the prosthetic and surgical technique related causes of pain after TKA, specifically as it relates to anterior knee pain, can aid surgeons in addressing these issues with their patients. Design features of the femoral and patellar components which have been reported as pain generators include: Improper femoral as well as patellar component sizing or designs that result in patellofemoral stuffing; a shortened trochlear groove distance from the flange to the intercondylar box; and then surgical technique related issues resulting in: Lateral patellar facet syndrome; overstuffed patella/flange combination; asymmetric patellar resurfacing, improper transverse plane component rotation resulting in patellar subluxation/tilt. Any design consideration that allows impingement of extensor mechanism anatomical elements has the possibility of impacting outcome by becoming a pain generator. As the number of TKA procedures continues to increase, it is increasingly critical to develop improved, evidence based prostheses that maximize function and patient satisfaction while minimizing pain and other complications. PMID:26601061

  16. SIMULTANEOUS BILATERAL TEAR OF THE KNEE EXTENSOR MECHANISM IN A PRE-ADOLESCENT: CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires; Giordano, Vincenzo; Albuquerque, Maria Isabel Pires; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; do Amaral, Ney Pecegueiro; Barretto, João Maurício

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral tearing of a patellar tendon and a contralateral sleeve fracture in a pre-adolescent are rare lesions. We report a case in which a pre-adolescent sustained a fall while jumping during a soccer match. No predisposing risk factors were identified. The injuries were treated with surgical repairs and transosseous suturing. The aim of this study was to present a case of spontaneous concurrent tearing of the extensor mechanism of the knee in a pre-adolescent. PMID:27047882

  17. Cutaneous angiosarcoma of the knee: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bonnie A; Wanat, Karolyn A; Eisen, Arthur Z

    2009-02-01

    Cutaneous angiosarcoma is a rare, malignant, vascular tumor that usually occurs in the scalp and face region of elderly white men. The tumor also can involve areas of prior irradiation; chronic lymphedema, otherwise known as Stewart-Treves syndrome; and preexisting vascular lesions. We report an unusual case of angiosarcoma occurring on the knee of a 70-year-old white woman with a strong family history of malignant melanoma in the absence of any known predisposing features. PMID:19326694

  18. A prosthetic knee using magnetorhelogical fluid damper for above-knee amputees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jinhyuk; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-04-01

    A prosthetic knee for above-knee (AK) amputees is categorized into two types; namely a passive and an active type. The passive prosthetic knee is generally made by elastic materials such as carbon fiber reinforced composite material, titanium and etc. The passive prosthetic knee easy to walk. But, it has disadvantages such that a knee joint motion is not similar to ordinary people. On the other hand, the active prosthetic knee can control the knee joint angle effectively because of mechanical actuator and microprocessor. The actuator should generate large damping force to support the weight of human body. But, generating the large torque using small actuator is difficult. To solve this problem, a semi-active type prosthetic knee has been researched. This paper proposes a semi-active prosthetic knee using a flow mode magneto-rheological (MR) damper for AK amputees. The proposed semi-active type prosthetic knee consists of the flow mode MR damper, hinge and prosthetic knee body. In order to support weight of human body, the required energy of MR damper is smaller than actuator of active prosthetic leg. And it can control the knee joint angle by inducing the magnetic field during the stance phase.

  19. How does knee pain affect trunk and knee motion during badminton forehand lunges?

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Hsing-Hsan; Lin, Cheng-Feng; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Liao, Jen-Chieh

    2014-01-01

    Badminton requires extensive lower extremity movement and a precise coordination of the upper extremity and trunk movements. Accordingly, this study investigated motions of the trunk and the knee, control of dynamic stability and muscle activation patterns of individuals with and without knee pain. Seventeen participants with chronic knee pain and 17 healthy participants participated in the study and performed forehand forward and backward diagonal lunges. This study showed that those with knee pain exhibited smaller knee motions in frontal and horizontal planes during forward lunge but greater knee motions in sagittal plane during backward lunge. By contrast, in both tasks, the injured group showed a smaller value on the activation level of the paraspinal muscles in pre-impact phase, hip-shoulder separation angle, trunk forward inclination range and peak centre of mass (COM) velocity. Badminton players with knee pain adopt a more conservative movement pattern of the knee to minimise recurrence of knee pain. The healthy group exhibit better weight-shifting ability due to a greater control of the trunk and knee muscles. Training programmes for badminton players with knee pain should be designed to improve both the neuromuscular control and muscle strength of the core muscles and the knee extensor with focus on the backward lunge motion. PMID:24404882

  20. Ghost cell lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, E.; Jimson, Sudha; Masthan, K. M. K.; Balachander, N.

    2015-01-01

    Ghost cells have been a controversy for a long time. Ghost cell is a swollen/enlarged epithelial cell with eosnophilic cytoplasm, but without a nucleus. In routine H and E staining these cells give a shadowy appearance. Hence these cells are also called as shadow cells or translucent cells. The appearance of these cells varies from lesion to lesion involving odontogenic and nonodontogenic lesions. This article review about the origin, nature and significance of ghost cells in different neoplasms. PMID:26015694

  1. [Surprising white lesions].

    PubMed

    Nolte, J W; van der Waal, I

    2011-09-01

    A 46-year-old man appeared with white lesions of the oral cavity. A previously taken biopsy revealed no classifying diagnosis and treatment with mouth rinse produced no improvement. A new biopsy was taken, on which the pathologist performed additional tests. This resulted in the diagnosis 'syphilis'. The patient was treated with benzylpenicillin and the oral white lesions disappeared. Although nowadays syphilis is rare, special attention is required when noticing these kinds of lesions of the oral cavity. PMID:21957637

  2. The Attenborough total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Attenborough, C G

    1978-08-01

    The stabilised gliding knee prosthesis is a compromise between hinged joints and condylar prostheses. It is a two-piece implant designed to allow normal gliding movements of flexion and extension and which, stabilised by a connecting rod between the femoral and tibial components, allows a designed laxity of rotation and lateral movements. A modification of the original femoral component is described. Two hundred and forty-five knee replacement operations have been done between January 1973 and September 1977 and the results are reported. The results using this prosthesis are at least equal to those using hinged or condylar prostheses. So far there has been no case of spontaneous loosening of the components and the implant can be used in patients who, because of severe deformities and instability, are unsuitable for condylar prostheses. PMID:681407

  3. Cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R; Ribeiro, F; Oliveira, J

    2010-03-01

    The effects of cryotherapy on joint position sense are not clearly established; however it is paramount to understand its impact on peripheral feedback to ascertain the safety of using ice therapy before resuming exercise on sports or rehabilitation settings. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the effects of cryotherapy, when applied over the quadriceps and over the knee joint, on knee position sense. This within-subjects repeated-measures study encompassed fifteen subjects. Knee position sense was measured by open kinetic chain technique and active positioning at baseline and after cryotherapy application. Knee angles were determined by computer analysis of the videotape images. Twenty-minute ice bag application was applied randomly, in two sessions 48 h apart, over the quadriceps and the knee joint. The main effect for cryotherapy application was significant (F (1.14)=7.7, p=0.015) indicating an increase in both absolute and relative angular errors after the application. There was no significant main effect for the location of cryotherapy application, indicating no differences between the application over the quadriceps and the knee joint. In conclusion, cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense in normal knees. This deleterious effect is similar when cryotherapy is applied over the quadriceps or the knee joint. PMID:20221997

  4. Imaging following acute knee trauma.

    PubMed

    Kijowski, R; Roemer, F; Englund, M; Tiderius, C J; Swärd, P; Frobell, R B

    2014-10-01

    Joint injury has been recognized as a potent risk factor for the onset of osteoarthritis. The vast majority of studies using imaging technology for longitudinal assessment of patients following joint injury have focused on the injured knee joint, specifically in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury and meniscus tears where a high risk for rapid onset of post-traumatic osteoarthritis is well known. Although there are many imaging modalities under constant development, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the most important instrument for longitudinal monitoring after joint injury. MR imaging is sensitive for detecting early cartilage degeneration and can evaluate other joint structures including the menisci, bone marrow, tendons, and ligaments which can be sources of pain following acute injury. In this review, focusing on imaging following acute knee trauma, several studies were identified with promising short-term results of osseous and soft tissue changes after joint injury. However, studies connecting these promising short-term results to the development of osteoarthritis were limited which is likely due to the long follow-up periods needed to document the radiographic and clinical onset of the disease. Thus, it is recommended that additional high quality longitudinal studies with extended follow-up periods be performed to further investigate the long-term consequences of the early osseous and soft tissue changes identified on MR imaging after acute knee trauma. PMID:25278054

  5. Arthroscopical and histological study of cartilaginous lesions treated by mosaicplasty

    PubMed Central

    Cirstoiu, CF; Bădilă, AE

    2010-01-01

    Aim. The aim of our study was to assess macro– and microscopically the knee cartilaginous lesions outcome treated by mosaicplasty. Material and method Our study included 32 patients which underwent mosaicplasty for nondegenerative cartilaginous lesions of the knee and a second look arthroscopy. In 21 patients, minibiopsies from the repaired lesion were performed under arthroscopic control (from the cartilaginous region of the transplanted osteocartilaginous grafts and from the spaces between grafts). All repaired lesions were carefully examined during arthroscopy and all harvested minifragments were studied by optical microscopy (staining method – hematoxylin eosin). Results Macroscopically, the articular surface of the repaired cartilaginous lesions was smooth and congruent to the adjacent surfaces. The aspect and resistance to compression of grafted area was similar to those of the normal surrounding cartilage. The transferred cartilage maintained its height, being at the level of the neighboring cartilage. One year postoperatively, the limits of the cartilaginous autografts were still visible. Two years postoperatively, these limits were no longer visible. Microscopically, the region of the former lesion was constituted mainly by viable hyaline cartilage. Fibrous cartilaginous tissue was visualized in the spaces between the grafts. Conclusions The second look arthroscopy showed that after mosaicplasty the repaired articular surface was smooth, leveled, homogenous and congruent to adjacent cartilage. The spaces between grafts are progressively covered by fibrous cartilaginous tissue with a more textured and uneven surface. Mosaicplasty is a biological surgical technique which restores the normal osteocartilaginous architecture of the most part of the grafted area. The transplanted osteocartilaginous cylindrical grafts maintain its viability and mechanical properties. PMID:21254739

  6. Knee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis: the effect of self-reported instability

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Jonathan A.; Robinson, Megan E.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Tashman, Scott; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis has been previously associated with a stereotypical knee-stiffening gait pattern and reduced knee joint motion variability due to increased antagonist muscle co-contractions and smaller utilized arc of motion during gait. However, episodic self-reported instability may be a sign of excessive motion variability for a large subgroup of patients with knee osteoarthritis. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in knee joint motion variability during gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis with and without self-reported instability compared to a control group of older adults with asymptomatic knees. Methods Forty-three subjects, 8 with knee osteoarthritis but no reports of instability (stable), 11 with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported instability (unstable), and 24 without knee osteoarthritis or instability (control) underwent Dynamic Stereo X-ray analysis during a decline gait task on a treadmill. Knee motion variability was assessed using parametric phase plots during the loading response phase of decline gait. Findings The stable group demonstrated decreased sagittal-plane motion variability compared to the control group (p=0.04), while the unstable group demonstrated increased sagittal-plane motion variability compared to the control (p=0.003) and stable groups (p<0.001). The unstable group also demonstrated increased anterior-posterior joint contact point motion variability for the medial tibiofemoral compartment compared to the control (p=0.03) and stable groups (p=0.03). Interpretation The finding of decreased knee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis without self-reported instability supports previous research. However, presence of self-reported instability is associated with increased knee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis and warrants further investigation. PMID:25796536

  7. Varus Thrust and Knee Frontal Plane Dynamic Motion in Persons with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alison H.; Chmiel, Joan S.; Moisio, Kirsten C.; Almagor, Orit; Zhang, Yunhui; Cahue, September; Sharma, Leena

    2013-01-01

    Objective Varus thrust visualized during walking is associated with a greater medial knee and an increased risk of medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) progression. Little is known about varus thrust presence determined by visual observation relates to quantitative gait kinematic We hypothesized that varus thrust presence is associated with greater knee frontal plane dynamic movement during the stance phase of gait. Methods Participants had knee OA in at least one knee. Trained examiners assessed participants for varus thrust presence during ambulation. Frontal plane knee motion during ambulation captured using external passive reflective markers and an 8-camera motion analysis system. To examine the cross-sectional relationship between varus thrust and frontal plane knee motion, used multivariable regression models with the quantitative motion measures as dependent variables and varus thrust (present/absent) as predictor; models were adjusted for age, gender, BMI, gait speed, and knee static alignment. Results 236 persons [mean BMI: 28.5 kg/m2 (SD 5.5), mean age: 64.9 years (SD 10.4), 75.8% women] contributing 440 knees comprised the study sample. 82 knees (18.6%) had definite varus thrust. Knees with varus thrust had greater peak varus angle and greater peak varus angular velocity during stance than knees without varus thrust (mean differences 0.90° and 6.65°/sec, respectively). These patterns remained significant after adjusting for age, gender, BMI, gait speed, and knee static alignment. Conclusion Visualized varus thrust during walking was associated with a greater peak knee varus angular velocity and a greater peak knee varus angle during stance phase of gait. PMID:23948980

  8. Arthralgia and Osteolytic Lesions Associated with Traumatic Pancreatitis in a 10-Year-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Obatake, Masayuki; Yamane, Yusuke; Tokunaga, Takayuki; Taura, Yasuaki; Inamura, Yukio; Nagayasu, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    A case of traumatic pancreatitis with subsequent joint pain and osteolytic lesions is presented. A 10-year-old girl was admitted to our hospital with abdominal pain caused by blunt epigastric injury. She was diagnosed with traumatic pancreatitis, and multiple pancreatic pseudocysts subsequently developed. Two weeks after admission, she complained of joint pain, and MR revealed osteolytic lesions of both knee joints. On the 58th day, endoscopic transgastric pseudocyst drainage was performed. Joint pain and osteolytic lesions resolved rapidly, in parallel with the decrease in serum amylase level and pseudocyst size. PMID:20041026

  9. Below Knee Impact Responses using Cadaveric Specimens.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Sriram; Beillas, Philippe; Belwadi, Aditya; Hardy, Warren N; Yang, King H; King, Albert I; Masuda, Mitsutoshi

    2004-11-01

    Knee injuries represent about 10% of all injuries suffered during car crashes. Efforts to assess the injury risk to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) have been based on a study available in the literature (Viano et al., 1978), in which only two of the five knees tested had PCL ruptures. The aims of the current study were to repeat the study with a higher number of samples, study the effects of other soft tissues on knee response, and assess the adequacy of the experimental setup for the identification of a PCL tolerance. A total of 14 knees were tested using a high-speed materials testing machine. Eight were intact knees (with the patella and all the muscular and ligamentous structures), three were PCL-only knees (patella and all the muscular and ligamentous structures other than the PCL removed), and the last three were PCL-only knees with the tibia protected from bending fracture. Of the eight intact knees tested, only one had PCL mid substance rupture, one had a partial articular fracture of the tibia below the plateau, and six had simple transverse fracture of the tibial metaphysis. Of the three PCL-only knees without tibial protection, one had PCL mid substance rupture, one had avulsion at the posterior intercondylar attachment point, and the last one had a simple oblique fracture of the tibial metaphysis. Of the three PCL only knees with tibia protection, two had PCL mid-substance ruptures and the third one had an avulsion at the tibial insertion site with partial articular fracture of the lateral plateau. Overall, the results of the current study were similar to those observed by Viano et al. (1978). The average displacement at failure for all PCL related injuries was 17.2+/-2.8 mm for the current study (n=6) and 16.2+/-3.9 mm for Viano et al. (1978) (n=4). This value is higher than the Injury Assessment Reference Value of 15 mm proposed by Mertz (1984) and used in various regulations. Both studies suggest that the existence of the soft tissues other

  10. Preinvasive lesions

    Cancer.gov

    This definition is for allocation of lesions with preinvasive/borderline properties. It is currently aimed at newly identified neoplasms, which may be similar to those described in humans. In mouse pathology, many adenomas may be preinvasive/borderline lesions. However, their inclusion in the preinvasive category can be justified only upon development of better diagnostic criteria.

  11. Noninfectious penile lesions.

    PubMed

    Teichman, Joel M H; Sea, Jason; Thompson, Ian M; Elston, Dirk M

    2010-01-15

    Family physicians commonly diagnose and manage penile cutaneous lesions. Noninfectious lesions may be classified as inflammatory and papulosquamous (e.g., psoriasis, lichen sclerosus, angiokeratomas, lichen nitidus, lichen planus), or as neoplastic (e.g., carcinoma in situ, invasive squamous cell carcinoma). The clinical presentation and appearance of the lesions guide the diagnosis. Psoriasis presents as red or salmon-colored plaques with overlying scales, often with systemic lesions. Lichen sclerosus presents as a phimotic, hypopigmented prepuce or glans penis with a cellophane-like texture. Angiokeratomas are typically asymptomatic, well-circumscribed, red or blue papules, whereas lichen nitidus usually produces asymptomatic pinhead-sized, hypopigmented papules. The lesions of lichen planus are pruritic, violaceous, polygonal papules that are typically systemic. Carcinoma in situ should be suspected if the patient has velvety red or keratotic plaques of the glans penis or prepuce, whereas invasive squamous cell carcinoma presents as a painless lump, ulcer, or fungating irregular mass. Some benign lesions, such as psoriasis and lichen planus, can mimic carcinoma in situ or squamous cell carcinoma. Biopsy is indicated if the diagnosis is in doubt or neoplasm cannot be excluded. The management of benign penile lesions usually involves observation or topical corticosteroids; however, neoplastic lesions generally require surgery. PMID:20082512

  12. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuyet A; Krakowski, Andrew C; Naheedy, John H; Kruk, Peter G; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2015-12-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  13. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  14. Extragastric Dieulafoy's lesion

    PubMed Central

    Gauci, James; Galea, Samuel; Galea, Joseph; Schembri, Mark

    2014-01-01

    A 74-year-old man on warfarin for aortic valve replacement presented with recurrent episodes of melaena. An initial oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) was normal, as were red cell scanning and colonoscopy. It was a third OGD that revealed the cause of the melaena—a vascular lesion in the duodenum, at the junction between D1 and D2. An extragastric Dieulafoy's lesion was diagnosed, and the lesion was injected with epinephrine and tattooed. Over the following months, episodes of bleeding recurred despite further attempts at injection. Percutaneous radiologically assisted embolisation of the gastroduodenal artery, and eventually duodenotomy and oversuturing of the lesion were performed to no avail. The patient has undergone over 10 endoscopies, and has received over 70 units of packed red cells to date, since his initial presentation 6 years ago. Attempts to stop the bleeding permanently have been difficult, highlighting the complexity of managing such a lesion. PMID:25216921

  15. The knee-spine syndrome. Association between lumbar lordosis and extension of the knee.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yasuaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamagata, Masatsune; Hanaoka, Eiji; Moriya, Hideshige

    2003-01-01

    Degenerative changes of the knee often cause loss of extension. This may affect aspects of posture such as lumbar lordosis. A total of 366 patients underwent radiological examination of the lumbar spine in a standing position. The knee and body angles were measured by physical examination using a goniometer. Limitation of extension of the knee was significantly greater in patients whose lumbar lordosis was 30 degrees or less. Lumbar lordosis was significantly reduced in patients whose limitation of extension of the knee was more than 5 degrees. It decreased over the age of 70 years, and the limitation of extension of the knee increased over the age of 60 years. Our study indicates that symptoms from the lumbar spine may be caused by degenerative changes in the knee. This may be called the 'knee-spine syndrome'. PMID:12585585

  16. Arthroscopic knee debridement can delay total knee replacement in painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos; Gomez-Cardero, Primitivo

    2016-09-01

    The role of arthroscopic debridement of the knee in haemophilia is controversial in the literature. The purpose of this study is to describe the results of arthroscopic knee debridement (AKD), with the aim of determining whether it is possible to delay total knee replacement (TKR) for painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients. In a 14-year period (1998-2011), AKD was performed for moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in 27 patients with haemophilia A. Their average age at operation was 28.6 years (range 26-39 years). Indications for surgery were as follows: more than 90° of knee flexion, flexion deformity less than 30°, good axial alignment of the knee, good patellar alignment, and pain above >60 points in a visual analogue scale [0 (no pain) to 100 points]. Secondary haematological prophylaxis and rehabilitation (physiotherapy) was given for at least 3 months after surgery. Follow-up was for an average of 7.5 years (range 2-14 years). We assessed the clinical outcome before surgery and at the time of latest follow-up using the Knee Society pain and function scores, the range of motion, and the radiological score of the World Federation of Haemophilia. Knee Society pain scores improved from 39 preoperatively to 66 postoperatively, and function scores improved from 36 to 52. Range of motion improved on an average from -15° of extension and 90° of flexion before surgery, to -5° of extension and 110° of flexion at the last follow-up. A radiological deterioration of 2.8 points on average was found. There were two (7.4%) postoperative complications (haemarthroses resolved by joint aspiration). One patient (3.7%) required a TKR 12.5 years later. AKD should be considered in painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients to delay TKR. PMID:26575489

  17. KNEE-JOINT LOADING IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: INFLUENCE OF ABDOMINAL AND THIGH FAT

    PubMed Central

    Messier, Stephen P.; Beavers, Daniel P.; Loeser, Richard F.; Carr, J. Jeffery; Khajanchi, Shubham; Legault, Claudine; Nicklas, Barbara J.; Hunter, David J.; DeVita, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Using three separate models that included total body mass, total lean and total fat mass, and abdominal and thigh fat as independent measures, we determined their association with knee-joint loads in older overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Fat depots were quantified using computed tomography and total lean and fat mass determined with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry in 176 adults (age = 66.3 yr., BMI = 33.5 kg·m−2) with radiographic knee OA. Knee moments and joint bone-on-bone forces were calculated using gait analysis and musculoskeletal modeling. Results Higher total body mass was significantly associated (p ≤ 0.0001) with greater knee compressive and shear forces, compressive and shear impulses (p < 0.0001), patellofemoral forces (p< 0.006), and knee extensor moments (p = 0.003). Regression analysis with total lean and total fat mass as independent variables revealed significant positive associations of total fat mass with knee compressive (p = 0.0001), shear (p < 0.001), and patellofemoral forces (p = 0.01) and knee extension moment (p = 0.008). Gastrocnemius and quadriceps forces were positively associated with total fat mass. Total lean mass was associated with knee compressive force (p = 0.002). A regression model that included total thigh and total abdominal fat found both were significantly associated with knee compressive and shear forces (p ≤ 0.04). Thigh fat was associated with the knee abduction (p = 0.03) and knee extension moment (p = 0.02). Conclusions Thigh fat, consisting predominately of subcutaneous fat, had similar significant associations with knee joint forces as abdominal fat despite its much smaller volume and could be an important therapeutic target for people with knee OA. PMID:25133996

  18. A rare variant of knee dislocation

    PubMed Central

    HUSSIN, P.; MAWARDI, M.; AB HALIM, A.H.

    2016-01-01

    Knee dislocation is a rare injury. It represents less than 0.2% of orthopaedic injuries. This case reports a rare form of knee dislocation caused by the impact of a high-energy trauma. In these cases the appropriate assessment and management is needed to ensure that patient receives the proper treatment. PMID:27381692

  19. Knee Braces to Prevent Injuries in Football.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physician and Sportsmedicine, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Five physicians discuss the use of knee braces to prevent injuries in football players. Questions are raised regarding the strength and design of the braces, whether they prestress the knee in some cases, and whether they actually reduce injuries. More clinical and biomechanical research is called for. (MT)

  20. Prophylactic Knee Braces: Where Do They Stand?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Paul

    1988-01-01

    The effectiveness of knee braces in preventing knee injuries in football is inconclusive. This article reviews research from epidemiologic, cadaver, and surrogate studies; discusses reasons for conflicting study results, including research design problems; and describes alternative approaches that have been suggested. (IAH)

  1. Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... regularly play sports that involve a lot of repetitive jumping — like track and field (particularly high-jumping), basketball, volleyball, gymnastics, running, and soccer — can put a lot of strain on their knees. Jumper's knee can seem like a minor injury that isn't really that serious. Because of ...

