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Sample records for knock-out reactions

  1. Proton Knock-Out in Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2002-06-01

    Proton knock-out is studied in a broad program in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. The first experiment performed in Hall A studied the {sup 16}O(e,e'p) reaction. Since then proton knock-out experiments have studied a variety of aspects of that reaction, from single-nucleon properties to its mechanism, such as final-state interactions and two-body currents, in nuclei from {sup 2}H to {sup 16}O. In this review the results of this program will be summarized and an outlook given of future accomplishments.

  2. Theoretical knock-outs on biological networks.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Pedro J; de S Pinto, Sandro E; Baptista, Murilo S; La Guardia, Giuliano G

    2016-08-21

    In this work we redefine the concept of biological importance and how to compute it, based on a model of complex networks and random walk. We call this new procedure, theoretical knock-out (KO). The proposed method generalizes the procedure presented in a recent study about Oral Tolerance. To devise this method, we make two approaches: algebraically and algorithmically. In both cases we compute a vector on an asymptotic state, called flux vector. The flux is given by a random walk on a directed graph that represents a biological phenomenon. This vector gives us the information about the relative flux of walkers on a vertex which represents a biological agent. With two vector of this kind, we can calculate the relative mean error between them by averaging over its coefficients. This quantity allows us to assess the degree of importance of each vertex of a complex network that evolves in time and has experimental background. We find out that this procedure can be applied in any sort of biological phenomena in which we can know the role and interrelationships of its agents. These results also provide experimental biologists to predict the order of importance of biological agents on a mounted complex network. PMID:27188251

  3. Cross sections for one-neutron knock-out from 37Ca at intermediate energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürger, A.; Azaiez, F.; Algora, A.; Al-Khatib, A.; Bastin, B.; Benzoni, G.; Borcea, R.; Bourgeois, C.; Bringel, P.; Clément, E.; Dalouzy, J.-C.; Dlouhý, Z.; Dombrádi, Z.; Drouart, A.; Engelhardt, C.; Franchoo, S.; Fülöp, Z.; Görgen, A.; Grévy, S.; Hübel, H.; Ibrahim, F.; Korten, W.; Mrázek, J.; Navin, A.; Rotaru, F.; Roussel Chomaz, P.; Saint-Laurent, M.-G.; Sletten, G.; Sohler, D.; Sorlin, O.; Stanoiu, M.; Stefan, I.; Theisen, C.; Timis, C.; Verney, D.; Williams, S.

    2012-12-01

    The cross section for the knock-out of a deeply bound valence neutron from 37Ca at an incident beam energy of 60AMeV has been measured along with momentum distributions of the residual nuclei and γ rays from the de-excitation of the first excited state in 36Ca. As for other cases of deeply bound nucleons studied using knock-out reactions, the reduction of the measured cross section compared to theoretical predictions is stronger than those observed for near-magic stable nuclei. Both the momentum distributions and the excitation energy of the first excited state in 36Ca indicate a sizable N=16 gap.

  4. Bex1 knock out mice show altered skeletal muscle regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, Jae Hyung Smiley, Mark A.; Lovering, Richard M.; Margolis, Frank L.

    2007-11-16

    Bex1 and Calmodulin (CaM) are upregulated during skeletal muscle regeneration. We confirm this finding and demonstrate the novel finding that they interact in a calcium-dependent manner. To study the role of Bex1 and its interaction with CaM in skeletal muscle regeneration, we generated Bex1 knock out (Bex1-KO) mice. These mice appeared to develop normally and are fertile, but displayed a functional deficit in exercise performance compared to wild type (WT) mice. After intramuscular injection of cardiotoxin, which causes extensive and reproducible myotrauma followed by recovery, regenerating muscles of Bex1-KO mice exhibited elevated and prolonged cell proliferation, as well as delayed cell differentiation, compared to WT mice. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that Bex1-KO mice show altered muscle regeneration, and allow us to propose that the interaction of Bex1 with Ca{sup 2+}/CaM may be involved in skeletal muscle regeneration.

  5. Photodynamic therapy and knocking out of single tumor cells by multiphoton excitation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann, Iris; Fischer, Peter; Koenig, Karsten

    2004-09-01

    Near infrared (NIR) ultrashort laser pulses of 780 nm have been used to induce intracellular photodynamic reactions by nonlinear excitation of porphyrin photosensitizers. Intracellular accumulation and photobleaching of the fluorescent photosensitizers protoporphyrin IX and Photofrin (PF) have been studied by non-resonant two-photon fluorescence excitation of PF and aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-labeled Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. To testify the efficacy of both substrates to induce irreversible destructive effects, the cloning efficiency (CE) of cells exposed to femtosecond pulses of a multiphoton laser scanning microscope (40x/1.3) was determined. In the case of Photofrin accumulation, CEs of 50% and 0% were obtained after 17 laserscans (2 mW?, 16 s/ frame) and 50 scans, respectively. All cells exposed to 50 scans died within 48h after laser exposure. 100 scans were required to induce lethal effects in ALA labeled cells. Sensitizer-free control cells could be scanned 250 times (1.1 h) and more without impact on the reproduction behavior, morphology, and vitality. In addition to the slow phototoxic effect by photooxidation processes, another destructive but immediate effect based on optical breakdown was induced when employing high intense NIR femtosecond laser beams. This was used to optically knock out single tumor cells in living mice (solid Ehrlich-Carcinoma) in a depth of 10 to 100 μm.

  6. The transforming growth factor-beta 3 knock-out mouse: an animal model for cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Koo, S H; Cunningham, M C; Arabshahi, B; Gruss, J S; Grant, J H

    2001-09-15

    The recent report of a transforming growth factor-beta 3 (TGF-beta 3) knock-out mouse in which 100 percent of the homozygous pups have cleft palate raised the question as to the potential usefulness of these animals as a model for cleft palate research. The specific aim in this study was to carefully document the anatomy of the cleft palate in the TGF-beta 3 knock-out mice as compared with wild type controls. Special attention was paid to the levator veli palatini muscle, the tensor veli palatini muscle, and their respective innervation. Because the TGF-beta 3 knock-out is lethal in the early perinatal period and because the heterozygotes are phenotypically normal, polymerase chain reaction was required to genotype the animals before mating. Time-mated pregnancies between proven heterozygotes were then delivered by cesarean section at gestational day 18.5 to prevent maternal cannibalism of homozygote pups. All delivered pups were killed and their tails processed by polymerase chain reaction to verify genotype. The heads were then fixed and sectioned in axial, coronal, or sagittal planes. Sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin or processed for immunohistochemistry with nerve specific protein gene product 9.5 and calcitonin gene-related peptide antibodies. Sections were analyzed in a serial fashion. Nine wild type control animals were analyzed along with nine TGF-beta 3 knock-out homozygotes. Time matings between proven heterozygotes yielded wild type pups, heterozygote pups, and homozygote knock-out pups in the expected mendelian ratios (28 percent to 46 percent to 26 percent; n = 43). The results demonstrated 100 percent clefting in the homozygous TGF-beta 3 knock-out pups. Complete clefting of the secondary palate was seen in four of nine and incomplete clefting was seen in five of nine. The levator veli palatini and tensor veli palatini muscles were demonstrated coursing parallel to the cleft margin in all cleft mice. The orientation of these muscles

  7. Hyperactivity of newborn Pten knock-out neurons results from increased excitatory synaptic drive.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael R; DeSpenza, Tyrone; Li, Meijie; Gulledge, Allan T; Luikart, Bryan W

    2015-01-21

    Developing neurons must regulate morphology, intrinsic excitability, and synaptogenesis to form neural circuits. When these processes go awry, disorders, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or epilepsy, may result. The phosphatase Pten is mutated in some patients having ASD and seizures, suggesting that its mutation disrupts neurological function in part through increasing neuronal activity. Supporting this idea, neuronal knock-out of Pten in mice can cause macrocephaly, behavioral changes similar to ASD, and seizures. However, the mechanisms through which excitability is enhanced following Pten depletion are unclear. Previous studies have separately shown that Pten-depleted neurons can drive seizures, receive elevated excitatory synaptic input, and have abnormal dendrites. We therefore tested the hypothesis that developing Pten-depleted neurons are hyperactive due to increased excitatory synaptogenesis using electrophysiology, calcium imaging, morphological analyses, and modeling. This was accomplished by coinjecting retroviruses to either "birthdate" or birthdate and knock-out Pten in granule neurons of the murine neonatal dentate gyrus. We found that Pten knock-out neurons, despite a rapid onset of hypertrophy, were more active in vivo. Pten knock-out neurons fired at more hyperpolarized membrane potentials, displayed greater peak spike rates, and were more sensitive to depolarizing synaptic input. The increased sensitivity of Pten knock-out neurons was due, in part, to a higher density of synapses located more proximal to the soma. We determined that increased synaptic drive was sufficient to drive hypertrophic Pten knock-out neurons beyond their altered action potential threshold. Thus, our work contributes a developmental mechanism for the increased activity of Pten-depleted neurons. PMID:25609613

  8. Activity of Pontine Neurons during Sleep and Cataplexy in Hypocretin Knock-Out Mice

    PubMed Central

    Thankachan, Stephen; Kaur, Satvinder; Shiromani, Priyattam J.

    2009-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a human sleep disorder resulting from the loss of neurons containing the neuropeptide orexin, also known as hypocretin. Cataplexy, which is a sudden loss of muscle tone during waking, is an important diagnostic symptom of narcolepsy. In humans and canines with narcolepsy, cataplexy is considered to be a separate and distinct behavioral state. However, in the mouse model of the disease this issue is not resolved. The present study monitored the activity of forty four neurons in the rostral pons in hypocretin knock-out mice. Majority of the neurons were active during wake and REM sleep, while four neurons were selectively active during REM sleep. All of these neurons were less active during cataplexy compared with REM sleep. Thus, although cataplexy and REM sleep share many common features, including the muscle atonia, cataplexy is a distinct state in mice. PMID:19193905

  9. Monitoring concussion in a knocked-out boxer by CSF biomarker analysis.

    PubMed

    Neselius, Sanna; Brisby, Helena; Granholm, Fredrik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj

    2015-09-01

    Concussion is common in many sports, and the incidence is increasing. The medical consequences after a sport-related concussion have received increased attention in recent years since it is known that concussions cause axonal and glial damage, which disturbs the cerebral physiology and makes the brain more vulnerable for additional concussions. This study reports on a knocked-out amateur boxer in whom cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurofilament light (NFL) protein, reflecting axonal damage, was used to identify and monitor brain damage. CSF NFL was markedly increased during 36 weeks, suggesting that neuronal injury persists longer than expected after a concussion. CSF biomarker analysis may be valuable in the medical counselling of concussed athletes and in return-to-play considerations. PMID:24819180

  10. The Expression of TALEN before Fertilization Provides a Rapid Knock-Out Phenotype in Xenopus laevis Founder Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Miyuki; Sakane, Yuto; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Herberg, Sarah; Simeone, Angela; Simpson, David; Jullien, Jerome; Yamamoto, Takashi; Gurdon, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in genome editing using programmable nucleases have revolutionized gene targeting in various organisms. Successful gene knock-out has been shown in Xenopus, a widely used model organism, although a system enabling less mosaic knock-out in founder embryos (F0) needs to be explored in order to judge phenotypes in the F0 generation. Here, we injected modified highly active transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) mRNA to oocytes at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage, followed by in vitro maturation and intracytoplasmic sperm injection, to achieve a full knock-out in F0 embryos. Unlike conventional injection methods to fertilized embryos, the injection of TALEN mRNA into GV oocytes allows expression of nucleases before fertilization, enabling them to work from an earlier stage. Using this procedure, most of developed embryos showed full knock-out phenotypes of the pigmentation gene tyrosinase and/or embryonic lethal gene pax6 in the founder generation. In addition, our method permitted a large 1 kb deletion. Thus, we describe nearly complete gene knock-out phenotypes in Xenopus laevis F0 embryos. The presented method will help to accelerate the production of knock-out frogs since we can bypass an extra generation of about 1 year in Xenopus laevis. Meantime, our method provides a unique opportunity to rapidly test the developmental effects of disrupting those genes that do not permit growth to an adult able to reproduce. In addition, the protocol shown here is considerably less invasive than the previously used host transfer since our protocol does not require surgery. The experimental scheme presented is potentially applicable to other organisms such as mammals and fish to resolve common issues of mosaicism in founders. PMID:26580070

  11. Phospholipase D δ knock-out mutants are tolerant to severe drought stress.

    PubMed

    Distéfano, Ayelen M; Valiñas, Matías A; Scuffi, Denise; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Ten Have, Arjen; García-Mata, Carlos; Laxalt, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in different plant processes, ranging from responses to abiotic and biotic stress to plant development. Phospholipase Dδ (PLDδ) is activated in dehydration and salt stress, producing the lipid second messenger phosphatidic acid. In this work we show that pldδ Arabidopsis mutants were more tolerant to severe drought than wild-type plants. PLDδ has been shown to be required for ABA regulation of stomatal closure of isolated epidermal peels. However, there was no significant difference in stomatal conductance at the whole plant level between wild-type and pldδ mutants. Since PLD hydrolyses structural phospholipids, then we looked at membrane integrity. Ion leakage measurements showed that during dehydration of leaf discs pldδ mutant has less membrane degradation compared to the wild-type. We further analyzed the mutants and showed that pldδ have higher mRNA levels of RAB18 and RD29A compared to wild-type plants under normal growth conditions. Transient expression of AtPLDδ in Nicotiana benthamiana plants induced a wilting phenotype. These findings suggest that, in wt plants PLDδ disrupt membranes in severe drought stress and, in the absence of the protein (PLDδ knock-out) might drought-prime the plants, making them more tolerant to severe drought stress. The results are discussed in relation to PLDδ role in guard cell signaling and drought tolerance. PMID:26340512

  12. Arterial Remodeling in B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Knock-Out Females.

    PubMed

    Holditch, Sara J; Schreiber, Claire A; Burnett, John C; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphisms are recognized in cardiovascular conditions such as hypertension, stroke, thrombosis and vasculitis. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a guanylyl cyclase A (GC-A) agonist. The anti-hypertensive, vasodilatory, anti-fibrotic, and anti-hypertrophic properties of BNP are well established in male animal models. Although circulating BNP levels are higher in women, when compared to age-matched men, the cardiovascular protective propensity of BNP in females is poorly understood. We assessed the cardiovascular consequences of BNP deletion in genetically null (Nppb-/-) female rat lines. Throughout the study, blood pressure (BP) remained uninfluenced by genotype, and cardiorenal consequences of BNP knock out remained minor. Unexpectedly, approximately 60% of Nppb-/- females developed mesenteric polyarteritis-nodosa (PAN)-like vasculitis in their life span, some as early as 4 months of age. Mesenteric lesions involved intense arterial remodeling, progressive inflammation, occluded lumens, and less frequently intestinal necrosis and multiple visceral arterial aneurysms. Cumulative pathologies resulted in a significant decline in survival of the Nppb-/- female. This study highlights BNP's vasoprotective propensity, bringing to light a possible sex specific difference in the cardiovascular protection provided by BNP. Defects in the BNP/GC-A/cGMP pathway may play a role in arteriopathies in women, while GC-A agonists may provide effective therapy for arteritis. PMID:27162120

  13. Arterial Remodeling in B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Knock-Out Females

    PubMed Central

    Holditch, Sara J.; Schreiber, Claire A.; Burnett, John C.; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphisms are recognized in cardiovascular conditions such as hypertension, stroke, thrombosis and vasculitis. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a guanylyl cyclase A (GC-A) agonist. The anti-hypertensive, vasodilatory, anti-fibrotic, and anti-hypertrophic properties of BNP are well established in male animal models. Although circulating BNP levels are higher in women, when compared to age-matched men, the cardiovascular protective propensity of BNP in females is poorly understood. We assessed the cardiovascular consequences of BNP deletion in genetically null (Nppb−/−) female rat lines. Throughout the study, blood pressure (BP) remained uninfluenced by genotype, and cardiorenal consequences of BNP knock out remained minor. Unexpectedly, approximately 60% of Nppb−/− females developed mesenteric polyarteritis-nodosa (PAN)-like vasculitis in their life span, some as early as 4 months of age. Mesenteric lesions involved intense arterial remodeling, progressive inflammation, occluded lumens, and less frequently intestinal necrosis and multiple visceral arterial aneurysms. Cumulative pathologies resulted in a significant decline in survival of the Nppb−/− female. This study highlights BNP’s vasoprotective propensity, bringing to light a possible sex specific difference in the cardiovascular protection provided by BNP. Defects in the BNP/GC-A/cGMP pathway may play a role in arteriopathies in women, while GC-A agonists may provide effective therapy for arteritis. PMID:27162120

  14. Phospholipase D δ knock-out mutants are tolerant to severe drought stress

    PubMed Central

    Distéfano, Ayelen M; Valiñas, Matías A; Scuffi, Denise; Lamattina, Lorenzo; ten Have, Arjen; García-Mata, Carlos; Laxalt, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in different plant processes, ranging from responses to abiotic and biotic stress to plant development. Phospholipase Dδ (PLDδ) is activated in dehydration and salt stress, producing the lipid second messenger phosphatidic acid. In this work we show that pldδ Arabidopsis mutants were more tolerant to severe drought than wild-type plants. PLDδ has been shown to be required for ABA regulation of stomatal closure of isolated epidermal peels. However, there was no significant difference in stomatal conductance at the whole plant level between wild-type and pldδ mutants. Since PLD hydrolyses structural phospholipids, then we looked at membrane integrity. Ion leakage measurements showed that during dehydration of leaf discs pldδ mutant has less membrane degradation compared to the wild-type. We further analyzed the mutants and showed that pldδ have higher mRNA levels of RAB18 and RD29A compared to wild-type plants under normal growth conditions. Transient expression of AtPLDδ in Nicotiana benthamiana plants induced a wilting phenotype. These findings suggest that, in wt plants PLDδ disrupt membranes in severe drought stress and, in the absence of the protein (PLDδ knock-out) might drought-prime the plants, making them more tolerant to severe drought stress. The results are discussed in relation to PLDδ role in guard cell signaling and drought tolerance. PMID:26340512

  15. Characterization of skeletal muscle in the synemin knock-out mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Pelagio, Karla P.; Muriel, Joaquin; Lovering, Richard M.; Lund, Linda; Bond, Meredith; Bloch, Robert J.

    2014-11-01

    Diseases linked to intermediate filament (IF) proteins are associated with defects in the organization of the contractile apparatus of skeletal and cardiac muscle and its links to costameres, which connect the sarcomeres to the cell membrane. Synemin is a large IF protein that associates with dystrobrevin, vinculin, and talin at costameres of the cell membrane of striated muscle, as well as with α-actinin and desmin at the Z disks. Synemin can be expressed in either 210 kDa α- or 180 kDa β- alternatively spliced forms. We generated mice null for synemin by homologous recombination to study synemin's function in skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle in the knock out (syn KO) mouse does not make synemin mRNA or protein. Preliminary characterization of the syn KO mouse suggests that it has a mild skeletal muscle phenotype. The organization of costameres appears to be normal. Treadmill running uphill test results was not significantly affected when compared to controls at any age. More notably, the biomechanical properties of the cell membrane are different in the syn KO, though they are less affected than by the absence of desmin or dystrophin. These results suggest that the viscoelastic properties of the cell membrane-costamere-myofibril complex are significantly influenced by synemin.

  16. Systemic and Cerebral Iron Homeostasis in Ferritin Knock-Out Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Garringer, Holly J.; Goodwin, Charles B.; Richine, Briana; Acton, Anthony; VanDuyn, Natalia; Muhoberac, Barry B.; Irimia-Dominguez, Jose; Chan, Rebecca J.; Peacock, Munro; Nass, Richard; Ghetti, Bernardino; Vidal, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin, a 24-mer heteropolymer of heavy (H) and light (L) subunits, is the main cellular iron storage protein and plays a pivotal role in iron homeostasis by modulating free iron levels thus reducing radical-mediated damage. The H subunit has ferroxidase activity (converting Fe(II) to Fe(III)), while the L subunit promotes iron nucleation and increases ferritin stability. Previous studies on the H gene (Fth) in mice have shown that complete inactivation of Fth is lethal during embryonic development, without ability to compensate by the L subunit. In humans, homozygous loss of the L gene (FTL) is associated with generalized seizure and atypical restless leg syndrome, while mutations in FTL cause a form of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation. Here we generated mice with genetic ablation of the Fth and Ftl genes. As previously reported, homozygous loss of the Fth allele on a wild-type Ftl background was embryonic lethal, whereas knock-out of the Ftl allele (Ftl-/-) led to a significant decrease in the percentage of Ftl-/- newborn mice. Analysis of Ftl-/- mice revealed systemic and brain iron dyshomeostasis, without any noticeable signs of neurodegeneration. Our findings indicate that expression of the H subunit can rescue the loss of the L subunit and that H ferritin homopolymers have the capacity to sequester iron in vivo. We also observed that a single allele expressing the H subunit is not sufficient for survival when both alleles encoding the L subunit are absent, suggesting the need of some degree of complementation between the subunits as well as a dosage effect. PMID:25629408

  17. Knock-out of nexilin in mice leads to dilated cardiomyopathy and endomyocardial fibroelastosis.

    PubMed

    Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Schlossarek, Saskia; Stoelting, Stephanie; Klinger, Matthias; Geertz, Birgit; Weinberger, Florian; Kessler, Thorsten; Aherrahrou, Redouane; Moreth, Kristin; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Just, Steffen; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Schunkert, Heribert; Carrier, Lucie; Erdmann, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is one of the most common causes of chronic heart failure worldwide. Mutations in the gene encoding nexilin (NEXN) occur in patients with both hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM); however, little is known about the pathophysiological mechanisms and relevance of NEXN to these disorders. Here, we evaluated the functional role of NEXN using a constitutive Nexn knock-out (KO) mouse model. Heterozygous (Het) mice were inter-crossed to produce wild-type (WT), Het, and homozygous KO mice. At birth, 32, 46, and 22 % of the mice were WT, Het, and KO, respectively, which is close to the expected Mendelian ratio. After postnatal day 6, the survival of the Nexn KO mice decreased dramatically and all of the animals died by day 8. Phenotypic characterizations of the WT and KO mice were performed at postnatal days 1, 2, 4, and 6. At birth, the relative heart weights of the WT and KO mice were similar; however, at day 4, the relative heart weight of the KO group was 2.3-fold higher than of the WT group. In addition, the KO mice developed rapidly progressive cardiomyopathy with left ventricular dilation and wall thinning and decreased cardiac function. At day 6, the KO mice developed a fulminant DCM phenotype characterized by dilated ventricular chambers and systolic dysfunction. At this stage, collagen deposits and some elastin deposits were observed within the left ventricle cavity, which resembles the features of endomyocardial fibroelastosis (EFE). Overall, these results further emphasize the role of NEXN in DCM and suggest a novel role in EFE. PMID:26659360

  18. Autism spectrum disorder traits in Slc9a9 knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lina; Faraone, Stephen V; Zhang-James, Yanli

    2016-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders which begin in childhood and persist into adulthood. They cause lifelong impairments and are associated with substantial burdens to patients, families, and society. Genetic studies have implicated the sodium/proton exchanger (NHE) nine gene, Slc9a9, to ASDs and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder(ADHD). Slc9a9 encodes, NHE9, a membrane protein of the late recycling endosomes. The recycling endosome plays an important role in synapse development and plasticity by regulating the trafficking of membrane neurotransmitter receptors and transporters. Here we tested the hypothesis that Slc9a9 knock-out (KO) mice would show ADHD-like and ASD-like traits. Ultrasonic vocalization (USV) recording showed that Slc9a9 KO mice emitted fewer calls and had shorter call durations, which suggest communication impairment. Slc9a9 KO mice lacked a preference for social novelty, but did not show deficits in social approach; Slc9a9 KO mice spent more time self-grooming, an indicator for restricted and repetitive behavior. We did not observe hyperactivity or other behavior impairments which are commonly comorbid with ASDs in human, such as anxiety-like behavior. Our study is the first animal behavior study that links Slc9a9 to ASDs. By eliminatingNHE9 activity, it provides strong evidence that lack of Slc9a9leads to ASD-like behaviors in mice and provides the field with a new mouse model of ASDs. PMID:26755066

  19. Impaired striatum-dependent behavior in GASP-1-knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Mathis, C; Bott, J-B; Candusso, M-P; Simonin, F; Cassel, J-C

    2011-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) associated sorting protein-1 (GASP-1) is suspected to play a key role in recycling and degradation of several GPCRs. In a previous study, we have shown that GASP-1-knock-out (GASP-1-KO) mice displayed deficits in acquiring a cocaine self-administration task, associated with an exacerbated down-regulation of striatal dopaminergic and cholinergic receptors. Among several possibilities, GASP-1 deficiency could have impaired memory processes underlying the acquisition of the operant conditioning task. Therefore, the present study investigated cognitive performances of GASP-1-KO mice and their wild-type littermates (WT) in a broad variety of memory tasks. Consistent with a deficit in procedural memory, GASP-1-KO mice showed delayed acquisition of a food-reinforced bar-press task. During water-maze training in hidden- or visible-platform paradigms, mutant and WT mice acquired the tasks at the same rate. However, GASP-1 mice exhibited persistent thigmotaxic swimming, longer distance to the platform, and reduced swim speed. There was no deficit in several tasks requiring simple behavioral responses (Barnes maze, object recognition and passive avoidance tasks). Thus, the ability to acquire and/or express complex responses seems affected in GASP-1-deficient mice. Hippocampal functions were preserved, as the retention of an acquired memory in spatial tasks remained unaffected. The pattern of behavioral deficits observed in GASP-1-KO mice is coherent with current knowledge on the role of striatal GPCRs in acquisition/expression of skilled behavior and in motivation. Together with the previous findings, the so far established phenotype of GASP-1-KO mice makes them a potentially exciting tool to study striatal functions. PMID:21091868

  20. Oral rapamycin inhibits growth of atherosclerotic plaque in apoE knock-out mice

    SciTech Connect

    Waksman, Ron; Pakala, Rajbabu; Burnett, Mary S.; Gulick, Cindy P.; Leborgne, Laurent; Fournadjiev, Jana; Wolfram, Roswitha; Hellinga, David

    2003-03-01

    Introduction: Inflammatory and immunological responses of vascular cells are known to play significant roles in atherosclerotic plaque development. Rapamycin with antiinflammatory, immunosuppressive and antiproliferative properties has been shown to reduce neointima formation when coated on stents. This study is designed to test the potential of oral rapamycin to inhibit atherosclerotic plaque development. Methods: Eight-week-old apoE knock-out mice were fed with 0.25% cholesterol supplemented diet (control diet), control diet containing 50 {mu}g/kg rapamycin (low-dose rapamycin) or 100 {mu}g/kg rapamycin (high-dose rapamycin) for 4 or 8 weeks. Subsets of mice from each group (n=10) were weighed and euthanized. Whole blood rapamycin levels were determined using HPLC-MS/MS, and histological analyses of atherosclerotic lesions in the aortic root were performed. Results: Mice fed with high-dose rapamycin did not gain weight (18.5{+-}1.5 vs. 20.6{+-}0.9 g, P=.01). Blood levels of rapamycin 117{+-}7 pg/ml were detected in the blood of mice fed with high-dose rapamycin for 8 weeks. The plaque area in mice fed with high dose oral rapamycin is significantly less as compared to control (0.168{+-}0.008 vs. 0.326{+-}0.013 mm{sup 2}, P=.001 at 4 weeks; 0.234{+-}0.013 vs. 0.447{+-}0.011 mm{sup 2}, P=.001 at 8 weeks). Lumen area was inversely proportional to the plaque area. Conclusions: The results indicate that oral rapamycin is effective in attenuating the progression of atherosclerotic plaque in the mice.

  1. Relevant feature set estimation with a knock-out strategy and random forests.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Melanie; Greve, Douglas N; Fischl, Bruce; Konukoglu, Ender

    2015-11-15

    Group analysis of neuroimaging data is a vital tool for identifying anatomical and functional variations related to diseases as well as normal biological processes. The analyses are often performed on a large number of highly correlated measurements using a relatively smaller number of samples. Despite the correlation structure, the most widely used approach is to analyze the data using univariate methods followed by post-hoc corrections that try to account for the data's multivariate nature. Although widely used, this approach may fail to recover from the adverse effects of the initial analysis when local effects are not strong. Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) is a powerful alternative to the univariate approach for identifying relevant variations. Jointly analyzing all the measures, MVPA techniques can detect global effects even when individual local effects are too weak to detect with univariate analysis. Current approaches are successful in identifying variations that yield highly predictive and compact models. However, they suffer from lessened sensitivity and instabilities in identification of relevant variations. Furthermore, current methods' user-defined parameters are often unintuitive and difficult to determine. In this article, we propose a novel MVPA method for group analysis of high-dimensional data that overcomes the drawbacks of the current techniques. Our approach explicitly aims to identify all relevant variations using a "knock-out" strategy and the Random Forest algorithm. In evaluations with synthetic datasets the proposed method achieved substantially higher sensitivity and accuracy than the state-of-the-art MVPA methods, and outperformed the univariate approach when the effect size is low. In experiments with real datasets the proposed method identified regions beyond the univariate approach, while other MVPA methods failed to replicate the univariate results. More importantly, in a reproducibility study with the well-known ADNI dataset

  2. PARP1 Gene Knock-Out Increases Resistance to Retinal Degeneration without Affecting Retinal Function

    PubMed Central

    Sahaboglu, Ayse; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Kaur, Jasvir; Sancho-Pelluz, Javier; Huber, Gesine; Fahl, Edda; Arango-Gonzalez, Blanca; Zrenner, Eberhart; Ekström, Per; Löwenheim, Hubert; Seeliger, Mathias; Paquet-Durand, François

    2010-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited neurodegenerative diseases affecting photoreceptors and causing blindness in humans. Previously, excessive activation of enzymes belonging to the poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) group was shown to be involved in photoreceptor degeneration in the human homologous rd1 mouse model for RP. Since there are at least 16 different PARP isoforms, we investigated the exact relevance of the predominant isoform - PARP1 - for photoreceptor cell death using PARP1 knock-out (KO) mice. In vivo and ex vivo morphological analysis using optic coherence tomography (OCT) and conventional histology revealed no major alterations of retinal phenotype when compared to wild-type (wt). Likewise, retinal function as assessed by electroretinography (ERG) was normal in PARP1 KO animals. We then used retinal explant cultures derived from wt, rd1, and PARP1 KO animals to test their susceptibility to chemically induced photoreceptor degeneration. Since photoreceptor degeneration in the rd1 retina is triggered by a loss-of-function in phosphodiesterase-6 (PDE6), we used selective PDE6 inhibition to emulate the rd1 situation on non-rd1 genotypes. While wt retina subjected to PDE6 inhibition showed massive photoreceptor degeneration comparable to rd1 retina, in the PARP1 KO situation, cell death was robustly reduced. Together, these findings demonstrate that PARP1 activity is in principle dispensable for normal retinal function, but is of major importance for photoreceptor degeneration under pathological conditions. Moreover, our results suggest that PARP dependent cell death or PARthanatos may play a major role in retinal degeneration and highlight the possibility to use specific PARP inhibitors for the treatment of RP. PMID:21124852

  3. Evaluation of cimi-shield knock-out bed bug eliminator against house fly (Musca domestica) adults.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cimi-Shield Knock-Out (CSKO) Bed Bug Eliminator is a green treatment labeled for use against bed bugs, carpet beetles, ants, roaches, fleas, ticks, silverfish, millipedes and centipedes. The active ingredient is soybean oil. If CSKO is formulated according to label instructions and sprayed directly ...

  4. Evaluation of cimi-shield knock-out bed bug eliminator against house fly (Musca domestica) adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cimi-Shield Knock-Out (CSKO) Bed Bug Eliminator is a green treatment labeled for use against bed bugs, carpet beetles, ants, roaches, fleas, ticks, silverfish, millipedes and centipedes. The active ingredient is soybean oil. If CSKO is formulated according to label instructions and sprayed directly ...

