Science.gov

Sample records for knock-out reactions

  1. Proton Knock-Out in Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2002-06-01

    Proton knock-out is studied in a broad program in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. The first experiment performed in Hall A studied the {sup 16}O(e,e'p) reaction. Since then proton knock-out experiments have studied a variety of aspects of that reaction, from single-nucleon properties to its mechanism, such as final-state interactions and two-body currents, in nuclei from {sup 2}H to {sup 16}O. In this review the results of this program will be summarized and an outlook given of future accomplishments.

  2. Theoretical knock-outs on biological networks.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Pedro J; de S Pinto, Sandro E; Baptista, Murilo S; La Guardia, Giuliano G

    2016-08-21

    In this work we redefine the concept of biological importance and how to compute it, based on a model of complex networks and random walk. We call this new procedure, theoretical knock-out (KO). The proposed method generalizes the procedure presented in a recent study about Oral Tolerance. To devise this method, we make two approaches: algebraically and algorithmically. In both cases we compute a vector on an asymptotic state, called flux vector. The flux is given by a random walk on a directed graph that represents a biological phenomenon. This vector gives us the information about the relative flux of walkers on a vertex which represents a biological agent. With two vector of this kind, we can calculate the relative mean error between them by averaging over its coefficients. This quantity allows us to assess the degree of importance of each vertex of a complex network that evolves in time and has experimental background. We find out that this procedure can be applied in any sort of biological phenomena in which we can know the role and interrelationships of its agents. These results also provide experimental biologists to predict the order of importance of biological agents on a mounted complex network. PMID:27188251

  3. Cross sections for one-neutron knock-out from 37Ca at intermediate energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürger, A.; Azaiez, F.; Algora, A.; Al-Khatib, A.; Bastin, B.; Benzoni, G.; Borcea, R.; Bourgeois, C.; Bringel, P.; Clément, E.; Dalouzy, J.-C.; Dlouhý, Z.; Dombrádi, Z.; Drouart, A.; Engelhardt, C.; Franchoo, S.; Fülöp, Z.; Görgen, A.; Grévy, S.; Hübel, H.; Ibrahim, F.; Korten, W.; Mrázek, J.; Navin, A.; Rotaru, F.; Roussel Chomaz, P.; Saint-Laurent, M.-G.; Sletten, G.; Sohler, D.; Sorlin, O.; Stanoiu, M.; Stefan, I.; Theisen, C.; Timis, C.; Verney, D.; Williams, S.

    2012-12-01

    The cross section for the knock-out of a deeply bound valence neutron from 37Ca at an incident beam energy of 60AMeV has been measured along with momentum distributions of the residual nuclei and γ rays from the de-excitation of the first excited state in 36Ca. As for other cases of deeply bound nucleons studied using knock-out reactions, the reduction of the measured cross section compared to theoretical predictions is stronger than those observed for near-magic stable nuclei. Both the momentum distributions and the excitation energy of the first excited state in 36Ca indicate a sizable N=16 gap.

  4. Bex1 knock out mice show altered skeletal muscle regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, Jae Hyung Smiley, Mark A.; Lovering, Richard M.; Margolis, Frank L.

    2007-11-16

    Bex1 and Calmodulin (CaM) are upregulated during skeletal muscle regeneration. We confirm this finding and demonstrate the novel finding that they interact in a calcium-dependent manner. To study the role of Bex1 and its interaction with CaM in skeletal muscle regeneration, we generated Bex1 knock out (Bex1-KO) mice. These mice appeared to develop normally and are fertile, but displayed a functional deficit in exercise performance compared to wild type (WT) mice. After intramuscular injection of cardiotoxin, which causes extensive and reproducible myotrauma followed by recovery, regenerating muscles of Bex1-KO mice exhibited elevated and prolonged cell proliferation, as well as delayed cell differentiation, compared to WT mice. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that Bex1-KO mice show altered muscle regeneration, and allow us to propose that the interaction of Bex1 with Ca{sup 2+}/CaM may be involved in skeletal muscle regeneration.

  5. Photodynamic therapy and knocking out of single tumor cells by multiphoton excitation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann, Iris; Fischer, Peter; Koenig, Karsten

    2004-09-01

    Near infrared (NIR) ultrashort laser pulses of 780 nm have been used to induce intracellular photodynamic reactions by nonlinear excitation of porphyrin photosensitizers. Intracellular accumulation and photobleaching of the fluorescent photosensitizers protoporphyrin IX and Photofrin (PF) have been studied by non-resonant two-photon fluorescence excitation of PF and aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-labeled Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. To testify the efficacy of both substrates to induce irreversible destructive effects, the cloning efficiency (CE) of cells exposed to femtosecond pulses of a multiphoton laser scanning microscope (40x/1.3) was determined. In the case of Photofrin accumulation, CEs of 50% and 0% were obtained after 17 laserscans (2 mW?, 16 s/ frame) and 50 scans, respectively. All cells exposed to 50 scans died within 48h after laser exposure. 100 scans were required to induce lethal effects in ALA labeled cells. Sensitizer-free control cells could be scanned 250 times (1.1 h) and more without impact on the reproduction behavior, morphology, and vitality. In addition to the slow phototoxic effect by photooxidation processes, another destructive but immediate effect based on optical breakdown was induced when employing high intense NIR femtosecond laser beams. This was used to optically knock out single tumor cells in living mice (solid Ehrlich-Carcinoma) in a depth of 10 to 100 μm.

  6. The transforming growth factor-beta 3 knock-out mouse: an animal model for cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Koo, S H; Cunningham, M C; Arabshahi, B; Gruss, J S; Grant, J H

    2001-09-15

    The recent report of a transforming growth factor-beta 3 (TGF-beta 3) knock-out mouse in which 100 percent of the homozygous pups have cleft palate raised the question as to the potential usefulness of these animals as a model for cleft palate research. The specific aim in this study was to carefully document the anatomy of the cleft palate in the TGF-beta 3 knock-out mice as compared with wild type controls. Special attention was paid to the levator veli palatini muscle, the tensor veli palatini muscle, and their respective innervation. Because the TGF-beta 3 knock-out is lethal in the early perinatal period and because the heterozygotes are phenotypically normal, polymerase chain reaction was required to genotype the animals before mating. Time-mated pregnancies between proven heterozygotes were then delivered by cesarean section at gestational day 18.5 to prevent maternal cannibalism of homozygote pups. All delivered pups were killed and their tails processed by polymerase chain reaction to verify genotype. The heads were then fixed and sectioned in axial, coronal, or sagittal planes. Sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin or processed for immunohistochemistry with nerve specific protein gene product 9.5 and calcitonin gene-related peptide antibodies. Sections were analyzed in a serial fashion. Nine wild type control animals were analyzed along with nine TGF-beta 3 knock-out homozygotes. Time matings between proven heterozygotes yielded wild type pups, heterozygote pups, and homozygote knock-out pups in the expected mendelian ratios (28 percent to 46 percent to 26 percent; n = 43). The results demonstrated 100 percent clefting in the homozygous TGF-beta 3 knock-out pups. Complete clefting of the secondary palate was seen in four of nine and incomplete clefting was seen in five of nine. The levator veli palatini and tensor veli palatini muscles were demonstrated coursing parallel to the cleft margin in all cleft mice. The orientation of these muscles

  7. Hyperactivity of newborn Pten knock-out neurons results from increased excitatory synaptic drive.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael R; DeSpenza, Tyrone; Li, Meijie; Gulledge, Allan T; Luikart, Bryan W

    2015-01-21

    Developing neurons must regulate morphology, intrinsic excitability, and synaptogenesis to form neural circuits. When these processes go awry, disorders, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or epilepsy, may result. The phosphatase Pten is mutated in some patients having ASD and seizures, suggesting that its mutation disrupts neurological function in part through increasing neuronal activity. Supporting this idea, neuronal knock-out of Pten in mice can cause macrocephaly, behavioral changes similar to ASD, and seizures. However, the mechanisms through which excitability is enhanced following Pten depletion are unclear. Previous studies have separately shown that Pten-depleted neurons can drive seizures, receive elevated excitatory synaptic input, and have abnormal dendrites. We therefore tested the hypothesis that developing Pten-depleted neurons are hyperactive due to increased excitatory synaptogenesis using electrophysiology, calcium imaging, morphological analyses, and modeling. This was accomplished by coinjecting retroviruses to either "birthdate" or birthdate and knock-out Pten in granule neurons of the murine neonatal dentate gyrus. We found that Pten knock-out neurons, despite a rapid onset of hypertrophy, were more active in vivo. Pten knock-out neurons fired at more hyperpolarized membrane potentials, displayed greater peak spike rates, and were more sensitive to depolarizing synaptic input. The increased sensitivity of Pten knock-out neurons was due, in part, to a higher density of synapses located more proximal to the soma. We determined that increased synaptic drive was sufficient to drive hypertrophic Pten knock-out neurons beyond their altered action potential threshold. Thus, our work contributes a developmental mechanism for the increased activity of Pten-depleted neurons. PMID:25609613

  8. Activity of Pontine Neurons during Sleep and Cataplexy in Hypocretin Knock-Out Mice

    PubMed Central

    Thankachan, Stephen; Kaur, Satvinder; Shiromani, Priyattam J.

    2009-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a human sleep disorder resulting from the loss of neurons containing the neuropeptide orexin, also known as hypocretin. Cataplexy, which is a sudden loss of muscle tone during waking, is an important diagnostic symptom of narcolepsy. In humans and canines with narcolepsy, cataplexy is considered to be a separate and distinct behavioral state. However, in the mouse model of the disease this issue is not resolved. The present study monitored the activity of forty four neurons in the rostral pons in hypocretin knock-out mice. Majority of the neurons were active during wake and REM sleep, while four neurons were selectively active during REM sleep. All of these neurons were less active during cataplexy compared with REM sleep. Thus, although cataplexy and REM sleep share many common features, including the muscle atonia, cataplexy is a distinct state in mice. PMID:19193905

  9. Monitoring concussion in a knocked-out boxer by CSF biomarker analysis.

    PubMed

    Neselius, Sanna; Brisby, Helena; Granholm, Fredrik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj

    2015-09-01

    Concussion is common in many sports, and the incidence is increasing. The medical consequences after a sport-related concussion have received increased attention in recent years since it is known that concussions cause axonal and glial damage, which disturbs the cerebral physiology and makes the brain more vulnerable for additional concussions. This study reports on a knocked-out amateur boxer in whom cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurofilament light (NFL) protein, reflecting axonal damage, was used to identify and monitor brain damage. CSF NFL was markedly increased during 36 weeks, suggesting that neuronal injury persists longer than expected after a concussion. CSF biomarker analysis may be valuable in the medical counselling of concussed athletes and in return-to-play considerations. PMID:24819180

  10. The Expression of TALEN before Fertilization Provides a Rapid Knock-Out Phenotype in Xenopus laevis Founder Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Miyuki; Sakane, Yuto; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Herberg, Sarah; Simeone, Angela; Simpson, David; Jullien, Jerome; Yamamoto, Takashi; Gurdon, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in genome editing using programmable nucleases have revolutionized gene targeting in various organisms. Successful gene knock-out has been shown in Xenopus, a widely used model organism, although a system enabling less mosaic knock-out in founder embryos (F0) needs to be explored in order to judge phenotypes in the F0 generation. Here, we injected modified highly active transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) mRNA to oocytes at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage, followed by in vitro maturation and intracytoplasmic sperm injection, to achieve a full knock-out in F0 embryos. Unlike conventional injection methods to fertilized embryos, the injection of TALEN mRNA into GV oocytes allows expression of nucleases before fertilization, enabling them to work from an earlier stage. Using this procedure, most of developed embryos showed full knock-out phenotypes of the pigmentation gene tyrosinase and/or embryonic lethal gene pax6 in the founder generation. In addition, our method permitted a large 1 kb deletion. Thus, we describe nearly complete gene knock-out phenotypes in Xenopus laevis F0 embryos. The presented method will help to accelerate the production of knock-out frogs since we can bypass an extra generation of about 1 year in Xenopus laevis. Meantime, our method provides a unique opportunity to rapidly test the developmental effects of disrupting those genes that do not permit growth to an adult able to reproduce. In addition, the protocol shown here is considerably less invasive than the previously used host transfer since our protocol does not require surgery. The experimental scheme presented is potentially applicable to other organisms such as mammals and fish to resolve common issues of mosaicism in founders. PMID:26580070

  11. Arterial Remodeling in B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Knock-Out Females.

    PubMed

    Holditch, Sara J; Schreiber, Claire A; Burnett, John C; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphisms are recognized in cardiovascular conditions such as hypertension, stroke, thrombosis and vasculitis. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a guanylyl cyclase A (GC-A) agonist. The anti-hypertensive, vasodilatory, anti-fibrotic, and anti-hypertrophic properties of BNP are well established in male animal models. Although circulating BNP levels are higher in women, when compared to age-matched men, the cardiovascular protective propensity of BNP in females is poorly understood. We assessed the cardiovascular consequences of BNP deletion in genetically null (Nppb-/-) female rat lines. Throughout the study, blood pressure (BP) remained uninfluenced by genotype, and cardiorenal consequences of BNP knock out remained minor. Unexpectedly, approximately 60% of Nppb-/- females developed mesenteric polyarteritis-nodosa (PAN)-like vasculitis in their life span, some as early as 4 months of age. Mesenteric lesions involved intense arterial remodeling, progressive inflammation, occluded lumens, and less frequently intestinal necrosis and multiple visceral arterial aneurysms. Cumulative pathologies resulted in a significant decline in survival of the Nppb-/- female. This study highlights BNP's vasoprotective propensity, bringing to light a possible sex specific difference in the cardiovascular protection provided by BNP. Defects in the BNP/GC-A/cGMP pathway may play a role in arteriopathies in women, while GC-A agonists may provide effective therapy for arteritis. PMID:27162120

  12. Phospholipase D δ knock-out mutants are tolerant to severe drought stress

    PubMed Central

    Distéfano, Ayelen M; Valiñas, Matías A; Scuffi, Denise; Lamattina, Lorenzo; ten Have, Arjen; García-Mata, Carlos; Laxalt, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in different plant processes, ranging from responses to abiotic and biotic stress to plant development. Phospholipase Dδ (PLDδ) is activated in dehydration and salt stress, producing the lipid second messenger phosphatidic acid. In this work we show that pldδ Arabidopsis mutants were more tolerant to severe drought than wild-type plants. PLDδ has been shown to be required for ABA regulation of stomatal closure of isolated epidermal peels. However, there was no significant difference in stomatal conductance at the whole plant level between wild-type and pldδ mutants. Since PLD hydrolyses structural phospholipids, then we looked at membrane integrity. Ion leakage measurements showed that during dehydration of leaf discs pldδ mutant has less membrane degradation compared to the wild-type. We further analyzed the mutants and showed that pldδ have higher mRNA levels of RAB18 and RD29A compared to wild-type plants under normal growth conditions. Transient expression of AtPLDδ in Nicotiana benthamiana plants induced a wilting phenotype. These findings suggest that, in wt plants PLDδ disrupt membranes in severe drought stress and, in the absence of the protein (PLDδ knock-out) might drought-prime the plants, making them more tolerant to severe drought stress. The results are discussed in relation to PLDδ role in guard cell signaling and drought tolerance. PMID:26340512

  13. Characterization of skeletal muscle in the synemin knock-out mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Pelagio, Karla P.; Muriel, Joaquin; Lovering, Richard M.; Lund, Linda; Bond, Meredith; Bloch, Robert J.

    2014-11-01

    Diseases linked to intermediate filament (IF) proteins are associated with defects in the organization of the contractile apparatus of skeletal and cardiac muscle and its links to costameres, which connect the sarcomeres to the cell membrane. Synemin is a large IF protein that associates with dystrobrevin, vinculin, and talin at costameres of the cell membrane of striated muscle, as well as with α-actinin and desmin at the Z disks. Synemin can be expressed in either 210 kDa α- or 180 kDa β- alternatively spliced forms. We generated mice null for synemin by homologous recombination to study synemin's function in skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle in the knock out (syn KO) mouse does not make synemin mRNA or protein. Preliminary characterization of the syn KO mouse suggests that it has a mild skeletal muscle phenotype. The organization of costameres appears to be normal. Treadmill running uphill test results was not significantly affected when compared to controls at any age. More notably, the biomechanical properties of the cell membrane are different in the syn KO, though they are less affected than by the absence of desmin or dystrophin. These results suggest that the viscoelastic properties of the cell membrane-costamere-myofibril complex are significantly influenced by synemin.

  14. Arterial Remodeling in B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Knock-Out Females

    PubMed Central

    Holditch, Sara J.; Schreiber, Claire A.; Burnett, John C.; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphisms are recognized in cardiovascular conditions such as hypertension, stroke, thrombosis and vasculitis. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a guanylyl cyclase A (GC-A) agonist. The anti-hypertensive, vasodilatory, anti-fibrotic, and anti-hypertrophic properties of BNP are well established in male animal models. Although circulating BNP levels are higher in women, when compared to age-matched men, the cardiovascular protective propensity of BNP in females is poorly understood. We assessed the cardiovascular consequences of BNP deletion in genetically null (Nppb−/−) female rat lines. Throughout the study, blood pressure (BP) remained uninfluenced by genotype, and cardiorenal consequences of BNP knock out remained minor. Unexpectedly, approximately 60% of Nppb−/− females developed mesenteric polyarteritis-nodosa (PAN)-like vasculitis in their life span, some as early as 4 months of age. Mesenteric lesions involved intense arterial remodeling, progressive inflammation, occluded lumens, and less frequently intestinal necrosis and multiple visceral arterial aneurysms. Cumulative pathologies resulted in a significant decline in survival of the Nppb−/− female. This study highlights BNP’s vasoprotective propensity, bringing to light a possible sex specific difference in the cardiovascular protection provided by BNP. Defects in the BNP/GC-A/cGMP pathway may play a role in arteriopathies in women, while GC-A agonists may provide effective therapy for arteritis. PMID:27162120

  15. Phospholipase D δ knock-out mutants are tolerant to severe drought stress.

    PubMed

    Distéfano, Ayelen M; Valiñas, Matías A; Scuffi, Denise; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Ten Have, Arjen; García-Mata, Carlos; Laxalt, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in different plant processes, ranging from responses to abiotic and biotic stress to plant development. Phospholipase Dδ (PLDδ) is activated in dehydration and salt stress, producing the lipid second messenger phosphatidic acid. In this work we show that pldδ Arabidopsis mutants were more tolerant to severe drought than wild-type plants. PLDδ has been shown to be required for ABA regulation of stomatal closure of isolated epidermal peels. However, there was no significant difference in stomatal conductance at the whole plant level between wild-type and pldδ mutants. Since PLD hydrolyses structural phospholipids, then we looked at membrane integrity. Ion leakage measurements showed that during dehydration of leaf discs pldδ mutant has less membrane degradation compared to the wild-type. We further analyzed the mutants and showed that pldδ have higher mRNA levels of RAB18 and RD29A compared to wild-type plants under normal growth conditions. Transient expression of AtPLDδ in Nicotiana benthamiana plants induced a wilting phenotype. These findings suggest that, in wt plants PLDδ disrupt membranes in severe drought stress and, in the absence of the protein (PLDδ knock-out) might drought-prime the plants, making them more tolerant to severe drought stress. The results are discussed in relation to PLDδ role in guard cell signaling and drought tolerance. PMID:26340512

  16. Autism spectrum disorder traits in Slc9a9 knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lina; Faraone, Stephen V; Zhang-James, Yanli

    2016-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders which begin in childhood and persist into adulthood. They cause lifelong impairments and are associated with substantial burdens to patients, families, and society. Genetic studies have implicated the sodium/proton exchanger (NHE) nine gene, Slc9a9, to ASDs and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder(ADHD). Slc9a9 encodes, NHE9, a membrane protein of the late recycling endosomes. The recycling endosome plays an important role in synapse development and plasticity by regulating the trafficking of membrane neurotransmitter receptors and transporters. Here we tested the hypothesis that Slc9a9 knock-out (KO) mice would show ADHD-like and ASD-like traits. Ultrasonic vocalization (USV) recording showed that Slc9a9 KO mice emitted fewer calls and had shorter call durations, which suggest communication impairment. Slc9a9 KO mice lacked a preference for social novelty, but did not show deficits in social approach; Slc9a9 KO mice spent more time self-grooming, an indicator for restricted and repetitive behavior. We did not observe hyperactivity or other behavior impairments which are commonly comorbid with ASDs in human, such as anxiety-like behavior. Our study is the first animal behavior study that links Slc9a9 to ASDs. By eliminatingNHE9 activity, it provides strong evidence that lack of Slc9a9leads to ASD-like behaviors in mice and provides the field with a new mouse model of ASDs. PMID:26755066

  17. Impaired striatum-dependent behavior in GASP-1-knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Mathis, C; Bott, J-B; Candusso, M-P; Simonin, F; Cassel, J-C

    2011-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) associated sorting protein-1 (GASP-1) is suspected to play a key role in recycling and degradation of several GPCRs. In a previous study, we have shown that GASP-1-knock-out (GASP-1-KO) mice displayed deficits in acquiring a cocaine self-administration task, associated with an exacerbated down-regulation of striatal dopaminergic and cholinergic receptors. Among several possibilities, GASP-1 deficiency could have impaired memory processes underlying the acquisition of the operant conditioning task. Therefore, the present study investigated cognitive performances of GASP-1-KO mice and their wild-type littermates (WT) in a broad variety of memory tasks. Consistent with a deficit in procedural memory, GASP-1-KO mice showed delayed acquisition of a food-reinforced bar-press task. During water-maze training in hidden- or visible-platform paradigms, mutant and WT mice acquired the tasks at the same rate. However, GASP-1 mice exhibited persistent thigmotaxic swimming, longer distance to the platform, and reduced swim speed. There was no deficit in several tasks requiring simple behavioral responses (Barnes maze, object recognition and passive avoidance tasks). Thus, the ability to acquire and/or express complex responses seems affected in GASP-1-deficient mice. Hippocampal functions were preserved, as the retention of an acquired memory in spatial tasks remained unaffected. The pattern of behavioral deficits observed in GASP-1-KO mice is coherent with current knowledge on the role of striatal GPCRs in acquisition/expression of skilled behavior and in motivation. Together with the previous findings, the so far established phenotype of GASP-1-KO mice makes them a potentially exciting tool to study striatal functions. PMID:21091868

  18. Oral rapamycin inhibits growth of atherosclerotic plaque in apoE knock-out mice

    SciTech Connect

    Waksman, Ron; Pakala, Rajbabu; Burnett, Mary S.; Gulick, Cindy P.; Leborgne, Laurent; Fournadjiev, Jana; Wolfram, Roswitha; Hellinga, David

    2003-03-01

    Introduction: Inflammatory and immunological responses of vascular cells are known to play significant roles in atherosclerotic plaque development. Rapamycin with antiinflammatory, immunosuppressive and antiproliferative properties has been shown to reduce neointima formation when coated on stents. This study is designed to test the potential of oral rapamycin to inhibit atherosclerotic plaque development. Methods: Eight-week-old apoE knock-out mice were fed with 0.25% cholesterol supplemented diet (control diet), control diet containing 50 {mu}g/kg rapamycin (low-dose rapamycin) or 100 {mu}g/kg rapamycin (high-dose rapamycin) for 4 or 8 weeks. Subsets of mice from each group (n=10) were weighed and euthanized. Whole blood rapamycin levels were determined using HPLC-MS/MS, and histological analyses of atherosclerotic lesions in the aortic root were performed. Results: Mice fed with high-dose rapamycin did not gain weight (18.5{+-}1.5 vs. 20.6{+-}0.9 g, P=.01). Blood levels of rapamycin 117{+-}7 pg/ml were detected in the blood of mice fed with high-dose rapamycin for 8 weeks. The plaque area in mice fed with high dose oral rapamycin is significantly less as compared to control (0.168{+-}0.008 vs. 0.326{+-}0.013 mm{sup 2}, P=.001 at 4 weeks; 0.234{+-}0.013 vs. 0.447{+-}0.011 mm{sup 2}, P=.001 at 8 weeks). Lumen area was inversely proportional to the plaque area. Conclusions: The results indicate that oral rapamycin is effective in attenuating the progression of atherosclerotic plaque in the mice.

  19. Systemic and Cerebral Iron Homeostasis in Ferritin Knock-Out Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Garringer, Holly J.; Goodwin, Charles B.; Richine, Briana; Acton, Anthony; VanDuyn, Natalia; Muhoberac, Barry B.; Irimia-Dominguez, Jose; Chan, Rebecca J.; Peacock, Munro; Nass, Richard; Ghetti, Bernardino; Vidal, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin, a 24-mer heteropolymer of heavy (H) and light (L) subunits, is the main cellular iron storage protein and plays a pivotal role in iron homeostasis by modulating free iron levels thus reducing radical-mediated damage. The H subunit has ferroxidase activity (converting Fe(II) to Fe(III)), while the L subunit promotes iron nucleation and increases ferritin stability. Previous studies on the H gene (Fth) in mice have shown that complete inactivation of Fth is lethal during embryonic development, without ability to compensate by the L subunit. In humans, homozygous loss of the L gene (FTL) is associated with generalized seizure and atypical restless leg syndrome, while mutations in FTL cause a form of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation. Here we generated mice with genetic ablation of the Fth and Ftl genes. As previously reported, homozygous loss of the Fth allele on a wild-type Ftl background was embryonic lethal, whereas knock-out of the Ftl allele (Ftl-/-) led to a significant decrease in the percentage of Ftl-/- newborn mice. Analysis of Ftl-/- mice revealed systemic and brain iron dyshomeostasis, without any noticeable signs of neurodegeneration. Our findings indicate that expression of the H subunit can rescue the loss of the L subunit and that H ferritin homopolymers have the capacity to sequester iron in vivo. We also observed that a single allele expressing the H subunit is not sufficient for survival when both alleles encoding the L subunit are absent, suggesting the need of some degree of complementation between the subunits as well as a dosage effect. PMID:25629408

  20. Knock-out of nexilin in mice leads to dilated cardiomyopathy and endomyocardial fibroelastosis.

    PubMed

    Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Schlossarek, Saskia; Stoelting, Stephanie; Klinger, Matthias; Geertz, Birgit; Weinberger, Florian; Kessler, Thorsten; Aherrahrou, Redouane; Moreth, Kristin; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Just, Steffen; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Schunkert, Heribert; Carrier, Lucie; Erdmann, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is one of the most common causes of chronic heart failure worldwide. Mutations in the gene encoding nexilin (NEXN) occur in patients with both hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM); however, little is known about the pathophysiological mechanisms and relevance of NEXN to these disorders. Here, we evaluated the functional role of NEXN using a constitutive Nexn knock-out (KO) mouse model. Heterozygous (Het) mice were inter-crossed to produce wild-type (WT), Het, and homozygous KO mice. At birth, 32, 46, and 22 % of the mice were WT, Het, and KO, respectively, which is close to the expected Mendelian ratio. After postnatal day 6, the survival of the Nexn KO mice decreased dramatically and all of the animals died by day 8. Phenotypic characterizations of the WT and KO mice were performed at postnatal days 1, 2, 4, and 6. At birth, the relative heart weights of the WT and KO mice were similar; however, at day 4, the relative heart weight of the KO group was 2.3-fold higher than of the WT group. In addition, the KO mice developed rapidly progressive cardiomyopathy with left ventricular dilation and wall thinning and decreased cardiac function. At day 6, the KO mice developed a fulminant DCM phenotype characterized by dilated ventricular chambers and systolic dysfunction. At this stage, collagen deposits and some elastin deposits were observed within the left ventricle cavity, which resembles the features of endomyocardial fibroelastosis (EFE). Overall, these results further emphasize the role of NEXN in DCM and suggest a novel role in EFE. PMID:26659360

  1. Relevant feature set estimation with a knock-out strategy and random forests.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Melanie; Greve, Douglas N; Fischl, Bruce; Konukoglu, Ender

    2015-11-15

    Group analysis of neuroimaging data is a vital tool for identifying anatomical and functional variations related to diseases as well as normal biological processes. The analyses are often performed on a large number of highly correlated measurements using a relatively smaller number of samples. Despite the correlation structure, the most widely used approach is to analyze the data using univariate methods followed by post-hoc corrections that try to account for the data's multivariate nature. Although widely used, this approach may fail to recover from the adverse effects of the initial analysis when local effects are not strong. Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) is a powerful alternative to the univariate approach for identifying relevant variations. Jointly analyzing all the measures, MVPA techniques can detect global effects even when individual local effects are too weak to detect with univariate analysis. Current approaches are successful in identifying variations that yield highly predictive and compact models. However, they suffer from lessened sensitivity and instabilities in identification of relevant variations. Furthermore, current methods' user-defined parameters are often unintuitive and difficult to determine. In this article, we propose a novel MVPA method for group analysis of high-dimensional data that overcomes the drawbacks of the current techniques. Our approach explicitly aims to identify all relevant variations using a "knock-out" strategy and the Random Forest algorithm. In evaluations with synthetic datasets the proposed method achieved substantially higher sensitivity and accuracy than the state-of-the-art MVPA methods, and outperformed the univariate approach when the effect size is low. In experiments with real datasets the proposed method identified regions beyond the univariate approach, while other MVPA methods failed to replicate the univariate results. More importantly, in a reproducibility study with the well-known ADNI dataset

  2. PARP1 Gene Knock-Out Increases Resistance to Retinal Degeneration without Affecting Retinal Function

    PubMed Central

    Sahaboglu, Ayse; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Kaur, Jasvir; Sancho-Pelluz, Javier; Huber, Gesine; Fahl, Edda; Arango-Gonzalez, Blanca; Zrenner, Eberhart; Ekström, Per; Löwenheim, Hubert; Seeliger, Mathias; Paquet-Durand, François

    2010-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited neurodegenerative diseases affecting photoreceptors and causing blindness in humans. Previously, excessive activation of enzymes belonging to the poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) group was shown to be involved in photoreceptor degeneration in the human homologous rd1 mouse model for RP. Since there are at least 16 different PARP isoforms, we investigated the exact relevance of the predominant isoform - PARP1 - for photoreceptor cell death using PARP1 knock-out (KO) mice. In vivo and ex vivo morphological analysis using optic coherence tomography (OCT) and conventional histology revealed no major alterations of retinal phenotype when compared to wild-type (wt). Likewise, retinal function as assessed by electroretinography (ERG) was normal in PARP1 KO animals. We then used retinal explant cultures derived from wt, rd1, and PARP1 KO animals to test their susceptibility to chemically induced photoreceptor degeneration. Since photoreceptor degeneration in the rd1 retina is triggered by a loss-of-function in phosphodiesterase-6 (PDE6), we used selective PDE6 inhibition to emulate the rd1 situation on non-rd1 genotypes. While wt retina subjected to PDE6 inhibition showed massive photoreceptor degeneration comparable to rd1 retina, in the PARP1 KO situation, cell death was robustly reduced. Together, these findings demonstrate that PARP1 activity is in principle dispensable for normal retinal function, but is of major importance for photoreceptor degeneration under pathological conditions. Moreover, our results suggest that PARP dependent cell death or PARthanatos may play a major role in retinal degeneration and highlight the possibility to use specific PARP inhibitors for the treatment of RP. PMID:21124852

  3. Evaluation of cimi-shield knock-out bed bug eliminator against house fly (Musca domestica) adults.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cimi-Shield Knock-Out (CSKO) Bed Bug Eliminator is a green treatment labeled for use against bed bugs, carpet beetles, ants, roaches, fleas, ticks, silverfish, millipedes and centipedes. The active ingredient is soybean oil. If CSKO is formulated according to label instructions and sprayed directly ...

  4. Evaluation of cimi-shield knock-out bed bug eliminator against house fly (Musca domestica) adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cimi-Shield Knock-Out (CSKO) Bed Bug Eliminator is a green treatment labeled for use against bed bugs, carpet beetles, ants, roaches, fleas, ticks, silverfish, millipedes and centipedes. The active ingredient is soybean oil. If CSKO is formulated according to label instructions and sprayed directly ...