  2. Design characteristics of pediatric prosthetic knees.

    PubMed

    Andrysek, Jan; Naumann, Stephen; Cleghorn, William L

    2004-12-01

    We examined whether pediatric prosthetic single-axis knees can theoretically provide the beneficial functional characteristics of polycentric knees and the design considerations needed to realize this. Five children and their parents provided subjective opinions of the relative importance of functional requirements (FRs) for the knee. FRs related to comfort, fatigue, stability, and falling were found to be of high importance, while sitting appearance and adequate knee flexion were of lower importance. Relationships were drawn between these FRs and deductions were made regarding the importance of associated design parameters. Stance-phase control was rated to be of greatest importance followed by toe clearance. Models were developed for five knees including four- and six-bar knees, corresponding to two commercially available components, and for three configurations of a single-axis knee. Stance-phase control, specifically stability after heel-strike and swing-phase initiation at push-off, and toe clearance were simulated. The results suggest that a single-axis knee design incorporating stance-phase control will mutually satisfy the identified set of highly and moderately important FRs. PMID:15614992

  3. Current Surgical Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rönn, Karolin; Reischl, Nikolaus; Gautier, Emanuel; Jacobi, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Osteoathritis (OA) of the knee is common, and the chances of suffering from OA increase with age. Its treatment should be initially nonoperative—and requires both pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment modalities. If conservative therapy fails, surgery should be considered. Surgical treatments for knee OA include arthroscopy, cartilage repair, osteotomy, and knee arthroplasty. Determining which of these procedures is most appropriate depends on several factors, including the location, stage of OA, comorbidities on the one side and patients suffering on the other side. Arthroscopic lavage and débridement is often carried out, but does not alter disease progression. If OA is limited to one compartment, unicompartmental knee arthroplasty or unloading osteotomy can be considered. They are recommended in young and active patients in regard to the risks and limited durability of total knee replacement. Total arthroplasty of the knee is a common and safe method in the elderly patients with advanced knee OA. This paper summarizes current surgical treatment strategies for knee OA, with a focus on the latest developments, indications and level of evidence. PMID:22046517

  4. Basic biomechanic principles of knee instability.

    PubMed

    Zlotnicki, Jason P; Naendrup, Jan-Hendrik; Ferrer, Gerald A; Debski, Richard E

    2016-06-01

    Motion at the knee joint is a complex mechanical phenomenon. Stability is provided by a combination of static and dynamic structures that work in concert to prevent excessive movement or instability that is inherent in various knee injuries. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a main stabilizer of the knee, providing both translational and rotatory constraint. Despite the high volume of research directed at native ACL function, pathogenesis and surgical reconstruction of this structure, a gold standard for objective quantification of injury and subsequent repair, has not been demonstrated. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that novel anatomic structures may play a significant role in knee stability. The use of biomechanical principles and testing techniques provides essential objective/quantitative information on the function of bone, ligaments, joint capsule, and other contributing soft tissues in response to various loading conditions. This review discusses the principles of biomechanics in relation to knee stability, with a focus on the objective quantification of knee stability, the individual contributions of specific knee structures to stability, and the most recent technological advances in the biomechanical evaluation of the knee joint. PMID:27007474

  5. Conservative biomechanical strategies for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Neil D; Bowling, Frank L

    2011-02-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most prevalent forms of this disease, with the medial compartment most commonly affected. The direction of external forces and limb orientation during walking results in an adduction moment that acts around the knee, and this parameter is regarded as a surrogate measure of medial knee compression. The knee adduction moment is intimately linked with the development and progression of knee OA and is, therefore, a target for conservative biomechanical intervention strategies, which are the focus of this Review. We examine the evidence for walking barefoot and the use of lateral wedge insoles and thin-soled, flexible shoes to reduce the knee adduction moment in patients with OA. We review strategies that directly affect the gait, such as walking with the foot externally rotated ('toe-out gait'), using a cane, lateral trunk sway and gait retraining. Valgus knee braces and muscle strengthening are also discussed for their effect upon reducing the knee adduction moment. PMID:21289615

  6. Development of the Occupational Activities Knee Scale.

    PubMed

    Styron, Joseph F; Singer, Mendel E; Barsoum, Wael K

    2010-06-01

    A primary concern of many knee surgery patients is their ability to return to work following surgery, but it is often difficult to predict the practicality of returning due to a job's unclear knee demands. A cross-sectional study of employed patients and general population participants was conducted. Study participants were asked if their job required nine separate tasks and if their job had low, moderate, or high physical demands. The relative risk of each task placing high demands on the knee was calculated, and those risk ratios were summated to calculate a scaled score. The scaled score accurately distinguishes the levels of job demands with each reported level of job demands having a significantly higher mean scaled score than the level below it (p < 0.0001). The Occupational Activities Knee Scale offers occupational and health care providers greater precision in comparing the physical requirements of jobs for knee surgery patients. PMID:21141686

  7. MR imaging of the postoperative knee.

    PubMed

    Gnannt, Ralph; Chhabra, Avneesh; Theodoropoulos, John S; Hodler, Juerg; Andreisek, Gustav

    2011-11-01

    Advances in orthopedic and arthroscopic surgical procedures of the knee such as, knee replacement, ligamentous reconstruction as well as articular cartilage and meniscus repair techniques have resulted in a significant increase in the number of patients undergoing knee arthroscopy or open surgery. As a consequence postoperative MR imaging examinations increase. Comprehensive knowledge of the normal postoperative MR imaging appearances and abnormal findings in the knee associated with failure or complications of common orthopedic and arthroscopic surgical procedures currently undertaken is crucial. This article reviews the various normal and pathological postoperative MR imaging findings following anterior and posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and posterolateral corner reconstruction, meniscus and articular cartilage surgery as well as total knee arthroplasty with emphasis on those surgical procedures which general radiologists will likely be faced in their daily clinical routine. PMID:22002752

  8. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  9. Oral Lesions in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  10. Retinal lesions in septicemia.

    PubMed

    Neudorfer, M; Barnea, Y; Geyer, O; Siegman-Igra, Y

    1993-12-15

    We explored the association between septicemia and specific retinal lesions in a prospective controlled study. Hemorrhages, cotton-wool spots, or Roth's spots were found in 24 of 101 septicemic patients (24%), compared to four of 99 age- and gender-matched control patients (4%) (P = .0002). There was no significant association between types of organisms or focus of infection and the presence of specific lesions. Histologic examination of affected eyes disclosed cytoid bodies in the nerve fiber layer without inflammation. A definite association between septicemia and retinal lesions was found and indicates the need for routine ophthalmoscopy in septicemic patients. PMID:8250076

  11. An update on methods for revascularization and expansion of the TASC lesion classification to include below-the-knee arteries: A supplement to the inter-society consensus for the management of peripheral arterial disease (TASC II): The TASC steering committee.

    PubMed

    Jaff, Michael R; White, Christopher J; Hiatt, William R; Fowkes, Gerry R; Dormandy, John; Razavi, Mahmood; Reekers, Jim; Norgren, Lars

    2015-10-01

    The Inter-Society Consensus for the Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease (TASC) guidelines were last updated in 2007 (TASC II) and represented the collaboration of international vascular specialties involved in the management of patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Since the publication of TASC II, there have been innovations in endovascular revascularization strategies for patients with PAD. The intent of this publication is to provide a complete anatomic lower limb TASC lesion classification, including the infrapopliteal segment, and an updated literature review of new endovascular techniques and practice patterns employed by vascular specialists today. PMID:26256456

  12. Radionuclide therapy for arthritic knees

    SciTech Connect

    Doepel, L.K.

    1985-02-08

    A new radionuclide therapeutic approach for rheumatoid arthritis of the knee is described. This therapy combines a short-lived radionuclide with a carrier whose physical and chemical characteristics aid retention of the radioactive particles within the joint. Joining a radionuclide to a particulate carrier had not been explored previously as a potential method for inhibiting radiation leakage. The treatment couples the rare earth element dysprosium 165 to ferric hydroxide in macroaggregate form (size range: 3 to 10 ..mu..m). After the relatively inert iron complex penetrates the synovium, it causes cell death. Macrophages and phagocytes clear away the cellular debris, essentially eliminating the synovium.

  13. Automatic locking knee brace joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention is an apparatus for controlling the pivotal movement of a knee brace comprising a tang-and-clevis joint that has been uniquely modified. Both the tang and the clevis have a set of teeth that, when engaged, can lock the tang and the clevis together. In addition, the tang is biased away from the clevis. Consequently, when there is no axial force (i.e., body weight) on the tang, the tang is free to pivot within the clevis. However, when an axial force is exerted on the tang, the tang is pushed into the clevis, both sets of teeth engage, and the tang and the clevis lock together.

  14. Rothia prosthetic knee joint infection.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Manish N; Malhotra, Prashant

    2015-08-01

    Rothia species - Gram-positive pleomorphic bacteria that are part of the normal oral and respiratory flora - are commonly associated with dental cavities and periodontal disease although systemic infections have been described. We describe a 53-year-old female with rheumatoid arthritis complicated by prosthetic knee joint infection due to Rothia species, which was successfully treated by surgical removal of prosthesis and prolonged antimicrobial therapy. The issue of antibiotic prophylaxis before dental procedures among patients with prosthetic joint replacements is discussed. PMID:23357608

  15. Closure in Knee Replacement Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kharat, Kiran

    2012-01-01

    Total Knee replacement (TKR) is one of the commonest arthroplasty surgeries performed. Various techniques of closures in TKR are described. This technical note describes an useful technique of achieving water tight closure in TKR. An optimal tension watertight closure also reduces the chances of dead space hematomas and infection. The author has described his technique where the soft tissues are never unduly compromised. In his experience the patient can be mobilized freely in bed and even allowed to sleep prone after first wound check.

  16. The Painful Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Mitchell; Park, Andrew; Gerlinger, Tad L

    2016-04-01

    There are many causes of residual pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Evaluation and management begins with a comprehensive history and physical examination, followed by radiographic evaluation of the replaced and adjacent joints, as well as previous films of the replaced joint. Further workup includes laboratory analysis, along with a synovial fluid aspirate to evaluate the white blood cell count with differential as well as culture. Advanced imaging modalities may be beneficial when the diagnosis remains unclear. Revision surgery is not advisable without a clear diagnosis, as it may be associated with poor results. PMID:26772940

  17. The Patella Pro study — effect of a knee brace on patellofemoral pain syndrome: design of a randomized clinical trial (DRKS-ID:DRKS00003291)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is a frequent cause of anterior knee pain predominantly affecting young female patients who do not have significant chondral damage. Development of PFPS is probably multifactorial, involving various knee, hip, and foot kinematic factors. Biomechanical studies have described patellar maltracking and dynamic valgus (functional malalignment) in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. The literature provides evidence for short-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; short-term medially directed taping; and exercise programs focusing on the lower extremity, hip, and trunk muscles. Evidence supporting the use of patellar braces is limited because previous studies have been low quality. The aim of this article is to publish the design of a prospective randomized trial that examines the outcomes of patients with PFPS after treatment with a new patellar brace (Patella Pro) that applies medially directed force on the patella. Methods/Design For this multicenter trial, 156 patients (adolescents and young adults) with PFPS were recruited from orthopedic practices and orthopedic hospitals and randomly allocated to 3 months of supervised physiotherapy in combination with the Patella Pro brace or supervised physiotherapy alone. The primary outcome measures are pain (numerical analog scale); knee function (Kujala score and Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score); and self-reported perception of recovery at baseline, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 1 year. Discussion Only limited evidence for the use of a patellar brace for the treatment of PFPS exists in the literature. Disputable evidence for the use of orthoses for PFPS patients has been presented in one meta-analysis, in which only one of three studies found the effect of a medially directed patellar brace to be significant. Because of these low-quality studies, the authors concluded that this evidence should be regarded as limited, and we feel there is a need for

  18. Ho:YAG laser arthroscopy of the knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisto, Domenick J.; Blazina, Martin E.; Hirsh, Linda C.

    1994-09-01

    The HO:YAG laser is a near-contact laser with a capacity to ablate or cut tissues. The ablation function allows the surgeon to remove meniscal tissue, lyse and resect adhesions, melt loose bodies, and dissolve inflamed synovium. The cutting function of the laser is utilized to perform a lateral release or resect torn menisci. The laser can also be utilized to drill holes in Grade IV chondromalacic lesions to initiate a healing response. The laser has been embraced by orthopaedic surgeons because of its shape and versatility. The tip is only 2 mm wide and can be delivered into the tight posterior compartments of the knee with no damaging contact with the articular surfaces. The laser coagulates as it works and bleeding is minimized. The laser can function both as a cutting and ablating tool. The laser can also drill holes into subchondral bone to, hopefully, initiate a healing response.

  19. Real-Time Tracking of Knee Adduction Moment in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sang Hoon; Lee, Song Joo; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Background The external knee adduction moment (EKAM) is closely associated with the presence, progression, and severity of knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, there is a lack of convenient and practical method to estimate and track in real-time the EKAM of patients with knee OA for clinical evaluation and gait training, especially outside of gait laboratories. New Method A real-time EKAM estimation method was developed and applied to track and investigate the EKAM and other knee moments during stepping on an elliptical trainer in both healthy subjects and a patient with knee OA. Results Substantial changes were observed in the EKAM and other knee moments during stepping in the patient with knee OA. Comparison with Existing Method(s) This is the first study to develop and test feasibility of real-time tracking method of the EKAM on patients with knee OA using 3-D inverse dynamics. Conclusions The study provides us an accurate and practical method to evaluate in real-time the critical EKAM associated with knee OA, which is expected to help us to diagnose and evaluate patients with knee OA and provide the patients with real-time EKAM feedback rehabilitation training. PMID:24361759

  20. Prevalence of and risk factors for hock and knee injuries on dairy cows in tiestall housing in Canada.

    PubMed

    Nash, C G R; Kelton, D F; DeVries, T J; Vasseur, E; Coe, J; Heyerhoff, J C Zaffino; Bouffard, V; Pellerin, D; Rushen, J; de Passillé, A M; Haley, D B

    2016-08-01

    Leg injuries on dairy cows are a common and highly visible welfare concern on commercial dairy farms. With greater attention being placed on food animal welfare and limited research being conducted on tiestall farms, this study aimed to identify prevalence and risk factors for hock and knee injuries on dairy cows housed in tiestall barns in Ontario (n=40) and Quebec (n=60). A sample of 40 cows was purposively selected per farm and several animal- and farm-based measures were taken. Both hocks and both knees on each cow were scored as injured (presence of lesions or swelling) or not injured (no alterations or hair loss), and the highest score of each of the 2 knees and the 2 hocks was considered the cow's hock or knee score. Possible animal- and farm-based risk factors were incorporated into 2 separate multivariable logistic models for hock injuries and knee injuries respectively at the cow level. Mean (±SD) percentage of cow with hock injuries per farm was found to be 56±18% and mean percentage of knee injuries per farm was found to be 43±23%. Animal-based factors found to be associated with a greater odds of hock injuries at the cow level were increased days in milk (DIM), lower body condition score (BCS), lameness, higher parity, higher cow width, median lying bout duration, and median number of lying bouts. Environmental factors found to be associated with hock injuries at the cow level were province, stall width, tie rail position, stall base, chain length, and age of stall base. Animal-based factors found to be associated with knee injuries at the cow level were DIM, BCS, and median lying time. Environmental factors found to be associated with knee injuries at the cow level were stall width, chain length, province, stall base, and bed length. Quadratic and interaction terms were also identified between these variables in both the hock and knee models. This study demonstrates that hock and knee injuries are still a common problem on tiestall dairy farms in

  1. Biological Therapies for Cartilage Lesions in the Hip: A New Horizon.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; LaPrade, Robert F; Mardones, Rodrigo; Huard, Johnny; Philippon, Marc J; Nho, Shane; Mei-Dan, Omer; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of hip cartilage disease is challenging, and there is no clear algorithm to address this entity. Biomarkers are arising as promising diagnostic tools because they could play a role in the early assessment of the prearthritic joint and as a prognostic factor before and after treatment. The potential effect of biomarkers may be used to categorize individuals at risk of evolving to severe osteoarthritis, to develop new measures for clinical progression of the disease, and to develop new treatment options for the prevention of osteoarthritis progression. A trend toward a less invasive biological treatment will usher in a new treatment era. With the growth of surgical skills in hip arthroscopy, cartilage restoration techniques are evolving in a fast and exponential manner. Biological and surgical treatments have been proposed to treat these pathologies. Biological treatments include platelet-rich plasma, stem cells or bone marrow aspirate concentration, hyaluronic acid, losartan, and fish oil. Surgical treatments include microfracture alone or augmented, direct repair, autologous chondrocyte implantation, matrix-induced chondrocyte implantation, autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis, mosaicplasty, osteochondral allograft transplantation, and stem cells implanted in matrix (stem cells in membranes/expanded stem cells). This article reviews new evidence available on treatment options for chondral lesions and early osteoarthritis of the hip. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e715-e723.]. PMID:27359284

  2. Platelet-Rich Plasma Treatment in Symptomatic Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gobbi, Alberto; Karnatzikos, Georgios; Mahajan, Vivek; Malchira, Somanna

    2012-01-01

    Background: With increasing frequency, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) preparations have been used to treat cartilage lesions to regenerate tissue homeostasis and retard the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of intra-articular PRP injections in active patients with knee OA and to evaluate clinical outcomes in patients with and without previous surgical treatment for cartilage lesions. Study Design: Case series. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with knee OA were followed for a minimum of 12 months. All were treated with 2 intra-articular injections of autologous PRP. Twenty-five patients had undergone a previous operative intervention for cartilage lesions, whereas 25 had not. Operated patients had undergone either cartilage shaving or microfracture. Multiple evaluative scores were collected at pretreatment and at 6 and 12 months posttreatment. The required sample of patients was determined beforehand by using statistical power analysis; International Knee Documentation Committee (subjective) score was defined as the primary parameter. A P value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. General linear model–repeated measure test evaluated within-time improvement for each variable for all patients. Post hoc test with Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons was performed to investigate the significance in improvement within time evaluations for each variable for the total sample. The differences in improvement between operated and nonoperated patients were also investigated, as were those between sexes. Results: All patients showed significant improvement in all scores at 6 and 12 months (P < 0.01) and returned to previous activities. No significant difference in improvement was found between the evaluated subgroups (P < 0.01). Conclusions: The PRP treatment showed positive effects in patients with knee OA. Operated and nonoperated patients showed significant improvement by means of diminishing

  3. Talar Dome Lesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... be helpful in reducing the pain and inflammation. Physical therapy . Range-of-motion and strengthening exercises are beneficial once the lesion is adequately healed. Physical therapy may also include techniques to reduce pain and ...

  4. Hypervascular liver lesions.

    PubMed

    Kamaya, Aya; Maturen, Katherine E; Tye, Grace A; Liu, Yueyi I; Parti, Naveen N; Desser, Terry S

    2009-10-01

    Hypervascular hepatocellular lesions include both benign and malignant etiologies. In the benign category, focal nodular hyperplasia and adenoma are typically hypervascular. In addition, some regenerative nodules in cirrhosis may be hypervascular. Malignant hypervascular primary hepatocellular lesions include hepatocellular carcinoma, fibrolamellar carcinoma, and peripheral cholangiocarcinoma. Vascular liver lesions often appear hypervascular because they tend to follow the enhancement of the blood pool; these include hemangiomas, arteriovenous malformations, angiosarcomas, and peliosis. While most gastrointestinal malignancies that metastasize to the liver will appear hypovascular on arterial and portal-venous phase imaging, certain cancers such as metastatic neuroendocrine tumors (including pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, carcinoid, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors) tend to produce hypervascular metastases due to the greater recruitment of arterial blood supply. Finally, rare hepatic lesions such as glomus tumor and inflammatory pseudotumor may have a hypervascular appearance. PMID:19842564

  5. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  6. Evaluation of Parotid Lesions.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Edward C; Mallen-St Clair, Jon; St John, Maie A

    2016-04-01

    The differential diagnosis of a parotid lesion is broad, and the otolaryngologist must consider inflammatory, neoplastic, autoimmune, traumatic, infectious, or congenital causes. A comprehensive history and physical examination, in conjunction with judicious use of radiographic imaging (MRI, computed tomography, ultrasonography, nuclear medicine studies), laboratory studies, and pathologic analysis (fine-needle aspiration, core biopsy, incisional biopsy), facilitates making an accurate diagnosis. This article reviews the key history and physical elements and adjunctive diagnostic tools available for working up parotid lesions. PMID:26902978

  7. Multiple Osteolytic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vinayachandran, Divya; Sankarapandian, Sathasivasubramanian

    2013-01-01

    Several systemic diseases initially present with various oral manifestations. Investigation of these oral symptoms may at times lead to the diagnosis of grave underlying life-threatening conditions. We present one such case, where the patient manifested with gross enlargement of the mandible, along with lesions in the lower limbs. These lesions were the initial manifestation and on further investigations the patient was diagnosed with multiple myeloma. PMID:24516769

  8. Petrous Apex Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Amedee, Ronald G.; Gianoli, Gerard J.; Mann, Wolf J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to detail our experience in treating 69 patients over the past 6 years with pathologic processes involving the petrous apex. These included 25 (36%) primary petrous apex lesions, 40 (58%) lesions that involved the petrous apex by direct invasion from an adjacent region, and four (6%) lesions that were the result of metastatic spread from a distant site. Although lesions of the petrous apex are uncommon, they may present significant morbidity to the patient. The symptoms elicited by these lesions are usually vague and nonlocalizing in the early stages but may progress to include multiple cranial neuropathies. Successful results are contingent on early diagnosis, which requires a high index of suspicion and use of appropriate imaging modalities. Thorough preoperative assessment with use of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and carotid arteriography is essential to plan the surgical approach. We present this collection of patients in order to aid in the further preoperative characterization of the differences in primary and secondary lesions of the petrous apex. PMID:17170919

  9. Colorectal Subepithelial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Most of subepithelial lesion (SEL) being identified was accidentally discovered as small bulging lesion covered with normal mucosa from endoscopic screening. The type of treatment and prognosis vary depending on the type of tumor, it would be crucial to perform an accurate differential diagnosis. Since the differentiation of SEL relied on the indirect findings observed from the mucosal surface using an endoscopy only in the past, it was able to confirm the presence of lesion only but difficult to identify complex detailed nature of the lesion. However, after the endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) was introduced, it became possible to identify extrinsic compression, and size of intramural tumors, internal properties and contour so that it gets possible to have differential diagnosis of lesions and prediction on the lesion whether it is malignant or benign. In addition, the use of EUS-guided fine needle aspiration and EUS-guided core biopsy made it possible to make histological differential diagnosis. This study intended to investigate endoscopic and EUS findings, histological diagnosis, treatment regimen and impression of colorectal SELs. PMID:26240803

  10. The Cruciate Ligaments in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Parcells, Bertrand W; Tria, Alfred J

    2016-01-01

    The early knee replacements were hinge designs that ignored the ligaments of the knee and resurfaced the joint, allowing freedom of motion in a single plane. Advances in implant fixation paved the way for modern designs, including the posterior-stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that sacrifices both cruciate ligaments while substituting for the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and the cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA designs that sacrifice the anterior cruciate ligament but retain the PCL. The early bicruciate retaining (BCR) TKA designs suffered from loosening and early failures. Townley and Cartier designed BCR knees that had better clinical results but the surgical techniques were challenging.Kinematic studies suggest that normal motion relies on preservation of both cruciate ligaments. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty retains all knee ligaments and closely matches normal motion, while PS and CR TKA deviate further from normal. The 15% to 20% dissatisfaction rate with current TKA has renewed interest in the BCR design. Replication of normal knee kinematics and proprioception may address some of the dissatisfaction. PMID:27327919

  11. Surgical approaches for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul; Demesugh, Daniel Mue; Agarwal, Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    There are various surgical approaches to the knee joint and its surrounding structures and such approaches are generally designed to allow the best access to an area of pathology whilst safeguarding important surrounding structures. Controversy currently surrounds the optimal surgical approach for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The medial parapatellar arthrotomy, or anteromedial approach, has been the most used and has been regarded as the standard approach for exposure of the knee joint. It provides extensive exposure and is useful for open anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, total knee replacement, and fixation of intra-articular fractures. Because this approach has been implicated in compromise of the patellar circulation, some authors have advocated the subvastus, midvastus, and trivector approaches for exposure of the knee joint. While these approaches expose the knee from the medial side, the anterolateral approach exposes the knee joint from the lateral side. With careful planning and arthrotomy selection, the anterior aspect of the joint can be adequately exposed for TKA in different clinical scenarios. PMID:27182142

  12. Osteolysis of the distal femur after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Cadambi, A; Engh, G A; Dwyer, K A; Vinh, T N

    1994-12-01

    An 11.1% incidence of femoral osteolysis (30 cases in 28 patients) was identified in a series of 271 primary total knee arthroplasties. Two minimally constrained total knee designs (Synatomic [Depuy, Warsaw, IN] and Porous-Coated Anatomic [PCA, Howmedica, Rutherford, NJ] were used in this patient population. Femoral osteolysis was observed in 26 Synatomic and 4 PCA knees. The average follow-up period was 52 months (range, 24-96 months). Osteolytic lesions were identified radiographically, adjacent to the nonporous-coated (smooth) regions of the anterior and posterior flanges of the Synatomic and PCA femoral components. The average time to the diagnosis of femoral osteolysis was 31 months (range, 7-96 months). The average patient age at the time of primary total knee arthroplasty was 63 years (range, 43-83 years) and the average weight was 180 lb. (range, 107-278 lb.). Sixteen of the 30 cases were in men. All of the cases with femoral osteolysis had cementless implantation. Tissue specimens were obtained from the 18 cases requiring revision. Implants remained in situ an average of 66 months (range, 15-96 months) prior to revision. In 16 of the 18 cases revised, the femoral component was clinically and radiographically stable. Six of 18 cases were revised for severe osteolysis. The remaining 12 cases were revised for failed metal-backed patellae, failed cementless tibial fixation, or advanced polyethylene wear. Wear of the thin tibial inserts and patellar components were the two sources of particulate polyethylene. Polyethylene debris was observed in all tissue specimens. In cases with failed metal-backed patellae or impingement of the tibial locking pin-and-clip, fine metallic debris was also noted in tissue specimens. Microscopic evaluation of the osteolytic tissue revealed a florid histiocytic response with occasional giant cells. Intracellular submicron particulate polyethylene was identified with polarized light microscopy and oil-red-O staining techniques. In

  13. Ganglion cysts in the lateral portal region of the knee after arthroscopy: report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Sever, Cem; Malkoc, Melih; Acar, Turker; Turkmen, Faik; Oto, Onur

    2015-01-01

    A ganglion cyst (GC) is a mucinous or gelatinous-filled benign tumor overlying a joint or tendon sheath, which commonly arises in the dorsal and volar wrist side but may occur anywhere in the body. Although cystic lesions around the knee are common, the occurrence of GCs are rare. Ganglia may arise from intra or extra-articular, soft tissue, intraosseous, or periosteal location. Symptoms may vary according to the size and location. After the more frequent performance of magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of a knee joint, the number of incidental, asymptomatic lesions have been increasingly diagnosed. The etiology of GC remains unclear; however, trauma and a flaw in the joint tissues may explain its appearance. The authors report two cases of women aged 47 years and 37 years who presented pain and swelling in their left knees following arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy. The former was surgically treated and had a favorable outcome, while the latter had conservative treatment and a gloomy outcome. PMID:26894048

  14. Ganglion cysts in the lateral portal region of the knee after arthroscopy: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Sever, Cem; Malkoc, Melih; Acar, Turker; Turkmen, Faik; Korkmaz, Ozgur; Oto, Onur

    2015-01-01

    A ganglion cyst (GC) is a mucinous or gelatinous-filled benign tumor overlying a joint or tendon sheath, which commonly arises in the dorsal and volar wrist side but may occur anywhere in the body. Although cystic lesions around the knee are common, the occurrence of GCs are rare. Ganglia may arise from intra or extra-articular, soft tissue, intraosseous, or periosteal location. Symptoms may vary according to the size and location. After the more frequent performance of magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of a knee joint, the number of incidental, asymptomatic lesions have been increasingly diagnosed. The etiology of GC remains unclear; however, trauma and a flaw in the joint tissues may explain its appearance. The authors report two cases of women aged 47 years and 37 years who presented pain and swelling in their left knees following arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy. The former was surgically treated and had a favorable outcome, while the latter had conservative treatment and a gloomy outcome. PMID:26894048

  15. Knee arthrodesis – ultima ratio for the treatment of the infected knee

    PubMed Central

    Tiemann, Andreas H. H.