  5. True-Breeding Targeted Gene Knock-Out in Barley Using Designer TALE-Nuclease in Haploid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gurushidze, Maia; Hensel, Goetz; Hiekel, Stefan; Schedel, Sindy; Valkov, Vladimir; Kumlehn, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are customizable fusion proteins able to cleave virtually any genomic DNA sequence of choice, and thereby to generate site-directed genetic modifications in a wide range of cells and organisms. In the present study, we expressed TALENs in pollen-derived, regenerable cells to establish the generation of instantly true-breeding mutant plants. A gfp-specific TALEN pair was expressed via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation in embryogenic pollen of transgenic barley harboring a functional copy of gfp. Thanks to the haploid nature of the target cells, knock-out mutations were readily detected, and homozygous primary mutant plants obtained following genome duplication. In all, 22% of the TALEN transgenics proved knocked out with respect to gfp, and the loss of function could be ascribed to the deletions of between four and 36 nucleotides in length. The altered gfp alleles were transmitted normally through meiosis, and the knock-out phenotype was consistently shown by the offspring of two independent mutants. Thus, here we describe the efficient production of TALEN-mediated gene knock-outs in barley that are instantaneously homozygous and non-chimeric in regard to the site-directed mutations induced. This TALEN approach has broad applicability for both elucidating gene function and tailoring the phenotype of barley and other crop species. PMID:24643227

  6. Selective Photoreceptor Gene Knock-out Reveals a Regulatory Role for the Growth Behavior of Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rashmi; Pathak, Gopal; Drepper, Thomas; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    The plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae (Ps) is a well-established model organism for bacterial infection of plants. The genome sequences of two pathovars, pv. syringae and pv. tomato, revealed one gene encoding a blue and two genes encoding red/far red light-sensing photoreceptors. Continuing former molecular characterization of the photoreceptor proteins, we here report selective photoreceptor gene disruption for pv. tomato aiming at identification of potentially regulatory functions of these photoreceptors. Transformation of Ps cells with linear DNA constructs yielded interposon mutations of the corresponding genes. Cell growth studies of the generated photoreceptor knock-out mutants revealed their role in light-dependent regulation of cell growth and motility. Disruption of the blue-light (BL) receptor gene caused a growth deregulation, in line with an observed increased virulence of this mutant (Moriconi et al., Plant J., 2013, 76, 322). Bacterial phytochrome-1 (BphP1) deletion mutant caused unaltered cell growth, but a stronger swarming capacity. Inactivation of its ortholog, BphP2, however, caused reduced growth and remarkably altered dendritic swarming behavior. Combined knock-out of both bacteriophytochromes reproduced the swarming pattern observed for the BphP2 mutant alone. A triple knock-out mutant showed a growth rate between that of the BL (deregulation) and the phytochrome-2 mutant (growth reduction). PMID:27289014

  7. Phenotypic and Molecular Alterations in the Mammary Tissue of R-Spondin1 Knock-Out Mice during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chadi, Sead; Polyte, Jacqueline; Lefevre, Lucas; Castille, Johan; Ehanno, Aude; Laubier, Johann; Jaffrézic, Florence; Le Provost, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    R-spondin1 (Rspo1) is a member of a secreted protein family which has pleiotropic functions in development and stem cell growth. Rspo1 knock-out mice are sex-reversed, but some remain sub-fertile, so they fail to nurse their pups. A lack of Rspo1 expression in the mammary gland results in an absence of duct side-branching development and defective alveolar formation. The aim of this study was to characterize the phenotypic and molecular alterations of mammary gland due to Rspo1 knock-out. Using the transcriptional profiling of mammary tissues, we identified misregulated genes in the mammary gland of Rspo1 knock-out mice during pregnancy. A stronger expression of mesenchymal markers was observed, without modifications to the structure of mammary epithelial tissue. Mammary epithelial cell immunohistochemical analysis revealed a persistence of virgin markers, which signify a delay in cell differentiation. Moreover, serial transplantation experiments showed that Rspo1 is associated with a regenerative potential of mammary epithelial cell control. Our finding also highlights the negatively regulated expression of Rspo1's partners, Lgr4 and RNF43, in the mammary gland during pregnancy. Moreover, we offer evidence that Tgf-β signalling is modified in the absence of Rspo1. Taken together, our results show an abrupt halt or delay to mammary development during pregnancy due to the loss of a further differentiated function. PMID:27611670

  8. Emotional instability but intact spatial cognition in adenosine receptor 1 knock out mice.

    PubMed

    Lang, Undine E; Lang, Florian; Richter, Kerstin; Vallon, Volker; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Schnermann, Jürgen; Wolfer, David P

    2003-10-17

    Several lines of evidence point to the involvement of adenosine in the regulation of important central mechanisms such as cognition, arousal, aggression and anxiety. In order to elucidate the involvement of the adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) in spatial learning and the control of exploratory behaviour, we assessed A1AR knockout mice (A1AR-/-) and their wild-type littermates (A1AR+/+) in a place navigation task in the water maze and in a battery of forced and free exploration tests. In the water maze, A1AR-/- mice showed normal escape latencies and were indistinguishable from controls with respect to measures of spatial performance during both training and probe trial. But despite normal performance they showed increased wall hugging, most prominently after the relocation of the goal platform for reversal training. Quantitative analysis of strategy choices indicated that wall hugging was increased mainly at the expense of chaining and passive floating, whereas the frequency of trials characterised as direct swims or focal searching was normal in A1AR-/- mice. These results indicate intact spatial cognition, but mildly altered emotional reactions to the water maze environment. In line with this interpretation, A1AR-/- mice showed normal levels and patterns of activity, but a mild increase of some measures of anxiety in our battery of forced and free exploration paradigms. These results are in line with findings published using a genetically similar line, but demonstrate that the magnitude of the changes and the range of affected behavioural measures may vary considerably depending on the environmental conditions during testing. PMID:14529816

  9. Loss of Bace2 in zebrafish affects melanocyte migration and is distinct from Bace1 knock out phenotypes.

    PubMed

    van Bebber, Frauke; Hruscha, Alexander; Willem, Michael; Schmid, Bettina; Haass, Christian

    2013-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most frequent dementia. Pathologically, Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the accumulation of senile plaques composed of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ). Two proteases, β- and γ-secretase proteolytically generate Aβ from its precursor, the ß-amyloid precursor protein (APP). Inhibition of β-secretase, also referred to as beta-site APP cleaving enzyme (BACE1) or γ-secretase is therefore of prime interest for the development of amyloid-lowering drugs. To assess the in vivo function of zebrafish Bace1 (zBace1), we generated zBace1 knock out fish by zinc finger nuclease-mediated genome editing. bace1 mutants (bace1-/-) are hypomyelinated in the PNS while the CNS is not affected. Moreover, the number of mechanosensory neuromasts is elevated in bace1-/-. Mutations in zebrafish Bace2 (zBace2) revealed a distinct melanocyte migration phenotype, which is not observed in bace1-/-. Double homozygous bace1-/-; bace2-/- fish do not enhance the single mutant phenotypes indicating non-redundant distinct physiological functions. Single homozygous bace1 mutants as well as double homozygous bace1 and bace2 mutants are viable and fertile suggesting that Bace1 is a promising drug target without major side effects. The identification of a specific bace2 -/- associated phenotype further allows improving selective Bace1 inhibitors and to distinguish between Bace 1 and Bace 2 inhibition in vivo. Inhibition of BACE1 protease activity has therapeutic importance for Alzheimer's disease. Analysis of BACE1 and BACE2 knock-out zebrafish revealed that they exhibit distinct phenotypes. bace1 mutants display hypomyelination in the PNS and supernumerary neuromasts while in bace2 mutants the shape and migration of melanocytes is affected. These phenotypes are not further enhanced in the viable double mutants. Our data suggest that blocking BACE1 activity is a safe therapeutic approach. PMID:23406323

  10. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor/translocator protein global knock-out mice are viable with no effects on steroid hormone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tu, Lan N; Morohaku, Kanako; Manna, Pulak R; Pelton, Susanne H; Butler, W Ronald; Stocco, Douglas M; Selvaraj, Vimal

    2014-10-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO), previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is a mitochondrial outer membrane protein implicated as essential for cholesterol import to the inner mitochondrial membrane, the rate-limiting step in steroid hormone biosynthesis. Previous research on TSPO was based entirely on in vitro experiments, and its critical role was reinforced by an early report that claimed TSPO knock-out mice were embryonic lethal. In a previous publication, we examined Leydig cell-specific TSPO conditional knock-out mice that suggested TSPO was not required for testosterone production in vivo. This raised controversy and several questions regarding TSPO function. To examine the definitive role of TSPO in steroidogenesis and embryo development, we generated global TSPO null (Tspo(-/-)) mice. Contrary to the early report, Tspo(-/-) mice survived with no apparent phenotypic abnormalities and were fertile. Examination of adrenal and gonadal steroidogenesis showed no defects in Tspo(-/-) mice. Adrenal transcriptome comparison of gene expression profiles showed that genes involved in steroid hormone biosynthesis (Star, Cyp11a1, and Hsd3b1) were unchanged in Tspo(-/-) mice. Adrenocortical ultrastructure illustrated no morphological alterations in Tspo(-/-) mice. In an attempt to correlate our in vivo findings to previously used in vitro models, we also determined that siRNA knockdown or the absence of TSPO in different mouse and human steroidogenic cell lines had no effect on steroidogenesis. These findings directly refute the dogma that TSPO is indispensable for steroid hormone biosynthesis and viability. By amending the current model, this study advances our understanding of steroidogenesis with broad implications in biology and medicine. PMID:24936060

  11. Lentivirus-ABCG1 instillation reduces lipid accumulation and improves lung compliance in GM-CSF knock-out mice

    SciTech Connect

    Malur, Anagha; Huizar, Isham; Wells, Greg; Barna, Barbara P.; Malur, Achut G.; Thomassen, Mary Jane

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lentivirus-ABCG1 reduces lipid accumulation in lungs of GM-CSF knock-out mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Up-regulation of ABCG1 improves lung function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulation of ABCG1 improves surfactant metabolism. -- Abstract: We have shown decreased expression of the nuclear transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR{gamma}) and the PPAR{gamma}-regulated ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) in alveolar macrophages from patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). PAP patients also exhibit neutralizing antibodies to granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), an upregulator of PPAR{gamma}. In association with functional GM-CSF deficiency, PAP lung is characterized by surfactant-filled alveolar spaces and lipid-filled alveolar macrophages. Similar pathology characterizes GM-CSF knock-out (KO) mice. We reported previously that intratracheal instillation of a lentivirus (lenti)-PPAR{gamma} plasmid into GM-CSF KO animals elevated ABCG1 and reduced alveolar macrophage lipid accumulation. Here, we hypothesized that instillation of lenti-ABCG1 might be sufficient to decrease lipid accumulation and improve pulmonary function in GM-CSF KO mice. Animals received intratracheal instillation of lenti-ABCG1 or control lenti-enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (eGFP) plasmids and alveolar macrophages were harvested 10 days later. Alveolar macrophage transduction efficiency was 79% as shown by lenti-eGFP fluorescence. Quantitative PCR analyses indicated a threefold (p = 0.0005) increase in ABCG1 expression with no change of PPAR{gamma} or ABCA1 in alveolar macrophages of lenti-ABCG1 treated mice. ABCG1 was unchanged in control lenti-eGFP and PBS-instilled groups. Oil Red O staining detected reduced intracellular neutral lipid in alveolar macrophages from lenti-ABCG1 treated mice. Extracellular cholesterol and phospholipids were also decreased as shown by

  12. Duodenal nonheme iron content correlates with iron stores in mice, but the relationship is altered by Hfe gene knock-out.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Robert J; Debnam, Edward S; Laftah, Abas H; Solanky, Nita; Beaumont, Nick; Bahram, Seiamak; Schümann, Klaus; Srai, S Kaila S

    2003-04-15

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a common iron-loading disorder found in populations of European descent. It has been proposed that mutations causing loss of function of HFE gene result in reduced iron incorporation into immature duodenal crypt cells. These cells then overexpress genes for iron absorption, leading to inappropriate cellular iron balance, a persistent iron deficiency of the duodenal mucosa, and increased iron absorption. The objective was to measure duodenal iron content in Hfe knock-out mice to test whether the mutation causes a persistent decrease in enterocyte iron concentration. In both normal and Hfe knock-out mice, duodenal nonheme iron content was found to correlate with liver iron stores (P <.001, r = 0.643 and 0.551, respectively), and this effect did not depend on dietary iron levels. However, duodenal iron content was reduced in Hfe knock-out mice for any given content of liver iron stores (P <.001). PMID:12468424

  13. Extended Synaptotagmin (ESyt) Triple Knock-Out Mice Are Viable and Fertile without Obvious Endoplasmic Reticulum Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sclip, Alessandra; Bacaj, Taulant; Giam, Louise R.; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Extended synaptotagmins (ESyts) are endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteins composed of an N-terminal transmembrane region, a central SMP-domain, and five (ESyt1) or three C-terminal cytoplasmic C2-domains (ESyt2 and ESyt3). ESyts bind phospholipids in a Ca2+-dependent manner via their C2-domains, are localized to ER-plasma membrane contact sites, and may catalyze lipid exchange between the plasma membrane and the ER via their SMP-domains. However, the overall function of ESyts has remained enigmatic. Here, we generated triple constitutive and conditional knock-out mice that lack all three ESyt isoforms; in addition, we produced knock-in mice that express mutant ESyt1 or ESyt2 carrying inactivating substitutions in the Ca2+-binding sites of their C2A-domains. Strikingly, all ESyt mutant mice, even those lacking all ESyts, were apparently normal and survived and bred in a manner indistinguishable from control mice. ESyt mutant mice displayed no major changes in brain morphology or synaptic protein composition, and exhibited no large alterations in stress responses. Thus, in mice ESyts do not perform an essential role in basic cellular functions, suggesting that these highly conserved proteins may perform a specialized role that may manifest only during specific, as yet untested challenges. PMID:27348751

  14. CHO cells knocked out for TSC2 display an improved productivity of antibodies under fed batch conditions.

    PubMed

    McVey, Duncan; Aronov, Michael; Rizzi, Giovanni; Cowan, Alexis; Scott, Charo; Megill, John; Russell, Reb; Tirosh, Boaz

    2016-09-01

    The kinase mTOR operates in two cellular complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2. mTORC1 adjusts metabolic activity according to external growth conditions and nutrients availability. When conditions are prosperous, mTOR facilitates protein and lipid biosyntheses and inhibits autophagy, while under metabolic constraints, however, its attenuation induces a catabolic program, energy preservation and autophagy. CHO is a key cell line for manufacturing of biologics owing to its remarkable ability to grow to high densities and maintain protein production and secretion for extended times. While high mTOR activity has been associated with high productivity in CHO cells, its inhibition by rapamycin has also been documented to augment productivity via promotion of viability. Here using CRISPR/Cas9 editing we engineered CHO cells to enforce high mTORC1 activity by knocking-out TSC2, a major mTOR inhibitory protein, or PTEN, a phosphatase that attenuates the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. Only TSC2-deleted cells exhibited a constitutive activation of mTORC1 under fed batch conditions. Cells grew larger in size, synthesized more proteins and displayed an over twofold elevation in their specific productivity. While peak viable cell density was compromised, overall titers increased to an extent dependent upon the parental clone. Our data underscore manipulation of TSC as a strategy to improve performance of CHO cell in bioreactors. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1942-1952. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26888596

  15. Reconstructing gene regulatory networks from knock-out data using Gaussian Noise Model and Pearson Correlation Coefficient.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Salleh, Faridah Hani; Arif, Shereena Mohd; Zainudin, Suhaila; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-12-01

    A gene regulatory network (GRN) is a large and complex network consisting of interacting elements that, over time, affect each other's state. The dynamics of complex gene regulatory processes are difficult to understand using intuitive approaches alone. To overcome this problem, we propose an algorithm for inferring the regulatory interactions from knock-out data using a Gaussian model combines with Pearson Correlation Coefficient (PCC). There are several problems relating to GRN construction that have been outlined in this paper. We demonstrated the ability of our proposed method to (1) predict the presence of regulatory interactions between genes, (2) their directionality and (3) their states (activation or suppression). The algorithm was applied to network sizes of 10 and 50 genes from DREAM3 datasets and network sizes of 10 from DREAM4 datasets. The predicted networks were evaluated based on AUROC and AUPR. We discovered that high false positive values were generated by our GRN prediction methods because the indirect regulations have been wrongly predicted as true relationships. We achieved satisfactory results as the majority of sub-networks achieved AUROC values above 0.5. PMID:26278974

  16. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration: altered mitochondria membrane potential and defective respiration in Pank2 knock-out mouse model.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Dario; Dusi, Sabrina; Morbin, Michela; Uggetti, Andrea; Moda, Fabio; D'Amato, Ilaria; Giordano, Carla; d'Amati, Giulia; Cozzi, Anna; Levi, Sonia; Hayflick, Susan; Tiranti, Valeria

    2012-12-15

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by high brain content of iron and presence of axonal spheroids. Mutations in the PANK2 gene, which encodes pantothenate kinase 2, underlie an autosomal recessive inborn error of coenzyme A metabolism, called pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN). PKAN is characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity and pigmentary retinal degeneration. The pathogenesis of this disorder is poorly understood and, although PANK2 is a mitochondrial protein, perturbations in mitochondrial bioenergetics have not been reported. A knock-out (KO) mouse model of PKAN exhibits retinal degeneration and azoospermia, but lacks any neurological phenotype. The absence of a clinical phenotype has partially been explained by the different cellular localization of the human and murine PANK2 proteins. Here we demonstrate that the mouse Pank2 protein localizes to mitochondria, similar to its human orthologue. Moreover, we show that Pank2-defective neurons derived from KO mice have an altered mitochondrial membrane potential, a defect further corroborated by the observations of swollen mitochondria at the ultra-structural level and by the presence of defective respiration. PMID:22983956

  17. Novel therapeutic targets in osteoarthritis: Narrative review on knock-out genes involved in disease development in mouse animal models.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Francesca; Della Bella, Elena; Cepollaro, Simona; Brogini, Silvia; Martini, Lucia; Fini, Milena

    2016-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) can affect every joint, especially the knee. Given the complexity of this pathology, OA is difficult to treat with current therapies, which only relieve pain and inflammation and are not capable of restoring tissues once OA has started. Currently, researchers focus on finding a therapeutic strategy that may help to arrest disease progression. The present narrative review gives an overview of the genes involved in the development and progression of OA, assessing in vivo studies performed in knock-out mice affected by OA, to suggest new therapeutic strategies. The article search was performed on the PubMed database and www.webofknowledge.com website with the following keywords: "knee osteoarthritis" AND "knockout mice". The included studies were in English and published from 2005 to 2015. Additional papers were found within the references of the selected articles. In the 55 analyzed in vivo studies, genes mainly affected chondrocyte homeostasis, inflammatory processes, extracellular matrix and the relationship between obesity and OA. Genes are defined as inducing, preventing and not influencing OA. This review shows that joint homeostasis depends on a variety of genetic factors, and preventing or restoring the loss of a gene encoding for protective proteins, or inhibiting the expression of proteins that induce OA, might be a potential therapeutic approach. However, conclusions cannot be drawn because of the wide variability concerning the technique used for OA induction, the role of the genes, the method for tissue evaluations and the lack of assessments of all joint tissues. PMID:27059198

  18. Generation and evaluation of Myostatin knock-out rabbits and goats using CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rihong; Wan, Yongjie; Xu, Dan; Cui, Libin; Deng, Mingtian; Zhang, Guomin; Jia, Ruoxin; Zhou, Wenjun; Wang, Zhen; Deng, Kaiping; Huang, Mingrui; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Yanli

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin (Mstn) is a conserved negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass in mammals. However, whether precise disruption of Mstn in livestock can be achieved and safely used to improve meat productivity has not been proven. We applied CRISPR/Cas9 system to generate Mstn knock-out (KO) rabbits and goats and then analyzed the changes in their phenotypes to answer this question. We efficiently generated 24 Mstn KO rabbits out of 32 newborn infants after embryo injection with two sgRNAs targeting rabbit Mstn, and found that the Mstn KO rabbits exhibited increased birthweight and a significantly increase in the weight ratios of the quadriceps and biceps muscles to the whole body. Mstn KO also caused high probability of enlarged tongue phenomenon and severe health problems such as stillbirth and early stage death. Using the same method, one out of four goats was generated with edition at Mstn locus. The early stage growth rate of this goat outperformed the control goats. In conclusion, we efficiently generated Mstn KO rabbits and goats using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. However, Mstn KO causes severe health problems and may also have the same effects on other species. This safety issue must be studied further before applied to animal reproduction processes. PMID:27417210

  19. 1,3-propanediol production with Citrobacter werkmanii DSM17579: effect of a dhaD knock-out

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background 1,3-propanediol (PDO) is a substantially industrial metabolite used in the polymer industry. Although several natural PDO production hosts exist, e.g. Klebsiella sp., Citrobacter sp. and Clostridium sp., the PDO yield on glycerol is insufficient for an economically viable bio-process. Enhancing this yield via strain improvement can be achieved by disconnecting the production and growth pathways. In the case of PDO formation, this approach results in a microorganism metabolizing glycerol strictly for PDO production, while catabolizing a co-substrate for growth and maintenance. We applied this strategy to improve the PDO production with Citrobacter werkmanii DSM17579. Results Genetic tools were developed and used to create Citrobacter werkmanii DSM17579 ∆dhaD in which dhaD, encoding for glycerol dehydrogenase, was deleted. Since this strain was unable to grow on glycerol anaerobically, both pathways were disconnected. The knock-out strain was perturbed with 13 different co-substrates for growth and maintenance. Glucose was the most promising, although a competition between NADH-consuming enzymes and 1,3-propanediol dehydrogenase emerged. Conclusion Due to the deletion of dhaD in Citrobacter werkmanii DSM17579, the PDO production and growth pathway were split. As a consequence, the PDO yield on glycerol was improved 1,5 times, strengthening the idea that Citrobacter werkmanii DSM17579 could become an industrially interesting host for PDO production. PMID:24885849

  20. Behavioral Phenotype of Fmr1 Knock-Out Mice during Active Phase in an Altered Light/Dark Cycle123

    PubMed Central

    Saré, R. Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most commonly inherited form of intellectual disability and is a disorder that is also highly associated with autism. FXS occurs as a result of an expanded CGG repeat sequence leading to transcriptional silencing. In an animal model of FXS in which Fmr1 is knocked out (Fmr1 KO), many physical, physiological, and behavioral characteristics of the human disease are recapitulated. Prior characterization of the mouse model was conducted during the day, the inactive phase of the circadian cycle. Circadian rhythms are an important contributor to behavior and may play a role in the study of disease phenotype. Moreover, changes in the parameters of circadian rhythm are known to occur in FXS animal models. We conducted an investigation of key behavioral phenotypes in Fmr1 KO mice during their active phase. We report that phase did not alter the Fmr1 KO phenotype in open field activity, anxiety, and learning and memory. There was a slight effect of phase on social behavior as measured by time in chamber, but not by time spent sniffing. Our data strengthen the existing data characterizing the phenotype of Fmr1 KO mice, indicating that it is independent of circadian phase. PMID:27294193

  1. Generation and evaluation of Myostatin knock-out rabbits and goats using CRISPR/Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rihong; Wan, Yongjie; Xu, Dan; Cui, Libin; Deng, Mingtian; Zhang, Guomin; Jia, Ruoxin; Zhou, Wenjun; Wang, Zhen; Deng, Kaiping; Huang, Mingrui; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Yanli

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin (Mstn) is a conserved negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass in mammals. However, whether precise disruption of Mstn in livestock can be achieved and safely used to improve meat productivity has not been proven. We applied CRISPR/Cas9 system to generate Mstn knock-out (KO) rabbits and goats and then analyzed the changes in their phenotypes to answer this question. We efficiently generated 24 Mstn KO rabbits out of 32 newborn infants after embryo injection with two sgRNAs targeting rabbit Mstn, and found that the Mstn KO rabbits exhibited increased birthweight and a significantly increase in the weight ratios of the quadriceps and biceps muscles to the whole body. Mstn KO also caused high probability of enlarged tongue phenomenon and severe health problems such as stillbirth and early stage death. Using the same method, one out of four goats was generated with edition at Mstn locus. The early stage growth rate of this goat outperformed the control goats. In conclusion, we efficiently generated Mstn KO rabbits and goats using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. However, Mstn KO causes severe health problems and may also have the same effects on other species. This safety issue must be studied further before applied to animal reproduction processes. PMID:27417210

  2. Prolonged Starvation Causes Up-Regulation of AQP1 in Adipose Tissue Capillaries of AQP7 Knock-Out Mice

    PubMed Central

    Skowronski, Mariusz T.; Skowronska, Agnieszka; Rojek, Aleksandra; Oklinski, Michal K.; Nielsen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are membrane proteins involved in the regulation of cellular transport and the balance of water and glycerol and cell volume in the white adipose tissue (WAT). In our previous study, we found the co-expression of the AQP1 water channel and AQP7 in the mouse WAT. In our present study, we aimed to find out whether prolonged starvation influences the AQP1 expression of AQP7 knock-out mice (AQP7 KO) in the WAT. To resolve this hypothesis, immunoperoxidase, immunoblot and immunogold microscopy were used. AQP1 expression was found with the use of immunohistochemistry and was confirmed by immunogold microscopy in the vessels of mouse WAT of all studied groups. Semi-quantitative immunoblot and quantitative immunogold microscopy showed a significant increase (by 2.5- to 3-fold) in the abundance of AQP1 protein expression in WAT in the 72 h starved AQP7 KO mice as compared to AQP7+/+ (p < 0.05) and AQP7−/− (p < 0.01) controls, respectively. In conclusion, the AQP1 water channel located in the vessels of WAT is up-regulated in response to prolonged starvation in the WAT of AQP7 KO mice. The present data suggest that an interaction of different AQP isoforms is required for maintaining proper water homeostasis within the mice WAT. PMID:27455244

  3. Prolonged Starvation Causes Up-Regulation of AQP1 in Adipose Tissue Capillaries of AQP7 Knock-Out Mice.

    PubMed

    Skowronski, Mariusz T; Skowronska, Agnieszka; Rojek, Aleksandra; Oklinski, Michal K; Nielsen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are membrane proteins involved in the regulation of cellular transport and the balance of water and glycerol and cell volume in the white adipose tissue (WAT). In our previous study, we found the co-expression of the AQP1 water channel and AQP7 in the mouse WAT. In our present study, we aimed to find out whether prolonged starvation influences the AQP1 expression of AQP7 knock-out mice (AQP7 KO) in the WAT. To resolve this hypothesis, immunoperoxidase, immunoblot and immunogold microscopy were used. AQP1 expression was found with the use of immunohistochemistry and was confirmed by immunogold microscopy in the vessels of mouse WAT of all studied groups. Semi-quantitative immunoblot and quantitative immunogold microscopy showed a significant increase (by 2.5- to 3-fold) in the abundance of AQP1 protein expression in WAT in the 72 h starved AQP7 KO mice as compared to AQP7+/+ (p < 0.05) and AQP7-/- (p < 0.01) controls, respectively. In conclusion, the AQP1 water channel located in the vessels of WAT is up-regulated in response to prolonged starvation in the WAT of AQP7 KO mice. The present data suggest that an interaction of different AQP isoforms is required for maintaining proper water homeostasis within the mice WAT. PMID:27455244

  4. Ammonia excretion in Caenorhabditis elegans: Physiological and molecular characterization of the rhr-2 knock-out mutant.

    PubMed

    Adlimoghaddam, Aida; O'Donnell, Michael J; Kormish, Jay; Banh, Sheena; Treberg, Jason R; Merz, David; Weihrauch, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown the free living soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (N2 strain) to be ammonotelic. Ammonia excretion was suggested to take place partially via the hypodermis, involving the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA), V-ATPase (VAT), carbonic anhydrase, NHX-3 and a functional microtubule network and at least one Rh-like ammonia transporter RHR-1. In the current study, we show that a second Rh-protein, RHR-2, is highly expressed in the hypodermis, here also in the apical membrane of that tissue. To further characterize the role of RHR-2 in ammonia excretion, a knock-out mutant rhr-2 (ok403), further referred to as ∆rhr-2, was employed. Compared to wild-type worms (N2), this mutant showed a lower rate of ammonia excretion and a lower hypodermal H(+) excretion rate. At the same time rhr-1, nka, vat, and nhx-3 showed higher mRNA expression levels when compared to N2. Also, in contrast to N2 worms, ∆rhr-2 did not show enhanced ammonia excretion rates when exposed to a low pH environment, suggesting that RHR-2 represents the apical NH3 pathway that allows ammonia trapping via the hypodermis in N2 worms. A hypothetical model for the mechanism of hypodermal ammonia excretion is proposed on the basis of data in this and previous investigations. PMID:26872996

  5. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration: altered mitochondria membrane potential and defective respiration in Pank2 knock-out mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti, Dario; Dusi, Sabrina; Morbin, Michela; Uggetti, Andrea; Moda, Fabio; D'Amato, Ilaria; Giordano, Carla; d'Amati, Giulia; Cozzi, Anna; Levi, Sonia; Hayflick, Susan; Tiranti, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by high brain content of iron and presence of axonal spheroids. Mutations in the PANK2 gene, which encodes pantothenate kinase 2, underlie an autosomal recessive inborn error of coenzyme A metabolism, called pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN). PKAN is characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity and pigmentary retinal degeneration. The pathogenesis of this disorder is poorly understood and, although PANK2 is a mitochondrial protein, perturbations in mitochondrial bioenergetics have not been reported. A knock-out (KO) mouse model of PKAN exhibits retinal degeneration and azoospermia, but lacks any neurological phenotype. The absence of a clinical phenotype has partially been explained by the different cellular localization of the human and murine PANK2 proteins. Here we demonstrate that the mouse Pank2 protein localizes to mitochondria, similar to its human orthologue. Moreover, we show that Pank2-defective neurons derived from KO mice have an altered mitochondrial membrane potential, a defect further corroborated by the observations of swollen mitochondria at the ultra-structural level and by the presence of defective respiration. PMID:22983956

  6. Sensitivity of Heterozygous α1,6-Fucosyltransferase Knock-out Mice to Cigarette Smoke-induced Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Congxiao; Maeno, Toshitaka; Ota, Fumi; Ueno, Manabu; Korekane, Hiroaki; Takamatsu, Shinji; Shirato, Ken; Matsumoto, Akio; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Yoshida, Keiichi; Kitazume, Shinobu; Ohtsubo, Kazuaki; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that a deficiency in core fucosylation caused by the genetic disruption of α1,6-fucosyltransferase (Fut8) leads to lethal abnormalities and the development of emphysematous lesions in the lung by attenuation of TGF-β1 receptor signaling. Herein, we investigated the physiological relevance of core fucosylation in the pathogenesis of emphysema using viable heterozygous knock-out mice (Fut8+/−) that were exposed to cigarette smoke (CS). The Fut8+/− mice exhibited a marked decrease in FUT8 activity, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 activities were elevated in the lung at an early stage of exposure. Emphysema developed after a 3-month CS exposure, accompanied by the recruitment of large numbers of macrophages to the lung. CS exposure substantially and persistently elevated the expression level of Smad7, resulting in a significant reduction of Smad2 phosphorylation (which controls MMP-9 expression) in Fut8+/− mice and Fut8-deficient embryonic fibroblast cells. These in vivo and in vitro studies show that impaired core fucosylation enhances the susceptibility to CS and constitutes at least part of the disease process of emphysema, in which TGF-β-Smad signaling is impaired and the MMP-mediated destruction of lung parenchyma is up-regulated. PMID:22433854

  7. Temporal evolution of neurophysiological and behavioral features of synapsin I/II/III triple knock-out mice

    PubMed Central

    Cambiaghi, Marco; Cursi, Marco; Monzani, Elena; Benfenati, Fabio; Comi, Giancarlo; Minicucci, Fabio; Valtorta, Flavia; Leocani, Letizia

    2013-01-01

    Summary Deletion of one or more synapsin genes in mice results in a spontaneous epilepsy. In these animals, seizures can be evoked by opening or moving the cage. Aim of the present study was to characterize the evolution of the epileptic phenotype by neurophysiological examination and behavioral observation in synapsin triple knock-out (Syn-TKO) mice. Syn-TKO mice were studied from 20 postnatal days (PND) up to 6 months of age by video-EEG recording and behavioral observation. Background EEG spectral analysis was performed and data were compared to WT animals. Syn-TKO revealed rare spontaneous seizures and increased susceptibility to evoked seizures in mice from 60 to 100 PND. Spontaneous and evoked seizures presented similar duration and morphology. At times, seizures were followed by a post-ictal phase characterized by a 4 Hz rhythmic activity and immobility of the animal. Spectral analysis of background EEG evidenced a slowing of the theta-alpha peak in Syn-TKO mice compared to WT mice within the period from PND 40 to 100. These data indicate that Syn-TKO mice do not exhibit a linear progression of the epileptic phenotype, with the period corresponding to a higher susceptibility to evoked seizures characterized by background EEG slowing. This aspect might be connected to brain dysfunction often associated to epilepsy in the interictal period. PMID:22846639

  8. FAT10 KNOCK OUT MICE LIVERS FAIL TO DEVELOP MALLORY-DENK BODIES IN THE DDC MOUSE MODEL

    PubMed Central

    French, SW; French, BA; Oliva, J; Li, J; Bardag-Gorce, F; Tillman, B; Canaan, A

    2016-01-01

    Mallory-Denk bodies (MDBs) are aggresomes composed of undigested ubiqutinated short lived proteins which have accumulated because of a decrease in the rate of their degradation by the 26s proteasome. The decrease in the activity of the proteasome is due to a shift in the activity of the 26s proteasome to the immunoproteasome triggered by an increase in expression of the catalytic subunits of the immunoproteasome which replaces the catalytic subunits of the 26s proteasome. This switch in the type of proteasome in liver cells is triggered by the binding of IFNγ to the IFNγ sequence response element (ISRE) located on the FAT10 promoter. To determine if either FAT10 or IFNγ are essential for the formation of MDBs we fed both IFNγ and FAT10 knock out (KO) mice DDC added to the control diet for 10 weeks in order to induce MDBs. Mice fed the control diet and Wild type mice fed the DDC or control diet were compared. MDBs were located by immunofluorescent double stains using antibodies to ubiquitin to stain MDBs and FAT10 to localize the increased expression of FAT10 in MDB forming hepatocytes. We found that MDB formation occurred in the IFNγ KO mice but not in the FAT10 KO mice. Western blots showed an increase in the ubiquitin smears and decreases β 5 (chymotrypsin-like 26S proteasome subunit) in the Wild type mice fed DDC but not in the FAT10 KO mice fed DDC. To conclude, we have demonstrated that FAT10 is essential to the induction of MDB formation in the DDC fed mice. PMID:22981937

  9. Increased Sensitivity to Inflammatory Pain Induced by Subcutaneous Formalin Injection in Serine Racemase Knock-Out Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tabata-Imai, Ayako; Inoue, Ran; Mori, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    D-Serine, an endogenous coagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), is widely distributed in the central nervous system and is synthesized from L-serine by serine racemase (SR). NMDAR plays an important role in pain processing including central sensitization that eventually causes hyperalgesia. To elucidate the roles of D-serine and SR in pain transmission, we evaluated the behavioral changes and spinal nociceptive processing induced by formalin using SR knock-out (KO) mice. We found that SR is mainly distributed in lamina II of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord in wild-type (WT) mice. Although the formalin injected subcutaneously induced the biphasic pain response of licking in SR-KO and WT mice, the time spent on licking was significantly longer in the SR-KO mice during the second phase of the formalin test. The number of neurons immunopositive for c-Fos and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK), which are molecular pain markers, in laminae I-II of the ipsilateral dorsal horn was significantly larger in the SR-KO mice. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the distribution of SR changed from being broad to being concentrated in cell bodies after the formalin injection. On the other hand, the expression level of the cytosolic SR in the ipsilateral dorsal horn significantly decreased. Oral administration of 10 mM D-serine in drinking water for one week cancelled the difference in pain behaviors between WT and SR-KO mice in phase 2 of the formalin test. These findings demonstrate that the SR-KO mice showed increased sensitivity to inflammatory pain and the WT mice showed translocation of SR and decreased SR expression levels after the formalin injection, which suggest a novel antinociceptive mechanism via SR indicating an important role of D-serine in pain transmission. PMID:25133605

  10. Efficient Generation of Myostatin Knock-Out Sheep Using CRISPR/Cas9 Technology and Microinjection into Zygotes.

    PubMed

    Crispo, M; Mulet, A P; Tesson, L; Barrera, N; Cuadro, F; dos Santos-Neto, P C; Nguyen, T H; Crénéguy, A; Brusselle, L; Anegón, I; Menchaca, A

    2015-01-01

    While CRISPR/Cas9 technology has proven to be a valuable system to generate gene-targeted modified animals in several species, this tool has been scarcely reported in farm animals. Myostatin is encoded by MSTN gene involved in the inhibition of muscle differentiation and growth. We determined the efficiency of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to edit MSTN in sheep and generate knock-out (KO) animals with the aim to promote muscle development and body growth. We generated CRISPR/Cas9 mRNAs specific for ovine MSTN and microinjected them into the cytoplasm of ovine zygotes. When embryo development of CRISPR/Cas9 microinjected zygotes (n = 216) was compared with buffer injected embryos (n = 183) and non microinjected embryos (n = 173), cleavage rate was lower for both microinjected groups (P<0.05) and neither was affected by CRISPR/Cas9 content in the injected medium. Embryo development to blastocyst was not affected by microinjection and was similar among the experimental groups. From 20 embryos analyzed by Sanger sequencing, ten were mutant (heterozygous or mosaic; 50% efficiency). To obtain live MSTN KO lambs, 53 blastocysts produced after zygote CRISPR/Cas9 microinjection were transferred to 29 recipient females resulting in 65.5% (19/29) of pregnant ewes and 41.5% (22/53) of newborns. From 22 born lambs analyzed by T7EI and Sanger sequencing, ten showed indel mutations at MSTN gene. Eight showed mutations in both alleles and five of them were homozygous for indels generating out-of frame mutations that resulted in premature stop codons. Western blot analysis of homozygous KO founders confirmed the absence of myostatin, showing heavier body weight than wild type counterparts. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9 system was a very efficient tool to generate gene KO sheep. This technology is quick and easy to perform and less expensive than previous techniques, and can be applied to obtain genetically modified animal models of interest for biomedicine and

  11. 2-Methyl-6-(phenylethynyl) pyridine (MPEP) reverses maze learning and PSD-95 deficits in Fmr1 knock-out mice

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Réno M.; Kogan, Cary S.; Messier, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is caused by the lack of expression of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), which results in intellectual disability and other debilitating symptoms including impairment of visual-spatial functioning. FXS is the only single-gene disorder that is highly co-morbid with autism spectrum disorder and can therefore provide insight into its pathophysiology. Lack of FMRP results in altered group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) signaling, which is a target for putative treatments. The Hebb-Williams (H-W) mazes are a set of increasingly complex spatial navigation problems that depend on intact hippocampal and thus mGluR-5 functioning. In the present investigation, we examined whether an antagonist of mGluR-5 would reverse previously described behavioral deficits in fragile X mental retardation 1 knock-out (Fmr1 KO) mice. Mice were trained on a subset of the H-W mazes and then treated with either 20 mg/kg of an mGluR-5 antagonist, 2-Methyl-6-(phenylethynyl) pyridine (MPEP; n = 11) or an equivalent dose of saline (n = 11) prior to running test mazes. Latency and errors were dependent variables recorded during the test phase. Immediately after completing each test, marble-burying behavior was assessed, which confirmed that the drug treatment was pharmacologically active during maze learning. Although latency was not statistically different between the groups, MPEP treated Fmr1 KO mice made significantly fewer errors on mazes deemed more difficult suggesting a reversal of the behavioral deficit. MPEP treated mice were also less perseverative and impulsive when navigating mazes. Furthermore, MPEP treatment reversed post-synaptic density-95 (PSD-95) protein deficits in Fmr1 KO treated mice, whereas levels of a control protein (β-tubulin) remained unchanged. These data further validate MPEP as a potentially beneficial treatment for FXS. Our findings also suggest that adapted H-W mazes may be a useful tool to document alterations in

  12. Efficient Generation of Myostatin Knock-Out Sheep Using CRISPR/Cas9 Technology and Microinjection into Zygotes

    PubMed Central

    Crispo, M.; Mulet, A. P.; Tesson, L.; Barrera, N.; Cuadro, F.; dos Santos-Neto, P. C.; Nguyen, T. H.; Crénéguy, A.; Brusselle, L.; Anegón, I.; Menchaca, A.

