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Sample records for knee joint arthroplasty

  1. Joint Line Reconstruction in Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-16

    Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty Because of; Loosening; Instability; Impingement; or Other Reasons Accepted as Indications for TKA Exchange.; The Focus is to Determine the Precision of Joint Line Restoration in Navigated vs. Conventional Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty

  2. Diagnosis of Periprosthetic Joint Infection Following Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, Javad; Fassihi, Safa Cyrus; Enayatollahi, Mohammad A

    2016-07-01

    The diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) following total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty has been one of the major challenges in orthopedic surgery. As there is no single absolute test for diagnosis of PJI, diagnostic criteria for PJI have been proposed that include using several diagnostic modalities. Focused history, physical examination, plain radiographs, and initial serologic tests should be followed by joint aspiration and synovial analysis. Newer diagnostic techniques, such as alpha-defensin and interleukin-6, hold great promise in the future diagnosis of equivocal infections. PMID:27241375

  3. The influence of joint line position on knee stability after condylar knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Martin, J W; Whiteside, L A

    1990-10-01

    Using a special knee-testing device, ten knees obtained at autopsy were subjected to varus-valgus, anterior-posterior, and flexion-rotation analysis in the intact state and after total knee arthroplasty. The ten knees showed no significant change in stability after knee replacement when the joint line was maintained in its natural position. When the femoral component was repositioned 5 mm proximally and 5 mm anteriorly, a significant increase in laxity occurred during midflexion. When the joint line was shifted 5 mm distal and 5 mm posterior to its anatomic location, significant tightening occurred in midrange of motion. Coupled rotation of the tibia with knee flexion was decreased after surgery in all knees with no specific relationship to joint line position. Coupled rotation with varus-valgus testing, however, remained within the normal range through the first 30 degrees of flexion only when the joint line was restored to its normal anatomic position. Stability in condylar knee arthroplasty is in part dependent on position of the joint line. Surgical techniques that rely on restoring the flexion and extension gap without regard to joint line position may result in alteration of varus-valgus or anterior-posterior displacement in midrange flexion. PMID:2208849

  4. Lateral dislocation of the knee joint after total knee arthroplasty: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ugutmen, Ender; Ozkan, Korhan; Unay, Koray; Mahirogullari, Mahir; Eceviz, Engin; Taser, Omer

    2008-01-01

    Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a successful therapy for functional improvement and pain relief in advanced symptomatic degeneration of the knee joint. But it can be associated with many complications, one of which is instability. Case presentation A 70-year-old woman was referred to our hospital because of right knee dislocation after TKA was performed on her right knee due to severe varus deformity and flexion contracture. This instability was caused by persistent MCL tightness and iatrogenic lateral collateral, arcuate ligament, and popliteus tendon injury. The torn lateral collateral ligament and arcuate ligament were sutured with no. 2 non-absorbable (Ethibond) sutures with plication of the posterolateral knee capsule. A deep-dish liner was inserted to optimize soft tissue tension. Conclusion This is a very severe complication, and surgeons must be cautious about ligament balancing and soft tissue resection during TKA for severe varus and valgus deformities. PMID:18687153

  5. Patient characteristics affecting the prognosis of total hip and knee joint arthroplasty: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Santaguida, Pasqualina L.; Hawker, Gillian A.; Hudak, Pamela L.; Glazier, Richard; Mahomed, Nizar N.; Kreder†, Hans J.; Coyte, Peter C.; Wright, James G.

    2008-01-01

    Background Total joint arthroplasty is a highly efficacious and cost-effective procedure for moderate to severe arthritis in the hip and knee. Although patient characteristics are considered to be important determinants of who receives total joint arthroplasty, no systematic review has addressed how they affect the outcomes of total joint arthroplasty. This study addresses how patient characteristics influence the outcomes of hip and knee arthroplasty in patients with osteoarthritis. Methods We searched 4 bibliographic databases (MEDLINE 1980–2001, CINAHL 1982–2001, EMBASE 1980–2001, HealthStar 1998–1999) for studies involving more than 500 patients with osteoarthritis and 1 or more of the following outcomes after total joint arthroplasty: pain, physical function, postoperative complications (short-and long-term) and time to revision. Prognostic patient characteristics of interest included age, sex, race, body weight, socioeconomic status and work status. Results Sixty-four of 14 276 studies were eligible for inclusion and had extractable data. Younger age (variably defined) and male sex increased the risk of revision 3-fold to 5-fold for hip and knee arthroplasty. The influence of weight on the risk of revision was contradictory. Mortality was greatest in the oldest age group and among men. Function for older patients was worse after hip arthroplasty (particularly in women). Function after knee arthroplasty was worse for obese patients. Conclusion Although further research is required, our findings suggest that, after total joint arthroplasty, younger age and male sex are associated with increased risk of revision, older age and male sex are associated with increased risk of mortality, older age is related to worse function (particularly among women), and age and sex do not influence the outcome of pain. Despite these findings, all subgroups derived benefit from total joint arthroplasty, suggesting that surgeons should not restrict access to these

  6. Bicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Giachino, Matteo; Risitano, Salvatore; Atzori, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most worldwide practiced surgery for knee osteoarthritis and its efficacy is mightily described by literature. Concerns about the invasiveness of TKA let the introduction of segmental resurfacing of the joint for younger patients with localized osteoarthritis. Bone stock sparing and ligaments preservation are the essence of both unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA). Advantages related to BKA are the respect of knee biomechanics, lower complications rates, shorter hospital stay, faster rehabilitation. Moreover, in case of failure of the first implant the conversion to TKA is undemanding and can be compared to a standard prosthesis. Our experience suggest that BKA is a reliable technique in selected cases and especially younger people with higher functional requests can favourably profit from it. Although those results are encouraging, we still need further prospective, randomized, long-term studies to finally assess BKA indications and outcomes. PMID:26855941

  7. Bicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Luigi; Giachino, Matteo; Risitano, Salvatore; Atzori, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most worldwide practiced surgery for knee osteoarthritis and its efficacy is mightily described by literature. Concerns about the invasiveness of TKA let the introduction of segmental resurfacing of the joint for younger patients with localized osteoarthritis. Bone stock sparing and ligaments preservation are the essence of both unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA). Advantages related to BKA are the respect of knee biomechanics, lower complications rates, shorter hospital stay, faster rehabilitation. Moreover, in case of failure of the first implant the conversion to TKA is undemanding and can be compared to a standard prosthesis. Our experience suggest that BKA is a reliable technique in selected cases and especially younger people with higher functional requests can favourably profit from it. Although those results are encouraging, we still need further prospective, randomized, long-term studies to finally assess BKA indications and outcomes. PMID:26855941

  8. Phenotypic characteristics of joint fluid cells from patients with continuous joint effusion after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Niki, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Hideo; Otani, Toshiro; Yatabe, Taku; Funayama, Atsushi; Maeno, Shinichi; Tomatsu, Taisuke; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2006-03-01

    Joint effusion after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) is a manifestation of inflammatory reactions within the prosthetic joint. Among the various causes for joint effusion following TJA, deep infection (DI), wear particle-induced synovitis (PS) and metal sensitivity to the implant should be excluded as soon as possible, as these may result in the failure of TJA. The present study analyzed joint fluid cells from patients after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS), and examined the feasibility of using FACS to exclude the possibility of biomaterial-related complication. A total of 72TKAs from 64 patients suffering from joint effusion were examined in this study. Joint fluid was aspirated in outpatient clinics and applied to FACS. The results indicated that patients could be clearly classified into four types based on forward/side scatter profiles. Analysis of specific CD markers revealed that leukocytes were selectively recruited from blood to inflamed prosthetic joints. Dominant cell types were CD16+neutrophils in DI and increased rheumatoid activity, CD14+macrophages in PS, and CD3+CD45RO+T cells in metal sensitivity. These findings suggest the feasibility of diagnosing joint effusion by analyzing dominant cell type recruited using FACS. In conclusion, FACS may offer a useful tool for analyzing joint fluid cells from post-TJA patients and for excluding biomaterial-related complication following TJA. PMID:16183112

  9. New Joints, Same Old Weight: Weight Changes After Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hurwit, Daniel J; Trehan, Samir K; Cross, Michael B

    2016-07-01

    Obesity is a well-known risk factor for postoperative complications following total joint arthroplasty. However, because the operation is often successful, orthopedic surgeons continue to operate on obese individuals, and many surgeons do so under the assumption that patients will lose weight after they are able to walk and exercise without pain. In this article, we review a recent study by Ast et al., who performed a retrospective review, using a single-center institutional registry, to determine (1) whether patients do actually lose weight after total hip and/or total knee arthroplasty, (2) whether there are predictors of postoperative weight change, and (3) whether postoperative weight changes affect patient-reported clinical outcomes. The principle conclusion was that most patients maintained their body mass index (BMI) after total hip and total knee arthroplasty (73 and 69%, respectively). However, patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty, patients who had a higher preoperative BMI, and female patients were more likely to lose weight postoperatively. When examined in the context of the current literature, this study provides valuable information for the preoperative counseling of total joint arthroplasty candidates, especially in the setting of obesity. PMID:27385952

  10. Revision of the Gunston polycentric knee arthroplasty with total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Memişoğlu, Kaya; Müezzinoğlu, U Sefa; Kesemenli, Cumhur Cevdet

    2010-01-01

    The Gunston polycentric knee arthroplasty, first designed and performed by Frank Gunston in 1971, is the first prosthesis considering the natural knee biomechanics. Although the polycentric knee arthroplasty showed encouraging results to relieve pain and to preserve the preoperative range of motion and joint instability, the improvements in prosthesis design and arthroplasty technology rapidly made the polycentric knee prosthesis obsolete. Herein, we report a 58-year old male patient who had revision of the Gunston polycentric knee arthroplasty with total knee arthroplasty performed 32 years after the initial operation. PMID:21343693

  11. Fungal Periprosthetic Joint Infection in Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Jakobs, Oliver; Schoof, Benjamin; Klatte, Till Orla; Schmidl, Stefan; Fensky, Florian; Guenther, Daniel; Frommelt, Lars; Gehrke, Thorsten; Gebauer, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Fungal periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a rare but devastating complication following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A standardized procedure regarding an accurate treatment of this serious complication of knee arthroplasty is lacking. In this systematic review, we collected data from 36 studies with a total of 45 reported cases of a TKA complicated by a fungal PJI. Subsequently, an analysis focusing on diagnostic, medicaments and surgical procedures in the pre-, intra- and postoperative period was performed. Candida spp. accounts for about 80% (36 out of 45 cases) of fungal PJIs and is therefore the most frequently reported pathogen. A systemic antifungal therapy was administered in all but one patient whereas a local antifungal therapy, e.g. the use of an impregnated spacer, is of inferior relevance. Resection arthroplasty with delayed re-implantation (two-stage revision) was the surgical treatment of choice. However, in 50% of all reported cases the surgical therapy was heterogeneous. The outcome under a combined therapy was moderate with recurrent fungal PJI in 11 patients and subsequent bacterial PJI as a main complication in 5 patients. In summary, this systematic review integrates data from up to date 45 reported cases of a fungal PJI of a TKA. On the basis of the current literature strategies for the treatment of this devastating complication after TKA are discussed. PMID:25874061

  12. Iranian Joint Registry (Iranian National Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Hamidreza; Nourbakhsh, Seyed Taghi; Lahiji, Farivar A.; Heydarian, Keykavoos; Jabalameli, Mahmood; Ghazavi, Mohammad Taghi; Tahmasebi, Mohammad Naghi; Fayyaz, Mahmoud Reza; Sazegari, Mohammad Ali; Mohaddes, Maziar; Rajabpour, Mojtaba; Emami, Mohammad; Jazayeri, Seyyed Mohammad; Madadi, Firooz; Farahini, Hossein; Mirzatoloee, Fardin; Gharahdaghi, Mohammad; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Ebrahimian, Mohammadreza; Mirvakili, Hossein; Bashti, Kaveh; Almasizadeh, Mohtasham; Abolghasemian, Mansour; Taheriazam, Afshin; Motififard, Mehdi; Yazdi, Hamidreza; Mobarakeh, Mahmood Karimi; Shayestehazar, Masoud; Moghtadae, Mehdi; Siavashi, Babak; Sajjadi, Mohammadreza M.; Rasi, Alireza Manafi; Chabok, Seyyed Kazem; Zafarani, Zohreh; Salehi, Shahin; Ahmadi, Monireh; Mohammadi, Amin; Shahsavand, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Periodic evaluation and monitoring the health and economic outcome of joint replacement surgery is a common and popular process under the territory of joint registries in many countries. In this article we introduce the methodology used for the foundation of the National Iranian Joint Registry (IJR) with a joint collaboration of the Social Security Organization (SSO) and academic research departments considering the requirements of the Iran’s Ministry of Health and Education. PMID:27200403

  13. Tourniquetless Total Knee Arthroplasty

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Tourniquetless Total Knee Arthroplasty You must have Javascript enabled in your web browser. View Program Transcript Click Here to view the OR-Live, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2010 OR- ...

  14. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Murray, D. W.; Liddle, A. D.; Dodd, C. A. F.; Pandit, H.

    2015-01-01

    There is a large amount of evidence available about the relative merits of unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty (UKA and TKA). Based on the same evidence, different people draw different conclusions and as a result, there is great variability in the usage of UKA. The revision rate of UKA is much higher than TKA and so some surgeons conclude that UKA should not be performed. Other surgeons believe that the main reason for the high revision rate is that UKA is easy to revise and, therefore, the threshold for revision is low. They also believe that UKA has many advantages over TKA such as a faster recovery, lower morbidity and mortality and better function. They therefore conclude that UKA should be undertaken whenever appropriate. The solution to this argument is to minimise the revision rate of UKA, thereby addressing the main disadvantage of UKA. The evidence suggests that this will be achieved if surgeons use UKA for at least 20% of their knee arthroplasties and use implants that are appropriate for these broad indications. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B(10 Suppl A):3–8. PMID:26430080

  15. Joint line and patellar height restoration after revision total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Seon, Jong-Keun; Song, Eun-Kyoo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Restoration of proper joint line (JL) position and patellar height in revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is essential in the recovery of knee function and kinematics. We determined whether the JL position and patellar height could be restored in patients undergoing septic and aseptic revision TKA. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 70 patients (74 knees) who had revision TKA between September 2004 and December 2010. Forty seven knees had a two stage revision for infected TKA and 27 knees for aseptic failure. The JL position, patellar height and patellar tendon (PT) length were measured and compared between primary TKA and post revision. The clinical scores including a hospital for special surgery (HSS), Knee Society Score (KSS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) and range of motion (ROM) were compared. Results: The overall JL increased from 17.51 mm to 18.37 mm post revision, the Insall-Salvati (IS) ratio declined from 0.98 to 0.92, and the PT length declined from 42.92 mm to 39.45 mm. 9 of the 21 patellar baja knees improved to normal patellar height. After revision, the JL in the septic group (17.02 mm) was significantly lower than the aseptic group (20.74 mm). The changes of the JL position and IS ratio in the septic group were significantly larger than the aseptic groups (P < 0.05). JL position had a positive correlation to the IS ratio and PT length post revision. The knee function scores including HSS, KSS, WOMAC scores, and ROM all improved post revision compared to pre revision (P < 0.05), and the septic group had a lower knee function compared to the aseptic group. JL position and IS ratio post revision had no correlation to the HSS, KSS, WOMAC scores, and ROM. Conclusions: JL position can be sufficiently restored with appropriate distal femoral augment reconstruction after revision TKA, but the patellar height cannot be well improved, especially in the septic revision with obvious PT contracture. No

  16. Multi-Joint Compensatory Effects of Unilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty During High-Demand Tasks.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Brecca M; Harris, Michael D; Davidson, Bradley S; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E; Christiansen, Cory L; Shelburne, Kevin B

    2016-08-01

    Patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) demonstrate quadriceps weakness and functional limitations 1 year after surgery during daily tasks such as walking and stair climbing. Most biomechanical analyses of patients after TKA focus on quadriceps function and rarely investigate other lower-extremity muscles or high-demand ambulatory activities of daily living. The purpose of this investigation was to quantify lower-extremity muscle forces in patients with unilateral TKA during high-demand tasks of pivoting and descending stairs. Five patients with unilateral TKA and five age and sex-matched controls performed three bilateral high-demand tasks: (1) step down from an 8-inch platform, (2) inside pivot: 90° direction change toward planted limb, and (3) outside pivot: 90° direction change away from planted limb. Subject-specific musculoskeletal simulations were created in OpenSim to determine joint angles, moments, and lower-extremity muscle forces. The results indicate that patients with TKA adopt compensatory strategies at both the hip and knee. Patients with TKA demonstrated increased hip external rotation, decreased knee flexion, decreased quadriceps force, and decreased hip abductor force in all three tasks. These strategies are likely a result of quadriceps avoidance, which may stem from instability after TKA or a habitual strategy developed during the late stages of osteoarthritis. PMID:26666227

  17. Neuromuscular exercise prior to joint arthroplasty in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee.

    PubMed

    Villadsen, Allan

    2016-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease affecting the whole joint and peri-articular structures like the muscles. The hallmark of OA is cartilage loss. The main symptoms are pain and decreased physical function leading to a reduced quality of life. OA ranks eight in leading causes of disability worldwide and it generates a heavy economic burden for society. The prevalence of OA increases with age and 10-18% aged above 60 years are affected. Currently there is no cure for OA and the various treatment modalities aim at addressing symptoms, i.e. reducing pain, improving physical function and preventing further progression of the disease. Exercise has proven to be a viable treatment option with regard to reducing pain and improving physical function in patients with mild to moderate knee OA and is today regarded a cornerstone in the treatment. The documentation is less clear for hip OA. Patients with severe OA of the hip or knee are treated with total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Although, in general, it is a very successful procedure, there are still challenges to overcome in this patient group, as approximately 10% of those having hip arthroplasty and 20% of those having knee arthroplasty have persistent symptoms. The evidence on the efficacy of exercise prior to TJA is sparse. It is based on insufficiently powered trials and with interventions of questionable validity. Two recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses reach conflicting conclusions and highlight the need for high quality trials with sufficient sample sizes. In this dissertation, I wanted to evaluate the effects of an individualised neuromuscular exercise programme (NEMEX-TJR) when administered prior to joint arthroplasty in patients with severe OA of the hip or knee joint. This intervention was previously found to be feasible with regard to pain level during exercise and it was possible to progress the training level in this patient group. The main question asked was: Does the addition of

  18. Recent advances and future directions in the management of knee osteoarthritis: Can biological joint reconstruction replace joint arthroplasty and when?

    PubMed Central

    Paschos, Nikolaos K

    2015-01-01

    In this article, a concise description of the recent advances in the field of osteoarthritis management is presented. The main focus is to highlight the most promising techniques that emerge in both biological joint replacement and artificial joint arthroplasty. A critical view of high quality evidence regarding outcome and safety profile of these techniques is presented. The potential role of kinematically aligned total knee replacement, navigation, and robotic-assisted surgery is outlined. A critical description of both primary and stem cell-based therapies, the cell homing theory, the use of biologic factors and recent advancements in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine is provided. Based on the current evidence, some thoughts on a realistic approach towards answering these questions are attempted. PMID:26495242

  19. Recent advances and future directions in the management of knee osteoarthritis: Can biological joint reconstruction replace joint arthroplasty and when?

    PubMed

    Paschos, Nikolaos K

    2015-10-18

    In this article, a concise description of the recent advances in the field of osteoarthritis management is presented. The main focus is to highlight the most promising techniques that emerge in both biological joint replacement and artificial joint arthroplasty. A critical view of high quality evidence regarding outcome and safety profile of these techniques is presented. The potential role of kinematically aligned total knee replacement, navigation, and robotic-assisted surgery is outlined. A critical description of both primary and stem cell-based therapies, the cell homing theory, the use of biologic factors and recent advancements in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine is provided. Based on the current evidence, some thoughts on a realistic approach towards answering these questions are attempted. PMID:26495242

  20. A comprehensive joint replacement program for total knee arthroplasty: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Jon R; Warren, Meghan; Ganley, Kathleen J; Prefontaine, Paul; Wylie, Jack W

    2008-01-01

    Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a commonly performed surgical procedure in the US. It is important to have a comprehensive inpatient TKA program which maximizes outcomes while minimizing adverse events. The purpose of this study was to describe a TKA program – the Joint Replacement Program (JRP) – and report post-surgical outcomes. Methods 74 candidates for a primary TKA were enrolled in the JRP. The JRP was designed to minimize complications and optimize patient-centered outcomes using a team approach including the patient, patient's family, and a multidisciplinary team of health professionals. The JRP consisted of a pre-operative class, standard pathways for medical care, comprehensive peri-operative pain management, aggressive physical therapy (PT), and proactive discharge planning. Measures included functional tests, knee range of motion (ROM), and medical record abstraction of patient demographics, length of stay, discharge disposition, and complications over a 6-month follow-up period. Results All patients achieved medical criteria for hospital discharge. The patients achieved the knee flexion ROM goal of 90° (91.7 ± 5.4°), but did not achieve the knee extension ROM goal of 0° (2.4 ± 2.6°). The length of hospital stay was two days for 53% of the patients, with 39% and 7% discharged in three and four days, respectively. All but three patients were discharged home with functional independence. 68% of these received outpatient physical therapy compared with 32% who received home physical therapy immediately after discharge. Two patients (< 3%) had medical complications during the inpatient hospital stay, and 9 patients (12%) had complications during the 6-month follow-up period. Conclusion The comprehensive JRP for TKA was associated with satisfactory clinical outcomes, short lengths of stay, a high percentage of patients discharged home with outpatient PT, and minimal complications. This JRP may represent an efficient, effective and safe

  1. Does joint line elevation after revision knee arthroplasty affect tibio-femoral kinematics, contact pressure or collateral ligament lengths? An in vitro analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczewski, Jacek B.; Chevalier, Yan; Okon, Tomasz; Innocenti, Bernardo; Bellemans, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Correct restoration of the joint line is generally considered as crucial when performing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). During revision knee arthroplasty however, elevation of the joint line occurs frequently. The general belief is that this negatively affects the clinical outcome, but the reasons are still not well understood. Material and methods In this cadaveric in vitro study the biomechanical consequences of joint line elevation were investigated using a previously validated cadaver model simulating active deep knee squats and passive flexion-extension cycles. Knee specimens were sequentially tested after total knee arthroplasty with joint line restoration and after 4 mm joint line elevation. Results The tibia rotated internally with increasing knee flexion during both passive and squatting motion (range: 17° and 7° respectively). Joint line elevation of 4 mm did not make a statistically significant difference. During passive motion, the tibia tended to become slightly more adducted with increasing knee flexion (range: 2°), while it went into slighlty less adduction during squatting (range: –2°). Neither of both trends was influenced by joint line elevation. Also anteroposterior translation of the femoral condyle centres was not affected by joint line elevation, although there was a tendency for a small posterior shift (of about 3 mm) during squatting after joint line elevation. In terms of kinetics, ligaments lengths and length changes, tibiofemoral contact pressures and quadriceps forces all showed the same patterns before and joint line elevation. No statistically significant changes could be detected. Conclusions Our study suggests that joint line elevation by 4 mm in revision total knee arthroplasty does not cause significant kinematic and kinetic differences during passive flexion/extension movement and squatting in the tibio-femoral joint, nor does it affect the elongation patterns of collateral ligaments. Therefore, clinical

  2. The medial and lateral epicondyle as a reliable landmark for intra-operative joint line determination in revision knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sen, T.; Cankaya, D.; Kendir, S.; Basarır, K.; Tabak, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to develop an accurate, reliable and easily applicable method for determining the anatomical location of the joint line during revision knee arthroplasty. Methods The transepicondylar width (TEW), the perpendicular distance between the medial and lateral epicondyles and the distal articular surfaces (DMAD, DLAD) and the distance between the medial and lateral epicondyles and the posterior articular surfaces (PMAD, DLAD) were measured in 40 knees from 20 formalin-fixed adult cadavers (11 male and nine female; mean age at death 56.9 years, sd 9.4; 34 to 69). The ratios of the DMAD, PMAD, DLAD and PLAD to TEW were calculated. Results The mean TEW, DMAD, PMAD, DLAD and PLAD were 82.76 mm (standard deviation (sd) 7.74), 28.95 mm (sd 3.3), 28.57 mm (sd 3), 23.97 mm (sd 3.27) and 24.42 mm (sd 3.14), respectively. The ratios between the TEW and the articular distances (DMAD/TEW, DLAD/TEW, PMAD/TEW and PLAD/TEW) were calculated and their means were 0.35 (sd 0.02), 0.34 (sd 0.02), 0.28 (sd 0.03) and 0.29 (sd 0.03), respectively. Conclusion This method provides a simple, reproducible and reliable technique enabling accurate anatomical joint line restoration during revision total knee arthroplasty. Cite this article: B. Ozkurt, T. Sen, D. Cankaya, S. Kendir, K. Basarır, Y. Tabak. The medial and lateral epicondyle as a reliable landmark for intra-operative joint line determination in revision knee arthroplasty. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:280–286. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.57.BJR-2016-0002.R1. PMID:27388715

  3. The Painful Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Mitchell; Park, Andrew; Gerlinger, Tad L

    2016-04-01

    There are many causes of residual pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Evaluation and management begins with a comprehensive history and physical examination, followed by radiographic evaluation of the replaced and adjacent joints, as well as previous films of the replaced joint. Further workup includes laboratory analysis, along with a synovial fluid aspirate to evaluate the white blood cell count with differential as well as culture. Advanced imaging modalities may be beneficial when the diagnosis remains unclear. Revision surgery is not advisable without a clear diagnosis, as it may be associated with poor results. PMID:26772940

  4. Cementless total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Salvatore; Sabatini, Luigi; Giachino, Matteo; Agati, Gabriele; Massè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Interest for uncemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has greatly increased in recent years. This technique, less used than cemented knee replacement in the last decades, sees a revival thanks an advance in prosthetic design, instrumentation and operative technique. The related literature in some cases shows conflicting data on survival and on the revision’s rate, but in most cases a success rate comparable to cemented TKA is reported. The optimal fixation in TKA is a subject of debate with the majority of surgeons favouring cemented fixation. PMID:27162779

  5. [Application and development of kinematical alighment during total knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Zhang Guo-dong; Yang, Chen; Yang, Guang; Qi, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Kinematical alignment during total knee arthroplasty is an emerging process, and draws more and more attentions from scholars. Knee joint is close to normal joint after TKA through kinematical alighment, which has good clinical results and functional scores, and not increase failure probility. Thus, it may increase joint stress of patella-femur joint, lead to patellar maltracking and increase abrasion. The paper summarized defination and basical principle, operative method, clinical outcomes and deficiency of kinematical alignment during total knee arthroplasty, in order to choose a better way for kinematical alignment during total knee arthroplasty. PMID:26911130

  6. Composition of joint fluid in patients undergoing total knee replacement and revision arthroplasty: correlation with flow properties.

    PubMed

    Mazzucco, Dan; Scott, Richard; Spector, Myron

    2004-08-01

    The protein, phospholipid and hyaluronic acid (HA) contents of joint fluid samples were determined in specimens obtained from patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and revision TKA. It was hypothesized that these components would vary widely among patients undergoing TKA, and that the composition of joint fluid in patients undergoing revision would differ from that in patients undergoing revision. It was further hypothesized that HA concentration and molecular weight would principally determine the flow properties previously reported. Biochemical assays were used to assess protein and phospholipid content, and size exclusion chromatography was used to determine HA concentration and molecular weight. Sixty samples were included in the study. HA, protein, and phospholipid concentrations all varied widely in patients undergoing index TKA and revision TKA. HA concentration was lower in patients undergoing revision arthroplasty due to wear-related failure compared to patients undergoing the index procedure (0.9 +/- 0.4 mg/ml versus 1.3 +/- 0.5 mg/ml, mean +/- standard deviation, p = 0.04). Other components were not different between the groups. Flow properties at high shear rates were correlated with HA concentration and, to a lesser extent, HA molecular weight, but neither protein nor phospholipid concentration. The composition of joint fluid is highly variable in the context of arthroplasty. Much of the variation in flow properties, especially at high shear rate, is explained by large variation in HA concentration and small variation in HA molecular weight. The variation in composition and lower HA concentration in joints necessitating revision may relate to variation in arthroplasty lubrication leading to highly variable wear rates and clinical outcomes. PMID:15046934

  7. Patients’ decision making in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, T.; Griffin, D.; Barlow, D.; Realpe, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A patient-centred approach, usually achieved through shared decision making, has the potential to help improve decision making around knee arthroplasty surgery. However, such an approach requires an understanding of the factors involved in patient decision making. This review’s objective is to systematically examine the qualitative literature surrounding patients’ decision making in knee arthroplasty. Methods A systematic literature review using Medline and Embase was conducted to identify qualitative studies that examined patients’ decision making around knee arthroplasty. An aggregated account of what is known about patients’ decision making in knee arthroplasties is provided. Results Seven studies with 234 participants in interviews or focus groups are included. Ten themes are replicated across studies, namely: expectations of surgery; coping mechanisms; relationship with clinician; fear; pain; function; psychological implications; social network; previous experience of surgery; and conflict in opinions. Conclusions This review is helpful in not only directing future research to areas that are not understood, or require confirmation, but also in highlighting areas that future interventions could address. These include those aimed at delivering information, which are likely to affect the satisfaction rate, demand, and use of knee arthroplasties. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4;163–169. PMID:26450640

  8. [Revision after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Mohr, G; Martin, J; Clarius, M

    2014-10-01

    Unicompartmental arthroplasty is an efficient and approved treatment option of unicompartmental arthritis of the knee, being performed with increasing frequency worldwide. Compared to total knee replacement, there are several advantages such as faster recovery, lower blood loss, better functional outcome and lower infection rates. However, higher revision rates are a frequent argument against the use of unicompartmental arthroplasty. The following article gives an overview of failure mechanisms and strategies for revision arthroplasty. This article is based on a selective literature review including PubMed and relevant print media. Our own clinical experience is considered as well. PMID:25209015

  9. Knee Joint Distraction Compared to Total Knee Arthroplasty for Treatment of End Stage Osteoarthritis: Simulating Long-Term Outcomes and Cost-Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    van der Woude, J. A. D.; Nair, S. C.; Custers, R. J. H.; van Laar, J. M.; Kuchuck, N. O.; Lafeber, F. P. J. G.; Welsing, P. M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective In end-stage knee osteoarthritis the treatment of choice is total knee arthroplasty (TKA). An alternative treatment is knee joint distraction (KJD), suggested to postpone TKA. Several studies reported significant and prolonged clinical improvement of KJD. To make an appropriate decision regarding the position of this treatment, a cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis from healthcare perspective for different age and gender categories was performed. Methods A treatment strategy starting with TKA and a strategy starting with KJD for patients of different age and gender was simulated. To extrapolate outcomes to long-term health and economic outcomes a Markov (Health state) model was used. The number of surgeries, QALYs, and treatment costs per strategy were calculated. Costs-effectiveness is expressed using the cost-effectiveness plane and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. Results Starting with KJD the number of knee replacing procedures could be reduced, most clearly in the younger age categories; especially revision surgery. This resulted in the KJD strategy being dominant (more effective with cost-savings) in about 80% of simulations (with only inferiority in about 1%) in these age categories when compared to TKA. At a willingness to pay of 20.000 Euro per QALY gained, the probability of starting with KJD to be cost-effective compared to starting with a TKA was already found to be over 75% for all age categories and over 90–95% for the younger age categories. Conclusion A treatment strategy starting with knee joint distraction for knee osteoarthritis has a large potential for being a cost-effective intervention, especially for the relatively young patient. PMID:27171268

  10. Ipsilateral lower extremity joint involvement increases the risk of poor pain and function outcomes after hip or knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Poor pain and function outcomes are undesirable after an elective surgery such as total hip or knee arthroplasty (THA/TKA). Recent studies have indicated that the presence of contralateral joint influences outcomes of THA/TKA, however the impact of ipsilateral knee/hip involvement on THA/TKA outcomes has not been explored. The objective of this study was to assess the association of ipsilateral knee/hip joint involvement on short-term and medium-term pain and function outcomes after THA/TKA. Methods In this retrospective study of prospectively collected data, we used the data from the Mayo Clinic Total Joint Registry to assess the association of ipsilateral knee or hip joint involvement with moderate to severe pain and moderate to severe activity limitation at 2-year and 5-year follow-up after primary and revision THA and TKA using multivariable-adjusted logistic regression analyses. Results At 2 years, 3,823 primary THA, 4,701 primary TKA, 1,218 revision THA and 725 revision TKA procedures were studied. After adjusting for multiple covariates, ipsilateral knee pain was significantly associated with outcomes after primary THA (all P values <0.01): (1) moderate to severe pain: at 2 years, odds ratio (OR), 2.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5 to 3.6); at 5 years, OR 1.8 (95% CI 1.1 to 2.7); (2) moderate to severe activity limitation: at 2 years, OR 3.1 (95% CI 2.3 to 4.3); at 5 years, OR 3.6 (95% CI 2.6 to 5.0). Ipsilateral hip pain was significantly associated with outcomes after primary TKA (all P values <0.01): (1) moderate to severe pain: at 2 years, OR 3.3 (95% CI 2.3 to 4.7); at 5 years, OR 1.8 (95% CI 1.1 to 2.7); (2) moderate to severe activity limitation: at 2 years, OR 3.6 (95% CI 2.6 to 4.9); at 5 years, OR 2.2 (95% CI 1.6 to 3.2). Similar associations were noted for revision THA and TKA patients. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing that the presence of ipsilateral joint involvement after THA or TKA is

  11. SCREW MIGRATION IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY: CLINICAL REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Fernando; Tomé, José; Barreto, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Complications from total knee arthroplasty caused by the implanted material are rare, with the exception of polyethylene wear. Descriptions of screw migration into the knee joint cavity are very rare. The authors report intra-articular migration of a polyethylene safety screw in a case of total knee arthroplasty, with sacrifice of the posterior cruciate ligament (TKA Performance; Biomet, Warsaw, IN, USA), which necessitated new surgery to remove the screw, replace the polyethylene insert and emplace a new fixation screw. PMID:27022526

  12. Acceleration-based joint stability parameters for total knee arthroplasty that correspond with patient-reported instability.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Dustyn; Khan, Humera; Kim, Joo H; Slover, James; Walker, Peter S

    2013-10-01

    There is no universally accepted definition of human joint stability, particularly in nonperiodic general activities of daily living. Instability has proven to be a difficult parameter to define and quantify, since both spatial and temporal measures need to be considered to fully characterize joint stability. In this preliminary study, acceleration-based parameters were proposed to characterize the joint stability. Several time-statistical parameters of acceleration and jerk were defined as potential stability measures, since anomalous acceleration or jerk could be a symptom of poor control or stability. An inertial measurement unit attached at the level of the tibial tubercle of controls and patients following total knee arthroplasty was used to determine linear acceleration of the knee joint during several activities of daily living. The resulting accelerations and jerks were compared with patient-reported instability as determined through a standard questionnaire. Several parameters based on accelerations and jerks in the anterior/posterior direction during the step-up/step-down activity were significantly different between patients and controls and correlated with patient reports of instability in that activity. The range of the positive to negative peak acceleration and infinity norm of acceleration, in the anterior/posterior direction during the step-up/step-down activity, proved to be the best indicators of instability. As time derivatives of displacement, these acceleration-based parameters represent spatial and temporal information and are an important step forward in developing a definition and objective quantification of human joint stability that can complement the subjective patient report. PMID:23886970

  13. Soft tissue balancing in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    MELONI, MARIA CHIARA; HOEDEMAEKER, RUSSALKA W.; VIOLANTE, BRUNO; MAZZOLA, CLAUDIO

    2014-01-01

    A good outcome in total knee arthroplasty depends on many factors: joint alignment, range of motion, patellar tracking and ligament stability. A correct soft tissue balance keeps the joint aligned in flexion and extension, and therefore constitutes the most important factor for durability of the implant. Indeed, incorrect soft tissue balancing is the primary cause of early implant failure necessitating revision surgery. Soft tissue releases, serving to correct imbalances, are performed until the flexion and extension gaps appear symmetrical and balanced. A knee is considered perfectly balanced when the flexion and extension gaps are perfectly rectangular and all the measurements are absolutely equal. PMID:25606540

  14. Bone loss during revision of unicompartmental to total knee arthroplasty: an analysis of implanted polyethylene thickness from the National Joint Registry data.

    PubMed

    Sarraf, Khaled M; Konan, Sujith; Pastides, Philip S; Haddad, Fares S; Oussedik, Sam

    2013-10-01

    Using the National Joint Registry (UK) database, we compared the thickness of polyethylene (PE) and the level of constraint used during primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) versus the revision of unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA) to TKA. A total of 251,803 TKA procedures and 374 revision UKA-TKA procedures between 2003 and 2009 were reviewed. The commonest PE size used in TKA was 10mm, compared to 12.79 mm in the revision group. The use of constrained knee implant was required in 2.15% of primary TKA and 4.19% of UKA to TKA revisions. The revision of UKA to TKA is a more complex procedure compared to primary TKA, with a higher incidence of using constrained implants and thicker PE inserts. These findings may be useful for surgeons in their decision making. PMID:23538124

  15. Good validity and reliability of the forgotten joint score in evaluating the outcome of total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Morten G; Latifi, Roshan; Kallemose, Thomas; Barfod, Kristoffer W; Husted, Henrik; Troelsen, Anders

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - When evaluating the outcome after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), increasing emphasis has been put on patient satisfaction and ability to perform activities of daily living. To address this, the forgotten joint score (FJS) for assessment of knee awareness has been developed. We investigated the validity and reliability of the FJS. Patients and methods - A Danish version of the FJS questionnaire was created according to internationally accepted standards. 360 participants who underwent primary TKA were invited to participate in the study. Of these, 315 were included in a validity study and 150 in a reliability study. Correlation between the Oxford knee score (OKS) and the FJS was examined and test-retest evaluation was performed. A ceiling effect was defined as participants reaching a score within 15% of the maximum achievable score. Results - The validity study revealed a strong correlation between the FJS and the OKS (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.77-0.85; p < 0.001). The test-retest evaluation showed almost perfect reliability for the FJS total score (ICC = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.88-0.94) and substantial reliability or better for individual items of the FJS (ICC? 0.79). We found a high level of internal consistency (Cronbach's? = 0.96). The ceiling effect for the FJS was 16%, as compared to 37% for the OKS. Interpretation - The FJS showed good construct validity and test-retest reliability. It had a lower ceiling effect than the OKS. The FJS appears to be a promising tool for evaluation of small differences in knee performance in groups of patients with good clinical results after TKA. PMID:26937689

  16. Good validity and reliability of the forgotten joint score in evaluating the outcome of total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Morten G; Latifi, Roshan; Kallemose, Thomas; Barfod, Kristoffer W; Husted, Henrik; Troelsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose When evaluating the outcome after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), increasing emphasis has been put on patient satisfaction and ability to perform activities of daily living. To address this, the forgotten joint score (FJS) for assessment of knee awareness has been developed. We investigated the validity and reliability of the FJS. Patients and methods A Danish version of the FJS questionnaire was created according to internationally accepted standards. 360 participants who underwent primary TKA were invited to participate in the study. Of these, 315 were included in a validity study and 150 in a reliability study. Correlation between the Oxford knee score (OKS) and the FJS was examined and test-retest evaluation was performed. A ceiling effect was defined as participants reaching a score within 15% of the maximum achievable score. Results The validity study revealed a strong correlation between the FJS and the OKS (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.77–0.85; p < 0.001). The test-retest evaluation showed almost perfect reliability for the FJS total score (ICC = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.88–0.94) and substantial reliability or better for individual items of the FJS (ICC? 0.79). We found a high level of internal consistency (Cronbach’s? = 0.96). The ceiling effect for the FJS was 16%, as compared to 37% for the OKS. Interpretation The FJS showed good construct validity and test-retest reliability. It had a lower ceiling effect than the OKS. The FJS appears to be a promising tool for evaluation of small differences in knee performance in groups of patients with good clinical results after TKA. PMID:26937689

  17. Robotic-assisted knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Elmallah, Randa K; Jauregui, Julio J; Pierce, Todd P; Mont, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Robotics in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has undergone vast improvements. Although some of the systems have fallen out of favor due to safety concerns, there has been recent increased interest for semi-active haptic robotic systems that provide intraoperative tactile feedback to the surgeon. The potential advantages include improvements in radiographic outcomes, reducing the incidence of mechanical axis malalignment of the lower extremity and better tissue balance. Proponents of robotic technology believe that these improvements may lead to superior functional outcomes and implant survivorship. We aim to discuss robotic technology development, outcomes of unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty and the future outlook. Short-term follow-up studies on robotic-assisted knee arthroplasty suggest that, although some alignment objectives may have been achieved, more studies regarding functional outcomes are needed. Furthermore, studies evaluating the projected cost-benefit analyses of this new technology are needed before widespread adoption. Nevertheless, the short-term results warrant further evaluation. PMID:26365088

  18. Surgical approaches for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul; Demesugh, Daniel Mue; Agarwal, Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    There are various surgical approaches to the knee joint and its surrounding structures and such approaches are generally designed to allow the best access to an area of pathology whilst safeguarding important surrounding structures. Controversy currently surrounds the optimal surgical approach for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The medial parapatellar arthrotomy, or anteromedial approach, has been the most used and has been regarded as the standard approach for exposure of the knee joint. It provides extensive exposure and is useful for open anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, total knee replacement, and fixation of intra-articular fractures. Because this approach has been implicated in compromise of the patellar circulation, some authors have advocated the subvastus, midvastus, and trivector approaches for exposure of the knee joint. While these approaches expose the knee from the medial side, the anterolateral approach exposes the knee joint from the lateral side. With careful planning and arthrotomy selection, the anterior aspect of the joint can be adequately exposed for TKA in different clinical scenarios. PMID:27182142

  19. A new approach to implant alignment and ligament balancing in total knee arthroplasty focussing on joint loads.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Frauke; Schwenninger, Christoph; Nolten, Ulrich; Firmbach, Franz Peter; Elfring, Robert; Radermacher, Klaus

    2012-08-01

    Preservation and recovery of the mechanical leg axis as well as good rotational alignment of the prosthesis components and well-balanced ligaments are essential for the longevity of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In the framework of the OrthoMIT project, the genALIGN system, a new navigated implantation approach based on intra-operative force-torque measurements, has been developed. With this system, optical or magnetic position tracking as well as any fixation of invasive rigid bodies are no longer necessary. For the alignment of the femoral component along the mechanical axis, a sensor-integrated instrument measures the torques resulting from the deviation between the instrument's axis and the mechanical axis under manually applied axial compression load. When both axes are coaxial, the resulting torques equal zero, and the tool axis can be fixed with respect to the bone. For ligament balancing and rotational alignment of the femoral component, the genALIGN system comprises a sensor-integrated tibial trial inlay measuring the amplitude and application points of the forces transferred between femur and tibia. Hereby, the impact of ligament tensions on knee joint loads can be determined over the whole range of motion. First studies with the genALIGN system, including a comparison with an imageless navigation system, show the feasibility of the concept. PMID:22868781

  20. The Cruciate Ligaments in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Parcells, Bertrand W; Tria, Alfred J

    2016-01-01

    The early knee replacements were hinge designs that ignored the ligaments of the knee and resurfaced the joint, allowing freedom of motion in a single plane. Advances in implant fixation paved the way for modern designs, including the posterior-stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that sacrifices both cruciate ligaments while substituting for the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and the cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA designs that sacrifice the anterior cruciate ligament but retain the PCL. The early bicruciate retaining (BCR) TKA designs suffered from loosening and early failures. Townley and Cartier designed BCR knees that had better clinical results but the surgical techniques were challenging.Kinematic studies suggest that normal motion relies on preservation of both cruciate ligaments. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty retains all knee ligaments and closely matches normal motion, while PS and CR TKA deviate further from normal. The 15% to 20% dissatisfaction rate with current TKA has renewed interest in the BCR design. Replication of normal knee kinematics and proprioception may address some of the dissatisfaction. PMID:27327919

  1. Changes in knee kinematics following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Akbari Shandiz, Mohsen; Boulos, Paul; Saevarsson, Stefan Karl; Yoo, Sam; Miller, Stephen; Anglin, Carolyn

    2016-04-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) changes the knee joint in both intentional and unintentional, known and unknown, ways. Patellofemoral and tibiofemoral kinematics play an important role in postoperative pain, function, satisfaction and revision, yet are largely unknown. Preoperative kinematics, postoperative kinematics or changes in kinematics may help identify causes of poor clinical outcome. Patellofemoral kinematics are challenging to record since the patella is obscured by the metal femoral component in X-ray and moves under the skin. The purpose of this study was to determine the kinematic degrees of freedom having significant changes and to evaluate the variability in individual changes to allow future study of patients with poor clinical outcomes. We prospectively studied the 6 degrees of freedom patellofemoral and tibiofemoral weightbearing kinematics, tibiofemoral contact points and helical axes of rotation of nine subjects before and at least 1 year after total knee arthroplasty using clinically available computed tomography and radiographic imaging systems. Normal kinematics for healthy individuals were identified from the literature. Significant differences existed between pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics, with the post-TKA kinematics being closer to normal. While on average the pre-total knee arthroplasty knees in this group displayed no pivoting (only translation), individually only five knees displayed this behaviour (of these, two showed lateral pivoting, one showed medial pivoting and one showed central pivoting). There was considerable variability postoperatively as well (five central, two lateral and two medial pivoting). Both preop and postop, flexion behaviour was more hinge-like medially and more rolling laterally. Helical axes were more consistent postop for this group. An inclusive understanding of the pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics and changes in kinematics due to total knee arthroplasty could improve implant design, patient diagnosis and

  2. Tibial rotation kinematics subsequent to knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Duane J.; Khatib, Yasser H.; Parker, David A.; Jenkin, Deanne E.; Molnar, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of computer assisted joint replacement has facilitated precise intraoperative measurement of knee kinematics. The changes in “screw home mechanism” (SHM) resulting from Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) with different prostheses and constraints has not yet been accurately described. Methods A pilot study was first completed. Intraoperative kinematic data was collected two groups of 15 patients receiving different prostheses. Results On average, patients lost 5.3° of ER (SD = 6.1°). There was no significant difference between the prostheses or different prosthetic constraints. Conclusions There significant loss of SHM after TKA. Further research is required to understand its impact on patient function. PMID:25829754

  3. Gap Balanced Total Knee Arthroplasty

    MedlinePlus

    Gap Balanced Total Knee Arthroplasty – SIGMA® with AOX™ You must have Javascript enabled in your web browser. View Program Transcript Click Here to view the OR-Live, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2010 OR-Live, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tranexamic Acid in Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Melvin, J Stuart; Stryker, Louis S; Sierra, Rafael J

    2015-12-01

    Perioperative blood loss is a significant concern for patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty. A growing body of evidence has shown tranexamic acid (TXA) to be effective in decreasing perioperative blood loss and transfusion requirements in both primary and revision hip and knee arthroplasty. TXA is a synthetic drug that limits blood loss through inhibition of fibrinolysis and clot degradation. Both topical and intravenous administration of TXA, in a variety of dosing regimens, has proven effective. Further investigation is required to determine the optimal dose and dosing regimens; however, evidence exists to recommend an initial intravenous dose be given before beginning the procedure, with at least one additional intravenous dose administered postoperatively. Additionally, topical TXA doses >2 g appear to be more efficacious than lower doses. Finally, relatively few adverse reactions have been reported in arthroplasty patients, and no study to date has demonstrated an increased risk of symptomatic venous thromboembolic events in this patient population. PMID:26493971

  5. Hepatitis B Virus Infection Is a Risk Factor for Periprosthetic Joint Infection Among Males After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Shu-Jui; Huang, Po-Hua; Chang, Chien-Chun; Kuo, Feng-Chih; Wu, Cheng-Ta; Hsu, Horng-Chaung; Lin, Che-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a grave complication that can affect patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In this study, we aim to determine whether hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a risk factor for PJIs. All patients (1184 males, 3435 females) undergoing primary TKA in Taiwan from 2001 to 2010 were recruited for analysis. The incidence of PJI was 523 among the males with HBV infection and 110 among the males without HBV (per 10,000 person-years, P < 0.001). The males with HBV infection had a 4.32-fold risk of PJI compared with the males without HBV. HBV infection and diabetes were the risk factors for PJI among males. The incidence of PJI was 58.8 among the females with HBV infection and 75.2 among the females without HBV (per 10,000 person-years, P = 0.67). The risk of PJI was higher for the males with HBV infection than for the males without 0.5 to 1 year after TKA (hazard ratio [HR] = 18.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.90–184) and >1 year after TKA (HR = 4.80, 95% CI = 1.57–14.7). HBV infection is a risk factor for PJI after TKA among males. PMID:27258517

  6. Infection following total knee arthroplasty: prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Kevin L; Konigsberg, Beau S

    2012-01-01

    Despite diligent efforts to prevent infection, prosthetic knee infection occurs in up to 2% of patients treated with total knee arthroplasty. Although the risk of infection is relatively low, the effects are considerable. The number of total knee arthroplasties is projected to increase by more than 600% by 2030, resulting in 3.48 million knee replacements, with a possible 70,000 prosthetic knee infections. Infection will be the most common indication for revision total knee arthroplasty. Prophylactic antibiotics and minimizing patient risk factors are critical in preventing infections. Staphylococcus is the most common organism in infected total knee arthroplasties. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are crucial to the long-term outcomes of patients with prosthetic joint infections. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein level, and interleukin-6 serum level should be checked in all patients with clinical signs of infection or unexplained pain or stiffness. The surgical management of a prosthetic knee infection depends on several factors, but none is more important than the timing of infection in relationship to the index surgery. With a success rate of 80% to 90%, two-stage component exchange remains the treatment of choice for chronically infected total knee arthroplasties. PMID:22301250

  7. Mycobacterium smegmatis infection of a prosthetic total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Saffo, Zaid; Ognjan, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The most common organisms causing prosthetic knee joint infections are staphylococci. However, arthroplasty infections with atypical microbial pathogens, such as Mycobacteria can occur. Due to the rarity of mycobacterial prosthetic joint infections, diagnosis, treatment, and management of these atypical infections represent a clinical challenge. A 71-year old female post-operative day 40 after a left total knee arthroplasty was hospitalized secondary to left knee pain and suspected arthroplasty infection. She had failed outpatient oral antimicrobial treatment for superficial stitch abscess; and outpatient IV/Oral antimicrobials for a clinical postoperative septic bursitis. Ultimately, resection arthroplasty with operative tissue acid fast bacterial cultures demonstrated growth of the Mycobacterium smegmatis group. Post-operatively, she completed a combination course of oral doxycycline and levofloxacin and successfully completed a replacement arthroplasty with clinical and microbial resolution of the infection. To our knowledge, literature review demonstrates three case of knee arthroplasty infection caused by the Mycobacterium smegmatis group. Correspondingly, optimal surgical procedures and antimicrobial management including antimicrobial selection, treatment duration are not well defined. Presently, the best treatment options consists of two step surgical management including prosthesis hardware removal followed by extended antimicrobial therapy, followed by consideration for re-implantation arthroplasty. Our case illustrates importance of considering atypical mycobacterial infections in post-operative arthroplasty infections not responding to traditional surgical manipulations and antimicrobials. For an arthroplasty infection involving the atypical Mycobacterium smegmatis group, two step arthroplasty revision, including arthroplasty resection, with a combination of oral doxycycline and levofloxacin can lead to successful infection resolution, allowing for a

  8. Knee joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002974.htm Knee joint replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Knee joint replacement is a surgery to replace a knee ...

  9. Acute gouty arthritis in a patient after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Fokter, Samo K; Repse-Fokter, Alenka

    2010-06-01

    Symptomatic gout in an artificial joint is exceptionally rare. We present a 68-year-old male patient who developed progressive knee pain and swelling one year after the cemented total arthroplasty of his left knee. The diagnosis was confirmed by crystal identification in the synovial fluid. Beside thorough workout to rule out infection in a painful and inflamed prosthetic knee, specific history of gout should be sought and fluid aspirate examined cytologically and under polarised light for crystal arthropathy. PMID:20552289

  10. NAVIGATION IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire

    2015-01-01

    Navigation was the most significant advance in instrumentation for total knee arthroplasty over the last decade. It provides surgeons with a precision tool for carrying out surgery, with the possibility of intraoperative simulation and objective control over various anatomical and surgical parameters and references. Since the first systems, which were basically used to control the alignment of bone cutting referenced to the mechanical axis of the lower limb, many other surgical steps have been incorporated, such as component rotation, ligament balancing and arranging the symmetry of flexion and extension spaces, among others. Its efficacy as a precision tool with an effective capacity for promoting better alignment of the lower-limb axis has been widely proven in the literature, but the real value of optimized alignment and the impact of navigation on clinical results and the longevity of arthroplasty have yet to be established. PMID:27026979

  11. Knee joint forces: prediction, measurement, and significance

    PubMed Central

    D’Lima, Darryl D.; Fregly, Benjamin J.; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Colwell, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    Knee forces are highly significant in osteoarthritis and in the survival and function of knee arthroplasty. A large number of studies have attempted to estimate forces around the knee during various activities. Several approaches have been used to relate knee kinematics and external forces to internal joint contact forces, the most popular being inverse dynamics, forward dynamics, and static body analyses. Knee forces have also been measured in vivo after knee arthroplasty, which serves as valuable validation of computational predictions. This review summarizes the results of published studies that measured knee forces for various activities. The efficacy of various methods to alter knee force distribution, such as gait modification, orthotics, walking aids, and custom treadmills are analyzed. Current gaps in our knowledge are identified and directions for future research in this area are outlined. PMID:22468461

  12. Knee joint forces: prediction, measurement, and significance.

    PubMed

    D'Lima, Darryl D; Fregly, Benjamin J; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Colwell, Clifford W

    2012-02-01

    Knee forces are highly significant in osteoarthritis and in the survival and function of knee arthroplasty. A large number of studies have attempted to estimate forces around the knee during various activities. Several approaches have been used to relate knee kinematics and external forces to internal joint contact forces, the most popular being inverse dynamics, forward dynamics, and static body analyses. Knee forces have also been measured in vivo after knee arthroplasty, which serves as valuable validation of computational predictions. This review summarizes the results of published studies that measured knee forces for various activities. The efficacy of various methods to alter knee force distribution, such as gait modification, orthotics, walking aids, and custom treadmills are analyzed. Current gaps in our knowledge are identified and directions for future research in this area are outlined. PMID:22468461

  13. Knee joint replacement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100088.htm Knee joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... of 4 Overview The knee is a complex joint. It contains the distal end of the femur ( ...

  14. Level of constraint in revision knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Indelli, Pier Francesco; Giori, Nick; Maloney, William

    2015-12-01

    Revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in the setting of major bone deficiency and/or soft tissue laxity might require increasing levels of constraint to restore knee stability. However, increasing the level of constraint not always correlates with mid-to-long-term satisfactory results. Recently, modular components as tantalum cones and titanium sleeves have been introduced to the market with the goal of obtaining better fixation where bone deficiency is an issue; theoretically, satisfactory meta-diaphyseal fixation can reduce the mechanical stress at the level of the joint line, reducing the need for high levels of constraint. This article reviews the recent literature on the surgical management of the unstable TKA with the goal to propose a modern surgical algorithm for adult reconstruction surgeons. PMID:26373770

  15. Failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Leta, Tesfaye H; Lygre, Stein Håkon L; Skredderstuen, Arne; Hallan, Geir; Furnes, Ove

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose In Norway, the proportion of revision knee arthroplasties increased from 6.9% in 1994 to 8.5% in 2011. However, there is limited information on the epidemiology and causes of subsequent failure of revision knee arthroplasty. We therefore studied survival rate and determined the modes of failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties. Method This study was based on 1,016 aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register between 1994 and 2011. Revisions done for infections were not included. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to assess the survival rate and the relative risk of re-revision with all causes of re-revision as endpoint. Results 145 knees failed after revision total knee arthroplasty. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of re-revision (28%), followed by instability (26%), loose tibial component (17%), and pain (10%). The cumulative survival rate for revision total knee arthroplasties was 85% at 5 years, 78% at 10 years, and 71% at 15 years. Revision total knee arthroplasties with exchange of the femoral or tibial component exclusively had a higher risk of re-revision (RR = 1.7) than those with exchange of the whole prosthesis. The risk of re-revision was higher for men (RR = 2.0) and for patients aged less than 60 years (RR = 1.6). Interpretation In terms of implant survival, revision of the whole implant was better than revision of 1 component only. Young age and male sex were risk factors for re-revision. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of failure of revision of aseptic total knee arthroplasties. PMID:25267502

  16. Who Should Not Undergo Short Stay Hip and Knee Arthroplasty? Risk Factors Associated With Major Medical Complications Following Primary Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Courtney, P Maxwell; Rozell, Joshua C; Melnic, Christopher M; Lee, Gwo-Chin

    2015-09-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 1012 consecutive patients undergoing elective primary hip and knee arthroplasties to identify risk factors associated with postoperative complications. A total of 70 complications (6.9%) requiring additional physician interventions occurred following surgery and 59 (84%) occurred past 24 hours postoperatively. Independent multivariate risk factors for developing late (>24 hours) complications included COPD (adjusted OR 4.16), CHF (adjusted OR 9.71), CAD (adjusted OR 2.80), and cirrhosis (adjusted OR 8.43). These results suggest that most major medical complications requiring additional physician interventions occur greater than 24 hours following primary THA/TKA. Patients with history of COPD, CHF, CAD, and cirrhosis should not undergo short stay or outpatient TJA. PMID:26105617

  17. Conversion of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty to total knee arthroplasty: the challenges and need for augments.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zeeshan; Nawaz, Syed Z; Kahane, Steven; Esler, Colin; Chatterji, Urjit

    2013-12-01

    The potential advantages of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) include lower morbidity and mortality, quicker recovery, good range of motion, good medium and long-term survival results, potential bone conservation and perceived easier revision. Converting a UKA to a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may be challenging due to issues of bone loss, need for augmentation, restoring joint line and rotation. We present the intraoperative findings of 201 cases of failed UKA's from the Trent Wales arthroplasty audit group (TWAAG) register. The objectives of the study were to determine the modes of failure, number of cases requiring augments and bone grafting, types of augments and implants used in revision surgery. This study does not include the clinical outcomes after revision knee surgery. The average age of the cohort at revision surgery was 67 years. There were 111 females and 90 males. The commonest modes of failure in young patients were unexplained pain/instability and aseptic loosening and in older patients they were aseptic loosening and progression of the disease. The survivorship of the implant was higher in the less than 55 years age group in comparison to the older patients. A total of 49 patients (25.9%) required bone grafting commonest in the 60 years and above age group (79.6%). Fifty patients (26.4%) required some form of augmentation, with the commonest site being tibia and commonest augment being tibial stem (35 cases). Only 8% of the cohort required revision knee implants whereas 78% of the cases received a cruciate retaining primary knee implant. To the author's knowledge, this is one of the largest studies in the literature which signifies the technical difficulties that might be experienced in revising the UKA's which will require appropriate pre-operative planning. PMID:24563977

  18. Total Knee Arthroplasty Failure Induced by Metal Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ryan; Phan, Duy; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 70 Final Diagnosis: Metal hypersensitivity Symptoms: Joint pain • swelling • instability Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Revision total knee arthroplasty Specialty: Orthopedics and Traumatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Metal hypersensitivity is an uncommon complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that can lead to significant functional impairment and aseptic prosthesis failure. Case Report: We describe a 70-year-old patient who presented with persistent pain, swelling, and instability 2 years after a primary TKA. The patient had a history of metal hypersensitivity following bilateral metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (THA) that was revised to ceramic-on-polyethylene implants. Knee radiographs showed severe osteolysis with implant loosening. Serum cobalt was elevated and serum chromium was significantly elevated, while joint aspiration and inflammatory marker levels ruled out a periprosthetic infection. Revision TKA was performed, with intraoperative tissue pathology and postoperative leukocyte transformation testing confirming metal hypersensitivity as the cause for aseptic implant failure. Conclusions: This case report demonstrates the clinical and laboratory signs that suggest metal hypersensitivity in total knee arthroplasty and the potential for joint function restoration with revision surgery. PMID:26278890

  19. Knee joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    The results of a total knee replacement are often excellent. The operation relieves pain for most people. Most people do not need help walking after they fully recover. Most artificial knee joints last 10 ...

  20. Prophylactic antibiotics in elective hip and knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hickson, C. J.; Metcalfe, D.; Elgohari, S.; Oswald, T.; Masters, J. P.; Rymaszewska, M.; Reed, M. R.; Sprowson†, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We wanted to investigate regional variations in the organisms reported to be causing peri-prosthetic infections and to report on prophylaxis regimens currently in use across England. Methods Analysis of data routinely collected by Public Health England’s (PHE) national surgical site infection database on elective primary hip and knee arthroplasty procedures between April 2010 and March 2013 to investigate regional variations in causative organisms. A separate national survey of 145 hospital Trusts (groups of hospitals under local management) in England routinely performing primary hip and/or knee arthroplasty was carried out by standard email questionnaire. Results Analysis of 189 858 elective primary hip and knee arthroplasty procedures and 1116 surgical site infections found statistically significant variations for some causative organism between regions. There was a 100% response rate to the prophylaxis questionnaire that showed substantial variation between individual trust guidelines. A number of regimens currently in use are inconsistent with the best available evidence. Conclusions The approach towards antibiotic prophylaxis in elective arthroplasty nationwide reveals substantial variation without clear justification. Only seven causative organisms are responsible for 89% of infections affecting primary hip and knee arthroplasty, which cannot justify such widespread variation between prophylactic antibiotic policies. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:181–189. PMID:26585304

  1. Introduction of total knee arthroplasty in Lithuania

    PubMed Central

    Stucinskas, Justinas; Robertsson, Otto; Wingstrand, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose We have previously reported that the first 10 years of hip arthroplasty in Lithuania resulted in a higher cumulative revision rate than that observed in Sweden. We thus compared the corresponding results after introduaction of total knee replacement in Lithuania. Methods The 10-year revision rate for the first 595 primary ScanKnee arthroplasties inserted in Klaipeda, Lithuania, was compared to that for the first 1,280 ScanKnee primary arthroplasties inserted in Sweden. As in the hip replacement study, only patients with osteoarthritis (OA) were included. Primary knee arthroplasties without patellar resurfacing were included, and the endpoint was revision for any reason other than addition of a patellar component. Results We found that the cumulative revision rate was not statistically significantly different between the groups. The revision pattern was different, however, and we observed 24 isolated patellar component additions in Sweden, but none in Klaipeda. Interpretation Contrary to the results of our previous hip arthroplasty study, the cumulative revision rate after total knee arthroplasty was similar in the two groups. This suggests that compared to hip arthroplasty, the outcome of total knee arthroplasty was less dependent on surgical experience. The large difference regarding isolated patellar component additions may be explained by long-term accumulation of severe OA cases in Lithuania. To patients subject to a newly introduced surgical treatment offering great improvement in quality of life, patellofemoral pain may be a minor problem. Furthermore, patellar problems may not have seemed particularly relevant for the surgeons, considering the disability of other patients waiting to be treated. PMID:19297790

  2. Blastomycosis infection of the knee treated with staged total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Ian S; Day, Shandra R; Moore, Christopher C; Browne, James A

    2015-12-01

    Blastomycosis is a rare fungal disease that can cause intraarticular infection and joint destruction requiring surgical reconstruction. We describe a patient who presented with destruction of the knee joint of unknown etiology. The patient was initially treated with debridement and spacer placement followed by antifungal therapy after cultures grew blastomycosis. Following adequate treatment of the infection, the patient was taken back to the operating room for reconstruction with a total knee arthroplasty. The patient had a successful outcome with no evidence of infection at two years following surgery. To our knowledge, this case report represents the first documented case in which a blastomycotic infection of a native knee was successfully treated with a two-stage total knee arthroplasty. PMID:26081592

  3. Total knee arthroplasty in a rheumatoid arthritic knee with large geode: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shih, H N; Hsu, K Y; Tan, C F; Hsueh, S; Hsu, R W

    1997-09-01

    Geodes (subchondral cysts) are a well-known manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis. Solitary cysts or cysts larger than 2 cm are not generally found in the knee joint of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We report a case of RA involving both knees with a giant geode over the right proximal tibia. Surgical treatment was performed including synovectomy, cyst enucleation and packing of autogenous bone chips followed by primary total knee arthroplasty. The postsurgical result was excellent with the knee restored to good function and complete healing of the cystic lesion. PMID:9397618

  4. [Recovery from total knee arthroplasty through continuous passive motion].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Mayo, B; Rodríguez-Mansilla, J; González Sánchez, B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to know the effects of continuous passive mobilization in patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty. A search strategy was developed to retrieve all clinical trials, written in English and/or Spanish, published in the electronic search databases PubMed, Cochrane Library Plus, Dialnet, CSIC and PEDro. The inclusion criteria were: clinical trials published from January 2000 until November 2014 in English or Spanish. Out of 537 clinical trials that were potentially relevant, a total of 12 were included in this review. The evaluation of 1,153 patients shows that there is no significant difference in improving the range of the joint, pain, balance, motion, healing and hospital stay using continuous passive mobilization against the regular physiotherapy treatment for total knee arthroplasty. The application of continuous passive mobilization in the long-term does not provide any benefit in terms of the breadth of the range of the joint, pain and improvement of standing and motion in comparison with conventional postoperative physiotherapy treatment in total knee arthroplasty. In the short term an improvement is obtained in the range of joint motion in knee flexion. PMID:26486536

  5. Spontaneous Knee Ankylosis through Heterotopic Ossification after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Boulezaz, Samuel; Gibon, Emmanuel; Loriaut, Philippe; Casabianca, Laurent; Rousseau, Romain; Dallaudiere, Benjamin; Pascal-Moussellard, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a case of total ankylosis of the knee after a cruciate-sacrificing cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA). An 82-year-old female patient previously underwent primary TKA for osteoarthritis twenty years ago in our institution. She had recovered uneventfully and returned to her regular activities. There was no history of postsurgical trauma; however, she progressively lost knee range of motion. Radiographs revealed severe bridging heterotopic ossification. PMID:27119034

  6. Lower Limbs Function and Pain Relationships after Unilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tali, Maie; Maaroos, Jaak

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate gait characteristics, lower limbs joint function, and pain relationships associated with knee osteoarthritis of female patients before and 3 months after total knee arthroplasty at an outpatient clinic rehabilitation department. Gait parameters were registered, the active range of lower extremity joints was…

  7. Cerebrovascular Disease Is Associated with Outcomes after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A U.S. Total Joint Registry Study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasvinder A.; Lewallen, David G.

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the association of cerebrovascular disease with patient-reported outcomes (PROs) of moderate-severe activity limitation and moderate-severe pain at 2- and 5-years after primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using multivariable-adjusted logistic regression. 7,139 primary and 4,234 revision TKAs were included. Compared to the patients without cerebrovascular disease, those with cerebrovascular disease had a higher odds ratio (OR) of moderate-severe limitation at 2-years and 5-years, 1.32 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02, 1.72; P=0.04) and 1.83 (95% CI: 1.32, 2.55; P<0.001). No significant associations were noted with moderate-severe pain at 2-years or 5-years. In conclusion, we found that cerebrovascular disease is independently associated with pain and function outcomes after primary TKA. This should be taken into consideration when discussing expected outcomes of TKA with patients. PMID:23664282

  8. Unique combination of patellofemoral joint arthroplasty with Osteochondral Autograft Transfer System (OATS) - a case series of six knees in five patients.