    2013-01-01

    The irretrievable destruction of the knee due to trauma, tumor or infection is the indication for knee arthrodesis. The main reason for knee arthrodesis in terms of infection ist the infected total knee arthroplasty. Central problem is the definition of the term “irretrievable”. It is based on the subjective opinion of the attending physician and depends on his expert knowledge of this specific entity. The preservation of a functioning extremity is the main goal. This article shows the typical indications and contraindications for knee arthrodesis following septic knee diseases. In addition it gives insight into the biomechanical and technical considerations to be kept in mind. Finally the postoperative care and outcome of different techniques are analysed. PMID:26504699

  16. Failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Leta, Tesfaye H; Lygre, Stein Håkon L; Skredderstuen, Arne; Hallan, Geir; Furnes, Ove

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose In Norway, the proportion of revision knee arthroplasties increased from 6.9% in 1994 to 8.5% in 2011. However, there is limited information on the epidemiology and causes of subsequent failure of revision knee arthroplasty. We therefore studied survival rate and determined the modes of failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties. Method This study was based on 1,016 aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register between 1994 and 2011. Revisions done for infections were not included. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to assess the survival rate and the relative risk of re-revision with all causes of re-revision as endpoint. Results 145 knees failed after revision total knee arthroplasty. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of re-revision (28%), followed by instability (26%), loose tibial component (17%), and pain (10%). The cumulative survival rate for revision total knee arthroplasties was 85% at 5 years, 78% at 10 years, and 71% at 15 years. Revision total knee arthroplasties with exchange of the femoral or tibial component exclusively had a higher risk of re-revision (RR = 1.7) than those with exchange of the whole prosthesis. The risk of re-revision was higher for men (RR = 2.0) and for patients aged less than 60 years (RR = 1.6). Interpretation In terms of implant survival, revision of the whole implant was better than revision of 1 component only. Young age and male sex were risk factors for re-revision. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of failure of revision of aseptic total knee arthroplasties. PMID:25267502

  17. Penetrating Blast Injury to the Knee of a United States Soldier Treated with Allograft Mosaicplasty

    PubMed Central

    Eichinger, Maj. Josef K.; Bluman, Eric M.; Arrington, Col. Edward D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This is the first report of successful allograft mosaicplasty treatment of a large osteochondral lesion of the knee caused by a blast fragment sustained during combat operations. The patient was able to return to active duty following rehabilitation. Methods: An active-duty infantryman sustained an osteochondral lesion of the medial femoral condyle caused by a metallic fragment of an explosively formed projectile. Initial treatment consisted of removal of the foreign body and primary closure. The patient continued to experience pain, mechanical symptoms, and repeated effusions after initial nonoperative treatment. Allograft mosaicplasty of the lesion utilizing two 18-mm-diameter fresh allograft osteochondral plugs was performed at 6 months post-injury. Results: At 2-year follow-up, the patient remains on active duty with marked improvement in symptoms. Two years postoperatively, his outcome scores are 72 of 100 on the Western Ontario and McMaster University osteoarthritis scoring index (WOMAC) and 60 of 100 on the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). His follow-up x-rays and MRI demonstrate intact articular cartilage and subchondral bone incorporation. Conclusion: Penetrating injuries to joints are commonplace in the battlefield environment. Combat injuries to the knee are frequently associated with articular cartilage injury. While numerous cartilage restoration techniques have been used with success for the treatment of osteochondral injuries to the femoral condyles, no published reports describe the use of allograft mosaicplasty in this location for open, penetrating injuries with focal cartilage loss. This is the first documented use of allograft mosaicplasty for a traumatic osteochondral defect of the medial femoral condyle caused by a metallic projectile. The patient was able to return to active duty following rehabilitation. We demonstrate a high level of functioning is possible following allograft mosaicplasty of a large

  18. Early knee changes in dancers identified by ultra-high-field 7 T MRI.

    PubMed

    Chang, G; Diamond, M; Nevsky, G; Regatte, R R; Weiss, D S

    2014-08-01

    We aimed to determine whether a unique, ultra-high-field 7 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner could detect occult cartilage and meniscal injuries in asymptomatic female dancers. This study had Institutional Review Board approval. We recruited eight pre-professional female dancers and nine non-athletic, female controls. We scanned the dominant knee on a 7 T MRI scanner using a three-dimensional fast low-angle shot sequence and a proton density, fast spin-echo sequence to evaluate cartilage and menisci, respectively. Two radiologists scored cartilage (International Cartilage Repair Society classification) and meniscal (Stoller classification) lesions. We applied two-tailed z- and t-tests to determine statistical significance. There were no cartilage lesions in dancers or controls. For the medial meniscus, the dancers demonstrated higher mean MRI score (2.38 ± 0.61 vs 1.0 ± 0.97, P < 0.0001) and higher frequency of mean grade 2 lesions (88% vs 11%, P < 0.01) compared with the controls. For the lateral meniscus, there was no difference in score (0.5 ± 0.81 vs 0.5 ± 0.78, P = 0.78) in dancers compared with the control groups. Asymptomatic dancers demonstrate occult medial meniscal lesions. Because this has been described in early osteoarthritis, close surveillance of dancers' knee symptoms and function with appropriate activity modification may help maintain their long-term knee health. PMID:23346987

  19. Computer-assisted knee surgical navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Zhou, D. G.; Xiong, Chun-Yang; Huang, W. P.; Fang, J.

    2002-05-01

    Total knee replacement requires high measurement accuracy and fixation precision in surgical operation. Misplacement larger than 5 degrees in the force line alignment will lead to re- operation or long term deficits. Based on conventional operation facilities, it was not easy to ensure the necessary precision during het surgery. With the help of CT images, 3D images of patient's knee can be reconstructed. With IR localizer, computer- assisted knee surgical navigation can be realized by tracking that is useful for accurate alignment in surgery and in visualized training program.

  20. Distinguishing ankle and knee articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Cole, Ada A; Margulis, Arkady; Kuettner, Klaus E

    2003-06-01

    Degenerative changes in the tall and femoral distal cartilages of more than 2,000 tissue donors were graded based on the appearance of articular cartilage and osteophytes. In the ankle and the knee the degenerative changes increased with age; however, the rate of degeneration in the ankle was slower than in the knee. The degenerative changes in the ankle were more severe in men than in women, were predominantly bilateral, and seemed to be correlated with weight. The slower rate of change in the ankle may be caused, in part, by the biochemical and biomechanical tissue properties that distinguish ankle cartilage from that of the knee. PMID:12911243

  1. Mid-term outcomes of primary constrained condylar knee arthroplasty for severe knee deformity.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiao-Bo; Yang, Cao; Fu, De-Hao; Ye, Shu-Nan; Liu, Xian-Zhe; Chen, Zhe; Rai, Saroj; Yang, Shu-Hua

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to examine the clinical and radiographic outcomes of primary total knee arthroplasy (TKA) with use of NexGen® Legacy® Constrained Condylar Knee (CCK) prosthesis for severe knee deformity. Clinical data of 46 patients (48 knees in total, aged 61 years on average) with severe knee deformity who underwent TKA with NexGen® Legacy® CCK prosthesis between December 2007 and February 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. There were 34 knees with severe valgus with incompetent medial collateral ligament, 11 knees with severe flexion contracture with inability to achieve knee balancing in flexion and extension by posterior soft tissue release, 2 knees with Charcot arthritis with severe varus and bone loss, and 1 with traumatic osteoarthritis with severe varus and ligamentous instability. The mean duration of follow-up was 71 months (range 40-90 months). The New Knee Society scoring (NKSS) system and the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) score were used to evaluate the functional and clinical outcomes. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was used for pain measurement and Knee Society criteria for evaluation of radiological images. The results showed that, in the total 48 knees, 1 case of loosening due to short-stem tibial component at 3 months post-operatively underwent revision. The 6-year prosthesis survival rate in this cohort was 97.9%. There was no component infection occurring within 6 years. Significant post-operative improvements were found in NKSS and HSS scores. Patient satisfaction was significantly increased. Pain score was decreased significantly. Total functional score was improved from 31.46±11.43 to 86.42±8.87, range of motion (ROM) from 42.42°±23.57° to 95.31°±23.45° and the flexion contracture from 5.31°±7.87° to 0.92°±1.80°. Preoperative radiographic study showed excessive valgus (≥7°) in 37 knees, and varus deformity in 3 knees. Post-operative femorotibial alignment was valgus 3.88°±1.76° in 48 knees. Antero/posterior (A

  2. Examination of knee joint moments on the function of knee-ankle-foot orthoses during walking.

    PubMed

    Andrysek, Jan; Klejman, Susan; Kooy, John

    2013-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate clinically relevant biomechanical conditions relating to the setup and alignment of knee-ankle-foot orthoses and the influence of these conditions on knee extension moments and orthotic stance control during gait. Knee moments were collected using an instrumented gait laboratory and concurrently a load transducer embedded at the knee-ankle-foot orthosis knee joint of four individuals with poliomyelitis. We found that knee extension moments were not typically produced in late stance-phase of gait. Adding a dorsiflexion stop at the orthotic ankle significantly decreased the knee flexion moments in late stance-phase, while slightly flexing the knee in stance-phase had a variable effect. The findings suggest that where users of orthoses have problems initiating swing-phase flexion with stance control orthoses, an ankle dorsiflexion stop may be used to enhance function. Furthermore, the use of stance control knee joints that lock while under flexion may contribute to more inconsistent unlocking of the stance control orthosis during gait. PMID:23182738

  3. Meniscal Ramp Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Mitchell, Justin J.; Cram, Tyler R.; Yacuzzi, Carlos; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reported to have a low sensitivity, and consequently, ramp lesions often go undiagnosed. Therefore, to rule out a ramp lesion, an arthroscopic evaluation with probing of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus should be performed. Several treatment options have been reported, including nonsurgical management, inside-out meniscal repair, or all-inside meniscal repair. In cases of isolated ramp lesions, a standard meniscal repair rehabilitation protocol should be followed. However, when a concomitant ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is performed, the rehabilitation should follow the designated ACLR postoperative protocol. The purpose of this article was to review the current literature regarding meniscal ramp lesions and summarize the pertinent anatomy, biomechanics, diagnostic strategies, recommended treatment options, and postoperative protocol. PMID:27504467

  4. Lesion of the hip abductor mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Caviglia, Horacio; Cambiaggi, Guillermo; Vattani, Nosrat; Landro, María Eulalia; Galatro, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The disruption of the abductor muscles of the hip after hip revision surgery often causes limping, pain, and instability of the implant. The purpose of our paper is to describe a mesh technique to repair hip abductor mechanism injuries after hip revision. Patients and methods: Forty-six patients with hip abductor damage after prosthetic revision were treated. Inclusion criteria were: patients presenting with prosthetic loosening, complaint of pain, and with a positive Trendelenburg sign due to deficient abductor muscle mechanisms. Thirty-one were women (67.39%) with an average age of 64 years (34–82 years). The number of previous revision surgeries was three (two to seven). The Merle d’Aubigné score and variants before and after treatment were also reported. Results: In the postoperative follow-up after hip revision with the mesh technique, the Merle d’Aubigné score improved and the Trendelenburg sign was negative in 78.3% of the patients (p < 0.001). Also, the Trendelenburg test with the knee flexed was negative in 60.9% (p < 0.001) and the stair-climbing test was negative in 60.9% of cases (p < 0.001). The gluteus medius test in the lateral position was negative in 52.2% of patients, and in the lateral position with the knee flexed it was negative in 47.8% of patients (p < 0.001). Discussion: Repair of the abductor mechanism with the mesh technique has proven effective for both partial and total lesions. PMID:27382925

  5. Radiological assessment of irreducible posterolateral knee subluxation after dislocation due to interposition of the vastus medialis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Paulin, Emilie; Boudabbous, Sana; Nicodème, Jean-Damien; Arditi, Daniel; Becker, Christoph

    2015-06-01

    Knee dislocation is a serious and relatively uncommon traumatism that every emergency room is supposed to diagnose and treat rapidly. Most of the time these dislocations reduce spontaneously or with closed reduction. If a subluxation persists, an incarceration of soft tissue in the joint must be suspected. Irreducible knee subluxations after dislocation are rare entities better described in the orthopaedic than in the radiological literature. However, the initial radiological assessment is an important tool to obtain the correct diagnosis, to detect neurovascular complications, and to plan the most suitable treatment. In cases of delayed diagnosis, the functional prognosis of the joint and even the limb may be seriously compromised primarily because of vascular lesions. Thereby, vascular imaging is essential in cases of dislocation of the knee, and we will discuss the role of angiography and the more recent use of computed tomography angiography or magnetic resonance angiography. Our patient presented with an irreducible knee subluxation due to interposition of the vastus medialis, and we will review the classical clinical presentation and 'do not miss' imaging findings on conventional radiography, computed tomography angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Finally, we will also report the classical imaging pathway indicated in knee dislocation, with a special emphasis on the irreducible form. PMID:25560996

  6. Bilateral bucket handle medial meniscal tears of the knee: A case report☆

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Hasan Basri; Arikan, Yavuz; Armagan, Raffi; Eren, Osman Tugrul

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Meniscal tears may cause knee pain and functional impairment. Bilateral bucket-handle meniscal tears is an uncommon condition. PRESENTATION OF CASE This report presents the case of a 35-year-old male patient with bilateral bucket handle medial meniscal tears that occurred nonsimultaneously. The lesions were treated arthroscopically with partial resection in one knee and meniscal suture in the other. DISCUSSION Bucket handle meniscal tear of meniscus without underlying meniscal, ligamentous pathology or lower limb deformity is a rare condition. CONCLUSION To our knowledge, bilateral bucket handle medial meniscal tears without underlying meniscal anomalies have been reported in only two cases before, and our case is the third one. PMID:24012575

  7. The knee: Surface-coil MR imaging at 1. 5 T

    SciTech Connect

    Beltran, J.; Noto, A.M.; Mosure, J.C.; Weiss, K.L.; Zuelzer, W.; Christoforidis, A.J.

    1986-06-01

    Seven normal knees (in five volunteers) and seven injured knees (in seven patients) were examined by high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 1.5 T with a surface coil. Seven medial meniscal tears, three anterior cruciate ligament tears, one posterior cruciate ligament avulsion, an old osteochondral fracture, femoral condylar chondro-malacia, and one case of semimembranous tendon reinsertion were identified. MR images correlated well with recent double-contrast arthrograms or results of surgery. All tears were identified in both the sagittal and coronal planes. Because of its ability to demonstrate small meniscal lesions and ligamentous injuries readily, MR imaging with a surface coil may eventually replace the more invasive arthrography.

  8. The Maturation of Synthetic Scaffolds for Osteochondral Donor Sites of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, Asheesh; Foo, Li Foong; Williams, Riley J.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to analyze the morphological imaging characteristics and incorporation of TruFit bone graft substitute (BGS) plugs using cartilage-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and quantitative T2 mapping. Design: Twenty-six patients (mean age, 28.72 years; range, 11-56 years) underwent osteochondral autologous transplantation (OATS) for chondral defects with filling of the knee joint donor sites using Trufit BGS plugs. The mean follow-up interval between implantation and MRI analysis was 21.3 months (range, 6-39 months). During this period, 43 cartilage-sensitive and 25 quantitative T2-mapping MRI studies were performed. The donor sites were assessed for plug and interface morphology, displacement, hypertrophy, subchondral edema, presence of bony overgrowth, percentage fill, and degree of incorporation. T2 relaxation times were measured for the superficial and deep layers of the repair tissue. A linear regression and correlational analysis was performed with Bonferroni correction, and P < 0.05 was defined as significant. Results: Longitudinal analysis revealed favorable plug appearance at early follow-up (≤6 months), with 75% of plugs demonstrating flush morphology and 78% demonstrating near complete to complete fill. Plug appearance deteriorated at intermediate follow-up (~12 months), with only 26% of plugs demonstrating flush morphology and 52% with near complete or complete fill. Plug appearance substantially improved with longer follow-up (≥16 months), with 70% of plugs demonstrating flush morphology and 90% demonstrating near complete or complete fill. Interface resorption was common at ~12 months (P < 0.0001) and was associated with older age (P = 0.01) or a single-plug configuration (P = 0.04). T2 values for the repair cartilage approached that of normal cartilage with increasing duration after surgery (P < 0.004), more so for single- compared with multiple-plug configurations (P = 0.03). Conclusions: The Trufit BGS

  9. Lockable Knee Brace Speeds Rehabilitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center develops key transportation and propulsion technologies for the Space Agency. The Center manages propulsion hardware and technologies of the space shuttle, develops the next generation of space transportation and propulsion systems, oversees science and hardware development for the International Space Station, manages projects and studies that will help pave the way back to the Moon, and handles a variety of associated scientific endeavors to benefit space exploration and improve life here on Earth. It is a large and diversified center, and home to a great wealth of design skill. Some of the same mechanical design skill that made its way into the plans for rocket engines and advanced propulsion at this Alabama-based NASA center also worked its way into the design of an orthotic knee joint that is changing the lives of people with weakened quadriceps.

  10. Rehabilitation of the arthrofibrotic knee.

    PubMed

    Millett, Peter J; Johnson, Burt; Carlson, Jeff; Krishnan, Sumant; Steadman, J Richard

    2003-11-01

    This paper describes the postoperative rehabilitation of the arthrofibrotic knee, with specific emphasis on modern rehabilitation techniques. The significance of prevention and early recognition is discussed. The importance of early motion and patellar mobility is emphasized and specific exercises to prevent and treat stiffness are described. Continuous passive motion, bracing, and exercise--on the stationary bicycle, on the treadmill, and in water--are adjuncts in the program. Strengthening is added when motion is re-established and there is no swelling or pain. Sport-specific activities are added if progress is satisfactory and motion is maintained. If pain, swelling, or stiffness develops, exercises should be discontinued. Modalities such as cryotherapy, ultrasound, electrical stimulation, rest, and manipulation can be used judiciously. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic medications should be used to prevent inflammation, to control pain, and to allow more aggressive rehabilitative exercises. PMID:14653482

  11. NAVIGATION IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire

    2015-01-01

    Navigation was the most significant advance in instrumentation for total knee arthroplasty over the last decade. It provides surgeons with a precision tool for carrying out surgery, with the possibility of intraoperative simulation and objective control over various anatomical and surgical parameters and references. Since the first systems, which were basically used to control the alignment of bone cutting referenced to the mechanical axis of the lower limb, many other surgical steps have been incorporated, such as component rotation, ligament balancing and arranging the symmetry of flexion and extension spaces, among others. Its efficacy as a precision tool with an effective capacity for promoting better alignment of the lower-limb axis has been widely proven in the literature, but the real value of optimized alignment and the impact of navigation on clinical results and the longevity of arthroplasty have yet to be established. PMID:27026979

  12. Knee System Utilizing Personalized Solutions Instrumentation

    MedlinePlus

    ATTUNE® Knee System utilizing the TRUMATCH® Personalized Solutions Instrumentation Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2016 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Progenitor model of cosmic ray knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijay, Biplab; Bhadra, Arunava

    2016-01-01

    The primary energy spectrum of cosmic rays exhibits a knee at about 3 PeV where a change in the spectral index occurs. Despite many efforts, the origin of such a feature in the spectrum is not satisfactorily solved yet. Here it is proposed that the steepening of the spectrum beyond the knee may be a consequence of the mass distribution of the progenitor of the cosmic ray source. The proposed speculative model can account for all the major observed features of cosmic rays without invoking any fine tuning to match flux or spectra at any energy point. The prediction of the proposed model regarding the primary composition scenario beyond the knee is quite different from most of the prevailing models of the knee, and thereby can be discriminated from precise experimental measurement of the primary composition.

  14. Tai Chi: Rx for Arthritic Knees

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chi: Rx for Arthritic Knees As effective as physical therapy, study suggests, plus it might also improve depression ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Legions of arthritis sufferers try physical therapy and anti-inflammatory drugs to no avail. Now, ...

  15. Posterior cruciate ligament of the knee (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is a powerful ligament extending from the top-rear surface of the tibia to the bottom-front surface of the femur. The ligament prevents the knee joint from posterior instability.

  16. Computational Poromechanics of Human Knee Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Mojtaba; Li, LePing

    2012-02-01

    Extensive computer modeling has been performed in the recent decade to investigate the mechanical response of the healthy and repaired knee joints. Articular cartilages and menisci have been commonly modeled as single-phase elastic materials in the previous 3D simulations. A comprehensive study considering the interplay of the collagen fibers and fluid pressurization in the tissues in situ remains challenging. We have developed a 3D model of the human knee accounting for the mechanical function of collagen fibers and fluid flow in the cartilages and menisci. An anatomically accurate structure of the human knee was used for this purpose including bones, articular cartilages, menisci and ligaments. The fluid pressurization in the femoral cartilage and menisci under combined creep loading was investigated. Numerical results showed that fluid flow and pressure in the tissues played an important role in the mechanical response of the knee joint. The load transfer in the joint was clearly seen when the fluid pressure was considered.

  17. Knee Pain and the Weekend Warriors

    MedlinePlus

    ... care. “OR-Live,” the vision of improving health. Hello, and welcome to Mercy Hospital. We’re in ... knee arthroscopy. Let me introduce first, Dr. Lavernia. Hello there. Dr. Lavernia Is the chief of the ...

  18. Partial Knee with Personalized Patient Care

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Oxford® Partial Knee with Signature™ Personalized Patient Care You must have Javascript enabled in your web browser. View Program Transcript Click Here to view the OR-Live, Inc. Privacy Policy and ...

  19. MicroRNA-9 regulates the development of knee osteoarthritis through the NF-kappaB1 pathway in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ronghe; Liu, Ning; Luo, Simin; Huang, Weiguo; Zha, Zhengang; Yang, Jie

    2016-09-01

    It has been suggested that microRNA-9 (miR-9) is associated with the development of knee osteoarthritis (OA). This study was aimed to investigate the association between the mechanism of miR-9 targeting nuclear factor kappa-B1 (NF-κB1) and the proliferation and apoptosis of knee OA chondrocytes.Cartilage samples were collected from 25 patients with knee OA and 10 traumatic amputees, and another 15 OA rat models, together with 15 rats without knee OA lesions were also established. MiR-9 expressions in both knee OA cartilage and normal cartilage samples were detected using quantitative real-time PCR. The expressions of related genes (NF-κB1, IL-6, and MMP-13) in the two groups were also detected. Dual luciferase reporter gene assay was employed to examine the effect of miR-9 on the luciferase activity of NF-κB1 3'UTR. Knee OA chondrocytes were transfected with miR-9 mimics, miR-9 inhibitor, and NF-κB1 siRNA, respectively, and changes in cellular proliferation and apoptosis were detected via MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Western blotting assay was used to detect the expressions of NF-κB1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13).According to results from human OA samples and rat OA models, miR-9 was significantly downregulated in knee OA cartilage tissues compared with normal cartilage tissues (P < 0.01). The expressions of NF-κB1, IL-6, and MMP-13 in knee OA cartilage tissues were significantly higher than those in normal cartilage tissues (P < 0.01). Dual luciferase reporter gene assay showed that miR-9 could bind to the 3'UTR of NF-κB1 and significantly inhibit the luciferase activity by 37% (P < 0.01). Upregulation of miR-9 or downregulation of NF-κB1 could promote cell proliferation and suppress cell apoptosis.Conclusively, downregulated miR-9 can facilitate proliferation and antiapoptosis of knee OA chondrocytes by directly binding to NF-kB1, implying that stimulating miR-9 expressions might

  20. MRI based knee cartilage assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, Dirk-Jan; Kowalski, Przemyslaw; Tekieli, Wojciech; Reeuwijk, Els; Saris, Daniel; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2012-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is one of the leading causes of pain and disability worldwide and a major health problem in developed countries due to the gradually aging population. Though the symptoms are easily recognized and described by a patient, it is difficult to assess the level of damage or loss of articular cartilage quantitatively. We present a novel method for fully automated knee cartilage thickness measurement and subsequent assessment of the knee joint. First, the point correspondence between a pre-segmented training bone model is obtained with use of Shape Context based non-rigid surface registration. Then, a single Active Shape Model (ASM) is used to segment both Femur and Tibia bone. The surfaces obtained are processed to extract the Bone-Cartilage Interface (BCI) points, where the proper segmentation of cartilage begins. For this purpose, the cartilage ASM is trained with cartilage edge positions expressed in 1D coordinates at the normals in the BCI points. The whole cartilage model is then constructed from the segmentations obtained in the previous step. An absolute thickness of the segmented cartilage is measured and compared to the mean of all training datasets, giving as a result the relative thickness value. The resulting cartilage structure is visualized and related to the segmented bone. In this way the condition of the cartilage is assessed over the surface. The quality of bone and cartilage segmentation is validated and the Dice's coefficients 0.92 and 0.86 for Femur and Tibia bones and 0.45 and 0.34 for respective cartilages are obtained. The clinical diagnostic relevance of the obtained thickness mapping is being evaluated retrospectively. We hope to validate it prospectively for prediction of clinical outcome the methods require improvements in accuracy and robustness.