  5. True-Breeding Targeted Gene Knock-Out in Barley Using Designer TALE-Nuclease in Haploid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gurushidze, Maia; Hensel, Goetz; Hiekel, Stefan; Schedel, Sindy; Valkov, Vladimir; Kumlehn, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are customizable fusion proteins able to cleave virtually any genomic DNA sequence of choice, and thereby to generate site-directed genetic modifications in a wide range of cells and organisms. In the present study, we expressed TALENs in pollen-derived, regenerable cells to establish the generation of instantly true-breeding mutant plants. A gfp-specific TALEN pair was expressed via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation in embryogenic pollen of transgenic barley harboring a functional copy of gfp. Thanks to the haploid nature of the target cells, knock-out mutations were readily detected, and homozygous primary mutant plants obtained following genome duplication. In all, 22% of the TALEN transgenics proved knocked out with respect to gfp, and the loss of function could be ascribed to the deletions of between four and 36 nucleotides in length. The altered gfp alleles were transmitted normally through meiosis, and the knock-out phenotype was consistently shown by the offspring of two independent mutants. Thus, here we describe the efficient production of TALEN-mediated gene knock-outs in barley that are instantaneously homozygous and non-chimeric in regard to the site-directed mutations induced. This TALEN approach has broad applicability for both elucidating gene function and tailoring the phenotype of barley and other crop species. PMID:24643227

  6. Selective Photoreceptor Gene Knock-out Reveals a Regulatory Role for the Growth Behavior of Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rashmi; Pathak, Gopal; Drepper, Thomas; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    The plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae (Ps) is a well-established model organism for bacterial infection of plants. The genome sequences of two pathovars, pv. syringae and pv. tomato, revealed one gene encoding a blue and two genes encoding red/far red light-sensing photoreceptors. Continuing former molecular characterization of the photoreceptor proteins, we here report selective photoreceptor gene disruption for pv. tomato aiming at identification of potentially regulatory functions of these photoreceptors. Transformation of Ps cells with linear DNA constructs yielded interposon mutations of the corresponding genes. Cell growth studies of the generated photoreceptor knock-out mutants revealed their role in light-dependent regulation of cell growth and motility. Disruption of the blue-light (BL) receptor gene caused a growth deregulation, in line with an observed increased virulence of this mutant (Moriconi et al., Plant J., 2013, 76, 322). Bacterial phytochrome-1 (BphP1) deletion mutant caused unaltered cell growth, but a stronger swarming capacity. Inactivation of its ortholog, BphP2, however, caused reduced growth and remarkably altered dendritic swarming behavior. Combined knock-out of both bacteriophytochromes reproduced the swarming pattern observed for the BphP2 mutant alone. A triple knock-out mutant showed a growth rate between that of the BL (deregulation) and the phytochrome-2 mutant (growth reduction). PMID:27289014

  7. Phenotypic and Molecular Alterations in the Mammary Tissue of R-Spondin1 Knock-Out Mice during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chadi, Sead; Polyte, Jacqueline; Lefevre, Lucas; Castille, Johan; Ehanno, Aude; Laubier, Johann; Jaffrézic, Florence; Le Provost, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    R-spondin1 (Rspo1) is a member of a secreted protein family which has pleiotropic functions in development and stem cell growth. Rspo1 knock-out mice are sex-reversed, but some remain sub-fertile, so they fail to nurse their pups. A lack of Rspo1 expression in the mammary gland results in an absence of duct side-branching development and defective alveolar formation. The aim of this study was to characterize the phenotypic and molecular alterations of mammary gland due to Rspo1 knock-out. Using the transcriptional profiling of mammary tissues, we identified misregulated genes in the mammary gland of Rspo1 knock-out mice during pregnancy. A stronger expression of mesenchymal markers was observed, without modifications to the structure of mammary epithelial tissue. Mammary epithelial cell immunohistochemical analysis revealed a persistence of virgin markers, which signify a delay in cell differentiation. Moreover, serial transplantation experiments showed that Rspo1 is associated with a regenerative potential of mammary epithelial cell control. Our finding also highlights the negatively regulated expression of Rspo1's partners, Lgr4 and RNF43, in the mammary gland during pregnancy. Moreover, we offer evidence that Tgf-β signalling is modified in the absence of Rspo1. Taken together, our results show an abrupt halt or delay to mammary development during pregnancy due to the loss of a further differentiated function. PMID:27611670

  8. Emotional instability but intact spatial cognition in adenosine receptor 1 knock out mice.

    PubMed

    Lang, Undine E; Lang, Florian; Richter, Kerstin; Vallon, Volker; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Schnermann, Jürgen; Wolfer, David P

    2003-10-17

    Several lines of evidence point to the involvement of adenosine in the regulation of important central mechanisms such as cognition, arousal, aggression and anxiety. In order to elucidate the involvement of the adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) in spatial learning and the control of exploratory behaviour, we assessed A1AR knockout mice (A1AR-/-) and their wild-type littermates (A1AR+/+) in a place navigation task in the water maze and in a battery of forced and free exploration tests. In the water maze, A1AR-/- mice showed normal escape latencies and were indistinguishable from controls with respect to measures of spatial performance during both training and probe trial. But despite normal performance they showed increased wall hugging, most prominently after the relocation of the goal platform for reversal training. Quantitative analysis of strategy choices indicated that wall hugging was increased mainly at the expense of chaining and passive floating, whereas the frequency of trials characterised as direct swims or focal searching was normal in A1AR-/- mice. These results indicate intact spatial cognition, but mildly altered emotional reactions to the water maze environment. In line with this interpretation, A1AR-/- mice showed normal levels and patterns of activity, but a mild increase of some measures of anxiety in our battery of forced and free exploration paradigms. These results are in line with findings published using a genetically similar line, but demonstrate that the magnitude of the changes and the range of affected behavioural measures may vary considerably depending on the environmental conditions during testing. PMID:14529816

  9. Loss of Bace2 in zebrafish affects melanocyte migration and is distinct from Bace1 knock out phenotypes.

    PubMed

    van Bebber, Frauke; Hruscha, Alexander; Willem, Michael; Schmid, Bettina; Haass, Christian

    2013-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most frequent dementia. Pathologically, Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the accumulation of senile plaques composed of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ). Two proteases, β- and γ-secretase proteolytically generate Aβ from its precursor, the ß-amyloid precursor protein (APP). Inhibition of β-secretase, also referred to as beta-site APP cleaving enzyme (BACE1) or γ-secretase is therefore of prime interest for the development of amyloid-lowering drugs. To assess the in vivo function of zebrafish Bace1 (zBace1), we generated zBace1 knock out fish by zinc finger nuclease-mediated genome editing. bace1 mutants (bace1-/-) are hypomyelinated in the PNS while the CNS is not affected. Moreover, the number of mechanosensory neuromasts is elevated in bace1-/-. Mutations in zebrafish Bace2 (zBace2) revealed a distinct melanocyte migration phenotype, which is not observed in bace1-/-. Double homozygous bace1-/-; bace2-/- fish do not enhance the single mutant phenotypes indicating non-redundant distinct physiological functions. Single homozygous bace1 mutants as well as double homozygous bace1 and bace2 mutants are viable and fertile suggesting that Bace1 is a promising drug target without major side effects. The identification of a specific bace2 -/- associated phenotype further allows improving selective Bace1 inhibitors and to distinguish between Bace 1 and Bace 2 inhibition in vivo. Inhibition of BACE1 protease activity has therapeutic importance for Alzheimer's disease. Analysis of BACE1 and BACE2 knock-out zebrafish revealed that they exhibit distinct phenotypes. bace1 mutants display hypomyelination in the PNS and supernumerary neuromasts while in bace2 mutants the shape and migration of melanocytes is affected. These phenotypes are not further enhanced in the viable double mutants. Our data suggest that blocking BACE1 activity is a safe therapeutic approach. PMID:23406323

  10. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor/translocator protein global knock-out mice are viable with no effects on steroid hormone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tu, Lan N; Morohaku, Kanako; Manna, Pulak R; Pelton, Susanne H; Butler, W Ronald; Stocco, Douglas M; Selvaraj, Vimal

    2014-10-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO), previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is a mitochondrial outer membrane protein implicated as essential for cholesterol import to the inner mitochondrial membrane, the rate-limiting step in steroid hormone biosynthesis. Previous research on TSPO was based entirely on in vitro experiments, and its critical role was reinforced by an early report that claimed TSPO knock-out mice were embryonic lethal. In a previous publication, we examined Leydig cell-specific TSPO conditional knock-out mice that suggested TSPO was not required for testosterone production in vivo. This raised controversy and several questions regarding TSPO function. To examine the definitive role of TSPO in steroidogenesis and embryo development, we generated global TSPO null (Tspo(-/-)) mice. Contrary to the early report, Tspo(-/-) mice survived with no apparent phenotypic abnormalities and were fertile. Examination of adrenal and gonadal steroidogenesis showed no defects in Tspo(-/-) mice. Adrenal transcriptome comparison of gene expression profiles showed that genes involved in steroid hormone biosynthesis (Star, Cyp11a1, and Hsd3b1) were unchanged in Tspo(-/-) mice. Adrenocortical ultrastructure illustrated no morphological alterations in Tspo(-/-) mice. In an attempt to correlate our in vivo findings to previously used in vitro models, we also determined that siRNA knockdown or the absence of TSPO in different mouse and human steroidogenic cell lines had no effect on steroidogenesis. These findings directly refute the dogma that TSPO is indispensable for steroid hormone biosynthesis and viability. By amending the current model, this study advances our understanding of steroidogenesis with broad implications in biology and medicine. PMID:24936060

  11. Lentivirus-ABCG1 instillation reduces lipid accumulation and improves lung compliance in GM-CSF knock-out mice

    SciTech Connect

    Malur, Anagha; Huizar, Isham; Wells, Greg; Barna, Barbara P.; Malur, Achut G.; Thomassen, Mary Jane

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lentivirus-ABCG1 reduces lipid accumulation in lungs of GM-CSF knock-out mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Up-regulation of ABCG1 improves lung function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulation of ABCG1 improves surfactant metabolism. -- Abstract: We have shown decreased expression of the nuclear transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR{gamma}) and the PPAR{gamma}-regulated ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) in alveolar macrophages from patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). PAP patients also exhibit neutralizing antibodies to granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), an upregulator of PPAR{gamma}. In association with functional GM-CSF deficiency, PAP lung is characterized by surfactant-filled alveolar spaces and lipid-filled alveolar macrophages. Similar pathology characterizes GM-CSF knock-out (KO) mice. We reported previously that intratracheal instillation of a lentivirus (lenti)-PPAR{gamma} plasmid into GM-CSF KO animals elevated ABCG1 and reduced alveolar macrophage lipid accumulation. Here, we hypothesized that instillation of lenti-ABCG1 might be sufficient to decrease lipid accumulation and improve pulmonary function in GM-CSF KO mice. Animals received intratracheal instillation of lenti-ABCG1 or control lenti-enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (eGFP) plasmids and alveolar macrophages were harvested 10 days later. Alveolar macrophage transduction efficiency was 79% as shown by lenti-eGFP fluorescence. Quantitative PCR analyses indicated a threefold (p = 0.0005) increase in ABCG1 expression with no change of PPAR{gamma} or ABCA1 in alveolar macrophages of lenti-ABCG1 treated mice. ABCG1 was unchanged in control lenti-eGFP and PBS-instilled groups. Oil Red O staining detected reduced intracellular neutral lipid in alveolar macrophages from lenti-ABCG1 treated mice. Extracellular cholesterol and phospholipids were also decreased as shown by

  12. Duodenal nonheme iron content correlates with iron stores in mice, but the relationship is altered by Hfe gene knock-out.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Robert J; Debnam, Edward S; Laftah, Abas H; Solanky, Nita; Beaumont, Nick; Bahram, Seiamak; Schümann, Klaus; Srai, S Kaila S

    2003-04-15

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a common iron-loading disorder found in populations of European descent. It has been proposed that mutations causing loss of function of HFE gene result in reduced iron incorporation into immature duodenal crypt cells. These cells then overexpress genes for iron absorption, leading to inappropriate cellular iron balance, a persistent iron deficiency of the duodenal mucosa, and increased iron absorption. The objective was to measure duodenal iron content in Hfe knock-out mice to test whether the mutation causes a persistent decrease in enterocyte iron concentration. In both normal and Hfe knock-out mice, duodenal nonheme iron content was found to correlate with liver iron stores (P <.001, r = 0.643 and 0.551, respectively), and this effect did not depend on dietary iron levels. However, duodenal iron content was reduced in Hfe knock-out mice for any given content of liver iron stores (P <.001). PMID:12468424

  13. Novel therapeutic targets in osteoarthritis: Narrative review on knock-out genes involved in disease development in mouse animal models.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Francesca; Della Bella, Elena; Cepollaro, Simona; Brogini, Silvia; Martini, Lucia; Fini, Milena

    2016-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) can affect every joint, especially the knee. Given the complexity of this pathology, OA is difficult to treat with current therapies, which only relieve pain and inflammation and are not capable of restoring tissues once OA has started. Currently, researchers focus on finding a therapeutic strategy that may help to arrest disease progression. The present narrative review gives an overview of the genes involved in the development and progression of OA, assessing in vivo studies performed in knock-out mice affected by OA, to suggest new therapeutic strategies. The article search was performed on the PubMed database and www.webofknowledge.com website with the following keywords: "knee osteoarthritis" AND "knockout mice". The included studies were in English and published from 2005 to 2015. Additional papers were found within the references of the selected articles. In the 55 analyzed in vivo studies, genes mainly affected chondrocyte homeostasis, inflammatory processes, extracellular matrix and the relationship between obesity and OA. Genes are defined as inducing, preventing and not influencing OA. This review shows that joint homeostasis depends on a variety of genetic factors, and preventing or restoring the loss of a gene encoding for protective proteins, or inhibiting the expression of proteins that induce OA, might be a potential therapeutic approach. However, conclusions cannot be drawn because of the wide variability concerning the technique used for OA induction, the role of the genes, the method for tissue evaluations and the lack of assessments of all joint tissues. PMID:27059198

  14. Generation and evaluation of Myostatin knock-out rabbits and goats using CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rihong; Wan, Yongjie; Xu, Dan; Cui, Libin; Deng, Mingtian; Zhang, Guomin; Jia, Ruoxin; Zhou, Wenjun; Wang, Zhen; Deng, Kaiping; Huang, Mingrui; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Yanli

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin (Mstn) is a conserved negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass in mammals. However, whether precise disruption of Mstn in livestock can be achieved and safely used to improve meat productivity has not been proven. We applied CRISPR/Cas9 system to generate Mstn knock-out (KO) rabbits and goats and then analyzed the changes in their phenotypes to answer this question. We efficiently generated 24 Mstn KO rabbits out of 32 newborn infants after embryo injection with two sgRNAs targeting rabbit Mstn, and found that the Mstn KO rabbits exhibited increased birthweight and a significantly increase in the weight ratios of the quadriceps and biceps muscles to the whole body. Mstn KO also caused high probability of enlarged tongue phenomenon and severe health problems such as stillbirth and early stage death. Using the same method, one out of four goats was generated with edition at Mstn locus. The early stage growth rate of this goat outperformed the control goats. In conclusion, we efficiently generated Mstn KO rabbits and goats using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. However, Mstn KO causes severe health problems and may also have the same effects on other species. This safety issue must be studied further before applied to animal reproduction processes. PMID:27417210

  15. 1,3-propanediol production with Citrobacter werkmanii DSM17579: effect of a dhaD knock-out

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background 1,3-propanediol (PDO) is a substantially industrial metabolite used in the polymer industry. Although several natural PDO production hosts exist, e.g. Klebsiella sp., Citrobacter sp. and Clostridium sp., the PDO yield on glycerol is insufficient for an economically viable bio-process. Enhancing this yield via strain improvement can be achieved by disconnecting the production and growth pathways. In the case of PDO formation, this approach results in a microorganism metabolizing glycerol strictly for PDO production, while catabolizing a co-substrate for growth and maintenance. We applied this strategy to improve the PDO production with Citrobacter werkmanii DSM17579. Results Genetic tools were developed and used to create Citrobacter werkmanii DSM17579 ∆dhaD in which dhaD, encoding for glycerol dehydrogenase, was deleted. Since this strain was unable to grow on glycerol anaerobically, both pathways were disconnected. The knock-out strain was perturbed with 13 different co-substrates for growth and maintenance. Glucose was the most promising, although a competition between NADH-consuming enzymes and 1,3-propanediol dehydrogenase emerged. Conclusion Due to the deletion of dhaD in Citrobacter werkmanii DSM17579, the PDO production and growth pathway were split. As a consequence, the PDO yield on glycerol was improved 1,5 times, strengthening the idea that Citrobacter werkmanii DSM17579 could become an industrially interesting host for PDO production. PMID:24885849

  16. Behavioral Phenotype of Fmr1 Knock-Out Mice during Active Phase in an Altered Light/Dark Cycle123

    PubMed Central

    Saré, R. Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most commonly inherited form of intellectual disability and is a disorder that is also highly associated with autism. FXS occurs as a result of an expanded CGG repeat sequence leading to transcriptional silencing. In an animal model of FXS in which Fmr1 is knocked out (Fmr1 KO), many physical, physiological, and behavioral characteristics of the human disease are recapitulated. Prior characterization of the mouse model was conducted during the day, the inactive phase of the circadian cycle. Circadian rhythms are an important contributor to behavior and may play a role in the study of disease phenotype. Moreover, changes in the parameters of circadian rhythm are known to occur in FXS animal models. We conducted an investigation of key behavioral phenotypes in Fmr1 KO mice during their active phase. We report that phase did not alter the Fmr1 KO phenotype in open field activity, anxiety, and learning and memory. There was a slight effect of phase on social behavior as measured by time in chamber, but not by time spent sniffing. Our data strengthen the existing data characterizing the phenotype of Fmr1 KO mice, indicating that it is independent of circadian phase. PMID:27294193

  17. Extended Synaptotagmin (ESyt) Triple Knock-Out Mice Are Viable and Fertile without Obvious Endoplasmic Reticulum Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sclip, Alessandra; Bacaj, Taulant; Giam, Louise R.; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Extended synaptotagmins (ESyts) are endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteins composed of an N-terminal transmembrane region, a central SMP-domain, and five (ESyt1) or three C-terminal cytoplasmic C2-domains (ESyt2 and ESyt3). ESyts bind phospholipids in a Ca2+-dependent manner via their C2-domains, are localized to ER-plasma membrane contact sites, and may catalyze lipid exchange between the plasma membrane and the ER via their SMP-domains. However, the overall function of ESyts has remained enigmatic. Here, we generated triple constitutive and conditional knock-out mice that lack all three ESyt isoforms; in addition, we produced knock-in mice that express mutant ESyt1 or ESyt2 carrying inactivating substitutions in the Ca2+-binding sites of their C2A-domains. Strikingly, all ESyt mutant mice, even those lacking all ESyts, were apparently normal and survived and bred in a manner indistinguishable from control mice. ESyt mutant mice displayed no major changes in brain morphology or synaptic protein composition, and exhibited no large alterations in stress responses. Thus, in mice ESyts do not perform an essential role in basic cellular functions, suggesting that these highly conserved proteins may perform a specialized role that may manifest only during specific, as yet untested challenges. PMID:27348751

  18. CHO cells knocked out for TSC2 display an improved productivity of antibodies under fed batch conditions.

    PubMed

    McVey, Duncan; Aronov, Michael; Rizzi, Giovanni; Cowan, Alexis; Scott, Charo; Megill, John; Russell, Reb; Tirosh, Boaz

    2016-09-01

    The kinase mTOR operates in two cellular complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2. mTORC1 adjusts metabolic activity according to external growth conditions and nutrients availability. When conditions are prosperous, mTOR facilitates protein and lipid biosyntheses and inhibits autophagy, while under metabolic constraints, however, its attenuation induces a catabolic program, energy preservation and autophagy. CHO is a key cell line for manufacturing of biologics owing to its remarkable ability to grow to high densities and maintain protein production and secretion for extended times. While high mTOR activity has been associated with high productivity in CHO cells, its inhibition by rapamycin has also been documented to augment productivity via promotion of viability. Here using CRISPR/Cas9 editing we engineered CHO cells to enforce high mTORC1 activity by knocking-out TSC2, a major mTOR inhibitory protein, or PTEN, a phosphatase that attenuates the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. Only TSC2-deleted cells exhibited a constitutive activation of mTORC1 under fed batch conditions. Cells grew larger in size, synthesized more proteins and displayed an over twofold elevation in their specific productivity. While peak viable cell density was compromised, overall titers increased to an extent dependent upon the parental clone. Our data underscore manipulation of TSC as a strategy to improve performance of CHO cell in bioreactors. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1942-1952. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26888596

  19. Reconstructing gene regulatory networks from knock-out data using Gaussian Noise Model and Pearson Correlation Coefficient.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Salleh, Faridah Hani; Arif, Shereena Mohd; Zainudin, Suhaila; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-12-01

    A gene regulatory network (GRN) is a large and complex network consisting of interacting elements that, over time, affect each other's state. The dynamics of complex gene regulatory processes are difficult to understand using intuitive approaches alone. To overcome this problem, we propose an algorithm for inferring the regulatory interactions from knock-out data using a Gaussian model combines with Pearson Correlation Coefficient (PCC). There are several problems relating to GRN construction that have been outlined in this paper. We demonstrated the ability of our proposed method to (1) predict the presence of regulatory interactions between genes, (2) their directionality and (3) their states (activation or suppression). The algorithm was applied to network sizes of 10 and 50 genes from DREAM3 datasets and network sizes of 10 from DREAM4 datasets. The predicted networks were evaluated based on AUROC and AUPR. We discovered that high false positive values were generated by our GRN prediction methods because the indirect regulations have been wrongly predicted as true relationships. We achieved satisfactory results as the majority of sub-networks achieved AUROC values above 0.5. PMID:26278974

  20. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration: altered mitochondria membrane potential and defective respiration in Pank2 knock-out mouse model.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Dario; Dusi, Sabrina; Morbin, Michela; Uggetti, Andrea; Moda, Fabio; D'Amato, Ilaria; Giordano, Carla; d'Amati, Giulia; Cozzi, Anna; Levi, Sonia; Hayflick, Susan; Tiranti, Valeria

    2012-12-15

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by high brain content of iron and presence of axonal spheroids. Mutations in the PANK2 gene, which encodes pantothenate kinase 2, underlie an autosomal recessive inborn error of coenzyme A metabolism, called pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN). PKAN is characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity and pigmentary retinal degeneration. The pathogenesis of this disorder is poorly understood and, although PANK2 is a mitochondrial protein, perturbations in mitochondrial bioenergetics have not been reported. A knock-out (KO) mouse model of PKAN exhibits retinal degeneration and azoospermia, but lacks any neurological phenotype. The absence of a clinical phenotype has partially been explained by the different cellular localization of the human and murine PANK2 proteins. Here we demonstrate that the mouse Pank2 protein localizes to mitochondria, similar to its human orthologue. Moreover, we show that Pank2-defective neurons derived from KO mice have an altered mitochondrial membrane potential, a defect further corroborated by the observations of swollen mitochondria at the ultra-structural level and by the presence of defective respiration. PMID:22983956

  1. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration: altered mitochondria membrane potential and defective respiration in Pank2 knock-out mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti, Dario; Dusi, Sabrina; Morbin, Michela; Uggetti, Andrea; Moda, Fabio; D'Amato, Ilaria; Giordano, Carla; d'Amati, Giulia; Cozzi, Anna; Levi, Sonia; Hayflick, Susan; Tiranti, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by high brain content of iron and presence of axonal spheroids. Mutations in the PANK2 gene, which encodes pantothenate kinase 2, underlie an autosomal recessive inborn error of coenzyme A metabolism, called pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN). PKAN is characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity and pigmentary retinal degeneration. The pathogenesis of this disorder is poorly understood and, although PANK2 is a mitochondrial protein, perturbations in mitochondrial bioenergetics have not been reported. A knock-out (KO) mouse model of PKAN exhibits retinal degeneration and azoospermia, but lacks any neurological phenotype. The absence of a clinical phenotype has partially been explained by the different cellular localization of the human and murine PANK2 proteins. Here we demonstrate that the mouse Pank2 protein localizes to mitochondria, similar to its human orthologue. Moreover, we show that Pank2-defective neurons derived from KO mice have an altered mitochondrial membrane potential, a defect further corroborated by the observations of swollen mitochondria at the ultra-structural level and by the presence of defective respiration. PMID:22983956

  2. Sensitivity of Heterozygous α1,6-Fucosyltransferase Knock-out Mice to Cigarette Smoke-induced Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Congxiao; Maeno, Toshitaka; Ota, Fumi; Ueno, Manabu; Korekane, Hiroaki; Takamatsu, Shinji; Shirato, Ken; Matsumoto, Akio; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Yoshida, Keiichi; Kitazume, Shinobu; Ohtsubo, Kazuaki; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that a deficiency in core fucosylation caused by the genetic disruption of α1,6-fucosyltransferase (Fut8) leads to lethal abnormalities and the development of emphysematous lesions in the lung by attenuation of TGF-β1 receptor signaling. Herein, we investigated the physiological relevance of core fucosylation in the pathogenesis of emphysema using viable heterozygous knock-out mice (Fut8+/−) that were exposed to cigarette smoke (CS). The Fut8+/− mice exhibited a marked decrease in FUT8 activity, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 activities were elevated in the lung at an early stage of exposure. Emphysema developed after a 3-month CS exposure, accompanied by the recruitment of large numbers of macrophages to the lung. CS exposure substantially and persistently elevated the expression level of Smad7, resulting in a significant reduction of Smad2 phosphorylation (which controls MMP-9 expression) in Fut8+/− mice and Fut8-deficient embryonic fibroblast cells. These in vivo and in vitro studies show that impaired core fucosylation enhances the susceptibility to CS and constitutes at least part of the disease process of emphysema, in which TGF-β-Smad signaling is impaired and the MMP-mediated destruction of lung parenchyma is up-regulated. PMID:22433854

  3. Temporal evolution of neurophysiological and behavioral features of synapsin I/II/III triple knock-out mice

    PubMed Central

    Cambiaghi, Marco; Cursi, Marco; Monzani, Elena; Benfenati, Fabio; Comi, Giancarlo; Minicucci, Fabio; Valtorta, Flavia; Leocani, Letizia

    2013-01-01

    Summary Deletion of one or more synapsin genes in mice results in a spontaneous epilepsy. In these animals, seizures can be evoked by opening or moving the cage. Aim of the present study was to characterize the evolution of the epileptic phenotype by neurophysiological examination and behavioral observation in synapsin triple knock-out (Syn-TKO) mice. Syn-TKO mice were studied from 20 postnatal days (PND) up to 6 months of age by video-EEG recording and behavioral observation. Background EEG spectral analysis was performed and data were compared to WT animals. Syn-TKO revealed rare spontaneous seizures and increased susceptibility to evoked seizures in mice from 60 to 100 PND. Spontaneous and evoked seizures presented similar duration and morphology. At times, seizures were followed by a post-ictal phase characterized by a 4 Hz rhythmic activity and immobility of the animal. Spectral analysis of background EEG evidenced a slowing of the theta-alpha peak in Syn-TKO mice compared to WT mice within the period from PND 40 to 100. These data indicate that Syn-TKO mice do not exhibit a linear progression of the epileptic phenotype, with the period corresponding to a higher susceptibility to evoked seizures characterized by background EEG slowing. This aspect might be connected to brain dysfunction often associated to epilepsy in the interictal period. PMID:22846639

  4. Prolonged Starvation Causes Up-Regulation of AQP1 in Adipose Tissue Capillaries of AQP7 Knock-Out Mice

    PubMed Central

    Skowronski, Mariusz T.; Skowronska, Agnieszka; Rojek, Aleksandra; Oklinski, Michal K.; Nielsen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are membrane proteins involved in the regulation of cellular transport and the balance of water and glycerol and cell volume in the white adipose tissue (WAT). In our previous study, we found the co-expression of the AQP1 water channel and AQP7 in the mouse WAT. In our present study, we aimed to find out whether prolonged starvation influences the AQP1 expression of AQP7 knock-out mice (AQP7 KO) in the WAT. To resolve this hypothesis, immunoperoxidase, immunoblot and immunogold microscopy were used. AQP1 expression was found with the use of immunohistochemistry and was confirmed by immunogold microscopy in the vessels of mouse WAT of all studied groups. Semi-quantitative immunoblot and quantitative immunogold microscopy showed a significant increase (by 2.5- to 3-fold) in the abundance of AQP1 protein expression in WAT in the 72 h starved AQP7 KO mice as compared to AQP7+/+ (p < 0.05) and AQP7−/− (p < 0.01) controls, respectively. In conclusion, the AQP1 water channel located in the vessels of WAT is up-regulated in response to prolonged starvation in the WAT of AQP7 KO mice. The present data suggest that an interaction of different AQP isoforms is required for maintaining proper water homeostasis within the mice WAT. PMID:27455244

  5. Prolonged Starvation Causes Up-Regulation of AQP1 in Adipose Tissue Capillaries of AQP7 Knock-Out Mice.

    PubMed

    Skowronski, Mariusz T; Skowronska, Agnieszka; Rojek, Aleksandra; Oklinski, Michal K; Nielsen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are membrane proteins involved in the regulation of cellular transport and the balance of water and glycerol and cell volume in the white adipose tissue (WAT). In our previous study, we found the co-expression of the AQP1 water channel and AQP7 in the mouse WAT. In our present study, we aimed to find out whether prolonged starvation influences the AQP1 expression of AQP7 knock-out mice (AQP7 KO) in the WAT. To resolve this hypothesis, immunoperoxidase, immunoblot and immunogold microscopy were used. AQP1 expression was found with the use of immunohistochemistry and was confirmed by immunogold microscopy in the vessels of mouse WAT of all studied groups. Semi-quantitative immunoblot and quantitative immunogold microscopy showed a significant increase (by 2.5- to 3-fold) in the abundance of AQP1 protein expression in WAT in the 72 h starved AQP7 KO mice as compared to AQP7+/+ (p < 0.05) and AQP7-/- (p < 0.01) controls, respectively. In conclusion, the AQP1 water channel located in the vessels of WAT is up-regulated in response to prolonged starvation in the WAT of AQP7 KO mice. The present data suggest that an interaction of different AQP isoforms is required for maintaining proper water homeostasis within the mice WAT. PMID:27455244

  6. Ammonia excretion in Caenorhabditis elegans: Physiological and molecular characterization of the rhr-2 knock-out mutant.