    2015-01-01

    While CRISPR/Cas9 technology has proven to be a valuable system to generate gene-targeted modified animals in several species, this tool has been scarcely reported in farm animals. Myostatin is encoded by MSTN gene involved in the inhibition of muscle differentiation and growth. We determined the efficiency of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to edit MSTN in sheep and generate knock-out (KO) animals with the aim to promote muscle development and body growth. We generated CRISPR/Cas9 mRNAs specific for ovine MSTN and microinjected them into the cytoplasm of ovine zygotes. When embryo development of CRISPR/Cas9 microinjected zygotes (n = 216) was compared with buffer injected embryos (n = 183) and non microinjected embryos (n = 173), cleavage rate was lower for both microinjected groups (P<0.05) and neither was affected by CRISPR/Cas9 content in the injected medium. Embryo development to blastocyst was not affected by microinjection and was similar among the experimental groups. From 20 embryos analyzed by Sanger sequencing, ten were mutant (heterozygous or mosaic; 50% efficiency). To obtain live MSTN KO lambs, 53 blastocysts produced after zygote CRISPR/Cas9 microinjection were transferred to 29 recipient females resulting in 65.5% (19/29) of pregnant ewes and 41.5% (22/53) of newborns. From 22 born lambs analyzed by T7EI and Sanger sequencing, ten showed indel mutations at MSTN gene. Eight showed mutations in both alleles and five of them were homozygous for indels generating out-of frame mutations that resulted in premature stop codons. Western blot analysis of homozygous KO founders confirmed the absence of myostatin, showing heavier body weight than wild type counterparts. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9 system was a very efficient tool to generate gene KO sheep. This technology is quick and easy to perform and less expensive than previous techniques, and can be applied to obtain genetically modified animal models of interest for biomedicine and

  13. Reduced levels of dopamine and altered metabolism in brains of HPRT knock-out rats: a new rodent model of Lesch-Nyhan Disease.

    PubMed

    Meek, Stephen; Thomson, Alison J; Sutherland, Linda; Sharp, Matthew G F; Thomson, Julie; Bishop, Valerie; Meddle, Simone L; Gloaguen, Yoann; Weidt, Stefan; Singh-Dolt, Karamjit; Buehr, Mia; Brown, Helen K; Gill, Andrew C; Burdon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is a severe neurological disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), an enzyme required for efficient recycling of purine nucleotides. Although this biochemical defect reconfigures purine metabolism and leads to elevated levels of the breakdown product urea, it remains unclear exactly how loss of HPRT activity disrupts brain function. As the rat is the preferred rodent experimental model for studying neurobiology and diseases of the brain, we used genetically-modified embryonic stem cells to generate an HPRT knock-out rat. Male HPRT-deficient rats were viable, fertile and displayed normal caged behaviour. However, metabolomic analysis revealed changes in brain biochemistry consistent with disruption of purine recycling and nucleotide metabolism. Broader changes in brain biochemistry were also indicated by increased levels of the core metabolite citrate and reduced levels of lipids and fatty acids. Targeted MS/MS analysis identified reduced levels of dopamine in the brains of HPRT-deficient animals, consistent with deficits noted previously in human LND patients and HPRT knock-out mice. The HPRT-deficient rat therefore provides a new experimental platform for future investigation of how HPRT activity and disruption of purine metabolism affects neural function and behaviour. PMID:27185277

  14. Reduced levels of dopamine and altered metabolism in brains of HPRT knock-out rats: a new rodent model of Lesch-Nyhan Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Stephen; Thomson, Alison J.; Sutherland, Linda; Sharp, Matthew G. F.; Thomson, Julie; Bishop, Valerie; Meddle, Simone L.; Gloaguen, Yoann; Weidt, Stefan; Singh-Dolt, Karamjit; Buehr, Mia; Brown, Helen K.; Gill, Andrew C.; Burdon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is a severe neurological disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), an enzyme required for efficient recycling of purine nucleotides. Although this biochemical defect reconfigures purine metabolism and leads to elevated levels of the breakdown product urea, it remains unclear exactly how loss of HPRT activity disrupts brain function. As the rat is the preferred rodent experimental model for studying neurobiology and diseases of the brain, we used genetically-modified embryonic stem cells to generate an HPRT knock-out rat. Male HPRT-deficient rats were viable, fertile and displayed normal caged behaviour. However, metabolomic analysis revealed changes in brain biochemistry consistent with disruption of purine recycling and nucleotide metabolism. Broader changes in brain biochemistry were also indicated by increased levels of the core metabolite citrate and reduced levels of lipids and fatty acids. Targeted MS/MS analysis identified reduced levels of dopamine in the brains of HPRT-deficient animals, consistent with deficits noted previously in human LND patients and HPRT knock-out mice. The HPRT-deficient rat therefore provides a new experimental platform for future investigation of how HPRT activity and disruption of purine metabolism affects neural function and behaviour. PMID:27185277

  15. Knock out of the PHOSPHATE 2 Gene TaPHO2-A1 Improves Phosphorus Uptake and Grain Yield under Low Phosphorus Conditions in Common Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Xiang; Hong, Xia; Zhao, Xueqiang; Zhang, Wei; He, Xue; Ma, Wenying; Teng, Wan; Tong, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    MiR399 and its target PHOSPHATE2 (PHO2) play pivotal roles in phosphate signaling in plants. Loss of function mutation in PHO2 leads to excessive Pi accumulation in shoots and growth retardation in diploid plants like Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa). Here we isolated three PHO2 homologous genes TaPHO2-A1, -B1 and -D1 from hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum). These TaPHO2 genes all contained miR399-binding sites and were able to be degraded by tae-miR399. TaPHO2-D1 was expressed much more abundantly than TaPHO2-A1 and -B1. The ion beam-induced deletion mutants were used to analyze the effects of TaPHO2s on phosphorus uptake and plant growth. The tapho2-a1, tapho2-b1 and tapho2-d1 mutants all had significant higher leaf Pi concentrations than did the wild type, with tapho2-d1 having the strongest effect, and tapho2-b1 the weakest. Two consecutive field experiments showed that knocking out TaPHO2-D1 reduced plant height and grain yield under both low and high phosphorus conditions. However, knocking out TaPHO2-A1 significantly increased phosphorus uptake and grain yield under low phosphorus conditions, with no adverse effect on grain yield under high phosphorus conditions. Our results indicated that TaPHO2s involved in phosphorus uptake and translocation, and molecular engineering TaPHO2 shows potential in improving wheat yield with less phosphorus fertilizer. PMID:27416927

  16. Knock out of the PHOSPHATE 2 Gene TaPHO2-A1 Improves Phosphorus Uptake and Grain Yield under Low Phosphorus Conditions in Common Wheat.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Xiang; Hong, Xia; Zhao, Xueqiang; Zhang, Wei; He, Xue; Ma, Wenying; Teng, Wan; Tong, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    MiR399 and its target PHOSPHATE2 (PHO2) play pivotal roles in phosphate signaling in plants. Loss of function mutation in PHO2 leads to excessive Pi accumulation in shoots and growth retardation in diploid plants like Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa). Here we isolated three PHO2 homologous genes TaPHO2-A1, -B1 and -D1 from hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum). These TaPHO2 genes all contained miR399-binding sites and were able to be degraded by tae-miR399. TaPHO2-D1 was expressed much more abundantly than TaPHO2-A1 and -B1. The ion beam-induced deletion mutants were used to analyze the effects of TaPHO2s on phosphorus uptake and plant growth. The tapho2-a1, tapho2-b1 and tapho2-d1 mutants all had significant higher leaf Pi concentrations than did the wild type, with tapho2-d1 having the strongest effect, and tapho2-b1 the weakest. Two consecutive field experiments showed that knocking out TaPHO2-D1 reduced plant height and grain yield under both low and high phosphorus conditions. However, knocking out TaPHO2-A1 significantly increased phosphorus uptake and grain yield under low phosphorus conditions, with no adverse effect on grain yield under high phosphorus conditions. Our results indicated that TaPHO2s involved in phosphorus uptake and translocation, and molecular engineering TaPHO2 shows potential in improving wheat yield with less phosphorus fertilizer. PMID:27416927

  17. Broken or knocked out tooth

    MedlinePlus

    ... bones, stale bread, tough bagels and unpopped popcorn kernels. Always wear a seatbelt. Alternative Names Teeth - broken; ... A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health ...

  18. Broken or knocked out tooth

    MedlinePlus

    Pfenninger JL, Fowlder GC. Management of dental injuries and reimplantation of an avulsed tooth. In: Pfenninger JL, Fowlder GC, eds. Pfenninger & Fowler's Procedures for Primary Care . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  19. Morphological and Functional Correlates of Synaptic Pathology in the Cathepsin D Knock-Out Mouse Model of Congenital Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Sabine; Molchanova, Svetlana M.; Wright, Ann K; Edwards, Andrew; Cooper, Jon D.; Taira, Tomi; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Tyynelä, Jaana

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the cathepsin D (CTSD) gene cause an aggressive neurodegenerative disease (congenital neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis) that leads to early death. Recent evidence suggests that presynaptic abnormalities play a major role in the pathogenesis of CTSD deficiencies. To identify the early events that lead to synaptic alterations, we investigated synaptic ultrastructure and function in pre-symptomatic CTSD knock-out (Ctsd−/−) mice. Electron microscopy revealed that there were significantly greater numbers of readily releasable synaptic vesicles present in Ctsd−/− mice than in wild-type control mice as early as postnatal day 16. The size of this synaptic vesicle pool continued to increase with disease progression in the hippocampus and thalamus of the Ctsd−/− mice. Electrophysiology revealed a markedly decreased frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) with no effect on pair-pulse modulation of the evoked EPSPs in the hippocampus of Ctsd−/− mice. The reduced miniature EPSC frequency was observed before the appearance of epilepsy or any morphological sign of synaptic degeneration. Taken together, the data indicate that CTSD is required for normal synaptic function, and that a failure in synaptic trafficking or recycling may be an early and important pathological mechanism in Ctsd−/− mice; these presynaptic abnormalities may initiate synaptic degeneration in advance of subsequent neuronal loss. PMID:22082660

  20. Investigation on the partial resistance of Cpkk2 knock out strain of Cryphonectria parasitica to Cryphonectria hypovirus 1 infection in presence of Geneticin and Geneticin resistance gene.

    PubMed

    Turina, Massimo; Rossi, Marika; Moretti, Marino

    2016-07-01

    We have recently characterized the central components of the three MAP kinase cascades present in Cryphonectria parasitica : the MEK genes cpkk1, cpkk2 and cpkk3. When we attempted to infect through anastomosis the three knock out strains with Cryphonectria hypovirus 1 (CHV1), only the deletion strain of Cpkk2, the yeast Ste7 homologue, involved in mating and filamentous growth, could not be infected. We then proceeded to attempt virus infection through transformation of Δcpkk2 protoplasts using an infectious cDNA clone able to establish virus infection through transformation. In this case, a very limited number of strains could be recovered as stable transformants compared to the efficiency of control transformations with plasmid carrying only the antibiotic marker. Furthermore, transformants carrying actively replicating virus could be isolated only if the selection marker Geneticin was used during the very initial selection process, and not maintained throughout the growth of the colonies. Moreover, Δcpkk2 isolates that maintained the virus lost Geneticin resistance. We therefore unveiled a specific negative interaction among virus infection, presence of Geneticin in the growth media, and lack of Cpkk2 MEK in the fungal host. PMID:26643512

  1. Progression of Alport Kidney Disease in Col4a3 Knock Out Mice Is Independent of Sex or Macrophage Depletion by Clodronate Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Munkyung; Piaia, Alessandro; Shenoy, Neeta; Kagan, David; Gapp, Berangere; Kueng, Benjamin; Weber, Delphine; Dietrich, William; Ksiazek, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    Alport syndrome is a genetic disease of collagen IV (α3, 4, 5) resulting in renal failure. This study was designed to investigate sex-phenotype correlations and evaluate the contribution of macrophage infiltration to disease progression using Col4a3 knock out (Col4a3KO) mice, an established genetic model of autosomal recessive Alport syndrome. No sex differences in the evolution of body mass loss, renal pathology, biomarkers of tubular damage KIM-1 and NGAL, or deterioration of kidney function were observed during the life span of Col4a3KO mice. These findings confirm that, similar to human autosomal recessive Alport syndrome, female and male Col4a3KO mice develop renal failure at the same age and with similar severity. The specific contribution of macrophage infiltration to Alport disease, one of the prominent features of the disease in human and Col4a3KO mice, remains unknown. This study shows that depletion of kidney macrophages in Col4a3KO male mice by administration of clodronate liposomes, prior to clinical onset of disease and throughout the study period, does not protect the mice from renal failure and interstitial fibrosis, nor delay disease progression. These results suggest that therapy targeting macrophage recruitment to kidney is unlikely to be effective as treatment of Alport syndrome. PMID:26555339

  2. Analysis of the synergistic effect of glycyrrhizin and other constituents in licorice extract on lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production using knock-out extract.

    PubMed

    Uto, Takuhiro; Morinaga, Osamu; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2012-01-01

    The pharmacological evidence for synergism between natural compounds is not fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the synergistic function of one target compound in medicinal plant extract by using knock-out (KO) extract, which is one target compound-eliminated extract from whole crude extract. Licorice is the most important ingredient used in the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and the Japanese Kampo medicine, and one of the major active components of licorice is glycyrrhizin (GC). To identify the potential role of GC, we prepared GC-removed extract (GC-KO extract) from licorice extract (LE) using immunoaffinity column conjugated with anti-GC monoclonal antibody (MAb), which could eliminate 99.5% of GC from LE. LE inhibited nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264 murine macrophage cells. However, treatment of GC alone could not show the suppression of NO production and iNOS expression. Interestingly, the inhibitory effect of GC-KO extract was significantly attenuated compared with LE. Furthermore, the combined treatment with GC-KO extract and GC could improve the attenuated inhibition. Taken together, our results indicate that GC may exert synergistic suppression of iNOS expression when coexisting with the other constituents contained in LE, and KO extract is a useful approach for determination of real pharmacological functions of natural compound in the phytochemical mixture. PMID:22178686

  3. Type II Cochlear Ganglion Neurons Do Not Drive the Olivocochlear Reflex: Re-Examination of the Cochlear Phenotype in Peripherin Knock-Out Mice.

    PubMed

    Maison, Stéphane; Liberman, Leslie D; Liberman, M Charles

    2016-01-01

    The cochlear nerve includes a small population of unmyelinated sensory fibers connecting outer hair cells to the brain. The functional role of these type II afferent neurons is controversial, because neurophysiological data are sparse. A recent study (Froud et al., 2015) reported that targeted deletion of peripherin, a type of neurofilament, eliminated type II afferents and inactivated efferent feedback to the outer hair cells, thereby suggesting that type II afferents were the sensory drive to this sound-evoked, negative-feedback reflex, the olivocochlear pathway. Here, we re-evaluated the cochlear phenotype in mice from the peripherin knock-out line and show that (1) type II afferent terminals are present in normal number and (2) olivocochlear suppression of cochlear responses is absent even when this efferent pathway is directly activated by shocks. We conclude that type II neurons are not the sensory drive for the efferent reflex and that peripherin deletion likely causes dysfunction of synaptic transmission between olivocochlear terminals and their peripheral targets. PMID:27570826

  4. Expression pattern of matrix metalloproteinase and TIMP genes in fibroblasts derived from Ets-1 knock-out mice compared to wild-type mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hahne, Jens Claus; Fuchs, Tanja; El Mustapha, Haddouti; Okuducu, Ali Fuat; Bories, Jean Christophe; Wernert, Nicolas

    2006-07-01

    Matrix-degrading proteases play a key role in normal development, wound healing, many diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and, in particular, tumour invasion. In invasive tumours, these enzymes are expressed by fibroblasts of the tumour stroma. Their expression and activity are tightly regulated at several levels, an important one being transcription. Previous in vitro and in vivo findings pointed to a major role of the Ets-1 transcription factor for this level of regulation. In the present study, we tried to prove this role in fibroblasts. We stimulated wild-type mouse fibroblasts with physiological doses of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, known to induce different proteases and expressed by tumour cells) and compared the results to those obtained in Ets-1 -/- fibroblasts derived from Ets-1 knock-out mice. We found that basal Ets-1 levels are necessary not only for a fast induction of MMPs 2, 3 and 13 by bFGF but also for maintenance of the bFGF-induced expression of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) 1, 2 and 3, which are known not only to inhibit but also participate as activators of certain pro-MMPs. PMID:16786167

  5. Establishment of Immortalized BMP2/4 Double Knock-Out Osteoblastic Cells Is Essential for Study of Osteoblast Growth, Differentiation, and Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-An; Wang, Feng; Donly, Kevin J; Baker, Andrew; Wan, Chunyan; Luo, Daoshu; MacDougall, Mary; Chen, Shuo

    2016-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins 2 and 4 (BMP2/4) are essential for osteoblast differentiation and osteogenesis. Generation of a BMP2/4 dual knock-out ((ko/ko)) osteoblastic cell line is a valuable asset for studying effects of BMP2/4 on skeletal development. In this study, our goal was to create immortalized mouse deleted BMP2/4 osteoblasts by infecting adenoviruses with Cre recombinase and green fluorescent protein genes into immortalized murine floxed BMP2/4 osteoblasts. Transduced BMP2/4(ko/ko) cells were verified by green immunofluorescence and PCR. BMP2/4(ko/ko) osteoblasts exhibited small size, slow cell proliferation rate and cell growth was arrested in G1 and G2 phases. Expression of bone-relate genes was reduced in the BMP2/4(ko/ko) cells, resulting in delay of cell differentiation and mineralization. Importantly, extracellular matrix remodeling was impaired in the BMP2/4(ko/ko) osteoblasts as reflected by decreased Mmp-2 and Mmp-9 expressions. Cell differentiation and mineralization were rescued by exogenous BMP2 and/or BMP4. Therefore, we for the first time described establishment of an immortalized deleted BMP2/4 osteoblast line useful for study of mechanisms in regulating osteoblast lineages. PMID:26595646

  6. The phenotypes of ATG9, ATG16 and ATG9/16 knock-out mutants imply autophagy-dependent and -independent functions

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qiuhong; Ünal, Can; Matthias, Jan; Steinert, Michael; Eichinger, Ludwig

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a highly conserved intracellular bulk degradation system of all eukaryotic cells. It is governed by a large number of autophagy proteins (ATGs) and is crucial for many cellular processes. Here, we describe the phenotypes of Dictyostelium discoideum ATG16− and ATG9−/16− cells and compare them to the previously reported ATG9− mutant. ATG16 deficiency caused an increase in the expression of several core autophagy genes, among them atg9 and the two atg8 paralogues. The single and double ATG9 and ATG16 knock-out mutants had complex phenotypes and displayed severe and comparable defects in pinocytosis and phagocytosis. Uptake of Legionella pneumophila was reduced. In addition, ATG9− and ATG16− cells had dramatic defects in autophagy, development and proteasomal activity which were much more severe in the ATG9−/16− double mutant. Mutant cells showed an increase in poly-ubiquitinated proteins and contained large ubiquitin-positive protein aggregates which partially co-localized with ATG16-GFP in ATG9−/16− cells. The more severe autophagic, developmental and proteasomal phenotypes of ATG9−/16− cells imply that ATG9 and ATG16 probably function in parallel in autophagy and have in addition autophagy-independent functions in further cellular processes. PMID:25878144

  7. Type II Cochlear Ganglion Neurons Do Not Drive the Olivocochlear Reflex: Re-Examination of the Cochlear Phenotype in Peripherin Knock-Out Mice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The cochlear nerve includes a small population of unmyelinated sensory fibers connecting outer hair cells to the brain. The functional role of these type II afferent neurons is controversial, because neurophysiological data are sparse. A recent study (Froud et al., 2015) reported that targeted deletion of peripherin, a type of neurofilament, eliminated type II afferents and inactivated efferent feedback to the outer hair cells, thereby suggesting that type II afferents were the sensory drive to this sound-evoked, negative-feedback reflex, the olivocochlear pathway. Here, we re-evaluated the cochlear phenotype in mice from the peripherin knock-out line and show that (1) type II afferent terminals are present in normal number and (2) olivocochlear suppression of cochlear responses is absent even when this efferent pathway is directly activated by shocks. We conclude that type II neurons are not the sensory drive for the efferent reflex and that peripherin deletion likely causes dysfunction of synaptic transmission between olivocochlear terminals and their peripheral targets. PMID:27570826

  8. Automated pipeline to analyze non-contact infrared images of the paraventricular nucleus specific leptin receptor knock-out mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Martinez, Myriam; Ghamari-Langroudi, Masoud; Gifford, Aliya; Cone, Roger; Welch, E. B.

    2015-03-01

    Evidence of leptin resistance is indicated by elevated leptin levels together with other hallmarks of obesity such as a defect in energy homeostasis.1 As obesity is an increasing epidemic in the US, the investigation of mechanisms by which leptin resistance has a pathophysiological impact on energy is an intensive field of research.2 However, the manner in which leptin resistance contributes to the dysregulation of energy, specifically thermoregulation,3 is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the leptin receptor expressed in paraventricular nucleus (PVN) neurons plays a role in thermoregulation at different temperatures. Non-contact infrared (NCIR) thermometry was employed to measure surface body temperature (SBT) of nonanesthetized mice with a specific deletion of the leptin receptor in the PVN after exposure to room (25 °C) and cold (4 °C) temperature. Dorsal side infrared images of wild type (LepRwtwt/sim1-Cre), heterozygous (LepRfloxwt/sim1-Cre) and knock-out (LepRfloxflox/sim1-Cre) mice were collected. Images were input to an automated post-processing pipeline developed in MATLAB to calculate average and maximum SBTs. Linear regression was used to evaluate the relationship between sex, cold exposure and leptin genotype with SBT measurements. Findings indicate that average SBT has a negative relationship to the LepRfloxflox/sim1-Cre genotype, the female sex and cold exposure. However, max SBT is affected by the LepRfloxflox/sim1-Cre genotype and the female sex. In conclusion this data suggests that leptin within the PVN may have a neuroendocrine role in thermoregulation and that NCIR thermometry combined with an automated imaging-processing pipeline is a promising approach to determine SBT in non-anesthetized mice.

  9. Developmental changes of ENaC expression and function in the inner ear of pendrin knock-out mice as a perspective on the development of endolymphatic hydrops.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo Gyung; Kim, Jin Young; Kim, Hee Nam; Bok, Jinwoong; Namkung, Wan; Choi, Jae Young; Kim, Sung Huhn

    2014-01-01

    Pendrin mutations cause enlarged vestibular aqueducts and various degrees of sensorineural hearing loss. The selective abolition of pendrin causes dilation of the membranous labyrinth known as endolymphatic hydrops, loss of the endocochlear potential, and consequently loss of hearing function. Because Na+ transport is one of the most important driving forces for fluid transport, the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) is believed to play an important role in fluid volume regulation in the inner ear. Therefore, the dysfunction of Na+ transport through ENaC by the acidification of endolymph in Pendred syndrome is one of the potential causes of endolymphatic hydrops. We investigated the changes of ENaC expression and function during the development of the pendrin knock-out mouse. In the cochlea, the expression of β and γENaC was significantly increased at P56 in Pds-/- mice compared with Pds+/+ mice. In the vestibule, the expression of βENaC was significantly increased at P56, and γENaC expression significantly increased from P6 to P56 in Pds-/- mice. The ENaC-dependent trans-epithelial current was not significantly different between Pds+/+ and Pds-/- mice in Reissner's membrane or the saccular extramacular roof epithelium at P0, but the current was significantly increased in Pds-/- mice at P56 compared with Pds+/+ mice. These findings indicate that the expression and function of ENaC were enhanced in Pds-/- mice after the development of endolymphatic hydrops as a compensatory mechanism. This result provides insight into the role of Na+ transport in the development and regulation of endolymphatic hydrops due to pendrin mutations. PMID:24752462

  10. Production of superoxide from photosystem II-light harvesting complex II supercomplex in STN8 kinase knock-out rice mutants under photoinhibitory illumination.

    PubMed

    Poudyal, Roshan Sharma; Nath, Krishna; Zulfugarov, Ismayil S; Lee, Choon-Hwan

    2016-09-01

    When phosphorylation of Photosystem (PS) II core proteins is blocked in STN8 knock-out mutants of rice (Oryza sativa) under photoinhibitory illumination, the mobilization of PSII supercomplex is prevented. We have previously proposed that more superoxide (O2(-)) is produced from PSII in the mutant (Nath et al., 2013, Plant J. 76, 675-686). Here, we clarify the type and site for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using both histochemical and fluorescence probes, we observed that, compared with wild-type (WT) leaves, levels of ROS, including O2(-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), were increased when leaves from mutant plants were illuminated with excess light. However, singlet oxygen production was not enhanced under such conditions. When superoxide dismutase was inhibited, O2(-) production was increased, indicating that it is the initial event prior to H2O2 production. In thylakoids isolated from WT leaves, kinase was active in the presence of ATP, and spectrophotometric analysis of nitrobluetetrazolium absorbance for O2(-) confirmed that PSII-driven superoxide production was greater in the mutant thylakoids than in the WT. This contrast in levels of PSII-driven superoxide production between the mutants and the WT plants was confirmed by conducting protein oxidation assays of PSII particles from osstn8 leaves under strong illumination. Those assays also demonstrated that PSII-LHCII supercomplex proteins were oxidized more in the mutant, thereby implying that PSII particles incur greater damage even though D1 degradation during PSII-supercomplex mobilization is partially blocked in the mutant. These results suggest that O2(-) is the major form of ROS produced in the mutant, and that the damaged PSII in the supercomplex is the primary source of O2(-). PMID:27390892

  11. Developmental Changes of ENaC Expression and Function in the Inner Ear of Pendrin Knock-Out Mice as a Perspective on the Development of Endolymphatic Hydrops

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bo Gyung; Kim, Jin Young; Kim, Hee Nam; Bok, Jinwoong; Namkung, Wan

    2014-01-01

    Pendrin mutations cause enlarged vestibular aqueducts and various degrees of sensorineural hearing loss. The selective abolition of pendrin causes dilation of the membranous labyrinth known as endolymphatic hydrops, loss of the endocochlear potential, and consequently loss of hearing function. Because Na+ transport is one of the most important driving forces for fluid transport, the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) is believed to play an important role in fluid volume regulation in the inner ear. Therefore, the dysfunction of Na+ transport through ENaC by the acidification of endolymph in Pendred syndrome is one of the potential causes of endolymphatic hydrops. We investigated the changes of ENaC expression and function during the development of the pendrin knock-out mouse. In the cochlea, the expression of β and γENaC was significantly increased at P56 in Pds−/− mice compared with Pds+/+ mice. In the vestibule, the expression of βENaC was significantly increased at P56, and γENaC expression significantly increased from P6 to P56 in Pds−/− mice. The ENaC-dependent trans-epithelial current was not significantly different between Pds+/+ and Pds−/− mice in Reissner’s membrane or the saccular extramacular roof epithelium at P0, but the current was significantly increased in Pds−/− mice at P56 compared with Pds+/+ mice. These findings indicate that the expression and function of ENaC were enhanced in Pds−/− mice after the development of endolymphatic hydrops as a compensatory mechanism. This result provides insight into the role of Na+ transport in the development and regulation of endolymphatic hydrops due to pendrin mutations. PMID:24752462

  12. Oleylphosphocholine (OlPC) arrests Cryptosporidium parvum growth in vitro and prevents lethal infection in interferon gamma receptor knock-out mice

    PubMed Central

    Sonzogni-Desautels, Karine; Renteria, Axel E.; Camargo, Fabio V.; Di Lenardo, Thomas Z.; Mikhail, Alexandre; Arrowood, Michael J.; Fortin, Anny; Ndao, Momar

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a species of protozoa that causes cryptosporidiosis, an intestinal disease affecting many mammals including humans. Typically, in healthy individuals, cryptosporidiosis is a self-limiting disease. However, C. parvum can cause a severe and persistent infection that can be life-threatening for immunocompromised individuals, such as AIDS patients. As there are no available treatments for these patients that can cure the disease, there is an urgent need to identify treatment options. We tested the anti-parasitic activity of the alkylphosphocholine oleylphosphocholine (OlPC), an analog of miltefosine, against C. parvum in in vitro and in vivo studies. In vitro experiments using C. parvum infected human ileocecal adenocarcinoma cells (HCT-8 cells) showed that OlPC has an EC50 of 18.84 nM. Moreover, no cell toxicity has been seen at concentrations ≤50 μM. C57BL/6 interferon gamma receptor knock-out mice, were infected by gavage with 4000 C. parvum oocysts on Day 0. Oral treatments, with OlPC, miltefosine, paromomycin or PBS, began on Day 3 post-infection for 10 days. Treatment with OlPC, at 40 mg/kg/day resulted in 100% survival, complete clearance of parasite in stools and a 99.9% parasite burden reduction in the intestines at Day 30. Doses of 30 and 20 mg/kg/day also demonstrated an increased survival rate and a dose-dependent parasite burden reduction. Mice treated with 10 mg/kg/day of miltefosine resulted in 50% survival at Day 30. In contrast, control mice, treated with PBS or 100 mg/kg/day of paromomycin, died or had to be euthanized between Days 6 and 13 due to severe illness. Results of parasite burden were obtained by qPCR and cross-validated by both flow cytometry of stool oocysts and histological sections of the ileum. Together, our results strongly support that OlPC represents a potential candidate for the treatment of C. parvum infections in immunocompromised patients. PMID:26441906

  13. Knock-in/Knock-out (KIKO) vectors for rapid integration of large DNA sequences, including whole metabolic pathways, onto the Escherichia coli chromosome at well-characterised loci

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metabolic engineering projects often require integration of multiple genes in order to control the desired phenotype. However, this often requires iterative rounds of engineering because many current insertion approaches are limited by the size of the DNA that can be transferred onto the chromosome. Consequently, construction of highly engineered strains is very time-consuming. A lack of well-characterised insertion loci is also problematic. Results A series of knock-in/knock-out (KIKO) vectors was constructed for integration of large DNA sequences onto the E. coli chromosome at well-defined loci. The KIKO plasmids target three nonessential genes/operons as insertion sites: arsB (an arsenite transporter); lacZ (β-galactosidase); and rbsA-rbsR (a ribose metabolism operon). Two homologous ‘arms’ target each insertion locus; insertion is mediated by λ Red recombinase through these arms. Between the arms is a multiple cloning site for the introduction of exogenous sequences and an antibiotic resistance marker (either chloramphenicol or kanamycin) for selection of positive recombinants. The resistance marker can subsequently be removed by flippase-mediated recombination. The insertion cassette is flanked by hairpin loops to isolate it from the effects of external transcription at the integration locus. To characterize each target locus, a xylanase reporter gene (xynA) was integrated onto the chromosomes of E. coli strains W and K-12 using the KIKO vectors. Expression levels varied between loci, with the arsB locus consistently showing the highest level of expression. To demonstrate the simultaneous use of all three loci in one strain, xynA, green fluorescent protein (gfp) and a sucrose catabolic operon (cscAKB) were introduced into lacZ, arsB and rbsAR respectively, and shown to be functional. Conclusions The KIKO plasmids are a useful tool for efficient integration of large DNA fragments (including multiple genes and pathways) into E. coli. Chromosomal

  14. Zinc Finger Nuclease Knock-out of NADPH:Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase (POR) in Human Tumor Cell Lines Demonstrates That Hypoxia-activated Prodrugs Differ in POR Dependence*

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jiechuang; Gu, Yongchuan; Pruijn, Frederik B.; Smaill, Jeff B.; Patterson, Adam V.; Guise, Christopher P.; Wilson, William R.

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia, a ubiquitous feature of tumors, can be exploited by hypoxia-activated prodrugs (HAP) that are substrates for one-electron reduction in the absence of oxygen. NADPH:cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is considered one of the major enzymes responsible, based on studies using purified enzyme or forced overexpression in cell lines. To examine the role of POR in HAP activation at endogenous levels of expression, POR knock-outs were generated in HCT116 and SiHa cells by targeted mutation of exon 8 using zinc finger nucleases. Absolute quantitation by proteotypic peptide mass spectrometry of DNA sequence-confirmed multiallelic mutants demonstrated expression of proteins with residual one-electron reductase activity in some clones and identified two (Hko2 from HCT116 and S2ko1 from SiHa) that were functionally null by multiple criteria. Sensitivities of the clones to 11 HAP (six nitroaromatics, three benzotriazine N-oxides, and two quinones) were compared with wild-type and POR-overexpressing cells. All except the quinones were potentiated by POR overexpression. Knocking out POR had a marked effect on antiproliferative activity of the 5-nitroquinoline SN24349 in both genetic backgrounds after anoxic exposure but little or no effect on activity of most other HAP, including the clinical stage 2-nitroimidazole mustard TH-302, dinitrobenzamide mustard PR-104A, and benzotriazine N-oxide SN30000. Clonogenic cell killing and reductive metabolism of PR-104A and SN30000 under anoxia also showed little change in the POR knock-outs. Thus, although POR expression is a potential biomarker of sensitivity to some HAP, identification of other one-electron reductases responsible for HAP activation is needed for their rational clinical development. PMID:24196959

  15. In vivo SPECT and ex vivo autoradiographic brain imaging of the novel selective CB1 receptor antagonist radioligand [125I]SD7015 in CB1 knock-out and wildtype mouse.

    PubMed

    Máthé, Domokos; Horváth, Ildikó; Szigeti, Krisztián; Donohue, Sean R; Pike, Victor W; Jia, Zisheng; Ledent, Catherine; Palkovits, Miklós; Freund, Tamás F; Halldin, Christer; Gulyás, Balázs

    2013-02-01

    We aimed to evaluate the novel high-affinity and relatively lipophilic CB(1) receptor (CB(1)R) antagonist radioligand [(125)I]SD7015 for SPECT imaging of CB(1)Rs in vivo using the multiplexed multipinhole dedicated small animal SPECT/CT system, NanoSPECT/CT(PLUS) (Mediso, Budapest, Hungary), in knock-out CB(1) receptor knock-out (CB(1)R-/-) and wildtype mice. In order to exclude possible differences in cerebral blood flow between the two types of animals, HMPAO SPECT scans were performed, whereas in order to confirm the brain uptake differences of the radioligand between knock-out mice and wildtype mice, in vivo scans were complemented with ex vivo autoradiographic measurements using the brains of the same animals. With SPECT/CT imaging, we measured the brain uptake of radioactivity, using %SUV (% standardised uptake values) in CB(1)R-/- mice (n=3) and C57BL6 wildtype mice (n=7) under urethane anaesthesia after injecting [(125)I]SD7015 intravenously or intraperitoneally. The Brookhaven Laboratory mouse MRI atlas was fused to the SPECT/CT images by using a combination of rigid and non-rigid algorithms in the Mediso Fusion™ (Mediso, Budapest, Hungary) and VivoQuant (inviCRO, Boston, MA, USA) softwares. Phosphor imager plate autoradiography (ARG) was performed on 4 μm-thin cryostat sections of the excised brains. %SUV was 8.6±3.6 (average±SD) in CB(1)R-/- mice and 22.1±12.4 in wildtype mice between 2 and 4 h after injection (p<0.05). ARG of identically taken sections from wildtype mouse brain showed moderate radioactivity uptake when compared with the in vivo images, with a clear difference between grey matter and white matter, whereas ARG in CB(1)R(-/-) mice showed practically no radioactivity uptake. [(125)I]SD7015 enters the mouse brain in sufficient amount to enable SPECT imaging. Brain radioactivity distribution largely coincides with that of the known CB(1)R expression pattern in rodent brain. We conclude that [(125)I]SD7015 should be a useful SPECT

  16. In vivo SPECT and ex vivo autoradiographic brain imaging of the novel selective CB1 receptor antagonist radioligand [125I]SD7015 in CB1 knock-out and wildtype mouse

    PubMed Central

    Máthé, Domokos; Horváth, Ildikó; Szigeti, Krisztián; Donohue, Sean R.; Pike, Victor W.; Jia, Zisheng; Ledent, Catherine; Palkovits, Miklós; Freund, Tamás F.; Halldin, Christer; Gulyás, Balázs

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the novel high-affinity and relatively lipophilic CB1 receptor (CB1R) antagonist radioligand [125I]SD7015 for SPECT imaging of CB1Rs in vivo using the multiplexed multipinhole dedicated small animal SPECT/CT system, NanoSPECT/CTPLUS (Mediso, Budapest, Hungary), in knock-out CB1 receptor knock-out (CB1R-/-) and wildtype mice. In order to exclude possible differences in cerebral blood flow between the two types of animals, HMPAO SPECT scans were performed, whereas in order to confirm the brain uptake differences of the radioligand between knock-out mice and wildtype mice, in vivo scans were complemented with ex vivo autoradiographic measurements using the brains of the same animals. With SPECT/CT imaging, we measured the brain uptake of radioactivity, using %SUV (% standardised uptake values) in CB1R-/- mice (n = 3) and C57BL6 wildtype mice (n = 7) under urethane anaesthesia after injecting [125I]SD7015 intravenously or intraperitoneally. The Brookhaven Laboratory mouse MRI atlas was fused to the SPECT/CT images by using a combination of rigid and non-rigid algorithms in the Mediso Fusion™ (Mediso, Budapest, Hungary) and VivoQuant (inviCRO, Boston, MA, USA) softwares. Phosphor imager plate autoradiography (ARG) was performed on 4 μm-thin cryostat sections of the excised brains. %SUV was 8.6 ± 3.6 (average ± SD) in CB1R-/- mice and 22.1 ± 12.4 in wildtype mice between 2 and 4 h after injection (p < 0.05). ARG of identically taken sections from wildtype mouse brain showed moderate radioactivity uptake when compared with the in vivo images, with a clear difference between grey matter and white matter, whereas ARG in CB1R(-/-) mice showed practically no radioactivity uptake. [125I]SD7015 enters the mouse brain in sufficient amount to enable SPECT imaging. Brain radioactivity distribution largely coincides with that of the known CB1R expression pattern in rodent brain. We conclude that [125I]SD7015 should be a useful SPECT radioligand for

  17. Knocking out Angiotensin II in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Zablocki, Daniela; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2011-01-01

    Despite ongoing medical advances, cardiovascular disease continues to be a leading health concern. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in regulating cardiovascular function, and is, therefore, the subject of extensive study. Several of the drugs currently used to treat hypertension and heart failure are designed to target Ang II synthesis and function, but none have been able to completely block the effects of RAS signaling thus far. This review discusses current and emerging approaches towards inhibiting cardiac RAS function in order to further improve cardiovascular disease outcomes. PMID:21234717

  18. Consequence analysis of IWTS metal water reactions (Fauske and Associates report 99-35)

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN, D.R.

    1999-07-28

    The report describes the consequences of postulated thermally unstable conditions in the IWTS knock out pot. The consequence analysis shows that both the knock out pot and particulate bed will stay intact, and that releases will be minor. Reaction rate limitations prevent knock out pot pressure and/or temperature from even approaching values that would threaten structural integrity. Source term calculations based on a particle bed with a homogeneous mixture of metal and oxide particles yield a release above the K Basin pool of about 12 grams.

  19. Working memory impairment in calcineurin knock-out mice is associated with alterations in synaptic vesicle cycling and disruption of high-frequency synaptic and network activity in prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, Jeffrey R; Levenson, Jonathan M; Kim, Sung Hyun; Gibson, Helen E; Richardson, Kristen A; Sivula, Michael; Li, Bing; Ashford, Crystle J; Heindl, Karen A; Babcock, Ryan J; Rose, David M; Hempel, Chris M; Wiig, Kjesten A; Laeng, Pascal; Levin, Margaret E; Ryan, Timothy A; Gerber, David J

    2013-07-01

    Working memory is an essential component of higher cognitive function, and its impairment is a core symptom of multiple CNS disorders, including schizophrenia. Neuronal mechanisms supporting working memory under normal conditions have been described and include persistent, high-frequency activity of prefrontal cortical neurons. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular basis of working memory dysfunction in the context of neuropsychiatric disorders. To elucidate synaptic and neuronal mechanisms of working memory dysfunction, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of a mouse model of schizophrenia, the forebrain-specific calcineurin knock-out mouse. Biochemical analyses of cortical tissue from these mice revealed a pronounced hyperphosphorylation of synaptic vesicle cycling proteins known to be necessary for high-frequency synaptic transmission. Examination of the synaptic vesicle cycle in calcineurin-deficient neurons demonstrated an impairment of vesicle release enhancement during periods of intense stimulation. Moreover, brain slice and in vivo electrophysiological analyses showed that loss of calcineurin leads to a gene dose-dependent disruption of high-frequency synaptic transmission and network activity in the PFC, correlating with selective working memory impairment. Finally, we showed that levels of dynamin I, a key presynaptic protein and calcineurin substrate, are significantly reduced in prefrontal cortical samples from schizophrenia patients, extending the disease relevance of our findings. Our data provide support for a model in which impaired synaptic vesicle cycling represents a critical node for disease pathologies underlying the cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. PMID:23825400

  20. D2 dopamine receptors colocalize regulator of G-protein signaling 9-2 (RGS9-2) via the RGS9 DEP domain, and RGS9 knock-out mice develop dyskinesias associated with dopamine pathways.

    PubMed

    Kovoor, Abraham; Seyffarth, Petra; Ebert, Jana; Barghshoon, Sami; Chen, Ching-Kang; Schwarz, Sigrid; Axelrod, Jeffrey D; Cheyette, Benjamin N R; Simon, Melvin I; Lester, Henry A; Schwarz, Johannes

    2005-02-23

    Regulator of G-protein signaling 9-2 (RGS9-2), a member of the RGS family of G GTPase accelerating proteins, is expressed specifically in the striatum, which participates in antipsychotic-induced tardive dyskinesia and in levodopa-induced dyskinesia. We report that RGS9 knock-out mice develop abnormal involuntary movements when inhibition of dopaminergic transmission is followed by activation of D2-like dopamine receptors (DRs). These abnormal movements resemble drug-induced dyskinesia more closely than other rodent models. Recordings from striatal neurons of these mice establish that activation of D2-like DRs abnormally inhibits glutamate-elicited currents. We show that RGS9-2, via its DEP domain (for Disheveled, EGL-10, Pleckstrin homology), colocalizes with D2DRs when coexpressed in mammalian cells. Recordings from oocytes coexpressing D2DR or the m2 muscarinic receptor and G-protein-gated inward rectifier potassium channels show that RGS9-2, via its DEP domain, preferentially accelerates the termination of D2DR signals. Thus, alterations in RGS9-2 may be a key factor in the pathway leading from D2DRs to the side effects associated with the treatment both of psychoses and Parkinson's disease. PMID:15728856

  1. IWTS metal-water reaction rate evaluation (Fauske and Associates report 99-26)

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN, D.R.

    1999-07-29

    The report presents a thermal stability analysis of partially metallic particulate in two IWTS components, the knock out pot and settlers. Particulate in the knock out pot is thermally stable for combinations of average particle size and metal mass fraction which appear realistic. Particulate in the settlers is thermally stable when a realistic account of particle reactions over time, metal fraction, and size distribution is considered.

  2. Intradermal Immunization of Leishmania donovani Centrin Knock-Out Parasites in Combination with Salivary Protein LJM19 from Sand Fly Vector Induces a Durable Protective Immune Response in Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Fiuza, Jacqueline Araújo; Dey, Ranadhir; Davenport, Dwann; Abdeladhim, Maha; Meneses, Claudio; Oliveira, Fabiano; Kamhawi, Shaden; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Nakhasi, Hira L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a neglected tropical disease and is fatal if untreated. There is no vaccine available against leishmaniasis. The majority of patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) or VL develop a long-term protective immunity after cure from infection, which indicates that development of an effective vaccine against leishmaniasis is possible. Such protection may also be achieved by immunization with live attenuated parasites that do not cause disease. We have previously reported a protective response in mice, hamsters and dogs with Leishmania donovani centrin gene knock-out parasites (LdCen-/-), a live attenuated parasite with a cell division specific centrin1 gene deletion. In this study we have explored the effects of salivary protein LJM19 as an adjuvant and intradermal (ID) route of immunization on the efficacy of LdCen-/- parasites as a vaccine against virulent L. donovani. Methodology/Principal Findings To explore the potential of a combination of LdCen-/- parasites and salivary protein LJM19 as vaccine antigens, LdCen-/- ID immunization followed by ID challenge with virulent L. donovani were performed in hamsters in a 9-month follow up study. We determined parasite burden (serial dilution), antibody production (ELISA) and cytokine expression (qPCR) in these animals. Compared to controls, animals immunized with LdCen-/- + LJM19 induced a strong antibody response, a reduction in spleen and liver parasite burden and a higher expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines after immunization and one month post-challenge. Additionally, a low parasite load in lymph nodes, spleen and liver, and a non-inflamed spleen was observed in immunized animals 9 months after the challenge infection. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that an ID vaccination using LdCen-/-parasites in combination with sand fly salivary protein LJM19 has the capability to confer long lasting protection against visceral leishmaniasis that is comparable to intravenous or

  3. Activation of NADPH-recycling systems in leaves and roots of Arabidopsis thaliana under arsenic-induced stress conditions is accelerated by knock-out of Nudix hydrolase 19 (AtNUDX19) gene.

    PubMed

    Corpas, Francisco J; Aguayo-Trinidad, Simeón; Ogawa, Takahisa; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2016-03-15

    NADPH is an important cofactor in cell growth, proliferation and detoxification. Arabidopsis thaliana Nudix hydrolase 19 (AtNUDX19) belongs to a family of proteins defined by the conserved amino-acid sequence GX5-EX7REUXEEXGU which has the capacity to hydrolyze NADPH as a physiological substrate in vivo. Given the importance of NADPH in the cellular redox homeostasis of plants, the present study compares the responses of the main NADPH-recycling systems including NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) and NADP-malic enzyme (ME) in the leaves and roots of Arabidopsis wild-type (Wt) and knock-out (KO) AtNUDX19 mutant (Atnudx19) plants under physiological and arsenic-induced stress conditions. Two major features were observed in the behavior of the main NADPH-recycling systems: (i) under optimal conditions in both organs, the levels of these activities were higher in nudx19 mutants than in Wt plants; and, (ii) under 500μM AsV conditions, these activities increase, especially in nudx19 mutant plants. Moreover, G6PDH activity in roots was the most affected enzyme in both Wt and nudx19 mutant plants, with a 4.6-fold and 5.0-fold increase, respectively. In summary, the data reveals a connection between the absence of chloroplastic AtNUDX19 and the rise in all NADP-dehydrogenase activities under physiological and arsenic-induced stress conditions, particularly in roots. This suggests that AtNUDX19 could be a key factor in modulating the NADPH pool in plants and consequently in redox homeostasis. PMID:26878367

  4. Effects of ascorbic acid on carcinogenicity and acute toxicity of nickel subsulfide, and on tumor transplants growth in gulonolactone oxidase knock-out mice and wild-type C57BL mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kasprzak, Kazimierz S.; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Kaczmarek, Monika Z.; Logsdon, Daniel L.; Fivash, Mathew J.; Salnikow, Konstantin

    2011-11-15

    The aim of this study was to test a hypothesis that ascorbate depletion could enhance carcinogenicity and acute toxicity of nickel. Homozygous L-gulono- < gamma > -lactone oxidase gene knock-out mice (Gulo-/- mice) unable to produce ascorbate and wild-type C57BL mice (WT mice) were injected intramuscularly with carcinogenic nickel subsulfide (Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}), and observed for the development of injection site tumors for 57 weeks. Small pieces of one of the induced tumors were transplanted subcutaneously into separate groups of Gulo-/- and WT mice and the growth of these tumors was measured for up to 3 months. The two strains of mice differed significantly with regard to (1) Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} carcinogenesis: Gulo-/- mice were 40% more susceptible than WT mice; and (2) transplanted tumors development: Gulo-/- mice were more receptive to tumor growth than WT mice, but only in terms of a much shorter tumor latency; later in the exponential phase of growth, the growth rates were the same. And, with adequate ascorbate supplementation, the two strains were equally susceptible to acute toxicity of Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}. Statistically significant effects of dietary ascorbate dosing levels were the following: (1) reduction in ascorbate supplementation increased acute toxicity of Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} in Gulo-/- mice; (2) ascorbate supplementation extended the latency of transplanted tumors in WT mice. In conclusion, the lack of endogenous ascorbate synthesis makes Gulo-/- mice more susceptible to Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} carcinogenesis. Dietary ascorbate tends to attenuate acute toxicity of Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} and to extend the latency of transplanted tumors. The latter effects may be of practical importance to humans and thus deserve further studies. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ascorbate depletion enhances carcinogenicity and acute toxicity of nickel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gulo-/- mice unable to synthesize ascorbate were used in this study. Black

  5. Meperidine, remifentanil and tramadol but not sufentanil interact with alpha(2)-adrenoceptors in alpha(2A)-, alpha(2B)- and alpha(2C)-adrenoceptor knock out mice brain.

    PubMed

    Höcker, Jan; Weber, Bernd; Tonner, Peter H; Scholz, Jens; Brand, Philipp-Alexander; Ohnesorge, Henning; Bein, Berthold

    2008-03-17

    alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists like clonidine or dexmedetomidine increase the sedative and analgesic actions of opioids. Furthermore opioids like meperidine show potent anti-shivering effects like alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists. The underlying molecular mechanisms of these effects are still poorly defined. The authors therefore studied the ability of four different opioids (meperidine, remifentanil, sufentanil and tramadol) to interact with different alpha(2)-adrenoceptor subtypes in mice lacking individual alpha(2A)-, alpha(2B)- or alpha(2C)-adrenoceptors (alpha(2)-adrenoceptor knock out (alpha(2)-AR KO) mice)). The interaction of opioids with alpha(2)-adrenoceptors was investigated by quantitative receptor autoradiography in brain slices of alpha(2A)-, alpha(2B)- or alpha(2C)-adrenoceptor deficient mice. Displacement of the radiolabelled alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist [(125)I]-paraiodoclonidine ([(125)I]-PIC) from alpha(2)-adrenoceptors in different brain regions by increasing opioid concentrations was measured, and binding affinity of the analysed opioids to alpha(2)-adrenoceptor subtypes in different brain regions was quantified. Meperidine, remifentanil and tramadol but not sufentanil provoked dose dependent displacement of specifically bound [(125)I]-PIC from all alpha(2)-adrenoceptor subtypes in cortex, cerebellum, medulla oblongata, thalamus, hippocampus and pons. Required concentrations of meperidine and remifentanil for [(125)I]-PIC displacement from alpha(2B)- and alpha(2C)-adrenoceptors were lower than from alpha(2A)-adrenoceptors, indicating higher binding affinity for alpha(2B)- and alpha(2C)-adrenoceptors. In contrast, [(125)I]-PIC displacement by tramadol indicated higher binding affinity to alpha(2A)-adrenoceptors than to alpha(2B)- and alpha(2C)-adrenoceptors. Our results indicate that meperidine, remifentanil and tramadol interact with alpha(2)-adrenoceptors in mouse brain showing different affinity for alpha(2A)-, alpha(2B)- and alpha(2C

  6. 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors control the firing of serotoninergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus of the mouse: studies in 5-HT1B knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Evrard, A; Laporte, A M; Chastanet, M; Hen, R; Hamon, M; Adrien, J

    1999-11-01

    The characteristics of the spontaneous firing of serotoninergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus and its control by serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) receptors were investigated in wild-type and 5-HT1B knock-out (5-HT1B-/-) mice of the 129/Sv strain, anaesthetized with chloral hydrate. In both groups of mice, 5-HT neurons exhibited a regular activity with an identical firing rate of 0.5-4.5 spikes/s. Intravenous administration of the 5-HT reuptake inhibitor citalopram or the 5-HT1A agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) induced a dose-dependent inhibition of 5-HT neuronal firing which could be reversed by the selective 5-HT1A antagonist N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-(2-pyridinyl)cyclohe xane carboxamide (WAY 100635). Both strains were equally sensitive to 8-OH-DPAT (ED50 approximately 6.3 microgram/kg i.v.), but the mutants were less sensitive than wild-type animals to citalopram (ED50 = 0.49 +/- 0.02 and 0.28 +/- 0.01 mg/kg i.v., respectively, P < 0.05). This difference could be reduced by pre-treatment of wild-type mice with the 5-HT1B/1D antagonist 2'-methyl-4'-(5-methyl-[1,2,4]oxadiazol-3-yl)-biphenyl-4-carbox yli c acid [4-methoxy-3-(4-methyl-piperazine-1-yl)-phenyl]amide (GR 127935), and might be accounted for by the lack of 5-HT1B receptors and a higher density of 5-HT reuptake sites (specifically labelled by [3H]citalopram) in 5-HT1B-/- mice. In wild-type but not 5-HT1B-/- mice, the 5-HT1B agonists 3-(1,2,5, 6-tetrahydro-4-pyridyl)-5-propoxypyrrolo[3,2-b]pyridine (CP 94253, 3 mg/kg i.v.) and 5-methoxy-3-(1,2,3, 6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)-1H-indole (RU 24969, 0.6 mg/kg i.v.) increased the firing rate of 5-HT neurons (+22.4 +/- 2.8% and +13.7 +/- 6.0%, respectively, P < 0.05), and this effect could be prevented by the 5-HT1B antagonist GR 127935 (1 mg/kg i.v.). Altogether, these data indicate that in the mouse, the firing of 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus is under both an inhibitory control through 5-HT1A

  7. The Gonococcus fights back: is this time a knock out?

    PubMed

    Lewis, David A

    2010-11-01

    Since the introduction of antibiotics in the 1930s, Neisseria gonorrhoeae has exhibited a remarkable ability to acquire novel genetic resistance determinants. Initially, sulphonamides were replaced by penicillin, while tetracyclines were prescribed for penicillin-allergic patients. With the advent of penicillinase-producing gonococci, spectinomycin was only briefly useful as alternative treatment and plasmid-mediated tetracycline resistance spread rapidly from the mid-1980s onwards. The fluoroquinolones followed but chromosomally mediated resistance appeared after only a decade of use. Seventy years on, we now face a global public health challenge of immense significance--the emergence of resistance to cephalosporins. With lack of investment in the search for new anti-gonococcal antimicrobial agents or vaccine research, the global spread of multiresistant gonococci can be seen. The impact of untreatable gonorrhoea on HIV transmission could be enormous in high-prevalence countries. This threat comes at a time when many national STI control programmes are weak. To delay the emergence of extensively drug-resistant gonorrhoea, public health systems require strengthening and novel strategies need implementing to enhance the therapeutic lifespan of the few antimicrobial agents that we have left. PMID:20656721

  8. Knock-out models reveal new aquaporin functions.

    PubMed

    Verkman, Alan S

    2009-01-01

    Knockout mice have been informative in the discovery of unexpected biological functions of aquaporins. Knockout mice have confirmed the predicted roles of aquaporins in transepithelial fluid transport, as in the urinary concentrating mechanism and glandular fluid secretion. A less obvious, though predictable role of aquaporins is in tissue swelling under stress, as in the brain in stroke, tumor and infection. Phenotype analysis of aquaporin knockout mice has revealed several unexpected cellular roles of aquaporins whose mechanisms are being elucidated. Aquaporins facilitate cell migration, as seen in aquaporin-dependent tumor angiogenesis and tumor metastasis, by a mechanism that may involve facilitated water transport in lamellipodia of migrating cells. The ' aquaglyceroporins', aquaporins that transport both glycerol and water, regulate glycerol content in epidermis, fat and other tissues, and lead to a multiplicity of interesting consequences of gene disruption including dry skin, resistance to skin carcinogenesis, impaired cell proliferation and altered fat metabolism. An even more surprising role of a mammalian aquaporin is in neural signal transduction in the central nervous system. The many roles of aquaporins might be exploited for clinical benefit by modulation of aquaporin expression/function - as diuretics, and in the treatment of brain swelling, glaucoma, epilepsy, obesity and cancer. PMID:19096787

  9. Railroads knock out pipeline in coal contract bidding battle

    SciTech Connect

    Minner, D.

    1983-09-01

    Union Pacific and Chicago Northwestern rail companies successfully outbid Energy Transportation Systems Inc. (ETSI) pipeline company for Arkansas Power and Light Company's coal-carrying contract. This raises questions about the need for pipelines, since ETSI had been the carrier of choice. The railroads deny taking a loss on the contract to bring low-sulfur coal from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming, while the utility estimates $16.5 billion savings to its customers over the 20-year life of the contract. Coal-slurry lobbyists will continue their fight for eminent-domain legislation despite the lost bid. (DCK)

  10. Appearance and disappearance of the second Born effects in the (e,3e) reaction on He

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, A.; Schroeter, C. D.; Hoehr, C.; Sakhelashvili, G.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.; Kheifets, A.; Lower, J.

    2003-07-01

    We demonstrate, both experimentally and theoretically, clear manifestation of the second Born effects in the angular distributions of two ejected electrons produced by a 500 eV electron impact on the He atom in the so-called (e,3e) reaction. The second Born contribution, due to subsequent interaction of the projectile with the target, is most prominent for glancing collisions with small momentum transfer. However, these effects are absent for hard knock-out collisions with large momentum transfer.

  11. Targeted Mybpc3 Knock-Out Mice with Cardiac Hypertrophy Exhibit Structural Mitral Valve Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Judge, Daniel P.; Neamatalla, Hany; Norris, Russell A.; Levine, Robert A.; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Vignier, Nicolas; Kang, Kevin H.; Nguyen, Quangtung; Bruneval, Patrick; Perier, Marie-Cécile; Messas, Emmanuel; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; de Vlaming, Annemarieke; Markwald, Roger; Carrier, Lucie; Hagège, Albert A.

    2015-01-01

    MYBPC3 mutations cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which is frequently associated with mitral valve (MV) pathology. We reasoned that increased MV size is caused by localized growth factors with paracrine effects. We used high-resolution echocardiography to compare Mybpc3-null, heterozygous, and wild-type mice (n = 84, aged 3–6 months) and micro-CT for MV volume (n = 6, age 6 months). Mybpc3-null mice showed left ventricular hypertrophy, dilation, and systolic dysfunction compared to heterozygous and wild-type mice, but no systolic anterior motion of the MV or left ventricular outflow obstruction. Compared to wild-type mice, echocardiographic anterior leaflet length (adjusted for left ventricular size) was greatest in Mybpc3-null mice (1.92 ± 0.08 vs. 1.72 ± 0.08 mm, p < 0.001), as was combined leaflet thickness (0.23 ± 0.04 vs. 0.15 ± 0.02 mm, p < 0.001). Micro-CT analyses of Mybpc3-null mice demonstrated increased MV volume (0.47 ± 0.06 vs. 0.15 ± 0.06 mm3, p = 0.018) and thickness (0.35 ± 0.04 vs. 0.12 ± 0.04 mm, p = 0.002), coincident with increased markers of TGFβ activity compared to heterozygous and wild-type littermates. Similarly, excised MV from a patient with MYBPC3 mutation showed increased TGFβ activity. We conclude that MYBPC3 deficiency causes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with increased MV leaflet length and thickness despite the absence of left ventricular outflow-tract obstruction, in parallel with increased TGFβ activity. MV changes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may be due to paracrine effects, which represent targets for therapeutic studies. PMID:26819945

  12. Autistic-Like Traits and Cerebellar Dysfunction in Purkinje Cell PTEN Knock-Out Mice.

    PubMed

    Cupolillo, Dario; Hoxha, Eriola; Faralli, Alessio; De Luca, Annarita; Rossi, Ferdinando; Tempia, Filippo; Carulli, Daniela

    2016-05-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by impaired social interaction, isolated areas of interest, and insistence on sameness. Mutations in Phosphatase and tensin homolog missing on chromosome 10 (PTEN) have been reported in individuals with ASDs. Recent evidence highlights a crucial role of the cerebellum in the etiopathogenesis of ASDs. In the present study we analyzed the specific contribution of cerebellar Purkinje cell (PC) PTEN loss to these disorders. Using the Cre-loxP recombination system, we generated conditional knockout mice in which PTEN inactivation was induced specifically in PCs. We investigated PC morphology and physiology as well as sociability, repetitive behavior, motor learning, and cognitive inflexibility of adult PC PTEN-mutant mice. Loss of PTEN in PCs results in autistic-like traits, including impaired sociability, repetitive behavior and deficits in motor learning. Mutant PCs appear hypertrophic and show structural abnormalities in dendrites and axons, decreased excitability, disrupted parallel fiber and climbing fiber synapses and late-onset cell death. Our results unveil new roles of PTEN in PC function and provide the first evidence of a link between the loss of PTEN in PCs and the genesis of ASD-like traits. PMID:26538449

  13. Insect ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) complements SPE1 knock-out of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soon-Yong; Park, Hee Yun; Paek, Aron; Kim, Gil Seob; Jeong, Seong Eun

    2009-12-31

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of polyamines, which are essential for cell growth, differentiation, and proliferation. This report presents the characterization of an ODC-encoding cDNA (SlitODC) isolated from a moth species, the tobacco cutworm, Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera); its expression in a polyamine-deficient strain of yeast, S. cerevisiae; and the recovery in polyamine levels and proliferation rate with the introduction of the insect enzyme. SlitODC encodes 448 amino acid residues, 4 amino acids longer than B. Mori ODC that has 71% identity, and has a longer C-terminus, consistent with B. mori ODC, than the reported dipteran enzymes. The null mutant yeast strain in the ODC gene, SPE1, showed remarkably depleted polyamine levels; in putrescine, spermidine, and spermine, the levels were > 7, > 1, and > 4%, respectively, of the levels in the wild-type strain. This consequently caused a significant arrest in cell proliferation of > 4% of the wild-type strain in polyaminefree media. The transformed strain, with the substituted SlitODC for the deleted endogenous ODC, grew and proliferated rapidly at even a higher rate than the wild-type strain. Furthermore, its polyamine content was significantly higher than even that in the wild-type strain as well as the spe1-null mutant, particularly with a very continuously enhanced putrescine level, reflecting no inhibition mechanism operating in the putrescine synthesis step by any corresponding insect ODC antizymes to SlitODC in this yeast system. PMID:19937472

  14. Generation and Validation of miR-142 Knock Out Mice.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Amit; Carraro, Gianni; El Agha, Elie; Mukhametshina, Regina; Chao, Cho-Ming; Rizvanov, Albert; Barreto, Guillermo; Bellusci, Saverio

    2015-01-01

    microRNA-142 (miR-142) is an important regulator of many biological processes and associated signaling pathways during embryonic development, homeostasis and disease. The miR-142 hairpin gives rise to the "guide strand" miR-142-3p and the sister "passenger" strand miR-142-5p. miR-142-3p has been shown to play critical, non-redundant functions in the development of the hematopoietic lineage. We have recently reported that miR-142-3p is critical for the control of Wnt signaling in the mesenchyme of the developing lung. miR-142-5p has been proposed to control adaptive growth in cardiomyocytes postnatally and its increase is associated with extensive apoptosis and cardiac dysfunction in a murine heart failure model. Using homologous recombination, we now report the generation and validation of miR-142-null mice. miR-142-null mice show a significant decrease in th expression levels of both the 3p and 5p isoforms. The expression of Bzrap1, a gene immediately flanking miR-142 is not altered while the expression of a long non-coding RNA embedded within the miR-142 gene is decreased. miR-142-null newborn pups appear normal and are normally represented indicating absence of embryonic lethality. At embryonic day 18.5, miR-142-null lungs display increased Wnt signaling associated with the up-regulation of Apc and p300, two previously reported targets of miR-142-3p and -5p, respectively. Adult miR-142-null animals display impaired hematopoietic lineage formation identical to previously reported miR-142 gene trap knockdown mice. We report, for the first time, the homologous recombination-based miR-142-null mice that will be useful for the scientific community working on the diverse biological functions of miR-142. PMID:26327117

  15. Knocking out P2X receptors reduces transmitter secretion in taste buds

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yijen A.; Stone, Leslie M.; Pereira, Elizabeth; Yang, Ruibiao; Kinnamon, John C.; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady; Chaudhari, Nirupa; Finger, Thomas E.; Kinnamon, Sue C.; Roper, Stephen D.

    2011-01-01

    In response to gustatory stimulation, taste bud cells release a transmitter, ATP, that activates P2X2 and P2X3 receptors on gustatory afferent fibers. Taste behavior and gustatory neural responses are largely abolished in mice lacking P2X2 and P2X3 receptors (P2X2 and P2X3 double knockout, or “DKO” mice). The assumption has been that eliminating P2X2 and P2X3 receptors only removes postsynaptic targets but that transmitter secretion in mice is normal. Using functional imaging, ATP biosensor cells, and a cell-free assay for ATP, we tested this assumption. Surprisingly, although gustatory stimulation mobilizes Ca2+ in taste Receptor (Type II) cells from DKO mice, as from wild type (WT) mice, taste cells from DKO mice fail to release ATP when stimulated with tastants. ATP release could be elicited by depolarizing DKO Receptor cells with KCl, suggesting that ATP-release machinery remains functional in DKO taste buds. To explore the difference in ATP release across genotypes, we employed reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR, immunostaining, and histochemistry for key proteins underlying ATP secretion and degradation: Pannexin1, TRPM5, and NTPDase2 (ecto-ATPase) are indistinguishable between WT and DKO mice. The ultrastructure of contacts between taste cells and nerve fibers is also normal in the DKO mice. Finally, quantitative RT-PCR show that P2X4 and P2X7, potential modulators of ATP secretion, are similarly expressed in taste buds in WT and DKO taste buds. Importantly, we find that P2X2 is expressed in WT taste buds and appears to function as an autocrine, positive feedback signal to amplify taste-evoked ATP secretion. PMID:21940456

  16. Age-Dependent Deficits in Fear Learning in Heterozygous BDNF Knock-Out Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endres, Thomas; Lessmann, Volkmar

    2012-01-01

    Beyond its trophic function, the neurotrophin BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) is well known to crucially mediate synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Whereas recent studies suggested that acute BDNF/TrkB signaling regulates amygdala-dependent fear learning, no impairments of cued fear learning were reported in heterozygous BDNF…

  17. Knocked-out and still walking: prion protein-deficient cattle are resistant to prion disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases are caused by the propagation of a misfolded form (PrP**d) of the normal cellular prion protein, PrP**c. Disruption of PrP**c expression in the mouse results in resistance to PrP-propagation and disease. However, the impa...

  18. Subregion-Specific p300 Conditional Knock-Out Mice Exhibit Long-Term Memory Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira, Ana M. M.; Estevez, Marcel A.; Hawk, Joshua D.; Grimes, Shannon; Brindle, Paul K.; Abel, Ted

    2011-01-01

    Histone acetylation plays a critical role during long-term memory formation. Several studies have demonstrated that the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) CBP is required during long-term memory formation, but the involvement of other HAT proteins has not been extensively investigated. The HATs CBP and p300 have at least 400 described interacting…

  19. Development of schemas revealed by prior experience and NMDA receptor knock-out

    PubMed Central

    Dragoi, George; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    Prior experience accelerates acquisition of novel, related information through processes like assimilation into mental schemas, but the underlying neuronal mechanisms are poorly understood. We investigated the roles that prior experience and hippocampal CA3 N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent synaptic plasticity play in CA1 place cell sequence encoding and learning during novel spatial experiences. We found that specific representations of de novo experiences on linear environments were formed on a framework of pre configured network activity expressed in the preceding sleep and were rapidly, flexibly adjusted via NMDAR-dependent activity. This prior experience accelerated encoding of subsequent experiences on contiguous or isolated novel tracks, significantly decreasing their NMDAR-dependence. Similarly, de novo learning of an alternation task was facilitated by CA3 NMDARs; this experience accelerated subsequent learning of related tasks, independent of CA3 NMDARs, consistent with a schema-based learning. These results reveal the existence of distinct neuronal encoding schemes which could explain why hippocampal dysfunction results in anterograde amnesia while sparing recollection of old, schema-based memories. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01326.001 PMID:24327561

  20. Investigation of olfactory function in a Panx1 knock out mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kurtenbach, Stefan; Whyte-Fagundes, Paige; Gelis, Lian; Kurtenbach, Sarah; Brazil, Emerson; Zoidl, Christiane; Hatt, Hanns; Shestopalov, Valery I; Zoidl, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Pannexin 1 (Panx1), the most extensively investigated member of a channel-forming protein family, is able to form pores conducting molecules up to 1.5 kDa, like ATP, upon activation. In the olfactory epithelium (OE), ATP modulates olfactory responsiveness and plays a role in proliferation and differentiation of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). This process continuously takes place in the OE, as neurons are replaced throughout the whole lifespan. The recent discovery of Panx1 expression in the OE raises the question whether Panx1 mediates ATP release responsible for modulating chemosensory function. In this study, we analyzed pannexin expression in the OE and a possible role of Panx1 in olfactory function using a Panx1(-/-) mouse line with a global ablation of Panx1. This mouse model has been previously used to investigate Panx1 functions in the retina and adult hippocampus. Here, qPCR, in-situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) demonstrated that Panx1 is expressed in axon bundles deriving from sensory neurons of the OE. The localization, distribution, and expression of major olfactory signal transduction proteins were not significantly altered in Panx1(-/-) mice. Further, functional analysis of Panx1(-/-) animals does not reveal any major impairment in odor perception, indicated by electroolfactogram (EOG) measurements and behavioral testing. However, ATP release evoked by potassium gluconate application was reduced in Panx1(-/-) mice. This result is consistent with previous reports on ATP release in isolated erythrocytes and spinal or lumbar cord preparations from Panx1(-/-) mice, suggesting that Panx1 is one of several alternative pathways to release ATP in the olfactory system. PMID:25309319

  1. Investigation of olfactory function in a Panx1 knock out mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kurtenbach, Stefan; Whyte-Fagundes, Paige; Gelis, Lian; Kurtenbach, Sarah; Brazil, Émerson; Zoidl, Christiane; Hatt, Hanns; Shestopalov, Valery I.; Zoidl, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Pannexin 1 (Panx1), the most extensively investigated member of a channel-forming protein family, is able to form pores conducting molecules up to 1.5 kDa, like ATP, upon activation. In the olfactory epithelium (OE), ATP modulates olfactory responsiveness and plays a role in proliferation and differentiation of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). This process continuously takes place in the OE, as neurons are replaced throughout the whole lifespan. The recent discovery of Panx1 expression in the OE raises the question whether Panx1 mediates ATP release responsible for modulating chemosensory function. In this study, we analyzed pannexin expression in the OE and a possible role of Panx1 in olfactory function using a Panx1−/− mouse line with a global ablation of Panx1. This mouse model has been previously used to investigate Panx1 functions in the retina and adult hippocampus. Here, qPCR, in-situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) demonstrated that Panx1 is expressed in axon bundles deriving from sensory neurons of the OE. The localization, distribution, and expression of major olfactory signal transduction proteins were not significantly altered in Panx1−/− mice. Further, functional analysis of Panx1−/− animals does not reveal any major impairment in odor perception, indicated by electroolfactogram (EOG) measurements and behavioral testing. However, ATP release evoked by potassium gluconate application was reduced in Panx1−/− mice. This result is consistent with previous reports on ATP release in isolated erythrocytes and spinal or lumbar cord preparations from Panx1−/− mice, suggesting that Panx1 is one of several alternative pathways to release ATP in the olfactory system. PMID:25309319

  2. [Progress in preparation of small monoclonal antibodies of knock out technique].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Mao, Xin-min; Li, Lin-lin; Li, Xin-xia; Wang, Ye; Lan, Yi

    2015-10-01

    With the application of monoclonal antibody technology more and more widely, its production technology is becoming more and more perfect. Small molecule monoclonal antibody technology is becoming a hot research topic for people. The application of traditional Chinese medicine small molecule monoclonal antibody technology has been more and more widely, the technology for effective Chinese medicine component knockout provide strong technical support. The preparation of monoclonal antibodies and small molecule knockout technology are reviewed in this paper. The preparation of several steps, such as: in the process of preparation of antigen, hapten carrier coupling, coupling ratio determination and identification of artificial antigen and establishment of animal immunization and hybridoma cell lines of monoclonal antibody, the large-scale preparation; small molecule monoclonal antibody on Immune in affinity chromatography column method is discussed in detail. The author believes that this technology will make the traditional Chinese medicine research on a higher level, and improve the level of internationalization of Chinese medicine research. PMID:26975094

  3. Knock-out of Arabidopsis AtNHX4 gene enhances tolerance to salt stress

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hong-Tao; Liu, Hua; Gao, Xiao-Shu; Zhang, Hongxia

    2009-05-08

    AtNHX4 belongs to the monovalent cation:proton antiporter-1 (CPA1) family in Arabidopsis. Several members of this family have been shown to be critical for plant responses to abiotic stress, but little is known on the biological functions of AtNHX4. Here, we provide the evidence that AtNHX4 plays important roles in Arabidopsis responses to salt stress. Expression of AtNHX4 was responsive to salt stress and abscisic acid. Experiments with CFP-AtNHX4 fusion protein indicated that AtNHX4 is vacuolar localized. The nhx4 mutant showed enhanced tolerance to salt stress, and lower Na{sup +} content under high NaCl stress compared with wild-type plants. Furthermore, heterologous expression of AtNHX4 in Escherichia coli BL21 rendered the transformants hypersensitive to NaCl. Deletion of the hydrophilic C-terminus of AtNHX4 dramatically increased the hypersensitivity of transformants, indicating that AtNHX4 may function in Na{sup +} homeostasis in plant cell, and its C-terminus plays a role in regulating the AtNHX4 activity.

  4. [Effect of P2X7 receptor knock-out on bone cancer pain in mice].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Liu, Hui-Zhu; Zhang, Yu-Qiu

    2016-06-25

    Cancer pain is one of the most common symptoms in patients with late stage cancer. Lung, breast and prostate carcinoma are the most common causes of pain from osseous metastasis. P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is one of the subtypes of ATP-gated purinergic ion channel family, predominately distributed in microglia in the spinal cord. Activation of P2X7Rs in the spinal dorsal horn has been associated with release of proinflammatory cytokines from glial cells, causing increased neuronal excitability and exaggerated nociception. Mounting evidence implies a critical role of P2X7R in inflammatory and neuropathic pain. However, whether P2X7R is involved in cancer pain remains controversial. Here we established a bone cancer pain model by injecting the Lewis lung carcinoma cells into the femur bone marrow cavity of C57BL/6J wild-type mice (C57 WT mice) and P2X7R knockout mice (P2rx7(-/-) mice) to explore the role of P2X7R in bone cancer pain. Following intrafemur carcinoma inoculation, robust mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in C57 WT mice were developed on day 7 and 14, respectively, and persisted for at least 28 days in the ipsilateral hindpaw of the affected limb. CatWalk gait analysis showed significant decreases in the print area and stand phase, and a significant increase in swing phase in the ipsilateral hindpaw on day 21 and 28 after carcinoma cells inoculation. Histopathological sections (hematoxylin and eosin stain) showed that the bone marrow of the affected femur was largely replaced by invading tumor cells, and the femur displayed medullary bone loss and bone destruction on day 28 after inoculation. Unexpectedly, no significant changes in bone cancer-induced hypersensitivity of pain behaviors were found in P2rx7(-/-) mice, and the changes of pain-related values in CatWalk gait analysis even occurred earlier in P2rx7(-/-) mice, as compared with C57 WT mice. Together with our previous study in rats that blockade of P2X7R significantly alleviated bone cancer pain, it is implied that P2X7R may play different roles in bone cancer pain in different species (e.g. rat vs mouse). These results implicated a huge difference between the pathophysiology discovered in the experimental animal models and that of human disease. PMID:27350194

  5. Accelerated Human Mutant Tau Aggregation by Knocking Out Murine Tau in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Kunie; Leroy, Karelle; Héraud, Céline; Yilmaz, Zehra; Authelet, Michèle; Suain, Valèrie; De Decker, Robert; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Many models of human tauopathies have been generated in mice by expression of a human mutant tau with maintained expression of mouse endogenous tau. Because murine tau might interfere with the toxic effects of human mutant tau, we generated a model in which a pathogenic human tau protein is expressed in the absence of wild-type tau protein, with the aim of facilitating the study of the pathogenic role of the mutant tau and to reproduce more faithfully a human tauopathy. The Tg30 line is a tau transgenic mouse model overexpressing human 1N4R double-mutant tau (P301S and G272V) that develops Alzheimer's disease-like neurofibrillary tangles in an age-dependent manner. By crossing Tg30 mice with mice invalidated for their endogenous tau gene, we obtained Tg30xtau−/− mice that express only exogenous human double-mutant 1N4R tau. Although Tg30xtau−/− mice express less tau protein compared with Tg30, they exhibit signs of decreased survival, increased proportion of sarkosyl-insoluble tau in the brain and in the spinal cord, increased number of Gallyas-positive neurofibrillary tangles in the hippocampus, increased number of inclusions in the spinal cord, and a more severe motor phenotype. Deletion of murine tau accelerated tau aggregation during aging of this mutant tau transgenic model, suggesting that murine tau could interfere with the development of tau pathology in transgenic models of human tauopathies. PMID:21281813

  6. WNT5A Knock-Out Mouse As A New Model of Anorectal Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Cindy C.; Sala, Frederic G.; Ford, Henri R.; Wang, Kasper S.; Minoo, Parviz; Grikscheit, Tracy C.; Bellusci, Saverio

    2009-01-01

    Background Anorectal malformations (ARM) represent a variety of congenital disorders that involve abnormal termination of the anorectum. Mutations in Shh signaling and Fgf10 produce a variety of ARM phenotypes. Wnt signaling has been shown to be crucial during gastrointestinal development. We therefore hypothesized that Wnt5a may play a role in anorectal development. Methods Wild type (WT), Wnt5a+/-, and Wnt5a-/- embryos were harvested from timed pregnant mice from E15.5 to E18.5 and analyzed for anorectal phenotype. Tissues were processed for whole-mount in situ hybridization and histology. Results Wnt5a is expressed in the embryonic WT colon and rectum. Wnt5a-/- mutants exhibit multiple deformities including anorectal malformation. A fistula between the urinary and intestinal tracts can be identified as early as E15.5. By E18.5, the majority of the Wnt5a-/- mutants display a blind-ending pouch of the distal gut. Conclusions The expression pattern of Wnt5a and the ARM phenotype seen in Wnt5a-/- mutants demonstrate the critical role of Wnt5a during anorectal development. This study establishes a new model of ARM involving the Wnt5a pathway. PMID:19577771

  7. Altered enteroendocrine cell expression in T cell receptor alpha chain knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Rubin, D C; Zhang, H; Qian, P; Lorenz, R G; Hutton, K; Peters, M G

    2000-10-15

    Mice lacking T cell receptor alpha chain (TCRalpha(-/-)) develop inflammation of the colon. We have examined the effect of this inflammation on the colonic epithelium by studying markers of epithelial cuff, enteroendocrine, and immune cell differentiation. Using immunohistochemical techniques, colons were compared in normal C57/BL6 and murine TCR alpha(-/-) mice aged 2 and 3 weeks and 3-11 months. TCR alpha(-/-) mice aged 3-11 months had histologic evidence of inflammation with increased expression of CD45, CD4+, CD8+, and B220+ cells and a decrease in expression of IgA+ cells. There was a decrease in the number of cholecystokinin, serotonin, and neurotensin enteroendocrine expressing cells in the colon of TCR alpha(-/-) mice. These changes were not present in 2-3-week-old suckling/weaning mice. In contrast, peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY), glucagon-like peptide-1, and gastrin expression did not change and small intestinal enteroendocrine cells remained unaltered. The change in colonic enteroendocrine cell expression appears to be a specific response, since only a subset of these cells was altered, and the epithelium was intact by histologic analysis. The absence of functional T cells in TCR alpha(-/-) colon has a marked effect on differentiation of a specific subpopulation of enteroendocrine cells, prior to loss of integrity of the epithelium. PMID:11054861

  8. Development of a transformation system for gene knock-out in the flavinogenic yeast Pichia guilliermondii.

    PubMed

    Boretsky, Yuriy R; Pynyaha, Yuriy V; Boretsky, Volodymyr Y; Kutsyaba, Vasyl I; Protchenko, Olga V; Philpott, Caroline C; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2007-07-01

    Pichia guilliermondii is a representative of a yeast species, all of which over-synthesize riboflavin in response to iron deprivation. Molecular genetic studies in this yeast species have been hampered by a lack of strain-specific tools for gene manipulation. Stable P. guilliermondii ura3 mutants were selected on the basis of 5'-fluoroorotic acid resistance. Plasmid carrying Saccharomyces cerevisiae URA3 gene transformed the mutant strains to prototrophy with a low efficiency. Substitution of a single leucine codon CUG by another leucine codon CUC in the URA3 gene increased the efficiency of transformation 100 fold. Deletion cassettes for the RIB1 and RIB7 genes, coding for GTP cyclohydrolase and riboflavin synthase, respectively, were constructed using the modified URA3 gene and subsequently introduced into a P. guilliermondii ura3 strain. Site-specific integrants were identified by selection for the Rib(-) Ura(+) phenotype and confirmed by PCR analysis. Transformation of the P. guilliermondii ura3 strain was performed using electroporation, spheroplasting or lithium acetate treatment. Only the lithium acetate transformation procedure provided selection of uracil prototrophic, riboflavin deficient recombinant strains. Depending on the type of cassette, efficiency of site-specific integration was 0.1% and 3-12% in the case of the RIB1 and RIB7 genes, respectively. We suggest that the presence of the ARS element adjacent to the 3' end of the RIB1 gene significantly reduced the frequency of homologous recombination. Efficient gene deletion in P. guilliermondii can be achieved using the modified URA3 gene of S. cerevisiae flanked by 0.8-0.9 kb sequences homologous to the target gene. PMID:17467833

  9. Direct Reaction Experimental Studies with Beams of Radioactive Tin Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K. L.; Ahn, S.H.; Allmond, James M; Ayres, A.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Beene, James R; Berryman, J. S.; Bey, A.; Bingham, C. R.; Cartegni, L.; Chae, K. Y.; Gade, A.; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Garcia-Ruiz, R.F.; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz; Howard, Meredith E; Kozub, R. L.; Liang, J Felix; Manning, Brett M; Matos, M.; McDaniel, S.; Miller, D.; Nesaraja, Caroline D; O'Malley, Patrick; Padgett, S; Padilla-Rodal, Elizabeth; Pain, Steven D; Pittman, S. T.; Radford, David C; Ratkiewicz, Andrew J; Schmitt, Kyle; Smith, Michael Scott; Stracener, Daniel W; Stroberg, S.; Tostevin, Jeffrey A; Varner Jr, Robert L; Weisshaar, D.; Wimmer, K.

    2015-01-01

    The tin chain of isotopes provides a unique region in which to investigate the evolution of single-particle structure, spreading from N = 50 at Sn-100, through 10 stable isotopes and the N = 82 shell closure at Sn-132 out into the r-process path. Direct reactions performed on radioactive ion beams are sensitive spectroscopic tools for studying exotic nuclei. Here we present one experiment knocking out neutrons from tin isotopes that are already neutron deficient and two reactions that add a neutron to neutron-rich Sn-130. Both techniques rely on selective particle identification and the measurement of gamma rays in coincidence with charged ions. We present the goals of the two experiments and the particle identification for the channels of interest. The final results will be presented in future publications.

  10. Direct reaction experimental studies with beams of radioactive tin ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K. L. Ayres, A.; Bey, A.; Burcher, S.; Cartegni, L.; Cerizza, G.; Ahn, S.; Allmond, J. M.; Beene, J. R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Liang, J. F.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Pain, S. D.; Radford, D. C.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Stracener, D. W.; Varner, R. L.; Bardayan, D. W.; Baugher, T.; and others

    2015-10-15

    The tin chain of isotopes provides a unique region in which to investigate the evolution of single-particle structure, spreading from N = 50 at {sup 100}Sn, through 10 stable isotopes and the N = 82 shell closure at {sup 132}Sn out into the r-process path. Direct reactions performed on radioactive ion beams are sensitive spectroscopic tools for studying exotic nuclei. Here we present one experiment knocking out neutrons from tin isotopes that are already neutron deficient and two reactions that add a neutron to neutron-rich {sup 130}Sn. Both techniques rely on selective particle identification and the measurement of γ rays in coincidence with charged ions. We present the goals of the two experiments and the particle identification for the channels of interest. The final results will be presented in future publications.

  11. Knockout reactions on p-shell nuclei for tests of structure and reaction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchera, A. N.; Bazin, D.; Babo, M.; Baumann, T.; Bowry, M.; Bradt, J.; Brown, J.; Deyoung, P. A.; Elman, B.; Finck, J. E.; Gade, A.; Grinyer, G. F.; Jones, M. D.; Lunderberg, E.; Redpath, T.; Rogers, W. F.; Stiefel, K.; Thoennessen, M.; Weisshaar, D.; Whitmore, K.

    2015-10-01

    A series of knockout reactions on p-shell nuclei were studied to extract exclusive cross sections and to investigate the neutron knockout mechanism. The measured cross sections provide stringent tests of shell model and ab initio calculations while measurements of neutron+residual coincidences test the accuracy and validity of reaction models used to predict cross sections. Six different beams ranging from A = 7 to 12 were produced at the NSCL totaling measurements of nine different reaction settings. The reaction settings were determined by the magnetic field of the Sweeper magnet which bends the residues into charged particle detectors. The reaction target was surrounded by the high efficiency CsI array, CAESAR, to tag gamma rays for cross section measurements of low-lying excited states. Additionally, knocked out neutrons were detected with MoNA-LISA in coincidence with the charged residuals. Preliminary results will be discussed. This work is partially supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY11-02511 and the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award No. DE-NA0000979.

  12. Direct Reactions with MoNA-LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchera, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear reactions can be used to probe the structure of nuclei. Direct reactions, which take place on short time scales, are well-suited for experiments with beams of short-lived nuclei. One such reaction is nucleon knockout where a proton or neutron is removed from the incoming beam from the interaction with a target. Single nucleon knockout reactions have been used to study the single-particle nature of nuclear wave functions. A recent experiment at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory was performed to measure cross sections from single nucleon knockout reactions for several p-shell nuclei. Detection of the residual nucleus in coincidence with any gamma rays emitted from the target allowed cross sections to ground and excited states to be measured. Together with input from reaction theory, ab initio structure theories can be tested. Simultaneously the accuracy of knockout reaction models can be validated by detecting the knocked out neutron with the Modular Neutron Array and Large multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (MoNA-LISA). Preliminary results from this experiment will be shown. Knockout reactions can also be used to populate nuclei which are neutron unbound, thus emit neutrons nearly instantaneously. The structure of these nuclei, therefore, cannot be probed with gamma ray spectroscopy. However, with large neutron detectors like MoNA-LISA the properties of these short-lived nuclei are able to be measured. Recent results using MoNA-LISA to study the structure of neutron-rich nuclei will be presented. The author would like to acknowledge support from the NNSA and NSF.

  13. NewsMars: Express journey to Mars ASE 2003: Knocked out by meteorites Events: Sun-Earth Day ASE 2003: Fun Physics - popular as ever Appointments: Sykes to bring science to the people UK Science Education: The future's bright, the future's science ASE 2003: A grand finale for Catherine Teaching Resources: UK goes to the planets Cambridge Physics Update: Basement physics Conferences: Earth Science Teachers' Association Conference 2003 New Website: JESEI sets sail GIREP: Teacher education seminar Malaysia: Rewards for curriculum change Cambridge Physics Update: My boomerang will come back! Teaching Resources: Widening particiption through ideas and evidence with the University of Surrey Wales: First Ffiseg Events: Nuna: Solar car on tour Physics on Stage: Physics on Stage 3 embraces life Symposium: In what sense a nuclear 'debate'? Gifted and Talented: Able pupils experiencing challenging science Australia: ISS flies high Down Under

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-03-01

    Mars: Express journey to Mars ASE 2003: Knocked out by meteorites Events: Sun-Earth Day ASE 2003: Fun Physics - popular as ever Appointments: Sykes to bring science to the people UK Science Education: The future's bright, the future's science ASE 2003: A grand finale for Catherine Teaching Resources: UK goes to the planets Cambridge Physics Update: Basement physics Conferences: Earth Science Teachers' Association Conference 2003 New Website: JESEI sets sail GIREP: Teacher education seminar Malaysia: Rewards for curriculum change Cambridge Physics Update: My boomerang will come back! Teaching Resources: Widening particiption through ideas and evidence with the University of Surrey Wales: First Ffiseg Events: Nuna: Solar car on tour Physics on Stage: Physics on Stage 3 embraces life Symposium: In what sense a nuclear 'debate'? Gifted and Talented: Able pupils experiencing challenging science Australia: ISS flies high Down Under

  14. Orexin/Hypocretin and Histamine: Distinct Roles in the Control of Wakefulness Demonstrated Using Knock-Out Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Anaclet, Christelle; Parmentier, Régis; Ouk, Koliane; Guidon, Gérard; Buda, Colette; Sastre, Jean-Pierre; Akaoka, Hidéo; Sergeeva, Olga A.; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Franco, Patricia; Haas, Helmut L.; Lin, Jian Sheng

    2009-01-01

    To determine the respective role played by orexin/hypocretin and histamine (HA) neurons in maintaining wakefulness (W), we characterized the behavioral and sleep-wake phenotypes of orexin(Ox) knockout(−/−) mice and compared them with those of histidine-decarboxylase(HDC, HA-synthesizing enzyme)−/−mice. While both mouse strains displayed sleep fragmentation and increased paradoxical sleep(PS), they presented a number of marked differences: 1) The PS-increase in HDC−/−mice was seen during lightness, whereas that in Ox−/−mice occurred during darkness; 2) Contrary to HDC−/−, Ox−/−mice had no W deficiency around lights-off, nor an abnormal EEG and responded to a new environment with increased W; 3) Only Ox−/−, but not HDC−/−mice, displayed narcolepsy and deficient W when faced with motor challenge. Thus, when placed on a wheel, WT, but not littermate Ox−/−mice, voluntarily spent their time in turning it and as a result, remained highly awake; this was accompanied by dense c-fos expression in many areas of their brains, including Ox-neurons in the dorsolateral hypothalamus. The W and motor deficiency of Ox−/−mice was due to the absence of Ox because intraventricular dosing of Ox-A restored their W amount and motor performance whereas SB-334867 (Ox1-receptor antagonist, i.p.) impaired W and locomotion of WT mice during the test. These data indicate that Ox, but not HA, promotes W through enhanced locomotion and suggest that HA and Ox neurons exert a distinct, but complementary and synergistic control of W: the neuropeptide being more involved in its behavioral aspects, whereas the amine is mainly responsible for its qualitative cognitive aspects and cortical-EEG activation. PMID:19923277

  15. Isoform and Splice-Variant Specific Functions of Dynamin-2 Revealed by Analysis of Conditional Knock-Out Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ya-Wen; Surka, Mark C.; Schroeter, Thomas; Lukiyanchuk, Vasyl

    2008-01-01

    Dynamin (Dyn) is a multifunctional GTPase implicated in several cellular events, including endocytosis, intracellular trafficking, cell signaling, and cytokinesis. The mammalian genome encodes three isoforms, Dyn1, Dyn2, and Dyn3, and several splice variants of each, leading to the suggestion that distinct isoforms and/or distinct splice variants might mediate distinct cellular functions. We generated a conditional Dyn2 KO cell line and performed knockout and reconstitution experiments to explore the isoform- and splice variant specific cellular functions of ubiquitously expressed Dyn2. We find that Dyn2 is required for clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), p75 export from the Golgi, and PDGF-stimulated macropinocytosis and cytokinesis, but not for other endocytic pathways. Surprisingly, CME and p75 exocytosis were efficiently rescued by reintroduction of Dyn2, but not Dyn1, suggesting that these two isoforms function differentially in vesicular trafficking in nonneuronal cells. Both isoforms rescued macropinocytosis and cytokinesis, suggesting that dynamin function in these processes might be mechanistically distinct from its role in CME. Although all four Dyn2 splice variants could equally restore CME, Dyn2ba and -bb were more effective at restoring p75 exocytosis. This splice variant specificity correlated with their differential targeting to the Golgi. These studies reveal isoform and splice-variant specific functions for Dyn2. PMID:18923138

  16. Isoform and splice-variant specific functions of dynamin-2 revealed by analysis of conditional knock-out cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Wen; Surka, Mark C; Schroeter, Thomas; Lukiyanchuk, Vasyl; Schmid, Sandra L

    2008-12-01

    Dynamin (Dyn) is a multifunctional GTPase implicated in several cellular events, including endocytosis, intracellular trafficking, cell signaling, and cytokinesis. The mammalian genome encodes three isoforms, Dyn1, Dyn2, and Dyn3, and several splice variants of each, leading to the suggestion that distinct isoforms and/or distinct splice variants might mediate distinct cellular functions. We generated a conditional Dyn2 KO cell line and performed knockout and reconstitution experiments to explore the isoform- and splice variant specific cellular functions of ubiquitously expressed Dyn2. We find that Dyn2 is required for clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), p75 export from the Golgi, and PDGF-stimulated macropinocytosis and cytokinesis, but not for other endocytic pathways. Surprisingly, CME and p75 exocytosis were efficiently rescued by reintroduction of Dyn2, but not Dyn1, suggesting that these two isoforms function differentially in vesicular trafficking in nonneuronal cells. Both isoforms rescued macropinocytosis and cytokinesis, suggesting that dynamin function in these processes might be mechanistically distinct from its role in CME. Although all four Dyn2 splice variants could equally restore CME, Dyn2ba and -bb were more effective at restoring p75 exocytosis. This splice variant specificity correlated with their differential targeting to the Golgi. These studies reveal isoform and splice-variant specific functions for Dyn2. PMID:18923138

  17. Genetic-Background Modulation of Core and Variable Autistic-Like Symptoms in Fmr1 Knock-Out Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pietropaolo, Susanna; Guilleminot, Aurélie; Martin, Benoît; D'Amato, Francesca R.; Crusio, Wim E.

    2011-01-01

    Background No animal models of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) with good construct validity are currently available; using genetic models of pathologies characterized by ASD-like deficits, but with known causes, may be therefore a promising strategy. The Fmr1-KO mouse is an example of this approach, modeling Fragile X syndrome, a well-known genetic disorder presenting ASD symptoms. The Fmr1-KO is available on different genetic backgrounds (FVB versus C57BL/6), which may explain some of the conflicting results that have been obtained with these mutants up till now. Methods Fmr1 KO and their wild-type littermates on both the FVB and C57BL/6 genetic backgrounds were examined on a battery of tests modeling the clinical symptoms of ASD, including the triad of core symptoms (alterations in social interaction and communication, presence of repetitive behaviors), as well as the secondary symptoms (disturbances in sensori-motor reactivity and in circadian patterns of activity, epileptic events). Results Fmr1-KO mice displayed autistic-like core symptoms of altered social interaction and occurrence of repetitive behaviors with additional hyperactivity. The genetic background modulated the effects of the Fmr1 deletion and it appears that the C57BL/6 background may be more suitable for further research on core autistic-like symptoms. Conclusions The Fmr1-mouse line does not recapitulate all of the main core and secondary ASD symptoms, but still can be useful to elucidate the neurobiological mechanisms underlying specific ASD-like endophenotypes. PMID:21364941

  18. Impaired spatial working memory and decreased frontal cortex BDNF protein level in dopamine transporter knock out mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, BingJin; Arime, Yosefu; Hall, F. Scott; Uhl, George R.; Sora, Ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), one of the key brain neurotrophins, has been implicated in neuronal plasticity and memory. Recent studies document the importance of BDNF for normal long-term memory functions. However, there are few studies of the roles of BDNF in short term memory. Dopamine is likely to play important roles in BDNF gene expression in specific brain regions, including frontal cortical regions that are implicated in short term working memory processes that include spontaneous alternation. We have thus tested spatial working memory in dopamine transporter knockout (DAT KO) and wild-type mice. Spontaneous alternation in the Y-maze, an index of short-term spatial working memory in mice, was significantly decreased in DAT KO mice compared to wildtype mice. BDNF protein was significantly decreased in frontal cortex, though not in striatum or hippocampus, of the DAT KO mice. The data support the hypothesis that impaired spatial working memory in DAT KO mice may be related to decreased frontal cortical BDNF in these animals, and document apparent roles for BDNF in a short term memory process. PMID:19932884

  19. Dietary cladode powder from wild type and domesticated Opuntia species reduces atherogenesis in apoE knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Garoby-Salom, Sandra; Guéraud, Françoise; Camaré, Caroline; de la Rosa, Ana-Paulina Barba; Rossignol, Michel; Santos Díaz, María del Socorro; Salvayre, Robert; Negre-Salvayre, Anne

    2016-03-01

    Dietary intake of Opuntia species may prevent the development of cardiovascular diseases. The present study was designed to characterize the biological antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of Opuntia species and to investigate whether Opuntia cladodes prevent the development of atherosclerosis in vivo, in apoE(-)KO mice. The effects of the two Opuntia species, the wild Opuntia streptacantha and the domesticated Opuntia ficus-indica, were tested on the generation of intra- and extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and kinetics of the LDL oxidation by murine CRL2181 endothelial cells and on the subsequent inflammatory signaling leading to the adhesion of monocytes on the activated endothelium and the formation of foam cells. Opuntia species blocked the extracellular ROS (superoxide anion) generation and LDL oxidation by CRL2181, as well as the intracellular ROS rise and signaling evoked by the oxidized LDL, including the nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NFκB, the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 adhesion molecules, and the adhesion of monocytes to CRL2181. In vivo, Opuntia significantly reduced the formation of atherosclerotic lesions and the accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal adducts in the vascular wall of apoE-KO mice, indicating that Opuntia cladodes prevent lipid oxidation in the vascular wall. In conclusion, wild and domesticated Opuntia species exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherogenic properties which emphasize their nutritional benefit for preventing cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26704378

  20. Impaired Angiogenesis during Fracture Healing in GPCR Kinase 2 Interacting Protein-1 (GIT1) Knock Out Mice

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Prashanthi; Pang, Jinjiang; Ho, Hsin-Chiu; Shi, Shanshan; Xie, Chao; Smolock, Elaine; Yan, Chen; Zuscik, Michael J.; Berk, Bradford C.

    2014-01-01

    G protein coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) interacting protein-1 (GIT1), is a scaffold protein that plays an important role in angiogenesis and osteoclast activity. We have previously demonstrated that GIT1 knockout (GIT1 KO) mice have impaired angiogenesis and dysregulated osteoclast podosome formation leading to a reduction in the bone resorbing ability of these cells. Since both angiogenesis and osteoclast-mediated bone remodeling are involved in the fracture healing process, we hypothesized that GIT1 participates in the normal progression of repair following bone injury. In the present study, comparison of fracture healing in wild type (WT) and GIT1 KO mice revealed altered healing in mice with loss of GIT1 function. Alcian blue staining of fracture callus indicated a persistence of cartilagenous matrix in day 21 callus samples from GIT1 KO mice which was temporally correlated with increased type 2 collagen immunostaining. GIT1 KO mice also showed a decrease in chondrocyte proliferation and apoptosis at days 7 and 14, as determined by PCNA and TUNEL staining. Vascular microcomputed tomography analysis of callus samples at days 7, 14 and 21 revealed decreased blood vessel volume, number, and connection density in GIT1 KO mice compared to WT controls. Correlating with this, VEGF-A, phospho-VEGFR2 and PECAM1 (CD31) were decreased in GIT1 KO mice, indicating reduced angiogenesis with loss of GIT1. Finally, calluses from GIT1 KO mice displayed a reduced number of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts at days 14 and 21. Collectively, these results indicate that GIT1 is an important signaling participant in fracture healing, with gene ablation leading to reduced callus vascularity and reduced osteoclast number in the healing callus. PMID:24586541

  1. Sun-Earth Connections: How the Sun Knocks Out My Cell Phone from 150 Million Kilometers Away

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladbury, Raymond L.

    2014-01-01

    Large solar particle events (SPE) threaten many elements of critical infrastructure. A 2013 study by Lloyds of London and Atmospheric and Environmental Research recently found that if a worst-case solar event like the 1859 Carrington Event struck our planet now, it could result on $0.6-$2.36 trillion in damages to the economy. In March 2014, researchers Y. D. Liu et al. revealed that just such an event had narrowly missed Earth in July 2012. The event was observed by the STEREO A spacecraft. In this presentation, we examine how the sun can pack such a punch from 150 million km away, the threats such solar particle events pose, their mechanisms and the efforts NASA and other space agencies are carrying out to understand and mitigate such risks.

  2. Epileptogenesis following Kainic Acid-Induced Status Epilepticus in Cyclin D2 Knock-Out Mice with Diminished Adult Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kondratiuk, Ilona; Plucinska, Gabriela; Miszczuk, Diana; Wozniak, Grazyna; Szydlowska, Kinga; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Filipkowski, Robert K; Lukasiuk, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether a substantial decrease in adult neurogenesis influences epileptogenesis evoked by the intra-amygdala injection of kainic acid (KA). Cyclin D2 knockout (cD2 KO) mice, which lack adult neurogenesis almost entirely, were used as a model. First, we examined whether status epilepticus (SE) evoked by an intra-amygdala injection of KA induces cell proliferation in cD2 KO mice. On the day after SE, we injected BrdU into mice for 5 days and evaluated the number of DCX- and DCX/BrdU-immunopositive cells 3 days later. In cD2 KO control animals, only a small number of DCX+ cells was observed. The number of DCX+ and DCX/BrdU+ cells/mm of subgranular layer in cD2 KO mice increased significantly following SE (p<0.05). However, the number of newly born cells was very low and was significantly lower than in KA-treated wild type (wt) mice. To evaluate the impact of diminished neurogenesis on epileptogenesis and early epilepsy, we performed video-EEG monitoring of wt and cD2 KO mice for 16 days following SE. The number of animals with seizures did not differ between wt (11 out of 15) and cD2 KO (9 out of 12) mice. The median latency to the first spontaneous seizure was 4 days (range 2-10 days) in wt mice and 8 days (range 2-16 days) in cD2 KO mice and did not differ significantly between groups. Similarly, no differences were observed in median seizure frequency (wt: 1.23, range 0.1-3.4; cD2 KO: 0.57, range 0.1-2.0 seizures/day) or median seizure duration (wt: 51 s, range 23-103; cD2 KO: 51 s, range 23-103). Our results indicate that SE-induced epileptogenesis is not disrupted in mice with markedly reduced adult neurogenesis. However, we cannot exclude the contribution of reduced neurogenesis to the chronic epileptic state. PMID:26020770

  3. The GAD65 knock out mouse - a model for GABAergic processes in fear- and stress-induced psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Müller, Iris; Çalışkan, Gürsel; Stork, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) synthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)65 is critically involved in the activity-dependent regulation of GABAergic inhibition in the central nervous system. It is also required for the maturation of the GABAergic system during adolescence, a phase that is critical for the development of several neuropsychiatric diseases. Mice bearing a null mutation of the GAD65 gene develop hyperexcitability of the amygdala and hippocampus, and a phenotype of increased anxiety and pathological fear memory reminiscent of posttraumatic stress disorder. Although genetic association of GAD65 in human has not yet been reported, these findings are in line with observations of reduced GABAergic function in these brain regions of anxiety disorder patients. The particular value of GAD65(-/-) mice thus lies in modeling the effects of reduced GABAergic function in the mature nervous system. The expression of GAD65 and a second GAD isozyme, GAD67, are differentially regulated in response to stress in limbic brain areas suggesting that by controlling GABAergic inhibition these enzymes determine the vulnerability for the development of pathological anxiety and other stress-induced phenotypes. In fact, we could recently show that GAD65 haplodeficiency, which results in delayed postnatal increase of GABA levels, provides resilience to juvenile-stress-induced anxiety to GAD65(+/-) mice thus foiling the increased fear and anxiety in homozygous GAD65(-/-) mice. PMID:25470336

  4. COMPARATIVE HEPATIC EFFECTS OF PERFLUOROOCTANOIC ACID AND WY 14,643 IN PPARÁ KNOCKED OUT AND WILD-TYPE MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a fluorinated organic chemical widely used in consumer and industrial products. Its persistence in the environment and presence in humans and wildlife have raised considerable concerns. PFOA induces liver tumors in rodents, which is thought to be ...

  5. Cyclophilin D Knock-Out Mice Show Enhanced Resistance to Osteoporosis and to Metabolic Changes Observed in Aging Bone

    PubMed Central

    White, Noelle S; Nadtochiy, Sergiy M.; Bentley, Karen L. de Mesy; Brookes, Paul S; Jonason, Jennifer H.; Eliseev, Roman A.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic factors associated with aging, such as oxidative stress and hormone depletion converge on mitochondria and impair their function via opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP). The MPTP is a large non-selective pore regulated by cyclophilin D (CypD) that disrupts mitochondrial membrane integrity. MPTP involvement has been firmly established in degenerative processes in heart, brain, and muscle. Bone has high energy demands and is therefore expected to be highly sensitive to mitochondrial dysfunction. Despite this, the role of mitochondria and the MPTP in bone maintenance and bone pathology has not been elucidated. Our goal was to determine whether mitochondria are impaired in aging bone and to see if protecting mitochondria from MPTP opening via CypD deletion protects against bone loss. We found that bone mass, strength, and formation progressively decline over the course of 18 months in C57BL/6J mice. Using metabolomics and electron microscopy, we determined that oxidative metabolism is impaired in aging bone leading to a glycolytic shift, imbalance in nucleotides, and decreased NAD+/NADH ratio. Mitochondria in osteocytes appear swollen which is a major marker of MPTP opening. CypD deletion by CypD knockout mouse model (CypD KO) protects against bone loss in 13- and 18-month-old mice and prevents decline in bone formation and mitochondrial changes observed in wild type C57BL/6J mice. Together, these data demonstrate that mitochondria are impaired in aging bone and that CypD deletion protects against this impairment to prevent bone loss. This implicates CypD-regulated MPTP and mitochondrial dysfunction in the impairment of bone cells and in aging-related bone loss. Our findings suggest mitochondrial metabolism as a new target for bone therapeutics and inhibition of CypD as a novel strategy against bone loss. PMID:27183225

  6. The effects of density-dependent form factors for (e, e'p) reaction in quasi-elastic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kim, Hungchong; So, W. Y.

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of a relativistic single particle model, the effects of density-dependent electromagnetic form factors on the exclusive (e,e'p) reaction are investigated in the quasi-elastic region. The density-dependent electromagnetic form factors are generated from a quark-meson coupling model and used to calculate the cross sections in two different densities, either at the normal density of ρ_0 ˜ 0.15 fm^-3 or at the lower density, 0.5ρ_0 . Then these cross sections are analyzed in the two different kinematics: One is that the momentum of the outgoing nucleon is along the momentum transfer. The other is that the angle between the momentum of the outgoing nucleon and the momentum transfer is varied at fixed magnitude of the momentum of the outgoing nucleon. Our theoretical differential reduced cross sections are compared with the NIKHEF data for the 208 Pb( e, e'p) reaction, which is related to the probability that a bound nucleon from a given orbit can be knocked-out of the nucleus. The effects of the density-dependent form factors increase the differential cross sections for both knocked-out proton and neutron by an amount of a few percent. Moreover they are shown to be almost the same within only a few percent, i.e., nearly independent of the shell location of knockout nucleons. These results are quite consistent with the characteristics of double magic nuclei which have relatively sharp smearing in the density distribution.

  7. Conditional Knock-Out of Vesicular GABA Transporter Gene from Starburst Amacrine Cells Reveals the Contributions of Multiple Synaptic Mechanisms Underlying Direction Selectivity in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Zhe; Chen, Qiang; Koren, David; Giammarinaro, Benno; Acaron Ledesma, Hector

    2015-01-01

    Direction selectivity of direction-selective ganglion cells (DSGCs) in the retina results from patterned excitatory and inhibitory inputs onto DSGCs during motion stimuli. The inhibitory inputs onto DSGCs are directionally tuned to the antipreferred (null) direction and therefore potently suppress spiking during motion in the null direction. However, whether direction-selective inhibition is indispensable for direction selectivity is unclear. Here, we selectively eliminated the directional tuning of inhibitory inputs onto DSGCs by disrupting GABA release from the presynaptic interneuron starburst amacrine cell in the mouse retina. We found that, even without directionally tuned inhibition, direction selectivity can still be implemented in a subset of On-Off DSGCs by direction-selective excitation and a temporal offset between excitation and isotropic inhibition. Our results therefore demonstrate the concerted action of multiple synaptic mechanisms for robust direction selectivity in the retina. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The direction-selective circuit in the retina has been a classic model to study neural computations by the brain. An important but unresolved question is how direction selectivity is implemented by directionally tuned excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms. Here we specifically removed the direction tuning of inhibition from the circuit. We found that direction tuning of inhibition is important but not indispensable for direction selectivity of DSGCs' spiking activity, and that the residual direction selectivity is implemented by direction-selective excitation and temporal offset between excitation and inhibition. Our results highlight the concerted actions of synaptic excitation and inhibition required for robust direction selectivity in the retina and provide critical insights into how patterned excitation and inhibition collectively implement sensory processing. PMID:26400950

  8. Knock out of the BASIGIN/CD147 chaperone of lactate/H+ symporters disproves its pro-tumour action via extracellular matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) induction.

    PubMed

    Marchiq, Ibtissam; Albrengues, Jean; Granja, Sara; Gaggioli, Cédric; Pouysségur, Jacques; Simon, Marie-Pierre

    2015-09-22

    BASIGIN/CD147/EMMPRIN is a multifunctional transmembrane glycoprotein strongly expressed in tumours. BASIGIN controls tumour metabolism, particularly glycolysis by facilitating lactic acid export through the two monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and hypoxia-inducible MCT4. However, before being recognized as a co-carrier of MCTs, BASIGIN was described as an inducer of extracellular matrix metalloproteases (MMPs). Early on, a model emerged in which, tumour cells use the extracellular domain of BASIGIN to recognize and stimulate neighbouring fibroblasts to produce MMPs. However, this model has remained hypothetical since a direct link between BASIGIN and MMPs production has not yet been clearly established. To validate the BASIGIN/MMP hypothesis, we developed BASIGIN knockouts in three human tumour cell lines derived from glioma, colon, and lung adenocarcinoma. By using co-culture experiments of either human or mouse fibroblasts and tumour cell lines we showed, contrary to what has been abundantly published, that the disruption of BASIGIN in tumour cells and in MEFs has no action on the production of MMPs. Our findings do not support the notion that the pro-tumoural action of BASIGIN is mediated via induction of MMPs. Therefore, we propose that to date, the strongest pro-tumoural action of BASIGIN is mediated through the control of fermentative glycolysis. PMID:26284589

  9. Amyloid beta deposition and phosphorylated tau accumulation are key features in aged choroidal vessels in the complement factor H knock out model of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Aboelnour, Asmaa; Kam, Jaimie Hoh; Elnasharty, M A; Sayed-Ahmed, Ahmed; Jeffery, Glen

    2016-06-01

    Extra-cellular deposition including amyloid beta (Aβ) is a feature of retinal ageing. It has been documented for Bruch's membrane (BM) where Aβ is elevated in complement factor H knockout mice (Cfh(-/-)) proposed as a model for age related macular degeneration. However, arterial deposition in choroidal vessels prior to perfusion across BM has not been examined. Aβ is associated with tau phosphorylation and these are linked in blood vessels in Alzheimers Disease where they can drive perivascular pathology. Here we ask if Aβ, tau and phosphorylated tau are features of ageing in choroidal vessels in 12 month C57 BL/6 and Cfh(-/-) mice, using immune staining and Western blot analysis. Greater levels of Aβ and phosphorylated tau are found in choroidal vessels in Cfh(-/-) mice. Western blot revealed a 40% increase in Aβ in Cfh(-/-) over C57 BL/6 mice. Aβ deposits coat around 55% of the luminal wall in Cfh(-/-) compared to only about 40% in C57 BL/6. Total tau was similar in both groups, but phosphorylated tau increased by >100% in Cfh(-/-) compared to C57 BL/6 and covered >75% of the luminal wall compared to 50% in C57 BL/6. Hence, phosphorylated tau is a marked choroidal feature in this mouse model. Aβ deposition was clumped in Cfh(-/-) mice and likely to influence blood flow dynamics. Disturbed flow is associated with atherogenesis and may be related to the accumulation of membrane attack complex recently identified between choroidal vessels in those at high risk of macular degeneration due to complement factor H polymorphisms. PMID:27181225

  10. HspX knock-out in Mycobacterium tuberculosis leads to shorter antibiotic treatment and lower relapse rate in a mouse model--a potential novel therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanmin; Liu, Alexander; Menendez, Maria C; Garcia, Maria J; Oravcova, Katarina; Gillespie, Stephen H; Davies, Gerry R; Mitchison, Denis A; Coates, Anthony R M

    2015-01-01

    Effective global tuberculosis control is hindered by the need for prolonged chemotherapy which leads to poor patient compliance. Therefore novel drug targets that shorten the duration of chemotherapy and reduce disease relapse rates are highly desirable. We have previously shown that HspX, an alpha-crystallin-like protein, is associated with growth suppression of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mouse models. We determined to evaluate hspX as a novel target for controlling M. tuberculosis growth in combination with traditional antibiotic therapy in the Cornell mouse model. The hspX deletion mutant (ΔhspX) was used as a model of potential hspX inhibition. Normal BALB/c mice were infected with ΔhspX or the wild type (WT) strain. Three weeks after infection, the mice were treated with rifampicin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide for 14 weeks followed by 8 weeks of hydrocortisone. The effect of chemotherapy was measured by organ bacterial counts and the relapse rate. Antibiotic treatment of mice infected with ΔhspX resulted in faster visceral clearance; organs were disease free 8 weeks post-treatment for ΔhspX infection compared to 14 weeks for the WT strain. Disease relapse rate was significantly lower in ΔhspX infection (60.7%) compared to WT infection (92.6%). HspX may be a promising therapeutic target in combination with traditional antibiotic therapy to shorten the length of treatment and reduce disease relapse. PMID:25481272

  11. Attrition of Hepatic Damage Inflicted by Angiotensin II with α-Tocopherol and β-Carotene in Experimental Apolipoprotein E Knock-out Mice.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Kaliappan; Gowtham, Munusamy; Sachin, Singh; Ravishankar Ram, Mani; Shankar, Esaki M; Kamarul, Tunku

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II is one of the key regulatory peptides implicated in the pathogenesis of liver disease. The mechanisms underlying the salubrious role of α-tocopherol and β-carotene on liver pathology have not been comprehensively assessed. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the role of Angiotensin II on hepatic damage and if α-tocopherol and β-carotene supplementation attenuates hepatic damage. Hepatic damage was induced in Apoe(-/-)mice by infusion of Angiotensin II followed by oral administration with α-tocopherol and β-carotene-enriched diet for 60 days. Investigations showed fibrosis, kupffer cell hyperplasia, hepatocyte degeneration and hepatic cell apoptosis; sinusoidal dilatation along with haemorrhages; evidence of fluid accumulation; increased ROS level and increased AST and ALT activities. In addition, tPA and uPA were down-regulated due to 42-fold up-regulation of PAI-1. MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-12, and M-CSF were down-regulated in Angiotensin II-treated animals. Notably, α-tocopherol and β-carotene treatment controlled ROS, fibrosis, hepatocyte degeneration, kupffer cell hyperplasia, hepatocyte apoptosis, sinusoidal dilatation and fluid accumulation in the liver sinusoids, and liver enzyme levels. In addition, PAI-1, tPA and uPA expressions were markedly controlled by β-carotene treatment. Thus, Angiotensin II markedly influenced hepatic damage possibly by restraining fibrinolytic system. We concluded that α-tocopherol and β-carotene treatment has salubrious role in repairing hepatic pathology. PMID:26670291

  12. Unexpected Lack of Hypersensitivity in LRRK2 Knock-out Mice to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)

    PubMed Central

    Andres-Mateos, Eva; Mejias, Rebeca; Sasaki, Masayuki; Li, Xiaojie; Lin, Brian M; Biskup, Saskia; Zhang, Li; Banerjee, Rebecca; Thomas, Bobby; Yang, Lichuan; Liu, Guosheng; Beal, M Flint; Huso, David L; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene are the most common known cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). Whether loss of LRRK2 function accounts for neurodegeneration of dopamine neurons in PD is not known, nor is it known whether LRRK2 kinase activity modulates the susceptibility of dopamine (DA) neurons to the selective dopaminergic toxin, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6 tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). To better understand the role of LRRK2 in DA neuronal survival and its role in the susceptibility of DA neurons to MPTP, we generated LRRK2 knockout (KO) mice lacking the kinase domain of LRRK2. Here we show that LRRK2 KO mice are viable and have no major abnormalities and live to adulthood. The dopaminergic system is normal in LRRK2 KO mice as assessed via HPLC for DA and its metabolites and via stereologic assessment of DA neuron number in young and aged mice. Importantly, there is no significant difference in the susceptibility of LRRK2 KO and wild type (WT) mice to MPTP. These results suggest that LRRK2 plays little if any role in the development and survival of DA neurons under physiologic conditions. Thus, PD due to LRRK2 mutations are likely not due to a loss of function. Moreover, LRRK2 is not required for the susceptibility of DA neurons to MPTP. PMID:20016100

  13. Differential proteome-metabolome profiling of YCA1-knock-out and wild type cells reveals novel metabolic pathways and cellular processes dependent on the yeast metacaspase.

    PubMed

    Ždralević, Maša; Longo, Valentina; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Giannattasio, Sergio; Timperio, Anna Maria; Zolla, Lello

    2015-06-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expresses one member of the metacaspase Cys protease family, encoded by the YCA1 gene. Combination of proteomics and metabolomics data showed that YCA1 deletion down-regulated glycolysis, the TCA cycle and alcoholic fermentation as compared with WT cells. Δyca1 cells also showed a down-regulation of the pentose phosphate pathway and accumulation of pyruvate, correlated with higher levels of certain amino acids found in these cells. Accordingly, there is a decrease in protein biosynthesis, and up-regulation of specific stress response proteins like Ahp1p, which possibly provides these cells with a better protection against stress. Moreover, in agreement with the down-regulation of protein biosynthesis machinery in Δyca1 cells, we have found that regulation of transcription, co-translational protein folding and protein targeting to different subcellular locations were also down-regulated. Metabolomics analysis of the nucleotide content showed a significant reduction in Δyca1 cells in comparison with the WT, except for GTP content which remained unchanged. Thus, our combined proteome-metabolome approach added a new dimension to the non-apoptotic function of yeast metacaspase, which can specifically affect cell metabolism through as yet unknown mechanisms and possibly stress-response pathways, like HOG and cell wall integrity pathways. Certainly, YCA1 deletion may induce compensatory changes in stress response proteins offering a better protection against apoptosis to Δyca1 cells rather than a loss in pro-apoptotic YCA1-associated activity. PMID:25697364

  14. Establishment of Immortalized Mouse Bmp2 Knock-Out Dental Papilla Mesenchymal Cells Necessary for Study of Odontoblastic Differentiation and Odontogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lian; Wang, Feng; Donly, Kevin J.; Wan, Chunyan; Luo, Daoshu; Harris, Stephen E.; Macdougall, Mary; Chen, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    Bmp2 is essential for dentin formation. Bmp2 cKO mice exhibited similar phenotype to dentinogenesis imperfecta, showing dental pulp exposure, hypomineralized dentin, and delayed odontoblast differentiation. As it is relatively difficult to obtain lot of primary Bmp2 cKO dental papilla mesenchymal cells and to maintain a long-term culture of these primary cells, availability of immortalized deleted Bmp2 dental papilla mesenchymal cells is critical for studying the underlying mechanism of Bmp2 signal in odontogenesis. In this study, our goal was to generate an immortalized deleted Bmp2 dental papilla mesenchymal (iBmp2ko/ko dp) cell line by introducing Cre fluorescent protein (GFP) into the immortalized mouse floxed Bmp2 dental papilla mesenchymal (iBmp2fx/fx dp) cells. iBmp2ko/ko dp cells were confirmed by GFP and PCR. The deleted Bmp2 cells exhibited slow cell proliferation rate and cell growth was arrested in G2 phase. Expression of tooth-related marker genes and cell differentiation were decreased in the deleted cells. Importantly, extracellular matrix remodeling was impaired in the iBmp2ko/ko dp cells as reflected by the decreased Mmp-9 expression. In addition, with exogenous Bmp2 induction, these cell differentiation and mineralization were rescued as well as extracellular matrix remodeling was enhanced. Therefore, we for the first time described establishment of iBmpko/ko cells that are useful for study of mechanisms in regulating dental papilla mesenchymal cell lineages. PMID:26037045

  15. Incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity of a growth defect as a consequence of knocking out two K(+) transporters in the euascomycete fungus Podospora anserina.

    PubMed Central

    Lalucque, Hervé; Silar, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    We describe an example of incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina, two genetic properties classically associated with mutations in more complex organisms, such as green plants and animals. We show that the knockouts of two TRK-related K(+) transporters of this ascomycete present variability in their phenotype that cannot be attributed to fluctuations of the genetic background or the environment. Thalli of the knockout strains derived from independent monokaryotic ascospores or from a single monokaryotic ascospore and cultivated under standard growth conditions may or may not present impaired growth. When impaired, thalli exhibit a range of phenotypes. Environmental conditions control expressivity to a large extent and penetrance to a low extent. Restoration of functional potassium transport by heterologous expression of K(+) transporters from Neurospora crassa abolishes or strongly diminishes the growth impairment. These data show that incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity can be an intrinsic property of a single Mendelian loss-of-function mutation. They also show that such variability in the expression of a mutant phenotype can be promoted by a phenomenon not obviously related to the well-known chromatin structure modifications, i.e., potassium transport. They provide a framework to understand human channelopathies with similar properties. PMID:15020412

  16. Knocking Out ACR2 Does Not Affect Arsenic Redox Status in Arabidopsis thaliana: Implications for As Detoxification and Accumulation in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenju; Schat, Henk; Bliek, Mathijs; Chen, Yi; McGrath, Steve P.; George, Graham; Salt, David E.; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Many plant species are able to reduce arsenate to arsenite efficiently, which is an important step allowing detoxification of As through either efflux of arsenite or complexation with thiol compounds. It has been suggested that this reduction is catalyzed by ACR2, a plant homologue of the yeast arsenate reductase ScACR2. Silencing of AtACR2 was reported to result in As hyperaccumulation in the shoots of Arabidopsis thaliana. However, no information of the in vivo As speciation has been reported. Here, we investigated the effect of AtACR2 knockout or overexpression on As speciation, arsenite efflux from roots and As accumulation in shoots. T-DNA insertion lines, overexpression lines and wild-type (WT) plants were exposed to different concentrations of arsenate for different periods, and As speciation in plants and arsenite efflux were determined using HPLC-ICP-MS. There were no significant differences in As speciation between different lines, with arsenite accounting for >90% of the total extractable As in both roots and shoots. Arsenite efflux to the external medium represented on average 77% of the arsenate taken up during 6 h exposure, but there were no significant differences between WT and mutants or overexpression lines. Accumulation of As in the shoots was also unaffected by AtACR2 knockout or overexpression. Additionally, after exposure to arsenate, the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) strain with ScACR2 deleted showed similar As speciation as the WT with arsenite-thiol complexes being the predominant species. Our results suggest the existence of multiple pathways of arsenate reduction in plants and yeast. PMID:22879969

  17. Metabolic consequences of knocking out UGT85B1, the gene encoding the glucosyltransferase required for synthesis of dhurrin in Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench).

    PubMed

    Blomstedt, Cecilia K; O'Donnell, Natalie H; Bjarnholt, Nanna; Neale, Alan D; Hamill, John D; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Gleadow, Roslyn M

    2016-02-01

    Many important food crops produce cyanogenic glucosides as natural defense compounds to protect against herbivory or pathogen attack. It has also been suggested that these nitrogen-based secondary metabolites act as storage reserves of nitrogen. In sorghum, three key genes, CYP79A1, CYP71E1 and UGT85B1, encode two Cytochrome P450s and a glycosyltransferase, respectively, the enzymes essential for synthesis of the cyanogenic glucoside dhurrin. Here, we report the use of targeted induced local lesions in genomes (TILLING) to identify a line with a mutation resulting in a premature stop codon in the N-terminal region of UGT85B1. Plants homozygous for this mutation do not produce dhurrin and are designated tcd2 (totally cyanide deficient 2) mutants. They have reduced vigor, being dwarfed, with poor root development and low fertility. Analysis using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) shows that tcd2 mutants accumulate numerous dhurrin pathway-derived metabolites, some of which are similar to those observed in transgenic Arabidopsis expressing the CYP79A1 and CYP71E1 genes. Our results demonstrate that UGT85B1 is essential for formation of dhurrin in sorghum with no co-expressed endogenous UDP-glucosyltransferases able to replace it. The tcd2 mutant suffers from self-intoxication because sorghum does not have a feedback mechanism to inhibit the initial steps of dhurrin biosynthesis when the glucosyltransferase activity required to complete the synthesis of dhurrin is lacking. The LC-MS analyses also revealed the presence of metabolites in the tcd2 mutant which have been suggested to be derived from dhurrin via endogenous pathways for nitrogen recovery, thus indicating which enzymes may be involved in such pathways. PMID:26493517

  18. Deficits in axonal transport in hippocampal-based circuitry and the visual pathway in APP knock-out animals witnessed by manganese enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Joseph J.; Zhang, Xiaowei; Ziomek, Greg; Jacobs, Russell E.; Bearer, Elaine L.

    2012-01-01

    Mounting evidence implicates axonal transport defects, typified by the presence of axonal varicosities with aberrant accumulations of cargo, as an early event in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. Work identifying amyloid precursor protein (APP) as a vesicular motor receptor for anterograde axonal transport further implicates axonal transport in AD. Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) detects axonal transport dynamics in preclinical studies. Here we pursue an understanding of the role of APP in axonal transport in the central nervous system by applying MEMRI to hippocampal circuitry and to the visual pathway in living mice homozygous for either wild type or a deletion in the APP gene (n = 12 for each genotype). Following intra-ocular or stereotaxic hippocampal injection, we performed time-lapse MRI to detect Mn2+ transport. Three dimensional whole brain datasets were compared on a voxel-wise basis using within-group pair-wise analysis. Quantification of transport to structures connected to injection sites via axonal fiber tracts was also performed. Histology confirmed consistent placement of hippocampal injections and no observable difference in glial-response to the injections. APP −/− mice had significantly reduced transport from the hippocampus to the septal nuclei and amygdala after 7 hours and reduced transport to the contralateral hippocampus after 25 hours; axonal transport deficits in the APP −/− animals were also identified in the visual pathway. These data support a system-wide role for APP in axonal transport within the central nervous system and demonstrate the power of MEMRI for assessing neuronal circuitry involved in memory and learning. PMID:22500926

  19. Knocking Out Cytosolic Cysteine Synthesis Compromises the Antioxidant Capacity of the Cytosol to Maintain Discrete Concentrations of Hydrogen Peroxide in Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    López-Martín, M. Carmen; Becana, Manuel; Romero, Luis C.; Gotor, Cecilia

    2008-01-01

    Plant cells contain different O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL) enzymes involved in cysteine (Cys) biosynthesis and located in different subcellular compartments. These enzymes are made up of a complex variety of isoforms resulting in different subcellular Cys pools. To unravel the contribution of cytosolic Cys to plant metabolism, we characterized the knockout oas-a1.1 and osa-a1.2 mutants, deficient in the most abundant cytosolic OASTL isoform in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Total intracellular Cys and glutathione concentrations were reduced, and the glutathione redox state was shifted in favor of its oxidized form. Interestingly, the capability of the mutants to chelate heavy metals did not differ from that of the wild type, but the mutants have an enhanced sensitivity to cadmium. With the aim of establishing the metabolic network most influenced by the cytosolic Cys pool, we used the ATH1 GeneChip for evaluation of differentially expressed genes in the oas-a1.1 mutant grown under nonstress conditions. The transcriptomic footprints of mutant plants had predicted functions associated with various physiological responses that are dependent on reactive oxygen species and suggested that the mutant was oxidatively stressed. Evidences that the mutation caused a perturbation in H2O2 homeostasis are that, in the knockout, H2O2 production was localized in shoots and roots; spontaneous cell death lesions occurred in the leaves; and lignification and guaiacol peroxidase activity were significantly increased. All these findings indicate that a deficiency of OAS-A1 in the cytosol promotes a perturbation in H2O2 homeostasis and that Cys is an important determinant of the antioxidative capacity of the cytosol in Arabidopsis. PMID:18441224

  20. Comparative hepatic effects of perfluorooctanoic acid and WY 14,643 in PPARa-knocked out and wild-type mice.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is an environmentally persistent chemical commonly found in humans and wildlife. Induction of liver tumors by PFOA in rodents is thought to be mediated by PPARα activation, although hepatic hypertrophy persists in PPARα-null mice. This study evalua...

  1. (R)-3-hydroxyacyl-ACP:CoA transacylase of Pseudomonas chlororaphis: gene cloning, characterization and knock-out on PHA and rhamnolipid syntheses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis is a useful microorganism capable of producing polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biopolymer and rhamnolipid (RL) biosurfactants by using carbon- and nitrogen-sources derived from renewable feedstocks as substrates of fermentation. We are interested in increasing the yield of RL pr...

  2. Enkephalin levels and the number of neuropeptide Y-containing interneurons in the hippocampus are decreased in female cannabinoid-receptor 1 knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Sophie A; Kempen, Tracey A Van; Pickel, Virginia M; Milner, Teresa A

    2016-05-01

    Drug addiction requires learning and memory processes that are facilitated by activation of cannabinoid-1 (CB1) and opioid receptors in the hippocampus. This involves activity-dependent synaptic plasticity that is partially regulated by endogenous opioid (enkephalin and dynorphin) and non-opioid peptides, specifically cholecystokinin, parvalbumin and neuropeptide Y, the neuropeptides present in inhibitory interneurons that co-express CB1 or selective opioid receptors. We tested the hypothesis that CB1 receptor expression is a determinant of the availability of one or more of these peptide modulators in the hippocampus. This was achieved by quantitatively analyzing the immunoperoxidase labeling for each of these neuropeptide in the dorsal hippocampus of female wild-type (CB1+/+) and cannabinoid receptor 1 knockout (CB1-/-) C57/BL6 mice. The levels of Leu(5)-enkephalin-immunoreactivity were significantly reduced in the hilus of the dentate gyrus and in stratum lucidum of CA3 in CB1-/- mice. Moreover, the numbers of neuropeptide Y-immunoreactive interneurons in the dentate hilus were significantly lower in the CB1-/- compared to wild-type mice. However, CB1+/+ and CB1-/- mice did not significantly differ in expression levels of either dynorphin or cholecystokinin, and showed no differences in numbers of parvalbumin-containing interneurons. These findings suggest that the cannabinoid and opioid systems have a nuanced, regulatory relationship that could affect the balance of excitation and inhibition in the hippocampus and thus processes such as learning that rely on this balance. PMID:27012427

  3. Attrition of Hepatic Damage Inflicted by Angiotensin II with α-Tocopherol and β-Carotene in Experimental Apolipoprotein E Knock-out Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Kaliappan; Gowtham, Munusamy; Sachin, Singh; Ravishankar Ram, Mani; Shankar, Esaki M.; Kamarul, Tunku

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II is one of the key regulatory peptides implicated in the pathogenesis of liver disease. The mechanisms underlying the salubrious role of α-tocopherol and β-carotene on liver pathology have not been comprehensively assessed. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the role of Angiotensin II on hepatic damage and if α-tocopherol and β-carotene supplementation attenuates hepatic damage. Hepatic damage was induced in Apoe−/−mice by infusion of Angiotensin II followed by oral administration with α-tocopherol and β-carotene-enriched diet for 60 days. Investigations showed fibrosis, kupffer cell hyperplasia, hepatocyte degeneration and hepatic cell apoptosis; sinusoidal dilatation along with haemorrhages; evidence of fluid accumulation; increased ROS level and increased AST and ALT activities. In addition, tPA and uPA were down-regulated due to 42-fold up-regulation of PAI-1. MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-12, and M-CSF were down-regulated in Angiotensin II-treated animals. Notably, α-tocopherol and β-carotene treatment controlled ROS, fibrosis, hepatocyte degeneration, kupffer cell hyperplasia, hepatocyte apoptosis, sinusoidal dilatation and fluid accumulation in the liver sinusoids, and liver enzyme levels. In addition, PAI-1, tPA and uPA expressions were markedly controlled by β-carotene treatment. Thus, Angiotensin II markedly influenced hepatic damage possibly by restraining fibrinolytic system. We concluded that α-tocopherol and β-carotene treatment has salubrious role in repairing hepatic pathology. PMID:26670291

  4. Developmental Toxicity of Perfluorononanoic Acid in the Wild-Type and PPAR-alpha Knock-out Mouse After Gestational Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) is a perfluoroalkyl acid detected in the environment and in tissues of humans and wildlife, and its concentration in human serum has increased in the past few years. PFNA negatively affects development and survival of CD1 mice and activates peroxisom...

  5. Establishment of Immortalized Mouse Bmp2 Knock-Out Dental Papilla Mesenchymal Cells Necessary for Study of Odontoblastic Differentiation and Odontogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lian; Wang, Feng; Donly, Kevin J; Wan, Chunyan; Luo, Daoshu; Harris, Stephen E; MacDougall, Mary; Chen, Shuo

    2015-11-01

    Bmp2 is essential for dentin formation. Bmp2 cKO mice exhibited similar phenotype to dentinogenesis imperfecta, showing dental pulp exposure, hypomineralized dentin, and delayed odontoblast differentiation. As it is relatively difficult to obtain lot of primary Bmp2 cKO dental papilla mesenchymal cells and to maintain a long-term culture of these primary cells, availability of immortalized deleted Bmp2 dental papilla mesenchymal cells is critical for studying the underlying mechanism of Bmp2 signal in odontogenesis. In this study, our goal was to generate an immortalized deleted Bmp2 dental papilla mesenchymal (iBmp2(ko/ko)dp) cell line by introducing Cre recombinase and green fluorescent protein (GFP) into the immortalized mouse floxed Bmp2 dental papilla mesenchymal (iBmp2(fx/fx)dp) cells. iBmp2(ko/ko)dp cells were confirmed by GFP and PCR. The deleted Bmp2 cells exhibited slow cell proliferation rate and cell growth was arrested in G2 phase. Expression of tooth-related marker genes and cell differentiation were decreased in the deleted cells. Importantly, extracellular matrix remodeling was impaired in the iBmp2(ko/ko)dp cells as reflected by the decreased Mmp-9 expression. In addition, with exogenous Bmp2 induction, these cell differentiation and mineralization were rescued as well as extracellular matrix remodeling was enhanced. Therefore, we for the first time described establishment of iBmp(ko/ko) cells that are useful for study of mechanisms in regulating dental papilla mesenchymal cell lineages. PMID:26037045

  6. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    Most of the time, medicines make our lives better. They reduce aches and pains, fight infections, and control problems such as high blood pressure or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions. One problem is ...

  7. [Plasma antioxidant activity--a test for impaired biological functions of endoecology, exotrophy, and inflammation reactions].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Krylin, V V; Dmitriev, V A; Iashin, Ia I

    2010-07-01

    The authors discuss the diagnostic value of a test for total serum antioxidant activity determined by an electrochemistry method on a liquid chromatograph (without a column), by using an amperometric detector, as well as the composition of the endogenously synthesized hydrophilic and hydrophobic acceptors of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Uric acid is a major hydrophilic acceptor of ROS; monoenic oleic fatty acid acts as its major lipophilic acceptor. The constant determined by the authors for of 03 oleic acid oxidation during automatic titration in the organic medium is an order of magnitude higher than that for alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene and linoleic fatty acid; its concentration is also an order of magnitude higher. In oxidative stress, the adrenal steroid hormone dehydroepiandrosterone initiates oleic acid synthesis via expression of palmitoyl elongase and steatoryl desaturase. In early steps of phylogenesis in primates, spontaneous mutation resulted in ascorbic acid synthesis gene knockout; phylogenetically, further other mutation knocked out the gene encoding the synthesis of uricase and the conversion of uric acid to alantoin. In primates, uric acid became not only a catabolite of purine bases in vivo, but also the major endogenous hydrophilic acceptor of ROS. This philogenetic order makes it clear why the epithelium in the proximal nephron tubule entirely reabsorbs uric acid (a catabolite?) from primary urine and then secretes it again to urine depending on the impairment of biological functions of endoecology (the intercellular medium being contaminated with biological rubbish), the activation of a biological inflammatory reaction, the cellular production of ROS, and the reduction in serum total antioxidant activity. With each biological reaction, there was an increase in the blood content of uric acid as a hydrophilic acceptor of ROS, by actively lowering its secretion into urine. Uric acid is a diagnostic test of inflammation, or rather compensatory

  8. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... using any of these products. Some types of food may also cause adverse drug reactions. For example, grapefruit and grapefruit juice, as well as alcohol and caffeine, may affect how drugs work. Every time your doctor ... interactions with any foods or beverages. What about medicines I've used ...

  9. Probing the Repulsive Core of the Nucleon-Nucleon Interaction via the He4(e ,e'pN) Triple-Coincidence Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korover, I.; Muangma, N.; Hen, O.; Shneor, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Kelleher, A.; Gilad, S.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Piasetzky, E.; Watson, J. W.; Wood, S. A.; Aguilera, P.; Ahmed, Z.; Albataineh, H.; Allada, K.; Anderson, B.; Anez, D.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J.; Armstrong, W.; Arrington, J.; Averett, T.; Badman, T.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Bai, X.; Beck, A.; Beck, S.; Bellini, V.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Bittner, J.; Boeglin, W.; Camsonne, A.; Chen, C.; Chen, J.-P.; Chirapatpimol, K.; Cisbani, E.; Dalton, M. M.; Daniel, A.; Day, D.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deconinck, W.; Defurne, M.; Flay, D.; Fomin, N.; Friend, M.; Frullani, S.; Fuchey, E.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Gu, C.; Gueye, P.; Hamilton, D.; Hanretty, C.; Hansen, J.-O.; Hashemi Shabestari, M.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, M.; Iqbal, S.; Jin, G.; Kalantarians, N.; Kang, H.; Khandaker, M.; LeRose, J.; Leckey, J.; Lindgren, R.; Long, E.; Mammei, J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marti Jimenez-Arguello, A.; Meekins, D.; Meziani, Z.; Michaels, R.; Mihovilovic, M.; Monaghan, P.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Norum, B.; Nuruzzaman, Pan, K.; Phillips, S.; Pomerantz, I.; Posik, M.; Punjabi, V.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Qiu, X.; Rakhman, A.; Reimer, P. E.; Riordan, S.; Ron, G.; Rondon-Aramayo, O.; Saha, A.; Schulte, E.; Selvy, L.; Shahinyan, A.; Sirca, S.; Sjoegren, J.; Slifer, K.; Solvignon, P.; Sparveris, N.; Subedi, R.; Tireman, W.; Wang, D.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Yan, W.; Yaron, I.; Ye, Z.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Z.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, P.; Zielinski, R.; Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    We studied simultaneously the He4(e ,e'p), He4(e ,e'pp), and He4(e ,e'pn) reactions at Q2=2(GeV/c)2 and xB>1, for an (e ,e'p) missing-momentum range of 400 to 830 MeV/c. The knocked-out proton was detected in coincidence with a proton or neutron recoiling almost back to back to the missing momentum, leaving the residual A =2 system at low excitation energy. These data were used to identify two-nucleon short-range correlated pairs and to deduce their isospin structure as a function of missing momentum, in a region where the nucleon-nucleon (NN) force is expected to change from predominantly tensor to repulsive. The abundance of neutron-proton pairs is reduced as the nucleon momentum increases beyond ˜500 MeV/c. The extracted fraction of proton-proton pairs is small and almost independent of the missing momentum. Our data are compared with calculations of two-nucleon momentum distributions in He4 and discussed in the context of probing the elusive repulsive component of the NN force.

  10. Probing the repulsive core of the nucleon-nucleon interaction via the (4)He(e,e'pN) triple-coincidence reaction.

    PubMed

    Korover, I; Muangma, N; Hen, O; Shneor, R; Sulkosky, V; Kelleher, A; Gilad, S; Higinbotham, D W; Piasetzky, E; Watson, J W; Wood, S A; Aguilera, P; Ahmed, Z; Albataineh, H; Allada, K; Anderson, B; Anez, D; Aniol, K; Annand, J; Armstrong, W; Arrington, J; Averett, T; Badman, T; Baghdasaryan, H; Bai, X; Beck, A; Beck, S; Bellini, V; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bittner, J; Boeglin, W; Camsonne, A; Chen, C; Chen, J-P; Chirapatpimol, K; Cisbani, E; Dalton, M M; Daniel, A; Day, D; de Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Deconinck, W; Defurne, M; Flay, D; Fomin, N; Friend, M; Frullani, S; Fuchey, E; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, O; Gu, C; Gueye, P; Hamilton, D; Hanretty, C; Hansen, J-O; Hashemi Shabestari, M; Holmstrom, T; Huang, M; Iqbal, S; Jin, G; Kalantarians, N; Kang, H; Khandaker, M; LeRose, J; Leckey, J; Lindgren, R; Long, E; Mammei, J; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marti Jimenez-Arguello, A; Meekins, D; Meziani, Z; Michaels, R; Mihovilovic, M; Monaghan, P; Munoz Camacho, C; Norum, B; Nuruzzaman; Pan, K; Phillips, S; Pomerantz, I; Posik, M; Punjabi, V; Qian, X; Qiang, Y; Qiu, X; Rakhman, A; Reimer, P E; Riordan, S; Ron, G; Rondon-Aramayo, O; Saha, A; Schulte, E; Selvy, L; Shahinyan, A; Sirca, S; Sjoegren, J; Slifer, K; Solvignon, P; Sparveris, N; Subedi, R; Tireman, W; Wang, D; Weinstein, L B; Wojtsekhowski, B; Yan, W; Yaron, I; Ye, Z; Zhan, X; Zhang, J; Zhang, Y; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z; Zheng, X; Zhu, P; Zielinski, R

    2014-07-11

    We studied simultaneously the (4)He(e,e'p), (4)He(e,e'pp), and (4)He(e,e'pn) reactions at Q(2)=2(GeV/c)(2) and x(B)>1, for an (e,e'p) missing-momentum range of 400 to 830  MeV/c. The knocked-out proton was detected in coincidence with a proton or neutron recoiling almost back to back to the missing momentum, leaving the residual A=2 system at low excitation energy. These data were used to identify two-nucleon short-range correlated pairs and to deduce their isospin structure as a function of missing momentum, in a region where the nucleon-nucleon (NN) force is expected to change from predominantly tensor to repulsive. The abundance of neutron-proton pairs is reduced as the nucleon momentum increases beyond ∼500  MeV/c. The extracted fraction of proton-proton pairs is small and almost independent of the missing momentum. Our data are compared with calculations of two-nucleon momentum distributions in (4)He and discussed in the context of probing the elusive repulsive component of the NN force. PMID:25062168

  11. Probing the Repulsive Core of the Nucleon-Nucleon Interaction via the 4He(e,e`pN) Triple-Coincidence Reaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Korover, Igor; Muangma, Navaphon; Hen, Or; Shneor, Ran; Sulkosky, Vincent; Kelleher, Aidan; Gilad, Shalev; Higinbotham, Douglas; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Wood, Stephen; et al

    2014-07-01

    We studied simultaneously the 4He(e,e'p), 4He(e,e'pp), and 4He(e,e'pn) reactions at Q2=2 [GeV/c]2 and xB >1, for a (e,e'p) missing-momentum range of 400 to 830 MeV/c. The knocked-out proton was detected in coincidence with a proton or neutron recoiling almost back to back to the missing momentum, leaving the residual A=2 system at low excitation energy. These data were used to identify two-nucleon short-range correlated pairs and to deduce their isospin structure as a function of missing momentum in a region where the nucleon-nucleon force is expected to change from predominantly tensor to repulsive. Neutron-proton pairs dominate the high-momentum tail ofmore » the nucleon momentum distributions, but their abundance is reduced as the nucleon momentum increases beyond ~500 MeV/c. The extracted fraction of proton-proton pairs is small and almost independent of the missing momentum in the range we studied. Our data are compared with ab-initio calculations of two-nucleon momentum distributions in 4He.« less

  12. Probing the Repulsive Core of the Nucleon-Nucleon Interaction via the 4He(e,e`pN) Triple-Coincidence Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Korover, Igor; Muangma, Navaphon; Hen, Or; Shneor, Ran; Sulkosky, Vincent; Kelleher, Aidan; Gilad, Shalev; Higinbotham, Douglas; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Wood, Stephen; Rakhman, Abdurahim; Aguilera, Paula; Ahmed, Zafar; Albataineh, Hisham; Allada, Kalyan; Anderson, Bryon; Anez, David; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Armstrong, Whitney; Arrington, John; Averett, Todd; Badman, Toby; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Bai, Xinzhan; Beck, Arie; Beck, Sharon; Bellini, Vincenzo; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Bittner, James; Boeglin, Werner; Camsonne, Alexandre; Chen, Chunhua; Chen, Jian -Ping; Chirapatpimol, Khem; Cisbani, Evaristo; Dalton, Mark; Daniel, Aji; Day, Donal; De, Cornelis; de Jager, C. W.; De, Raffaele; Leo, R. De; Deconinck, Wouter; Defurne, Maxime; Flay, David; Fomin, Nadia; Friend, Megan; Frullani, Salvatore; Fuchey, Eric; Garibaldi, Franco; Gaskell, David; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Gu, Chao; Gueye, Paul; Hamilton, David; Hanretty, Charles; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Shabestari, Mitra Hashemi; Holmstrom, Timothy; Huang, Min; Iqbal, Sophia; Jin, Ge; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kang, Hoyoung; Khandaker, Mahbubul; LeRose, John; Leckey, John; Lindgren, Richard; Long, Elena; Mammei, Juliette; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Meekins, David; Meziani, Zein -Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Mihovilovic, Miha; Monaghan, Peter; Munoz, Carlos; Camacho, C. Munoz; Norum, Blaine; Nuruzzaman, nfn; Pan, Kai; Phillips, Sarah; Pomerantz, Ishay; Posik, Matthew; Punjabi, Vina; Qian, Xin; Qiang, Yi; Qiu, Xiyu; Reimer, Paul; Riordan, Seamus; Ron, Guy; Rondon-Aramayo, Oscar; Saha, Arunava; Schulte, Elaine; Selvy, Lawrence; Shahinyan, Albert; Sirca, Simon; Sjoegren, Johan; Slifer, Karl; Solvignon-Slifer, Patricia; Sparveris, Nikolaos; Subedi, Ramesh; Tireman, William; Wang, Diancheng; Weinstein, Lawrence; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, Wenbiao; Yaron, Israel; Ye, Zhihong; Zhan, X.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Yawei; Zhao, Bo; Zhao, Zhiwen; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Pengjia; Zielinski, Ryan; Watson, John

    2014-07-01

    We studied simultaneously the 4He(e,e'p), 4He(e,e'pp), and 4He(e,e'pn) reactions at Q2=2 [GeV/c]2 and xB >1, for a (e,e'p) missing-momentum range of 400 to 830 MeV/c. The knocked-out proton was detected in coincidence with a proton or neutron recoiling almost back to back to the missing momentum, leaving the residual A=2 system at low excitation energy. These data were used to identify two-nucleon short-range correlated pairs and to deduce their isospin structure as a function of missing momentum in a region where the nucleon-nucleon force is expected to change from predominantly tensor to repulsive. Neutron-proton pairs dominate the high-momentum tail of the nucleon momentum distributions, but their abundance is reduced as the nucleon momentum increases beyond ~500 MeV/c. The extracted fraction of proton-proton pairs is small and almost independent of the missing momentum in the range we studied. Our data are compared with ab-initio calculations of two-nucleon momentum distributions in 4He.

  13. Study of Quasielastic 1p-shell proton Knockout in the {sup 16}O (e,e'p) reaction at Q{sup 2}=0.8 (GeV/c){sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Juncai Gao

    1999-06-01

    Coincidence cross sections and the structure functions R{sub L+TT}, R{sub T} and R{sub LT} have been obtained for the quasielastic {sup 16}O( e, e'p) reaction with the proton knocked out from the 1p{sub 1/2} and 1p{sub 3/2} states in perpendicular kinematics. The nominal energy transfer {omega} was 439 MeV the nominal Q{sup 2} was 0.8 ( GeV/ c){sup 2} and the kinetic energy of knocked- out proton was 427 MeV. The data was taken in Hall A Je erson Laboratory using two high resolution spectrometers to detect electrons and protons respectively. Nominal beam energies 845 MeV , 1645 MeV and 2445 MeV were employed. For each beam energy, the momentum and angle of electron arm were fixed, while the angle between the proton momentum and the momentum transfer {vector q} was varied to map out the missing momentum. R{sub LT} was separated out to ~350 MeV /c in missing momentum. R{sub L+TT} and R{sub T} were separated out to ~280 MeV/ c in missing momentum. R{sub L} and R{sub T} were separated at a missing momentum of 52.5 MeV/ c for the data taken with hadron arm along {vector q}. The measured cross sections and response functions agree with both relativistic and non relativistic DWIA calculations employing spectroscopic factors between 60-75% for 1 p{sub 1/2} and 1 p{sub 3/2} states. The left- right asymmetry does not support the non -relativistic DWIA calculation using the Weyl gauge. Also the left- right asymmetry measurement favors the relativistic calculation. This thesis describes the details of the experimental setup , the calibration of the spectrometers, the techniques used in the data analysis to derive the fi nal cross sec tions as well as the response functions and the comparison of the results with the theoretical calculations.

  14. The Glyoxal Clock Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ealy, Julie B.; Negron, Alexandra Rodriguez; Stephens, Jessica; Stauffer, Rebecca; Furrow, Stanley D.

    2007-01-01

    Research on the glyoxal clock reaction has led to adaptation of the clock reaction to a general chemistry experiment. This particular reaction is just one of many that used formaldehyde in the past. The kinetics of the glyoxal clock makes the reaction suitable as a general chemistry lab using a Calculator Based Laboratory (CBL) or a LabPro. The…

  15. Practice Gaps: Drug Reactions.

    PubMed

    Wolverton, Stephen E

    2016-07-01

    The term "drug reactions" is relevant to dermatology in three categories of reactions: cutaneous drug reactions without systemic features, cutaneous drug reactions with systemic features, and systemic drugs prescribed by the dermatologist with systematic adverse effects. This article uses examples from each of these categories to illustrate several important principles central to drug reaction diagnosis and management. The information presented will help clinicians attain the highest possible level of certainty before making clinical decisions. PMID:27363888

  16. a Study of the Mechanism of OXYGEN-16-INDUCED Reactions Between 140 and 315 Mev Incident Energies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awes, Terry Clayton

    model, a precompound model, and with a simple knock-out model. The d,t, and (alpha)-particle cross sections are also described using the proton cross sections in terms of a generalized coalescence relation which takes into account Coulomb repulsion from the target nucleus.

  17. Deep phosphorus fertiliser placement and reduced irrigation methods for rice (Oryza sativa L.) combine to knock-out competition from its nemesis, barnyard grass (Echinochloa crus-galli (L.) P.Beauv)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Productivity of rice is increasingly being constrained by limitations in the quantity, quality, and cost of water and nutrients, and competition from weeds. This is a ‘commentary’ on the recent work of Weerarathne et al. (2015). They reported new discoveries from greenhouse experiments that showed...

  18. Generation of a Novel T Cell Specific Interleukin-1 Receptor Type 1 Conditional Knock Out Mouse Reveals Intrinsic Defects in Survival, Expansion and Cytokine Production of CD4 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mufazalov, Ilgiz A.; Regen, Tommy; Schelmbauer, Carsten; Kuschmann, Janina; Muratova, Alisa M.; Nikolaev, Alexei; Müller, Werner; Pinteaux, Emmanuel; Waisman, Ari

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) plays a crucial role in numerous inflammatory diseases via action on its only known signaling IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1). To investigate the role of IL-1 signaling in selected cell types, we generated a new mouse strain in which exon 5 of the Il1r1 gene is flanked by loxP sites. Crossing of these mice with CD4-Cre transgenic mice resulted in IL-1R1 loss of function specifically in T cells. These mice, termed IL-1R1ΔT, displayed normal development under steady state conditions. Importantly, isolated CD4 positive T cells retained their capacity to differentiate toward Th1 or Th17 cell lineages in vitro, and strongly proliferated in cultures supplemented with either anti-CD3/CD28 or Concanavalin A, but, as predicted, were completely unresponsive to IL-1β administration. Furthermore, IL-1R1ΔT mice were protected from gut inflammation in the anti-CD3 treatment model, due to dramatically reduced frequencies and absolute numbers of IL-17A and interferon (IFN)-γ producing cells. Taken together, our data shows the necessity of intact IL-1 signaling for survival and expansion of CD4 T cells that were developed in an otherwise IL-1 sufficient environment. PMID:27551932

  19. Accumulation of Oxidized LDL in the Tendon Tissues of C57BL/6 or Apolipoprotein E Knock-Out Mice That Consume a High Fat Diet: Potential Impact on Tendon Health

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, Navdeep; Thornton, Gail M.; Behzad, Hayedeh; Sharma, Aishwariya; Lu, Alex; Zhang, Peng; Reid, W. Darlene; Granville, David J.; Scott, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Objective Clinical studies have suggested an association between dyslipidemia and tendon injuries or chronic tendon pain; the mechanisms underlying this association are not yet known. The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate the impact of a high fat diet on the function of load-bearing tendons and on the distribution in tendons of oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL), and (2) to examine the effect of oxLDL on tendon fibroblast proliferation and gene expression. Methods Gene expression (Mmp2, Tgfb1, Col1a1, Col3a1), fat content (Oil Red O staining), oxLDL levels (immunohistochemistry) and tendon biomechanical properties were examined in mice (C57Bl/6 or ApoE -/-) receiving a standard or a high fat diet. Human tendon fibroblast proliferation and gene expression (COL1A1, COL3A1, MMP2) were examined following oxLDL exposure. Results In both types of mice (C57Bl/6 or ApoE -/-), consumption of a high fat diet led to a marked increase in oxLDL deposition in the load-bearing extracellular matrix of the tendon. The consumption of a high fat diet also reduced the failure stress and load of the patellar tendon in both mouse types, and increased Mmp2 expression. ApoE -/- mice exhibited more pronounced reductions in tendon function than wild-type mice, and decreased expression of Col1a1 compared to wild type mice. Human tendon fibroblasts responded to oxLDL by increasing their proliferation and their mRNA levels of MMP2, while decreasing their mRNA levels for COL1A1 and COL3A1. Conclusion The consumption of a high fat diet resulted in deleterious changes in tendon function, and these changes may be explained in part by the effects of oxLDL, which induced a proliferative, matrix-degrading phenotype in human tenocytes. PMID:25502628

  20. Immunization of knock-out α/β interferon receptor mice against lethal bluetongue infection with a BoHV-4-based vector expressing BTV-8 VP2 antigen.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Valentina; Capocefalo, Antonio; Calvo-Pinilla, Eva; Redaelli, Marco; Mucignat-Caretta, Carla; Mertens, Peter; Ortego, Javier; Donofrio, Gaetano

    2011-04-01

    New effective tools for vaccine strategies are necessary to limit the spread of bluetongue, an insect-transmitted viral disease of domestic and wild ruminants. In the present study, BoHV-4-based vector cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) was engineered to express the bluetongue virus (BTV) immune-dominant glycoprotein VP2 provided of a heterologous signal peptide to its amino terminal and a trans-membrane domain to its carboxyl terminal (IgK-VP2gDtm), to allow the VP2 expression targeting to the cell membrane fraction. Based on adult α/β interferon receptor knockout (IFNAR(-/-)) mice, a newly generated bluetongue laboratory animal model, a pre-challenge experiment was performed to test BoHV-4 safety on such immune-compromised animal. BoHV-4 infected IFNAR(-/-) mice did not show clinical signs even following the inoculation of BoHV-4 intra-cerebrally, although many areas of the brain got transduced. IFNAR(-/-) mice intraperitoneally inoculated twice with BoHV-4-A-IgK-VP2gDtm at different time points developed serum neutralizing antibodies against BTV and showed a strongly reduced viremia and a longer survival time when challenged with a lethal dose of BTV-8. The data acquired in this pilot study validate BoHV-4-based vector as a safe and effective heterologous antigen carrier/producer for the formulation of enhanced recombinant immunogens for the vaccination against lethal bluetongue. PMID:21320537

  1. The delta 6 desaturase knock out mouse reveals that immunomodulatory effects of essential n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are both independent of and dependent upon conversion.

    PubMed

    Monk, Jennifer M; Liddle, Danyelle M; Cohen, Daniel J A; Tsang, Denis H; Hillyer, Lyn M; Abdelmagid, Salma A; Nakamura, Manabu T; Power, Krista A; Ma, David W L; Robinson, Lindsay E

    2016-06-01

    Typically fatty acids (FA) exert differential immunomodulatory effects with n-3 [α-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)] and n-6 [linoleic acid (LA) and arachidonic acid (AA)] exerting anti- and pro-inflammatory effects, respectively. This over-simplified interpretation is confounded by a failure to account for conversion of the parent FA (LA and ALA) to longer-chain bioactive products (AA and EPA/DHA, respectively), thereby precluding discernment of the immunomodulatory potential of specific FA. Therefore, we utilized the Δ6-desaturase model, wherein knockout mice (D6KO) lack the Fads2 gene encoding for the rate-limiting enzyme that initiates FA metabolism, thereby providing a model to determine specific FA immunomodulatory effects. Wild-type (WT) and D6KO mice were fed one of four isocaloric diets differing in FA source (9weeks): corn oil (LA-enriched), arachidonic acid single cell oil (AA-enriched), flaxseed oil (ALA-enriched) or menhaden fish oil (EPA/DHA-enriched). Splenic mononuclear cell cytokine production in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), T-cell receptor (TCR) and anti-CD40 stimulation was determined. Following LPS stimulation, AA was more bioactive compared to LA, by increasing inflammatory cytokine production of IL-6 (1.2-fold) and TNFα (1.3-fold). Further, LPS-stimulated IFNγ production in LA-fed D6KO mice was reduced 5-fold compared to LA-fed WT mice, indicating that conversion of LA to AA was necessary for cytokine production. Conversely, ALA exerted an independent immunomodulatory effect from EPA/DHA and all n-3 FA increased LPS-stimulated IL-10 production versus LA and AA. These data definitively identify specific immunomodulatory effects of individual FA and challenge the simplified view of the immunomodulatory effects of n-3 and n-6 FA. PMID:27142734

  2. Dynamics of Sun5 Localization during Spermatogenesis in Wild Type and Dpy19l2 Knock-Out Mice Indicates That Sun5 Is Not Involved in Acrosome Attachment to the Nuclear Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Yassine, Sandra; Escoffier, Jessica; Nahed, Roland Abi; Pierre, Virginie; Karaouzene, Thomas; Ray, Pierre F.; Arnoult, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The acrosome is an organelle that is central to sperm physiology and a defective acrosome biogenesis leads to globozoospermia, a severe male infertility. The identification of the actors involved in acrosome biogenesis is therefore particularly important to decipher the molecular pathogeny of globozoospermia. We recently showed that a defect in the DPY19L2 gene is present in more than 70% of globozoospermic men and demonstrated that Dpy19l2, located in the inner nuclear membrane, is the first protein involved in the attachment of the acrosome to the nuclear envelope (NE). SUN proteins serve to link the nuclear envelope to the cytoskeleton and are therefore good candidates to participate in acrosome-nucleus attachment, potentially by interacting with DPY19L2. In order to characterize new actors of acrosomal attachment, we focused on Sun5 (also called Spag4l), which is highly expressed in male germ cells, and investigated its localization during spermatogenesis. Using immunohistochemistry and Western blot experiments in mice, we showed that Sun5 transits through different cellular compartments during meiosis. In pachytene spermatocytes, it is located in a membranous compartment different to the reticulum. In round spermatids, it progresses to the Golgi and the NE before to be located to the tail/head junction in epididymal sperm. Interestingly, we demonstrate that Sun5 is not, as initially reported, facing the acrosome but is in fact excluded from this zone. Moreover, we show that in Dpy19l2 KO spermatids, upon the detachment of the acrosome, Sun5 relocalizes to the totality of the NE suggesting that the acrosome attachment excludes Sun5 from the NE facing the acrosome. Finally, Western-blot experiments demonstrate that Sun5 is glycosylated. Overall, our work, associated with other publications, strongly suggests that the attachment of the acrosome to the nucleus does not likely depend on the formation of SUN complexes. PMID:25775128

  3. Determination of loperamide in mdr1a/1b knock-out mouse brain tissue using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and comparison with quantitative electrospray-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young G; Dong, Teresa; Chou, Bilin; Menghrajani, Kapil

    2011-11-01

    Recently matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) imaging has been used to analyze small molecule pharmaceutical compounds directly on tissue sections to determine spatial distribution within target tissue and organs. The data presented to date usually indicate relative amounts of drug within the tissue. The determination of absolute amounts is still done using tissue homogenization followed by traditional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In this study, the quantitative determination of loperamide, an antidiarrheal agent and a P-glycoprotein substrate, in mdr1a/1b (-/-) mouse brain tissue sections using MALDI MS on a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry is described. 5 mg/mL α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid in 50% acetonitrile with 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid and 0.5 μM reserpine was used as the MALDI matrix. The calibration curve constructed by the peak intensities of standard samples from MALDI MS was linear from 0.025 to 0.5 μM with r² = 0.9989. The accuracy of calibration curve standards was 78.3-105.9% and the percent deviation was less than 25%. Comparison between direct MALDI tissue analysis and conventional tissue analysis using homogenization followed by electrospray LC-MS/MS was also explored. PMID:22139698

  4. Continuous detonation reaction engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, O. H.; Stein, R. J.; Tubbs, H. E.

    1968-01-01

    Reaction engine operates on the principles of a controlled condensed detonation rather than on the principles of gas expansion. The detonation results in reaction products that are expelled at a much higher velocity.

  5. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  6. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction can be provoked by skin contact with poison plants, chemicals and animal scratches, as well as by ... dust, nuts and shellfish, may also cause allergic reaction. Medications such as penicillin and other antibiotics are ...

  7. Microscale Thermite Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnaiz, Francisco J.; Aguado, Rafael; Arnaiz, Susana

    1998-01-01

    Describes the adaptation of thermite (aluminum with metal oxides) reactions from whole-class demonstrations to student-run micro-reactions. Lists detailed directions and possible variations of the experiment. (WRM)

  8. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C.; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R.; Phelps, Michael E.; Quake, Stephen R.; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  9. Reaction coordinates for electron transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rasaiah, Jayendran C.; Zhu Jianjun

    2008-12-07

    The polarization fluctuation and energy gap formulations of the reaction coordinate for outer sphere electron transfer are linearly related to the constant energy constraint Lagrangian multiplier m in Marcus' theory of electron transfer. The quadratic dependence of the free energies of the reactant and product intermediates on m and m+1, respectively, leads to similar dependence of the free energies on the reaction coordinates and to the same dependence of the activation energy on the reorganization energy and the standard reaction free energy. Within the approximations of a continuum model of the solvent and linear response of the longitudinal polarization to the electric field in Marcus' theory, both formulations of the reaction coordinate are expected to lead to the same results.

  10. Catalytic diastereoselective petasis reactions.

    PubMed

    Muncipinto, Giovanni; Moquist, Philip N; Schreiber, Stuart L; Schaus, Scott E

    2011-08-22

    Multicomponent Petasis reactions: the first diastereoselective Petasis reaction catalyzed by chiral biphenols that enables the synthesis of syn and anti β-amino alcohols in pure form has been developed. The reaction exploits a multicomponent approach that involves boronates, α-hydroxy aldehydes, and amines. PMID:21751322

  11. Reaction efficiency effects on binary chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazaridis, Filippos; Savara, Aditya; Argyrakis, Panos

    2014-09-01

    We study the effect of the variation of reaction efficiency in binary reactions. We use the well-known A + B → 0 model, which has been extensively studied in the past. We perform simulations on this model where we vary the efficiency of reaction, i.e., when two particles meet they do not instantly react, as has been assumed in previous studies, but they react with a probability γ, where γ is in the range 0 < γ < 1. Our results show that at small γ values the system is reaction limited, but as γ increases it crosses over to a diffusion limited behavior. At early times, for small γ values, the particle density falls slower than for larger γ values. This fall-off goes over a crossover point, around the value of γ = 0.50 for high initial densities. Under a variety of conditions simulated, we find that the crossover point was dependent on the initial concentration but not on the lattice size. For intermediate and long times simulations, all γ values (in the depleted reciprocal density versus time plot) converge to the same behavior. These theoretical results are useful in models of epidemic reactions and epidemic spreading, where a contagion from one neighbor to the next is not always successful but proceeds with a certain probability, an analogous effect with the reaction probability examined in the current work.

  12. (. pi. sup +- ,. pi. sup +- prime N) reactions on sup 12 C and sup 208 Pb near the giant resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Sung Hoon.

    1990-05-01

    Angular distributions for the {sup 12}C({pi}{sup {plus minus}}, {pi}{sup {plus minus}}{prime} p) and {sup 208}Pb({pi}{sup {plus minus}}, {pi}{sup {plus minus}}{prime} p or n) reactions near the giant resonance region have been measured at T{sub {pi}} = 180 MeV, and found different between {pi}{sup +} and {pi}{sup {minus}} data. This observation is interpreted as evidence for different excitation mechanisms dominating the {pi}{sup {minus}}-nucleus and {pi}{sup +}-nucleus interactions in the giant resonance region of these targets. A comparison with the single-nucleon knock-out distorted-wave impulse approximation calculations shows, even though these calculations underestimate ({pi}{sup {plus minus}}, {pi}{sup {plus minus}}{prime} N) data for both targets, the dominance of direct process for ({pi}{sup +}, {pi}{sup {plus}}{prime} p) or ({pi}{sup {minus}}, {pi}{sup {minus}}{prime} n) in contrast to ({pi}{sup {minus}}, {pi}{sup {minus}}{prime} p) or ({pi}{sup +}, {pi}{sup +}{prime} n). In the ({pi}{sup +}, {pi}{sup +}{prime} p) reaction proton-proton hole states are excited directly and appear to have a large probability for direct decay with escape width, whereas in ({pi}{sup {minus}}, {pi}{sup {minus}}{prime} p) the preferentially excited neutron-neutron hole doorway states couple to resonance states and decay with spreading width. This interpretation led us to suggest that the ratio of cross-sections for inelastic scattering to the giant resonance region should be written in terms of an incoherent sum of cross-sections to neutron and proton doorway states. In a heavy nucleus such as {sup 208}Pb, neutron and proton doorway states. In a heavy nucleus such as {sup 208}Pb, neutron and proton doorway states contribute incoherently because the different decay processes do not populate the same final states of the residual nucleus.

  13. Reactions to radiocontrast media.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sandra J; Wong, Johnson T; Bloch, Kurt J

    2002-01-01

    Adverse reactions to radiocontrast media (RCM) occur unexpectedly and may be life-threatening. This article describes an anaphylactoid reaction (AR) in one patient. The term AR refers to a syndrome clinically similar to anaphylaxis, but these reactions are independent of immunoglobulin E antibody-mediated mast cell or basophil degranulation. This article briefly reviews the literature regarding RCMs and types of reactions to RCM. The risk factors for AR to RCM infusions will be discussed along with current concepts of the pathogenesis of RCM-induced ARs. This article also describes the therapeutic management of patients who have had a previous adverse reaction to RCM and provides an approach to patients who have breakthrough reactions despite adequate premedication, but require additional radiographic studies. PMID:12476546

  14. Noncanonical Reactions of Flavoenzymes

    PubMed Central

    Sobrado, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes containing flavin cofactors are predominantly involved in redox reactions in numerous cellular processes where the protein environment modulates the chemical reactivity of the flavin to either transfer one or two electrons. Some flavoenzymes catalyze reactions with no net redox change. In these reactions, the protein environment modulates the reactivity of the flavin to perform novel chemistries. Recent mechanistic and structural data supporting novel flavin functionalities in reactions catalyzed by chorismate synthase, type II isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase, UDP-galactopyranose mutase, and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase are presented in this review. In these enzymes, the flavin plays either a direct role in acid/base reactions or as a nucleophile or electrophile. In addition, the flavin cofactor is proposed to function as a “molecular scaffold” in the formation of UDP-galactofuranose and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate by forming a covalent adduct with reaction intermediates. PMID:23203060

  15. Mechanisms in Knockout Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, D.; Charity, R. J.; de Souza, R. T.; Famiano, M. A.; Gade, A.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Hudan, S.; Lee, J.; Lukyanov, S.; Lynch, W. G.; McDaniel, S.; Mocko, M.; Obertelli, A.; Rogers, A. M.; Sobotka, L. G.; Terry, J. R.; Tostevin, J. A.; Tsang, M. B.; Wallace, M. S.

    2009-06-01

    We report the first detailed study of the relative importance of the stripping and diffraction mechanisms involved in nucleon knockout reactions, by the use of a coincidence measurement of the residue and fast proton following one-proton knockout reactions. The measurements used the S800 spectrograph in combination with the HiRA detector array at the NSCL. Results for the reactions Be9(C9,B8+X)Y and Be9(B8,Be7+X)Y are presented and compared with theoretical predictions for the two reaction mechanisms calculated using the eikonal model. The data show a clear distinction between the stripping and diffraction mechanisms and the measured relative proportions are very well reproduced by the reaction theory. This agreement adds support to the results of knockout reaction analyses and their applications to the spectroscopy of rare isotopes.

  16. Anaphylactic reactions to cinoxacin.

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, B. H.; Slagboom, G.; Demaeseneer, R.; Slootmaekers, V.; Thijs, I.; Olsson, S.

    1988-01-01

    During 1981 to mid-1988 three cases of anaphylactic shock after treatment with the quinolone derivative cinoxacin were reviewed by the Netherlands Centre for Monitoring of Adverse Reactions to Drugs and 17 cases of an anaphylactic type of reaction notified to the World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre for International Drug Monitoring. In five out of six patients for whom data were available the reaction began shortly after taking a single capsule of a second or next course of treatment. Cinoxacin is related to nalidixic acid, and one patient previously treated with that agent subsequently had an anaphylactoid reaction to cinoxacin and later developed a skin reaction to nalidixic acid. There were no deaths, and patients treated as an emergency with plasma expanders or with adrenaline and corticosteroids generally recovered promptly and uneventfully. In view of the potentially fatal consequences of anaphylactic reactions to cinoxacin and other quinolones doctors should take care when prescribing these drugs. PMID:3147004

  17. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, M. Allen; Beeman, Barton V.; Benett, William J.; Hadley, Dean R.; Landre, Phoebe; Lehew, Stacy L.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  18. Metal-mullite reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Loehman, R.E.; Tomsia, A.P.

    1993-11-01

    Mullite was reacted with pure Al and with Ti or Zr dissolved in Ag-Cu eutectic alloys at 1100 C in Ar. Analysis of the Ti and Zr-containing specimens showed reaction zones with compositions of Ti{sub 50}Cu{sub 3O}O{sub 20} and ZrO{sub 2}, respectively. The Al-mullite specimen showed much more extensive penetration into the ceramic and a more diffuse reaction zone than the other two systems. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Si were the main reaction products for Al-mullite reaction.

  19. REUSABLE REACTION VESSEL

    DOEpatents

    Soine, T.S.

    1963-02-26

    This patent shows a reusable reaction vessel for such high temperature reactions as the reduction of actinide metal chlorides by calcium metal. The vessel consists of an outer metal shell, an inner container of refractory material such as sintered magnesia, and between these, a bed of loose refractory material impregnated with thermally conductive inorganic salts. (AEC)

  20. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  2. Chemical Reaction Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veal, William

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the role of chemical-equation problem solving in helping students predict reaction products. Methods for helping students learn this process must be taught to students and future teachers by using pedagogical skills within the content of chemistry. Emphasizes that solving chemical reactions should involve creative cognition where…

  3. Applications of Reaction Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an assignment in which students are to research and report on a chemical reaction whose increased or decreased rate is of practical importance. Specifically, students are asked to represent the reaction they have chosen with an acceptable chemical equation, identify a factor that influences its rate and explain how and why it…

  4. Degradations and Rearrangement Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianbo

    This section deals with recent reports concerning degradation and rearrangement reactions of free sugars as well as some glycosides. The transformations are classified in chemical and enzymatic ways. In addition, the Maillard reaction will be discussed as an example of degradation and rearrangement transformation and its application in current research in the fields of chemistry and biology.

  5. Oscillating Reactions: Two Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petruševski, Vladimir M.; Stojanovska, Marina I.; Šoptrajanov, Bojan T.

    2007-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions are truly spectacular phenomena, and demonstrations are always appreciated by the class. However, explaining such reactions to high school or first-year university students is problematic, because it may seem that no acceptable explanation is possible unless the students have profound knowledge of both physical…

  6. Clock Reaction: Outreach Attraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Yuen-ying; Phillips, Heather A.; Jakubinek, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Chemistry students are often introduced to the concept of reaction rates through demonstrations or laboratory activities involving the well-known iodine clock reaction. For example, a laboratory experiment involving thiosulfate as an iodine scavenger is part of the first-year general chemistry laboratory curriculum at Dalhousie University. With…

  7. Chemical burn or reaction

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000059.htm Chemical burn or reaction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chemicals that touch skin can lead to a reaction on the skin, throughout the body, or both. ...

  8. Lipases in lipophilization reactions.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Lipases are used in various sectors, as pharmaceutical, food or detergency industry. Their advantage versus classical chemical catalysts is that they exhibit a better selectivity and operate in milder reaction conditions. Theses enzymes can also be used in lipophilization reactions corresponding to the grafting of a lipophilic moiety to a hydrophilic one such as sugar, amino acids and proteins, or phenolic compounds. The major difficulty to overcome in such enzyme-catalyzed reaction resides in the fact that the two involved substrates greatly differ in term of polarity and solvent affinity. Therefore, several key parameters are to be considered in order to achieve the reaction in satisfactory kinetics and yields. The present review discusses the nature of such parameters (eg solvent nature, water activity, chemical modification of substrates) and illustrates their effect with examples of lipase-catalyzed lipophilization reactions of various sugar, amino acids or phenolic derivatives. PMID:17681737

  9. Reactions of oriented molecules.

    PubMed

    Brooks, P R

    1976-07-01

    Beams of oriented molecules have been used to directly study geometrical requirements in chemical reactions. These studies have shown that reactivity is much greater in some orientations than others and demonstrated the existence of steric effects. For some reactions portions of the orientation results are in good accord with traditional views of steric hindrance, but for others it is clear that our chemical intuition needs recalibrating. Indeed, the information gained from simultaneously orienting the reactants and observing the scattering angle of the products may lead to new insights about the detailed mechanism of certain reactions. Further work must be done to extend the scope and detail of the studies described here. More detailed information is needed on the CH(3)I reaction and the CF(3)I reaction. The effects of alkyl groups of various sizes and alkali metals of various sizes are of interest. In addition, reactions where a long-lived complex is formed should be studied to see if orientation is important. Finally, it would be of interest to apply the technique to the sort of reactions that led to our interest in the first place: the S(N)2 displacements in alkyl halides where the fascinating Walden inversion occurs. PMID:17793988

  10. Mechanisms in knockout reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, D.; Charity, R. J.; de Souza, R. T.; Famiano, M. A.; Gade, A.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Hudan, S.; Lee, J.; Lukyanov, S.; Lynch, W. G.; McDaniel, S.; Mocko, M.; Obertelli, A.; Rogers, A. M.; Sobotka, L. G.; Terry, J. R.; Tostevin, J. A.; Tsang, M. B.; Wallace, M. S.

    2009-10-01

    We report on the first detailed study of the mechanisms involved in knockout reactions, via a coincidence measurement of the residue and fast proton in one-proton knockout reactions, using the S800 spectrograph in combination with the HiRA detector array at the NSCL. Results on the reactions ^9Be(^9C,^8B+X)Y and ^9Be(^8B,^7Be+X)Y are presented. They are compared with theoretical predictions for both the diffraction (elastic breakup) and stripping (inelastic breakup) reaction mechanisms, as calculated in the eikonal model. The data shows a clear distinction between the two reaction mechanisms, and the observed respective proportions are very well reproduced by the reaction theory. This agreement supports the results of knockout reaction analyses and their applications to the spectroscopy of rare isotopes. In particular, this add considerable support to the use of the eikonal model as a quantitative tool, able, for example, to determine single-particle spectroscopic strengths in rare isotopes.

  11. Enhancing chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of enhancing selected chemical reactions. The population of a selected high vibrational energy state of a reactant molecule is increased substantially above its population at thermal equilibrium by directing onto the molecule a beam of radiant energy from a laser having a combination of frequency and intensity selected to pump the selected energy state, and the reaction is carried out with the temperature, pressure, and concentrations of reactants maintained at a combination of values selected to optimize the reaction in preference to thermal degradation by transforming the absorbed energy into translational motion. The reaction temperature is selected to optimize the reaction. Typically a laser and a frequency doubler emit radiant energy at frequencies of .nu. and 2.nu. into an optical dye within an optical cavity capable of being tuned to a wanted frequency .delta. or a parametric oscillator comprising a non-centrosymmetric crystal having two indices of refraction, to emit radiant energy at the frequencies of .nu., 2.nu., and .delta. (and, with a parametric oscillator, also at 2.nu.-.delta.). Each unwanted frequency is filtered out, and each desired frequency is focused to the desired radiation flux within a reaction chamber and is reflected repeatedly through the chamber while reactants are fed into the chamber and reaction products are removed therefrom.

