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Sample records for knees comparative study

  1. Comparative Study on Strength of Knee Joint Using Various Material Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhengzhi; Ding, Zhiwei; Liu, Zishun; Swaddiwudhipong, Somsak; Tan, Yi Min; Lee, Kevin

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we adopt different material models to study the strength and stiffness of menisci of the knee joint using finite element method. The three-dimensional (3-D) knee joint finite element model is constructed based on the Magnetic Resonance (MR) images of a human knee joint, and the strength of menisci is analyzed under a specific vertical loading case. In this paper we categorize and implement three types of appropriate material properties, namely isotropic linearly elastic, transversely isotropic elastic and isotropic hyperelastic for menisci of the knee joint. Different strain energy models are also studied and compared under hyperelastic category. The comparative study demonstrates that the hyperelastic model with Ogden form is more appropriate in modeling menisci of the knee joint. By referring to the test data of different material properties from earlier studies by various researchers, we hope to provide a comparative study leading to appropriate menisci material models and properties for finite element analyses of knee joint structures.

  2. Comparative study of hamstring and quadriceps strengthening treatments in the management of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Al-Johani, Ahmed H; Kachanathu, Shaji John; Ramadan Hafez, Ashraf; Al-Ahaideb, Abdulaziz; Algarni, Abdulrahman D; Meshari Alroumi, Abdulmohesn; Alanezi, Aqeel M

    2014-06-01

    [Purpose] Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is the most common form of joint disease. It is one of the major causes of impaired function that reduces quality of life (QOL) worldwide. The purpose of this study was to compare exercise treatments for hamstring and quadriceps strength in the management of knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Forty patients with OA knee, aged 50-65 years were divided into 2 groups. The first group (57.65±4.78 years) received hot packs and performed strengthening exercises for the quadriceps and hamstring, and stretching exercises for the hamstring. The second group (58.15±5.11 years) received hot packs and performed strengthening exercises for only the quadriceps, and stretching exercise for the hamstring. Outcome measures were the WOMAC (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities OA index questionnaire), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) assessment of pain, the Fifty-Foot Walk Test (FWS), and Handheld dynamometry. [Results] There was a significant difference between the groups. The first group showed a more significant result than the second group. [Conclusion] Strengthening of the hamstrings in addition to strengthening of the quadriceps was shown to be beneficial for improving subjective knee pain, range of motion and decreasing the limitation of functional performance of patients with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:25013274

  3. Minimally Invasive Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Comparative Study to the Standard Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dabboussi, Naji; Sakr, Mazen; Girard, Julien; Fakih, Riad

    2012-01-01

    Background: Minimally invasive surgery has gained popularity over the past several years. Early results have shown better functional outcome with early recovery and rapid rehabilitation. Aim: Evaluation of the short-term clinical and functional outcome of minimally invasive surgery total knee arthroplasty (MIS-TKA) compared with the traditional total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Materials and Methods: During 2009, all cases scheduled for primary TKA through the modified mini-mid-vastus approach (MIS group) were studied. This group included 40 knees and was compared to a cohort control group of similar number of patients (40 knees) that underwent the procedure through the standard conventional technique (standard group). Results: Patients in the MIS group showed significant decrease in postoperative pain, blood loss in first 24 hours, and in hospital stay. Furthermore, they achieved motion considerably faster than the standard group with earlier return of quadriceps function and greater early flexion. Conclusion: This study proved that MIS-TPA has the ability to couple the benefits of less invasive surgical approach. PMID:22408753

  4. Outcome in primary cemented total knee arthroplasty with or without drain: A prospective comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Kęska, Rafał; Paradowski, T Przemysław; Witoński, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Suction drain insertion is a common practice in orthopedic surgery, especially after joint arthroplasty to prevent the formation of a hematoma. Theoretically the use of a drain should diminish the volume of hematoma; however the literature has conflicting data. Some authors state that drainage evacuates fluid from a limited area only and can be a cause of infection due to retrograde migration of bacteria. It can also impair the early postoperative rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome (especially postoperative pain) and intake of analgesics in patients who had undergone primary cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with or without a postoperative drain. Materials and Methods: A prospective comparative study of 108 consecutive patients (121 knees) was conducted. They were divided into two groups: A study group, with no drainage and a control group with drain inserted at the end of surgery. A total of 121 patients were recruited into two groups. A study group consisted of 59 knees, in which we did not use drainage after TKA and a control group with 62 knees, in which drain was inserted post surgery. Both groups were comparable in terms of preoperative characteristics. The indication for TKA was osteoarthritis (n = 105) and rheumatoid arthritis (n = 16). Results: In patients without drainage we observed lower need for opioids, higher blood loss on the 1st postoperative day and a lower need for change of dressings. There were no statistically significant differences in terms of total blood loss, hidden blood loss, transfusion rate, range of motion, length of hospital stay or incidence of complications between the two groups. In 1 year observation there were no differences in clinical outcome between the two groups. Conclusions: The present study conclude that there is no rationale for the use of drain after primary TKA. There are benefits in terms of lower opioid intake, lower blood loss on the first postoperative day

  5. Limited femoral navigation versus conventional intramedullary femoral jig based instrumentation for achieving optimal restoration of mechanical axis post total knee arthroplasty: a prospective comparative study of 200 knees.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nilen A; Patil, Hitendra G; Dhawale, Amol S; Khedkar, Bipin M

    2015-04-01

    A prospective comparative study was conducted to compare the mechanical axis post total knee arthroplasty (TKA) between two groups: In the first group of 100 knees (ASM group) Articular Surface Mounted navigation system was used to guide the distal femoral cut. In the second group of 100 knees (JIG group) conventional intramedullary femoral jig was used. The postoperative mechanical axis of the leg was within 3° of neutral alignment in 90% of the TKA in the ASM group (mean 178.12°) as compared to 74% in the JIG group (mean 177.02°). This difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). The data presented show that the use of limited femoral navigation leads to more accurate restoration of mechanical axis alignment when compared to conventional intramedullary femoral jigs. PMID:25466168

  6. Knee joint position sense of roller hockey players: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Venâncio, João; Lopes, Diogo; Lourenço, Joaquim; Ribeiro, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to compare knee joint position sense of roller hockey players with an age-matched group of non-athletes. Forty-three male participants voluntarily participated in this cross-sectional study: 21 roller hockey players (mean age: 23.2 ± 4.2 years old, mean weight: 81.8 ± 9.8 kg, mean height: 180.5 ± 4.1 cm) and 22 age-matched non-athletes (mean age: 23.7 ± 3.9 years old, mean weight: 85.0 ± 6.2 kg, mean height: 181.5 ± 5.0 cm). Knee joint position sense of the dominant limb was evaluated using a technique of open-kinetic chain and active knee positioning. Joint position sense was reported using absolute, relative and variable angular errors. The main results indicated that the group of roller hockey players showed significantly lower absolute (2.4 ± 1.2º vs. 6.5 ± 3.2º, p ≤ 0.001) and relative (1.7 ± 2.1º vs. 5.8 ± 4.4º, p ≤ 0.001) angular errors in comparison with the non-athletes group. In conclusion, the results from this present study suggest that proprioceptive acuity, assessed by measuring joint position sense, is increased in roller hockey players. The enhanced proprioception of the roller hockey players could contribute to injury prevention and improved performance during sporting activities. PMID:27111126

  7. Is the use of computer navigation in total knee arthroplasty improving implant positioning and function? A comparative study of 198 knees operated at a Norwegian district hospital

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There are few Scandinavian studies on the effect of computer assisted orthopedic surgery (CAOS) in total knee arthroplasty (TKA), compared to conventional technique (CON), and there is little information on effects in pain and function scores. This retrospective study has evaluated the effects of CAOS on radiological parameters and pain, function and quality of life after primary TKA. Methods 198 primary TKAs were operated by one surgeon in two district hospitals; 103 CAOS and 95 CON. The groups were evaluated based on 3 months post-operative radiographs and a questionnaire containing the knee osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS), the EQ-5D index score and a visual analogue scale (VAS) two years after surgery. Multiple linear regression method was used to investigate possible impact from exposure (CON or CAOS). Results On hip-knee-ankle radiographs, 20% of measurements were > ±3° of neutral in the CAOS group and 25% in the CON group (p = 0.37). For the femoral component, the number was 5% for CAOS and 18% for CON (p < 0.01). For the tibial component, the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.58). In the sagittal plane, the surgeon tended to apply more femoral flexion and more posterior tibial slope with CAOS. We observed no statistically or clinically significant difference in KOOS score, VAS or ∆EQ-5D (all p values >0.05), but there was a trend towards better scores for CAOS. Operation time was 3 minutes longer for CON (p = 0.37). Conclusions CAOS can improve radiological measurements in primary TKA, and makes it possible to adjust component placement to the patient’s anatomy. Over-all, the two methods are equal in pain, function and quality-of-life scores. PMID:24228727

  8. Total Knee Arthroplasty in Morbidly Obese Patients Treated with Bariatric Surgery: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Severson, Erik P.; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Browne, James A.; Trousdale, Robert T.; Sarr, Michael; Lewallen, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Our objective was to compare outcomes (anesthesia time, total operative time, tourniquet time, duration of hospital stay, 90-day complication rate and transfusion rates) of patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) who underwent bariatric surgery before or after TKA. One-hundred-twenty-five patients were included: TKA before bariatric surgery (group 1; n=39); TKA within two years of bariatric surgery (group 2; n=25); and TKA more than 2 years after bariatric surgery (group 3; n=61). Patients with TKA more than 2 years after bariatric surgery had shorter anesthesia, total operative and tourniquet times than other groups; differences were significant between groups. Ninety-day complication and transfusion rates approached but did not meet statistical significance. Ninety-day complication rates and duration of hospital stay did not differ significantly between the three groups. PMID:22554730

  9. Comparative study on isokinetic capacity of knee and ankle joints by functional injury

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Seo, Byoung-Do; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To collect basic data for exercise programs designed to enhance functional knee and ankle joint stability based on isokinetic measurement and muscle strength evaluations in normal and impaired functional states. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects were randomly assigned to the athlete group and the control group (n = 12 each). Data were collected of isokinetic knee extensor and flexor strength at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec and ankle plantar and dorsiflexor strength at 30°/sec and 120°/sec. [Results] Significant intergroup differences were observed in peak torque of the right extensors at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec and the right flexors at 240°/sec. Significant differences were observed in peak torque/body weight in the right extensors at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec and in the right flexors at 180°/sec and 240°/sec. Significant peak torque differences were noted in the left ankle joint dorsiflexor at 30°/sec and 120°/sec, right plantar flexor at 120°/sec, left plantar flexor at 30°/sec, left dorsiflexor at 30°/sec and 120°/sec, and right dorsiflexor at 120°/sec. [Conclusion] Isokinetic evaluation stimulates muscle contraction at motion-dependent speeds and may contribute to the development of intervention programs to improve knee and ankle joint function and correct lower-extremity instability. PMID:26957768

  10. Outcome of Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review of Comparative Studies between Fixed and Mobile Bearings Focusing on Complications

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young-Bong; Gujarathi, Manan Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review is to collate results of studies comparing fixed and mobile bearing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA), focusing on complications and timing for reoperations. Out of 723 results derived from PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane database search engines on bearings in arthroplasty, 10 studies comparing clinical results of fixed bearings to mobile bearings in UKA were found eligible for analysis. The reoperation rate was calculated using a novel method such as reoperations per hundred component years, and the causes of specific reoperations were investigated. The overall reoperation rate per hundred component years was similar between the mobile bearings (1.392) and fixed bearings (1.377); however, mobile bearings were more susceptible to reoperations in cases with aseptic loosening (0.393>0.255), progression of arthritis (0.428>0.357) and implant dislocation (0.286>0). The overall incidence of complications is similar for fixed and mobile bearing designs in UKA. The discussion on complications presented above may assist surgeons in their choice of bearing design. PMID:26389066

  11. Outcome of Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review of Comparative Studies between Fixed and Mobile Bearings Focusing on Complications.

    PubMed

    Ko, Young-Bong; Gujarathi, Manan Ramesh; Oh, Kwang-Jun

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this systematic review is to collate results of studies comparing fixed and mobile bearing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA), focusing on complications and timing for reoperations. Out of 723 results derived from PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane database search engines on bearings in arthroplasty, 10 studies comparing clinical results of fixed bearings to mobile bearings in UKA were found eligible for analysis. The reoperation rate was calculated using a novel method such as reoperations per hundred component years, and the causes of specific reoperations were investigated. The overall reoperation rate per hundred component years was similar between the mobile bearings (1.392) and fixed bearings (1.377); however, mobile bearings were more susceptible to reoperations in cases with aseptic loosening (0.393>0.255), progression of arthritis (0.428>0.357) and implant dislocation (0.286>0). The overall incidence of complications is similar for fixed and mobile bearing designs in UKA. The discussion on complications presented above may assist surgeons in their choice of bearing design. PMID:26389066

  12. Comparative study of extended versus short term thromboprophylaxis in patients undergoing elective total hip and knee arthroplasty in Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Velu; Kumar, Ratheesh; Singh, Bikram Kumar; Sharma, Ajay; Joshi, Gururaj R; Pathak, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Background: Postoperative thromboprophylaxis with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) for an extended period of 4 weeks is now preferred over short term thromboprophylaxis in patients undergoing total hip/knee arthroplasty (THA/TKA). However, most of the data demonstrating the efficacy and safety of extended thromboprophylaxis and short term thromboprophylaxis is from clinical trials done in the West. In India, the data of the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) following THA/TKA has been conflicting and the duration has not been clearly defined. The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of extended thromboprophylaxis over short term thromboprophylaxis in Indian patients undergoing elective THA/TKA surgeries. Materials and Methods: A prospective arm of 197 consecutive patients undergoing elective THA/TKA surgeries who were administered extended thromboprophylaxis for 4 weeks was compared with a historical group of 795 patients who were administered short term thromboprophylaxis for only 7-11 days. In both groups, LMWH (enoxaparin) was used in a dose of 40 mg subcutaneously, in addition to mechanical thromboprophylaxis. Primary efficacy endpoint was objectively confirmed venous thromboembolism (VTE). The presence of DVT was confirmed by a combination of pretest scoring, D-dimer, and Color Doppler Flow Imaging (CDFI) of deep veins of the legs, and pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) was confirmed by ventilation perfusion (V/Q) scan or pulmonary angiography. Fisher's exact test and t test were used for the statistical analysis. The baseline confounding factors were compared between the two groups using t test for comparing the means for continuous data and Fisher's exact test for categorical data. Results: In the prospective arm, only 1 patient developed symptomatic PTE compared to 26 (3.27%) cases of VTE (20 cases of PTE and 6 cases of DVT) in the retrospective group. Conclusion: Extended thromboprophylaxis (for 4 weeks) was found to be more

  13. A FUNCTIONAL AND ROENTGENOGRAPHIC PRELIMINARY COMPARATIVE STUDY USING METAL-BACKED AND ALL-POLYETHYLENE TIBIAL COMPONENTS IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Marco Antônio Percope; dos Santos, Juliano Rodrigues; Gonzaga, Luiz Gustavo Alves; Silva, Guilherme Moreira Abreu e

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe and clinically and radiographically compare patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with all-polyethylene (ALP) and metal-backed (MTB) tibial implants. Methods: Patients who underwent TKA between January 1988 and December 2004 were grouped according to the type of implant received: all-polyethylene or metal-backed. Sixty patients came for evaluations, totaling 82 operated knees. Among these, 22 patients had undergone TKA only with ALP (12 unilateral and 10 bilateral cases), 33 patients only with MTB (26 unilateral and 7 bilateral cases) and five patients underwent TKA with ALP in one knee and MTB in the other. The knees were divided thus: group 1, 37 knees with ALP; and group 2, 45 knees with MTB. Results: There were no differences in clinical or functional evaluations between the groups. The mean radiolucency in the femur was 0.838 mm for the patients in group 1 and 0.356 mm for the patients in group 2 (p = 0.049). For the tibia, in the AP view, there was a mean value of 2.703 mm for group 1 and 0.733 mm for group 2 (p = 0.000). In the lateral view, the mean values for osteolysis was 0.405 mm for group 1 and 0.200 mm for group 2 (p = 0.074). Conclusions: There were no differences between the groups in the functional and clinical evaluations. However, greater radiolucency was observed in the arthroplasties with ALP, both in the femur in the lateral view and in the tibia in the AP view. Level of evidence IV – case series study. PMID:27022556

  14. Tranexamic Acid Reduces Hidden Blood Loss in Patients Undergoing Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Comparative Study and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guang-Ping; Jia, Xu-Feng; Xiang, Zhou; Ji, Yong; Wu, Guo-Yong; Tang, Yi; Li, Jian; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background To explore the efficacy of tranexamic acid (TXA) on reducing hidden blood loss (HBL) in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) by conducting a comparative study and meta-analysis. Material/Methods A total of 108 patients underwent TKA was equally distributed to experimental and control groups. The only difference between two groups was the administrations of 15 mg of TXA mixed in 100 mL normal saline for experimental group and 100 mL of normal saline for control group. The volumes of blood loss, red blood loss (RBL) were recorded, calculated and analyzed. Stata 12.0 software was applied for data analysis. Results The intraoperative and postoperative blood loss volume in experimental group were remarkably reduced compared with those in control group (intraoperative: 105.1±12.1 mL vs. 185.5±20.3 mL, P<0.001; postoperative: 220.7±16.8 mL vs. 290.5±22.4 mL, P<0.001). Accordingly, the control group had significantly higher transfusion rate than experimental group (3.7% vs.25.9%, P=0.001). Our results also found that both the measured and hidden RBL were obviously reduced in experimental group compared with control group (measured RBL: 96.9±11.8 mL vs. 135.2±13.5 mL, P<0.001; hidden RBL: 170.8±37.2 mL vs. 364.2±41.5 mL, P<0.001). Furthermore, meta-analysis confirmed that TXA can notably decrease HBL (SMD=2.68, 95%CI=1.55~3.80, P<0.001). Conclusions TXA can significantly reduce the intraoperative and postoperative blood loss and HBL, therefore decreasing the transfusion need in TKA. PMID:26961597

  15. [Cemented total knee replacement: comparative study between the use or not of tourniquet on the inmediate results].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-García, J A; Sierra-Pérez, M; García-Velazco, R A; Salas-Mora, C A; Cisneros-González, V M

    2016-01-01

    Comparison of immediate postoperative results of patients undergoing cemented total knee arthroplasty with and without ischemia. Observational, cross-sectional, retrospective, analytical, single-center study that included 180 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty from 2011 to 2014: 120 without ischemia, 60 with ischemia. Mean age was 70 years with SD ± 7. Criteria to assess the immediate postoperative results include intraoperative bleeding, hemoglobin differential and pain. Exclusion criteria comprised patients being treated at a pain clinic, those on anticoagulants, with a history of bleeding disorders, psychiatric conditions, kidney failure or those intolerant to NSAIDs. In total knee arthroplasty without ischemia there is better pain control (p = 0.026). The hemoglobin differential and intraoperative bleeding were less with ischemia (p = 0.008). 32.8% of patients required blood transfusion, but no statistically significant relationship was established with the use or non-use of ischemia (p = 0.301). The most commonly reported pain was within a VAS of 0-3; 62.2% of cases reported mild pain. Mean hemoglobin differential was 3.7 with SD ± 1.3 with a range from 0 to 7.4. Patients in whom no ischemia was used during the surgical procedure experienced less pain. There was less bleeding and hemoglobin differential with the use of ischemia. However, this did not result in a statistically significant difference in the need for blood transfusion. The use of ischemia with caution and according to the surgeons preference is recommended. PMID:27627771

  16. Short-term efficacy of calcium fructoborate on subjects with knee discomfort: a comparative, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Pietrzkowski, Zbigniew; Phelan, Michael J; Keller, Robert; Shu, Cynthia; Argumedo, Ruby; Reyes-Izquierdo, Tania

    2014-01-01

    Calcium fructoborate (CFB) at a dose of 110 mg twice per day was previously reported to improve knee discomfort during the first 14 days of treatment. In this study, 60 participants with self-reported knee discomfort were randomized into two groups receiving CFB or placebo. Initial levels of knee discomfort were evaluated by Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) and McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) scores at the beginning of the study and also at 7 and 14 days after treatment. Results showed that supplementation with CFB significantly improved knee discomfort in the study subjects; significant reductions of mean within-subject change in WOMAC and MPQ scores were observed for the CFB group compared to the placebo group at both 7 and 14 days after treatment. Estimated treatment differences for the MPQ score were −5.8 (P=0.0009) and −8.9 (P<0.0001) at Day 7 and 14, respectively. Estimated differences for the WOMAC score were −5.3 (P=0.06) and −13.73 (P<0.0001) at Day 7 and 14, respectively. Negative values indicate greater reductions in reported discomfort. On both Day 7 and Day 14, the trend was toward greater improvement in the CFB group. The placebo group did not exhibit any change in the WOMAC and MPQ scores. In conclusion, supplementation with 110 mg CFB twice per day was associated with improving knee discomfort during the 2 weeks of intake. PMID:24940052

  17. Comparative effectiveness of a complex Ayurvedic treatment and conventional standard care in osteoarthritis of the kneestudy protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicine uses complex treatment approaches, including manual therapies, lifestyle and nutritional advice, dietary supplements, medication, yoga, and purification techniques. Ayurvedic strategies are often used to treat osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee; however, no systematic data are available on their effectiveness in comparison with standard care. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of complex Ayurvedic treatment in comparison with conventional methods of treating OA symptoms in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods and design In a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial, 150 patients between 40 and 70 years, diagnosed with osteoarthritis of the knee, following American College of Rheumatology criteria and an average pain intensity of ≥40 mm on a 100 mm visual analog scale in the affected knee at baseline will be randomized into two groups. In the Ayurveda group, treatment will include tailored combinations of manual treatments, massages, dietary and lifestyle advice, consideration of selected foods, nutritional supplements, yoga posture advice, and knee massage. Patients in the conventional group will receive self-care advice, pain medication, weight-loss advice (if overweight), and physiotherapy following current international guidelines. Both groups will receive 15 treatment sessions over 12 weeks. Outcomes will be evaluated after 6 and 12 weeks and 6 and 12 months. The primary endpoint is a change in the score on the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) after 12 weeks. Secondary outcome measurements will use WOMAC subscales, a pain disability index, a visual analog scale for pain and sleep quality, a pain experience scale, a quality-of-life index, a profile of mood states, and Likert scales for patient satisfaction, patient diaries, and safety. Using an adapted PRECIS scale, the trial was identified as lying mainly in the middle of the efficacy

  18. A pilot study comparing the efficacy of radiofrequency and microwave diathermy in combination with intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid in knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kenji; Hashimoto, Sanshiro; Kurosaki, Hiromasa; Kato, Kazuo; Majima, Tokifumi; Shindo, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Mochizuki, Yusuke; Takai, Shinro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to compare the efficacy of radiofrequency diathermy with that of microwave diathermy in combination with intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid into the knee of patients with osteoarthritis (OA). [Subjects] A total of 17 patients with knee OA were enrolled. The participants were randomly divided into two groups: a radiofrequency diathermy group (RF group, 9 subjects), and a microwave diathermy group (MW group, 8 subjects). [Methods] Subjects received radiofrequency or microwave thermal therapy 3 times at 1-week intervals. Intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid was administered 10 min before every thermal therapy session. The outcome was evaluated using the Japan Orthopaedic Association (JOA) and the Lequesne Index (LI) at baseline, at weeks 1 (1 week after the first thermal therapy) and 3 (1 week after the last thermal therapy). [Results] The JOA scale increased significantly after three sessions of thermal therapy in the RF group, while no significant increase was observed in the MW group. LI decreased significantly after 3 weeks in the RF group. In the MW group, there was no significant difference in LI between the two time points. [Conclusion] This study revealed that symptom relief in patients with knee OA was greater with radiofrequency diathermy than with microwave diathermy with concurrent use of hyaluronic acid injection, presumably due to the different heating characteristics of the two methods. PMID:27065540

  19. A comparative study of articular cartilage thickness in the stifle of animal species used in human pre-clinical studies compared to articular cartilage thickness in the human knee.

    PubMed

    Frisbie, D D; Cross, M W; McIlwraith, C W

    2006-01-01

    Histological measurements of the thickness of non-calcified and calcified cartilage, as well as the subchondral bone plate in five locations on the femoral trochlea and medial femoral condyles of species were used in preclinical studies of articular cartilage and compared to those of the human knee. Cadaver specimens were obtained of six human knees, as well as six equine, six goat, six dog, six sheep and six rabbit stifle joints (the animal equivalent of the human knee). Specimens were taken from the lateral trochlear ridge, medial trochlear ridge and medial femoral condyle. After histopathological processing, the thickness of non-calcified and calcified cartilage layers, as well as the subchondral bone plate, was measured. Average articular cartilage thickness over five locations were 2.2-2.5 mm for human, 0.3 mm for rabbit, 0.4-0.5 mm for sheep, 0.6-1.3 mm for dog, 0.7-1.5 mm for goat and 1.5-2 mm for horse. The horse provides the closest approximation to humans in terms of articular cartilage thickness, and this approximation is considered relevant in pre-clinical studies of cartilage healing. PMID:16971996

  20. Are patients more satisfied and have better functional outcome after bilateral total knee arthroplasty as compared to total hip arthroplasty and unilateral total knee arthroplasty surgery? A two-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jason Beng Teck; Chou, Andrew Chia Chen; Chong, Hwei Chi; Lo, Ngai Nung; Chia, Shi-lu; Tay, Keng Jin Darren; Yeo, Seng Jin

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to review the quality of life and physical improvement achieved by total joint arthroplasty surgery, namely unilateral TKA, bilateral TKA and THA. We hypothesize that patients who undergo bilateral TKA should have greater improvement in patient-reported outcome measures, as compared to patients who had unilateral TKA, and their outcomes may be comparable to that of THA. We analyzed prospectively collected data of all patients who underwent unilateral TKA, bilateral TKA and THA (5291, 187 and 529 patients respectively) for end-stage osteoarthritis at a tertiary hospital during the 5-year period. Patients who underwent bilateral TKA had a greater degree of improvement in SF-36 and Knee Society Scores as compared to unilateral TKA at 6 months and 2 years follow-up. Bilateral TKA had the highest proportion of patients who were satisfied and had expectations met by surgery. PMID:26790791

  1. Imageless computer assisted versus conventional total knee replacement. A Bayesian meta-analysis of 23 comparative studies.

    PubMed

    Brin, Yaron S; Nikolaou, Vassilios S; Joseph, Lawrence; Zukor, David J; Antoniou, John

    2011-03-01

    We have undertaken a meta-analysis of the English literature, to assess the component alignment outcomes after imageless computer assisted (CAOS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) versus conventional TKA. We reviewed 23 publications that met the inclusion criteria. Results were summarised via a Bayesian hierarchical random effects meta-analysis model. Separate analyses were conducted for prospective randomised trials alone, as well as for all randomised and observational studies. In 20 papers (4,199 TKAs) we found a reduction in outliers rate of approximately 80% in limb mechanical axis when operated with the CAOS. For the coronal femoral and tibial implants positions, the analysis included 3,058 TKAs. The analysis for the femoral implant showed a reduction in outliers rate of approximately 87% and for the tibial implant a reduction in outliers rate of approximately 80%. Imageless navigation when performing TKA improves component orientation and postoperative limb alignment. The clinical significance of these findings though has to be proven in the future. PMID:20376440

  2. A comparative microstructural study of vitamin-E blended and infused highly crosslinked UHMWPE for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Puppulin, Leonardo; Leto, Andrea; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2014-11-01

    The impact of adding antioxidant vitamin-E (α-tocopherol) to the microstructure of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) for total knee arthroplasty has been studied in detail by means of Raman microprobe spectroscopy. Three tibial insert samples prepared by different manufacturing methods were investigated, as follows: (A) a sample manufactured without blending with vitamin E which did not receive any irradiation dose after consolidation but underwent final sterilization in ethylene oxide (EtO); (B) a sample blended with 0.3 wt% of α-tocopherol, an isomer of vitamin E, and manufactured as sample (A); and, (C) a sample in which vitamin E was diffused after being irradiated with 100 kGy dose of γ-ray. Clear microstructural differences were observed in terms of phase contents (i.e., amorphous, crystalline, and intermediate phase fraction), molecular orientation, and the degree of anisotropy between the investigated tibial plates. Vitamin E in the starting resin promoted chain mobility leading to reorganization of the molecular chains. The spectroscopic characterizations helps to rationalize the complex effect of vitamin-E on the UHMWPE microstructure and gives useful information on how significantly any single step of the manufacturing procedures might affect the mechanical properties of the final orthopedic component. PMID:25151446

  3. To Cement or Not? Two-Year Results of a Prospective, Randomized Study Comparing Cemented Vs. Cementless Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA).

    PubMed

    Fricka, Kevin B; Sritulanondha, Supatra; McAsey, Craig J

    2015-09-01

    The optimal mode of fixation in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a subject of debate. We enrolled 100 TKA patients randomized to cemented or cementless fixation. Knee Society Scores (KSS), Oxford scores and pain visual analog scales (VAS) were collected pre-operatively and post-operatively. Two-year follow-up was obtained for 93 patients. The mean VAS trended higher for the cementless group at 4 months (P=0.06). At 2 years, the KSS functional scores, Oxford scores, and self-reported questions for satisfaction, less pain and better function were similar but the cemented group had higher KSS clinical scores (96.4 vs. 92.3, P=0.03). More radiolucencies were seen in cementless knees (P<0.001). The cementless group had one revision for instability and one cemented knee was revised for infection. Cementless TKA showed equivalent survivorship (revision for any reason as the endpoint) compared to cemented TKA at this early follow-up. Close monitoring of radiolucencies is important with continued follow-up. PMID:26118567

  4. International Comparative Evaluation of Knee Replacement with Fixed or Mobile Non-Posterior-Stabilized Implants

    PubMed Central

    Namba, Robert; Graves, Stephen; Robertsson, Otto; Furnes, Ove; Stea, Susanna; Puig-Verdié, Lluis; Hoeffel, Daniel; Cafri, Guy; Paxton, Elizabeth; Sedrakyan, Art

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mobile-bearing total knee prostheses were designed to reduce wear and improve implant survivorship following total knee arthroplasty. However, the benefit of mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty remains unproven. Both mobile-bearing and fixed-bearing total knee arthroplasty implants are available in posterior-stabilized and non-posterior-stabilized designs. With the latter, the implant does not recreate the function of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) with a posterior-stabilizing cam mechanism. The purpose of the present study was to compare mobile-bearing, non-posterior-stabilized devices with fixed-bearing, non-posterior-stabilized devices used in total knee arthroplasty through a novel multinational study design. Methods: Through the use of a distributed health data network, primary total knee arthroplasties performed for osteoarthritis from 2001 to 2010 were identified from six national and regional total joint arthroplasty registries. Multivariate meta-analysis was performed with use of linear mixed models, with the primary outcome of interest being revision for any reason. Survival probabilities and their standard errors were extracted from each registry for each unique combination of the covariates. Results: A total of 319,616 patients (60% female) underwent non-posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty. A fixed-bearing, non-posterior-stabilized design was used in 258,190 (81%) of the knees and a mobile-bearing, non-posterior-stabilized design in 61,426 (19%) of the knees. Sixty-nine percent of the patients who received a fixed-bearing implant were over sixty-five years of age, compared with 63% of those who received a mobile-bearing implant. Mobile-bearing designs had a higher risk of revision, with a hazard ratio of 1.43 (95% confidence interval, 1.36 to 1.51; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Previous comparisons of mobile-bearing and fixed-bearing total knee arthroplasty outcomes have been inconclusive. The current study utilized an advanced

  5. Relationship of Buckling and Knee Injury to Pain Exacerbation in Knee Osteoarthritis: A Web-Based Case-Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Zobel, Isabelle; Erfani, Tahereh; Bennell, Kim L; Makovey, Joanna; Metcalf, Ben; March, Lyn; Zhang, Yuqing; Eckstein, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most frequent causes of limited mobility and diminished quality of life. Pain is the main symptom that drives individuals with knee OA to seek medical care and a recognized antecedent to disability and eventually joint replacement. Evidence shows that patients with symptomatic OA experience fluctuations in pain severity. Mechanical insults to the knee such as injury and buckling may contribute to pain exacerbation. Objective Our objective was to examine whether knee injury and buckling (giving way) are triggers for exacerbation of pain in persons with symptomatic knee OA. Methods We conducted a case-crossover study, a novel methodology in which participants with symptomatic radiographic knee OA who have had knee pain exacerbations were used as their own control (self-matched design), with all data collected via the Internet. Participants were asked to log-on to the study website and complete an online questionnaire at baseline and then at regular 10-day intervals for 3 months (control periods)—a total of 10 questionnaires. They were also instructed to go to the website and complete pain exacerbation questionnaires when they experienced an isolated incident of knee pain exacerbation (case periods). A pain exacerbation “case” period was defined as an increase of ≥2 compared to baseline. At each contact the pain exacerbation was designated a case period, and at all other regular 10-day contacts (control periods) participants were asked about knee injuries during the previous 7 days and knee buckling during the previous 2 days. The relationship of knee injury and buckling to the risk of pain exacerbation was examined using conditional logistic regression models. Results The analysis included 157 participants (66% women, mean age: 62 years, mean BMI: 29.5 kg/m2). Sustaining a knee injury was associated with experiencing a pain exacerbation (odds ratio [OR] 10.2, 95% CI 5.4, 19.3) compared with no injury. Knee

  6. Comparative assessment of the effectiveness and tolerability of lornoxicam 8 mg BID and diclofenac 50 mg TID in adult indian patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: A 4-week, double-blind, randomized, comparative, multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Goregaonkar, Arvind; Mathiazhagan, K.J.; Shah, Ravindra R.; Kapoor, Paramjeet Singh; Taneja, Praveen; Sharma, Akhilesh; Bolmall, Chandrashekhar; Baliga, Vidyagauri P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Reports of cardiovascular adverse events (AEs) associated with the use of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) have prompted the quest for a better-tolerated NSAID. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness and tolerability of lornoxicam 8 mg BID and diclofenac 50 mg TID in adult Indian patients with OA of the hip or knee. Methods: This 4-week, double-blind, randomized, comparative, multicenter study was undertaken to compare oral lornoxicam and diclofenac in patients with OA. Patients who met the selection criteria were enrolled consecutively from the outpatient clinics of each of the participating hospitals in India. Participants completed the Western Ontario and McMasters Individual Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC-OA), WOMAC Composite Index (WOMAC-CI) (for pain, stiffness, and physical function), and a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS) (0–10 where 0 = no pain and 10 = worst possible pain or severe or excruciating pain) at each study visit (weeks 0 [baseline], 2, and 4 [or at early termination]). Patients' and physicians' global assessments of arthritis control were measured at each study visit when laboratory and clinical AEs were also monitored. The primary end points were the WOMAC-OA, the WOMAC-CI, and VAS scores for pain among the patients who completed the study. Results: Of the 273 patients (159 men, 114 women; mean [SD] age, 44.73 [10.72] years; range, 28–68 years) enrolled in the study, 13 (7 in the lornoxicam group and 6 in the diclofenac group) were lost to follow-up and their effectiveness and tolerability results were not included in the study analysis. Over the 4-week study period, both drugs provided significant (P < 0.05) sustained relief of OA symptoms compared with baseline. Compared with baseline, the mean pain score (WOMAC-CI) decreased 90.6% (13.88 [4.47] vs 1.30 [1.49]; P < 0.05) in the lornoxicam group and 88.9% (14.15 [4.56] vs 1.57 [1.49]; P < 0.05) in the diclofenac group

  7. How does surgery compare with advanced intra-articular therapies in knee osteoarthritis: current thoughts

    PubMed Central

    Wehling, Peter; Moser, Carsten; Maixner, William

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of osteoarthritis (OA) management are to reduce pain and inflammation, slow cartilage degradation, improve function and reduce disability. Current strategies for managing knee OA include nonpharmacological interventions, oral pharmacological treatments, localized intra-articular injections, and surgery. It has become evident that the inflammatory response is a key contributor to the development and progression of knee OA. Signaling pathways involving growth factors and cytokines are being investigated for the development of new therapies that target the underlying biological processes causing the disease. This concept of ‘molecular orthopedics’ enables more patient-centered diagnostic and treatment strategies. In contrast to other conservative therapies, which ultimately only address OA symptoms, intra-articular injections, in particular autologous conditioned serum (ACS), provide benefits that have the potential to outweigh those of established pharmacological treatments and surgery. Surgery has historically been considered the final solution for treatment of knee OA, both by treating physicians and by patients; however, there are increasing concerns regarding the lack of randomized clinical trials providing evidence to support this opinion. Intra-articular injection of ACS has demonstrated efficacy as a treatment for knee OA in a number of studies, with a very low rate of adverse events and side effects, compared with surgery. Treatment with ACS utilizes the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines and regenerative growth factors to support the natural healing processes in the knee, and has the potential to provide a valuable alternative to surgical intervention. PMID:27247634

  8. Patient directed self management of pain (PaDSMaP) compared to treatment as usual following total knee replacement: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In 2009, 665 patients underwent total knee replacements (TKRs) at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (NNUH), representing nearly 1% of the national total. Pain control following the operation can be poor, and this can cause poor mobilization and potential long-term adverse events. Although high levels of pain are not associated with patient dissatisfaction, brief periods of pain may lead to neuronal remodeling and sensitization. Patient controlled oral analgesia (PCOA) may improve pain relief; however, the evidence to date has been inconclusive. Patient directed self management of pain (PaDSMaP) is a single center randomized controlled trial, which aims to establish if patient self-medication improves, or is equivalent to, treatment as usual and to create an educational package to allow implementation elsewhere. Methods/design Patients eligible for a TKR will be recruited and randomized in the outpatient clinic. All patients will undergo their operations according to normal clinical practice but will be randomized into two groups. Once oral medication has commenced, one group will have pain relief administered by nursing staff in the usual way (treatment as usual; TAU), whilst the second group will self manage their pain medication (patient directed self management of pain; PaDSMaP). Those recruited for self-medication will undergo a training program to teach the use of oral analgesics according to the World Health Organization (WHO) pain cascade and how to complete the study documentation. The primary endpoint of the trial is the visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score at 3 days or discharge, whichever is sooner. The follow-up time is 6 weeks with a planned trial period of 3 years. The secondary objectives are satisfaction with the management of patient pain post-operatively whilst an inpatient after primary TKR; overall pain levels and pain on mobilization; satisfaction with pain management information provided; global

  9. Vitamin D supplementation in the management of knee osteoarthritis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common health issue worldwide in the aging population who are also commonly deficient in vitamin D. Our previous study suggested that higher serum 25-(OH)D levels were associated with reduced knee cartilage loss, implying that vitamin D supplementation may prevent the progression of knee OA. The aim of the VItamin D Effects on OA (VIDEO) study is to compare, over a 2- year period, the effects of vitamin D supplementation versus placebo on knee structural changes, knee pain, and lower limb muscle strength in patients with symptomatic knee OA. Methods/design Randomised, placebo-controlled, and double-blind clinical trial aiming to recruit 400 subjects (200 from Tasmania and 200 from Victoria) with both symptomatic knee OA and vitamin D deficiency (serum [25-(OH)D] level of >12.5 nmol/liter and <60 nmol/liter). Participants will be randomly allocated to vitamin D supplementation (50,000 IU compounded vitamin D3 capsule monthly) or identical inert placebo group for 2 years. The primary endpoint is loss of knee cartilage volume measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index of OA (WOMAC) knee pain score. The secondary endpoints will be other knee structural changes, and lower limb muscle strength. Several other outcome measures including core muscle images and central blood pressure will be recorded. Linear and logistic regression will be used to compare changes between groups using univariable and multivariable modeling analyses. Both intention to treat and per protocol analyses will be utilized. Discussion The trial is designed to test if vitamin D supplementation will reduce loss of knee cartilage volume, prevent the progression of other knee structural abnormalities, reduce knee pain and strengthen lower limb muscle strength, thus modify disease progression in knee OA. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01176344; Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials

  10. A randomised controlled trial comparing skin closure in total knee arthroplasty in the same knee: nylon sutures versus skin staples

    PubMed Central

    Iamthanaporn, K.; Hongnaparak, T.; Tangtrakulwanich, B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Nylon sutures and skin staples are used commonly in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgical wound closure. However, there is no study that compares the wound healing efficacy and patient satisfaction scores of both techniques in the same knee. Methods We randomised 70 patients who underwent primary TKA into two groups. In one group of 34 patients, the skin at the upper half of the wound was closed with skin staples and the lower half of the wound was closed with simple interrupted nylon sutures. In the other group of 36 patients, the skin at the upper half of the wound was closed with nylon stitches and the lower half of the wound was closed with skin staples. We recorded the wound closure time, pain score at the time of stitch removal, wound complication rate, patient satisfaction score, and the Hollander wound evaluation score at the post-operative periods of five days, 14 days, six weeks, three months, and six months. Each half wound was analysed separately. Results The mean patient body mass index was 26.8 kg/m2 (standard deviation 6.3). A total of 70 nylon stitched wounds and 70 skin stapled wounds were analysed. There were no significant differences in wound complication rates, patient satisfaction score, and the Hollander wound evaluation score between both types of wounds (p > 0.05). The wound closure time for skin stapled wounds was significantly lower than the nylon stitched wounds (p < 0.001). However, the skin stapled wounds had a significantly higher pain score at the time of stitch removal (p < 0.001). Conclusion Skin staples and nylon stitches had comparable results with respect to wound healing and patient satisfaction in TKA wound closure in non-obese patients. The benefit of skin staples over nylon stitches was a decrease in operative time, but was more painful upon removal. Cite this article: V. Yuenyongviwat. A randomised controlled trial comparing skin closure in total knee arthroplasty in the same knee: nylon sutures versus skin

  11. Knee injuries in severe trauma patients: a trauma registry study in 3.458 patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Purpose of the presented study is to answer the following questions: Are knee injuries associated with trauma mechanisms or concomitant injuries? Do injuries of the knee region aggravate treatment costs or prolong hospital stay in polytraumatized patients? Methods A retrospective analysis including 29.779 severely injured patients (Injury Severity Score [greater than or equal to] 16) from the Trauma Registry of the German Society for Trauma Surgery database (1993-2008) was conducted. Patients were subdivided into two groups; the "Knee" group (n=3.458, 11.6% of all patients) including all multiple trauma patients with knee injuries, and the "Non Knee" group (n=26.321) including the remaining patients. Patients with knee injuries were slightly younger, less often male gender and had a significantly increased ISS. Results Patients in the Knee group suffered significantly more traffic accidents compared to the Non Knee group (82% vs. 52%, p<0.001). These injuries were more often caused by car or motorbike accidents. Severe thoracic and limb injuries (AIS[greater than or equal to]3) were more frequently found in the Knee group (p<0.001) while head injury was distributed equally. The overall hospital stay, ICU stay, and treatment costs were significantly higher for the Knee group (38.1 vs. 25.5 days, 15.2 vs. 11.4 days, 40,116 vs. 25,336 Euro, respectively; all p<0.001). Conclusions Traffic accidents are associated with an increased incidence of knee injuries than falls or attempted suicides. Furthermore, severe injuries of the limbs and chest are more common in polytraumatized patients with knee injuries. At last, treatment of these patients is prolonged and consequently more expensive. PMID:22866995

  12. The influence of knee position on ankle dorsiflexion - a biometric study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Musculus gastrocnemius tightness (MGT) can be diagnosed by comparing ankle dorsiflexion (ADF) with the knee extended and flexed. Although various measurement techniques exist, the degree of knee flexion needed to eliminate the effect of the gastrocnemius on ADF is still unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the minimal degree of knee flexion required to eliminate the restricting effect of the musculus gastrocnemius on ADF. Methods Bilateral ADF of 20 asymptomatic volunteers aged 18-40 years (50% female) was assessed prospectively at six different degrees of knee flexion (0°, 20°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, Lunge). Tests were performed following a standardized protocol, non weightbearing and weightbearing, by two observers. Statistics comprised of descriptive statistics, t-tests, repeated measurement ANOVA and ICC. Results 20 individuals with a mean age of 27 ± 4 years were tested. No significant side to side differences were observed. The average ADF [95% confidence interval] for non weightbearing was 4° [1°-8°] with the knee extended and 20° [16°-24°] for the knee 75° flexed. Mean weightbearing ADF was 25° [22°-28°] for the knee extended and 39° [36°-42°] for the knee 75° flexed. The mean differences between 20° knee flexion and full extension were 15° [12°-18°] non weightbearing and 13° [11°-16°] weightbearing. Significant differences of ADF were only found between full extension and 20° of knee flexion. Further knee flexion did not increase ADF. Conclusion Knee flexion of 20° fully eliminates the ADF restraining effect of the gastrocnemius. This knowledge is essential to design a standardized clinical examination assessing MGT. PMID:25053374

  13. Knee Joint Distraction Compared to Total Knee Arthroplasty for Treatment of End Stage Osteoarthritis: Simulating Long-Term Outcomes and Cost-Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    van der Woude, J. A. D.; Nair, S. C.; Custers, R. J. H.; van Laar, J. M.; Kuchuck, N. O.; Lafeber, F. P. J. G.; Welsing, P. M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective In end-stage knee osteoarthritis the treatment of choice is total knee arthroplasty (TKA). An alternative treatment is knee joint distraction (KJD), suggested to postpone TKA. Several studies reported significant and prolonged clinical improvement of KJD. To make an appropriate decision regarding the position of this treatment, a cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis from healthcare perspective for different age and gender categories was performed. Methods A treatment strategy starting with TKA and a strategy starting with KJD for patients of different age and gender was simulated. To extrapolate outcomes to long-term health and economic outcomes a Markov (Health state) model was used. The number of surgeries, QALYs, and treatment costs per strategy were calculated. Costs-effectiveness is expressed using the cost-effectiveness plane and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. Results Starting with KJD the number of knee replacing procedures could be reduced, most clearly in the younger age categories; especially revision surgery. This resulted in the KJD strategy being dominant (more effective with cost-savings) in about 80% of simulations (with only inferiority in about 1%) in these age categories when compared to TKA. At a willingness to pay of 20.000 Euro per QALY gained, the probability of starting with KJD to be cost-effective compared to starting with a TKA was already found to be over 75% for all age categories and over 90–95% for the younger age categories. Conclusion A treatment strategy starting with knee joint distraction for knee osteoarthritis has a large potential for being a cost-effective intervention, especially for the relatively young patient. PMID:27171268

  14. Exercise in children with joint hypermobility syndrome and knee pain: a randomised controlled trial comparing exercise into hypermobile versus neutral knee extension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knee pain in children with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS) is traditionally managed with exercise, however the supporting evidence for this is scarce. No trial has previously examined whether exercising to neutral or into the hypermobile range affects outcomes. This study aimed to (i) determine if a physiotherapist-prescribed exercise programme focused on knee joint strength and control is effective in reducing knee pain in children with JHS compared to no treatment, and (ii) whether the range in which these exercises are performed affects outcomes. Methods A prospective, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial conducted in a tertiary hospital in Sydney, Australia compared an 8 week exercise programme performed into either the full hypermobile range or only to neutral knee extension, following a minimum 2 week baseline period without treatment. Randomisation was computer-generated, with allocation concealed by sequentially numbered opaque sealed envelopes. Knee pain was the primary outcome. Quality of life, thigh muscle strength, and function were also measured at (i) initial assessment, (ii) following the baseline period and (iii) post treatment. Assessors were blinded to the participants’ treatment allocation and participants blinded to the difference in the treatments. Results Children with JHS and knee pain (n=26) aged 7-16 years were randomly assigned to the hypermobile (n=12) or neutral (n=14) treatment group. Significant improvements in child-reported maximal knee pain were found following treatment, regardless of group allocation with a mean 14.5 mm reduction on the visual analogue scale (95% CI 5.2 – 23.8 mm, p=0.003). Significant differences between treatment groups were noted for parent-reported overall psychosocial health (p=0.009), specifically self-esteem (p=0.034), mental health (p=0.001) and behaviour (p=0.019), in favour of exercising into the hypermobile range (n=11) compared to neutral only (n=14). Conversely, parent

  15. Comparative Effectiveness of Tai Chi Versus Physical Therapy for Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenchen; Schmid, Christopher H.; Iversen, Maura D.; Harvey, William F.; Fielding, Roger A.; Driban, Jeffrey B.; Price, Lori Lyn; Wong, John B.; Reid, Kieran F.; Rones, Ramel; McAlindon, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Background Few remedies effectively treat long-term pain and disability from knee osteoarthritis. Studies suggest that Tai Chi alleviates symptoms, but no trials have directly compared Tai Chi with standard therapies for osteoarthritis. Objective To compare Tai Chi with standard physical therapy for patients with knee osteoarthritis. Design Randomized, 52-week, single-blind comparative effectiveness trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01258985) Setting An urban tertiary care academic hospital. Patients 204 participants with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (mean age, 60 years; 70% women; 53% white). Intervention Tai Chi (2 times per week for 12 weeks) or standard physical therapy (2 times per week for 6 weeks, followed by 6 weeks of monitored home exercise). Measurements The primary outcome was Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) score at 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes included physical function, depression, medication use, and quality of life. Results At 12 weeks, the WOMAC score was substantially reduced in both groups (Tai Chi, 167 points [95% CI, 145 to 190 points]; physical therapy, 143 points [CI, 119 to 167 points]). The between-group difference was not significant (24 points [CI, −10 to 58 points]). Both groups also showed similar clinically significant improvement in most secondary outcomes, and the benefits were maintained up to 52 weeks. Of note, the Tai Chi group had significantly greater improvements in depression and the physical component of quality of life. The benefit of Tai Chi was consistent across instructors. No serious adverse events occurred. Limitation Patients were aware of their treatment group assignment, and the generalizability of the findings to other settings remains undetermined. Conclusion Tai Chi produced beneficial effects similar to those of a standard course of physical therapy in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. Primary Funding Source National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health of

  16. Elevated corticospinal excitability in patellar tendinopathy compared with other anterior knee pain or no pain.

    PubMed

    Rio, E; Kidgell, D; Moseley, G L; Cook, J

    2016-09-01

    Anterior knee pain (AKP) is a frequent clinical presentation in jumping athletes and may be aggravated by sustained sitting, stair use, and loading of the quadriceps. Corticospinal activation of the quadriceps in athletes with AKP has not yet been investigated, but is important in guiding efficacious treatment. This cross-sectional study assessed corticospinal excitability (CSE) of the quadriceps in jumping athletes using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Groups consisted of Control (no knee pain); patellar tendinopathy (PT) [localized inferior pole pain on single-leg decline squat (SLDS)]; and other AKP (nonlocalized pain around the patella). SLDS (numerical score of pain 0-10), Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment Patellar tendon (VISA-P), maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), active motor threshold (AMT), CSE, and Mmax were tested. Twenty nine athletes participated; control n = 8, PT n = 11, AKP n = 10. There were no group differences in age (P = 0.23), body mass index (P = 0.16), MVIC (P = 0.38) or weekly activity (P = 0.22). PT had elevated CSE compared with controls and other AKP (P < 0.001), but no differences were detected between AKP and controls (P = 0.47). CSE appears to be greater in PT than controls and other AKP. An improved understanding of the corticospinal responses in different sources of knee pain may direct better treatment approaches. PMID:26369282

  17. Total or Partial Knee Arthroplasty Trial - TOPKAT: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the majority of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee the disease originates in the medial compartment. There are two fundamentally different approaches to knee replacement for patients with unicompartmental disease: some surgeons feel that it is always best to replace both the knee compartments with a total knee replacement (TKR); whereas others feel it is best to replace just the damaged component of the knee using a partial or unicompartment replacement (UKR). Both interventions are established and well-documented procedures. Little evidence exists to prove the clinical and cost-effectiveness of either management option. This provides an explanation for the high variation in treatment of choice by individual surgeons for the same knee pathology. The aim of the TOPKAT study will be to assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of TKRs compared to UKRs in patients with medial compartment osteoarthritis. Methods/Design The design of the study is a single layer multicentre superiority type randomised controlled trial of unilateral knee replacement patients. Blinding will not be possible as the surgical scars for each procedure differ. We aim to recruit 500 patients from approximately 28 secondary care orthopaedic units from across the UK including district general and teaching hospitals. Participants will be randomised to either UKR or TKR. Randomisation will occur using a web-based randomisation system. The study is pragmatic in terms of implant selection for the knee replacement operation. Participants will be followed up for 5 years. The primary outcome is the Oxford Knee Score, which will be collected via questionnaires at 2 months, 1 year and then annually to 5 years. Secondary outcomes will include cost-effectiveness, patient satisfaction and complications data. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN03013488; ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01352247 PMID:24028414

  18. Comparison of Diagnostic Performance of Semi-Quantitative Knee Ultrasound and Knee Radiography with MRI: Oulu Knee Osteoarthritis Study.

    PubMed

    Podlipská, Jana; Guermazi, Ali; Lehenkari, Petri; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Roemer, Frank W; Arokoski, Jari P; Kaukinen, Päivi; Liukkonen, Esa; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T; Tervonen, Osmo; Koski, Juhani M; Saarakkala, Simo

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative musculoskeletal disease highly prevalent in aging societies worldwide. Traditionally, knee OA is diagnosed using conventional radiography. However, structural changes of articular cartilage or menisci cannot be directly evaluated using this method. On the other hand, ultrasound is a promising tool able to provide direct information on soft tissue degeneration. The aim of our study was to systematically determine the site-specific diagnostic performance of semi-quantitative ultrasound grading of knee femoral articular cartilage, osteophytes and meniscal extrusion, and of radiographic assessment of joint space narrowing and osteophytes, using MRI as a reference standard. Eighty asymptomatic and 79 symptomatic subjects with mean age of 57.7 years were included in the study. Ultrasound performed best in the assessment of femoral medial and lateral osteophytes, and medial meniscal extrusion. In comparison to radiography, ultrasound performed better or at least equally well in identification of tibio-femoral osteophytes, medial meniscal extrusion and medial femoral cartilage morphological degeneration. Ultrasound provides relevant additional diagnostic information on tissue-specific morphological changes not depicted by conventional radiography. Consequently, the use of ultrasound as a complementary imaging tool along with radiography may enable more accurate and cost-effective diagnostics of knee osteoarthritis at the primary healthcare level. PMID:26926836

  19. Comparison of Diagnostic Performance of Semi-Quantitative Knee Ultrasound and Knee Radiography with MRI: Oulu Knee Osteoarthritis Study

    PubMed Central

    Podlipská, Jana; Guermazi, Ali; Lehenkari, Petri; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Roemer, Frank W.; Arokoski, Jari P.; Kaukinen, Päivi; Liukkonen, Esa; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T.; Tervonen, Osmo; Koski, Juhani M.; Saarakkala, Simo

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative musculoskeletal disease highly prevalent in aging societies worldwide. Traditionally, knee OA is diagnosed using conventional radiography. However, structural changes of articular cartilage or menisci cannot be directly evaluated using this method. On the other hand, ultrasound is a promising tool able to provide direct information on soft tissue degeneration. The aim of our study was to systematically determine the site-specific diagnostic performance of semi-quantitative ultrasound grading of knee femoral articular cartilage, osteophytes and meniscal extrusion, and of radiographic assessment of joint space narrowing and osteophytes, using MRI as a reference standard. Eighty asymptomatic and 79 symptomatic subjects with mean age of 57.7 years were included in the study. Ultrasound performed best in the assessment of femoral medial and lateral osteophytes, and medial meniscal extrusion. In comparison to radiography, ultrasound performed better or at least equally well in identification of tibio-femoral osteophytes, medial meniscal extrusion and medial femoral cartilage morphological degeneration. Ultrasound provides relevant additional diagnostic information on tissue-specific morphological changes not depicted by conventional radiography. Consequently, the use of ultrasound as a complementary imaging tool along with radiography may enable more accurate and cost-effective diagnostics of knee osteoarthritis at the primary healthcare level. PMID:26926836

  20. The relation of MRI-detected structural damage in the medial and lateral patellofemoral joint to knee pain: The Multicenter and Framingham Osteoarthritis Studies

    PubMed Central

    Stefanik, Joshua J.; Gross, K. Douglas; Guermazi, Ali; Felson, David T.; Roemer, Frank W.; Zhang, Yuquing; Niu, Jingbo; Segal, Neil A.; Lewis, Cora E.; Nevitt, Michael; Neogi, Tuhina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the relation of cartilage loss and bone marrow lesions (BMLs) in the medial and lateral patellofemoral joint (PFJ) to knee pain. Methods We categorized the location of full-thickness cartilage loss and BMLs in the PFJ on knee MRIs from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis (MOST) and Framingham Osteoarthritis (FOA) Studies as no damage, isolated medial, isolated lateral, or both medial and lateral (mixed). We determined the relation of MRI lesions in each PFJ region to prevalent knee pain. Differences in knee pain severity were compared among categories of PFJ full-thickness cartilage loss and BMLs using quantile regression. Results In MOST (n=1137 knees), compared with knees without full-thickness cartilage loss, knees with isolated lateral or mixed PFJ full-thickness cartilage loss had 1.9 (1.3, 2.8) and 1.9 (1.2, 2.9) times the odds of knee pain, respectively, while isolated medial cartilage loss had no association with knee pain.. BMLs in both the medial and lateral PFJ had 1.5 (1.1, 2.0) times the odds of knee pain compared with knees without BMLs. Knee pain severity was lowest in knees with isolated medial PFJ cartilage loss or BMLs. In FOA (n=934 knees), neither isolated medial nor lateral cartilage loss was associated with knee pain, whereas isolated BMLs in either region were associated with pain. Conclusions Results were not completely concordant but suggest that knee pain risk and severity is greatest with cartilage loss isolated to (MOST) or inclusive of (MOST and FOA) the lateral PFJ. While BMLs in either the medial or lateral PFJ are related to pain. PMID:25575967

  1. Attitudes to knee osteoarthritis and total knee replacement in Arab women: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) is offered to patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in the oil-rich countries in the Gulf region without adequate understanding of their perceptions, preferences or pain experiences. This study aimed to explore the pain experience and mobility limitation as well as the patient’s decision making process to undertake TKA among women with knee pain in the waiting list for surgery. Methods Five focus group discussions were conducted comprised of 39 women with severe knee OA from the waiting list for TKA in the only orthopaedic hospital in Kuwait. Discussions were recorded, transcribed and coded for themes to identify the factors considered to be important in decision-making for TKA. Results Experiencing knee pain was central to daily living and affected patients and their families. Mobility limitation was shaped by a strong sense of expected obligation to take care of the family. Two major sources of TKA delay were identified; one was due to late clinical advice to undergo TKA which was the result of receiving several consultations from different clinicians each of whom tried the medical management for OA. The second delay occurred after the clinical advice for TKA and was mainly due to ambivalence of patients because of fear of the operation and the lack of information about TKA that resulted in unclear expectations of the surgery. Conclusions Both verbal and written information about TKA should be provided as part of preoperative rehabilitation. This is critical to improve doctor-patient interactions and facilitate informed decision about the procedure and thus achieve patient-centered healthcare. PMID:24107658

  2. Hyaluronic Acid (HA) Viscosupplementation on Synovial Fluid Inflammation in Knee Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Heather K; Percival, Susan S; Conrad, Bryan P; Seay, Amanda N; Montero, Cindy; Vincent, Kevin R

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the changes in synovial fluid levels of cytokines, oxidative stress and viscosity six months after intraarticular hyaluronic acid (HA) treatment in adults and elderly adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Design: This was a prospective, repeated-measures study design in which patients with knee OA were administered 1% sodium hyaluronate. Patients (N=28) were stratified by age (adults, 50-64 years and elderly adults, ≥65 years). Ambulatory knee pain values and self-reported physical activity were collected at baseline and month six. Materials and Methods: Knee synovial fluid aspirates were collected at baseline and at six months. Fluid samples were analyzed for pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukins 1β, 6,8,12, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemotactic protein), anti-inflammatory cytokines (interleukins 4, 10 13), oxidative stress (4-hydroxynonenal) and viscosity at two different physiological shear speeds 2.5Hz and 5Hz. Results: HA improved ambulatory knee pain in adults and elderly groups by month six, but adults reported less knee pain-related interference with participation in exercise than elderly adults. A greater reduction in TNF-α occurred in adults compared to elderly adults (-95.8% ± 7.1% vs 19.2% ± 83.8%, respectively; p=.044). Fluid tended to improve at both shear speeds in adults compared to the elderly adults. The reduction in pain severity correlated with the change in IL-1β levels by month six (r= -.566; p=.044). Conclusion: Reduction of knee pain might be due to improvements in synovial fluid viscosity and inflammation. Cartilage preservation may be dependent on how cytokine, oxidative stress profiles and viscosity change over time. PMID:24093052

  3. Symptomatic knee disorders in floor layers and graphic designers. A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies have described an increased risk of developing tibio-femoral osteoarthritis (TF OA), meniscal tears and bursitis among those with a trade as floor layers. The purpose of this study was to analyse symptomatic knee disorders among floor layers that were highly exposed to kneeling work tasks compared to graphic designers without knee-demanding work tasks. Methods Data on the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) were collected by questionnaires. In total 134 floor layers and 120 graphic designers had a bilateral radiographic knee examination to detect TF OA and patella-femoral (PF) OA. A random sample of 92 floor layers and 49 graphic designers had Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of both knees to examine meniscal tears. Means of the subscales of KOOS were compared by analysis of variance. The risk ratio of symptomatic knee disorders defined as a combination of radiological detected knee OA or MRI-detected meniscal tears combined with a low KOOS score was estimated by logistic regression in floor layers with 95% confidence interval (CI) and adjusted for age, body mass index, traumas, and knee-straining sports activities. Symptomatic knee OA or meniscal tears were defined as a combination of low KOOS-scores and radiographic or MRI pathology. Results Symptomatic TF and medial meniscal tears were found in floor layers compared to graphic designers with odds ratios 2.6 (95%CI 0.99-6.9) and 2.04 (95% CI 0.77-5.5), respectively. There were no differences in PF OA. Floor layers scored significantly lower on all KOOS subscales compared to graphic designers. Significantly lower scores on the KOOS subscales were also found for radiographic TF and PF OA regardless of trade but not for meniscal tears. Conclusions The study showed an overall increased risk of developing symptomatic TF OA in a group of floor layers with a substantial amount of kneeling work positions. Prevention would be appropriate to reduce the proportion of kneeling

  4. Importance of the different posterolateral knee static stabilizers: biomechanical study

    PubMed Central

    Lasmar, Rodrigo Campos Pace; Marques de Almeida, Adriano; Serbino, José Wilson; da Mota Albuquerque, Roberto Freire; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative importance of the different static stabilizers of the posterolateral corner of the knee in cadavers. METHODS Tests were performed with the application of a varus and external rotation force to the knee in extension at 30 and 60 degrees of flexion using 10 cadaver knees. The forces were applied initially to an intact knee and then repeated after a selective sectioning of the ligaments into the following: section of the lateral collateral ligament; section of the lateral collateral ligament and the popliteofibular complex; and section of the lateral collateral ligament, the popliteofibular complex and the posterolateral capsule. The parameters studied were the angular deformity and stiffness when the knees were submitted to a 15 Newton-meter varus torque and a 6 Newton-meter external tibial torque. Statistical analysis was performed using the ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) and Tukey’s tests. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION Our findings showed that the lateral collateral ligament was important in varus stability at 0, 30 and 60 degrees. The popliteofibular complex was the most important structure for external rotation stability at all angles of flexion and was also important for varus stability at 30 and 60 degrees. The posterolateral capsule was important for varus stability at 0 and 30 degrees and for external rotation stability in extension. Level of evidence: Level IV (cadaver study). PMID:20454502

  5. A Randomized controlled trial comparing patellar retention versus patellar resurfacing in primary total knee arthroplasty: 5–10 year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The primary purpose of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) was to compare knee-specific outcomes (stiffness, pain, function) between patellar retention and resurfacing up to 10 years after primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Secondarily, we compared re-operation rates. Methods 38 subjects with non-inflammatory arthritis were randomized at primary TKA surgery to receive patellar resurfacing (n = 21; Resurfaced group) or to retain their native patella (n = 17; Non-resurfaced group). Evaluations were performed preoperatively, one, five and 10 years postoperatively by an evaluator who was blinded to group allocation. Self-reported knee-specific stiffness, pain and function, the primary outcomes, were measured by the Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Revision rate was determined at each evaluation and through hospital record review. Results 30 (88%) and 23 (72%) of available subjects completed the five and 10-year review respectively. Knee-specific scores continued to improve for both groups over the 10-years, despite diminishing overall health with no significant group differences seen. All revisions occurred within five years of surgery (three Non-resurfaced subjects; one Resurfaced subject) (p = 0.31). Two revisions in the Non-resurfaced group were due to persistent anterior knee pain. Conclusions We found no differences in knee-specific results between groups at 5–10 years postoperatively. The Non-resurfaced group had two revisions due to anterior knee pain similar to rates reported in other studies. Knee-specific results provide useful postoperative information and should be used in future studies comparing patellar management strategies. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01500252 PMID:22676495

  6. Adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell therapy in the treatment of isolated knee chondral lesions: design of a randomised controlled pilot study comparing arthroscopic microfracture versus arthroscopic microfracture combined with postoperative mesenchymal stem cell injections

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Julien; Ford, Jon; Bates, Dan; Boyd, Richard; Hahne, Andrew; Wang, Yuanyuan; Cicuttini, Flavia; Huguenin, Leesa; Norsworthy, Cameron; Shah, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The management of intra-articular chondral defects in the knee remains a challenge. Inadequate healing in areas of weight bearing leads to impairment in load transmission and these defects predispose to later development of osteoarthritis. Surgical management of full thickness chondral defects include arthroscopic microfracture and when appropriate autologous chondrocyte implantation. This latter method however is technically challenging, and may not offer significant improvement over microfracture. Preclinical and limited clinical trials have indicated the capacity of mesenchymal stem cells to influence chondral repair. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology of a pilot randomised controlled trial comparing arthroscopic microfracture alone for isolated knee chondral defects versus arthroscopic microfracture combined with postoperative autologous adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell injections. Methods and analysis A pilot single-centre randomised controlled trial is proposed. 40 participants aged 18–50 years, with isolated femoral condyle chondral defects and awaiting planned arthroscopic microfracture will be randomly allocated to a control group (receiving no additional treatment) or treatment group (receiving postoperative adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell treatment). Primary outcome measures will include MRI assessment of cartilage volume and defects and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. Secondary outcomes will include further MRI assessment of bone marrow lesions, bone area and T2 cartilage mapping, a 0–10 Numerical Pain Rating Scale, a Global Impression of Change score and a treatment satisfaction scale. Adverse events and cointerventions will be recorded. Initial outcome follow-up for publication of results will be at 12 months. Further annual follow-up to assess long-term differences between the two group will occur. Ethics and dissemination This trial has received prospective ethics approval through

  7. Care-seeking behaviour of adolescents with knee pain: a population-based study among 504 adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knee pain is common during adolescence. Adolescents and their parents may think that knee pain is benign and self-limiting and therefore avoid seeking medical care. However, long-term prognosis of knee pain is not favourable and treatment seems to offer greater reductions in pain compared to a “wait-and-see” approach. The purpose of this study was to describe the determinants of care-seeking behaviour among adolescents with current knee pain and investigate what types of treatment are initiated. Methods An online questionnaire was forwarded to 2,846 adolescents aged 15–19 in four upper secondary schools. The questionnaire contained questions on age, gender, height, weight, currently painful body regions, frequency of knee pain, health-related quality of life measured by the EuroQol 5-dimensions, sports participation and if they had sought medical care. Adolescents who reported current knee pain at least monthly or more frequently were telephoned. The adolescents were asked about pain duration, onset of knee pain (traumatic or insidious) and if they were currently being treated for their knee pain. Results 504 adolescents currently reported at least monthly knee pain. 59% of these had sought medical care and 18% were currently under medical treatment . A longer pain duration and higher pain severity increased the odds of seeking medical care. Females with traumatic onset of knee pain were more likely to have sought medical care than females with insidious onset of knee pain. Females with traumatic onset of knee pain and increased pain severity were more likely to be undergoing medical treatment. The most frequently reported treatments were the combination of exercises and orthotics (68% of those undergoing medical treatment). Conclusion Females with insidious onset of knee pain do not seek medical care as often as those with traumatic onset and adolescents of both genders with insidious onset are less likely to be under medical treatment. These

  8. Differences in Injury Pattern and Prevalence of Cartilage Lesions in Knee and Ankle Joints: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Aurich, Matthias; Hofmann, Gunther O.; Rolauffs, Bernd; Gras, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is more common in the knee compared to the ankle joint. This can not be explained exclusively by anatomical and biomechanical differences. The aim of this study is to analyze and compare the injury pattern (clinically) and the cartilage lesions (arthroscopically) of knee and ankle joints in a cohort of patients from the same catchment area. A retrospective study of the clinical data of 3122 patients (2139 outpatients and 983 inpatients) was performed, who were treated due to an injury of the knee and ankle joint. Statistical analysis was performed using SigmaStat 3.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, USA). There is a higher prevalence of injuries in the ankle as compared to the knee joint in this population from the same catchment area. In contrast, high-grade cartilage lesions are more prevalent in the knee, whereas low grade cartilage lesions are equally distributed between knee and ankle. From this data it can be concluded that the frequency of injuries and the injury pattern of knee versus ankle joints do not correlate with the severity of cartilage lesions and may therefore have no direct influence on the differential incidence of OA in those two joints. PMID:25568732

  9. Differences in injury pattern and prevalence of cartilage lesions in knee and ankle joints: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Aurich, Matthias; Hofmann, Gunther O; Rolauffs, Bernd; Gras, Florian

    2014-10-27

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is more common in the knee compared to the ankle joint. This can not be explained exclusively by anatomical and biomechanical differences. The aim of this study is to analyze and compare the injury pattern (clinically) and the cartilage lesions (arthroscopically) of knee and ankle joints in a cohort of patients from the same catchment area. A retrospective study of the clinical data of 3122 patients (2139 outpatients and 983 inpatients) was performed, who were treated due to an injury of the knee and ankle joint. Statistical analysis was performed using SigmaStat 3.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, USA). There is a higher prevalence of injuries in the ankle as compared to the knee joint in this population from the same catchment area. In contrast, high-grade cartilage lesions are more prevalent in the knee, whereas low grade cartilage lesions are equally distributed between knee and ankle. From this data it can be concluded that the frequency of injuries and the injury pattern of knee versus ankle joints do not correlate with the severity of cartilage lesions and may therefore have no direct influence on the differential incidence of OA in those two joints. PMID:25568732

  10. Pilot Study of Massage in Veterans with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Juberg, Michael; Allen, Kelli D.; Dmitrieva, Natalia O.; Keever, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To (1) assess the feasibility and acceptability of Swedish massage among Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care users with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and (2) collect preliminary data on efficacy of Swedish massage in this patient group. Design: Experimental pilot study. Setting: Duke Integrative Medicine clinic and VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. Patients: Twenty-five veterans with symptomatic knee OA. Interventions: Eight weekly 1-hour sessions of full-body Swedish massage. Outcome measures: Primary: Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and global pain (Visual Analog Scale [VAS]). Secondary: National Institutes of Health Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System-Pain Interference Questionnaire 6b (PROMIS-PI 6b), 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12 v1) and the EuroQol health status index (EQ-5D-5L), knee range of motion (ROM), and time to walk 50 feet. Results: Study feasibility was established by a 92% retention rate with 99% of massage visits and 100% of research visits completed. Results showed significant improvements in self-reported OA-related pain, stiffness and function (30% improvement in Global WOMAC scores; p=0.001) and knee pain over the past 7 days (36% improvement in VAS score; p<0.001). PROMIS-PI, EQ-5D-5L, and physical composite score of the SF-12 also significantly improved (p<0.01 for all), while the mental composite score of the SF-12 and knee ROM showed trends toward significant improvement. Time to walk 50 feet did not significantly improve. Conclusions: Results of this pilot study support the feasibility and acceptability of Swedish massage among VA health care users as well as preliminary data suggesting its efficacy for reducing pain due to knee OA. If results are confirmed in a larger randomized trial, massage could be an important component of regular care for these patients. PMID:25966332

  11. Comparing the mechanical properties of the porcine knee meniscus when hydrated in saline versus synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Lakes, Emily H; Kline, Courtney L; McFetridge, Peter S; Allen, Kyle D

    2015-12-16

    As research progresses to find a suitable knee meniscus replacement, accurate in vitro testing becomes critical for feasibility and comparison studies of mechanical integrity. Within the knee, the meniscus is bathed in synovial fluid, yet the most common hydration fluid in laboratory testing is phosphate buffered saline (PBS). PBS is a relatively simple salt solution, while synovial fluid is a complex non-Newtonian fluid with multiple lubricating factors. As such, PBS may interact with meniscal tissue differently than synovial fluid, and thus, the hydration fluid may be an important factor in obtaining accurate results during in vitro testing. To evaluate these effects, medial porcine menisci were used to evaluate tissue mechanics in tension (n=11) and compression (n=15). In all tests, two samples from the same meniscus were taken, where one sample was hydrated in PBS and the other was hydrated in synovial fluid. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences between the mean mechanical properties of samples tested in PBS compared to synovial fluid; however, compressive testing revealed the variability between samples was significantly reduced if samples were tested in synovial fluid. For example, the compressive Young׳s Modulus was 12.69±7.49MPa in PBS versus 12.34±4.27MPa in synovial fluid. These results indicate testing meniscal tissue in PBS will largely not affect the mean value of the mechanical properties, but performing compression testing in synovial fluid may provide more consistent results between samples and assist in reducing sample numbers in some experiments. PMID:26592438

  12. Hybrid component fixation in total knee arthroplasty: minimum of 10-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Yoon, Jung-Ro; Oh, Chi-Hun; Kim, Taik-Sun

    2012-06-01

    Hybrid total knee arthroplasty (TKA) (uncemented femur with cemented tibia and patella) was introduced in the late 1980s to gain the theoretical advantage of durable cementless femoral fixation while avoiding the problems noted with cementless tibial fixation. From December 1992 to July 2000, 215 patients (235 knees) who underwent hybrid TKA were enrolled in this study. Five types of prosthesis (AGC, Maxim, LCS-M, LCS-APG, and Scorpio) were used. Revision rate for aseptic loosening was 16 (6.8%) of 235 knees. At 10 and 15 years, survivorship with tibial or femoral revision as the end point was 0.95 and 0.92, respectively. Hybrid TKA provides durable fixation with clinical and radiographic performance at minimum 10 years comparable with cemented series. PMID:22019322

  13. Knee Kinematics Estimation Using Multi-Body Optimisation Embedding a Knee Joint Stiffness Matrix: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Vincent; Lamberto, Giuliano; Lu, Tung-Wu; Cappozzo, Aurelio; Dumas, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    The use of multi-body optimisation (MBO) to estimate joint kinematics from stereophotogrammetric data while compensating for soft tissue artefact is still open to debate. Presently used joint models embedded in MBO, such as mechanical linkages, constitute a considerable simplification of joint function, preventing a detailed understanding of it. The present study proposes a knee joint model where femur and tibia are represented as rigid bodies connected through an elastic element the behaviour of which is described by a single stiffness matrix. The deformation energy, computed from the stiffness matrix and joint angles and displacements, is minimised within the MBO. Implemented as a “soft” constraint using a penalty-based method, this elastic joint description challenges the strictness of “hard” constraints. In this study, estimates of knee kinematics obtained using MBO embedding four different knee joint models (i.e., no constraints, spherical joint, parallel mechanism, and elastic joint) were compared against reference kinematics measured using bi-planar fluoroscopy on two healthy subjects ascending stairs. Bland-Altman analysis and sensitivity analysis investigating the influence of variations in the stiffness matrix terms on the estimated kinematics substantiate the conclusions. The difference between the reference knee joint angles and displacements and the corresponding estimates obtained using MBO embedding the stiffness matrix showed an average bias and standard deviation for kinematics of 0.9±3.2° and 1.6±2.3 mm. These values were lower than when no joint constraints (1.1±3.8°, 2.4±4.1 mm) or a parallel mechanism (7.7±3.6°, 1.6±1.7 mm) were used and were comparable to the values obtained with a spherical joint (1.0±3.2°, 1.3±1.9 mm). The study demonstrated the feasibility of substituting an elastic joint for more classic joint constraints in MBO. PMID:27314586

  14. A pilot study of post-total knee replacement gait rehabilitation using lower limbs robot-assisted training system.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianhua; Wu, Tao; Xu, Zhisheng; Gu, Xudong

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the application value of the lower limbs robot-assisted training system for post-total knee replacement (TKR) gait rehabilitation. A total of 60 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee were equally randomized into the traditional and robot-assisted rehabilitation training groups within 1 week after TKR. All patients received 2-week training. Scores of hospital for special surgery (HSS), knee kinesthesia grades, knee proprioception grades, functional ambulation (FAC) scores, Berg balance scores, 10-m sitting-standing time, and 6-min walking distances were compared between the groups. The HSS score, Berg score, 10-m sitting-standing time, and 6-min walking distance of the robot-assisted training group were significantly higher than the control group (P < 0.05). Its knee kinesthesia grade, knee proprioception grade, and FAC score were better than the control group but not significantly (P > 0.05). Lower limbs robot-assisted rehabilitation training improves post-TKR patients' knee proprioception and stability more effectively compared with the traditional method. It improves patients' gait and symptoms, increases their walking speed, and prolongs their walking distances, which benefit their return to family and society. PMID:23412304

  15. A Yoga Strengthening Program Designed to Minimize the Knee Adduction Moment for Women with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Proof-Of-Principle Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    People with knee osteoarthritis may benefit from exercise prescriptions that minimize knee loads in the frontal plane. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether a novel 12-week strengthening program designed to minimize exposure to the knee adduction moment (KAM) could improve symptoms and knee strength in women with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. A secondary objective was to determine whether the program could improve mobility and fitness, and decrease peak KAM during gait. The tertiary objective was to evaluate the biomechanical characteristics of this yoga program. In particular, we compared the peak KAM during gait with that during yoga postures at baseline. We also compared lower limb normalized mean electromyography (EMG) amplitudes during yoga postures between baseline and follow-up. Primary measures included self-reported pain and physical function (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score) and knee strength (extensor and flexor torques). Secondary measures included mobility (six-minute walk, 30-second chair stand, stair climbing), fitness (submaximal cycle ergometer test), and clinical gait analysis using motion capture synchronized with electromyography and force measurement. Also, KAM and normalized mean EMG amplitudes were collected during yoga postures. Forty-five women over age 50 with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis, consistent with the American College of Rheumatology criteria, enrolled in our 12-week (3 sessions per week) program. Data from 38 were analyzed (six drop-outs; one lost to co-intervention). Participants experienced reduced pain (mean improvement 10.1–20.1 normalized to 100; p<0.001), increased knee extensor strength (mean improvement 0.01 Nm/kg; p = 0.004), and increased flexor strength (mean improvement 0.01 Nm/kg; p = 0.001) at follow-up compared to baseline. Participants improved mobility on the six-minute walk (mean improvement 37.7 m; p<0.001) and 30-second chair stand (mean improvement 1.3; p = 0.006) at

  16. The Complexity of Human Walking: A Knee Osteoarthritis Study

    PubMed Central

    Kotti, Margarita; Duffell, Lynsey D.; Faisal, Aldo A.; McGregor, Alison H.