    PubMed

    Adlimoghaddam, Aida; O'Donnell, Michael J; Kormish, Jay; Banh, Sheena; Treberg, Jason R; Merz, David; Weihrauch, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown the free living soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (N2 strain) to be ammonotelic. Ammonia excretion was suggested to take place partially via the hypodermis, involving the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA), V-ATPase (VAT), carbonic anhydrase, NHX-3 and a functional microtubule network and at least one Rh-like ammonia transporter RHR-1. In the current study, we show that a second Rh-protein, RHR-2, is highly expressed in the hypodermis, here also in the apical membrane of that tissue. To further characterize the role of RHR-2 in ammonia excretion, a knock-out mutant rhr-2 (ok403), further referred to as ∆rhr-2, was employed. Compared to wild-type worms (N2), this mutant showed a lower rate of ammonia excretion and a lower hypodermal H(+) excretion rate. At the same time rhr-1, nka, vat, and nhx-3 showed higher mRNA expression levels when compared to N2. Also, in contrast to N2 worms, ∆rhr-2 did not show enhanced ammonia excretion rates when exposed to a low pH environment, suggesting that RHR-2 represents the apical NH3 pathway that allows ammonia trapping via the hypodermis in N2 worms. A hypothetical model for the mechanism of hypodermal ammonia excretion is proposed on the basis of data in this and previous investigations. PMID:26872996

  7. Generation and evaluation of Myostatin knock-out rabbits and goats using CRISPR/Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rihong; Wan, Yongjie; Xu, Dan; Cui, Libin; Deng, Mingtian; Zhang, Guomin; Jia, Ruoxin; Zhou, Wenjun; Wang, Zhen; Deng, Kaiping; Huang, Mingrui; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Yanli

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin (Mstn) is a conserved negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass in mammals. However, whether precise disruption of Mstn in livestock can be achieved and safely used to improve meat productivity has not been proven. We applied CRISPR/Cas9 system to generate Mstn knock-out (KO) rabbits and goats and then analyzed the changes in their phenotypes to answer this question. We efficiently generated 24 Mstn KO rabbits out of 32 newborn infants after embryo injection with two sgRNAs targeting rabbit Mstn, and found that the Mstn KO rabbits exhibited increased birthweight and a significantly increase in the weight ratios of the quadriceps and biceps muscles to the whole body. Mstn KO also caused high probability of enlarged tongue phenomenon and severe health problems such as stillbirth and early stage death. Using the same method, one out of four goats was generated with edition at Mstn locus. The early stage growth rate of this goat outperformed the control goats. In conclusion, we efficiently generated Mstn KO rabbits and goats using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. However, Mstn KO causes severe health problems and may also have the same effects on other species. This safety issue must be studied further before applied to animal reproduction processes. PMID:27417210

  8. Increased Sensitivity to Inflammatory Pain Induced by Subcutaneous Formalin Injection in Serine Racemase Knock-Out Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tabata-Imai, Ayako; Inoue, Ran; Mori, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    D-Serine, an endogenous coagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), is widely distributed in the central nervous system and is synthesized from L-serine by serine racemase (SR). NMDAR plays an important role in pain processing including central sensitization that eventually causes hyperalgesia. To elucidate the roles of D-serine and SR in pain transmission, we evaluated the behavioral changes and spinal nociceptive processing induced by formalin using SR knock-out (KO) mice. We found that SR is mainly distributed in lamina II of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord in wild-type (WT) mice. Although the formalin injected subcutaneously induced the biphasic pain response of licking in SR-KO and WT mice, the time spent on licking was significantly longer in the SR-KO mice during the second phase of the formalin test. The number of neurons immunopositive for c-Fos and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK), which are molecular pain markers, in laminae I-II of the ipsilateral dorsal horn was significantly larger in the SR-KO mice. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the distribution of SR changed from being broad to being concentrated in cell bodies after the formalin injection. On the other hand, the expression level of the cytosolic SR in the ipsilateral dorsal horn significantly decreased. Oral administration of 10 mM D-serine in drinking water for one week cancelled the difference in pain behaviors between WT and SR-KO mice in phase 2 of the formalin test. These findings demonstrate that the SR-KO mice showed increased sensitivity to inflammatory pain and the WT mice showed translocation of SR and decreased SR expression levels after the formalin injection, which suggest a novel antinociceptive mechanism via SR indicating an important role of D-serine in pain transmission. PMID:25133605

  9. FAT10 KNOCK OUT MICE LIVERS FAIL TO DEVELOP MALLORY-DENK BODIES IN THE DDC MOUSE MODEL

    PubMed Central

    French, SW; French, BA; Oliva, J; Li, J; Bardag-Gorce, F; Tillman, B; Canaan, A

    2016-01-01

    Mallory-Denk bodies (MDBs) are aggresomes composed of undigested ubiqutinated short lived proteins which have accumulated because of a decrease in the rate of their degradation by the 26s proteasome. The decrease in the activity of the proteasome is due to a shift in the activity of the 26s proteasome to the immunoproteasome triggered by an increase in expression of the catalytic subunits of the immunoproteasome which replaces the catalytic subunits of the 26s proteasome. This switch in the type of proteasome in liver cells is triggered by the binding of IFNγ to the IFNγ sequence response element (ISRE) located on the FAT10 promoter. To determine if either FAT10 or IFNγ are essential for the formation of MDBs we fed both IFNγ and FAT10 knock out (KO) mice DDC added to the control diet for 10 weeks in order to induce MDBs. Mice fed the control diet and Wild type mice fed the DDC or control diet were compared. MDBs were located by immunofluorescent double stains using antibodies to ubiquitin to stain MDBs and FAT10 to localize the increased expression of FAT10 in MDB forming hepatocytes. We found that MDB formation occurred in the IFNγ KO mice but not in the FAT10 KO mice. Western blots showed an increase in the ubiquitin smears and decreases β 5 (chymotrypsin-like 26S proteasome subunit) in the Wild type mice fed DDC but not in the FAT10 KO mice fed DDC. To conclude, we have demonstrated that FAT10 is essential to the induction of MDB formation in the DDC fed mice. PMID:22981937

  10. Efficient Generation of Myostatin Knock-Out Sheep Using CRISPR/Cas9 Technology and Microinjection into Zygotes.

    PubMed

    Crispo, M; Mulet, A P; Tesson, L; Barrera, N; Cuadro, F; dos Santos-Neto, P C; Nguyen, T H; Crénéguy, A; Brusselle, L; Anegón, I; Menchaca, A

    2015-01-01

    While CRISPR/Cas9 technology has proven to be a valuable system to generate gene-targeted modified animals in several species, this tool has been scarcely reported in farm animals. Myostatin is encoded by MSTN gene involved in the inhibition of muscle differentiation and growth. We determined the efficiency of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to edit MSTN in sheep and generate knock-out (KO) animals with the aim to promote muscle development and body growth. We generated CRISPR/Cas9 mRNAs specific for ovine MSTN and microinjected them into the cytoplasm of ovine zygotes. When embryo development of CRISPR/Cas9 microinjected zygotes (n = 216) was compared with buffer injected embryos (n = 183) and non microinjected embryos (n = 173), cleavage rate was lower for both microinjected groups (P<0.05) and neither was affected by CRISPR/Cas9 content in the injected medium. Embryo development to blastocyst was not affected by microinjection and was similar among the experimental groups. From 20 embryos analyzed by Sanger sequencing, ten were mutant (heterozygous or mosaic; 50% efficiency). To obtain live MSTN KO lambs, 53 blastocysts produced after zygote CRISPR/Cas9 microinjection were transferred to 29 recipient females resulting in 65.5% (19/29) of pregnant ewes and 41.5% (22/53) of newborns. From 22 born lambs analyzed by T7EI and Sanger sequencing, ten showed indel mutations at MSTN gene. Eight showed mutations in both alleles and five of them were homozygous for indels generating out-of frame mutations that resulted in premature stop codons. Western blot analysis of homozygous KO founders confirmed the absence of myostatin, showing heavier body weight than wild type counterparts. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9 system was a very efficient tool to generate gene KO sheep. This technology is quick and easy to perform and less expensive than previous techniques, and can be applied to obtain genetically modified animal models of interest for biomedicine and

  11. 2-Methyl-6-(phenylethynyl) pyridine (MPEP) reverses maze learning and PSD-95 deficits in Fmr1 knock-out mice

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Réno M.; Kogan, Cary S.; Messier, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is caused by the lack of expression of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), which results in intellectual disability and other debilitating symptoms including impairment of visual-spatial functioning. FXS is the only single-gene disorder that is highly co-morbid with autism spectrum disorder and can therefore provide insight into its pathophysiology. Lack of FMRP results in altered group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) signaling, which is a target for putative treatments. The Hebb-Williams (H-W) mazes are a set of increasingly complex spatial navigation problems that depend on intact hippocampal and thus mGluR-5 functioning. In the present investigation, we examined whether an antagonist of mGluR-5 would reverse previously described behavioral deficits in fragile X mental retardation 1 knock-out (Fmr1 KO) mice. Mice were trained on a subset of the H-W mazes and then treated with either 20 mg/kg of an mGluR-5 antagonist, 2-Methyl-6-(phenylethynyl) pyridine (MPEP; n = 11) or an equivalent dose of saline (n = 11) prior to running test mazes. Latency and errors were dependent variables recorded during the test phase. Immediately after completing each test, marble-burying behavior was assessed, which confirmed that the drug treatment was pharmacologically active during maze learning. Although latency was not statistically different between the groups, MPEP treated Fmr1 KO mice made significantly fewer errors on mazes deemed more difficult suggesting a reversal of the behavioral deficit. MPEP treated mice were also less perseverative and impulsive when navigating mazes. Furthermore, MPEP treatment reversed post-synaptic density-95 (PSD-95) protein deficits in Fmr1 KO treated mice, whereas levels of a control protein (β-tubulin) remained unchanged. These data further validate MPEP as a potentially beneficial treatment for FXS. Our findings also suggest that adapted H-W mazes may be a useful tool to document alterations in

  12. Efficient Generation of Myostatin Knock-Out Sheep Using CRISPR/Cas9 Technology and Microinjection into Zygotes

    PubMed Central

    Crispo, M.; Mulet, A. P.; Tesson, L.; Barrera, N.; Cuadro, F.; dos Santos-Neto, P. C.; Nguyen, T. H.; Crénéguy, A.; Brusselle, L.; Anegón, I.; Menchaca, A.

    2015-01-01

    While CRISPR/Cas9 technology has proven to be a valuable system to generate gene-targeted modified animals in several species, this tool has been scarcely reported in farm animals. Myostatin is encoded by MSTN gene involved in the inhibition of muscle differentiation and growth. We determined the efficiency of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to edit MSTN in sheep and generate knock-out (KO) animals with the aim to promote muscle development and body growth. We generated CRISPR/Cas9 mRNAs specific for ovine MSTN and microinjected them into the cytoplasm of ovine zygotes. When embryo development of CRISPR/Cas9 microinjected zygotes (n = 216) was compared with buffer injected embryos (n = 183) and non microinjected embryos (n = 173), cleavage rate was lower for both microinjected groups (P<0.05) and neither was affected by CRISPR/Cas9 content in the injected medium. Embryo development to blastocyst was not affected by microinjection and was similar among the experimental groups. From 20 embryos analyzed by Sanger sequencing, ten were mutant (heterozygous or mosaic; 50% efficiency). To obtain live MSTN KO lambs, 53 blastocysts produced after zygote CRISPR/Cas9 microinjection were transferred to 29 recipient females resulting in 65.5% (19/29) of pregnant ewes and 41.5% (22/53) of newborns. From 22 born lambs analyzed by T7EI and Sanger sequencing, ten showed indel mutations at MSTN gene. Eight showed mutations in both alleles and five of them were homozygous for indels generating out-of frame mutations that resulted in premature stop codons. Western blot analysis of homozygous KO founders confirmed the absence of myostatin, showing heavier body weight than wild type counterparts. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9 system was a very efficient tool to generate gene KO sheep. This technology is quick and easy to perform and less expensive than previous techniques, and can be applied to obtain genetically modified animal models of interest for biomedicine and

  13. Reduced levels of dopamine and altered metabolism in brains of HPRT knock-out rats: a new rodent model of Lesch-Nyhan Disease.

    PubMed

    Meek, Stephen; Thomson, Alison J; Sutherland, Linda; Sharp, Matthew G F; Thomson, Julie; Bishop, Valerie; Meddle, Simone L; Gloaguen, Yoann; Weidt, Stefan; Singh-Dolt, Karamjit; Buehr, Mia; Brown, Helen K; Gill, Andrew C; Burdon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is a severe neurological disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), an enzyme required for efficient recycling of purine nucleotides. Although this biochemical defect reconfigures purine metabolism and leads to elevated levels of the breakdown product urea, it remains unclear exactly how loss of HPRT activity disrupts brain function. As the rat is the preferred rodent experimental model for studying neurobiology and diseases of the brain, we used genetically-modified embryonic stem cells to generate an HPRT knock-out rat. Male HPRT-deficient rats were viable, fertile and displayed normal caged behaviour. However, metabolomic analysis revealed changes in brain biochemistry consistent with disruption of purine recycling and nucleotide metabolism. Broader changes in brain biochemistry were also indicated by increased levels of the core metabolite citrate and reduced levels of lipids and fatty acids. Targeted MS/MS analysis identified reduced levels of dopamine in the brains of HPRT-deficient animals, consistent with deficits noted previously in human LND patients and HPRT knock-out mice. The HPRT-deficient rat therefore provides a new experimental platform for future investigation of how HPRT activity and disruption of purine metabolism affects neural function and behaviour. PMID:27185277

  14. Reduced levels of dopamine and altered metabolism in brains of HPRT knock-out rats: a new rodent model of Lesch-Nyhan Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Stephen; Thomson, Alison J.; Sutherland, Linda; Sharp, Matthew G. F.; Thomson, Julie; Bishop, Valerie; Meddle, Simone L.; Gloaguen, Yoann; Weidt, Stefan; Singh-Dolt, Karamjit; Buehr, Mia; Brown, Helen K.; Gill, Andrew C.; Burdon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is a severe neurological disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), an enzyme required for efficient recycling of purine nucleotides. Although this biochemical defect reconfigures purine metabolism and leads to elevated levels of the breakdown product urea, it remains unclear exactly how loss of HPRT activity disrupts brain function. As the rat is the preferred rodent experimental model for studying neurobiology and diseases of the brain, we used genetically-modified embryonic stem cells to generate an HPRT knock-out rat. Male HPRT-deficient rats were viable, fertile and displayed normal caged behaviour. However, metabolomic analysis revealed changes in brain biochemistry consistent with disruption of purine recycling and nucleotide metabolism. Broader changes in brain biochemistry were also indicated by increased levels of the core metabolite citrate and reduced levels of lipids and fatty acids. Targeted MS/MS analysis identified reduced levels of dopamine in the brains of HPRT-deficient animals, consistent with deficits noted previously in human LND patients and HPRT knock-out mice. The HPRT-deficient rat therefore provides a new experimental platform for future investigation of how HPRT activity and disruption of purine metabolism affects neural function and behaviour. PMID:27185277

  15. Knock out of the PHOSPHATE 2 Gene TaPHO2-A1 Improves Phosphorus Uptake and Grain Yield under Low Phosphorus Conditions in Common Wheat.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Xiang; Hong, Xia; Zhao, Xueqiang; Zhang, Wei; He, Xue; Ma, Wenying; Teng, Wan; Tong, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    MiR399 and its target PHOSPHATE2 (PHO2) play pivotal roles in phosphate signaling in plants. Loss of function mutation in PHO2 leads to excessive Pi accumulation in shoots and growth retardation in diploid plants like Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa). Here we isolated three PHO2 homologous genes TaPHO2-A1, -B1 and -D1 from hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum). These TaPHO2 genes all contained miR399-binding sites and were able to be degraded by tae-miR399. TaPHO2-D1 was expressed much more abundantly than TaPHO2-A1 and -B1. The ion beam-induced deletion mutants were used to analyze the effects of TaPHO2s on phosphorus uptake and plant growth. The tapho2-a1, tapho2-b1 and tapho2-d1 mutants all had significant higher leaf Pi concentrations than did the wild type, with tapho2-d1 having the strongest effect, and tapho2-b1 the weakest. Two consecutive field experiments showed that knocking out TaPHO2-D1 reduced plant height and grain yield under both low and high phosphorus conditions. However, knocking out TaPHO2-A1 significantly increased phosphorus uptake and grain yield under low phosphorus conditions, with no adverse effect on grain yield under high phosphorus conditions. Our results indicated that TaPHO2s involved in phosphorus uptake and translocation, and molecular engineering TaPHO2 shows potential in improving wheat yield with less phosphorus fertilizer. PMID:27416927

  16. Knock out of the PHOSPHATE 2 Gene TaPHO2-A1 Improves Phosphorus Uptake and Grain Yield under Low Phosphorus Conditions in Common Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Xiang; Hong, Xia; Zhao, Xueqiang; Zhang, Wei; He, Xue; Ma, Wenying; Teng, Wan; Tong, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    MiR399 and its target PHOSPHATE2 (PHO2) play pivotal roles in phosphate signaling in plants. Loss of function mutation in PHO2 leads to excessive Pi accumulation in shoots and growth retardation in diploid plants like Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa). Here we isolated three PHO2 homologous genes TaPHO2-A1, -B1 and -D1 from hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum). These TaPHO2 genes all contained miR399-binding sites and were able to be degraded by tae-miR399. TaPHO2-D1 was expressed much more abundantly than TaPHO2-A1 and -B1. The ion beam-induced deletion mutants were used to analyze the effects of TaPHO2s on phosphorus uptake and plant growth. The tapho2-a1, tapho2-b1 and tapho2-d1 mutants all had significant higher leaf Pi concentrations than did the wild type, with tapho2-d1 having the strongest effect, and tapho2-b1 the weakest. Two consecutive field experiments showed that knocking out TaPHO2-D1 reduced plant height and grain yield under both low and high phosphorus conditions. However, knocking out TaPHO2-A1 significantly increased phosphorus uptake and grain yield under low phosphorus conditions, with no adverse effect on grain yield under high phosphorus conditions. Our results indicated that TaPHO2s involved in phosphorus uptake and translocation, and molecular engineering TaPHO2 shows potential in improving wheat yield with less phosphorus fertilizer. PMID:27416927

  17. Broken or knocked out tooth

    MedlinePlus

    Pfenninger JL, Fowlder GC. Management of dental injuries and reimplantation of an avulsed tooth. In: Pfenninger JL, Fowlder GC, eds. Pfenninger & Fowler's Procedures for Primary Care . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  18. Broken or knocked out tooth

    MedlinePlus

    ... bones, stale bread, tough bagels and unpopped popcorn kernels. Always wear a seatbelt. Alternative Names Teeth - broken; ... A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health ...

  19. Expression pattern of matrix metalloproteinase and TIMP genes in fibroblasts derived from Ets-1 knock-out mice compared to wild-type mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hahne, Jens Claus; Fuchs, Tanja; El Mustapha, Haddouti; Okuducu, Ali Fuat; Bories, Jean Christophe; Wernert, Nicolas

    2006-07-01

    Matrix-degrading proteases play a key role in normal development, wound healing, many diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and, in particular, tumour invasion. In invasive tumours, these enzymes are expressed by fibroblasts of the tumour stroma. Their expression and activity are tightly regulated at several levels, an important one being transcription. Previous in vitro and in vivo findings pointed to a major role of the Ets-1 transcription factor for this level of regulation. In the present study, we tried to prove this role in fibroblasts. We stimulated wild-type mouse fibroblasts with physiological doses of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, known to induce different proteases and expressed by tumour cells) and compared the results to those obtained in Ets-1 -/- fibroblasts derived from Ets-1 knock-out mice. We found that basal Ets-1 levels are necessary not only for a fast induction of MMPs 2, 3 and 13 by bFGF but also for maintenance of the bFGF-induced expression of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) 1, 2 and 3, which are known not only to inhibit but also participate as activators of certain pro-MMPs. PMID:16786167

  20. Establishment of Immortalized BMP2/4 Double Knock-Out Osteoblastic Cells Is Essential for Study of Osteoblast Growth, Differentiation, and Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-An; Wang, Feng; Donly, Kevin J; Baker, Andrew; Wan, Chunyan; Luo, Daoshu; MacDougall, Mary; Chen, Shuo

    2016-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins 2 and 4 (BMP2/4) are essential for osteoblast differentiation and osteogenesis. Generation of a BMP2/4 dual knock-out ((ko/ko)) osteoblastic cell line is a valuable asset for studying effects of BMP2/4 on skeletal development. In this study, our goal was to create immortalized mouse deleted BMP2/4 osteoblasts by infecting adenoviruses with Cre recombinase and green fluorescent protein genes into immortalized murine floxed BMP2/4 osteoblasts. Transduced BMP2/4(ko/ko) cells were verified by green immunofluorescence and PCR. BMP2/4(ko/ko) osteoblasts exhibited small size, slow cell proliferation rate and cell growth was arrested in G1 and G2 phases. Expression of bone-relate genes was reduced in the BMP2/4(ko/ko) cells, resulting in delay of cell differentiation and mineralization. Importantly, extracellular matrix remodeling was impaired in the BMP2/4(ko/ko) osteoblasts as reflected by decreased Mmp-2 and Mmp-9 expressions. Cell differentiation and mineralization were rescued by exogenous BMP2 and/or BMP4. Therefore, we for the first time described establishment of an immortalized deleted BMP2/4 osteoblast line useful for study of mechanisms in regulating osteoblast lineages. PMID:26595646

  1. The phenotypes of ATG9, ATG16 and ATG9/16 knock-out mutants imply autophagy-dependent and -independent functions

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qiuhong; Ünal, Can; Matthias, Jan; Steinert, Michael; Eichinger, Ludwig

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a highly conserved intracellular bulk degradation system of all eukaryotic cells. It is governed by a large number of autophagy proteins (ATGs) and is crucial for many cellular processes. Here, we describe the phenotypes of Dictyostelium discoideum ATG16− and ATG9−/16− cells and compare them to the previously reported ATG9− mutant. ATG16 deficiency caused an increase in the expression of several core autophagy genes, among them atg9 and the two atg8 paralogues. The single and double ATG9 and ATG16 knock-out mutants had complex phenotypes and displayed severe and comparable defects in pinocytosis and phagocytosis. Uptake of Legionella pneumophila was reduced. In addition, ATG9− and ATG16− cells had dramatic defects in autophagy, development and proteasomal activity which were much more severe in the ATG9−/16− double mutant. Mutant cells showed an increase in poly-ubiquitinated proteins and contained large ubiquitin-positive protein aggregates which partially co-localized with ATG16-GFP in ATG9−/16− cells. The more severe autophagic, developmental and proteasomal phenotypes of ATG9−/16− cells imply that ATG9 and ATG16 probably function in parallel in autophagy and have in addition autophagy-independent functions in further cellular processes. PMID:25878144

  2. Morphological and Functional Correlates of Synaptic Pathology in the Cathepsin D Knock-Out Mouse Model of Congenital Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Sabine; Molchanova, Svetlana M.; Wright, Ann K; Edwards, Andrew; Cooper, Jon D.; Taira, Tomi; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Tyynelä, Jaana

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the cathepsin D (CTSD) gene cause an aggressive neurodegenerative disease (congenital neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis) that leads to early death. Recent evidence suggests that presynaptic abnormalities play a major role in the pathogenesis of CTSD deficiencies. To identify the early events that lead to synaptic alterations, we investigated synaptic ultrastructure and function in pre-symptomatic CTSD knock-out (Ctsd−/−) mice. Electron microscopy revealed that there were significantly greater numbers of readily releasable synaptic vesicles present in Ctsd−/− mice than in wild-type control mice as early as postnatal day 16. The size of this synaptic vesicle pool continued to increase with disease progression in the hippocampus and thalamus of the Ctsd−/− mice. Electrophysiology revealed a markedly decreased frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) with no effect on pair-pulse modulation of the evoked EPSPs in the hippocampus of Ctsd−/− mice. The reduced miniature EPSC frequency was observed before the appearance of epilepsy or any morphological sign of synaptic degeneration. Taken together, the data indicate that CTSD is required for normal synaptic function, and that a failure in synaptic trafficking or recycling may be an early and important pathological mechanism in Ctsd−/− mice; these presynaptic abnormalities may initiate synaptic degeneration in advance of subsequent neuronal loss. PMID:22082660

  3. Investigation on the partial resistance of Cpkk2 knock out strain of Cryphonectria parasitica to Cryphonectria hypovirus 1 infection in presence of Geneticin and Geneticin resistance gene.

    PubMed

    Turina, Massimo; Rossi, Marika; Moretti, Marino

    2016-07-01

    We have recently characterized the central components of the three MAP kinase cascades present in Cryphonectria parasitica : the MEK genes cpkk1, cpkk2 and cpkk3. When we attempted to infect through anastomosis the three knock out strains with Cryphonectria hypovirus 1 (CHV1), only the deletion strain of Cpkk2, the yeast Ste7 homologue, involved in mating and filamentous growth, could not be infected. We then proceeded to attempt virus infection through transformation of Δcpkk2 protoplasts using an infectious cDNA clone able to establish virus infection through transformation. In this case, a very limited number of strains could be recovered as stable transformants compared to the efficiency of control transformations with plasmid carrying only the antibiotic marker. Furthermore, transformants carrying actively replicating virus could be isolated only if the selection marker Geneticin was used during the very initial selection process, and not maintained throughout the growth of the colonies. Moreover, Δcpkk2 isolates that maintained the virus lost Geneticin resistance. We therefore unveiled a specific negative interaction among virus infection, presence of Geneticin in the growth media, and lack of Cpkk2 MEK in the fungal host. PMID:26643512

  4. Progression of Alport Kidney Disease in Col4a3 Knock Out Mice Is Independent of Sex or Macrophage Depletion by Clodronate Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Munkyung; Piaia, Alessandro; Shenoy, Neeta; Kagan, David; Gapp, Berangere; Kueng, Benjamin; Weber, Delphine; Dietrich, William; Ksiazek, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    Alport syndrome is a genetic disease of collagen IV (α3, 4, 5) resulting in renal failure. This study was designed to investigate sex-phenotype correlations and evaluate the contribution of macrophage infiltration to disease progression using Col4a3 knock out (Col4a3KO) mice, an established genetic model of autosomal recessive Alport syndrome. No sex differences in the evolution of body mass loss, renal pathology, biomarkers of tubular damage KIM-1 and NGAL, or deterioration of kidney function were observed during the life span of Col4a3KO mice. These findings confirm that, similar to human autosomal recessive Alport syndrome, female and male Col4a3KO mice develop renal failure at the same age and with similar severity. The specific contribution of macrophage infiltration to Alport disease, one of the prominent features of the disease in human and Col4a3KO mice, remains unknown. This study shows that depletion of kidney macrophages in Col4a3KO male mice by administration of clodronate liposomes, prior to clinical onset of disease and throughout the study period, does not protect the mice from renal failure and interstitial fibrosis, nor delay disease progression. These results suggest that therapy targeting macrophage recruitment to kidney is unlikely to be effective as treatment of Alport syndrome. PMID:26555339

  5. Analysis of the synergistic effect of glycyrrhizin and other constituents in licorice extract on lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production using knock-out extract.

    PubMed

    Uto, Takuhiro; Morinaga, Osamu; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2012-01-01

    The pharmacological evidence for synergism between natural compounds is not fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the synergistic function of one target compound in medicinal plant extract by using knock-out (KO) extract, which is one target compound-eliminated extract from whole crude extract. Licorice is the most important ingredient used in the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and the Japanese Kampo medicine, and one of the major active components of licorice is glycyrrhizin (GC). To identify the potential role of GC, we prepared GC-removed extract (GC-KO extract) from licorice extract (LE) using immunoaffinity column conjugated with anti-GC monoclonal antibody (MAb), which could eliminate 99.5% of GC from LE. LE inhibited nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264 murine macrophage cells. However, treatment of GC alone could not show the suppression of NO production and iNOS expression. Interestingly, the inhibitory effect of GC-KO extract was significantly attenuated compared with LE. Furthermore, the combined treatment with GC-KO extract and GC could improve the attenuated inhibition. Taken together, our results indicate that GC may exert synergistic suppression of iNOS expression when coexisting with the other constituents contained in LE, and KO extract is a useful approach for determination of real pharmacological functions of natural compound in the phytochemical mixture. PMID:22178686

  6. Type II Cochlear Ganglion Neurons Do Not Drive the Olivocochlear Reflex: Re-Examination of the Cochlear Phenotype in Peripherin Knock-Out Mice.

    PubMed

    Maison, Stéphane; Liberman, Leslie D; Liberman, M Charles

    2016-01-01

    The cochlear nerve includes a small population of unmyelinated sensory fibers connecting outer hair cells to the brain. The functional role of these type II afferent neurons is controversial, because neurophysiological data are sparse. A recent study (Froud et al., 2015) reported that targeted deletion of peripherin, a type of neurofilament, eliminated type II afferents and inactivated efferent feedback to the outer hair cells, thereby suggesting that type II afferents were the sensory drive to this sound-evoked, negative-feedback reflex, the olivocochlear pathway. Here, we re-evaluated the cochlear phenotype in mice from the peripherin knock-out line and show that (1) type II afferent terminals are present in normal number and (2) olivocochlear suppression of cochlear responses is absent even when this efferent pathway is directly activated by shocks. We conclude that type II neurons are not the sensory drive for the efferent reflex and that peripherin deletion likely causes dysfunction of synaptic transmission between olivocochlear terminals and their peripheral targets. PMID:27570826

  7. Type II Cochlear Ganglion Neurons Do Not Drive the Olivocochlear Reflex: Re-Examination of the Cochlear Phenotype in Peripherin Knock-Out Mice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The cochlear nerve includes a small population of unmyelinated sensory fibers connecting outer hair cells to the brain. The functional role of these type II afferent neurons is controversial, because neurophysiological data are sparse. A recent study (Froud et al., 2015) reported that targeted deletion of peripherin, a type of neurofilament, eliminated type II afferents and inactivated efferent feedback to the outer hair cells, thereby suggesting that type II afferents were the sensory drive to this sound-evoked, negative-feedback reflex, the olivocochlear pathway. Here, we re-evaluated the cochlear phenotype in mice from the peripherin knock-out line and show that (1) type II afferent terminals are present in normal number and (2) olivocochlear suppression of cochlear responses is absent even when this efferent pathway is directly activated by shocks. We conclude that type II neurons are not the sensory drive for the efferent reflex and that peripherin deletion likely causes dysfunction of synaptic transmission between olivocochlear terminals and their peripheral targets. PMID:27570826

  8. Production of superoxide from photosystem II-light harvesting complex II supercomplex in STN8 kinase knock-out rice mutants under photoinhibitory illumination.

    PubMed

    Poudyal, Roshan Sharma; Nath, Krishna; Zulfugarov, Ismayil S; Lee, Choon-Hwan

    2016-09-01

    When phosphorylation of Photosystem (PS) II core proteins is blocked in STN8 knock-out mutants of rice (Oryza sativa) under photoinhibitory illumination, the mobilization of PSII supercomplex is prevented. We have previously proposed that more superoxide (O2(-)) is produced from PSII in the mutant (Nath et al., 2013, Plant J. 76, 675-686). Here, we clarify the type and site for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using both histochemical and fluorescence probes, we observed that, compared with wild-type (WT) leaves, levels of ROS, including O2(-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), were increased when leaves from mutant plants were illuminated with excess light. However, singlet oxygen production was not enhanced under such conditions. When superoxide dismutase was inhibited, O2(-) production was increased, indicating that it is the initial event prior to H2O2 production. In thylakoids isolated from WT leaves, kinase was active in the presence of ATP, and spectrophotometric analysis of nitrobluetetrazolium absorbance for O2(-) confirmed that PSII-driven superoxide production was greater in the mutant thylakoids than in the WT. This contrast in levels of PSII-driven superoxide production between the mutants and the WT plants was confirmed by conducting protein oxidation assays of PSII particles from osstn8 leaves under strong illumination. Those assays also demonstrated that PSII-LHCII supercomplex proteins were oxidized more in the mutant, thereby implying that PSII particles incur greater damage even though D1 degradation during PSII-supercomplex mobilization is partially blocked in the mutant. These results suggest that O2(-) is the major form of ROS produced in the mutant, and that the damaged PSII in the supercomplex is the primary source of O2(-). PMID:27390892

  9. Developmental Changes of ENaC Expression and Function in the Inner Ear of Pendrin Knock-Out Mice as a Perspective on the Development of Endolymphatic Hydrops

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bo Gyung; Kim, Jin Young; Kim, Hee Nam; Bok, Jinwoong; Namkung, Wan

    2014-01-01

    Pendrin mutations cause enlarged vestibular aqueducts and various degrees of sensorineural hearing loss. The selective abolition of pendrin causes dilation of the membranous labyrinth known as endolymphatic hydrops, loss of the endocochlear potential, and consequently loss of hearing function. Because Na+ transport is one of the most important driving forces for fluid transport, the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) is believed to play an important role in fluid volume regulation in the inner ear. Therefore, the dysfunction of Na+ transport through ENaC by the acidification of endolymph in Pendred syndrome is one of the potential causes of endolymphatic hydrops. We investigated the changes of ENaC expression and function during the development of the pendrin knock-out mouse. In the cochlea, the expression of β and γENaC was significantly increased at P56 in Pds−/− mice compared with Pds+/+ mice. In the vestibule, the expression of βENaC was significantly increased at P56, and γENaC expression significantly increased from P6 to P56 in Pds−/− mice. The ENaC-dependent trans-epithelial current was not significantly different between Pds+/+ and Pds−/− mice in Reissner’s membrane or the saccular extramacular roof epithelium at P0, but the current was significantly increased in Pds−/− mice at P56 compared with Pds+/+ mice. These findings indicate that the expression and function of ENaC were enhanced in Pds−/− mice after the development of endolymphatic hydrops as a compensatory mechanism. This result provides insight into the role of Na+ transport in the development and regulation of endolymphatic hydrops due to pendrin mutations. PMID:24752462

  10. Automated pipeline to analyze non-contact infrared images of the paraventricular nucleus specific leptin receptor knock-out mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Martinez, Myriam; Ghamari-Langroudi, Masoud; Gifford, Aliya; Cone, Roger; Welch, E. B.