    PubMed

    Unnithan, A; Jimulia, T; Mohammed, R; Learmonth, D J A

    2008-06-01

    Patellofemoral arthroplasty (PFA) is an accepted procedure for the treatment of isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis. However its failure rate has been attributed to progressive femorotibial arthritis. Autologous osteochondral transplantation is an established procedure for the repair of focal cartilaginous defects on the medial and lateral femoral condyles. We present our case series of six knees in five patients where we combined the two procedures and extended the indication for PFA and delayed the need for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in all but one patient over a mean follow up period of 3.8 years. PMID:18372179

  9. The use of anti-osteoporosis drugs in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Carulli, Christian; Civinini, Roberto; Matassi, Fabrizio; Villano, Marco; Innocenti, Massimo

    2011-04-01

    Stress shielding, osteolysis, lack of integration affect the clinical results of total joint arthroplasty. Drugs as bisphosphonates administered after surgery may improve the fixation of the components to the bone, preserving the survival of the implant: however, few reports regarding applications in Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) are published. PMID:21970917

  10. [Arthritis of the Medial Knee Joint Compartment].

    PubMed

    Matziolis, G; Röhner, E

    2015-10-01

    23 % of all persons older than 65 years suffer from osteoarthritis of the medial compartment of the knee joint, a very common situation in orthopaedic practice 1. As a result of the demographic trend the number of patients is expected to increase in the future. Based on specific joint biomechanics and kinematics the medial knee joint compartment is more frequently affected than the lateral. Only an understanding of the functional anatomy and underlying pathology allows a critical evaluation of different available conservative and operative treatment options. This article gives an overview of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies of osteoarthritis of the medial knee joint. Frequently performed surgeries, e.g. high tibial osteotomy (HTO), unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) will be presented in a comparative manner. The actual scientific evidence will be given with the goal of an evidence based therapy that is adopted to stage and pathology of osteoarthritis of the medial compartment of the knee joint. PMID:26451864

  11. Taking care of your new knee joint

    MedlinePlus

    Knee arthroplasty - precautions; Knee replacement - precautions ... After you have knee replacement surgery , you will need to be careful about how you move your knee, especially for the first few months after ...

  12. Proximal tibial fracture following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Krause, Heike; Dunleavy, Kim

    2011-09-01

    The patient was a 74-year-old man, with a history of total knee arthoplasty 14 years earlier, after having sustained a pathological fracture of the proximal diaphysis of the left tibia following a fall. Given the unstable nature of the fracture and the severe osteolysis noted below the total knee arthroplasty, surgical management 1 day after the fall entailed packing cancellous bone graft into the defect and realigning the fracture. PMID:21885911

  13. Physical Activity After Total Joint Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Laura A.; Carotenuto, Giuseppe; Basti, John J.; Levine, William N.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Total joint arthroplasty (TJA) is a common surgical option to treat painful degenerative joint disease. However, there is currently no consensus on the appropriate intensity of physical activity after TJA or how physical activity level affects the rate of revision surgery. Materials and Methods: A systematic review of the literature regarding physical or athletic activity after TJA was performed to determine current clinical opinion and recommendations regarding appropriate activity levels after TJA, as well as variables affecting successful surgery and improved outcomes. Results: Many studies in the literature regarding athletic activity after TJA focus on total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty. The literature reports contradictory results regarding rates of physical activity after TJA as well as the relationship between physical activity and rates of revision surgery. The current trend in expert opinion shows more liberal recommendations for patients to engage in athletic activity after TJA. Conclusions: Individual characteristics, lifestyle, and patient preferences must be taken into account when one considers appropriate recommendations for athletic activity after TJA. Current trends in clinical opinion favor a higher level of athletic activity after TJA, but clinicians should caution patients not to participate in contact sports or sports that create high joint loads in the replaced joint. PMID:23016041

  14. Changes in Femoral Posterior Condylar Offset, Tibial Posterior Slope Angle, and Joint Line Height after Cruciate-Retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sang Jun; Kim, Kang Il; Jeong, Ho Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Changes in the femoral posterior condylar offset (PCO), tibial posterior slope angle (PSA), and joint line height (JLH) after cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty (CR-TKA) were evaluated to determine their influence on the flexion angle. Materials and Methods A total of 125 CR-TKAs performed on 110 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Pre- and postoperative PCO, PSA, and JLH were compared using correlation analysis. Independent factors affecting the postoperative flexion angle of the knee were analyzed. Results The PCO was 28.2±2.0 mm (range, 24.5 to 33.1 mm) preoperatively and 26.7±1.8 mm (range, 22.2 to 31.2 mm) postoperatively (r=0.807, p<0.001). The PSA was 10.4°±4.9° (range, 1.6° to 21.2°) preoperatively and decreased to 4.9°±2.0° (2.2° to 10.7°) postoperatively (r=–0.023, p=0.800). The JLH was 16.2±3.0 mm (range, 10.2 to 27.5 mm) preoperatively and 16.1±2.6 mm (range, 11.1 to 24.8 mm) postoperatively (r=0.505, p<0.001). None of the independent factors affected the flexion angle (p>0.291). Conclusions Although the PCO and JLH did not change significantly after CR-TKA, the PSA decreased by 5.5° with a small range of variation. Restoration of the PCO and JLH could promote optimization of knee flexion in spite of the decreased PSA after CR-TKA. PMID:26955610

  15. Unexpected wear of an unicompartimental knee arthroplasty in oxidized zirconium.

    PubMed

    Luyet, Anais; Fischer, Jean-François; Jolles, Brigitte M; Lunebourg, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    Unicompartimental knee arthroplasty is a successful procedure for the treatment of localized osteoarthritis to one compartment of the knee with good long-term results. However, several modes of failure of unicompartimental knee arthroplasty have been described, namely aseptic or septic loosening, progression of disease, wear, and instability. Metallosis after unicompartimental knee arthroplasty is rarely reported and is most often related with polyethylene wear or break. We report on a case of rapid failure of unicompartimental knee arthroplasty in oxidized zirconium associated with metallosis secondary to the dislocation of the polyethylene. PMID:26790806

  16. Pain Management After Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Lisa T; Corbiere, Nicole C; DeLisle, Jay A; Clark, Alexander Martin; Kuxhaus, Laurel

    2016-06-01

    Controlling pain after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) is critical to minimizing complications, decreasing costs, and expediting patients' return to function. We implemented a TJA multimodal pain management protocol at a Level III trauma center in a small, rural community in New York. We retrospectively reviewed 266 patient charts and collected patient demographics, pain management information, and discharge data. Our primary goals were to quantify the total number of narcotic medication doses used and length of hospital stay. The multimodal pain management protocol significantly reduced the number of narcotic doses used (P < .01). Hospital length of stay decreased slightly; although not statistically significant (P = .25), this may be clinically significant. Gender, age, and type of arthroplasty (ie, knee, hip) were not significant factors. A multimodal approach to pain management after TJA can reduce narcotic use and hospital length of stay, thereby also reducing the incidence of side effects from narcotics. PMID:27234795

  17. Long-term results of compartmental arthroplasties of the knee: Long term results of partial knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Parratte, S; Ollivier, M; Lunebourg, A; Abdel, M P; Argenson, J-N

    2015-10-01

    Partial knee arthroplasty (PKA), either medial or lateral unicompartmental knee artroplasty (UKA) or patellofemoral arthroplasty (PFA) are a good option in suitable patients and have the advantages of reduced operative trauma, preservation of both cruciate ligaments and bone stock, and restoration of normal kinematics within the knee joint. However, questions remain concerning long-term survival. The goal of this review article was to present the long-term results of medial and lateral UKA, PFA and combined compartmental arthroplasty for multicompartmental disease. Medium- and long-term studies suggest reasonable outcomes at ten years with survival greater than 95% in UKA performed for medial osteoarthritis or osteonecrosis, and similarly for lateral UKA, particularly when fixed-bearing implants are used. Disappointing long-term outcomes have been observed with the first generation of patellofemoral implants, as well as early Bi-Uni (i.e., combined medial and lateral UKA) or Bicompartmental (combined UKA and PFA) implants due to design and fixation issues. Promising short- and med-term results with the newer generations of PFAs and bicompartmental arthroplasties will require long-term confirmation. PMID:26430081

  18. Current surgical strategies for total arthroplasty in valgus knee

    PubMed Central

    Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios; Michos, Ioannis; Safos, George; Safos, Petros

    2015-01-01

    The majority of orthopaedic surgeons even currently agree that primary total arthroplasty in valgus knees with a deformity of more than ten degrees may prove challenging. The unique sets of bone and soft tissue abnormalities that must be addressed at the time of the operation make accurate axis restoration, component orientation and joint stability attainment a difficult task. Understanding the specific pathologic anatomic changes associated with the valgus knee is a prerequisite so as to select the proper surgical method, to optimize component position and restore soft-tissue balance. The purpose of this article is to review the valgus knee anatomical variations, to assess the best pre-operative planning and to evaluate how to choose the grade of constraint of the implant. It will also be underlying the up-to-date main approaches and surgical techniques be proposed in the English literature both for bone cuts and soft tissue management of valgus knees. PMID:26191494

  19. Early outcomes of patella resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Warren J; Miller, Lisa; Whitehouse, Sarah L; Graves, Stephen E; Ryan, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Background Patella resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty is a contentious issue. The literature suggests that resurfacing of the patella is based on surgeon preference, and little is known about the role and timing of resurfacing and how this affects outcomes. Methods We analyzed 134,799 total knee arthroplasties using data from the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Hazards ratios (HRs) were used to compare rates of early revision between patella resurfacing at the primary procedure (the resurfacing group, R) and primary arthroplasty without resurfacing (no-resurfacing group, NR). We also analyzed the outcomes of NR that were revised for isolated patella addition. Results At 5 years, the R group showed a lower revision rate than the NR group: cumulative per cent revision (CPR) 3.1% and 4.0%, respectively (HR = 0.75, p < 0.001). Revisions for patellofemoral pain were more common in the NR group (17%) than in the R group (1%), and “patella only” revisions were more common in the NR group (29%) than in the R group (6%). Non-resurfaced knees revised for isolated patella addition had a higher revision rate than patella resurfacing at the primary procedure, with a 4-year CPR of 15% and 2.8%, respectively (HR = 4.1, p < 0.001). Interpretation Rates of early revision of primary total knees were higher when the patella was not resurfaced, and suggest that surgeons may be inclined to resurface later if there is patellofemoral pain. However, 15% of non-resurfaced knees revised for patella addition are re-revised by 4 years. Our results suggest an early beneficial outcome for patella resurfacing at primary arthroplasty based on revision rates up to 5 years. PMID:19968604

  20. Effect of Joint Line Elevation after Posterior-stabilized and Cruciate-retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty on Clinical Function and Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Song-Jie; Zhou, Yi-Xin; Jiang, Xu; Cheng, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Guang-Zhi; Ding, Hui; Yang, Ming-Lei; Zhu, Zhong-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Joint line (JL) is a very important factor for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) to restore. The objective of this study was to evaluate the early clinical and kinematic results of TKAs with posterior-stabilized (PS) or cruciate retaining (CR) implants in which the JL was elevated postoperatively. Methods: Data were collected from patients who underwent TKA in our department between April 2011 and April 2014. The patients were divided into two groups based on the prosthesis they received (PS or CR). At 1-year postoperatively, clinical outcomes were evaluated by the American Knee Society (AKS) knee score, AKS function score, and patella score. In vivo kinematic analysis after TKA was performed on all patients and a previously validated three-dimensional to two-dimensional image registration technique was used to obtain the kinematic data. Anteroposterior (AP) translation of the medial and lateral femoral condyles, and axial rotation relative to the tibial plateau, were analyzed. The data were assessed using the Mann–Whitney test. Results: At time of follow-up, there were differences in the AKS knee scores (P = 0.005), AKS function scores (P = 0.025), patella scores (P = 0.015), and postoperative range of motions (P = 0.004) between the PS group and the CR group. In the PS group, the magnitude of AP translation for the medial and lateral condyle was 4.9 ± 3.0 mm and 12.8 ± 3.3 mm, respectively. Axial rotation of the tibial component relative to the femoral component was 12.9 ± 4.5°. In the CR group, the magnitude of AP translation for the medial and lateral condyle was 4.3 ± 3.5 mm and 7.9 ± 4.2 mm, respectively. The axial rotation was 6.7 ± 5.9°. There were statistically different between PS group and CR group in kinematics postoperatively. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that postoperative JL elevation had more adverse effects on the clinical and kinematic outcomes of CR TKAs than PS TKAs. PMID:26521783

  1. Popliteal Artery Pseudoaneurysm Following Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young-Soo; Hwang, Yeok-Gu; Savale, Abhijit Prakash

    2014-01-01

    An early diagnosis of popliteal artery pseudoaneurysm-a sequela of popliteal artery trauma-is difficult owing to its late presentation following total knee arthroplasty. The incidence of a popliteal artery pseudoaneurysm with a hematoma presenting only a peripheral nerve injury after total knee arthroplasty is also uncommon in the absence of common diagnostic features such as a pulsatile swelling with an audible bruit on auscultation. In the present report, we describe popliteal artery pseudoaneurysm following total knee arthroplasty. PMID:24944978

  2. Patellar malalignment treatment in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Giorgio; Familiari, Filippo; Ranuccio, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Summary The patella, with or without resurfacing, plays a fundamental role in the success of a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Patellofemoral joint complications are due to problems related to the patient, to the surgical technique, or to the design of the components. Patellar tracking is influenced by several factors: a severe preoperative valgus, the presence of pre-existing patellofemoral dysplasia, the design of the femoral component, the surgical approach, the Q angle, the mechanical alignment of the limb, the tightness of the lateral retinaculum, the positioning of the patellar component in the proximal-distal and medial-lateral directions, the patella height, the patella (native or resurfaced) thickness, the size of the femoral and the tibial components, and the alignment and rotation of the components. Several factors are crucial to prevent patellar maltracking in TKA: the use of an anatomical femoral component, a meticulous surgical technique, careful dynamic intraoperative assessment of patellar tracking, and, if necessary, the achievement of an adequate lateral release. PMID:25606506

  3. Periprosthetic Fractures Following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Ki

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic fractures after total knee arthroplasty may occur in any part of the femur, tibia and patella, and the most common pattern involves the supracondylar area of the distal femur. Supracondylar periprosthetic fractures frequently occur above a well-fixed prosthesis, and risk factors include anterior femoral cortical notching and use of the rotational constrained implant. Periprosthetic tibial fractures are frequently associated with loose components and malalignment or malposition of implants. Fractures of the patella are much less common and associated with rheumatoid arthritis, use of steroid, osteonecrosis and malalignment of implants. Most patients with periprosthetic fractures around the knee are the elderly with poor bone quality. There are many difficulties and increased risk of nonunion after treatment because reduction and internal fixation is interfered with by preexisting prosthesis and bone cement. Additionally, previous soft tissue injury is another disadvantageous condition for bone healing. Many authors reported good clinical outcomes after non-operative treatment of undisplaced or minimally displaced periprosthetic fractures; however, open reduction or revision arthroplasty was required in displaced fractures or fractures with unstable prosthesis. Periprosthetic fractures around the knee should be prevented by appropriate technique during total knee arthroplasty. Nevertheless, if a periprosthetic fracture occurs, an appropriate treatment method should be selected considering the stability of the prosthesis, displacement of fracture and bone quality. PMID:25750888

  4. Minimally invasive knee arthroplasty: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Tria, Alfred J; Scuderi, Giles R

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for arthroplasty of the knee began with surgery for unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA). Partial knee replacements were designed in the 1970s and were amenable to a more limited exposure. In the 1990s Repicci popularized the MIS for UKA. Surgeons began to apply his concepts to total knee arthroplasty. Four MIS surgical techniques were developed: quadriceps sparing, mini-mid vastus, mini-subvastus, and mini-medial parapatellar. The quadriceps sparing technique is the most limited one and is also the most difficult. However, it is the least invasive and allows rapid recovery. The mini-midvastus is the most common technique because it affords slightly better exposure and can be extended. The mini-subvastus technique entirely avoids incising the quadriceps extensor mechanism but is time consuming and difficult in the obese and in the muscular male patient. The mini-parapatellar technique is most familiar to surgeons and represents a good starting point for surgeons who are learning the techniques. The surgeries are easier with smaller instruments but can be performed with standard ones. The techniques are accurate and do lead to a more rapid recovery, with less pain, less blood loss, and greater motion if they are appropriately performed. PMID:26601062

  5. Patient function after a posterior stabilizing total knee arthroplasty: cam-post engagement and knee kinematics.

    PubMed

    Suggs, Jeremy F; Hanson, George R; Park, Sang Eun; Moynihan, Angela L; Li, Guoan

    2008-03-01

    Even though posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty has been widely used in surgery, how the cam-post mechanism (posterior substituting mechanism) affects knee joint kinematics and function in patients is not known. The objective of the present study was to investigate posterior femoral translation, internal tibial rotation, tibiofemoral contact, and cam-post engagement of total knee arthroplasty patients during in vivo weight-bearing flexion. Twenty-four knees with a PS TKA were investigated while performing a single leg weight-bearing lunge from full extension to maximum flexion as images were recorded using a dual fluoroscopic system. The in vivo knee position at each targeted flexion angle was reproduced using 3D TKA models and the fluoroscopic images. The kinematics of the knee was measured from the series of the total knee arthroplasty models. The cam-post engagement was determined when the surface model of the femoral cam overlapped with that of the tibial post. The mean maximum flexion angle for all the subjects was 112.5 +/- 13.1 degrees . The mean flexion angle where cam-post engagement was observed was 91.1 +/- 10.9 degrees . The femur moved anteriorly from 0 degrees to 30 degrees and posteriorly through the rest of the flexion range. The internal tibial rotation increased approximately 6 degrees from full extension to 90 degrees of flexion and decreased slightly with further flexion. Both the medial and lateral contact point moved posteriorly from 0 degrees to 30 degrees , remained relatively constant from 30 degrees to 90 degrees , and then moved further posterior from 90 degrees to maximum flexion. The in vivo cam-post engagement corresponded to increased posterior translation and reduced internal tibial rotation at high flexion of the posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty. The initial cam-post engagement was also mildly correlated with the maximum flexion angle of the knee (R = 0.51, p = 0.019). A later cam-post engagement might

  6. Hip and knee arthroplasty implants contraindicated in obesity.

    PubMed

    Craik, J D; Bircher, M D; Rickman, M

    2016-05-01

    Introduction High patient weight is a risk factor for mechanical implant failure and some manufacturers list obesity as a contraindication for implant use. We reviewed data from the 2012-2013 UK National Joint Registry to determine whether surgical practice reflects these manufacturer recommendations. Methods The product literature for the most commonly used hip and knee implants was reviewed for recommendations against use in obese patients (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 30kg/m(2)). The total number of obese patients undergoing hip and knee arthroplasty was calculated, as was the proportion receiving implants against manufacturer recommendations. Results Out of 200,054 patient records, 147,691 (74%) had a recorded BMI. The mean BMI for patients undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty was 29kg/m(2), compared with 31kg/m(2) for total knee arthroplasty. Of the 25 components reviewed, 5 listed obesity as a contraindication or recommended against implant use in obese patients. A total of 10,745 patients (16% of all obese patients) received implants against manufacturer recommendations. Conclusions A high proportion of patients are receiving implants against manufacturer recommendations. However, there are limitations to using BMI for stratifying risk of implant fatigue failure and manufacturers should therefore provide more detailed guidelines on size specific implant load limits to facilitate surgical decisions. PMID:27023636

  7. Knee arthroplasty in Denmark, Norway and Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Bizjajeva, Svetlana; Fenstad, Anne Marie; Furnes, Ove; Lidgren, Lars; Mehnert, Frank; Odgaard, Anders; Pedersen, Alma Becic; Havelin, Leif Ivar

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose The number of national arthroplasty registries is increasing. However, the methods of registration, classification, and analysis often differ. Methods We combined data from 3 Nordic knee arthroplasty registers, comparing demographics, methods, and overall results. Primary arthroplasties during the period 1997–2007 were included. Each register produced a dataset of predefined variables, after which the data were combined and descriptive and survival statistics produced. Results The incidence of knee arthroplasty increased in all 3 countries, but most in Denmark. Norway had the lowest number of procedures per hospital—less than half that of Sweden and Denmark. The preference for implant brands varied and only 3 total brands and 1 unicompartmental brand were common in all 3 countries. Use of patellar button for total knee arthroplasty was popular in Denmark (76%) but not in Norway (11%) or Sweden (14%). Uncemented or hybrid fixation of components was also more frequent in Denmark (22%) than in Norway (14%) and Sweden (2%). After total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, the cumulative revision rate (CRR) was lowest in Sweden, with Denmark and Norway having a relative risk (RR) of 1.4 (95% CI: 1.3–1.6) and 1.6 (CI: 1.4–1.7) times higher. The result was similar when only including brands used in more than 200 cases in all 3 countries (AGC, Duracon, and NexGen). After unicompartmental arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, the CRR for all models was also lowest in Sweden, with Denmark and Norway having RRs of 1.7 (CI: 1.4–2.0) and 1.5 (CI: 1.3–1.8), respectively. When only the Oxford implant was analyzed, however, the CRRs were similar and the RRs were 1.2 (CI: 0.9–1.7) and 1.3 (CI: 1.0–1.7). Interpretation We found considerable differences between the 3 countries, with Sweden having a lower revision rate than Denmark and Norway. Further classification and standardization work is needed to permit more elaborate studies. PMID:20180723

  8. A novel total knee arthroplasty infection model in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Craig, Matthew R; Poelstra, Kornelis A; Sherrell, J Christopher; Kwon, Michael S; Belzile, Etienne L; Brown, Thomas E

    2005-09-01

    Infection of biomaterial implants is an expensive and devastating complication of orthopaedic surgery historically ranging from less than 1% in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) to 10% in revision TKA. An in vivo animal model was developed to test the efficacy of innovative therapies for the prevention of biomaterial centered infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteria (MRSA). Twenty-two New Zealand White rabbits were used in this study. After proper anesthesia, a stainless-steel screw with a high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) washer was cemented in a defect created in the intra-articular, non-articulating portion of the lateral femoral condyle of each knee. After closure of the joint capsule, each knee was inoculated with 0, 10(2), 10(3), or 10(4) colony forming units (CFU) of MRSA. Animals were sacrificed after 7 days at which time joint aspirate, tissues and biomaterial samples were examined for evidence of infection. A total of 42 knees were used for analysis. When saline was injected into the knee, 0/10 of the knees demonstrated evidence of biomaterial centered infection (with the contralateral knee receiving 10(4)CFU MRSA). Four of 10 knees developed a biomaterial centered infection when 10(2)CFU MRSA was introduced. Seven out of 10 knees developed a biomaterial centered infection when either 10(3) or 10(4)CFU MRSA was injected. No evidence of septicemia (positive blood cultures) was found in any animal. This rabbit knee model utilizes commonly employed inexpensive orthopaedic implant materials in an in vivo milieu and provides an effective method for the evaluation of treatments for biomaterial centered infections. PMID:15927441

  9. Snapping Pes Syndrome after Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Taketomi, Shuji; Yamagami, Ryota; Tahara, Keitaro; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    Snapping pes syndrome is defined as a snapping sensation in the medial knee caused by pes anserinus and rarely occurs. Snapping pes syndrome after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) has not been reported yet. We experienced two cases with this syndrome after UKA. Conservative treatment was effective in one case, while surgical excision of the gracilis tendon was necessary to relieve painful snapping in the other case. The main cause of the first case might be posteromedial overhang of the tibial tray that reached up to 5 mm. The probable cause of the second case was posteromedial overhang of the mobile bearing. PMID:27274476

  10. The Difficult Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Malkani, Arthur L; Hitt, Kirby D; Badarudeen, Sameer; Lewis, Courtland; Cherian, Jeffrey; Elmallah, Randa; Mont, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) for the treatment of knee arthritis has substantially increased over the past decade. Because of its success, the indications for primary TKA have expanded to include younger patients who are more active, elderly patients who have multiple comorbidities, and patients who have more complex issues, such as posttraumatic arthritis and severe deformity. TKA also has been used to salvage failed unicondylar arthroplasty and osteotomies about the knee. Exposure may be challenging and outcomes may not be as successful in patients with soft-tissue contractures, such as a stiff knee, who undergo TKA. Bone graft or augments may be required to correct deformity and attain proper knee alignment in patients who have a substantial varus or valgus deformity. TKA is somewhat challenging in patients who have deformity, bone loss, contracture, or multiple comorbidities, or have had prior surgery; therefore, it is necessary for surgeons to be aware of some general principles that may help minimize complications and improve outcomes. PMID:27049194

  11. Results of Revision Surgery and Causes of Unstable Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Doo-Hoon; Chon, Jae-Gyun; Jang, Sung-Won; Sun, Dong-Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate causes of unstable total knee arthroplasty and results of revision surgery. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 24 knees that underwent a revision arthroplasty for unstable total knee arthroplasty. The average follow-up period was 33.8 months. We classified the instability and analyzed the treatment results according to its cause. Stress radiographs, postoperative component position, and joint level were measured. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) score and range of motion. Results Causes of instability included coronal instability with posteromedial polyethylene wear and lateral laxity in 13 knees, coronal instability with posteromedial polyethylene wear in 6 knees and coronal and sagittal instability in 3 knees including post breakage in 1 knee, global instability in 1 knee and flexion instability in 1 knee. Mean preoperative/postoperative varus and valgus angles were 5.8°/3.2° (p = 0.713) and 22.5°/5.6° (p = 0.032). Mean postoperative α, β, γ, δ angle were 5.34°, 89.65°, 2.74°, 6.77°. Mean changes of joint levels were from 14.1 mm to 13.6 mm from fibular head (p = 0.82). The mean HSS score improved from 53.4 to 89.2 (p = 0.04). The average range of motion was changed from 123° to 122° (p = 0.82). Conclusions Revision total knee arthroplasty with or without a more constrained prosthesis will be a definite solution for an unstable total knee arthroplasty. The solution according to cause is very important and seems to be helpful to avoid unnecessary over-constrained implant selection in revision surgery for total knee instability. PMID:24900897

  12. Minimally Invasive Total Knee Arthroplasty

    MedlinePlus

    ... and drill her. And how much are you rotating there? This rotates 3 degrees externally with respect ... femoral components that can be used. With the rotating knee system, a class III device at this ...

  13. Metallosis Presenting as Knee Pain 26 years after Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sharareh, Behnam; Phan, Duy L.; Goreal, Wamda; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Metallosis occurs when periprosthetic soft tissues, synovium, and/or bone is infiltrated by metallic debris secondary to metal-on-metal wear. This debris can cause a chronic inflammatory reaction leading to joint instability, pain, and swelling, and may cause osteolysis, implant looseningand ultimately implant failure. Case Report: An 81 year old female, with a history of primary left total knee arthroplasty, presented with a 6 month history of left knee pain, swelling, and limited range of motion following a fall. Radiographs and joint aspiration were performed, with results that showed no evidence of periprosthetic trauma or infection but were suspicious for chronic metallosis. The patient underwent revision total knee replacement of the left knee which revealed extensive necrotic black metal debris throughout the joint space. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of a foreign body reaction consistent with metallosis. Conclusion: This case is a rare example of chronic metallosis presenting 26 years following total knee replacement. Treatment with revision total knee replacement is the consensus management choice to avoid further destruction of the bone and joint capsule that can occur with metal-induced inflammation. PMID:27299048

  14. A new protocol from real joint motion data for wear simulation in total knee arthroplasty: stair climbing.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Santina; Belvedere, Claudio; Jaber, Sami Abdel; Affatato, Saverio; D'Angeli, Valentina; Leardini, Alberto

    2014-12-01

    In its normal lifespan, a knee prosthesis must bear highly demanding loading conditions, going beyond the sole activity of level walking required by ISO standard 14243. We have developed a protocol for in vitro wear simulation of stair climbing on a displacement controlled knee simulator. The flexion/extension angle, intra/extra rotation angle, and antero/posterior translation were obtained in patients by three-dimensional video-fluoroscopy. Axial load data were collected by gait analysis. Kinematics and load data revealed a good consistence across patients, in spite of the different prosthesis size. The protocol was then implemented and tested on a displacement controlled knee wear simulator, showing an accurate reproduction of stair climbing waveforms with a relative error lower than 5%. PMID:25242732

  15. Historical view and future demand for knee arthroplasty in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Rolfson, Ola; W-Dahl, Annette; Garellick, Göran; Sundberg, Martin; Kärrholm, Johan; Robertsson, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose The incidence of knee osteoarthritis will most likely increase. We analyzed historical trends in the incidence of knee arthroplasty in Sweden between 1975 and 2013, in order to be able to provide projections of future demand. Patients and methods We obtained information on all knee arthroplasties in Sweden in the period 1975–2013 from the Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register, and used public domain data from Statistics Sweden on the evolution of and forecasts for the Swedish population. We forecast the incidence, presuming the existence of a maximum incidence. Results We found that the incidence of knee arthroplasty will continue to increase until a projected upper incidence level of about 469 total knee replacements per 105 Swedish residents aged 40 years and older is reached around the year 2130. In 2020, the estimated incidence of total knee arthroplasties per 105 Swedish residents aged 40 years and older will be 334 (95% prediction interval (PI): 281–374) and in 2030 it will be 382 (PI: 308–441). Using officially forecast population growth data, around 17,500 operations would be expected to be performed in 2020 and around 21,700 would be expected to be performed in 2030. Interpretation Today’s levels of knee arthroplasty are well below the expected maximum incidence, and we expect a continued annual increase in the total number of knee arthroplasties performed. PMID:25806653

  16. Total knee arthroplasty in patients with a previous patellectomy.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Jed; Zuckerman, Joseph D; Immerman, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Post-patellectomy patients represent a specific subgroup of patients that may develop arthritis and persistent knee pain and potentially require treatment with total knee arthroplasty. This article reviews the treatment and functional outcomes following total knee arthroplasty in patients with prior patellectomy. A case report is presented as an example of the clinical management of a post-patellectomy patient with significant knee pain and disability treated with total knee arthroplasty. Emphasis will be placed in decision- making, specifically with the use of a posterior stabilized implant. In addition, postoperative strengthening of the quadriceps is essential to compensate for the lack of the patella and increase the success of total knee arthroplasty in this subgroup of patients. PMID:24151951

  17. Kinematics and Mechanical Properties of Knees following Patellar Replacing and Patellar Retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rongying; Liu, Yanqiang; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Knee injury is a common medical issue. A full understanding of the kinematics and mechanical properties of knees following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) repair utilizing patellar replacement (only the base of the patella is replaced) versus patellar retaining surgical techniques is still lacking. In the current paper, we investigated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging data from knees repaired by these two methods and evaluated total knee models created using imaging reconstruction technology that simulated gait conditions. Results revealed that patellar replacement had little influence on tibiofemoral kinematics, although the tibia-surface equivalent stress increased slightly. By contrast, patellar replacement had a significant influence on the patellofemoral joint; patellar internal rotation, external rotation, and medial-lateral translation were all increased. Moreover, the stress distribution on patellar prostheses was altered, resulting in an increased surface maximal equivalent stress on the corresponding area. Moreover, during the gait cycle, we found that the area with maximal equivalent stress shifted its position. Finally, the patellofemoral joint showed decreased motion stability. From the view of kinematics and mechanics, this paper suggests that patella should be retained during TKA if it is possible. The present study presented approaches and technologies for evaluating kinematics and mechanical properties of total knee joint after TKA under gait loads. PMID:27057134

  18. Kinematics and Mechanical Properties of Knees following Patellar Replacing and Patellar Retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rongying; Liu, Yanqiang; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Knee injury is a common medical issue. A full understanding of the kinematics and mechanical properties of knees following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) repair utilizing patellar replacement (only the base of the patella is replaced) versus patellar retaining surgical techniques is still lacking. In the current paper, we investigated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging data from knees repaired by these two methods and evaluated total knee models created using imaging reconstruction technology that simulated gait conditions. Results revealed that patellar replacement had little influence on tibiofemoral kinematics, although the tibia-surface equivalent stress increased slightly. By contrast, patellar replacement had a significant influence on the patellofemoral joint; patellar internal rotation, external rotation, and medial-lateral translation were all increased. Moreover, the stress distribution on patellar prostheses was altered, resulting in an increased surface maximal equivalent stress on the corresponding area. Moreover, during the gait cycle, we found that the area with maximal equivalent stress shifted its position. Finally, the patellofemoral joint showed decreased motion stability. From the view of kinematics and mechanics, this paper suggests that patella should be retained during TKA if it is possible. The present study presented approaches and technologies for evaluating kinematics and mechanical properties of total knee joint after TKA under gait loads. PMID:27057134

  19. A Dutch Survey on Circumpatellar Electrocautery in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    van Jonbergen, Hans-Peter W.; Barnaart, Alexander F.W.; Verheyen, Cees C.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Anterior knee pain following total knee arthroplasty is estimated to occur in 4-49% of patients. Some orthopedic surgeons use circumpatellar electrocautery (diathermy) to reduce the prevalence of postsurgical anterior knee pain; however, the extent of its use is unknown. Materials and Methodology: In April 2009, a postal questionnaire was sent to all 98 departments of orthopedic surgery in The Netherlands. The questions focused on the frequency of total knee arthroplasties, patellar resurfacing, and the use of circumpatellar electrocautery. Results: The response rate was 92%. A total of 18,876 TKAs, 2,096 unicompartmental knee arthroplasties, and 215 patellofemoral arthroplasties are performed yearly in The Netherlands by the responding orthopedic surgeons. Of the orthopedic surgeons performing TKA, 13% always use patellar resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, 49% use selective patellar resurfacing, and 38% never use it. Fifty-six percent of orthopedic surgeons use circumpatellar electrocautery when not resurfacing the patella, and 32% use electrocautery when resurfacing the patella. Conclusion: There is no consensus among Dutch orthopedic surgeons on the use of patellar resurfacing or circumpatellar electrocautery in total knee replacement performed for osteoarthritis. A prospective clinical trial is currently underway to fully evaluate the effect of circumpatellar electrocautery on the prevalence of anterior knee pain following total knee arthroplasty. PMID:21228917

  20. Hospital volume affects outcome after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Pamilo, Konsta J; Peltola, Mikko; Paloneva, Juha; Mäkelä, Keijo; Häkkinen, Unto; Remes, Ville

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose The influence of hospital volume on the outcome of total knee joint replacement surgery is controversial. We evaluated nationwide data on the effect of hospital volume on length of stay, re-admission, revision, manipulation under anesthesia (MUA), and discharge disposition for total knee replacement (TKR) in Finland. Patients and methods 59,696 TKRs for primary osteoarthritis performed between 1998 and 2010 were identified from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register and the Finnish Arthroplasty Register. Hospitals were classified into 4 groups according to the number of primary and revision knee arthroplasties performed on an annual basis throughout the study period: 1–99 (group 1), 100–249 (group 2), 250–449 (group 3), and ≥ 450 (group 4). The association between hospital procedure volume and length of stay (LOS), length of uninterrupted institutional care (LUIC), re-admissions, revisions, MUA, and discharge disposition were analyzed. Results The greater the volume of the hospital, the shorter was the average LOS and LUIC. Smaller hospital volume was not unambiguously associated with increased revision, re-admission, or MUA rates. The smaller the annual hospital volume, the more often patients were discharged home. Interpretation LOS and LUIC ought to be shortened in lower-volume hospitals. There is potential for a reduction in length of stay in extended institutional care facilities. PMID:25323798

  1. Navigated minimally invasive unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jenny, Jean-Yves; Müller, Peter E; Weyer, R; John, Michael; Weber, Patrick; Ciobanu, Eugène; Schmitz, Andreas; Bacher, Thomas; Neumann, Wolfram; Jansson, Volkmar

    2006-10-01

    Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) is an alternative procedure to high tibial osteotomy. This study assessed the procedure using computer navigation to improve implantation accuracy and presents early radiological results of a group of patients implanted with the univation UKA (B. Braun Aesculap, Tuttlingen, Germany) with navigation instrumentation and a minimally invasive approach. The authors concluded that navigated implantation of a UKA using a nonimage-based system improved radiologic accuracy implantation without significant inconvenience and minimal change in the conventional operating technique. PMID:17407935

  2. The rotating platform mobile bearing total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sorrells, R B

    2000-01-01

    The recent evolution of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has been substantial and unlike that of total hip arthroplasty (THA). The current THA technique is similar to that initially developed and perfected by Professor John Charnley in the mid 1960s. The ball-and-socket articulation of the hip is simple and reproducible biomechanically. The long term (20 years and longer) results with total hip arthroplasty have been very satisfactory. The THA prosthetic designs of today remain similar to those of years past. Improvements have been in biomaterials, methods of fixation and surgical technique. The total knee arthroplasty prostheses of today differ greatly from their predecessors. PMID:21136412

  3. The Rotating Platform Mobile Bearing Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sorrells, R Barry

    2000-10-01

    The recent evolution of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has been substantial and unlike that of total hip arthroplasty (THA). The current THA technique is similar to that initially developed and perfected by Professor John Charnley in the mid 1960s. The ball-and-socket articulation of the hip is simple and reproducible biomechanically. The long term (20 years and longer) results with total hip arthroplasty have been very satisfactory. The THA prosthetic designs of today remain similar to those of years past. Improvements have been in biomaterials, methods of fixation and surgical technique. The total knee arthroplasty prostheses of today differ greatly from their predecessors. PMID:12219304

  4. Fracture Blisters After Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Halawi, Mohamad J

    2015-08-01

    Fracture blisters are tense vesicles that arise on markedly swollen skin overlying traumatized soft tissue. While this relatively uncommon complication has been well described in the trauma literature, this article reports for the first time a case of fracture blisters after primary total knee arthroplasty. The fracture blisters developed within 36 hours of surgery and were associated with profound swelling and erythema. There was no evidence of vascular injury, compartment syndrome, iatrogenic fracture, or deep venous thrombosis. The patient was treated with leg elevation, loosely applied nonadhesive dressings, and a short course of oral antibiotics after skin desquamation. Blood-filled blisters required longer time to reepithelialization than fluid-filled blisters. Knee stiffness developed because of pain and fear of participation with physical therapy, but the patient was able to resume intensive rehabilitation after resolution of the blisters. Patient factors, surgical factors, and review of the literature are discussed. PMID:26251947

  5. The role of surgeon volume on patient outcome in total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A number of factors have been identified as influencing total knee arthroplasty outcomes, including patient factors such as gender and medical comorbidity, technical factors such as alignment of the prosthesis, and provider factors such as hospital and surgeon procedure volumes. Recently, strategies aimed at optimizing provider factors have been proposed, including regionalization of total joint arthroplasty to higher volume centers, and adoption of volume standards. To contribute to the discussions concerning the optimization of provider factors and proposals to regionalize total knee arthroplasty practices, we undertook a systematic review to investigate the association between surgeon volume and primary total knee arthroplasty outcomes. Methods We performed a systematic review examining the association between surgeon volume and primary knee arthroplasty outcomes. To be included in the review, the study population had to include patients undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty. Studies had to report on the association between surgeon volume and primary total knee arthroplasty outcomes, including perioperative mortality and morbidity, patient-reported outcomes, or total knee arthroplasty implant survivorship. There were no restrictions placed on study design or language. Results Studies were variable in defining surgeon volume (‘low’: <3 to <52 total knee arthroplasty per year; ‘high’: >5 to >70 total knee arthroplasty per year). Mortality rate, survivorship and thromboembolic events were not found to be associated with surgeon volume. We found a significant association between low surgeon volume and higher rate of infection (0.26% - 2.8% higher), procedure time (165 min versus 135 min), longer length of stay (0.4 - 2.13 days longer), transfusion rate (13% versus 4%), and worse patient reported outcomes. Conclusions Findings suggest a trend towards better outcomes for higher volume surgeons, but results must be interpreted with caution. PMID

  6. Total Limb Rotation after Unilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty: Side-to-Side Discrepancy.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kwang-Jun; Yoon, Seok-Tae; Ko, Young-Bong

    2016-08-01

    Total limb rotation, an important anatomical feature of the lower limb, is defined as any rotation of the lower limb on its longitudinal axis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the discrepancies of rotational profiles of total limb between nonoperated and operated limb following unilateral total knee arthroplasty. We conducted an analysis of the computed tomography (CT) data from 32 patients undergoing primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty. Using these CT scan, rotational profiles of total limb, such as femoral neck anteversion angle expressed as femoral torsion angle (FTA), tibial torsion angle (TTA), knee joint rotation angle (KJRA), and total limb rotation (TLR) were measured. There were significant discrepancies of FTA and KJRA between operated and nonoperated limb following unilateral total knee arthroplasty. The mean difference of operated and nonoperated side for FTA and KJRA were -6.51 ± 11.88 degrees (p = 0.0041) and -6.83 ± 5.04 degrees (p < 0.001), respectively. However, there were no significant discrepancies of TLR, TTA. These results are due to the compensation effect of KJRA. However, excessive external rotation of the femoral component beyond the compensation effect of prosthetic knee joint can lead to a total limb rotational discrepancy in patient undergoing unilateral total knee arthroplasty. PMID:26571050

  7. Total Knee Arthroplasty in a Patient with an Ankylosing Knee after Previous Patellectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Seung Joon; Park, Shi Hwan; Hong, Sung Min

    2014-01-01

    Patellectomized patients may have less satisfactory clinical outcomes following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) due to a decreased extensor mechanism efficiency and potential instability. Furthermore, the existing literature does not provide concrete guidance on the expected results of TKA or the type of implant that should be used in patellectomized patients. We present a case of a patient with an ankylosing knee who had undergone patellectomy due to gunshot injury 45 years ago and was treated with primary TKA using a posterior stabilized prosthesis at our institution. TKA using this prosthesis in the ankylosed knee with a previous history of patellectomy yielded good results in terms of postoperative clinical scores, range of motion and joint stability. PMID:25229049

  8. Primary total knee arthroplasty in infection sequelae about the native knee.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jai-Gon; Moon, Young-Wan; Park, Sang-Hoon; Han, Kye-Young; Kim, Sang-Min

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the results of primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) after bone or joint sepsis about the native knee and to analyze the risk factors of periprosthetic infection. Sixty-two patients (62 knees), considered to have prior sepsis history to be resolved, underwent primary TKA and were followed during a mean of 6.1years (range, 2-10.4years). Of the 62 patients, periprosthetic infection occurred in 6 after primary TKA (9.7%). Five of 6 patients grew the same organism as prior infection. The number of prior surgeries undertaken for deep infection was found to be an independent risk factor of periprosthetic infection. PMID:24703782

  9. TREATMENT OF INFECTION AFTER TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Ricardo de Paula Leite; Cinagawa, Eduardo Hitoshi Tsuge; Camargo, Osmar Pedro Arbix; Honda, Emerson Kiyoshi; Klautau, Giselle Burlamaqui; Salles, Mauro José Costa

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To identify and compare the rate of success of therapeutic modalities applied in surgeries for the treatment of infections associated with total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and to evaluate the functional outcome and pain in different therapeutic modalities by means of quality of life scores. Methods: We evaluated all patients who developed periprosthetic infection after TKA for primary or secondary osteoarthritis, in the period from January 1st, 2008 to December 31st, 2010. Results: In the study period, 29 patients with TKA had infection, and 12 of these underwent debridement and retention of the prosthesis (D+R), seven received two-stage and six one-stage exchange arthroplasties, and four patients were treated with suppressive antibiotic therapy because they could not undergo another surgical procedure. Conclusion: The D+R, one-stage revision and two-stage revision success rates were 75%, 83.3%, and 100%, respectively. The best results of quality of life (QoL) and function occur in patients undergoing D+R. In contrast, the worst QoL and functional results were obtained in patients treated with two-stage revision arthroplasty. Level of Evidence II, Prognostic Studies - Investigating the Effect of a Patient Characteristic on the Outcome of Disease. PMID:26981029

  10. Robot-assisted unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pearle, Andrew D; O'Loughlin, Padhraig F; Kendoff, Daniel O

    2010-02-01

    The outcomes of unicompartmental knee arthroplasties (UKAs) have demonstrated inconsistent long-term survival. We report the first clinical series of UKA using a semiactive robotic system for the implantation of an inlay unicondylar knee arthroplasty. Ten patients were selected for this study. Preoperative mechanical leg alignment values ranged from 0.3 degrees varus to 9.8 degrees varus. A haptic guidance system was used; a detailed description is given in the manuscript. The setup time for the robot was 41 minutes; intraoperative registration process, 7.5 minutes (6-13 minutes); skin incision, 8 cm; robot-assisted burring, 34.8 minutes (18-50 minutes); mean tourniquet time, 87.4 minutes (68-113 minutes); and overall operation time, 132 minutes (118-152 minutes). The planned and intraoperative tibiofemoral angle was within 1 degrees. The postoperative long leg axis radiographs were within 1.6 degrees. Haptic guidance in combination with a navigation module allows for precise planning and execution of both inlay components in UKA. PMID:19056227

  11. Painful knee arthroplasty: definition and overview

    PubMed Central

    Carulli, Christian; Villano, Marco; Bucciarelli, Giovanni; Martini, Caterina; Innocenti, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Summary Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) is one of the most successful procedures in Orthopaedic Surgery, with good clinical results and high survival rate in more than 90% of the cases at long-term follow-up. Since the increase of population’s mean age, worsening of articular degenerative alterations, and articular sequelae related to previous fractures, there is a persistent growing of the number of knee arthroplasties in every country each year, with expected increase of complications rates. Painful TKA is considered an unusual complication, but several reports focus on this challenging clinical issue. Common causes of painful TKA may be divided as early or late, and in referred, periarticular or intra-articular. Among the early, we recall implant instability (related to surgical and technical mistakes) and problems of extensor mechanism (patella not resurfaced, malalignment of femoral, tibial, or patellar component, tendons failure or degeneration). Late causes of painful TKA are almost related to aseptic loosening and infection, but also, even if unusual, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, synovitis, and hypersensitivity to metal implants are represented. Hypersensitivity to metal is a clinical issue with significative increase, but to date without a specific characterization. The Authors report about incidence, clinical features, and diagnostic pathways of hypersensitivity to metal implants, focusing on the prevention of this challenging problem. PMID:22461811

  12. Conversion of lateral unicompartmental arthroplasty to anterior cruciate retaining tricompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Rolston, Lindsey; Moore, Christopher

    2010-06-01

    This case report presents the conversion of a lateral unicompartmental arthroplasty (UKA) to an anterior cruciate retaining tricompartmental knee arthroplasty. The patient presented with disease progression to the medial and patellofemoral compartments of the knee, in addition to significant varus deformity. During revision surgery, the previously implanted UKA device was found to be well fixed and in good condition. The conventional treatment option would be conversion to total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, in this case conversion to a tricompartmental, ligament sparing arthroplasty via implantation of a bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA) device was found to be feasible. In UKA revision cases where the device is functional, the current surgical approach may be an appropriate alternative to conventional TKA. PMID:19875295

  13. Total Knee Arthroplasty in Severe Synovial Osteochondromatosis in an Osteoarthritic Knee.

    PubMed

    Deinum, Joukje; Nolte, Peter A

    2016-06-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis (SO) can occur idiopathic or secondary to osteoarthritis. SO can be easily diagnosed with plain film radiography and clinical findings. In case of disabling osteoarthritis, total knee arthroplasty and removal of all corpora libra are indicated. We present a 71-year-old woman with significant osteoarthritis and severe SO intra-articular and in the suprapatellar bursa of the right knee. Total knee arthroplasty, extraction of the loose bodies, and partial synovectomy were performed. During a 2.5-year follow-up, the patient regained full function of her affected knee and there was no recurrence of SO. We choose to present this case to show the extensiveness SO can occur in. Our advice is to remove all the loose bodies carefully to prevent damage to the prosthesis. During follow-up, special attention should be paid to prevent recurrence of SO. When recurrence is associated with rapid growth or destruction of joints, malignant reoccurrence must be considered. PMID:27247750

  14. Total Knee Arthroplasty in Severe Synovial Osteochondromatosis in an Osteoarthritic Knee

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis (SO) can occur idiopathic or secondary to osteoarthritis. SO can be easily diagnosed with plain film radiography and clinical findings. In case of disabling osteoarthritis, total knee arthroplasty and removal of all corpora libra are indicated. We present a 71-year-old woman with significant osteoarthritis and severe SO intra-articular and in the suprapatellar bursa of the right knee. Total knee arthroplasty, extraction of the loose bodies, and partial synovectomy were performed. During a 2.5-year follow-up, the patient regained full function of her affected knee and there was no recurrence of SO. We choose to present this case to show the extensiveness SO can occur in. Our advice is to remove all the loose bodies carefully to prevent damage to the prosthesis. During follow-up, special attention should be paid to prevent recurrence of SO. When recurrence is associated with rapid growth or destruction of joints, malignant reoccurrence must be considered. PMID:27247750

  15. The epidemiology of revision total knee and hip arthroplasty in England and Wales: a comparative analysis with projections for the United States. A study using the National Joint Registry dataset.

    PubMed

    Patel, A; Pavlou, G; Mújica-Mota, R E; Toms, A D

    2015-08-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) are recognised and proven interventions for patients with advanced arthritis. Studies to date have demonstrated a steady increase in the requirement for primary and revision procedures. Projected estimates made for the United States show that by 2030 the demand for primary TKA will grow by 673% and for revision TKA by 601% from the level in 2005. For THA the projected estimates are 174% and 137% for primary and revision surgery, respectively. The purpose of this study was to see if those predictions were similar for England and Wales using data from the National Joint Registry and the Office of National Statistics. Analysis of data for England and Wales suggest that by 2030, the volume of primary and revision TKAs will have increased by 117% and 332%, respectively between 2012 and 2030. The data for the United States translates to a 306% cumulative rate of increase between 2012 and 2030 for revision surgery, which is similar to our predictions for England and Wales. The predictions from the United States for primary TKA were similar to our upper limit projections. For THA, we predicted an increase of 134% and 31% for primary and revision hip surgery, respectively. Our model has limitations, however, it highlights the economic burden of arthroplasty in the future in England and Wales as a real and unaddressed problem. This will have significant implications for the provision of health care and the management of orthopaedic services in the future. PMID:26224824

  16. Outcomes of Varus Valgus Constrained Versus Rotating-Hinge Implants in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Tennison L; Bederman, S Samuel; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2016-01-01

    The stability of a total knee arthroplasty is determined by the ability of the prosthesis components in concert with supportive bone and soft tissue structures to sufficiently resist deforming forces transmitted across the knee joint. Constrained prostheses are used in unstable knees due to their ability to resist varus and valgus transformative forces across the knee. Constraint requires inherent rigidity, which can facilitate early implant failure. The purpose of this study was to describe the comparative indications for surgery and postoperative outcomes of varus valgus constrained knee (VVK) and rotating-hinge knee (RHK) total knee arthroplasty prostheses. Seven retrospective observational studies describing 544 VVK and 254 RHK patients with an average follow-up of 66 months (range, 7-197 months) were evaluated. Patients in both groups experienced similar failure rates (P=.74), ranges of motion (P=.81), and Knee Society function scores (P=.29). Average Knee Society knee scores were 4.2 points higher in VVK patients compared with RHK patients, indicating minimal mid-term clinical differences may exist (P<.0001). Absent collateral ligament support is an almost universal indication for RHK implantation vs VVK. Constrained device implantation is routinely guided by inherent stability of the knee, and, when performed, similar postoperative outcomes can be achieved with VVK and RHK prostheses. PMID:26730689

  17. Prevention of Periprosthetic Joint Infections of the Hip and Knee.

    PubMed

    Levy, David M; Wetters, Nathan G; Levine, Brett R

    2016-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a rare but devastating complication of arthroplasty. Research has been dedicated to minimizing the incidence of PJI, leading to the development of a comprehensive perioperative approach. Multiple preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors can increase patient risk. From medical management and skin sterilization to wound sterility and blood management, multiple issues must be considered in a well-rounded prevention protocol. In this literature review, we consolidate the current information that orthopedic surgeons can use to minimize PJI after total knee arthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27552468

  18. No clinical benefit of gender-specific total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chen; Wang, Jiaxing; Cheng, Mengqi; Peng, Xiaochun; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xianlong

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose There is no consensus regarding the clinical relevance of gender-specific prostheses in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We summarize the current best evidence in a comparison of clinical and radiographic outcomes between gender-specific prostheses and standard unisex prostheses in female patients. Methods We used the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, Science Citation Index, and Scopus databases. We included randomized controlled trials published up to January 2013 that compared gender-specific prostheses with standard unisex prostheses in female patients who underwent primary TKAs. Results 6 trials involving 423 patients with 846 knee joints met the inclusion criteria. No statistically significant differences were observed between the 2 designs regarding pain, range of motion (ROM), knee scores, satisfaction, preference, complications, and radiographic results. The gender-specific design (Gender Solutions; Zimmer Inc, Warsaw, Indiana) reduced the prevalence of overhang. However, it had less overall coverage of the femoral condyles compared to the unisex group. In fact, the femoral prosthesis in the standard unisex group matched better than that in the gender-specific group. Interpretation Gender-specific prostheses do not appear to confer any benefit in terms of clinician- and patient-reported outcomes for the female knee. PMID:24954488

  19. A Perspective on Robotic Assistance for Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Netravali, Nathan A.; Shen, Feimo; Park, Youngbae; Bargar, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Knee arthroplasty is used to treat patients with degenerative joint disease of the knee to reduce pain and restore the function of the joint. Although patient outcomes are generally quite good, there are still a number of patients that are dissatisfied with their procedures. Aside from implant design which has largely become standard, surgical technique is one of the main factors that determine clinical results. Therefore, a lot of effort has gone into improving surgical technique including the use of computer-aided surgery. The latest generation of orthopedic surgical tools involves the use of robotics to enhance the surgeons' abilities to install implants more precisely and consistently. This review presents an evolution of robot-assisted surgical systems for knee replacement with an emphasis on the clinical results available in the literature. Ever since various robotic-assistance systems were developed and used clinically worldwide, studies have demonstrated that these systems are as safe as and more accurate than conventional methods of manual implantation. Robotic surgical assistance will likely result in improved surgical technique and improved clinical results. PMID:23738083

  20. Femoral Component Survival in Hybrid Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Perry, Clayton R; Perry, Kevin I

    2016-05-01

    Although the majority of North American surgeons perform total knee arthroplasty by cementing both the femoral and the tibial components, hybrid fixation with a press-fit femur and cemented tibia is an alternative form of total knee arthroplasty performed by some. Currently, there is a paucity of literature evaluating long-term outcomes after hybrid total knee arthroplasty. As such, the purpose of the current study was to describe the long-term results of total knee arthroplasty performed using the hybrid technique. The authors retrospectively reviewed a total of 77 hybrid total knee arthroplasties with at least 12 years of follow-up. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed to determine patient function and the incidence of femoral component failure after hybrid total knee arthroplasty. At the time of last follow-up, 76 of 77 (99%) of the femoral components remained in place without evidence of loosening. One femoral component failed due to aseptic loosening and was ultimately revised to a cemented femoral component without further complication. In addition, 1 tibial component and 2 patellar components failed due to aseptic loosening. Four tibial polyethylene liners were revised for polyethylene wear. In conclusion, press-fit fixation of the femoral component is a reliable and durable alternative to cemented fixation. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):181-186.]. PMID:27135453

  1. Exercise and the Knee Joint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    This report by the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports examines the effects of various forms of physical exercise on the knee joint which, because of its vulnerability, is especially subject to injury. Discussion centers around the physical characteristics of the joint, commonly used measurements for determining knee stability,…

  2. Anatomic Versus Mechanically Aligned Total Knee Arthroplasty for Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    PubMed Central

    Toliopoulos, Panagiota; LeBlanc, Marc-Andre; Hutt, Jonathan; Lavigne, Martin; Desmeules, Francois; Vendittoli, Pascal-Andre

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the intra-operative benefits and the clinical outcomes from kinematic or mechanical alignment for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in patients undergoing revision of failed unicompartmental kneel arthroplasty (UKA) to TKA. Methods: Ten revisions were performed with a kinematic alignment technique and 11 with a mechanical alignment. Measurements of the hip-knee-ankle angle (HKA), the lateral distal femoral angle (LDFA), and the medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) were performed using long-leg radiographs. The need for augments, stems, and constrained inserts was compared between groups. Clinical outcomes were compared using the WOMAC score along with maximum distance walked as well as knee range of motion obtained prior to discharge. All data was obtained by a retrospective review of patient files. Results: The kinematic group required less augments, stems, and constrained inserts than the mechanical group and thinner polyethylene bearings. There were significant differences in the lateral distal femoral angle (LDFA) and the medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) between the two groups (p<0.05). The mean WOMAC score obtained at discharge was better in the kinematic group as was mean knee flexion. At last follow up of 34 months for the kinematic group and 58 months for the mechanical group, no orthopedic complications or reoperations were recorded. Conclusion: Although this study has a small patient cohort, our results suggest that kinematic alignment for TKA after UKA revision is an attractive method. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27563365

  3. Blood Management Strategies in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Michael; Martinez Martos, Sara; Beller, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    A perioperative blood management program is one of a number of important elements for successful patient care in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and surgeons should be proactive in its application. The aims of blood conservation are to reduce the risk of blood transfusion whilst at the same time maximizing hemoglobin (Hb) in the postoperative period, leading to a positive effect on outcome and cost. An individualized strategy based on patient specific risk factors, anticipated blood loss and comorbidities are useful in achieving this aim. Multiple blood conservation strategies are available in the preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative periods and can be employed in various combinations. Recent literature has highlighted the importance of preoperative Hb optimization, minimizing blood loss and evidence-based transfusion guidelines. Given TKA is an elective procedure, a zero allogenic blood transfusion rate should be the aim and an achievable goal. PMID:27595070

  4. Robotic-assisted unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tamam, Cuneyt; Poehling, Gary G

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, development of computer graphics and haptic feedback technology enabled the use of virtual reality. Virtual reality provides the opportunity to combine 3D visual imagery with interactivity, visual, and tactile realism. Robotic-assisted orthopedic surgery is defined as the use of computers and robotic technology to assist the orthopedist in providing musculoskeletal care, in which machine has the capability of precision and accuracy. Robotic-assisted orthopedic surgery is used in simulating diagnosis, preoperative and intraoperative planning, and actual surgery. One of the main areas for computer-assisted surgical applications is unicompartmental or bicompartmental knee arthroplasty, in which the clinical efficacy is improved by providing enhanced component positioning with dynamic ligament balancing. PMID:25370877

  5. Patellar meniscus in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lavernia, Carlos J; Sheldon, Daniel A; Hernández, Victor H; D'Apuzzo, Michele R; Lee, David J; Krackow, Kenneth A; Hungerford, David S

    2007-04-01

    Twenty-four clinically successful, autopsy retrieved porous-coated anatomic total knee arthroplasty (TKA) specimens were evaluated to determine the structure and function of the patellar meniscus. Mean implant duration was 76 months (range: 11-135 months). Histological examination showed the patellar meniscus to be composed of dense fibrous tissue with scattered regions of chronic granulomatous response to polyethylene debris. Patellar wear and polyethylene exposed patellar surface area were correlated with implant duration (r = 0.47, P = .03; r = 0.52, P = .06). Postoperative patellar tilt was also associated with patellar component wear (r = 0.64, P = .03). No other clinical measures were significantly associated with patellar wear or exposed surface area. Additional research is needed to determine what role, if any, the patellar meniscus plays in TKA outcomes. PMID:17486906

  6. Metaphyseal bone loss in revision knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ponzio, Danielle Y; Austin, Matthew S

    2015-12-01

    The etiology of bone loss encountered during revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is often multifactorial and can include stress shielding, osteolysis, osteonecrosis, infection, mechanical loss due to a grossly loose implant, and iatrogenic loss at the time of implant resection. Selection of the reconstructive technique(s) to manage bone deficiency is determined by the location and magnitude of bone loss, ligament integrity, surgeon experience, and patient factors including the potential for additional revision, functional demand, and comorbidities. Smaller, contained defects are reliably managed with bone graft, cement augmented with screw fixation, or modular augments. Large metaphyseal defects require more extensive reconstruction such as impaction bone grafting with or without mesh augmentation, prosthetic augmentation, use of bulk structural allografts, or use of metaphyseal cones or sleeves. While each technique has advantages and disadvantages, the most optimal method for reconstruction of large metaphyseal bone defects during revision TKA is not clearly established. PMID:26362647

  7. Blood Management Strategies in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Liu, David; Dan, Michael; Martinez Martos, Sara; Beller, Elaine

    2016-09-01

    A perioperative blood management program is one of a number of important elements for successful patient care in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and surgeons should be proactive in its application. The aims of blood conservation are to reduce the risk of blood transfusion whilst at the same time maximizing hemoglobin (Hb) in the postoperative period, leading to a positive effect on outcome and cost. An individualized strategy based on patient specific risk factors, anticipated blood loss and comorbidities are useful in achieving this aim. Multiple blood conservation strategies are available in the preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative periods and can be employed in various combinations. Recent literature has highlighted the importance of preoperative Hb optimization, minimizing blood loss and evidence-based transfusion guidelines. Given TKA is an elective procedure, a zero allogenic blood transfusion rate should be the aim and an achievable goal. PMID:27595070

  8. Revision of infected knee arthroplasties in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Lindberg-Larsen, Martin; Jørgensen, Christoffer C; Bagger, Jens; Schrøder, Henrik M; Kehlet, Henrik

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - The surgical treatment of periprosthetic knee infection is generally either a partial revision procedure (open debridement and exchange of the tibial insert) or a 2-stage exchange arthroplasty procedure. We describe the failure rates of these procedures on a nationwide basis. Patients and methods - 105 partial revisions (100 patients) and 215 potential 2-stage revision procedures (205 patients) performed due to infection from July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013 were identified from the Danish Knee Arthroplasty Register (DKR). Failure was defined as surgically related death ≤ 90 days postoperatively, re-revision due to infection, or not reaching the second stage for a planned 2-stage procedure within a median follow-up period of 3.2 (2.2-4.2) years. Results - The failure rate of the partial revisions was 43%. 71 of the partial revisions (67%) were revisions of a primary prosthesis with a re-revision rate due to infection of 34%, as compared to 55% in revisions of a revision prosthesis (p = 0.05). The failure rate of the 2-stage revisions was 30%. Median time interval between stages was 84 (9-597) days. 117 (54%) of the 2-stage revisions were revisions of a primary prosthesis with a re-revision rate due to infection of 21%, as compared to 29% in revisions of a previously revised prosthesis (p = 0.1). Overall postoperative mortality was 0.6% in high-volume centers (> 30 procedures within 2 years) as opposed to 7% in the remaining centers (p = 0.003). Interpretation - The failure rates of 43% after the partial revision procedures and 30% after the 2-stage revisions in combination with the higher mortality outside high-volume centers call for centralization and reconsideration of surgical strategies. PMID:26900908

  9. Preventing Hospital Readmissions and Limiting the Complications Associated With Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Yu, Stephen; Garvin, Kevin L; Healy, William L; Pellegrini, Vincent D; Iorio, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Total joint arthroplasty is a highly successful surgical procedure for patients who have painful arthritic joints. The increasing prevalence of total joint arthroplasty is generating substantial expenditures in the American healthcare system. Healthcare payers, specifically the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, currently target total joint arthroplasty as an area for healthcare cost-savings initiatives, which has resulted in increased scrutiny surrounding orthopaedic care, health resource utilization, and hospital readmissions. Identifying the complications associated with total hip and total knee arthroplasty that result in readmissions will be critically important for predictive modeling and to decrease the number of readmissions after total joint arthroplasty. In addition, improving perioperative optimization, providing seamless episodic care, and intensifying posthospital coordination of care may decrease the number of unnecessary hospital readmissions. Identified modifiable risk factors that substantially contribute to poor clinical outcomes after total joint arthroplasty include morbid obesity; poorly controlled diabetes and nutritional deficiencies; Staphylococcus aureus colonization; tobacco use; venous thromboembolic disease; cardiovascular disease; neurocognitive, psychological, and behavioral problems; and physical deconditioning and fall risk. Both clinical practice and research will be enhanced if defined total joint arthroplasty complications are standardized and stratification schemes are used to identify high-risk patients. Subsequently, clinical intervention will be warranted to address modifiable risk factors before proceeding with total joint arthroplasty. PMID:27049191

  10. Anterior knee pain following primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shervin, David; Pratt, Katelyn; Healey, Travis; Nguyen, Samantha; Mihalko, William M; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2015-01-01

    Despite improvements in technique and technology for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), anterior knee pain impacts patient outcomes and satisfaction. Addressing the prosthetic and surgical technique related causes of pain after TKA, specifically as it relates to anterior knee pain, can aid surgeons in addressing these issues with their patients. Design features of the femoral and patellar components which have been reported as pain generators include: Improper femoral as well as patellar component sizing or designs that result in patellofemoral stuffing; a shortened trochlear groove distance from the flange to the intercondylar box; and then surgical technique related issues resulting in: Lateral patellar facet syndrome; overstuffed patella/flange combination; asymmetric patellar resurfacing, improper transverse plane component rotation resulting in patellar subluxation/tilt. Any design consideration that allows impingement of extensor mechanism anatomical elements has the possibility of impacting outcome by becoming a pain generator. As the number of TKA procedures continues to increase, it is increasingly critical to develop improved, evidence based prostheses that maximize function and patient satisfaction while minimizing pain and other complications. PMID:26601061

  11. Effect of femoral component design on unresurfaced patellas in knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Leo A; Nakamura, Takashi

    2003-05-01

    Three total knee designs were evaluated to test the hypothesis that femoral component design affects the clinical and mechanical functions of the unresurfaced patella after total knee arthroplasty. Patients with the Ortholoc II, Advantim, and Profix femoral components were followed up for as many as 14 years and revision rate, anterior knee pain, and generalized knee pain were compared. A laboratory protocol was devised to evaluate pressure in the patellofemoral joint of knees from cadavers with a pressure-sensitive transducer using the same three designs at various degrees of knee flexion. Thirty Ortholoc II knee components were followed up for 14 years. Nineteen patients (63%) had severe anterior knee pain and 15 patients (50%) had reoperation to resurface the patella within 2 years. Two hundred one patients (222 knees) with Advantim components were followed up for 10 years and 305 patients (330 knees) with Profix components were followed up for 5 years. No patients with these two knee designs had severe anterior knee pain or reoperation for patellar resurfacing. A significantly higher rate of mild anterior knee pain was seen in the patients with Advantim components than in the patients with Profix components. No apparent relationship was seen between the severity of patellar wear found at the time of surgery and the incidence of anterior knee pain. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis receiving either the Advantim or Profix knee component performed as well as patients with osteoarthritis when the patella was not resurfaced. Pressure was significantly higher in the patellofemoral joints of the laboratory knee specimens with Ortholoc II components than in the specimens with either the Advantim or Profix components. The specimens with Advantim components had significantly higher pressure than did the specimens with normal knees, and the specimens with Profix components differed little from those with normal knees. PMID:12771830

  12. Total knee arthroplasty after high tibial osteotomy. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    van Raaij, Tom M; Reijman, Max; Furlan, Andrea D; Verhaar, Jan AN

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous osteotomy may compromise subsequent knee replacement, but no guidelines considering knee arthroplasty after prior osteotomy have been developed. We describe a systematic review of non-randomized studies to analyze the effect of high tibial osteotomy on total knee arthroplasty. Methods A computerized search for relevant studies published up to September 2007 was performed in Medline and Embase using a search strategy that is highly sensitive to find nonrandomized studies. Included were observational studies in which patients had total knee arthroplasty performed after prior high tibial osteotomy. Studies that fulfilled these criteria, were assessed for methodologic quality by two independent reviewers using the critical appraisal of observational studies developed by Deeks and the MINORS instrument. The study characteristics and data on the intervention, follow-up, and outcome measures, were extracted using a pre-tested standardized form. Primary outcomes were: knee range of motion, knee clinical score, and revision surgery. The grade of evidence was determined using the guidelines of the GRADE working group. Results Of the 458 articles identified using our search strategy, 17 met the inclusion criteria. Fifteen studies were cohort study with a concurrent control group, one was a historical cohort study and one a case-control study. Nine studies scored 50% or more on both methodological quality assessments. Pooling of the results was not possible due to the heterogeneity of the studies, and our analysis could not raise the overall low quality of evidence. No significant differences between primary total knee arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty after osteotomy were found for knee range of motion in four out of six studies, knee clinical scores in eight out of nine studies, and revision surgery in eight out of eight studies after a median follow-up of 5 years. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that osteotomy does not compromise subsequent knee

  13. Dislocation following total knee arthroplasty: A report of six cases

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Manuel; Ríos-Luna, Antonio; Pereiro, Javier; Fahandez-Saddi, Homid; Pérez-Caballer, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Background: Dislocation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the worst form of instability. The incidence is from 0.15 to 0.5%. We report six cases of TKA dislocation and analyze the patterns of dislocation and the factors related to each of them. Materials and Methods: Six patients with dislocation of knee following TKA are reported. The causes for the dislocations were an imbalance of the flexion gap (n=4), an inadequate selection of implants (n=1), malrotation of components (n=1) leading to incompetence of the extensor mechanism, or rupture of the medial collateral ligament (MCC). The patients presented complained of pain, giving way episodes, joint effusion and difficulty in climbing stairs. Five patients suffered posterior dislocation while one anterior dislocation. An urgent closed reduction of dislocation was performed under general anaesthesia in all patients. All patients were operated for residual instability by revision arthroplasty after a period of conservative treatment. Results: One patient had deep infection and knee was arthrodesed. Two patients have a minimal residual lag for active extension, including a patient with a previous patellectomy. Result was considered excellent or good in four cases and fair in one, without residual instability. Five out of six patients in our series had a cruciate retaining (CR) TKA designs: four were revised to a posterior stabilized (PS) TKA and one to a rotating hinge design because of the presence of a ruptured MCL. Conclusion: Further episodes of dislocation or instability will be prevented by identifying and treating major causes of instability. The increase in the level of constraint and correction of previous technical mistakes is mandatory. PMID:20924487

  14. Fibrosis is a common outcome following total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Abdul, Nicole; Dixon, David; Walker, Andrew; Horabin, Joanna; Smith, Nick; Weir, David J.; Brewster, Nigel T.; Deehan, David J.; Mann, Derek A.; Borthwick, Lee A.

