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Sample records for knee pain randomised

  1. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... the front of your knee around the kneecap Torn ligament. An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, or ... into your knee, swelling, or an unstable knee. Torn cartilage (a meniscus tear ). Pain felt on the ...

  2. Exercise in children with joint hypermobility syndrome and knee pain: a randomised controlled trial comparing exercise into hypermobile versus neutral knee extension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knee pain in children with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS) is traditionally managed with exercise, however the supporting evidence for this is scarce. No trial has previously examined whether exercising to neutral or into the hypermobile range affects outcomes. This study aimed to (i) determine if a physiotherapist-prescribed exercise programme focused on knee joint strength and control is effective in reducing knee pain in children with JHS compared to no treatment, and (ii) whether the range in which these exercises are performed affects outcomes. Methods A prospective, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial conducted in a tertiary hospital in Sydney, Australia compared an 8 week exercise programme performed into either the full hypermobile range or only to neutral knee extension, following a minimum 2 week baseline period without treatment. Randomisation was computer-generated, with allocation concealed by sequentially numbered opaque sealed envelopes. Knee pain was the primary outcome. Quality of life, thigh muscle strength, and function were also measured at (i) initial assessment, (ii) following the baseline period and (iii) post treatment. Assessors were blinded to the participants’ treatment allocation and participants blinded to the difference in the treatments. Results Children with JHS and knee pain (n=26) aged 7-16 years were randomly assigned to the hypermobile (n=12) or neutral (n=14) treatment group. Significant improvements in child-reported maximal knee pain were found following treatment, regardless of group allocation with a mean 14.5 mm reduction on the visual analogue scale (95% CI 5.2 – 23.8 mm, p=0.003). Significant differences between treatment groups were noted for parent-reported overall psychosocial health (p=0.009), specifically self-esteem (p=0.034), mental health (p=0.001) and behaviour (p=0.019), in favour of exercising into the hypermobile range (n=11) compared to neutral only (n=14). Conversely, parent

  3. Efficacy of acupuncture for chronic knee pain: protocol for a randomised controlled trial using a Zelen design

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic knee pain is a common and disabling condition in people over 50 years of age, with knee joint osteoarthritis being a major cause. Acupuncture is a popular form of complementary and alternative medicine for treating pain and dysfunction associated with musculoskeletal conditions. This pragmatic Zelen-design randomised controlled trial is investigating the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of needle and laser acupuncture, administered by medical practitioners, in people with chronic knee pain. Methods/Design Two hundred and eighty two people aged over 50 years with chronic knee pain have been recruited from metropolitan Melbourne and regional Victoria, Australia. Participants originally consented to participate in a longitudinal natural history study but were then covertly randomised into one of four treatment groups. One group continued as originally consented (ie natural history group) and received no acupuncture treatment. The other three were treatment groups: i) laser acupuncture, ii) sham laser or, iii) needle acupuncture. Acupuncture treatments used a combined Western and Traditional Chinese Medicine style, were delivered by general practitioners and comprised 8–12 visits over 12 weeks. Follow-up is currently ongoing. The primary outcomes are pain measured by an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS) and self-reported physical function measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster (WOMAC) Universities Osteoarthritis Index subscale at the completion of treatment at 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes include quality of life, global rating of change scores and additional measures of pain (other NRS and WOMAC subscale) and physical function (NRS). Additional parameters include a range of psychosocial measures in order to evaluate potential relationships with acupuncture treatment outcomes. Relative cost-effectiveness will be determined from health service usage and outcome data. Follow-up assessments will also occur at 12 months. Discussion The

  4. Knee pain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... front of the knee can be due to bursitis, arthritis, or softening of the patella cartilage as ... knee. Overall knee pain can be due to bursitis, arthritis, tears in the ligaments, osteoarthritis of the ...

  5. Combined chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine for painful knee osteoarthritis: a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, non-inferiority trial versus celecoxib

    PubMed Central

    Hochberg, Marc C; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Monfort, Jordi; Möller, Ingrid; Castillo, Juan Ramón; Arden, Nigel; Berenbaum, Francis; Blanco, Francisco J; Conaghan, Philip G; Doménech, Gema; Henrotin, Yves; Pap, Thomas; Richette, Pascal; Sawitzke, Allen; du Souich, Patrick; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare the efficacy and safety of chondroitin sulfate plus glucosamine hydrochloride (CS+GH) versus celecoxib in patients with knee osteoarthritis and severe pain. Methods Double-blind Multicentre Osteoarthritis interVEntion trial with SYSADOA (MOVES) conducted in France, Germany, Poland and Spain evaluating treatment with CS+GH versus celecoxib in 606 patients with Kellgren and Lawrence grades 2–3 knee osteoarthritis and moderate-to-severe pain (Western Ontario and McMaster osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) score ≥301; 0–500 scale). Patients were randomised to receive 400 mg CS plus 500 mg GH three times a day or 200 mg celecoxib every day for 6 months. The primary outcome was the mean decrease in WOMAC pain from baseline to 6 months. Secondary outcomes included WOMAC function and stiffness, visual analogue scale for pain, presence of joint swelling/effusion, rescue medication consumption, Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OMERACT-OARSI) criteria and EuroQoL-5D. Results The adjusted mean change (95% CI) in WOMAC pain was −185.7 (−200.3 to −171.1) (50.1% decrease) with CS+GH and −186.8 (−201.7 to −171.9) (50.2% decrease) with celecoxib, meeting the non-inferiority margin of −40: −1.11 (−22.0 to 19.8; p=0.92). All sensitivity analyses were consistent with that result. At 6 months, 79.7% of patients in the combination group and 79.2% in the celecoxib group fulfilled OMERACT-OARSI criteria. Both groups elicited a reduction >50% in the presence of joint swelling; a similar reduction was seen for effusion. No differences were observed for the other secondary outcomes. Adverse events were low and similarly distributed between groups. Conclusions CS+GH has comparable efficacy to celecoxib in reducing pain, stiffness, functional limitation and joint swelling/effusion after 6 months in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis, with a good safety profile. Trial

  6. Short-term efficacy of physical interventions in osteoarthritic knee pain. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised placebo-controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Bjordal, Jan M; Johnson, Mark I; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo AB; Bogen, Bård; Chow, Roberta; Ljunggren, Anne E

    2007-01-01

    Background Treatment efficacy of physical agents in osteoarthritis of the knee (OAK) pain has been largely unknown, and this systematic review was aimed at assessing their short-term efficacies for pain relief. Methods Systematic review with meta-analysis of efficacy within 1–4 weeks and at follow up at 1–12 weeks after the end of treament. Results 36 randomised placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) were identified with 2434 patients where 1391 patients received active treatment. 33 trials satisfied three or more out of five methodological criteria (Jadad scale). The patient sample had a mean age of 65.1 years and mean baseline pain of 62.9 mm on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS). Within 4 weeks of the commencement of treatment manual acupuncture, static magnets and ultrasound therapies did not offer statistically significant short-term pain relief over placebo. Pulsed electromagnetic fields offered a small reduction in pain of 6.9 mm [95% CI: 2.2 to 11.6] (n = 487). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS, including interferential currents), electro-acupuncture (EA) and low level laser therapy (LLLT) offered clinically relevant pain relieving effects of 18.8 mm [95% CI: 9.6 to 28.1] (n = 414), 21.9 mm [95% CI: 17.3 to 26.5] (n = 73) and 17.7 mm [95% CI: 8.1 to 27.3] (n = 343) on VAS respectively versus placebo control. In a subgroup analysis of trials with assumed optimal doses, short-term efficacy increased to 22.2 mm [95% CI: 18.1 to 26.3] for TENS, and 24.2 mm [95% CI: 17.3 to 31.3] for LLLT on VAS. Follow-up data up to 12 weeks were sparse, but positive effects seemed to persist for at least 4 weeks after the course of LLLT, EA and TENS treatment was stopped. Conclusion TENS, EA and LLLT administered with optimal doses in an intensive 2–4 week treatment regimen, seem to offer clinically relevant short-term pain relief for OAK. PMID:17587446

  7. Duloxetine in OsteoArthritis (DOA) study: study protocol of a pragmatic open-label randomised controlled trial assessing the effect of preoperative pain treatment on postoperative outcome after total hip or knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Blikman, T; Rienstra, W; van Raaij, T M; ten Hagen, A J; Dijkstra, B; Zijlstra, W P; Bulstra, S K; van den Akker-Scheek, I; Stevens, M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Residual pain is a major factor in patient dissatisfaction following total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty (THA/TKA). The proportion of patients with unfavourable long-term residual pain is high, ranging from 7% to 34%. There are studies indicating that a preoperative degree of central sensitisation (CS) is associated with poorer postoperative outcomes and residual pain. It is thus hypothesised that preoperative treatment of CS could enhance postoperative outcomes. Duloxetine has been shown to be effective for several chronic pain syndromes, including knee osteoarthritis (OA), in which CS is most likely one of the underlying pain mechanisms. This study aims to evaluate the postoperative effects of preoperative screening and targeted duloxetine treatment of CS on residual pain compared with care-as-usual. Methods and analysis This multicentre, pragmatic, prospective, open-label, randomised controlled trial includes patients with idiopathic hip/knee OA who are on a waiting list for primary THA/TKA. Patients at risk for CS will be randomly allocated to the preoperative duloxetine treatment programme group or the care-as-usual control group. The primary end point is the degree of postoperative pain 6 months after THA/TKA. Secondary end points at multiple time points up to 12 months postoperatively are: pain, neuropathic pain-like symptoms, (pain) sensitisation, pain catastrophising, joint-associated problems, physical activity, health-related quality of life, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and perceived improvement. Data will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the local Medical Ethics Committee (METc 2014/087) and will be conducted according to the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki (64th, 2013) and the Good Clinical Practice standard (GCP), and in compliance with the Medical Research Involving Human Subjects Act (WMO). Trial registration number 2013-004313-41; Pre

  8. Total knee replacement with and without patellar resurfacing: a prospective, randomised trial using the profix total knee system.

    PubMed

    Smith, A J; Wood, D J; Li, M-G

    2008-01-01

    We have examined the differences in clinical outcome of total knee replacement (TKR) with and without patellar resurfacing in a prospective, randomised study of 181 osteoarthritic knees in 142 patients using the Profix total knee system which has a femoral component with features considered to be anatomical and a domed patellar implant. The procedures were carried out between February 1998 and November 2002. A total of 159 TKRs in 142 patients were available for review at a mean of four years (3 to 7). The patients and the clinical evaluator were blinded in this prospective study. Evaluation was undertaken annually by an independent observer using the knee pain scale and the Knee Society clinical rating system. Specific evaluation of anterior knee pain, stair-climbing and rising from a seated to a standing position was also undertaken. No benefit was shown of TKR with patellar resurfacing over that without resurfacing with respect to any of the measured outcomes. In 22 of 73 knees (30.1%) with and 18 of 86 knees (20.9%) without patellar resurfacing there was some degree of anterior knee pain (p = 0.183). No revisions related to the patellofemoral joint were performed in either group. Only one TKR in each group underwent a re-operation related to the patellofemoral joint. A significant association between knee flexion contracture and anterior knee pain was observed in those knees with patellar resurfacing (p = 0.006). PMID:18160498

  9. Anterior Knee Pain (Chondromalacia Patellae).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrick, James G.

    1989-01-01

    This article presents a pragmatic approach to the definition, diagnosis, and management of anterior knee pain. Symptoms and treatment are described. Emphasis is on active involvement of the patient in the rehabilitation exercise program. (IAH)

  10. Single-blinded, randomised preliminary study evaluating the effects of 2 Hz electroacupuncture for postoperative pain in patients with total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Chung-Yuh; Chang, Shih-Liang; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chang, Chu-Ling; Chen, Wen-Gii; Tong, Kwok-Man; Huang, Kui-Chou; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the point-specific clinical effect of 2 Hz electroacupuncture (EA) in treating postoperative pain in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA), Methods In a randomised, partially single-blinded preliminary study, 47patients with TKA were randomly divided into three groups: control group (CG, n=17) using only patient-controlled analgesia (PCA); EA group (EAG, n=16) with 2 Hz EA applied at ST36 (Zusanli) and GB34 (Yanglingquan) contralateral to the operated leg for 30 min on the first two postoperative days, also receiving PCA; and non-point group (NPG, n=14), with EA identical to the EAG except given 1 cm lateral to both ST36 and GB34. The Mann–Whitney test was used to show the difference between two groups and the Kruskal–Wallis test to show the difference between the three groups. Results The time until patients first required PCA in the CG was 34.1±22.0 min, which was significantly shorter than the 92.0±82.7 min in the EAG (p<0.001) and 90.7±94.8 min in the NPG (p<0.001); there was no difference between the EAG and NPG groups (p>0.05). The total dosage of PCA solution given was 4.6±0.9 mL/kg body weight in the CG, 4.2±1.0 mL/kg in the EAG and 4.5±1.0 mL/kg in the NPG; there were no significant differences (p>0.05) among the three groups. Conclusions In this small preliminary study, EA retarded the first demand for PCA in comparison with no EA. No effect was seen on the total dosage of PCA required and no point-specific effect was seen. PMID:25910930

  11. Anterior knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... places extra stress on the kneecap (such as running, jumping or twisting, skiing, or playing soccer). You ... noticeable with: Deep knee bends Going down stairs Running downhill Standing up after sitting for awhile

  12. The Painful Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Mitchell; Park, Andrew; Gerlinger, Tad L

    2016-04-01

    There are many causes of residual pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Evaluation and management begins with a comprehensive history and physical examination, followed by radiographic evaluation of the replaced and adjacent joints, as well as previous films of the replaced joint. Further workup includes laboratory analysis, along with a synovial fluid aspirate to evaluate the white blood cell count with differential as well as culture. Advanced imaging modalities may be beneficial when the diagnosis remains unclear. Revision surgery is not advisable without a clear diagnosis, as it may be associated with poor results. PMID:26772940

  13. Comparison of hip and knee muscle moments in subjects with and without knee pain.

    PubMed

    Manetta, Jennifer; Franz, Laura Hayden; Moon, Chris; Perell, Karen L; Fang, Meika

    2002-12-01

    Elderly subjects with and without knee pain walked at a comfortable pace during gait analysis. Comparison of peak hip and knee internal extensor generalized muscle moments (GMMs) during loading response was made between groups. Walking velocity, peak hip internal extensor GMM, and knee range of motion (ROM) were significantly less for the group with knee pain than for the group without pain. Peak hip internal extensor GMM was strongly correlated with velocity, but peak knee internal extensor GMM was not. Knee ROM limitations may account for the increased peak knee internal extensor GMM in the knee pain group. PMID:12443949

  14. The effectiveness of hyaluronic acid intra-articular injections in managing osteoarthritic knee pain

    PubMed Central

    Anand, A

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a common and progressive joint disease. Treatment options for knee OA vary from simple analgesia in mild cases to knee replacement for advanced disease. Knee pain due to moderate OA can be targeted with intra-articular injections. Steroid injections have been used widely in managing acute flare-ups of the disease. In recent years, viscosupplementation has been used as a therapeutic modality for the management of knee OA. The principle of viscosupplementation is based on the physiological properties of the hyaluronic acid (HA) in the synovial joint. Despite a sound principle and promising in vitro studies, clinical studies have been less conclusive on the effectiveness of HA in managing osteoarthritic knee pain. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness of HA intra-articular injections in the management of osteoarthritic knee pain. Methods A systematic review of the literature was performed using MEDLINE®, Embase™ and CINAHL® (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature). The databases were searched for randomised controlled trials available on the effectiveness of HA intra-articular injections in managing osteoarthritic knee pain. Results The search yielded 188 studies. Of these, 14 met the eligibility criteria and were reviewed in chronological order. Conclusions HA intra-articular injections have a modest effect on early to moderate knee OA. The effect peaks at around 6–8 weeks following administration, with a doubtful effect at 6 months. PMID:24165334

  15. Anterior knee pain following primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shervin, David; Pratt, Katelyn; Healey, Travis; Nguyen, Samantha; Mihalko, William M; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2015-01-01

    Despite improvements in technique and technology for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), anterior knee pain impacts patient outcomes and satisfaction. Addressing the prosthetic and surgical technique related causes of pain after TKA, specifically as it relates to anterior knee pain, can aid surgeons in addressing these issues with their patients. Design features of the femoral and patellar components which have been reported as pain generators include: Improper femoral as well as patellar component sizing or designs that result in patellofemoral stuffing; a shortened trochlear groove distance from the flange to the intercondylar box; and then surgical technique related issues resulting in: Lateral patellar facet syndrome; overstuffed patella/flange combination; asymmetric patellar resurfacing, improper transverse plane component rotation resulting in patellar subluxation/tilt. Any design consideration that allows impingement of extensor mechanism anatomical elements has the possibility of impacting outcome by becoming a pain generator. As the number of TKA procedures continues to increase, it is increasingly critical to develop improved, evidence based prostheses that maximize function and patient satisfaction while minimizing pain and other complications. PMID:26601061

  16. Knee Pain in Children: Part I: Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Michael

    2016-01-01

    • On the basis of primarily consensus, due to lack of relevant clinical studies, the information obtained from the history and physical examination is the key to establishing a diagnosis and directing initial management of knee pain. • By applying history and physical examination findings to a diagnosis and management algorithm, clinicians can efficiently and effectively determine the potential cause of the knee pain. • On the basis of primarily consensus, due to lack of relevant clinical studies, the most important step of the evaluation of knee pain is to identify emergent conditions, including limb- and life-threatening conditions (eg, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and malignancy), hip pathology, or conditions associated with effusions. PMID:26729778

  17. Techniques for assessing knee joint pain in arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Volker; Han, Jeong S; Adwanikar, Hita; Fu, Yu; Ji, Guangchen

    2007-01-01

    The assessment of pain is of critical importance for mechanistic studies as well as for the validation of drug targets. This review will focus on knee joint pain associated with arthritis. Different animal models have been developed for the study of knee joint arthritis. Behavioral tests in animal models of knee joint arthritis typically measure knee joint pain rather indirectly. In recent years, however, progress has been made in the development of tests that actually evaluate the sensitivity of the knee joint in arthritis models. They include measurements of the knee extension angle struggle threshold, hind limb withdrawal reflex threshold of knee compression force, and vocalizations in response to stimulation of the knee. A discussion of pain assessment in humans with arthritis pain conditions concludes this review. PMID:17391515

  18. A randomised controlled trial comparing skin closure in total knee arthroplasty in the same knee: nylon sutures versus skin staples

    PubMed Central

    Iamthanaporn, K.; Hongnaparak, T.; Tangtrakulwanich, B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Nylon sutures and skin staples are used commonly in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgical wound closure. However, there is no study that compares the wound healing efficacy and patient satisfaction scores of both techniques in the same knee. Methods We randomised 70 patients who underwent primary TKA into two groups. In one group of 34 patients, the skin at the upper half of the wound was closed with skin staples and the lower half of the wound was closed with simple interrupted nylon sutures. In the other group of 36 patients, the skin at the upper half of the wound was closed with nylon stitches and the lower half of the wound was closed with skin staples. We recorded the wound closure time, pain score at the time of stitch removal, wound complication rate, patient satisfaction score, and the Hollander wound evaluation score at the post-operative periods of five days, 14 days, six weeks, three months, and six months. Each half wound was analysed separately. Results The mean patient body mass index was 26.8 kg/m2 (standard deviation 6.3). A total of 70 nylon stitched wounds and 70 skin stapled wounds were analysed. There were no significant differences in wound complication rates, patient satisfaction score, and the Hollander wound evaluation score between both types of wounds (p > 0.05). The wound closure time for skin stapled wounds was significantly lower than the nylon stitched wounds (p < 0.001). However, the skin stapled wounds had a significantly higher pain score at the time of stitch removal (p < 0.001). Conclusion Skin staples and nylon stitches had comparable results with respect to wound healing and patient satisfaction in TKA wound closure in non-obese patients. The benefit of skin staples over nylon stitches was a decrease in operative time, but was more painful upon removal. Cite this article: V. Yuenyongviwat. A randomised controlled trial comparing skin closure in total knee arthroplasty in the same knee: nylon sutures versus skin

  19. Spa therapy in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: a large randomised multicentre trial

    PubMed Central

    Forestier, R; Desfour, H; Tessier, J-M; Françon, A; Foote, A M; Genty, C; Rolland, C; Roques, C-F; Bosson, J-L

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether spa therapy, plus home exercises and usual medical treatment provides any benefit over exercises and usual treatment, in the management of knee osteoarthritis. Methods Large multicentre randomised prospective clinical trial of patients with knee osteoarthritis according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria, attending French spa resorts as outpatients between June 2006 and April 2007. Zelen randomisation was used so patients were ignorant of the other group and spa personnel were not told which patients were participating. The main endpoint criteria were patient self-assessed. All patients continued usual treatments and performed daily standardised home exercises. The spa therapy group also received 18 days of spa therapy (massages, showers, mud and pool sessions). Main Endpoint The number of patients achieving minimal clinically important improvement (MCII) at 6 months, defined as ≥19.9 mm on the visual analogue pain scale and/or ≥9.1 points in a normalised Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index function score and no knee surgery. Results The intention to treat analysis included 187 controls and 195 spa therapy patients. At 6 months, 99/195 (50.8%) spa group patients had MCII and 68/187 (36.4%) controls (χ2=8.05; df=1; p=0.005). However, no improvement in quality of life (Short Form 36) or patient acceptable symptom state was observed at 6 months. Conclusion For patients with knee osteoarthritis a 3-week course of spa therapy together with home exercises and usual pharmacological treatments offers benefit after 6 months compared with exercises and usual treatment alone, and is well tolerated. Trial registration number NCT00348777. PMID:19734131

  20. Editorial Commentary: Platelet-Rich Plasma Improves Knee Pain and Function in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-11-01

    Systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses shows that platelet-rich plasma improves knee pain and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Ultimately, biologics hold promise for chondroprotection in addition to symptomatic relief. PMID:26542203

  1. Pain hypervigilance is associated with greater clinical pain severity and enhanced experimental pain sensitivity among adults with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Matthew S.; Goodin, Burel R.; Pero, Samuel T.; Schmidt, Jessica K.; Sotolongo, Adriana; Bulls, Hailey W.; Glover, Toni L.; King, Christopher D.; Sibille, Kimberly T.; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Staud, Roland; Fessler, Barri J.; Bradley, Laurence A.; Fillingim, Roger B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain hypervigilance is an important aspect of the fear-avoidance model of pain that may help explain individual differences in pain sensitivity among persons with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the contribution of pain hypervigilance to clinical pain severity and experimental pain sensitivity in persons with symptomatic knee OA. Methods We analyzed cross-sectional data from 168 adults with symptomatic knee OA. Quantitative sensory testing was used to measure sensitivity to heat pain, pressure pain, and cold pain, as well as temporal summation of heat pain, a marker of central sensitization. Results Pain hypervigilance was associated with greater clinical pain severity, as well as greater pressure pain. Pain hypervigilance was also a significant predictor of temporal summation of heat pain. Conclusions Pain hypervigilance may be an important contributor to pain reports and experimental pain sensitivity among persons with knee OA. PMID:24352850

  2. How does knee pain affect trunk and knee motion during badminton forehand lunges?

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Hsing-Hsan; Lin, Cheng-Feng; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Liao, Jen-Chieh

    2014-01-01

    Badminton requires extensive lower extremity movement and a precise coordination of the upper extremity and trunk movements. Accordingly, this study investigated motions of the trunk and the knee, control of dynamic stability and muscle activation patterns of individuals with and without knee pain. Seventeen participants with chronic knee pain and 17 healthy participants participated in the study and performed forehand forward and backward diagonal lunges. This study showed that those with knee pain exhibited smaller knee motions in frontal and horizontal planes during forward lunge but greater knee motions in sagittal plane during backward lunge. By contrast, in both tasks, the injured group showed a smaller value on the activation level of the paraspinal muscles in pre-impact phase, hip-shoulder separation angle, trunk forward inclination range and peak centre of mass (COM) velocity. Badminton players with knee pain adopt a more conservative movement pattern of the knee to minimise recurrence of knee pain. The healthy group exhibit better weight-shifting ability due to a greater control of the trunk and knee muscles. Training programmes for badminton players with knee pain should be designed to improve both the neuromuscular control and muscle strength of the core muscles and the knee extensor with focus on the backward lunge motion. PMID:24404882

  3. The intra-articular use of ropivacaine for the control of post knee arthroscopy pain

    PubMed Central

    Samoladas, Efthimios P; Chalidis, Byron; Fotiadis, Hlias; Terzidis, Ioanis; Ntobas, Thomas; Koimtzis, Miltos

    2006-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this prospective randomised study is to evaluate the efficacy, safety and the appropriate dose of the ropivacaine in the control of post-knee arthroscopy pain. Methods We randomised 60 patients in two groups to receive 10 ml/7.5 mg/ml ropivacaine (Group B) or 20 ml/7.5 mg/ml (Group A) at the end of a routine knee arthroscopy. We monitored the patient's blood pressure, heart rate, allergic reactions, headache, nausea, we assessed the pain using the visual analogue score at intervals of 1,2,3,4 and 6 hours after the operation. and we recorded the need for extra analgesia. Results The intraarticular use of the ropivacaine provided excellent control of pain after knee arthroscopy. At two hours post-operatively there wasn't any difference between the two groups. Afterwards, the Group A showed increased pain and need for supplementary medication. Conclusion We believe that intraarticular use of ropivacaine is effective to reduce post-operative pain minimising the use of systematic analgesia. PMID:17187686

  4. Painful knee arthroplasty: definition and overview

    PubMed Central

    Carulli, Christian; Villano, Marco; Bucciarelli, Giovanni; Martini, Caterina; Innocenti, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Summary Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) is one of the most successful procedures in Orthopaedic Surgery, with good clinical results and high survival rate in more than 90% of the cases at long-term follow-up. Since the increase of population’s mean age, worsening of articular degenerative alterations, and articular sequelae related to previous fractures, there is a persistent growing of the number of knee arthroplasties in every country each year, with expected increase of complications rates. Painful TKA is considered an unusual complication, but several reports focus on this challenging clinical issue. Common causes of painful TKA may be divided as early or late, and in referred, periarticular or intra-articular. Among the early, we recall implant instability (related to surgical and technical mistakes) and problems of extensor mechanism (patella not resurfaced, malalignment of femoral, tibial, or patellar component, tendons failure or degeneration). Late causes of painful TKA are almost related to aseptic loosening and infection, but also, even if unusual, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, synovitis, and hypersensitivity to metal implants are represented. Hypersensitivity to metal is a clinical issue with significative increase, but to date without a specific characterization. The Authors report about incidence, clinical features, and diagnostic pathways of hypersensitivity to metal implants, focusing on the prevention of this challenging problem. PMID:22461811

  5. Graduated compression stockings to treat acute leg pain associated with proximal DVT. A randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kahn, S R; Shapiro, S; Ducruet, T; Wells, P S; Rodger, M A; Kovacs, M J; Anderson, D; Tagalakis, V; Morrison, D R; Solymoss, S; Miron, M-J; Yeo, E; Smith, R; Schulman, S; Kassis, J; Kearon, C; Chagnon, I; Wong, T; Demers, C; Hanmiah, R; Kaatz, S; Selby, R; Rathbun, S; Desmarais, S; Opatrny, L; Ortel, T L; Galanaud, J-P; Ginsberg, J S

    2014-12-01

    Acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT) causes leg pain. Elastic compression stockings (ECS) have potential to relieve DVT-related leg pain by diminishing the diameter of distended veins and increasing venous blood flow. It was our objective to determine whether ECS reduce leg pain in patients with acute DVT. We performed a secondary analysis of the SOX Trial, a multicentre randomised placebo controlled trial of active ECS versus placebo ECS to prevent the post-thrombotic syndrome.The study was performed in 24 hospital centres in Canada and the U.S. and included 803 patients with a first episode of acute proximal DVT. Patients were randomised to receive active ECS (knee length, 30-40 mm Hg graduated pressure) or placebo ECS (manufactured to look identical to active ECS, but lacking therapeutic compression). Study outcome was leg pain severity assessed on an 11-point numerical pain rating scale (0, no pain; 10, worst possible pain) at baseline, 14, 30 and 60 days after randomisation. Mean age was 55 years and 60% were male. In active ECS patients (n=409), mean (SD) pain severity at baseline and at 60 days were 5.18 (3.29) and 1.39 (2.19), respectively, and in placebo ECS patients (n=394) were 5.38 (3.29) and 1.13 (1.86), respectively. There were no significant differences in pain scores between groups at any assessment point, and no evidence for subgroup interaction by age, sex or anatomical extent of DVT. Results were similar in an analysis restricted to patients who reported wearing stockings every day. In conclusion, ECS do not reduce leg pain in patients with acute proximal DVT. PMID:25183442

  6. Tibial Tubercle Osteotomy for Anterior Knee Pain

    PubMed Central

    Bonasia, Davide; Rosso, Federica; Cottino, Umberto; Governale, Giorgio; Cherubini, Valeria; Dettoni, Federico; Bruzzone, Matteo; Rossi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the mid-term radiological and clinical outcomes of tibial tubercle osteotomy in patients affected by anterior knee pain. In addition, prognostic factors correlated with the outcomes were evaluated. Methods: The patients treated with tibial tubercle osteotomy (anteromedialization) for anterior knee pain between 2002 and 2014 were included. Exclusion criteria: 1) previous knee surgeries; 2) different procedures to treat anterior knee pain; 3) history of patellar dislocation, 4) Rheumatic conditions. Different variables were collected, as shown in. The patients were prospectively evaluated using the WOMAC short form and Kujala scores. An objective evaluation was performed looking for different potential risk factors and using part of the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score. Radiological evaluation was performed, including the congruence angle, the grade of osteoarthritis (Kellegren-Lawrence) and the patellar tilt angle. Three main outcomes were identified. The multiple logistic regression was used to analyze the correlation between the variables and a worse outcome. Results: 72 cases were included in the study (9 bilateral). 72.2% of the cases were female, and the average age was 42,2 years (SD15,9). The average BMI was 24.4 kg/m2 (SD5,2). In 70.8% of patients a lateral release was associated to the tibial tubercle osteotomy. 77.8% of patients were evaluated clinically, the remaining, who were unable to come for the visits, were interviewed and the subjective scores were administered by phone. The average follow-up was 68.4 months (SD35.5).In 62.5% of cases a valgus lower limb alignment was detected, with 25% and 39.3% of patients having respectively an increased femoral antiversion and foot pronation. Post-operatively there was a statistical significant improvement in all the scores. No differences in the pre-operative and post-operative congruence angle or patellar tilt were detected (p>0.05). All

  7. Editorial Commentary: Knee Hyaluronic Acid Viscosupplementation Reduces Osteoarthritis Pain.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-10-01

    In contrast to the AAOS knee osteoarthritis guidelines, systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses shows that viscosupplementation with intra-articular hyaluronic acid injection reduces knee osteoarthritis pain and improves function according to the highest level of evidence. PMID:26433240

  8. [A man with a painful knee with restricted flexion].

    PubMed

    Valkering, Lucia J J; Zengerink, Maartje; van Kampen, Albert

    2015-01-01

    A 39-year-old man presented with knee pain and limited knee flexion. MRI showed a mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament (celery stalk sign). This rare condition can be treated with arthroscopic debridement with volume reduction of the anterior cruciate ligament. In severe cases, anterior cruciate ligament resection could be considered. PMID:26395568

  9. Preoperative Predictors of Pain Following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Noiseux, Nicolas O.; Callaghan, John J.; Clark, Charles R.; Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Sluka, Kathleen A.; Rakel, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty has provided dramatic improvements in function and pain for the majority of patients with knee arthritis, yet a significant proportion of patients remain dissatisfied with their results. We performed a prospective analysis of 215 patients undergoing TKA who underwent a comprehensive array of evaluations to discover whether any preoperative assessment could predict high pain scores and functional limitations postoperatively. Patients with severe pain with a simple knee range-of-motion test prior to TKA had a 10x higher likelihood of moderate to severe pain at 6 months. A simple test of pain intensity with active flexion and extension preoperatively was a significant predictor of postoperative pain at 6 months after surgery. Strategies to address this particular patient group may improve satisfaction rates of TKA. PMID:24630598

  10. Factors Associated with Pain Experience Outcome in Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rayahin, Jamie E.; Chmiel, Joan S.; Hayes, Karen W.; Almagor, Orit; Belisle, Laura; Chang, Alison H.; Moisio, Kirsten; Zhang, Yunhui; Sharma, Leena

    2014-01-01

    Objective Few strategies to improve pain outcome in knee OA exist, in part because how best to evaluate pain over the long-term is unclear. Our objectives were: determine frequency of a good pain experience outcome based on previously formulated OA pain stages; and test the hypothesis that less depression and pain catastrophizing and greater self-efficacy and social support are each associated with greater likelihood of a good outcome. Methods Study participants all with knee OA reported pain stage at baseline and 2 years. Baseline assessments utilized the Geriatric Depression Scale, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale, and MOS Social Support Survey. Using pain experience stages, good outcome was defined b persistence in or movement to no pain or stage 1 (predictable pain, known trigger) at 2 years. A multivariable logistic regression model was developed to identify independent predictors of a good outcome. Results Of 212, 136 (64%) had a good pain outcome and 76 (36%) a poor outcome. In multivariable analysis, higher self-efficacy was associated with a significantly higher likelihood of good outcome (adjusted OR 1.14, 95% CI: 1.04–1.24); higher pain catastrophizing was associated with a significantly lower likelihood of good outcome (adjusted OR 0.88, 95% CI: 0.83–0.94). Conclusion This stage-based measure provides a meaningful and interpretable means to assess pain outcome in knee OA. The odds of a good 2-year outcome in knee OA were lower in persons with greater pain catastrophizing and higher in persons with greater self-efficacy. Targeting these factors may help to improve pain outcome in knee OA. PMID:25047144

  11. Total or Partial Knee Arthroplasty Trial - TOPKAT: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the majority of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee the disease originates in the medial compartment. There are two fundamentally different approaches to knee replacement for patients with unicompartmental disease: some surgeons feel that it is always best to replace both the knee compartments with a total knee replacement (TKR); whereas others feel it is best to replace just the damaged component of the knee using a partial or unicompartment replacement (UKR). Both interventions are established and well-documented procedures. Little evidence exists to prove the clinical and cost-effectiveness of either management option. This provides an explanation for the high variation in treatment of choice by individual surgeons for the same knee pathology. The aim of the TOPKAT study will be to assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of TKRs compared to UKRs in patients with medial compartment osteoarthritis. Methods/Design The design of the study is a single layer multicentre superiority type randomised controlled trial of unilateral knee replacement patients. Blinding will not be possible as the surgical scars for each procedure differ. We aim to recruit 500 patients from approximately 28 secondary care orthopaedic units from across the UK including district general and teaching hospitals. Participants will be randomised to either UKR or TKR. Randomisation will occur using a web-based randomisation system. The study is pragmatic in terms of implant selection for the knee replacement operation. Participants will be followed up for 5 years. The primary outcome is the Oxford Knee Score, which will be collected via questionnaires at 2 months, 1 year and then annually to 5 years. Secondary outcomes will include cost-effectiveness, patient satisfaction and complications data. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN03013488; ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01352247 PMID:24028414

  12. Ponseti casting for club foot - above- or below-knee?: A prospective randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Maripuri, S N; Gallacher, P D; Bridgens, J; Kuiper, J H; Kiely, N T

    2013-11-01

    We undertook a randomised clinical trial to compare treatment times and failure rates between above- and below-knee Ponseti casting groups. Eligible children with idiopathic clubfoot, treated using the Ponseti method, were randomised to either below- or above-knee plaster of Paris casting. Outcome measures were total treatment time and the occurrence of failure, defined as two slippages or a treatment time above eight weeks. A total of 26 children (33 feet) were entered into the trial. The above-knee group comprised 17 feet in 13 children (ten boys and three girls, median age 13 days (1 to 40)) and the below-knee group comprised 16 feet in 13 children (ten boys and three girls, median age 13 days (5 to 20)). Because of six failures (37.5%) in the below-knee group, the trial was stopped early for ethical reasons. The rate of failure was significantly higher in the below-knee group (p = 0.039). The median treatment times of six weeks in the below-knee and four weeks in the above-knee group differed significantly (p = 0.01). This study demonstrates that the use of a below-knee plaster of Paris cast in conjunction with the Ponseti technique leads to unacceptably high failure rates and significantly longer treatment times. Therefore, this technique is not recommended. PMID:24151281

  13. Arthroscopic knee debridement can delay total knee replacement in painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos; Gomez-Cardero, Primitivo

    2016-09-01

    The role of arthroscopic debridement of the knee in haemophilia is controversial in the literature. The purpose of this study is to describe the results of arthroscopic knee debridement (AKD), with the aim of determining whether it is possible to delay total knee replacement (TKR) for painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients. In a 14-year period (1998-2011), AKD was performed for moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in 27 patients with haemophilia A. Their average age at operation was 28.6 years (range 26-39 years). Indications for surgery were as follows: more than 90° of knee flexion, flexion deformity less than 30°, good axial alignment of the knee, good patellar alignment, and pain above >60 points in a visual analogue scale [0 (no pain) to 100 points]. Secondary haematological prophylaxis and rehabilitation (physiotherapy) was given for at least 3 months after surgery. Follow-up was for an average of 7.5 years (range 2-14 years). We assessed the clinical outcome before surgery and at the time of latest follow-up using the Knee Society pain and function scores, the range of motion, and the radiological score of the World Federation of Haemophilia. Knee Society pain scores improved from 39 preoperatively to 66 postoperatively, and function scores improved from 36 to 52. Range of motion improved on an average from -15° of extension and 90° of flexion before surgery, to -5° of extension and 110° of flexion at the last follow-up. A radiological deterioration of 2.8 points on average was found. There were two (7.4%) postoperative complications (haemarthroses resolved by joint aspiration). One patient (3.7%) required a TKR 12.5 years later. AKD should be considered in painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients to delay TKR. PMID:26575489

  14. Early intervention for adolescents with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome - a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Self-reported knee pain is highly prevalent among adolescents. As much as 50% of the non-specific knee pain may be attributed to Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS). In the short term, exercise therapy appears to have a better effect than patient education consisting of written information and general advice on exercise or compared with placebo treatment. But the long-term effect of exercise therapy compared with patient education is conflicting. The purpose of this study is to examine the short- and long-term effectiveness of patient education compared with patient education and multimodal physiotherapy applied at a very early stage of the condition among adolescents. Methods/Design This study is a single blind pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial. Four upper secondary schools have been invited to participate in the study (approximately 2500 students, aged 15-19 years). Students are asked to answer an online questionnaire regarding musculoskeletal pain. The students who report knee pain are contacted by telephone and offered a clinical examination by a rheumatologist. Subjects who fit the inclusion criteria and are diagnosed with PFPS are invited to participate in the study. A minimum of 102 students with PFPS are then cluster-randomised into two intervention groups based on which school they attend. Both intervention groups receive written information and education. In addition to patient education, one group receives multimodal physiotherapy consisting primarily of neuromuscular training of the muscles around the foot, knee and hip and home exercises. The students with PFPS fill out self-reported questionnaires at baseline, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after inclusion in the study. The primary outcome measure is perception of recovery measured on a 7-point Likert scale ranging from "completely recovered" to "worse than ever" at 12 months. Discussion This study is designed to investigate the effectiveness of patient education compared with patient

  15. Acupuncture for chronic knee pain: a protocol for an updated systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinhong; Yue, Jinhuan; Sun, Zhongren; Lu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for patients with chronic knee pain. Methods and analysis MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTERAL, CINAHL and four Chinese medical databases will be searched from their inception to present. We will also manually retrieve eligible studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in which acupuncture is assessed as the sole treatment or as an adjunct treatment for chronic knee pain will be included. The primary outcome of our analysis is pain measured by the visual analogue scale (VAS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale or the 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes will include the quality of life, measured by the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) and adverse events. Two researchers will conduct the study selection, data extraction and quality assessment independently. Any disagreement will be resolved through discussion with a third reviewer. The Cochrane risk-of-bias criteria and the Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA) checklist will be used to assess the methodological quality of the trials. Dissemination This systematic review will assess the current evidence on acupuncture therapy for chronic knee pain. It uses aggregated published data instead of individual patient data and does not require an ethical board review and approval. The findings will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and disseminated in conference presentations. It will provide the latest analysis of the currently available evidence for acupuncture treating chronic knee pain. Trial registration number CRD42014015514. PMID:26911581

  16. Myofascial pain in patients waitlisted for total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Richard; Cahill, Catherine M; Wood, Gavin; Hroch, Jennifer; Wilson, Rosemary; Cupido, Tracy; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knee pain is one of the major sources of pain and disability in developed countries, particularly in aging populations, and is the primary indication for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). OBJECTIVES: To determine the presence of myofascial pain in OA patients waitlisted for TKA and to determine whether their knee pain may be alleviated by trigger point injections. METHODS: Following ethics approval, 25 participants were recruited from the wait list for elective unilateral primary TKA at the study centre. After providing informed consent, all participants were examined for the presence of active trigger points in the muscles surrounding the knee and received trigger point injections of bupivacaine. Assessments and trigger point injections were implemented on the first visit and at subsequent visits on weeks 1, 2, 4 and 8. Outcome measures included the Timed Up and Go test, Brief Pain Inventory, Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire. RESULTS: Myofascial trigger points were identified in all participants. Trigger point injections significantly reduced pain intensity and pain interference, and improved mobility. All participants had trigger points identified in medial muscles, most commonly in the head of the gastrocnemius muscle. An acute reduction in pain and improved functionality was observed immediately following intervention, and persisted over the eight-week course of the investigation. CONCLUSION: All patients had trigger points in the vastus and gastrocnemius muscles, and 92% of patients experienced significant pain relief with trigger point injections at the first visit, indicating that a significant proportion of the OA knee pain was myofascial in origin. Further investigation is warranted to determine the prevalence of myofascial pain and whether treatment delays or prevents TKA. PMID:23061082

  17. A review of knee pain in adolescent females.

    PubMed

    Lipman, Rachel; John, Rita Marie

    2015-07-15

    Primary care practitioners are in a position to educate patients and parents about the risk factors that may increase the incidence of knee pain in adolescent females. This article highlights patellofemoral pain syndrome, Sinding-Larsen-Johansson syndrome, Osgood-Schlatter disease, and meniscal tears. PMID:26016939

  18. [Chronic knee pain and specific heat phobia. A case report].