    2015-03-01

    Evidence of leptin resistance is indicated by elevated leptin levels together with other hallmarks of obesity such as a defect in energy homeostasis.1 As obesity is an increasing epidemic in the US, the investigation of mechanisms by which leptin resistance has a pathophysiological impact on energy is an intensive field of research.2 However, the manner in which leptin resistance contributes to the dysregulation of energy, specifically thermoregulation,3 is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the leptin receptor expressed in paraventricular nucleus (PVN) neurons plays a role in thermoregulation at different temperatures. Non-contact infrared (NCIR) thermometry was employed to measure surface body temperature (SBT) of nonanesthetized mice with a specific deletion of the leptin receptor in the PVN after exposure to room (25 °C) and cold (4 °C) temperature. Dorsal side infrared images of wild type (LepRwtwt/sim1-Cre), heterozygous (LepRfloxwt/sim1-Cre) and knock-out (LepRfloxflox/sim1-Cre) mice were collected. Images were input to an automated post-processing pipeline developed in MATLAB to calculate average and maximum SBTs. Linear regression was used to evaluate the relationship between sex, cold exposure and leptin genotype with SBT measurements. Findings indicate that average SBT has a negative relationship to the LepRfloxflox/sim1-Cre genotype, the female sex and cold exposure. However, max SBT is affected by the LepRfloxflox/sim1-Cre genotype and the female sex. In conclusion this data suggests that leptin within the PVN may have a neuroendocrine role in thermoregulation and that NCIR thermometry combined with an automated imaging-processing pipeline is a promising approach to determine SBT in non-anesthetized mice.

  11. Developmental changes of ENaC expression and function in the inner ear of pendrin knock-out mice as a perspective on the development of endolymphatic hydrops.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo Gyung; Kim, Jin Young; Kim, Hee Nam; Bok, Jinwoong; Namkung, Wan; Choi, Jae Young; Kim, Sung Huhn

    2014-01-01

    Pendrin mutations cause enlarged vestibular aqueducts and various degrees of sensorineural hearing loss. The selective abolition of pendrin causes dilation of the membranous labyrinth known as endolymphatic hydrops, loss of the endocochlear potential, and consequently loss of hearing function. Because Na+ transport is one of the most important driving forces for fluid transport, the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) is believed to play an important role in fluid volume regulation in the inner ear. Therefore, the dysfunction of Na+ transport through ENaC by the acidification of endolymph in Pendred syndrome is one of the potential causes of endolymphatic hydrops. We investigated the changes of ENaC expression and function during the development of the pendrin knock-out mouse. In the cochlea, the expression of β and γENaC was significantly increased at P56 in Pds-/- mice compared with Pds+/+ mice. In the vestibule, the expression of βENaC was significantly increased at P56, and γENaC expression significantly increased from P6 to P56 in Pds-/- mice. The ENaC-dependent trans-epithelial current was not significantly different between Pds+/+ and Pds-/- mice in Reissner's membrane or the saccular extramacular roof epithelium at P0, but the current was significantly increased in Pds-/- mice at P56 compared with Pds+/+ mice. These findings indicate that the expression and function of ENaC were enhanced in Pds-/- mice after the development of endolymphatic hydrops as a compensatory mechanism. This result provides insight into the role of Na+ transport in the development and regulation of endolymphatic hydrops due to pendrin mutations. PMID:24752462

  12. Oleylphosphocholine (OlPC) arrests Cryptosporidium parvum growth in vitro and prevents lethal infection in interferon gamma receptor knock-out mice

    PubMed Central

    Sonzogni-Desautels, Karine; Renteria, Axel E.; Camargo, Fabio V.; Di Lenardo, Thomas Z.; Mikhail, Alexandre; Arrowood, Michael J.; Fortin, Anny; Ndao, Momar

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a species of protozoa that causes cryptosporidiosis, an intestinal disease affecting many mammals including humans. Typically, in healthy individuals, cryptosporidiosis is a self-limiting disease. However, C. parvum can cause a severe and persistent infection that can be life-threatening for immunocompromised individuals, such as AIDS patients. As there are no available treatments for these patients that can cure the disease, there is an urgent need to identify treatment options. We tested the anti-parasitic activity of the alkylphosphocholine oleylphosphocholine (OlPC), an analog of miltefosine, against C. parvum in in vitro and in vivo studies. In vitro experiments using C. parvum infected human ileocecal adenocarcinoma cells (HCT-8 cells) showed that OlPC has an EC50 of 18.84 nM. Moreover, no cell toxicity has been seen at concentrations ≤50 μM. C57BL/6 interferon gamma receptor knock-out mice, were infected by gavage with 4000 C. parvum oocysts on Day 0. Oral treatments, with OlPC, miltefosine, paromomycin or PBS, began on Day 3 post-infection for 10 days. Treatment with OlPC, at 40 mg/kg/day resulted in 100% survival, complete clearance of parasite in stools and a 99.9% parasite burden reduction in the intestines at Day 30. Doses of 30 and 20 mg/kg/day also demonstrated an increased survival rate and a dose-dependent parasite burden reduction. Mice treated with 10 mg/kg/day of miltefosine resulted in 50% survival at Day 30. In contrast, control mice, treated with PBS or 100 mg/kg/day of paromomycin, died or had to be euthanized between Days 6 and 13 due to severe illness. Results of parasite burden were obtained by qPCR and cross-validated by both flow cytometry of stool oocysts and histological sections of the ileum. Together, our results strongly support that OlPC represents a potential candidate for the treatment of C. parvum infections in immunocompromised patients. PMID:26441906

  13. Knock-in/Knock-out (KIKO) vectors for rapid integration of large DNA sequences, including whole metabolic pathways, onto the Escherichia coli chromosome at well-characterised loci

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metabolic engineering projects often require integration of multiple genes in order to control the desired phenotype. However, this often requires iterative rounds of engineering because many current insertion approaches are limited by the size of the DNA that can be transferred onto the chromosome. Consequently, construction of highly engineered strains is very time-consuming. A lack of well-characterised insertion loci is also problematic. Results A series of knock-in/knock-out (KIKO) vectors was constructed for integration of large DNA sequences onto the E. coli chromosome at well-defined loci. The KIKO plasmids target three nonessential genes/operons as insertion sites: arsB (an arsenite transporter); lacZ (β-galactosidase); and rbsA-rbsR (a ribose metabolism operon). Two homologous ‘arms’ target each insertion locus; insertion is mediated by λ Red recombinase through these arms. Between the arms is a multiple cloning site for the introduction of exogenous sequences and an antibiotic resistance marker (either chloramphenicol or kanamycin) for selection of positive recombinants. The resistance marker can subsequently be removed by flippase-mediated recombination. The insertion cassette is flanked by hairpin loops to isolate it from the effects of external transcription at the integration locus. To characterize each target locus, a xylanase reporter gene (xynA) was integrated onto the chromosomes of E. coli strains W and K-12 using the KIKO vectors. Expression levels varied between loci, with the arsB locus consistently showing the highest level of expression. To demonstrate the simultaneous use of all three loci in one strain, xynA, green fluorescent protein (gfp) and a sucrose catabolic operon (cscAKB) were introduced into lacZ, arsB and rbsAR respectively, and shown to be functional. Conclusions The KIKO plasmids are a useful tool for efficient integration of large DNA fragments (including multiple genes and pathways) into E. coli. Chromosomal

  14. Zinc Finger Nuclease Knock-out of NADPH:Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase (POR) in Human Tumor Cell Lines Demonstrates That Hypoxia-activated Prodrugs Differ in POR Dependence*

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jiechuang; Gu, Yongchuan; Pruijn, Frederik B.; Smaill, Jeff B.; Patterson, Adam V.; Guise, Christopher P.; Wilson, William R.

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia, a ubiquitous feature of tumors, can be exploited by hypoxia-activated prodrugs (HAP) that are substrates for one-electron reduction in the absence of oxygen. NADPH:cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is considered one of the major enzymes responsible, based on studies using purified enzyme or forced overexpression in cell lines. To examine the role of POR in HAP activation at endogenous levels of expression, POR knock-outs were generated in HCT116 and SiHa cells by targeted mutation of exon 8 using zinc finger nucleases. Absolute quantitation by proteotypic peptide mass spectrometry of DNA sequence-confirmed multiallelic mutants demonstrated expression of proteins with residual one-electron reductase activity in some clones and identified two (Hko2 from HCT116 and S2ko1 from SiHa) that were functionally null by multiple criteria. Sensitivities of the clones to 11 HAP (six nitroaromatics, three benzotriazine N-oxides, and two quinones) were compared with wild-type and POR-overexpressing cells. All except the quinones were potentiated by POR overexpression. Knocking out POR had a marked effect on antiproliferative activity of the 5-nitroquinoline SN24349 in both genetic backgrounds after anoxic exposure but little or no effect on activity of most other HAP, including the clinical stage 2-nitroimidazole mustard TH-302, dinitrobenzamide mustard PR-104A, and benzotriazine N-oxide SN30000. Clonogenic cell killing and reductive metabolism of PR-104A and SN30000 under anoxia also showed little change in the POR knock-outs. Thus, although POR expression is a potential biomarker of sensitivity to some HAP, identification of other one-electron reductases responsible for HAP activation is needed for their rational clinical development. PMID:24196959

  15. In vivo SPECT and ex vivo autoradiographic brain imaging of the novel selective CB1 receptor antagonist radioligand [125I]SD7015 in CB1 knock-out and wildtype mouse.

    PubMed

    Máthé, Domokos; Horváth, Ildikó; Szigeti, Krisztián; Donohue, Sean R; Pike, Victor W; Jia, Zisheng; Ledent, Catherine; Palkovits, Miklós; Freund, Tamás F; Halldin, Christer; Gulyás, Balázs

    2013-02-01

    We aimed to evaluate the novel high-affinity and relatively lipophilic CB(1) receptor (CB(1)R) antagonist radioligand [(125)I]SD7015 for SPECT imaging of CB(1)Rs in vivo using the multiplexed multipinhole dedicated small animal SPECT/CT system, NanoSPECT/CT(PLUS) (Mediso, Budapest, Hungary), in knock-out CB(1) receptor knock-out (CB(1)R-/-) and wildtype mice. In order to exclude possible differences in cerebral blood flow between the two types of animals, HMPAO SPECT scans were performed, whereas in order to confirm the brain uptake differences of the radioligand between knock-out mice and wildtype mice, in vivo scans were complemented with ex vivo autoradiographic measurements using the brains of the same animals. With SPECT/CT imaging, we measured the brain uptake of radioactivity, using %SUV (% standardised uptake values) in CB(1)R-/- mice (n=3) and C57BL6 wildtype mice (n=7) under urethane anaesthesia after injecting [(125)I]SD7015 intravenously or intraperitoneally. The Brookhaven Laboratory mouse MRI atlas was fused to the SPECT/CT images by using a combination of rigid and non-rigid algorithms in the Mediso Fusion™ (Mediso, Budapest, Hungary) and VivoQuant (inviCRO, Boston, MA, USA) softwares. Phosphor imager plate autoradiography (ARG) was performed on 4 μm-thin cryostat sections of the excised brains. %SUV was 8.6±3.6 (average±SD) in CB(1)R-/- mice and 22.1±12.4 in wildtype mice between 2 and 4 h after injection (p<0.05). ARG of identically taken sections from wildtype mouse brain showed moderate radioactivity uptake when compared with the in vivo images, with a clear difference between grey matter and white matter, whereas ARG in CB(1)R(-/-) mice showed practically no radioactivity uptake. [(125)I]SD7015 enters the mouse brain in sufficient amount to enable SPECT imaging. Brain radioactivity distribution largely coincides with that of the known CB(1)R expression pattern in rodent brain. We conclude that [(125)I]SD7015 should be a useful SPECT

  16. In vivo SPECT and ex vivo autoradiographic brain imaging of the novel selective CB1 receptor antagonist radioligand [125I]SD7015 in CB1 knock-out and wildtype mouse

    PubMed Central

    Máthé, Domokos; Horváth, Ildikó; Szigeti, Krisztián; Donohue, Sean R.; Pike, Victor W.; Jia, Zisheng; Ledent, Catherine; Palkovits, Miklós; Freund, Tamás F.; Halldin, Christer; Gulyás, Balázs

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the novel high-affinity and relatively lipophilic CB1 receptor (CB1R) antagonist radioligand [125I]SD7015 for SPECT imaging of CB1Rs in vivo using the multiplexed multipinhole dedicated small animal SPECT/CT system, NanoSPECT/CTPLUS (Mediso, Budapest, Hungary), in knock-out CB1 receptor knock-out (CB1R-/-) and wildtype mice. In order to exclude possible differences in cerebral blood flow between the two types of animals, HMPAO SPECT scans were performed, whereas in order to confirm the brain uptake differences of the radioligand between knock-out mice and wildtype mice, in vivo scans were complemented with ex vivo autoradiographic measurements using the brains of the same animals. With SPECT/CT imaging, we measured the brain uptake of radioactivity, using %SUV (% standardised uptake values) in CB1R-/- mice (n = 3) and C57BL6 wildtype mice (n = 7) under urethane anaesthesia after injecting [125I]SD7015 intravenously or intraperitoneally. The Brookhaven Laboratory mouse MRI atlas was fused to the SPECT/CT images by using a combination of rigid and non-rigid algorithms in the Mediso Fusion™ (Mediso, Budapest, Hungary) and VivoQuant (inviCRO, Boston, MA, USA) softwares. Phosphor imager plate autoradiography (ARG) was performed on 4 μm-thin cryostat sections of the excised brains. %SUV was 8.6 ± 3.6 (average ± SD) in CB1R-/- mice and 22.1 ± 12.4 in wildtype mice between 2 and 4 h after injection (p < 0.05). ARG of identically taken sections from wildtype mouse brain showed moderate radioactivity uptake when compared with the in vivo images, with a clear difference between grey matter and white matter, whereas ARG in CB1R(-/-) mice showed practically no radioactivity uptake. [125I]SD7015 enters the mouse brain in sufficient amount to enable SPECT imaging. Brain radioactivity distribution largely coincides with that of the known CB1R expression pattern in rodent brain. We conclude that [125I]SD7015 should be a useful SPECT radioligand for

  17. Knocking out Angiotensin II in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Zablocki, Daniela; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2011-01-01

    Despite ongoing medical advances, cardiovascular disease continues to be a leading health concern. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in regulating cardiovascular function, and is, therefore, the subject of extensive study. Several of the drugs currently used to treat hypertension and heart failure are designed to target Ang II synthesis and function, but none have been able to completely block the effects of RAS signaling thus far. This review discusses current and emerging approaches towards inhibiting cardiac RAS function in order to further improve cardiovascular disease outcomes. PMID:21234717

  18. Consequence analysis of IWTS metal water reactions (Fauske and Associates report 99-35)

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN, D.R.

    1999-07-28

    The report describes the consequences of postulated thermally unstable conditions in the IWTS knock out pot. The consequence analysis shows that both the knock out pot and particulate bed will stay intact, and that releases will be minor. Reaction rate limitations prevent knock out pot pressure and/or temperature from even approaching values that would threaten structural integrity. Source term calculations based on a particle bed with a homogeneous mixture of metal and oxide particles yield a release above the K Basin pool of about 12 grams.

  19. Working memory impairment in calcineurin knock-out mice is associated with alterations in synaptic vesicle cycling and disruption of high-frequency synaptic and network activity in prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, Jeffrey R; Levenson, Jonathan M; Kim, Sung Hyun; Gibson, Helen E; Richardson, Kristen A; Sivula, Michael; Li, Bing; Ashford, Crystle J; Heindl, Karen A; Babcock, Ryan J; Rose, David M; Hempel, Chris M; Wiig, Kjesten A; Laeng, Pascal; Levin, Margaret E; Ryan, Timothy A; Gerber, David J

    2013-07-01

    Working memory is an essential component of higher cognitive function, and its impairment is a core symptom of multiple CNS disorders, including schizophrenia. Neuronal mechanisms supporting working memory under normal conditions have been described and include persistent, high-frequency activity of prefrontal cortical neurons. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular basis of working memory dysfunction in the context of neuropsychiatric disorders. To elucidate synaptic and neuronal mechanisms of working memory dysfunction, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of a mouse model of schizophrenia, the forebrain-specific calcineurin knock-out mouse. Biochemical analyses of cortical tissue from these mice revealed a pronounced hyperphosphorylation of synaptic vesicle cycling proteins known to be necessary for high-frequency synaptic transmission. Examination of the synaptic vesicle cycle in calcineurin-deficient neurons demonstrated an impairment of vesicle release enhancement during periods of intense stimulation. Moreover, brain slice and in vivo electrophysiological analyses showed that loss of calcineurin leads to a gene dose-dependent disruption of high-frequency synaptic transmission and network activity in the PFC, correlating with selective working memory impairment. Finally, we showed that levels of dynamin I, a key presynaptic protein and calcineurin substrate, are significantly reduced in prefrontal cortical samples from schizophrenia patients, extending the disease relevance of our findings. Our data provide support for a model in which impaired synaptic vesicle cycling represents a critical node for disease pathologies underlying the cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. PMID:23825400

  20. D2 dopamine receptors colocalize regulator of G-protein signaling 9-2 (RGS9-2) via the RGS9 DEP domain, and RGS9 knock-out mice develop dyskinesias associated with dopamine pathways.

    PubMed

    Kovoor, Abraham; Seyffarth, Petra; Ebert, Jana; Barghshoon, Sami; Chen, Ching-Kang; Schwarz, Sigrid; Axelrod, Jeffrey D; Cheyette, Benjamin N R; Simon, Melvin I; Lester, Henry A; Schwarz, Johannes

    2005-02-23

    Regulator of G-protein signaling 9-2 (RGS9-2), a member of the RGS family of G GTPase accelerating proteins, is expressed specifically in the striatum, which participates in antipsychotic-induced tardive dyskinesia and in levodopa-induced dyskinesia. We report that RGS9 knock-out mice develop abnormal involuntary movements when inhibition of dopaminergic transmission is followed by activation of D2-like dopamine receptors (DRs). These abnormal movements resemble drug-induced dyskinesia more closely than other rodent models. Recordings from striatal neurons of these mice establish that activation of D2-like DRs abnormally inhibits glutamate-elicited currents. We show that RGS9-2, via its DEP domain (for Disheveled, EGL-10, Pleckstrin homology), colocalizes with D2DRs when coexpressed in mammalian cells. Recordings from oocytes coexpressing D2DR or the m2 muscarinic receptor and G-protein-gated inward rectifier potassium channels show that RGS9-2, via its DEP domain, preferentially accelerates the termination of D2DR signals. Thus, alterations in RGS9-2 may be a key factor in the pathway leading from D2DRs to the side effects associated with the treatment both of psychoses and Parkinson's disease. PMID:15728856

  1. IWTS metal-water reaction rate evaluation (Fauske and Associates report 99-26)

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN, D.R.

    1999-07-29

    The report presents a thermal stability analysis of partially metallic particulate in two IWTS components, the knock out pot and settlers. Particulate in the knock out pot is thermally stable for combinations of average particle size and metal mass fraction which appear realistic. Particulate in the settlers is thermally stable when a realistic account of particle reactions over time, metal fraction, and size distribution is considered.

  2. Activation of NADPH-recycling systems in leaves and roots of Arabidopsis thaliana under arsenic-induced stress conditions is accelerated by knock-out of Nudix hydrolase 19 (AtNUDX19) gene.

    PubMed

    Corpas, Francisco J; Aguayo-Trinidad, Simeón; Ogawa, Takahisa; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2016-03-15

    NADPH is an important cofactor in cell growth, proliferation and detoxification. Arabidopsis thaliana Nudix hydrolase 19 (AtNUDX19) belongs to a family of proteins defined by the conserved amino-acid sequence GX5-EX7REUXEEXGU which has the capacity to hydrolyze NADPH as a physiological substrate in vivo. Given the importance of NADPH in the cellular redox homeostasis of plants, the present study compares the responses of the main NADPH-recycling systems including NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) and NADP-malic enzyme (ME) in the leaves and roots of Arabidopsis wild-type (Wt) and knock-out (KO) AtNUDX19 mutant (Atnudx19) plants under physiological and arsenic-induced stress conditions. Two major features were observed in the behavior of the main NADPH-recycling systems: (i) under optimal conditions in both organs, the levels of these activities were higher in nudx19 mutants than in Wt plants; and, (ii) under 500μM AsV conditions, these activities increase, especially in nudx19 mutant plants. Moreover, G6PDH activity in roots was the most affected enzyme in both Wt and nudx19 mutant plants, with a 4.6-fold and 5.0-fold increase, respectively. In summary, the data reveals a connection between the absence of chloroplastic AtNUDX19 and the rise in all NADP-dehydrogenase activities under physiological and arsenic-induced stress conditions, particularly in roots. This suggests that AtNUDX19 could be a key factor in modulating the NADPH pool in plants and consequently in redox homeostasis. PMID:26878367

  3. Intradermal Immunization of Leishmania donovani Centrin Knock-Out Parasites in Combination with Salivary Protein LJM19 from Sand Fly Vector Induces a Durable Protective Immune Response in Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Fiuza, Jacqueline Araújo; Dey, Ranadhir; Davenport, Dwann; Abdeladhim, Maha; Meneses, Claudio; Oliveira, Fabiano; Kamhawi, Shaden; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Nakhasi, Hira L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a neglected tropical disease and is fatal if untreated. There is no vaccine available against leishmaniasis. The majority of patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) or VL develop a long-term protective immunity after cure from infection, which indicates that development of an effective vaccine against leishmaniasis is possible. Such protection may also be achieved by immunization with live attenuated parasites that do not cause disease. We have previously reported a protective response in mice, hamsters and dogs with Leishmania donovani centrin gene knock-out parasites (LdCen-/-), a live attenuated parasite with a cell division specific centrin1 gene deletion. In this study we have explored the effects of salivary protein LJM19 as an adjuvant and intradermal (ID) route of immunization on the efficacy of LdCen-/- parasites as a vaccine against virulent L. donovani. Methodology/Principal Findings To explore the potential of a combination of LdCen-/- parasites and salivary protein LJM19 as vaccine antigens, LdCen-/- ID immunization followed by ID challenge with virulent L. donovani were performed in hamsters in a 9-month follow up study. We determined parasite burden (serial dilution), antibody production (ELISA) and cytokine expression (qPCR) in these animals. Compared to controls, animals immunized with LdCen-/- + LJM19 induced a strong antibody response, a reduction in spleen and liver parasite burden and a higher expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines after immunization and one month post-challenge. Additionally, a low parasite load in lymph nodes, spleen and liver, and a non-inflamed spleen was observed in immunized animals 9 months after the challenge infection. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that an ID vaccination using LdCen-/-parasites in combination with sand fly salivary protein LJM19 has the capability to confer long lasting protection against visceral leishmaniasis that is comparable to intravenous or

  4. Effects of ascorbic acid on carcinogenicity and acute toxicity of nickel subsulfide, and on tumor transplants growth in gulonolactone oxidase knock-out mice and wild-type C57BL mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kasprzak, Kazimierz S.; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Kaczmarek, Monika Z.; Logsdon, Daniel L.; Fivash, Mathew J.; Salnikow, Konstantin

    2011-11-15

    The aim of this study was to test a hypothesis that ascorbate depletion could enhance carcinogenicity and acute toxicity of nickel. Homozygous L-gulono- < gamma > -lactone oxidase gene knock-out mice (Gulo-/- mice) unable to produce ascorbate and wild-type C57BL mice (WT mice) were injected intramuscularly with carcinogenic nickel subsulfide (Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}), and observed for the development of injection site tumors for 57 weeks. Small pieces of one of the induced tumors were transplanted subcutaneously into separate groups of Gulo-/- and WT mice and the growth of these tumors was measured for up to 3 months. The two strains of mice differed significantly with regard to (1) Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} carcinogenesis: Gulo-/- mice were 40% more susceptible than WT mice; and (2) transplanted tumors development: Gulo-/- mice were more receptive to tumor growth than WT mice, but only in terms of a much shorter tumor latency; later in the exponential phase of growth, the growth rates were the same. And, with adequate ascorbate supplementation, the two strains were equally susceptible to acute toxicity of Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}. Statistically significant effects of dietary ascorbate dosing levels were the following: (1) reduction in ascorbate supplementation increased acute toxicity of Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} in Gulo-/- mice; (2) ascorbate supplementation extended the latency of transplanted tumors in WT mice. In conclusion, the lack of endogenous ascorbate synthesis makes Gulo-/- mice more susceptible to Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} carcinogenesis. Dietary ascorbate tends to attenuate acute toxicity of Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} and to extend the latency of transplanted tumors. The latter effects may be of practical importance to humans and thus deserve further studies. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ascorbate depletion enhances carcinogenicity and acute toxicity of nickel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gulo-/- mice unable to synthesize ascorbate were used in this study. Black

  5. Meperidine, remifentanil and tramadol but not sufentanil interact with alpha(2)-adrenoceptors in alpha(2A)-, alpha(2B)- and alpha(2C)-adrenoceptor knock out mice brain.

    PubMed

    Höcker, Jan; Weber, Bernd; Tonner, Peter H; Scholz, Jens; Brand, Philipp-Alexander; Ohnesorge, Henning; Bein, Berthold

    2008-03-17

    alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists like clonidine or dexmedetomidine increase the sedative and analgesic actions of opioids. Furthermore opioids like meperidine show potent anti-shivering effects like alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists. The underlying molecular mechanisms of these effects are still poorly defined. The authors therefore studied the ability of four different opioids (meperidine, remifentanil, sufentanil and tramadol) to interact with different alpha(2)-adrenoceptor subtypes in mice lacking individual alpha(2A)-, alpha(2B)- or alpha(2C)-adrenoceptors (alpha(2)-adrenoceptor knock out (alpha(2)-AR KO) mice)). The interaction of opioids with alpha(2)-adrenoceptors was investigated by quantitative receptor autoradiography in brain slices of alpha(2A)-, alpha(2B)- or alpha(2C)-adrenoceptor deficient mice. Displacement of the radiolabelled alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist [(125)I]-paraiodoclonidine ([(125)I]-PIC) from alpha(2)-adrenoceptors in different brain regions by increasing opioid concentrations was measured, and binding affinity of the analysed opioids to alpha(2)-adrenoceptor subtypes in different brain regions was quantified. Meperidine, remifentanil and tramadol but not sufentanil provoked dose dependent displacement of specifically bound [(125)I]-PIC from all alpha(2)-adrenoceptor subtypes in cortex, cerebellum, medulla oblongata, thalamus, hippocampus and pons. Required concentrations of meperidine and remifentanil for [(125)I]-PIC displacement from alpha(2B)- and alpha(2C)-adrenoceptors were lower than from alpha(2A)-adrenoceptors, indicating higher binding affinity for alpha(2B)- and alpha(2C)-adrenoceptors. In contrast, [(125)I]-PIC displacement by tramadol indicated higher binding affinity to alpha(2A)-adrenoceptors than to alpha(2B)- and alpha(2C)-adrenoceptors. Our results indicate that meperidine, remifentanil and tramadol interact with alpha(2)-adrenoceptors in mouse brain showing different affinity for alpha(2A)-, alpha(2B)- and alpha(2C

  6. 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors control the firing of serotoninergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus of the mouse: studies in 5-HT1B knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Evrard, A; Laporte, A M; Chastanet, M; Hen, R; Hamon, M; Adrien, J

    1999-11-01

    The characteristics of the spontaneous firing of serotoninergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus and its control by serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) receptors were investigated in wild-type and 5-HT1B knock-out (5-HT1B-/-) mice of the 129/Sv strain, anaesthetized with chloral hydrate. In both groups of mice, 5-HT neurons exhibited a regular activity with an identical firing rate of 0.5-4.5 spikes/s. Intravenous administration of the 5-HT reuptake inhibitor citalopram or the 5-HT1A agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) induced a dose-dependent inhibition of 5-HT neuronal firing which could be reversed by the selective 5-HT1A antagonist N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-(2-pyridinyl)cyclohe xane carboxamide (WAY 100635). Both strains were equally sensitive to 8-OH-DPAT (ED50 approximately 6.3 microgram/kg i.v.), but the mutants were less sensitive than wild-type animals to citalopram (ED50 = 0.49 +/- 0.02 and 0.28 +/- 0.01 mg/kg i.v., respectively, P < 0.05). This difference could be reduced by pre-treatment of wild-type mice with the 5-HT1B/1D antagonist 2'-methyl-4'-(5-methyl-[1,2,4]oxadiazol-3-yl)-biphenyl-4-carbox yli c acid [4-methoxy-3-(4-methyl-piperazine-1-yl)-phenyl]amide (GR 127935), and might be accounted for by the lack of 5-HT1B receptors and a higher density of 5-HT reuptake sites (specifically labelled by [3H]citalopram) in 5-HT1B-/- mice. In wild-type but not 5-HT1B-/- mice, the 5-HT1B agonists 3-(1,2,5, 6-tetrahydro-4-pyridyl)-5-propoxypyrrolo[3,2-b]pyridine (CP 94253, 3 mg/kg i.v.) and 5-methoxy-3-(1,2,3, 6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)-1H-indole (RU 24969, 0.6 mg/kg i.v.) increased the firing rate of 5-HT neurons (+22.4 +/- 2.8% and +13.7 +/- 6.0%, respectively, P < 0.05), and this effect could be prevented by the 5-HT1B antagonist GR 127935 (1 mg/kg i.v.). Altogether, these data indicate that in the mouse, the firing of 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus is under both an inhibitory control through 5-HT1A

  7. The Gonococcus fights back: is this time a knock out?

    PubMed

    Lewis, David A

    2010-11-01

    Since the introduction of antibiotics in the 1930s, Neisseria gonorrhoeae has exhibited a remarkable ability to acquire novel genetic resistance determinants. Initially, sulphonamides were replaced by penicillin, while tetracyclines were prescribed for penicillin-allergic patients. With the advent of penicillinase-producing gonococci, spectinomycin was only briefly useful as alternative treatment and plasmid-mediated tetracycline resistance spread rapidly from the mid-1980s onwards. The fluoroquinolones followed but chromosomally mediated resistance appeared after only a decade of use. Seventy years on, we now face a global public health challenge of immense significance--the emergence of resistance to cephalosporins. With lack of investment in the search for new anti-gonococcal antimicrobial agents or vaccine research, the global spread of multiresistant gonococci can be seen. The impact of untreatable gonorrhoea on HIV transmission could be enormous in high-prevalence countries. This threat comes at a time when many national STI control programmes are weak. To delay the emergence of extensively drug-resistant gonorrhoea, public health systems require strengthening and novel strategies need implementing to enhance the therapeutic lifespan of the few antimicrobial agents that we have left. PMID:20656721

  8. Railroads knock out pipeline in coal contract bidding battle

    SciTech Connect

    Minner, D.

    1983-09-01

    Union Pacific and Chicago Northwestern rail companies successfully outbid Energy Transportation Systems Inc. (ETSI) pipeline company for Arkansas Power and Light Company's coal-carrying contract. This raises questions about the need for pipelines, since ETSI had been the carrier of choice. The railroads deny taking a loss on the contract to bring low-sulfur coal from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming, while the utility estimates $16.5 billion savings to its customers over the 20-year life of the contract. Coal-slurry lobbyists will continue their fight for eminent-domain legislation despite the lost bid. (DCK)

  9. Knock-out models reveal new aquaporin functions.

    PubMed

    Verkman, Alan S

    2009-01-01

    Knockout mice have been informative in the discovery of unexpected biological functions of aquaporins. Knockout mice have confirmed the predicted roles of aquaporins in transepithelial fluid transport, as in the urinary concentrating mechanism and glandular fluid secretion. A less obvious, though predictable role of aquaporins is in tissue swelling under stress, as in the brain in stroke, tumor and infection. Phenotype analysis of aquaporin knockout mice has revealed several unexpected cellular roles of aquaporins whose mechanisms are being elucidated. Aquaporins facilitate cell migration, as seen in aquaporin-dependent tumor angiogenesis and tumor metastasis, by a mechanism that may involve facilitated water transport in lamellipodia of migrating cells. The ' aquaglyceroporins', aquaporins that transport both glycerol and water, regulate glycerol content in epidermis, fat and other tissues, and lead to a multiplicity of interesting consequences of gene disruption including dry skin, resistance to skin carcinogenesis, impaired cell proliferation and altered fat metabolism. An even more surprising role of a mammalian aquaporin is in neural signal transduction in the central nervous system. The many roles of aquaporins might be exploited for clinical benefit by modulation of aquaporin expression/function - as diuretics, and in the treatment of brain swelling, glaucoma, epilepsy, obesity and cancer. PMID:19096787

  10. Appearance and disappearance of the second Born effects in the (e,3e) reaction on He

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, A.; Schroeter, C. D.; Hoehr, C.; Sakhelashvili, G.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.; Kheifets, A.; Lower, J.