  1. Multibody dynamic simulation of knee contact mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Bei, Yanhong; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2006-01-01

    Multibody dynamic musculoskeletal models capable of predicting muscle forces and joint contact pressures simultaneously would be valuable for studying clinical issues related to knee joint degeneration and restoration. Current three-dimensional multi-body knee models are either quasi-static with deformable contact or dynamic with rigid contact. This study proposes a computationally efficient methodology for combining multibody dynamic simulation methods with a deformable contact knee model. The methodology requires preparation of the articular surface geometry, development of efficient methods to calculate distances between contact surfaces, implementation of an efficient contact solver that accounts for the unique characteristics of human joints, and specification of an application programming interface for integration with any multibody dynamic simulation environment. The current implementation accommodates natural or artificial tibiofemoral joint models, small or large strain contact models, and linear or nonlinear material models. Applications are presented for static analysis (via dynamic simulation) of a natural knee model created from MRI and CT data and dynamic simulation of an artificial knee model produced from manufacturer’s CAD data. Small and large strain natural knee static analyses required 1 min of CPU time and predicted similar contact conditions except for peak pressure, which was higher for the large strain model. Linear and nonlinear artificial knee dynamic simulations required 10 min of CPU time and predicted similar contact force and torque but different contact pressures, which were lower for the nonlinear model due to increased contact area. This methodology provides an important step toward the realization of dynamic musculoskeletal models that can predict in vivo knee joint motion and loading simultaneously. PMID:15564115

  2. Plastinated Knee Specimens: A Novel Educational Tool

    PubMed Central

    Neha; Lalwani, Sanjeev; Dhingra, Renu

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: During the routine dissection of knee joints in an anatomy dissection hall, it was observed that the specimens had deteriorated overtime, due to their repeated handling and the use of high concentrations of formalin for their fixation. In order to stop their further deterioration, we decided to plastinate these specimens. Thus, the present study was undertaken to prepare plastinated knee specimens from old embalmed cadavers and to compare them with freshly fixed, plastinated specimens. Objectives: 1. To plastinate old embalmed and fresh formalin fixed knee regions. 2. To demonstrate the extra and the intracapsular structures around both the plastinated knee regions. 3. To compare their morphological features in terms of their colours, dilatation and flexibility. Methods: A total of 15 knee joint specimens from among fresh formalin (5-8%) fixed (group I) and old embalmed bodies (group II) were collected, washed and plastinated by using the standard S-10 silicon technique and they were compared for their colours, dilatation and flexibility. Results: All the plastinated specimens showed an accurate reproduction of the tissue details that were comparable to those of the natural unfixed specimens. A comparison among the two groups showed a significant difference in terms of the colour, dilatation and the flexibility of the specimens. The plastinated knee joint specimens from group I were of good quality, with negligible shrinkage, more flexibility and well preserved morphologies. Conclusion: Plastinated knee specimens can serve as an excellent educational tool for the undergraduate and postgraduate students of anatomy, radiology and orthopaedics, as they are dry, odourless and nontoxic, with a good structural preservation and a higher instructional value. The fresh knee regions, when they were plastinated, were aesthetically superior in terms of their colours, dilatation and flexibility, thus making them ideal for teaching and hands-on experiences. PMID

  3. Proximal tibial fracture following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Krause, Heike; Dunleavy, Kim

    2011-09-01

    The patient was a 74-year-old man, with a history of total knee arthoplasty 14 years earlier, after having sustained a pathological fracture of the proximal diaphysis of the left tibia following a fall. Given the unstable nature of the fracture and the severe osteolysis noted below the total knee arthroplasty, surgical management 1 day after the fall entailed packing cancellous bone graft into the defect and realigning the fracture. PMID:21885911

  4. Total knee arthroplasty using subvastus approach in stiff knee: A retrospective analysis of 110 cases

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilen A; Patil, Hitendra Gulabrao; Vaishnav, Vinod O; Savale, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    Background: Subvastus approach used in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is known to produce an earlier recovery but is not commonly utilized for TKA when the preoperative range of motion (ROM) of the knee is limited. Subvastus approach is known for its ability to give earlier recovery due to less postoperative pain and early mobilization (due to rapid quadriceps recovery). Subvastus approach is considered as a relative contraindication for TKA in knees with limited ROM due to difficulty in exposure which can increase risk of complications such as patellar tendon avulsion or medial collateral injury. Short stature and obesity are also relative contraindications. Tarabichi successfully used subvastus approach in knees with limited preoperative ROM. However, there are no large series in literature with the experience of the subvatus approach in knees with limited preoperative ROM. We are presenting our experience of the subvastus approach for TKA in knees with limited ROM. Materials and Methods: We conducted retrospective analysis of patients with limited preoperative ROM (flexion ≤90°) of the knee who underwent TKA using subvastus approach and presenting the 2 years results. There were a total 84 patients (110 knees) with mean age 64 (range 49–79 years) years. The mean preoperative flexion was 72° (range 40°–90°) with a total ROM of 64° (range 36°–90°). Results: Postoperatively knee flexion improved by mean 38° (P < 0.05) which was significant as assed by Student's t- test. The mean knee society score improved from 36 (range 20–60) to 80 (range 70–90) postoperatively (P < 0.05). There was one case of partial avulsion of patellar tendon from the tibial tubercle. Conclusions: We concluded that satisfactory results of TKA can be obtained in knees with limited preoperative ROM using subvastus approach maintaining the advantages of early mobilization. PMID:27053806

  5. Chondroblastoma of the Knee Treated with Resection and Osteochondral Allograft Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Judd; Broehm, Cory; Treme, Gehron

    2014-01-01

    Case. This case report describes the operative management of 16-year-old male with a symptomatic chondroblastoma of the distal femur with breach of the chondral surface. Following appropriate imaging and core needle biopsy, the diagnosis was confirmed histologically. The patient then underwent intralesional curettage and osteochondral allograft reconstruction of the defect. At one-year follow-up the patient was pain-free and has obtained excellent range of motion. There is radiographic evidence of allograft incorporation and no evidence of local recurrence. Conclusion. Osteochondral allograft reconstruction is an effective option following marginal resection and curettage of chondroblastoma involving the chondral surface of the distal femur. PMID:25548701

  6. Muscle Impairments in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Alnahdi, Ali H.; Zeni, Joseph A.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Context: Muscle impairments associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) are the primary underlying cause of functional limitations. Understanding the extent of muscle impairments, its relationship with physical function and disease progression, and the evidence behind exercise therapy that targets muscle impairments is crucial. Evidence Acquisition: An electronic search for relevant articles using MEDLINE and CINHAL databases up to September 2011 was performed. In addition to the electronic search, retrieved articles were searched manually for relevant studies. Results: Quadriceps, hamstrings, and hip muscles are significantly impaired in subjects with knee OA compared with age-matched controls. Muscle strength, especially quadriceps, is a major determinant of both performance-based and self-reported physical function. Whether stronger quadriceps is protective against knee OA onset and progression is not clear. Exercise therapy, including global and targeted resistance training, is effective in reducing pain and improving function in subjects with knee OA. Conclusions: Subjects with knee OA have significant muscle impairments. These muscle impairments affect physical function and should be targeted in therapy. Further research is needed to explore the relationship between quadriceps strength and knee OA initiation and progression and to determine the optimal exercise prescription that augments outcomes in this patient population. PMID:23016099

  7. [Arthritis of the Medial Knee Joint Compartment].

    PubMed

    Matziolis, G; Röhner, E

    2015-10-01

    23 % of all persons older than 65 years suffer from osteoarthritis of the medial compartment of the knee joint, a very common situation in orthopaedic practice 1. As a result of the demographic trend the number of patients is expected to increase in the future. Based on specific joint biomechanics and kinematics the medial knee joint compartment is more frequently affected than the lateral. Only an understanding of the functional anatomy and underlying pathology allows a critical evaluation of different available conservative and operative treatment options. This article gives an overview of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies of osteoarthritis of the medial knee joint. Frequently performed surgeries, e.g. high tibial osteotomy (HTO), unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) will be presented in a comparative manner. The actual scientific evidence will be given with the goal of an evidence based therapy that is adopted to stage and pathology of osteoarthritis of the medial compartment of the knee joint. PMID:26451864

  8. Current perspectives in stem cell research for knee cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Orth, Patrick; Rey-Rico, Ana; Venkatesan, Jagadeesh K; Madry, Henning; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2014-01-01

    Protocols based on the delivery of stem cells are currently applied in patients, showing encouraging results for the treatment of articular cartilage lesions (focal defects, osteoarthritis). Yet, restoration of a fully functional cartilage surface (native structural organization and mechanical functions) especially in the knee joint has not been reported to date, showing the need for improved designs of clinical trials. Various sources of progenitor cells are now available, originating from adult tissues but also from embryonic or reprogrammed tissues, most of which have already been evaluated for their chondrogenic potential in culture and for their reparative properties in vivo upon implantation in relevant animal models of cartilage lesions. Nevertheless, particular attention will be needed regarding their safe clinical use and their potential to form a cartilaginous repair tissue of proper quality and functionality in the patient. Possible improvements may reside in the use of biological supplements in accordance with regulations, while some challenges remain in establishing standardized, effective procedures in the clinics. PMID:24520197

  9. OSTEOCHONDRITIS DISSECANS OF THE KNEE: DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Mestriner, Luiz Aurélio

    2015-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is a pathological process affecting the subchondral bone of the knee in children and adolescents with open growth plates (juvenile OCD) and young adults with closed growth plates (adult OCD). It may lead to secondary effects on joint cartilage, such as pain, edema, possible formation of free bodies and mechanical symptoms, including joint locking. OCD may lead to degenerative changes may develop if left untreated. This article presents a review and update on this problem, with special emphasis on diagnosis and treatment. The latter may include either conservative methods, which show more predictable results for juvenile OCD, or various surgical methods, which include reparative techniques like isolated removal of the fragment, bone drilling and fixation of the osteochondral fragments, and restorative techniques like microfractures, autologous osteochondral transplantation (mosaicplasty), autologous chondrocyte implantation and fresh osteochondral allograft, depending on lesion stability, lesion viability, skeletal maturity and OCD process location. Recent assessments on the results from several types of treatment have shown that there is a lack of studies with reliable levels of evidence and have suggested that further multicenter prospective randomized and controlled studies on management of this disease should be conducted. PMID:27047865

  10. Greater Step Widths Reduce Internal Knee Abduction Moments in Medial Compartment Knee Osteoarthritis Patients During Stair Ascent.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Max R; Klipple, Gary; Zhang, Songning

    2015-08-01

    Increased step widths have been shown to reduce peak internal knee abduction moments in healthy individuals but not in knee osteoarthritis patients during stair descent. This study aimed to assess effects of increased step widths on peak knee abduction moments and associated variables in adults with medial knee osteoarthritis and healthy older adults during stair ascent. Thirteen healthy older adults and 13 medial knee osteoarthritis patients performed stair ascent using preferred, wide, and wider step widths. Three-dimensional kinematics and ground reaction forces (GRFs) using an instrumented staircase were collected. Increased step width reduced first and second peak knee abduction moments, and knee abduction moment impulse. In addition, frontal plane GRF at time of first and second peak knee abduction moment and lateral trunk lean at time of first peak knee abduction moment were reduced with increased step width during stair ascent in both groups. Knee abduction moment variables were not different between knee osteoarthritis patients and healthy controls. Our findings suggest that increasing step width may be an effective simple gait alteration to reduce knee abduction moment variables in both knee osteoarthritis and healthy adults during stair ascent. However, long term effects of increasing step width during stair ascent in knee osteoarthritis and healthy adults remain unknown. PMID:25781222

  11. Active knee motion after cruciate ligament rupture. Stereoradiography.

    PubMed

    Kärrholm, J; Selvik, G; Elmqvist, L G; Hansson, L I

    1988-04-01

    In 10 patients with an old injury of the anterior cruciate ligament, the three-dimensional movements of the knee joint were studied when the patients flexed their knees. Tibial motions were recorded using roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis. Internal rotation and adduction of the tibia were reduced in the injured knees when compared with the intact knees; during flexion of the knee joint, the tibial intercondylar eminence occupied a more lateral and posterior position on the injured side. Our results may indicate that the knee joint is continuously exposed to abnormal stresses when the anterior cruciate ligament is torn. PMID:3364185

  12. Gender Effect on the Outcome of Partial Medial Meniscectomy.

    PubMed

    Haviv, Barak; Bronak, Shlomo; Kosashvili, Yona; Thein, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    Complex posterior horn tears of the medial meniscus are common. Previous reports performed statistical stratifications to address the influence of gender on outcome following arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy with variable conclusions. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical results of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy of the knee between men and women with complex medial meniscal tear type while controlling for other variables that may affect outcome. This study compared groups of 86 men and 49 women who were followed prospectively using the Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale, the visual analogue scale, and patient's satisfaction. Mean age at operation was 51 years and mean follow-up was 26 months. Mean Lysholm score improved from 69 preoperatively to 82.1 postoperatively (P<.001) in the male group and from 64.2 preoperatively to 73.5 postoperatively (P=.04) in the female group. At last follow-up, 68 (79%) men and 35 (71%) women stated that they were satisfied with the operation. In both groups, the severity of chondral lesions was found to be negatively correlated to the preoperative score. Women had more severe chondral lesions at arthroscopy than men. This comparative study showed no significant difference between men and women in terms of clinical improvement following arthroscopic partial meniscectomies of complex tear types in stable knees with intact lateral meniscus. Women had lower functionality pre- and postoperatively, which correlated with more severe chondral degeneration at surgery compared with men. PMID:26488789

  13. Genital lesions following bestiality.

    PubMed

    Mittal, A; Shenoi, S D; Kumar, K B; Sharma, P V

    2000-01-01

    A 48-year-old man presented with painful genital lesions with history of bestiality and abnor-mal sexual behaviour. Examination revealed multiple irregular tender ulcers and erosions, with phimosis and left sided tender inguinal adenopathy. VDRL, TPHA, HIV-ELISA were negative. He was treated with ciprofloxacin 500mg b.d. along with saline compresses with complete resolution. PMID:20877040

  14. The influence of joint line position on knee stability after condylar knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Martin, J W; Whiteside, L A

    1990-10-01

    Using a special knee-testing device, ten knees obtained at autopsy were subjected to varus-valgus, anterior-posterior, and flexion-rotation analysis in the intact state and after total knee arthroplasty. The ten knees showed no significant change in stability after knee replacement when the joint line was maintained in its natural position. When the femoral component was repositioned 5 mm proximally and 5 mm anteriorly, a significant increase in laxity occurred during midflexion. When the joint line was shifted 5 mm distal and 5 mm posterior to its anatomic location, significant tightening occurred in midrange of motion. Coupled rotation of the tibia with knee flexion was decreased after surgery in all knees with no specific relationship to joint line position. Coupled rotation with varus-valgus testing, however, remained within the normal range through the first 30 degrees of flexion only when the joint line was restored to its normal anatomic position. Stability in condylar knee arthroplasty is in part dependent on position of the joint line. Surgical techniques that rely on restoring the flexion and extension gap without regard to joint line position may result in alteration of varus-valgus or anterior-posterior displacement in midrange flexion. PMID:2208849

  15. An improved OpenSim gait model with multiple degrees of freedom knee joint and knee ligaments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hang; Bloswick, Donald; Merryweather, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Musculoskeletal models are widely used to investigate joint kinematics and predict muscle force during gait. However, the knee is usually simplified as a one degree of freedom joint and knee ligaments are neglected. The aim of this study was to develop an OpenSim gait model with enhanced knee structures. The knee joint in this study included three rotations and three translations. The three knee rotations and mediolateral translation were independent, with proximodistal and anteroposterior translations occurring as a function of knee flexion/extension. Ten elastic elements described the geometrical and mechanical properties of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PCL), and the medial and lateral collateral ligaments (MCL and LCL). The three independent knee rotations were evaluated using OpenSim to observe ligament function. The results showed that the anterior and posterior bundles of ACL and PCL (aACL, pACL and aPCL, pPCL) intersected during knee flexion. The aACL and pACL mainly provided force during knee flexion and adduction, respectively. The aPCL was slack throughout the range of three knee rotations; however, the pPCL was utilised for knee abduction and internal rotation. The LCL was employed for knee adduction and rotation, but was slack beyond 20° of knee flexion. The MCL bundles were mainly used during knee adduction and external rotation. All these results suggest that the functions of knee ligaments in this model approximated the behaviour of the physical knee and the enhanced knee structures can improve the ability to investigate knee joint biomechanics during various gait activities. PMID:24611807

  16. Degenerative lesions in the articular cartilage after meniscectomy: preliminary experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Berjon, J J; Munuera, L; Calvo, M

    1991-03-01

    Articular cartilage degeneration was studied in an experimental model including 68 knees of adult dogs on which five different types of medial meniscectomy had been performed with a followup period of 10 to 450 days. The results were assessed by macroscopic, radiologic, and histologic methods. The degenerative lesions increased proportionally to the amount of meniscal tissue resected and the duration of observation. These lesions proved to be more intense at the tibial plateau compared to the femoral condyle. For both joint surfaces the predominant location was the central zone. Considering the degenerative process by the articular cartilage after total meniscectomy, maximum preservation of meniscal tissue is recommended. PMID:2002520

  17. Evaluation of a knee-kicker bumper design for reducing knee morbidity among carpet layers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wan-Fu; Wu, Chih-Fu

    2012-09-01

    Carpet layers have a high prevalence of occupational knee morbidity. One of the main causes is that they need to frequently 'kick' the bumper on the rear end of the knee kicker with one knee when laying a carpet. Considering the bumper's marked effects on kicking force transmission and safety, this study aims to improve the design of the knee-kicker bumper by reducing the risk factors. An improved pendulum-type impact-testing platform was designed as an evaluative apparatus, with the impulse and the coefficient of restitution serving as evaluative criteria. The newly developed bumper has improved firmness from drilled blind holes and an increase in effective forward force of 15%-138%, which implies lower operational demands and a lighter knee burden (i.e., less kicking energy results in the same work efficiency), and a softer contact surface that enhances operating comfort. The newly designed kicker was positively reviewed by subjects. PMID:22326189

  18. Lateral dislocation of the knee joint after total knee arthroplasty: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ugutmen, Ender; Ozkan, Korhan; Unay, Koray; Mahirogullari, Mahir; Eceviz, Engin; Taser, Omer

    2008-01-01

    Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a successful therapy for functional improvement and pain relief in advanced symptomatic degeneration of the knee joint. But it can be associated with many complications, one of which is instability. Case presentation A 70-year-old woman was referred to our hospital because of right knee dislocation after TKA was performed on her right knee due to severe varus deformity and flexion contracture. This instability was caused by persistent MCL tightness and iatrogenic lateral collateral, arcuate ligament, and popliteus tendon injury. The torn lateral collateral ligament and arcuate ligament were sutured with no. 2 non-absorbable (Ethibond) sutures with plication of the posterolateral knee capsule. A deep-dish liner was inserted to optimize soft tissue tension. Conclusion This is a very severe complication, and surgeons must be cautious about ligament balancing and soft tissue resection during TKA for severe varus and valgus deformities. PMID:18687153

  19. Knee Osteochondritis Dissecans Treated by the AO Hook Fixation System: A Four Year Follow-Up of an Alternative Technique

    PubMed Central

    Pengas, Ioannis P; Assiotis, Angelos; Kokkinakis, Michail; Khan, Wasim S; Meyers, Paul; Arbuthnot, James; Mcnicholas, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Surgical fixation is recommended for stable osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) lesions that have failed nonoperative management and for all unstable lesions. In this study we set out to describe and evaluate an alternative method of surgical fixation for such lesions. Five knees with unstable OCD lesions in four male adolescent patients with open physes were treated with the AO Hook Fixation System. The outcome was evaluated both clinically and with three separate outcome systems (IKDC 2000, KOOS, Lysholm) at one and a mean four year follow-up. We demonstrated excellent clinical results in all patients. At four years, all scoring systems demonstrated statistically significant improvement when compared to the preoperative status. Our study suggests that the AO Hook Fixation System is an alternative method of surgical intervention with comparable medium term results with other existing modes of fixation and the added biomechanical advantage of the absence of distracting forces during hardware removal. PMID:25067976

  20. Usefulness of the Korean Knee Score for Evaluation of the Results of Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Kyu; Shim, Ji-Hoon; Chung, Kyu-Sung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Korean Knee score (KKS) was designed to reflect the floor-sitting lifestyle that necessitates high knee flexion. The purpose of this study is to assess whether the KKS reflects the floor-sitting lifestyle more accurately than the previously developed Knee Society clinical rating system. In addition, the presence of ceiling effects was compared between the two rating systems. Materials and Methods Eighty-one consecutive patients (120 knees) who were assessed regularly after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) on an outpatient basis between January 2012 and December 2012 were enrolled. All patients were asked to complete a questionnaire to assess the Knee Society Knee score (KSKS), Knee Society Function score (KSFS), and KKS. Results At the final follow-up, the mean KSKS, KSFS, and KKS were 91.2, 86.0, and 70.1, respectively, and the scores were similar between the ≥125° maximum flexion group and <125° maximum flexion group. However, the 'floor life' subdomain score of the KKS was significantly higher in the >125° maximum flexion group (15.13 vs. 11.24, p=0.001). The number of cases with the highest possible score was 24 (20%) for the KSKS and 47 (39%) for the KSFS, whereas none of the cases obtained the highest possible KKS. According to the standard deviation method, more substantial ceiling effects were present in the KSKS (83 cases, 69.1%) and KSFS (67 cases, 55.8%) than in the KKS (23 cases, 19.2%). Conclusions Although, the KKS was effective in reducing the ceiling effect, it demonstrated limited improvement in assessing the ability to perform high knee flexion after TKA. However, the 'floor life' subdomain of KSS appeared to be valid for evaluating high flexion of the knee. PMID:25750889

  1. Knee Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Knee Injuries and Disorders URL of this page: https://medlineplus. ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Knee Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages To use the sharing ...

  2. Getting Active After Knee Replacement Might Raise Hip Fracture Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Getting Active After Knee Replacement Might Raise Hip Fracture Risk Swedish study found that people with new knees had slight uptick in spinal fractures, too To use the sharing features on this ...

  3. Hip or knee replacement - before - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... replace all or part of your hip or knee joint with an artificial device (a prosthesis). Below are some questions you may want to ask your health care provider to help you prepare for your hip or knee replacement.

  4. Hip or knee replacement - after - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Below are some questions you may want to ask your health care provider to help you take ... What to ask your doctor after hip or knee replacement; Hip replacement - after - what to ask your doctor; Knee replacement - after - ...

  5. Hip or knee replacement - after - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 7. Read More Hip joint replacement Hip pain Knee joint replacement Knee pain ... joint replacement - discharge Taking care of your new hip joint Update Date 3/5/2015 Updated by: C. ...

  6. Hip or knee replacement - before - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 7. Read More Hip joint replacement Hip pain Knee joint replacement Knee pain ... joint replacement - discharge Taking care of your new hip joint Update Date 3/5/2015 Updated by: C. ...

  7. Joint Line Reconstruction in Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-16

    Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty Because of; Loosening; Instability; Impingement; or Other Reasons Accepted as Indications for TKA Exchange.; The Focus is to Determine the Precision of Joint Line Restoration in Navigated vs. Conventional Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty

  8. Techniques for assessing knee joint pain in arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Volker; Han, Jeong S; Adwanikar, Hita; Fu, Yu; Ji, Guangchen

    2007-01-01

    The assessment of pain is of critical importance for mechanistic studies as well as for the validation of drug targets. This review will focus on knee joint pain associated with arthritis. Different animal models have been developed for the study of knee joint arthritis. Behavioral tests in animal models of knee joint arthritis typically measure knee joint pain rather indirectly. In recent years, however, progress has been made in the development of tests that actually evaluate the sensitivity of the knee joint in arthritis models. They include measurements of the knee extension angle struggle threshold, hind limb withdrawal reflex threshold of knee compression force, and vocalizations in response to stimulation of the knee. A discussion of pain assessment in humans with arthritis pain conditions concludes this review. PMID:17391515

  9. Demyelinative chiamal lesions.

    PubMed

    Spector, R H; Glaser, J S; Schatz, N J

    1980-12-01

    To clarify the clinical syndrome of demyelinative chiasmal involvement, six case histories were analyzed and the literature was reviewed. This entitity is characterized by especial predilection for women in the third to fifth decades; visual deficites of a chiasmal pattern that may be modest to marked, with a generallly good prognosis for functional recovery; and other signs and symptoms, not necessarily severe, of scattered lesions of the neuraxis. Neuroradiological studies, especially laminography of the sellar area and computerized tomography, must be employed to rule out a suprasellar mass lesion. The efficacy of systemic corticosteroid therapy is moot, but it seems reasonable to use such agents during acute stages, especially where vision is severely reduced on both sides. PMID:7447764

  10. A Case of Spontaneous Osteonecrosis of the Knee with Early and Simultaneous Involvement of the Medial Femoral Condyle and Medial Tibial Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Shinya; Arai, Yuji; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SPONK) usually involves a single condyle, most often the medial femoral condyle (MFC). Involvement of the medial tibial plateau (MTP) is less common, occurring in about 2% of knees with SPONK. Early onset SPONK on the ipsilateral side of the medial compartment is very rare, with, to our knowledge, only four cases reported to date. We describe a very rare case of SPONK with early simultaneous development in the MFC and MTP. Serial plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging showed that SPONK in both condyles followed a similar progressive course. The pathological findings in these lesions were similar to those observed in subchondral insufficiency fractures. PMID:27242941

  11. A Case of Spontaneous Osteonecrosis of the Knee with Early and Simultaneous Involvement of the Medial Femoral Condyle and Medial Tibial Plateau.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Shinya; Arai, Yuji; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SPONK) usually involves a single condyle, most often the medial femoral condyle (MFC). Involvement of the medial tibial plateau (MTP) is less common, occurring in about 2% of knees with SPONK. Early onset SPONK on the ipsilateral side of the medial compartment is very rare, with, to our knowledge, only four cases reported to date. We describe a very rare case of SPONK with early simultaneous development in the MFC and MTP. Serial plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging showed that SPONK in both condyles followed a similar progressive course. The pathological findings in these lesions were similar to those observed in subchondral insufficiency fractures. PMID:27242941

  12. Novel lesion detection aids.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, K W; Longbottom, C; Ellwood, R; Lussi, A

    2009-01-01

    Several non-invasive and novel aids for the detection of (and in some cases monitoring of) caries lesions have been introduced in the field of 'caries diagnostics' over the last 15 years. This chapter focusses on those available to dentists at the time of writing; continuing research is bound to lead to further developments in the coming years. Laser fluorescence is based on measurements of back-scattered fluorescence of a 655-nm light source. It enhances occlusal and (potentially) approximal lesion detection and enables semi-quantitative caries monitoring. Systematic reviews have identified false-positive results as a limitation. Quantitative light-induced fluorescence is another sensitive method to quantitatively detect and measure mineral loss both in enamel and some dentine lesions; again, the trade-offs with lower specificity when compared with clinical visual detection must be considered. Subtraction radiography is based on the principle of digitally superimposing two radiographs with exactly the same projection geometry. This method is applicable for approximal surfaces and occlusal caries involving dentine but is not yet widely available. Electrical caries measurements gather either site-specific or surface-specific information of teeth and tooth structure. Fixed-frequency devices perform best for occlusal dentine caries but the method has also shown promise for lesions in enamel and other tooth surfaces with multi-frequency approaches. All methods require further research and further validation in well-designed clinical trials. In the future, they could have useful applications in clinical practice as part of a personalized, comprehensive caries management system. PMID:19494675

  13. Improved Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Proposed orthotic knee joint improved version of one described in "Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint" (MFS-28633). Locks automatically upon initial application of radial force (wearer's weight) and unlocks automatically, but only when all loads (radial force and bending) relieved. Joints lock whenever wearer applies weight to knee at any joint angle between full extension and 45 degree bend. Both devices offer increased safety and convenience relative to conventional orthotic knee joints.