    2015-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is one of the most successful orthopaedic procedures that alleviates pain and restores function in patients with degenerative knee joint diseases. Arthrofibrosis, abnormal scarring in which dense fibrous tissue prevents normal range of motion, develops in ~3–10% of TKA patients. No prophylactic intervention is available and treatment is restricted to aggressive physiotherapy or revision surgery. Tissue was collected from patients undergoing primary (n = 30) or revision (n = 27) TKA. Revision patients were stratified as non-arthrofibrotic and arthrofibrotic. Tissue was macroscopically and histologically compared to improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of arthrofibrosis. Macroscopically, tissue from primary TKA presents as homogenous, fatty tissue whereas tissue from revision TKA presents as dense, pigmented tissue. Histologically, there was dramatic tissue remodelling, increased collagen deposition and increased (myo)fibroblast staining in tissue from revision TKA. Significantly, tissue architecture was similar between revision patients regardless of clinically diagnosis. There are significant differences in architecture and composition of tissue from revision TKA over primary TKA. Surprisingly, whether revision TKA were clinically diagnosed as arthrofibrotic or non-arthrofibrotic there were still significant differences in fibrotic markers compared to primary TKA suggesting an ongoing fibrotic process in all revision knees. PMID:26553967

  15. In vivo determination of total knee arthroplasty kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Komistek, Richard D; Mahfouz, Mohamed R; Bertin, Kim; Rosenberg, Aaron; Kennedy, William

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if consistent posterior femoral rollback of an asymmetrical posterior cruciate retaining (PCR) total knee arthroplasty was mostly influenced by the implant design, surgical technique, or presence of a well-functioning posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Three-dimensional femorotibial kinematics was determined for 80 subjects implanted by 3 surgeons, and each subject was evaluated under fluoroscopic surveillance during a deep knee bend. All subjects in this present study having an intact PCL had a well-functioning PCR knee and experienced normal kinematic patterns, although less in magnitude than the normal knee. In addition, a surprising finding was that, on average, subjects without a PCL still achieved posterior femoral rollback from full extension to maximum knee flexion. The findings in this study revealed that implant design did contribute to the normal kinematics demonstrated by subjects having this asymmetrical PCR total knee arthroplasty.

  16. Stress fracture of the proximal fibula after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vaish, Abhishek; Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare case of proximal fibular fatigue fracture developing 14 years after total knee arthroplasty in a known case of rheumatoid arthritis. A valgus deformity of the knee can put abnormal stress on the upper fibula leading to its failure. We believe that, as the fibula acts as an important lateral strut, its disruption due to a fracture led to rapid progress of the valgus deformity of the knee in this patient. PMID:27107057

  17. A Computational Modeling Approach for Investigating Soft Tissue Balancing in Bicruciate Retaining Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Shahram; Wilson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Bicruciate retaining knee arthroplasty, although has shown improved functions and patient satisfaction compared to other designs of total knee replacement, remains a technically demanding option for treating severe cases of arthritic knees. One of the main challenges in bicruciate retaining arthroplasty is proper balancing of the soft tissue during the surgery. In this study biomechanics of soft tissue balancing was investigated using a validated computational model of the knee joint with high fidelity definitions of the soft tissue structures along with a Taguchi method for design of experiments. The model was used to simulate intraoperative balancing of soft tissue structures following the combinations suggested by an orthogonal array design. The results were used to quantify the corresponding effects on the laxity of the joint under anterior-posterior, internal-external, and varus-valgus loads. These effects were ranked for each ligament bundle to identify the components of laxity which were most sensitive to the corresponding surgical modifications. The resulting map of sensitivity for all the ligament bundles determined the components of laxity most suitable for examination during intraoperative balancing of the soft tissue. Ultimately, a sequence for intraoperative soft tissue balancing was suggested for a bicruciate retaining knee arthroplasty. PMID:23082090

  18. Analysis of rehabilitation procedure following arthroplasty of the knee with the use of complete endoprosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wilk-Frańczuk, Magdalena; Tomaszewski, Wiesław; Zemła, Jerzy; Noga, Henryk; Czamara, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The use of endoprosthesis in arthroplasty requires adaptation of rehabilitation procedures in order to reinstate the correct model of gait, which enables the patient to recover independence and full functionality in everyday life, which in turn results in an improvement in the quality of life. Material/Methods We studied 33 patients following an initial total arthroplasty of the knee involving endoprosthesis. The patients were divided into two groups according to age. The range of movement within the knee joints was measured for all patients, along with muscle strength and the subjective sensation of pain on a VAS, and the time required to complete the ‘up and go’ test was measured. The gait model and movement ability were evaluated. The testing was conducted at baseline and after completion of the rehabilitation exercise cycle. Results No significant differences were noted between the groups in the tests of the range of movement in the operated joint or muscle strength acting on the knee joint. Muscle strength was similar in both groups. In the “up and go” task the time needed to complete the test was 2.9 seconds shorter after rehabilitation in Group 1 (average age 60.4), and 4.5 seconds shorter in Group 2 (average age 73.1)). Conclusions The physiotherapy procedures we applied, following arthroplasty of the knee with cemented endoprosthesis, brought about good results in both research groups of older patients. PMID:21358604

  19. Abnormal loading of the major joints in knee osteoarthritis and the response to knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Andrew; Stewart, Caroline; Postans, Neil; Barlow, David; Dodds, Alexander; Holt, Cathy; Whatling, Gemma; Roberts, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is common and patients frequently complain that they are 'overloading' the joints of the opposite leg when they walk. However, it is unknown whether moments or co-contractions are abnormal in the unaffected joints of patients with single joint knee osteoarthritis, or how they change following treatment of the affected knee. Twenty patients with single joint medial compartment knee osteoarthritis were compared to 20 asymptomatic control subjects. Gait analysis was performed for normal level gait and surface EMG recordings of the medial and lateral quadriceps and hamstrings were used to investigate co-contraction. Patients were followed up 12 months post-operatively and the analysis was repeated. Results are presented for the first 14 patients who have attended follow-up. Pre-operatively, adduction moment impulses were elevated at both knees and the contra-lateral hip compared to controls. Co-contraction of hamstrings and quadriceps was elevated bilaterally. Post-operatively, moment waveforms returned to near-normal levels at the affected knee and co-contraction fell in the majority of patients. However, abnormalities persisted in the contra-lateral limb with partial or no recovery of both moment waveforms and co-contraction in the majority. Patients with knee osteoarthritis do experience abnormal loads of their major weight bearing joints bilaterally, and abnormalities persist despite treatment of the affected limb. Further treatment may be required if we are to protect the other major joints following joint arthroplasty. PMID:22841587

  20. Preventing Hospital Readmissions and Limiting the Complications Associated With Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Yu, Stephen; Garvin, Kevin L; Healy, William L; Pellegrini, Vincent D; Iorio, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Total joint arthroplasty is a highly successful surgical procedure for patients with painful arthritic joints. The increasing prevalence of the procedure is generating significant expenditures in the American healthcare system. Healthcare payers, specifically the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, currently target total joint arthroplasty as an area for healthcare cost-savings initiatives, resulting in increased scrutiny surrounding orthopaedic care, health resource utilization, and hospital readmissions. Identifying the complications associated with total hip and total knee arthroplasty that result in readmissions will be critically important for predictive modeling and for decreasing the number of readmissions following total joint arthroplasty. Additionally, improving perioperative optimization, providing seamless episodic care, and intensifying posthospital coordination of care may result in a decreasing number of unnecessary hospital readmissions. Identified modifiable risk factors that significantly contribute to poor clinical outcome following total joint arthroplasty include morbid obesity; poorly controlled diabetes and nutritional deficiencies; Staphylococcus aureus colonization; tobacco use; venous thromboembolic disease; cardiovascular disease; neurocognitive, psychological, and behavioral problems; and physical deconditioning and fall risk. Both clinical practice and research will be enhanced if there is standardization of defined total joint arthroplasty complications and utilization of stratification schemes to identify high-risk patients. Subsequently, clinical intervention would be warranted to address modifiable risk factors before proceeding with total joint arthroplasty. PMID:26498587

  1. Radiographic and scintigraphic evaluation of total knee arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, R.; Soudry, M.

    1986-04-01

    Various radiographic and scintigraphic methods are used to supplement clinical findings in the evaluation of total knee arthroplasty and its complications. Serial roentgenograms offer reliable information for diagnosing mechanical loosening. Wide and extensive radiolucency at the cement-bone interface and shift in position and alignment of prosthetic components can be seen in almost all cases by the time revision is necessary. Radiographic abnormalities are usually not present in acute infection, but are often present in chronic infection. Bone scanning has a high sensitivity for diagnosis of infection or loosening, but is nonspecific because increased uptake is often present around asymptomatic total knee arthroplasties with normal radiographs. Differential bone and Gallium scanning and scanning with Indium 111-labeled leukocytes have a greater specificity for diagnosis of infection than does bone or Gallium scanning alone. Routine radiographic and scintigraphic studies have shown a high incidence of deep vein thrombosis in the calf after total knee arthroplasty. Clinically significant pulmonary embolization is infrequent.

  2. Patient Satisfaction after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is one of the most successful and effective surgical options to reduce pain and restore function for patients with severe osteoarthritis. The purpose of this article was to review and summarize the recent literatures regarding patient satisfaction after TKA and to analyze the various factors associated with patient dissatisfaction after TKA. Patient satisfaction is one of the many patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). Patient satisfaction can be evaluated from two categories, determinants of satisfaction and components of satisfaction. The former have been described as all of the patient-related factors including age, gender, personality, patient expectations, medical and psychiatric comorbidity, patient's diagnosis leading to TKA and severity of arthropathy. The latter are all of the processes and technical aspects of TKA, ranging from the anesthetic and surgical factors, type of implants and postoperative rehabilitations. The surgeon- and patient-reported outcomes have been shown to be disparate occasionally. Among various factors that contribute to patient satisfaction, some factors can be managed by the surgeon, which should be improved through continuous research. Furthermore, extensive discussion and explanation before surgery will reduce patient dissatisfaction after TKA. PMID:26955608

  3. Surgical waste audit of 5 total knee arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Stall, Nathan M.; Kagoma, Yoan K.; Bondy, Jennifer N.; Naudie, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Background Operating rooms (ORs) are estimated to generate up to one-third of hospital waste. At the London Health Sciences Centre, prosthetics and implants represent 17% of the institution’s ecological footprint. To investigate waste production associated with total knee arthroplasties (TKAs), we performed a surgical waste audit to gauge the environmental impact of this procedure and generate strategies to improve waste management. Methods We conducted a waste audit of 5 primary TKAs performed by a single surgeon in February 2010. Waste was categorized into 6 streams: regular solid waste, recyclable plastics, biohazard waste, laundered linens, sharps and blue sterile wrap. Volume and weight of each stream was quantified. We used Canadian Joint Replacement Registry data (2008–2009) to estimate annual weight and volume totals of waste from all TKAs performed in Canada. Results The average surgical waste (excluding laundered linens) per TKA was 13.3 kg, of which 8.6 kg (64.5%) was normal solid waste, 2.5 kg (19.2%) was biohazard waste, 1.6 kg (12.1%) was blue sterile wrap, 0.3 kg (2.2%) was recyclables and 0.3 kg (2.2%) was sharps. Plastic wrappers, disposable surgical linens and personal protective equipment contributed considerably to total waste. We estimated that landfill waste from all 47 429 TKAs performed in Canada in 2008–2009 was 407 889 kg by weight and 15 272 m3 by volume. Conclusion Total knee arthroplasties produce substantial amounts of surgical waste. Environmentally friendly surgical products and waste management strategies may allow ORs to reduce the negative impacts of waste production without compromising patient care. Level of evidence Level IV, case series. PMID:23351497

  4. Manipulation under Anesthesia for Stiffness after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ju-Hyung; Oh, Jin-Cheol; Park, Sang-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the incidence of manipulation under anesthesia (MUA) for stiffness after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and the degree of joint motion recovery after MUA. Materials and Methods A total of 4,449 TKAs (2,973 patients) were performed between March 2000 and August 2014. Cases that underwent MUA for stiffness after TKA were reviewed. TKAs were performed using the conventional procedure in 329 cases and using the minimally invasive procedure in 4,120 cases. The preoperative range of joint motion, timing of manipulation, diagnosis and the range of joint motion before and after MUA were retrospectively investigated. Results MUA was carried out in 22 cases (16 patients), resulting in the incidence of 0.5%. The incidence after the conventional procedure was 1.2% and 0.4% after the minimally invasive procedure. In the manipulated knees, the preoperative range of motion (ROM) was 102.5°±26.7°, and the preoperative diagnosis was osteoarthritis in 19 cases, rheumatoid arthritis in two, and infection sequela in one. MUA was performed 4.7±3.0 weeks after TKA. The average ROM was 64.5°±13.5° before manipulation. At an average of 64.3±41.3 months after manipulation, the ROM was recovered to 113.4°±31.2°, which was an additional 49.9° improvement in flexion. Conclusions The satisfactory recovery of joint movement was achieved when MUA for stiffness was performed relatively early after TKA. PMID:26676186

  5. Seasonality of infection rates after total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kane, Patrick; Chen, Christopher; Post, Zachary; Radcliff, Kris; Orozco, Fabio; Ong, Alvin

    2014-02-01

    The correlation between season (fall, winter, spring, and summer) and infection rate in surgical patients is well defined in many specialties. To the authors' knowledge, there are no data in the literature on this phenomenon in patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty. They hypothesized that there would be an increased infection rate in the summer months in patients undergoing elective total joint arthroplasty. They retrospectively reviewed consecutive patients undergoing elective total hip or knee arthroplasty at a single institution during 1 year by a single surgeon. Wound infections were defined as any patient requiring oral antibiotics for cellulitis, readmission for intravenous antibiotics, a return to the operating room for irrigation and debridement, or excisional arthroplasty and placement of a cement spacer within 90 days of the initial procedure. Seventeen of 750 patients developed an infection, for an overall incidence of 2.2%. There was a statistically significant difference in infection rate according to season: 3 (1.5%) infections occurred in winter, 1 (0.5%) in spring, 9 (4.7%) in summer, and 4 (2.4%) in fall. The incidence was highest during July (4.5%), August (5.4%), and September (4.3%). There was a statistically significant difference in infection rate between summer/fall (3.6%) vs winter/spring (1.0%). There is an increase in the incidence of infection during summer months for patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty. The authors recommend increased surveillance and more thorough preoperative sterilization procedures during these warmer months. PMID:24679206

  6. Conversion Total Knee Arthroplasty after Failed High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sang Jun; Kim, Kang Il; Lee, Chung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Clinical results of high tibial osteotomy (HTO) deteriorate over time despite the initial satisfactory results. Several knees may require a conversion to total knee arthroplasty (TKA) because of failure such as the progression of degenerative osteoarthritis and the loss of the correction angle. It is important to know the long-term survival rate and common reason of failure in HTO to inform patients of postoperative expectations before surgery and to prevent surgical errors during surgery. In addition, it has been reported that clinical and radiological results, revision rate, and complication rate were poorer than those in patients without a previous HTO. There are few review articles that describe why conversion TKA after HTO is surgically difficult and the results are poor. Surgeons have to avoid the various complications and surgical errors in this specific situation. We would like to present the considering factors and technical difficulties during conversion TKA after HTO with a review of the literature. We could conclude through the review that the correction of deformity, lower amount of tibial bone resection, and sufficient polyethylene insert thickness, restoration of the joint line height, and adequate ligament balancing can be helpful in overcoming the technical challenges encountered during TKA following HTO. PMID:27274465

  7. Computer-Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasty Utilization.

    PubMed

    Bala, Abiram; Penrose, Colin Thomas; Seyler, Thorsten Markus; Mather, Richard Chad; Wellman, Samuel Secord; Bolognesi, Michael Paul

    2016-07-01

    Computer-navigated total knee arthroplasty (CN-TKA) has been used to improve component alignment, though the evidence is currently mixed on whether there are clinically significant differences in long-term outcomes. Given the established increased costs and operative time, we hypothesized that the utilization rate of CN-TKA would be decreasing relative to standard TKA in the Medicare population given the current health care economic environment. We queried 1,914,514 primary TKAs performed in the entire Medicare database from 2005 to 2012. Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) and International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes were used to identify and separate CN-TKAs. Utilization of TKA was compared by year, gender, and region. Average change in cases per year and compound annual growth rate (CAGR) were used to evaluate trends in utilization of the procedure. We identified 30,773 CN-TKAs performed over this time period. There was an increase in utilization of CN-TKA per year from 984 to 5,352 (average = 572/year, R (2) = 0.85, CAGR = 23.58%) from 2005 to 2012. In contrast, there was a slight decrease in overall TKA utilization from 264,345 to 230,654 (average = 4297/year, R (2) = 0.74, CAGR = - 1.69%). When comparing proportion of CN-TKA to all TKAs, there was an increase from 0.37 to 2.32% (average 0.26%/year, R (2) = 0.88, CAGR = 25.70%). CN-TKA growth in males and females was comparable at 24.42 and 23.11%, respectively. The South region had the highest growth rate at 28.76%, whereas the Midwest had the lowest growth rate at 15.51%. The Midwest was the only region that peaked (2008) with a slow decline in utilization until 2012. Despite increased costs with unclear clinical benefit, CN-TKA is increasing in utilization among Medicare patients. Reasons could include patient preference, advertising, proper of coding the procedure, and increased publicly available information about

  8. TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY IN A PATIENT WITH HOFFA FRACTURE PSEUDARTHROSIS: CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires e; Giordano, Vincenzo; Amaral, Ney Pecegueiro do; Carvalho, Antônio Carlos Pires; Barretto, João Maurício

    2015-01-01

    A rare occurrence of a case of Hoffa fracture pseudarthrosis in an alcoholic patient with genu valgum associated with venous insufficiency who underwent total knee arthroplasty is reported. The literature is reviewed and the main factors for surgical indication of total knee arthroplasty after a fracture of the knee are discussed. Total knee arthroplasty was a viable option in a 60-year-old patient with Hoffa fracture pseudarthrosis and comorbidities. PMID:27027038

  9. UNICOMPARTMENTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY: CURRENT PERSPECTIVES AND TRENDS IN BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Júnior, João Alberto Yazigi; Angelini, Felipe Bertelli; Ferlin, Fernando; Hernandes, Andrea Canizares; Astur, Diego da Costa; Cohen, Moises

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the approaches and procedures used by Brazilian orthopedic surgeons for treating osteoarthrosis by means of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty and high tibial osteotomy of the knee. Methods: A questionnaire with 14 closed questions was developed and applied to Brazilian knee surgeons during the three days of the 43rd Brazilian Congress of Orthopedics and Traumatology. Results: A total of 113 surgeons filled out the questionnaire completely and became part of the sample analyzed. In this study, the majority of the surgeons performed fewer than five unicompartmental knee arthroplasty procedures/year (61.1%) and between 5 and 15 high tibial osteotomy procedures/year (37.2%). Use of computerized navigation systems during surgery remains uncommon in our environment, since only 0.9% of the specialists were using it. 65.5% of the surgeons reported that they had chosen to use total knee arthroplasty rather than partial arthroplasty due to lack of familiarity with the surgical technique. When asked about the possibility that the number of unicompartmental prostheses used in Brazil would grow as surgeons in this country become increasingly familiar with the technique, 80.5% of the respondents believed in this hypothesis. In this sample, we found that the greater the surgeon's experience was, the greater the numbers of unicompartmental prostheses and tibial osteotomies performed annually were (r = 0.550 and r = 0.465, respectively; p < 0.05). Conclusions: There is a clear evolutional trend towards treatment of unicompartmental osteoarthritis using partial knee arthroplasty in Brazil. However, further prospective controlled studies are needed in order to evaluate the clinical and scientific benefits of these trends. PMID:27047891

  10. Patient satisfaction after total knee arthroplasty: an Asian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Thambiah, Matthew Dhanaraj; Nathan, Sahaya; Seow, Branden ZX; Liang, Shen; Lingaraj, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is an effective method for alleviating pain and restoring knee function in patients with severe osteoarthritis. However, despite the improvements in surgical technique and postoperative care, it has been reported that up to 19% of patients are dissatisfied after their operations. The aim of this study was to evaluate patient satisfaction levels after TKA in an Asian cohort, as well as assess the correlation between patient satisfaction levels and the results of traditional physician-based scoring systems. METHODS The medical data of 103 Asian patients who underwent 110 TKAs between December 2008 and June 2009 were obtained from our hospital’s Joint Replacement Registry. The minimum follow-up period was one year and patient expectations were assessed before TKA. Patient satisfaction was assessed postoperatively using a 5-point Likert scale. Reasons for patient dissatisfaction were recorded. Standardised instruments (e.g. the Knee Society Score, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index [WOMAC] and the generic Short Form-36 health survey) were used to assess the patient’s functional status and the severity of symptoms pre- and postoperatively. RESULTS Among the 110 TKAs performed, 92.8% resulted in patient satisfaction. Patient satisfaction correlated with postoperative WOMAC function scores (p = 0.028), postoperative WOMAC final scores (p = 0.040) and expectations being met (p = 0.033). CONCLUSION Although there was a high level of patient satisfaction following TKA in our cohort of Asian patients, a significant minority was dissatisfied. Patient satisfaction is an important outcome measure and should be assessed in addition to traditional outcome scores. PMID:26034317

  11. Particulate debris presenting as radiographic dense masses following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, A V; Mallory, T H; Staab, M; Herrington, S M

    1998-04-01

    Two cases of failed total knee arthroplasty associated with significant titanium debris that created massive radiographic densities are reported. The similarities of the failed total knee arthroplasties are that both involve titanium femoral components with failed metal-backed patellar components. At the time of surgical intervention, patellar polyethylene dissociation from metal-backed patellar components was noted with excessive burnishing and wear of the remaining metal-backed patellar component and of the titanium femoral component. Wear of the tibial polyethylene was noted in both cases. The titanium-on-titanium wear couple produced significant debris, resulting in large mass formation about the total knee arthroplasty. Additionally, there were loculated, fluid-filled sacks of titanium debris. Histologic sections performed for both cases revealed significant deposits of titanium in combination with polyethylene. In both cases, radiographs revealed the presence of large, radiodense masses. These cases illustrate that when considering etiologies for radiodense masses about total joint arthroplasty, particulate titanium debris resulting in mass formation must be added to the differential diagnosis. PMID:9590649

  12. Spacesuit mobility knee joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Pressure suit mobility joints are for use in interconnecting adjacent segments of an hermetically sealed spacesuit in which low torques, low leakage and a high degree of reliability are required. Each of the joints is a special purpose joint characterized by substantially constant volume and low torque characteristics and includes linkages which restrain the joint from longitudinal distension and includes a flexible, substantially impermeable diaphragm of tubular configuration spanning the distance between pivotally supported annuli. The diaphragms of selected joints include rolling convolutions for balancing the joints, while various joints include wedge-shaped sections which enhance the range of motion for the joints.

  13. Low-grade infection after a total knee arthroplasty caused by Actinomyces naeslundii.

    PubMed

    Hedke, J; Skripitz, R; Ellenrieder, M; Frickmann, H; Köller, T; Podbielski, A; Mittelmeier, W

    2012-08-01

    Here, we present a case of an 85-year-old woman with a low-grade-infection caused by Actinomyces naeslundii after total-knee arthroplasty (TKA) followed by septic loosening. Actinomyces naeslundii was cultured from a tissue sample from the knee joint capsule/synovial tissue obtained after the initial TKA. A review of the literature revealed two cases of periprosthetic infection and another three cases of arthritis due to Actinomyces naeslundii. So far, no standard treatment for periprosthetic infections caused by Actinomyces species has been established. PMID:22556326

  14. Rotational alignment of the femoral component in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Falvo, Daniele Antonio; Iapicca, Mario Luigi; Gotti, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    We describe here various surgical options to obtain a correct rotational alignment of femoral component in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The correct rotational alignment is the key point to obtain a rectangular balanced flexion gap as well to have a good patellar tracking. For that reason, rotation alignment largely affects postoperative kinematic results particularly during flexion. PMID:26855940

  15. Calcaneal Insufficiency Fracture after Ipsilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Min; Shin, Sung Jin; Kang, Byoung Youl

    2016-01-01

    Insufficiency fracture of the calcaneus is a rare entity. In the absence of trauma, evaluating a painful ankle in an elderly patient can be difficult and also it might be overlook the insufficiency fracture. We experienced a case of insufficiency calcaneus fracture that occurred after ipsilateral total knee arthroplasty. Here, we report our case with a review of literatures. PMID:26981521

  16. The five-year radiological results of the uncemented Oxford medial compartment knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hooper, N; Snell, D; Hooper, G; Maxwell, R; Frampton, C

    2015-10-01

    This study reports on the first 150 consecutive Oxford cementless unicompartmental knee arthroplasties (UKA) performed in an independent centre (126 patients). All eligible patients had functional scores (Oxford knee score and high activity arthroplasty score) recorded pre-operatively and at two- and five-years of follow-up. Fluoroscopically aligned radiographs were taken at five years and analysed for any evidence of radiolucent lines (RLLs), subsidence or loosening. The mean age of the cohort was 63.6 years (39 to 86) with 81 (53.1%) males. Excellent functional scores were maintained at five years and there were no progressive RLLs demonstrated on radiographs. Two patients underwent revision to a total knee arthroplasty giving a revision rate of 0.23/100 (95% confidence interval 0.03 to 0.84) component years with overall component survivorship of 98.7% at five years. There were a further four patients who underwent further surgery on the same knee, two underwent bearing exchanges for dislocation and two underwent lateral UKAs for disease progression. This was a marked improvement from other UKAs reported in New Zealand Joint Registry data and supports the designing centre's early results. PMID:26430010

  17. Factors influencing the choice of anesthetic technique for primary hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wong, Patrick By; McVicar, Jason; Nelligan, Kathleen; Bleackley, Joanne C; McCartney, Colin Jl

    2016-05-01

    Despite evidence in the literature, continuing wide variation exists in anesthetic technique for primary joint arthroplasties. Recent evidence suggests that neuraxial anesthesia has advantages over general anesthesia in terms of mortality, major morbidity and healthcare utilization. Yet, despite the proposed benefits, utilization of these two techniques varies greatly across geographical locations, with general anesthesia being most common for total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in parts of the world. We uncover some factors that promote or hinder the use of neuraxial anesthesia in THA and TKA. Healthcare professionals should be familiarized with the evidence for neuraxial anesthesia, and unbiased educational material should be developed for patients regarding anesthetic options for THA and TKA in order to promote best practice. PMID:26984367

  18. Tibial tubercle osteotomy for exposure of the difficult total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, L A; Ohl, M D

    1990-11-01

    Tibial tubercle osteotomy provides a safe and reliable means of extensile exposure of the knee. A technique was developed using a long osteoperiosteal segment including the tibial tubercle and upper tibial crest leaving lateral muscular attachments intact to this bone fragment. The bone fragment was reattached to its bed with two cobalt-chromium wires passed through the fragment and through the medial tibial cortex. The procedure was used in 71 knees to expose the joint for total knee arthroplasty, and the follow-up period was one to five years. All healed uneventfully, and no significant complications occurred. Mean postoperative flexion was 97 degrees. No extension lag occurred, and mean flexion contracture was 2.5 degrees. Excellent exposure can be achieved by means of a viable bone flap below the knee. Early rehabilitation and weight bearing can be done with low potential for complications. PMID:2225644

  19. MOBILE TIBIAL POLYETHYLENE BEARING IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo Barros Cobra, Hugo Alexandre; da Palma, Idemar Monteiro

    2015-01-01

    Debris of polyethylene tibial bearings have been recognized as a major cause for the onset of the cascade of biological events leading to osteolysis and loosening of prosthetic components after total knee arthroplasty. Since then, research has been focused on alternative bearing surfaces in order to minimize the amount and rate of polyethylene wear off and, in doing so, increasing the survivorship rate for knee arthroplasties. One such option is to have a mobile tibial bearing allowing more conformity and rotational self-alignment of the components, improving kinetics and kinematics of the prosthesis. The authors present a resumed but throughout and comprehensive review of the rationale, biomechanics fundamentals, indications, pitfalls, outcomes and complications for the use of mobile tibial bearings in total knee replacement. PMID:27077055

  20. Advantage of Minimal Anterior Knee Pain and Long-term Survivorship of Cemented Single Radius Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty without Patella Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hyung-Min; Baek, Ji-Hoon; Ko, Young-Bong

    2015-01-01

    Background The single radius total knee prosthesis was introduced with the advantage of reduced patellar symptoms; however, there is no long-term follow-up study of the same. The purpose of this study was to determine the survival rate of single radius posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty and patellofemoral complication rates in a consecutive series. Methods Seventy-one patients (103 knees) who underwent arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing using a single radius posterior-stabilized total knee prosthesis were followed up for a minimum 10 years. Clinical evaluation using Knee Society knee and function scores and radiologic evaluation were performed at regular intervals. Anterior knee pain as well as patellofemoral complications were evaluated with a simple questionnaire. The Kaplan-Meier product-limit method was used to estimate survival. Results Seventeen patients (23 knees) were excluded due to death (12 knees) or lost to follow-up (11 knees). Of the 80 knees enrolled, all femoral components and 78 tibial components were well fixed without loosening at final follow-up. Two revisions were performed because of tibial component loosening and periprosthetic joint infection. One patient with tibial component loosening refused to have revision surgery. No obvious tibial insert polyethylene wear was observed. The survivorships at 132 months were 96.7% using revision or pending revision as end points. Anterior knee pain was present in 6 patients (6 knees, 7.5%) at the latest follow-up. No patellofemoral complication requiring revision was encountered. Conclusions The single radius posterior-stabilized total knee prosthesis demonstrated an excellent minimum 10-year survivorship. The low rates of implant loosening and 7.5% of anterior knee pain as a patellofemoral complication are comparable with those reported for other modern total knee prosthesis. PMID:25729519

  1. Load Sharing Among Collateral Ligaments, Articular Surfaces, and the Tibial Post in Constrained Condylar Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaonan; Malik, Aamer; Bartel, Donald L; Wright, Timothy M; Padgett, Douglas E

    2016-08-01

    The normal knee joint maintains stable motion during activities of daily living. After total knee arthroplasty (TKA), stability is achieved by the conformity of the bearing surfaces of the implant components, ligaments, and constraint structures incorporated in the implant design. The large, rectangular tibial post in constrained condylar knee (CCK) arthroplasty, often used in revision surgery, provides added stability, but increases susceptibility to polyethylene wear as it contacts the intercondylar box on the femoral component. We examined coronal plane stability to understand the relative contributions of the mechanisms that act to stabilize the CCK knee under varus-valgus loading, namely, load distribution between the medial and lateral condyles, contact of the tibial post with the femoral intercondylar box, and elongation of the collateral ligaments. A robot testing system was used to determine the joint stability in human cadaveric knees as described by the moment versus angular rotation behavior under varus-valgus moments at 0 deg, 30 deg, and 90 deg of flexion. The angular rotation of the CCK knee in response to the physiological moments was limited to ≤1.5 deg. The primary stabilizing mechanism was the redistribution of the contact force on the bearing surfaces. Contact between the tibial post and the femoral box provided a secondary stabilizing mechanism after lift-off of a condyle had occurred. Collateral ligaments provide limited stability because little ligament elongation occurred under such small angular rotations. Compressive loads applied across the knee joint, such as would occur with the application of muscle forces, enhanced the ability of the bearing surfaces to provide resisting internal varus-valgus moment and, thus, reduced the exposure of the tibial post to the external varus-valgus loads. Our results suggest that the CCK stability can be refined by considering both the geometry of the bearing surfaces and the contacting geometry

  2. Knee joint replacement prosthesis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A prosthesis is a device designed to replace a missing part of the body, or to make a part of the body work better. The metal prosthetic device in knee joint replacement surgery replaces cartilage and bone which is damaged from disease or aging.

  3. Influence of Total Knee Arthroplasty on Gait Mechanics of the Replaced and Non-Replaced Limb During Stair Negotiation.

    PubMed

    Standifird, Tyler W; Saxton, Arnold M; Coe, Dawn P; Cates, Harold E; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Zhang, Songning

    2016-01-01

    This study compared biomechanics during stair ascent in replaced and non-replaced limbs of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients with control limbs of healthy participants. Thirteen TKA patients and fifteen controls performed stair ascent. Replaced and non-replaced knees of TKA patients were less flexed at contact compared to controls. The loading response peak knee extension moment was greater in control and non-replaced knees compared with replaced. The push-off peak knee abduction moment was elevated in replaced limbs compared to controls. Loading and push-off peak hip abduction moments were greater in replaced limbs compared to controls. The push-off peak hip abduction moment was greater in non-replaced limbs compared to controls. Future rehabilitation protocols should consider the replaced knee and also the non-replaced knee and surrounding joints. PMID:26231075

  4. Predicting Poor Physical Performance after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bade, Michael J; Wolfe, Pamela; Zeni, Joseph A; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a preliminary decision algorithm predicting functional performance outcomes to aid in the decision of when to undergo total knee arthroplasty (TKA). One hundred nineteen patients undergoing primary unilateral TKA were evaluated before and 6 months after TKA. A regression tree analysis using a recursive partitioning function was performed with the Timed Up and Go (TUG) time, Six-Minute Walk (6MW) distance, and Stair Climbing Test (SCT) time as measured 6 months after TKA as the primary outcomes. Preoperative measures of functional performance, joint performance, anthropometrics, demographics, and self reported status were evaluated as predictors of the primary outcomes 6 months after surgery. Individuals taking ≥ 10.1 seconds on the TUG and aged 72 years or older before surgery had the poorest performance on the TUG 6 months after surgery. Individuals walking < 314 meters on the 6MW before surgery had the poorest performance on the 6MW test 6 months after surgery. Individuals taking ≥ 17 seconds to complete the SCT and scoring < 40 on the SF-36 mental component score before surgery had the poorest performance on the SCT 6 months after surgery. Poorer performance preoperatively on the 6MW, SCT, and TUG, was related to poorer performance in the same measure after TKA. Age and decreased mental health were secondary predictors of poorer performance at 6 months on the TUG and SCT, respectively. These measures may help further develop models predicting thresholds for poor outcomes after TKA. PMID:22539338

  5. Osteolysis around total knee arthroplasty: a review of pathogenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gallo, J; Goodman, S B; Konttinen, Y T; Wimmer, M A; Holinka, M

    2013-09-01

    Aseptic loosening and other wear-related complications are some of the most frequent late reasons for revision of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Periprosthetic osteolysis (PPOL) pre-dates aseptic loosening in many cases, indicating the clinical significance of this pathogenic mechanism. A variety of implant-, surgery- and host-related factors have been delineated to explain the development of PPOL. These factors influence the development of PPOL because of changes in mechanical stresses within the vicinity of the prosthetic device, excessive wear of the polyethylene liner, and joint fluid pressure and flow acting on the peri-implant bone. The process of aseptic loosening is initially governed by factors such as implant/limb alignment, device fixation quality and muscle coordination/strength. Later, large numbers of wear particles detached from TKA trigger and perpetuate particle disease, as highlighted by progressive growth of inflammatory/granulomatous tissue around the joint cavity. An increased accumulation of osteoclasts at the bone-implant interface, impairment of osteoblast function, mechanical stresses and increased production of joint fluid contribute to bone resorption and subsequent loosening of the implant. In addition, hypersensitivity and adverse reactions to metal debris may contribute to aseptic TKA failure, but should be determined more precisely. Patient activity level appears to be the most important factor when the long-term development of PPOL is considered. Surgical technique, implant design and material factors are the most important preventative factors, because they influence both the generation of wear debris and excessive mechanical stresses. New generations of bearing surfaces and designs for TKA should carefully address these important issues in extensive preclinical studies. Currently, there is little evidence that PPOL can be prevented by pharmacological intervention. PMID:23669623

  6. Robotic control in knee joint replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Davies, B L; Rodriguez y Baena, F M; Barrett, A R W; Gomes, M P S F; Harris, S J; Jakopec, M; Cobb, J P

    2007-01-01

    A brief history of robotic systems in knee arthroplasty is provided. The place of autonomous robots is then discussed and compared to more recent 'hands-on' robotic systems that can be more cost effective. The case is made for robotic systems to have a clear justification, with improved benefits compared to those from cheaper navigation systems. A number of more recent, smaller, robot systems for knee arthroplasty are also described. A specific example is given of an active constraint medical robot, the ACROBOT system, used in a prospective randomized controlled trial of unicondylar robotic knee arthroplasty in which the robot was compared to conventional surgery. The results of the trial are presented together with a discussion of the need for measures of accuracy to be introduced so that the efficacy of the robotic surgery can be immediately identified, rather than have to wait for a number of years before long-term clinical improvements can be demonstrated. PMID:17315770

  7. Evaluation of the effects of a physiotherapy program on quality of life in females after unilateral total knee arthroplasty: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Hudáková, Zuzana; Zięba, Halina Romualda; Lizis, Paweł; Dvořáková, Vlasta; Cetlová, Lada; Friediger, Teresa; Kobza, Wojciech

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Osteoarthritis is a chronic and degenerative joint disease and is considered to be one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders. This study evaluated the differences in the quality of life of females treated with supervised physiotherapy and a standardized home program after unilateral total knee arthroplasty. [Subjects and Methods] From January 2012 to May 2015, a total of 40 females were examined at the Central Military Hospital in Ruzomberk, Slovakia. Quality of life was assessed with the Short Form-36. Quality of life and intensity of pain after normal daily activity, according to the visual analog scale, were assessed before total knee arthroplasty, immediately after physiotherapy, 3 months after total knee arthroplasty, and 6 months after total knee arthroplasty. [Results] We found statistically significant improvement of the quality of life results and a decreased intensity of pain at each time point compared with before total knee arthroplasty. [Conclusions] The results of this study provide further evidence indicating that patients who undergo total knee arthroplasty for primary osteoarthritis of the knee can achieve a significant improvement in the quality of life by using supervised physiotherapy compared with a standardized home program. PMID:27313341

  8. Evaluation of the effects of a physiotherapy program on quality of life in females after unilateral total knee arthroplasty: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Hudáková, Zuzana; Zięba, Halina Romualda; Lizis, Paweł; Dvořáková, Vlasta; Cetlová, Lada; Friediger, Teresa; Kobza, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Osteoarthritis is a chronic and degenerative joint disease and is considered to be one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders. This study evaluated the differences in the quality of life of females treated with supervised physiotherapy and a standardized home program after unilateral total knee arthroplasty. [Subjects and Methods] From January 2012 to May 2015, a total of 40 females were examined at the Central Military Hospital in Ruzomberk, Slovakia. Quality of life was assessed with the Short Form-36. Quality of life and intensity of pain after normal daily activity, according to the visual analog scale, were assessed before total knee arthroplasty, immediately after physiotherapy, 3 months after total knee arthroplasty, and 6 months after total knee arthroplasty. [Results] We found statistically significant improvement of the quality of life results and a decreased intensity of pain at each time point compared with before total knee arthroplasty. [Conclusions] The results of this study provide further evidence indicating that patients who undergo total knee arthroplasty for primary osteoarthritis of the knee can achieve a significant improvement in the quality of life by using supervised physiotherapy compared with a standardized home program. PMID:27313341

  9. Knee awareness and functionality after simultaneous bilateral vs unilateral total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Latifi, Roshan; Thomsen, Morten Grove; Kallemose, Thomas; Husted, Henrik; Troelsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate knee awareness and functional outcomes in patients treated with simultaneous bilateral vs unilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: Through a database search, we identified 210 patients who had undergone unilateral TKA (UTKA) and 65 patients who had undergone simultaneous bilateral TKA (SBTKA) at our institution between 2010 and 2012. All TKAs were cemented and cruciate retaining. The mean follow-up period was 3.2 (2 to 4) years. All the patients had symptomatic and debilitating unilateral or bilateral osteoarthritis for which all conservative and non-surgical treatments were failed, thus preoperatively the patients had poor functionality. All patients were asked to complete Forgotten Joint Score (FJS) and Oxford Knee Score (OKS) questionnaires. The patients were matched according to age, gender, year of surgery, Kellgren-Lawrence score and pre- and postoperative overall knee alignment. The FJS and OKS questionnaire results of the two groups were then compared. RESULTS: A mixed-effects model was used to analyze differences between SBTKA and UTKA. OKS: The mean difference in the OKS between the patients who had undergone SBTKA and those who had undergone UTKA was 1.5, which was not statistically significant (CI = -0.9:4.0, P-value = 0.228). The mean OKS of the SBTKA patients was 37.6 (SD = 9.0), and the mean OKS of the UTKA patients was 36.1 (SD = 9.9). FJS: The mean difference in the FJS between the patients who had undergone SBTKA and those who had undergone UTKA was 2.3, which was not statistically significant (CI = -6.2:10.8, P-value = 0.593). The mean FJS of the SBTKA patients was 59.9 (SD = 27.5), and the mean FJS of the UTKA patients was 57.5 (SD = 28.8). CONCLUSION: SBTKA and UTKA patients exhibited similar joint functionality and knee awareness. Our results support the use of SBTKA in selected patients suffering from clinically symptomatic bilateral osteoarthritis. PMID:27004168

  10. Early failure with the Journey-Deuce bicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dudhniwala, A G; Rath, N K; Joshy, S; Forster, M C; White, S P

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the early functional outcome and survivorship of a bicompartmental knee arthroplasty implant (Journey-Deuce) in a cohort of patients with combined medial and patellofemoral degenerative osteoarthritis. Fifteen patients with a mean age of 57 years were followed up prospectively and evaluated with clinical examination, Oxford knee score and radiology imaging. Poor pain scores, concerns about the tibial fixation, early aseptic loosening of the tibial component and a revision rate of 60 % at a minimum follow-up of 54 months are reported. Implantation of this prosthesis was stopped at our institution well before the first revision due to an unfavourable early clinical response. This was further endorsed by an unacceptable revision rate. The outcome of the Journey-Deuce bicompartmental knee replacement was considerably worse than the published outcome of total knee replacement. PMID:27001223

  11. Rotational stability of a posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, L A; Amador, D D

    1989-05-01

    The effect of the posterior stabilizing mechanism on rotational stability in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was investigated in six cadaver knees using a special knee-testing device. The device evaluated varus-valgus, rotational, and anteroposterior (AP) stability in the normal knee compared to a posterior stabilized TKA with either a rotationally constrained or an unconstrained articular surface. None of the stability parameters was significantly different from normal in either configuration of the tibial surface, but the constrained surface did decrease rotational deflection compared to the rotationally unconstrained surfaces. These findings show that rotational constraint in a posterior stabilized TKA is not necessary to achieve rotational stability as long as varus-valgus stability is achieved by appropriately tensioning the collateral ligaments. PMID:2706852

  12. Total knee arthroplasty in human immunodeficiency virus-infected hemophiliacs.

    PubMed

    Unger, A S; Kessler, C M; Lewis, R J

    1995-08-01

    Twenty-six knee arthroplasties were performed in 15 patients with hemophilia A and human immunodeficiency virus infection from 1984 to 1991. Patient age range was 27 to 48 years. After an average follow-up period of 6.4 years (range, 1-9 years) all patients were alive and none of the implants had become infected. T4 lymphocyte counts showed some deterioration, which was not clinically significant. All of the patients were improved following surgery. Nineteen implants were rated excellent, four good, and three fair. Infection with human immunodeficiency virus did not adversely affect the clinical outcome of knee arthroplasty at follow-up periods up to 9 years. PMID:8523002

  13. Cementless fixation in total knee arthroplasty: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Meneghini, R Michael; Hanssen, Arlen D

    2008-10-01

    Cementless fixation in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has had limited use in recent decades due to past failures in the early generation of cementless designs. Screw track osteolysis, poor polyethylene, and metal-backed patellar component failures contributed to a controversial track record and created a reluctance to embrace cementless fixation in TKA; however, these failure mechanisms are correctable. In addition, there is renewed interest in cementless fixation due to the recent development of improved biomaterials, particularly highly porous metals and highly crosslinked polyethylene, as well as time-saving advantages and long-term osseointegration of cementless fixation. There are long-term reports of successful designs of cementless knee arthroplasty that are nearly equal to the results of cemented designs. This article discusses the past history, current long-term results, and future of cementless fixation in TKA. PMID:18979934

  14. Fracture of the Tibial Baseplate in Bicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Stuyts, Bart; Vandenberghe, Melanie; Van der Bracht, Hans; Fortems, Yves; Van den Eeden, Elke; Cuypers, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA) addresses combined medial and patellofemoral compartment osteoarthritis, which is relatively common, and has been proposed as a bridge between unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Case Presentation. We present the case report of a young active man treated with BKA after unsuccessful conservative therapy. Four years later, loosening with fracture of the tibial baseplate was identified and the patient was revised to TKA. Discussion. Although our case is only the second fractured tibial baseplate to be reported, we believe that the modular titanium design, with two fixation pegs, is too thin to withstand daily cyclic loading powers. Light daily routine use, rather than high-impact sports, is therefore advised. Failures may also be related to the implant being an early generation and known to be technically complex, with too few implant sizes. We currently use TKA for the treatment of medial and patellofemoral compartment osteoarthritis. PMID:26843998

  15. Fracture of the Tibial Baseplate in Bicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Stuyts, Bart; Vandenberghe, Melanie; Van der Bracht, Hans; Fortems, Yves; Van den Eeden, Elke; Cuypers, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA) addresses combined medial and patellofemoral compartment osteoarthritis, which is relatively common, and has been proposed as a bridge between unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Case Presentation. We present the case report of a young active man treated with BKA after unsuccessful conservative therapy. Four years later, loosening with fracture of the tibial baseplate was identified and the patient was revised to TKA. Discussion. Although our case is only the second fractured tibial baseplate to be reported, we believe that the modular titanium design, with two fixation pegs, is too thin to withstand daily cyclic loading powers. Light daily routine use, rather than high-impact sports, is therefore advised. Failures may also be related to the implant being an early generation and known to be technically complex, with too few implant sizes. We currently use TKA for the treatment of medial and patellofemoral compartment osteoarthritis. PMID:26843998

  16. Knee joint replacement - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... than 3 blocks because of knee pain Loose knee prosthesis Some knee fractures ... an incision over the affected knee. The patella (knee cap) is moved ... helps the prosthesis to adhere better. The two parts of the ...

  17. Patellofemoral Crepitus after Total Knee Arthroplasty: Etiology and Preventive Measures

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Patellofemoral crepitus and clunk syndrome are infrequent, yet troublesome complications of total knee arthroplasty with a reported incidence of 0%-18%. They are primarily associated with implantation of posterior cruciate substituting designs. These entities are the result of peripatellar fibrosynovial hyperplasia at the junction of the superior pole of the patella and the distal quadriceps tendon which becomes entrapped within the superior aspect of the intercondylar box of the femoral component during knee flexion. When the knee extends, a crepitant sensation occurs as the fibrosynovial tissue exits the intercondylar box. Numerous etiologies have been proposed such as femoral component designs with a high intercondylar box ratio, previous knee surgery, reduced patellar tendon length, thinner patellar components, reduced patella-patellar component composite thickness, and smaller femoral components. Preventative measures include choice of femoral components with a reduced intercondylar box ratio, use of thicker patellar components, avoidance of over-resection of the patella, and debridement of the fibrosynovial tissue at the time of knee arthroplasty. Most patients with crepitus are unaware of the problem or have minimal symptoms so that no treatment is required. If significant disability is incurred, symptoms can be eliminated in a high percentage of patients with arthroscopic debridement of the fibrosynovial hyperplasia. PMID:24605184

  18. Analysis and Treatment of Complications after Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Song; Lee, Jae Il; Kim, Jin Woo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the causes and types of complications after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and determine proper prevention and treatment methods. Materials and Methods A total of 1,576 UKAs were performed for osteoarthritis of the knee from January 2002 to December 2014 at one institution. We analyzed complications after UKA retrospectively and investigated proper methods of treatment. Results A total of 89 complications (5.6%) occurred after UKA. Regarding the type of complications after UKA, there were 42 cases of dislocation of the mobile bearing, 23 cases of loosening of the prosthesis, 6 cases of periprosthetic fracture, 3 cases of polyethylene wear, 3 cases of progression of arthritis in the contralateral compartment, 2 cases of medial collateral ligament injury, 2 cases of impingement, 5 cases of infection, 1 case of arthrofibrosis, and 2 cases of failure due to unexplained pain. The most common complication after UKA was mobile bearing dislocation in the mobile-bearing knees and loosening of the prosthesis in the fixed-bearing knees, but polyethylene wear and progression of arthritis were relatively rare. The complications were treated with conversion to total knee arthroplasty in 58 cases and simple bearing change in 21 cases. Conclusions The most common complication after UKA was dislocation of the mobile bearing. When a complication occurs after UKA, appropriate treatment should be performed after accurate analysis of the cause of complication. PMID:26952551

  19. Painful prosthesis: approaching the patient with persistent pain following total hip and knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Piscitelli, Prisco; Iolascon, Giovanni; Innocenti, Massimo; Civinini, Roberto; Rubinacci, Alessandro; Muratore, Maurizio; D’Arienzo, Michele; Leali, Paolo Tranquilli; Carossino, Anna Maria; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Symptomatic severe osteoarthritis and hip osteoporotic fractures are the main conditions requiring total hip arthroplasty (THA), whereas total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is mainly performed for pain, disability or deformity due to osteoarthritis. After surgery, some patients suffer from “painful prosthesis”, which currently represents a clinical problem. Methods A systematic review of scientific literature has been performed. A panel of experts has examined the issue of persistent pain following total hip or knee arthroplasty, in order to characterize etiopathological mechanisms and define how to cope with this condition. Results Four major categories (non infective, septic, other and idiopathic causes) have been identified as possible origin of persistent pain after total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Time to surgery, pain level and function impairment before surgical intervention, mechanical stress following prosthesis implant, osseointegration deficiency, and post-traumatic or allergic inflammatory response are all factors playing an important role in causing persistent pain after joint arthroplasty. Diagnosis of persistent pain should be made in case of post-operative pain (self-reported as VAS ≥3) persisting for at least 4 months after surgery, or new onset of pain (VAS ≥3) after the first 4 months, lasting ≥2 months. Acute pain reported as VAS score ≥7 in patients who underwent TJA should be always immediately investigated. Conclusions The cause of pain needs always to be indentified and removed whenever possible. Implant revision is indicated only when septic or aseptic loosening is diagnosed. Current evidence has shown that peri-and/or post-operative administration of bisphosphonates may have a role in pain management and periprosthetic bone loss prevention. PMID:24133526

  20. The economic impact of minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Coon, Thomas M

    2006-07-01

    The goals of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are to minimize surgical trauma, minimize blood loss, and maximize the effect of analgesia. Assuming these surgical procedures are successful and rigid fixation is achieved, the result, in theory, should be shorter hospital stays and successful, early, aggressive rehabilitation at reduced cost relative to standard TKA surgical techniques. In this article, I address the economic benefits of applying MIS TKA surgical techniques compared with standard TKA surgical techniques. PMID:16927653

  1. The pathogenesis of bone loss following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lewis, P L; Brewster, N T; Graves, S E

    1998-04-01

    Bone loss following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may be focal or diffuse. It may be caused mechanically, either by unloading of the bone leading to disuse osteoporosis, or by overloading of the bone leading to trabecular fractures and bone destruction. Osteolysis, instigated by an inflammatory reaction to particulate wear debris, is an important and common cause of bone loss after TKA. Less common, though sometimes dramatic, causes of bone loss are infection and osteonecrosis. PMID:9553564

  2. Rothia prosthetic knee joint infection.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Manish N; Malhotra, Prashant

    2015-08-01

    Rothia species - Gram-positive pleomorphic bacteria that are part of the normal oral and respiratory flora - are commonly associated with dental cavities and periodontal disease although systemic infections have been described. We describe a 53-year-old female with rheumatoid arthritis complicated by prosthetic knee joint infection due to Rothia species, which was successfully treated by surgical removal of prosthesis and prolonged antimicrobial therapy. The issue of antibiotic prophylaxis before dental procedures among patients with prosthetic joint replacements is discussed. PMID:23357608

  3. Assessing hospital cost of joint arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    BONIFORTI, FILIPPO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose total joint replacement is one of the most successful procedures in medicine and cost reimbursements to hospitals for the joint arthroplasty diagnosis-related group are among the largest payments made by a Regional Health Service. Despite the popularity of these procedures, there are few high-quality cost-effectiveness studies on this topic. This study evaluates the cost of total joint arthroplasty performed in a district hospital. Methods direct and indirect costs have been measured and patient procedure pathway was analyzed subdivided into three stages: surgical procedure, inpatient care and outpatient clinic. Results the cost of the surgical procedure stage was calculated as 3,798 euros, while that of the inpatient stage was 2,924 euros. The mean hospital costs per procedure amounted to 6,952 euros. Conclusions although the Health Service tariffs fully reimburse the cost of providing a joint replacement, our data contribute to point out the role of hospital staff’s organization to support sustainable improvements on health care for joint replacement surgery. Level of evidence Level VI, single economic evaluation. PMID:26904524

  4. Role of negative pressure wound therapy in total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Marcelo Bp; Ramanathan, Deepak; Klika, Alison K; Higuera, Carlos A; Barsoum, Wael K

    2016-01-18

    Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been a successful modality of wound management which is in widespread use in several surgical fields. The main mechanisms of action thought to play a role in enhancing wound healing and preventing surgical site infection are macrodeformation and microdeformation of the wound bed, fluid removal, and stabilization of the wound environment. Due to the devastating consequences of infection in the setting of joint arthroplasty, there has been some interest in the use of NPWT following total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty. However, there is still a scarcity of data reporting on the use of NPWT within this field and most studies are limited by small sample sizes, high variability of clinical settings and end-points. There is little evidence to support the use of NPWT as an adjunctive treatment for surgical wound drainage, and for this reason surgical intervention should not be delayed when indicated. The prophylactic use of NPWT after arthroplasty in patients that are at high risk for postoperative wound drainage appears to have the strongest clinical evidence. Several clinical trials including single-use NPWT devices for this purpose are currently in progress and this may soon be incorporated in clinical guidelines as a mean to prevent periprosthetic joint infections. PMID:26807353

  5. Role of negative pressure wound therapy in total hip and knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Marcelo BP; Ramanathan, Deepak; Klika, Alison K; Higuera, Carlos A; Barsoum, Wael K

    2016-01-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been a successful modality of wound management which is in widespread use in several surgical fields. The main mechanisms of action thought to play a role in enhancing wound healing and preventing surgical site infection are macrodeformation and microdeformation of the wound bed, fluid removal, and stabilization of the wound environment. Due to the devastating consequences of infection in the setting of joint arthroplasty, there has been some interest in the use of NPWT following total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty. However, there is still a scarcity of data reporting on the use of NPWT within this field and most studies are limited by small sample sizes, high variability of clinical settings and end-points. There is little evidence to support the use of NPWT as an adjunctive treatment for surgical wound drainage, and for this reason surgical intervention should not be delayed when indicated. The prophylactic use of NPWT after arthroplasty in patients that are at high risk for postoperative wound drainage appears to have the strongest clinical evidence. Several clinical trials including single-use NPWT devices for this purpose are currently in progress and this may soon be incorporated in clinical guidelines as a mean to prevent periprosthetic joint infections. PMID:26807353

  6. Popliteal pseudoaneurysm after total knee arthroplasty: a report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Geertsema, Dorien; Defoort, Koen C; van Hellemondt, Gijs G

    2012-09-01

    Although the incidence of vascular injuries after total knee arthroplasty is quite low, clinical outcome could be significantly impaired. Quick response and accurate management are important to achieve the best possible outcome. We present 3 cases of popliteal pseudoaneurysm formation after total knee arthroplasty and their treatment by endovascular stenting together with a review of literature. PMID:22425296

  7. Double-concave deformity of the polyethylene tibial post in posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Niki, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Hideo; Yoshimine, Fumihiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Suda, Yasunori; Banks, Scott A

    2010-04-01

    This report describes a unique case of bilateral total knee arthroplasty necessitating revision of the polyethylene insert, which showed prominent marks on the tibial post resulting from repeated seiza-style sitting. The patient presented 7 years postoperatively with knee pain and flexion disturbance due to continuous joint effusion persisting for more than 4 months. Proliferating synovia throughout the joint revealed reactive synovitis to polyethylene particles. The retrieved polyethylene inserts displayed double-concave deformity of the tibial post with burnishing and creep in tibiofemoral articulation. The damage pattern of retrieved polyethylene inserts reflected the data from tibiofemoral contact location obtained using a shape-matching technique in the early postoperative phase. This case provides an example of damage to the polyethylene tibial post caused by a floor-sitting lifestyle and the potential clinical sequelae. PMID:19261434

  8. Severe persistent synovitis after cobalt-chromium total knee arthroplasty requiring revision.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Raman R; Ast, Michael P; McGraw, Michael; Bostrom, Mathias P; Rodriguez, Jose A; Parks, Michael L

    2013-04-01

    Implant-related hypersensitivity is a well-established cause of failure after total hip arthroplasty but is a rare complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It remains a relatively unpredictable and poorly understood cause of implant-related failure. This article describes 5 patients (6 knees) who presented with persistent pain and hypertrophic synovitis after TKA using a cobalt-chromium component. Extensive perioperative workup, including white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, joint aspiration, and intraoperative cultures, ruled out infection as a cause of the symptoms. All knees demonstrated appropriate ligamentous balance and were well aligned, with all components noted to be well fixed at revision. In all patients, the clinical condition improved dramatically after revision to zirconium femoral and titanium metal-backed tibial components. Pain and functional outcome scores improved in all patients. Intraoperative histopathology revealed a thickened synovium with either a predominantly lymphocytic or histiocytic monocellular response. Final pathology confirmed that no infection was present in any patient. The goal of TKA is to produce a well-performing, pain-free joint. When patients present with recurrent pain and synovitis after TKA, infection must be excluded. When infection and instability have been excluded, metal hypersensitivity should be considered as a cause of primary TKA failure. In these patients, revision to a zirconium femoral component can provide predictable and effective clinical improvement. PMID:23590796

  9. Early Quadriceps Strength Loss After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mizner, Ryan L; Petterson, Stephanie C; Stevens, Jennifer E; Vandenborne, Krista; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2005-01-01

    Background: While total knee arthroplasty reduces pain and provides a functional range of motion of the knee, quadriceps weakness and reduced functional capacity typically are still present one year after surgery. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the role of failure of voluntary muscle activation and muscle atrophy in the early loss of quadriceps strength after surgery. Methods: Twenty patients with unilateral knee osteoarthritis were tested an average of ten days before and twenty-seven days after primary total knee arthroplasty. Quadriceps strength and voluntary muscle activation were measured with use of a burst-superimposition technique in which a supramaximal burst of electrical stimulation is superimposed on a maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Maximal quadriceps cross-sectional area was assessed with use of magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Postoperatively, quadriceps strength was decreased by 62%, voluntary activation was decreased by 17%, and maximal cross-sectional area was decreased by 10% in comparison with the preoperative values; these differences were significant (p < 0.01). Collectively, failure of voluntary muscle activation and atrophy explained 85% of the loss of quadriceps strength (p < 0.001). Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that failure of voluntary activation contributed nearly twice as much as atrophy did to the loss of quadriceps strength. The severity of knee pain with muscle contraction did not change significantly compared with the preoperative level (p = 0.31). Changes in knee pain during strength-testing did not account for a significant amount of the change in voluntary activation (p = 0.14). Conclusions: Patients who are managed with total knee arthroplasty have profound impairment of quadriceps strength one month after surgery. This impairment is predominantly due to failure of voluntary muscle activation, and it is also influenced, to a lesser degree, by muscle atrophy. Knee pain with

  10. Trends and predictors of opioid use after total knee and total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Goesling, Jenna; Moser, Stephanie E; Zaidi, Bilal; Hassett, Afton L; Hilliard, Paul; Hallstrom, Brian; Clauw, Daniel J; Brummett, Chad M

    2016-06-01

    Few studies have assessed postoperative trends in opioid cessation and predictors of persistent opioid use after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA). Preoperatively, 574 TKA and THA patients completed validated, self-report measures of pain, functioning, and mood and were longitudinally assessed for 6 months after surgery. Among patients who were opioid naive the day of surgery, 8.2% of TKA and 4.3% of THA patients were using opioids at 6 months. In comparison, 53.3% of TKA and 34.7% of THA patients who reported opioid use the day of surgery continued to use opioids at 6 months. Patients taking >60 mg oral morphine equivalents preoperatively had an 80% likelihood of persistent use postoperatively. Day of surgery predictors for 6-month opioid use by opioid-naive patients included greater overall body pain (P = 0.002), greater affected joint pain (knee/hip) (P = 0.034), and greater catastrophizing (P = 0.010). For both opioid-naive and opioid users on the day of surgery, decreases in overall body pain from baseline to 6 months were associated with decreased odds of being on opioids at 6 months (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 0.72, P = 0.050; aOR = 0.62, P = 0.001); however, change in affected joint pain (knee/hip) was not predictive of opioid use (aOR = 0.99, P = 0.939; aOR = 1.00, P = 0.963). In conclusion, many patients taking opioids before surgery continue to use opioids after arthroplasty and some opioid-naive patients remained on opioids; however, persistent opioid use was not associated with change in joint pain. Given the growing concerns about chronic opioid use, the reasons for persistent opioid use and perioperative prescribing of opioids deserve further study. PMID:26871536

  11. Preoperative Predictors of Pain Following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Noiseux, Nicolas O.; Callaghan, John J.; Clark, Charles R.; Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Sluka, Kathleen A.; Rakel, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty has provided dramatic improvements in function and pain for the majority of patients with knee arthritis, yet a significant proportion of patients remain dissatisfied with their results. We performed a prospective analysis of 215 patients undergoing TKA who underwent a comprehensive array of evaluations to discover whether any preoperative assessment could predict high pain scores and functional limitations postoperatively. Patients with severe pain with a simple knee range-of-motion test prior to TKA had a 10x higher likelihood of moderate to severe pain at 6 months. A simple test of pain intensity with active flexion and extension preoperatively was a significant predictor of postoperative pain at 6 months after surgery. Strategies to address this particular patient group may improve satisfaction rates of TKA. PMID:24630598

  12. Acute Patellar Tendon Rupture after Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Seung Joon; Pham, The Hien

    2015-01-01

    Patellar tendon rupture is a catastrophic complication following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Though revision TKA has been suspected of being a predisposing factor for the occurrence of patellar tendon rupture, there are few reports on patellar tendon rupture after revision TKA. Here, we present a case of acute patellar tendon rupture that occurred after TKA revision. In the patient, the patellar tendon was so thin and could not be repaired, and accordingly was sutured end to end. We used the anterior tibialis tendon allograft to augment the poor quality patellar tendon tissue. Fixation of the allograft was done by using the bone tunnel created through tibial tuberosity and suturing the allograft to the patellar tendon and quadriceps tendon. The patient was instructed to wear a full extension knee splint and was kept non-weight bearing for 6 weeks after operation. Full knee extension could be achieved 6 weeks postoperatively. PMID:26060612

  13. Correcting deformity in total knee arthroplasty: Techniques to avoid the release of collateral ligaments in severely deformed knees.