    2003-07-01

    We demonstrate, both experimentally and theoretically, clear manifestation of the second Born effects in the angular distributions of two ejected electrons produced by a 500 eV electron impact on the He atom in the so-called (e,3e) reaction. The second Born contribution, due to subsequent interaction of the projectile with the target, is most prominent for glancing collisions with small momentum transfer. However, these effects are absent for hard knock-out collisions with large momentum transfer.

  11. Subregion-Specific p300 Conditional Knock-Out Mice Exhibit Long-Term Memory Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira, Ana M. M.; Estevez, Marcel A.; Hawk, Joshua D.; Grimes, Shannon; Brindle, Paul K.; Abel, Ted

    2011-01-01

    Histone acetylation plays a critical role during long-term memory formation. Several studies have demonstrated that the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) CBP is required during long-term memory formation, but the involvement of other HAT proteins has not been extensively investigated. The HATs CBP and p300 have at least 400 described interacting…

  12. Development of schemas revealed by prior experience and NMDA receptor knock-out

    PubMed Central

    Dragoi, George; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    Prior experience accelerates acquisition of novel, related information through processes like assimilation into mental schemas, but the underlying neuronal mechanisms are poorly understood. We investigated the roles that prior experience and hippocampal CA3 N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent synaptic plasticity play in CA1 place cell sequence encoding and learning during novel spatial experiences. We found that specific representations of de novo experiences on linear environments were formed on a framework of pre configured network activity expressed in the preceding sleep and were rapidly, flexibly adjusted via NMDAR-dependent activity. This prior experience accelerated encoding of subsequent experiences on contiguous or isolated novel tracks, significantly decreasing their NMDAR-dependence. Similarly, de novo learning of an alternation task was facilitated by CA3 NMDARs; this experience accelerated subsequent learning of related tasks, independent of CA3 NMDARs, consistent with a schema-based learning. These results reveal the existence of distinct neuronal encoding schemes which could explain why hippocampal dysfunction results in anterograde amnesia while sparing recollection of old, schema-based memories. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01326.001 PMID:24327561

  13. Investigation of olfactory function in a Panx1 knock out mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kurtenbach, Stefan; Whyte-Fagundes, Paige; Gelis, Lian; Kurtenbach, Sarah; Brazil, Emerson; Zoidl, Christiane; Hatt, Hanns; Shestopalov, Valery I; Zoidl, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Pannexin 1 (Panx1), the most extensively investigated member of a channel-forming protein family, is able to form pores conducting molecules up to 1.5 kDa, like ATP, upon activation. In the olfactory epithelium (OE), ATP modulates olfactory responsiveness and plays a role in proliferation and differentiation of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). This process continuously takes place in the OE, as neurons are replaced throughout the whole lifespan. The recent discovery of Panx1 expression in the OE raises the question whether Panx1 mediates ATP release responsible for modulating chemosensory function. In this study, we analyzed pannexin expression in the OE and a possible role of Panx1 in olfactory function using a Panx1(-/-) mouse line with a global ablation of Panx1. This mouse model has been previously used to investigate Panx1 functions in the retina and adult hippocampus. Here, qPCR, in-situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) demonstrated that Panx1 is expressed in axon bundles deriving from sensory neurons of the OE. The localization, distribution, and expression of major olfactory signal transduction proteins were not significantly altered in Panx1(-/-) mice. Further, functional analysis of Panx1(-/-) animals does not reveal any major impairment in odor perception, indicated by electroolfactogram (EOG) measurements and behavioral testing. However, ATP release evoked by potassium gluconate application was reduced in Panx1(-/-) mice. This result is consistent with previous reports on ATP release in isolated erythrocytes and spinal or lumbar cord preparations from Panx1(-/-) mice, suggesting that Panx1 is one of several alternative pathways to release ATP in the olfactory system. PMID:25309319

  14. Investigation of olfactory function in a Panx1 knock out mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kurtenbach, Stefan; Whyte-Fagundes, Paige; Gelis, Lian; Kurtenbach, Sarah; Brazil, Émerson; Zoidl, Christiane; Hatt, Hanns; Shestopalov, Valery I.; Zoidl, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Pannexin 1 (Panx1), the most extensively investigated member of a channel-forming protein family, is able to form pores conducting molecules up to 1.5 kDa, like ATP, upon activation. In the olfactory epithelium (OE), ATP modulates olfactory responsiveness and plays a role in proliferation and differentiation of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). This process continuously takes place in the OE, as neurons are replaced throughout the whole lifespan. The recent discovery of Panx1 expression in the OE raises the question whether Panx1 mediates ATP release responsible for modulating chemosensory function. In this study, we analyzed pannexin expression in the OE and a possible role of Panx1 in olfactory function using a Panx1−/− mouse line with a global ablation of Panx1. This mouse model has been previously used to investigate Panx1 functions in the retina and adult hippocampus. Here, qPCR, in-situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) demonstrated that Panx1 is expressed in axon bundles deriving from sensory neurons of the OE. The localization, distribution, and expression of major olfactory signal transduction proteins were not significantly altered in Panx1−/− mice. Further, functional analysis of Panx1−/− animals does not reveal any major impairment in odor perception, indicated by electroolfactogram (EOG) measurements and behavioral testing. However, ATP release evoked by potassium gluconate application was reduced in Panx1−/− mice. This result is consistent with previous reports on ATP release in isolated erythrocytes and spinal or lumbar cord preparations from Panx1−/− mice, suggesting that Panx1 is one of several alternative pathways to release ATP in the olfactory system. PMID:25309319

  15. Targeted Mybpc3 Knock-Out Mice with Cardiac Hypertrophy Exhibit Structural Mitral Valve Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Judge, Daniel P.; Neamatalla, Hany; Norris, Russell A.; Levine, Robert A.; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Vignier, Nicolas; Kang, Kevin H.; Nguyen, Quangtung; Bruneval, Patrick; Perier, Marie-Cécile; Messas, Emmanuel; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; de Vlaming, Annemarieke; Markwald, Roger; Carrier, Lucie; Hagège, Albert A.

    2015-01-01

    MYBPC3 mutations cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which is frequently associated with mitral valve (MV) pathology. We reasoned that increased MV size is caused by localized growth factors with paracrine effects. We used high-resolution echocardiography to compare Mybpc3-null, heterozygous, and wild-type mice (n = 84, aged 3–6 months) and micro-CT for MV volume (n = 6, age 6 months). Mybpc3-null mice showed left ventricular hypertrophy, dilation, and systolic dysfunction compared to heterozygous and wild-type mice, but no systolic anterior motion of the MV or left ventricular outflow obstruction. Compared to wild-type mice, echocardiographic anterior leaflet length (adjusted for left ventricular size) was greatest in Mybpc3-null mice (1.92 ± 0.08 vs. 1.72 ± 0.08 mm, p < 0.001), as was combined leaflet thickness (0.23 ± 0.04 vs. 0.15 ± 0.02 mm, p < 0.001). Micro-CT analyses of Mybpc3-null mice demonstrated increased MV volume (0.47 ± 0.06 vs. 0.15 ± 0.06 mm3, p = 0.018) and thickness (0.35 ± 0.04 vs. 0.12 ± 0.04 mm, p = 0.002), coincident with increased markers of TGFβ activity compared to heterozygous and wild-type littermates. Similarly, excised MV from a patient with MYBPC3 mutation showed increased TGFβ activity. We conclude that MYBPC3 deficiency causes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with increased MV leaflet length and thickness despite the absence of left ventricular outflow-tract obstruction, in parallel with increased TGFβ activity. MV changes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may be due to paracrine effects, which represent targets for therapeutic studies. PMID:26819945

  16. Autistic-Like Traits and Cerebellar Dysfunction in Purkinje Cell PTEN Knock-Out Mice.

    PubMed

    Cupolillo, Dario; Hoxha, Eriola; Faralli, Alessio; De Luca, Annarita; Rossi, Ferdinando; Tempia, Filippo; Carulli, Daniela

    2016-05-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by impaired social interaction, isolated areas of interest, and insistence on sameness. Mutations in Phosphatase and tensin homolog missing on chromosome 10 (PTEN) have been reported in individuals with ASDs. Recent evidence highlights a crucial role of the cerebellum in the etiopathogenesis of ASDs. In the present study we analyzed the specific contribution of cerebellar Purkinje cell (PC) PTEN loss to these disorders. Using the Cre-loxP recombination system, we generated conditional knockout mice in which PTEN inactivation was induced specifically in PCs. We investigated PC morphology and physiology as well as sociability, repetitive behavior, motor learning, and cognitive inflexibility of adult PC PTEN-mutant mice. Loss of PTEN in PCs results in autistic-like traits, including impaired sociability, repetitive behavior and deficits in motor learning. Mutant PCs appear hypertrophic and show structural abnormalities in dendrites and axons, decreased excitability, disrupted parallel fiber and climbing fiber synapses and late-onset cell death. Our results unveil new roles of PTEN in PC function and provide the first evidence of a link between the loss of PTEN in PCs and the genesis of ASD-like traits. PMID:26538449

  17. Insect ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) complements SPE1 knock-out of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soon-Yong; Park, Hee Yun; Paek, Aron; Kim, Gil Seob; Jeong, Seong Eun

    2009-12-31

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of polyamines, which are essential for cell growth, differentiation, and proliferation. This report presents the characterization of an ODC-encoding cDNA (SlitODC) isolated from a moth species, the tobacco cutworm, Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera); its expression in a polyamine-deficient strain of yeast, S. cerevisiae; and the recovery in polyamine levels and proliferation rate with the introduction of the insect enzyme. SlitODC encodes 448 amino acid residues, 4 amino acids longer than B. Mori ODC that has 71% identity, and has a longer C-terminus, consistent with B. mori ODC, than the reported dipteran enzymes. The null mutant yeast strain in the ODC gene, SPE1, showed remarkably depleted polyamine levels; in putrescine, spermidine, and spermine, the levels were > 7, > 1, and > 4%, respectively, of the levels in the wild-type strain. This consequently caused a significant arrest in cell proliferation of > 4% of the wild-type strain in polyaminefree media. The transformed strain, with the substituted SlitODC for the deleted endogenous ODC, grew and proliferated rapidly at even a higher rate than the wild-type strain. Furthermore, its polyamine content was significantly higher than even that in the wild-type strain as well as the spe1-null mutant, particularly with a very continuously enhanced putrescine level, reflecting no inhibition mechanism operating in the putrescine synthesis step by any corresponding insect ODC antizymes to SlitODC in this yeast system. PMID:19937472

  18. Generation and Validation of miR-142 Knock Out Mice.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Amit; Carraro, Gianni; El Agha, Elie; Mukhametshina, Regina; Chao, Cho-Ming; Rizvanov, Albert; Barreto, Guillermo; Bellusci, Saverio

    2015-01-01

    microRNA-142 (miR-142) is an important regulator of many biological processes and associated signaling pathways during embryonic development, homeostasis and disease. The miR-142 hairpin gives rise to the "guide strand" miR-142-3p and the sister "passenger" strand miR-142-5p. miR-142-3p has been shown to play critical, non-redundant functions in the development of the hematopoietic lineage. We have recently reported that miR-142-3p is critical for the control of Wnt signaling in the mesenchyme of the developing lung. miR-142-5p has been proposed to control adaptive growth in cardiomyocytes postnatally and its increase is associated with extensive apoptosis and cardiac dysfunction in a murine heart failure model. Using homologous recombination, we now report the generation and validation of miR-142-null mice. miR-142-null mice show a significant decrease in th expression levels of both the 3p and 5p isoforms. The expression of Bzrap1, a gene immediately flanking miR-142 is not altered while the expression of a long non-coding RNA embedded within the miR-142 gene is decreased. miR-142-null newborn pups appear normal and are normally represented indicating absence of embryonic lethality. At embryonic day 18.5, miR-142-null lungs display increased Wnt signaling associated with the up-regulation of Apc and p300, two previously reported targets of miR-142-3p and -5p, respectively. Adult miR-142-null animals display impaired hematopoietic lineage formation identical to previously reported miR-142 gene trap knockdown mice. We report, for the first time, the homologous recombination-based miR-142-null mice that will be useful for the scientific community working on the diverse biological functions of miR-142. PMID:26327117

  19. Knocking out P2X receptors reduces transmitter secretion in taste buds

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yijen A.; Stone, Leslie M.; Pereira, Elizabeth; Yang, Ruibiao; Kinnamon, John C.; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady; Chaudhari, Nirupa; Finger, Thomas E.; Kinnamon, Sue C.; Roper, Stephen D.

    2011-01-01

    In response to gustatory stimulation, taste bud cells release a transmitter, ATP, that activates P2X2 and P2X3 receptors on gustatory afferent fibers. Taste behavior and gustatory neural responses are largely abolished in mice lacking P2X2 and P2X3 receptors (P2X2 and P2X3 double knockout, or “DKO” mice). The assumption has been that eliminating P2X2 and P2X3 receptors only removes postsynaptic targets but that transmitter secretion in mice is normal. Using functional imaging, ATP biosensor cells, and a cell-free assay for ATP, we tested this assumption. Surprisingly, although gustatory stimulation mobilizes Ca2+ in taste Receptor (Type II) cells from DKO mice, as from wild type (WT) mice, taste cells from DKO mice fail to release ATP when stimulated with tastants. ATP release could be elicited by depolarizing DKO Receptor cells with KCl, suggesting that ATP-release machinery remains functional in DKO taste buds. To explore the difference in ATP release across genotypes, we employed reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR, immunostaining, and histochemistry for key proteins underlying ATP secretion and degradation: Pannexin1, TRPM5, and NTPDase2 (ecto-ATPase) are indistinguishable between WT and DKO mice. The ultrastructure of contacts between taste cells and nerve fibers is also normal in the DKO mice. Finally, quantitative RT-PCR show that P2X4 and P2X7, potential modulators of ATP secretion, are similarly expressed in taste buds in WT and DKO taste buds. Importantly, we find that P2X2 is expressed in WT taste buds and appears to function as an autocrine, positive feedback signal to amplify taste-evoked ATP secretion. PMID:21940456

  20. Age-Dependent Deficits in Fear Learning in Heterozygous BDNF Knock-Out Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endres, Thomas; Lessmann, Volkmar

    2012-01-01

    Beyond its trophic function, the neurotrophin BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) is well known to crucially mediate synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Whereas recent studies suggested that acute BDNF/TrkB signaling regulates amygdala-dependent fear learning, no impairments of cued fear learning were reported in heterozygous BDNF…

  1. WNT5A Knock-Out Mouse As A New Model of Anorectal Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Cindy C.; Sala, Frederic G.; Ford, Henri R.; Wang, Kasper S.; Minoo, Parviz; Grikscheit, Tracy C.; Bellusci, Saverio

    2009-01-01

    Background Anorectal malformations (ARM) represent a variety of congenital disorders that involve abnormal termination of the anorectum. Mutations in Shh signaling and Fgf10 produce a variety of ARM phenotypes. Wnt signaling has been shown to be crucial during gastrointestinal development. We therefore hypothesized that Wnt5a may play a role in anorectal development. Methods Wild type (WT), Wnt5a+/-, and Wnt5a-/- embryos were harvested from timed pregnant mice from E15.5 to E18.5 and analyzed for anorectal phenotype. Tissues were processed for whole-mount in situ hybridization and histology. Results Wnt5a is expressed in the embryonic WT colon and rectum. Wnt5a-/- mutants exhibit multiple deformities including anorectal malformation. A fistula between the urinary and intestinal tracts can be identified as early as E15.5. By E18.5, the majority of the Wnt5a-/- mutants display a blind-ending pouch of the distal gut. Conclusions The expression pattern of Wnt5a and the ARM phenotype seen in Wnt5a-/- mutants demonstrate the critical role of Wnt5a during anorectal development. This study establishes a new model of ARM involving the Wnt5a pathway. PMID:19577771

  2. Altered enteroendocrine cell expression in T cell receptor alpha chain knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Rubin, D C; Zhang, H; Qian, P; Lorenz, R G; Hutton, K; Peters, M G

    2000-10-15

    Mice lacking T cell receptor alpha chain (TCRalpha(-/-)) develop inflammation of the colon. We have examined the effect of this inflammation on the colonic epithelium by studying markers of epithelial cuff, enteroendocrine, and immune cell differentiation. Using immunohistochemical techniques, colons were compared in normal C57/BL6 and murine TCR alpha(-/-) mice aged 2 and 3 weeks and 3-11 months. TCR alpha(-/-) mice aged 3-11 months had histologic evidence of inflammation with increased expression of CD45, CD4+, CD8+, and B220+ cells and a decrease in expression of IgA+ cells. There was a decrease in the number of cholecystokinin, serotonin, and neurotensin enteroendocrine expressing cells in the colon of TCR alpha(-/-) mice. These changes were not present in 2-3-week-old suckling/weaning mice. In contrast, peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY), glucagon-like peptide-1, and gastrin expression did not change and small intestinal enteroendocrine cells remained unaltered. The change in colonic enteroendocrine cell expression appears to be a specific response, since only a subset of these cells was altered, and the epithelium was intact by histologic analysis. The absence of functional T cells in TCR alpha(-/-) colon has a marked effect on differentiation of a specific subpopulation of enteroendocrine cells, prior to loss of integrity of the epithelium. PMID:11054861

  3. Development of a transformation system for gene knock-out in the flavinogenic yeast Pichia guilliermondii.

    PubMed

    Boretsky, Yuriy R; Pynyaha, Yuriy V; Boretsky, Volodymyr Y; Kutsyaba, Vasyl I; Protchenko, Olga V; Philpott, Caroline C; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2007-07-01

    Pichia guilliermondii is a representative of a yeast species, all of which over-synthesize riboflavin in response to iron deprivation. Molecular genetic studies in this yeast species have been hampered by a lack of strain-specific tools for gene manipulation. Stable P. guilliermondii ura3 mutants were selected on the basis of 5'-fluoroorotic acid resistance. Plasmid carrying Saccharomyces cerevisiae URA3 gene transformed the mutant strains to prototrophy with a low efficiency. Substitution of a single leucine codon CUG by another leucine codon CUC in the URA3 gene increased the efficiency of transformation 100 fold. Deletion cassettes for the RIB1 and RIB7 genes, coding for GTP cyclohydrolase and riboflavin synthase, respectively, were constructed using the modified URA3 gene and subsequently introduced into a P. guilliermondii ura3 strain. Site-specific integrants were identified by selection for the Rib(-) Ura(+) phenotype and confirmed by PCR analysis. Transformation of the P. guilliermondii ura3 strain was performed using electroporation, spheroplasting or lithium acetate treatment. Only the lithium acetate transformation procedure provided selection of uracil prototrophic, riboflavin deficient recombinant strains. Depending on the type of cassette, efficiency of site-specific integration was 0.1% and 3-12% in the case of the RIB1 and RIB7 genes, respectively. We suggest that the presence of the ARS element adjacent to the 3' end of the RIB1 gene significantly reduced the frequency of homologous recombination. Efficient gene deletion in P. guilliermondii can be achieved using the modified URA3 gene of S. cerevisiae flanked by 0.8-0.9 kb sequences homologous to the target gene. PMID:17467833

  4. Accelerated Human Mutant Tau Aggregation by Knocking Out Murine Tau in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Kunie; Leroy, Karelle; Héraud, Céline; Yilmaz, Zehra; Authelet, Michèle; Suain, Valèrie; De Decker, Robert; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Many models of human tauopathies have been generated in mice by expression of a human mutant tau with maintained expression of mouse endogenous tau. Because murine tau might interfere with the toxic effects of human mutant tau, we generated a model in which a pathogenic human tau protein is expressed in the absence of wild-type tau protein, with the aim of facilitating the study of the pathogenic role of the mutant tau and to reproduce more faithfully a human tauopathy. The Tg30 line is a tau transgenic mouse model overexpressing human 1N4R double-mutant tau (P301S and G272V) that develops Alzheimer's disease-like neurofibrillary tangles in an age-dependent manner. By crossing Tg30 mice with mice invalidated for their endogenous tau gene, we obtained Tg30xtau−/− mice that express only exogenous human double-mutant 1N4R tau. Although Tg30xtau−/− mice express less tau protein compared with Tg30, they exhibit signs of decreased survival, increased proportion of sarkosyl-insoluble tau in the brain and in the spinal cord, increased number of Gallyas-positive neurofibrillary tangles in the hippocampus, increased number of inclusions in the spinal cord, and a more severe motor phenotype. Deletion of murine tau accelerated tau aggregation during aging of this mutant tau transgenic model, suggesting that murine tau could interfere with the development of tau pathology in transgenic models of human tauopathies. PMID:21281813

  5. Knock-out of Arabidopsis AtNHX4 gene enhances tolerance to salt stress

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hong-Tao; Liu, Hua; Gao, Xiao-Shu; Zhang, Hongxia

    2009-05-08

    AtNHX4 belongs to the monovalent cation:proton antiporter-1 (CPA1) family in Arabidopsis. Several members of this family have been shown to be critical for plant responses to abiotic stress, but little is known on the biological functions of AtNHX4. Here, we provide the evidence that AtNHX4 plays important roles in Arabidopsis responses to salt stress. Expression of AtNHX4 was responsive to salt stress and abscisic acid. Experiments with CFP-AtNHX4 fusion protein indicated that AtNHX4 is vacuolar localized. The nhx4 mutant showed enhanced tolerance to salt stress, and lower Na{sup +} content under high NaCl stress compared with wild-type plants. Furthermore, heterologous expression of AtNHX4 in Escherichia coli BL21 rendered the transformants hypersensitive to NaCl. Deletion of the hydrophilic C-terminus of AtNHX4 dramatically increased the hypersensitivity of transformants, indicating that AtNHX4 may function in Na{sup +} homeostasis in plant cell, and its C-terminus plays a role in regulating the AtNHX4 activity.

  6. [Progress in preparation of small monoclonal antibodies of knock out technique].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Mao, Xin-min; Li, Lin-lin; Li, Xin-xia; Wang, Ye; Lan, Yi

    2015-10-01

    With the application of monoclonal antibody technology more and more widely, its production technology is becoming more and more perfect. Small molecule monoclonal antibody technology is becoming a hot research topic for people. The application of traditional Chinese medicine small molecule monoclonal antibody technology has been more and more widely, the technology for effective Chinese medicine component knockout provide strong technical support. The preparation of monoclonal antibodies and small molecule knockout technology are reviewed in this paper. The preparation of several steps, such as: in the process of preparation of antigen, hapten carrier coupling, coupling ratio determination and identification of artificial antigen and establishment of animal immunization and hybridoma cell lines of monoclonal antibody, the large-scale preparation; small molecule monoclonal antibody on Immune in affinity chromatography column method is discussed in detail. The author believes that this technology will make the traditional Chinese medicine research on a higher level, and improve the level of internationalization of Chinese medicine research. PMID:26975094

  7. Knocked-out and still walking: prion protein-deficient cattle are resistant to prion disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases are caused by the propagation of a misfolded form (PrP**d) of the normal cellular prion protein, PrP**c. Disruption of PrP**c expression in the mouse results in resistance to PrP-propagation and disease. However, the impa...

  8. [Effect of P2X7 receptor knock-out on bone cancer pain in mice].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Liu, Hui-Zhu; Zhang, Yu-Qiu

    2016-06-25

    Cancer pain is one of the most common symptoms in patients with late stage cancer. Lung, breast and prostate carcinoma are the most common causes of pain from osseous metastasis. P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is one of the subtypes of ATP-gated purinergic ion channel family, predominately distributed in microglia in the spinal cord. Activation of P2X7Rs in the spinal dorsal horn has been associated with release of proinflammatory cytokines from glial cells, causing increased neuronal excitability and exaggerated nociception. Mounting evidence implies a critical role of P2X7R in inflammatory and neuropathic pain. However, whether P2X7R is involved in cancer pain remains controversial. Here we established a bone cancer pain model by injecting the Lewis lung carcinoma cells into the femur bone marrow cavity of C57BL/6J wild-type mice (C57 WT mice) and P2X7R knockout mice (P2rx7(-/-) mice) to explore the role of P2X7R in bone cancer pain. Following intrafemur carcinoma inoculation, robust mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in C57 WT mice were developed on day 7 and 14, respectively, and persisted for at least 28 days in the ipsilateral hindpaw of the affected limb. CatWalk gait analysis showed significant decreases in the print area and stand phase, and a significant increase in swing phase in the ipsilateral hindpaw on day 21 and 28 after carcinoma cells inoculation. Histopathological sections (hematoxylin and eosin stain) showed that the bone marrow of the affected femur was largely replaced by invading tumor cells, and the femur displayed medullary bone loss and bone destruction on day 28 after inoculation. Unexpectedly, no significant changes in bone cancer-induced hypersensitivity of pain behaviors were found in P2rx7(-/-) mice, and the changes of pain-related values in CatWalk gait analysis even occurred earlier in P2rx7(-/-) mice, as compared with C57 WT mice. Together with our previous study in rats that blockade of P2X7R significantly alleviated bone cancer pain, it is implied that P2X7R may play different roles in bone cancer pain in different species (e.g. rat vs mouse). These results implicated a huge difference between the pathophysiology discovered in the experimental animal models and that of human disease. PMID:27350194

  9. Direct Reaction Experimental Studies with Beams of Radioactive Tin Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K. L.; Ahn, S.H.; Allmond, James M; Ayres, A.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Beene, James R; Berryman, J. S.; Bey, A.; Bingham, C. R.; Cartegni, L.; Chae, K. Y.; Gade, A.; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Garcia-Ruiz, R.F.; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz; Howard, Meredith E; Kozub, R. L.; Liang, J Felix; Manning, Brett M; Matos, M.; McDaniel, S.; Miller, D.; Nesaraja, Caroline D; O'Malley, Patrick; Padgett, S; Padilla-Rodal, Elizabeth; Pain, Steven D; Pittman, S. T.; Radford, David C; Ratkiewicz, Andrew J; Schmitt, Kyle; Smith, Michael Scott; Stracener, Daniel W; Stroberg, S.; Tostevin, Jeffrey A; Varner Jr, Robert L; Weisshaar, D.; Wimmer, K.

    2015-01-01

    The tin chain of isotopes provides a unique region in which to investigate the evolution of single-particle structure, spreading from N = 50 at Sn-100, through 10 stable isotopes and the N = 82 shell closure at Sn-132 out into the r-process path. Direct reactions performed on radioactive ion beams are sensitive spectroscopic tools for studying exotic nuclei. Here we present one experiment knocking out neutrons from tin isotopes that are already neutron deficient and two reactions that add a neutron to neutron-rich Sn-130. Both techniques rely on selective particle identification and the measurement of gamma rays in coincidence with charged ions. We present the goals of the two experiments and the particle identification for the channels of interest. The final results will be presented in future publications.

  10. Direct reaction experimental studies with beams of radioactive tin ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K. L. Ayres, A.; Bey, A.; Burcher, S.; Cartegni, L.; Cerizza, G.; Ahn, S.; Allmond, J. M.; Beene, J. R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Liang, J. F.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Pain, S. D.; Radford, D. C.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Stracener, D. W.; Varner, R. L.; Bardayan, D. W.; Baugher, T.; and others

    2015-10-15

    The tin chain of isotopes provides a unique region in which to investigate the evolution of single-particle structure, spreading from N = 50 at {sup 100}Sn, through 10 stable isotopes and the N = 82 shell closure at {sup 132}Sn out into the r-process path. Direct reactions performed on radioactive ion beams are sensitive spectroscopic tools for studying exotic nuclei. Here we present one experiment knocking out neutrons from tin isotopes that are already neutron deficient and two reactions that add a neutron to neutron-rich {sup 130}Sn. Both techniques rely on selective particle identification and the measurement of γ rays in coincidence with charged ions. We present the goals of the two experiments and the particle identification for the channels of interest. The final results will be presented in future publications.

  11. Knockout reactions on p-shell nuclei for tests of structure and reaction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchera, A. N.; Bazin, D.; Babo, M.; Baumann, T.; Bowry, M.; Bradt, J.; Brown, J.; Deyoung, P. A.; Elman, B.; Finck, J. E.; Gade, A.; Grinyer, G. F.; Jones, M. D.; Lunderberg, E.; Redpath, T.; Rogers, W. F.; Stiefel, K.; Thoennessen, M.; Weisshaar, D.; Whitmore, K.

    2015-10-01

    A series of knockout reactions on p-shell nuclei were studied to extract exclusive cross sections and to investigate the neutron knockout mechanism. The measured cross sections provide stringent tests of shell model and ab initio calculations while measurements of neutron+residual coincidences test the accuracy and validity of reaction models used to predict cross sections. Six different beams ranging from A = 7 to 12 were produced at the NSCL totaling measurements of nine different reaction settings. The reaction settings were determined by the magnetic field of the Sweeper magnet which bends the residues into charged particle detectors. The reaction target was surrounded by the high efficiency CsI array, CAESAR, to tag gamma rays for cross section measurements of low-lying excited states. Additionally, knocked out neutrons were detected with MoNA-LISA in coincidence with the charged residuals. Preliminary results will be discussed. This work is partially supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY11-02511 and the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award No. DE-NA0000979.

  12. Direct Reactions with MoNA-LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchera, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear reactions can be used to probe the structure of nuclei. Direct reactions, which take place on short time scales, are well-suited for experiments with beams of short-lived nuclei. One such reaction is nucleon knockout where a proton or neutron is removed from the incoming beam from the interaction with a target. Single nucleon knockout reactions have been used to study the single-particle nature of nuclear wave functions. A recent experiment at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory was performed to measure cross sections from single nucleon knockout reactions for several p-shell nuclei. Detection of the residual nucleus in coincidence with any gamma rays emitted from the target allowed cross sections to ground and excited states to be measured. Together with input from reaction theory, ab initio structure theories can be tested. Simultaneously the accuracy of knockout reaction models can be validated by detecting the knocked out neutron with the Modular Neutron Array and Large multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (MoNA-LISA). Preliminary results from this experiment will be shown. Knockout reactions can also be used to populate nuclei which are neutron unbound, thus emit neutrons nearly instantaneously. The structure of these nuclei, therefore, cannot be probed with gamma ray spectroscopy. However, with large neutron detectors like MoNA-LISA the properties of these short-lived nuclei are able to be measured. Recent results using MoNA-LISA to study the structure of neutron-rich nuclei will be presented. The author would like to acknowledge support from the NNSA and NSF.