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes a framework for deconstructing complex walking patterns to create a simple principal component space before checking whether the projection to this space is suitable for identifying changes from the normality. We focus on knee osteoarthritis, the most common knee joint disease and the second leading cause of disability. Knee osteoarthritis affects over 250 million people worldwide. The motivation for projecting the highly dimensional movements to a lower dimensional and simpler space is our belief that motor behaviour can be understood by identifying a simplicity via projection to a low principal component space, which may reflect upon the underlying mechanism. To study this, we recruited 180 subjects, 47 of which reported that they had knee osteoarthritis. They were asked to walk several times along a walkway equipped with two force plates that capture their ground reaction forces along 3 axes, namely vertical, anterior-posterior, and medio-lateral, at 1000 Hz. Data when the subject does not clearly strike the force plate were excluded, leaving 1–3 gait cycles per subject. To examine the complexity of human walking, we applied dimensionality reduction via Probabilistic Principal Component Analysis. The first principal component explains 34% of the variance in the data, whereas over 80% of the variance is explained by 8 principal components or more. This proves the complexity of the underlying structure of the ground reaction forces. To examine if our musculoskeletal system generates movements that are distinguishable between normal and pathological subjects in a low dimensional principal component space, we applied a Bayes classifier. For the tested cross-validated, subject-independent experimental protocol, the classification accuracy equals 82.62%. Also, a novel complexity measure is proposed, which can be used as an objective index to facilitate clinical decision making. This measure proves that knee osteoarthritis subjects exhibit more

  17. Better survival of hybrid total knee arthroplasty compared to cemented arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Petursson, Gunnar; Fenstad, Anne Marie; Havelin, Leif Ivar; Gøthesen, Øystein; Lygre, Stein Håkon Låstad; Röhrl, Stephan M; Furnes, Ove

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — There have been few comparative studies on total knee replacement (TKR) with cemented tibia and uncemented femur (hybrid TKR). Previous studies have not shown any difference in revision rate between cemented and hybrid fixation, but these studies had few hybrid prostheses. We have evaluated the outcome of hybrid TKR based on data from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register (NAR). Patients and methods — We compared 4,585 hybrid TKRs to 20,095 cemented TKRs with risk of revision for any cause as the primary endpoint. We included primary TKRs without patella resurfacing that were reported to the NAR during the years 1999–2012. To minimize the possible confounding effect of prosthesis brands, only brands that were used both as hybrids and cemented in more than 200 cases were included. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox regression analysis were done with adjustment for age, sex, and preoperative diagnosis. To include death as a competing risk, cumulative incidence function estimates were calculated. Results — Estimated survival at 11 years was 94.3% (95% CI: 93.9–94.7) in the cemented TKR group and 96.3% (CI: 95.3–97.3) in the hybrid TKR group. The adjusted Cox regression analysis showed a lower risk of revision in the hybrid group (relative risk = 0.58, CI: 0.48–0.72, p < 0.001). The hybrid group included 3 brands of prostheses: LCS classic, LCS complete, and Profix. Profix hybrid TKR had lower risk of revision than cemented TKR, but the LCS classic and LCS complete did not. Kaplan-Meier estimated survival at 11 years was 96.8% (CI: 95.6–98.0) in the hybrid Profix group and 95.2% (CI: 94.6–95.8) in the cemented Profix group. Mean operating time was 17 min longer in the cemented group. Interpretation — Survivorship of the hybrid TKR at 11 years was better than that for cemented TKR, or the same, depending on the brand of prosthesis. Hybrid fixation appears to be a safe and time-efficient alternative to cemented fixation in

  18. A 12-week randomized study of topical therapy with three dosages of ketoprofen in Transfersome® gel (IDEA-033) compared with the ketoprofen-free vehicle (TDT 064), in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Kneer, Werner; Rother, Matthias; Mazgareanu, Stefan; Seidel, Egbert J

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety and efficacy of ketoprofen in Transfersome® gel (IDEA-033) in comparison with a ketoprofen-free vehicle (TDT 064) for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Methods Patients with knee OA (N = 866) were randomly assigned to receive topical IDEA-033 containing 100, 50, or 25 mg ketoprofen, or TDT 064 twice daily for 12 weeks, in a double-blind trial. The primary efficacy endpoint was the change in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC®) Osteoarthritis Index pain subscale score. The coprimary efficacy endpoints were the WOMAC function subscale score and the patient global assessment of response to therapy. The secondary endpoints included the numeric pain rating for the first 14 days of treatment and the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT)-Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) responder rates. Results The WOMAC pain scores were reduced by approximately 50% or more in all four groups. The 100 and 50 mg ketoprofen groups, but not the 25 mg group, showed a superior reduction in the WOMAC pain score versus the TDT 064 group (100 mg: −57.4% [P = 0.0383]; 50 mg: −57.1% [P = 0.0204]; and 25 mg: −53.4% [P = 0.3616] versus TDT 064: −49.5%). The superiority of the ketoprofen-containing formulations was not demonstrated for the WOMAC function subscale score, whereas the patient global assessment of 50 mg ketoprofen group, but not the 100 or 25 mg group, was superior to that of the TDT 064 group (P = 0.0283). Responder rates were significantly higher for all the IDEA-033 groups versus the TDT 064 group, but were high in all groups (100 mg: 88.6%; 50 mg: 86.8%; 25 mg: 88.6%; and TDT 064: 77.5%). Dermal reactions were the only relevant drug-related adverse events in all four groups. Conclusion The 50 and 100 mg ketoprofen doses of IDEA-033 were only marginally superior to TDT 064 for reducing pain associated with knee OA. The study indicates a high treatment response to the topical

  19. Medial Compartment Decompression by Fibular Osteotomy to Treat Medial Compartment Knee Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zong-You; Chen, Wei; Li, Cun-Xiang; Wang, Juan; Shao, De-Cheng; Hou, Zhi-Yong; Gao, Shi-Jun; Wang, Fei; Li, Ji-Dong; Hao, Jian-Dong; Chen, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2015-12-01

    Compared with high tibial osteotomy and total knee arthroplasty, the authors found a simpler surgical procedure, partial fibular osteotomy, could effectively relieve knee pain and also correct the varus deformity for patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA). From January 1996 to April 2012, a total of 156 patients with medial compartment OA were treated by proximal fibular osteotomy in the authors' hospital. A 2-cm-long section of fibula was resected 6 to 10 cm below the fibular head. A total of 110 patients with follow-up of more than 2 years were included in the study, including 34 males and 76 females with an average age of 59.2 years. Anteroposterior and lateral weight-bearing radiographs, the femorotibial angle (FTA) and lateral joint space, and the American Knee Society Score (KSS) and the visual analog scale (VAS) score of the knee joint were evaluated preoperatively and at final follow-up, respectively. At final follow-up, mean FTA and lateral joint space were 179.4°±1.8° and 6.9±0.7 mm, respectively, which were significantly smaller than those measured preoperatively (182.7°±2.0° and 12.2±1.1 mm, respectively; both P<.001). Mean KSS at final follow-up was 92.3±31.7, significantly higher than the mean preoperative score of 45.0±21.3 (P<.001). Mean VAS score and interquartile range were 2.0 and 2.0, significantly lower than the preoperative data (7 and 1.0, respectively; P<.001). The authors found that proximal fibular osteotomy can significantly improve both the radiographic appearance and function of the affected knee joint and also achieve long-term pain relief. This procedure may be an alternative treatment option for medial compartment OA. PMID:26652332

  20. Adductor Canal Block for Postoperative Pain Treatment after Revision Knee Arthroplasty: A Blinded, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Jæger, Pia; Koscielniak-Nielsen, Zbigniew J.; Schrøder, Henrik M.; Mathiesen, Ole; Henningsen, Maria H.; Lund, Jørgen; Jenstrup, Morten T.; Dahl, Jørgen B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Revision knee arthroplasty is assumed to be even more painful than primary knee arthroplasty and predominantly performed in chronic pain patients, which challenges postoperative pain treatment. We hypothesized that the adductor canal block, effective for pain relief after primary total knee arthroplasty, may reduce pain during knee flexion (primary endpoint: at 4 h) compared with placebo after revision total knee arthroplasty. Secondary endpoints were pain at rest, morphine consumption and morphine-related side effects. Methods We included patients scheduled for revision knee arthroplasty in general anesthesia into this blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized trial. Patients were allocated to an adductor canal block via a catheter with either ropivacaine or placebo; bolus of 0.75% ropivacaine/saline, followed by infusion of 0.2% ropivacaine/saline. Clinicaltrials.gov ID: NCT01191593. Results We enrolled 36 patients, of which 30 were analyzed. Mean pain scores during knee flexion at 4 h (primary endpoint) were: 52±22 versus 71±25 mm (mean difference 19, 95% CI: 1 to 37, P = 0.04), ropivacaine and placebo group respectively. When calculated as area under the curve (1–8 h/7 h) pain scores were 55±21 versus 69±21 mm during knee flexion (P = 0.11) and 39±18 versus 45±23 mm at rest (P = 0.43), ropivacaine and placebo group respectively. Groups were similar regarding morphine consumption and morphine-related side effects (P>0.05). Conclusions The only statistically significant difference found between groups was in the primary endpoint: pain during knee flexion at 4 h. However, due to a larger than anticipated dropout rate and heterogeneous study population, the study was underpowered. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01191593 PMID:25386752

  1. Comparative Effects of Periarticular Multimodal Drug Injection and Single-Shot Femoral Nerve Block on Pain Following Total Knee Arthroplasty and Factors Influencing Their Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Shuji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Kan, Hiroyuki; Hino, Manabu; Ichimaru, Shohei; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Amaya, Fumimasa; Sawa, Teiji; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study compared the analgesic effects of local infiltration analgesia (LIA) and femoral nerve block (FNB) after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and assessed factors associated with analgesia obtained by these two methods. Materials and Methods Study subjects included 66 patients (72 knees) who underwent TKA for osteoarthritis of the knee. Pain visual analogue scale (VAS), the amount of analgesics used, number of days to achieve 90° of flexion of the knee joint, date of initiating parallel-bar walking, range of motion of the knee joint at discharge, and adverse events were investigated. Results The VAS scores did not differ significantly between two groups, whereas the amount of analgesics used was significantly lower in the LIA group. Preoperative flexion contracture was significantly more severe in the LIA group with high VAS compared with low VAS. No serious adverse event occurred in the LIA or FNB group. Conclusions The lower analgesic usage in the LIA group than the FNB group indicates that the analgesic effect of LIA was greater than that of singleshot FNB after TKA. There were no serious complications in either group. The postoperative analgesic effect of LIA was smaller in patients with severe than less severe preoperative flexion contracture. PMID:27595078

  2. Bicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Giachino, Matteo; Risitano, Salvatore; Atzori, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most worldwide practiced surgery for knee osteoarthritis and its efficacy is mightily described by literature. Concerns about the invasiveness of TKA let the introduction of segmental resurfacing of the joint for younger patients with localized osteoarthritis. Bone stock sparing and ligaments preservation are the essence of both unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA). Advantages related to BKA are the respect of knee biomechanics, lower complications rates, shorter hospital stay, faster rehabilitation. Moreover, in case of failure of the first implant the conversion to TKA is undemanding and can be compared to a standard prosthesis. Our experience suggest that BKA is a reliable technique in selected cases and especially younger people with higher functional requests can favourably profit from it. Although those results are encouraging, we still need further prospective, randomized, long-term studies to finally assess BKA indications and outcomes. PMID:26855941

  3. Bicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Luigi; Giachino, Matteo; Risitano, Salvatore; Atzori, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most worldwide practiced surgery for knee osteoarthritis and its efficacy is mightily described by literature. Concerns about the invasiveness of TKA let the introduction of segmental resurfacing of the joint for younger patients with localized osteoarthritis. Bone stock sparing and ligaments preservation are the essence of both unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA). Advantages related to BKA are the respect of knee biomechanics, lower complications rates, shorter hospital stay, faster rehabilitation. Moreover, in case of failure of the first implant the conversion to TKA is undemanding and can be compared to a standard prosthesis. Our experience suggest that BKA is a reliable technique in selected cases and especially younger people with higher functional requests can favourably profit from it. Although those results are encouraging, we still need further prospective, randomized, long-term studies to finally assess BKA indications and outcomes. PMID:26855941

  4. Analgesia for total knee arthroplasty: a meta-analysis comparing local infiltration and femoral nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Mei, ShuYa; Jin, ShuQing; Chen, ZhiXia; Ding, XiBing; Zhao, Xiang; Li, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Patients frequently experience postoperative pain after a total knee arthroplasty; such pain is always challenging to treat and may delay the patient's recovery. It is unclear whether local infiltration or a femoral nerve block offers a better analgesic effect after total knee arthroplasty. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to compare local infiltration with a femoral nerve block in patients who underwent a primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty. We searched Pubmed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library through December 2014. Two reviewers scanned abstracts and extracted data. The data collected included numeric rating scale values for pain at rest and pain upon movement and opioid consumption in the first 24 hours. Mean differences with 95% confidence intervals were calculated for each end point. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate potential sources of heterogeneity. While the numeric rating scale values for pain upon movement (MD-0.62; 95%CI: -1.13 to -0.12; p=0.02) in the first 24 hours differed significantly between the patients who received local infiltration and those who received a femoral nerve block, there were no differences in the numeric rating scale results for pain at rest (MD-0.42; 95%CI:-1.32 to 0.47; p=0.35) or opioid consumption (MD 2.92; 95%CI:-1.32 to 7.16; p=0.18) in the first 24 hours. Local infiltration and femoral nerve block showed no significant differences in pain intensity at rest or opioid consumption after total knee arthroplasty, but the femoral nerve block was associated with reduced pain upon movement. PMID:26375568

  5. Assessment of Knee Proprioception in the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Risk Position in Healthy Subjects: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Seyed Mohsen; Talebian, Saeed; Naseri, Nasrin; Hadian, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Knee joint proprioception combines sensory input from a variety of afferent receptors that encompasses the sensations of joint position and motion. Poor proprioception is one of the risk factors of anterior cruciate ligament injury. Most studies have favored testing knee joint position sense in the sagittal plane and non-weight-bearing position. One of the most common mechanisms of noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury is dynamic knee valgus. No study has measured joint position sense in a manner relevant to the mechanism of injury. Therefore, the aim of this study was to measure knee joint position sense in the noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury risk position and normal condition. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy male athletes participated in the study. Joint position sense was evaluated by active reproduction of the anterior cruciate ligament injury risk position and normal condition. The dominant knees of subjects were tested. [Results] The results showed less accurate knee joint position sense in the noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury risk position rather than the normal condition. [Conclusion] The poorer joint position sense in non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injury risk position compared with the normal condition may contribute to the increased incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury. PMID:25364100

  6. A Study of Knee Joint Kinematics and Mechanics using a Human FE Model.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Yuichi; Hasegawa, Junji; Yasuki, Tsuyoshi; Iwamoto, Masami; Miki, Kazuo

    2005-11-01

    Posterior translation of the tibia with respect to the femur can stretch the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Fifteen millimeters of relative displacement between the femur and tibia is known as the Injury Assessment Reference Value (IARV) for the PCL injury. Since the anterior protuberance of the tibial plateau can be the first site of contact when the knee is flexed, the knee bolster is generally designed with an inclined surface so as not to directly load the projection in frontal crashes. It should be noted, however, that the initial flexion angle of the occupant knee can vary among individuals and the knee flexion angle can change due to the occupant motion. The behavior of the tibial protuberance related to the knee flexion angle has not been described yet. The instantaneous angle of the knee joint at the timing of restraining the knee should be known to manage the geometry and functions of knee restraint devices. The purposes of this study are first to understand the kinematics of the knee joint during flexion, and second to characterize the mechanics of the knee joint under anterior-posterior loading. A finite element model of the knee joint, extracted from the Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS), was used to analyze the mechanism. The model was validated against kinematics and mechanical responses of the human knee joint. By tracking the relative positions and angles between the patella and the tibia in a knee flexing simulation, the magnitude of the tibial anterior protuberance was described as a function of the knee joint angle. The model revealed that the mechanics of the knee joint was characterized as a combination of stiffness of the patella-femur structure and the PCL It was also found that the magnitude of the tibial anterior protuberance determined the amount of initial stretch of the PCL in anterior-posterior loading. Based on the knee joint kinematics and mechanics, an interference boundary was proposed for different knee flexion angles, so

  7. Biomechanical study of the tibia in knee replacement revision.

    PubMed

    Quílez, M P; Pérez, M A; Seral-García, B

    2015-01-01

    The best management of severe bone defects following total knee replacement is still controversial. Metal augments, tantalum cones and porous tibial sleeves could help the surgeon to manage any type of bone loss, providing a stable and durable knee joint reconstruction. Five different types of prostheses have been analysed: one prosthesis with straight stem; two prostheses with offset stem, with and without supplement, and two prostheses with sleeves, with and without stem. The purpose of this study is to report a finite element study of revision knee tibial implants. The main objective was to analyse the tibial bone density changes and Von Misses tension changes following different tibial implant designs. In all cases, the bone density decreases in the proximal epiphysis and medullary channels, with a bone density increase also being predicted in the diaphysis and at the bone around the stems tips. The highest value of Von Misses stress has been obtained for the straight tibial stem, and the lowest for the stemless metaphyseal sleeves prosthesis. PMID:25650079

  8. Accuracy and repeatability of Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) for measuring knee laxity in longitudinal studies.

    PubMed

    Fleming, B C; Peura, G D; Abate, J A; Beynnon, B D

    2001-10-01

    Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) can be used to assess temporal changes in anterior-posterior (A-P) knee laxity. However, the accuracy and precision of RSA is dependent on many factors and should be independently evaluated for a particular application. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of RSA for measuring A-P knee laxity. The specific aims were to assess the variation or "noise" inherent to RSA, to determine the reproducibility of RSA for repeated A-P laxity testing, and to assess the accuracy of these measurements. Two experiments were performed. The first experiment utilized three rigid models of the tibiofemoral joint to assess the noise and to compare digitization errors of two independent examiners. No differences were found in the kinematic outputs of the RSA due to examiner, repeated trials, or the model used. In a second experiment, A-P laxity values between the A-P shear load limits of +/-60 N of five cadaver goat knees were measured to assess the error associated with repeated testing. The RSA laxity values were also compared to those obtained from a custom designed linkage system. The mean A-P laxity values with the knee 30 degrees, 60 degrees, and 90 degrees of flexion for the ACL-intact goat knee (+/-95% confidence interval) were 0.8 (+/-0.25), 0.9 (+/-0.29), and 0.4 (+/-0.22) mm, respectively. In the ACL-deficient knee, the A-P laxity values increased by an order of magnitude to 8.8 (+/-1.39), 7.6 (+/-1.32), and 3.1 (+/-1.20)mm, respectively. No significant differences were found between the A-P laxity values measured by RSA and the independent measurement technique. A highly significant linear relationship (r(2)=0.83) was also found between these techniques. This study suggests that the RSA method is an accurate and precise means to measure A-P knee laxity for repeated testing over time. PMID:11522316

  9. Variable stiffness actuated prosthetic knee to restore knee buckling during stance: a modeling study.

    PubMed

    Wentink, E C; Koopman, H F J M; Stramigioli, S; Rietman, J S; Veltink, P H

    2013-06-01

    Most modern intelligent knee prosthesis use dampers to modulate dynamic behavior and prevent excessive knee flexion, but they dissipate energy and do not assist in knee extension. Energy efficient variable stiffness control (VSA) can reduce the energy consumption yet effectively modulate the dynamic behavior and use stored energy during flexion to assist in subsequent extension. A principle design of energy efficient VSA in a prosthetic knee is proposed and analyzed for the specific case of rejection of a disturbed stance phase. The concept is based on the principle that the output stiffness of a spring can be changed without changing the energy stored in the elastic elements of the spring. The usability of this concept to control a prosthetic knee is evaluated using a model. Part of the stance phase of the human leg was modeled by a double pendulum. Specifically the rejection of a common disturbance of transfemoral prosthetic gait, an unlocked knee at heel strike, was evaluated. The ranges of spring stiffnesses were determined such that the angular characteristics of a normal stance phase were preserved, but disturbances could also be rejected. The simulations predicted that energy efficient VSA can be useful for the control of prosthetic knees. PMID:23000012

  10. Identifying the Functional Flexion-extension Axis of the Knee: An In-Vivo Kinematics Study

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Li; Chen, Kaining; Guo, Lin; Cheng, Liangjun; Wang, Fuyou; Yang, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to calculate the flexion-extension axis (FEA) of the knee through in-vivo knee kinematics data, and then compare it with two major anatomical axes of the femoral condyles: the transepicondylar axis (TEA) defined by connecting the medial sulcus and lateral prominence, and the cylinder axis (CA) defined by connecting the centers of posterior condyles. Methods The knee kinematics data of 20 healthy subjects were acquired under weight-bearing condition using bi-planar x-ray imaging and 3D-2D registration techniques. By tracking the vertical coordinate change of all points on the surface of femur during knee flexion, the FEA was determined as the line connecting the points with the least vertical shift in the medial and lateral condyles respectively. Angular deviation and distance among the TEA, CA and FEA were measured. Results The TEA-FEA angular deviation was significantly larger than that of the CA-FEA in 3D and transverse plane (3.45° vs. 1.98°, p < 0.001; 2.72° vs. 1.19°, p = 0.002), but not in the coronal plane (1.61° vs. 0.83°, p = 0.076). The TEA-FEA distance was significantly greater than that of the CA-FEA in the medial side (6.7 mm vs. 1.9 mm, p < 0.001), but not in the lateral side (3.2 mm vs. 2.0 mm, p = 0.16). Conclusion The CA is closer to the FEA compared with the TEA; it can better serve as an anatomical surrogate for the functional knee axis. PMID:26039711

  11. Knee Pain during Strength Training Shortly following Fast-Track Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Bandholm, Thomas; Thorborg, Kristian; Lunn, Troels Haxholdt; Kehlet, Henrik; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding

    2014-01-01

    Background Loading and contraction failure (muscular exhaustion) are strength training variables known to influence neural activation of the exercising muscle in healthy subjects, which may help reduce neural inhibition of the quadriceps muscle following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It is unknown how these exercise variables influence knee pain after TKA. Objective To investigate the effect of loading and contraction failure on knee pain during strength training, shortly following TKA. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Consecutive sample of patients from the Copenhagen area, Denmark, receiving a TKA, between November 2012 and April 2013. Participants Seventeen patients, no more than 3 weeks after their TKA. Main outcome measures: In a randomized order, the patients performed 1 set of 4 standardized knee extensions, using relative loads of 8, 14, and 20 repetition maximum (RM), and ended with 1 single set to contraction failure (14 RM load). The individual loadings (kilograms) were determined during a familiarization session >72 hours prior. The patients rated their knee pain during each repetition, using a numerical rating scale (0–10). Results Two patients were lost to follow up. Knee pain increased with increasing load (20 RM: 3.1±2.0 points, 14 RM: 3.5±1.8 points, 8 RM: 4.3±2.5 points, P = 0.006), and repetitions to contraction failure (10% failure: 3.2±1.9 points, 100% failure: 5.4±1.6 points, P<0.001). Resting knee pain 60 seconds after the final repetition (2.7±2.4 points) was not different from that recorded before strength training (2.7±1.8 points, P = 0.88). Conclusion Both loading and repetitions performed to contraction failure during knee- extension strength-training, increased post-operative knee pain during strength training implemented shortly following TKA. However, only the increase in pain during repetitions to contraction failure exceeded that defined as clinically relevant, and was very short-lived. Trial Registration

  12. The role of cumulative physical work load in symptomatic knee osteoarthritis – a case-control study in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Seidler, Andreas; Bolm-Audorff, Ulrich; Abolmaali, Nasreddin; Elsner, Gine

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To examine the dose-response relationship between cumulative exposure to kneeling and squatting as well as to lifting and carrying of loads and symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) in a population-based case-control study. Methods In five orthopedic clinics and five practices we recruited 295 male patients aged 25 to 70 with radiographically confirmed knee osteoarthritis associated with chronic complaints. A total of 327 male control subjects were recruited. Data were gathered in a structured personal interview. To calculate cumulative exposure, the self-reported duration of kneeling and squatting as well as the duration of lifting and carrying of loads were summed up over the entire working life. Results The results of our study support a dose-response relationship between kneeling/squatting and symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. For a cumulative exposure to kneeling and squatting > 10.800 hours, the risk of having radiographically confirmed knee osteoarthritis as measured by the odds ratio (adjusted for age, region, weight, jogging/athletics, and lifting or carrying of loads) is 2.4 (95% CI 1.1–5.0) compared to unexposed subjects. Lifting and carrying of loads is significantly associated with knee osteoarthritis independent of kneeling or similar activities. Conclusion As the knee osteoarthritis risk is strongly elevated in occupations that involve both kneeling/squatting and heavy lifting/carrying, preventive efforts should particularly focus on these "high-risk occupations". PMID:18625053

  13. Cost-effectiveness analysis of arthroscopic surgery compared with non-operative management for osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Jacquelyn D; Birmingham, Trevor B; Giffin, J Robert; Isaranuwatchai, Wanrudee; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Feagan, Brian G; Litchfield, Robert; Willits, Kevin; Fowler, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic surgery in addition to non-operative treatments compared with non-operative treatments alone in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Design, setting and participants We conducted an economic evaluation alongside a single-centre, randomised trial among patients with symptomatic, radiographic knee OA (KL grade ≥2). Interventions Patients received arthroscopic debridement and partial resection of degenerative knee tissues in addition to optimised non-operative therapy, or optimised non-operative therapy only. Main outcome measures Direct and indirect costs were collected prospectively over the 2-year study period. The effectiveness outcomes were the Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Cost-effectiveness was estimated using the net benefit regression framework considering a range of willingness-to-pay values from the Canadian public payer and societal perspectives. We calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios and conducted sensitivity analyses using the extremes of the 95% CIs surrounding mean differences in effect between groups. Results 168 patients were included. Patients allocated to arthroscopy received partial resection and debridement of degenerative meniscal tears (81%) and/or articular cartilage (97%). There were no significant differences between groups in use of non-operative treatments. The incremental net benefit was negative for all willingness-to-pay values. Uncertainty estimates suggest that even if willing to pay $400 000 to achieve a clinically important improvement in WOMAC score, or ≥$50 000 for an additional QALY, there is <20% probability that the addition of arthroscopy is cost-effective compared with non-operative therapies only. Our sensitivity analysis suggests that even when assuming the largest treatment effect, the addition of arthroscopic surgery is not economically attractive compared with non

  14. The epidemiology of revision total knee and hip arthroplasty in England and Wales: a comparative analysis with projections for the United States. A study using the National Joint Registry dataset.

    PubMed

    Patel, A; Pavlou, G; Mújica-Mota, R E; Toms, A D

    2015-08-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) are recognised and proven interventions for patients with advanced arthritis. Studies to date have demonstrated a steady increase in the requirement for primary and revision procedures. Projected estimates made for the United States show that by 2030 the demand for primary TKA will grow by 673% and for revision TKA by 601% from the level in 2005. For THA the projected estimates are 174% and 137% for primary and revision surgery, respectively. The purpose of this study was to see if those predictions were similar for England and Wales using data from the National Joint Registry and the Office of National Statistics. Analysis of data for England and Wales suggest that by 2030, the volume of primary and revision TKAs will have increased by 117% and 332%, respectively between 2012 and 2030. The data for the United States translates to a 306% cumulative rate of increase between 2012 and 2030 for revision surgery, which is similar to our predictions for England and Wales. The predictions from the United States for primary TKA were similar to our upper limit projections. For THA, we predicted an increase of 134% and 31% for primary and revision hip surgery, respectively. Our model has limitations, however, it highlights the economic burden of arthroplasty in the future in England and Wales as a real and unaddressed problem. This will have significant implications for the provision of health care and the management of orthopaedic services in the future. PMID:26224824

  15. Incidence and Risk Factors for Falling in Patients after Total Knee Arthroplasty Compared to Healthy Elderly Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hiromi; Okuno, Makoto; Nakamura, Tatsuhiko; Yamamoto, Kichizo; Osaki, Mari; Hagino, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Background It is possible that patients who have undergone total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are at a high risk of falling. However, there are insufficient data to confirm the incidence and risk factors for falling in patients after TKA compared with healthy elderly counterparts. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the incidence and risk factors for falling in patients after TKA compared to the age- and gender-matched healthy elderly. Methods Subjects who underwent TKA consisted of 252 patients over 60 years of age. Controls were 150 healthy elderly individuals over 60 years of age living independently in the community. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to patients after TKA and a similar questionnaire was distributed to the controls by investigators during the town-sponsored healthy aging program. The questionnaire included questions for ambulatory ability, functional status in daily living, knee pain, other joint pain and information on falls. Results Self-administered questionnares were returned by 192 of the 252 patients (76.1%) and 146 of the 150 controls (97.3%). Age and gender matching was performed for respondents between 70 and 80 years of age. There were 81 patients and 80 controls who fulfilled the inclusion criteria, and all of them agreed to participate. In the previous year, 34 of the 81 patients (38.2%) fell. The incidence of falls was significantly higher in patients than controls (23.8%, P = 0.041). In controls, ability to stand up from a chair without using the arms and restriction from joining social activities due to knee pain showed the strongest association with recent falls. In patients, self-reported kyphosis showed the strongest association with recent falls. Conclusion Patients after TKA are more likely to fall than the general Japanese population. Kyphosis showed the strongest association with recent falls in patients after TKA, which was different from the results obtained in the healthy elderly. PMID:25901101

  16. Alternative bearings in total knee arthroplasty: risk of early revision compared to traditional bearings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose There is no substantial clinical evidence for the superiority of alternative bearings in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We compared the short-term revision risk in alternative surface bearing knees (oxidized zirconium (OZ) femoral implants or highly crosslinked polyethylene (HXLPE) inserts) with that for traditional bearings (cobalt-chromium (CoCR) on conventional polyethelene (CPE)). The risk of revision with commercially available HXLPE inserts was also evaluated. Methods All 62,177 primary TKA cases registered in a Total Joint Replacement Registry between April 2001 and December 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The endpoints for the analysis were all-cause revisions, septic revisions, or aseptic revisions. Bearing surfaces were categorized as OZ-CPE, CoCr-HXLPE, or CoCr-CPE. HXLPE inserts were stratified according to brand name. Confounding was addressed using propensity score weights. Marginal Cox-regression models adjusting for surgeon clustering were used. Results The proportion of females was 62%. Average age was 68 (SD 9.3) years, and median follow-up time was 2.8 (IQR 1.2–4.9) years. After adjustments, the risks of all-cause, aseptic, and septic revision with CoCr-HXLPE and OZ-CPE bearings were not statistically significantly higher than with traditional CoCr-CPE bearings. No specific brand of HXLPE insert was associated with a higher risk of all-cause, aseptic, or septic revision compared to CoCr-CPE. Interpretation At least in the short term, none of the alternative knee bearings evaluated (CoCr-HXLPE or OZ-CPE) had a greater risk of all-cause, aseptic, and septic revision than traditional CoCr-CPE bearings. PMID:23485105

  17. The Basic Science of Continuous Passive Motion in Promoting Knee Health: A Systematic Review of Studies in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Knapik, Derrick M.; Harris, Joshua D.; Pangrazzi, Garett; Griesser, Michael J.; Siston, Robert A.; Agarwal, Sudha; Flanigan, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether the basic science evidence supports the use of continuous passive motion (CPM) after articular cartilage injury in the knee. Methods A systematic review was performed identifying and evaluating studies in animal models that focused on the basic science of CPM of the knee. Databases included in this review were PubMed, Biosis Previews, SPORTDiscus, PEDro, and EMBASE. All functional, gross anatomic, histologic, and histochemical outcomes were extracted and analyzed. Results Primary outcomes of CPM analyzed in rabbit animal models (19 studies) included histologic changes in articular cartilage (13 studies), biomechanical changes and nutrition of intra-articular tissue (3 studies), and anti-inflammatory biochemical changes (3 studies). Nine studies specifically examined osteochondral defects, 6 of which used autogenous periosteal grafts. Other pathologies included were antigen-induced arthritis, septic arthritis, medial collateral ligament reconstruction, hemarthrosis, and chymopapain-induced proteoglycan destruction. In comparison to immobilized knees, CPM therapy led to decreased joint stiffness and complications related to adhesions while promoting improved neochondrogenesis with formation and preservation of normal articular cartilage. CPM was also shown to create a strong anti-inflammatory environment by effectively clearing harmful, inflammatory particles from within the knee. Conclusions Current basic science evidence from rabbit studies has shown that CPM for the knee significantly improves motion and biological properties of articular cartilage. This may be translated to potentially improved outcomes in the management of articular cartilage pathology of the knee. Clinical Relevance If the rabbit model is relevant to humans, CPM may contribute to improved knee health by preventing joint stiffness, preserving normal articular tissue with better histologic and biologic properties, and improving range of motion as compared with joint

  18. A qualitative study of the consequences of knee symptoms: ‘It's like you're an athlete and you go to a couch potato’

    PubMed Central

    MacKay, Crystal; Jaglal, Susan B; Sale, Joanna; Badley, Elizabeth M; Davis, Aileen M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To explore the perceived consequences of knee symptoms on the lives of people aged 35–65 years who had diagnosed osteoarthritis (OA) or OA-like symptoms. Design A qualitative study with six focus groups and 10 one-on-one interviews. Constructivist grounded theory guided data collection and analysis. Data were analysed using the constant comparative method. Setting Toronto, Canada. Participants 51 participants (median age 49; 61% female) who self-reported knee OA or reported knee pain, aching or stiffness on most days of the past month participated in the study. Results The core finding, disruption and change, illustrates the range of perceived consequences of knee symptoms in peoples’ lives. Participants described the consequences of symptoms on their physical activity (giving up high-level activities or changing how or how much they performed activities), social life (leisure, family and work) and emotional life. Knee symptoms also altered the way participants thought about their bodies and themselves. They reported that they had a new awareness of their knee and that they no longer trusted their knee. They also conveyed that their sense of self was altered. Conclusions This study illuminates the significant and varied consequences that mild to moderate knee symptoms have on the lives of adults age 35–65 years. Findings highlight the need for clinicians to tailor advice and support to the individual's needs considering their symptoms, the consequences of symptoms on their lives and their personal context. PMID:25324325

  19. On extracting design principles from biology: II. Case study-the effect of knee direction on bipedal robot running efficiency.

    PubMed

    Haberland, M; Kim, S

    2015-01-01

    Comparing the leg of an ostrich to that of a human suggests an important question to legged robot designers: should a robot's leg joint bend in the direction of running ('forwards') or opposite ('backwards')? Biological studies cannot answer this question for engineers due to significant differences between the biological and engineering domains. Instead, we investigated the inherent effect of joint bending direction on bipedal robot running efficiency by comparing energetically optimal gaits of a wide variety of robot designs sampled at random from a design space. We found that the great majority of robot designs have several locally optimal gaits with the knee bending backwards that are more efficient than the most efficient gait with the knee bending forwards. The most efficient backwards gaits do not exhibit lower touchdown losses than the most efficient forward gaits; rather, the improved efficiency of backwards gaits stems from lower torque and reduced motion at the hip. The reduced hip use of backwards gaits is enabled by the ability of the backwards knee, acting alone, to (1) propel the robot upwards and forwards simultaneously and (2) lift and protract the foot simultaneously. In the absence of other information, designers interested in building efficient bipedal robots with two-segment legs driven by electric motors should design the knee to bend backwards rather than forwards. Compared to common practices for choosing robot knee direction, application of this principle would have a strong tendency to improve robot efficiency and save design resources. PMID:25643285

  20. Effect of total knee arthroplasty on type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Shrinand V; Arora, Arvind; Mathesul, Ambarish A

    2013-01-01

    Context: Advanced osteoarthritis of knee joint if bilateral, severely restricts patient mobility. This acts as an aggravating factor for pre existing comorbid elements of metabolical syndrome (MS) like Type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension as patients are unable to carry out therapeutic walks. Successfully implanted total knee arthroplasty (TKA) increases physical activity and enables to carry out therapeutic walks thus may help in better control of type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The objective of this prospective study was to find whether TKA for osteoarthritis knee had any effect to improve blood glucose levels and reduce blood pressure. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was done in which patients operated for tricompartmental osteoarthritis of knee with associated comorbidities like Type II diabetes mellitus or hypertension during a period of 2008 and 2009 were studied. One hundred and twenty patients were enrolled (55 diabetics, 65 hypertensives) who met our inclusion criteria. Preoperative knee society score, lower extremity activity scale fasting blood glucose level and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were compared with one year followup values. The KSS and LEAS scores were analysed by the Wilcoxon signed ranked test, while the fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels and systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels were analysed by paired ‘t’ test. Results: The reduction of systolic blood pressure by 8 mmHg (t = 5.6, P value < 0.05) and diastolic blood pressure by 6 mmHg (t = 7.6, P value < 0.05) was recorded which was statistically significant. However, no statistically significant effect on fasting blood glucose levels was observed (t = -0.77, P value = 0.442). KSS improved in DM from preoperative 29 to 86 and LEAS improved from 6.7 to 11.3. Conclusions: Authors are of the opinion that successful total knee replacement results in increased physical activity and reduces blood pressure (systolic and diastolic) in hypertensives

  1. The effect of mechanical massage on early outcome after total knee arthroplasty: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Mi; Kim, Sang-Rim; Lee, Yong Ki; Kim, Bo Ryun; Han, Eun Young

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of mechanical massage via Endermologie® after total knee arthroplasty in reducing edema and pain and improving knee range of motion, in the early postoperative period. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen patients with knee edema following total knee arthroplasty were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n=8) or the control group (n=10). The intervention group received mechanical massage therapy using Endermologie® and the control group received conventional physical therapy for 20 minutes a day, 5 times a week from the seventh day postsurgery. Clinical assessments included active knee flexion and extension range of motion, knee pain using a numeric rating scale, the operated limb circumference, the soft tissue cross-sectional area using ultrasonography, the extracelluar fluid volume, and single frequency bioimpedance analysis at 5 kHz using bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy. [Results] Both groups showed significant reduction in edema and pain, and improvement in active knee flexion at the end of treatment. There were no significant inter-group differences before or after treatment. [Conclusion] Mechanical massage could be an alternative way of managing knee edema after total knee arthroplasty in early postoperative recovery. PMID:26696709

  2. The relationship between three-dimensional knee MRI bone shape and total knee replacement—a case control study: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Andrew J.; Dube, Bright; Hensor, Elizabeth M. A.; Kingsbury, Sarah R.; Peat, George; Bowes, Mike A.; Sharples, Linda D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. There is growing understanding of the importance of bone in OA. Our aim was to determine the relationship between 3D MRI bone shape and total knee replacement (TKR). Methods. A nested case-control study within the Osteoarthritis Initiative cohort identified case knees with confirmed TKR for OA and controls that were matched using propensity scores. Active appearance modelling quantification of the bone shape of all knee bones identified vectors between knees having or not having OA. Vectors were scaled such that −1 and +1 represented the mean non-OA and mean OA shapes. Results. Compared to controls (n = 310), TKR cases (n = 310) had a more positive mean baseline 3D bone shape vector, indicating more advanced structural OA, for the femur [mean 0.98 vs −0.11; difference (95% CI) 1.10 (0.88, 1.31)], tibia [mean 0.86 vs −0.07; difference (95% CI) 0.94 (0.72, 1.16)] and patella [mean 0.95 vs 0.03; difference (95% CI) 0.92 (0.65, 1.20)]. Odds ratios (95% CI) for TKR per normalized unit of 3D bone shape vector for the femur, tibia and patella were: 1.85 (1.59, 2.16), 1.64 (1.42, 1.89) and 1.36 (1.22, 1.50), respectively, all P < 0.001. After including Kellgren–Lawrence grade in a multivariable analysis, only the femur 3D shape vector remained significantly associated with TKR [odds ratio 1.24 (1.02, 1.51)]. Conclusion. 3D bone shape was associated with the endpoint of this study, TKR, with femoral shape being most associated. This study contributes to the validation of quantitative MRI bone biomarkers for OA structure-modification trials. PMID:27185958

  3. Active knee motion after cruciate ligament rupture. Stereoradiography.

    PubMed

    Kärrholm, J; Selvik, G; Elmqvist, L G; Hansson, L I

    1988-04-01

    In 10 patients with an old injury of the anterior cruciate ligament, the three-dimensional movements of the knee joint were studied when the patients flexed their knees. Tibial motions were recorded using roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis. Internal rotation and adduction of the tibia were reduced in the injured knees when compared with the intact knees; during flexion of the knee joint, the tibial intercondylar eminence occupied a more lateral and posterior position on the injured side. Our results may indicate that the knee joint is continuously exposed to abnormal stresses when the anterior cruciate ligament is torn. PMID:3364185

  4. Analysis of Early Postoperative Pain in the First and Second Knee in Staged Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Retrospective Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiuyi; Li, Lintao; Yuan, Shuai; Zhou, Yiqin

    2015-01-01

    Objective A retrospective analysis of early postoperative pain in the first and second knee in staged bilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA) to provide a clinical evidence for the change of analgesic strategy. Methods From January 2009 to January 2013, 87 cases which meet the inclusion criterion were retrospectively reviewed. In stage TKA, the postoperative pain in the first and second knee at 24h, 48h, 72h after operation were compared using the visual analogue scale (VAS) score in the rest and maximum knee flexion position. The difference in pain scores (ΔVAS) was also compared between the second and first knee at different time intervals (less than 6 months, 6-12 months, more than 12 months). Results The VAS scores in the second knee were significantly higher than those in the first knee at 24h, 48h after surgery, but with no difference at 72h. The ΔVAS in the group of less than 6 months was significantly higher than of those more than 6 months, and there was no difference in ΔVAS between group of 6-12 months and group of more than 12 months. Conclusions Patient receiving staged bilateral TKA experiences greater postoperative pain within 48h after operation in the second knee than in the first knee, which can provide a clinical evidence to enhance the analgesic strategy in the second operation of the staged bilateral TKA. And for the management of postoperative pain in staged bilateral TKA, it’s better to recommend that the interval between two operations should be more than 6 months, which may reduce the postoperative pain in the second knee, improve patient satisfaction, and speed up patient‘s rehabilitation process. PMID:26068371

  5. Evaluation of the effects of a physiotherapy program on quality of life in females after unilateral total knee arthroplasty: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Hudáková, Zuzana; Zięba, Halina Romualda; Lizis, Paweł; Dvořáková, Vlasta; Cetlová, Lada; Friediger, Teresa; Kobza, Wojciech

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Osteoarthritis is a chronic and degenerative joint disease and is considered to be one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders. This study evaluated the differences in the quality of life of females treated with supervised physiotherapy and a standardized home program after unilateral total knee arthroplasty. [Subjects and Methods] From January 2012 to May 2015, a total of 40 females were examined at the Central Military Hospital in Ruzomberk, Slovakia. Quality of life was assessed with the Short Form-36. Quality of life and intensity of pain after normal daily activity, according to the visual analog scale, were assessed before total knee arthroplasty, immediately after physiotherapy, 3 months after total knee arthroplasty, and 6 months after total knee arthroplasty. [Results] We found statistically significant improvement of the quality of life results and a decreased intensity of pain at each time point compared with before total knee arthroplasty. [Conclusions] The results of this study provide further evidence indicating that patients who undergo total knee arthroplasty for primary osteoarthritis of the knee can achieve a significant improvement in the quality of life by using supervised physiotherapy compared with a standardized home program. PMID:27313341

  6. Evaluation of the effects of a physiotherapy program on quality of life in females after unilateral total knee arthroplasty: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Hudáková, Zuzana; Zięba, Halina Romualda; Lizis, Paweł; Dvořáková, Vlasta; Cetlová, Lada; Friediger, Teresa; Kobza, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Osteoarthritis is a chronic and degenerative joint disease and is considered to be one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders. This study evaluated the differences in the quality of life of females treated with supervised physiotherapy and a standardized home program after unilateral total knee arthroplasty. [Subjects and Methods] From January 2012 to May 2015, a total of 40 females were examined at the Central Military Hospital in Ruzomberk, Slovakia. Quality of life was assessed with the Short Form-36. Quality of life and intensity of pain after normal daily activity, according to the visual analog scale, were assessed before total knee arthroplasty, immediately after physiotherapy, 3 months after total knee arthroplasty, and 6 months after total knee arthroplasty. [Results] We found statistically significant improvement of the quality of life results and a decreased intensity of pain at each time point compared with before total knee arthroplasty. [Conclusions] The results of this study provide further evidence indicating that patients who undergo total knee arthroplasty for primary osteoarthritis of the knee can achieve a significant improvement in the quality of life by using supervised physiotherapy compared with a standardized home program. PMID:27313341

  7. Computer-assisted surgery patterns of ligamentous deformity of the knee: a clinical and cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Ran; Hadley, Scott; Abbasi, Mohammed; Meere, Patrick A

    2013-08-01

    Knee malalignment during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is commonly classified as either varus or valgus on the basis of a standing anteroposterior radiograph. Computer-assisted surgery (CAS) navigation TKA provides precise dynamic evaluation of knee alignment throughout the full range of motion (FROM). The goal of this study was to classify patterns of CAS-generated knee deformity curves that match specific soft tissue contracture combinations. This can then be applied as an algorithm for soft tissue balancing on the basis of the preoperative knee deformity curve. Computer navigation-generated graphs from 65 consecutive TKA procedures performed by a single surgeon were analyzed. A stress-strain curve of the coronal alignment of the knee was recorded throughout FROM before bony resection. All graphs were classified into groups according to their pattern. Cadaveric knee models were then used to test the correlation between isolated and combined ligamentous contractures and identified CAS deformity curves. An analysis of the intraoperative knee alignment graphs revealed four distinct patterns of coronal deformity on the basis of intraoperative data: 13% diagonal, 18.5% C-shaped, 43.5% comma shaped, and 25% S-shaped. Each represents the change in varus and valgus alignment during FROM. All patterns were reproduced with cadaveric knees by recreating specific contracture constellations. A tight posterior capsule gave an S-shaped curve, a tight lateral collateral ligament gave a C-shaped curve, tight medial collateral ligament gave a diagonal curve, and a tight posterior lateral corner gave a comma-shaped curve. Release of the specific contractures resulted in correction of all patterns of deformity as measured by CAS. We propose a new classification system for coronal plane knee deformity throughout FROM. This system intends to match individual and combined soft tissue pathological contractures to specific stress-strain curves obtained through routine knee CAS

  8. A comprehensive joint replacement program for total knee arthroplasty: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Jon R; Warren, Meghan; Ganley, Kathleen J; Prefontaine, Paul; Wylie, Jack W

    2008-01-01

    Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a commonly performed surgical procedure in the US. It is important to have a comprehensive inpatient TKA program which maximizes outcomes while minimizing adverse events. The purpose of this study was to describe a TKA program – the Joint Replacement Program (JRP) – and report post-surgical outcomes. Methods 74 candidates for a primary TKA were enrolled in the JRP. The JRP was designed to minimize complications and optimize patient-centered outcomes using a team approach including the patient, patient's family, and a multidisciplinary team of health professionals. The JRP consisted of a pre-operative class, standard pathways for medical care, comprehensive peri-operative pain management, aggressive physical therapy (PT), and proactive discharge planning. Measures included functional tests, knee range of motion (ROM), and medical record abstraction of patient demographics, length of stay, discharge disposition, and complications over a 6-month follow-up period. Results All patients achieved medical criteria for hospital discharge. The patients achieved the knee flexion ROM goal of 90° (91.7 ± 5.4°), but did not achieve the knee extension ROM goal of 0° (2.4 ± 2.6°). The length of hospital stay was two days for 53% of the patients, with 39% and 7% discharged in three and four days, respectively. All but three patients were discharged home with functional independence. 68% of these received outpatient physical therapy compared with 32% who received home physical therapy immediately after discharge. Two patients (< 3%) had medical complications during the inpatient hospital stay, and 9 patients (12%) had complications during the 6-month follow-up period. Conclusion The comprehensive JRP for TKA was associated with satisfactory clinical outcomes, short lengths of stay, a high percentage of patients discharged home with outpatient PT, and minimal complications. This JRP may represent an efficient, effective and safe

  9. Retrospective Cohort Study of 207 Cases of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Green, Daniel W.; Arbucci, John; Silberman, Jason; Luderowski, Eva; Uppstrom, Tyler J.; Nguyen, Joseph; Tuca, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Describe the clinical characteristics, image findings, and outcomes of patients with juvenile osteochondritis dissecans (JOCD) of the knee. To our knowledge, this is the largest single-surgeon cohort of JOCD patients. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of knee JOCD patients assessed by a single pediatric orthopaedic surgeon at a tertiary care center between 2005-2015. All diagnoses were confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients with patellar dislocations or osteochondral fractures were excluded. Demographic data, sports played, comorbidities, surgical procedures, and clinical data were extracted from charts. Images were analyzed to identify the location and size of lesions. Chi-square or Fisher’s exact tests were used to compare discrete variables, and Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal Wallis tests to compare continuous variables between groups. P-values of <0.05 were considered significant. Results: Sample consisted of 180 patients (207 knees), 124 boys and 56 girls. Average age at diagnosis was 12.8 years (7.5-17.5). Majority were active in sports (80.8%), primary soccer (36.7%) and basketball (29.4%). JOCD was present bilaterally in 27 patients (15%), 14 knees had bifocal OCD (6.8%), and only 1 patient had bifocal lesions in both knees. Most common location was medial femoral condyle (56.3%) followed by lateral femoral condyle (23.1%), trochlea (11.4%), patella (9%), and tibia (0.5%). In the sagittal view, most common location was the middle third of the condyles (48.7%). Surgery was performed in 72 knees (34.8%), with an average age at surgery of 14.1 years (9.3-18.1). Bilateral JOCD was present in 13 surgical patients (18.8%), but only 3 patients had bilateral surgery. Two operative patients had bifocal JOCD (2.7%) and surgery on both lesions. Location distribution did not differ between surgical and non-surgical lesions. The average normalized area of non-surgical JOCD lesions was 6.8 (0.1-18), whereas surgical lesions averaged a

  10. Relationship Between Functional Knee Joint Position Sense and Functional Performance Scores Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction (Pilot Study)

    PubMed Central

    Kafa, Nihan; Ataoglu, Muhammed Baybars; Hazar, Zeynep; Citaker, Seyit; Ozer, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between functional knee joint position sense (JPS) and functional performance following ACL reconstruction Methods: Seven male patients (mean age=32,66 ±6,47) who had undergone ACL reconstruction and 10 male healthy control subjects participated in the study. Knee joint position sense was evaluated by reproduction of 20° knee flexion angle in weight-bearing position with single and bilateral limb movement into flexion and extension. The deviations in the angle were recorded and compared to both noninjured side and healthy controls’. Functional performance was evaluated with Single Leg Hop Test in both injured and non-injured sides. The scores were also compared with healthy controls and non-injured sides. Relationship between measured values was tested with Spearman Correlation Analysis. Results: There was no significant difference in knee joint position sense in functional position between the operated and uninjured knees of patients or between patients and healthy controls (p>0,05). However, there is significant difference in Single Leg Hop test scores between operated and non-operated or between patients and healthy controls (p=0,037; p<0,05). There was no significant correlation between Single Leg Hop test scores and knee joint position sense (p>0,05). Conclusion: There was no evidence of impaired joint position sense in weight-bearing positions in subjects with ACL reconstruction but there was a decrease in functional performance. This decrease in functional performance may depend on the other parameters except proprioceptive deficits.

  11. In vivo kinematics of knee prostheses patients during level walking compared with the ISO force-controlled simulator standard

    PubMed Central

    Ngai, Valentina; Schwenke, Thorsten; Wimmer, Markus A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Differences between wear-scar features of simulator-tested and retrieved tibial total knee replacement (TKR) liners have been reported. This disagreement may result from differences between in vivo kinematic profiles and those defined by the standard. Purpose To determine the knee kinematics of a TKR subject group during level walking and compare them with the motion profiles produced by a wear test conducted according to the force-controlled knee wear testing ISO 14243-1 (ISO-1)standard. Methods Ten patients with a posterior cruciate ligament-retaining TKR design were gait tested using the point cluster technique (PCT) to obtain flexion-extension (FE) rotation, anterior-posterior (AP) translation and internal-external (IE) rotation motions during a complete cycle of level walking. Motion data were directly compared against the output kinematics from the wear test. Results The subjects exhibited a FE rotation pattern similar to the output from ISO-1; however had higher midstance knee flexion angles. For both AP translation and IE rotation, the standard profiles had significantly smaller total ranges of motion than seen in vivo, with noticeably different patterns of motions. Conclusions For this particular implant design, significant differences were found in both the pattern and magnitudes of in vivo motion during level walking compared with the ISO-1 standard. PMID:19908427

  12. Prognostic Criteria in Traumatic Knee Dislocations: A Retrospective Study of 42 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Pehlivanoğlu, Tuna; Balcı, Halil İbrahim; Chodza, Mehmet; Kılıçoğlu, Önder İsmet

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Traumatic knee dislocation (TKD) is an orthopaedic emergency, which may include not only knee joint’s structures, but also neurovascular tissues. While such a major trauma can easily be expected to cause significant impairment in knee joint’s functions in long term, individual impact of these injured structures on the outcome needs to be clarified. This study questions the effect of injury type and the effect of the presence of neurovascular injuries on the functional outcome after TKD treatment in a level 3 trauma center. Methods: Between 1997 and 2013, 42 knee joints of 42 patients (mean age 34; range 18 – 80) were diagnosed with TKD and treated accordingly. Patients were reviewed after a mean period of 116 months (range 12 – 204), retrospectively. The type of knee injury was classified according to Schenck’s criteria, accompanying injuries and emergency and elective surgical interventions were recorded. Patients were evaluated radiographically and clinically on the follow-up examination. Clinical outcome parameters were KSS, Lysholm-Tegner, IKDC and SF-36 scores, grouping patients as either “good or excellent” or “poor or fair”. Cut-off values for this stratification was 70 points or higher for KSS, 80 or higher for Tegner-Lysholm and 70 for IKDC score. Effect of injury patterns on the clinical outcome was investigated using frequency tables and Chi-Square test for categorical data and Anova one-way analysis or Kruskal-Wallis test for numerical results. Results: According to Schenck’s classification, 6 knee joints (13.9%) were classified as KDI, 3 joints (6.9%) as KDII, 10 joints (23.2%) as KDIII, 19 joints (44.1%) as KDIV and 3 (6.9%) as KDV. An arterial injury was diagnosed in 11 cases (25.5%), fibular nerve injury in 12 cases (27.9%) and tibial nerve injury in 2 cases (4.6%). An external fixator was placed in 20 patients (46.5%) in the emergency setting. Vascular repair was performed in 6 patients, of which four (9.3%) also

  13. Midterm survivorship and clinical outcome of INDUS knee prosthesis: 5 year followup study

    PubMed Central

    Sancheti, Kantilal H; Sancheti, Parag K; Joshi, Rajeev S; Patil, Kailash R; Shyam, Ashok K; Bhaskar, Raja R

    2016-01-01

    Background: INDUS knee implant has been designed as per the anatomical morphology of the Indian population and has shown good clinical outcome in short term studies. The purpose of the present study was to report the midterm survivorship and clinical outcome of this implant. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and twenty three primary total knee arthroplasties in 209 consecutive patients using the INDUS knee prosthesis were prospectively enrolled. There were 145 females (155 knees) and 64 males (68 knees) with a mean age of 69.95 years (range 42–86 years). Annual followup with clinical and radiological examination was conducted, and a survivorship analysis was done using the Kaplan–Meier analysis. Results: Mean followup was 5.8 years (range 5–6.5 years). Eleven patients died while eight were lost to followup and a total of 204 knees were available for followup. The mean knee flexion improved from preoperative 110.4° ± 11.24° (range 60°–130°) to 128.17° ± 8.32° (range 100°–140°) at the final followup. The mean knee score improved from 40.1 ± 10.7 to 90.3 ± 5.34 while the function score improved from 44.35 ± 12.9 to 89.58 ± 7.43. Two patient developed infection and required revision. The Kaplan–Meier analysis reported a survivorship of 98.6% (confidence interval 95.7–99.6%) at the end for 5 years for INDUS knee prosthesis. Conclusion: INDUS knee prosthesis has excellent survivorship with a good clinical outcome and low failure rate. PMID:27053801

  14. When it hurts, a positive attitude may help: The association of positive affect with daily walking in knee OA: the MOST Study

    PubMed Central

    White, Daniel K; Keysor, Julie J; Neogi, Tuhina; Felson, David T; LaValley, Michael; Gross, K Doug; Niu, Jingbo; Nevitt, Michael; Lewis, Cora E; Torner, Jim; Fredman, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE While depressive symptoms and knee pain are independently known to impede daily walking in older adults, it is unknown whether positive affect promotes daily walking. This study investigated this association among adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and examined whether knee pain modified this association. DESIGN Cross-sectional analysis of the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study. We included 1018 participants (mean age 63.1 ± 7.8 years, 60% female) who had radiographic knee OA and had worn a StepWatch monitor to record steps/day. High- and low- positive affect, and depressive symptoms were based on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale. Knee pain was categorized as present in respondents who reported pain on most days at both a clinic visit and a telephone screen. RESULTS Compared to respondents with low positive affect (27% of respondents), those with high positive affect (63%) walked similar steps/day while those with depressive symptoms (10%) walked less (adjusted beta coefficients = −32.6 [−458.9, 393.8] and −579.1 [−1274.9, 116.7], respectively). There was a statistically significant interaction of positive affect by knee pain (p= 0.0045). Among respondents with knee pain (39%), those with high positive affect walked significantly more steps/day (711.0 [55.1, 1366.9]) than those with low positive affect. CONCLUSION High positive affect was associated with more daily walking among adults with painful knee OA. Positive affect may be an important psychological factor to consider to promote physical activity among people with painful knee OA. PMID:22504854

  15. Posterior cruciate ligament balancing in total knee arthroplasty: a numerical study with a dynamic force controlled knee model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adequate soft tissue balancing is a key factor for a successful result after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is the primary restraint to posterior translation of the tibia after cruciate retaining TKA and is also responsible for the amount of joint compression. However, it is complex to quantify the amount of ligament release with its effects on load bearing and kinematics in TKA and limited both in vivo and in vitro. The goal of this study was to create a dynamic and deformable finite element model of a full leg and analyze a stepwise release of the PCL regarding knee kinematics, pressure distribution and ligament stresses. Methods A dynamic finite element model was developed in Ansys V14.0 based on boundary conditions of an existing knee rig. A cruciate retraining knee prosthesis was virtually implanted. Ligament and muscle structures were simulated with modified spring elements. Linear elastic materials were defined for femoral component, inlay and patella cartilage. A restart algorithm was developed and implemented into the finite element simulation to hold the ground reaction force constant by adapting quadriceps force. After simulating the unreleased PCL model, two models were developed and calculated with the same boundary conditions with a 50% and 75% release of the PCL stiffness. Results From the beginning of the simulation to approximately 35° of flexion, tibia moves posterior related to the femur and with higher flexion anteriorly. Anterior translation of the tibia ranged from 5.8 mm for unreleased PCL to 3.7 mm for 75% PCL release (4.9 mm 50% release). A decrease of maximum von Mises equivalent stress on the inlay was given with PCL release, especially in higher flexion angles from 11.1 MPa for unreleased PCL to 8.9 MPa for 50% release of the PCL and 7.8 MPa for 75% release. Conclusions Our study showed that dynamic FEM is an effective method for simulation of PCL balancing in knee arthroplasty. A tight

  16. Anatomical versus Non-Anatomical Single Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Cadaveric Study of Comparison of Knee Stability

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hong-Chul; Yoon, Yong-Cheol; Wang, Joon-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the initial stability of anatomical and non-anatomical single bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and to determine which would better restore intact knee kinematics. Our hypothesis was that the initial stability of anatomical single bundle ACL reconstruction would be superior to that of non-anatomical single bundle ACL reconstruction. Methods Anterior tibial translation (ATT) and internal rotation of the tibia were measured with a computer navigation system in seven pairs of fresh-frozen cadaveric knees under two testing conditions (manual maximum anterior force, and a manual maximum anterior force combined with an internal rotational force). Tests were performed at 0, 30, 60, and 90 degrees of flexion with the ACL intact, the ACL transected, and after reconstruction of one side of a pair with either anatomical or non-anatomical single bundle ACL reconstruction. Results Under manual maximal anterior force, both reconstruction techniques showed no significant difference of ATT when compared to ACL intact knee state at 30° of knee flexion (p > 0.05). Under the combined anterior and internal rotatory force, non-anatomical single-bundle ACL reconstruction showed significant difference of ATT compared to those in ACL intact group (p < 0.05). In contrast, central anatomical single bundle ACL reconstruction showed no significant difference of ATT compared to those in ACL intact group (p > 0.05). Internal rotation of the tibia showed no significant difference in the ACL intact, the ACL transected, non-anatomical reconstructed and anatomical reconstructed knees. Conclusions Anatomical single bundle ACL reconstruction restored the initial stability closer to the native ACL under combined anterior and internal rotational forces when compared to non-anatomical ACL single bundle reconstruction. PMID:23205233

  17. Influence of increasing construct constraint in the presence of posterolateral deficiency at knee replacement: A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Kanishka M; Manning, William A; Blain, Alasdair P; Rushton, Steve P; Longstaff, Lee M; Amis, Andrew A; Deehan, David J

    2016-03-01

    When faced with posterolateral corner (PLC) deficiency, surgeons must choose a total knee replacement (TKR) construct that provides the appropriate level of constraint. This should match the internal constraint of the device to the soft tissue host laxity pattern. Little guidance is available peroperatively, with factors influencing final component choice remaining ill defined. This study aimed to quantify the effect of PLC insufficiency on the "envelope of laxity" (EoL) after TKR and the effect of increasingly component constraint upon knee behavior through a functional arc of flexion. Using computer navigation, mixed effect modeling and loaded cadaveric legs--laxity was quantified under separate states: the native knee, after implantation of a posterior stabilized (PS)-TKR, after sectioning the lateral (fibular) collateral ligament and popliteus tendon (PS-TKR-PLC), and after re-implantation with a semi-constrained "total stabilized" knee replacement (TS-TKR). Laxity was quantified from 0 to 110° of flexion for anterior draw, varus-valgus, and internal-external rotation. Implantation of the PS-TKR was consistently associated with increased constraint when compared to the native knee. PLC sectioning led to significantly increased laxity during varus stress from mid to deep flexion. Revision to a TS-TKR construct restored constraint mimicking that of the primary state but only for the arc of motion 0-90°. In a posterolateral deficient state, a fixed bearing semi-constrained TS-TKR restored the knee to near normal kinematics but this was only achieved from an arc of motion 0-90° of flexion. At higher flexion angles, there remained an unfavorable laxity pattern with varus stress opening. PMID:26267425

  18. Study of Wearable Knee Assistive Instruments for Walk Rehabilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yong; Nakamura, Masahiro; Ito, Noritaka; Fujimoto, Hiroshi; Horikuchi, Kenichi; Wakabayashi, Shojiro; Takahashi, Rei; Terada, Hidetsugu; Haro, Hirotaka

    A wearable Knee Assistive Instrument for the walk rehabilitation was newly developed. Especially, this system aimed at supporting the rehabilitation for the post-TKA (Total Knee Arthroplasty) which is a popular surgery for aging people. This system consisted of an assisting mechanism for the knee joint, a hip joint support system and a foot pressure sensor system. The driving system of this robot consisted of a CPU board which generated the walking pattern, a Li-ion battery, DC motors with motor drivers, contact sensors to detect the state of foot and potentiometers to detect the hip joint angle. The control method was proposed to reproduce complex motion of knee joint as much as possible, and to increase hip or knee flexion angle. Especially, this method used the timing that heel left from the floor. This method included that the lower limb was raised to prevent a subject's fall. Also, the prototype of knee assisting system was tested. It was confirmed that the assisting system is useful.