    PubMed

    Pepke, W; Neubauer, E; Schiltenwolf, M

    2013-02-01

    This case report presents the medical history of a patient suffering from chronic knee pain with specific heat phobia who had a long history of sick certificates. Using multimodal pain therapy and biofeedback therapy the acquired anxiety disorder could be solved. Long-term working ability could be achieved. PMID:23321701

  19. Effectiveness of GP access to magnetic resonance imaging of the knee: a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background GPs commonly see patients with knee problems. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee is an accurate diagnostic test for meniscus and ligament injuries of the knee, but there is uncertainty about the appropriate use of MRI and when it should enter the diagnostic pathway for patients with these problems. Aim To assess the effectiveness of GP referral to early MRI and a provisional orthopaedic appointment, compared with referral to an orthopaedic specialist without prior MRI for patients with continuing knee problems. Design of study Pragmatic multicentre randomised trial with two parallel groups. Setting A total of 553 patients consulting their GP about a continuing knee problem were recruited from 163 general practices at 11 sites across the UK. Method Patients were randomised to MRI within 12 weeks of GP referral including a provisional orthopaedic appointment, or orthopaedic appointment without prior MRI within a maximum of 9 months from GP referral. The primary outcome measures were the Short Form 36-item (SF-36) physical functioning scale and the Knee Quality of Life 26-item Questionnaire (KQoL-26) at 6, 12, and 24 months. Results Patients randomised to MRI improved mean SF-36 physical functioning scores by 2.81 (95% confidence interval [CI] = −0.26 to 5.89) more than those referred to orthopaedics (P = 0.072). Patients randomised to MRI improved mean KQoL-26 physical functioning scores by 3.65 (95% CI = 1.03 to 6.28) more than controls (P = 0.007). There were no other significant differences. Conclusion GP access to MRI yielded small, but statistically significant, benefits in patients' knee-related quality of life but non-significant improvements in physical functioning. PMID:19000393

  20. Efficacy of MRI in primary care for patients with knee complaints due to trauma: protocol of a randomised controlled non-inferiority trial (TACKLE trial)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with traumatic knee complaints regularly consult their general practitioner (GP). MRI might be a valuable diagnostic tool to assist GPs in making appropriate treatment decisions and reducing costs. Therefore, this study will assess the cost-effectiveness of referral to MRI by GPs compared with usual care, in patients with persistent traumatic knee complaints. Design and methods This is a multi-centre, open-labelled randomised controlled non-inferiority trial in combination with a concurrent observational cohort study. Eligible patients (aged 18–45 years) have knee complaints due to trauma (or sudden onset) occurring in the preceding 6 months and consulting their GP. Participants are randomised to: 1) an MRI group, i.e. GP referral to MRI, or 2) a usual care group, i.e. no MRI. Primary outcomes are knee-related daily function, medical costs (healthcare use and productivity loss), and quality of life. Secondary outcomes are disability due to knee complaints, severity of knee pain, and patients’ perceived recovery and satisfaction. Outcomes are measured at baseline and at 1.5, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months follow-up. Also collected are data on patient demographics, GPs’ initial working diagnosis, GPs’ preferred management at baseline, and MRI findings. Discussion In the Netherlands, the additional diagnostic value and cost-effectiveness of direct access to knee MRI for patients presenting with traumatic knee complaints in general practice is unknown. Although GPs increasingly refer patients to MRI, the Dutch clinical guideline ‘Traumatic knee complaints’ for GPs does not recommend referral to MRI, mainly because the cost-effectiveness is still unknown. Trial registration Dutch Trial Registration: NTR3689. PMID:24588860

  1. Pain sensitivity profiles in patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Frey-Law, Laura A; Bohr, Nicole L; Sluka, Kathleen A; Herr, Keela; Clark, Charles R; Noiseux, Nicolas O; Callaghan, John J; Zimmerman, M Bridget; Rakel, Barbara A

    2016-09-01

    The development of patient profiles to subgroup individuals on a variety of variables has gained attention as a potential means to better inform clinical decision making. Patterns of pain sensitivity response specific to quantitative sensory testing (QST) modality have been demonstrated in healthy subjects. It has not been determined whether these patterns persist in a knee osteoarthritis population. In a sample of 218 participants, 19 QST measures along with pain, psychological factors, self-reported function, and quality of life were assessed before total knee arthroplasty. Component analysis was used to identify commonalities across the 19 QST assessments to produce standardized pain sensitivity factors. Cluster analysis then grouped individuals who exhibited similar patterns of standardized pain sensitivity component scores. The QST resulted in 4 pain sensitivity components: heat, punctate, temporal summation, and pressure. Cluster analysis resulted in 5 pain sensitivity profiles: a "low pressure pain" group, an "average pain" group, and 3 "high pain" sensitivity groups who were sensitive to different modalities (punctate, heat, and temporal summation). Pain and function differed between pain sensitivity profiles, along with sex distribution; however, no differences in osteoarthritis grade, medication use, or psychological traits were found. Residualizing QST data by age and sex resulted in similar components and pain sensitivity profiles. Furthermore, these profiles are surprisingly similar to those reported in healthy populations, which suggests that individual differences in pain sensitivity are a robust finding even in an older population with significant disease. PMID:27152688

  2. The impact of including corticosteroid in a periarticular injection for pain control after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Tsukada, S.; Wakui, M.; Hoshino, A.

    2016-01-01

    There is conflicting evidence about the benefit of using corticosteroid in periarticular injections for pain relief after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We carried out a double-blinded, randomised controlled trial to assess the efficacy of using corticosteroid in a periarticular injection to control pain after TKA. A total of 77 patients, 67 women and ten men, with a mean age of 74 years (47 to 88) who were about to undergo unilateral TKA were randomly assigned to have a periarticular injection with or without corticosteroid. The primary outcome was post-operative pain at rest during the first 24 hours after surgery, measured every two hours using a visual analogue pain scale score. The cumulative pain score was quantified using the area under the curve. The corticosteroid group had a significantly lower cumulative pain score than the no-corticosteroid group during the first 24 hours after surgery (mean area under the curve 139, 0 to 560, and 264, 0 to 1460; p = 0.024). The rate of complications, including surgical site infection, was not significantly different between the two groups up to one year post-operatively. The addition of corticosteroid to the periarticular injection significantly decreased early post-operative pain. Further studies are needed to confirm the safety of corticosteroid in periarticular injection. Take home message: The use of corticosteroid in periarticular injection offered better pain relief during the initial 24 hours after TKA. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:194–200. PMID:26850424

  3. Brain activity for chronic knee osteoarthritis: dissociating evoked pain from spontaneous pain

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Elle L.; Geha, Paul Y.; Baliki, Marwan N.; Katz, Jeffrey; Schnitzer, Thomas J.; Apkarian, A. Vania

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pain is a hallmark of osteoarthritis (OA), yet little is known about its properties and representation in the brain. Here we use fMRI combined with psychophysics to study knee pain in 14 OA patients and 9 healthy controls. Mechanical painful pressure stimuli were applied to the knee in both groups and ratings of evoked pain and related brain activity examined. We observe that psychophysical properties and brain activation patterns of evoked pain are essentially the same between OA patients and healthy subjects, and between worse and better OA knees. In OA patients, stimulus-related brain activity could be distinguished from brain activity associated with spontaneous pain. The former activated brain regions commonly observed for acute painful stimuli in healthy subjects, while the spontaneous pain of OA engaged prefrontal-limbic regions closely corresponding to areas observed for spontaneous pain in other chronic pain conditions, such as chronic back pain and post-herpetic neuralgia. Arthritis-related clinical characteristics of knee OA also mapped to prefrontal-limbic regions. In a subgroup of patients (n = 6) we examined brain activity changes for a 2-week, repeat measure, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (valdecoxib) therapy. Treatment decreased spontaneous pain for the worse knee and clinical characteristics of OA, and increased blood and csf levels of the drug which correlated positively with prefrontal-limbic brain activity. These findings indicate dissociation between mechanically induced and spontaneous OA knee pain, the latter engaging brain regions involved in emotional assessment of the self, and challenge the standard clinical view regarding the nature of OA pain. PMID:21315627

  4. A Novel Association between Femoroacetabular Impingement and Anterior Knee Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sanchis-Alfonso, Vicente; Tey, Marc; Monllau, Joan Carles

    2015-01-01

    Background. For a long time it has been accepted that the main problem in the anterior knee pain (AKP) patient is in the patella. Currently, literature supports the link between abnormal hip function and AKP. Objective. Our objective is to investigate if Cam femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) resolution is related to the outcome in pain and disability in patients with chronic AKP recalcitrant to conservative treatment associated with Cam FAI. Material and Methods. A retrospective study on 7 patients with chronic AKP associated with FAI type Cam was performed. Knee and hip pain were measured with the visual analogue scale (VAS), knee disability with the Kujala scale, and hip disability with the Nonarthritic Hip Score (NAHS). Results. The VAS knee pain score and VAS hip pain score had a significant improvement postoperatively. At final follow-up, there was significant improvement in all functional scores (Kujala score and NAHS). Conclusion. Our finding supports the link between Cam FAI and AKP in some young patients. Assessment of Cam FAI should be considered as a part of the physical examination of patients with AKP, mainly in cases with pain recalcitrant to conservative treatment. PMID:26451254

  5. A Novel Association between Femoroacetabular Impingement and Anterior Knee Pain.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Alfonso, Vicente; Tey, Marc; Monllau, Joan Carles

    2015-01-01

    Background. For a long time it has been accepted that the main problem in the anterior knee pain (AKP) patient is in the patella. Currently, literature supports the link between abnormal hip function and AKP. Objective. Our objective is to investigate if Cam femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) resolution is related to the outcome in pain and disability in patients with chronic AKP recalcitrant to conservative treatment associated with Cam FAI. Material and Methods. A retrospective study on 7 patients with chronic AKP associated with FAI type Cam was performed. Knee and hip pain were measured with the visual analogue scale (VAS), knee disability with the Kujala scale, and hip disability with the Nonarthritic Hip Score (NAHS). Results. The VAS knee pain score and VAS hip pain score had a significant improvement postoperatively. At final follow-up, there was significant improvement in all functional scores (Kujala score and NAHS). Conclusion. Our finding supports the link between Cam FAI and AKP in some young patients. Assessment of Cam FAI should be considered as a part of the physical examination of patients with AKP, mainly in cases with pain recalcitrant to conservative treatment. PMID:26451254

  6. Activity Increase Despite Arthritis (AÏDA): design of a Phase II randomised controlled trial evaluating an active management booklet for hip and knee osteoarthritis [ISRCTN24554946

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Nefyn H; Amoakwa, Elvis; Burton, Kim; Hendry, Maggie; Belcher, John; Lewis, Ruth; Hood, Kerenza; Jones, Jeremy; Bennett, Paul; Edwards, Rhiannon T; Neal, Richard D; Andrew, Glynne; Wilkinson, Clare

    2009-01-01

    Background Hip and knee osteoarthritis is a common cause of pain and disability, which can be improved by exercise interventions. However, regular exercise is uncommon in this group because the low physical activity level in the general population is probably reduced even further by pain related fear of movement. The best method of encouraging increased activity in this patient group is not known. A booklet has been developed for patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis. It focuses on changing disadvantageous beliefs and encouraging increased physical activity. Methods/Design This paper describes the design of a Phase II randomised controlled trial (RCT) to test the effectiveness of this new booklet for patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis in influencing illness and treatment beliefs, and to assess the feasibility of conducting a larger definitive RCT in terms of health status and exercise behaviour. A computerised search of four general medical practice patients' record databases will identify patients older than 50 years of age who have consulted with hip or knee pain in the previous twelve months. A random sample of 120 will be invited to participate in the RCT comparing the new booklet with a control booklet, and we expect 100 to return final questionnaires. This trial will assess the feasibility of recruitment and randomisation, the suitability of the control intervention and outcome measurement tools, and will provide an estimate of effect size. Outcomes will include beliefs about hip and knee pain, beliefs about exercise, fear avoidance, level of physical activity, health status and health service costs. They will be measured at baseline, one month and three months. Discussion We discuss the merits of testing effectiveness in a phase II trial, in terms of intermediate outcome measures, whilst testing the processes for a larger definitive trial. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of testing the psychometric properties of the primary outcome

  7. Knee Pain and the Weekend Warriors

    MedlinePlus

    ... care. “OR-Live,” the vision of improving health. Hello, and welcome to Mercy Hospital. We’re in ... knee arthroscopy. Let me introduce first, Dr. Lavernia. Hello there. Dr. Lavernia Is the chief of the ...

  8. Pain relief in knee osteoarthritis reduces the propensity to trip on an obstacle.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Nirav K; Piotrowski, Gary A; Pottenger, Lawrence; Draganich, Louis F

    2007-01-01

    The pain associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) has been shown to lead to an increased propensity to trip on an obstacle. Pain-relieving intra-articular injections are widely utilized in the treatment of knee OA. This study examined the effects of pain-relieving intra-articular knee injections on the ability to avoid contacting a suddenly appearing obstacle in patients with knee OA. Obstacle avoidance success rates, pain, body mass index, visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, depth perception, and single-leg stance duration were evaluated in nine patients with painful osteoarthritis of the knee and 14 age-matched healthy control subjects. Obstacle avoidance success rates, pain, and single leg stance duration were tested a second time in the patients with knee OA after they received their injections, which contained a fast-acting local anesthetic to provide rapid pain relief. After receiving the pain-relieving knee injections, patients with knee OA had 48% less pain and were 31% more successful in avoiding stepping on the obstacle. However, after receiving the injection, the obstacle avoidance success rates remained 20% less than those of the healthy controls. The results of this study suggest that knee pain-relief can decrease the propensity of people with painful knee OA to trip and fall over an obstacle. However, pain-relief alone did not return the patients with knee OA in this study to a disease-free risk of tripping. PMID:16529934

  9. Repeatability of gait analysis for measuring knee osteoarthritis pain in patients with severe chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Asay, Jessica L; Boyer, Katherine A; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2013-07-01

    Gait measures are receiving increased attention in the evaluation of patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Yet, there remains a need to assess variability of gait analysis in patients with knee osteoarthritis over time and how pain affects variation in these gait parameters. The purpose of this study was to determine if important gait parameters, such as the knee adduction moment, knee flexion moment, peak vertical ground reaction force, and speed, were repeatable in patients with mild-to-moderate knee OA over a trial period of 12 weeks. Six patients were enrolled in this cross-over study design after meeting strict inclusion criteria. Gait tests were conducted three times at 4 week intervals and once after the placebo arm of a randomized treatment sequence; each gait test followed a 2-week period of receiving a placebo for a pain modifying drug. Repeatability for each gait variable was found using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) with a two-way random model. This study found that the knee adduction moment was repeatable throughout the four gait tests. However, normalized peak vertical ground reaction force and knee flexion moment were not as repeatable, varying with pain. This suggests that these gait outcomes could offer a more objective way to measure a patient's level of pain. PMID:23508626

  10. Metallosis Presenting as Knee Pain 26 years after Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sharareh, Behnam; Phan, Duy L.; Goreal, Wamda; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Metallosis occurs when periprosthetic soft tissues, synovium, and/or bone is infiltrated by metallic debris secondary to metal-on-metal wear. This debris can cause a chronic inflammatory reaction leading to joint instability, pain, and swelling, and may cause osteolysis, implant looseningand ultimately implant failure. Case Report: An 81 year old female, with a history of primary left total knee arthroplasty, presented with a 6 month history of left knee pain, swelling, and limited range of motion following a fall. Radiographs and joint aspiration were performed, with results that showed no evidence of periprosthetic trauma or infection but were suspicious for chronic metallosis. The patient underwent revision total knee replacement of the left knee which revealed extensive necrotic black metal debris throughout the joint space. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of a foreign body reaction consistent with metallosis. Conclusion: This case is a rare example of chronic metallosis presenting 26 years following total knee replacement. Treatment with revision total knee replacement is the consensus management choice to avoid further destruction of the bone and joint capsule that can occur with metal-induced inflammation. PMID:27299048

  11. Relationship of Buckling and Knee Injury to Pain Exacerbation in Knee Osteoarthritis: A Web-Based Case-Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Zobel, Isabelle; Erfani, Tahereh; Bennell, Kim L; Makovey, Joanna; Metcalf, Ben; March, Lyn; Zhang, Yuqing; Eckstein, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most frequent causes of limited mobility and diminished quality of life. Pain is the main symptom that drives individuals with knee OA to seek medical care and a recognized antecedent to disability and eventually joint replacement. Evidence shows that patients with symptomatic OA experience fluctuations in pain severity. Mechanical insults to the knee such as injury and buckling may contribute to pain exacerbation. Objective Our objective was to examine whether knee injury and buckling (giving way) are triggers for exacerbation of pain in persons with symptomatic knee OA. Methods We conducted a case-crossover study, a novel methodology in which participants with symptomatic radiographic knee OA who have had knee pain exacerbations were used as their own control (self-matched design), with all data collected via the Internet. Participants were asked to log-on to the study website and complete an online questionnaire at baseline and then at regular 10-day intervals for 3 months (control periods)—a total of 10 questionnaires. They were also instructed to go to the website and complete pain exacerbation questionnaires when they experienced an isolated incident of knee pain exacerbation (case periods). A pain exacerbation “case” period was defined as an increase of ≥2 compared to baseline. At each contact the pain exacerbation was designated a case period, and at all other regular 10-day contacts (control periods) participants were asked about knee injuries during the previous 7 days and knee buckling during the previous 2 days. The relationship of knee injury and buckling to the risk of pain exacerbation was examined using conditional logistic regression models. Results The analysis included 157 participants (66% women, mean age: 62 years, mean BMI: 29.5 kg/m2). Sustaining a knee injury was associated with experiencing a pain exacerbation (odds ratio [OR] 10.2, 95% CI 5.4, 19.3) compared with no injury. Knee

  12. A randomised controlled trial comparing three analgesia regimens following total knee joint replacement: continuous femoral nerve block, intrathecal morphine or both.

    PubMed

    Olive, D J; Barrington, M J; Simone, S A; Kluger, R

    2015-07-01

    This randomised controlled trial compared three analgesia regimens following primary unilateral total knee joint replacement: continuous femoral nerve block (CFNB), intrathecal morphine (ITM), and both. The primary outcome was pain ratings over the first 24 hours. Secondary outcomes included morphine consumption, nausea, pruritus and sedation ratings, oxygen saturation (SpO2) ratings, and ability to mobilise postoperatively. All patients received a spinal anaesthetic and a postoperative patient-controlled morphine pump. Patients were randomised to receive CFNB, ITM, or both. In patients with no CFNB, the use of ITM was blinded. Eighty-one patients were randomised and there were no withdrawals. At 24 hours, the ITM-only group had higher pain ratings than either of the other groups (P=0.04 versus CFNB, P=0.01 versus combination). In the 18 to 24 hour period, the ITM group used more morphine than either of the other groups. There were no statistically significant differences in pain ratings or morphine consumption at earlier time intervals. The ITM group were less likely to be able to sit out of bed on day one. Patients who received ITM were more likely to have pruritus. There were no statistically significant differences in nausea, SpO₂or sedation ratings. This study showed that a CFNB resulted in reduced pain and was also associated with less morphine consumption and improved mobilisation at 24 hours compared to ITM. This study did not show any statistically significant differences between CFNB alone and CFNB+ITM. PMID:26099756

  13. Ultrasonographic scan in knee pain in athletes.

    PubMed Central

    Maffulli, N; Regine, R; Carrillo, F; Minelli, S; Beaconsfield, T

    1992-01-01

    Fifty-two knees were examined using real-time high-definition ultrasonography with a 7.5 MHz probe. The extra-articular structures were easily visualized and diagnosis of patellar tendon lesions and Baker's cysts formulated. While the meniscal cartilages were shown as a homogeneous triangular structure between the femoral condyle and the tibial plateau, no lesions were detected. Deeper intra-articular structures, such as the cruciate ligaments, were not shown by the scan, thus their evaluation was not possible. Given its low cost, wide availability, non-invasiveness and patients' acceptability of the technique, ultrasonography may play an important role in the diagnosis of soft tissue lesions in and around the knee joint. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:1623366

  14. Combined exercise and transcranial direct current stimulation intervention for knee osteoarthritis: protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Ju; Bennell, Kim L; Hodges, Paul W; Hinman, Rana S; Liston, Matthew B; Schabrun, Siobhan M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Osteoarthritis (OA) is a major health problem and a leading cause of disability. The knee joint is commonly affected, resulting in pain and physical dysfunction. Exercise is considered the cornerstone of conservative management, yet meta-analyses indicate, at best, moderate effect sizes. Treatments that bolster the effects of exercise, such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), may improve outcomes in knee OA. The aims of this pilot study are to (1) determine the feasibility, safety and perceived patient response to a combined tDCS and exercise intervention in knee OA, and (2) provide data to support a sample size calculation for a fully-powered trial should trends of effectiveness be present. Methods and analysis A pilot randomised, assessor-blind and participant-blind, sham-controlled trial. 20 individuals with knee OA who report a pain score of 40 or more on a 100 mm visual analogue scale on walking, and meet a priori selection criteria will be randomly allocated to receive either: (1) active tDCS plus exercise, or (2) sham tDCS plus exercise. All participants will receive 20 min of either active or sham tDCS immediately prior to 30 min of supervised muscle strengthening exercise twice a week for 8 weeks. Participants in both groups will also complete unsupervised home exercises twice per week. Outcome measures of feasibility, safety, pain, disability and pain system function will be assessed immediately before and after the 8-week intervention. Analyses of feasibility and safety will be performed using descriptive statistics. Statistical analyses will be used to determine trends of effectiveness and will be based on intention-to-treat as well as per protocol. Ethics and dissemination This study was approved by the institutional ethics committee (H10184). Written informed consent will be obtained from all participants. The results of this study will be submitted for peer-reviewed publication. Trial registration number ANZCTR

  15. Gonyautoxins: First evidence in pain management in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hinzpeter, Jaime; Barrientos, Cristián; Zamorano, Álvaro; Martinez, Álvaro; Palet, Miguel; Wulf, Rodrigo; Barahona, Maximiliano; Sepúlveda, Joaquín M; Guerra, Matias; Bustamante, Tamara; Del Campo, Miguel; Tapia, Eric; Lagos, Nestor

    2016-09-01

    Improvements in pain management techniques in the last decade have had a major impact on the practice of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Gonyautoxin are phycotoxins, whose molecular mechanism of action is a reversible block of the voltage-gated sodium channels at the axonal level, impeding nerve impulse propagation. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of Gonyautoxin infiltration, as a long acting pain blocker in TKA. Fifteen patients received a total dose of 40 μg of Gonyautoxin during the TKA operation. Postoperatively, all patients were given a standard painkiller protocol: 100 mg of intravenous ketoprofen and 1000 mg of oral acetaminophen every 8 hours for 3 days. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain score and range of motion were recorded 12, 36, and 60 hours post-surgery. All patients reported pain of 2 or less on the VAS 12 and 36 hours post-surgery. Moreover, all scored were less than 4 at 60 hours post-surgery. All patients achieved full knee extension at all times. No side effects or adverse reactions to Gonyautoxin were detected in the follow-up period. The median hospital stay was 3 days. For the first time, this study has shown the effect of blocking the neuronal transmission of pain by locally infiltrating Gonyautoxin during TKA. All patients successfully responded to the pain control. The Gonyautoxin infiltration was safe and effective, and patients experienced pain relief without the use of opioids. PMID:27317871

  16. A natural seaweed derived mineral supplement (Aquamin F) for knee osteoarthritis: A randomised, placebo controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Frestedt, Joy L; Kuskowski, Michael A; Zenk, John L

    2009-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is a slowly destructive process that may be influenced by a nutritional mineral balance in the body. Methods This small, double blind, placebo controlled pilot study investigated the impact of treatment with a natural multi-mineral supplement from seaweed (Aquamin) on 6 minute walking distance (6 MWD), range of motion (ROM), and pain and joint mobility measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index in subjects with moderate to severe OA of the knee during gradual withdrawal of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that were being used daily for pain management. Subjects (n = 29) with moderate to severe OA of the knee were randomised to receive either Aquamin (2400 mg/d) or Placebo for up to 12 weeks. Results Of the 29 subjects initially randomized, only 22 subjects proceeded to treatment due to 7 subjects not meeting study selection criteria at baseline. Fourteen subjects completed the study and an ITT analysis (n = 22) of the data showed no significant differences in WOMAC scores however, the data did reveal significant improvements in passive and active extension ROM (0.83° ± 1.54 vs. -1.54° ± 2.43; difference, 5.2° ± 2.2, p = 0.028) and 6 MWD (150 ± 48 ft vs. 12.5 ± 31.5 ft; difference, 136 ± 57 ft, p = 0.03) in the Aquamin group compared to the placebo group; respectively, following a 50% reduction in NSAID use. The treatments were well tolerated and the adverse event profiles were not significantly different between the groups. Conclusion This small preliminary study suggests Aquamin may increase range of motion and walking distances in subjects with OA of the knee and may allow partial withdrawal of NSAIDs over 12 weeks of treatment. Additional research is needed to confirm these preliminary observations. Trial registration NCT00755482 PMID:19187557

  17. Analgesic efficacy of three different dosages of intra-articular morphine in arthroscopic knee surgeries: Randomised double-blind trial

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Babita; Banerjee, Sumantra; Prasad, Arunima; Farooque, Kamran; Sharma, Vijay; Trikha, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Arthroscopic knee surgery is a common procedure and may cause enough pain to delay rehabilitation. Intra-articular (IA) morphine is a known modality for post-operative pain relief. However, the optimal dose of IA morphine has not been studied. The current study has been conducted to find out the optimal dosage of IA morphine when administered with 0.25% bupivacaine. Methods: Sixty adult patients of either sex, aged between 18 and 60 years, undergoing diagnostic/therapeutic knee arthroscopic surgery were included in the study and randomised into three groups. All patients underwent surgery under subarachnoid block. After the surgical closure, 20 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine with 1 mg, 3 mg and 5 mg of morphine as additive was injected intra-articularly in Group A, B and C patients, respectively. Post-operative pain assessment was performed with visual analogue scale score in the 1st, 2nd, 6th, 12th and 24th post-operative hour. The common complications were also recorded. Results: There was statistically significant analgesia in Group B and C than Group A in the 1st and 2nd post-operative hour; while at the 24th post-operative hour, Group C had statistically significant analgesia than the other two groups. Time to first rescue analgesia was statistically significantly less and consumption of supplemental analgesia was significantly higher in Group A than the other two groups. Conclusion: IA dose of 3 mg and 5 mg morphine with 20 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine provided adequate analgesia. However, 3 mg morphine group patients had fewer side effects than 5 mg group patients although the difference was not statistically significant. PMID:26644611

  18. Knee muscle forces during walking and running in patellofemoral pain patients and pain-free controls.

    PubMed

    Besier, Thor F; Fredericson, Michael; Gold, Garry E; Beaupré, Gary S; Delp, Scott L

    2009-05-11

    One proposed mechanism of patellofemoral pain, increased stress in the joint, is dependent on forces generated by the quadriceps muscles. Describing causal relationships between muscle forces, tissue stresses, and pain is difficult due to the inability to directly measure these variables in vivo. The purpose of this study was to estimate quadriceps forces during walking and running in a group of male and female patients with patellofemoral pain (n = 27, 16 female; 11 male) and compare these to pain-free controls (n = 16, 8 female; 8 male). Subjects walked and ran at self-selected speeds in a gait laboratory. Lower limb kinematics and electromyography (EMG) data were input to an EMG-driven musculoskeletal model of the knee, which was scaled and calibrated to each individual to estimate forces in 10 muscles surrounding the joint. Compared to controls, the patellofemoral pain group had greater co-contraction of quadriceps and hamstrings (p = 0.025) and greater normalized muscle forces during walking, even though the net knee moment was similar between groups. Muscle forces during running were similar between groups, but the net knee extension moment was less in the patellofemoral pain group compared to controls. Females displayed 30-50% greater normalized hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle forces during both walking and running compared to males (p<0.05). These results suggest that some patellofemoral pain patients might experience greater joint contact forces and joint stresses than pain-free subjects. The muscle force data are available as supplementary material. PMID:19268945

  19. Pain in the knee associated with osteoporosis of the patella.

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, M; Colston, J R; Tucker, A K

    1977-01-01

    Four patients, all of whom complained of pain in the knee, were found to have radiological evidence of osteoporosis particularly marked in the patella. In 3 a neurological lesion at the appropriate spinal segment was present, and the fourth patient, who was frankly hysterical, had an autonomic disturbance. If radiological porosis is isolated to the patella a distant cause such as nerve irritation should be sought. Images PMID:856068

  20. PAIN FOLLOWING TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY – A SYSTEMATIC APPROACH

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Wilson Mello; Migon, Eduardo Zaniol; Zabeu, Jose Luis Amim

    2015-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is known to be a successful procedure. The aging of the population and the growing demand for quality of life have greatly increased the indications for the procedure. Nonetheless, TKA presents some complications that still lack definitive resolution. Pain after TKA is caused by a myriad of reasons that need to be systematically studied in order to reach the correct diagnosis and treatment. History, physical examination, laboratory tests and imaging examinations must all be included in the workup and repeated until a plausible reason has been identified, since if pain is the only indication for TKA revision, the results may be catastrophic. PMID:27022583

  1. Is acupuncture a useful adjunct to physiotherapy for older adults with knee pain?: The "Acupuncture, Physiotherapy and Exercise" (APEX) study [ISRCTN88597683

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Elaine; Barlas, Panos; Foster, Nadine; Hill, Jonathan; Thomas, Elaine; Young, Julie

    2004-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is a popular non-pharmacological modality for treating musculoskeletal pain. Physiotherapists are one of the largest groups of acupuncture providers within the NHS, and they commonly use it alongside advice and exercise. Conclusive evidence of acupuncture's clinical effectiveness and its superiority over sham interventions is lacking. The Arthritis Research Campaign (arc) has funded this randomised sham-controlled trial which addresses three important questions. Firstly, we will determine the additional benefit of true acupuncture when used by physiotherapists alongside advice and exercise for older people presenting to primary care with knee pain. Secondly, we will evaluate sham acupuncture in the same way. Thirdly, we will investigate the treatment preferences and expectations of both the participants and physiotherapists participating in the study, and explore the effect of these on clinical outcome. We will thus investigate whether acupuncture is a useful adjunct to advice and exercise for treating knee pain and gain insight into whether this effect is due to specific needling properties. Methods/Design This randomised clinical trial will recruit 350 participants with knee pain to three intervention arms. It is based in 43 community physiotherapy departments in 21 NHS Trusts in the West Midlands and Cheshire regions in England. Patients aged 50 years and over with knee pain will be recruited. Outcome data will be collected by self-complete questionnaires before randomisation, and 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months after randomisation and by telephone interview 2 weeks after treatment commences. The questionnaires collect demographic details as well as information on knee-related pain, movement and function, pain intensity and affect, main functional problem, illness perceptions, self-efficacy, treatment preference and expectations, general health and quality of life. Participants are randomised to receive a package of advice and exercise; or

  2. Biomechanical analysis of knee and trunk in badminton players with and without knee pain during backhand diagonal lunges.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Feng; Hua, Shiang-Hua; Huang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Hsing-Hsan; Liao, Jen-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of core neuromuscular control to the dynamic stability of badminton players with and without knee pain during backhand lunges has not been investigated. Accordingly, this study compared the kinematics of the lower extremity, the trunk movement, the muscle activation and the balance performance of knee-injured and knee-uninjured badminton players when performing backhand stroke diagonal lunges. Seventeen participants with chronic knee pain (injured group) and 17 healthy participants (control group) randomly performed two diagonal backhand lunges in the forward and backward directions, respectively. This study showed that the injured group had lower frontal and horizontal motions of the knee joint, a smaller hip-shoulder separation angle and a reduced trunk tilt angle. In addition, the injured group exhibited a greater left paraspinal muscle activity, while the control group demonstrated a greater activation of the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis and medial gastrocnemius muscle groups. Finally, the injured group showed a smaller distance between centre of mass (COM) and centre of pressure, and a lower peak COM velocity when performing the backhand backward lunge tasks. In conclusion, the injured group used reduced knee and trunk motions to complete the backhand lunge tasks. Furthermore, the paraspinal muscles contributed to the lunge performance of the individuals with knee pain, whereas the knee extensors and ankle plantar flexor played a greater role for those without knee pain. PMID:25574707

  3. Evidence of Chinese herbal medicine Duhuo Jisheng decoction for knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenming; Wang, Shangquan; Zhang, Ranxing; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Xinjian; Lin, Yanping; Wei, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Duhuo Jisheng decoction (DJD) is considered beneficial for controlling knee osteoarthritis (KOA)-related symptoms in some Asian countries. This review compiles the evidence from randomised clinical trials and quantifies the effects of DJD on KOA. Designs 7 online databases were investigated up to 12 October 2015. Randomised clinical trials investigating treatment of KOA for which DJD was used either as a monotherapy or in combination with conventional therapy compared to no intervention, placebo or conventional therapy, were included. The outcomes included the evaluation of functional activities, pain and adverse effect. The risk of bias was evaluated using the Cochrane Collaboration tool. The estimated mean difference (MD) and SMD was within a 95% CI with respect to interstudy heterogeneity. Results 12 studies with 982 participants were identified. The quality presented a high risk of bias. Meta-analysis found that DJD combined with glucosamine (MD 4.20 (1.72 to 6.69); p<0.001) or DJD plus meloxicam and glucosamine (MD 3.48 (1.59 to 5.37); p<0.001) had a more significant effect in improving Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (total WOMAC scores). Also, meta-analysis presented more remarkable pain improvement when DJD plus sodium hyaluronate injection (MD 0.89 (0.26 to 1.53); p=0.006) was used. These studies demonstrated that active treatment of DJD in combination should be practiced for at least 4 weeks. Information on the safety of DJD or comprehensive therapies was insufficient in few studies. Conclusions DJD combined with Western medicine or sodium hyaluronate injection appears to have benefits for KOA. However, the effectiveness and safety of DJD is uncertain because of the limited number of trials and low methodological quality. Therefore, practitioners should be cautious when applying DJD in daily practice. Future clinical trials should be well designed; more research is needed. PMID:26729379

  4. Persistent post-surgical pain and neuropathic pain after total knee replacement

    PubMed Central

    Drosos, Georgios I; Triantafilidou, Triantafilia; Ververidis, Athanasios; Agelopoulou, Cristina; Vogiatzaki, Theodosia; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the prevalence of persistent post-surgical pain (PPSP) and neuropathic pain (NP) after total knee replacement (TKR). METHODS: MEDLINE and Embase databases were searched for articles published until December 2014 in English language. Published articles were included if they referred to pain that lasts at least 3 mo after primary TKR for knee osteoarthritis, and measured pain with pain specific instruments. Studies that referred to pain caused by septic reasons and implant malalignment were excluded. Both prospective and retrospective studies were included and only 14 studies that match the inclusion criteria were selected for this review. RESULTS: The included studies were characterized by the heterogeneity on the scales used to measure pain and pre-operative factors related to PPSP and NP. The reported prevalence of PPSP and NP seems to be relatively high, but it varies among different studies. There is also evidence that the prevalence of post-surgical pain is related to the scale used for pain measurement. The prevalence of PPSP is ranging at 6 mo from 16% to 39% and at 12 mo from 13.1% to 23% and even 38% of the patients. The prevalence of NP at 6 mo post-operatively is ranging from 5.2% to 13%. Pre-operative factors related to the development of PPSP also differ, including emotional functioning, such as depression and pain catastrophizing, number of comorbidities, pain problems elsewhere and operations in knees with early grade of osteoarthritis. CONCLUSION: No firm conclusions can be reached regarding the prevalence of PPSP and NP and the related factors due to the heterogeneity of the studies. PMID:26301182

  5. Elevated corticospinal excitability in patellar tendinopathy compared with other anterior knee pain or no pain.

    PubMed

    Rio, E; Kidgell, D; Moseley, G L; Cook, J

    2016-09-01

    Anterior knee pain (AKP) is a frequent clinical presentation in jumping athletes and may be aggravated by sustained sitting, stair use, and loading of the quadriceps. Corticospinal activation of the quadriceps in athletes with AKP has not yet been investigated, but is important in guiding efficacious treatment. This cross-sectional study assessed corticospinal excitability (CSE) of the quadriceps in jumping athletes using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Groups consisted of Control (no knee pain); patellar tendinopathy (PT) [localized inferior pole pain on single-leg decline squat (SLDS)]; and other AKP (nonlocalized pain around the patella). SLDS (numerical score of pain 0-10), Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment Patellar tendon (VISA-P), maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), active motor threshold (AMT), CSE, and Mmax were tested. Twenty nine athletes participated; control n = 8, PT n = 11, AKP n = 10. There were no group differences in age (P = 0.23), body mass index (P = 0.16), MVIC (P = 0.38) or weekly activity (P = 0.22). PT had elevated CSE compared with controls and other AKP (P < 0.001), but no differences were detected between AKP and controls (P = 0.47). CSE appears to be greater in PT than controls and other AKP. An improved understanding of the corticospinal responses in different sources of knee pain may direct better treatment approaches. PMID:26369282

  6. Acupuncture for postoperative pain following total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae-Young; Cho, Jae-Heung; Chung, Seok-hee

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a common surgical method in orthopaedics; however, pain management after TKA remains a significant challenge. This review provides a comprehensive evaluation of the effects of acupuncture for postoperative pain after TKA. Methods and analysis The following 10 databases will be searched until August 2015: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, AMED, CINAHL, three Chinese databases (the China National Knowledge Infrastructure Database, the Chongqing VIP Chinese Science and Technology Periodical Database, and Wanfang Database) and five Korean databases (the Korean Medical Database, the Korean Studies Information Service System, the National Discovery for Science Leaders, the Database Periodical Information Academic, and the Oriental Medicine Advanced Searching Integrated System). All eligible randomised controlled trials related to the use of acupuncture for postoperative pain after TKA will be included. Assessment of risk of bias will be performed with the Cochrane risk-of-bias method. Mean differences or standardised mean differences will be calculated with 95% CIs for continuous data; the risk ratio will be used with 95% CIs for dichotomous data. Dissemination This systematic review will be presented in a peer-reviewed journal. The result of this review will also be disseminated at a relevant conference presentation. Trial registration number PROSPERO 2015: CRD42015020924. PMID:26582406

  7. Influence of magnetic resonance imaging of the knee on GPs' decisions: a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee for meniscus and ligament injuries is an accurate diagnostic test. Early and accurate diagnosis of patients with knee problems may prevent the onset of chronic problems such as osteoarthritis, a common cause of disability in older people consulting their GP. Aim To assess the effect of early access to MRI, compared with referral to an orthopaedic specialist, on GPs' diagnoses and treatment plans for patients with knee problems. Design of study A multicentre, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial. Setting Five hundred and fifty-three patients with knee problems were recruited from 163 general practices across the UK from November 2002 to October 2004. Method Eligible patients were randomised to MRI or consultation with an orthopaedic specialist. GPs made a concomitant provisional referral to orthopaedics for patients who were allocated to imaging. GPs recorded patients' diagnoses, treatment plans, and their confidence in these decisions at trial entry and follow-up. Data were analysed as intention to treat. Results There was no significant difference between MRI and orthopaedic groups for changes in diagnosis (P = 0.79) or treatment plans (P = 0.059). Significant changes in diagnostic and therapeutic confidence were observed for both groups with a greater increase in diagnostic confidence (P<0.001) and therapeutic confidence (P = 0.002) in the MRI group. There was a significant increase in within-group changes in diagnostic and therapeutic confidence. Conclusion Access to MRI did not significantly alter GPs' diagnoses or treatment plans compared with direct referral to an orthopaedic specialist, but access to MRI significantly increased their confidence in these decisions. PMID:17688756

  8. Prevention of acute knee injuries in adolescent female football players: cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Atroshi, Isam; Magnusson, Henrik; Wagner, Philippe; Hägglund, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of neuromuscular training in reducing the rate of acute knee injury in adolescent female football players. Design Stratified cluster randomised controlled trial with clubs as the unit of randomisation. Setting 230 Swedish football clubs (121 in the intervention group, 109 in the control group) were followed for one season (2009, seven months). Participants 4564 players aged 12-17 years (2479 in the intervention group, 2085 in the control group) completed the study. Intervention 15 minute neuromuscular warm-up programme (targeting core stability, balance, and proper knee alignment) to be carried out twice a week throughout the season. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was rate of anterior cruciate ligament injury; secondary outcomes were rates of severe knee injury (>4 weeks’ absence) and any acute knee injury. Results Seven players (0.28%) in the intervention group, and 14 (0.67%) in the control group had an anterior cruciate ligament injury. By Cox regression analysis according to intention to treat, a 64% reduction in the rate of anterior cruciate ligament injury was seen in the intervention group (rate ratio 0.36, 95% confidence interval 0.15 to 0.85). The absolute rate difference was −0.07 (95% confidence interval −0.13 to 0.001) per 1000 playing hours in favour of the intervention group. No significant rate reductions were seen for secondary outcomes. Conclusions A neuromuscular warm-up programme significantly reduced the rate of anterior cruciate ligament injury in adolescent female football players. However, the absolute rate difference did not reach statistical significance, possibly owing to the small number of events. Trial registration Clinical trials NCT00894595. PMID:22556050

  9. Analysis of stem tip pain in revision total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kimpton, Christine I; Crocombe, Andrew David; Bradley, William Neil; Gavin Huw Owen, Brigstocke

    2013-06-01

    Stem tip pain following revision total knee arthroplasty is a significant cause of patient dissatisfaction, which in the presence of an aseptic well-fixed component has no widely accepted surgical solution. A definitive cause of stem tip pain remains elusive, however it has been suggested that high stress concentrations within the region of the stem tip may play a role. This paper reports a finite element study of a novel clinical technique where a plate is attached to the tibia within the region of the stem tip to reduce stem tip pain. The results demonstrate that the plate reduces stress concentrations in the bone at the stem tip of the implant. The magnitude of stress reduction is dependent upon plate location, material and attachment method. PMID:23523204

  10. Protocol for a single-centre randomised controlled trial of multimodal periarticular anaesthetic infiltration versus single-agent femoral nerve blockade as analgesia for total knee arthroplasty: Perioperative Analgesia for Knee Arthroplasty (PAKA)

    PubMed Central

    Wall, P D H; Sprowson, A P; Parsons, N; Parsons, H; Achten, J; Balasubramanian, S; Costa, M L

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery causes postoperative pain. The use of perioperative injections around the knee containing local anaesthetic, opiates and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has increased in popularity to manage pain. Theoretical advantages include reduced requirements for analgesia and earlier mobilisation. We propose a single-centre randomised controlled trial of multimodal periarticular anaesthetic infiltration versus femoral nerve anaesthetic blockade as analgesia for TKA. The aim is to determine, in patients undergoing TKA, if there is a difference in patient-reported pain scores on the visual analogue scale (VAS) prior to physiotherapy on day 1 postoperatively between treatment groups. Methods and analysis Patients undergoing a primary unilateral TKA at University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire Hospitals will be assessed for eligibility. A total of 264 patients will provide 90% power to detect a difference of 12 mm on the VAS on day 1 postoperatively at the 5% level. The trial will use 1:1 randomisation, stratified by mode of anaesthetic. Primary outcome measure will be the VAS for pain prior to physiotherapy on day 1. Secondary outcome measures include VAS on day 2, total use of opiate analgesia up to 48 h, ordinal pain scores up to 40 min after surgery, independent functional knee physiotherapist assessment on days 1 and 2. Oxford knee Scores (OKS), EuroQol (EQ-5D) and Douleur Neuropathic Pain Scores (DN2) will be recorded at baseline, 6 weeks and 12 months. Adverse events will be recorded up to 12 months. Analysis will investigate differences in VAS on day 1 between the two treatment groups on an intention-to-treat basis. Tests will be two-sided and considered to provide evidence for a significant difference if p values are less than 0.05. Ethics and dissemination NRES Committee West Midlands, 23 September 2013 (ref: 13/WM/0316). The results will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publications and

  11. A randomised trial of all-polyethylene and metal-backed tibial components in unicompartmental arthroplasty of the knee.

    PubMed

    Hutt, J R B; Farhadnia, P; Massé, V; LaVigne, M; Vendittoli, P-A

    2015-06-01

    This randomised trial evaluated the outcome of a single design of unicompartmental arthroplasty of the knee (UKA) with either a cemented all-polyethylene or a metal-backed modular tibial component. A total of 63 knees in 45 patients (17 male, 28 female) were included, 27 in the all-polyethylene group and 36 in the metal-backed group. The mean age was 57.9 years (39.6 to 76.9). At a mean follow-up of 6.4 years (5 to 9.9), 11 all-polyethylene components (41%) were revised (at a mean of 5.8 years; 1.4 to 8.0) post-operatively and two metal-backed components were revised (at one and five years). One revision in both groups was for unexplained pain, one in the metal-backed group was for progression of osteoarthritis. The others in the all-polyethylene group were for aseptic loosening. The survivorship at seven years calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method for the all-polyethylene group was 56.5% (95% CI 31.9 to 75.2, number at risk 7) and for the metal-backed group was 93.8% (95% CI 77.3 to 98.4, number at risk 16) This difference was statistically significant (p < 0.001). At the most recent follow-up, significantly better mean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index Scores were found in the all-polyethylene group (13.4 vs 23.0, p = 0.03) but there was no difference in the mean Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome scores (68.8; 41.4 to 99.0 vs 62.6; 24.0 to 100.0), p = 0.36). There were no significant differences for range of movement (p = 0.36) or satisfaction (p = 0.23). This randomised study demonstrates that all-polyethylene components in this design of fixed bearing UKA had unsatisfactory results with significantly higher rates of failure before ten years compared with the metal-back components. PMID:26033058

  12. Are depression, anxiety and poor mental health risk factors for knee pain? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background While it is recognized that psychosocial factors are important in the development and progression of musculoskeletal pain and disability, no systematic review has specifically focused on examining the relationship between psychosocial factors and knee pain. We aimed to systematically review the evidence to determine whether psychosocial factors, specifically depression, anxiety and poor mental health, are risk factors for knee pain. Methods Electronic searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsycINFO were performed to identify relevant studies published up to August 2012 using MESH terms and keywords. We included studies that met a set of predefined criteria and two independent reviewers assessed the methodological quality of the selected studies. Due to the heterogeneity of the studies, a best evidence synthesis was performed. Results Sixteen studies were included in the review, of which 9 were considered high quality. The study populations were heterogeneous in terms of diagnosis of knee pain. We found a strong level of evidence for a relationship between depression and knee pain, limited evidence for no relationship between anxiety and knee pain, and minimal evidence for no relationship between poor mental health and knee pain. Conclusions Despite the heterogeneity of the included studies, these data show that depression plays a significant role in knee pain, and that a biopsychosocial approach to the management of this condition is integral to optimising outcomes for knee pain. PMID:24405725

  13. Painful prosthesis: approaching the patient with persistent pain following total hip and knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Piscitelli, Prisco; Iolascon, Giovanni; Innocenti, Massimo; Civinini, Roberto; Rubinacci, Alessandro; Muratore, Maurizio; D’Arienzo, Michele; Leali, Paolo Tranquilli; Carossino, Anna Maria; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Symptomatic severe osteoarthritis and hip osteoporotic fractures are the main conditions requiring total hip arthroplasty (THA), whereas total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is mainly performed for pain, disability or deformity due to osteoarthritis. After surgery, some patients suffer from “painful prosthesis”, which currently represents a clinical problem. Methods A systematic review of scientific literature has been performed. A panel of experts has examined the issue of persistent pain following total hip or knee arthroplasty, in order to characterize etiopathological mechanisms and define how to cope with this condition. Results Four major categories (non infective, septic, other and idiopathic causes) have been identified as possible origin of persistent pain after total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Time to surgery, pain level and function impairment before surgical intervention, mechanical stress following prosthesis implant, osseointegration deficiency, and post-traumatic or allergic inflammatory response are all factors playing an important role in causing persistent pain after joint arthroplasty. Diagnosis of persistent pain should be made in case of post-operative pain (self-reported as VAS ≥3) persisting for at least 4 months after surgery, or new onset of pain (VAS ≥3) after the first 4 months, lasting ≥2 months. Acute pain reported as VAS score ≥7 in patients who underwent TJA should be always immediately investigated. Conclusions The cause of pain needs always to be indentified and removed whenever possible. Implant revision is indicated only when septic or aseptic loosening is diagnosed. Current evidence has shown that peri-and/or post-operative administration of bisphosphonates may have a role in pain management and periprosthetic bone loss prevention. PMID:24133526

  14. Effects of a progressive aquatic resistance exercise program on the biochemical composition and morphology of cartilage in women with mild knee osteoarthritis: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Symptoms associated with osteoarthritis of the knee result in decreased function, loss of working capacity and extensive social and medical costs. There is a need to investigate and develop effective interventions to minimise the impact of and even prevent the progression of osteoarthritis. Aquatic exercise has been shown to be effective at reducing the impact of osteoarthritis. The purpose of this article is to describe the rationale, design and intervention of a study investigating the effect of an aquatic resistance exercise intervention on cartilage in postmenopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis. Methods A minimum of 80 volunteers who meet the inclusion criteria will be recruited from the local population through newspaper advertisements. Following initial assessment volunteers will be randomised into two groups. The intervention group will participate in a progressive aquatic resistance exercise program of 1-hour duration 3 times a week for four months. The control group will be asked to maintain normal care during this period. Primary outcome measure for this study is the biochemical composition of knee cartilage measured using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging; T2 relaxation time and delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques. In addition, knee cartilage morphology as regional cartilage thickness will be studied. Secondary outcomes include measures of body composition and bone traits using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and peripheral quantitative computed tomography, pain, function using questionnaires and physical performance tests and quality of life. Measurements will be performed at baseline, after the 4-month intervention period and at one year follow up. Discussion This randomised controlled trial will investigate the effect a progressive aquatic resistance exercise program has on the biochemical composition of cartilage in post-menopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis. This is the first study to

  15. Pain after total knee arthroplasty: a narrative review focusing on the stratification of patients at risk for persistent pain.

    PubMed

    Lavand'homme, P; Thienpont, E

    2015-10-01

    The patient with a painful arthritic knee awaiting total knee arthroplasty (TKA) requires a multidisciplinary approach. Optimal control of acute post-operative pain and the prevention of chronic persistent pain remains a challenge. The aim of this paper is to evaluate whether stratification of patients can help identify those who are at particular risk for severe acute or chronic pain. Intense acute post-operative pain, which is itself a risk factor for chronic pain, is more common in younger, obese female patients and those suffering from central pain sensitisation. Pre-operative pain, in the knee or elsewhere in the body, predisposes to central sensitisation. Pain due to osteoarthritis of the knee may also trigger neuropathic pain and may be associated with chronic medication like opioids, leading to a state of nociceptive sensitisation called 'opioid-induced hyperalgesia'. Finally, genetic and personality related risk factors may also put patients at a higher risk for the development of chronic pain. Those identified as at risk for chronic pain would benefit from specific peri-operative management including reduction in opioid intake pre-operatively, the peri-operative use of antihyperalgesic drugs such as ketamine and gabapentinoids, and a close post-operative follow-up in a dedicated chronic pain clinic. PMID:26430086

  16. Q-angle in patellofemoral pain: relationship with dynamic knee valgus, hip abductor torque, pain and function☆

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Gabriel Peixoto Leão; Silva, Ana Paula de Moura Campos Carvalho e; França, Fábio Jorge Renovato; Magalhães, Maurício Oliveira; Burke, Thomaz Nogueira; Marques, Amélia Pasqual

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the q-angle and anterior knee pain severity, functional capacity, dynamic knee valgus and hip abductor torque in women with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Methods This study included 22 women with PFPS. The q-angle was assessed using goniometry: the participants were positioned in dorsal decubitus with the knee and hip extended, and the hip and foot in neutral rotation. Anterior knee pain severity was assessed using a visual analog scale, and functional capacity was assessed using the anterior knee pain scale. Dynamic valgus was evaluated using the frontal plane projection angle (FPPA) of the knee, which was recorded using a digital camera during step down, and hip abductor peak torque was recorded using a handheld dynamometer. Results The q-angle did not present any significant correlation with severity of knee pain (r = −0.29; p = 0.19), functional capacity (r = −0.08; p = 0.72), FPPA (r = −0.28; p = 0.19) or isometric peak torque of the abductor muscles (r = −0.21; p = 0.35). Conclusion The q-angle did not present any relationship with pain intensity, functional capacity, FPPA, or hip abductor peak torque in the patients with PFPS. PMID:27069887

  17. Anterolateral Portal Is Less Painful than Superolateral Portal in Knee Intra-Articular Injection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Yup; GN, Kiran Kumar; Chung, Byung June; Lee, Sang Wook

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intra-articular knee injections are commonly performed in clinical practice for treating various knee joint disorders such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. When selecting the portal for injection, not only intra-articular needle accuracy but also procedural pain should be taken into consideration. The purpose of this study was to determine whether injection through anterolateral portal provokes less pain and provides better pain relief compared to superolateral portal. Materials and Methods A total of 60 patients with primary osteoarthritis of the knee receiving intra-articular injections were randomized into 2 groups according to the type of portal approach; anterolateral or superolateral. All patients received hyaluronic acid (20 mg) and triamcinolone (40 mg) as the first injection followed by second and third injections of hyaluronic acid on a weekly basis. Underlying knee pain, procedural pain, and knee pain at 4 weeks were evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS). Results Injection through anterolateral portal provoked less pain (VAS, 1.5±1.3) than the superolateral portal (VAS, 1.5 vs. 2.7; p=0.004). No differences were found in the degree of pain relief at weeks between the two groups (p=0.517). Conclusions We recommend the use of anterolateral portal for intra-articular knee injection as it provokes less pain and comparably short-term pain relief than the superolateral portal. PMID:26676089

  18. Impact of Alprazolam on Comorbid Pain and Knee Functions in Total Knee Arthroplasty Patients Diagnosed with Anxiety and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Barış; Kömür, Baran; Aktaş, Erdem; Sonnur Yılmaz, Firdes; Çopuroğlu, Cem; Özcan, Mert; Çiftdemir, Mert; Çopuroğlu, Elif

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Studies report 19-33% postoperative moderate-severe pain and dissatisfaction in uncomplicated total knee arthroplasty (TKA), even after 1 year. High rates of undiagnosed depression and anxiety may have a strong impact on these unfavourable outcomes. Here we aimed to investigate the efficacy of alprazolam on postoperative analgesic use and knee functions. Methods: Seventy-six patients with a mean age of 65 ± 9.3 years (range 46-80) diagnosed with mild-moderate anxiety or depression according to the Hamilton anxiety scale (HAS) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) that underwent TKA were evaluated in the study. Group 1 patients were subjected to alprazolam treatment in addition to an analgesic/antiinflammatory drug, whereas Group 2 consisted of patients receiving only the standard postoperative pain management protocol. Visual analog scale (VAS) and postoperative analgesic use (g/day) were calculated to evaluate the magnitude of pain experienced. Preoperative and postoperative knee functions were assessed from the patients’ Knee Society Score and Knee Society Functional Score records. Results: A positive correlation was found between the preoperative HAS, BDI, and total postoperative analgesic use in both groups. Although the decrease in VAS was significant in both groups, postoperative analgesic need (4.25 ± 0.30 g) in Group 1 was less compared to Group 2 (4.81 ± 0.41 g) (p=0.01). The mean change in postoperative (1 month) Knee Society Score and Knee Society Functional Score were also significantly improved in Group1 compared to Group 2. Conclusion: Alprazolam can reduce postoperative analgesic use and improve knee functions by reducing the pain threshold, and enhancing overall mood via its antidepressive and anxiolytic properties in patients undergoing TKA diagnosed with mild-moderate anxiety/depression. PMID:26664498

  19. Acupuncture and other physical treatments for the relief of pain due to osteoarthritis of the knee: network meta-analysis☆

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, M.S.; Rice, S.J.C.; Madurasinghe, V.; Slack, R.; Fayter, D.A.; Harden, M.; Sutton, A.J.; MacPherson, H.; Woolacott, N.F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objective To compare the effectiveness of acupuncture with other relevant physical treatments for alleviating pain due to knee osteoarthritis. Design Systematic review with network meta-analysis, to allow comparison of treatments within a coherent framework. Comprehensive searches were undertaken up to January 2013 to identify randomised controlled trials in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee, which reported pain. Results Of 156 eligible studies, 114 trials (covering 22 treatments and 9,709 patients) provided data suitable for analysis. Most trials studied short-term effects and many were classed as being of poor quality with high risk of bias, commonly associated with lack of blinding (which was sometimes impossible to achieve). End of treatment results showed that eight interventions: interferential therapy, acupuncture, TENS, pulsed electrical stimulation, balneotherapy, aerobic exercise, sham acupuncture, and muscle-strengthening exercise produced a statistically significant reduction in pain when compared with standard care. In a sensitivity analysis of satisfactory and good quality studies, most studies were of acupuncture (11 trials) or muscle-strengthening exercise (9 trials); both interventions were statistically significantly better than standard care, with acupuncture being statistically significantly better than muscle-strengthening exercise (standardised mean difference: 0.49, 95% credible interval 0.00–0.98). Conclusions As a summary of the current available research, the network meta-analysis results indicate that acupuncture can be considered as one of the more effective physical treatments for alleviating osteoarthritis knee pain in the short-term. However, much of the evidence in this area of research is of poor quality, meaning there is uncertainty about the efficacy of many physical treatments. PMID:23973143

  20. Addition of telephone coaching to a physiotherapist-delivered physical activity program in people with knee osteoarthritis: A randomised controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common and costly chronic musculoskeletal conditions world-wide and is associated with substantial pain and disability. Many people with knee OA also experience co-morbidities that further add to the OA burden. Uptake of and adherence to physical activity recommendations is suboptimal in this patient population, leading to poorer OA outcomes and greater impact of associated co-morbidities. This pragmatic randomised controlled trial will investigate the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of adding telephone coaching to a physiotherapist-delivered physical activity intervention for people with knee OA. Methods/Design 168 people with clinically diagnosed knee OA will be recruited from the community in metropolitan and regional areas and randomly allocated to physiotherapy only, or physiotherapy plus nurse-delivered telephone coaching. Physiotherapy involves five treatment sessions over 6 months, incorporating a home exercise program of 4–6 exercises (targeting knee extensor and hip abductor strength) and advice to increase daily physical activity. Telephone coaching comprises 6–12 telephone calls over 6 months by health practitioners trained in applying the Health Change Australia (HCA) Model of Health Change to provide behaviour change support. The telephone coaching intervention aims to maximise adherence to the physiotherapy program, as well as facilitate increased levels of participation in general physical activity. The primary outcomes are pain measured by an 11-point numeric rating scale and self-reported physical function measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index subscale after 6 months. Secondary outcomes include physical activity levels, quality-of-life, and potential moderators and mediators of outcomes including self-efficacy, pain coping and depression. Relative cost-effectiveness will be determined from health service usage and outcome data. Follow

  1. Efficacy and safety of strontium ranelate in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: results of a double-blind, randomised placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Reginster, Jean-Yves; Badurski, Janusz; Bellamy, Nicholas; Bensen, William; Chapurlat, Roland; Chevalier, Xavier; Christiansen, Claus; Genant, Harry; Navarro, Federico; Nasonov, Evgeny; Sambrook, Philip N; Spector, Timothy D; Cooper, Cyrus

    2013-01-01

    Background Strontium ranelate is currently used for osteoporosis. The international, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled Strontium ranelate Efficacy in Knee OsteoarthrItis triAl evaluated its effect on radiological progression of knee osteoarthritis. Methods Patients with knee osteoarthritis (Kellgren and Lawrence grade 2 or 3, and joint space width (JSW) 2.5–5 mm) were randomly allocated to strontium ranelate 1 g/day (n=558), 2 g/day (n=566) or placebo (n=559). The primary endpoint was radiographical change in JSW (medial tibiofemoral compartment) over 3 years versus placebo. Secondary endpoints included radiological progression, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) score, and knee pain. The trial is registered (ISRCTN41323372). Results The intention-to-treat population included 1371 patients. Treatment with strontium ranelate was associated with smaller degradations in JSW than placebo (1 g/day: −0.23 (SD 0.56) mm; 2 g/day: −0.27 (SD 0.63) mm; placebo: −0.37 (SD 0.59) mm); treatment-placebo differences were 0.14 (SE 0.04), 95% CI 0.05 to 0.23, p<0.001 for 1 g/day and 0.10 (SE 0.04), 95% CI 0.02 to 0.19, p=0.018 for 2 g/day. Fewer radiological progressors were observed with strontium ranelate (p<0.001 and p=0.012 for 1 and 2 g/day). There were greater reductions in total WOMAC score (p=0.045), pain subscore (p=0.028), physical function subscore (p=0.099) and knee pain (p=0.065) with strontium ranelate 2 g/day. Strontium ranelate was well tolerated. Conclusions Treatment with strontium ranelate 1 and 2 g/day is associated with a significant effect on structure in patients with knee osteoarthritis, and a beneficial effect on symptoms for strontium ranelate 2 g/day. PMID:23117245

  2. Low Back Pain and Other Musculoskeletal Pain Comorbidities in Individuals with Symptomatic Osteoarthritis of the Knee: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Suri, Pradeep; Morgenroth, David C.; Kwoh, C. Kent; Bean, Jonathan F.; Kalichman, Leonid; Hunter, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the association of concurrent low back pain (LBP), and other musculoskeletal pain comorbidity, with knee pain severity in symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods 1389 individuals from the Progression Cohort of the Osteoarthritis Initiative, age 45-79 with symptomatic tibiofemoral knee OA, were studied. Participants identified pain in the low back, neck, shoulder, elbow, wrist, hand, hip, knee, ankle, or foot. The primary outcome was the pain subscale of the Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) applied to the more symptomatic knee. We examined WOMAC pain score in persons with and without LBP, before and after adjusting for other musculoskeletal symptoms. Results 57.4% of participants reported LBP. WOMAC pain score (possible range 0-20) was 6.5±4.1 in participants with LBP, and 5.2±3.4 in participants without (p<0.0001). In multivariate analyses, LBP was significantly associated with increased WOMAC knee pain score (β[SE]=1.00[0.21]; p=<.0001). However, pain in all other individual musculoskeletal locations demonstrated similar associations with knee pain score. In models including all pain locations simultaneously, only LBP (β[SE]=0.65[0.21];p=.002), ipsilateral elbow pain (0.98 [0.40]; p=.02), and ipsilateral foot pain (1.03[0.45]; p=.02) were significantly associated with knee pain score. Having more than one pain location was associated with greater WOMAC knee pain; this relationship was strongest for individuals having four (β[SE]= 1.83[0.42]; p<0.0001), or five or more pain locations (1.86[0.36]; p<0.0001). Conclusions LBP, foot pain, and elbow pain are significantly associated with WOMAC knee pain score, as are a higher total number of pain locations. This may have implications for clinical trial planning. PMID:20799265

  3. Knee Pain during Strength Training Shortly following Fast-Track Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Bandholm, Thomas; Thorborg, Kristian; Lunn, Troels Haxholdt; Kehlet, Henrik; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding

    2014-01-01

    Background Loading and contraction failure (muscular exhaustion) are strength training variables known to influence neural activation of the exercising muscle in healthy subjects, which may help reduce neural inhibition of the quadriceps muscle following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It is unknown how these exercise variables influence knee pain after TKA. Objective To investigate the effect of loading and contraction failure on knee pain during strength training, shortly following TKA. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Consecutive sample of patients from the Copenhagen area, Denmark, receiving a TKA, between November 2012 and April 2013. Participants Seventeen patients, no more than 3 weeks after their TKA. Main outcome measures: In a randomized order, the patients performed 1 set of 4 standardized knee extensions, using relative loads of 8, 14, and 20 repetition maximum (RM), and ended with 1 single set to contraction failure (14 RM load). The individual loadings (kilograms) were determined during a familiarization session >72 hours prior. The patients rated their knee pain during each repetition, using a numerical rating scale (0–10). Results Two patients were lost to follow up. Knee pain increased with increasing load (20 RM: 3.1±2.0 points, 14 RM: 3.5±1.8 points, 8 RM: 4.3±2.5 points, P = 0.006), and repetitions to contraction failure (10% failure: 3.2±1.9 points, 100% failure: 5.4±1.6 points, P<0.001). Resting knee pain 60 seconds after the final repetition (2.7±2.4 points) was not different from that recorded before strength training (2.7±1.8 points, P = 0.88). Conclusion Both loading and repetitions performed to contraction failure during knee- extension strength-training, increased post-operative knee pain during strength training implemented shortly following TKA. However, only the increase in pain during repetitions to contraction failure exceeded that defined as clinically relevant, and was very short-lived. Trial Registration

  4. Randomised controlled trial of referral to a telephone-based weight management and healthy lifestyle programme for patients with knee osteoarthritis who are overweight or obese: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Kate M; Wiggers, John; Williams, Amanda; Campbell, Elizabeth; Yoong, Serene; Robson, Emma K; McAuley, James; Haskins, Robin; Kamper, Steven J; Williams, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common chronic diseases worldwide and is associated with significant pain and disability. Clinical practice guidelines consistently recommend weight management as a core aspect of care for overweight and obese patients with knee OA; however, provision of such care is suboptimal. Telephone-based interventions offer a novel approach to delivery of weight management care in these patients. The aim of the proposed study is to assess the effectiveness of referral to a telephone-based weight management and healthy lifestyle programme, previously shown to be effective in changing weight, in improving knee pain intensity in overweight or obese patients with knee OA, compared to usual care. Methods and analysis A parallel, randomised controlled trial will be undertaken. Patients with OA of the knee who are waiting for an outpatient orthopaedic consultation at a tertiary referral public hospital within New South Wales, Australia, will be allocated to either an intervention or a control group (1:1 ratio). After baseline data collection, patients in the intervention group will receive a 6-month telephone-based intervention, and patients in the control group will continue with usual care. Surveys will be conducted at baseline, 6 and 26 weeks post-randomisation. The study requires 60 participants per group to detect a two-point difference in pain intensity (primary outcome) 26 weeks after baseline. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the Hunter New England Health Human Research Ethics Committee (13/12/11/5.18) and the University of Newcastle Human Research Ethics Committee (H-2015-0043). The results will be disseminated in peer-reviewed journals and at scientific conferences. Trial registration number ACTRN12615000490572, Pre-results. PMID:26940110

  5. Ultrasonographic Findings in a Large Series of Patients with Knee Pain

    PubMed Central

    Artul, Suheil; Khazin, Fadi; Hakim, Jeries; Habib, George

    2014-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSKUS) is becoming more and more popular in the evaluation of different musculoskeletal abnormalities. The aim of this retrospective study was to document the prevalence and spectrum of MSKUS findings at the painful knee. Materials and Methods: All the studies of MSKUS that were performed for the evaluation of knee pain during the previous 2 years at the Department of Radiology in Nazareth hospital were reviewed. Demographic and clinical parameters including age, gender, side, and MSKUS findings were documented. Results: Two hundred and seventy-six patients were included in the review. In 21 of them, both knees were evaluated at the same setting (total number of knees evaluated was 297). One hundred and forty-four knees were of the left side. Thirty-three pathologies were identified. 34% of the studies were negative. The most common MSKUS findings were medial meniscal tear (MMT) (20%), Baker's cyst (BC) (16%), and osteoarthritis (OA) (11%). Only one knee of all the knees evaluated in our study showed synovitis. Fifty-three knees (18% of all the knees evaluated) had more than one imaging finding, mosty two and while some had three findings. The most common combination of findings was MMT and BC (8 knees), MMT with OA (8 knees), and MMT with fluid (6 knee). In 67% of the patients who had simultaneous bilateral knee evaluation, at least one knee had no abnormal findings and in 43%, both knees were negative. Conclusions: MSKUS has the potential for revealing huge spectrum of abnormalities. In nearly 90% of the positive studies, degenerative/mechanical abnormalities were reported, with MMT, BC, and osteoarthritic changes being the most common. PMID:25250194

  6. [The relevance of muscle strength--extensors of the knee on pain relief in elderly people with knee osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Slivar, Senka Rendulić; Peri, Dusan; Jukić, Igor

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to evaluate muscle strength after short-term exercise program by elderly people with knee osteoarthritis that usually non exercising and to estimate if this change have influence on decrease of the pain. This study was longitudinal experiment that involved thirty participants aged 61-80 years with clinical signs and radiographic evidence of knee OA stage Kellgren II and III. They completed individual strengthening program knee muscle stabilisator and hydrotherapy in the pool during two weeks. Muscle strength and pain was estimated pre and post experimental time. The results are analysed by SPSS programme, version 15.0 for Windows. Values demonstrated decreasing degrees of the pain and increasing of muscle strength. The pain decreased 33% in advance, final pain oposite initial estimated 2.4 degrees smaller by VAS. Muscle strength for stronger leg was (initial/final) 93.10/106.33 kg/cm2 (t-test 3.584*, p < 0.001), and for weak leg 71.93/83.37 kg/cm2 (t-test 3.118* p < 0.004). Regression analysis gave small valuables of determination coefficient (R2 of 0.014-0.081) and regression coefficient (B of 0.004-0.015) for stronger and weaker leg. Exercises produced significant increase in muscle strength and decrease in pain in OA of the knee. Hypothesis that increase of muscle quadriceps strength have influence on decrease of the pain in the knee is not confirmed. PMID:21751572

  7. Muscle power is an independent determinant of pain and quality of life in knee osteoarthritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: This study examined the relationships between leg muscle strength, power, and perceived disease severity in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in order to determine whether dynamic leg extensor muscle power would be associated with pain and quality of life in knee OA. METHODS: Baseli...

  8. Lower Limbs Function and Pain Relationships after Unilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tali, Maie; Maaroos, Jaak

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate gait characteristics, lower limbs joint function, and pain relationships associated with knee osteoarthritis of female patients before and 3 months after total knee arthroplasty at an outpatient clinic rehabilitation department. Gait parameters were registered, the active range of lower extremity joints was…

  9. Unusual Presentation of Anterior Knee Pain in Elite Female Athletes: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinning; Williams, Phillip; Curry, Emily J.; Hannafin, Jo A.

    2016-01-01

    Two elite female athletes presented with anterior knee pain with range of motion and reproducible tenderness to palpation. Diagnostic arthroscopy was performed in both cases resulting in excision of a nodular pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) in the first patient and scar tissue in the second patient. Correct diagnosis of anterior knee pain in the elite female athlete can present a challenge to clinicians. Although patellofe-moral pain is the most common diagnosis, other uncommon causes include PVNS and residual scar formation in patients with a history of surgery or trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images are helpful in confirming the diagnosis, however, in a subset of patients, the physician must rely on clinical suspicion and physical exam to make the proper diagnosis. Given the possibility of a false negative MRI images, patients with persistent anterior knee pain with a history of knee surgeries and focal tenderness reproducible on physical exam may benefit from a diagnostic arthroscopy. PMID:27114812

  10. Unusual Presentation of Anterior Knee Pain in Elite Female Athletes: Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinning; Williams, Phillip; Curry, Emily J; Hannafin, Jo A

    2016-03-21

    Two elite female athletes presented with anterior knee pain with range of motion and reproducible tenderness to palpation. Diagnostic arthroscopy was performed in both cases resulting in excision of a nodular pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) in the first patient and scar tissue in the second patient. Correct diagnosis of anterior knee pain in the elite female athlete can present a challenge to clinicians. Although patellofe-moral pain is the most common diagnosis, other uncommon causes include PVNS and residual scar formation in patients with a history of surgery or trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images are helpful in confirming the diagnosis, however, in a subset of patients, the physician must rely on clinical suspicion and physical exam to make the proper diagnosis. Given the possibility of a false negative MRI images, patients with persistent anterior knee pain with a history of knee surgeries and focal tenderness reproducible on physical exam may benefit from a diagnostic arthroscopy. PMID:27114812

  11. Care-seeking behaviour of adolescents with knee pain: a population-based study among 504 adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knee pain is common during adolescence. Adolescents and their parents may think that knee pain is benign and self-limiting and therefore avoid seeking medical care. However, long-term prognosis of knee pain is not favourable and treatment seems to offer greater reductions in pain compared to a “wait-and-see” approach. The purpose of this study was to describe the determinants of care-seeking behaviour among adolescents with current knee pain and investigate what types of treatment are initiated. Methods An online questionnaire was forwarded to 2,846 adolescents aged 15–19 in four upper secondary schools. The questionnaire contained questions on age, gender, height, weight, currently painful body regions, frequency of knee pain, health-related quality of life measured by the EuroQol 5-dimensions, sports participation and if they had sought medical care. Adolescents who reported current knee pain at least monthly or more frequently were telephoned. The adolescents were asked about pain duration, onset of knee pain (traumatic or insidious) and if they were currently being treated for their knee pain. Results 504 adolescents currently reported at least monthly knee pain. 59% of these had sought medical care and 18% were currently under medical treatment . A longer pain duration and higher pain severity increased the odds of seeking medical care. Females with traumatic onset of knee pain were more likely to have sought medical care than females with insidious onset of knee pain. Females with traumatic onset of knee pain and increased pain severity were more likely to be undergoing medical treatment. The most frequently reported treatments were the combination of exercises and orthotics (68% of those undergoing medical treatment). Conclusion Females with insidious onset of knee pain do not seek medical care as often as those with traumatic onset and adolescents of both genders with insidious onset are less likely to be under medical treatment. These

  12. Comparison of pain perception between open and minimally invasive surgery in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Biagio; Vitale, Elsa; Esposito, Antonio; Colella, Antonio; Cassano, Maria; Notarnicola, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was a well-established procedure that had shown excellent long-term results in terms of reduced pain and increased mobility. Pain was one of the most important outcome measures that contributed to patient dissatisfaction after TKA. After a computerized search of the Medline and Embase databases, we considered articles from January 1st, 1997 to October 31st, 2009 that underlined the impact on patient pain perception of either standard open total knee arthroplasty or minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty. We included articles that used the visual analog scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), Knee Score, Hospital for Special Surgery Score (HSS), Oxford Knee Score (OKS) as postoperative pain indicators, and we included studies with a minimum follow-up period of two months. We excluded studies that monitored only functional postoperative knee activities. It was shown that TKA with the open technique was a better treatment for knees with a positive effect on pain and function than the minimally invasive technique. PMID:21042568

  13. Knee and hip radiographic osteoarthritis features: differences on pain, function and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Duarte; Severo, Milton; Santos, Rui A; Barros, Henrique; Branco, Jaime; Lucas, Raquel; Costa, Lúcia; Ramos, Elisabete

    2016-06-01

    The association between radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) and symptoms is inconsistent and variable according to each joint. The purpose of this study is to understand the relation between radiographic OA features, pain, function and quality of life, in knee and hip joints. A cross-sectional study was performed using information from EPIPorto cohort. Data was obtained by interview using a structured questionnaire on social, demographic, behavioural and clinical data. Pain was assessed using a pain frequency score (regarding ever having knee pain, pain in the last year, in the last 6 months and in the last month). Quality of life was evaluated with Short Form 36 (SF-36) and function disability with the Lequesne knee and hip indexes. Radiographic knees and hips were classified using the Kellgren-Lawrence score (KL 0-4). Linear regression and proportional odds ratios estimated the association between radiographic features, pain, function and quality of life. In our study, symptomatic OA (KL ≥ 2 plus joint pain) was 26.0 % in knee and 7.0 % hip joints. In knee, the increase on radiographic score increased the odds to have a higher pain frequency score [1.58 (95 % CI = 1.27, 1.97)] and was associated [adjusted β (95 % CI)] with worst general health [-3.05 (-5.00, -1.09)], physical function [-4.92 (-7.03, -2.80)], role-physical [-4.10 (-8.08, -0.11)], bodily pain [-2.96 (-5.45, -0.48)] and limitations in activities of daily living [0.48 (0.08, 0.89)]. Regarding hip, no significant associations were found between the severity of radiographic lesions and these measures. Radiographic lesions in knee were associated with higher complaints, as far as pain and functional limitations are concerned, compared with hip. PMID:26445941

  14. Increased joint loads during walking--a consequence of pain relief in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Marius; Simonsen, Erik B; Alkjaer, Tine; Lund, Hans; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bliddal, Henning

    2006-12-01

    Joint pain is a primary symptom in knee osteoarthritis (OA), but the effect of pain and pain relief on the knee joint mechanics of walking is not clear. In this study, the effects of local knee joint analgesia on knee joint loads during walking were studied in a group of knee osteoarthritis patients. A group of healthy subjects was included as a reference group. The joint loads were calculated from standard gait analysis data obtained with standardised walking speed (4 km/h). The gait analyses were performed before and after pain relief by intra-articular injections of 10 mL lidocaine (1%). Pre-injection measurements revealed lower joint loads in the OA group compared to the reference group. Following injections pain during walking decreased significantly and the joint loads increased in the OA group during the late single support phase to a level comparable to the reference group. Although the patients walked with less compressive knee joint forces compared to the reference group, the effects of pain relief may accelerate the degenerative changes. PMID:17011194

  15. Predictors of pain medication use for arthroplasty pain after revision total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lewallen, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Our objective was to study the use of pain medications for persistent knee pain and their predictors after revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods. We examined whether demographic (gender, age) and clinical characteristics [BMI, co-morbidity measured by the Deyo–Charlson index (a 5-point increase), anxiety and depression] predict the use of NSAIDs and narcotic pain medications 2 and 5 years after revision TKA. Multivariable logistic regression adjusted for these predictors as well as operative diagnosis, American Society of Anesthesiologists class and distance from the medical centre. Results. A total of 1533 patients responded to the 2-year questionnaire and 881 responded to the 5-year questionnaire. NSAID use was reported by 13.4% (206/1533) of patients at 2 years and 16.7% (147/881) at 5 years. Narcotic medication use was reported by 5.4% (83/1533) of patients at 2 years and 5.9% (52/881) at 5 years. Significant predictors of the use of NSAIDs for index TKA pain at 2 and 5 years were age >60–70 years [odds ratio (OR) 0.62 (95% CI 0.39, 0.98) and 0.46 (0.25, 0.85)] compared with age ≤60 years and a higher Deyo–Charlson index [OR 0.51 (95% CI 0.28, 0.93)] per 5-point increase at 5-year after revision TKA. Significant predictors of narcotic pain medication use for index TKA pain were age >60–70 years [OR 0.41 (0.21, 0.78)] and >70–80 years [0.40 (95% CI 0.22, 0.73)] at 2 years and depression [OR 4.58 (95% CI 1.58, 13.18)] at 5 years. Conclusion. Younger age and depression were risk factors for the use of NSAIDs and narcotic pain medications for index TKA pain at 2- and 5-years after revision TKA. PMID:24459220

  16. Medial Abrasion Syndrome: A Neglected Cause of Knee Pain in Middle and Old Age

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Shaw-Ruey; Lee, Ching-Chih; Hsu, Chia-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Knee pain is a prevailing health problem of middle and old age. Medial plica-related medial abrasion syndrome (MAS), although a well-known cause of knee pain in younger individuals, has rarely been investigated in older individuals. This prospective study was conducted to investigate the prevalence and clinical manifestations of this syndrome as a cause of knee pain in middle and old age. The outcomes of arthroscopic treatment for this syndrome were also evaluated. A total of 232 knees of 169 patients >40 years of age (41–82, median: 63 years old) suffering from chronic knee pain were analyzed. The clinical diagnosis, predisposing factors, presenting symptoms, and physical signs were investigated. The sensitivity and specificity of each parameter of the clinical presentation for the diagnosis of MAS were evaluated after confirmation by arthroscopy. For patients with MAS, the roentgenographic and arthroscopic manifestations were investigated, and arthroscopic medial release (AMR) was performed. The outcomes were evaluated by the changes in the pain domain of the Knee Society scoring system and by patient satisfaction. The prevalence of medial plica was 95%, and osteoarthritis (OA) was the most common clinical diagnosis. Symptoms of pain and crepitus in motion and local tenderness during physical examination were the most sensitive parameters for the diagnosis. A history of a single knee injury combined with local tenderness and a palpable band found during physical examination were the most specific parameters for the diagnosis. The majority of patients suffering from this syndrome were successfully treated using AMR, yielding a satisfaction rate of 85.5% after a minimum of 3 years. MAS is a common cause of knee pain in middle and old age and can be effectively treated by AMR. Its concomitance with OA warrants further investigation. PMID:25906102

  17. Vitamin D, Race, and Experimental Pain Sensitivity in Older Adults with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Glover, T.L.; Goodin, B.R.; Horgas, A.L.; Kindler, L.L.; King, C.D.; Sibille, K.T.; Peloquin, C.A.; Riley, J.L.; Staud, R.; Bradley, L.A.; Fillingim, R.B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Low levels of serum circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D have been correlated with many health conditions, including chronic pain. Recent clinical practice guidelines define vitamin D levels < 20 ng/mL as deficient and values of 21–29 ng/mL as insufficient. Vitamin D insufficiency, including the most severe levels of deficiency, is more prevalent in black Americans. Ethnic and race group differences have been reported in both clinical and experimental pain, with black Americans reporting increased pain. The purpose of this study was to examine whether variation in vitamin D levels contribute to race differences in knee osteoarthritic pain. Methods The sample consisted of 94 participants (75% female), including 45 blacks and 49 whites with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Average age was 55.8 years (range 45–71 years). Participants completed a questionnaire on knee osteoarthritic symptoms and underwent quantitative sensory testing, including measures of heat and mechanical pain sensitivity. Results Blacks had significantly lower levels of vitamin D compared to whites, demonstrated greater clinical pain, and showed greater sensitivity to mechanical and heat pain. Low levels of vitamin D predicted increased experimental pain sensitivity, but did not predict self-reported clinical pain. Group differences in vitamin D significantly predicted group differences in heat pain and pressure pain thresholds on the index knee and ipsilateral forearm. Conclusion These data demonstrate race differences in experimental pain are mediated by differences in vitamin D level. Vitamin D deficiency may be a risk factor for increased knee osteoarthritic pain in black Americans. PMID:23135697

  18. Calcific tendinitis of biceps femoris: an unusual site and cause for lateral knee pain.

    PubMed

    Chan, Warwick; Chase, Helen Emily; Cahir, John G; Walton, Neil Patrick

    2016-01-01

    A 37-year-old man presented to the acute knee and sports medicine clinic with atraumatic lateral knee pain. He had point tenderness over the lateral aspect of his knee which had not settled with anti-inflammatory medications. Imaging revealed a large opaque lesion lateral to the knee and although there was no clear mechanism, injury to the posterolateral corner was considered. An MRI subsequently revealed a rare case of calcific tendinitis to the biceps femoris tendon insertion. This condition was self-limiting and did not require interventions such as steroid injections. This is the first reported case of calcific tendinitis of biceps femoris as a cause of acute knee pain. PMID:27473032

  19. Knee Pain and Low Back Pain Additively Disturb Sleep in the General Population: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of the Nagahama Study

    PubMed Central

    Murase, Kimihiko; Tabara, Yasuharu; Ito, Hiromu; Kobayashi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Setoh, Kazuya; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Muro, Shigeo; Kadotani, Hiroshi; Kosugi, Shinji; Sekine, Akihiro; Yamada, Ryo; Nakayama, Takeo; Mishima, Michiaki; Matsuda, Shuichi; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Chin, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Association of knee and low back pain with sleep disturbance is poorly understood. We aimed to clarify the independent and combined effects of these orthopedic symptoms on sleep in a large-scale general population. Methods Cross-sectional data about sleep and knee/low back pain were collected for 9,611 community residents (53±14 years old) by a structured questionnaire. Sleep duration less than 6 h/d was defined as short sleep. Sleep quality and the presence of knee and low back pain were evaluated by dichotomous questions. Subjects who complained about knee or low back pains were graded by tertiles of a numerical response scale (NRS) score and a Roland-Morris disability questionnaire (RDQ) score respectively. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to determine the correlates of short sleep duration and poor sleep quality. Results Frequency of participants who complained of the orthopedic symptoms was as follows; knee pain, 29.0%; low back pain, 42.0% and both knee and low back pain 17.6%. Both knee and low back pain were significantly and independently associated with short sleep duration (knee pain: odds ratio (OR) = 1.19, p<0.01; low back pain: OR = 1.13, p = 0.01) and poor sleep quality (knee pain: OR = 1.22, p<0.01; low back pain; OR = 1.57, p<0.01). The group in the highest tertile of the NRS or RDQ score had the highest risk for short sleep duration and poor sleep quality except for the relationship between the highest tertile of the RDQ score and short sleep duration.(the highest tertile of the NRS: OR for short sleep duration = 1.31, p<0.01; OR for poor sleep quality = 1.47, p<0.01; the highest tertile of the RDQ: OR for short sleep duration = 1.11, p = 0.12; OR for poor sleep quality = 1.81, p<0.01) Further, coincident knee and low back pain raised the odds ratios for short sleep duration (either of knee or low back pain: OR = 1.10, p = 0.06; both knee and low back pain: OR = 1.40, p<0.01) and poor sleep quality (either of knee or

  20. Fracture of the Anterior Locking Flange of a Total Knee Arthroplasty Polyethylene Liner Presenting with Pain following Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Jeavons, Richard; Dowen, Daniel; Rushton, Paul; Ryan, Daniel; Gill, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Fracture of the modern polyethylene insert of a total knee arthroplasty is rare. We describe the first case of a fractured anterior locking flange of the commonly used Depuy Press-fit Condylar (PFC) Sigma prosthesis. Case Report: The 80 year old Caucasian gentleman presented 8 years following previously uncomplicated and successful primary total knee replacement with pain, swelling and symptoms of instability of the knee. He was able to sublux his knee posteriorly using his hamstrings. Dissociation of the liner was evident on radiographs. He underwent revision of the polyethylene liner. It was evident during the revision that the anterior locking flange of the polyethylene liner had fractured allowing it to dissociate from the tibial tray. At 12 months following this revision he continues to do well and has similar range of movement and function to prior to the episode. This cause of the failure is not clear. Conclusion: Surgeons should be aware of this rare complication when assessing a painful or unstable total knee replacement. PMID:27298962

  1. Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on quadriceps function in individuals with experimental knee pain.

    PubMed

    Son, S J; Kim, H; Seeley, M K; Feland, J B; Hopkins, J T

    2016-09-01

    Knee joint pain (KJP) is a cardinal symptom in knee pathologies, and quadriceps inhibition is commonly observed among KJP patients. Previously, KJP independently reduced quadriceps strength and activation. However, it remains unknown how disinhibitory transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) will affect inhibited quadriceps motor function. This study aimed at examining changes in quadriceps maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and central activation ratio (CAR) before and after sensory TENS following experimental knee pain. Thirty healthy participants were assigned to either the TENS or placebo groups. All participants underwent three separate data collection sessions consisting of two saline infusions and one no infusion control in a crossover design. TENS or placebo treatment was administered to each group for 20 min. Quadriceps MVC and CAR were measured at baseline, infusion, treatment, and post-treatment. Perceived knee pain intensity was measured on a 100-mm visual analogue scale. Post-hoc analysis revealed that hypertonic saline infusion significantly reduced the quadriceps MVC and CAR compared with control sessions (P < 0.05). Sensory TENS, however, significantly restored inhibited quadriceps motor function compared with placebo treatment (P < 0.05). There was a negative correlation between changes in MVC and knee pain (r = 0.33, P < 0.001), and CAR and knee pain (r = 0.62, P < 0.001), respectively. PMID:26346597

  2. Uncommon causes of anterior knee pain: a case report of infrapatellar contracture syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ellen, M I; Jackson, H B; DiBiase, S J

    1999-01-01

    The uncommon causes of anterior knee pain should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of a painful knee when treatment of common origins become ineffective. A case is presented in which the revised diagnosis of infrapatellar contracture syndrome was made after noting delayed progress in the rehabilitation of an active female patient with a presumed anterior horn medial meniscus tear and a contracted patellar tendon. The patient improved after the treatment program was augmented with closed manipulation under arthroscopy and infrapatellar injection of both corticosteroids and a local anesthetic. Infrapatellar contraction syndrome and other uncommon sources of anterior knee pain, including arthrofibrosis, Hoffa's syndrome, tibial collateral ligament bursitis, saphenous nerve palsy, isolated ganglions of the anterior cruciate ligament, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, and knee tumors, are subsequently discussed. Delayed functional advancement in a rehabilitation program requires full reassessment of the patient's diagnosis and treatment plan. Alternative diagnoses of knee pain are not always of common origins. Ample knowledge of uncommon causes of anterior knee pain is necessary to form a full differential diagnosis in patients with challenging presentations. PMID:10418845

  3. Advantage of Minimal Anterior Knee Pain and Long-term Survivorship of Cemented Single Radius Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty without Patella Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hyung-Min; Baek, Ji-Hoon; Ko, Young-Bong

    2015-01-01

    Background The single radius total knee prosthesis was introduced with the advantage of reduced patellar symptoms; however, there is no long-term follow-up study of the same. The purpose of this study was to determine the survival rate of single radius posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty and patellofemoral complication rates in a consecutive series. Methods Seventy-one patients (103 knees) who underwent arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing using a single radius posterior-stabilized total knee prosthesis were followed up for a minimum 10 years. Clinical evaluation using Knee Society knee and function scores and radiologic evaluation were performed at regular intervals. Anterior knee pain as well as patellofemoral complications were evaluated with a simple questionnaire. The Kaplan-Meier product-limit method was used to estimate survival. Results Seventeen patients (23 knees) were excluded due to death (12 knees) or lost to follow-up (11 knees). Of the 80 knees enrolled, all femoral components and 78 tibial components were well fixed without loosening at final follow-up. Two revisions were performed because of tibial component loosening and periprosthetic joint infection. One patient with tibial component loosening refused to have revision surgery. No obvious tibial insert polyethylene wear was observed. The survivorships at 132 months were 96.7% using revision or pending revision as end points. Anterior knee pain was present in 6 patients (6 knees, 7.5%) at the latest follow-up. No patellofemoral complication requiring revision was encountered. Conclusions The single radius posterior-stabilized total knee prosthesis demonstrated an excellent minimum 10-year survivorship. The low rates of implant loosening and 7.5% of anterior knee pain as a patellofemoral complication are comparable with those reported for other modern total knee prosthesis. PMID:25729519

  4. Preoperative pain mechanisms assessed by cuff algometry are associated with chronic postoperative pain relief after total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Kristian Kjær; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Simonsen, Ole; Laursen, Mogens Berg; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    Chronic postoperative pain after total knee replacement (TKR) in knee osteoarthritis (KOA) implies clinical challenges. Widespread hyperalgesia, facilitated temporal summation of pain (TSP), and impaired conditioned pain modulation (CPM) have been found in painful KOA. This exploratory study investigated postoperative pain relief 12 months after TKR in 4 subgroups of patients preoperatively profiled by mechanistic quantitative sensory testing. In 103 patients with KOA, pressure pain detection threshold (PDT) and tolerance thresholds (PTT) were assessed at the lower leg using cuff algometry. Temporal summation of pain was measured as an increase in pain intensity scores during 10 repeated (2 seconds intervals) painful cuff stimuli. Conditioned pain modulation was calculated as the relative increase in PDT during painful conditioning stimulation. The grand averages of TSP and CPM were calculated and values below or above were used for subgrouping: facilitated TSP/impaired CPM (group A, N = 16), facilitated TSP/normal CPM (group B, N = 15), normal TSP/impaired CPM (group C, N = 44), and normal TSP/normal CPM (group D, N = 28). Clinical VAS pain intensity scores were collected before and 12 months after TKR surgery and the pain relief calculated. Less pain relief was found in group A (52.0% ± 14.0% pain relief) than in group B (81.1% ± 3.5%, P = 0.023) and group C (79.6% ± 4.4%, P = 0.007), but not group D (69.4% ± 7.9%, P = 0.087). Low preoperative PDT was associated with a less postoperative pain relief (R = -0.222, P = 0.034), whereas TSP or CPM alone showed no associations with postoperative pain relief. This explorative study indicated that patients with osteoarthritis with facilitated TSP together with impaired CPM are more vulnerable to experience less pain relief after TKR. PMID:27331347

  5. Alpine Skiing With total knee ArthroPlasty (ASWAP): physical activity, knee function, pain, exertion, and well-being.

    PubMed

    Würth, S; Finkenzeller, T; Pötzelsberger, B; Müller, E; Amesberger, G

    2015-08-01

    This study focused on the psychological and quality of life aspects of resuming alpine skiing practice after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in elderly skilled skiers. Two data pools were used in order to analyze psychological states: (a) at the beginning, at the end, and 8 weeks after a 12-week skiing intervention; and (b) concerning diurnal variations of states (i.e., skiing days compared with everyday life during intervention and retention phase). In particular, effects of skiing on amount of physical activity and perceived exertion, perceived pain and knee function, and subjective well-being were analyzed using a control group design. Results reveal that the skiing intervention substantially increases the amount of physical activity by the intervention group (122.30 ± 32.38 min/day), compared with the control group (75.14 ± 21.27 min/day) [F (2, 32) = 8.22, P < 0.01, η(2)  = 0.34)]. Additionally, the analyses of psychological states demonstrated that skiing goes along with enhanced well-being and no significant impact on perceived pain, exertion or knee function. In sum, alpine skiing can be recommended for older persons with TKA with respect to well-being, perceived pain and knee function, and perceived exertion. PMID:26083705

  6. Anterior knee pain following total knee replacement correlates with the OARSI score of the cartilage of the patella

    PubMed Central

    Vorobjov, Sigrid; Lepik, Katrin; Märtson, Aare

    2014-01-01

    Background Attempts to relate patellar cartilage involvement to anterior knee pain (AKP) have yielded conflicting results. We determined whether the condition of the cartilage of the patella at the time of knee replacement, as assessed by the OARSI score, correlates with postsurgical AKP. Patients and methods We prospectively studied 100 patients undergoing knee arthroplasty. At surgery, we photographed and biopsied the articular surface of the patella, leaving the patella unresurfaced. Following determination of the microscopic grade of the patellar cartilage lesion and the stage by analyzing the intraoperative photographs, we calculated the OARSI score. We interviewed the patients 1 year after knee arthroplasty using the HSS patella score for diagnosis of AKP. Results 57 of 95 patients examined had AKP. The average OARSI score of painless patients was 13 (6–20) and that of patients with AKP was 15 (6–20) (p = 0.04). Patients with OARSI scores of 13–24 had 50% higher risk of AKP (prevalence ratio = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.0–2.3) than patients with OARSI scores of 0–12. Interpretation The depth and extent of the cartilage lesion of the knee-cap should be considered when deciding between the various options for treatment of the patella during knee replacement. PMID:24954482

  7. Characterizing Pain Flares from the Perspective of Individuals with Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Susan; Lyden, Angela; Kratz, Anna; Fritz, Heather; Williams, David A.; Clauw, Daniel J.; Gammaitoni, Arnold R.; Phillips, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although pain in knee osteoarthritis (OA) commonly affects activity engagement, the daily pain experience has not been fully-characterized. Specifically, the nature and impact of pain flares is not well-understood. This study characterized pain flares, defined by participants with knee OA; pain flare occurrence and experience were measured over 7 days. Methods This was a multiple methods study; qualitative methods were dominant. Data were collected during the baseline portion of a randomized controlled trial. Participants met criteria for knee OA and had moderate to severe pain. They completed questionnaires and a 7-day home monitoring period that captured momentary symptom reports simultaneously with physical activity via accelerometry (N = 45). Participants also provided individual definitions of pain flare which were used throughout the home monitoring period to indicate whether a pain flare occurred. Results Pain flares were described most often by quality (often sharp), followed by timing (seconds-minutes), and by antecedents and consequences. When asked if their definition of a flare agreed with a supplied definition, 49% of the sample reported only “somewhat”, “a little” or “not at all”. Using individual definitions, 78% experienced at least one daily pain flare over the home monitoring period; 24% had a flare on over 50% of the monitored days. Conclusions Pain flares were common, fleeting, and often experienced in the context of activity engagement. Participants’ views on what constitutes a pain flare differ from commonly accepted definitions. Pain flares are an understudied aspect of the knee OA pain experience and require further characterization. PMID:25580697

  8. Auricular Acupuncture for Pain Relief after Ambulatory Knee Arthroscopy—A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Auricular acupuncture (AA) is effective in treating various pain conditions, but there have been no analyses of AA for the treatment of pain after ambulatory knee surgery. We assessed the range of analgesic requirements under AA after ambulatory knee arthroscopy. Twenty patients randomly received a true AA procedure (Lung, Shenmen and Knee points) or sham procedure (three non-acupuncture points on the auricular helix) before ambulatory knee arthroscopy. Permanent press AA needles were retained in situ for one day after surgery. Post-operative pain was treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory ibuprofen, and weak oral opioid tramadol was used for rescue analgesic medication. The quantity of post-operative analgesics and pain intensity were used to assess the effect of AA. The incidence of analgesia-related side effects, time to discharge from the anesthesia recovery room, heart rate and blood pressure were also recorded. Ibuprofen consumption after surgery in the AA group was lower than in the control group: median 500 versus 800 mg, P = 0.043. Pain intensity on a 100 mm visual analogue scale for pain measurement and other parameters were similar in both groups. Thus AA might be useful in reducing the post-operative analgesic requirement after ambulatory knee arthroscopy. PMID:15937559

  9. Pain Management in the Elderly: Transdermal Fentanyl for the Treatment of Pain Caused by Osteoarthritis of the Knee and Hip

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the utility of transdermal fentanyl (transdermal fentanyl, TDF) for the treatment of pain due to osteoarthritis (osteoarthritis, OA) of the knee and hip, which was not adequately controlled by nonopioid analgesics or weak opioids. WOMAC is a reliable, valid, and responsive multidimensional, self-administrated outcome measure designed specifically to evaluate patients with OA of the knee or hip. TDF significantly increased pain control and improved functioning and quality of life. Metoclopramide appeared to be of limited value in preventing nausea and vomiting. PMID:24527441

  10. Knee pain during activities of daily living and its relationship with physical activity in patients with early and severe knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Fukutani, Naoto; Iijima, Hirotaka; Aoyama, Tomoki; Yamamoto, Yuko; Hiraoka, Masakazu; Miyanobu, Kazuyuki; Jinnouchi, Masashi; Kaneda, Eishi; Tsuboyama, Tadao; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether knee pain during various activities of daily living (ADLs) is associated with physical activity in patients with early and severe knee osteoarthritis (OA). We hypothesized that the painful ADLs associated with decreased physical activity differ according to disease severity. This cross-sectional study enrolled 270 patients with medial knee OA, assigned to either the early (Kellgren Lawrence [K/L] grade 1-2) or the severe group (K/L grade 3-4). Physical activity was assessed using a pedometer. Knee pain during six ADLs (waking up in the morning, walking on a flat surface, ascending stairs, etc.) was evaluated using a questionnaire. We performed multiple regression and quantile regression analysis to investigate whether knee pain during each ADL was associated with physical activity. In the early group, the more knee pain they experienced while ascending stairs, the lower their physical activity was (75th regression coefficient = -1033.70, P = 0.018). In the severe group, the more knee pain they experienced while walking on a flat surface or bending to the floor or standing up, the lower their physical activity was (unstandardized coefficients = -1850.87, P = 0.026; unstandardized coefficients = -2640.35, P = 0.010). Knee pain while ascending stairs and while walking on a flat surface or bending to the floor or standing up was a probable limiting factor for physical activity in early and severe knee OA, respectively. These findings suggested that a reduction in task-specific knee pain according to disease severity could improve physical activity levels. PMID:27041381

  11. Women with knee osteoarthritis have more pain and poorer function than men, but similar physical activity prior to total knee replacement

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis of the knee is a major clinical problem affecting a greater proportion of women than men. Women generally report higher pain intensity at rest and greater perceived functional deficits than men. Women also perform worse than men on function measures such as the 6-minute walk and timed up and go tests. Differences in pain sensitivity, pain during function, psychosocial variables, and physical activity levels are unclear. Further the ability of various biopsychosocial variables to explain physical activity, function and pain is unknown. Methods This study examined differences in pain, pain sensitivity, function, psychosocial variables, and physical activity between women and men with knee osteoarthritis (N = 208) immediately prior to total knee arthroplasty. We assessed: (1) pain using self-report measures and a numerical rating scale at rest and during functional tasks, (2) pain sensitivity using quantitative sensory measures, (3) function with self-report measures and specific function tasks (timed walk, maximal active flexion and extension), (4) psychosocial measures (depression, anxiety, catastrophizing, and social support), and (5) physical activity using accelerometry. The ability of these mixed variables to explain physical activity, function and pain was assessed using regression analysis. Results Our findings showed significant differences on pain intensity, pain sensitivity, and function tasks, but not on psychosocial measures or physical activity. Women had significantly worse pain and more impaired function than men. Their levels of depression, anxiety, pain catastrophizing, social support, and physical activity, however, did not differ significantly. Factors explaining differences in (1) pain during movement (during gait speed test) were pain at rest, knee extension, state anxiety, and pressure pain threshold; (2) function (gait speed test) were sex, age, knee extension, knee flexion opioid medications, pain duration, pain

  12. The Role of Botulinum Toxin Type A in the Clinical Management of Refractory Anterior Knee Pain

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Barbara J.; Silbert, Benjamin I.; Silbert, Peter L.; Singer, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    Anterior knee pain is a highly prevalent condition affecting largely young to middle aged adults. Symptoms can recur in more than two thirds of cases, often resulting in activity limitation and reduced participation in employment and recreational pursuits. Persistent anterior knee pain is difficult to treat and many individuals eventually consider a surgical intervention. Evidence for long term benefit of most conservative treatments or surgical approaches is currently lacking. Injection of Botulinum toxin type A to the distal region of vastus lateralis muscle causes a short term functional “denervation” which moderates the influence of vastus lateralis muscle on the knee extensor mechanism and increases the relative contribution of the vastus medialis muscle. Initial data suggest that, compared with other interventions for anterior knee pain, Botulinum toxin type A injection, in combination with an active exercise programme, can lead to sustained relief of symptoms, reduced health care utilisation and increased activity participation. The procedure is less invasive than surgical intervention, relatively easy to perform, and is time- and cost-effective. Further studies, including larger randomized placebo-controlled trials, are required to confirm the effectiveness of Botulinum toxin type A injection for anterior knee pain and to elaborate the possible mechanisms underpinning pain and symptom relief. PMID:26308056

  13. The comparison of anterior knee pain in severe and non severe arthritis of the lateral facet of the patella following a mobile bearing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pongcharoen, Boonchana; Reutiwarangkoon, Chaivet

    2016-01-01

    In the past, medial osteoarthritis (OA) knee with symptomatic patellofemoral (PF) arthritis has not been recommended for a unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). However, recent studies have reported that UKA has shown good results in patients with medial OA of the knee, including those with PF arthritis. The purpose of this study is to compare the results between patients with medial OA knees; those with severe arthritis of the lateral facet of the patella and patients without severe arthritis of the lateral facet of the patella following mobile bearing UKA. We have prospectively evaluated 104 patients (114 knees) who had undergone an Oxford mobile bearing UKA. The mean follow-up was 19.05 months (range 12.30-29.70 months). The patients were divided into two groups: group I consisted of eighty patients (88 knees) who did not have severe arthritis of the lateral facet (Outerbridge grade 0-2) and group II had twenty-four patients (26 knees) who had severe arthritis of the lateral facet (Outerbridge grade 3, 4). We recorded the incidence of anterior knee pain, knee scores, pain scores, and functional scores in comparison of the two groups. The visual analog scale (VAS) and incidence of post-operative anterior knee pain had not shown any significant differences. The VAS for post-operative anterior knee pain was 0.11 (SD 0.56, range 0-3 point) versus 0.12 (SD 0.59, range 0-3 point) for group I and group II patients, respectively (P = 0.98). The incidence of post-operative anterior knee pain was 4.5 versus 3.8 % for group I and group II patients, respectively (P = 0.88). The pain scores and functional scores had not exhibited any differences. However, the knee scores of patients with severe arthritis of the lateral facet of the patella was worse than those seen in patients without severe arthritis of the lateral facet of the patella with a statistical significance. It was scored as 96.78 (SD 4.56, range 85-100) versus 94.43 (SD 4.50, range 81-100) for group I

  14. Serum Levels of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Painful Knee Osteoarthritis and Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Marta; Ezquerro, Fernando; Marcon Alfieri, Fábio; Vilas Boas, Lucy; Tozetto-Mendoza, Tania Regina; Chen, Janini; Özçakar, Levent; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disorder in the world. Among the mechanisms involved in osteoarthritis, biomarkers (cytokines profile) may be related to pain and pain intensity, functional capacity, and pressure pain thresholds (PPT). Thus, the study of these relationships may offer useful information about pathophysiology and associated mechanisms involved in osteoarthritis. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the seric concentration of pro (IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis and to correlate the levels of these biomarkers with the patients' functional capacity and pressure pain threshold (PPT) values. PMID:25821631

  15. Determinants of pain and functioning in knee osteoarthritis: a one-year prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Helminen, Eeva-Eerika; Sinikallio, Sanna H; Valjakka, Anna L; Väisänen-Rouvali, Rauni H; Arokoski, Jari PA

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify predictors of pain and disability in knee osteoarthritis. Design: A one-year prospective analysis of determinants of pain and functioning in knee osteoarthritis. Study setting: Primary care providers in a medium-sized city. Patients: A total of 111 patients aged from 35 to 75 with clinical symptoms and radiographic grading (Kellgren-Lawrence 2–4) of knee osteoarthritis who participated in a randomized controlled trial. Main measures: The outcome measures were self-reported pain and function, which were recorded at 0, 3 and 12 months. Disease-specific pain and functioning were assessed using the pain and function subscales of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index. Generic physical and mental functioning were assessed using the RAND-36 subscales for function, and physical and mental component summary scores. Possible baseline predictors for these outcomes were 1) demographic, socioeconomic and disease-related variables, and 2) psychological measures of resources, distress, fear of movement and catastrophizing. Results: Multivariate linear mixed model analyses revealed that normal mood at baseline measured with the Beck Anxiety Inventory predicted significantly better results in all measures of pain (WOMAC P=0.02) and function (WOMAC P=0.002, RAND-36 P=0.002) during the one-year follow-up. Psychological resource factors (pain self-efficacy P=0.012, satisfaction with life P=0.002) predicted better function (RAND-36). Pain catastrophizing predicted higher WOMAC pain levels (P=0.013), whereas fear of movement (kinesiophobia) predicted poorer functioning (WOMAC P=0.046, RAND-36 P=0.024). Conclusions: Multiple psychological factors in people with knee osteoarthritis pain are associated with the development of disability and longer term worse pain. PMID:27496698

  16. Two cases of chronic knee pain caused by unusual injuries to the popliteus tendon

    PubMed Central

    DAVALOS, ERIC A.; BARANK, DAVID; VARMA, RAJEEV K.

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to the popliteus tendon are less frequent than injuries to the menisci or ligamentous structures of the knee. When they do occur, injuries to the popliteus tendon tend to be the result of trauma and associated with injuries to other components of the knee. The most commonly seen injuries include tears at the musculotendinous junction and avulsion tears at the lateral femoral condyle insertion site. This report presents two unusual injuries of the popliteus tendon in patients with chronic knee pain: an isolated split tear of the tendon and a subluxed tendon residing within the lateral joint space. PMID:27386449

  17. Single-dose intra-articular bupivacaine plus morphine after knee arthroscopic surgery: a meta-analysis of randomised placebo-controlled studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-lun; Zeng, Chao; Xie, Dong-xing; Yang, Ye; Wei, Jie; Yang, Tuo; Li, Hui; Lei, Guang-hua

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety of single-dose intra-articular bupivacaine plus morphine after knee arthroscopic surgery. Design Meta-analysis. Data sources and study eligibility criteria A comprehensive literature search, using Medline (1966–2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Embase databases, was conducted to identify randomised placebo-controlled trials that used a combination of single-dose intra-articular bupivacaine and morphine for postoperative pain relief. Results 12 articles were included in this meta-analysis. The mean visual analogue scale (VAS) scores of the bupivacaine plus morphine group were significantly lower than those of the placebo group (weighted mean difference (WMD) −1.75; 95% CI −2.16 to −1.33; p<0.001). The VAS scores at the last follow-up time point (last VAS scores) of the bupivacaine plus morphine group were also significantly lower than those of the placebo group (WMD −1.46; 95% CI −1.63 to −1.29; p<0.001). The number of patients requiring supplementary analgesia was also significantly reduced (RR 0.60; 95% CI 0.39 to 0.93; p=0.02), while there was no significant difference in the time to first analgesic request (WMD 3.46; 95% CI −1.81 to 8.72; p=0.20) or short-term side effects (RR 1.67; 95% CI 0.65 to 4.26; p=0.29). Conclusions The administration of single-dose intra-articular bupivacaine plus morphine after knee arthroscopic surgery is effective for pain relief, and its short-term side effects remain similar to saline placebo. PMID:26078306

  18. Cam Femoroacetabular Impingement as a Possible Explanation of Recalcitrant Anterior Knee Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sanchis-Alfonso, Vicente; Tey, Marc; Monllau, Joan Carles

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a patient with chronic anterior knee pain (AKP) recalcitrant to conservative treatment who returned to our office for severe hip pain secondary to Cam femoroacetabular impingement (Cam FAI) at 10 months after the onset of knee pain. This case highlights the fact that the main problem is not in the patella but in the hip in some patients with AKP. We hypothesize that there is an external femoral rotation in order to avoid the impingement and therefore the hip pain in patients with Cam FAI. This functional femoral rotation could provoke a patellofemoral imbalance that may be, in theory, responsible for patellofemoral pain in this particular patient. In our case, Cam FAI resolution was related to the resolution of AKP. PMID:27247817

  19. Giant Cell Tumor of the Patella Tendon Sheath Presenting as a Painful Locked Knee

    PubMed Central

    Panagopoulos, Andreas; Tsoumpos, Pantelis; Tatani, Irini; Iliopoulos, Ilias; Papachristou, Dionysios

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 26 Final Diagnosis: Giant cell tumor of the patella tendon seath Symptoms: Efusion • locking kneepain Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Arthroscopy and open resection of the tumor Specialty: Orthopedics and Traumatology Objective: Rare disease Background: The giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath (GCT-TS) is a benign proliferative synovial tumor manifesting as an intra-articular solitary nodule. When it involves the infrapatellar fat pad it can present acutely as a painful locked knee. Case Report: A 26-year-old white male presented with a 2-week history of painful locking in his right knee. Clinical examination revealed lack of extension by approximately 20°. To help establish the diagnosis, an MRI scan of the right knee was performed, showing a large (5×4×2 cm), oval, well-circumscribed mass with a low-intensity homogenous signal. The size of the mass prohibited the removal by arthroscopy and we therefore proceeded with an open arthrotomy. Histological examination showed a tendosynovial giant cell tumor of the patella tendon sheath. At the latest follow-up, 2 years postoperatively, there was no local tumor recurrence. Conclusions: These rare tumorous lesions should be included in the differential diagnosis of painful locking knee, especially in the absence of definite traumatic history. PMID:26302970

  20. Short Term Recovery of Function following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomised Study of the Medial Parapatellar and Midvastus Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Nutton, Richard W.; Wade, Frazer A.; Coutts, Fiona J.; van der Linden, Marietta L.

    2014-01-01

    This pilot double blind randomised controlled study aimed to investigate whether the midvastus (MV) approach without patellar eversion in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) resulted in improved recovery of function compared to the medial parapatellar (MP) approach. Patients were randomly allocated to either the MV approach or the MP approach. Achievements of inpatient mobility milestones were recorded. Knee kinematics, muscle strength, Timed Up and Go, WOMAC, and daily step count were assessed before and up to six months after surgery. Cohen's effect size d was calculated to inform the sample size in future trials. Twenty-eight participants (16 males, 12 females) participated. Patient mobility milestones such as straight leg raise were achieved on average 1.3 days (95% CI −3.4 to 0.7, d = 0.63) earlier in the MV group. Knee extensor strength at 6 weeks after surgery was higher (95% CI −0.38 to 0.61, d = 0.73) in the MV group. No trends for differences between the groups were observed in knee kinematics, TUG, WOMAC, or step count. Our results suggest a short term advantage in the first 6 weeks after surgery of the MV approach over the MP approach, but a larger study is required to confirm these findings. This trial is registered with NCT056445. PMID:25349736

  1. Efficacy of Myofascial Trigger Point Dry Needling in the Prevention of Pain after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mayoral, Orlando; Salvat, Isabel; Martín, María Teresa; Martín, Stella; Santiago, Jesús; Cotarelo, José; Rodríguez, Constantino

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the dry needling of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) is superior to placebo in the prevention of pain after total knee arthroplasty. Forty subjects were randomised to a true dry needling group (T) or to a sham group (S). All were examined for MTrPs by an experienced physical therapist 4–5 hours before surgery. Immediately following anesthesiology and before surgery started, subjects in the T group were dry needled in all previously diagnosed MTrPs, while the S group received no treatment in their MTrPs. Subjects were blinded to group allocation as well as the examiner in presurgical and follow-up examinations performed 1, 3, and 6 months after arthroplasty. Subjects in the T group had less pain after intervention, with statistically significant differences in the variation rate of the visual analogue scale (VAS) measurements 1 month after intervention and in the need for immediate postsurgery analgesics. Differences were not significant at 3- and 6-month follow-up examinations. In conclusion, a single dry needling treatment of MTrP under anaesthesia reduced pain in the first month after knee arthroplasty, when pain was the most severe. Results show a superiority of dry needling versus placebo. An interesting novel placebo methodology for dry needling, with a real blinding procedure, is presented. PMID:23606888

  2. Efficacy and safety of paracetamol for spinal pain and osteoarthritis: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised placebo controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Chris G; Ferreira, Paulo H; Pinheiro, Marina B; Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; Day, Richard O; McLachlan, Andrew J; Ferreira, Manuela L

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy and safety of paracetamol (acetaminophen) in the management of spinal pain and osteoarthritis of the hip or knee. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Medline, Embase, AMED, CINAHL, Web of Science, LILACS, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from inception to December 2014. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Randomised controlled trials comparing the efficacy and safety of paracetamol with placebo for spinal pain (neck or low back pain) and osteoarthritis of the hip or knee. Data extraction Two independent reviewers extracted data on pain, disability, and quality of life. Secondary outcomes were adverse effects, patient adherence, and use of rescue medication. Pain and disability scores were converted to a scale of 0 (no pain or disability) to 100 (worst possible pain or disability). We calculated weighted mean differences or risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals using a random effects model. The Cochrane Collaboration’s tool was used for assessing risk of bias, and the GRADE approach was used to evaluate the quality of evidence and summarise conclusions. Results 12 reports (13 randomised trials) were included. There was “high quality” evidence that paracetamol is ineffective for reducing pain intensity (weighted mean difference −0.5, 95% confidence interval −2.9 to 1.9) and disability (0.4, −1.7 to 2.5) or improving quality of life (0.4, −0.9 to 1.7) in the short term in people with low back pain. For hip or knee osteoarthritis there was “high quality” evidence that paracetamol provides a significant, although not clinically important, effect on pain (−3.7, −5.5 to −1.9) and disability (−2.9, −4.9 to −0.9) in the short term. The number of patients reporting any adverse event (risk ratio 1.0, 95% confidence interval 0.9 to 1.1), any serious adverse event (1.2, 0.7 to 2.1), or withdrawn from the study because of

  3. Analysis of Early Postoperative Pain in the First and Second Knee in Staged Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Retrospective Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiuyi; Li, Lintao; Yuan, Shuai; Zhou, Yiqin

    2015-01-01

    Objective A retrospective analysis of early postoperative pain in the first and second knee in staged bilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA) to provide a clinical evidence for the change of analgesic strategy. Methods From January 2009 to January 2013, 87 cases which meet the inclusion criterion were retrospectively reviewed. In stage TKA, the postoperative pain in the first and second knee at 24h, 48h, 72h after operation were compared using the visual analogue scale (VAS) score in the rest and maximum knee flexion position. The difference in pain scores (ΔVAS) was also compared between the second and first knee at different time intervals (less than 6 months, 6-12 months, more than 12 months). Results The VAS scores in the second knee were significantly higher than those in the first knee at 24h, 48h after surgery, but with no difference at 72h. The ΔVAS in the group of less than 6 months was significantly higher than of those more than 6 months, and there was no difference in ΔVAS between group of 6-12 months and group of more than 12 months. Conclusions Patient receiving staged bilateral TKA experiences greater postoperative pain within 48h after operation in the second knee than in the first knee, which can provide a clinical evidence to enhance the analgesic strategy in the second operation of the staged bilateral TKA. And for the management of postoperative pain in staged bilateral TKA, it’s better to recommend that the interval between two operations should be more than 6 months, which may reduce the postoperative pain in the second knee, improve patient satisfaction, and speed up patient‘s rehabilitation process. PMID:26068371

  4. The relationship among psychological factors, neglect-like symptoms and postoperative pain after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Yoshiyuki; Hara, Michiya; Fujiwara, Akira; Hanada, Hirofumi; Morioka, Shu

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Persistent postoperative pain has a significant relationship with patient health and satisfaction. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence and association of neglect-like symptoms (NLS) and other psychological factors on postoperative pain in patients following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). NLS are defined as the loss of perception of the limb with pain and excessive effort required to move the limb. The authors hypothesized that NLS were an important contributor to postoperative pain. METHODS: The factors influencing pain were investigated using a longitudinal study with assessments at three and six weeks postsurgery. The relationships among demographic factors (age, body weight, body mass index), psychological factors (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Pain Catastrophizing Scale [PCS]) and NLS with postoperative pain were investigated in 90 patients after TKA. The associations among motor functions (muscle strength of knee extension, range of motion), sensory functions (joint position sense and two-point discrimination in the thigh) and NLS were also investigated. RESULTS: At three and six weeks after surgery, 36% and 19% of patients, respectively, experienced NLS. In hierarchical multiple regression analysis, NLS and PCS scores were significantly associated with postoperative pain, while joint position sense and range of motion were significantly associated with NLS. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that facilitation of sensory integration is important in rehabilitation after TKA because NLS appears to result from impaired sensory integration. The association of PCS scores with postoperative pain and NLS suggests the need to provide appropriate postoperative education to reduce persistent negative thoughts regarding future pain. PMID:25101335

  5. Modifiable lifestyle factors are associated with lower pain levels in adults with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, A Erin; Tucker, Amy J; Kott, Laima S; Wright, Amanda J; Duncan, Alison M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With no cure or effective treatments for osteoarthritis (OA), the need to identify modifiable factors to decrease pain and increase physical function is well recognized. OBJECTIVE: To examine factors that characterize OA patients at different levels of pain, and to investigate the relationships among these factors and pain. METHODS: Details of OA characteristics and lifestyle factors were collected from interviews with healthy adults with knee OA (n=197). The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index was used to assess pain. Factors were summarized across three pain score categories, and χ2 and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to examine differences. Multiple linear regression analysis using a stepwise selection procedure was used to examine associations between lifestyle factors and pain. RESULTS: Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that pain was significantly higher with the use of OA medications and higher body mass index category, and significantly lower with the use of supplements and meeting physical activity guidelines (≥150 min/week). Stiffness and physical function scores, bilateral knee OA, body mass index category and OA medication use were significantly higher with increasing pain, whereas self-reported health, servings of fruit, supplement use and meeting physical activity guidelines significantly lower. No significant differences across pain categories were found for sex, age, number of diseases, duration of OA, ever smoked, alcoholic drinks/week, over-the-counter pain medication use, OA supplement use, physical therapy use, servings of vegetables or minutes walked/week. CONCLUSIONS: Healthy weight maintenance, exercise for at least 150 min/week and appropriate use of medications and supplements represent important modifiable factors related to lower knee OA pain. PMID:26125195

  6. Comparison of the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio and pressure pain threshold after overhead assembly work and below knee assembly work

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio following overhead work and below-knee work. [Subjects and Methods] Ten men (20–30 years) were recruited to this study. The thoracic flexion relaxation ratio and pressure pain threshold was measured after both overhead work and below-knee work. [Results] The pressure-pain thresholds of the thoracic erector spinae muscle decreased significantly from initial, to overhead, to below-knee work. Similarly, the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio decreased significantly from initial, to overhead, to below-knee work. [Conclusion] Below-knee work results in greater thoracic pain than overhead work. Future studies should investigate below-knee work in detail. This study confirmed the thoracic relaxation phenomenon in the mid-position of the thoracic erector spinae. PMID:26957744

  7. Analgesia and Improved Performance in a Patient Treated by Cooled Radiofrequency for Pain and Dysfunction Postbilateral Total Knee Replacement.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Robert D; Hawkins, Jeffery K

    2015-07-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is a terminal therapy for osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. While TKR results are generally satisfactory, a significant proportion of patients experience persistent pain lasting > 3 months following surgery, even after a technically acceptable operation. Knee pain of any kind post-TKR has been reported in up to 53% of patients, while 15% of patients have reported severe pain. Pain post-TKR is worse than preoperative pain in 7%, often resulting in surgical revision. The clinical experience of a patient that originally presented to an orthopedic surgeon with OA of both knees demonstrates an alternative relatively noninvasive pain management strategy: cooled radiofrequency (CRF) ablation of sensory nerves. PMID:25857719

  8. Five-year results of a randomised controlled trial comparing mobile and fixed bearings in total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Breeman, S; Campbell, M K; Dakin, H; Fiddian, N; Fitzpatrick, R; Grant, A; Gray, A; Johnston, L; MacLennan, G S; Morris, R W; Murray, D W

    2013-04-01

    There is conflicting evidence about the merits of mobile bearings in total knee replacement, partly because most randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have not been adequately powered. We report the results of a multicentre RCT of mobile versus fixed bearings. This was part of the knee arthroplasty trial (KAT), where 539 patients were randomly allocated to mobile or fixed bearings and analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. The primary outcome measure was the Oxford Knee Score (OKS) plus secondary measures including Short Form-12, EuroQol EQ-5D, costs, cost-effectiveness and need for further surgery. There was no significant difference between the groups pre-operatively: mean OKS was 17.18 (sd 7.60) in the mobile-bearing group and 16.49 (sd 7.40) in the fixed-bearing group. At five years mean OKS was 33.19 (sd 16.68) and 33.65 (sd 9.68), respectively. There was no significant difference between trial groups in OKS at five years (-1.12 (95% confidence interval -2.77 to 0.52) or any of the other outcome measures. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in the proportion of patients with knee-related re-operations or in total costs. In this appropriately powered RCT, over the first five years after total knee replacement functional outcomes, re-operation rates and healthcare costs appear to be the same irrespective of whether a mobile or fixed bearing is used. PMID:23539700

  9. Bipartite patella causing knee pain in young adults: a report of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Chopra, Surender; Vijay, Vipul; Vaish, Abhishek

    2015-04-01

    We report on 5 patients who underwent arthroscopic excision or open reduction and internal fixation for bipartite patella. All patients presented with refractory anterior knee pain. The diagnosis of bipartite patella was made using radiography, and confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomographic arthrography. All 5 patients achieved complete resolution of symptoms after surgery, and remained pain-free after a mean followup period of 13 months. PMID:25920661

  10. A multicentre, pragmatic, parallel group, randomised controlled trial to compare the clinical and cost-effectiveness of three physiotherapy-led exercise interventions for knee osteoarthritis in older adults: the BEEP trial protocol (ISRCTN: 93634563)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise is consistently recommended for older adults with knee pain related to osteoarthritis. However, the effects from exercise are typically small and short-term, likely linked to insufficient individualisation of the exercise programme and limited attention to supporting exercise adherence over time. The BEEP randomised trial aims to improve patients’ short and long-term outcomes from exercise. It will test the overall effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of two physiotherapy-led exercise interventions (Individually Tailored Exercise and Targeted Exercise Adherence) to improve the individual tailoring of, and adherence to exercise, compared with usual physiotherapy care. Methods/design Based on the learning from a pilot study (ISRCTN 23294263), the BEEP trial is a multi-centre, pragmatic, parallel group, individually randomised controlled trial, with embedded longitudinal qualitative interviews. 500 adults in primary care, aged 45 years and over with knee pain will be randomised to 1 of 3 treatment groups delivered by fully trained physiotherapists in up to 6 NHS services. These are: Usual Physiotherapy Care (control group consisting of up to 4 treatment sessions of advice and exercise), Individually Tailored Exercise (an individualised, supervised and progressed lower-limb exercise programme) or Targeted Exercise Adherence (supporting patients to adhere to exercise and to engage in general physical activity over the longer-term). The primary outcomes are pain and function as measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis index. A comprehensive range of secondary outcomes are also included. Outcomes are measured at 3, 6 (primary outcome time-point), 9, 18 and 36 months. Data on adverse events will also be collected. Semi-structured, qualitative interviews with a subsample of 30 participants (10 from each treatment group) will be undertaken at two time-points (end of treatment and 12 to 18 months later) and analysed thematically

  11. LATERAL PAIN IN AN ATHLETE'S KNEE: A RARE CASE OF DISLOCATION OF THE FEMORAL BICEPS TENDON

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Aires; Severino, Nilson; da Silva, Ana Paula Simões; de Lima, Marcos Vaz; Resende, Vanessa Ribeiro; Kertzman, Paulo F.

    2015-01-01

    Dislocation of the femoral biceps tendon is rare and is described clinically in the literature as a lateral pain in the knee. It was initially reported as an anomalous insertion of the long head of the femoral biceps. Subsequently, it was found to be caused by abnormal mobility of the tendon over the prominence of the fibular head at certain angles of knee flexion. The objective of the present report was to describe and discuss a condition of lateral knee pain in a swimmer who started to present subluxation of the femoral biceps during sports practice, which incapacitated him from taking part in trials and competitions. The case is discussed in the light of the literature surveyed; the likelihood that the etiology for the trauma leading to this condition was repetition; and the surgical treatment instituted, which led to excellent results and the patient's return to his habitual sports practice. PMID:27047902

  12. Synovial lipomatosis: A rare cause of knee pain in an adolescent female

    PubMed Central

    Miladore, Nicholas; Childs, Mary A; Sabesan, Vani J

    2015-01-01

    Synovial lipomatosis is a benign proliferative disease of the subsynovial adipose which can lead to a variety of presentations. Cases of synovial lipomatosis in children or adolescents are rare. This case report describes an adolescent patient with a rare bilateral presentation of synovial lipomatosis. She had been treated for years prior to her presentation for juvenile idiopathic arthritis. She presented with chronic bilateral knee pain, swelling, and mechanical symptoms. Bilateral MR imaging demonstrated effusions, hypertrophy of the synovium, and polyp-like projections of tissue with the same signal intensity as fat which is pathognomonic for synovial lipomatosis. Arthroscopic synovectomy and extensive debridement of polyp like fat projections of the right knee was performed. Histopathology was consistent with the synovial lipomatosis diagnosis. Postoperatively, the patient was satisfied with her outcome with improved pain relief and function in her right knee. PMID:25893181

  13. Laboratory and sonographic findings in dialyzed patients with bilateral chronic knee pain versus dialyzed asymptomatic patients.

    PubMed

    Barisić, Igor; Ljutić, Dragan; Vlak, Tonko; Bekavac, Josip; Janković, Stipan

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate connection of plasma level of beta2-microglobulin, C-reactive protein and uric acid as well as sonographic parameters like thickness of synovial membrane, thickness of femoral condylar cartilage and presence of joint effusion and Baker's cysts with bilateral knee pain in dialyzed patients, comparing them with parameters in asymptomatic dialyzed patients. Plasma levels of beta2-microglobulin and C-reactive protein were significantly higher in symptomatic patients while uric acid level showed no difference among the groups. In symptomatic patients synovial membrane was thicker and in those patients there were more knee effusions and Baker's cysts. Thickness of femoral condylar cartilage showed no difference between groups. That suggests that inflammatory mechanisms developing from beta2-microglobulin accumulation could be important factor in bilateral knee pain in dialyzed patients even in shorter duration dialysis. PMID:17847928

  14. Cruciate Retaining Versus Cruciate Stabilising Total Knee Arthroplasty – A Prospective Randomised Kinematic Study

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, T L; Bayan, A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: While there is a large body of research in regards to cruciate retaining(CR) and cruciate sacrificing total condylar knee replacement, the literature is spars in regards to highly conforming polyetheylene such as the triatholon cruciate stabilising tibial insert (CS).The aim was to determine whether there is a difference in the range of motion, kinematics as well as the functional outcome for Triathlon CS and CR TKJR. Methods: A single hospital consecutive series of one surgeon between 2011 and 2013 were enrolled. Kinematic data recorded prospectively at the time of surgery utilizing imageless navigation included preoperative and post-replacement extension, gravity flexion, passive flexion and rotation. Intraoperative femoral and tibial cuts and definitive implants were also recorded. Statistically analysis performed to compare CS and CR TKJR range of motion, deformity correction, and rotation pre and post-operatively. Oxford functional scores were obtained at the final follow up. 124 patients were randomised to 71 CS and 53 CR TKJR. The demographics were comparable between the two groups. Results: No significant difference was found between the groups’ preoperative range of motion. The net gain in extension for the CS group was 5.65 degrees (4.14-7.17) and for CR 5.64 degrees (4.24-7.04, p=0.99) with no significant difference shown. Post-operative gravity flexion significantly increased in CS TKJR with 129.01 degrees (127.37130.66) compared with 126.35 degrees (124.39-128.30, p =0.04) for CR. A weak positive correlation was shown between the size of distal femoral cut and post-operative extension for both CS and CR TKJR. A weak positive correlation was also shown for the difference between the intraoperative cuts (tibial and femoral) and the size of the implants used, in relation to post-operative extension. Post-operative oxford scores at average of 3.4 year follow up comparable between groups. Conclusion: The kinematics of CS and CR TKJR are

  15. Comparison of Indirect MR Arthrography With Conventional MRI in the Diagnosis of Knee Pathologies in Patients With Knee Pain

    PubMed Central

    Babaei Jandaghi, Ali; Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Mirbolook, Ahmadreza; Emami-Meybodi, Mohammad Kazem; Mohammadzadeh, Solmaz; Farahmand, Maral

    2016-01-01

    Background Knee pain is a common problem in the general population. In order to determine the extent of the injury and the appropriate treatment, MRI provides the most accurate imaging method. This may be done through conventional MRI techniques or by injecting a contrast material (MR arthrography). Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of these two methods. Patients and Methods The study involved the diagnostic evaluation on 60 patients with knee pain who received treatment over the course of a one-year period. Referred patients were randomly divided into two groups: indirect MR arthrography was performed on one group, and conventional MRI was performed on the other group. Both groups then underwent arthroscopy. The results from both groups were compared with the arthroscopic findings. Results In all of the pathologies studied, the sensitivity, specificity, and the positive and negative predictive values were evaluated. A high rate of accuracy was found between MR arthrography and arthroscopy (P < 0.05) for all knee injuries, however a similar rate of accuracy between conventional MRI and arthroscopy was only seen in patients with damage to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), the tibio-femoral articular cartilage, and patella chondromalacia (P < 0.05). The highest rate of accuracy was seen in cases where indirect MR arthrography was used for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) damage (K = 1). Conclusions Our results have shown that indirect MR arthrography had greater diagnostic accuracy in regards to the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values than conventional MRI in knee pathologies. PMID:27625998

  16. Knee Pain in Children, Part II: Limb- and Life-threatening Conditions, Hip Pathology, and Effusion.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Michael

    2016-02-01

    On the basis of primarily consensus due to lack of relevant clinical studies, the most important evaluative step for knee pain is to identify any emergent conditions, including limb- and life-threatening disorders (septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and malignancy), hip pathology, or conditions associated with effusions. (2)(3)(6)(8)(11)(13)(14) PMID:26834226

  17. Influence of pain severity on health-related quality of life in Chinese knee osteoarthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jian; Cao, Yue-Long; Zheng, Yu-Xin; Gao, Ning-Yang; Wang, Xue-Zong; Chen, Bo; Gu, Xin-Feng; Yuan, Weian; Zhang, Ming; Liu, Ting; Zhan, Hong-Sheng; Shi, Yin-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the relationship among pain and other symptoms intensity, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in Chinese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods: The study was cross-sectional, descriptive, and correlational. A convenience sample of 466 patients with knee OA was recruited in the study. Age, gender, body mass index (BMI), duration of disease, and Kellgren- Lawrence (KL) scores were recorded. HRQoL and symptoms were assessed using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and the Western Ontario and McMaster (WOMAC) index in participants. Results: The sample was predominantly female (82%) with mean age 56.56 years and mean BMI 24.53 kg/m2. We found that WOMAC subscale scores significantly negative correlated with the majority of SF-36 subscale scores in knee OA patients (P < 0.05). There were no correlations between BMI, duration of disease, KL score and the vast majority of SF-36 subscale scores in patients (P > 0.05). In addition, there was a significant correlation between age and PCS, gender and MCS in patients (P < 0.05). Regression analysis showed, WOMAC subscale scores significantly negative correlated with the vast majority of SF-36 subscale scores. WOMAC-pain score had the strongest relationship with SF-36 PCS and MCS scores. Conclusions: In summary, pain severity has a greater impact on HRQoL than patient characteristics, other joint symptoms and radiographic severity in Chinese knee OA patients. Relieving of knee symptoms may help to improve patients’ HRQOL. The study provided the evidence that relieving pain should be the first choice of therapy for knee osteoarthritis. PMID:26064371

  18. The effect of patient age, gender, and tibial component fixation on pain relief after cementless total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, L A

    1991-10-01

    Cementless total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) were prospectively evaluated for pain relief in 1110 knees. The effect of screws in the tibial component, the age of the patients, and the gender of the patients were studied to determine the effect of these parameters on pain relief one and two years postsurgery. The group with screws in the tibial component (Ortholoc II) had a significantly higher percentage of pain-free knees at one year than at two years postsurgery, and the older patients had a significantly higher rate of pain-free knees at one- and two years postsurgery than the younger patients. Older female patients with Ortholoc I TKAs had a significantly higher percentage of pain-free knees than did older male patients at one-year postsurgery, but not at two years. The group with screws in the tibial components (Ortholoc II) had a higher percentage of pain-free knees at one-year postsurgery than did the Ortholoc I knees, but there was no difference between Ortholoc I and II at two-years postsurgery. In the Ortholoc II group, there was also no difference in results among sexes or between patients older and younger than 65 years old. The correlation coefficient was calculated to evaluate the relationship between body weight and the degree of pain after TKA. No significant correlation could be found at one and two years after surgery. PMID:1914298

  19. Adductor Canal Block for Postoperative Pain Treatment after Revision Knee Arthroplasty: A Blinded, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Jæger, Pia; Koscielniak-Nielsen, Zbigniew J.; Schrøder, Henrik M.; Mathiesen, Ole; Henningsen, Maria H.; Lund, Jørgen; Jenstrup, Morten T.; Dahl, Jørgen B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Revision knee arthroplasty is assumed to be even more painful than primary knee arthroplasty and predominantly performed in chronic pain patients, which challenges postoperative pain treatment. We hypothesized that the adductor canal block, effective for pain relief after primary total knee arthroplasty, may reduce pain during knee flexion (primary endpoint: at 4 h) compared with placebo after revision total knee arthroplasty. Secondary endpoints were pain at rest, morphine consumption and morphine-related side effects. Methods We included patients scheduled for revision knee arthroplasty in general anesthesia into this blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized trial. Patients were allocated to an adductor canal block via a catheter with either ropivacaine or placebo; bolus of 0.75% ropivacaine/saline, followed by infusion of 0.2% ropivacaine/saline. Clinicaltrials.gov ID: NCT01191593. Results We enrolled 36 patients, of which 30 were analyzed. Mean pain scores during knee flexion at 4 h (primary endpoint) were: 52±22 versus 71±25 mm (mean difference 19, 95% CI: 1 to 37, P = 0.04), ropivacaine and placebo group respectively. When calculated as area under the curve (1–8 h/7 h) pain scores were 55±21 versus 69±21 mm during knee flexion (P = 0.11) and 39±18 versus 45±23 mm at rest (P = 0.43), ropivacaine and placebo group respectively. Groups were similar regarding morphine consumption and morphine-related side effects (P>0.05). Conclusions The only statistically significant difference found between groups was in the primary endpoint: pain during knee flexion at 4 h. However, due to a larger than anticipated dropout rate and heterogeneous study population, the study was underpowered. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01191593 PMID:25386752

  20. Association of neuropathic pain with ultrasonographic measurements of femoral cartilage thickness and clinical parameters in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mesci, Nilgün; Mesci, Erkan; Külcü, Duygu Geler

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether neuropathic pain is associated with femoral condylar cartilage thickness, electrical pain threshold, and clinical parameters in patients with knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty patients over the age of 40 diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were enrolled. The PainDETECT questionnaire, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Short Form-36 questionnaire were completed for all patients. Electrical sensory threshold and electrical pain threshold measurements were obtained. Femoral condylar cartilage thickness was determined by means of ultrasound. [Results] PainDETECT scores of 13 or greater were observed in 28 (46.7%) patients, indicating the presence of neuropathic pain. These patients were found to have greater average pain severity, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and depression and anxiety scores and lower Short Form-36 scores than patients without neuropathic pain. Patients with neuropathic pain showed lower knee electrical sensory threshold and pain threshold values on average than patients without neuropathic pain. Femoral condylar cartilage thickness was not different between the two groups. [Conclusion] Neuropathic pain is associated with increased pain severity and decreased functional capacity and adversely affects quality of life and mood in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  1. Tactile acuity training for patients with chronic low back pain: a pilot randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic pain can disrupt the cortical representation of a painful body part. This disruption may play a role in maintaining the individual’s pain. Tactile acuity training has been used to normalise cortical representation and reduce pain in certain pain conditions. However, there is little evidence for the effectiveness of this intervention for chronic low back pain (CLBP). The primary aim of this study was to inform the development of a fully powered randomised controlled trial (RCT) by providing preliminary data on the effect of tactile acuity training on pain and function in individuals with CLBP. The secondary aim was to obtain qualitative feedback about the intervention. Methods In this mixed-methods pilot RCT 15 individuals were randomised to either an intervention (tactile acuity training) or a placebo group (sham tactile acuity training). All participants received 3 sessions of acuity training (intervention or sham) from a physiotherapist and were requested to undertake daily acuity home training facilitated by an informal carer (friend/relative). All participants also received usual care physiotherapy. The primary outcome measures were pain (0-100visual analogue scale (VAS)) and function (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ)). Participants and their informal carers were invited to a focus group to provide feedback on the intervention. Results The placebo group improved by the greatest magnitude for both outcome measures, but there was no statistically significant difference (Mean difference (95%CI), p-value) between groups for change in pain (25.6 (-0.7 to 51.9), p = 0.056) or function (2.2 (-1.6 to 6.0), p = 0.237). Comparing the number of individuals achieving a minimally clinically significant improvement, the placebo group had better outcomes for pain with all participants achieving ≥30% improvement compared to only a third of the intervention group (6/6 vs. 3/9, p = 0.036). Qualitatively, participants reported that

  2. Motor control or graded activity exercises for chronic low back pain? A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Luciana G; Latimer, Jane; Maher, Chris G; Hodges, Paul W; Nicholas, Michael; Tonkin, Lois; McAuley, James H; Stafford, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    Background Chronic low back pain remains a major health problem in Australia and around the world. Unfortunately the majority of treatments for this condition produce small effects because not all patients respond to each treatment. It appears that only 25–50% of patients respond to exercise. The two most popular types of exercise for low back pain are graded activity and motor control exercises. At present however, there are no guidelines to help clinicians select the best treatment for a patient. As a result, time and money are wasted on treatments which ultimately fail to help the patient. Methods This paper describes the protocol of a randomised clinical trial comparing the effects of motor control exercises with a graded activity program in the treatment of chronic non specific low back pain. Further analysis will identify clinical features that may predict a patient's response to each treatment. One hundred and seventy two participants will be randomly allocated to receive either a program of motor control exercises or graded activity. Measures of outcome will be obtained at 2, 6 and 12 months after randomisation. The primary outcomes are: pain (average pain intensity over the last week) and function (patient-specific functional scale) at 2 and 6 months. Potential treatment effect modifiers will be measured at baseline. Discussion This trial will not only evaluate which exercise approach is more effective in general for patients will chronic low back pain, but will also determine which exercise approach is best for an individual patient. Trial registration number ACTRN12607000432415 PMID:18454877

  3. The relation of MRI-detected structural damage in the medial and lateral patellofemoral joint to knee pain: The Multicenter and Framingham Osteoarthritis Studies

    PubMed Central

    Stefanik, Joshua J.; Gross, K. Douglas; Guermazi, Ali; Felson, David T.; Roemer, Frank W.; Zhang, Yuquing; Niu, Jingbo; Segal, Neil A.; Lewis, Cora E.; Nevitt, Michael; Neogi, Tuhina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the relation of cartilage loss and bone marrow lesions (BMLs) in the medial and lateral patellofemoral joint (PFJ) to knee pain. Methods We categorized the location of full-thickness cartilage loss and BMLs in the PFJ on knee MRIs from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis (MOST) and Framingham Osteoarthritis (FOA) Studies as no damage, isolated medial, isolated lateral, or both medial and lateral (mixed). We determined the relation of MRI lesions in each PFJ region to prevalent knee pain. Differences in knee pain severity were compared among categories of PFJ full-thickness cartilage loss and BMLs using quantile regression. Results In MOST (n=1137 knees), compared with knees without full-thickness cartilage loss, knees with isolated lateral or mixed PFJ full-thickness cartilage loss had 1.9 (1.3, 2.8) and 1.9 (1.2, 2.9) times the odds of knee pain, respectively, while isolated medial cartilage loss had no association with knee pain.. BMLs in both the medial and lateral PFJ had 1.5 (1.1, 2.0) times the odds of knee pain compared with knees without BMLs. Knee pain severity was lowest in knees with isolated medial PFJ cartilage loss or BMLs. In FOA (n=934 knees), neither isolated medial nor lateral cartilage loss was associated with knee pain, whereas isolated BMLs in either region were associated with pain. Conclusions Results were not completely concordant but suggest that knee pain risk and severity is greatest with cartilage loss isolated to (MOST) or inclusive of (MOST and FOA) the lateral PFJ. While BMLs in either the medial or lateral PFJ are related to pain. PMID:25575967

  4. [Rotational malalignment of the components may cause chronic pain or early failure in total knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Hofmann, S; Romero, J; Roth-Schiffl, E; Albrecht, T

    2003-06-01

    Rotational alignment of the tibial and femoral component plays an important role in modern total knee replacement surgery. After correct frontal alignment and proper soft tissue balancing, the rotational placement of the components represents the "third dimension" in knee endoprosthetic surgery. Improved surgical techniques with modified instruments and better rotational component positioning will lead to better functional outcomes. Patients with painful total knee arthroplasties (TKA) or early failure without evident classic implantation failures or signs of infection should be evaluated for malrotation of the components. In a prospective study in 26 patients with painful TKA and malrotation of the tibia and/or femur component, revision surgery with exchange of the components was performed. Twenty-five cases showed clinically relevant internal malrotation of the tibial component (ø 8.4 degrees ) and/or femoral component (ø 5.6 degrees ). Only one patient had 10 degrees of external malrotation of the femoral component. Combined malrotations of the tibia and femur were found in ten knees (38%). After revision surgery and correction of malrotations, 20 patients (78%) were scored with excellent and good results. Patients with painful TKA resistant to conservative therapy and evident malrotations of the component should be considered for revision surgery with change of the malrotated components. PMID:12819885

  5. Fabella Syndrome as an Uncommon Cause of Posterolateral Knee Pain after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Eriko; Yanai, Takaji; Kohyama, Sho; Kanamori, Akihiro; Yamazaki, Masashi; Tanaka, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    The fabella is a sesamoid bone that is located in the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle and has been identified on magnetic resonance imaging in 31% of Japanese people. In the present case, a 65-year-old woman experienced posterolateral knee pain, accompanied by a clicking “sound” during active knee flexion, after undergoing total knee arthroplasty for knee osteoarthritis. Eight months of conservative therapy failed to produce an improvement, with progressive osteoarthritic change of the fabella identified on plain radiography. Based on this evidence, a diagnosis of fabella syndrome was made and the patient underwent a fabellectomy. Fabellectomy provided immediate resolution of posterolateral knee pain and the clicking sound with knee flexion, with the patient remaining symptom-free 18 months after fabellectomy and with no limitations in knee function. Fabellectomy eliminated symptoms in all of five case reports that have been previously published and is regarded as an effective first choice for treating fabella syndrome after total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27418991

  6. Postoperative Pain Control for Total Knee Arthroplasty: Continuous Femoral Nerve Block Versus Intravenous Patient Controlled Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Rui Min; Lim Tey, John Boon; Chua, Nicholas Hai Liang

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pain after total knee arthroplasty is severe and impacts functional recovery. Objectives: We performed a retrospective study, comparing conventional patient control analgesia (PCA) modalities versus continuous femoral nerve blockade (CFNB) for 1582 post-TKA (total knee arthroplasty) patients. Patients and Methods: Using our electronic acute pain service (APS) database, we reviewed the data of 579 patients who had received CFNBs compared with 1003 patients with intravenous PCA over 4 years. Results: Our results show that the incidence of a severe pain episode was higher in the PCA compared with the CFNB group. Lower pain scores were observed in the CFNB group compared with the PCA group from postoperative day (POD) 1 to 3, primarily due to lower rest pain scores in the CFNB group. Conclusions: Our study shows that there is improvement in pain scores, at rest and on movement, as well as a reduction in incidence of severe pain, in patients who receive CFNB versus those who receive intravenous PCA. PMID:24904807

  7. Knee osteoarthritis related pain: a narrative review of diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Alshami, Ali M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis is a common progressive joint disease, involving not only the joint lining but also cartilage, ligaments, and bone. For the last ten years, majority of published review articles were not specific to osteoarthritis of the knee, and strength of evidence and clinical guidelines were not appropriately summarized. Objectives To appraise the literature by summarizing the findings of current evidence and clinical guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of knee osteoarthritis pain. Methodology English journal articles that focused on knee osteoarthritis related pain were searched via PubMed (1 January 2002 – 26 August 2012) and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) databases, using the terms ‘knee’, ‘osteoarthritis’ and ‘pain’. In addition, reference lists from identified articles and related book chapters were included as comprehensive overviews. Results For knee osteoarthritis, the highest diagnostic accuracy can be achieved by presence of pain and five or more clinical or laboratory criteria plus osteophytes. Some inconsistencies in the recommendations and findings were found between the clinical guidelines and systematic reviews. Generally, paracetamol, oral and topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, corticosteroid injections and physical therapy techniques, such as therapeutic exercises, joint manual therapy and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, can help reduce pain and improve function. Patient education programs and weight reduction for overweight patients are important to be considered. Conclusions Some inconsistencies in the recommendations and findings were found between the clinical guidelines and systematic reviews. However, it is likely that a combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments is most effective in treating patients with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:24899883

  8. Pain exposure physical therapy (PEPT) compared to conventional treatment in complex regional pain syndrome type 1: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Barnhoorn, Karlijn J; van de Meent, Henk; van Dongen, Robert T M; Klomp, Frank P; Groenewoud, Hans; Samwel, Han; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Frölke, Jan Paul M; Staal, J Bart

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of pain exposure physical therapy (PEPT) with conventional treatment in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) in a randomised controlled trial with a blinded assessor. Setting The study was conducted at a level 1 trauma centre in the Netherlands. Participants 56 adult patients with CRPS-1 participated. Three patients were lost to follow-up. Interventions Patients received either PEPT in a maximum of five treatment sessions, or conventional treatment following the Dutch multidisciplinary guideline. Measurements Outcomes were assessed at baseline and at 3, 6 and 9 months after randomisation. The primary outcome measure was the Impairment level Sum Score—Restricted Version (ISS-RV), consisting of visual analogue scale for pain (VAS-pain), McGill Pain Questionnaire, active range of motion (AROM) and skin temperature. Secondary outcome measures included Pain Disability Index (PDI); muscle strength; Short Form 36 (SF-36); disability of arm, shoulder and hand; Lower Limb Tasks Questionnaire (LLTQ); 10 m walk test; timed up-and-go test (TUG) and EuroQol-5D. Results The intention-to-treat analysis showed a clinically relevant decrease in ISS-RV (6.7 points for PEPT and 6.2 points for conventional treatment), but the between-group difference was not significant (0.96, 95% CI −1.56 to 3.48). Participants allocated to PEPT experienced a greater improvement in AROM (between-group difference 0.51, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.94; p=0.02). The per protocol analysis showed larger and significant between-group effects on ISS-RV, VAS-pain, AROM, PDI, SF-36, LLTQ and TUG. Conclusions We cannot conclude that PEPT is superior to conventional treatment for patients with CRPS-1. Further high-quality research on the effects of PEPT is warranted given the potential effects as indicated by the per protocol analysis. Trial registration numbers NCT00817128 and NTR 2090. PMID:26628523

  9. [Calcified inclusions in a popliteal cyst as a rare cause of persistent knee pain and recurrent effusions].

    PubMed

    Küllmer, K; Letsch, R; Bug, R

    1994-11-01

    Popliteal cysts may occur with diseases of the knee and may cause several complications. We report about a patient with a popliteal cyst, that contained calcified concrements after a femur fracture and a complex knee injury and that we found to be a rare cause of persisting knee pain and effusions. The etiology of the concrements will be discussed, that we think are more likely to be posttraumatic loose joint bodies than traumatically induced chondromatosis. PMID:7825471

  10. Exercise therapy after corticosteroid injection for moderate to severe shoulder pain: large pragmatic randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Crawshaw, Dickon P; Helliwell, Philip S; Hensor, Elizabeth M A; Hay, Elaine M; Aldous, Simon J

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of subacromial corticosteroid injection combined with timely exercise and manual therapy (injection plus exercise) or exercise and manual therapy alone (exercise only) in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. Design Pragmatic randomised clinical trial. Setting Primary care based musculoskeletal service. Patients Adults aged 40 or over with subacromial impingement syndrome with moderate or severe shoulder pain. Interventions Injection plus exercise or exercise only. Main outcome measures Primary outcome was the difference in improvement in the total shoulder pain and disability index at 12 weeks. Results 232 participants were randomised (115 to injection plus exercise, 117 to exercise only). The mean age was 56 (range 40-78), 127 were women, and all had had a median of 16 weeks of shoulder pain (interquartile range 12-28). At week 12 there was no significant difference between the groups in change in total pain and disability index (mean difference between change in groups 3.26 (95% confidence interval −0.81 to 7.34), P=0.116). Improvement was significantly greater in the injection plus exercise group at week 1 (6.56, 4.30 to 8.82) and week 6 (7.37, 4.34 to 10.39) for the total pain and disability index (P<0.001), with no differences at week 24 (−2.26, −6.77 to 2.25, P=0.324). Conclusions In the treatment of patients with subacromial impingement syndrome, injection plus exercise and exercise only are similarly effective at 12 weeks. Trial registration ISRCT 25817033; EudraCT No 2005-003628-20. PMID:20584793

  11. Cingulate GABA levels inversely correlate with the intensity of ongoing chronic knee osteoarthritis pain

    PubMed Central

    Reckziegel, Diane; Raschke, Felix; Cottam, William J

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aims to investigate the role of the mid-anterior cingulate cortex γ-aminobutyric acid levels in chronic nociceptive pain. The molecular mechanisms of pain chronification are not well understood. In fibromyalgia, low mid-anterior cingulate cortex γ-aminobutyric acid was associated with high pain suggesting a role of prefrontal disinhibition. We hypothesize that mid-anterior cingulate cortex GABAergic disinhibition may underpin chronic pain independent of the pain etiology and comorbid negative affect. Proton magnetic resonance spectra were acquired at 3T from the mid-anterior cingulate cortex in 20 patients with chronic painful knee osteoarthritis, and 19 healthy pain-free individuals using a point resolved spectroscopy sequence optimized for detection of γ-aminobutyric acid. Participants underwent questionnaires for negative affect (depression and anxiety) and psychophysical pain phenotyping. Results No differences in mid-anterior cingulate cortex γ-aminobutyric acid or other metabolite levels were detected between groups. Ratings of perceived intensity of ongoing osteoarthritis pain were inversely correlated with γ-aminobutyric acid (r = −0.758, p < 0.001), but no correlations were seen for negative affect or pain thresholds. The pain γ-aminobutyric acid interrelation remained strong when controlling for depression (r = −0.820, p < 0.001). Combined levels of glutamine and glutamate were unrelated to psychometric or to pain thresholds. Conclusion Our study supports mid-anterior cingulate cortex γ-aminobutyric acid as a potential marker of pain severity in chronic nociceptive pain states independent of negative affect. The findings suggest that GABAergic disinhibition of the salience network may underlie sensitization to averse stimuli as a mechanism contributing to pain chronification. PMID:27206661

  12. Do the Effects of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Knee Osteoarthritis Pain and Function Last?

    PubMed

    Cherian, Jeffrey Jai; Harrison, Paige E; Benjamin, Samantha A; Bhave, Anil; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2016-08-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) has been shown to decrease pain associated with knee osteoarthritis, which potentially leads to better function, improved quality of life, and postpones the need for surgical intervention. The purpose of this study was to perform a 1-year follow-up of a previous prospective group of patients with knee osteoarthritis, randomized to TENS or standard of care, who were asked to rate their changes in: (1) patient pain perception; (2) subjective medication use; (3) subjective functional abilities; (4) quality of life; (5) device use; and (6) conversion to TKA. A population of 70 patients were randomized to receive either a TENS device or a standard conservative therapy regimen. Patients were evaluated based on various subjective outcomes at minimum 1-year (mean, 19 months) follow-up. The TENS cohort had lower visual analog pain scores compared with the matching cohort. Subjective functional outcomes, as well as functional and activity scores, were also greater in the TENS cohort. Patients in TENS cohort showed significant improvements in their subjective and functional outcomes as compared with their initial status, while the control group did not show significant change. A majority of the TENS patients were able to reduce the amount of pain medications. Additionally, a large portion of the patients assigned to the TENS group continue to use the device, after completion of the trial. This study demonstrated the benefit of TENS for improving subjective outcomes in patients with pain due to knee osteoarthritis, compared with standard conservative treatments. The results of the study suggest that TENS is a safe and effective adjunct as part of the spectrum of current nonoperative treatment methods for knee osteoarthritis. PMID:26540652

  13. PAIN AT THE TIP OF THE STEM AFTER REVISION TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Albino, Rômulo Ballarin; Santos, Lívia Souza; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; lamaguchi, Maurício; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Tirico, Luis Eduardo; Pécora, José Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To correlate parameters of implants with incidence of pain. Methods: 32 knees (31 patients) operated on between 2006 to 2008 in a serie of cases of TKA revision surgery were monitored for evidence of pain at the tip of the stem. In all we used uncemented stem Scorpio TS Total Knee ® Revision System (Stryker ®). Criteria assessed: pain in the leg or thigh without other causes, diameter and length of the nail; position of the rod in the medullary canal, intramedullary canal diameter. Results: Mean age was 66.7 years and mean follow-up was 2.6 years.21,87% of patients reported leg pain, 9.37% thigh pain. The group of pacients with leg pain presented with shaft diameter 14.7 mm, length 80 mm in 71.42% and 155 mm in 28,58%, stem diameter/ intramedullary canal diameter average relation of 0,76, 42.8% had stem malalignment. The group without leg pain presented with shaft diameter 15.2 mm, length 80 mm in 68% and 155 mm in 32%, diameters average relation of 0.80, 20.8% had stem malalignment. The group with thigh pain presented with shaft diameter 18.3 mm, length 80 mm in 66.67% and 155 mm in 33,33%,diameters average relation of 0.75, 0% had stem malalignment The group without thigh pain presented with shaft diameter 16.56 mm, length 80 mm in 70.37% and 155 mm in 29,63%, diameters average relation of 0.79, 14,2% had stem malalignment. Conclusion: There was no association between the assessed criteria and pain in the tip of the stem. PMID:27027084

  14. Patient-level improvements in pain and activities of daily living after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lewallen, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To study patient-level improvements in pain and limitations of key activities of daily living (ADLs) after primary or revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods. We analysed prospectively collected data from the Mayo Clinic Total Joint Registry for improvements in index knee pain severity and limitations in three key ADLs (walking, climbing stairs and rising from a chair) from pre-operative to 2 and 5 years post-TKA. Results. The primary TKA cohort consisted of 7229 responders pre-operatively, 7139 at 2 years and 4234 at 5 years post-operatively. The revision TKA cohort consisted of 1206 responders pre-operatively, 1533 at 2 years and 881 at 5 years post-operatively. In the primary TKA cohort, important pain reduction to mild or no knee pain at 2 years was reported by 92% with moderate pre-operative pain and 93% with severe pre-operative pain; respective proportions were 91% and 91% at 5 years follow-up. For revision TKA, respective proportions were 71% and 66% at 2 years and 68% and 74% at 5 years. Three per cent with no/mild pre-operative overall limitation and 19% with moderate/severe pre-operative overall limitation had moderate/severe overall activity limitation 2 years post-operatively; at 5 years the respective proportions were 4% and 22%. Respective proportions for revision TKA were up to 3% and 32% at 2 years and 4% and 34% at 5 years. Conclusion. Our study provides comprehensive data for patient-level improvements in pain and key ADLs. These data can be used to inform patients pre-operatively of expected outcomes, based on pre-operative status, which may further help patients set realistic goals for improvements after TKA. PMID:24162150

  15. Strengthening of the Hip and Core Versus Knee Muscles for the Treatment of Patellofemoral Pain: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ferber, Reed; Bolgla, Lori; Earl-Boehm, Jennifer E.; Emery, Carolyn; Hamstra-Wright, Karrie

    2015-01-01

    Context: Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is the most common injury in running and jumping athletes. Randomized controlled trials suggest that incorporating hip and core strengthening (HIP) with knee-focused rehabilitation (KNEE) improves PFP outcomes. However, no randomized controlled trials have, to our knowledge, directly compared HIP and KNEE programs. Objective: To compare PFP pain, function, hip- and knee-muscle strength, and core endurance between KNEE and HIP protocols after 6 weeks of rehabilitation. We hypothesized greater improvements in (1) pain and function, (2) hip strength and core endurance for patients with PFP involved in the HIP protocol, and (3) knee strength for patients involved in the KNEE protocol. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting: Four clinical research laboratories in Calgary, Alberta; Chicago, Illinois; Milwaukee, Wisconsin; and Augusta, Georgia. Patients or Other Participants: Of 721 patients with PFP screened, 199 (27.6%) met the inclusion criteria (66 men [31.2%], 133 women [66.8%], age = 29.0 ± 7.1 years, height = 170.4 ± 9.4 cm, weight = 67.6 ± 13.5 kg). Intervention(s): Patients with PFP were randomly assigned to a 6-week KNEE or HIP protocol. Main Outcome Measure(s): Primary variables were self-reported visual analog scale and Anterior Knee Pain Scale measures, which were conducted weekly. Secondary variables were muscle strength and core endurance measured at baseline and at 6 weeks. Results: Compared with baseline, both the visual analog scale and the Anterior Knee Pain Scale improved for patients with PFP in both the HIP and KNEE protocols (P < .001), but the visual analog scale scores for those in the HIP protocol were reduced 1 week earlier than in the KNEE group. Both groups increased in strength (P < .001), but those in the HIP protocol gained more in hip-abductor (P = .01) and -extensor (P = .01) strength and posterior core endurance (P = .05) compared with the KNEE group. Conclusions: Both the HIP and KNEE

  16. Individuals with incident accelerated knee osteoarthritis have greater pain than those with common knee osteoarthritis progression: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    PubMed

    Driban, Jeffrey B; Price, Lori Lyn; Eaton, Charles B; Lu, Bing; Lo, Grace H; Lapane, Kate L; McAlindon, Timothy E

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated whether accelerated knee osteoarthritis (AKOA) was associated with greater pain and other outcomes and if outcomes varied over time differently among those with incident AKOA or common knee osteoarthritis (KOA), which we defined as a gradual onset of disease. We conducted longitudinal analyses among participants in the Osteoarthritis Initiative who had no radiographic KOA at baseline (Kellgren-Lawrence [KL] <2). Participants were considered AKOA if ≥1 knees progressed to KL grade ≥3 and common KOA if ≥1 knees increased in radiographic scoring within 48 months. We defined the index visit as the study visit when they met the AKOA or common KOA criteria. Our observation period included up to 3 years before and after the index visit. Our primary outcome was WOMAC pain converted to an ordinal scale: none (pain score = 0/1 out of 20), mild (pain score = 2/3), and moderate-severe pain (pain score >3). We explored 11 other secondary outcome measures. We performed an ordinal logistic regression or linear models with generalized estimating equations. The predictors were group (AKOA or common KOA), time (seven visits), and a group-by-time interaction. Overall, individuals with AKOA (n = 54) had greater pain, functional disability, and global rating scale as well as slower chair-stand and walking pace compared with those with common KOA (n = 187). There was no significant interaction between group and time for knee pain; however, there was for chair-stand pace and global rating scale. In conclusion, AKOA may be a painful and disabling phenotype that warrants more attention by clinicians and researchers. PMID:26614536

  17. Low-tech rehabilitation of bilateral patellofemoral knee pain in a runner: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Stefanick, Gary F

    2004-01-01

    Patellofemoral pain is a common ailment within both the running and general populations. Many of the structures of the anterior knee that comprise the patellofemoral joint can be the source of chronic pain and inflammation that is associated with this condition. Much of the evidence in the literature points to a delay in activation of the vastus medialis oblique muscle as compared to the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis weakness, and ultimately faulty patellar tracking as the chief causative factors in the development of patellofemoral pain. This is a single case study of a 51-year-old recreational runner with an 18-month history of bilateral patellofemoral knee pain. Treatment included the use of low-tech in office rehabilitation strategies known to affect those causative factors responsible for patellofemoral pain. Evidence based treatment modalities were utilized in combination, which included patellar mobilization, spinal manipulation, proprioceptive and strength training, and semi-rigid orthotic use, to effect vastus medialis oblique vs. vastus lateralis activation, vastus medialis strength, and patellar movement. The patient responded very well to a 12 week course of treatment and resumed recreational running with minimal to no pain at the six month, one and two year follow-ups. PMID:17549103

  18. Adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell therapy in the treatment of isolated knee chondral lesions: design of a randomised controlled pilot study comparing arthroscopic microfracture versus arthroscopic microfracture combined with postoperative mesenchymal stem cell injections

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Julien; Ford, Jon; Bates, Dan; Boyd, Richard; Hahne, Andrew; Wang, Yuanyuan; Cicuttini, Flavia; Huguenin, Leesa; Norsworthy, Cameron; Shah, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The management of intra-articular chondral defects in the knee remains a challenge. Inadequate healing in areas of weight bearing leads to impairment in load transmission and these defects predispose to later development of osteoarthritis. Surgical management of full thickness chondral defects include arthroscopic microfracture and when appropriate autologous chondrocyte implantation. This latter method however is technically challenging, and may not offer significant improvement over microfracture. Preclinical and limited clinical trials have indicated the capacity of mesenchymal stem cells to influence chondral repair. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology of a pilot randomised controlled trial comparing arthroscopic microfracture alone for isolated knee chondral defects versus arthroscopic microfracture combined with postoperative autologous adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell injections. Methods and analysis A pilot single-centre randomised controlled trial is proposed. 40 participants aged 18–50 years, with isolated femoral condyle chondral defects and awaiting planned arthroscopic microfracture will be randomly allocated to a control group (receiving no additional treatment) or treatment group (receiving postoperative adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell treatment). Primary outcome measures will include MRI assessment of cartilage volume and defects and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. Secondary outcomes will include further MRI assessment of bone marrow lesions, bone area and T2 cartilage mapping, a 0–10 Numerical Pain Rating Scale, a Global Impression of Change score and a treatment satisfaction scale. Adverse events and cointerventions will be recorded. Initial outcome follow-up for publication of results will be at 12 months. Further annual follow-up to assess long-term differences between the two group will occur. Ethics and dissemination This trial has received prospective ethics approval through

  19. Effect of site selection on pain of intravenous cannula insertion: A prospective randomised study

    PubMed Central

    Goudra, Basavana Gouda; Galvin, Eilish; Singh, Preet Mohinder; Lions, Jimme

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: Pain on intravenous (IV) cannulation continues to cause considerable anxiety among the patients visiting the hospital for elective surgery. Often, it is the only unpleasant experience, especially in ambulatory surgical settings. Although, anecdotal evidence suggests that antecubital fossa (ACF) might be less painful site for venous cannulation, no scientific study exists to validate the same. Methods: In this prospective randomised study, effect of site selection on pain of venous cannulation was studied. Fifty-five consecutive adults, scheduled to undergo elective surgery, were randomly allocated to get IV cannulation first on ACF (28 patients) or on dorsum of hand (DOH) (27 patients) followed by cannulation on the contralateral arm on the alternative site (DOH or ACF). Five patients were excluded due to multiple cannulation attempts. Pain scores on cannulation related to both sites were recorded and compared. Results: Non-parametric data and frequency data analysis, using the Wilcoxon signed rank test or the Chi-square test as appropriate, showed that ACF approach was significantly less painful in comparison to the DOH when using a 20-gauge cannula for venous cannulation (P < 0.05). Conclusion: We recommend that in the absence of any contraindications, ACF should be the cannulation site of choice. However, considerations like increased chance of kinking and obstruction might preclude such practice. PMID:25624538

  20. MRI findings of young male soldiers with atraumatic anterior knee pain.

    PubMed

    Kang, S; Park, J; Kang, S-B; Chang, C B

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate abnormal magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings of young active males with atraumatic anterior knee pain (AKP). Targeting young male soldiers, we prospectively gathered and analyzed 157 knee MRIs from patients with atraumatic AKP (AKP group) and 53 knee MRIs from patients without knee pain (control group). Abnormalities of the patellofemoral (PF) joint and extensor mechanism on MRI were more common in the AKP group than the control group (48% vs 13%, P < 0.001). The overall prevalence of medial plica (34% vs 13%, P = 0.004) and the prevalence of the thick medial plica (9% vs 0%, P = 0.023) were considerably higher in the AKP group. The cartilaginous sulcus angle in the AKP group without abnormalities on MRI was significantly higher than both the AKP group with abnormalities and the control group (145° vs 141° vs 142°, respectively, P = 0.001). Our results suggest that careful assessment of young, active males with atraumatic AKP is warranted regarding PF joint abnormalities, particularly the presence of medial plica and/or subtle abnormalities of the articular geometry. The results from the present study could be used for the management of patients with AKP. PMID:25996828

  1. Trajectories of Pain and Function after Primary Hip and Knee Arthroplasty: The ADAPT Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lenguerrand, Erik; Wylde, Vikki; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Sayers, Adrian; Brunton, Luke; Beswick, Andrew D.; Dieppe, Paul; Blom, Ashley W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Pain and function improve dramatically in the first three months after hip and knee arthroplasty but the trajectory after three months is less well described. It is also unclear how pre-operative pain and function influence short- and long-term recovery. We explored the trajectory of change in function and pain until and beyond 3-months post-operatively and the influence of pre-operative self-reported symptoms. Methods The study was a prospective cohort study of 164 patients undergoing primary hip (n = 80) or knee (n = 84) arthroplasty in the United Kingdom. Self-reported measures of pain and function using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index were collected pre-operatively and at 3 and 12 months post-operatively. Hip and knee arthroplasties were analysed separately, and patients were split into two groups: those with high or low symptoms pre-operatively. Multilevel regression models were used for each outcome (pain and function), and the trajectories of change were charted (0–3 months and 3–12 months). Results Hip: Most improvement occurred within the first 3 months following hip surgery and patients with worse pre-operative scores had greater changes. The mean changes observed between 3 and twelve months were statistically insignificant. One year after surgery, patients with worse pre-operative scores had post-operative outcomes similar to those observed among patients with less severe pre-operative symptoms. Knee: Most improvement occurred in the first 3 months following knee surgery with no significant change thereafter. Despite greater mean change during the first three months, patients with worse pre-operative scores had not ‘caught-up’ with those with less severe pre-operative symptoms 12 months after their surgery. Conclusion Most symptomatic improvement occurred within the first 3 months after surgery with no significant change between 3–12 months. Further investigations are now required to

  2. The fabella syndrome - a rare cause of posterolateral knee pain: a review of the literature and two case reports

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this article was to evaluate the risks and benefits of non-operative treatment versus surgical excision of a fabella causing posterolateral knee pain. We performed a systematic review of literature and also present two case reports. Twelve publications were found in a PubMed literature review searching the word “fabella syndrome”. Non-operative treatment and surgical excision of the fabella has been described. Case presentation Two patients presented to our outpatient clinic with persisting posterolateral knee pain. In both cases the presence of a fabella was identified, located in close proximity to the posterolateral femoral condyle. All other common causes of intra- and extra articular pathologies possibly causing the posterolateral knee pain were excluded. Following failure to respond to physiotherapy both patients underwent arthroscopy which excluded other possible causes for posterolateral knee pain. The decision was made to undertake surgical excision of the fabella in both cases without complication. Both patients were examined 6 month and one year after surgery with the Tegner activity score, the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and International Knee Documentation Committee Score (IKDC). Conclusion Consistent posterolateral pain during exercise might indicate the presence of a fabella syndrome. Resecting the fabella can be indicated and is a minor surgical procedure with minimal risk. Despite good results in the literature posterolateral knee pain can persist and prevent return to a high level of sports. Level of evidence: IV, case reports and analysis of literature. PMID:24666711

  3. The use of glucosamine for chronic low back pain: a systematic review of randomised control trials

    PubMed Central

    Sodha, Reena; Sivanadarajah, Naveethan; Alam, Mahbub

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To ascertain whether the use of oral glucosamine influences symptoms or functional outcomes in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP) thought to be related to spinal osteoarthritis (OA). Design Systematic review of randomised control trials. Searches were performed up to March 2011 on Medline, AMED, CINHAL, Cochrane and EMBASE with subsequent reference screening of retrieved studies. In addition, the grey literature was searched via opensigle. Included studies were required to incorporate at least one of the Cochrane Back Pain Review Group's outcome measures as part of their design. Trials with participants over 18 years with a minimum of 12 weeks of back pain, in combination with radiographic changes of OA in the spine, were included. Studies were rated for risk-of-bias and graded for quality. Results 148 studies were identified after screening and meeting eligibility requirements, and three randomised controlled trials (n=309) were included in the quantitative synthesis. The review found that there was low quality but generally no evidence of an effect from glucosamine on function, with no change in the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire score in all studies. Conflicting evidence was demonstrated with pain scores with two studies showing no difference and one study with a high risk-of-bias showing both a statistically and clinically significant improvement from taking glucosamine. Conclusions On the basis of the current research, any clinical benefit of oral glucosamine for patients with chronic LBP and radiographic changes of spinal OA can neither be demonstrated nor excluded based on insufficient data and the low quality of existing studies. PMID:23794557

  4. Does patella resurfacing really matter? Pain and function in 972 patients after primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Espehaug, Birgitte; Havelin, Leif Ivar; Vollset, Stein Emil; Furnes, Ove

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Resurfacing of the patella during primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is often recommended based on higher revision rates in non-resurfaced knees. As many of these revisions are insertions of a patella component due to pain, and since only patients with a non-resurfaced patella have the option of secondary resurfacing, we do not really know whether these patients have more pain and poorer function. The main purpose of the present paper was therefore to assess pain and function at least 2 years after surgery for unrevised primary non-resurfaced and resurfaced TKA, and secondary among prosthesis brands. Methods Information needed to calculate subscales from the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) was collected in a questionnaire given to 972 osteoarthritis patients with intact primary TKAs that had been reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register. Pain and satisfaction on visual analog scales and improvement in EQ-5D index score ΔEQ-5D) were also used as outcomes. Outcomes were measured on a scale from 0 to 100 units (worst to best). To estimate differences in mean scores, we used multiple linear regression with adjustment for possible confounders. Results We did not observe any differences between resurfacing and non-resurfacing in any outcome, with estimated differences of ≤ 1.4 units and p-values of > 0.4. There was, however, a tendency of better results for the NexGen implant as compared to the reference brand AGC for symptoms (difference = 4.9, p = 0.05), pain (VAS) (difference = 8.3, p = 0.004), and satisfaction (VAS) (difference = 7.9, p = 0.02). However, none of these differences reached the stated level of minimal perceptible clinical difference. Interpretation Resurfacing of the patella has no clinical effect on pain and function after TKA. Differences between the brands investigated were small and they were assumed to be of minor importance. PMID:20158405

  5. Multivariate Radiological-Based Models for the Prediction of Future Knee Pain: Data from the OAI

    PubMed Central

    Galván-Tejada, Jorge I.; Celaya-Padilla, José M.; Treviño, Victor; Tamez-Peña, José G.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the potential of X-ray based multivariate prognostic models to predict the onset of chronic knee pain is presented. Using X-rays quantitative image assessments of joint-space-width (JSW) and paired semiquantitative central X-ray scores from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI), a case-control study is presented. The pain assessments of the right knee at the baseline and the 60-month visits were used to screen for case/control subjects. Scores were analyzed at the time of pain incidence (T-0), the year prior incidence (T-1), and two years before pain incidence (T-2). Multivariate models were created by a cross validated elastic-net regularized generalized linear models feature selection tool. Univariate differences between cases and controls were reported by AUC, C-statistics, and ODDs ratios. Univariate analysis indicated that the medial osteophytes were significantly more prevalent in cases than controls: C-stat 0.62, 0.62, and 0.61, at T-0, T-1, and T-2, respectively. The multivariate JSW models significantly predicted pain: AUC = 0.695, 0.623, and 0.620, at T-0, T-1, and T-2, respectively. Semiquantitative multivariate models predicted paint with C-stat = 0.671, 0.648, and 0.645 at T-0, T-1, and T-2, respectively. Multivariate models derived from plain X-ray radiography assessments may be used to predict subjects that are at risk of developing knee pain. PMID:26504490

  6. Exploring the effect of space and place on response to exercise therapy for knee and hip pain—a protocol for a double-blind randomised controlled clinical trial: the CONEX trial

    PubMed Central

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Ulrich, Roger S; Dieppe, Paul A; Roos, Ewa M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Context effects are described as effects of a given treatment, not directly caused by the treatment itself, but rather caused by the context in which treatment is delivered. Exercise is a recommended core treatment in clinical guidelines for musculoskeletal disorders. Although moderately effective overall, variation is seen in size of response to exercise across randomised controlled trial (RCT) studies. Part of this variation may be related to the fact that exercise interventions are performed in different physical environments, which may affect participants differently. The study aims to investigate the effect of exercising in a contextually enhanced physical environment for 8 weeks in people with knee or hip pain. Methods and analysis The study is a double-blind RCT. Eligible participants are 35 years or older with persisting knee and/or hip pain for 3 months. Participants are randomised to one of three groups: (1) exercise in a contextually enhanced environment, (2) exercise in a standard environment and (3) waiting list. The contextually enhanced environment is located in a newly built facility, has large windows providing abundant daylight and overlooks a recreational park. The standard environment is in a basement, has artificial lighting and is marked by years of use; that is, resembling many clinical environments. The primary outcome is the participant's global perceived effect rated on a seven-point Likert scale after 8 weeks exercise. Patient-reported and objective secondary outcomes are included. Ethics and dissemination The Regional Scientific Ethical Committee for Southern Denmark has approved the study. Study findings will be disseminated in peer-reviewed publications and presented at national and international conferences. Trial registration number NCT02043613. PMID:25818278

  7. Massage or music for pain relief in labour: a pilot randomised placebo controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kimber, L; McNabb, M; Mc Court, C; Haines, A; Brocklehurst, P

    2008-11-01

    Research on massage therapy for maternal pain and anxiety in labour is currently limited to four small trials. Each used different massage techniques, at different frequencies and durations, and relaxation techniques were included in three trials. Given the need to investigate massage interventions that complement maternal neurophysiological adaptations to labour and birth pain(s), we designed a pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) to test the effects of a massage programme practised during physiological changes in pain threshold, from late pregnancy to birth, on women's reported pain, measured by a visual analogue scale (VAS) at 90 min following birth. To control for the potential bias of the possible effects of support offered within preparation for the intervention group, the study included 3 arms--intervention (massage programme with relaxation techniques), placebo (music with relaxation techniques) and control (usual care). The placebo offered a non-pharmacological coping strategy, to ensure that use of massage was the only difference between intervention and placebo groups. There was a trend towards slightly lower mean pain scores in the intervention group but these differences were not statistically significant. No differences were found in use of pharmacological analgesia, need for augmentation or mode of delivery. There was a trend towards more positive views of labour preparedness and sense of control in the intervention and placebo groups, compared with the control group. These findings suggest that regular massage with relaxation techniques from late pregnancy to birth is an acceptable coping strategy that merits a large trial with sufficient power to detect differences in reported pain as a primary outcome measure. PMID:18304848

  8. Knee Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your knee joint is made up of bone, cartilage, ligaments and fluid. Muscles and tendons help the knee joint move. When any of these structures is hurt or diseased, you have knee problems. Knee problems can cause pain and difficulty ...

  9. Evidence for a central mode of action for etoricoxib (COX-2 inhibitor) in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Egsgaard, Line Lindhardt; Petersen, Kristian Kjær

    2016-08-01

    The COX-2 inhibitor etoricoxib modulates the peripheral and central nociceptive mechanisms in animals. This interaction has not been studied in patients with pain. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-way crossover, 4-week treatment study investigated the pain mechanisms modulated by etoricoxib in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis. Patients were randomized to group A (60 mg/d etoricoxib followed by placebo) or B (placebo followed by 60 mg/d etoricoxib). The quantitative, mechanistic pain biomarkers were pressure pain thresholds, temporal summation (TS), and conditioning pain modulation. Clinical readouts were Brief Pain Inventory, WOMAC, painDETECT questionnaire (PD-Q), and time and pain intensity during walking and stair climbing. Etoricoxib as compared with placebo significantly modulated the pressure pain thresholds (P = 0.012, localized sensitization) at the knee and leg (control site) (P = 0.025, spreading sensitization) and TS assessed from the knee (P = 0.038) and leg (P = 0.045). Conditioning pain modulation was not modulated. The Brief Pain Inventory (pain scores), PD-Q, WOMAC, and walking and stair climbing tests were all significantly improved by etoricoxib. Based on a minimum of 30% or 50% pain alleviation (day 0-day 28), responders and nonresponders were defined. The nonresponders showed a significant association between increased facilitation of TS and increased pain alleviation. None of the other parameters predicted the degree of pain alleviation. Generally, a responder to etoricoxib has the most facilitated TS. In conclusion, etoricoxib (1) modulated central pain modulatory mechanisms and (2) improved pain and function in painful osteoarthritis. Stronger facilitation of TS may indicate a better response to etoricoxib, supporting the central mode-of-action of the drug. PMID:27007068

  10. Web-Based Study of Risk Factors for Pain Exacerbation in Osteoarthritis of the Knee (SPARK-Web): Design and Rationale

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Ben; Zhang, Yuqing; Bennell, Kim; March, Lyn; Hunter, David J

    2015-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent cause of limited mobility and diminished quality of life. Pain is the main symptom that drives individuals with knee OA to seek medical care and a recognized antecedent to disability and eventually joint replacement. Many persons with symptomatic knee OA experience recurrent pain exacerbations. Knowledge and clarification of risk factors for pain exacerbation may allow those affected to minimize reoccurrence of these episodes. Objective The aim of this study is to use a Web-based case-crossover design to identify risk factors for knee pain exacerbations in persons with symptomatic knee OA. Methods Web-based case-crossover design is used to study persons with symptomatic knee OA. Participants with knee pain and radiographic knee OA will be recruited and followed for 90 days. Participants will complete an online questionnaire at the baseline and every 10 days thereafter (totaling up to 10 control-period questionnaires); participants will also be asked to report online when they experience an episode of increased knee pain. Pain exacerbation will be defined as an increase in knee pain severity of two points from baseline on a numeric rating scale (NRS 0-10). Physical activity, footwear, knee injury, medication use, climate, psychological factors, and their possible interactions will be assessed as potential triggers for pain exacerbation using conditional logistic regression models. Results This project has been funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). The enrollment for the study has started. So far, 343 participants have been enrolled. The study is expected to be finished in October 2015. Conclusions This study will identify risk factors for pain exacerbations in knee OA. The identification and possible modification/elimination of such risk factors will help to prevent the reoccurrence of pain exacerbation episodes and therefore improve knee OA management. PMID:26156210

  11. Knee joint replacement - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... than 3 blocks because of knee pain Loose knee prosthesis Some knee fractures ... an incision over the affected knee. The patella (knee cap) is moved ... helps the prosthesis to adhere better. The two parts of the ...

  12. New and Common Perioperative Pain Management Techniques in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Elmallah, Randa K; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Pierce, Todd P; Jauregui, Julio J; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2016-02-01

    Optimal pain control in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is imperative for good rehabilitation and functional outcomes. However, despite technological advancements, surgeons continue to struggle with adequate pain management in their patients. Current modalities in use, such as patient-controlled analgesia, opioids, and epidural anesthetics, provide good pain relief but can be associated with side effects and serious complications. As a result, newer pain control modalities have been used to try to reduce the use of opioids while providing adequate pain relief. Currently, there are no clear guidelines or evidence for an optimum postoperative TKA analgesic regimen. Our aim was to evaluate the recent literature and provide a summary of the newer perioperative analgesic modalities. Evidence suggests that analgesics, such as newer oral medications, peripheral nerve blocks, and periarticular injections, may improve pain management, rehabilitation, and patient satisfaction, as well as reduce opioid consumption. The literature has also highlighted that a multimodal approach to pain management may provide the best results. However, determining which modalities provide superior pain control is still being extensively studied, and further research is needed. PMID:25892004

  13. Reduced Maximal Force during Acute Anterior Knee Pain Is Associated with Deficits in Voluntary Muscle Activation

    PubMed Central

    Salomoni, Sauro; Tucker, Kylie; Hug, François; McPhee, Megan; Hodges, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Although maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force is reduced during pain, studies using interpolated twitch show no consistent reduction of voluntary muscle drive. The present study aimed to test if the reduction in MVC force during acute experimental pain could be explained by increased activation of antagonist muscles, weak voluntary activation at baseline, or changes in force direction. Twenty-two healthy volunteers performed maximal voluntary isometric knee extensions before, during, and after the effects of hypertonic (pain) and isotonic (control) saline injections into the infrapatellar fat pad. The MVC force, voluntary activation, electromyographic (EMG) activity of agonist, antagonist, and auxiliary (hip) muscles, and pain cognition and anxiety scores were recorded. MVC force was 9.3% lower during pain than baseline (p < 0.001), but there was no systematic change in voluntary activation. Reduced MVC force during pain was variable between participants (SD: 14%), and was correlated with reduced voluntary activation (r = 0.90), baseline voluntary activation (r = − 0.62), and reduced EMG amplitude of agonist and antagonist muscles (all r > 0.52), but not with changes in force direction, pain or anxiety scores. Hence, reduced MVC force during acute pain was mainly explained by deficits in maximal voluntary drive. PMID:27559737

  14. Knee pain and osteoarthritis in older adults: a review of community burden and current use of primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Peat, G; McCarney, R; Croft, P

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Osteoarthritis is the single most common cause of disability in older adults, and most patients with the condition will be managed in the community and primary care.
AIM—To discuss case definition of knee osteoarthritis for primary care and to summarise the burden of the condition in the community and related use of primary health care in the United Kingdom.
DESIGN—Narrative review.
METHOD—A literature search identified studies of incidence and prevalence of knee pain, disability, and radiographic osteoarthritis in the general population, and data related to primary care consultations. Findings from UK studies were summarised with reference to European and international studies.
RESULTS—During a one year period 25% of people over 55 years have a persistent episode of knee pain, of whom about one in six in the UK and the Netherlands consult their general practitioner about it in the same time period. The prevalence of painful disabling knee osteoarthritis in people over 55 years is 10%, of whom one quarter are severely disabled.
CONCLUSION—Knee osteoarthritis sufficiently severe to consider joint replacement represents a minority of all knee pain and disability suffered by older people. Healthcare provision in primary care needs to focus on this broader group to impact on community levels of pain and disability.

 PMID:11156538

  15. Acupuncture for post anaesthetic recovery and postoperative pain: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We report on the design and implementation of a study protocol entitled Acupuncture randomised trial for post anaesthetic recovery and postoperative pain - a pilot study (ACUARP) designed to investigate the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy performed in the perioperative period on post anaesthetic recovery and postoperative pain. Methods/Design The study is designed as a randomised controlled pilot trial with three arms and partial double blinding. We will compare (a) press needle acupuncture, (b) no treatment and (c) press plaster acupressure in a standardised anaesthetic setting. Seventy-five patients scheduled for laparoscopic surgery to the uterus or ovaries will be allocated randomly to one of the three trial arms. The total observation period will begin one day before surgery and end on the second postoperative day. Twelve press needles and press plasters are to be administered preoperatively at seven acupuncture points. The primary outcome measure will be time from extubation to ‘ready for discharge’ from the post anaesthesia care unit (in minutes). The ‘ready for discharge’ end point will be assessed using three different scores: the Aldrete score, the Post Anaesthetic Discharge Scoring System and an In-House score. Secondary outcome measures will comprise pre-, intra- and postoperative variables (which are anxiety, pain, nausea and vomiting, concomitant medication). Discussion The results of this study will provide information on whether acupuncture may improve patient post anaesthetic recovery. Comparing acupuncture with acupressure will provide insight into potential therapeutic differences between invasive and non-invasive acupuncture techniques. Trial registration NCT01816386 (First received: 28 October 2012) PMID:25047046

  16. Physiotherapy for sleep disturbance in chronic low back pain: a feasibility randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sleep disturbance is becoming increasingly recognised as a clinically important symptom in people with chronic low back pain (CLBP, low back pain >12 weeks), associated with physical inactivity and depression. Current research and international clinical guidelines recommend people with CLBP assume a physically active role in their recovery to prevent chronicity, but the high prevalence of sleep disturbance in this population may be unknowingly limiting their ability to participate in exercise-based rehabilitation programmes and contributing to poor outcomes. There is currently no knowledge concerning the effectiveness of physiotherapy on sleep disturbance in people with chronic low back pain and no evidence of the feasibility of conducting randomized controlled trials that comprehensively evaluate sleep as an outcome measure in this population. Methods/Design This study will evaluate the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial (RCT), exploring the effects of three forms of physiotherapy (supervised general exercise programme, individualized walking programme and usual physiotherapy, which will serve as the control group) on sleep quality in people with chronic low back pain. A presenting sample of 60 consenting patients will be recruited in the physiotherapy department of Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland, and randomly allocated to one of the three groups in a concealed manner. The main outcomes will be sleep quality (self-report and objective measurement), and self-reported functional disability, pain, quality of life, fear avoidance, anxiety and depression, physical activity, and patient satisfaction. Outcome will be evaluated at baseline, 3 months and 6 months. Qualitative telephone interviews will be embedded in the research design to obtain feedback from a sample of participants' about their experiences of sleep monitoring, trial participation and interventions, and to inform the design of a fully powered future RCT. Planned analysis will

  17. Low back pain of mechanical origin: randomised comparison of chiropractic and hospital outpatient treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Meade, T W; Dyer, S; Browne, W; Townsend, J; Frank, A O

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare chiropractic and hospital outpatient treatment for managing low back pain of mechanical origin. DESIGN--Randomised controlled trial. Allocation to chiropractic or hospital management by minimisation to establish groups for analysis of results according to initial referral clinic, length of current episode, history, and severity of back pain. Patients were followed up for up two years. SETTING--Chiropractic and hospital outpatient clinics in 11 centres. PATIENTS--741 Patients aged 18-65 who had no contraindications to manipulation and who had not been treated within the past month. INTERVENTIONS--Treatment at the discretion of the chiropractors, who used chiropractic manipulation in most patients, or of the hospital staff, who most commonly used Maitland mobilisation or manipulation, or both. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Changes in the score on the Oswestry pain disability questionnaire and in the results of tests of straight leg raising and lumbar flexion. RESULTS--Chiropractic treatment was more effective than hospital outpatient management, mainly for patients with chronic or severe back pain. A benefit of about 7% points on the Oswestry scale was seen at two years. The benefit of chiropractic treatment became more evident throughout the follow up period. Secondary outcome measures also showed that chiropractic was more beneficial. CONCLUSIONS--For patients with low back pain in whom manipulation is not contraindicated chiropractic almost certainly confers worthwhile, long term benefit in comparison with hospital outpatient management. The benefit is seen mainly in those with chronic or severe pain. Introducing chiropractic into NHS practice should be considered. PMID:2143092

  18. Does anterior knee pain severity and function relate to the frontal plane projection angle and trunk and hip strength in women with patellofemoral pain?

    PubMed

    Almeida, Gabriel Peixoto Leão; Carvalho E Silva, Ana Paula de Moura Campos; França, Fábio Jorge Renovato; Magalhães, Maurício Oliveira; Burke, Thomaz Nogueira; Marques, Amélia Pasqual

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between knee pain severity and function with the frontal plane projection angle (FPPA) and trunk and hip peak torque (PT) in women with patellofemoral pain (PFPS). Twenty-two women with PFPS were assessed. Knee pain severity (KPS) was assessed with an 11-point visual analog scale and function with an Anterior Knee Pain Scale. The FPPA was recorded with a digital camera. PT of extensors, abductors, and the lateral rotators of hip and lateral core stability were measured with a handheld dynamometer. FPPA was the only predictor for the KPS. Regarding predictors of function, PT of lateral core stability and the extensor and abductor of the hip explained 41.4% of the function. Increase in FPPA was associated with greater KPS, and the lowest PT of lateral core stability, hip abductors, and extensors was associated with lower function in women with PFPS. PMID:26118529

  19. The effect of music on pain and acute confusion in older adults undergoing hip and knee surgery.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Ruth; Locsin, Rozzano

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of music listening in older adults following hip or knee surgery. Acute confusion and pain after surgery can increase length of stay and reduce function. Study results demonstrate a reduction in acute confusion and pain and improved ambulation and higher satisfaction scores in older adults who listened to music. PMID:16974175

  20. Pressure and pain In Systemic sclerosis/Scleroderma - an evaluation of a simple intervention (PISCES): randomised controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Foot problems associated with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc)/Scleroderma have been reported to be both common and disabling. There are only limited data describing specifically, the mechanical changes occurring in the foot in SSc. A pilot project conducted in preparation for this trial confirmed the previous reports of foot related impairment and reduced foot function in people with SSc and demonstrated a link to mechanical etiologies. To-date there have been no formal studies of interventions directed at the foot problems experienced by people with Systemic Sclerosis. The primary aim of this trial is to evaluate whether foot pain and foot-related health status in people with Systemic Sclerosis can be improved through the provision of a simple pressure-relieving insole. Methods The proposed trial is a pragmatic, multicenter, randomised controlled clinical trial following a completed pilot study. In four participating centres, 140 consenting patients with SSc and plantar foot pain will be randomised to receive either a commercially available pressure relieving and thermally insulating insole, or a sham insole with no cushioning or thermal properties. The primary end point is a reduction in pain measured using the Foot Function Index Pain subscale, 12 weeks after the start of intervention. Participants will complete the primary outcome measure (Foot Function Index pain sub-scale) prior to randomisation and at 12 weeks post randomisation. Secondary outcomes include participant reported pain and disability as derived from the Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Questionnaire and plantar pressures with and without the insoles in situ. Discussion This trial protocol proposes a rigorous and potentially significant evaluation of a simple and readily provided therapeutic approach which, if effective, could be of a great benefit for this group of patients. Trial registration number ISRCTN: ISRCTN02824122 PMID:22309847

  1. UK Back pain Exercise And Manipulation (UK BEAM) trial – national randomised trial of physical treatments for back pain in primary care: objectives, design and interventions [ISRCTN32683578

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Background Low back pain has major health and social implications. Although there have been many randomised controlled trials of manipulation and exercise for the management of low back pain, the role of these two treatments in its routine management remains unclear. A previous trial comparing private chiropractic treatment with National Health Service (NHS) outpatient treatment, which found a benefit from chiropractic treatment, has been criticised because it did not take treatment location into account. There are data to suggest that general exercise programmes may have beneficial effects on low back pain. The UK Medical Research Council (MRC) has funded this major trial of physical treatments for back pain, based in primary care. It aims to establish if, when added to best care in general practice, a defined package of spinal manipulation and a defined programme of exercise classes (Back to Fitness) improve participant-assessed outcomes. Additionally the trial compares outcomes between participants receiving the spinal manipulation in NHS premises and in private premises. Design Randomised controlled trial using a 3 × 2 factorial design. Methods We sought to randomise 1350 participants with simple low back pain of at least one month's duration. These came from 14 locations across the UK, each with a cluster of 10–15 general practices that were members of the MRC General Practice Research Framework (GPRF). All practices were trained in the active management of low back pain. Participants were randomised to this form of general practice care only, or this general practice care plus manipulation, or this general practice care plus exercise, or this general practice care plus manipulation followed by exercise. Those randomised to manipulation were further randomised to receive treatment in either NHS or private premises. Follow up was by postal questionnaire one, three and 12 months after randomisation. The primary analysis will consider the main treatment

  2. The Associations between Pain Sensitivity and Knee Muscle Strength in Healthy Volunteers: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Bliddal, Henning

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate associations between muscle strength and pain sensitivity among healthy volunteers and associations between different pain sensitivity measures. Methods. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers (21 females) participated. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were obtained from 1) computer-controlled pressure algometry on the vastus lateralis and deltoid muscles and on the infrapatellar fat pad and 2) computerized cuff pressure algometry applied on the lower leg. Deep-tissue pain sensitivity (intensity and duration) was assessed by hypertonic saline injections into the vastus lateralis, deltoid, and infrapatellar fat pad. Quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength was assessed isometrically at 60-degree knee flexion using a dynamometer. Associations between pain sensitivity and muscle strength were investigated using multiple regressions including age, gender, and body mass index as covariates. Results. Knee extension strength was associated with computer-controlled PPT on the vastus lateralis muscle. Computer-controlled PPTs were significantly correlated between sites (r > 0.72) and with cuff PPT (r > 0.4). Saline induced pain intensity and duration were correlated between sites (r > 0.39) and with all PPTs (r < −0.41). Conclusions. Pressure pain thresholds at the vastus lateralis are positively associated with knee extensor muscle strength. Different pain sensitivity assessment methods are generally correlated. The cuff PPT and evoked infrapatellar pain seem to reflect the general pain sensitivity. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01351558. PMID:24167727

  3. Inferomedial or Inferolateral Intra-articular Injections of the Knee to Minimize Pain Intensity.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Todd P; Elmallah, Randa K; Jauregui, Julio J; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    Pain levels of 3 knee intra-articular corticosteroid injection sites were assessed to determine if an optimal site exists. Patients were stratified by site, demographic, and disease characteristics. All injections were performed by 1 surgeon using a uniform technique. Pain severity was assessed before, 1 minute after, and 5 minutes after injection using a visual analog scale. Mean visual analog scale scores for the lateral suprapatellar, medial infrapatellar, and lateral infrapatellar injection sites were 7, 4, and 2 points, respectively, but this was not statistically significant. These results suggest intra-articular injections should be administered from an inferomedial or inferolateral site to minimize pain intensity. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e578-e581.]. PMID:27064778

  4. Knee Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not helping you anymore. When you have a total knee replacement, the surgeon removes damaged cartilage and bone ...

  5. A COMPARISON OF TWO TAPING TECHNIQUES (KINESIO AND MCCONNELL) AND THEIR EFFECT ON ANTERIOR KNEE PAIN DURING FUNCTIONAL ACTIVITIES

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Jenie; Dmochowska, Katarzyna; Scariah, Shiju; Varughese, Jincy

    2013-01-01

    Background: Anterior knee pain is a clinical syndrome characterized by pain experienced perceived over the anterior aspect of the knee that can be aggravated by functional activities such as stair climbing and squatting. Two taping techniques commonly used for anterior knee pain in the clinic include the McConnell Taping Technique (MT) and the Kinesio Taping® Method (KT®). Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of KT® and the MT versus no tape in subjects with anterior knee pain during a squat lift and stair climbing. Design: Pretest‐ posttest design. Participants: A total of 20 subjects (15 female, 5 male) with unilateral anterior knee pain were recruited. The mean age of the subjects was 24 (+/–3) years, with a mean weight of 160 (+/–28) pounds. Methods: Each participant was tested during two functional activities; a squat lift with a weighted box (10% of his/her body weight, plus the weight [8.5 pounds] of the box) and stair climbing under three conditions: 1) no tape, 2) MT and 3) KT®. Pain levels were assessed (verbally) using the 0‐10 Numeric Pain Intensity Scale. Results: The median (interquartile range [IQR]) pain during squat lift was 2 (2.75) for no tape, 1 (1) for KT®, and 0.5 (2) for McConnell, with no significant differences between the groups. During the stair activity the median (IQR) pain was 1.5 (2.75) for no tape, 1 (1.75) for KT®, and 1 (1.75) for MT with a significant difference (p=0.024) between the groups. Further analysis determined that the only a significant difference was (p=0.034) between the no tape and the KT® conditions. Conclusion: The results of this study found that both the KT® and the MT may be effective in reducing pain during stair climbing activities. Level of Evidence: Level 2, Prospective Cohort study PMID:23593548

  6. EULAR report on the use of ultrasonography in painful knee osteoarthritis. Part 1: Prevalence of inflammation in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    D'Agostino, M; Conaghan, P; Le Bars, M; Baron, G; Grassi, W; Martin-Mola, E; Wakefield, R; Brasseur, J; So, A; Backhaus, M; Malaise, M; Burmester, G; Schmidely, N; Ravaud, P; Dougados, M; Emery, P

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the prevalence of inflammation in subjects with chronic painful knee osteoarthritis (OA), as determined by the presence of synovitis or joint effusion at ultrasonography (US); and to evaluate the correlation between synovitis, effusion, and clinical parameters. Methods: A cross sectional, multicentre, European study was conducted under the umbrella of EULAR-ESCISIT. Subjects had primary chronic knee OA (ACR criteria) with pain during physical activity ⩾30 mm for at least 48 hours. Clinical parameters were collected by a rheumatologist and an US examination of the painful knee was performed by a radiologist or rheumatologist within 72 hours of the clinical examination. Ultrasonographic synovitis was defined as synovial thickness ⩾4 mm and diffuse or nodular appearance, and a joint effusion was defined as effusion depth ⩾4 mm. Results: 600 patients with painful knee OA were analysed. At US 16 (2.7%) had synovitis alone, 85 (14.2%) had both synovitis and effusion, 177 (29.5%) had joint effusion alone, and 322 (53.7%) had no inflammation according to the definitions employed. Multivariate analysis showed that inflammation seen by US correlated statistically with advanced radiographic disease (Kellgren-Lawrence grade ⩾3; odds ratio (OR) = 2.20 and 1.91 for synovitis and joint effusion, respectively), and with clinical signs and symptoms suggestive of an inflammatory "flare", such as joint effusion on clinical examination (OR = 1.97 and 2.70 for synovitis and joint effusion, respectively) or sudden aggravation of knee pain (OR = 1.77 for joint effusion). Conclusion: US can detect synovial inflammation and effusion in painful knee OA, which correlate significantly with knee synovitis, effusion, and clinical parameters suggestive of an inflammatory "flare". PMID:15878903

  7. De Novo Cerebral Palsy Diagnosis in 9-Year-Old Soccer Player Presenting With Knee Pain.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, Jérôme; Jevremovic, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    A 9-year-old boy presented to our outpatient specialized sport and exercise medicine clinic complaining of a subacute onset of unilateral knee pain, after an increased level of soccer training. His knee examination was unremarkable. However, he demonstrated significant tenderness on palpation of his ipsilateral hip flexor and adductor tendons. Abnormalities in muscle tone and difficulty in relaxing and resisting the examiner properly were noted and lead to a complete neurological examination. It demonstrated multiple abnormalities such as increased tone and deep tendon reflexes, greater in lower than upper extremities, and abnormal patterning. A mild form of spastic diplegia was suspected and the patient was referred to a pediatric neurologist who confirmed our initial diagnosis. This case draws attention to the importance of maintaining a high level of suspicion for milder forms of diseases that can go unnoticed for years. PMID:25831409

  8. Does pre-surgical central modulation of pain influence outcome after total knee replacement? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Baert, I A C; Lluch, E; Mulder, T; Nijs, J; Noten, S; Meeus, M

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to systematically review whether the presence of altered central pain modulation pre-surgical influences outcome after total knee replacement (TKR) in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), and if so which indices of central pain modulation predict poor outcome after TKR. To identify relevant articles, PubMed and Web of Science were searched. The search strategy was a combination of key words related to "Knee Osteoarthritis and Total Knee Replacement", "Central Pain Modulation" and "Post-Surgical Outcome Measures". Articles fulfilling the inclusion criteria were screened for methodological quality and results were analyzed and summarized. Sixteen prospective cohort studies were included. Strong evidence is available that presence of catastrophic thinking and poor coping strategies predict more pain after TKR and that there is no association between fear of movement and post-surgical pain or function. Evidence on other psychosocial influences is limited or conflicting. Literature on the influence of other signs of altered central pain modulation on post-surgical outcome is scarce. It is plausible that pre-surgical signs of altered central pain modulation, such as joint pain at rest or widespread pain sensitization, predict more post-surgical pain. Surgeons should be attentive for patients with signs of altered central pain modulation before surgery as they might be at risk for unfavorable outcome. A broader therapeutic approach aiming to desensitize the central nervous system can be adapted in these patients. Further research is however needed to identify the influence of central pain modulation pre-surgical in predicting outcome after TKR. PMID:26382109

  9. Efficacy of an accelerated recovery protocol for Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty--a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Reilly, K A; Beard, D J; Barker, K L; Dodd, C A F; Price, A J; Murray, D W

    2005-10-01

    Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) is appropriate for one in four patients with osteoarthritic knees. This study was performed to compare the safety, effectiveness and economic viability of a new accelerated protocol with current standard care in a state healthcare system. A single blind RCT design was used. Eligible patients were screened for NSAID tolerance, social circumstances and geographical location before allocation to an accelerated recovery group (A) or standard care group (S). Primary outcome was the Oxford Knee Assessment at 6 months post operation, compared using independent Mann-Whitney U-tests. A simple difference in costs incurred was calculated. The study power was sufficient to avoid type 2 errors. Forty-one patients were included. The average stay for Group A was 1.5 days. Group S averaged 4.3 days. No significant difference in outcomes was found between groups. The new protocol achieved cost savings of 27% and significantly reduced hospital bed occupancy. In addition, patient satisfaction was assessed as greater with the accelerated discharge than with the routine discharge time. The strict inclusion criteria meant that 75% of eligible patients were excluded. However, a large percentage of these were due to the distances patients lived from the hospital. PMID:15994082

  10. PAIN MANAGEMENT AFTER TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY: THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY.

    PubMed

    Spinarelli, A; Moretti, L; Marella, G; Solarino, G; Maccagnano, G; Moretti, B

    2015-01-01

    Improvement in pain management after knee replacement surgery has made progress in the last years, improving the results of this type of operation. Among these techniques, multimodal have shown the best results. In this study we try to compare the results of a combination of intravenous analgesia (IA), oral controlled analgesia (OCA) and periarticular injection (PAI) with our traditional protocol consisting in intravenous analgesia and femoral nerve block (IA/FNB). ne-hundred patients, undergoing primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty between June 2014 and June 2015 were randomized into 2 groups. Mean patient age was 69.4. The first group received the intravenous analgesia combined with continuous femoral nerve block, while the second group received the new combined protocol. We used the same technique with standard medial parapatellar approach for all patients and they all received pre-emptive analgesia and postoperative pain protocols. All patients were interviewed daily postoperatively at 3 days, at discharge and at 3 months. The 2 groups had a similar discharge period (traditional group 7.3 days, combined group 6.9 days). In both groups, the results indicated no statistical difference in regards to rest and continuous passive movement. Pain on ambulation was the only category that was statistically lower in the PAI/IA/OCA group compared to traditional group. PMID:26652499

  11. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization as a Treatment for Medial Knee Pain in Patients with Mild to Moderate Osteoarthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Okuno, Yuji; Korchi, Amine Mohamed; Shinjo, Takuma; Kato, Shojiro

    2015-04-15

    PurposeOsteoarthritis is a common cause of pain and disability. Mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis that is resistant to nonsurgical options and not severe enough to warrant joint replacement represents a challenge in its management. On the basis of the hypothesis that neovessels and accompanying nerves are possible sources of pain, previous work demonstrated that transcatheter arterial embolization for chronic painful conditions resulted in excellent pain relief. We hypothesized that transcatheter arterial embolization can relieve pain associated with knee osteoarthritis.MethodsTranscatheter arterial embolization for mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis using imipenem/cilastatin sodium or 75 μm calibrated Embozene microspheres as an embolic agent has been performed in 11 and three patients, respectively. We assessed adverse events and changes in Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores.ResultsAbnormal neovessels were identified within soft tissue surrounding knee joint in all cases by arteriography. No major adverse events were related to the procedures. Transcatheter arterial embolization rapidly improved WOMAC pain scores from 12.2 ± 1.9 to 3.3 ± 2.1 at 1 month after the procedure, with further improvement at 4 months (1.7 ± 2.2) and WOMAC total scores from 47.3 ± 5.8 to 11.6 ± 5.4 at 1 month, and to 6.3 ± 6.0 at 4 months. These improvements were maintained in most cases at the final follow-up examination at a mean of 12 ± 5 months (range 4–19 months).ConclusionTranscatheter arterial embolization for mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis was feasible, rapidly relieved resistant pain, and restored knee function.

  12. OPAL: a randomised, placebo-controlled trial of opioid analgesia for the reduction of pain severity in people with acute spinal pain. Trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; McLachlan, Andrew J; Latimer, Jane; Day, Ric O; Billot, Laurent; Koes, Bart W; Maher, Chris G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain and neck pain are extremely prevalent and are responsible for an enormous burden of disease globally. Strong analgesics, such as opioid analgesics, are recommended by clinical guidelines for people with acute low back pain or neck pain who are slow to recover and require more pain relief. Opioid analgesics are widely and increasingly used, but there are no strong efficacy data supporting the use of opioid analgesics for acute low back pain or neck pain. Concerns regarding opioid use are further heightened by the risks of adverse events, some of which can be serious (eg, dependency, misuse and overdose). Methods and analysis OPAL is a randomised, placebo-controlled, triple-blinded trial that will investigate the judicious use of an opioid analgesic in 346 participants with acute low back pain and/or neck pain who are slow to recover. Participants will be recruited from general practice and randomised to receive the opioid analgesic (controlled release oxycodone plus naloxone up to 20 mg per day) or placebo in addition to guideline-based care (eg, reassurance and advice of staying active) for up to 6 weeks. Participants will be followed-up for 3 months for effectiveness outcomes. The primary outcome will be pain severity. Secondary outcomes will include physical functioning and time to recovery. Medication-related adverse events will be assessed and a cost-effectiveness analysis will be conducted. We will additionally assess long-term use and risk of misuse of opioid analgesics for up to 12 months. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained. Trial results will be disseminated by publications and conference presentations, and via the media. Trial registration number ACTRN12615000775516: Pre-results. PMID:27558901

  13. Sativex successfully treats neuropathic pain characterised by allodynia: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Nurmikko, Turo J; Serpell, Mick G; Hoggart, Barbara; Toomey, Peter J; Morlion, Bart J; Haines, Derek

    2007-12-15

    Cannabinoids are known to have analgesic properties. We evaluated the effect of oro-mucosal sativex, (THC: CBD), an endocannabinoid system modulator, on pain and allodynia, in 125 patients with neuropathic pain of peripheral origin in a five-week, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel design trial. Patients remained on their existing stable analgesia. A self-titrating regimen was used to optimise drug administration. Sixty-three patients were randomised to receive sativex and 62 placebo. The mean reduction in pain intensity scores (primary outcome measure) was greater in patients receiving sativex than placebo (mean adjusted scores -1.48 points vs. -0.52 points on a 0-10 Numerical Rating Scale (p=0.004; 95% CI: -1.59, -0.32). Improvements in Neuropathic Pain Scale composite score (p=0.007), sleep NRS (p=0.001), dynamic allodynia (p=0.042), punctate allodynia (p=0.021), Pain Disability Index (p=0.003) and Patient's Global Impression of Change (p<0.001) were similarly greater on sativex vs. placebo. Sedative and gastrointestinal side effects were reported more commonly by patients on active medication. Of all participants, 18% on sativex and 3% on placebo withdrew during the study. An open-label extension study showed that the initial pain relief was maintained without dose escalation or toxicity for 52 weeks. PMID:17997224

  14. Novel Noxipoint Therapy versus Conventional Physical Therapy for Chronic Neck and Shoulder Pain: Multicentre Randomised Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Charles C.; Lin, Ray S.; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Tsauo, Jau-Yih; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yen, Chen-Tung; Biswal, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    As chronic pain affects 115 million people and costs $600B annually in the US alone, effective noninvasive nonpharmacological remedies are desirable. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and the generalisability of Noxipoint therapy (NT), a novel electrotherapy characterised by site-specific stimulation, intensity-and-submodality-specific settings and a immobilization period, for chronic neck and shoulder pain. Ninety-seven heavily pretreated severe chronic neck/shoulder pain patients were recruited; 34 and 44 patients were randomly allocated to different treatment arms in two patient-and-assessor-blinded, randomised controlled studies. The participants received NT or conventional physical therapy including transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PT-TENS) for three to six 90-minute sessions. In Study One, NT improved chronic pain (−89.6%, Brief Pain Inventory, p < 0.0001, 95% confidence interval), function (+77.4%, range of motion) and quality of life (+88.1%) at follow-up (from 4 weeks to 5 months), whereas PT-TENS resulted in no significant changes in these parameters. Study Two demonstrated similar advantages of NT over PT-TENS and the generalisability of NT. NT-like treatments in a randomised rat study showed a similar reduction in chronic hypersensitivity (−81%, p < 0.01) compared with sham treatments. NT substantially reduces chronic neck and shoulder pain, restores function, and improves quality of life in a sustained manner. PMID:26552835

  15. Pain Levels after Local Anaesthetic with or without Hyaluronidase in Carpal Tunnel Release: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, G.; Gupta, A.; Ding, G.; Skerman, H.; Khatun, M.; Melsom, D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Hyaluronidase is an enzyme that temporarily liquefies the interstitial barrier, allowing easy dispersal of local anaesthetic through cleavage of tissue planes. This prospective, blinded, randomised controlled study investigates the utility of adding hyaluronidase to local anaesthetic in the setting of carpal tunnel release. Methods. 70 consecutive carpal tunnel release patients were recruited and randomised into a control group only receiving local anaesthetic and a hyaluronidase group receiving both hyaluronidase and local anaesthetic. Pain scores were rated using the visual analogue scale (VAS) by patients immediately after local anaesthetic injection and again immediately after the carpal tunnel release. Results. Preoperative VAS scores, taken after local anaesthetic injection, were greater than postoperative VAS scores. Postoperative VAS scores were significantly lower in the hyaluronidase group and tourniquet times were significantly shorter in the hyaluronidase group. Conclusion. Hyaluronidase addition to local anaesthetic in carpal tunnel release resulted in significant reductions in operative time and pain immediately after operation. PMID:26587288

  16. Work-related outcomes in randomised placebo-controlled pain trials: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic painful conditions have an important influence on the ability to work. Work-related outcomes, however, are not commonly reported in publications on trials investigating the treatment of chronic painful conditions. We aim to provide an overview of the reporting of work-related outcomes in such trials and investigate the relationship between work-related outcomes and pain outcomes. Methods We conducted a systematic literature search in PubMed with the aim of identifying randomised placebo-controlled clinical trials investigating treatments for chronic painful conditions or rheumatic diseases that also reported on work-related outcomes. Methodological study quality was assessed with the Oxford Quality Scale (OQS). Meta-analyses were conducted for the outcomes of interference with work and number of patients with at least 30% reduction in pain intensity (30% pain responders). The correlation between work-related and pain outcomes was investigated with regression analyses. Results We included 31 publications reporting on 27 datasets from randomised placebo-controlled trials (with a total of 11,434 study participants) conducted in chronic painful or rheumatic diseases and reporting on work-related outcomes. These 31 publications make up only about 0.2% of all publications on randomised placebo-controlled trials in such conditions. The methodological quality of the included studies was high; only nine studies scored less than four (out of a maximum five) points on the OQS. Sixteen different work-related outcomes were reported on in the studies. Of 25 studies testing for the statistical significance of changes in work-related outcomes over the course of the trials, 14 (56%) reported a significant improvement; the others reported non-significant changes. Eight studies reported data on both interference with work and 30% pain responders: meta-analyses demonstrated similar, statistically significant improvements in both these outcomes with active therapy

  17. Acupuncture in acute herpes zoster pain therapy (ACUZoster) – design and protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Fleckenstein, Johannes; Kramer, Sybille; Hoffrogge, Philipp; Thoma, Sarah; Lang, Philip M; Lehmeyer, Lukas; Schober, Gabriel M; Pfab, Florian; Ring, Johannes; Weisenseel, Peter; Schotten, Klaus J; Mansmann, Ulrich; Irnich, Dominik

    2009-01-01

    Background Acute herpes zoster is a prevalent condition. One of its major symptoms is pain, which can highly influence patient's quality of life. Pain therapy is limited. Acupuncture is supposed to soften neuropathic pain conditions and might therefore act as a therapeutic alternative. Objective of the present study is to investigate whether a 4 week semi-standardised acupuncture is non-inferior to sham laser acupuncture and the anticonvulsive drug gabapentine in the treatment of pain associated with herpes zoster. Methods/Design Three-armed, randomised, placebo-controlled trial with a total follow-up time of 6 months. Up to estimated 336 patients (interim analyses) with acute herpes zoster pain (VAS > 30 mm) will be randomised to one of three groups (a) semi-standardised acupuncture (168 patients); (b) gabapentine with individualised dosage between 900–3600 mg/d (84 patients); (c) sham laser acupuncture. Intervention takes place over 4 weeks, all patients will receive analgesic therapy (non-opioid analgesics: metamizol or paracetamol and opioids: tramadol or morphine). Therapy phase includes 4 weeks in which group (a) and (c) consist of 12 sessions per patient, (b) visits depend on patients needs. Main outcome measure is to assess the alteration of pain intensity before and 1 week after treatment sessions (visual analogue scale VAS 0–100 mm). Secondary outcome measure are: alteration of pain intensity and frequency of pain attacks; alteration of different aspects of pain evaluated by standardised pain questionnaires (NPI, PDI, SES); effects on quality of life (SF 36); analgesic demand; alteration of sensoric perception by systematic quantitative sensory testing (QST); incidence of postherpetic neuralgia; side effects and cost effectiveness. Credibility of treatments will be assessed. Discussion This study is the first large-scale randomised placebo controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture compared to gabapentine and sham treatment and will

  18. The use of gabapentin in the management of postoperative pain after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chao; Li, Xiao-dan; Jiang, Hong-qiang; Ma, Jian-xiong; Ma, Xin-long

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pain management after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) varies and has been widely studied in recent years. Some randomized controlled studies have carried out to evaluate the effects of gabapentin on pain relief after TKA. However, no solid result was made about it. The purpose of this Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) was to estimate the overall effect of pain control of gabapentin versus placebo after a TKA. An electronic-based search using the following databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Ovid MEDLINE, ClinicalTrials.gov, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trial from 1966 to June 2015. RCTs involving gabapentin and placebo for total knee arthroplasty were included. The meta-analysis was performed following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Six trials with 859 participants met the inclusion criteria. The primary endpoint was cumulative narcotic consumption and the visual analog scale scores at 12 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours, postoperatively. The knee flexion degree and treatment side effects were also compiled to evaluate the safety of gabapentin. After testing for the heterogeneity and publication bias among studies, data were aggregated for random-effects modeling when necessary. There was a significant decrease in morphine consumption at 12 hours (MD = –4.69, 95% CI: −7.18 to –2.21, P = 0.0002), 24 hours (MD = –5.30, 95% CI: −9.94 to –0.66, P = 0.03), and 48 hours (MD = –17.80, 95% CI: −31.95 to –3.64, P = 0.01), respectively. Compared with the control group, the rate of pruritus was less in the gabapentin group (RR 0.20, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.38, P = 0.00). In summary, the administration of gabapentin was effective in decreasing postoperative narcotic consumption and the incidence of pruritus. There was a high risk of selection bias and a higher heterogeneity of knee flexion range in this analysis. More high-quality large randomized controlled

  19. Local anaesthetic infiltration for peri-operative pain control in total hip and knee replacement: systematic review and meta-analyses of short- and long-term effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Surgical pain is managed with multi-modal anaesthesia in total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR). It is unclear whether including local anaesthetic infiltration before wound closure provides additional pain control. Methods We performed a systematic review of randomised controlled trials of local anaesthetic infiltration in patients receiving THR or TKR. We searched MEDLINE, Embase and Cochrane CENTRAL to December 2012. Two reviewers screened abstracts, extracted data, and contacted authors for unpublished outcomes and data. Outcomes collected were post-operative pain at rest and during activity after 24 and 48 hours, opioid requirement, mobilisation, hospital stay and complications. When feasible, we estimated pooled treatment effects using random effects meta-analyses. Results In 13 studies including 909 patients undergoing THR, patients receiving local anaesthetic infiltration experienced a greater reduction in pain at 24 hours at rest by standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.61 (95% CI -1.05, -0.16; p = 0.008) and by SMD -0.43 (95% CI -0.78 -0.09; p = 0.014) at 48 hours during activity. In TKR, diverse multi-modal regimens were reported. In 23 studies including 1439 patients undergoing TKR, local anaesthetic infiltration reduced pain on average by SMD -0.40 (95% CI -0.58, -0.22; p < 0.001) at 24 hours at rest and by SMD -0.27 (95% CI -0.50, -0.05; p = 0.018) at 48 hours during activity, compared with patients receiving no infiltration or placebo. There was evidence of a larger reduction in studies delivering additional local anaesthetic after wound closure. There was no evidence of pain control additional to that provided by femoral nerve block. Patients receiving local anaesthetic infiltration spent on average an estimated 0.83 (95% CI 1.54, 0.12; p = 0.022) and 0.87 (95% CI 1.62, 0.11; p = 0.025) fewer days in hospital after THR and TKR respectively, had reduced opioid consumption, earlier

  20. The effects of various physical non-operative modalities on the pain in osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Cherian, J J; Jauregui, J J; Leichliter, A K; Elmallah, R K; Bhave, A; Mont, M A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various non-operative modalities of treatment (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS); neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES); insoles and bracing) on the pain of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. We conducted a systematic review according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines to identify the therapeutic options which are commonly adopted for the management of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. The outcome measurement tools used in the different studies were the visual analogue scale and The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index pain index: all pain scores were converted to a 100-point scale. A total of 30 studies met our inclusion criteria: 13 on insoles, seven on TENS, six on NMES, and four on bracing. The standardised mean difference (SMD) in pain after treatment with TENS was 1.796, which represented a significant reduction in pain. The significant overall effect estimate for NMES on pain was similar to that of TENS, with a SMD of 1.924. The overall effect estimate of insoles on pain was a SMD of 0.992. The overall effect of bracing showed a significant reduction in pain of 1.34. Overall, all four non-operative modalities of treatment were found to have a significant effect on the reduction of pain in OA of the knee. This study shows that non-operative physical modalities of treatment are of benefit when treating OA of the knee. However, much of the literature reviewed evaluates studies with follow-up of less than six months: future work should aim to evaluate patients with longer follow-up. PMID:26733650

  1. A multifaceted workplace intervention for low back pain in nurses' aides: a pragmatic stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Charlotte Diana Nørregaard; Holtermann, Andreas; Bay, Hans; Søgaard, Karen; Birk Jørgensen, Marie

    2015-09-01

    This study established the effectiveness of a workplace multifaceted intervention consisting of participatory ergonomics, physical training, and cognitive-behavioural training (CBT) for low back pain (LBP). Between November 2012 and May 2014, we conducted a pragmatic stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial with 594 workers from eldercare workplaces (nursing homes and home care) randomised to 4 successive time periods, 3 months apart. The intervention lasted 12 weeks and consisted of 19 sessions in total (physical training [12 sessions], CBT [2 sessions], and participatory ergonomics [5 sessions]). Low back pain was the outcome and was measured as days, intensity (worst pain on a 0-10 numeric rank scale), and bothersomeness (days) by monthly text messages. Linear mixed models were used to estimate the intervention effect. Analyses were performed according to intention to treat, including all eligible randomised participants, and were adjusted for baseline values of the outcome. The linear mixed models yielded significant effects on LBP days of -0.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], -1.19 to -0.38), LBP intensity of -0.4 (95% CI, -0.60 to -0.26), and bothersomeness days of -0.5 (95% CI, -0.85 to -0.13) after the intervention compared with the control group. This study shows that a multifaceted intervention consisting of participatory ergonomics, physical training, and CBT can reduce LBP among workers in eldercare. Thus, multifaceted interventions may be relevant for improving LBP in a working population. PMID:25993549

  2. The effects of neuromuscular exercise on medial knee joint load post-arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy: ‘SCOPEX’ a randomised control trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Meniscectomy is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, with increased medial joint loading a likely contributor to the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis in this group. Therefore, post-surgical rehabilitation or interventions that reduce medial knee joint loading have the potential to reduce the risk of developing or progressing osteoarthritis. The primary purpose of this randomised, assessor-blind controlled trial is to determine the effects of a home-based, physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint load during functional tasks in people who have recently undergone a partial medial meniscectomy. Methods/design 62 people aged 30–50 years who have undergone an arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy within the previous 3 to 12 months will be recruited and randomly assigned to a neuromuscular exercise or control group using concealed allocation. The neuromuscular exercise group will attend 8 supervised exercise sessions with a physiotherapist and will perform 6 exercises at home, at least 3 times per week for 12 weeks. The control group will not receive the neuromuscular training program. Blinded assessment will be performed at baseline and immediately following the 12-week intervention. The primary outcomes are change in the peak external knee adduction moment measured by 3-dimensional analysis during normal paced walking and one-leg rise. Secondary outcomes include the change in peak external knee adduction moment during fast pace walking and one-leg hop and change in the knee adduction moment impulse during walking, one-leg rise and one-leg hop, knee and hip muscle strength, electromyographic muscle activation patterns, objective measures of physical function, as well as self-reported measures of physical function and symptoms and additional biomechanical parameters. Discussion The findings from this trial will provide evidence regarding the effect of a home-based, physiotherapist

  3. Effectiveness of trigger point dry needling for plantar heel pain: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Plantar heel pain (plantar fasciitis) is a common and disabling condition, which has a detrimental impact on health-related quality of life. Despite the high prevalence of plantar heel pain, the optimal treatment for this disorder remains unclear. Consequently, an alternative therapy such as dry needling is increasingly being used as an adjunctive treatment by health practitioners. Only two trials have investigated the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain, however both trials were of a low methodological quality. This manuscript describes the design of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain. Methods Eighty community-dwelling men and woman aged over 18 years with plantar heel pain (who satisfy the inclusion and exclusion criteria) will be recruited. Eligible participants with plantar heel pain will be randomised to receive either one of two interventions, (i) real dry needling or (ii) sham dry needling. The protocol (including needling details and treatment regimen) was formulated by general consensus (using the Delphi research method) using 30 experts worldwide that commonly use dry needling for plantar heel pain. Primary outcome measures will be the pain subscale of the Foot Health Status Questionnaire and "first step" pain as measured on a visual analogue scale. The secondary outcome measures will be health related quality of life (assessed using the Short Form-36 questionnaire - Version Two) and depression, anxiety and stress (assessed using the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale - short version). Primary outcome measures will be performed at baseline, 2, 4, 6 and 12 weeks and secondary outcome measures will be performed at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Data will be analysed using the intention to treat principle. Conclusion This study is the first randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain. The trial will be reported in

  4. The Interactive Relationship between Pain, Psychosis, and Agitation in People with Dementia: Results from a Cluster-Randomised Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Habiger, Torstein F.; Flo, Elisabeth; Achterberg, Wilco P.; Husebo, Bettina S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in people with dementia, and pain is thought to be an important underlying factor. Pain has previously been associated with agitation, and pain treatment has been shown to ameliorate agitated behaviour. So far, the association between pain and psychosis and the effect of pain treatment on psychotic symptoms is unclear. Furthermore, the impact of opioid treatment on psychosis is not established. Aim. To investigate the efficacy of a stepwise protocol for treating pain (SPTP) on psychosis and agitation measured with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, Nursing Home version, and to explore the impact of opioid analgesics on psychosis. Method. Secondary analyses are from a cluster-randomised controlled trial including 352 patients with advanced dementia and agitation from 18 nursing homes in Western Norway. The intervention group received pain treatment according to SPTP. Results. Pain was associated with disinhibition (adjusted OR: 1.21, 95% CI: 1.10–1.34) and irritability (adjusted OR: 1.10, 95% CI: 1.01–1.21) at baseline. Pain treatment reduced agitation (p < 0.001, df = 1; 300) and aberrant motor behaviour (p = 0.017, df = 1; 300). Psychosis was reduced in people with at least one symptom at baseline (p = 0.034, df = 1; 135). The use of opioid analgesics did not increase psychotic symptoms. Study Registration. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01021696), Norwegian Medicines Agency, EudraCT (EudraCTnr: 2008-007490-20). PMID:27247487

  5. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the back of your thigh (hamstrings). Avoid running down hills -- walk down instead. Bicycle, or better ... inserts and arch supports (orthotics). Make sure your running shoes are well made, fit well, and have ...

  6. Knee Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Schueler, MD How it Works Testimonials FAQ for Consumers FAQ for Physicians News Advertising Terms of Use Contact Us Site Map How it Works When people are sick, they must make critical decisions about when and where they should receive healthcare. ...

  7. An 11-year-old girl presenting with chronic knee pain: a case report with diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Maj, M Kamal; Ar, Abdul Halim; Faisal, Syed A; Ahmad, Johan; Das, Srijit

    2010-01-01

    Discoid meniscus is the commonest anatomical aberration of the knee joint, among rare cases such as bilateral separated lateral meniscus, accessory lateral meniscus, partial deficiency of the lateral meniscus and double-layered lateral meniscus. An 11-year-old girl presented with history of chronic pain in her right knee for the last 6 months. The problem disturbed her involvement in the sport activities at school. Clinical examination revealed a clicking sensation on knee extension with lateral joint line tenderness. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of her right knee showed torn posterior horn of lateral meniscus. Arthroscopy examination revealed a discoid meniscus with absence posterior horn. Posterior horn deficient discoid meniscus is a rare form of a congenital meniscus anomaly. We as clinicians believe that the abnormal shaped meniscus may pose a diagnostic challenge clinically and radiologically. Presentation of this case may be beneficial for orthopaedicians in their daily clinical practice. PMID:21400986

  8. Unexplained Pain Following Total Knee Arthroplasty – Is Rotational Malalignment the Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon; Roberts, Catherine; Bauman, Alicia; Sperlak, Cynthia; Spangehl, Mark; Clarke, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Malrotation of both tibial and femoral components has been suggested as a potential source of pain following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However previous studies have been small, with variable control groups. The aim of this study was to compare component rotational alignment in TKA patients with unexplained pain to a control group with well-functioning TKA. Method: Seventy-one patients presenting with unexplained pain following primary TKA were included in this retrospective, comparative study. Diagnostic work-up included clinical examination, blood tests, x-rays, long-leg films, and CT scan. Patients with an identifiable diagnosis or with initially well-functioning TKAs were excluded. A control group of 41 patients with well-functioning TKAs also underwent CT scans. Femoral component rotation was measured relative to the surgical epicondylar axis, and tibial component rotation relative to the medial third of the tibial tubercle using a previously validated method involving 3D-image reconstruction. Findings were compared between painful and control TKA groups. Results: We found no difference in femoral component rotation between the painful and control groups (mean 0.6° vs 1.0° external rotation (ER), p=0.4), and no difference in tibial component rotation (mean 11.2° vs 9.5° internal rotation(IR), p=0.3). Fifty-nine percent of patients in the painful group had tibial component rotation >9°IR versus 49% in the control group. 6% of patients in the painful group and 2% in the control group had femoral component rotation >3°IR. There was no difference in overall coronal alignment between groups (mean 1.3° varus vs 0.5° varus, p=0.23). Conclusion: In this the largest study yet reported on component rotation in TKA, we found no difference in the incidence of tibial or femoral component malalignment in painful versus well-functioning TKAs. Tibial component IR in particular appears to be a common finding, and its significance when evaluating the

  9. Low Vitamin D levels are associated with greater pain and slow walking speed in patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The clinical status of patients with knee OA is primarily predicated by their level of pain and their muscle function. Recent studies have shown that vitamin D influences both musculoskeletal health and neuromuscular function. Vitamin D deficiency is common among elders and those with comorbidities....

  10. Intensive lifestyle intervention improves physical function among obese adults with knee pain: Findings from the Look AHEAD trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lifestyle interventions causing weight loss or improved physical fitness in obese individuals may lead to improved physical function. This study involved participants in the Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) trial who reported knee pain at baseline (n = 2,203). The purposes of this study we...

  11. Intensive lifestyle intervention improves physical function among obese adults with knee pain: Findings from the Look AHEAD Trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lifestyle interventions have resulted in weight loss or improved physical fitness among individuals with obesity, which may lead to improved physical function. This prospective investigation involved participants in the Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) trial who reported knee pain at basel...

  12. Subcutaneous versus intraarticular closed suction indwelling drainage after total knee arthroplasty: A randomised control trial

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Yoon, Jung-Ro; Dahuja, Anshul; Song, Seungyeop

    2016-01-01

    Background: Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is widely accepted treatment for moderate or severe osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Significant blood loss can be seen during the early postoperative period where a blood transfusion may be necessary. Closed suction drainage is known to prevent the formation of hematomas in the operative field, decrease tension on incisions, diminish delayed wound healing and reduce the risk of infection. Subcutaneous indwelling closed suction drainage method has been known to be beneficial and an alternative to the intraarticular indwelling method. This prospective randomized study was to compare the visible, hidden, total blood loss and postoperative hemodynamic change of subcutaneous and intraarticular indwelling closed suction drainage method after TKA. Materials and Methods: One hundred and sixty patients with primary osteoarthritis who underwent unilateral TKA were enrolled; group A with subcutaneous (n = 78) and group B with intraarticular (n = 79) indwelling closed suction drainage method. Total blood loss, visible blood loss, internal blood loss, postoperative day 1, 5th, 10th day hemoglobin, hematocrit levels were compared. Allogeneic blood transfusion rate and complications related to soft tissue hematoma formation were additionally compared. Results: Allogenic transfusion requirements between subcutaneous drainage group and intraarticular drainage groups (6.4% vs. 24.1%) were significantly different (P = 0.002). Although the minor complications such as the incidence of bullae formation and the ecchymosis were higher in the subcutaneous indwelling group, the functional outcome at postoperative 2 year did not demonstrate the difference from intraarticular drainage group. Conclusion: Subcutaneous indwelling closed suction drainage method is a reasonable option after TKA for reduction of postoperative bleeding and transfusion rate. PMID:26955178

  13. The effects of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy on head, neck, shoulder, low back and knee pain of female patients

    PubMed Central

    Çakır, Tuğrul; Oruç, Mehmet Tahir; Aslaner, Arif; Duygun, Fatih; Yardımcı, Erdem Can; Mayir, Burhan; Bülbüller, Nurullah

    2015-01-01

    As the rise on the prevalence of obesity, it is related with physical impairment of joints, especially in the lumbar spine and knee joints. Losing body weight can reduce or eliminate pain of head, neck, shoulder, lumbar spine and knees. By performing a laparoscopic bariatric surgery we demonstrated a significant improvement on the pain by body weight reduction. In this study we aimed to explore the efficacy and safety of Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG) on the relief of pain on head and neck, shoulder, low back and knee among the severely morbid obese female patients. A total of 39 morbidly obese female patients who underwent LSG for morbid obesity were included in this study. Body weight, height, body mass index (BMI), head and neck, shoulder, low back and knee pain intensity were measured with Visual Analog Scale (VAS) before and after LSG at the 6th month. 39 morbidly obese female patients were enrolled to this study. The mean age of the patients was 37.69 ± 11.33 years. Preoperative and postoperative body weights were 127.3 kg and 91.21 kg, respectively. Mean height was 165.23 ± 5.78 cm. Preoperative and postoperative BMIs were 46.49 kg/m2 and 32.33 kg/m2, respectively. A significant correlation between preoperative and postoperative parameters was found according to BMI. Our data showed that LSG is an efficient and safe procedure on severely obese patients and showed a predictive remission of head and neck, shoulder, low back and knee pain intensity of female patients by analyzing with VAS during the first 6 months. PMID:25932217

  14. Prevalence and Predictive Factors of Chronic Postsurgical Pain and Global Surgical Recovery 1 Year After Outpatient Knee Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hoofwijk, Daisy M.N.; Fiddelers, Audrey A.A.; Emans, Peter J.; Joosten, Elbert A.; Gramke, Hans-Fritz; Marcus, Marco A.E.; Buhre, Wolfgang F.F.A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Outpatient knee arthroscopy is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures. Previous research has demonstrated that chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP) after outpatient surgery is prevalent. Our objective was to determine the prevalence and predictive factors of CPSP and Global Surgical Recovery (GSR) 1 year after knee arthroscopy. A prospective longitudinal cohort study was performed. Patients were included during an 18-month period. Data were collected by using 3 questionnaires: at 1 week preoperatively, 4 days postoperatively, and 1 year postoperatively. A value of >3 on an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS) was defined as moderate to severe pain. A score of ≤80% on the Global Surgical Recovery Index was defined as poor GSR. Stepwise logistic regression analysis was performed to determine which variables were predictors for CPSP and poor GSR. The prevalence of moderate to severe preoperative pain in patients undergoing knee arthroscopy (n = 104) was 71.2%, of acute postsurgical pain 37.5%, and of CPSP 32.7%. Risk factors for CPSP were the presence of preoperative pain and preoperative analgesic use, with odds ratios of 6.31 (1.25–31.74) and 4.36 (1.58–12.07), respectively. The prevalence of poor GSR 1 year after outpatient knee arthrosocpy was 50.0%. Poor GSR 4 days after the surgery was a risk factor with an odds ratio of 8.38 (0.92–76.58) and quality of life 4 days after surgery was a protective factor with and odds ratio of 0.10 (0.02–0.64). Both CPSP and poor GSR are common 1 year after knee arthroscopy. Patients at risk for CPSP can be identified during the preoperative phase. Prediction of poor GSR 1 year after surgery is mainly related to early postoperative recovery. PMID:26559300

  15. Associations between Pressure-Pain Threshold, Symptoms, and Radiographic Knee and Hip Osteoarthritis: The Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Adam P.; Shi, Xiaoyan A.; Gracely, Richard H.; Renner, Jordan B.; Jordan, Joanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between generalized evoked pressure pain sensitivity with distal pressure-pain threshold (PPT) and the presence, severity, or number of involved knee/hip joints with radiographic osteoarthritis (rOA) or related symptoms. Methods Data for these cross-sectional analyses come from the second follow-up (2008–11) of the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project (n=1,602). Pressure-pain threshold measurements were averaged over two trials from both the left and right trapezius. Outcomes of radiographic knee and hip OA were both defined by a Kellgren-Lawrence score of 2–4 and site-specific symptoms were ascertained at clinical interview. Associations were determine with multiple logistic regression models, and two-way interactions were tested at p<0.05. Results The sample was 67.2% female and 31.0% African American. Participants’ mean age was 67.9 (SD 9.0); mean body mass index was 31.5 (SD 7.1); mean Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale score was 6.5 (SD 7.4); and mean total PPT was 3.6kg (SD 0.7). Significant associations were found between PPT and self-reported knee/hip symptoms. No significant associations were found between PPT and presence, severity, or number of joints with knee and hip rOA without accompanying symptoms. No significant interactions were found with demographic or clinical characteristics. Conclusion Pressure-pain threshold was significantly associated with self-reported single and multi-joint symptoms. In contrast, after adjustment, PPT measured at the trapezius was not associated with asymptomatic knee or hip rOA. As such, PPT may prove to be a useful indicator of rOA pain processing and of why individuals respond favorably and others do not to treatments targeting rOA. PMID:24643946

  16. Randomised, double-blind controlled trial by dose reduction of implanted intrathecal morphine delivery in chronic non-cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Jon H; Duarte, Rui V; Southall, Jane L; Nightingale, Peter; Kitas, George D

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of intrathecal morphine in the long term by hypothesising that a reduction of the intrathecal opioid dose following long-term administration would increase the level of pain intensity. Design Randomised, double-blind, controlled, parallel group trial. Setting Department of Pain Management, Russells Hall Hospital, Dudley, UK. Participants 24 patients with non-cancer pain implanted with morphine reservoirs were assessed for eligibility. Interventions Participants were randomly allocated to one of two parallel groups in which one of the groups had no change in morphine dose and the other group had a small reduction (20%) in dosage every week during a 10-week follow-up. Outcome Primary outcomes were visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score change and withdrawal from the study due to lack of efficacy. Results 9 of the patients assessed for eligibility declined to participate in the study. 15 patients were randomised to control (n=5) or intervention (n=10) and included in an intention-to-treat analysis. Owing to worsening of pain, seven patients withdrew from the study prematurely. None knew prior to withdrawal which arm of the study they were in, but all turned out to be in the dose-reduction arm. The calculation of dropout rates between groups indicated a significant statistical difference (p=0.026) and recruitment was ceased. The VAS change between baseline and the last observation was smaller in the control group (median, Mdn=11) than in the intervention group (Mdn=30.5), although not statistically significant, Z=−1.839, p=0.070; r=−0.47. Within groups, VAS was significantly lower at baseline (Mdn=49.5) than at the last observation (Mdn=77.5) for the reduction group, Z=−2.805, p=0.002; r=−0.627 but not for the control group (p=0.188). Conclusions This double-blind randomised controlled trial of chronic intrathecal morphine administration suggests the effectiveness of this therapy for the management of

  17. Intraoperative music reduces perceived pain after total knee arthroplasty: a blinded, prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Simcock, Xavier C; Yoon, Richard S; Chalmers, Peter; Geller, Jeffrey A; Kiernan, Howard A; Macaulay, William

    2008-10-01

    Patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) often experience a difficult recovery due to severe postoperative pain. Using a multimodal pain management protocol, a blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of patient-selected music on reducing perceived pain. Thirty patients undergoing primary unilateral TKA were enrolled and randomized into the music group (15 patients) or the control group (15 patients). Postoperative pain scores, assessed with the visual analog scale, indicated the music group experienced less pain at 3 and 24 hours postoperatively than did the nonmusic group (at 3 hours: 1.47+/-1.39 versus 3.87+/-3.44, P=.01; at 24 hours: 2.41+/-1.67 versus 4.03+/-2.89, P=.04). Intraoperative music provides an inexpensive nonpharmacological option to further reduce postoperative pain. PMID:18979928

  18. Clinical value of SPECT/CT in the ‘unhappy’ total knee arthroplasty (TKA)- a prospective study in a consecutive series of 100 painful knees after TKA

    PubMed Central

    Rotigliano, Niccolò; Hirschmann, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Bone SPECT/CT is considered as beneficial hybrid imaging modality in unhappy patients with pain, stiffness or swelling after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to identify typical pattern of tracer uptake distribution and intensity values in these patients after TKA. The above findings were correlated with the type of TKA, the time from primary TKA, fixation of TKA (cemented or non-cemented) and intraoperative findings at revision surgery (loose vs well fixed TKA components). Materials and Methods: A total of 100 knees (mean age±standard deviation 70±11 years) of 84 consecutive patients who have previously undergone primary TKA and complained about postoperative knee pain or stiffness after TKA were prospectively included. All patients underwent clinical and radiological examination including standardized radiographs and Tc-99m-HDP-SPECT/CT as part of a routine diagnostic algorithm. The diagnosis before and after SPECT/CT imaging, as well as the final treatment were recorded. Femoral and tibial TKA component position (varus-valgus, flexion-extension, internal rotation-external rotation) was determined on 3D reconstructed images using a customized analysis software. Intensity and anatomical distribution of 99mTc-HDP-SPECT/CT bone tracer uptake was determined using a validated localisation scheme. Maximum intensity values were recorded as well as ratios between the respective value and the background tracer activity (proximal mid-shaft of the femur). Level of significance was p<0.05. Univariate analysis (Chi square test, Pearson correlation, t-test for independent samples) was performed to identify any correlations between component position, tracer uptake and diagnosis. For all analysis, p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: SPECT/CT changed the clinical diagnosis and final treatment in 85/100 (85%) knees. 33 knees (33%) were surgically revised, 58 knees (58%) non-surgically treated and 9 knees (9

  19. Reliability and Validity of the Anterior Knee Pain Scale: Applications for Use as an Epidemiologic Screener.

    PubMed

    Ittenbach, Richard F; Huang, Guixia; Barber Foss, Kim D; Hewett, Timothy E; Myer, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    A screening instrument's ability to provide clinicians with consistent and reproducible information is crucial to intervention. Despite widespread acceptance and clinical use of the Kujala Anterior Knee Pain Scale (AKPS) in orthopedics and sports medicine, few studies have reported on its reliability and no such studies have concentrated on child or adolescent samples exclusively, segments of the population for which this instrument is often used. The purpose of the current study was to describe and report on the reliability and validity of the AKPS for use with high school female athletes participating in interscholastic athletics. The study was a secondary analysis of prospective epidemiologic data using established scale validation methods. The records of 414 female athletes 11.0 to 18.1 years of age (Mean 13.9 yrs, SD = 1.7 yrs) were used for analysis. Four different approaches to scoring and scale reduction of the AKPS were evaluated, including the original, ordinal 13-item form, a modified, ordinal 6-item form, a modified, dichotomous 13-item form, and a modified, dichotomous 6-item form. Three different types of reliability (internal consistency, equivalence across forms, standard error of measurement) and one type of validity (criterion-related) were estimated for the AKPS in the current sample. The four scoring formats of the AKPS scale were found to have high internal consistency (αcoef = 0.83 to 0.91), equivalence across the short and long forms (r = 0.98), acceptable standard errors of measurement (0.82 to 3.00), and moderate to high criterion related validity-as determined by physican's diagnosis: 0.92 (13-item form), 0.90 (6-item form). The Kujala AKPS is a valid and reliable measure of anterior knee pain and appropriate for use as an epidemiologic screening tool with adolescent female athletes. PMID:27441381

  20. Reliability and Validity of the Anterior Knee Pain Scale: Applications for Use as an Epidemiologic Screener

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A screening instrument’s ability to provide clinicians with consistent and reproducible information is crucial to intervention. Despite widespread acceptance and clinical use of the Kujala Anterior Knee Pain Scale (AKPS) in orthopedics and sports medicine, few studies have reported on its reliability and no such studies have concentrated on child or adolescent samples exclusively, segments of the population for which this instrument is often used. The purpose of the current study was to describe and report on the reliability and validity of the AKPS for use with high school female athletes participating in interscholastic athletics. The study was a secondary analysis of prospective epidemiologic data using established scale validation methods. The records of 414 female athletes 11.0 to 18.1 years of age (Mean 13.9 yrs, SD = 1.7 yrs) were used for analysis. Four different approaches to scoring and scale reduction of the AKPS were evaluated, including the original, ordinal 13-item form, a modified, ordinal 6-item form, a modified, dichotomous 13-item form, and a modified, dichotomous 6-item form. Three different types of reliability (internal consistency, equivalence across forms, standard error of measurement) and one type of validity (criterion-related) were estimated for the AKPS in the current sample. The four scoring formats of the AKPS scale were found to have high internal consistency (αcoef = 0.83 to 0.91), equivalence across the short and long forms (r = 0.98), acceptable standard errors of measurement (0.82 to 3.00), and moderate to high criterion related validity—as determined by physican’s diagnosis: 0.92 (13-item form), 0.90 (6-item form). The Kujala AKPS is a valid and reliable measure of anterior knee pain and appropriate for use as an epidemiologic screening tool with adolescent female athletes. PMID:27441381

  1. Evaluation of bone marrow lesion volume as a knee osteoarthritis biomarker - longitudinal relationships with pain and structural changes: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Bone marrow lesion (BML) size may be an important imaging biomarker for osteoarthritis-related clinical trials and reducing BML size may be an important therapeutic goal. However, data on the interrelationships between BML size, pain, and structural progression are inconsistent and rarely examined in the same cohort. Therefore, we evaluated the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of BML volume with knee pain and joint space narrowing (JSN). Methods A BML volume assessment was performed on magnetic resonance images of the knee collected at the 24- and 48-month Osteoarthritis Initiative visits from a convenience sample of 404 participants in the progression cohort. During the same visits, knee pain was assessed with WOMAC pain scores and knee radiographs were acquired and scored for JSN. BML volume was summed to generate a total knee volume and an index tibiofemoral compartment volume (compartment with greater baseline JSN). Primary analyses included multiple linear regressions (outcome = pain, predictor = total knee BML volume) and logistic regressions (outcome = JSN, predictor = index tibiofemoral compartment BML volume). Results This sample was 49% female with a mean age of 63 (9.2 standard deviation (SD)) years, and 71% had radiographic osteoarthritis in the study knee. Larger baseline BMLs were associated with greater baseline knee pain (P = 0.01), the presence of JSN at baseline (odds ratio (OR) = 1.50, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.23 to 1.83), and JSN progression (OR = 1.27, 95%CI = 1.11 to 1.46). Changes in total knee BML volume had a positive association with changes in knee pain severity (P = 0.004) and this association may be driven by knees that were progressing from no or small baseline BMLs to larger BMLs. In contrast, we found no linear positive relationship between BML volume change and JSN progression. Instead, regression of medial tibiofemoral BML volume was associated with JSN progression compared to knees with no or

  2. EULAR report on the use of ultrasonography in painful knee osteoarthritis. Part 2: Exploring decision rules for clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Conaghan, P; D'Agostino, M; Ravaud, P; Baron, G; Le Bars, M; Grassi, W; Martin-Mola, E; Wakefield, R; Brasseur, J; So, A; Backhaus, M; Malaise, M; Burmester, G; Schmidely, N; Emery, P; Dougados, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Synovial inflammation (as defined by hypertrophy and effusion) is common in osteoarthritis (OA) and may be important in both pain and structural progression. Objective: To determine if decision rules can be devised from clinical findings and ultrasonography (US) to allow recognition of synovial inflammation in patients with painful knee OA. Methods: A EULAR-ESCISIT cross sectional, multicentre study enrolled subjects with painful OA knee who had clinical, radiographic, and US evaluations. A classification and regression tree (CART) analysis was performed to find combinations of predictor variables that would provide high sensitivity and specificity for clinically detecting synovitis and effusion in individual subjects. A range of definitions for the two key US variables, synovitis and effusion (using different combinations of synovial thickness, depth, and appearance), were also included in exploratory analyses. Results: 600 patients with knee OA were included in the analysis. For both knee synovitis and joint effusion, the sensitivity and specificity were poor, yielding unsatisfactory likelihood ratios (75% sensitivity, 45% specificity, and positive LR of 1.36 for knee synovitis; 71.6% sensitivity, 43.2% specificity, and positive LR of 1.26 for joint effusion). The exploratory analyses did not improve the sensitivity and specificity (demonstrating positive LRs of between 1.26 and 1.57). Conclusion: Although it is possible to determine clinical and radiological predictors of OA inflammation in populations, CART analysis could not be used to devise useful clinical decision rules for an individual subject. Thus sensitive imaging techniques such as US remain the most useful tool for demonstrating synovial inflammation of the knee at the individual level. PMID:15878902

  3. Pessimistic explanatory style: a psychological risk factor for poor pain and functional outcomes two years after knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Singh, J A; O'Byrne, M M; Colligan, R C; Lewallen, D G

    2010-06-01

    Seligman's theory of causal attribution predicts that patients with a pessimistic explanatory style will have less favourable health outcomes. We identified 702 patients who had undergone 894 primary total knee replacements between 1993 and 2005, who responded to follow-up surveys at two (n = 783 knee replacements) and/or five years (n = 443 knee replacements) and had also completed the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory long before the joint replacement (median = 16.6 and 14.5 years for two- and five-year cohorts, respectively). Scores from the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory Optimism-Pessimism scale were used to categorise patients as pessimistic (t-score > 60) or non-pessimistic (t-score < or = 60). Multivariate logistic regression models assessing the effect of pessimistic explanatory style on pain or improvement in knee function were adjusted for gender, age, distance from the place of treatment and depression score. Pessimists reported (a) significantly more moderate or severe pain at two years with odds ratio 2.21 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12 to 4.35; p = 0.02), but not at five years when the odds ratio was 1.21 (95% CI 0.51 to 2.83; p = 0.67); and (b) less improvement in knee function at two years when the odds ratio was 0.53 (95% CI 0.30 to 0.96; p = 0.04), but not at five years when the odds ratio was 1.26 (95% CI 0.57 to 2.77; p = 0.57). No significant associations with moderate or severe limitation of activity were seen at two or five years. We conclude that a pessimistic explanatory style is associated with worse pain and functional outcomes two years after total knee replacement. PMID:20513876

  4. DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF ATYPICAL AND PERSISTENT ANTEROLATERAL KNEE PAIN IN A 16-YEAR-OLD TRIATHLETE: AN ITERATIVE PROCESS

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and Background: The subject of this case study, a 16‐year‐old female triathlete, presented to physiotherapy reporting a 6 month history of anterior knee pain, with symptoms unchanged upon resuming a graduated triathlon training program, despite 3 months rest from all training. Case Description: The case describes the differential diagnosis and management of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS), and discoid lateral meniscus (DLM) in an adolescent female triathlete. Clinical reasoning and rehabilitation strategies are presented with respect to literature base. Final outcome was full resolution of symptoms and return to full athletic function, however, symptoms were relatively persistent and atypical. Purpose: This case report discusses the differential diagnosis and management of persistent and atypical anterior knee pain in a sixteen‐year‐old female triathlete. In such cases, the diagnostic process is often iterative, where intervention serves both therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. Discussion: Recent changes in the understanding of the pathophysiology of ITBS and links between the anterior and lateral knee compartments through highly innervated knee synovial tissue assist the therapist's understanding of how these conditions may occur concomitantly, with resulting atypical symptoms. The potential influences of likely changes in the subject's peripheral and central nervous system on symptom perception is also discussed. Level of Evidence: Level 5; Single case report. PMID:24377071

  5. Management of chronic neuropathic pain: a protocol for a multiple treatment comparison meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Mulla, Sohail M; Buckley, D Norman; Moulin, Dwight E; Couban, Rachel; Izhar, Zain; Agarwal, Arnav; Panju, Akbar; Wang, Li; Kallyth, Sun Makosso; Turan, Alparslan; Montori, Victor M; Sessler, Daniel I; Thabane, Lehana; Guyatt, Gordon H; Busse, Jason W

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Chronic neuropathic pain is associated with reduced health-related quality of life and substantial socioeconomic costs. Current research addressing management of chronic neuropathic pain is limited. No review has evaluated all interventional studies for chronic neuropathic pain, which limits attempts to make inferences regarding the relative effectiveness of treatments. Methods and analysis We will conduct a systematic review of all randomised controlled trials evaluating therapies for chronic neuropathic pain. We will identify eligible trials, in any language, by a systematic search of CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE, AMED, HealthSTAR, DARE, PsychINFO and the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials. Eligible trials will be: (1) enrol patients presenting with chronic neuropathic pain, and (2) randomise patients to alternative interventions (pharmacological or non-pharmacological) or an intervention and a control arm. Pairs of reviewers will, independently and in duplicate, screen titles and abstracts of identified citations, review the full texts of potentially eligible trials and extract information from eligible trials. We will use a modified Cochrane instrument to evaluate risk of bias of eligible studies, recommendations from the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) to inform the outcomes we will collect, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system to evaluate our confidence in treatment effects. When possible, we will conduct: (1) in direct comparisons, a random-effects meta-analysis to establish the effect of reported therapies on patient-important outcomes; and (2) a multiple treatment comparison meta-analysis within a Bayesian framework to assess the relative effects of treatments. We will define a priori hypotheses to explain heterogeneity between studies, and conduct meta-regression and subgroup analyses consistent with the current best practices

  6. Psychological Health Impact on Two-Year Changes in Pain and Function in Persons with Knee Pain: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangrong; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley

    2011-01-01

    Objective We determined whether baseline depressive symptoms, knee-related confidence and general psychological distress influenced changes in pain and function during two years of follow up. Design We included persons in the OAI dataset with baseline pain of 1 or greater on a 0 to 10 scale in at least one knee and no knee or hip surgery during the two-year follow-up (n=3,407). The four outcome variables were repeated chair standing, 20 meter walk and WOMAC Pain and Disability. Linear mixed effects models assessed the association of each mental health variable with the yearly change in each baseline adjusted outcome measure after controlling for covariates. Results Depressive symptoms were significantly predictive of worsening in most outcomes. The magnitude of worsening predicted for each year was small. For example, the dichotomized WOMAC Pain model indicated that depressed persons experience more rapid worsening than non-depressed persons at an average rate of 0.59 WOMAC points per year (95%CI 0.176, 1.013, p=0.005). Similar significant but very small effects of depressive symptoms on other outcomes were observed. Knee confidence was not predictive of change. General psychological distress was predictive of change in 20-meter walk and WOMAC Pain. Conclusions The most consistent psychological predictor of yearly worsening was baseline depressive symptoms. Although a statistically robust predictor of outcome, given that change was very small and highly dependent on baseline status, our results indicate that a considerable degree of persistent depressive symptoms would be required to have a meaningful effect on future self-reported outcome. PMID:21723400

  7. Evidence of Physiotherapy Interventions for Patients with Chronic Neck Pain: A Systematic Review of Randomised Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Damgaard, Pia; Bartels, Else Marie; Ris, Inge; Christensen, Robin; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Chronic neck pain (CNP) is common and costly, and the effect of physiotherapeutic interventions on the condition is unclear. We reviewed the literature for evidence of effect of physiotherapy interventions on patients with CNP. Five bibliographic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and PEDro) were systematically searched. Randomised, placebo and active-treatment-controlled trials including physiotherapy interventions for adults with CNP were selected. Data were extracted primary outcome was pain. Risk of bias was appraised. Effect of an intervention was assessed, weighted to risk of bias. 42 trials reporting on randomised comparisons of various physiotherapy interventions and control conditions were eligible for inclusion involving 3919 patients with CNP. Out of these, 23 were unclear or at high risk of bias, and their results were considered moderate- or low-quality evidence. Nineteen were at low risk of bias, and here eight trials found effect on pain of a physiotherapy intervention. Only exercise therapy, focusing on strength and endurance training, and multimodal physiotherapy, cognitive-behavioural interventions, massage, manipulations, laser therapy, and to some extent also TNS appear to have an effect on CNP. However, sufficient evidence for application of a specific physiotherapy modality or aiming at a specific patient subgroup is not available. PMID:27335877

  8. Ipsilateral lower extremity joint involvement increases the risk of poor pain and function outcomes after hip or knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Poor pain and function outcomes are undesirable after an elective surgery such as total hip or knee arthroplasty (THA/TKA). Recent studies have indicated that the presence of contralateral joint influences outcomes of THA/TKA, however the impact of ipsilateral knee/hip involvement on THA/TKA outcomes has not been explored. The objective of this study was to assess the association of ipsilateral knee/hip joint involvement on short-term and medium-term pain and function outcomes after THA/TKA. Methods In this retrospective study of prospectively collected data, we used the data from the Mayo Clinic Total Joint Registry to assess the association of ipsilateral knee or hip joint involvement with moderate to severe pain and moderate to severe activity limitation at 2-year and 5-year follow-up after primary and revision THA and TKA using multivariable-adjusted logistic regression analyses. Results At 2 years, 3,823 primary THA, 4,701 primary TKA, 1,218 revision THA and 725 revision TKA procedures were studied. After adjusting for multiple covariates, ipsilateral knee pain was significantly associated with outcomes after primary THA (all P values <0.01): (1) moderate to severe pain: at 2 years, odds ratio (OR), 2.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5 to 3.6); at 5 years, OR 1.8 (95% CI 1.1 to 2.7); (2) moderate to severe activity limitation: at 2 years, OR 3.1 (95% CI 2.3 to 4.3); at 5 years, OR 3.6 (95% CI 2.6 to 5.0). Ipsilateral hip pain was significantly associated with outcomes after primary TKA (all P values <0.01): (1) moderate to severe pain: at 2 years, OR 3.3 (95% CI 2.3 to 4.7); at 5 years, OR 1.8 (95% CI 1.1 to 2.7); (2) moderate to severe activity limitation: at 2 years, OR 3.6 (95% CI 2.6 to 4.9); at 5 years, OR 2.2 (95% CI 1.6 to 3.2). Similar associations were noted for revision THA and TKA patients. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing that the presence of ipsilateral joint involvement after THA or TKA is

  9. Gabapentin for the Management of Chronic Pelvic Pain in Women (GaPP1): A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Steff C.; Bhattacharya, Siladitya; Wu, Olivia; Vincent, Katy; Jack, Stuart A.; Critchley, Hilary O. D.; Porter, Maureen A.; Cranley, Denise; Wilson, John A.; Horne, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) affects 2.1–24% of women. Frequently, no underlying pathology is identified, and the pain is difficult to manage. Gabapentin is prescribed for CPP despite no robust evidence of efficacy. We performed a pilot trial in two UK centres to inform the planning of a future multicentre RCT to evaluate gabapentin in CPP management. Our primary objective was to determine levels of participant recruitment and retention. Secondary objectives included estimating potential effectiveness, acceptability to participants of trial methodology, and cost-effectiveness of gabapentin. Women with CPP and no obvious pelvic pathology were assigned to an increasing regimen of gabapentin (300-2700mg daily) or placebo. We calculated the proportion of eligible women randomised, and of randomised participants who were followed up to six months. The analyses by treatment group were by intention-to-treat. Interviews were conducted to evaluate women’s experiences of the trial. A probabilistic decision analytical model was used to estimate cost-effectiveness. Between September 2012–2013, 47 women (34% of those eligible) were randomised (22 to gabapentin, 25 to placebo), and 25 (53%) completed six-month follow-up. Participants on gabapentin had less pain (BPI difference 1.72 points, 95% CI:0.07–3.36), and an improvement in mood (HADS difference 4.35 points, 95% CI:1.97–6.73) at six months than those allocated placebo. The majority of participants described their trial experience favorably. At the UK threshold for willingness-to-pay, the probabilities of gabapentin or no treatment being cost-effective are similar. A pilot trial assessing gabapentin for CPP was feasible, but uncertainty remains, highlighting the need for a large definitive trial. Trial registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN45178534 PMID:27070434

  10. A multifaceted workplace intervention for low back pain in nurses' aides: a pragmatic stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Charlotte Diana Nørregaard; Holtermann, Andreas; Bay, Hans; Søgaard, Karen; Birk Jørgensen, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study established the effectiveness of a workplace multifaceted intervention consisting of participatory ergonomics, physical training, and cognitive–behavioural training (CBT) for low back pain (LBP). Between November 2012 and May 2014, we conducted a pragmatic stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial with 594 workers from eldercare workplaces (nursing homes and home care) randomised to 4 successive time periods, 3 months apart. The intervention lasted 12 weeks and consisted of 19 sessions in total (physical training [12 sessions], CBT [2 sessions], and participatory ergonomics [5 sessions]). Low back pain was the outcome and was measured as days, intensity (worst pain on a 0-10 numeric rank scale), and bothersomeness (days) by monthly text messages. Linear mixed models were used to estimate the intervention effect. Analyses were performed according to intention to treat, including all eligible randomised participants, and were adjusted for baseline values of the outcome. The linear mixed models yielded significant effects on LBP days of −0.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], −1.19 to −0.38), LBP intensity of −0.4 (95% CI, −0.60 to −0.26), and bothersomeness days of −0.5 (95% CI, −0.85 to −0.13) after the intervention compared with the control group. This study shows that a multifaceted intervention consisting of participatory ergonomics, physical training, and CBT can reduce LBP among workers in eldercare. Thus, multifaceted interventions may be relevant for improving LBP in a working population. PMID:25993549

  11. Effects on musculoskeletal pain, work ability and sickness absence in a 1-year randomised controlled trial among cleaners

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Only a few workplace initiatives among cleaners have been reported, even though they constitute a job group in great need of health promotion. The purpose of this trial was to evaluate the effect of either physical coordination training or cognitive behavioural training on musculoskeletal pain, work ability and sickness absence among cleaners. Methods A cluster-randomised controlled trial was conducted among 294 female cleaners allocated to either physical coordination training (PCT), cognitive behavioural training (CBTr) or a reference group (REF). Questionnaires about musculoskeletal pain and work ability were completed at baseline and after one year's intervention. Sickness absence data were obtained from the managers' records. Analyses were performed according to the intention-to-treat-principle (ITT). Results No overall reduction in musculoskeletal pain, work ability or sickness absence from either PCT or CBTr compared with REF was found in conservative ITT analyses. However, explorative analyses revealed a treatment effect for musculoskeletal pain of the PCT. People with chronic neck/shoulder pain at baseline were more frequently non-chronic at follow-up after PCT compared with REF (p = 0.05). Conclusions The PCT intervention appeared effective for reducing chronic neck/shoulder pain among the female cleaners. It is recommended that future interventions among similar high-risk job groups focus on the implementation aspects of the interventions to maximise outcomes more distal from the intervention such as work ability and sickness absence. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN96241850 PMID:22044549

  12. Epidemiology of hip and knee pain in a community based sample of Italian persons aged 65 and older1

    PubMed Central

    Cecchi, F.; Mannoni, A.; Molino-Lova, R.; Ceppatelli, S.; Benvenuti, E.; Bandinelli, S.; Lauretani, F.; Macchi, C.; Ferrucci, L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective To describe prevalence, characteristics and correlates of hip pain (HP) and knee pain (KP) in an Italian community based cohort aged 65 and older (65+). Method Baseline survey (1998–2000), population-based study in the Chianti area (Tuscany, Italy); 1299 persons aged 65+ were selected from the city registry of Greve in Chianti and Bagno a Ripoli (multistage sampling method); 1006 participants (564 women and 442 men, age 75.2 ± 7.1) provided information for this analysis. Persons reporting HP/KP in the past 4 weeks were recorded and their Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index pain score (WPS-range 0–20) calculated. Potential correlates of HP/KP, including clinical, lifestyle and psycho-social features and physical measures, were tested in age- and gender-adjusted regression analyses and then entered a multivariate regression model. Results HP was reported by 11.9% participants, while 22.4% reported KP and 7.2% both conditions. Climbing/descending stairs and walking were the activities eliciting more severe pain in either condition. Average WPSs were 5.6 ± 3.5 for HP and 5.4 ± 10.4 for KP. Both HP and KP were related to back pain, reduced hip abduction, reduced muscle power and increased trunk flexibility. HP was also related to KP and poor self-rated health (SRH), while KP to HP, foot pain, high body mass index, reduced knee passive flexion and knee extension torque, low education. Conclusion In a community sample of an Italian persons aged 65+, the prevalence of KP almost doubled that of HP. While both conditions were related to pain in other joints and specific joint impairment, only HP was related to poor SRH, and only KP to mechanical overload. PMID:18343164

  13. [PAIN MANAGEMENT IN PATIENTS OF RAPID RECOVERY (RR) PROGRAM IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY (TKA)].

    PubMed

    Marina Fernández, Rosa; Ginés Mateos, Gracia; Arco Pérez, Ma Carmen; Nuevo Gayoso, Montse; Faura Vendrell, Teresa

    2015-06-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a surgery consisting on the artificial joint replacement, due to a traumatic injury or a degenerative process or arthrosis. This surgery causes an important pain to patients, and sometimes affects negatively on their recovery. The choice of the prostheses will depend on the anatomical features of the patient and the surgeon criterion. The concept of a "rapid recovery surgery" was introduced in 1997 by Khelet and meant the beginning of the Fast Track model or the Rapid Recovery (RR) linked to an accelerated rehabilitation, an early discharge and the optimization of all the aspects of pre, intra and post-operative patient experience. Fast recovery is a surgical process which aims to achieve maximum autonomy of the patient through education, pain control and early mobilization. The key of the rapid recovery is to get the involvement of the patient thanks to the empowerment, which means a preoperative patient education that will help to reduce anxiety and it will make easier to engage in their own recovery. Furthermore the patient will take part of an effective post-operative physical therapy, using all the necessary tools to increase their ability to manage their own health problems. The empowerment of these patients is part of the Nursing Model in the Hospital Clinic de Barcelona (HCB), adopted by the Nursing Management in December of 2012. In Catalonia, until the start of the RR surgery, 14,132 interventions in 2008 where done by TKA conventional surgery, needing subsequent conventional hospitalization. This article describes the care and outcomes of nurse interventions, defined in the RR of TKA clinical way, which is focused on the pain's minimization and the impact on patients' mobilization. It was performed in a monographic unit from a tertiary-level hospital in Barcelona in 2013. PMID:26591937

  14. Synovial haemangioma of the knee joint: an unusual cause of knee pain in a 14-month old girl.

    PubMed

    Wen, D W; Tan, T J; Rasheed, S

    2016-06-01

    We report a histologically proven case of synovial haemangioma of the knee in a 14-month old girl who presented to the emergency department with an acute 1-day history of refusing to weight-bear on the right leg and a preceding 3-week history of a right knee lump. Physical examination revealed a non-tender, soft lump over the lateral infrapatellar region. Radiographs revealed a poorly defined soft tissue density over the infrapatellar fat pad and a suprapatellar joint effusion. Ultrasound was used to confirm the presence of a vascular soft tissue mass compatible with a synovial haemangioma within the infrapatellar fat pad which showed both intra-articular and extra-articular extension. There was good correlation of the ultrasound findings with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), highlighting the potential clinical utility of ultrasound as an alternative imaging modality in establishing the pre-operative diagnosis and extent of a synovial haemangioma about the knee joint. PMID:26960422

  15. Glucosamine-containing supplement improves locomotor functions in subjects with knee pain – a pilot study of gait analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kanzaki, Noriyuki; Otsuka, Yuta; Izumo, Takayuki; Shibata, Hiroshi; Nagao, Hideyuki; Ogawara, Keita; Yamada, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Seiji; Nakamura, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Background Previously, we demonstrated that glucosamine-containing supplementation was effective for improving locomotor functions, especially walking speed. However, the biomechanical mechanism of efficacy has not been elucidated. This study aimed to address this challenge in subjects with knee pain, using a motion capture system. Methods An open label study was conducted in 30 Japanese subjects with knee pain. The subjects were administered a daily supplement containing 1,200 mg of glucosamine hydrochloride, 60 mg of chondroitin sulfate, 45 mg of type II collagen peptides, 90 mg of quercetin glycosides, 10 mg of imidazole peptides, 1 mg of proteoglycan, and 5 μg of vitamin D (GCQID). The intervention continued for 16 weeks. Efficacy for locomotor functions involving the knee joint was evaluated mainly using the Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure (JKOM) and the 5-question Geriatric Locomotive Function Scale (GLFS-5). To examine the biomechanical mechanism of efficacy for locomotor functions, motions of subjects in a normal walking state were captured. Gait analysis was conducted and efficacy for gait parameters such as normal walking speed, stride length, cadence, and angle of soles was evaluated. Results GCQID significantly improved total scores on the JKOM and GLFS-5. In gait analysis, normal walking speed, stride length, and angle of soles at the end of the stance phase were all significantly increased, but cadence did not change significantly during the intervention period. There were significant intercorrelations of changes in normal walking speed, stride length, and angle of soles at the end of the stance phase, and between changes in stride length and total JKOM score. Conclusion A GCQID supplement may increase walking speed through increased stride length and angle of kicking from the ground during steps, which might be mainly associated with alleviated knee pain. PMID:27382267

  16. Efficacy and safety of flupirtine maleate and tramadol hydrochloride in postoperative pain management--a prospective randomised double blinded study.

    PubMed

    Naser, Syed Mohammed; Sarkar, Niladri; Biswas, Arunava; Kamal, Firdaus; Prakash, Raghu; Rahaman, Q M; Das, Anup Kumar

    2012-03-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of flupirtine maleate 100 mg thrice daily compared to tramadol hydrochloride 50 mg thrice daily as postoperative pain management for 5 days. A total of 113 postoperative patients were recruited for the study. Those who met the inclusion criteria (n = 104) were randomised into two treatment groups. One of the groups received flupirtine maleate and the other tramadol hydrochloride both orally. The pain intensity was assessed by visual analogue scale. Patients were informed to report any adverse effect encountered during the study period. The overall effect of the drug (global assessment of the study medication) on pain and side-effects was assessed by the patients at the end of the trial on a categorical scale. There was significant reduction in pain score (p < 0.001) in the flupirtine group with almost equal efficacy to that of tramadol group but the incidence of adverse effects were much less (7.4%) and didn't need discontinuation of the study. All drugs were assessed as good. Therefore it can be concluded that oral flupirtine can deliver the same analgesic efficacy as oral tramadol for postoperative pain relief, which might be beneficial for avoiding the adverse effects ofopioids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy. PMID:23029946

  17. Treatment of patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain in China: a double-blind randomised trial of duloxetine vs. placebo

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Y; Guo, X; Han, P; Li, Q; Yang, G; Qu, S; Yue, L; Wang, C-N; Skljarevski, V; Dueñas, H; Raskin, J; Gu, L

    2015-01-01

    Background Duloxetine has been approved in the United States, European Union and some Asian countries for the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP). We assessed the efficacy and safety of duloxetine (60 mg once daily) compared with placebo in Chinese patients suffering from DPNP. Methods This was a phase 3, multicenter, randomised, double-blind, parallel, placebo-controlled, 12-week trial of the treatment of DPNP with duloxetine. Subjects were male and female outpatients ≥ 18 years of age with DPNP, as assessed by the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument, and had a rating of ≥ 4 on the Brief Pain Inventory-Modified Short Form-Severity weekly average pain item. The primary efficacy measure was the reduction in pain severity from baseline to 12 weeks, as measured by the weekly mean of 24-h average pain ratings recorded in the patient’s diary. Mean changes from baseline in efficacy measures were analysed by a restricted maximum likelihood-based, mixed-effects model repeated measures approach and by analysis of covariance. Results Of the 405 patients randomised, 203 patients were assigned to duloxetine 60 mg once daily and 202 patients were assigned to placebo. Duloxetine-treated patients showed significantly greater pain relief on 24-h average pain ratings compared with placebo-treated patients each week of the 12-week study period [week 12: least squares (LS) mean change duloxetine: −2.40, placebo: −1.97; LS mean change difference (95% confidence interval) = −0.43 (−0.82, −0.04), p = 0.030]. Compared with placebo, patients treated with duloxetine experienced higher rates of nausea (p = 0.010), somnolence (p < 0.001) and asthenia (p = 0.002). Conclusions Duloxetine-treated patients showed significantly greater pain relief compared with placebo-treated patients over the 12-week study period. Duloxetine was shown in Chinese patients to have a safety profile similar to that found in previous duloxetine trials. PMID

  18. Acupuncture and rehabilitation of the painful shoulder: study protocol of an ongoing multicentre randomised controlled clinical trial [ISRCTN28687220

    PubMed Central

    Vas, Jorge; Perea-Milla, Emilio; Mendez, Camila; Galante, Antonia Herrera; Madrazo, Fernando; Medina, Ivan; Ortega, Caridad; Olmo, Victoria; Fernandez, Francisco Perez; Hernandez, Luz; Seminario, Jose Maria; Brioso, Mauricio; Luna, Francisco; Gordo, Isabel; Godoy, Ana Maria; Jimenez, Carmen; Ruiz, Manuel Anselmo; Montes, Joaquin; Hidalgo, Alonso; Gonzalez-Quevedo, Rosa; Bosch, Pablo; Vazquez, Antonio; Lozano, Juan Vicente

    2005-01-01

    Background Although the painful shoulder is one of the most common dysfunctions of the locomotor apparatus, and is frequently treated both at primary healthcare centres and by specialists, little evidence has been reported to support or refute the effectiveness of the treatments most commonly applied. According to the bibliography reviewed, physiotherapy, which is the most common action taken to alleviate this problem, has not yet been proven to be effective, because of the small size of sample groups and the lack of methodological rigor in the papers published on the subject. No reviews have been made to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture in treating this complaint, but in recent years controlled randomised studies have been made and these demonstrate an increasing use of acupuncture to treat pathologies of the soft tissues of the shoulder. In this study, we seek to evaluate the effectiveness of physiotherapy applied jointly with acupuncture, compared with physiotherapy applied with a TENS-placebo, in the treatment of painful shoulder caused by subacromial syndrome (rotator cuff tendinitis and subacromial bursitis). Methods/design Randomised controlled multicentre study with blind evaluation by an independent observer and blind, independent analysis. A study will be made of 465 patients referred to the rehabilitation services at participating healthcare centres, belonging to the regional public health systems of Andalusia and Murcia, these patients presenting symptoms of painful shoulder and a diagnosis of subacromial syndrome (rotator cuff tendinitis and subacromial bursitis). The patients will be randomised into two groups: 1) experimental (acupuncture + physiotherapy); 2) control (TENS-placebo + physiotherapy); the administration of rescue medication will also be allowed. The treatment period will have a duration of three weeks. The main result variable will be the change produced on Constant's Shoulder Function Assessment (SFA) Scale; as secondary

  19. The value of indium 111 leukocyte scanning in the evaluation of painful or infected total knee arthroplasties

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, J.A.; Brown, M.L. )

    1990-10-01

    Evaluation of painful total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) for infection can be difficult. Indium 111 ({sup 111}In) leukocyte bone scanning provides a minimally invasive technique for evaluation of possible infection. Thirty-eight patients with a painful TKA who had surgical exploration after {sup 111}In leukocyte scanning were reviewed. The scan had an accuracy of 84%, a sensitivity of 83%, and a specificity of 85%. The {sup 111}In leukocyte scans must be interpreted in conjunction with the clinical evaluation of the patient because they are less accurate for study of TKAs than of total hip arthroplasties.

  20. The effects of kinesiology taping therapy on degenerative knee arthritis patients’ pain, function, and joint range of motion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwansub; Yi, Chae-Woo; Lee, Sangyong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of kinesiology taping therapy on degenerative knee arthritis patients’ pain, function, and joint range of motion. [Subjects] To conduct the experiment in the present study, 30 patients with degenerative knee arthritis were divided into a control group (the conservative treatment group) of 15 patients, who received conservative physical therapy, and an experimental group (the kinesiology taping group) of 15 patients, who received kinesiology taping therapy. [Methods] All patients received treatment three times per week for four weeks. The kinesiology taping group had elastic tapes applied to the hamstring muscles, anterior tibialis, quadriceps femoris, and gastrocnemius. The range of motion was measured using joint goniometers, pain was measured using visual analog scales, and functional evaluation was conducted using the Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index. [Results] In intragroup comparisons of the kinesiology taping group and the conservative treatment group, the visual analog scale and Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scores significantly decreased, and the range of motion increased more than significantly. In intergroup comparisons, the kinesiology taping group showed significantly lower visual analog scale and Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scores and significantly larger ranges of motion than the conservative treatment group. [Conclusion] Kinesiology taping therapy is considered to be an effective nonsurgical intervention method for pain relief, daily living activities, and range of motion of degenerative knee arthritis patients. PMID:26957729

  1. Two cases of medial knee pain involving the medial coronary ligament in adolescents treated with conservative rehabilitation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hudes, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This case study chronicled the assessment, treatment and management of two adolescent patients presenting with acute knee pain, diagnosed as medial meniscus tear, with or without a medial collateral ligament sprain, with coronary ligament involvement. Cases Patient 1: A 16 year old male football player presented with right medial knee pain of 2 days duration after having been tackled during practice from the left side. Patient 2: A 16 year old female presented with right medial knee pain that began 1 week prior to presentation after a fall down the stairs. Treatment: Treatment was initiated in both cases using inflammatory control techniques of icing and fascial stripping and progressed to rehabilitative exercises including VMO (vastus medialis oblique) exercises and squatting exercises to strengthen the quadriceps femoris musculature and proprioceptive exercise. Rehabilitation occurred over a four week duration in both cases with progression of exercises on an individual basis. Both cases resolved within four weeks and return to normal activities resumed at the three week mark including a return to play in patient 1. Both patients reported complete resolution of symptoms at the four week mark with no recurrence on follow up a number of months later. Summary: Conservative management, including icing, fascial stripping, and rehabilitative exercises may be beneficial in the treatment of medial meniscus tears with coronary ligament involvement in adolescents. PMID:21629464

  2. Depression and the Overall Burden of Painful Joints: An Examination among Individuals Undergoing Hip and Knee Replacement for Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Rajiv; Zywiel, Michael G.; Mahomed, Nizar N.; Perruccio, Anthony V.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) report one or more symptomatic joints apart from the one targeted for surgical care. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between the burden of multiple symptomatic joints and self-reported depression in patients awaiting joint replacement for OA. Four hundred and seventy-five patients at a single centre were evaluated. Patients self-reported joints that were painful and/or symptomatic most days of the previous month on a homunculus, with nearly one-third of the sample reporting 6 or more painful joints. The prevalence of depression was 12.2% (58/475). When adjusted for age, sex, education level, hip or knee OA, body mass index, chronic condition count, and joint-specific WOMAC scores, each additional symptomatic joint was associated with a 19% increased odds (odds ratio: 1.19 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.31, P < 0.01)) of self-reported depression. Individuals reporting 6 or more painful joints had 2.5-fold or greater odds of depression when compared to those patients whose symptoms were limited to the surgical joint. A focus on the surgical joint alone is likely to miss a potentially important determinant of postsurgical patient-reported outcomes in patients undergoing hip or knee replacement. PMID:25861476

  3. Depression and the Overall Burden of Painful Joints: An Examination among Individuals Undergoing Hip and Knee Replacement for Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Rajiv; Zywiel, Michael G; Mahomed, Nizar N; Perruccio, Anthony V

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) report one or more symptomatic joints apart from the one targeted for surgical care. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between the burden of multiple symptomatic joints and self-reported depression in patients awaiting joint replacement for OA. Four hundred and seventy-five patients at a single centre were evaluated. Patients self-reported joints that were painful and/or symptomatic most days of the previous month on a homunculus, with nearly one-third of the sample reporting 6 or more painful joints. The prevalence of depression was 12.2% (58/475). When adjusted for age, sex, education level, hip or knee OA, body mass index, chronic condition count, and joint-specific WOMAC scores, each additional symptomatic joint was associated with a 19% increased odds (odds ratio: 1.19 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.31, P < 0.01)) of self-reported depression. Individuals reporting 6 or more painful joints had 2.5-fold or greater odds of depression when compared to those patients whose symptoms were limited to the surgical joint. A focus on the surgical joint alone is likely to miss a potentially important determinant of postsurgical patient-reported outcomes in patients undergoing hip or knee replacement. PMID:25861476

  4. MAGnesium-oral supplementation to reduce PAin in patients with severe PERipheral arterial occlusive disease: the MAG-PAPER randomised clinical trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Venturini, Monica Aida; Zappa, Sergio; Minelli, Cosetta; Bonardelli, Stefano; Lamberti, Laura; Bisighini, Luca; Zangrandi, Marta; Turin, Maddalena; Rizzo, Francesco; Rizzolo, Andrea; Latronico, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Magnesium exerts analgaesic effects in several animal pain models, as well as in patients affected by acute postoperative pain and neuropathic chronic pain. There is no evidence that magnesium can modulate pain in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). We describe the protocol of a single-centre randomised double-blind clinical trial aimed at assessing the efficacy of oral magnesium supplementation in controlling severe pain in patients with advanced PAOD. Methods and analysis Adult patients affected by PAOD at stages III and IV of Lèriche-Fontaine classification, who are opioid-naïve, and who have been admitted to our Acute Pain Service for intractable pain, will be eligible. Patients will be randomised to the control group, treated with standard therapy (oxycodone and pregabalin) plus placebo for 2 weeks, or to the experimental group (standard therapy plus magnesium oxide). Patients will be evaluated on days 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 14; the following information will being collected: daily oxycodone dose; average and maximum pain (Numerical Rating Scale); pain relief (Pain Relief Scale); characteristics of the pain (Neuropathic Pain Scale); impact of pain on the patient's daily activities (Brief Pain Inventory). The primary outcome will be oxycodone dosage needed to achieve satisfactory analgaesia on day 14. Secondary outcomes will be pain relief on day 2, time needed to achieve satisfactory analgaesia and time needed to achieve a pain reduction of 50%. A sample size calculation was performed for the primary outcome, which estimated a required sample size of 150 patients (75 per group). Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval of the study protocol has been obtained from Comitato Etico Provinciale di Brescia, Brescia, Italy. Trial results will be disseminated through scientific journal manuscripts and scientific conference presentations. Trial registration number NCT02455726. PMID:26674497

  5. A 10-day course of SPA therapy is beneficial for people with severe knee osteoarthritis. A 24-week randomised, controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Karagülle, Mine; Karagülle, Müfit Zeki; Karagülle, Oğuz; Dönmez, Arif; Turan, Mustafa

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to test if spa therapy can play a role in the management of severe knee osteoarthritis (OA). Twenty patients with radiologically and clinically severe knee OA were randomly assigned into spa and drug therapy groups. Spa group (n = 10) traveled to a spa town and stayed at a hotel for a 10-day spa therapy course. They followed a balneotherapy regimen including thermal pool baths at 37 degrees C for 20 min two times daily. Drug therapy group (n = 10) stayed at home and followed their individually prescribed drug therapy (NSAIDs and paracetamol). Patients were assessed at baseline (week 0), after spa therapy at 2 weeks (week 2) and during follow-up period at 12 (week 12) and 24 (week 24) weeks by a blinded investigator. Patients assessed with Lequesne algofunctional index (LAFI), pain (visual analogue scale, VAS), patient's and investigator's global evaluation (VAS), ten-stairs stepping up and down time, 15 m walking time and three times squatting up and down time. Significant improvement in pain and LAFI scores were found at week 2, week 12 and week 24 in the spa therapy group compared to baseline. Comparing the two group differences, spa therapy was superior to drug therapy in pain reduction and in physician's global assessment at all time points. This superiority was also found in LAFI scores and patients' global assessments at week 12 and week 24. A 10-day course of spa therapy may be beneficial in short- and medium-term up to 24 weeks by reducing pain and improving functional status and overall well-being in patients with severe knee OA and may be considered as an effective therapeutic tool for such patients in countries like Turkey where it is widely available and (at least partly) reimbursed. PMID:17431728

  6. A randomized controlled trial for the effectiveness of intraarticular versus intravenous midazolam on pain after knee arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sajedi, Parvin; Nemati, Mohammad; Mosavi, Seye Hamid; Honarmand, Azim; Safavi, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: This double-blinded, randomized clinical trial was designed to evaluate the comparison of intravenous versus intraarticular (IA) administration of midazolam on postoperative pain after knee arthroscopy. Materials and Methods: In this study, 75 patients randomized in three groups to receive 75 mc/kg IA injection of midazolam and 10 ml intravenous injection of isotonic saline (Group I), 75 mc/kg intravenous injection of midazolam and 10 cc IA injection of isotonic saline (Group II) or IA and intravenous injection of isotonic saline (Group III) at the end of knee arthroscopy. Pain scores, time until the first request for analgesics, cumulative analgesic consumption, satisfaction, sedation, and complications as studied outcomes were assessed. Patients were observed for 24-h. Results: IA administration of midazolam significantly reduced pain scores in the early postoperative period compared with intravenous injection. Mean of time to first analgesic requirement in Group III (33.6 min) was significantly lower than Group II (288.8 min) and Group I (427.5 min). Cumulative analgesic consumption was increased in Groups II (35.5 mg), and III (70 mg) compared with Group I (16 mg), (P < 0.0001). Complications significantly occurred in 3 of 25 patients in Group I in contrast to 20 of 25 patients in Group III (P < 0.0001). At 2-, 4- and 8-h after arthroscopy pain score significantly decreased in Group I than other groups (P < 0.0001). Patients in Group I were significantly satisfy than other groups (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Results show the greater analgesic effect after IA administration of midazolam than after intravenous injection and hence, IA administration may be is the method of choice for pain relief after knee arthroscopy. PMID:25097627

  7. A Preclinical Physiological Assay to Test Modulation of Knee Joint Pain in the Spinal Cord: Effects of Oxycodone and Naproxen

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Jason A.; Stanley, Phil; Gore, Katrina; Turner, Jamie; Dias, Rebecca; Rees, Huw

    2014-01-01

    Sensory processing in the spinal cord during disease states can reveal mechanisms for novel treatments, yet very little is known about pain processing at this level in the most commonly used animal models of articular pain. Here we report a test of the prediction that two clinically effective compounds, naproxen (an NSAID) and oxycodone (an opiate), are efficacious in reducing the response of spinal dorsal horn neurons to noxious knee joint rotation in the monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) sensitized rat. The overall objective for these experiments was to develop a high quality in vivo electrophysiology assay to confidently test novel compounds for efficacy against pain. Given the recent calls for improved preclinical experimental quality we also developed and implemented an Assay Capability Tool to determine the quality of our assay and ensure the quality of our results. Spinal dorsal horn neurons receiving input from the hind limb knee joint were recorded in anesthetized rats 14 days after they were sensitized with 1 mg of MIA. Intravenous administered oxycodone and naproxen were each tested separately for their effects on phasic, tonic, ongoing and afterdischarge action potential counts in response to innocuous and noxious knee joint rotation. Oxycodone reduced tonic spike counts more than the other measures, doing so by up to 85%. Tonic counts were therefore designated the primary endpoint when testing naproxen which reduced counts by up to 81%. Both reductions occurred at doses consistent with clinically effective doses for osteoarthritis. These results demonstrate that clinically effective doses of standard treatments for osteoarthritis reduce pain processing measured at the level of the spinal cord for two different mechanisms. The Assay Capability Tool helped to guide experimental design leading to a high quality and robust preclinical assay to use in discovering novel treatments for pain. PMID:25157947

  8. Efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for low back pain: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Koes, B.; Scholten, R.; Mens, J.; Bouter, L.

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE—To assess the efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for low back pain.
DATA SOURCES—Computer aided search of published randomised clinical trials and assessment of the methods of the studies.
STUDY SELECTION—26 randomised clinical trials evaluating NSAIDs for low back pain were identified.
DATA EXTRACTION—Score for quality (maximum = 100 points) of the methods based on four categories: study population; interventions; effect measurement; data presentation and analysis. Determination of success rate per study group and evaluation of different contrasts. Statistical pooling of placebo controlled trials in similar patient groups and using similar outcome measures.
RESULTS—The methods scores of the trials ranged from 27 to 83 points. NSAIDs were compared with placebo treatment in 10 studies. The pooled odds ratio in four trials comparing NSAIDs with placebo after one week was 0.53 (95% confidence intervals 0.32 to 0.89) using the fixed effect model, indicating a significant effect in favour of NSAIDs compared with placebo. In nine studies NSAIDs were compared with other (drug) therapies. Of these, only two studies reported better results of NSAIDs compared with paracetamol with and without dextropropoxyphene. In the other trials NSAIDs were not better than the reference treatment. In 11 studies different NSAIDs were compared, of which seven studies reported no differences in effect.
CONCLUSIONS—There are flaws in the design of most studies. The pooled odds ratio must be interpreted with caution because the trials at issue, including the high quality trials, did not use identical outcome measures. The results of the 26 randomised trials that have been carried out to date, suggest that NSAIDs might be effective for short-term symptomatic relief in patients with uncomplicated low back pain, but are less effective or ineffective in patients with low back pain with sciatica and patients with sciatica with nerve

  9. The hard work of self-management: Living with chronic knee pain

    PubMed Central

    ONG, BIE NIO; JINKS, CLARE; MORDEN, ANDREW

    2011-01-01

    Self-management is a key policy initiative in many western countries, and most approaches are designed for people with long-term conditions based upon giving support and advice in order to manage the impact of the condition(s). Less attention has been paid to what people already do themselves. In this paper we focus on the meaning and enactment of self-management in everyday life and the hard work associated with devising and maintaining routine adaptive strategies. This UK-based qualitative study examined how people live with knee pain. From the interviews (22 at baseline, 15 at 6 months) and monthly diaries, it emerged that self-management could be based on implicit and incremental learning from experience or on explicit evaluation of actions. Either way, embodied and emotional hard work was involved in maintaining a daily life that allowed people to fulfil social roles and relationships. This individual and contextualised work needs to be recognised and drawn upon before specific self-management approaches are promoted. PMID:21760837

  10. RESPONSIVENESS OF THE ACTIVITIES OF DAILY LIVING SCALE OF THE KNEE OUTCOME SURVEY AND NUMERIC PAIN RATING SCALE IN PATIENTS WITH PATELLOFEMORAL PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Piva, Sara R.; Gil, Alexandra B.; Moore, Charity G.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess internal and external responsiveness of the Activity of Daily Living Scale of the Knee Outcome Survey and Numeric Pain Rating Scale on patients with patellofemoral pain. Design One group pre-post design. Subjects A total of 60 individuals with patellofemoral pain (33 women; mean age 29.9 (standard deviation 9.6) years). Methods The Activity of Daily Living Scale and the Numeric Pain Rating Scale were assessed before and after 8 weeks of physical therapy program. Patients completed a global rating of change scale at the end of therapy. The standardized effect size, Guyatt responsiveness index, and the minimum clinical important difference were calculated. Results Standardized effect size of the Activity of Daily Living Scale was 0.63, Guyatt responsiveness index was 1.4, area under the curve was 0.83 (95% confidence interval: 0.72, 0.94), and the minimum clinical important difference corresponded to an increase of 7.1 percentile points. Standardized effect size of the Numeric Pain Rating Scale was 0.72, Guyatt responsiveness index was 2.2, area under the curve was 0.80 (95% confidence interval: 0.70, 0.92), and the minimum clinical important difference corresponded to a decrease of 1.16 points. Conclusion Information from this study may be helpful to therapists when evaluating the effectiveness of rehabilitation intervention on physical function and pain, and to power future clinical trials on patients with patellofemoral pain. PMID:19229444