  13. NewsMars: Express journey to Mars ASE 2003: Knocked out by meteorites Events: Sun-Earth Day ASE 2003: Fun Physics - popular as ever Appointments: Sykes to bring science to the people UK Science Education: The future's bright, the future's science ASE 2003: A grand finale for Catherine Teaching Resources: UK goes to the planets Cambridge Physics Update: Basement physics Conferences: Earth Science Teachers' Association Conference 2003 New Website: JESEI sets sail GIREP: Teacher education seminar Malaysia: Rewards for curriculum change Cambridge Physics Update: My boomerang will come back! Teaching Resources: Widening particiption through ideas and evidence with the University of Surrey Wales: First Ffiseg Events: Nuna: Solar car on tour Physics on Stage: Physics on Stage 3 embraces life Symposium: In what sense a nuclear 'debate'? Gifted and Talented: Able pupils experiencing challenging science Australia: ISS flies high Down Under

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-03-01

    Mars: Express journey to Mars ASE 2003: Knocked out by meteorites Events: Sun-Earth Day ASE 2003: Fun Physics - popular as ever Appointments: Sykes to bring science to the people UK Science Education: The future's bright, the future's science ASE 2003: A grand finale for Catherine Teaching Resources: UK goes to the planets Cambridge Physics Update: Basement physics Conferences: Earth Science Teachers' Association Conference 2003 New Website: JESEI sets sail GIREP: Teacher education seminar Malaysia: Rewards for curriculum change Cambridge Physics Update: My boomerang will come back! Teaching Resources: Widening particiption through ideas and evidence with the University of Surrey Wales: First Ffiseg Events: Nuna: Solar car on tour Physics on Stage: Physics on Stage 3 embraces life Symposium: In what sense a nuclear 'debate'? Gifted and Talented: Able pupils experiencing challenging science Australia: ISS flies high Down Under

  14. Impaired spatial working memory and decreased frontal cortex BDNF protein level in dopamine transporter knock out mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, BingJin; Arime, Yosefu; Hall, F. Scott; Uhl, George R.; Sora, Ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), one of the key brain neurotrophins, has been implicated in neuronal plasticity and memory. Recent studies document the importance of BDNF for normal long-term memory functions. However, there are few studies of the roles of BDNF in short term memory. Dopamine is likely to play important roles in BDNF gene expression in specific brain regions, including frontal cortical regions that are implicated in short term working memory processes that include spontaneous alternation. We have thus tested spatial working memory in dopamine transporter knockout (DAT KO) and wild-type mice. Spontaneous alternation in the Y-maze, an index of short-term spatial working memory in mice, was significantly decreased in DAT KO mice compared to wildtype mice. BDNF protein was significantly decreased in frontal cortex, though not in striatum or hippocampus, of the DAT KO mice. The data support the hypothesis that impaired spatial working memory in DAT KO mice may be related to decreased frontal cortical BDNF in these animals, and document apparent roles for BDNF in a short term memory process. PMID:19932884

  15. Dietary cladode powder from wild type and domesticated Opuntia species reduces atherogenesis in apoE knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Garoby-Salom, Sandra; Guéraud, Françoise; Camaré, Caroline; de la Rosa, Ana-Paulina Barba; Rossignol, Michel; Santos Díaz, María del Socorro; Salvayre, Robert; Negre-Salvayre, Anne

    2016-03-01

    Dietary intake of Opuntia species may prevent the development of cardiovascular diseases. The present study was designed to characterize the biological antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of Opuntia species and to investigate whether Opuntia cladodes prevent the development of atherosclerosis in vivo, in apoE(-)KO mice. The effects of the two Opuntia species, the wild Opuntia streptacantha and the domesticated Opuntia ficus-indica, were tested on the generation of intra- and extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and kinetics of the LDL oxidation by murine CRL2181 endothelial cells and on the subsequent inflammatory signaling leading to the adhesion of monocytes on the activated endothelium and the formation of foam cells. Opuntia species blocked the extracellular ROS (superoxide anion) generation and LDL oxidation by CRL2181, as well as the intracellular ROS rise and signaling evoked by the oxidized LDL, including the nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NFκB, the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 adhesion molecules, and the adhesion of monocytes to CRL2181. In vivo, Opuntia significantly reduced the formation of atherosclerotic lesions and the accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal adducts in the vascular wall of apoE-KO mice, indicating that Opuntia cladodes prevent lipid oxidation in the vascular wall. In conclusion, wild and domesticated Opuntia species exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherogenic properties which emphasize their nutritional benefit for preventing cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26704378

  16. Impaired Angiogenesis during Fracture Healing in GPCR Kinase 2 Interacting Protein-1 (GIT1) Knock Out Mice

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Prashanthi; Pang, Jinjiang; Ho, Hsin-Chiu; Shi, Shanshan; Xie, Chao; Smolock, Elaine; Yan, Chen; Zuscik, Michael J.; Berk, Bradford C.

    2014-01-01

    G protein coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) interacting protein-1 (GIT1), is a scaffold protein that plays an important role in angiogenesis and osteoclast activity. We have previously demonstrated that GIT1 knockout (GIT1 KO) mice have impaired angiogenesis and dysregulated osteoclast podosome formation leading to a reduction in the bone resorbing ability of these cells. Since both angiogenesis and osteoclast-mediated bone remodeling are involved in the fracture healing process, we hypothesized that GIT1 participates in the normal progression of repair following bone injury. In the present study, comparison of fracture healing in wild type (WT) and GIT1 KO mice revealed altered healing in mice with loss of GIT1 function. Alcian blue staining of fracture callus indicated a persistence of cartilagenous matrix in day 21 callus samples from GIT1 KO mice which was temporally correlated with increased type 2 collagen immunostaining. GIT1 KO mice also showed a decrease in chondrocyte proliferation and apoptosis at days 7 and 14, as determined by PCNA and TUNEL staining. Vascular microcomputed tomography analysis of callus samples at days 7, 14 and 21 revealed decreased blood vessel volume, number, and connection density in GIT1 KO mice compared to WT controls. Correlating with this, VEGF-A, phospho-VEGFR2 and PECAM1 (CD31) were decreased in GIT1 KO mice, indicating reduced angiogenesis with loss of GIT1. Finally, calluses from GIT1 KO mice displayed a reduced number of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts at days 14 and 21. Collectively, these results indicate that GIT1 is an important signaling participant in fracture healing, with gene ablation leading to reduced callus vascularity and reduced osteoclast number in the healing callus. PMID:24586541

  17. Sun-Earth Connections: How the Sun Knocks Out My Cell Phone from 150 Million Kilometers Away

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladbury, Raymond L.

    2014-01-01

    Large solar particle events (SPE) threaten many elements of critical infrastructure. A 2013 study by Lloyds of London and Atmospheric and Environmental Research recently found that if a worst-case solar event like the 1859 Carrington Event struck our planet now, it could result on $0.6-$2.36 trillion in damages to the economy. In March 2014, researchers Y. D. Liu et al. revealed that just such an event had narrowly missed Earth in July 2012. The event was observed by the STEREO A spacecraft. In this presentation, we examine how the sun can pack such a punch from 150 million km away, the threats such solar particle events pose, their mechanisms and the efforts NASA and other space agencies are carrying out to understand and mitigate such risks.

  18. Orexin/Hypocretin and Histamine: Distinct Roles in the Control of Wakefulness Demonstrated Using Knock-Out Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Anaclet, Christelle; Parmentier, Régis; Ouk, Koliane; Guidon, Gérard; Buda, Colette; Sastre, Jean-Pierre; Akaoka, Hidéo; Sergeeva, Olga A.; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Franco, Patricia; Haas, Helmut L.; Lin, Jian Sheng

    2009-01-01

    To determine the respective role played by orexin/hypocretin and histamine (HA) neurons in maintaining wakefulness (W), we characterized the behavioral and sleep-wake phenotypes of orexin(Ox) knockout(−/−) mice and compared them with those of histidine-decarboxylase(HDC, HA-synthesizing enzyme)−/−mice. While both mouse strains displayed sleep fragmentation and increased paradoxical sleep(PS), they presented a number of marked differences: 1) The PS-increase in HDC−/−mice was seen during lightness, whereas that in Ox−/−mice occurred during darkness; 2) Contrary to HDC−/−, Ox−/−mice had no W deficiency around lights-off, nor an abnormal EEG and responded to a new environment with increased W; 3) Only Ox−/−, but not HDC−/−mice, displayed narcolepsy and deficient W when faced with motor challenge. Thus, when placed on a wheel, WT, but not littermate Ox−/−mice, voluntarily spent their time in turning it and as a result, remained highly awake; this was accompanied by dense c-fos expression in many areas of their brains, including Ox-neurons in the dorsolateral hypothalamus. The W and motor deficiency of Ox−/−mice was due to the absence of Ox because intraventricular dosing of Ox-A restored their W amount and motor performance whereas SB-334867 (Ox1-receptor antagonist, i.p.) impaired W and locomotion of WT mice during the test. These data indicate that Ox, but not HA, promotes W through enhanced locomotion and suggest that HA and Ox neurons exert a distinct, but complementary and synergistic control of W: the neuropeptide being more involved in its behavioral aspects, whereas the amine is mainly responsible for its qualitative cognitive aspects and cortical-EEG activation. PMID:19923277

  19. Isoform and Splice-Variant Specific Functions of Dynamin-2 Revealed by Analysis of Conditional Knock-Out Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ya-Wen; Surka, Mark C.; Schroeter, Thomas; Lukiyanchuk, Vasyl

    2008-01-01

    Dynamin (Dyn) is a multifunctional GTPase implicated in several cellular events, including endocytosis, intracellular trafficking, cell signaling, and cytokinesis. The mammalian genome encodes three isoforms, Dyn1, Dyn2, and Dyn3, and several splice variants of each, leading to the suggestion that distinct isoforms and/or distinct splice variants might mediate distinct cellular functions. We generated a conditional Dyn2 KO cell line and performed knockout and reconstitution experiments to explore the isoform- and splice variant specific cellular functions of ubiquitously expressed Dyn2. We find that Dyn2 is required for clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), p75 export from the Golgi, and PDGF-stimulated macropinocytosis and cytokinesis, but not for other endocytic pathways. Surprisingly, CME and p75 exocytosis were efficiently rescued by reintroduction of Dyn2, but not Dyn1, suggesting that these two isoforms function differentially in vesicular trafficking in nonneuronal cells. Both isoforms rescued macropinocytosis and cytokinesis, suggesting that dynamin function in these processes might be mechanistically distinct from its role in CME. Although all four Dyn2 splice variants could equally restore CME, Dyn2ba and -bb were more effective at restoring p75 exocytosis. This splice variant specificity correlated with their differential targeting to the Golgi. These studies reveal isoform and splice-variant specific functions for Dyn2. PMID:18923138

  20. Isoform and splice-variant specific functions of dynamin-2 revealed by analysis of conditional knock-out cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Wen; Surka, Mark C; Schroeter, Thomas; Lukiyanchuk, Vasyl; Schmid, Sandra L

    2008-12-01

    Dynamin (Dyn) is a multifunctional GTPase implicated in several cellular events, including endocytosis, intracellular trafficking, cell signaling, and cytokinesis. The mammalian genome encodes three isoforms, Dyn1, Dyn2, and Dyn3, and several splice variants of each, leading to the suggestion that distinct isoforms and/or distinct splice variants might mediate distinct cellular functions. We generated a conditional Dyn2 KO cell line and performed knockout and reconstitution experiments to explore the isoform- and splice variant specific cellular functions of ubiquitously expressed Dyn2. We find that Dyn2 is required for clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), p75 export from the Golgi, and PDGF-stimulated macropinocytosis and cytokinesis, but not for other endocytic pathways. Surprisingly, CME and p75 exocytosis were efficiently rescued by reintroduction of Dyn2, but not Dyn1, suggesting that these two isoforms function differentially in vesicular trafficking in nonneuronal cells. Both isoforms rescued macropinocytosis and cytokinesis, suggesting that dynamin function in these processes might be mechanistically distinct from its role in CME. Although all four Dyn2 splice variants could equally restore CME, Dyn2ba and -bb were more effective at restoring p75 exocytosis. This splice variant specificity correlated with their differential targeting to the Golgi. These studies reveal isoform and splice-variant specific functions for Dyn2. PMID:18923138

  1. Genetic-Background Modulation of Core and Variable Autistic-Like Symptoms in Fmr1 Knock-Out Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pietropaolo, Susanna; Guilleminot, Aurélie; Martin, Benoît; D'Amato, Francesca R.; Crusio, Wim E.

    2011-01-01

    Background No animal models of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) with good construct validity are currently available; using genetic models of pathologies characterized by ASD-like deficits, but with known causes, may be therefore a promising strategy. The Fmr1-KO mouse is an example of this approach, modeling Fragile X syndrome, a well-known genetic disorder presenting ASD symptoms. The Fmr1-KO is available on different genetic backgrounds (FVB versus C57BL/6), which may explain some of the conflicting results that have been obtained with these mutants up till now. Methods Fmr1 KO and their wild-type littermates on both the FVB and C57BL/6 genetic backgrounds were examined on a battery of tests modeling the clinical symptoms of ASD, including the triad of core symptoms (alterations in social interaction and communication, presence of repetitive behaviors), as well as the secondary symptoms (disturbances in sensori-motor reactivity and in circadian patterns of activity, epileptic events). Results Fmr1-KO mice displayed autistic-like core symptoms of altered social interaction and occurrence of repetitive behaviors with additional hyperactivity. The genetic background modulated the effects of the Fmr1 deletion and it appears that the C57BL/6 background may be more suitable for further research on core autistic-like symptoms. Conclusions The Fmr1-mouse line does not recapitulate all of the main core and secondary ASD symptoms, but still can be useful to elucidate the neurobiological mechanisms underlying specific ASD-like endophenotypes. PMID:21364941

  2. Epileptogenesis following Kainic Acid-Induced Status Epilepticus in Cyclin D2 Knock-Out Mice with Diminished Adult Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kondratiuk, Ilona; Plucinska, Gabriela; Miszczuk, Diana; Wozniak, Grazyna; Szydlowska, Kinga; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Filipkowski, Robert K; Lukasiuk, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether a substantial decrease in adult neurogenesis influences epileptogenesis evoked by the intra-amygdala injection of kainic acid (KA). Cyclin D2 knockout (cD2 KO) mice, which lack adult neurogenesis almost entirely, were used as a model. First, we examined whether status epilepticus (SE) evoked by an intra-amygdala injection of KA induces cell proliferation in cD2 KO mice. On the day after SE, we injected BrdU into mice for 5 days and evaluated the number of DCX- and DCX/BrdU-immunopositive cells 3 days later. In cD2 KO control animals, only a small number of DCX+ cells was observed. The number of DCX+ and DCX/BrdU+ cells/mm of subgranular layer in cD2 KO mice increased significantly following SE (p<0.05). However, the number of newly born cells was very low and was significantly lower than in KA-treated wild type (wt) mice. To evaluate the impact of diminished neurogenesis on epileptogenesis and early epilepsy, we performed video-EEG monitoring of wt and cD2 KO mice for 16 days following SE. The number of animals with seizures did not differ between wt (11 out of 15) and cD2 KO (9 out of 12) mice. The median latency to the first spontaneous seizure was 4 days (range 2-10 days) in wt mice and 8 days (range 2-16 days) in cD2 KO mice and did not differ significantly between groups. Similarly, no differences were observed in median seizure frequency (wt: 1.23, range 0.1-3.4; cD2 KO: 0.57, range 0.1-2.0 seizures/day) or median seizure duration (wt: 51 s, range 23-103; cD2 KO: 51 s, range 23-103). Our results indicate that SE-induced epileptogenesis is not disrupted in mice with markedly reduced adult neurogenesis. However, we cannot exclude the contribution of reduced neurogenesis to the chronic epileptic state. PMID:26020770

  3. The GAD65 knock out mouse - a model for GABAergic processes in fear- and stress-induced psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Müller, Iris; Çalışkan, Gürsel; Stork, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) synthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)65 is critically involved in the activity-dependent regulation of GABAergic inhibition in the central nervous system. It is also required for the maturation of the GABAergic system during adolescence, a phase that is critical for the development of several neuropsychiatric diseases. Mice bearing a null mutation of the GAD65 gene develop hyperexcitability of the amygdala and hippocampus, and a phenotype of increased anxiety and pathological fear memory reminiscent of posttraumatic stress disorder. Although genetic association of GAD65 in human has not yet been reported, these findings are in line with observations of reduced GABAergic function in these brain regions of anxiety disorder patients. The particular value of GAD65(-/-) mice thus lies in modeling the effects of reduced GABAergic function in the mature nervous system. The expression of GAD65 and a second GAD isozyme, GAD67, are differentially regulated in response to stress in limbic brain areas suggesting that by controlling GABAergic inhibition these enzymes determine the vulnerability for the development of pathological anxiety and other stress-induced phenotypes. In fact, we could recently show that GAD65 haplodeficiency, which results in delayed postnatal increase of GABA levels, provides resilience to juvenile-stress-induced anxiety to GAD65(+/-) mice thus foiling the increased fear and anxiety in homozygous GAD65(-/-) mice. PMID:25470336

  4. Cyclophilin D Knock-Out Mice Show Enhanced Resistance to Osteoporosis and to Metabolic Changes Observed in Aging Bone

    PubMed Central

    White, Noelle S; Nadtochiy, Sergiy M.; Bentley, Karen L. de Mesy; Brookes, Paul S; Jonason, Jennifer H.; Eliseev, Roman A.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic factors associated with aging, such as oxidative stress and hormone depletion converge on mitochondria and impair their function via opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP). The MPTP is a large non-selective pore regulated by cyclophilin D (CypD) that disrupts mitochondrial membrane integrity. MPTP involvement has been firmly established in degenerative processes in heart, brain, and muscle. Bone has high energy demands and is therefore expected to be highly sensitive to mitochondrial dysfunction. Despite this, the role of mitochondria and the MPTP in bone maintenance and bone pathology has not been elucidated. Our goal was to determine whether mitochondria are impaired in aging bone and to see if protecting mitochondria from MPTP opening via CypD deletion protects against bone loss. We found that bone mass, strength, and formation progressively decline over the course of 18 months in C57BL/6J mice. Using metabolomics and electron microscopy, we determined that oxidative metabolism is impaired in aging bone leading to a glycolytic shift, imbalance in nucleotides, and decreased NAD+/NADH ratio. Mitochondria in osteocytes appear swollen which is a major marker of MPTP opening. CypD deletion by CypD knockout mouse model (CypD KO) protects against bone loss in 13- and 18-month-old mice and prevents decline in bone formation and mitochondrial changes observed in wild type C57BL/6J mice. Together, these data demonstrate that mitochondria are impaired in aging bone and that CypD deletion protects against this impairment to prevent bone loss. This implicates CypD-regulated MPTP and mitochondrial dysfunction in the impairment of bone cells and in aging-related bone loss. Our findings suggest mitochondrial metabolism as a new target for bone therapeutics and inhibition of CypD as a novel strategy against bone loss. PMID:27183225

  5. COMPARATIVE HEPATIC EFFECTS OF PERFLUOROOCTANOIC ACID AND WY 14,643 IN PPARÁ KNOCKED OUT AND WILD-TYPE MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a fluorinated organic chemical widely used in consumer and industrial products. Its persistence in the environment and presence in humans and wildlife have raised considerable concerns. PFOA induces liver tumors in rodents, which is thought to be ...

  6. The effects of density-dependent form factors for (e, e'p) reaction in quasi-elastic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kim, Hungchong; So, W. Y.

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of a relativistic single particle model, the effects of density-dependent electromagnetic form factors on the exclusive (e,e'p) reaction are investigated in the quasi-elastic region. The density-dependent electromagnetic form factors are generated from a quark-meson coupling model and used to calculate the cross sections in two different densities, either at the normal density of ρ_0 ˜ 0.15 fm^-3 or at the lower density, 0.5ρ_0 . Then these cross sections are analyzed in the two different kinematics: One is that the momentum of the outgoing nucleon is along the momentum transfer. The other is that the angle between the momentum of the outgoing nucleon and the momentum transfer is varied at fixed magnitude of the momentum of the outgoing nucleon. Our theoretical differential reduced cross sections are compared with the NIKHEF data for the 208 Pb( e, e'p) reaction, which is related to the probability that a bound nucleon from a given orbit can be knocked-out of the nucleus. The effects of the density-dependent form factors increase the differential cross sections for both knocked-out proton and neutron by an amount of a few percent. Moreover they are shown to be almost the same within only a few percent, i.e., nearly independent of the shell location of knockout nucleons. These results are quite consistent with the characteristics of double magic nuclei which have relatively sharp smearing in the density distribution.

  7. Differential proteome-metabolome profiling of YCA1-knock-out and wild type cells reveals novel metabolic pathways and cellular processes dependent on the yeast metacaspase.

    PubMed

    Ždralević, Maša; Longo, Valentina; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Giannattasio, Sergio; Timperio, Anna Maria; Zolla, Lello

    2015-06-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expresses one member of the metacaspase Cys protease family, encoded by the YCA1 gene. Combination of proteomics and metabolomics data showed that YCA1 deletion down-regulated glycolysis, the TCA cycle and alcoholic fermentation as compared with WT cells. Δyca1 cells also showed a down-regulation of the pentose phosphate pathway and accumulation of pyruvate, correlated with higher levels of certain amino acids found in these cells. Accordingly, there is a decrease in protein biosynthesis, and up-regulation of specific stress response proteins like Ahp1p, which possibly provides these cells with a better protection against stress. Moreover, in agreement with the down-regulation of protein biosynthesis machinery in Δyca1 cells, we have found that regulation of transcription, co-translational protein folding and protein targeting to different subcellular locations were also down-regulated. Metabolomics analysis of the nucleotide content showed a significant reduction in Δyca1 cells in comparison with the WT, except for GTP content which remained unchanged. Thus, our combined proteome-metabolome approach added a new dimension to the non-apoptotic function of yeast metacaspase, which can specifically affect cell metabolism through as yet unknown mechanisms and possibly stress-response pathways, like HOG and cell wall integrity pathways. Certainly, YCA1 deletion may induce compensatory changes in stress response proteins offering a better protection against apoptosis to Δyca1 cells rather than a loss in pro-apoptotic YCA1-associated activity. PMID:25697364

  8. Establishment of Immortalized Mouse Bmp2 Knock-Out Dental Papilla Mesenchymal Cells Necessary for Study of Odontoblastic Differentiation and Odontogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lian; Wang, Feng; Donly, Kevin J.; Wan, Chunyan; Luo, Daoshu; Harris, Stephen E.; Macdougall, Mary; Chen, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    Bmp2 is essential for dentin formation. Bmp2 cKO mice exhibited similar phenotype to dentinogenesis imperfecta, showing dental pulp exposure, hypomineralized dentin, and delayed odontoblast differentiation. As it is relatively difficult to obtain lot of primary Bmp2 cKO dental papilla mesenchymal cells and to maintain a long-term culture of these primary cells, availability of immortalized deleted Bmp2 dental papilla mesenchymal cells is critical for studying the underlying mechanism of Bmp2 signal in odontogenesis. In this study, our goal was to generate an immortalized deleted Bmp2 dental papilla mesenchymal (iBmp2ko/ko dp) cell line by introducing Cre fluorescent protein (GFP) into the immortalized mouse floxed Bmp2 dental papilla mesenchymal (iBmp2fx/fx dp) cells. iBmp2ko/ko dp cells were confirmed by GFP and PCR. The deleted Bmp2 cells exhibited slow cell proliferation rate and cell growth was arrested in G2 phase. Expression of tooth-related marker genes and cell differentiation were decreased in the deleted cells. Importantly, extracellular matrix remodeling was impaired in the iBmp2ko/ko dp cells as reflected by the decreased Mmp-9 expression. In addition, with exogenous Bmp2 induction, these cell differentiation and mineralization were rescued as well as extracellular matrix remodeling was enhanced. Therefore, we for the first time described establishment of iBmpko/ko cells that are useful for study of mechanisms in regulating dental papilla mesenchymal cell lineages. PMID:26037045

  9. Incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity of a growth defect as a consequence of knocking out two K(+) transporters in the euascomycete fungus Podospora anserina.

    PubMed Central

    Lalucque, Hervé; Silar, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    We describe an example of incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina, two genetic properties classically associated with mutations in more complex organisms, such as green plants and animals. We show that the knockouts of two TRK-related K(+) transporters of this ascomycete present variability in their phenotype that cannot be attributed to fluctuations of the genetic background or the environment. Thalli of the knockout strains derived from independent monokaryotic ascospores or from a single monokaryotic ascospore and cultivated under standard growth conditions may or may not present impaired growth. When impaired, thalli exhibit a range of phenotypes. Environmental conditions control expressivity to a large extent and penetrance to a low extent. Restoration of functional potassium transport by heterologous expression of K(+) transporters from Neurospora crassa abolishes or strongly diminishes the growth impairment. These data show that incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity can be an intrinsic property of a single Mendelian loss-of-function mutation. They also show that such variability in the expression of a mutant phenotype can be promoted by a phenomenon not obviously related to the well-known chromatin structure modifications, i.e., potassium transport. They provide a framework to understand human channelopathies with similar properties. PMID:15020412

  10. Knocking Out ACR2 Does Not Affect Arsenic Redox Status in Arabidopsis thaliana: Implications for As Detoxification and Accumulation in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenju; Schat, Henk; Bliek, Mathijs; Chen, Yi; McGrath, Steve P.; George, Graham; Salt, David E.; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Many plant species are able to reduce arsenate to arsenite efficiently, which is an important step allowing detoxification of As through either efflux of arsenite or complexation with thiol compounds. It has been suggested that this reduction is catalyzed by ACR2, a plant homologue of the yeast arsenate reductase ScACR2. Silencing of AtACR2 was reported to result in As hyperaccumulation in the shoots of Arabidopsis thaliana. However, no information of the in vivo As speciation has been reported. Here, we investigated the effect of AtACR2 knockout or overexpression on As speciation, arsenite efflux from roots and As accumulation in shoots. T-DNA insertion lines, overexpression lines and wild-type (WT) plants were exposed to different concentrations of arsenate for different periods, and As speciation in plants and arsenite efflux were determined using HPLC-ICP-MS. There were no significant differences in As speciation between different lines, with arsenite accounting for >90% of the total extractable As in both roots and shoots. Arsenite efflux to the external medium represented on average 77% of the arsenate taken up during 6 h exposure, but there were no significant differences between WT and mutants or overexpression lines. Accumulation of As in the shoots was also unaffected by AtACR2 knockout or overexpression. Additionally, after exposure to arsenate, the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) strain with ScACR2 deleted showed similar As speciation as the WT with arsenite-thiol complexes being the predominant species. Our results suggest the existence of multiple pathways of arsenate reduction in plants and yeast. PMID:22879969

  11. Metabolic consequences of knocking out UGT85B1, the gene encoding the glucosyltransferase required for synthesis of dhurrin in Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench).

    PubMed

    Blomstedt, Cecilia K; O'Donnell, Natalie H; Bjarnholt, Nanna; Neale, Alan D; Hamill, John D; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Gleadow, Roslyn M

    2016-02-01

    Many important food crops produce cyanogenic glucosides as natural defense compounds to protect against herbivory or pathogen attack. It has also been suggested that these nitrogen-based secondary metabolites act as storage reserves of nitrogen. In sorghum, three key genes, CYP79A1, CYP71E1 and UGT85B1, encode two Cytochrome P450s and a glycosyltransferase, respectively, the enzymes essential for synthesis of the cyanogenic glucoside dhurrin. Here, we report the use of targeted induced local lesions in genomes (TILLING) to identify a line with a mutation resulting in a premature stop codon in the N-terminal region of UGT85B1. Plants homozygous for this mutation do not produce dhurrin and are designated tcd2 (totally cyanide deficient 2) mutants. They have reduced vigor, being dwarfed, with poor root development and low fertility. Analysis using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) shows that tcd2 mutants accumulate numerous dhurrin pathway-derived metabolites, some of which are similar to those observed in transgenic Arabidopsis expressing the CYP79A1 and CYP71E1 genes. Our results demonstrate that UGT85B1 is essential for formation of dhurrin in sorghum with no co-expressed endogenous UDP-glucosyltransferases able to replace it. The tcd2 mutant suffers from self-intoxication because sorghum does not have a feedback mechanism to inhibit the initial steps of dhurrin biosynthesis when the glucosyltransferase activity required to complete the synthesis of dhurrin is lacking. The LC-MS analyses also revealed the presence of metabolites in the tcd2 mutant which have been suggested to be derived from dhurrin via endogenous pathways for nitrogen recovery, thus indicating which enzymes may be involved in such pathways. PMID:26493517

  12. Deficits in axonal transport in hippocampal-based circuitry and the visual pathway in APP knock-out animals witnessed by manganese enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Joseph J.; Zhang, Xiaowei; Ziomek, Greg; Jacobs, Russell E.; Bearer, Elaine L.

    2012-01-01

    Mounting evidence implicates axonal transport defects, typified by the presence of axonal varicosities with aberrant accumulations of cargo, as an early event in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. Work identifying amyloid precursor protein (APP) as a vesicular motor receptor for anterograde axonal transport further implicates axonal transport in AD. Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) detects axonal transport dynamics in preclinical studies. Here we pursue an understanding of the role of APP in axonal transport in the central nervous system by applying MEMRI to hippocampal circuitry and to the visual pathway in living mice homozygous for either wild type or a deletion in the APP gene (n = 12 for each genotype). Following intra-ocular or stereotaxic hippocampal injection, we performed time-lapse MRI to detect Mn2+ transport. Three dimensional whole brain datasets were compared on a voxel-wise basis using within-group pair-wise analysis. Quantification of transport to structures connected to injection sites via axonal fiber tracts was also performed. Histology confirmed consistent placement of hippocampal injections and no observable difference in glial-response to the injections. APP −/− mice had significantly reduced transport from the hippocampus to the septal nuclei and amygdala after 7 hours and reduced transport to the contralateral hippocampus after 25 hours; axonal transport deficits in the APP −/− animals were also identified in the visual pathway. These data support a system-wide role for APP in axonal transport within the central nervous system and demonstrate the power of MEMRI for assessing neuronal circuitry involved in memory and learning. PMID:22500926

  13. Knock out of the BASIGIN/CD147 chaperone of lactate/H+ symporters disproves its pro-tumour action via extracellular matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) induction.