  14. Patients’ decision making in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, T.; Griffin, D.; Barlow, D.; Realpe, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A patient-centred approach, usually achieved through shared decision making, has the potential to help improve decision making around knee arthroplasty surgery. However, such an approach requires an understanding of the factors involved in patient decision making. This review’s objective is to systematically examine the qualitative literature surrounding patients’ decision making in knee arthroplasty. Methods A systematic literature review using Medline and Embase was conducted to identify qualitative studies that examined patients’ decision making around knee arthroplasty. An aggregated account of what is known about patients’ decision making in knee arthroplasties is provided. Results Seven studies with 234 participants in interviews or focus groups are included. Ten themes are replicated across studies, namely: expectations of surgery; coping mechanisms; relationship with clinician; fear; pain; function; psychological implications; social network; previous experience of surgery; and conflict in opinions. Conclusions This review is helpful in not only directing future research to areas that are not understood, or require confirmation, but also in highlighting areas that future interventions could address. These include those aimed at delivering information, which are likely to affect the satisfaction rate, demand, and use of knee arthroplasties. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4;163–169. PMID:26450640

  15. Cooling Does Not Affect Knee Proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Ozmun, John C.; Thieme, Heather A.; Ingersoll, Christopher D.; Knight, Kenneth L.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of cooling on proprioception of the knee has not been studied extensively. In this study, we investigated the movement reproduction (timing and accuracy) aspect of proprioception. Subjects were tested under two conditions: a 20-minute application of ice and control. Proprioceptive accuracy and timing were measured by passively moving the knee, then comparing the subject's active reproduction of the passive movement. Subjects were blindfolded, then tested in three sectors of the knee's range of motion: 90° to 60°, 60° to 30°, and 30° to full extension. Ice application had no apparent effect on the subject's ability to perform accurate movement reproductions in the sectors tested. However, accuracy of the subject's final angle reproduction varied between the sectors as did the total time of the movement. One possible explanation for the difference between sectors is that different receptors are active at different points in the knee's range of motion. We conclude that cooling the knee joint for 20 minutes does not have an adverse effect on proprioception. PMID:16558379

  16. Knee alignment in professional tennis players.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2002-01-01

    This study determined lower-limb alignment and knee geometry in professional tennis players and compared the data with those from nonathletic individuals. Twenty-four radiographs from 12 asymptomatic players (mean age: 23.4+/-3.8 years) were prospectively studied. The three angles most useful for describing limb alignment and knee geometry in the coronal plane were measured: hip-knee-ankle, condylar-hip, and plateau-ankle. The condylar-plateau angle, frontal foot rotation angle, and the relationship between the mechanical axis and tibial plateau also were calculated. Varus limb alignment was predominant and the mechanical axis passed medially through the knee center; there was increased valgus inclination of the distal femur, varus angulation of the tibial plateau, near parallel alignment of the joint, and exaggerated external foot rotation. Hip-knee-ankle, condylar-hip, plateau-ankle, and frontal foot rotation angles were significantly different (P<.05, two-tailed t test) from previously reported angles of nonathletic individuals. Variations, probably due to repetitive dynamic demands imposed on lower limbs from an early age, seem to involve both femoral condyles and proximal tibial metaphyses, maintaining normal parallel joint alignment. PMID:11829331

  17. Arthrodiatasis for management of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Aly, Tarek A; Hafez, Kamal; Amin, Osama

    2011-08-01

    Osteoarthritic disease is the result of mechanical and biological events that destabilize the normal processes of degradation and synthesis of articular cartilage chondrocytes, extracellular matrix, and subchondral bone. Osteoarthritis of the knee can cause symptoms ranging from mild to disabling. Initial management of most patients should be nonoperative, but because of the progressive nature of the disease, many patients with osteoarthritis of the knee eventually benefit from operative treatment. Various procedures have been described for treatment of the osteoarthritic knee, ranging from arthroscopic lavage and debridement to total knee arthroplasty. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical results of distraction arthroplasty combined with arthroscopic lavage and drilling of cartilage defects for treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee. Nineteen patients (15 women and 4 men; age range, 39-65 years) were operated on. Pre- and postoperative findings were compared. A control group comprising 42 patients treated with only arthroscopic procedures was evaluated for comparison. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 5 years. Results were evaluated both clinically and radiologically postoperatively and throughout the follow-up period. Clinically, pain and walking capacity improved in most patients. Radiologically, joint space widening and improvement of the tibiofemoral angle was noted in nearly all patients. PMID:21815573

  18. The Difficult Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Malkani, Arthur L; Hitt, Kirby D; Badarudeen, Sameer; Lewis, Courtland; Cherian, Jeffrey; Elmallah, Randa; Mont, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) for the treatment of knee arthritis has substantially increased over the past decade. Because of its success, the indications for primary TKA have expanded to include younger patients who are more active, elderly patients who have multiple comorbidities, and patients who have more complex issues, such as posttraumatic arthritis and severe deformity. TKA also has been used to salvage failed unicondylar arthroplasty and osteotomies about the knee. Exposure may be challenging and outcomes may not be as successful in patients with soft-tissue contractures, such as a stiff knee, who undergo TKA. Bone graft or augments may be required to correct deformity and attain proper knee alignment in patients who have a substantial varus or valgus deformity. TKA is somewhat challenging in patients who have deformity, bone loss, contracture, or multiple comorbidities, or have had prior surgery; therefore, it is necessary for surgeons to be aware of some general principles that may help minimize complications and improve outcomes. PMID:27049194

  19. Abnormal loading of the major joints in knee osteoarthritis and the response to knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Andrew; Stewart, Caroline; Postans, Neil; Barlow, David; Dodds, Alexander; Holt, Cathy; Whatling, Gemma; Roberts, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is common and patients frequently complain that they are 'overloading' the joints of the opposite leg when they walk. However, it is unknown whether moments or co-contractions are abnormal in the unaffected joints of patients with single joint knee osteoarthritis, or how they change following treatment of the affected knee. Twenty patients with single joint medial compartment knee osteoarthritis were compared to 20 asymptomatic control subjects. Gait analysis was performed for normal level gait and surface EMG recordings of the medial and lateral quadriceps and hamstrings were used to investigate co-contraction. Patients were followed up 12 months post-operatively and the analysis was repeated. Results are presented for the first 14 patients who have attended follow-up. Pre-operatively, adduction moment impulses were elevated at both knees and the contra-lateral hip compared to controls. Co-contraction of hamstrings and quadriceps was elevated bilaterally. Post-operatively, moment waveforms returned to near-normal levels at the affected knee and co-contraction fell in the majority of patients. However, abnormalities persisted in the contra-lateral limb with partial or no recovery of both moment waveforms and co-contraction in the majority. Patients with knee osteoarthritis do experience abnormal loads of their major weight bearing joints bilaterally, and abnormalities persist despite treatment of the affected limb. Further treatment may be required if we are to protect the other major joints following joint arthroplasty. PMID:22841587

  20. Variable stiffness actuated prosthetic knee to restore knee buckling during stance: a modeling study.

    PubMed

    Wentink, E C; Koopman, H F J M; Stramigioli, S; Rietman, J S; Veltink, P H

    2013-06-01

    Most modern intelligent knee prosthesis use dampers to modulate dynamic behavior and prevent excessive knee flexion, but they dissipate energy and do not assist in knee extension. Energy efficient variable stiffness control (VSA) can reduce the energy consumption yet effectively modulate the dynamic behavior and use stored energy during flexion to assist in subsequent extension. A principle design of energy efficient VSA in a prosthetic knee is proposed and analyzed for the specific case of rejection of a disturbed stance phase. The concept is based on the principle that the output stiffness of a spring can be changed without changing the energy stored in the elastic elements of the spring. The usability of this concept to control a prosthetic knee is evaluated using a model. Part of the stance phase of the human leg was modeled by a double pendulum. Specifically the rejection of a common disturbance of transfemoral prosthetic gait, an unlocked knee at heel strike, was evaluated. The ranges of spring stiffnesses were determined such that the angular characteristics of a normal stance phase were preserved, but disturbances could also be rejected. The simulations predicted that energy efficient VSA can be useful for the control of prosthetic knees. PMID:23000012

  1. MR imaging of extrasynovial inflammation and impingement about the knee.

    PubMed

    Grando, Higor; Chang, Eric Y; Chen, Karen C; Chung, Christine B

    2014-11-01

    The knee has unique anatomy regarding the relationship between the synovial and capsular layers, with interposed fat pads at certain locations. The extrasynovial impingement and inflammation syndromes about the knee are underdiagnosed and should be included in the differential diagnosis of anterior knee pain. MR imaging is the best imaging modality for evaluation of the anatomy and disorders of these extrasynovial compartments. PMID:25442030

  2. Lateral Knee Braces in Football: Do They Prevent Injury?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulos, Lonnie E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The results of three recently presented clinical studies and a biomechanical study of the use of lateral knee braces to prevent knee injuries are reviewed. The results raise serious doubts about the efficacy of the preventive knee braces which are currently available. (Author/MT)

  3. Improving diagnosis of atraumatic splenic lesions, part I: nonneoplastic lesions.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Zina J; Oh, Sarah K; Chernyak, Victoria; Flusberg, Milana; Rozenblit, Alla M; Kaul, Bindu; Stein, Marjorie W; Mazzariol, Fernanda S

    2016-01-01

    Focal atraumatic splenic lesions often pose a diagnostic challenge on cross-sectional imaging. They can be categorized based on etiology as nonneoplastic (reviewed in Part I), benign neoplastic, and malignant neoplastic lesions. Lesions can also be characterized based on prevalence as common, uncommon, and rare. Familiarity with pertinent clinical parameters, etiology, pathology, prevalence, and ancillary features such as splenomegaly, concomitant hepatic involvement, and extrasplenic findings, in addition to knowledge of imaging spectra of these lesions, can improve diagnostic confidence. Since the nonneoplastic lesions are usually easily recognized, it is critical that the radiologist identifies them avoiding unnecessary work up. PMID:27317223

  4. Evaluation of total knee mechanics using a crouching simulator with a synthetic knee substitute.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Michael; Rosenbaum, Heather; Walker, Peter S

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical evaluation of total knees is frequently required for aspects such as wear, strength, kinematics, contact areas, and force transmission. In order to carry out such tests, we developed a crouching simulator, based on the Oxford-type machine, with novel features including a synthetic knee including ligaments. The instrumentation and data processing methods enabled the determination of contact area locations and interface forces and moments, for a full flexion-extension cycle. To demonstrate the use of the simulator, we carried out a comparison of two different total knee designs, cruciate retaining and substituting. The first part of the study describes the simulator design and the methodology for testing the knees without requiring cadaveric knee specimens. The degrees of freedom of the anatomic hip and ankle joints were reproduced. Flexion-extension was obtained by changing quadriceps length, while variable hamstring forces were applied using springs. The knee joint was represented by three-dimensional printed blocks on to which the total knee components were fixed. Pretensioned elastomeric bands of realistic stiffnesses passed through holes in the block at anatomical locations to represent ligaments. Motion capture of the knees during flexion, together with laser scanning and computer modeling, was used to reconstruct contact areas on the bearing surfaces. A method was also developed for measuring tibial component interface forces and moments as a comparative assessment of fixation. The method involved interposing Tekscan pads at locations on the interface. Overall, the crouching machine and the methodology could be used for many different mechanical measurements of total knee designs, adapted especially for comparative or parametric studies. PMID:26802075

  5. Robotic control in knee joint replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Davies, B L; Rodriguez y Baena, F M; Barrett, A R W; Gomes, M P S F; Harris, S J; Jakopec, M; Cobb, J P

    2007-01-01

    A brief history of robotic systems in knee arthroplasty is provided. The place of autonomous robots is then discussed and compared to more recent 'hands-on' robotic systems that can be more cost effective. The case is made for robotic systems to have a clear justification, with improved benefits compared to those from cheaper navigation systems. A number of more recent, smaller, robot systems for knee arthroplasty are also described. A specific example is given of an active constraint medical robot, the ACROBOT system, used in a prospective randomized controlled trial of unicondylar robotic knee arthroplasty in which the robot was compared to conventional surgery. The results of the trial are presented together with a discussion of the need for measures of accuracy to be introduced so that the efficacy of the robotic surgery can be immediately identified, rather than have to wait for a number of years before long-term clinical improvements can be demonstrated. PMID:17315770

  6. The Basic Science of Human Knee Menisci

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Alice J. S.; Bedi, Asheesh; Rodeo, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Information regarding the structure, composition, and function of the knee menisci has been scattered across multiple sources and fields. This review contains a concise, detailed description of the knee menisci—including anatomy, etymology, phylogeny, ultrastructure and biochemistry, vascular anatomy and neuroanatomy, biomechanical function, maturation and aging, and imaging modalities. Evidence Acquisition: A literature search was performed by a review of PubMed and OVID articles published from 1858 to 2011. Results: This study highlights the structural, compositional, and functional characteristics of the menisci, which may be relevant to clinical presentations, diagnosis, and surgical repairs. Conclusions: An understanding of the normal anatomy and biomechanics of the menisci is a necessary prerequisite to understanding the pathogenesis of disorders involving the knee. PMID:23016106

  7. Functional knee assessment with advanced imaging.

    PubMed

    Amano, Keiko; Li, Qi; Ma, C Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is to restore the native stability of the knee joint and to prevent further injury to meniscus and cartilage, yet studies have suggested that joint laxity remains prevalent in varying degrees after ACL reconstruction. Imaging can provide measurements of translational and rotational motions of the tibiofemoral joint that may be too small to detect in routine physical examinations. Various imaging modalities, including fluoroscopy, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have emerged as powerful methods in measuring the minute details involved in joint biomechanics. While each technique has its own strengths and limitations, they have all enhanced our understanding of the knee joint under various stresses and movements. Acquiring the knowledge of the complex and dynamic motions of the knee after surgery would help lead to improved surgical techniques and better patient outcomes. PMID:27052009

  8. Knee osteoarthritis: a review of management options.

    PubMed

    Hussain, S M; Neilly, D W; Baliga, S; Patil, S; Meek, Rmd

    2016-02-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee is a complex peripheral joint disorder with multiple risk factors. The molecular basis of osteoarthritis has been generally accepted; however, the exact pathogenesis is still not known. Management of patients with osteoarthritis involves a comprehensive history, thorough physical examination and appropriate radiological investigation. The relative slow progress in the disease allows a stepwise algorithmic approach in treatment. Non-surgical treatment involves patient education, lifestyle modification and the use of orthotic devises. These can be achieved in the community. Surgical options include joint sparing procedures such as arthroscopyando osteotomy or joint-replacing procedures. Joint-replacing procedures can be isolated to a single compartment such as patellofemoral arthroplasty or unicompartmental knee replacement or total knee arthroplasty. The key to a successful long-term outcome is optimal patient selection, preoperative counselling and good surgical technique. PMID:27330013

  9. Knee instability scores for ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Rahnemai-Azar, Ata A; Naendrup, Jan-Hendrik; Soni, Ashish; Olsen, Adam; Zlotnicki, Jason; Musahl, Volker

    2016-06-01

    Despite abundant biological, biomechanical, and clinical research, return to sport after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury remains a significant challenge. Residual rotatory knee laxity has been identified as one of the factors responsible for poor functional outcome. To improve and standardize the assessment of knee instability, a variety of instability scoring systems is available. Recently, devices to objectively quantify static and dynamic clinical exams have been developed to complement traditional subjective grading systems. These devices enable an improved evaluation of knee instability and possible associated injuries. This additional information may promote the development of new treatment algorithms and allow for individualized treatment. In this review, the different subjective laxity scores as well as complementary objective measuring systems are discussed, along with an introduction of injury to an individualized treatment algorithm. PMID:26980119

  10. Knee Pain in Children: Part I: Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Michael

    2016-01-01

    • On the basis of primarily consensus, due to lack of relevant clinical studies, the information obtained from the history and physical examination is the key to establishing a diagnosis and directing initial management of knee pain. • By applying history and physical examination findings to a diagnosis and management algorithm, clinicians can efficiently and effectively determine the potential cause of the knee pain. • On the basis of primarily consensus, due to lack of relevant clinical studies, the most important step of the evaluation of knee pain is to identify emergent conditions, including limb- and life-threatening conditions (eg, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and malignancy), hip pathology, or conditions associated with effusions. PMID:26729778

  11. Correcting deformity in total knee arthroplasty: Techniques to avoid the release of collateral ligaments in severely deformed knees.

    PubMed

    Mullaji, A B; Shetty, G M

    2016-01-01

    Collateral ligament release is advocated in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) to deal with significant coronal plane deformities, but is also associated with significant disadvantages. We describe steps to avoid release of the collateral (superficial medial and lateral collateral) ligaments during TKA in severely deformed knees, while correcting deformity and balancing the knee. PMID:26733653

  12. Total knee replacement with and without patellar resurfacing: a prospective, randomised trial using the profix total knee system.

    PubMed

    Smith, A J; Wood, D J; Li, M-G

    2008-01-01

    We have examined the differences in clinical outcome of total knee replacement (TKR) with and without patellar resurfacing in a prospective, randomised study of 181 osteoarthritic knees in 142 patients using the Profix total knee system which has a femoral component with features considered to be anatomical and a domed patellar implant. The procedures were carried out between February 1998 and November 2002. A total of 159 TKRs in 142 patients were available for review at a mean of four years (3 to 7). The patients and the clinical evaluator were blinded in this prospective study. Evaluation was undertaken annually by an independent observer using the knee pain scale and the Knee Society clinical rating system. Specific evaluation of anterior knee pain, stair-climbing and rising from a seated to a standing position was also undertaken. No benefit was shown of TKR with patellar resurfacing over that without resurfacing with respect to any of the measured outcomes. In 22 of 73 knees (30.1%) with and 18 of 86 knees (20.9%) without patellar resurfacing there was some degree of anterior knee pain (p = 0.183). No revisions related to the patellofemoral joint were performed in either group. Only one TKR in each group underwent a re-operation related to the patellofemoral joint. A significant association between knee flexion contracture and anterior knee pain was observed in those knees with patellar resurfacing (p = 0.006). PMID:18160498

  13. Arthroscopic approach to the posterior compartment of the knee using a posterior transseptal portal

    PubMed Central

    Ohishi, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Masaaki; Suzuki, Daisuke; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic surgery of the posterior compartment of the knee is difficult when only two anterior portals are used for access because of the inaccessibility of the back of the knee. Since its introduction, the posterior transseptal portal has been widely employed to access lesions in the posterior compartment. However, special care should be taken to avoid neurovascular injuries around the posteromedial, posterolateral, and transseptal portals. Most importantly, popliteal vessel injury should be avoided when creating and using the transseptal portal during surgery. Purpose of the present study is to describe how to avoid the neurovascular injuries during establishing the posterior three portals and to introduce our safer technique to create the transseptal portal. To date, we have performed arthroscopic surgeries via the transseptal portal in the posterior compartments of 161 knees and have not encountered nerve or vascular injury. In our procedure, the posterior septum is perforated with a 1.5-3.0-mm Kirschner wire that is protected by a sheath inserted from the posterolateral portal and monitored from the posteromedial portal to avoid popliteal vessel injury. PMID:26301179

  14. Introduction of total knee arthroplasty in Lithuania

    PubMed Central

    Stucinskas, Justinas; Robertsson, Otto; Wingstrand, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose We have previously reported that the first 10 years of hip arthroplasty in Lithuania resulted in a higher cumulative revision rate than that observed in Sweden. We thus compared the corresponding results after introduaction of total knee replacement in Lithuania. Methods The 10-year revision rate for the first 595 primary ScanKnee arthroplasties inserted in Klaipeda, Lithuania, was compared to that for the first 1,280 ScanKnee primary arthroplasties inserted in Sweden. As in the hip replacement study, only patients with osteoarthritis (OA) were included. Primary knee arthroplasties without patellar resurfacing were included, and the endpoint was revision for any reason other than addition of a patellar component. Results We found that the cumulative revision rate was not statistically significantly different between the groups. The revision pattern was different, however, and we observed 24 isolated patellar component additions in Sweden, but none in Klaipeda. Interpretation Contrary to the results of our previous hip arthroplasty study, the cumulative revision rate after total knee arthroplasty was similar in the two groups. This suggests that compared to hip arthroplasty, the outcome of total knee arthroplasty was less dependent on surgical experience. The large difference regarding isolated patellar component additions may be explained by long-term accumulation of severe OA cases in Lithuania. To patients subject to a newly introduced surgical treatment offering great improvement in quality of life, patellofemoral pain may be a minor problem. Furthermore, patellar problems may not have seemed particularly relevant for the surgeons, considering the disability of other patients waiting to be treated. PMID:19297790

  15. Gait Using Pneumatic Brace for End-Stage Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Cherian, Jeffrey Jai; Starr, Roland; Chughtai, Morad; Mont, Michael A; Harwin, Steven F; Bhave, Anil

    2016-04-01

    More than 20 million individuals in the United States are affected by knee osteoarthritis (OA), which can lead to altered biomechanics and excessive joint loading. The use of an unloader pneumatic brace with extension assist has been proposed as a nonoperative treatment modality that may improve gait mechanics and correct knee malalignment. We assessed the following parameters in patients who have knee OA treated with and without a brace: (1) changes in temporospatial parameters in gait; (2) knee range of motion, knee extension at heel strike, and foot placement; (3) knee joint moments and impulse; and (4) changes in dynamic stiffness and rate of change of knee flexion during midstance to terminal stance. This 2:1 prospective, randomized, single-blinded trial evaluated 36 patients (24 brace and 12 matching). OA knee patients were randomized to receive either a pneumatic unloader brace or a standard nonoperative treatment regimen as the matching cohort for a 3-month period. They underwent evaluation of gait parameters using a three-dimensional gait analysis system at their initial appointment and at 3 months follow-up. All the testing, pre- and postbracing were performed without wearing the brace to examine for retained effects. Treatment with the brace led to significant improvements versus standard treatment in various gait parameters. Patients in the brace group had improvements in walking speed, knee extension at heel strike, total range of motion, knee joint forces, and rate of knee flexion from midstance to terminal stance when compared with the matching cohort. Knee OA patients who used a pneumatic unloader brace for 3 months for at least 3 hours per day had significant improvements various gait parameters when compared with a standard nonoperative therapy cohort. Braced patients demonstrated gait-modifying affects when not wearing the brace. These results are encouraging and suggest that this device represents a promising treatment modality for knee OA that

  16. Kinematic Analysis of a Posterior-stabilized Knee Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhi-Xin; Wen, Liang; Qu, Tie-Bing; Hou, Li-Li; Xiang, Dong; Bin, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Background: The goal of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is to restore knee kinematics. Knee prosthesis design plays a very important role in successful restoration. Here, kinematics models of normal and prosthetic knees were created and validated using previously published data. Methods: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of a healthy, anticorrosive female cadaver were used to establish a model of the entire lower limbs, including the femur, tibia, patella, fibula, distal femur cartilage, and medial and lateral menisci, as well as the anterior cruciate, posterior cruciate, medial collateral, and lateral collateral ligaments. The data from the three-dimensional models of the normal knee joint and a posterior-stabilized (PS) knee prosthesis were imported into finite element analysis software to create the final kinematic model of the TKA prosthesis, which was then validated by comparison with a previous study. The displacement of the medial/lateral femur and the internal rotation angle of the tibia were analyzed during 0–135° flexion. Results: Both the output data trends and the measured values derived from the normal knee's kinematics model were very close to the results reported in a previous in vivo study, suggesting that this model can be used for further analyses. The PS knee prosthesis underwent an abnormal forward displacement compared with the normal knee and has insufficient, or insufficiently aggressive, “rollback” compared with the lateral femur of the normal knee. In addition, a certain degree of reverse rotation occurs during flexion of the PS knee prosthesis. Conclusions: There were still several differences between the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis and a normal knee, suggesting room for improving the design of the PS knee prosthesis. The abnormal kinematics during early flexion shows that the design of the articular surface played a vital role in improving the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis. PMID:25591565

  17. Moxibustion Treatment for Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ang; Wei, Zhi-Jian; Liu, Yi; Li, Bo; Guo, Xing; Feng, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To determine whether the administration of moxibustion is an effective treatment for knee osteoarthritis (KOA). We conducted a search of relevant articles using Medline, EMBASE, the Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library published before October 2015. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities’ Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC scale) and the short form 36 questionnaire (SF-36 scale) were assessed. Evidence grading was evaluated according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Four studies containing 746 participants fulfilled the inclusion criteria in the final analysis. In terms of quality of life (QOL), the meta-analysis of 2 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) showed significantly effects of moxibustion only in bodily pain (BP) compared with those in the control group (n = 348; weighted mean difference [WMD], 4.36; 95% confidence intervals [CIs], 2.27–6.44; P < 0.0001; heterogeneity: χ2 = 1.53, P = 0.22, I2 = 34%) in all of the subcategories of the SF-36 scale, with moderate quality. The meta-analysis of the 2 included trials showed that there was not a statistically significant difference in the pain or function subscale for the WOMAC scale when the 2 groups were compared (n = 322; WMD, 17.63; 95% CI, −23.15–58.41; P = 0.40; heterogeneity: χ2 = 19.42, P < 0.0001, I2 = 95%), with low or moderate quality separately. The administration of moxibustion can to some extent alleviate the symptoms of KOA. More rigorous, randomized controlled trials are required in the future. PMID:27057863

  18. Cystic Lesions of the Mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Daniel; Suby-Long, Thomas; Restrepo, Carlos S

    2016-06-01

    Cystic lesions are commonly seen in the mediastinum, and they may arise from virtually any organ. The vast majority of these lesions are benign and result in no symptoms. When large, cysts may produce symptoms related to compression of adjacent structures. The most common mediastinal cysts are pericardial and foregut duplication cysts. Both computed tomography and magnetic resonance are routinely used to evaluate these lesions. Although computed tomography offers superior spatial resolution, magnetic resonance is useful in differentiating cysts that contain proteinaceous material from solid lesions. Occasionally, cysts arise from solid lesions, such as thymoma or teratoma. Although cysts are alike in appearance, location helps narrowing the differential diagnoses. PMID:27261346

  19. Tibial rotation kinematics subsequent to knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Duane J.; Khatib, Yasser H.; Parker, David A.; Jenkin, Deanne E.; Molnar, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of computer assisted joint replacement has facilitated precise intraoperative measurement of knee kinematics. The changes in “screw home mechanism” (SHM) resulting from Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) with different prostheses and constraints has not yet been accurately described. Methods A pilot study was first completed. Intraoperative kinematic data was collected two groups of 15 patients receiving different prostheses. Results On average, patients lost 5.3° of ER (SD = 6.1°). There was no significant difference between the prostheses or different prosthetic constraints. Conclusions There significant loss of SHM after TKA. Further research is required to understand its impact on patient function. PMID:25829754

  20. Soft tissue balancing in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    MELONI, MARIA CHIARA; HOEDEMAEKER, RUSSALKA W.; VIOLANTE, BRUNO; MAZZOLA, CLAUDIO

    2014-01-01

    A good outcome in total knee arthroplasty depends on many factors: joint alignment, range of motion, patellar tracking and ligament stability. A correct soft tissue balance keeps the joint aligned in flexion and extension, and therefore constitutes the most important factor for durability of the implant. Indeed, incorrect soft tissue balancing is the primary cause of early implant failure necessitating revision surgery. Soft tissue releases, serving to correct imbalances, are performed until the flexion and extension gaps appear symmetrical and balanced. A knee is considered perfectly balanced when the flexion and extension gaps are perfectly rectangular and all the measurements are absolutely equal. PMID:25606540

  1. Safety of knee radiosynovectomy with yttrium - 90

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempińska, M.; Lass, P.; Ćwikła, J. B.; Żbikowski, P.

    2011-09-01

    Radioisotope knee synovectomy is based on an Yttrium - 90 citrate injection (185 - 222 MBq) into the knee joint cavity. The performance of procedure needs participation of a nuclear medicine specialist as well as an orthopedist or a rheumatologist and a technologist, who prepares radiopharmaceuticals. The ionization doses for patients and personnel depend not only on the injected activity, but also on the method and process of injection and the radioactivity measurement procedure used. The aim of this study is the evaluation of the degree of radiation exposure of patients and medical personnel during the performance of therapy with 90Y.

  2. Snapping Pes Syndrome after Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Taketomi, Shuji; Yamagami, Ryota; Tahara, Keitaro; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    Snapping pes syndrome is defined as a snapping sensation in the medial knee caused by pes anserinus and rarely occurs. Snapping pes syndrome after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) has not been reported yet. We experienced two cases with this syndrome after UKA. Conservative treatment was effective in one case, while surgical excision of the gracilis tendon was necessary to relieve painful snapping in the other case. The main cause of the first case might be posteromedial overhang of the tibial tray that reached up to 5 mm. The probable cause of the second case was posteromedial overhang of the mobile bearing. PMID:27274476

  3. Anterolateral rotatory instability of the knee.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Daniel; Griffith, Chad; Lesniak, Bryson; Lopomo, Nicola; Grassi, Alberto; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Fu, Freddie H; Musahl, Volker

    2015-10-01

    Recent publications have generated renewed interest in the anatomy of the anterolateral capsule. Knowledge of the biomechanical function of the anterolateral components is lacking. Further research is required to evaluate the influence of the anterolateral capsule on rotatory laxity of the knee. The role of surgical procedures, such as an extra-articular tenodesis or lateral plasty, has to be defined based on quantification of the injury. This article seeks to summarize the current literature and discusses the role of the anterolateral capsule and reconstructive techniques in combined ligamentous knee trauma. Level of evidence V. PMID:25941044

  4. [Multifocal Vitelliform Retinal Lesion].