  12. Hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Vatti, Rani R; Ali, Fatima; Teuber, Suzanne; Chang, Christopher; Gershwin, M Eric

    2014-08-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids (CS) are rare in the general population, but they are not uncommon in high-risk groups such as patients who receive repeated doses of CS. Hypersensitivity reactions to steroids are broadly divided into two categories: immediate reactions, typically occurring within 1 h of drug administration, and non-immediate reactions, which manifest more than an hour after drug administration. The latter group is more common. We reviewed the literature using the search terms "hypersensitivity to steroids, adverse effects of steroids, steroid allergy, allergic contact dermatitis, corticosteroid side effects, and type I hypersensitivity" to identify studies or clinical reports of steroid hypersensitivity. We discuss the prevalence, mechanism, presentation, evaluation, and therapeutic options in corticosteroid hypersensitivity reactions. There is a paucity of literature on corticosteroid allergy, with most reports being case reports. Most reports involve non-systemic application of corticosteroids. Steroid hypersensitivity has been associated with type I IgE-mediated allergy including anaphylaxis. The overall prevalence of type I steroid hypersensitivity is estimated to be 0.3-0.5%. Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is the most commonly reported non-immediate hypersensitivity reaction and usually follows topical CS application. Atopic dermatitis and stasis dermatitis of the lower extremities are risk factors for the development of ACD from topical CS. Patients can also develop hypersensitivity reactions to nasal, inhaled, oral, and parenteral CS. A close and detailed evaluation is required for the clinician to confirm the presence of a true hypersensitivity reaction to the suspected drug and choose the safest alternative. Choosing an alternative CS is not only paramount to the patient's safety but also ameliorates the worry of developing an allergic, and potentially fatal, steroid hypersensitivity reaction. This evaluation becomes

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1963-09-01

    A nuclear reactor system is described for breeding fissionable material, including a heat-exchange tank, a high- and a low-pressure chamber therein, heat- exchange tubes connecting these chambers, a solution of U/sup 233/ in heavy water in a reaction container within the tank, a slurry of thorium dioxide in heavy water in a second container surrounding the first container, an inlet conduit including a pump connecting the low pressure chamber to the reaction container, an outlet conduit connecting the high pressure chamber to the reaction container, and means of removing gaseous fission products released in both chambers. (AEC)

  14. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Hearn, Dennis; Jones, Jr., Edward M.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  15. Iodine Clock Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Richard S.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a combination of solutions that can be used in the study of kinetics using the iodine clock reaction. The combination slows down degradation of the prepared solutions and can be used successfully for several weeks. (JRH)

  16. Untoward penicillin reactions

    PubMed Central

    Guthe, T.; Idsöe, O.; Willcox, R. R.

    1958-01-01

    The literature on untoward reactions following the administration of penicillin is reviewed. These reactions, including a certain number of deaths which have been reported, are of particular interest to health administrations and to WHO in view of the large-scale programmes for controlling the treponematoses which are now under way—programmes affecting millions of people in many parts of the world. The most serious problems are anaphylactic sensitivity phenomena and superinfection or cross-infection with penicillin-resistant organisms, and the reactions involved range in intensity from the mildest to the fatal; the incidence of the latter is estimated at 0.1-0.3 per million injections. The authors point out that with increasing use of penicillin, more persons are likely to become sensitized and the number of reactions can therefore be expected to rise. The best prevention against such an increase is the restriction of the unnecessary use of penicillin. PMID:13596877

  17. Catalysis in reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Gopalkrishnan, Manoj

    2011-12-01

    We define catalytic networks as chemical reaction networks with an essentially catalytic reaction pathway: one which is "on" in the presence of certain catalysts and "off" in their absence. We show that examples of catalytic networks include synthetic DNA molecular circuits that have been shown to perform signal amplification and molecular logic. Recall that a critical siphon is a subset of the species in a chemical reaction network whose absence is forward invariant and stoichiometrically compatible with a positive point. Our main theorem is that all weakly-reversible networks with critical siphons are catalytic. Consequently, we obtain new proofs for the persistence of atomic event-systems of Adleman et al., and normal networks of Gnacadja. We define autocatalytic networks, and conjecture that a weakly-reversible reaction network has critical siphons if and only if it is autocatalytic. PMID:21503834

  18. Chemisorption And Precipitation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transport and bioavailability of chemical components within soils is, in part, controlled by partitioning between solids and solution. General terms used to describe these partitioning reactions include chemisorption and precipitation. Chemisorption is inclusive of the suit...

  19. An Illuminating Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Catherine E.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of carbide lights as an excellent mechanism for introducing or reviewing many basic chemistry concepts including elements and compounds, endothermic and exothermic reactions, physical and chemical changes, and balancing chemical equations. (JRH)

  20. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-03-02

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  1. Autocatalysis in reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Abhishek; Gopalkrishnan, Manoj

    2014-10-01

    The persistence conjecture is a long-standing open problem in chemical reaction network theory. It concerns the behavior of solutions to coupled ODE systems that arise from applying mass-action kinetics to a network of chemical reactions. The idea is that if all reactions are reversible in a weak sense, then no species can go extinct. A notion that has been found useful in thinking about persistence is that of "critical siphon." We explore the combinatorics of critical siphons, with a view toward the persistence conjecture. We introduce the notions of "drainable" and "self-replicable" (or autocatalytic) siphons. We show that: Every minimal critical siphon is either drainable or self-replicable; reaction networks without drainable siphons are persistent; and nonautocatalytic weakly reversible networks are persistent. Our results clarify that the difficulties in proving the persistence conjecture are essentially due to competition between drainable and self-replicable siphons. PMID:25245394

  2. Adverse reactions to sulfites

    PubMed Central

    Yang, William H.; Purchase, Emerson C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfites are widely used as preservatives in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In the United States more than 250 cases of sulfite-related adverse reactions, including anaphylactic shock, asthmatic attacks, urticaria and angioedema, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, seizures and death, have been reported, including 6 deaths allegedly associated with restaurant food containing sulfites. In Canada 10 sulfite-related adverse reactions have been documented, and 1 death suspected to be sulfite-related has occurred. The exact mechanism of sulfite-induced reactions is unknown. Practising physicians should be aware of the clinical manifestations of sulfite-related adverse reactions as well as which foods and pharmaceuticals contain sulfites. Cases should be reported to health officials and proper advice given to the victims to prevent further exposure to sulfites. The food industry, including beer and wine manufacturers, and the pharmaceutical industry should consider using alternative preservatives. In the interim, they should list any sulfites in their products. PMID:4052897

  3. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  4. Jets in hadronic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Paige, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Recent experimental data on the properties of jets in hadronic reactions are reviewed and compared with theoretical expectations. Jets are clearly established as the dominant process for high E/sub T/ events in hadronic reactions. The cross section and the other properties of these events are in qualitative and even semiquantitative agreement with expectations based on perturbative QCD. However, we can not yet make precise tests of QCD, primarily because there are substantial uncertainties in the theoretical calculations. 45 references. (WHK)

  5. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions. PMID:25458866

  6. Immediate reaction to clarithromycin.

    PubMed

    Gangemi, S; Ricciardi, L; Fedele, R; Isola, S; Purello-D'Ambrosio, F

    2001-01-01

    We present the case of bronchospastic reaction to clarithromycin had during a drug challenge test. Personal allergic history was negative for respiratory allergies and positive for adverse drug reactions to general and regional anesthesia and to ceftriaxone. After the administration of 1/4 of therapeutic dose of clarithromycin the patient showed dyspnea, cough and bronchospasm in all the lung fields. The positivity of the test was confirmed by the negativity to the administration of placebo. The quickness and the clinical characteristic of the adverse reaction suggest a pathogenic mechanism of immediate-type hypersensitivity. On reviewing the literature we have found no reports of bronchospastic reaction to clarithromycin. Macrolides are a class of antibiotics mainly used in the last years in place of beta-lactams because of a broad spectrum of action and a low allergic power. In fact, there are few reports on allergic reactions to these molecules. Clarithromycin is one of the latest macrolides, characterised by the presence of a 14-carbon-atom lactone ring as erythromycin, active on a wide spectrum of pathogens. PMID:11449533

  7. Find favorable reactions faster

    SciTech Connect

    Yaws, C.L.; Chiang, P.Y. )

    1988-11-01

    Now, equations are given to identify whether the reactions are thermodynamically favorable. The method uses Gibbs free energy of formation for the reactants and products. The equation for any 700 major organic compounds is given as temperature coefficients. Then the reaction can be tested at various temperature levels beyond the standard 298/sup 0/K conditions imposed by many other data tabulations. Data for the water and hydrogen chloride are also included. Gibbs free energy of formation of ideal gas (..delta..G/sub f/, jkoule/g-mol) is calculated from the tabulated coefficients (A, B, C) and the temperature (T, /sup 0/K) using the following equation: (1) ..delta..G/sub f/ = A + BT + CT/sup 2/. Chemical equilibrium for a reaction is associated with the change in Gibbs free energy (..delta..G/sub r/) calculated as follows: (2) ..delta..G/sub r/ = ..delta..G/sub f/, products - ..delta..G/sub f/, reactants. If the change in Gibbs free energy is negative, the thermodynamics for the reaction are favorable. On the other hand, if the change in Gibbs free energy is highly positive, the thermodynamics for the reaction are not favorable and may be feasible only under special circumstances.

  8. Nanoparticle Reactions on Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J. M.; Kirner, Th.; Wagner, J.; Csáki, A.; Möller, R.; Fritzsche, W.

    The handling of heterogenous systems in micro reactors is difficult due to their adhesion and transport behaviour. Therefore, the formation of precipitates and gas bubbles has to be avoided in micro reaction technology, in most cases. But, micro channels and other micro reactors offer interesting possibilities for the control of reaction conditions and transport by diffusion and convection due to the laminar flow caused by small Reynolds numbers. This can be used for the preparation and modification of objects, which are much smaller than the cross section of microchannels. The formation of colloidal solutions and the change of surface states of nano particles are two important tasks for the application of chip reactors in nanoparticle technology. Some concepts for the preparation and reaction of nanoparticles in modular chip reactor arrangements will be discussed.

  9. Hipersensitivity Reactions to Corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Berbegal, L; DeLeon, F J; Silvestre, J F

    2016-03-01

    Corticosteroids are widely used drugs in the clinical practice, especially by topic application in dermatology. These substances may act as allergens and produce immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions. Allergic contact dermatitis is the most frequent presentation of corticosteroid allergy and it should be studied by patch testing in specific units. The corticosteroids included in the Spanish standard battery are good markers but not ideal. Therefore, if those makers are positive, it is useful to apply a specific battery of corticosteroids and the drugs provided by patients. Immediate reactions are relatively rare but potentially severe, and it is important to confirm the sensitization profile and to guide the use of alternative corticosteroids, because they are often necessary in several diseases. In this article we review the main concepts regarding these two types of hypersensitivity reactions in corticosteroid allergy, as well as their approach in the clinical practice. PMID:26621334

  10. Cutaneous reactions to vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, Adena E; Stein, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinations are important for infectious disease prevention; however, there are adverse effects of vaccines, many of which are cutaneous. Some of these reactions are due to nonspecific inflammation and irritation at the injection site, whereas other reactions are directly related to the live attenuated virus. Rarely, vaccinations have been associated with generalized hypersensitivity reactions, such as erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, urticaria, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, and drug hypersensitivity syndrome. The onset of certain inflammatory dermatologic conditions, such as lichen planus, granuloma annulare, and pemphigoid, were reported to occur shortly after vaccine administration. Allergic contact dermatitis can develop at the injection site, typically due to adjuvant ingredients in the vaccine, such as thimerosal and aluminum. Vaccinations are important to promote development of both individual and herd immunity. Although most vaccinations are considered relatively safe, there may be adverse effects associated with any vaccine. Cutaneous manifestations make up a large portion of the types of reactions associated with vaccines. There are many different reasons for the development of a cutaneous reaction to a vaccination. Some are directly related to the injection of a live attenuated virus, such as varicella or vaccinia (for immunity to smallpox), whereas others cause more nonspecific erythema and swelling at the injection site, as a result of local inflammation or irritation. Vaccinations have also been associated in rare reports with generalized hypersensitivity reactions, such as erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, urticaria, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, and drug hypersensitivity syndrome. There have been case reports associating the administration of a vaccine with the new onset of a dermatologic condition, such as lichen planus, granuloma annulare, and Sweet syndrome. Finally, allergic contact

  11. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, P.A.

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  12. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1984-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  13. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1982-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  14. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Henderson and Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-04-14

    Chemical reactions at surfaces underlie some of the most important processes of today, including catalysis, energy conversion, microelectronics, human health and the environment. Understanding surface chemical reactions at a fundamental level is at the core of the field of surface science. The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is one of the premiere meetings in the field. The program this year will cover a broad range of topics, including heterogeneous catalysis and surface chemistry, surfaces in environmental chemistry and energy conversion, reactions at the liquid-solid and liquid-gas interface, electronic materials growth and surface modification, biological interfaces, and electrons and photons at surfaces. An exciting program is planned, with contributions from outstanding speakers and discussion leaders from the international scientific community. The conference provides a dynamic environment with ample time for discussion and interaction. Attendees are encouraged to present posters; the poster sessions are historically well attended and stimulate additional discussions. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for junior researchers (e.g. graduate students or postdocs) to present their work and interact with established leaders in the field.

  15. Radiobiology of tissue reactions.

    PubMed

    Dörr, W

    2015-06-01

    Tissue effects of radiation exposure are observed in virtually all normal tissues, with interactions when several organs are involved. Early reactions occur in turnover tissues, where proliferative impairment results in hypoplasia; late reactions, based on combined parenchymal, vascular, and connective tissue changes, result in loss of function within the exposed volume; consequential late effects develop through interactions between early and late effects in the same organ; and very late effects are dominated by vascular sequelae. Invariably, involvement of the immune system is observed. Importantly, latent times of late effects are inversely dependent on the biologically equieffective dose. Each tissue component and--importantly--each individual symptom/endpoint displays a specific dose-effect relationship. Equieffective doses are modulated by exposure conditions: in particular, dose-rate reduction--down to chronic levels--and dose fractionation impact on late responding tissues, while overall exposure time predominantly affects early (and consequential late) reactions. Consequences of partial organ exposure are related to tissue architecture. In 'tubular' organs (gastrointestinal tract, but also vasculature), punctual exposure affects function in downstream compartments. In 'parallel' organs, such as liver or lungs, only exposure of a significant (organ-dependent) fraction of the total volume results in clinical consequences. Forthcoming studies must address biomarkers of the individual risk for tissue reactions, and strategies to prevent/mitigate tissue effects after exposure. PMID:25816259

  16. Reaction and Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armento, Beverly J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Provides a reaction by three economic educators to an article by Raymond C. Miller calling for the elimination of economics. Contends that traditional economics does not necessarily lead to the degradation of the environment. Argues that economics should not promote any set of social values. (CFR)

  17. A Principal's Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaretsky, Lindy

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a principal's reaction to Catherine Marshall and Michael Ward's article on research on social justice and training for leadership. The author applauds Marshall and Ward's efforts to address what is undoubtedly among the most fundamentally important issues facing principals today. Marshall and Ward illuminate the importance of…

  18. Reaction product imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, D.W.

    1993-12-01

    Over the past few years the author has investigated the photochemistry of small molecules using the photofragment imaging technique. Bond energies, spectroscopy of radicals, dissociation dynamics and branching ratios are examples of information obtained by this technique. Along with extending the technique to the study of bimolecular reactions, efforts to make the technique as quantitative as possible have been the focus of the research effort. To this end, the author has measured the bond energy of the C-H bond in acetylene, branching ratios in the dissociation of HI, the energetics of CH{sub 3}Br, CD{sub 3}Br, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Br and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OBr dissociation, and the alignment of the CD{sub 3} fragment from CD{sub 3}I photolysis. In an effort to extend the technique to bimolecular reactions the author has studied the reaction of H with HI and the isotopic exchange reaction between H and D{sub 2}.

  19. Reactions to Others' Intimacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeldt, David E.; Olinger, Evanelle J.

    Research using behavioral measures has indicated that men react less positively to the touch of a same sex individual than women, that both men and women react more positively to the touch of an opposite sex individual than to the touch of a same sex individual, and that men and women do not differ in their reactions to opposite sex touch. This…

  20. Polymerase chain reaction system

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.; Stratton, Paul L.; Hadley, Dean R.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Belgrader, Phil; Meyer, Peter L.

    2004-03-02

    A portable polymerase chain reaction DNA amplification and detection system includes one or more chamber modules. Each module supports a duplex assay of a biological sample. Each module has two parallel interrogation ports with a linear optical system. The system is capable of being handheld.

  1. A Superintendent's Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytle, James H.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a superintendent's reaction to Catherine Marshall and Michael Ward's article on research on social justice and training for leadership. The author states that there is a problem with Marshall and Ward's article which begins with the title, particularly with the word "training." The author contends that there is a significant…

  2. Quinoprotein-catalysed reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, C

    1996-01-01

    This review is concerned with the structure and function of the quinoprotein enzymes, sometimes called quinoenzymes. These have prosthetic groups containing quinones, the name thus being analogous to the flavoproteins containing flavin prosthetic groups. Pyrrolo-quinoline quinone (PQQ) is non-covalently attached, whereas tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ), topaquinone (TPQ) and lysine tyrosylquinone (LTQ) are derived from amino acid residues in the backbone of the enzymes. The mechanisms of the quinoproteins are reviewed and related to their recently determined three-dimensional structures. As expected, the quinone structures in the prosthetic groups play important roles in the mechanisms. A second common feature is the presence of a catalytic base (aspartate) at the active site which initiates the reactions by abstracting a proton from the substrate, and it is likely to be involved in multiple reactions in the mechanism. A third common feature of these enzymes is that the first part of the reaction produces a reduced prosthetic group; this part of the mechanism is fairly well understood. This is followed by an oxidative phase involving electron transfer reactions which remain poorly understood. In both types of dehydrogenase (containing PQQ and TTQ), electrons must pass from the reduced prosthetic group to redox centres in a second recipient protein (or protein domain), whereas in amine oxidases (containing TPQ or LTQ), electrons must be transferred to molecular oxygen by way of a redox-active copper ion in the protein. PMID:9003352

  3. Chain Reaction Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, James E.

    1981-01-01

    The salient features and importance of chain-reaction polymerization are discussed, including such topics as the thermodynamics of polymerization, free-radical polymerization kinetics, radical polymerization processes, copolymers, and free-radical chain, anionic, cationic, coordination, and ring-opening polymerizations. (JN)

  4. Exocharmic Reactions up Close

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramette, R. W.

    2007-01-01

    The exocharmic reactions that can be observed microscopically are discussed. The students can discover the optimal concentration of an acidic lead nitrate solution, so that a crystal of potassium iodide, nudged to the edge of a drop, results in glinting golden hexagons of lead iodide.

  5. Azlactone Reaction Developments.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Pedro P; Carpanez, Arthur G; Amarante, Giovanni W

    2016-07-18

    Azlactones (also known as oxazolones) are heterocycles usually employed in the stereoselective synthesis of α,α-amino acids, heterocycles and natural products. The versatility of the azlactone scaffold arises from the numerous reactive sites, allowing its application in a diversity of transformations. This review aims to cover classical and recent applications of oxazolones, especially those involving stereoselective processes. After a short introduction on their structures and intrinsic reactivities, dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) processes as well as reactions involving stereoselective formation of a new σ C-C bond, such as alkylation/allylation/arylation, aldol, ene, Michael and Mannich reactions will be exposed. Additionally, cycloadditions, Steglich rearrangement and sulfenylation reactions will also be discussed. Recent developments of the well-known Erlenmeyer azlactones will be described. For the most examples, the proposed mechanism, activation modes and/or key reaction intermediates will be exposed to rationalize both the final product and the observed stereochemistry. Finally, this review gives an overview of the synthetic utility of oxazolones. PMID:27245128

  6. Reaction Formulation: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Reaction formation was studied by Sigmund Freud. This defense mechanism may be related to repression, substitution, reversal, and compensation (or over-compensation). Alfred Adler considered compensation a basic process in his individual psychology. Anna Freud discussed some defense mechanisms, and Bibring, Dwyer, Huntington, and Valenstein…

  7. Enantioselective Vinylogous Organocascade Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, Hamish B; Dell'Amico, Luca; Melchiorre, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Cascade reactions are powerful tools for rapidly assembling complex molecular architectures from readily available starting materials in a single synthetic operation. Their marriage with asymmetric organocatalysis has led to the development of novel techniques, which are now recognized as reliable strategies for the one-pot enantioselective synthesis of stereochemically dense molecules. In recent years, even more complex synthetic challenges have been addressed by applying the principle of vinylogy to the realm of organocascade catalysis. The key to the success of vinylogous organocascade reactions is the unique ability of the chiral organocatalyst to transfer reactivity to a distal position without losing control on the stereo-determining events. This approach has greatly expanded the synthetic horizons of the field by providing the possibility of forging multiple stereocenters in remote positions from the catalyst's point of action with high selectivity, while simultaneously constructing multiple new bonds. This article critically describes the developments achieved in the field of enantioselective vinylogous organocascade reactions, charting the ideas, the conceptual advances, and the milestone reactions that have been essential for reaching highly practical levels of synthetic efficiency. PMID:27256039

  8. Photoneutron reactions in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Varlamov, V. V. Ishkhanov, B. S.; Orlin, V. N.; Peskov, N. N.; Stopani, K. A.

    2014-12-15

    Among key problems in nuclear astrophysics, that of obtaining deeper insight into the mechanism of synthesis of chemical elements is of paramount importance. The majority of heavy elements existing in nature are produced in stars via radiative neutron capture in so-called s- and r processes, which are, respectively, slow and fast, in relation to competing β{sup −}-decay processes. At the same time, we know 35 neutron-deficient so-called bypassed p-nuclei that lie between {sup 74}Se and {sup 196}Hg and which cannot originate from the aforementioned s- and r-processes. Their production is possible in (γ, n), (γ, p), or (γ, α) photonuclear reactions. In view of this, data on photoneutron reactions play an important role in predicting and describing processes leading to the production of p-nuclei. Interest in determining cross sections for photoneutron reactions in the threshold energy region, which is of particular importance for astrophysics, has grown substantially in recent years. The use of modern sources of quasimonoenergetic photons obtained in processes of inverse Compton laser-radiation scattering on relativistic electronsmakes it possible to reveal rather interesting special features of respective cross sections, manifestations of pygmy E1 and M1 resonances, or the production of nuclei in isomeric states, on one hand, and to revisit the problem of systematic discrepancies between data on reaction cross sections from experiments of different types, on the other hand. Data obtained on the basis of our new experimental-theoretical approach to evaluating cross sections for partial photoneutron reactions are invoked in considering these problems.

  9. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms. Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Provides a collection of data on the mechanistic aspects of inorganic chemical reactions. Wherever possible includes procedures for classroom demonstration or student project work. The material covered includes gas phase reactions, reactions in solution, mechanisms of electron transfer, the reaction between iron III and iodine, and hydrolysis. (GS)

  10. Water-gas shift reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    A review covers the industrial applications of the water-gas shift reaction in hydrogen manufacturing, removing CO from ammonia synthesis feeds, and detoxifying town gas; and the catalyst characteristics, reaction kinetics, and reaction mechanisms of the water-gas shift reactions catalyzed by iron-based, copper-based, or sulfided cobalt-molybdenum catalysts.

  11. What Is a Reaction Rate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitz, Guy

    2005-01-01

    The definition of reaction rate is derived and demonstrations are made for the care to be taken while using the term. Reaction rate can be in terms of a reaction property, the extent of reaction and thus it is possible to give a definition applicable in open and closed systems.

  12. Reaction chemistry of cerium

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    It is truly ironic that a synthetic organic chemist likely has far greater knowledge of the reaction chemistry of cerium(IV) than an inorganic colleague. Cerium(IV) reagents have long since been employed as oxidants in effecting a wide variety of organic transformations. Conversely, prior to the late 1980s, the number of well characterized cerium(IV) complexes did not extend past a handful of known species. Though in many other areas, interest in the molecular chemistry of the 4f-elements has undergone an explosive growth over the last twenty years, the chemistry of cerium(IV) has for the most part been overlooked. This report describes reactions of cerium complexes and structure.

  13. Magnetically suspended reaction wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabnis, A. V.; Stocking, G. L.; Dendy, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    Magnetic suspensions offer several advantages over conventional bearings, arising because of the contactless nature of the load support. In application to spacecraft reaction wheels, the advantages are low drag torque, wearfree, unlubricated, vacuum-compatible operation, and unlimited life. By the provision of redundancy in the control electronics, single-point failures are eliminated. The rational for selection of a passive radial, active axial, dc magnetic suspension is presented, and the relative merits of 3-loop and single-loop magnetic suspensions are discussed. The design of a .678 N-m-sec (.5 ft-lb-sec) reaction wheel using the single loop magnetic suspension was developed; the design compares favorably with current ball bearing wheels in terms of weight and power.

  14. Dearomatization through Halofunctionalization Reactions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao-Wei; Zheng, Chao; You, Shu-Li

    2016-08-16

    Recent advances in dearomatization through halofunctionalization reactions are summarized in this Minireview. Two general categories of strategies are currently employed in this field. On one hand, the reaction can be initiated with electrophilic halogenation at an alkyne or alkene moiety. The resulting halonium ion intermediate is then captured by a pendant aromatic ring at the ipso position, affording the dearomatization product. On the other hand, electrophilic halogenation can directly take place at a substituted arene, and the final dearomatization product is furnished by deprotonation or intramolecular nucleophilic trap. Highly enantioselective variants have been realized in the latter case by organocatalysis or transition metal catalysis. By applying these methods, various valuable halogenated polycyclic molecular architectures have been obtained from readily available starting materials. PMID:27377184

  15. Polymerase chain displacement reaction.

    PubMed

    Harris, Claire L; Sanchez-Vargas, Irma J; Olson, Ken E; Alphey, Luke; Fu, Guoliang

    2013-02-01

    Quantitative PCR assays are now the standard method for viral diagnostics. These assays must be specific, as well as sensitive, to detect the potentially low starting copy number of viral genomic material. We describe a new technique, polymerase chain displacement reaction (PCDR), which uses multiple nested primers in a rapid, capped, one-tube reaction that increases the sensitivity of normal quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays. Sensitivity was increased by approximately 10-fold in a proof-of-principle test on dengue virus sequence. In PCDR, when extension occurs from the outer primer, it displaces the extension strand produced from the inner primer by utilizing a polymerase that has strand displacement activity. This allows a greater than 2-fold increase of amplification product for each amplification cycle and therefore increased sensitivity and speed over conventional PCR. Increased sensitivity in PCDR would be useful in nucleic acid detection for viral diagnostics. PMID:23384180

  16. Photochemical reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.C.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the program is to develop a fundamental understanding of unimolecular and bimolecular reaction dynamics with application in combustion and energy systems. The energy dependence in ketene isomerization, ketene dissociation dynamics, and carbonyl substitution on organometallic rhodium complexes in liquid xenon have been studied. Future studies concerning unimolecular processes in ketene as well as energy transfer and kinetic studies of methylene radicals are discussed.

  17. Nonhemolytic, noninfectious transfusion reactions.

    PubMed

    Barton, J C

    1981-04-01

    The delivery of optimal transfusion therapy requires that the physician first have a thorough understanding of his patient's disease and prior transfusion history. Sometimes the need for blood product administration is more apparent than real. In the selection of necessary therapy, particular blood components, their volumes, and the timing of their administration should be carefully planned. The transfusion of whole blood, particularly as single-unit transfusions, is rarely indicated. Often forgotten, autotransfusion represents a means whereby many subjects who have repeated, unusual, or severe reactions may receive safe treatment. An appreciation of the frequency and manifestations of transfusion-related problems permits effective treatment of ongoing reactions. The prophylactic measures which should be taken against future reactions in most patients are specific, and are the responsibility of the clinician, based upon his bedside observations and laboratory studies. Problems should be discussed with either a hematologist, pathologist, or blood banking expert without hesitation. These guidelines help conserve a precious resource and assure that safe, effective, and economical transfusion therapy is available for all patients in need. PMID:6164098

  18. On-surface reactions.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Robert; Kühnle, Angelika

    2015-06-01

    On-surface synthesis constitutes a rapidly growing field of research due to its promising application for creating stable molecular structures on surfaces. While self-assembled structures rely on reversible interactions, on-surface synthesis provides the potential for creating long-term stable structures with well-controlled properties, for example superior electron transport for future molecular electronic devices. On-surface synthesis holds the promise for preparing insoluble compounds that cannot be produced in solution. Another highly exciting aspect of on-surface synthesis is the chance to discover new reaction pathways due to the two-dimensional confinement of the reaction educts. In this review, we discuss the current state-of-the-art and classify the reactions that have been successfully performed so far. Special emphasis is put on electrically insulating surfaces, as these substrates pose particular challenges for on-surface synthesis while at the same time bearing high potential for future use, for example, in molecular electronics. PMID:25965579

  19. Chemical Reactions in DSMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, G. A.

    2011-05-01

    DSMC simulations of chemically reacting gas flows have generally employed procedures that convert the macroscopic chemical rate equations to reaction cross-sections at the microscopic level. They therefore depend on the availability of experimental data that has been fitted to equations of the Arrhenius form. This paper presents a physical model for dissociation and recombination reactions and a phenomenological model for exchange and chain reactions. These are based on the vibrational states of the colliding molecules and do not require any experimentally-based data. The simplicity of the models allows the corresponding rate equations to be written down and, while these are not required for the implementation of the models, they facilitate their validation. The model is applied to a typical hypersonic atmospheric entry problem and the results are compared with the corresponding results from the traditional method. It is also used to investigate both spontaneous and forced ignition as well as the structure of a deflagration wave in an oxygen-hydrogen mixture.

  20. ADVERSE CUTANEOUS DRUG REACTION

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR. PMID:19967009

  1. Chemical Reactions in DSMC

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, G. A.

    2011-05-20

    DSMC simulations of chemically reacting gas flows have generally employed procedures that convert the macroscopic chemical rate equations to reaction cross-sections at the microscopic level. They therefore depend on the availability of experimental data that has been fitted to equations of the Arrhenius form. This paper presents a physical model for dissociation and recombination reactions and a phenomenological model for exchange and chain reactions. These are based on the vibrational states of the colliding molecules and do not require any experimentally-based data. The simplicity of the models allows the corresponding rate equations to be written down and, while these are not required for the implementation of the models, they facilitate their validation. The model is applied to a typical hypersonic atmospheric entry problem and the results are compared with the corresponding results from the traditional method. It is also used to investigate both spontaneous and forced ignition as well as the structure of a deflagration wave in an oxygen-hydrogen mixture.

  2. Reaction Extrema: Extent of Reaction in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandezande, Jonathon E.; Vander Griend, Douglas A.; DeKock, Roger L.

    2013-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago de Donder introduced the term "extent of reaction", ?. We build on that work by defining the concept of reagent extrema for an arbitrary chemical reaction, aA + bB [reversible reaction] yY + zZ. The central equation is ?^[subscript i] = -n[subscript i,0]/?[subscript i]. The symbol ?^[subscript i] represents the…

  3. Procedures for Decomposing a Redox Reaction into Half-Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishtik, Ilie; Berka, Ladislav H.

    2005-01-01

    A simple algorithm for a complete enumeration of the possible ways a redox reaction (RR) might be uniquely decomposed into half-reactions (HRs) using the response reactions (RERs) formalism is presented. A complete enumeration of the possible ways a RR may be decomposed into HRs is equivalent to a complete enumeration of stoichiometrically…

  4. Insect bite reactions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjay; Mann, Baldeep Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Insects are a class of living creatures within the arthropods. Insect bite reactions are commonly seen in clinical practice. The present review touches upon the medically important insects and their places in the classification, the sparse literature on the epidemiology of insect bites in India, and different variables influencing the susceptibility of an individual to insect bites. Clinical features of mosquito bites, hypersensitivity to mosquito bites Epstein-Barr virus NK (HMB-EBV-NK) disease, eruptive pseudoangiomatosis, Skeeter syndrome, papular pruritic eruption of HIV/AIDS, and clinical features produced by bed bugs, Mexican chicken bugs, assassin bugs, kissing bugs, fleas, black flies, Blandford flies, louse flies, tsetse flies, midges, and thrips are discussed. Brief account is presented of the immunogenic components of mosquito and bed bug saliva. Papular urticaria is discussed including its epidemiology, the 5 stages of skin reaction, the SCRATCH principle as an aid in diagnosis, and the recent evidence supporting participation of types I, III, and IV hypersensitivity reactions in its causation is summarized. Recent developments in the treatment of pediculosis capitis including spinosad 0.9% suspension, benzyl alcohol 5% lotion, dimethicone 4% lotion, isopropyl myristate 50% rinse, and other suffocants are discussed within the context of evidence derived from randomized controlled trials and key findings of a recent systematic review. We also touch upon a non-chemical treatment of head lice and the ineffectiveness of egg-loosening products. Knockdown resistance (kdr) as the genetic mechanism making the lice nerves insensitive to permethrin is discussed along with the surprising contrary clinical evidence from Europe about efficacy of permethrin in children with head lice carrying kdr-like gene. The review also presents a brief account of insects as vectors of diseases and ends with discussion of prevention of insect bites and some serious adverse effects

  5. Electronegativity and redox reactions.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Quintana, Ramón Alain; Martínez González, Marco; Ayers, Paul W

    2016-08-10

    Using the maximum hardness principle, we show that the oxidation potential of a molecule increases as its electronegativity increases and also increases as its electronegativity in its oxidized state increases. This insight can be used to construct a linear free energy relation for the oxidation potential, which we train on a set of 31 organic redox couples and test on a set of 10 different redox reactions. Better results are obtained when the electronegativity of the oxidized/reduced reagents are adjusted to account for the reagents' interaction with their chemical environment. PMID:27451962

  6. Copper mediated carbometalation reactions.

    PubMed

    Müller, D S; Marek, I

    2016-08-01

    Since the first discovery of carbocupration of alkynes in the 1970s a tremendous amount of research has been carried out in this field. The exceptionally high selectivities obtained attribute to the great synthetic value of carbocupration reactions. This tutorial review will present the most important features of carbocupration of alkynes and highlight the most relevant reviews. Then a comprehensive review of copper mediated carbometalation of cyclopropenes will follow. The latter method has received much attention over the last decade as it allows the highly selective construction of poly-substituted cyclopropanes which can be transformed into acyclic derivatives bearing one or multiple tertiary or quaternary carbon stereocenters. PMID:26808300

  7. Positive reaction to allergen (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  8. Hydrazine decomposition and other reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Warren E. (Inventor); La France, Donald S. (Inventor); Voge, Hervey H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to the catalytic decomposition of hydrazine, catalysts useful for this decomposition and other reactions, and to reactions in hydrogen atmospheres generally using carbon-containing catalysts.

  9. Organic chemistry: Reactions triggered electrically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Limin; Tao, N. J.

    2016-03-01

    Single-molecule experiments have revealed that chemical reactions can be controlled using electric fields -- and that the reaction rate is sensitive to both the direction and the strength of the applied field. See Letter p.88

  10. Demonstration of the Fenton Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luehrs, Dean C.; Roher, Alex E.

    2007-01-01

    The study demonstrates the Fenton reaction, which is carried out using the Fenton reagent that is used for groundwater and soil remediation. The Fenton reaction can be implicated in DNA damage, Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular disease and ageing in general.