    PubMed

    Mullaji, A B; Shetty, G M

    2016-01-01

    Collateral ligament release is advocated in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) to deal with significant coronal plane deformities, but is also associated with significant disadvantages. We describe steps to avoid release of the collateral (superficial medial and lateral collateral) ligaments during TKA in severely deformed knees, while correcting deformity and balancing the knee. PMID:26733653

  14. CLINICAL OUTCOME AFTER INFECTED TOTAL KNEE AND TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Mittag, Falk; Leichtle, Carmen Ina; Schlumberger, Michael; Leichtle, Ulf Gunther; Wünschel, Markus

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Infection after total hip (THA) and knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a serious complication which typically leads to a long lasting and intensive surgical and medicamentous treatment. The aim of this study was to identify factors that influence outcome after revision surgery caused by prosthetic infection. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 64 patients who had revision surgery between 1989 and 2009 due to periprosthetic infection. We examined a total of 69 joints (TKA: 36%, THA: 64%), follow-up 5.1 years (0.5-21 years) after the initial surgical intervention. The mean patient age at time of surgery was 67 years old (43-79 years old). Clinical data and scores including the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC)-Index, the Harris Hip Score (HHS) and the Hospital for Special Surgery Score (HSS) were surveyed. Results: There was no difference in clinical scores regarding treatment between a single and a multiple stage treatment regime. Infections with multiple microorganisms and Enterococcus spp. lead to a significantly higher number of interventions. Using a modified Tsukayama system we classified 24% as type I, 34% type II and 42% type III- infections, with no differences in clinical outcome. Overweight patients had a significantly lower HHS and WOMAC-score. Immunosuppression leads to a worse WOMAC and HSS-Score. An increased number of procedures was associated to a limping gait. Conclusion: Thorough surgical technique leads to good clinical results independent of infection-type and treatment philosophy. Level of Evidence III, Case Control Study. PMID:26997914

  15. Compartment syndrome after total knee arthroplasty: regarding a clinical case☆

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Ana Alexandra da Costa; Marques, Pedro Miguel Dantas Costa; Sá, Pedro Miguel Gomes; Oliveira, Carolina Fernandes; da Silva, Bruno Pombo Ferreira; de Sousa, Cristina Maria Varino

    2015-01-01

    Although compartment syndrome is a rare complication of total knee arthroplasty, it is one of the most devastating complications. It is defined as a situation of increased pressure within a closed osteofascial space that impairs the circulation and the functioning of the tissues inside this space, thereby leading to ischemia and tissue dysfunction. Here, a clinical case of a patient who was followed up in orthopedic outpatient consultations due to right gonarthrosis is presented. The patient had a history of arthroscopic meniscectomy and presented knee flexion of 10° before the operation, which consisted of total arthroplasty of the right knee. The operation seemed to be free from intercurrences, but the patient evolved with compartment syndrome of the ipsilateral leg after the operation. Since compartment syndrome is a true surgical emergency, early recognition and treatment of this condition through fasciotomy is crucial in order to avoid amputation, limb dysfunction, kidney failure and death. However, it may be difficult to make the diagnosis and cases may not be recognized if the cause of compartment syndrome is unusual or if the patient is under epidural analgesia and/or peripheral nerve block, which thus camouflages the main warning sign, i.e. disproportional pain. In addition, edema of the limb that underwent the intervention is common after total knee arthroplasty operations. This study presents a review of the literature and signals that the possible rarity of cases is probably due to failure to recognize this condition in a timely manner and to placing these patients in other diagnostic groups that are less likely, such as neuropraxia caused by using a tourniquet or peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26401507

  16. Contact stresses with an unresurfaced patella in total knee arthroplasty: the effect of femoral component design.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, S; Ishinishi, T; Whiteside, L A

    2000-03-01

    Compressive contact stresses between the patella and the anterior femur were measured with a digital electronic sensor before and after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in 10 cadaver knee specimens. Contact stresses were measured first in normal knees, then after TKA with the Insall-Burstein Total Condylar, Miller Galante II, Ortholoc II, Porous Coated Anatomic, and Profix knee prostheses implanted without resurfacing the patella. The Insall-Burstein, Miller-Galante II, and Ortholoc II prostheses had significantly higher contact stresses than the normal knee throughout the flexion arc. The Porous Coated Anatomic, which has a smooth patellar groove, maintained contact area as in the normal knee and did not have significantly higher contact stresses at flexion angles <90 degrees. At flexion angles > or =105 degrees, patellofemoral contact occurred in two small areas as the patella encountered the intercondylar notch in all components except the Profix. The Profix maintained full contact and low compressive stresses throughout the full flexion arc because of its posteriorly extended patellar groove. Design features of the patellofemoral portion of TKA components are important factors that affect contact stresses in the patellofemoral joint. These features likely will affect the clinical results of TKA with an unresurfaced patella. PMID:10741365

  17. Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    Proposed orthotic knee joint locks and unlocks automatically, at any position within range of bend angles, without manual intervention by wearer. Includes tang and clevis, locks whenever wearer transfers weight to knee and unlocks when weight removed. Locking occurs at any angle between 45 degrees knee bend and full extension.

  18. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3580 - Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic... § 888.3580 Knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint patellar (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device made...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3590 - Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing... Knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint tibial (hemi-knee) metallic resurfacing uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  6. Automatic locking knee brace joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention is an apparatus for controlling the pivotal movement of a knee brace comprising a tang-and-clevis joint that has been uniquely modified. Both the tang and the clevis have a set of teeth that, when engaged, can lock the tang and the clevis together. In addition, the tang is biased away from the clevis. Consequently, when there is no axial force (i.e., body weight) on the tang, the tang is free to pivot within the clevis. However, when an axial force is exerted on the tang, the tang is pushed into the clevis, both sets of teeth engage, and the tang and the clevis lock together.

  7. Cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R; Ribeiro, F; Oliveira, J

    2010-03-01

    The effects of cryotherapy on joint position sense are not clearly established; however it is paramount to understand its impact on peripheral feedback to ascertain the safety of using ice therapy before resuming exercise on sports or rehabilitation settings. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the effects of cryotherapy, when applied over the quadriceps and over the knee joint, on knee position sense. This within-subjects repeated-measures study encompassed fifteen subjects. Knee position sense was measured by open kinetic chain technique and active positioning at baseline and after cryotherapy application. Knee angles were determined by computer analysis of the videotape images. Twenty-minute ice bag application was applied randomly, in two sessions 48 h apart, over the quadriceps and the knee joint. The main effect for cryotherapy application was significant (F (1.14)=7.7, p=0.015) indicating an increase in both absolute and relative angular errors after the application. There was no significant main effect for the location of cryotherapy application, indicating no differences between the application over the quadriceps and the knee joint. In conclusion, cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense in normal knees. This deleterious effect is similar when cryotherapy is applied over the quadriceps or the knee joint. PMID:20221997

  8. Is There an Ideal Patellar Thickness Following Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Pierce, Todd P; Jauregui, Julio J; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Elmallah, Randa K; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic surgeons resurface the patella during total knee arthroplasty to avoid complications such as pain, patello-femoral arthritis, and patellar maltracking and to reduce the risk for reoperation. However, many complications, such as decreased range of motion, increased fractures, and polyethylene wear, have been described with this procedure. One determinant when resurfacing a patella is the thickness of its cuts. This review aims to investigate the relationship between patellar thickness and outcome parameters such as range of motion, patient-reported outcomes, periprosthetic fractures, and reoperations. PMID:26726982

  9. PAIN FOLLOWING TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY – A SYSTEMATIC APPROACH

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Wilson Mello; Migon, Eduardo Zaniol; Zabeu, Jose Luis Amim

    2015-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is known to be a successful procedure. The aging of the population and the growing demand for quality of life have greatly increased the indications for the procedure. Nonetheless, TKA presents some complications that still lack definitive resolution. Pain after TKA is caused by a myriad of reasons that need to be systematically studied in order to reach the correct diagnosis and treatment. History, physical examination, laboratory tests and imaging examinations must all be included in the workup and repeated until a plausible reason has been identified, since if pain is the only indication for TKA revision, the results may be catastrophic. PMID:27022583

  10. Achieving ligament stability and correct rotational alignment of the femur in knee arthroplasty: a study using the Medial Pivot knee.

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, David; Kinzel, Vera; Ledger, Michael

    2005-12-01

    In a series of 90 Medial Pivot arthroplasties rotational alignment of the femur was achieved by provisionally reconstructing the lateral side of the joint and tensioning the medial side with feeler gauges. Axial CT scans were employed to measure the rotational alignment relative to surgical epicondylar axis. In valgus knees the cutting block was externally rotated to adjust for posterolateral bone loss. The mean rotational alignment of the femur was 0.6 degrees of external rotation (S.D. 1.3, range 3 degrees of ER to 4 degrees of IR). The mean laxity of the medial ligament was 1 mm in flexion (SD 1, range 0-5 mm) and 0.5 mm in flexion (S.D. 0.5, range 0-2 mm) In those knees in which the medial ligament had been released the CT alignment was perfect, but when internally rotated against the hip 3-4 mm of gapping was noted. In valgus knees the mean rotation of the femoral component was 0.8 degrees of internal rotation (S.D. 1.5, range 1 degrees of IR to 4 degrees of ER). In spite of externally rotating the cutting block there was still a tendency to internally rotate the femur in some knees. This simple technique achieves the two goals of ligament stability and correct rotational alignment in a high proportion of cases. It may be applicable to any instrument system which employs posterior referencing. PMID:15967668

  11. Treating Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... osteotomy may need knee replacement surgery in the future. Arthroplasty is also called joint or knee replacement therapy. A surgeon removes the part of the knee damaged by osteoarthritis and replaces it with an artificial joint made from metals and plastic. All or part of the knee joint may ...

  12. Predictors of bone loss in revision total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Michael R; Klika, Alison K; Lee, Ho H; Joyce, David M; Mehta, Priyesh; Barsoum, Wael K

    2010-03-01

    Revision total knee arthroplasty (RTKA) requires preoperative planning to enable the reconstruction of bony deficiencies. The objective of this project was to identify predictors of bone loss management at RTKA based on the preoperative failure mode and patient demographics known preoperatively. We retrospectively reviewed 245 consecutive RTKA procedures in which the same revision knee system was utilized. Patient demographic and treatment data were recorded, and locations of bone loss were identified based on the reconstructive management. We identified significant predictors for use of femoral augments at all four positions. Several predictors significantly predisposed to use of a thick (>19 mm) polyethylene; however, no predictors of tibial augments were significant. Although the reconstruction of bone loss is primarily based on the intraoperative assessment, these findings may provide additional information to help the surgeon prepare for difficult revision procedures. PMID:20812582

  13. Load transfer characteristics of a noncemented total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, L A; Pafford, J

    1989-02-01

    This study evaluated load transfer characteristics of femoral and tibial components of a total knee prosthesis that was designed to achieve distal femoral and proximal tibial compressive load-bearing. Strain gauge readings were highest on the cortex of the tibial metaphyseal flare. Roentgenograms of 110 patients with noncemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with follow-up periods of 12-24 months were evaluated. Cancellous bone hypertrophy bridging from the undersurface of the tibial component to the metaphyseal cortical bone was noted on all roentgenograms at six months, suggesting stress transfer through cancellous bone to this area. Anterolateral sinking was noted in six of the first 46 patients but was not seen again in the series after a design change was made to more rigidly fix the stem in the bone of the upper tibia. Roentgenograms of the femoral components demonstrated distal bone hypertrophy suggesting compressive load bearing. None of the femoral components migrated or sank. PMID:2912617

  14. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. Method: We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance images to reconstruct solid bones and attachments of ligaments, and assemble femoral and tibial components according representative literatures and operational specifications. Dynamic data of axial tibial rotation and femoral translation from full-extension to 135 were measured for analyzing the motion of knee models. Findings: The computational simulation results show that comparing with the posterior cruciate ligament retained knee model and the posterior cruciate ligament substituted knee model, reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament improves the posterior movement of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation through a full range of flexion. The maximum posterior translations of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee are 15.3 mm, 4.6 mm and 20.6 at 135 of flexion. Interpretation: Reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty has been approved to be an more efficient way of maintaining normal knee kinematics comparing to posterior cruciate ligament retained and posterior cruciate ligament substituted total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27347334

  15. [Intraoperative Evaluation of Total Knee Arthroplasty: Anatomic and Kinematic Assessment with Trial Components].

    PubMed

    von Roth, P; Pfitzner, T; Fuchs, M; Perka, C

    2015-06-01

    The intraoperative use of trial components in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is of paramount importance to prevent inadequate ligament balance and to achieve optimal position of the definitive components. This review demonstrates an 8-step algorithm to assess the anatomy of the femoral, tibial and patellar component as well as the kinematics of the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints. Trial components allow an easy assessment of the anatomic fit of the final implants. Upon the trials insertion, bone coverage and the component overhang should be evaluated. The femoral rotation should be assessed using the transepicondylar axis and for the tibial component rotation assessment, the tibial tuberosity would be the most reliable bony landmark. Addressing the patella, sizing and bone coverage should be thoroughly evaluated. In order to restore physiological kinematics the remnants of the meniscus rim can be used to determine the correct reconstruction of the joint line. A tight extension gap results in limited extension, whereas a tight or unbalanced flexion gap leads to "booking" or "spin-out" of the inlay. The POLO test (pull-out, lift- off) allows an easy assessment of the posterior cruciate ligament tension and the size of the flexion gap as well. To prevent postoperative dislocation and overstuffing, specific tests for correct patellar positioning and tracking support should be performed. The anatomy and kinematics of total knee arthroplasty have to be evaluated by trial components on a routine basis before inserting the final implants in order to identify implant positioning errors and inadequate ligament balance. PMID:26114563

  16. Clinical and Biomechanical Evaluations of Staged Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty Patients with Two Different Implant Designs

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, Alexandre; Fuentes, Alexandre; Hagemeister, Nicola; Lavigne, Martin; Vendittoli, Pascal-André

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various implants of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are used in clinical practice and each presents specific design characteristics. No implant managed this day to reproduce perfectly the biomechanics of the natural knee during gait. Objectives: We therefore asked whether (1) differences in tridimensional (3D) kinematic data during gait could be observed in two different designs of TKA on the same patients, (2) if those gait kinematic data are comparable with those of asymptomatic knees and (3) if difference in clinical subjective scores can be observed between the two TKA designs on the same patient. Methods: We performed knee kinematic analysis on 15 patients (30 TKAs) with two different TKA implant designs (Nexgen, Zimmer and Triathlon, Stryker) on each knee and on 25 asymptomatic subjects (35 knees). Clinical evaluation included range of motion, weight bearing radiographs, questionnaire of joint perception, KOOS, WOMAC and SF-12. Results: Comparison between TKAs and asymptomatic knees revealed that asymptomatic knees had significantly less knee flexion at initial contact (p < 0.04) and more flexion for most of the swing phase (p between 0.004 and 0.04). Asymptomatic knees also had less varus at loading response, during stance phase and during most of the swing phase (p between 0.001 - 0.05). Transverse plane analysis showed a tendency for asymptomatic knees to be more in internal rotation during stance phase (p 0.02 - 0.04). Comparing both TKA designs, NexgenTM implant had significantly more flexion at the end of swing phase (p = 0.04) compared to knees with the TriathlonTM implant. In frontal plane, from initial contact to maximum mid stance angle and between the mean mid stance angle and initial contact NexgenTM TKA had significantly more adduction (varus, p =0.02 – 0.03). Clinical scores of both TKAs did not have significant difference. Conclusions: TKA with the tested implants did not reproduce natural knee kinematics during gait. In our cohort

  17. Total knee arthroplasty using subvastus approach in stiff knee: A retrospective analysis of 110 cases

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilen A; Patil, Hitendra Gulabrao; Vaishnav, Vinod O; Savale, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    Background: Subvastus approach used in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is known to produce an earlier recovery but is not commonly utilized for TKA when the preoperative range of motion (ROM) of the knee is limited. Subvastus approach is known for its ability to give earlier recovery due to less postoperative pain and early mobilization (due to rapid quadriceps recovery). Subvastus approach is considered as a relative contraindication for TKA in knees with limited ROM due to difficulty in exposure which can increase risk of complications such as patellar tendon avulsion or medial collateral injury. Short stature and obesity are also relative contraindications. Tarabichi successfully used subvastus approach in knees with limited preoperative ROM. However, there are no large series in literature with the experience of the subvatus approach in knees with limited preoperative ROM. We are presenting our experience of the subvastus approach for TKA in knees with limited ROM. Materials and Methods: We conducted retrospective analysis of patients with limited preoperative ROM (flexion ≤90°) of the knee who underwent TKA using subvastus approach and presenting the 2 years results. There were a total 84 patients (110 knees) with mean age 64 (range 49–79 years) years. The mean preoperative flexion was 72° (range 40°–90°) with a total ROM of 64° (range 36°–90°). Results: Postoperatively knee flexion improved by mean 38° (P < 0.05) which was significant as assed by Student's t- test. The mean knee society score improved from 36 (range 20–60) to 80 (range 70–90) postoperatively (P < 0.05). There was one case of partial avulsion of patellar tendon from the tibial tubercle. Conclusions: We concluded that satisfactory results of TKA can be obtained in knees with limited preoperative ROM using subvastus approach maintaining the advantages of early mobilization. PMID:27053806

  18. Review of Arthroscopic and Histological Findings Following Knee Inlay Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Markarian, Gregory G; Kambour, Michael T; Uribe, John W

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of cartilage rim loading in defects exceeding the threshold diameter of 10 mm is well documented. Contoured defect fill off-loads the perimeter and counteracts further delamination and progression of defects. When biological procedures have failed, inlay arthroplasty follows these concepts. The human biological response to contoured metallic surface implants has not been described. Four patients underwent non-implant-related, second-look arthroscopy following inlay arthroplasty for bi- (n=3) and tricompartmental (n=1) knee arthrosis without subchondral bone collapse. Arthroscopic probing of the implant-cartilage interface of nine prosthetic components did not show signs of implant-cartilage gap formation, loosening, or subsidence. The implant periphery was consistently covered by cartilage confluence leading to a reduction of the original defect size diameter. Femoral condyle cartilage flow appeared to have more hyaline characteristics. Trochlear cartilage flow showed greater histological variability and less organization with fibrocartilage and synovialized scar tissue. This review reconfirmed previous basic science results and demonstrated effective defect fill and rim off-loading with inlay arthroplasty. PMID:27082884

  19. Similar outcome for total knee arthroplasty after previous high tibial osteotomy and for total knee arthroplasty as the first measure.

    PubMed

    W-Dahl, Annette; Robertsson, Otto

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - Patients having a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) after a previous high tibial osteotomy (HTO) constitute a minor group among those undergoing primary TKA for knee osteoarthritis (OA). There have been few reports on whether such patients differ pre- and postoperatively from those who undergo TKA as the first measure. We evaluated patient characteristics, knee-related pain, function, quality of life, and general health before and 1 year after TKA surgery in these 2 groups of patients. Patients and methods - We included 119 HTOs that were operated on for knee OA in the Skåne region, Sweden, in the period1998-2007 and that had been converted to a TKA during 2009-2013 (the C group). We also included 5,013 primary TKAs performed for knee OA in the same region, during the same period, and in patients of the same age range (42-82 years) (the P group). The patients were evaluated with the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and the EQ-VAS preoperatively and 1 year after the TKA surgery, when they were also asked about their satisfaction with the surgery. Case-mix variables available were Charnley category, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification, sex, age, and body mass index (BMI). Results - Most of the HTOs were performed using open-wedge osteotomy with external fixation (81 of 119). Compared to the P group, the patients in the C group were more often men, were younger, and were healthier (according to the ASA classification). With respect to pre- and postoperative knee-related pain, function, quality of life, and general health, the 2 groups had similar mean values without any statistically significant differences. A similar proportion of patients in the 2 groups were satisfied with the surgery 1 year postoperatively (82% vs. 80%). Interpretation - Our findings indicate that HTO is a reasonable alternative for delaying TKA surgery in younger and/or physically active OA patients. PMID:27339330

  20. Acute Infection in Total Knee Arthroplasty: Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Pastor, Juan Carlos; Maculé-Beneyto, Francisco; Suso-Vergara, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Infection is one of the most serious complications after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The current incidence of prosthetic knee infection is 1-3%, depending on the series. For treatment and control to be more cost effective, multidisciplinary groups made up of professionals from different specialities who can work together to eradicate these kinds of infections need to be assembled. About the microbiology, Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococcus were among the most frequent microorganisms involved (74%). Anamnesis and clinical examination are of primary importance in order to determine whether the problem may point to a possible acute septic complication. The first diagnosis may then be supported by increased CRP and ESR levels. The surgical treatment for a chronic prosthetic knee infection has been perfectly defined and standardized, and consists in a two-stage implant revision process. In contrast, the treatment for acute prosthetic knee infection is currently under debate. Considering the different surgical techniques that already exist, surgical debridement with conservation of the prosthesis and polythene revision appears to be an attractive option for both surgeon and patient, as it is less aggressive than the two-stage revision process and has lower initial costs. The different results obtained from this technique, along with prognosis factors and conclusions to keep in mind when it is indicated for an acute prosthetic infection, whether post-operative or haematogenous, will be analysed by the authors. PMID:23919094

  1. Curvature analysis of femoral shaft in total knee arthroplasty patient and control group.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ki Seon; Oh, Wang Kyun; Shin, Ji Yun; Cho, Byung Ki; Lee, Tae Soo

    2013-01-01

    For some patients with joint illnesses such as rheumarthritis or varus deformity, the total knee arthroplasty (TKA) procedures are performed. However, when inserting metal cutting guide for the procedures, due to the femoral shaft bowing, complications such as the cortex of the femoral shaft damages or secondary fractures can be caused. If the central coordinate value of the femoral shaft is known, the metal cutting guide could be inserted into the anatomical center, so such complications can be prevented. In this study, CT images of femoral shafts of 10 individuals in the experiment group who are in need of receiving the total knee arthroplasty procedures and those of 10 individuals in the control group without illness in the femoral shaft have been utilized to locate the 3-dimensional coordinate values. Then, Matlab was utilized to identify the central coordinate value in order to obtain a graph reflecting the anatomical shapes as well as to acquire the 3-dimensional curvature values by section. As a result, the average curvature range of femoral shafts of the experiment group was determined to be 631.2 mm whereas the average curvature range of femoral shafts of the control group was determined to be 1430.4 mm. The statistical significant of the measured results was verified through ANOVA analysis. Based on these results, it was verified that the level of curvature of the femoral shaft of the experiment group was higher. If the anatomical central points are located and analyzed using this methodology, it would be helpful in performing orthopedic operations such as the total knee arthroplasty. PMID:24110202

  2. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  5. Activity Levels in Healthy Older Adults: Implications for Joint Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Thorp, Laura E.; Orozco, Diego; Block, Joel A.; Sumner, Dale R.; Wimmer, Markus A.

    2012-01-01

    This work evaluated activity levels in a group of healthy older adults to establish a target activity level for adults of similar age after total joint arthroplasty (TJA). With the decreasing age of TJA patients, it is essential to have a reference for activity level in younger patients as activity level affects quality of life and implant design. 54 asymptomatic, healthy older adults with no clinical evidence of lower extremity OA participated. The main outcome measure, average daily step count, was measured using an accelerometer-based activity monitor. On average the group took 8813 ± 3611 steps per day, approximately 4000 more steps per day than has been previously reported in patients following total joint arthroplasty. The present work provides a reference for activity after joint arthroplasty which is relevant given the projected number of people under the age of 65 who will undergo joint arthroplasty in the coming years. PMID:23577274

  6. Usefulness of the Korean Knee Score for Evaluation of the Results of Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Kyu; Shim, Ji-Hoon; Chung, Kyu-Sung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Korean Knee score (KKS) was designed to reflect the floor-sitting lifestyle that necessitates high knee flexion. The purpose of this study is to assess whether the KKS reflects the floor-sitting lifestyle more accurately than the previously developed Knee Society clinical rating system. In addition, the presence of ceiling effects was compared between the two rating systems. Materials and Methods Eighty-one consecutive patients (120 knees) who were assessed regularly after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) on an outpatient basis between January 2012 and December 2012 were enrolled. All patients were asked to complete a questionnaire to assess the Knee Society Knee score (KSKS), Knee Society Function score (KSFS), and KKS. Results At the final follow-up, the mean KSKS, KSFS, and KKS were 91.2, 86.0, and 70.1, respectively, and the scores were similar between the ≥125° maximum flexion group and <125° maximum flexion group. However, the 'floor life' subdomain score of the KKS was significantly higher in the >125° maximum flexion group (15.13 vs. 11.24, p=0.001). The number of cases with the highest possible score was 24 (20%) for the KSKS and 47 (39%) for the KSFS, whereas none of the cases obtained the highest possible KKS. According to the standard deviation method, more substantial ceiling effects were present in the KSKS (83 cases, 69.1%) and KSFS (67 cases, 55.8%) than in the KKS (23 cases, 19.2%). Conclusions Although, the KKS was effective in reducing the ceiling effect, it demonstrated limited improvement in assessing the ability to perform high knee flexion after TKA. However, the 'floor life' subdomain of KSS appeared to be valid for evaluating high flexion of the knee. PMID:25750889

  7. Effect of Pedal Deformity on Gait in a Patient With Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wynes, Jacob; Lamm, Bradley M; Bhave, Anil; Elmallah, Randa K; Mont, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The authors present the case of an 81-year-old man who, despite an anatomically aligned total knee arthroplasty, continued to have knee pain. The patient's ipsilateral rigid flatfoot caused by an earlier partial pedal amputation resulted in a valgus moment during gait, thus creating clinical symptoms in the total knee arthroplasty. Because of the deformity and scarring within the flatfoot, this valgus deformity was corrected through a varus distal femoral osteotomy. The result was normalization of the mechanical axis of the lower limb and a pain-free total knee arthroplasty with an excellent clinical outcome. This case shows the importance of comprehensive lower-extremity clinical and radiographic examination as well as gait analysis to understand the biomechanical effect on total knee arthroplasty. Recognition of pedal deformities and lower limb malalignment is paramount for achieving optimal outcomes and long-term success of total knee arthroplasty. The authors show that a rigid or nonflexible pedal deformity can have negative biomechanical effects on total knee arthroplasty. PMID:26709556

  8. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Retention versus Posterior Stabilization for Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Bian, Yanyan; Feng, Bin; Weng, Xisheng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although being debated for many years, the superiority of posterior cruciate-retaining (CR) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and posterior-stabilized (PS) TKA remains controversial. We compare the knee scores, post-operative knee range of motion (ROM), radiological outcomes about knee kinematic and complications between CR TKA and PS TKA. Methods Literature published up to August 2015 was searched in PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases, and meta-analysis was performed using the software, Review Manager version 5.3. Results Totally 14 random control trials (RCTs) on this topic were included for the analysis, which showed that PS and CR TKA had no significant difference in Knee Society knee Score (KSS), pain score (KSPS), Hospital for Special Surgery score (HSS), kinematic characteristics including postoperative component alignment, tibial posterior slope and joint line, and complication rate. However, PS TKA is superior to CR TKA regarding post-operative knee range of motion (ROM) [Random Effect model (RE), Mean Difference (MD) = -7.07, 95% Confidential Interval (CI) -10.50 to -3.65, p<0.0001], improvement of ROM (Fixed Effect model (FE), MD = -5.66, 95% CI -10.79 to -0.53, p = 0.03) and femoral-tibial angle [FE, MD = 0.85, 95% CI 0.46 to 1.25, p<0.0001]. Conclusions There are no clinically relevant differences between CR and PS TKA in terms of clinical, functional, radiological outcome, and complications, while PS TKA is superior to CR TKA in respects of ROM, while whether this superiority matters or not in clinical practice still needs further investigation and longer follow-up. PMID:26824368

  9. Advances in Small Joint Arthroplasty of the Hand

    PubMed Central

    Adkinson, Joshua M.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Substantial effort has been directed at the development of small joint prostheses for the hand. Despite advances in prosthetic joint design, outcomes have been relatively unchanged over the past 60 years. Pain relief and range of motion achieved after surgery have yet to mirror the success of large joint arthroplasty. Innovations in biotechnology and stem cell applications for damaged joint surfaces may someday make prostheses obsolete. The purpose of this review is to describe the current status, ongoing advances, and future of small joint arthroplasty of the hand. PMID:25415093

  10. Biomechanics of knee joint — A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madeti, Bhaskar Kumar; Chalamalasetti, Srinivasa Rao; Bolla Pragada, S. K. Sundara siva rao

    2015-06-01

    The present paper is to know how the work is carried out in the field of biomechanics of knee. Various model formulations are discussed and further classified into mathematical model, two-dimensional model and three-dimensional model. Knee geometry is a crucial part of human body movement, in which how various views of knee is shown in different planes and how the forces act on tibia and femur are studied. It leads to know the forces acting on the knee joint. Experimental studies of knee geometry and forces acting on knee shown by various researchers have been discussed, and comparisons of results are made. In addition, static and dynamic analysis of knee has been also discussed respectively to some extent.

  11. Infected total knee arthroplasty due to postoperative wound contamination with Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Bala; Holloway, Edward; Townsend, Robert; Sutton, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a small Gram-negative bacterium comprising part of the normal gastrointestinal and nasopharyngeal flora of domestic pets, such as dogs and cats. It rarely causes infection in humans. Previous reports of P multocida causing prosthetic joint infection have described either haematogenous spread of infection from a distant site through a scratch or bite, or reactivation of infection from a previous injury. We report a case of acute total knee arthroplasty joint infection becoming acutely infected by P multocida. We postulate that the mechanism of infection was direct contamination of the wound as a consequence of the patient being licked by his pet dog. We discuss the potential role played by thromboprophylaxis as a factor contributing to prolonged wound leak. PMID:24108765

  12. Myofascial pain in patients waitlisted for total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Richard; Cahill, Catherine M; Wood, Gavin; Hroch, Jennifer; Wilson, Rosemary; Cupido, Tracy; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knee pain is one of the major sources of pain and disability in developed countries, particularly in aging populations, and is the primary indication for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). OBJECTIVES: To determine the presence of myofascial pain in OA patients waitlisted for TKA and to determine whether their knee pain may be alleviated by trigger point injections. METHODS: Following ethics approval, 25 participants were recruited from the wait list for elective unilateral primary TKA at the study centre. After providing informed consent, all participants were examined for the presence of active trigger points in the muscles surrounding the knee and received trigger point injections of bupivacaine. Assessments and trigger point injections were implemented on the first visit and at subsequent visits on weeks 1, 2, 4 and 8. Outcome measures included the Timed Up and Go test, Brief Pain Inventory, Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire. RESULTS: Myofascial trigger points were identified in all participants. Trigger point injections significantly reduced pain intensity and pain interference, and improved mobility. All participants had trigger points identified in medial muscles, most commonly in the head of the gastrocnemius muscle. An acute reduction in pain and improved functionality was observed immediately following intervention, and persisted over the eight-week course of the investigation. CONCLUSION: All patients had trigger points in the vastus and gastrocnemius muscles, and 92% of patients experienced significant pain relief with trigger point injections at the first visit, indicating that a significant proportion of the OA knee pain was myofascial in origin. Further investigation is warranted to determine the prevalence of myofascial pain and whether treatment delays or prevents TKA. PMID:23061082

  13. Periprosthetic tibial bone mineral density changes after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jaroma, Antti; Soininvaara, Tarja; Kröger, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may cause postoperative periprosthetic bone loss due to stress shielding. Bone also adapts to mechanical alterations such as correction of malalignment. We investigated medium-term changes in bone mineral density (BMD) in tibial periprosthetic bone after TKA. Patients and methods 86 TKA patients were prospectively measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), the baseline measurement being within 1 week after TKA and the follow-up measurements being at 3 and 6 months, and at 1, 2, 4, and 7 years postoperatively. Long standing radiographs were taken and clinical evaluation was done with the American Knee Society (AKS) score. Results The baseline BMD of the medial tibial metaphyseal region of interest (ROI) was higher in the varus aligned knees (25%; p < 0.001). Medial metaphyseal BMD decreased in subjects with preoperatively varus aligned knees (13%, p < 0.001) and in those with preoperatively valgus aligned knees (12%, p = 0.02) between the baseline and 7-year measurements. No statistically significant changes in BMD were detected in lateral metaphyseal ROIs. No implant failures or revision surgery due to tibial problems occurred. Interpretation Tibial metaphyseal periprosthetic bone is remodeled after TKA due to mechanical axis correction, resulting in more balanced bone stock below the tibial tray. The diaphyseal BMD remains unchanged after the initial drop, within 3–6 months. This remodeling process was related to good component survival, as there were no implant failures or revision operations due to tibial problems in this medium-term follow-up. PMID:27120266

  14. Periprosthetic tibial bone mineral density changes after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jaroma, Antti; Soininvaara, Tarja; Kröger, Heikki

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may cause postoperative periprosthetic bone loss due to stress shielding. Bone also adapts to mechanical alterations such as correction of malalignment. We investigated medium-term changes in bone mineral density (BMD) in tibial periprosthetic bone after TKA. Patients and methods - 86 TKA patients were prospectively measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), the baseline measurement being within 1 week after TKA and the follow-up measurements being at 3 and 6 months, and at 1, 2, 4, and 7 years postoperatively. Long standing radiographs were taken and clinical evaluation was done with the American Knee Society (AKS) score. Results - The baseline BMD of the medial tibial metaphyseal region of interest (ROI) was higher in the varus aligned knees (25%; p < 0.001). Medial metaphyseal BMD decreased in subjects with preoperatively varus aligned knees (13%, p < 0.001) and in those with preoperatively valgus aligned knees (12%, p = 0.02) between the baseline and 7-year measurements. No statistically significant changes in BMD were detected in lateral metaphyseal ROIs. No implant failures or revision surgery due to tibial problems occurred. Interpretation - Tibial metaphyseal periprosthetic bone is remodeled after TKA due to mechanical axis correction, resulting in more balanced bone stock below the tibial tray. The diaphyseal BMD remains unchanged after the initial drop, within 3-6 months. This remodeling process was related to good component survival, as there were no implant failures or revision operations due to tibial problems in this medium-term follow-up. PMID:27120266

  15. Three-step sequential management for knee arthroplasty after severe ballistic injury: Two cases.

    PubMed

    Herry, Y; Boucher, F; Neyret, P; Ferry, T; Lustig, S

    2016-02-01

    Management of knee bone loss after gunshot trauma requires a multidisciplinary approach. Two cases of knee arthroplasty after devastating ballistic trauma are reported. Treatment comprised several steps: sampling, bone resection, reinforced cement spacer, latent sepsis control, and prosthetic reconstruction. The patients showed no neurovascular disorder and had a functioning extensor mechanism. At follow-up of at least 2 years, results were satisfactory, with return to unaided walking and mean International Knee Society (IKS) score improved from 18 to 59 points. In light of these observations, knee reconstruction arthroplasty using a sequential strategy can provide satisfactory functional outcome after severe ballistic trauma. PMID:26774900

  16. Correlation Between Asymmetric Resection of Posterior Femoral Condyles and Femoral Component Rotation in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, Harun Reşit; Ök, Nusret; Ağladıoğlu, Kadir; Akkaya, Semih; Kıter, Esat

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Pertaining to peculiar designs of current knee prostheses, more bone is removed from posteromedial femoral condyle than posterolateral condyle to obtain desired femoral component rotation. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether there is a correlation between the asymmetry of the cuts and the femoral component rotation in total knee arthroplasty. Methods: We built a model to simulate anterior chamfer cut (ACC) performed during total knee arthroplasty for measuring posterior condylar offset (PCO). Right knee axial MRI slices of a total 290 consecutive patients (142 male, 138 female, and mean age 31.39 ± 6.6) were examined. A parallel line to surgical transepiphyseal axis was drawn, and placed at the deepest part of trochlear groove. Posteromedial and posterolateral condylar offsets were measured by drawing perpendicular lines to ACC beginning from the intersection points of both anteromedial and anterolateral cortices to posterior joint line (PJL), respectively. Differences between posteromedial and posterolateral PCO were calculated, and femoral rotation angles (FRA) relative to PJL were measured. Results: The mean surgical FRA was 4.76 ± 1.16 degrees and the mean PCO differencesss- was 4.35 ± 1.04 mm for the whole group and there was no statistically significant difference between genders. There was a strong correlation between surgical FRA and PCO difference (p<0.0001, r=0.803). Linear regression analyses revealed that 0.8 mm of difference between the anteroposterior dimensions of medial and lateral PCO corresponds to 1 degree of surgical FRA (p<0.0001, R2=0.645). Conclusion: Correlation between the asymmetry of posterior chamfer cuts and achieved femoral component rotation can verify the accuracy of desired rotation, intraoperatively. However, further clinical investigations should be planned to test the results of our morphometric study.

  17. Outcome in primary cemented total knee arthroplasty with or without drain: A prospective comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Kęska, Rafał; Paradowski, T Przemysław; Witoński, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Suction drain insertion is a common practice in orthopedic surgery, especially after joint arthroplasty to prevent the formation of a hematoma. Theoretically the use of a drain should diminish the volume of hematoma; however the literature has conflicting data. Some authors state that drainage evacuates fluid from a limited area only and can be a cause of infection due to retrograde migration of bacteria. It can also impair the early postoperative rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome (especially postoperative pain) and intake of analgesics in patients who had undergone primary cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with or without a postoperative drain. Materials and Methods: A prospective comparative study of 108 consecutive patients (121 knees) was conducted. They were divided into two groups: A study group, with no drainage and a control group with drain inserted at the end of surgery. A total of 121 patients were recruited into two groups. A study group consisted of 59 knees, in which we did not use drainage after TKA and a control group with 62 knees, in which drain was inserted post surgery. Both groups were comparable in terms of preoperative characteristics. The indication for TKA was osteoarthritis (n = 105) and rheumatoid arthritis (n = 16). Results: In patients without drainage we observed lower need for opioids, higher blood loss on the 1st postoperative day and a lower need for change of dressings. There were no statistically significant differences in terms of total blood loss, hidden blood loss, transfusion rate, range of motion, length of hospital stay or incidence of complications between the two groups. In 1 year observation there were no differences in clinical outcome between the two groups. Conclusions: The present study conclude that there is no rationale for the use of drain after primary TKA. There are benefits in terms of lower opioid intake, lower blood loss on the first postoperative day

  18. Ertapenem Articulating Spacer for the Treatment of Polymicrobial Total Knee Arthroplasty Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marinkovic, Jugoslav

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Periprosthetic joint infections (PJIs) are the primary cause of early failure of the total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Polymicrobial TKA infections are often associated with a higher risk of treatment failure. The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of ertapenem loaded spacers in the treatment of polymicrobial PJI. Methods. There were 18 patients enrolled; nine patients with polymicrobial PJI treated with ertapenem loaded articulating spacers were compared to the group of 9 patients treated with vancomycin or ceftazidime loaded spacers. Results. Successful reimplantation with revision implants was possible in 66.67%. Ertapenem spacers were used in 6 cases in primary two-stage procedure and in 3 cases in secondary spacer exchange. Successful infection eradication was achieved in all cases; final reimplantation with revision knee arthroplasty implants was possible in 6 cases. Conclusion. Ertapenem can be successfully used as antimicrobial addition to the cement spacers in two-stage revision treatment of polymicrobial PJIs. However, this type of spacer may also be useful in the treatment of infections caused by monomicrobial extended spectrum beta-lactamases producing gram-negative bacilli. Further clinical studies are required to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ertapenem spacers in the treatment of polymicrobial and monomicrobial PJIs. PMID:27366173

  19. Primary posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty: analysis of different instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Intercondylar femoral bone removal during posterior stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) makes many cruciate substituting implant designs less appealing than cruciate retaining implants. Bone stock conservation is considered fundamental in the prevision of future revision surgeries. The purpose of this study was to compare the quantity of intercondylar bone removable during PS housing preparation using three contemporary PS TKA instrumentations. Method We compared different box cutting jigs which were utilized for the PS housing of three popular PS knee prostheses. The bone removal area from every PS box cutting jig was three-dimensionally measured. Results Independently from the implant size, the cutting jig for a specific PS TKA always resected significantly less bone than the others: this difference was statistically significant, especially for small- to medium-sized total knee femoral components. Conclusion This study does not establish a clinical relevance of removing more or less bone at primary TKA, but suggests that if a PS design is indicated, it is preferable to select a model which possibly resects less distal femoral bone. PMID:25037275

  20. Accuracy of Patient Specific Cutting Blocks in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Helmy, Naeder; Kühnel, Stefanie P.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Long-term survival of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is mainly determined by optimal positioning of the components and prosthesis alignment. Implant positioning can be optimized by computer assisted surgery (CAS). Patient specific cutting blocks (PSCB) seem to have the potential to improve component alignment compared to the conventional technique and to be comparable to CAS. Methods. 113 knees were selected for PSI and included in this study. Pre- and postoperative mechanical axis, represented by the hip-knee-angle (HKA), the proximal tibial angle (PTA), the distal femoral angle (DFA), and the tibial slope (TS) were measured and the deviation from expected ideal values was calculated. Results. With a margin of error of ±3°, success rates were 81.4% for HKA, 92.0% for TPA, and 94.7% for DFA. With the margin of error for alignments extended to ±4°, we obtained a success rate of 92.9% for the HKA, 98.2% for the PTA, and 99.1% for the DFA. The TS showed postoperative results of 2.86 ± 2.02° (mean change 1.76 ± 2.85°). Conclusion. PSCBs for TKA seem to restore the overall leg alignment. Our data suggest that each individual component can be implanted accurately and the results are comparable to the ones in CAS. PMID:25254210

  1. Anatomic variations should be considered in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nagamine, R; Miura, H; Bravo, C V; Urabe, K; Matsuda, S; Miyanishi, K; Hirata, G; Iwamoto, Y

    2000-01-01

    The effect of anatomic variations on the operative techniques used in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was assessed. In 133 Japanese patients with medial osteoarthritis (OA), six parameters were measured on anteroposterior radiographs of the lower extremities taken with the patients in the supine position. The results showed that the characteristics of the knees were bowing of the femoral shaft and proximal tibia vara, with lateral offset of the tibial shaft with respect to the center of the tibial plateau. The angle between a perpendicular to the mechanical axis and the tangent to the distal femoral condyles can be used in determining the external rotation of the femoral component. This angle was more than 3 degrees in 20% of the patients. The femoral component should therefore be externally rotated more than 3 degrees relative to the posterior condylar line in such patients. Because the center of the tibial plateau is located medial to the central line of the tibial shaft in knees with medial OA, the central point of the tibial articular surface should not be used for alignment of the tibial component. The medial offset stem of the tibial component may impinge against the medial wall. Anatomic variations should be evaluated before TKA is attempted. PMID:10982663

  2. Intra-Articular Knee Contact Force Estimation During Walking Using Force-Reaction Elements and Subject-Specific Joint Model.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yihwan; Phan, Cong-Bo; Koo, Seungbum

    2016-02-01

    Joint contact forces measured with instrumented knee implants have not only revealed general patterns of joint loading but also showed individual variations that could be due to differences in anatomy and joint kinematics. Musculoskeletal human models for dynamic simulation have been utilized to understand body kinetics including joint moments, muscle tension, and knee contact forces. The objectives of this study were to develop a knee contact model which can predict knee contact forces using an inverse dynamics-based optimization solver and to investigate the effect of joint constraints on knee contact force prediction. A knee contact model was developed to include 32 reaction force elements on the surface of a tibial insert of a total knee replacement (TKR), which was embedded in a full-body musculoskeletal model. Various external measurements including motion data and external force data during walking trials of a subject with an instrumented knee implant were provided from the Sixth Grand Challenge Competition to Predict in vivo Knee Loads. Knee contact forces in the medial and lateral portions of the instrumented knee implant were also provided for the same walking trials. A knee contact model with a hinge joint and normal alignment could predict knee contact forces with root mean square errors (RMSEs) of 165 N and 288 N for the medial and lateral portions of the knee, respectively, and coefficients of determination (R2) of 0.70 and -0.63. When the degrees-of-freedom (DOF) of the knee and locations of leg markers were adjusted to account for the valgus lower-limb alignment of the subject, RMSE values improved to 144 N and 179 N, and R2 values improved to 0.77 and 0.37, respectively. The proposed knee contact model with subject-specific joint model could predict in vivo knee contact forces with reasonable accuracy. This model may contribute to the development and improvement of knee arthroplasty. PMID:26720762

  3. Cosmetic effect of knee joint in a knee disarticulation prosthesis.

    PubMed

    de Laat, Fred A; van der Pluijm, Mark J; van Kuijk, Annette A; Geertzen, Jan H; Roorda, Leo D

    2014-01-01

    Despite numerous advantages, knee disarticulations (KDs) are rarely performed because of the anticipated KD prosthesis fitting problems that include the positioning of the knee joint distally from the KD socket. This results in lengthening of the thigh and subsequent shortening of the shank. The objective of this study was to assess the cosmetic effect of the knee joint in a KD prosthesis by determining the extent of the lengthening of the thigh and the shortening of the shank. This lengthening and shortening were measured through an experimental setup using laser techniques. These measurements were made of 18 knee joints used in KD prostheses. Lengthening of the thigh varied between 23 and 92 mm, and shortening of the shank varied between 3 and 50 mm. The polycentric knees Medi KH6 and Medi KHF1 showed the least lengthening of the thigh, and the polycentric knees Teh Lin Prosthetic & Orthotic Co. Ltd Graph-Lite and Medi KP5 showed the least shortening of the shank. PMID:25856500

  4. Total knee arthroplasty in a patient with neglected congenital patellar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Tunay, Servet; Ozkan, Huseyin; Köse, Ozkan; Atik, Aziz; Basbozkurt, Mustafa

    2009-10-01

    Late presentation of congenital patellar dislocation with advanced osteoarthritis is rare. This article presents a case of 56-year-old woman with advanced osteoarthritis due to right neglected congenital patellar dislocation treated with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with release of the lateral retinaculum and proximal extensor mechanism realignment. One year later, the patient had improvement of her Knee Society scores and painless function, stability, and better extensor strength. A literature search revealed a limited number of similar cases in which congenital patellar dislocation was treated with TKA. Total knee arthroplasty provides a valid treatment option for adults with congenital patellar dislocation who have absence of the femoral sulcus and associated osteoarthritis. Total knee arthroplasty has the ability to correct the pathologies seen with congenital patellar dislocation, eg, external tibial rotation, absence of femoral groove, and patellar hypoplasia. Realignment of extensor mechanism restores quadriceps strength, normal knee biomechanics, and may prevent complications such as dislocation. PMID:19824599

  5. The patellofemoral joint in total knee prostheses. Design considerations.

    PubMed

    Freeman, M A; Samuelson, K M; Elias, S G; Mariorenzi, L J; Gokcay, E I; Tuke, M

    1989-01-01

    Some desirable design features of the patellofemoral joint in a total knee arthroplasty condylar prosthesis are proposed. These are that the femoral element should be grooved, have a high anterior flange, and be circular as viewed from the side. The groove should be about 5 mm deep and have relatively vertical walls. The patellar component should have a saddle-shaped articular surface matching the femur and should be countersunk into the patella. The components should be placed so as to position the joint automatically. Results with such a design are reported; loosening, wear, dislocation, and fracture have been rare. Osteolysis of the patella has not been seen after 9 years, so that the cementless press-fit fixation of an H.D.P. patellar prosthesis to date seems safe and efficacious. PMID:2584990

  6. Posterior cruciate ligament balancing in total knee arthroplasty: a numerical study with a dynamic force controlled knee model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adequate soft tissue balancing is a key factor for a successful result after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is the primary restraint to posterior translation of the tibia after cruciate retaining TKA and is also responsible for the amount of joint compression. However, it is complex to quantify the amount of ligament release with its effects on load bearing and kinematics in TKA and limited both in vivo and in vitro. The goal of this study was to create a dynamic and deformable finite element model of a full leg and analyze a stepwise release of the PCL regarding knee kinematics, pressure distribution and ligament stresses. Methods A dynamic finite element model was developed in Ansys V14.0 based on boundary conditions of an existing knee rig. A cruciate retraining knee prosthesis was virtually implanted. Ligament and muscle structures were simulated with modified spring elements. Linear elastic materials were defined for femoral component, inlay and patella cartilage. A restart algorithm was developed and implemented into the finite element simulation to hold the ground reaction force constant by adapting quadriceps force. After simulating the unreleased PCL model, two models were developed and calculated with the same boundary conditions with a 50% and 75% release of the PCL stiffness. Results From the beginning of the simulation to approximately 35° of flexion, tibia moves posterior related to the femur and with higher flexion anteriorly. Anterior translation of the tibia ranged from 5.8 mm for unreleased PCL to 3.7 mm for 75% PCL release (4.9 mm 50% release). A decrease of maximum von Mises equivalent stress on the inlay was given with PCL release, especially in higher flexion angles from 11.1 MPa for unreleased PCL to 8.9 MPa for 50% release of the PCL and 7.8 MPa for 75% release. Conclusions Our study showed that dynamic FEM is an effective method for simulation of PCL balancing in knee arthroplasty. A tight

  7. Cementless porous-coated total knee arthroplasty: 10-year results in a consecutive series.

    PubMed

    Schrøder, H M; Berthelsen, A; Hassani, G; Hansen, E B; Solgaard, S

    2001-08-01

    We report the results of 114 AGC 2000 porous-coated, cementless total knee arthroplasties (TKA) performed consecutively in 102 patients during the period 1984-1986. After 10 years, 58 TKAs in 52 patients were evaluated with patient assessment, Hospital for Special Surgery knee score, weight-bearing radiographs done under fluoroscopic control, and survivorship analysis. All dropouts within the first 9 years were patients dying with a functioning TKA except 1 revision secondary to a supracondylar fracture after 8.5 years. Of the patients, 53 (92%) were satisfied or very satisfied with their TKA, and 55 (95%) of the knees were rated good or excellent. There was no pain in 53 knees, and the median knee flexion was 110 degrees. Six radiolucencies >1 mm were found beneath parts of the tibial component, and 5 radiolucencies were seen beneath the femoral component. None had progressed compared with the 5-year follow-up, and in all cases trabeculae could be seen reaching the prosthetic component. No migrations had occurred since the 5-year follow-up. No obvious joint space reduction was seen. Osteolysis presenting as an isolated cyst was found in 1 knee in the lateral tibial condyle and was not progressive. Two tibial components had been revised because of aseptic loosening and 1 because of septic loosening, all within the first 3 years. No femoral or patellar components were revised. The cumulative prosthesis survival rate after 10 to 11 years was 97%. When pain and radiographic loosening also were considered, the success rate was 87%. Cementless insertion of a nonmodular, porous-coated TKA resulted in a long-term durable bone-prosthesis interface. The flat-on-flat articulation did not result in catastrophic polyethylene wear or osteolysis within the first 10 years. PMID:11503114

  8. Cemented versus cementless fixation in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    MATASSI, FABRIZIO; CARULLI, CHRISTIAN; CIVININI, ROBERTO; INNOCENTI, MASSIMO

    2013-01-01

    The question of whether to use cemented or cement-less fixation for a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is still debated. Discouraging preliminary results of cement-less TKAs have determined the worldwide use of cemented implants. However, with the development of biotechnologies and new biomaterials with high osteoconductive properties, biological fixation is now becoming an attractive option for improving the longevity of TKAs, especially in young patients. There is no evidence in the current literature to support the use of one method of fixation. The extensive clinical experience with cemented implants gathered over the years justifies their widespread use. New randomized clinical trials are necessary to compare cementless fixation based on the new ingrowth surfaces with standard cemented implants. PMID:25606521

  9. Analysis of stem tip pain in revision total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kimpton, Christine I; Crocombe, Andrew David; Bradley, William Neil; Gavin Huw Owen, Brigstocke

    2013-06-01

    Stem tip pain following revision total knee arthroplasty is a significant cause of patient dissatisfaction, which in the presence of an aseptic well-fixed component has no widely accepted surgical solution. A definitive cause of stem tip pain remains elusive, however it has been suggested that high stress concentrations within the region of the stem tip may play a role. This paper reports a finite element study of a novel clinical technique where a plate is attached to the tibia within the region of the stem tip to reduce stem tip pain. The results demonstrate that the plate reduces stress concentrations in the bone at the stem tip of the implant. The magnitude of stress reduction is dependent upon plate location, material and attachment method. PMID:23523204

  10. Cemented versus cementless fixation in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Matassi, Fabrizio; Carulli, Christian; Civinini, Roberto; Innocenti, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    The question of whether to use cemented or cement-less fixation for a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is still debated. Discouraging preliminary results of cement-less TKAs have determined the worldwide use of cemented implants. However, with the development of biotechnologies and new biomaterials with high osteoconductive properties, biological fixation is now becoming an attractive option for improving the longevity of TKAs, especially in young patients. There is no evidence in the current literature to support the use of one method of fixation. The extensive clinical experience with cemented implants gathered over the years justifies their widespread use. New randomized clinical trials are necessary to compare cementless fixation based on the new ingrowth surfaces with standard cemented implants. PMID:25606521

  11. Rotational alignment of the tibial component in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Graceffa, Angelo; Marcucci, Massimiliano; Baldini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Many surgical techniques, correlated to different anatomical landmarks, have been proposed to allow a satisfactory rotational alignment of the tibial component in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Unfortunately, an accurate landmark has not yet been established although many computer models using CT reconstructions and standard radiologic studies have been performed. In this review article, the authors propose a new anatomical rotational reference for a correct positioning of the tibial component during primary TKA; the authors compared the results of their studies with the current literature on rotational alignment references and previously proposed surgical techniques. The authors also analyzed the correlation between classic and newer tibial baseplate designs and different tibial rotational landmarks. PMID:26855939

  12. Mobile bearing and fixed bearing total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dolfin, Marco; Saccia, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The mobile bearing (MB) concept in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was developed as an alternative to fixed bearing (FB) implants in order to reduce wear and improve range of motion (ROM), especially focused on younger patients. Unfortunately, its theoretical advantages are still controversial. In this paper we exhibit a review of the more recent literature available comparing FB and MB designs in biomechanical and clinical aspects, including observational studies, clinical trials, national and international registries analyses, randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses and Cochrane reviews. Except for some minor aspects, none of the studies published so far has reported a significant improvement related to MBs regarding patient satisfaction, clinical, functional and radiological outcome or medium and long-term survivorship. Thus the presumed superiority of MBs over FBs appears largely inconsistent. The routine use of MB is not currently supported by adequate evidences; implant choice should be therefore made on the basis of other factors, including cost and surgeon experience. PMID:27162777

  13. Sensitivity to implant materials in patients with total knee arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Granchi, Donatella; Cenni, Elisabetta; Tigani, Domenico; Trisolino, Giovanni; Baldini, Nicola; Giunti, Armando

    2008-04-01

    Materials used for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), may elicit an immune response whose role in the outcome of the arthroplasty is still unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of sensitization in patients who had undergone TKA, and the clinical impact of this event on the outcome of the implant. Ninety-four subjects were recruited, including 20 patients who had not yet undergone arthroplasty, 27 individuals who had a well-functioning TKA, and 47 patients with loosening of TKA components. Sensitization was detected by using patch testing including haptens representative of cobalt-based alloys (CoCrMo), titanium-based alloys (TiAlV), and bone cements. The frequency of positive skin reactions to metals increased significantly after TKA, either stable or loosened (No Implant 20%; Stable TKA 48.1%, p=0.05; Loosened TKA 59.6%, p=0.001, respectively). We found a higher frequency of positive patch testing to vanadium in patients who had a Stable TKA with at least one TiAlV component (39.1%, p=0.01). The medical history for metal allergy seems to be a risk factor, because the TKA failure was fourfold more likely in patients who had symptoms of metal hypersensitivity before TKA. The prognostic value was supported by survival analysis, because in these individuals the outcome of the implant was negatively influenced (the logrank test Chi square 5.1, p=0.02). This study confirms that in patients with a TKA the frequency of positive patch testing is higher than in the normal population, although no predictive value is attributable to the sensitization because patch testing was not able to discriminate between stable and loose implants. On the contrary, the presence of symptoms of metal allergy before implantation should be taken into account as a potential risk factor for TKA failure. PMID:18155140

  14. Osteolysis of the distal femur after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Cadambi, A; Engh, G A; Dwyer, K A; Vinh, T N

    1994-12-01

    An 11.1% incidence of femoral osteolysis (30 cases in 28 patients) was identified in a series of 271 primary total knee arthroplasties. Two minimally constrained total knee designs (Synatomic [Depuy, Warsaw, IN] and Porous-Coated Anatomic [PCA, Howmedica, Rutherford, NJ] were used in this patient population. Femoral osteolysis was observed in 26 Synatomic and 4 PCA knees. The average follow-up period was 52 months (range, 24-96 months). Osteolytic lesions were identified radiographically, adjacent to the nonporous-coated (smooth) regions of the anterior and posterior flanges of the Synatomic and PCA femoral components. The average time to the diagnosis of femoral osteolysis was 31 months (range, 7-96 months). The average patient age at the time of primary total knee arthroplasty was 63 years (range, 43-83 years) and the average weight was 180 lb. (range, 107-278 lb.). Sixteen of the 30 cases were in men. All of the cases with femoral osteolysis had cementless implantation. Tissue specimens were obtained from the 18 cases requiring revision. Implants remained in situ an average of 66 months (range, 15-96 months) prior to revision. In 16 of the 18 cases revised, the femoral component was clinically and radiographically stable. Six of 18 cases were revised for severe osteolysis. The remaining 12 cases were revised for failed metal-backed patellae, failed cementless tibial fixation, or advanced polyethylene wear. Wear of the thin tibial inserts and patellar components were the two sources of particulate polyethylene. Polyethylene debris was observed in all tissue specimens. In cases with failed metal-backed patellae or impingement of the tibial locking pin-and-clip, fine metallic debris was also noted in tissue specimens. Microscopic evaluation of the osteolytic tissue revealed a florid histiocytic response with occasional giant cells. Intracellular submicron particulate polyethylene was identified with polarized light microscopy and oil-red-O staining techniques. In

  15. Evaluation and management of the infected total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Springer, Bryan D; Scuderi, Giles R

    2013-01-01

    Infection after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains a difficult complication to treat. The risk of infection ranges from 0.5% to 2% for primary TKAs and 2% to 4% for revision TKAs. Several demographic studies indicate that more infections are occurring after these procedures, and infection is one of the most common reasons for TKA failure. Prevention remains the key to minimizing the risk of infection; however, little evidence-based literature exists to establish the optimal approach. Every patient with a painful TKA should be suspected of having an infection until proven otherwise. An algorithmic approach to these patients should include standard laboratory screening tests to rule out infection. Synovial fluid aspiration remains the best test for diagnosing infection. Synovial fluid white blood cell counts greater than 1,700 cells/µL and a differential greater than 69% polymorphonuclear cells should raise a high index of suspicion for infection. Several options are available to treat deep periprosthetic infection. The timing of the infection as it relates to surgery and the onset of symptoms are critical in determining treatment success. Prosthetic retention is indicated only in patients with an acute onset of infection, but its limited success reported in recent literature brings into question its role in infected TKAs. A two-stage exchange arthroplasty remains the gold standard for treatment of infection following TKA. PMID:23395040

  16. Traditions and myths in hip and knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Husted, Henrik; Gromov, Kirill; Malchau, Henrik; Freiberg, Andrew; Gebuhr, Peter; Troelsen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose — Traditions are passed on from experienced surgeons to younger fellows and become “the right way to do it”. Traditions associated with arthroplasty surgery may, however, not be evidence-based and may be potentially deleterious to both patients and society, increasing morbidity and mortality, slowing early functional recovery, and increasing cost. Methods — We identified selected traditions and performed a literature search using relevant search criteria (June 2014). We present a narrative review grading the studies according to evidence, and we suggest some lines of future research. Results — We present traditions and evaluate them against the published evidence. Preoperative removal of hair, urine testing for bacteria, use of plastic adhesive drapes intraoperatively, and prewarming of the operation room should be abandoned—as should use of a tourniquet, a space suit, a urinary catheter, and closure of the knee in extension. The safety and efficacy of tranexamic acid is supported by meta-analyses. Postoperatively, there is no evidence to support postponement of showering or postponement of changing of dressings to after 48 h. There is no evidence to recommend routine dental antibiotic prophylaxis, continuous passive motion (CPM), the use of compression stockings, cooling for pain control or reduction of swelling, flexion of at least 90 degrees as a discharge criterion following TKA, or having restrictions after THA. We present evidence supporting the use of NSAIDs, early mobilization, allowing early travel, and a low hemoglobin trigger for transfusion. Interpretation — Revision of traditions and myths surrounding hip and knee arthroplasty towards more contemporary evidence-based principles can be expected to improve early functional recovery, thus reducing morbidity, mortality, and costs. PMID:25285615

  17. Pulse lavage is inadequate at removal of biofilm from the surface of total knee arthroplasty materials.

    PubMed

    Urish, Kenneth L; DeMuth, Peter W; Craft, David W; Haider, Hani; Davis, Charles M

    2014-06-01

    In acute periprosthetic infection, irrigation and debridement with component retention has a high failure rate in some studies. We hypothesize that pulse lavage irrigation is ineffective at removing biofilm from total knee arthroplasty (TKA) components. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm mass and location was directly visualized on arthroplasty materials with a photon collection camera and laser scanning confocal microscopy. There was a substantial reduction in biofilm signal intensity, but the reduction was less than a ten-fold decrease. This suggests that irrigation needs to be further improved for the removal of biofilm mass below the necessary bioburden level to prevent recurrence of acute infection in total knee arthroplasty. PMID:24439797

  18. Computational Poromechanics of Human Knee Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Mojtaba; Li, LePing

    2012-02-01

    Extensive computer modeling has been performed in the recent decade to investigate the mechanical response of the healthy and repaired knee joints. Articular cartilages and menisci have been commonly modeled as single-phase elastic materials in the previous 3D simulations. A comprehensive study considering the interplay of the collagen fibers and fluid pressurization in the tissues in situ remains challenging. We have developed a 3D model of the human knee accounting for the mechanical function of collagen fibers and fluid flow in the cartilages and menisci. An anatomically accurate structure of the human knee was used for this purpose including bones, articular cartilages, menisci and ligaments. The fluid pressurization in the femoral cartilage and menisci under combined creep loading was investigated. Numerical results showed that fluid flow and pressure in the tissues played an important role in the mechanical response of the knee joint. The load transfer in the joint was clearly seen when the fluid pressure was considered.

  19. Comparison of self-reported and measured range of motion in total knee arthroplasty patients.

    PubMed

    Unver, Bayram; Nalbant, Abdurrahman; Karatosun, Vasfi

    2015-08-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is an established method used in the treatment of end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Range of motion (ROM) and relief from pain show success of TKA. One of the most important aims of this treatment is to achieve an adequate ROM. Numerous outcome instruments and patient-reported questionnaires are in use to evaluate of TKA patients. For this purpose, disease-specific questionnaires and self-reported ROM and function evaluation tools are also being developed. The most important criteria in musculoskeletal care is assessing the joint mobility of the patient's. Joint mobility can be measured with visual estimates, universal goniometer, X-ray radiography, digital gravity goniometers and applications found in smart phones. Apart from the reliability and validity of the method, obtaining the same results from different examiners is very important. The clinical follow-up of patients is an important part of postoperative care after TKA. The follow-up interval and duration remain dependent on the physician's anticipation of the clinical progress of the individual patient. Long-term surveillance of joint arthroplasty is necessary, but it has also become increasingly burdensome as greater numbers of TKAs are performed, and in younger populations. Patient self-reported questionnaires and self-goniometric measurement are used by many investigators to decrease this burden on the surgeon or staff, and in combination with telemedicine radiographs might be a reasonable option to routine clinic visits. They could reasonably be expected to lower the burden on both the patient and the clinician without eliminating contact and thus sacrificing quality of care. At the same time, it would reduce the financial burden too. Self-reported measured ROM can use in the routine follow-ups to reduce surgeons, physiotherapist and other staff. PMID:26417576

  20. Underlying diagnosis predicts patient-reported outcomes after revision total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lewallen, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess the association of underlying diagnosis with outcomes after revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods. For this cohort study we used prospectively collected data from the Mayo Clinic Total Joint Registry on all revision TKA patients from 1993 to 2005 with 2- or 5-year response to a validated knee questionnaire that assesses pain and function. We used logistic regression to assess the odds of moderate–severe activities of daily living (ADL) limitations and moderate–severe index knee pain 2 and 5 years after revision TKA. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs are presented. Results. The underlying diagnosis for the 2- and 5-year cohorts was loosening, wear or osteolysis in 73% and 75%; dislocation, bone or prosthesis fracture, instability or non-union in 17% and 15%; and failed prior arthroplasty with components removed or infection in 11% and 11%, respectively. In multivariable adjusted analyses that included preoperative status, compared with patients with loosening/wear/osteolysis, patients with dislocation/fracture/instability/non-union had an OR of 2.1 for moderate–severe ADL limitation (95% CI 1.3, 3.1, P < 0.001) and those with failed prior arthroplasty/infection had an OR of 1.1 (95% CI 0.6, 1.8, P = 0.4). At 5 years, differences were no longer significant. In multivariable adjusted analyses, compared with patients with loosening/wear/osteolysis, patients with dislocation/fracture/instability/non-union had an OR of 2.0 for moderate–severe pain (95% CI 1.3, 3.1, P < 0.01) at 2 years and an OR of 2.1 (95% CI 1.3, 3.8, P = 0.01) at 5 years. Failed prior arthroplasty/infection was not significantly different than the reference category. Conclusion. Underlying diagnosis is independently associated with ADL limitations and pain after revision TKA. This information can help patients have realistic expectations of outcomes. PMID:24196389

  1. The Mark Coventry Award: in vivo knee forces during recreation and exercise after knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    D'Lima, Darryl D; Steklov, Nikolai; Patil, Shantanu; Colwell, Clifford W

    2008-11-01

    Knee forces directly affect arthroplasty component survivorship, wear of articular bearing surfaces, and integrity of the bone-implant interface. It is not known which activities generate forces within a range that is physiologically desirable but not high enough to jeopardize the survivorship of the prosthetic components. We implanted three patients with an instrumented tibial prosthesis and measured knee forces and moments in vivo during exercise and recreational activities. As expected, stationary bicycling generated low tibial forces, whereas jogging and tennis generated high peak forces. On the other hand, the golf swing generated unexpectedly high forces, especially in the leading knee. Exercise on the elliptical trainer generated lower forces than jogging but not lower than treadmill walking. These novel data allow for a more scientific approach to recommending activities after TKA. In addition, these data can be used to develop clinically relevant structural and tribologic testing, which may result in activity-specific knee designs such as a knee design more tolerant of golfing by optimizing the conflicting needs of increased rotational laxity and conformity. PMID:18563502

  2. [Biomechanics of the knee joint].

    PubMed

    Witzel, U

    1993-01-01

    The capsular and ligamentous structures as control system of a healthy knee-joint supported by the muscular system are responsible for the rolling and gliding motion of the femoral condyles on the tibial plateau. Both the condyles and the tibial plateau have individually developed but to each other adjusted shapes and fine structures thereby. These structures consist of hyaline cartilage at their three-dimensional surfaces and of closely packed fibrils (lamina splendens) as the final gliding zone for tensile load. The orientation of the collagenous fibres can be made visible by split lines. The chondral surfaces are indirectly in contact to each other and orthogonally stressed at the particular point of contact. The indirect contact of the cartilaginous surfaces happens under interposition of the menisci. The meniscus serves to reduce and equalize the surface pressure by its own projected surface on the one hand and by maintaining of a hydraulic pressure of the synovial fluid on the other hand. Deviations of the condylar position as a result on ligamentous instabilities or ruptures with a following occurring loss of congruence, meniscal lesions or traumatic ruptures lead to a rapid discharge of the synovial fluid under load. The result is a hydraulic head loss with direct contact of the chondral surfaces under stress leading to arthrotic deformations. Severe arthrotic deformations or very much every meniscectomy produce intraarticular lumped loads resulting in a hyper-physiologic chondral pressure and malnutrition thereby. Further on there develop subchondral stress concentrations (caused by the lumped loads) leading to osseous damages, too. MR-pictures can make visible these damages. Chondromalacia, fissure or even chondrolysis are arthroscopically detectable sometimes. As after-effects of deficient knee ligaments occur pathological deviations of the femoral condyles and resulting destructions of the articular surfaces under stress enormously intensified by

  3. Which Route of Tranexamic Acid Administration is More Effective to Reduce Blood Loss Following Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    PubMed Central

    Keyhani, Sohrab; Esmailiejah, Ali Akbar; Abbasian, Mohammad Reza; Safdari, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    Background: The most appropriate route of tranexamic acid administration is controversial. In the current study, we compared the efficacy of intravenous (IV) and topical intra-articular tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss and transfusion rate in patients who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty. Methods: One hundred twenty 120 patients were scheduled to undergo primary total knee arthroplasty. Patients were randomly allocated to three equal groups: IV tranexamic acid (500 mg), topical tranexamic acid (3 g in 100 mL normal saline) and the control. In the topical group, half of the volume was used to irrigate the joint and the other half was injected intra-articularly. The volume of blood loss, hemoglobin (Hb) level at 24 hours postoperative, and rate of transfusion was compared between groups. Results: The blood loss and Hb level were significantly greater and lower in the control group, respectively (P=0.031). Also, the rate of transfusion was significantly greater in the control group (P=0.013). However, IV and topical groups did not differ significantly in terms of measured variables. No patient experienced a thromboembolic event in our study. Conclusion: Tranexamic acid is a useful antifibrinolytic drug to reduce postoperative blood loss, Hb drop, and rate of blood transfusion in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. The route of tranexamic acid administration did not affect the efficacy and safety. PMID:26894222

  4. Clinical experience with novel oral anticoagulants for thromboprophylaxis after elective hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Messerschmidt, Cory; Friedman, Richard J

    2015-04-01

    Anticoagulant medications help to reduce the risk of thromboembolic events after total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty. Traditionally, this has been accomplished with medications, such as low-molecular-weight heparin and warfarin. However, these traditional anticoagulants possess a variety of shortcomings that leave much room for improvement. A new class of oral anticoagulants is now available, and present a more convenient option for safe and efficacious thromboprophylaxis in post arthroplasty patients, particularly in the outpatient setting. This review focuses on the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran, and the selective factor Xa inhibitors, rivaroxaban and apixaban, and the clinical data to date about their use in total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty patients. PMID:25767271

  5. Body mass and weight thresholds for increased prosthetic joint infection rates after primary total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lübbeke, Anne; Zingg, Matthieu; Vu, Diemlan; Miozzari, Hermes H; Christofilopoulos, Panayiotis; Uçkay, Ilker; Harbarth, Stephan; Hoffmeyer, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Background and purpose - Obesity increases the risk of deep infection after total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Our objective was to determine whether there may be body mass index (BMI) and weight thresholds indicating a higher prosthetic joint infection rate. Patients and methods - We included all 9,061 primary hip and knee arthroplasties (mean age 70 years, 61% women) performed between March 1996 and December 2013 where the patient had received intravenous cefuroxime (1.5 g) perioperatively. The main exposures of interest were BMI (5 categories: < 24.9, 25-29.9, 30-34.9, 35-39.9, and ≥ 40) and weight (5 categories: < 60, 60-79, 80-99, 100-119, and ≥ 120 kg). Numbers of TJAs according to BMI categories (lowest to highest) were as follows: 2,956, 3,350, 1,908, 633, and 214, respectively. The main outcome was prosthetic joint infection. The mean follow-up time was 6.5 years (0.5-18 years). Results - 111 prosthetic joint infections were observed: 68 postoperative, 16 hematogenous, and 27 of undetermined cause. Incidence rates were similar in the first 3 BMI categories (< 35), but they were twice as high with BMI 35-39.9 (adjusted HR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.1-4.3) and 4 times higher with BMI ≥ 40 (adjusted HR = 4.2, 95% CI: 1.8-9.7). Weight ≥ 100 kg was identified as threshold for a significant increase in infection from the early postoperative period onward (adjusted HR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.3-3.6). Interpretation - BMI ≥ 35 or weight ≥ 100 kg may serve as a cutoff for higher perioperative dosage of antibiotics. PMID:26731633

  6. [Anxiety in patients undergoing fast-track knee arthroplasty in the light of recent literature].

    PubMed

    Ziętek, Paweł; Ziętek, Joanna; Szczypiór, Karina

    2014-01-01

    The rapid progress in knee implants technology and operational techniques go together with more and more modem medical programs, designed to optimize the patients' care and shorten their stay in hospital. However, this does not guarantee any elimination ofperioperative stress in patients. Anxiety is a negative emotional state arising from stressful circumstances accompanied by activation of the autonomous nervous system. Anxiety causes negative physiological changes, including wound healing, resistance to anesthetic induction, it is associated with an increased perioperative pain and prolong recovery period. The purpose of this work is to present the current state of knowledge on the preoperative anxiety and discuss its impact on pain and other parameters in patients undergoing fast-track arthroplasty of big joints. The work also shows selected issues of anxiety pathomechanism, and actual methods reducing preoperative anxiety in hospitalized patients. The common prevalence of anxiety in patients undergoing surgery induces the attempt to routinely identify patients with higher anxiety, which may be a predictive factor of worse results after TKA. Undertaking widely understood psychological support in these patients before and after the operation could be a favorable element, which would influence thefinal result of the treatment of patients after big joints arthroplasties. PMID:25639020

  7. Periarticular regional analgesia in total knee arthroplasty: a review of the neuroanatomy and injection technique.

    PubMed

    Guild, George N; Galindo, Rubin P; Marino, Joseph; Cushner, Fred D; Scuderi, Giles R

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative pain control after total knee arthroplasty may be insufficient, resulting in insomnia, antalgic ambulation, and difficulty with rehabilitation. Current strategies, including the use of femoral nerve catheters, may control pain but have been associated with falls, motor blockade, and quadriceps inhibition. Periarticular infiltration using the appropriate technique and knowledge of intraarticular knee anatomy may increase pain control and maximize rehabilitation. PMID:25435030

  8. Relationship between Improvements in Physical Measures and Patient Satisfaction in Rehabilitation after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazzal, Mahmoud I.; Bashaireh, Khaldoon H.; Alomari, Mahmoud A.; Nazzal, Mohammad S.; Maayah, Mikhled F.; Mesmar, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine patient satisfaction with rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Fifty-six patients, aged 45-77 years, were enrolled in a post-TKA comprehensive therapy program focusing on knee strengthening and functional activities. The program lasted 3 months and was conducted for 1 h, twice a day, 5 days per…

  9. Radiologic Outcomes According to Varus Deformity in Minimally Invasive Surgery Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ju-Hyung; Han, Chang-Dong; Oh, Hyun-Cheol; Park, Jun-Young; Choi, Seung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the accuracy of postoperative implant alignment in minimally invasive surgery total knee arthroplasty (MIS-TKA), based on the degree of varus deformity. Materials and Methods The research examined 627 cases of MIS-TKA from November 2005 to December 2007. The cases were categorized according to the preoperative degree of varus deformity in the knee joint in order to compare the postoperative alignment of the implant: less than 5° varus (Group 1, 351 cases), 5° to less than 10° varus (Group 2, 189 cases), 10° to less than 15° varus (Group 3, 59 cases), and 15° varus or more (Group 4, 28 cases). Results On average, the alignment of the tibial implant was 0.2±1.4°, 0.1±1.3°, 0.1±1.6°, and 0.3±1.7° varus, and the tibiofemoral alignment was 5.2±1.9°, 4.7±1.9°, 4.9±1.9°, and 5.1±2.0° valgus for Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively, in the preoperative stage, indicating no difference between the groups (p>0.05). With respect to the accuracy of the tibial implant alignment, 98.1%, 97.6%, 87.5%, and 86.7% of Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively, had 0±3° varus angulation, demonstrating a reduced level of accuracy in Groups 3 and 4 (p<0.0001). There was no difference in terms of tibiofemoral alignment, with 83.9%, 82.9%, 85.4%, and 86.7% of each group, respectively, showing 6±3° valgus angulation (p>0.05). Conclusion Satisfactory component alignment was achieved in minimally invasive surgery in total knee arthroplasty, regardless of the degree of varus deformity. PMID:26632405

  10. Physical activity after total knee arthroplasty: A critical review

    PubMed Central

    Paxton, Roger J; Melanson, Edward L; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E; Christiansen, Cory L

    2015-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most commonly performed elective surgery in the United States. TKA typically improves functional performance and reduces pain associated with knee osteoarthritis. Little is known about the influence of TKA on overall physical activity levels. Physical activity, defined as “any bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles that results in energy expenditure”, confers many health benefits but typically decreases with endstage osteoarthritis. The purpose of this review is to describe the potential benefits (metabolic, functional, and orthopedic) of physical activity to patients undergoing TKA, present results from recent studies aimed to determine the effect of TKA on physical activity, and discuss potential sources of variability and conflicting results for physical activity outcomes. Several studies utilizing self-reported outcomes indicate that patients perceive themselves to be more physically active after TKA than they were before surgery. Accelerometry-based outcomes indicate that physical activity for patients after TKA remains at or below pre-surgical levels. Several different factors likely contributed to these variable results, including the use of different instruments, duration of follow-up, and characteristics of the subjects studied. Comparison to norms, however, suggests that daily physical activity for patients following TKA may fall short of healthy age-matched controls. We propose that further study of the relationship between TKA and physical activity needs to be performed using accelerometry-based outcome measures at multiple post-surgical time points. PMID:26396937

  11. Comparison of cementless and hybrid cemented total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lass, Richard; Kubista, Bernd; Holinka, Johannes; Pfeiffer, Martin; Schuller, Spiro; Stenicka, Sandra; Windhager, Reinhard; Giurea, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Cementless total knee arthroplasty (TKA) implants were designed to provide long-term fixation without the risk of cement-associated complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of titanium-coated cementless implants compared with hybrid TKA implants with a cemented tibial and a cementless femoral component. The authors performed a case-control, single-center study of 120 TKAs performed between 2003 and 2007, including 60 cementless and 60 hybrid cemented TKAs. The authors prospectively analyzed the radiographic and clinical data and the survivorship of the implants at a minimum follow-up of 5 years. Ninety patients who underwent TKA completed the 5-year assessment. Knee Society Scores increased significantly in both groups (P<.001). In both groups, 2 patients underwent revision due to aseptic tibial component loosening, resulting in a 96% implant survival rate. Radiographs showed significantly less radiolucent lines around the tibial baseplate in the cementless group (n=12) than in the hybrid cemented group (n=26) (P=.009).At 6-year mean follow-up, no significant difference existed between the cementless and hybrid cemented tibial components in TKA in terms of clinical and functional results and postoperative complications. The significantly smaller number of radiolucent lines in the cementless group is an indicator of primary stability with the benefit of long-term fixation durability of TKA. PMID:23590780

  12. Gonyautoxins: First evidence in pain management in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hinzpeter, Jaime; Barrientos, Cristián; Zamorano, Álvaro; Martinez, Álvaro; Palet, Miguel; Wulf, Rodrigo; Barahona, Maximiliano; Sepúlveda, Joaquín M; Guerra, Matias; Bustamante, Tamara; Del Campo, Miguel; Tapia, Eric; Lagos, Nestor

    2016-09-01

    Improvements in pain management techniques in the last decade have had a major impact on the practice of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Gonyautoxin are phycotoxins, whose molecular mechanism of action is a reversible block of the voltage-gated sodium channels at the axonal level, impeding nerve impulse propagation. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of Gonyautoxin infiltration, as a long acting pain blocker in TKA. Fifteen patients received a total dose of 40 μg of Gonyautoxin during the TKA operation. Postoperatively, all patients were given a standard painkiller protocol: 100 mg of intravenous ketoprofen and 1000 mg of oral acetaminophen every 8 hours for 3 days. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain score and range of motion were recorded 12, 36, and 60 hours post-surgery. All patients reported pain of 2 or less on the VAS 12 and 36 hours post-surgery. Moreover, all scored were less than 4 at 60 hours post-surgery. All patients achieved full knee extension at all times. No side effects or adverse reactions to Gonyautoxin were detected in the follow-up period. The median hospital stay was 3 days. For the first time, this study has shown the effect of blocking the neuronal transmission of pain by locally infiltrating Gonyautoxin during TKA. All patients successfully responded to the pain control. The Gonyautoxin infiltration was safe and effective, and patients experienced pain relief without the use of opioids. PMID:27317871

  13. Complications of perioperative warfarin therapy in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Phil M S; Brew, Chris J; Whitehouse, Sarah L; Crawford, Ross W; Donnelly, Bill J

    2014-02-01

    Patients presenting for knee replacement on warfarin for medical reasons often require higher levels of anticoagulation peri-operatively than primary thromboprophylaxis and may require bridging therapy with heparin. We performed a retrospective case control study on 149 consecutive primary knee arthroplasty patients to investigate whether anti-coagulation affected short-term outcomes. Specific outcome measures indicated significant increases in prolonged wound drainage (26.8% of cases vs 7.3% of controls, P<0.001); superficial infection (16.8% vs 3.3%, P<0.001); deep infection (6.0% vs 0%, P<0.001); return-to-theatre for washout (4.7% vs 0.7%, P=0.004); and revision (4.7% vs 0.3%, P=0.001). Management of patients on long-term warfarin therapy following TKR is particularly challenging, as the surgeon must balance risk of thromboembolism against post-operative complications on an individual patient basis in order to optimise outcomes. PMID:24209787

  14. The epidemiology of failure in total knee arthroplasty: avoiding your next revision.

    PubMed

    Khan, M; Osman, K; Green, G; Haddad, F S

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a cost effective and extremely successful operation. As longevity increases, the demand for primary TKA will continue to rise. The success and survivorship of TKAs are dependent on the demographics of the patient, surgical technique and implant-related factors. Currently the risk of failure of a TKA requiring revision surgery ten years post-operatively is 5%. The most common indications for revision include aseptic loosening (29.8%), infection (14.8%), and pain (9.5%). Revision surgery poses considerable clinical burdens on patients and financial burdens on healthcare systems. We present a current concepts review on the epidemiology of failed TKAs using data from worldwide National Joint Registries. PMID:26733654

  15. A randomised controlled trial comparing skin closure in total knee arthroplasty in the same knee: nylon sutures versus skin staples

    PubMed Central

    Iamthanaporn, K.; Hongnaparak, T.; Tangtrakulwanich, B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Nylon sutures and skin staples are used commonly in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgical wound closure. However, there is no study that compares the wound healing efficacy and patient satisfaction scores of both techniques in the same knee. Methods We randomised 70 patients who underwent primary TKA into two groups. In one group of 34 patients, the skin at the upper half of the wound was closed with skin staples and the lower half of the wound was closed with simple interrupted nylon sutures. In the other group of 36 patients, the skin at the upper half of the wound was closed with nylon stitches and the lower half of the wound was closed with skin staples. We recorded the wound closure time, pain score at the time of stitch removal, wound complication rate, patient satisfaction score, and the Hollander wound evaluation score at the post-operative periods of five days, 14 days, six weeks, three months, and six months. Each half wound was analysed separately. Results The mean patient body mass index was 26.8 kg/m2 (standard deviation 6.3). A total of 70 nylon stitched wounds and 70 skin stapled wounds were analysed. There were no significant differences in wound complication rates, patient satisfaction score, and the Hollander wound evaluation score between both types of wounds (p > 0.05). The wound closure time for skin stapled wounds was significantly lower than the nylon stitched wounds (p < 0.001). However, the skin stapled wounds had a significantly higher pain score at the time of stitch removal (p < 0.001). Conclusion Skin staples and nylon stitches had comparable results with respect to wound healing and patient satisfaction in TKA wound closure in non-obese patients. The benefit of skin staples over nylon stitches was a decrease in operative time, but was more painful upon removal. Cite this article: V. Yuenyongviwat. A randomised controlled trial comparing skin closure in total knee arthroplasty in the same knee: nylon sutures versus skin

  16. Improved Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Proposed orthotic knee joint improved version of one described in "Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint" (MFS-28633). Locks automatically upon initial application of radial force (wearer's weight) and unlocks automatically, but only when all loads (radial force and bending) relieved. Joints lock whenever wearer applies weight to knee at any joint angle between full extension and 45 degree bend. Both devices offer increased safety and convenience relative to conventional orthotic knee joints.

  17. Metal block augmentation for bone defects of the medial tibia during primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stable and well-aligned placement of tibial components during primary total knee arthroplasty is challenging in patients with bone defects. Although rectangular block-shaped augmentations are widely used to reduce the shearing force between the tibial tray and bone compared with wedge-shaped augmentations, the clinical result remains unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the outcome of primary total knee arthroplasty with metal block augmentation. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the 3- to 6-year follow-up results of 33 knees that underwent total knee arthroplasty with metal block augmentation (metal-augmented group) for bone defects of the medial tibia and 132 varus knees without bone defects as the control group. All surgeries were performed using posterior-stabilized cemented prostheses in both groups. Cemented stems were routinely augmented when the metal block was used. Results There were no differences in implant survival rates (100% in metal-augmented and 99.2% in control) or knee function scores (82 points in metal-augmented and 84 points in control) between the two groups at the final follow-up examination (P = 0.60 and P = 0.09, respectively). No subsidence or loosening of the tibial tray was observed. Of 33 metal-augmented total knee arthroplasties, a nonprogressive radiolucent line beneath the metal was detected in 10 knees (30.3%), and rounding of the medial edge of the tibia was observed in 17 knees (51.5%). Conclusions The clinical results of total knee arthroplasty with metal augmentation were not inferior to those in patients without bone defects. However, radiolucent lines were observed in 30.3%. PMID:24139483

  18. Smooth Pins Reinforcing Static Cement Spacers for Infected Total Knee Arthroplasty Are Not Safe.

    PubMed

    Llado, Roald J; Banerjee, Samik; Khanuja, Harpal S

    2016-05-01

    Prosthetic joint infection is one of the most dreaded complications following elective lower extremity primary total joint arthroplasty, resulting in substantial pain, disability, and health care costs. Both static and articulating antibiotic-impregnated spacers have been used in the management of 2-stage revision for infected total knee arthroplasty, which remains the gold standard for treatment of these infections. Articulating spacers may provide theoretical benefits with regard to improved range of motion after reimplantation secondary to less scar formations and soft tissue contractures. However, static spacers may be necessary to overcome instability associated with substantial bone defects, incompetent extensor mechanisms, and collateral ligament insufficiencies. In these scenarios, static spacers are often reinforced with intramedullary rods or Steinmann pins to provide additional knee stability, improve construct strength, maintain extension, and avoid flexion contractures. This case report describes an extremely rare case of migration of smooth pins through the posterior tibia into the calf following static spacer use in a 48-year-old man. Various mechanical and systemic complications have been reported in up to 50% of patients with the use of polymethyl methacrylate spacer devices, such as acute renal failure, allergic reactions from antibiotic use, stiffness, bone loss, fractures, and dislocations. However, to the best of the authors' knowledge, this complication of hardware migration has not been reported previously in the literature. The authors believe that orthopedic surgeons should consider the use of threaded pin dowels or intramedullary rods to avoid this potential untoward complication. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e553-e557.]. PMID:27045481

  19. Are patients more satisfied and have better functional outcome after bilateral total knee arthroplasty as compared to total hip arthroplasty and unilateral total knee arthroplasty surgery? A two-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jason Beng Teck; Chou, Andrew Chia Chen; Chong, Hwei Chi; Lo, Ngai Nung; Chia, Shi-lu; Tay, Keng Jin Darren; Yeo, Seng Jin

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to review the quality of life and physical improvement achieved by total joint arthroplasty surgery, namely unilateral TKA, bilateral TKA and THA. We hypothesize that patients who undergo bilateral TKA should have greater improvement in patient-reported outcome measures, as compared to patients who had unilateral TKA, and their outcomes may be comparable to that of THA. We analyzed prospectively collected data of all patients who underwent unilateral TKA, bilateral TKA and THA (5291, 187 and 529 patients respectively) for end-stage osteoarthritis at a tertiary hospital during the 5-year period. Patients who underwent bilateral TKA had a greater degree of improvement in SF-36 and Knee Society Scores as compared to unilateral TKA at 6 months and 2 years follow-up. Bilateral TKA had the highest proportion of patients who were satisfied and had expectations met by surgery. PMID:26790791

  20. Time trends in the Characteristics of Patients Undergoing Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasvinder A.; Lewallen, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the time-trends in socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of patients undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods We used the Mayo Clinic Total Joint Registry to examine the time-trends in patient demographics (body mass index [BMI], age), underlying diagnosis, medical (Deyo-Charlson index) and psychological comorbidity (anxiety, depression) and examination findings of primary TKA patients from 1993–2005. We used chi-square test and analysis of variance. Results 7,229 patients constituted the primary TKA cohort; 55% were women. The mean age decreased by 1.3 years (69.3 to 68.0), BMI increased by 1.7 kg/m2 (30.1 to 31.8) and Deyo-Charlson index increased by 36% (1.1 to 1.5) over the 13-year study period (p<0.001 for all). Compared to 1993–95, significantly more patients (by 2–3 times) in 2002–05 had (p<0.001 for all): BMI ≥40, 4.8% vs. 10.6%; age <50, 2.9% vs. 5.2%; Deyo-Charlson index of ≥3, 12% vs. 22.3%; depression, 4.1% vs. 14.8%; anxiety, 4.1% vs. 8.9%; and a significantly fewer had an underlying diagnosis of rheumatoid/inflammatory arthritis, 6.4% vs. 1.5%. Compared to 1993–95, significant reductions were noted in 2002–05 for the physical examination findings of (p<0.001 for all): knee joint effusion, anterior-posterior knee instability, medial-lateral knee instability, moderate-severe knee synovitis, severe limp, fair or poor muscle strength and absent peripheral pulses. Conclusions In this large U.S. total joint registry study, we found significant time-trends in patient characteristics, diagnosis, comorbidity and knee/limb examination findings in primary TKA patients over 13-years. These secular trends should be taken into account when comparing outcomes over time and in policy-making decisions. PMID:24249702

  1. The effect of mechanical massage on early outcome after total knee arthroplasty: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Mi; Kim, Sang-Rim; Lee, Yong Ki; Kim, Bo Ryun; Han, Eun Young

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of mechanical massage via Endermologie® after total knee arthroplasty in reducing edema and pain and improving knee range of motion, in the early postoperative period. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen patients with knee edema following total knee arthroplasty were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n=8) or the control group (n=10). The intervention group received mechanical massage therapy using Endermologie® and the control group received conventional physical therapy for 20 minutes a day, 5 times a week from the seventh day postsurgery. Clinical assessments included active knee flexion and extension range of motion, knee pain using a numeric rating scale, the operated limb circumference, the soft tissue cross-sectional area using ultrasonography, the extracelluar fluid volume, and single frequency bioimpedance analysis at 5 kHz using bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy. [Results] Both groups showed significant reduction in edema and pain, and improvement in active knee flexion at the end of treatment. There were no significant inter-group differences before or after treatment. [Conclusion] Mechanical massage could be an alternative way of managing knee edema after total knee arthroplasty in early postoperative recovery. PMID:26696709

  2. Characterization of hip and knee arthroplasties and factors associated with infection☆

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Pinto, Cibele Zdebsky; Alpendre, Francine Taporosky; Stier, Christiane Johnscher Niebel; Maziero, Eliane Cristina Sanches; de Alencar, Paulo Gilberto Cimbalista; de Almeida Cruz, Elaine Drehmer

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize arthroplasty procedures, calculate the surgical infection rate and identify related risk factors. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study. Data on operations performed between 2010 and 2012 were gathered from documental sources and were analyzed with the aid of statistical software, using Fisher's exact test, Student's t test and the nonparametric Mann–Whitney and Wilcoxon tests. Results 421 total arthroplasty procedures performed on 346 patients were analyzed, of which 208 were on the knee and 213 on the hip. It was found that 18 patients (4.3%) were infected. Among these, 15 (83.33%) were reoperated and 2 (15.74%) died. The prevalence of infection in primary total hip arthroplasty procedures was 3%; in primary total knee arthroplasty, 6.14%; and in revision of total knee arthroplasty, 3.45%. Staphylococcus aureus was prevalent. The length of the surgical procedure showed a tendency toward being a risk factor (p = 0.067). Conclusion The prevalence of infection in cases of primary total knee arthroplasty was greater than in other cases. No statistically significant risk factors for infection were identified. PMID:27218082

  3. Joint arthroplasty Perioperative Surgical Home: Impact of patient characteristics on postoperative outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Duy L; Ahn, Kyle; Rinehart, Joseph B; Calderon, Michael-David; Wu, Wei-Der; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the impact of different characteristics on postoperative outcomes for patients in a joint arthroplasty Perioperative Surgical Home (PSH) program. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed for patients enrolled in a joint arthroplasty PSH program who had undergone primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Patients were preoperatively stratified based on specific procedure performed, age, gender, body mass index (BMI), American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Classification System (ASA) score, and Charleston Comorbidity Index (CCI) score. The primary outcome criterion was hospital length of stay (LOS). Secondary criteria including operative room (OR) duration, transfusion rate, Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) stay, readmission rate, post-operative complications, and discharge disposition. For each outcome, the predictor variables were entered into a generalized linear model with appropriate response and assessed for predictive relationship to the dependent variable. Significance level was set to 0.05. RESULTS: A total of 337 patients, 200 in the TKA cohort and 137 in the THA cohort, were eligible for the study. Nearly two-third of patients were female. Patient age averaged 64 years and preoperative BMI averaged 29 kg/m2. The majority of patients were ASA score III and CCI score 0. After analysis, ASA score was the only variable predictive for LOS (P = 0.0011) and each increase in ASA score above 2 increased LOS by approximately 0.5 d. ASA score was also the only variable predictive for readmission rate (P = 0.0332). BMI was the only variable predictive for PACU duration (P = 0.0136). Specific procedure performed, age, gender, and CCI score were not predictive for any of the outcome criteria. OR duration, transfusion rate, post-operative complications or discharge disposition were not significantly associated with any of the predictor variables. CONCLUSION: The joint arthroplasty PSH model reduces

  4. The relationship among psychological factors, neglect-like symptoms and postoperative pain after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Yoshiyuki; Hara, Michiya; Fujiwara, Akira; Hanada, Hirofumi; Morioka, Shu

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Persistent postoperative pain has a significant relationship with patient health and satisfaction. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence and association of neglect-like symptoms (NLS) and other psychological factors on postoperative pain in patients following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). NLS are defined as the loss of perception of the limb with pain and excessive effort required to move the limb. The authors hypothesized that NLS were an important contributor to postoperative pain. METHODS: The factors influencing pain were investigated using a longitudinal study with assessments at three and six weeks postsurgery. The relationships among demographic factors (age, body weight, body mass index), psychological factors (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Pain Catastrophizing Scale [PCS]) and NLS with postoperative pain were investigated in 90 patients after TKA. The associations among motor functions (muscle strength of knee extension, range of motion), sensory functions (joint position sense and two-point discrimination in the thigh) and NLS were also investigated. RESULTS: At three and six weeks after surgery, 36% and 19% of patients, respectively, experienced NLS. In hierarchical multiple regression analysis, NLS and PCS scores were significantly associated with postoperative pain, while joint position sense and range of motion were significantly associated with NLS. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that facilitation of sensory integration is important in rehabilitation after TKA because NLS appears to result from impaired sensory integration. The association of PCS scores with postoperative pain and NLS suggests the need to provide appropriate postoperative education to reduce persistent negative thoughts regarding future pain. PMID:25101335

  5. Systematic review of periprosthetic tibia fracture after total knee arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Ebraheim, Nabil A; Ray, Joseph R; Wandtke, Meghan E; Buchanan, Grant S; Sanford, Chris G; Liu, Jiayong

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the known incidences, treatment options, and related outcomes of periprosthetic tibia fractures after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: A literature search was done to identify studies that fit the inclusion criteria. The database search yielded 185 results, which were further reduced by the exclusion criteria to 13 papers, totaling 157 patients that met these criteria. Incidence rates of the different types of periprosthetic tibia fractures were determined and their treatments were subsequently analyzed based on the fracture’s subclass, with patient outcomes being overall favorable. RESULTS: Of the 144 documented patients, 54 (37.5%) had a subclass C fracture, which are frequently seen in revision arthroplasties or when using cement intraoperatively. The fractures of subclasses A and B occur postoperatively. There were 90 subclass A and B fractures with incidences of 18.75% and 43.75% respectively. When broken down by type, 62 (55.36%) were type 1, 24 (21.4%) were type 2, 24 (21.4%) were type 3, and 2 (1.8%) were type 4. Furthermore, from the studies that included origin of injury, the types were further classified as having non-traumatic or traumatic origins. Type 1 had 78% (40/51) non-traumatic origin and 22% (11/51) traumatic origin. Fifteen fractures were type 2, but 5 were falls and 1 through a motor vehicle accident, giving a trauma causation of 40% (6/15). Of the 24 type 3 fractures, 12 were falls and 2 vehicular accidents, leading to a trauma causation of 58% (14/24). CONCLUSION: Type 1 fractures were the most common. Subclass A was treated with locking plates, B required a revision TKA, and C was treated intraoperatively or nonoperatively. PMID:26396942

  6. Impact of venous thromboembolism on clinical management and therapy after hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Fisher, William D

    2011-10-01

    Postoperative deep vein thrombosis (DVT) occurs most often in the large veins of the legs in patients undergoing major joint arthroplasty and major surgical procedures. These patients remain at high risk for venous thromboembolic events. In patients undergoing total hip or total knee arthroplasty (THA or TKA, respectively), different patterns of altered venous hemodynamics and hypercoagulability have been found, thus the rate of distal DVT is higher than that of proximal DVT after TKA. In addition, symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs earlier after TKA than THA; however, most of those events occur after hospital discharge. Consequently, extended thromboprophylaxis after discharge should be considered and is particularly important after THA owing to the prolonged risk period for VTE. Evidence-based guideline recommendations for the prevention of VTE in these patients have not been fully implemented. This is partly owing to the limitations of traditional anticoagulants, such as the parenteral route of administration or frequent coagulation monitoring and dose adjustment, as well as concerns about bleeding risks. The introduction of new oral agents (e.g., dabigatran etexilate and rivaroxaban) may facilitate guideline adherence, particularly in the outpatient setting, owing to their oral administration without the need for routine coagulation monitoring. Furthermore, the direct Factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban has been shown to be more effective than enoxaparin in preventing VTE. PMID:21774881

  7. What role do periodontal pathogens play in osteoarthritis and periprosthetic joint infections of the knee?

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Garth D; Hu, Fen Z; Sotereanos, Nicholas; Sewicke, Jeffrey; Parvizi, Javad; Nara, Peter L; Arciola, Carla Renata

    2014-01-01

    Through the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-electron spray ionization (ESI)-time of flight (TOF)-mass spectrometry (MS), we identified multiple periodontal pathogens within joint tissues of individuals undergoing replacement arthroplasties of the knee. The most prevalent of the periodontal pathogens were Treponema denticola and Enterococcus faecalis, the latter of which is commonly associated with apical periodontitis. These findings were unique to periprosthetic joint infections (PJI) of the knee and were never observed for PJIs of other lower extremity joints (hip and ankle) or upper extremity joints (shoulder and elbow). These data were confirmed by multiple independent methodologies including fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) which showed the bacteria deeply penetrated inside the diseased tissues, and 454-based deep 16S rDNA sequencing. The site-specificity, the tissue investment, and the identical findings by multiple nucleic-acid-based techniques strongly suggests the presence of infecting bacteria within these diseased anatomic sites. Subsequently, as part of a control program using PCR-ESI-TOF-MS, we again detected these same periodontal pathogens in aspirates from patients with osteoarthritis who were undergoing primary arthroplasty of the knee and thus who had no history of orthopedic implants. This latter finding raises the question of whether hematogenic spread of periodontal pathogens to the knee play a primary or secondary-exacerbatory role in osteoarthritis. PMID:24921460

  8. Histopathological Evaluation of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament in Patients Undergoing Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mont, Michael A; Elmallah, Randa K; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Banerjee, Samik; Kapadia, Bhaveen H

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed gross and histopathological ACL changes in arthritic knees (n=174) undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Histopathological changes were assessed and graded as absent (0), mild (1), moderate (2), or marked (3). These were correlated to demographic and clinical factors, and radiographic evaluations. The ACL was intact in 43, frayed in 85, torn in 15, and absent in 31 knees. Eighty-five percent had histological changes. Overall, there were significant associations between greater age and BMI, and histological changes. Grade IV knees had significantly greater calcium pyrophosphate deposits, microcyst formation, and number of pathologic changes. These correlations may aid decision-making when determining suitability for unicompartmental or bicruciate-retaining arthroplasties, though further studies should correlate these histological findings to mechanical and functional knee status. PMID:26239235

  9. Total knee arthroplasty in valgus knees using minimally invasive medial-subvastus approach

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilen Amulak; Jain, Nimesh Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Background: An ideal approach for valgus knees must provide adequate exposure with minimal complications due to approach per se. Median parapatellar approach is most commonly used approach in TKA including valgus knees. A medial subvastus approach is seldom used for valgus knees and has definite advantages of maintaining extensor mechanism integrity and minimal effect on patellar tracking. The present study was conducted to evaluate outcomes of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and efficacy of subvastus approach in valgus knees in terms of early functional recovery, limb alignment and complications. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 112 knees with valgus deformity between January 2006 and December 2011. All patients were assessed postoperatively for pain using Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and quadriceps recovery in form of time to active straight leg raising (SLR) and staircase competency and clinical outcomes using American Knee Society (AKS) score and radiographic evaluation with average followup of 40 months (range 24–84 months). Results: The mean VAS on postoperative day (POD) 1 and POD2 at rest was 2.73 and 2.39, respectively and after mobilization was 3.28 and 3.08, respectively (P < 0.001). The quadriceps recovery was very early and 92 (86.7%) patients were able to do active SLR by POD1 with mean time of 21.98 h while reciprocal gait and staircase competency was possible at 43.05 h. The AKS and function score showed significant improvement from preoperative mean score of 39 and 36 to 91 and 79 (P < 0.001), respectively, and the mean range of motion increased from 102° preoperatively to 119° at recent followup (P < 0.001). The mean tibiofemoral valgus was corrected from preoperative 16° (range 10°–35°) to 5° (range 3°–9°) valgus (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Mini-subvastus quadriceps approach provides adequate exposure and excellent early recovery for TKA in valgus knees, without increase in incidence of complications. PMID:26955174

  10. How human gait responds to muscle impairment in total knee arthroplasty patients: Muscular compensations and articular perturbations.

    PubMed

    Ardestani, Marzieh M; Moazen, Mehran

    2016-06-14

    Post-surgical muscle weakness is prevalent among patients who undergo total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We conducted a probabilistic multi-body dynamics (MBD) to determine whether and to what extent habitual gait patterns of TKA patients may accommodate strength deficits in lower extremity muscles. We analyzed muscular and articular compensations in response to various muscle impairments, and the minimum muscle strength requirements needed to preserve TKA gait patterns in its habitual status. Muscle weakness was simulated by reducing the strength parameter of muscle models in MBD analysis. Using impaired models, muscle and joint forces were calculated and compared versus those from baseline gait i.e. TKA habitual gait before simulating muscle weakness. Comparisons were conducted using a relatively new statistical approach for the evaluation of gait waveforms, i.e. Spatial Parameter Mapping (SPM). Principal component analysis was then conducted on the MBD results to quantify the sensitivity of every joint force component to individual muscle impairment. The results of this study contain clinically important, although preliminary, suggestions. Our findings suggested that: (1) hip flexor and ankle plantar flexor muscles compensated for hip extensor weakness; (2) hip extensor, hip adductor and ankle plantar flexor muscles compensated for hip flexor weakness; (3) hip and knee flexor muscles responded to hip abductor weakness; (4) knee flexor and hip abductor balanced hip adductor impairment; and (5) knee extensor and knee flexor weakness were compensated by hip extensor and hip flexor muscles. Future clinical studies are required to validate the results of this computational study. PMID:27063251

  11. Revision after early aseptic failures in primary total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Piedade, Sérgio Rocha; Pinaroli, Alban; Servien, Elvire; Neyret, Philippe

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate cases of early aseptic failures presented during the first 5-year follow-up in a group of 981 primary total knee arthroplasty (primary TKA). Predisposing factors as well causes of failures and postoperative complications in different groups of aseptic failures were re-assessed and compared to a control group. A retrospective and cohort study compared one group of 944 primary TKA without surgical revision (890 patients) (Group A) with 22 primary TKA (22 patients) (Group B) that had revision TKA secondary to aseptic failure during the first five years follow-up. The cases of isolated patellar button replacement (n = 8) and infection (n = 7) were not considered in this study. All patients underwent a systematic assessment that included clinical and radiographic examinations, and IKS scores. Aseptic failure was more prevalent at the first 2-year follow-up (63%). TKA loosening (n = 11) and undiagnosed pain (n = 7) were considered the most frequent modes of failures, and laxity (n = 1) was a very rare early cause of failure. The aseptic failure group was characterized as average 5 years younger with a greater number of previous knee surgeries, lower IKS scores improvement, and more postoperative pain compared to control group, despite the fact that the aseptic failure group showed a prevalence of cases during the first 2-year follow-up. Inside this group, the undiagnosed pain group had lower improvement of IKS scores, a remarkable prevalence in prior surgical procedure (71%) and a minor mean interval between primary and revision TKA (11.6 months). PMID:19082578

  12. Doubtful effect of continuous intraarticular analgesia after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdulemir; Sundberg, Martin; Hansson, Ulrik; Malmvik, Johan; Flivik, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Local infiltration analgesia (LIA) is well established for effective postoperative pain relief in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). To prolong the effect of LIA, infusion pumps with local intraarticular analgesia can be used. We evaluated the effect of such an infusion pump for the first 48 h postoperatively regarding pain, knee function, length of stay (LOS) in hospital, and complications. Patients and methods 200 patients received peroperative LIA and a continuous intraarticular elastomeric infusion pump set at 2 mL/h. The patients were randomized either to ropivacaine (7.5 mg/mL) or to NaCl (9 mg/mL) in the pump. Visual analog scale (VAS) pain (0–100 mm), analgesic consumption, side effects of medicine, range of motion (ROM), leg-raising ability, LOS, and complications during the first 3 months were recorded. Results On the first postoperative day, the ropivacaine group had lower VAS pain (33 vs. 40 at 12 noon and 36 vs. 43 at 8 p.m.; p = 0.02 and 0.03, respectively), but after that all recorded variables were similar between the groups. During the first 3 months, the ropivacaine group had a greater number of superficial and deep surgical wound infections (11 patients vs. 2 patients, p = 0.02). There were no other statistically significant differences between the groups. Interpretation Continuous intraarticular analgesia (CIAA) with ropivacaine after TKA has no relevant clinical effect on VAS pain and does not affect LOS, analgesic consumption, ROM, or leg-raising ability. There may, however, be a higher risk of wound-healing complications including deep infections. PMID:25428755

  13. Evolution of trochlear compartment geometry in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Demey, Guillaume; Nover, Luca; Dejour, David

    2016-01-01

    Background The study aimed to compare trochlear profiles in recent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) models and to determine whether they feature improvements compared to their predecessors. The hypothesis was that recent TKA models have more anatomic trochlear compartments and would display no signs of trochlear dysplasia. Methods The authors analyzed the geometry of the 6 following TKA models using engineering software: PFC and Attune (DePuy), NexGen and Persona (Zimmer), Noetos and KneeTec (Tornier). The mediolateral trochlear profiles were plotted at various flexion angles (0°, 15°, 30° and 45°) to deduce the sulcus angle. Results Analysis of sulcus angles reveals general convergence of recent designs towards anatomic values. At 0° of flexion, sulcus angles of recent implant models were between 156.0–157.4°, while those of previous generation models between 154.5–165.5°. At 30° of flexion, sulcus angles of recent models also lie within 145.7–148.6°, but those of previous models are between 149.5–152.0°. All three manufacturers deepened their trochlear profile at 30° of flexion in recent models compared to earlier designs. Sulcus angles converge towards anatomic values but still exceed radiologic signs of dysplasia by 2–5°. Conclusions Recent TKA designs have more anatomic trochlear geometries than earlier TKA models by the same manufacturers, but trochlear compartments still exceed radiologic signs of trochlear dysplasia by 2° to 5°. The hypothesis that recent TKA models display no signs of trochlear dysplasia is therefore refuted. Surgeons should be aware of design limitations to optimize choice of implant and extensor mechanisms alignment. Level of evidence: IV geometric implant analysis. PMID:26855943

  14. Effects of Tourniquet Release on Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tie, Kai; Hu, Dongcai; Qi, Yongjian; Wang, Hua; Chen, Liaobin

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the clinical outcomes of early and late tourniquet release (tourniquet release after cementing the prosthesis vs tourniquet release after wound closure and pressure dressing) in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The study was conducted by searching PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central databases for articles on randomized controlled trials comparing early and late tourniquet release in primary TKA that were published from 1966 to March 2015. Relevant data were extracted, and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) Scale was used to assess the methodologic quality. Stata software (StatCorp, College Station, Texas) was used to perform a meta-analysis. Sixteen articles were included with a total of 1073 patients and 1097 knees. For blood loss, there were no significant differences between the 2 groups in calculated blood loss, decrease in hemoglobin level, drop in hematocrit level, and measured postoperative blood loss, although total measured blood loss and postoperative blood transfusion rate were significantly higher in the early tourniquet release group than in the late tourniquet release group. No statistical differences were found for operative time and incidence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) between the 2 groups. Wound complication rate in the early tourniquet release group was significantly lower than in the late tourniquet release group. Primary TKA with early tourniquet release is similar to TKA with late tourniquet release regarding perioperative blood loss, operative time, and incidence of DVT. Early tourniquet release reduced the incidence of wound complications compared with late tourniquet release. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e642-e650.]. PMID:27286051

  15. Why Patients Do Not Participate in Sports Activities After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Moon Jong; Kang, Yeon Gwi; Chung, Byung June; Chang, Chong Bum; Kim, Tae Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Background It is important to identify the reasons or factors preventing patients from participating in sports activities after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) to improve patient satisfaction and general health that can be gained from regular sports activities. Purpose To determine the reasons for lack of participation in regular sports activities after TKA as perceived by patients and to identify specific factors involved. Study Design Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods A total of 369 patients with a follow-up longer than 1 year after TKA were included in this retrospective study. A postal survey regarding sports activities was conducted using a questionnaire gathering information such as sociodemographic data, activity levels, and sports activities after TKA. The reasons perceived by patients for not participating in sports activities were determined. Patients unable to participate in sports activities were compared with patients able to do so in terms of sociodemographic data and pre- and postoperative outcomes. Results Of the 369 patients, 88 (24%) replied that they could not participate in a sports activity. Among the perceived reasons, reasons not related to the replaced knee were more frequent than those related to the replaced knee (76% vs 24%). Symptoms related to the spine or other joints composed 25% of the total perceived reasons. The presence of medical comorbidities accounted for 16%, while symptoms in the nonreplaced knee represented 8% of the reasons. In terms of patient factors, multivariate logistic regression revealed that male sex, a floor-based (ie, non-Western) lifestyle with greater demands on knee flexion, and worse postoperative University of California at Los Angeles activity scale were associated with nonregular sports activity levels. Conclusion The perceived reasons and patient factors hindering regular sports activities after TKA were not restricted to problems with the replaced knee. Nonetheless, orthopaedic surgeons may have a

  16. Diabetes: A Risk Factor for Poor Functional Outcome after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasvinder A.; Lewallen, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Background To assess the association of diabetes with postoperative limitation of activities of daily living (ADLs) after primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methodology/Principal Findings We used the prospectively collected data from the Mayo Clinic Total Joint Registry to assess the association of diabetes and diabetes with complications with moderate-severe ADL limitation 2- and 5-years after primary TKA. Multivariable logistic regression with general estimating equations adjusted for preoperative ADL limitation, comorbidity and demographic and clinical covariates. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) are presented. 7,139 primary TKAs at 2-years and 4,234 at 5-years constituted the cohorts. In multivariable-adjusted analyses, diabetes was associated with higher odds of moderate-severe limitation at 2- and 5-years, 1.71 (95% CI: 1.26, 2.32; P = 0.001) and 1.66 (95% CI: 1.13, 2.46; P = 0.01). Respective ORs for patients with diabetes with complications were 2.73 (95% CI: 1.47, 5.07; P = 0.001) and 2.73 (95% CI: 1.21, 6.15; P = 0.016). Sensitivity analyses that adjusted for anxiety and depression or anxiety, depression and ipsilateral hip involvement showed minimal attenuation of magnitude of the association. Conclusions/Significance In this large study of patients who underwent primary TKA, diabetes as well as its severity were independently associated with poorer functional outcome. Given the increasing rates of both diabetes as well as arthroplasty, more insight is needed into disease-related and treatment-related factors that underlie this higher risk of ADL limitation in patients with diabetes. Poor functional outcomes may be preventable by modifying the control of diabetes and associated comorbidity in pre- and post-arthroplasty periods. PMID:24236080

  17. Spontaneous dislocation of the polyethylene component following knee revision arthroplasty: case report☆

    PubMed Central

    Migon, Eduardo Zaniol; de Freitas, Geraldo Luiz Schuck; Rodrigues, Marcos Wainberg; de Oliveira, Gustavo Kaempf; de Almeida, Luis Gustavo Morato Pinto; Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Dislocation of the polyethylene component in knee arthroplasty is a rare complication. The main triggering factor is failure of the locking mechanism, which may result from technical errors of insertion, trauma or even implant failure. Here, a case of dislocation of the polyethylene component from the tibial base, nine years after revision arthroplasty, is reported. It is believed that this is the first such case reported in the Brazilian literature. PMID:26229887

  18. Patient specific guides for total knee arthroplasty are ready for primetime

    PubMed Central

    Schotanus, Martijn GM; Boonen, Bert; Kort, Nanne P

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To present the radiological results of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with use of patient specific matched guides (PSG) from different manufacturer in patients suffering from severe osteoarthritis of the knee joint. METHODS: This study describes the results of 57 knees operated with 4 different PSG systems and a group operated with conventional instrumentation (n = 60) by a single surgeon. The PSG systems were compared with each other and subdivided into cut- and pin PSG. The biomechanical axis [hip-knee-ankle angle (HKA)], varus/valgus of the femur [frontal femoral component (FFC)] and tibia (frontal tibial component) component, flexion/extension of the femur [flexion/extension of the femur component (LFC)] and posterior slope of the tibia [lateral tibial component (LTC)] component were evaluated on long-leg standing and lateral X-rays. A percentage of > 3° deviation was seen as an outlier. RESULTS: The inter class correlation coefficient (ICC) revealed that radiographic measurements between both assessors were reliable (ICC > 0.8). Fisher exact test was used to test differences of proportions. The percentage of outliers of the HKA-axis was comparable between both the PSG and conventional groups (12.28% vs 18.33%, P < 0.424) and the cut- and pin PSG groups (14.3% vs 10.3%, P < 1.00). The percentage of outliers of the FFC (0% vs 18.33%, P < 0.000), LFC (15.78% vs 58.33%, P < 0.000) and LTC (15.78% vs 41.67%, P < 0.033) were significant different in favour of the PSG group. There were no significant differences regarding the outliers between the individual PSG systems and the PSG group subdivided into cut- and pin PSG. CONCLUSION: PSG for TKA show significant less outliers compared to the conventional technique. These single surgeon results suggest that PSG are ready for primetime. PMID:26807358

  19. Acute hypotension after total knee arthroplasty and its nursing strategy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Mei; He, Jie; Zhou, Chang; Li, Yu; Yi, De-Kun; Zhang, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the factors affecting postoperative acute hypotension after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and provide a basis for guiding the clinical prevention. Methods: Between May 2001 and May 2013, a total of 495 patients undergoing routine TKA were analyzed retrospectively. Independent risk factors related to postoperative acute hypotension after TKA were determined by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: Of the 495 patients undergoing TKA, 61 (12.32%) developed postoperative acute hypotension after surgery. Univariate analysis showed that preoperative Neu, time of surgery, time of anesthesia, pressure of tourniquet, time of using tourniquet, preoperative hypertension, age and type of surgery were significant influencing factors, whereas by multivariate analysis, only age, pressure of tourniquet and type of surgery were significant influencing factors. Conclusion: Factors those were associated with a significantly increased postoperative acute hypotension after TKA included age, pressure of tourniquet and type of surgery. Achieving a good preoperative and postoperative evaluation and monitoring vital signs and disease change contribute to the detection, intervention and salvage for the acute hypotension. PMID:26550351

  20. Can Tibial Cementation Be Enhanced in Knee Arthroplasty Surgery?

    PubMed

    Westerman, Richard W

    2016-07-01

    Aseptic loosening of the tibial component continues to be a significant mode of failure in total knee arthroplasty surgery. Surface cemented components preserve tibial bone stock, but are reliant on a strong bone-cement interface. This study compares standard surface cemented tibial component design to a tibial component with the addition of an undersurface cement containment skirt. The hypothesis was that the addition of a 2-mm underside skirt would allow cement containment and pressurization during implantation, which might improve the overall survival. Two identical tibial components were used, out of which one had the 2-mm underside skirt removed for the purposes of this study. Overall, 12 tibial Sawbones were prepared identically and transducers placed in the medial and lateral plateau. Each component was implanted six times, according to the manufacturer's operative technique. The series of implantation experiments showed no difference in cement pressurization (p = 0.86) regardless of the tibial component design used, with a wide variation in pressure measurements occurring in both groups. The tibial component skirt has not demonstrated any enhancement in cement pressurization. The cement containment skirt might still be advantageous by increasing the cement mantle thickness without causing excessive bone penetration; however, the biological effects cannot be predicted without further clinical evaluation. PMID:26408994

  1. Influence of body mass index in revision total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Rogério Teixeira; Santos, Diego Benone; Chammas, Victor; Arrebola, Lucas Simões; Colombo, Mauricio Lebre; Scalizi, Caetano

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE : To evaluate the influence of the body mass index (BMI) on the functional assessment of patients who underwent revision total knee arthroplasty (RTKA). METHODS : Thirty patients who un-derwent RTKA between January 2008 and January 2012 were retrospectively assessed using the WOMAC questionnaire. The patients were divided into three groups according to the BMI ca-tegories defined by the World Health Organization (WHO): Group I with normal BMI (18-24.9 Kg/m2), with eight patients; Group II, overweight (BMI 25-29.9 Kg/m2), with 15 patients, and Group III obesity with BMI ≥ 30 Kg/m2, with seven patients. The post-ope-rative function scores obtained through the WOMAC questionnaire were compared with the BMI of each group. The statistical analysis between BMI and WOMAC scores was performed with the Spe-arman correlation test. RESULTS : The average functional WOMAC score for individuals in Group I was 16.7; in Group II it was 47.7; and in Group III it was 69.9, with a statistically significant differen-ce between groups I, II and III (p< 0.0001). CONCLUSION : Patients with BMI > 25 Kg/m2 had a worse functional evaluation through WOMAC scores when compared to patients with normal BMI after RTKA. Level of Evidence III, Tranversal Retrospective Study. PMID:27057139

  2. Non-arthroplasty treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Sanders, James O; Murray, Jayson; Gross, Leeaht

    2014-04-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons has developed an Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) on the Non-Arthroplasty Treatment of Osteoarthritis of the Knee (OAK). Evidence-based information, in conjunction with clinical expertise of physicians, was used to develop the criteria to improve patient care and obtain best outcomes while considering the subtleties and distinctions necessary in making clinical decisions. The OAK AUC clinical scenarios were derived from patient indications that generally accompany OAK as well as from the current evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and its supporting literature. The 576 patient scenarios and 10 treatments were developed by the Writing Panel, a group of clinicians who are specialists in this AUC topic. Next, the Review Panel, a separate group of volunteer physicians, independently reviewed these materials to ensure that they were representative of patient scenarios clinicians are likely to encounter in daily practice. Finally, the multidisciplinary Voting Panel (made up of specialists and nonspecialists) rated the appropriateness of treatment of each patient scenario using a 9-point scale to designate a treatment as Appropriate (median rating, 7 to 9), May Be Appropriate (median rating, 4 to 6), or Rarely Appropriate (median rating, 1 to 3). The final appropriateness ratings assigned by the voting panel can be accessed online via the AAOS OAK AUC web-based mobile application at: www.aaos.org/aucapp. PMID:24668355

  3. Rotation flaps for coverage after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Pozzobon, Leonardo Rafael; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Guimarães, Tales Mollica; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results obtained using local myocutaneous rotation flaps in cases of wound dehiscence after total knee arthroplasty. METHODS: Patients undergoing these surgical procedures were selected in the 2000-2012 period. The nine selected cases during this period were subjected to flap coverage due to skin dehiscence associated with infection. In eight cases we used rotation flaps of the medial gastrocnemius, and in one case we used advancing skin. RESULTS: Eighty nine percent of the cases were successful in the coverage of the prosthesis and the viability of the flaps. In four cases it was possible to maintain or review the prosthesis. Four other cases progressed to amputation due to failure on treatment of infections, and one case remained without the prosthesis. The functional evaluation showed an unsatisfactory outcome in 89% of cases. CONCLUSION: Coverage flaps are a good option for the treatment of cases of dehiscence with exposure of the prosthesis and the functional failure was associated with the inability to control the infection and the damage it caused. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453672

  4. [Chronic sports injuries of the knee joint].

    PubMed

    Mannil, M; Andreisek, G; Weishaupt, D; Fischer, M A

    2016-05-01

    Chronic sports injuries of the knee joint are common and mainly caused by repetitive (micro) trauma and exertion. Chronic insertion tendinopathies and avulsion fractures and symptoms related to entrapment, friction and impingement can be pathophysiologically distinguished in athletes. In this review, we depict the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the most commonly occurring pathologies. PMID:27118369

  5. Risk of Anterior Femoral Notching in Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background We retrospectively investigated the prevalence of femoral anterior notching and risk factors after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using an image-free navigation system. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 148 consecutive TKAs in 130 patients beginning in July 2005. Seventy knees (62 patients) underwent conventional TKA, and 78 knees (68 patients) received navigated TKA. We investigated the prevalence of femoral anterior notching and measured notching depth by conventional and navigated TKA. Additionally, the navigated TKA group was categorized into two subgroups according to whether anterior femoral notching had occurred. The degree of preoperative varus deformity, femoral bowing, and mediolateral suitability of the size of the femoral component were determined by reviewing preoperative and postoperative radiographs. The resection angle on the sagittal plane and the angle of external rotation that was set by the navigation system were checked when resecting the distal femur. Clinical outcomes were compared using range of motion (ROM) and the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAX) scores between the two groups. Results The prevalence of anterior femoral notching by conventional TKA was 5.7%, and that for navigated TKA was 16.7% (p = 0.037). Mean notching depth by conventional TKA was 2.92 ± 1.18 mm (range, 1.8 to 4.5 mm) and 3.32 ± 1.54 mm (range, 1.55 to 6.93 mm) by navigated TKA. Preoperative anterior femoral bowing was observed in 61.5% (p = 0.047) and both anterior and lateral femoral bowing in five cases in notching group during navigated TKA (p = 0.021). Oversized femoral components were inserted in 53.8% of cases (p = 0.035). No differences in clinical outcomes for ROM or the HSS and WOMAX scores were observed between the groups. A periprosthetic fracture, which was considered a notching-related side effect, occurred in one case each in the conventional and navigated TKA groups

  6. I-ONE therapy in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty: a prospective, randomized and controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is often associated with a severe local inflammatory reaction which, unless controlled, leads to persistent pain up to one year after surgery. Standard and accelerated rehabilitation protocols are currently being implemented after TKA, but no consensus exists regarding the long-term effects. Biophysical stimulation with pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) has been demonstrated to exert an anti-inflammatory effect, to promote early functional recovery and to maintain a positive long-term effect in patients undergoing joint arthroscopy. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether PEMFs can be used to limit the pain and enhance patient recovery after TKA. Methods A prospective, randomized, controlled study in 30 patients undergoing TKA was conducted. Patients were randomized into experimental PEMFs or a control group. Patients in the experimental group were instructed to use I-ONE stimulator 4hours/day for 60days. Postoperatively, all patients received the same rehabilitation program. Treatment outcome was assessed using the Knee Society Score, SF-36 Health-Survey and VAS. Patients were evaluated pre-operatively and one, two, six and 12 months after TKA. Joint swelling and Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drug (NSAID) consumption were recorded. Comparisons between the two groups were carried out using a two-tail heteroschedastic Student’s t-test. Analysis of variance for each individual subject during the study was performed using ANOVA for multiple comparisons, applied on each group, and a Dunnet post hoc test. A p value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Pre-operatively, no differences were observed between groups in terms of age, sex, weight, height, Knee-Score, VAS, SF-36 and joint swelling, with the exception of the Functional Score. The Knee-Score, SF-36 and VAS demonstrated significantly positive outcomes in the I-ONE stimulated group compared with the controls at follow-ups. In the I

  7. Regional uptake an variations in orthopaedic enhanced recovery pathways in knee and hip total arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mawdsley, M J; Baker, P N; Desai, A; Green, R N; Jevons, L

    2016-05-01

    The use of enhanced recovery (ER) pathways for hip and knee arthroplasty has increased over the last decade, and the adoption within orthopaedics is becoming more common. We have demonstrated a regional variation and institutional inconsistency of uptake and delivery of ER pathways in our region. Units that have a unified pathway were more likely to have consistency in treatment and early analgesia for patients. We would advocate that units use an agreed enhanced recovery pathway to optimise patient recovery from hip and knee arthroplasties. PMID:27400490

  8. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea in primary joint arthroplasty in Aneurin Bevan University Health Board South.

    PubMed

    Blocker, O; Abdulkadir, U; Roberts, P

    2016-03-01

    Introduction The choice of perioperative antibiotics to reduce the prevalence of infection after joint arthroplasty should be considered carefully to minimise the risk of nosocomial infections. Dramatic increases in the incidence and severity of healthcare-associated Clostridium difficile infection with Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD) have occurred since 2000. Methods A retrospective audit of patients who underwent total hip and total knee replacement between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2007 was undertaken in Aneurin Bevan University Health Board South (ABHBS). Stool samples from patients who had diarrhoea <12 months of surgery were recorded. Positive samples for CDAD <1 month of surgery were identified. After the change in practice in June 2010, a re-audit linked joint-replacement patients between 1 July 2010 and 26 June 2013 with infection control-records for CDAD-positive cases. Results In the first audit cycle, 1900 joint procedures were carried out in 1845 patients. There were 4 cases of CDAD <1 month of surgery (0.22%). In the re-audit period, 2591 joint procedures were undertaken in 2400 patients: no cases of CDAD <1 month of surgery were recorded. Fisher's exact test gave a two-tailed p=0.036. Conclusions The significant reduction in CDAD cases after the change in perioperative antibiotic regimen for primary joint arthroplasty mirrored a 66% reduction in overall CDAD cases in the ABUHBS between 2008 and 2012. This reduction was accompanied by financial savings in antibiotics and nursing hours. PMID:26836055

  9. Comparison of pain perception between open and minimally invasive surgery in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Biagio; Vitale, Elsa; Esposito, Antonio; Colella, Antonio; Cassano, Maria; Notarnicola, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was a well-established procedure that had shown excellent long-term results in terms of reduced pain and increased mobility. Pain was one of the most important outcome measures that contributed to patient dissatisfaction after TKA. After a computerized search of the Medline and Embase databases, we considered articles from January 1st, 1997 to October 31st, 2009 that underlined the impact on patient pain perception of either standard open total knee arthroplasty or minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty. We included articles that used the visual analog scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), Knee Score, Hospital for Special Surgery Score (HSS), Oxford Knee Score (OKS) as postoperative pain indicators, and we included studies with a minimum follow-up period of two months. We excluded studies that monitored only functional postoperative knee activities. It was shown that TKA with the open technique was a better treatment for knees with a positive effect on pain and function than the minimally invasive technique. PMID:21042568

  10. Two-stage revision of implant-associated infections after total hip and knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ellenrieder, Martin; Lenz, Robert; Haenle, Maximilian; Bader, Rainer; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    Septic loosening of total hip and knee endoprostheses gains an increasing proportion of revision arthroplasties. Operative revisions of infected endoprostheses are mentally and physically wearing for the patient, challenging for the surgeon and a significant economic burden for healthcare systems. In cases of early infection within the first three weeks after implantation a one-stage revision with leaving the implant in place is widely accepted. The recommendations for the management of late infections vary by far. One-stage revisions as well as two-stage or multiple revision schedules have been reported to be successful in over 90% of all cases for certain patient collectives. But implant associated infection still remains a severe complication. Moreover, the management of late endoprosthetic infection requires specific logistics, sufficient and standardized treatment protocol, qualified manpower as well as an efficient quality management. With regard to the literature and experience of specialized orthopaedic surgeons from several university and regional hospitals we modified a commonly used treatment protocol for two-stage revision of infected total hip and knee endoprostheses. In addition to the achievement of maximum survival rate of the revision implants an optimisation of the functional outcome of the affected artificial joint is aimed for. PMID:22242098

  11. Accuracy of screening compression ultrasonography and clinical examination for the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis after total hip or knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, K. Sue; Anderson, David R.; Gross, Michael; Petrie, David; Leighton, Ross; Stanish, William; Alexander, David; Mitchell, Michael; Mason, William; Flemming, Bruce; Fairhurst-Vaughan, Marlene; Gent, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Objective To determine whether compression ultrasonography or clinical examination should be considered as screening tests for the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) after total hip or knee arthroplasty in patients receiving warfarin prophylaxis postoperatively. Design A prospective cohort study. Setting A single tertiary care orthopedic centre. Patients One hundred and eleven patients who underwent elective total hip or knee arthroplasty were enrolled. Postoperatively the warfarin dose was adjusted daily to maintain the international normalized ratio between 1.8 and 2.5. Eighty-six patients successfully completed the study protocol. Intervention Before they were discharged from hospital, patients were assessed for DVT by clinical examination, bilateral compression ultrasonography of the proximal venous system and bilateral contrast venography. Results DVT was found in 29 patients (34%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 24% to 45%), and 6 patients (7%; 95% CI 3% to 15%) had proximal DVT. DVT developed in 18 (40%) of 45 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty and in 11 (27%) of 41 patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty. The sensitivity of compression ultrasonography for the diagnosis of proximal DVT was 83% (95% CI 36% to 99%) and the specificity was 98% (95% CI 91% to 99%). The positive predictive value of compression ultrasonography was 71%. In contrast, clinical examination for DVT had a sensitivity of 11% (95% CI 2% to 28%) and a positive predictive value of 25%. Conclusions DVT is a common complication after total hip or knee arthroplasty. Compression ultrasonography appears to be a relatively accurate noninvasive test for diagnosing postoperative proximal DVT. In contrast, clinical examination is a very insensitive test. Whether routine use of screening compression ultrasonography will reduce the morbidity of venous thromboembolism after joint arthroplasty requires confirmation in a prospective trial involving long-term follow-up of patients

  12. Comparison of Difference in Hematologic and Hemodynamic Outcomes between Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty and Revision of Infected Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shon, Oog-Jin; Lee, Dong-Chul; Ryu, Seung Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study is to identify preoperative cautions for revision of infected total knee arthroplasty (TKA) by understanding the differences in hematologic and hemodynamic changes between primary TKA and revision of infected TKA. Materials and Methods The study included 40 patients in each of the two groups: one group with patients who underwent TKA and the other group with patients who underwent revision of infected TKA. All patients matched for age and body mass index. The following data were compared between the groups: changes in blood pressure, variations in hemoglobin level, amount of postoperative blood loss and transfused blood, incidence of blood transfusion, white blood cell (WBC) count, albumin level, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and liver enzyme level. Results The hemoglobin levels, transfusion rate, and the amount of blood loss were significantly higher in the revision group (p=0.012). In both groups, CRP reached the highest level on the 3rd postoperative day but it was normalized 2 weeks postoperatively; however, the revision TKA group showed a greater tendency to normalization (p=0.029). There were significant differences between the groups in ESR, WBC, blood pressure, and changes in liver enzyme levels. Conclusions Revision of infected TKA results in greater hemodynamic variations than primary TKA. Therefore, more efforts should be made to identify pre- and postoperative hemodynamic changes and hematologic status. PMID:27274469

  13. Failure of total knee arthroplasty with or without patella resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Patella resurfacing during primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is disputed and new prosthesis designs have been introduced without documentation of their survival. We assessed the impact on prosthesis survival of patella resurfacing and of prosthesis brand, based on data from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register. Patients and methods 5 prosthesis brands in common use with and without patella resurfacing from 1994 through 2009 were included n = 11,887. The median follow-up times were 9 years for patella-resurfaced implants and 7 years for implants without patella resurfacing. For comparison of prosthesis brands, also brands in common use with only one of the two treatment options were included in the study population (n = 25,590). Cox regression analyses were performed with different reasons for revision as endpoints with adjustment for potential confounders. Results We observed a reduced overall risk of revision for patella resurfaced (PR) TKAs, but the statistical significance was borderline (RR = 0.84, p = 0.05). At 15 years, 92% of PR and 91% of patella non resurfaced (NR) prostheses were still unrevised. However, PR implants had a lower risk of revision due to pain alone (RR = 0.1, p < 0.001), but a higher risk of revision due to loosening of the tibial component (RR = 1.4, p = 0.03) and due to a defective polyethylene insert (RR = 3.2, p < 0.001). At 10 years, the survival for the reference NR brand AGC Universal was 93%. The NR brands Genesis I, Duracon, and Tricon (RR = 1.4–1.7) performed statistically significantly worse than NR AGC Universal, while the NR prostheses e.motion, Profix, and AGC Anatomic (RR = 0.1–0.7), and the PR prostheses NexGen and AGC Universal (RR = 0.4–0.5) performed statistically significantly better. LCS, NexGen, LCS Complete (all NR), and Tricon, Genesis I, LCS, and Kinemax (all PR) showed no differences in this respect from the reference brand. A lower risk of revision (crude) was found for TKAs

  14. Antibiotic-loaded bone cement in total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Soares, Daniel; Leite, Pedro; Barreira, Pedro; Aido, Ricardo; Sousa, Ricardo

    2015-06-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection is a devastating complication after total joint replacement. Prevention is mandatory and systemic antibiotic prophylaxis is nowadays a recognized cornerstone. Further addition of local antibiotics eluting from bone cement is a real possibility but its routine use is controversial. Pros and cons of its routine use in primary and revision total joint arthroplasty will be discussed. Cement spacers carrying high doses of antibiotic(s) are currently accepted during two-stage treatment of infected prosthetic joints. Several issues such as alternatives to classic antibiotics, optimal dosages and others will also be explored. PMID:26280954

  15. Effect of total knee arthroplasty on type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Shrinand V; Arora, Arvind; Mathesul, Ambarish A

    2013-01-01

    Context: Advanced osteoarthritis of knee joint if bilateral, severely restricts patient mobility. This acts as an aggravating factor for pre existing comorbid elements of metabolical syndrome (MS) like Type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension as patients are unable to carry out therapeutic walks. Successfully implanted total knee arthroplasty (TKA) increases physical activity and enables to carry out therapeutic walks thus may help in better control of type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The objective of this prospective study was to find whether TKA for osteoarthritis knee had any effect to improve blood glucose levels and reduce blood pressure. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was done in which patients operated for tricompartmental osteoarthritis of knee with associated comorbidities like Type II diabetes mellitus or hypertension during a period of 2008 and 2009 were studied. One hundred and twenty patients were enrolled (55 diabetics, 65 hypertensives) who met our inclusion criteria. Preoperative knee society score, lower extremity activity scale fasting blood glucose level and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were compared with one year followup values. The KSS and LEAS scores were analysed by the Wilcoxon signed ranked test, while the fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels and systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels were analysed by paired ‘t’ test. Results: The reduction of systolic blood pressure by 8 mmHg (t = 5.6, P value < 0.05) and diastolic blood pressure by 6 mmHg (t = 7.6, P value < 0.05) was recorded which was statistically significant. However, no statistically significant effect on fasting blood glucose levels was observed (t = -0.77, P value = 0.442). KSS improved in DM from preoperative 29 to 86 and LEAS improved from 6.7 to 11.3. Conclusions: Authors are of the opinion that successful total knee replacement results in increased physical activity and reduces blood pressure (systolic and diastolic) in hypertensives

  16. Young patients with hematologic and lymphatic malignancies have an increased risk of hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Niinimäki, Tuukka T; Ohtonen, Pasi; Harila-Saari, Arja H; Niinimäki, Riitta A

    2016-05-01

    Background Skeletal complications such as osteonecrosis (ON) are potential adverse events in patients treated for cancer, especially in those treated for hematologic and lymphatic malignancies (HLMs). ON may damage the hip or knee joints and may lead to arthrosis requiring total joint arthroplasty (TJA). The aim of this study was to address the risk of TJA in patients with cancer, especially those treated for HLM, in a nationwide population-based setting. Material and methods All patients who had undergone TJA after cancer diagnosis between the years 2000 and 2012 were identified by linking the Arthroplasty Register and the Cancer Registry. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of TJAs were calculated to assess whether patients with any cancer, but especially HLM, have increased risk for TJA when compared with the general population. Results In patients with HLM or other cancer, the overall SIRs were similar compared with the general population. However, in HLM patients under 50 years of age, the SIR was 7.6, and in patients under 35 years of age, it was 45.5. The corresponding SIRs in patients with other cancers were 3.6 and 6.6, respectively. The highest SIRs, including all age groups, were among patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (SIR = 4.5) and acute myeloid leukemia (SIR = 1.9). Discussion HLMs imply an increased risk for TJA compared with the general population. The risk is especially high in patients younger than 50 years, regardless of the type of HLM. Young patients with HLM, as well as their healthcare providers, should be aware of the highly increased risk of skeletal complications requiring TJA. PMID:26967713

  17. Techniques for assessing knee joint pain in arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Volker; Han, Jeong S; Adwanikar, Hita; Fu, Yu; Ji, Guangchen

    2007-01-01

    The assessment of pain is of critical importance for mechanistic studies as well as for the validation of drug targets. This review will focus on knee joint pain associated with arthritis. Different animal models have been developed for the study of knee joint arthritis. Behavioral tests in animal models of knee joint arthritis typically measure knee joint pain rather indirectly. In recent years, however, progress has been made in the development of tests that actually evaluate the sensitivity of the knee joint in arthritis models. They include measurements of the knee extension angle struggle threshold, hind limb withdrawal reflex threshold of knee compression force, and vocalizations in response to stimulation of the knee. A discussion of pain assessment in humans with arthritis pain conditions concludes this review. PMID:17391515

  18. Biomaterial Hypersensitivity: Is It Real? Supportive Evidence and Approach Considerations for Metal Allergic Patients following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mihalko, William M.; Grupp, Thomas M.; Manning, Blaine T.; Dennis, Douglas A.; Goodman, Stuart B.; Saleh, Khaled J.

    2015-01-01

    The prospect of biomaterial hypersensitivity developing in response to joint implant materials was first presented more than 30 years ago. Many studies have established probable causation between first-generation metal-on-metal hip implants and hypersensitivity reactions. In a limited patient population, implant failure may ultimately be related to metal hypersensitivity. The examination of hypersensitivity reactions in current-generation metal-on-metal knee implants is comparatively limited. The purpose of this study is to summarize all available literature regarding biomaterial hypersensitivity after total knee arthroplasty, elucidate overall trends about this topic in the current literature, and provide a foundation for clinical approach considerations when biomaterial hypersensitivity is suspected. PMID:25883940

  19. Biomaterial hypersensitivity: is it real? Supportive evidence and approach considerations for metal allergic patients following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mitchelson, Andrew J; Wilson, Craig J; Mihalko, William M; Grupp, Thomas M; Manning, Blaine T; Dennis, Douglas A; Goodman, Stuart B; Tzeng, Tony H; Vasdev, Sonia; Saleh, Khaled J

    2015-01-01

    The prospect of biomaterial hypersensitivity developing in response to joint implant materials was first presented more than 30 years ago. Many studies have established probable causation between first-generation metal-on-metal hip implants and hypersensitivity reactions. In a limited patient population, implant failure may ultimately be related to metal hypersensitivity. The examination of hypersensitivity reactions in current-generation metal-on-metal knee implants is comparatively limited. The purpose of this study is to summarize all available literature regarding biomaterial hypersensitivity after total knee arthroplasty, elucidate overall trends about this topic in the current literature, and provide a foundation for clinical approach considerations when biomaterial hypersensitivity is suspected. PMID:25883940

  20. A Standardized Protocol for the Treatment of Early Postoperative Stiffness following Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Werner, Steven; Jacofsky, Marc; Kocisky, Sarah; Jacofsky, David

    2015-10-01

    Manipulation under anesthesia (MUA) and continuous passive motion (CPM) are commonly used to optimize range of motion (ROM) for the treatment of early stiffness following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The addition of systemic glucocorticoid as an adjunct to a standardized protocol of MUA and aggressive CPM treatment is outlined. Results demonstrate an average postoperative increase in knee ROM of 45 degrees in 78 TKAs at 10 weeks from MUA procedure with no complications reported. PMID:26030262

  1. Tranexamic Acid Administration in Total Knee Arthroplasty Without Tourniquet

    PubMed Central

    Bohler, Iain R M; Howse, Louise; Baird, Andrew; Giles, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: There are multiple documented advantages of undertaking total knee arthroplasty (TKA) without tourniquet, however, increased rates of blood loss and transfusion are often cited as contraindications to this approach. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of intra-operative TA administration on blood loss and transfusion rates in TKA without pneumatic tourniquet, using Rivaroxaban as thrombo-embolic prophylaxis. Method: 120 patients split into two continuous data sets, (A+B), underwent TKA without application of above knee tourniquet, receiving a post-operative dose of oral Rivaroxaban within 8 hours. Group B patients received an intra-operative dose of 1 gram of Tranexamic Acid intravenously before the first cut, whilst those in group A did not. Haemoglobin and Haematocrit levels were recorded peri-operatively. A revised Gross formula was used to calculate blood loss. Four patients were excluded from the study for incomplete data. Result: 58 patients (M34F24) in Group A, average age 6, had a mean Haemoglobin drop of 33gram/litre, Haematocrit drop of 0.097litre/litre (9.7%), with an average calculated blood loss of 1393 ml. 58 (M34, F24) patients in group B, average age 67, had a Haemoglobin drop of 25.2gram/litre, Haematocrit drop of 0.076litre/litre (7.6%) with an average calculated blood loss of1079 ml. Thus Group A patients were seen to sustain significantly more blood loss without TA administration, with a 29.1% larger calculated blood loss, a 25.5% larger drop in Haemoglobin and a 27.6% larger fall in Haematocrit. Transfusion rate was 5.2%(3 patients) per group. Conclusion: TA was shown to be effective in reducing blood loss in TKA without tourniquet using Rivaroxaban. Transfusion rates of 5.2% across both groups is close to 1/10th of the transfusion rate reported for major studies of TKA using Rivaroxaban with tourniquet application, and 1/8th of the transfusion rate in studies of TKA with administration of TA and use of tourniquet.

  2. Body mass and weight thresholds for increased prosthetic joint infection rates after primary total joint arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lübbeke, Anne; Zingg, Matthieu; Vu, Diemlan; Miozzari, Hermes H; Christofilopoulos, Panayiotis; Uçkay, Ilker; Harbarth, Stephan; Hoffmeyer, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Obesity increases the risk of deep infection after total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Our objective was to determine whether there may be body mass index (BMI) and weight thresholds indicating a higher prosthetic joint infection rate. Patients and methods — We included all 9,061 primary hip and knee arthroplasties (mean age 70 years, 61% women) performed between March 1996 and December 2013 where the patient had received intravenous cefuroxime (1.5 g) perioperatively. The main exposures of interest were BMI (5 categories: < 24.9, 25–29.9, 30–34.9, 35–39.9, and ≥ 40) and weight (5 categories: < 60, 60–79, 80–99, 100–119, and ≥ 120 kg). Numbers of TJAs according to BMI categories (lowest to highest) were as follows: 2,956, 3,350, 1,908, 633, and 214, respectively. The main outcome was prosthetic joint infection. The mean follow-up time was 6.5 years (0.5–18 years). Results — 111 prosthetic joint infections were observed: 68 postoperative, 16 hematogenous, and 27 of undetermined cause. Incidence rates were similar in the first 3 BMI categories (< 35), but they were twice as high with BMI 35–39.9 (adjusted HR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.1–4.3) and 4 times higher with BMI ≥ 40 (adjusted HR = 4.2, 95% CI: 1.8–9.7). Weight ≥ 100 kg was identified as threshold for a significant increase in infection from the early postoperative period onward (adjusted HR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.3–3.6). Interpretation — BMI ≥ 35 or weight ≥ 100 kg may serve as a cutoff for higher perioperative dosage of antibiotics. PMID:26731633

  3. Prophylaxis for Venous Thromboembolism Following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Survey of Korean Knee Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Ki; Kim, Tae Kyun; Kim, Jong Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to provide information on the actual status and prevailing trend of prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism (VTE) following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in South Korea. Materials and Methods The Korean Knee Society (KKS) developed a questionnaire with 6 clinical questions on VTE. The questionnaire was distributed to all members of KKS by both postal and online mail. Participants were asked to supply details on their specialty and to select methods of prophylaxis they employ. Of the total members of KKS, 27.9% participated in the survey. Results The percentage of surgeons who routinely performed prophylaxis for VTE was 60.4%; 19.4% performed prophylaxis depending on the patient's health condition; and the remaining 20.2% never implemented prophylaxis after surgery. The common prophylactic methods among the responders were compression stocking (72.9%), pneumatic leg compression (63.3%), perioral direct factor Xa inhibitor (46.9%), and low-molecular-weight heparin (39.5%). For the respondents who did not perform prophylaxis, the main reason (51.5%) was the low risk of postoperative VTE considering the low incidences in Asians. Conclusions The present study involving members of the KKS will help to comprehend the actual status of VTE prevention in South Korea. The results of this study may be useful to design VTE guidelines appropriate for Koreans in the future. PMID:27595074

  4. Distribution and Alteration of Lymphatic Vessels in Knee Joints of Normal and Osteoarthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jixiang; Liang, Qianqian; Zuscik, Michael; Shen, Jie; Chen, Di; Xu, Hao; Wang, Yong-Jun; Chen, Yan; Wood, Ronald W.; Li, Jia; Boyce, Brendan F.; Xing, Lianping

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the distribution and alteration of lymphatic vessels and draining function in knee joints of normal and osteoarthritic mice. Methods For the mouse models of osteoarthritis (OA), we used mice with meniscal-ligamentous injury or mice with conditional knockout of the gene for cartilage transforming growth factor β (TGF β) type II receptor. The severity of cartilage loss and joint destruction was assessed histologically. Capillary and mature lymphatic vessels were identified and analyzed using double immunofluorescence staining and a whole-slide digital imaging system. Lymphatic drainage of knee joints was examined using near-infrared lymphatic imaging. Patient joint specimens obtained during total knee or hip arthroplasty were evaluated to verify the content validity of the mouse findings. Results Lymphatic vessels were distributed in soft tissues (mainly around the joint capsule, ligaments, fat pads, and muscles of normal knees). The number of lymphatic vessels, particularly the number of capillaries, was significantly increased in joints of mice with mild OA, while the number of mature lymphatic vessels was markedly decreased in joints of mice with severe OA. OA knees exhibited significantly decreased lymph clearance. The number of both capillary and mature lymphatic vessels was significantly decreased in the joints of patients with OA. Conclusion The whole-slide digital imaging system is a powerful tool, enabling the identification and assessment of lymphatic microvasculature in the entire mouse knee. Lymphatic capillaries and mature vessels are present in various soft tissues around articular spaces. Abnormalities of lymphatic vessels and draining function, including significantly reduced numbers of mature vessels and impaired clearance, are present in OA joints. PMID:24574226

  5. One-stage débridement and knee fusion for infected total knee arthroplasty using the hybrid frame.

    PubMed

    VanRyn, Jacques S; Verebelyi, David M

    2002-01-01

    In 1997 and 1998, a hybrid fixator was used for a one-step arthrodesis in 2 cases of infected total knee arthroplasty. One patient had rheumatoid arthritis, and the other had an infected reimplant arthroplasty. Neither patient was a candidate for reimplantation. Fusions were achieved with the hybrid frame in an average of 10 weeks. All signs of local and systemic infections were eliminated. After 24 months for patient 1 and 37 months for patient 2, both are infection-free and ambulatory without the aid of a wheelchair. PMID:11805940

  6. Modification of the total first metatarsophalangeal joint implant arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, G; Kanat, I O

    1989-01-01

    The Swanson Silastic HP 100 Flexible Hinge Toe Implant (Dow Corning Wright, Arlington Tennessee) displays superior tensile, elongation and tear propagation strength in comparison to other silicone implant materials. It is, however, subject to many factors which may shorten its life-span. One reason for such failure has been attributed to the irregular contour of bone ends created after metatarsophalangeal joint arthroplasty, resulting in abrasion shards and shearing fractures of the implant stems and hinge. Titanium grommets were developed to alleviate this factor. This case report demonstrates a complication subsequent to total first metatarsophalangeal joint implant arthroplasty and the effectiveness of the Swanson Flexible Hinge Toe Joint Grommet. (Dow Corning Wright, Arlington, Tennessee). PMID:2794361

  7. MEDIUM-TERM ASSESSMENT OF TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY WITH IMPLANT MADE IN BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Barretto, João Maurício; Malta, Márcio; e Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires; de Assis, Daniel Pinho; Campos, André Siqueira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed 47 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with implants manufactured in Brazil, with a mean follow-up of five years. Methods: This was a retrospective study at Santa Casa de Misericordia Hospital in Rio de Janeiro, from January 1993 to December 2002. The sample comprised 47 patients (44 females and three males) who underwent TKA, totaling 58 knees. The patients’ ages ranged from 46 to 83 years. A diagnosis of osteoarthritis or rheumatic disease was confirmed in all the patients. Results: In this investigation, all the patients underwent cemented TKA with preservation of the posterior cruciate ligament. The length of follow-up ranged from 5 to 17 years. The functional assessment criterion used was the one of the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS), and this yielded an average of 87 points after the operation. The radiographic criterion used was the Knee Society Total Knee Arthroplasty Roentgenographic Evaluation and Scoring System. We had three cases with a radiolucent line without implant loosening, which were asymptomatic from a clinical standpoint. Conclusion: The total knee arthroplasty procedures using an implant made in Brazil were performed by a trained and experienced team. To date, over the clinical follow-up on these patients with knee osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, the results have been seen to be satisfactory. PMID:27027051

  8. Can a total knee arthroplasty be both rotationally unconstrained and anteroposteriorly stabilised?

    PubMed Central

    Imam, M. A.; Eifert, A.; Freeman, M. A. R.; Pinskerova, V.; Field, R. E.; Skinner, J.; Banks, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    pattern, although reduced in magnitude, to those in recent reports relating to normal knees during several activities. Specifically, little or no translation of the medial femoral condyle was observed during flexion, but there was posterior roll-back of the lateral femoral condyle, equating to tibiofemoral rotation. We conclude that the GMK Sphere is anteroposteriorly stable medially and permits rotation about the medial compartment. Cite this article: Professor G. Scott. Can a total knee arthroplasty be both rotationally unconstrained and anteroposteriorly stabilised?: A pulsed fluoroscopic investigation. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:80–86. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.53.2000621. PMID:26965166

  9. Alternative bearings in total knee arthroplasty: risk of early revision compared to traditional bearings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose There is no substantial clinical evidence for the superiority of alternative bearings in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We compared the short-term revision risk in alternative surface bearing knees (oxidized zirconium (OZ) femoral implants or highly crosslinked polyethylene (HXLPE) inserts) with that for traditional bearings (cobalt-chromium (CoCR) on conventional polyethelene (CPE)). The risk of revision with commercially available HXLPE inserts was also evaluated. Methods All 62,177 primary TKA cases registered in a Total Joint Replacement Registry between April 2001 and December 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The endpoints for the analysis were all-cause revisions, septic revisions, or aseptic revisions. Bearing surfaces were categorized as OZ-CPE, CoCr-HXLPE, or CoCr-CPE. HXLPE inserts were stratified according to brand name. Confounding was addressed using propensity score weights. Marginal Cox-regression models adjusting for surgeon clustering were used. Results The proportion of females was 62%. Average age was 68 (SD 9.3) years, and median follow-up time was 2.8 (IQR 1.2–4.9) years. After adjustments, the risks of all-cause, aseptic, and septic revision with CoCr-HXLPE and OZ-CPE bearings were not statistically significantly higher than with traditional CoCr-CPE bearings. No specific brand of HXLPE insert was associated with a higher risk of all-cause, aseptic, or septic revision compared to CoCr-CPE. Interpretation At least in the short term, none of the alternative knee bearings evaluated (CoCr-HXLPE or OZ-CPE) had a greater risk of all-cause, aseptic, and septic revision than traditional CoCr-CPE bearings. PMID:23485105

  10. Patient-level improvements in pain and activities of daily living after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lewallen, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To study patient-level improvements in pain and limitations of key activities of daily living (ADLs) after primary or revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods. We analysed prospectively collected data from the Mayo Clinic Total Joint Registry for improvements in index knee pain severity and limitations in three key ADLs (walking, climbing stairs and rising from a chair) from pre-operative to 2 and 5 years post-TKA. Results. The primary TKA cohort consisted of 7229 responders pre-operatively, 7139 at 2 years and 4234 at 5 years post-operatively. The revision TKA cohort consisted of 1206 responders pre-operatively, 1533 at 2 years and 881 at 5 years post-operatively. In the primary TKA cohort, important pain reduction to mild or no knee pain at 2 years was reported by 92% with moderate pre-operative pain and 93% with severe pre-operative pain; respective proportions were 91% and 91% at 5 years follow-up. For revision TKA, respective proportions were 71% and 66% at 2 years and 68% and 74% at 5 years. Three per cent with no/mild pre-operative overall limitation and 19% with moderate/severe pre-operative overall limitation had moderate/severe overall activity limitation 2 years post-operatively; at 5 years the respective proportions were 4% and 22%. Respective proportions for revision TKA were up to 3% and 32% at 2 years and 4% and 34% at 5 years. Conclusion. Our study provides comprehensive data for patient-level improvements in pain and key ADLs. These data can be used to inform patients pre-operatively of expected outcomes, based on pre-operative status, which may further help patients set realistic goals for improvements after TKA. PMID:24162150

  11. The role of intraoperative frozen sections in revision total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Feldman, D S; Lonner, J H; Desai, P; Zuckerman, J D

    1995-12-01

    delayed reimplantation had a secondary skin slough and eventually was managed with an arthrodesis of the knee. In the group that had negative frozen sections, eighteen patients had a primary exchange revision arthroplasty and five had a delayed reimplantation. At the time of follow-up, one patient who had had a delayed reimplantation had radiographic loosening of the femoral component and was asymptomatic. One patient who had had a primary exchange arthroplasty was managed with a second revision because of aseptic loosening. There was no clinical recurrence of infection in any patient. The data indicate that analysis of frozen sections of periprosthetic tissue is a reliable predictor of the presence of active infection during revision joint arthroplasty. We recommend its use to differentiate aseptic from septic loosening. PMID:8550647

  12. Is previous knee arthroscopy related to worse results in primary total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Piedade, Sérgio Rocha; Pinaroli, Alban; Servien, Elvire; Neyret, Philippe

    2009-04-01

    According to literature, knee arthroscopy is a minimal invasive surgery performed for minor surgical trauma, reduced morbidity and shortens the hospitalization period. Therefore, this type of surgery before total knee arthroplasty (TKA) could be considered a minor procedure with minimum postoperative complication. A retrospective and cohort series of 1,474 primary TKA was performed with re-assessment after a minimum follow-up period of 2 years: 1,119 primary TKA had no previous surgery (group A) and 60 primary TKA had arthroscopic debridement (group B). All the patients underwent a clinical and radiological evaluation as well as IKS scores. Statistical analysis of postoperative complications revealed that group B had a higher postoperative complication rate (P < 0.01). In this group, 30% of local complications were re-operated and 8.3% of these cases underwent revision TKA (P < 0.01). The mean interval between arthroscopy and primary TKA was 53 months. However, statistical analysis did not reveal a direct correlation between arthroscopy/primary TKA interval and postoperative complications/failures (P = 0.55). The Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed a survival rate of 98.1 and 86.8% at 10 years follow-up for groups A and B, respectively. Our data allow us to conclude that previous knee arthroscopy should be considered a factor related to postoperative primary TKA outcomes as demonstrated by the higher rate of postoperative complications and failures (P < 0.001) as well as a worse survival curve than group A. PMID:19099293

  13. Results of revision total knee arthroplasty in the face of significant bone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rorabeck, C H; Smith, P N

    1998-04-01

    The successful approach to the failed knee with bone deficiency is dependent upon thorough planning prior to surgery in order to have the resources available in terms of adequate bone allograft and suitable revision implants. The approximate size of bone stock deficiency can be calculated from preoperative radiographs and similarly ligamentous incompetence can often be diagnosed clinically prior to surgery. Smaller defects of up to 1 to 1.5 cm in depth and localized in the main to a single side of the tibial plateau or to a single femoral condyle can be dealt with using smaller grafts that may be local autograft or allograft, or modular wedges. Larger tibial defects can be compensated for using conventional revision systems by thicker polyethylene and augmented baseplates, but once the flexion-extension gap reaches approximately 40 mm this is no longer possible and structural graft or customized componentry becomes necessary. Femoral defects larger than about 1 cm that cannot be made up by augments necessitate grafting. The need to use a large proximal tibial allograft also may dictate the operative approach used to expose the joint, especially in the situation of a multiply-operated tight knee. In such cases the use of a quadriceps turndown may be more advisable than the use of a tibial tubercle osteotomy as the osteotomy may well not have an adequate bed to heal to following the reconstruction. Several series have reported cases of patellar tendon avulsion and the clinical results following this complication usually are not satisfactory. Preoperatively it is important to identify, if possible, the case that is likely to require a more extended approach because of a tight soft tissue envelope. The reports of results of series of revision total knee arthroplasty in the setting of significant bone loss are at present confined to short-term followup. The clinical results of these series are satisfactory at this early point in time, but decision regarding the

  14. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after total hip or knee arthroplasty: a survey of Canadian orthopedic surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Michael; Anderson, David R.; Nagpal, Seema; O’Brien, Bernie

    1999-01-01

    Objective To determine the pharmacologic and physical modalities used by orthopedic surgeons in Canada to prevent venous thromboembolism (deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism) after total hip or knee arthroplasty. Design Mail survey sent to all members of the Canadian Orthopaedic Association. Setting A nation-wide study. Methods A total of 828 questionnaires, designed to identify the type and frequency of prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism that were used after hip and knee arthroplasty were mailed to orthopedic surgeons. Outcome measures Demographic data and the frequency and type of thromboprophylaxis. Results Of the 828 surveys mailed 445 (54%) were returned, and 397 were included in this analysis. Of the respondents, 97% used prophylaxis routinely for patients who undergo total hip or knee arthroplasty. Three of the 397 (0.8%) did not use any method of prophylaxis. Warfarin was the most common agent used (46%), followed by low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) (36%). Combination therapy with both mechanical and pharmacologic methods were used in 39% of patients. Objective screening tests were not frequently performed before discharge. Extended prophylaxis beyond the duration of hospitalization was used by 36% of physicians. Conclusion Prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism with warfarin or LMWH has become standard care after total hip or knee arthroplasty in Canada. PMID:10593248

  15. Refractory Arthrographis kalrae native knee joint infection

    PubMed Central

    Boan, Peter; Arthur, Ian; Golledge, Clay; Ellis, David

    2012-01-01

    Rare reports of infection with Arthrographis kalrae have often demonstrated a protracted clinical course. We describe refractory infection of the native knee with Arthrographis kalrae after a penetrating injury and Yttrium synovectomy, finally controlled with two stage joint revision and combination antifungal therapy. The paucity of worldwide data about such uncommon invasive fungal infections contributes to the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges of these cases. PMID:24371754

  16. Use of antibiotic-loaded cement in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hinarejos, Pedro; Guirro, Pau; Puig-Verdie, Lluis; Torres-Claramunt, Raul; Leal-Blanquet, Joan; Sanchez-Soler, Juan; Monllau, Joan Carles

    2015-01-01

    Bone cement has the capacity to release antibiotic molecules if any antibiotic is included in it, and these elution properties are improved as cement porosity is increased. In vitro studies have shown high local antibiotic concentration for many hours or few days after its use. Antibiotic loaded bone cement (ALBC) is helpful when treating an infection in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) revision surgery. The purpose of this paper was to review the evidence for the routine use of ALBC in TKA in the literature, its pros and cons. Many authors have recommended the use of ALBC also in primary TKA for infection prophylaxis, but the evidence based on data from National Registries, randomized clinical trials and meta-analysis suggest a protective effect of ALBC against infection when used in hips, but not (or only mild) in knees. A possible explanation to this finding is that the duration and quantity of locally elevated antibiotic levels after surgery are smaller in TKA, due to the smaller amount of cement used for fixation in TKA-only a layer in the bone surface. There are some concerns about the routine use of ALBC in primary TKA as prophylaxis against infection: Firstly, there is a risk of hypersensivity or toxicity even when the chance is highly improbable. Secondly, there is a reduction in the mechanical properties of the cement, but this can be probably neglected if the antibiotic is used in low doses, not more than 1 g per 40 g cement package. Another significant concern is the increased economic cost, which could be overlooked if there were enough savings in treating fewer prosthetic infections. Finally, there is also a risk of selection of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria and this could be the main concern. If used, the choice of the antibiotic mixed in ALBC should consider microbiological aspects (broad antimicrobial spectrum and low rate of resistant bacteria), physical and chemical aspects (thermal stability, high water solubility), pharmacological

  17. Factors for Assessing the Effectiveness of Early Rehabilitation after Minimally Invasive Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Tetsuya; Tamari, Kotaro; Tanaka, Shigeharu; Uchida, Shigehiro; Ito, Hideyuki; Morikawa, Shinya; Kawamura, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of current rehabilitation programs is supported by high-level evidence from the results of randomized controlled trials, but an increasing number of patients are not discharged from the hospital because of the schedule of the critical path (CP). The present study aimed to determine which factors can be used to assess the effectiveness of early rehabilitation. We enrolled 123 patients with medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) who had undergone unilateral minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty for the first time. The following factors were assessed preoperatively: the maximum isometric muscle strength of the knee extensors and flexors, maximum knee and hip joint angle, pain, 5-m maximum walking speed, sex, age, body mass index, exercise habits, Kellgren-Lawrence grade, femorotibial angle, failure side (bilateral or unilateral knee OA), and functional independence measure. We re-evaluated physical function (i.e., muscle strength, joint angle, and pain) and motor function (5-m maximum walking speed) 14 days postoperatively. Changes in physical function, motor function (5-m maximum walking speed), and number of days to independent walking were used as explanatory variables. The postoperative duration of hospitalization (in days) was used as the dependent variable in multivariate analyses. These analyses were adjusted for sex, age, body mass index, exercise habits, Kellgren-Lawrence grade, femorotibial angle, failure side, and functional independence measure. The duration of hospitalization was significantly affected by the number of days to independent walking (p < 0.001, β = 0.507) and a change in the 5-m maximum walking speed (p = 0.016, β = -0.262). Multiple regression analysis showed that the radiographic knee grade (p = 0.029, β = 0.239) was a significant confounding factor. Independent walking and walking speed recovery were considered to reduce the duration of hospitalization. Therefore, these indices can be used to assess the effectiveness of

  18. Diabetes mellitus, hemoglobin A1C, and the incidence of total joint arthroplasty infection.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Richard; Williams, Kelly M; Marcantonio, Andrew J; Specht, Lawrence M; Tilzey, John F; Healy, William L

    2012-05-01

    Patients with diabetes have a higher incidence of infection after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) than patients without diabetes. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels are a marker for blood glucose control in diabetic patients. A total of 3468 patients underwent 4241 primary or revision total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty at one institution. Hemoglobin A1c levels were examined to evaluate if there was a correlation between the control of HbA1c and infection after TJA. There were a total of 46 infections (28 deep and 18 superficial [9 cellulitis and 9 operative abscesses]). Twelve (3.43%) occurred in diabetic patients (n = 350; 8.3%) and 34 (0.87%) in nondiabetic patients (n = 3891; 91.7%) (P < .001). There were 9 deep (2.6%) infections in diabetic patients and 19 (0.49%) in nondiabetic patients. In noninfected, diabetic patients, HbA1c level ranged from 4.7% to 15.1% (mean, 6.92%). In infected diabetic patients, HbA1c level ranged from 5.1% to 11.7% (mean, 7.2%) (P < .445). The average HbA1c level in patients with diabetes was 6.93%. Diabetic patients have a significantly higher risk for infection after TJA. Hemoglobin A1c levels are not reliable for predicting the risk of infection after TJA. PMID:22054905

  19. Lateral patellar burnishing in total knee arthroplasty following medialization of the patellar button.

    PubMed

    Doerr, T E; Eckhoff, D G

    1995-08-01

    This case report describes a total knee revision necessitated by painful contact between the exposed lateral facet of the patella and the femoral component. Pain was resolved following repositioning and enlarging the patellar component. The clinical significance of this report is that the contemporary practice of medializing the patellar component to improve patellar tracking should be performed in moderation to avoid overexposure of the lateral patella. In the setting of persistent anterior knee pain following total knee arthroplasty, the etiology of the pain may be identified as contact between the patellar and femoral component on the sunrise radiograph. PMID:8523016

  20. Total Knee Arthroplasty Using a Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sacrificing Medial Pivot Knee: Minimum 5-year Follow-up Results

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Yoon-Seok; Lee, Seon-Ho; Cho, Hye-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate minimum 5-year follow-up clinical and radiological results of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using a posterior cruciate ligament sacrificing (PS), non-substituting Advance Medial Pivot Knee. Materials and Methods One hundred and twenty knees in 80 patients who could be followed up for more than 5 years after TKA using the PS Advance Medial Pivot Knee were evaluated retrospectively. The evaluations included the preoperative and postoperative range of motion (ROM), tibiofemoral angle, Knee Society (KS) knee and function scores, and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) score. The Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis. Results The ROM increased from a preoperative mean flexion contracture of 7.6° and further flexion of 115.1° to a postoperative mean flexion contracture of 1.5° and further flexion of 120.5°. The tibiofemoral angle was changed from 4.6° varus preoperatively to 5.8° valgus postoperatively. The KS knee and function scores as well as WOMAC score significantly improved after surgery (p<0.05). Complications developed in 4 cases (3.3%): 2 cases of periprosthetic patellar fracture (1.7%) and 2 cases of aseptic loosening (1.7%). The seven-year survival rate was 98.1% in the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Conclusions The minimum 5-year follow-up results of TKA using the PS Medial Pivot Knee were satisfactory. PMID:25229042

  1. Better survival of hybrid total knee arthroplasty compared to cemented arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Petursson, Gunnar; Fenstad, Anne Marie; Havelin, Leif Ivar; Gøthesen, Øystein; Lygre, Stein Håkon Låstad; Röhrl, Stephan M; Furnes, Ove

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — There have been few comparative studies on total knee replacement (TKR) with cemented tibia and uncemented femur (hybrid TKR). Previous studies have not shown any difference in revision rate between cemented and hybrid fixation, but these studies had few hybrid prostheses. We have evaluated the outcome of hybrid TKR based on data from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register (NAR). Patients and methods — We compared 4,585 hybrid TKRs to 20,095 cemented TKRs with risk of revision for any cause as the primary endpoint. We included primary TKRs without patella resurfacing that were reported to the NAR during the years 1999–2012. To minimize the possible confounding effect of prosthesis brands, only brands that were used both as hybrids and cemented in more than 200 cases were included. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox regression analysis were done with adjustment for age, sex, and preoperative diagnosis. To include death as a competing risk, cumulative incidence function estimates were calculated. Results — Estimated survival at 11 years was 94.3% (95% CI: 93.9–94.7) in the cemented TKR group and 96.3% (CI: 95.3–97.3) in the hybrid TKR group. The adjusted Cox regression analysis showed a lower risk of revision in the hybrid group (relative risk = 0.58, CI: 0.48–0.72, p < 0.001). The hybrid group included 3 brands of prostheses: LCS classic, LCS complete, and Profix. Profix hybrid TKR had lower risk of revision than cemented TKR, but the LCS classic and LCS complete did not. Kaplan-Meier estimated survival at 11 years was 96.8% (CI: 95.6–98.0) in the hybrid Profix group and 95.2% (CI: 94.6–95.8) in the cemented Profix group. Mean operating time was 17 min longer in the cemented group. Interpretation — Survivorship of the hybrid TKR at 11 years was better than that for cemented TKR, or the same, depending on the brand of prosthesis. Hybrid fixation appears to be a safe and time-efficient alternative to cemented fixation in

  2. Predictors of pain medication use for arthroplasty pain after revision total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lewallen, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Our objective was to study the use of pain medications for persistent knee pain and their predictors after revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods. We examined whether demographic (gender, age) and clinical characteristics [BMI, co-morbidity measured by the Deyo–Charlson index (a 5-point increase), anxiety and depression] predict the use of NSAIDs and narcotic pain medications 2 and 5 years after revision TKA. Multivariable logistic regression adjusted for these predictors as well as operative diagnosis, American Society of Anesthesiologists class and distance from the medical centre. Results. A total of 1533 patients responded to the 2-year questionnaire and 881 responded to the 5-year questionnaire. NSAID use was reported by 13.4% (206/1533) of patients at 2 years and 16.7% (147/881) at 5 years. Narcotic medication use was reported by 5.4% (83/1533) of patients at 2 years and 5.9% (52/881) at 5 years. Significant predictors of the use of NSAIDs for index TKA pain at 2 and 5 years were age >60–70 years [odds ratio (OR) 0.62 (95% CI 0.39, 0.98) and 0.46 (0.25, 0.85)] compared with age ≤60 years and a higher Deyo–Charlson index [OR 0.51 (95% CI 0.28, 0.93)] per 5-point increase at 5-year after revision TKA. Significant predictors of narcotic pain medication use for index TKA pain were age >60–70 years [OR 0.41 (0.21, 0.78)] and >70–80 years [0.40 (95% CI 0.22, 0.73)] at 2 years and depression [OR 4.58 (95% CI 1.58, 13.18)] at 5 years. Conclusion. Younger age and depression were risk factors for the use of NSAIDs and narcotic pain medications for index TKA pain at 2- and 5-years after revision TKA. PMID:24459220

  3. Screening for symptomatic metal sensitivity: a prospective study of 92 patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Niki, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Hideo; Otani, Toshiro; Yatabe, Taku; Kondo, Makoto; Yoshimine, Fumihiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2005-03-01

    Metal sensitivity (MS) reactions to implant metals represent a rare but well-documented complication following total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Although 20-25% of post-TJA patients develop MS, only a few highly susceptible patients (< 1%) exhibit symptoms. Whether surgeons should perform screening for MS is currently a matter of debate. The present study investigated the clinical importance of screening for patients predisposed to symptomatic MS, and the specific metals causing symptomatic MS following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Between 2000 and 2002, a total of 108 primary TKAs were performed on 92 patients. Preoperatively, all patients underwent modified lymphocyte stimulation test (mLST) to Ni, Co, Cr, and Fe. Of the 92 patients, 24 (26%) displayed positive preoperative responses to at least one metal. Five patients displayed implant metal-related eczema and were all mLST-positive preoperatively, suggesting that screening for symptomatic MS is clinically useful. Two of these underwent revision TKA and thereafter, eczema healed and mLST results changed from positive to negative. All mLST-positive patients were divided into three groups: Group I, patients with eczema; Group II, patients with clear history of MS; and Group III, patients neither eczema nor history of MS. When the type of sensitive metals were compared among the three groups, a significant association between presence of Cr-sensitivity and development of eczema (P < 0.05) was identified. No significant association was observed between other metals and development of eczema or history of MS. This indicates that Cr is a potential candidate metal for causing eczema in our TKA series, and Cr-sensitivity may offer a potential predictor for symptomatic MS. The present study indicates that the surgeons should undertake routine preoperative screening for MS, particularly to Cr. PMID:15369690

  4. Femoral quadriceps neuromuscular electrical stimulation after total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Volpato, Helena Bruna Bettoni; Szego, Paulo; Lenza, Mario; Milan, Silvia Lefone; Talerman, Claudia; Ferretti, Mario

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in patients submitted to total knee arthroplasty. This was a systematic review with no language or publication status restriction. Our search was made in Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase and LILACS. Randomized or quasi-randomized clinical trials evaluating neuromuscular electrical stimulation after total knee arthroplasty were included. Four studies with moderate risk of bias and low statistical power were included, totalizing 376 participants. There was no statistically significant difference in knee function, pain and range of motion during 12 month follow-up. This review concluded that neuromuscular electrical stimulation was less effective than traditional rehabilitation in function, muscular strength and range of motion. However, this technique was useful for quadriceps activation during the first days after surgery. PMID:26537511

  5. [Evolution of total knee arthroplasty : From robotics and navigation to patient-specific instruments].

    PubMed

    Haaker, R

    2016-04-01

    In this article the evolution beginning with the robotics of total knee arthroplasty to CT-based and kinematic navigation and patient-specific instruments is described. Thereby it is pointed out that in the early 1990s, CT imaging solely for the planning of a knee endoprosthesis was considered as obsolete radiation exposure and this led to the widespread development of kinematical systems.Also a patient specific planning tool based on CAD built acryl harz blocs existed at the time. There is an ongoing process of implanting total knee arthroplasties in a more exact position. Nowadays the new evolution of soft tissue balancing by using a kinematic alignment has put these efforts into perspective. PMID:27025867

  6. Iodine-impregnated incision drape and bacterial recolonization in simulated total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Milandt, Nikolaj; Nymark, Tine; Jørn Kolmos, Hans; Emmeluth, Claus; Overgaard, Søren

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - Iodine-impregnated incision drapes (IIIDs) are used to prevent surgical site infection (SSI). However, there is some evidence to suggest a potential increase in SSI risk as a result of IIID use, possibly from promotion of skin recolonization. A greater number of viable bacteria in the surgical field of an arthroplasty, and surgery in general, may increase the infection risk. We investigated whether IIID use increases bacterial recolonization compared to no drape use under conditions of simulated total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods - 20 patients scheduled for TKA were recruited. Each patient had 1 knee randomized for draping with IIID, while the contralateral knee was left bare. The patients thus served as their own control. The operating room conditions and perioperative procedures of a TKA were simulated. Cylinder samples were collected from the skin of each knee prior to disinfection, and again on 2 occasions after skin preparation-75 min apart. Quantities of bacteria were estimated using a spread plate technique under aerobic conditions. Results - We found similar quantities of bacteria on the intervention and control knees immediately after skin disinfection and after 75 min of simulated surgery. These quantities had not increased at the end of surgery when compared to baseline, so no recolonization was detected on the draped knees or on the bare knees. Interpretation - The use of IIIDs did not increase bacterial recolonization in simulated TKA. This study does not support the hypothesis that IIIDs promote bacterial recolonization and postoperative infection risk. PMID:27168308

  7. A systematic literature review of the Profix in primary total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Viganò, Roberto; Marega, Luca; Breemans, Eric; Miró, Rafael Llopis

    2012-02-01

    Despite more than a decade of use, there are currently no comprehensive reviews summarising clinical results with the Profix Total Knee System in primary total knee arthroplasty. Searching the PubMed and Google Scholar databases revealed 17 potentially relevant Profix manuscripts. After author review and exclusion of studies not meeting predetermined variables, 8 manuscripts were selected. Knee Society data were provided in all 8 and implant survival data in 4. Data for 987 patients (1152 knees) were available. The overall estimated implant survival was 98.6% at 5 years and 94.2% at 10 years with revision for any reason as an endpoint, and 100% at both time points with radiographic loosening as an endpoint. Mean/median preoperative Knee Society knee scores improved from 39.2/24.7 at baseline, to 91.4/92.1 at the last postoperative follow-up visit. Good medium-to long-term clinical results can be expected with the Profix in primary total knee arthroplasty. PMID:22523928

  8. Patient-Specific Computer Model of Dynamic Squatting after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mizu-uchi, Hideki; Colwell, Clifford W.; Flores-Hernandez, Cesar; Fregly, Benjamin J.; Matsuda, Shuichi; D’Lima, Darryl D.

    2015-01-01

    Knee forces are highly relevant to performance after total knee arthroplasty especially during high flexion activities such as squatting. We constructed subject-specific models of two patients implanted with instrumented knee prosthesis that measured knee forces in vivo. In vivo peak forces ranged from 2.2 to 2.3 times bodyweight but peaked at different flexion angles based on the type of squatting activity. Our model predicted tibiofemoral contact force with reasonable accuracy in both subjects. This model can be a very useful tool to predict the effect of surgical techniques and component alignment on contact forces. In addition, this model could be used for implant design development, to enhance knee function, to predict forces generated during other activities, and for predicting clinical outcomes. PMID:25662671

  9. Current Approaches in Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Güler, Gülen; Atıcı, Şebnem; Kurt, Ercan; Karaca, Saffet; Yılmazlar, Aysun

    2015-01-01

    Risk assesment, preoperative drug regulation, the anesthesia and analgesia techniques are very important and the effectivity on success of surgery is great. So, these topics in arthroplasty were reviewed under current knowledge. PMID:27366493

  10. Micromotion at the tibial plateau in primary and revision total knee arthroplasty: fixed versus rotating platform designs

    PubMed Central

    Rogge, R. D.; Malinzak, R. A.; Reyes, E. M.; Cook, P. L.; Farley, K. A.; Ritter, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Initial stability of tibial trays is crucial for long-term success of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in both primary and revision settings. Rotating platform (RP) designs reduce torque transfer at the tibiofemoral interface. We asked if this reduced torque transfer in RP designs resulted in subsequently reduced micromotion at the cemented fixation interface between the prosthesis component and the adjacent bone. Methods Composite tibias were implanted with fixed and RP primary and revision tibial trays and biomechanically tested under up to 2.5 kN of axial compression and 10° of external femoral component rotation. Relative micromotion between the implanted tibial tray and the neighbouring bone was quantified using high-precision digital image correlation techniques. Results Rotational malalignment between femoral and tibial components generated 40% less overall tibial tray micromotion in RP designs than in standard fixed bearing tibial trays. RP trays reduced micromotion by up to 172 µm in axial compression and 84 µm in rotational malalignment models. Conclusions Reduced torque transfer at the tibiofemoral interface in RP tibial trays reduces relative component micromotion and may aid long-term stability in cases of revision TKA or poor bone quality. Cite this article: Mr S. R. Small. Micromotion at the tibial plateau in primary and revision total knee arthroplasty: fixed versus rotating platform designs. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:122–129. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.54.2000481. PMID:27095658

  11. Total knee arthroplasty: indication of blood transfusion according to hematimetric variation and clinical symptoms of hypoperfusion☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Tavares Cardozo, Rodrigo; Fidelis de Souza Junior, Edison; Campoli Alves, Wagner; Barbi Filho, Flávio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the relationship between hematimetric variation and the presence of clinical symptoms of hypoperfusion for indicating blood transfusion in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted on data gathered from the medical files of 55 patients with a diagnosis of gonarthrosis, who underwent total knee arthroplasty at a hospital orthopedics and traumatology service between February 2011 and December 2012. The patients studied presented unilateral joint degeneration and fitted into the indications for surgical treatment. All the patients underwent a preoperative cardiological evaluation, presenting a pattern of ASA I–III and absence of blood dyscrasia, and preoperative hemoglobin measurements were made. However, no minimum hematimetric value was established for the surgical treatment; there were only clinical criteria for blood perfusion. Results Among the 55 patients, 35 were female and 20 were male, and the mean age was 68 years. Six patients underwent homologous blood transfusion, because of their clinical condition of tissue hypoperfusion, persistent hypotension, loss of consciousness, sweating and coercible vomiting. They presented postoperative hemoglobin of 7.5–8.8 g/dL. Conclusion For patients with falls in hemoglobin counts greater than 20% and values lower than 9 g/dL after the surgery, there is a possible need for blood transfusion, which should only be indicated when accompanied by major symptoms of tissue hypoperfusion. PMID:26229853

  12. Outcome of total hip arthroplasty, but not of total knee arthroplasty, is related to the preoperative radiographic severity of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tilbury, Claire; Holtslag, Maarten J; Tordoir, Rutger L; Leichtenberg, Claudia S; Verdegaal, Suzan H M; Kroon, Herman M; Fiocco, Marta; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose There is no consensus on the impact of radiographic severity of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) on the clinical outcome of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We assessed whether preoperative radiographic severity of OA is related to improvements in functioning, pain, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) 1 year after THA or TKA. Patients and methods This prospective cohort study included 302 THA patients and 271 TKA patients with hip or knee OA. In the THA patients, preoperatively 26% had mild OA and 74% had severe OA; in the TKA patients, preoperatively 27% had mild OA and 73% had severe OA. Radiographic severity was determined according to the Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) classification. Clinical assessments preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively included: sociodemographic characteristics and patient-reported outcomes (PROMs): Oxford hip/knee score, hip/knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS/KOOS), SF36, and EQ5D. Change scores of PROMs were compared with mild OA (KL 0–2) and severe OA (KL 3–4) using a multivariate linear regression model. Results Adjusted for sex, age, preoperative scores, BMI, and Charnley score, radiographic severity of OA in THA was associated with improvement in HOOS “Activities of daily living”, “Pain”, and “Symptoms”, and SF36 physical component summary (“PCS”) scale. In TKA, we found no such associations. Interpretation The decrease in pain and improvement in function in THA patients, but not in TKA patients, was positively associated with the preoperative radiographic severity of OA. PMID:26484651

  13. Efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban thromboprophylaxis after arthroplasty of the hip or knee: retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, L; Hua, A; Patel, S; Gibbons, C; Vizcaychipi, M P

    2016-09-01

    Introduction Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a potentially fatal complication of hip arthroplasty and knee arthroplasty. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommend rivaroxaban for VTE prevention. Amid concerns over bleeding complications, the modified thromboprophylaxis policy of Chelsea and Westminster Hospital (CWH; London, UK) advises enoxaparin given after surgery in the inpatient setting followed by rivaroxaban upon hospital discharge. This retrospective study investigated the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban in this novel, modified venous-prophylaxis regimen in a surgical orthopaedic cohort at CWH. Methods A total of 479 patients who received modified thromboprophylaxis treatment at CWH after hip arthroplasty or knee arthroplasty between April 2013 and October 2014 formed the study cohort. Seven outcomes based on efficacy and safety while undergoing treatment with rivaroxaban were investigated: symptomatic deep-vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), death, stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), major bleeding episodes (MBEs) and non-major bleeding episodes (NMBEs). Median follow-up was 369 days. Fisher's exact and Mann-Whitney U-tests were adopted to identify associations with these outcomes. Results Prevalence of symptomatic PE, DVT, death, stroke and MI during treatment was zero. One (0.2%) MBE and nine (1.9%) NMBEs occurred. The MBE (a wound haematoma) required a return to theatre for aspiration. Off-treatment VTEs occurred in four (0.8%) patients after completion of a course of rivaroxaban, and were associated with known risk factors. Conclusions Rivaroxaban is an effective and safe anticoagulant for thromboprophylaxis after hip arthroplasty or knee arthroplasty if used in a modified regimen involving enoxaparin administered in the inpatient setting followed by rivaroxaban upon hospital discharge. PMID:27580310

  14. Kinematic and dynamic analysis of an anatomically based knee joint.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kok-Meng; Guo, Jiajie

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a knee-joint model to provide a better understanding on the interaction between natural joints and artificial mechanisms for design and control of rehabilitation exoskeletons. The anatomically based knee model relaxes several commonly made assumptions that approximate a human knee as engineering pin-joint in exoskeleton design. Based on published MRI data, we formulate the kinematics of a knee-joint and compare three mathematical approximations; one model bases on two sequential circles rolling a flat plane; and the other two are mathematically differentiable ellipses-based models with and without sliding at the contact. The ellipses-based model taking sliding contact into accounts shows that the rolling-sliding ratio of a knee-joint is not a constant but has an average value consistent with published measurements. This knee-joint kinematics leads to a physically more accurate contact-point trajectory than methods based on multiple circles or lines, and provides a basis to derive a knee-joint kinetic model upon which the effects of a planar exoskeleton mechanism on the internal joint forces and torque during flexion can be numerically investigated. Two different knee-joint kinetic models (pin-joint approximation and anatomically based model) are compared against a condition with no exoskeleton. The leg and exoskeleton form a closed kinematic chain that has a significant effect on the joint forces in the knee. Human knee is more tolerant than pin-joint in negotiating around a singularity but its internal forces increase with the exoskeleton mass-to-length ratio. An oversimplifying pin-joint approximation cannot capture the finite change in the knee forces due to the singularity effect. PMID:20189182

  15. Pure Varus Injury to the Knee Joint.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae Ho; Lee, Jung Ha; Chang, Chong Bum

    2015-06-01

    A 30-year-old male was involved in a car accident. Radiographs revealed a depressed marginal fracture of the medial tibial plateau and an avulsion fracture of the fibular head. Magnetic resonance imaging showed avulsion fracture of Gerdy's tubercle, injury to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), posterior horn of the medial meniscus, and the attachments of the lateral collateral ligament and the biceps femoris tendon. The depressed fracture of the medial tibial plateau was elevated and stabilized using a cannulated screw and washer. The injured lateral and posterolateral corner (PLC) structures were repaired and augmented by PLC reconstruction. However, the avulsion fracture of Gerdy's tubercle was not fixed because it was minimally displaced and the torn PCL was also not repaired or reconstructed. We present a unique case of pure varus injury to the knee joint. This case contributes to our understanding of the mechanism of knee injury and provides insight regarding appropriate treatment plans for this type of injury. PMID:26217477

  16. Analgesic Techniques in Hip and Knee Arthroplasty: From the Daily Practice to Evidence-Based Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Anastase, Denisa Madalina; Cionac Florescu, Simona; Munteanu, Ana Maria; Ursu, Traian; Stoica, Cristian Ioan

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are major orthopedic surgery models, addressing mainly ageing populations with multiple comorbidities and treatments, ASA II–IV, which may complicate the perioperative period. Therefore effective management of postoperative pain should allow rapid mobilization of the patient with shortening of hospitalization and social reintegration. In our review we propose an evaluation of the main analgesics models used today in the postoperative period. Their comparative analysis shows the benefits and side effects of each of these methods and guides us to how to use evidence-based medicine in our daily practice. PMID:25484894

  17. Durability of highly cross-linked polyethylene in total hip and total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dion, Neil T; Bragdon, Charles; Muratoglu, Orhun; Freiberg, Andrew A

    2015-07-01

    This article reviews the history of the development of highly cross-linked polyethylene and provides an in-depth review of the clinical results regarding the durability of highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE) used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The use of polyethylene as a bearing surface has contributed to the success of THA and TKA; however, polyethylene wear and osteolysis can lead to failure. Ongoing clinical and retrieval studies are required to analyze outcomes at longer-term follow-up. PMID:26043046

  18. Income and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) after primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To assess whether income is associated with patient-reported outcomes (PROs) after primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods We used prospectively collected data from the Mayo Clinic Total Joint Registry to assess the association of income with index knee functional improvement, moderate to severe pain and moderate to severe activity limitation at 2-year and 5-year follow-up after primary TKA using multivariable-adjusted logistic regression analyses. Results There were 7, 139 primary TKAs at 2 years and 4, 234 at 5 years. In multivariable-adjusted analyses, at 2-year follow-up, compared to income > US$45, 000, lower incomes of ≤ US$35, 000 and > US$35, 000 to 45, 000 were associated (1) significantly with moderate to severe pain with an odds ratio (OR) 0.61 (95% CI 0.40 to 0.94) (P = 0.02) and 0.68 (95% CI 0.49 to 0.94) (P = 0.02); and (2) trended towards significance for moderate to severe activity limitation with OR 0.78 (95% CI 0.60 to 1.02) (P = 0.07) and no significant association with OR 0.96 (95% CI 0.78 to 1.20) (P = 0.75), respectively. At 5 years, odds were not statistically significantly different by income, although numerically they favored lower income. In multivariable-adjusted analyses, overall improvement in knee function was rated as 'better' slightly more often at 2 years by patients with income in the ≤ US$35, 000 range compared to patients with income > US$45, 000, with an OR 1.9 (95% CI 1.0 to 3.6) (P = 0.06). Conclusions We found that patients with lower income had better pain outcomes compared to patients with higher income. There was more improvement in knee function, and a trend towards less overall activity limitation after primary TKA in lower income patients compared to those with higher incomes. Insights into mediators of these relationships need to be investigated to understand how income influences outcomes after TKA. PMID:23497272

  19. The impact of including corticosteroid in a periarticular injection for pain control after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Tsukada, S.; Wakui, M.; Hoshino, A.

    2016-01-01

    There is conflicting evidence about the benefit of using corticosteroid in periarticular injections for pain relief after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We carried out a double-blinded, randomised controlled trial to assess the efficacy of using corticosteroid in a periarticular injection to control pain after TKA. A total of 77 patients, 67 women and ten men, with a mean age of 74 years (47 to 88) who were about to undergo unilateral TKA were randomly assigned to have a periarticular injection with or without corticosteroid. The primary outcome was post-operative pain at rest during the first 24 hours after surgery, measured every two hours using a visual analogue pain scale score. The cumulative pain score was quantified using the area under the curve. The corticosteroid group had a significantly lower cumulative pain score than the no-corticosteroid group during the first 24 hours after surgery (mean area under the curve 139, 0 to 560, and 264, 0 to 1460; p = 0.024). The rate of complications, including surgical site infection, was not significantly different between the two groups up to one year post-operatively. The addition of corticosteroid to the periarticular injection significantly decreased early post-operative pain. Further studies are needed to confirm the safety of corticosteroid in periarticular injection. Take home message: The use of corticosteroid in periarticular injection offered better pain relief during the initial 24 hours after TKA. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:194–200. PMID:26850424

  20. When and How Is Patella Tracking Best Assessed in Total Knee Arthroplasty Surgery?

    PubMed

    Westerman, Richard W; Bhangoo, Navjot S; James, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Much emphasis has been placed on the role of patella resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty (TKA), yet the impact of soft tissue balancing has frequently been understated. The authors used a novel system to precisely assess patellofemoral joint (PFJ) tracking intraoperatively, to determine the impact of both retinacular reconstruction and tourniquet use on PFJ kinematics. PFJ kinematics assessed intraoperatively for 20 consecutive TKA patients. Measurements were recorded using both the "no thumb technique" and following reconstruction of the retinaculum with two positional sutures. The tourniquet was deflated and both measurements were repeated. Tourniquet inflation was not found to have a significant impact on the patella tracking (mean translation 0.9 mm, p = 0.15). Patella retinacular reconstruction generated a significant medialization of the patella by a mean of 5.5 mm (p < 0.0001) when compared with the traditional retinacular open "no thumb technique." The use of a tourniquet has been shown to have no effect on patella tracking. Reconstruction of the patella retinaculum markedly improves patella tracking, generating a mean medialization of 15%. The authors advocate the routine use of two positional sutures to restore the patella retinaculum, before trialing the patella component, as a reproducible means of assessing the PFJ kinematics. PMID:26266552

  1. TIBIAL COMPONENT IN REVISION OF TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY: COMPARISON BETWEEN CEMENTED AND HYBRID FIXATION

    PubMed Central

    Cintra, Francisco Fontes; Yepéz, Anthony Kerbes; Rasga, Marcos Gilbert Sucena; Abagge, Marcelo; Alencar, Paulo Gilberto Cimbalista

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the clinical, radiographic and medium-term follow-up results from two fixation methods for the tibial component in revision procedures on total knee prostheses: cemented (tray and stem) and hybrid (cemented tray and uncemented, nonporous canal-filling stem). Methods: Between August 1999 and November 2005, 30 revision procedures on total knee arthroplasties were performed on 26 patients, who were divided between group I (cemented fixation; 21 knees) and group II (hybrid fixation; nine knees). The mean follow-up was 52 months and no patients were lost from the follow up. Results: No differences in the scores from the WOMAC and Knee Society questionnaires were observed between the two groups. One patient in group I presented radiographic signs of loosening. Two patients (one in each group) complained of pain in the diaphyseal region, compatible with the location of the stem tip. The pedestal radiographic sign was observed in 89% of the knees with uncemented stems and in none of the cemented group. Conclusion: The comparative analysis between the two methods did not show any differences regarding clinical and radiographic parameters, or arthroplasty survival. PMID:27027058

  2. Osteonecrosis of the knee: review

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Ammar R.; Cherian, Jeffrey J.; Jauregui, Julio J.; Pierce, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is a devastating disease that can lead to end-stage arthritis of various joint including the knee. There are three categories of osteonecrosis that affect the knee: spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SONK), secondary, and post-arthroscopic. Regardless of osteonecrosis categories, the treatment of this disease aims to halt further progression or delay the onset of end-stage arthritis of the knee. However, once substantial joint surface collapse has occurred or there are sign of degenerative arthritis, joint arthroplasty is the most appropriate treatment option. Currently, the non-operative treatment options consist of observation, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), protected weight bearing, and analgesia as needed. Operative interventions include joint preserving surgery, unilateral knee arthroplasty (UKA), or total knee arthroplasty (TKA) depending on the extent and type of disease. Joint preserving procedures (i.e., arthroscopy, core decompression, osteochondral autograft, and bone grafting) are usually attempted in pre-collapse and some post-collapse lesions, when the articular cartilage is generally intact with only the underlying subchondral bone being affected. Conversely, after severe subchondral collapse has occurred, procedures that attempt to salvage the joint are rarely successful and joint arthroplasty are necessary to relieve pain. The purpose of this article is to highlight the recent evidence concerning the treatment options across the spectrum of management of osteonecrosis of the knee including lesion observation, medications, joint preserving techniques, and total joint arthroplasties. PMID:25705638

  3. Effects of Weight-Bearing Biofeedback Training on Functional Movement Patterns Following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Cory L.; Bade, Michael J.; Davidson, Bradley S.; Dayton, Michael R.; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Randomized controlled trial. OBJECTIVES Examine the effects of weight-bearing (WB) biofeedback training on WB symmetry and functional joint moments following unilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). BACKGROUND Individuals post unilateral TKA place more weight on the non-surgical limb compared to the surgical limb during function. It is unknown if targeted intervention can improve surgical limb use and resolve altered movement patterns. METHODS Twenty-six patients were randomized to 2 groups: RELOAD or CONTROL. The RELOAD group had standard of care rehabilitation augmented with WB biofeedback training and the CONTROL group had dose-matched standard of care. Lower limb weight-bearing ratios (WBRs) were measured preoperatively and 6 and 26 weeks after TKA during a Five Times Sit-to-Stand Test (FTSST) and walking. Secondary outcomes were FTSST time, walking speed, and lower limb joint moments during the FTSST and walking. RESULTS No between-group differences were found in WBR. FTSST time improved in the RELOAD group compared to the CONTROL group at 6 (P=.021) and 26 weeks (P=.021) and there was a tendency for improved walking speed in the RELOAD group at 26 weeks (P=.068). There were no between-group differences in knee extension moment during the FTSST. Surgical-limb knee extension moments during walking increased from baseline to 26 weeks in the RELOAD group and decreased in the CONTROL group (P=.008). CONCLUSION WB biofeedback training had no effect on functional WB symmetry or knee extension moments during the FTSST. However, the biofeedback training resulted in increases of knee extension moments during gait and improved FTSST times. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE Therapy, level 2b. PMID:26207975

  4. Press-fit condylar total knee arthroplasty. 5- to 9-year follow-up evaluation.

    PubMed

    Martin, S D; McManus, J L; Scott, R D; Thornhill, T S

    1997-09-01

    Between November 1984 and December 1987, 378 consecutive Press-Fit Condylar (PFC, Johnson & Johnson Professional, Raynham, MA) total knee arthroplasties were performed in 290 patients. The average age at surgery was 67 years (range, 22-91 years). The average follow-up period was 6.5 years (range, 5-9 years). Scoring was carried out according to the Knee Society scoring system. The average preoperative knee score was 28, and the average postoperative knee score was 88. The average preoperative functional knee score was 49, and the average postoperative functional knee score was 72. Ninety-five percent of the patients had no pain on level walking and were satisfied with their functional result. The average postoperative knee flexion was 110 degrees. No implant showed any evidence of radiographic loosening. There were 17 complications, all requiring reoperation. Complications included excessive wear of a metal-backed patella in 8 knees. If complications resulting from the earlier use of a metal-backed patella are eliminated, the overall complication rate is 2.9%, which is comparable to or lower than the rates for other total knee systems with similar follow-up periods. PMID:9306210

  5. Mid- term results of stryker® scorpio plus mobile bearing total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The mobile bearing knee system was introduced to lessen contact stress on the articular bearing surface and reduce polyethylene wear. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the mid-term results of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) using Scorpio Plus Mobile Bearing Knee System (Stryker, Mahwah, NJ), and compare the outcomes between patients with osteoarthritis and osteonecrosis (OA·ON group) and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA group). Methods Eight males and 58 females were followed up for a period of 4.4- 7.6 years from June 1, 2003 to December 31, 2005. There were 53 knees with osteoarthritis, 17 knees with rheumatoid arthritis, and 6 knees with osteonecrosis. Clinical and radiographic follow- up was done using The Japanese Orthopedic Association knee rating score (JOA score) and Knee Society Total Knee Arthroplasty Roentgenographic Evaluation and Scoring System. Results With regard to the JOA score, there was significant improvement in both groups. The postoperative range of motion was between 0.8°and 116.8° in OA·ON group, and between 0.0° and 113.7° in RA group. There were no significant differences with the radiographic evaluation between two groups. Spontaneous dislocation of a polyethylene insert occurred in one patient, and deep infection was occurred in one patient. Conclusion There was significant improvement with regard to the clinical and radiographic results of patients undergoing TKAs using the model. The risk of polyethylene insert dislocation related to the mobile bearing TKA is a cause for concern. PMID:23075162

  6. Ten-Year Comparison of Oxidized Zirconium and Cobalt-Chromium Femoral Components in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Justin; Vioreanu, Mihai; Salmon, Lucy; Waller, Alison; Pinczewski, Leo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine if oxidized zirconium femoral components had better outcomes than cobalt-chromium in vivo at medium and long term and if the use of oxidized zirconium components had clinical adverse effects. Methods: Forty consecutive patients (eighty knees) underwent simultaneous bilateral cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty for primary osteoarthritis from January 2002 to December 2003. For each patient, the knees were randomized to receive the oxidized zirconium femoral component, with the contralateral knee receiving the cobalt-chromium component. Outcome measures included the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Knee Society score, and British Orthopaedic Association patient satisfaction scale. Radiographic outcomes include the Knee Society total knee arthroplasty roentgenographic evaluation and scoring system and measurement of radiographic wear. Patients and assessors were blinded to the treatment groups and results. Results: There were no significant differences in clinical, subjective, and radiographic outcomes between the two implants at ten years postoperatively. Ten years following surgery, 36% of the patients preferred the cobalt-chromium knee compared with 11% who preferred the oxidized zirconium knee (p = 0.02) and 53% had no preference. Conclusions: Ten-year outcomes after total knee arthroplasty with oxidized zirconium and cobalt-chromium femoral components showed no significant differences in clinical, subjective, and radiographic outcomes. Patients had no preference or preferred the cobalt chromium prosthesis to the oxidized zirconium prosthesis. There were no adverse effects associated with the use of oxidized zirconium femoral implants.

  7. Minimally Invasive Total Knee Arthroplasty Improves Early Knee Strength but Not Functional Performance: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E.; Bade, Michael J.; Shulman, Benjamin C.; Kohrt, Wendy M.; Dayton, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    A prospective, randomized investigation compared early clinical outcomes of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using conventional (CONTROL) or minimally invasive surgical (MIS) approaches (n=44). Outcome measures included isometric quadriceps and hamstrings strength, quadriceps activation, functional performance, knee pain, active knee range of motion (AROM), muscle mass, the SF-36, and WOMAC, assessed preoperatively and 4 and 12 weeks after TKA. Four weeks after TKA, the MIS group had greater hamstring strength (p=0.02) and quadriceps strength (p=0.07), which did not translate to differences in other outcomes. At 12 weeks, there were no clinically meaningful differences between groups on any measure. Although MIS may lead to faster recovery of strength in patients undergoing TKA, there was no benefit on longer-term recovery of strength or functional performance. PMID:22459124

  8. Arthroscopic interposition arthroplasty of the first carpometacarpal joint.

    PubMed

    Adams, J E; Merten, S M; Steinmann, S P

    2007-06-01

    First carpometacarpal joint arthritis is a common condition encountered by hand surgeons. Traditionally, surgical approaches have included arthrodesis, trapeziectomy or reconstructive arthroplasty techniques. Previously, we described a technique for arthroscopic debridement and interposition arthroplasty of the first carpometacarpal joint. Patients with Eaton stages II and III symptomatic first carpometacarpal joint arthritis recalcitrant to >6 months of non-operative therapy underwent arthroscopic debridement of the first carpometacarpal joint with interposition of an acellular dermal matrix allograft (GRAFTJACKET). In this paper, we describe outcomes following this procedure. Postoperatively, all patients reported symptomatic relief and 94% stated that they were partially, or completely, satisfied. More than 70% of patients reported no to mild difficulty in performing activities of daily living (average grip strength = 18.5 kg, pinch strength = 3.9kg). Complications were minimal. Outcomes from this study compare favourably to those of other series, demonstrating that this technique is a viable option for treatment of Eaton stages II and III first carpometacarpal arthritis. PMID:17276564

  9. In vivo human knee joint dynamic properties as functions of muscle contraction and joint position.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L Q; Nuber, G; Butler, J; Bowen, M; Rymer, W Z

    1998-01-01

    Information on the dynamic properties (joint stiffness, viscosity and limb inertia) of the human knee joint is scarce in the literature, especially for actively contracting knee musculature. A joint driving device was developed to apply small-amplitude random perturbations to the human knee at several flexion angles with the subject maintaining various levels of muscle contraction. It was found that joint stiffness and viscosity increased with muscle contraction substantially, while limb inertia was constant. Stiffness produced by the quadriceps was highest at 30 degrees flexion and decreased with increasing or decreasing flexion angle, while knee flexors produced highest stiffness at 90 degree flexion. When knee flexion was < 60 degrees, stiffness produced by the quadriceps was higher than that of the hamstrings and gastrocnemius at the same level of background muscle torque, while knee flexor muscles produced higher stiffnesses than the quadriceps at 90 degree flexion. Similar but less obvious trends were observed for joint viscosity. Passive joint stiffness at full knee extension was significantly higher than in more flexed positions. Surprisingly, as the knee joint musculature changed from relaxed to contracting at 50% MVC, system damping ratio remained at about 0.2. This outcome potentially simplifies neuromuscular control of the knee joint. In contrast, the natural undamped frequency increased more than twofold, potentially making the knee joint respond more quickly to the central nervous system commands. The approach described here provides us with a potentially valuable tool to quantify in vivo dynamic properties of normal and pathological human knee joints. PMID:9596540

  10. Elongation of the collateral ligaments after cruciate retaining total knee arthroplasty and the maximum flexion of the knee.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwan Kyu; Hosseini, Ali; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Kwon, Young-Min; Li, Guoan

    2015-02-01

    The mechanisms that affect knee flexion after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are still debatable. This study investigated the elongation of the superficial medial (sMCL) and lateral collateral ligaments (LCL) before and after a posterior cruciate retaining (CR) TKA. We hypothesized that overstretching of the collateral ligaments in high flexion after TKA could reduce maximal flexion of the knee. Three-dimensional models of 11 osteoarthritic knees of 11 patients including the insertions of the collateral ligaments were created using MR images. Each ligament was divided into three equal portions: anterior, middle and posterior portions. The shortest 3D wrapping length of each ligament portion was determined before and after the TKA surgery along a weight-bearing, single leg flexion path. The relationship between the changes of ligament elongation and the changes of the maximal knee flexion after TKAs was quantitatively analyzed. The sMCL showed significant increases in length only at low flexion after TKA; the LCL showed decreases in length at full extension, but increases with further flexion after TKA. The amount of increases of the maximum flexion angle after TKA was negatively correlated with the increases of the elongations of the anterior portion (p=0.010, r=0.733) and middle portion (p=0.049, r=0.604) of the sMCL as well as the anterior portion (p=0.010, r=0.733) of the LCL at maximal flexion of the knee. The results indicated that the increases of the length of the collateral ligaments at maximal flexion after TKA were associated with the decreases of the maximal flexion of the knee. Our data suggest that collateral ligament management should also be evaluated at higher knee flexion angles in order to optimize maximal flexion of the knee after TKAs. PMID:25555307

  11. Complications Related to Metal-on-Metal Articulation in Trapeziometacarpal Joint Total Joint Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Frølich, Christina; Hansen, Torben Bæk

    2015-01-01

    Adverse reactions to metal-on-metal (MoM) prostheses are well known from total hip joint resurfacing arthroplasty with elevated serum chrome or cobalt, pain and pseudo tumor formation. It may, however, also be seen after total joint replacement of the trapeziometacarpal joint using MoM articulation, and we present two cases of failure of MoM prostheses due to elevated metal-serum levels in one case and pseudo tumor formation in another case. Furthermore, we suggest a diagnostic algorithm for joint pain after MoM trapeziometacarpal joint replacement based on published experiences from MoM hip prostheses and adverse reactions to metal. PMID:26020592

  12. Total knee arthroplasty in patient with paraplegia after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zietek, P; Dobiecki, K

    2015-01-01

    The clinical management of paraplegic patients is more complex than in able-bodied subjects. Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects younger, active people more often than the elderly during high-energy fall or traffic accidents. In order to return to work after suffering an SCI, patients need to regain their functional independence, especially their ability to drive. The literature lacks strong evidence addressing the surgical solutions in severe knee arthrosis in paralyzed patients after SCI. We present a favourable outcome of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) of a stiff knee in extension in a man with T12 grade C paraplegia after SCI. We describe an effective rehabilitation protocol after knee arthroplasty in patient with damage to the spinal cord. Several factors should be taken into account before performing surgery: 1. ability of regaining some of spinal cord locomotor function through intensive gait rehabilitation in SCI patients, 2. presence of muscle imbalance and knee contractures combined with a risk of bone fracture resulting from intensive postoperative rehabilitation, 3. the impaired microvasculature of the skin and subcutaneous tissues and increased risk of occlusion occurrence of the capillaries and small vessels of the leg, 4. higher prevalence of secondary infections via urinary entry sites in patients after SCI, 5. patient's strong determination and willingness to undergo the arthroplasty procedure. TKA might be considered in selected paralyzed patients after SCI, especially in those with severe arthrosis as well as significant knee contractures. Our study reveals the advantage of performing TKA in improving functional state in patients with cord injury. PMID:25748667

  13. Pathological Knee Joint Motion Analysis By High Speed Cinephotography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Jurg U.