    PubMed

    Marchiq, Ibtissam; Albrengues, Jean; Granja, Sara; Gaggioli, Cédric; Pouysségur, Jacques; Simon, Marie-Pierre

    2015-09-22

    BASIGIN/CD147/EMMPRIN is a multifunctional transmembrane glycoprotein strongly expressed in tumours. BASIGIN controls tumour metabolism, particularly glycolysis by facilitating lactic acid export through the two monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and hypoxia-inducible MCT4. However, before being recognized as a co-carrier of MCTs, BASIGIN was described as an inducer of extracellular matrix metalloproteases (MMPs). Early on, a model emerged in which, tumour cells use the extracellular domain of BASIGIN to recognize and stimulate neighbouring fibroblasts to produce MMPs. However, this model has remained hypothetical since a direct link between BASIGIN and MMPs production has not yet been clearly established. To validate the BASIGIN/MMP hypothesis, we developed BASIGIN knockouts in three human tumour cell lines derived from glioma, colon, and lung adenocarcinoma. By using co-culture experiments of either human or mouse fibroblasts and tumour cell lines we showed, contrary to what has been abundantly published, that the disruption of BASIGIN in tumour cells and in MEFs has no action on the production of MMPs. Our findings do not support the notion that the pro-tumoural action of BASIGIN is mediated via induction of MMPs. Therefore, we propose that to date, the strongest pro-tumoural action of BASIGIN is mediated through the control of fermentative glycolysis. PMID:26284589

  14. Amyloid beta deposition and phosphorylated tau accumulation are key features in aged choroidal vessels in the complement factor H knock out model of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Aboelnour, Asmaa; Kam, Jaimie Hoh; Elnasharty, M A; Sayed-Ahmed, Ahmed; Jeffery, Glen

    2016-06-01

    Extra-cellular deposition including amyloid beta (Aβ) is a feature of retinal ageing. It has been documented for Bruch's membrane (BM) where Aβ is elevated in complement factor H knockout mice (Cfh(-/-)) proposed as a model for age related macular degeneration. However, arterial deposition in choroidal vessels prior to perfusion across BM has not been examined. Aβ is associated with tau phosphorylation and these are linked in blood vessels in Alzheimers Disease where they can drive perivascular pathology. Here we ask if Aβ, tau and phosphorylated tau are features of ageing in choroidal vessels in 12 month C57 BL/6 and Cfh(-/-) mice, using immune staining and Western blot analysis. Greater levels of Aβ and phosphorylated tau are found in choroidal vessels in Cfh(-/-) mice. Western blot revealed a 40% increase in Aβ in Cfh(-/-) over C57 BL/6 mice. Aβ deposits coat around 55% of the luminal wall in Cfh(-/-) compared to only about 40% in C57 BL/6. Total tau was similar in both groups, but phosphorylated tau increased by >100% in Cfh(-/-) compared to C57 BL/6 and covered >75% of the luminal wall compared to 50% in C57 BL/6. Hence, phosphorylated tau is a marked choroidal feature in this mouse model. Aβ deposition was clumped in Cfh(-/-) mice and likely to influence blood flow dynamics. Disturbed flow is associated with atherogenesis and may be related to the accumulation of membrane attack complex recently identified between choroidal vessels in those at high risk of macular degeneration due to complement factor H polymorphisms. PMID:27181225

  15. HspX knock-out in Mycobacterium tuberculosis leads to shorter antibiotic treatment and lower relapse rate in a mouse model--a potential novel therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanmin; Liu, Alexander; Menendez, Maria C; Garcia, Maria J; Oravcova, Katarina; Gillespie, Stephen H; Davies, Gerry R; Mitchison, Denis A; Coates, Anthony R M

    2015-01-01

    Effective global tuberculosis control is hindered by the need for prolonged chemotherapy which leads to poor patient compliance. Therefore novel drug targets that shorten the duration of chemotherapy and reduce disease relapse rates are highly desirable. We have previously shown that HspX, an alpha-crystallin-like protein, is associated with growth suppression of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mouse models. We determined to evaluate hspX as a novel target for controlling M. tuberculosis growth in combination with traditional antibiotic therapy in the Cornell mouse model. The hspX deletion mutant (ΔhspX) was used as a model of potential hspX inhibition. Normal BALB/c mice were infected with ΔhspX or the wild type (WT) strain. Three weeks after infection, the mice were treated with rifampicin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide for 14 weeks followed by 8 weeks of hydrocortisone. The effect of chemotherapy was measured by organ bacterial counts and the relapse rate. Antibiotic treatment of mice infected with ΔhspX resulted in faster visceral clearance; organs were disease free 8 weeks post-treatment for ΔhspX infection compared to 14 weeks for the WT strain. Disease relapse rate was significantly lower in ΔhspX infection (60.7%) compared to WT infection (92.6%). HspX may be a promising therapeutic target in combination with traditional antibiotic therapy to shorten the length of treatment and reduce disease relapse. PMID:25481272

  16. Attrition of Hepatic Damage Inflicted by Angiotensin II with α-Tocopherol and β-Carotene in Experimental Apolipoprotein E Knock-out Mice.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Kaliappan; Gowtham, Munusamy; Sachin, Singh; Ravishankar Ram, Mani; Shankar, Esaki M; Kamarul, Tunku

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II is one of the key regulatory peptides implicated in the pathogenesis of liver disease. The mechanisms underlying the salubrious role of α-tocopherol and β-carotene on liver pathology have not been comprehensively assessed. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the role of Angiotensin II on hepatic damage and if α-tocopherol and β-carotene supplementation attenuates hepatic damage. Hepatic damage was induced in Apoe(-/-)mice by infusion of Angiotensin II followed by oral administration with α-tocopherol and β-carotene-enriched diet for 60 days. Investigations showed fibrosis, kupffer cell hyperplasia, hepatocyte degeneration and hepatic cell apoptosis; sinusoidal dilatation along with haemorrhages; evidence of fluid accumulation; increased ROS level and increased AST and ALT activities. In addition, tPA and uPA were down-regulated due to 42-fold up-regulation of PAI-1. MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-12, and M-CSF were down-regulated in Angiotensin II-treated animals. Notably, α-tocopherol and β-carotene treatment controlled ROS, fibrosis, hepatocyte degeneration, kupffer cell hyperplasia, hepatocyte apoptosis, sinusoidal dilatation and fluid accumulation in the liver sinusoids, and liver enzyme levels. In addition, PAI-1, tPA and uPA expressions were markedly controlled by β-carotene treatment. Thus, Angiotensin II markedly influenced hepatic damage possibly by restraining fibrinolytic system. We concluded that α-tocopherol and β-carotene treatment has salubrious role in repairing hepatic pathology. PMID:26670291

  17. (R)-3-hydroxyacyl-ACP:CoA transacylase of Pseudomonas chlororaphis: gene cloning, characterization and knock-out on PHA and rhamnolipid syntheses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis is a useful microorganism capable of producing polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biopolymer and rhamnolipid (RL) biosurfactants by using carbon- and nitrogen-sources derived from renewable feedstocks as substrates of fermentation. We are interested in increasing the yield of RL pr...

  18. Enkephalin levels and the number of neuropeptide Y-containing interneurons in the hippocampus are decreased in female cannabinoid-receptor 1 knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Sophie A; Kempen, Tracey A Van; Pickel, Virginia M; Milner, Teresa A

    2016-05-01

    Drug addiction requires learning and memory processes that are facilitated by activation of cannabinoid-1 (CB1) and opioid receptors in the hippocampus. This involves activity-dependent synaptic plasticity that is partially regulated by endogenous opioid (enkephalin and dynorphin) and non-opioid peptides, specifically cholecystokinin, parvalbumin and neuropeptide Y, the neuropeptides present in inhibitory interneurons that co-express CB1 or selective opioid receptors. We tested the hypothesis that CB1 receptor expression is a determinant of the availability of one or more of these peptide modulators in the hippocampus. This was achieved by quantitatively analyzing the immunoperoxidase labeling for each of these neuropeptide in the dorsal hippocampus of female wild-type (CB1+/+) and cannabinoid receptor 1 knockout (CB1-/-) C57/BL6 mice. The levels of Leu(5)-enkephalin-immunoreactivity were significantly reduced in the hilus of the dentate gyrus and in stratum lucidum of CA3 in CB1-/- mice. Moreover, the numbers of neuropeptide Y-immunoreactive interneurons in the dentate hilus were significantly lower in the CB1-/- compared to wild-type mice. However, CB1+/+ and CB1-/- mice did not significantly differ in expression levels of either dynorphin or cholecystokinin, and showed no differences in numbers of parvalbumin-containing interneurons. These findings suggest that the cannabinoid and opioid systems have a nuanced, regulatory relationship that could affect the balance of excitation and inhibition in the hippocampus and thus processes such as learning that rely on this balance. PMID:27012427

  19. Attrition of Hepatic Damage Inflicted by Angiotensin II with α-Tocopherol and β-Carotene in Experimental Apolipoprotein E Knock-out Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Kaliappan; Gowtham, Munusamy; Sachin, Singh; Ravishankar Ram, Mani; Shankar, Esaki M.; Kamarul, Tunku

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II is one of the key regulatory peptides implicated in the pathogenesis of liver disease. The mechanisms underlying the salubrious role of α-tocopherol and β-carotene on liver pathology have not been comprehensively assessed. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the role of Angiotensin II on hepatic damage and if α-tocopherol and β-carotene supplementation attenuates hepatic damage. Hepatic damage was induced in Apoe−/−mice by infusion of Angiotensin II followed by oral administration with α-tocopherol and β-carotene-enriched diet for 60 days. Investigations showed fibrosis, kupffer cell hyperplasia, hepatocyte degeneration and hepatic cell apoptosis; sinusoidal dilatation along with haemorrhages; evidence of fluid accumulation; increased ROS level and increased AST and ALT activities. In addition, tPA and uPA were down-regulated due to 42-fold up-regulation of PAI-1. MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-12, and M-CSF were down-regulated in Angiotensin II-treated animals. Notably, α-tocopherol and β-carotene treatment controlled ROS, fibrosis, hepatocyte degeneration, kupffer cell hyperplasia, hepatocyte apoptosis, sinusoidal dilatation and fluid accumulation in the liver sinusoids, and liver enzyme levels. In addition, PAI-1, tPA and uPA expressions were markedly controlled by β-carotene treatment. Thus, Angiotensin II markedly influenced hepatic damage possibly by restraining fibrinolytic system. We concluded that α-tocopherol and β-carotene treatment has salubrious role in repairing hepatic pathology. PMID:26670291

  20. Knocking Out Cytosolic Cysteine Synthesis Compromises the Antioxidant Capacity of the Cytosol to Maintain Discrete Concentrations of Hydrogen Peroxide in Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    López-Martín, M. Carmen; Becana, Manuel; Romero, Luis C.; Gotor, Cecilia

    2008-01-01

    Plant cells contain different O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL) enzymes involved in cysteine (Cys) biosynthesis and located in different subcellular compartments. These enzymes are made up of a complex variety of isoforms resulting in different subcellular Cys pools. To unravel the contribution of cytosolic Cys to plant metabolism, we characterized the knockout oas-a1.1 and osa-a1.2 mutants, deficient in the most abundant cytosolic OASTL isoform in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Total intracellular Cys and glutathione concentrations were reduced, and the glutathione redox state was shifted in favor of its oxidized form. Interestingly, the capability of the mutants to chelate heavy metals did not differ from that of the wild type, but the mutants have an enhanced sensitivity to cadmium. With the aim of establishing the metabolic network most influenced by the cytosolic Cys pool, we used the ATH1 GeneChip for evaluation of differentially expressed genes in the oas-a1.1 mutant grown under nonstress conditions. The transcriptomic footprints of mutant plants had predicted functions associated with various physiological responses that are dependent on reactive oxygen species and suggested that the mutant was oxidatively stressed. Evidences that the mutation caused a perturbation in H2O2 homeostasis are that, in the knockout, H2O2 production was localized in shoots and roots; spontaneous cell death lesions occurred in the leaves; and lignification and guaiacol peroxidase activity were significantly increased. All these findings indicate that a deficiency of OAS-A1 in the cytosol promotes a perturbation in H2O2 homeostasis and that Cys is an important determinant of the antioxidative capacity of the cytosol in Arabidopsis. PMID:18441224

  1. Conditional Knock-Out of Vesicular GABA Transporter Gene from Starburst Amacrine Cells Reveals the Contributions of Multiple Synaptic Mechanisms Underlying Direction Selectivity in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Zhe; Chen, Qiang; Koren, David; Giammarinaro, Benno; Acaron Ledesma, Hector

    2015-01-01

    Direction selectivity of direction-selective ganglion cells (DSGCs) in the retina results from patterned excitatory and inhibitory inputs onto DSGCs during motion stimuli. The inhibitory inputs onto DSGCs are directionally tuned to the antipreferred (null) direction and therefore potently suppress spiking during motion in the null direction. However, whether direction-selective inhibition is indispensable for direction selectivity is unclear. Here, we selectively eliminated the directional tuning of inhibitory inputs onto DSGCs by disrupting GABA release from the presynaptic interneuron starburst amacrine cell in the mouse retina. We found that, even without directionally tuned inhibition, direction selectivity can still be implemented in a subset of On-Off DSGCs by direction-selective excitation and a temporal offset between excitation and isotropic inhibition. Our results therefore demonstrate the concerted action of multiple synaptic mechanisms for robust direction selectivity in the retina. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The direction-selective circuit in the retina has been a classic model to study neural computations by the brain. An important but unresolved question is how direction selectivity is implemented by directionally tuned excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms. Here we specifically removed the direction tuning of inhibition from the circuit. We found that direction tuning of inhibition is important but not indispensable for direction selectivity of DSGCs' spiking activity, and that the residual direction selectivity is implemented by direction-selective excitation and temporal offset between excitation and inhibition. Our results highlight the concerted actions of synaptic excitation and inhibition required for robust direction selectivity in the retina and provide critical insights into how patterned excitation and inhibition collectively implement sensory processing. PMID:26400950

  2. Unexpected Lack of Hypersensitivity in LRRK2 Knock-out Mice to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)

    PubMed Central

    Andres-Mateos, Eva; Mejias, Rebeca; Sasaki, Masayuki; Li, Xiaojie; Lin, Brian M; Biskup, Saskia; Zhang, Li; Banerjee, Rebecca; Thomas, Bobby; Yang, Lichuan; Liu, Guosheng; Beal, M Flint; Huso, David L; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene are the most common known cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). Whether loss of LRRK2 function accounts for neurodegeneration of dopamine neurons in PD is not known, nor is it known whether LRRK2 kinase activity modulates the susceptibility of dopamine (DA) neurons to the selective dopaminergic toxin, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6 tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). To better understand the role of LRRK2 in DA neuronal survival and its role in the susceptibility of DA neurons to MPTP, we generated LRRK2 knockout (KO) mice lacking the kinase domain of LRRK2. Here we show that LRRK2 KO mice are viable and have no major abnormalities and live to adulthood. The dopaminergic system is normal in LRRK2 KO mice as assessed via HPLC for DA and its metabolites and via stereologic assessment of DA neuron number in young and aged mice. Importantly, there is no significant difference in the susceptibility of LRRK2 KO and wild type (WT) mice to MPTP. These results suggest that LRRK2 plays little if any role in the development and survival of DA neurons under physiologic conditions. Thus, PD due to LRRK2 mutations are likely not due to a loss of function. Moreover, LRRK2 is not required for the susceptibility of DA neurons to MPTP. PMID:20016100

  3. Comparative hepatic effects of perfluorooctanoic acid and WY 14,643 in PPARa-knocked out and wild-type mice.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is an environmentally persistent chemical commonly found in humans and wildlife. Induction of liver tumors by PFOA in rodents is thought to be mediated by PPARα activation, although hepatic hypertrophy persists in PPARα-null mice. This study evalua...

  4. Developmental Toxicity of Perfluorononanoic Acid in the Wild-Type and PPAR-alpha Knock-out Mouse After Gestational Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) is a perfluoroalkyl acid detected in the environment and in tissues of humans and wildlife, and its concentration in human serum has increased in the past few years. PFNA negatively affects development and survival of CD1 mice and activates peroxisom...

  5. Establishment of Immortalized Mouse Bmp2 Knock-Out Dental Papilla Mesenchymal Cells Necessary for Study of Odontoblastic Differentiation and Odontogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lian; Wang, Feng; Donly, Kevin J; Wan, Chunyan; Luo, Daoshu; Harris, Stephen E; MacDougall, Mary; Chen, Shuo

    2015-11-01

    Bmp2 is essential for dentin formation. Bmp2 cKO mice exhibited similar phenotype to dentinogenesis imperfecta, showing dental pulp exposure, hypomineralized dentin, and delayed odontoblast differentiation. As it is relatively difficult to obtain lot of primary Bmp2 cKO dental papilla mesenchymal cells and to maintain a long-term culture of these primary cells, availability of immortalized deleted Bmp2 dental papilla mesenchymal cells is critical for studying the underlying mechanism of Bmp2 signal in odontogenesis. In this study, our goal was to generate an immortalized deleted Bmp2 dental papilla mesenchymal (iBmp2(ko/ko)dp) cell line by introducing Cre recombinase and green fluorescent protein (GFP) into the immortalized mouse floxed Bmp2 dental papilla mesenchymal (iBmp2(fx/fx)dp) cells. iBmp2(ko/ko)dp cells were confirmed by GFP and PCR. The deleted Bmp2 cells exhibited slow cell proliferation rate and cell growth was arrested in G2 phase. Expression of tooth-related marker genes and cell differentiation were decreased in the deleted cells. Importantly, extracellular matrix remodeling was impaired in the iBmp2(ko/ko)dp cells as reflected by the decreased Mmp-9 expression. In addition, with exogenous Bmp2 induction, these cell differentiation and mineralization were rescued as well as extracellular matrix remodeling was enhanced. Therefore, we for the first time described establishment of iBmp(ko/ko) cells that are useful for study of mechanisms in regulating dental papilla mesenchymal cell lineages. PMID:26037045

  6. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    Most of the time, medicines make our lives better. They reduce aches and pains, fight infections, and control problems such as high blood pressure or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions. One problem is ...

  7. [Plasma antioxidant activity--a test for impaired biological functions of endoecology, exotrophy, and inflammation reactions].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Krylin, V V; Dmitriev, V A; Iashin, Ia I

    2010-07-01

    The authors discuss the diagnostic value of a test for total serum antioxidant activity determined by an electrochemistry method on a liquid chromatograph (without a column), by using an amperometric detector, as well as the composition of the endogenously synthesized hydrophilic and hydrophobic acceptors of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Uric acid is a major hydrophilic acceptor of ROS; monoenic oleic fatty acid acts as its major lipophilic acceptor. The constant determined by the authors for of 03 oleic acid oxidation during automatic titration in the organic medium is an order of magnitude higher than that for alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene and linoleic fatty acid; its concentration is also an order of magnitude higher. In oxidative stress, the adrenal steroid hormone dehydroepiandrosterone initiates oleic acid synthesis via expression of palmitoyl elongase and steatoryl desaturase. In early steps of phylogenesis in primates, spontaneous mutation resulted in ascorbic acid synthesis gene knockout; phylogenetically, further other mutation knocked out the gene encoding the synthesis of uricase and the conversion of uric acid to alantoin. In primates, uric acid became not only a catabolite of purine bases in vivo, but also the major endogenous hydrophilic acceptor of ROS. This philogenetic order makes it clear why the epithelium in the proximal nephron tubule entirely reabsorbs uric acid (a catabolite?) from primary urine and then secretes it again to urine depending on the impairment of biological functions of endoecology (the intercellular medium being contaminated with biological rubbish), the activation of a biological inflammatory reaction, the cellular production of ROS, and the reduction in serum total antioxidant activity. With each biological reaction, there was an increase in the blood content of uric acid as a hydrophilic acceptor of ROS, by actively lowering its secretion into urine. Uric acid is a diagnostic test of inflammation, or rather compensatory

  8. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... using any of these products. Some types of food may also cause adverse drug reactions. For example, grapefruit and grapefruit juice, as well as alcohol and caffeine, may affect how drugs work. Every time your doctor ... interactions with any foods or beverages. What about medicines I've used ...

  9. Probing the Repulsive Core of the Nucleon-Nucleon Interaction via the 4He(e,e`pN) Triple-Coincidence Reaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Korover, Igor; Muangma, Navaphon; Hen, Or; Shneor, Ran; Sulkosky, Vincent; Kelleher, Aidan; Gilad, Shalev; Higinbotham, Douglas; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Wood, Stephen; et al

    2014-07-01

    We studied simultaneously the 4He(e,e'p), 4He(e,e'pp), and 4He(e,e'pn) reactions at Q2=2 [GeV/c]2 and xB >1, for a (e,e'p) missing-momentum range of 400 to 830 MeV/c. The knocked-out proton was detected in coincidence with a proton or neutron recoiling almost back to back to the missing momentum, leaving the residual A=2 system at low excitation energy. These data were used to identify two-nucleon short-range correlated pairs and to deduce their isospin structure as a function of missing momentum in a region where the nucleon-nucleon force is expected to change from predominantly tensor to repulsive. Neutron-proton pairs dominate the high-momentum tail ofmore » the nucleon momentum distributions, but their abundance is reduced as the nucleon momentum increases beyond ~500 MeV/c. The extracted fraction of proton-proton pairs is small and almost independent of the missing momentum in the range we studied. Our data are compared with ab-initio calculations of two-nucleon momentum distributions in 4He.« less

  10. Probing the Repulsive Core of the Nucleon-Nucleon Interaction via the 4He(e,e`pN) Triple-Coincidence Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Korover, Igor; Muangma, Navaphon; Hen, Or; Shneor, Ran; Sulkosky, Vincent; Kelleher, Aidan; Gilad, Shalev; Higinbotham, Douglas; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Wood, Stephen; Rakhman, Abdurahim; Aguilera, Paula; Ahmed, Zafar; Albataineh, Hisham; Allada, Kalyan; Anderson, Bryon; Anez, David; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Armstrong, Whitney; Arrington, John; Averett, Todd; Badman, Toby; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Bai, Xinzhan; Beck, Arie; Beck, Sharon; Bellini, Vincenzo; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Bittner, James; Boeglin, Werner; Camsonne, Alexandre; Chen, Chunhua; Chen, Jian -Ping; Chirapatpimol, Khem; Cisbani, Evaristo; Dalton, Mark; Daniel, Aji; Day, Donal; De, Cornelis; de Jager, C. W.; De, Raffaele; Leo, R. De; Deconinck, Wouter; Defurne, Maxime; Flay, David; Fomin, Nadia; Friend, Megan; Frullani, Salvatore; Fuchey, Eric; Garibaldi, Franco; Gaskell, David; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Gu, Chao; Gueye, Paul; Hamilton, David; Hanretty, Charles; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Shabestari, Mitra Hashemi; Holmstrom, Timothy; Huang, Min; Iqbal, Sophia; Jin, Ge; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kang, Hoyoung; Khandaker, Mahbubul; LeRose, John; Leckey, John; Lindgren, Richard; Long, Elena; Mammei, Juliette; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Meekins, David; Meziani, Zein -Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Mihovilovic, Miha; Monaghan, Peter; Munoz, Carlos; Camacho, C. Munoz; Norum, Blaine; Nuruzzaman, nfn; Pan, Kai; Phillips, Sarah; Pomerantz, Ishay; Posik, Matthew; Punjabi, Vina; Qian, Xin; Qiang, Yi; Qiu, Xiyu; Reimer, Paul; Riordan, Seamus; Ron, Guy; Rondon-Aramayo, Oscar; Saha, Arunava; Schulte, Elaine; Selvy, Lawrence; Shahinyan, Albert; Sirca, Simon; Sjoegren, Johan; Slifer, Karl; Solvignon-Slifer, Patricia; Sparveris, Nikolaos; Subedi, Ramesh; Tireman, William; Wang, Diancheng; Weinstein, Lawrence; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, Wenbiao; Yaron, Israel; Ye, Zhihong; Zhan, X.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Yawei; Zhao, Bo; Zhao, Zhiwen; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Pengjia; Zielinski, Ryan; Watson, John

    2014-07-01

    We studied simultaneously the 4He(e,e'p), 4He(e,e'pp), and 4He(e,e'pn) reactions at Q2=2 [GeV/c]2 and xB >1, for a (e,e'p) missing-momentum range of 400 to 830 MeV/c. The knocked-out proton was detected in coincidence with a proton or neutron recoiling almost back to back to the missing momentum, leaving the residual A=2 system at low excitation energy. These data were used to identify two-nucleon short-range correlated pairs and to deduce their isospin structure as a function of missing momentum in a region where the nucleon-nucleon force is expected to change from predominantly tensor to repulsive. Neutron-proton pairs dominate the high-momentum tail of the nucleon momentum distributions, but their abundance is reduced as the nucleon momentum increases beyond ~500 MeV/c. The extracted fraction of proton-proton pairs is small and almost independent of the missing momentum in the range we studied. Our data are compared with ab-initio calculations of two-nucleon momentum distributions in 4He.

  11. Probing the Repulsive Core of the Nucleon-Nucleon Interaction via the He4(e ,e'pN) Triple-Coincidence Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korover, I.; Muangma, N.; Hen, O.; Shneor, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Kelleher, A.; Gilad, S.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Piasetzky, E.; Watson, J. W.; Wood, S. A.; Aguilera, P.; Ahmed, Z.; Albataineh, H.; Allada, K.; Anderson, B.; Anez, D.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J.; Armstrong, W.; Arrington, J.; Averett, T.; Badman, T.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Bai, X.; Beck, A.; Beck, S.; Bellini, V.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Bittner, J.; Boeglin, W.; Camsonne, A.; Chen, C.; Chen, J.-P.; Chirapatpimol, K.; Cisbani, E.; Dalton, M. M.; Daniel, A.; Day, D.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deconinck, W.; Defurne, M.; Flay, D.; Fomin, N.; Friend, M.; Frullani, S.; Fuchey, E.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Gu, C.; Gueye, P.; Hamilton, D.; Hanretty, C.; Hansen, J.-O.; Hashemi Shabestari, M.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, M.; Iqbal, S.; Jin, G.; Kalantarians, N.; Kang, H.; Khandaker, M.; LeRose, J.; Leckey, J.; Lindgren, R.; Long, E.; Mammei, J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marti Jimenez-Arguello, A.; Meekins, D.; Meziani, Z.; Michaels, R.; Mihovilovic, M.; Monaghan, P.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Norum, B.; Nuruzzaman, Pan, K.; Phillips, S.; Pomerantz, I.; Posik, M.; Punjabi, V.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Qiu, X.; Rakhman, A.; Reimer, P. E.; Riordan, S.; Ron, G.; Rondon-Aramayo, O.; Saha, A.; Schulte, E.; Selvy, L.; Shahinyan, A.; Sirca, S.; Sjoegren, J.; Slifer, K.; Solvignon, P.; Sparveris, N.; Subedi, R.; Tireman, W.; Wang, D.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Yan, W.; Yaron, I.; Ye, Z.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Z.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, P.; Zielinski, R.; Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    We studied simultaneously the He4(e ,e'p), He4(e ,e'pp), and He4(e ,e'pn) reactions at Q2=2(GeV/c)2 and xB>1, for an (e ,e'p) missing-momentum range of 400 to 830 MeV/c. The knocked-out proton was detected in coincidence with a proton or neutron recoiling almost back to back to the missing momentum, leaving the residual A =2 system at low excitation energy. These data were used to identify two-nucleon short-range correlated pairs and to deduce their isospin structure as a function of missing momentum, in a region where the nucleon-nucleon (NN) force is expected to change from predominantly tensor to repulsive. The abundance of neutron-proton pairs is reduced as the nucleon momentum increases beyond ˜500 MeV/c. The extracted fraction of proton-proton pairs is small and almost independent of the missing momentum. Our data are compared with calculations of two-nucleon momentum distributions in He4 and discussed in the context of probing the elusive repulsive component of the NN force.

  12. Probing the repulsive core of the nucleon-nucleon interaction via the (4)He(e,e'pN) triple-coincidence reaction.

    PubMed

    Korover, I; Muangma, N; Hen, O; Shneor, R; Sulkosky, V; Kelleher, A; Gilad, S; Higinbotham, D W; Piasetzky, E; Watson, J W; Wood, S A; Aguilera, P; Ahmed, Z; Albataineh, H; Allada, K; Anderson, B; Anez, D; Aniol, K; Annand, J; Armstrong, W; Arrington, J; Averett, T; Badman, T; Baghdasaryan, H; Bai, X; Beck, A; Beck, S; Bellini, V; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bittner, J; Boeglin, W; Camsonne, A; Chen, C; Chen, J-P; Chirapatpimol, K; Cisbani, E; Dalton, M M; Daniel, A; Day, D; de Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Deconinck, W; Defurne, M; Flay, D; Fomin, N; Friend, M; Frullani, S; Fuchey, E; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, O; Gu, C; Gueye, P; Hamilton, D; Hanretty, C; Hansen, J-O; Hashemi Shabestari, M; Holmstrom, T; Huang, M; Iqbal, S; Jin, G; Kalantarians, N; Kang, H; Khandaker, M; LeRose, J; Leckey, J; Lindgren, R; Long, E; Mammei, J; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marti Jimenez-Arguello, A; Meekins, D; Meziani, Z; Michaels, R; Mihovilovic, M; Monaghan, P; Munoz Camacho, C; Norum, B; Nuruzzaman; Pan, K; Phillips, S; Pomerantz, I; Posik, M; Punjabi, V; Qian, X; Qiang, Y; Qiu, X; Rakhman, A; Reimer, P E; Riordan, S; Ron, G; Rondon-Aramayo, O; Saha, A; Schulte, E; Selvy, L; Shahinyan, A; Sirca, S; Sjoegren, J; Slifer, K; Solvignon, P; Sparveris, N; Subedi, R; Tireman, W; Wang, D; Weinstein, L B; Wojtsekhowski, B; Yan, W; Yaron, I; Ye, Z; Zhan, X; Zhang, J; Zhang, Y; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z; Zheng, X; Zhu, P; Zielinski, R

    2014-07-11

    We studied simultaneously the (4)He(e,e'p), (4)He(e,e'pp), and (4)He(e,e'pn) reactions at Q(2)=2(GeV/c)(2) and x(B)>1, for an (e,e'p) missing-momentum range of 400 to 830  MeV/c. The knocked-out proton was detected in coincidence with a proton or neutron recoiling almost back to back to the missing momentum, leaving the residual A=2 system at low excitation energy. These data were used to identify two-nucleon short-range correlated pairs and to deduce their isospin structure as a function of missing momentum, in a region where the nucleon-nucleon (NN) force is expected to change from predominantly tensor to repulsive. The abundance of neutron-proton pairs is reduced as the nucleon momentum increases beyond ∼500  MeV/c. The extracted fraction of proton-proton pairs is small and almost independent of the missing momentum. Our data are compared with calculations of two-nucleon momentum distributions in (4)He and discussed in the context of probing the elusive repulsive component of the NN force. PMID:25062168

  13. Study of Quasielastic 1p-shell proton Knockout in the {sup 16}O (e,e'p) reaction at Q{sup 2}=0.8 (GeV/c){sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Juncai Gao

    1999-06-01

    Coincidence cross sections and the structure functions R{sub L+TT}, R{sub T} and R{sub LT} have been obtained for the quasielastic {sup 16}O( e, e'p) reaction with the proton knocked out from the 1p{sub 1/2} and 1p{sub 3/2} states in perpendicular kinematics. The nominal energy transfer {omega} was 439 MeV the nominal Q{sup 2} was 0.8 ( GeV/ c){sup 2} and the kinetic energy of knocked- out proton was 427 MeV. The data was taken in Hall A Je erson Laboratory using two high resolution spectrometers to detect electrons and protons respectively. Nominal beam energies 845 MeV , 1645 MeV and 2445 MeV were employed. For each beam energy, the momentum and angle of electron arm were fixed, while the angle between the proton momentum and the momentum transfer {vector q} was varied to map out the missing momentum. R{sub LT} was separated out to ~350 MeV /c in missing momentum. R{sub L+TT} and R{sub T} were separated out to ~280 MeV/ c in missing momentum. R{sub L} and R{sub T} were separated at a missing momentum of 52.5 MeV/ c for the data taken with hadron arm along {vector q}. The measured cross sections and response functions agree with both relativistic and non relativistic DWIA calculations employing spectroscopic factors between 60-75% for 1 p{sub 1/2} and 1 p{sub 3/2} states. The left- right asymmetry does not support the non -relativistic DWIA calculation using the Weyl gauge. Also the left- right asymmetry measurement favors the relativistic calculation. This thesis describes the details of the experimental setup , the calibration of the spectrometers, the techniques used in the data analysis to derive the fi nal cross sec tions as well as the response functions and the comparison of the results with the theoretical calculations.

  14. The Glyoxal Clock Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ealy, Julie B.; Negron, Alexandra Rodriguez; Stephens, Jessica; Stauffer, Rebecca; Furrow, Stanley D.

    2007-01-01

    Research on the glyoxal clock reaction has led to adaptation of the clock reaction to a general chemistry experiment. This particular reaction is just one of many that used formaldehyde in the past. The kinetics of the glyoxal clock makes the reaction suitable as a general chemistry lab using a Calculator Based Laboratory (CBL) or a LabPro. The…

  15. Practice Gaps: Drug Reactions.

    PubMed

    Wolverton, Stephen E

    2016-07-01

    The term "drug reactions" is relevant to dermatology in three categories of reactions: cutaneous drug reactions without systemic features, cutaneous drug reactions with systemic features, and systemic drugs prescribed by the dermatologist with systematic adverse effects. This article uses examples from each of these categories to illustrate several important principles central to drug reaction diagnosis and management. The information presented will help clinicians attain the highest possible level of certainty before making clinical decisions. PMID:27363888

  16. a Study of the Mechanism of OXYGEN-16-INDUCED Reactions Between 140 and 315 Mev Incident Energies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awes, Terry Clayton

    model, a precompound model, and with a simple knock-out model. The d,t, and (alpha)-particle cross sections are also described using the proton cross sections in terms of a generalized coalescence relation which takes into account Coulomb repulsion from the target nucleus.