    PubMed

    Streicher, T; Špirková, J; Ilavská, M

    2015-06-01

    The authors present retrospective follow up of patient with bilateral multifocal vitelliform retinal lesion during the 18 years period. At this time, spontaneous improvement of objective picture on retina and subjective visual troubles was observed. It is probable, that this case is a part of the same symptom complex as a variant of Best´s hereditary disease. This conclusion was based on initial stadium of phenotypical expressivity and additional evaluations. The course and outcomes of visual functions were different. The hereditary transmission was not confirmed. PMID:26201364

  5. Unexpected wear of an unicompartimental knee arthroplasty in oxidized zirconium.

    PubMed

    Luyet, Anais; Fischer, Jean-François; Jolles, Brigitte M; Lunebourg, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    Unicompartimental knee arthroplasty is a successful procedure for the treatment of localized osteoarthritis to one compartment of the knee with good long-term results. However, several modes of failure of unicompartimental knee arthroplasty have been described, namely aseptic or septic loosening, progression of disease, wear, and instability. Metallosis after unicompartimental knee arthroplasty is rarely reported and is most often related with polyethylene wear or break. We report on a case of rapid failure of unicompartimental knee arthroplasty in oxidized zirconium associated with metallosis secondary to the dislocation of the polyethylene. PMID:26790806

  6. Progressive foot drop caused by below-knee compression stocking after spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Karan; Butler, Joseph S.; Benton, Adam; Molloy, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Foot drop is a debilitating condition, which may take many months to recover. The most common cause of foot drop is a neuropathy of the common peroneal nerve (CPN). However, similar symptoms can be caused by proximal lesions of the sciatic nerve, lumbar plexus or L5 nerve root. We present a rare and unusual case of a patient undergoing spinal surgery at the level of L5/S1 and presenting 4 weeks postoperatively with progressive foot drop. Although the initial concern was a postoperative lesion at L5, the cause for this delayed presentation was extrinsic compression of the CPN at the level of the fibular head by a tight-fitting below-knee thromboembolic deterrent stocking. Compression stockings are widely used in all branches of medicine and in the community. It is important to recognize this potential cause of progressive foot drop early as it is preventable by simple measures, which can significantly reduce morbidity.

  7. Progressive foot drop caused by below-knee compression stocking after spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Karan; Butler, Joseph S; Benton, Adam; Molloy, Sean

    2016-09-01

    Foot drop is a debilitating condition, which may take many months to recover. The most common cause of foot drop is a neuropathy of the common peroneal nerve (CPN). However, similar symptoms can be caused by proximal lesions of the sciatic nerve, lumbar plexus or L5 nerve root. We present a rare and unusual case of a patient undergoing spinal surgery at the level of L5/S1 and presenting 4 weeks postoperatively with progressive foot drop. Although the initial concern was a postoperative lesion at L5, the cause for this delayed presentation was extrinsic compression of the CPN at the level of the fibular head by a tight-fitting below-knee thromboembolic deterrent stocking. Compression stockings are widely used in all branches of medicine and in the community. It is important to recognize this potential cause of progressive foot drop early as it is preventable by simple measures, which can significantly reduce morbidity. PMID:27617106

  8. Blastomycosis infection of the knee treated with staged total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Ian S; Day, Shandra R; Moore, Christopher C; Browne, James A

    2015-12-01

    Blastomycosis is a rare fungal disease that can cause intraarticular infection and joint destruction requiring surgical reconstruction. We describe a patient who presented with destruction of the knee joint of unknown etiology. The patient was initially treated with debridement and spacer placement followed by antifungal therapy after cultures grew blastomycosis. Following adequate treatment of the infection, the patient was taken back to the operating room for reconstruction with a total knee arthroplasty. The patient had a successful outcome with no evidence of infection at two years following surgery. To our knowledge, this case report represents the first documented case in which a blastomycotic infection of a native knee was successfully treated with a two-stage total knee arthroplasty. PMID:26081592

  9. The SIGN nail for knee fusion: technique and clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Duane Ray; Anderson, Lucas Aaron; Haller, Justin M.; Feyissa, Abebe Chala

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the efficacy of using the SIGN nail for instrumented knee fusion. Methods: Six consecutive patients (seven knees, three males) with an average age of 30.5 years (range, 18–50 years) underwent a knee arthrodesis with SIGN nail (mean follow-up 10.7 months; range, 8–14 months). Diagnoses included tuberculosis (two knees), congenital knee dislocation in two knees (one patient), bacterial septic arthritis (one knee), malunited spontaneous fusion (one knee), and severe gout with 90° flexion contracture (one knee). The nail was inserted through an anteromedial entry point on the femur and full weightbearing was permitted immediately. Results: All knees had clinical and radiographic evidence of fusion at final follow-up and none required further surgery. Four of six patients ambulated without assistive device, and all patients reported improved overall physical function. There were no post-operative complications. Conclusion: The technique described utilizing the SIGN nail is both safe and effective for knee arthrodesis and useful for austere environments with limited fluoroscopy and implant options. PMID:27163095

  10. Patient function after a posterior stabilizing total knee arthroplasty: cam-post engagement and knee kinematics.

    PubMed

    Suggs, Jeremy F; Hanson, George R; Park, Sang Eun; Moynihan, Angela L; Li, Guoan

    2008-03-01

    Even though posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty has been widely used in surgery, how the cam-post mechanism (posterior substituting mechanism) affects knee joint kinematics and function in patients is not known. The objective of the present study was to investigate posterior femoral translation, internal tibial rotation, tibiofemoral contact, and cam-post engagement of total knee arthroplasty patients during in vivo weight-bearing flexion. Twenty-four knees with a PS TKA were investigated while performing a single leg weight-bearing lunge from full extension to maximum flexion as images were recorded using a dual fluoroscopic system. The in vivo knee position at each targeted flexion angle was reproduced using 3D TKA models and the fluoroscopic images. The kinematics of the knee was measured from the series of the total knee arthroplasty models. The cam-post engagement was determined when the surface model of the femoral cam overlapped with that of the tibial post. The mean maximum flexion angle for all the subjects was 112.5 +/- 13.1 degrees . The mean flexion angle where cam-post engagement was observed was 91.1 +/- 10.9 degrees . The femur moved anteriorly from 0 degrees to 30 degrees and posteriorly through the rest of the flexion range. The internal tibial rotation increased approximately 6 degrees from full extension to 90 degrees of flexion and decreased slightly with further flexion. Both the medial and lateral contact point moved posteriorly from 0 degrees to 30 degrees , remained relatively constant from 30 degrees to 90 degrees , and then moved further posterior from 90 degrees to maximum flexion. The in vivo cam-post engagement corresponded to increased posterior translation and reduced internal tibial rotation at high flexion of the posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty. The initial cam-post engagement was also mildly correlated with the maximum flexion angle of the knee (R = 0.51, p = 0.019). A later cam-post engagement might

  11. Financial impact of radiological reports on medical-legal evaluation of compensation for meniscal lesions.

    PubMed

    Lelario, M; Ciuffreda, P; Lupo, P; Bristogiannis, C; Vinci, R; Stoppino, L P; De Filippo, M; Macarini, L

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate any discrepancy between radiological reports for clinical purposes and for medicolegal purposes and to quantify its economic impact on repayments made by private insurance companies for meniscal injuries of the knee. The medical records obtained pertaining to 108 knee injury patients (mean age 43.3 years) assessed over a period of 12 months were analysed. Clinical medical reports, aimed at assessing the lesion, and medicolegal reports, drawn up with a view to quantifying compensation, were compared. Unlike reports for clinical purposes in reports for medicolegal purposes, in the evaluation of meniscal lesions, in addition to morphological features of lesions, chronological, topographical, severity and exclusion criteria were applied. To estimate the economic impact resulting from the biological damage, we consulted an actuarial table based on the 9-point minor incapacity classification system. Meniscal lesions not compatible with a traumatic event and therefore not eligible for an insurance payout were found in 56 patients. Of these, 37 failed exclusion criteria, while 19 failed to meet chronological criteria. This difference resulted in a reduction in compensation made by private insurance companies with savings estimated with a saving between euro 203,715.41 and euro 622,315.39. The use of a clinical report for medicolegal purposes can be a source of valuation error, as chronological and/or dynamic information regarding the trauma mechanism may be lacking. Therefore, the use of a full radiological appraisal allows a better damage's assessment and an adequate compensation for injuries. PMID:23949935

  12. High prevalence of anterolateral ligament abnormalities in magnetic resonance images of anterior cruciate ligament-injured knees.

    PubMed

    Claes, Steven; Bartholomeeusen, Stijn; Bellemans, Johan

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the newly described anterolateral ligament of the human knee on magnetic resonance imaging and to describe its eventual radiological abnormalities in anterior cruciate ligament-injured subjects. A retrospective cohort study on a series of consecutive subjects undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstructive surgery was performed. The MR images of 206 included knees were studied and the status of the anterolateral ligament status was judged to be either "non-visualized", "normal" or "abnormal". Of all the visualized anterolateral ligaments, 44 (21.3%) were considered uninjured, while 162 (78.8%) knees demonstrated radiological ALL abnormalities. The majority of ALL abnormalities were situated in the distal part of the ligament (77.8%). In conclusion, the anterolateral ligament can be identified on classic knee magnetic resonance images. Although anterior cruciate ligament injured subjects often demonstrated associated anterolateral ligament lesions, further research is needed in order to establish the clinical relevance of these highly frequent radiological abnormalities. PMID:24873084

  13. Osteoarthritis of the knees in the COPCORD world.

    PubMed

    Haq, Syed A; Davatchi, Fereydoun

    2011-05-01

    This paper examines and summarizes data on knee osteoarthritis (AO) in Community Oriented Program For Control Of Rheumatic Disorders (COPCORD) publications. A literature search was made through PubMed, Google, Proceedings of Asia-Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology (APLAR) congresses, and Abstracts from APLAR congresses. Data were compiled to examine the prevalence of knee OA and knee pain, sex ratio, urban/rural differences and other risk factors. Data on knee pain and OA were available in a total of 36 COPCORD publications. The pooled prevalence of knee OA was 7.9% in adults above the age of 15 years. It was more common in women. Overweight, squatting and cycling appeared to be modifiable risk factors for knee OA. OA of the knee is the commonest rheumatic disease in studied communities. Further research is needed for identification of its modifiable risk factors and development of strategies for reduction of the community burden of this malady. PMID:21518310

  14. Knee kinetics during walking at different speeds in people who have undergone total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Jodie A; Webster, Kate E; Feller, Julian A; Menz, Hylton B

    2010-06-01

    Previous research suggests that most people who have undergone total knee replacement (TKR) walk with a sagittal knee moment profile and peak knee moments that are different from normal. However, most previous research has consisted of small samples of patients with prostheses that are no longer in use. The aim of this study was to compare the peak knee moments and patterns of the moment waveforms of walking at different speeds between a large cohort of TKR patients with the Genesis-II PS prosthesis (Smith and Nephew, Memphis, USA) and matched control participants. Forty patients 12months following TKR and 40 control participants were assessed during walking at self-selected comfortable and fast speeds using motion analysis. Individual sagittal plane knee moment graphs were assessed for the presence of a biphasic pattern. Peak sagittal and coronal plane knee moments were compared between groups using a univariate ANOVA with walking speed as a covariate. A biphasic moment pattern was present in 87% and 92% of TKR patients when walking at comfortable and fast speeds, respectively. The knee flexor (p<0.001 at both speeds), extensor (p=0.004 at comfortable speed and p<0.001 at fast speed) and adductor (p<0.001 at both speeds) moments were reduced in the TKR patients. The high proportion of TKR patients with biphasic moment patterns was unexpected, but suggests that modern prostheses can result in more normal outcomes. Nonetheless, the peak knee moments of patients were reduced compared to controls. Although these reductions may be beneficial to the survival of the prosthesis, these abnormalities may also indicate suboptimal functional outcome from TKR. PMID:20510613

  15. A bio-inspired test system for bionic above-knee prosthetic knees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dai-Hua; Xu, Lei; Fu, Qiang; Yuan, Gang

    2013-04-01

    Recently, prosthetic knees in the developing stage are usually tested by installing them on amputees' stumps directly or on above-knee prostheses (AKPs) test platforms. Although amputees can fully provide the actual motion state of the thigh, immature prosthetic knees may hurt amputees. For AKPs test platforms, it just can partly simulate the actual motion state of the thigh with limitation of the motion curve of the thigh, the merits or demerits of newly developed bionic above-knee prosthetic knees cannot be accessed thoroughly. Aiming at the defects of two testing methods, this paper presents a bio-inspired AKPs test system for bionic above-knee prosthetic knees. The proposed bio-inspired AKPs test system is composed of a AKPs test platform, a control system, and a bio-inspired system. The AKPs test platform generates the motion of the thigh simulation mechanism (TSM) via two screw pairs with servo motors. The bio-inspired system includes the tester and the bio-inspired sensor wore by the tester. The control system, which is inspired by the bio-inspired system, generates the control command signal to move the TSM of the AKPs test platform. The bio-inspired AKPs test system is developed and experimentally tested with a commercially available prosthetic knee. The research results show that the bio-inspired AKPs test system can not only ensure the safety of the testers, but also track all kinds of the actual motion state of the thigh of the testers in real time.

  16. A spatial model of the knee for the preoperative planning of knee surgery.

    PubMed

    Olanlokun, K F T; Wills, D P M

    2002-01-01

    A model on the spatial mechanical behaviour of the passive knee is presented. The femoral articular surfaces were represented by generalized, sagittally elliptical, toroidal surfaces. The medial and lateral tibial articular surfaces were represented by a dished spherical surface and the lower hemihyperbolic region of a torus respectively. Anatomical articular cartilage, knee ligaments and the posterior capsule were represented by spring-like deformable elements with non-linear load versus deflection characteristics. All the forces that act on the femur relative to the tibia were represented by three orthogonal forces and three associated moments. Spatial, articulation-dependent femorotibial kinematic constraint equations of the passive knee were formulated in an analytically explicit manner, based on the natural coordinates of the articular surfaces. The constraint equations were solved algebraically in closed form. Equations were derived that describe spatial femoro-tibial motion, ligament length, ligament strain, ligament-based elastic potential energy and the quasi-static equilibrium of the passive knee. Software was written, simulations on the motion characteristics and load versus deflection characteristics of the knee were carried out and graphical results were presented. The simulation of planar flexion/extension was almost spontaneous. The time taken to simulate spatial six-degree-of-freedom femoro-tibial motion was less than 2.5 min. The models were found to be capable of representing real-life passive knees to a high degree of satisfaction. It has been demonstrated that the models can provide knee surgeons with additional information on major aspects of the preoperative planning of knee surgery. The models can be used to enhance the preoperative planning of ligament reconstruction, articular surfaces related surgery, osteotomy and patellar tendon transfer surgery. PMID:11908484

  17. Knee Joint Loads and Surrounding Muscle Forces during Stair Ascent in Patients with Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rasnick, Robert; Standifird, Tyler; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A.; Cates, Harold E.

    2016-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is commonly used to correct end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, difficulty with stair climbing often persists and prolongs the challenges of TKR patents. Complete understanding of loading at the knee is of great interest in order to aid patient populations, implant manufacturers, rehabilitation, and future healthcare research. Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation approximates joint loading and corresponding muscle forces during a movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if knee joint loadings following TKR are recovered to the level of healthy individuals, and determine the differences in muscle forces causing those loadings. Data from five healthy and five TKR patients were selected for musculoskeletal simulation. Variables of interest included knee joint reaction forces (JRF) and the corresponding muscle forces. A paired samples t-test was used to detect differences between groups for each variable of interest (p<0.05). No differences were observed for peak joint compressive forces between groups. Some muscle force compensatory strategies appear to be present in both the loading and push-off phases. Evidence from knee extension moment and muscle forces during the loading response phase indicates the presence of deficits in TKR in quadriceps muscle force production during stair ascent. This result combined with greater flexor muscle forces resulted in similar compressive JRF during loading response between groups. PMID:27258086

  18. Variability of TKR Knee Kinematics and Relationship with Gait Kinetics: Implications for Total Knee Wear

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Markus A.

    2015-01-01

    Several factors, including compressive load and knee kinematics, have been shown to influence wear. External knee moments (a surrogate for load) have recently been correlated with the medial and lateral wear scar areas of an unconstrained, PCL retaining knee design. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether differences in kinetics during level walking are accompanied by specific differences in relative knee kinematics. Thirty TKR patients were gait tested using the point cluster technique to obtain 3D motions of the knee. External knee moments were calculated from ground reaction forces recorded with a multicomponent force plate. The subjects were separated into two distinct anteroposterior (AP) motion categories: a low motion group and a high motion group. Similarly, the low and high motion groups for internal-external (IE) rotation were also identified. For the IE motion, there was no significant difference between the transverse internal rotation moments between the two IE motion groups. However for the AP motion groups, a higher external peak flexion moment was found for the group displaying less AP motion. These observations suggest that subjects with higher joint moments execute smaller ranges of AP motion and thus are likely to incur less wear. PMID:25866770

  19. Knee Joint Loads and Surrounding Muscle Forces during Stair Ascent in Patients with Total Knee Replacement.

    PubMed

    Rasnick, Robert; Standifird, Tyler; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Cates, Harold E; Zhang, Songning

    2016-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is commonly used to correct end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, difficulty with stair climbing often persists and prolongs the challenges of TKR patents. Complete understanding of loading at the knee is of great interest in order to aid patient populations, implant manufacturers, rehabilitation, and future healthcare research. Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation approximates joint loading and corresponding muscle forces during a movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if knee joint loadings following TKR are recovered to the level of healthy individuals, and determine the differences in muscle forces causing those loadings. Data from five healthy and five TKR patients were selected for musculoskeletal simulation. Variables of interest included knee joint reaction forces (JRF) and the corresponding muscle forces. A paired samples t-test was used to detect differences between groups for each variable of interest (p<0.05). No differences were observed for peak joint compressive forces between groups. Some muscle force compensatory strategies appear to be present in both the loading and push-off phases. Evidence from knee extension moment and muscle forces during the loading response phase indicates the presence of deficits in TKR in quadriceps muscle force production during stair ascent. This result combined with greater flexor muscle forces resulted in similar compressive JRF during loading response between groups. PMID:27258086

  20. Kinematics and Mechanical Properties of Knees following Patellar Replacing and Patellar Retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rongying; Liu, Yanqiang; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Knee injury is a common medical issue. A full understanding of the kinematics and mechanical properties of knees following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) repair utilizing patellar replacement (only the base of the patella is replaced) versus patellar retaining surgical techniques is still lacking. In the current paper, we investigated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging data from knees repaired by these two methods and evaluated total knee models created using imaging reconstruction technology that simulated gait conditions. Results revealed that patellar replacement had little influence on tibiofemoral kinematics, although the tibia-surface equivalent stress increased slightly. By contrast, patellar replacement had a significant influence on the patellofemoral joint; patellar internal rotation, external rotation, and medial-lateral translation were all increased. Moreover, the stress distribution on patellar prostheses was altered, resulting in an increased surface maximal equivalent stress on the corresponding area. Moreover, during the gait cycle, we found that the area with maximal equivalent stress shifted its position. Finally, the patellofemoral joint showed decreased motion stability. From the view of kinematics and mechanics, this paper suggests that patella should be retained during TKA if it is possible. The present study presented approaches and technologies for evaluating kinematics and mechanical properties of total knee joint after TKA under gait loads. PMID:27057134

  1. Metallosis Presenting as Knee Pain 26 years after Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sharareh, Behnam; Phan, Duy L.; Goreal, Wamda; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Metallosis occurs when periprosthetic soft tissues, synovium, and/or bone is infiltrated by metallic debris secondary to metal-on-metal wear. This debris can cause a chronic inflammatory reaction leading to joint instability, pain, and swelling, and may cause osteolysis, implant looseningand ultimately implant failure. Case Report: An 81 year old female, with a history of primary left total knee arthroplasty, presented with a 6 month history of left knee pain, swelling, and limited range of motion following a fall. Radiographs and joint aspiration were performed, with results that showed no evidence of periprosthetic trauma or infection but were suspicious for chronic metallosis. The patient underwent revision total knee replacement of the left knee which revealed extensive necrotic black metal debris throughout the joint space. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of a foreign body reaction consistent with metallosis. Conclusion: This case is a rare example of chronic metallosis presenting 26 years following total knee replacement. Treatment with revision total knee replacement is the consensus management choice to avoid further destruction of the bone and joint capsule that can occur with metal-induced inflammation. PMID:27299048

  2. Kinematics and Mechanical Properties of Knees following Patellar Replacing and Patellar Retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rongying; Liu, Yanqiang; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Knee injury is a common medical issue. A full understanding of the kinematics and mechanical properties of knees following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) repair utilizing patellar replacement (only the base of the patella is replaced) versus patellar retaining surgical techniques is still lacking. In the current paper, we investigated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging data from knees repaired by these two methods and evaluated total knee models created using imaging reconstruction technology that simulated gait conditions. Results revealed that patellar replacement had little influence on tibiofemoral kinematics, although the tibia-surface equivalent stress increased slightly. By contrast, patellar replacement had a significant influence on the patellofemoral joint; patellar internal rotation, external rotation, and medial-lateral translation were all increased. Moreover, the stress distribution on patellar prostheses was altered, resulting in an increased surface maximal equivalent stress on the corresponding area. Moreover, during the gait cycle, we found that the area with maximal equivalent stress shifted its position. Finally, the patellofemoral joint showed decreased motion stability. From the view of kinematics and mechanics, this paper suggests that patella should be retained during TKA if it is possible. The present study presented approaches and technologies for evaluating kinematics and mechanical properties of total knee joint after TKA under gait loads. PMID:27057134

  3. Eugen Bircher (1882-1956) the first knee surgeon to use diagnostic arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kieser, Christopher W; Jackson, Robert W

    2003-09-01

    Eugen Bircher was a strong advocate of diagnostic arthroscopy as shown in several papers on the topic of internal derangements of the knee published between 1921 and 1926. During that time, he performed about 60 endoscopic procedures, which usually preceded a meniscectomy. We believe that this was the first time arthroscopy was used in a large scale for clinical purposes. Bircher was the head surgeon of the busy provincial Aarau General Hospital, a right-wing politician, and a highly ranked army officer. His interest in knee surgery was supported by his friend Fritz Steinmann, who was the "man of the pin" and an early promoter of skeletal traction for fracture treatment. Bircher believed in the early surgical treatment of meniscal lesions and, later, in the reconstruction of cruciate ligament lesions. He used the Jacobaeus thoracolaparoscope for arthroscopy, but it had poor endoscopic qualities. The electric lamp at the tip of the optical device was not mechanically protected and was therefore endangered by every manipulation within the joint space. Also, the 90 degrees optical system delivered a dark image. By the late 1920s, Bircher had developed the technique of double-contrast arthrography, and he gave up endoscopy by 1930. In 1935, he left surgery and took a military command in the Swiss army; later he was a representative of the Farmers Party in the National Parliament until his death. PMID:12966386

  4. Patellar Subluxation With Early-Phase Synovial Chondromatosis of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Bashaireh, Khaldoon M

    2016-01-01

    Primary synovial chondromatosis is a rare, benign, monoarticular disease process that affects the synovial membrane of the joint, the synovial sheath, or the bursa around the joint. The etiology is unknown, but it has been associated with trauma in some cases. Although it is a benign lesion, if left untreated, it may lead to early secondary osteoarthritis of the joint. The knee joint is affected in 50% to 65% of cases, followed by the elbow and the hip. This article reports a 30-year-old active woman who presented to the author's clinic with a large infrapatellar mass that caused lateral subluxation of the patella, swelling, and episodic pain with crepitations 14 months after direct trauma to the knee. Clinical examination, magnetic resonance imaging, and arthroscopy revealed a large infrapatellar mass causing lateral subluxation of the patella with no loose bodies. Hoffa's disease, para-articular osteochondroma, and early-phase synovial chondromatosis were considered in the differential diagnosis. The histopathologic and clinical features were consistent with early synovial chondromatosis. The patient underwent local excision of the mass through a medial parapatellar arthrotomy. At 5 years of follow-up, she had no recurrence of the lesion or progression of the disease. Early diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis with local excision offers a reliable cure. However, long-term follow-up is advised because of the high recurrence rates as well as the risk of metaplastic transformation. PMID:26726983

  5. Taking care of your new knee joint

    MedlinePlus

    ... Avoid putting your pants on while standing up. Sit on a chair or the edge of your ... When you are sitting: Try not to sit in the same position for more than 45 to 60 minutes at a time. Keep your feet and knees pointed straight ahead, not ...

  6. Energy Recovery in Individuals with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sparling, Tawnee L.; Schmitt, Daniel; Miller, Charlotte E.; Guilak, Farshid; Somers, Tamara J.; Keefe, Francis J.; Queen, Robin M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pathological gaits have been shown to limit transfer between potential (PE) and kinetic (KE) energy during walking, which can increase locomotor costs. The purpose of this study was to examine whether energy exchange would be limited in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Ground reaction forces during walking were collected from 93 subjects with symptomatic knee OA (self-selected and fast speeds) and 13 healthy controls (self-selected speed) and used to calculate their center of mass (COM) movements, PE and KE relationships, and energy recovery during a stride. Correlations and linear regressions examined the impact of energy fluctuation phase and amplitude, walking velocity, body mass, self-reported pain, and radiographic severity on recovery. Paired t-tests were run to compare energy recovery between cohorts. Results Symptomatic knee OA subjects displayed lower energetic recovery during self-selected walking speeds than healthy controls (p=0.0018). PE and KE phase relationships explained the majority (66%) of variance in recovery. Recovery had a complex relationship with velocity and its change across speeds was significantly influenced by the self-selected walking speed of each subject. Neither radiographic OA scores nor subject self-reported measures demonstrated any relationship with energy recovery. Conclusions Knee OA reduces effective exchange of PE and KE, potentially increasing the muscular work required to control movements of the COM. Gait retraining may return subjects to more normal patterns of energy exchange and allow them to reduce fatigue. PMID:24752039

  7. Periprosthetic Fractures Following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Ki

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic fractures after total knee arthroplasty may occur in any part of the femur, tibia and patella, and the most common pattern involves the supracondylar area of the distal femur. Supracondylar periprosthetic fractures frequently occur above a well-fixed prosthesis, and risk factors include anterior femoral cortical notching and use of the rotational constrained implant. Periprosthetic tibial fractures are frequently associated with loose components and malalignment or malposition of implants. Fractures of the patella are much less common and associated with rheumatoid arthritis, use of steroid, osteonecrosis and malalignment of implants. Most patients with periprosthetic fractures around the knee are the elderly with poor bone quality. There are many difficulties and increased risk of nonunion after treatment because reduction and internal fixation is interfered with by preexisting prosthesis and bone cement. Additionally, previous soft tissue injury is another disadvantageous condition for bone healing. Many authors reported good clinical outcomes after non-operative treatment of undisplaced or minimally displaced periprosthetic fractures; however, open reduction or revision arthroplasty was required in displaced fractures or fractures with unstable prosthesis. Periprosthetic fractures around the knee should be prevented by appropriate technique during total knee arthroplasty. Nevertheless, if a periprosthetic fracture occurs, an appropriate treatment method should be selected considering the stability of the prosthesis, displacement of fracture and bone quality. PMID:25750888

  8. Minimally invasive knee arthroplasty: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Tria, Alfred J; Scuderi, Giles R

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for arthroplasty of the knee began with surgery for unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA). Partial knee replacements were designed in the 1970s and were amenable to a more limited exposure. In the 1990s Repicci popularized the MIS for UKA. Surgeons began to apply his concepts to total knee arthroplasty. Four MIS surgical techniques were developed: quadriceps sparing, mini-mid vastus, mini-subvastus, and mini-medial parapatellar. The quadriceps sparing technique is the most limited one and is also the most difficult. However, it is the least invasive and allows rapid recovery. The mini-midvastus is the most common technique because it affords slightly better exposure and can be extended. The mini-subvastus technique entirely avoids incising the quadriceps extensor mechanism but is time consuming and difficult in the obese and in the muscular male patient. The mini-parapatellar technique is most familiar to surgeons and represents a good starting point for surgeons who are learning the techniques. The surgeries are easier with smaller instruments but can be performed with standard ones. The techniques are accurate and do lead to a more rapid recovery, with less pain, less blood loss, and greater motion if they are appropriately performed. PMID:26601062

  9. [Chronic sports injuries of the knee joint].

    PubMed

    Mannil, M; Andreisek, G; Weishaupt, D; Fischer, M A

    2016-05-01

    Chronic sports injuries of the knee joint are common and mainly caused by repetitive (micro) trauma and exertion. Chronic insertion tendinopathies and avulsion fractures and symptoms related to entrapment, friction and impingement can be pathophysiologically distinguished in athletes. In this review, we depict the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the most commonly occurring pathologies. PMID:27118369

  10. Microfracture for the treatment of cartilage defects in the knee joint - A golden standard?

    PubMed

    Erggelet, Christoph; Vavken, P

    2016-01-01

    The evidence for the effectiveness of the microfracture procedure is largely derived from case series and few randomized trials. Clinical outcomes improve with microfracture for the most part, but in some studies these effects are not sustained. The quality of cartilage repair following microfracture is variable and inconsistent due to unknown reasons. Younger patients have better clinical outcomes and quality of cartilage repair than older patients. When lesion location was shown to affect microfracture outcome, patients with lesions of the femoral condyle have the best clinical improvements and quality of cartilage repair compared with patients who had lesions in other areas. Patients with smaller lesions have better clinical improvement than patients with larger lesions. The necessity of long postoperative CPM and restricted weight bearing is widely accepted but not completely supported by solid data. Maybe new developments like the scaffold augmented microfracture(6) will show even more consistent clinical and biological results as well as faster rehabilitation for the treatment of small to medium sized cartilage defects in younger individuals. All in all there is limited evidence that micro fracture should be accepted as gold standard for the treatment of cartilage lesions in the knee joint. There is no study available which compares empty controls or non-surgical treatment/physiotherapy with microfracture. According to the literature there is even evidence for self regeneration of cartilage lesions. The natural history of damaged cartilage seems to be written e.g. by inflammatory processes, genetic predisposition and other factors. Possibly that explains the large variety of the clinical outcome after micro fracture and possibly the standard tools for evaluation of new technologies (randomized controlled trials, case series, etc.) are not sufficient (anymore). Future technologies will be evaluated by big data from international registries for earlier

  11. Influence of Bicompartmental Knee Replacement on Stand-to-Sit Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, He; Frame, Jeff; Rolston, Lindsey

    2012-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis often occurs in medial and patellofemoral compartments. A bicompartmental knee replacement system replaces these two affected knee compartments and keeps the lateral compartment and cruciate ligaments intact. It is yet to be determined whether limbs with bicompartmental knee systems can demonstrate frontal-plane knee mechanics…

  12. Andersson lesion in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Dhakad, Urmila; Das, Siddharth K

    2013-01-01

    A middle-aged male patient developed acute back pain and a lumbar vertebral lesion following trivial physical trauma. The lesion was considered as tuberculous on vertebral x-rays and MRI. After biopsy of the lesion and spinal fixation, the patient was kept on empirical antituberculous treatment (ATT) to which he did not respond. On re-evaluation he was diagnosed to have an Andersson lesion in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). ATT was stopped and he was successfully managed by rest, steroids, methotrexate and sulfasalazine. A careful look at the patient's plain x-ray spine and awareness about the lesion can avoid misdiagnosis of this characteristic vertebral lesion found in AS. PMID:23559648

  13. Nonsurgical or Surgical Treatment of ACL Injuries: Knee Function, Sports Participation, and Knee Reinjury

    PubMed Central

    Grindem, Hege; Eitzen, Ingrid; Engebretsen, Lars; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Risberg, May Arna

    2014-01-01

    Background: While there are many opinions about the expected knee function, sports participation, and risk of knee reinjury following nonsurgical treatment of injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), there is a lack of knowledge about the clinical course following nonsurgical treatment compared with that after surgical treatment. Methods: This prospective cohort study included 143 patients with an ACL injury. Isokinetic knee extension and flexion strength and patient-reported knee function as recorded on the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) 2000 form were collected at baseline, six weeks, and two years. Sports participation was reported monthly for two years with use of an online activity survey. Knee reinjuries were reported at the follow-up evaluations and in a monthly online survey. Repeated analysis of variance (ANOVA), generalized estimating equation (GEE) models, and Cox regression analysis were used to analyze group differences in functional outcomes, sports participation, and knee reinjuries, respectively. Results: The surgically treated patients (n = 100) were significantly younger, more likely to participate in level-I sports, and less likely to participate in level-II sports prior to injury than the nonsurgically treated patients (n = 43). There were no significant group-by-time effects on functional outcome. The crude analysis showed that surgically treated patients were more likely to sustain a knee reinjury and to participate in level-I sports in the second year of the follow-up period. After propensity score adjustment, these differences were nonsignificant; however, the nonsurgically treated patients were significantly more likely to participate in level-II sports during the first year of the follow-up period and in level-III sports over the two years. After two years, 30% of all patients had an extensor strength deficit, 31% had a flexor strength deficit, 20% had patient-reported knee function below the normal range, and

  14. Laser arthroscopic surgery of the shoulder and knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Chadwick F.; Johansen, Ed; Bonvalet, Todd; Sutter, Leroy V., Jr.; Marshall, G. June

    1990-06-01

    The laser is used less in orthopaedics than in any other medical specialty. Improving technology and the impressive effect of the CO2 laser on orthopaedic tissues has, however, accelerated the interest of orthopaedic surgeons over the past two years. The carbon dioxide laser is now commonly used in orthopaedics for difficult to access lesions of the knee - particularly those of a degenerative nature with high surface area and low volume. The results are presented in this paper and reveal no evidence of lasting complications. Although several types of lasers are being experimentally utilized in orthopaedics, the YAG and CO2 lasers are the only lasers commonly utilized. The YAG laser is utilized for shoulder arthroscopy and offers the advantage of passage of energy through fiber and the ability to utilize the tool in an aqueous environment. It is too early to determine as to whether or not the YAG laser or the CO2 laser will be the most efficient energy delivery system for use in the shoulder.

  15. [Diagnostic arthroscopy and arthroscopic surgery: experiences with 500 knee arthroscopies].

    PubMed

    Glinz, W

    1979-05-01

    A diagnosis by clinical examination and arthrography was not possible in 160 out of 500 arthroscopically examined patients, most of them with post-traumatic knee disorders. In 157 cases the clinical diagnosis was wrong, and in another 58 cases incomplete. Only in 89 patients (18%) arthroscopy proved the clinical diagnosis to be correct. At arthroscopy, a meniscal injury was found in 156 patients (medial meniscus 57, lateral meniscus 64, both menisci 8). With regard to the menisci a previous arthrography was found correct only in 103 out of 213 cases, i.e. in 48%. Lesions of the articular cartilage were present in 210 patients, although they were expected clinically in only one third of these cases. Normal intraarticular structures were found in 95 examinations. The arthroscopic examination was insufficient three times because of a protruding fat pad, and wrong in 2 patients in whom an arthroscopically diagnosed meniscal tear could not be found at arthrotomy. The morbidity of arthroscopy is small. Only complications: A local allergic reaction because of a wound spray in four cases, bronchial asthma following general anesthesia in two patients. No infection occurred. Several therapeutic procedures may be carried out through the arthroscope. So loose bodies were removed from the joint in 39 and partial meniscectomy performed in 13 patients, all of them being treated as out-patients. PMID:468577

  16. Focal lesions in normal liver.

    PubMed

    Semelka, Richard C; Martin, Diego R; Balci, N Cem

    2005-10-01

    A variety of lesions occur in the normal liver. This review will describe the most common benign, malignant, and infectious lesions. Illustration will be made of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the most common of these. Due to the high accuracy for liver lesion detection and characterization, and the intrinsic safety of the modality, MR should be considered the primary imaging tool to investigate liver diseases. PMID:16174062

  17. Pigmented Lesion of Buccal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Manas; Kumar, Malay; Kumar, Manish; Agarwal, Deshant

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented lesions are commonly found in the mouth. Such lesions represent a variety of clinical entities, ranging from physiologic changes to manifestation of systemic illness and malignant neoplasm. Diagnosis of such lesions requires a proper case history, extraoral and intraoral examination, and, in some cases, biopsy, aspiration cytology, and laboratory investigations. Here we present a case of purple lesion on the buccal mucosa of a 34-year-old male patient which was provisionally diagnosed as mucocele but on the basis of histopathological picture it was finally diagnosed as angiofibroma, and we also discuss the clinical and histopathological differential diagnosis. PMID:25161669

  18. Stress-induced cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Braem, M; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G

    1992-05-01

    The increasing occurrence of dental lesions at the cervical surfaces requires more knowledge of the causes of the process. Acidic and abrasive mechanisms have clearly been documented as causes but the stress theory by Lee and Eakle is still controversial. This report describes several incidences of possible stress-induced lesions according to the characteristics described by Lee and Eakle. The occurrences of subgingival lesions lend credence to the stress-induction theory by exclusion of other superimposing etiologic factors. With the current concepts, a perceptive approach to the treatment of cervical lesions can be executed. PMID:1527763

  19. Pigmented lesion of buccal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Manas; Kumar, Malay; Kumar, Manish; Agarwal, Deshant

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented lesions are commonly found in the mouth. Such lesions represent a variety of clinical entities, ranging from physiologic changes to manifestation of systemic illness and malignant neoplasm. Diagnosis of such lesions requires a proper case history, extraoral and intraoral examination, and, in some cases, biopsy, aspiration cytology, and laboratory investigations. Here we present a case of purple lesion on the buccal mucosa of a 34-year-old male patient which was provisionally diagnosed as mucocele but on the basis of histopathological picture it was finally diagnosed as angiofibroma, and we also discuss the clinical and histopathological differential diagnosis. PMID:25161669

  20. Decreased Knee Joint Loading Associated With Early Knee Osteoarthritis After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wellsandt, Elizabeth; Gardinier, Emily S.; Manal, Kurt; Axe, Michael J.; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury predisposes individuals to early-onset knee joint osteoarthritis (OA). Abnormal joint loading is apparent after ACL injury and reconstruction. The relationship between altered joint biomechanics and the development of knee OA is unknown. Hypothesis Altered knee joint kinetics and medial compartment contact forces initially after injury and reconstruction are associated with radiographic knee OA 5 years after reconstruction. Study Design Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods Individuals with acute, unilateral ACL injury completed gait analysis before (baseline) and after (posttraining) preoperative rehabilitation and at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after reconstruction. Surface electromyographic and knee biomechanical data served as inputs to an electromyographically driven musculoskeletal model to estimate knee joint contact forces. Patients completed radiographic testing 5 years after reconstruction. Differences in knee joint kinetics and contact forces were compared between patients with and those without radiographic knee OA. Results Patients with OA walked with greater frontal plane interlimb differences than those without OA (nonOA) at baseline (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.00 ± 0.08 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.15 ± 0.09 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .014; peak knee adduction moment impulse difference: −0.001 ± 0.032 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.048 ± 0.031 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .042). The involved limb knee adduction moment impulse of the group with osteoarthritis was also lower than that of the group without osteoarthritis at baseline (0.087 ± 0.023 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs 0.049 ± 0.018 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .023). Significant group differences were absent at posttraining but reemerged 6 months after reconstruction (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.02 ± 0.04 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.06 ± 0.11 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .043). In addition, the OA group walked with lower peak

  1. Is Knee Magnetic Resonance Imaging Overutilized in Current Practice?

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young Dong; Jain, Nimesh Prakash; Kim, Seok Jin; Kwon, Sae Kwang; Chang, Moon Jong; Chang, Chong Bum

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine what proportion of patients visiting a tertiary knee clinic had pre-obtained knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to assess the impact of pre-obtained knee MRI on the selection of treatment plans. Materials and Methods Six hundred and eighty patients were enrolled from patients who visited our knee clinic during a 6-month period. The proportion of patients with pre-obtained knee MRI was calculated, and associations of sociodemographic factors, disease category, and finally selected treatment options with knee MRI pre-obtainment were investigated. A utility assessment panel of five orthopaedic surgeons was formed and established utility assessment criteria. Two rounds of utility assessment (before and after MRI review) were performed. Results Of the 680 patients, 185 (27%) had pre-obtained knee MRI. In the first round of utility assessment, 39%, 18%, and 43% of the 185 knee MRIs were evaluated as useful, equivocal, and arguably useless, respectively, and almost identical results were obtained in the second round. The proportion of assessed 'useful MRI' was higher in sports related injury (84%) and other conditions (91%) than in degenerative joint disease (18%) and nonspecific knee pain (31%). Utility assessment results among panels varied little for practice patterns and education duration. Conclusions This study suggests clinicians should reconsider and counsel patients the expected utility of knee MRI acquisition. PMID:26060608

  2. Lack of Axial Rotation in Mobile-bearing Knee Designs

    PubMed Central

    Komistek, Richard D.; Zingde, Sumesh M.; Sheridan, Kate C.; Mahfouz, Mohamed R.

    2008-01-01

    It has often been assumed rotational kinematics are improved with mobile-bearing TKA designs as the terms mobile-bearing and rotating platform imply. We tested this assumption by assessing the in vivo axial rotation magnitudes and patterns of 527 knees implanted with 12 different mobile-bearing TKA designs. Implants were grouped and compared by type—posterior stabilized (PS), posterior cruciate retaining (PCR), and posterior cruciate sacrificing (PCS)—and by specific design. We hypothesized all three mobile-bearing types (PS, PCR, and PCS) would achieve greater than 10° average axial rotation and we would find no differences in axial rotation between types. Only 14% of PS knees, 3% of PCS knees, and 17% of PCR knees attained greater than 10° axial rotation when measured from 0° to 90°. The percentage of PCS knees with greater than 10° axial rotation was less compared with the other two groups. Axial rotation averaged 4.3°, 2.5°, and 3.8° for the PS, PCS, and PCR knees, respectively. Incidences of reverse rotation were observed in 17% of PS knees, 32% of PCS knees, and 28% of PCR knees. Compared with the PCS group, the PS group achieved greater average axial rotation and had a lower percentage of knees displaying incidences of reverse rotation. The data refuted the hypotheses. PMID:18581194

  3. Treatment of posttraumatic and focal osteoarthritic cartilage defects of the knee with autologous polymer-based three-dimensional chondrocyte grafts: 2-year clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Ossendorf, Christian; Kaps, Christian; Kreuz, Peter C; Burmester, Gerd R; Sittinger, Michael; Erggelet, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is an effective clinical procedure for the regeneration of articular cartilage defects. BioSeed®-C is a second-generation ACI tissue engineering cartilage graft that is based on autologous chondrocytes embedded in a three-dimensional bioresorbable two-component gel-polymer scaffold. In the present prospective study, we evaluated the short-term to mid-term efficacy of BioSeed-C for the arthrotomic and arthroscopic treatment of posttraumatic and degenerative cartilage defects in a group of patients suffering from chronic posttraumatic and/or degenerative cartilage lesions of the knee. Clinical outcome was assessed in 40 patients with a 2-year clinical follow-up before implantation and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after implantation by using the modified Cincinnati Knee Rating System, the Lysholm score, the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, and the current health assessment form (SF-36) of the International Knee Documentation Committee, as well as histological analysis of second-look biopsies. Significant improvement (p < 0.05) in the evaluated scores was observed at 1 and/or 2 years after implantation of BioSeed-C, and histological staining of the biopsies showed good integration of the graft and formation of a cartilaginous repair tissue. The Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score showed significant improvement in the subclasses pain, other symptoms, and knee-related quality of life 2 years after implantation of BioSeed-C in focal osteoarthritic defects. The results suggest that implanting BioSeed-C is an effective treatment option for the regeneration of posttraumatic and/or osteoarthritic defects of the knee. PMID:17451597

  4. Intercondylar Ganglion Cyst with Mucoid Degeneration of Posterior Cruciate Ligament of Knee: Report of A Rare Case and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ahluwalia, Vandana V; DayanandaSagar, G; Narayan, Shamrendra; Gupta, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Mucoid degeneration and Ganglion cysts arising from the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) of the knee are rare. The aetiology, clinical features and Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of PCL mucoid degeneration and intercondylar ganglion cyst are discussed. Case Report: We present a 36 year-old male patient who presented with chronic right knee pain for the duration of 5-6 months. No evidence of ligament instability on clinical examination was found. A diagnosis of PCL mucoid degeneration and intercondylar ganglion cyst was made on MRI. Conclusion: Mucoid degeneration and ganglion cyst involving PCL are uncommon lesions and represents the spectrum of same pathology. MR imaging is sensitive, specific, accurate and noninvasive, while providing multiplanar imaging and superior identification of the anatomical and morphological relationship of the synovial tissue to the surrounding structures, an additional intra-articular lesions can also be detected. PMID:27298942

  5. A Preliminary In Vivo Assessment of Anterior Cruciate Ligament–Deficient Knee Kinematics With the KneeM Device

    PubMed Central

    Tardy, Nicolas; Marchand, Philippe; Kouyoumdjian, Pascal; Blin, Dominique; Demattei, Christophe; Asencio, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    Background: Methods of objectively measuring rotational knee laxity are either experimental or difficult to use in daily practice. A new method has been developed to quantitatively assess rotatory laxity using an open MRI system and new tool, the KneeM device. Purpose/Hypothesis: To perform a preliminary evaluation of a novel knee rotation measurement device to assess knee kinematics during flexion in an MRI field, in both anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)–deficient and healthy contralateral knees. The hypothesis was that the KneeM device would allow in vivo reproduction and analysis of knee kinematics during flexion in healthy and ACL-deficient knees. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Ten subjects (7 men and 3 women; mean age ± standard deviation, 32.3 ± 9.4 years) with ACL-deficient knees and contralateral uninjured knees participated in the study. An open MRI was performed with the KneeM device at a mean 4.9 months (range, 3.0-7 months) after ACL injury. The device exerted on the knee an anterior drawer force of 100 N, with an internal rotation of 20°, through the range of flexion (0°, 20°, 40°, and 60°). Both ACL-deficient and healthy contralateral knees were analyzed using the Iwaki method. Results: There was no statistical difference of anterior translation in the medial compartment between intact and ACL-deficient knees at all degrees of flexion. However, significant differences in the anterior translation of the lateral compartment were observed between ACL-deficient and intact contralateral knees at 0° and 20° of flexion (P = .005 and P = .002, respectively). Between 20° and 40°, the lateral plateau of ACL-deficient knees translated 7.7 mm posteriorly, whereas the medial compartment remained stable, reflecting a sudden external rotation of the lateral plateau under the femoral condyle. Conclusion: This preliminary study suggests that measurement of tibiofemoral movements in both compartments during flexion using the Knee

  6. OCD Lesions Of The Patella And Trochlea In Children

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Dennis E.; Yen, Yi-Meng; Simoni, Michael; Miller, Patricia; Micheli, Lyle J.; Kocher, Mininder S.; Heyworth, Benton E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this report is to evaluate the functional outcomes of surgical management of OCD lesions of the patella and trochlea in children. Secondary aims include elucidating predictors for higher functional outcomes, determining complication rates, surgical satisfaction and ability to return to sports. Methods: Patients age ≤ 18 years who were surgically treated for OCD of the patellar or trochlea were identified. Charts were queried to record patient/lesion data, surgical procedure, results and complications. Pre- and postoperative imaging was reviewed. Patients were asked to complete a follow-up athletic questionnaire and a Pediatric International Knee Documentation Committee (Pedi-IKDC) score. Statistical analysis was conducted to look for predictors for reoperation, residual pain, ability to return to sports and lower Pedi-IKDC scores. Results: Twenty-six children (9 female, 17 male, 3 bilateral) were identified. Mean age was 14.7 (range: 9-18), 21/29 (72%) had open physes, and median follow-up was 3.8 years (range: 1-9 years). The most common location was the trochlea (17/29, 59%). Twenty-two lesions (76%) underwent transarticular drilling (n=14) or drilling with fixation (8), while 7 underwent excision and marrow stimulation. Four patients (14%) required unplanned re-operation. Internal fixation was predictive of reoperation (OR= 8.7, 95% CI= 2.8-26.9, P=0.04). At final follow up, 14 knees (48%) were pain-free, 14 (48%) had mild residual pain. Female gender was predictive of residual pain (OR= 9, 95% CI= 2-56, P=0.02). Twenty-two patients (85%) returned to sports. Longer duration of preoperative pain negatively impacted return to sports (OR= 0.32, 95% CI= 0.05-0.97, P=0.04). On postoperative imaging, the lesion appeared completely healed in 5 cases (42%) and partially healed in 12 cases (58%). All 15 survey respondents were satisfied with surgery. The mean Pedi-IKDC score was 82.4 ± 17.8 (range: 40.2 -100). Conclusion: Surgical treatment

  7. Fortuitously discovered liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Sharma, Malay; Gibson, Robert N; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Jenssen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The fortuitously discovered liver lesion is a common problem. Consensus might be expected in terms of its work-up, and yet there is none. This stems in part from the fact that there is no preventive campaign involving the early detection of liver tumors other than for patients with known liver cirrhosis and oncological patients. The work-up (detection and differential diagnosis) of liver tumors comprises theoretical considerations, history, physical examination, laboratory tests, standard ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound techniques, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, as well as image-guided biopsy. CEUS techniques have proved to be the most pertinent method; these techniques became part of the clinical routine about 10 years ago in Europe and Asia and are used for a variety of indications in daily clinical practice. CEUS is in many cases the first and also decisive technical intervention for detecting and characterizing liver tumors. This development is reflected in many CEUS guidelines, e.g., in the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) guidelines 2004, 2008 and 2012 as well as the recently published World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology-EFSUMB guidelines 2012. This article sets out considerations for making a structured work-up of incidental liver tumors feasible. PMID:23745019

  8. Comparison of Diagnostic Performance of Semi-Quantitative Knee Ultrasound and Knee Radiography with MRI: Oulu Knee Osteoarthritis Study.