  19. Rehabilitation after ACL Injury: A Fluoroscopic Study on the Effects of Type of Exercise on the Knee Sagittal Plane Arthrokinematics

    PubMed Central

    Norouzi, Sadegh; Esfandiarpour, Fateme; Shakourirad, Ali; Salehi, Reza; Akbar, Mohammad; Farahmand, Farzam

    2013-01-01

    A safe rehabilitation exercise for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries needs to be compatible with the normal knee arthrokinematics to avoid abnormal loading on the joint structures. The objective of this study was to measure the amount of the anterior tibial translation (ATT) of the ACL-deficient knees during selective open and closed kinetic chain exercises. The intact and injured knees of fourteen male subjects with unilateral ACL injury were imaged using uniplanar fluoroscopy, while the subjects performed forward lunge and unloaded/loaded open kinetic knee extension exercises. The ATTs were measured from fluoroscopic images, as the distance between the tibial and femoral reference points, at seven knee flexion angles, from 0° to 90°. No significant differences were found between the ATTs of the ACL-deficient and intact knees at all flexion angles during forward lunge and unloaded open kinetic knee extension (P < 0.05). During loaded open kinetic knee extension, however, the ATTs of the ACL deficient knees were significantly larger than those of the intact knees at 0° (P = 0.002) and 15° (P = 0.012). It was suggested that the forward lunge, as a weight-bearing closed kinetic chain exercise, provides a safer approach for developing muscle strength and functional stability in rehabilitation program of ACL-deficient knees, in comparison with open kinetic knee extension exercise. PMID:24066288

  20. Knee stability, athletic performance and sport-specific tasks in non-professional soccer players after ACL reconstruction: comparing trans-tibial and antero-medial portal techniques

    PubMed Central

    Tudisco, Cosimo; Bisicchia, Salvatore; Cosentino, Andrea; Chiozzi, Federica; Piva, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background a wrong position of bone tunnels, in particular on the femur, is one of the most frequent causes of a failed anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Several studies demonstrated that drilling the femoral tunnel through the antero-medial portal (AMP) allows a more anatomical placement on the lateral femoral condyle and higher knee stability, compared to trans-tibial (TT) technique. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate two groups of soccer players operated on for ACL reconstruction according to either one of these two techniques. Methods two groups of non-professional soccer players operated on for a single bundle ACL reconstruction with hamstrings autograft using either a TT (20 patients) or an AMP (23 patients) technique were retrospectively evaluated with KT-1000 arthrometer, manual pivot shift test, isokinetic test, the incremental treadmill-running test, athletic and sport specific tasks, and knee scores (IKDC, Lysholm and KOOS). Results the AMP group showed better results at pivot shift test and KOOS, but lower flexion angles at single leg squat test. There were no differences in all the other considered outcomes. Conclusions the better rotational stability of the knee achieved in AMP group did not lead to significantly better clinical and functional results in our patients. Level of evidence III. Treatment study Case-control study. PMID:26605191

  1. Biofeedback to Promote Movement Symmetry After Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    ZENI, JOSEPH; ABUJABER, SUMAYAH; FLOWERS, PORTIA; POZZI, FEDERICO; SNYDER-MACKLER, LYNN

    2014-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Prospective analysis of a longitudinal cohort with an embedded comparison group at a single time point. OBJECTIVES To determine the feasibility and effectiveness of an outpatient rehabilitation protocol that includes movement symmetry biofeedback on functional and biomechanical outcomes after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). BACKGROUND TKA reduces pain and improves functional ability, but many patients experience strength deficits and movement abnormalities in the operated limb, despite outpatient rehabilitation. These asymmetries increase load on the nonoperated limb, and greater asymmetry is related to worse functional outcomes. METHODS Biomechanical and functional metrics were assessed 2 to 3 weeks prior to TKA, at discharge from outpatient physical therapy, and 6 months after TKA in 11 patients (9 men, 2 women; mean ± SD age, 61.4 ± 5.8 years; body mass index, 33.1 ± 5.4 kg/m2) who received 6 to 8 weeks of outpatient physical therapy that included specialized symmetry training. Six-month outcomes were compared to a control group, matched by age, body mass index, and sex (9 men, 2 women; mean ± SD age, 61.8 ± 5 years; body mass index, 34.3 ± 5.1 kg/m2), that did not receive specialized symmetry retraining. RESULTS Of the 11 patients who received added symmetry training, 9 demonstrated clinically meaningful improvements that exceeded the minimal detectable change for all performance-based functional tests at 6 months post-TKA compared to pre-TKA. Six months after TKA, when walking, patients who underwent symmetry retraining had greater knee extension during midstance and had mean sagittal knee moments that were more symmetrical, biphasic, and more representative of normal knee kinetics compared to patients who did not undergo symmetry training. No patients experienced adverse events as the result of the protocol. CONCLUSION Adding symmetry retraining to postoperative protocols is clinically viable, safe, and may have additional benefits compared

  2. Asymmetric loading and bone mineral density at the asymptomatic knees of subjects with unilateral hip osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shakoor, Najia; Dua, Anisha; Thorp, Laura; Mikolaitis, Rachel A.; Wimmer, Markus A.; Foucher, Kharma C.; Fogg, Louis F.; Block, Joel A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The contralateral knee of those with unilateral endstage hip OA is known to be at greater risk for endstage knee OA compared to the ipsilateral, same side knee. Likewise, in endstage hip OA, this contralateral knee is known to have increased dynamic joint loads compared to the ipsilateral knee. Here, we study a population with unilateral hip OA, who are asymptomatic at the knees, for early asymmetries in knee loading. Methods Data from 62 subjects with unilateral hip OA were evaluated. Subjects underwent gait analyses for evaluation of dynamic knee loads as well as dual energy X-ray absorptiometry for evaluation of bone mineral density (BMD) at both knees. Differences between knees were compared. Results Peak dynamic knee loads were significantly higher at the contralateral knee compared to the ipsilateral knee (2.46±0.71 vs 2.23±0.81 %BW*ht, p=0.029). Similarly, medial compartment tibial BMD was significantly higher at the contralateral knee compared to the ipsilateral knee (0.897±0.208 vs 0.854±0.206 gm/c2, p=0.033). Interestingly, there was a direct correlation between contralteral:ipsilateral dynamic knee load and contralateral:ipsilateral medial compartment tibial BMD (Spearman’s rho= 0.287, p=0.036). Conclusions This study demonstrates that at the contralateral knees of patients with unilateral hip OA, which are at higher risk of developing progressive symptomatic OA compared to the ipsilateral knees, loading and structural asymmetries appear early in the disease course, while the knees are still asymptomatic. These early biomechanical asymmetries may have corresponding long term consequences, providing further support for the potential role of loading in OA onset and progression. PMID:22127702

  3. Reliability of a simple fluoroscopic method to study sagittal plane femorotibial contact changes in total knee arthroplasties during flexion.

    PubMed

    Lacoste, C; Granizo, J J; Gómez-Barrena, E

    2007-08-01

    Clinical interest in sagittal plane kinematic analysis of the knee undergoing total knee replacement fosters the development of simple, reliable methods to estimate femorotibial contact in a regular clinical setting. In this study, the sagittal femorotibial contact was analysed in lateral X-rays and lateral fluoroscopic views, from extension to knee flexion. Quantitative and categorical data were obtained from these views by two different observers, and compared with data from direct views of the components. Interobserver and intermethod errors for quantitative and categorical data were evaluated based on correlation, kappa coefficient, and Bland-Altman graphs. Interobserver reproducibility of quantitative measurement from fluoroscopic views was r=0.96 while categorical assignment exhibited a kappa coefficient of 0.95. Reproducibility from plain radiographs was not so high, with a kappa coefficient of 0.64. High concordance was also obtained when the method was compared with the direct view of the implant, supporting these measurement techniques. Bland-Altman graphs confirmed the absence of bias in the intermethod comparison. Therefore, with the obvious limitation of rotational assessment, lateral fluoroscopic evaluation enhanced by a simple fitting technique can be used as a valuable tool for clinical evaluation of knee kinematics in the sagittal plane. PMID:17553683

  4. The Quality of Life (QOL) after Total Knee Arthroplasties among Saudi Arabians: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Omran, Abdallah S.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is commonly performed in Saudi Arabia but there is very limited published data on outcome and quality of life (QOL) post Knee arthroplasty. To assess the QOL post TKA we performed this retrospective study. Methods: Total Knee arthroplasty was started in mid- 2000’s at the university hospital. Fifty–two patients of TKA who came for follow up during the study period were asked to fill a pre-determined questionnaire and clinical examination, were included in the study. Patients were assessed and at 2 parameters pre and postoperative time-points, for pain [1-9], walking [1-9] and asked whether they would recommend the procedure to their relatives and friends, and finally whether they were satisfied with the outcome. Results: We interviewed 52 patients (9 males and 43 females), mean age of 64.75 ± 7.90 years. Twenty (34.50%) had bilateral TKR, and the rest single sided. The preoperative night pain was 7.72 ± 2.03 compared to postoperative 1.92 ± 1.41 (P<0.001 (5.80 and < 6.47) and pain at walking was 8.39 ± 0.77 versus 2.39 ± 2.05 (P<0.001(5.40 and < 6.55). The overall satisfaction 93% (8.37 ± 1.32) and QOL as assessed preoperatively was 3.60 ± 2.15 and postoperatively was 8.41  ±  1.27 (P<0.001 (4.81and 4.13). Fifty-one (98.07%) patients indicated that they will recommend the procedure to others. Conclusions: The overall satisfaction and improvement of QOL in male patients was 93.77% and female patients 92.77% and all patients indicated that they will recommend others to undergo the similar procedure to improve their QOL. PMID:25324701

  5. Pain Control after Total Knee Arthroplasty: Comparing Intra-Articular Local Anesthetic Injection with Femoral Nerve Block

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Shengchin; Lee, Hungchen; Cheng, Chihwen; Lin, Chingfeng; Tsai, Hsini

    2015-01-01

    Background. Direct intra-articular injection of low doses of local anesthetic (IALA) after closure of the joint capsule remains controversial for pain control after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods. A retrospective study comparing patients receiving IALA with high doses (0.5% bupivacaine 60 mL) of local anesthetics or FNB in addition to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia with opioids for pain management after TKA was conducted. The primary end point was to compare the analgesic efficacy and early ambulation between the two groups. Results. No significant differences between the two groups in pain intensity, cumulative opioid consumption, incidences of opioid-related side effects, the time interval from the end of operation to the first time the patient could walk assisted with a walker postoperatively, and postoperative hospital stay were identified. Three patients in the IALA group but none in the FNB group walked within 12 hours after the end of operation. Summary. IALA with high doses of local anesthetics provides comparable analgesic efficacy as single-shot FNB after TKA and might be associated with earlier ambulation than FNB postoperatively. PMID:26064937

  6. An in vivo study of the effect of distal femoral resection on passive knee extension.

    PubMed

    Smith, Conrad K; Chen, Justin A; Howell, Stephen M; Hull, Maury L

    2010-10-01

    A previous study showed that 1 mm of distal femoral resection restored knee extension 4.5°. We determined the relationship with a more accurate measurement technique. Twenty-six subjects treated with total knee arthroplasty were studied. Digital photographs of the extended knee with and without 1.5 and 3.0 mm thick augments placed between the femoral component and distal femur were analyzed, and knee extension was measured. One millimeter of distal femoral resection restored 1.8° of extension that is less correction than the previous study reported. Because an attempt to correct a 10° extension deficit by resecting the distal femur could require 5 mm or more of bone removal that moves the joint line too proximal, we recommend exploring other techniques before resecting the femur. PMID:19643566

  7. Short Term Recovery of Function following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomised Study of the Medial Parapatellar and Midvastus Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Nutton, Richard W.; Wade, Frazer A.; Coutts, Fiona J.; van der Linden, Marietta L.

    2014-01-01

    This pilot double blind randomised controlled study aimed to investigate whether the midvastus (MV) approach without patellar eversion in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) resulted in improved recovery of function compared to the medial parapatellar (MP) approach. Patients were randomly allocated to either the MV approach or the MP approach. Achievements of inpatient mobility milestones were recorded. Knee kinematics, muscle strength, Timed Up and Go, WOMAC, and daily step count were assessed before and up to six months after surgery. Cohen's effect size d was calculated to inform the sample size in future trials. Twenty-eight participants (16 males, 12 females) participated. Patient mobility milestones such as straight leg raise were achieved on average 1.3 days (95% CI −3.4 to 0.7, d = 0.63) earlier in the MV group. Knee extensor strength at 6 weeks after surgery was higher (95% CI −0.38 to 0.61, d = 0.73) in the MV group. No trends for differences between the groups were observed in knee kinematics, TUG, WOMAC, or step count. Our results suggest a short term advantage in the first 6 weeks after surgery of the MV approach over the MP approach, but a larger study is required to confirm these findings. This trial is registered with NCT056445. PMID:25349736

  8. It’s not just a knee, but a whole life: A qualitative descriptive study on patients’ experiences of living with knee osteoarthritis and their expectations for knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Nyvang, Josefina; Hedström, Margareta; Gleissman, Sissel Andreassen

    2016-01-01

    Aim Knee arthroplasties are an increasingly common treatment for osteoarthritis (OA) and the main indication is pain. Previous research states, however, that 15–20% of the operated patients are dissatisfied and 20–30% have persistent pain after surgery. This study is aimed at describing patients’ experiences of living with knee OA when scheduled for surgery and further their expectations for future life after surgery. Methods We interviewed 12 patients with knee OA scheduled for arthroplasty, using semi-structured qualitative interviews. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative thematic analysis. Findings Three categories were formulated with an overriding theme: “It's not just a knee, but a whole life.” The three categories were “Change from their earlier lives,” “Coping with knee problems,” and “Ultimate decision to undergo surgery.” The main finding was that knee OA affects the whole body and self, ultimately affecting the patients’ lives on many levels. Further findings were that knee OA was considered to be the central focus in the participants’ lives, which limited their level of activity, their ability to function as desired, their quality of life, and their mental well-being. Although surgery was considered to be the only solution, the expectations regarding the outcome differed. Conclusions The participants were forced to change how they previously had lived their lives resulting in a feeling of loss. Thus, the experienced loss and expectations for future life must be put into the context of the individual's own personality and be taken into account when treating individuals with knee OA. The experience of living with knee OA largely varies between individuals. This mandates that patients’ assessment should be considered on individual basis with regard to each patient. PMID:27036130

  9. I-ONE therapy in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty: a prospective, randomized and controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is often associated with a severe local inflammatory reaction which, unless controlled, leads to persistent pain up to one year after surgery. Standard and accelerated rehabilitation protocols are currently being implemented after TKA, but no consensus exists regarding the long-term effects. Biophysical stimulation with pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) has been demonstrated to exert an anti-inflammatory effect, to promote early functional recovery and to maintain a positive long-term effect in patients undergoing joint arthroscopy. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether PEMFs can be used to limit the pain and enhance patient recovery after TKA. Methods A prospective, randomized, controlled study in 30 patients undergoing TKA was conducted. Patients were randomized into experimental PEMFs or a control group. Patients in the experimental group were instructed to use I-ONE stimulator 4hours/day for 60days. Postoperatively, all patients received the same rehabilitation program. Treatment outcome was assessed using the Knee Society Score, SF-36 Health-Survey and VAS. Patients were evaluated pre-operatively and one, two, six and 12 months after TKA. Joint swelling and Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drug (NSAID) consumption were recorded. Comparisons between the two groups were carried out using a two-tail heteroschedastic Student’s t-test. Analysis of variance for each individual subject during the study was performed using ANOVA for multiple comparisons, applied on each group, and a Dunnet post hoc test. A p value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Pre-operatively, no differences were observed between groups in terms of age, sex, weight, height, Knee-Score, VAS, SF-36 and joint swelling, with the exception of the Functional Score. The Knee-Score, SF-36 and VAS demonstrated significantly positive outcomes in the I-ONE stimulated group compared with the controls at follow-ups. In the I

  10. Are Western Knee Designs Dimensionally Correct for Korean Women? A Morphometric Study of Resected Femoral Surfaces during Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Suk-Joo; Kang, Hyung Wook

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the shape of the distal femur of Korean women compared with the prostheses currently available in Korea. Methods Morphometric data (5 parameters) were measured in 356 resected femurs of Korean women undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) utilizing the LCS knee implant (DePuy). The data were then compared with 5 additional contemporary TKA implant systems. Results Implant designs based on Caucasian population data do not ideally match the distal femoral morphology of Korean women. Overhang at the anterior mediolateral width was observed in 84.8% for the LCS while a gender-specific implant resulted in undercoverage of the bone in 86%. Posterior overhang was observed in up to 51.2%. Most implant designs have a narrower intercondylar notch than the morphologic data of Korean women. Conclusions Since there is some difference between the shape of distal femur of Korean women and that of the implants, surgeons should have this in mind when selecting an implant for a patient. These data may also be used as a guideline for future prosthetic design options for Korean women population. PMID:27583107

  11. Knee Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Schenck, Robert C.; Richter, Dustin L.; Wascher, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Traumatic knee dislocation is becoming more prevalent because of improved recognition and increased exposure to high-energy trauma, but long-term results are lacking. Purpose: To present 2 cases with minimum 20-year follow-up and a review of the literature to illustrate some of the fundamental principles in the management of the dislocated knee. Study Design: Review and case reports. Methods: Two patients with knee dislocations who underwent multiligamentous knee reconstruction were reviewed, with a minimum 20-year follow-up. These patients were brought back for a clinical evaluation using both subjective and objective measures. Subjective measures include the following scales: Lysholm, Tegner activity, visual analog scale (VAS), Short Form–36 (SF-36), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), and a psychosocial questionnaire. Objective measures included ligamentous examination, radiographic evaluation (including Telos stress radiographs), and physical therapy assessment of function and stability. Results: The mean follow-up was 22 years. One patient had a vascular injury requiring repair prior to ligament reconstruction. The average assessment scores were as follows: SF-36 physical health, 52; SF-36 mental health, 59; Lysholm, 92; IKDC, 86.5; VAS involved, 10.5 mm; and VAS uninvolved, 2.5 mm. Both patients had excellent stability and were functioning at high levels of activity for their age (eg, hiking, skydiving). Both patients had radiographic signs of arthritis, which lowered 1 subject’s IKDC score to “C.” Conclusion: Knee dislocations have rare long-term excellent results, and most intermediate-term studies show fair to good functional results. By following fundamental principles in the management of a dislocated knee, patients can be given the opportunity to function at high levels. Hopefully, continued advances in the evaluation and treatment of knee dislocations will improve the long-term outcomes for these patients in the

  12. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. Method: We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance images to reconstruct solid bones and attachments of ligaments, and assemble femoral and tibial components according representative literatures and operational specifications. Dynamic data of axial tibial rotation and femoral translation from full-extension to 135 were measured for analyzing the motion of knee models. Findings: The computational simulation results show that comparing with the posterior cruciate ligament retained knee model and the posterior cruciate ligament substituted knee model, reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament improves the posterior movement of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation through a full range of flexion. The maximum posterior translations of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee are 15.3 mm, 4.6 mm and 20.6 at 135 of flexion. Interpretation: Reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty has been approved to be an more efficient way of maintaining normal knee kinematics comparing to posterior cruciate ligament retained and posterior cruciate ligament substituted total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27347334

  13. Study of Imaging Pattern in Bone Marrow Oedema in MRI in Recent Knee Injuries and its Correlation with Type of Knee Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Kulamani; Saha, Pramod; Dodia, Jainesh Valjibhai; Raj, Vinay Rajappa; Bhairagond, Shweta Jagadish

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The knee is a major weight bearing joint that provides mobility and stability during physical activity as well as balance while standing. If the knee is exposed to forces beyond its physiologic range, risk of injury to bone or soft tissue structures increases. A thorough understanding of knee injury patterns and their mechanisms may help in achieving more accurate assessment of injuries. Aim To identify imaging pattern in bone marrow oedema and to correlate the pattern of bone marrow oedema retrospectively with type of knee injury from clinical history. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was done on all patients referred to Krishna Hospital, Karad for MRI knee with history of recent (< 6 weeks) knee injury. Study was conducted between May 2014 to September 2015 with a sample size of 200 patients. Plain radiograph of knee was done in all patients and they were scanned using 1.5 Tesla Seimens Avanto (Tim + Dot) with Tx/Rx 15 channel knee coil # Tim. Results Among the 200 cases, bone marrow contusion was noted in 138 cases (69%) and absent contusion in 62 cases (31%). Bone marrow contusion showed five patterns (according to Sanders classification) i.e., Clip injury in 39 cases (28.3%), Pivot shift injury in 78 cases (56.5%), Dashboard injury in eight cases (5.8%), Hyperextension injury in four cases (2.9%), Lateral patellar dislocation in three cases (2.2%). In six cases (4.3%) no pattern of bone marrow contusion could be explained and was categorized as unclassified pattern. Conclusion Pivot shift pattern is most common contusion pattern and the most common type/mode of sports related injury. By analysing bone marrow contusion pattern, type/mode can be determined in most of the cases. By applying a biomechanical approach in MR interpretation, it is possible to detect lesions like ligament rupture and osseous contusion, to predict subtle but it might overlook important abnormalities. PMID:27190914

  14. High systemic bone mineral density increases the risk of incident knee OA and joint space narrowing, but not radiographic progression of existing knee OA: The MOST study

    PubMed Central

    Nevitt, Michael C.; Zhang, Yuqing; Javaid, M. Kassim; Neogi, Tuhina; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Niu, Jingbo; McCulloch, Charles E.; Segal, Neil A.; Felson, David T.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Previous studies suggest that high systemic bone mineral density (BMD) is associated with incident knee OA defined by osteophytes, but not with joint space narrowing (JSN), and are inconsistent regarding BMD and progression of existing OA. We tested the association of BMD with incident and progressive tibiofemoral OA in a large, prospective study of men and women ages 50–79 with, or at risk for, knee OA. Methods Baseline and 30-month weight-bearing PA and lateral knee x-rays were scored for K–L grade, JSN and osteophytes. Incident OA was defined as the development of K–L grade ≥2 at follow-up. All knees were classified for increases in grade of JSN and osteophytes from baseline. The association of gender-specific quartiles of baseline BMD with risk of incident and progressive OA was analyzed using logistic regression, adjusting for covariates. Results The mean age of 1,754 subjects was 63.2 (SD, 7.8) and BMI 29.9 (SD, 5.4). In knees without baseline OA, higher femoral neck and whole body BMD were associated with an increased risk of incident OA and increases in grade of JSN and osteophytes (p < 0.01 for trends); adjusted odds were 2.3 to 2.9-fold greater in the highest vs. the lowest BMD quartiles. In knees with existing OA, progression was not significantly related to BMD. Conclusions In knees without OA, higher systemic BMD was associated with a greater risk of the onset of JSN and K–L grade ≥2. The role of systemic BMD in early knee OA pathogenesis warrants further investigation. PMID:19147619

  15. Differences in Health-Related Quality of Life among Subjects with Frequent Bilateral or Unilateral Knee Pain: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative Study

    PubMed Central

    Bindawas, Saad; Vennu, Vishal; Snih, Soham Al

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional study. OBJECTIVE To examine associations between frequent bilateral knee pain (BKP) and unilateral knee pain (UKP) and health-related quality of life (QoL). We hypothesized that frequent BKP would be associated with poorer health-related QoL than would frequent UKP and no knee pain. BACKGROUND Knee pain is one of the most frequently reported types of joint pain among adults in the United States. It is the most frequent cause of limited physical function, disability, and reduced QoL. METHODS Data were collected from the Osteoarthritis Initiative public-use data sets. Health-related QoL was assessed in 2481 participants (aged 45–79 years at baseline). The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score QoL subscale (knee-specific measure) and the physical component summary and mental component summary (MCS) scores of the Medical Outcomes Study 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) (generic measure) were used to assess health-related QoL. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine the relationships between frequent knee pain and health-related QoL, adjusted for sociodemographic and health covariates. RESULTS Compared with subjects with no knee pain, subjects with frequent BKP and UKP had significantly lower scores on the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score QoL subscale (mean difference, −35.2; standard error [SE], 0.86; P<.001 and mean difference, −29.2; SE, 0.93; P<.001; respectively) and the SF-12 physical component summary score (mean difference, −6.25; SE, 0.41; P<.001 and mean difference, −4.10, SE, 0.43; P<.00; respectively), after controlling for sociodemographic and health covariates. The SF-12 MCS score was lower among those with BKP (−1.29; SE, 0.42; P<.001). Frequent UKP was not associated with the SF-12 MCS. CONCLUSIONS Subjects with frequent BKP had lower health-related QoL than those with frequent unilateral or no knee pain, as reflected in lower Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Socre Qo

  16. Evaluation of occupational knee-joint stress using liquid crystal thermography: a case study.

    PubMed

    Habes, D J; Bhattacharya, A; Milliron, M

    1994-04-01

    This paper describes a method to detect knee stress using liquid crystal thermography and presents the results of a case study in which the system was applied to two carpet installers. The method involves placing heat-sensitive sheets of film on the knees of workers at various intervals during the work day. The thermographic sheets react to variations in heat by changing colour. The measurements are taken with the worker's knee positioned in an illuminated, enclosed box. Once the patch stabilizes, the exhibited colours are recorded with an 8 mm video camera. The colour pattern, ranging from brown to blue, provides a thermal record of what is believed to be knee stress resulting from installing carpet. The thermographic records are stored in computer memory for subsequent analysis using an AT&T TARGA 16 video board. Custom software allows computation of the area of each distinct colour pattern as a percentage of total patch size. These records provide a characterization of knee response (inflammation) resulting from the biomechanical load sustained by the knee during the carpet installation task. PMID:15676958

  17. Low-tech rehabilitation of bilateral patellofemoral knee pain in a runner: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Stefanick, Gary F

    2004-01-01

    Patellofemoral pain is a common ailment within both the running and general populations. Many of the structures of the anterior knee that comprise the patellofemoral joint can be the source of chronic pain and inflammation that is associated with this condition. Much of the evidence in the literature points to a delay in activation of the vastus medialis oblique muscle as compared to the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis weakness, and ultimately faulty patellar tracking as the chief causative factors in the development of patellofemoral pain. This is a single case study of a 51-year-old recreational runner with an 18-month history of bilateral patellofemoral knee pain. Treatment included the use of low-tech in office rehabilitation strategies known to affect those causative factors responsible for patellofemoral pain. Evidence based treatment modalities were utilized in combination, which included patellar mobilization, spinal manipulation, proprioceptive and strength training, and semi-rigid orthotic use, to effect vastus medialis oblique vs. vastus lateralis activation, vastus medialis strength, and patellar movement. The patient responded very well to a 12 week course of treatment and resumed recreational running with minimal to no pain at the six month, one and two year follow-ups. PMID:17549103

  18. “We’re All Looking for Solutions”: A Qualitative Study of the Management of Knee Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    MacKay, Crystal; Badley, Elizabeth M; Jaglal, Susan B; Sale, Joanna; Davis, Aileen M

    2014-01-01

    Objective While the prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA) increases with age, the first signs begin in the fourth or fifth decade. Little is known about how younger adults respond to OA. This study explores how people ages 35–65 years manage knee symptoms. Methods Six focus groups were conducted with 41 participants (mean age 50.9 years, 63% women) who self-reported a diagnosis of OA or reported knee symptoms (i.e., pain, aching, or stiffness) on most days of the past month. Purposive sampling was used, seeking variation in age and sex. The principles of constructivist grounded theory guided data collection and analysis. Data were analyzed using a constant comparative method. Results Participants engaged in a process of proactively trying to find ways to control knee symptoms and disease progression. Their approach to management was not linear, but rather a process that moved back and forth between searching for “solutions” and active management (ongoing use of strategies). During the process, participants consulted health care providers, but often perceived that medical care offered limited options and guidance. Management was constructed as a “never-ending” process that entailed effort and personal resources. Conclusion Participants were proactive in seeking ways to manage knee OA symptoms. There is a mismatch between participants’ proactive approach and the reactive approach of the health care system that has focused on late-stage disease. Programs and supports within the formal and informal health care system are required to enable people to successfully manage knee symptoms across their lifespan. PMID:24403242

  19. Kinematic Analysis of a Posterior-stabilized Knee Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhi-Xin; Wen, Liang; Qu, Tie-Bing; Hou, Li-Li; Xiang, Dong; Bin, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Background: The goal of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is to restore knee kinematics. Knee prosthesis design plays a very important role in successful restoration. Here, kinematics models of normal and prosthetic knees were created and validated using previously published data. Methods: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of a healthy, anticorrosive female cadaver were used to establish a model of the entire lower limbs, including the femur, tibia, patella, fibula, distal femur cartilage, and medial and lateral menisci, as well as the anterior cruciate, posterior cruciate, medial collateral, and lateral collateral ligaments. The data from the three-dimensional models of the normal knee joint and a posterior-stabilized (PS) knee prosthesis were imported into finite element analysis software to create the final kinematic model of the TKA prosthesis, which was then validated by comparison with a previous study. The displacement of the medial/lateral femur and the internal rotation angle of the tibia were analyzed during 0–135° flexion. Results: Both the output data trends and the measured values derived from the normal knee's kinematics model were very close to the results reported in a previous in vivo study, suggesting that this model can be used for further analyses. The PS knee prosthesis underwent an abnormal forward displacement compared with the normal knee and has insufficient, or insufficiently aggressive, “rollback” compared with the lateral femur of the normal knee. In addition, a certain degree of reverse rotation occurs during flexion of the PS knee prosthesis. Conclusions: There were still several differences between the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis and a normal knee, suggesting room for improving the design of the PS knee prosthesis. The abnormal kinematics during early flexion shows that the design of the articular surface played a vital role in improving the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis. PMID:25591565

  20. Computational study of thermal effects of large blood vessels in human knee joint.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xu; He, Zhi Zhu; Liu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to present a comprehensive investigation on the thermal effects of large blood vessels of human knee joint during topical cooling and fomentation treatment. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis by taking full use of the anatomical CAD model of human knee joint was developed to accurately simulate the treatment process. Based on the classical Pennes bio-heat transfer equation, the time evolution of knee joint's temperature distribution and heat flux from large blood vessels was obtained. In addition, we compared several influencing factors and obtained some key conclusions which cannot be easily acquired through clinical experiments. The results indicated that the thermal effects of large blood vessels could remarkably affect the temperature distribution of knee joint during treatment process. Fluctuations of blood flow velocity and metabolic heat production rate affect little on the thermal effects of large blood vessels. Changing the temperature of blood and regimes of treatment could effectively regulate this phenomenon, which is important for many physiological activities. These results provide a guideline to the basic and applied research for the thermally significant large blood vessels in the knee organism. PMID:23196147

  1. Relationship between cigarette smoking and radiographic knee osteoarthritis in Chinese population: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zeng, Chao; Li, Hui; Yang, Tuo; Deng, Zhen-Han; Yang, Ye; Ding, Xiang; Xie, Dong-Xing; Wang, Yi-Lun; Lei, Guang-Hua

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this paper was to estimate the cross-sectional association between cigarette smoking and radiographic knee Osteoarthritis (OA) in Chinese population. A total of 3,789 subjects (1,796 females and 1,993 males) participated in this study. A subject was diagnosed with radiographic knee OA if Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grade ≥2 in at least one leg. The smoking status was classified into four levels based on the daily smoking habit: (1) 0/day; (2) 1-10/day; (3) 11-20/day; and (4) >20/day. Linear trend and multivariable logistic regression were conducted for statistical analysis. The prevalence of radiographic knee OA was 28.4 % among the subjects of this study. An inverse association was observed between cigarette smoking and radiographic knee OA in the linear trend test. Such association remained valid after adjusting the factors of age, gender, body mass index, betel quilt chewing status, physical activity, alcohol drinking status, mean total energy intake and educational level in the multivariable logistic regression. This study suggested a negative association between cigarette smoking and radiographic knee OA in the Chinese population. The findings of this study need to be confirmed by further prospective research. PMID:25588371

  2. Comparative Packaging Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, Michele; Antonini, David

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes a comparative packaging study for use on long duration space missions. The topics include: 1) Purpose; 2) Deliverables; 3) Food Sample Selection; 4) Experimental Design Matrix; 5) Permeation Rate Comparison; and 6) Packaging Material Information.

  3. Evaluation of 5-Year Trends in Knee Society Scores Stratified by Comorbidities: A Prospective, Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, Julio J; Issa, Kimona; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Harwin, Steven F; Given, Kristin; Mont, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) are reliable procedures for treating end-stage knee osteoarthritis with excellent long-term outcomes. The purpose of this study was to longitudinally evaluate temporal trends of Knee Society Scores (KSS) after TKA and to identify potential demographic and comorbid factors that affect these outcomes. This prospective study evaluated 281 patients (108 men and 173 women) with a mean age of 66 years (range, 39-80 years) who underwent primary TKA (minimum follow-up 5 years). During each follow-up visit, KS objective, function, and total scores were evaluated. The effects of different demographics and comorbidities on outcomes were further analyzed using multivariate regression analysis. Following TKA, peak mean KSS were observed at 1-year follow-up (mean, 92 points), after which there was no significant difference in scores at 5 years compared with 1-year follow-up (mean, 92 points). KS function scores were observed to be unchanged from preoperative levels (mean, 53 points) and at 6 weeks (mean, 56 points). These were significantly higher at 3 months (mean, 78 points) and reached a maximum mean peak at 1 year (mean, 85 points). KS objective scores increased earlier than function scores. The demographic variables and comorbidities that demonstrated a significantly negative impact in KS function scores were increased age, female gender, higher body mass index, and several medical comorbidities including immunological and neurological disease, and neoplasm. Race was the only variable that significantly decreased the KS objective scores. KSS after TKA follow temporal trends with scores initially unchanged from preoperative levels for the objective component, but the scores increased for the functional component. All components demonstrated higher levels compared with preoperative scores by 3 months and peaked at 1-year follow-up. At 5-year follow-up, all mean KSS were unchanged relative to peak scores seen at 1 year. Various patient

  4. Glucosamine-containing supplement improves locomotor functions in subjects with knee pain: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Kanzaki, Noriyuki; Ono, Yoshiko; Shibata, Hiroshi; Moritani, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of a glucosamine-containing supplement to improve locomotor functions in subjects with knee pain. Methods A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group comparative study was conducted for 16 weeks in 100 Japanese subjects (age, 51.8±0.8 years) with knee pain. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the two supplements containing 1) 1,200 mg of glucosamine hydrochloride, 60 mg of chondroitin sulfate, 45 mg of type II collagen peptides, 90 mg of quercetin glycosides, 10 mg of imidazole peptides, and 5 μg of vitamin D per day (GCQID group, n=50) or 2) a placebo (placebo group, n=50). Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure, visual analog scale score, normal walking speed, and knee-extensor strength were measured to evaluate the effects of the supplement on knee-joint functions and locomotor functions. Results In subjects eligible for efficacy assessment, there was no significant group × time interaction, and there were improvements in knee-joint functions and locomotor functions in both groups, but there was no significant difference between the groups. In subjects with mild-to-severe knee pain at baseline, knee-extensor strength at week 8 (104.6±5.0% body weight vs 92.3±5.5% body weight, P=0.030) and the change in normal walking speed at week 16 (0.11±0.03 m/s vs 0.05±0.02 m/s, P=0.038) were significantly greater in the GCQID group than in the placebo group. Further subgroup analysis based on Kellgren–Lawrence (K–L) grade showed that normal walking speed at week 16 (1.36±0.05 m/s vs 1.21±0.02 m/s, P<0.05) was significantly greater in the GCQID group than in the placebo group in subjects with K–L grade I. No adverse effect of treatment was identified in the safety assessment. Conclusion In subjects with knee pain, GCQID supplementation was effective for relieving knee pain and improving locomotor functions. PMID:26604721

  5. Relationship between body adiposity measures and risk of primary knee and hip replacement for osteoarthritis: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Simpson, Julie Anne; Wluka, Anita E; Teichtahl, Andrew J; English, Dallas R; Giles, Graham G; Graves, Stephen; Cicuttini, Flavia M

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Total joint replacement is considered a surrogate measure for symptomatic end-stage osteoarthritis. It is unknown whether the adipose mass and the distribution of adipose mass are associated with the risk of primary knee and hip replacement for osteoarthritis. The aim of the present investigation was to examine this in a cohort study. Methods A total of 39,023 healthy volunteers from Melbourne, Australia were recruited for a prospective cohort study during 1990 to 1994. Their body mass index, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio were obtained from direct anthropometric measurements. The fat mass and percentage fat were estimated from bioelectrical impedance analysis. Primary knee and hip replacements for osteoarthritis between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2005 were determined by data linkage to the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) for primary joint replacement associated with each adiposity measure. Results Comparing the fourth quartile with the first, there was a threefold to fourfold increased risk of primary joint replacement associated with body weight (HR = 3.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.83 to 4.18), body mass index (HR = 3.44, 95% CI = 2.80 to 4.22), fat mass (HR = 3.51, 95% CI = 2.87 to 4.30), and percentage fat (HR = 2.99, 95% CI = 2.46 to 3.63). The waist circumference (HR = 2.77, 95% CI = 2.26 to 3.39) and waist-to-hip ratio (HR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.21 to 1.76) were less strongly associated with the risk. Except for the waist-to-hip ratio, which was not significantly associated with hip replacement risk, all adiposity measures were associated with the risk of both knee and hip joint replacement, and were significantly stronger risk factors for knee. Conclusions Risk of primary knee and hip joint replacement for osteoarthritis relates to both adipose mass and central adiposity. This relationship

  6. Development of the Occupational Activities Knee Scale.

    PubMed

    Styron, Joseph F; Singer, Mendel E; Barsoum, Wael K

    2010-06-01

    A primary concern of many knee surgery patients is their ability to return to work following surgery, but it is often difficult to predict the practicality of returning due to a job's unclear knee demands. A cross-sectional study of employed patients and general population participants was conducted. Study participants were asked if their job required nine separate tasks and if their job had low, moderate, or high physical demands. The relative risk of each task placing high demands on the knee was calculated, and those risk ratios were summated to calculate a scaled score. The scaled score accurately distinguishes the levels of job demands with each reported level of job demands having a significantly higher mean scaled score than the level below it (p < 0.0001). The Occupational Activities Knee Scale offers occupational and health care providers greater precision in comparing the physical requirements of jobs for knee surgery patients. PMID:21141686

  7. The effects of exercise and neuromuscular electrical stimulation in subjects with knee osteoarthritis: a 3-month follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Laufer, Yocheved; Shtraker, Haim; Elboim Gabyzon, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Background Strengthening exercises of the quadriceps femoris muscle (QFM) are beneficial for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Studies reporting short-term effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) of the QFM in this population support the use of this modality as an adjunct treatment. The objectives of this follow-up study are to compare the effects of an exercise program with and without NMES of the QFM on pain, functional performance, and muscle strength immediately posttreatment and 12 weeks after completion of the intervention. Methods Sixty-three participants with knee OA were randomly assigned into two groups receiving 12 biweekly treatments: An exercise-only program or an exercise program combined with NMES. Results A significantly greater reduction in knee pain was observed immediately after treatment in the NMES group, which was maintained 12 weeks postintervention in both groups. Although at this stage NMES had no additive effect, both groups demonstrated an immediate increase in muscle strength and in functional abilities, with no differences between groups. Although the improvements in gait velocity and in self-report functional ability were maintained at the follow-up session, the noted improvements in muscle strength, time to up and go, and stair negotiation were not maintained. Conclusion Supplementing an exercise program with NMES to the QFM increased pain modulation immediately after treatment in patients with knee OA. Maintenance of the positive posttreatment effects during a 12-week period was observed only for pain, self-reported functional ability, and walk velocity, with no difference between groups. Clinical rehabilitation effect The effects of a comprehensive group exercise program with or without NMES are partially maintained 12 weeks after completion of the intervention. The addition of NMES is recommended primarily for its immediate effect on pain. Further studies are necessary to determine the effects of repeated bouts

  8. Simple Scoring System and Artificial Neural Network for Knee Osteoarthritis Risk Prediction: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Tae Keun; Kim, Deok Won; Choi, Soo Beom; Oh, Ein; Park, Jee Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease of adults worldwide. Since the treatments for advanced radiographic knee OA are limited, clinicians face a significant challenge of identifying patients who are at high risk of OA in a timely and appropriate way. Therefore, we developed a simple self-assessment scoring system and an improved artificial neural network (ANN) model for knee OA. Methods The Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES V-1) data were used to develop a scoring system and ANN for radiographic knee OA. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictors of the scoring system. The ANN was constructed using 1777 participants and validated internally on 888 participants in the KNHANES V-1. The predictors of the scoring system were selected as the inputs of the ANN. External validation was performed using 4731 participants in the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI). Area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic was calculated to compare the prediction models. Results The scoring system and ANN were built using the independent predictors including sex, age, body mass index, educational status, hypertension, moderate physical activity, and knee pain. In the internal validation, both scoring system and ANN predicted radiographic knee OA (AUC 0.73 versus 0.81, p<0.001) and symptomatic knee OA (AUC 0.88 versus 0.94, p<0.001) with good discriminative ability. In the external validation, both scoring system and ANN showed lower discriminative ability in predicting radiographic knee OA (AUC 0.62 versus 0.67, p<0.001) and symptomatic knee OA (AUC 0.70 versus 0.76, p<0.001). Conclusions The self-assessment scoring system may be useful for identifying the adults at high risk for knee OA. The performance of the scoring system is improved significantly by the ANN. We provided an ANN calculator to simply predict the knee OA risk. PMID:26859664

  9. Knee Osteoarthritis and the Efficacy of Kinesthesia, Balance & Agility Exercise Training: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    ROGERS, MATTHEW W.; TAMULEVICIUS, NAURIS; COETSEE, MARIUS F.; CURRY, BETH F.; SEMPLE, STUART J.

    2011-01-01

    Kinesthesia, balance and agility (KBA) neuromuscular exercises are commonly used for rehabilitation of lower extremity injuries. KBA combined with strength training (ST) reportedly improves function among persons with knee osteoarthritis (OA), but independent effects of KBA are unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of KBA exercises, independent of ST, to improve function among persons with knee OA. Twenty participants (69.3, SD 11.4 y) were randomized to 8 weeks, 3-days per week, instructor-lead KBA or ST groups. Self-reported physical function (difficulty with daily living activities such as walking, bending, stair climbing, etc.) was measured at baseline and every two weeks. Community physical activity level, negative and positive outcome expectancies for exercise, self-reported knee stability, and timed 10-stair climb, 10-stair descent, and ‘get up and go’ 15 m walk were measured at baseline and follow-up. Physical function improved 59% (p = 0.02) with KBA and 40% (p = 0.02) with ST at 8 weeks. Community physical activity level improved only in KBA (p = 0.04); knee stability improved in both KBA (p = 0.04) and ST (p = 0.01). There were no significant between-group differences (p > 0.05). In conclusion, both interventions appear to improve function and knee stability among persons with symptomatic knee OA. As KBA has never been studied as an independent treatment program, our results indicate it is a promising stand-alone intervention worthy of further study. PMID:27182359

  10. Comparing the Predictive Value of Task Performance and Task-Specific Sensitivity During Physical Function Testing Among People With Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Wideman, Timothy H; Edwards, Robert R; Finan, Patrick H; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Smith, Michael T

    2016-05-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional cohort. Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of pain and mobility restriction. Past research has advocated the use of brief, functional tasks to evaluate these restrictions, such as the six-minute-walk test and the timed up-and-go test. Typically, only task performance (ie, walking distance, completion time) is used to inform clinical practice. Recent research, however, suggests that individual variance in how people feel while completing these tasks (ie, task sensitivity) might also have important clinical value. Objective To compare the predictive value of task performance and task-specific sensitivity in determining OA-related physical function (measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index) and pain-related interference (measured by the Multidimensional Pain Inventory). Methods One hundred eight participants with chronic knee OA completed the six-minute-walk test and the timed up-and-go test, and reported levels of discomfort and affective response (mood) associated with each test. Results In separate regression models, both task performance and task-specific sensitivity predicted OA-related physical function and pain-related interference. A final regression model including all significant predictors showed that task-specific sensitivity (specifically, post-six-minute-walk discomfort) emerged as a unique predictor of both outcomes. Conclusion These findings highlight the value of a novel clinical assessment strategy for patients with knee OA. While clinicians commonly focus on how patients perform on standardized functional tasks, these results highlight the value of also considering levels of posttask sensitivity. Measures of task-specific sensitivity relate to Maitland's concept of pain irritability, which may be a useful framework for future research on sensitizing factors and pain-related disability. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(5):346-356. Epub 21 Mar 2016. doi:10

  11. Prospective epidemiological study of basketball injuries during one competitive season: ankle sprains and overuse knee injuries.

    PubMed

    Cumps, Elke; Verhagen, Evert; Meeusen, Romain

    2007-01-01

    This prospective cohort study aims to assess the overall incidence of acute and overuse basketball injuries and identifies risk factors associated with ankle sprains and knee overuse injuries. In total, 164 senior players (23.7 years ± 7.0) of all levels of play, and including both men and women, participated voluntarily during one season. A total of 139 acute and 87 overuse injuries were reported, resulting in an overall injury incidence of 9.8 (8.5 to 11.1) per 1,000 hours. The incidence of acute injuries was 6.0/1,000 hours. Ankle sprains (n = 34) accounted for most acute injuries, and 52.9% of all players with ankle sprains reported a previous ankle sprain. Relative Risks (RR) and Odds Ratio (OR) with their 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) were calculated to determine significant differences. Landing on an opponent's foot was the major inciting event, significantly more so than non contact mechanisms (RR=2.1 [95% CI: 1.0-4.2]). Acute knee injuries resulted in the highest playing absence (7 weeks 2 days ± 9 weeks 1 day). Overuse injury incidence was 3.8/1,000 hours. The knee (1.5/1,000 hours) was the most common site. Forward players sustained less knee overuse injuries than players of all other playing positions, and significantly less than center players (OR=0.5 [95% CI: 0.2-0.9]). This study showed that ankle sprains and overuse knee injuries are the most common injuries in basketball, both accounting for 14.8%. Injury prevention programmes however should not concentrate on those injuries only, but might one to consider that acute knee injuries, in spite of the fact that they occur less frequently, also merit further research. Key pointsAnkle sprains are the most common acute injuries in basketball with the inciting event being landing on an opponent's foot or changing direction.Anterior knee pain is the most common overuse injury. Etiologic factors are well described in literature, but prevention strategies are lacking.Acute knee injuries account for the

  12. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... the front of your knee around the kneecap Torn ligament. An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, or ... into your knee, swelling, or an unstable knee. Torn cartilage (a meniscus tear ). Pain felt on the ...

  13. Association between body mass index and risk of total knee replacement, the Singapore Chinese Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ying-Ying; Allen, John Carson; Noviani, Maria; Ang, Li-Wei; Wang, Renwei; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Data on the association between body mass index (BMI) and risk of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) are sparse for Asian populations who are leaner than Western populations. We evaluated the association between BMI and risk of total knee replacement (TKR) due to severe KOA among Chinese in Singapore. Methods We used data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a population based prospective cohort of 63,257 Chinese men and women, aged 45–74 years at enrollment from 1993 to 1998. Information on height, weight, diet and lifestyle factors were obtained via in-person interviews. TKR cases for severe KOA were identified via linkage with the nationwide hospital discharge database through 2011. Cox regression and weighted least squares regression were used in the analysis. Results The mean BMI among cohort participants was 23.1 kg/m2, and more than two-thirds had BMI below 25 kg/m2. A total of 1,649 had TKR attributable to severe KOA. Risk of TKR increased in a strong dose-dependent manner with increasing BMI throughout the 15–32 kg/m2 range and became less clear at BMI > 32 kg/m2. In the BMI range 16–27 kg/m2, there was a 27% increase in TKR risk for each unit increase in BMI (p for trend < 0.001). Compared to BMI 19–20 kg/m2, the risk estimates of TKR were all statistically significant with increasing unit of BMI ≥ 21 kg/m2. Results were similar for men and women. Conclusion Our results provided evidence for a constant mechanical mechanism underlying BMI and KOA initiation and/or progression. PMID:25450848

  14. Efficacy of strength and aerobic exercise on patient-reported outcomes and structural changes in patients with knee osteoarthritis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite an extensive literature on treatment interventions for patients with knee osteoarthritis, studies comparing the efficacy of different exercise interventions and living the life as usual on quality of life, cartilage quality and cost-effectiveness are lacking. The aim of the present study is to compare the efficacy of two different exercise programs compared to a control group in individuals with established radiographic and symptomatic knee osteoarthritis on self-reported knee-related quality of life, knee pain, physical function, and cartilage quality. Methods/Design A three-armed randomized controlled trial involving two exercise interventions and a control group of individuals doing as they usually do is described. The patients will have mild to moderate radiographic osteoarthritis according to the Kellgren and Lawrence classification (grade 2–3), and fulfill the American College of Rheumatology clinical criteria, be aged between 45 and 65 years, and have no other serious physical or mental illnesses. The patients will be randomly allocated to a strength exercise group; a cycling group, or a control group. The primary outcome is the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score knee-related quality of life subscale. Secondary outcomes include all five Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score subscales, morphological evaluation of cartilage including focal thickness, subchondral bone marrow edema, proteoglycan content and collagen degradation (measured using magnetic resonance imaging clinical sequences, T2 mapping and T1ρ), specific serum biomarkers, isokinetic muscle strength, maximal oxygen uptake, quality of life (EuroQol 5D), and self-efficacy (Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale). A sample size calculation on the primary outcome showed that 207 individuals, 69 in each group, is needed to detect a clinically relevant difference of 10 points with 80% power and a significance level of 5%. Assessments will be conducted at baseline, 14

  15. A comparison of the biomechanical effects of valgus knee braces and lateral wedged insoles in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard K; Nester, Christopher J; Richards, Jim D; Kim, Winston Y; Johnson, David S; Jari, Sanjiv; Laxton, Philip; Tyson, Sarah F

    2013-03-01

    Increases in the external knee adduction moment (EKAM) have been associated with increased mechanical load at the knee and progression of knee osteoarthritis. Valgus knee braces and lateral wedged insoles are common approaches to reducing this loading; however no study has directly compared the biomechanical and clinical effects of these two treatments in patients with medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. A cross-over randomised design was used where each intervention was worn by 28 patients for a two week period. Pre- and post-intervention gait kinematic/kinetic data and clinical outcomes were collected to evaluate the biomechanical and clinical effects on the knee joint. The valgus knee brace and the lateral wedged insole significantly increased walking speed, reduced the early stance EKAM by 7% and 12%, and the knee adduction angular impulse by 8.6 and 16.1% respectively. The lateral wedged insole significantly reduced the early stance EKAM compared to the valgus knee brace (p=0.001). The valgus knee brace significantly reduced the knee varus angle compared to the baseline and lateral wedged insole. Improvements in pain and function subscales were comparable for the valgus knee brace and lateral wedged insole. There were no significant differences between the two treatments in any of the clinical outcomes; however the lateral wedged insoles demonstrated greater levels of acceptance by patients. This is the first study to biomechanically compare these two treatments, and demonstrates that given the potential role of knee loading in osteoarthritis progression, that both treatments reduce this but lateral wedge insoles appear to have a greater effect. PMID:22920242

  16. Knee Bracing: What Works?

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Knee Bracing: What Works? Knee Bracing: What Works? What are knee braces? Knee braces are supports ... have arthritis in their knees. Do knee braces work? Maybe. Companies that make knee braces claim that ...

  17. Rates of change and Sensitivity to Change in Cartilage Morphology in Healthy Knees and in Knees with Mild, Moderate, and End Stage Radiographic Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Eckstein, Felix; Nevitt, Michael; Gimona, Alberto; Picha, Kristen; Lee, Jennifer H; Davies, Richard Y; Dreher, Donatus; Benichou, Olivier; Le Graverand, Marie-Pierre Hellio; Hudelmaier, Martin; Maschek, Susanne; Wirth, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the longitudinal rate of (and sensitivity to) change of knee cartilage thickness across defined stages of radiographic osteoarthritis (ROA), specifically healthy knees and knees with end-stage ROA. Methods One knee of 831 Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) participants was examined: 112 healthy, without ROA or risk factors for knee OA, and 719 ROA knees: 310 calculated Kellgren Lawrence [cKLG] grade 2, 300 cKLG3, and 109 cKLG4. Subregional change in thickness was assessed after segmentation of weight-bearing femorotibial cartilage at baseline and at one year from coronal MRI. Regional and ordered values (OV) of change were compared by baseline ROA status. Results Healthy knees displayed small changes in plates and subregions (±0.7%; standardized response mean [SRM] ±0.15), with OVs being symmetrically distributed around zero. In cKLG2 knees, changes in cartilage thickness were small (≤1%; minimal SRM -0.22) and not significantly different from healthy knees. Knees with cKLG3 showed substantial loss of cartilage thickness (up to -2.5%; minimal SRM -0.35), with OV changes being significantly (p<0.05) greater than those in healthy knees. cKLG4 knees displayed the largest rate of loss across ROA grades (up to -3.9%; minimal SRM -0.51), with OV changes also significantly (p<0.05) greater than in healthy knees. Conclusion MRI-based cartilage thickness showed high rates of loss in knees with moderate and end-stage ROA, and small rates (indistinguishable from healthy knees) in mild ROA. From the perspective of sensitivity to change, end-stage ROA knees need not be excluded from longitudinal studies using MRI cartilage morphology as an endpoint. PMID:20957657

  18. Advantage of Minimal Anterior Knee Pain and Long-term Survivorship of Cemented Single Radius Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty without Patella Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hyung-Min; Baek, Ji-Hoon; Ko, Young-Bong

    2015-01-01

    Background The single radius total knee prosthesis was introduced with the advantage of reduced patellar symptoms; however, there is no long-term follow-up study of the same. The purpose of this study was to determine the survival rate of single radius posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty and patellofemoral complication rates in a consecutive series. Methods Seventy-one patients (103 knees) who underwent arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing using a single radius posterior-stabilized total knee prosthesis were followed up for a minimum 10 years. Clinical evaluation using Knee Society knee and function scores and radiologic evaluation were performed at regular intervals. Anterior knee pain as well as patellofemoral complications were evaluated with a simple questionnaire. The Kaplan-Meier product-limit method was used to estimate survival. Results Seventeen patients (23 knees) were excluded due to death (12 knees) or lost to follow-up (11 knees). Of the 80 knees enrolled, all femoral components and 78 tibial components were well fixed without loosening at final follow-up. Two revisions were performed because of tibial component loosening and periprosthetic joint infection. One patient with tibial component loosening refused to have revision surgery. No obvious tibial insert polyethylene wear was observed. The survivorships at 132 months were 96.7% using revision or pending revision as end points. Anterior knee pain was present in 6 patients (6 knees, 7.5%) at the latest follow-up. No patellofemoral complication requiring revision was encountered. Conclusions The single radius posterior-stabilized total knee prosthesis demonstrated an excellent minimum 10-year survivorship. The low rates of implant loosening and 7.5% of anterior knee pain as a patellofemoral complication are comparable with those reported for other modern total knee prosthesis. PMID:25729519

  19. Prospective image registration for automated scan prescription of follow-up knee images in quantitative studies.

    PubMed

    Goldenstein, Janet; Schooler, Joseph; Crane, Jason C; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Pialat, Jean-Baptiste; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2011-06-01

    Consistent scan prescription for MRI of the knee is very important for accurate comparison of images in a longitudinal study. However, consistent scan region selection is difficult due to the complexity of the knee joint. We propose a novel method for registering knee images using a mutual information registration algorithm to align images in a baseline and follow-up exam. The output of the registration algorithm, three translations and three Euler angles, is then used to redefine the region to be imaged and acquire an identical oblique imaging volume in the follow-up exam as in the baseline. This algorithm is robust to articulation of the knee and anatomical abnormalities due to disease (e.g., osteophytes). The registration method is performed only on the distal femur and is not affected by the proximal tibia or soft tissues. We have incorporated this approach in a clinical MR system and have demonstrated its utility in automatically obtaining consistent scan regions between baseline and follow-up examinations, thus improving the precision of quantitative evaluation of cartilage. Results show an improvement with prospective registration in the coefficient of variation for cartilage thickness, cartilage volume and T2 relaxation measurements. PMID:21546186

  20. Cementless total knee arthroplasty with Profix: a 8- to 10-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Hardeman, François; Vandenneucker, Hilde; Van Lauwe, Johan; Bellemans, Johan

    2006-12-01

    A consecutive series of 115 cementless Profix (Smith and Nephew, Memphis, USA) Total Knee Arthroplasties performed in 113 patients were followed in order to determine the functional results and survivorship at 8 to 10 years. All patients were included in a prospective database and were reviewed annually until final follow-up. Patients overall satisfaction was excellent or good in 91.3% of cases. The mean Knee Society's knee and function scores increased respectively from 49.3 and 36.7 preoperatively to 93.1 and 82.2 postoperatively. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of implant survival at 10 years was 97.1%. Two patients underwent revision and were considered as failures. One patient had a fracture of the medial condyle at 4 days post-surgery, and the other was revised for aseptic loosening of the tibial component at 6 years post-surgery. On the basis of this long-term follow-up study, we can conclude that the Profix Total Knee System is effective and safe. PMID:17064905

  1. Prosthesis alignment affects axial rotation motion after total knee replacement: a prospective in vivo study combining computed tomography and fluoroscopic evaluations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    -flexion. Knees with femoral-tibial rotational mismatch had significantly lower total axial rotation compared to knees with nominal alignment. Conclusions Maintaining relative rotational mismatch within ±5° during TKR provided for controlled knee axial rotation during flexion. TKR with rotational alignment outside of defined surgical norms, with either positive or negative mismatch, experienced measurable kinematic differences and presented different patterns of axial rotation motions during passive knee flexion compared to TKR with nominal mismatch. These findings support previous studies linking prosthesis rotational alignment with inferior clinical and functional outcomes. Trial Registration Clinical Trials NCT01022099 PMID:23088451

  2. Operations dashboard: comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramly, Noor Nashriq; Ismail, Ahmad Zuhairi; Aziz, Mohd Haris; Ahmad, Nurul Haszeli

    2011-10-01

    In this present days and age, there are increasing needs for companies to monitor application and infrastructure health. Apart from having proactive measures to secure their application and infrastructure, many see monitoring dashboards as crucial investment in disaster preparedness. As companies struggle to find the best solution to cater for their needs and interest for monitoring their application and infrastructure's health, this paper summarizes the studies made on several known off-the-shelf operations dashboard and in-house developed dashboard. A few criteria of good dashboard are collected from previous studies carried out by several researchers and rank them according to importance and business needs. The finalized criteria that will be discussed in later sections are data visualization, performance indicator, dashboard personalization, audit capability and alert/ notification. Comparative studies between several popular dashboards were then carried out to determine whether they met these criteria that we derived from the first exercise. The findings hopefully can be used to educate and provide an overview of selecting the best IT application and infrastructure operations dashboard that suit business needs, thus become the main contribution of this paper.

  3. Achieving ligament stability and correct rotational alignment of the femur in knee arthroplasty: a study using the Medial Pivot knee.

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, David; Kinzel, Vera; Ledger, Michael

    2005-12-01

    In a series of 90 Medial Pivot arthroplasties rotational alignment of the femur was achieved by provisionally reconstructing the lateral side of the joint and tensioning the medial side with feeler gauges. Axial CT scans were employed to measure the rotational alignment relative to surgical epicondylar axis. In valgus knees the cutting block was externally rotated to adjust for posterolateral bone loss. The mean rotational alignment of the femur was 0.6 degrees of external rotation (S.D. 1.3, range 3 degrees of ER to 4 degrees of IR). The mean laxity of the medial ligament was 1 mm in flexion (SD 1, range 0-5 mm) and 0.5 mm in flexion (S.D. 0.5, range 0-2 mm) In those knees in which the medial ligament had been released the CT alignment was perfect, but when internally rotated against the hip 3-4 mm of gapping was noted. In valgus knees the mean rotation of the femoral component was 0.8 degrees of internal rotation (S.D. 1.5, range 1 degrees of IR to 4 degrees of ER). In spite of externally rotating the cutting block there was still a tendency to internally rotate the femur in some knees. This simple technique achieves the two goals of ligament stability and correct rotational alignment in a high proportion of cases. It may be applicable to any instrument system which employs posterior referencing. PMID:15967668

  4. Clinical value of SPECT/CT in the ‘unhappy’ total knee arthroplasty (TKA)- a prospective study in a consecutive series of 100 painful knees after TKA

    PubMed Central

    Rotigliano, Niccolò; Hirschmann, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Bone SPECT/CT is considered as beneficial hybrid imaging modality in unhappy patients with pain, stiffness or swelling after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to identify typical pattern of tracer uptake distribution and intensity values in these patients after TKA. The above findings were correlated with the type of TKA, the time from primary TKA, fixation of TKA (cemented or non-cemented) and intraoperative findings at revision surgery (loose vs well fixed TKA components). Materials and Methods: A total of 100 knees (mean age±standard deviation 70±11 years) of 84 consecutive patients who have previously undergone primary TKA and complained about postoperative knee pain or stiffness after TKA were prospectively included. All patients underwent clinical and radiological examination including standardized radiographs and Tc-99m-HDP-SPECT/CT as part of a routine diagnostic algorithm. The diagnosis before and after SPECT/CT imaging, as well as the final treatment were recorded. Femoral and tibial TKA component position (varus-valgus, flexion-extension, internal rotation-external rotation) was determined on 3D reconstructed images using a customized analysis software. Intensity and anatomical distribution of 99mTc-HDP-SPECT/CT bone tracer uptake was determined using a validated localisation scheme. Maximum intensity values were recorded as well as ratios between the respective value and the background tracer activity (proximal mid-shaft of the femur). Level of significance was p<0.05. Univariate analysis (Chi square test, Pearson correlation, t-test for independent samples) was performed to identify any correlations between component position, tracer uptake and diagnosis. For all analysis, p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: SPECT/CT changed the clinical diagnosis and final treatment in 85/100 (85%) knees. 33 knees (33%) were surgically revised, 58 knees (58%) non-surgically treated and 9 knees (9

  5. Association between abnormal kinematics and degenerative change in knees of people with chronic anterior cruciate ligament deficiency: a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Scarvell, Jennifer M; Smith, Paul N; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Galloway, Howard R; Woods, Kevin R

    2005-01-01

    Progressive degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficient knee may be partly due to chondral trauma at the time of ACL rupture and repeat episodes of subluxation, but also due to aberrant kinematics altering the wear pattern at the tibiofemoral interface. The hypothesis that altered kinematics, represented by the tibiofemoral contact pattern, would be associated with articular cartilage degeneration in ACL-deficient knees was tested in a cross-sectional study of 23 subjects with a history of > 10 years ACL deficiency without knee reconstruction. Subjects were aged 31 to 67 years. Eleven were male, 12 were female. Sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans enabled tibiofemoral contact mapping as subjects performed a closed-chain leg-press. Images were acquired at 15 degree intervals from 0 degrees to 90 degrees knee flexion. Articular cartilage degeneration was assessed by diagnostic MRI and where possible, arthroscopy. The ACL-deficient knees had a posterior tibiofemoral contact pattern on the tibial plateau compared to the healthy knees (F((1,171)) = 9.2, p = 0.003). The difference appeared to be seen in the medial compartment (F((1,171)) = 3.2, p = 0.07), though this failed to reach significance. Articular cartilage degeneration in the medial compartment was related to the variation of the tibiofemoral contact pattern (r = -0.53, p = 0.01). Articular cartilage degeneration was not related to time since injury (r = -0.16, p = 0.65). The association between aberrant kinematics and degenerative change may stimulate thinking on the role of dynamic stability and neuromuscular co-ordination in joint protection. PMID:16321130

  6. Cost savings associated with the use of the Ho:YAG laser in knee arthroscopy: a comparative retrospective review of 140 conventional and laser-assisted procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael D.

    1994-09-01

    The impact of using the 2.1 micrometers Ho:YAG laser in orthopaedic surgery has not been fully investigated, especially as to what affect it may have on an employee's return to work and normal activities. In this retrospective review of 140 patients who underwent arthroscopic surgery at our facility, there were found to be significant decreases in time on crutches and time off from work when laser-assisted knee arthroscopies were compared to procedures where conventional mechanical or motorized instruments were used. The patients who had laser-assisted knee arthroscopies discontinued use of crutches 5 days earlier than the conventional group and returned to work 10 days earlier than their counterparts who had undergone conventional arthroscopic surgery. The ability to return to work more quickly translates into significant cost savings for employers who otherwise would have to replace the worker with temporary help, pay overtime, or face lost productivity due to an employee's absence following arthroscopic knee surgery.

  7. Radiolucent lines in low-contact-stress mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty: a blinded and matched case control study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Low-contact-stress (LCS) mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) (Johnson & Johnson, New Brunswick, NJ; previously: DePuy, Warsawa, USA) provides excellent functional results and wear rates in long-term follow-up analyses. Radiological analysis shows radiolucent lines (RLL) appearing immediately or two years after primary implantation, indicative of poor seat. Investigations proved RLL to be more frequent in uncemented TKA, resulting in a consensus to cement the tibial plateau, but their association with clinical findings and patients discomfort and knee pain is still unknown. Methods 553 patients with 566 low-contact-stress (LCS) total knee prostheses were screened for continuous moderate knee pain. We compared tibial stress shielding classified by Ewald in patients suffering from pain with a matched, pain-free control group on blinded X-rays. We hypothesized a positive correlation between pain and radiolucency and higher frequency of such radiolucent lines in the most medial and most lateral zones of the tibial plateau. Results Twenty-eight patients suffered from knee pain in total. Radiolucencies were detected in 27 of these cases and in six out of 28 matched controls without knee pain. We could demonstrate a significant correlation of knee pain and radiolucencies, which appeared significantly more frequently in the outermost zones of the tibial plateau. Conclusion Our findings suggest that radiolucent lines, representing poor implant seat, about the tibial plateau are associated with knee pain in LCS patients. Radiolucencies are observed more often in noncemented LCS, and cementing the tibial plateau might improve implant seat and reduce both radiolucent lines and associated knee pain. PMID:21714916

  8. An Open Randomized Trial Comparing the Effects of Oral NSAIDs Versus Steroid Intra-Articular Infiltration in Congestive Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Dieu-Donné, Ouédraogo; Théodore, Ouédraogo; Joëlle, Zabsonré/Tiendrébéogo; Pierre, Dionou; Smaïla, Ouédraogo; Christian, Compaoré; Fulgence, Kaboré; Joseph, Drabo Youssouf

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy on pain and joint function of NSAIDs versus steroid intra-articular infiltration in congestive knee osteoarthritis. Patients and Methods: Open randomized study comparing a series of patients treated with NSAIDs for 21 days and another who received steroid intra-articular infiltration (SIAI) spaced at every 7 days. The visual analog scale was used for the weekly assessment of spontaneous pain and pain when walking. Lequesne functional pain scale was used to assess the functional impact of knee osteoarthritis. Results: Seventy patients were enrolled, including 35 in the NSAID arm and 35 in SIAI arm. Forty-nine (70%) had stage III of Kellgren and Lawrance scale. On admission, the average pain intensity was 50.46 ± 30.93 in the NSAID arm and 60.92 ± 30 in SIAI arm (p = 0.0189). At the end of follow-up, pain intensity was 6.72 ± 13 in NSAIDs patients and 17.80 ± 21 in SIAI one (p = 0.001). The average intensity of pain on walking was 64.41 ± 22.61. It was 53.33 ± 22.31 in NSAID’s against 74.85 ± 17.55 in SIAI patients (P <0.0001). At the end of the treatment, they were respectively 19.11 ± 11.37, and 35 ± 30.69 (P = 0.0085). Conclusion: Corticosteroid injections have a short efficacy compared to NSAIDs. Prescribing NSAIDs should consider the cons-indications, comorbidities and their deleterious digestive, renal, and cardiovascular effect. PMID:27006727

  9. Approximation of the functional kinematics of posterior stabilised total knee replacements using a two-dimensional sagittal plane patello-femoral model: comparing model approximation to in vivo measurement.

    PubMed

    Van Duren, Bernard; Pandit, Hemant; Murray, David; Gill, Harinderjit

    2015-08-01

    Previous in vivo studies have observed that current designs of posterior stabilised (PS) total knee replacements (TKRs) may be ineffective in restoring normal kinematics in Late flexion. Computer-based models can prove a useful tool in improving PS knee replacement designs. This study investigates the accuracy of a two-dimensional (2D) sagittal plane model capable of predicting the functional sagittal plane kinematics of PS TKR implanted knees against direct in vivo measurement. Implant constraints are often used as determinants of anterior-posterior tibio-femoral positioning. This allowed the use of a patello-femoral modelling approach to determine the effect of implant constraints. The model was executed using motion simulation software which uses the constraint force algorithm to achieve a solution. A group of 10 patients implanted with Scorpio PS implants were recruited and underwent fluoroscopic imaging of their knees. The fluoroscopic images were used to determine relative implant orientation using a three-dimensional reconstruction method. The determined relative tibio-femoral orientations were then input to the model. The model calculated the patella tendon angles (PTAs) which were then compared with those measured from the in vivo fluoroscopic images. There were no significant differences between the measured and calculated PTAs. The average root mean square error between measured and modelled ranged from 1.17° to 2.10° over the flexion range. A sagittal plane patello-femoral model could conceivably be used to predict the functional 2D kinematics of an implanted knee joint. This may prove particularly useful in optimising PS designs. PMID:24559039

  10. A natural seaweed derived mineral supplement (Aquamin F) for knee osteoarthritis: A randomised, placebo controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Frestedt, Joy L; Kuskowski, Michael A; Zenk, John L

    2009-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is a slowly destructive process that may be influenced by a nutritional mineral balance in the body. Methods This small, double blind, placebo controlled pilot study investigated the impact of treatment with a natural multi-mineral supplement from seaweed (Aquamin) on 6 minute walking distance (6 MWD), range of motion (ROM), and pain and joint mobility measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index in subjects with moderate to severe OA of the knee during gradual withdrawal of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that were being used daily for pain management. Subjects (n = 29) with moderate to severe OA of the knee were randomised to receive either Aquamin (2400 mg/d) or Placebo for up to 12 weeks. Results Of the 29 subjects initially randomized, only 22 subjects proceeded to treatment due to 7 subjects not meeting study selection criteria at baseline. Fourteen subjects completed the study and an ITT analysis (n = 22) of the data showed no significant differences in WOMAC scores however, the data did reveal significant improvements in passive and active extension ROM (0.83° ± 1.54 vs. -1.54° ± 2.43; difference, 5.2° ± 2.2, p = 0.028) and 6 MWD (150 ± 48 ft vs. 12.5 ± 31.5 ft; difference, 136 ± 57 ft, p = 0.03) in the Aquamin group compared to the placebo group; respectively, following a 50% reduction in NSAID use. The treatments were well tolerated and the adverse event profiles were not significantly different between the groups. Conclusion This small preliminary study suggests Aquamin may increase range of motion and walking distances in subjects with OA of the knee and may allow partial withdrawal of NSAIDs over 12 weeks of treatment. Additional research is needed to confirm these preliminary observations. Trial registration NCT00755482 PMID:19187557

  11. A Blended Intervention for Patients With Knee and Hip Osteoarthritis in the Physical Therapy Practice: Development and a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kloek, Corelien; Snippe, Harm Wouter; Dekker, Joost; de Bakker, Dinny; Veenhof, Cindy

    2016-01-01

    Background Blended care, a combination of online and face-to-face care, is seen as a promising treatment option. However, actual use of blended interventions in practice is disappointing. Objective The objective of this study was two folded. The first aim was to develop a blended exercise therapy intervention for patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis that matches the values of the users and that can be implemented in the daily routine of physical therapists. The second aim was to investigate the feasibility through interviews and a pilot study. Methods In this paper, we employed the first 3 steps of the CeHRes road map to develop a blended intervention for patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis. We used interviews, a focus group and discussions with stakeholders to explore the needs, values, and requirements with respect to our to-be-developed blended intervention, which we called e-Exercise. The first version of e-Exercise was tested in a pilot study. Feasibility outcomes, including recruitment rates within each practice, website usage (assignments completed and website visits), and user satisfaction, were measured. In addition, therapists and patients from the pilot study were interviewed to investigate users’ experiences. Results The study captured important information about stakeholders’ needs and perspectives. Based on our findings, we created a first version and attuned the application’s content, functionality, and structure. Patients and, to lesser extent, physical therapists were satisfied with the e-Exercise intervention. Eight patients were recruited by 8 physical therapists. Of the 8 patients, 6 completed more than 7 of 12 modules. Conclusions This study outlines the development and feasibility of a blended exercise therapy intervention for patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis. E-Exercise offers an alternative approach in the physical therapy treatment of knee and hip osteoarthritis. This study provides valuable information to conduct

  12. Variability of indication criteria in knee and hip replacement: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Total knee (TKR) and hip (THR) replacement (arthroplasty) are effective surgical procedures that relieve pain, improve patients' quality of life and increase functional capacity. Studies on variations in medical practice usually place the indications for performing these procedures to be highly variable, because surgeons appear to follow different criteria when recommending surgery in patients with different severity levels. We therefore proposed a study to evaluate inter-hospital variability in arthroplasty indication. Methods The pre-surgical condition of 1603 patients included was compared by their personal characteristics, clinical situation and self-perceived health status. Patients were asked to complete two health-related quality of life questionnaires: the generic SF-12 (Short Form) and the specific WOMAC (Western Ontario and Mcmaster Universities) scale. The type of patient undergoing primary arthroplasty was similar in the 15 different hospitals evaluated. The variability in baseline WOMAC score between hospitals in THR and TKR indication was described by range, mean and standard deviation (SD), mean and standard deviation weighted by the number of procedures at each hospital, high/low ratio or extremal quotient (EQ5-95), variation coefficient (CV5-95) and weighted variation coefficient (WCV5-95) for 5-95 percentile range. The variability in subjective and objective signs was evaluated using median, range and WCV5-95. The appropriateness of the procedures performed was calculated using a specific threshold proposed by Quintana et al for assessing pain and functional capacity. Results The variability expressed as WCV5-95 was very low, between 0.05 and 0.11 for all three dimensions on WOMAC scale for both types of procedure in all participating hospitals. The variability in the physical and mental SF-12 components was very low for both types of procedure (0.08 and 0.07 for hip and 0.03 and 0.07 for knee surgery patients). However, a moderate

  13. Trajectories of Pain and Function after Primary Hip and Knee Arthroplasty: The ADAPT Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lenguerrand, Erik; Wylde, Vikki; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Sayers, Adrian; Brunton, Luke; Beswick, Andrew D.; Dieppe, Paul; Blom, Ashley W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Pain and function improve dramatically in the first three months after hip and knee arthroplasty but the trajectory after three months is less well described. It is also unclear how pre-operative pain and function influence short- and long-term recovery. We explored the trajectory of change in function and pain until and beyond 3-months post-operatively and the influence of pre-operative self-reported symptoms. Methods The study was a prospective cohort study of 164 patients undergoing primary hip (n = 80) or knee (n = 84) arthroplasty in the United Kingdom. Self-reported measures of pain and function using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index were collected pre-operatively and at 3 and 12 months post-operatively. Hip and knee arthroplasties were analysed separately, and patients were split into two groups: those with high or low symptoms pre-operatively. Multilevel regression models were used for each outcome (pain and function), and the trajectories of change were charted (0–3 months and 3–12 months). Results Hip: Most improvement occurred within the first 3 months following hip surgery and patients with worse pre-operative scores had greater changes. The mean changes observed between 3 and twelve months were statistically insignificant. One year after surgery, patients with worse pre-operative scores had post-operative outcomes similar to those observed among patients with less severe pre-operative symptoms. Knee: Most improvement occurred in the first 3 months following knee surgery with no significant change thereafter. Despite greater mean change during the first three months, patients with worse pre-operative scores had not ‘caught-up’ with those with less severe pre-operative symptoms 12 months after their surgery. Conclusion Most symptomatic improvement occurred within the first 3 months after surgery with no significant change between 3–12 months. Further investigations are now required to

  14. Influence of Total Knee Arthroplasty on Gait Mechanics of the Replaced and Non-Replaced Limb During Stair Negotiation.

    PubMed

    Standifird, Tyler W; Saxton, Arnold M; Coe, Dawn P; Cates, Harold E; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Zhang, Songning

    2016-01-01

    This study compared biomechanics during stair ascent in replaced and non-replaced limbs of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients with control limbs of healthy participants. Thirteen TKA patients and fifteen controls performed stair ascent. Replaced and non-replaced knees of TKA patients were less flexed at contact compared to controls. The loading response peak knee extension moment was greater in control and non-replaced knees compared with replaced. The push-off peak knee abduction moment was elevated in replaced limbs compared to controls. Loading and push-off peak hip abduction moments were greater in replaced limbs compared to controls. The push-off peak hip abduction moment was greater in non-replaced limbs compared to controls. Future rehabilitation protocols should consider the replaced knee and also the non-replaced knee and surrounding joints. PMID:26231075

  15. Laser therapy for the treatment of arthritic knees: a clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, F.; Liboro, R.; Saraga, F.

    2010-02-01

    In a follow-up clinical study to our previously published 2006 SPIE conference proceeding, we analyzed a cross-section of patients treated for a variety of knee problems that present at our Meditech Laser Rehabilitation Clinics on a daily basis. Of the 98 patients with knee pathologies included in this study, 63% presented with degenerative osteoarthritis. On average 11 treatments, each 30-45 minutes in duration, were administered for the individual patient resulting in a significant improvement rate in excess of 92%. Laser Therapy is active at both the cellular and systemic levels activating a variety of mechanisms including cartilage regeneration, DNA synthesis, improved microcirculation and an analgesic and anti-inflammatory effect.

  16. The Role of Varus and Valgus Alignment in the Initial Development of Knee Cartilage Damage by MRI: the MOST Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Leena; Chmiel, Joan S.; Almagor, Orit; Felson, David; Guermazi, Ali; Roemer, Frank; Lewis, Cora E.; Segal, Neil; Torner, James; Cooke, T. Derek V.; Hietpas, Jean; Lynch, John; Nevitt, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objective Varus and valgus alignment are associated with progression of knee osteoarthritis, but their role in incident disease is less certain. Radiographic measures of incident knee osteoarthritis may be capturing early progression rather than disease development. We tested the hypothesis: in knees with normal cartilage morphology by MRI, varus is associated with incident medial cartilage damage and valgus with incident lateral damage. Methods In MOST, a prospective study of persons at risk for or with knee osteoarthritis, baseline full-limb x-rays and baseline and 30-month MRIs were acquired. In knees with normal baseline cartilage morphology in all tibiofemoral subregions, we used logistic regression with GEE to examine the association between alignment and incident cartilage damage adjusting for age, gender, BMI, laxity, meniscal tear, and extrusion. Results Of 1881 knees, 293 from 256 persons met criteria. Varus vs. non-varus was associated with incident medial damage (adjusted OR 3.59, 95% CI: 1.59, 8.10), as was varus vs. neutral, with evidence of a dose effect (adjusted OR 1.38/1° varus, 95% CI: 1.19, 1.59). Findings held even excluding knees with medial meniscal damage. Valgus was not associated with incident lateral damage. Varus and valgus were associated with a reduced risk of incident lateral and medial damage, respectively. Conclusion In knees with normal cartilage morphology, varus was associated with incident cartilage damage in the medial compartment, and varus and valgus with a reduced risk of incident damage in the less loaded compartment. These results support that varus increases the risk for initial development of knee osteoarthritis. PMID:22550314

  17. Comparative morphology of the lateral meniscus of the knee in primates.

    PubMed Central

    Le Minor, J M

    1990-01-01

    The morphology of the lateral meniscus has been studied in a series of 316 non-human primates, representative of 43 genera. The lateral meniscus has a crescentic shape in Prosimii, in Platyrrhinii (New World monkeys) and in Pongo pygmaeus. The lateral meniscus is disc-shaped, with a central foramen, in Catarrhinii (Old World monkeys), in Hylobates, in Gorilla and in Pan Troglodytes. In man, the lateral meniscus has a crescentic shape. Discoid lateral menisci are reported as anomalies in man; their origin has given rise to much discussion, but the comparative data favour a phylogenetic origin. The posterior fasciculus (Wrisberg's ligament) of the posterior menisco-femoral ligament is always present and large in all non-human primates; in man, it may be absent and seems to be a regressive structure. On the other hand, the anterior fasciculus (Humphry's ligament) exists only in man and seems to be a progressive structure. The posterior menisco-tibial attachments are weak or non-existent in non-human primates, but they are well-developed in man. The evolutionary development of these characters can be related to human bipedal locomotion. The lateral meniscus in some Prosimii contains one or two intramensical ossicles (lunulae). These structures are absent or very rare in all other primate groups. In man, intrameniscal ossicles are extremely unusual; their origin, phylogenetic or post-traumatic is controversial, but comparative data favour, at least in some cases, the persistence of an ancestral character. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2123845

  18. [Pharmacokinetic studies following 2 and 4-week Felbinac gel administration to the knee joint].

    PubMed

    Bolten, W; Waldorf-Bolten, E; Sarfert, D; Lehmann, W; Miehlke, W

    1990-01-01

    Twelve patients with osteoarthrosis were locally treated with Felbinac Gel (biphenyl acetic acid (BPAA) 3%) three times daily for 14 days (five patients), 28 days (six patients) or 42 days (one patient) before elective knee joint surgery. BPAA plasma concentrations as of the seventh day of treatment were steady at between 423 and 1040 ng/ml. In surgery, synovial and tissue samples were taken to determine BPAA concentrations. Moderate and sometimes higher synovial BPAA levels in the treated knee joint compared to the contralateral knee seem to indicate a combined direct and systemic absorption. The highest BPAA concentrations (1497-13939 ng/g) were measured in the skin. Drug levels in the synovial membrane (36-994 ng/g), the synovia (104-768 ng/ml), tendon (less than 10-197 ng/g), cartilage (less than 10-109 ng/g), muscle (12-101 ng/g), and subcutis (16-97 ng/g) were lower. BPAA neither accumulates in the skin, nor in any other peri-articular tissue. A steady state was reached as of the 14th day of treatment at the latest. None of the patients reported any local or systemic side effects. PMID:2085060

  19. Effects of exercise on knee joints with osteoarthritis: a pilot study of biologic markers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautch, J. C.; Malone, D. G.; Vailas, A. C.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of low intensity weight-bearing exercise on osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. METHODS: Synovial fluid keratan sulfate (KS) and hydroxyproline were measured as markers of cartilage degradation. The Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales (AIMS) were used to measure health status, and a visual analog scale for pain assessment was used before and after intervention. An exercise (EX) group (n = 15) received a thrice-weekly 12-week low intensity exercise program and a weekly educational program, and a minimal treatment (Min RX) group (n = 15) received only the education program. RESULTS: Pain levels declined in the EX group, and the Min RX group showed improvement on the AIMS. Synovial fluid was obtained in 11 subjects before and after the intervention. Levels of KS and hydroxyproline did not change. CONCLUSION: Further study of exercise effects should include both clinical and biologic parameters to examine the outcome of exercise as a therapeutic intervention in OA of the knee.

  20. Patients' and Practitioners' Views of Knee Osteoarthritis and Its Management: A Qualitative Interview Study

    PubMed Central

    Alami, Sophie; Boutron, Isabelle; Desjeux, Dominique; Hirschhorn, Monique; Meric, Gwendoline; Rannou, François; Poiraudeau, Serge

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To identify the views of patients and care providers regarding the management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to reveal potential obstacles to improving health care strategies. Methods We performed a qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews of a stratified sample of 81 patients (59 women) and 29 practitioners (8 women, 11 general practitioners [GPs], 6 rheumatologists, 4 orthopedic surgeons, and 8 [4 GPs] delivering alternative medicine). Results Two main domains of patient views were identified: one about the patient–physician relationship and the other about treatments. Patients feel that their complaints are not taken seriously. They also feel that practitioners act as technicians, paying more attention to the knee than to the individual, and they consider that not enough time is spent on information and counseling. They have negative perceptions of drugs and a feeling of medical uncertainty about OA, which leads to less compliance with treatment and a switch to alternative medicine. Patients believe that knee OA is an inevitable illness associated with age, that not much can be done to modify its evolution, that treatments are of little help, and that practitioners have not much to propose. They express unrealistic fears about the impact of knee OA on daily and social life. Practitioners' views differ from those of patients. Physicians emphasize the difficulty in elaborating treatment strategies and the need for a tool to help in treatment choice. Conclusions This qualitative study suggests several ways to improve the patient–practitioner relationship and the efficacy of treatment strategies, by increasing their acceptability and compliance. Providing adapted and formalized information to patients, adopting more global assessment and therapeutic approaches, and dealing more accurately with patients' paradoxal representation of drug therapy are main factors of improvement that should be addressed. PMID:21573185

  1. Single bundle anterior cruciate reconstruction does not restore normal knee kinematics at six months: an upright MRI study.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, J A; Sutherland, A G; Smith, F W

    2011-10-01

    Abnormal knee kinematics following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament may exist despite an apparent resolution of tibial laxity and functional benefit. We performed upright, weight-bearing MR scans of both knees in the sagittal plane at different angles of flexion to determine the kinematics of the knee following unilateral reconstruction (n = 12). The uninjured knee acted as a control. Scans were performed pre-operatively and at three and six months post-operatively. Anteroposterior tibial laxity was determined using an arthrometer and patient function by validated questionnaires before and after reconstruction. In all the knees with deficient anterior cruciate ligaments, the tibial plateau was displaced anteriorly and internally rotated relative to the femur when compared with the control contralateral knee, particularly in extension and early flexion (mean lateral compartment displacement: extension 7.9 mm (sd 4.8), p = 0.002 and 30° flexion 5.1 mm (sd 3.6), p = 0.004). In all ten patients underwent post-operative scans. Reconstruction reduced the subluxation of the lateral tibial plateau at three months, with resolution of anterior displacement in early flexion, but not in extension (p = 0.015). At six months, the reconstructed knee again showed anterior subluxation in both the lateral (mean: extension 4.2 mm (sd 4.2), p = 0.021 and 30° flexion 3.2 mm (sd 3.3), p = 0.024) and medial compartments (extension, p = 0.049). Our results show that despite improvement in laxity and functional benefit, abnormal knee kinematics remain at six months and actually deteriorate from three to six months following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. PMID:21969431

  2. Plastinated Knee Specimens: A Novel Educational Tool

    PubMed Central

    Neha; Lalwani, Sanjeev; Dhingra, Renu

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: During the routine dissection of knee joints in an anatomy dissection hall, it was observed that the specimens had deteriorated overtime, due to their repeated handling and the use of high concentrations of formalin for their fixation. In order to stop their further deterioration, we decided to plastinate these specimens. Thus, the present study was undertaken to prepare plastinated knee specimens from old embalmed cadavers and to compare them with freshly fixed, plastinated specimens. Objectives: 1. To plastinate old embalmed and fresh formalin fixed knee regions. 2. To demonstrate the extra and the intracapsular structures around both the plastinated knee regions. 3. To compare their morphological features in terms of their colours, dilatation and flexibility. Methods: A total of 15 knee joint specimens from among fresh formalin (5-8%) fixed (group I) and old embalmed bodies (group II) were collected, washed and plastinated by using the standard S-10 silicon technique and they were compared for their colours, dilatation and flexibility. Results: All the plastinated specimens showed an accurate reproduction of the tissue details that were comparable to those of the natural unfixed specimens. A comparison among the two groups showed a significant difference in terms of the colour, dilatation and the flexibility of the specimens. The plastinated knee joint specimens from group I were of good quality, with negligible shrinkage, more flexibility and well preserved morphologies. Conclusion: Plastinated knee specimens can serve as an excellent educational tool for the undergraduate and postgraduate students of anatomy, radiology and orthopaedics, as they are dry, odourless and nontoxic, with a good structural preservation and a higher instructional value. The fresh knee regions, when they were plastinated, were aesthetically superior in terms of their colours, dilatation and flexibility, thus making them ideal for teaching and hands-on experiences. PMID

  3. Biomechanical analysis of knee and trunk in badminton players with and without knee pain during backhand diagonal lunges.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Feng; Hua, Shiang-Hua; Huang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Hsing-Hsan; Liao, Jen-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of core neuromuscular control to the dynamic stability of badminton players with and without knee pain during backhand lunges has not been investigated. Accordingly, this study compared the kinematics of the lower extremity, the trunk movement, the muscle activation and the balance performance of knee-injured and knee-uninjured badminton players when performing backhand stroke diagonal lunges. Seventeen participants with chronic knee pain (injured group) and 17 healthy participants (control group) randomly performed two diagonal backhand lunges in the forward and backward directions, respectively. This study showed that the injured group had lower frontal and horizontal motions of the knee joint, a smaller hip-shoulder separation angle and a reduced trunk tilt angle. In addition, the injured group exhibited a greater left paraspinal muscle activity, while the control group demonstrated a greater activation of the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis and medial gastrocnemius muscle groups. Finally, the injured group showed a smaller distance between centre of mass (COM) and centre of pressure, and a lower peak COM velocity when performing the backhand backward lunge tasks. In conclusion, the injured group used reduced knee and trunk motions to complete the backhand lunge tasks. Furthermore, the paraspinal muscles contributed to the lunge performance of the individuals with knee pain, whereas the knee extensors and ankle plantar flexor played a greater role for those without knee pain. PMID:25574707

  4. Abnormal Subcortical Brain Morphology in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Cui Ping; Bai, Zhi Lan; Zhang, Xiao Na; Zhang, Qiu Juan; Zhang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Despite the involvement of subcortical brain structures in the pathogenesis of chronic pain and persistent pain as the defining symptom of knee osteoarthritis (KOA), little attention has been paid to the morphometric measurements of these subcortical nuclei in patients with KOA. The purpose of this study is to explore the potential morphological abnormalities of subcortical brain structures in patients with KOA as compared to the healthy control subjects by using high-resolution MRI. Structural MR data were acquired from 26 patients with KOA and 31 demographically similar healthy individuals. The MR data were analyzed by using FMRIB’s integrated registration and segmentation tool. Both volumetric analysis and surface-based shape analysis were performed to characterize the subcortical morphology. The normalized volumes of bilateral caudate nucleus were significantly smaller in the KOA group than in the control group (P = 0.004). There was also a trend toward smaller volume of the hippocampus in KOA as compared to the control group (P = 0.027). Detailed surface analyses further localized these differences with a greater involvement of the left hemisphere (P < 0.05, corrected) for the caudate nucleus. Hemispheric asymmetry (right larger than left) of the caudate nucleus was found in both KOA and control groups. Besides, no significant correlation was found between the structural data and pain intensities. Our results indicated that patients with KOA had statistically significant smaller normalized volumes of bilateral caudate nucleus and a trend toward smaller volume of the hippocampus as compared to the control subjects. Further investigations are necessary to characterize the role of caudate nucleus in the course of chronicity of pain associated with KOA. PMID:26834629

  5. Outcomes of Varus Valgus Constrained Versus Rotating-Hinge Implants in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Tennison L; Bederman, S Samuel; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2016-01-01

    The stability of a total knee arthroplasty is determined by the ability of the prosthesis components in concert with supportive bone and soft tissue structures to sufficiently resist deforming forces transmitted across the knee joint. Constrained prostheses are used in unstable knees due to their ability to resist varus and valgus transformative forces across the knee. Constraint requires inherent rigidity, which can facilitate early implant failure. The purpose of this study was to describe the comparative indications for surgery and postoperative outcomes of varus valgus constrained knee (VVK) and rotating-hinge knee (RHK) total knee arthroplasty prostheses. Seven retrospective observational studies describing 544 VVK and 254 RHK patients with an average follow-up of 66 months (range, 7-197 months) were evaluated. Patients in both groups experienced similar failure rates (P=.74), ranges of motion (P=.81), and Knee Society function scores (P=.29). Average Knee Society knee scores were 4.2 points higher in VVK patients compared with RHK patients, indicating minimal mid-term clinical differences may exist (P<.0001). Absent collateral ligament support is an almost universal indication for RHK implantation vs VVK. Constrained device implantation is routinely guided by inherent stability of the knee, and, when performed, similar postoperative outcomes can be achieved with VVK and RHK prostheses. PMID:26730689

  6. Usefulness of the Korean Knee Score for Evaluation of the Results of Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Kyu; Shim, Ji-Hoon; Chung, Kyu-Sung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Korean Knee score (KKS) was designed to reflect the floor-sitting lifestyle that necessitates high knee flexion. The purpose of this study is to assess whether the KKS reflects the floor-sitting lifestyle more accurately than the previously developed Knee Society clinical rating system. In addition, the presence of ceiling effects was compared between the two rating systems. Materials and Methods Eighty-one consecutive patients (120 knees) who were assessed regularly after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) on an outpatient basis between January 2012 and December 2012 were enrolled. All patients were asked to complete a questionnaire to assess the Knee Society Knee score (KSKS), Knee Society Function score (KSFS), and KKS. Results At the final follow-up, the mean KSKS, KSFS, and KKS were 91.2, 86.0, and 70.1, respectively, and the scores were similar between the ≥125° maximum flexion group and <125° maximum flexion group. However, the 'floor life' subdomain score of the KKS was significantly higher in the >125° maximum flexion group (15.13 vs. 11.24, p=0.001). The number of cases with the highest possible score was 24 (20%) for the KSKS and 47 (39%) for the KSFS, whereas none of the cases obtained the highest possible KKS. According to the standard deviation method, more substantial ceiling effects were present in the KSKS (83 cases, 69.1%) and KSFS (67 cases, 55.8%) than in the KKS (23 cases, 19.2%). Conclusions Although, the KKS was effective in reducing the ceiling effect, it demonstrated limited improvement in assessing the ability to perform high knee flexion after TKA. However, the 'floor life' subdomain of KSS appeared to be valid for evaluating high flexion of the knee. PMID:25750889

  7. Determinants of pain and functioning in knee osteoarthritis: a one-year prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Helminen, Eeva-Eerika; Sinikallio, Sanna H; Valjakka, Anna L; Väisänen-Rouvali, Rauni H; Arokoski, Jari PA

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify predictors of pain and disability in knee osteoarthritis. Design: A one-year prospective analysis of determinants of pain and functioning in knee osteoarthritis. Study setting: Primary care providers in a medium-sized city. Patients: A total of 111 patients aged from 35 to 75 with clinical symptoms and radiographic grading (Kellgren-Lawrence 2–4) of knee osteoarthritis who participated in a randomized controlled trial. Main measures: The outcome measures were self-reported pain and function, which were recorded at 0, 3 and 12 months. Disease-specific pain and functioning were assessed using the pain and function subscales of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index. Generic physical and mental functioning were assessed using the RAND-36 subscales for function, and physical and mental component summary scores. Possible baseline predictors for these outcomes were 1) demographic, socioeconomic and disease-related variables, and 2) psychological measures of resources, distress, fear of movement and catastrophizing. Results: Multivariate linear mixed model analyses revealed that normal mood at baseline measured with the Beck Anxiety Inventory predicted significantly better results in all measures of pain (WOMAC P=0.02) and function (WOMAC P=0.002, RAND-36 P=0.002) during the one-year follow-up. Psychological resource factors (pain self-efficacy P=0.012, satisfaction with life P=0.002) predicted better function (RAND-36). Pain catastrophizing predicted higher WOMAC pain levels (P=0.013), whereas fear of movement (kinesiophobia) predicted poorer functioning (WOMAC P=0.046, RAND-36 P=0.024). Conclusions: Multiple psychological factors in people with knee osteoarthritis pain are associated with the development of disability and longer term worse pain. PMID:27496698

  8. Meat consumption and risk of primary hip and knee joint replacement due to osteoarthritis: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is emerging evidence for a beneficial effect of meat consumption on the musculoskeletal system. However, whether it affects the risk of knee and hip osteoarthritis is unknown. We performed a prospective cohort study to examine the relationship between meat consumption and risk of primary hip and knee replacement for osteoarthritis. Methods Eligible 35,331 participants were selected from the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study recruited during 1990-1994. Consumption of fresh red meat, processed meat, chicken, and fish was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire. Primary hip and knee replacement for osteoarthritis during 2001-2005 was determined by linking the cohort records to the Australian National Joint Replacement Registry. Results There was a negative dose-response relationship between fresh red meat consumption and the risk of hip replacement (hazard ratio (HR) 0.94 per increase in intake of one time/week, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.89-0.98). In contrast, there was no association with knee replacement risk (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.94-1.02). Consumption of processed meat, chicken and fish were not associated with risk of hip or knee replacement. Conclusion A high level consumption of fresh red meat was associated with a decreased risk of hip, but not knee, joint replacement for osteoarthritis. One possible mechanism to explain these differential associations may be via an effect of meat intake on bone strength and hip shape. Further confirmatory studies are warranted. PMID:21235820

  9. Twelve Year Outcomes of Oxinium Total Knee Arthroplasty Compared to the Same Cobalt Chrome Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Vertullo, Christopher; Lewis, Peter; Graves, Stephen; Kelly, Lan; Myers, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Alternative bearings surfaces to Cobalt Chrome (Co-Cr), such as Oxidised have been introduced in an attempt to reduce polyethylene wear and hence decrease TKA loosening and lysis. While non-comparative reports have been described as promising, no short or long term clinical studies exists showing the superiority of Oxinium on a polyethylene bearing surfaces. In this study, we investigate the long-term outcomes of Oxinium and Co-Cr TKR in a “like for like” or matched cohort analysis of the Genesis II design (Smith & Nephew, Memphis, TN, USA). Using data from a large national joint replacement registry we selected cohorts that used only the cruciate retaining design, with the same method of fixation and polyethylene type, differing only in the femoral component bearing surfaces. Our primary hypothesis was that Oxinium TKA would have a lower cumulative percent revision than the same Co-Cr prosthesis at 12 years for all causes of revision. Our secondary hypothesis was that Oxinium TKA would have a lower loosening/ lysis rate and lower rate of non-infective revision than the same Co-Cr prosthesis at 12 years. Methods: Cumulative percent revision and revision diagnosis data were obtained from the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry (AOANJRR) from 1 September 1999, until 31 December 2013. Results: At 12 years the cumulative percent revision of the Co-Cr Genesis II of 4.8 % (95%: CI 4.2, 5.4) for all causes was not statistically different to the Oxinium Genesis II CPR of 7.7 % (95%: CI 6.2, 9.5) (For the entire period, Hazard Ratio = 1.09 (95%: CI 0.92, 1.29), p = 0.329). The CPR for all causes was not different in the under 55 years old age group (Figure 3) (HR= 1.06 (0.68, 1.66) p=0.798).). Subgroup analysis of the CPR for loosening /lysis in both groups overall was not different (HR= 0.87 (95%: CI 0.61, 1.26), p = 0.461) Subgroup analysis of all causes of revisions excluding infection in both groups overall was not

  10. Motor control investigation of dystonic cerebral palsy: A pilot study of passive knee trajectory.

    PubMed

    Androwis, Ghaith J; Michael, Peter A; Jewaid, Darine; Nolan, Karen J; Strongwater, Allan; Foulds, Richard A

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to better understand dystonia in CP and be able to objectively distinguish between individuals who experience spasticity, dystonia, or a combination of these conditions while evaluating the effect of 2Hz vestibular stimulation. Selected outcome measures included knee ROM, angular velocity and acceleration and all measures increased post vestibular stimulation; these results are indications of a possible reduction in the level of disability. The current investigation also identified an unexpected and unique behavior of the knee in children with dystonic cerebral palsy (CP) that was noticed while administering the Pendulum Knee Drop test (PKD) at approximately 0.4 rad (a mid-angle between full extension and zero vertical). There was a catch-like phenomenon at the described mid-angle in dystonic individuals. These results may suggest that dystonia is not a velocity dependent hypersensitivity of reflexes, but may include position dependent muscle reflexes and co-contractions. This reinforces the need for a more precise objective measure or perhaps a modified measure such as a mid-angle PKD test. Furthermore, based on the results obtained through the modified technique, beneficial alterations can be made to the form of treatment such as: robotic therapy or physical therapy that specifically accommodates the unique motor control disorder in individuals with dystonic CP. PMID:26737309

  11. Detection of Prosthetic Knee Movement Phases via In-Socket Sensors: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Amr M; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Tan, Kenneth Y S; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an approach of identifying prosthetic knee movements through pattern recognition of mechanical responses at the internal socket's wall. A quadrilateral double socket was custom made and instrumented with two force sensing resistors (FSR) attached to specific anterior and posterior sites of the socket's wall. A second setup was established by attaching three piezoelectric sensors at the anterior distal, anterior proximal, and posterior sites. Gait cycle and locomotion movements such as stair ascent and sit to stand were adopted to characterize the validity of the technique. FSR and piezoelectric outputs were measured with reference to the knee angle during each phase. Piezoelectric sensors could identify the movement of midswing and terminal swing, pre-full standing, pull-up at gait, sit to stand, and stair ascent. In contrast, FSR could estimate the gait cycle stance and swing phases and identify the pre-full standing at sit to stand. FSR showed less variation during sit to stand and stair ascent to sensitively represent the different movement states. The study highlighted the capacity of using in-socket sensors for knee movement identification. In addition, it validated the efficacy of the system and warrants further investigation with more amputee subjects and different sockets types. PMID:25945365

  12. Detection of Prosthetic Knee Movement Phases via In-Socket Sensors: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Amr M.; Tan, Kenneth Y. S.; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an approach of identifying prosthetic knee movements through pattern recognition of mechanical responses at the internal socket's wall. A quadrilateral double socket was custom made and instrumented with two force sensing resistors (FSR) attached to specific anterior and posterior sites of the socket's wall. A second setup was established by attaching three piezoelectric sensors at the anterior distal, anterior proximal, and posterior sites. Gait cycle and locomotion movements such as stair ascent and sit to stand were adopted to characterize the validity of the technique. FSR and piezoelectric outputs were measured with reference to the knee angle during each phase. Piezoelectric sensors could identify the movement of midswing and terminal swing, pre-full standing, pull-up at gait, sit to stand, and stair ascent. In contrast, FSR could estimate the gait cycle stance and swing phases and identify the pre-full standing at sit to stand. FSR showed less variation during sit to stand and stair ascent to sensitively represent the different movement states. The study highlighted the capacity of using in-socket sensors for knee movement identification. In addition, it validated the efficacy of the system and warrants further investigation with more amputee subjects and different sockets types. PMID:25945365

  13. Outcome predictors of intra-articular glucocorticoid treatment for knee synovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis – a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Intra-articular glucocorticoid treatment (IAGC) is widely used for symptom relief in arthritis. However, knowledge of factors predicting treatment outcome is limited. The aim of the present study was to identify response predictors of IAGC for knee synovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods In this study 121 RA patients with synovitis of the knee were treated with intra-articular injections of 20 mg triamcinolone hexacetonide. They were followed for six months and the rate of clinical relapse was studied. Non-responders (relapse within 6 months) and responders were compared regarding patient characteristics and knee joint damage as determined by the Larsen-Dale index. In addition, matched samples of serum and synovial fluid were analysed for factors reflecting the inflammatory process (C-reactive protein, interleukin 6, tumour necrosis factor alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor), joint tissue turnover (cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, metalloproteinase 3), and autoimmunity (antinuclear antibodies, antibodies against citrullinated peptides, rheumatoid factor). Results During the observation period, 48 knees relapsed (40%). Non-responders had more radiographic joint damage than responders (P = 0.002) and the pre-treatment vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) level in synovial fluid was significantly higher in non-responders (P = 0.002). Conclusions Joint destruction is associated with poor outcome of IAGC for knee synovitis in RA. In addition, higher levels of VEGF in synovial fluid are found in non-responders, suggesting that locally produced VEGF is a biomarker for recurrence of synovial hyperplasia and the risk for arthritis relapse. PMID:24950951

  14. Knee Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not helping you anymore. When you have a total knee replacement, the surgeon removes damaged cartilage and bone ...

  15. Knee Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... cartilage, a tough, elastic material that helps absorb shock and allows the knee joint to move smoothly. ... The two menisci in each knee act as shock absorbers, cushioning the lower part of the leg ...

  16. Knee Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sprains A sprain means you've stretched or torn a ligament. Common knee sprains usually involve damage ... A strain means you've partly or completely torn a muscle or tendon. With knee strains, you ...

  17. “…Keep mobile, I think that’s half the battle.” A qualitative study of prevention of knee pain in symptomless older adults

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The emphasis on prevention in English health policy continues to centre predominantly on major diseases such as coronary heart disease and diabetes. A number of key documents detailing self-management techniques and prevention of osteoarthritis (OA) are currently available, including the NICE guidelines and the Arthritis Foundation’s National Public Health Agenda for Osteoarthritis. However, few investigations have explored preventative knowledge of knee OA amongst the population. In particular, asymptomatic members of the population may use further information in considering how to prevent knee pain. This study considers perceptions around the prevention of knee pain amongst an asymptomatic population; this target population may provide alternative insights by which to stimulate preventative behaviours. Methods A sample of thirteen patients with no current knee pain was selected from responders to a population survey. Each interview was tape recorded and fully transcribed. Qualitative computer software package NVivo8 was used to manage the data. Thematic analysis was conducted using the constant comparative method. Results The definition and causes of knee pain were interpreted in a multitude of ways. The importance of prevention was recognised by a sub-set, while a small proportion of participants negated the role of prevention. A range of social factors, including early adoption of actions, influenced the implementation and continuation of preventative behaviours. Individual responsibility for prevention was a key theme, although the role of society was also considered. Exercise was cited as a principal preventative strategy, although some participants viewed exercise as a destructive activity. A number of participants deemed pharmacotherapy to be harmful and at odds with normal physiology, instead preferring to adopt preventative behaviour over medication usage. Conclusions This asymptomatic population exhibit considerable breadth and variation in

  18. Comparative Packaging Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, Michele H.; Oziomek, Thomas V.

    2009-01-01

    Future long duration manned space flights beyond low earth orbit will require the food system to remain safe, acceptable and nutritious. Development of high barrier food packaging will enable this requirement by preventing the ingress and egress of gases and moisture. New high barrier food packaging materials have been identified through a trade study. Practical application of this packaging material within a shelf life test will allow for better determination of whether this material will allow the food system to meet given requirements after the package has undergone processing. The reason to conduct shelf life testing, using a variety of packaging materials, stems from the need to preserve food used for mission durations of several years. Chemical reactions that take place during longer durations may decrease food quality to a point where crew physical or psychological well-being is compromised. This can result in a reduction or loss of mission success. The rate of chemical reactions, including oxidative rancidity and staling, can be controlled by limiting the reactants, reducing the amount of energy available to drive the reaction, and minimizing the amount of water available. Water not only acts as a media for microbial growth, but also as a reactant and means by which two reactants may come into contact with each other. The objective of this study is to evaluate three packaging materials for potential use in long duration space exploration missions.

  19. Web-Based Study of Risk Factors for Pain Exacerbation in Osteoarthritis of the Knee (SPARK-Web): Design and Rationale

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Ben; Zhang, Yuqing; Bennell, Kim; March, Lyn; Hunter, David J

    2015-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent cause of limited mobility and diminished quality of life. Pain is the main symptom that drives individuals with knee OA to seek medical care and a recognized antecedent to disability and eventually joint replacement. Many persons with symptomatic knee OA experience recurrent pain exacerbations. Knowledge and clarification of risk factors for pain exacerbation may allow those affected to minimize reoccurrence of these episodes. Objective The aim of this study is to use a Web-based case-crossover design to identify risk factors for knee pain exacerbations in persons with symptomatic knee OA. Methods Web-based case-crossover design is used to study persons with symptomatic knee OA. Participants with knee pain and radiographic knee OA will be recruited and followed for 90 days. Participants will complete an online questionnaire at the baseline and every 10 days thereafter (totaling up to 10 control-period questionnaires); participants will also be asked to report online when they experience an episode of increased knee pain. Pain exacerbation will be defined as an increase in knee pain severity of two points from baseline on a numeric rating scale (NRS 0-10). Physical activity, footwear, knee injury, medication use, climate, psychological factors, and their possible interactions will be assessed as potential triggers for pain exacerbation using conditional logistic regression models. Results This project has been funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). The enrollment for the study has started. So far, 343 participants have been enrolled. The study is expected to be finished in October 2015. Conclusions This study will identify risk factors for pain exacerbations in knee OA. The identification and possible modification/elimination of such risk factors will help to prevent the reoccurrence of pain exacerbation episodes and therefore improve knee OA management. PMID:26156210

  20. Image based weighted center of proximity versus directly measured knee contact location during simulated gait.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongsheng; Chen, Tony; Koff, Matthew F; Hutchinson, Ian D; Gilbert, Susannah; Choi, Dan; Warren, Russell F; Rodeo, Scott A; Maher, Suzanne A

    2014-07-18

    To understand the mechanical consequences of knee injury requires a detailed analysis of the effect of that injury on joint contact mechanics during activities of daily living. Three-dimensional (3D) knee joint geometric models have been combined with knee joint kinematics to dynamically estimate the location of joint contact during physiological activities-using a weighted center of proximity (WCoP) method. However, the relationship between the estimated WCoP and the actual location of contact has not been defined. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between knee joint contact location as estimated using the image-based WCoP method, and a directly measured weighted center of contact (WCoC) method during simulated walking. To achieve this goal, we created knee specific models of six human cadaveric knees from magnetic resonance imaging. All knees were then subjected to physiological loads on a knee simulator intended to mimic gait. Knee joint motion was captured using a motion capture system. Knee joint contact stresses were synchronously recorded using a thin electronic sensor throughout gait, and used to compute WCoC for the medial and lateral plateaus of each knee. WCoP was calculated by combining knee kinematics with the MRI-based knee specific model. Both metrics were compared throughout gait using linear regression. The anteroposterior (AP) location of WCoP was significantly correlated with that of WCoC on both tibial plateaus in all specimens (p<0.01, 95% confidence interval of Pearson׳s coefficient r>0), but the correlation was not significant in the mediolateral (ML) direction for 4/6 knees (p>0.05). Our study demonstrates that while the location of joint contact obtained from 3D knee joint contact model, using the WCoP method, is significantly correlated with the location of actual contact stresses in the AP direction, that relationship is less certain in the ML direction. PMID:24837219

  1. Electroacupuncture with different current intensities to treat knee osteoarthritis: a single-blinded controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Ziyong; Guo, Xianhui; Jiang, Xu; Wang, Xin; Liu, Shimin; He, Jinsen; Cui, Huashun; Wang, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Background: To assess the efficacy of Electroacupuncture (EA) stimulation with high-intensity compared with low-intensity on knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Methods: Participants with KOA were randomized to either high-intensity EA group or low-intensity EA group. EA was applied unilaterally on the affected leg with the local points GB34, ST34, EX-LE4, EX-LE5, ST36, and SP9. The visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) were measured before and after participation. Plasma TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, and apelin levels were also assessed by enzyme immunoassay (ELA) before and after treatment. Results: Of 80 participants who consented to study participation, 77 completed the program. The patients showed a significant improvement in their pain, stiffness, and physical function on the VAS and WOMAC, accompanying with a significantly reduction in plasma levels of apelin and TNFα. Furthermore, high-intensity group exhibited statistically significant improvements in stiffness and physical function symptoms compared with low-intensity group. Plasma level of IL-6 was significantly decreased only after high-intensity EA treatment. Furthermore, apelin level was significantly inhibited in high-intensity EA group than in low-intensity EA group. Conclusions: Both high- and low-intensity EA treatments alleviate the clinical symptoms of KOA patients. High-intensity EA is more effective than low-intensity EA. Changes in plasma levels of TNFα, apelin and IL-6 may be involved in the therapeutic effect of EA on KOA. PMID:26770523

  2. Evaluation of total knee mechanics using a crouching simulator with a synthetic knee substitute.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Michael; Rosenbaum, Heather; Walker, Peter S

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical evaluation of total knees is frequently required for aspects such as wear, strength, kinematics, contact areas, and force transmission. In order to carry out such tests, we developed a crouching simulator, based on the Oxford-type machine, with novel features including a synthetic knee including ligaments. The instrumentation and data processing methods enabled the determination of contact area locations and interface forces and moments, for a full flexion-extension cycle. To demonstrate the use of the simulator, we carried out a comparison of two different total knee designs, cruciate retaining and substituting. The first part of the study describes the simulator design and the methodology for testing the knees without requiring cadaveric knee specimens. The degrees of freedom of the anatomic hip and ankle joints were reproduced. Flexion-extension was obtained by changing quadriceps length, while variable hamstring forces were applied using springs. The knee joint was represented by three-dimensional printed blocks on to which the total knee components were fixed. Pretensioned elastomeric bands of realistic stiffnesses passed through holes in the block at anatomical locations to represent ligaments. Motion capture of the knees during flexion, together with laser scanning and computer modeling, was used to reconstruct contact areas on the bearing surfaces. A method was also developed for measuring tibial component interface forces and moments as a comparative assessment of fixation. The method involved interposing Tekscan pads at locations on the interface. Overall, the crouching machine and the methodology could be used for many different mechanical measurements of total knee designs, adapted especially for comparative or parametric studies. PMID:26802075

  3. Does the rectus femoris nerve block improve knee recurvatum in adult stroke patients? A kinematic and electromyographic study.

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Delporte, L; Arsenault, L; Revol, P; Lefevre, M; Clevenot, D; Boisson, D; Mertens, P; Rossetti, Y; Luauté, J

    2014-02-01

    Knee recurvatum (KR) during gait is common in hemiplegic patients. Quadriceps spasticity has been postulated as a cause of KR in this population. The aim of this study was to assess the role of rectus femoris spasticity in KR by using selective motor nerve blocks of the rectus femoris nerve in hemiparetic stroke patients. The data from six adult, post-stroke hemiplegic patients who underwent a rectus femoris nerve block for a stiff-knee gait were retrospectively analyzed. An extensive clinical and functional evaluation was performed and gait was assessed by motion analysis (kinematic, kinetic and electromyographic parameters) before and during the block realized using 2% lidocaine injected under a neurostimulation and ultrasonographic targeting procedure. The main outcome measures were the peak knee extension in stance and peak knee extensor moment obtained during gait analysis. No serious adverse effect of the nerve block was observed. The block allowed a reduction of rectus femoris overactivity in all patients. Peak knee extension and extensor moment in stance did not improve in any patient, but peak knee flexion during the swing phase was significantly higher after block (mean: 31.2° post, 26.4 pre, p < 0.05). Our results provide arguments against the hypothesis that the spasticity of the rectus femoris contributes to KR. PMID:24286615

  4. Optimization of prosthetic foot stiffness to reduce metabolic cost and intact knee loading during below-knee amputee walking: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Fey, Nicholas P; Klute, Glenn K; Neptune, Richard R

    2012-11-01

    Unilateral below-knee amputees develop abnormal gait characteristics that include bilateral asymmetries and an elevated metabolic cost relative to non-amputees. In addition, long-term prosthesis use has been linked to an increased prevalence of joint pain and osteoarthritis in the intact leg knee. To improve amputee mobility, prosthetic feet that utilize elastic energy storage and return (ESAR) have been designed, which perform important biomechanical functions such as providing body support and forward propulsion. However, the prescription of appropriate design characteristics (e.g., stiffness) is not well-defined since its influence on foot function and important in vivo biomechanical quantities such as metabolic cost and joint loading remain unclear. The design of feet that improve these quantities could provide considerable advancements in amputee care. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to couple design optimization with dynamic simulations of amputee walking to identify the optimal foot stiffness that minimizes metabolic cost and intact knee joint loading. A musculoskeletal model and distributed stiffness ESAR prosthetic foot model were developed to generate muscle-actuated forward dynamics simulations of amputee walking. Dynamic optimization was used to solve for the optimal muscle excitation patterns and foot stiffness profile that produced simulations that tracked experimental amputee walking data while minimizing metabolic cost and intact leg internal knee contact forces. Muscle and foot function were evaluated by calculating their contributions to the important walking subtasks of body support, forward propulsion and leg swing. The analyses showed that altering a nominal prosthetic foot stiffness distribution by stiffening the toe and mid-foot while making the ankle and heel less stiff improved ESAR foot performance by offloading the intact knee during early to mid-stance of the intact leg and reducing metabolic cost. The optimal design also

  5. The epidemiological and clinical features of primary giant cell tumor around the knee: A report from the multicenter retrospective study in china

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fengsong; Hu, Yongcheng; Zhao, Liming; Zhang, Huilin; Yu, Xiuchun; Wang, Zhen; Ye, Zhaoming; Wu, Sujia; Guo, Shibing; Zhang, Guochuan; Wang, Jinghua

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to determine the demographic characteristics of giant cell tumor around the knee in China. Methods Between March 2000 and June 2014, patients with primary giant cell tumor around the knee were recruited from 6 institutions located in different regions of China, and were reviewed retrospectively the clinical features according to gender and age. Results 334 qualified patients were included in this study. The sex ratio was 1.14:1 (178/156), with mean ages of 36.9 years in men and 33.1 years in women, constituting a significant difference (P=0.007). The prevalence of pathological fracture was 32.9% overall (28.7% in men and 37.8% in women). The prevalence of simple fracture was significantly higher in women (26.3%) than in men (15.2%), P=0.042. Tumor location and staging did not differ significantly according to sex (P>0.05). However, comparing with >40 years old, those patients aged ≤40 were more likely to have a right knee tumor (56.7% vs. 44.7%, P=0.042), less likely to have Enneking stage 3 disease (18.6% vs. 35.0%, P=0.005), and less likely to have both soft-tissue extension and a mass (18.6% vs. 34.0%, P=0.009). Conclusions Giant cell tumor around the knee was more common in men than in women, although female patients were younger on average. Further, cases among patients ≤40 years old were observed to be milder than cases among older patients. The results suggest that efficient treatment and preservation of function should both be valued for young patients with giant cell tumor around the knee. PMID:26998425

  6. An open label, prospective, clinical study on a polyherbal formulation in osteoarthritis of knee

    PubMed Central

    Nipanikar, Sanjay U.; Saluja, Manjit; Kuber, Vinod V.; Kadbhane, Kalyan P.; Chopra, Arvind; Khade, Namdev R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Currently, though pharmacological, mechanical, and surgical interventions are used, there is no known cure for osteoarthritis (OA). Objectives: The main aim of the study was to assess the efficacy and safety of “TLPL/AY/03/2008”, a polyherbal formulation on knee joint pain assessed on visual analogue scale (VAS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Materials and Methods: It was an open label, single center, prospective, clinical study conducted in 36 patients of OA Knee. Two capsules of ‘TLPL/AY/03/2008’ were given to all patients twice daily orally after meals for 180 days. Results: Data describing quantitative measures are expressed as mean ± SD. Comparison of variables representing categorical data was performed using Chi-square test. The mean joint pain (as assessed on VAS) reduced significantly (59.85%; P < 0.05) and the mean WOMAC combined score, WOMAC pain sub-score, WOMAC stiffness sub-score, and WOMAC difficulty sub-score also reduced significantly at the end of the study. The mean time taken by the patients to walk 50 feet too, was reduced significantly (25.26%) at the end of the study. At the end of 4 months of the treatment, no patient needed paracetamol as rescue medicine to control pain. Most of the patients had shown good overall improvement assessed by the physician and by the patients. Majority of the patients showed excellent tolerability to the study drug. No significant change in most of the safety laboratory parameters was observed at the end of the study. Conclusion: The study provides good evidence in support of the efficacy and safety of the ‘TLPL/AY/03/2008’ in OA of knee. PMID:23741160

  7. Quasi-stiffness of the knee joint in flexion and extension during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ahnryul; Sim, Taeyong; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical understanding of the knee joint during a golf swing is essential to improve performance and prevent injury. In this study, we quantified the flexion/extension angle and moment as the primary knee movement, and evaluated quasi-stiffness represented by moment-angle coupling in the knee joint. Eighteen skilled and 23 unskilled golfers participated in this study. Six infrared cameras and two force platforms were used to record a swing motion. The anatomical angle and moment were calculated from kinematic and kinetic models, and quasi-stiffness of the knee joint was determined as an instantaneous slope of moment-angle curves. The lead knee of the skilled group had decreased resistance duration compared with the unskilled group (P < 0.05), and the resistance duration of the lead knee was lower than that of the trail knee in the skilled group (P < 0.01). The lead knee of the skilled golfers had greater flexible excursion duration than the trail knee of the skilled golfers, and of both the lead and trail knees of the unskilled golfers. These results provide critical information for preventing knee injuries during a golf swing and developing rehabilitation strategies following surgery. PMID:25651162

  8. Screening for symptomatic metal sensitivity: a prospective study of 92 patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Niki, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Hideo; Otani, Toshiro; Yatabe, Taku; Kondo, Makoto; Yoshimine, Fumihiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2005-03-01

    Metal sensitivity (MS) reactions to implant metals represent a rare but well-documented complication following total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Although 20-25% of post-TJA patients develop MS, only a few highly susceptible patients (< 1%) exhibit symptoms. Whether surgeons should perform screening for MS is currently a matter of debate. The present study investigated the clinical importance of screening for patients predisposed to symptomatic MS, and the specific metals causing symptomatic MS following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Between 2000 and 2002, a total of 108 primary TKAs were performed on 92 patients. Preoperatively, all patients underwent modified lymphocyte stimulation test (mLST) to Ni, Co, Cr, and Fe. Of the 92 patients, 24 (26%) displayed positive preoperative responses to at least one metal. Five patients displayed implant metal-related eczema and were all mLST-positive preoperatively, suggesting that screening for symptomatic MS is clinically useful. Two of these underwent revision TKA and thereafter, eczema healed and mLST results changed from positive to negative. All mLST-positive patients were divided into three groups: Group I, patients with eczema; Group II, patients with clear history of MS; and Group III, patients neither eczema nor history of MS. When the type of sensitive metals were compared among the three groups, a significant association between presence of Cr-sensitivity and development of eczema (P < 0.05) was identified. No significant association was observed between other metals and development of eczema or history of MS. This indicates that Cr is a potential candidate metal for causing eczema in our TKA series, and Cr-sensitivity may offer a potential predictor for symptomatic MS. The present study indicates that the surgeons should undertake routine preoperative screening for MS, particularly to Cr. PMID:15369690

  9. A randomised controlled trial comparing three analgesia regimens following total knee joint replacement: continuous femoral nerve block, intrathecal morphine or both.

    PubMed

    Olive, D J; Barrington, M J; Simone, S A; Kluger, R

    2015-07-01

    This randomised controlled trial compared three analgesia regimens following primary unilateral total knee joint replacement: continuous femoral nerve block (CFNB), intrathecal morphine (ITM), and both. The primary outcome was pain ratings over the first 24 hours. Secondary outcomes included morphine consumption, nausea, pruritus and sedation ratings, oxygen saturation (SpO2) ratings, and ability to mobilise postoperatively. All patients received a spinal anaesthetic and a postoperative patient-controlled morphine pump. Patients were randomised to receive CFNB, ITM, or both. In patients with no CFNB, the use of ITM was blinded. Eighty-one patients were randomised and there were no withdrawals. At 24 hours, the ITM-only group had higher pain ratings than either of the other groups (P=0.04 versus CFNB, P=0.01 versus combination). In the 18 to 24 hour period, the ITM group used more morphine than either of the other groups. There were no statistically significant differences in pain ratings or morphine consumption at earlier time intervals. The ITM group were less likely to be able to sit out of bed on day one. Patients who received ITM were more likely to have pruritus. There were no statistically significant differences in nausea, SpO₂or sedation ratings. This study showed that a CFNB resulted in reduced pain and was also associated with less morphine consumption and improved mobilisation at 24 hours compared to ITM. This study did not show any statistically significant differences between CFNB alone and CFNB+ITM. PMID:26099756

  10. Stem Cell Therapies for Knee Cartilage Repair: The Current Status of Preclinical and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John A.; Little, Dianne; Toth, Alison P.; Moorman, Claude T.; Tucker, Bradford S.; Ciccotti, Michael G.; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Background Articular cartilage damage of the knee is common, causing significant morbidity worldwide. Many adult tissues contain cells that are able to differentiate into multiple cell types, including chondrocytes. These stem cells have gained significant attention over the past decade and may become frontline management for cartilage defects in the very near future. Purpose The role of stem cells in the treatment of knee osteochondral defects was reviewed. Recent animal and clinical studies were reviewed to determine the benefits and potential outcomes of using stem cells for cartilage defects. Study Design Literature review. Methods A PubMed search was undertaken. The key phrase “stem cells and knee” was used. The search included reviews and original articles over an unlimited time period. From this search, articles outlining animal and clinical trials were selected. A search of current clinical trials in progress was performed on the clinicaltrials.gov website, and “stem cells and knee” was used as the search phrase. Results Stem cells have been used in many recent in vitro and animal studies. A number of cell-based approaches for cartilage repair have progressed from preclinical animal studies into clinical trials. Conclusion The use of stem cells for the treatment of cartilage defects is increasing in animal and clinical studies. Methods of delivery of stem cells to the knee’s cartilage vary from direct injection to implantation with scaffolds. While these approaches are highly promising, there is currently limited evidence of a direct clinical benefit, and further research is required to assess the overall outcome of stem cell therapies for knee cartilage repair. PMID:24220016

  11. Interpolation function for approximating knee joint behavior in human gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth-Taşcǎu, Mirela; Pater, Flavius; Stoia, Dan Ioan

    2013-10-01

    Starting from the importance of analyzing the kinematic data of the lower limb in gait movement, especially the angular variation of the knee joint, the paper propose an approximation function that can be used for processing the correlation among a multitude of knee cycles. The approximation of the raw knee data was done by Lagrange polynomial interpolation on a signal acquired using Zebris Gait Analysis System. The signal used in approximation belongs to a typical subject extracted from a lot of ten investigated subjects, but the function domain of definition belongs to the entire group. The study of the knee joint kinematics plays an important role in understanding the kinematics of the gait, this articulation having the largest range of motion in whole joints, in gait. The study does not propose to find an approximation function for the adduction-abduction movement of the knee, this being considered a residual movement comparing to the flexion-extension.

  12. Cement or cementless fixation in total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Rand, J A

    1991-12-01

    A prospectively studied group of 59 knees with cementless fixation were compared to a retrospectively studied but matched group of 59 knees with cement fixation using a Press Fit Condylar prosthesis. The only significant preoperative difference between the patient groups was mean age; the cemented group was on average nine years older than the cementless group (p less than 0.0001). At an average of 2.8 years after surgery, there were no significant differences in knee scores between the two groups. Radiolucent lines adjacent to the tibial component were similar in both groups. The complication rate of 20% in the cementless knees was higher than the 12% rate in the cemented knees; this was primarily related to polyethylene wear of metal-backed patellar components. Cement or cementless fixation of this prosthesis appears to provide equivalent early results. PMID:1959287

  13. Symptomatic knee osteonecrosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lidan; Wu, Xiuhua; Wu, Honghua; Su, Jinmei; Zhang, Wen; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xuan; Zheng, Wenjie

    2016-08-01

    To explore the associated risk factors of symptomatic knee osteonecrosis (KON) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we conducted a retrospective case-control study to compare the clinical and laboratory features between SLE patients with and without symptomatic KON matched by age and gender. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to evaluate possible associated risk factors. Twenty (one male, nineteen females) out of 3941 lupus patients were identified as symptomatic KON, which was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean age at KON onset was 34.4 (range 12-67) years, and the median course of lupus at KON onset was 72.5 (range 8-123) months. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified that the prevalence of cutaneous vasculitis (OR 5.23; 95 % CI 1.11-24.70), hyperfibrinogenemia (OR 4.75; 95 % CI 1.08-20.85), and elevated IgG levels (OR 6.05; 95 % CI 1.58-23.16) were statistically higher in KON group, and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) usage was statistically lower in KON group (OR 0.27; 95 % CI 0.07-0.97). Glucocorticoid usage, in terms of maximal dose, duration of treatment, and the percentage of receiving methylprednisolone pulse therapy, did not show statistical difference between the two groups (p > 0.05). Symptomatic KON is a relatively rare complication of SLE. Cutaneous vasculitis, hyperfibrinogenemia, and elevated IgG levels are possible risk factors, whereas HCQ may provide a protective effect. Our results suggest that lupus activity as well as hypercoagulation status may play a role in the pathogenesis of KON in lupus. PMID:27230994

  14. Effects of preoperative neuromuscular electrical stimulation on quadriceps strength and functional recovery in total knee arthroplasty. A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Supervised preoperative muscle strengthening programmes (prehabilitation) can improve recovery after total joint arthroplasty but are considered resource intensive. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been shown to improve quadriceps femoris muscle (QFM) strength and clinical function in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) however it has not been previously investigated as a prehabilitation modality. Methods This pilot study assessed the compliance of a home-based, NMES prehabilitation programme in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We evaluated its effect on preoperative and postoperative isometric quadriceps femoris muscle (QFM) strength, QFM cross-sectional area (CSA) and clinical function (subjective and objective). Seventeen subjects were recruited with 14 completing the study (NMES group n = 9; Control group n = 5). Results Overall compliance with the programme was excellent (99%). Preoperative QFM strength increased by 28% (p > 0.05) with associated gains in walk, stair-climb and chair-rise times (p < 0.05). Early postoperative strength loss (approximately 50%) was similar in both groups. Only the NMES group demonstrated significant strength (53.3%, p = 0.011) and functional recovery (p < 0.05) from 6 to 12 weeks post-TKA. QFM CSA decreased by 4% in the NMES group compared to a reduction of 12% in the control group (P > 0.05) at 12 weeks postoperatively compared to baseline. There were only limited associations found between objective and subjective functional outcome instruments. Conclusions This pilot study has shown that preoperative NMES may improve recovery of quadriceps muscle strength and expedite a return to normal activities in patients undergoing TKA for OA. Recommendations for appropriate outcome instruments in future studies of prehabilitation in TKA have been provided. PMID:20540807

  15. Vitamin D a No Go for Arthritic Knees, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... published in the March 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association . The study findings did not come as ... Responsible Nutrition, Washington, D.C.; March 8, 2016, Journal of the American Medical Association HealthDay Copyright (c) 2016 HealthDay . All rights ...

  16. Frontal Plane Knee Moments in Golf: Effect of Target Side Foot Position at Address

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, Scott K.; Noffal, Guillermo J.

    2010-01-01

    Golf has the potential to keep people active well into their later years. Injuries to the target side knee have been reported in golfers, yet no mechanisms for these injuries have been proposed. The loads on the knee during the golf swing may be insufficient to cause acute injury, yet they may be a factor in the progression of overuse/degenerative conditions; therefore, research developing swing modifications that may alter loading of the knee is warranted. It has been suggested that the proper golf set-up position has the target-side foot externally rotated but no reasoning for this modification has been provided. Frontal plane knee moments have been implicated in many knee pathologies. Therefore, this study used a 3-dimensional link segment model to quantify the frontal plane knee moments during the golf swing in a straight (STR) and externally rotated (EXT) target-side foot position. Subjects were 7 collegiate golfers and knee moments were compared between conditions using repeated measures T-tests. The golf swing knee moment magnitudes were also descriptively compared to those reported for two athletic maneuvers (drop jump landing, side-step cutting) and activities of daily living (gait, stair ascent). The EXT condition decreased the peak knee adduction moment as compared to the STR condition; however, foot position had no effect on the peak knee abduction moment. Also, the magnitude of the knee adduction moments during the two activities of daily living were 9-33% smaller than those experienced during the two different golfing conditions. The drop jump landing and golf swing knee moments were of similar magnitude (STR= - 5%, EXT= + 8%); however, the moments associated with side- step cutting were 50-71% larger than those on the target side knee during the golf swing. The loading of the target side knee during the golf swing may be a factor in the development and progression of knee pathologies and further research should examine ways of attenuating these loads

  17. Revision total knee arthroplasty with a cemented posterior-stabilized or constrained condylar prosthesis: a minimum 3-year and average 5-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Peters, C L; Hennessey, R; Barden, R M; Galante, J O; Rosenberg, A G

    1997-12-01

    The results of 57 revision total knee arthroplasties performed for aseptic failure between 1984 and 1992 with a cemented posterior-stabilized or constrained condylar prosthesis were reviewed at follow-up examinations at a minimum of 36 and an average of 62 months (range, 36-120 months). The reason for revision was aseptic loosening of 1 or both components in 32 knees (56%), instability in 16 knees (28%), polyethylene wear and osteolysis in 4 knees (7%), supracondylar femur fracture in 2 knees (4%), and a failed allograft, pain, and arthrofibrosis in 1 knee each (5% total). The average age of the patients at the time of the revision was 74 years (range, 38-90), and the original diagnosis for the majority of patients was osteoarthritis (74%). All of the revision prostheses were cemented posterior stabilized or constrained condylar-type implants. Bone deficiencies were grafted with cancellous allograft in contained defects and cortical allograft in noncontained defects. Five knees were reconstructed with allograft-prosthesis composites. The average modified Hospital for Special Surgery knee score improved from 49 to 82 (100 points possible) at final follow-up evaluation (P < 0.001). Seventy-nine percent of knees were graded as good or excellent. Kaplan-Meier survivorship analysis predicted 94%+/-6.2% survival at 40 months and 75%+/-25% at 99 months. There were 4 clinical failures, 3 of which were related to residual instability in patients with a posterior-stabilized prosthesis. Complications (3 knees) were exclusively related to the extensor mechanism. Radiographically, overall knee alignment improved from 0.3 degrees varus to 3.0 degrees valgus. Fifty-six percent of tibial components were placed in slight varus alignment. Radiolucent lines occurred in 33% of knees, but there were no complete or progressive radiolucencies. Radiolucent lines were more prevalent adjacent to press-fit intramedullary femoral stems compared with cemented stems (P < .02), but the

  18. Efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban thromboprophylaxis after arthroplasty of the hip or knee: retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, L; Hua, A; Patel, S; Gibbons, C; Vizcaychipi, M P

    2016-09-01

    Introduction Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a potentially fatal complication of hip arthroplasty and knee arthroplasty. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommend rivaroxaban for VTE prevention. Amid concerns over bleeding complications, the modified thromboprophylaxis policy of Chelsea and Westminster Hospital (CWH; London, UK) advises enoxaparin given after surgery in the inpatient setting followed by rivaroxaban upon hospital discharge. This retrospective study investigated the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban in this novel, modified venous-prophylaxis regimen in a surgical orthopaedic cohort at CWH. Methods A total of 479 patients who received modified thromboprophylaxis treatment at CWH after hip arthroplasty or knee arthroplasty between April 2013 and October 2014 formed the study cohort. Seven outcomes based on efficacy and safety while undergoing treatment with rivaroxaban were investigated: symptomatic deep-vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), death, stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), major bleeding episodes (MBEs) and non-major bleeding episodes (NMBEs). Median follow-up was 369 days. Fisher's exact and Mann-Whitney U-tests were adopted to identify associations with these outcomes. Results Prevalence of symptomatic PE, DVT, death, stroke and MI during treatment was zero. One (0.2%) MBE and nine (1.9%) NMBEs occurred. The MBE (a wound haematoma) required a return to theatre for aspiration. Off-treatment VTEs occurred in four (0.8%) patients after completion of a course of rivaroxaban, and were associated with known risk factors. Conclusions Rivaroxaban is an effective and safe anticoagulant for thromboprophylaxis after hip arthroplasty or knee arthroplasty if used in a modified regimen involving enoxaparin administered in the inpatient setting followed by rivaroxaban upon hospital discharge. PMID:27580310

  19. Muscle Impairments in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Alnahdi, Ali H.; Zeni, Joseph A.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Context: Muscle impairments associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) are the primary underlying cause of functional limitations. Understanding the extent of muscle impairments, its relationship with physical function and disease progression, and the evidence behind exercise therapy that targets muscle impairments is crucial. Evidence Acquisition: An electronic search for relevant articles using MEDLINE and CINHAL databases up to September 2011 was performed. In addition to the electronic search, retrieved articles were searched manually for relevant studies. Results: Quadriceps, hamstrings, and hip muscles are significantly impaired in subjects with knee OA compared with age-matched controls. Muscle strength, especially quadriceps, is a major determinant of both performance-based and self-reported physical function. Whether stronger quadriceps is protective against knee OA onset and progression is not clear. Exercise therapy, including global and targeted resistance training, is effective in reducing pain and improving function in subjects with knee OA. Conclusions: Subjects with knee OA have significant muscle impairments. These muscle impairments affect physical function and should be targeted in therapy. Further research is needed to explore the relationship between quadriceps strength and knee OA initiation and progression and to determine the optimal exercise prescription that augments outcomes in this patient population. PMID:23016099

  20. Severity of Diabetes Mellitus and Total Hip or Knee Replacement: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Nielen, Johannes T H; Emans, Pieter J; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Boonen, Annelies; Lalmohamed, Arief; de Boer, Anthonius; van den Bemt, Bart J F; de Vries, Frank

    2016-05-01

    It is generally thought that people with diabetes mellitus (DM) are more likely to suffer from osteoarthritis (OA) due to an increased body mass index (BMI), resulting in mechanical destruction of cartilage. However, previous studies have suggested a coexisting metabolic causality.To evaluate the risk of hip or knee replacement, as a proxy for severe OA, in patients with DM. We additionally evaluated the risk of total joint replacement (TJR) with various proxies for increased DM severity.A population-based case-control study was performed, using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). Cases (n = 94,609) were defined as patients >18 years who had undergone TJR between 2000 and 2012. Controls were matched by age, gender, and general practice. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of total knee (TKR) and total hip replacement (THR) surgery associated with use of antidiabetic drugs (ADs). We additionally stratified current AD users by proxies for DM severity.Current AD use was significantly associated with a lower risk of TKR (OR = 0.86 (95% CI = 0.78-0.94)) and THR (OR = 0.90 (95% CI = 0.82-0.99)) compared to patients not using ADs. Moreover, risk of TKR and THR was decreased with increasing HbA1c.This study does not support the theory that DM patients are more likely to suffer from severe OA as compared to patients without diabetes. Moreover, risk of severe OA necessitating TJR decreases with increasing DM severity. This is possibly due to dissimilarities in methodology, a decrease in eligibility for surgery, or variability of OA phenotypes. PMID:27196498

  1. Functional Fitness and Self-Reported Quality of Life of Older Women Diagnosed with Knee Osteoarthrosis: A Cross-Sectional Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcante, Paula Andréa Malveira; Doro, Márcio Roberto; Suzuki, Frank Shiguemitsu; Rica, Roberta Luksevicius; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Pontes Junior, Francisco Luciano; Evangelista, Alexandre Lopes; Figueira Junior, Aylton José; Baker, Julien Steven; Bocalini, Danilo Sales

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Utilizing a cross-sectional case control design, the aim of this study was to evaluate the functional fitness and self-reported quality of life differences in older people diagnosed with knee osteoarthrosis (O) who participated in health promotion groups. Methods. Ninety older women were distributed into two groups: control without O of the knee (C, n = 40) and a group diagnosed with primary and secondary knee O with grade II or higher, with definite osteophytes (OA, n = 50). Functional fitness was evaluated by specific tests, and the time spent in physical activity and quality of life was evaluated by the IPAQ and WHOQOL (distributed in four domains: physical: P, psychological: PS, social: S, and environmental: E) domain questionnaires. Results. No differences were found between ages of groups (C: 66 ± 7; OA: 67 ± 9; years). The values of the chair stand test (rep) in the OA (13 ± 5) group were different when compared to C group (22 ± 5). For the 6-minute walk test (meters), the values obtained for the C (635 ± 142) were higher (P < 0.01) than the OA (297 ± 143) group. The time spent in physical activity (min) was greater (P < 0.001) in the control (220 ± 12) group compared to OA (100 ± 10) group. Higher values (P < 0.001) in all domains were found in the C (P: 69 ± 16, PS: 72 ± 17, S: 67 ± 15, E: 70 ± 15) group compared to OA (P: 48 ± 7, PS: 43 ± 8, S: 53 ± 13, E: 47 ± 14) group. Conclusion. Our data suggests that knee O, in older women, can promote a decline in time spent performing physical activity and functional fitness with decline in quality of life with an increase in sitting time. PMID:26346896

  2. Effect of ACL graft material on anterior knee force during simulated in vivo ovine motion applied to the porcine knee: An in vitro examination of force during 2000 cycles.

    PubMed

    Boguszewski, Daniel V; Wagner, Christopher T; Butler, David L; Shearn, Jason T

    2015-12-01

    This study determined how anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction affected the magnitude and temporal patterns of anterior knee force and internal knee moment during 2000 cycles of simulated gait. Porcine knees were tested using a six degree-of-freedom robot, examining three porcine allograft materials compared with the native ACL. Reconstructions were performed using: (1) bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft (BPTB), (2) reconstructive porcine tissue matrix (RTM), or (3) an RTM-polymer hybrid construct (Hybrid). Forces and moments were measured over the entire gait cycle and contrasted at heel strike, mid stance, toe off, and peak flexion. The Hybrid construct performed the best, as magnitude and temporal changes in both anterior knee force and internal knee moment were not different from the native ACL knee. Conversely, the RTM knees showed greater loss in anterior knee force during 2000 cycles than the native ACL knee at heel strike and toe off, with an average force loss of 46%. BPTB knees performed the least favorably, with significant loss in anterior knee force at all key points and an average force loss of 61%. This is clinically relevant, as increases in post-operative knee laxity are believed to play a role in graft failure and early onset osteoarthritis. PMID:26134453

  3. Knee arthroscopy - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... knee problems such as: a torn knee disc (meniscus) a damaged knee bone (patella) a damaged ligament ... surgeon can see the ligaments, the knee disc (meniscus), the knee bone (patella), the lining of the ...

  4. Radiological study of the knee joint line position measured from the fibular head and proximal tibial landmarks.

    PubMed

    Havet, Eric; Gabrion, Antoine; Leiber-Wackenheim, Frederic; Vernois, Joël; Olory, Bruno; Mertl, Patrice

    2007-06-01

    Restoring the joint line level is one of the surgical challenges during revision of total knee arthroplasty. The position of the tibial surface is commonly estimated by its distance to the apex of fibular head, but no study evaluating this distance accurately has been published yet. The purpose of this work was to study the distance between the knee joint line and the apex of the fibular head and the proximal tibia, particularly the tibial tuberosity. Variability with clinical data and relations with other local measurements have been evaluated on knee radiographs (an antero-posterior view, a medio-lateral view and an anteroposterior full length view) of 100 subjects (125 knees). Results showed no correlation between the joint line-fibular head apex distance and any clinical data of the patients, or any other performed measurements. Relations between tibial measurements and the sexe or the height of the subjects were noted. Besides, the review of the 25 bilateral cases did not show statistically significant side difference but the descriptive analysis showed too large discrepancies for the joint line-fibular head apex distance to be used as a landmark. We conclude that the fibular head apex cannot be used as a morphologic landmark to determine the knee joint line position. Its interest in clinical and surgical practice must be discussed. PMID:17440678

  5. Gait Variability before Surgery and at Discharge in Patients Who Undergo Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hiyama, Yoshinori; Asai, Tsuyoshi; Wada, Osamu; Okada, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine gait ability at hospital discharge in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) as an indicator of the risk of falling. Fifty-seven patients undergoing primary TKA for knee osteoarthritis participated in this study. Gait variability measured with accelerometers and physical function including knee range of motion (ROM), quadriceps strength, walking speed, and the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test were evaluated preoperatively and at discharge from the hospital (1 month before and 5 days after surgery). All patients were discharged directly home at 5 days after surgery. Knee flexion of ROM, quadriceps strength, walking speed, and the TUG test results were significantly worse at hospital discharge than preoperatively (p < 0.001). However, gait variability was not significantly different before and after TKA. This result indicated that patients following TKA surgery could walk at hospital discharge as stably as preoperatively regardless of the decrease in physical function, including knee ROM, quadriceps strength, and gait speed after surgery. PMID:25617842

  6. Arthroscopic verification of objectivity of the orthopaedic examination and magnetic resonance imaging in intra-articular knee injury. Retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Skowronek, Michał; Skowronek, Paweł; Dutka, Łukasz

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Arthroscopy of the knee joint is regarded as the most objective diagnostic method in intra-articular knee joint lesions. Aim The purpose of this study was to assess the objectivity and diagnostic value of orthopaedic examination (OE) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in reference to the arthroscopic result. Material and methods In a group of 113 patients treated by arthroscopic surgery for post-traumatic knee pathology between 2008 and 2010 in our department, accuracy of clinical and MRI findings that preceded surgery were studied retrospectively using a statistical method. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and predictive negative and positive values were the subject of analysis. Results In the presented trial, sensitivity values of the orthopaedic examination for injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), meniscus medialis (MM), meniscus lateralis (ML) and chondral injuries (ChI) were 86%, 65%, 38% and 51%, respectively. Specificity values were 90%, 65%, 100% and 100%, respectively. The MR sensitivity and specificity values were 80%, 88%, 44% and 32%, and 86%, 64%, 93% and 97%, respectively. Conclusions Assessment of intra-articular knee joint lesions is a difficult diagnostic problem. In making a decision about arthroscopy of the knee joint, an appropriate sequence of examinations should be carried out: OE, MRI and arthroscopy. The improvement in the effectiveness of the orthopaedic examination and MRI can limit the too high frequency of diagnostic arthroscopies, which generates the risk of operation treatment and costs. PMID:23255995

  7. Comparative repair capacity of knee osteochondral defects using regenerated silk fiber scaffolds and fibrin glue with/without autologous chondrocytes during 36 weeks in rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Khanmohammadi, Manijeh; Mobini, Sahba; Taghizadeh-Jahed, Masoud; Khanjani, Sayeh; Arasteh, Shaghayegh; Golshahi, Hannaneh; Torkaman, Giti; Ravanbod, Roya; Heidari-Vala, Hamed; Moshiri, Ali; Tahmasebi, Mohammad-Naghi; Akhondi, Mohammad-Mehdi

    2016-06-01

    The reconstruction capability of osteochondral (OCD) defects using silk-based scaffolds has been demonstrated in a few studies. However, improvement in the mechanical properties of natural scaffolds is still challengeable. Here, we investigate the in vivo repair capacity of OCD defects using a novel Bombyx mori silk-based composite scaffold with great mechanical properties and porosity during 36 weeks. After evaluation of the in vivo biocompatibility and degradation rate of these scaffolds, we examined the effectiveness of these fabricated scaffolds accompanied with/without autologous chondrocytes in the repair of OCD lesions of rabbit knees after 12 and 36 weeks. Moreover, the efficiency of these scaffolds was compared with fibrin glue (FG) as a natural carrier of chondrocytes using parallel clinical, histopathological and mechanical examinations. The data on subcutaneous implantation in mice showed that the designed scaffolds have a suitable in vivo degradation rate and regenerative capacity. The repair ability of chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds was typically higher than the scaffolds alone. After 36 weeks of implantation, most parts of the defects reconstructed by chondrocytes-seeded silk scaffolds (SFC) were hyaline-like cartilage. However, spontaneous healing and filling with a scaffold alone did not eventuate in typical repair. We could not find significant differences between quantitative histopathological and mechanical data of SFC and FGC. The fabricated constructs consisting of regenerated silk fiber scaffolds and chondrocytes are safe and suitable for in vivo repair of OCD defects and promising for future clinical trial studies. PMID:26822846

  8. Five-year results of a randomised controlled trial comparing mobile and fixed bearings in total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Breeman, S; Campbell, M K; Dakin, H; Fiddian, N; Fitzpatrick, R; Grant, A; Gray, A; Johnston, L; MacLennan, G S; Morris, R W; Murray, D W

    2013-04-01

    There is conflicting evidence about the merits of mobile bearings in total knee replacement, partly because most randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have not been adequately powered. We report the results of a multicentre RCT of mobile versus fixed bearings. This was part of the knee arthroplasty trial (KAT), where 539 patients were randomly allocated to mobile or fixed bearings and analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. The primary outcome measure was the Oxford Knee Score (OKS) plus secondary measures including Short Form-12, EuroQol EQ-5D, costs, cost-effectiveness and need for further surgery. There was no significant difference between the groups pre-operatively: mean OKS was 17.18 (sd 7.60) in the mobile-bearing group and 16.49 (sd 7.40) in the fixed-bearing group. At five years mean OKS was 33.19 (sd 16.68) and 33.65 (sd 9.68), respectively. There was no significant difference between trial groups in OKS at five years (-1.12 (95% confidence interval -2.77 to 0.52) or any of the other outcome measures. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in the proportion of patients with knee-related re-operations or in total costs. In this appropriately powered RCT, over the first five years after total knee replacement functional outcomes, re-operation rates and healthcare costs appear to be the same irrespective of whether a mobile or fixed bearing is used. PMID:23539700

  9. Evaluation of knee joint proprioception and balance of young female volleyball players: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Şahin, Neşe; Bianco, Antonino; Patti, Antonino; Paoli, Antonio; Palma, Antonio; Ersöz, Gülfem

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The main purpose of our study was the evaluation of the effects of long-term volleyball practice on knee joint proprioception and balance of young female athletes. [Subjects and Methods] An observational case-control study was performed. The study enrolled 19 female volleyball players in the experimental group and 19 sedentary counterparts as controls. A Biodex balance system and dynamometer were used for the evaluations. The paired t-test was used to determine the significance of differences between the performance of athletes and controls. [Results] The knee proprioception analysis showed a significant difference at 60° joint position in active and passive tests. A similar trend, but without significance, was found for the 20° joint position. In the postural stability tests both groups showed similar results with no significant differences between them. [Conclusion] In conclusion, the results indicate a significant influence on joint proprioception is elicited by long-term exposure to a team sport like volleyball. However, the postural stability indexes showed similar trends in both groups, highlighting the analogous ontogenesis of the subjects investigated and the low influence of volleyball practice on postural stability. PMID:25729185

  10. Knee kinetics during walking at different speeds in people who have undergone total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Jodie A; Webster, Kate E; Feller, Julian A; Menz, Hylton B

    2010-06-01

    Previous research suggests that most people who have undergone total knee replacement (TKR) walk with a sagittal knee moment profile and peak knee moments that are different from normal. However, most previous research has consisted of small samples of patients with prostheses that are no longer in use. The aim of this study was to compare the peak knee moments and patterns of the moment waveforms of walking at different speeds between a large cohort of TKR patients with the Genesis-II PS prosthesis (Smith and Nephew, Memphis, USA) and matched control participants. Forty patients 12months following TKR and 40 control participants were assessed during walking at self-selected comfortable and fast speeds using motion analysis. Individual sagittal plane knee moment graphs were assessed for the presence of a biphasic pattern. Peak sagittal and coronal plane knee moments were compared between groups using a univariate ANOVA with walking speed as a covariate. A biphasic moment pattern was present in 87% and 92% of TKR patients when walking at comfortable and fast speeds, respectively. The knee flexor (p<0.001 at both speeds), extensor (p=0.004 at comfortable speed and p<0.001 at fast speed) and adductor (p<0.001 at both speeds) moments were reduced in the TKR patients. The high proportion of TKR patients with biphasic moment patterns was unexpected, but suggests that modern prostheses can result in more normal outcomes. Nonetheless, the peak knee moments of patients were reduced compared to controls. Although these reductions may be beneficial to the survival of the prosthesis, these abnormalities may also indicate suboptimal functional outcome from TKR. PMID:20510613

  11. Morsellized bone grafting compensates for femoral bone loss in revision total knee arthroplasty. An experimental study.

    PubMed

    van Loon, C J; de Waal Malefijt, M C; Verdonschot, N; Buma, P; van der Aa, A J; Huiskes, R

    1999-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the contribution of uncontained morsellized bone graft to the structural properties of a femoral reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty and to serve as a basis for an in vivo animal study. Ten human distal femora with a standard unicondylar uncontained medial bone defect were prepared to fit a femoral component of a cruciate sacrificing TKA. A cyclic axial load of 750 N was applied to the medial part of the femoral component in the presence of impacted morsellized bone graft. After removal of the bone graft, the cyclic loading was repeated for the unsupported situation. None of the grafts collapsed and all cement mantles stayed intact during the experiments. Elastic deformation during cyclic loading was significantly less when graft was added while time-dependent deformation was not affected. We conclude that impacted morsellized bone graft, used for reconstruction of uncontained femoral bone loss in revision knee arthroplasty, may improve the structural resistance against loading. Further animal experimentation for in vivo application is warranted. PMID:9916775

  12. Are periprosthetic tissue reactions observed after revision of total disc replacement comparable to the reactions observed after total hip or knee revision surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Punt, Ilona M.; Austen, Shennah; Cleutjens, Jack P.M.; Kurtz, Steven M.; ten Broeke, René H.M.; van Rhijn, Lodewijk W.; Willems, Paul C.; van Ooij, André

    2011-01-01

    Study design Comparative study. Objective To compare periprosthetic tissue reactions observed after total disc replacement (TDR), total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) revision surgery. Summary of background data Prosthetic wear debris leading to particle disease, followed by osteolysis, is often observed after THA and TKA. Although the presence of polyethylene (PE) particles and periprosthetic inflammation after TDR has been proven recently, osteolysis is rarely observed. The clinical relevance of PE wear debris in the spine remains poorly understood. Methods Number, size and shape of PE particles, as well as quantity and type of inflammatory cells in periprosthetic tissue retrieved during Charité TDR (n=22), THA (n=10) and TKA (n=4) revision surgery were compared. Tissue samples were stained with hematoxylin/eosin and examined by using light microscopy with bright field and polarized light. Results After THA, large numbers of PE particles <6 µm were observed, which were mainly phagocytosed by macrophages. The TKA group had a broad size range with many larger PE particles and more giant cells. In TDR, the size range was similar to that observed in TKA. However, the smallest particles were the most prevalent with 75% of the particles being <6 µm, as seen in revision THA. In TDR, both macrophages and giant cells were present with a higher number of macrophages. Conclusions Both small and large PE particles are present after TDR revision surgery compatible with both THA and TKA wear patterns. The similarities between periprosthetic tissue reactions in the different groups may give more insight in the clinical relevance of PE particles and inflammatory cells in the lumbar spine. The current findings may help to improve TDR design as applied from technologies previously developed in THA and TKA with the goal of a longer survival of TDR. PMID:21336235

  13. An immunohistochemical study of the sciatic nerve in a rat knee immobilization model.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shinya; Matsuzaki, Taro; Hoso, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to immunohistochemically evaluate changes in the periphery of the sciatic nerve in a rat model of knee immobilization, and to assess the effects of range of motion exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one male rats were divided randomly into three groups: control (C), immobilized (I), and exercise (E group). Rats in the I and E groups had the right knee joint immobilized for 2 weeks. In the E group, range of motion exercise was also performed. After the experimental period, the periphery of the sciatic nerve was immunohistochemically observed. [Results] Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the myelin sheath and the perineurium in all groups were laminin positive. In the C and E groups, all rats showed normal staining. In contrast, 4 rats in the I group exhibited weak labeling. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that immobilization alters the perineurium at a molecular level and the range of motion exercise is essential for maintaining the environment of the perineurium. PMID:27190437

  14. An immunohistochemical study of the sciatic nerve in a rat knee immobilization model

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Shinya; Matsuzaki, Taro; Hoso, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to immunohistochemically evaluate changes in the periphery of the sciatic nerve in a rat model of knee immobilization, and to assess the effects of range of motion exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one male rats were divided randomly into three groups: control (C), immobilized (I), and exercise (E group). Rats in the I and E groups had the right knee joint immobilized for 2 weeks. In the E group, range of motion exercise was also performed. After the experimental period, the periphery of the sciatic nerve was immunohistochemically observed. [Results] Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the myelin sheath and the perineurium in all groups were laminin positive. In the C and E groups, all rats showed normal staining. In contrast, 4 rats in the I group exhibited weak labeling. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that immobilization alters the perineurium at a molecular level and the range of motion exercise is essential for maintaining the environment of the perineurium. PMID:27190437

  15. Do ACL-injured copers exhibit differences in knee kinematics?: An MRI study.

    PubMed

    Barrance, Peter J; Williams, Glenn N; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Buchanan, Thomas S

    2007-01-01

    Kinematic changes after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury may play a role in the long-term development of osteoarthritis (OA). Some ACL-injured patients (copers) successfully return to demanding activities without the reconstructive surgery usually recommended for functionally unstable patients (noncopers). We determined whether copers exhibit less disruption to kinematics than noncopers, perhaps because of lower impairment of muscular control as observed in earlier studies. We used dynamic magnetic resonance imaging and model-based tracking to investigate anteroposterior (AP) and internal-external tibial positioning in copers, presurgical noncopers, and uninjured control subjects during dynamic nonloaded knee extension. Copers and control subjects showed similar levels of side-to-side differences in AP tibial positioning (1.1 +/- 4.9 mm and 1.4 +/- 2.7 mm, respectively), whereas noncopers exhibited anterior tibial positioning in their injured knees (2.6 +/- 3 mm) that differed from control subjects. Copers were the most variable of the three groups, and contrary to our hypothesis, tibial positioning in copers was not different from that of noncopers. Differences in tibial positioning did not correlate with side-to-side differences in AP laxity in any of the groups, and we identified no changes to tibial axial rotation patterns associated with ACL deficiency. PMID:17091013

  16. Lower limbs composition and radiographic knee osteoarthritis (RKOA) in Chingford sample--a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, Orit; Williams, Frances M K; Hart, Deborah J; Arden, Nigel K; Spector, Timothy D; Livshits, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Our aim in this longitudinal study was to evaluate to what extent fat and lean tissue mass variations are associated and can predict RKOA in a large sample of British women followed-up over 10 years. Kellgren/Lawrence (K/L), joint space narrowing (JSN) and osteophyte (OSP) grades were scored from radiographs of both knees in 909 middle-aged women from the Chingford registry. Body composition components were assessed using the dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) method. In cross-sectional analysis, combined effect of age, BMI and leg tissue composition was required for best fitting model explaining variations of K/L scoring and osteophytes at lateral compartment. To explain medial osteophytes, age and BMI were sufficient to generate the best fitting model. In prediction analysis, leg lean mass was the more powerful predictor of K/L, medial osteophytes than BMI. In conclusion, BMI appears to influence the development of knee OA through both fat and/or lean mass, depending on RKOA phenotype. PMID:23084478

  17. Military Exercises, Knee and Ankle Joint Position Sense, and Injury in Male Conscripts: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Farshid; Azma, Kamran; Naseh, Iman; Emadifard, Reza; Etemadi, Yasaman

    2013-01-01

    Context: The high incidence of lower limb injuries associated with physical exercises in military conscripts suggests that fatigue may be a risk factor for injuries. Researchers have hypothesized that lower limb injuries may be related to altered ankle and knee joint position sense (JPS) due to fatigue. Objective: To evaluate if military exercises could alter JPS and to examine the possible relation of JPS to future lower extremity injuries in military service. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 50 male conscripts (age = 21.4 ± 2.3 years, height = 174.5 ± 6.4 cm, mass = 73.1 ± 6.3 kg) from a unique military base were recruited randomly. Main Outcome Measure(s): Participants performed 8 weeks of physical activities at the beginning of a military course. In the first part of the study, we instructed participants to recognize predetermined positions before and after military exercises so we could examine the effects of military exercise on JPS. The averages of the absolute error and the variable error of 3 trials were recorded. We collected data on the frequency of lower extremity injuries over 8 weeks. Next, the participants were divided into 2 groups: injured and uninjured. Separate 2 × 2 × 2 (group-by-time-by-joint) mixed-model analyses of variance were used to determine main effects and interactions of these factors for each JPS measure. In the second part of the study, we examined whether the effects of fatigue on JPS were related to the development of injury during an 8-week training program. We calculated Hedges effect sizes for JPS changes postexercise in each group and compared change scores between groups. Results: We found group-by-time interactions for all JPS variables (F range = 2.86–4.05, P < .01). All participants showed increases in JPS errors postexercise (P < .01), but the injured group had greater changes for all the variables (P < .01). Conclusions: Military conscripts who sustained lower

  18. Preliminary study on verifying the detection of gait intention based on knee joint anterior displacement of gait slopes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changho; Kang, Seung Rok; Yang, Giltae; Hong, Chul Un; Lee, Hyung Jong; Oh, Do Young; Kwon, Tae Kyu

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of the Infrared (IR) sensor-based walking aids for detecting the gait intention. To compensate for the defects of Force Sensing Resistors (FSRs) or force sensors, such as the velocity control problem on gait slopes, we used IR sensors to investigate knee joint anterior displacement in order to recognize the gait intention. We also measure leg muscle activities and foot pressure, in order to verify our investigation. We placed two IR sensors on the rollator center to sense left and right leg walking intentions. We took EMG signals of four leg muscles, and analyzed them. Foot pressure analysis parameters were the measured force and mean pressure. We conducted experiments on twenty young healthy adults. The results show that knee joint anterior displacement increases according to gait slope and velocity. We confirm similar results of knee joint anterior displacement through the IR sensors. PMID:26406052

  19. Arthroscopic Synovectomy and Postoperative Assisted Radiotherapy for Treating Diffuse Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis of the Knee: An observational retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Sun, Xiaofei; Lin, Jianning; Ji, Wei; Ruan, Dike

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This retrospective observational study aims to explore the treatment procedure and outcomes of arthroscopically assisted radiotherapy for diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) of the knee joint. Methods: From September 2006 to August 2011, 28 diffuse PVNS patients were diagnosed and treated under arthroscopy. Twenty six underwent post-operative radiotherapy. All patients were followed up, and the average follow-up period was 54 months (range: 24 to 72 months). Results: All 26 patients who received external radiotherapy showed no recurrence at post-operative follow-up; The Lysholm knee joint function score increased from 54.3±9.0 at pre-operation to 71.2±6.7 at post-operation (paired t-test, t = −13.35, P< 0.01). Conclusions: Arthroscopic synovectomy is an ideal treatment for PVNS of the knee. Adjuvant post-operative external radiotherapy prevents the recurrence of diffuse PVNS. PMID:26430437

  20. A new method to measure post-traumatic joint contractures in the rabbit knee.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Kevin A; Holmberg, Michael; Shrive, Nigel

    2003-12-01

    extension (flexion contracture) was demonstrated for the experimental knees using the new methodology where the maximum extension was 35 deg +/- 9 deg, compared to the unoperated knee maximum extension of 11 deg +/- 7 deg, 10 or 12 weeks after the immobilization was discontinued. The custom gripping device coupled to a materials testing machine will serve as a measurement test for future studies characterizing a rabbit knee model of post-traumatic joint contractures. PMID:14986415

  1. Computational knee ligament modeling using experimentally determined zero-load lengths.

    PubMed

    Bloemker, Katherine H; Guess, Trent M; Maletsky, Lorin; Dodd, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This study presents a subject-specific method of determining the zero-load lengths of the cruciate and collateral ligaments in computational knee modeling. Three cadaver knees were tested in a dynamic knee simulator. The cadaver knees also underwent manual envelope of motion testing to find their passive range of motion in order to determine the zero-load lengths for each ligament bundle. Computational multibody knee models were created for each knee and model kinematics were compared to experimental kinematics for a simulated walk cycle. One-dimensional non-linear spring damper elements were used to represent cruciate and collateral ligament bundles in the knee models. This study found that knee kinematics were highly sensitive to altering of the zero-load length. The results also suggest optimal methods for defining each of the ligament bundle zero-load lengths, regardless of the subject. These results verify the importance of the zero-load length when modeling the knee joint and verify that manual envelope of motion measurements can be used to determine the passive range of motion of the knee joint. It is also believed that the method described here for determining zero-load length can be used for in vitro or in vivo subject-specific computational models. PMID:22523522

  2. Computational Knee Ligament Modeling Using Experimentally Determined Zero-Load Lengths

    PubMed Central

    Bloemker, Katherine H; Guess, Trent M; Maletsky, Lorin; Dodd, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This study presents a subject-specific method of determining the zero-load lengths of the cruciate and collateral ligaments in computational knee modeling. Three cadaver knees were tested in a dynamic knee simulator. The cadaver knees also underwent manual envelope of motion testing to find their passive range of motion in order to determine the zero-load lengths for each ligament bundle. Computational multibody knee models were created for each knee and model kinematics were compared to experimental kinematics for a simulated walk cycle. One-dimensional non-linear spring damper elements were used to represent cruciate and collateral ligament bundles in the knee models. This study found that knee kinematics were highly sensitive to altering of the zero-load length. The results also suggest optimal methods for defining each of the ligament bundle zero-load lengths, regardless of the subject. These results verify the importance of the zero-load length when modeling the knee joint and verify that manual envelope of motion measurements can be used to determine the passive range of motion of the knee joint. It is also believed that the method described here for determining zero-load length can be used for in vitro or in vivo subject-specific computational models. PMID:22523522

  3. Guidelines for the Design and Conduct of Clinical Studies in Knee Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mithoefer, Kai; Saris, Daniel B.F.; Farr, Jack; Kon, Elizaveta; Zaslav, Kenneth; Cole, Brian J.; Ranstam, Jonas; Yao, Jian; Shive, Matthew; Levine, David; Dalemans, Wilfried; Brittberg, Mats

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To summarize current clinical research practice and develop methodological standards for objective scientific evaluation of knee cartilage repair procedures and products. Design: A comprehensive literature review was performed of high-level original studies providing information relevant for the design of clinical studies on articular cartilage repair in the knee. Analysis of cartilage repair publications and synopses of ongoing trials were used to identify important criteria for the design, reporting, and interpretation of studies in this field. Results: Current literature reflects the methodological limitations of the scientific evidence available for articular cartilage repair. However, clinical trial databases of ongoing trials document a trend suggesting improved study designs and clinical evaluation methodology. Based on the current scientific information and standards of clinical care, detailed methodological recommendations were developed for the statistical study design, patient recruitment, control group considerations, study endpoint definition, documentation of results, use of validated patient-reported outcome instruments, and inclusion and exclusion criteria for the design and conduct of scientifically sound cartilage repair study protocols. A consensus statement among the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) and contributing authors experienced in clinical trial design and implementation was achieved. Conclusions: High-quality clinical research methodology is critical for the optimal evaluation of current and new cartilage repair technologies. In addition to generally applicable principles for orthopedic study design, specific criteria and considerations apply to cartilage repair studies. Systematic application of these criteria and considerations can facilitate study designs that are scientifically rigorous, ethical, practical, and appropriate for the question(s) being addressed in any given cartilage repair research project

  4. Venous Thromboembolism Following Hip and Knee Replacement Arthroplasty in Korea: A Nationwide Study Based on Claims Registry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sahnghoon; Hwang, Jee-In; Kim, Yunjung; Yoon, Pil Whan; Ahn, Jeonghoon; Yoo, Jeong Joon

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the incidence and trends of clinically relevant venous thromboembolism (VTE) including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) after hip and knee replacement arthroplasty (HKRA) in Korea. Between January 1 and December 31, 2010, 22,127 hip replacement arthroplasty (HRA) patients and 52,882 knee replacement arthroplasty (KRA) patients were enrolled in the analysis using the administrative claims database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA). All available parameters including procedure history and clinically relevant VTE during the 90 days after HKRA were identified based on diagnostic and electronic data interchange (EDI) codes. The overall incidence of VTE, DVT, and PE during the 90 days was 3.9% (n=853), 2.7% (n=597), and 1.5% (n=327) after HRA, while the incidence was 3.8% (n=1,990), 3.2% (n=1,699), and 0.7% (n=355) after KRA. The incidence of VTE after HKRA was significantly higher in patients who had previous VTE history (odds ratio [OR], 10.8 after HRA, OR, 8.5 after KRA), chronic heart failure (2.1, 1.3), arrhythmia (1.8, 1.7), and atrial fibrillation (3.4, 2.1) than in patients who did not. The VTE incidence in patients with chemoprophylaxis was higher than that in patients without chemoprophylaxis. The incidence of VTEs revealed in this retrospective review was not low compared with the results of the studies targeting other Asian or Caucasian populations. It may warrant routine prevention including employment of chemoprophylaxis. However, the limitation of the reviewed data mandates large scale prospective investigation to affirm this observation. PMID:26770042

  5. Venous Thromboembolism Following Hip and Knee Replacement Arthroplasty in Korea: A Nationwide Study Based on Claims Registry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the incidence and trends of clinically relevant venous thromboembolism (VTE) including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) after hip and knee replacement arthroplasty (HKRA) in Korea. Between January 1 and December 31, 2010, 22,127 hip replacement arthroplasty (HRA) patients and 52,882 knee replacement arthroplasty (KRA) patients were enrolled in the analysis using the administrative claims database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA). All available parameters including procedure history and clinically relevant VTE during the 90 days after HKRA were identified based on diagnostic and electronic data interchange (EDI) codes. The overall incidence of VTE, DVT, and PE during the 90 days was 3.9% (n=853), 2.7% (n=597), and 1.5% (n=327) after HRA, while the incidence was 3.8% (n=1,990), 3.2% (n=1,699), and 0.7% (n=355) after KRA. The incidence of VTE after HKRA was significantly higher in patients who had previous VTE history (odds ratio [OR], 10.8 after HRA, OR, 8.5 after KRA), chronic heart failure (2.1, 1.3), arrhythmia (1.8, 1.7), and atrial fibrillation (3.4, 2.1) than in patients who did not. The VTE incidence in patients with chemoprophylaxis was higher than that in patients without chemoprophylaxis. The incidence of VTEs revealed in this retrospective review was not low compared with the results of the studies targeting other Asian or Caucasian populations. It may warrant routine prevention including employment of chemoprophylaxis. However, the limitation of the reviewed data mandates large scale prospective investigation to affirm this observation. PMID:26770042

  6. Genome-wide linkage scan for contraction velocity characteristics of knee musculature in the Leuven Genes for Muscular Strength Study.

    PubMed

    De Mars, Gunther; Windelinckx, An; Huygens, Wim; Peeters, Maarten W; Beunen, Gaston P; Aerssens, Jeroen; Vlietinck, Robert; Thomis, Martine A I

    2008-09-17

    The torque-velocity relationship is known to be affected by ageing, decreasing its protective role in the prevention of falls. Interindividual variability in this torque-velocity relationship is partly determined by genetic factors (h(2): 44-67%). As a first attempt, this genome-wide linkage study aimed to identify chromosomal regions linked to the torque-velocity relationship of the knee flexors and extensors. A selection of 283 informative male siblings (17-36 yr), belonging to 105 families, was used to conduct a genome-wide SNP-based (Illumina Linkage IVb panel) multipoint linkage analysis for the torque-velocity relationship of the knee flexors and extensors. The strongest evidence for linkage was found at 15q23 for the torque-velocity slope of the knee extensors (TVSE). Other interesting linkage regions with LOD scores >2 were found at 7p12.3 [logarithm of the odds ratio (LOD) = 2.03, P = 0.0011] for the torque-velocity ratio of the knee flexors (TVRF), at 2q14.3 (LOD = 2.25, P = 0.0006) for TVSE, and at 4p14 and 18q23 for the torque-velocity ratio of the knee extensors TVRE (LOD = 2.23 and 2.08; P = 0.0007 and 0.001, respectively). We conclude that many small contributing genes are involved in causing variation in the torque-velocity relationship of the knee flexor and extensor muscles. Several earlier reported candidate genes for muscle strength and muscle mass and new candidates are harbored within or in close vicinity of the linkage regions reported in the present study. PMID:18682575

  7. Clinical Outcomes in Men and Women following Total Knee Arthroplasty with a High-Flex Knee: No Clinical Effect of Gender

    PubMed Central

    Nassif, Jeffrey M.; Pietrzak, William S.

    2015-01-01

    While it is generally recognized that anatomical differences exist between the male and female knee, the literature generally refutes the clinical need for gender-specific total knee prostheses. It has been found that standard, unisex knees perform as well, or better, in women than men. Recently, high-flex knees have become available that mechanically accommodate increased flexion yet no studies have directly compared the outcomes of these devices in men and women to see if gender-based differences exist. We retrospectively compared the performance of the high-flex Vanguard knee (Biomet, Warsaw, IN) in 716 male and 1,069 female knees. Kaplan-Meier survivorship was 98.5% at 5.6–5.7 years for both genders. After 2 years, mean improvements in Knee Society Knee and Function scores for men and women (50.9 versus 46.3; 26.5 versus 23.1) and corresponding SF-12 Mental and Physical scores (0.2 versus 2.2; 13.7 versus 12.2) were similar with differences not clinically relevant. Postoperative motion gains as a function of preoperative motion level were virtually identical in men and women. This further confirms the suitability of unisex total knee prostheses for both men and women. PMID:26451389

  8. Factors for Assessing the Effectiveness of Early Rehabilitation after Minimally Invasive Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Tetsuya; Tamari, Kotaro; Tanaka, Shigeharu; Uchida, Shigehiro; Ito, Hideyuki; Morikawa, Shinya; Kawamura, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of current rehabilitation programs is supported by high-level evidence from the results of randomized controlled trials, but an increasing number of patients are not discharged from the hospital because of the schedule of the critical path (CP). The present study aimed to determine which factors can be used to assess the effectiveness of early rehabilitation. We enrolled 123 patients with medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) who had undergone unilateral minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty for the first time. The following factors were assessed preoperatively: the maximum isometric muscle strength of the knee extensors and flexors, maximum knee and hip joint angle, pain, 5-m maximum walking speed, sex, age, body mass index, exercise habits, Kellgren-Lawrence grade, femorotibial angle, failure side (bilateral or unilateral knee OA), and functional independence measure. We re-evaluated physical function (i.e., muscle strength, joint angle, and pain) and motor function (5-m maximum walking speed) 14 days postoperatively. Changes in physical function, motor function (5-m maximum walking speed), and number of days to independent walking were used as explanatory variables. The postoperative duration of hospitalization (in days) was used as the dependent variable in multivariate analyses. These analyses were adjusted for sex, age, body mass index, exercise habits, Kellgren-Lawrence grade, femorotibial angle, failure side, and functional independence measure. The duration of hospitalization was significantly affected by the number of days to independent walking (p < 0.001, β = 0.507) and a change in the 5-m maximum walking speed (p = 0.016, β = -0.262). Multiple regression analysis showed that the radiographic knee grade (p = 0.029, β = 0.239) was a significant confounding factor. Independent walking and walking speed recovery were considered to reduce the duration of hospitalization. Therefore, these indices can be used to assess the effectiveness of

  9. Hand, hip and knee osteoarthritis in a Norwegian population-based study - The MUST protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knowledge about the prevalence and consequences of osteoarthritis (OA) in the Norwegian population is limited. This study has been designed to gain a greater understanding of musculoskeletal pain in the general population with a focus on clinically and radiologically confirmed OA, as well as risk factors, consequences, and management of OA. Methods/Design The Musculoskeletal pain in Ullensaker STudy (MUST) has been designed as an observational study comprising a population-based postal survey and a comprehensive clinical examination of a sub-sample with self-reported OA (MUST OA cohort). All inhabitants in Ullensaker municipality, Norway, aged 40 to 79 years receive the initial population-based postal survey questionnaire with questions about life style, general health, musculoskeletal pain, self-reported OA, comorbidities, health care utilisation, medication use, and functional ability. Participants who self-report OA in their hip, knee and/or hand joints are asked to attend a comprehensive clinical examination at Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, including a comprehensive medical examination, performance-based functional tests, different imaging modalities, cardiovascular assessment, blood and urine samples, and a number of patient-reported questionnaires including five OA disease specific instruments. Data will be merged with six national data registries. A subsample of those who receive the questionnaire has previously participated in postal surveys conducted in 1990, 1994, and 2004 with data on musculoskeletal pain and functional ability in addition to demographic characteristics and a number of health related factors. This subsample constitutes a population based cohort with 20 years follow-up. Discussion This protocol describes the design of an observational population-based study that will involve the collection of data from a postal survey on musculoskeletal pain, and a comprehensive clinical examination on those with self-reported hand, hip and

  10. Cryopreserved Amniotic Suspension for the Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Vines, Jeremy B; Aliprantis, Antonios O; Gomoll, Andreas H; Farr, Jack

    2016-08-01

    There are few treatment options for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). Human amniotic suspension allografts (ASA) have anti-inflammatory and chondroregenerative potential and thus represent a promising treatment strategy. In anticipation of a large, placebo-controlled trial of intra-articular ASA for symptomatic knee OA, an open-label prospective feasibility study was performed. Six patients with Kellgren-Lawrence grades 3 and 4 tibiofemoral knee OA were administered a single intra-articular ASA injection containing cryopreserved particulated human amnion and amniotic fluid cells. Patients were followed for 12 months after treatment. No significant injection reactions were noted. Compared with baseline there were (1) no significant effect of the ASA injection on blood cell counts, lymphocyte subsets, or inflammatory markers and (2) a small, but statistically significant increase in serum IgG and IgE levels. Patient-reported outcomes including International Knee Documentation Committee, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome, and Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation scores were collected throughout the study and evaluated for up to 12 months. Overall, this study demonstrates the feasibility of a single intra-articular injection of ASA for the treatment of knee OA and provides the foundation for a large placebo-controlled trial of intra-articular ASA for symptomatic knee OA. PMID:26683979

  11. Clinical efficacy of certain Unani herbs in knee osteoarthritis: A pretest and post-test evaluation study

    PubMed Central

    Tarannum, Asfia; Sultana, Arshiya; Ur Rahman, Khaleeq

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of preparations of certain Unani herbs on Lequesne Algo-Functional Index of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Materials and Methods: A prospective, pre- and post test evaluation study was conducted on 20 diagnosed patients of OA recruited from the Nizamia General Hospital, Hyderabad. Internally, a combination (formula) of Unani herbs was administered, which was as follows: 3.5 g powder of Asarun (2 g), Tukhme karafs (2 g), and Filfil daraz (3 g) was administered internally twice daily. Externally, the concoction of Gule baboona (20 g) and Gule tesu (40 g) made in 1 l water was poured over the affected knee, daily once for 40 days. The primary outcome was to assess the efficacy of Unani test drugs with the modified Lequesne Algo-Functional Index for knee OA. Results: The mean percentage reduction of Lequesne Algo-Functional Index score was 71.09%. The mean and standard deviation was 10.55 (1.70) and 3.05 (2.30) before treatment and after treatment, respectively. The pre- and post test evaluation showed reduction in Lequesne Algo-Functional Index score (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: In this study, the Unani treatment module was found to be effective in reducing the severity of disease in patients with osteoarthritis of knees. PMID:27621521

  12. Pilot Study of Cartilage Repair in the Knee Joint with Multiply Incised Chondral Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Vancsodi, Jozsef; Farkas, Boglarka; Fazekas, Adam; Nagy, Szilvia Anett; Bogner, Peter; Vermes, Csaba; Than, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Focal cartilage lesions in the knee joint have limited capacity to heal. Current animal experiments show that incisions of the deep zone of a cartilage allograft allow acceptable integration for the graft. Questions/Purposes We performed this clinical study to determine (1) if the multiply incised cartilage graft is surgically applicable for focal cartilage lesions, (2) whether this allograft has a potential to integrate to the repair site, and (3) if patients show clinical improvement. Patients and Methods Seven patients with 8 chondral lesions were enrolled into the study. Symptomatic lesions between 2 and 8 cm2 were accepted. Additional injuries were allowed but were addressed simultaneously. Grafts were tailored to match and the deep zone of the cartilage was multiply incised to augment the basal integration before securing in place. Rigorous postoperative physiotherapy followed. At 12 and 24 months the patients’ satisfaction were measured and serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 6 patients. Results Following the implantations no adverse reaction occurred. MRI evaluation postoperatively showed the graft in place in 5 out of 6 patients. In 1 patient, MRI suggested partial delamination at 1 year and graft degeneration at 2 years. Short Form–36 health survey and the Lysholm knee score demonstrated a significant improvement in the first year; however, by 2 years there was a noticeable drop in the scores. Conclusions. Multiply incised pure chondral allograft used for cartilage repair appears to be a relatively safe method. Further studies are necessary to assess its potential in cartilage repair before its clinical use. PMID:26069710

  13. Relationship Between Force Production During Isometric Squats and Knee Flexion Angles During Landing.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Harry; Stephenson, Mitchell L; Graves, Kyle K; Hinshaw, Taylour J; Smith, Derek T; Zhu, Qin; Wilson, Margaret A; Dai, Boyi

    2016-06-01

    Fisher, H, Stephenson, ML, Graves, KK, Hinshaw, TJ, Smith, DT, Zhu, Q, Wilson, MA, and Dai, B. Relationship between force production during isometric squats and knee flexion angles during landing. J Strength Cond Res 30(6): 1670-1679, 2016-Decreased knee flexion angles during landing are associated with increased anterior cruciate ligament loading. The underlying mechanisms associated with decreased self-selected knee flexion angles during landing are still unclear. The purpose of this study was to establish the relationship between the peak force production at various knee flexion angles (35, 55, 70, and 90°) during isometric squats and the actual knee flexion angles that occur during landing in both men and women. A total of 18 men and 18 women recreational/collegiate athletes performed 4 isometric squats at various knee flexion angles while vertical ground reaction forces were recorded. Participants also performed a jump-landing-jump task while lower extremity kinematics were collected. For women, significant correlations were found between the peak force production at 55 and 70° of knee flexion during isometric squats and the knee flexion angle at initial contact of landing. There were also significant correlations between the peak force production at 55, 70, and 90° of knee flexion during isometric squats and the peak knee flexion angle during landing. These correlations tended to be stronger during isometric squats at greater knee flexion compared with smaller knee flexion. No significant correlations were found for men. Posture-specific strength may play an important role in determining self-selected knee flexion angles during landing for women. PMID:26566166

  14. Treatment of Osteoarthritis of the Knee with a Combination of Autologous Conditioned Serum and Physiotherapy: A Two-Year Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Baselga García-Escudero, Jaime; Miguel Hernández Trillos, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Background Autologous conditioned serum (ACS) is an autologous blood product that has shown efficacy against knee osteoarthritis (OA) in randomized controlled trials. However, there are few reports of its effectiveness in everyday practice. Here, we report clinical efficacy results from a two-year prospective observational study of patients with highly symptomatic knee OA who received ACS in conjunction with physiotherapy. Methods 118 patients with unilateral knee OA (Kellgren-Lawrence grades I–IV), who were candidates for surgery but instead chose conservative treatment, were treated with a combination of four intra-articular injections of ACS (2 mL each) once weekly over four weeks and subsequent physiotherapy applied 4 weeks after ACS injection. Main endpoints of the study were pain (Numeric Rating Scale [NRS]) assessed at 0, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months, and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) global score, assessed at 0 and 24 months. The effect size (Cohen’s d) was calculated for pain and WOMAC outcomes, with effect sizes >0.8 considered large. Results By 3 months, there were significant improvements in pain (NRS) from baseline (-63.0%, p<0.001), which were maintained over 24 months. Mean WOMAC global score was reduced at 24 months compared to baseline (-56.9%, p<0.001), as were WOMAC subscores of pain (-86.0%, p<0.001) and function (-51.3%, p<0.001). Effect sizes for pain (>5) and WOMAC improvement (8.0–13.6) were very large. Only one patient received total knee joint replacement during the study. Clinical improvement did not correlate with gender, age, Kellgren-Lawrence grade, or body mass index. Conclusions Treatment with ACS and physiotherapy produced a rapid decline in pain, which was sustained for the entire two years of the study. This was accompanied by a large improvement in WOMAC scores at two years. These results confirm that ACS combined with physiotherapy is an effective treatment for OA of the knee. PMID

  15. Cooling Does Not Affect Knee Proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Ozmun, John C.; Thieme, Heather A.; Ingersoll, Christopher D.; Knight, Kenneth L.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of cooling on proprioception of the knee has not been studied extensively. In this study, we investigated the movement reproduction (timing and accuracy) aspect of proprioception. Subjects were tested under two conditions: a 20-minute application of ice and control. Proprioceptive accuracy and timing were measured by passively moving the knee, then comparing the subject's active reproduction of the passive movement. Subjects were blindfolded, then tested in three sectors of the knee's range of motion: 90° to 60°, 60° to 30°, and 30° to full extension. Ice application had no apparent effect on the subject's ability to perform accurate movement reproductions in the sectors tested. However, accuracy of the subject's final angle reproduction varied between the sectors as did the total time of the movement. One possible explanation for the difference between sectors is that different receptors are active at different points in the knee's range of motion. We conclude that cooling the knee joint for 20 minutes does not have an adverse effect on proprioception. PMID:16558379

  16. Knee alignment in professional tennis players.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2002-01-01

    This study determined lower-limb alignment and knee geometry in professional tennis players and compared the data with those from nonathletic individuals. Twenty-four radiographs from 12 asymptomatic players (mean age: 23.4+/-3.8 years) were prospectively studied. The three angles most useful for describing limb alignment and knee geometry in the coronal plane were measured: hip-knee-ankle, condylar-hip, and plateau-ankle. The condylar-plateau angle, frontal foot rotation angle, and the relationship between the mechanical axis and tibial plateau also were calculated. Varus limb alignment was predominant and the mechanical axis passed medially through the knee center; there was increased valgus inclination of the distal femur, varus angulation of the tibial plateau, near parallel alignment of the joint, and exaggerated external foot rotation. Hip-knee-ankle, condylar-hip, plateau-ankle, and frontal foot rotation angles were significantly different (P<.05, two-tailed t test) from previously reported angles of nonathletic individuals. Variations, probably due to repetitive dynamic demands imposed on lower limbs from an early age, seem to involve both femoral condyles and proximal tibial metaphyses, maintaining normal parallel joint alignment. PMID:11829331

  17. Ten-Year Comparison of Oxidized Zirconium and Cobalt-Chromium Femoral Components in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Justin; Vioreanu, Mihai; Salmon, Lucy; Waller, Alison; Pinczewski, Leo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine if oxidized zirconium femoral components had better outcomes than cobalt-chromium in vivo at medium and long term and if the use of oxidized zirconium components had clinical adverse effects. Methods: Forty consecutive patients (eighty knees) underwent simultaneous bilateral cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty for primary osteoarthritis from January 2002 to December 2003. For each patient, the knees were randomized to receive the oxidized zirconium femoral component, with the contralateral knee receiving the cobalt-chromium component. Outcome measures included the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Knee Society score, and British Orthopaedic Association patient satisfaction scale. Radiographic outcomes include the Knee Society total knee arthroplasty roentgenographic evaluation and scoring system and measurement of radiographic wear. Patients and assessors were blinded to the treatment groups and results. Results: There were no significant differences in clinical, subjective, and radiographic outcomes between the two implants at ten years postoperatively. Ten years following surgery, 36% of the patients preferred the cobalt-chromium knee compared with 11% who preferred the oxidized zirconium knee (p = 0.02) and 53% had no preference. Conclusions: Ten-year outcomes after total knee arthroplasty with oxidized zirconium and cobalt-chromium femoral components showed no significant differences in clinical, subjective, and radiographic outcomes. Patients had no preference or preferred the cobalt chromium prosthesis to the oxidized zirconium prosthesis. There were no adverse effects associated with the use of oxidized zirconium femoral implants.

  18. Aquaporin 1 (AQP1) expression in experimentally induced osteoarthritic knee menisci: an in vivo and in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, G; Leonardi, R; Carnazza, M L; Cardile, V; Pichler, K; Weinberg, A M; Loreto, C

    2013-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is a major problem in our society. The development of new treatment options for OA is limited, because the pathophysiological mechanisms are not clearly understood, especially on the molecular level. Aquaporin 1 (AQP1) is a specific protein channels for water transport; it is expressed in articular chondrocytes, human synovitis, in chondrocytes of patients with rheumatoid arthritis or OA and in chondrocyte-like cells of human intervertebral disc. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of AQP1, through immunohistochemistry, immunocytochemistry and Western blot, in experimentally induced OA knee menisci. AQP1 was studied in vivo in knee OA menisci from 36 rats that underwent medial or lateral meniscectomy, and in vitro on fibrochondrocytes derived from knee OA menisci rats. OA in rats was experimentally induced and tested by histomorphometric analysis. Histological results demonstrated structural alterations in OA menisci accompanied by a very strong AQP1 immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical staining. The Western blot analysis confirmed a strong expression of AQP1 in OA fibrochondrocytes cells. The results of the present research suggest that an activation of AQP1, induced by the OA process, may represent an endogenous mechanism, which can be used to control the tissue degeneration within OA articular joints. PMID:23164158

  19. Bisphosphonate Use and Risk of Implant Revision after Total Hip/Knee Arthroplasty: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Songsong; Yi, Chengqing; Krettek, Christian; Jagodzinski, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several studies investigated the association between bisphosphonate use and the risk of implant revision after total hip or knee arthroplasty (THA or TKA); However, the findings were inconsistent. We performed this meta-analysis to evaluate the overall relative risk of such an event. Methods We searched the PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane library databases to identify relevant publications on April 22, 2015. To calculate the pooled risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidential intervals (CIs), a fixed- or random-effects model was applied based on the heterogeneity across studies. Results Three cohort studies and one case-control study were included in this meta-analysis. Compared with the bisphosphonate nonusers, the patients who used bisphosphonates for a long period of time had a significantly decreased risk of implant revision after THA/TKA (summary adjusted RR = 0.48, 95% CI: 0.38–0.61), and the summary adjusted RRs for the users who underwent THA and those who underwent TKA were 0.47 (95% CI: 0.36–0.61) and 0.45 (95% CI: 0.21–0.95), respectively. Conclusions Long-term use of bisphosphonates is correlated with a significantly decreased risk of implant revision after THA/TKA. However, due to limited number of the included studies, the findings of the present study should be treated with caution. More well-designed studies are required to further confirm our findings. PMID:26444555

  20. Introduction of total knee arthroplasty in Lithuania

    PubMed Central

    Stucinskas, Justinas; Robertsson, Otto; Wingstrand, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose We have previously reported that the first 10 years of hip arthroplasty in Lithuania resulted in a higher cumulative revision rate than that observed in Sweden. We thus compared the corresponding results after introduaction of total knee replacement in Lithuania. Methods The 10-year revision rate for the first 595 primary ScanKnee arthroplasties inserted in Klaipeda, Lithuania, was compared to that for the first 1,280 ScanKnee primary arthroplasties inserted in Sweden. As in the hip replacement study, only patients with osteoarthritis (OA) were included. Primary knee arthroplasties without patellar resurfacing were included, and the endpoint was revision for any reason other than addition of a patellar component. Results We found that the cumulative revision rate was not statistically significantly different between the groups. The revision pattern was different, however, and we observed 24 isolated patellar component additions in Sweden, but none in Klaipeda. Interpretation Contrary to the results of our previous hip arthroplasty study, the cumulative revision rate after total knee arthroplasty was similar in the two groups. This suggests that compared to hip arthroplasty, the outcome of total knee arthroplasty was less dependent on surgical experience. The large difference regarding isolated patellar component additions may be explained by long-term accumulation of severe OA cases in Lithuania. To patients subject to a newly introduced surgical treatment offering great improvement in quality of life, patellofemoral pain may be a minor problem. Furthermore, patellar problems may not have seemed particularly relevant for the surgeons, considering the disability of other patients waiting to be treated. PMID:19297790

  1. Return to work after knee replacement: a qualitative study of patient experiences

    PubMed Central

    Bardgett, Michelle; Lally, Joanne; Malviya, Ajay; Deehan, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective An increasing number of patients in the working population are undergoing total knee replacement (TKR) for end-stage osteoarthritis. The timing and success of return to work is becoming increasingly important for this group of patients with social and economic implications for patients, employers and society. There is limited understanding of the patient variables that determine the ability to return to work. Our objective was (from the patient's perspective) to gain an insight into the factors influencing return to work following knee replacement. Setting and participants This qualitative study was undertaken in a secondary-care setting in a large teaching hospital in the north of England. Semistructured interviews were carried out with 10 patients regarding their experiences of returning to work following TKR. Outcomes Interviews were transcribed and analysed using a qualitative thematic approach to identify the factors influencing return to work from the patient's perspective. Results Three themes were identified that influenced the process of return to work, from the patient's perspective. These were delays in surgical intervention, limited and often inconsistent advice from healthcare professionals regarding return to work, and finally the absence of rehabilitation to optimise patient's recovery and facilitate return to work. Conclusions There is currently no consistent process to optimise return to work for patients of working age after TKR. The impact of delayed surgical intervention, limited advice regarding return to work, and a lack of work-focused rehabilitation, all contribute to potential delays in successful return to work. There is a need to change the focus of healthcare provision for this cohort of patients, and provide a tailored healthcare intervention to optimise patient outcomes. PMID:26832426

  2. Treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the knee with a biomimetic scaffold. A prospective multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    DELCOGLIANO, MARCO; MENGHI, AMERIGO; PLACELLA, GIACOMO; SPEZIALI, ANDREA; CERULLI, GIULIANO; CARIMATI, GIULIA; PASQUALOTTO, STEFANO; BERRUTO, MASSIMO

    2014-01-01

    Purpose the aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee with a type-I collagen-hydroxyapatite nanostructural biomimetic osteochondral scaffold. Methods twenty-three patients affected by symptomatic knee OCD of the femoral condyles, grade 3 or 4 of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) scale, underwent biomimetic scaffold implantation. The site of the defect was the medial femoral condyle in 14 patients, whereas in 9 patients the lateral femoral condyle was involved. The average size of the defects was 3.5±1.43 cm2. All patients were clinically evaluated using the ICRS subjective score, the IKDC objective score, the EQ-VAS and the Tegner Activity Score. Minimum follow-up was two years. MRI was performed at 12 and 24 months after surgery and then every 12 months thereafter. Results the ICRS subjective score improved from the baseline value of 50.93±20.6 to 76.44±18.03 at the 12 months (p<0.0005) and 82.23± 17.36 at the two-year follow-up (p<0.0005). The IKDC objective score confirmed the results. The EQ-VAS showed a significant improvement from 3.15±1.09 to 8.15±1.04 (p<0.0005) at two years of follow-up. The Tegner Activity Score improvement was statistically significant (p<0.0005). Conclusions biomimetic scaffold implantation was a good procedure for treating grade 3 and 4 OCD, in which other classic techniques are burdened by different limitations. This open one-step surgery gave promising stable results at short-term follow-up. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic case series. PMID:25606552

  3. Correlation study of knee joint proprioception test results using common test methods

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Ji, Zhong-Qiu; Li, Yan-Xia; Liu, Wei-Tong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To study the correlation of the results obtained from different proprioception test methods, namely, the joint angle reset method, the motion minimum threshold measurement method, and the force sense reproduction method, performed on the same subjects’ knees. [Subjects and Methods] Different proprioception test methods, the joint angle reset method, the motion minimum threshold measurement method and the force sense reproduction method were used to test the knees of 30 healthy young men. [Results] Correlations were found in the following descending order from strong to weak: the correlation between the joint angle reset method and the force sense reproduction method (correlation coefficient of 0.41), the correlation between the joint angle reset method and the motion minimum threshold measurement method (correlation coefficient of 0.29), the correlation between the motion minimum threshold measurement method and the force sense reproduce method (correlation coefficient of 0.15). [Conclusion] No correlation was found among the results obtained using the joint angle reset method, the motion minimum threshold measurement method and the force sense reproduction method. Therefore, no correlation was found among the position sense, the motion sense and the force sense represented by these methods. Using the results of only one of the test methods to represent proprioception is one-sided. Force sensation depends more on the sensory input of information from the Golgi tendon organs, motion sense depends more on the input information of the muscle spindles, and position sense relies on the double input information of the muscle spindles and the Golgi tendon organs. PMID:27065533

  4. Evaluation of distance maps from fast GRE MRI as a tool to study the knee joint space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamez-Pena, Jose G.; Lerner, Amy L.; Yao, Jiang; Salo, Arthur D.; Totterman, Saara

    2003-05-01

    A new three-dimensional (3D) method of evaluating the joint space from fast GRE MRI has been developed that allows the reconstruction of the two dimensional (2D) distance map between the femur and the tibia bone plates. This method uses the MRI data, an automated 3D segmentation, and an unsupervised joint space extraction algorithm that identify the medial and lateral compartments of the knee joint. The extracted medial and lateral compartments of the tibia-femur joint space were analyzed by 2D distance maps, where visual as well quantitative information was extracted. This method was applied to study the dynamic behavior of the knee joint space under axial load. Three healthy volunteers' knees were imaged using fast GRE sequences in a clinical scanner under unloaded (normal) conditions and with an axial load that mimics the person's standing load. Furthermore, one volunteer's knee was imaged at four regular time intervals while the load was applied and at four regular intervals without load. The results show that changes of 50 microns in the average distance between bones can be measured and that normal axial loads reduce the joint space width significantly and can be detected by this method.

  5. Will 'Unloading' Shoes Help Your Arthritic Knees?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160406.html Will 'Unloading' Shoes Help Your Arthritic Knees? Study puts specially designed footwear to the test ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For reducing pain from arthritic knees, "unloading" shoes don't offer a leg up ...

  6. Arthrodiatasis for management of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Aly, Tarek A; Hafez, Kamal; Amin, Osama

    2011-08-01

    Osteoarthritic disease is the result of mechanical and biological events that destabilize the normal processes of degradation and synthesis of articular cartilage chondrocytes, extracellular matrix, and subchondral bone. Osteoarthritis of the knee can cause symptoms ranging from mild to disabling. Initial management of most patients should be nonoperative, but because of the progressive nature of the disease, many patients with osteoarthritis of the knee eventually benefit from operative treatment. Various procedures have been described for treatment of the osteoarthritic knee, ranging from arthroscopic lavage and debridement to total knee arthroplasty. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical results of distraction arthroplasty combined with arthroscopic lavage and drilling of cartilage defects for treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee. Nineteen patients (15 women and 4 men; age range, 39-65 years) were operated on. Pre- and postoperative findings were compared. A control group comprising 42 patients treated with only arthroscopic procedures was evaluated for comparison. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 5 years. Results were evaluated both clinically and radiologically postoperatively and throughout the follow-up period. Clinically, pain and walking capacity improved in most patients. Radiologically, joint space widening and improvement of the tibiofemoral angle was noted in nearly all patients. PMID:21815573

  7. Runner's Knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... Over the summer he bought a pair of running shoes and took up jogging. He started with ... bending the knee — when walking, kneeling, squatting, or running, for example. Walking or running downhill or even ...

  8. Knee arthroscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... is cartilage that cushions the space between the bones in the knee. Surgery is done to repair or remove it. Torn or damaged anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) or posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) Torn or damaged collateral ligament Swollen (inflamed) or ...

  9. Knee Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your knee joint is made up of bone, cartilage, ligaments and fluid. Muscles and tendons help the knee joint move. When any of these structures is hurt or diseased, you have knee problems. Knee problems can cause pain and difficulty ...

  10. Glucosamine-containing supplement improves locomotor functions in subjects with knee pain – a pilot study of gait analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kanzaki, Noriyuki; Otsuka, Yuta; Izumo, Takayuki; Shibata, Hiroshi; Nagao, Hideyuki; Ogawara, Keita; Yamada, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Seiji; Nakamura, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Background Previously, we demonstrated that glucosamine-containing supplementation was effective for improving locomotor functions, especially walking speed. However, the biomechanical mechanism of efficacy has not been elucidated. This study aimed to address this challenge in subjects with knee pain, using a motion capture system. Methods An open label study was conducted in 30 Japanese subjects with knee pain. The subjects were administered a daily supplement containing 1,200 mg of glucosamine hydrochloride, 60 mg of chondroitin sulfate, 45 mg of type II collagen peptides, 90 mg of quercetin glycosides, 10 mg of imidazole peptides, 1 mg of proteoglycan, and 5 μg of vitamin D (GCQID). The intervention continued for 16 weeks. Efficacy for locomotor functions involving the knee joint was evaluated mainly using the Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure (JKOM) and the 5-question Geriatric Locomotive Function Scale (GLFS-5). To examine the biomechanical mechanism of efficacy for locomotor functions, motions of subjects in a normal walking state were captured. Gait analysis was conducted and efficacy for gait parameters such as normal walking speed, stride length, cadence, and angle of soles was evaluated. Results GCQID significantly improved total scores on the JKOM and GLFS-5. In gait analysis, normal walking speed, stride length, and angle of soles at the end of the stance phase were all significantly increased, but cadence did not change significantly during the intervention period. There were significant intercorrelations of changes in normal walking speed, stride length, and angle of soles at the end of the stance phase, and between changes in stride length and total JKOM score. Conclusion A GCQID supplement may increase walking speed through increased stride length and angle of kicking from the ground during steps, which might be mainly associated with alleviated knee pain. PMID:27382267

  11. A Systematic Review of Prophylactic Braces in the Prevention of Knee Ligament Injuries in Collegiate Football Players

    PubMed Central

    Pietrosimone, Brian G; Grindstaff, Terry L; Linens, Shelley W; Uczekaj, Elizabeth; Hertel, Jay

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relative risk reduction associated with prophylactic knee braces in the prevention of knee injuries in collegiate football players. Data Sources: An exhaustive search for original research was performed using the PubMed, SportDiscus, and CINAHL databases from 1970 through November 2006, with the search terms knee brace, knee braces, knee bracing and football, prophylactic brace, and prophylactic knee braces. Study Selection: Seven studies comparing knee injuries among braced and nonbraced collegiate football players were included. Study methods were assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. PEDro scores ranged from 2 to 5. Data Extraction: The number of participants and frequency of knee injuries were used to calculate the relative risk reduction or increase. Data Synthesis: We found a relative risk reduction for 3 studies with point estimates of 10% (36% to −26%), 58% (25% to 76%), and 56% (13% to 77%). Four studies demonstrated an increased risk of injury, with point estimates of 17% (19% to −71%), 49% (−31% to −69%), 114% (23% to −492%), and 42% (−18% to −70%). Conclusions: Data from existing research are inconsistent. Based on a Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy level of evidence of 2 with a grade B recommendation, we cannot conclusively advocate or discourage the use of prophylactic knee braces in the prevention of knee injuries in collegiate football players. PMID:18668174

  12. Validation of a novel smartphone accelerometer-based knee goniometer.

    PubMed

    Ockendon, Matthew; Gilbert, Robin E

    2012-09-01

    Loss of full knee extension following anterior cruciate ligament surgery has been shown to impair knee function. However, there can be significant difficulties in accurately and reproducibly measuring a fixed flexion of the knee. We studied the interobserver and the intraobserver reliabilities of a novel, smartphone accelerometer-based, knee goniometer and compared it with a long-armed conventional goniometer for the assessment of fixed flexion knee deformity. Five healthy male volunteers (age range 30 to 40 years) were studied. Measurements of knee flexion angle were made with a telescopic-armed goniometer (Lafayette Instrument, Lafayette, IN) and compared with measurements using the smartphone (iPhone 3GS, Apple Inc., Cupertino, CA) knee goniometer using a novel trigonometric technique based on tibial inclination. Bland-Altman analysis of validity and reliability including statistical analysis of correlation by Pearson's method was undertaken. The iPhone goniometer had an interobserver correlation (r) of 0.994 compared with 0.952 for the Lafayette. The intraobserver correlation was r = 0.982 for the iPhone (compared with 0.927). The datasets from the two instruments correlate closely (r = 0.947) are proportional and have mean difference of only -0.4 degrees (SD 3.86 degrees). The Lafayette goniometer had an intraobserver reliability +/- 9.6 degrees. The interobserver reliability was +/- 8.4 degrees. By comparison the iPhone had an interobserver reliability +/- 2.7 degrees and an intraobserver reliability +/- 4.6 degrees. We found the iPhone goniometer to be a reliable tool for the measurement of subtle knee flexion in the clinic setting. PMID:23150162

  13. Effect of Mulligan's and Kinesio knee taping on adolescent ballet dancers knee and hip biomechanics during landing.

    PubMed

    Hendry, D; Campbell, A; Ng, L; Grisbrook, T L; Hopper, D M

    2015-12-01

    Taping is often used to manage the high rate of knee injuries in ballet dancers; however, little is known about the effect of taping on lower-limb biomechanics during ballet landings in the turnout position. This study investigated the effects of Kinesiotape (KT), Mulligan's tape (MT) and no tape (NT) on knee and hip kinetics during landing in three turnout positions. The effect of taping on the esthetic execution of ballet jumps was also assessed. Eighteen pain-free 12-15-year-old female ballet dancers performed ballet jumps in three turnout positions, under the three knee taping conditions. A Vicon Motion Analysis system (Vicon Oxford, Oxford, UK) and Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc. (Watertown, Massa chusetts, USA) force plate collected lower-limb mechanics. The results demonstrated that MT significantly reduced peak posterior knee shear forces (P = 0.025) and peak posterior (P = 0.005), medial (P = 0.022) and lateral (P = 0.014) hip shear forces compared with NT when landing in first position. KT had no effect on knee or hip forces. No significant differences existed between taping conditions in all landing positions for the esthetic measures. MT was able to reduce knee and the hip forces without affecting the esthetic performance of ballet jumps, which may have implications for preventing and managing knee injuries in ballet dancers. PMID:25091570

  14. Research On The Special Moving Pair. The Moire Contour Fringes On The Femoral Articular Facies Of Knee Of Pongidae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Wenzi; Lan, Zuyun; Zhang, Renxiang

    1987-02-01

    Articulation is the special moving pair in the body of animal. In this article, the different forms and the comparative targets of the moire contour fringes on two condyles of knee of Pongidae, and comparative study of the articulation of knee between the Gorilla, Orangutan and Chimpanzee are given.

  15. Comparison of the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio and pressure pain threshold after overhead assembly work and below knee assembly work

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio following overhead work and below-knee work. [Subjects and Methods] Ten men (20–30 years) were recruited to this study. The thoracic flexion relaxation ratio and pressure pain threshold was measured after both overhead work and below-knee work. [Results] The pressure-pain thresholds of the thoracic erector spinae muscle decreased significantly from initial, to overhead, to below-knee work. Similarly, the thoracic flexion relaxation ratio decreased significantly from initial, to overhead, to below-knee work. [Conclusion] Below-knee work results in greater thoracic pain than overhead work. Future studies should investigate below-knee work in detail. This study confirmed the thoracic relaxation phenomenon in the mid-position of the thoracic erector spinae. PMID:26957744

  16. Knee joint forces: prediction, measurement, and significance

    PubMed Central

    D’Lima, Darryl D.; Fregly, Benjamin J.; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Colwell, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    Knee forces are highly significant in osteoarthritis and in the survival and function of knee arthroplasty. A large number of studies have attempted to estimate forces around the knee during various activities. Several approaches have been used to relate knee kinematics and external forces to internal joint contact forces, the most popular being inverse dynamics, forward dynamics, and static body analyses. Knee forces have also been measured in vivo after knee arthroplasty, which serves as valuable validation of computational predictions. This review summarizes the results of published studies that measured knee forces for various activities. The efficacy of various methods to alter knee force distribution, such as gait modification, orthotics, walking aids, and custom treadmills are analyzed. Current gaps in our knowledge are identified and directions for future research in this area are outlined. PMID:22468461

  17. Knee joint forces: prediction, measurement, and significance.

    PubMed

    D'Lima, Darryl D; Fregly, Benjamin J; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Colwell, Clifford W

    2012-02-01

    Knee forces are highly significant in osteoarthritis and in the survival and function of knee arthroplasty. A large number of studies have attempted to estimate forces around the knee during various activities. Several approaches have been used to relate knee kinematics and external forces to internal joint contact forces, the most popular being inverse dynamics, forward dynamics, and static body analyses. Knee forces have also been measured in vivo after knee arthroplasty, which serves as valuable validation of computational predictions. This review summarizes the results of published studies that measured knee forces for various activities. The efficacy of various methods to alter knee force distribution, such as gait modification, orthotics, walking aids, and custom treadmills are analyzed. Current gaps in our knowledge are identified and directions for future research in this area are outlined. PMID:22468461

  18. The Effects of Common Footwear on Joint Loading in Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Shakoor, Najia; Sengupta, Mondira; Foucher, Kharma C.; Wimmer, Markus A.; Fogg, Louis F.; Block, Joel A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Elevated joint loads during walking have been associated with the severity and progression of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Footwear may have the potential to alter these loads. This study compared the effects of several common shoe types on knee loading in subjects with OA of the knee. Methods 31 subjects (10 men, 21 women) with radiographic and symptomatic knee OA underwent gait analyses using an optoelectronic camera system and multi-component force plate. In each case, gait was evaluated barefoot and while wearing 4 different shoes: 1) clogs (Dansko®), 2) stability shoes (Brooks Addiction®), 3) flat walking shoes (Puma H Street®), and 4) flip-flops. Peak knee loads were compared between the different footwear conditions. Results Overall, the clogs and stability shoes, resulted in a significantly higher peak knee adduction moment (3.1±0.7 and 3.0±0.7 %BW*ht, respectively, ~15% higher, p<0.05)) compared with that of flat walking shoes (2.8±0.7%BW*ht), flip-flops (2.7±0.8%BW*ht) and barefoot walking (2.7±0.7%BW*ht). There were no statistically significant differences in knee loads with the flat walking shoes and flip-flops compared to barefoot walking. Conclusions These data confirm that footwear may have significant effects on knee loads during walking in subjects with OA of the knee. Flexibility and heel height may be important differentiating characteristics of shoes which affect knee loads. In light of the strong relationship between knee loading and OA, the design and biomechanical effects of modern footwear should be more closely evaluated in terms of their effects on the disease. PMID:20191571

  19. Nonsurgical or Surgical Treatment of ACL Injuries: Knee Function, Sports Participation, and Knee Reinjury

    PubMed Central

    Grindem, Hege; Eitzen, Ingrid; Engebretsen, Lars; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Risberg, May Arna

    2014-01-01

    Background: While there are many opinions about the expected knee function, sports participation, and risk of knee reinjury following nonsurgical treatment of injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), there is a lack of knowledge about the clinical course following nonsurgical treatment compared with that after surgical treatment. Methods: This prospective cohort study included 143 patients with an ACL injury. Isokinetic knee extension and flexion strength and patient-reported knee function as recorded on the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) 2000 form were collected at baseline, six weeks, and two years. Sports participation was reported monthly for two years with use of an online activity survey. Knee reinjuries were reported at the follow-up evaluations and in a monthly online survey. Repeated analysis of variance (ANOVA), generalized estimating equation (GEE) models, and Cox regression analysis were used to analyze group differences in functional outcomes, sports participation, and knee reinjuries, respectively. Results: The surgically treated patients (n = 100) were significantly younger, more likely to participate in level-I sports, and less likely to participate in level-II sports prior to injury than the nonsurgically treated patients (n = 43). There were no significant group-by-time effects on functional outcome. The crude analysis showed that surgically treated patients were more likely to sustain a knee reinjury and to participate in level-I sports in the second year of the follow-up period. After propensity score adjustment, these differences were nonsignificant; however, the nonsurgically treated patients were significantly more likely to participate in level-II sports during the first year of the follow-up period and in level-III sports over the two years. After two years, 30% of all patients had an extensor strength deficit, 31% had a flexor strength deficit, 20% had patient-reported knee function below the normal range, and

  20. Knee stabilization in patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lewek, Michael D.; Ramsey, Dan K.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Rudolph, Katherine S.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis (MKOA) experience knee laxity and instability. Muscle stabilization strategies may influence the long term integrity of the joint. In this study we determined how individuals with medial knee OA respond to a rapid valgus knee movement to investigate the relationship between muscle stabilization strategies and knee instability. METHODS Twenty one subjects with MKOA and genu varum, and 19 control subjects were tested. Subjects stood with the test limb on a moveable platform that translated laterally to rapidly stress the knee’s medial periarticular structures and create a potentially destabilizing feeling at the knee joint. Knee motion and muscle responses were recorded. Subjects rated their knee instability with a self-report questionnaire about knee instability during daily activities. RESULTS Prior to plate movement the OA subjects demonstrated more medial muscle co-contraction (p=0.014). Following plate movement the OA subjects shifted less weight off the test limb (p = 0.013) and had more medial co-contraction (p=0.037). Those without instability had higher VMMH co-contraction than those who reported more instability (p=0.038). Knee stability correlated positively with VMMH co-contraction prior to plate movement (r = 0.459; p = 0.042). CONCLUSION This study demonstrates that individuals with MKOA attempt to stabilize the knee with greater medial muscle co-contraction in response to laxity that appears on only the medial side of the joint. This strategy presumably contributes to higher joint compression and could exacerbate joint destruction and needs to be altered to slow or stop the progression of the OA disease process. PMID:16142714

  1. A three-dimensional anatomy of the posterolateral compartment of the knee: the use of a new technology in the study of musculoskeletal anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Astur, Diego Costa; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Jalikjian, Wahy; Golano, Pau; Cohen, Moises

    2012-01-01

    Background Recently, an interest has developed in understanding the anatomy of the posterior and posterolateral knee. The posterolateral compartment of the knee corresponds to a complex arrangement of ligaments and myotendinous structures. Undiagnosed lesions in this compartment are the main reason for failure of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. Understanding the anatomy of these structures is essential to assist in the diagnosis and treatment of these lesions. The aim of this study was to better understand the relationship between these structures of the knee using three-dimensional technology. Methods Ten knees were included from cadaver lower limbs of adult patients. The skin and subcutaneous tissue were removed leaving only the muscle groups and ligaments. The neurovascular bundles and their ramifications were preserved. Images were acquired from the dissections using a Nikon D40 camera with AF-S Nikkor 18–55 mm (1:3.5 5.6 GII ED) and Micro Nikkor 105 mm (1:2.8) lenses. The pair of images were processed using Callipyan 3D and AnaBuilder software, which transforms the two images into one anaglyphic image. Results During the dissection of the knees, twelve pictures were acquired and transformed into anaglyphic images. Conclusion The use of three-dimensional images in this study demonstrates that this technique is useful to improve the knowledge in anatomy of the knee as well as for knee reconstruction surgery. PMID:24198580

  2. Is Electrocautery of Patella Useful in Patella Non-Resurfacing Total Knee Arthroplasty?: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sae Kwang; Nguku, Levis; Han, Chang Dong; Koh, Yong-Gon; Kim, Dong-Wook; Park, Kwan Kyu

    2015-12-01

    There is controversy over the need for electrocauterization of the patella in non-resurfacing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We investigated whether this procedure is beneficial through a prospective randomized controlled trial. Fifty patients who underwent electrocautery were compared with 50 patients who did not undergo this procedure. We determined cartilage status, preoperative and postoperative American Knee Society (AKS) score, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities score (WOMAC) and the Patellofemoral (PF) scores for a minimum of 5 years. The two groups did not differ significantly in demographics, intraoperative cartilage status, or preoperative or postoperative outcomes. No complications were detected in either group. We found no benefits of electrocautery of the patella in patellar non-resurfacing TKA up to 5 years. PMID:26100474

  3. Ponseti casting for club foot - above- or below-knee?: A prospective randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Maripuri, S N; Gallacher, P D; Bridgens, J; Kuiper, J H; Kiely, N T

    2013-11-01

    We undertook a randomised clinical trial to compare treatment times and failure rates between above- and below-knee Ponseti casting groups. Eligible children with idiopathic clubfoot, treated using the Ponseti method, were randomised to either below- or above-knee plaster of Paris casting. Outcome measures were total treatment time and the occurrence of failure, defined as two slippages or a treatment time above eight weeks. A total of 26 children (33 feet) were entered into the trial. The above-knee group comprised 17 feet in 13 children (ten boys and three girls, median age 13 days (1 to 40)) and the below-knee group comprised 16 feet in 13 children (ten boys and three girls, median age 13 days (5 to 20)). Because of six failures (37.5%) in the below-knee group, the trial was stopped early for ethical reasons. The rate of failure was significantly higher in the below-knee group (p = 0.039). The median treatment times of six weeks in the below-knee and four weeks in the above-knee group differed significantly (p = 0.01). This study demonstrates that the use of a below-knee plaster of Paris cast in conjunction with the Ponseti technique leads to unacceptably high failure rates and significantly longer treatment times. Therefore, this technique is not recommended. PMID:24151281

  4. Cementless total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Salvatore; Sabatini, Luigi; Giachino, Matteo; Agati, Gabriele; Massè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Interest for uncemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has greatly increased in recent years. This technique, less used than cemented knee replacement in the last decades, sees a revival thanks an advance in prosthetic design, instrumentation and operative technique. The related literature in some cases shows conflicting data on survival and on the revision’s rate, but in most cases a success rate comparable to cemented TKA is reported. The optimal fixation in TKA is a subject of debate with the majority of surgeons favouring cemented fixation. PMID:27162779

  5. Anabolic steroids after total knee arthroplasty. A double blinded prospective pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Total knee arthroplasty is reported to improve the patient's quality of life and mobility. However loss of mobility and pain prior to surgery often results in disuse atrophy of muscle. As a consequence the baseline functional state prior to surgery may result in poorer outcome "post surgery" and extended rehabilitation may be required. The use of anabolic steroids for performance enhancement and to influence muscle mass is well established. The positive effects of such treatment on bone and muscle could therefore be beneficial in the rehabilitation of elderly patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of small doses of Nandrolone decanoate on recovery and muscle strength after total knee replacement and to establish the safety of this drug in multimorbid patients. Methods This study was designed as a prospective double blind randomized investigation. Five patients (treatment group) with a mean age of 66.2 (58-72), average BMI of 30.76 (24.3-35.3) received 50 mg nandrolone decanoate intramuscular bi-weekly for 6 months. The control group (five patients; mean age 65.2, range 59-72; average BMI 31.7, range 21.2-35.2) was injected with saline solution. "Pre-operatively" and "post-operatively" (6 weeks, 3,6,9 and 12 months) all patients were assessed using the knee society score (KSS), isokinetic strength testing and functional tests (a sit-to-stand and timed walking tests). In addition, a bone density scan was used preoperatively and 6 month postoperatively to assess bone mineral density. Results Whilst the steroid group generally performed better than the placebo group for all of the functional tests, ANOVA failed to reveal any significant differences. The steroid group demonstrated higher levels of quadriceps muscle strength across the postoperative period which reached significance at 3 (p = 0.02), 6 (p = 0.01), and 12 months (p = 0.02). There was a significant difference for the KSS at 6 weeks (p = 0.02), 6 (p = 0.02) and 12 month

  6. A 10-day course of SPA therapy is beneficial for people with severe knee osteoarthritis. A 24-week randomised, controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Karagülle, Mine; Karagülle, Müfit Zeki; Karagülle, Oğuz; Dönmez, Arif; Turan, Mustafa

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to test if spa therapy can play a role in the management of severe knee osteoarthritis (OA). Twenty patients with radiologically and clinically severe knee OA were randomly assigned into spa and drug therapy groups. Spa group (n = 10) traveled to a spa town and stayed at a hotel for a 10-day spa therapy course. They followed a balneotherapy regimen including thermal pool baths at 37 degrees C for 20 min two times daily. Drug therapy group (n = 10) stayed at home and followed their individually prescribed drug therapy (NSAIDs and paracetamol). Patients were assessed at baseline (week 0), after spa therapy at 2 weeks (week 2) and during follow-up period at 12 (week 12) and 24 (week 24) weeks by a blinded investigator. Patients assessed with Lequesne algofunctional index (LAFI), pain (visual analogue scale, VAS), patient's and investigator's global evaluation (VAS), ten-stairs stepping up and down time, 15 m walking time and three times squatting up and down time. Significant improvement in pain and LAFI scores were found at week 2, week 12 and week 24 in the spa therapy group compared to baseline. Comparing the two group differences, spa therapy was superior to drug therapy in pain reduction and in physician's global assessment at all time points. This superiority was also found in LAFI scores and patients' global assessments at week 12 and week 24. A 10-day course of spa therapy may be beneficial in short- and medium-term up to 24 weeks by reducing pain and improving functional status and overall well-being in patients with severe knee OA and may be considered as an effective therapeutic tool for such patients in countries like Turkey where it is widely available and (at least partly) reimbursed. PMID:17431728

  7. Joint unloading implant modifies subchondral bone trabecular structure in medial knee osteoarthritis: 2-year outcomes of a pilot study using fractal signature analysis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Larry E; Sode, Miki; Fuerst, Thomas; Block, Jon E

    2015-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is largely attributable to chronic excessive and aberrant joint loading. The purpose of this pilot study was to quantify radiographic changes in subchondral bone after treatment with a minimally invasive joint unloading implant (KineSpring® Knee Implant System). Methods Nine patients with unilateral medial knee OA resistant to nonsurgical therapy were treated with the KineSpring System and followed for 2 years. Main outcomes included Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain, function, and stiffness subscores and independent core laboratory determinations of joint space width and fractal signature of the tibial cortex. Results WOMAC scores, on average, improved by 92% for pain, 91% for function, and 79% for stiffness over the 2-year follow-up period. Joint space width in the medial compartment of the treated knee significantly increased from 0.9 mm at baseline to 3.1 mm at 2 years; joint space width in the medial compartment of the untreated knee was unchanged. Fractal signatures of the vertically oriented trabeculae in the medial compartment decreased by 2.8% in the treated knee and increased by 2.1% in the untreated knee over 2 years. No statistically significant fractal signature changes were observed in the horizontally oriented trabeculae in the medial compartment or in the horizontal or vertical trabeculae of the lateral compartment in the treated knee. Conclusion Preliminary evidence suggests that the KineSpring System may modify knee OA disease progression by increasing joint space width and improving subchondral bone trabecular integrity, thereby reducing pain and improving joint function. PMID:25670891

  8. The Patella Pro study — effect of a knee brace on patellofemoral pain syndrome: design of a randomized clinical trial (DRKS-ID:DRKS00003291)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is a frequent cause of anterior knee pain predominantly affecting young female patients who do not have significant chondral damage. Development of PFPS is probably multifactorial, involving various knee, hip, and foot kinematic factors. Biomechanical studies have described patellar maltracking and dynamic valgus (functional malalignment) in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. The literature provides evidence for short-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; short-term medially directed taping; and exercise programs focusing on the lower extremity, hip, and trunk muscles. Evidence supporting the use of patellar braces is limited because previous studies have been low quality. The aim of this article is to publish the design of a prospective randomized trial that examines the outcomes of patients with PFPS after treatment with a new patellar brace (Patella Pro) that applies medially directed force on the patella. Methods/Design For this multicenter trial, 156 patients (adolescents and young adults) with PFPS were recruited from orthopedic practices and orthopedic hospitals and randomly allocated to 3 months of supervised physiotherapy in combination with the Patella Pro brace or supervised physiotherapy alone. The primary outcome measures are pain (numerical analog scale); knee function (Kujala score and Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score); and self-reported perception of recovery at baseline, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 1 year. Discussion Only limited evidence for the use of a patellar brace for the treatment of PFPS exists in the literature. Disputable evidence for the use of orthoses for PFPS patients has been presented in one meta-analysis, in which only one of three studies found the effect of a medially directed patellar brace to be significant. Because of these low-quality studies, the authors concluded that this evidence should be regarded as limited, and we feel there is a need for

  9. The comparison of anterior knee pain in severe and non severe arthritis of the lateral facet of the patella following a mobile bearing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pongcharoen, Boonchana; Reutiwarangkoon, Chaivet

    2016-01-01

    In the past, medial osteoarthritis (OA) knee with symptomatic patellofemoral (PF) arthritis has not been recommended for a unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). However, recent studies have reported that UKA has shown good results in patients with medial OA of the knee, including those with PF arthritis. The purpose of this study is to compare the results between patients with medial OA knees; those with severe arthritis of the lateral facet of the patella and patients without severe arthritis of the lateral facet of the patella following mobile bearing UKA. We have prospectively evaluated 104 patients (114 knees) who had undergone an Oxford mobile bearing UKA. The mean follow-up was 19.05 months (range 12.30-29.70 months). The patients were divided into two groups: group I consisted of eighty patients (88 knees) who did not have severe arthritis of the lateral facet (Outerbridge grade 0-2) and group II had twenty-four patients (26 knees) who had severe arthritis of the lateral facet (Outerbridge grade 3, 4). We recorded the incidence of anterior knee pain, knee scores, pain scores, and functional scores in comparison of the two groups. The visual analog scale (VAS) and incidence of post-operative anterior knee pain had not shown any significant differences. The VAS for post-operative anterior knee pain was 0.11 (SD 0.56, range 0-3 point) versus 0.12 (SD 0.59, range 0-3 point) for group I and group II patients, respectively (P = 0.98). The incidence of post-operative anterior knee pain was 4.5 versus 3.8 % for group I and group II patients, respectively (P = 0.88). The pain scores and functional scores had not exhibited any differences. However, the knee scores of patients with severe arthritis of the lateral facet of the patella was worse than those seen in patients without severe arthritis of the lateral facet of the patella with a statistical significance. It was scored as 96.78 (SD 4.56, range 85-100) versus 94.43 (SD 4.50, range 81-100) for group I

  10. The influence of simulator input conditions on the wear of total knee replacements: An experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Brockett, Claire L; Abdelgaied, Abdellatif; Haythornthwaite, Tony; Hardaker, Catherine; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-05-01

    Advancements in knee replacement design, material and sterilisation processes have provided improved clinical results. However, surface wear of the polyethylene leading to osteolysis is still considered the longer-term risk factor. Experimental wear simulation is an established method for evaluating the wear performance of total joint replacements. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of simulation input conditions, specifically input kinematic magnitudes, waveforms and directions of motion and position of the femoral centre of rotation, on the wear performance of a fixed-bearing total knee replacement through a combined experimental and computational approach. Studies were completed using conventional and moderately cross-linked polyethylene to determine whether the influence of these simulation input conditions varied with material. The position of the femoral centre of rotation and the input kinematics were shown to have a significant influence on the wear rates. Similar trends were shown for both the conventional and moderately cross-linked polyethylene materials, although lower wear rates were found for the moderately cross-linked polyethylene due to the higher level of cross-linking. The most important factor influencing the wear was the position of the relative contact point at the femoral component and tibial insert interface. This was dependent on the combination of input displacement magnitudes, waveforms, direction of motion and femoral centre of rotation. This study provides further evidence that in order to study variables such as design and material in total knee replacement, it is important to carefully control knee simulation conditions. This can be more effectively achieved through the use of displacement control simulation. PMID:27160561

  11. The influence of simulator input conditions on the wear of total knee replacements: An experimental and computational study

    PubMed Central

    Brockett, Claire L; Abdelgaied, Abdellatif; Haythornthwaite, Tony; Hardaker, Catherine; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-01-01

    Advancements in knee replacement design, material and sterilisation processes have provided improved clinical results. However, surface wear of the polyethylene leading to osteolysis is still considered the longer-term risk factor. Experimental wear simulation is an established method for evaluating the wear performance of total joint replacements. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of simulation input conditions, specifically input kinematic magnitudes, waveforms and directions of motion and position of the femoral centre of rotation, on the wear performance of a fixed-bearing total knee replacement through a combined experimental and computational approach. Studies were completed using conventional and moderately cross-linked polyethylene to determine whether the influence of these simulation input conditions varied with material. The position of the femoral centre of rotation and the input kinematics were shown to have a significant influence on the wear rates. Similar trends were shown for both the conventional and moderately cross-linked polyethylene materials, although lower wear rates were found for the moderately cross-linked polyethylene due to the higher level of cross-linking. The most important factor influencing the wear was the position of the relative contact point at the femoral component and tibial insert interface. This was dependent on the combination of input displacement magnitudes, waveforms, direction of motion and femoral centre of rotation. This study provides further evidence that in order to study variables such as design and material in total knee replacement, it is important to carefully control knee simulation conditions. This can be more effectively achieved through the use of displacement control simulation. PMID:27160561

  12. Intra-articular sodium hyaluronate in osteoarthritis of the knee: a multicenter, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Puhl, W; Bernau, A; Greiling, H; Köpcke, W; Pförringer, W; Steck, K J; Zacher, J; Scharf, H P

    1993-10-01

    The efficacy and the safety of intra-articular injections of sodium hyaluronate were studied in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee in a randomized multicenter double-blind study. Two hundred and nine patients received five injections of either 25 mg hyaluronate/2.5 ml (verum, N = 102) or 0.25 mg hyaluronate/2.5 ml (control, N = 107) at weekly intervals. Seven patients in each group were excluded from the protocol-correct efficacy analysis. The Lequesne Index, the first main criterion, showed a significant superiority of the verum-treated patients after the third injection up to the final follow-up examination 9 weeks after the last injection (MANOVA, P < 0.025). The consumption of paracetamol was defined as a complementary main criterion that did not reveal significant differences between the treatment groups. Most of the individual secondary endpoints demonstrated a much better response to the active treatment without reaching the significance level in the intergroup comparisons for the single time-points. Side-effects were confined to local reactions of minor severity and short duration in four patients (six events) of the verum group and in five patients of the control group. Clinical chemistry and hematology remained essentially unchanged. PMID:15449510

  13. Associations of cigarette smoking, betel quid chewing and alcohol consumption with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in early radiographic knee osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zeng, Chao; Wei, Jie; Li, Hui; Yang, Tuo; Yang, Ye; Deng, Zhen-han; Ding, Xiang; Lei, Guanghua

    2016-01-01

    Objectives High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is possibly related to osteoarthritis (OA) progression and a variety of OA-related symptoms. This study aimed to examine associations between cigarette smoking, betel quid chewing and alcohol consumption and hsCRP in early radiographic knee OA. Design Cross-sectional health examination survey. Setting This primary study was conducted in a health examination centre in China. Participants 936 (656 men and 280 women) patients with early radiographic knee OA were included in this cross-sectional study. Primary and secondary outcome measures Smoking status was classified into four levels based on daily smoking habit: 0/day, 1–10/day, 11–20/day and >20/day. Betel quid chewing and alcohol consumption status was divided into ‘Yes’ or ‘No’. Early radiographic knee OA was defined as Kellgren Lawrence (K-L) grade 1 or 2 in at least one leg, and elevated hsCRP was assessed as ≥3.0 mg/L. Results After adjustment for a number of potential confounding factors, a significant positive association between cigarette smoking and hsCRP was observed in the multivariable model. The multivariable-adjusted ORs (95% CI) of elevated hsCRP (≥3.0 mg/L) in the second (1–10/day, n=133), third (11–20/day, n=59) and highest (>20/day, n=104) cigarette smoking categories were 1.54 (95% CI 0.91 to 2.61), 1.27 (95% CI 0.57 to 2.79) and 2.09 (95% CI 1.20 to 3.64), respectively, compared with the non-smoker category (n=640). In addition, there was a positive dose–response relationship between cigarette smoking and elevated hsCRP (p for trend=0.01). No significant associations between betel quid chewing and alcohol consumption and hsCRP were observed in the multivariable model. Conclusions This study indicated that cigarette smoking was positively associated with serum hsCRP level in patients with early radiographic knee OA. However, in view of the nature of cross-sectional designs, the results need to be confirmed by

  14. Decreased Knee Joint Loading Associated With Early Knee Osteoarthritis After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wellsandt, Elizabeth; Gardinier, Emily S.; Manal, Kurt; Axe, Michael J.; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury predisposes individuals to early-onset knee joint osteoarthritis (OA). Abnormal joint loading is apparent after ACL injury and reconstruction. The relationship between altered joint biomechanics and the development of knee OA is unknown. Hypothesis Altered knee joint kinetics and medial compartment contact forces initially after injury and reconstruction are associated with radiographic knee OA 5 years after reconstruction. Study Design Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods Individuals with acute, unilateral ACL injury completed gait analysis before (baseline) and after (posttraining) preoperative rehabilitation and at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after reconstruction. Surface electromyographic and knee biomechanical data served as inputs to an electromyographically driven musculoskeletal model to estimate knee joint contact forces. Patients completed radiographic testing 5 years after reconstruction. Differences in knee joint kinetics and contact forces were compared between patients with and those without radiographic knee OA. Results Patients with OA walked with greater frontal plane interlimb differences than those without OA (nonOA) at baseline (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.00 ± 0.08 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.15 ± 0.09 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .014; peak knee adduction moment impulse difference: −0.001 ± 0.032 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.048 ± 0.031 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .042). The involved limb knee adduction moment impulse of the group with osteoarthritis was also lower than that of the group without osteoarthritis at baseline (0.087 ± 0.023 N·m·s/kg·m [nonOA] vs 0.049 ± 0.018 N·m·s/kg·m [OA], P = .023). Significant group differences were absent at posttraining but reemerged 6 months after reconstruction (peak knee adduction moment difference: 0.02 ± 0.04 N·m/kg·m [nonOA] vs −0.06 ± 0.11 N·m/kg·m [OA], P = .043). In addition, the OA group walked with lower peak

  15. Auricular Acupuncture for Pain Relief after Ambulatory Knee Arthroscopy—A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Auricular acupuncture (AA) is effective in treating various pain conditions, but there have been no analyses of AA for the treatment of pain after ambulatory knee surgery. We assessed the range of analgesic requirements under AA after ambulatory knee arthroscopy. Twenty patients randomly received a true AA procedure (Lung, Shenmen and Knee points) or sham procedure (three non-acupuncture points on the auricular helix) before ambulatory knee arthroscopy. Permanent press AA needles were retained in situ for one day after surgery. Post-operative pain was treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory ibuprofen, and weak oral opioid tramadol was used for rescue analgesic medication. The quantity of post-operative analgesics and pain intensity were used to assess the effect of AA. The incidence of analgesia-related side effects, time to discharge from the anesthesia recovery room, heart rate and blood pressure were also recorded. Ibuprofen consumption after surgery in the AA group was lower than in the control group: median 500 versus 800 mg, P = 0.043. Pain intensity on a 100 mm visual analogue scale for pain measurement and other parameters were similar in both groups. Thus AA might be useful in reducing the post-operative analgesic requirement after ambulatory knee arthroscopy. PMID:15937559

  16. Effect of Planning on Trunk Motion and Knee Moments During a Side Step Cut Task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houck, Jeff; Gorniak, Stacey; Nicholson, Kristen

    2004-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that alterations in knee biomechanics associated with unanticipated cutting tasks place athletes at higher risk of knee injuries. Besier et al observed alterations in knee moments during unanticipated cutting tasks that were consistent with in-vitro ACL injury mechanisms. During similar tasks, Patla et al observed lateral trunk lean and decreased foot placement, suggesting that full body center of mass control is perturbed during such tasks. The purpose of this study was to compare the trunk and knee frontal plane moments and evaluate a relationship between the two during unanticipated cutting tasks. The results of this study suggest that there is a relationship between the trunk and knee frontal plane moments during the first 200-400ms of the stance phase of gait.

  17. A comparison of radiographic anatomic axis knee alignment measurements and cross-sectional associations with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Goulston, L.M.; Sanchez-Santos, M.T.; D'Angelo, S.; Leyland, K.M.; Hart, D.J.; Spector, T.D.; Cooper, C.; Dennison, E.M.; Hunter, D.; Arden, N.K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective Malalignment is associated with knee osteoarthritis (KOA), however, the optimal anatomic axis (AA) knee alignment measurement on a standard limb radiograph (SLR) is unknown. This study compares one-point (1P) and two-point (2P) AA methods using three knee joint centre locations and examines cross-sectional associations with symptomatic radiographic knee osteoarthritis (SRKOA), radiographic knee osteoarthritis (RKOA) and knee pain. Methods AA alignment was measured six different ways using the KneeMorf software on 1058 SLRs from 584 women in the Chingford Study. Cross-sectional associations with principal outcome SRKOA combined with greatest reproducibility determined the optimal 1P and 2P AA method. Appropriate varus/neutral/valgus alignment categories were established using logistic regression with generalised estimating equation models fitted with restricted cubic spline function. Results The tibial plateau centre displayed greatest reproducibility and associations with SRKOA. As mean 1P and 2P values differed by >2°, new alignment categories were generated for 1P: varus <178°, neutral 178–182°, valgus >182° and for 2P methods: varus <180°, neutral 180–185°, valgus >185°. Varus vs neutral alignment was associated with a near 2-fold increase in SRKOA and RKOA, and valgus vs neutral for RKOA using 2P method. Nonsignificant associations were seen for 1P method for SRKOA, RKOA and knee pain. Conclusions AA alignment was associated with SRKOA and the tibial plateau centre had the strongest association. Differences in AA alignment when 1P vs 2P methods were compared indicated bespoke alignment categories were necessary. Further replication and validation with mechanical axis alignment comparison is required. PMID:26700504

  18. Impact of Alprazolam on Comorbid Pain and Knee Functions in Total Knee Arthroplasty Patients Diagnosed with Anxiety and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Barış; Kömür, Baran; Aktaş, Erdem; Sonnur Yılmaz, Firdes; Çopuroğlu, Cem; Özcan, Mert; Çiftdemir, Mert; Çopuroğlu, Elif

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Studies report 19-33% postoperative moderate-severe pain and dissatisfaction in uncomplicated total knee arthroplasty (TKA), even after 1 year. High rates of undiagnosed depression and anxiety may have a strong impact on these unfavourable outcomes. Here we aimed to investigate the efficacy of alprazolam on postoperative analgesic use and knee functions. Methods: Seventy-six patients with a mean age of 65 ± 9.3 years (range 46-80) diagnosed with mild-moderate anxiety or depression according to the Hamilton anxiety scale (HAS) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) that underwent TKA were evaluated in the study. Group 1 patients were subjected to alprazolam treatment in addition to an analgesic/antiinflammatory drug, whereas Group 2 consisted of patients receiving only the standard postoperative pain management protocol. Visual analog scale (VAS) and postoperative analgesic use (g/day) were calculated to evaluate the magnitude of pain experienced. Preoperative and postoperative knee functions were assessed from the patients’ Knee Society Score and Knee Society Functional Score records. Results: A positive correlation was found between the preoperative HAS, BDI, and total postoperative analgesic use in both groups. Although the decrease in VAS was significant in both groups, postoperative analgesic need (4.25 ± 0.30 g) in Group 1 was less compared to Group 2 (4.81 ± 0.41 g) (p=0.01). The mean change in postoperative (1 month) Knee Society Score and Knee Society Functional Score were also significantly improved in Group1 compared to Group 2. Conclusion: Alprazolam can reduce postoperative analgesic use and improve knee functions by reducing the pain threshold, and enhancing overall mood via its antidepressive and anxiolytic properties in patients undergoing TKA diagnosed with mild-moderate anxiety/depression. PMID:26664498

  19. Safety of desirudin in thrombosis prevention after total knee arthroplasty: the DESIR-ABLE study.

    PubMed

    Jove, Maurice; Maslanka, Marc; Minkowitz, Harold S; Jaffer, Amir K

    2014-01-01

    Desirudin, administered 30 minutes before total hip arthroplasty is superior to enoxaparin in preventing proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) with similar bleeding. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety of desirudin in patients undergoing elective total knee arthroplasty (TKA) when the first dose of desirudin was administered the evening after surgery. This is a case series of patients undergoing TKA who received desirudin 15 mg every 12 hours subcutaneously for an average of 5 days with the first dose administered postoperatively. The primary endpoint was major bleeding; secondary endpoints included wound outcomes (oozing and infection) and new symptomatic DVT or PE. Desirudin has a favorable safety profile when administered postoperatively in patients undergoing TKA with no reports of major bleeding, wound ooze, or infection. No patients experienced symptomatic DVT, but 2 patients had PE detected by computed tomography after experiencing atypical symptoms. The safety profile of desirudin is improved when administered postoperatively. Bleeding and wound outcomes seem to occur less frequently than historical desirudin and enoxaparin controls. PMID:23344102

  20. Cruciate Retaining Versus Cruciate Stabilising Total Knee Arthroplasty – A Prospective Randomised Kinematic Study

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, T L; Bayan, A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: While there is a large body of research in regards to cruciate retaining(CR) and cruciate sacrificing total condylar knee replacement, the literature is spars in regards to highly conforming polyetheylene such as the triatholon cruciate stabilising tibial insert (CS).The aim was to determine whether there is a difference in the range of motion, kinematics as well as the functional outcome for Triathlon CS and CR TKJR. Methods: A single hospital consecutive series of one surgeon between 2011 and 2013 were enrolled. Kinematic data recorded prospectively at the time of surgery utilizing imageless navigation included preoperative and post-replacement extension, gravity flexion, passive flexion and rotation. Intraoperative femoral and tibial cuts and definitive implants were also recorded. Statistically analysis performed to compare CS and CR TKJR range of motion, deformity correction, and rotation pre and post-operatively. Oxford functional scores were obtained at the final follow up. 124 patients were randomised to 71 CS and 53 CR TKJR. The demographics were comparable between the two groups. Results: No significant difference was found between the groups’ preoperative range of motion. The net gain in extension for the CS group was 5.65 degrees (4.14-7.17) and for CR 5.64 degrees (4.24-7.04, p=0.99) with no significant difference shown. Post-operative gravity flexion significantly increased in CS TKJR with 129.01 degrees (127.37130.66) compared with 126.35 degrees (124.39-128.30, p =0.04) for CR. A weak positive correlation was shown between the size of distal femoral cut and post-operative extension for both CS and CR TKJR. A weak positive correlation was also shown for the difference between the intraoperative cuts (tibial and femoral) and the size of the implants used, in relation to post-operative extension. Post-operative oxford scores at average of 3.4 year follow up comparable between groups. Conclusion: The kinematics of CS and CR TKJR are

  1. Self-reported previous knee injury and low knee function increase knee injury risk in adolescent female football.

    PubMed

    Clausen, M B; Tang, L; Zebis, M K; Krustrup, P; Hölmich, P; Wedderkopp, N; Andersen, L L; Christensen, K B; Møller, M; Thorborg, K

    2016-08-01

    Knee injuries are common in adolescent female football. Self-reported previous knee injury and low Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) are proposed to predict future knee injuries, but evidence regarding this in adolescent female football is scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate self-reported previous knee injury and low KOOS subscale score as risk factors for future knee injuries in adolescent female football. A sample of 326 adolescent female football players, aged 15-18, without knee injury at baseline, were included. Data on self-reported previous knee injury and KOOS questionnaires were collected at baseline. Time-loss knee injuries and football exposures were reported weekly by answers to standardized text-message questions, followed by injury telephone interviews. A priori, self-reported previous knee injury and low KOOS subscale scores (< 80 points) were chosen as independent variables in the risk factor analyses. The study showed that self-reported previous knee injury significantly increased the risk of time-loss knee injury [relative risk (RR): 3.65, 95% confidence (CI) 1.73-7.68; P < 0.001]. Risk of time-loss knee injury was also significantly increased in players with low KOOS subscale scores (< 80 points) in Activities of Daily Living (RR: 5.0), Sport/Recreational (RR: 2.2) and Quality of Life (RR: 3.0) (P < 0.05). In conclusion, self-reported previous knee injury and low scores in three KOOS subscales significantly increase the risk of future time-loss knee injury in adolescent female football. PMID:26179111

  2. Anthropometric measurements of knee joints in Thai population: correlation to the sizing of current knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Chaichankul, Chaiyos; Tanavalee, Aree; Itiravivong, Pibul

    2011-01-01

    Anthropometric data on the distal femoral condyle and the proximal tibia of 200 knees in 200 Thai subjects were measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The data including the resected femoral anterior-posterior (AP) length, the resected femoral medial-lateral (ML) width, the resected tibial AP length and the resected tibial ML width were measured. A characterization of the aspect ratio (the ML to AP dimensions) was made for the distal part of the femur and the aspect ratio (the AP to ML dimensions) was made for the proximal part of the tibia. All parameters were compared to the size of the total knee prosthesis with four prosthetic systems which currently used in Thailand: NexGen (Zimmer), P.F.C. Sigma (Depuy-Johnson & Johnson), Genesis II (Smith & nephew), and Scorpio (Stryker). The results of this study could provide fundamental data for the design of knee prostheses suitable for the Thai population. PMID:20133135

  3. Effect of a glucosamine-based combination supplement containing chondroitin sulfate and antioxidant micronutrients in subjects with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nakasone, Yasushi; Watabe, Kazunori; Watanabe, Keita; Tomonaga, Akihito; Nagaoka, Isao; Yamamoto, Tetsuro; Yamaguchi, Hideyo

    2011-09-01

    In the present study, we aimed to investigate the potential effect of a glucosamine (1,200 mg/day)-based dietary supplement combined with chondroitin sulfate and three antioxidant micronutrients, namely methylsulfonylmethane, guava leaf extract, and vitamin D (test supplement) on osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. A 16-week, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial was conducted involving 32 subjects with symptomatic knee OA. Clinical outcomes were measured using the Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure (JKOM) for symptoms and a study diary-based visual analog scale (diary VAS) for pain at baseline and at weeks 4, 8, 12 and 16 during the 16-week intervention period. Furthermore, biomarkers for cartilage type II collagen degradation (C2C) and synovitis hyaluronan (HA) were measured. As compared with the baseline, the JKOM pain subscale was significantly improved at all of the four assessment time points in the test group, but was not at any time point in the placebo group. On the other hand, all of the four symptom subscales and the aggregated total symptoms were significantly improved in the two groups at one or more time points. However, all of these clinical improvements were greater in extent in the test group than in the placebo group, and there were significant differences between groups in the magnitude of changes from baseline for one subscale 'general activities' and the aggregated total symptoms at week 8 (P<0.05). The results of efficacy assessments with the diary VAS showed that all of the three pain subscales were significantly improved only in the test group at almost all the time points. Moreover, serum levels of C2C and HA were decreased by 10 and 25%, respectively, at week 16 in the test group, albeit not statistically significant, without any detectable changes in the placebo group. In conclusion, although the results obtained in this study were not conclusive, the tested glucosamine-based combination supplement is likely to have a

  4. Combination of Intra-Articular and Intraosseous Injections of Platelet Rich Plasma for Severe Knee Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Mikel; Delgado, Diego; Sánchez, Pello; Muiños-López, Emma; Paiva, Bruno; Granero-Moltó, Froilán; Prósper, Felipe; Pompei, Orlando; Pérez, Juan Carlos; Azofra, Juan; Padilla, Sabino; Fiz, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess a novel approach to treating severe knee osteoarthritis by targeting synovial membrane, superficial articular cartilage, synovial fluid, and subchondral bone by combining intra-articular injections and intraosseous infiltrations of platelet rich plasma. We explored a new strategy consisting of intraosseous infiltrations of platelet rich plasma into the subchondral bone in combination with the conventional intra-articular injection in order to tackle several knee joint tissues simultaneously. We assessed the clinical outcomes through osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) and the inflammatory response by quantifying mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid. There was a significant pain reduction in the KOOS from baseline (61.55 ± 14.11) to week 24 (74.60 ± 19.19), after treatment (p = 0.008), in the secondary outcomes (symptoms, p = 0.004; ADL, p = 0.022; sport/rec., p = 0.017; QOL, p = 0.012), as well as VAS score (p < 0.001) and Lequesne Index (p = 0.008). The presence of mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid and colony-forming cells one week after treatment decreased substantially from 7.98 ± 8.21 MSC/μL to 4.04 ± 5.36 MSC/μL (p = 0.019) and from 601.75 ± 312.30 to 139.19 ± 123.61  (p = 0.012), respectively. Intra-articular injections combined with intraosseous infiltrations of platelet rich plasma reduce pain and mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid, besides significantly improving knee joint function in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis. This trial is registered on EudraCT with the number 2013-003982-32. PMID:27462609

  5. Combination of Intra-Articular and Intraosseous Injections of Platelet Rich Plasma for Severe Knee Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Pello; Muiños-López, Emma; Prósper, Felipe; Pompei, Orlando; Pérez, Juan Carlos; Padilla, Sabino; Fiz, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess a novel approach to treating severe knee osteoarthritis by targeting synovial membrane, superficial articular cartilage, synovial fluid, and subchondral bone by combining intra-articular injections and intraosseous infiltrations of platelet rich plasma. We explored a new strategy consisting of intraosseous infiltrations of platelet rich plasma into the subchondral bone in combination with the conventional intra-articular injection in order to tackle several knee joint tissues simultaneously. We assessed the clinical outcomes through osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) and the inflammatory response by quantifying mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid. There was a significant pain reduction in the KOOS from baseline (61.55 ± 14.11) to week 24 (74.60 ± 19.19), after treatment (p = 0.008), in the secondary outcomes (symptoms, p = 0.004; ADL, p = 0.022; sport/rec., p = 0.017; QOL, p = 0.012), as well as VAS score (p < 0.001) and Lequesne Index (p = 0.008). The presence of mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid and colony-forming cells one week after treatment decreased substantially from 7.98 ± 8.21 MSC/μL to 4.04 ± 5.36 MSC/μL (p = 0.019) and from 601.75 ± 312.30 to 139.19 ± 123.61  (p = 0.012), respectively. Intra-articular injections combined with intraosseous infiltrations of platelet rich plasma reduce pain and mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid, besides significantly improving knee joint function in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis. This trial is registered on EudraCT with the number 2013-003982-32. PMID:27462609

  6. [Jumper's knee].

    PubMed

    Hagner, W; Sosnowski, S; Kaziński, W; Frankowski, S

    1993-01-01

    A series of 30 athletes aged about 16 years on an average, exposed to activities putting a strain on the patellar tendon during training has been examined. They were involved in competitive sports for 3 years on an average. In 27 per cent of them jumpers knee symptoms have been found. PMID:7671664

  7. Sex work: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Bill; Benoit, Cecilia; Jansson, Mikael

    2014-10-01

    Explanations of adult involvement in sex work typically adopt one of two approaches. One perspective highlights a variety of negative experiences in childhood and adolescence, including physical and sexual abuse, family instability, poverty, associations with "pimps" and other exploiters, homelessness, and drug use. An alternative account recognizes that some of these factors may be involved, but underscores the contribution of more immediate circumstances, such as current economic needs, human capital, and employment opportunities. Prior research offers a limited assessment of these contrasting claims: most studies have focused exclusively on people working in the sex industry and they have not assessed the independent effects of life course variables central to these two perspectives. We add to this literature with an analysis that drew on insights from life course and life-span development theories and considered the contributions of factors from childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Our comparative approach examined predictors of employment in sex work relative to two other low-income service or care work occupations: food and beverage serving and barbering and hairstyling. Using data from a study of almost 600 workers from two cities, one in Canada and the other in the United States, we found that both immediate circumstances and negative experiences from early life are related to current sex work involvement: childhood poverty, abuse, and family instability were independently associated with adult sex work, as were limited education and employment experience, adult drug use, and marital status. PMID:24671729

  8. Effectiveness of platelet-rich plasma in the treatment of moderate knee osteoarthritis: a randomized prospective study.

    PubMed

    Kavadar, Gulis; Demircioglu, Demet Tekdos; Celik, Memet Yusuf; Emre, Tuluhan Yunus

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] To assess the effects of different numbers of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) applications on pain and physical function in grade 3 knee osteoarthritis (OA). [Subjects and Methods] A total of 102 patients with grade 3 knee OA were randomly divided into three groups: Group 1 received a single injection of PRP, Group 2 received two injections of PRP two weeks apart, Group 3 received three injections of PRP at 2-weeks intervals. All patients were evaluated with a visual analog scale (VAS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), and the Timed-Up and Go test (TUG) before the treatment and at 1, 3 and 6 months after the treatment. [Results] Ninety-eight patients (15 males, 83 females) completed the study. The mean ages of the patients were 53.5±6.6, 54.9±5.3, and 55.1±5.6 years in Group 1, Group 2, and Group 3, respectively. Statistically significant improvements were noted in all of the evaluated measures in all of the groups. The mean differences of Group 1-Group 2 and Group 1-Group 3 WOMAC total, WOMAC pain, WOMAC stiffness, and WOMAC function scores were statistically significant. [Conclusion] PRP is an effective treatment for functional status and pain in moderate knee osteoarthritis and a minimum of two injections is appropriate. PMID:26834369

  9. Anatomical study of the posterior cruciate ligament with the knee flexed at 90°☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Daniel Kyubin; Rosa, Sthéphano Pellizzaro; Prestes, Guilherme Bello; da Cunha, Luiz Antônio Munhoz; de Moura, Márcio Fernando Aparecido; Stieven Filho, Edmar

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the anatomy of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and define anatomical parameters with the knee flexed at 90°. Methods Eight knees from cadavers were dissected in order to make measurements from the center of the anterolateral band to the roof (AL1), from the center of the anterolateral band to the anterior cartilage (AL2), from the center of the posteromedial band to the roof (PM1), from the center of the posteromedial band to the anterior cartilage (PM2), from the center of the tibial insertion to the medial region of the tibia (TIM), from the center of the tibial insertion to the lateral region of the tibia (TIL), from the center of the medial insertion to the medial meniscus (IMM) and the width of the origin of the PCL (WO). To obtain the results from each anatomical structure, the means and standard deviations of the measurements were calculated. Results The measurements in millimeters that were found were AL1, 6.2; AL2, 4.9; PM1, 11.7; PM2, 5.5; TIM, 32.5; TIL, 40.6; IMM, 9.4; and WO, 32.5. Conclusions The PCL has an extensive origin. The center of the anterolateral band is 6 mm from the roof and 5 mm from the anterior cartilage of the knee. The tibial insertion is slightly medial and 10 mm distal to the posterior cornu of the medial meniscus. PMID:26229851

  10. Randomised controlled trial of referral to a telephone-based weight management and healthy lifestyle programme for patients with knee osteoarthritis who are overweight or obese: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Kate M; Wiggers, John; Williams, Amanda; Campbell, Elizabeth; Yoong, Serene; Robson, Emma K; McAuley, James; Haskins, Robin; Kamper, Steven J; Williams, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common chronic diseases worldwide and is associated with significant pain and disability. Clinical practice guidelines consistently recommend weight management as a core aspect of care for overweight and obese patients with knee OA; however, provision of such care is suboptimal. Telephone-based interventions offer a novel approach to delivery of weight management care in these patients. The aim of the proposed study is to assess the effectiveness of referral to a telephone-based weight management and healthy lifestyle programme, previously shown to be effective in changing weight, in improving knee pain intensity in overweight or obese patients with knee OA, compared to usual care. Methods and analysis A parallel, randomised controlled trial will be undertaken. Patients with OA of the knee who are waiting for an outpatient orthopaedic consultation at a tertiary referral public hospital within New South Wales, Australia, will be allocated to either an intervention or a control group (1:1 ratio). After baseline data collection, patients in the intervention group will receive a 6-month telephone-based intervention, and patients in the control group will continue with usual care. Surveys will be conducted at baseline, 6 and 26 weeks post-randomisation. The study requires 60 participants per group to detect a two-point difference in pain intensity (primary outcome) 26 weeks after baseline. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the Hunter New England Health Human Research Ethics Committee (13/12/11/5.18) and the University of Newcastle Human Research Ethics Committee (H-2015-0043). The results will be disseminated in peer-reviewed journals and at scientific conferences. Trial registration number ACTRN12615000490572, Pre-results. PMID:26940110

  11. Clinical effects of lateral wedge arch support insoles in knee osteoarthritis: A prospective double-blind randomized study.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ru-Lan; Lee, Wen-Chung

    2016-07-01

    We compared the short-term efficacy of rigid versus soft lateral wedge arch support (LWAS) insoles for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), as assessed using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) system, through a prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial.Participants who fulfilled the combined radiographic and clinical criteria for knee OA, as defined by the American College of Rheumatology, were randomly prescribed 1 pair of rigid or soft LWAS insoles. Body functions and structures were evaluated according to Kellgren-Lawrence scores, the Foot Posture Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, the pain-pressure threshold, postural stability, dynamic balance, and fall risk; activities and participation were assessed according to 10-m fast speed walking, stair climbing and chair rising times, and Chronic Pain Grade questionnaire responses; and knee OA-related health status was evaluated using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, the pain-pressure threshold, physical activity, balance, Chronic Pain Grade questionnaire responses, and the KOOS were recorded before treatment and at 1-, 2-, and 3-month follow-ups.We enrolled 90 participants, 70 women and 20 men, with mean ages of 60.6 ± 10.8 and 63.1 ± 10.8 years in the rigid and soft LWAS insole groups, respectively. Repeated-measures analysis of covariance revealed significant time × group effect improvements in pain (P = 0.008 for the KOOS), stair ascent time (P = 0.003), daily living function (P = 0.003 for the KOOS), sports and recreation function (P = 0.012 for the KOOS), and quality of life (P = 0.021 for the KOOS) in the soft LWAS insole group.Patients with knee OA who used soft LWAS insoles for a short term showed more significant improvement than did those who used rigid LWAS insoles in pain, physical activity, daily living function, sports and recreation function

  12. Morphological variants of lateral meniscus of the knee: a cadaveric study in South Indian human fetuses.

    PubMed

    Murlimanju, B V; Nair, Narga; Ray, Biswabina; Pai, Mangala M; Amin, Soumya; Pai, Shakuntala R

    2011-06-01

    In the present study, the objectives were to study the morphology of the lateral menisci (LMs) in human fetuses from a South Indian population and to verify the developmental etiology of the discoid lateral meniscus (DLM). The study included 106 fetal knee joints which were fixed in 10% formalin. After dissecting the joints, the morphological variants of the shapes of the LMs were macroscopically noted and classified as discoid and nondiscoid. The nondiscoids were subdivided into C-shaped and crescentic. The discoid lateral menisci (DLMs) were divided into complete and incomplete discoid. From our observations, 82.1% of the LMs were found to be nondiscoid. Among them, 62.3% were C-shaped and 19.8% were crescentic. The remaining 17.9% of the LMs had a discoid shape, and among these, 14.1% were incomplete discoid and 3.8% were completely discoid. Bilaterality of the discoid shape was observed in 26.6% of the cases. There was a female preponderance (11:8) among LMs with discoid morphology. In conclusion, the prevalence of DLM according to the present study was estimated as 17.9%. Our findings favor Kaplan's theory, as the majority of the fetuses of various gestational ages had nondiscoid LMs. Even the youngest fetus (CRL 88 mm, 14 weeks of gestation) exhibited a lateral tibial plateau that was incompletely covered by the meniscus, which did not exhibit a discoid shape. We believe that the DLM is anomalous and arises through variant morphogenesis. PMID:20549581

  13. Knee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis: the effect of self-reported instability

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Jonathan A.; Robinson, Megan E.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Tashman, Scott; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis has been previously associated with a stereotypical knee-stiffening gait pattern and reduced knee joint motion variability due to increased antagonist muscle co-contractions and smaller utilized arc of motion during gait. However, episodic self-reported instability may be a sign of excessive motion variability for a large subgroup of patients with knee osteoarthritis. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in knee joint motion variability during gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis with and without self-reported instability compared to a control group of older adults with asymptomatic knees. Methods Forty-three subjects, 8 with knee osteoarthritis but no reports of instability (stable), 11 with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported instability (unstable), and 24 without knee osteoarthritis or instability (control) underwent Dynamic Stereo X-ray analysis during a decline gait task on a treadmill. Knee motion variability was assessed using parametric phase plots during the loading response phase of decline gait. Findings The stable group demonstrated decreased sagittal-plane motion variability compared to the control group (p=0.04), while the unstable group demonstrated increased sagittal-plane motion variability compared to the control (p=0.003) and stable groups (p<0.001). The unstable group also demonstrated increased anterior-posterior joint contact point motion variability for the medial tibiofemoral compartment compared to the control (p=0.03) and stable groups (p=0.03). Interpretation The finding of decreased knee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis without self-reported instability supports previous research. However, presence of self-reported instability is associated with increased knee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis and warrants further investigation. PMID:25796536

  14. Anatomic Versus Mechanically Aligned Total Knee Arthroplasty for Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    PubMed Central

    Toliopoulos, Panagiota; LeBlanc, Marc-Andre; Hutt, Jonathan; Lavigne, Martin; Desmeules, Francois; Vendittoli, Pascal-Andre

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the intra-operative benefits and the clinical outcomes from kinematic or mechanical alignment for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in patients undergoing revision of failed unicompartmental kneel arthroplasty (UKA) to TKA. Methods: Ten revisions were performed with a kinematic alignment technique and 11 with a mechanical alignment. Measurements of the hip-knee-ankle angle (HKA), the lateral distal femoral angle (LDFA), and the medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) were performed using long-leg radiographs. The need for augments, stems, and constrained inserts was compared between groups. Clinical outcomes were compared using the WOMAC score along with maximum distance walked as well as knee range of motion obtained prior to discharge. All data was obtained by a retrospective review of patient files. Results: The kinematic group required less augments, stems, and constrained inserts than the mechanical group and thinner polyethylene bearings. There were significant differences in the lateral distal femoral angle (LDFA) and the medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) between the two groups (p<0.05). The mean WOMAC score obtained at discharge was better in the kinematic group as was mean knee flexion. At last follow up of 34 months for the kinematic group and 58 months for the mechanical group, no orthopedic complications or reoperations were recorded. Conclusion: Although this study has a small patient cohort, our results suggest that kinematic alignment for TKA after UKA revision is an attractive method. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27563365

  15. Patient-Specific CT-Based Instrumentation versus Conventional Instrumentation in Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Study on Clinical Outcomes and In-Hospital Data

    PubMed Central

    Kotela, Andrzej; Lorkowski, Jacek; Kucharzewski, Marek; Wilk-Frańczuk, Magdalena; Śliwiński, Zbigniew; Frańczuk, Bogusław; Łęgosz, Paweł  ; Kotela, Ireneusz

    2015-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a frequently performed procedure in orthopaedic surgery. Recently, patient-specific instrumentation was introduced to facilitate correct positioning of implants. The aim of this study was to compare the early clinical results of TKA performed with patient-specific CT-based instrumentation and conventional technique. A prospective, randomized controlled trial on 112 patients was performed between January 2011 and December 2011. A group of 112 patients who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were enrolled in this study and randomly assigned to an experimental or control group. The experimental group comprised 52 patients who received the Signature CT-based implant positioning system, and the control group consisted of 60 patients with conventional instrumentation. Clinical outcomes were evaluated with the KSS scale, WOMAC scale, and VAS scales to assess knee pain severity and patient satisfaction with the surgery. Specified in-hospital data were recorded. Patients were followed up for 12 months. At one year after surgery, there were no statistically significant differences between groups with respect to clinical outcomes and in-hospital data, including operative time, blood loss, hospital length of stay, intraoperative observations, and postoperative complications. Further high-quality investigations of various patient-specific systems and longer follow-up may be helpful in assessing their utility for TKA. PMID:26301241

  16. The role of the anterolateral ligament in ACL insufficient and reconstructed knees on rotatory stability: A biomechanical study on human cadavers.

    PubMed

    Tavlo, M; Eljaja, S; Jensen, J T; Siersma, V D; Krogsgaard, M R

    2016-08-01

    Studies suggest that the anterolateral ligament (ALL) is important for knee stability. The purpose was to clarify ALL's effect on rotatory and anterior-posterior stability in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-insufficient and reconstructed knees and the effect of reconstruction of an insufficient ALL. Eighteen cadaveric knees were included. Stability was tested for intact (+ALL), detached (-ALL) and reconstructed (+ reALL) ALL, with ACL removed (-ACL) and reconstructed (+ACL) in six combinations. All were tested in 0, 30, 60, and 90 °C flexion. Anterior-posterior stability was measured with a rolimeter. Rotation with a torque of 8.85 Nm was measured photographically. The ALL was well defined in 78% of knees. ACL reconstruction had a significant effect on anterior-posterior stability. Detaching the ALL had a significant effect on internal rotatory stability and on anterior-posterior stability in ACL-insufficient knees. Reconstruction of ACL and ALL reestablished knee stability. The appearance of the ALL was not uniform. The ALL was an internal rotational stabilizer. Anatomical ALL reconstruction in combination with ACL reconstruction could reestablish stability. ALL reconstruction might be considered in patients with combined ACL and ALL tears, but the clinical effect should be established in a controlled clinical study. PMID:26247376

  17. Unique Anatomic Feature of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament in Knees Associated With Osteochondritis Dissecans

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masakazu; Adachi, Nobuo; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Nakamae, Atsuo; Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Ikuta, Yasunari; Hayashi, Seiju; Deie, Masataka; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee is a disorder in juveniles and young adults; however, its etiology still remains unclear. For OCD at the medial femoral condyle (MFC), it is sometimes observed that the lesion has a connection with fibers of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Although this could be important information related to the etiology of MFC OCD, there is no report examining an association between the MFC OCD and the PCL anatomy. Purpose: To investigate the anatomic features of knees associated with MFC OCD, focusing especially on the femoral attachment of the PCL, and to compare them with knees associated with lateral femoral condyle (LFC) OCD and non-OCD lesions. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 39 patients (46 knees) with OCD lesions who had undergone surgical treatment. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, the PCL attachment at the lateral wall of the MFC was measured on the coronal sections, and the knee flexion angle was also measured on the sagittal sections. As with non-OCD knees, we reviewed and analyzed 25 knees with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and 16 knees with meniscal injuries. Results: MRIs revealed that the femoral PCL footprint was located in a significantly more distal position in the patients with MFC OCD compared with patients with LFC OCD and ACL and meniscal injuries. There was no significant difference in knee flexion angle among the 4 groups. Conclusion: The PCL in patients with MFC OCD attached more distally at the lateral aspect of the MFC compared with knees with LFC OCD and ACL and meniscal injuries. PMID:27294170

  18. Biomechanics of knee joint — A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madeti, Bhaskar Kumar; Chalamalasetti, Srinivasa Rao; Bolla Pragada, S. K. Sundara siva rao

    2015-06-01

    The present paper is to know how the work is carried out in the field of biomechanics of knee. Various model formulations are discussed and further classified into mathematical model, two-dimensional model and three-dimensional model. Knee geometry is a crucial part of human body movement, in which how various views of knee is shown in different planes and how the forces act on tibia and femur are studied. It leads to know the forces acting on the knee joint. Experimental studies of knee geometry and forces acting on knee shown by various researchers have been discussed, and comparisons of results are made. In addition, static and dynamic analysis of knee has been also discussed respectively to some extent.

  19. Knee Control and Jump-Landing Technique in Young Basketball and Floorball Players.

    PubMed

    Leppänen, M; Pasanen, K; Kulmala, J-P; Kujala, U M; Krosshaug, T; Kannus, P; Perttunen, J; Vasankari, T; Parkkari, J

    2016-04-01

    Poor knee alignment is associated with increased loading of the joints, ligaments and tendons, and may increase the risk of injury. The study purpose was to compare differences in knee kinematics between basketball and floorball players during a vertical drop jump (VDJ) task. We wanted to investigate whether basketball players, whose sport includes frequent jump-landings, exhibited better knee control compared with floorball players, whose sport involves less jumping. Complete data was obtained from 173 basketball and 141 floorball players. Peak knee valgus and flexion angles during the VDJ were analyzed by 3D motion analysis.Larger knee valgus angles were observed among basketball players (- 3.2°, 95%CI -4.5 to - 2.0) compared with floorball players (- 0.9°, 95%CI -2.3 to 0.6) (P=0.022). Basketball players landed with a decreased peak knee flexion angle (83.1°, 95%CI 81.4 to 84.8) compared with floorball players (86.5°, 95%CI 84.6 to 88.4) (P=0.016). There were no significant differences in height, weight or BMI between basketball and floorball players. Female athletes exhibited significantly greater valgus angles than males. This study revealed that proper knee control during jump-landing does not seem to develop in young athletes simply by playing the sport, despite the fact that jump-landings occur frequently in practice and games. PMID:26701826

  20. Proprioception in the ACL-ruptured knee: the contribution of the medial collateral ligament and patellar ligament. An in vivo experimental study in the cat.

    PubMed

    Bonsfills, N; Raygoza, J J; Boemo, E; Garrido, J; Núñez, A; Gómez-Barrena, E

    2007-01-01

    In the absence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), secondary restraints such as menisci, ligaments, and tendons restrict anterior knee laxity. Strain detection at these sites could define the contribution of this alternative signalling system to knee proprioception after ACL injury. The hypothesis in this study questions if measurements of anterior tibial translation (ATT) from surface strain gauges on the insertions of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) and the patellar tendon (PT) are sufficiently sensitive and specific to differentiate normal, stable knees from acutely unstable knees due to ACL section. Twelve cats received miniaturized strain gauges on the surface of MCL and PT distal insertions. A purpose-made receiver transformed into measurements any voltage variation obtained during passive knee flexion-extension and anterior tibial translation manoeuvres. Variables under evaluation included first peak latency, normalized amplitude, and slope of voltage along time. Femorotibial displacements were video recorded, digitized, and used as the ATT reference. The proposed system detected significant changes in the slope of the voltage/time signal, with higher specificity and sensitivity during ATT after experimental ACL section. Changes were not significant during flexion or extension. It was found that a pattern of earlier and more intense strain in MCL and PT distal insertions was found during ATT in the ACL deficient knee. Enhanced pattern recognition learning from these structures could be a future target for proprioceptive training after ACL injury. PMID:17070686

  1. Accurate joint space quantification in knee osteoarthritis: a digital x-ray tomosynthesis phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sewell, Tanzania S.; Piacsek, Kelly L.; Heckel, Beth A.; Sabol, John M.

    2011-03-01

    The current imaging standard for diagnosis and monitoring of knee osteoarthritis (OA) is projection radiography. However radiographs may be insensitive to markers of early disease such as osteophytes and joint space narrowing (JSN). Relative to standard radiography, digital X-ray tomosynthesis (DTS) may provide improved visualization of the markers of knee OA without the interference of superimposed anatomy. DTS utilizes a series of low-dose projection images over an arc of +/-20 degrees to reconstruct tomographic images parallel to the detector. We propose that DTS can increase accuracy and precision in JSN quantification. The geometric accuracy of DTS was characterized by quantifying joint space width (JSW) as a function of knee flexion and position using physical and anthropomorphic phantoms. Using a commercially available digital X-ray system, projection and DTS images were acquired for a Lucite rod phantom with known gaps at various source-object-distances, and angles of flexion. Gap width, representative of JSW, was measured using a validated algorithm. Over an object-to-detector-distance range of 5-21cm, a 3.0mm gap width was reproducibly measured in the DTS images, independent of magnification. A simulated 0.50mm (+/-0.13) JSN was quantified accurately (95% CI 0.44-0.56mm) in the DTS images. Angling the rods to represent knee flexion, the minimum gap could be precisely determined from the DTS images and was independent of flexion angle. JSN quantification using DTS was insensitive to distance from patient barrier and flexion angle. Potential exists for the optimization of DTS for accurate radiographic quantification of knee OA independent of patient positioning.

  2. Is blood neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio an independent predictor of knee osteoarthritis severity?

    PubMed

    Taşoğlu, Özlem; Bölük, Hüma; Şahin Onat, Şule; Taşoğlu, İrfan; Özgirgin, Neşe

    2016-06-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common forms of joint disease, affecting an increasing number of people worldwide. Latest data suggests that inflammation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of OA. There are a number of inflammatory markers like cytokins and cartilage degradation products that can be used as indicators in OA. Blood neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is a simple non-invasive and cost-effective marker of inflammation in various systemic diseases, but it has not been investigated in OA yet. The aim of the present study was to compare blood NLR levels in patients with severe - Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) grade 4 - knee OA and mild to moderate - KL grades 1-3 - knee OA. A total of 176 patients with knee OA were included in this cross-sectional study. KL grading was done according to the two-view (antero-posterior and lateral) plain radiography of both knees. Demographic characteristics, blood neutrophil, lymphocyte and platelet counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein were recorded. Blood NLR levels were calculated. In the severe knee OA group, blood NLR levels were found to be elevated as compared to the mild to moderate knee OA group. A blood NLR of ≥2.1 was taken as the cutoff based upon the receiver operating characteristics (roc). In the roc curve analysis, blood NLR ≥ 2.1 had 50 % sensitivity and 77 % specificity in predicting severe knee OA. In multivariate analysis, age and blood NLR ≥ 2.1 emerged as independent predictors of severe knee OA. The results of the present study, for the first time in the literature, suggests blood NLR as a novel and promising inflammatory marker indicating the severity of knee OA. PMID:26780447

  3. Factors Related to Postoperative Pain Trajectories following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Longitudinal Study of Patients Admitted to a Russian Orthopaedic Clinic.

    PubMed

    Kornilov, Nikolai; Lindberg, Maren Falch; Gay, Caryl; Saraev, Alexander; Kuliaba, Taras; Rosseland, Leiv Arne; Muniz, Konstantin; Lerdal, Anners

    2016-01-01

    This study explores sociodemographic, clinical, and surgical factors in relation to pain trajectories during the first 3 days following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). 100 patients (mean age 63.5 ± 7.8 years and 93% female) consecutively admitted for uncomplicated primary TKA were prospectively included. Postoperative pain was assessed using pain diaries. Measures of preoperative pain, symptoms, daily functioning, quality of life, comorbidities, knee function, perioperative characteristics, and physical/biochemical parameters were also evaluated. All pain ratings decreased in the three days following surgery (p < .001) as well as the reported number of daily hours in moderate/severe pain (p < .001). Women reported more pain than men (p = .009). Pain trajectories did not differ by education, employment, cohabitation, or any patient clinical and biochemical characteristics but were significantly related to preoperative anxiety (p = .029). Patients reporting moderate/severe pain prior to surgery also reported more hours in moderate/severe pain on days 0-3 postoperatively (p = .029). Patients with surgeries longer than 90 min reported more hours of moderate/severe pain compared with patients who had shorter surgeries (p = .008), and similar results were observed for ratings of pain with activity (p = .012). In this sample, only female gender, higher levels of preoperative pain and anxiety, and longer surgical duration were associated with increased pain after TKA. PMID:26885390

  4. Factors Related to Postoperative Pain Trajectories following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Longitudinal Study of Patients Admitted to a Russian Orthopaedic Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Kornilov, Nikolai; Lindberg, Maren Falch; Gay, Caryl; Saraev, Alexander; Kuliaba, Taras; Rosseland, Leiv Arne; Muniz, Konstantin; Lerdal, Anners

    2016-01-01

    This study explores sociodemographic, clinical, and surgical factors in relation to pain trajectories during the first 3 days following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). 100 patients (mean age 63.5 ± 7.8 years and 93% female) consecutively admitted for uncomplicated primary TKA were prospectively included. Postoperative pain was assessed using pain diaries. Measures of preoperative pain, symptoms, daily functioning, quality of life, comorbidities, knee function, perioperative characteristics, and physical/biochemical parameters were also evaluated. All pain ratings decreased in the three days following surgery (p < .001) as well as the reported number of daily hours in moderate/severe pain (p < .001). Women reported more pain than men (p = .009). Pain trajectories did not differ by education, employment, cohabitation, or any patient clinical and biochemical characteristics but were significantly related to preoperative anxiety (p = .029). Patients reporting moderate/severe pain prior to surgery also reported more hours in moderate/severe pain on days 0–3 postoperatively (p = .029). Patients with surgeries longer than 90 min reported more hours of moderate/severe pain compared with patients who had shorter surgeries (p = .008), and similar results were observed for ratings of pain with activity (p = .012). In this sample, only female gender, higher levels of preoperative pain and anxiety, and longer surgical duration were associated with increased pain after TKA. PMID:26885390

  5. Knee joint replacement - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... than 3 blocks because of knee pain Loose knee prosthesis Some knee fractures ... an incision over the affected knee. The patella (knee cap) is moved ... helps the prosthesis to adhere better. The two parts of the ...

  6. Knee Flexion and Daily Activities in Patients following Total Knee Replacement: A Comparison with ISO Standard 14243

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Markus A.; Nechtow, William; Schwenke, Thorsten; Moisio, Kirsten C.

    2015-01-01

    Walking is only one of many daily activities performed by patients following total knee replacement (TKR). The purpose of this study was to examine the hypotheses (a) that subject activity characteristics are correlated with knee flexion range of motion (ROM) and (b) that there is a significant difference between the subject's flexion/extension excursion throughout the day and the ISO specified input for knee wear testing. In order to characterize activity, the number of walking and stair stepping cycles, the time spent with dynamic and stationary activities, the number of activity sequences, and the knee flexion/extension excursion of 32 TKR subjects were collected during daily activity. Flexion/extension profiles were compared with the ISO 14243 simulator input profile using a level crossing classification algorithm. Subjects took an average of 3102 (range: 343–5857) walking cycles including 65 (range: 0–319) stair stepping cycles. Active and passive ROMs were positively correlated with stair walking time, stair step counts, and stair walking sequences. Simulated knee motion according to ISO showed significantly fewer level crossings at the flexion angles 20–40° and beyond 50° than those measured with the monitor. This suggests that implant wear testing protocols should contain more cycles and a variety of activities requiring higher knee flexion angles with incorporated resting/transition periods to account for the many activity sequences. PMID:26347875

  7. Knee microfracture surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Cartilage regeneration - knee ... Three types of anesthesia may be used for knee arthroscopy surgery: Medicine to relax you, and shots of painkillers to numb the knee Spinal (regional) anesthesia General anesthesia (you will be ...

  8. Knee CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - knee; Computed axial tomography scan - knee; Computed tomography scan - knee ... Saunders; 2015:chap 93. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  9. Knee joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002974.htm Knee joint replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Knee joint replacement is a surgery to replace a knee ...

  10. Knee pain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... front of the knee can be due to bursitis, arthritis, or softening of the patella cartilage as ... knee. Overall knee pain can be due to bursitis, arthritis, tears in the ligaments, osteoarthritis of the ...

  11. Trabecular bone strength at the knee.

    PubMed

    Hvid, I

    1988-02-01

    The axial strength of trabecular bone at the knee is critical for the maintenance of support and fixation of the prosthetic components after total surface knee arthroplasty. The resistance of trabecular bone to penetration was measured posteriorly, centrally, and anteriorly in each of the tibial and femoral condyles in 150 consecutive total knee arthroplasties. Forty-seven rheumatoid knees and 88 osteoarthritic knees were evaluated. The correlation of bone strength with selected clinical parameters was found to be too poor to predict bone strength. Tibial bone strength was lower in rheumatoid than in osteoarthritic knees. Steroid medication did not influence tibial bone strength in rheumatoid arthritis. The distribution of bone strength between the medial and lateral condyles was closely dependent on knee alignment, with high medial strength in varus knees. At the unloaded condyle, strength was reduced relative to the findings for normally aligned knees. At the tibia, strength decreased with depth from the resection surface, while at the femur the converse was true. Tibial bone strength, both condylar and overall average, was lower than values reported in studies of normal cadaver knees. Evaluation of the absolute bone strength at the tibial condyles suggested that the values too low to meet load-bearing requirements after well-aligned knee replacement were infrequent. PMID:3276421

  12. Energy Recovery in Individuals with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sparling, Tawnee L.; Schmitt, Daniel; Miller, Charlotte E.; Guilak, Farshid; Somers, Tamara J.; Keefe, Francis J.; Queen, Robin M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pathological gaits have been shown to limit transfer between potential (PE) and kinetic (KE) energy during walking, which can increase locomotor costs. The purpose of this study was to examine whether energy exchange would be limited in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Ground reaction forces during walking were collected from 93 subjects with symptomatic knee OA (self-selected and fast speeds) and 13 healthy controls (self-selected speed) and used to calculate their center of mass (COM) movements, PE and KE relationships, and energy recovery during a stride. Correlations and linear regressions examined the impact of energy fluctuation phase and amplitude, walking velocity, body mass, self-reported pain, and radiographic severity on recovery. Paired t-tests were run to compare energy recovery between cohorts. Results Symptomatic knee OA subjects displayed lower energetic recovery during self-selected walking speeds than healthy controls (p=0.0018). PE and KE phase relationships explained the majority (66%) of variance in recovery. Recovery had a complex relationship with velocity and its change across speeds was significantly influenced by the self-selected walking speed of each subject. Neither radiographic OA scores nor subject self-reported measures demonstrated any relationship with energy recovery. Conclusions Knee OA reduces effective exchange of PE and KE, potentially increasing the muscular work required to control movements of the COM. Gait retraining may return subjects to more normal patterns of energy exchange and allow them to reduce fatigue. PMID:24752039

  13. How does knee pain affect trunk and knee motion during badminton forehand lunges?

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Hsing-Hsan; Lin, Cheng-Feng; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Liao, Jen-Chieh

    2014-01-01

    Badminton requires extensive lower extremity movement and a precise coordination of the upper extremity and trunk movements. Accordingly, this study investigated motions of the trunk and the knee, control of dynamic stability and muscle activation patterns of individuals with and without knee pain. Seventeen participants with chronic knee pain and 17 healthy participants participated in the study and performed forehand forward and backward diagonal lunges. This study showed that those with knee pain exhibited smaller knee motions in frontal and horizontal planes during forward lunge but greater knee motions in sagittal plane during backward lunge. By contrast, in both tasks, the injured group showed a smaller value on the activation level of the paraspinal muscles in pre-impact phase, hip-shoulder separation angle, trunk forward inclination range and peak centre of mass (COM) velocity. Badminton players with knee pain adopt a more conservative movement pattern of the knee to minimise recurrence of knee pain. The healthy group exhibit better weight-shifting ability due to a greater control of the trunk and knee muscles. Training programmes for badminton players with knee pain should be designed to improve both the neuromuscular control and muscle strength of the core muscles and the knee extensor with focus on the backward lunge motion. PMID:24404882

  14. Knee muscle strength at varying angular velocities and associations with gross motor function in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wei-Hsien; Chen, Hseih-Ching; Shen, I-Hsuan; Chen, Chung-Yao; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chung, Chia-Ying

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships of muscle strength at different angular velocities and gross motor functions in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy (CP). This study included 33 ambulatory children with spastic CP aged 6-15 years and 15 children with normal development. Children with CP were categorized into level I (n=17) or level II (n=16) according to Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels. All children underwent curl-up test and isokinetic tests of the knee extensor and flexor muscle. Children with CP underwent the gross motor function assessments, including the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM-66) and the gross motor subtests of Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (BOTMP). The hamstring-quadriceps ratio (HQ ratio) was calculated as 100%×(isokinetic peak torque of hamstring (knee flexor)/isokinetic peak torque of quadriceps (knee extensor)). Children with GMFCS level II had lower BOTMP and GMFM-66 scores, curl-up scores, HQ ratio, and knee muscle strength, especially knee flexor, compared to those with GMFCS level I. The regression analysis showed that knee flexor torques at 60 and 90°/s are mainly related to balance (r(2)=0.167, p=0.011) and strength (r(2)=0.243, p=0.002) while knee flexor torques at 120°/s mainly contribute to running speed and agility (r(2)=0.372, p<0.001). These findings suggest that children with CP had knee strength deficits, especially knee flexor. Postural muscle (knee flexor) strength dominated gross motor function than antigravity muscle strength (knee extensor). The knee flexor strength at different angular velocities was associated with various gross motor tasks. The HQ ratio may be used as a potential biomarker to probe the therapeutic effectiveness for muscle strengthening in these children. These data may allow clinician for formulating effective muscle strengthening strategies for these children. PMID:22853889

  15. Articular cartilage of the knee 3 years after ACL reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Ji-Hoon; Hosseini, Ali; Wang, Yang; Torriani, Martin; Gill, Thomas J; Grodzinsky, Alan J

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose T1ρ or T2 relaxation imaging has been increasingly used to evaluate the cartilage of the knee. We investigated the cartilage of ACL-reconstructed knees 3 years after surgery using T2 relaxation times. Patients and methods 10 patients with a clinically successful unilateral ACL reconstruction were examined 3 years after surgery. Multiple-TE fast-spin echo sagittal images of both knees were acquired using a 3T MRI scanner for T2 mapping of the tibiofemoral cartilage. T2 values of the superficial and deep zones of the tibiofemoral cartilage were analyzed in sub-compartmental areas and compared between the ACL-reconstructed and uninjured contralateral knees. Results Higher T2 values were observed in 1 or more sub-compartmental areas of each ACL-reconstructed knee compared to the uninjured contralateral side. Most of the T2 increases were observed at the superficial zones of the cartilage, especially at the medial compartment. At the medial compartment of the ACL-reconstructed knee, the T2 values of the femoral and tibial cartilage were increased by 3–81% compared to the uninjured contralateral side, at the superficial zones of the weight-bearing areas. T2 values in the superficial zone of the central medial femoral condyle differed between the 2 groups (p = 0.002). Interpretation The articular cartilage of ACL-reconstructed knees, although clinically satisfactory, had higher T2 values in the superficial zone of the central medial femoral condyle than in the uninjured contralateral side 3 years after surgery. Further studies are warranted to determine whether these patients would undergo cartilage degeneration over time. PMID:25854533

  16. Leukocyte and Platelet Rich Plasma (L-PRP) Versus Leukocyte and Platelet Rich Fibrin (L-PRF) For Articular Cartilage Repair of the Knee: A Comparative Evaluation in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Davoud; Fakhrjou, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    Background: Articular cartilage injuries of the knee are among the most debilitating injuries leading to osteoarthritis due to limited regenerative capability of cartilaginous tissue. The use of platelet concentrates containing necessary growth factors for cartilage healing has recently emerged as a new treatment method. Objectives: The efficacy of two types of different platelet concentrates were compared in the treatment of acute articular cartilage injuries of the knee in an animal model. Materials and Methods: Eighteen adult Iranian mixed breed male dogs were used to conduct this experimental study. Full thickness articular cartilage defects (diameter 6 mm, depth 5 mm) were created in the weight bearing area of femoral condyles of both hind limbs in all dogs (n = 72). Twelve dogs were randomly selected to receive treatment and their right and left hind limb defects were treated by L-PRP and L-PRF implantation respectively, while no treatment was undertaken in six other dogs as controls. The animals were euthanized at 4, 16 and 24 weeks following surgery and the resultant repair tissue was investigated macroscopically and microscopically. At each sampling time, 4 treated dogs and 2 control dogs were euthanized, therefore 8 defects per group were evaluated. Results: Mean macroscopic scores of the treated defects were higher than the controls at all sampling times with significant differences (P < 0.05) observed between L-PRF treated and control defects (10.13 vs. 8.37) and L-PRP treated and control defects (10 vs. 8.5) at 4 and 16 weeks, respectively. A similar trend in mean total microscopic scores was observed with a significant difference (P < 0.05) between L-PRP treated and control defects at 4 (9.87 vs. 7.62) and 16 (13.38 vs. 11) weeks. No significant difference was observed between the platelet concentrate treated defects in either mean macroscopic scores or mean total microscopic scores. Conclusions: Both L-PRP and L-PRF could be used to effectively

  17. A multicentre, pragmatic, parallel group, randomised controlled trial to compare the clinical and cost-effectiveness of three physiotherapy-led exercise interventions for knee osteoarthritis in older adults: the BEEP trial protocol (ISRCTN: 93634563)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise is consistently recommended for older adults with knee pain related to osteoarthritis. However, the effects from exercise are typically small and short-term, likely linked to insufficient individualisation of the exercise programme and limited attention to supporting exercise adherence over time. The BEEP randomised trial aims to improve patients’ short and long-term outcomes from exercise. It will test the overall effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of two physiotherapy-led exercise interventions (Individually Tailored Exercise and Targeted Exercise Adherence) to improve the individual tailoring of, and adherence to exercise, compared with usual physiotherapy care. Methods/design Based on the learning from a pilot study (ISRCTN 23294263), the BEEP trial is a multi-centre, pragmatic, parallel group, individually randomised controlled trial, with embedded longitudinal qualitative interviews. 500 adults in primary care, aged 45 years and over with knee pain will be randomised to 1 of 3 treatment groups delivered by fully trained physiotherapists in up to 6 NHS services. These are: Usual Physiotherapy Care (control group consisting of up to 4 treatment sessions of advice and exercise), Individually Tailored Exercise (an individualised, supervised and progressed lower-limb exercise programme) or Targeted Exercise Adherence (supporting patients to adhere to exercise and to engage in general physical activity over the longer-term). The primary outcomes are pain and function as measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis index. A comprehensive range of secondary outcomes are also included. Outcomes are measured at 3, 6 (primary outcome time-point), 9, 18 and 36 months. Data on adverse events will also be collected. Semi-structured, qualitative interviews with a subsample of 30 participants (10 from each treatment group) will be undertaken at two time-points (end of treatment and 12 to 18 months later) and analysed thematically

  18. Gait kinematics and passive knee joint range of motion in children with hypermobility syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fatoye, Francis A; Palmer, Shea; van der Linden, Marietta L; Rowe, Philip J; Macmillan, Fiona

    2011-03-01

    Hypermobility syndrome (HMS) is characterised by generalised joint laxity and musculoskeletal complaints. Gait abnormalities have been reported in children with HMS but have not been empirically investigated. The extent of passive knee joint range of motion (ROM) has also not been well reported in children with HMS. This study evaluated gait kinematics and passive knee joint ROM in children diagnosed with HMS and healthy controls. Thirty-seven healthy children (mean age±SD=11.5±2.6 years) and 29 children with HMS (mean age±SD=11.9±1.8 years) participated. Sagittal knee motion and gait speed were evaluated using a VICON 3D motion analysis system. Passive knee ROM was measured with a manual goniometer. Independent t-tests compared the values of sagittal knee motion and gait speed between the two groups. Mann-Whitney U tests compared passive knee ROM between groups. Passive ROM (extension and flexion) was significantly higher (both p<0.001) in children with HMS than the healthy controls. Peak knee flexion (during loading response and swing phase) during walking was significantly lower (both p<0.001) in children with HMS. Knee extension in mid stance during walking was significantly increased (p<0.001) in children with HMS. However, gait speed was not statistically (p=0.496) different between the two groups. Children with HMS had higher passive knee ROM than healthy children and also demonstrated abnormal knee motion during gait. Gait re-education and joint stability exercise programmes may be of value to children with HMS. PMID:21300548

  19. A cross sectional study of 100 athletes with jumper's knee managed conservatively and surgically. The Victorian Institute of Sport Tendon Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, J L; Khan, K M; Harcourt, P R; Grant, M; Young, D A; Bonar, S F

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Jumper's knee causes significant morbidity in athletes of all standards. However, there are few reference data on the clinical course of this condition in a large number of patients, and the aim of this study was to rectify this. METHODS: A retrospective study of the course of jumper's knee in 100 athletes who presented to a sports medicine clinic over a nine year period was carried out. Subjects completed a questionnaire designed to collect details of sport participation, symptoms, and time out of sport. Ultrasonographic results were recorded from the radiologists' reports. Histopathological results were obtained for patients who had surgery. RESULTS: Forty eight subjects recalled that symptoms of jumper's knee began before the age of 20 years. Symptoms prevented 33 from participating in sport for more than six months, and 18 of these were sidelined for more than 12 months. Forty nine of the subjects had two or more separate episodes of symptoms. Ultrasonography showed a characteristics hypoechoic region at the junction of the inferior pole of the patella and the deep surface of the patellar tendon. Histopathological examination showed separation and disruption of collagen fibres on polarisation light microscopy and an increase in mucoid ground substance consistent with damage of tendon collagen without inflammation. CONCLUSIONS: Jumper's knee has the potential to be a debilitating condition for a sports person. About 33% of athletes presenting to a sports medicine clinic with jumper's knee were unable to return to sport for more than six months. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9429013

  20. Rotational knee strain resulting in patellar dislocation. An experimental study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Finsterbush, A

    1982-09-01

    The right lower extremities of 64 young rabbits were immobilized by a plaster spica. The animals developed a gait pattern, which included internal tibial rotation and adduction of the left (unimmobilized) tibia. Twenty-one of the animals developed medial patellar dislocation in the unimmobilized lower extremity. The mechanism of the patellar dislocation in this experimental model was possibly overstretching of the lateral colateral ligament and the lateral side of the joint capsule, associated with medial rotation of the tibia and the tibial tubercle. The direction of patellar pull when gliding inferiorly during knee flexion was shifted medially, resulting in patellar dislocation and secondarily, in formation of an exostosis under the displaced patella. Hip arthrodesis in humans, as a course of rotational instability of the contralateral knee, resembles some aspects of this experimental condition. PMID:7105585

  1. Telerehabilitation after total knee replacement in Italy: cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis of a mixed telerehabilitation-standard rehabilitation programme compared with usual care

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Francesco; Turchetti, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess cost-effectiveness and cost utility of telerehabilitation (TR) versus standard rehabilitation (SR) after total knee replacement (TKR). Design Markov decision modelling of cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis based on patient-level and secondary data sources employing Italian National Health Service (NHS; Ita-NHS) and Society perspectives. Setting Primary care units (PCUs) in Italy. Participants Patients discharged after TKR. Interventions Mixed SR-TR service (10 face-to-face sessions and 10 telesessions) versus SR (20 face-to-face sessions) Primary and secondary outcome measures The incremental cost per additional knee flexion range of motion (ROM) and per QALY gained by SR-TR compared with SR. Second, we considered the probability of being cost-effective and the probability of being more effective and less expensive. Results TR appears to be the cost-effective in the base case and in all of the considered scenarios, but is no longer more effective and less expensive if transportation costs are excluded. Comparing SR-TR with SR, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) adopting the Ita-NHS perspective for the base case was −€117/ROM gained. The cost-effectiveness probability for SR-TR was 0.98 (ceiling ratio: €50/ROM), while the joint probability of being more effective and less expensive was 0.87. Assuming that TR would increase health-related quality of life (HRQOL) utilities by 2.5%, the ICER adopting Ita-NHS perspective is −€960/QALY (cost-effectiveness probability: 1; ceiling ratio: €30 000/QALY). All the performed sensitivity analyses did not change the conclusions, but if transportation costs were excluded, the probability for SR-TR of being more clinically effective and less expensive reduced to 0.56. Conclusions The analysis suggested SR-TR to be cost-effective, even less expensive and more effective if the PCUs provide ambulance transportations. However, the uncertainty related to TR costs, HRQOL and long

  2. Effects of Specialized Footwear on Joint Loads in Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Shakoor, Najia; Lidtke, Roy H.; Sengupta, Mondira; Fogg, Louis F.; Block, Joel A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Elevated dynamic joint loads have been associated with the severity and progression of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. This study compared the effects of a specialized shoe (the mobility shoe) designed to lower dynamic loads at the knee with self-chosen conventional walking shoes and with a commercially available walking shoe as a control. Methods Subjects with knee OA were evaluated in 2 groups. Group A (n = 28) underwent gait analyses with both their self-chosen walking shoes and the mobility shoes. Group B (n = 20) underwent gait analyses with a control shoe and the mobility shoe. Frontal plane knee loads were compared between the different footwear conditions. Results Group A demonstrated an 8% reduction in the peak external knee adduction moment with the mobility shoe compared with self-chosen walking shoes (mean ± SD 49 ± 0.80 versus 2.71 ± 0.84 %BW × H; P < 0.05). Group B demonstrated a 12% reduction in the peak external knee adduction moment with the mobility shoe compared with the control shoe (mean ± SD 2.66 ± 0.69 versus 3.07 ± 0.75 %BW × H; P < 0.05). Conclusion Specialized footwear can effectively reduce joint loads in subjects with knee OA, compared with self-chosen shoes and control walking shoes. Footwear may represent a therapeutic target for the treatment of knee OA. The types of shoes worn by subjects with knee OA should be evaluated more closely in terms of their effects on the disease. PMID:18759313

  3. Comparative Studies of Acculturative Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, J. W.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Studies of acculturative stress are reported from Canada. The reduction in health status among people undergoing acculturation has psychological, somatic, and social aspects. The stress varies across types of groups and individual differences. Further study is needed to determine variations across host societies. (VM)

  4. Comparative Studies in Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazurek, Kas, Ed.; Winzer, Margret A., Ed.

    This text presents 26 case studies which examine special education provisions for children in the world today. The reports focus on the current state of special education in selected nations and major issues and controversies in the field of special education within those nations. Each case study addresses the following themes: (1) prevalence of…

  5. Evaluation of Distal Femoral Rotational Alignment with Spiral CT Scan before Total Knee Arthroplasty (A Study in Iranian population)

    PubMed Central

    Jabalameli, Mahmoud; Moradi, Amin; Bagherifard, Abolfazl; Radi, Mehran; Mokhtari, Tahmineh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evaluating the landmarks for rotation of the distal femur is a challenge for orthopedic surgeons. Although the posterior femoral condyle axis is a good landmark for surgeons, the surgical transepicondylar axis may be a better option with the help of preoperative CT scanning. The purpose of this study was to ascertain relationships among the axes’ guiding distal femur rotational alignment in preoperative CT scans of Iranian patients who were candidates for total knee arthroplasty and the effects of age, gender, and knee alignment on these relationships. Methods: One hundred and eight cases who were admitted to two university hospitals for total knee arthroplasty were included in this study. The rotation of the distal femur was evaluated using single axial CT images through the femoral epicondyle. Four lines were drawn digitally in this view: anatomical and surgical transepicondylar axes, posterior condylar axis and the Whiteside anteroposterior line. The alignment of the extremity was evaluated in the standing alignment view. Then the angles were measured along these lines and their relationship was evaluated. Results: The mean angle between the anatomical transepicondylar axis and posterior condylar axis and between the surgical transepicondylar axis and posterior condylar axis were 5.9 ± 1.6 degrees and 1.6±1.7 degrees respectively. The mean angle between the Whiteside’s anteroposterior line and the line perpendicular to the posterior condylar axis was 3.7±2.1 degrees. Significant differences existed between the two genders in these relationships. No significant correlation between the age of patients and angles of the distal femur was detected. The anatomical surgical transepicondylar axis was in 4.3 degrees external rotation in relation to the surgical transepicondylar axis. Conclusion: Preoperative CT scanning can help accurately determine rotational landmarks of the distal femur. If one of the reference axes cannot be determined, other

  6. Advantages of Pure Platelet-Rich Plasma Compared with Leukocyte- and Platelet-Rich Plasma in Treating Rabbit Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wen-Jing; Xu, Hai-Tao; Sheng, Jia-Gen; An, Zhi-Quan; Guo, Shang-Chun; Xie, Xue-Tao; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background Concentrated leukocytes in leukocyte- and platelet-rich plasma (L-PRP) may deliver increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines to activate the NF-κB signaling pathway, to counter the beneficial effects of growth factors on osteoarthritic cartilage. However, to date no relevant studies have substantiated that in vivo. Material/Methods Autologous L-PRP and pure platelet-rich plasma (P-PRP) were prepared, measured for componential composition, and injected intra-articularly after 4, 5, and 6 weeks post-anterior cruciate ligament transection. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) was injected intraperitoneally to inhibit NF-κB activation. All rabbits were sacrificed after 8 weeks postoperative. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were performed to determine interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentrations in the synovial fluid, Indian ink staining was performed for gross morphological assessment, and hematoxylin and eosin staining and toluidine blue staining were performed for histological assessment. Results Compared with L-PRP, P-PRP injections achieved better outcomes regarding the prevention of cartilage destruction, preservation of cartilaginous matrix, and reduction of IL-1β and PGE2 concentrations. CAPE injections reversed the increased IL-1β and PGE2 concentrations in the synovial fluid after L-PRP injections and improved the outcome of L-PRP injections to a level similar to P-PRP injections, while they had no influence on the therapeutic efficacy of P-PRP injections. Conclusions Concentrated leukocytes in L-PRP may release increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines to activate the NF-κB signaling pathway, to counter the beneficial effects of growth factors on osteoarthritic cartilage, and finally, result in a inferior efficacy of L-PRP to P-PRP for the treatment of osteoarthritis. PMID:27086145

  7. Advantages of Pure Platelet-Rich Plasma Compared with Leukocyte- and Platelet-Rich Plasma in Treating Rabbit Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wen-Jing; Xu, Hai-Tao; Sheng, Jia-Gen; An, Zhi-Quan; Guo, Shang-Chun; Xie, Xue-Tao; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Concentrated leukocytes in leukocyte- and platelet-rich plasma (L-PRP) may deliver increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines to activate the NF-κB signaling pathway, to counter the beneficial effects of growth factors on osteoarthritic cartilage. However, to date no relevant studies have substantiated that in vivo. MATERIAL AND METHODS Autologous L-PRP and pure platelet-rich plasma (P-PRP) were prepared, measured for componential composition, and injected intra-articularly after 4, 5, and 6 weeks post-anterior cruciate ligament transection. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) was injected intraperitoneally to inhibit NF-κB activation. All rabbits were sacrificed after 8 weeks postoperative. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were performed to determine interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentrations in the synovial fluid, Indian ink staining was performed for gross morphological assessment, and hematoxylin and eosin staining and toluidine blue staining were performed for histological assessment. RESULTS Compared with L-PRP, P-PRP injections achieved better outcomes regarding the prevention of cartilage destruction, preservation of cartilaginous matrix, and reduction of IL-1β and PGE2 concentrations. CAPE injections reversed the increased IL-1β and PGE2 concentrations in the synovial fluid after L-PRP injections and improved the outcome of L-PRP injections to a level similar to P-PRP injections, while they had no influence on the therapeutic efficacy of P-PRP injections. CONCLUSIONS Concentrated leukocytes in L-PRP may release increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines to activate the NF-κB signaling pathway, to counter the beneficial effects of growth factors on osteoarthritic cartilage, and finally, result in a inferior efficacy of L-PRP to P-PRP for the treatment of osteoarthritis. PMID:27086145

  8. Prospective study of the cementless "New Wave" total knee mobile-bearing arthroplasty: 8-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Normand, Xavier; Pinçon, Jean-Louis; Ragot, Jean-Marie; Verdier, Régis; Aslanian, Thierry

    2015-02-01

    One of the main factors affecting the survival of a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the fixation method. The constraints placed on the bone-implant interface of a mobile-bearing TKA must be taken in account during the design and evaluation phases. For more than two decades, calcium phosphate ceramics, particularly hydroxyapatitis, have been used in Europe to accelerate the bone integration of cementless implants. A prospective study of patients continuously recruited by three senior surgeons at three French private hospitals has been carried out. There were no exclusion criteria. Eighty-four (84) cementless mobile-bearing total knee prosthesis of the brand "New Wave" were implanted in 74 patients over a 2-year period (2004-2005). Implant survival at 8 years was 95% [with a confidence interval of 95%: 80.2-96.4%] when revision for any cause was defined as the endpoint. Five implants required surgical revision to exchange all or part of the implant: two for aseptic loosening of tibial component, one for osteolysis, one for persistent flessum (30°) and one for tibial periprosthetic fracture. Completely integrated implants and event-free outcomes were recorded in 91.4% of the cases at eight-year follow-up. The Hospital for Special Surgery score significantly improved from 56.8/100 points before the surgery to 83.9/100 points at the last follow-up (p < 0.05). Radiologically, only one patient had radiolucent lines around the tibial and femoral components. This cementless total knee prosthesis yielded good medium-term survival. Cementless arthroplasty can generate solid and durable bone fixation in this total weight-bearing implant, and it seems that the hidroxyapathitis surface in this series stimulate the bone integration at the bone-implant interface. PMID:24858380

  9. Varus Thrust and Knee Frontal Plane Dynamic Motion in Persons with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alison H.; Chmiel, Joan S.; Moisio, Kirsten C.; Almagor, Orit; Zhang, Yunhui; Cahue, September; Sharma, Leena

    2013-01-01

    Objective Varus thrust visualized during walking is associated with a greater medial knee and an increased risk of medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) progression. Little is known about varus thrust presence determined by visual observation relates to quantitative gait kinematic We hypothesized that varus thrust presence is associated with greater knee frontal plane dynamic movement during the stance phase of gait. Methods Participants had knee OA in at least one knee. Trained examiners assessed participants for varus thrust presence during ambulation. Frontal plane knee motion during ambulation captured using external passive reflective markers and an 8-camera motion analysis system. To examine the cross-sectional relationship between varus thrust and frontal plane knee motion, used multivariable regression models with the quantitative motion measures as dependent variables and varus thrust (present/absent) as predictor; models were adjusted for age, gender, BMI, gait speed, and knee static alignment. Results 236 persons [mean BMI: 28.5 kg/m2 (SD 5.5), mean age: 64.9 years (SD 10.4), 75.8% women] contributing 440 knees comprised the study sample. 82 knees (18.6%) had definite varus thrust. Knees with varus thrust had greater peak varus angle and greater peak varus angular velocity during stance than knees without varus thrust (mean differences 0.90° and 6.65°/sec, respectively). These patterns remained significant after adjusting for age, gender, BMI, gait speed, and knee static alignment. Conclusion Visualized varus thrust during walking was associated with a greater peak knee varus angular velocity and a greater peak knee varus angle during stance phase of gait. PMID:23948980

  10. Registration of knee joint surfaces for the in vivo study of joint injuries based on magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Rita W. T.; Habib, Ayman F.; Frayne, Richard; Ronsky, Janet L.

    2006-03-01

    In-vivo quantitative assessments of joint conditions and health status can help to increase understanding of the pathology of osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease that affects a large population each year. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a non-invasive and accurate means to assess and monitor joint properties, and has become widely used for diagnosis and biomechanics studies. Quantitative analyses and comparisons of MR datasets require accurate alignment of anatomical structures, thus image registration becomes a necessary procedure for these applications. This research focuses on developing a registration technique for MR knee joint surfaces to allow quantitative study of joint injuries and health status. It introduces a novel idea of translating techniques originally developed for geographic data in the field of photogrammetry and remote sensing to register 3D MR data. The proposed algorithm works with surfaces that are represented by randomly distributed points with no requirement of known correspondences. The algorithm performs matching locally by identifying corresponding surface elements, and solves for the transformation parameters relating the surfaces by minimizing normal distances between them. This technique was used in three applications to: 1) register temporal MR data to verify the feasibility of the algorithm to help monitor diseases, 2) quantify patellar movement with respect to the femur based on the transformation parameters, and 3) quantify changes in contact area locations between the patellar and femoral cartilage at different knee flexion angles. The results indicate accurate registration and the proposed algorithm can be applied for in-vivo study of joint injuries with MRI.

  11. A principal component analysis approach to correcting the knee flexion axis during gait.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Elisabeth; Lugade, Vipul; Crenshaw, Jeremy; Miller, Emily; Kaufman, Kenton

    2016-06-14

    Accurate and precise knee flexion axis identification is critical for prescribing and assessing tibial and femoral derotation osteotomies, but is highly prone to marker misplacement-induced error. The purpose of this study was to develop an efficient algorithm for post-hoc correction of the knee flexion axis and test its efficacy relative to other established algorithms. Gait data were collected on twelve healthy subjects using standard marker placement as well as intentionally misplaced lateral knee markers. The efficacy of the algorithm was assessed by quantifying the reduction in knee angle errors. Crosstalk error was quantified from the coefficient of determination (r(2)) between knee flexion and adduction angles. Mean rotation offset error (αo) was quantified from the knee and hip rotation kinematics across the gait cycle. The principal component analysis (PCA)-based algorithm significantly reduced r(2) (p<0.001) and caused αo,knee to converge toward 11.9±8.0° of external rotation, demonstrating improved certainty of the knee kinematics. The within-subject standard deviation of αo,hip between marker placements was reduced from 13.5±1.5° to 0.7±0.2° (p<0.001), demonstrating improved precision of the knee kinematics. The PCA-based algorithm performed at levels comparable to a knee abduction-adduction minimization algorithm (Baker et al., 1999) and better than a null space algorithm (Schwartz and Rozumalski, 2005) for this healthy subject population. PMID:27079622

  12. Metal block augmentation for bone defects of the medial tibia during primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stable and well-aligned placement of tibial components during primary total knee arthroplasty is challenging in patients with bone defects. Although rectangular block-shaped augmentations are widely used to reduce the shearing force between the tibial tray and bone compared with wedge-shaped augmentations, the clinical result remains unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the outcome of primary total knee arthroplasty with metal block augmentation. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the 3- to 6-year follow-up results of 33 knees that underwent total knee arthroplasty with metal block augmentation (metal-augmented group) for bone defects of the medial tibia and 132 varus knees without bone defects as the control group. All surgeries were performed using posterior-stabilized cemented prostheses in both groups. Cemented stems were routinely augmented when the metal block was used. Results There were no differences in implant survival rates (100% in metal-augmented and 99.2% in control) or knee function scores (82 points in metal-augmented and 84 points in control) between the two groups at the final follow-up examination (P = 0.60 and P = 0.09, respectively). No subsidence or loosening of the tibial tray was observed. Of 33 metal-augmented total knee arthroplasties, a nonprogressive radiolucent line beneath the metal was detected in 10 knees (30.3%), and rounding of the medial edge of the tibia was observed in 17 knees (51.5%). Conclusions The clinical results of total knee arthroplasty with metal augmentation were not inferior to those in patients without bone defects. However, radiolucent lines were observed in 30.3%. PMID:24139483

  13. Is symptomatic knee osteoarthritis a risk factor for a fast decline in gait speed? Results from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    White, Daniel K.; Niu, Jingbo; Zhang, Yuqing

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Gait speed is an important marker of health in adults and slows with aging. While knee osteoarthritis (OA) can result in difficulty walking, it is not known if radiographic knee OA (ROA) and/or knee pain are associated with a fast decline trajectory of gait speed over time. Methods Gait speed trajectories were constructed using a multinomial modeling strategy from repeated 20-meter walk tests measured annually over four years among participants from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI), a prospective cohort study of adults with or at high risk of knee OA aged 45 to 79 at baseline. We grouped participants into four knee OA categories (having neither ROA nor knee pain, ROA only, knee pain only, or symptomatic knee OA (ROA and pain)) and examined their association with trajectories of gait speed using a multivariable polytomous regression model adjusting for age and other potential confounders. Results Of the 4179 participants (mean age (sd) = 61.1 (9.1), women =57.6%, mean BMI =28.5 (4.8) kg/m2), 5% (n=205) were in a fast decline trajectory slowing 2.75%/year. People with symptomatic knee OA had almost a 9-fold risk (OR = 8.9, 95% CI [3.1, 25.5]) of being in a fast decline trajectory compared with those with neither pain nor ROA. Participants with knee pain had 4.5 times the odds of fast decline (95% CI [1.4, 14.6]) and those with ROA only had a slight but non-statistically significant increased risk. Conclusions People with symptomatic knee OA have the highest risk of fast decline trajectory of gait speed compared with people with ROA or pain alone. PMID:22899342

  14. Can Structural Joint Damage Measured with MR Imaging Be Used to Predict Knee Replacement in the Following Year?

    PubMed Central

    Kwoh, C. Kent; Hannon, Michael J.; Hunter, David J.; Eckstein, Felix; Wang, Zhijie; Boudreau, Robert M.; John, Markus R.; Nevitt, Michael C.; Guermazi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess whether magnetic resonance (MR) imaging–based cross-sectional measures of structural joint damage can be used to predict knee replacement during the following year. Materials and Methods Participants were drawn from the Osteoarthritis Initiative, a longitudinal observational study that includes 4796 participants who have knee osteoarthritis or are at risk. The HIPAA-compliant protocol was approved by the institutional review boards of all participating centers, and written informed consent was obtained from all participants. During the 5 years of follow-up, 199 knees underwent knee replacement and were matched with 199 control knees that did not undergo knee replacement. Knees were matched according to radiographic disease stage and patient sex and age. All knees that underwent knee replacement and had MR images available from the year before surgery were included. MR images were assessed for cartilage damage, bone marrow lesions, meniscal damage, meniscal extrusion, synovitis, and effusion prior to reported knee replacement. Conditional logistic regression was applied to assess the risk of knee replacement. Analyses were performed on a compartmental and knee level. Results Participants had a mean age ± standard deviation of 64.2 years ± 8.4 (range, 47–82 years) and were predominantly women (232 of 398 participants, 58.3%). Risk for knee replacement was significantly increased for knees that exhibited two or more subregions with severe cartilage loss (odds ratio [OR], 16.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.96, 68.76), more than two subregions with bone marrow lesions (OR, 4.00; 95% CI: 1.75, 9.16), medial meniscal maceration (OR, 1.84; 95% CI: 1.13, 2.99), effusion (OR, 4.75; 95% CI: 2.55, 8.85), or synovitis (OR, 2.17; 95% CI: 1.33, 3.56), but not extrusion (OR, 1.00; 95% CI: 0.60,1.67), when compared with knees that did not exhibit these features as the reference standard. Conclusion Apart from meniscal extrusion, all features of tissue

  15. Iodine-impregnated incision drape and bacterial recolonization in simulated total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Milandt, Nikolaj; Nymark, Tine; Jørn Kolmos, Hans; Emmeluth, Claus; Overgaard, Søren

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - Iodine-impregnated incision drapes (IIIDs) are used to prevent surgical site infection (SSI). However, there is some evidence to suggest a potential increase in SSI risk as a result of IIID use, possibly from promotion of skin recolonization. A greater number of viable bacteria in the surgical field of an arthroplasty, and surgery in general, may increase the infection risk. We investigated whether IIID use increases bacterial recolonization compared to no drape use under conditions of simulated total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods - 20 patients scheduled for TKA were recruited. Each patient had 1 knee randomized for draping with IIID, while the contralateral knee was left bare. The patients thus served as their own control. The operating room conditions and perioperative procedures of a TKA were simulated. Cylinder samples were collected from the skin of each knee prior to disinfection, and again on 2 occasions after skin preparation-75 min apart. Quantities of bacteria were estimated using a spread plate technique under aerobic conditions. Results - We found similar quantities of bacteria on the intervention and control knees immediately after skin disinfection and after 75 min of simulated surgery. These quantities had not increased at the end of surgery when compared to baseline, so no recolonization was detected on the draped knees or on the bare knees. Interpretation - The use of IIIDs did not increase bacterial recolonization in simulated TKA. This study does not support the hypothesis that IIIDs promote bacterial recolonization and postoperative infection risk. PMID:27168308

  16. Outcomes of patellar resurfacing versus nonresurfacing in total knee arthroplasty: a 9-year experience based on a case series of scorpio PS knees.

    PubMed

    Epinette, Jean-Alain; Manley, Michael T

    2008-10-01

    Patellar resurfacing during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is an actively debated issue. This prospective study addresses fundamental questions regarding whether to resurface the patella. To do this, we compared clinical results of Scorpio PS knees with and without patellar resurfacing to determine whether there was any statistically significant difference in survivorship, function, pain, and radiographic analyses. Our study failed to demonstrate any statistical difference between the 2 groups (resurfaced versus nonresurfaced) according to knee pain, walking abilities, stair climbing, range of motion, and radiologic findings, as well as cross-correlations between patellar pain and age, gender, obesity, or etiology. Our radiologic findings did not reveal any failures of bony structures facing the metallic flange. Some knee designs can thus be seen as "patella friendly." Given the significant cost of patella resurfacing and the resulting well-known complications, we continue to avoid systematic resurfacing of the patella during Scorpio TKA. PMID:18979932

  17. Application of Infrared Thermography as a Diagnostic Tool of Knee Osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfaoui, Ahlem; Bouzid, Mohamed Amine; Pron, Hervé; Taiar, Redha; Polidori, Guillaume

    This paper aimed to study the feasibility of application of infrared thermography to detect osteoarthritis of the knee and to compare the distribution of skin temperature between participants with osteoarthritis and those without pathology. All tests were conducted at LACM (Laboratory of Mechanical Stresses Analysis) and the gymnasium of the University of Reims Champagne Ardennes. IR thermography was performed using an IR camera. Ten participants with knee osteoarthritis and 12 reference healthy participants without OA participated in this study. Questionnaires were also used. The participants with osteoarthritis of the knee were selected on clinical examination and a series of radiographs. The level of pain was recorded by using a simple verbal scale (0-4). Infrared thermography reveals relevant disease by highlighting asymmetrical behavior in thermal color maps of both knees. Moreover, a linear evolution of skin temperature in the knee area versus time has been found whatever the participant group is in the first stage following a given effort. Results clearly show that the temperature can be regarded as a key parameter for evaluating pain. Thermal images of the knee were taken with an infrared camera. The study shows that with the advantage of being noninvasive and easily repeatable, IRT appears to be a useful tool to detect quantifiable patterns of surface temperatures and predict the singular thermal behavior of this pathology. It also seems that this non-intrusive technique enables to detect the early clinical manifestations of knee OA.

  18. Cosmetic effect of knee joint in a knee disarticulation prosthesis.

    PubMed

    de Laat, Fred A; van der Pluijm, Mark J; van Kuijk, Annette A; Geertzen, Jan H; Roorda, Leo D

    2014-01-01

    Despite numerous advantages, knee disarticulations (KDs) are rarely performed because of the anticipated KD prosthesis fitting problems that include the positioning of the knee joint distally from the KD socket. This results in lengthening of the thigh and subsequent shortening of the shank. The objective of this study was to assess the cosmetic effect of the knee joint in a KD prosthesis by determining the extent of the lengthening of the thigh and the shortening of the shank. This lengthening and shortening were measured through an experimental setup using laser techniques. These measurements were made of 18 knee joints used in KD prostheses. Lengthening of the thigh varied between 23 and 92 mm, and shortening of the shank varied between 3 and 50 mm. The polycentric knees Medi KH6 and Medi KHF1 showed the least lengthening of the thigh, and the polycentric knees Teh Lin Prosthetic & Orthotic Co. Ltd Graph-Lite and Medi KP5 showed the least shortening of the shank. PMID:25856500

  19. Surgical and Functional Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Total Knee Replacement With Patient-Specific Implants Compared With “Off-the-Shelf” Implants

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzkopf, Ran; Brodsky, Merrick; Garcia, Giancarlo A.; Gomoll, Andreas H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) instrumentation and implant designs have been evolving, with one of the current innovations being patient-specific implants (PSIs). Purpose To evaluate whether there is a significant difference in surgical time, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative range of motion, and length of stay between PSI and conventional TKA. Study Design Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods A consecutive series of 621 TKA patients, 307 with PSIs and 314 with conventional implants, was reviewed. Differences in estimated blood loss, length of stay, range of motion, and surgical time/tourniquet time between the 2 cohorts were analyzed. Results Linear regression analysis demonstrated that PSI decreased estimated blood loss by 44.72 mL (P < .01), decreased length of stay by 0.39 days (P < .01), decreased postoperative range of motion by 3.90° (P < .01), and had a negligible difference on surgical and tourniquet time. Conclusion The use of PSI is associated with decreased estimated blood loss, decreased length of stay, decreased range of motion, and no discernible difference in surgical or tourniquet time, all of which are unlikely to be clinically significant. PMID:26673037

  20. The knee-spine syndrome. Association between lumbar lordosis and extension of the knee.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yasuaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamagata, Masatsune; Hanaoka, Eiji; Moriya, Hideshige

    2003-01-01

    Degenerative changes of the knee often cause loss of extension. This may affect aspects of posture such as lumbar lordosis. A total of 366 patients underwent radiological examination of the lumbar spine in a standing position. The knee and body angles were measured by physical examination using a goniometer. Limitation of extension of the knee was significantly greater in patients whose lumbar lordosis was 30 degrees or less. Lumbar lordosis was significantly reduced in patients whose limitation of extension of the knee was more than 5 degrees. It decreased over the age of 70 years, and the limitation of extension of the knee increased over the age of 60 years. Our study indicates that symptoms from the lumbar spine may be caused by degenerative changes in the knee. This may be called the 'knee-spine syndrome'. PMID:12585585

  1. The effect of osteoarthritis of the knee on the biomechanics of other joints in the lower limbs.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, A J; Stewart, C; Postans, N; Dodds, A L; Holt, C A; Roberts, A P

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the loading of the other joints of the lower limb in patients with unilateral osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. We recruited 20 patients with no other symptoms or deformity in the lower limbs from a consecutive cohort of patients awaiting knee replacement. Gait analysis and electromyographic recordings were performed to determine moments at both knees and hips, and contraction patterns in the medial and lateral quadriceps and hamstrings bilaterally. The speed of gait was reduced in the group with OA compared with the controls, but there were only minor differences in stance times between the limbs. Patients with OA of the knee had significant increases in adduction moment impulse at both knees and the contralateral hip (adjusted p-values: affected knee: p < 0.01, unaffected knee p = 0.048, contralateral hip p = 0.03), and significantly increased muscular co-contraction bilaterally compared with controls (all comparisons for co-contraction, p < 0.01). The other major weight-bearing joints are at risk from abnormal biomechanics in patients with unilateral OA of the knee. PMID:23450019

  2. Sports Activity after Low-contact-stress Total Knee Arthroplasty – A long term follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Vielgut, Ines; Leitner, Lukas; Kastner, Norbert; Radl, Roman; Leithner, Andreas; Sadoghi, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide comprehensive long-term data about sports activity levels in patients following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and to determine the impact of pre-operative function, pain and specific performed sports on the results. 236 patients who have undergone TKA for severe osteoarthritis of the knee were asked to provide specific information regarding exercised types of sports before surgery and after at least 10 years following TKA. Pre- and postoperative function and pain were evaluated by the use of Tegner-, WOMAC- and VAS Score. After a mean of 14.9 years, a significant improvement regarding pain and function was observed. Pre-operative Tegner- and WOMAC scores revealed significant positive correlations with the post-operative Tegner-Score. Accordingly, a high percentage of patients (70.9%) stayed actively involved in sports. Nevertheless, the number of performing patients has decreased according to the sports impact. 71.3% continued practising low-impact-, 43.7% intermediate-impact sports whereas only 16.4% kept performing high impact sports. We conclude that TKA is highly effective in long-time pain reduction as well as improvement of function. Additionally, we found considerable sports activities preserved in the investigated series. However, sports activities in particular, seem to decrease according to the impact of sports. PMID:27090945

  3. A study of the biological behavior of the meniscus as a transplant in the medial compartment of a dog's knee.

    PubMed

    Canham, W; Stanish, W

    1986-01-01

    A surgical procedure was developed such that a meniscus could be reimplanted in the medial compartment of canine knees. The medial meniscus was removed and reimplanted in one group of seven animals, removed and reimplanted with a glutaraldehyde-preserved bioprosthesis in a second group of five animals, and removed and replaced by an allograft meniscus preserved 2 to 3 weeks in tissue culture in a final group of ten animals. All animals were autopsied at 2 months and the knees were examined by gross dissection and histologic study of the joint capsule meniscal interface. Results showed that implantation by the surgical technique was effective and no loose bodies or partial detachments were found in the reimplantation or tissue culture-stored allogenic menisci. Allogenic menisci preserved in glutaraldehyde and termed a bioprosthesis attached to the joint capsule less satisfactorily. There was minimal inflammation of the synovium in any group at 2 months; however, the glutaraldehyde group showed repeated effusions at 1 and 2 weeks. PMID:3096157

  4. The influence of immediate physiotherapy in the out-patient management of acute knee injuries: a controlled study.

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, M A; Venner, R M; Ford, I; Todd, B D

    1990-01-01

    All patients who presented to our Accident & Emergency Department over a 6-month period with an acute knee injury were randomly assigned to receive either immediate physiotherapy or not prior to further follow up at an out-patient clinic. Patients with trivial injuries not requiring follow up and patients with severe injuries requiring immediate admission were excluded from the study. Patients not immediately referred for physiotherapy could be referred if this was thought necessary at later follow up. There was no statistical difference in the number of outpatient follow up appointments or the length of time to discharge from the clinic between the groups. Those patients referred for physiotherapy immediately had a significantly greater number of total attendances at the physiotherapy department. However more patients in the 'no physiotherapy' group ultimately required arthroscopy for suspected meniscal injury. We conclude that a blanket referral of all acute knee injury patients is unjustified and wasteful of resources. However physiotherapy may be indicated in patients initially suspected of having meniscal injury. PMID:2099163

  5. Histochemical study on the atrophy of the quadriceps femoris muscle caused by knee joint injuries of rats.

    PubMed

    Okada, Y

    1989-03-01

    Atrophy developing in the quadriceps femoris muscle following knee injury is one of the serious problems not only in the field of orthopedics but also of rehabilitation. However the pathogenesis of this atrophy has not yet been elucidated. The author therefore produced a complex ligament injury model using the knee joints of rats in order to study the pathogenesis of this atrophy. After severing the anterior cruciate ligament, the medial collateral ligament and tibial insertion of the medial meniscus of rats, these animals were sacrificed at 4, 8 and 12 weeks. After removing the vastus lateralis muscle, vastus medialis muscle, and rectus femoris muscle, specimens of these muscles were stained for ATPase. The transection area of the muscle fibers was measured and the fiber type composition was determined. At 4 weeks the vastus medialis muscle and at 12 weeks the vastus lateralis muscle showed marked atrophy. The rectus femoris muscle exhibited the least atrophy throughout the entire observation period. In examining the atrophy of the quadriceps femoris muscle by muscle fiber type, the degree of atrophy was found to differ among the venters and even the same venter showed a different reaction depending on the elapsed time after sustaining the injury. Neither changes in the fiber type composition not neurogenic findings could be observed. PMID:2526800

  6. Longitudinal Course of Physical Function in People With Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis: Data From the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study and the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    ØIESTAD, BRITT ELIN; WHITE, DANIEL K.; BOOTON, ROSS; NIU, JINGBO; ZHANG, YUQING; TORNER, JIM; LEWIS, CORA E.; NEVITT, MICHAEL; LaVALLEY, MICHAEL; FELSON, DAVID T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Pain and functional decline are hallmarks of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Nevertheless, longitudinal studies unexpectedly reveal stable or improved physical function. The aim of this study was to impute missing and pre–total knee replacement (TKR) values to describe physical function over time among people with symptomatic knee OA. Methods We included participants from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST) and the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) with incident symptomatic knee OA, observed during the first 30 months in MOST and 36 months in OAI. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) physical function (WOMAC-PF), the 5-times sit-to-stand test, and the 20-meter-walk test were assessed at 4 and 5 years in MOST and at 6 years in OAI. We used a multiple imputation method for missing visits, and estimated pre-TKR values close to the time of TKR, using a fitted local regression smoothing curve. In mixed-effect models, we investigated the physical function change over time, using data before and after imputation and calculation of pre-TKR values. Results In MOST, 225 (8%) had incident knee OA, with corresponding 577 (12.7%) in OAI. After adjusting for pre-TKR values and imputing missing values, we found that WOMAC-PF values remained stable or slightly declined over time, and the 20-meter-walk test results changed from stable in nonimputed analyses to worsening using imputed data. Conclusion Data from MOST and OAI showed stable to worsening physical function over time in people with incident symptomatic knee OA after imputing missing values and adjusting pre-TKR values. PMID:26236919

  7. Total Knee Arthroplasty Designed to Accommodate the Presence or Absence of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Harman, Melinda K.; Bonin, Stephanie J.; Leslie, Chris J.; Banks, Scott A.; Hodge, W. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for selecting the same total knee arthroplasty prosthesis whether the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is retained or resected is rarely documented. This study reports prospective midterm clinical, radiographic, and functional outcomes of a fixed-bearing design implanted using two different surgical techniques. The PCL was completely retained in 116 knees and completely resected in 43 knees. For the entire cohort, clinical knee (96 ± 7) and function (92 ± 13) scores and radiographic outcomes were good to excellent for 84% of patients after 5–10 years in vivo. Range of motion averaged 124° ± 9°, with 126 knees exhibiting ≥120° flexion. Small differences in average knee flexion and function scores were noted, with the PCL-resected group exhibiting an average of 5° more flexion but an average function score that was 7 points lower compared to the PCL-retained group. Fluoroscopic analysis of 33 knees revealed stable tibiofemoral translations. This study demonstrates that a TKA articular design with progressive congruency in the lateral compartment can provide for femoral condyle rollback in maximal flexion activities and achieve good clinical and functional performance in patients with PCL-retained and PCL-resected TKA. This TKA design proved suitable for use with either surgical technique, providing surgeons with the choice of maintaining or sacrificing the PCL. PMID:25374697

  8. Comparison of Two-dimensional Measurement Techniques for Predicting Knee Angle and Moment during a Drop Vertical Jump

    PubMed Central

    Mizner, Ryan L.; Chmielewski, Terese L.; Toepke, John J.; Tofte, Kari B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the association of two dimensional (2D) video-based techniques and three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis to assess potential knee injury risk factors during jump landing. Design Observational study Setting Research Laboratory Participants Thirty-six female athletes in cutting and pivoting sports. Assessment Athletes performed a drop vertical jump during which movement was recorded with a motion analysis system and a digital video camera positioned in the frontal plane. Main Outcome Measures The 2D variables were the frontal plane projection angle (FPPA), the angle formed between thigh and leg, and the knee:ankle separation ratio, the distance between knee joints divided by the distance between ankles. The 3D variables were knee abduction angle and external abduction moment. All variables were assessed at peak knee flexion. Linear regression assessed the relationship between the 2D and 3D variables. In addition, intraclass correlation coefficients determined rater reliability for the 2D variables and compared the 2D measurements made from digital video to the same measurements from the motion analysis. Results The knee:ankle separation ratio accounted for a higher variance of 3D knee abduction angle (r2 =0.350) and knee abduction moment (r2=0.394) when compared to the FPPA (r2=0.145, 0.254). The digital video measures had favorable rater reliability (ICC:0.89–0.94) and were comparable to the motion analysis system (ICC≥0.92). Conclusion When compared to the FPPA, the knee:ankle separation ratio had better association with previously cited knee injury risk factors in female athletes. The 2D measures have adequate consistency and validity to merit further clinical consideration in jump landing assessments. PMID:22544058

  9. Greater Step Widths Reduce Internal Knee Abduction Moments in Medial Compartment Knee Osteoarthritis Patients During Stair Ascent.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Max R; Klipple, Gary; Zhang, Songning

    2015-08-01

    Increased step widths have been shown to reduce peak internal knee abduction moments in healthy individuals but not in knee osteoarthritis patients during stair descent. This study aimed to assess effects of increased step widths on peak knee abduction moments and associated variables in adults with medial knee osteoarthritis and healthy older adults during stair ascent. Thirteen healthy older adults and 13 medial knee osteoarthritis patients performed stair ascent using preferred, wide, and wider step widths. Three-dimensional kinematics and ground reaction forces (GRFs) using an instrumented staircase were collected. Increased step width reduced first and second peak knee abduction moments, and knee abduction moment impulse. In addition, frontal plane GRF at time of first and second peak knee abduction moment and lateral trunk lean at time of first peak knee abduction moment were reduced with increased step width during stair ascent in both groups. Knee abduction moment variables were not different between knee osteoarthritis patients and healthy controls. Our findings suggest that increasing step width may be an effective simple gait alteration to reduce knee abduction moment variables in both knee osteoarthritis and healthy adults during stair ascent. However, long term effects of increasing step width during stair ascent in knee osteoarthritis and healthy adults remain unknown. PMID:25781222

  10. Impact of an Automated Surveillance to Detect Surgical-Site Infections in Patients Undergoing Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Perdiz, Luciana B; Yokoe, Deborah S; Furtado, Guilherme H; Medeiros, Eduardo A S

    2016-08-01

    In this retrospective study, we compared automated surveillance with conventional surveillance to detect surgical site infection after primary total hip or knee arthroplasty. Automated surveillance demonstrated better efficacy than routine surveillance in SSI diagnosis, sensitivity, and predictive negative value in hip and knee arthroplasty. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:991-993. PMID:27072598

  11. An improved OpenSim gait model with multiple degrees of freedom knee joint and knee ligaments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hang; Bloswick, Donald; Merryweather, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Musculoskeletal models are widely used to investigate joint kinematics and predict muscle force during gait. However, the knee is usually simplified as a one degree of freedom joint and knee ligaments are neglected. The aim of this study was to develop an OpenSim gait model with enhanced knee structures. The knee joint in this study included three rotations and three translations. The three knee rotations and mediolateral translation were independent, with proximodistal and anteroposterior translations occurring as a function of knee flexion/extension. Ten elastic elements described the geometrical and mechanical properties of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PCL), and the medial and lateral collateral ligaments (MCL and LCL). The three independent knee rotations were evaluated using OpenSim to observe ligament function. The results showed that the anterior and posterior bundles of ACL and PCL (aACL, pACL and aPCL, pPCL) intersected during knee flexion. The aACL and pACL mainly provided force during knee flexion and adduction, respectively. The aPCL was slack throughout the range of three knee rotations; however, the pPCL was utilised for knee abduction and internal rotation. The LCL was employed for knee adduction and rotation, but was slack beyond 20° of knee flexion. The MCL bundles were mainly used during knee adduction and external rotation. All these results suggest that the functions of knee ligaments in this model approximated the behaviour of the physical knee and the enhanced knee structures can improve the ability to investigate knee joint biomechanics during various gait activities. PMID:24611807

  12. Gait patterns after intraarticular treatment of patients with osteoarthritis of the Knee - Hyaluronan versus triamcinolone: a prospective, randomized, doubleblind, monocentric study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective Evaluation of gait performance and muscle activity patterns as well as clinical efficacy and safety after single intraarticular injection with hyaluronan compared with triamcinolone in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Materials and Methods This trial evaluated the influence of a single injection of hyaluronan or triamcinolone on gait pattern and muscle activity. For clinical evaluation a visual analogue scale for pain, Lequesne index, and Knee Society Score were used. Quality of life was assessed with the SF-36. Results The complete analysis was performed in 50 of 60 patients. 26 patients were treated with triamcinolone and 24 with hyaluronan. Hyaluronan treatment led to significant improvement of range of motion at hip and knee. Significant improvement could be either demonstrated for the pain scale, Lequesne and Knee Society score in both groups. Quality of life showed greater improvement in the triamcinolone group. Conclusion Single application of high-viscosity hyaluronan shows superior range of motion and pain reduction as well as improvement in clinical results. Even if there was a lack of significant differences compared to triamcinolone, this therapy classified as safe and effective in the short follow up. PMID:19380288

  13. An innovative care model coordinated by a physical therapist and nurse practitioner for osteoarthritis of the hip and knee in specialist care: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Voorn, Veronique M A; Vermeulen, Henricus M; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Huizinga, Tom W J; Leijerzapf, Nicolette A C; Kroon, Herman M; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; van der Linden, Henrica M J

    2013-07-01

    The subject of the study is to investigate whether health-related quality of life (HRQoL), pain and function of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) improves after a specialist care intervention coordinated by a physical therapist and a nurse practitioner (NP) and to assess satisfaction with this care at 12 weeks. This observational study included all consecutive patients with hip or knee OA referred to an outpatient orthopaedics clinic. The intervention consisted of a single, standardized visit (assessment and individually tailored management advice, to be executed in primary care) and a telephone follow-up, coordinated by a physical therapist and a NP, in cooperation with an orthopaedic surgeon. Assessments at baseline and 10 weeks thereafter included the short form-36 (SF-36), EuroQol 5D (EQ-5D), hip or knee disability and osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS or KOOS), the intermittent and constant osteoarthritis pain questionnaire (ICOAP) for hip or knee and a multidimensional satisfaction questionnaire (23 items; 4 point scale). Eighty-seven patients (57 female), mean age 68 years (SD 10.9) were included, with follow-up data available in 63 patients (72 %). Statistically significant improvements were seen regarding the SF-36 physical summary component score, the EQ-5D, the ICOAP scores for hip and knee, the HOOS subscale sports and the KOOS subscales pain, symptoms and activities of daily living. The proportions of patients reporting to be satisfied ranged from 79 to 98 % per item. In patients with hip and knee OA pain, function and HRQoL improved significantly after a single-visit multidisciplinary OA management intervention in specialist care, with high patient satisfaction. PMID:23325095

  14. Popliteal cysts and subgastrocnemius bursitis are associated with knee symptoms and structural abnormalities in older adults: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The role of popliteal cysts and subgastrocnemius bursitis in knee joint homeostasis is uncertain. The aim of this study is to describe cross-sectional associations between popliteal cysts, subgastrocnemius bursitis, knee symptoms and structural abnormalities in older adults. Methods A cross-sectional sample of 900 randomly-selected subjects (mean age 63 years, 48% female) were studied. Knee pain, stiffness and dysfunction were assessed by self-administered Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) questionnaire. Radiographic knee osteophyte and joint space narrowing (JSN) were recorded. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was utilized to assess popliteal cysts, subgastrocnemius bursitis, cartilage defects and bone marrow lesions (BMLs). Results Popliteal cysts were present in 11.7% and subgastrocnemius bursitis in 12.7% of subjects. Subgastrocnemius bursitis was more common in those with popliteal cyst (36.2% versus 9.7%, P <0.01). In multivariable analyses, popliteal cysts were significantly associated with increased osteophytes in both medial and lateral tibiofemoral compartments while subgastrocnemius bursitis was associated with increased osteophytes and JSN in the medial tibiofemoral compartment. Both were significantly associated with cartilage defects in all compartments, and with BMLs in the medial tibiofemoral compartment. Furthermore, both popliteal cysts and subgastrocnemius bursitis were significantly associated with increased weight-bearing knee pain but these associations became non-significant after adjustment for cartilage defects and BMLs. Conclusions Popliteal cysts and subgastrocnemius bursitis are associated with increased symptoms as well as radiographic and MRI-detected joint structural abnormalities. Longitudinal data will help resolve if they are a consequence or a cause of knee joint abnormalities. PMID:24581327

  15. Obesity and osteoarthritis in knee, hip and/or hand: An epidemiological study in the general population with 10 years follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Grotle, Margreth; Hagen, Kare B; Natvig, Bard; Dahl, Fredrik A; Kvien, Tore K

    2008-01-01

    Background Obesity is one of the most important risk factors for osteoarthritis (OA) in knee(s). However, the relationship between obesity and OA in hand(s) and hip(s) remains controversial and needs further investigation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of obesity on incident osteoarthritis (OA) in hip, knee, and hand in a general population followed in 10 years. Methods A total of 1854 people aged 24–76 years in 1994 participated in a Norwegian study on musculoskeletal pain in both 1994 and 2004. Participants with OA or rheumatoid arthritis in 1994 and those above 74 years in 1994 were excluded, leaving n = 1675 for the analyses. The main outcome measure was OA diagnosis at follow-up based on self-report. Obesity was defined by a body mass index (BMI) of 30 and above. Results At 10-years follow-up the incidence rates were 5.8% (CI 4.3–7.3) for hip OA, 7.3% (CI 5.7–9.0) for knee OA, and 5.6% (CI 4.2–7.1) for hand OA. When adjusting for age, gender, work status and leisure time activities, a high BMI (> 30) was significantly associated with knee OA (OR 2.81; 95%CI 1.32–5.96), and a dose-response relationship was found for this association. Obesity was also significantly associated with hand OA (OR 2.59; 1.08–6.19), but not with hip OA (OR 1.11; 0.41–2.97). There was no statistically significant interaction effect between BMI and gender, age or any of the other confounding variables. Conclusion A high BMI was significantly associated with knee OA and hand OA, but not with hip OA. PMID:18831740

  16. Lifestyle-Related Factors Contributing to Decline in Knee Extension Strength among Elderly Women: A Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Narumi; Kim, Miji; Saito, Kyoko; Yoshida, Hideyo; Yoshida, Yuko; Hirano, Hirohiko; Obuchi, Shuichi; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Takao; Kim, Hunkyung

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional and 4-year longitudinal cohort study aimed to clarify how various lifestyle-related variables affect knee extension strength in elderly Japanese women. The participants were community-dwelling women (n = 575) living in the Itabashi Ward of Tokyo, Japan aged 75–85 years at baseline (in 2008) who returned for a follow-up examination 4 years later (in 2012). Maximum isometric knee extension strength in the dominant leg was measured during comprehensive medical check-ups at baseline and follow-up. Interviews with participants included questions on their history of 11 diseases and lifestyle-related factors such as physical activity as well as dietary, smoking, and drinking habits. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses yielded inconsistent results regarding the associations between lifestyle-related factors and knee extension strength. While going out more frequently and regular physical exercise positively affected baseline knee extension strength, they did not affect knee extension strength in the longitudinal analysis. The longitudinal analysis revealed that more frequent intake of soy products or green and yellow vegetables at baseline decreased age-related knee extension strength decline. The inconsistent results from the cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses indicate that conducting both types of analyses is crucial for researching this type of subject. The present study demonstrates that the age-related decline in muscle strength is lower in those who frequently eat soy products or green and yellow vegetables. Thus, recommending higher intake of soy products, and green and yellow vegetables for the elderly might help maintain their muscle health. PMID:26177292

  17. An Implementation Study of Two Evidence-Based Exercise and Health Education Programmes for Older Adults with Osteoarthritis of the Knee and Hip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jong, O. R. W.; Hopman-Rock, M.; Tak, E. C. M. P.; Klazinga, N. S.

    2004-01-01

    Implementation studies are recommended to assess the feasibility and effectiveness in real-life of programmes which have been tested in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We report on an implementation study of two evidence-based exercise and health education programmes for older adults with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee or hip. Three types of…

  18. A Prospective, Longitudinal Study of Patient Activity Levels Following Total Knee Arthroplasty Stratified by Demographic and Comorbid Factors.

    PubMed

    Issa, Kimona; Jauregui, Julio J; Given, Kristin; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    With the marked increase in the annual number of total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) in the United States, there has been an increased interest in evaluating patient-reported outcomes. The purpose of this study was to prospectively and longitudinally evaluate temporal trends in patient activity levels following TKA and to identify potential demographic and comorbid factors that may affect these outcomes. This prospective study evaluated 281 patients, including 108 men and 173 women, who had a mean age of 66 years (39-80 years) and underwent primary TKA. All patients were followed for a minimum of 2 years. Medical comorbidities were recorded preoperatively and activity scores were evaluated at each follow-up visit. The effects of different patient demographics and systemic comorbidities on activity outcomes were further analyzed using multivariate regression analysis. Compared with preoperative levels, the activity score was observed to initially significantly decrease at 6 weeks postoperatively to below preoperative levels (9.2 vs. 8.1 points). By 3 months, scores were above preoperative levels (10.3 points), but below peak levels. A significant peak in the activity score was observed at 2-year follow-up after which there were no significant differences in scores at 5 years (11.49 vs. 11.47 points). In evaluating patient demographics and comorbidities, significant negative impact of older age, tobacco use, history of cancer, cardiovascular disease, lymphatic disease, and renal disease can be seen on activity levels. Activity scores following TKA follow a temporal trend in which scores initially drop below preoperative levels after surgery, but recover and reach a peak at 2 years postoperatively. This peak was maintained at 5-year follow-up. Surgeons should counsel their patients that they will not perceive the full benefit of a TKA until 1 to 2 years after surgery, in addition, patients may actually perceive their progress to decrease initially. Also, their

  19. Duloxetine in OsteoArthritis (DOA) study: study protocol of a pragmatic open-label randomised controlled trial assessing the effect of preoperative pain treatment on postoperative outcome after total hip or knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Blikman, T; Rienstra, W; van Raaij, T M; ten Hagen, A J; Dijkstra, B; Zijlstra, W P; Bulstra, S K; van den Akker-Scheek, I; Stevens, M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Residual pain is a major factor in patient dissatisfaction following total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty (THA/TKA). The proportion of patients with unfavourable long-term residual pain is high, ranging from 7% to 34%. There are studies indicating that a preoperative degree of central sensitisation (CS) is associated with poorer postoperative outcomes and residual pain. It is thus hypothesised that preoperative treatment of CS could enhance postoperative outcomes. Duloxetine has been shown to be effective for several chronic pain syndromes, including knee osteoarthritis (OA), in which CS is most likely one of the underlying pain mechanisms. This study aims to evaluate the postoperative effects of preoperative screening and targeted duloxetine treatment of CS on residual pain compared with care-as-usual. Methods and analysis This multicentre, pragmatic, prospective, open-label, randomised controlled trial includes patients with idiopathic hip/knee OA who are on a waiting list for primary THA/TKA. Patients at risk for CS will be randomly allocated to the preoperative duloxetine treatment programme group or the care-as-usual control group. The primary end point is the degree of postoperative pain 6 months after THA/TKA. Secondary end points at multiple time points up to 12 months postoperatively are: pain, neuropathic pain-like symptoms, (pain) sensitisation, pain catastrophising, joint-associated problems, physical activity, health-related quality of life, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and perceived improvement. Data will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the local Medical Ethics Committee (METc 2014/087) and will be conducted according to the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki (64th, 2013) and the Good Clinical Practice standard (GCP), and in compliance with the Medical Research Involving Human Subjects Act (WMO). Trial registration number 2013-004313-41; Pre

  20. Effect of Sodium Hyaluronate on Recovery after Arthroscopic Knee Surgery.

    PubMed

    Anand, Sanjeev; Singisetti, Kiran; Srikanth, Koppa N; Bamforth, Cathy; Asumu, Theophilus; Buch, Keyur

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a single immediate postoperative instillation of 10 mL of sodium hyaluronate (Viscoseal) into the knee following arthroscopy. A single-center, prospective, randomized, controlled study was undertaken. Consenting knee arthroscopy patients were randomized into two groups following surgery: the study group received 10 mL of sodium hyaluronate intra-articularly, while the control group received an intra-articular instillation of 10 mL of Bupivacaine. Pre- and postoperative visual analogue scale scores for pain and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) scores for knee function were obtained. Overall, 48 patients under the care of a single surgeon were randomized into two groups of 24. There were no statistically significant demographic differences at baseline. Three patients were lost to follow-up. There was a statistically significant difference in pain scores favoring the study group compared with the control group at 3 and 6 weeks postoperatively (p < 0.05), and a statistically significant difference in WOMAC scores favoring the study group compared with the control group at 3 and 6 weeks postoperatively (p = 0.01). Synovial fluid replacement with sodium hyaluronate following arthroscopic knee surgery conferred statistically significant improvements in pain and function scores compared with Bupivacaine in the short term (3-6 weeks). PMID:26551066

  1. Management of knee osteoarthritis with cupping therapy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Asim Ali; Jahangir, Umar; Urooj, Shaista

    2013-10-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effect of cupping therapy at a clinical setting for knee osteoarthritis. A randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted. Cupping was performed on 0-6(th) day; 9-11(th) day and 14(th) day, i.e., 11 sittings follow-up to determine longer term carryover of treatment effects utilizing both objective and subjective assessment. The assessment was performed before and after treatment spreading over a period of 15 days. The results of this study shows significant and better results in the overall management of knee osteoarthritis, particularly in relieving pain, edema, stiffness and disability. The efficacy of treatment with cupping therapy in relieving signs and symptoms of knee osteoarthritis is comparable to that of acetaminophen 650 mg thrice a day orally, in terms of analgesia, anti-inflammatory and resolution of edema with minimal and temporary side-effects like echymosis and blister formation while as control drug has greater side-effects particularly on upper gastrointestinal tract. It is recommended that further studies are conducted with a larger study samples and of longer duration. PMID:24350053

  2. Synovial chemokine expression and relationship with knee symptoms in patients with meniscal tears

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Anjali; Gan, Justin; Bush-Joseph, Charles; Verma, Nikhil; Tetreault, Matthew W.; Saha, Kanta; Margulis, Arkady; Fogg, Louis; Scanzello, Carla R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In patients with knee OA, synovitis is associated with knee pain and symptoms. We previously identified synovial mRNA expression of a set of chemokines (CCL19, IL-8, CCL5, XCL-1, CCR7) associated with synovitis in patients with meniscal tears but without radiographic OA. CCL19 and CCR7 were also associated with knee symptoms. This study sought to validate expression of these chemokines and association with knee symptoms in more typical patients presenting for meniscal arthroscopy, many who have pre-existing OA. Design Synovial biopsies and fluid (SF) were collected from patients undergoing meniscal arthroscopy. Synovial mRNA expression was measured using quantitative RT-PCR. The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) was administered preoperatively. Regression analyses determined if associations between chemokine mRNA levels and KOOS scores were independent of other factors including radiographic OA. CCL19 in SF was measured by ELISA, and compared to patients with advanced knee OA and asymptomatic organ donors. Results 90% of patients had intra-operative evidence of early cartilage degeneration. CCL19, IL-8, CCL5, XCL1, CCR7 transcripts were detected in all patients. Synovial CCL19 mRNA levels independently correlated with KOOS Activities of Daily Living scores (95% CI [-8.071, -0.331], p= 0.036), indicating higher expression was associated with more knee-related dysfunction. SF CCL19 was detected in 7 of 10 patients, compared to 4 of 10 asymptomatic donors. Conclusion In typical patients presenting for meniscal arthroscopy, synovial CCL19 mRNA expression was associated with knee-related difficulty with activities of daily living, independent of other factors including presence of radiographic knee OA. PMID:25724256

  3. Getting Active After Knee Replacement Might Raise Hip Fracture Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Getting Active After Knee Replacement Might Raise Hip Fracture Risk Swedish study found that people with new knees had slight uptick in spinal fractures, too To use the sharing features on this ...

  4. The dynamic nature of alignment and variations in normal knees.

    PubMed

    Deep, K; Eachempati, K K; Apsingi, S

    2015-04-01

    The restoration of knee alignment is an important goal during total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In the past surgeons aimed to restore neutral limb alignment during surgery. However, previous studies have demonstrated alignment to be dynamic, varying depending on the position of the limb and the degree of weight-bearing, and between patients. We used a validated computer navigation system to measure the femorotibial mechanical angle (FTMA) in 264 knees in 77 male and 55 female healthy volunteers aged 18 to 35 years (mean 26.2). We found the mean supine alignment to be a varus angle of 1.2° (standard deviation (sd) 4), with few patients having neutral alignment. FTMA differs significantly between males and females (with a mean varus of 1.7° (sd 4) and 0.4° (sd 3.9), respectively; p = 0.008). It changes significantly with posture, the knee hyperextending by a mean of 5.6°, and coronal plane alignment becoming more varus by 2.2° (sd 3.6) on standing compared with supine. Knee alignment is different in different individuals and is dynamic in nature, changing with different postures. This may have implications for the assessment of alignment in TKA, which is achieved in non-weight-bearing conditions and which may not represent the situation observed during weight-bearing. PMID:25820888

  5. Effect of homeopathy on analgesic intake following knee ligament reconstruction: a phase III monocentre randomized placebo controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Paris, A; Gonnet, N; Chaussard, C; Belon, P; Rocourt, F; Saragaglia, D; Cracowski, J L

    2008-01-01

    Aims The efficacy of homeopathy is still under debate. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of homeopathic treatment (Arnica montana 5 CH, Bryonia alba 5 CH, Hypericum perforatum 5 CH and Ruta graveolens 3 DH) on cumulated morphine intake delivered by PCA over 24 h after knee ligament reconstruction. Methods This was an add-on randomized controlled study with three parallel groups: a double-blind homeopathic or placebo arm and an open-label noninterventional control arm. Eligible patients were 18–60 years old candidates for surgery of the anterior cruciate ligament. Treatment was administered the evening before surgery and continued for 3 days. The primary end-point was cumulated morphine intake delivered by PCA during the first 24 h inferior or superior/equal to 10 mg day−1. Results One hundred and fifty-eight patients were randomized (66 in the placebo arm, 67 in the homeopathic arm and 25 in the noninterventional group). There was no difference between the treated and the placebo group for primary end-point (mean (95% CI) 48% (35.8, 56.3), and 56% (43.7, 68.3), required less than 10 mg day−1 of morphine in each group, respectively). The homeopathy treatment had no effect on morphine intake between 24 and 72 h or on the visual analogue pain scale, or on quality of life assessed by the SF-36 questionnaire. In addition, these parameters were not different in patients enrolled in the open-label noninterventional control arm. Conclusions The complex of homeopathy tested in this study was not superior to placebo in reducing 24 h morphine consumption after knee ligament reconstruction. What is already known about this subject The efficacy of homeopathy is still under debate and a recent meta-analysis recommended further randomized double-blind clinical trials to identify any clinical situation in which homeopathy might be effective. What this study adds The complex of homeopathy tested in this study (Arnica montana 5 CH, Bryonia alba 5 CH

  6. Effects of ankle joint mobilization with movement and weight-bearing exercise on knee strength, ankle range of motion, and gait velocity in patients with stroke: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    An, Chang-Man; Won, Jong-Im

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of ankle joint mobilization with movement on knee strength, ankle range of motion, and gait velocity, compared with weight-bearing exercise in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty subjects with chronic stroke were divided into three groups: MWM (n = 12), WBE (n = 8), and control (n = 10). All groups attended physical therapy sessions 3 times a week for 5 weeks. Subjects in the MWM group performed mobilization with movement exercises, whilst participants in the WBE group performed weight-bearing exercises. Knee peak torque, ankle range of motion, and spatiotemporal gait parameters were evaluated before and after the interventions. [Results] Knee extensor peak torque increased significantly in both MWM and WBE groups. However, only the MWM group showed significant improvement in passive and active ankle range of motion and gait velocity, among the three groups. [Conclusion] Ankle joint mobilization with movement intervention is more effective than simple weight-bearing intervention in improving gait speed in stroke patients with limited ankle motion. PMID:27065565

  7. Cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R; Ribeiro, F; Oliveira, J

    2010-03-01

    The effects of cryotherapy on joint position sense are not clearly established; however it is paramount to understand its impact on peripheral feedback to ascertain the safety of using ice therapy before resuming exercise on sports or rehabilitation settings. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the effects of cryotherapy, when applied over the quadriceps and over the knee joint, on knee position sense. This within-subjects repeated-measures study encompassed fifteen subjects. Knee position sense was measured by open kinetic chain technique and active positioning at baseline and after cryotherapy application. Knee angles were determined by computer analysis of the videotape images. Twenty-minute ice bag application was applied randomly, in two sessions 48 h apart, over the quadriceps and the knee joint. The main effect for cryotherapy application was significant (F (1.14)=7.7, p=0.015) indicating an increase in both absolute and relative angular errors after the application. There was no significant main effect for the location of cryotherapy application, indicating no differences between the application over the quadriceps and the knee joint. In conclusion, cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense in normal knees. This deleterious effect is similar when cryotherapy is applied over the quadriceps or the knee joint. PMID:20221997

  8. Does knee replacement surgery lead to chronic limb ischemia?

    PubMed

    Dawson, Alan G; Bachoo, Paul; Sutherland, Alasdair G

    2010-12-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) may be associated with chronic limb ischemia (CLI) due to arterial injury intraoperatively. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of CLI after TKR surgery. Patients who received a unilateral TKR in 2003-2004 were identified from our database. Patients with diabetes mellitus and preexisting peripheral arterial disease were excluded. Patient assessment was by collection of demographic details, completion of the Oxford Knee Score, Short Form-12 Health Survey, and King's College Hospital's Vascular Quality of Life Questionnaire, and measurement of the ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI). Of the 209 eligible patients, 86 (41%) participated (median age, 73 years; 50% male). Five (5.8%) patients had a reduced ABPI compared with population norms of 4.6 to 7%. Patients with reduced ABPI measurements had higher Oxford Knee Scores, but no relationships between other variables were demonstrated. TKR surgery does not appear to increase the risk of CLI. PMID:21446628

  9. A Review of Translational Animal Models for Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Martin H.; Capito, Nicholas; Kuroki, Keiichi; Stoker, Aaron M.; Cook, James L.; Sherman, Seth L.

    2012-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis remains a tremendous public health concern, both in terms of health-related quality of life and financial burden of disease. Translational research is a critical step towards understanding and mitigating the long-term effects of this disease process. Animal models provide practical and clinically relevant ways to study both the natural history and response to treatment of knee osteoarthritis. Many factors including size, cost, and method of inducing osteoarthritis are important considerations for choosing an appropriate animal model. Smaller animals are useful because of their ease of use and cost, while larger animals are advantageous because of their anatomical similarity to humans. This evidence-based review will compare and contrast several different animal models for knee osteoarthritis. Our goal is to inform the clinician about current research models, in order to facilitate the transfer of knowledge from the “bench” to the “bedside.” PMID:23326663

  10. Ceramic Femoral Components in Total Knee Arthroplasty - Two Year Follow-Up Results of an International Prospective Multi-Centre Study

    PubMed Central

    Bergschmidt, Philipp; Bader, Rainer; Ganzer, Dirk; Hauzeur, Christian; Lohmann, Christoph; Rüther, Wolfgang; Tigani, Domenico; Rani, Nicola; Prats, Fernando Lopez; Zorzi, Claudio; Madonna, Vincenzo; Rigotti, Stefano; Benazzo, Francesco; Rossi, Stefano Marco Paolo; Kundt, Guenther; Bloch, Hans Rudolf; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2012-01-01

    Background: Total knee arthroplasty can be considered as a reliable surgical procedure with a good long-term clinical result. However, implant failure due to particle induced aseptic loosening as well as the aspect of hypersensitivity to metal ions still remains an emerging issue. Methods: The purpose of this prospective international multi-centre study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes and the reliability of the unconstrained Multigen Plus Total Knee System with a new BIOLOX® delta ceramic femoral component. Cemented total knee arthroplasty was performed on 108 patients (110 knees) at seven hospitals in three countries. Clinical and radiological evaluations were performed preoperatively, and after 3, 12 and 24 months postoperatively using the HSS-, WOMAC-, SF-36-score and standardised X-rays. Results: The mean preoperative HSS-Score amounted to 55.5 ± 11.5 points and improved significantly in all postoperative evaluations (85.7 ± 11.7 points at 24 months). Furthermore, improvements in WOMAC- and SF-36-score were evaluated as significant at all points of evaluation. Radiolucent lines around the femoral ceramic component at 24 months were found in four cases. Progression of radiolucent lines was not seen and no implant loosening was observed. During the 24 month follow-up eight patients underwent subsequent surgery due to reasons unrelated to the implant material. Conclusions: The observed clinical and radiological results are encouraging for a long-term survival of the ceramic femoral component. Therefore, ceramic implants could be a promising solution not only for patients with allergies against metallic implant materials, but also for the osteoarthritic knee joint. Long-term follow-up is necessary to draw conclusions regarding the superiority of the ceramic knee implants concerning in vivo wear and long-term survivorship. PMID:22582104

  11. Individuals with high bone mass have an increased prevalence of radiographic knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, S A; Dieppe, P; Gregson, C L; Arden, N K; Spector, T D; Hart, D J; Edwards, M H; Dennison, E M; Cooper, C; Sayers, A; Williams, M; Davey Smith, G; Tobias, J H

    2015-02-01

    We previously reported an association between high bone mass (HBM) and a bone-forming phenotype of radiographic hip osteoarthritis (OA). As knee and hip OA have distinct risk factors, in this study we aimed to determine (i) whether HBM is also associated with knee OA, and (ii) whether the HBM knee OA phenotype demonstrates a similar pattern of radiographic features to that observed at the hip. HBM cases (defined by DXA BMD Z-scores) from the UK-based HBM study were compared with unaffected family controls and general population controls from the Chingford and Hertfordshire cohort studies. A single blinded observer graded AP weight-bearing knee radiographs for features of OA (Kellgren-Lawrence score, osteophytes, joint space narrowing (JSN), sclerosis) using an atlas. Analyses used logistic regression, adjusting a priori for age and gender, and additionally for BMI as a potential mediator of the HBM-OA association, using Stata v12. 609 HBM knees in 311 cases (mean age 60.8years, 74% female) and 1937 control knees in 991 controls (63.4years, 81% female) were analysed. The prevalence of radiographic knee OA, defined as Kellgren-Lawrence grade≥2, was increased in cases (31.5% vs. 20.9%), with age and gender adjusted OR [95% CI] 2.38 [1.81, 3.14], p<0.001. The association between HBM and osteophytosis was stronger than that for JSN, both before and after adjustment for BMI which attenuated the ORs for knee OA and osteophytes in cases vs. controls by approximately 50%. Our findings support a positive association between HBM and knee OA. This association was strongest for osteophytes, suggesting HBM confers a general predisposition to a subtype of OA characterised by increased bone formation. PMID:25445455

  12. Changes in knee kinematics following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Akbari Shandiz, Mohsen; Boulos, Paul; Saevarsson, Stefan Karl; Yoo, Sam; Miller, Stephen; Anglin, Carolyn

    2016-04-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) changes the knee joint in both intentional and unintentional, known and unknown, ways. Patellofemoral and tibiofemoral kinematics play an important role in postoperative pain, function, satisfaction and revision, yet are largely unknown. Preoperative kinematics, postoperative kinematics or changes in kinematics may help identify causes of poor clinical outcome. Patellofemoral kinematics are challenging to record since the patella is obscured by the metal femoral component in X-ray and moves under the skin. The purpose of this study was to determine the kinematic degrees of freedom having significant changes and to evaluate the variability in individual changes to allow future study of patients with poor clinical outcomes. We prospectively studied the 6 degrees of freedom patellofemoral and tibiofemoral weightbearing kinematics, tibiofemoral contact points and helical axes of rotation of nine subjects before and at least 1 year after total knee arthroplasty using clinically available computed tomography and radiographic imaging systems. Normal kinematics for healthy individuals were identified from the literature. Significant differences existed between pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics, with the post-TKA kinematics being closer to normal. While on average the pre-total knee arthroplasty knees in this group displayed no pivoting (only translation), individually only five knees displayed this behaviour (of these, two showed lateral pivoting, one showed medial pivoting and one showed central pivoting). There was considerable variability postoperatively as well (five central, two lateral and two medial pivoting). Both preop and postop, flexion behaviour was more hinge-like medially and more rolling laterally. Helical axes were more consistent postop for this group. An inclusive understanding of the pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics and changes in kinematics due to total knee arthroplasty could improve implant design, patient diagnosis and

  13. Study rationale and protocol: prospective randomized comparison of metal ion concentrations in the patient's plasma after implantation of coated and uncoated total knee prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Lützner, Jörg; Dinnebier, Gerd; Hartmann, Albrecht; Günther, Klaus-Peter; Kirschner, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Background Any metal placed in a biological environment undergoes corrosion. Thus, with their large metallic surfaces, TKA implants are particularly prone to corrosion with subsequent release of metal ions into the human body which may cause local and systemic toxic effects and hypersensitivity reactions, and increase cancer risk. To address this problem, a new 7-layer zirconium coating developed especially for cobalt-chrome orthopaedic implants was tested biomechanically and found to lower metal ion release. The purpose of the proposed clinical trial is to compare the metal ion concentration in patients' plasma before and after implantation of a coated or uncoated TKA implant. Methods/Design In this randomised controlled trial, 120 patients undergoing primary TKA will be recruited at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery of the University Hospital in Dresden, Germany, and randomised to either the coated or uncoated prosthesis. Outcome assessments will be conducted preoperatively and at 3 months, 12 months and 5 years postoperatively. The primary clinical endpoint will be the chromium ion concentration in the patient's plasma after 1 and 5 years. Secondary outcomes include cobalt, molybdenum and nickel ion concentrations after 1 and 5 years, allergy testing for hypersensitivity against one of these metals, the Knee Society Score to assess clinical and physical function of the knee joint, the self-assessment Oxford Score and the Short Form 36 quality of live questionnaire. Discussion The metal ion concentration in the patient's plasma has been shown to increase after TKA, its eventual adverse effects being widely debated. In the light of this discussion, ways to reduce metal ion release from orthopaedic implants should be studied in detail. The results of this investigation may lead to a new method to achieve this goal. Trials register Clinicaltrials registry NCT00862511 PMID:19828019

  14. Accuracy of clinical diagnosis in knee arthroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Stuart; Morgan, Mamdouh

    2002-01-01

    A prospective study of 238 patients was performed in a district general hospital to assess current diagnostic accuracy rates and to ascertain the use and the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning in reducing the number of negative arthroscopies. The pre-operative diagnosis of patients listed for knee arthroscopy was medial meniscus tear 94 (40%) and osteoarthritis 59 (25%). MRI scans were requested in 57 patients (24%) with medial meniscus tear representing 65% (37 patients). The correlation study was done between pre-operative diagnosis, MRI and arthroscopic diagnosis. Clinical diagnosis was as accurate as the MRI with 79% agreement between the preoperative diagnosis and arthroscopy compared to 77% agreement between MRI scan and arthroscopy. There was no evidence, in this study, that MRI scan can reduce the number of negative arthroscopies. Four normal MRI scans had positive arthroscopic diagnosis (two torn medial meniscus, one torn lateral meniscus and one chondromalacia patella). Out of 240 arthroscopies, there were only 10 normal knees (negative arthroscopy) representing 4% of the total number of knee arthroscopies; one patient of those 10 cases had MRI scan with ACL rupture diagnosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:12215031

  15. Genitourinary Procedures as Risk Factors for Prosthetic Hip or Knee Infection: A Hospital-Based Prospective Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Arjun; Osmon, Douglas R.; Hanssen, Arlen D.; Lightner, Deborah J.; Wilson, Walter R.; Steckelberg, James M.; Baddour, Larry M.; Harmsen, William S.; Mandrekar, Jay N.; Berbari, Elie F.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) as a complication of routine genitourinary (GU) procedures in patients with total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and to study the impact of antibiotic prophylaxis administered prior to these procedures. Methods. We conducted a prospective, single-center, case-control study between December 1, 2001 and May 31, 2006. Case patients were hospitalized with total hip or knee PJI. Control subjects underwent a THA or TKA and were hospitalized during the same period on the same orthopedic floor without a PJI. Data regarding demographic features and potential risk factors were collected. The outcome measure was the odds ratio (OR) of PJI after GU procedures performed within 2 years of admission. Results. A total of 339 case patients and 339 control subjects were enrolled in the study. Of these, 52 cases (15%) and 55 controls (16%) had undergone a GU procedure in the preceding 2 years. There was no increased risk of PJI for patients undergoing a GU procedure with or without antibiotic prophylaxis (adjusted OR [aOR] = 1.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.2–4.5, P = .95 and aOR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.6–1.7, P = .99, respectively). Results were similar in a subset of patients with a joint age less than 6 months, less than 1 year, or greater than 1 year. Conclusions. Genitourinary procedures were not risk factors for subsequent PJI. The use of antibiotic prophylaxis before GU procedures did not decrease the risk of subsequent PJI in our study. PMID:26258154

  16. Lateral Knee Braces in Football: Do They Prevent Injury?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulos, Lonnie E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The results of three recently presented clinical studies and a biomechanical study of the use of lateral knee braces to prevent knee injuries are reviewed. The results raise serious doubts about the efficacy of the preventive knee braces which are currently available. (Author/MT)

  17. An electromechanical swing-phase-controlled prosthetic knee joint for conversion of physiological energy to electrical energy: feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Andrysek, Jan; Chau, Gilbert

    2007-12-01

    Microprocessor-controlled prostheses facilitate a more natural and efficient gait for individuals with above-knee amputations by continually adjusting the level of swing-phase damping. One caveat associated with these technologies is that the user must charge the onboard batteries on a daily basis. It is, therefore, the aim of this study to examine the feasibility of using an electromechanical system to provide prosthetic swing-phase damping and, concomitantly, the function of converting physiological energy that is normally dissipated during the swing phase, to electrical energy. Gait data from a single subject and data from a kinematic simulator were used to develop an empirical model. The findings in this study indicate that an electromagnetic system has appropriate characteristics for use in swing-phase control and also has the potential to recover energy under particular conditions. PMID:18075044

  18. Study of Cherenkov Light Lateral Distribution Function Around the Knee Region in Extensive Air Showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rubaiee, A.; Hashim, U.; Marwah, M.; Al-Douri, Y.

    2015-06-01

    The Cherenkov light lateral distribution function (LDF) was simulated with the CORSIKA code in the energy range (10^{13} - 10^{16}) eV. This simulation was performed for conditions and configurations of the Tunka EAS Cherenkov array for the two primary particles (p and Fe). Basing on the simulated results, many approximated functions are structured for two primary particles and different zenith angles. This allowed us to reconstruct the EAS events, which is, to determine the type and energy of the primary particles that produced showers from signal amplitudes of Cherenkov radiation measured by the Tunka Cherenkov array experiment. Comparison of the calculated LDF of Cherenkov radiation with that measured at the Tunka EAS array shows the ability to identify the primary particle that initiated the EAS cascades by determining its primary energy around the knee region of the cosmic ray spectrum.

  19. The effect of varus tilt on contact stresses in total knee arthroplasty: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, S; Whiteside, L A; White, S E

    1999-03-01

    The contact stress produced in the tibiofemoral joint from a varus-tilted tibial component was tested in five total knee prostheses. Peak and mean stresses were measured with a digital electronic sensor under compressive load at 15 degrees and 90 degrees flexion. Stresses were measured with the tibial component tilted 0 degrees and 5 degrees in the mediolateral direction. At a 5 degree tilt, the Advantim, the Miller-Galante II, and the Omnifit prostheses, which have a flat configuration on the femoral and tibial surfaces in the coronal plane, had significantly greater stresses than the LCS and the Profix prostheses, which have tibial and femoral components with matching curved surfaces in the coronal plane. These results suggest that the femoral component surface should have a radius of curvature that matches that of the tibial articular surface in the coronal plane to achieve a large contact area even in varus-valgus tilting. PMID:10192260

  20. Mechanical correction of dynamometer moment for the effects of segment motion during isometric knee-extension tests.

    PubMed

    Tsaopoulos, Dimitrios E; Baltzopoulos, Vasilios; Richards, Paula J; Maganaris, Constantinos N

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of dynamometer and joint axis misalignment on measured isometric knee-extension moments using inverse dynamics based on the actual joint kinematic information derived from the real-time X-ray video and to compare the errors when the moments were calculated using measurements from external anatomical surface markers or obtained from the isokinetic dynamometer. Six healthy males participated in this study. They performed isometric contractions at 90° and 20° of knee flexion, gradually increasing to maximum effort. For the calculation of the actual knee-joint moment and the joint moment relative to the knee-joint center, determined using the external marker, two free body diagrams were used of the Cybex arm and the lower leg segment system. In the first free body diagram, the mean center of the circular profiles of the femoral epicondyles was used as the knee-joint center, whereas in the second diagram, the joint center was assumed to coincide with the external marker. Then, the calculated knee-joint moments were compared with those measured by the dynamometer. The results indicate that 1) the actual knee-joint moment was different from the dynamometer recorded moment (difference ranged between 1.9% and 4.3%) and the moment calculated using the skin marker (difference ranged between 2.5% and 3%), and 2) during isometric knee extension, the internal knee angle changed significantly from rest to the maximum contraction state by about 19°. Therefore, these differences cannot be neglected if the moment-knee-joint angle relationship or the muscle mechanical properties, such as length-tension relationship, need to be determined. PMID:21474701

  1. Below Knee Impact Responses using Cadaveric Specimens.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Sriram; Beillas, Philippe; Belwadi, Aditya; Hardy, Warren N; Yang, King H; King, Albert I; Masuda, Mitsutoshi

    2004-11-01

    Knee injuries represent about 10% of all injuries suffered during car crashes. Efforts to assess the injury risk to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) have been based on a study available in the literature (Viano et al., 1978), in which only two of the five knees tested had PCL ruptures. The aims of the current study were to repeat the study with a higher number of samples, study the effects of other soft tissues on knee response, and assess the adequacy of the experimental setup for the identification of a PCL tolerance. A total of 14 knees were tested using a high-speed materials testing machine. Eight were intact knees (with the patella and all the muscular and ligamentous structures), three were PCL-only knees (patella and all the muscular and ligamentous structures other than the PCL removed), and the last three were PCL-only knees with the tibia protected from bending fracture. Of the eight intact knees tested, only one had PCL mid substance rupture, one had a partial articular fracture of the tibia below the plateau, and six had simple transverse fracture of the tibial metaphysis. Of the three PCL-only knees without tibial protection, one had PCL mid substance rupture, one had avulsion at the posterior intercondylar attachment point, and the last one had a simple oblique fracture of the tibial metaphysis. Of the three PCL only knees with tibia protection, two had PCL mid-substance ruptures and the third one had an avulsion at the tibial insertion site with partial articular fracture of the lateral plateau. Overall, the results of the current study were similar to those observed by Viano et al. (1978). The average displacement at failure for all PCL related injuries was 17.2+/-2.8 mm for the current study (n=6) and 16.2+/-3.9 mm for Viano et al. (1978) (n=4). This value is higher than the Injury Assessment Reference Value of 15 mm proposed by Mertz (1984) and used in various regulations. Both studies suggest that the existence of the soft tissues other

  2. Prophylactic Knee Braces: Where Do They Stand?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Paul

    1988-01-01

    The effectiveness of knee braces in preventing knee injuries in football is inconclusive. This article reviews research from epidemiologic, cadaver, and surrogate studies; discusses reasons for conflicting study results, including research design problems; and describes alternative approaches that have been suggested. (IAH)

  3. Effects of soft tissue artifacts on differentiating kinematic differences between natural and replaced knee joints during functional activity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Chung; Lu, Tung-Wu; Lu, Hsuan-Lun; Kuo, Mei-Ying; Hsu, Horng-Chaung

    2016-05-01

    Functional performance of total knee replacement (TKR) is often assessed using skin marker-based stereophotogrammetry, which can be affected by soft tissue artifacts (STA). The current study aimed to compare the STA and their effects on the kinematics of the knee between twelve patients with TKR and twelve healthy controls during sit-to-stand, and to assess the effects of STA on the statistical between-group comparisons. Each subject performed the sit-to-stand task while motions of the skin markers and the knees were measured by a motion capture system integrated with a three-dimensional fluoroscopy technique. The bone motions measured by the three-dimensional fluoroscopy were taken as the gold standard, with respect to which the STA of the markers were obtained. The STA were found to affect the calculated segmental poses and knee kinematics between the groups differently. The STA resulted in artefactual posterior displacements of the knee joint center, with magnitudes significantly greater in TKR than controls (p<0.01). The STA-induced knee external rotations in TKR were smaller than those in controls with mean differences of 2.3-3.0°. These between-group differences in the STA effects on knee kinematics in turn concealed the true between-group differences in the anterior-posterior translation and internal/external rotation of knee while leading to false significant between-group differences in the abduction/adduction and proximal-distal translation. PMID:27131194

  4. Increased joint loads during walking--a consequence of pain relief in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Marius; Simonsen, Erik B; Alkjaer, Tine; Lund, Hans; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bliddal, Henning

    2006-12-01

    Joint pain is a primary symptom in knee osteoarthritis (OA), but the effect of pain and pain relief on the knee joint mechanics of walking is not clear. In this study, the effects of local knee joint analgesia on knee joint loads during walking were studied in a group of knee osteoarthritis patients. A group of healthy subjects was included as a reference group. The joint loads were calculated from standard gait analysis data obtained with standardised walking speed (4 km/h). The gait analyses were performed before and after pain relief by intra-articular injections of 10 mL lidocaine (1%). Pre-injection measurements revealed lower joint loads in the OA group compared to the reference group. Following injections pain during walking decreased significantly and the joint loads increased in the OA group during the late single support phase to a level comparable to the reference group. Although the patients walked with less compressive knee joint forces compared to the reference group, the effects of pain relief may accelerate the degenerative changes. PMID:17011194

  5. Real-Time Tracking of Knee Adduction Moment in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sang Hoon; Lee, Song Joo; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Background The external knee adduction moment (EKAM) is closely associated with the presence, progression, and severity of knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, there is a lack of convenient and practical method to estimate and track in real-time the EKAM of patients with knee OA for clinical evaluation and gait training, especially outside of gait laboratories. New Method A real-time EKAM estimation method was developed and applied to track and investigate the EKAM and other knee moments during stepping on an elliptical trainer in both healthy subjects and a patient with knee OA. Results Substantial changes were observed in the EKAM and other knee moments during stepping in the patient with knee OA. Comparison with Existing Method(s) This is the first study to develop and test feasibility of real-time tracking method of the EKAM on patients with knee OA using 3-D inverse dynamics. Conclusions The study provides us an accurate and practical method to evaluate in real-time the critical EKAM associated with knee OA, which is expected to help us to diagnose and evaluate patients with knee OA and provide the patients with real-time EKAM feedback rehabilitation training. PMID:24361759

  6. Techniques for assessing knee joint pain in arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Volker; Han, Jeong S; Adwanikar, Hita; Fu, Yu; Ji, Guangchen

    2007-01-01

    The assessment of pain is of critical importance for mechanistic studies as well as for the validation of drug targets. This review will focus on knee joint pain associated with arthritis. Different animal models have been developed for the study of knee joint arthritis. Behavioral tests in animal models of knee joint arthritis typically measure knee joint pain rather indirectly. In recent years, however, progress has been made in the development of tests that actually evaluate the sensitivity of the knee joint in arthritis models. They include measurements of the knee extension angle struggle threshold, hind limb withdrawal reflex threshold of knee compression force, and vocalizations in response to stimulation of the knee. A discussion of pain assessment in humans with arthritis pain conditions concludes this review. PMID:17391515

  7. Effects of Cold Irrigation on Early Results after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhirui; Liu, Daohong; Dong, Jiyuan; Gong, Long; Wang, Yong; Tang, Peifu; Zhang, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Several studies have indicated that pain peaks at 24 to 48 hours after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery. TKA has been associated with disruption in normal sleep patterns, swelling knee, and significant blood loss. However, a satisfactory regime to resolve these mentioned problems has yet to be found.In this study, a total of 420 patients were randomly allocated into two groups and treated with continuous irrigation of either 4000 mL cold saline with 0.5% epinephrine or normal temperature solution. Clinical outcomes including pain scores at rest during postoperative three days, drainage output, analgesic consumption, decreased hemoglobin, sleep quality, and satisfaction rate were analyzed. Mean scores and postoperative change in scores were calculated.Visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores in the treatment group were significantly reduced from 4 hours (P = 0.0016) to 24 hours (P = 0.0004) after TKA. Additional benefits including reduced analgesic consumption, improved satisfaction rate, and sleep quality were observed. In addition, a significant reduction in blood loss reflected by decreased Hb and drainage was found.In this study, irrigation with a cold 0.5% epinephrine solution was a beneficial and cost-effective treatment that decreased acute postoperative VAS pain scores immediately after and 1 day after surgery. Patients reported postoperative improvement in sleep quality and overall satisfaction rate with a decrease in morphine usage. In addition, a reduction of intraoperative blood loss might decrease the blood transfusion rate and related costs. Collectively, irrigation with cold 0.5% epinephrine offers a safe, simple, and effective treatment that might improve recovery and enhance quality of life of patients undergoing TKA. PMID:27310945

  8. Wearing knee wraps affects mechanical output and performance characteristics of back squat exercise.

    PubMed

    Lake, Jason P; Carden, Patrick J C; Shorter, Kath A

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of wearing knee wraps on mechanical output and performance characteristics of back squat exercise. Ten resistance trained men (back squat 1 repetition maximum [1RM]: 160.5 ± 18.4 kg) performed 6 single back squats with 80% 1RM, 3 wearing knee wraps, 3 without. Mechanical output was obtained from ground reaction force, performance characteristics from digitized motion footage obtained from a single high-speed digital camera. Wearing knee wraps led to a 39% reduction (0.09 compared with 0.11 m, p = 0.037) in horizontal barbell displacement that continued during the lifting phase. Lowering phase vertical impulse remained within 1% across conditions; however, the lowering phase was performed 45% faster (1.13 compared with 1.57 seconds). This demonstrated that vertical force applied to the center of mass during the lowering phase was considerably larger and was likely a consequence of the generation and storage of elastic energy within the knee wrap. Subsequent vertical impulse applied to the center of mass was 10% greater (192 compared with 169 N·s, p = 0.018). Mechanical work involved in vertically displacing the center of mass was performed 20% faster and was reflected by a 10% increase in peak power (2,121 compared with 1,841 W, p = 0.019). The elastic properties of knee wraps increased mechanical output but altered back squat technique in a way that is likely to alter the musculature targeted by the exercise and possibly compromise the integrity of the knee joint. Knee wraps should not be worn during the strength and condition process, and perceived weakness in the knee joint should be assessed and treated. PMID:22995993

  9. Sleep Quality Effects Recovery After Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA)--A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Gong, Long; Wang, ZhenHu; Fan, Dong

    2015-11-01

    This study examined the effects of sleep quality on early recovery after total knee arthroplasty. A total of 148 patients were randomized 1:1 to receive either zolpidem or placebo for 2 weeks. VAS pain scores (rest, ambulation and night), range of motion (ROM), total amount of opioid analgesics and antiemetics taken, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), sleep efficacy and satisfaction were recorded. It was found that patients taking zolpidem achieved greater improvement in quality of life and reported better satisfaction. Patients in the intervention group had lower pain score and took less antiemetics. Moreover, a significant correlation between sleep quality and ROM was detected. These results demonstrated that improved sleep quality is beneficial to patients' post-TKA recovery. PMID:26344094

  10. Mid- term results of stryker® scorpio plus mobile bearing total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The mobile bearing knee system was introduced to lessen contact stress on the articular bearing surface and reduce polyethylene wear. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the mid-term results of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) using Scorpio Plus Mobile Bearing Knee System (Stryker, Mahwah, NJ), and compare the outcomes between patients with osteoarthritis and osteonecrosis (OA·ON group) and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA group). Methods Eight males and 58 females were followed up for a period of 4.4- 7.6 years from June 1, 2003 to December 31, 2005. There were 53 knees with osteoarthritis, 17 knees with rheumatoid arthritis, and 6 knees with osteonecrosis. Clinical and radiographic follow- up was done using The Japanese Orthopedic Association knee rating score (JOA score) and Knee Society Total Knee Arthroplasty Roentgenographic Evaluation and Scoring System. Results With regard to the JOA score, there was significant improvement in both groups. The postoperative range of motion was between 0.8°and 116.8° in OA·ON group, and between 0.0° and 113.7° in RA group. There were no significant differences with the radiographic evaluation between two groups. Spontaneous dislocation of a polyethylene insert occurred in one patient, and deep infection was occurred in one patient. Conclusion There was significant improvement with regard to the clinical and radiographic results of patients undergoing TKAs using the model. The risk of polyethylene insert dislocation related to the mobile bearing TKA is a cause for concern. PMID:23075162

  11. Impact of Preemptive Analgesia on inflammatory responses and Rehabilitation after Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Controlled Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Jianda, Xu; Yuxing, Qu; Yi, Gao; Hong, Zhao; Libo, Peng; Jianning, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of preemptive analgesia on the inflammatory response and rehabilitation in TKA. 75 patients with unilateral primary knee osteoarthritis were conducted in this prospective study. All patients were randomly divided into two groups (MMA with/without preemptive analgesia group). The following parameters were used to evaluate analgesic efficacy: knee flexion, pain at rest and walking, functional walking capacity (2 MWT and 6 MWT), WOMAC score, and hs-CRP level. Patients in MMA with preemptive analgesia group had lower hs-CRP level and less pain at rest and walking during the first week postoperatively (P < 0.05). The 2 MWT was significantly better in MMA with preemptive analgesia group (17.13 ± 3.82 VS 14.19 ± 3.56, P = 0.001). The 6 MWT scores and WOMAC scores increased significantly within Groups (P = 0.020, 0.000), but no difference between groups postoperatively (P > 0.05). Less cumulative consumption of morphine was found in MMA with preemptive analgesia group at 48 h (P = 0.017, 0.023), but no difference at total requirement (P = 0.113). Preemptive analgesia added to a multimodal analgesic regime improved analgesia, reduced inflammatory reaction and accelerated functional recovery at the first week postoperatively, but not improved long-term function. PMID:27578313

  12. Impact of Preemptive Analgesia on inflammatory responses and Rehabilitation after Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Controlled Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Jianda, Xu; Yuxing, Qu; Yi, Gao; Hong, Zhao; Libo, Peng; Jianning, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of preemptive analgesia on the inflammatory response and rehabilitation in TKA. 75 patients with unilateral primary knee osteoarthritis were conducted in this prospective study. All patients were randomly divided into two groups (MMA with/without preemptive analgesia group). The following parameters were used to evaluate analgesic efficacy: knee flexion, pain at rest and walking, functional walking capacity (2 MWT and 6 MWT), WOMAC score, and hs-CRP level. Patients in MMA with preemptive analgesia group had lower hs-CRP level and less pain at rest and walking during the first week postoperatively (P < 0.05). The 2 MWT was significantly better in MMA with preemptive analgesia group (17.13 ± 3.82 VS 14.19 ± 3.56, P = 0.001). The 6 MWT scores and WOMAC scores increased significantly within Groups (P = 0.020, 0.000), but no difference between groups postoperatively (P > 0.05). Less cumulative consumption of morphine was found in MMA with preemptive analgesia group at 48 h (P = 0.017, 0.023), but no difference at total requirement (P = 0.113). Preemptive analgesia added to a multimodal analgesic regime improved analgesia, reduced inflammatory reaction and accelerated functional recovery at the first week postoperatively, but not improved long-term function. PMID:27578313

  13. Knee arthroscopy - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100117.htm Knee arthroscopy - series To use the sharing features on ... 5 out of 5 Normal anatomy Overview The knee is a complex joint made up of the ...

  14. Knee braces - unloading

    MedlinePlus

    ... most people talk about the arthritis in their knees, they are referring to a type of arthritis ... is caused by wear and tear inside your knee joints. Cartilage, the firm, rubbery tissue that cushions ...

  15. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series To use the sharing features on ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  16. Osteotomy of the knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... is not affected unless you have had a knee injury in the past. Osteotomy surgery works by shifting ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Arthritis Knee Injuries and Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  17. Knee joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    The results of a total knee replacement are often excellent. The operation relieves pain for most people. Most people do not need help walking after they fully recover. Most artificial knee joints last 10 ...

  18. Partial knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    Most people recover quickly and have much less pain than they did before surgery. People who have a partial knee replacement recover faster than those who have a total knee replacement. Many people are able to walk ...

  19. Knee joint replacement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100088.htm Knee joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... of 4 Overview The knee is a complex joint. It contains the distal end of the femur ( ...

  20. [Revision after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Mohr, G; Martin, J; Clarius, M

    2014-10-01

    Unicompartmental arthroplasty is an efficient and approved treatment option of unicompartmental arthritis of the knee, being performed with increasing frequency worldwide. Compared to total knee replacement, there are several advantages such as faster recovery, lower blood loss, better functional outcome and lower infection rates. However, higher revision rates are a frequent argument against the use of unicompartmental arthroplasty. The following article gives an overview of failure mechanisms and strategies for revision arthroplasty. This article is based on a selective literature review including PubMed and relevant print media. Our own clinical experience is considered as well. PMID:25209015

  1. Utilization and cost of a new model of care for managing acute knee injuries: the Calgary acute knee injury clinic

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) affect a large proportion of the Canadian population and present a huge problem that continues to strain primary healthcare resources. Currently, the Canadian healthcare system depicts a clinical care pathway for MSDs that is inefficient and ineffective. Therefore, a new inter-disciplinary team-based model of care for managing acute knee injuries was developed in Calgary, Alberta, Canada: the Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic (C-AKIC). The goal of this paper is to evaluate and report on the appropriateness, efficiency, and effectiveness of the C-AKIC through healthcare utilization and costs associated with acute knee injuries. Methods This quasi-experimental study measured and evaluated cost and utilization associated with specific healthcare services for patients presenting with acute knee injuries. The goal was to compare patients receiving care from two clinical care pathways: the existing pathway (i.e. comparison group) and a new model, the C-AKIC (i.e. experimental group). This was accomplished through the use of a Healthcare Access and Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (HAPSQ). Results Data from 138 questionnaires were analyzed in the experimental group and 136 in the comparison group. A post-hoc analysis determined that both groups were statistically similar in socio-demographic characteristics. With respect to utilization, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC used significantly less resources. Overall, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC incurred 37% of the cost of patients with knee injuries in the comparison group and significantly incurred less costs when compared to the comparison group. The total aggregate average cost for the C-AKIC group was $2,549.59 compared to $6,954.33 for the comparison group (p <.001). Conclusions The Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic was able to manage and treat knee injured patients for less cost than the existing state of healthcare delivery. The combined results from

  2. Effect of Closed Suction Drain on Blood Loss and Transfusion Rates in Simultaneous Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Prospective Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Gautam M.; Gupta, Vinay; Saxena, Purvi; Singh, Nidhi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is associated with excessive blood loss and morbidity arising from postoperative reduction in hemoglobin (Hb). The purpose of this prospective randomized study was to determine if drains have any effect on blood loss, postoperative reduction in Hb levels and transfusion rates compared to no drainage in simultaneous bilateral TKAs. Materials and Methods Two hundred and thirty patients who underwent simultaneous bilateral TKA by a single surgeon were randomly allotted to drain or no-drain group (n=115 in each group). Postoperative Hb level, blood loss volume and transfusion rate were compared between the two groups. Results The mean postoperative Hb level (p=0.38), blood loss volume (p=0.33) and transfusion rate (p=0.52) in the drain group were not significantly different compared to the no-drain group. No statistical difference was found in terms of complications, readmissions and mortality rates between the two groups. Conclusions No significant difference was observed in the two groups with respect to blood loss and blood transfusion. Non-drainage does not offer an advantage over drainage with respect to conserving blood in simultaneous bilateral TKA. PMID:27595073

  3. On the roughness measurement on knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Sami Abdel; Ruggiero, Alessandro; Battaglia, Santina; Affatato, Saverio

    2015-01-01

    The majority of total knee replacements currently implanted present an articulation composed of two metal parts, femoral and tibial components, between which there is a polyethylene insert serving as a bearing surface. The finishing surface of the metal components is a very important factor in minimizing the polyethylene wear rate and, later, the gradual production of metal and plastic debris. Considering the role of surface roughness on volumetric wear rates, the purpose of this study is to develop a protocol for the roughness characterization of total knee prosthesis (TKP) metal components, taking into consideration a limited number of points on each surface. Six mobile TKP of different sizes (three size 2 and three size 6) were tested on a knee joint simulator to compare the wear behavior of each group. After 2 million cycles the weight loss by the polyethylene inserts was measured with gravimetric method and the surface roughness of the metallic components was assessed in terms of average surface roughness, Ra, skewness, Rsk, and total roughness, Rt. Roughness measurement involved 29 points on each femoral condyle and 26 points on each metal tibial plate. The data collected has shown an increased roughness upon wear testing for both the investigated TKP sizes. No statistical differences were observed between the two groups for both the parameters Ra, Rsk, and Rt. The surface of all metallic components became more negatively skewed, indicating diminishing peaks. The various parameters were correlated to the volumetric loss using a linear regression analysis. PMID:25588764

  4. Imaging knee position using MRI, RSA/CT and 3D digitisation.

    PubMed

    McPherson, A; Kärrholm, J; Pinskerova, V; Sosna, A; Martelli, S

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare 3 methods of imaging knee position. Three fresh cadaver knees were imaged at 6 flexion angles between 0 degrees and 120 degrees by MRI, a combination of RSA and CT and 3D digitisation (in two knees). Virtual models of all 42 positions were created using suitable computer software. Each virtual model was aligned to a newly defined anatomically based Cartesian coordinate system. The angular rotations around the 3 coordinate system axes were calculated directly from the aligned virtual models using rigid body kinematics and found to be equally accurate for the 3 methods. The 3 rotations in each knee could be depicted using anatomy-based diagrams for all 3 methods. We conclude that the 3 methods of data acquisition are equally and adequately accurate in vitro. MRI may be the most useful in vivo. PMID:15598452

  5. Preoperative prediction of potentially preventable morbidity after fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty: a detailed descriptive cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Morten Aa; Kehlet, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Construction of a simple preoperative risk score for patients in high risk of potentially preventable ‘medical’ complications. Secondary objectives were to construct simple preoperative risk scores for ‘severe medical’, ‘surgical’ and ‘total’ potentially preventable complications. Design Prospective observational study. Setting Elective primary unilateral total hip and knee arthroplasty with prospectively collected preoperative patient characteristics; similar standardised fast-track protocols; evaluation of complications through discharge and medical records; and complete 90 days follow-up through nationwide databases. Participants 8373 consecutive unselected total hip arthroplasty (THA) and knee arthroplasty from January 2010 to November 2012. Results There were 557 procedures (6.4%) followed by potentially preventable complications resulting in hospitalisation >4 days or readmission. Of 22 preoperative characteristics, 7 were associated with 379 (4.2%) potentially preventable ‘medical’ complications. Patients with ≥2 of the following, age ≥80 years, anticoagulant therapy, pulmonary disease, pharmacologically treated psychiatric disorder, anaemia and walking aids, composed 19.1% of the procedures; 55.7% constituted potentially preventable ‘medical’ complications that were mainly falls, mobilisation issues, pneumonias and cardiac arrhythmias. The number needed to be treated for a hypothetical intervention leading to 25% reduction in potentially preventable ‘medical’ complications was 34. THA, use of walking aids and cardiac disease were associated with 189 (2.2%) ‘surgical’ complications, but no clinically relevant preoperative prediction was possible. Conclusions Preoperative identification of patients at high risk of preventable ‘medical’, but not ‘surgical’, complications is statistically possible. However, clinical relevance is limited. Future risk indices should differ between ‘medical’ and

  6. Effect of two different kinesio taping techniques on knee kinematics and kinetics in young females

    PubMed Central

    Guner, Senem; Alsancak, Serap; Koz, Mitat

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The application of kinesio taping may improve strength and performance, inhibit and facilitate motor activity, and increase range of motion. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of kinesio taping facilitation and inhibition applications on spatiotemporal knee kinematics and kinetics during walking activity in healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] A three-dimensional quantitative gait evaluation was performed without tape and with, facilitation and inhibition kinesio taping application on the knee. Sixteen healthy female college students (age, 19.7 ± 0.4 years; height, 1.64 ± 3.4 cm; body mass, 51.5 ± 4.8 kg) participated in the study. [Results] Spatiotemporal parameters (cadence, walking speed, stride length) were significantly different among the trials. Knee joint sagittal plane range of motion was not different with either kinesio taping application. Knee external flexion moment during the early stance phase decreased significantly with facilitation kinesio taping and increased with the inhibition kinesio taping. Knee external extension moment during the mid-stance phase increased with facilitation kinesio taping. Knee power parameters, eccentric activity in the rectus femoris during the pre-swing phase was significantly increased with inhibition kinesio taping application, while eccentric activity of the hamstrings during the terminal swing of gait was decreased. [Conclusion] These findings showed that facilitation kinesio taping application affected the terminal stance phase and that inhibition kinesio taping influenced the terminal swing phase compared with the no tape condition. PMID:26644651

  7. Effect of two different kinesio taping techniques on knee kinematics and kinetics in young females.

    PubMed

    Guner, Senem; Alsancak, Serap; Koz, Mitat

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The application of kinesio taping may improve strength and performance, inhibit and facilitate motor activity, and increase range of motion. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of kinesio taping facilitation and inhibition applications on spatiotemporal knee kinematics and kinetics during walking activity in healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] A three-dimensional quantitative gait evaluation was performed without tape and with, facilitation and inhibition kinesio taping application on the knee. Sixteen healthy female college students (age, 19.7 ± 0.4 years; height, 1.64 ± 3.4 cm; body mass, 51.5 ± 4.8 kg) participated in the study. [Results] Spatiotemporal parameters (cadence, walking speed, stride length) were significantly different among the trials. Knee joint sagittal plane range of motion was not different with either kinesio taping application. Knee external flexion moment during the early stance phase decreased significantly with facilitation kinesio taping and increased with the inhibition kinesio taping. Knee external extension moment during the mid-stance phase increased with facilitation kinesio taping. Knee power parameters, eccentric activity in the rectus femoris during the pre-swing phase was significantly increased with inhibition kinesio taping application, while eccentric activity of the hamstrings during the terminal swing of gait was decreased. [Conclusion] These findings showed that facilitation kinesio taping application affected the terminal stance phase and that inhibition kinesio taping influenced the terminal swing phase compared with the no tape condition. PMID:26644651

  8. Robotic-assisted knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Elmallah, Randa K; Jauregui, Julio J; Pierce, Todd P; Mont, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Robotics in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has undergone vast improvements. Although some of the systems have fallen out of favor due to safety concerns, there has been recent increased interest for semi-active haptic robotic systems that provide intraoperative tactile feedback to the surgeon. The potential advantages include improvements in radiographic outcomes, reducing the incidence of mechanical axis malalignment of the lower extremity and better tissue balance. Proponents of robotic technology believe that these improvements may lead to superior functional outcomes and implant survivorship. We aim to discuss robotic technology development, outcomes of unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty and the future outlook. Short-term follow-up studies on robotic-assisted knee arthroplasty suggest that, although some alignment objectives may have been achieved, more studies regarding functional outcomes are needed. Furthermore, studies evaluating the projected cost-benefit analyses of this new technology are needed before widespread adoption. Nevertheless, the short-term results warrant further evaluation. PMID:26365088

  9. Knee braces - unloading

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by wear and tear inside your knee joints. Cartilage, the firm, rubbery tissue that cushions all of your bones and joints, lets the bones glide over one another. If ... the knee become weaker. Over time, your whole knee becomes ...

  10. Gait Using Pneumatic Brace for End-Stage Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Cherian, Jeffrey Jai; Starr, Roland; Chughtai, Morad; Mont, Michael A; Harwin, Steven F; Bhave, Anil

    2016-04-01

    More than 20 million individuals in the United States are affected by knee osteoarthritis (OA), which can lead to altered biomechanics and excessive joint loading. The use of an unloader pneumatic brace with extension assist has been proposed as a nonoperative treatment modality that may improve gait mechanics and correct knee malalignment. We assessed the following parameters in patients who have knee OA treated with and without a brace: (1) changes in temporospatial parameters in gait; (2) knee range of motion, knee extension at heel strike, and foot placement; (3) knee joint moments and impulse; and (4) changes in dynamic stiffness and rate of change of knee flexion during midstance to terminal stance. This 2:1 prospective, randomized, single-blinded trial evaluated 36 patients (24 brace and 12 matching). OA knee patients were randomized to receive either a pneumatic unloader brace or a standard nonoperative treatment regimen as the matching cohort for a 3-month period. They underwent evaluation of gait parameters using a three-dimensional gait analysis system at their initial appointment and at 3 months follow-up. All the testing, pre- and postbracing were performed without wearing the brace to examine for retained effects. Treatment with the brace led to significant improvements versus standard treatment in various gait parameters. Patients in the brace group had improvements in walking speed, knee extension at heel strike, total range of motion, knee joint forces, and rate of knee flexion from midstance to terminal stance when compared with the matching cohort. Knee OA patients who used a pneumatic unloader brace for 3 months for at least 3 hours per day had significant improvements various gait parameters when compared with a standard nonoperative therapy cohort. Braced patients demonstrated gait-modifying affects when not wearing the brace. These results are encouraging and suggest that this device represents a promising treatment modality for knee OA that

  11. Homologous platelet-rich plasma for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis in selected elderly patients: an open-label, uncontrolled, pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Bottegoni, Carlo; Dei Giudici, Luca; Salvemini, Sergio; Chiurazzi, Enrico; Bencivenga, Rosella; Gigante, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and the effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) intra-articular injections obtained from blood donors (homologous PRP) on elderly patients with early or moderate knee osteoarthritis (OA) who are not candidates for autologous PRP treatment. Methods: A total of 60 symptomatic patients, aged 65–86 years, affected by hematologic disorders and early or moderate knee OA, were treated with 5 ml of homologous PRP intra-articular injections every 14 days for a total of three injections. Clinical evaluations before the treatment, and after 2 and 6 months were performed by International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and Equal Visual Analogue Scale (EQ VAS) scores. Adverse events and patient satisfaction were recorded. Results: No severe complications were noted during the treatment and the follow-up period. A statistically significant improvement from basal evaluation to the 2-month follow-up visit was observed, whereas a statistically significant worsening from the 2-month to the 6-month follow-up visit was showed. The overall worst results were observed in patients aged 80 years or over and in those affected by minor bone attrition. It was found that 90% of patients were satisfied at the 6-month evaluation. Conclusions: Homologous PRP has an excellent safety profile but offers only a short-term clinical improvement in selected elderly patients with knee OA who are not candidates for autologous PRP treatment. Increasing age and developing degeneration result in a decreased potential for homologous PRP injection therapy. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:27047571

  12. Low-Velocity Knee Dislocations in Obese and Morbidly Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Rahul; Roth, Matthew; Nanavati, Dhiren; Prince, Matthew; Sethi, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Knee dislocations from minor trauma have been reported sparsely in the literature. The consensus is that these injuries tend not to be associated with neurovascular compromise. Purpose: To present a series of atraumatic knee dislocations in obese and morbidly obese patients and to compare operative versus conservative treatment. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: This study included 19 patients (21 knees) who presented with knee dislocation from a low-velocity or ultra low–velocity incident. Charts, radiographs, and magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were reviewed, and patients were reviewed based on their latest follow-up. We included patients in our database from 2001 to 2011 and compared knees of patients who had ligament repair or reconstruction (9 total knees) verses nonoperative treatment (12 total knees). Range of motion, activity levels, and knee laxity information were collected as outcome measures to compare operative and nonoperative results. Results: The mean age at presentation was 30.3 years (range, 15-74 years), with 5 men and 14 women. The average body mass index (BMI) was 41.4 kg/m2 (range, 30-64.4 kg/m2), with an average follow-up of 31 months (range, 12-72 months). Five patients (27%) had a popliteal artery injury, and 7 (44.4%) had a peroneal nerve injury at presentation. Four had a vascular repair, 1 had an amputation, and 3 of 7 patients had return of peroneal nerve. Ligament reconstruction was performed on 9 individuals. The average operating time for ligament reconstruction was 183% of that with injury-matched normal-weight patients. Eight operative patients who complied with therapy had an average range of motion of 91.4° (range, 60°-110°). The nonoperative patients had an average range of motion of 60.45° (range, 0°-120°). Two of these patients later required a total knee arthroplasty (3 total knee arthroplasties overall). Conclusion: Knee dislocations from minor falls occur in obese patients and

  13. Less incidence of coronary artery disease in general anesthesia compared to spinal-epidural anesthesia after total knee replacement: 90-day follow-up period by a population-based dataset.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Jui-Yang; Lin, Hui-Wen

    2015-07-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is an effective and safe procedure. However, large-scale study to compare the incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD) after spinal or epidural anesthesia (SA-EA) or general anesthesia (GA) for TKR has not ever been conducted. To do so, we studied a population-based dataset from the Taiwan National Health Research Institute and hypothesized that the incidence of CAD might be different with regional than with general anesthesia. The risk of CAD-related events during a 90-day follow-up period among patients who received TKR under SA-EA or GA was evaluated in the present study. A total of 1500 patients from the Taiwan National Health Insurance claims database who underwent TKR from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2006, were allocated into two groups. Group 1 included 1012 patients who received SA-EA during TKR procedure. Group 2 included 488 patients who received GA during this procedure. The number of patients who developed CAD during the 90-day follow-up period was 31 (3.1 %) in group 1 and 6 (1.2 %) in group 2. The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis of IHD-free cumulative survival rate during the 90-day follow-up period for patients who underwent TKR was significantly lower in group 1 than in group 2. The hazard ratio for the occurrence of CAD was 2.80 (95 % CI 1.16-6.78), and the hazard was higher for patients who received SA-EA than for patients who received GA after adjusted potential confounding factors. After the performance of TKR, patients had a potentially increased risk for CAD in SA-EA compared to GA during the 90-day follow-up period. PMID:25761988

  14. Altered knee joint neuromuscular control during landing from a jump in 10-15 year old children with Generalised Joint Hypermobility. A substudy of the CHAMPS-study Denmark.

    PubMed

    Junge, Tina; Wedderkopp, Niels; Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Søgaard, Karen; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2015-06-01

    Generalised Joint Hypermobility (GJH) is considered an intrinsic risk factor for knee injuries. Knee neuromuscular control during landing may be altered in GJH due to reduced passive stability. The aim was to identify differences in knee neuromuscular control during landing of the Single-Leg-Hop-for-Distance test (SLHD) in 25 children with GJH compared to 29 children without GJH (controls), all 10-15years. Inclusion criteria for GJH: Beighton score⩾5/9 and minimum one hypermobile knee. EMG was recorded from the quadriceps, the hamstring and the calf muscles, presented relative to Maximum Voluntary Electrical activity (MVE). There was no difference in jump length between groups. Before landing, GJH had 33% lower Semitendinosus, but 32% higher Gastrocnemius Medialis activity and 39% higher co contraction of the lateral knee muscles, than controls. After landing, GJH had 36% lower Semitendinosus activity than controls, all significant findings. Although the groups performed equally in SLHD, GJH had a Gastrocnemius Medialis dominated neuromuscular strategy before landing, plausibly caused by reduced Semitendinosus activity. Reduced Semitendinosus activity was seen in GJH after landing, but with no compensatory Gastrocnemius Medialis activity. Reduced pre and post-activation of the Semitendinosus may present a risk factor for traumatic knee injuries as ACL ruptures in GJH with knee hypermobility. PMID:25801907

  15. Prevalence and Predictive Factors of Chronic Postsurgical Pain and Global Surgical Recovery 1 Year After Outpatient Knee Arthroscopy: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hoofwijk, Daisy M N; Fiddelers, Audrey A A; Emans, Peter J; Joosten, Elbert A; Gramke, Hans-Fritz; Marcus, Marco A E; Buhre, Wolfgang F F A

    2015-11-01

    Outpatient knee arthroscopy is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures. Previous research has demonstrated that chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP) after outpatient surgery is prevalent. Our objective was to determine the prevalence and predictive factors of CPSP and Global Surgical Recovery (GSR) 1 year after knee arthroscopy.A prospective longitudinal cohort study was performed. Patients were included during an 18-month period. Data were collected by using 3 questionnaires: at 1 week preoperatively, 4 days postoperatively, and 1 year postoperatively. A value of >3 on an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS) was defined as moderate to severe pain. A score of ≤80% on the Global Surgical Recovery Index was defined as poor GSR. Stepwise logistic regression analysis was performed to determine which variables were predictors for CPSP and poor GSR.The prevalence of moderate to severe preoperative pain in patients undergoing knee arthroscopy (n = 104) was 71.2%, of acute postsurgical pain 37.5%, and of CPSP 32.7%. Risk factors for CPSP were the presence of preoperative pain and preoperative analgesic use, with odds ratios of 6.31 (1.25-31.74) and 4.36 (1.58-12.07), respectively. The prevalence of poor GSR 1 year after outpatient knee arthrosocpy was 50.0%. Poor GSR 4 days after the surgery was a risk factor with an odds ratio of 8.38 (0.92-76.58) and quality of life 4 days after surgery was a protective factor with and odds ratio of 0.10 (0.02-0.64).Both CPSP and poor GSR are common 1 year after knee arthroscopy. Patients at risk for CPSP can be identified during the preoperative phase. Prediction of poor GSR 1 year after surgery is mainly related to early postoperative recovery. PMID:26559300

  16. Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on quadriceps function in individuals with experimental knee pain.

    PubMed

    Son, S J; Kim, H; Seeley, M K; Feland, J B; Hopkins, J T

    2016-09-01

    Knee joint pain (KJP) is a cardinal symptom in knee pathologies, and quadriceps inhibition is commonly observed among KJP patients. Previously, KJP independently reduced quadriceps strength and activation. However, it remains unknown how disinhibitory transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) will affect inhibited quadriceps motor function. This study aimed at examining changes in quadriceps maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and central activation ratio (CAR) before and after sensory TENS following experimental knee pain. Thirty healthy participants were assigned to either the TENS or placebo groups. All participants underwent three separate data collection sessions consisting of two saline infusions and one no infusion control in a crossover design. TENS or placebo treatment was administered to each group for 20 min. Quadriceps MVC and CAR were measured at baseline, infusion, treatment, and post-treatment. Perceived knee pain intensity was measured on a 100-mm visual analogue scale. Post-hoc analysis revealed that hypertonic saline infusion significantly reduced the quadriceps MVC and CAR compared with control sessions (P < 0.05). Sensory TENS, however, significantly restored inhibited quadriceps motor function compared with placebo treatment (P < 0.05). There was a negative correlation between changes in MVC and knee pain (r = 0.33, P < 0.001), and CAR and knee pain (r = 0.62, P < 0.001), respectively. PMID:26346597

  17. Anterolateral Portal Is Less Painful than Superolateral Portal in Knee Intra-Articular Injection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Yup; GN, Kiran Kumar; Chung, Byung June; Lee, Sang Wook

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intra-articular knee injections are commonly performed in clinical practice for treating various knee joint disorders such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. When selecting the portal for injection, not only intra-articular needle accuracy but also procedural pain should be taken into consideration. The purpose of this study was to determine whether injection through anterolateral portal provokes less pain and provides better pain relief compared to superolateral portal. Materials and Methods A total of 60 patients with primary osteoarthritis of the knee receiving intra-articular injections were randomized into 2 groups according to the type of portal approach; anterolateral or superolateral. All patients received hyaluronic acid (20 mg) and triamcinolone (40 mg) as the first injection followed by second and third injections of hyaluronic acid on a weekly basis. Underlying knee pain, procedural pain, and knee pain at 4 weeks were evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS). Results Injection through anterolateral portal provoked less pain (VAS, 1.5±1.3) than the superolateral portal (VAS, 1.5 vs. 2.7; p=0.004). No differences were found in the degree of pain relief at weeks between the two groups (p=0.517). Conclusions We recommend the use of anterolateral portal for intra-articular knee injection as it provokes less pain and comparably short-term pain relief than the superolateral portal. PMID:26676089

  18. Total knee replacement with and without patellar resurfacing: a prospective, randomised trial using the profix total knee system.

    PubMed

    Smith, A J; Wood, D J; Li, M-G

    2008-01-01

    We have examined the differences in clinical outcome of total knee replacement (TKR) with and without patellar resurfacing in a prospective, randomised study of 181 osteoarthritic knees in 142 patients using the Profix total knee system which has a femoral component with features considered to be anatomical and a domed patellar implant. The procedures were carried out between February 1998 and November 2002. A total of 159 TKRs in 142 patients were available for review at a mean of four years (3 to 7). The patients and the clinical evaluator were blinded in this prospective study. Evaluation was undertaken annually by an independent observer using the knee pain scale and the Knee Society clinical rating system. Specific evaluation of anterior knee pain, stair-climbing and rising from a seated to a standing position was also undertaken. No benefit was shown of TKR with patellar resurfacing over that without resurfacing with respect to any of the measured outcomes. In 22 of 73 knees (30.1%) with and 18 of 86 knees (20.9%) without patellar resurfacing there was some degree of anterior knee pain (p = 0.183). No revisions related to the patellofemoral joint were performed in either group. Only one TKR in each group underwent a re-operation related to the patellofemoral joint. A significant association between knee flexion contracture and anterior knee pain was observed in those knees with patellar resurfacing (p = 0.006). PMID:18160498

  19. Modelling and Analysis on Biomechanical Dynamic Characteristics of Knee Flexion Movement under Squatting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianping; Tao, Kun; Li, Huanyi; Wang, Chengtao

    2014-01-01

    The model of three-dimensional (3D) geometric knee was built, which included femoral-tibial, patellofemoral articulations and the bone and soft tissues. Dynamic finite element (FE) model of knee was developed to simulate both the kinematics and the internal stresses during knee flexion. The biomechanical experimental system of knee was built to simulate knee squatting using cadaver knees. The flexion motion and dynamic contact characteristics of knee were analyzed, and verified by comparing with the data from in vitro experiment. The results showed that the established dynamic FE models of knee are capable of predicting kinematics and the contact stresses during flexion, and could be an efficient tool for the analysis of total knee replacement (TKR) and knee prosthesis design. PMID:25013852

  20. Basic biomechanic principles of knee instability.

    PubMed

    Zlotnicki, Jason P; Naendrup, Jan-Hendrik; Ferrer, Gerald A; Debski, Richard E

    2016-06-01

    Motion at the knee joint is a complex mechanical phenomenon. Stability is provided by a combination of static and dynamic structures that work in concert to prevent excessive movement or instability that is inherent in various knee injuries. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a main stabilizer of the knee, providing both translational and rotatory constraint. Despite the high volume of research directed at native ACL function, pathogenesis and surgical reconstruction of this structure, a gold standard for objective quantification of injury and subsequent repair, has not been demonstrated. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that novel anatomic structures may play a significant role in knee stability. The use of biomechanical principles and testing techniques provides essential objective/quantitative information on the function of bone, ligaments, joint capsule, and other contributing soft tissues in response to various loading conditions. This review discusses the principles of biomechanics in relation to knee stability, with a focus on the objective quantification of knee stability, the individual contributions of specific knee structures to stability, and the most recent technological advances in the biomechanical evaluation of the knee joint. PMID:27007474

  1. FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE AND KNEE LAXITY IN NORMAL INDIVIDUALS AND IN INDIVIDUALS SUBMITTED TO ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    de Vasconcelos, Rodrigo Antunes; Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora; Shimano, Antonio Carlos; Jansen Paccola, Cleber Antonio; Salvini, Tânia Fátima; Prado, Christiane Lanatovits; Mello Junior, Wilson A.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between deficits in the isokinetic peak torque of the knee extensors and flexors with hop tests, postoperative knee laxity and functional scores in normal and ACL- reconstructed subjects with patellar tendon and hamstring tendon autografts. Methods: Sixty male subjects were enrolled and subdivided into three groups: Twenty subjects without knee injuries (GC group) and two groups of 20 subjects submitted to ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon (GTP group) and hamstrings autograft (GTF group). Results: The results showed significant correlation between knee extensors peak torque and performance in the hop tests for GTF and GC groups. There are no significantly correlations between post op knee laxity and Lysholm score compared with the hop tests and peak torque deficits. Concerning the differences between groups, the GTP group showed greater peak torque deficits in knee extensors, worst Lysholm scores and higher percentage of individuals with lower limb symmetry index (ISM) < 90% in both hop tests when compared to the other two groups. Conclusion: It is not recommendable to use only one measurement instrument for the functional evaluation of ACL-reconstructed patients, because significant correlation between peak torque, subject's functional score, knee laxity and hop tests were not observed in all groups. PMID:26998464

  2. The effect of exercise therapy on knee osteoarthritis: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Nejati, Parisa; Farzinmehr, Azizeh; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common musculoskeletal disease among old individuals which affects ability for sitting on the chair, standing, walking and climbing stairs. Our objective was to investigate the short and long-term effects of the most simple and the least expensive exercise protocols in combination to conventional conservative therapy for knee OA. Methods: It was a single blind RCT study with a 12-months follow-up. Totally, 56 patients with knee OA were assigned into 2 random groups. The patients in exercise group received exercise for knee muscles in combination with non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and 10 sessions acupuncture and physiotherapy modalities. Non-exercise group received similar treatments except exercise program. The changes in patients’ pain and functional status were evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS), knee and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) questionnaire and functional tests (4 steps, 5 sit up, and 6 min walk test) before and after treatment (1 and 3 months after intervention), and 1 year later at the follow-up. Results: The results showed that the patients with knee OA in exercise group had significant improvement in pain, disability, walking, stair climbing, and sit up speed after treatment at first and second follow-up when compared with their initial status and when compared with non-exercise group. At third follow up (1 year later) there was significant difference between groups in VAS and in three items of KOOS questionnaire in functional status. Conclusion: Non aerobic exercises for muscles around knee can augment the effect of other therapeutic interventions like medical therapy, acupuncture, and modalities for knee OA. PMID:26034739

  3. Practical approach to subject-specific estimation of knee joint contact force.

    PubMed

    Knarr, Brian A; Higginson, Jill S

    2015-08-20

    Compressive forces experienced at the knee can significantly contribute to cartilage degeneration. Musculoskeletal models enable predictions of the internal forces experienced at the knee, but validation is often not possible, as experimental data detailing loading at the knee joint is limited. Recently available data reporting compressive knee force through direct measurement using instrumented total knee replacements offer a unique opportunity to evaluate the accuracy of models. Previous studies have highlighted the importance of subject-specificity in increasing the accuracy of model predictions; however, these techniques may be unrealistic outside of a research setting. Therefore, the goal of our work was to identify a practical approach for accurate prediction of tibiofemoral knee contact force (KCF). Four methods for prediction of knee contact force were compared: (1) standard static optimization, (2) uniform muscle coordination weighting, (3) subject-specific muscle coordination weighting and (4) subject-specific strength adjustments. Walking trials for three subjects with instrumented knee replacements were used to evaluate the accuracy of model predictions. Predictions utilizing subject-specific muscle coordination weighting yielded the best agreement with experimental data; however this method required in vivo data for weighting factor calibration. Including subject-specific strength adjustments improved models' predictions compared to standard static optimization, with errors in peak KCF less than 0.5 body weight for all subjects. Overall, combining clinical assessments of muscle strength with standard tools available in the OpenSim software package, such as inverse kinematics and static optimization, appears to be a practical method for predicting joint contact force that can be implemented for many applications. PMID:25952546

  4. Position-Specific Hip and Knee Kinematics in NCAA Football Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Deneweth, Jessica M.; Pomeroy, Shannon M.; Russell, Jason R.; McLean, Scott G.; Zernicke, Ronald F.; Bedi, Asheesh; Goulet, Grant C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Femoroacetabular impingement is a debilitating hip condition commonly affecting athletes playing American football. The condition is associated with reduced hip range of motion; however, little is known about the range-of-motion demands of football athletes. This knowledge is critical to effective management of this condition. Purpose: To (1) develop a normative database of game-like hip and knee kinematics used by football athletes and (2) analyze kinematic data by playing position. The hypothesis was that kinematics would be similar between running backs and defensive backs and between wide receivers and quarterbacks, and that linemen would perform the activities with the most erect lower limb posture. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Forty National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) football athletes, representing 5 playing positions (quarterback, defensive back, running back, wide receiver, offensive lineman), executed game-like maneuvers while lower body kinematics were recorded via optical motion capture. Passive hip range of motion at 90° of hip flexion was assessed using a goniometer. Passive range of motion, athlete physical dimensions, hip function, and hip and knee rotations were submitted to 1-way analysis of variance to test for differences between playing positions. Correlations between maximal hip and knee kinematics and maximal hip kinematics and passive range of motion were also computed. Results: Hip and knee kinematics were similar across positions. Significant differences arose with linemen, who used lower maximal knee flexion (mean ± SD, 45.04° ± 7.27°) compared with running backs (61.20° ± 6.07°; P < .001) and wide receivers (54.67° ± 6.97°; P = .048) during the cut. No significant differences were found among positions for hip passive range of motion (overall means: 102° ± 15° [flexion]; 25° ± 9° [internal rotation]; 25° ± 8° [external rotation]). Several maximal hip measures were found

  5. Molecular changes after shockwave therapy in osteoarthritic knee in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.-J.; Sun, Y.-C.; Wu, C.-T.; Weng, L.-H.; Wang, F.-S.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the molecular changes of DKK-1, MMP13, Wnt-5a and \\upbeta -catenin after extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in anterior cruciate ligament transected (ACLT) osteoarthritic (OA) knee in rats. 27 male Spraque-Dawley rats were divided into three groups. Group I was the control one and received sham knee arthrotomy but no ACLT or ESWT. Group II underwent ACLT, but no ESWT. Group III underwent ACLT and received ESWT. The animals were killed at 12 weeks, and the harvested knee specimens were subjected to histopathological examination and immunohistochemical analysis. Radiographs of the knees were obtained at 0 and 12 weeks. At 12 weeks, radiographs of group II showed more arthritic changes with formation of osteochondral fragments, whereas very subtle arthritis was noted in groups I and III. In histopathological examination, group II showed a significant increase of Mankin score and a decrease of subchondral bone as compared to groups I and III. Group III showed a significant decrease of Mankin score and an increase of subchondral bone, with the data comparable to group I. In immunohistochemical analysis, group II showed significant increases of DKK-1 and MMP13 and decreases of Wnt-5a and \\upbeta -catenin in articular cartilage and subchondral bone as compared to groups I and III. Group III showed significant decreases of DKK-1 and MMP13 and increases of Wnt-5a and \\upbeta -catenin, with the data comparable to group I. In conclusion, the application of ESWT causes molecular changes that are consistent with the improvement in subchondral bone remodeling and chondroprotective effect in ACLT OA knees in rats.

  6. TOTAL KNEE REPLACEMENT IN PATIENTS WITH BELOW-KNEE AMPUTATION

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Matthew D; Willey, Michael; Shurr, Donald G

    2010-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is reserved for patients with severe and disabling arthritis that is non-responsive to conservative measures. Based on existing data, total knee replacement is a safe and cost-effective treatment for alleviating pain and improving physical function in patients who do not respond to conservative therapy. Despite the large variation in health status of patients and types of prosthesis implanted, total knee replacement has proven to be a relatively low risk and successful operation. Each year in the United States surgeons perform approximately 300,000 TKR.1 Likewise, lower extremity amputation is commonly performed in the United States with an annual incidence of 110,000 per year.2 Nearly 70% of all lower extremity amputations are performed as the result of chronic vascular disease, followed by trauma (22%), congenital etiology and tumor (4% each).3 Approximately 50% of all lower extremity amputations are performed secondary to complications from Diabetes Mellitus. Norvell et al. demonstrated that patients who have previously undergone transtibial amputation and ambulate with a prosthesis are more likely to develop degenerative joint disease in the con-tralateral extremity than the ipsilateral extremity.4 Further, radiographic changes consistent with osteoporosis have been demonstrated in up to 88% of limbs that have undergone transtibial amputation.8 To our knowledge, there have been only three reported cases of total knee replacement in patients with ipsilateral transtibial amputation.5,7 The purpose of the present study is to review the existing data on total knee replacement in patients who have undergone transtibial amputation. Further we present a patient with a transtibial amputation who underwent contralateral total knee replacement. PMID:21045987

  7. Teaching the Comparative Approach to American Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaberg, Stanley

    The rationale behind this book of five suggested or sample comparative units contains several elements: 1) an interdisciplinary social science approach to studying the American past, present, and future; and 2) a view of our country's history in terms of a world setting and in the light on contemporary concerns. The global comparative method…

  8. Comparative Environmental Threat Analysis: Three Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latour, J. B.; Reiling, R.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews how carrying capacity for different environmental problems is operationalized. Discusses whether it is possible to compare threats, using the exceeding of carrying capacity as a yardstick. Points out problems in comparative threat analysis using three case studies: threats to European groundwater resources, threats to ecosystems in Europe,…

  9. Sex Differences in Proximal Control of the Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Mendiguchia, Jurdan; Ford, Kevin R.; Quatman, Carmen E.; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Following the onset of maturation, female athletes have a significantly higher risk for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury compared with male athletes. While multiple sex differences in lower-extremity neuromuscular control and biomechanics have been identified as potential risk factors for ACL injury in females, the majority of these studies have focused specifically on the knee joint. However, increasing evidence in the literature indicates that lumbopelvic (core) control may have a large effect on knee-joint control and injury risk. This review examines the published evidence on the contributions of the trunk and hip to knee-joint control. Specifically, the sex differences in potential proximal controllers of the knee as risk factors for ACL injury are identified and discussed. Sex differences in trunk and hip biomechanics have been identified in all planes of motion (sagittal, coronal and transverse). Essentially, female athletes show greater lateral trunk displacement, altered trunk and hip flexion angles, greater ranges of trunk motion, and increased hip adduction and internal rotation during sport manoeuvres, compared with their male counterparts. These differences may increase the risk of ACL injury among female athletes. Prevention programmes targeted towards trunk and hip neuromuscular control may decrease the risk for ACL injuries. PMID:21688868

  10. Arthroscopic knee debridement can delay total knee replacement in painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos; Gomez-Cardero, Primitivo

    2016-09-01

    The role of arthroscopic debridement of the knee in haemophilia is controversial in the literature. The purpose of this study is to describe the results of arthroscopic knee debridement (AKD), with the aim of determining whether it is possible to delay total knee replacement (TKR) for painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients. In a 14-year period (1998-2011), AKD was performed for moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in 27 patients with haemophilia A. Their average age at operation was 28.6 years (range 26-39 years). Indications for surgery were as follows: more than 90° of knee flexion, flexion deformity less than 30°, good axial alignment of the knee, good patellar alignment, and pain above >60 points in a visual analogue scale [0 (no pain) to 100 points]. Secondary haematological prophylaxis and rehabilitation (physiotherapy) was given for at least 3 months after surgery. Follow-up was for an average of 7.5 years (range 2-14 years). We assessed the clinical outcome before surgery and at the time of latest follow-up using the Knee Society pain and function scores, the range of motion, and the radiological score of the World Federation of Haemophilia. Knee Society pain scores improved from 39 preoperatively to 66 postoperatively, and function scores improved from 36 to 52. Range of motion improved on an average from -15° of extension and 90° of flexion before surgery, to -5° of extension and 110° of flexion at the last follow-up. A radiological deterioration of 2.8 points on average was found. There were two (7.4%) postoperative complications (haemarthroses resolved by joint aspiration). One patient (3.7%) required a TKR 12.5 years later. AKD should be considered in painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients to delay TKR. PMID:26575489

  11. Patellar resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty: functional outcome differs with different outcome scores

    PubMed Central

    Aunan, Eirik; Næss, Grethe; Clarke-Jenssen, John; Sandvik, Leiv; Kibsgård, Thomas Johan

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Recent research on outcomes after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has raised the question of the ability of traditional outcome measures to distinguish between treatments. We compared functional outcomes in patients undergoing TKA with and without patellar resurfacing, using the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) as the primary outcome and 3 traditional outcome measures as secondary outcomes. Patients and methods — 129 knees in 115 patients (mean age 70 (42–82) years; 67 female) were evaluated in this single-center, randomized, double-blind study. Data were recorded preoperatively, at 1 year, and at 3 years, and were assessed using repeated-measures mixed models. Results — The mean subscores for the KOOS after surgery were statistically significantly in favor of patellar resurfacing: sport/recreation, knee-related quality of life, pain, and symptoms. No statistically significant differences between the groups were observed with the Knee Society clinical rating system, with the Oxford knee score, and with visual analog scale (VAS) for patient satisfaction. Interpretation — In the present study, the KOOS—but no other outcome measure used—indicated that patellar resurfacing may be beneficial in TKA. PMID:26540368

  12. Range of Motion of the Ankle According to Pushing Force, Gender and Knee Position

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kang Hee; Lee, Hyunkeun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the difference of range of motion (ROM) of ankle according to pushing force, gender and knee position. Methods One hundred and twenty-eight healthy adults (55 men, 73 women) between the ages of 20 and 51, were included in the study. One examiner measured the passive range of motion (PROM) of ankle by Dualer IQ Inclinometers and Commander Muscle Testing. ROM of ankle dorsiflexion (DF) and plantarflexion (PF) according to change of pushing force and knee position were measured at prone position. Results There was significant correlation between ROM and pushing force, the more pushing force leads the more ROM at ankle DF and ankle PF. Knee flexion of 90° position showed low PF angle and high ankle DF angle, as compared to the at neutral position of knee joint. ROM of ankle DF for female was greater than for male, with no significant difference. ROM of ankle PF for female was greater than male regardless of the pushing force. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the relationship between pushing force and ROM of ankle joint. There was significant correlation between ROM of ankle and pushing force. ROM of ankle PF for female estimated greater than male regardless of the pushing force and the number of measurement. The ROM of the ankle is measured differently according to the knee joint position. Pushing force, gender and knee joint position are required to be considered when measuring the ROM of ankle joint. PMID:27152277

  13. Mid-term outcomes of primary constrained condylar knee arthroplasty for severe knee deformity.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiao-Bo; Yang, Cao; Fu, De-Hao; Ye, Shu-Nan; Liu, Xian-Zhe; Chen, Zhe; Rai, Saroj; Yang, Shu-Hua

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to examine the clinical and radiographic outcomes of primary total knee arthroplasy (TKA) with use of NexGen® Legacy® Constrained Condylar Knee (CCK) prosthesis for severe knee deformity. Clinical data of 46 patients (48 knees in total, aged 61 years on average) with severe knee deformity who underwent TKA with NexGen® Legacy® CCK prosthesis between December 2007 and February 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. There were 34 knees with severe valgus with incompetent medial collateral ligament, 11 knees with severe flexion contracture with inability to achieve knee balancing in flexion and extension by posterior soft tissue release, 2 knees with Charcot arthritis with severe varus and bone loss, and 1 with traumatic osteoarthritis with severe varus and ligamentous instability. The mea