    1985-02-01

    The use of cinephotography for evaluation of disturbed knee joint function was compared in three groups of patients. While a sampling rate of 50 images per second was adequate for patients with neuromuscular disorders, a higher frequency of around 300 i.p.s. is necessary in osteoarthritis and ligamentous knee joint injuries, but the task of digitizing is prohibitive unless automated.

  14. The elephant knee joint: morphological and biomechanical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Weissengruber, G E; Fuss, F K; Egger, G; Stanek, G; Hittmair, K M; Forstenpointner, G

    2006-01-01

    Elephant limbs display unique morphological features which are related mainly to supporting the enormous body weight of the animal. In elephants, the knee joint plays important roles in weight bearing and locomotion, but anatomical data are sparse and lacking in functional analyses. In addition, the knee joint is affected frequently by arthrosis. Here we examined structures of the knee joint by means of standard anatomical techniques in eight African (Loxodonta africana) and three Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Furthermore, we performed radiography in five African and two Asian elephants and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in one African elephant. Macerated bones of 11 individuals (four African, seven Asian elephants) were measured with a pair of callipers to give standardized measurements of the articular parts. In one Asian and three African elephants, kinematic and functional analyses were carried out using a digitizer and according to the helical axis concept. Some peculiarities of healthy and arthrotic knee joints of elephants were compared with human knees. In contrast to those of other quadruped mammals, the knee joint of elephants displays an extended resting position. The femorotibial joint of elephants shows a high grade of congruency and the menisci are extremely narrow and thin. The four-bar mechanism of the cruciate ligaments exists also in the elephant. The main motion of the knee joint is extension–flexion with a range of motion of 142°. In elephants, arthrotic alterations of the knee joint can lead to injury or loss of the cranial (anterior) cruciate ligament. PMID:16420379

  15. Accuracy and efficacy of osteotomy in total knee arthroplasty with patient-specific navigational template

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Yudong; Ding, Jing; Xu, Yongqing; Hou, Chunlin

    2015-01-01

    This study develops and validates a novel patient-specific navigational template for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A total of 70 patients who underwent TKA were randomized and divided into conventional method group and navigational template group. In the navigational template group, the patient-specific navigational templates were designed and used intraoperatively to assist 35 patients with knee arthroplasty. Information on operation time and blood loss was recorded. After surgery, the positions of the prosthesis were evaluated using CT scan and X-rays. Analysis showed significant differences in errors between the two techniques. In addition, mean operation time and mean blood loss were statistically and significantly lower in the navigational template group than in the conventional group. Overall, the navigational template method showed a high degree of accuracy and efficacy. PMID:26550129

  16. Local infiltration analgesia in hip and knee arthroplasty: an emerging technique.

    PubMed

    Dillon, John P; Brennan, Louise; Mitchell, David

    2012-04-01

    The optimal form of post-operative analgesia in hip and knee arthroplasty is still debated. Traditionally, patient-controlled analgesia and epidural anaesthesia were used. Potential side-effects such as nausea, confusion, urinary retention, hypotension and immobility have resulted in the emergence of newer techniques that limit opioid use. Peripheral nerve blockade provides excellent analgesia but limits patient ability to ambulate in the immediate post-operative period. Local infiltrative analgesia (LIA) is an emerging technique that has shown to provide superior analgesia, higher patient satisfaction and earlier discharge from hospital when compared to some of the more traditional methods. This review article highlights the advantages of LIA in hip and knee arthroplasty surgery. We describe the technique used, including additional measures that aid early ambulation and discharge from hospital in this cohort of patients. PMID:22696983

  17. Low Infection Rates in Total Knee Arthroplasty in End Stage Renal Failure Patients.

    PubMed

    Ling, Zhixing Marcus; Soong, Jun Wei; Loh, Bryan; Yeo, Seng Jin; Pang, Hee Nee; Lo, Ngai Nung

    2016-01-01

    End stage renal failure is considered a risk factor for postoperative infection and many surgeons are cautious in offering this group of patients total knee arthroplasty for symptomatic osteoarthritis. In this retrospective study, 16 total knee arthroplasties were performed in 13 patients and each case was followed up for an average of 5.1 years. We report no cases of infection and also an overall improvement in multiple validated outcome measures. There were, however, 2 cases of periprosthetic loosening. As the patients in our series were generally younger and none was diagnosed with stroke or peripheral vascular disease at the time of surgery, we believe that careful patient selection is key to reducing infection rates in this challenging group of patients. PMID:26282498

  18. Consensus Statement on Indications and Contraindications for Medial Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Berend, Keith R; Berend, Michael E; Dalury, David F; Argenson, Jean-Noel; Dodd, Chris A; Scott, Richard D

    2015-01-01

    Previous work, now nearly 30 years dated, is frequently cited as the "gold standard" for the indications and contraindications for medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). The purpose of this article is to review current literature on the indications and contraindications to UKA and develop a consensus statement based on those data. Six surgeons with a combined experience of performing more than 8,000 partial knee arthroplasties were surveyed. Surgeons then participated in a discussion, emerging proposal, collaborative modification, and final consensus phase. The final consensus on primary indications and contraindications is presented. Notably, the authors provide consensus on previous contraindications, which are no longer considered to be contraindications. The authors provide an updated and concise review of the current indications and contraindications for medial UKA using scientifically based consensus-building methodology. PMID:26731390

  19. Analgesia for total knee arthroplasty: a meta-analysis comparing local infiltration and femoral nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Mei, ShuYa; Jin, ShuQing; Chen, ZhiXia; Ding, XiBing; Zhao, Xiang; Li, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Patients frequently experience postoperative pain after a total knee arthroplasty; such pain is always challenging to treat and may delay the patient's recovery. It is unclear whether local infiltration or a femoral nerve block offers a better analgesic effect after total knee arthroplasty. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to compare local infiltration with a femoral nerve block in patients who underwent a primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty. We searched Pubmed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library through December 2014. Two reviewers scanned abstracts and extracted data. The data collected included numeric rating scale values for pain at rest and pain upon movement and opioid consumption in the first 24 hours. Mean differences with 95% confidence intervals were calculated for each end point. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate potential sources of heterogeneity. While the numeric rating scale values for pain upon movement (MD-0.62; 95%CI: -1.13 to -0.12; p=0.02) in the first 24 hours differed significantly between the patients who received local infiltration and those who received a femoral nerve block, there were no differences in the numeric rating scale results for pain at rest (MD-0.42; 95%CI:-1.32 to 0.47; p=0.35) or opioid consumption (MD 2.92; 95%CI:-1.32 to 7.16; p=0.18) in the first 24 hours. Local infiltration and femoral nerve block showed no significant differences in pain intensity at rest or opioid consumption after total knee arthroplasty, but the femoral nerve block was associated with reduced pain upon movement. PMID:26375568

  20. The effects of knee arthroplasty on walking speed: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with knee osteoarthritis patients have problems with walking, and tend to walk slower. An important aim of knee arthroplasty is functional recovery, which should include a post-operative increase in walking speed. Still, there are several problems with measuring walking speed in groups of knee osteoarthritis patients. Nevertheless, test-retest reliability of walking speed measurements is high, and when the same investigators monitor the same subjects, it should be possible to assess the walking speed effects of knee arthroplasty. The present study reports a meta-analysis of these effects. Methods A total of 16 independent pre-post arthroplasty comparisons of walking speed were identified through MEDLINE, Web of Science, and PEDro, in 12 papers, involving 419 patients. Results For 0.5–5 months post-operatively, heterogeneity was too large to obtain a valid estimate of the overall effect-size. For 6–12 and 13–60 months post-operatively, heterogeneity was absent, low, or moderate (depending on estimated pre-post correlations). During these periods, subjects walked on average 0.8 standard-deviations faster than pre-operatively, which is a large effect. Meta-regression analysis revealed significant effects of time and time squared, suggesting initial improvement followed by decline. Conclusion This meta-analysis revealed a large effect of arthroplasty on walking speed 6–60 months post-operatively. For the first 0.5–5 months, heterogeneity of effect-sizes precluded a valid estimate of short-term effects. Hence, patients may expect a considerable improvement of their walking speed, which, however, may take several months to occur. Meta-regression analysis suggested a small decline from 13 months post-operatively onwards. PMID:22559793

  1. Technique for removal of femoral components with intercondylar articulation in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Alpert, S W; Stuchin, S A; Lubliner, J A

    Total knee revision arthroplasty is a challenging and demanding procedure. Removal of well-fixed implants must be done meticulously to preserve bone stock. The presence of intercondylar geometries compounds this problem because the cement-metal interface is inaccessible. The authors present a new technique for approaching this region using a high speed metal cutting burr, thus effectively preserving bone stock in the distal femur. PMID:8829597

  2. Fabella Fractures after Total Knee Arthroplasty with Correction of Valgus Malalignment.

    PubMed

    Kwee, Thomas Christian; Heggelman, Ben; Gaasbeek, Robert; Nix, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of fabella fractures is considered to be extremely low. This report presents two patients with femorotibial osteoarthritis and considerable preoperative valgus malalignment, who developed a fracture of the fabella (as demonstrated by radiography) after total knee arthroplasty with intraoperative correction of the valgus malalignment. Special attention should be paid to the fabella for not missing a fabella fracture in these patients. PMID:27340579

  3. Fabella Fractures after Total Knee Arthroplasty with Correction of Valgus Malalignment

    PubMed Central

    Heggelman, Ben; Gaasbeek, Robert; Nix, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of fabella fractures is considered to be extremely low. This report presents two patients with femorotibial osteoarthritis and considerable preoperative valgus malalignment, who developed a fracture of the fabella (as demonstrated by radiography) after total knee arthroplasty with intraoperative correction of the valgus malalignment. Special attention should be paid to the fabella for not missing a fabella fracture in these patients. PMID:27340579

  4. Cement or cementless fixation in total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Rand, J A

    1991-12-01

    A prospectively studied group of 59 knees with cementless fixation were compared to a retrospectively studied but matched group of 59 knees with cement fixation using a Press Fit Condylar prosthesis. The only significant preoperative difference between the patient groups was mean age; the cemented group was on average nine years older than the cementless group (p less than 0.0001). At an average of 2.8 years after surgery, there were no significant differences in knee scores between the two groups. Radiolucent lines adjacent to the tibial component were similar in both groups. The complication rate of 20% in the cementless knees was higher than the 12% rate in the cemented knees; this was primarily related to polyethylene wear of metal-backed patellar components. Cement or cementless fixation of this prosthesis appears to provide equivalent early results. PMID:1959287

  5. 2003 Hap Paul Award Paper of the International Society for Technology in Arthroplasty. Design and activity dependence of kinematics in fixed and mobile-bearing knee arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Banks, Scott A; Hodge, W Andrew

    2004-10-01

    Knee arthroplasty implants are designed with features that provide varying articular constraint over the range of flexion such that the pattern of knee motion may also vary. Because the motions of total knee implants have a direct influence on patient function and device longevity, it is important to understand how knee implants based on a variety of design philosophies perform in vivo. Fifty-nine knees in patients with 5 designs of implants were studied with fluoroscopic imaging during gait and stair-climbing activities. Many knees showed significantly different kinematics between the gait and stair activities, as well as differences from knees having other implant designs. The measured motions were consistent with the intrinsic constraint provided by the implant components and the variation in constraint over the flexion range. PMID:15483794

  6. Door Opening Affects Operating Room Pressure During Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mears, Simon C; Blanding, Renee; Belkoff, Stephen M

    2015-11-01

    Many resources are expended to ensure a sterile operating room environment. Efforts are made to prevent exposure of patients to personnel and to achieve positive room pressure to keep out airborne contaminants. Foot traffic into and out of the operating room during surgery can undermine these efforts. The authors investigated the number and duration of operating room door openings during hip and knee arthroplasty procedures and the effect of the door openings on room pressure. They tested the hypothesis that door openings defeat positive pressure, permitting air flow into the room. Room pressure and door status were monitored electronically during 191 hip and knee arthroplasty procedures. Operating room staff were unaware that data were being collected. The authors evaluated the data with regression analysis to determine whether the number and duration of door openings had an effect on room pressure. Significance was set at P<.05. Doors were open, on average, 9.5 minutes per case. In 77 of 191 cases, positive pressure was defeated, allowing air flow to reverse into the operating room. Total time with the door open significantly affected the minimum pressure recorded in the room (P<.02), but did not significantly affect average room pressure (P=.7). This finding suggested that the loss of positive pressure was a transient event from which the room recovered. The number and duration of door openings showed a significant association with length of surgery. Door openings threaten positive pressure, potentially jeopardizing operating room sterility. The causes of excessive operating room traffic must be evaluated to identify ways to reduce this traffic and the associated risks. PMID:26558679

  7. Serum Metal Ion Concentrations in Paediatric Patients following Total Knee Arthroplasty Using Megaprostheses

    PubMed Central

    Friesenbichler, Jörg; Sadoghi, Patrick; Maurer-Ertl, Werner; Szkandera, Joanna; Glehr, Mathias; Ogris, Kathrin; Wolf, Matthias; Weger, Christian; Leithner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the concentrations of cobalt, chromium, and molybdenum in the serum of paediatric tumour patients after fixed hinge total knee arthroplasty. Further, these metal ion levels were compared with serum metal ion levels of patients with other orthopaedic devices such as hip and knee prostheses with metal-on-metal or metal-on-polyethylene articulation to find differences between anatomical locations, abrasion characteristics, and bearing surfaces. After an average follow-up of 108 months (range: 67 to 163) of 11 paediatric patients with fixed hinge total knee arthroplasty, the mean concentrations for Co and Cr were significantly increased while Mo was within the limits compared to the upper values from the reference laboratory. Furthermore, these serum concentrations were significantly higher compared to patients with a standard rotating hinge device (P = 0.002 and P < 0.001) and preoperative controls (P < 0.001). On the other hand, the serum levels of patients following MoM THA or rotating hinge arthroplasty using megaprostheses were higher. Therefore, periodic long-term follow-ups are recommended due to the rising concerns about systemic metal ion exposure in the literature. Upon the occurrence of adverse reactions to metal debris the revision of the fixed hinge implant should be considered. PMID:25276819

  8. Impact of Alprazolam on Comorbid Pain and Knee Functions in Total Knee Arthroplasty Patients Diagnosed with Anxiety and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Barış; Kömür, Baran; Aktaş, Erdem; Sonnur Yılmaz, Firdes; Çopuroğlu, Cem; Özcan, Mert; Çiftdemir, Mert; Çopuroğlu, Elif

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Studies report 19-33% postoperative moderate-severe pain and dissatisfaction in uncomplicated total knee arthroplasty (TKA), even after 1 year. High rates of undiagnosed depression and anxiety may have a strong impact on these unfavourable outcomes. Here we aimed to investigate the efficacy of alprazolam on postoperative analgesic use and knee functions. Methods: Seventy-six patients with a mean age of 65 ± 9.3 years (range 46-80) diagnosed with mild-moderate anxiety or depression according to the Hamilton anxiety scale (HAS) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) that underwent TKA were evaluated in the study. Group 1 patients were subjected to alprazolam treatment in addition to an analgesic/antiinflammatory drug, whereas Group 2 consisted of patients receiving only the standard postoperative pain management protocol. Visual analog scale (VAS) and postoperative analgesic use (g/day) were calculated to evaluate the magnitude of pain experienced. Preoperative and postoperative knee functions were assessed from the patients’ Knee Society Score and Knee Society Functional Score records. Results: A positive correlation was found between the preoperative HAS, BDI, and total postoperative analgesic use in both groups. Although the decrease in VAS was significant in both groups, postoperative analgesic need (4.25 ± 0.30 g) in Group 1 was less compared to Group 2 (4.81 ± 0.41 g) (p=0.01). The mean change in postoperative (1 month) Knee Society Score and Knee Society Functional Score were also significantly improved in Group1 compared to Group 2. Conclusion: Alprazolam can reduce postoperative analgesic use and improve knee functions by reducing the pain threshold, and enhancing overall mood via its antidepressive and anxiolytic properties in patients undergoing TKA diagnosed with mild-moderate anxiety/depression. PMID:26664498

  9. The impact of joint line restoration on functional results after hinged knee prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Serdar; Cankaya, Deniz; Deveci, Alper; Firat, Ahmet; Ozkurt, Bulent; Bozkurt, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hinged knee prosthesis is an effective treatment method as a salvage procedure in marked ligamentous insufficiency and severe bone defects. Joint line determination and restoration are difficult due to large bone defects and distorted anatomy. We evaluated the impact of joint line alteration on the outcome in rotating hinge knee arthroplasty (RHKA). Materials and Methods: 35 patients who had rotating hinged knee prosthesis applied between 2008 and 2013 were evaluated in this retrospective study. The patients were studied radiologically and clinically. Five patients were lost to followup and two patients died, leaving a total of 28 (7 male, 21 female) patients for final evaluation. The average age of the patients was 66.19 ± 8.35 years (range 52–83 years). The patients were evaluated clinically with Knee Society knee and functional score and patellar score. The joint line positions were evaluated radiographically with femoral epicondylar ratio method. The outcomes were also evaluated according to age, body weight and gender. Student's t-test, independent t-test, and the Wilcoxon signed rank test were used in the statistical analysis. Results: The mean Knee Society knee and functional score significantly improved from preoperative 19.52 ± 11.77 and 12.5 ± 15.66 respectively to 72.46 ± 14.01 and 70.36 ± 9.22 respectively postoperatively (P < 0.001). The mean range of motion of the knee improved from 55.95° ± 25.08° preoperatively to 92.14° ± 13.47° postoperatively (P < 0.001). Joint line position was restored in 20 patients (71.4%). Joint line alteration did not affect Knee Society Scores (KSSs) in contrast to patellar scores. Additionally, KSS was better in the patients with body mass index ≤30 at followup (P = 0.022 and P = 0.045). Conclusion: RHKA is an effective salvage procedure for serious instability and large bone defects. Restoration of the joint line improves the patellar score although it had no effect on the clinical outcome

  10. Fracture of the Anterior Locking Flange of a Total Knee Arthroplasty Polyethylene Liner Presenting with Pain following Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Jeavons, Richard; Dowen, Daniel; Rushton, Paul; Ryan, Daniel; Gill, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Fracture of the modern polyethylene insert of a total knee arthroplasty is rare. We describe the first case of a fractured anterior locking flange of the commonly used Depuy Press-fit Condylar (PFC) Sigma prosthesis. Case Report: The 80 year old Caucasian gentleman presented 8 years following previously uncomplicated and successful primary total knee replacement with pain, swelling and symptoms of instability of the knee. He was able to sublux his knee posteriorly using his hamstrings. Dissociation of the liner was evident on radiographs. He underwent revision of the polyethylene liner. It was evident during the revision that the anterior locking flange of the polyethylene liner had fractured allowing it to dissociate from the tibial tray. At 12 months following this revision he continues to do well and has similar range of movement and function to prior to the episode. This cause of the failure is not clear. Conclusion: Surgeons should be aware of this rare complication when assessing a painful or unstable total knee replacement. PMID:27298962

  11. Timeframe for return to driving for patients with minimally invasive knee arthroplasty is associated with knee performance on functional tests

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study hopes to establish the timeframe for a safe return to driving under different speed conditions for patients after minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty and further explores how well various kinds of functional tests on knee performance can predict the patients’ braking ability. Methods 14 patients with right knee osteoarthritis were included in the present study and instructed to perform three simulated driving tasks at preoperative, 2 weeks postoperative and 4 weeks postoperative. Results The results showed that the total braking time at 4 week postoperative has attained the preoperative level at the driving speed 50 and 70 km/hr but not at the driving speed 90 km/hr. It had significantly improving in knee reaction time and maximum isometric force at 4 weeks postoperative. Besides, there was a moderate to high correlation between the scores of the step counts and the total braking time. Conclusions Summary, it is recommended that driving may be resumed 4 weeks after a right knee replacement but had to drive at low or moderate speed and the best predictor of safety driving is step counts. PMID:24913312

  12. Total Knee Arthroplasty Designed to Accommodate the Presence or Absence of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Harman, Melinda K.; Bonin, Stephanie J.; Leslie, Chris J.; Banks, Scott A.; Hodge, W. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for selecting the same total knee arthroplasty prosthesis whether the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is retained or resected is rarely documented. This study reports prospective midterm clinical, radiographic, and functional outcomes of a fixed-bearing design implanted using two different surgical techniques. The PCL was completely retained in 116 knees and completely resected in 43 knees. For the entire cohort, clinical knee (96 ± 7) and function (92 ± 13) scores and radiographic outcomes were good to excellent for 84% of patients after 5–10 years in vivo. Range of motion averaged 124° ± 9°, with 126 knees exhibiting ≥120° flexion. Small differences in average knee flexion and function scores were noted, with the PCL-resected group exhibiting an average of 5° more flexion but an average function score that was 7 points lower compared to the PCL-retained group. Fluoroscopic analysis of 33 knees revealed stable tibiofemoral translations. This study demonstrates that a TKA articular design with progressive congruency in the lateral compartment can provide for femoral condyle rollback in maximal flexion activities and achieve good clinical and functional performance in patients with PCL-retained and PCL-resected TKA. This TKA design proved suitable for use with either surgical technique, providing surgeons with the choice of maintaining or sacrificing the PCL. PMID:25374697

  13. Perioperative management of hemophilia patients receiving total hip and knee arthroplasty: a complication report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Yasuhito; Ishida, Tsunehito; Kubo, Kosuke; Masaoka, Toshinori; Shishido, Takaaki; Sano, Keiji; Yamamoto, Kengo

    2015-01-01

    It has been recognized that perioperative hemostasis management after joint-replacement surgery for hemophilia patients is complicated and cumbersome, due to the necessity of rigorous monitoring for clotting-factor levels throughout the infusion. Between 2005 and 2014, we examined seven patients with hemophilia A (ten joints: six hips and four knees) receiving total hip or knee arthroplasty (THA or TKA) for hemophilic arthropathy. One male patient (31 years old) showed an intra-articular hematoma formation after THA (case 1). In another male patient (46 years old) receiving TKA, the postoperative trough factor VIII level became lower significantly than reference levels (80%–100% for the 5–10 postoperative days) recommended by the guidelines from the Japanese Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis, despite sufficient coagulant based on the guidelines being administered (case 2). In the latter patient, deep infection and hematoma formation were observed postoperatively. In this article, we provide a detailed clinical report regarding these two complication cases at the early postoperative periods, and the management of bleeding control for hemophilia patients is discussed. PMID:26396523

  14. Increased total knee arthroplasty ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene wear using a clinically relevant hyaluronic acid simulator lubricant.

    PubMed

    DesJardins, J; Aurora, A; Tanner, S L; Pace, T B; Acampora, K B; Laberge, M

    2006-07-01

    In this study, osteoarthritic and periprosthetic synovial fluid samples were rheologically and biochemically compared to develop a hyaluronic acid (HA) supplemented bovine serum (BS) lubricant that mimicked the properties of human joint synovial fluid. The effect of this BS + HA lubricant (50 per cent bovine calf serum + 1.5 g/l HA) on the wear rate of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) during a total knee replacement wear test was then investigated. In conjunction with biochemical similarities, the rheological analysis showed that the BS + HA lubricant viscosity was not statistically different to aspirated total knee arthroplasty (TKA) revision joint fluid viscosity over a range of physiologic shear rates. Gravimetric results at 5 million wear testing cycles showed that the BS + HA lubricant produced an average of 6.88 times more UHMWPE wear than 50 per cent bovine serum lubricant alone. The BS + HA lubricated CoCr femoral component surfaces revealed pitting and surface roughening that was not observed using standard bovine serum only lubricants, but that was similar to the metallic surface corrosion observed on in vivo CoCr femoral component retrievals. These findings support the hypothesis that the addition of HA to simulator lubricant is capable of producing CoCr femoral component surface damage similar to that observed in vivo. PMID:16898218

  15. Impact of an Automated Surveillance to Detect Surgical-Site Infections in Patients Undergoing Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Perdiz, Luciana B; Yokoe, Deborah S; Furtado, Guilherme H; Medeiros, Eduardo A S

    2016-08-01

    In this retrospective study, we compared automated surveillance with conventional surveillance to detect surgical site infection after primary total hip or knee arthroplasty. Automated surveillance demonstrated better efficacy than routine surveillance in SSI diagnosis, sensitivity, and predictive negative value in hip and knee arthroplasty. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:991-993. PMID:27072598

  16. Minimally Invasive Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Comparative Study to the Standard Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dabboussi, Naji; Sakr, Mazen; Girard, Julien; Fakih, Riad

    2012-01-01

    Background: Minimally invasive surgery has gained popularity over the past several years. Early results have shown better functional outcome with early recovery and rapid rehabilitation. Aim: Evaluation of the short-term clinical and functional outcome of minimally invasive surgery total knee arthroplasty (MIS-TKA) compared with the traditional total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Materials and Methods: During 2009, all cases scheduled for primary TKA through the modified mini-mid-vastus approach (MIS group) were studied. This group included 40 knees and was compared to a cohort control group of similar number of patients (40 knees) that underwent the procedure through the standard conventional technique (standard group). Results: Patients in the MIS group showed significant decrease in postoperative pain, blood loss in first 24 hours, and in hospital stay. Furthermore, they achieved motion considerably faster than the standard group with earlier return of quadriceps function and greater early flexion. Conclusion: This study proved that MIS-TPA has the ability to couple the benefits of less invasive surgical approach. PMID:22408753

  17. Adductor Canal Block for Postoperative Pain Treatment after Revision Knee Arthroplasty: A Blinded, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Jæger, Pia; Koscielniak-Nielsen, Zbigniew J.; Schrøder, Henrik M.; Mathiesen, Ole; Henningsen, Maria H.; Lund, Jørgen; Jenstrup, Morten T.; Dahl, Jørgen B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Revision knee arthroplasty is assumed to be even more painful than primary knee arthroplasty and predominantly performed in chronic pain patients, which challenges postoperative pain treatment. We hypothesized that the adductor canal block, effective for pain relief after primary total knee arthroplasty, may reduce pain during knee flexion (primary endpoint: at 4 h) compared with placebo after revision total knee arthroplasty. Secondary endpoints were pain at rest, morphine consumption and morphine-related side effects. Methods We included patients scheduled for revision knee arthroplasty in general anesthesia into this blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized trial. Patients were allocated to an adductor canal block via a catheter with either ropivacaine or placebo; bolus of 0.75% ropivacaine/saline, followed by infusion of 0.2% ropivacaine/saline. Clinicaltrials.gov ID: NCT01191593. Results We enrolled 36 patients, of which 30 were analyzed. Mean pain scores during knee flexion at 4 h (primary endpoint) were: 52±22 versus 71±25 mm (mean difference 19, 95% CI: 1 to 37, P = 0.04), ropivacaine and placebo group respectively. When calculated as area under the curve (1–8 h/7 h) pain scores were 55±21 versus 69±21 mm during knee flexion (P = 0.11) and 39±18 versus 45±23 mm at rest (P = 0.43), ropivacaine and placebo group respectively. Groups were similar regarding morphine consumption and morphine-related side effects (P>0.05). Conclusions The only statistically significant difference found between groups was in the primary endpoint: pain during knee flexion at 4 h. However, due to a larger than anticipated dropout rate and heterogeneous study population, the study was underpowered. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01191593 PMID:25386752

  18. Variations in hospital billing for total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Stryker, Louis S; Odum, Susan M; Fehring, Thomas K

    2014-09-01

    Although regional variations in Medicare spending are known, it is not clear whether regional variations exist in hospital charges for total joint arthroplasty. Data from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) on Diagnosis Related Groups 469 and 470 (Major Joint with and without Major Complicating or Comorbid Condition) from 2011 were analyzed for variation by region. Drastic variations in charges between institutions were apparent with significant differences between regions for hospital charges and payments. The median hospital charge nationwide was $71,601 and $46,219 for Diagnosis Related Groups 469 and 470, respectively, with corresponding median payments of $21,231 and $13,743. Weak to no correlation was found between hospital charges and payments despite adjustments for wage index, cost of living, low-income care and teaching institution status. PMID:24973930

  19. The behavior of reinforced concrete knee joints under earthquake loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelakos, Bill

    The poor performance of knee joint connections during recent earthquakes motivated a number of experimental investigations of knee joint behavior under reversed cyclic loading. In this work the knee joint design problem is studied through a collective evaluation of the available experimental results and analytical modeling. The objective is to identify the critical response variables controlling the mechanics of knee joints under earthquake loads and to quantify the influence they have on the strength and deformation capacity of the joint. A knee joint model is derived from simple mechanical constructs of equilibrium and compatibility. The parametric dependence of knee joint behavior is investigated for critical design parameters such as concrete strength, amounts and yield strengths of horizontal and vertical transverse reinforcement, and bond demand. Three different limiting equations are developed from the model limiting the joint shear resistance according with the three alternative modes of joint shear failure. These are: (i) yielding of horizontal and vertical transverse reinforcement, (ii) and (iii) yielding in either of the two principal reinforcing directions accompanied by crushing of the concrete in compression (here the softening influence of orthogonal tensile deformations is considered). For those test specimens from the experimental database that experienced a joint shear failure, the simple knee joint model predicts their joint shear capacity well. Consistent with observations from interior connections it is shown that anchorage of the main reinforcement in the knee joint region prevails as the determining factor of the response of the joint panel. In addition, the same basic physical model that describes the source of resistance in interior connections also applies to knee joints; truss action, and diagonal strut action. By favorably anchoring the beam and column bars it is possible to develop the joint shear strength which is associated with one

  20. Trajectories of Pain and Function after Primary Hip and Knee Arthroplasty: The ADAPT Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lenguerrand, Erik; Wylde, Vikki; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Sayers, Adrian; Brunton, Luke; Beswick, Andrew D.; Dieppe, Paul; Blom, Ashley W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Pain and function improve dramatically in the first three months after hip and knee arthroplasty but the trajectory after three months is less well described. It is also unclear how pre-operative pain and function influence short- and long-term recovery. We explored the trajectory of change in function and pain until and beyond 3-months post-operatively and the influence of pre-operative self-reported symptoms. Methods The study was a prospective cohort study of 164 patients undergoing primary hip (n = 80) or knee (n = 84) arthroplasty in the United Kingdom. Self-reported measures of pain and function using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index were collected pre-operatively and at 3 and 12 months post-operatively. Hip and knee arthroplasties were analysed separately, and patients were split into two groups: those with high or low symptoms pre-operatively. Multilevel regression models were used for each outcome (pain and function), and the trajectories of change were charted (0–3 months and 3–12 months). Results Hip: Most improvement occurred within the first 3 months following hip surgery and patients with worse pre-operative scores had greater changes. The mean changes observed between 3 and twelve months were statistically insignificant. One year after surgery, patients with worse pre-operative scores had post-operative outcomes similar to those observed among patients with less severe pre-operative symptoms. Knee: Most improvement occurred in the first 3 months following knee surgery with no significant change thereafter. Despite greater mean change during the first three months, patients with worse pre-operative scores had not ‘caught-up’ with those with less severe pre-operative symptoms 12 months after their surgery. Conclusion Most symptomatic improvement occurred within the first 3 months after surgery with no significant change between 3–12 months. Further investigations are now required to

  1. Hybrid component fixation in total knee arthroplasty: minimum of 10-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Yoon, Jung-Ro; Oh, Chi-Hun; Kim, Taik-Sun

    2012-06-01

    Hybrid total knee arthroplasty (TKA) (uncemented femur with cemented tibia and patella) was introduced in the late 1980s to gain the theoretical advantage of durable cementless femoral fixation while avoiding the problems noted with cementless tibial fixation. From December 1992 to July 2000, 215 patients (235 knees) who underwent hybrid TKA were enrolled in this study. Five types of prosthesis (AGC, Maxim, LCS-M, LCS-APG, and Scorpio) were used. Revision rate for aseptic loosening was 16 (6.8%) of 235 knees. At 10 and 15 years, survivorship with tibial or femoral revision as the end point was 0.95 and 0.92, respectively. Hybrid TKA provides durable fixation with clinical and radiographic performance at minimum 10 years comparable with cemented series. PMID:22019322

  2. Is referencing the posterior condyles sufficient to achieve a rectangular flexion gap in total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Schnurr, Christoph; Nessler, Jochen; König, Dietmar Pierre

    2009-12-01

    Femoral malrotation in total knee arthroplasty causes flexion gap instability. Conventional instruments mostly reference the posterior condylar angle (PCA). The aim of this study was to verify whether the computer-navigated flexion gap (GAP) method produces a rectangular flexion gap and if a balanced flexion gap could also be achieved by referencing the PCA. A total of 100 knee prostheses were analysed using the navigated GAP method, and flexion gap symmetry along with femoral rotation were recorded. The GAP technique resulted in a rectangular flexion gap with adequate femoral rotational alignment. If the PCA technique had been used, only 51% of the femoral components would have been implanted in correct femoral rotation; the remaining 49% would have implanted with flexion gap instability. The GAP technique produces a rectangular flexion gap. The referencing of the PCA was shown to be less reliable. Thus, modern knee prosthesis instrumentation should not base femoral rotation solely on the PCA. PMID:18956189

  3. Factors affecting the postoperative limb alignment and clinical outcome after Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Ju; Bae, Ji-Hoon; Lim, Hong Chul

    2012-06-01

    We evaluated the postoperative mechanical axis deviation and clinical outcome according to bearing size, femoral component position, and tibial resection angle after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). A total of 104 patients with 124 knees underwent Oxford phase 3 UKA. The overall changes in mechanical axis deviation and tibiofemoral angle were significantly different according to bearing size (P = .001 and < .001), but they were not significantly different according to the tibial resection angle and femoral component position. The postoperative mechanical axis fell into the zone C or zone 2 in 108 knees (87%) and into the zone 3 or zone 4 in 16 cases (13%). One hundred eight cases, which had the mechanical axis passing the zone C or zone 2, did not show any progression of arthritis. Limb alignment is a function of the thickness of the bearing rather than alignments of femoral and tibial implant. PMID:22285234

  4. Computer-assisted navigation in total knee arthroplasty: a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Quack, Valentin Michael; Kathrein, Susanne; Rath, Bijörn; Tingart, Markus; Lüring, Christian

    2012-08-01

    Computer-assisted navigation surgery (CAS) has been performed in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) for approximately 10 years. This technique offers experienced and inexperienced surgeons improved control and reproducible results. Currently, 30% of primary total knee replacements are performed using the CAS technique in Germany. The main problems after total knee replacement are generally aseptic loosening, instability and infection. According to various authors, the main reason for aseptic loosening is an inadequate alignment of the mechanical limb axis. Several level I and II studies have demonstrated that CAS leads to significantly less axial deviation. Nevertheless, there are critical arguments against CAS for routine use, such as longer operation times and higher costs. Additionally, there are still no long-term results available that post a definitive statement about lower revision rates, declining numbers of aseptic loosening, cost-effectiveness and clinical outcomes following CAS. PMID:22718583

  5. Mechanical and kinematic alignment in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bonzanini, Giancarlo; Chirillo, Danilo; de Tullio, Vito

    2016-01-01

    In the last 10 years many studies have questioned if the strive to mechanical align any knee may pose some problems related to ligament misbalancing that could explain the high rate of disappointed patients, almost 20% in some reports. Proper indication and difference between patient’s and surgeon’s expectations are among the most important one’s but it must be underlined that, there is indeed a sharp difference between normal knee kinematics, prosthetic knee kinematics and arthritic knee kinematics being the last one extremely variable. A so called kinematic alignment has recently been developed in order to improve patient’s knee function and pain control minimizing any surgical gesture focused on ligaments balance. The amount of bone resections may not affect limb alignment but has an important consequence in ligament tension and balance, clinical result and function therefore a measured bone resection technique is essential in order to perform a proper kinematic alignment. Purpose of this paper is to briefly review the different alignment procedures used for TKA and to discuss their definitions, concepts and evidence on outcome. PMID:27162780

  6. [PAIN MANAGEMENT IN PATIENTS OF RAPID RECOVERY (RR) PROGRAM IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY (TKA)].

    PubMed

    Marina Fernández, Rosa; Ginés Mateos, Gracia; Arco Pérez, Ma Carmen; Nuevo Gayoso, Montse; Faura Vendrell, Teresa

    2015-06-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a surgery consisting on the artificial joint replacement, due to a traumatic injury or a degenerative process or arthrosis. This surgery causes an important pain to patients, and sometimes affects negatively on their recovery. The choice of the prostheses will depend on the anatomical features of the patient and the surgeon criterion. The concept of a "rapid recovery surgery" was introduced in 1997 by Khelet and meant the beginning of the Fast Track model or the Rapid Recovery (RR) linked to an accelerated rehabilitation, an early discharge and the optimization of all the aspects of pre, intra and post-operative patient experience. Fast recovery is a surgical process which aims to achieve maximum autonomy of the patient through education, pain control and early mobilization. The key of the rapid recovery is to get the involvement of the patient thanks to the empowerment, which means a preoperative patient education that will help to reduce anxiety and it will make easier to engage in their own recovery. Furthermore the patient will take part of an effective post-operative physical therapy, using all the necessary tools to increase their ability to manage their own health problems. The empowerment of these patients is part of the Nursing Model in the Hospital Clinic de Barcelona (HCB), adopted by the Nursing Management in December of 2012. In Catalonia, until the start of the RR surgery, 14,132 interventions in 2008 where done by TKA conventional surgery, needing subsequent conventional hospitalization. This article describes the care and outcomes of nurse interventions, defined in the RR of TKA clinical way, which is focused on the pain's minimization and the impact on patients' mobilization. It was performed in a monographic unit from a tertiary-level hospital in Barcelona in 2013. PMID:26591937

  7. 21 CFR 888.3480 - Knee joint femorotibial metallic constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metallic constrained... Knee joint femorotibial metallic constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint... knee joint. The device prevents dislocation in more than one anatomic plane and has components that...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3480 - Knee joint femorotibial metallic constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metallic constrained... Knee joint femorotibial metallic constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint... knee joint. The device prevents dislocation in more than one anatomic plane and has components that...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3480 - Knee joint femorotibial metallic constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metallic constrained... Knee joint femorotibial metallic constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint... knee joint. The device prevents dislocation in more than one anatomic plane and has components that...

  10. Radiological study of the knee joint line position measured from the fibular head and proximal tibial landmarks.

    PubMed

    Havet, Eric; Gabrion, Antoine; Leiber-Wackenheim, Frederic; Vernois, Joël; Olory, Bruno; Mertl, Patrice

    2007-06-01

    Restoring the joint line level is one of the surgical challenges during revision of total knee arthroplasty. The position of the tibial surface is commonly estimated by its distance to the apex of fibular head, but no study evaluating this distance accurately has been published yet. The purpose of this work was to study the distance between the knee joint line and the apex of the fibular head and the proximal tibia, particularly the tibial tuberosity. Variability with clinical data and relations with other local measurements have been evaluated on knee radiographs (an antero-posterior view, a medio-lateral view and an anteroposterior full length view) of 100 subjects (125 knees). Results showed no correlation between the joint line-fibular head apex distance and any clinical data of the patients, or any other performed measurements. Relations between tibial measurements and the sexe or the height of the subjects were noted. Besides, the review of the 25 bilateral cases did not show statistically significant side difference but the descriptive analysis showed too large discrepancies for the joint line-fibular head apex distance to be used as a landmark. We conclude that the fibular head apex cannot be used as a morphologic landmark to determine the knee joint line position. Its interest in clinical and surgical practice must be discussed. PMID:17440678

  11. Knee osteoarthritis affects the distribution of joint moments during gait.

    PubMed

    Zeni, Joseph A; Higginson, Jill S

    2011-06-01

    Alterations in lower extremity kinetics have been shown to exist in persons with knee osteoarthritis (OA), however few investigations have examined how the intersegmental coordination of the lower extremity kinetic chain varies in the presence of knee joint pathology. The objective of this study was to evaluate how knee OA and walking speed affect total support moment and individual joint contributions to the total support moment. Fifteen healthy subjects and 30 persons with knee OA participated in 3D walking analysis at constrained (1.0 m/s), self-selected and fastest tolerable walking speeds. Individual joint contributions to total support moment were analyzed using separate ANOVAs with one repeated measure (walking speed). Linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between walking speed and joint contribution. Persons with knee OA reduced the contribution of the knee joint when walking at constrained (p = 0.04) and self-selected walking speeds (p = 0.009). There was a significant increase in the ankle contribution and a significant decrease in the hip contribution when walking speed was increased (p < 0.004), however individual walking speeds were not significantly related to joint contributions. This suggests that the relationship between walking speed and joint contribution is dependent on the individual's control strategy and we cannot estimate the joint contribution solely based on walking speed. The slower gait speed observed in persons with knee OA is not responsible for the reduction in knee joint moments, rather this change is likely due to alterations in the neuromuscular strategy of the lower extremity kinetic chain in response to joint pain or muscle weakness. PMID:20510618

  12. Comparative Effects of Periarticular Multimodal Drug Injection and Single-Shot Femoral Nerve Block on Pain Following Total Knee Arthroplasty and Factors Influencing Their Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Shuji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Kan, Hiroyuki; Hino, Manabu; Ichimaru, Shohei; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Amaya, Fumimasa; Sawa, Teiji; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study compared the analgesic effects of local infiltration analgesia (LIA) and femoral nerve block (FNB) after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and assessed factors associated with analgesia obtained by these two methods. Materials and Methods Study subjects included 66 patients (72 knees) who underwent TKA for osteoarthritis of the knee. Pain visual analogue scale (VAS), the amount of analgesics used, number of days to achieve 90° of flexion of the knee joint, date of initiating parallel-bar walking, range of motion of the knee joint at discharge, and adverse events were investigated. Results The VAS scores did not differ significantly between two groups, whereas the amount of analgesics used was significantly lower in the LIA group. Preoperative flexion contracture was significantly more severe in the LIA group with high VAS compared with low VAS. No serious adverse event occurred in the LIA or FNB group. Conclusions The lower analgesic usage in the LIA group than the FNB group indicates that the analgesic effect of LIA was greater than that of singleshot FNB after TKA. There were no serious complications in either group. The postoperative analgesic effect of LIA was smaller in patients with severe than less severe preoperative flexion contracture. PMID:27595078

  13. VALUE OF PREOPERATIVE RADIOGRAPHIC EVALUATIONS ON KNEE BONE DEFECTS FOR REVISION ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Iamaguchi, Mauricio Masasi; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Tirico, Luiz Eduardo Passarelli; Pecora, Jose Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of preoperative radiographic evaluations for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) revision. Methods: Thirty-one knees that were operated between 2006 and 2008, in a consecutive series of cases of TKA revision surgery were analyzed retrospectively. The following criteria were evaluated: number of wedges or structured bone grafts used for filling the bone defects; locations of the wedges and bone grafts used; and mean thickness of the polyethylene used. The AORI classification was previously established based on preoperative radiographs, using preestablished criteria. After the analysis, the knees were divided into four groups (I, IIA, IIB and III). Results: The mean number of wedges or grafts used in each knee progressively increased among the groups (group I: 1.33; group IIA: 2; group IIB: 4.33; and group III: 4.83) (P = 0.0012). The commonest locations were medial in the tibia and posteromedial in the femur. There were no statistically significant differences in the thickness of the polyethylene used. Conclusion: The AORI classification for bone defects in the knee, based on preoperative radiographs, showed a correlation with increasing need to use wedges and/or structured grafts in TKA revisions. However, up to 46% of the knees in groups I and IIA presented bone defects of up to 5 mm that were not diagnosed by means of preoperative radiographs. PMID:27047889

  14. Patellar resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty: functional outcome differs with different outcome scores

    PubMed Central

    Aunan, Eirik; Næss, Grethe; Clarke-Jenssen, John; Sandvik, Leiv; Kibsgård, Thomas Johan

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Recent research on outcomes after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has raised the question of the ability of traditional outcome measures to distinguish between treatments. We compared functional outcomes in patients undergoing TKA with and without patellar resurfacing, using the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) as the primary outcome and 3 traditional outcome measures as secondary outcomes. Patients and methods — 129 knees in 115 patients (mean age 70 (42–82) years; 67 female) were evaluated in this single-center, randomized, double-blind study. Data were recorded preoperatively, at 1 year, and at 3 years, and were assessed using repeated-measures mixed models. Results — The mean subscores for the KOOS after surgery were statistically significantly in favor of patellar resurfacing: sport/recreation, knee-related quality of life, pain, and symptoms. No statistically significant differences between the groups were observed with the Knee Society clinical rating system, with the Oxford knee score, and with visual analog scale (VAS) for patient satisfaction. Interpretation — In the present study, the KOOS—but no other outcome measure used—indicated that patellar resurfacing may be beneficial in TKA. PMID:26540368

  15. KNEE-JOINT LOADING IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: INFLUENCE OF ABDOMINAL AND THIGH FAT

    PubMed Central

    Messier, Stephen P.; Beavers, Daniel P.; Loeser, Richard F.; Carr, J. Jeffery; Khajanchi, Shubham; Legault, Claudine; Nicklas, Barbara J.; Hunter, David J.; DeVita, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Using three separate models that included total body mass, total lean and total fat mass, and abdominal and thigh fat as independent measures, we determined their association with knee-joint loads in older overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Fat depots were quantified using computed tomography and total lean and fat mass determined with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry in 176 adults (age = 66.3 yr., BMI = 33.5 kg·m−2) with radiographic knee OA. Knee moments and joint bone-on-bone forces were calculated using gait analysis and musculoskeletal modeling. Results Higher total body mass was significantly associated (p ≤ 0.0001) with greater knee compressive and shear forces, compressive and shear impulses (p < 0.0001), patellofemoral forces (p< 0.006), and knee extensor moments (p = 0.003). Regression analysis with total lean and total fat mass as independent variables revealed significant positive associations of total fat mass with knee compressive (p = 0.0001), shear (p < 0.001), and patellofemoral forces (p = 0.01) and knee extension moment (p = 0.008). Gastrocnemius and quadriceps forces were positively associated with total fat mass. Total lean mass was associated with knee compressive force (p = 0.002). A regression model that included total thigh and total abdominal fat found both were significantly associated with knee compressive and shear forces (p ≤ 0.04). Thigh fat was associated with the knee abduction (p = 0.03) and knee extension moment (p = 0.02). Conclusions Thigh fat, consisting predominately of subcutaneous fat, had similar significant associations with knee joint forces as abdominal fat despite its much smaller volume and could be an important therapeutic target for people with knee OA. PMID:25133996

  16. Interpolation function for approximating knee joint behavior in human gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth-Taşcǎu, Mirela; Pater, Flavius; Stoia, Dan Ioan

    2013-10-01

    Starting from the importance of analyzing the kinematic data of the lower limb in gait movement, especially the angular variation of the knee joint, the paper propose an approximation function that can be used for processing the correlation among a multitude of knee cycles. The approximation of the raw knee data was done by Lagrange polynomial interpolation on a signal acquired using Zebris Gait Analysis System. The signal used in approximation belongs to a typical subject extracted from a lot of ten investigated subjects, but the function domain of definition belongs to the entire group. The study of the knee joint kinematics plays an important role in understanding the kinematics of the gait, this articulation having the largest range of motion in whole joints, in gait. The study does not propose to find an approximation function for the adduction-abduction movement of the knee, this being considered a residual movement comparing to the flexion-extension.

  17. Tranexamic acid for the reduction of blood loss in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Oremus, Kresimir

    2015-05-01

    The Journal of Arthroplasty recently published a paper entitled "The Efficacy of Combined Use of Intraarticular and Intravenous Tranexamic Acid on Reducing Blood Loss and Transfusion Rate in Total Knee Arthroplasty". Tranexamic acid (TXA) is an antifibrinolytic drug whose administration during the perioperative period either by intravenous route or topically applied to the surgical field has been shown to reliably reduce blood loss and need for transfusion in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Although randomized trials and meta-analyses did not show an increase in thromboembolic events, concerns remain about its repeated systemic application. The authors of the study introduced a novel regimen of TXA administration combining a preoperative intravenous bolus followed by local infiltration at the end of surgery with the idea of maximizing drug concentration at the surgical site while minimizing systemic antifibrinolytic effects. The combined dosage regimen appears to be more effective than single dose local application in reducing blood loss and transfusion rate without any complications noted. PMID:26046088

  18. Contact stress at the post-cam mechanism in posterior-stabilised total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, K; Matsuda, S; Miura, H; Iwamoto, Y; Higaki, H; Otsuka, K

    2005-04-01

    We measured the contact areas and contact stresses at the post-cam mechanism of a posterior-stabilised total knee arthroplasty when a posterior force of 500 N was applied to the Kirschner Performance, Scorpio Superflex, NexGen LPS Flex Fixed, and NexGen LPS Flex Mobile knee systems. Measurements were made at 90 degrees, 120 degrees, and 150 degrees of flexion both in neutral rotation and 10 degrees of internal rotation of the tibial component. Peak contact stresses at 90 degrees, 120 degrees, and 150 degrees were 24.0, 33.9, and 28.8 MPa, respectively, for the Kirschner; 26.0, 32.4, and 22.1 MPa, respectively, for the Scorpio; and 34.1, 31.5, and 32.5 MPa, respectively, for the NexGen LPS Flex Fixed. With an internally rotated tibia, the contact stress increased significantly with all the fixed-bearing arthroplasties but not with the NexGen LPS Flex Mobile arthroplasty. The post-cam design should be modified in order to provide a larger contact area whilst avoiding any impingement and edge loading. PMID:15795197

  19. Alpine Skiing With total knee ArthroPlasty (ASWAP): physical activity, knee function, pain, exertion, and well-being.

    PubMed

    Würth, S; Finkenzeller, T; Pötzelsberger, B; Müller, E; Amesberger, G

    2015-08-01

    This study focused on the psychological and quality of life aspects of resuming alpine skiing practice after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in elderly skilled skiers. Two data pools were used in order to analyze psychological states: (a) at the beginning, at the end, and 8 weeks after a 12-week skiing intervention; and (b) concerning diurnal variations of states (i.e., skiing days compared with everyday life during intervention and retention phase). In particular, effects of skiing on amount of physical activity and perceived exertion, perceived pain and knee function, and subjective well-being were analyzed using a control group design. Results reveal that the skiing intervention substantially increases the amount of physical activity by the intervention group (122.30 ± 32.38 min/day), compared with the control group (75.14 ± 21.27 min/day) [F (2, 32) = 8.22, P < 0.01, η(2)  = 0.34)]. Additionally, the analyses of psychological states demonstrated that skiing goes along with enhanced well-being and no significant impact on perceived pain, exertion or knee function. In sum, alpine skiing can be recommended for older persons with TKA with respect to well-being, perceived pain and knee function, and perceived exertion. PMID:26083705

  20. Clinical Outcomes and Risks of Single-stage Bilateral Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty via Oxford Phase III

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Tong; Tu, Yi-Hui; Xue, Hua-Ming; Wen, Tao; Cai, Min-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis often affects the joint bilaterally, and the single-stage (SS) unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) is advantageous in terms of a single anesthesia administration, a short hospital stay, lower medical costs, and enhanced patient convenience. However, the complication risk of SS UKA continues to be debated. The aim of this article was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness, complications, and functional recovery of SS and two-stage (TS) UKA. Methods: From January 2008 to December 2013, we compared a series of 36 SS UKA with 45 TS UKA for osteoarthritis. The mean age was 65.4 years (range: 55–75 years). The mean body mass index was 25.2 kg/m2 (range: 22–29 kg/m2). The pre- and post-operative Oxford Knee Scores (OKSs), complications, operative times, tourniquet times, the amount of drainage, and hemoglobin (Hb) were evaluated. The Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and paired and grouped t-tests were used in this study. Results: The mean follow-up was 50 months. No complications of death, fat embolism, deep vein thrombosis, and prosthetic infection were reported. Patients who underwent SS UKA had a shorter cumulative anesthesia time (113.5 vs. 133.0 min, P < 0.01). There were no significant variations between the values of the mean tourniquet time, the amount of drainage, pre- and post-operative Hb in the different groups. No patient required a blood transfusion. No statistical differences were found in the complications between two groups (P > 0.05). At the final follow-up, the mean OKS improved from 39.48 ± 5.69 to 18.83 ± 3.82 (P < 0.01), with no statistical differences between the two groups (P > 0.05). Patients who underwent SS UKA had a faster recovery. Conclusions: The single-staged UKA offers the benefits of a single anesthesia administration, reduced total anesthetic time, decreased overall rehabilitation time, and absence of an increase in perioperative mortality or complications compared with the TS bilateral UKA

  1. Primary rotating-hinge total knee arthroplasty: good outcomes at mid-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kowalczewski, Jacek; Marczak, Dariusz; Synder, Marek; Sibiński, Marcin

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated the clinical and radiologic outcomes of primary knee replacements using a rotating-hinge knee prosthesis in 12 knees with a minimum follow-up of 10 years. Indications for the operation included gross joint destruction, significant axial deformities and contracture with a dysfunctional medial collateral ligament in all cases. The patients' WOMAC and Knee Society scores improved, and the use of mobility aids decreased. No loosening of implants was observed. Nonprogressive radiolucent lines were identified around three tibial components. Three patients required marginal wound excision with resuturing and thereafter healed uneventfully. With significant improvement in function, pain and range of motion, the rotating-hinge knee prosthesis can be used as a salvage device in patients with medial collateral ligament deficiency, contracture, and gross joint destruction. PMID:24418767

  2. Total Knee Arthroplasty as Salvage for Non Union in Bicondylar Hoffa Fracture: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Venkata Gurava; Mootha, Aditya Krishna; Chiranjeevi, T; Kantesaria, Pareen

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Bicondylar Hoffa fracture is a rare injury with implant failure and non unions as known complications. Case report: Two cases of Bicondylar Hoffa fractures with implant failure and nonunion treated successfully with long stem total knee arthroplasty are reported here. At a minimum follow up of 2 years both the implants were well fixed and the fractures have united. The knee society scores in both the patients improved from 14 and 19 to 86 and 82 respectively. To our knowledge there are no reports of such rare fractures managed successfully with non hinged arthroplasty. Conclusion: A long stem total knee arthroplasty can be used as a treatment option in cases of nonunion bicondylar Hoffa fractures

  3. Novel computer-assisted method for revision arthroplasty of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Hoffart, Hanns-Edgar; Dinges, Harald; Kolbeck, Stefan; Ritschl, Peter; Hommel, Hagen

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To introduce the navigation system of software and instruments designed specifically for revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: We present an imageless navigation system for revision TKA, with optical point and tracker identification to assess kinematic and anatomical landmarks. The system automatically positions the cutting guides with a motorized cutting unit. The cutting unit is placed on the distal femur with a femoral clamp and acts as a rigid body and the base for all femoral cuts. The surgical technique for using the navigation system for revision TKA is based on the technique used in primary TKA. However, there are some important differences. The most notable are: (1) differences in estimation of the position of the primary implant relative to the bone and the mechanical axes; (2) the specific possibilities the revision navigation software offers in terms of optimal joint level positioning; and (3) the suggested “best fit” position, in which the clock position, stem position and offset, femoral component size, and mediolateral position of the femoral component are taken into account to find the optimal femoral component position. We assessed the surgical technique, and accompanying software procedural steps, of the system, identifying any advantages or disadvantages that they present. RESULTS: The system aims to visualize critical steps of the procedure and is intended as a tool to support the surgeon in surgical decision-making. Combining a computer-assisted cutting device with navigation makes it possible to carry out precise cuts without pinning. Furthermore, the femoral clamp provides a stable fixation mechanism for the motorized cutting unit. A stable clamp is paramount in the presence of periarticular bony defects. The system allows the position of the primary implant relative to the bone and mechanical axes to be estimated, at which point any malalignments can be corrected. It also offers an optimal joint level position for

  4. Effects of preoperative neuromuscular electrical stimulation on quadriceps strength and functional recovery in total knee arthroplasty. A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Supervised preoperative muscle strengthening programmes (prehabilitation) can improve recovery after total joint arthroplasty but are considered resource intensive. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been shown to improve quadriceps femoris muscle (QFM) strength and clinical function in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) however it has not been previously investigated as a prehabilitation modality. Methods This pilot study assessed the compliance of a home-based, NMES prehabilitation programme in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We evaluated its effect on preoperative and postoperative isometric quadriceps femoris muscle (QFM) strength, QFM cross-sectional area (CSA) and clinical function (subjective and objective). Seventeen subjects were recruited with 14 completing the study (NMES group n = 9; Control group n = 5). Results Overall compliance with the programme was excellent (99%). Preoperative QFM strength increased by 28% (p > 0.05) with associated gains in walk, stair-climb and chair-rise times (p < 0.05). Early postoperative strength loss (approximately 50%) was similar in both groups. Only the NMES group demonstrated significant strength (53.3%, p = 0.011) and functional recovery (p < 0.05) from 6 to 12 weeks post-TKA. QFM CSA decreased by 4% in the NMES group compared to a reduction of 12% in the control group (P > 0.05) at 12 weeks postoperatively compared to baseline. There were only limited associations found between objective and subjective functional outcome instruments. Conclusions This pilot study has shown that preoperative NMES may improve recovery of quadriceps muscle strength and expedite a return to normal activities in patients undergoing TKA for OA. Recommendations for appropriate outcome instruments in future studies of prehabilitation in TKA have been provided. PMID:20540807

  5. Treatment and Rehabilitation of Knee Joints Straight Stiffness After Burns.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jinshu; Xu, Minghuo; Wu, Wenwen; Hu, Yuan; Shi, Xiuxiu; Hou, Shuxun

    2015-12-01

    The knee release surgery and postoperative rehabilitation of patients after burns and knee straight stiffness were investigated. Eleven patients were treated for 16 side burns and knee stiffness who consisted of nine males and two females, aged 19 to 54 years (mean = 33.2). The duration of the patients' knee stiffness ranged from 8 to 26 months, with an average of 12.6 months. Their preoperative flexion ranged from 5° to 50°, with an average of 26.2°. Their preoperative Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) knee scores ranged from 46 to 72 points, with an average of 55.8 points. All stiff knees were treated with release surgery, along with total release of intra-articular adhesion and excision of vastus intermedius. After the arthrolysis of the stiff knee joint, the tight skin was completely loose in the adhesions. The soft tissue contracture was not grafted, but the shade fascia was freed to increase skin ductility. All knee joints were released to more than 90° of flexion in the operation, and reversed fascia flaps were used to suture the loss of the deep fascia at the position of flexion of 90°. After the operation, the knee joint was fixed in flexion for 72 h while being actively cared for by early rehabilitation. Subsequently, the patient's skin coverage, joint motion, and joint function recovery were observed. Based on the follow-up of the patients for the following 16 to 36 months (mean = 25.7), the knee flexion of the patients ranged from 110° to 135°, with an average of 122.2° and 96° increase (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the patients had better skin ductility to meet the increase in joint flexion. HSS knee function scores at the end of follow-up ranged from 93 to 100 points, with an average of 97.5 points and an increase of 41.7 points (P < 0.01). The joint function improved significantly. The arthrolysis of straight stiff knee joints after burns can ease muscle contracture and free the shade fascia, thus avoiding the need to

  6. Ceramic Femoral Components in Total Knee Arthroplasty - Two Year Follow-Up Results of an International Prospective Multi-Centre Study

    PubMed Central

    Bergschmidt, Philipp; Bader, Rainer; Ganzer, Dirk; Hauzeur, Christian; Lohmann, Christoph; Rüther, Wolfgang; Tigani, Domenico; Rani, Nicola; Prats, Fernando Lopez; Zorzi, Claudio; Madonna, Vincenzo; Rigotti, Stefano; Benazzo, Francesco; Rossi, Stefano Marco Paolo; Kundt, Guenther; Bloch, Hans Rudolf; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2012-01-01

    Background: Total knee arthroplasty can be considered as a reliable surgical procedure with a good long-term clinical result. However, implant failure due to particle induced aseptic loosening as well as the aspect of hypersensitivity to metal ions still remains an emerging issue. Methods: The purpose of this prospective international multi-centre study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes and the reliability of the unconstrained Multigen Plus Total Knee System with a new BIOLOX® delta ceramic femoral component. Cemented total knee arthroplasty was performed on 108 patients (110 knees) at seven hospitals in three countries. Clinical and radiological evaluations were performed preoperatively, and after 3, 12 and 24 months postoperatively using the HSS-, WOMAC-, SF-36-score and standardised X-rays. Results: The mean preoperative HSS-Score amounted to 55.5 ± 11.5 points and improved significantly in all postoperative evaluations (85.7 ± 11.7 points at 24 months). Furthermore, improvements in WOMAC- and SF-36-score were evaluated as significant at all points of evaluation. Radiolucent lines around the femoral ceramic component at 24 months were found in four cases. Progression of radiolucent lines was not seen and no implant loosening was observed. During the 24 month follow-up eight patients underwent subsequent surgery due to reasons unrelated to the implant material. Conclusions: The observed clinical and radiological results are encouraging for a long-term survival of the ceramic femoral component. Therefore, ceramic implants could be a promising solution not only for patients with allergies against metallic implant materials, but also for the osteoarthritic knee joint. Long-term follow-up is necessary to draw conclusions regarding the superiority of the ceramic knee implants concerning in vivo wear and long-term survivorship. PMID:22582104

  7. Accuracy of CT-based patient-specific guides for total knee arthroplasty in patients with post-traumatic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Schotanus, M G M; van Haaren, E H; Hendrickx, R P M; Jansen, E J P; Kort, N P

    2015-12-01

    Published clinical trials who studied the accuracy of patient-specific guides (PSG) for total knee arthroplasty exclude patients with articular deformity of the knee joint. We prospectively analysed a series of 30 patients with post-traumatic osteoarthritis of the knee joint with use of PSG. At 1 year post-operative, the achieved biomechanical (HKA) axis and varus/valgus of the femur and tibia components were measured on anterior-posterior (AP) long-standing weight-bearing radiographs. Flexion/extension of the femoral and AP slope of the tibia component was measured on standard lateral radiographs. Percentages >3° deviation of the pre-operative planned HKA axis and individual implant components were considered as outliers. Approved and used implant size, median blood loss (ml) and operation time (min) were obtained from the operation records. Pre- and 1-year post-operative patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) were performed. Eighty-three per cent of the patients had a HKA axis restored <3° of the pre-operative planned alignment. Varus/valgus outliers were 0.0 and 6.7 % for the femoral and tibial components, respectively. Percentages of outliers of flexion/extension were 36.7 % for the femoral component and 10.0 % for the AP slope of the tibial component. Median blood loss was 300 ml (50-700), while operation time was 67 min (44-144). In 20 % of all cases, the approved implant size was changed into one size smaller. One-year post-operative PROMs improved significantly. We conclude that the accuracy of CT-based PSG is not impaired in patients with post-traumatic osteoarthritis and this modality can restore biomechanical limb alignment. PMID:26265403

  8. The AViKA (Adding Value in Knee Arthroplasty) postoperative care navigation trial: rationale and design features

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Utilization of total knee arthroplasty is increasing rapidly. A substantial number of total knee arthroplasty recipients have persistent pain after surgery. Our objective was to design a randomized controlled trial to establish the efficacy of a motivational-interviewing-based telephone intervention aimed at improving patient outcomes and satisfaction following total knee arthroplasty. Methods/Design The study was conducted at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. The study focused on individuals 40 years or older with a primary diagnosis of osteoarthritis who were scheduled for total knee arthroplasty. The study compared two management strategies over the first six months postoperatively: 1) enhanced postoperative care with frequent follow-up by a care navigator; 2) usual postoperative care. Those who were randomized into the enhanced postoperative care arm received ten calls from a trained non-clinician care navigator over the first six postoperative months. The navigator used motivational interviewing techniques to engage patients in discussions related to their rehabilitation goals, including patient’s plans for and confidence in achieving those goals. Patients in the usual care arm received standard postoperative management and received no navigator phone calls. Patients in both arms were assessed at baseline, three months, and six months postoperatively. Discussion The primary outcome of the study was improvement in function as measured by the difference in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index function score between preoperative (baseline) status and six months postoperatively. Data were collected to identify factors that may be related to total knee arthroplasty outcomes, including preoperative pain, pain catastrophizing, self-efficacy, and depression. A formal economic analysis is also planned to determine the cost-effectiveness of the care navigator as a component of total knee arthroplasty care

  9. Bone marrow edema in the knee in osteoarthrosis and association with total knee arthroplasty within a three-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Joseph; Nelson, Fred

    2008-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine if a correlation exists between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of bone marrow edema (BME) in osteoarthrosis (OA) of the knee joint and need for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) within a follow-up period of 3 years. Materials and methods The entire database of knee MR studies over a 3-year period was used to select individuals with knee OA. A chart review was conducted to identify and include only those who had a 3-year follow-up appointment from the time of the initial MR study. There were 25 patients in the OA-only group (four men and 21 women; age range, 28–75; average age, 49.3 years). The OA and BME group had 48 patients (23 men and 25 women; average age, 55.5 years). The MRs were reviewed and interpreted by a musculoskeletal radiologist and were classified into one of four patterns of BME: none, focal, global, or cystic pattern. Meniscal tear and degree of cartilage loss were also assessed. Results Subjects who had BME of any pattern type were 8.95 times as likely to progress rapidly to a TKA when compared to subjects with no BME (p = 0.016). Subjects with a global pattern of BME were 5.45 times as likely to have a TKA compared to subjects with focal, cyst, or no BME (p < 0.05). Subjects with a global edema pattern were 13.04 times as likely to have a TKA than subjects with no marrow edema in the knee (p < 0.01). There was no correlation of TKA with meniscal tear or cartilage loss. The group of subjects who had a TKA were 12.6 years older than those who did not have a TKA (p < 0.001). However, the BME results were still significant after accounting for the age difference. Conclusion Our classification of patterns into global, focal, cystic, and absence of BME is an attempt to further define edema in osteoarthrosis and how it relates to clinical progression. Patients with BME and OA have an increased risk of TKA as opposed to OA and no marrow edema. The BME pattern with the worst

  10. Knee Pain during Strength Training Shortly following Fast-Track Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Bandholm, Thomas; Thorborg, Kristian; Lunn, Troels Haxholdt; Kehlet, Henrik; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding

    2014-01-01

    Background Loading and contraction failure (muscular exhaustion) are strength training variables known to influence neural activation of the exercising muscle in healthy subjects, which may help reduce neural inhibition of the quadriceps muscle following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It is unknown how these exercise variables influence knee pain after TKA. Objective To investigate the effect of loading and contraction failure on knee pain during strength training, shortly following TKA. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Consecutive sample of patients from the Copenhagen area, Denmark, receiving a TKA, between November 2012 and April 2013. Participants Seventeen patients, no more than 3 weeks after their TKA. Main outcome measures: In a randomized order, the patients performed 1 set of 4 standardized knee extensions, using relative loads of 8, 14, and 20 repetition maximum (RM), and ended with 1 single set to contraction failure (14 RM load). The individual loadings (kilograms) were determined during a familiarization session >72 hours prior. The patients rated their knee pain during each repetition, using a numerical rating scale (0–10). Results Two patients were lost to follow up. Knee pain increased with increasing load (20 RM: 3.1±2.0 points, 14 RM: 3.5±1.8 points, 8 RM: 4.3±2.5 points, P = 0.006), and repetitions to contraction failure (10% failure: 3.2±1.9 points, 100% failure: 5.4±1.6 points, P<0.001). Resting knee pain 60 seconds after the final repetition (2.7±2.4 points) was not different from that recorded before strength training (2.7±1.8 points, P = 0.88). Conclusion Both loading and repetitions performed to contraction failure during knee- extension strength-training, increased post-operative knee pain during strength training implemented shortly following TKA. However, only the increase in pain during repetitions to contraction failure exceeded that defined as clinically relevant, and was very short-lived. Trial Registration

  11. Novel intramedullary plug with sliding mechanism used in revision total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Fujita, H; Kitaori, T; Iida, H; Shimizu, K; Hiroshima, Y; Kawanabe, K; Nakamura, T

    2005-07-01

    A novel intramedullary plug with sliding mechanism has been developed and evaluated clinically in the settings of revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The new plug consists of a pair of specially designed components. Each component is shaped like an obliquely cut cylinder. Postoperative plain radiographs of 8 arthroplasties that include 7 stemmed femoral components and 6 stemmed tibial components (total 13 regions) were examined. No radiolucent line between the cement and the cortical bone was observed. Plugging was complete in 11 regions. No migration of the plug was observed. Slight leak of the cement was observed in 2 of 7 femoral components, but not found in tibial components. Our study demonstrated the efficacy of the plug in occluding the femoral and tibial canal completely in 11 out of 13 regions in revision TKAs. PMID:15909302

  12. Patient versus Provider Characteristics Impacting Hospital Lengths of Stay Following Total Knee or Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Styron, Joseph F.; Koroukian, Siran; Klika, Alison; Barsoum, Wael K.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction This study aims to identify whether patient-level or provider-level characteristics are most influential on a patient’s length of stay in the acute care hospital. Materials and Methods A dataset containing a nationally representative sample of inpatient discharge abstracts was used. Multi-level linear regression models were used to evaluate the associations between patient- and provider-level characteristics on patients’ lengths of stay. Results The target population included 322,894 discharges with a primary procedure code for primary total knee arthroplasty and 193,553 discharges for total hip arthroplasty. The variables associated with the greatest increases in length of stay were a higher co-morbidity level among patient level attributes (+17.4%) and low surgeon volume among provider-level characteristics (+18.8%). Discussion Provider-level characteristics, particularly provider volume, had a greater impact on length of stay. PMID:21277159

  13. Patient vs provider characteristics impacting hospital lengths of stay after total knee or hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Styron, Joseph F; Koroukian, Siran M; Klika, Alison K; Barsoum, Wael K

    2011-12-01

    This study aims to identify whether patient-level or provider-level characteristics are most influential on a patient's length of stay in the acute care hospital. A data set containing a nationally representative sample of inpatient discharge abstracts was used. Multilevel linear regression models were used to evaluate the associations between patient-level and provider-level characteristics on patients' lengths of stay. The target population included 322,894 discharges with a primary procedure code for primary total knee arthroplasty and 193,553 discharges for total hip arthroplasty. The variables associated with the greatest increases in length of stay were a higher comorbidity level among patient level attributes (+17.4%) and low surgeon volume among provider-level characteristics (+18.8%). Provider-level characteristics, particularly provider volume, had a greater impact on length of stay. PMID:21277159

  14. Which patients do not return to work after total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Kuijer, P Paul F M; Kievit, Arthur J; Pahlplatz, Thijs M J; Hooiveld, Truus; Hoozemans, Marco J M; Blankevoort, Leendert; Schafroth, Matthias U; van Geenen, Rutger C I; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2016-09-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is increasingly being performed among working patients suffering from knee osteoarthritis. Two out of ten patients do not return to work (RTW) after TKA. Little evidence is available about these patients to guide clinicians. Therefore, this study investigates patients' characteristics associated with no RTW. A multicenter retrospective cohort study was performed among working patients having undergone a primary TKA during 2005-2010. The following preoperative characteristics were assessed: age at surgery, sex, comorbidity, body mass index (BMI), preoperative sick-leave duration, patient-reported work-relatedness of knee symptoms, and physical job demands. In addition, the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Scores (KOOS) after TKA were assessed. Backward stepwise logistic regression analyses were performed to predict no RTW. Seven hundred and sixty-four patients were approached, and 558 patients (73 %) responded. One hundred and sixty-seven met the inclusion criteria and 46 did not RTW. A preoperative sick-leave duration >2 weeks (OR 12.5, 90 % CI 5.0-31.5) was most strongly associated with no RTW. Other associations found were: female sex (OR 3.2, 90 % CI 1.3-8.2), BMI ≥ 30 (OR 2.8, 90 % CI 1.1-7.1), patient-reported work-relatedness of knee symptoms (OR 5.3, 90 % CI 2.0-14.1), and a physically knee-demanding job (OR 3.3, 90 % CI 1.2-8.9). Age and KOOS were not associated with no RTW. Especially obese female workers, with a preoperative sick-leave duration >2 weeks, who perform knee-demanding work and indicate that their knee symptoms are work-related have a high chance for no RTW after TKA. These results stress the importance of a more timely referral for work-directed care of patients at risk for no RTW after TKA. PMID:27342661

  15. Wireless Microcurrent-Generating Antimicrobial Wound Dressing in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Chow, James

    2016-01-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria and financial burden of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) further the need for treatments to address pathogenic contamination and expedite healing. This retrospective study was a chart review of a series of 92 patients who underwent 100 total knee arthroplasties performed by the same surgeon and treated with a novel microcurrent-generating antimicrobial dressing (MCD). Mean hospital length of stay was 2.3±0.9 days, while the mean length of treatment with MCD was 8.3±1.2 days. No major complications, PJI or major infectious complications were reported, with two readmissions (2%) within 30 days of surgery. Knee Society Score function showed statistically significant improvements post-operatively, with a mean six-month score of 75.0±20.3 and mean change from baseline of 36.3±21.1 (P<0.0001). These results support previous findings that use of the MCD may result in improved outcomes as an element in post-operative wound management. PMID:27433298

  16. Modern perceptions and expectations regarding total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Meneghini, Robert Michael; Russo, Glenn S; Lieberman, Jay R

    2014-04-01

    It is established that patients and surgeons share different perceptions regarding total knee replacement (TKA). This study's objective was to determine patient perceptions regarding TKA as well as the influence of the various information sources in shaping these perceptions. All patients presenting with knee pain for evaluation of TKA were offered a questionnaire. Multivariate statistical analysis correlated response and demographic variables. Approximately 81% of patients felt the main reason for TKA was to alleviate pain, whereas only 19% felt return to sports-related activities was the main reason. Approximately 37% of patients felt TKAs should last for 20 years or more, which was strongly correlated with TV, newspaper, or Internet exposure (p ≤ 0.01). Approximately 38% of respondents had heard of partial knee replacement, whereas relatively few had received information regarding patient-specific, gender-specific, mobile-bearing, or high-flexion TKA designs. Men were likelier than women to get their information from friends, family, or another patient (p = 0.04). Although most respondents perceived pain relief as the primary goal, patients getting information from the media are likelier to expect TKA to last longer than 20 years. This suggests direct-to-patient marketing with such claims as 30-year durability may influence patient perceptions regarding TKA. PMID:23775544

  17. The Validity of Administrative BMI Data in Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lau, Edmund C; Son, Min-Sun; Mossad, David; Toossi, Nader; Johanson, Norman A; Gonzalez, Mark H; Meller, Menachem M

    2015-10-01

    Identifying BMI via administrative data is a useful way to evaluate outcomes in total joint arthroplasty (TJA) for varying degrees of obesity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the concordance between BMI coding in administrative claims data and actual clinical BMI measurements in the medical record for patients undergoing TJA. Clinical BMI value was shown to be a significant determinant of whether ICD-9 codes were used to report the patient's obesity status (P<0.01). Although a higher clinical BMI strongly increased the likelihood of having either of the ICD-9 diagnosis codes used to identify obesity status, only the accuracy of the V85 code increased with increasing levels of BMI. PMID:26088396

  18. Total Joint Arthroplasty in Nonagenarians: What Are the Risks?

    PubMed

    Jauregui, Julio J; Boylan, Matthew R; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Naziri, Qais; Maheshwari, Aditya V; Mont, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    With recent increases in life expectancy in the United States, the number of nonagenarians (age 90-99 years) presenting for lower extremity joint arthroplasty (TJA) will likely rise. Utilizing the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database, we compared 30-day outcomes of TJA between nonagenarians and controls (age <90 years). Nonagenarians had lower mean BMI, no difference in mean number of comorbidities, and shorter mean operation time. Compared to controls, nonagenarians had longer mean length-of-stay, higher readmission rate, and higher risk of postoperative adverse events. Given these findings, orthopaedic surgeons should be aware of the increased risks of TJA in nonagenarians, and should discuss these risks with potential surgical candidates during a shared decision-making process. PMID:26169454

  19. Assessment of the responsibility between a road traffic accident and medical defects after the traffic accident injury of knee joint.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiemin; Xia, Wentao

    2012-04-01

    A 48-year-old Chinese woman was hit by a car in a road traffic accident. Local county hospital considered that her right knee was injured, but didn't find any sign of fracture from X-ray imaging. Then the hospital gave diagnosis of soft tissue contusion and the patient started to exercise with burden 21 days after her right lower limb was fixed by plaster slab. Four months later, she had to go back to the county hospital for recheck due to persistent pain on her right knee. Then, the right tibia outer plateau fracture was found. The patient rejected the advice of open reduction and internal fixation of right tibia plateau fracture. Instead, she accepted the unicompartmental knee arthroplasty in a hospital affiliated to a medical college. The patient felt the knee pain alleviated after surgery However, the joint dysfunction was aggravated even more. The patient used the legal procedure for personal compensation. Both driver and the insurance company disputed that the final consequence of the injured knee was due to not only the traffic accident, but also poor medical practice involved. Therefore the court consigned us to make judicial judgment of expertise. After investigation, we found the earliest X-ray graph after the accident had shown the fracture of right tibia outer plateau and right knee valgum, with articular surface involvement, and the traffic accident was considered as the primary cause of sequelae. At the same time, the county hospital missed the diagnosis of fracture, and led to insufficient fixation of right lower limb, which was not good for rehabilitation from fracture and joint injury. This was the secondary cause of sequelae. Additionally, instead of the standard therapy, the affiliated hospital of medical college made the unicompartmental knee arthroplasty four months later, which also had a little defect. It was the minor reason for the result. PMID:22391004

  20. Radiological Stability after Revision of Infected Total Knee Arthroplasty Using Modular Metal Augments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Jae; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Son, Eun-Seok; Jung, Jae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the radiological stability according to the number of modular augments after revision of infected total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Materials and Methods Between February 2006 and September 2013, 37 patients (39 knees) followed ≥2 years after revision of infected TKA using modular metal augments for bone defects were reviewed retrospectively. We divided the patients into 3 groups according to the number of augments into group A (≤2 augments, 14 knees), group B (3–4 augments, 18 knees), and group C (5≥ augments, 7 knees) and evaluated the width of radiolucent zones around the implant at the last follow-up. Results There were 3 Anderson Orthopedic Research Institute type I, 33 type II, and 3 type III bone defects. The mean number of radiolucent zones of group A was 3 and the sum of width averaged 4.4 mm. In group B, the values were 4.8 and 6.2 mm, respectively. In group C, the values were 8.1 and 12.9 mm, respectively. The differences between the three groups were statistically significant. Conclusions In revision TKA with modular metal augmentation caused by infected TKA, increased modularity can result in radiological instability. PMID:26955613

  1. Faster recovery without the use of a tourniquet in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Anders C; Kappel, Andreas; Laursen, Mogens B; Jakobsen, Thomas; Rasmussen, Sten; Nielsen, Poul Torben

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Tourniquet application is still a common practice in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery despite being associated with several adverse effects. We evaluated the effects of tourniquet use on functional and clinical outcome and on knee range of motion (ROM). Patients and methods 70 patients who underwent TKA were randomized into a tourniquet group (n = 35) and a non-tourniquet group (n = 35). All operations were performed by the same surgeon and follow-up was for 1 year. Primary outcomes were functional and clinical outcomes, as evaluated by KOOS and knee ROM. Secondary outcomes were intraoperative blood loss, surgical time and visibility, postoperative pain, analgesic consumption, and transfusion requirements. Results Patients in the non-tourniquet group showed a better outcome in all KOOS subscores and better early knee ROM from surgery to week 8. No difference was detected at the 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Postoperative pain and analgesic consumption were less when a tourniquet was not used. Surgical time and visibility were similar between groups. Intraoperative blood loss was greater when not using a tourniquet, but no postoperative transfusions were required. Interpretation This study shows that TKA without the use of a tourniquet results in faster recovery in terms of better functional outcome and improved knee ROM. Furthermore, reduced pain and analgesic use were registered and no intraoperative difficulties were encountered. PMID:24954487

  2. The influence of component alignment on patellar kinematics in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Keshmiri, Armin; Maderbacher, Günther; Baier, Clemens; Sendtner, Ernst; Schaumburger, Jens; Zeman, Florian; Grifka, Joachim; Springorum, Hans R

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Postoperative anterior knee pain is one of the most frequent complications after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Changes in patellar kinematics after TKA relative to the preoperative arthritic knee are not well understood. We compared the patellar kinematics preoperatively with the kinematics after ligament-balanced navigated TKA. Patients and methods We measured patellar tracking before and after ligament-balanced TKA in 40 consecutive patients using computer navigation. Furthermore, the influences of different femoral and tibial component alignment on patellar kinematics were analyzed using generalized linear models. Results After TKA, the patellae shifted statistically significantly more laterally between 30° and 60°. The lateral tilt increased at 90° of flexion whereas the epicondylar distance decreased between 45° and 75° of flexion. Sagittal component alignment, but not rotational component alignment, had a significant influence on patellar kinematics. Interpretation There are major differences in patellar kinematics between the preoperative arthritic knee and the knee after TKA. Combined sagittal component alignment in particular appears to have a major effect on patellar kinematics. Surgeons should be especially aware of altering preoperative sagittal alignment until the possible clinical relevance has been investigated. PMID:25582349

  3. Total Knee Arthroplasty for Post-Traumatic Proximal Tibial Bone Defect: Three Cases Report

    PubMed Central

    Tigani, D; Dallari, D; Coppola, C; Ben Ayad, R; Sabbioni, G; Fosco, M

    2011-01-01

    Bone stock deficiency in primary as well as in revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) represents a difficult problem to surgeon with regard to maintaining proper alignment of the implant components and in establishing a stable bone-implant interface. Different surgical procedures are available in these situations, for instances the use of bone cement, prosthetic augments, custom implant, and wire mesh with morsellized bone grafting and structural bone allograft. Structural allograft offers a numerous advantages as easy remodeling and felling cavitary or segmental defects, excellent biocompatibility, bone stock restoration and potential for ligamentous reattachment. In this article we report a short term result of three cases affected by severe segmental medial post/traumatic tibial plateau defect in arthritic knee, for which massive structural allograft reconstruction and primary total knee replacement were carried. The heights of the bone defect were between 27-33 mm and with moderate medio-lateral knee instability. Pre-operative AKS score in three cases was 30, 34 and 51 points consecutively and improved at the last follow-up to 83, 78 and 85 consecutively. No acute or chronic complication was observed. Last radiological exam referred no signs of prosthetic loosening, no secondary resorption of bone graft and well integrated graft to host bone. These results achieved in our similar three cases have confirmed that the structural bone allograft is a successful biological material to restore hemi-condylar segmental tibial bone defect when total knee replacement is indicated. PMID:21584202

  4. Parecoxib prevents early postoperative cognitive dysfunction in elderly patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yang-Zi; Yao, Rui; Zhang, Zhe; Xu, Hui; Wang, Li-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Trial design neuroinflammation and postoperative pain after surgery are increasingly reported in association with postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). Parecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, is used for postoperative analgesia for its potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. This study aimed to evaluate parecoxib's effects on POCD in elderly patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Methods: Around 134 elderly patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty were randomly divided into parecoxib (group P) and control (group C) groups, and treated with parecoxib sodium and saline, respectively, shortly after induction of general anesthesia and 12-h postsurgery, respectively. Perioperative plasma IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and C-reactive protein (CRP) 1evels were measured. Postoperative pain was assessed following surgery. Neuropsychological tests were performed before surgery, and 1 week and 3 months postoperation. Results: POCD incidence in group P was significantly lower compared with that of group C at 1 week after surgery (16.7% vs 33.9%; P < 0.05); no significant difference was found between groups C and P at 3-month follow-up (9.7% vs 6.7%). Compared with group C values, visual analog pain scale (VAS) scores at 3, 6, and 12 hours after surgery were significantly lower in group P(P < 0.05). Plasma IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α levels were lower in group P than in group C after the operation (P < 0.05). No significant difference in the plasma CRP level was found between groups P and C. Conclusions: Parecoxib sodium decreases POCD incidence after total knee arthroplasty in elderly patients and may explain how this drug suppresses inflammation and acute postoperative pain caused by surgical trauma. PMID:27428192

  5. The Quality of Life (QOL) after Total Knee Arthroplasties among Saudi Arabians: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Omran, Abdallah S.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is commonly performed in Saudi Arabia but there is very limited published data on outcome and quality of life (QOL) post Knee arthroplasty. To assess the QOL post TKA we performed this retrospective study. Methods: Total Knee arthroplasty was started in mid- 2000’s at the university hospital. Fifty–two patients of TKA who came for follow up during the study period were asked to fill a pre-determined questionnaire and clinical examination, were included in the study. Patients were assessed and at 2 parameters pre and postoperative time-points, for pain [1-9], walking [1-9] and asked whether they would recommend the procedure to their relatives and friends, and finally whether they were satisfied with the outcome. Results: We interviewed 52 patients (9 males and 43 females), mean age of 64.75 ± 7.90 years. Twenty (34.50%) had bilateral TKR, and the rest single sided. The preoperative night pain was 7.72 ± 2.03 compared to postoperative 1.92 ± 1.41 (P<0.001 (5.80 and < 6.47) and pain at walking was 8.39 ± 0.77 versus 2.39 ± 2.05 (P<0.001(5.40 and < 6.55). The overall satisfaction 93% (8.37 ± 1.32) and QOL as assessed preoperatively was 3.60 ± 2.15 and postoperatively was 8.41  ±  1.27 (P<0.001 (4.81and 4.13). Fifty-one (98.07%) patients indicated that they will recommend the procedure to others. Conclusions: The overall satisfaction and improvement of QOL in male patients was 93.77% and female patients 92.77% and all patients indicated that they will recommend others to undergo the similar procedure to improve their QOL. PMID:25324701

  6. [Single use custom made instrumentation, the future of total knee arthroplasty?].

    PubMed

    Spaltenstein, Maaike; Allami, Behrang; Gardon, Roland; Jolles, Brigitte M

    2014-12-17

    It is expected that the number of total knee arthroplasties should be multiplied by 7 in twenty years. Until now, this procedure required a large number of surgical trays. Three-dimensional preoperative planning, persona-lized cutting guides, and disposable instrumentation kits can now help to optimize this procedure by providing a unique single-use surgical kit per patient. This type of instrumentation leads to improvements in precision, operative time, turnover time, sterilization and maintenance costs, and could help reduce infectious risks. This technology is a step towards personalized orthopedic surgery, and opens new perspectives on a future with implants entirely customized for each patient. PMID:25752014

  7. Review article: Treatments for bone loss in revision total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yi Yan; Yan, Chun Hoi; Chiu, Kwong Yuen; Ng, Fu Yuen

    2012-04-01

    Bone deficiency hinders implant alignment and stabilisation of the bone-implant interface in revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Treatments for bone defects include bone cement, bone cement with screw reinforcement, metal augments, impaction bone grafts, structural allografts, and tantalum, depending on the location and size of the defects. Small defects are usually treated with cement, cement plus screws, or impaction allograft bone. Large defects are repaired with structural allografts or metal augments. Recent developments involve the use of highly porous osteoconductive tantalum. We reviewed the pros and cons of each method for bone defect management in revision TKA. PMID:22535817

  8. [Research progress of polyethylene inserts wear measurement and evaluation in total knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Wang, Chuan; Fan, Yubo

    2015-01-01

    Wear of polyethylene (PE) tibial inserts is a significant cause of implant failure of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). PE inserts wear measurement and evaluation is the key in TKA researches. There are many methods to measure insert wear. Qualitative methods such as observation are used to determine the wear and its type. Quantitative methods such as gravimetric analysis, coordinate measuring machines (CMM) and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) are used to measure the mass, volume and geometry of wear. In this paper, the principle, characteristics and research progress of main insert wear evaluation method were introduced and the problems and disadvantages were analyzed. PMID:26027291

  9. Mid-term outcomes of primary constrained condylar knee arthroplasty for severe knee deformity.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiao-Bo; Yang, Cao; Fu, De-Hao; Ye, Shu-Nan; Liu, Xian-Zhe; Chen, Zhe; Rai, Saroj; Yang, Shu-Hua

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to examine the clinical and radiographic outcomes of primary total knee arthroplasy (TKA) with use of NexGen® Legacy® Constrained Condylar Knee (CCK) prosthesis for severe knee deformity. Clinical data of 46 patients (48 knees in total, aged 61 years on average) with severe knee deformity who underwent TKA with NexGen® Legacy® CCK prosthesis between December 2007 and February 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. There were 34 knees with severe valgus with incompetent medial collateral ligament, 11 knees with severe flexion contracture with inability to achieve knee balancing in flexion and extension by posterior soft tissue release, 2 knees with Charcot arthritis with severe varus and bone loss, and 1 with traumatic osteoarthritis with severe varus and ligamentous instability. The mean duration of follow-up was 71 months (range 40-90 months). The New Knee Society scoring (NKSS) system and the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) score were used to evaluate the functional and clinical outcomes. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was used for pain measurement and Knee Society criteria for evaluation of radiological images. The results showed that, in the total 48 knees, 1 case of loosening due to short-stem tibial component at 3 months post-operatively underwent revision. The 6-year prosthesis survival rate in this cohort was 97.9%. There was no component infection occurring within 6 years. Significant post-operative improvements were found in NKSS and HSS scores. Patient satisfaction was significantly increased. Pain score was decreased significantly. Total functional score was improved from 31.46±11.43 to 86.42±8.87, range of motion (ROM) from 42.42°±23.57° to 95.31°±23.45° and the flexion contracture from 5.31°±7.87° to 0.92°±1.80°. Preoperative radiographic study showed excessive valgus (≥7°) in 37 knees, and varus deformity in 3 knees. Post-operative femorotibial alignment was valgus 3.88°±1.76° in 48 knees. Antero/posterior (A

  10. Fabella Syndrome as an Uncommon Cause of Posterolateral Knee Pain after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Eriko; Yanai, Takaji; Kohyama, Sho; Kanamori, Akihiro; Yamazaki, Masashi; Tanaka, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    The fabella is a sesamoid bone that is located in the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle and has been identified on magnetic resonance imaging in 31% of Japanese people. In the present case, a 65-year-old woman experienced posterolateral knee pain, accompanied by a clicking “sound” during active knee flexion, after undergoing total knee arthroplasty for knee osteoarthritis. Eight months of conservative therapy failed to produce an improvement, with progressive osteoarthritic change of the fabella identified on plain radiography. Based on this evidence, a diagnosis of fabella syndrome was made and the patient underwent a fabellectomy. Fabellectomy provided immediate resolution of posterolateral knee pain and the clicking sound with knee flexion, with the patient remaining symptom-free 18 months after fabellectomy and with no limitations in knee function. Fabellectomy eliminated symptoms in all of five case reports that have been previously published and is regarded as an effective first choice for treating fabella syndrome after total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27418991

  11. Use of a New Knee Prosthesis as an Articulating Spacer in Two-Stage Revision of Infected Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Fabrin, Jesper; Poulsen, Klaus; Schroder, Henrik Morville

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report our experience with two-stage revision using a new femoral component (NFC) spacer (Depuy Synthes) as an articulating spacer. Materials and Methods In this retrospective study, we reviewed 22 two-stage revisions that were performed using an NFC spacer in 22 patients suspected of having an infected total knee arthroplasty (TKA) from December 2010 to March 2013. The result was considered successful when eradication of infection was achieved using only one NFC spacer. Results The average time from primary TKA to the first stage procedure was 29.1 months and the average time from the first stage procedure until the final second stage procedure was 12.7 weeks. The average range of motion increased from 82° preoperatively to 104° postoperatively. The American Knee Society Knee score increased from 29.3 points to 66 points. The Function score increased from 29.5 points to 64 points. Four cases were reinfected after two-stage revision. The mean follow-up was 37.6 months. Conclusions The new articulating spacer showed promising short-term results both with regard to eradication of infection and functional improvement. PMID:27595079

  12. Capturing orthopaedic surgical site infection data and assessing dental recommendations with respect to total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Florschutz, Anthony V; Parsley, Brian S; Shapiro, Irving M

    2015-04-01

    Greater documentation of patient history and clinical course is crucial for identifying factors that can influence surgical outcomes. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have already begun public reporting of hospital data on readmission, complication, and infection rates and will soon launch a website to make physician-specific outcomes data public. The orthopaedic community has the opportunity to lead the way in ensuring that adequate and accurate data is collected to facilitate appropriate comparisons that are based on patients' true risk of complications and the complexity of treatment. Several studies have reported a link between oral pathogens and periprosthetic infection, although it remains unclear whether organisms unique to dental tissues are also present in osteoarthritic joints and tissues affected by periprosthetic joint infection. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the American Dental Association are aware of these concerns and have created guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis in patients who have undergone total hip or knee arthroplasty and require high-risk dental procedures. Because these guidelines have received considerable criticism, recommendations that are based on scientific and case-controlled clinical studies and provide effective guidance on this important subject are needed. PMID:25808970

  13. Extensor Mechanism Disruption after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Series and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Extensor mechanism disruption following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a rare but devastating complication. These patients may require revision of the implants, but even then, it may not be possible to restore the normal function of the knee after the disruption. The patterns of extensor mechanism disruption can broadly be classified into three types: suprapatellar (quadriceps tendon rupture), transpatellar (patellar fracture), or infrapatellar (patellar tendon rupture). Infrapatellar tendon ruptures are the worst injuries, as they carry maximum morbidity and are challenging to manage. The disruption of the extensor mechanism may occur either intra-operatively or in the immediate postoperative period due to an injury. The treatment of extensor mechanism complications after TKA may include either nonsurgical management or surgical intervention in the form of primary repair or reconstruction with autogenous, allogeneic, or synthetic substitutes. We have provided an algorithm for the management of extensor mechanism disruption after TKA. PMID:27004156

  14. Can cementing technique reduce the cost of a primary total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Aditya V; Argawal, Mayank; Naziri, Qais; Pivec, Robert; Mont, Michael A; Rasquinha, Vijay J

    2015-06-01

    Studies on cost containment of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) have generated substantial interest over the past decade. Although multiple studies have evaluated the various intraoperative methods to control cost, no prior study has evaluated the economic impact and the clinical outcome based on amount of bone cement needed for a primary TKA. At a minimum of 3 years follow-up, we observed no difference in implant survivorship or Knee Society scores, but did observe substantial cost savings when one versus two packets of bone cement were used in combination with a hand mixing technique. By eliminating several extra cement mixing products, we achieved an approximately $1,000 cost saving per case with no difference in clinical outcomes at midterm follow-up. PMID:24752922

  15. Posterior cruciate-retaining versus posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bercik, Michael J; Joshi, Ashish; Parvizi, Javad

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this meta-analysis was to compare outcomes of posterior cruciate-retaining and posterior stabilized prostheses. A computerized literature search was conducted to identify randomized controlled trials comparing the clinical outcomes of cruciate-retaining and posterior-stabilized designs. The table of contents of four major Orthopaedic journals and the references section of two arthroplasty text books were reviewed to identify other relevant studies. Ultimately, 1114 patients (1265 knees) were compared. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference in flexion and range of motion in favor of posterior-stabilized knees, but no difference in complication rates. The clinical importance of this remains unknown. The decision to use one design versus the other should rest with the surgeon's preference and comfort with a particular design. PMID:23433255

  16. Outcomes of a Newer-Generation Cementless Total Knee Arthroplasty Design.

    PubMed

    Harwin, Steven F; Elmallah, Randa K; Jauregui, Julio J; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Mont, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Newer-generation cementless total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) aim to improve durability, function, and longevity. In a large series of cementless TKAs at a mean 4-year follow-up, the authors evaluated (1) survivorship, (2) range of motion, (3) patient-reported outcomes, and (4) complications. Mean age was 66 years (range, 34-88 years) and mean body mass index was 32.5 kg/m(2) (range, 20-54 kg/m(2)). Aseptic and septic implant survivorships were 99.6% and 99.5%, respectively. Mean extension, flexion, and Knee Society scores improved significantly. There were 3 septic failures. Aseptic failures included 3 aseptic loosenings, 1 polyethylene revision, and 1 revision to a cemented patella. This study showed excellent clinical and patient-reported outcomes of cementless TKA. PMID:26488775

  17. Long-Term Survivorship and Clinical Outcomes Following Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, Julio J; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Pierce, Todd P; Beaver, Walter B; Issa, Kimona; Mont, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is one of the most successful commonly performed orthopedic procedures; as such, the purpose was to assess the long-term outcomes and survivorship of primary TKAs with a dual-radius prosthesis. We evaluated 125-patients (145-knees), with a mean age of 63 years (37-90 years) for a mean 11-year follow-up (10-13 years). Outcomes were assessed with KSS, UCLA, SF-36, satisfaction scores, and aseptic survivorship analysis. At 10-year follow-up, the UCLA (6-points), KSS objective (84-points) and functional (73-points), SF-36 physical (41-points) and mental (51-points), and patient satisfaction (14-points) scores were reported to be good to excellent. The 10-year Kaplan-Meier survivorship rate was 99%; one TKA demonstrated radiographic loosening. At a minimum 10-year follow-up, this device demonstrated satisfactory outcomes and outstanding aseptic-survivorship rates. PMID:26100473

  18. Radiographic Evaluations of Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Plea for Uniform Assessments.

    PubMed

    Elmallah, Randa K; Scuderi, Giles R; Jauregui, Julio J; Meneghini, R Michael; Dennis, Doug A; Backstein, David B; Bourne, Robert B; Mont, Michael A

    2015-11-01

    Thorough radiographic evaluation is necessary for perioperative assessments in revision total knee arthroplasty. There has been a large degree of variability in reporting these findings within the peer-reviewed literature. Our purpose was to evaluate studies that radiographically assessed alignment in the coronal and sagittal plane, patella alignment and thickness, presence and characterization of implant interface, and radiolucency. Secondly, we reviewed studies using a standardized reporting system to evaluate radiographic findings (the Knee Society Roentgenographic Evaluation and Scoring System) and the number of times it was referenced. Only 62% of studies evaluated all radiographic parameters, 57% to 91% assessed each metric, and 55% used standardized reporting systems. This emphasizes the need for a uniform evaluation method to ensure consistent radiographic assessment and optimal standard of care. PMID:26364904

  19. Cemented total knee arthroplasty using a modern prosthesis in young patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Gavan P; Crowder, Amy R; Trousdale, Robert R; Berry, Daniel J

    2007-09-01

    Fifty-two consecutive cemented total knee arthroplasties were performed using the Press-Fit Condylar (DePuy, Warsaw, Ind) knee system on patients aged 55 years or younger at Mayo Clinic Rochester from 1988 to 1994. Patients were followed for a minimum of 10 years, with an average follow-up of 12 years (range, 10-15 years). There were 8 total revisions (15%), including 2 revisions before 10 years, one for sepsis at 1 year, and one for instability at 8 years. Six revisions occurred between 10 and 15 years, all associated with polyethylene wear and osteolysis. Implant survival rate was estimated to be 96% at 10 years and 85% at 15 years of follow-up. PMID:17823019

  20. Intra-Articular Giant Heterotopic Ossification following Total Knee Arthroplasty for Charcot Arthropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tsuge, Shintaro; Aoki, Yasuchika; Sonobe, Masato; Shibata, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Yu; Nakagawa, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Although the Charcot arthropathy may be associated with serious complications, total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the preferred choice of treatment by patients. This case report presents an 80-year-old man with intra-articular giant heterotopic ossification following loosening of femoral and tibial implants and femoral condylar fracture. He had undergone TKA because of Charcot neuropathy seven years ago and had been doing well since. Immediately after a left knee sprain, he became unable to walk. Because he had developed a skin ulcer on his left calf where methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was detected, we postponed revision surgery until the ulcer was completely healed. While waiting, intra-articular bony fragments grew larger and formed giant heterotopic ossified masses. Eventually, the patient underwent revision surgery, and two major ossified masses were carefully and successfully extirpated. It should be noted that intra-articular heterotopic giant ossification is a significant complication after TKA for neuropathic arthropathy. PMID:24151574

  1. Total knee arthroplasty using cementless keels and cemented tibial trays: 10-year results

    PubMed Central

    Kolisek, Frank R.; Mont, Michael A.; Seyler, Thorsten M.; Marker, David R.; Jessup, Nenette M.; Siddiqui, Junaed A.; Monesmith, Eric

    2008-01-01

    The problem of early mechanical stability of cemented and cementless keels of the tibial component in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is controversial. The purpose of this study was to assess clinical and radiographic outcomes of a cohort of 51 TKAs using a cemented platform with cementless keel fixation. At a mean follow-up of 10.4 years (range, 7 to 14 years), the mean Knee Society Score (KSS) was 93 points (range, 59 to 100 points), and the mean functional score was 73 points (range, 0 to 100 points). Only one patient demonstrated progressive tibial radiolucencies at 13.1 years follow-up, which resolved with a revision with an exchange of components. The results of this study suggest that a proximally cemented tibial tray with a press-fit keel TKA provides excellent mean 10-year outcomes. PMID:18185931

  2. Examination of knee joint moments on the function of knee-ankle-foot orthoses during walking.

    PubMed

    Andrysek, Jan; Klejman, Susan; Kooy, John

    2013-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate clinically relevant biomechanical conditions relating to the setup and alignment of knee-ankle-foot orthoses and the influence of these conditions on knee extension moments and orthotic stance control during gait. Knee moments were collected using an instrumented gait laboratory and concurrently a load transducer embedded at the knee-ankle-foot orthosis knee joint of four individuals with poliomyelitis. We found that knee extension moments were not typically produced in late stance-phase of gait. Adding a dorsiflexion stop at the orthotic ankle significantly decreased the knee flexion moments in late stance-phase, while slightly flexing the knee in stance-phase had a variable effect. The findings suggest that where users of orthoses have problems initiating swing-phase flexion with stance control orthoses, an ankle dorsiflexion stop may be used to enhance function. Furthermore, the use of stance control knee joints that lock while under flexion may contribute to more inconsistent unlocking of the stance control orthosis during gait. PMID:23182738

  3. Gap Arthroplasty versus Interpositional Arthroplasty for Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junli; Liang, Limin; Jiang, Hua; Gu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gap arthroplasty (GA) and interpositional arthroplasty (IA) are widely used for the treatment of temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA). However, controversy remains as to whether IA is superior to GA. PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Web of science and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure were searched for literature regarding these procedures (published from 1946 to July 28, 2014). A study was included in this analysis if it was: (1) a randomized controlled trial or non-randomized observational cohort study; (2) comparing the clinical outcomes between GA and IA with respect to the maximal incisal opening (MIO) and reankylosis; (3) with a follow-up period of at least 12 months. The methodological quality of the included studies was evaluated according to the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale Eight non-randomized observational cohort studies with 272 patients were included. All the statistical analyses were performed using the RevMan 5.3 and Stat 12. The pooled analysis showed no significant difference in the incidence of reankylosis between the IA group (13/120) and the GA group (29/163) (RR= 0.67, 95% CI=0.38 to 1.16; Z=1.43, p=0.15). The IA group showed a significantly larger MIO than the GA group (MD=1.96, 95% CI=0.21 to 3.72, Z=2.19, p=0.03, I2=0%). In conclusion, patients with TMJA could benefit more from IA than GA, with a larger MIO and a similar incidence of reankylosis. IA shows to be an adequate option in the treatment of TMJA based on the results of maximal incisal opening. PMID:26010224

  4. Preoperative physiotherapy and short-term functional outcomes of primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Mohd Shukry Mat Eil @; Sharifudin, Mohd Ariff; Shokri, Amran Ahmed; Rahman, Shaifuzain Ab

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Physiotherapy is an important part of rehabilitation following arthroplasty, but the impact of preoperative physiotherapy on functional outcomes is still being studied. This randomised controlled trial evaluated the effect of preoperative physiotherapy on the short-term functional outcomes of primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS 50 patients with primary knee osteoarthritis who underwent unilateral primary TKA were randomised into two groups: the physiotherapy group (n = 24), whose patients performed physical exercises for six weeks immediately prior to surgery, and the nonphysiotherapy group (n = 26). All patients went through a similar physiotherapy regime in the postoperative rehabilitation period. Functional outcome assessment using the algofunctional Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) scale and range of motion (ROM) evaluation was performed preoperatively, and postoperatively at six weeks and three months. RESULTS Both groups showed a significant difference in all algofunctional KOOS subscales (p < 0.001). The mean score difference at six weeks and three months was not significant in the sports and recreational activities subscale for both groups (p > 0.05). Significant differences were observed in the time-versus-treatment analysis between groups for the symptoms (p = 0.003) and activities of daily living (p = 0.025) subscales. No significant difference in ROM was found when comparing preoperative measurements and those at three months following surgery, as well as in time-versus-treatment analysis (p = 0.928). CONCLUSION Six-week preoperative physiotherapy showed no significant impact on short-term functional outcomes (KOOS subscales) and ROM of the knee following primary TKA. PMID:26996450

  5. Clinical Evaluation of a Mobile Sensor-Based Gait Analysis Method for Outcome Measurement after Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Calliess, Tilman; Bocklage, Raphael; Karkosch, Roman; Marschollek, Michael; Windhagen, Henning; Schulze, Mareike

    2014-01-01

    Clinical scores and motion-capturing gait analysis are today's gold standard for outcome measurement after knee arthroplasty, although they are criticized for bias and their ability to reflect patients' actual quality of life has been questioned. In this context, mobile gait analysis systems have been introduced to overcome some of these limitations. This study used a previously developed mobile gait analysis system comprising three inertial sensor units to evaluate daily activities and sports. The sensors were taped to the lumbosacral junction and the thigh and shank of the affected limb. The annotated raw data was evaluated using our validated proprietary software. Six patients undergoing knee arthroplasty were examined the day before and 12 months after surgery. All patients reported a satisfactory outcome, although four patients still had limitations in their desired activities. In this context, feasible running speed demonstrated a good correlation with reported impairments in sports-related activities. Notably, knee flexion angle while descending stairs and the ability to stop abruptly when running exhibited good correlation with the clinical stability and proprioception of the knee. Moreover, fatigue effects were displayed in some patients. The introduced system appears to be suitable for outcome measurement after knee arthroplasty and has the potential to overcome some of the limitations of stationary gait labs while gathering additional meaningful parameters regarding the force limits of the knee. PMID:25171119

  6. Incidence and Risk Factors for Falling in Patients after Total Knee Arthroplasty Compared to Healthy Elderly Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hiromi; Okuno, Makoto; Nakamura, Tatsuhiko; Yamamoto, Kichizo; Osaki, Mari; Hagino, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Background It is possible that patients who have undergone total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are at a high risk of falling. However, there are insufficient data to confirm the incidence and risk factors for falling in patients after TKA compared with healthy elderly counterparts. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the incidence and risk factors for falling in patients after TKA compared to the age- and gender-matched healthy elderly. Methods Subjects who underwent TKA consisted of 252 patients over 60 years of age. Controls were 150 healthy elderly individuals over 60 years of age living independently in the community. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to patients after TKA and a similar questionnaire was distributed to the controls by investigators during the town-sponsored healthy aging program. The questionnaire included questions for ambulatory ability, functional status in daily living, knee pain, other joint pain and information on falls. Results Self-administered questionnares were returned by 192 of the 252 patients (76.1%) and 146 of the 150 controls (97.3%). Age and gender matching was performed for respondents between 70 and 80 years of age. There were 81 patients and 80 controls who fulfilled the inclusion criteria, and all of them agreed to participate. In the previous year, 34 of the 81 patients (38.2%) fell. The incidence of falls was significantly higher in patients than controls (23.8%, P = 0.041). In controls, ability to stand up from a chair without using the arms and restriction from joining social activities due to knee pain showed the strongest association with recent falls. In patients, self-reported kyphosis showed the strongest association with recent falls. Conclusion Patients after TKA are more likely to fall than the general Japanese population. Kyphosis showed the strongest association with recent falls in patients after TKA, which was different from the results obtained in the healthy elderly. PMID:25901101

  7. Computer Assisted Total Knee Arthroplasty: Does it Make a Difference?

    PubMed Central

    HARITINIAN, Emil G.; PIMPALNERKAR, Ashvin L.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The longevity of total knee prostheses depends mostly on the correct alignment (frontal, sagittal and axial) of the prosthetic components, soft tissue balancing and restoring the mechanical axis of the lower limb. The use of computer-assisted navigation allows more accurate and reproducible restoration of mechanical axis and component positioning, better results in patients with extra-articular deformities and it has an important role in surgical training. Better alignment should lead to an improved functional outcome and an increased long-term survival of the prosthesis. Several studies have proven an improved function in the short and mid-term but we still lack long-term data regarding functional outcome and longevity of the prostheses. PMID:24371482

  8. [Synovial hemangioma of the knee joint. A case report].

    PubMed

    Lassoued, S; Billey, T; Ould-Henia, A; Aziz-Alaoui, M; Fardou, H; Jacobzone, D

    2002-11-01

    Synovial hemangioma of the knee joint was diagnosed in a young woman 15 years after the first signs. The principal clinical manifestation involved repeated episodes of hemorrhagic joint effusion. MRI is the exploration of choice for this vascular tumor of the synovial membrane, although a pathology study is needed to confirm the diagnosis. Cure is achieved with surgical resection. PMID:12457119

  9. Arthroscopic technique of interposition arthroplasty of the glenohumeral joint.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Deepak N; van Rooyen, Karin S; du Toit, Donald F; de Beer, Joe F

    2006-05-01

    Arthroscopic glenohumeral interposition arthroplasty is performed with the patient placed in the lateral decubitus position. Standard posterior, anterior, and anterosuperior portals are created, a routine diagnostic arthroscopy is performed, and the joint is débrided with the use of an arthroscopic shaver. An arthroscopic burr is used to resect prominent osteophytes, to alter the version of the glenoid if necessary, and to create microfractures on the glenoid surface. Next, 3 absorbable sutures are passed percutaneously with a 30 degrees angled suture grasper from 3 different sites posteriorly through the posterior capsular-labral tissue and into the anterior portal cannula, where they are isolated by means of the suture saver kit. The prepared interposition membrane/tissue (GRAFTJACKET Regenerative Tissue Matrix, Wright Medical Technology, Inc., Arlington, TN) is tagged with the 3 sutures in the anterior cannula before it is introduced into the joint. Three additional sutures are attached to the membrane anteriorly at 1, 3, and 5 o'clock positions and are isolated with suture savers. The membrane is next introduced into the joint through the anterior cannula and is aligned with the glenoid rim. The anterior sutures are rerouted through the anterior capsular-labral tissue with a 70 degrees angled suture grasper, and they are retrieved through the anterior cannula. Intra-articular nonsliding knots are used anteriorly to anchor the interposition tissue to the anterior glenoid labrum and capsule. The posterior sutures are knotted intra-articularly, or they may be tied extra-articularly; the proximal and distal posterior sutures are retrieved subcutaneously out through the skin tract of the posterior portal and are knotted with the suture present in this portal, with the use of nonsliding knots. Stability of the interposition tissue is assessed by movement of the glenohumeral joint through its entire range of motion. The postoperative protocol consists of early

  10. [Scorpio TS prosthesis in severe deformity and revision knee arthroplasty--preliminary report].

    PubMed

    Kowalczewski, Jacek; Marczak, Dariusz; Wielopolski, Aleksander; Milecki, Marcin; Okoń, Tomasz

    2009-01-01

    Authors present early results of Scorpio TS prosthesis in primary and revision total knee arthoplasty due to aseptic and septic loosening. 26 arthroplasties were performed on 25 patients. There were 19 women and 6 men of age from 37 to 80 (average 68.4 years). 11 patients from this group were operated because of septic loosening. The follow up from 2 to 22 months (average 11 months). Early results were access according to Clinical Rating System of The Knee Society: 19 patients had very good and good (73%) including primaries, 1 satisfactory (4%) and 6 poor (23%) results. The satisfactory and poor results were obtained in 7 cases with septic loosening who had had four or more previous operations on the knee. Four of them had instability of prosthesis and we changed it for MRH type. In one case due to reinfection and sepsis amputation above the knee was performed. In another patient tibia fracture below stem and loosening of tibial component occurs after 6 months of revision. ORIF gave fracture union after 8 months and exchange Scorpio TS to MRH was performed. In two cases the wound problems occurred and was solved. There were no reinfection and aseptic loosening in another cases. We didn't notice any thrombosis complications. PMID:20201329

  11. [Rotational malalignment of the components may cause chronic pain or early failure in total knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Hofmann, S; Romero, J; Roth-Schiffl, E; Albrecht, T

    2003-06-01

    Rotational alignment of the tibial and femoral component plays an important role in modern total knee replacement surgery. After correct frontal alignment and proper soft tissue balancing, the rotational placement of the components represents the "third dimension" in knee endoprosthetic surgery. Improved surgical techniques with modified instruments and better rotational component positioning will lead to better functional outcomes. Patients with painful total knee arthroplasties (TKA) or early failure without evident classic implantation failures or signs of infection should be evaluated for malrotation of the components. In a prospective study in 26 patients with painful TKA and malrotation of the tibia and/or femur component, revision surgery with exchange of the components was performed. Twenty-five cases showed clinically relevant internal malrotation of the tibial component (ø 8.4 degrees ) and/or femoral component (ø 5.6 degrees ). Only one patient had 10 degrees of external malrotation of the femoral component. Combined malrotations of the tibia and femur were found in ten knees (38%). After revision surgery and correction of malrotations, 20 patients (78%) were scored with excellent and good results. Patients with painful TKA resistant to conservative therapy and evident malrotations of the component should be considered for revision surgery with change of the malrotated components. PMID:12819885

  12. Cementless total knee arthroplasty with Profix: a 8- to 10-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Hardeman, François; Vandenneucker, Hilde; Van Lauwe, Johan; Bellemans, Johan

    2006-12-01

    A consecutive series of 115 cementless Profix (Smith and Nephew, Memphis, USA) Total Knee Arthroplasties performed in 113 patients were followed in order to determine the functional results and survivorship at 8 to 10 years. All patients were included in a prospective database and were reviewed annually until final follow-up. Patients overall satisfaction was excellent or good in 91.3% of cases. The mean Knee Society's knee and function scores increased respectively from 49.3 and 36.7 preoperatively to 93.1 and 82.2 postoperatively. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of implant survival at 10 years was 97.1%. Two patients underwent revision and were considered as failures. One patient had a fracture of the medial condyle at 4 days post-surgery, and the other was revised for aseptic loosening of the tibial component at 6 years post-surgery. On the basis of this long-term follow-up study, we can conclude that the Profix Total Knee System is effective and safe. PMID:17064905

  13. Antibiotic-impregnated articulating cement spacer for infected total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Parag; Ranjan, Rajeev; Bandyopadhyay, Utpal; Chouksey, Shiv; Mitra, SR; Gupta, Samar K

    2011-01-01

    Background: Standard treatment of chronic infected total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a two-stage revision, the first step being placement of an antibiotic-impregnated cement spacer. Here we describe the results of a new technique (modification of the Goldstien's technique) for intraoperative manufacture of a customized articulating spacer at minimal cost and with relatively good conformity and longevity. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six infected knees underwent this procedure from June 2002 to May 2007. The technique consists of using the freshened femur and tibia interface as molds wrapped in a tin foil for manufacturing the two components of the spacer with antibiotic-impregnated methyl methycrylate cement. We used the spacer and the femoral component of the trial set of a TKA system to mold them to perfect articulation. We also reinforced the spacer with a K-wire scaffold to prevent fracture of the cement mantle in the last 21 cases. Results: All 36 knees showed excellent results in terms of infection control, mobility, and stability. There was significant improvement in the WOMAC and Knee Society Scores (20 and 39 points respectively). There were two fractures of the spacers in the initial 15 cases that did not have K-wire scaffolding but none in the last 21 that had reinforcement. Conclusion: This technique provides a more conforming spacer, with good range of motion and stability. The reinforcement helps in preventing the fracture of the cement mantle and is cost effective. PMID:22144747

  14. Soft tissue balancing in varus total knee arthroplasty: an algorithmic approach.

    PubMed

    Verdonk, Peter C M; Pernin, Jerome; Pinaroli, Alban; Ait Si Selmi, Tarik; Neyret, Philippe

    2009-06-01

    We present an algorithmic release approach to the varus knee, including a novel pie crust release technique of the superficial MCL, in 359 total knee arthroplasty patients and report the clinical and radiological outcome. Medio-lateral stability was evaluated as normal in 97% of group 0 (deep MCL), 95% of group 1 (pie crust superficial MCL) and 83% of group 2 (distal superficial MCL). The mean preoperative hip-knee angle was 174.0, 172.1, and 169.5 and was corrected postoperatively to 179.1, 179.2, and 177.6 for groups 0, 1, and 2, respectively. A satisfactory correction in the coronal plane was achieved in 82.9% of all-comers falling within the 180 degrees +/- 3 degrees interval. An algorithmic release approach can be beneficial for soft tissue balancing. In all patients, the deep medial collateral ligament should be released and otseophytes removed. The novel pie crust technique of the superficial MCL is safe, efficient and reliable, provided a medial release of 6-8 mm or less is required. The release of the superficial MCL on the distal tibia is advocated in severe varus knees. Preoperative coronal alignment is an important predictor for the release technique, but should be combined with other parameters such as reducibility of the deformity and the obtained gap asymmetry. PMID:19290507

  15. An Examination of the Effects of Pre-Surgical Education on Patient Expectations in Total Knee Arthroplasties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montez-Ray, Natasha Dawn

    2011-01-01

    As patients prepare for total-knee arthroplasty surgery, they have numerous expectations related to their long-term recovery and function. This research discerned whether the use of a pre-surgical patient education class with an additional long-term expectation module addressing recovery during the first 12 months after surgery was more effective…

  16. Biomechanics of the knee joint: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, S

    1993-01-01

    The literature concerning kinematic and kinetic studies on the knee joint is comprehensively reviewed in this article. Also reviewed are studies of etiology and operative treatment of injury, as well as chronic disease such as dislocation, arthritis, and ligamentous rupture. This paper formulates experimental study and mathematical model analysis of the tibio-femoral and patello-femoral joints, respectively. The sections on experimental study cover the following: the tibio-femoral joint including load bearing capacity, knee laxity, ligamentous strain, articular geometry, and multiaxial movement; the patello-femoral joint including forces and stresses and patellar tracking patterns. Further, three items, considered as future problems, are discussed briefly: individual variations in material properties of the soft tissue and biphasic cartilage-bone structures, quantitative description of bone geometry, and quantitative determination of extreme tensions and distortions in connective tissues surrounding the knee. PMID:8243091

  17. The Modified Static Spacers Using Antibiotic-Impregnated Cement Rod in Two-Stage Revision for Infected Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Juhyung; Lee, Seungyup; Han, Changdong

    2011-01-01

    The two-stage exchange arthroplasty (one- or two-stage) is believed to be the gold standard for the management of infections following total knee arthroplasty. We herein report a novel two-stage exchange arthroplasty technique using an antibiotic-impregnated cement intramedullary nail, which can be easily prepared during surgery using a straight thoracic tube and a Steinmann pin, and may provide additional stability to the knee to maintain normal mechanical axis. In addition, there is less pain between the period of prosthesis removal and subsequent reimplantation. Less soft tissue contracture, less scar adhesion, easy removal of the cement intramedullary nail, and successful infection control are the advantages of this technique. PMID:21909473

  18. Wound dressings for primary and revision total joint arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhry, Madhav

    2015-01-01

    Background Preventing post-surgical complications after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) is of great importance, and application of an appropriate wound dressing is necessary. Since no dressing encompasses all the parameters required for ideal wound healing, a comparison of the available dressing types can assist the surgeon to choose the best dressing after TJA. Methods Studies evaluating postoperative wound dressings after TJA were reviewed in order to assess the outcomes, complications and costs associated with dressing types. Results Traditional cotton dressings have a high ability to absorb exudate. However, they dry out sooner and there is a risk of pain and additional trauma during dressing changes. Although vapor permeable dressings allow transmission of moisture, but they have low absorptive capacity and require frequent changes even with moderately exudating wounds. On the other hand, hydrofiber and hydrocolloid dressings have high absorptive capacity and permeability, and can cope with exudate production. They are changed less often and have low blistering rates, which may reduce surgical site infection (SSI). Although the unit cost associated with advanced dressings is much higher than the traditional dressings, the decreased rate of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) and the cost associated with treating PJI more than compensate for it. Conclusions Choice of dressing type after TJA should depend upon permeability, absorptive capacity, documented rate of SSI and cost effectiveness with its use, apart from a surgeon’s past clinical experience and familiarity. PMID:26605314

  19. Intra-articular injection of tranexamic acid reduce blood loss in cemented total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Digas, G; Koutsogiannis, I; Meletiadis, G; Antonopoulou, E; Karamoulas, V; Bikos, Ch

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of intravenous and topical tranexamic acid (TXA) versus control group for reduction in blood loss following primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A total of 90 patients were prospectively allocated to each of three groups (control, intravenous IV and intra-articular) and underwent unilateral total knee arthroplasty. In the IV group, patients received one dose of TXA of 15 mg/kg before deflation of the tourniquet, while in the intra-articular group patients received 2 g TXA via the drain retrogradely after closure of the wound. The mean drained blood loss in control, IV and intra-articular groups was 415 ± 24, 192 ± 21 and 121 ± 17 ml, respectively. About 43 % (control), 23 % (IV) and 17 % (intra-articular) of each group required transfusion, and the mean transfusion was 338, 168 and 79 ml, respectively. Preoperative hemoglobin values decreased at 24 h by 2.80 ± 0.14, 2.24 ± 0.17 and 2.26 ± 0.18 mg/dl, respectively. TXA reduced blood loss and transfusion requirement. Compared with one-dose intravenous administration, intra-articular administration of TXA seems to be more effective in terms of reducing drained blood loss and transfusion frequency. We recommend administration of topical TXA in primary TKA in healthy patients to decrease perioperative blood loss. PMID:26169991

  20. Postoperative Pain Control for Total Knee Arthroplasty: Continuous Femoral Nerve Block Versus Intravenous Patient Controlled Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Rui Min; Lim Tey, John Boon; Chua, Nicholas Hai Liang

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pain after total knee arthroplasty is severe and impacts functional recovery. Objectives: We performed a retrospective study, comparing conventional patient control analgesia (PCA) modalities versus continuous femoral nerve blockade (CFNB) for 1582 post-TKA (total knee arthroplasty) patients. Patients and Methods: Using our electronic acute pain service (APS) database, we reviewed the data of 579 patients who had received CFNBs compared with 1003 patients with intravenous PCA over 4 years. Results: Our results show that the incidence of a severe pain episode was higher in the PCA compared with the CFNB group. Lower pain scores were observed in the CFNB group compared with the PCA group from postoperative day (POD) 1 to 3, primarily due to lower rest pain scores in the CFNB group. Conclusions: Our study shows that there is improvement in pain scores, at rest and on movement, as well as a reduction in incidence of severe pain, in patients who receive CFNB versus those who receive intravenous PCA. PMID:24904807

  1. Morsellized bone grafting compensates for femoral bone loss in revision total knee arthroplasty. An experimental study.

    PubMed

    van Loon, C J; de Waal Malefijt, M C; Verdonschot, N; Buma, P; van der Aa, A J; Huiskes, R

    1999-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the contribution of uncontained morsellized bone graft to the structural properties of a femoral reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty and to serve as a basis for an in vivo animal study. Ten human distal femora with a standard unicondylar uncontained medial bone defect were prepared to fit a femoral component of a cruciate sacrificing TKA. A cyclic axial load of 750 N was applied to the medial part of the femoral component in the presence of impacted morsellized bone graft. After removal of the bone graft, the cyclic loading was repeated for the unsupported situation. None of the grafts collapsed and all cement mantles stayed intact during the experiments. Elastic deformation during cyclic loading was significantly less when graft was added while time-dependent deformation was not affected. We conclude that impacted morsellized bone graft, used for reconstruction of uncontained femoral bone loss in revision knee arthroplasty, may improve the structural resistance against loading. Further animal experimentation for in vivo application is warranted. PMID:9916775

  2. Bibliometric Analysis of Orthopedic Literature on Total Knee Arthroplasty in Asian Countries: A 10-year Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Sang Hwa; Bamne, Ankur B.; Chowdhry, Madhav; Chae, Ihn Seok

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to determine the quantity and quality of research output of selected Asian countries in the field of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in the last 10 years. Materials and Methods Top 15 Asian countries were selected according to their gross domestic product. The Science Citation Index Expanded database was used to search for the literature published between 2004 and 2013 using "Total Knee Arthroplasty". The numbers of articles, journals and citations and the contribution of each country were analyzed. The articles were classified according to the type of study and the relative proportion of each type was analyzed. Results Asian surgeons have increasingly contributed to orthopedic literature on TKA for the past 10 years, but the dominant contribution came from only a few countries. The total number of articles published by Asian countries increased by 261%, with Japan producing most of the studies and China showing the maximum growth rate. The majority of studies were published in low impact factor journals. Korea published the highest proportion of articles in high impact factor journals. Clinical papers were most frequent. Conclusions Our identification of research productivity pertaining to TKA among Asian countries gives a unique insight into the level of academic research in the field of TKA in these countries. There is a need to improve the quality of research to enhance the publishing power in high impact journals as well as the need for more basic research and epidemiological studies considering the unique differences among Asian patients undergoing TKA. PMID:26389067

  3. Tranexamic acid for the reduction of blood loss in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Journal of Arthroplasty recently published a paper entitled “The Efficacy of Combined Use of Intraarticular and Intravenous Tranexamic Acid on Reducing Blood Loss and Transfusion Rate in Total Knee Arthroplasty”. Tranexamic acid (TXA) is an antifibrinolytic drug whose administration during the perioperative period either by intravenous route or topically applied to the surgical field has been shown to reliably reduce blood loss and need for transfusion in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Although randomized trials and meta-analyses did not show an increase in thromboembolic events, concerns remain about its repeated systemic application. The authors of the study introduced a novel regimen of TXA administration combining a preoperative intravenous bolus followed by local infiltration at the end of surgery with the idea of maximizing drug concentration at the surgical site while minimizing systemic antifibrinolytic effects. The combined dosage regimen appears to be more effective than single dose local application in reducing blood loss and transfusion rate without any complications noted. PMID:26046088

  4. Development of a Wearable Assist Robot for Walk Rehabilitation After Knee Arthroplasty Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, H.; Zhu, Y.; Horiguchi, K.; Nakamura, M.; Takahashi, R.

    In Japan, it is popular that the disease knee joints will be replaced to artificial joints by surgery. And we have to assist so many patients for walk rehabilitation. So, the wearable assist robot has been developed. This robot includes the knee motion assist mechanism and the hip joint support mechanism. Especially, the knee motion assist mechanism consists of a non-circular gear and grooved cams. This mechanism rotates and slides simultaneously, which has two degree-of-freedom. Also, the hip joint support mechanism consists of a hip brace and a ball-joint. This mechanism can avoid motion constraints which are the internal or external rotation and the adduction or abduction. Then, the control algorithm, which considers an assisting timing for the walk rehabilitation, has been proposed. A sensing system of a walk state for this control system uses a heel contacts sensor and knee and hip joint rotation angle sensors. Also, the prototype robot has been tested. And it is confirmed that the assisting system is useful.

  5. Mini-midvastus total knee arthroplasty in patients with severe varus deformity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Chen; Kuo, Feng-Chih; Huang, Chung-Chen; Wang, Jun-Wen

    2015-02-01

    Patients with severe varus deformity of the knee (≥15° varus) usually are not considered good candidates for minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The goal of this study was to retrospectively investigate outcomes in patients with severe varus deformity after minimally invasive TKA. A study group of 52 patients with a tibiofemoral mechanical axis of 195° or greater was compared with a matched control group of 55 patients with a tibiofemoral mechanical axis of less than 195°. Clinical and radiographic evaluations according to the American Knee Society rating system were obtained preoperatively and postoperatively, and postoperative patient satisfaction in the 2 groups was compared. All patients were followed at a mean of 3 years (range, 2-5 years). Preoperatively, clinical knee and function scores and range of motion were inferior in the study group compared with the control group (P<.001). However, at the latest follow-up, both groups of patients were satisfied with the clinical results, and no significant differences were found in the knee and function scores (P>.05). Radiographic evaluation showed no differences in the mechanical axis, femoral component valgus angle, and tibial component valgus angle, and all outliers of the radiographic parameters between the 2 groups postoperatively (P >.05). The study results showed that mini-midvastus TKA did not result in more inaccurate implant positioning in patients with severe varus deformity of the knee. The clinical outcome in the group with severe varus was comparable to that in the group with less severe varus PMID:25665115

  6. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BIOMECHANICAL ASYMMETRIES DURING A STEP UP AND OVER TASK AND STAIR CLIMBING AFTER TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, Federico; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Zeni, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients six months after total knee arthroplasty demonstrate movement asymmetries and functional deficits, which may be related to poor functional performance. The aims of this study were to 1) compare biomechanical variables between subjects 6 months after total knee arthroplasty and an agematched healthy control group during a step up and over task and 2) determine the relationship between quadriceps strength, movement patterns and stair climbing performance. Methods Twenty patients 6 months following unilateral total knee arthroplasty and twenty healthy controls were enrolled. Participants completed questionnaires, isometric quadriceps strength testing and performance based tests to quantify functional performance. Motion analysis was performed during a step up and over task. Functional and biomechanical variables were analyzed using a 2×2 ANOVA. The symmetry ratios (operated/non-operated limb *100) for biomechanical variables were analyzed using independent t-tests. Pearson correlations were performed to determine the relationships between biomechanical variables, strength and stair climbing performance. Findings In the TKA group, subjects had lower peak moments, power and sagittal plane excursion in the operated knee compared to the contralateral knee (p < .05), while the hip on the operated side had greater power generation (p = .014). Compared to the control group, all symmetry ratios were significantly lower in the surgical group (p < .05). Stair climbing time was correlated with quadriceps strength of the operated limb (R=−0.762, p<0.001). Interpretation Individuals 6 months after total knee arthroplasty had worse performance with respect to biomechanics, quadriceps strength, and performance-based tests. Biomechanical asymmetries after TKA reduce the demand on the operated knee and increase reliance on the contralateral limb and ipsilateral hip. PMID:25467765

  7. Orthopaedic Enhanced Recovery Programme for Elective Hip and Knee Arthroplasty – Could a Regional Programme be Beneficial?

    PubMed Central

    McCusker, Darren; Gupta, Nidhi; Bunn, Jonathon; Murnaghan, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Arthroplasty is commonplace in orthopaedic practice, and post operative pain has been shown to substantially hinder recovery and discharge from hospital. Objectives The current study assessed a multidisciplinary, multimodal Orthopaedic ERP in terms of its effect on patient perceived post operative pain in hip and knee arthroplasty. Secondary outcome was in the form of a cost analysis. Methods A prospective study was performed on consecutive arthroplasty patients across a 6 week period in a district orthopaedic unit. A multidisciplinary approach to devising an ERP was undertaken between anaesthetists, surgeons and physiotherapists. Domains included optimising pre-operative nutrition, anaesthetic pre-meds, standardised anaesthetic technique, standardised intra-operative technique and use of locally infiltrated anaesthetic (LIA), as well as a post operative pain regimen. The multidisciplinary team (MDT) involved physiotherapy for the patient on day 0. Demographic data, day 1 and day 2 post operative subjective pain scores using an analogue scale were recorded. Data was collated and analysed using appropriate statistical methods. A p-value of <0.05 was considered significant. Results A total of 40 patients (25 total hip replacements and 15 total knee replacements) were included. All conformed to the ERP. Reductions in patient reported pain scores were observed. Specifically, in total hip arthroplasty (THA), day 1 scores were not significantly improved (p=0.25), however day 2 scores improved significantly (p=0.02). For total knee arthroplasty (TKA), both day 1 and day 2 scores improved significantly (p=0.02 & p<0.001, respectively) Analgesic requirements were not significantly different between hip and knee replacements. Early mobilization occurred in 95% of patients. Length of stay was reduced significantly in hip (1.8 days, p=0.003) and knee (1.9 days(p<0.001) replacements following ERP. Cost analysis demonstrated a potential annual saving of

  8. Recent Advances in Computational Mechanics of the Human Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, M.; Dabiri, Y.; Li, L. P.

    2013-01-01

    Computational mechanics has been advanced in every area of orthopedic biomechanics. The objective of this paper is to provide a general review of the computational models used in the analysis of the mechanical function of the knee joint in different loading and pathological conditions. Major review articles published in related areas are summarized first. The constitutive models for soft tissues of the knee are briefly discussed to facilitate understanding the joint modeling. A detailed review of the tibiofemoral joint models is presented thereafter. The geometry reconstruction procedures as well as some critical issues in finite element modeling are also discussed. Computational modeling can be a reliable and effective method for the study of mechanical behavior of the knee joint, if the model is constructed correctly. Single-phase material models have been used to predict the instantaneous load response for the healthy knees and repaired joints, such as total and partial meniscectomies, ACL and PCL reconstructions, and joint replacements. Recently, poromechanical models accounting for fluid pressurization in soft tissues have been proposed to study the viscoelastic response of the healthy and impaired knee joints. While the constitutive modeling has been considerably advanced at the tissue level, many challenges still exist in applying a good material model to three-dimensional joint simulations. A complete model validation at the joint level seems impossible presently, because only simple data can be obtained experimentally. Therefore, model validation may be concentrated on the constitutive laws using multiple mechanical tests of the tissues. Extensive model verifications at the joint level are still crucial for the accuracy of the modeling. PMID:23509602

  9. Results of a Second-generation Constrained Condylar Prosthesis in Complex Primary and Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Mean 5.5-Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Chen-Yi; Xue, De-Ting; Jiang, Shuai; He, Rong-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background: The application of second-generation constrained condylar knee (CCK) prostheses has not been widely studied. This retrospective study was carried out to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of a second-generation CCK prosthesis for complex primary or revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods: In total, 51 consecutive TKAs (47 patients) were performed between June 2003 and June 2013 using second-generation modular CCK prostheses. The follow-up was conducted at 3rd day, 1st, 6th, and 12th months postoperatively and later annually. Anteroposterior (