    PubMed

    Podlipská, Jana; Guermazi, Ali; Lehenkari, Petri; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Roemer, Frank W; Arokoski, Jari P; Kaukinen, Päivi; Liukkonen, Esa; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T; Tervonen, Osmo; Koski, Juhani M; Saarakkala, Simo

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative musculoskeletal disease highly prevalent in aging societies worldwide. Traditionally, knee OA is diagnosed using conventional radiography. However, structural changes of articular cartilage or menisci cannot be directly evaluated using this method. On the other hand, ultrasound is a promising tool able to provide direct information on soft tissue degeneration. The aim of our study was to systematically determine the site-specific diagnostic performance of semi-quantitative ultrasound grading of knee femoral articular cartilage, osteophytes and meniscal extrusion, and of radiographic assessment of joint space narrowing and osteophytes, using MRI as a reference standard. Eighty asymptomatic and 79 symptomatic subjects with mean age of 57.7 years were included in the study. Ultrasound performed best in the assessment of femoral medial and lateral osteophytes, and medial meniscal extrusion. In comparison to radiography, ultrasound performed better or at least equally well in identification of tibio-femoral osteophytes, medial meniscal extrusion and medial femoral cartilage morphological degeneration. Ultrasound provides relevant additional diagnostic information on tissue-specific morphological changes not depicted by conventional radiography. Consequently, the use of ultrasound as a complementary imaging tool along with radiography may enable more accurate and cost-effective diagnostics of knee osteoarthritis at the primary healthcare level. PMID:26926836

  9. Comparison of Diagnostic Performance of Semi-Quantitative Knee Ultrasound and Knee Radiography with MRI: Oulu Knee Osteoarthritis Study

    PubMed Central

    Podlipská, Jana; Guermazi, Ali; Lehenkari, Petri; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Roemer, Frank W.; Arokoski, Jari P.; Kaukinen, Päivi; Liukkonen, Esa; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T.; Tervonen, Osmo; Koski, Juhani M.; Saarakkala, Simo

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative musculoskeletal disease highly prevalent in aging societies worldwide. Traditionally, knee OA is diagnosed using conventional radiography. However, structural changes of articular cartilage or menisci cannot be directly evaluated using this method. On the other hand, ultrasound is a promising tool able to provide direct information on soft tissue degeneration. The aim of our study was to systematically determine the site-specific diagnostic performance of semi-quantitative ultrasound grading of knee femoral articular cartilage, osteophytes and meniscal extrusion, and of radiographic assessment of joint space narrowing and osteophytes, using MRI as a reference standard. Eighty asymptomatic and 79 symptomatic subjects with mean age of 57.7 years were included in the study. Ultrasound performed best in the assessment of femoral medial and lateral osteophytes, and medial meniscal extrusion. In comparison to radiography, ultrasound performed better or at least equally well in identification of tibio-femoral osteophytes, medial meniscal extrusion and medial femoral cartilage morphological degeneration. Ultrasound provides relevant additional diagnostic information on tissue-specific morphological changes not depicted by conventional radiography. Consequently, the use of ultrasound as a complementary imaging tool along with radiography may enable more accurate and cost-effective diagnostics of knee osteoarthritis at the primary healthcare level. PMID:26926836

  10. Cystic lesions of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Hruban, Ralph H.; Fukushima, Noriyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Summary In contrast to the relatively uniform pathology and the unyielding dismal outcome associated with infiltrating ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas, cystic lesions have a broad spectrum of gross and microscopic pathologies, and a range of clinical outcomes. The common cystic lesions of the pancreas are reviewed with emphasis on practical tips for distinguishing between the main entities. PMID:20953247

  11. Hamartomatous tongue lesions in children.

    PubMed

    Kreiger, Portia A; Ernst, Linda M; Elden, Lisa M; Kazahaya, Ken; Alawi, Faizan; Russo, Pierre A

    2007-08-01

    The incidence and spectrum of tongue lesions in children, in particular tongue hamartomas, is relatively unknown. We report a retrospective review of all tongue lesions seen at a major tertiary care children's hospital over an 18-year period with an emphasis on describing tongue hamartomas. A total of 135 tongue lesions were identified. Vascular/lymphatic lesions (36/135) were the most common followed by mucus extravasation phenomenon (22/135). Interestingly, hamartomatous lesions (18/135) were the third most common lesion category identified. Lingual hamartomas were predominantly submucosal in location and were classified histologically by tissue composition as follows: neurovascular (2/18), smooth muscle predominant (5/18), fat predominant (1/18), and smooth muscle and fat containing (10/18). All 5 smooth muscle predominant hamartomas also contained vasculature, and 1 case additionally contained salivary gland tissue. The single fat predominant hamartoma additionally contained vessels and salivary gland. The final 10 hamartomas contained varying amounts of both smooth muscle and fat, and also admixed combinations of vessels, nerves, and salivary glands. Two of these 10 cases additionally contained foci of choristomatous elements, including cutaneous adnexal structures and cartilage. Most patients with hamartomatous lesions were young, 2 years or less. Eight cases were congenital in origin. Females outnumbered males by 2:1. The majority of lesions (16/18) were dorsal in location, and 4 patients had a syndromic association, all oral-facial-digital syndrome. PMID:17667541

  12. Nonsurgical management of periapical lesions

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marina; de Ataide, Ida

    2010-01-01

    Periapical lesions develop as sequelae to pulp disease. They often occur without any episode of acute pain and are discovered on routine radiographic examination. The incidence of cysts within periapical lesions varies between 6 and 55%. The occurrence of periapical granulomas ranges between 9.3 and 87.1%, and of abscesses between 28.7 and 70.07%. It is accepted that all inflammatory periapical lesions should be initially treated with conservative nonsurgical procedures. Studies have reported a success rate of up to 85% after endodontic treatment of teeth with periapical lesions. A review of literature was performed by using electronic and hand searching methods for the nonsurgical management of periapical lesions. Various methods can be used in the nonsurgical management of periapical lesions: the conservative root canal treatment, decompression technique, active nonsurgical decompression technique, aspiration-irrigation technique, method using calcium hydroxide, Lesion Sterilization and Repair Therapy, and the Apexum procedure. Monitoring the healing of periapical lesions is essential through periodic follow-up examinations. PMID:21217952

  13. In vivo determination of total knee arthroplasty kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Komistek, Richard D; Mahfouz, Mohamed R; Bertin, Kim; Rosenberg, Aaron; Kennedy, William

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if consistent posterior femoral rollback of an asymmetrical posterior cruciate retaining (PCR) total knee arthroplasty was mostly influenced by the implant design, surgical technique, or presence of a well-functioning posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Three-dimensional femorotibial kinematics was determined for 80 subjects implanted by 3 surgeons, and each subject was evaluated under fluoroscopic surveillance during a deep knee bend. All subjects in this present study having an intact PCL had a well-functioning PCR knee and experienced normal kinematic patterns, although less in magnitude than the normal knee. In addition, a surprising finding was that, on average, subjects without a PCL still achieved posterior femoral rollback from full extension to maximum knee flexion. The findings in this study revealed that implant design did contribute to the normal kinematics demonstrated by subjects having this asymmetrical PCR total knee arthroplasty.

  14. Total knee arthroplasty in patients with a previous patellectomy.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Jed; Zuckerman, Joseph D; Immerman, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Post-patellectomy patients represent a specific subgroup of patients that may develop arthritis and persistent knee pain and potentially require treatment with total knee arthroplasty. This article reviews the treatment and functional outcomes following total knee arthroplasty in patients with prior patellectomy. A case report is presented as an example of the clinical management of a post-patellectomy patient with significant knee pain and disability treated with total knee arthroplasty. Emphasis will be placed in decision- making, specifically with the use of a posterior stabilized implant. In addition, postoperative strengthening of the quadriceps is essential to compensate for the lack of the patella and increase the success of total knee arthroplasty in this subgroup of patients. PMID:24151951

  15. Translation and Validation of the Korean Version of the International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Form

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Goo; Lee, Joong Yub; Seo, Seung Suk; Choi, Choong Hyeok; Lee, Myung Chul

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To perform a cross-cultural adaptation and to test the measurement properties of the Korean version of International Knee Documentation Committee (K-IKDC) Subjective Knee Form. Materials and Methods According to the guidelines for cross-cultural adaptation, translation and backward translation of the English version of the IKDC Subjective Knee Form were performed. After translation into the Korean version, 150 patients who had knee-related problems were asked to complete the K-IKDC, Lysholm score, and Short Form-36 (SF-36). Of these patients, 126 were retested 2 weeks later to evaluate test-retest reliability, and 104 were recruited 3 months later to evaluate responsiveness. Construct validity was analyzed by investigating the correlation with Lysholm score and SF-36; content validity was also evaluated. Standardized mean response was calculated for evaluating responsiveness. Results The test-retest reliability proved excellent with a high value for the intraclass correlation coefficient (r=0.94). The internal consistency was strong (Cronbach's α=0.91). Good content validity with absence of floor not ceiling effects and good convergent and divergent validity were observed. Moderate responsiveness was shown (standardized mean response=0.689). Conclusions The K-IKDC demonstrated good measurement properties. We suggest that this instrument is an excellent evaluation instrument that can be used for Korean patients with knee-related injuries. PMID:24032098

  16. The Mark Coventry Award: in vivo knee forces during recreation and exercise after knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    D'Lima, Darryl D; Steklov, Nikolai; Patil, Shantanu; Colwell, Clifford W

    2008-11-01

    Knee forces directly affect arthroplasty component survivorship, wear of articular bearing surfaces, and integrity of the bone-implant interface. It is not known which activities generate forces within a range that is physiologically desirable but not high enough to jeopardize the survivorship of the prosthetic components. We implanted three patients with an instrumented tibial prosthesis and measured knee forces and moments in vivo during exercise and recreational activities. As expected, stationary bicycling generated low tibial forces, whereas jogging and tennis generated high peak forces. On the other hand, the golf swing generated unexpectedly high forces, especially in the leading knee. Exercise on the elliptical trainer generated lower forces than jogging but not lower than treadmill walking. These novel data allow for a more scientific approach to recommending activities after TKA. In addition, these data can be used to develop clinically relevant structural and tribologic testing, which may result in activity-specific knee designs such as a knee design more tolerant of golfing by optimizing the conflicting needs of increased rotational laxity and conformity. PMID:18563502

  17. Radioguided occult lesion localization (ROLL) of the nonpalpable breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Zgajnar, J; Hocevar, M; Frkovic-Grazio, S; Hertl, K; Schweiger, E; Besic, N

    2004-01-01

    Standard localization techniques of the nonpalpable breast lesions (guide wire, carbon, skin marking) have several disadvantages. Radioguided occult lesion localization (ROLL) was recently proposed as a better alternative resulting in wider surgical margins and lower average specimen weight. The aim of our study was to compare ROLL to our previously published series of the standard guidewire localization, performed at the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana. ROLL was performed in 110 nonpalpable breast lesions. Human serum albumin macroaggregats, marked with 1.8-5.5 MBq 99mTc was injected in the nonpalpable lesion. During surgery the radioactive breast tissue was excised using hand held gamma probe. Nonpalpable breast lesions were excised in all 110 patients. The definitive histology revealed 32 invasive carcinomas, 19 DCIS, 5 LCIS in and 54 benign breast lesions. Mean specimen weight was 40 g which is less in comparison to 53 g of the guidewire series (p=0.002). Surgical margins were clear in 36/51 (70%) invasive breast cancer or DCIS patients and close or involved in 15/51 (30%) patients. Compared to the guidewire series, where 41/92 (44%) margins were clear and 51/92 (56%) were close or involved, the difference was statistically significant (p=0.005). ROLL proved to be superior to guidewire localization in our series, allowing excision of the nonpalpable breast lesion with wider surgical margins despite lower average specimen weight. PMID:15640944

  18. Popliteal Artery Pseudoaneurysm Following Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young-Soo; Hwang, Yeok-Gu; Savale, Abhijit Prakash

    2014-01-01

    An early diagnosis of popliteal artery pseudoaneurysm-a sequela of popliteal artery trauma-is difficult owing to its late presentation following total knee arthroplasty. The incidence of a popliteal artery pseudoaneurysm with a hematoma presenting only a peripheral nerve injury after total knee arthroplasty is also uncommon in the absence of common diagnostic features such as a pulsatile swelling with an audible bruit on auscultation. In the present report, we describe popliteal artery pseudoaneurysm following total knee arthroplasty. PMID:24944978

  19. SCREW MIGRATION IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY: CLINICAL REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Fernando; Tomé, José; Barreto, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Complications from total knee arthroplasty caused by the implanted material are rare, with the exception of polyethylene wear. Descriptions of screw migration into the knee joint cavity are very rare. The authors report intra-articular migration of a polyethylene safety screw in a case of total knee arthroplasty, with sacrifice of the posterior cruciate ligament (TKA Performance; Biomet, Warsaw, IN, USA), which necessitated new surgery to remove the screw, replace the polyethylene insert and emplace a new fixation screw. PMID:27022526

  20. Acute gouty arthritis in a patient after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Fokter, Samo K; Repse-Fokter, Alenka

    2010-06-01

    Symptomatic gout in an artificial joint is exceptionally rare. We present a 68-year-old male patient who developed progressive knee pain and swelling one year after the cemented total arthroplasty of his left knee. The diagnosis was confirmed by crystal identification in the synovial fluid. Beside thorough workout to rule out infection in a painful and inflamed prosthetic knee, specific history of gout should be sought and fluid aspirate examined cytologically and under polarised light for crystal arthropathy. PMID:20552289

  1. Stress fracture of the proximal fibula after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vaish, Abhishek; Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare case of proximal fibular fatigue fracture developing 14 years after total knee arthroplasty in a known case of rheumatoid arthritis. A valgus deformity of the knee can put abnormal stress on the upper fibula leading to its failure. We believe that, as the fibula acts as an important lateral strut, its disruption due to a fracture led to rapid progress of the valgus deformity of the knee in this patient. PMID:27107057

  2. Wilbrand's knee of the primate optic chiasm is an artefact of monocular enucleation.

    PubMed Central

    Horton, J C

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: The anterior chiasmal syndrome consists of a temporal hemianopia or complete visual field loss in one eye, plus a superior temporal hemianopia in the other eye. The superior temporal hemianopia in the other eye is thought to result from injury to Wilbrand's Knee of the optic chiasm. Wilbrand's Knee is a loop of decussating fibers which detours into the contralateral optic nerve before entering the optic tract. I studied the organization of fibers in the optic chiasm of monkeys and humans to verify the existence of Wilbrand's Knee and to elucidate further the pattern of visual field loss seen from lesions of the sellar region. METHODS: The primary optic pathway was labelled in monkeys by injection of [3H] proline into one eye, followed by autoradiography. There were 8 intact Rhesus monkeys and 3 intact squirrel monkeys. In addition, the optic pathway was studied in the Rhesus monkey 6 months and 4 years after monocular enucleation. The optic chiasm was also examined using myelin stains in specimens obtained post-mortem from 3 patients. The patients had lost 1 eye 5 months, 2 years, and 28 years prior to their deaths. Finally, clinical observations were recorded in 3 patients with the anterior chiasmal syndrome. RESULTS: In normal Rhesus and squirrel monkeys, optic nerve fibers crossed the optic chiasm without entering the contralateral optic nerve. After short-term monocular enucleation, fibers from the normal optic nerve were drawn closer to the entry zone of the degenerating optic nerve, but Wilbrand's Knee was still absent. After long-term enucleation, a typical Wilbrand's Knee was induced to form. In the human, Wilbrand's Knee was absent 5 months after monocular enucleation, but emerged in the two cases involving long-term enucleation, in a fashion analogous to the monkey. The case reports describe 3 patients with variants of the anterior chiasmal syndrome from parasellar tumors. CONCLUSIONS: Wilbrand's Knee does not exist in the normal primate optic

  3. Be aware of wood in the knee

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Rachel Louise; Fageir, Mazin M; Addison, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of a 7-year-old boy who sustained a penetrating injury of a splinter of wood to the knee. Arthroscopic examination, removal of visualised foreign material and washout did not alleviate the symptoms of pain and swelling in its entirety. Microbiology cultures also failed to determine the cause of the on-going symptoms. Five days later, the patient underwent a mini arthrotomy through a lateral incision, which demonstrated synovitis, and removal of the remaining embedded foreign body from the lateral condyle. Although the authors advocate arthroscopy as the surgeon’s first choice for removal of a foreign body from the knee, a mini-arthrotomy should also be considered to facilitate superior visualisation and easier instrumentation to remove embedded foreign bodies. PMID:22669952

  4. Inherited knee disorders in the Medici family.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Donatella; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Alburyc, W R; Weisz, George M

    2014-01-01

    Reconstructing a medical condition which was existent centuries ago is limited by the lack of contemporaneous evidence-based descriptions in the accounts given by physicians and other observers. Despite these limitations modern paleopathological evidence, supplemented by techniques of historical investigation, have led to the conclusion that males in the Medici family typically suffered from a complex clinical entity with a triple pathology of stenotic spinal ankylosis, recurrent peripheral joint disease and erythematous skin disease; the Medici Syndrome. Examination of the knee joint is illustrative of recurrent joint disease both in the primary and secondary lines of the family. Pictorial and sculptural representations, if used cautiously, can assist in this retrospective process. The six cases presented here illustrate the involvement of the knee joint where the joint destruction ultimately led to an ankylosis. PMID:24439765

  5. Level of constraint in revision knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Indelli, Pier Francesco; Giori, Nick; Maloney, William

    2015-12-01

    Revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in the setting of major bone deficiency and/or soft tissue laxity might require increasing levels of constraint to restore knee stability. However, increasing the level of constraint not always correlates with mid-to-long-term satisfactory results. Recently, modular components as tantalum cones and titanium sleeves have been introduced to the market with the goal of obtaining better fixation where bone deficiency is an issue; theoretically, satisfactory meta-diaphyseal fixation can reduce the mechanical stress at the level of the joint line, reducing the need for high levels of constraint. This article reviews the recent literature on the surgical management of the unstable TKA with the goal to propose a modern surgical algorithm for adult reconstruction surgeons. PMID:26373770

  6. Pure Varus Injury to the Knee Joint.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae Ho; Lee, Jung Ha; Chang, Chong Bum

    2015-06-01

    A 30-year-old male was involved in a car accident. Radiographs revealed a depressed marginal fracture of the medial tibial plateau and an avulsion fracture of the fibular head. Magnetic resonance imaging showed avulsion fracture of Gerdy's tubercle, injury to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), posterior horn of the medial meniscus, and the attachments of the lateral collateral ligament and the biceps femoris tendon. The depressed fracture of the medial tibial plateau was elevated and stabilized using a cannulated screw and washer. The injured lateral and posterolateral corner (PLC) structures were repaired and augmented by PLC reconstruction. However, the avulsion fracture of Gerdy's tubercle was not fixed because it was minimally displaced and the torn PCL was also not repaired or reconstructed. We present a unique case of pure varus injury to the knee joint. This case contributes to our understanding of the mechanism of knee injury and provides insight regarding appropriate treatment plans for this type of injury. PMID:26217477

  7. Fracture Blisters After Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Halawi, Mohamad J

    2015-08-01

    Fracture blisters are tense vesicles that arise on markedly swollen skin overlying traumatized soft tissue. While this relatively uncommon complication has been well described in the trauma literature, this article reports for the first time a case of fracture blisters after primary total knee arthroplasty. The fracture blisters developed within 36 hours of surgery and were associated with profound swelling and erythema. There was no evidence of vascular injury, compartment syndrome, iatrogenic fracture, or deep venous thrombosis. The patient was treated with leg elevation, loosely applied nonadhesive dressings, and a short course of oral antibiotics after skin desquamation. Blood-filled blisters required longer time to reepithelialization than fluid-filled blisters. Knee stiffness developed because of pain and fear of participation with physical therapy, but the patient was able to resume intensive rehabilitation after resolution of the blisters. Patient factors, surgical factors, and review of the literature are discussed. PMID:26251947

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Hash, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) affords high-resolution visualization of the soft tissue structures (menisci, ligaments, cartilage, etc) and bone marrow of the knee. Evidence Acquisition: Pertinent clinical and research articles in the orthopaedic and radiology literature over the past 30 years using PubMed. Results: Ligament tears can be accurately assessed with MRI, but distinguishing partial tears from ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) can be challenging. Determining the extent of a partial tear is often extremely difficult to accurately assess. The status of the posterolateral corner structures, menisci, and cartilage can be accurately evaluated, although limitations in the evaluation of certain structures exist. Patellofemoral joint, marrow, tibiofibular joint, and synovial pathology can supplement physical examination findings and provide definitive diagnosis. Conclusions: MRI provides an accurate noninvasive assessment of knee pathology. PMID:24381701

  9. Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation in the Knee.

    PubMed

    Zouzias, Ioannis C; Bugbee, William D

    2016-06-01

    The technique of osteochondral allograft (OCA) transplantation has been used to treat a wide spectrum of cartilage deficiencies in the knee. Its use has been supported by basic science and clinical studies that show it is a safe and effective treatment option. What sets fresh OCA transplantation apart from other cartilage procedures in the knee, is the ability to treat large defects with mature hyaline cartilage. Studies looking at transplantation of fresh OCAs in the general population have shown reliable pain relief and return to activities of daily living. Reports of cartilage injuries in athletes have risen over the years and more research is needed in evaluating the successfulness of OCA transplantation in the athletic population. PMID:27135291

  10. Inactivated autograft–prosthesis composite have a role for grade III giant cell tumor of bone around the knee

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Giant cell tumors (GCT) around the knee are common and pose a special problem of reconstruction after tumor excision, especially for grade III GCT. We questioned whether en bloc resection and reconstruction with alcohol inactivated autograft-prosthesis composite would provide (1) local control and long-term survival and (2) useful limb function in patients who had grade III GCT around the knee. Methods We retrospectively reviewed eight patients (5 males and 3 females) treated with this procedure with mean age of 31 years (range 20 to 43 years) from Jan 2007 to Oct 2008. 5 lesions were located in distal femur and 3 in proximal tibia. 4 patients were with primary tumor and the other 4 with recurrence. 2 patients showed pathological fracture. Results Mean Follow-up is 54 months ranging from 38 to 47 months. No recurrence, metastasis, prosthesis loosening were found. The mean healing time between autograft and host bone was 5.5 months. The mean MSTS score was 26.3 (88%) ranging from 25 to 29. The mean ISOLS composite graft score was 32.8 (88.5%) ranging from 28 to 35. Creeping substitution is possibly the main way in bony junction. The healing time in femoral lesion is faster than that in tibial lesion. Conclusions The technique of alcohol inactivated autograft-prosthesis composite could be able to achieve satisfactory oncological and functional outcomes in Grade III GCT. PMID:24209887

  11. The living anatomy of the knee.

    PubMed

    Garnham, M

    1989-07-01

    A brief account is given of the subject chosen by a candidate for the IMBI Higher Examination. His major project was to produce a video programme about the knee. With limited technical equipment at his disposal, but with plenty of visual imagination and technical ingenuity, a programme was produced that not only gave him a distinction award in his examination, but also received wide acclaim and won him several awards. PMID:2600361

  12. Knee Replacement - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Portuguese (português) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) Tagalog ( ... 한국어 (Korean) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Portuguese (português) Total Knee Replacement Substituição total do joelho - português ( ...

  13. Refractory Arthrographis kalrae native knee joint infection

    PubMed Central

    Boan, Peter; Arthur, Ian; Golledge, Clay; Ellis, David

    2012-01-01

    Rare reports of infection with Arthrographis kalrae have often demonstrated a protracted clinical course. We describe refractory infection of the native knee with Arthrographis kalrae after a penetrating injury and Yttrium synovectomy, finally controlled with two stage joint revision and combination antifungal therapy. The paucity of worldwide data about such uncommon invasive fungal infections contributes to the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges of these cases. PMID:24371754

  14. Mathematical modeling of the human knee joint

    SciTech Connect

    Ricafort, Juliet

    1996-05-01

    A model was developed to determine the forces exerted by several flexor and extensor muscles of the human knee under static conditions. The following muscles were studied: the gastrocnemius, biceps femoris, semitendinosus, semimembranosus, and the set of quadricep muscles. The tibia and fibula were each modeled as rigid bodies; muscles were modeled by their functional lines of action in space. Assumptions based on previous data were used to resolve the indeterminacy.

  15. [Application and development of kinematical alighment during total knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Zhang Guo-dong; Yang, Chen; Yang, Guang; Qi, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Kinematical alignment during total knee arthroplasty is an emerging process, and draws more and more attentions from scholars. Knee joint is close to normal joint after TKA through kinematical alighment, which has good clinical results and functional scores, and not increase failure probility. Thus, it may increase joint stress of patella-femur joint, lead to patellar maltracking and increase abrasion. The paper summarized defination and basical principle, operative method, clinical outcomes and deficiency of kinematical alignment during total knee arthroplasty, in order to choose a better way for kinematical alignment during total knee arthroplasty. PMID:26911130

  16. Mobile Sensor Application for Kinematic Detection of the Knees

    PubMed Central

    Suputtitada, Areerat; Khovidhungij, Watcharapong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To correctly measure the knee joint angle, this study utilized a Qualisys motion capture system and also used it as the reference to assess the validity of the study's Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) system that consisted of four IMU sensors and the Knee Angle Recorder software. The validity was evaluated by the root mean square (RMS) of different angles and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values between the Qualisys system and the IMU system. Methods Four functional knee movement tests for ten healthy participants were investigated, which were the knee flexion test, the hip and knee flexion test, the forward step test and the leg abduction test, and the walking test. Results The outcomes of the knee flexion test, the hip and knee flexion test, the forward step test, and the walking test showed that the RMS of different angles were less than 6°. The ICC values were in the range of 0.84 to 0.99. However, the leg abduction test showed a poor correlation in the measurement of the knee abduction-adduction movement. Conclusion The IMU system used in this study is a new good method to measure the knee flexion-extension movement. PMID:26361597

  17. Correlation of Adrenomedullin Concentrations with Knee Osteoarthritis Grade.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linghua; Huang, Ruokun; Ma, Dezhang; Cheng, Wenjun; Feng, Wei; Xing, Danmou; Kan, Wusheng; Xiao, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Adrenomedullin, a recently identified myokine, has an anti-inflammatory effect. Therefore, we aimed to assess the correlation of adrenomedullin concentrations with the presence and grade of severity of knee osteoarthritis (OA). MATERIAL AND METHODS We recruited 187 knee OA patients and 109 healthy subjects. The severity of OA was evaluated using the Kellgren-Lawrence grading system. RESULTS Compared with the control group, the knee OA group revealed markedly higher adrenomedullin concentrations. Serum and synovial fluid (SF) adrenomedullin concentrations increased with increased KL grades. CONCLUSIONS Serum and SF adrenomedullin concentrations show a correlation with the severity of knee OA. PMID:27495944

  18. Alignment Analyses in the Varus Osteoarthritic Knee Using Computer Navigation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kelvin G; Sathappan, Sathappan S; Teo, Yee Hong; Low, Wilson C J

    2015-06-01

    Osteoarthritic (OA) knees with severe extension varus deformity seem to have correspondingly more severe flexion varus, especially beyond a certain tibiofemoral angle. Clinical measurement of flexion varus and fixed flexion deformity (FFD), which had been difficult to perform because of the spatial alignment of the knee in flexion, was recently made possible with computer navigation. We conducted a study to evaluate the relationship of extension and flexion varus in OA knees and to determine whether severity of FFD in the sagittal plane correlates with severity of coronal plane varus deformity. The study included 317 consecutive cases of computer-navigated total knee arthroplasty performed on OA knees with varus deformities. Three sets of values were extracted from the navigation data: varus angle at maximal knee extension, 90° knee flexion, and maximal knee extension. Correlation analyses were performed for extension and flexion varus, FFD, and coronal plane deformity. OA knees with extension varus of more than 10° had an incremental likelihood of more severe flexion varus. When the extension varus angle exceeded 20°, probability became almost certainty. There was no correlation between FFD and coronal plane varus deformity. PMID:26046998

  19. A Dutch Survey on Circumpatellar Electrocautery in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    van Jonbergen, Hans-Peter W.; Barnaart, Alexander F.W.; Verheyen, Cees C.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Anterior knee pain following total knee arthroplasty is estimated to occur in 4-49% of patients. Some orthopedic surgeons use circumpatellar electrocautery (diathermy) to reduce the prevalence of postsurgical anterior knee pain; however, the extent of its use is unknown. Materials and Methodology: In April 2009, a postal questionnaire was sent to all 98 departments of orthopedic surgery in The Netherlands. The questions focused on the frequency of total knee arthroplasties, patellar resurfacing, and the use of circumpatellar electrocautery. Results: The response rate was 92%. A total of 18,876 TKAs, 2,096 unicompartmental knee arthroplasties, and 215 patellofemoral arthroplasties are performed yearly in The Netherlands by the responding orthopedic surgeons. Of the orthopedic surgeons performing TKA, 13% always use patellar resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, 49% use selective patellar resurfacing, and 38% never use it. Fifty-six percent of orthopedic surgeons use circumpatellar electrocautery when not resurfacing the patella, and 32% use electrocautery when resurfacing the patella. Conclusion: There is no consensus among Dutch orthopedic surgeons on the use of patellar resurfacing or circumpatellar electrocautery in total knee replacement performed for osteoarthritis. A prospective clinical trial is currently underway to fully evaluate the effect of circumpatellar electrocautery on the prevalence of anterior knee pain following total knee arthroplasty. PMID:21228917

  20. Correlation of Adrenomedullin Concentrations with Knee Osteoarthritis Grade

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Linghua; Huang, Ruokun; Ma, Dezhang; Cheng, Wenjun; Feng, Wei; Xing, Danmou; Kan, Wusheng; Xiao, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Background Adrenomedullin, a recently identified myokine, has an anti-inflammatory effect. Therefore, we aimed to assess the correlation of adrenomedullin concentrations with the presence and grade of severity of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Material/Methods We recruited 187 knee OA patients and 109 healthy subjects. The severity of OA was evaluated using the Kellgren-Lawrence grading system. Results Compared with the control group, the knee OA group revealed markedly higher adrenomedullin concentrations. Serum and synovial fluid (SF) adrenomedullin concentrations increased with increased KL grades. Conclusions Serum and SF adrenomedullin concentrations show a correlation with the severity of knee OA. PMID:27495944