  17. Generation of a Novel T Cell Specific Interleukin-1 Receptor Type 1 Conditional Knock Out Mouse Reveals Intrinsic Defects in Survival, Expansion and Cytokine Production of CD4 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mufazalov, Ilgiz A.; Regen, Tommy; Schelmbauer, Carsten; Kuschmann, Janina; Muratova, Alisa M.; Nikolaev, Alexei; Müller, Werner; Pinteaux, Emmanuel; Waisman, Ari

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) plays a crucial role in numerous inflammatory diseases via action on its only known signaling IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1). To investigate the role of IL-1 signaling in selected cell types, we generated a new mouse strain in which exon 5 of the Il1r1 gene is flanked by loxP sites. Crossing of these mice with CD4-Cre transgenic mice resulted in IL-1R1 loss of function specifically in T cells. These mice, termed IL-1R1ΔT, displayed normal development under steady state conditions. Importantly, isolated CD4 positive T cells retained their capacity to differentiate toward Th1 or Th17 cell lineages in vitro, and strongly proliferated in cultures supplemented with either anti-CD3/CD28 or Concanavalin A, but, as predicted, were completely unresponsive to IL-1β administration. Furthermore, IL-1R1ΔT mice were protected from gut inflammation in the anti-CD3 treatment model, due to dramatically reduced frequencies and absolute numbers of IL-17A and interferon (IFN)-γ producing cells. Taken together, our data shows the necessity of intact IL-1 signaling for survival and expansion of CD4 T cells that were developed in an otherwise IL-1 sufficient environment. PMID:27551932

  18. Accumulation of Oxidized LDL in the Tendon Tissues of C57BL/6 or Apolipoprotein E Knock-Out Mice That Consume a High Fat Diet: Potential Impact on Tendon Health

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, Navdeep; Thornton, Gail M.; Behzad, Hayedeh; Sharma, Aishwariya; Lu, Alex; Zhang, Peng; Reid, W. Darlene; Granville, David J.; Scott, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Objective Clinical studies have suggested an association between dyslipidemia and tendon injuries or chronic tendon pain; the mechanisms underlying this association are not yet known. The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate the impact of a high fat diet on the function of load-bearing tendons and on the distribution in tendons of oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL), and (2) to examine the effect of oxLDL on tendon fibroblast proliferation and gene expression. Methods Gene expression (Mmp2, Tgfb1, Col1a1, Col3a1), fat content (Oil Red O staining), oxLDL levels (immunohistochemistry) and tendon biomechanical properties were examined in mice (C57Bl/6 or ApoE -/-) receiving a standard or a high fat diet. Human tendon fibroblast proliferation and gene expression (COL1A1, COL3A1, MMP2) were examined following oxLDL exposure. Results In both types of mice (C57Bl/6 or ApoE -/-), consumption of a high fat diet led to a marked increase in oxLDL deposition in the load-bearing extracellular matrix of the tendon. The consumption of a high fat diet also reduced the failure stress and load of the patellar tendon in both mouse types, and increased Mmp2 expression. ApoE -/- mice exhibited more pronounced reductions in tendon function than wild-type mice, and decreased expression of Col1a1 compared to wild type mice. Human tendon fibroblasts responded to oxLDL by increasing their proliferation and their mRNA levels of MMP2, while decreasing their mRNA levels for COL1A1 and COL3A1. Conclusion The consumption of a high fat diet resulted in deleterious changes in tendon function, and these changes may be explained in part by the effects of oxLDL, which induced a proliferative, matrix-degrading phenotype in human tenocytes. PMID:25502628

  19. Immunization of knock-out α/β interferon receptor mice against lethal bluetongue infection with a BoHV-4-based vector expressing BTV-8 VP2 antigen.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Valentina; Capocefalo, Antonio; Calvo-Pinilla, Eva; Redaelli, Marco; Mucignat-Caretta, Carla; Mertens, Peter; Ortego, Javier; Donofrio, Gaetano

    2011-04-01

    New effective tools for vaccine strategies are necessary to limit the spread of bluetongue, an insect-transmitted viral disease of domestic and wild ruminants. In the present study, BoHV-4-based vector cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) was engineered to express the bluetongue virus (BTV) immune-dominant glycoprotein VP2 provided of a heterologous signal peptide to its amino terminal and a trans-membrane domain to its carboxyl terminal (IgK-VP2gDtm), to allow the VP2 expression targeting to the cell membrane fraction. Based on adult α/β interferon receptor knockout (IFNAR(-/-)) mice, a newly generated bluetongue laboratory animal model, a pre-challenge experiment was performed to test BoHV-4 safety on such immune-compromised animal. BoHV-4 infected IFNAR(-/-) mice did not show clinical signs even following the inoculation of BoHV-4 intra-cerebrally, although many areas of the brain got transduced. IFNAR(-/-) mice intraperitoneally inoculated twice with BoHV-4-A-IgK-VP2gDtm at different time points developed serum neutralizing antibodies against BTV and showed a strongly reduced viremia and a longer survival time when challenged with a lethal dose of BTV-8. The data acquired in this pilot study validate BoHV-4-based vector as a safe and effective heterologous antigen carrier/producer for the formulation of enhanced recombinant immunogens for the vaccination against lethal bluetongue. PMID:21320537

  20. Deep phosphorus fertiliser placement and reduced irrigation methods for rice (Oryza sativa L.) combine to knock-out competition from its nemesis, barnyard grass (Echinochloa crus-galli (L.) P.Beauv)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Productivity of rice is increasingly being constrained by limitations in the quantity, quality, and cost of water and nutrients, and competition from weeds. This is a ‘commentary’ on the recent work of Weerarathne et al. (2015). They reported new discoveries from greenhouse experiments that showed...

  1. The delta 6 desaturase knock out mouse reveals that immunomodulatory effects of essential n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are both independent of and dependent upon conversion.

    PubMed

    Monk, Jennifer M; Liddle, Danyelle M; Cohen, Daniel J A; Tsang, Denis H; Hillyer, Lyn M; Abdelmagid, Salma A; Nakamura, Manabu T; Power, Krista A; Ma, David W L; Robinson, Lindsay E

    2016-06-01

    Typically fatty acids (FA) exert differential immunomodulatory effects with n-3 [α-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)] and n-6 [linoleic acid (LA) and arachidonic acid (AA)] exerting anti- and pro-inflammatory effects, respectively. This over-simplified interpretation is confounded by a failure to account for conversion of the parent FA (LA and ALA) to longer-chain bioactive products (AA and EPA/DHA, respectively), thereby precluding discernment of the immunomodulatory potential of specific FA. Therefore, we utilized the Δ6-desaturase model, wherein knockout mice (D6KO) lack the Fads2 gene encoding for the rate-limiting enzyme that initiates FA metabolism, thereby providing a model to determine specific FA immunomodulatory effects. Wild-type (WT) and D6KO mice were fed one of four isocaloric diets differing in FA source (9weeks): corn oil (LA-enriched), arachidonic acid single cell oil (AA-enriched), flaxseed oil (ALA-enriched) or menhaden fish oil (EPA/DHA-enriched). Splenic mononuclear cell cytokine production in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), T-cell receptor (TCR) and anti-CD40 stimulation was determined. Following LPS stimulation, AA was more bioactive compared to LA, by increasing inflammatory cytokine production of IL-6 (1.2-fold) and TNFα (1.3-fold). Further, LPS-stimulated IFNγ production in LA-fed D6KO mice was reduced 5-fold compared to LA-fed WT mice, indicating that conversion of LA to AA was necessary for cytokine production. Conversely, ALA exerted an independent immunomodulatory effect from EPA/DHA and all n-3 FA increased LPS-stimulated IL-10 production versus LA and AA. These data definitively identify specific immunomodulatory effects of individual FA and challenge the simplified view of the immunomodulatory effects of n-3 and n-6 FA. PMID:27142734

  2. Dynamics of Sun5 Localization during Spermatogenesis in Wild Type and Dpy19l2 Knock-Out Mice Indicates That Sun5 Is Not Involved in Acrosome Attachment to the Nuclear Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Yassine, Sandra; Escoffier, Jessica; Nahed, Roland Abi; Pierre, Virginie; Karaouzene, Thomas; Ray, Pierre F.; Arnoult, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The acrosome is an organelle that is central to sperm physiology and a defective acrosome biogenesis leads to globozoospermia, a severe male infertility. The identification of the actors involved in acrosome biogenesis is therefore particularly important to decipher the molecular pathogeny of globozoospermia. We recently showed that a defect in the DPY19L2 gene is present in more than 70% of globozoospermic men and demonstrated that Dpy19l2, located in the inner nuclear membrane, is the first protein involved in the attachment of the acrosome to the nuclear envelope (NE). SUN proteins serve to link the nuclear envelope to the cytoskeleton and are therefore good candidates to participate in acrosome-nucleus attachment, potentially by interacting with DPY19L2. In order to characterize new actors of acrosomal attachment, we focused on Sun5 (also called Spag4l), which is highly expressed in male germ cells, and investigated its localization during spermatogenesis. Using immunohistochemistry and Western blot experiments in mice, we showed that Sun5 transits through different cellular compartments during meiosis. In pachytene spermatocytes, it is located in a membranous compartment different to the reticulum. In round spermatids, it progresses to the Golgi and the NE before to be located to the tail/head junction in epididymal sperm. Interestingly, we demonstrate that Sun5 is not, as initially reported, facing the acrosome but is in fact excluded from this zone. Moreover, we show that in Dpy19l2 KO spermatids, upon the detachment of the acrosome, Sun5 relocalizes to the totality of the NE suggesting that the acrosome attachment excludes Sun5 from the NE facing the acrosome. Finally, Western-blot experiments demonstrate that Sun5 is glycosylated. Overall, our work, associated with other publications, strongly suggests that the attachment of the acrosome to the nucleus does not likely depend on the formation of SUN complexes. PMID:25775128

  3. Determination of loperamide in mdr1a/1b knock-out mouse brain tissue using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and comparison with quantitative electrospray-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young G; Dong, Teresa; Chou, Bilin; Menghrajani, Kapil

    2011-11-01

    Recently matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) imaging has been used to analyze small molecule pharmaceutical compounds directly on tissue sections to determine spatial distribution within target tissue and organs. The data presented to date usually indicate relative amounts of drug within the tissue. The determination of absolute amounts is still done using tissue homogenization followed by traditional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In this study, the quantitative determination of loperamide, an antidiarrheal agent and a P-glycoprotein substrate, in mdr1a/1b (-/-) mouse brain tissue sections using MALDI MS on a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry is described. 5 mg/mL α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid in 50% acetonitrile with 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid and 0.5 μM reserpine was used as the MALDI matrix. The calibration curve constructed by the peak intensities of standard samples from MALDI MS was linear from 0.025 to 0.5 μM with r² = 0.9989. The accuracy of calibration curve standards was 78.3-105.9% and the percent deviation was less than 25%. Comparison between direct MALDI tissue analysis and conventional tissue analysis using homogenization followed by electrospray LC-MS/MS was also explored. PMID:22139698

  4. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C.; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R.; Phelps, Michael E.; Quake, Stephen R.; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  5. Continuous detonation reaction engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, O. H.; Stein, R. J.; Tubbs, H. E.

    1968-01-01

    Reaction engine operates on the principles of a controlled condensed detonation rather than on the principles of gas expansion. The detonation results in reaction products that are expelled at a much higher velocity.

  6. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  7. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction can be provoked by skin contact with poison plants, chemicals and animal scratches, as well as by ... dust, nuts and shellfish, may also cause allergic reaction. Medications such as penicillin and other antibiotics are ...

  8. Microscale Thermite Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnaiz, Francisco J.; Aguado, Rafael; Arnaiz, Susana

    1998-01-01

    Describes the adaptation of thermite (aluminum with metal oxides) reactions from whole-class demonstrations to student-run micro-reactions. Lists detailed directions and possible variations of the experiment. (WRM)

  9. Reaction coordinates for electron transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rasaiah, Jayendran C.; Zhu Jianjun

    2008-12-07

    The polarization fluctuation and energy gap formulations of the reaction coordinate for outer sphere electron transfer are linearly related to the constant energy constraint Lagrangian multiplier m in Marcus' theory of electron transfer. The quadratic dependence of the free energies of the reactant and product intermediates on m and m+1, respectively, leads to similar dependence of the free energies on the reaction coordinates and to the same dependence of the activation energy on the reorganization energy and the standard reaction free energy. Within the approximations of a continuum model of the solvent and linear response of the longitudinal polarization to the electric field in Marcus' theory, both formulations of the reaction coordinate are expected to lead to the same results.

  10. Catalytic diastereoselective petasis reactions.

    PubMed

    Muncipinto, Giovanni; Moquist, Philip N; Schreiber, Stuart L; Schaus, Scott E

    2011-08-22

    Multicomponent Petasis reactions: the first diastereoselective Petasis reaction catalyzed by chiral biphenols that enables the synthesis of syn and anti β-amino alcohols in pure form has been developed. The reaction exploits a multicomponent approach that involves boronates, α-hydroxy aldehydes, and amines. PMID:21751322

  11. Reaction efficiency effects on binary chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazaridis, Filippos; Savara, Aditya; Argyrakis, Panos

    2014-09-01

    We study the effect of the variation of reaction efficiency in binary reactions. We use the well-known A + B → 0 model, which has been extensively studied in the past. We perform simulations on this model where we vary the efficiency of reaction, i.e., when two particles meet they do not instantly react, as has been assumed in previous studies, but they react with a probability γ, where γ is in the range 0 < γ < 1. Our results show that at small γ values the system is reaction limited, but as γ increases it crosses over to a diffusion limited behavior. At early times, for small γ values, the particle density falls slower than for larger γ values. This fall-off goes over a crossover point, around the value of γ = 0.50 for high initial densities. Under a variety of conditions simulated, we find that the crossover point was dependent on the initial concentration but not on the lattice size. For intermediate and long times simulations, all γ values (in the depleted reciprocal density versus time plot) converge to the same behavior. These theoretical results are useful in models of epidemic reactions and epidemic spreading, where a contagion from one neighbor to the next is not always successful but proceeds with a certain probability, an analogous effect with the reaction probability examined in the current work.

  12. (. pi. sup +- ,. pi. sup +- prime N) reactions on sup 12 C and sup 208 Pb near the giant resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Sung Hoon.

    1990-05-01

    Angular distributions for the {sup 12}C({pi}{sup {plus minus}}, {pi}{sup {plus minus}}{prime} p) and {sup 208}Pb({pi}{sup {plus minus}}, {pi}{sup {plus minus}}{prime} p or n) reactions near the giant resonance region have been measured at T{sub {pi}} = 180 MeV, and found different between {pi}{sup +} and {pi}{sup {minus}} data. This observation is interpreted as evidence for different excitation mechanisms dominating the {pi}{sup {minus}}-nucleus and {pi}{sup +}-nucleus interactions in the giant resonance region of these targets. A comparison with the single-nucleon knock-out distorted-wave impulse approximation calculations shows, even though these calculations underestimate ({pi}{sup {plus minus}}, {pi}{sup {plus minus}}{prime} N) data for both targets, the dominance of direct process for ({pi}{sup +}, {pi}{sup {plus}}{prime} p) or ({pi}{sup {minus}}, {pi}{sup {minus}}{prime} n) in contrast to ({pi}{sup {minus}}, {pi}{sup {minus}}{prime} p) or ({pi}{sup +}, {pi}{sup +}{prime} n). In the ({pi}{sup +}, {pi}{sup +}{prime} p) reaction proton-proton hole states are excited directly and appear to have a large probability for direct decay with escape width, whereas in ({pi}{sup {minus}}, {pi}{sup {minus}}{prime} p) the preferentially excited neutron-neutron hole doorway states couple to resonance states and decay with spreading width. This interpretation led us to suggest that the ratio of cross-sections for inelastic scattering to the giant resonance region should be written in terms of an incoherent sum of cross-sections to neutron and proton doorway states. In a heavy nucleus such as {sup 208}Pb, neutron and proton doorway states. In a heavy nucleus such as {sup 208}Pb, neutron and proton doorway states contribute incoherently because the different decay processes do not populate the same final states of the residual nucleus.

  13. Anaphylactic reactions to cinoxacin.

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, B. H.; Slagboom, G.; Demaeseneer, R.; Slootmaekers, V.; Thijs, I.; Olsson, S.

    1988-01-01

    During 1981 to mid-1988 three cases of anaphylactic shock after treatment with the quinolone derivative cinoxacin were reviewed by the Netherlands Centre for Monitoring of Adverse Reactions to Drugs and 17 cases of an anaphylactic type of reaction notified to the World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre for International Drug Monitoring. In five out of six patients for whom data were available the reaction began shortly after taking a single capsule of a second or next course of treatment. Cinoxacin is related to nalidixic acid, and one patient previously treated with that agent subsequently had an anaphylactoid reaction to cinoxacin and later developed a skin reaction to nalidixic acid. There were no deaths, and patients treated as an emergency with plasma expanders or with adrenaline and corticosteroids generally recovered promptly and uneventfully. In view of the potentially fatal consequences of anaphylactic reactions to cinoxacin and other quinolones doctors should take care when prescribing these drugs. PMID:3147004

  14. Reactions to radiocontrast media.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sandra J; Wong, Johnson T; Bloch, Kurt J

    2002-01-01

    Adverse reactions to radiocontrast media (RCM) occur unexpectedly and may be life-threatening. This article describes an anaphylactoid reaction (AR) in one patient. The term AR refers to a syndrome clinically similar to anaphylaxis, but these reactions are independent of immunoglobulin E antibody-mediated mast cell or basophil degranulation. This article briefly reviews the literature regarding RCMs and types of reactions to RCM. The risk factors for AR to RCM infusions will be discussed along with current concepts of the pathogenesis of RCM-induced ARs. This article also describes the therapeutic management of patients who have had a previous adverse reaction to RCM and provides an approach to patients who have breakthrough reactions despite adequate premedication, but require additional radiographic studies. PMID:12476546

  15. Noncanonical Reactions of Flavoenzymes

    PubMed Central

    Sobrado, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes containing flavin cofactors are predominantly involved in redox reactions in numerous cellular processes where the protein environment modulates the chemical reactivity of the flavin to either transfer one or two electrons. Some flavoenzymes catalyze reactions with no net redox change. In these reactions, the protein environment modulates the reactivity of the flavin to perform novel chemistries. Recent mechanistic and structural data supporting novel flavin functionalities in reactions catalyzed by chorismate synthase, type II isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase, UDP-galactopyranose mutase, and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase are presented in this review. In these enzymes, the flavin plays either a direct role in acid/base reactions or as a nucleophile or electrophile. In addition, the flavin cofactor is proposed to function as a “molecular scaffold” in the formation of UDP-galactofuranose and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate by forming a covalent adduct with reaction intermediates. PMID:23203060

  16. Mechanisms in Knockout Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, D.; Charity, R. J.; de Souza, R. T.; Famiano, M. A.; Gade, A.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Hudan, S.; Lee, J.; Lukyanov, S.; Lynch, W. G.; McDaniel, S.; Mocko, M.; Obertelli, A.; Rogers, A. M.; Sobotka, L. G.; Terry, J. R.; Tostevin, J. A.; Tsang, M. B.; Wallace, M. S.

    2009-06-01

    We report the first detailed study of the relative importance of the stripping and diffraction mechanisms involved in nucleon knockout reactions, by the use of a coincidence measurement of the residue and fast proton following one-proton knockout reactions. The measurements used the S800 spectrograph in combination with the HiRA detector array at the NSCL. Results for the reactions Be9(C9,B8+X)Y and Be9(B8,Be7+X)Y are presented and compared with theoretical predictions for the two reaction mechanisms calculated using the eikonal model. The data show a clear distinction between the stripping and diffraction mechanisms and the measured relative proportions are very well reproduced by the reaction theory. This agreement adds support to the results of knockout reaction analyses and their applications to the spectroscopy of rare isotopes.

  17. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, M. Allen; Beeman, Barton V.; Benett, William J.; Hadley, Dean R.; Landre, Phoebe; Lehew, Stacy L.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  18. Metal-mullite reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Loehman, R.E.; Tomsia, A.P.

    1993-11-01

    Mullite was reacted with pure Al and with Ti or Zr dissolved in Ag-Cu eutectic alloys at 1100 C in Ar. Analysis of the Ti and Zr-containing specimens showed reaction zones with compositions of Ti{sub 50}Cu{sub 3O}O{sub 20} and ZrO{sub 2}, respectively. The Al-mullite specimen showed much more extensive penetration into the ceramic and a more diffuse reaction zone than the other two systems. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Si were the main reaction products for Al-mullite reaction.

  19. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  20. Chemical Reaction Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veal, William

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the role of chemical-equation problem solving in helping students predict reaction products. Methods for helping students learn this process must be taught to students and future teachers by using pedagogical skills within the content of chemistry. Emphasizes that solving chemical reactions should involve creative cognition where…

  1. Applications of Reaction Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an assignment in which students are to research and report on a chemical reaction whose increased or decreased rate is of practical importance. Specifically, students are asked to represent the reaction they have chosen with an acceptable chemical equation, identify a factor that influences its rate and explain how and why it…

  2. REUSABLE REACTION VESSEL

    DOEpatents

    Soine, T.S.

    1963-02-26

    This patent shows a reusable reaction vessel for such high temperature reactions as the reduction of actinide metal chlorides by calcium metal. The vessel consists of an outer metal shell, an inner container of refractory material such as sintered magnesia, and between these, a bed of loose refractory material impregnated with thermally conductive inorganic salts. (AEC)

  3. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Degradations and Rearrangement Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianbo

    This section deals with recent reports concerning degradation and rearrangement reactions of free sugars as well as some glycosides. The transformations are classified in chemical and enzymatic ways. In addition, the Maillard reaction will be discussed as an example of degradation and rearrangement transformation and its application in current research in the fields of chemistry and biology.

  5. Oscillating Reactions: Two Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petruševski, Vladimir M.; Stojanovska, Marina I.; Šoptrajanov, Bojan T.

    2007-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions are truly spectacular phenomena, and demonstrations are always appreciated by the class. However, explaining such reactions to high school or first-year university students is problematic, because it may seem that no acceptable explanation is possible unless the students have profound knowledge of both physical…

  6. Clock Reaction: Outreach Attraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Yuen-ying; Phillips, Heather A.; Jakubinek, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Chemistry students are often introduced to the concept of reaction rates through demonstrations or laboratory activities involving the well-known iodine clock reaction. For example, a laboratory experiment involving thiosulfate as an iodine scavenger is part of the first-year general chemistry laboratory curriculum at Dalhousie University. With…

  7. Chemical burn or reaction

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000059.htm Chemical burn or reaction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chemicals that touch skin can lead to a reaction on the skin, throughout the body, or both. ...

  8. Lipases in lipophilization reactions.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Lipases are used in various sectors, as pharmaceutical, food or detergency industry. Their advantage versus classical chemical catalysts is that they exhibit a better selectivity and operate in milder reaction conditions. Theses enzymes can also be used in lipophilization reactions corresponding to the grafting of a lipophilic moiety to a hydrophilic one such as sugar, amino acids and proteins, or phenolic compounds. The major difficulty to overcome in such enzyme-catalyzed reaction resides in the fact that the two involved substrates greatly differ in term of polarity and solvent affinity. Therefore, several key parameters are to be considered in order to achieve the reaction in satisfactory kinetics and yields. The present review discusses the nature of such parameters (eg solvent nature, water activity, chemical modification of substrates) and illustrates their effect with examples of lipase-catalyzed lipophilization reactions of various sugar, amino acids or phenolic derivatives. PMID:17681737

  9. Enhancing chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of enhancing selected chemical reactions. The population of a selected high vibrational energy state of a reactant molecule is increased substantially above its population at thermal equilibrium by directing onto the molecule a beam of radiant energy from a laser having a combination of frequency and intensity selected to pump the selected energy state, and the reaction is carried out with the temperature, pressure, and concentrations of reactants maintained at a combination of values selected to optimize the reaction in preference to thermal degradation by transforming the absorbed energy into translational motion. The reaction temperature is selected to optimize the reaction. Typically a laser and a frequency doubler emit radiant energy at frequencies of .nu. and 2.nu. into an optical dye within an optical cavity capable of being tuned to a wanted frequency .delta. or a parametric oscillator comprising a non-centrosymmetric crystal having two indices of refraction, to emit radiant energy at the frequencies of .nu., 2.nu., and .delta. (and, with a parametric oscillator, also at 2.nu.-.delta.). Each unwanted frequency is filtered out, and each desired frequency is focused to the desired radiation flux within a reaction chamber and is reflected repeatedly through the chamber while reactants are fed into the chamber and reaction products are removed therefrom.

  10. Reactions of oriented molecules.

    PubMed

    Brooks, P R

    1976-07-01

    Beams of oriented molecules have been used to directly study geometrical requirements in chemical reactions. These studies have shown that reactivity is much greater in some orientations than others and demonstrated the existence of steric effects. For some reactions portions of the orientation results are in good accord with traditional views of steric hindrance, but for others it is clear that our chemical intuition needs recalibrating. Indeed, the information gained from simultaneously orienting the reactants and observing the scattering angle of the products may lead to new insights about the detailed mechanism of certain reactions. Further work must be done to extend the scope and detail of the studies described here. More detailed information is needed on the CH(3)I reaction and the CF(3)I reaction. The effects of alkyl groups of various sizes and alkali metals of various sizes are of interest. In addition, reactions where a long-lived complex is formed should be studied to see if orientation is important. Finally, it would be of interest to apply the technique to the sort of reactions that led to our interest in the first place: the S(N)2 displacements in alkyl halides where the fascinating Walden inversion occurs. PMID:17793988

  11. Mechanisms in knockout reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, D.; Charity, R. J.; de Souza, R. T.; Famiano, M. A.; Gade, A.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Hudan, S.; Lee, J.; Lukyanov, S.; Lynch, W. G.; McDaniel, S.; Mocko, M.; Obertelli, A.; Rogers, A. M.; Sobotka, L. G.; Terry, J. R.; Tostevin, J. A.; Tsang, M. B.; Wallace, M. S.

    2009-10-01

    We report on the first detailed study of the mechanisms involved in knockout reactions, via a coincidence measurement of the residue and fast proton in one-proton knockout reactions, using the S800 spectrograph in combination with the HiRA detector array at the NSCL. Results on the reactions ^9Be(^9C,^8B+X)Y and ^9Be(^8B,^7Be+X)Y are presented. They are compared with theoretical predictions for both the diffraction (elastic breakup) and stripping (inelastic breakup) reaction mechanisms, as calculated in the eikonal model. The data shows a clear distinction between the two reaction mechanisms, and the observed respective proportions are very well reproduced by the reaction theory. This agreement supports the results of knockout reaction analyses and their applications to the spectroscopy of rare isotopes. In particular, this add considerable support to the use of the eikonal model as a quantitative tool, able, for example, to determine single-particle spectroscopic strengths in rare isotopes.

  12. Hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Vatti, Rani R; Ali, Fatima; Teuber, Suzanne; Chang, Christopher; Gershwin, M Eric

    2014-08-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids (CS) are rare in the general population, but they are not uncommon in high-risk groups such as patients who receive repeated doses of CS. Hypersensitivity reactions to steroids are broadly divided into two categories: immediate reactions, typically occurring within 1 h of drug administration, and non-immediate reactions, which manifest more than an hour after drug administration. The latter group is more common. We reviewed the literature using the search terms "hypersensitivity to steroids, adverse effects of steroids, steroid allergy, allergic contact dermatitis, corticosteroid side effects, and type I hypersensitivity" to identify studies or clinical reports of steroid hypersensitivity. We discuss the prevalence, mechanism, presentation, evaluation, and therapeutic options in corticosteroid hypersensitivity reactions. There is a paucity of literature on corticosteroid allergy, with most reports being case reports. Most reports involve non-systemic application of corticosteroids. Steroid hypersensitivity has been associated with type I IgE-mediated allergy including anaphylaxis. The overall prevalence of type I steroid hypersensitivity is estimated to be 0.3-0.5%. Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is the most commonly reported non-immediate hypersensitivity reaction and usually follows topical CS application. Atopic dermatitis and stasis dermatitis of the lower extremities are risk factors for the development of ACD from topical CS. Patients can also develop hypersensitivity reactions to nasal, inhaled, oral, and parenteral CS. A close and detailed evaluation is required for the clinician to confirm the presence of a true hypersensitivity reaction to the suspected drug and choose the safest alternative. Choosing an alternative CS is not only paramount to the patient's safety but also ameliorates the worry of developing an allergic, and potentially fatal, steroid hypersensitivity reaction. This evaluation becomes

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1963-09-01

    A nuclear reactor system is described for breeding fissionable material, including a heat-exchange tank, a high- and a low-pressure chamber therein, heat- exchange tubes connecting these chambers, a solution of U/sup 233/ in heavy water in a reaction container within the tank, a slurry of thorium dioxide in heavy water in a second container surrounding the first container, an inlet conduit including a pump connecting the low pressure chamber to the reaction container, an outlet conduit connecting the high pressure chamber to the reaction container, and means of removing gaseous fission products released in both chambers. (AEC)

  14. Catalysis in reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Gopalkrishnan, Manoj

    2011-12-01

    We define catalytic networks as chemical reaction networks with an essentially catalytic reaction pathway: one which is "on" in the presence of certain catalysts and "off" in their absence. We show that examples of catalytic networks include synthetic DNA molecular circuits that have been shown to perform signal amplification and molecular logic. Recall that a critical siphon is a subset of the species in a chemical reaction network whose absence is forward invariant and stoichiometrically compatible with a positive point. Our main theorem is that all weakly-reversible networks with critical siphons are catalytic. Consequently, we obtain new proofs for the persistence of atomic event-systems of Adleman et al., and normal networks of Gnacadja. We define autocatalytic networks, and conjecture that a weakly-reversible reaction network has critical siphons if and only if it is autocatalytic. PMID:21503834

  15. Chemisorption And Precipitation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transport and bioavailability of chemical components within soils is, in part, controlled by partitioning between solids and solution. General terms used to describe these partitioning reactions include chemisorption and precipitation. Chemisorption is inclusive of the suit...

  16. An Illuminating Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Catherine E.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of carbide lights as an excellent mechanism for introducing or reviewing many basic chemistry concepts including elements and compounds, endothermic and exothermic reactions, physical and chemical changes, and balancing chemical equations. (JRH)

  17. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-03-02

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  18. Iodine Clock Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Richard S.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a combination of solutions that can be used in the study of kinetics using the iodine clock reaction. The combination slows down degradation of the prepared solutions and can be used successfully for several weeks. (JRH)

  19. Untoward penicillin reactions

    PubMed Central

    Guthe, T.; Idsöe, O.; Willcox, R. R.

    1958-01-01

    The literature on untoward reactions following the administration of penicillin is reviewed. These reactions, including a certain number of deaths which have been reported, are of particular interest to health administrations and to WHO in view of the large-scale programmes for controlling the treponematoses which are now under way—programmes affecting millions of people in many parts of the world. The most serious problems are anaphylactic sensitivity phenomena and superinfection or cross-infection with penicillin-resistant organisms, and the reactions involved range in intensity from the mildest to the fatal; the incidence of the latter is estimated at 0.1-0.3 per million injections. The authors point out that with increasing use of penicillin, more persons are likely to become sensitized and the number of reactions can therefore be expected to rise. The best prevention against such an increase is the restriction of the unnecessary use of penicillin. PMID:13596877

  20. Adverse reactions to sulfites

    PubMed Central

    Yang, William H.; Purchase, Emerson C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfites are widely used as preservatives in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In the United States more than 250 cases of sulfite-related adverse reactions, including anaphylactic shock, asthmatic attacks, urticaria and angioedema, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, seizures and death, have been reported, including 6 deaths allegedly associated with restaurant food containing sulfites. In Canada 10 sulfite-related adverse reactions have been documented, and 1 death suspected to be sulfite-related has occurred. The exact mechanism of sulfite-induced reactions is unknown. Practising physicians should be aware of the clinical manifestations of sulfite-related adverse reactions as well as which foods and pharmaceuticals contain sulfites. Cases should be reported to health officials and proper advice given to the victims to prevent further exposure to sulfites. The food industry, including beer and wine manufacturers, and the pharmaceutical industry should consider using alternative preservatives. In the interim, they should list any sulfites in their products. PMID:4052897

  1. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Hearn, Dennis; Jones, Jr., Edward M.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  2. Autocatalysis in reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Abhishek; Gopalkrishnan, Manoj

    2014-10-01

    The persistence conjecture is a long-standing open problem in chemical reaction network theory. It concerns the behavior of solutions to coupled ODE systems that arise from applying mass-action kinetics to a network of chemical reactions. The idea is that if all reactions are reversible in a weak sense, then no species can go extinct. A notion that has been found useful in thinking about persistence is that of "critical siphon." We explore the combinatorics of critical siphons, with a view toward the persistence conjecture. We introduce the notions of "drainable" and "self-replicable" (or autocatalytic) siphons. We show that: Every minimal critical siphon is either drainable or self-replicable; reaction networks without drainable siphons are persistent; and nonautocatalytic weakly reversible networks are persistent. Our results clarify that the difficulties in proving the persistence conjecture are essentially due to competition between drainable and self-replicable siphons. PMID:25245394

  3. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  4. Jets in hadronic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Paige, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Recent experimental data on the properties of jets in hadronic reactions are reviewed and compared with theoretical expectations. Jets are clearly established as the dominant process for high E/sub T/ events in hadronic reactions. The cross section and the other properties of these events are in qualitative and even semiquantitative agreement with expectations based on perturbative QCD. However, we can not yet make precise tests of QCD, primarily because there are substantial uncertainties in the theoretical calculations. 45 references. (WHK)

  5. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions. PMID:25458866

  6. Immediate reaction to clarithromycin.

    PubMed

    Gangemi, S; Ricciardi, L; Fedele, R; