Science.gov

Sample records for knee extension isometric

  1. Acute effects of sustained isometric knee extension on cerebral and muscle oxygenation responses.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Marta Inez R; Gomes, Paulo Sergio C; Bhambhani, Yagesh N

    2009-07-01

    Cerebral contra-lateral frontal lobe and the dominant vastus lateralis muscle oxygenation (Cox, Mox) and blood volume (Cbv, Mbv) were recorded simultaneously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in 12 healthy volunteers (37.4 +/- 9.9 years; 72.3 +/- 16.1 kg; 171.0 +/- 9.6 cm) during 2 min resting baseline, an isometric knee extension with the 1 RM load sustained to the point of fatigue, and 3 min recovery. The mean exercise duration was 19.1 +/- 2.6 s. During the contraction, Cox and Cbv increased systematically with no sign of levelling off until the point of fatigue. In contrast, Mox and Mbv declined continuously until the termination of exercise. Qualitative analysis of these NIRS profiles suggested that maximal isometric performance under normoxic conditions was most likely not limited by central neuronal activation, but rather, was due to factors within the exercising muscle. It is likely that depletion of intramuscular stores of high energy phosphates and oxymyoglobin, as well as the accumulation of metabolites from anaerobic pathways, were implicated in fatigue during this sustained high intensity isometric contraction. PMID:19486342

  2. Mechanical correction of dynamometer moment for the effects of segment motion during isometric knee-extension tests.

    PubMed

    Tsaopoulos, Dimitrios E; Baltzopoulos, Vasilios; Richards, Paula J; Maganaris, Constantinos N

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of dynamometer and joint axis misalignment on measured isometric knee-extension moments using inverse dynamics based on the actual joint kinematic information derived from the real-time X-ray video and to compare the errors when the moments were calculated using measurements from external anatomical surface markers or obtained from the isokinetic dynamometer. Six healthy males participated in this study. They performed isometric contractions at 90° and 20° of knee flexion, gradually increasing to maximum effort. For the calculation of the actual knee-joint moment and the joint moment relative to the knee-joint center, determined using the external marker, two free body diagrams were used of the Cybex arm and the lower leg segment system. In the first free body diagram, the mean center of the circular profiles of the femoral epicondyles was used as the knee-joint center, whereas in the second diagram, the joint center was assumed to coincide with the external marker. Then, the calculated knee-joint moments were compared with those measured by the dynamometer. The results indicate that 1) the actual knee-joint moment was different from the dynamometer recorded moment (difference ranged between 1.9% and 4.3%) and the moment calculated using the skin marker (difference ranged between 2.5% and 3%), and 2) during isometric knee extension, the internal knee angle changed significantly from rest to the maximum contraction state by about 19°. Therefore, these differences cannot be neglected if the moment-knee-joint angle relationship or the muscle mechanical properties, such as length-tension relationship, need to be determined. PMID:21474701

  3. Estimations of One Repetition Maximum and Isometric Peak Torque in Knee Extension Based on the Relationship Between Force and Velocity.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Yoshito; Hatanaka, Yasuhiko; Arai, Tomoaki; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Kanada, Yoshikiyo

    2016-04-01

    Sugiura, Y, Hatanaka, Y, Arai, T, Sakurai, H, and Kanada, Y. Estimations of one repetition maximum and isometric peak torque in knee extension based on the relationship between force and velocity. J Strength Cond Res 30(4): 980-988, 2016-We aimed to investigate whether a linear regression formula based on the relationship between joint torque and angular velocity measured using a high-speed video camera and image measurement software is effective for estimating 1 repetition maximum (1RM) and isometric peak torque in knee extension. Subjects comprised 20 healthy men (mean ± SD; age, 27.4 ± 4.9 years; height, 170.3 ± 4.4 cm; and body weight, 66.1 ± 10.9 kg). The exercise load ranged from 40% to 150% 1RM. Peak angular velocity (PAV) and peak torque were used to estimate 1RM and isometric peak torque. To elucidate the relationship between force and velocity in knee extension, the relationship between the relative proportion of 1RM (% 1RM) and PAV was examined using simple regression analysis. The concordance rate between the estimated value and actual measurement of 1RM and isometric peak torque was examined using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Reliability of the regression line of PAV and % 1RM was 0.95. The concordance rate between the actual measurement and estimated value of 1RM resulted in an ICC(2,1) of 0.93 and that of isometric peak torque had an ICC(2,1) of 0.87 and 0.86 for 6 and 3 levels of load, respectively. Our method for estimating 1RM was effective for decreasing the measurement time and reducing patients' burden. Additionally, isometric peak torque can be estimated using 3 levels of load, as we obtained the same results as those reported previously. We plan to expand the range of subjects and examine the generalizability of our results. PMID:26382131

  4. Knee extension isometric torque production differences based on verbal motivation given to introverted and extroverted female children.

    PubMed

    McWhorter, J Wesley; Landers, Merrill; Young, Daniel; Puentedura, E Louie; Hickman, Robbin A; Brooksby, Candi; Liveratti, Marc; Taylor, Lisa

    2011-08-01

    To date, little research has been conducted to test the efficacy of different forms of motivation based on a female child's personality type. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of female children to perform a maximal knee extension isometric torque test with varying forms of motivation, based on the child's personality type (introvert vs. extrovert). The subjects were asked to perform a maximal isometric knee extension test under three different conditions: 1) with no verbal motivation, 2) with verbal motivation from the evaluator only, and 3) with verbal motivation from a group of their peers and the evaluator combined. A 2×3 mixed ANOVA was significant for an interaction (F 2,62=17.530; p<0.0005). Post hoc testing for the introverted group showed that scores without verbal motivation were significantly higher than with verbal motivation from the evaluator or the evaluator plus the peers. The extroverted group revealed that scores with verbal motivation from the evaluator or the evaluator plus the peers were significantly higher than without verbal motivation. Results suggest that verbal motivation has a varying effect on isometric knee extension torque production in female children with different personality types. Extroverted girls perform better with motivation, whereas introverted girls perform better without motivation from others. PMID:20812856

  5. Skinfold thickness affects the isometric knee extension torque evoked by Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Flávia V. A.; Vieira, Amilton; Carregaro, Rodrigo L.; Bottaro, Martim; Maffiuletti, Nicola A.; Durigan, João L. Q.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subcutaneous adipose tissue may influence the transmission of electrical stimuli through to the skin, thus affecting both evoked torque and comfort perception associated with neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES). This could seriously affect the effectiveness of NMES for either rehabilitation or sports purposes. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of skinfold thickness (SFT) on maximal NMES current intensity, NMES-evoked torque, and NMES-induced discomfort. METHOD: First, we compared NMES current intensity, NMES-induced discomfort, and NMES-evoked torque between two subgroups of subjects with thicker (n=10; 20.7 mm) vs. thinner (n=10; 29.4 mm) SFT. Second, we correlated SFT to NMES current intensity, NMES-induced discomfort, and NMES-evoked knee extension torque in 20 healthy women. The NMES-evoked torque was normalized to the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque. The discomfort induced by NMES was assessed with a visual analog scale (VAS). RESULTS: NMES-evoked torque was 27.5% lower in subjects with thicker SFT (p=0.01) while maximal current intensity was 24.2% lower in subjects with thinner SFT (p=0.01). A positive correlation was found between current intensity and SFT (r=0.540, p=0.017). A negative correlation was found between NMES-evoked torque and SFT (r=-0.563, p=0.012). No significant correlation was observed between discomfort scores and SFT (rs=0.15, p=0.53). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the amount of subcutaneous adipose tissue (as reflected by skinfold thickness) affected NMES current intensity and NMES-evoked torque, but had no effect on discomfort perception. Our findings may help physical therapists to better understand the impact of SFT on NMES and to design more rational stimulation strategies. PMID:26647748

  6. β-alanine supplementation improves isometric endurance of the knee extensor muscles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We examined the effect of four weeks of β-alanine supplementation on isometric endurance of the knee extensors at 45% maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Methods Thirteen males (age 23 ± 6 y; height 1.80 ± 0.05 m; body mass 81.0 ± 10.5 kg), matched for pre-supplementation isometric endurance, were allocated to either a placebo (n = 6) or β-alanine (n = 7; 6.4 g·d-1 over 4 weeks) supplementation group. Participants completed an isometric knee extension test (IKET) to fatigue, at an intensity of 45% MVIC, before and after supplementation. In addition, two habituation tests were completed in the week prior to the pre-supplementation test and a further practice test was completed in the week prior to the post-supplementation test. MVIC force, IKET hold-time, and impulse generated were recorded. Results IKET hold-time increased by 9.7 ± 9.4 s (13.2%) and impulse by 3.7 ± 1.3 kN·s-1 (13.9%) following β-alanine supplementation. These changes were significantly greater than those in the placebo group (IKET: t(11) = 2.9, p ≤0.05; impulse: t(11) = 3.1, p ≤ 0.05). There were no significant changes in MVIC force in either group. Conclusion Four weeks of β-alanine supplementation at 6.4 g·d-1 improved endurance capacity of the knee extensors at 45% MVIC, which most likely results from improved pH regulation within the muscle cell as a result of elevated muscle carnosine levels. PMID:22697405

  7. Relationship Between Force Production During Isometric Squats and Knee Flexion Angles During Landing.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Harry; Stephenson, Mitchell L; Graves, Kyle K; Hinshaw, Taylour J; Smith, Derek T; Zhu, Qin; Wilson, Margaret A; Dai, Boyi

    2016-06-01

    Fisher, H, Stephenson, ML, Graves, KK, Hinshaw, TJ, Smith, DT, Zhu, Q, Wilson, MA, and Dai, B. Relationship between force production during isometric squats and knee flexion angles during landing. J Strength Cond Res 30(6): 1670-1679, 2016-Decreased knee flexion angles during landing are associated with increased anterior cruciate ligament loading. The underlying mechanisms associated with decreased self-selected knee flexion angles during landing are still unclear. The purpose of this study was to establish the relationship between the peak force production at various knee flexion angles (35, 55, 70, and 90°) during isometric squats and the actual knee flexion angles that occur during landing in both men and women. A total of 18 men and 18 women recreational/collegiate athletes performed 4 isometric squats at various knee flexion angles while vertical ground reaction forces were recorded. Participants also performed a jump-landing-jump task while lower extremity kinematics were collected. For women, significant correlations were found between the peak force production at 55 and 70° of knee flexion during isometric squats and the knee flexion angle at initial contact of landing. There were also significant correlations between the peak force production at 55, 70, and 90° of knee flexion during isometric squats and the peak knee flexion angle during landing. These correlations tended to be stronger during isometric squats at greater knee flexion compared with smaller knee flexion. No significant correlations were found for men. Posture-specific strength may play an important role in determining self-selected knee flexion angles during landing for women. PMID:26566166

  8. Constant vs variable resistance knee extension training.

    PubMed

    Manning, R J; Graves, J E; Carpenter, D M; Leggett, S H; Pollock, M L

    1990-06-01

    To compare the effect of constant resistance (CR) and variable resistance (VR) training on full range-of-motion (ROM) strength development, 22 men and 27 women (age = 26 +/- 5 yr) were randomly assigned to either a CR training group (N = 17), a VR training group (N = 17), or a control group (N = 15) that did not train. The CR and VR groups trained 2 to 3 d.wk-1 for 10 wk. Subjects completed one set of full ROM (120 to 0 degrees of flexion) bilateral knee extensions with an amount of weight that allowed 8 to 12 repetitions during each training session. For the VR group, resistance was varied with a cam supplied by the manufacturer (Nautilus). For the CR group, the cam was removed and replaced with a round sprocket. Prior to and after training, maximal voluntary isometric torque was measured at 9, 20, 35, 50, 65, 80, 95, and 110 degrees of knee flexion. Analysis of covariance indicated that the VR and CR groups gained strength at all angles (P less than or equal to 0.05) when compared to the control. [table: see text] There was no difference (P greater than 0.05) between the CR and VR groups at any angle, and the magnitude of strength gained was similar (P greater than 0.05) among angles for both groups. These data indicate that both CR and VR knee extension training elicit full ROM strength development. PMID:2381309

  9. Effects of isometric exercise using biofeedback on maximum voluntary isometric contraction, pain, and muscle thickness in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun Lak; Kim, Bo Kyung; Hwang, Yong Pil; Moon, Ok Kon; Choi, Wan Suk

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of our study was to investigate the effects of isometric exercises using electromyographic biofeedback (EMGBF) and ultrasound biofeedback (USBF) on maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), pain assessed by the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and vastus medialis oblique (VMO) thickness in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). [Subjects and Methods] Thirty females over 65 years of age who had been diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were recruited and randomly assigned to three groups, each comprising of 10 subjects. The Subjects in the EMGBF training and USBF training groups were trained with the corresponding physical training exercise program targeting the vastus medialis oblique, whereas the subjects in the control group were treated with conventional physical therapies, such as a hot pack, ultrasound, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Subjects in each group were trained or treated for 20 min, 3 times a week for 8 weeks. [Results] The MVIC in the EMGBF and USBF training groups was significantly increased compared with that in the control group, and the VAS score (for measurement of pain) in the EMGBF and USBF training groups was significantly decreased compared with that in the control group. Only the EMGBF training group showed a significantly increased VMO thickness compared with before training. [Conclusion] These results suggest that USBF training is similar to EMGBF training in terms of its effectiveness and is helpful for treating patients with knee OA. PMID:25642061

  10. Kinesio Taping effects on knee extension force among soccer players

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Maysa V. G. B.; Vieira, Edgar R.; Brunt, Denis; Goethel, Márcio F.; Gonçalves, Mauro; Quemelo, Paulo R. V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Kinesio Taping (KT) is widely used, however the effects of KT on muscle activation and force are contradictory. Objective: To evaluate the effects of KT on knee extension force in soccer players. Method: This is a clinical trial study design. Thirty-four subjects performed two maximal isometric voluntary contractions of the lower limbs pre, immediately post, and 24 hours after tape application on the lower limbs. Both lower limbs were taped, using K-Tape and 3M Micropore tape randomly on the right and left thighs of the participants. Isometric knee extension force was measured for dominant side using a strain gauge. The following variables were assessed: peak force, time to peak force, rate of force development until peak force, time to peak rate of force development, and 200 ms pulse. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in the variables assessed between KT and Micropore conditions (F=0.645, p=0.666) or among testing sessions (pre, post, and 24h after) (F=0.528, p=0.868), and there was no statistical significance (F=0.271, p=0.986) for interaction between tape conditions and testing session. Conclusion: KT did not affect the force-related measures assessed immediately and 24 hours after the KT application compared with Micropore application, during maximal isometric voluntary knee extension. PMID:25789557

  11. Muscle Damage following Maximal Eccentric Knee Extensions in Males and Females

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate whether there is a sex difference in exercise induced muscle damage. Materials and Method Vastus Lateralis and patella tendon properties were measured in males and females using ultrasonography. During maximal voluntary eccentric knee extensions (12 reps x 6 sets), Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening and maximal voluntary eccentric knee extensions torque were recorded every 10° of knee joint angle (20–90°). Isometric torque, Creatine Kinase and muscle soreness were measured pre, post, 48, 96 and 168 hours post damage as markers of exercise induced muscle damage. Results Patella tendon stiffness and Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening were significantly higher in males compared to females (p<0.05). There was no sex difference in isometric torque loss and muscle soreness post exercise induced muscle damage (p>0.05). Creatine Kinase levels post exercise induced muscle damage were higher in males compared to females (p<0.05), and remained higher when maximal voluntary eccentric knee extension torque, relative to estimated quadriceps anatomical cross sectional area, was taken as a covariate (p<0.05). Conclusion Based on isometric torque loss, there is no sex difference in exercise induced muscle damage. The higher Creatine Kinase in males could not be explained by differences in maximal voluntary eccentric knee extension torque, Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening and patella tendon stiffness. Further research is required to understand the significant sex differences in Creatine Kinase levels following exercise induced muscle damage. PMID:26986066

  12. Effects of isometric training at different knee angles on the muscle-tendon complex in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kubo, K; Ohgo, K; Takeishi, R; Yoshinaga, K; Tsunoda, N; Kanehisa, H; Fukunaga, T

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influences of isometric training at different joint angles on the muscle size and function of the human muscle-tendon complex in vivo. Furthermore, we tried to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in angle specificity after isometric training from the aspect of neuromuscular adaptation and the changes in the properties of the muscle-tendon complex. Nine males completed 12-week unilateral training program (70% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) x 15 s x six sets) on the knee extensors at 50 degrees (shorter muscle length: ST) and 100 degrees (longer muscle length: LT). The internal muscle force (mechanical stress) is higher at 100 degrees than at 50 degrees because of the difference in the moment arm length, although there were no difference in the relative torque level, contraction and relaxation times, and repetition between ST and LT. Before and after training, isometric strength at eight angles and muscle volume were determined. Tendon elongation of knee extensors was measured by ultrasonography. There was no significant difference in the rate of increment of muscle volume between the protocols. Tendon stiffness increased significantly for LT, but not for ST. Although significant gain was limited to angles at or near the training angle for ST, increases in MVC at all angles were found for LT. These results suggest that only mechanical stress (internal muscle force imposed on muscle and tendon) contributes to adaptation in the tendon stiffness, although metabolic (relative torque level, etc.) and mechanical stress relate to muscle hypertrophy. Furthermore, increment of tendon stiffness for LT might contribute to increase torque output at smaller angles other than the training angle. PMID:16643193

  13. Loss of knee extensor torque complexity during fatiguing isometric muscle contractions occurs exclusively above the critical torque.

    PubMed

    Pethick, Jamie; Winter, Samantha L; Burnley, Mark

    2016-06-01

    The complexity of knee extensor torque time series decreases during fatiguing isometric muscle contractions. We hypothesized that because of peripheral fatigue, this loss of torque complexity would occur exclusively during contractions above the critical torque (CT). Nine healthy participants performed isometric knee extension exercise (6 s of contraction, 4 s of rest) on six occasions for 30 min or to task failure, whichever occurred sooner. Four trials were performed above CT (trials S1-S4, S1 being the lowest intensity), and two were performed below CT (at 50% and 90% of CT). Global, central, and peripheral fatigue were quantified using maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) with femoral nerve stimulation. The complexity of torque output was determined using approximate entropy (ApEn) and the detrended fluctuation analysis-α scaling exponent (DFA-α). The MVC torque was reduced in trials below CT [by 19 ± 4% (means ± SE) in 90%CT], but complexity did not decrease [ApEn for 90%CT: from 0.82 ± 0.03 to 0.75 ± 0.06, 95% paired-samples confidence intervals (CIs), 95% CI = -0.23, 0.10; DFA-α from 1.36 ± 0.01 to 1.32 ± 0.03, 95% CI -0.12, 0.04]. Above CT, substantial reductions in MVC torque occurred (of 49 ± 8% in S1), and torque complexity was reduced (ApEn for S1: from 0.67 ± 0.06 to 0.14 ± 0.01, 95% CI = -0.72, -0.33; DFA-α from 1.38 ± 0.03 to 1.58 ± 0.01, 95% CI 0.12, 0.29). Thus, in these experiments, the fatigue-induced loss of torque complexity occurred exclusively during contractions performed above the CT. PMID:27101290

  14. The effects of isometric resistance training on stretch reflex induced tremor in the knee extensor muscles.

    PubMed

    Durbaba, Rade; Cassidy, Angela; Budini, Francesco; Macaluso, Andrea

    2013-06-15

    This study examines the effect of 4 wk of high-intensity isometric resistance training on induced tremor in knee extensor muscles. Fourteen healthy volunteers were assigned to either the training group (n = 7) or the nontraining control group (n = 7). Induced tremor was assessed by measuring force fluctuations during anisometric contractions against spring loading, whose compliance was varied to allow for preferential activation of the short or long latency stretch reflex components. Effects of high-intensity isometric resistance training on induced tremor was assessed under two contraction conditions: relative force matching, where the relative level of activity was equal for both pre- and post-training sessions, set at 30% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), and absolute force matching, where the level of activity was set to 30% pretrained MVC. The training group experienced a 26.5% increase in MVC in contrast to the 0.8% for the control group. For relative force-matching contractions, induced tremor amplitude and frequency did not change in either the training or control group. During absolute force-matching contractions, induced tremor amplitude was decreased by 37.5% and 31.6% for the short and long components, respectively, with no accompanying change in frequency, for the training group. No change in either measure was observed in the control group for absolute force-matching contractions. The results are consistent with high-intensity isometric resistance training induced neural changes leading to increased strength, coupled with realignment of stretch reflex automatic gain compensation to the new maximal force output. Also, previous reported reductions in anisometric tremor following strength training may partly be due to changed stretch reflex behavior. PMID:23580599

  15. Muscle Activation Differs between Three Different Knee Joint-Angle Positions during a Maximal Isometric Back Squat Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Jarbas da Silva, Josinaldo; Jon Schoenfeld, Brad; Nardi, Priscyla Silva Monteiro; Pecoraro, Silvio Luis; D'Andréa Greve, Julia Maria; Hartigan, Erin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare muscle activation of the lower limb muscles when performing a maximal isometric back squat exercise over three different positions. Fifteen young, healthy, resistance-trained men performed an isometric back squat at three knee joint angles (20°, 90°, and 140°) in a randomized, counterbalanced fashion. Surface electromyography was used to measure muscle activation of the vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), rectus femoris (RF), biceps femoris (BF), semitendinosus (ST), and gluteus maximus (GM). In general, muscle activity was the highest at 90° for the three quadriceps muscles, yet differences in muscle activation between knee angles were muscle specific. Activity of the GM was significantly greater at 20° and 90° compared to 140°. The BF and ST displayed similar activation at all joint angles. In conclusion, knee position alters muscles activation of the quadriceps and gluteus maximus muscles. An isometric back squat at 90° generates the highest overall muscle activation, yet an isometric back squat at 140° generates the lowest overall muscle activation of the VL and GM only. PMID:27504484

  16. A Multiple Degree of Freedom Lower Extremity Isometric Device to Simultaneously Quantify Hip, Knee and Ankle Torques

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Natalia; Acosta, Ana Maria; Stienen, Arno H.A.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of the joint torque coupling strategies used in the lower extremity to generate maximal and submaximal levels of torque at either the hip, knee or ankle is lacking. Currently, there are no available isometric devices that quantify all concurrent joint torques in the hip, knee and ankle of a single leg during maximum voluntary torque generation. Thus, joint-torque coupling strategies in the hip, knee and concurrent torques at ankle and/or coupling patterns at the hip and knee driven by the ankle have yet to be quantified. This manuscript describes the design, implementation and validation of a multiple degree of freedom, lower extremity isometric device (the MultiLEIT) that accurately quantifies simultaneous torques at the hip, knee and ankle. The system was mechanically validated and then implemented with two healthy control individuals and two post-stroke individuals to test usability and patient acceptance. Data indicated different joint torque coupling strategies used by both healthy individuals. In contrast, data showed the same torque coupling patterns in both post-stroke individuals, comparable to those described in the clinic. Successful implementation of the MultiLEIT can contribute to the understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for abnormal movement patterns and aid in the design of therapeutic interventions. PMID:25163064

  17. Acute Improvement of Vertical Jump Performance After Isometric Squats Depends on Knee Angle and Vertical Jumping Ability.

    PubMed

    Tsoukos, Athanasios; Bogdanis, Gregory C; Terzis, Gerasimos; Veligekas, Panagiotis

    2016-08-01

    Tsoukos, A, Bogdanis, GC, Terzis, G, and Veligekas, P. Acute improvement of vertical jump performance after isometric squats depends on knee angle and vertical jumping ability. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2250-2257, 2016-This study examined the acute effects of maximum isometric squats at 2 different knee angles (90 or 140°) on countermovement jump (CMJ) performance in power athletes. Fourteen national-level male track and field power athletes completed 3 main trials (2 experimental and 1 control) in a randomized and counterbalanced order 1 week apart. Countermovement jump performance was evaluated using a force-plate before and 15 seconds, 3, 6, 9, and 12 minutes after 3 sets of 3 seconds maximum isometric contractions with 1-minute rest in between, from a squat position with knee angle set at 90 or 140°. Countermovement jump performance was improved compared with baseline only in the 140° condition by 3.8 ± 1.2% on the 12th minute of recovery (p = 0.027), whereas there was no change in CMJ height in the 90° condition. In the control condition, there was a decrease in CMJ performance over time, reaching -3.6 ± 1.2% (p = 0.049) after 12 minutes of recovery. To determine the possible effects of baseline jump performance on subsequent CMJ performance, subjects were divided into 2 groups ("high jumpers" and "low jumpers"). The baseline CMJ values of "high jumpers" and "low jumpers" differed significantly (CMJ: 45.1 ± 2.2 vs. 37.1 ± 3.9 cm, respectively, p = 0.001). Countermovement jump was increased only in the "high jumpers" group by 5.4 ± 1.4% (p = 0.001) and 7.4 ± 1.2% (p = 0.001) at the knee angles of 90 and 140°, respectively. This improvement was larger at the 140° angle (p = 0.049). Knee angle during isometric squats and vertical jumping ability are important determinants of the acute CMJ performance increase observed after a conditioning activity. PMID:26808841

  18. Intensity-dependent alterations in the excitability of cortical and spinal projections to the knee extensors during isometric and locomotor exercise

    PubMed Central

    Weavil, J. C.; Sidhu, S. K.; Mangum, T. S.; Richardson, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of exercise intensity and associated central motor drive in determining corticomotoneuronal excitability. Ten participants performed a series of nonfatiguing (3 s) isometric single-leg knee extensions (ISO; 10–100% of maximal voluntary contractions, MVC) and cycling bouts (30–160% peak aerobic capacity, Wpeak). At various exercise intensities, electrical potentials were evoked in the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) via transcranial magnetic stimulation (motor-evoked potentials, MEP), and electrical stimulation of both the cervicomedullary junction (cervicomedullary evoked potentials, CMEP) and the femoral nerve (maximal M-waves, Mmax). Whereas Mmax remained unchanged in both muscles (P > 0.40), voluntary electromyographic activity (EMG) increased in an exercise intensity-dependent manner for ISO and cycling exercise in VL and RF (both P < 0.001). During ISO exercise, MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased in VL and RF until a plateau was reached at ∼75% MVC; further increases in contraction intensity did not cause additional changes (P > 0.35). During cycling exercise, VL-MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased by ∼65% until a plateau was reached at Wpeak. In contrast, RF MEPs and CMEPs progressively increased by ∼110% throughout the tested cycling intensities without the occurrence of a plateau. Furthermore, alterations in EMG below the plateau influenced corticomotoneuronal excitability similarly between exercise modalities. In both exercise modalities, the MEP-to-CMEP ratio did not change with exercise intensity (P > 0.22). In conclusion, increases in exercise intensity and EMG facilitates the corticomotoneuronal pathway similarly in isometric knee extension and locomotor exercise until a plateau occurs at a submaximal exercise intensity. This facilitation appears to be primarily mediated by increases in excitability of the motoneuron pool. PMID:25876651

  19. The knee-spine syndrome. Association between lumbar lordosis and extension of the knee.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yasuaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamagata, Masatsune; Hanaoka, Eiji; Moriya, Hideshige

    2003-01-01

    Degenerative changes of the knee often cause loss of extension. This may affect aspects of posture such as lumbar lordosis. A total of 366 patients underwent radiological examination of the lumbar spine in a standing position. The knee and body angles were measured by physical examination using a goniometer. Limitation of extension of the knee was significantly greater in patients whose lumbar lordosis was 30 degrees or less. Lumbar lordosis was significantly reduced in patients whose limitation of extension of the knee was more than 5 degrees. It decreased over the age of 70 years, and the limitation of extension of the knee increased over the age of 60 years. Our study indicates that symptoms from the lumbar spine may be caused by degenerative changes in the knee. This may be called the 'knee-spine syndrome'. PMID:12585585

  20. Rhythmic Isometric Fatigue Patterns of the Elbow Flexors and Knee Extensors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordway, George A.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    During a rhythmic, all-out task, the rates of fatigue experienced by elbow flexor and knee extendor muscle groups tend to differ, with the elbow flexors fatiguing more rapidly initially, but reaching a plateau at a relatively higher level than the knee extensors. (Author)

  1. Protective effect by maximal isometric contractions against maximal eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage of the knee extensors.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Kuo-Wei; Tseng, Wei-Chin; Lin, Ming-Ju; Chen, Hsin-Lian; Nosaka, Kazunori; Chen, Trevor C

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) performed before maximal eccentric contractions (MaxEC) would attenuate muscle damage of the knee extensors. Untrained men were placed to an experimental group that performed 6 sets of 10 MVIC at 90° knee flexion 2 weeks before 6 sets of 10 MaxEC or a control group that performed MaxEC only (n = 13/group). Changes in muscle damage markers were assessed before to 5 days after each exercise. Small but significant changes in maximal voluntary concentric contraction torque, range of motion (ROM) and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity were evident at immediately to 2 days post-MVIC (p < 0.05), but other variables (e.g. thigh girth, myoglobin concentration, B-mode echo intensity) did not change significantly. Changes in all variables after MaxEC were smaller (p < 0.05) by 45% (soreness)-67% (CK) for the experimental than the control group. These results suggest that MVIC conferred potent protective effect against MaxEC-induced muscle damage. PMID:27366814

  2. Effects of Series Elasticity on the Human Knee Extension Torque-Angle Relationship in Vivo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubo, Keitaro; Ohgo, Kazuya; Takeishi, Ryuichi; Yoshinaga, Kazunari; Tsunoda, Naoya; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of series elasticity on the torque-angle relationship of the knee extensors in vivo. Forty-two men volunteered to take part in the present study. The participants performed maximal voluntary isometric contractions at eight knee-joint angles (40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 110[degree]). The…

  3. The effect of exercise-induced muscle damage on isometric and dynamic knee extensor strength and vertical jump performance.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Christopher; Eston, Roger

    2002-05-01

    In this study, we assessed the effect of exercise-induced muscle damage on knee extensor muscle strength during isometric, concentric and eccentric actions at 1.57 rad x s(-1) and vertical jump performance under conditions of squat jump, countermovement jump and drop jump. The eight participants (5 males, 3 females) were aged 29.5+/-7.1 years (mean +/- s). These variables, together with plasma creatine kinase (CK), were measured before, 1 h after and 1, 2, 3, 4 and 7 days after a bout of muscle damaging exercise: 100 barbell squats (10 sets x 10 repetitions at 70% body mass load). Strength was reduced for 4 days (P< 0.05) but no significant differences (P> 0.05) were apparent in the magnitude or rate of recovery of strength between isometric, concentric and eccentric muscle actions. The overall decline in vertical jump performance was dependent on jump method: squat jump performance was affected to a greater extent than countermovement (91.6+/-1.1% vs 95.2+/-1.3% of pre-exercise values, P< 0.05) and drop jump (95.2+/-1.4%, P< 0.05) performance. Creatine kinase was elevated (P < 0.05) above baseline 1 h after exercise, peaked on day 1 and remained significantly elevated on days 2 and 3. Strength loss after exercise-induced muscle damage was independent of the muscle action being performed. However, the impairment of muscle function was attenuated when the stretch-shortening cycle was used in vertical jumping performance. PMID:12043831

  4. Isometric knee extensor fatigue following a Wingate test: peripheral and central mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-del-Olmo, M; Rodriguez, F A; Marquez, G; Iglesias, X; Marina, M; Benitez, A; Vallejo, L; Acero, R M

    2013-02-01

    Central and peripheral fatigue have been explored during and after running or cycling exercises. However, the fatigue mechanisms associated with a short maximal cycling exercise (30 s Wingate test) have not been investigated. In this study, 10 volunteer subjects performed several isometric voluntary contractions using the leg muscle extensors before and after two bouts of cycling at 25% of maximal power output and two bouts of Wingate tests. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electrical motor nerve stimulation (NM) were applied at rest and during the voluntary contractions. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), voluntary activation (VA), twitch amplitude evoked by electrical nerve stimulation, M wave and motor potential evoked by TMS (MEP) were recorded. MVC, VA and twitch amplitude evoked at rest by NM decreased significantly after the first and second Wingate tests, indicating central and peripheral fatigue. MVC and VA, but not the twitch amplitude evoked by NM, recovered before the second Wingate test. These results suggest that the Wingate test results in a decrease in MVC associated with peripheral and central fatigue. While the peripheral fatigue is associated with an intramuscular impairment, the central fatigue seems to be the main reason for the Wingate test-induced impairment of MVC. PMID:21812824

  5. Characteristics of human knee muscle coordination during isometric contractions in a standing posture: The effect of limb task

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Toran D.; Manal, Kurt; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Buchanan, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    Different functional roles for the hands have been demonstrated, however leg control is not as well understood. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate bilateral knee neuromuscular control to determine if the limb receiving greater attention would have more well-tuned control compared to an unattended limb. Surface electrodes were placed on seven muscles of each limb, before standing on two force platforms. Visual feedback was given of the forces and moments of the “focus limb,” but not the “unattended limb.” Static isometric forces were matched with their focus limb, requiring their unattended limb to push in the opposite direction, using a combination of forward-backward-medial-lateral shear forces while muscle activity was collected bilaterally. There was a significant main effect for limb task (p = 0.02), with the medial hamstrings being more specific (p = 0.001) while performing the unattended limb and the lateral hamstring being more well-tuned (p = 0.007) while performing the focus limb task. The focus limb's medial and lateral gastrocnemius were principally active in the forwards direction, but only the unattended limb's lateral gastrocnemius was active in the backwards direction. Findings suggest unique neuromuscular control strategies are used for the legs depending on limb task. PMID:23790392

  6. Influence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in the fluctuation of the submaximal isometric torque of knee extensors in patients with early-grade osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Andressa; Mello, Marco T.; Serrão, Paula R.; Luz, Roberta P.; Bittencourt, Lia R.; Mattiello, Stela M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) alters the fluctuation of submaximal isometric torque of the knee extensors in patients with early-grade osteoarthritis (OA). METHOD: The study included 60 male volunteers, aged 40 to 70 years, divided into four groups: Group 1 (G1) - Control (n=15): without OA and without OSA; Group 2 (G2) (n=15): with OA and without OSA; Group 3 (G3) (n=15): without OA and with OSA; and Group 4 (G4) (n=15) with OA and with OSA. Five patients underwent maximal isometric contractions of 10 seconds duration each, with the knee at 60° of flexion to determine peak torque at 60°. To evaluate the fluctuation of torque, 5 submaximal isometric contractions (50% of maximum peak torque) of 10 seconds each, which were calculated from the standard deviation of torque and coefficient of variation, were performed. RESULTS: Significant differences were observed between groups for maximum peak torque, while G4 showed a lower value compared with G1 (p=0.005). Additionally, for the average torque exerted, G4 showed a lower value compared to the G1 (p=0.036). However, no differences were found between the groups for the standard deviation (p=0.844) and the coefficient of variation (p=0.143). CONCLUSION: The authors concluded that OSA did not change the parameters of the fluctuation of isometric submaximal torque of knee extensors in patients with early-grade OA. PMID:26443974

  7. Fatigue reduces the complexity of knee extensor torque fluctuations during maximal and submaximal intermittent isometric contractions in man

    PubMed Central

    Pethick, Jamie; Winter, Samantha L; Burnley, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular fatigue increases the amplitude of fluctuations in torque output during isometric contractions, but the effect of fatigue on the temporal structure, or complexity, of these fluctuations is not known. We hypothesised that fatigue would result in a loss of temporal complexity and a change in fractal scaling of the torque signal during isometric knee extensor exercise. Eleven healthy participants performed a maximal test (5 min of intermittent maximal voluntary contractions, MVCs), and a submaximal test (contractions at a target of 40% MVC performed until task failure), each with a 60% duty factor (6 s contraction, 4 s rest). Torque and surface EMG signals were sampled continuously. Complexity and fractal scaling of torque were quantified by calculating approximate entropy (ApEn), sample entropy (SampEn) and the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) scaling exponent α. Fresh submaximal contractions were more complex than maximal contractions (mean ± SEM, submaximal vs. maximal: ApEn 0.65 ± 0.09 vs. 0.15 ± 0.02; SampEn 0.62 ± 0.09 vs. 0.14 ± 0.02; DFA α 1.35 ± 0.04 vs. 1.55 ± 0.03; all P < 0.005). Fatigue reduced the complexity of submaximal contractions (ApEn to 0.24 ± 0.05; SampEn to 0.22 ± 0.04; DFA α to 1.55 ± 0.03; all P < 0.005) and maximal contractions (ApEn to 0.10 ± 0.02; SampEn to 0.10 ± 0.02; DFA α to 1.63 ± 0.02; all P < 0.01). This loss of complexity and shift towards Brownian-like noise suggests that as well as reducing the capacity to produce torque, fatigue reduces the neuromuscular system's adaptability to external perturbations. PMID:25664928

  8. Knee Extension Range of Motion at 4 Weeks Is Related to Knee Extension Loss at 12 Weeks After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Noll, Sarah; Garrison, J. Craig; Bothwell, James; Conway, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is commonly torn, and surgical reconstruction is often required to allow a patient to return to their prior level of activity. Avoiding range of motion (ROM) loss is a common goal, but little research has been done to identify when ROM loss becomes detrimental to a patient’s future function. Purpose: To determine whether there is a relationship between early knee side-to-side extension difference after ACL reconstruction and knee side-to-side extension difference at 12 weeks. The hypothesis was that early (within the first 8 weeks) knee side-to-side extension difference will be predictive of knee side-to-side extension difference seen at 12 weeks. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Knee side-to-side extension difference measures were taken on 74 patients undergoing ACL reconstruction rehabilitation at the initial visit and 4, 8, and 12 weeks postoperatively. Visual analog scores (VAS) and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores were also recorded at these time frames. Results: There was a strong relationship between knee extension ROM at 4 and 12 weeks (r = 0.639, P < .001) and 8 and 12 weeks (r = 0.742, P < .001). When the variables of knee extension ROM at initial visit and 4 and 8 weeks were entered into a regression analysis, the predictor variable explained 61% (R2 = 0.611) of variance for knee extension ROM at 12 weeks, with 4 weeks (R2 = 0.259) explaining the majority of this variance. Conclusion: This study found that a patient’s knee extension at 4 weeks was strongly correlated with knee extension at 12 weeks. Clinical Relevance: This information may be useful for clinicians treating athletic patients who are anxious for return to sport by providing them an initial goal to work toward in hopes of ensuring successful rehabilitation of their knee. PMID:26675061

  9. Interrater Reliability of Isokinetic Measures of Knee Flexion and Extension

    PubMed Central

    Keskula, Douglas R.; Dowling, Jeffrey S.; Davis, Virginia L.; Finley, Paula W.; Dell'Omo, Daniel L.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the interrater reliability of peak torque and total work values obtained with isokinetic measures of knee flexion and extension. Eight male and eight female students were evaluated on four occasions by four different examiners (range of isokinetic test experience: 0 to 10 yrs) using a standardized isokinetic measurement protocol. Subjects were randomly assigned to participate in a test sequence determined by a 4 × 4 balanced Latin square. Peak torque and total work values at 60°/sec and 180°/sec were obtained for the concentric measures of knee extension and flexion. The measures of peak torque and total work were corrected for the effects of gravity. Intraclass correlation coefficients and standard error of measurement estimates were used to estimate the interrater reliability for each test condition (test speed × muscle group). Intraclass correlation coefficient values ranged from .90 to .96 for peak torque and .90 to .95 for total work. Standard error of measurement estimates ranged from 8.9 to 13.3 Nm for peak torque and 11.3 to 16.8 Nm for total work. The results of this investigation demonstrate that reliable measures of isokinetic muscle performance of knee extension and flexion may be obtained by four clinicians with varied experience when following a standardized measurement protocol. ImagesFig 1.Fig 2. PMID:16558330

  10. Knee extension and flexion: MR delineation of normal and torn anterior cruciate ligaments

    SciTech Connect

    Niitsu, Mamoru; Ikeda, Kotaroh; Fukubayashi, Tohru; Anno, Izumi; Itai, Yuji

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the effect of joint position of semiflexed and extended knees in MR delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, the knee joint was either fully extended or bent to a semiflexed position (average 45{degrees} of flexion) within the magnet bore. Sets of oblique sagittal MR images were obtained for both extended and flexed knee positions. Thirty-two knees with intact ACLs and 43 knees with arthroscopically proven ACL tears were evaluated. Two observers compared paired MR images of both extended and flexed positions and rated them by a relative three point scale. Anatomic correlation in MR images was obtained by a cadaveric knee with incremental flexion. The MR images of flexed knees were more useful than of extended knees in 53% of the case reviews of femoral attachments and 36% of reviews of midportions of normal ACLs. Compared with knee extensions, the MR images for knee flexion provided better clarity in 48% of reviews of disrupted sites and 52% of residual bundles of torn ACLs. Normal ACL appeared taut in the knee extension and lax in semiflexion. Compared with MR images of knees in extension, MR images of knees in flexion more clearly delineate the femoral side of the ligament with wider space under the intercondylar roof and with decreased volume-averaging artifacts, providing superior visualization of normal and torn ACLs. 13 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Perioperative Rehabilitation Using a Knee Extension Device and Arthroscopic Debridement in the Treatment of Arthrofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs-Kinzer, Angie; Murphy, Brian; Shelbourne, K. Donald; Urch, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Background: Arthrofibrosis is a postoperative complication of intra-articular knee surgery that can be difficult to treat. Evidence suggests that maximizing knee range of motion may improve outcomes in patients with arthrofibrosis who undergo arthroscopic debridement. Hypothesis: Patients who achieve greater knee range of motion will have better subjective scores. Study Design: Retrospective case series analysis. Methods: A review of records was performed for 33 patients with arthrofibrosis who underwent knee arthroscopy and scar resection coupled with perioperative rehabilitation to maximize knee range of motion. Patient demographics and preoperative and postoperative range of motion measurements were extracted from the records. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Form was administered to assess pain, activity, and knee function. Patients performed a preoperative and postoperative rehabilitation program utilizing a knee extension device to maximize knee extension. Results: According to the IKDC range of motion criteria, 27 of 33 patients achieved normal knee extension, and 14 of 33 achieved normal knee flexion at a mean of 8.6 months after surgery. Patients with normal knee motion had a mean IKDC Subjective Knee Form score of 72.6 ± 13.6, which was significantly higher than patients who did not achieve normal motion (P = .04). Overall, mean IKDC Subjective Knee Form scores improved from 45.3 ± 16.7 preoperatively to 67.1 ± 18.0 postoperatively (P < .01) at a mean of 14.7 months after surgery. Conclusions: Perioperative rehabilitation that emphasizes restoration of normal knee range of motion appears to improve outcomes in patients with arthrofibrosis who undergo arthroscopic scar resection. In support of our hypothesis, patients who achieved greater knee range of motion had better subjective knee scores. PMID:23015970

  12. Lifestyle-Related Factors Contributing to Decline in Knee Extension Strength among Elderly Women: A Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Narumi; Kim, Miji; Saito, Kyoko; Yoshida, Hideyo; Yoshida, Yuko; Hirano, Hirohiko; Obuchi, Shuichi; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Takao; Kim, Hunkyung

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional and 4-year longitudinal cohort study aimed to clarify how various lifestyle-related variables affect knee extension strength in elderly Japanese women. The participants were community-dwelling women (n = 575) living in the Itabashi Ward of Tokyo, Japan aged 75–85 years at baseline (in 2008) who returned for a follow-up examination 4 years later (in 2012). Maximum isometric knee extension strength in the dominant leg was measured during comprehensive medical check-ups at baseline and follow-up. Interviews with participants included questions on their history of 11 diseases and lifestyle-related factors such as physical activity as well as dietary, smoking, and drinking habits. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses yielded inconsistent results regarding the associations between lifestyle-related factors and knee extension strength. While going out more frequently and regular physical exercise positively affected baseline knee extension strength, they did not affect knee extension strength in the longitudinal analysis. The longitudinal analysis revealed that more frequent intake of soy products or green and yellow vegetables at baseline decreased age-related knee extension strength decline. The inconsistent results from the cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses indicate that conducting both types of analyses is crucial for researching this type of subject. The present study demonstrates that the age-related decline in muscle strength is lower in those who frequently eat soy products or green and yellow vegetables. Thus, recommending higher intake of soy products, and green and yellow vegetables for the elderly might help maintain their muscle health. PMID:26177292

  13. Quasi-stiffness of the knee joint in flexion and extension during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ahnryul; Sim, Taeyong; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical understanding of the knee joint during a golf swing is essential to improve performance and prevent injury. In this study, we quantified the flexion/extension angle and moment as the primary knee movement, and evaluated quasi-stiffness represented by moment-angle coupling in the knee joint. Eighteen skilled and 23 unskilled golfers participated in this study. Six infrared cameras and two force platforms were used to record a swing motion. The anatomical angle and moment were calculated from kinematic and kinetic models, and quasi-stiffness of the knee joint was determined as an instantaneous slope of moment-angle curves. The lead knee of the skilled group had decreased resistance duration compared with the unskilled group (P < 0.05), and the resistance duration of the lead knee was lower than that of the trail knee in the skilled group (P < 0.01). The lead knee of the skilled golfers had greater flexible excursion duration than the trail knee of the skilled golfers, and of both the lead and trail knees of the unskilled golfers. These results provide critical information for preventing knee injuries during a golf swing and developing rehabilitation strategies following surgery. PMID:25651162

  14. An in vivo study of the effect of distal femoral resection on passive knee extension.

    PubMed

    Smith, Conrad K; Chen, Justin A; Howell, Stephen M; Hull, Maury L

    2010-10-01

    A previous study showed that 1 mm of distal femoral resection restored knee extension 4.5°. We determined the relationship with a more accurate measurement technique. Twenty-six subjects treated with total knee arthroplasty were studied. Digital photographs of the extended knee with and without 1.5 and 3.0 mm thick augments placed between the femoral component and distal femur were analyzed, and knee extension was measured. One millimeter of distal femoral resection restored 1.8° of extension that is less correction than the previous study reported. Because an attempt to correct a 10° extension deficit by resecting the distal femur could require 5 mm or more of bone removal that moves the joint line too proximal, we recommend exploring other techniques before resecting the femur. PMID:19643566

  15. Effects of isokinetic training of the knee extensors on isometric strength and peak power output during cycling.

    PubMed

    Mannion, A F; Jakeman, P M; Willan, P L

    1992-01-01

    Isokinetic training of right and left quadriceps femoris was undertaken three times per week for 16 weeks. One group of subjects (n = 13) trained at an angular velocity of 4.19 rad.s-1 and a second group (n = 10) at 1.05 rad.s-1. A control group (n = 10) performed no training. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the quadriceps, and peak pedal velocity nu p,peak) and peak power output (Wpeak) during all-out cycling (against loads equivalent to 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14% MVC) were assessed before and after training. The two training groups did not differ significantly from each other in their training response to any of the performance variables (P > 0.05). No significant difference in MVC was observed for any group after the 16-week period (P = 0.167). The post-training increases in average Wpeak (7%) and nu p,peak (6%) during the cycle tests were each significantly different from the control group response (P = 0.018 and P = 0.008, respectively). It is concluded that 16 weeks of isokinetic strength training of the knee extensors is able to significantly improve nu p, peak and Wpeak during spring cycling, an activity which demands considerable involvement of the trained muscle group but with its own distinct pattern of coordination. PMID:1425638

  16. Deformation analysis of Hoffa's fat pad from CT images of knee flexion and extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamarneh, Ghassan; Chu, Vincent; Bordalo-Rodrigues, Marcelo; Schweitzer, Mark

    2005-04-01

    Recent advances in medicine conjecture that certain body fat may have mechanical function in addition to its classical role of energy storage. In particular we aim to analyze if the intra-articular fat pad of Hoffa is merely a space holder or if it changes shape to provide cushioning for the knee bones. Towards this goal, 3D CT images of real knees, as well as a skeletal knee model with fat simulating Hoffa's pad, were acquired in both extension and flexion. Image segmentation was performed to automatically extract the real and simulated fat regions from the extension and flexion images. Utilizing the segmentation results as binary masks, we performed automatic multi-resolution image registration of the fat pad between flexed and extended knee positions. The resulting displacement fields from flexion-extension registration are examined and used to calculate local fat volume changes thus providing insight into shape changes that may have a mechanical component.

  17. The Effect of Stabilization on Isokinetic Knee Extension and Flexion Torque Production

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson, S. Peter; Geismar, Richard A.; Gleim, Gilbert W.; Nicholas, James A.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of four methods of stabilization on maximal reciprocal isokinetic knee extension and flexion. Left knee extension/flexion was tested at 60°/s in 20 subjects. Warm-up consisted of five submaximal and one maximal effort followed by three maximal efforts in each of four randomized stabilization conditions: 1) Hands and back stabilization; the trunk was strapped to the back rest and the hands grasped the seat. 2) Back stabilization; the trunk was strapped to the back rest and the hands were folded across the chest. 3) Hand stabilization; the hands grasped the seat and the back rest was removed. 4) No stabilization; the hands were folded across the chest and the back rest was removed. One-way repeated measures ANOVA showed a significant effect of stabilization for knee extension (F(3,57)=17.44, p=.0001) and knee flexion (F(3,57)= 5.37, p=.002). Paired, two-tailed student's t-tests with Bonferroni correction showed that, in knee extension, no stabilization was significantly less than all others, p<.001. In addition, back stabilization was less than hands and back stabilization, p<.005. In knee flexion, no stabilization was significantly less than all others, p<.01. In conclusion, the method of trunk stabilization significantly affected maximal reciprocal isokinetic knee extension/flexion strength measurements. Maximal knee extension/flexion torque production was achieved when the trunk was strapped to the back support and when the hands grasped the seat. ImagesFig 1a.Fig 1b.Fig 1c.Fig 1d. PMID:16558235

  18. Greater Hip Extension but Not Hip Abduction Explosive Strength Is Associated With Lesser Hip Adduction and Knee Valgus Motion During a Single-Leg Jump-Cut

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Baker; Johnson, Samuel T.; Chang, Eunwook; Pollard, Christine D.; Norcross, Marc F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationships between hip abductor and extensor strength and frontal plane hip and knee motions that are associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury risk are equivocal. However, previous research on these relationships has evaluated relatively low-level movement tasks and peak torque rather than a time-critical strength measure such as the rate of torque development (RTD). Hypothesis: Females with greater hip abduction and extension RTD would exhibit lesser frontal plane hip and knee motion during a single-leg jump-cutting task. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Forty recreationally active females performed maximal isometric contractions and single-leg jump-cuts. From recorded torque data, hip extension and abduction RTD was calculated from torque onset to 200 ms after onset. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to quantify frontal plane hip and knee kinematics during the movement task. For each RTD measure, jump-cut biomechanics were compared between participants in the highest (high) and lowest (low) RTD tertiles. Results: No differences in frontal plane hip and knee kinematics were identified between high and low hip abduction RTD groups. However, those in the high hip extension RTD group exhibited lower hip adduction (high, 3.8° ± 3.0°; low, 6.5° ± 3.0°; P = .019) and knee valgus (high, –2.5° ± 2.3°; low, –4.4° ± 3.2°; P = .046) displacements during the jump-cut. Conclusion: In movements such as cutting that are performed with the hip in a relatively abducted and flexed position, the ability of the gluteus medius to control hip adduction may be compromised. However, the gluteus maximus, functioning as a hip abductor, may take on a pivotal role in controlling hip adduction and knee valgus motion during these types of tasks. Clinical Relevance: Training with a specific emphasis on increasing explosive strength of the hip extensors may be a means through which to improve frontal plane hip and knee

  19. Voluntary Movement Frequencies in Submaximal One- and Two-Legged Knee Extension Exercise and Pedaling.

    PubMed

    Stang, Julie; Wiig, Håvard; Hermansen, Marte; Hansen, Ernst Albin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of behavior and control of human voluntary rhythmic stereotyped leg movements is useful in work to improve performance, function, and rehabilitation of exercising, healthy, and injured humans. The present study aimed at adding to the existing understanding within this field. To pursue the aim, correlations between freely chosen movement frequencies in relatively simple, single-joint, one- and two-legged knee extension exercise were investigated. The same was done for more complex, multiple-joint, one- and two-legged pedaling. These particular activities were chosen because they could be considered related to some extent, as they shared a key aspect of knee extension, and because they at the same time were different. The activities were performed at submaximal intensities, by healthy individuals (n = 16, thereof eight women; 23.4 ± 2.7 years; 1.70 ± 0.11 m; 68.6 ± 11.2 kg). High and fair correlations (R-values of 0.99 and 0.75) occurred between frequencies generated with the dominant leg and the nondominant leg during knee extension exercise and pedaling, respectively. Fair to high correlations (R-values between 0.71 and 0.95) occurred between frequencies performed with each of the two legs in an activity, and the two-legged frequency performed in the same type of activity. In general, the correlations were higher for knee extension exercise than for pedaling. Correlations between knee extension and pedaling frequencies were of modest occurrence. The correlations between movement frequencies generated separately by each of the legs might be interpreted to support the following working hypothesis, which was based on existing literature. It is likely that involved central pattern generators (CPGs) of the two legs share a common frequency generator or that separate frequency generators of each leg are attuned via interneuronal connections. Further, activity type appeared to be relevant. Thus, the apparent common rhythmogenesis for the two legs appeared

  20. Voluntary Movement Frequencies in Submaximal One- and Two-Legged Knee Extension Exercise and Pedaling

    PubMed Central

    Stang, Julie; Wiig, Håvard; Hermansen, Marte; Hansen, Ernst Albin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of behavior and control of human voluntary rhythmic stereotyped leg movements is useful in work to improve performance, function, and rehabilitation of exercising, healthy, and injured humans. The present study aimed at adding to the existing understanding within this field. To pursue the aim, correlations between freely chosen movement frequencies in relatively simple, single-joint, one- and two-legged knee extension exercise were investigated. The same was done for more complex, multiple-joint, one- and two-legged pedaling. These particular activities were chosen because they could be considered related to some extent, as they shared a key aspect of knee extension, and because they at the same time were different. The activities were performed at submaximal intensities, by healthy individuals (n = 16, thereof eight women; 23.4 ± 2.7 years; 1.70 ± 0.11 m; 68.6 ± 11.2 kg). High and fair correlations (R-values of 0.99 and 0.75) occurred between frequencies generated with the dominant leg and the nondominant leg during knee extension exercise and pedaling, respectively. Fair to high correlations (R-values between 0.71 and 0.95) occurred between frequencies performed with each of the two legs in an activity, and the two-legged frequency performed in the same type of activity. In general, the correlations were higher for knee extension exercise than for pedaling. Correlations between knee extension and pedaling frequencies were of modest occurrence. The correlations between movement frequencies generated separately by each of the legs might be interpreted to support the following working hypothesis, which was based on existing literature. It is likely that involved central pattern generators (CPGs) of the two legs share a common frequency generator or that separate frequency generators of each leg are attuned via interneuronal connections. Further, activity type appeared to be relevant. Thus, the apparent common rhythmogenesis for the two legs appeared

  1. Effects of isometric and dynamic postactivation potentiation protocols on maximal sprint performance.

    PubMed

    Lim, Julian J H; Kong, Pui W

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the effects of 3 types of postactivation potentiation (PAP) protocols (single-joint isometric, multijoint isometric, and multijoint dynamic) on subsequent 10-m, 20-m and 30-m sprint performance in 12 well-trained male track athletes (mean ± SD age = 22.4 ± 3.2 years). The subjects performed 4 protocols in a randomized order on different days as follows: control (4 minutes of passive rest), maximum voluntary isometric knee extension (3 repetitions of 3-second isometric knee extension), maximum voluntary isometric back squat (3 repetitions of 3-second isometric squat), and dynamic back squat (3 repetitions of back squats at 90% 1 repetition maximum). After each protocol, a 4-minute recovery period was incorporated before a 30-m maximal sprint assessment. Maximal sprint times at 10 m, 20 m, and 30 m were measured using timing gates to reflect sprint performance. One-way repeated measures analyses of variance revealed no differences in sprint performance among the 4 protocols at 10-m, 20-m, or 30-m intervals. There were, however, large individual variations in the response to the PAP protocols with some athletes benefiting from the PAP effect and others not. In summary, this study showed no enhancement of short-distance sprint performance after PAP protocols with a 4-minute recovery period, regardless of isometric or dynamics, single-joint or multijoint. Coaches considering the use of PAP protocols to improve sprinting performance of their athletes should exploit the effectiveness of different PAP protocols on an individual basis. PMID:23302751

  2. Isometric embeddings of polyhedra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minemyer, Barry

    An indefinite metric polyhedron is a triple (X, T, g) where X is a topological space, T is a simplicial triangulation of X with edge set E, and g is a function from E to the reals. g assigns to each k-dimensional simplex S a unique quadratic form on Rk, denoted by G(S). An indefinite metric polyhedron is called a Euclidean polyhedron if the form G(S) is positive definite for every simplex S. Rpq denotes R p + q endowed with the inner product of signature (p, q). Our first result is that every compact n-dimensional indefinite metric polyhedron with vertex set V admits a simplicial isometric embedding into Rqq where q = max{d, 2n + 1} and d = max{deg(v) | v is in V}. We can use the compact case to extend to the non-compact case, but only if we assume that d = max{deg(v) | v is in V} is less than infinity. Specifically, every (non-compact) indefinite metric polyhedron admits a simplicial isometric embedding into Rpp where p = 2q(d3 - d2 + d + 1) and q and d are defined as above. Finally we use results of Akopyan and Greene to prove that every n-dimensional indefinite metric polyhedron admits a piecewise linear isometric embedding into Rn2n. In Chapter 2 we prove that every short (1-Lipschitz) map from an n-dimensional Euclidean polyhedron into EN is epsilon close to a pl isometric embedding (for anyepsilon > 0) provided N ≥ 3n. We can relax the dimensionality of the Euclidean space to 2n + 1 if we allow our map to be continuous instead of pl. These results are extensions of a result due to Akopyan. We provide a detailed proof of Akopyan's Theorem, as the only currently available proof is in Russian. The remaining results in this work are applications of our continuous isometric embedding theorem above. This result is used to prove that every Pro-Euclidean space of rank at most n admits an isometric embedding into E2n + 1. The result, as well as a theorem due to Bridson, also allows for an approximate isometric embedding theorem for geodesic metric spaces with

  3. Muscle Fiber Type Composition and Knee Extension Isometric Strength Fatigue Patterns in Power- and Endurance-Trained Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroll, Walter; And Others

    1980-01-01

    There is a degree of uniqueness in fatigue patterns, particularly between different levels of absolute maximum strength. Caution should be used when analyzing fatigue curves among subjects with unspecified strength levels. (CJ)

  4. Knee extension fatigue attenuates repeated force production of the elbow flexors.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Israel; Aboodarda, Saied J; Behm, David G

    2014-01-01

    Non-local muscle fatigue has been demonstrated with unilateral activities, where fatiguing one limb alters opposite limb forces. Fewer studies have examined if non-local fatigue occurs with unrelated muscles. The purpose of this study was to investigate if knee extensors fatigue alters elbow flexors force and electromyography (EMG) activity. Eighteen males completed a control and fatiguing session (randomised). Blood lactate was initially sampled followed by three maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) with the elbow flexors and two with the knee extensors. Thereafter, subjects either sat (control) or performed five sets of bilateral dynamic knee extensions to exhaustion using a load equal to the dominant limb MVC (1-min rest between sets). Immediately afterwards, subjects were assessed for blood lactate and unilateral knee extensors MVC, and after 1 min performed a single unilateral elbow flexor MVC. Two minutes later, subjects performed 12 unilateral elbow flexor MVCs (5 s contraction/10 s rest) followed by a third blood lactate test. Compared to control, knee extensor force dropped by 35% (p < 0.001; ES = 1.6) and blood lactate increased by 18% (p < 0.001; ES = 2.8). Elbow flexor forces were lower after the fatiguing protocol only during the last five MVCs (p < 0.05; ES = ∼ 0.58; ∼ 5%). No changes occurred between conditions in EMG. Elbow flexor forces significantly decreased after knee extensors fatigue. The effect was revealed during the later stages of the repeated MVCs protocol, demonstrating that non-local fatigue may have a stronger effect on repeated rather than on single attempts of maximal force production. PMID:24766625

  5. Influence of angular velocity on vastus lateralis and rectus femoris oxygenation dynamics during knee extension exercises.

    PubMed

    Denis, Romain; Wilkinson, Jennifer; De Vito, Giuseppe

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether changes in angular velocity would alter vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) oxygenation status during maximal isokinetic knee extension exercises. Eleven recreationally active male participants randomly performed ten maximal knee extensions at 30, 60, 120 and 240° s(-1). Tissue oxygenation index (TOI) and total haemoglobin concentration ([tHb]) were acquired from the VL and RF muscles by means of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Breath-by-breath pulmonary oxygen consumption (VO(2p)) was recorded throughout the tests. Peak torque and VO(2p) significantly decreased as a function of velocity (P<0·05). Interestingly, RF and VL TOI significantly increased as a function of velocity (P<0·05), whereas [tHb] significantly decreased as a function of velocity (P<0·05). A greater number of muscle fibre recruited at slow velocity, where the torque and VO(2p) were the highest, might explain the lower VL and RF TOI observed herein. Furthermore, the increase in local blood flow (suggested by [tHb] changes) during isokinetic knee extension exercises performed at slow angular velocity might have been induced by a higher intramuscular pressure during the contraction phases as well as a greater microcirculatory vasodilatation during relaxation phases. Implementing slow-velocity isokinetic exercises in rehabilitation or other training programmes could delay the short-term anoxia generated by such exercises and result in muscle metabolism enhancement. PMID:21771253

  6. Within- and between-session reliability of the maximal voluntary knee extension torque and activation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jihong; Hopkins, J Ty

    2013-01-01

    A ratio between the torque generated by maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) and exogenous electrical stimulus, central activation ratio (CAR), has been widely used to assess quadriceps function. To date, no data exist regarding between-session reliability of this measurement. Thirteen neurologically sound volunteers underwent three testing sessions (three trials per session) with 48 hours between-session. Subjects performed MVICs of the quadriceps with the knee locked at 90° flexion and the hip at 85°. Once the MVIC reached a plateau, an electrical stimulation from superimposed burst technique (SIB: 125 V with peak output current 450 mA) was manually delivered and transmitted directly to the quadriceps via stimulating electrodes. CAR was calculated by using the following equation: CAR = MVIC torque/MVIC + SIB torque. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated within- (ICC((2,1))) and between-session (ICC((2,k))) for MVIC torques and CAR values. Our data show that quadriceps MVIC and CAR are very reliable both within- (ICC((2,1)) = 0.99 for MVIC; 0.94 for CAR) and between-measurement sessions (ICC((2,k)) = 0.92 for MVIC; 0.86 for CAR) in healthy young adults. For clinical research, more data of the patients with pathological conditions are required to ensure reproducibility of calculation of CAR. PMID:23009562

  7. Right-Left Differences in Knee Extension Stiffness for the Normal Rat Knee: In Vitro Measurements Using a New Testing Apparatus.

    PubMed

    Markolf, Keith L; Evseenko, Denis; Petrigliano, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Knee stiffness following joint injury or immobilization is a common clinical problem, and the rat has been used as a model for studies related to joint stiffness and limitation of motion. Knee stiffness measurements have been reported for the anesthetized rat, but it is difficult to separate the contributions of muscular and ligamentous restraints to the recorded values. in vitro testing of isolated rat knees devoid of musculature allows measurement of joint structural properties alone. In order to measure the effects of therapeutic or surgical interventions designed to alter joint stiffness, the opposite extremity is often used as a control. However, right-left stiffness differences for the normal rat knee have not been reported in the literature. If stiffness changes observed for a treatment group are within the normal right-left variation, validity of the results could be questioned. The objectives of this study were to utilize a new testing apparatus to measure right-left stiffness differences during knee extension in a population of normal rat knees and to document repeatability of the stiffness measurements on successive testing days. Moment versus rotation curves were recorded for 15 right-left pairs of normal rat knees on three consecutive days, with overnight specimen storage in a refrigerator. Each knee was subjected to ten loading-unloading cycles, with the last loading curve used for analysis. Angular rotation (AR), defined here as the change in flexion-extension angle from a specified applied joint moment, is commonly used as a measure of overall joint stiffness. For these tests, ARs were measured from the recorded test curves with a maximum applied extension moment of 100 g cm. Mean rotations for testing days 2 and 3 were 0.81-1.25 deg lower (p < 0.001) than for day 1, but were not significantly different from each other. For each testing day, mean rotations for right knees were 1.12-1.30 deg greater (p < 0.001) than left knees. These right

  8. Neuromuscular Activation of the Vastus Intermedius Muscle during Isometric Hip Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Akira; Akima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Although activity of the rectus femoris (RF) differs from that of the other synergists in quadriceps femoris muscle group during physical activities in humans, it has been suggested that the activation pattern of the vastus intermedius (VI) is similar to that of the RF. The purpose of present study was to examine activation of the VI during isometric hip flexion. Ten healthy men performed isometric hip flexion contractions at 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of maximal voluntary contraction at hip joint angles of 90°, 110° and 130°. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to record activity of the four quadriceps femoris muscles and EMG signals were root mean square processed and normalized to EMG amplitude during an isometric knee extension with maximal voluntary contraction. The normalized EMG was significantly higher for the VI than for the vastus medialis during hip flexion at 100% of maximal voluntary contraction at hip joint angles of 110° and 130° (P < 0.05). The onset of VI activation was 230–240 ms later than the onset of RF activation during hip flexion at each hip joint angle, which was significantly later than during knee extension at 100% of maximal voluntary contraction (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the VI is activated later than the RF during hip flexion. Activity of the VI during hip flexion might contribute to stabilize the knee joint as an antagonist and might help to smooth knee joint motion, such as in the transition from hip flexion to knee extension during walking, running and pedaling. PMID:26488742

  9. Knee Extension Strength and Hamstrings-to-Quadriceps Imbalances in Elite Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Bogdanis, G C; Kalapotharakos, V I

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the relationship between hamstrings-to-quadriceps strength ratio (H:Q) and relative strength of the knee extensors in elite soccer players. Peak torque was measured during isokinetic knee extension/flexion at angular velocities of 60°·s(-1), 180°·s(-1) and 300°·s(-1). 18 professional players were divided into 2 groups, depending on their H:Q at 60°·s(-1). Players in the lower H:Q group (n=7) had significantly smaller H:Q ratios compared with the higher H:Q group (n=11) at all angular velocities (60°·s(-1): 49.2%; 95% CI: 61.3-57.8% vs. 59.5%; 95% CI: 52.2-46.2%, p=0.001). Players in the lower H:Q group had greater knee-extension peak torque compared with the higher H:Q group (60°·s(-1): 313; 95% CI: 335-291 vs. 269; 95% CI: 289-250 N·m, p=0.01). No differences were found in hamstrings' strength between the 2 groups (60°·s(-1): 156; 95% CI: 170-143 vs. 160; 95% CI: 173-148 N·m, p=0.96). Negative correlations between knee extension peak torque and H:Q ratio were observed at all angular velocities (r=-0.65 to -0.67, p<0.01). In conclusion, a low H:Q strength ratio measured during isokinetic strength testing in professional soccer players, is observed mainly in those with strong quadriceps muscles, while players with lower quadriceps strength have H:Q ratios around the recommended values. PMID:26509377

  10. Development of estimation system of knee extension strength using image features in ultrasound images of rectus femoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tsuneo; Fukuoka, Daisuke; Terabayashi, Nobuo; Hara, Takeshi; Muramatsu, Chisako; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    The word "Locomotive syndrome" has been proposed to describe the state of requiring care by musculoskeletal disorders and its high-risk condition. Reduction of the knee extension strength is cited as one of the risk factors, and the accurate measurement of the strength is needed for the evaluation. The measurement of knee extension strength using a dynamometer is one of the most direct and quantitative methods. This study aims to develop a system for measuring the knee extension strength using the ultrasound images of the rectus femoris muscles obtained with non-invasive ultrasonic diagnostic equipment. First, we extract the muscle area from the ultrasound images and determine the image features, such as the thickness of the muscle. We combine these features and physical features, such as the patient's height, and build a regression model of the knee extension strength from training data. We have developed a system for estimating the knee extension strength by applying the regression model to the features obtained from test data. Using the test data of 168 cases, correlation coefficient value between the measured values and estimated values was 0.82. This result suggests that this system can estimate knee extension strength with high accuracy.

  11. Identifying the Functional Flexion-extension Axis of the Knee: An In-Vivo Kinematics Study

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Li; Chen, Kaining; Guo, Lin; Cheng, Liangjun; Wang, Fuyou; Yang, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to calculate the flexion-extension axis (FEA) of the knee through in-vivo knee kinematics data, and then compare it with two major anatomical axes of the femoral condyles: the transepicondylar axis (TEA) defined by connecting the medial sulcus and lateral prominence, and the cylinder axis (CA) defined by connecting the centers of posterior condyles. Methods The knee kinematics data of 20 healthy subjects were acquired under weight-bearing condition using bi-planar x-ray imaging and 3D-2D registration techniques. By tracking the vertical coordinate change of all points on the surface of femur during knee flexion, the FEA was determined as the line connecting the points with the least vertical shift in the medial and lateral condyles respectively. Angular deviation and distance among the TEA, CA and FEA were measured. Results The TEA-FEA angular deviation was significantly larger than that of the CA-FEA in 3D and transverse plane (3.45° vs. 1.98°, p < 0.001; 2.72° vs. 1.19°, p = 0.002), but not in the coronal plane (1.61° vs. 0.83°, p = 0.076). The TEA-FEA distance was significantly greater than that of the CA-FEA in the medial side (6.7 mm vs. 1.9 mm, p < 0.001), but not in the lateral side (3.2 mm vs. 2.0 mm, p = 0.16). Conclusion The CA is closer to the FEA compared with the TEA; it can better serve as an anatomical surrogate for the functional knee axis. PMID:26039711

  12. The use of navigation to obtain rectangular flexion and extension gaps during primary total knee arthroplasty and midterm clinical results.

    PubMed

    Seon, Jong-Keun; Song, Eun-Kyoo; Park, Sang-Jin; Lee, Dam-Seon

    2011-06-01

    The authors evaluated 112 knees treated by total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using a navigation-assisted modified gap balancing technique. Initial mediolateral gap differences in extension and in 90° of flexion were measured after proximal tibia bone cutting. Final flexion and extension gaps were measured by checking distances under equal tension before prosthesis insertion. Amount of femoral bone cutting and external rotations of femoral components were found to depend on initial gaps. Patients with a final rectangular gap had greater knee flexion angles preoperatively and at 1 year after TKA. However, no differences were observed between the clinical and radiologic outcomes of knees with rectangular and nonrectangular gaps at 1 or 4 years after TKA. The study shows that the navigation-assisted modified gap balancing technique provides an effective means of achieving rectangular flexion and extension gaps during TKA. PMID:20580194

  13. Skeletal muscle blood flow and flow heterogeneity during dynamic and isometric exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Laaksonen, Marko S; Kalliokoski, Kari K; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Kemppainen, Jukka; Teräs, Mika; Sipilä, Hannu; Nuutila, Pirjo; Knuuti, Juhani

    2003-03-01

    The effects of dynamic and intermittent isometric knee extension exercises on skeletal muscle blood flow and flow heterogeneity were studied in seven healthy endurance-trained men. Regional muscle blood flow was measured using positron emission tomography (PET) and an [(15)O]H(2)O tracer, and electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded in the quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle during submaximal intermittent isometric and dynamic exercises. QF blood flow was 61% (P = 0.002) higher during dynamic exercise. Interestingly, flow heterogeneity was 13% (P = 0.024) lower during dynamic compared with intermittent isometric exercise. EMG activity was significantly higher (P < 0.001) during dynamic exercise, and the change in EMG activity from isometric to dynamic exercise was tightly related to the change in blood flow in the vastus lateralis muscle (r = 0.98, P < 0.001) but not in the rectus femoris muscle (r = -0.09, P = 0.942). In conclusion, dynamic exercise causes higher and less heterogeneous blood flow than intermittent isometric exercise at the same exercise intensity. These responses are, at least partly, related to the increased EMG activity. PMID:12446282

  14. Discrepancy between femoral and capillary blood flow kinetics during knee extension exercise.

    PubMed

    Schlup, S J; Ade, C J; Broxterman, R M; Barstow, T J

    2015-12-01

    Capillary blood flow (QCAP) kinetics have previously been shown to be significantly slower than femoral artery (QFA) kinetics following the onset of dynamic knee extension exercise. If the increase in QCAP does not follow a similar time course to QFA, then a substantial proportion of the available blood flow is not distributed to the working muscle. One possible explanation for this discrepancy is that blood flow also increases to the nonworking lower leg muscles. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine if a reduction in lower limb blood flow, via arterial occlusion below the knee, alters the kinetics of QFA and QCAP during knee extension exercise, and thus provide insight into the potential mechanisms controlling the rapid increase in QFA. Subjects performed a ramp max test to determine the work rate at which gas exchange threshold (GET) occurred. At least four constant work rate trials with and without below-knee occlusion were conducted at work rates eliciting ∼ 80% GET. Pulmonary gas exchange, near-infrared spectroscopy and QFA measurements were taken continuously during each exercise bout. Muscle oxygen uptake (VO2m) and deoxy[hemoglobin+myoglobin] were used to estimate QCAP. There was no significant difference between the uncuffed and cuffed conditions in any response (P>0.05). The mean response times (MRT) of QFA were 18.7 ± 14.2s (uncuffed) and 24.6 ± 14.9s (cuffed). QCAP MRTs were 51.8 ± 23.4s (uncuffed) and 56.7 ± 23.2s (cuffed), which were not significantly different from the time constants (τ) of VO2m (39.7 ± 23.2s (uncuffed) and 46.3 ± 24.1s (cuffed). However, the MRT of QFA was significantly faster (P<0.05) than the MRT of QCAP and τVO2m. τVO2m and MRT QCAP were significantly correlated and estimated QCAP kinetics tracked VO2m following exercise onset. Cuffing below the knee did not significantly change the kinetics of QFA, QCAP or VO2m, although an effect size of 1.02 suggested that a significant effect on QFA may have been hidden

  15. A Novel Device to Apply Controlled Flexion and Extension to the Rat Knee Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Mark Stasiak M.; Wiznia, Dan; Alzoobae, Saif; Ciccotti, Michael; Imhauser, Carl; Voigt, Clifford; Torzilli, Peter; Deng, Xenghua; Rodeo, Scott

    2013-01-01

    We designed and validated a novel device for applying flexion-extension cycles to a rat knee in an in-vivo model of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R). Our device is intended to simulate rehabilitation motion and exercise post ACL-R to optimize physical rehabilitation treatments for the improved healing of tendon graft ligament reconstructions. The device was validated for repeatability of the knee kinematic motion by measuring the force versus angular rotation response from repeated trials using cadaver rats. The average maximum force required for rotating an ACL reconstructed rat knee through 100 degrees of flexion-extension was 0.4 N with 95 % variability for all trials within ±0.1 N PMID:22667683

  16. Exercise in children with joint hypermobility syndrome and knee pain: a randomised controlled trial comparing exercise into hypermobile versus neutral knee extension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knee pain in children with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS) is traditionally managed with exercise, however the supporting evidence for this is scarce. No trial has previously examined whether exercising to neutral or into the hypermobile range affects outcomes. This study aimed to (i) determine if a physiotherapist-prescribed exercise programme focused on knee joint strength and control is effective in reducing knee pain in children with JHS compared to no treatment, and (ii) whether the range in which these exercises are performed affects outcomes. Methods A prospective, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial conducted in a tertiary hospital in Sydney, Australia compared an 8 week exercise programme performed into either the full hypermobile range or only to neutral knee extension, following a minimum 2 week baseline period without treatment. Randomisation was computer-generated, with allocation concealed by sequentially numbered opaque sealed envelopes. Knee pain was the primary outcome. Quality of life, thigh muscle strength, and function were also measured at (i) initial assessment, (ii) following the baseline period and (iii) post treatment. Assessors were blinded to the participants’ treatment allocation and participants blinded to the difference in the treatments. Results Children with JHS and knee pain (n=26) aged 7-16 years were randomly assigned to the hypermobile (n=12) or neutral (n=14) treatment group. Significant improvements in child-reported maximal knee pain were found following treatment, regardless of group allocation with a mean 14.5 mm reduction on the visual analogue scale (95% CI 5.2 – 23.8 mm, p=0.003). Significant differences between treatment groups were noted for parent-reported overall psychosocial health (p=0.009), specifically self-esteem (p=0.034), mental health (p=0.001) and behaviour (p=0.019), in favour of exercising into the hypermobile range (n=11) compared to neutral only (n=14). Conversely, parent

  17. Obliteration of Intercondylar Notch Mimicking Flexion-Extension Gap Imbalance in a Cruciate Retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gungor, Harun Resit; Kiter, Esat; Akkaya, Semih; Ok, Nusret; Yorukoglu, Cagdas

    2015-01-01

    Following total knee arthroplasty (TKA), the most frequent cause of extension deficit and limitation of range of motion in early postoperative period is related to improper tensioning of soft tissues and failure to balance extension and flexion gaps. If a cruciate retaining (CR) prosthesis is the planned implant, then attention should be given to balancing the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and any factor that alters this balance may also cause deterioration of knee balance in postoperative period. Here, we report on an unusual case referred from another hospital because of continuous pain and restriction of knee motion in early postoperative period following CR-designed TKA that was initially thought to be due to flexion-extension imbalance. However, during the revision procedure, extruded cement to the intercondylar notch was found to be both mechanically blocking terminal extension and limiting flexion by possible mechanism of irritation of the synovial nerve endings around the stretched anterior fibers of PCL during flexion. This case was successfully treated by removal of extruded cement from intercondylar notch to decompress PCL, polyethylene exchange, and secondary patellar resurfacing. PMID:26185697

  18. Huge Subchondral Cyst Communicating with Medulary Canal of Femur in OA Knee-Treated by Extension Stem and Bone Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Rajani, Amyn M; Kumar, Ritesh; Shyam, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We report an osteoarthritic patient with huge sub-chondral cyst-like lesions in the Anterior part of distal femur. Deep and large bone defects and severe lateral laxity due to Advanced osteoarthritis was successfully treated with semi-constrained type total knee arthroplasty with long stem. Case Report: A 70yrs old Female was admitted in our institution diagnosed with severe bilateral Osteoarthritis. The x-rays showed bone on bone Tricompartment OA Knee with Varus Malalignment. She was posted for Single Stage Bilateral Total Knee Replacement and as planned the Left Knee Was Operated first. After exposure, Proximal Tibial, Distal Femoral Cuts and measurement of extension gaps the synovium from the anterior Femur was removed and sizing was done. The AP cut was then proceeded with. We spotted a small Osteochondral Cyst in the Anterior Femur which was curretted to remove the cystic material, which is when we realised that the cyst was large and communicating with the medulary canal. The remaining Femoral preparations was done keeping in mind the risk of iatrogenic fracture and extension Stem was used in the femur. The defect was then packed cancellous bone graft. Conclusion: If suspected a Preoperative MRI should be done to exclude any sub-chondral cysts osteochondral defects and any surprise during surgery. Usually one should keep extension stems ready for difficult cases. Operating surgeon should know his implants very well, as in many standard implants extension stems can only be used when distal femur cuts are taken accordingly as 5° Valgus. Mini incision should be avoided because it may fail to reveal such surprises and may land into periprosthetic fractures. PMID:27298967

  19. Knee extension strength and post-operative functional prediction in quadriceps resection for soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, A.; Aoki, K.; Kito, M.; Okamoto, M.; Suzuki, S.; Momose, T.; Kato, H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our objective was to predict the knee extension strength and post-operative function in quadriceps resection for soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh. Methods A total of 18 patients (14 men, four women) underwent total or partial quadriceps resection for soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh between 2002 and 2014. The number of resected quadriceps was surveyed, knee extension strength was measured with the Biodex isokinetic dynamometer system (affected side/unaffected side) and relationships between these were examined. The Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) score, Toronto Extremity Salvage Score (TESS), European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) score and the Short Form 8 were used to evaluate post-operative function and examine correlations with extension strength. The cutoff value for extension strength to expect good post-operative function was also calculated using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and Fisher’s exact test. Results Extension strength decreased when the number of resected quadriceps increased (p < 0.001), and was associated with lower MSTS score, TESS and EQ-5D (p = 0.004, p = 0.005, p = 0.006, respectively). Based on the functional evaluation scales, the cutoff value of extension strength was 56.2%, the equivalent to muscle strength with resection of up to two muscles. Conclusion Good post-operative results can be expected if at least two quadriceps muscles are preserved. Cite this article: A. Tanaka, Y. Yoshimura, K. Aoki, M. Kito, M. Okamoto, S. Suzuki, T. Momose, H. Kato. Knee extension strength and post-operative functional prediction in quadriceps resection for soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:232–238. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.56.2000631. PMID:27317788

  20. Muscle activation and knee biomechanics during squatting and lunging after lower extremity fatigue in healthy young women.

    PubMed

    Longpré, Heather S; Acker, Stacey M; Maly, Monica R

    2015-02-01

    Muscle activations and knee joint loads were compared during squatting and lunging before and after lower extremity neuromuscular fatigue. Electromyographic activations of the rectus femoris, vastus lateralis and biceps femoris, and the external knee adduction and flexion moments were collected on 25 healthy women (mean age 23.5 years, BMI of 23.7 kg/m(2)) during squatting and lunging. Participants were fatigued through sets of 50 isotonic knee extensions and flexions, with resistance set at 50% of the peak torque achieved during a maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Fatigue was defined as a decrease in peak isometric knee extension or flexion torque ≥25% from baseline. Co-activation indices were calculated between rectus femoris and biceps femoris; and between vastus lateralis and biceps femoris. Fatigue decreased peak isometric extension and flexion torques (p<0.05), mean vastus lateralis activation during squatting and lunging (p<0.05), and knee adduction and flexion moments during lunging (p<0.05). Quadriceps activations were greater during lunging than squatting (p<0.05). Thus, fatigue altered the recruitment strategy of the quadriceps during squatting and lunging. Lunging challenges quadriceps activation more than squatting in healthy, young women. PMID:25258248

  1. Effects of hypoxia on cerebral and muscle haemodynamics during knee extensions in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Paulo Sergio Chagas; Matsuura, Cristiane; Bhambhani, Yagesh N

    2013-01-01

    A hypoxic model was used to investigate changes in localized cerebral and muscle haemodynamics during knee extension (KE) in healthy individuals. Thirty-one young healthy volunteers performed one set of KE until failure under hypoxia (14 % O(2)) or normoxia (21 % O(2)) at 50, 75 or 100 % of 1 repetition maximum, in random order, on three occasions. Prefrontal cerebral and vastus lateralis muscle oxygenation and blood volume (Cox, Mox, Cbv and Mbv, respectively) were recorded simultaneously by near-infrared spectroscopy. Hypoxia induced significant declines in Cox [-0.017 ± 0.016 optical density (OD) units] and Mox (-0.014 ± 0.026 OD units) and increases in Cbv (0.017 ± 0.027 OD units) and Mbv (0.016 ± 0.023 OD units) at rest. Hypoxia significantly reduced total work (TW) performed during KE at each exercise intensity. Cox, Cbv, Mox, and Mbv changes during KE did not differ between normoxia and hypoxia. Correlations between TW done and Cox changes under normoxia (r = 0.04, p = 0.182) and hypoxia (r = 0.05, p = 0.122) were not significant. However, TW was significantly correlated with Mox under both normoxia (R (2) = 0.24, p = 0.000) and hypoxia (R (2) = 0.15, p = 0.004). Since changes in Cox and Mox reflect alterations in the balance between oxygen delivery and extraction in these tissues, which, in the brain, is an index of neuronal activation, we conclude that: (1) limitation of KE performance was mediated peripherally under both normoxia and hypoxia, with no additional effect of hypoxia, and (2) because of the low common variance with Mox additional intramuscular factors likely play a role in limiting KE performance. PMID:22544440

  2. Isokinetic strength training in below-knee amputees.

    PubMed

    Klingenstierna, U; Renström, P; Grimby, G; Morelli, B

    1990-01-01

    Eight below-knee amputees performed isokinetic training of knee extensor- and knee-flexor muscles for a period of 8-12 weeks at angular velocities of 60 degrees/s, 180 degrees/s and 240 degrees/s. Before and after training isokinetic and isometric knee extensor/flexor strength was measured. Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis and the cross-sectional area of the thigh muscles was measured with computerized tomography. Peak torque of the amputated leg increased significantly in all knee-extension tests and in knee-flexion at 180 degrees/s, and in the non-amputated leg in extension at 180 degrees/s, 240 degrees/s and for isometric strength at 60 degrees knee angle. Knee-flexion strength increased at 240 degrees/s. The cross-sectional area of the muscle fibers increased in the amputated leg in all patients except one. There was no significant increase in the non-amputated leg which also was trained. The quotient between the cross-sectional areas of type II and type I fibers increased from 1.04 to 1.20 in the amputated leg, demonstrating an increase specially in the type II fibers. There was no difference in the non-amputated leg. The cross-sectional area of the thigh muscles did not show any significant change in either leg. The patients estimated their ability to walk after training to more than double the distance compared to before training. They could also manage better without walking aids. The increase in strength and the synchronous increase in the size of type II (fast twitch) fibers indicate that the training model has activated also these motor units which probably have not been given as much training earlier. PMID:2326608

  3. Voluntary breathing increases corticospinal excitability of lower limb muscle during isometric contraction.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Kazuki; Yunoki, Takahiro; Afroundeh, Roghayyeh; Lian, Chang-Shun; Matsuura, Ryouta; Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Yano, Tokuo

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of voluntary breathing on corticospinal excitability of a leg muscle during isometric contraction. Seven subjects performed 5-s isometric knee extension at the intensity of 10% of maximal voluntary contraction (10% MVC). During the 10% MVC, the subjects were instructed to breath normally (NORM) or to inhale (IN) or exhale (OUT) once as fast as possible. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) induced by transcranialmagnetic stimulation in the right vastus lateralis (VL) during the 10% MVC were recorded and compared during the three breathing tasks. MEPs in IN and OUT were significantly higher than that in NORM. Effort sense of breathing was significantly higher in IN and OUT than in NORM. There was a significant positive correlation between MEP and effort sense of breathing. These results suggest that activation of the breathing-associated cortical areas with voluntary breathing is involved in the increase in corticospinal excitability of the VL during isometric contraction. PMID:26184658

  4. Moment-knee angle relation in well trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, B; Brueggemann, G P

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether different modes of long-term competitive physical activity cause functional differences in the moment-knee angle relation of the M. quadriceps femoris (QF). Therefore, a sample (n = 40) of young male competitive endurance runners, cyclists, triathletes and tennis players performed isometric maximal voluntary knee extensions (MVC) with their stronger leg at six different knee joint angles while keeping the hip joint angle constant. Muscle activation of QF-muscles during MVC was estimated using surface electromyography (EMG). Moments and EMG data of each subject were normalized to the largest value produced at any knee joint position [% Max.]. No significant differences in the normalized [% Max.] moment-knee angle relation of the QF were found between endurance runners, cyclists and triathletes. Despite few unsystematic exceptions, no functional differences in the normalized moment-knee angle relation of the QF occurred among tennis players and the endurance-oriented athletic groups. Obtained by curve fitting, the optimal knee joint angle for moment production was not significantly different among all athletic groups. We conclude that long-term competitive endurance running, cycling, triathlon and tennis do not provoke functional differences in the moment-knee angle relation of the whole QF. PMID:18050053

  5. Functional impairment of skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism during knee extension exercise after bed rest

    PubMed Central

    Salvadego, Desy; Lazzer, Stefano; Marzorati, Mauro; Porcelli, Simone; Rejc, Enrico; Šimunič, Bostjan; Pišot, Rado; di Prampero, Pietro Enrico

    2011-01-01

    A functional evaluation of skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism during dynamic knee extension (KE) incremental exercises was carried out following a 35-day bed rest (BR) (Valdoltra 2008 BR campaign). Nine young male volunteers (age: 23.5 ± 2.2 yr; mean ± SD) were evaluated. Pulmonary gas exchange, heart rate and cardiac output (by impedance cardiography), skeletal muscle (vastus lateralis) fractional O2 extraction, and brain (frontal cortex) oxygenation (by near-infrared spectroscopy) were determined during incremental KE. Values at exhaustion were considered “peak”. Peak heart rate (147 ± 18 beats/min before vs. 146 ± 17 beats/min after BR) and peak cardiac output (17.8 ± 3.3 l/min before vs. 16.1 ± 1.8 l/min after BR) were unaffected by BR. As expected, brain oxygenation did not decrease during KE. Peak O2 uptake was lower after vs. before BR, both when expressed as liters per minute (0.99 ± 0.17 vs. 1.26 ± 0.27) and when normalized per unit of quadriceps muscle mass (46.5 ± 6.4 vs. 56.9 ± 11.0 ml·min−1·100 g−1). Skeletal muscle peak fractional O2 extraction, expressed as a percentage of the maximal values obtained during a transient limb ischemia, was lower after (46.3 ± 12.1%) vs. before BR (66.5 ± 11.2%). After elimination, by the adopted exercise protocol, of constraints related to cardiovascular O2 delivery, a decrease in peak O2 uptake and muscle peak capacity of fractional O2 extraction was found after 35 days of BR. These findings suggest a substantial impairment of oxidative function at the muscle level, “downstream” with respect to bulk blood flow to the exercising muscles, that is possibly at the level of blood flow distribution/O2 utilization inside the muscle, peripheral O2 diffusion, and intracellular oxidative metabolism. PMID:21921243

  6. Effects of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Stretching and Kinesiology Taping on Pelvic Compensation During Double-Knee Extension.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Woong; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-12-22

    Shortened hamstrings are likely to restrict the anterior pelvic tilt and induce a slumped posture due to the posterior pelvic tilt. This study was conducted to compare the effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching and modified anterior pelvic tilt taping (APTT) on hamstring shortness-associated pelvic compensation while executing seated double-knee extension. Male college students (28 healthy young adults; mean age: 21.4 ± 2.1 years) with hamstring shortness were recruited as study subjects and randomly assigned to either the PNF stretching group (control group) or the APTT group (experimental group). In all the subjects, changes in the movement distance of the centre of gluteal pressure (COGP) as well as rectus abdominis (RA) and semitendinosus (SEM) muscle activities were measured during seated double-knee extension while the respective intervention method was applied. Both groups showed significant decreases in COGP distance and RA muscle activity compared with their respective baseline values (p < 0.05), however, no significant changes were observed in SEM muscle activity. We can infer that not only a direct intervention on the hamstring, such as PNF stretching, but also a modified APTT-mediated pelvic intervention may be used as a method for reducing pelvic compensation induced by hamstring shortness. PMID:26839606

  7. Effects of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Stretching and Kinesiology Taping on Pelvic Compensation During Double-Knee Extension

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Woong; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Shortened hamstrings are likely to restrict the anterior pelvic tilt and induce a slumped posture due to the posterior pelvic tilt. This study was conducted to compare the effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching and modified anterior pelvic tilt taping (APTT) on hamstring shortness-associated pelvic compensation while executing seated double-knee extension. Male college students (28 healthy young adults; mean age: 21.4 ± 2.1 years) with hamstring shortness were recruited as study subjects and randomly assigned to either the PNF stretching group (control group) or the APTT group (experimental group). In all the subjects, changes in the movement distance of the centre of gluteal pressure (COGP) as well as rectus abdominis (RA) and semitendinosus (SEM) muscle activities were measured during seated double-knee extension while the respective intervention method was applied. Both groups showed significant decreases in COGP distance and RA muscle activity compared with their respective baseline values (p < 0.05), however, no significant changes were observed in SEM muscle activity. We can infer that not only a direct intervention on the hamstring, such as PNF stretching, but also a modified APTT-mediated pelvic intervention may be used as a method for reducing pelvic compensation induced by hamstring shortness. PMID:26839606

  8. Study of Cherenkov Light Lateral Distribution Function Around the Knee Region in Extensive Air Showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rubaiee, A.; Hashim, U.; Marwah, M.; Al-Douri, Y.

    2015-06-01

    The Cherenkov light lateral distribution function (LDF) was simulated with the CORSIKA code in the energy range (10^{13} - 10^{16}) eV. This simulation was performed for conditions and configurations of the Tunka EAS Cherenkov array for the two primary particles (p and Fe). Basing on the simulated results, many approximated functions are structured for two primary particles and different zenith angles. This allowed us to reconstruct the EAS events, which is, to determine the type and energy of the primary particles that produced showers from signal amplitudes of Cherenkov radiation measured by the Tunka Cherenkov array experiment. Comparison of the calculated LDF of Cherenkov radiation with that measured at the Tunka EAS array shows the ability to identify the primary particle that initiated the EAS cascades by determining its primary energy around the knee region of the cosmic ray spectrum.

  9. The effective mechanical advantage of a.L. 129-1a for knee extension.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Adam D; Mahfouz, Mohamed R; Kramer, Patricia Ann

    2011-09-01

    The functional significance of shape differences between modern human and australopithecine distal femora remains unclear. Here, we examine the morphological component of the effective mechanical advantage (EMA) of the quadriceps muscle group in a sample of hominins that includes the fossil A.L. 129-1a (Australopithecus afarensis) and modern humans. Quadriceps muscle moment arms were calculated from three-dimensional computer models of specimens through a range of knee flexion. All hominins were compared using the same limb positions to allow us to examine, in isolation, the morphological component of the lengths of the pertinent moment arms. After taking into account the differences in bicondylar angle, the morphological component of the EMA was calculated as the ratio of the quadriceps muscle and ground reaction force moment arms. Our analyses reveal that A.L. 129-1a would have possessed a morphological component of the quadriceps muscle EMA expected for a hominin of its body mass. PMID:21809469

  10. Postural control and torque of the knee joint after healed tibial shaft fracture.

    PubMed

    Karladani, A H; Svantesson, U; Granhed, H; Styf, J

    2001-01-01

    Muscular atrophy occurs as a consequence of trauma and immobilisation. This cohort comparison study was conducted to evaluate the limb function after healed tibial shaft fractures, which were treated by casting versus nailing. Balance (as centre of pressure) and muscle strength (as torque of the knee joint during knee extension) have been measured in 27 patients with tibial shaft fractures with a mean age of 39 (19-73) years, 1 year after fracture healing. Fourteen patients were treated by intramedullary nailing 'nailed group' and 13 by plaster cast with or without minimal internal fixation 'casted group'. Centre of pressure was measured on a force platform. Knee extension torque was measured during isometric and concentric muscle actions by an isokinetic dynamometer. Centre of pressure tended to be more towards the uninjured leg in patients who had been treated by plaster cast (P<0.05). Side-to-side differences for isometric torque were significantly higher within the casted group (P<0.05). Patients with tibial shaft fractures treated by intramedullary nailing showed better postural control, one-leg standing test, and side-to-side differences for isometric muscle strength compared with patients treated by cast. Therefore, we recommend intramedullary nailing as a better method of treatment for tibial shaft fractures, with regard to recovery of muscle function. PMID:11164404

  11. Comparison of Proximally Versus Distally Placed Spatially Distributed Sequential Stimulation Electrodes in a Dynamic Knee Extension Task

    PubMed Central

    Laubacher, Marco; Aksöz, Efe A.; Binder-Macleod, Stuart; Hunt, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Spatially distributed sequential stimulation (SDSS) has demonstrated substantial power output and fatigue benefits compared to single electrode stimulation (SES) in the application of functional electrical stimulation (FES). This asymmetric electrode setup brings new possibilities but also new questions since precise placement of the electrodes is one critical factor for good muscle activation. The aim of this study was to compare the power output, fatigue and activation properties of proximally versus distally placed SDSS electrodes in an isokinetic knee extension task simulating knee movement during recumbent cycling. M. vastus lateralis and medialis of seven able-bodied subjects were stimulated with rectangular bi-phasic pulses of constant amplitude of 40 mA and at an SDSS frequency of 35 Hz for 6 min on both legs with both setups (i.e. n=14). Torque was measured during knee-extension movement by a dynamometer at an angular velocity of 110 deg/s. Mean power, peak power and activation time were calculated and compared for the initial and final stimulation phases, together with an overall fatigue index. Power output values (Pmean, Ppeak) were scaled to a standardised reference input pulse width of 100 μs (Pmean,s, Ppeak,s). The initial evaluation phase showed no significant differences between the two setups for all outcome measures. Ppeak and Ppeak,s were both significantly higher in the final phase for the distal setup (25.4 ± 8.1 W vs. 28.2 ± 6.2 W, p=0.0062 and 34.8 ± 9.5 W vs. 38.9 ± 6.7 W, p=0.021, respectively). With distal SDSS, there was modest evidence of higher Pmean and Pmean,s (p=0.071, p=0.14, respectively) but of longer activation time (p=0.096). The rate of fatigue was similar for both setups. For practical FES applications, distal placement of the SDSS electrodes is preferable. PMID:27478563

  12. Comparison of Proximally Versus Distally Placed Spatially Distributed Sequential Stimulation Electrodes in a Dynamic Knee Extension Task.

    PubMed

    Laubacher, Marco; Aksöz, Efe A; Binder-Macleod, Stuart; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2016-06-13

    Spatially distributed sequential stimulation (SDSS) has demonstrated substantial power output and fatigue benefits compared to single electrode stimulation (SES) in the application of functional electrical stimulation (FES). This asymmetric electrode setup brings new possibilities but also new questions since precise placement of the electrodes is one critical factor for good muscle activation. The aim of this study was to compare the power output, fatigue and activation properties of proximally versus distally placed SDSS electrodes in an isokinetic knee extension task simulating knee movement during recumbent cycling. M. vastus lateralis and medialis of seven able-bodied subjects were stimulated with rectangular bi-phasic pulses of constant amplitude of 40 mA and at an SDSS frequency of 35 Hz for 6 min on both legs with both setups (i.e. n=14). Torque was measured during knee-extension movement by a dynamometer at an angular velocity of 110 deg/s. Mean power, peak power and activation time were calculated and compared for the initial and final stimulation phases, together with an overall fatigue index. Power output values (Pmean, Ppeak) were scaled to a standardised reference input pulse width of 100 μs (Pmean,s, Ppeak,s). The initial evaluation phase showed no significant differences between the two setups for all outcome measures. Ppeak and Ppeak,s were both significantly higher in the final phase for the distal setup (25.4 ± 8.1 W vs. 28.2 ± 6.2 W, p=0.0062 and 34.8 ± 9.5 W vs. 38.9 ± 6.7 W, p=0.021, respectively). With distal SDSS, there was modest evidence of higher Pmean and Pmean,s (p=0.071, p=0.14, respectively) but of longer activation time (p=0.096). The rate of fatigue was similar for both setups. For practical FES applications, distal placement of the SDSS electrodes is preferable. PMID:27478563

  13. Is the Modified Tardieu Scale in Semi-Standing Position Better Associated with Knee Extension and Hamstring Activity in Terminal Swing than the Supine Tardieu?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faber, Irene R.; Nienhuis, Bart; Rijs, Nique P. A. M.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Duysens, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the modified Tardieu scale (MTS) in a semi-standing position, used for the assessment of hamstrings spasticity, was better associated with knee extension and hamstrings activity in terminal swing than the MTS in a supine position in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Seven children diagnosed with…

  14. The validity of an assessment of maximum angular velocity of knee extension (KE) using a gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Arai, Takeshi; Obuchi, Shuichi; Shiba, Yoshitaka; Omuro, Kazuya; Inaba, Yasuko; Kojima, Motonaga

    2012-01-01

    Although it is more important to assess the muscular power of the lower extremities than the strength, no simplified method for doing so has been found. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of the assessment of the angular velocity of KE using a gyroscope. Participants included 105 community-dwelling older people (55 women, 50 men, age ± standard deviation (SD) 75±5.3). Pearson correlation coefficients and Spearman rank-correlation coefficients were used to examine the relationships between the angular velocity of KE and functional performance measurements, a self-efficacy scale and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The data from the gyroscope were significantly correlated with some physical functions such as muscle strength (r=0.304, p<0.01), and walking velocity (r=0.543, p<0.001). In addition, the joint angular velocity was significantly correlated with self-efficacy (r=0.219-0.329, p<0.01-0.05) and HRQOL (r=0.207-0.359, p<0.01-0.05). The absolute value of the correlation coefficient of angular velocity tended to be greater than that of the muscle strength for mobility functions such as walking velocity and the timed-up-and-go (TUG) test. In conclusion, it was found that the assessment of the angular velocity of the knee joint using a gyroscope could be a feasible and meaningful measurement in the geriatrics field. PMID:22100108

  15. Effects of blood flow restriction duration on muscle activation and microvascular oxygenation during low-volume isometric exercise.

    PubMed

    Cayot, Trent E; Lauver, Jakob D; Silette, Christopher R; Scheuermann, Barry W

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to observe how varying occlusion durations affected neuromuscular activation and microvascular oxygenation during low-volume isometric knee extension exercise. Healthy, recreationally active males performed isometric knee extension at a variety of submaximal intensities under different blood flow restriction (BFR) occlusion durations. The occlusion pressure (130% SBP) was applied either 5 min prior to exercise (PO), immediately prior to exercise (IO) or not during exercise (CON). Surface electromyography (sEMG) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to record the neuromuscular activation and microvascular oxygenation of the knee extensors during exercise. No difference in sEMG was observed in the vastus lateralis or vastus medialis during any exercise condition or any submaximal intensity. PO elicited greater microvascular deoxygenation (deoxy-[Hb + Mb]) compared to CON (P≤0·05) at all submaximal intensities and also compared to IO at 20% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). IO resulted in a greater deoxy-[Hb + Mb] response during low-intensity exercise (20% and 40% MVC) compared to CON (P≤0·05). These findings suggest that applying BFR 5 min before exercise can enhance the exercise-induced metabolic stress (i.e. deoxy-[Hb + Mb]), measured via NIRS, during low-intensity exercise (20% MVC) compared to applying BFR immediately prior to exercise. Furthermore, the increased metabolic stress observed during IO is attenuated during high-intensity (60% MVC, 80% MVC) exercise when compared to CON conditions. Knowledge of the changes in exercise-induced metabolic stress between the various occlusion durations may assist in developing efficient BFR exercise programmes. PMID:25564998

  16. A new isometric quadriceps-strengthening exercise using EMG-biofeedback

    PubMed Central

    Kesemenli, Cumhur C; Sarman, Hakan; Baran, Tuncay; Memisoglu, Kaya; Binbir, Ismail; Savas, Yilmaz; Isik, Cengiz; Boyraz, Ismail; Koc, Bunyamin

    2014-01-01

    A new isometric contraction quadriceps-strengthening exercise was developed to restore the quadriceps strength lost after knee surgery more rapidly. This study evaluated the results of this new method. Patients were taught to perform the isometric quadriceps-strengthening exercise in the unaffected knee in the supine position, and then they performed it in the affected knee. First, patients were taught the classical isometric quadriceps-strengthening exercise, and then they were taught our new alternative method: “pull the patella superiorly tightly and hold the leg in the same position for 10 seconds”. Afterward, the quadriceps contraction was evaluated using a non-invasive Myomed 932 EMG-biofeedback device (Enraf-Nonius, The Netherlands) with gel-containing 48 mm electrodes (Türklab, The Turkey) placed on both knees. The isometric quadriceps-strengthening exercise performed using our new method had stronger contraction than the classical method (P < 0.01). The new method involving pulling the patella superiorly appears to be a better choice, which can be applied easily, leading to better patient compliance and greater quadriceps force after arthroscopic and other knee surgeries. PMID:25356122

  17. Comparative Study on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Determination of Isometric Points with and Without Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Fabio J.; Albuquerque, Roberto F. M.; Sasaki, Sandra U.; Camanho, Gilberto L.; Hernandez, Arnaldo J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the accuracy of tunnel placement and graft isometry for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction performed using a computer-assisted navigation system (Orthopilot) and using traditional instruments. METHODS: The anterior cruciate ligament was removed intact from 36 pairs of human cadaver knees. From each pair, one knee was randomized to Group 1 (conventional) and the other to Group 2 (Orthopilot). An inelastic suture was then passed through the central points of the tibial and femoral tunnels. Neither of the tunnels was drilled. All knees were then dissected, and six parameters were obtained: distances from the tibial tunnel center to the 1) posterior cruciate ligament, 2) anterior horn of the lateral meniscus and 3) medial tibial spine; 4) distance from the femoral tunnel center to the posterior femoral cortex; 5) femoral tunnel coronal angle; and 6) variation of the distance from the femoral to the tibial tunnel with the knee extended and at 90 degrees of flexion. RESULTS: The variation of the distance from the femoral to the tibial tunnel during flexion and extension was smaller in the Orthopilot group (better isometry) compared to the conventional group. There were no statistical differences in any other parameters between the groups, and all tunnels were considered to be in satisfactory positions. DISCUSSION: The results obtained for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction depend on precise isometric point positioning, and a navigation system is a precision tool that can assist surgeons in tunnel positioning. CONCLUSION: No differences in tunnel position were observed between the groups. Nonetheless, better isometry was achieved in the Orthopilot group than with conventional instruments. PMID:20668625

  18. Relationships between Isometric Muscle Strength, Gait Parameters, and Gross Motor Function Measure in Patients with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyung-Ik; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Chung, Chin Youb; Lee, Kyoung Min; Lee, Seung Yeol; Lee, In Hyeok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the correlation between isometric muscle strength, gross motor function, and gait parameters in patients with spastic cerebral palsy and to find which muscle groups play an important role for gait pattern in a flexed knee gait. Materials and Methods Twenty-four ambulatory patients (mean age, 10.0 years) with spastic cerebral palsy who were scheduled for single event multilevel surgery, including distal hamstring lengthening, were included. Preoperatively, peak isometric muscle strength was measured for the hip flexor, hip extensor, knee flexor, and knee extensor muscle groups using a handheld dynamometer, and three-dimensional (3D) gait analysis and gross motor function measure (GMFM) scoring were also performed. Correlations between peak isometric strength and GMFM, gait kinematics, and gait kinetics were analyzed. Results Peak isometric muscle strength of all muscle groups was not related to the GMFM score and the gross motor function classification system level. Peak isometric strength of the hip extensor and knee extensor was significantly correlated with the mean pelvic tilt (r=-0.588, p=0.003 and r=-0.436, p=0.033) and maximum pelvic obliquity (r=-0.450, p=0.031 and r=-0.419, p=0.041). There were significant correlations between peak isometric strength of the knee extensor and peak knee extensor moment in early stance (r=0.467, p=0.021) and in terminal stance (r=0.416, p=0.043). Conclusion There is no correlation between muscle strength and gross motor function. However, this study showed that muscle strength, especially of the extensor muscle group of the hip and knee joints, might play a critical role in gait by stabilizing pelvic motion and decreasing energy consumption in a flexed knee gait. PMID:26632404

  19. Statistical mapping of the effect of knee extension on thigh muscle viscoelastic properties using magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Barnhill, Eric; Kennedy, Paul; Hammer, Steven; van Beek, Edwin J R; Brown, Colin; Roberts, Neil

    2013-12-01

    Skeletal muscle viscoelastic properties reflect muscle microstructure and neuromuscular activation. Elastographic methods, including magnetic resonance elastography, have been used to characterize muscle viscoelastic properties in terms of region of interest (ROI) measurements. The present study extended this approach to create thresholded pixel-by-pixel maps of viscoelastic properties of skeletal muscle during rest and knee extension in eleven subjects. ROI measurements were taken for individual quadricep muscles and the quadriceps region as a whole, and the viscoelastic parameter map pixels were statistically tested at positive false discovery rate q ≤ 0.25. ROI measurements showed significant (p ≤ 0.05) increase in storage modulus (G') and loss modulus (G″), with G″ increasing more than G', in agreement with previous findings. The q-value maps further identified the vastus intermedius as the primary driver of this change, with greater G″/G' increase than surrounding regions. Additionally, a cluster of significant decrease in G″/G' was found in the region of vastus lateralis below the fulcrum point of the lift. Viscoelastic parameter mapping of contracted muscle allows new insight into the relationship between physiology, neuromuscular activation, and human performance. PMID:24254405

  20. The Influence of Oral L-Glutamine Supplementation on Muscle Strength Recovery and Soreness Following Unilateral Knee Extension Eccentric Exercise.

    PubMed

    Legault, Zachary; Bagnall, Nicholas; Kimmerly, Derek S

    2015-10-01

    The study aimed to examine the effects that L-glutamine supplementation has on quadriceps muscle strength and soreness ratings following eccentric exercise. It was hypothesized that glutamine ingestion would quicken the recovery rate of peak force production and decrease muscle soreness ratings over a 72-hr recovery period. Sixteen healthy participants (8♀/8♂; 22 ± 4 years) volunteered in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study. Supplement conditions consisted of isoenergetic placebo (maltodextrin, 0.6 g·kg-1·day-1) and L-glutamine (0.3 g·kg-1·day-1 + 0.3 g·kg-1·day-1 maltodextrin) ingestion once per day over 72 hr. Knee extensor peak torque at 0°, 30°, and 180° per second and muscle soreness were measured before, immediately following, 24, 48, and 72 hr posteccentric exercise. Eccentric exercise consisted of 8 sets (10 repetitions/set) of unilateral knee extension at 125% maximum concentric force with 2-min rest intervals. L-glutamine resulted in greater relative peak torque at 180°/sec both immediately after (71 ± 8% vs. 66 ± 9%), and 72 hr (91 ± 8% vs. 86 ± 7%) postexercise (all, p < .01). In men, L-glutamine produced greater (p < .01) peak torques at 30°/ sec postexercise. Men also produced greater normalized peak torques at 30°/sec (Nm/kg) in the L-glutamine condition than women (all, p < .05). In the entire sample, L-glutamine resulted in lower soreness ratings at 24 (2.8 ± 1.2 vs. 3.4 ± 1.2), 48 (2.6 ± 1.4 vs. 3.9 ± 1.2), and 72 (1.7 ± 1.2 vs. 2.9 ± 1.3) hr postexercise (p < .01). The L-glutamine supplementation resulted in faster recovery of peak torque and diminished muscle soreness following eccentric exercise. The effect of L-glutamine on muscle force recovery may be greater in men than women. PMID:25811544

  1. Evaluation of the Length and Isometric Pattern of the Anterolateral Ligament With Serial Computer Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Helito, Paulo Victor Partezani; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire; Bordalo-Rodrigues, Marcelo; Pecora, Jose Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recent anatomical studies have identified the anterolateral ligament (ALL). Injury to this structure may lead to the presence of residual pivot shift in some reconstructions of the anterior cruciate ligament. The behavior of the length of this structure and its tension during range of motion has not been established and is essential when planning reconstruction. Purpose: To establish differences in the ALL length during range of knee motion. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Ten unpaired cadavers were dissected. The attachments of the ALL were isolated. Its origin and insertion were marked with a 2 mm–diameter metallic sphere. Computed tomography scans were performed on the dissected parts under extension and 30°, 60°, and 90° of flexion; measurements of the distance between the 2 markers were taken at all mentioned degrees of flexion. The distances between the points were compared. Results: The mean ALL length increased with knee flexion. Its mean length at full extension and at 30°, 60°, and 90° of flexion was 37.9 ± 5.3, 39.3 ± 5.4, 40.9 ± 5.4, and 44.1 ± 6.4 mm, respectively. The mean increase in length from 0° to 30° was 3.99% ± 4.7%, from 30° to 60° was 4.20% ± 3.2%, and from 60° to 90° was 7.45% ± 4.8%. From full extension to 90° of flexion, the ligament length increased on average 16.7% ± 12.1%. From 60° to 90° of flexion, there was a significantly higher increase in the mean distance between the points compared with the flexion from 0° to 30° and from 30° to 60°. Conclusion: The ALL shows no isometric behavior during the range of motion of the knee. The ALL increases in length from full extension to 90° of flexion by 16.7%, on average. The increase in length was greater from 60° to 90° than from 0° to 30° and from 30° to 60°. The increase in length at higher degrees of flexion suggests greater tension with increasing flexion. Clinical Relevance: Knowledge of ALL behavior during the range of

  2. Peak Torque and Average Power at Flexion/Extension of the Shoulder and Knee when Using a Mouth Guard in Adults with Mild Midline Discrepancy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Yeol; Hong, Min-Ho; Choi, Seung-Jun

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate the changes in torque and power during flexion and extension of the shoulder and the knee joints caused by midline correction using mouth guards made from different materials in adults with mild midline discrepancy. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were males (n=12) in their 20s who showed a 3–5 mm difference between the midlines of the upper and lower teeth but had normal masticatory function. [Methods] The torque and average power of the lower limb and upper limb were measured during flexion and extension according to various types of mouth guard. [Results] There were significant differences in relative torque and average power between three conditions (no mouth guard, soft-type mouth guard, and hard-type mouth guard) at shoulder flexion and extension. There were no significant differences in relative torque and average power between the three conditions at knee flexion and extension. [Conclusions] These results suggest that use of a mouth guard is a method by which people with a mild midline discrepancy can improve the stability of the entire body. PMID:25140095

  3. Interaction between environmental temperature and hypoxia on central and peripheral fatigue during high-intensity dynamic knee extension.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Alex; Raccuglia, Margherita; Hodder, Simon; Havenith, George

    2016-03-15

    This study investigated causative factors behind the expression of different interaction types during exposure to multistressor environments. Neuromuscular fatigue rates and time to exhaustion (TTE) were investigated in active men (n = 9) exposed to three climates [5 °C, 50% relative humidity (rh); 23 °C, 50% rh; and 42 °C, 70% rh] at two inspired oxygen fractions (0.209 and 0.125 FiO2; equivalent attitude = 4,100 m). After a 40-min rest in the three climatic conditions, participants performed constant-workload (high intensity) knee extension exercise until exhaustion, with brief assessments of neuromuscular function every 110 s. Independent exposure to cold, heat, and hypoxia significantly (P < 0.01) reduced TTE from thermoneutral normoxia (reductions of 190, 405, and 505 s from 915 s, respectively). The TTE decrease was consistent with a faster rate of peripheral fatigue development (P < 0.01) compared with thermoneutral normoxia (increase of 1.6, 3.1, and 4.9%/min from 4.1%/min, respectively). Combined exposure to hypoxic-cold resulted in an even greater TTE reduction (-589 s), likely due to an increase in the rate of peripheral fatigue development (increased by 7.6%/min), but this was without significant interaction between stressors (P > 0.198). In contrast, combined exposure to hypoxic heat reduced TTE by 609 s, showing a significant antagonistic interaction (P = 0.003) similarly supported by an increased rate of peripheral fatigue development (which increased by 8.3%/min). A small decline (<0.4%/min) in voluntary muscle activation was observed only in thermoneutral normoxia. In conclusion, interaction type is influenced by the impact magnitude of the effect of the individual stressors' effect on exercise capacity, whereby the greater the effect of stressors, the greater the probability that one stressor will be abolished by the other. This indicates that humans respond to severe and simultaneous physiological strains on the basis of a worst

  4. Skeletal muscle ATP turnover by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during moderate and heavy bilateral knee extension

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Daniel T; Bimson, William E; Hampson, Sophie A; Bowen, T Scott; Murgatroyd, Scott R; Marwood, Simon; Kemp, Graham J; Rossiter, Harry B

    2014-01-01

    During constant-power high-intensity exercise, the expected increase in oxygen uptake () is supplemented by a  slow component (), reflecting reduced work efficiency, predominantly within the locomotor muscles. The intracellular source of inefficiency is postulated to be an increase in the ATP cost of power production (an increase in P/W). To test this hypothesis, we measured intramuscular ATP turnover with 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and whole-body during moderate (MOD) and heavy (HVY) bilateral knee-extension exercise in healthy participants (n = 14). Unlocalized 31P spectra were collected from the quadriceps throughout using a dual-tuned (1H and 31P) surface coil with a simple pulse-and-acquire sequence. Total ATP turnover rate (ATPtot) was estimated at exercise cessation from direct measurements of the dynamics of phosphocreatine (PCr) and proton handling. Between 3 and 8 min during MOD, there was no discernable (mean ± SD, 0.06 ± 0.12 l min−1) or change in [PCr] (30 ± 8 vs. 32 ± 7 mm) or ATPtot (24 ± 14 vs. 17 ± 14 mm min−1; each P = n.s.). During HVY, the was 0.37 ± 0.16 l min−1 (22 ± 8%), [PCr] decreased (19 ± 7 vs. 18 ± 7 mm, or 12 ± 15%; P < 0.05) and ATPtot increased (38 ± 16 vs. 44 ± 14 mm min−1, or 26 ± 30%; P < 0.05) between 3 and 8 min. However, the increase in ATPtot (ΔATPtot) was not correlated with the during HVY (r2 = 0.06; P = n.s.). This lack of relationship between ΔATPtot and , together with a steepening of the [PCr]– relationship in HVY, suggests that reduced work efficiency during heavy exercise arises from both contractile (P/W) and mitochondrial sources (the O2 cost of ATP resynthesis; P/O). PMID:25281731

  5. Skeletal muscle ATP turnover by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during moderate and heavy bilateral knee extension.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Daniel T; Bimson, William E; Hampson, Sophie A; Bowen, T Scott; Murgatroyd, Scott R; Marwood, Simon; Kemp, Graham J; Rossiter, Harry B

    2014-12-01

    During constant-power high-intensity exercise, the expected increase in oxygen uptake (V̇O2) is supplemented by a V̇O2 slow component (V̇O2 sc ), reflecting reduced work efficiency, predominantly within the locomotor muscles. The intracellular source of inefficiency is postulated to be an increase in the ATP cost of power production (an increase in P/W). To test this hypothesis, we measured intramuscular ATP turnover with (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and whole-body V̇O2 during moderate (MOD) and heavy (HVY) bilateral knee-extension exercise in healthy participants (n = 14). Unlocalized (31)P spectra were collected from the quadriceps throughout using a dual-tuned ((1)H and (31)P) surface coil with a simple pulse-and-acquire sequence. Total ATP turnover rate (ATPtot) was estimated at exercise cessation from direct measurements of the dynamics of phosphocreatine (PCr) and proton handling. Between 3 and 8 min during MOD, there was no discernable V̇O2 sc (mean ± SD, 0.06 ± 0.12 l min(-1)) or change in [PCr] (30 ± 8 vs. 32 ± 7 mm) or ATPtot (24 ± 14 vs. 17 ± 14 mm min(-1); each P = n.s.). During HVY, the V̇O2 sc was 0.37 ± 0.16 l min(-1) (22 ± 8%), [PCr] decreased (19 ± 7 vs. 18 ± 7 mm, or 12 ± 15%; P < 0.05) and ATPtot increased (38 ± 16 vs. 44 ± 14 mm min(-1), or 26 ± 30%; P < 0.05) between 3 and 8 min. However, the increase in ATPtot (ΔATPtot) was not correlated with the V̇O2 sc during HVY (r(2) = 0.06; P = n.s.). This lack of relationship between ΔATPtot and V̇O2 sc , together with a steepening of the [PCr]-V̇O2 relationship in HVY, suggests that reduced work efficiency during heavy exercise arises from both contractile (P/W) and mitochondrial sources (the O2 cost of ATP resynthesis; P/O). PMID:25281731

  6. Effects of Lumbosacral Manipulation on Isokinetic Strength of the Knee Extensors and Flexors in Healthy Subjects: A Randomized, Controlled, Single-Blind Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Grant D.; Nitz, Arthur J.; Abel, Mark G.; Symons, T. Brock; Shapiro, Robert; Black, W. Scott; Yates, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of manual manipulations targeting the lumbar spine and/or sacroiliac joint on concentric knee extension and flexion forces. Torque production was measured during isometric and isokinetic contractions. Methods This was a randomized, controlled, single-blind crossover design with 21 asymptomatic, college-aged subjects who had never received spinal manipulation. During 2 separate sessions, subjects’ peak torques were recorded while performing maximal voluntary contractions on an isokinetic dynamometer. Isometric knee extension and flexion were recorded at 60° of knee flexion, in addition to isokinetic measurements obtained at 60°/s and 180°/s. Baseline measurements were acquired before either treatment form of lumbosacral manipulation or sham manipulation, followed by identical peak torque measurements within 5 and 20 minutes posttreatment. Data were analyzed with a repeated measures analysis of variance. Results A statistically significant difference did not occur between the effects of lumbosacral manipulation or the sham manipulation in the percentage changes of knee extension and flexion peak torques at 5 and 20 minutes posttreatment. Similar, nonsignificant results were observed in the overall percentage changes of isometric contractions (spinal manipulation 4.0 ± 9.5 vs sham 1.2 ± 6.3, P = .067), isokinetic contractions at 60°/s (spinal manipulation − 4.0 ± 14.2 vs sham − 0.3 ± 8.2, P = .34), and isokinetic contractions at 180°/s (spinal manipulation − 1.4 ± 13.9 vs sham − 5.5 ± 20.0, P = .18). Conclusion The results of the current study suggest that spinal manipulation does not yield an immediate strength-enhancing effect about the knee in healthy, college-aged subjects when measured with isokinetic dynamometry. PMID:26793035

  7. Older men are more fatigable than young when matched for maximal power and knee extension angular velocity is unconstrained.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Brian H; Power, Geoffrey A; Paturel, Justin R; Rice, Charles L

    2015-06-01

    The underlying factors related to the divergent findings of age-related fatigue for dynamic tasks are not well understood. The purpose here was to investigate age-related fatigability and recovery between a repeated constrained (isokinetic) and an unconstrained velocity (isotonic) task, in which participants performed fatiguing contractions at the velocity (isokinetic) or resistance (isotonic) corresponding with maximal power. To compare between tasks, isotonic torque-power relationships were constructed prior to and following both fatiguing tasks and during short-term recovery. Contractile properties were recorded from 9 old (~75 years) and 11 young (~25 years) men during three testing sessions. In the first session, maximal power was assessed, and sessions 2 and 3 involved an isokinetic or an isotonic concentric fatigue task performed until maximal power was reduced by 40 %. Compared with young, the older men performed the same number of contractions to task failure for the isokinetic task (~45 contractions), but 20 % fewer for the isotonic task (p < 0.05). Regardless of age and task, maximal voluntary isometric contraction strength, angular velocity, and power were reduced by ~30, ~13, and ~25 %, respectively, immediately following task failure, and only isometric torque was not recovered fully by 10 min. In conclusion, older men are more fatigable than the young when performing a repetitive maximal dynamic task at a relative resistance (isotonic) but not an absolute velocity (isokinetic), corresponding to maximal power. PMID:25943700

  8. Isokinetic and isometric strength-endurance after 6 hours of immersion and 6 degrees head-down tilt in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer-Bailey, M.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Hutchinson, T. M.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine weight (water) loss levels for onset of muscular strength and endurance changes during deconditioning. METHODS: Seven men (27-40 yr) performed maximal shoulder-, knee-, and ankle-joint isometric (0 degree.s(-1) load) and isokinetic (60 degrees, 120 degrees, 180 degrees.s(-1) velocity) exercise tests during ambulatory control (AC), after 6 h of 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT; dry-bulb temp. = 23.2 +/- SD 0.6 degrees C, relative humidity = 31.1+/- 11.1%) and after 6 h of 80 degrees foot-down head-out water immersion (WI; water temp. = 35.0 +/- SD 0.1 degree C) treatments. RESULTS: Weight (water) loss after HDT (1.10 +/- SE 0.14 kg, 1.4 +/- 0.2% body wt) and WI (1.54+/- 0.19 kg, 2.0 +/- 0.2% body wt) were not different, but urinary excretion with WI (1,354 +/- 142 ml.6 h(-1)) was 28% greater (p < 0.05) than that of 975 +/- 139 ml.6 h(-1) with HDT. Muscular endurance (total work; maximal flexion-extension of the non-dominant knee at 180 degrees.s(-1) for 30 s) was not different between AC and the WI or HDT treatments. Shoulder-, knee-, and ankle-joint strength was unchanged except for three knee-joint peak torques: AC torque (120 degrees.s(-1), 285 +/- 20 Nm) decreased to 268 +/- 21 Nm (delta = -6%, p < 0.05) with WI; and AC torques (180 degrees.s(-1), 260 +/- 19 Nm) decreased to 236 +/- 15 Nm (delta = -9%, p < 0.01) with HDT, and to 235 +/- 19 Nm (delta = -10%, p < 0.01) with WI. CONCLUSION: Thus, the total body hypohydration threshold level for shoulder- and ankle-joint strength and endurance decrements is more than 2% body weight (water) loss, while significant reduction in knee-joint muscular strength-endurance occurred only at moderate (120 degrees.s(-1) and lighter (180 degrees.s(-1)) loads with body weight loss of 1.4-2.0% following WI or HDT, respectively. These weight (water) losses and knee-joint strength decrements are somewhat less than the mean weight loss of 2.6% and knee-joint strength decrements of 6-20% of American astronauts after

  9. REHABILITATION AND FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER EXTENSIVE SURGICAL DEBRIDEMENT OF A KNEE INFECTED BY FUSOBACTERIUM NECROPHORUM: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Matthew S.; Kegelmeyer, Deborah K.; Kloos, Anne D.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Joint infection is a rare but serious complication after knee injury that should be part of a physical therapist's differential diagnosis. This case report presents the care of a 17 year‐old female athlete with septic arthritis from a Fusobacterium infection after sustaining a right lateral meniscus tear. Joint pathology combined with the aggressive infectious agent led to arthrofibrosis of her knee joint and resultant activity limitations and participation restrictions. The purpose of this case report is to highlight a rare and unique pathology, the serious effects that a joint infection can have on musculoskeletal function, and the challenges encountered during the rehabilitation process. Case Description: The subject was a 17 year‐old volleyball player who injured her right knee while playing volleyball. Within 7 days, the subject developed a severe joint infection that spread into surrounding gluteal, quadriceps, and gastrocnemius musculature. The infection was surgically debrided eight times during a 10‐week inpatient hospital stay. A manipulation under anesthesia was performed to restore range of motion in her knee joint. Outpatient physical therapy was initiated 4 days later in order to restore musculoskeletal function. Outcome: Over eight months of physical therapy services were utilized to address the impairments and activity limitations caused by her joint dysfunction. She met her physical therapy goals and made significant improvements on the Knee Outcome Survey and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale. Success in physical therapy and completion of additional strength training exercise allowed this subject to return to competitive softball at the club level during her freshman year of college. Discussion: Though rare after musculoskeletal injury, joint infection can lead to soft tissue damage, partial or complete degradation of articular cartilage, and arthrofibrosis causing significant disability. Physical therapists must

  10. Preliminary assessment of the efficacy of supplementing knee extension capability in a lower limb exoskeleton with FES.

    PubMed

    Quintero, Hugo A; Farris, Ryan J; Ha, Kevin; Goldfarb, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe a cooperative controller that combines the knee joint actuation of an externally powered lower limb exoskeleton with the torque and power contribution from the electrically stimulated quadriceps muscle group. The efficacy of combining these efforts is experimentally validated with a series of weighted leg lift maneuvers. Measurements from these experiments indicate that the control approach effectively combines the respective efforts of the motor and muscle, such that good control performance is achieved, with substantial torque and energy contributions from both the biological and non-biological actuators. PMID:23366646

  11. Monitoring muscle metabolic indexes by time-domain near-infrared spectroscopy during knee flex-extension induced by functional electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrante, Simona; Contini, Davide; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Torricelli, Alessandro; Molteni, Franco; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2009-07-01

    A noninvasive methodology, combining functional electrical stimulation and time-domain near-infrared spectroscopy (TD-NIRS), is developed to verify whether stroke-altered muscular metabolism on postacute patients. Seven healthy subjects and nine postacute stroke patients undergo a protocol of knee flex-extension induced by quadricep electrical stimulation. During the protocol, TD-NIRS measurements are performed on both rectus femoris to investigate whether significant differences arise between able-bodied and stroke subjects and between patients' paretic and healthy legs. During baseline, metabolic parameters do not show any significant differences among subjects. During stimulation, paretic limbs produce a knee angle significantly lower than healthy legs. During recovery, patients' healthy limbs show a metabolic behavior correlated to able-bodied subjects. Instead, the correlation between the metabolic behavior of the paretic and able-bodied legs allows the definition of two patients' subgroups: one highly correlated (R>0.87) and the other uncorrelated (R<0.08). This grouping reflects the patient functional condition. The results obtained on the most impaired patients suggest that stroke does not produce any systemic consequences at the muscle, but the metabolic dysfunction seems to be local and unilateral. It is crucial to enlarge the sample size of the two subgroups before making these preliminary results a general finding.

  12. Dynamic Frequency Analyses of Lower Extremity Muscles during Sit-To-Stand Motion for the Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kentaro; Yagi, Masahide

    2016-01-01

    Objective Muscle activities during the sit-to-stand motion (STS) are characterized by coordinated movements between hip extensors and knee extensors. However, previous reports regarding the STS and lower extremity muscle activities have focused on some quantitative assessment, but little qualitative research. This study aimed to examine the muscle activities of the lower extremity both quantitatively and qualitatively. Methods Study participants included 13 patients with knee osteoarthritis (knee OA) and 11 age-matched asymptomatic controls. The task was STS from a chair with a height-adjustable seat. EMG activities were acquired using surface electromyogram. The root mean square signals normalized as a percentage of maximum voluntary isometric contraction values (RMS%MVC) and the mean power frequency (MPF) were calculated. Results During STS, knee OA patients had increased RMS%MVC of the vastus medialis and raised MPF of the rectus femoris before buttocks-off. Conclusion These findings suggest that STS of knee OA patients not only increased relative muscle activity of the vastus medialis, but also enlisted the rectus femoris in knee extension to improve muscle contraction force by activating more type II fibers to accomplish buttocks-off. PMID:26807578

  13. Effects of Low-Impact Dance on Blood Biochemistry, Bone Mineral Density, the Joint Range of Motion of Lower Extremities, Knee Extension Torque, and Fall in Females.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui Ying; Tu, Jui Hung; Hsu, Chin Hsing; Tsao, Te Hung

    2016-01-01

    The effect of low-impact dance on blood metabolites, the joint range of motion (ROM) of the lower extremities, knee extension torque, bone mass density (BMD), the number of falls, and the confidence to perform daily activities (Modified Falls Efficacy Scale [MFES]) was examined in older sedentary women (age: 59 ± 4 years) before and after a 16-week intervention. Results showed that the average score for the MFES, some parameters of blood chemistry, and joint ROM were significantly improved after low-impact intervention. In addition to improvements in blood lipids and body fat percentages, the increases shown in the parameters regarding the lower extremities may contribute to confidence in performing common daily activities in older women, although the number of falls did not significantly differ between the two groups during the 16-week period. PMID:25642949

  14. Impulse variability in isometric tasks.

    PubMed

    Carlton, L G; Kim, K H; Liu, Y T; Newell, K M

    1993-03-01

    An isometric elbow flexion task was used in two experiments that examined the influence of force-production characteristics on impulse variability. Impulse size was held constant while peak force, time to peak force, rate of force, and, hence, the shape of the criterion force-time curve were manipulated. The results indicated that changes in the force-time curve under conditions of equal impulse bring about systematic changes in impulse variability, and this effect is more pronounced for larger impulse conditions. The inability of existing functions to account for the peak force variability findings led to the generation of a new predicted force variability function. The proposed function accounts for changes in the standard deviation and coefficient of variation of peak force, impulse, and rate of force over a range of force-time conditions. PMID:12730039

  15. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... the front of your knee around the kneecap Torn ligament. An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, or ... into your knee, swelling, or an unstable knee. Torn cartilage (a meniscus tear ). Pain felt on the ...

  16. Oxygen cost of dynamic or isometric exercise relative to recruited muscle mass

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Christopher P; Mahoney, Edward T; Black, Christopher D; Slade, Jill M; Dudley, Gary A

    2006-01-01

    Background Oxygen cost of different muscle actions may be influenced by different recruitment and rate coding strategies. The purpose of this study was to account for these strategies by comparing the oxygen cost of dynamic and isometric muscle actions relative to the muscle mass recruited via surface electrical stimulation of the knee extensors. Methods Comparisons of whole body pulmonary Δ V˙ MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaafiart1ev1aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacH8akY=wiFfYdH8Gipec8Eeeu0xXdbba9frFj0=OqFfea0dXdd9vqai=hGuQ8kuc9pgc9s8qqaq=dirpe0xb9q8qiLsFr0=vr0=vr0dc8meaabaqaciaacaGaaeqabaqabeGadaaakeaacuWGwbGvgaGaaaaa@2DEA@O2 were made in seven young healthy adults (1 female) during 3 minutes of dynamic or isometric knee extensions, both induced by surface electrical stimulation. Recruited mass was quantified in T2 weighted spin echo magnetic resonance images. Results The Δ V˙ MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaafiart1ev1aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacH8akY=wiFfYdH8Gipec8Eeeu0xXdbba9frFj0=OqFfea0dXdd9vqai=hGuQ8kuc9pgc9s8qqaq=dirpe0xb9q8qiLsFr0=vr0=vr0dc8meaabaqaciaacaGaaeqabaqabeGadaaakeaacuWGwbGvgaGaaaaa@2DEA@O2 for dynamic muscle actions, 242 ± 128 ml • min-1 (mean ± SD) was greater (p = 0.003) than that for isometric actions, 143 ± 99 ml • min-1. Recruited muscle mass was also greater (p = 0.004) for dynamic exercise, 0.716 ± 282 versus 0.483 ± 0.139 kg. The rate of oxygen consumption per unit of recruited muscle (V˙O2RM MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaafiart1ev1aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacH8akY=wiFfYdH8Gipec8Eeeu0xXdbba9frFj0=OqFfea0dXdd9vqai=hGuQ8kuc9pgc9s8qqaq=dirpe0xb9q8qiLsFr0=vr0=vr0dc8meaabaqaciaacaGaaeqabaqabeGadaaakeaacuqGwbGvgaGaaiabb+eapnaaBaaaleaacqaIYaGmdaahaaadbeqaaiabbkfasjabb2eanbaaaSqabaaaaa@32B0@) was similar in dynamic and isometric exercise (346 ± 162 versus 307 ± 198 ml • kg-1 • min-1; p = 0.352), but the V˙O2RM MathType@MTEF@5

  17. Serratus Anterior and Lower Trapezius Muscle Activities During Multi-Joint Isotonic Scapular Exercises and Isometric Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruike, Masaaki; Ellenbecker, Todd S.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Proper scapular function during humeral elevation, such as upward rotation, external rotation, and posterior tilting of the scapula, is necessary to prevent shoulder injury. However, the appropriate intensity of rehabilitation exercise for the periscapular muscles has yet to be clarified. Objective: To identify the serratus anterior, lower trapezius, infraspinatus, and posterior deltoid muscle activities during 2 free-motion exercises using 3 intensities and to compare these muscle activities with isometric contractions during quadruped shoulder flexion and external rotation and abduction of the glenohumeral joint. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Health Science Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 16 uninjured, healthy, active, male college students (age = 19.5 ± 1.2 years, height = 173.1 ± 6.5 cm, weight = 68.8 ± 6.6 kg). Main Outcome Measure(s): Mean electromyographic activity normalized by the maximal voluntary isometric contraction was analyzed across 3 intensities and 5 exercises. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated for electromyographic activity of the 4 muscles in each free-motion exercise. Results: Significant interactions in electromyographic activity were observed between intensities and exercises (P < .05). The quadruped shoulder-flexion exercise activated all 4 muscles compared with other exercises. Also, the modified robbery free-motion exercise activated the serratus anterior, lower trapezius, and infraspinatus compared with the lawn-mower free-motion exercise. However, neither exercise showed a difference in posterior deltoid electromyographic activity. Conclusions: Three intensities exposed the nature of the periscapular muscle activities across the different exercises. The free-motion exercise in periscapular muscle rehabilitation may not modify serratus anterior, lower trapezius, and infraspinatus muscle activities unless knee-joint extension is limited. PMID:25689561

  18. Knee Bracing: What Works?

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Knee Bracing: What Works? Knee Bracing: What Works? What are knee braces? Knee braces are supports ... have arthritis in their knees. Do knee braces work? Maybe. Companies that make knee braces claim that ...

  19. RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY OF A MODIFIED ISOMETRIC DYNAMOMETER IN THE ASSESSMENT OF MUSCULAR PERFORMANCE IN INDIVIDUALS WITH ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    de Vasconcelos, Rodrigo Antunes; Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora; Shimano, Antonio Carlos; Paccola, Cleber Jansen; Salvini, Tânia Fátima; Prado, Christiane Lanatovits; Junior, Wilson A. Mello

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of a modified isometric dynamometer (MID) in performance deficits of the knee extensor and flexor muscles in normal individuals and in those with ACL reconstructions. Methods: Sixty male subjects were invited to participate of the study, being divided into three groups with 20 subjects each: control group (GC), group of individuals with ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon graft (GTP, and group of individuals with ACL reconstruction with hamstrings graft (GTF). All individuals performed isometric tests in the MID, muscular strength deficits collected were subsequently compared to the tests performed on the Biodex System 3 operating in the isometric and isokinetic mode at speeds of 60°/s and 180o/s. Intraclass ICC correlation calculations were done in order to assess MID reliability, specificity, sensitivity and Kappa's consistency coefficient calculations, respectively, for assessing the MID's validity in detecting muscular deficits and intra- and intergroup comparisons when performing the four strength tests using the ANOVA method. Results: The modified isometric dynamometer (MID) showed excellent reliability and good validity in the assessment of the performance of the knee extensor and flexor muscles groups. In the comparison between groups, the GTP showed significantly greater deficits as compared to the GTF and GC groups. Conclusion: Isometric dynamometers connected to mechanotherapy equipments could be an alternative option to collect data concerning performance deficits of the extensor and flexor muscles groups of the knee in subjects with ACL reconstruction. PMID:27004175

  20. The mechanics of activated semitendinosus are not representative of the pathological knee joint condition of children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Ateş, Filiz; Temelli, Yener; Yucesoy, Can A

    2016-06-01

    Characteristic cerebral palsy effects in the knee include a restricted joint range of motion and forcefully kept joint in a flexed position. To show whether the mechanics of activated spastic semitendinosus muscle are contributing to these effects, we tested the hypothesis that the muscle's joint range of force exertion is narrow and force production capacity in flexed positions is high. The isometric semitendinosus forces of children with cerebral palsy (n=7, mean (SD)=7years (8months), GMFCS levels III-IV, 12 limbs tested) were measured intra-operatively as a function of knee angle, from flexion (120°) to full extension (0°). Peak force measured in the most flexed position was considered as the benchmark. However, peak force (mean (SD)=112.4N (54.3N)) was measured either at intermediate or even full knee extension (three limbs) indicating no narrow joint range of force exertion. Lack of high force production capacity in flexed knee positions (e.g., at 120° negligible or below 22% of the peak force) was shown except for one limb. Therefore, our hypothesis was rejected for a vast majority of the limbs. These findings and those reported for spastic gracilis agree, indicating that the patients' pathological joint condition must rely on a more complex mechanism than the mechanics of individual spastic muscles. PMID:27128957

  1. Radiological analysis on femoral tunnel positioning between isometric and anatomical reconstructions of the anterior cruciate ligament☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Rodrigo Barreiros; de Pinho Tavares, Leonardo Augusto; Pace Lasmar, Rodrigo Campos; da Cunha, Fernando Amaral; de Melo Lisboa, Lucas Araujo

    2014-01-01

    Objective the aim of this study was to radiologically evaluate the femoral tunnel position in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions using the isometric and anatomical techniques. Methods a prospective analytical study was conducted on patients undergoing ACL reconstruction by means of the isometric and anatomical techniques, using grafts from the knee flexor tendons or patellar tendon. Twenty-eight patients were recruited during the immediate postoperative period, at the knee surgery outpatient clinic of FCMMG-HUSJ. Radiographs of the operated knee were produced in anteroposterior (AP) view with the patient standing on both feet and in lateral view with 30° of flexion. The lines were traced out and the distances and angles were measured on the lateral radiograph to evaluate the sagittal plane. The distance from the center of the screw to the posterior cortical bone of the lateral condyle was measured and divided by the Blumensaat line. In relation to the height of the screw, the distance from the center of the screw to the joint surface of the lateral condyle of the knee was measured. On the AP radiograph, evaluating the coronal plane, the angle between the anatomical axis of the femur and a line traced at the center of the screw was measured. Results with regard to the p measurement (posteriorization of the interference screw), the tests showed that the p-value (0.4213) was greater than the significance level used (0.05); the null hypothesis was not rejected and it could be stated that there was no statistically significant difference between the anatomical and isometric techniques. With regard to the H measurement (height of the screw in relation to the lower cortical bone of the knee), the p-value observed (0.0006) was less than the significance level used (0.05); the null hypothesis was rejected and it could be stated that there was a statistically significant difference between the anatomical and isometric techniques. It can be concluded that the

  2. Maximal-intensity isometric and dynamic exercise performance after eccentric muscle actions.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Christopher; Eston, Roger

    2002-12-01

    A well-documented observation after eccentric exercise is a reduction in maximal voluntary force. However, little is known about the ability to maintain maximal isometric force or generate and maintain dynamic peak power. These aspects of muscle function were studied in seven participants (5 males, 2 females). Knee extensor isometric strength and rate of fatigue were assessed by a sustained 60 s maximal voluntary contraction at 80 degrees and 40 degrees knee flexion, corresponding to an optimal and a shortened muscle length, respectively. Dynamic peak power and rate of fatigue were assessed during a 30 s Wingate cycle test. Plasma creatine kinase was measured from a fingertip blood sample. These variables were measured before, 1 h after and 1, 2, 3 and 7 days after 100 repetitions of the eccentric phase of the barbell squat exercise (10 sets x 10 reps at 80% concentric one-repetition maximum). Eccentric exercise resulted in elevations in creatine kinase activity above baseline (274+/-109 U x l(-1); mean +/- s(x)) after 1 h (506+/-116 U x l(-1), P < 0.05) and 1 day (808+/-117 U x l(-1), P < 0.05). Isometric strength was reduced (P < 0.05) for 7 days (35% at 1 h, 5% at day 7) and the rate of fatigue was lower (P < 0.05) for 3 days at 80 degrees and for 1 day at 40 degrees. Wingate peak power was reduced to a lesser extent (P < 0.05) than isometric strength at 1 h (13%) and, although the time course of recovery was equal, the two variables differed in their pattern of recovery. Eccentrically exercised muscle was characterized by an inability to generate high force and power, but an improved ability to maintain force and power. Such functional outcomes are consistent with the proposition that type II fibres are selectively recruited or damaged during eccentric exercise. PMID:12477004

  3. Influence of length-restricted strength training on athlete's power-load curves of knee extensors and flexors.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Boris; Kleinöder, Heinz; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2010-03-01

    This study investigated whether different length-restricted strength training regimens affect voluntary explosive concentric power-load curves of the quadriceps femoris (QF) and hamstring (HAM) muscles. Thirty-two athletes were divided into 3 different training groups (G1-G3): G1 performed isometric training at knee joint angles corresponding to long muscle-tendon unit (MTU) length for QF and HAM; G2 conducted concentric-eccentric contraction cycles that were restricted to a knee joint range of motion corresponding to predominantly long MTU length for QF and HAM; and G3 combined the protocols of G1 and G2. Knee joint angle-dependent power-load curves during maximal voluntary explosive concentric knee extensions and flexions were measured for loads corresponding to 40, 60, and 80% of individual 1 repetition maximum at 5 different occasions: 2 times before, after 5 and 8 weeks of training, and 4 weeks post training. Power values of each subject were normalized to the largest value produced at any knee joint position (percent maximum). Obtained by curve fitting, the optimal knee joint angle for power production of QF and HAM remained unaltered throughout the course of the study for all testing loads and training groups. Therefore, different strength training regimens with a common restriction to long MTU lengths failed to induce length-dependent alterations in athlete's voluntary concentric power-load curves of knee extensors and flexors. The approach to develop strength training programs that induce systematic shifts in length-dependent power production of QF and HAM is of direct practical relevance for athletic activities such as cycling, ice skating, and skiing. However, restricting the muscle excursion range during loading seems to be an inappropriate trigger to cause length-dependent alterations in athlete's voluntary concentric power-load curves. PMID:20145573

  4. Prediction of three dimensional maximum isometric neck strength.

    PubMed

    Fice, Jason B; Siegmund, Gunter P; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-09-01

    We measured maximum isometric neck strength under combinations of flexion/extension, lateral bending and axial rotation to determine whether neck strength in three dimensions (3D) can be predicted from principal axes strength. This would allow biomechanical modelers to validate their neck models across many directions using only principal axis strength data. Maximum isometric neck moments were measured in 9 male volunteers (29±9 years) for 17 directions. The 3D moments were normalized by the principal axis moments, and compared to unity for all directions tested. Finally, each subject's maximum principal axis moments were used to predict their resultant moment in the off-axis directions. Maximum moments were 30±6 N m in flexion, 32±9 N m in lateral bending, 51±11 N m in extension, and 13±5 N m in axial rotation. The normalized 3D moments were not significantly different from unity (95% confidence interval contained one), except for three directions that combined ipsilateral axial rotation and lateral bending; in these directions the normalized moments exceeded one. Predicted resultant moments compared well to the actual measured values (r2=0.88). Despite exceeding unity, the normalized moments were consistent across subjects to allow prediction of maximum 3D neck strength using principal axes neck strength. PMID:24893597

  5. Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    Proposed orthotic knee joint locks and unlocks automatically, at any position within range of bend angles, without manual intervention by wearer. Includes tang and clevis, locks whenever wearer transfers weight to knee and unlocks when weight removed. Locking occurs at any angle between 45 degrees knee bend and full extension.

  6. Knee Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not helping you anymore. When you have a total knee replacement, the surgeon removes damaged cartilage and bone ...

  7. Knee Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... cartilage, a tough, elastic material that helps absorb shock and allows the knee joint to move smoothly. ... The two menisci in each knee act as shock absorbers, cushioning the lower part of the leg ...

  8. Knee Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sprains A sprain means you've stretched or torn a ligament. Common knee sprains usually involve damage ... A strain means you've partly or completely torn a muscle or tendon. With knee strains, you ...

  9. Light: Isometric Casing with Lens, South Elevation, North Elevation, Top ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Light: Isometric Casing with Lens, South Elevation, North Elevation, Top Plan, Base Plan; Fresnel Lens: Isometric, Elevation, Plan - Fort Washington, Fort Washington Light, Northeast side of Potomac River at Fort Washington Park, Fort Washington, Prince George's County, MD

  10. Task complexity and maximal isometric strength gains through motor learning

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Jessica; Green, Lara A.; Gabriel, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study compared the effects of a simple versus complex contraction pattern on the acquisition, retention, and transfer of maximal isometric strength gains and reductions in force variability. A control group (N = 12) performed simple isometric contractions of the wrist flexors. An experimental group (N = 12) performed complex proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) contractions consisting of maximal isometric wrist extension immediately reversing force direction to wrist flexion within a single trial. Ten contractions were completed on three consecutive days with a retention and transfer test 2‐weeks later. For the retention test, the groups performed their assigned contraction pattern followed by a transfer test that consisted of the other contraction pattern for a cross‐over design. Both groups exhibited comparable increases in strength (20.2%, P < 0.01) and reductions in mean torque variability (26.2%, P < 0.01), which were retained and transferred. There was a decrease in the coactivation ratio (antagonist/agonist muscle activity) for both groups, which was retained and transferred (35.2%, P < 0.01). The experimental group exhibited a linear decrease in variability of the torque‐ and sEMG‐time curves, indicating transfer to the simple contraction pattern (P < 0.01). The control group underwent a decrease in variability of the torque‐ and sEMG‐time curves from the first day of training to retention, but participants returned to baseline levels during the transfer condition (P < 0.01). However, the difference between torque RMS error versus the variability in torque‐ and sEMG‐time curves suggests the demands of the complex task were transferred, but could not be achieved in a reproducible way. PMID:25428951

  11. Learning and generalization in an isometric visuomotor task.

    PubMed

    Rotella, Michele F; Nisky, Ilana; Koehler, Margaret; Rinderknecht, Mike D; Bastian, Amy J; Okamura, Allison M

    2015-03-15

    Adaptation is a prominent feature of the human motor system and has been studied extensively in reaching movements. This study characterizes adaptation and generalization during isometric reaching in which the arm remains stationary and the participant controls a virtual cursor via force applied by the hand. We measured how learning of a visual cursor rotation generalizes across workspace 1) to determine the coordinate system that predominates visual rotation learning, and 2) to ascertain whether mapping type, namely position or velocity control, influences transfer. Participants performed virtual reaches to one of two orthogonal training targets with the applied rotation. In a new workspace, participants reached to a single target, similar to the training target in either hand or joint space. Furthermore, a control experiment measured within-workspace generalization to an orthogonal target. Across position and velocity mappings, learning transferred predominantly in intrinsic (joint) space, although the transfer was incomplete. The velocity mapping resulted in significantly larger aftereffects and broader within-workspace generalization than the position mapping, potentially due to slower peak speeds, longer trial times, greater target overshoot, or other factors. Although we cannot rule out a mixed reference frame in our task, the predominance of intrinsic coding of cursor kinematics in the isometric environment opposes the extrinsic coding of arm kinematics in real reaching but matches the intrinsic coding of dynamics found in prior work. These findings have implications for the design of isometric control systems in human-machine interaction or in rehabilitation when coordinated multi-degree-of-freedom movement is difficult to achieve. PMID:25520430

  12. Differential effects of whole body vibration durations on knee extensor strength.

    PubMed

    Stewart, James A; Cochrane, Darryl J; Morton, R Hugh

    2009-01-01

    The effectiveness and optimality of whole body vibration (WBV) duration on muscular strength is yet to be determined. Hence the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of three different durations of continuous WBV exposure on isometric right knee extensor strength measured pre and post exposure. The study involved 12 trained male subjects (age 23.7+/-4.2 years, height 1.82+/-0.06m, weight 81.8+/-15.5kg). Pre and post knee extensor strength was measured using the Biodex System 3. Peak and mean torques were recorded over three maximal 2s contractions with 10s intervals. All subjects completed three interventions of WBV lasting 2, 4, or 6min, in a balanced randomized order. Whole body vibration was performed on the Galileo machine set at 26Hz with peak-to-peak amplitude of 4mm. We found significant interaction (durationxpre-post) effects for both peak and mean torque. Two minutes of WBV provided a significantly different (p<0.05) effect (peak torque +3.8%, mean torque +3.6%) compared to 4min (-2.7% and -0.8%, respectively), and compared to 6min (-6.0% and -5.2%, respectively), while 4min produced significantly different results compared to 6min for peak torque measurements only. Two minutes of WBV produced an improvement in isometric right knee extension strength compared to 4 and 6min, both of which produced strength decreases. Nevertheless, the mechanisms and optimal dose-response character of vibration exposure remain unclear. PMID:18078783

  13. Feedforward consequences of isometric contractions: effort and ventilation.

    PubMed

    Luu, Billy L; Smith, Janette L; Martin, Peter G; McBain, Rachel A; Taylor, Janet L; Butler, Jane E

    2016-08-01

    The onset of voluntary muscle contractions causes rapid increases in ventilation and is accompanied by a sensation of effort. Both the ventilatory response and perception of effort are proportional to contraction intensity, but these behaviors have been generalized from contractions of a single muscle group. Our aim was to determine how these relationships are affected by simultaneous contractions of multiple muscle groups. We examined the ventilatory response and perceived effort of contraction during separate and simultaneous isometric contractions of the contralateral elbow flexors and of an ipsilateral elbow flexor and knee extensor. Subjects made 10-sec contractions at 25, 50, and 100% of maximum during normocapnia and hypercapnia. For simultaneous contractions, both muscle groups were activated at the same intensities. Ventilation was measured continuously and subjects rated the effort required to produce each contraction. As expected, ventilation and perceived effort increased proportionally with contraction intensity during individual contractions. However, during simultaneous contractions, neither ventilation nor effort reflected the combined muscle output. Rather, the ventilatory response was similar to when contractions were performed separately, and effort ratings showed a small but significant increase for simultaneous contractions. Hypercapnia at rest doubled baseline ventilation, but did not affect the difference in perceived effort between separate and simultaneous contractions. The ventilatory response and the sense of effort at the onset of muscle activity are not related to the total output of the motor pathways, or the working muscles, but arise from cortical regions upstream from the motor cortex. PMID:27482074

  14. A model of human knee ligaments in the sagittal plane. Part 1: Response to passive flexion.

    PubMed

    Zavatsky, A B; O'Connor, J J

    1992-01-01

    The development of a mathematical model of the knee ligaments in the sagittal plane is presented. Essential features of the model are (a) the representation of selected cruciate ligament fibres as isometric links in a kinematic mechanism that controls passive knee flexion and (b) the mapping of all other ligament fibres between attachments on the tibia and femur. Fibres slacken and tighten as the ligament attachment areas on the bones move relative to each other. The model is used to study the shape and fibre length changes of the cruciate and collateral ligaments in response to passive flexion/extension of the knee. The model ligament shape and fibre length changes compare well qualitatively with experimental results reported in the literature. The results suggest that when designing and implanting a ligament replacement with the aim of reproducing the natural fibre strain patterns, the surgeon must not only implant through the natural attachment areas but must also maintain the natural fibre mapping and render all fibres just tight at the appropriate flexion angle. PMID:1482508

  15. Physiological response to submaximal isometric contractions of the paravertebral muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, B. R.; Jorgensen, K.; Hargens, A. R.; Nielsen, P. K.; Nicolaisen, T.

    1999-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Brief (30-second) isometric trunk extensions at 5%, 20%, 40%, 60%, and 80% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and 3 minutes of prolonged trunk extension (20% MVC) in erect position were studied in nine healthy male subjects. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the intercorrelation between intramuscular pressure and tissue oxygenation of the paravertebral muscles during submaximal isometric contractions and further, to evaluate paravertebral electromyogram and intramuscular pressure as indicators of force development. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Local physiologic responses to muscle contraction are incompletely understood. METHODS: Relative oxygenation was monitored with noninvasive near-infrared spectroscopy, intramuscular pressure was measured with a transducer-tipped catheter, and surface electromyogram was monitored at three recording sites. RESULTS: The root mean square amplitudes of the paravertebral electromyogram (L4, left and right; T12, right) and intramuscular pressure measured in the lumbar multifidus muscle at L4 increased with greater force development in a curvilinear manner. A significant decrease in the oxygenation of the lumbar paravertebral muscle in response to muscle contraction was found at an initial contraction level of 20% MVC. This corresponded to a paravertebral intramuscular pressure of 30-40 mm Hg. However, during prolonged trunk extension, no further decrease in tissue oxygenation was found compared with the tissue oxygenation level at the end of the brief contractions, indicating that homeostatic adjustments (mean blood pressure and heart rate) over time were sufficient to maintain paravertebral muscle oxygen levels. CONCLUSION: At a threshold intramuscular pressure of 30-40 mm Hg during muscle contraction, oxygenation in the paravertebral muscles is significantly reduced. The effect of further increase in intramuscular pressure on tissue oxygenation over time may be compensated for by an increase in blood pressure and heart

  16. Knee arthroscopy - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... knee problems such as: a torn knee disc (meniscus) a damaged knee bone (patella) a damaged ligament ... surgeon can see the ligaments, the knee disc (meniscus), the knee bone (patella), the lining of the ...

  17. BIOMECHANICAL ACCESS METHOD FOR ANALYZING ISOMETRICITY IN RECONSTRUCTING THE MEDIAL PATELLOFEMORAL LIGAMENT

    PubMed Central

    Sadigursky, David; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pereira, César Augusto Martins; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present a biomechanical device for evaluating medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction and its isometricity. Methods: An accessible biomechanical method that allowed application of physiological and non-physiological forces to the knee using a mechanical arm and application of weights and counterweights was developed, so as to enable many different evaluations and have a very accurate measurement system for distances between different structures, for analysis on experiments. This article describes the assembly of this system, and suggests some practical applications. Six cadaver knees were studied. The knees were prepared in a testing machine developed at the Biomechanics Laboratory of IOT–HCFMUSP, which allowed dynamic evaluation of patellar behavior, with quantification of patellar lateralization between 0° and 120°. The differences between the distances found with and without load applied to the patella were grouped according to the graft fixation angle (0°, 30°, 60° or 90°) and knee position (intact, damaged or reconstructed). Results: There was a tendency for smaller lateral displacement to occur at fixation angles greater than 30 degrees of flexion, especially between the angles of 45° and 60° degrees of flexion, after the reconstruction. For the other angles, there was no statistical significance. Conclusion: The method developed is a useful tool for studies on the patellofemoral joint and the MPFL, and has a very accurate measurement system for distances between different structures. It can be used in institutions with fewer resources available. PMID:27047872

  18. Effect of long-term isometric training on core/torso stiffness.

    PubMed

    Lee, Benjamin C Y; McGill, Stuart M

    2015-06-01

    Although core stiffness enhances athletic performance traits, controversy exists regarding the effectiveness of isometric vs. dynamic core training methods. This study aimed to determine whether long-term changes in stiffness can be trained, and if so, what is the most effective method. Twenty-four healthy male subjects (23 ± 3 years; 1.8 ± 0.06 m; 77.5 ± 10.8 kg) were recruited for passive and active stiffness measurements before and after a 6-week core training intervention. Twelve subjects (22 ± 2 years; 1.8 ± 0.08 m; 78.3 ± 12.3 kg) were considered naive to physical and core exercise. The other 12 subjects (24 ± 3 years; 1.8 ± 0.05 m; 76.8 ± 9.7 kg) were Muay Thai athletes (savvy). A repeated-measures design compared core training methods (isometric vs. dynamic, with a control group) and subject training experience (naive vs. savvy) before and after a 6-week training period. Passive stiffness was assessed on a "frictionless" bending apparatus and active stiffness assessed through a quick release mechanism. Passive stiffness increased after the isometric training protocol. Dynamic training produced a smaller effect, and as expected, there was no change in the control group. Active stiffness did not change in any group. Comparisons between subject and training groups did not reveal any interactions. Thus, an isometric training approach was superior in terms of enhancing core stiffness. This is important since increased core stiffness enhances load bearing ability, arrests painful vertebral micromovements, and enhances ballistic distal limb movement. This may explain the efficacy reported for back and knee injury reduction. PMID:26010794

  19. Use of embedded strain gages for the in-vitro study of proximal tibial cancellous bone deformation during knee flexion-extension movement: development, reproducibility and preliminary results of feasibility after frontal low femoral osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This paper reports the development of an in-vitro technique allowing quantification of relative (not absolute) deformations measured at the level of the cancellous bone of the tibial proximal epiphysis (CBTPE) during knee flexion-extension. This method has been developed to allow a future study of the effects of low femoral osteotomies consequence on the CBTPE. Methods Six strain gages were encapsulated in an epoxy resin solution to form, after resin polymerisation, six measurement elements (ME). The latter were inserted into the CBTPE of six unembalmed specimens, just below the tibial plateau. Knee motion data were collected by three-dimensional (3D) electrogoniometry during several cycles of knee flexion-extension. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility was estimated on one specimen for all MEs. Intra-specimen repeatability was calculated to determine specimen's variability and the error of measurement. A varum and valgum chirurgical procedure was realised on another specimen to observed CBTPE deformation after these kind of procedure. Results Average intra-observer variation of the deformation ranged from 8% to 9% (mean coefficient of variation, MCV) respectively for extension and flexion movement. The coefficient of multiple correlations (CMC) ranged from 0.93 to 0.96 for flexion and extension. No phase shift of maximum strain peaks was observed. Inter-observer MCV averaged 23% and 28% for flexion and extension. The CMC were 0.82 and 0.87 respectively for extension and flexion. For the intra-specimen repeatability, the average of mean RMS difference and the mean ICC were calculated only for flexion movement. The mean RMS variability ranged from 7 to 10% and the mean ICC was 0.98 (0.95 - 0.99). A Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated showing that RMS was independent of signal intensity. For the chirurgical procedure, valgum and varum deviation seems be in agree with the frontal misalignment theory. Conclusions Results show that the

  20. Prosthetic knee design by simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K; Hollister, A

    1999-07-30

    Although 150,000 total knee replacement surgeries are performed annually in North America, current designs of knee prostheses have mechanical problems that include a limited range of motion, abnormal gait patterns, patellofemoral joint dysfunction, implant loosening or subsidence, and excessive wear. These problems fall into three categories: failure to reproduce normal joint kinematics, which results in altered limb function; bone-implant interface failure; and material failure. Modern computer technology can be used to design, prototype, and test new total knee implants. The design team uses the full range of CAD-CAM to design and produce implant prototypes for mechanical and clinical testing. Closer approximation of natural knee kinematics and kinetics is essential for improved patient function and diminished implant loads. Current knee replacement designs are based on 19th Century theories that the knee moves about a variable axis of rotation. Recent research has shown, however, that knee motion occurs about two fixed, offset axes of rotation. These aces are not perpendicular to the long axes of the bones or to each other, and the axes do not intersect. Bearing surfaces of mechanisms that move about axes of rotation are surfaces of revolution of those axes which advanced CAD technology can produce. Solids with surfaces of revolution for the two axes of rotation for the knee have been made using an HP9000 workstation and Structural Ideas Master Series CAD software at ArthroMotion. The implant's CAD model should closely replicate movements of the normal knee. The knee model will have a range of flexion-extension (FE) from -5 to 120 degrees. Movements include varus, valgus, internal and external rotation, as well as flexion and extension. The patellofemoral joint is aligned perpendicular to the FE axis and replicates the natural joint more closely than those of existing prostheses. The bearing surfaces will be more congruent than current designs and should

  1. [ISOMETRIC RETRACTION AND THE INVISIBLE PROCESSES OF NERVE CELLS].

    PubMed

    Sotnikov, O S; Vasyagina, N Yu; Krasnova, T V

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a large number of physiological studies on stress and hibernation had described an unusual morphological phenomenon of the rapid disappearance and reapperance of apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and other parts of the brain. In this article an attempt is maid to explain this phenomenon on the basis of morphological analysis of natural elastic properties of neuroplasm and structural kinetics of partially preserved processes of the living isolated neurons. The neuroplasm displacement with its bidirectional flow was identified in the processes. A new physiological phenomenon is described--the isometric retraction of nerve cell processes, during which the neuroplasm fluxes were directed to the opposite sides, leading to abrupt thinning of middle parts of the processes and to a thickening of both ends. It is suggested that the extremely attenuated processes can reach the submicroscopic sizes, becoming invisible in the light microscope. The repeated reversible "disappearance" and "appearance" of the processes was demonstrated supravitally in the culture of neurons and of C-1300 neuroblastoma cells. Reduction of the diameter of the processes to a limit of their visibility was demonstrated by the example of their natural stretching. The same effect was observed in the areas between the reversible varicosities of the processes. These areas became extremely thin, and then invisible. Becoming thinner, the processes were capable of sharp extension. A review of the available literature and our own data allow to conclude that the phenomenon of the disappearance of the apical dendrites was due to their isometric retraction, which lead to the emergence of "invisible processes". PMID:27141578

  2. Interhemispheric connectivity during bimanual isometric force generation

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jinyi; Tazoe, Toshiki; Soteropoulos, Demetris S.

    2015-01-01

    Interhemispheric interactions through the corpus callosum play an important role in the control of bimanual forces. However, the extent to which physiological connections between primary motor cortices are modulated during increasing levels of bimanual force generation in intact humans remains poorly understood. Here we studied coherence between electroencephalographic (EEG) signals and the ipsilateral cortical silent period (iSP), two well-known measures of interhemispheric connectivity between motor cortices, during unilateral and bilateral 10%, 40%, and 70% of maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVC) into index finger abduction. We found that EEG-EEG coherence in the alpha frequency band decreased while the iSP area increased during bilateral compared with unilateral 40% and 70% but not 10% of MVC. Decreases in coherence in the alpha frequency band correlated with increases in the iSP area, and subjects who showed this inverse relation were able to maintain more steady bilateral muscle contractions. To further examine the relationship between the iSP and coherence we electrically stimulated the ulnar nerve at the wrist at the alpha frequency. Electrical stimulation increased coherence in the alpha frequency band and decreased the iSP area during bilateral 70% of MVC. Altogether, our findings demonstrate an inverse relation between alpha oscillations and the iSP during strong levels of bimanual force generation. We suggest that interactions between neural pathways mediating alpha oscillatory activity and transcallosal inhibition between motor cortices might contribute to the steadiness of strong bilateral isometric muscle contractions in intact humans. PMID:26538610

  3. The Associations between Pain Sensitivity and Knee Muscle Strength in Healthy Volunteers: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Bliddal, Henning

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate associations between muscle strength and pain sensitivity among healthy volunteers and associations between different pain sensitivity measures. Methods. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers (21 females) participated. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were obtained from 1) computer-controlled pressure algometry on the vastus lateralis and deltoid muscles and on the infrapatellar fat pad and 2) computerized cuff pressure algometry applied on the lower leg. Deep-tissue pain sensitivity (intensity and duration) was assessed by hypertonic saline injections into the vastus lateralis, deltoid, and infrapatellar fat pad. Quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength was assessed isometrically at 60-degree knee flexion using a dynamometer. Associations between pain sensitivity and muscle strength were investigated using multiple regressions including age, gender, and body mass index as covariates. Results. Knee extension strength was associated with computer-controlled PPT on the vastus lateralis muscle. Computer-controlled PPTs were significantly correlated between sites (r > 0.72) and with cuff PPT (r > 0.4). Saline induced pain intensity and duration were correlated between sites (r > 0.39) and with all PPTs (r < −0.41). Conclusions. Pressure pain thresholds at the vastus lateralis are positively associated with knee extensor muscle strength. Different pain sensitivity assessment methods are generally correlated. The cuff PPT and evoked infrapatellar pain seem to reflect the general pain sensitivity. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01351558. PMID:24167727

  4. Effect of Preactivation on Torque Enhancement by the Stretch-Shortening Cycle in Knee Extensors

    PubMed Central

    Fukutani, Atsuki; Misaki, Jun; Isaka, Tadao

    2016-01-01

    The stretch-shortening cycle is one of the most interesting topics in the field of sport sciences, because the performance of human movement is enhanced by the stretch-shortening cycle (eccentric contraction). The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the influence of preactivation on the torque enhancement by stretch-shortening cycle in knee extensors. Twelve men participated in this study. The following three conditions were conducted for knee extensors: (1) concentric contraction without preactivation (CON), (2) concentric contraction with eccentric preactivation (ECC), and (3) concentric contraction with isometric preactivation (ISO). Muscle contractions were evoked by electrical stimulation to discard the influence of neural activity. The range of motion of the knee joint was set from 80 to 140 degrees (full extension = 180 degrees). Angular velocities of the concentric and eccentric contractions were set at 180 and 90 degrees/s, respectively. In the concentric contraction phase, joint torques were recorded at 85, 95, and 105 degrees, and they were compared among the three conditions. In the early phase (85 degrees) of concentric contraction, the joint torque was larger in the ECC and ISO conditions than in the CON condition. However, these clear differences disappeared in the later phase (105 degrees) of concentric contraction. The results showed that joint torque was clearly different among the three conditions in the early phase whereas this difference disappeared in the later phase. Thus, preactivation, which is prominent in the early phase of contractions, plays an important role in torque enhancement by the stretch-shortening cycle in knee extensors. PMID:27414804

  5. Runner's Knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... Over the summer he bought a pair of running shoes and took up jogging. He started with ... bending the knee — when walking, kneeling, squatting, or running, for example. Walking or running downhill or even ...

  6. Knee arthroscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... is cartilage that cushions the space between the bones in the knee. Surgery is done to repair or remove it. Torn or damaged anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) or posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) Torn or damaged collateral ligament Swollen (inflamed) or ...

  7. Knee Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your knee joint is made up of bone, cartilage, ligaments and fluid. Muscles and tendons help the knee joint move. When any of these structures is hurt or diseased, you have knee problems. Knee problems can cause pain and difficulty ...

  8. Knee Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Schenck, Robert C.; Richter, Dustin L.; Wascher, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Traumatic knee dislocation is becoming more prevalent because of improved recognition and increased exposure to high-energy trauma, but long-term results are lacking. Purpose: To present 2 cases with minimum 20-year follow-up and a review of the literature to illustrate some of the fundamental principles in the management of the dislocated knee. Study Design: Review and case reports. Methods: Two patients with knee dislocations who underwent multiligamentous knee reconstruction were reviewed, with a minimum 20-year follow-up. These patients were brought back for a clinical evaluation using both subjective and objective measures. Subjective measures include the following scales: Lysholm, Tegner activity, visual analog scale (VAS), Short Form–36 (SF-36), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), and a psychosocial questionnaire. Objective measures included ligamentous examination, radiographic evaluation (including Telos stress radiographs), and physical therapy assessment of function and stability. Results: The mean follow-up was 22 years. One patient had a vascular injury requiring repair prior to ligament reconstruction. The average assessment scores were as follows: SF-36 physical health, 52; SF-36 mental health, 59; Lysholm, 92; IKDC, 86.5; VAS involved, 10.5 mm; and VAS uninvolved, 2.5 mm. Both patients had excellent stability and were functioning at high levels of activity for their age (eg, hiking, skydiving). Both patients had radiographic signs of arthritis, which lowered 1 subject’s IKDC score to “C.” Conclusion: Knee dislocations have rare long-term excellent results, and most intermediate-term studies show fair to good functional results. By following fundamental principles in the management of a dislocated knee, patients can be given the opportunity to function at high levels. Hopefully, continued advances in the evaluation and treatment of knee dislocations will improve the long-term outcomes for these patients in the

  9. The Adaptive Range of 1/f Isometric Force Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosnoff, Jacob J.; Valantine, Andrew D.; Newell, Karl M.

    2009-01-01

    The adaptive range of 1/f dynamics in isometric force output was investigated. Participants produced isometric force to targets with predictable demands (constant and sinusoidal) and 1/f noise waveforms (white, pink, brown, and black) that also varied in the frequency bandwidth represented in the force signal (0-4 Hz, 0-8 Hz, and 0-12 Hz). The…

  10. Isometric deformations of planar quadrilaterals with constant index

    SciTech Connect

    Zaputryaeva, E S

    2014-05-31

    We consider isometric deformations (motions) of polygons (so-called carpenter's rule problem) in the case of self-intersecting polygons with the additional condition that the index of the polygon is preserved by the motion. We provide general information about isometric deformations of planar polygons and give a complete solution of the carpenter's problem for quadrilaterals. Bibliography: 17 titles.

  11. How does knee pain affect trunk and knee motion during badminton forehand lunges?

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Hsing-Hsan; Lin, Cheng-Feng; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Liao, Jen-Chieh

    2014-01-01

    Badminton requires extensive lower extremity movement and a precise coordination of the upper extremity and trunk movements. Accordingly, this study investigated motions of the trunk and the knee, control of dynamic stability and muscle activation patterns of individuals with and without knee pain. Seventeen participants with chronic knee pain and 17 healthy participants participated in the study and performed forehand forward and backward diagonal lunges. This study showed that those with knee pain exhibited smaller knee motions in frontal and horizontal planes during forward lunge but greater knee motions in sagittal plane during backward lunge. By contrast, in both tasks, the injured group showed a smaller value on the activation level of the paraspinal muscles in pre-impact phase, hip-shoulder separation angle, trunk forward inclination range and peak centre of mass (COM) velocity. Badminton players with knee pain adopt a more conservative movement pattern of the knee to minimise recurrence of knee pain. The healthy group exhibit better weight-shifting ability due to a greater control of the trunk and knee muscles. Training programmes for badminton players with knee pain should be designed to improve both the neuromuscular control and muscle strength of the core muscles and the knee extensor with focus on the backward lunge motion. PMID:24404882

  12. Severe COPD Alters Muscle Fiber Conduction Velocity During Knee Extensors Fatiguing Contraction.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Gennaro; Coratella, Giuseppe; Dardanello, Davide; Rinaldo, Nicoletta; Lanza, Massimo; Schena, Federico; Rainoldi, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the changes in muscle fiber conduction velocity (CV), as a sign of fatigue during knee extensor contraction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as compared with healthy controls. Eleven male patients (5 with severe and 6 with moderate COPD; age 67 ± 5 years) and 11 age-matched healthy male controls (age 65 ± 4 years) volunteered for the study. CV was obtained by multichannel surface electromyography (EMG) from the vastus lateralis (VL) and medialis (VM) of the quadriceps muscle during isometric, 30-second duration knee extension at 70% of maximal voluntary contraction. The decline in CV in both the VL and VM was steeper in the severe COPD patients than in healthy controls (for VL: severe COPD vs. controls -0.45 ± 0.07%/s; p < 0.001, and for VM: severe COPD vs. controls -0.54 ± 0.09%/s, p < 0.001). No difference in CV decline was found between the moderate COPD patients and the healthy controls. These findings suggest that severe COPD may impair muscle functions, leading to greater muscular fatigue, as expressed by CV changes. The results may be due to a greater involvement of anaerobic metabolism and a shift towards fatigable type II fibers in the muscle composition of the severe COPD patients. PMID:27007486

  13. Improved Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Proposed orthotic knee joint improved version of one described in "Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint" (MFS-28633). Locks automatically upon initial application of radial force (wearer's weight) and unlocks automatically, but only when all loads (radial force and bending) relieved. Joints lock whenever wearer applies weight to knee at any joint angle between full extension and 45 degree bend. Both devices offer increased safety and convenience relative to conventional orthotic knee joints.

  14. KNEE-JOINT LOADING IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: INFLUENCE OF ABDOMINAL AND THIGH FAT

    PubMed Central

    Messier, Stephen P.; Beavers, Daniel P.; Loeser, Richard F.; Carr, J. Jeffery; Khajanchi, Shubham; Legault, Claudine; Nicklas, Barbara J.; Hunter, David J.; DeVita, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Using three separate models that included total body mass, total lean and total fat mass, and abdominal and thigh fat as independent measures, we determined their association with knee-joint loads in older overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Fat depots were quantified using computed tomography and total lean and fat mass determined with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry in 176 adults (age = 66.3 yr., BMI = 33.5 kg·m−2) with radiographic knee OA. Knee moments and joint bone-on-bone forces were calculated using gait analysis and musculoskeletal modeling. Results Higher total body mass was significantly associated (p ≤ 0.0001) with greater knee compressive and shear forces, compressive and shear impulses (p < 0.0001), patellofemoral forces (p< 0.006), and knee extensor moments (p = 0.003). Regression analysis with total lean and total fat mass as independent variables revealed significant positive associations of total fat mass with knee compressive (p = 0.0001), shear (p < 0.001), and patellofemoral forces (p = 0.01) and knee extension moment (p = 0.008). Gastrocnemius and quadriceps forces were positively associated with total fat mass. Total lean mass was associated with knee compressive force (p = 0.002). A regression model that included total thigh and total abdominal fat found both were significantly associated with knee compressive and shear forces (p ≤ 0.04). Thigh fat was associated with the knee abduction (p = 0.03) and knee extension moment (p = 0.02). Conclusions Thigh fat, consisting predominately of subcutaneous fat, had similar significant associations with knee joint forces as abdominal fat despite its much smaller volume and could be an important therapeutic target for people with knee OA. PMID:25133996

  15. [Jumper's knee].

    PubMed

    Hagner, W; Sosnowski, S; Kaziński, W; Frankowski, S

    1993-01-01

    A series of 30 athletes aged about 16 years on an average, exposed to activities putting a strain on the patellar tendon during training has been examined. They were involved in competitive sports for 3 years on an average. In 27 per cent of them jumpers knee symptoms have been found. PMID:7671664

  16. Neuromuscular dysfunction with the experimental arm acting as its own reference following eccentric and isometric exercise.

    PubMed

    Philippou, Anastassios; Bogdanis, Gregory C; Maridaki, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Eccentric exercise has been extensively used as a model to study muscle damage-induced neuromuscular impairment, adopting mainly a bilateral matching task between the reference (unexercised) arm and the indicator (exercised) arm. However, little attention has been given to the muscle proprioceptive function when the exercised arm acts as its own reference. This study investigated muscle proprioception and motor control, with the arm acting both as reference and indicator, following eccentric exercise and compared them with those observed after isometric exercise. Fourteen young male volunteers were equally divided into two groups and performed an eccentric or isometric exercise protocol with the elbow flexors of the non-dominant arm on an isokinetic dynamometer. Both exercise protocols induced significant changes in indicators of muscle damage, that is, muscle soreness, range of motion and maximal isometric force post-exercise (p < 0.05-0.001), and neuromuscular function was similarly affected following both protocols. Perception of force was impaired over the 4-day post-exercise period (p < 0.001), with the applied force being systematically overestimated. Perception of joint position was significantly disturbed (i.e., target angle was underestimated) only at one elbow angle on day 4 post-exercise (p < 0.05). The misjudgements and disturbed motor output observed when the exercised arm acted as its own reference concur with the view that they could be a result of a mismatch between the central motor command and an impaired motor control after muscle damage. PMID:20553224

  17. Elevations, Major Component Isometric, Propellant Flow Schematic, and External Tank ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevations, Major Component Isometric, Propellant Flow Schematic, and External Tank Connection to Shuttle Main Engines - Space Transportation System, Space Shuttle Main Engine, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  18. 45. Photographic reproduction of construction drawing: "Launch Control Facility, Isometric." ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. Photographic reproduction of construction drawing: "Launch Control Facility, Isometric." - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  19. 41. OPERATING CORRIDOR PLAN AND SECTIONS, INCLUDING SOME ISOMETRIC DETAILS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. OPERATING CORRIDOR PLAN AND SECTIONS, INCLUDING SOME ISOMETRIC DETAILS. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106455. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-P-60 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. Comparison of sympathetic nerve responses to neck and forearm isometric exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, S. L. Jr; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although the autonomic and cardiovascular responses to arm and leg exercise have been studied, the sympathetic adjustments to exercise of the neck have not. The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1) to determine sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric contractions of the neck extensors and 2) to compare sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric exercise of the neck and forearm. METHODS: Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate were measured in nine healthy subjects while performing isometric neck extension (INE) and isometric handgrip (IHG) in the prone position. After a 3-min baseline period, subjects performed three intensities of INE for 2.5 min each: 1) unloaded (supporting head alone), 2) 10% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and 3) 30% MVC, then subjects performed two intensities (10% and 30% MVC) of IHG for 2.5 min. RESULTS: Supporting the head by itself did not significantly change any of the variables. During [NE, MAP significantly increased by 10 +/- 2 and 31 +/- 4 mm Hg and MSNA increased by 67 +/- 46 and 168 +/- 36 units/30 s for 10% and 30% MVC, respectively. IHG and INE evoked similar responses at 10% MVC, but IHG elicited higher peak MAP and MSNA at 30% MVC (37 +/- 7 mm Hg (P < 0.05) and 300 +/- 48 units/30 s (P < 0.01) for IHG, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The data indicate that INE can elicit marked increases in MSNA and cardiovascular responses but that it evokes lower peak responses as compared to IHG. We speculate that possible differences in muscle fiber type composition, muscle mass, and/or muscle architecture of the neck and forearm are responsible for these differences in peak responses.

  1. Alignment Analyses in the Varus Osteoarthritic Knee Using Computer Navigation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kelvin G; Sathappan, Sathappan S; Teo, Yee Hong; Low, Wilson C J

    2015-06-01

    Osteoarthritic (OA) knees with severe extension varus deformity seem to have correspondingly more severe flexion varus, especially beyond a certain tibiofemoral angle. Clinical measurement of flexion varus and fixed flexion deformity (FFD), which had been difficult to perform because of the spatial alignment of the knee in flexion, was recently made possible with computer navigation. We conducted a study to evaluate the relationship of extension and flexion varus in OA knees and to determine whether severity of FFD in the sagittal plane correlates with severity of coronal plane varus deformity. The study included 317 consecutive cases of computer-navigated total knee arthroplasty performed on OA knees with varus deformities. Three sets of values were extracted from the navigation data: varus angle at maximal knee extension, 90° knee flexion, and maximal knee extension. Correlation analyses were performed for extension and flexion varus, FFD, and coronal plane deformity. OA knees with extension varus of more than 10° had an incremental likelihood of more severe flexion varus. When the extension varus angle exceeded 20°, probability became almost certainty. There was no correlation between FFD and coronal plane varus deformity. PMID:26046998

  2. Torque and mechanomyogram relationships during electrically-evoked isometric quadriceps contractions in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ibitoye, Morufu Olusola; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Hasnan, Nazirah; Abdul Wahab, Ahmad Khairi; Islam, Md Anamul; Kean, Victor S P; Davis, Glen M

    2016-08-01

    The interaction between muscle contractions and joint loading produces torques necessary for movements during activities of daily living. However, during neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES)-evoked contractions in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), a simple and reliable proxy of torque at the muscle level has been minimally investigated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between muscle mechanomyographic (MMG) characteristics and NMES-evoked isometric quadriceps torques in persons with motor complete SCI. Six SCI participants with lesion levels below C4 [(mean (SD) age, 39.2 (7.9) year; stature, 1.71 (0.05) m; and body mass, 69.3 (12.9) kg)] performed randomly ordered NMES-evoked isometric leg muscle contractions at 30°, 60° and 90° knee flexion angles on an isokinetic dynamometer. MMG signals were detected by an accelerometer-based vibromyographic sensor placed over the belly of rectus femoris muscle. The relationship between MMG root mean square (MMG-RMS) and NMES-evoked torque revealed a very high association (R(2)=0.91 at 30°; R(2)=0.98 at 60°; and R(2)=0.97 at 90° knee angles; P<0.001). MMG peak-to-peak (MMG-PTP) and stimulation intensity were less well related (R(2)=0.63 at 30°; R(2)=0.67 at 60°; and R(2)=0.45 at 90° knee angles), although were still significantly associated (P≤0.006). Test-retest interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for the dependent variables ranged from 0.82 to 0.97 for NMES-evoked torque, between 0.65 and 0.79 for MMG-RMS, and from 0.67 to 0.73 for MMG-PTP. Their standard error of measurements (SEM) ranged between 10.1% and 31.6% (of mean values) for torque, MMG-RMS and MMG-PTP. The MMG peak frequency (MMG-PF) of 30Hz approximated the stimulation frequency, indicating NMES-evoked motor unit firing rate. The results demonstrated knee angle differences in the MMG-RMS versus NMES-isometric torque relationship, but a similar torque related pattern for MMG-PF. These findings

  3. Knee joint replacement - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... than 3 blocks because of knee pain Loose knee prosthesis Some knee fractures ... an incision over the affected knee. The patella (knee cap) is moved ... helps the prosthesis to adhere better. The two parts of the ...

  4. Knee microfracture surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Cartilage regeneration - knee ... Three types of anesthesia may be used for knee arthroscopy surgery: Medicine to relax you, and shots of painkillers to numb the knee Spinal (regional) anesthesia General anesthesia (you will be ...

  5. Knee CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - knee; Computed axial tomography scan - knee; Computed tomography scan - knee ... Saunders; 2015:chap 93. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  6. Knee joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002974.htm Knee joint replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Knee joint replacement is a surgery to replace a knee ...

  7. Knee pain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... front of the knee can be due to bursitis, arthritis, or softening of the patella cartilage as ... knee. Overall knee pain can be due to bursitis, arthritis, tears in the ligaments, osteoarthritis of the ...

  8. Techniques for assessing knee joint pain in arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Volker; Han, Jeong S; Adwanikar, Hita; Fu, Yu; Ji, Guangchen

    2007-01-01

    The assessment of pain is of critical importance for mechanistic studies as well as for the validation of drug targets. This review will focus on knee joint pain associated with arthritis. Different animal models have been developed for the study of knee joint arthritis. Behavioral tests in animal models of knee joint arthritis typically measure knee joint pain rather indirectly. In recent years, however, progress has been made in the development of tests that actually evaluate the sensitivity of the knee joint in arthritis models. They include measurements of the knee extension angle struggle threshold, hind limb withdrawal reflex threshold of knee compression force, and vocalizations in response to stimulation of the knee. A discussion of pain assessment in humans with arthritis pain conditions concludes this review. PMID:17391515

  9. An improved OpenSim gait model with multiple degrees of freedom knee joint and knee ligaments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hang; Bloswick, Donald; Merryweather, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Musculoskeletal models are widely used to investigate joint kinematics and predict muscle force during gait. However, the knee is usually simplified as a one degree of freedom joint and knee ligaments are neglected. The aim of this study was to develop an OpenSim gait model with enhanced knee structures. The knee joint in this study included three rotations and three translations. The three knee rotations and mediolateral translation were independent, with proximodistal and anteroposterior translations occurring as a function of knee flexion/extension. Ten elastic elements described the geometrical and mechanical properties of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PCL), and the medial and lateral collateral ligaments (MCL and LCL). The three independent knee rotations were evaluated using OpenSim to observe ligament function. The results showed that the anterior and posterior bundles of ACL and PCL (aACL, pACL and aPCL, pPCL) intersected during knee flexion. The aACL and pACL mainly provided force during knee flexion and adduction, respectively. The aPCL was slack throughout the range of three knee rotations; however, the pPCL was utilised for knee abduction and internal rotation. The LCL was employed for knee adduction and rotation, but was slack beyond 20° of knee flexion. The MCL bundles were mainly used during knee adduction and external rotation. All these results suggest that the functions of knee ligaments in this model approximated the behaviour of the physical knee and the enhanced knee structures can improve the ability to investigate knee joint biomechanics during various gait activities. PMID:24611807

  10. Gait Using Pneumatic Brace for End-Stage Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Cherian, Jeffrey Jai; Starr, Roland; Chughtai, Morad; Mont, Michael A; Harwin, Steven F; Bhave, Anil

    2016-04-01

    More than 20 million individuals in the United States are affected by knee osteoarthritis (OA), which can lead to altered biomechanics and excessive joint loading. The use of an unloader pneumatic brace with extension assist has been proposed as a nonoperative treatment modality that may improve gait mechanics and correct knee malalignment. We assessed the following parameters in patients who have knee OA treated with and without a brace: (1) changes in temporospatial parameters in gait; (2) knee range of motion, knee extension at heel strike, and foot placement; (3) knee joint moments and impulse; and (4) changes in dynamic stiffness and rate of change of knee flexion during midstance to terminal stance. This 2:1 prospective, randomized, single-blinded trial evaluated 36 patients (24 brace and 12 matching). OA knee patients were randomized to receive either a pneumatic unloader brace or a standard nonoperative treatment regimen as the matching cohort for a 3-month period. They underwent evaluation of gait parameters using a three-dimensional gait analysis system at their initial appointment and at 3 months follow-up. All the testing, pre- and postbracing were performed without wearing the brace to examine for retained effects. Treatment with the brace led to significant improvements versus standard treatment in various gait parameters. Patients in the brace group had improvements in walking speed, knee extension at heel strike, total range of motion, knee joint forces, and rate of knee flexion from midstance to terminal stance when compared with the matching cohort. Knee OA patients who used a pneumatic unloader brace for 3 months for at least 3 hours per day had significant improvements various gait parameters when compared with a standard nonoperative therapy cohort. Braced patients demonstrated gait-modifying affects when not wearing the brace. These results are encouraging and suggest that this device represents a promising treatment modality for knee OA that

  11. Examination of knee joint moments on the function of knee-ankle-foot orthoses during walking.

    PubMed

    Andrysek, Jan; Klejman, Susan; Kooy, John

    2013-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate clinically relevant biomechanical conditions relating to the setup and alignment of knee-ankle-foot orthoses and the influence of these conditions on knee extension moments and orthotic stance control during gait. Knee moments were collected using an instrumented gait laboratory and concurrently a load transducer embedded at the knee-ankle-foot orthosis knee joint of four individuals with poliomyelitis. We found that knee extension moments were not typically produced in late stance-phase of gait. Adding a dorsiflexion stop at the orthotic ankle significantly decreased the knee flexion moments in late stance-phase, while slightly flexing the knee in stance-phase had a variable effect. The findings suggest that where users of orthoses have problems initiating swing-phase flexion with stance control orthoses, an ankle dorsiflexion stop may be used to enhance function. Furthermore, the use of stance control knee joints that lock while under flexion may contribute to more inconsistent unlocking of the stance control orthosis during gait. PMID:23182738

  12. Arthroscopic knee debridement can delay total knee replacement in painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos; Gomez-Cardero, Primitivo

    2016-09-01

    The role of arthroscopic debridement of the knee in haemophilia is controversial in the literature. The purpose of this study is to describe the results of arthroscopic knee debridement (AKD), with the aim of determining whether it is possible to delay total knee replacement (TKR) for painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients. In a 14-year period (1998-2011), AKD was performed for moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in 27 patients with haemophilia A. Their average age at operation was 28.6 years (range 26-39 years). Indications for surgery were as follows: more than 90° of knee flexion, flexion deformity less than 30°, good axial alignment of the knee, good patellar alignment, and pain above >60 points in a visual analogue scale [0 (no pain) to 100 points]. Secondary haematological prophylaxis and rehabilitation (physiotherapy) was given for at least 3 months after surgery. Follow-up was for an average of 7.5 years (range 2-14 years). We assessed the clinical outcome before surgery and at the time of latest follow-up using the Knee Society pain and function scores, the range of motion, and the radiological score of the World Federation of Haemophilia. Knee Society pain scores improved from 39 preoperatively to 66 postoperatively, and function scores improved from 36 to 52. Range of motion improved on an average from -15° of extension and 90° of flexion before surgery, to -5° of extension and 110° of flexion at the last follow-up. A radiological deterioration of 2.8 points on average was found. There were two (7.4%) postoperative complications (haemarthroses resolved by joint aspiration). One patient (3.7%) required a TKR 12.5 years later. AKD should be considered in painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients to delay TKR. PMID:26575489

  13. Electromyographic Responses from the Vastus Medialis during Isometric Muscle Actions.

    PubMed

    Smith, C M; Housh, T J; Herda, T; Zuniga, J M; Camic, C L; Bergstrom, H C; Smith, D B; Weir, J P; Cramer, J T; Hill, E C; Cochrane, K C; Jenkins, N D M; Schmidt, R J; Johnson, G

    2016-07-01

    This study examined the electromyographic (EMG) responses from the vastus medialis (VM) for electrodes placed over and away from the innervation zone (IZ) during a maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) and sustained, submaximal isometric muscle action. A linear electrode array was placed on the VM to identify the IZ and muscle fiber pennation angle during an MVIC and sustained isometric muscle action at 50% MVIC. EMG amplitude and frequency parameters were determined from 7 bipolar channels of the electrode array, including over the IZ, as well as 10 mm, 20 mm and 30 mm proximal and distal to the IZ. There were no differences between the channels for the patterns of responses for EMG amplitude or mean power frequency during the sustained, submaximal isometric muscle action; however, there were differences between channels during the MVIC. The results of the present study supported the need to standardize the placement of electrodes on the VM for the assessment of EMG amplitude and mean power frequency. Based on the current findings, it is recommended that electrode placements be distal to the IZ and aligned with the muscle fiber pennation angle during MVICs, as well as sustained, submaximal isometric muscle actions. PMID:27176892

  14. Minimally Invasive Total Knee Arthroplasty Improves Early Knee Strength but Not Functional Performance: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E.; Bade, Michael J.; Shulman, Benjamin C.; Kohrt, Wendy M.; Dayton, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    A prospective, randomized investigation compared early clinical outcomes of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using conventional (CONTROL) or minimally invasive surgical (MIS) approaches (n=44). Outcome measures included isometric quadriceps and hamstrings strength, quadriceps activation, functional performance, knee pain, active knee range of motion (AROM), muscle mass, the SF-36, and WOMAC, assessed preoperatively and 4 and 12 weeks after TKA. Four weeks after TKA, the MIS group had greater hamstring strength (p=0.02) and quadriceps strength (p=0.07), which did not translate to differences in other outcomes. At 12 weeks, there were no clinically meaningful differences between groups on any measure. Although MIS may lead to faster recovery of strength in patients undergoing TKA, there was no benefit on longer-term recovery of strength or functional performance. PMID:22459124

  15. Remarks on Muscle Contraction Mechanism II. Isometric Tension Transient and Isotonic Velocity Transient

    PubMed Central

    Mitsui, Toshio; Takai, Nobukatsu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Mitsui and Ohshima (2008) criticized the power-stroke model for muscle contraction and proposed a new model. In the new model, about 41% of the myosin heads are bound to actin filaments, and each bound head forms a complex MA3 with three actin molecules A1, A2 and A3 forming the crossbridge. The complex translates along the actin filament cooperating with each other. The new model well explained the experimental data on the steady filament sliding. As an extension of the study, the isometric tension transient and isotonic velocity transient are investigated. Statistical ensemble of crossbridges is introduced, and variation of the binding probability of myosin head to A1 is considered. When the binding probability to A1 is zero, the Hill-type force-velocity relation is resulted in. When the binding probability to A1 becomes finite, the deviation from the Hill-type force-velocity relation takes place, as observed by Edman (1988). The characteristics of the isometric tension transient observed by Ford, Huxley and Simmons (1977) and of the isotonic velocity transient observed by Civan and Podolsky (1966) are theoretically reproduced. Ratios of the extensibility are estimated as 0.22 for the crossbridge, 0.26 for the myosin filament and 0.52 for the actin filament, in consistency with the values determined by X-ray diffraction by Wakabayashi et al. (1994). PMID:21673917

  16. Time Course of Central and Peripheral Alterations after Isometric Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation-Induced Muscle Damage

    PubMed Central

    Fouré, Alexandre; Nosaka, Kazunori; Wegrzyk, Jennifer; Duhamel, Guillaume; Le Troter, Arnaud; Boudinet, Hélène; Mattei, Jean-Pierre; Vilmen, Christophe; Jubeau, Marc; Bendahan, David; Gondin, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Isometric contractions induced by neuromuscular electrostimulation (NMES) have been shown to result in a prolonged force decrease but the time course of the potential central and peripheral factors have never been investigated. This study examined the specific time course of central and peripheral factors after isometric NMES-induced muscle damage. Twenty-five young healthy men were subjected to an NMES exercise consisting of 40 contractions for both legs. Changes in maximal voluntary contraction force of the knee extensors (MVC), peak evoked force during double stimulations at 10 Hz (Db10) and 100 Hz (Db100), its ratio (10∶100), voluntary activation, muscle soreness and plasma creatine kinase activity were assessed before, immediately after and throughout four days after NMES session. Changes in knee extensors volume and T2 relaxation time were also assessed at two (D2) and four (D4) days post-exercise. MVC decreased by 29% immediately after NMES session and was still 19% lower than the baseline value at D4. The decrease in Db10 was higher than in Db100 immediately and one day post-exercise resulting in a decrease (−12%) in the 10∶100 ratio. On the contrary, voluntary activation significantly decreased at D2 (−5%) and was still depressed at D4 (−5%). Muscle soreness and plasma creatine kinase activity increased after NMES and peaked at D2 and D4, respectively. T2 was also increased at D2 (6%) and D4 (9%). Additionally, changes in MVC and peripheral factors (e.g., Db100) were correlated on the full recovery period, while a significant correlation was found between changes in MVC and VA only from D2 to D4. The decrease in MVC recorded immediately after the NMES session was mainly due to peripheral changes while both central and peripheral contributions were involved in the prolonged force reduction. Interestingly, the chronological events differ from what has been reported so far for voluntary exercise-induced muscle damage. PMID:25215511

  17. Soft tissue balancing in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    MELONI, MARIA CHIARA; HOEDEMAEKER, RUSSALKA W.; VIOLANTE, BRUNO; MAZZOLA, CLAUDIO

    2014-01-01

    A good outcome in total knee arthroplasty depends on many factors: joint alignment, range of motion, patellar tracking and ligament stability. A correct soft tissue balance keeps the joint aligned in flexion and extension, and therefore constitutes the most important factor for durability of the implant. Indeed, incorrect soft tissue balancing is the primary cause of early implant failure necessitating revision surgery. Soft tissue releases, serving to correct imbalances, are performed until the flexion and extension gaps appear symmetrical and balanced. A knee is considered perfectly balanced when the flexion and extension gaps are perfectly rectangular and all the measurements are absolutely equal. PMID:25606540

  18. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey, PHOTOCOPY OF ISOMETRIC PORTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey, PHOTOCOPY OF ISOMETRIC PORTION OF J.M. WHITAKER'S SURVEY OF THE LIPPITT MILL, SHEET NO. 15912 DATED MARCH 22, 1913. Blue line ozalid print in the collection of the Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, Museum of History and Technology, the Smithsonian Institution. - Lippitt Mill, 825 Main Street, West Warwick, Kent County, RI

  19. Probing disorder in isometric pyrochlore and related complex oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamblin, Jacob; Feygenson, Mikhail; Neuefeind, Joerg; Tracy, Cameron L.; Zhang, Fuxiang; Finkeldei, Sarah; Bosbach, Dirk; Zhou, Haidong; Ewing, Rodney C.; Lang, Maik

    2016-05-01

    There has been an increased focus on understanding the energetics of structures with unconventional ordering (for example, correlated disorder that is heterogeneous across different length scales). In particular, compounds with the isometric pyrochlore structure, A2B2O7, can adopt a disordered, isometric fluorite-type structure, (A, B)4O7, under extreme conditions. Despite the importance of the disordering process there exists only a limited understanding of the role of local ordering on the energy landscape. We have used neutron total scattering to show that disordered fluorite (induced intrinsically by composition/stoichiometry or at far-from-equilibrium conditions produced by high-energy radiation) consists of a local orthorhombic structural unit that is repeated by a pseudo-translational symmetry, such that orthorhombic and isometric arrays coexist at different length scales. We also show that inversion in isometric spinel occurs by a similar process. This insight provides a new basis for understanding order-to-disorder transformations important for applications such as plutonium immobilization, fast ion conduction, and thermal barrier coatings.

  20. Near Isometric Biomass Partitioning in Forest Ecosystems of China

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Dafeng; Wang, Jun; Shen, Weijun; Le, Xuan; Ganter, Philip; Ren, Hai

    2014-01-01

    Based on the isometric hypothesis, belowground plant biomass (MB) should scale isometrically with aboveground biomass (MA) and the scaling exponent should not vary with environmental factors. We tested this hypothesis using a large forest biomass database collected in China. Allometric scaling functions relating MB and MA were developed for the entire database and for different groups based on tree age, diameter at breast height, height, latitude, longitude or elevation. To investigate whether the scaling exponent is independent of these biotic and abiotic factors, we analyzed the relationship between the scaling exponent and these factors. Overall MB was significantly related to MA with a scaling exponent of 0.964. The scaling exponent of the allometric function did not vary with tree age, density, latitude, or longitude, but varied with diameter at breast height, height, and elevation. The mean of the scaling exponent over all groups was 0.986. Among 57 scaling relationships developed, 26 of the scaling exponents were not significantly different from 1. Our results generally support the isometric hypothesis. MB scaled near isometrically with MA and the scaling exponent did not vary with tree age, density, latitude, or longitude, but increased with tree size and elevation. While fitting a single allometric scaling relationship may be adequate, the estimation of MB from MA could be improved with size-specific scaling relationships. PMID:24466149

  1. Strength and isometric torque control in individuals with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marcio Alves; de Oliveira, Marcio Alves; Rodrigues, Ana Melissa; Caballero, Raphael Maciel Silva; da Silva Caballero, Raphael Maciel; Petersen, Ricardo Demetrio; de Souza Petersen, Ricardo Demetrio; Shim, Jae Kun

    2008-01-01

    It has been previously reported that patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) struggle with fine adjustments of finger forces while manipulating an object. However, impairments in everyday activities can not only be attributed to difficulties with the linear forces applied on an object, but also to the application of rotational forces (torque). This study examined finger strength and isometric torque control in elderly persons with PD. Six individuals with PD (66.1 +/- 0.7 years), six elderly healthy controls (65.3 +/- 0.2 years) matched by age, gender and handedness, and six young adults (22.3 +/- 0.2 years) participated in this study. The subjects were asked to perform two tasks: maximum voluntary thumb-index pinching torque production (MVT) and constant isometric thumb-index torque control at 40% of their MVT for 20 s. The results showed decreased strength and increased difficulty in isometric torque control in individuals with PD as compared to their healthy peers. This study demonstrates that PD affects isometric finger torque production and control. PMID:18030452

  2. Make No Bones about It: Long Bones Scale Isometrically.

    PubMed

    Sedwick, Caitlin

    2015-08-01

    Long bones are far from being simple cylinders, so how is the relative positioning of their various features maintained during growth? A new study shows that growth is isometric and that drift from the correct position is minimized. Read the Research Article. PMID:26241695

  3. Probing disorder in isometric pyrochlore and related complex oxides.

    PubMed

    Shamblin, Jacob; Feygenson, Mikhail; Neuefeind, Joerg; Tracy, Cameron L; Zhang, Fuxiang; Finkeldei, Sarah; Bosbach, Dirk; Zhou, Haidong; Ewing, Rodney C; Lang, Maik

    2016-05-01

    There has been an increased focus on understanding the energetics of structures with unconventional ordering (for example, correlated disorder that is heterogeneous across different length scales). In particular, compounds with the isometric pyrochlore structure, A2B2O7, can adopt a disordered, isometric fluorite-type structure, (A, B)4O7, under extreme conditions. Despite the importance of the disordering process there exists only a limited understanding of the role of local ordering on the energy landscape. We have used neutron total scattering to show that disordered fluorite (induced intrinsically by composition/stoichiometry or at far-from-equilibrium conditions produced by high-energy radiation) consists of a local orthorhombic structural unit that is repeated by a pseudo-translational symmetry, such that orthorhombic and isometric arrays coexist at different length scales. We also show that inversion in isometric spinel occurs by a similar process. This insight provides a new basis for understanding order-to-disorder transformations important for applications such as plutonium immobilization, fast ion conduction, and thermal barrier coatings. PMID:26928636

  4. 32. ISOMETRIC VIEW OF PIPING PLAN, SHOWING PATH OF CONDUIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. ISOMETRIC VIEW OF PIPING PLAN, SHOWING PATH OF CONDUIT FROM CONTROL BUNKER TO SHIELDING TANK. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-701-P-1. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0701 60 851 151977. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Mid-term outcomes of primary constrained condylar knee arthroplasty for severe knee deformity.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiao-Bo; Yang, Cao; Fu, De-Hao; Ye, Shu-Nan; Liu, Xian-Zhe; Chen, Zhe; Rai, Saroj; Yang, Shu-Hua

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to examine the clinical and radiographic outcomes of primary total knee arthroplasy (TKA) with use of NexGen® Legacy® Constrained Condylar Knee (CCK) prosthesis for severe knee deformity. Clinical data of 46 patients (48 knees in total, aged 61 years on average) with severe knee deformity who underwent TKA with NexGen® Legacy® CCK prosthesis between December 2007 and February 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. There were 34 knees with severe valgus with incompetent medial collateral ligament, 11 knees with severe flexion contracture with inability to achieve knee balancing in flexion and extension by posterior soft tissue release, 2 knees with Charcot arthritis with severe varus and bone loss, and 1 with traumatic osteoarthritis with severe varus and ligamentous instability. The mean duration of follow-up was 71 months (range 40-90 months). The New Knee Society scoring (NKSS) system and the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) score were used to evaluate the functional and clinical outcomes. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was used for pain measurement and Knee Society criteria for evaluation of radiological images. The results showed that, in the total 48 knees, 1 case of loosening due to short-stem tibial component at 3 months post-operatively underwent revision. The 6-year prosthesis survival rate in this cohort was 97.9%. There was no component infection occurring within 6 years. Significant post-operative improvements were found in NKSS and HSS scores. Patient satisfaction was significantly increased. Pain score was decreased significantly. Total functional score was improved from 31.46±11.43 to 86.42±8.87, range of motion (ROM) from 42.42°±23.57° to 95.31°±23.45° and the flexion contracture from 5.31°±7.87° to 0.92°±1.80°. Preoperative radiographic study showed excessive valgus (≥7°) in 37 knees, and varus deformity in 3 knees. Post-operative femorotibial alignment was valgus 3.88°±1.76° in 48 knees. Antero/posterior (A

  6. Relationship between Isometric Strength of Six Lower Limb Muscle Groups and Motor Skills among Nursing Home Residents.

    PubMed

    Buckinx, F; Croisier, J L; Reginster, J Y; Petermans, J; Goffart, E; Bruyère, O

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to assess the correlation between isometric muscle strength of the lower limb and motor skills. This is a cross sectional study performed among volunteer nursing home residents included in the SENIOR (Sample of Elderly Nursing home Individuals: an Observational Research) cohort. The present analysis focused on isometric muscle strength of 6 lower limb muscle groups (i.e. knee extensors, knee flexors, hip abductors, hip extensors, ankle flexors and ankle extensors), assessed using a validated hand-held dynamometer (i.e. the MicroFET2 device), and motor skills evaluated using the Tinetti test, the Timed Up and Go test, the Short Physical Performance Battery test (SPPB) and the walking speed. The relationship between all these parameters was tested by means of a multiple correlation, adjusted on age, sex and body mass index. 450 nursing home residents (69.8% of women) with a mean age of 83.1±9.4 years were included in this study. Our results showed a significant inverse correlation between lower limb muscle strength and the time required to perform the TUG test or gait speed, except for ankle flexors and ankle extensors. The relationship between the Tinetti test or the SPPB score, and lower limb muscle strength was significant, except for ankle flexors and ankle extensors. In conclusion, a positive association between lower limb muscle strength of the four main muscle groups and motor skills of the elderly nursing residents was found in this research. Therefore, special attention should be given to these muscle groups during rehabilitation programs. PMID:27031016

  7. Shear Modulus Estimation on Vastus Intermedius of Elderly and Young Females over the Entire Range of Isometric Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cong-Zhi; Li, Tian-Jie; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Elderly people often suffer from sarcopenia in their lower extremities, which gives rise to the increased susceptibility of fall. Comparing the mechanical properties of the knee extensor/flexors on elderly and young subjects is helpful in understanding the underlying mechanisms of the muscle aging process. However, although the stiffness of skeletal muscle has been proved to be positively correlated to its non-fatiguing contraction intensity by some existing methods, this conclusion has not been verified above 50% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) due to the limitation of their measurement range. In this study, a vibro-ultrasound system was set up to achieve a considerably larger measurement range on muscle stiffness estimation. Its feasibility was verified on self-made silicone phantoms by comparing with the mechanical indentation method. The system was then used to assess the stiffness of vastus intermedius (VI), one of the knee extensors, on 10 healthy elderly female subjects (56.7±4.9 yr) and 10 healthy young female subjects (27.6±5.0 yr). The VI stiffness in its action direction was confirmed to be positively correlated to the % MVC level (R2 = 0.999) over the entire range of isometric contraction, i.e. from 0% MVC (relaxed state) to 100% MVC. Furthermore, it was shown that there was no significant difference between the mean VI shear modulus of the elderly and young subjects in a relaxed state (p>0.1). However, when performing step isometric contraction, the VI stiffness of young female subjects was found to be larger than that of elderly participants (p<0.001), especially at the relatively higher contraction levels. The results expanded our knowledge on the mechanical property of the elderly’s skeletal muscle and its relationship with intensity of active contraction. Furthermore, the vibro-ultrasound system has a potential to become a powerful tool for investigating the elderly’s muscle diseases. PMID:24991890

  8. Surgical approaches for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul; Demesugh, Daniel Mue; Agarwal, Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    There are various surgical approaches to the knee joint and its surrounding structures and such approaches are generally designed to allow the best access to an area of pathology whilst safeguarding important surrounding structures. Controversy currently surrounds the optimal surgical approach for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The medial parapatellar arthrotomy, or anteromedial approach, has been the most used and has been regarded as the standard approach for exposure of the knee joint. It provides extensive exposure and is useful for open anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, total knee replacement, and fixation of intra-articular fractures. Because this approach has been implicated in compromise of the patellar circulation, some authors have advocated the subvastus, midvastus, and trivector approaches for exposure of the knee joint. While these approaches expose the knee from the medial side, the anterolateral approach exposes the knee joint from the lateral side. With careful planning and arthrotomy selection, the anterior aspect of the joint can be adequately exposed for TKA in different clinical scenarios. PMID:27182142

  9. Attenuation of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage conferred by maximal isometric contractions: a mini review

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Leonardo C. R.; Denadai, Benedito S.

    2015-01-01

    Although, beneficial in determined contexts, eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) might be unwanted during training regimens, competitions and daily activities. There are a vast number of studies investigating strategies to attenuate EIMD response after damaging exercise bouts. Many of them consist of performing exercises that induce EIMD, consuming supplements or using equipment that are not accessible for most people. It appears that performing maximal isometric contractions (ISOs) 2–4 days prior to damaging bouts promotes significant attenuation of EIMD symptoms that are not related to muscle function. It has been shown that the volume of ISOs, muscle length in which they are performed, and interval between them and the damaging bout influence the magnitude of this protection. In addition, it appears that this protection is not long-lived, lasting no longer than 4 days. Although no particular mechanisms for these adaptations were identified, professionals should consider applying this non-damaging stimulus before submitting their patients to unaccustomed exercised. However, it seems not to be the best option for athletes or relatively trained individuals. Future, studies should focus on establishing if ISOs protect other populations (i.e., trained individuals) or muscle groups (i.e., knee extensors) against EIMD, as well as investigate different mechanisms for ISO-induced protection. PMID:26578972

  10. Insulin and glucose responses during bed rest with isotonic and isometric exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolkas, C. B.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of daily intensive isotonic (68% maximum oxygen uptake) and isometric (21% maximum extension force) leg exercise on plasma insulin and glucose responses to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) during 14-day bed-rest (BR) periods were investigated in seven young healthy men. The OGTT was given during ambulatory control and on day 10 of the no-exercise, isotonic, and isometric exercise BR periods during the 15-wk study. The subjects were placed on a controlled diet starting 10 days before each BR period. During BR, basal plasma glucose concentration remained unchanged with no exercise, but increased (P less 0.05) to 87-89 mg/100 ml with both exercise regimens on day 2, and then fell slightly below control levels on day 13. The fall in glucose content during BR was independent of the exercise regimen and was an adjustment for the loss of plasma volume. The intensity of the responses of insulin and glucose to the OGTT was inversely proportional to the total daily energy expenditure during BR. It was estimated that at least 1020 kcal/day must be provided by supplemental exercise to restore the hyperinsulinemia to control levels.

  11. Abdominal muscle activity according to knee joint angle during sit-to-stand

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Juri; Rhee, Min-Hyung; Kim, Laurentius Jongsoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study assessed the activity of the abdominal muscles according to the angle of the knee joints during sit-to-stand. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy adult males participated in this study. Subjects initiated sit-to-stand at knee joint angles of 60°, 90°, or 120°. An electromyography system was used to measure the maximum voluntary isometric contraction of the rectus abdominis, external oblique, and internal oblique and transverse abdominis muscles. [Results] Percent contraction differed significantly among the three knee joint angles, most notably for the internal oblique and transverse abdominis muscles. [Conclusion] Wider knee joint angles more effectively activate the abdominal muscles, especially those in the deep abdomen, than do narrower angles. PMID:27390431

  12. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. Method: We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance images to reconstruct solid bones and attachments of ligaments, and assemble femoral and tibial components according representative literatures and operational specifications. Dynamic data of axial tibial rotation and femoral translation from full-extension to 135 were measured for analyzing the motion of knee models. Findings: The computational simulation results show that comparing with the posterior cruciate ligament retained knee model and the posterior cruciate ligament substituted knee model, reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament improves the posterior movement of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation through a full range of flexion. The maximum posterior translations of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee are 15.3 mm, 4.6 mm and 20.6 at 135 of flexion. Interpretation: Reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty has been approved to be an more efficient way of maintaining normal knee kinematics comparing to posterior cruciate ligament retained and posterior cruciate ligament substituted total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27347334

  13. Knee arthroscopy - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100117.htm Knee arthroscopy - series To use the sharing features on ... 5 out of 5 Normal anatomy Overview The knee is a complex joint made up of the ...

  14. Knee braces - unloading

    MedlinePlus

    ... most people talk about the arthritis in their knees, they are referring to a type of arthritis ... is caused by wear and tear inside your knee joints. Cartilage, the firm, rubbery tissue that cushions ...

  15. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series To use the sharing features on ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  16. Osteotomy of the knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... is not affected unless you have had a knee injury in the past. Osteotomy surgery works by shifting ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Arthritis Knee Injuries and Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  17. Knee joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    The results of a total knee replacement are often excellent. The operation relieves pain for most people. Most people do not need help walking after they fully recover. Most artificial knee joints last 10 ...

  18. Partial knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    Most people recover quickly and have much less pain than they did before surgery. People who have a partial knee replacement recover faster than those who have a total knee replacement. Many people are able to walk ...

  19. Knee joint replacement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100088.htm Knee joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... of 4 Overview The knee is a complex joint. It contains the distal end of the femur ( ...

  20. The influence of joint line position on knee stability after condylar knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Martin, J W; Whiteside, L A

    1990-10-01

    Using a special knee-testing device, ten knees obtained at autopsy were subjected to varus-valgus, anterior-posterior, and flexion-rotation analysis in the intact state and after total knee arthroplasty. The ten knees showed no significant change in stability after knee replacement when the joint line was maintained in its natural position. When the femoral component was repositioned 5 mm proximally and 5 mm anteriorly, a significant increase in laxity occurred during midflexion. When the joint line was shifted 5 mm distal and 5 mm posterior to its anatomic location, significant tightening occurred in midrange of motion. Coupled rotation of the tibia with knee flexion was decreased after surgery in all knees with no specific relationship to joint line position. Coupled rotation with varus-valgus testing, however, remained within the normal range through the first 30 degrees of flexion only when the joint line was restored to its normal anatomic position. Stability in condylar knee arthroplasty is in part dependent on position of the joint line. Surgical techniques that rely on restoring the flexion and extension gap without regard to joint line position may result in alteration of varus-valgus or anterior-posterior displacement in midrange flexion. PMID:2208849

  1. Computational Poromechanics of Human Knee Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Mojtaba; Li, LePing

    2012-02-01

    Extensive computer modeling has been performed in the recent decade to investigate the mechanical response of the healthy and repaired knee joints. Articular cartilages and menisci have been commonly modeled as single-phase elastic materials in the previous 3D simulations. A comprehensive study considering the interplay of the collagen fibers and fluid pressurization in the tissues in situ remains challenging. We have developed a 3D model of the human knee accounting for the mechanical function of collagen fibers and fluid flow in the cartilages and menisci. An anatomically accurate structure of the human knee was used for this purpose including bones, articular cartilages, menisci and ligaments. The fluid pressurization in the femoral cartilage and menisci under combined creep loading was investigated. Numerical results showed that fluid flow and pressure in the tissues played an important role in the mechanical response of the knee joint. The load transfer in the joint was clearly seen when the fluid pressure was considered.

  2. Variable stiffness actuated prosthetic knee to restore knee buckling during stance: a modeling study.

    PubMed

    Wentink, E C; Koopman, H F J M; Stramigioli, S; Rietman, J S; Veltink, P H

    2013-06-01

    Most modern intelligent knee prosthesis use dampers to modulate dynamic behavior and prevent excessive knee flexion, but they dissipate energy and do not assist in knee extension. Energy efficient variable stiffness control (VSA) can reduce the energy consumption yet effectively modulate the dynamic behavior and use stored energy during flexion to assist in subsequent extension. A principle design of energy efficient VSA in a prosthetic knee is proposed and analyzed for the specific case of rejection of a disturbed stance phase. The concept is based on the principle that the output stiffness of a spring can be changed without changing the energy stored in the elastic elements of the spring. The usability of this concept to control a prosthetic knee is evaluated using a model. Part of the stance phase of the human leg was modeled by a double pendulum. Specifically the rejection of a common disturbance of transfemoral prosthetic gait, an unlocked knee at heel strike, was evaluated. The ranges of spring stiffnesses were determined such that the angular characteristics of a normal stance phase were preserved, but disturbances could also be rejected. The simulations predicted that energy efficient VSA can be useful for the control of prosthetic knees. PMID:23000012

  3. Timeframe for return to driving for patients with minimally invasive knee arthroplasty is associated with knee performance on functional tests

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study hopes to establish the timeframe for a safe return to driving under different speed conditions for patients after minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty and further explores how well various kinds of functional tests on knee performance can predict the patients’ braking ability. Methods 14 patients with right knee osteoarthritis were included in the present study and instructed to perform three simulated driving tasks at preoperative, 2 weeks postoperative and 4 weeks postoperative. Results The results showed that the total braking time at 4 week postoperative has attained the preoperative level at the driving speed 50 and 70 km/hr but not at the driving speed 90 km/hr. It had significantly improving in knee reaction time and maximum isometric force at 4 weeks postoperative. Besides, there was a moderate to high correlation between the scores of the step counts and the total braking time. Conclusions Summary, it is recommended that driving may be resumed 4 weeks after a right knee replacement but had to drive at low or moderate speed and the best predictor of safety driving is step counts. PMID:24913312

  4. Reduced Maximal Force during Acute Anterior Knee Pain Is Associated with Deficits in Voluntary Muscle Activation

    PubMed Central

    Salomoni, Sauro; Tucker, Kylie; Hug, François; McPhee, Megan; Hodges, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Although maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force is reduced during pain, studies using interpolated twitch show no consistent reduction of voluntary muscle drive. The present study aimed to test if the reduction in MVC force during acute experimental pain could be explained by increased activation of antagonist muscles, weak voluntary activation at baseline, or changes in force direction. Twenty-two healthy volunteers performed maximal voluntary isometric knee extensions before, during, and after the effects of hypertonic (pain) and isotonic (control) saline injections into the infrapatellar fat pad. The MVC force, voluntary activation, electromyographic (EMG) activity of agonist, antagonist, and auxiliary (hip) muscles, and pain cognition and anxiety scores were recorded. MVC force was 9.3% lower during pain than baseline (p < 0.001), but there was no systematic change in voluntary activation. Reduced MVC force during pain was variable between participants (SD: 14%), and was correlated with reduced voluntary activation (r = 0.90), baseline voluntary activation (r = − 0.62), and reduced EMG amplitude of agonist and antagonist muscles (all r > 0.52), but not with changes in force direction, pain or anxiety scores. Hence, reduced MVC force during acute pain was mainly explained by deficits in maximal voluntary drive. PMID:27559737

  5. Knee braces - unloading

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by wear and tear inside your knee joints. Cartilage, the firm, rubbery tissue that cushions all of your bones and joints, lets the bones glide over one another. If ... the knee become weaker. Over time, your whole knee becomes ...

  6. 15. "GENERAL, INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL SYSTEMS, ISOMETRIC." Test Area 1120. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. "GENERAL, INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL SYSTEMS, ISOMETRIC." Test Area 1-120. Specifications No. ENG04-353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 6 of 148; file no. 1320/57. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. Exoskeletal chitin scales isometrically with body size in terrestrial insects.

    PubMed

    Lease, Hilary M; Wolf, Blair O

    2010-06-01

    The skeletal system of animals provides the support for a variety of activities and functions. For animals such as mammals, which have endoskeletons, research has shown that skeletal investment (mass) scales with body mass to the 1.1 power. In this study, we ask how exoskeletal investment in insects scales with body mass. We measured the body mass and mass of exoskeletal chitin of 551 adult terrestrial insects of 245 species, with dry masses ranging from 0.0001 to 2.41 g (0.0002-6.13 g wet mass) to assess the allometry of exoskeletal investment. Our results showed that exoskeletal chitin mass scales isometrically with dry body mass across the Insecta as M(chitin) = a M(dry) (b), where b = 1.03 +/- 0.04, indicating that both large and small terrestrial insects allocate a similar fraction of their body mass to chitin. This isometric chitin-scaling relationship was also evident at the taxonomic level of order, for all insect orders except Coleoptera. We additionally found that the relative exoskeletal chitin investment, indexed by the coefficient, a, varies with insect life history and phylogeny. Exoskeletal chitin mass tends to be proportionally less and to increase at a lower rate with mass in flying than in nonflying insects (M(flying insect chitin) = -0.56 x M(dry) (0.97); M(nonflying insect chitin) = -0.55 x M(dry) (1.03)), and to vary with insect order. Isometric scaling (b = 1) of insect exoskeletal chitin suggests that the exoskeleton in insects scales differently than support structures of most other organisms, which have a positive allometry (b > 1) (e.g., vertebrate endoskeleton, tree secondary tissue). The isometric pattern that we document here additionally suggests that exoskeletal investment may not be the primary limit on insect body size. PMID:20235123

  8. Splenic constriction during isometric handgrip exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Frances, Maria F; Dujic, Zeljko; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2008-10-01

    During the first minute of a moderate-intensity isometric handgrip (HG) exercise, there is an increase in stroke volume and cardiac output that occurs without any change in systemic vascular conductance. Although the mechanism of increased venous return is not yet known, current focus has been placed on the constriction of visceral organs. The human spleen represents a compliant organ with high perfusion that constricts during the rather severe stresses of maximal exercise, a diving reflex, or prolonged apnea. This study tested the hypothesis that spleen constriction occurs during isometric HG exercise. Eight participants performed a 1 min isometric HG test at 40% maximum voluntary contraction. Splenic length and width were measured (with ultrasound imaging) after 1 min of exercise, and volume was calculated. To investigate the reflex specificity of this response, spleen dimensions were also measured during 4 min of lower-body negative pressure (LBNP; -20 mm Hg). To test the additional impact of altered breathing and intra-abdominal pressures during the HG, measures were also taken during Valsalva's manoeuvre (VM) at 30 mm Hg. Compared with baseline, both length and width of the spleen were reduced by 0.20 to 0.55 cm (or 4.44%-6.09%; p < 0.05) during each test. This resulted in relative reductions in splenic volume of 13 +/- 1% (HG), 9% +/- 7% (LBNP) and 18% +/- 7% (VM) (p < 0.05; all mean +/- SD). It was concluded that the spleen can constrict during the first minute of isometric HG exercise. PMID:18923575

  9. The effect of shoulder core exercises on isometric torque of glenohumeral joint movements in healthy young females

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam, Afsun Nodehi; Mohammadi, Roghayeh; Arab, Amir Massoud; Kazamnajad, Anoshirvan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strength improvement of the shoulder muscles is a major goal in rehabilitation or athletic conditioning programs. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of shoulder core exercises on the isometric torque of glenohumeral joint movements. METHODS: A total of 36 healthy females with no history of shoulder injury enrolled in this study. Subjects were randomly assigned into the control group (n = 18, 22 ± 2.19 years of age) or experimental group (n = 18, 21 ± 2.05 years of age). Subjects in experimental group performed shoulder core exercises, using progressive resistance training, three times a week for six weeks. Subjects in control group performed no exercise. The isometric torque of shoulder movements were measured with Dynatorq device in isolated test positions of glenohumeral muscles at the beginning and after six weeks in both groups. RESULTS: shoulder core exercise training led to an increase in maximal isometric torques of shoulder scaption at 0° and 90° arm elevation, external and internal rotation, horizontal adduction and extension movements (p < 0.001 in all instances). No significant difference was found between initial scores and scores after six weeks in the control group (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicated that shoulder core exercise training leads to an increase in peak torque for all glenohumeral movements that can be considered in glenohumeral muscles strengthening programs. PMID:22973363

  10. Development of a Device for Measurement of Multi-Directional Isometric Trunk Kinetics in a Seated Position

    PubMed Central

    Perlmutter, Sam; Lin, Fang; Dewald, Julius P. A.

    2014-01-01

    Trunk torque is typically quantified in a single plane. This is not ideal since any unmeasured coupled trunk kinetics in other directions, than the intended one, could affect the accuracy and reliability of the strength measurements as well as the ability to corroborate findings with electromyographic recordings. Therefore, an isometric device that simultaneously records trunk kinetics across planes has been developed to aid in the research of trunk control in both the healthy or impaired populations. This device utilizes a six degree-of-freedom load cell and custom designed frame to attach individuals while in the sitting position. The performance of the device was tested in six healthy controls and while using two protocols. The device was able to detect coupled trunk kinetics during maximum lateral flexion and axial twisting torque generation. It also allowed the implementation of a multi-axis isometric protocol showing that subjects were able to generate larger amounts of axial torque during sub-maximal trunk extension compared to sub-maximal trunk flexion. In conclusion, the device and mechanical transformations discussed in this article will aid in the interpretation of multi-directional isometric trunk kinetics in a wide range of populations. PMID:24608688

  11. Effect of Strain on Actomyosin Kinetics in Isometric Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Siththanandan, V. B.; Donnelly, J. L.; Ferenczi, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    Investigations were conducted into the biochemical and mechanical states of cross-bridges during isometric muscle contraction. Rapid length steps (3 or 6 nm hs−1) were applied to rabbit psoas fibers, permeabilized and isometric, at either 12°C or 20°C. Fibers were activated by photolysis of P3-1-(2-nitrophenyl)-ethyl ester of ATP infused into rigor fibers at saturating Ca2+. Sarcomere length, tension, and phosphate release were recorded—the latter using the MDCC-PBP fluorescent probe. A reduction in strain, induced by a rapid release step, produced a short-lived acceleration of phosphate release. Rates of the phosphate transient and that of phases 3 and 4 of tension recovery were unaffected by step size but were elevated at higher temperatures. In contrast the amplitude of the phosphate transient was smaller at 20°C than 12°C. The presence of 0.5 or 1.0 mM added ADP during a release step reduced both the rate of tension recovery and the poststep isometric tension. A kinetic scheme is presented to simulate the observed data and to precisely determine the rate constants for the elementary steps of the ATPase cycle. PMID:16513783

  12. In vivo determination of total knee arthroplasty kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Komistek, Richard D; Mahfouz, Mohamed R; Bertin, Kim; Rosenberg, Aaron; Kennedy, William

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if consistent posterior femoral rollback of an asymmetrical posterior cruciate retaining (PCR) total knee arthroplasty was mostly influenced by the implant design, surgical technique, or presence of a well-functioning posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Three-dimensional femorotibial kinematics was determined for 80 subjects implanted by 3 surgeons, and each subject was evaluated under fluoroscopic surveillance during a deep knee bend. All subjects in this present study having an intact PCL had a well-functioning PCR knee and experienced normal kinematic patterns, although less in magnitude than the normal knee. In addition, a surprising finding was that, on average, subjects without a PCL still achieved posterior femoral rollback from full extension to maximum knee flexion. The findings in this study revealed that implant design did contribute to the normal kinematics demonstrated by subjects having this asymmetrical PCR total knee arthroplasty.

  13. A new method to measure post-traumatic joint contractures in the rabbit knee.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Kevin A; Holmberg, Michael; Shrive, Nigel

    2003-12-01

    A new device and method to measure rabbit knee joint angles are described. The method was used to measure rabbit knee joint angles in normal specimens and in knee joints with obvious contractures. The custom-designed and manufactured gripping device has two clamps. The femoral clamp sits on a pinion gear that is driven by a rack attached to a materials testing system. A 100 N load cell in series with the rack gives force feedback. The tibial clamp is attached to a rotatory potentiometer. The system allows the knee joint multiple degrees-of-freedom (DOF). There are two independent DOF (compression-distraction and internal-external rotation) and two coupled motions (medial-lateral translation coupled with varus-valgus rotation; anterior-posterior translation coupled with flexion-extension rotation). Knee joint extension-flexion motion is measured, which is a combination of the materials testing system displacement (converted to degrees of motion) and the potentiometer values (calibrated to degrees). Internal frictional forces were determined to be at maximum 2% of measured loading. Two separate experiments were performed to evaluate rabbit knees. First, normal right and left pairs of knees from four New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits were subjected to cyclic loading. An extension torque of 0.2 Nm was applied to each knee. The average change in knee joint extension from the first to the fifth cycle was 1.9 deg +/- 1.5 deg (mean +/- sd) with a total of 49 tests of these eight knees. The maximum extension of the four left knees (tested 23 times) was 14.6 deg +/- 7.1 deg, and of the four right knees (tested 26 times) was 12.0 deg +/- 10.9 deg. There was no significant difference in the maximum extension between normal left and right knees. In the second experiment, nine skeletally mature NZW rabbits had stable fractures of the femoral condyles of the right knee that were immobilized for five, six or 10 weeks. The left knee served as an unoperated control. Loss of knee joint

  14. Evaluation of total knee mechanics using a crouching simulator with a synthetic knee substitute.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Michael; Rosenbaum, Heather; Walker, Peter S

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical evaluation of total knees is frequently required for aspects such as wear, strength, kinematics, contact areas, and force transmission. In order to carry out such tests, we developed a crouching simulator, based on the Oxford-type machine, with novel features including a synthetic knee including ligaments. The instrumentation and data processing methods enabled the determination of contact area locations and interface forces and moments, for a full flexion-extension cycle. To demonstrate the use of the simulator, we carried out a comparison of two different total knee designs, cruciate retaining and substituting. The first part of the study describes the simulator design and the methodology for testing the knees without requiring cadaveric knee specimens. The degrees of freedom of the anatomic hip and ankle joints were reproduced. Flexion-extension was obtained by changing quadriceps length, while variable hamstring forces were applied using springs. The knee joint was represented by three-dimensional printed blocks on to which the total knee components were fixed. Pretensioned elastomeric bands of realistic stiffnesses passed through holes in the block at anatomical locations to represent ligaments. Motion capture of the knees during flexion, together with laser scanning and computer modeling, was used to reconstruct contact areas on the bearing surfaces. A method was also developed for measuring tibial component interface forces and moments as a comparative assessment of fixation. The method involved interposing Tekscan pads at locations on the interface. Overall, the crouching machine and the methodology could be used for many different mechanical measurements of total knee designs, adapted especially for comparative or parametric studies. PMID:26802075

  15. The Attenborough total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Attenborough, C G

    1978-08-01

    The stabilised gliding knee prosthesis is a compromise between hinged joints and condylar prostheses. It is a two-piece implant designed to allow normal gliding movements of flexion and extension and which, stabilised by a connecting rod between the femoral and tibial components, allows a designed laxity of rotation and lateral movements. A modification of the original femoral component is described. Two hundred and forty-five knee replacement operations have been done between January 1973 and September 1977 and the results are reported. The results using this prosthesis are at least equal to those using hinged or condylar prostheses. So far there has been no case of spontaneous loosening of the components and the implant can be used in patients who, because of severe deformities and instability, are unsuitable for condylar prostheses. PMID:681407

  16. Cooling Does Not Affect Knee Proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Ozmun, John C.; Thieme, Heather A.; Ingersoll, Christopher D.; Knight, Kenneth L.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of cooling on proprioception of the knee has not been studied extensively. In this study, we investigated the movement reproduction (timing and accuracy) aspect of proprioception. Subjects were tested under two conditions: a 20-minute application of ice and control. Proprioceptive accuracy and timing were measured by passively moving the knee, then comparing the subject's active reproduction of the passive movement. Subjects were blindfolded, then tested in three sectors of the knee's range of motion: 90° to 60°, 60° to 30°, and 30° to full extension. Ice application had no apparent effect on the subject's ability to perform accurate movement reproductions in the sectors tested. However, accuracy of the subject's final angle reproduction varied between the sectors as did the total time of the movement. One possible explanation for the difference between sectors is that different receptors are active at different points in the knee's range of motion. We conclude that cooling the knee joint for 20 minutes does not have an adverse effect on proprioception. PMID:16558379

  17. Effects of Isometric Scaling on Vertical Jumping Performance

    PubMed Central

    Bobbert, Maarten F.

    2013-01-01

    Jump height, defined as vertical displacement in the airborne phase, depends on vertical takeoff velocity. For centuries, researchers have speculated on how jump height is affected by body size and many have adhered to what has come to be known as Borelli’s law, which states that jump height does not depend on body size per se. The underlying assumption is that the amount of work produced per kg body mass during the push-off is independent of size. However, if a big body is isometrically downscaled to a small body, the latter requires higher joint angular velocities to achieve a given takeoff velocity and work production will be more impaired by the force-velocity relationship of muscle. In the present study, the effects of pure isometric scaling on vertical jumping performance were investigated using a biologically realistic model of the human musculoskeletal system. The input of the model, muscle stimulation over time, was optimized using jump height as criterion. It was found that when the human model was miniaturized to the size of a mouse lemur, with a mass of about one-thousandth that of a human, jump height dropped from 40 cm to only 6 cm, mainly because of the force-velocity relationship. In reality, mouse lemurs achieve jump heights of about 33 cm. By implication, the unfavourable effects of the small body size of mouse lemurs on jumping performance must be counteracted by favourable effects of morphological and physiological adaptations. The same holds true for other small jumping animals. The simulations for the first time expose and explain the sheer magnitude of the isolated effects of isometric downscaling on jumping performance, to be counteracted by morphological and physiological adaptations. PMID:23936494

  18. Crystal structures and isometricity comparison of methylated bisphenol F derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Tobias; Nestler, Robert; Seichter, Wilhelm; Bombicz, Petra

    2014-01-01

    The syntheses and X-ray structures of three methylated bisphenol F derivatives and one respective analogue are reported. A special emphasis lies on the influence of methyl groups on the conformation of the common diphenylmethane scaffold. The introduction of four methyl groups to bisphenol F was found not to disturb its typical strong hydrogen bond network, and yet, to change the pattern of the aromatic interactions in the overall packing. According to the isometricity comparison, the addition of methyl groups to the diphenylmethane core has a greater influence on the conformation of the individual molecules, than the presence or absence of hydrogen bonding donors or acceptors.

  19. Structure of Isometric Viruses Containing Nonidentical Polypeptide Chains

    PubMed Central

    Dunker, A. Keith

    1974-01-01

    The theory of Caspar and Klug (1962) for the structure of isometric viruses has been generalized to the case in which the identical repeating unit is composed of n nonidentical polypeptide chains. This modified theory accounts for the structure of picornaviruses, the lambda phage head, cowpea mosaic virus, and φX174, while at the same time conserving the principle of having identical subunits in identical environments. Furthermore, the modified theory suggests amending the triangulation number to T[n] for capsids with n nonidentical polypeptide chains as the repeating unit. Images PMID:4418754

  20. Mobile Sensor Application for Kinematic Detection of the Knees

    PubMed Central

    Suputtitada, Areerat; Khovidhungij, Watcharapong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To correctly measure the knee joint angle, this study utilized a Qualisys motion capture system and also used it as the reference to assess the validity of the study's Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) system that consisted of four IMU sensors and the Knee Angle Recorder software. The validity was evaluated by the root mean square (RMS) of different angles and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values between the Qualisys system and the IMU system. Methods Four functional knee movement tests for ten healthy participants were investigated, which were the knee flexion test, the hip and knee flexion test, the forward step test and the leg abduction test, and the walking test. Results The outcomes of the knee flexion test, the hip and knee flexion test, the forward step test, and the walking test showed that the RMS of different angles were less than 6°. The ICC values were in the range of 0.84 to 0.99. However, the leg abduction test showed a poor correlation in the measurement of the knee abduction-adduction movement. Conclusion The IMU system used in this study is a new good method to measure the knee flexion-extension movement. PMID:26361597

  1. +Gz tolerance in man after 14-day bedrest periods with isometric and isotonic exercise conditioning.

    PubMed

    Greenleaf, J E; Bernauer, E M; Morse, J T; Sandler, H; Armbruster, R; Sagan, L; van Beaumont, W

    1975-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of isometric or isotonic exercise training on post-bedrest +Gz tolerance. Seven male volunteers, 19-22 years, underwent accelerations of +2.1 Gz (740 s), +3.2 Gz (327 s), and +3.8 Gz (312 s) in a selected, randomized order; the ramp to peak acceleration was 1.8 G/min. The centrifugation runs were terminated by loss of central vision (blackout) to a white light with a luminance of 3.15 times 10-5 log candle/cm-2 (0.092 ft-lambert). The study began with a 14-d ambulatory control period, followed by three 14-d bedrest periods (each separated by a 21-d recovery period) and then a final week of recovery. During the ambulatory periods, the subjects exercised on a bicycle ergometer at 50% of their maximal oxygen uptake (max VO2) for 1 h/d. During two of the three bedrest periods, the subjects performed in the supine position one of two routines, either isometric exercise (21% of max leg extension force for 1 min followed by 1-min rest) or isotonic exercise (68% of max VO2) for 0.5 in the morning and afternoon. During the third bedrest period, no exercise was performed. In general +Gz tolerance was reduced by 24% to 35% (p less than or equal to 0.05) after bedrest. Compared with control values, there were significant reductions in average tolerance times after bedrest with no exercise and isotonic exercise at all G levels. With isometric exercise, there was a significant decrease in tolerance at 2.1 Gz but not at 3.2 Gz or 3.8 Gz, even though the latter tolerances were reduced 15.6% and 10.0%, respectively. Both exercise regimens maintained tolerance at levels equal to or above that obtained with no exercise. Compared with control values, average tolerances were lower (p less than or equal to 0.05) after the two recovery periods between the bedrest periods (minus 24% to minus 26% at 3.2 Gz and 3.8 Gz), indicating that 3 weeks of ambulation was not sufficient time for full recovery from the deconditioning induced in

  2. Hemiparetic Knee Extensor Strength and Balance Function Are Predictors of Ambulatory Function in Subacute Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Chul Woong; Im, Sang Hee; Choi, Jay Chol; Kim, Bo Ryun; Yoon, Ho Min; Lee, Yong Ki

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify the potential predictors of ambulatory function in subacute stroke patients, and to determine the contributing factors according to gait severity. Methods Fifty-three subacute stroke patents were enrolled. Ambulatory function was assessed by gait speed and endurance. Balance function was evaluated by the Berg Balance Scale score (BBS) and the Timed Up and Go test (TUG). The isometric muscular strengths of bilateral knee extensors and flexors were measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. Cardiovascular fitness was evaluated using an expired gas analyzer. Participants were assigned into the household ambulator group (<0.4 m/s) or the community ambulator group (≥0.4 m/s) based on gait severity. Results In the linear regression analyses of all patients, paretic knee isometric extensor strength (p=0.007) and BBS (p<0.001) were independent predictors of gait endurance (R2=0.668). TUG (p<0.001) and BBS (p=0.037) were independent predictors of gait speed (R2=0.671). Paretic isometric extensor strength was a predictor of gait endurance (R2=0.340, p=0.008). TUG was a predictor of gait speed (R2=0.404, p<0.001) in the household ambulator group, whereas BBS was a predictive factor of gait endurance (R2=0.598, p=0.008) and speed (R2=0.713, p=0.006). TUG was a predictor of gait speed (R2=0.713, p=0.004) in the community ambulator group. Conclusion Our results reveal that balance function and knee extensor isometric strength were strong predictors of ambulatory function in subacute stroke patients. However, they work differently according to gait severity. Therefore, a comprehensive functional assessment and a different therapeutic approach should be provided depending on gait severity in subacute stroke patients. PMID:26361594

  3. Gravitational effects on human cardiovascular responses to isometric muscle contractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonde-Petersen, Flemmig; Suzuki, Yoji; Sadamoto, Tomoko

    Isometric exercise induces profound cardiovascular adaptations increasing mean arterial pressure and heart rate. We investigated effects of simulated +Gz and -Gz respectively on the central and peripheral cardiovascular system. Sustained handgrip exercise was performed at 40% of maximum for 2 minutes in five subjects. This maneuver increased mean arterial pressure by 40-45 mm Hg both during head out water immersion which simulates weightlessness, as well as bedrest during -25, 0, and +25 degrees tilt from the horizontal. Lower body negative pressure (-60 mm Hg for 10 min) attenuated the response to handgrip exercise to 30 mm Hg. It also increased the heart rate minimally by about 20 beats per minute while the water immersion, as well as head up, head down and horizontal bedrest showed increments of about 50 beats per min. It was concluded that the response to isometric contraction is mediated through the high pressure baroreceptors, because similar responses were seen during stresses producing a wide variation in central venous pressure. During lower body negative pressure the increased sympathetic nervous activity itself increased resting heart rate and mean arterial pressure. The responses to static exercise were, therefore, weaker.

  4. Rehabilitation after ACL Injury: A Fluoroscopic Study on the Effects of Type of Exercise on the Knee Sagittal Plane Arthrokinematics

    PubMed Central

    Norouzi, Sadegh; Esfandiarpour, Fateme; Shakourirad, Ali; Salehi, Reza; Akbar, Mohammad; Farahmand, Farzam

    2013-01-01

    A safe rehabilitation exercise for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries needs to be compatible with the normal knee arthrokinematics to avoid abnormal loading on the joint structures. The objective of this study was to measure the amount of the anterior tibial translation (ATT) of the ACL-deficient knees during selective open and closed kinetic chain exercises. The intact and injured knees of fourteen male subjects with unilateral ACL injury were imaged using uniplanar fluoroscopy, while the subjects performed forward lunge and unloaded/loaded open kinetic knee extension exercises. The ATTs were measured from fluoroscopic images, as the distance between the tibial and femoral reference points, at seven knee flexion angles, from 0° to 90°. No significant differences were found between the ATTs of the ACL-deficient and intact knees at all flexion angles during forward lunge and unloaded open kinetic knee extension (P < 0.05). During loaded open kinetic knee extension, however, the ATTs of the ACL deficient knees were significantly larger than those of the intact knees at 0° (P = 0.002) and 15° (P = 0.012). It was suggested that the forward lunge, as a weight-bearing closed kinetic chain exercise, provides a safer approach for developing muscle strength and functional stability in rehabilitation program of ACL-deficient knees, in comparison with open kinetic knee extension exercise. PMID:24066288

  5. Patient function after a posterior stabilizing total knee arthroplasty: cam-post engagement and knee kinematics.

    PubMed

    Suggs, Jeremy F; Hanson, George R; Park, Sang Eun; Moynihan, Angela L; Li, Guoan

    2008-03-01

    Even though posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty has been widely used in surgery, how the cam-post mechanism (posterior substituting mechanism) affects knee joint kinematics and function in patients is not known. The objective of the present study was to investigate posterior femoral translation, internal tibial rotation, tibiofemoral contact, and cam-post engagement of total knee arthroplasty patients during in vivo weight-bearing flexion. Twenty-four knees with a PS TKA were investigated while performing a single leg weight-bearing lunge from full extension to maximum flexion as images were recorded using a dual fluoroscopic system. The in vivo knee position at each targeted flexion angle was reproduced using 3D TKA models and the fluoroscopic images. The kinematics of the knee was measured from the series of the total knee arthroplasty models. The cam-post engagement was determined when the surface model of the femoral cam overlapped with that of the tibial post. The mean maximum flexion angle for all the subjects was 112.5 +/- 13.1 degrees . The mean flexion angle where cam-post engagement was observed was 91.1 +/- 10.9 degrees . The femur moved anteriorly from 0 degrees to 30 degrees and posteriorly through the rest of the flexion range. The internal tibial rotation increased approximately 6 degrees from full extension to 90 degrees of flexion and decreased slightly with further flexion. Both the medial and lateral contact point moved posteriorly from 0 degrees to 30 degrees , remained relatively constant from 30 degrees to 90 degrees , and then moved further posterior from 90 degrees to maximum flexion. The in vivo cam-post engagement corresponded to increased posterior translation and reduced internal tibial rotation at high flexion of the posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty. The initial cam-post engagement was also mildly correlated with the maximum flexion angle of the knee (R = 0.51, p = 0.019). A later cam-post engagement might

  6. Assessment of Isometric Trunk Strength – The Relevance of Body Position and Relationship between Planes of Movement

    PubMed Central

    Kocjan, Andrej; Sarabon, Nejc

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the differences in maximal isometric trunk extension and flexion strength during standing, sitting and kneeling. Additionally, we were interested in correlations between the maximal strength in sagittal, frontal and transverse plane, measured in the sitting position. Sixty healthy subjects (24 male, 36 female; age 41.3 ± 15.1 yrs; body height 1.70 ± 0.09 m; body mass 72.7 ± 13.3 kg) performed maximal voluntary isometric contractions of the trunk flexor and extensor muscles in standing, sitting and kneeling position. The subjects also performed lateral flexions and rotations in the sitting position. Each task was repeated three times and average of maximal forces was used for data analysis. RANOVA with post-hoc testing was applied to the flexion and extension data. The level of statistical significance was set to p < 0.05. Overall, in both genders together, the highest average force for trunk extension was recorded in sitting posture (910.5 ± 271.5 N), followed by kneeling (834.3 ± 242.9 N) and standing (504.0 ± 165.4 N), compared with flexion, where we observed the opposite trend (508.5 ± 213.0 N, 450.9 ± 165.7 N and 443.4 ± 153.1 N, respectively). Post-hoc tests showed significant differences in all extension positions (p < 0.0001) and between sitting/standing (p = 0.018) and kneeling/standing (p = 0.033) flexion exertions. The extension/flexion ratio for sitting was 2.1 ± 0.4, for kneeling 1.9 ± 0.4, followed by standing, where motion forward approximately equals motion backward (1.1 ± 0.6). Trunk sagittal-transverse strength showed the strongest correlation, followed by frontal-transverse and sagittal-frontal plane correlation pairs (R2 = 0.830, 0.712 and 0.657). The baseline trunk isometric strength data provided by this study should help further strength diagnostics, more precisely, the prevention of low back disorders. Key points Maximal voluntary isometric force of the trunk extensors increased with the angle at

  7. Neuromuscular Changes After Aerobic Exercise in People with Anterior Cruciate Ligament– Reconstructed Knees

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Elizabeth C.; Pfile, Kate R.; Weniger, Gerald R.; Ingersoll, Christopher D.; Herman, Daniel; Hart, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions are common, especially in young, active people. The lower extremity neuromuscular adaptations seen after aerobic exercise provide information about how previously injured patients perform and highlight deficits and, hence, areas for focused treatment. Little information is available about neuromuscular performance after aerobic exercise in people with ACL reconstructions. Objective: To compare dynamic balance, gluteus medius muscle activation, vertical jump height, and hip muscle strength after aerobic exercise in people with ACL-reconstructed knees. Design: Case-control study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Of 34 recreationally active volunteers, 17 had a unilateral primary ACL reconstruction at least 2 years earlier and 17 were matched controls. Intervention(s): All participants performed 20 minutes of aerobic exercise on a treadmill. Main Outcome Measure(s): We recorded dynamic, single-legged balance electromyographic gluteus medius muscle activation, single-legged vertical jump height, and maximum isometric strength for hip abduction, extension, and external rotation preexercise and postexercise. Results: Participants with ACL reconstructions exhibited shorter reach distances during dynamic balance tasks, indicating poorer dynamic balance, and less gluteus medius muscle electromyographic activation. Reductions in hip abduction and extension strength after exercise were noted in all participants; however, those with ACL reconstructions displayed greater hip extensor strength loss after aerobic exercise than did the control group. Conclusions: Neuromuscular changes after aerobic exercise exist in both patients with ACL reconstructions and controls. The former group may experience greater deficits in hip extensor strength after aerobic exercise. Reduced reach distances in people with ACL reconstructions may represent a protective mechanism against excessive tibiofemoral

  8. Interpolation function for approximating knee joint behavior in human gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth-Taşcǎu, Mirela; Pater, Flavius; Stoia, Dan Ioan

    2013-10-01

    Starting from the importance of analyzing the kinematic data of the lower limb in gait movement, especially the angular variation of the knee joint, the paper propose an approximation function that can be used for processing the correlation among a multitude of knee cycles. The approximation of the raw knee data was done by Lagrange polynomial interpolation on a signal acquired using Zebris Gait Analysis System. The signal used in approximation belongs to a typical subject extracted from a lot of ten investigated subjects, but the function domain of definition belongs to the entire group. The study of the knee joint kinematics plays an important role in understanding the kinematics of the gait, this articulation having the largest range of motion in whole joints, in gait. The study does not propose to find an approximation function for the adduction-abduction movement of the knee, this being considered a residual movement comparing to the flexion-extension.

  9. Preventing Knee Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... to tearing. Growth Plate Injuries, Fractures, and Dislocations Knee fractures rarely occur in childhood sports, but with any ... is the bump on the front of the knee where the patellar tendon attaches. Fractures to the growth plate in this area often ...

  10. The relationship between femoral cartilage thickness and muscle strength in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Tuna, Serpil; Balcı, Nilüfer; Özçakar, Levent

    2016-08-01

    To explore whether femoral cartilage thickness is related (and changes) with muscle strength in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Forty patients (27 F, 13 M) with knee OA-who were under quadriceps muscle strengthening program-were enrolled in the study. Isokinetic/isometric knee muscle strength measurements (at 30-60° angles and 60-180° velocity) were performed at baseline, end of the muscle strengthening program, and third month control visit using a biodex dynamometer. Femoral cartilage thicknesses (at medial/lateral condyle and intercondylar area) were measured using ultrasonography. Seventy-nine knees of 40 patients (27 F, 13 M) aged 52.03 ± 11.72 years (range, 26-71) were analyzed. Mean VAS scores on the first and third months were significantly lower than the initial values (p < 0.001, p = 0.049). Isometric peak torque and total work values at 180 °/s were significantly higher than the baseline measurements at first and third month controls (all p < 0.05). Cartilage thicknesses (at three sites) were significantly higher than the baseline measurements (all p < 0.05) on the third month but not on the first month (all p > 0.05). Femoral cartilage thicknesses were positively correlated with isometric strength values at baseline and third month. We propose that femoral cartilage thicknesses increase on the third month of strengthening therapy. Since this late-phase thickening parallels the earlier increase in muscle strength (starting, on the first month), we speculate that regeneration rather than edema might be the primary underlying cause. PMID:27091650

  11. Hip Strength Deficits in People With Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review With Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Deasy, Margaret; Leahy, Edmund; Semciw, Adam Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Systematic review with meta-analysis. Background A complete understanding of impairments associated with knee osteoarthritis would optimize exercise interventions for people with knee osteoarthritis. Our current understanding of hip strength deficits in this population is based on studies with conflicting findings and small samples. There is a need to systematically review and pool current evidence. Objectives To determine whether hip strength deficits exist in people with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Methods Electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and PsycINFO) were searched through February 2016. Studies comparing hip strength in people diagnosed with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis to healthy control participants were included in the review. A meta-analysis with random effects was applied to relevant data from included studies and a modified Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach was used to evaluate the quality of evidence for each pooled analysis. Results Five studies were included in the review. Meta-analysis revealed moderate-quality evidence of weaker isometric and isokinetic hip abduction strength in people with knee osteoarthritis (moderate difference: 7% to 24% weaker) and very low-quality evidence of no difference in isometric hip adduction strength. There was very low- to moderate-quality evidence of weaker isokinetic hip strength in the remaining planes of motion (moderate to large differences: 14% to 55% weaker). Conclusion Significant hip strength deficits exist in people with knee osteoarthritis. Hip strength assessment should be considered in clinical practice and may assist with directing targeted management strategies. Level of Evidence Symptom prevalence, level 1a-. J Orthop Sports PhysTher 2016;46(8):629-639. Epub3 Jul 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6618. PMID:27374011

  12. Bicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Giachino, Matteo; Risitano, Salvatore; Atzori, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most worldwide practiced surgery for knee osteoarthritis and its efficacy is mightily described by literature. Concerns about the invasiveness of TKA let the introduction of segmental resurfacing of the joint for younger patients with localized osteoarthritis. Bone stock sparing and ligaments preservation are the essence of both unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA). Advantages related to BKA are the respect of knee biomechanics, lower complications rates, shorter hospital stay, faster rehabilitation. Moreover, in case of failure of the first implant the conversion to TKA is undemanding and can be compared to a standard prosthesis. Our experience suggest that BKA is a reliable technique in selected cases and especially younger people with higher functional requests can favourably profit from it. Although those results are encouraging, we still need further prospective, randomized, long-term studies to finally assess BKA indications and outcomes. PMID:26855941

  13. Bicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Luigi; Giachino, Matteo; Risitano, Salvatore; Atzori, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most worldwide practiced surgery for knee osteoarthritis and its efficacy is mightily described by literature. Concerns about the invasiveness of TKA let the introduction of segmental resurfacing of the joint for younger patients with localized osteoarthritis. Bone stock sparing and ligaments preservation are the essence of both unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA). Advantages related to BKA are the respect of knee biomechanics, lower complications rates, shorter hospital stay, faster rehabilitation. Moreover, in case of failure of the first implant the conversion to TKA is undemanding and can be compared to a standard prosthesis. Our experience suggest that BKA is a reliable technique in selected cases and especially younger people with higher functional requests can favourably profit from it. Although those results are encouraging, we still need further prospective, randomized, long-term studies to finally assess BKA indications and outcomes. PMID:26855941

  14. Knee Joint Loads and Surrounding Muscle Forces during Stair Ascent in Patients with Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rasnick, Robert; Standifird, Tyler; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A.; Cates, Harold E.

    2016-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is commonly used to correct end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, difficulty with stair climbing often persists and prolongs the challenges of TKR patents. Complete understanding of loading at the knee is of great interest in order to aid patient populations, implant manufacturers, rehabilitation, and future healthcare research. Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation approximates joint loading and corresponding muscle forces during a movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if knee joint loadings following TKR are recovered to the level of healthy individuals, and determine the differences in muscle forces causing those loadings. Data from five healthy and five TKR patients were selected for musculoskeletal simulation. Variables of interest included knee joint reaction forces (JRF) and the corresponding muscle forces. A paired samples t-test was used to detect differences between groups for each variable of interest (p<0.05). No differences were observed for peak joint compressive forces between groups. Some muscle force compensatory strategies appear to be present in both the loading and push-off phases. Evidence from knee extension moment and muscle forces during the loading response phase indicates the presence of deficits in TKR in quadriceps muscle force production during stair ascent. This result combined with greater flexor muscle forces resulted in similar compressive JRF during loading response between groups. PMID:27258086

  15. Knee Joint Loads and Surrounding Muscle Forces during Stair Ascent in Patients with Total Knee Replacement.

    PubMed

    Rasnick, Robert; Standifird, Tyler; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Cates, Harold E; Zhang, Songning

    2016-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is commonly used to correct end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, difficulty with stair climbing often persists and prolongs the challenges of TKR patents. Complete understanding of loading at the knee is of great interest in order to aid patient populations, implant manufacturers, rehabilitation, and future healthcare research. Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation approximates joint loading and corresponding muscle forces during a movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if knee joint loadings following TKR are recovered to the level of healthy individuals, and determine the differences in muscle forces causing those loadings. Data from five healthy and five TKR patients were selected for musculoskeletal simulation. Variables of interest included knee joint reaction forces (JRF) and the corresponding muscle forces. A paired samples t-test was used to detect differences between groups for each variable of interest (p<0.05). No differences were observed for peak joint compressive forces between groups. Some muscle force compensatory strategies appear to be present in both the loading and push-off phases. Evidence from knee extension moment and muscle forces during the loading response phase indicates the presence of deficits in TKR in quadriceps muscle force production during stair ascent. This result combined with greater flexor muscle forces resulted in similar compressive JRF during loading response between groups. PMID:27258086

  16. Metallosis Presenting as Knee Pain 26 years after Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sharareh, Behnam; Phan, Duy L.; Goreal, Wamda; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Metallosis occurs when periprosthetic soft tissues, synovium, and/or bone is infiltrated by metallic debris secondary to metal-on-metal wear. This debris can cause a chronic inflammatory reaction leading to joint instability, pain, and swelling, and may cause osteolysis, implant looseningand ultimately implant failure. Case Report: An 81 year old female, with a history of primary left total knee arthroplasty, presented with a 6 month history of left knee pain, swelling, and limited range of motion following a fall. Radiographs and joint aspiration were performed, with results that showed no evidence of periprosthetic trauma or infection but were suspicious for chronic metallosis. The patient underwent revision total knee replacement of the left knee which revealed extensive necrotic black metal debris throughout the joint space. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of a foreign body reaction consistent with metallosis. Conclusion: This case is a rare example of chronic metallosis presenting 26 years following total knee replacement. Treatment with revision total knee replacement is the consensus management choice to avoid further destruction of the bone and joint capsule that can occur with metal-induced inflammation. PMID:27299048

  17. Effects of isometric hip movements on electromyographic activities of the trunk muscles during plank exercises

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min-Hyeok; Kim, Soo-Yong; Kang, Myoung-Joo; Yoon, So-Hee; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of isometric hip adduction and abduction on trunk muscle activity during plank exercises. [Subjects and Methods] Nineteen healthy male subjects were recruited for this study. All subjects performed the traditional plank exercise (TP), plank exercise with isometric hip adduction (PHAD), and plank exercise with isometric hip abduction (PHAB) by using an elastic band. Electromyographic (EMG) activities of the internal oblique (IO) and external oblique (EO) were measured during the 3 plank exercises by using an Electromyography system. [Results] Internal oblique and external oblique muscle activities were significantly greater during plank exercise with isometric hip adduction and plank exercise with isometric hip abduction than during traditional plank exercise. Internal oblique and external oblique muscle activities did not differ between the plank exercise with isometric hip adduction and plank exercise with isometric hip abduction conditions. [Conclusion] These findings demonstrate that loaded isometric hip movements may be a useful strategy to increase trunk muscle activity during plank exercises.

  18. Strength Development: Using Functional Isometrics in an Isotonic Strength Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Allen; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A study was made to determine if a combination of functional isometrics and standard isotonic training would be superior to a standard isotonic program in an instructional setting. The results provide support for functional isometrics as an enhancement where achievement of maximum strength is the goal. (Author/MT)

  19. Enhanced muscle activity during lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Seong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether pelvic stabilization affects multifidus (MF) and iliocostalis lumborum (IL) muscle activities during dynamic extension exercise. Nine males (age, 25.1±6.3 yr; height, 176.6±2.4 cm; body mass, 74.9±6.7 kg) performed an isometric lumbar extension strength test and dynamic exercise in an upright seated position with or without pelvic stabilization. The electromyography and muscle strength of the MF and IL muscles were measured when the subjects performed the isometric lumbar extension strength test at the trunk angle 110°, 146°, and 182°. In addition, the trunk extensor muscle activities were measured using 50% muscle strength of maximum isometric strength during a dynamic trunk extension exercise. The MF and IL muscle activities were significantly higher at 110°, 146°, and 182° with pelvic stabilization than that without pelvic stabilization during the isometric lumbar extension strength test (P<0.05) and the dynamic exercise (P<0.05). These results suggest that the lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization may be more effective for MF and IL muscle activity compared to that without pelvic stabilization. PMID:26730390

  20. Treating Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... osteotomy may need knee replacement surgery in the future. Arthroplasty is also called joint or knee replacement therapy. A surgeon removes the part of the knee damaged by osteoarthritis and replaces it with an artificial joint made from metals and plastic. All or part of the knee joint may ...

  1. A spatial model of the knee for the preoperative planning of knee surgery.

    PubMed

    Olanlokun, K F T; Wills, D P M

    2002-01-01

    A model on the spatial mechanical behaviour of the passive knee is presented. The femoral articular surfaces were represented by generalized, sagittally elliptical, toroidal surfaces. The medial and lateral tibial articular surfaces were represented by a dished spherical surface and the lower hemihyperbolic region of a torus respectively. Anatomical articular cartilage, knee ligaments and the posterior capsule were represented by spring-like deformable elements with non-linear load versus deflection characteristics. All the forces that act on the femur relative to the tibia were represented by three orthogonal forces and three associated moments. Spatial, articulation-dependent femorotibial kinematic constraint equations of the passive knee were formulated in an analytically explicit manner, based on the natural coordinates of the articular surfaces. The constraint equations were solved algebraically in closed form. Equations were derived that describe spatial femoro-tibial motion, ligament length, ligament strain, ligament-based elastic potential energy and the quasi-static equilibrium of the passive knee. Software was written, simulations on the motion characteristics and load versus deflection characteristics of the knee were carried out and graphical results were presented. The simulation of planar flexion/extension was almost spontaneous. The time taken to simulate spatial six-degree-of-freedom femoro-tibial motion was less than 2.5 min. The models were found to be capable of representing real-life passive knees to a high degree of satisfaction. It has been demonstrated that the models can provide knee surgeons with additional information on major aspects of the preoperative planning of knee surgery. The models can be used to enhance the preoperative planning of ligament reconstruction, articular surfaces related surgery, osteotomy and patellar tendon transfer surgery. PMID:11908484

  2. Biomechanical Analysis of Stair Descent in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Igawa, Tatsuya; Katsuhira, Junji

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purposes of this study were to investigate the lower extremity joint kinematics and kinetics of patients with the knee osteoarthritis (knee OA) during stair descent and clarify the biomechanical factors related to their difficulty in stair descent. [Subjects and Methods] Eight healthy elderly persons and four knee OA patients participated in this study. A 3-D motion analysis system and force plates were employed to measure lower extremity joint angles, ranges of motion, joint moments, joint powers, and ratios of contribution for the joint powers while descending stairs. [Results] Knee joint flexion angle, extension moment, and negative power during the early stance phase in the knee OA group were smaller than those in the healthy subjects group. However, no significant changes in these parameters in the ankle joint were observed between the two subject groups. [Conclusion] Knee OA patients could not use the knee joint to absorb impact during the early stance phase of stair descent. Hence, they might compensate for the roles played by the intact knee joint by mainly using ipsilateral ankle kinematics and kinetics. PMID:24926119

  3. Synchronization of Muscular Oscillations Between Two Subjects During Isometric Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Torick, Arndt H; Matuschek, Hannes; Holschneider, Matthias; Bittmann, Frank N

    2014-01-01

    Muscles oscillate with a frequency around 10 Hz. But what happens with myofascial oscillations, if two neuromuscular systems interact? The purpose of this study was to examine this question, initially, on the basis of a case study. Oscillations of the triceps brachii muscles of two subjects were determined through mechanomyography (MMG) during isometric interaction. The MMG-signals were analyzed concerning the interaction of the two subjects with algorithms of nonlinear dynamics. In this case study it could be shown, that the muscles of both neuromuscular systems also oscillate with the known frequency (here 12 Hz) during interaction. Furthermore, both subjects were able to adapt their oscillations against each other. This adjustment induced a significant (α < .05) coherent behavior, which was characterized by a phase shifting of approximately 90°. The authors draw the conclusion, that the complementary neuromuscular partners potentially have the ability of mutual synchronization. PMID:26913134

  4. Human arm posture prediction in response to isometric endpoint forces.

    PubMed

    Davoudabadi Farahani, Saeed; Andersen, Michael Skipper; de Zee, Mark; Rasmussen, John

    2015-11-26

    The ability to predict the musculoskeletal response to external loads has multiple applications for the design of machines with a human interface and for the prediction of outcomes of musculoskeletal interventions. In this study, we applied an inverse-inverse dynamics technique to investigate its ability to predict arm posture in response to isometric hand forces. For each subject, we made a three-dimensional musculoskeletal model using the AnyBody Modelling System (AMS). Then, we had each subject-specific model hold a weight anteriorly to the right shoulder joint at a distance of half of the arm length. We selected the glenohumeral abduction angle (GHAA) as the only free parameter. Subsequently, we used inverse-inverse dynamics to find the optimal GHAA that minimised a performance criterion with physiological constraints. In this study, we investigated the performance of two different objective functions: summation of squared muscle activity (SSMA) and summation of squared normalised joint torques (SSNJT). To validate the simulation results, arm posture responses to different isometric downward hand forces were measured for six healthy male subjects. Five trials were performed for each loading condition. The results showed that, with an increase in hand load, there was a reduced GHAA in all subjects. Another interesting finding was that self-selected postures for lighter tasks varied more than postures for heavier tasks for all subjects. To understand this, we investigated the curvature of the objective function as a function of the load and observed an increased curvature with increased load. This may explain the reduced intra-subject variations observed for increasing loads. PMID:26482735

  5. Early Quadriceps Strength Loss After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mizner, Ryan L; Petterson, Stephanie C; Stevens, Jennifer E; Vandenborne, Krista; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2005-01-01

    Background: While total knee arthroplasty reduces pain and provides a functional range of motion of the knee, quadriceps weakness and reduced functional capacity typically are still present one year after surgery. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the role of failure of voluntary muscle activation and muscle atrophy in the early loss of quadriceps strength after surgery. Methods: Twenty patients with unilateral knee osteoarthritis were tested an average of ten days before and twenty-seven days after primary total knee arthroplasty. Quadriceps strength and voluntary muscle activation were measured with use of a burst-superimposition technique in which a supramaximal burst of electrical stimulation is superimposed on a maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Maximal quadriceps cross-sectional area was assessed with use of magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Postoperatively, quadriceps strength was decreased by 62%, voluntary activation was decreased by 17%, and maximal cross-sectional area was decreased by 10% in comparison with the preoperative values; these differences were significant (p < 0.01). Collectively, failure of voluntary muscle activation and atrophy explained 85% of the loss of quadriceps strength (p < 0.001). Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that failure of voluntary activation contributed nearly twice as much as atrophy did to the loss of quadriceps strength. The severity of knee pain with muscle contraction did not change significantly compared with the preoperative level (p = 0.31). Changes in knee pain during strength-testing did not account for a significant amount of the change in voluntary activation (p = 0.14). Conclusions: Patients who are managed with total knee arthroplasty have profound impairment of quadriceps strength one month after surgery. This impairment is predominantly due to failure of voluntary muscle activation, and it is also influenced, to a lesser degree, by muscle atrophy. Knee pain with

  6. Advanced concepts in knee arthrodesis

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Jennifer H; Conway, Janet D

    2015-01-01

    The aim is to describe advanced strategies that can be used to diagnose and treat complications after knee arthrodesis and to describe temporary knee arthrodesis to treat infected knee arthroplasty. Potential difficult complications include nonunited knee arthrodesis, limb length discrepancy after knee arthrodesis, and united but infected knee arthrodesis. If a nonunited knee arthrodesis shows evidence of implant loosening or failure, then bone grafting the nonunion site as well as exchange intramedullary nailing and/or supplemental plate fixation are recommended. If symptomatic limb length discrepancy cannot be satisfactorily treated with a shoe lift, then the patient should undergo tibial lengthening over nail with a monolateral fixator or exchange nailing with a femoral internal lengthening device. If a united knee arthrodesis is infected, the nail must be removed. Then the surgeon has the option of replacing it with a long, antibiotic cement-coated nail. The authors also describe temporary knee arthrodesis for infected knee arthroplasty in patients who have the potential to undergo insertion of a new implant. The procedure has two goals: eradication of infection and stabilization of the knee. A temporary knee fusion can be accomplished by inserting both an antibiotic cement-coated knee fusion nail and a static antibiotic cement-coated spacer. These advanced techniques can be helpful when treating difficult complications after knee arthrodesis and treating cases of infected knee arthroplasty. PMID:25793160

  7. EMGD-FE: an open source graphical user interface for estimating isometric muscle forces in the lower limb using an EMG-driven model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper describes the “EMG Driven Force Estimator (EMGD-FE)”, a Matlab® graphical user interface (GUI) application that estimates skeletal muscle forces from electromyography (EMG) signals. Muscle forces are obtained by numerically integrating a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that simulates Hill-type muscle dynamics and that utilises EMG signals as input. In the current version, the GUI can estimate the forces of lower limb muscles executing isometric contractions. Muscles from other parts of the body can be tested as well, although no default values for model parameters are provided. To achieve accurate evaluations, EMG collection is performed simultaneously with torque measurement from a dynamometer. The computer application guides the user, step-by-step, to pre-process the raw EMG signals, create inputs for the muscle model, numerically integrate the ODEs and analyse the results. Results An example of the application’s functions is presented using the quadriceps femoris muscle. Individual muscle force estimations for the four components as well the knee isometric torque are shown. Conclusions The proposed GUI can estimate individual muscle forces from EMG signals of skeletal muscles. The estimation accuracy depends on several factors, including signal collection and modelling hypothesis issues. PMID:24708668

  8. The Effects of a Prophylactic Knee Brace and Two Neoprene Knee Sleeves on the Performance of Healthy Athletes: A Crossover Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mortaza, Niyousha; Ebrahimi, Ismail; Jamshidi, Ali Ashraf; Abdollah, Vahid; Kamali, Mohammad; Abas, Wan Abu Bakar Wan; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu

    2012-01-01

    Knee injury is one of the major problems in sports medicine, and the use of prophylactic knee braces is an attempt to reduce the occurrence and/or severity of injuries to the knee joint ligament(s) without inhibiting knee mobility. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of one recently designed prophylactic knee brace and two neoprene knee sleeves upon performance of healthy athletes. Thirty-one healthy male athletes (age = 21.2±1.5) volunteered as participants to examine the effect of prophylactic knee brace/sleeves on performance using isokinetic and functional tests. All subjects were tested in four conditions in a random order: 1. nonbraced (control) 2. using a neoprene knee sleeve 3. using a knee sleeve with four bilateral metal supports and 4. using a prophylactic knee brace. The study design was a crossover, randomized, controlled trial. Subjects completed single leg vertical jump, cross-over hop, and the isokinetic knee flexion and extension (at 60, 180, 300°/sec). Data were collected from the above tests and analyzed for jump height, cross-over hop distance, peak torque to body weight ratio and average power, respectively. Comparisons of these variables in the four testing conditions revealed no statistically significant difference (p>0.05). The selected prophylactic brace/sleeves did not significantly inhibit athletic performance which might verify that their structure and design have caused no complication in the normal function of the knee joint. Moreover, it could be speculated that, if the brace or the sleeves had any limiting effect, our young healthy athletic subjects were well able to generate a mean peak torque large enough to overcome this possible restriction. Further studies are suggested to investigate the long term effect of these prophylactic knee brace and sleeves as well as their possible effect on the adjacent joints to the knee. PMID:23185549

  9. Q-angle in patellofemoral pain: relationship with dynamic knee valgus, hip abductor torque, pain and function☆

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Gabriel Peixoto Leão; Silva, Ana Paula de Moura Campos Carvalho e; França, Fábio Jorge Renovato; Magalhães, Maurício Oliveira; Burke, Thomaz Nogueira; Marques, Amélia Pasqual

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the q-angle and anterior knee pain severity, functional capacity, dynamic knee valgus and hip abductor torque in women with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Methods This study included 22 women with PFPS. The q-angle was assessed using goniometry: the participants were positioned in dorsal decubitus with the knee and hip extended, and the hip and foot in neutral rotation. Anterior knee pain severity was assessed using a visual analog scale, and functional capacity was assessed using the anterior knee pain scale. Dynamic valgus was evaluated using the frontal plane projection angle (FPPA) of the knee, which was recorded using a digital camera during step down, and hip abductor peak torque was recorded using a handheld dynamometer. Results The q-angle did not present any significant correlation with severity of knee pain (r = −0.29; p = 0.19), functional capacity (r = −0.08; p = 0.72), FPPA (r = −0.28; p = 0.19) or isometric peak torque of the abductor muscles (r = −0.21; p = 0.35). Conclusion The q-angle did not present any relationship with pain intensity, functional capacity, FPPA, or hip abductor peak torque in the patients with PFPS. PMID:27069887

  10. Knee MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the knee joint and ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  11. Anterior knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... places extra stress on the kneecap (such as running, jumping or twisting, skiing, or playing soccer). You ... noticeable with: Deep knee bends Going down stairs Running downhill Standing up after sitting for awhile

  12. Total Knee Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... as anti- inflammatory medications, cortisone injections, lubricating injections, physical therapy, or other surgeries A knee that has become ... your function. Other treatment options — including medications, injections, physical therapy, or other types of surgery — will also be ...

  13. Tourniquetless Total Knee Arthroplasty

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Tourniquetless Total Knee Arthroplasty You must have Javascript enabled in your web browser. View Program Transcript Click Here to view the OR-Live, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2010 OR- ...

  14. Knee arthroscopy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... is cartilage that cushions the space between the bones in the knee. Surgery is done to repair or remove it. Torn or damaged anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) or posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) Inflamed or damaged lining of the joint. This ...

  15. Knee arthroscopy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... knee arthroscopy). You may have been checked for: Torn meniscus. Meniscus is cartilage that cushions the space ... Surgery is done to repair or remove it. Torn or damaged anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) or posterior ...

  16. Taking care of your new knee joint

    MedlinePlus

    Knee arthroplasty - precautions; Knee replacement - precautions ... After you have knee replacement surgery , you will need to be careful about how you move your knee, especially for the first few months after ...

  17. Knee Flexion and Daily Activities in Patients following Total Knee Replacement: A Comparison with ISO Standard 14243

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Markus A.; Nechtow, William; Schwenke, Thorsten; Moisio, Kirsten C.

    2015-01-01

    Walking is only one of many daily activities performed by patients following total knee replacement (TKR). The purpose of this study was to examine the hypotheses (a) that subject activity characteristics are correlated with knee flexion range of motion (ROM) and (b) that there is a significant difference between the subject's flexion/extension excursion throughout the day and the ISO specified input for knee wear testing. In order to characterize activity, the number of walking and stair stepping cycles, the time spent with dynamic and stationary activities, the number of activity sequences, and the knee flexion/extension excursion of 32 TKR subjects were collected during daily activity. Flexion/extension profiles were compared with the ISO 14243 simulator input profile using a level crossing classification algorithm. Subjects took an average of 3102 (range: 343–5857) walking cycles including 65 (range: 0–319) stair stepping cycles. Active and passive ROMs were positively correlated with stair walking time, stair step counts, and stair walking sequences. Simulated knee motion according to ISO showed significantly fewer level crossings at the flexion angles 20–40° and beyond 50° than those measured with the monitor. This suggests that implant wear testing protocols should contain more cycles and a variety of activities requiring higher knee flexion angles with incorporated resting/transition periods to account for the many activity sequences. PMID:26347875

  18. Reading Knee-Deep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewett, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    Freire told his audience at a seminar at the University of Massachusetts, "You need to read knee-deep in texts, for deeper than surface meanings, and you need to know the words to be able to do it" (quoted in Cleary, 2003). In a children's literature class, fifteen teachers and I traveled along a path that moved us toward reading knee-deep as we…

  19. Dashboard (in the) knee.

    PubMed

    Patel, M S; Qureshi, A A; Green, T P

    2015-03-01

    We present the case of a 19-year-old individual presenting to an orthopaedic outpatient clinic several months following a dashboard knee injury during a road traffic accident with intermittent mechanical symptoms. Despite unremarkable examination findings and normal magnetic resonance imaging, the patient was identified subsequently as having an intra-articular plastic foreign body consistent with a piece of dashboard on arthroscopic knee assessment, the retrieval of which resulted in a complete resolution of symptoms. PMID:25723676

  20. +Gz tolerance in man after 14-day bedrest periods with isometric and isotonic exercise conditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Haines, R. F.; Sandler, H.; Bernauer, E. M.; Morse, J. T.; Armbruster, R.; Sagan, L.; Van Beaumont, W.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of isometric and isotonic exercise training on post-bedrest +Gz tolerance were determined. In general, 14-day bedrest resulted in a significant loss of Gz tolerance, as previously discovered. At 2.1 Gz, neither the isometric nor the isotonic exercises regimens resulted in a significant increase in post-bedrest Gz tolerance. However, following isometric exercise, restoration of about half the tolerance decrement occurred at 3.2 Gz and 3.8 Gz. Possible reasons for this partial restoration of tolerance are put forward.

  1. In vivo human knee joint dynamic properties as functions of muscle contraction and joint position.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L Q; Nuber, G; Butler, J; Bowen, M; Rymer, W Z

    1998-01-01

    Information on the dynamic properties (joint stiffness, viscosity and limb inertia) of the human knee joint is scarce in the literature, especially for actively contracting knee musculature. A joint driving device was developed to apply small-amplitude random perturbations to the human knee at several flexion angles with the subject maintaining various levels of muscle contraction. It was found that joint stiffness and viscosity increased with muscle contraction substantially, while limb inertia was constant. Stiffness produced by the quadriceps was highest at 30 degrees flexion and decreased with increasing or decreasing flexion angle, while knee flexors produced highest stiffness at 90 degree flexion. When knee flexion was < 60 degrees, stiffness produced by the quadriceps was higher than that of the hamstrings and gastrocnemius at the same level of background muscle torque, while knee flexor muscles produced higher stiffnesses than the quadriceps at 90 degree flexion. Similar but less obvious trends were observed for joint viscosity. Passive joint stiffness at full knee extension was significantly higher than in more flexed positions. Surprisingly, as the knee joint musculature changed from relaxed to contracting at 50% MVC, system damping ratio remained at about 0.2. This outcome potentially simplifies neuromuscular control of the knee joint. In contrast, the natural undamped frequency increased more than twofold, potentially making the knee joint respond more quickly to the central nervous system commands. The approach described here provides us with a potentially valuable tool to quantify in vivo dynamic properties of normal and pathological human knee joints. PMID:9596540

  2. Nonsurgical or Surgical Treatment of ACL Injuries: Knee Function, Sports Participation, and Knee Reinjury

    PubMed Central

    Grindem, Hege; Eitzen, Ingrid; Engebretsen, Lars; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Risberg, May Arna

    2014-01-01

    Background: While there are many opinions about the expected knee function, sports participation, and risk of knee reinjury following nonsurgical treatment of injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), there is a lack of knowledge about the clinical course following nonsurgical treatment compared with that after surgical treatment. Methods: This prospective cohort study included 143 patients with an ACL injury. Isokinetic knee extension and flexion strength and patient-reported knee function as recorded on the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) 2000 form were collected at baseline, six weeks, and two years. Sports participation was reported monthly for two years with use of an online activity survey. Knee reinjuries were reported at the follow-up evaluations and in a monthly online survey. Repeated analysis of variance (ANOVA), generalized estimating equation (GEE) models, and Cox regression analysis were used to analyze group differences in functional outcomes, sports participation, and knee reinjuries, respectively. Results: The surgically treated patients (n = 100) were significantly younger, more likely to participate in level-I sports, and less likely to participate in level-II sports prior to injury than the nonsurgically treated patients (n = 43). There were no significant group-by-time effects on functional outcome. The crude analysis showed that surgically treated patients were more likely to sustain a knee reinjury and to participate in level-I sports in the second year of the follow-up period. After propensity score adjustment, these differences were nonsignificant; however, the nonsurgically treated patients were significantly more likely to participate in level-II sports during the first year of the follow-up period and in level-III sports over the two years. After two years, 30% of all patients had an extensor strength deficit, 31% had a flexor strength deficit, 20% had patient-reported knee function below the normal range, and

  3. Knee osteoarthritis image registration: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galván-Tejada, Jorge I.; Celaya-Padilla, José M.; Treviño, Victor; Tamez-Peña, José G.

    2015-03-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a very common disease, in early stages, changes in joint structures are shown, some of the most common symptoms are; formation of osteophytes, cartilage degradation and joint space reduction, among others. Based on a joint space reduction measurement, Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale, is a very extensive used tool to asses radiological OA knee x-ray images, based on information obtained from these assessments, the objective of this work is to correlate the Kellgren-Lawrence score to the bilateral asymmetry between knees. Using public data from the Osteoarthritis initiative (OAI), a set of images with different Kellgren-Lawrencescores were used to determine a relationship of Kellgren-Lawrence score and the bilateral asymmetry, in order to measure the asymmetry between the knees, the right knee was registered to match the left knee, then a series of similarity metrics, mutual information, correlation, and mean squared error where computed to correlate the deformation (mismatch) of the knees to the Kellgren-Lawrence score. Radiological information was evaluated and scored by OAI radiologist groups. The results of the study suggest an association between Radiological Kellgren-Lawrence score and image registration metrics, mutual information and correlation is higher in the early stages, and mean squared error is higher in advanced stages. This association can be helpful to develop a computer aided grading tool.

  4. Locally isometric and conformal parameterization of image manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, A. V.; Kuleshov, A. P.; Yanovich, Yu. A.

    2015-12-01

    Images can be represented as vectors in a high-dimensional Image space with components specifying light intensities at image pixels. To avoid the `curse of dimensionality', the original high-dimensional image data are transformed into their lower-dimensional features preserving certain subject-driven data properties. These properties can include `information-preserving' when using the constructed low-dimensional features instead of original high-dimensional vectors, as well preserving the distances and angles between the original high-dimensional image vectors. Under the commonly used Manifold assumption that the high-dimensional image data lie on or near a certain unknown low-dimensional Image manifold embedded in an ambient high-dimensional `observation' space, a constructing of the lower-dimensional features consists in constructing an Embedding mapping from the Image manifold to Feature space, which, in turn, determines a low-dimensional parameterization of the Image manifold. We propose a new geometrically motivated Embedding method which constructs a low-dimensional parameterization of the Image manifold and provides the information-preserving property as well as the locally isometric and conformal properties.

  5. Clipped random wave analysis of isometric lamellar microemulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Choy, Dawen; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2000-04-01

    We have made small angle neutron scattering studies of C{sub 10}E{sub 4}-D{sub 2}O-octane isometric microemulsions in the lamellar phase at the hydrophile-lipophile balance temperature. The scattering intensity distributions were then analyzed with a particular choice of a spectral density function (SDF) derived by maximization of generalized entropy. The model agrees well with the measured intensities on an absolute scale, and allowed us to derive various length scales associated with the microemulsion mesoscopic structure as well as the average interfacial curvatures. We also used the experimentally determined SDF to generate a three-dimensional snapshot of the fluctuating microemulsion microstructure. Unlike conventional pictures of extended lamellar planes, we observed small domains which were internally lamellar but randomly oriented with respect to each other. Finally, we computed the probability distributions of the mean curvature H and the Gaussian curvature K on the oil-water interface. The former showed a symmetric distribution centered around H = 0, while the latter showed a skewed distribution peaked at a negative value of K, but with a wing extending to positive values. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  6. Measurement of force sense reproduction in the knee joint: application of a new dynamometric device

    PubMed Central

    Zavieh,, Minoo Khalkhali; Amirshakeri,, Bahram; Rezasoltani,, Asghar; Talebi,, Ghadam Ali; Kalantari,, Khosro Khademi; Nedaey,, Vahab; Baghban,, Alireza Akbarzadeh

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of a newly designed dynamometric device for use in frequent force producing/reproducing tasks on the knee joint. [Subjects and Methods] In this cross-sectional study (Development & Reliability), 30 young healthy males and females (age 23.4 ± 2.48 years) were selected among students of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences by simple randomized selection. The study instrument was designed to measure any isometric contraction force exerted by the knee joint flexor/extensor muscles, known as the ipsilateral and contralateral methods. Participant knees were fixed in 60° flexion, and each participant completed the entire set of measurements twice, 72 hours apart. [Results] The findings showed a good intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.73 to 0.81 for all muscle groups. The standard error of measurement and smallest detectable difference for flexor muscle groups were 0.37 and 1.02, respectively, while the values increased to standard error of measurement=0.38 and smallest detectable difference=1.05 for extensor muscle groups. [Conclusion] The device designed could quantify the forces producing/reproducing tasks on the knee joint with a high rate of reliability, and can probably be applied for outcome measurements in proprioceptive assessment of the knee joint.

  7. NAVIGATION IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire

    2015-01-01

    Navigation was the most significant advance in instrumentation for total knee arthroplasty over the last decade. It provides surgeons with a precision tool for carrying out surgery, with the possibility of intraoperative simulation and objective control over various anatomical and surgical parameters and references. Since the first systems, which were basically used to control the alignment of bone cutting referenced to the mechanical axis of the lower limb, many other surgical steps have been incorporated, such as component rotation, ligament balancing and arranging the symmetry of flexion and extension spaces, among others. Its efficacy as a precision tool with an effective capacity for promoting better alignment of the lower-limb axis has been widely proven in the literature, but the real value of optimized alignment and the impact of navigation on clinical results and the longevity of arthroplasty have yet to be established. PMID:27026979

  8. Validation and Reliability of a Novel Test of Upper Body Isometric Strength

    PubMed Central

    Bellar, David; Marcus, Lena; Judge, Lawrence W.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the association of a novel test of upper body isometric strength against a 1RM bench press measurement. Forty college age adults (n = 20 female, n = 20 male; age 22.8 ± 2.8 years; body height 171.6 ± 10.8 cm; body mass 73.5 ± 16.3 kg; body fat 23.1 ± 5.4%) volunteered for the present investigation. The participants reported to the lab on three occasions. The first visit included anthropometric measurements and familiarization with both the upper body isometric test and bench press exercise. The final visits were conducted in a randomized order, with one being a 1RM assessment on the bench press and the other consisting of three trials of the upper body isometric assessment. For the isometric test, participants were positioned in a “push-up” style position while tethered (stainless steel chain) to a load cell (high frequency) anchored to the ground. The peak isometric force was consistent across all three trials (ICC = 0.98) suggesting good reliability. Multiple regression analysis was completed with the predictors: peak isometric force, gender, against the outcome variable 1RM bench press. The analysis resulted in a significant model (r2 = 0.861, p≤0.001) with all predictor variables attaining significance in the model (p<0.05). Isometric peak strength had the greatest effect on the model (Beta = 5.19, p≤0.001). Results from this study suggest that the described isometric upper body strength assessment is likely a valid and reliable tool to determine strength. Further research is warranted to gather a larger pool of data in regard to this assessment. PMID:26557203

  9. A standardized approach to study human variability in isometric thermogenesis during low-intensity physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Sarafian, Delphine; Miles-Chan, Jennifer L.; Yepuri, Gayathri; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Schutz, Yves; Dulloo, Abdul G.

    2013-01-01

    Limitations of current methods: The assessment of human variability in various compartments of daily energy expenditure (EE) under standardized conditions is well defined at rest [as basal metabolic rate (BMR) and thermic effect of feeding (TEF)], and currently under validation for assessing the energy cost of low-intensity dynamic work. However, because physical activities of daily life consist of a combination of both dynamic and isometric work, there is also a need to develop standardized tests for assessing human variability in the energy cost of low-intensity isometric work. Experimental objectives: Development of an approach to study human variability in isometric thermogenesis by incorporating a protocol of intermittent leg press exercise of varying low-intensity isometric loads with measurements of EE by indirect calorimetry. Results: EE was measured in the seated position with the subject at rest or while intermittently pressing both legs against a press-platform at 5 low-intensity isometric loads (+5, +10, +15, +20, and +25 kg force), each consisting of a succession of 8 cycles of press (30 s) and rest (30 s). EE, integrated over each 8-min period of the intermittent leg press exercise, was found to increase linearly across the 5 isometric loads with a correlation coefficient (r) > 0.9 for each individual. The slope of this EE-Load relationship, which provides the energy cost of this standardized isometric exercise expressed per kg force applied intermittently (30 s in every min), was found to show good repeatability when assessed in subjects who repeated the same experimental protocol on 3 separate days: its low intra-individual coefficient of variation (CV) of ~ 10% contrasted with its much higher inter-individual CV of 35%; the latter being mass-independent but partly explained by height. Conclusion: This standardized approach to study isometric thermogenesis opens up a new avenue for research in EE phenotyping and metabolic predisposition to obesity

  10. Injuries to the posterior cruciate ligament of the knee.

    PubMed

    Kannus, P; Bergfeld, J; Järvinen, M; Johnson, R J; Pope, M; Renström, P; Yasuda, K

    1991-08-01

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is the strongest ligament about the knee and is approximately twice as strong as the anterior cruciate ligament. Its main function is to prevent the posterior dislocation of the tibia in relation to the femur, providing 95% of the strength to resist the tibial posterior displacement. Along with the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) the PCL controls the passive 'screw home' mechanism of the knee in terminal knee extension. It also provides mechanical support for the collateral ligaments during valgus or varus stress of the knee. PCL ruptures are uncommon apparently due to its strong fibre structure. The most frequent injury mechanism in isolated PCL tears is a direct blow on the anterior tibia with the knee flexed thus driving the tibia posteriorly. Automobile accidents (in which the knee hits the dashboard) and soccer injuries (in which an athlete receives a blow to the anterior surface of the tibia during knee flexion) characteristically produce this type of injury. In other PCL injury mechanisms (hyperextension, hyperflexion or rotational injuries with associated valgum/varum stress), other knee structures are also often damaged. The most characteristic diagnostic finding in a knee with a PCL rupture is the 'posterior sag sign' meaning the apparent disappearance of the tibial tubercle in lateral inspection when the knee is flexed 90 degrees. This is due to gravity-assisted posterior displacement of the tibia in relation to the femur. A positive posterior drawer test performed at 90 degrees of flexion and a knee hyperextension sign are sensitive but nonspecific tests. False negative findings are frequent, especially in acute cases. If necessary, the clinical diagnosis of the PCL tear can be verified by magnetic resonance imaging, examination under anaesthesia, arthroscopy, or a combination of these modalities. If a PCL avulsion fragment has been dislocated, surgical treatment is recommended. In isolated, complete midsubstance

  11. Recovery Kinetics of Knee Flexor and Extensor Strength after a Football Match

    PubMed Central

    Draganidis, Dimitrios; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Avloniti, Alexandra; Barbero-Álvarez, José C.; Mohr, Magni; Malliou, Paraskevi; Gourgoulis, Vassilios; Deli, Chariklia K.; Douroudos, Ioannis I.; Margonis, Konstantinos; Gioftsidou, Asimenia; Fouris, Andreas D.; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Fatouros, Ioannis G.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the temporal changes of isokinetic strength performance of knee flexor (KF) and extensor (KE) strength after a football match. Players were randomly assigned to a control (N = 14, participated only in measurements and practices) or an experimental group (N = 20, participated also in a football match). Participants trained daily during the two days after the match. Match and training overload was monitored with GPS devices. Venous blood was sampled and muscle damage was assessed pre-match, post-match and at 12h, 36h and 60h post-match. Isometric strength as well as eccentric and concentric peak torque of knee flexors and extensors in both limbs (dominant and non-dominant) were measured on an isokinetic dynamometer at baseline and at 12h, 36h and 60h after the match. Functional (KFecc/KEcon) and conventional (KFcon/KEcon) ratios were then calculated. Only eccentric peak torque of knee flexors declined at 60h after the match in the control group. In the experimental group: a) isometric strength of knee extensors and knee flexors declined (P<0.05) at 12h (both limbs) and 36h (dominant limb only), b) eccentric and concentric peak torque of knee extensors and flexors declined (P<0.05) in both limbs for 36h at 60°/s and for 60h at 180°/s with eccentric peak torque of knee flexors demonstrating a greater (P<0.05) reduction than concentric peak torque, c) strength deterioration was greater (P<0.05) at 180°/s and in dominant limb, d) the functional ratio was more sensitive to match-induced fatigue demonstrating a more prolonged decline. Discriminant and regression analysis revealed that strength deterioration and recovery may be related to the amount of eccentric actions performed during the match and athletes' football-specific conditioning. Our data suggest that recovery kinetics of knee flexor and extensor strength after a football match demonstrate strength, limb and velocity specificity and may depend on match physical overload and players' physical

  12. Physical characteristics as predictors of quadriceps muscle isometric strength: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hamzat, T K

    2001-09-01

    This one-group experimental study was carried out to investigate the relationship between isometric strength of quadriceps femoris muscle group and physical characteristics of subjects namely: age; weight; and height. Prediction equations were also derived for quadriceps isometric strength from these physical characteristics. Fifty volunteer, right-legged healthy normal male subjects participated in the study. They were aged between 19 and 27 years. The subjects had no previous history of neuromuscular and skeletal injuries to the lower limbs. Their ages, height and weight were measured in years, centimeters and kilograms, respectively. Quadriceps isometric strength was measured using an adapted cable tensiometer (ACT) and recorded in kilogramforce (kgf). Pearson's product correlation co-efficient (r) was used to study the relationship between quadriceps strength and each of age, height and weight. Linear and multiple regression analyses were also carried out. The result showed a high and positive Pearson's moment correlation coefficient (r) between quadriceps isometric strength and each of weight and height. A positive but low correlation (r) was also found between age and quadriceps isometric strength. Prediction equations were also derived from the linear and regression analyses. The study concluded that there was linear relationship between the physical characteristics and quadriceps isometric strength. It was recommended that the prediction equation be employed to estimate quadriceps strength while setting muscle strengthening goals in the clinics during medical rehabilitation for patients within the age range used in this study. PMID:14510124

  13. Elongation of the collateral ligaments after cruciate retaining total knee arthroplasty and the maximum flexion of the knee.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwan Kyu; Hosseini, Ali; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Kwon, Young-Min; Li, Guoan

    2015-02-01

    The mechanisms that affect knee flexion after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are still debatable. This study investigated the elongation of the superficial medial (sMCL) and lateral collateral ligaments (LCL) before and after a posterior cruciate retaining (CR) TKA. We hypothesized that overstretching of the collateral ligaments in high flexion after TKA could reduce maximal flexion of the knee. Three-dimensional models of 11 osteoarthritic knees of 11 patients including the insertions of the collateral ligaments were created using MR images. Each ligament was divided into three equal portions: anterior, middle and posterior portions. The shortest 3D wrapping length of each ligament portion was determined before and after the TKA surgery along a weight-bearing, single leg flexion path. The relationship between the changes of ligament elongation and the changes of the maximal knee flexion after TKAs was quantitatively analyzed. The sMCL showed significant increases in length only at low flexion after TKA; the LCL showed decreases in length at full extension, but increases with further flexion after TKA. The amount of increases of the maximum flexion angle after TKA was negatively correlated with the increases of the elongations of the anterior portion (p=0.010, r=0.733) and middle portion (p=0.049, r=0.604) of the sMCL as well as the anterior portion (p=0.010, r=0.733) of the LCL at maximal flexion of the knee. The results indicated that the increases of the length of the collateral ligaments at maximal flexion after TKA were associated with the decreases of the maximal flexion of the knee. Our data suggest that collateral ligament management should also be evaluated at higher knee flexion angles in order to optimize maximal flexion of the knee after TKAs. PMID:25555307

  14. A cadaver knee simulator to evaluate the biomechanics of rectus femoris transfer.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Michael C; Brown, Nicholas A T; Bachus, Kent N; Macwilliams, Bruce A

    2009-07-01

    A cadaver knee simulator has been developed to model surgical transfer of the rectus femoris. The simulator allows knee specimens six degrees of freedom and is capable of modeling both the swing and stance phases of human gait. Experiments were conducted using a mechanical hinge analog of the knee to verify that time, flexion angle, and knee extension force measurements recorded when using the simulator were not influenced by its design or operation. A ballistic double pendulum model was used to model the swing phase of gait, and the contributions of hip and ankle torques and hamstrings cocontraction were included when modeling the stance phase of gait. When modeling swing, range of motion and time to peak knee flexion in swing for the hinge knee were similar to those of in vivo test subjects. Measurements of hinge knee extension force when modeling stance under various biomechanical conditions matched those predicted using an analytical model. Future studies using cadaver knee specimens will apply techniques described in this paper to further our understanding of changes in knee biomechanics caused by rectus femoris transfer surgery. PMID:19403312

  15. Cementless total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Salvatore; Sabatini, Luigi; Giachino, Matteo; Agati, Gabriele; Massè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Interest for uncemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has greatly increased in recent years. This technique, less used than cemented knee replacement in the last decades, sees a revival thanks an advance in prosthetic design, instrumentation and operative technique. The related literature in some cases shows conflicting data on survival and on the revision’s rate, but in most cases a success rate comparable to cemented TKA is reported. The optimal fixation in TKA is a subject of debate with the majority of surgeons favouring cemented fixation. PMID:27162779

  16. Impaired varus-valgus proprioception and neuromuscular stabilization in medial knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alison H; Lee, Song Joo; Zhao, Heng; Ren, Yupeng; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-22

    Impaired proprioception and poor muscular stabilization in the frontal plane may lead to knee instability during functional activities, a common complaint in persons with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Understanding these frontal plane neuromechanical properties in KOA will help elucidate the factors contributing to knee instability and aid in the development of targeted intervention strategies. The objectives of the study were to compare knee varus-valgus proprioception, isometric muscle strength, and active muscular contribution to stability between persons with medial KOA and healthy controls. We evaluated knee frontal plane neuromechanical parameters in 14 participants with medial KOA and 14 age- and gender-matched controls, using a joint driving device (JDD) with a customized motor and a 6-axis force sensor. Analysis of covariance with BMI as a covariate was used to test the differences in varus-valgus neuromechanical parameters between these two groups. The KOA group had impaired varus proprioception acuity (1.08±0.59° vs. 0.69±0.49°, p<0.05), decreased normalized varus muscle strength (1.31±0.75% vs. 1.79±0.84% body weight, p<0.05), a trend toward decreased valgus strength (1.29±0.67% vs. 1.88±0.99%, p=0.054), and impaired ability to actively stabilize the knee in the frontal plane during external perturbation (4.67±2.86 vs. 8.26±5.95 Nm/degree, p<0.05). The knee frontal plane sensorimotor control system is compromised in persons with medial KOA. Our findings suggest varus-valgus control deficits in both the afferent input (proprioceptive acuity) and muscular effectors (muscle strength and capacity to stabilize the joint). PMID:24321442

  17. Impaired Varus-Valgus Proprioception and Neuromuscular Stabilization in Medial Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alison H.; Lee, Song Joo; Zhao, Heng; Ren, Yupeng; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Impaired proprioception and poor muscular stabilization in the frontal plane may lead to knee instability during functional activities, a common complaint in persons with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Understanding these frontal plane neuromechanical properties in KOA will help elucidate the factors contributing to knee instability and aid in the development of targeted intervention strategies. The study objectives were to compare knee varus-valgus proprioception, isometric muscle strength, and active muscular contribution to stability between persons with medial KOA and healthy controls. We evaluated knee frontal plane neuromechanical parameters in 14 participants with medial KOA and 14 age- and gender-matched controls, using a joint driving device (JDD) with a customized motor and a 6-axis force sensor. Analysis of covariance with BMI as a covariate was used to test the differences in varus-valgus neuromechanical parameters between these two groups. The KOA group had impaired varus proprioception acuity (1.08 ± 0.59° vs. 0.69 ± 0.49°, p < 0.05), decreased normalized varus muscle strength (1.31 ± 0.75% vs. 1.79 ± 0.84% body weight, p < 0.05), a trend toward decreased valgus strength (1.29 ± 0.67% vs. 1.88 ± 0.99%, p = 0.054), and impaired ability to actively stabilize the knee in the frontal plane during external perturbation (4.67 ± 2.86 vs. 8.26 ± 5.95 Nm/degree, p < 0.05). The knee frontal plane sensorimotor control system is compromised in persons with medial KOA. Our findings suggest varus-valgus control deficits in both the afferent input (proprioceptive acuity) and muscular effectors (muscle strength and capacity to stabilize the joint). PMID:24321442

  18. The influence of knee position on ankle dorsiflexion - a biometric study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Musculus gastrocnemius tightness (MGT) can be diagnosed by comparing ankle dorsiflexion (ADF) with the knee extended and flexed. Although various measurement techniques exist, the degree of knee flexion needed to eliminate the effect of the gastrocnemius on ADF is still unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the minimal degree of knee flexion required to eliminate the restricting effect of the musculus gastrocnemius on ADF. Methods Bilateral ADF of 20 asymptomatic volunteers aged 18-40 years (50% female) was assessed prospectively at six different degrees of knee flexion (0°, 20°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, Lunge). Tests were performed following a standardized protocol, non weightbearing and weightbearing, by two observers. Statistics comprised of descriptive statistics, t-tests, repeated measurement ANOVA and ICC. Results 20 individuals with a mean age of 27 ± 4 years were tested. No significant side to side differences were observed. The average ADF [95% confidence interval] for non weightbearing was 4° [1°-8°] with the knee extended and 20° [16°-24°] for the knee 75° flexed. Mean weightbearing ADF was 25° [22°-28°] for the knee extended and 39° [36°-42°] for the knee 75° flexed. The mean differences between 20° knee flexion and full extension were 15° [12°-18°] non weightbearing and 13° [11°-16°] weightbearing. Significant differences of ADF were only found between full extension and 20° of knee flexion. Further knee flexion did not increase ADF. Conclusion Knee flexion of 20° fully eliminates the ADF restraining effect of the gastrocnemius. This knowledge is essential to design a standardized clinical examination assessing MGT. PMID:25053374

  19. Dynamic and static control of the human knee joint in abduction-adduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L Q; Wang, G

    2001-09-01

    It is unclear whether humans can voluntarily control dynamic and static properties in knee abduction-adduction, which may be important in performing functional tasks and preventing injuries, whether the main load is about the abduction axis or not. A joint-driving device was used to perturb the knee in abduction-adduction at full knee extension under both passive (muscle relaxed) and active (muscle contracted in abduction or adduction) conditions. Dynamic control properties in knee abduction-adduction were characterized by joint stiffness, viscosity, and limb inertia, and quasi-static knee torque-angle relationship was characterized by knee abduction-adduction laxity and quasi-static stiffness (at a 20Nm moment). It was found that the subjects were capable of generating net abduction and adduction moment through differential co-contraction of muscles crossing the medial and lateral sides of the knee, which helped to reduce the abduction-adduction joint laxity (p< or =0.01) and increase stiffness (p<0.027) and viscous damping. Knee abduction laxity was significantly lower than adduction laxity (p=0.043) and the quasi-static abduction stiffness was significantly higher than adduction stiffness (p<0.001). The knee joint showed significantly higher stiffness and viscosity in abduction-adduction than their counterparts in knee flexion-extension at comparable levels of joint torque (p<0.05). Similar to dynamic flexion-extension properties, the system damping ratio remained constant over different levels of contraction, indicating simplified control tasks for the central nervous system; while the natural undamped frequency increased considerably with abduction-adduction muscle contraction, presumably making the knee a quicker system during strenuous tasks involving strong muscle contraction. PMID:11506781

  20. Acute patellar dislocation with multiple ligament injuries after knee dislocation and single session reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Gormeli, Gokay; Gormeli, Cemile Ayse; Karakaplan, Mustafa; Gurbuz, Sukru; Ozdemir, Zeynep; Ozer, Mustafa

    2016-06-01

    Knee dislocation is a relatively rare condition of all orthopaedic injuries. Accompanying multiple ligament injuries are common after knee dislocations. A 41-year-old male presented to the emergency department suffering from right knee dislocation in June 2013. The patient had anterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament (MCL), medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) rupture, and lateral meniscal tear. A single-bundle anatomic reconstruction, medial collateral ligament reconstruction, medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction and meniscus repair were performed in single session. At twelve months follow-up; there was 160º flexion and 10° extension knee range of motion. Lysholm knee score was 90. Extensive forces can cause both MCL and MPFL injury due to overload and the anatomical relationship between these two structures. Therefore, patients with valgus instability should be evaluated for both MPFL and MCL tears to facilitate successful treatment. PMID:27339584

  1. Acute Patellar Tendon Rupture after Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Seung Joon; Pham, The Hien

    2015-01-01

    Patellar tendon rupture is a catastrophic complication following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Though revision TKA has been suspected of being a predisposing factor for the occurrence of patellar tendon rupture, there are few reports on patellar tendon rupture after revision TKA. Here, we present a case of acute patellar tendon rupture that occurred after TKA revision. In the patient, the patellar tendon was so thin and could not be repaired, and accordingly was sutured end to end. We used the anterior tibialis tendon allograft to augment the poor quality patellar tendon tissue. Fixation of the allograft was done by using the bone tunnel created through tibial tuberosity and suturing the allograft to the patellar tendon and quadriceps tendon. The patient was instructed to wear a full extension knee splint and was kept non-weight bearing for 6 weeks after operation. Full knee extension could be achieved 6 weeks postoperatively. PMID:26060612

  2. Hypermobility and Knee Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Mark E.

    1987-01-01

    A review of research on the effect of hypermobility on knee injury indicates that greater than normal joint flexibility may be necessary for some athletic endeavors and that it may be possible to change one's underlying flexibility through training. However, for most athletes, inherited flexibility probably plays only a small role, if any, in…

  3. Influence of Total Knee Arthroplasty on Gait Mechanics of the Replaced and Non-Replaced Limb During Stair Negotiation.

    PubMed

    Standifird, Tyler W; Saxton, Arnold M; Coe, Dawn P; Cates, Harold E; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Zhang, Songning

    2016-01-01

    This study compared biomechanics during stair ascent in replaced and non-replaced limbs of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients with control limbs of healthy participants. Thirteen TKA patients and fifteen controls performed stair ascent. Replaced and non-replaced knees of TKA patients were less flexed at contact compared to controls. The loading response peak knee extension moment was greater in control and non-replaced knees compared with replaced. The push-off peak knee abduction moment was elevated in replaced limbs compared to controls. Loading and push-off peak hip abduction moments were greater in replaced limbs compared to controls. The push-off peak hip abduction moment was greater in non-replaced limbs compared to controls. Future rehabilitation protocols should consider the replaced knee and also the non-replaced knee and surrounding joints. PMID:26231075

  4. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  5. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.136 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly (refer to §§ 572.130(a)(1)(v) and (vi)) for the purpose of...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  7. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly is part of the leg assembly (drawing 127-4000-1 and -2). (b) When the...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  9. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.136 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly (refer to §§ 572.130(a)(1)(v) and (vi)) for the purpose of...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  11. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly is part of the leg assembly (drawing 127-4000-1 and -2). (b) When the...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  13. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly is part of the leg assembly (drawing 127-4000-1 and -2). (b) When the...

  14. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.136 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly (refer to §§ 572.130(a)(1)(v) and (vi)) for the purpose of...

  15. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly is part of the leg assembly (drawing 127-4000-1 and -2). (b) When the...

  16. 49 CFR 572.126 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.126...-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version § 572.126 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly is part of the leg assembly (drawing 127-4000-1 and -2). (b) When the...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  18. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.136 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly (refer to §§ 572.130(a)(1)(v) and (vi)) for the purpose of...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  1. 49 CFR 572.136 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.136... Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version § 572.136 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) Knee assembly. The knee assembly (refer to §§ 572.130(a)(1)(v) and (vi)) for the purpose of...

  2. Biomechanical analysis of the human finger extensor mechanism during isometric pressing.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Howard, David; Ren, Lei

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the finger extensor mechanism on the bone-to-bone contact forces at the interphalangeal and metacarpal joints and also on the forces in the intrinsic and extrinsic muscles during finger pressing. This was done with finger postures ranging from very flexed to fully extended. The role of the finger extensor mechanism was investigated by using two alternative finger models, one which omitted the extensor mechanism and another which included it. A six-camera three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to capture the finger posture during maximum voluntary isometric pressing. The fingertip loads were recorded simultaneously using a force plate system. Two three-dimensional biomechanical finger models, a minimal model without extensor mechanism and a full model with extensor mechanism (tendon network), were used to calculate the joint bone-to-bone contact forces and the extrinsic and intrinsic muscle forces. If the full model is assumed to be realistic, then the results suggest some useful biomechanical advantages provided by the tendon network of the extensor mechanism. It was found that the forces in the intrinsic muscles (interosseus group and lumbrical) are significantly reduced by 22% to 61% due to the action of the extensor mechanism, with the greatest reductions in more flexed postures. The bone-to-bone contact force at the MCP joint is reduced by 10% to 41%. This suggests that the extensor mechanism may help to reduce the risk of injury at the finger joints and also to moderate the forces in intrinsic muscles. These apparent biomechanical advantages may be a result of the extensor mechanism's distinctive interconnected fibrous structure, through which the contraction of the intrinsic muscles as flexors of the MCP joint can generate extensions at the DIP and PIP joints. PMID:24732789

  3. Biomechanical Analysis of the Human Finger Extensor Mechanism during Isometric Pressing

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dan; Howard, David; Ren, Lei

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the finger extensor mechanism on the bone-to-bone contact forces at the interphalangeal and metacarpal joints and also on the forces in the intrinsic and extrinsic muscles during finger pressing. This was done with finger postures ranging from very flexed to fully extended. The role of the finger extensor mechanism was investigated by using two alternative finger models, one which omitted the extensor mechanism and another which included it. A six-camera three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to capture the finger posture during maximum voluntary isometric pressing. The fingertip loads were recorded simultaneously using a force plate system. Two three-dimensional biomechanical finger models, a minimal model without extensor mechanism and a full model with extensor mechanism (tendon network), were used to calculate the joint bone-to-bone contact forces and the extrinsic and intrinsic muscle forces. If the full model is assumed to be realistic, then the results suggest some useful biomechanical advantages provided by the tendon network of the extensor mechanism. It was found that the forces in the intrinsic muscles (interosseus group and lumbrical) are significantly reduced by 22% to 61% due to the action of the extensor mechanism, with the greatest reductions in more flexed postures. The bone-to-bone contact force at the MCP joint is reduced by 10% to 41%. This suggests that the extensor mechanism may help to reduce the risk of injury at the finger joints and also to moderate the forces in intrinsic muscles. These apparent biomechanical advantages may be a result of the extensor mechanism's distinctive interconnected fibrous structure, through which the contraction of the intrinsic muscles as flexors of the MCP joint can generate extensions at the DIP and PIP joints. PMID:24732789

  4. Muscle strategies for leg extensions on a "Reformer" apparatus.

    PubMed

    Cantergi, Débora; Loss, Jefferson Fagundes; Jinha, Azim; Brodt, Guilherme Auler; Herzog, Walter

    2015-04-01

    Considering the kinematics of leg extensions performed on a Reformer apparatus, one would expect high activation of hip and knee extensor muscle groups. However, because of the bi-articular nature of some lower limb muscles, and the possibility to vary the direction of force application on the Reformer bar, muscles can be coordinated theoretically in a variety of ways and still achieve the desired outcome. Hence, the aim of this study was to determine the knee and hip moments during leg extensions performed on the Reformer apparatus and to estimate the forces in individual muscles crossing these joints using static optimization. Fifteen subjects performed leg extensions exercises on the Reformer apparatus using an individually chosen resistance. To our big surprise, we found that subjects performed the exercise using two conceptually different strategies (i) the first group used simultaneous hip and knee extension moments, (ii) while the second group used simultaneous hip flexion and knee extension moments to perform the exercise. These different strategies were achieved by changing the direction of the resultant force applied by the subject's feet on the Reformer bar. While leg extensions on the Reformer apparatus have been thought to strengthen the hip and knee extensors muscles, our results demonstrate that patients can perform the exercise in a different and unexpected way. In order to control the hip and knee moments and achieve the desired outcome of the exercise, the direction of force application on the Reformer bar must be controlled carefully. PMID:25262161

  5. Adapting relative phase of bimanual isometric force coordination through scaling visual information intermittency.

    PubMed

    Lafe, Charley W; Pacheco, Matheus M; Newell, Karl M

    2016-06-01

    Visual information plays an adaptive role in the relation between bimanual force coupling and error corrective processes of isometric force control. In the present study, the evolving distribution of the relative phase properties of bimanual isometric force coupling was examined by scaling within a trial the temporal feedback rate of visual intermittency (short to long presentation intervals and vice versa). The force error (RMSE) was reduced, and time-dependent irregularity (SampEn) of the force output was increased with greater amounts of visual information (shorter intermittency). Multi-stable coordination patterns of bimanual isometric force control were differentially shifted toward and away from the intrinsic dynamics by the changing the intermittency of visual information. The distribution of Hilbert transformed relative phase values showed progressively a predominantly anti-phase mode under less intermittent visual information to predominantly an in-phase mode with limited (almost no) visual information. Correlation between the hands showed a continuous reduction, rather than abrupt "transition," with increase in visual information, although no mean negative correlation was realized, despite the tendency towards an anti-phase distribution. Lastly, changes in both the performance outcome and bimanual isometric force coordination occurred at visual feedback rates faster than the minimal visual processing times established from single limb movement and isometric force protocols. PMID:27017544

  6. Mechanomyographic amplitude and mean power frequency versus torque relationships during isokinetic and isometric muscle actions of the biceps brachii.

    PubMed

    Beck, Travis W; Housh, Terry J; Johnson, Glen O; Weir, Joseph P; Cramer, Joel T; Coburn, Jared W; Malek, Moh H

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the mechanomyographic (MMG) amplitude and mean power frequency (MPF) versus torque (or force) relationships during isokinetic and isometric muscle actions of the biceps brachii. Ten adults (mean +/- SD age = 21.6 +/- 1.7 years) performed submaximal to maximal isokinetic and isometric muscle actions of the dominant forearm flexors. Following determination of isokinetic peak torque (PT) and the isometric maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), the subjects randomly performed submaximal step muscle actions in 10% increments from 10% to 90% PT and MVC. Polynomial regression analyses indicated that MMG amplitude increased linearly with torque during both the isokinetic (r2 = 0.982) and isometric (r2 = 0.956) muscle actions. From 80% to 100% of isometric MVC, however, MMG amplitude appeared to plateau. Cubic models provided the best fit for the MMG MPF versus isokinetic (R2 = 0.786) and isometric (R2 = 0.940) torque relationships, although no significant increase in MMG MPF was found from 10% to 100% of isokinetic PT. For the isometric muscle actions, however, MMG MPF remained relatively stable from 10% to 50% MVC, increased from 50% to 80% MVC, and decreased from 80% to 100% MVC. The results demonstrated differences in the MMG amplitude and MPF versus torque relationships between the isokinetic and isometric muscle actions. These findings suggested that the time and frequency domains of the MMG signal may be useful for describing the unique motor control strategies that modulate dynamic versus isometric torque production. PMID:15301774

  7. Validation of a novel smartphone accelerometer-based knee goniometer.

    PubMed

    Ockendon, Matthew; Gilbert, Robin E

    2012-09-01

    Loss of full knee extension following anterior cruciate ligament surgery has been shown to impair knee function. However, there can be significant difficulties in accurately and reproducibly measuring a fixed flexion of the knee. We studied the interobserver and the intraobserver reliabilities of a novel, smartphone accelerometer-based, knee goniometer and compared it with a long-armed conventional goniometer for the assessment of fixed flexion knee deformity. Five healthy male volunteers (age range 30 to 40 years) were studied. Measurements of knee flexion angle were made with a telescopic-armed goniometer (Lafayette Instrument, Lafayette, IN) and compared with measurements using the smartphone (iPhone 3GS, Apple Inc., Cupertino, CA) knee goniometer using a novel trigonometric technique based on tibial inclination. Bland-Altman analysis of validity and reliability including statistical analysis of correlation by Pearson's method was undertaken. The iPhone goniometer had an interobserver correlation (r) of 0.994 compared with 0.952 for the Lafayette. The intraobserver correlation was r = 0.982 for the iPhone (compared with 0.927). The datasets from the two instruments correlate closely (r = 0.947) are proportional and have mean difference of only -0.4 degrees (SD 3.86 degrees). The Lafayette goniometer had an intraobserver reliability +/- 9.6 degrees. The interobserver reliability was +/- 8.4 degrees. By comparison the iPhone had an interobserver reliability +/- 2.7 degrees and an intraobserver reliability +/- 4.6 degrees. We found the iPhone goniometer to be a reliable tool for the measurement of subtle knee flexion in the clinic setting. PMID:23150162

  8. Total Knee Arthroplasty in Severe Synovial Osteochondromatosis in an Osteoarthritic Knee.

    PubMed

    Deinum, Joukje; Nolte, Peter A

    2016-06-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis (SO) can occur idiopathic or secondary to osteoarthritis. SO can be easily diagnosed with plain film radiography and clinical findings. In case of disabling osteoarthritis, total knee arthroplasty and removal of all corpora libra are indicated. We present a 71-year-old woman with significant osteoarthritis and severe SO intra-articular and in the suprapatellar bursa of the right knee. Total knee arthroplasty, extraction of the loose bodies, and partial synovectomy were performed. During a 2.5-year follow-up, the patient regained full function of her affected knee and there was no recurrence of SO. We choose to present this case to show the extensiveness SO can occur in. Our advice is to remove all the loose bodies carefully to prevent damage to the prosthesis. During follow-up, special attention should be paid to prevent recurrence of SO. When recurrence is associated with rapid growth or destruction of joints, malignant reoccurrence must be considered. PMID:27247750

  9. Total Knee Arthroplasty in Severe Synovial Osteochondromatosis in an Osteoarthritic Knee

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis (SO) can occur idiopathic or secondary to osteoarthritis. SO can be easily diagnosed with plain film radiography and clinical findings. In case of disabling osteoarthritis, total knee arthroplasty and removal of all corpora libra are indicated. We present a 71-year-old woman with significant osteoarthritis and severe SO intra-articular and in the suprapatellar bursa of the right knee. Total knee arthroplasty, extraction of the loose bodies, and partial synovectomy were performed. During a 2.5-year follow-up, the patient regained full function of her affected knee and there was no recurrence of SO. We choose to present this case to show the extensiveness SO can occur in. Our advice is to remove all the loose bodies carefully to prevent damage to the prosthesis. During follow-up, special attention should be paid to prevent recurrence of SO. When recurrence is associated with rapid growth or destruction of joints, malignant reoccurrence must be considered. PMID:27247750

  10. Spontaneous Knee Ankylosis through Heterotopic Ossification after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Boulezaz, Samuel; Gibon, Emmanuel; Loriaut, Philippe; Casabianca, Laurent; Rousseau, Romain; Dallaudiere, Benjamin; Pascal-Moussellard, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a case of total ankylosis of the knee after a cruciate-sacrificing cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA). An 82-year-old female patient previously underwent primary TKA for osteoarthritis twenty years ago in our institution. She had recovered uneventfully and returned to her regular activities. There was no history of postsurgical trauma; however, she progressively lost knee range of motion. Radiographs revealed severe bridging heterotopic ossification. PMID:27119034

  11. Importance of the different posterolateral knee static stabilizers: biomechanical study

    PubMed Central

    Lasmar, Rodrigo Campos Pace; Marques de Almeida, Adriano; Serbino, José Wilson; da Mota Albuquerque, Roberto Freire; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative importance of the different static stabilizers of the posterolateral corner of the knee in cadavers. METHODS Tests were performed with the application of a varus and external rotation force to the knee in extension at 30 and 60 degrees of flexion using 10 cadaver knees. The forces were applied initially to an intact knee and then repeated after a selective sectioning of the ligaments into the following: section of the lateral collateral ligament; section of the lateral collateral ligament and the popliteofibular complex; and section of the lateral collateral ligament, the popliteofibular complex and the posterolateral capsule. The parameters studied were the angular deformity and stiffness when the knees were submitted to a 15 Newton-meter varus torque and a 6 Newton-meter external tibial torque. Statistical analysis was performed using the ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) and Tukey’s tests. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION Our findings showed that the lateral collateral ligament was important in varus stability at 0, 30 and 60 degrees. The popliteofibular complex was the most important structure for external rotation stability at all angles of flexion and was also important for varus stability at 30 and 60 degrees. The posterolateral capsule was important for varus stability at 0 and 30 degrees and for external rotation stability in extension. Level of evidence: Level IV (cadaver study). PMID:20454502

  12. Combined Anterior and Anterolateral Stabilization of the Knee With the Iliotibial Band.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Christian; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Imbert, Pierre; Barbosa, Nuno Camelo; Tuteja, Sanesh; Jaeger, Jean-Henri

    2016-04-01

    Interest and knowledge on the anatomy, function, and biomechanical properties of the anterolateral ligament has led to the recognition of the importance of this structure in rotational control of the knee. This article describes a technique that allows for a combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and anterolateral reconstruction, using an Iliotibial band (ITB) autograft. The graft is detached from the vastus lateralis from proximal to distal, at the center portion from ITB, preserving its distal insertion on the Gerdy tubercle. Its width is 1 cm for the distal part, used for the anterolateral ligament reconstruction, and 3 cm for the proximal part. An outside-in femoral tunnel is drilled respecting both the preferred favorable isometric femoral insertion site and the femoral ACL footprint. An ACL reconstruction combined with a lateral tenodesis with a continuous ITB graft respects the anatomical and isometric rules providing superior internal rotational control of the knee in comparison with a stand-alone ACL reconstruction. PMID:27354943

  13. Effects of 17-day spaceflight on knee extensor muscle function and size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tesch, Per A.; Berg, Hans E.; Bring, Daniel; Evans, Harlan J.; LeBlanc, Adrian D.

    2005-01-01

    It is generally held that space travelers experience muscle dysfunction and atrophy during exposure to microgravity. However, observations are scarce and reports somewhat inconsistent with regard to the time course, specificity and magnitude of such changes. Hence, we examined four male astronauts (group mean approximately 43 years, 86 kg and 183 cm) before and after a 17-day spaceflight (Space Transport System-78). Knee extensor muscle function was measured during maximal bilateral voluntary isometric and iso-inertial concentric, and eccentric actions. Cross-sectional area (CSA) of the knee extensor and flexor, and gluteal muscle groups was assessed by means of magnetic resonance imaging. The decrease in strength (P<0.05) across different muscle actions after spaceflight amounted to 10%. Eight ambulatory men, examined on two occasions 20 days apart, showed unchanged (P>0.05) muscle strength. CSA of the knee extensor and gluteal muscles, each decreased (P<0.05) by 8%. Knee flexor muscle CSA showed no significant (P>0.05) change. The magnitude of these changes concord with earlier results from ground-based studies of similar duration. The results of this study, however, do contrast with the findings of no decrease in maximal voluntary ankle plantar flexor force previously reported in the same crew.

  14. Test-retest reliability of isometric shoulder muscle strength measurement with a handheld dynamometer and belt

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, Munenori

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to develop a method of measuring isometric shoulder joint muscle strength using a handheld dynamometer with a belt and investigate its test-retest reliability. [Subjects] The subjects comprised 40 healthy adults. [Methods] Six types of isometric shoulder muscle strength were measured twice, and reliability was assessed. [Results] The intraclass correlation coefficient (1, 1) values ranged from 0.976 to 0.902. The result of a Bland-Altman analysis showed differences in the types of errors between measurement items. [Conclusion] The relative reliability of isometric shoulder muscle measurement using a handheld dynamometer with a belt was high. However, analysis of absolute reliability revealed errors that may affect interpretation of values; therefore, it was considered that adapting the greater of two measurement values is appropriate. PMID:26180305

  15. Isometric Arm Strength and Subjective Rating of Upper Limb Fatigue in Two-Handed Carrying Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai Way; Chiu, Wen-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Sustained carrying could result in muscular fatigue of the upper limb. Ten male and ten female subjects were recruited for measurements of isometric arm strength before and during carrying a load for a period of 4 minutes. Two levels of load of carrying were tested for each of the male and female subjects. Exponential function based predictive equations for the isometric arm strength were established. The mean absolute deviations of these models in predicting the isometric arm strength were in the range of 3.24 to 17.34 N. Regression analyses between the subjective ratings of upper limb fatigue and force change index (FCI) for the carrying were also performed. The results indicated that the subjective rating of muscular fatigue may be estimated by multiplying the FCI with a constant. The FCI may, therefore, be adopted as an index to assess muscular fatigue for two-handed carrying tasks. PMID:25794159

  16. Elastic properties of an intact and ACL-ruptured knee joint: measurement, mathematical modelling, and haptic rendering.

    PubMed

    Frey, Martin; Riener, Robert; Michas, Christian; Regenfelder, Felix; Burgkart, Rainer

    2006-01-01

    An analytical, dynamic model of the human knee joint has been developed to simulate the unloaded knee joint behaviour in 6 degrees of freedom. It is based on extensive robot-based measurements of the elastic properties of a human cadaver knee joint. The measured data are compared with data from the literature to ensure that a proper database for modelling is used. The analytical modelling of the passive elastic joint properties is done with Local Linear Model Trees. The deduced knee joint model incorporates passive elastic properties of the internal knee joint structures, passive elastic muscle forces, damping forces, gravitational forces, and external forces. There are two sets of parameters, one simulating the movement of the intact knee joint, and a second simulating the knee joint with ruptured anterior cruciate ligament. The dynamic model can be easily processed in real-time. It is implemented in the haptic display of the Munich Knee Joint Simulator (MKS), which enables a person to move a plastic leg driven by a robot manipulator and feel the simulated knee joint force. Orthopaedic physicians judged the performance of the dynamic knee joint model by executing physical knee joint tests at the MKS. PMID:16039659

  17. The effect of mechanical massage on early outcome after total knee arthroplasty: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Mi; Kim, Sang-Rim; Lee, Yong Ki; Kim, Bo Ryun; Han, Eun Young

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of mechanical massage via Endermologie® after total knee arthroplasty in reducing edema and pain and improving knee range of motion, in the early postoperative period. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen patients with knee edema following total knee arthroplasty were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n=8) or the control group (n=10). The intervention group received mechanical massage therapy using Endermologie® and the control group received conventional physical therapy for 20 minutes a day, 5 times a week from the seventh day postsurgery. Clinical assessments included active knee flexion and extension range of motion, knee pain using a numeric rating scale, the operated limb circumference, the soft tissue cross-sectional area using ultrasonography, the extracelluar fluid volume, and single frequency bioimpedance analysis at 5 kHz using bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy. [Results] Both groups showed significant reduction in edema and pain, and improvement in active knee flexion at the end of treatment. There were no significant inter-group differences before or after treatment. [Conclusion] Mechanical massage could be an alternative way of managing knee edema after total knee arthroplasty in early postoperative recovery. PMID:26696709

  18. Higher Neuromuscular Manifestations of Fatigue in Dynamic than Isometric Pull-Up Tasks in Rock Climbers

    PubMed Central

    Boccia, Gennaro; Pizzigalli, Luisa; Formicola, Donato; Ivaldi, Marco; Rainoldi, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular assessment of rock climbers has been mainly focused on forearm muscles in the literature. We aimed to extend the body of knowledge investigating on two other upper limb muscles during sport-specific activities in nine male rock climbers. We assessed neuromuscular manifestations of fatigue recording surface electromyographic signals from brachioradialis and teres major muscles, using multi-channel electrode arrays. Participants performed two tasks until volitional exhaustion: a sequence of dynamic pull-ups and an isometric contraction sustaining the body at half-way of a pull-up (with the elbows flexed at 90°). The tasks were performed in randomized order with 10 minutes of rest in between. The normalized rate of change of muscle fiber conduction velocity was calculated as the index of fatigue. The time-to-task failure was significantly shorter in the dynamic (31 ±10 s) than isometric contraction (59 ±19 s). The rate of decrease of muscle fiber conduction velocity was found steeper in the dynamic than isometric task both in brachioradialis (isometric: −0.2 ±0.1%/s; dynamic: −1.2 ±0.6%/s) and teres major muscles (isometric: −0.4±0.3%/s; dynamic: −1.8±0.7%/s). The main finding was that a sequence of dynamic pull-ups lead to higher fatigue than sustaining the body weight in an isometric condition at half-way of a pull-up. Furthermore, we confirmed the possibility to properly record physiological CV estimates from two muscles, which had never been studied before in rock climbing, in highly dynamic contractions. PMID:26557188

  19. Higher Neuromuscular Manifestations of Fatigue in Dynamic than Isometric Pull-Up Tasks in Rock Climbers.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Gennaro; Pizzigalli, Luisa; Formicola, Donato; Ivaldi, Marco; Rainoldi, Alberto

    2015-09-29

    Neuromuscular assessment of rock climbers has been mainly focused on forearm muscles in the literature. We aimed to extend the body of knowledge investigating on two other upper limb muscles during sport-specific activities in nine male rock climbers. We assessed neuromuscular manifestations of fatigue recording surface electromyographic signals from brachioradialis and teres major muscles, using multi-channel electrode arrays. Participants performed two tasks until volitional exhaustion: a sequence of dynamic pull-ups and an isometric contraction sustaining the body at half-way of a pull-up (with the elbows flexed at 90°). The tasks were performed in randomized order with 10 minutes of rest in between. The normalized rate of change of muscle fiber conduction velocity was calculated as the index of fatigue. The time-to-task failure was significantly shorter in the dynamic (31 ±10 s) than isometric contraction (59 ±19 s). The rate of decrease of muscle fiber conduction velocity was found steeper in the dynamic than isometric task both in brachioradialis (isometric: -0.2 ±0.1%/s; dynamic: -1.2 ±0.6%/s) and teres major muscles (isometric: -0.4±0.3%/s; dynamic: -1.8±0.7%/s). The main finding was that a sequence of dynamic pull-ups lead to higher fatigue than sustaining the body weight in an isometric condition at half-way of a pull-up. Furthermore, we confirmed the possibility to properly record physiological CV estimates from two muscles, which had never been studied before in rock climbing, in highly dynamic contractions. PMID:26557188

  20. Quadriceps intramuscular fat fraction rather than muscle size is associated with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepak; Karampinos, Dimitrios C.; MacLeod, Toran D.; Lin, Wilson; Nardo, Lorenzo; Li, Xiaojuan; Link, Thomas M; Majumdar, Sharmila; Souza, Richard B

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare thigh muscle intramuscular fat (intraMF) fractions and area between people with and without knee radiographic osteoarthritis (ROA); and to evaluate the relationships of quadriceps adiposity and area with strength, function and knee MRI lesions. Methods Ninety six subjects (ROA: KL >1; n = 30, control: KL = 0,1; n = 66) underwent 3-Tesla MRI of the thigh muscles using chemical shift-based water/fat MR imaging (fat fractions) and the knee (clinical grading). Subjects were assessed for isometric/isokinetic quadriceps/hamstrings strength, function (KOOS, stair climbing test [SCT], and 6-minute walk test [(6MWT]. Thigh muscle intraMF fractions, muscle area and strength, and function were compared between controls and ROA subjects, adjusting for age. Relationships between measures of muscle fat/area with strength, function, KL and lesion scores were assessed using regression and correlational analyses. Results The ROA group had worse KOOS scores but SCT and 6MWT were not different. The ROA group had greater quadriceps intraMF fraction but not for other muscles. Quadriceps strength was lower in ROA group but the area was not different. Quadriceps intraMF fraction but not area predicted self-reported disability. Aging, worse KL, and cartilage and meniscus lesions were associated with higher quadriceps intraMF fraction. Conclusion Quadriceps intraMF is higher in people with knee OA and is related to symptomatic and structural severity of knee OA, where as the quadriceps area is not. Quadriceps fat fraction from chemical shift-based water/fat MR imaging may have utility as a marker of structural and symptomatic severity of knee OA disease process. PMID:24361743

  1. Effect of active pre-shortening on isometric and isotonic performance of single frog muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Granzier, H L; Pollack, G H

    1989-01-01

    1. We studied the effects of shortening history on isometric force and isotonic velocity in single intact frog fibres. Fibres were isometrically tetanized. When force reached a plateau, shortening was imposed, after which the fibre was held isometric again. Isometric force after shortening could then be compared with controls in which no shortening had taken place. 2. Sarcomere length was measured simultaneously with two independent methods: a laser-diffraction method and a segment-length method that detects the distance between two markers attached to the surface of the fibre, about 800 microns apart. 3. The fibre was mounted between two servomotors. One was used to impose the load clamp while the other cancelled the translation that occurred during this load clamp. Thus, translation of the segment under investigation could be minimized. 4. Initial experiments were performed at the fibre level. We found that active preshortening reduced isometric force considerably, thereby confirming earlier work of others. Force reductions as large as 70% were observed. 5. Under conditions in which there were large effects of shortening at the fibre level, we measured sarcomere length changes in the central region of the fibre. These sarcomeres shortened much less than the fibre's average. In fact, when the load was high, these sarcomeres lengthened while the fibre as a whole shortened. Thus, while the fibre-length signal implied that sarcomeres might have shortened to some intermediate length, in reality some sarcomeres were much longer, others much shorter. 6. Experiments performed at the sarcomere level revealed that isometric force was unaffected by previous sarcomere shortening provided the shortening occurred against either a low load or over a short distance. However, if the work done during shortening was high, force after previous shortening was less than if sarcomeres had remained at the final length throughout contraction. The correlation between the force deficit and

  2. Three-dimensional geometrical changes of the human tibialis anterior muscle and its central aponeurosis measured with three-dimensional ultrasound during isometric contractions

    PubMed Central

    Cresswell, Andrew G.; Lichtwark, Glen A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Muscles not only shorten during contraction to perform mechanical work, but they also bulge radially because of the isovolumetric constraint on muscle fibres. Muscle bulging may have important implications for muscle performance, however quantifying three-dimensional (3D) muscle shape changes in human muscle is problematic because of difficulties with sustaining contractions for the duration of an in vivo scan. Although two-dimensional ultrasound imaging is useful for measuring local muscle deformations, assumptions must be made about global muscle shape changes, which could lead to errors in fully understanding the mechanical behaviour of muscle and its surrounding connective tissues, such as aponeurosis. Therefore, the aims of this investigation were (a) to determine the intra-session reliability of a novel 3D ultrasound (3DUS) imaging method for measuring in vivo human muscle and aponeurosis deformations and (b) to examine how contraction intensity influences in vivo human muscle and aponeurosis strains during isometric contractions. Methods. Participants (n = 12) were seated in a reclined position with their left knee extended and ankle at 90° and performed isometric dorsiflexion contractions up to 50% of maximal voluntary contraction. 3DUS scans of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle belly were performed during the contractions and at rest to assess muscle volume, muscle length, muscle cross-sectional area, muscle thickness and width, fascicle length and pennation angle, and central aponeurosis width and length. The 3DUS scan involved synchronous B-mode ultrasound imaging and 3D motion capture of the position and orientation of the ultrasound transducer, while successive cross-sectional slices were captured by sweeping the transducer along the muscle. Results. 3DUS was shown to be highly reliable across measures of muscle volume, muscle length, fascicle length and central aponeurosis length (ICC ≥ 0.98, CV < 1%). The TA remained isovolumetric

  3. Three-dimensional geometrical changes of the human tibialis anterior muscle and its central aponeurosis measured with three-dimensional ultrasound during isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Raiteri, Brent J; Cresswell, Andrew G; Lichtwark, Glen A

    2016-01-01

    Background. Muscles not only shorten during contraction to perform mechanical work, but they also bulge radially because of the isovolumetric constraint on muscle fibres. Muscle bulging may have important implications for muscle performance, however quantifying three-dimensional (3D) muscle shape changes in human muscle is problematic because of difficulties with sustaining contractions for the duration of an in vivo scan. Although two-dimensional ultrasound imaging is useful for measuring local muscle deformations, assumptions must be made about global muscle shape changes, which could lead to errors in fully understanding the mechanical behaviour of muscle and its surrounding connective tissues, such as aponeurosis. Therefore, the aims of this investigation were (a) to determine the intra-session reliability of a novel 3D ultrasound (3DUS) imaging method for measuring in vivo human muscle and aponeurosis deformations and (b) to examine how contraction intensity influences in vivo human muscle and aponeurosis strains during isometric contractions. Methods. Participants (n = 12) were seated in a reclined position with their left knee extended and ankle at 90° and performed isometric dorsiflexion contractions up to 50% of maximal voluntary contraction. 3DUS scans of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle belly were performed during the contractions and at rest to assess muscle volume, muscle length, muscle cross-sectional area, muscle thickness and width, fascicle length and pennation angle, and central aponeurosis width and length. The 3DUS scan involved synchronous B-mode ultrasound imaging and 3D motion capture of the position and orientation of the ultrasound transducer, while successive cross-sectional slices were captured by sweeping the transducer along the muscle. Results. 3DUS was shown to be highly reliable across measures of muscle volume, muscle length, fascicle length and central aponeurosis length (ICC ≥ 0.98, CV < 1%). The TA remained isovolumetric

  4. Synovial plicae of the knee

    SciTech Connect

    Apple, J.S.; Martinez, S.; Daffner, R.H.; Gehweiler, J.A.; Hardaker, W.T.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the anatomy, patho-physiology, clinical, and radiographic findings, and treatment of the synovial plicae of the knee joint. The suprapatellar plica is a synovial fold present in the suprapatellar pouch of the knee joint in approximately 20% of the population. This fold may become symptomatic after injury and cause symptoms similar to other common internal derangements of the knee. Double contrast arthrography of the knee can be used to identify the presence of plicae. Although arthrography can identify the presence of a plica, its clinical significance requires close correlation with symptoms and an accurate clinical examination.

  5. Multiligamentous injuries and knee dislocations.

    PubMed

    Gimber, Lana H; Scalcione, Luke R; Rowan, Andrew; Hardy, Jolene C; Melville, David M; Taljanovic, Mihra S

    2015-11-01

    Complex capsular ligamentous structures contribute to stability of the knee joint. Simultaneous injury of two or more knee ligaments, aside from concurrent tears involving the anterior cruciate and medial collateral ligaments, is considered to be associated with femorotibial knee dislocations. Proximal tibiofibular joint dislocations are not always easily recognized and may be overlooked or missed. Patellofemoral dislocations can be transient with MR imaging sometimes required to reach the diagnosis. In this article, the authors describe the mechanism of injury, ligamentous disruptions, imaging, and treatment options of various types of knee dislocations including injuries of the femorotibial, proximal tibiofibular, and patellofemoral joints. PMID:26002747

  6. Knee stabilization in patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lewek, Michael D.; Ramsey, Dan K.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Rudolph, Katherine S.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis (MKOA) experience knee laxity and instability. Muscle stabilization strategies may influence the long term integrity of the joint. In this study we determined how individuals with medial knee OA respond to a rapid valgus knee movement to investigate the relationship between muscle stabilization strategies and knee instability. METHODS Twenty one subjects with MKOA and genu varum, and 19 control subjects were tested. Subjects stood with the test limb on a moveable platform that translated laterally to rapidly stress the knee’s medial periarticular structures and create a potentially destabilizing feeling at the knee joint. Knee motion and muscle responses were recorded. Subjects rated their knee instability with a self-report questionnaire about knee instability during daily activities. RESULTS Prior to plate movement the OA subjects demonstrated more medial muscle co-contraction (p=0.014). Following plate movement the OA subjects shifted less weight off the test limb (p = 0.013) and had more medial co-contraction (p=0.037). Those without instability had higher VMMH co-contraction than those who reported more instability (p=0.038). Knee stability correlated positively with VMMH co-contraction prior to plate movement (r = 0.459; p = 0.042). CONCLUSION This study demonstrates that individuals with MKOA attempt to stabilize the knee with greater medial muscle co-contraction in response to laxity that appears on only the medial side of the joint. This strategy presumably contributes to higher joint compression and could exacerbate joint destruction and needs to be altered to slow or stop the progression of the OA disease process. PMID:16142714

  7. A Multi-Station Proprioceptive Exercise Program in Patients with Bilateral Knee Osteoarthrosis: Functional Capacity, Pain and Sensoriomotor Function. A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gür, Hakan

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the effects of a multi-station proprioceptive exercise program on functional capacity, perceived knee pain, and sensoriomotor function. Twenty-two patients (aged 41-75 years) with grade 2-3 bilateral knee osteoarthrosis were randomly assigned to two groups: treatment (TR; n = 12) and non-treatment (NONTR; n = 10). TR performed 11 different balance/coordination and proprioception exercises, twice a week for 6 weeks. Functional capacity and perceived knee pain during rest and physical activity was measured. Also knee position sense, kinaesthesia, postural control, isometric and isokinetic knee strength (at 60, 120 and 180°·s-1) measures were taken at baseline and after 6 weeks of training. There was no significant difference in any of the tested variables between TR and NONTR before the intervention period. In TR perceived knee pain during daily activities and functional tests was lessened following the exercise program (p < 0.05). Perceived knee pain was also lower in TR vs. NONTR after training (p < 0.05). The time for rising from a chair, stair climbing and descending improved in TR (p < 0.05) and these values were faster compared with NONTR after training (p < 0.05). Joint position sense (degrees) for active and passive tests and for weight bearing tests improved in TR (p < 0.05) and the values were lower compared with NONTR after training (p < 0.05). Postural control (‘eyes closed’) also improved for single leg and tandem tests in TR (p < 0.01) and these values were higher compared with NONTR after training. The isometric quadriceps strength of TR improved (p < 0.05) but the values were not significantly different compared with NONTR after training. There was no change in isokinetic strength for TR and NONTR after the training period. The results suggest that using a multi-station proprioceptive exercise program it is possible to improve postural control, functional capacity and decrease perceived knee pain in patients with bilateral knee

  8. Selectively Lockable Knee Brace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael D. (Inventor); Forbes, John C. (Inventor); Baker, Kevin J. (Inventor); Rice, Darron C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A knee brace for aiding in rehabilitation of damaged leg muscles includes upper and lower housings normally pivotable one relative to the other about the knee joint axis of a patient. The upper housing is attachable to the thigh of the patient above the knee joint while the lower housing is secured to a stirrup which extends downwardly along the patient's leg and is attached to the patient's shoe. An actuation rod is carried within the lower housing and is coupled to a cable. The upper and lower housings carry cooperative clutch/brake elements which normally are disengaged to permit relative movement between the upper and lower housings. When the cable is extended the clutch/brake elements engage and lock the housings together. A heel strike mechanism fastened to the stirrup and the heel of the shoe is connected to the cable to selectively extend the cable and lock the brace in substantially any position when the patient places weight on the heel.

  9. Selectively lockable knee brace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Neill (Inventor); Shadoan, Mike (Inventor); Forbes, John (Inventor); Baker, Kevin (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A knee brace for aiding in rehabilitation of damaged leg muscles includes upper and lower housings, normally pivotable, one relative to the other about the knee joint axis of a patient. The upper housing is attachable to the thigh of the patient above the knee joint, while the lower housing is secured to a stirrup which extends downwardly along the patient's leg and is attached to the patient's shoe. An actuation rod is carried within the lower housing and is coupled to a cable. The upper and lower housings carry cooperative clutch/brake elements which normally are disengaged to permit relative movement between the upper and lower housings. When the cable is extended, the clutch/brake elements engage and lock the housings together. A heel strike mechanism fastened to the stirrup and the heel of the shoe is connected to the cable to selectively extend the cable and lock the brace in substantially any position when the patient places weight on the heel.

  10. Dynamic knee stability estimated by finite helical axis methods during functional performance approximately twenty years after anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Grip, Helena; Tengman, Eva; Häger, Charlotte K

    2015-07-16

    Finite helical axis (FHA) measures of the knee joint during weight-bearing tasks may capture dynamic knee stability following Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury. The aim was to investigate dynamic knee stability during two-leg squat (TLS) and one-leg side hop (SH) in a long-term follow-up of ACL injury, and to examine correlations with knee laxity (KT-1000), osteoarthritis (OA, Kellgren-Lawrence) and knee function (Lysholm score). Participants were injured 17-28 years ago and then treated with surgery (n=33, ACLR) or physiotherapy only (n=37, ACLPT) and healthy-knee controls (n=33) were tested. Movements were registered with an optical motion capture system. We computed three FHA inclination angles, its' Anterior-Posterior (A-P) position, and an index quantifying directional changes (DI), during stepwise knee flexion intervals of ∼15°. Injured knees were less stable compared to healthy controls' and to contralateral non-injured knees, regardless of treatment: the A-P intersection was more anterior (indicating a more anterior positioning of tibia relative to femur) positively correlating with high laxity/low knee function, and during SH, the FHA was more inclined relative to the flexion-extension axis, possibly due to reduced rotational stability. During the TLS, A-P intersection was more anterior in the non-injured knee than the injured, and DI was higher, probably related to higher load on the non-injured knee. ACLR had less anterior A-P intersection than ACLPT, suggesting that surgery enhanced stability, although rotational stability may remain reduced. More anterior A-P intersection and greater inclination between the FHA and the knee flexion-extension axis best revealed reduced dynamic stability ∼23 years post-injury. PMID:25935685

  11. Interface and biocompatibility of polyethylene terephthalate knee ligament prostheses. A histological and ultrastructural device retrieval analysis in failed synthetic implants used for surgical repair of anterior cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Kock, H J; Stürmer, K M; Letsch, R; Schmit-Neuerburg, K P

    1994-01-01

    In a prospective clinical study of 54 patients with acute anterior cruciate ligament instability, 56 artificial ligaments made of polyethylene terephthalate (Trevira hochfest) were implanted to restore knee stability. The average follow-up of these artificial knee ligaments was 40.2 (12-79) months; five implants (10%) had to be explanted due to failure after an average of 17.8 (6-50) months. All explants were examined by histological and ultrastructural methods in a device retrieval analysis. With regard to short- and medium-term artificial ligament failure in the human knee joint, a non-isometric surgical implantation technique, inappropriate strain during rehabilitation and implant fatigue and wear were responsible for ligament failures. PMID:7696041

  12. Preoperative Predictors of Pain Following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Noiseux, Nicolas O.; Callaghan, John J.; Clark, Charles R.; Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Sluka, Kathleen A.; Rakel, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty has provided dramatic improvements in function and pain for the majority of patients with knee arthritis, yet a significant proportion of patients remain dissatisfied with their results. We performed a prospective analysis of 215 patients undergoing TKA who underwent a comprehensive array of evaluations to discover whether any preoperative assessment could predict high pain scores and functional limitations postoperatively. Patients with severe pain with a simple knee range-of-motion test prior to TKA had a 10x higher likelihood of moderate to severe pain at 6 months. A simple test of pain intensity with active flexion and extension preoperatively was a significant predictor of postoperative pain at 6 months after surgery. Strategies to address this particular patient group may improve satisfaction rates of TKA. PMID:24630598

  13. Radiographic and scintigraphic evaluation of total knee arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, R.; Soudry, M.

    1986-04-01

    Various radiographic and scintigraphic methods are used to supplement clinical findings in the evaluation of total knee arthroplasty and its complications. Serial roentgenograms offer reliable information for diagnosing mechanical loosening. Wide and extensive radiolucency at the cement-bone interface and shift in position and alignment of prosthetic components can be seen in almost all cases by the time revision is necessary. Radiographic abnormalities are usually not present in acute infection, but are often present in chronic infection. Bone scanning has a high sensitivity for diagnosis of infection or loosening, but is nonspecific because increased uptake is often present around asymptomatic total knee arthroplasties with normal radiographs. Differential bone and Gallium scanning and scanning with Indium 111-labeled leukocytes have a greater specificity for diagnosis of infection than does bone or Gallium scanning alone. Routine radiographic and scintigraphic studies have shown a high incidence of deep vein thrombosis in the calf after total knee arthroplasty. Clinically significant pulmonary embolization is infrequent.

  14. Sets meeting isometric copies of the lattice Z2 in exactly one point

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Steve; Mauldin, R. Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The construction of a subset S of ℝ2 such that each isometric copy of ℤ2 (the lattice points in the plane) meets S in exactly one point is indicated. This provides a positive answer to a problem of H. Steinhaus [Sierpiński, W. (1958) Fund. Math. 46, 191–194]. PMID:12466499

  15. Reliability of ultrasound thickness measurement of the abdominal muscles during clinical isometric endurance tests.

    PubMed

    ShahAli, Shabnam; Arab, Amir Massoud; Talebian, Saeed; Ebrahimi, Esmaeil; Bahmani, Andia; Karimi, Noureddin; Nabavi, Hoda

    2015-07-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the intra-examiner reliability of ultrasound (US) thickness measurement of abdominal muscles activity when supine lying and during two isometric endurance tests in subjects with and without Low back pain (LBP). A total of 19 women (9 with LBP, 10 without LBP) participated in the study. Within-day reliability of the US thickness measurements at supine lying and the two isometric endurance tests were assessed in all subjects. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess the relative reliability of thickness measurement. The standard error of measurement (SEM), minimal detectable change (MDC) and the coefficient of variation (CV) were used to evaluate the absolute reliability. Results indicated high ICC scores (0.73-0.99) and also small SEM and MDC scores for within-day reliability assessment. The Bland-Altman plots of agreement in US measurement of the abdominal muscles during the two isometric endurance tests demonstrated that 95% of the observations fall between the limits of agreement for test and retest measurements. Together the results indicate high intra-tester reliability for the US measurement of the thickness of abdominal muscles in all the positions tested. According to the study's findings, US imaging can be used as a reliable method for assessment of abdominal muscles activity in supine lying and the two isometric endurance tests employed, in participants with and without LBP. PMID:26118508

  16. Interaction of Rate of Force Development and Duration of Rate in Isometric Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Donald

    A study attempted to determine whether force and duration parameters are programmed in an interactive or independent fashion prior to executing ballistic type isometric contractions of graded intensities. Four adult females each performed 360 trials of producing ballistic type forces representing 25, 40, 55, and 75 percent of their maximal…

  17. Relationship Between Erectores Spinae Voltage and Back-Lift Strength for Isometric, Concentric, and Eccentric Contractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, T. Edwin J.; Singh, Mohan

    1975-01-01

    This study determined the maximal mean values for concentric and eccentric back-lift strength as well as isometric, and examined and compared the relationships between the mean peak voltage of the erectores spinae muscle(s) and maximal force exerted for the three types of muscle contractions. (RC)

  18. Efficacy of Interactive Whiteboard on Psychomotor Skills Achievement of Students in Isometric and Orthographic Projection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambari, Isiaka A.; Balogun, Sherifat A.; Alfa, Ahmadu S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses importance of technology education and evidences of declining performance of junior secondary school students in basic technology subject. Potentials on interactive whiteboard (IWB) as one of the new technologies to meet the challenges of the 21st century are also discussed. The efficacy of IWB for teaching Isometric and…

  19. Automatic locking orthotic knee device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce C. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An articulated tang in clevis joint for incorporation in newly manufactured conventional strap-on orthotic knee devices or for replacing such joints in conventional strap-on orthotic knee devices is discussed. The instant tang in clevis joint allows the user the freedom to extend and bend the knee normally when no load (weight) is applied to the knee and to automatically lock the knee when the user transfers weight to the knee, thus preventing a damaged knee from bending uncontrollably when weight is applied to the knee. The tang in clevis joint of the present invention includes first and second clevis plates, a tang assembly and a spacer plate secured between the clevis plates. Each clevis plate includes a bevelled serrated upper section. A bevelled shoe is secured to the tank in close proximity to the bevelled serrated upper section of the clevis plates. A coiled spring mounted within an oblong bore of the tang normally urges the shoes secured to the tang out of engagement with the serrated upper section of each clevic plate to allow rotation of the tang relative to the clevis plate. When weight is applied to the joint, the load compresses the coiled spring, the serrations on each clevis plate dig into the bevelled shoes secured to the tang to prevent relative movement between the tang and clevis plates. A shoulder is provided on the tang and the spacer plate to prevent overextension of the joint.

  20. Exercise and the Knee Joint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    This report by the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports examines the effects of various forms of physical exercise on the knee joint which, because of its vulnerability, is especially subject to injury. Discussion centers around the physical characteristics of the joint, commonly used measurements for determining knee stability,…

  1. New Generation Lockable Knee Brace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A knee brace that uses Space Shuttle propulsion technology has moved a step closer to being available to help knee injury and stroke patients and may possibly benefit patients with birth defects, spinal cord injuries, and post-polio conditions. After years of hard work, inventors at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, have turned over the final design and prototype to industry partners at Horton's Orthotic Lab in Little Rock, Arkansas for further clinical testing. The device, called the Selectively Lockable Knee Brace, may mean faster, less painful rehabilitation for patients by allowing the knee to move when weight is not on the heel. Devices currently on the market lock the knee in a rigid, straight-leg position, or allow continuous free motion. Pictured here is a knee brace prototype being tested and fitted at Horton's Orthotic Lab. The knee brace is just one example of how space technology is being used to improve the lives of people on Earth. NASA's MSFC inventors Michael Shadoan and Neill Myers are space propulsion engineers who use the same mechanisms and materials to build systems for rockets that they used to design and develop the knee brace.

  2. Knee Pain during Strength Training Shortly following Fast-Track Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Bandholm, Thomas; Thorborg, Kristian; Lunn, Troels Haxholdt; Kehlet, Henrik; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding

    2014-01-01

    Background Loading and contraction failure (muscular exhaustion) are strength training variables known to influence neural activation of the exercising muscle in healthy subjects, which may help reduce neural inhibition of the quadriceps muscle following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It is unknown how these exercise variables influence knee pain after TKA. Objective To investigate the effect of loading and contraction failure on knee pain during strength training, shortly following TKA. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Consecutive sample of patients from the Copenhagen area, Denmark, receiving a TKA, between November 2012 and April 2013. Participants Seventeen patients, no more than 3 weeks after their TKA. Main outcome measures: In a randomized order, the patients performed 1 set of 4 standardized knee extensions, using relative loads of 8, 14, and 20 repetition maximum (RM), and ended with 1 single set to contraction failure (14 RM load). The individual loadings (kilograms) were determined during a familiarization session >72 hours prior. The patients rated their knee pain during each repetition, using a numerical rating scale (0–10). Results Two patients were lost to follow up. Knee pain increased with increasing load (20 RM: 3.1±2.0 points, 14 RM: 3.5±1.8 points, 8 RM: 4.3±2.5 points, P = 0.006), and repetitions to contraction failure (10% failure: 3.2±1.9 points, 100% failure: 5.4±1.6 points, P<0.001). Resting knee pain 60 seconds after the final repetition (2.7±2.4 points) was not different from that recorded before strength training (2.7±1.8 points, P = 0.88). Conclusion Both loading and repetitions performed to contraction failure during knee- extension strength-training, increased post-operative knee pain during strength training implemented shortly following TKA. However, only the increase in pain during repetitions to contraction failure exceeded that defined as clinically relevant, and was very short-lived. Trial Registration

  3. 49 CFR 572.176 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.176... Hybrid III 10-Year-Old Child Test Dummy (HIII-10C) § 572.176 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) The knee assembly for the purpose of this test is the part of the leg assembly shown in drawing...

  4. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  5. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  6. 49 CFR 572.176 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.176... Hybrid III 10-Year-Old Child Test Dummy (HIII-10C) § 572.176 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) The knee assembly for the purpose of this test is the part of the leg assembly shown in drawing...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  8. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  9. 49 CFR 572.176 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure. 572.176... Hybrid III 10-Year-Old Child Test Dummy (HIII-10C) § 572.176 Knees and knee impact test procedure. (a) The knee assembly for the purpose of this test is the part of the leg assembly shown in drawing...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  11. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  12. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  13. 49 CFR 572.166 - Knees and knee impact test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.166 Knees and knee impact test procedure. The knee assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.126 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Knees and knee impact test procedure....

  14. Gait kinematics and passive knee joint range of motion in children with hypermobility syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fatoye, Francis A; Palmer, Shea; van der Linden, Marietta L; Rowe, Philip J; Macmillan, Fiona

    2011-03-01

    Hypermobility syndrome (HMS) is characterised by generalised joint laxity and musculoskeletal complaints. Gait abnormalities have been reported in children with HMS but have not been empirically investigated. The extent of passive knee joint range of motion (ROM) has also not been well reported in children with HMS. This study evaluated gait kinematics and passive knee joint ROM in children diagnosed with HMS and healthy controls. Thirty-seven healthy children (mean age±SD=11.5±2.6 years) and 29 children with HMS (mean age±SD=11.9±1.8 years) participated. Sagittal knee motion and gait speed were evaluated using a VICON 3D motion analysis system. Passive knee ROM was measured with a manual goniometer. Independent t-tests compared the values of sagittal knee motion and gait speed between the two groups. Mann-Whitney U tests compared passive knee ROM between groups. Passive ROM (extension and flexion) was significantly higher (both p<0.001) in children with HMS than the healthy controls. Peak knee flexion (during loading response and swing phase) during walking was significantly lower (both p<0.001) in children with HMS. Knee extension in mid stance during walking was significantly increased (p<0.001) in children with HMS. However, gait speed was not statistically (p=0.496) different between the two groups. Children with HMS had higher passive knee ROM than healthy children and also demonstrated abnormal knee motion during gait. Gait re-education and joint stability exercise programmes may be of value to children with HMS. PMID:21300548

  15. A biomechanical evaluation of hinged total knee replacement prostheses.

    PubMed

    Long, Robin; Gheduzzi, Sabina; Bucher, Thomas A; Toms, Andrew D; Miles, Anthony W

    2013-08-01

    The number of total knee replacements being performed worldwide is undergoing an unprecedented increase. Hinged total knee replacements, used in complex salvage and revision procedures, currently account for a small but growing proportion of prostheses implanted. Modern hinged prostheses share the same basic configuration, allowing flexion-extension and tibial rotation. One aspect on which designs differ is the anteroposterior location of the hinge. A more posterior hinge is designed to increase the patellar tendon moment arm, reducing the quadriceps force required for a given activity and benefiting the patient. Five commonly used total knee replacements were evaluated in terms of quadriceps force and patellar tendon moment arm using a laboratory-based rig. Significant differences were identified between the five prostheses in quadriceps force and patellar tendon moment arm. Analysis of the correlation between these two parameters indicates that while patellar tendon moment arm influences quadriceps force, it is not the only factor. Also important is the lever function of the patella, and it is suggested here that the non-physiological nature of the prosthetic patellofemoral geometry may result in unnatural joint function. Thus, a thorough understanding of the resulting kinematic function of hinged total knee replacements is becoming increasingly important in complex revision total knee replacement to meet rising patient expectations and functional demands. PMID:23722496

  16. Synovial haemangioma of the knee joint: an unusual cause of knee pain in a 14-month old girl.

    PubMed

    Wen, D W; Tan, T J; Rasheed, S

    2016-06-01

    We report a histologically proven case of synovial haemangioma of the knee in a 14-month old girl who presented to the emergency department with an acute 1-day history of refusing to weight-bear on the right leg and a preceding 3-week history of a right knee lump. Physical examination revealed a non-tender, soft lump over the lateral infrapatellar region. Radiographs revealed a poorly defined soft tissue density over the infrapatellar fat pad and a suprapatellar joint effusion. Ultrasound was used to confirm the presence of a vascular soft tissue mass compatible with a synovial haemangioma within the infrapatellar fat pad which showed both intra-articular and extra-articular extension. There was good correlation of the ultrasound findings with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), highlighting the potential clinical utility of ultrasound as an alternative imaging modality in establishing the pre-operative diagnosis and extent of a synovial haemangioma about the knee joint. PMID:26960422

  17. Effects of isotonic and isometric exercises with mist sauna bathing on cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, and metabolic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, Satoshi; Kawahara, Yuko; Nishimura, Naoki; Nishimura, Rumiko; Sugenoya, Junichi; Miwa, Chihiro; Takada, Masumi

    2014-08-01

    To clarify the effects of isometric and isotonic exercise during mist sauna bathing on the cardiovascular function, thermoregulatory function, and metabolism, six healthy young men (22 ± 1 years old, height 173 ± 4 cm, weight 65.0 ± 5.0 kg) were exposed to a mist sauna for 10 min at a temperature of 40 °C, and relative humidity of 100 % while performing or not performing ˜30 W of isometric or isotonic exercise. The effect of the exercise was assessed by measuring tympanic temperature, heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, chest sweat rate, chest skin blood flow, and plasma catecholamine and cortisol, glucose, lactate, and free fatty acid levels. Repeated measures ANOVA showed no significant differences in blood pressure, skin blood flow, sweat rate, and total amount of sweating. Tympanic temperature increased more during isotonic exercise, and heart rate increase was more marked during isotonic exercise. The changes in lactate indicated that fatigue was not very great during isometric exercise. The glucose level indicated greater energy expenditure during isometric exercise. The free fatty acid and catecholamine levels indicated that isometric exercise did not result in very great energy expenditure and stress, respectively. The results for isotonic exercise of a decrease in lactate level and an increase in plasma free fatty acid level indicated that fatigue and energy expenditure were rather large while the perceived stress was comparatively low. We concluded that isotonic exercise may be a more desirable form of exercise during mist sauna bathing given the changes in glucose and free fatty acid levels.

  18. Effects of isotonic and isometric exercises with mist sauna bathing on cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, and metabolic functions.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Satoshi; Kawahara, Yuko; Nishimura, Naoki; Nishimura, Rumiko; Sugenoya, Junichi; Miwa, Chihiro; Takada, Masumi

    2014-08-01

    To clarify the effects of isometric and isotonic exercise during mist sauna bathing on the cardiovascular function, thermoregulatory function, and metabolism, six healthy young men (22 ± 1 years old, height 173 ± 4 cm, weight 65.0 ± 5.0 kg) were exposed to a mist sauna for 10 min at a temperature of 40 °C, and relative humidity of 100 % while performing or not performing ∼30 W of isometric or isotonic exercise. The effect of the exercise was assessed by measuring tympanic temperature, heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, chest sweat rate, chest skin blood flow, and plasma catecholamine and cortisol, glucose, lactate, and free fatty acid levels. Repeated measures ANOVA showed no significant differences in blood pressure, skin blood flow, sweat rate, and total amount of sweating. Tympanic temperature increased more during isotonic exercise, and heart rate increase was more marked during isotonic exercise. The changes in lactate indicated that fatigue was not very great during isometric exercise. The glucose level indicated greater energy expenditure during isometric exercise. The free fatty acid and catecholamine levels indicated that isometric exercise did not result in very great energy expenditure and stress, respectively. The results for isotonic exercise of a decrease in lactate level and an increase in plasma free fatty acid level indicated that fatigue and energy expenditure were rather large while the perceived stress was comparatively low. We concluded that isotonic exercise may be a more desirable form of exercise during mist sauna bathing given the changes in glucose and free fatty acid levels. PMID:23884733

  19. Enhanced knee joint function due to accelerated rehabilitation exercise after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery in Korean male high school soccer players.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myungchun; Sung, Dong Jun; Lee, Joohyung; Oh, Inyoung; Kim, Sojung; Kim, Seungho; Kim, Jooyoung

    2016-02-01

    This study was conducted on Korean male high school soccer players who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) to identify the effects of an accelerated rehabilitation exercise (ARE) program on knee joint isometric strength, thigh circumference, Lysholm score, and active balance agility. We assigned eight test participants each to a physical therapy group (PTG) and an accelerated rehabilitation exercise group (AREG), and compared differences between the groups. Both the PTG and AREG showed significant increases in 30° away and 60° toward isometric strength after treatment. In addition, significant differences were observed in these strength tests between the two groups. Both groups also showed significant increases in thigh circumference, Lysholm score, and active balance agility after treatment, but no significant differences were observed between the two groups. We conclude that the ARE treatment was more effective for improving isometric strength of the knee joint than that of physical therapy, and that an active rehabilitation exercise program after ACLR had positive effects on recovery performance of patients with an ACL injury and their return to the playing field. PMID:26933657

  20. Enhanced knee joint function due to accelerated rehabilitation exercise after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery in Korean male high school soccer players

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myungchun; Sung, Dong Jun; Lee, Joohyung; Oh, Inyoung; Kim, Sojung; Kim, Seungho; Kim, Jooyoung

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted on Korean male high school soccer players who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) to identify the effects of an accelerated rehabilitation exercise (ARE) program on knee joint isometric strength, thigh circumference, Lysholm score, and active balance agility. We assigned eight test participants each to a physical therapy group (PTG) and an accelerated rehabilitation exercise group (AREG), and compared differences between the groups. Both the PTG and AREG showed significant increases in 30° away and 60° toward isometric strength after treatment. In addition, significant differences were observed in these strength tests between the two groups. Both groups also showed significant increases in thigh circumference, Lysholm score, and active balance agility after treatment, but no significant differences were observed between the two groups. We conclude that the ARE treatment was more effective for improving isometric strength of the knee joint than that of physical therapy, and that an active rehabilitation exercise program after ACLR had positive effects on recovery performance of patients with an ACL injury and their return to the playing field. PMID:26933657

  1. Queen Alexandra's Knee.

    PubMed

    Pinals, Robert S

    2016-06-01

    In 1867, Alexandra, the 22-year-old Princess of Wales, late in her third pregnancy, had sudden onset of a febrile illness. There was a brief period of migratory arthritis, followed by persistent, severe inflammation in 1 knee. A diagnosis of rheumatic fever was made by her physicians, but the course of her illness differed greatly from the expected one. In this report reviewing her disorder, the suggestion is made that she more likely had gonococcal arthritis and that the infection was transmitted to her by her husband, the future King Edward VII, then known as "The Playboy Prince." PMID:27219308

  2. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BIOMECHANICAL ASYMMETRIES DURING A STEP UP AND OVER TASK AND STAIR CLIMBING AFTER TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, Federico; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Zeni, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients six months after total knee arthroplasty demonstrate movement asymmetries and functional deficits, which may be related to poor functional performance. The aims of this study were to 1) compare biomechanical variables between subjects 6 months after total knee arthroplasty and an agematched healthy control group during a step up and over task and 2) determine the relationship between quadriceps strength, movement patterns and stair climbing performance. Methods Twenty patients 6 months following unilateral total knee arthroplasty and twenty healthy controls were enrolled. Participants completed questionnaires, isometric quadriceps strength testing and performance based tests to quantify functional performance. Motion analysis was performed during a step up and over task. Functional and biomechanical variables were analyzed using a 2×2 ANOVA. The symmetry ratios (operated/non-operated limb *100) for biomechanical variables were analyzed using independent t-tests. Pearson correlations were performed to determine the relationships between biomechanical variables, strength and stair climbing performance. Findings In the TKA group, subjects had lower peak moments, power and sagittal plane excursion in the operated knee compared to the contralateral knee (p < .05), while the hip on the operated side had greater power generation (p = .014). Compared to the control group, all symmetry ratios were significantly lower in the surgical group (p < .05). Stair climbing time was correlated with quadriceps strength of the operated limb (R=−0.762, p<0.001). Interpretation Individuals 6 months after total knee arthroplasty had worse performance with respect to biomechanics, quadriceps strength, and performance-based tests. Biomechanical asymmetries after TKA reduce the demand on the operated knee and increase reliance on the contralateral limb and ipsilateral hip. PMID:25467765

  3. Neglected surgically intervened bilateral congenital dislocation of knee in an adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Jaswant; Dhammi, Ish Kumar; Jain, Anil K

    2014-01-01

    Neglected bilateral congenital dislocation of knee is unusual. A 12 year old boy presented with inability to walk due to buckling of the knee. The symptoms were present since the child learnt walking. He preferred not to walk. Bilateral supracondylar femoral osteotomy was done at the age of 6 years. Patient had a fixed flexion deformity of both knees, 30° in the right (range of flexion from 30° to 45°) and 45° fixed flexion deformity in left knee respectively (range of flexion from 45° to 65°) when presented to us. The radiological examination revealed bilateral congenital dislocation of knee (CDK). No syndromic association was observed. He was planned for staged treatment. In stage I, the knee joints were distracted by Ilizarov ring fixators and this was followed by open reduction of both the knee joints in stage II. A bilateral supracondylar extension osteotomy was done 18 months after the previous surgery (stage III). The final followup visit at 4 years the patient presented with range of motion 5-100° and 5-80° on the right and left knee respectively with good functional outcome. The case is reported in view of lack of treatment guidelines for long standing neglected CDK in an adolescent child. PMID:24600070

  4. The relationship between leg preference and knee mechanics during sidestepping in collegiate female footballers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Scott R; Wang, Henry; Dickin, D Clark; Weiss, Kaitlyn J

    2014-11-01

    This study examined the relationship between leg preference and knee mechanics in females during sidestepping. Three-dimensional data were recorded on 16 female collegiate footballers during a planned 45° sidestep manoeuvre with their preferred and non-preferred kicking leg. Knee kinematics and kinetics during initial contact, weight acceptance, peak push-off, and final push-off phases of sidestepping were analysed in both legs. The preferred leg showed trivial to small increases (ES = 0.19-0.36) in knee flexion angle at initial contact, weight acceptance, and peak push-off, and small increases (ES = 0.21-0.34) in peak power production and peak knee extension velocity. The non-preferred leg showed a trivial increase (ES = 0.10) in knee abduction angle during weight acceptance; small to moderate increases (ES = 0.22-0.64) in knee internal rotation angle at weight acceptance, peak push-off, and final push-off; a small increase (ES = 0.22) in knee abductor moment; and trivial increases (ES = 0.09-0.14) in peak power absorption and peak knee flexion velocity. The results of this study show that differences do exist between the preferred and non-preferred leg in females. The findings of this study will increase the knowledge base of anterior cruciate ligament injury in females and can aid in the design of more appropriate neuromuscular, plyometric, and strength training protocols for injury prevention. PMID:25204331

  5. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Murray, D. W.; Liddle, A. D.; Dodd, C. A. F.; Pandit, H.

    2015-01-01

    There is a large amount of evidence available about the relative merits of unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty (UKA and TKA). Based on the same evidence, different people draw different conclusions and as a result, there is great variability in the usage of UKA. The revision rate of UKA is much higher than TKA and so some surgeons conclude that UKA should not be performed. Other surgeons believe that the main reason for the high revision rate is that UKA is easy to revise and, therefore, the threshold for revision is low. They also believe that UKA has many advantages over TKA such as a faster recovery, lower morbidity and mortality and better function. They therefore conclude that UKA should be undertaken whenever appropriate. The solution to this argument is to minimise the revision rate of UKA, thereby addressing the main disadvantage of UKA. The evidence suggests that this will be achieved if surgeons use UKA for at least 20% of their knee arthroplasties and use implants that are appropriate for these broad indications. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B(10 Suppl A):3–8. PMID:26430080

  6. Osteonecrosis of the knee: review

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Ammar R.; Cherian, Jeffrey J.; Jauregui, Julio J.; Pierce, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is a devastating disease that can lead to end-stage arthritis of various joint including the knee. There are three categories of osteonecrosis that affect the knee: spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SONK), secondary, and post-arthroscopic. Regardless of osteonecrosis categories, the treatment of this disease aims to halt further progression or delay the onset of end-stage arthritis of the knee. However, once substantial joint surface collapse has occurred or there are sign of degenerative arthritis, joint arthroplasty is the most appropriate treatment option. Currently, the non-operative treatment options consist of observation, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), protected weight bearing, and analgesia as needed. Operative interventions include joint preserving surgery, unilateral knee arthroplasty (UKA), or total knee arthroplasty (TKA) depending on the extent and type of disease. Joint preserving procedures (i.e., arthroscopy, core decompression, osteochondral autograft, and bone grafting) are usually attempted in pre-collapse and some post-collapse lesions, when the articular cartilage is generally intact with only the underlying subchondral bone being affected. Conversely, after severe subchondral collapse has occurred, procedures that attempt to salvage the joint are rarely successful and joint arthroplasty are necessary to relieve pain. The purpose of this article is to highlight the recent evidence concerning the treatment options across the spectrum of management of osteonecrosis of the knee including lesion observation, medications, joint preserving techniques, and total joint arthroplasties. PMID:25705638

  7. New Generation Lockable Knee Brace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A knee brace that uses Space Shuttle propulsion technology has moved a step closer to being available to help knee injury and stroke patients and may possibly benefit patients with birth defects, spinal cord injuries, and post-polio conditions. After years of hard work, inventors at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, have turned over the final design and prototype to industry partners at Horton's Orthotic Lab in Little Rock, Arkansas for further clinical testing. The device, called the Selectively Lockable Knee Brace, may mean faster, less painful rehabilitation for patients by allowing the knee to move when weight is not on the heel. Devices currently on the market lock the knee in a rigid, straight-leg position, or allow continuous free motion. The knee brace is just one example of how space technology is being used to improve the lives of people on Earth. NASA's MSFC inventors Michael Shadoan and Neill Myers are space propulsion engineers who use the same mechanisms and materials to build systems for rockets that they used to design and develop the knee brace.

  8. Disseminated synovial chondromatosis of the knee treated by open radical synovectomy using combined anterior and posterior approaches.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shailendra; Neelakandan, Karthik; Sood, Chetan; Krishnan, Jeganath

    2014-09-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of the knee is a rare benign neoplasm of the synovium. Likewise, uncertainty on management still prevails. Though rare, it nevertheless warrants greater emphasis than it receives in the literature to allow correct diagnosis and accurate early surgical intervention. It predominantly involves the anterior compartment of the knee and disseminated disease is extremely rare. The optimal approach for surgical treatment of such an extensive synovial chondromatosis of knee remains unclear. Herein, we describe a case of extensive generalized synovial chondromatosis of the knee extending into the Baker's cyst in a 30 years old female. A diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis was made by clinical evaluation and MR imaging and confirmed by histopathological examination. Patient was successfully treated by open radical synovectomy of knee using both anterior and posterior approaches in a single step procedure. PMID:25983490

  9. Collateral soft tissue release in primary total knee replacement

    PubMed Central

    Deep, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the rate of collateral soft tissue release required in navigated total knee arthroplasty (TKA) to achieve an intra-operative coronal femoral tibial mechanical axis (FTMA) in extension of 0 ± 2°. The primary outcomes assessed were post-operative coronal plane alignment and rate of collateral soft tissue release. The secondary outcomes were range of motion, function, patient satisfaction, and complication rates at one-year follow-up. This is a prospective study of 224 knees. No exclusions were made on the basis of pathology or severity of deformity. Pre-operative FTMA ranged from 27° valgus to 25° varus (mean: −4.5° SD 7.6). Soft tissue release was carried out in 5 of 224 knees (2.2%). Post-operative weight-bearing radiological FTMA ranged from 7° valgus to 8° varus (mean: −0.4° SD 2.5°). Two hundred and ten knees (96%) were within 0 ± 5° of neutral. At one year, median maximum flexion was 100° (IQR 15°) and extension was 0°; mean post-operative Oxford Knee Score had improved from 42 to 23; and 91% of patients were satisfied or very satisfied, with only 2% being dissatisfied. We have found that in the vast majority of cases, including those with large pre-operative coronal deformity in extension, good outcomes in terms of coronal alignment, range of movement, function and patient satisfaction can be achieved. PMID:24720493

  10. The pendulum test as a tool to evaluate passive knee stiffness and viscosity of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Maria S; Casabona, Antonino; Sgarlata, Rosaria; Garozzo, Rosaria; Vinci, Maria; Cioni, Matteo

    2006-01-01

    Background The pendulum test of Wartenberg is a technique commonly used to measure passive knee motion with the aim to assess spasticity. We used this test to evaluate changes of the knee angular displacement, passive stiffness and viscosity in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Stiffness and viscosity represent passive resistances to joint motion associated with the structural properties of the joint tissue and of the muscular-tendon complex. Stiffness can be considered an intrinsic property of the tissues to resist deformation, while viscosity is related to cohesive forces between adjacent layers of tissues. Both parameters may influence the joint range of motion affecting angular displacement. Methods Nine women with rheumatoid arthritis were compared with a group of healthy women. With the subject half-lying, the relaxed knee was dropped from near-full extension and the characteristics of the ensuring damped unsustained knee oscillation evaluated. The kinematics of leg oscillations was recorded using ultrasonic markers (Zebris CMS HS 10) and the kinetic data were calculated from kinematic and anthropometric measures. Results Knee stiffness significantly increased (p < 0.001) in patients with respect to the control group, while differences in viscosity were not significant. Moreover, the amplitudes of first knee flexion (the maximal flexion excursion after knee release) and first knee extension (the maximal extension excursion after the first knee flexion) were significantly decreased (p < 0.001). A regression analysis showed that disease severity correlated moderately with stiffness (R2 = 0.68) and first flexion (R2 = 0.78). Using a multivariate regression, we found that increasing stiffness was the main factor for the reduction of flexion and extension motions. Conclusion We showed that the Wartenberg test can be considered a practical tool to measure mechanical changes of knee caused by rheumatoid arthritis. This novel application of Wartenberg test could be

  11. Comparison of hip and knee muscle moments in subjects with and without knee pain.

    PubMed

    Manetta, Jennifer; Franz, Laura Hayden; Moon, Chris; Perell, Karen L; Fang, Meika

    2002-12-01

    Elderly subjects with and without knee pain walked at a comfortable pace during gait analysis. Comparison of peak hip and knee internal extensor generalized muscle moments (GMMs) during loading response was made between groups. Walking velocity, peak hip internal extensor GMM, and knee range of motion (ROM) were significantly less for the group with knee pain than for the group without pain. Peak hip internal extensor GMM was strongly correlated with velocity, but peak knee internal extensor GMM was not. Knee ROM limitations may account for the increased peak knee internal extensor GMM in the knee pain group. PMID:12443949

  12. Elevated corticospinal excitability in patellar tendinopathy compared with other anterior knee pain or no pain.

    PubMed

    Rio, E; Kidgell, D; Moseley, G L; Cook, J

    2016-09-01

    Anterior knee pain (AKP) is a frequent clinical presentation in jumping athletes and may be aggravated by sustained sitting, stair use, and loading of the quadriceps. Corticospinal activation of the quadriceps in athletes with AKP has not yet been investigated, but is important in guiding efficacious treatment. This cross-sectional study assessed corticospinal excitability (CSE) of the quadriceps in jumping athletes using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Groups consisted of Control (no knee pain); patellar tendinopathy (PT) [localized inferior pole pain on single-leg decline squat (SLDS)]; and other AKP (nonlocalized pain around the patella). SLDS (numerical score of pain 0-10), Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment Patellar tendon (VISA-P), maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), active motor threshold (AMT), CSE, and Mmax were tested. Twenty nine athletes participated; control n = 8, PT n = 11, AKP n = 10. There were no group differences in age (P = 0.23), body mass index (P = 0.16), MVIC (P = 0.38) or weekly activity (P = 0.22). PT had elevated CSE compared with controls and other AKP (P < 0.001), but no differences were detected between AKP and controls (P = 0.47). CSE appears to be greater in PT than controls and other AKP. An improved understanding of the corticospinal responses in different sources of knee pain may direct better treatment approaches. PMID:26369282

  13. Mechanical loading of knee articular cartilage induced by muscle contraction can be assessed by measuring electrical potentials at the surface of the knee.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Buschmann, Michael D; Savard, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Electroarthrography (EAG) consists of recording electrical potentials on the knee surface that originate from streaming potentials within articular cartilage while the joint is undergoing compressive loading. The aim was to investigate how the contraction of specific leg muscles affects the contact force of the knee joint and, in turn, the EAG values. For six normal subjects, voluntary isometric muscle contractions were repeatedly conducted to activate four leg muscle groups while the subject was lying on his back. Two EAG signals were recorded on the medial and lateral sides of the knee, as well as four EMG signals (gastrocnemius, hamstring, quadriceps, tensor fascia latae), and the signal from a force plate fixed against the foot according to the direction of the force. The EAG and force signals were very well correlated: the median of the correlation coefficients between an EAG signal and the corresponding force signal during each loading cycle was 0.91, and 86% of the correlation coefficients were statistically significant (p<5%). Isolated muscle contraction was possible for the gastrocnemius and hamstring, but not always for the quadriceps and tensor fascia latae. Using the clinical loading protocol which consists of a one-legged stance, the quadriceps and hamstring EMGs showed minimal activity; loading cycles with increased EAG amplitude were associated with higher EMG activity from the gastrocnemius, which is involved in antero-posterior balance. These results document the role of the EAG as a "sensor" of the knee contact force and contribute to the development of clinical loading protocols with improved reproducibility. PMID:26792286

  14. Cosmetic effect of knee joint in a knee disarticulation prosthesis.

    PubMed

    de Laat, Fred A; van der Pluijm, Mark J; van Kuijk, Annette A; Geertzen, Jan H; Roorda, Leo D

    2014-01-01

    Despite numerous advantages, knee disarticulations (KDs) are rarely performed because of the anticipated KD prosthesis fitting problems that include the positioning of the knee joint distally from the KD socket. This results in lengthening of the thigh and subsequent shortening of the shank. The objective of this study was to assess the cosmetic effect of the knee joint in a KD prosthesis by determining the extent of the lengthening of the thigh and the shortening of the shank. This lengthening and shortening were measured through an experimental setup using laser techniques. These measurements were made of 18 knee joints used in KD prostheses. Lengthening of the thigh varied between 23 and 92 mm, and shortening of the shank varied between 3 and 50 mm. The polycentric knees Medi KH6 and Medi KHF1 showed the least lengthening of the thigh, and the polycentric knees Teh Lin Prosthetic & Orthotic Co. Ltd Graph-Lite and Medi KP5 showed the least shortening of the shank. PMID:25856500

  15. 'Diving reflex' in man - Its relation to isometric and dynamic exercise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, S. A., Jr.; Campbell, J. K.; Wildenthal, K.

    1972-01-01

    To test the influence of physical activity on the diving reflex, 10 normal men held their breath with their faces immersed in 15 C water during rest, bicycle exercise, and sustained isometric handgrip contraction. At all conditions, a slight but statistically significant elevation of blood pressure and a marked decrease in heart rate occurred during each dive. During moderate bicycle exercise heart rate fell more rapidly than at rest and the final level of bradycardia approached that achieved at rest, despite the fact that predive heart rates were much higher during exercise. When diving occurred in combination with isometric exercise, bradycardia was less severe than during resting dives and final heart rates could be represented as the sum of the expected responses to each intervention alone. In all conditions apnea without face immersion caused bradycardia that was less severe than during wet dives.

  16. Description and validation of isometric tetanic muscle force test in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Guilherme; Kremer, Thomas; Willems, Wouter F; Friedrich, Patricia F; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2012-01-01

    Isometric tetanic muscle force has been described in a rat model to evaluate motor recovery in a segmental sciatic nerve defect reconstructions. However, to test longer nerve defects, an alternative and larger animal model is necessary. The purpose of this study is to describe and validate a technique for isometric force measurement of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle in New Zealand rabbits. Muscle preload and electrical stimulation parameters were optimized to obtain the highest tetanic contraction bilaterally in 10 animals. Electrophysiology, muscle weight, peroneal nerve length, and histomorphometry were also analyzed. Only the peroneal nerve length and the ratio of highest muscle force/muscle weight demonstrated the equivalence between the sides. A small variability of TA muscle force and TA muscle weight was observed between the sides suggesting dominance. Optimization of electrical stimulation and preload as well as the use of correct anesthesia were fundamental to acquire the highest muscle force. PMID:22113792

  17. Ways of increasing muscular activity by means of isometric muscular exertion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovalik, A. V.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of isometric muscular exertion on the human body was investigated by having subjects perform basic movements in a sitting position in the conventional manner with additional muscle tension at 50% maximum force and at maximum force. The pulse, arterial pressure, skin temperature, respiratory rate, minute respiratory volume and electrical activity of the muscles involved were all measured. Performance of the exercises with maximum muscular exertion for 20 sec and without movement resulted in the greatest shifts in these indices; in the conventional manner substantial changes did not occur; and with isometric muscular exertion with 50% maximum force with and without movement, optimal functional shifts resulted. The latter is recommended for use in industrial exercises for the prevention of hypodynamia. Ten exercises are suggested.

  18. Fluid and electrolyte shifts during bed rest with isometric and isotonic exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Young, H. L.; Morse, J. T.; Juhos, L. T.; Van Beaumont, W.; Staley, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    It is difficult to separate the effects of reduction in hydrostatic pressure from that of reduced energy expenditure when investigating the confinement deconditioning problem. Experiments were conducted on seven healthy young men aged 19-21 yr with the purpose of separating these two factors by using isotonic physical exercise during bed rest to provide a daily energy expenditure greater than normal ambulatory levels. Fluid and electrolyte shifts were measured during three two-week bed rest periods, each of which being separated by a three-week ambulatory recovery period. During two of the three bed rest periods they performed isometric and isotonic exercises to compare their effects on fluid and electrolyte shifts during bed rest. It is shown that during bed rest, preservation of the extracellular volume takes precedence over maintenance of the plasma volume and that this mechanism is independent of the effects of isometric or isotonic exercise.

  19. Intraarticular osteochondroma of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Morey, Vivek Morey; Jalan, Divesh; Mittal, Ravi; Gamangatti, Shivanand

    2014-01-01

    Osteochondromas are usually extra articular and grow away from the joint towards the diaphysis. Intraarticular osteochondromas are very rare and often misdiagnosed. We report a case of 16-year-old boy who presented with pain and clicking sound in the right knee for last 6 months. On examination, click was felt at the terminal flexion of the knee. The lateral radiograph of the right knee showed a radio opaque shadow at the posterior aspect of the distal end of femur, which was further evaluated with an MRI. Arthroscopy showed a hard lesion arising from the roof of the intercondylar notch of femur. It was excised arthroscopically. Histopathology revealed it to be an osteochondroma. Thus, intraarticular osteochondroma of the knee can be considered as a rare cause of pain in young patients. PMID:24932044

  20. Anterior Knee Pain (Chondromalacia Patellae).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrick, James G.

    1989-01-01

    This article presents a pragmatic approach to the definition, diagnosis, and management of anterior knee pain. Symptoms and treatment are described. Emphasis is on active involvement of the patient in the rehabilitation exercise program. (IAH)

  1. Knee injuries in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, M R; Ireland, M L

    1995-04-01

    Female athletes are at increased risk for certain sports-related injuries, particularly those involving the knee. Factors that contribute to this increased risk are the differences in sports undertaken and in gender anatomy and structure. Gender differences include baseline level of conditioning, lower extremity alignment, physiological laxity, pelvis width, tibial rotation and foot alignment. Sports like gymnastics and cheerleading create a noncontact environment, but can result in significant knee injuries. In quick stopping and cutting sports, females have an increased incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury by noncontact mechanisms. Patellofemoral (PF) disorders are also very common in female athletes. Awareness of these facts helps the sports medicine professional make an accurate diagnosis and institute earlier treatment-focused rehabilitation with or without surgery. Further prospective and retrospective research is needed in areas of epidemiology, mechanisms, severity and types of knee injuries. The goal is to lessen the severity of certain knee injuries and to prevent others. PMID:7604201

  2. Minimally Invasive Total Knee Arthroplasty

    MedlinePlus

    ... and drill her. And how much are you rotating there? This rotates 3 degrees externally with respect ... femoral components that can be used. With the rotating knee system, a class III device at this ...

  3. Knee Brace Would Lock And Unlock Automatically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Neill; Forbes, John; Shadoan, Mike; Baker, Kevin

    1995-01-01

    Proposed knee brace designed to aid rehabilitation of person who suffered some muscle damage in leg. Not limited to locking in straight-leg position and, instead, locks at any bend angle. Does not prevent knee from bearing weight. Instead, knee brace allows knee to bear weight and locks only when foot and lower leg bear weight. Thus, brace prevents flexion that wearer desired to prevent but could not prevent because of weakened muscles. Knee bends freely to exercise knee-related muscles. Knee brace strapped at upper end to leg above knee, and anchored at lower end by stirrup under foot. Joint mechanism (identical mechanisms used in left and right assemblies) allows knee joint to flex freely except when weight applied to heel.

  4. Analysis of Joint Sounds in the Diagnosis of Knee Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-22

    Healthy Patients; No Knee Complaints; No Knee Injuries; No Knee Surgeries; No Neurological Problems; Patients Undergoing Knee Arthroscopy, Who Has a Pre-op MRI; Age Groups of 20,40 and 60 Years of Age.

  5. Alternative Methods for Measuring Scapular Muscles Protraction and Retraction Maximal Isometric Forces

    PubMed Central

    Roush, James R.; Davies, George J.; Ellenbecker, Todd S.; Rauh, Mitchell J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The importance of the scapular stabilizing muscles has led to an increased interest in quantitative measurements of their strength. Few studies have measured isometric or concentric isokinetic forces. Additionally, limited reports exist on the reliability of objective measures for testing scapular protraction and retraction muscle strength or scapular testing that does not involve the glenohumeral joint. Objective To determine the reliability of four new methods of measuring the maximal isometric strength of key scapular stabilizing muscles for the actions of protraction and retraction, both with and without the involvement of the glenohumeral (GH) joint. Methods The Isobex® stationary tension dynamometer was used to measure the maximal isometric force (kg) on thirty healthy females (ages 22–26 years). Three measures were taken for each method that was sequentially randomized for three separate testing sessions on three nonconsecutive days. Results Intraclass correlations (ICC2,3) for intrasession reliability and (ICC3,3) for intersession reliability ranged from 0.95 to 0.98, and 0.94 to 0.96 respectively. The standard errors of measurement (95% confidence interval [CI]) were narrow. Scatter grams for both protraction and retraction testing methods demonstrated a significant relationship, 0.92 for protraction (95% CI 0.83 to 0.96) and 0.93 for retraction (95% CI 0.87 to 0.97). Bland-Altman plots indicated good agreement between the two methods for measuring protraction strength but a weaker agreement for the two methods measuring retraction strength. Discussion/Conclusion The four new methods assessed in this study indicate reliable options for measuring scapular protraction or retraction isometric strength with or without involving the GH joint for young healthy females. PMID:21509104

  6. Isometric immersions via compensated compactness for slowly decaying negative Gauss curvature and rough data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoforou, Cleopatra; Slemrod, Marshall

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the method of compensated compactness is applied to the problem of isometric immersion of a two-dimensional Riemannian manifold with negative Gauss curvature into three-dimensional Euclidean space. Previous applications of the method to this problem have required decay of order t -4 in the Gauss curvature. Here, we show that the decay of Hong (Commun Anal Geom 1:487-514, 1993) t -2- δ/2 where δ ∈ (0, 4) suffices.

  7. Isometric immersions, energy minimization and self-similar buckling in non-Euclidean elastic sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmer, John; Sharon, Eran; Shearman, Toby; Venkataramani, Shankar C.

    2016-04-01

    The edges of torn plastic sheets and growing leaves often display hierarchical buckling patterns. We show that this complex morphology i) emerges even in zero strain configurations, and ii) is driven by a competition between the two principal curvatures, rather than between bending and stretching. We identify the key role of branch point (or “monkey saddle”) singularities in generating complex wrinkling patterns in isometric immersions, and show how they arise naturally from minimizing the elastic energy.

  8. Sex difference in substrate oxidation during low-intensity isometric exercise in young adults.

    PubMed

    Sarafian, Delphine; Schutz, Yves; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Dulloo, Abdul G; Miles-Chan, Jennifer L

    2016-09-01

    Low-intensity physical activity is increasingly promoted as an alternative to sedentary behavior. However, much research to date has focused on moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity, and in particular dynamic work, with the effect of low-intensity isometric exercise (<4 METs) on substrate utilization yet to be explored. Here we investigate the effects of such exercise on respiratory quotient (RQ) and determine the extent of intra- and inter-individual variability in response. Energy expenditure, RQ, and substrate oxidation were measured by ventilated-hood indirect calorimetry at rest and in response to standardized, intermittent, low-level isometric leg-press exercises at 5 loads (+5, +10, +15, +20, +25 kg) in 26 healthy, young adults. Nine participants repeated the experiment on 3 separate days to assess within-subject, between-day variability. There was no significant difference in energy cost and heart rate responses to low-intensity isometric exercise (<2 METs) between men and women. However, a sex difference was apparent in terms of substrate oxidation - with men increasing both fat and carbohydrate oxidation, and women only increasing fat oxidation while maintaining carbohydrate oxidation at baseline, resting levels. This sex difference was repeatable and persisted when substrate oxidation was adjusted for differences in body weight or body composition. Individual variability in RQ was relatively low, with both intra- and inter-individual coefficients of variation in the range of 3%-6% in both sexes. These results suggest that women preferentially increase fat oxidation during low-level isometric exercise. Whether such physical activity could be incorporated into treatment/prevention strategies aimed at optimizing fat oxidation in women warrants further investigation. PMID:27540628

  9. Cardiovascular responses to isometric hand grip vs. relaxed hand grip in sustained cycling efforts.

    PubMed

    Canivel, Randy G; Wyatt, Frank B; Baker, Julien S

    2012-11-01

    Peripheral isometric contractions may lead to enhanced performance. Previous research using hand grip protocols indicates increased stabilization and peak power outputs. Research is lacking with the grip vs. no-grip protocol during sustained efforts. The purpose of this study is to determine cardiovascular reactions (i.e., heart rate [HR], blood pressure [BP], and rate pressure product [RPP]) during sustained cycling via an isometric and relaxed hand grip. Nine (n = 9) recreational cyclists participated in this study. After signing a medical and physical readiness questionnaire, the subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 different protocols. Preexercising values of the HR (beats per minute), BP (miilimeters of mercury), height (centimeters), weight (kilograms), and age (years) were assessed before testing. A Monark bicycle ergometer was used for testing. Grip was substantiated through the use of a hand grip dynamometer at 20 kg of tension. Protocol 1 used an isometric "Hand Grip" scenario at 150 W for 20 minutes. Protocol 2 used a "Relaxed Hand Grip" at the same power and time. During the 20-minute exercise test, HR (POLAR), BP (stethoscope and sphygmomanometer), and calculated RPP (HR × systolic BP [SPB]/100) were recorded every minute. Statistical measures included mean and SDs between protocols, and dependent samples t-tests were used to examine differences between grip and no-grip protocols. At an alpha of ≤0.05, SBP did show a significant increase when using no grip, 161.4 (5.1) mm Hg vs. grip, 154.1 (6.6) mm Hg. However, rate pressure product and heart rate showed no significant differences between protocols. Our data suggested that the use of an isometric hand grip is transient and diminishes over time. PMID:22105053

  10. Some piloting experiences with multifunction isometric side-arm controllers in a helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The installation of two side-arm mounted, isometric controllers in the NAE Airborne Simulator, a modified, variable stability Bell 205 A is described, as is the development of various control systems for use with them. The results of two experiments are presented indicating both the feasibility and acceptability of such systems for a wide variety of tasks in a conventional single rotor helicopter, with a minimum of stability augmentation. Areas of future research are indicated.

  11. Extracting low-velocity concentric and eccentric dynamic muscle properties from isometric contraction experiments.

    PubMed

    Rockenfeller, R; Günther, M

    2016-08-01

    Determining dynamic properties of mammalian muscles, such as activation characteristics or the force-velocity relation, challenges the experimentalist. Tracking system, apparatus stiffness, load oscillation, force transducer, other sensors, and additional measuring devices may be incorporated, integrated and evaluated in an experimental set-up. In contrast, isometric contraction experiments (ICEs) are less challenging, but are generally not considered to reveal dynamic muscle properties. Yet, a sensitivity analysis of our muscle model discloses the influence of concentric, eccentric and activation parameters on isometric force development. Accordingly, we used solely experimental ICE data to identify muscle model parameters that generally describe concentric as well as eccentric muscle performance. In addition, we compared two different activation dynamics in regards to their physiological relevance to improve model-fits to ICE data. To this end, we optimized different combinations of such dynamic parameter subsets with respect to their influence on contraction solutions. Depending on muscle length in our optimized model, the contractile element reached shortening peaks during activation in the range 9-39% of its maximum contraction velocity, and about 8-25% during lengthening when deactivated. As a first result, we suggest one formulation of activation dynamics to be superior. Second, the step in slope of the force-velocity relation at isometric force was found to be the least influential among all dynamic parameters. Third, we suggest a specially designed isometric experimental set-up to estimate this transition parameter. Fourth, because of an inconsistency in literature, we developed a simple method to determine switching times of the neural stimulation and thus electro-mechanical delay (EMD) values from measuring muscle force in ICEs only. PMID:27321191

  12. Isometric exercise and cognitive function: an investigation of acute dose-response effects during submaximal fatiguing contractions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Denver M Y; Bray, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the dose-response relationship between exercise and cognitive performance using an acute bout of isometric exercise. University students (N = 55) were randomly assigned to control, 30%, 50% and 70% of maximum voluntary handgrip contraction groups. Participants performed a modified Stroop task before and after completion of an isometric handgrip endurance trial at their assigned exercise intensity. Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and forearm muscle activation (EMG) showed linear trends of progressively greater RPE and muscle activation at greater exercise intensity levels. Regression analysis showed significant (P < .05) linear degradations in frequency of errors on the Stroop task with increasing exercise intensity. We conclude that performing isometric exercise until exhaustion is associated with reduced cognitive performance and that higher intensity isometric exercise leads to greater performance impairments in a linear dose-response manner. PMID:25260112

  13. Toward isometric force capabilities evaluation by using a musculoskeletal model: Comparison with direct force measurement.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Vincent; Rezzoug, Nasser; Gorce, Philippe

    2015-09-18

    Developing formalisms to determine force capabilities of human limbs by using musculoskeletal models could be useful for biomechanical and ergonomic applications. In this framework, the purpose of this study was to compare measured maximal isometric force capabilities at the hand in a set of Cartesian directions with forces computed from a musculoskeletal model of the upper-limb. The results were represented under the form of a measured force polytope (MFP) and a musculoskeletal force polytope (MSFP). Both of them were obtained from the convex hull of measured and simulated force vectors endpoints. Nine subjects participated to the experiment. For one posture recorded with an optoelectronic system, maximum isometric forces exerted at the hand were recorded in twenty six directions of the Cartesian space with a triaxial force sensor. Results showed significant differences between the polytopes global shapes. The MSFP was more elongated than the MFP. Concerning the polytopes volumes, no significant difference was found. Mean maximal isometric forces provided by MFP and MSFP were 509.6 (118.4)N and 627.9 (73.3)N respectively. Moreover, the angle between the main axes of the two polytopes was 5.5 (2.3)° on average. Finally, RMS error values between MFP and MSFP were lower than 100N in 88% of the considered directions. The proposed MSFP based on a musculoskeletal model gave interesting information on optimal force orientation parameters. The possible applications in the frame of ergonomics, rehabilitation and biomechanics are proposed and discussed. PMID:26206551

  14. Changes in knee kinematics following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Akbari Shandiz, Mohsen; Boulos, Paul; Saevarsson, Stefan Karl; Yoo, Sam; Miller, Stephen; Anglin, Carolyn

    2016-04-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) changes the knee joint in both intentional and unintentional, known and unknown, ways. Patellofemoral and tibiofemoral kinematics play an important role in postoperative pain, function, satisfaction and revision, yet are largely unknown. Preoperative kinematics, postoperative kinematics or changes in kinematics may help identify causes of poor clinical outcome. Patellofemoral kinematics are challenging to record since the patella is obscured by the metal femoral component in X-ray and moves under the skin. The purpose of this study was to determine the kinematic degrees of freedom having significant changes and to evaluate the variability in individual changes to allow future study of patients with poor clinical outcomes. We prospectively studied the 6 degrees of freedom patellofemoral and tibiofemoral weightbearing kinematics, tibiofemoral contact points and helical axes of rotation of nine subjects before and at least 1 year after total knee arthroplasty using clinically available computed tomography and radiographic imaging systems. Normal kinematics for healthy individuals were identified from the literature. Significant differences existed between pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics, with the post-TKA kinematics being closer to normal. While on average the pre-total knee arthroplasty knees in this group displayed no pivoting (only translation), individually only five knees displayed this behaviour (of these, two showed lateral pivoting, one showed medial pivoting and one showed central pivoting). There was considerable variability postoperatively as well (five central, two lateral and two medial pivoting). Both preop and postop, flexion behaviour was more hinge-like medially and more rolling laterally. Helical axes were more consistent postop for this group. An inclusive understanding of the pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics and changes in kinematics due to total knee arthroplasty could improve implant design, patient diagnosis and

  15. Factors for Assessing the Effectiveness of Early Rehabilitation after Minimally Invasive Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Tetsuya; Tamari, Kotaro; Tanaka, Shigeharu; Uchida, Shigehiro; Ito, Hideyuki; Morikawa, Shinya; Kawamura, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of current rehabilitation programs is supported by high-level evidence from the results of randomized controlled trials, but an increasing number of patients are not discharged from the hospital because of the schedule of the critical path (CP). The present study aimed to determine which factors can be used to assess the effectiveness of early rehabilitation. We enrolled 123 patients with medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) who had undergone unilateral minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty for the first time. The following factors were assessed preoperatively: the maximum isometric muscle strength of the knee extensors and flexors, maximum knee and hip joint angle, pain, 5-m maximum walking speed, sex, age, body mass index, exercise habits, Kellgren-Lawrence grade, femorotibial angle, failure side (bilateral or unilateral knee OA), and functional independence measure. We re-evaluated physical function (i.e., muscle strength, joint angle, and pain) and motor function (5-m maximum walking speed) 14 days postoperatively. Changes in physical function, motor function (5-m maximum walking speed), and number of days to independent walking were used as explanatory variables. The postoperative duration of hospitalization (in days) was used as the dependent variable in multivariate analyses. These analyses were adjusted for sex, age, body mass index, exercise habits, Kellgren-Lawrence grade, femorotibial angle, failure side, and functional independence measure. The duration of hospitalization was significantly affected by the number of days to independent walking (p < 0.001, β = 0.507) and a change in the 5-m maximum walking speed (p = 0.016, β = -0.262). Multiple regression analysis showed that the radiographic knee grade (p = 0.029, β = 0.239) was a significant confounding factor. Independent walking and walking speed recovery were considered to reduce the duration of hospitalization. Therefore, these indices can be used to assess the effectiveness of

  16. History dependence of the electromyogram: Implications for isometric steady-state EMG parameters following a lengthening or shortening contraction.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alexis A; Power, Geoffrey A; Herzog, Walter

    2016-04-01

    Residual force enhancement (RFE) and force depression (FD) refer to an increased or decreased force following an active lengthening or shortening contraction, respectively, relative to the isometric force produced at the same activation level and muscle length. Our intent was to determine if EMG characteristics differed in the RFE or FD states compared with a purely isometric reference contraction for maximal and submaximal voluntary activation of the adductor pollicis muscle. Quantifying these alterations to EMG in history-dependent states allows for more accurate modeling approaches for movement control in the future. For maximal voluntary contractions (MVC), RFE was 6-15% (P<0.001) and FD was 12-19% (P<0.001). The median frequency of the EMG was not different between RFE, FD and isometric reference contractions for the 100% and 40% MVC intensities (P>0.05). However, root mean square EMG (EMGRMS) amplitude for the submaximal contractions was higher in the FD and lower in the RFE state, respectively (P<0.05). For maximal contractions, EMGRMS was lower for the FD state but was the same for the RFE state compared to the isometric reference contractions (P>0.05). Neuromuscular efficiency (NME; force/EMG) was lower in the force depressed state and higher in the force enhanced state (P<0.05) compared to the isometric reference contractions. EMG spectral properties were not altered between the force-enhanced and depressed states relative to the isometric reference contractions, while EMG amplitude measures were. PMID:26891078

  17. Fatigability and recovery of arm muscles with advanced age for dynamic and isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Tejin; Schlinder-Delap, Bonnie; Hunter, Sandra K

    2013-02-01

    This study determined whether age-related mechanisms can increase fatigue of arm muscles during maximal velocity dynamic contractions, as it occurs in the lower limb. We compared elbow flexor fatigue of young (n=10, 20.8±2.7 years) and old men (n=16, 73.8±6.1 years) during and in recovery from a dynamic and an isometric postural fatiguing task. Each task was maintained until failure while supporting a load equivalent to 20% of maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) torque. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to assess supraspinal fatigue (superimposed twitch, SIT) and muscle relaxation. Time to failure was longer for the old men than for the young men for the isometric task (9.5±3.1 vs. 17.2±7.0 min, P=0.01) but similar for the dynamic task (6.3±2.4 min vs. 6.0±2.0 min, P=0.73). Initial peak rate of relaxation was slower for the old men than for the young men, and was associated with a longer time to failure for both tasks (P<0.05). Low initial power during elbow flexion was associated with the greatest difference (reduction) in time to failure between the isometric task and the dynamic task (r=-0.54, P=0.015). SIT declined after both fatigue tasks similarly with age, although the recovery of SIT was associated with MVIC recovery for the old (both sessions) but not for the young men. Biceps brachii and brachioradialis EMG activity (% MVIC) of the old men were greater than that of the young men during the dynamic fatiguing task (P<0.05), but were similar during the isometric task. Muscular mechanisms and greater relative muscle activity (EMG activity) explain the greater fatigue during the dynamic task for the old men compared with the young men in the elbow flexor muscles. Recovery of MVC torque however relies more on the recovery of supraspinal fatigue among the old men than among the young men. PMID:23103238

  18. EEG signatures of arm isometric exertions in preparation, planning and execution.

    PubMed

    Nasseroleslami, Bahman; Lakany, Heba; Conway, Bernard A

    2014-04-15

    The electroencephalographic (EEG) activity patterns in humans during motor behaviour provide insight into normal motor control processes and for diagnostic and rehabilitation applications. While the patterns preceding brisk voluntary movements, and especially movement execution, are well described, there are few EEG studies that address the cortical activation patterns seen in isometric exertions and their planning. In this paper, we report on time and time-frequency EEG signatures in experiments in normal subjects (n=8), using multichannel EEG during motor preparation, planning and execution of directional centre-out arm isometric exertions performed at the wrist in the horizontal plane, in response to instruction-delay visual cues. Our observations suggest that isometric force exertions are accompanied by transient and sustained event-related potentials (ERP) and event-related (de-)synchronisations (ERD/ERS), comparable to those of a movement task. Furthermore, the ERPs and ERD/ERS are also observed during preparation and planning of the isometric task. Comparison of ear-lobe-referenced and surface Laplacian ERPs indicates the contribution of superficial sources in supplementary and pre-motor (FC(z)), parietal (CP(z)) and primary motor cortical areas (C₁ and FC₁) to ERPs (primarily negative peaks in frontal and positive peaks in parietal areas), but contribution of deep sources to sustained time-domain potentials (negativity in planning and positivity in execution). Transient and sustained ERD patterns in μ and β frequency bands of ear-lobe-referenced and surface Laplacian EEG indicate the contribution of both superficial and deep sources to ERD/ERS. As no physical displacement happens during the task, we can infer that the underlying mechanisms of motor-related ERPs and ERD/ERS patterns do not only depend on change in limb coordinate or muscle-length-dependent ascending sensory information and are primary generated by motor preparation, direction

  19. C*-algebras associated with reversible extensions of logistic maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwaśniewski, Bartosz K.

    2012-10-01

    The construction of reversible extensions of dynamical systems presented in a previous paper by the author and A.V. Lebedev is enhanced, so that it applies to arbitrary mappings (not necessarily with open range). It is based on calculating the maximal ideal space of C*-algebras that extends endomorphisms to partial automorphisms via partial isometric representations, and involves a new set of 'parameters' (the role of parameters is played by chosen sets or ideals). As model examples, we give a thorough description of reversible extensions of logistic maps and a classification of systems associated with compression of unitaries generating homeomorphisms of the circle. Bibliography: 34 titles.

  20. C*-algebras associated with reversible extensions of logistic maps

    SciTech Connect

    Kwasniewski, Bartosz K

    2012-10-31

    The construction of reversible extensions of dynamical systems presented in a previous paper by the author and A.V. Lebedev is enhanced, so that it applies to arbitrary mappings (not necessarily with open range). It is based on calculating the maximal ideal space of C*-algebras that extends endomorphisms to partial automorphisms via partial isometric representations, and involves a new set of 'parameters' (the role of parameters is played by chosen sets or ideals). As model examples, we give a thorough description of reversible extensions of logistic maps and a classification of systems associated with compression of unitaries generating homeomorphisms of the circle. Bibliography: 34 titles.

  1. Sharp knee phenomenon of primary cosmic ray energy spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter-Antonyan, Samvel

    2014-06-01

    Primary energy spectral models are tested in the energy range of 1-200 PeV using standardized extensive air shower responses from BASJE-MAS, Tibet, GAMMA and KASCADE scintillation shower arrays. Results point toward the two-component origin of observed cosmic ray energy spectra in the knee region consisting of a pulsar component superimposed upon rigidity-dependent power law diffuse Galactic flux. The two-component energy spectral model accounts for both the sharp knee shower spectral phenomenon and observed irregularity of all-particle energy spectrum in the region of 50-100 PeV. Alternatively, tested multipopulation primary energy spectra predicted by nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration models describe observed shower spectra in the knee region provided that the cutoff magnetic rigidities of accelerating particles are 6±0.3 and 45±2 PV for the first two populations, respectively. Both tested spectral models confirm the predominant H-He primary nuclei origin of observed shower spectral knee. The parameters of tested energy spectra are evaluated using solutions of the inverse problem on the basis of the corresponding parameterizations of energy spectra for primary H, He, O-like and Fe-like nuclei, standardized shower size spectral responses in the 550-1085 g/cm2 atmospheric slant depth range and near vertical muon truncated size spectra detected by the GAMMA array.

  2. KNEE EXTENSOR STRENGTH EXHIBITS POTENTIAL TO PREDICT FUNCTION IN SPORADIC INCLUSION-BODY MYOSITIS

    PubMed Central

    LOWES, LINDA PAX; ALFANO, LINDSAY; VIOLLET, LAURENCE; ROSALES, XIOMARA QUINTERO; SAHENK, ZARIFE; KASPAR, BRIAN K.; CLARK, K. REED; FLANIGAN, KEVIN M.; MENDELL, JERRY R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In this study we address the challenging issue of potential use of muscle strength to predict function in clinical trials. This has immediate relevance to translational studies that attempt to improve quadriceps strength in sporadic inclusion-body myositis (sIBM). Methods Maximum voluntary isometric contraction testing as a measure of muscle strength and a battery of functional outcomes were tested in 85 ambulatory subjects with sIBM. Results Marked quadriceps weakness was noted in all patients. Strength was correlated with distance walked at 2 and 6 minutes. Additional correlations were found with time to get up from a chair, climb stairs, and step up on curbs. Conclusions Quadriceps (knee extensor) strength correlated with performance in this large cohort of sIBM subjects, which demonstrated its potential to predict function in this disease. These data provide initial support for use of muscle strength as a surrogate for function, although validation in a clinical trial is required. PMID:22246869

  3. Ambulatory estimation of knee-joint kinematics in anatomical coordinate system using accelerometers and magnetometers.

    PubMed

    Kun, Liu; Inoue, Yoshio; Shibata, Kyoko; Enguo, Cao

    2011-02-01

    Knee-joint kinematics analysis using an optimal sensor set and a reliable algorithm would be useful in the gait analysis. An original approach for ambulatory estimation of knee-joint angles in anatomical coordinate system is presented, which is composed of a physical-sensor-difference-based algorithm and virtual-sensor-difference-based algorithm. To test the approach, a wearable monitoring system composed of accelerometers and magnetometers was developed and evaluated on lower limb. The flexion/extension (f/e), abduction/adduction (a/a), and inversion/extension (i/e) rotation angles of the knee joint in the anatomical joint coordinate system were estimated. In this method, since there is no integration of angular acceleration or angular velocity, the result is not distorted by offset and drift. The three knee-joint angles within the anatomical coordinate system are independent of the orders, which must be considered when Euler angles are used. Besides, since there are no physical sensors implanted in the knee joint based on the virtual-sensor-difference-based algorithm, it is feasible to analyze knee-joint kinematics with less numbers and types of sensors than those mentioned in some others methods. Compared with results from the reference system, the developed wearable sensor system is available to do gait analysis with fewer sensors and high degree of accuracy. PMID:21257363

  4. Will 'Unloading' Shoes Help Your Arthritic Knees?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160406.html Will 'Unloading' Shoes Help Your Arthritic Knees? Study puts specially designed footwear to the test ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For reducing pain from arthritic knees, "unloading" shoes don't offer a leg up ...

  5. Knee joint forces: prediction, measurement, and significance

    PubMed Central

    D’Lima, Darryl D.; Fregly, Benjamin J.; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Colwell, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    Knee forces are highly significant in osteoarthritis and in the survival and function of knee arthroplasty. A large number of studies have attempted to estimate forces around the knee during various activities. Several approaches have been used to relate knee kinematics and external forces to internal joint contact forces, the most popular being inverse dynamics, forward dynamics, and static body analyses. Knee forces have also been measured in vivo after knee arthroplasty, which serves as valuable validation of computational predictions. This review summarizes the results of published studies that measured knee forces for various activities. The efficacy of various methods to alter knee force distribution, such as gait modification, orthotics, walking aids, and custom treadmills are analyzed. Current gaps in our knowledge are identified and directions for future research in this area are outlined. PMID:22468461

  6. Deciding to have knee or hip replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... patientinstructions/000368.htm Deciding to have knee or hip replacement To use the sharing features on this page, ... make a decision. Who Benefits From Knee or hip Replacement Surgery? The most common reason to have a ...

  7. Risks of hip and knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... is normal to lose blood during and after hip or knee replacement surgery. Some people need a blood transfusion during ... clot form are higher during and soon after hip or knee replacement surgery. Sitting or lying down for long periods ...

  8. Knee joint forces: prediction, measurement, and significance.

    PubMed

    D'Lima, Darryl D; Fregly, Benjamin J; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Colwell, Clifford W

    2012-02-01

    Knee forces are highly significant in osteoarthritis and in the survival and function of knee arthroplasty. A large number of studies have attempted to estimate forces around the knee during various activities. Several approaches have been used to relate knee kinematics and external forces to internal joint contact forces, the most popular being inverse dynamics, forward dynamics, and static body analyses. Knee forces have also been measured in vivo after knee arthroplasty, which serves as valuable validation of computational predictions. This review summarizes the results of published studies that measured knee forces for various activities. The efficacy of various methods to alter knee force distribution, such as gait modification, orthotics, walking aids, and custom treadmills are analyzed. Current gaps in our knowledge are identified and directions for future research in this area are outlined. PMID:22468461

  9. Metaphyseal bone loss in revision knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ponzio, Danielle Y; Austin, Matthew S

    2015-12-01

    The etiology of bone loss encountered during revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is often multifactorial and can include stress shielding, osteolysis, osteonecrosis, infection, mechanical loss due to a grossly loose implant, and iatrogenic loss at the time of implant resection. Selection of the reconstructive technique(s) to manage bone deficiency is determined by the location and magnitude of bone loss, ligament integrity, surgeon experience, and patient factors including the potential for additional revision, functional demand, and comorbidities. Smaller, contained defects are reliably managed with bone graft, cement augmented with screw fixation, or modular augments. Large metaphyseal defects require more extensive reconstruction such as impaction bone grafting with or without mesh augmentation, prosthetic augmentation, use of bulk structural allografts, or use of metaphyseal cones or sleeves. While each technique has advantages and disadvantages, the most optimal method for reconstruction of large metaphyseal bone defects during revision TKA is not clearly established. PMID:26362647

  10. Biomechanical and clinical evaluation of a newly designed polycentric knee of transfemoral prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Yokogushi, Kazutoshi; Narita, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Eiichi; Chiba, Susumu; Nosaka, Toshiya; Yamakoshi, Ken-ichi

    2004-09-01

    We have designed a new polycentric knee adopting a hydraulic unit and an intelligent mechanism. The biomechanical parameters of this prototype, such as the stance duration, peak knee flexion angle in stance and swing, peak hip flexion angle, and peak hip extension moments were analyzed at three different cadences (88, 96, 104 steps/min) in three amputees, and then compared to those of polycentric hydraulic knees currently in use. The same parameters were also measured for 10 healthy volunteers and subsequently analyzed. In the prototype, almost all the values of the parameters showed no significant variety in individuals at the different cadences. The situation was the same with the healthy volunteers. However, the values of the parameter for the conventional knee varied significantly with the individual at the different cadences. The prototype may be of practical use, contributing to a stable walk even at different cadences. PMID:15558397

  11. Orthopedic management of spina bifida. Part I: hip, knee, and rotational deformities.

    PubMed

    Swaroop, Vineeta T; Dias, Luciano

    2009-12-01

    Children with spina bifida develop a wide variety of congenital and acquired orthopedic deformities. Among these are hip deformities such as contracture, subluxation, or dislocation. Patients may also have problems with the knee joint, such as knee flexion or extension contracture, knee valgus deformity, or late knee instability and pain. In addition, rotational deformities of the lower extremities, either internal or external torsion, are common as well. This paper will review both the overall orthopedic care of a patient with spina bifida and provide a focused review of the diagnosis and management of the above deformities. In addition, this paper will review the incidence, etiology, classification, and prognosis of spina bifida. The use of gait analysis and orthoses will be covered as well. The forthcoming Part II will cover foot and ankle deformities in spina bifida. PMID:19856195

  12. Tibial tubercle osteotomy for exposure of the difficult total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, L A; Ohl, M D

    1990-11-01

    Tibial tubercle osteotomy provides a safe and reliable means of extensile exposure of the knee. A technique was developed using a long osteoperiosteal segment including the tibial tubercle and upper tibial crest leaving lateral muscular attachments intact to this bone fragment. The bone fragment was reattached to its bed with two cobalt-chromium wires passed through the fragment and through the medial tibial cortex. The procedure was used in 71 knees to expose the joint for total knee arthroplasty, and the follow-up period was one to five years. All healed uneventfully, and no significant complications occurred. Mean postoperative flexion was 97 degrees. No extension lag occurred, and mean flexion contracture was 2.5 degrees. Excellent exposure can be achieved by means of a viable bone flap below the knee. Early rehabilitation and weight bearing can be done with low potential for complications. PMID:2225644

  13. Predicting Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Bruce S; Woodhouse, Francis G; Besier, Thor F; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Lloyd, David G; Zhang, Lihai; Smith, David W

    2016-01-01

    Treatment options for osteoarthritis (OA) beyond pain relief or total knee replacement are very limited. Because of this, attention has shifted to identifying which factors increase the risk of OA in vulnerable populations in order to be able to give recommendations to delay disease onset or to slow disease progression. The gold standard is then to use principles of risk management, first to provide subject-specific estimates of risk and then to find ways of reducing that risk. Population studies of OA risk based on statistical associations do not provide such individually tailored information. Here we argue that mechanistic models of cartilage tissue maintenance and damage coupled to statistical models incorporating model uncertainty, united within the framework of structural reliability analysis, provide an avenue for bridging the disciplines of epidemiology, cell biology, genetics and biomechanics. Such models promise subject-specific OA risk assessment and personalized strategies for mitigating or even avoiding OA. We illustrate the proposed approach with a simple model of cartilage extracellular matrix synthesis and loss regulated by daily physical activity. PMID:26206679

  14. Early knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Favero, Marta; Ramonda, Roberta; Goldring, Mary B; Goldring, Steven R; Punzi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Concepts regarding osteoarthritis, the most common joint disease, have dramatically changed in the past decade thanks to the development of new imaging techniques and the widespread use of arthroscopy that permits direct visualisation of intra-articular tissues and structure. MRI and ultrasound allow the early detection of pre-radiographic structural changes not only in the peri-articular bone but also in the cartilage, menisci, synovial membrane, ligaments and fat pad. The significance of MRI findings such as cartilage defects, bone marrow lesions, synovial inflammation/effusions and meniscal tears in patients without radiographic signs of osteoarthritis is not fully understood. Nevertheless, early joint tissue changes are associated with symptoms and, in some cases, with progression of disease. In this short review, we discuss the emerging concept of early osteoarthritis localised to the knee based on recently updated knowledge. We highlight the need for a new definition of early osteoarthritis that will permit the identification of patients at high risk of osteoarthritis progression and to initiate early treatment interventions. PMID:26557380

  15. TOTAL KNEE REPLACEMENT IN PATIENTS WITH BELOW-KNEE AMPUTATION

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Matthew D; Willey, Michael; Shurr, Donald G

    2010-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is reserved for patients with severe and disabling arthritis that is non-responsive to conservative measures. Based on existing data, total knee replacement is a safe and cost-effective treatment for alleviating pain and improving physical function in patients who do not respond to conservative therapy. Despite the large variation in health status of patients and types of prosthesis implanted, total knee replacement has proven to be a relatively low risk and successful operation. Each year in the United States surgeons perform approximately 300,000 TKR.1 Likewise, lower extremity amputation is commonly performed in the United States with an annual incidence of 110,000 per year.2 Nearly 70% of all lower extremity amputations are performed as the result of chronic vascular disease, followed by trauma (22%), congenital etiology and tumor (4% each).3 Approximately 50% of all lower extremity amputations are performed secondary to complications from Diabetes Mellitus. Norvell et al. demonstrated that patients who have previously undergone transtibial amputation and ambulate with a prosthesis are more likely to develop degenerative joint disease in the con-tralateral extremity than the ipsilateral extremity.4 Further, radiographic changes consistent with osteoporosis have been demonstrated in up to 88% of limbs that have undergone transtibial amputation.8 To our knowledge, there have been only three reported cases of total knee replacement in patients with ipsilateral transtibial amputation.5,7 The purpose of the present study is to review the existing data on total knee replacement in patients who have undergone transtibial amputation. Further we present a patient with a transtibial amputation who underwent contralateral total knee replacement. PMID:21045987

  16. Self-reported previous knee injury and low knee function increase knee injury risk in adolescent female football.

    PubMed

    Clausen, M B; Tang, L; Zebis, M K; Krustrup, P; Hölmich, P; Wedderkopp, N; Andersen, L L; Christensen, K B; Møller, M; Thorborg, K

    2016-08-01

    Knee injuries are common in adolescent female football. Self-reported previous knee injury and low Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) are proposed to predict future knee injuries, but evidence regarding this in adolescent female football is scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate self-reported previous knee injury and low KOOS subscale score as risk factors for future knee injuries in adolescent female football. A sample of 326 adolescent female football players, aged 15-18, without knee injury at baseline, were included. Data on self-reported previous knee injury and KOOS questionnaires were collected at baseline. Time-loss knee injuries and football exposures were reported weekly by answers to standardized text-message questions, followed by injury telephone interviews. A priori, self-reported previous knee injury and low KOOS subscale scores (< 80 points) were chosen as independent variables in the risk factor analyses. The study showed that self-reported previous knee injury significantly increased the risk of time-loss knee injury [relative risk (RR): 3.65, 95% confidence (CI) 1.73-7.68; P < 0.001]. Risk of time-loss knee injury was also significantly increased in players with low KOOS subscale scores (< 80 points) in Activities of Daily Living (RR: 5.0), Sport/Recreational (RR: 2.2) and Quality of Life (RR: 3.0) (P < 0.05). In conclusion, self-reported previous knee injury and low scores in three KOOS subscales significantly increase the risk of future time-loss knee injury in adolescent female football. PMID:26179111

  17. Snapping knee caused by symptomatic fabella in a native knee.

    PubMed

    Hire, Justin M; Oliver, David L; Hubbard, Ryan C; Fontaine, Michelle L; Bojescul, John A

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of a 31-year-old man with a 5-year history of snapping knee syndrome secondary to a single, large symptomatic fabella of the knee. On physical examination, the patient was able to reproduce an audible and palpable snapping with active range of motion. His condition was refractory to physical therapy. He had undergone a prior iliotibial band release at an outside facility. After excision of the fabella, measuring 15 × 8 × 9 mm, the patient's snapping and pain with activity were resolved. PMID:25136872

  18. Knee Replacement - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Knee Replacement (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Total Knee Replacement Potpuna zamjena koljena - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Total Knee Replacement 全膝关节置换 - 简体中文 ( ...

  19. Arthrometric evaluation of stabilizing effect of knee functional bracing at different flexion angles.

    PubMed

    Seyed Mohseni, Saeedeh; Moss, Farzam; Karimi, Hossein; Kamali, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Previous in-vivo investigations on the stabilizing efficacy of knee bracing for ACL reconstructed patients have been often limited to 20-30 degrees of knee flexion. In this study, the effectiveness of a uniaxial hinged functional brace to improve the knee stability was assessed at 30, 60 and 90 degrees of knee flexion. Arthrometry tests were conducted on 15 healthy subjects before and following wearing the brace and the tibial displacements were measured at up to 150 N anterior forces. Results indicated that functional bracing has a significant stabilizing effect throughout the range of knee flexion examined (p < 0.05). The rate of effectiveness, however, was not consistent across the flexion range, e.g., 50% at 30 degrees and only 4% at 90 degrees. It was suggested that accurate sizing and fitting as well as attention to correct hinge placement relative to the femoral condyles can limit brace migration and improve its effectiveness in mid and deep knee flexion. With using adaptive limb fittings, through flexible pads, and a polycentric joint a more significant improvement of the overall brace performance and efficacy might be obtained. Key pointsFunctional bracing improves the knee joint stability mostly in extension posture.Unlike the non-braced condition, the least knee joint stability appears in mid and deep flexion angles when using a hinged brace.Accurate sizing and fitting and attention to correct hinge placement relative to the femoral condyles can limit brace migration and improve its effectiveness in mid and deep knee flexion.The overall brace performance and efficacy might be improved significantly using adaptive limb fittings through flexible pads and/or polycentric joints. PMID:24149533

  20. AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FARQUHAR, R.N.

    AUSTRALIAN AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION HAS LONG EMPHASIZED TECHNICAL ADVISORY SERVICE AT THE EXPENSE OF THE SOCIOECONOMIC ASPECTS OF FARM PRODUCTION AND FARM LIFE. ONLY IN TASMANIA HAS FARM MANAGEMENT BEEN STRESSED. DEMANDS FOR THE WHOLE-FARM APPROACH HAVE PRODUCED A TREND TOWARD GENERALISM FOR DISTRICT OFFICERS IN MOST STATES. THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT,…

  1. [Imaging strategies for knee injuries].

    PubMed

    Hegenscheid, K; Puls, R; Rosenberg, C

    2012-11-01

    Injuries of the knees are common. The Ottawa knee rule provides decisional support to determine whether radiographs are indicated or not. With the use of ultrasound it is possible to detect defects of the extensor ligaments and the anterior cruciate ligament. Furthermore, it is possible to detect indirect signs of an intra-articular fracture, e.g. lipohemarthrosis. In complex fractures, e.g. tibial plateau fractures, further diagnostic procedures with multislice computed tomography (CT) are needed for accurate classification and preoperative planning. Multislice CT with CT angiography enables three-dimensional reconstruction of the knee and non-invasive vascular imaging for detection of vascular injury. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the gold standard for detection of occult fractures and injuries of the ligaments and menisci. Higher field strengths can be used to improve the diagnostics of cartilage lesions. Virtual MR arthrography is superior to conventional MRI for detection of cartilage lesions especially after meniscus surgery. PMID:23154845

  2. Robotic-assisted knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Elmallah, Randa K; Jauregui, Julio J; Pierce, Todd P; Mont, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Robotics in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has undergone vast improvements. Although some of the systems have fallen out of favor due to safety concerns, there has been recent increased interest for semi-active haptic robotic systems that provide intraoperative tactile feedback to the surgeon. The potential advantages include improvements in radiographic outcomes, reducing the incidence of mechanical axis malalignment of the lower extremity and better tissue balance. Proponents of robotic technology believe that these improvements may lead to superior functional outcomes and implant survivorship. We aim to discuss robotic technology development, outcomes of unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty and the future outlook. Short-term follow-up studies on robotic-assisted knee arthroplasty suggest that, although some alignment objectives may have been achieved, more studies regarding functional outcomes are needed. Furthermore, studies evaluating the projected cost-benefit analyses of this new technology are needed before widespread adoption. Nevertheless, the short-term results warrant further evaluation. PMID:26365088

  3. Early osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Madry, Henning; Kon, Elizaveta; Condello, Vincenzo; Peretti, Giuseppe M; Steinwachs, Matthias; Seil, Romain; Berruto, Massimo; Engebretsen, Lars; Filardo, Giuseppe; Angele, Peter

    2016-06-01

    There is an increasing awareness on the importance in identifying early phases of the degenerative processes in knee osteoarthritis (OA), the crucial period of the disease when there might still be the possibility to initiate treatments preventing its progression. Early OA may show a diffuse and ill-defined involvement, but also originate in the cartilage surrounding a focal lesion, thus necessitating a separate assessment of these two entities. Early OA can be considered to include a maximal involvement of 50 % of the cartilage thickness based on the macroscopic ICRS classification, reflecting an OARSI grade 4. The purpose of this paper was to provide an updated review of the current status of the diagnosis and definition of early knee OA, including the clinical, radiographical, histological, MRI, and arthroscopic definitions and biomarkers. Based on current evidence, practical classification criteria are presented. As new insights and technologies become available, they will further evolve to better define and treat early knee OA. PMID:27000393

  4. Single bundle anterior cruciate reconstruction does not restore normal knee kinematics at six months: an upright MRI study.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, J A; Sutherland, A G; Smith, F W

    2011-10-01

    Abnormal knee kinematics following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament may exist despite an apparent resolution of tibial laxity and functional benefit. We performed upright, weight-bearing MR scans of both knees in the sagittal plane at different angles of flexion to determine the kinematics of the knee following unilateral reconstruction (n = 12). The uninjured knee acted as a control. Scans were performed pre-operatively and at three and six months post-operatively. Anteroposterior tibial laxity was determined using an arthrometer and patient function by validated questionnaires before and after reconstruction. In all the knees with deficient anterior cruciate ligaments, the tibial plateau was displaced anteriorly and internally rotated relative to the femur when compared with the control contralateral knee, particularly in extension and early flexion (mean lateral compartment displacement: extension 7.9 mm (sd 4.8), p = 0.002 and 30° flexion 5.1 mm (sd 3.6), p = 0.004). In all ten patients underwent post-operative scans. Reconstruction reduced the subluxation of the lateral tibial plateau at three months, with resolution of anterior displacement in early flexion, but not in extension (p = 0.015). At six months, the reconstructed knee again showed anterior subluxation in both the lateral (mean: extension 4.2 mm (sd 4.2), p = 0.021 and 30° flexion 3.2 mm (sd 3.3), p = 0.024) and medial compartments (extension, p = 0.049). Our results show that despite improvement in laxity and functional benefit, abnormal knee kinematics remain at six months and actually deteriorate from three to six months following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. PMID:21969431

  5. Asymmetries of bilateral isometric force matching with movement intention and unilateral fatigue.

    PubMed

    Gueugnon, Mathieu; Torre, Kjerstin; Mottet, Denis; Bonnetblanc, François

    2014-06-01

    During bilateral coordination, some level of inter-hemispheric remapping (i.e., the congruency between afferent and efferent force signals from both hemispheres) is required. In this case, sensory-motor information is exchanged between the two hemispheres, but it remains unclear whether this information exchange is always equivalent or not, especially in a bilateral isometric force-matching task. We used unilateral fatigue applied to one arm in order to determine whether inter-hemispheric remapping can vary asymmetrically during a bilateral isometric matching task. Because fatigue is considered to bias the sensory-motor system, we hypothesized that if bimanual coordination is modulated solely in function of the state of the sensory-motor system (motor efferences, inter-hemispheric inhibitions, and sensory reafferences), we should not observe any asymmetric effect of fatigue with movement intention (leading vs. matching arm). However, if any other process could participate in the modulation of inter-hemispheric remapping, we should observe an interaction between movement intentions and fatigue on the force produced. We found that, when the leading arm was the non-fatigued arm, participants succeeded in reproducing the force level with their fatigued arm. By contrast, when the leading arm was fatigued, subjects over-estimated the force level produced with their non-fatigued arm. Hence, lateralized fatigue exacerbates an asymmetric behavior that seems modulated by movement intention (leading vs. matching). In other words, when unilateral fatigue is introduced in a bilateral isometric force-matching task, inter-hemispheric remapping is asymmetrical. Intensity levels of motor commands sent to both arms (directly or modulated through inter-hemispheric inhibitions) and sensory reafferences alone cannot explain these observations. Some attentional focus may be not balanced continuously between both arms but may be mainly directed toward the matching arm. PMID:24553753

  6. The influence of straining maneuvers on the pressor response during isometric exercise.

    PubMed

    Williams, C A; Lind, A R

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine to what extent increments in esophageal and abdominal pressure would have on arterial blood pressure during fatiguing isometric exercise. Arterial blood pressure was measured during handgrip and leg isometric exercise performed with both a free and occluded circulation to active muscles. Handgrip contractions were exerted at 33 and 70% MVC (maximum voluntary contraction) by 4 volunteers in a sitting position and calf muscle contractions at 50 and 70% MVC with the subjects in a kneeling position. Esophageal pressure measured at the peak of inspirations did not change during either handgrip or leg contractions but peak expiratory pressures increased progressively during both handgrip and leg contractions as fatigue occurred. These increments were independent of the tensions of the isometric contractions exerted. Intra-abdominal pressures measured at the peak of either inspiration or expiration did not change during inspiration with handgrip contractions but increased during expiration. During leg exercise, intraabdominal pressures increased during both inspiration and expiration, reaching peak levels at fatigue. The arterial blood pressure also reached peak levels at fatigue, independent of circulatory occlusion and tension exerted, averaging 18.5-20 kPa (140-150 mm Hg) for both handgrip and leg contractions. While blood pressure returned to resting levels following exercise with a free circulation, it declined by only 2.7-3.8 kPa after leg and handgrip exercise, respectively, during circulatory occlusion. These results indicate that straining maneuvers contribute 3.5 to 7.8 kPa to the change in blood pressure depending on body position. PMID:3569231

  7. Intramuscular water movement during and after isometric muscle contraction: evaluation at different exercise intensities.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Osamu; Kurihara, Toshiyuki

    2016-09-01

    We aimed at evaluating the effect of isometric muscle contraction on intramuscular water movement at different exercise intensities. Seven men performed 1-min isometric ankle dorsiflexion (20% and 50% maximal voluntary contractions [MVCs]) with a non-magnetic custom-made dynamometer, inside a magnetic resonance (MR) device. Axial diffusion-weighted images were obtained before, during and at 1-20 min (1-min interval) after the exercise to calculate the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the tibialis anterior. Under the same exercise condition, the concentration change of total haemoglobin (Hb) and myoglobin (Mb) (total Hb/Mb) within the tibialis anterior was assessed by performing near-infrared spectroscopy before, during and after the exercise outside the MR device. The 20% MVC exercise significantly increased the ADC only at 1 min postexercise (P<0·01), whereas the ADC significantly increased during and at 2-20 min after the 50% MVC exercise (P<0·01). The 20% MVC exercise decreased the total Hb/Mb during exercise (P<0·01), but the value significantly increased at 1 min postexercise (P<0·01). The total Hb/Mb significantly decreased during the 50% MVC exercise, but significantly increased at 1-5 min postexercise (P<0·01). One-minute moderate-intensity isometric exercise activates intramuscular water movement during and after the exercise. This activation was found even after a low-intensity exercise, but the effect was small and did not last long. The effect of intramuscular hyperaemia on the postexercise ADC elevation may be limited to the very early period after low- to moderate-intensity exercises. PMID:26147530

  8. Isometric Embeddings into the Minkowski Space and New Quasi-Local Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mu-Tao; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2009-06-01

    The definition of quasi-local mass for a bounded space-like region Ω in space-time is essential in several major unsettled problems in general relativity. The quasi-local mass is expected to be a type of flux integral on the boundary two-surface {Σ=partial Ω} and should be independent of whichever space-like region {Σ} bounds. An important idea which is related to the Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity is to consider a reference surface in a flat ambient space with the same first fundamental form and derive the quasi-local mass from the difference of the extrinsic geometries. This approach has been taken by Brown-York [4,5] and Liu-Yau [16,17] (see also related works [3,6,9,12,14,15,28,32]) to define such notions using the isometric embedding theorem into the Euclidean three space. However, there exist surfaces in the Minkowski space whose quasilocal mass is strictly positive [19]. It appears that the momentum information needs to be accounted for to reconcile the difference. In order to fully capture this information, we use isometric embeddings into the Minkowski space as references. In this article, we first prove an existence and uniqueness theorem for such isometric embeddings. We then solve the boundary value problem for Jang’s [13] equation as a procedure to recognize such a surface in the Minkowski space. In doing so, we discover a new expression of quasi-local mass for a large class of “admissible” surfaces (see Theorem A and Remark 1.1). The new mass is positive when the ambient space-time satisfies the dominant energy condition and vanishes on surfaces in the Minkowski space. It also has the nice asymptotic behavior at spatial infinity and null infinity. Some of these results were announced in [29].

  9. Comparison of regression models for estimation of isometric wrist joint torques using surface electromyography

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several regression models have been proposed for estimation of isometric joint torque using surface electromyography (SEMG) signals. Common issues related to torque estimation models are degradation of model accuracy with passage of time, electrode displacement, and alteration of limb posture. This work compares the performance of the most commonly used regression models under these circumstances, in order to assist researchers with identifying the most appropriate model for a specific biomedical application. Methods Eleven healthy volunteers participated in this study. A custom-built rig, equipped with a torque sensor, was used to measure isometric torque as each volunteer flexed and extended his wrist. SEMG signals from eight forearm muscles, in addition to wrist joint torque data were gathered during the experiment. Additional data were gathered one hour and twenty-four hours following the completion of the first data gathering session, for the purpose of evaluating the effects of passage of time and electrode displacement on accuracy of models. Acquired SEMG signals were filtered, rectified, normalized and then fed to models for training. Results It was shown that mean adjusted coefficient of determination (Ra2) values decrease between 20%-35% for different models after one hour while altering arm posture decreased mean Ra2 values between 64% to 74% for different models. Conclusions Model estimation accuracy drops significantly with passage of time, electrode displacement, and alteration of limb posture. Therefore model retraining is crucial for preserving estimation accuracy. Data resampling can significantly reduce model training time without losing estimation accuracy. Among the models compared, ordinary least squares linear regression model (OLS) was shown to have high isometric torque estimation accuracy combined with very short training times. PMID:21943179

  10. Evaluation of isometric strength and fatty infiltration of the subscapularis in latarjet surgery

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Ricardo Barreto Monteiro; Kauffman, Fábio Neumann; de Lima, Gabriel Praxedes; Ferreira, Avraham Machado Costa; dos Santos, Saulo Monteiro; Aguiar, José Lamartine de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the function of the subscapularis muscle by means of isometric strength, clinical examination and analysis of fatty infiltration in patients with recurrent anterior dislocation of the shoulder undergoing Latarjet-Patte surgery. METHODS: 38 patients operated from March 2011 to March 2012, with minimum follow-up of two years were evaluated, being 26 males and 12 females, with a mean age of 28.7 years old. Isometric strength was measured using a portable dynamometer and measuring the distance from the back of the hand during the lift-off test. We used the Rowe and Walch-Duplay scores for clinical evaluation. The degree of fatty infiltration of the subscapularis belly was assessed by computed tomography. RESULTS: The mean scores in the Walch-Duplay and Rowe were 84.7 and 89.4, respectively. The mean distance to the back of the hand was 7.34 cm on the operated side and 8.72 cm on the opposite side (p <0.0001). The mean strength measured in the lift-off test was 0.38 kg lower than on the contralateral side (p = 0.001). There was no fatty infiltration of the subscapularis in 16 patients (42.1%). Sixteen patients (42.1%) were classified as Goutallier grade 1 and six (15.8%) as grade 2. We found that the measured isometric strength decreases with increasing the degree of fatty infiltration (p <0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: The decrease in subscapularis strength, albeit of low magnitude (0.38 kg), was directly related to the degree of fatty infiltration and worse clinical outcomes. Level of Evidence III, Therapeutic Study - Investigating the Results of Treatment. PMID:26207088

  11. An in vivo biomechanical analysis of the soft-tissue envelope of osteoarthritic knees.

    PubMed

    Zalzal, Paul; Papini, Marcello; Petruccelli, Danielle; de Beer, Justin; Winemaker, Mitchell J

    2004-02-01

    Soft-tissue balancing and the amount of tension applied to the ligaments in a well-functioning total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has, thus far, not been accurately quantified. A ligament-tensioning device was used to measure displacement between the tibia and femur versus load during 86 consecutive TKAs. Measurements were made in flexion and extension following bone cuts and final soft-tissue balancing to calculate mean effective stiffness (MES) of the soft-tissue envelope and mean resting force on the implanted polyethylene component. MES was not affected by age or gender and did not differ in flexion versus extension. MES was significantly higher in posterior cruciate-retaining knees compared with posterior cruciate-sacrificing knees. There was no statistical difference between mean resting force on the polyethylene in flexion versus extension, or in posterior cruciate-retaining versus -sacrificing knees. These biomechanical data will serve as a good starting point for which to compare the expected stiffness of the ligaments and resting load on the polyethylene in well-balanced knees. PMID:14973866

  12. Arthroscopic surgery of the knee.

    PubMed Central

    Dandy, D J; O'Carroll, P F

    1982-01-01

    In the first 1000 arthroscopic operations performed by one surgeon 136 patients had two or more procedures, making a total of 1168 during the 1000 operations. The indications for operation were internal mechanical derangements in 565 patients, anterior knee pain in 246, disorders of the synovium in 77, ligament injuries in 63, and degenerative joint disease in 49. Complications included fracture of instruments in the knee in five patients, haemarthrosis in 10, deep vein thrombosis in three, and synovial fistula in one. In no patient was the wound infected. A total of 26 different operations was performed. PMID:6812832

  13. [Revision after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Mohr, G; Martin, J; Clarius, M

    2014-10-01

    Unicompartmental arthroplasty is an efficient and approved treatment option of unicompartmental arthritis of the knee, being performed with increasing frequency worldwide. Compared to total knee replacement, there are several advantages such as faster recovery, lower blood loss, better functional outcome and lower infection rates. However, higher revision rates are a frequent argument against the use of unicompartmental arthroplasty. The following article gives an overview of failure mechanisms and strategies for revision arthroplasty. This article is based on a selective literature review including PubMed and relevant print media. Our own clinical experience is considered as well. PMID:25209015

  14. Recent Advances in Computational Mechanics of the Human Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, M.; Dabiri, Y.; Li, L. P.

    2013-01-01

    Computational mechanics has been advanced in every area of orthopedic biomechanics. The objective of this paper is to provide a general review of the computational models used in the analysis of the mechanical function of the knee joint in different loading and pathological conditions. Major review articles published in related areas are summarized first. The constitutive models for soft tissues of the knee are briefly discussed to facilitate understanding the joint modeling. A detailed review of the tibiofemoral joint models is presented thereafter. The geometry reconstruction procedures as well as some critical issues in finite element modeling are also discussed. Computational modeling can be a reliable and effective method for the study of mechanical behavior of the knee joint, if the model is constructed correctly. Single-phase material models have been used to predict the instantaneous load response for the healthy knees and repaired joints, such as total and partial meniscectomies, ACL and PCL reconstructions, and joint replacements. Recently, poromechanical models accounting for fluid pressurization in soft tissues have been proposed to study the viscoelastic response of the healthy and impaired knee joints. While the constitutive modeling has been considerably advanced at the tissue level, many challenges still exist in applying a good material model to three-dimensional joint simulations. A complete model validation at the joint level seems impossible presently, because only simple data can be obtained experimentally. Therefore, model validation may be concentrated on the constitutive laws using multiple mechanical tests of the tissues. Extensive model verifications at the joint level are still crucial for the accuracy of the modeling. PMID:23509602

  15. Construction-conditioned rollback in total knee replacement: fluoroscopic results.

    PubMed

    Wachowski, Martin Michael; Fiedler, Christoph; Walde, Tim Alexander; Balcarek, Peter; Schüttrumpf, Jan Philipp; Frosch, Stephan; Frosch, Karl-Heinz; Fanghänel, Jochen; Gezzi, Riccardo; Kubein-Meesenburg, Dietmar; Nägerl, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Firstly, the way of implementing approximatively the initial rollback of the natural tibiofemoral joint (TFJ) in a total knee replacement (AEQUOS G1 TKR) is discussed. By configuration of the curvatures of the medial and lateral articulating surfaces a cam gear mechanism with positive drive can be installed, which works under force closure of the femoral and tibial surfaces. Briefly the geometric design features in flexion/extension are described and construction-conditioned kinematical and functional properties that arise are discussed. Due to a positive drive of the cam gear under the force closure during the stance phase of gait the articulating surfaces predominantly roll. As a result of rolling, a sliding friction is avoided, thus the resistance to motion is reduced during the stance phase. Secondly, in vivo fluoroscopic measurements of the patella tendon angle during flexion/extension are presented. The patella tendon angle/ knee flexion angle characteristic and the kinematic profile in trend were similar to those observed in the native knee during gait (0°-60°). PMID:22098089

  16. The force dependence of isometric and concentric potentiation in mouse muscle with and without skeletal myosin light chain kinase.

    PubMed

    Gittings, William; Aggarwal, Harish; Stull, James T; Vandenboom, Rene

    2015-01-01

    The isometric potentiation associated with myosin phosphorylation is force dependent. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of a pre-existing period of isometric force on the concentric force potentiation displayed by mouse muscles with and without the ability to phosphorylate myosin. We tested isometric (ISO) and concentric (CON) potentiation, as well as concentric potentiation after isometric force (ISO-CON), in muscles from wild-type (WT) and skeletal myosin light chain kinase-deficient (skMLCK(-/-)) mice. A conditioning stimulus increased (i.e., potentiated) mean concentric force in the ISO-CON and CON conditions to 1.31 ± 0.02 and 1.35 ± 0.02 (WT) and to 1.19 ± 0.02 and 1.21 ± 0.01 (skMLCK(-/-)) of prestimulus levels, respectively (data n = 6-8, p < 0.05). No potentiation of mean isometric force was observed in either genotype. The potentiation of mean concentric force was inversely related to relative tetanic force level (P/Po) in both genotypes. Moreover, concentric potentiation varied greatly within each contraction type and was negatively correlated with unpotentiated force in both genotypes. Thus, although no effect of pre-existing force was observed, strong and inverse relationships between concentric force potentiation and unpotentiated concentric force may suggest an influence of attached and force-generating crossbridges on potentiation magnitude in both WT and skMLCK(-/-) muscles. PMID:25412230

  17. Trabecular bone strength at the knee.

    PubMed

    Hvid, I

    1988-02-01

    The axial strength of trabecular bone at the knee is critical for the maintenance of support and fixation of the prosthetic components after total surface knee arthroplasty. The resistance of trabecular bone to penetration was measured posteriorly, centrally, and anteriorly in each of the tibial and femoral condyles in 150 consecutive total knee arthroplasties. Forty-seven rheumatoid knees and 88 osteoarthritic knees were evaluated. The correlation of bone strength with selected clinical parameters was found to be too poor to predict bone strength. Tibial bone strength was lower in rheumatoid than in osteoarthritic knees. Steroid medication did not influence tibial bone strength in rheumatoid arthritis. The distribution of bone strength between the medial and lateral condyles was closely dependent on knee alignment, with high medial strength in varus knees. At the unloaded condyle, strength was reduced relative to the findings for normally aligned knees. At the tibia, strength decreased with depth from the resection surface, while at the femur the converse was true. Tibial bone strength, both condylar and overall average, was lower than values reported in studies of normal cadaver knees. Evaluation of the absolute bone strength at the tibial condyles suggested that the values too low to meet load-bearing requirements after well-aligned knee replacement were infrequent. PMID:3276421

  18. Deprivation and outcome of total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Murray, James R D; Birdsall, Paul D; Sher, J Lester; Deehan, David J

    2006-03-01

    Deprivation correlates with poor health and psychosocial variables can affect the symptoms of knee arthritis. Our aim was to determine the effect of deprivation on the level of knee function and health-related quality of life at the time of arthroplasty and 12 months after total knee replacement. From our database of over 2500 knee replacements, we analysed both clinical and quality of life outcome measures. We analysed the relationship between deprivation (by Townsend score), knee function (Knee Society Score) and health-related quality of life (Nottingham Health Profile) before total knee replacement (TKR) and at 12 months post-operation. There was no significant correlation between Townsend score, Knee Society Score and Nottingham Health Profile preoperatively or at 12 months after knee replacement, thus showing that there was no association between deprivation and the severity of knee arthritis at the time of joint replacement nor was there a relationship between deprivation and the short-term outcome from total knee replacement. PMID:16469499

  19. Biomechanics of knee joint — A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madeti, Bhaskar Kumar; Chalamalasetti, Srinivasa Rao; Bolla Pragada, S. K. Sundara siva rao

    2015-06-01

    The present paper is to know how the work is carried out in the field of biomechanics of knee. Various model formulations are discussed and further classified into mathematical model, two-dimensional model and three-dimensional model. Knee geometry is a crucial part of human body movement, in which how various views of knee is shown in different planes and how the forces act on tibia and femur are studied. It leads to know the forces acting on the knee joint. Experimental studies of knee geometry and forces acting on knee shown by various researchers have been discussed, and comparisons of results are made. In addition, static and dynamic analysis of knee has been also discussed respectively to some extent.

  20. Open Knee: Open Source Modeling and Simulation in Knee Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Erdemir, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Virtual representations of the knee joint can provide clinicians, scientists, and engineers the tools to explore mechanical functions of the knee and its tissue structures in health and disease. Modeling and simulation approaches such as finite element analysis also provide the possibility to understand the influence of surgical procedures and implants on joint stresses and tissue deformations. A large number of knee joint models are described in the biomechanics literature. However, freely accessible, customizable, and easy-to-use models are scarce. Availability of such models can accelerate clinical translation of simulations, where labor-intensive reproduction of model development steps can be avoided. Interested parties can immediately utilize readily available models for scientific discovery and clinical care. Motivated by this gap, this study aims to describe an open source and freely available finite element representation of the tibiofemoral joint, namely Open Knee, which includes the detailed anatomical representation of the joint's major tissue structures and their nonlinear mechanical properties and interactions. Three use cases illustrate customization potential of the model, its predictive capacity, and its scientific and clinical utility: prediction of joint movements during passive flexion, examining the role of meniscectomy on contact mechanics and joint movements, and understanding anterior cruciate ligament mechanics. A summary of scientific and clinically directed studies conducted by other investigators are also provided. The utilization of this open source model by groups other than its developers emphasizes the premise of model sharing as an accelerator of simulation-based medicine. Finally, the imminent need to develop next-generation knee models is noted. These are anticipated to incorporate individualized anatomy and tissue properties supported by specimen-specific joint mechanics data for evaluation, all acquired in vitro from varying age

  1. Representations and module-extensions of 3-hom-Lie algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Chen, Liangyun; Ma, Yao

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we study the representations and module-extensions of 3-hom-Lie algebras. We show that a linear map between 3-hom-Lie algebras is a morphism if and only if its graph is a hom subalgebra and show that the set of derivations of a 3-hom-Lie algebra is a Lie algebra. Moreover, we introduce the definition of Tθ-extensions and Tθ∗ -extensions of 3-hom-Lie algebras in terms of modules, providing the necessary and sufficient conditions for a 2 k-dimensional metric 3-hom-Lie algebra to be isometric to a Tθ∗ -extension.

  2. Effect of kinesio taping on the isokinetic muscle function in football athletes with a knee injury

    PubMed Central

    Hong, SoonKwon; Shim, JeMyung; Kim, SungJoong; Namkoong, Seung; Roh, HyoLyun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the difference in isokinetic muscle function in football athletes with a knee injury with and without kinesio taping. [Subjects] The subjects for this study were 10 football athletes (males) with a knee injury. [Methods] Measurements were performed by using Cybex dynamometer under uniform motion before and after the application of kinesio tape to the quadriceps and hamstring muscle. Maximal concentric knee extension and flexion at three angular velocities (60°/s, 120°/s, and 180°/s) were measured. [Results] A significant difference was found in peak torque and total work of the flexion at 120°/s and 180°/s, as well as in the average power of extension at 180°/s. [Conclusion] Though it is not the main therapy for muscle function in football athletes with injury, kinesio taping was an effective adjunct therapy. PMID:26957761

  3. Effect of kinesio taping on the isokinetic muscle function in football athletes with a knee injury.

    PubMed

    Hong, SoonKwon; Shim, JeMyung; Kim, SungJoong; Namkoong, Seung; Roh, HyoLyun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the difference in isokinetic muscle function in football athletes with a knee injury with and without kinesio taping. [Subjects] The subjects for this study were 10 football athletes (males) with a knee injury. [Methods] Measurements were performed by using Cybex dynamometer under uniform motion before and after the application of kinesio tape to the quadriceps and hamstring muscle. Maximal concentric knee extension and flexion at three angular velocities (60°/s, 120°/s, and 180°/s) were measured. [Results] A significant difference was found in peak torque and total work of the flexion at 120°/s and 180°/s, as well as in the average power of extension at 180°/s. [Conclusion] Though it is not the main therapy for muscle function in football athletes with injury, kinesio taping was an effective adjunct therapy. PMID:26957761

  4. Effects of underwater treadmill walking training on the peak torque of the knee in hemiplegic patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-geol; Jeong, Seong-kwan; Kim, Young-dong

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of underwater treadmill walking training on the peak torque of the knee in hemiplegic patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-two subjects, who were randomly allocated to an experimental group (n=16) and a control group (n=16), performed underwater treadmill walking training and overground treadmill walking training, respectively, for 30 minutes/session, 3 sessions/week, for 6 weeks. An isokinetic dynamometer was used to assess the peak torque. [Results] The subjects in the experimental group showed an increase in the peak knee extension torque compared to the control group. [Conclusion] The results suggested that underwater treadmill walking training has a greater effect on peak knee extension torque at velocities of 60°/sec and 120°/sec than overground treadmill walking training. PMID:26504314

  5. Gap Balanced Total Knee Arthroplasty

    MedlinePlus

    Gap Balanced Total Knee Arthroplasty – SIGMA® with AOX™ You must have Javascript enabled in your web browser. View Program Transcript Click Here to view the OR-Live, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2010 OR-Live, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Petriellidium boydii infection of knee

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, H.B.S.; Bedford, A.F.; Fincham, W.J.

    1982-12-01

    A case of Petriellidium boydii (synonym: Allescheria boydii) infection of the knee joint is described. It followed a penetrating soft tissue injury with a pitchfork. Such infections are rare in this country and bone involvement has not been recorded previously except in maduramycosis contracted in tropical areas.

  7. Knee joint replacement prosthesis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A prosthesis is a device designed to replace a missing part of the body, or to make a part of the body work better. The metal prosthetic device in knee joint replacement surgery replaces cartilage and bone which is damaged from disease or aging.

  8. The Meniscus-Deficient Knee

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Allison J.; Erickson, Brandon J.; Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Yanke, Adam B.; Bach, Bernard R.; Cole, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Meniscal tears are the most common knee injury, and partial meniscectomies are the most common orthopaedic surgical procedure. The injured meniscus has an impaired ability to distribute load and resist tibial translation. Partial or complete loss of the meniscus promotes early development of chondromalacia and osteoarthritis. The primary goal of treatment for meniscus-deficient knees is to provide symptomatic relief, ideally to delay advanced joint space narrowing, and ultimately, joint replacement. Surgical treatments, including meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT), high tibial osteotomy (HTO), and distal femoral osteotomy (DFO), are options that attempt to decrease the loads on the articular cartilage of the meniscus-deficient compartment by replacing meniscal tissue or altering joint alignment. Clinical and biomechanical studies have reported promising outcomes for MAT, HTO, and DFO in the postmeniscectomized knee. These procedures can be performed alone or in conjunction with ligament reconstruction or chondral procedures (reparative, restorative, or reconstructive) to optimize stability and longevity of the knee. Complications can include fracture, nonunion, patella baja, compartment syndrome, infection, and deep venous thrombosis. MAT, HTO, and DFO are effective options for young patients suffering from pain and functional limitations secondary to meniscal deficiency. PMID:26779547

  9. Phaeohyphomycosis infection in the knee.

    PubMed

    Sadigursky, David; Nogueira E Ferreira, Luisa; Moreno de Oliveira Corrêa, Liz

    2016-01-01

    Phaeohyphomycosis is caused by cutaneous fungi and rarely affects large joints. This is a case report on phaeohyphomycosis in the left knee of an elderly individual without immunosuppression. It was accompanied by pain and swelling the anterior knee. The case was first suspected to be suprapatellar bursitis, and was treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, without remission of symptoms. Surgical treatment was performed, with resection of the suprapatellar bursa and anterior region of the quadriceps tendon. The material was sent for anatomopathological examination and culturing. The pathological examination showed phaeohyphomycosis. The treatment instituted consisted of itraconazole, 200 mg/day for six weeks, and complete remission of symptoms was achieved. The physical examination remained normal after one year of follow-up. This is the first published case of phaeohyphomycosis infection in the suprapatellar region of the knee. Although almost all the cases reported have been associated with immunosuppressed patients, this was an exception. It is important to suspect phaeohyphomycosis in cases of knee infection, in the area of the suprapatellar bursa, when the symptoms do not resolve after clinical treatment. PMID:27069894

  10. Elbow torques and EMG patterns of flexor muscles during different isometric tasks.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, G E; Van Leemputte, M

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines the torque responses and EMG activity levels in four muscles acting at the elbow joint during different combinations of one- and two- degree of freedom isometric torque production (single and dual tasks, respectively). Flexor and supinator/pronator torques and surface EMG signals from m. biceps brachii, m. brachialis, m. brachioradialis and m. triceps brachii were measured in 16 male subjects while they performed maximal effort isometric contractions of pure flexion, pure supination, pure pronation, combined flexion and supination and combined flexion and pronation. In the single tasks, the torque responses were consistent with task requirements, but the dual task results were surprising in that flexor torque levels were reduced as compared to pure flexion, while supinator/pronator torque levels were as high or higher than in pure supination or pronation. Muscle activity levels varied with task, and could not always explain the differences observed in torque responses. These data are discussed within the framework of subpopulations of task-specific motor units within each muscle. The implications of such task-specific muscle units are related to musculoskeletal modelling and previous EMG - torque relationships found at the elbow. PMID:1748080

  11. Smooth muscle modeling and experimental identification: application to bladder isometric contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laforêt, Jérémy; Guiraud, David; Andreu, David; Taillades, Hubert; Azevedo Coste, Christine

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents an original smooth muscle model based on the Huxley microscopic approach. This model is the main part of a comprehensive lower urinary track model. The latter is used for simulation studies and is assessed through experiments on rabbits, for which a subset of parameters is estimated, using intravesical pressure measurements in isometric conditions. Bladder contraction is induced by electrical stimulation that determines the onset and thus synchronizes simulation and experimental data. Model sensitivity versus parameter accuracy is discussed and allows the definition of a subset of four parameters that must be accurately identified in order to obtain good fitting between experimental and acquired data. Preliminary experimental data are presented as well as model identification results. They show that the model is able to follow the pressure changes induced by an artificial stimulus in isometric contractions. Moreover, the model gives an insight into the internal changes in calcium concentration and the ratio of the different chemical species present in the muscle cells, in particular the bounded and unbounded actin and myosin and the normalized concentration of intracellular calcium.

  12. Selective visual scaling of time-scale processes facilitates broadband learning of isometric force frequency tracking.

    PubMed

    King, Adam C; Newell, Karl M

    2015-10-01

    The experiment investigated the effect of selectively augmenting faster time scales of visual feedback information on the learning and transfer of continuous isometric force tracking tasks to test the generality of the self-organization of 1/f properties of force output. Three experimental groups tracked an irregular target pattern either under a standard fixed gain condition or with selectively enhancement in the visual feedback display of intermediate (4-8 Hz) or high (8-12 Hz) frequency components of the force output. All groups reduced tracking error over practice, with the error lowest in the intermediate scaling condition followed by the high scaling and fixed gain conditions, respectively. Selective visual scaling induced persistent changes across the frequency spectrum, with the strongest effect in the intermediate scaling condition and positive transfer to novel feedback displays. The findings reveal an interdependence of the timescales in the learning and transfer of isometric force output frequency structures consistent with 1/f process models of the time scales of motor output variability. PMID:26041272

  13. Clinically meaningful blood pressure reductions with low intensity isometric handgrip exercise. A randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Hess, N Cl; Carlson, D J; Inder, J D; Jesulola, E; McFarlane, J R; Smart, N A

    2016-07-18

    There exists no examination of what is the minimum anti-hypertensive threshold intensity for isometric exercise training. Twenty two normotensive participants were randomly assigned to training intensities at either 5 % or 10 % of their maximal contraction. Twenty participants completed the study. Clinical meaningful, but not statistically significant, reductions in systolic blood pressure were observed in both 5 % and 10 % groups -4.04 mm Hg (95 % CI -8.67 to +0.59, p=0.08) and -5.62 mm Hg (95 % CI -11.5 to +0.29, p=0.06) respectively after 6 weeks training. No diastolic blood pressure reductions were observed in either 5 % -0.97 mm Hg (95 % CI -2.56 to +0.62, p=0.20) or 10 % MVC +1.8 mm Hg (95 % CI -1.29 to +4.89, p=0.22) groups respectively after training. In those unable to complete isometric exercise at the traditional 30 % intensity, our results suggest there is no difference between 5 and 10 % groups and based on the principle of regression to the mean, this could mean both interventions induce a similar placebo-effect. PMID:27070747

  14. Corticospinal interaction during isometric compensation for modulated forces with different frequencies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background During isometric compensation of modulated low-level forces corticomuscular coherence (CMC) has been shown to occur in high-beta or gamma-range. The influence of the frequency of force modulation on CMC has up to now remained unexplored. We addressed this question by investigating CMC, motor performance, and cortical spectral power during a visuomotor task in which subjects had to compensate a modulated force of 8% of the maximum voluntary contraction exerted on their right index finger. The effect of three frequencies of force modulation (0.6, 1.0 and 1.6 Hz) was tested. EEG, EMG from first dorsal interosseus, hand flexor and extensor muscles, and finger position were recorded in eight right-handed women. Results Five subjects showed CMC in gamma- (28-45 Hz) and three in beta-range (15-30 Hz). Beta- and gamma-range CMC and cortical motor spectral power were not modulated by the various frequencies. However, a sharp bilateral CMC peak at 1.6 Hz was observed, but only in the five gamma-range CMC subjects. The performance error increased linearly with the frequency. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the frequency of force modulation has no effect on the beta- and gamma-range CMC during isometric compensation for modulated forces at 8% MVC. The beta- and gamma-range CMC may be related to interindividual differences and possibly to strategy differences. PMID:21194447

  15. Estimating Isometric Tension of Finger Muscle Using Needle EMG Signals and the Twitch Contraction Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Takafumi; Mabuchi, Kunihiko

    We address an estimation method of isometric muscle tension of fingers, as fundamental research for a neural signal-based prosthesis of fingers. We utilize needle electromyogram (EMG) signals, which have approximately equivalent information to peripheral neural signals. The estimating algorithm comprised two convolution operations. The first convolution is between normal distribution and a spike array, which is detected by needle EMG signals. The convolution estimates the probability density of spike-invoking time in the muscle. In this convolution, we hypothesize that each motor unit in a muscle activates spikes independently based on a same probability density function. The second convolution is between the result of the previous convolution and isometric twitch, viz., the impulse response of the motor unit. The result of the calculation is the sum of all estimated tensions of whole muscle fibers, i.e., muscle tension. We confirmed that there is good correlation between the estimated tension of the muscle and the actual tension, with >0.9 correlation coefficients at 59%, and >0.8 at 89% of all trials.

  16. Bimanual coordination and the intermittency of visual information in isometric force tracking.

    PubMed

    Lafe, Charley W; Pacheco, Matheus M; Newell, Karl M

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the intermittency of visual information in the bimanual coordination of an isometric force coordination task was investigated as a function of criterion force level. Eight levels of visual information intermittency (.2-25.6 Hz) were used in blocked fashion at each force level. Participants were required to produce a constant force output matching as accurately as possible the criterion force target. The results showed that performance improved as the intermittency of visual information was reduced-this effect being a function of force level. The distribution of the relative phase through the trial revealed a preference for the two hands to be coupled together (in-phase) at the slower rates of visual presentation (~.2 Hz). However, as the rate of visual feedback was increased (up to ~25.6 Hz), there was a transition to predominantly a negative correlation pattern (anti-phase). The pattern of bimanual coordination in this isometric tracking task is driven by the availability of information for error correction and the interactive influence of perceptual-motor constraints. PMID:26960740

  17. The importance of isometric maximum strength and peak rate-of-force development in sprint cycling.

    PubMed

    Stone, Michael H; Sands, William A; Carlock, Jon; Callan, Sam; Dickie, Des; Daigle, Karen; Cotton, John; Smith, Sarah L; Hartman, Michael

    2004-11-01

    This study was designed to investigate the relationship of whole-body maximum strength to variables potentially associated with track sprint-cycling success. These variables included body composition, power measures, coach's rank, and sprint-cycling times. The study was carried out in 2 parts. The first part (n = 30) served as a pilot for the second part (n = 20). Subjects for both parts ranged from international-caliber sprint cyclists to local-level cyclists. Maximum strength was measured using an isometric midthigh pull (IPF). Explosive strength was measured as the peak rate-of-force development (IPRFD) from the isometric force-time curve. Peak power was estimated from countermovement (CMJPP) and static vertical jumps (SJPP) and measured by modified Wingate tests. Athletes were ranked by the U.S. national cycling coach (part 1). Sprint times (from a standing start) were measured using timing gates placed at 25, 82.5, 165, 247.5, and 330 m of an outdoor velodrome (part 2). Maximum strength (both absolute and body-mass corrected) and explosive strength were shown to be strongly correlated with jump and Wingate power. Additionally, maximum strength was strongly correlated with both coach's rank (parts 1 and 2) and sprint cycling times (part 2). The results suggest that larger, stronger sprint cyclists have an advantage in producing power and are generally faster sprint cyclists. PMID:15574097

  18. Isometric quadriceps strength determines sailing performance and neuromuscular fatigue during an upwind sailing emulation.

    PubMed

    Bourgois, Jan G; Callewaert, Margot; Celie, Bert; De Clercq, Dirk; Boone, Jan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the physiological responses to upwind sailing on a laser emulation ergometer and analyses the components of the physical profile that determine the physiological responses related to sailing level. Ten male high-level laser sailors performed an upwind sailing test, incremental cycling test and quadriceps strength test. During the upwind sailing test, heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake, ventilation, respiratory exchange ratio, rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and lactate concentration were measured, combined with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and electromyography (EMG) registration of the M. Vastus lateralis. Repeated measures ANOVA showed for the cardio-respiratory, metabolic and muscles responses (mean power frequency [MPF], root mean square [RMS], deoxy[Hb+Mb]) during the upwind sailing test an initial significant increase followed by a stabilisation, despite a constant increase in RPE. Stepwise regression analysis showed that better sailing level was for 46.5% predicted by lower MPF decrease. Lower MPF decrease was for 57.8% predicted by a higher maximal isometric quadriceps strength. In conclusion, this study indicates that higher sailing level was mainly determined by a lower rate of neuromuscular fatigue during the upwind sailing test (as indicated by MPF decrease). Additionally, the level of neuromuscular fatigue was mainly determined by higher maximal isometric quadriceps strength stressing the importance of resistance training in the planning of training. PMID:26323461

  19. Intramuscular pressure and torque during isometric, concentric and eccentric muscular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Styf, J.; Ballard, R.; Aratow, M.; Crenshaw, A.; Watenpaugh, D.; Hargens, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    Intramuscular pressures, electromyography (EMG) and torque generation during isometric, concentric and eccentric maximal isokinetic muscle activity were recorded in 10 healthy volunteers. Pressure and EMG activity were continuously and simultaneously measured side by side in the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles. Ankle joint torque and position were monitored continuously by an isokinetic dynamometer during plantar flexion and dorsiflexion of the foot. The increased force generation during eccentric muscular activity, compared with other muscular activity, was not accompanied by higher intramuscular pressure. Thus, this study demonstrated that eccentric muscular activity generated higher torque values for each increment of intramuscular pressure. Intramuscular pressures during antagonistic co-activation were significantly higher in the tibilis anterior muscle (42-46% of maximal agonistic activity) compared with the soleus muscle (12-29% of maximal agonistic activity) and was largely due to active recruitment of muscle fibers. In summary, eccentric muscular activity creates higher torque values with no additional increase of the intramuscular pressure compared with concentric and isometric muscular activity.

  20. Revision of the Gunston polycentric knee arthroplasty with total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Memişoğlu, Kaya; Müezzinoğlu, U Sefa; Kesemenli, Cumhur Cevdet

    2010-01-01

    The Gunston polycentric knee arthroplasty, first designed and performed by Frank Gunston in 1971, is the first prosthesis considering the natural knee biomechanics. Although the polycentric knee arthroplasty showed encouraging results to relieve pain and to preserve the preoperative range of motion and joint instability, the improvements in prosthesis design and arthroplasty technology rapidly made the polycentric knee prosthesis obsolete. Herein, we report a 58-year old male patient who had revision of the Gunston polycentric knee arthroplasty with total knee arthroplasty performed 32 years after the initial operation. PMID:21343693

  1. Effect of two different kinesio taping techniques on knee kinematics and kinetics in young females

    PubMed Central

    Guner, Senem; Alsancak, Serap; Koz, Mitat

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The application of kinesio taping may improve strength and performance, inhibit and facilitate motor activity, and increase range of motion. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of kinesio taping facilitation and inhibition applications on spatiotemporal knee kinematics and kinetics during walking activity in healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] A three-dimensional quantitative gait evaluation was performed without tape and with, facilitation and inhibition kinesio taping application on the knee. Sixteen healthy female college students (age, 19.7 ± 0.4 years; height, 1.64 ± 3.4 cm; body mass, 51.5 ± 4.8 kg) participated in the study. [Results] Spatiotemporal parameters (cadence, walking speed, stride length) were significantly different among the trials. Knee joint sagittal plane range of motion was not different with either kinesio taping application. Knee external flexion moment during the early stance phase decreased significantly with facilitation kinesio taping and increased with the inhibition kinesio taping. Knee external extension moment during the mid-stance phase increased with facilitation kinesio taping. Knee power parameters, eccentric activity in the rectus femoris during the pre-swing phase was significantly increased with inhibition kinesio taping application, while eccentric activity of the hamstrings during the terminal swing of gait was decreased. [Conclusion] These findings showed that facilitation kinesio taping application affected the terminal stance phase and that inhibition kinesio taping influenced the terminal swing phase compared with the no tape condition. PMID:26644651

  2. Kinematics of the human knee using an open chain cadaver model.

    PubMed

    Blaha, J David; Mancinelli, Corrie A; Simons, William H; Kish, Vincent L; Thyagarajan, Ganesh

    2003-05-01

    There continues to be controversy about the kinematics of the human knee. This study used seven knees from cadavers moved by pulling on the quadriceps tendon in an open chain fashion using video motion analysis to determine the instantaneous helical axis of movement. Computed tomography scans of the specimens allowed the axes to be related to condyles. The parameter beta was defined by the relationship of the helical axis to the center of the condyle (pure spinning motion) and the contact point of the condyle on the tibia (pure rolling motion). Axes above the center of the condyle represent countertranslation, those between the center and the contact point combined spinning and rolling, and those below represent concordant translation. If the motion of the knee is guided by the crossed four-bar link then this model, that allows the knee to 'seek its own path' throughout the range of motion, should show the rollback that commonly is thought to be an important feature of knee motion. The results of this study show that the medial side of the knee stays stable in spinning kinematics whereas the lateral side has a rolling motion in full flexion progressing to a spinning motion in midflexion and counter-translation near full extension. The kinematics that would be expected from rollback were not observed. PMID:12771814

  3. Knee joint laxity and neuromuscular characteristics of male and female soccer and basketball players.

    PubMed

    Rozzi, S L; Lephart, S M; Gear, W S; Fu, F H

    1999-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injuries are occurring at a higher rate in female athletes compared with their male counterparts. Research in the area of anterior cruciate ligament injury has increasingly focused on the role of joint proprioception and muscle activity in promoting knee joint stability. We measured knee joint laxity, joint kinesthesia, lower extremity balance, the amount of time required to generate peak torque of the knee flexor and extensor musculature, and electromyographically assessed muscle activity in 34 healthy, collegiate-level athletes (average age, 19.6 +/- 1.5 years) who played soccer or basketball or both. Independent t-tests were used to determine significant sex differences. Results revealed that women inherently possess significantly greater knee joint laxity values, demonstrate a significantly longer time to detect the knee joint motion moving into extension, possess significantly superior single-legged balance ability, and produce significantly greater electromyographic peak amplitude and area of the lateral hamstring muscle subsequent to landing a jump. The excessive joint laxity of women appears to contribute to diminished joint proprioception, rendering the knee less sensitive to potentially damaging forces and possibly at risk for injury. Unable to rely on ligamentous structures, healthy female athletes appear to have adopted compensatory mechanisms of increased hamstring activity to achieve functional joint stabilization. PMID:10352766

  4. [Surgical technique: reconstruction of deficient extensor apparatus of the knee - a case report].

    PubMed

    Wilken, F; Harrasser, N; Pohlig, F; Laux, F M; von Eisenhart-Rothe, R

    2015-04-01

    Injuries to the extensor apparatus of the knee are a rare but in case of their occurrence a serious injury. In the following discussion, the focus is on treatment of chronic patellar tendon tears. The aim of surgical treatment is the recovery of the active extension and full weight-bearing ability of the leg. The video presentation shows the operative treatment of a patient with a chronic extensor mechanism deficiency of the knee after multiple revision of a total knee arthroplasty due to periprosthetic infection and three-times occurrence of a patella tendon tear. A frame-shaped reinforcement between patella and tibial tuberosity by FiberTape® combined with a medial gastrocnemius flap was performed. This type of surgery is indicated in cases of large defects of the patellar tendon that cannot be treated with end-to-end suture or simple augmentation with autologous tendons (e.g. semitendinosus). In addition to augmentation of the tendon defect, cutaneous soft tissue defects around the knee and proximal lower leg can be covered. In general, the best treatment option is chosen according to size of the defect, the quality of the tendon tissue and possible previous surgery on the knee joint. There are no reports of large series of chronic patella tendon tears, but only isolated cases using a variety of techniques. In addition with low level of evidence, there is currently no established gold standard in the surgical treatment of insufficiencies of the extensor apparatus of the knee. PMID:25874403

  5. Effect of two different kinesio taping techniques on knee kinematics and kinetics in young females.

    PubMed

    Guner, Senem; Alsancak, Serap; Koz, Mitat

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The application of kinesio taping may improve strength and performance, inhibit and facilitate motor activity, and increase range of motion. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of kinesio taping facilitation and inhibition applications on spatiotemporal knee kinematics and kinetics during walking activity in healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] A three-dimensional quantitative gait evaluation was performed without tape and with, facilitation and inhibition kinesio taping application on the knee. Sixteen healthy female college students (age, 19.7 ± 0.4 years; height, 1.64 ± 3.4 cm; body mass, 51.5 ± 4.8 kg) participated in the study. [Results] Spatiotemporal parameters (cadence, walking speed, stride length) were significantly different among the trials. Knee joint sagittal plane range of motion was not different with either kinesio taping application. Knee external flexion moment during the early stance phase decreased significantly with facilitation kinesio taping and increased with the inhibition kinesio taping. Knee external extension moment during the mid-stance phase increased with facilitation kinesio taping. Knee power parameters, eccentric activity in the rectus femoris during the pre-swing phase was significantly increased with inhibition kinesio taping application, while eccentric activity of the hamstrings during the terminal swing of gait was decreased. [Conclusion] These findings showed that facilitation kinesio taping application affected the terminal stance phase and that inhibition kinesio taping influenced the terminal swing phase compared with the no tape condition. PMID:26644651

  6. Persons with reconstructed ACL exhibit altered knee mechanics during high-speed maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Lee, S-P; Chow, J W; Tillman, M D

    2014-06-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is a sports trauma that causes long-term disability. The function of the knee during dynamic activities can be severely limited even after successful surgical reconstruction. This study examined the effects of approach velocity during side-step cutting on knee joint mechanics in persons with reconstructed ACL (ACLR). 22 participants (11 with unilateral ACLR, 11 matched-controls) participated. Knee joint mechanics were tested in 3 approach conditions: counter-movement, one-step, and running. Dependent variables, including peak knee flexion, extension, valgus, varus, internal rotation, external rotation angles and corresponding peak joint moments, were assessed during the stance phase of cutting. Two 2×3 ("group" by "approach condition") mixed MANOVA tests were used to examine the effects of ACLR and approach velocity on knee mechanics. ACLR participants exhibited higher knee internal rotator moment (0.22 vs. 0.13 Nm/kg, p=0.003). Inter-group comparisons revealed that the ACLR participants exhibited significantly higher abductor and internal rotator moments only in the running condition (1.86 vs. 1.16 Nm/kg, p=0.018; 0.28 vs. 0.17 Nm/kg, p=0.010, respectively). Our findings suggested that patients with ACLR may be at increased risk of re-injury when participating in high-demand physical activities. Task demand should be considered when prescribing progressive therapeutic interventions to ACLR patients. PMID:24408765

  7. Tensile properties of human knee joint cartilage: I. Influence of ionic conditions, weight bearing, and fibrillation on the tensile modulus.

    PubMed

    Akizuki, S; Mow, V C; Müller, F; Pita, J C; Howell, D S; Manicourt, D H

    1986-01-01

    The flow-independent (intrinsic) tensile modulus of the extracellular matrix of human knee joint cartilage has been measured for normal, fibrillated, and osteoarthritic (removed from total knee joint replacements) cartilage. The modulus was determined in our isometric tensile apparatus and measured at equilibrium. We found a linear equilibrium stress-strain behavior up to approximately 15% strain. The modulus was measured for tissues from the high and low weight-bearing areas of the joint surfaces, the medial femoral condyle and lateral patello femoral groove, and from different zones (surface, subsurface, middle, and middle-deep) within the tissue. For all specimens, the intrinsic tensile modulus was always less than 30 MPa. Tissues from low weight-bearing areas (LWA) are stiffer than those from high weight-bearing areas (HWA). The tensile modulus of the ECM correlates strongly with the collagen/proteoglycan ratio; it is higher for LWA than for HWA. Osteoarthritic cartilage from total knee replacement procedures has a tensile stiffness less than 2 MPa. PMID:3783297

  8. Does the rectus femoris nerve block improve knee recurvatum in adult stroke patients? A kinematic and electromyographic study.

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Delporte, L; Arsenault, L; Revol, P; Lefevre, M; Clevenot, D; Boisson, D; Mertens, P; Rossetti, Y; Luauté, J

    2014-02-01

    Knee recurvatum (KR) during gait is common in hemiplegic patients. Quadriceps spasticity has been postulated as a cause of KR in this population. The aim of this study was to assess the role of rectus femoris spasticity in KR by using selective motor nerve blocks of the rectus femoris nerve in hemiparetic stroke patients. The data from six adult, post-stroke hemiplegic patients who underwent a rectus femoris nerve block for a stiff-knee gait were retrospectively analyzed. An extensive clinical and functional evaluation was performed and gait was assessed by motion analysis (kinematic, kinetic and electromyographic parameters) before and during the block realized using 2% lidocaine injected under a neurostimulation and ultrasonographic targeting procedure. The main outcome measures were the peak knee extension in stance and peak knee extensor moment obtained during gait analysis. No serious adverse effect of the nerve block was observed. The block allowed a reduction of rectus femoris overactivity in all patients. Peak knee extension and extensor moment in stance did not improve in any patient, but peak knee flexion during the swing phase was significantly higher after block (mean: 31.2° post, 26.4 pre, p < 0.05). Our results provide arguments against the hypothesis that the spasticity of the rectus femoris contributes to KR. PMID:24286615

  9. Ganglion Cyst of Knee from Hoffa’s Fat Pad Protruding Anterolaterally Through Retinacular Rent: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Partha; Bandyopadhyay, Utpal; Mukhopadhyay, Anindya S.; Kundu, Srikanta; Mandal, Subhadip

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Intra-articular ganglion cysts of the knee joint are rare occurrences. They are usually encountered as incidental findings in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or in arthroscopy. They may originate from both the cruciate ligaments and the menisci, from the popliteus tendon and alar folds, infrapatellar fat pad of Hoffa, and subchondral bone cysts. Those arising from the Hoffa’s fat pad, usually present as palpable mass at anterior aspect of the knee joint. We report a case of intraarticular ganglion cyst of knee arising from the infrapatellar fat pad and protruding anterolaterally through retinacular rent into the subcutaneous plane. Case Report: A 19-year-old young man, presented with a painless gradually increasing swelling at the anterior aspect of left knee of 9 months duration. MRI scan revealed a multilobulated, cyst with septations within the anterior aspect of the knee joint, just inferolateral to the patella, with deep extension into the infrapatellar fat pad, and superficial extension into the subcutaneous space across the retinaculum. After diagnostic arthroscopy, we performed an open excision of the cystic mass and confirmed the retinacular rent pre-operatively. Conclusion: Arthroscopic resection and debridement is the gold standard treatment in ganglion cyst of the knee. However, a subcutaneous extension may lead to incomplete arthroscopic resection: Leaving behind the residual tissue which may cause recurrence. Therefore, proper pre-operative evaluation of MR images of these cases is very important. PMID:27299075

  10. Provocative mechanical tests of the peripheral nervous system affect the joint torque-angle during passive knee motion.

    PubMed

    Andrade, R J; Freitas, S R; Vaz, J R; Bruno, P M; Pezarat-Correia, P

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the influence of the head, upper trunk, and foot position on the passive knee extension (PKE) torque-angle response. PKE tests were performed in 10 healthy subjects using an isokinetic dynamometer at 2°/s. Subjects lay in the supine position with their hips flexed to 90°. The knee angle, passive torque, surface electromyography (EMG) of the semitendinosus and quadriceps vastus medialis, and stretch discomfort were recorded in six body positions during PKE. The different maximal active positions of the cervical spine (neutral; flexion; extension), thoracic spine (neutral; flexion), and ankle (neutral; dorsiflexion) were passively combined for the tests. Visual analog scale scores and EMG were unaffected by body segment positioning. An effect of the ankle joint was verified on the peak torque and knee maximum angle when the ankle was in the dorsiflexion position (P < 0.05). Upper trunk positioning had an effect on the knee submaximal torque (P < 0.05), observed as an increase in the knee passive submaximal torque when the cervical and thoracic spines were flexed (P < 0.05). In conclusion, other apparently mechanical unrelated body segments influence torque-angle response since different positions of head, upper trunk, and foot induce dissimilar knee mechanical responses during passive extension. PMID:24941915

  11. Subject-specific knee joint geometry improves predictions of medial tibiofemoral contact forces.

    PubMed

    Gerus, Pauline; Sartori, Massimo; Besier, Thor F; Fregly, Benjamin J; Delp, Scott L; Banks, Scott A; Pandy, Marcus G; D'Lima, Darryl D; Lloyd, David G

    2013-11-15

    Estimating tibiofemoral joint contact forces is important for understanding the initiation and progression of knee osteoarthritis. However, tibiofemoral contact force predictions are influenced by many factors including muscle forces and anatomical representations of the knee joint. This study aimed to investigate the influence of subject-specific geometry and knee joint kinematics on the prediction of tibiofemoral contact forces using a calibrated EMG-driven neuromusculoskeletal model of the knee. One participant fitted with an instrumented total knee replacement walked at a self-selected speed while medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces, ground reaction forces, whole-body kinematics, and lower-limb muscle activity were simultaneously measured. The combination of generic and subject-specific knee joint geometry and kinematics resulted in four different OpenSim models used to estimate muscle-tendon lengths and moment arms. The subject-specific geometric model was created from CT scans and the subject-specific knee joint kinematics representing the translation of the tibia relative to the femur was obtained from fluoroscopy. The EMG-driven model was calibrated using one walking trial, but with three different cost functions that tracked the knee flexion/extension moments with and without constraint over the estimated joint contact forces. The calibrated models then predicted the medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces for five other different walking trials. The use of subject-specific models with minimization of the peak tibiofemoral contact forces improved the accuracy of medial contact forces by 47% and lateral contact forces by 7%, respectively compared with the use of generic musculoskeletal model. PMID:24074941

  12. Subject-specific knee joint geometry improves predictions of medial tibiofemoral contact forces

    PubMed Central

    Gerus, Pauline; Sartori, Massimo; Besier, Thor F.; Fregly, Benjamin J.; Delp, Scott L.; Banks, Scott A.; Pandy, Marcus G.; D’Lima, Darryl D.; Lloyd, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Estimating tibiofemoral joint contact forces is important for understanding the initiation and progression of knee osteoarthritis. However, tibiofemoral contact force predictions are influenced by many factors including muscle forces and anatomical representations of the knee joint. This study aimed to investigate the influence of subject-specific geometry and knee joint kinematics on the prediction of tibiofemoral contact forces using a calibrated EMG-driven neuromusculoskeletal model of the knee. One participant fitted with an instrumented total knee replacement walked at a self-selected speed while medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces, ground reaction forces, whole-body kinematics, and lower-limb muscle activity were simultaneously measured. The combination of generic and subject-specific knee joint geometry and kinematics resulted in four different OpenSim models used to estimate muscle-tendon lengths and moment arms. The subject-specific geometric model was created from CT scans and the subject-specific knee joint kinematics representing the translation of the tibia relative to the femur was obtained from fluoroscopy. The EMG-driven model was calibrated using one walking trial, but with three different cost functions that tracked the knee flexion/extension moments with and without constraint over the estimated joint contact forces. The calibrated models then predicted the medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces for five other different walking trials. The use of subject-specific models with minimization of the peak tibiofemoral contact forces improved the accuracy of medial contact forces by 47% and lateral contact forces by 7%, respectively compared with the use of generic musculoskeletal model. PMID:24074941

  13. Knee Extensor and Flexor Torque Development with Concentric and Eccentric Isokinetic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Larry E.; Pierson, Lee M.; Nickols-Richardson, Sharon M.; Wootten, David F.; Selmon, Serah E.; Ramp, Warren K.; Herbert, William G.

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed muscular torque and rate of torque development following concentric (CON) or eccentric (ECC) isokinetic training. Thirty-eight women were randomly assigned to either CON or ECC training groups. Training consisted of knee extension and flexion of the nondominant leg three times per week for 20 weeks (SD = 1). Eccentric training…

  14. Effects of high heel wear and increased weight on the knee during walking.

    PubMed

    Titchenal, Matthew R; Asay, Jessica L; Favre, Julien; Andriacchi, Thomas P; Chu, Constance R

    2015-03-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA), a leading cause of disability, is more prevalent in women than men. Wearing high heeled shoes has been implicated as a potential contributing factor for the higher lifetime risk of osteoarthritis in women. This study tests the hypotheses that changes to knee kinematics and kinetics observed during high heeled walking increase in magnitude with increasing heel height and are accentuated by a 20% increase in weight. Fourteen healthy females were tested using marker-based gait analysis in combinations of footwear (flat athletic shoe, 3.8 cm and 8.3 cm heeled shoes) and weight (with and without 20% bodyweight vest). At preferred walking speed, knee flexion angle at heel-strike and midstance increased with increasing heel height and weight. Maximum knee extension moment during loading response decreased with added weight; maximum knee extension moment during terminal stance decreased with heel height; maximum adduction moments increased with heel height. Many of the changes observed with increasing heel height and weight were similar to those seen with aging and OA progression. This suggests that high heel use, especially in combination with additional weight, may contribute to increased OA risk in women. PMID:25532875

  15. Relationship of spasticity to knee angular velocity and motion during gait in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Damiano, Diane L; Laws, Edward; Carmines, Dave V; Abel, Mark F

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of spasticity in the hamstrings and quadriceps muscles on gait parameters including temporal spatial measures, knee position, excursion and angular velocity in 25 children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (CP) as compared to 17 age-matched peers. While subjects were instructed to relax, an isokinetic device alternately flexed and extended the left knee at one of the three constant velocities 30 degrees/s, 60 degrees/s and 120 degrees/s, while surface electromyography (EMG) electrodes over the biceps femoris and the rectus femoris recorded muscle activity. Patients then participated in 3D gait analysis at a self-selected speed. Results showed that, those with CP who exhibited heightened stretch responses (spasticity) in both muscles, had significantly slower knee angular velocities during the swing phase of gait as compared to those with and without CP who did not exhibit stretch responses at the joint and the tested speeds. The measured amount (torque) of the resistance to passive flexion or extension was not related to gait parameters in subjects with CP; however, the rate of change in resistance torque per unit angle change (stiffness) at the fastest test speed of 120 degrees/s showed weak to moderate relationships with knee angular velocity and motion during gait. For the subset of seven patients with CP who subsequently underwent a selective dorsal rhizotomy, knee angular extension and flexion velocity increased post-operatively, suggesting some degree of causality between spasticity and movement speed. PMID:16311188

  16. The Effects of Continued Rehabilitation After Primary Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Radulovic, Tatjana Nozica; Lazovic, Milica; Jandric, Slavica; Bucma, Tatjana; Cvjetkovic, Dragana Dragicevic; Manojlovic, Slavko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tasks of rehabilitation after arthroplasty are to provide painless joint movements, to improve the range of motion, to establish a scheme of walking, to achieve independence in activities of daily living. The aim: of the study is to determine the effects of continued rehabilitation on the range of the knee motion and reducing the swelling after total knee replacement. Methods: The study was conducted from 2011 to 2013 and included 140 patients of both sexes, aged 45 to 85 with implanted endoprosthesis based on primary osteoarthritis. They were divided into two groups, experimental, which after early rehabilitation continued ongoing rehabilitation for a period of three weeks, while the control group after completion of early rehabilitation began rehabilitation two months from the surgery for a period of three weeks. The range of motion in the knee joint and the extent of the knee joint in the medium of patella were measured in both groups during the admission and discharge from rehabilitation. In the experimental group, control measurements were carried out three months after surgery. Results: In both groups, there was a significant reduction of the swelling at the discharge in relation to the admission while in the experimental group there was no change on the control of the joint swelling after three months in relation to the release from rehabilitation. In the experimental group, the range of motion of flexion and extension was improved at the discharge in relation to the admission as well as the flexion during the control while the range of motion of extension wasn’t significantly changing during the control examination. In the control group, the extension and flexion were significantly improved at the discharge compared to the admission. Comparing both groups, the results showed that there was a significant improvement in flexion movements in the experimental group during rehabilitation in comparison to the control group, while the range of

  17. Editorial Commentary: Platelet-Rich Plasma Improves Knee Pain and Function in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-11-01

    Systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses shows that platelet-rich plasma improves knee pain and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Ultimately, biologics hold promise for chondroprotection in addition to symptomatic relief. PMID:26542203

  18. Women with knee osteoarthritis have more pain and poorer function than men, but similar physical activity prior to total knee replacement

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis of the knee is a major clinical problem affecting a greater proportion of women than men. Women generally report higher pain intensity at rest and greater perceived functional deficits than men. Women also perform worse than men on function measures such as the 6-minute walk and timed up and go tests. Differences in pain sensitivity, pain during function, psychosocial variables, and physical activity levels are unclear. Further the ability of various biopsychosocial variables to explain physical activity, function and pain is unknown. Methods This study examined differences in pain, pain sensitivity, function, psychosocial variables, and physical activity between women and men with knee osteoarthritis (N = 208) immediately prior to total knee arthroplasty. We assessed: (1) pain using self-report measures and a numerical rating scale at rest and during functional tasks, (2) pain sensitivity using quantitative sensory measures, (3) function with self-report measures and specific function tasks (timed walk, maximal active flexion and extension), (4) psychosocial measures (depression, anxiety, catastrophizing, and social support), and (5) physical activity using accelerometry. The ability of these mixed variables to explain physical activity, function and pain was assessed using regression analysis. Results Our findings showed significant differences on pain intensity, pain sensitivity, and function tasks, but not on psychosocial measures or physical activity. Women had significantly worse pain and more impaired function than men. Their levels of depression, anxiety, pain catastrophizing, social support, and physical activity, however, did not differ significantly. Factors explaining differences in (1) pain during movement (during gait speed test) were pain at rest, knee extension, state anxiety, and pressure pain threshold; (2) function (gait speed test) were sex, age, knee extension, knee flexion opioid medications, pain duration, pain

  19. Total Knee Replacement as a Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Raynauld, Jean-Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Dorais, Marc; Haraoui, Boulos; Choquette, Denis; Abram, François; Beaulieu, André; Bessette, Louis; Morin, Frédéric; Wildi, Lukas M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To predict, using clinical and qMRI data, the incidence of total knee replacement (TKR) during the long-term follow-up of knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients who formerly received chondroitin sulfate (CS) or placebo treatment. Design. A post hoc intention-to-treat analysis to evaluate the incidence of TKR was done on knee OA patients who had participated in a 12-month trial evaluating the impact of CS (800 mg/d) versus placebo for 6 months, followed by a 6-month open-phase in which all patients received CS. Additionally, the clinical and qMRI predictors of TKR were determined. Results. Thirteen TKRs were performed in the population after a 4-year follow-up. More TKRs were performed in the placebo group than in the CS group (69% vs. 31%, P = 0.150, logistic regression). The statistically significant predictors of TKRs were, at baseline, higher WOMAC pain and function scores, presence of bone marrow lesions (BMLs), and higher C-reactive protein levels. Loss of medial cartilage volume and increase in WOMAC pain and function at one-year were also predictors of TKR. Multivariate analyses revealed that baseline presence of BML and higher WOMAC pain score were independent predictors. Time to occurrence of the TKR also favored the CS group versus placebo (log-rank, P = 0.094). Conclusion. Symptoms such as knee pain and function, presence of BML, and cartilage volume loss predict the long-term occurrence of a “hard” outcome such as TKR. PMID:26069668

  20. Surface electromyogram analysis of the direction of isometric torque generation by the first dorsal interosseous muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ping; Suresh, Nina L.; Zev Rymer, William

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether a novel technique using high density surface electromyogram (EMG) recordings can be used to detect the directional dependence of muscle activity in a multifunctional muscle, the first dorsal interosseous (FDI). We used surface EMG recordings with a two-dimensional electrode array to search for inhomogeneous FDI activation patterns with changing torque direction at the metacarpophalangeal joint, the locus of action of the FDI muscle. The interference EMG distribution across the whole FDI muscle was recorded during isometric contraction at the same force magnitude in five different directions in the index finger abduction-flexion plane. The electrode array EMG activity was characterized by contour plots, interpolating the EMG amplitude between electrode sites. Across all subjects the amplitude of the flexion EMG was consistently lower than that of the abduction EMG at the given force. Pattern recognition methods were used to discriminate the isometric muscle contraction tasks with a linear discriminant analysis classifier, based on the extraction of two different feature sets of the surface EMG signal: the time domain (TD) feature set and a combination of autoregressive coefficients and the root mean square amplitude (AR+RMS) as a feature set. We found that high accuracies were obtained in the classification of different directions of the FDI muscle isometric contraction. With a monopolar electrode configuration, the average overall classification accuracy from nine subjects was 94.1 ± 2.3% for the TD feature set and 95.8 ± 1.5% for the AR+RMS feature set. Spatial filtering of the signal with bipolar electrode configuration improved the average overall classification accuracy to 96.7 ± 2.7% for the TD feature set and 98.1 ± 1.6% for the AR+RMS feature set. The distinct EMG contour plots and the high classification accuracies obtained from this study confirm distinct interference EMG pattern distributions as a

  1. Adjustable hinge permits movement of knee in plaster cast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maley, W. E.

    1967-01-01

    Metal knee hinge with an adjustable sleeve worn on the outside of a leg cast facilitates movement of the knee joint. This helps eliminate stiffness of the knee and eliminates bulkiness and adjustment difficulty.

  2. [Is knee osteotomy still indicated in knee osteoarthritis?].

    PubMed

    Antonescu, D N

    2000-12-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate whether high tibial osteotomy (HTO) still had a role in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee joint. The author has performed photoelasticity studies which confirmed abnormal stress distribution over the joint, as soon as its mechanical axis was deviated and the joint line had an obliquity over 10 degrees. High tibial osteotomy to correct varus or valgus deformity restores a symmetrical stress distribution and represents the only etiological treatment of secondary osteoarthritis of the knee. Two hundred and fifty HTO's were performed between 1971 and 1985 for osteoarthritis of the knee. The short-term result was good or very good in 75%, fair in 20% and poor in 5%. Fair and poor results were related to insufficient correction, to infection or mostly to incorrect indications. In 152 cases with a good or very good short term result, a further evaluation was made between 8 years and 15 years after operation. It was noted that osteoarthritis had been arrested in 105 cases (69%) whereas it had deteriorated in 47 cases. The main factors associated with further deterioration were insufficient correction and persistence of joint line obliquity. Provided on optimal correction is achieved (3 degrees to 6 degrees hypercorrection in valgus osteotomy, 0 degree in varus osteotomy) and provided a horizontal joint line is restored, HTO performed in good indications (Ahlback grade I or II) may provide good results for at least 10 to 15 years. PMID:11196365

  3. Anterior knee pain following primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shervin, David; Pratt, Katelyn; Healey, Travis; Nguyen, Samantha; Mihalko, William M; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2015-01-01

    Despite improvements in technique and technology for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), anterior knee pain impacts patient outcomes and satisfaction. Addressing the prosthetic and surgical technique related causes of pain after TKA, specifically as it relates to anterior knee pain, can aid surgeons in addressing these issues with their patients. Design features of the femoral and patellar components which have been reported as pain generators include: Improper femoral as well as patellar component sizing or designs that result in patellofemoral stuffing; a shortened trochlear groove distance from the flange to the intercondylar box; and then surgical technique related issues resulting in: Lateral patellar facet syndrome; overstuffed patella/flange combination; asymmetric patellar resurfacing, improper transverse plane component rotation resulting in patellar subluxation/tilt. Any design consideration that allows impingement of extensor mechanism anatomical elements has the possibility of impacting outcome by becoming a pain generator. As the number of TKA procedures continues to increase, it is increasingly critical to develop improved, evidence based prostheses that maximize function and patient satisfaction while minimizing pain and other complications. PMID:26601061

  4. A prosthetic knee using magnetorhelogical fluid damper for above-knee amputees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jinhyuk; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-04-01

    A prosthetic knee for above-knee (AK) amputees is categorized into two types; namely a passive and an active type. The passive prosthetic knee is generally made by elastic materials such as carbon fiber reinforced composite material, titanium and etc. The passive prosthetic knee easy to walk. But, it has disadvantages such that a knee joint motion is not similar to ordinary people. On the other hand, the active prosthetic knee can control the knee joint angle effectively because of mechanical actuator and microprocessor. The actuator should generate large damping force to support the weight of human body. But, generating the large torque using small actuator is difficult. To solve this problem, a semi-active type prosthetic knee has been researched. This paper proposes a semi-active prosthetic knee using a flow mode magneto-rheological (MR) damper for AK amputees. The proposed semi-active type prosthetic knee consists of the flow mode MR damper, hinge and prosthetic knee body. In order to support weight of human body, the required energy of MR damper is smaller than actuator of active prosthetic leg. And it can control the knee joint angle by inducing the magnetic field during the stance phase.

  5. Acute Metallosis Following Total Knee Replacement – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Klontz, Karl C.; Smith, William I; Jonathan C., Klontz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Metallosis involving the knee joint most often results from metal-on-metal contact late in the life of a failing implant following polyethylene wear. We report a case of acute metallosis following knee arthroplasty in a previously healthy 59-year old male. Case Report: In June 2011, the patient underwent left knee arthroplasty for severe osteoarthritis with necrosis and bone edema in the medial femoral condyle and tibial plateau. Nine months later, because of persistent pain and swelling in the joint, revision arthroplasty was undertaken along with partial synovectomy. Examination revealed pristine prosthetic implants in the absence of loose fragments of bone or glue. Synovial pathology exhibited marked chronic inflammation and hyperplasia with extensive finely granular foreign material resembling metallic debris. Laboratory analysis of synovium revealed a predominance of iron, the principal component of the saw blades. Conclusion: We hypothesize the patient experienced acute metallosis resulting from deposition of metallic fragments from three saw blades used during arthroplasty. We believe the increased density of the patient’s bone that required use of multiple blades may have resulted, in part, from heavy lifting the patient partook in during the two years preceding arthroplasty. PMID:27298939

  6. Cruciate ligament loading during common knee rehabilitation exercises.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Macleod, Toran D; Wilk, Kevin E; Paulos, Lonnie; Andrews, James R

    2012-09-01

    Cruciate ligament injuries are common and may lead to dysfunction if not rehabilitated. Understanding how to progress anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament loading, early after injury or reconstruction, helps clinicians prescribe rehabilitation exercises in a safe manner to enhance recovery. Commonly prescribed therapeutic exercises include both weight-bearing exercise and non-weight-bearing exercise. This review was written to summarize and provide an update on the available literature on cruciate ligament loading during commonly used therapeutic exercises. In general, weight-bearing exercise produces smaller loads on the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament compared with non-weight-bearing exercise. The anterior cruciate ligament is loaded less at higher knee angles (i.e. 50-100 degrees). Squatting and lunging with a more forward trunk tilt and moving the resistance pad proximally on the leg during the seated knee extension unloads the anterior cruciate ligament. The posterior cruciate ligament is less loaded at lower knee angles (i.e. 0-50 degrees), and may be progressed from level ground walking to a one-leg squat, lunges, wall squat, leg press, and the two-leg squat (from smallest to greatest). Exercise type and technique variation affect cruciate ligament loading, such that the clinician may prescribe therapeutic exercises to progress ligament loading safely, while ensuring optimal recovery of the musculoskeletal system. PMID:23025167

  7. Differentiating between types and levels of isokinetic knee musculature efforts.

    PubMed

    Almosnino, Sivan; Stevenson, Joan M; Day, Andrew G; Bardana, Davide D; Diaconescu, Elena D; Dvir, Zeevi

    2011-12-01

    This investigation assessed whether a measure of moment curve shape similarity, and a measure quantifying curve magnitude differences, enables differentiation between types (sincere vs. feigned) and levels (maximal vs. submaximal) of effort exerted during isokinetic testing of the knee. Healthy participants (n=37) performed four sets of six concentric knee extension-flexion repetitions on two occasions. The sets consisted of: (1) maximal effort; (2) self-perceived 75% of maximal effort; (3) self-perceived 50% of maximal effort; and (4) a set attempting to feign injury. Average cross-correlation and percent root mean square difference values were computed between moment curves in each direction. Logistic regression was used to derive decision rules for differentiating between maximal and submaximal effort levels; and between sincere and feigned effort types. Using a cutoff criteria corresponding to 100% specificity, maximal effort production could be ascertained with 96% sensitivity within the sample. Feigned efforts, however, could be ascertained with only 31% sensitivity due to overlap with sincere submaximal effort. Using the proposed models, clinicians may be able to ascertain whether maximal efforts were produced during isokinetic knee musculature testing. Additionally, evidence regarding participant's intentions with regard to influencing test results may be gauged, although to a lesser extent. PMID:21925901

  8. Hand-Held Dynamometry Isometric Torque Reference Values for Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Maltais, Désirée B.; Lepage, Céline; Saulnier, Joanne; Crête, Mélanie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To establish hand-held dynamometry (HHD) maximal isometric muscle torque (MIT) reference values for children and adolescents who are developing typically. Methods: The MIT of 10 upper and lower limb muscle groups was assessed in 351 Caucasian youth (4 years 2 months to 17 years) using a standardized HHD protocol, previously shown to be feasible, valid, and reliable. Results: The mean MIT and 95% confidence interval of the mean for all muscle groups, for each of the 14 age groups (1 year age span for each group), and for each sex, were reported in both absolute (Nm) and normalized (Nm/kg) values. Conclusion: These HHD reference values may be helpful in the identification of muscle strength impairments in several pediatric populations, especially when bilateral impairments are present. PMID:26397089

  9. Diverse effects of a 445 nm diode laser on isometric contraction of the rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Woong; Shin, Kyung Chul; Park, Hyun Ji; Lee, In Wha; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Kim, Ji-Sun; Jun, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Bokyung; Bae, Young Min

    2015-09-01

    The usefulness of visible lasers in treating vascular diseases is controversial. It is probable that multiple effects of visible lasers on blood vessels and their unclear mechanisms have hampered the usefulness of this therapy. Therefore, elucidating the precise actions and mechanisms of the effects of lasers on blood vessels would provide insight into potential biomedical applications. Here, using organ chamber isometric contraction measurements, western blotting, patch-clamp, and en face immunohistochemistry, we showed that a 445 nm diode laser contracted rat aortic rings, both by activating endothelial nitric oxide synthase and by increasing oxidative stress. In addition to the effects on the endothelium, the laser also directly relaxed and contracted vascular smooth muscle by inhibiting L-type Ca(2+) channels and by activating protein tyrosine kinases, respectively. Thus, we conclude that exposure to 445 nm laser might contract and dilate blood vessels in the endothelium and smooth muscle via distinct mechanisms. PMID:26417517

  10. Diverse effects of a 445 nm diode laser on isometric contraction of the rat aorta

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Woong; Shin, Kyung Chul; Park, Hyun Ji; Lee, In Wha; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Kim, Ji-Sun; Jun, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Bokyung; Bae, Young Min

    2015-01-01

    The usefulness of visible lasers in treating vascular diseases is controversial. It is probable that multiple effects of visible lasers on blood vessels and their unclear mechanisms have hampered the usefulness of this therapy. Therefore, elucidating the precise actions and mechanisms of the effects of lasers on blood vessels would provide insight into potential biomedical applications. Here, using organ chamber isometric contraction measurements, western blotting, patch-clamp, and en face immunohistochemistry, we showed that a 445 nm diode laser contracted rat aortic rings, both by activating endothelial nitric oxide synthase and by increasing oxidative stress. In addition to the effects on the endothelium, the laser also directly relaxed and contracted vascular smooth muscle by inhibiting L-type Ca2+ channels and by activating protein tyrosine kinases, respectively. Thus, we conclude that exposure to 445 nm laser might contract and dilate blood vessels in the endothelium and smooth muscle via distinct mechanisms. PMID:26417517

  11. Semi-isometric registration of line features for flexible fitting of protein structures.

    PubMed

    Abeysinghe, S; Baker, M L; Chiu, W; Ju, T

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study a registration problem that is motivated by a practical biology problem - fitting protein structures to low-resolution density maps. We consider registration between two sets of lines features (e.g., helices in the proteins) that have undergone not a single, but multiple isometric transformations (e.g., hinge-motions). The problem is further complicated by the presence of symmetry in each set. We formulate the problem as a clique-finding problem in a product graph, and propose a heuristic solution that includes a fast clique-finding algorithm unique to the structure of this graph. When tested on a suite of real protein structures, the algorithm achieved high accuracy even for very large inputs containing hundreds of helices. PMID:21124809

  12. An Isometric Dynamics for a Causal Set Approach to Discrete Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudder, S.

    2015-12-01

    We consider a covariant causal set approach to discrete quantum gravity. We first review the microscopic picture of this approach. In this picture a universe grows one element at a time and its geometry is determined by a sequence of integers called the shell sequence. We next present the macroscopic picture which is described by a sequential growth process. We introduce a model in which the dynamics is governed by a quantum transition amplitude. The amplitude satisfies a stochastic and unitary condition and the resulting dynamics becomes isometric. We show that the dynamics preserves stochastic states. By "doubling down" on the dynamics we obtain a unitary group representation and a natural energy operator. These unitary operators are employed to define canonical position and momentum operators.

  13. Measurement of Maximum Isometric Force Generated by Permeabilized Skeletal Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Stuart M.; Gumucio, Jonathan P.; Brooks, Susan V.; Mendias, Christopher L.; Claflin, Dennis R.

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of the contractile properties of chemically skinned, or permeabilized, skeletal muscle fibers offers a powerful means by which to assess muscle function at the level of the single muscle cell. Single muscle fiber studies are useful in both basic science and clinical studies. For basic studies, single muscle fiber contractility measurements allow investigation of fundamental mechanisms of force production, and analysis of muscle function in the context of genetic manipulations. Clinically, single muscle fiber studies provide useful insight into the impact of injury and disease on muscle function, and may be used to guide the understanding of muscular pathologies. In this video article we outline the steps required to prepare and isolate an individual skeletal muscle fiber segment, attach it to force-measuring apparatus, activate it to produce maximum isometric force, and estimate its cross-sectional area for the purpose of normalizing the force produced. PMID:26131687

  14. Performing Isometric Force Control in Combination with a Cognitive Task: A Multidimensional Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Temprado, Jean-Jacques; Vieluf, Solveig; Bricot, Nicolas; Berton, Eric; Sleimen-Malkoun, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We used a multidimensional approach to study isometric force control in single and dual-task conditions. Methods Multiple measures of performance, efficiency, variability, and structural interference were calculated at low and higher force levels under single (force maintenance) and dual-task (force maintenance and reaction time) conditions. Results Reaction time and signal-to-noise ratio were larger in the dual-task conditions. They were also greater for the higher force condition, while sample entropy was lower. Perturbation analyses revealed smaller relative amplitude of downward perturbations for the higher force level. Discussion Attentional effort and efficiency are positively related when force level increases, and inversely related to entropy. These relations were presumably mediated by attentional investment. Behavioral perturbations show that attentional resources and structural interference models are not mutually exclusive to account for dual-task situation. Overall, the present study highlights the interest of a multidimensional assessment of force control. PMID:26571036

  15. CGVIEW: A program to generate isometric and perspective views of combinatorial geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, T.J.

    1992-07-01

    The prototype of a graphical debugger for combinatorial geometry (CG) is described. The prototype debugger consists of two parts: a FORTRAN-based view'' generator and a Microsoft Windows application for displaying the geometry. This document describes the code CGVIEW, which comprises the first part of the system. User-specified options permit the selection of an arbitrary viewpoint in space and the generation of either an isometric or perspective view. Additionally, any combination of zones, materials, or regions can be flagged as invisible to facilitate the inspection of internal details of the geometry. In the same manner, an arbitrary body can be cut away from the geometry to facilitate inspection and debugging. Examples illustrating the various options are described.

  16. CGVIEW: A program to generate isometric and perspective views of combinatorial geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, T.J.

    1992-07-01

    The prototype of a graphical debugger for combinatorial geometry (CG) is described. The prototype debugger consists of two parts: a FORTRAN-based ``view`` generator and a Microsoft Windows application for displaying the geometry. This document describes the code CGVIEW, which comprises the first part of the system. User-specified options permit the selection of an arbitrary viewpoint in space and the generation of either an isometric or perspective view. Additionally, any combination of zones, materials, or regions can be flagged as invisible to facilitate the inspection of internal details of the geometry. In the same manner, an arbitrary body can be cut away from the geometry to facilitate inspection and debugging. Examples illustrating the various options are described.

  17. The Effects of Attentional Focusing Instructions on Force Production During the Isometric Midthigh Pull.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Israel; Williams, Kym J; Martin, David T; Chapman, Dale W

    2016-04-01

    Halperin, I, Williams, KJ, Martin, DT, and Chapman, DW. The effects of attentional focusing instructions on force production during the isometric midthigh pull. J Strength Cond Res 30(4): 919-923, 2016-Verbal instructions play a key role in motor learning and performance. Whereas directing one's attention toward bodily movements or muscles (internal focus) tends to hinder performance, instructing persons to focus on the movement outcome, or an external object related to the performed task (external focus) enhances performance. The study's purpose was to examine whether focus of attention affects maximal force production during an isometric midthigh pull (IMTP) among 18 trained athletes (8F & 10M). Athletes performed 3 IMTP trials a day for 3 consecutive days. The first day was a familiarization session in which athlete's received only control instructions. The following 2 days athletes received either control, internal, or external focus of attention instructions in a randomized, within-subject design. Compared to performance with an internal focus of attention, athletes applied 9% greater force when using an external focus of attention (p < 0.001, effect size [ES] = 0.33) and 5% greater force with control instructions (p = 0.001, ES = 0.28). A small positive 3% advantage was observed between performances with an external focus of attention compared with control instructions (p = 0.03, ES = 0.13). Focusing internally on body parts and/or muscle groups during a movement task that requires maximal force hinders performance, whereas focusing on an object external to the self leads to enhanced force production, even when using a simple multijoint static task such as the IMTP. PMID:27003451

  18. Electron Tomography of Cryofixed, Isometrically Contracting Insect Flight Muscle Reveals Novel Actin-Myosin Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shenping; Liu, Jun; Tregear, Richard T.; Winkler, Hanspeter; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Lucaveche, Carmen; Goldman, Yale E.; Reedy, Michael K.; Taylor, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ. Methodology We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the “target zone”, situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77°/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127° range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening. Conclusion We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force

  19. Using evoked EMG as a synthetic force sensor of isometric electrically stimulated muscle.

    PubMed

    Erfanian, A; Chizeck, H J; Hashemi, R M

    1998-02-01

    A method for the estimation of the force generated by electrically stimulated muscle during isometric contraction is developed here. It is based upon measurements of the evoked electromyogram (EMG) [EEMG] signal. Muscle stimulation is provided to the quadriceps muscle of a paralyzed human subject using percutaneous intramuscular electrodes, and EEMG signals are collected using surface electrodes. Through the use of novel signal acquisition and processing techniques, as well as a mathematical model that reflects both the excitation and activation phenomena involved in isometric muscle force generation, accurate prediction of stimulated muscle forces is obtained for large time horizons. This approach yields synthetic muscle force estimates for both unfatigued and fatigued states of the stimulated muscle. In addition, a method is developed that accomplishes automatic recalibration of the model to account for day-to-day changes in pickup electrode mounting as well as other factors contributing to EEMG gain variations. It is demonstrated that the use of the measured EEMG as the input to a predictive model of muscle torque generation is superior to the use of the electrical stimulation signal as the model input. This is because the measured EEMG signal captures all of the neural excitation, whereas stimulation-to-torque models only reflect that portion of the neural excitation that results directly from stimulation. The time-varying properties of the excitation process cannot be captured by existing stimulation-to-torque models, but they are tracked by the EEMG-to-torque models that are developed here. This work represents a promising approach to the real-time estimation of stimulated muscle force in functional neuromuscular stimulation applications. PMID:9473842

  20. Post-exercise depression following submaximal and maximal isometric voluntary contraction.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, David A; Janini, Daniel; Wyant, Alexandria; Bonnett, Corin; Varnerin, Nicole; Sankarasubramanian, Vishwanath; Potter-Baker, Kelsey A; Roelle, Sarah; Wang, Xiaofeng; Siemionow, Vlodek; Yue, Guang H; Plow, Ela B

    2016-06-21

    It is well known that corticomotor excitability is altered during the post-exercise depression following fatigue within the primary motor cortex (M1). However, it is currently unknown whether corticomotor reorganization following muscle fatigue differs between magnitudes of force and whether corticomotor reorganization occurs measured with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Fifteen young healthy adults (age 23.8±1.4, 8 females) participated in a within-subjects, repeated measures design study, where they underwent three testing sessions separated by one-week each. Subjects performed separate sessions of each: low-force isometric contraction (30% maximal voluntary contraction [MVC]), high-force isometric contraction (95% MVC) of the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle until self-perceived exhaustion, as well as one session of a 30-min rest as a control. We examined changes in corticomotor map area, excitability and location of the FDI representation in and around M1 using TMS. The main finding was that following low-force, but not high-force fatigue (HFF) corticomotor map area and excitability reduced [by 3cm(2) (t(14)=-2.94, p=0.01) and 56% respectively t(14)=-4.01, p<0.001)]. Additionally, the region of corticomotor excitability shifted posteriorly (6.4±2.5mm) (t(14)=-6.33, p=.019). Corticomotor output became less excitable particularly in regions adjoining M1. Overall, post-exercise depression is present in low-force, but not for HFF. Further, low-force fatigue (LFF) results in a posterior shift in corticomotor output. These changes may be indicative of increased sensory feedback from the somatosensory cortex during the recovery phase of fatigue. PMID:27058145

  1. Longitudinal and transverse deformation of human Achilles tendon induced by isometric plantar flexion at different intensities.

    PubMed

    Iwanuma, Soichiro; Akagi, Ryota; Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Ikegawa, Shigeki; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2011-06-01

    The present study determined in vivo deformation of the entire Achilles tendon in the longitudinal and transverse directions during isometric plantar flexions. Twelve young women and men performed isometric plantar flexions at 0% (rest), 30%, and 60% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) while a series of oblique longitudinal and cross-sectional magnetic resonance (MR) images of the Achilles tendon were taken. At the distal end of the soleus muscle belly, the Achilles tendon was divided into the aponeurotic (ATapo) and the tendinous (ATten) components. The length of each component was measured in the MR images. The widths of the Achilles tendon were determined at 10 regions along ATapo and at four regions along ATten. Longitudinal and transverse strains were calculated as changes in relative length and width compared with those at rest. The ATapo deformed in both longitudinal and transverse directions at 30%MVC and 60%MVC. There was no difference between the strains of the ATapo at 30%MVC and 60%MVC either in the longitudinal (1.1 and 1.6%) or transverse (5.0∼11.4 and 5.0∼13.9%) direction. The ATten was elongated longitudinally (3.3%) to a greater amount than ATapo, while narrowing transversely in the most distal region (-4.6%). The current results show that the magnitude and the direction of contraction-induced deformation of Achilles tendon are different for the proximal and distal components. This may be related to the different functions of Achilles tendon, i.e., force transmission or elastic energy storage during muscle contractions. PMID:21415176

  2. Electron Tomography of Cryofixed, Isometrically Contracting Insect Flight Muscle Reveals Novel Actin-Myosin Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Shenping; Liu, Jun; Reedy, Mary C.; Tregear, Richard T.; Winkler, Hanspeter; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Lucaveche, Carmen; Goldman, Yale E.; Reedy, Michael K.; Taylor, Kenneth A.

    2010-10-22

    Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ. We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the 'target zone', situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77{sup o}/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127{sup o} range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening. We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force generation are very

  3. Role of adenosine in the sympathetic activation produced by isometric exercise in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Costa, F; Biaggioni, I

    1994-01-01

    Isometric exercise increases sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure. This exercise pressor reflex is partly mediated by metabolic products activating muscle afferents (metaboreceptors). Whereas adenosine is a known inhibitory neuromodulator, there is increasing evidence that it activates afferent nerves. We, therefore, examined the hypothesis that adenosine stimulates muscle afferents and participates in the exercise pressor reflex in healthy volunteers. Intraarterial administration of adenosine into the forearm, during venous occlusion to prevent systemic effects, mimicked the response to exercise, increasing muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, lower limb microneurography) and mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) at all doses studied (2, 3, and 4 mg). Heart rate increased only with the highest dose. Intrabrachial adenosine (4 mg) increased MSNA by 96 +/- 25% (n = 6, P < 0.01) and MABP by 12 +/- 3 mmHg (P < 0.01). Adenosine produced forearm discomfort, but equivalent painful stimuli (forearm ischemia and cold exposure) increased MSNA significantly less than adenosine. Furthermore, adenosine receptor antagonism with intrabrachial theophylline (1 microgram/ml forearm per min) blocked the increase in MSNA (92 +/- 15% vs. 28 +/- 6%, n = 7, P < 0.01) and MABP (38 +/- 6 vs. 27 +/- 4 mmHg, P = 0.01) produced by isometric handgrip (30% of maximal voluntary contraction) in the infused arm, but not the contralateral arm. Theophylline did not prevent the increase in heart rate produced by handgrip, a response mediated more by central command than muscle afferent activation. We propose that endogenous adenosine contributes to the activation of muscle afferents involved in the exercise pressor reflex in humans. PMID:8163667

  4. Isometric resistance exercise fails to counteract skeletal muscle atrophy processes during the initial stages of unloading.

    PubMed

    Haddad, F; Adams, G R; Bodell, P W; Baldwin, K M

    2006-02-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that an isometric resistance training paradigm targeting the medial gastrocnemius of adult rodents is effective in preventing muscle atrophy during the early stages of hindlimb unloading by maintaining normal activation of the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1)/phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. This pathway has been shown to simultaneously create an anabolic response while inhibiting processes upregulating catabolic processes involving expression of key enzymes in the ubiquitination of proteins for degradation. The findings show that during the 5 days of unloading 1) absolute medial gastrocnemius muscle weight reduction occurred by approximately 20%, but muscle weight corrected to body weight was not different from normal weight-bearing controls (P < 0.05); 2) normalized myofibril fraction concentration and content were decreased; and 3) a robust isometric training program, known to induce a hypertrophy response, failed to maintain the myofibril protein content. This response occurred despite fully blunting the increases in the mRNA for of atrogin-1, MURF-1, and myostatin, e.g., sensitive gene markers of an activated catabolic state. Analyses of the IRS-1/PI3K/Akt markers indicated that abundance of IRS-1 and phosphorylation state of Akt and p70S6 kinase were decreased relative to normal control rats, and the resistance training failed to maintain these signaling markers at normal regulatory level. Our findings suggest that to fully prevent muscle atrophy responses affecting the myofibril system during unloading, the volume of mechanical stress must be augmented sufficiently to maintain optimal activity of the IRS-1/PI3K/Akt pathway to provide an effective anabolic stimulus on the muscle. PMID:16239603

  5. Cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R; Ribeiro, F; Oliveira, J

    2010-03-01

    The effects of cryotherapy on joint position sense are not clearly established; however it is paramount to understand its impact on peripheral feedback to ascertain the safety of using ice therapy before resuming exercise on sports or rehabilitation settings. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the effects of cryotherapy, when applied over the quadriceps and over the knee joint, on knee position sense. This within-subjects repeated-measures study encompassed fifteen subjects. Knee position sense was measured by open kinetic chain technique and active positioning at baseline and after cryotherapy application. Knee angles were determined by computer analysis of the videotape images. Twenty-minute ice bag application was applied randomly, in two sessions 48 h apart, over the quadriceps and the knee joint. The main effect for cryotherapy application was significant (F (1.14)=7.7, p=0.015) indicating an increase in both absolute and relative angular errors after the application. There was no significant main effect for the location of cryotherapy application, indicating no differences between the application over the quadriceps and the knee joint. In conclusion, cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense in normal knees. This deleterious effect is similar when cryotherapy is applied over the quadriceps or the knee joint. PMID:20221997

  6. Localized Electrical Impedance Myography of the Biceps Brachii Muscle during Different Levels of Isometric Contraction and Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Li, Le; Shin, Henry; Li, Xiaoyan; Li, Sheng; Zhou, Ping

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed changes in electrical impedance myography (EIM) at different levels of isometric muscle contraction as well as during exhaustive exercise at 60% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) until task failure. The EIM was performed on the biceps brachii muscle of 19 healthy subjects. The results showed that there was a significant difference between the muscle resistance (R) measured during the isometric contraction and when the muscle was completely relaxed. Post hoc analysis shows that the resistance increased at higher contractions (both 60% MVC and MVC), however, there were no significant changes in muscle reactance (X) during the isometric contractions. The resistance also changed during different stages of the fatigue task and there were significant decreases from the beginning of the contraction to task failure as well as between task failure and post fatigue rest. Although our results demonstrated an increase in resistance during isometric contraction, the changes were within 10% of the baseline value. These changes might be related to the modest alterations in muscle architecture during a contraction. The decrease in resistance seen with muscle fatigue may be explained by an accumulation of metabolites in the muscle tissue. PMID:27110795

  7. The combined effect of electrical stimulation and resistance isometric contraction on muscle atrophy in rat tibialis anterior muscle.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Naoto; Murakami, Shinichiro; Arakawa, Takamitsu; Miki, Akinori; Fujino, Hidemi

    2011-05-01

    Electrical stimulation has been used to prevent muscle atrophy, but this method is different in many previous studies, appropriate stimulation protocol is still not decided. Although resistance exercise has also been shown to be an effective countermeasure on muscle atrophy, almost previous studies carried out an electrical stimulation without resistance. It was hypothesized that electrical stimulation without resistance is insufficient to contract skeletal muscle forcefully, and the combination of electrical stimulation and forceful resistance contraction is more effective than electrical stimulation without resistance to attenuate muscle atrophy. This study investigated the combined effects of electrical stimulation and resistance isometric contraction on muscle atrophy in the rat tibialis anterior muscle. The animals were divided into control, hindlimb unloading (HU), hindlimb unloading plus electrical stimulation (ES), and hindlimb unloading plus the combination of electrical stimulation and resistance isometric contraction (ES+IC). Electrical stimulation was applied to the tibialis anterior muscle percutaneously for total 240 sec per day. In the ES+IC group, the ankle joint was fixed to produce resistance isometric contraction during electrical stimulation. After 7 days, the cross-sectional areas of each muscle fiber type in the HU group decreased. Those were prevented in the ES+IC group rather than the ES group. The expression of heat shock protein 72 was enhanced in the ES and ES+IC groups. These results indicated that although electrical stimulation is effective to prevent muscle atrophy, the combination of electrical stimulation and isometric contraction have further effect. PMID:21619551

  8. Caffeine-induced increase in voluntary activation and strength of the quadriceps muscle during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Martin; Mau-Moeller, Anett; Weippert, Matthias; Fuhrmann, Josefin; Wegner, Katharina; Skripitz, Ralf; Bader, Rainer; Bruhn, Sven

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated effects of caffeine ingestion (8 mg/kg) on maximum voluntary torque (MVT) and voluntary activation of the quadriceps during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions. Fourteen subjects ingested caffeine and placebo in a randomized, controlled, counterbalanced, double-blind crossover design. Neuromuscular tests were performed before and 1 h after oral caffeine and placebo intake. MVTs were measured and the interpolated twitch technique was applied during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions to assess voluntary activation. Furthermore, normalized root mean square of the EMG signal was calculated and evoked spinal reflex responses (H-reflex evoked at rest and during weak isometric voluntary contraction) as well as twitch torques were analyzed. Caffeine increased MVT by 26.4 N m (95%CI: 9.3-43.5 N m, P = 0.004), 22.5 N m (95%CI: 3.1-42.0 N m, P = 0.025) and 22.5 N m (95%CI: 2.2-42.7 N m, P = 0.032) for isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions. Strength enhancements were associated with increases in voluntary activation. Explosive voluntary strength and voluntary activation at the onset of contraction were significantly increased following caffeine ingestion. Changes in spinal reflex responses and at the muscle level were not observed. Data suggest that caffeine ingestion induced an acute increase in voluntary activation that was responsible for the increased strength regardless of the contraction mode. PMID:25969895

  9. Localized Electrical Impedance Myography of the Biceps Brachii Muscle during Different Levels of Isometric Contraction and Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Li, Le; Shin, Henry; Li, Xiaoyan; Li, Sheng; Zhou, Ping

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed changes in electrical impedance myography (EIM) at different levels of isometric muscle contraction as well as during exhaustive exercise at 60% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) until task failure. The EIM was performed on the biceps brachii muscle of 19 healthy subjects. The results showed that there was a significant difference between the muscle resistance (R) measured during the isometric contraction and when the muscle was completely relaxed. Post hoc analysis shows that the resistance increased at higher contractions (both 60% MVC and MVC), however, there were no significant changes in muscle reactance (X) during the isometric contractions. The resistance also changed during different stages of the fatigue task and there were significant decreases from the beginning of the contraction to task failure as well as between task failure and post fatigue rest. Although our results demonstrated an increase in resistance during isometric contraction, the changes were within 10% of the baseline value. These changes might be related to the modest alterations in muscle architecture during a contraction. The decrease in resistance seen with muscle fatigue may be explained by an accumulation of metabolites in the muscle tissue. PMID:27110795

  10. Logistic time constant of isometric relaxation force curve of ferret ventricular papillary muscle: reliable index of lusitropism.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, J; Araki, J; Mikane, T; Mohri, S; Imaoka, T; Matsubara, H; Okuyama, H; Kurihara, S; Ohe, T; Hirakawa, M; Suga, H

    2000-10-01

    We have found that a logistic function fits the left ventricular isovolumic relaxation pressure curve in the canine excised, cross-circulated heart more precisely than a monoexponential function. On this basis, we have proposed a logistic time constant (tau(L)) as a better index of ventricular isovolumic lusitropism than the conventional monoexponential time constant (tau(E)). We hypothesize in the present study that this tau(L) would also be a better index of myocardial isometric lusitropism than the conventional tau(E). We tested this hypothesis by analyzing the isometric relaxation force curve of 114 twitches of eight ferret isolated right ventricular papillary muscles. The muscle length was changed between 82 and 100% L(max) and extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](o)) between 0.2 and 8 mmol/l. We found that the logistic function always fitted the isometric relaxation force curve much more precisely than the monoexponential function at any muscle length and [Ca(2+)](o) level. We also found that tau(L) was independent of the choice of the end of isometric relaxation but tau(E) was considerably dependent on it as in ventricular relaxation. These results validated our present hypothesis. We conclude that tau(L) is a more reliable, though still empirical, index of lusitropism than conventional tau(E) in the myocardium as in the ventricle. PMID:11120914

  11. Effect of the Mandibular Orthopedic Repositioning Appliance on Trunk and Upper Limb Muscle Activation during Maximum Isometric Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Yeol; Hong, Min-Ho; Park, Min-Chull; Choi, Sung-Min

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to measure the muscle activities of the trunk muscles and upper limb muscles during maximum isometric contraction when temporomandibular joint alignment was achieved with a mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance in order provide basic data on the effects of mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance on the entire body. [Subjects] The present study was conducted with healthy Korean adults in their 20s (males=10, females=10). [Methods] An 8 channel surface electromyography system was used to measure the muscle activities of the upper limb muscles and neck muscles of the subjects during maximum isometric contraction with and without use of a mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance. [Results] The maximum isometric contractions of the trunk and upper limb muscles when mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance were used were compared with those when no mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance was used. The results showed that the sternocleidomastoid muscle, cervical and lumbar erector spinae, upper trapezius, biceps, triceps, rectus abdominis and internal oblique and external oblique muscles all showed significant increases in maximum isometric contractions with a mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance. [Conclusion] The use of a mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance is considered to be a method for normal adults to improve the stability of the entire body with the improvement of the stability of the TMJ. The proximal improvement in stability improves of the proximal thereby improving not only muscle strength with increased muscle activation but also stability during exercises. PMID:24396194

  12. Imaging following acute knee trauma.

    PubMed

    Kijowski, R; Roemer, F; Englund, M; Tiderius, C J; Swärd, P; Frobell, R B

    2014-10-01

    Joint injury has been recognized as a potent risk factor for the onset of osteoarthritis. The vast majority of studies using imaging technology for longitudinal assessment of patients following joint injury have focused on the injured knee joint, specifically in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury and meniscus tears where a high risk for rapid onset of post-traumatic osteoarthritis is well known. Although there are many imaging modalities under constant development, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the most important instrument for longitudinal monitoring after joint injury. MR imaging is sensitive for detecting early cartilage degeneration and can evaluate other joint structures including the menisci, bone marrow, tendons, and ligaments which can be sources of pain following acute injury. In this review, focusing on imaging following acute knee trauma, several studies were identified with promising short-term results of osseous and soft tissue changes after joint injury. However, studies connecting these promising short-term results to the development of osteoarthritis were limited which is likely due to the long follow-up periods needed to document the radiographic and clinical onset of the disease. Thus, it is recommended that additional high quality longitudinal studies with extended follow-up periods be performed to further investigate the long-term consequences of the early osseous and soft tissue changes identified on MR imaging after acute knee trauma. PMID:25278054

  13. Principal component modeling of isokinetic moment curves for discriminating between the injured and healthy knees of unilateral ACL deficient patients.

    PubMed

    Almosnino, Sivan; Brandon, Scott C E; Day, Andrew G; Stevenson, Joan M; Dvir, Zeevi; Bardana, Davide D

    2014-02-01

    Bilateral knee strength evaluations of unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficient patients using isokinetic dynamometry are commonly performed in rehabilitation settings. The most frequently-used outcome measure is the peak moment value attained by the knee extensor and flexor muscle groups. However, other strength curve features may also be of clinical interest and utility. The purpose of this investigation was to identify, using Principal Component Analysis (PCA), strength curve features that explain the majority of variation between the injured and uninjured knee, and to assess the capabilities of these features to detect the presence of injury. A mixed gender cohort of 43 unilateral ACL deficient patients performed 6 continuous concentric knee extension and flexion repetitions bilaterally at 60°s(-1) and 180°s(-1) within a 90° range of motion. Moment waveforms were analyzed using PCA, and binary logistic regression was used to develop a discriminatory decision rule. For all directions and speeds, a statistically significant overall reduction in strength was noted for the involved knee in comparison to the uninvolved knee. The discriminatory decision rule yielded a specificity and sensitivity of 60.5% and 60.5%, respectively, corresponding to an accuracy of ∼62%. As such, the curve features extracted using PCA enabled only limited clinical usefulness in discerning between the ACL deficient and contra lateral, healthy knee. Improvement in discrimination capabilities may perhaps be achieved by consideration of different testing speeds and contraction modes, as well as utilization of other data analysis techniques. PMID:24280243

  14. Knee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis: the effect of self-reported instability

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Jonathan A.; Robinson, Megan E.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Tashman, Scott; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis has been previously associated with a stereotypical knee-stiffening gait pattern and reduced knee joint motion variability due to increased antagonist muscle co-contractions and smaller utilized arc of motion during gait. However, episodic self-reported instability may be a sign of excessive motion variability for a large subgroup of patients with knee osteoarthritis. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in knee joint motion variability during gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis with and without self-reported instability compared to a control group of older adults with asymptomatic knees. Methods Forty-three subjects, 8 with knee osteoarthritis but no reports of instability (stable), 11 with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported instability (unstable), and 24 without knee osteoarthritis or instability (control) underwent Dynamic Stereo X-ray analysis during a decline gait task on a treadmill. Knee motion variability was assessed using parametric phase plots during the loading response phase of decline gait. Findings The stable group demonstrated decreased sagittal-plane motion variability compared to the control group (p=0.04), while the unstable group demonstrated increased sagittal-plane motion variability compared to the control (p=0.003) and stable groups (p<0.001). The unstable group also demonstrated increased anterior-posterior joint contact point motion variability for the medial tibiofemoral compartment compared to the control (p=0.03) and stable groups (p=0.03). Interpretation The finding of decreased knee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis without self-reported instability supports previous research. However, presence of self-reported instability is associated with increased knee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis and warrants further investigation. PMID:25796536

  15. Varus Thrust and Knee Frontal Plane Dynamic Motion in Persons with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alison H.; Chmiel, Joan S.; Moisio, Kirsten C.; Almagor, Orit; Zhang, Yunhui; Cahue, September; Sharma, Leena

    2013-01-01

    Objective Varus thrust visualized during walking is associated with a greater medial knee and an increased risk of medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) progression. Little is known about varus thrust presence determined by visual observation relates to quantitative gait kinematic We hypothesized that varus thrust presence is associated with greater knee frontal plane dynamic movement during the stance phase of gait. Methods Participants had knee OA in at least one knee. Trained examiners assessed participants for varus thrust presence during ambulation. Frontal plane knee motion during ambulation captured using external passive reflective markers and an 8-camera motion analysis system. To examine the cross-sectional relationship between varus thrust and frontal plane knee motion, used multivariable regression models with the quantitative motion measures as dependent variables and varus thrust (present/absent) as predictor; models were adjusted for age, gender, BMI, gait speed, and knee static alignment. Results 236 persons [mean BMI: 28.5 kg/m2 (SD 5.5), mean age: 64.9 years (SD 10.4), 75.8% women] contributing 440 knees comprised the study sample. 82 knees (18.6%) had definite varus thrust. Knees with varus thrust had greater peak varus angle and greater peak varus angular velocity during stance than knees without varus thrust (mean differences 0.90° and 6.65°/sec, respectively). These patterns remained significant after adjusting for age, gender, BMI, gait speed, and knee static alignment. Conclusion Visualized varus thrust during walking was associated with a greater peak knee varus angular velocity and a greater peak knee varus angle during stance phase of gait. PMID:23948980

  16. Reconstruction of knee joint soft tissue and patellar tendon defects using a composite anterolateral thigh flap with vascularized fascia lata.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yur-Ren; An, Po-Chung; Kuo, Mei-Hui; Kueh, Nai-Siong; Yao, Sheng-Fa; Jeng, Seng-Feng

    2008-01-01

    Reconstruction of a complex knee trauma with knee joint exposure and composite soft tissue and patellar tendon deficiency remains a challenging task. Multiple-stage reconstruction is time-consuming and produces considerable suffering for patients. Early mobilization following knee reconstruction has achieved good outcomes. Herein, we reported one-stage reconstruction with an ALT myocutaneous flap with vascularized fascia lata was utilized for one patient with a large complex knee joint soft tissue defect, and segmental deficiency of the patellar tendon. The fascia lata sheet was rolled to mimic a patellar tendon. The exposed knee joint was obturated by the vastus lateralis muscle of the ALT myocutaneous flap. The skin and soft tissue defect was reconstructed using the skin paddle of the ALT flap. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. An MRI examination demonstrated good continuity of the reconstructed patellar tendon. The active ROM of the injured knee reached 100 degrees (extension deficiency 20 degrees and flexion 120 degrees ) at 5 years. Objective functional assessment of the patella-femoral joint utilized a kinetic communicator machine (Kin-Com 500H, Chattecx, Chattanooga, TN, USA) revealed still mild extension insufficiency. However, the patient reported that he was able to perform normal daily activities without difficulty at 5-year follow-up. PMID:18215803

  17. Isokinetic Identification of Knee Joint Torques before and after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Czaplicki, Adam; Jarocka, Marta; Walawski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the serial change of isokinetic muscle strength of the knees before and after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) in physically active males and to estimate the time of return to full physical fitness. Extension and flexion torques were measured for the injured and healthy limbs at two angular velocities approximately 1.5 months before the surgery and 3, 6, and 12 months after ACLR. Significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) in peak knee extension and flexion torques, hamstring/quadriceps (H/Q) strength ratios, uninvolved/involved limb peak torque ratios, and the normalized work of these muscles between the four stages of rehabilitation were identified. Significant differences between extension peak torques for the injured and healthy limbs were also detected at all stages. The obtained results showed that 12 months of rehabilitation were insufficient for the involved knee joint to recover its strength to the level of strength of the uninvolved knee joint. The results helped to evaluate the progress of the rehabilitation and to implement necessary modifications optimizing the rehabilitation training program. The results of the study may also be used as referential data for physically active males of similar age. PMID:26646385

  18. Isokinetic Identification of Knee Joint Torques before and after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Czaplicki, Adam; Jarocka, Marta; Walawski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the serial change of isokinetic muscle strength of the knees before and after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) in physically active males and to estimate the time of return to full physical fitness. Extension and flexion torques were measured for the injured and healthy limbs at two angular velocities approximately 1.5 months before the surgery and 3, 6, and 12 months after ACLR. Significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) in peak knee extension and flexion torques, hamstring/quadriceps (H/Q) strength ratios, uninvolved/involved limb peak torque ratios, and the normalized work of these muscles between the four stages of rehabilitation were identified. Significant differences between extension peak torques for the injured and healthy limbs were also detected at all stages. The obtained results showed that 12 months of rehabilitation were insufficient for the involved knee joint to recover its strength to the level of strength of the uninvolved knee joint. The results helped to evaluate the progress of the rehabilitation and to implement necessary modifications optimizing the rehabilitation training program. The results of the study may also be used as referential data for physically active males of similar age. PMID:26646385

  19. Below Knee Impact Responses using Cadaveric Specimens.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Sriram; Beillas, Philippe; Belwadi, Aditya; Hardy, Warren N; Yang, King H; King, Albert I; Masuda, Mitsutoshi

    2004-11-01

    Knee injuries represent about 10% of all injuries suffered during car crashes. Efforts to assess the injury risk to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) have been based on a study available in the literature (Viano et al., 1978), in which only two of the five knees tested had PCL ruptures. The aims of the current study were to repeat the study with a higher number of samples, study the effects of other soft tissues on knee response, and assess the adequacy of the experimental setup for the identification of a PCL tolerance. A total of 14 knees were tested using a high-speed materials testing machine. Eight were intact knees (with the patella and all the muscular and ligamentous structures), three were PCL-only knees (patella and all the muscular and ligamentous structures other than the PCL removed), and the last three were PCL-only knees with the tibia protected from bending fracture. Of the eight intact knees tested, only one had PCL mid substance rupture, one had a partial articular fracture of the tibia below the plateau, and six had simple transverse fracture of the tibial metaphysis. Of the three PCL-only knees without tibial protection, one had PCL mid substance rupture, one had avulsion at the posterior intercondylar attachment point, and the last one had a simple oblique fracture of the tibial metaphysis. Of the three PCL only knees with tibia protection, two had PCL mid-substance ruptures and the third one had an avulsion at the tibial insertion site with partial articular fracture of the lateral plateau. Overall, the results of the current study were similar to those observed by Viano et al. (1978). The average displacement at failure for all PCL related injuries was 17.2+/-2.8 mm for the current study (n=6) and 16.2+/-3.9 mm for Viano et al. (1978) (n=4). This value is higher than the Injury Assessment Reference Value of 15 mm proposed by Mertz (1984) and used in various regulations. Both studies suggest that the existence of the soft tissues other

  20. Longitudinal, Lateral and Transverse Axes of Forearm Muscles Influence the Crosstalk in the Mechanomyographic Signals during Isometric Wrist Postures

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Anamul; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Ahmad, R. Badlishah; Sundaraj, Sebastian; Ahamed, Nizam Uddin; Ali, Md. Asraf

    2014-01-01

    Problem Statement In mechanomyography (MMG), crosstalk refers to the contamination of the signal from the muscle of interest by the signal from another muscle or muscle group that is in close proximity. Purpose The aim of the present study was two-fold: i) to quantify the level of crosstalk in the mechanomyographic (MMG) signals from the longitudinal (Lo), lateral (La) and transverse (Tr) axes of the extensor digitorum (ED), extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) and flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) muscles during isometric wrist flexion (WF) and extension (WE), radial (RD) and ulnar (UD) deviations; and ii) to analyze whether the three-directional MMG signals influence the level of crosstalk between the muscle groups during these wrist postures. Methods Twenty, healthy right-handed men (mean ± SD: age = 26.7±3.83 y; height = 174.47±6.3 cm; mass = 72.79±14.36 kg) participated in this study. During each wrist posture, the MMG signals propagated through the axes of the muscles were detected using three separate tri-axial accelerometers. The x-axis, y-axis, and z-axis of the sensor were placed in the Lo, La, and Tr directions with respect to muscle fibers. The peak cross-correlations were used to quantify the proportion of crosstalk between the different muscle groups. Results The average level of crosstalk in the MMG signals generated by the muscle groups ranged from: 34.28–69.69% for the Lo axis, 27.32–52.55% for the La axis and 11.38–25.55% for the Tr axis for all participants and their wrist postures. The Tr axes between the muscle groups showed significantly smaller crosstalk values for all wrist postures [F (2, 38) = 14–63, p<0.05, η2 = 0.416–0.769]. Significance The results may be applied in the field of human movement research, especially for the examination of muscle mechanics during various types of the wrist postures. PMID:25090008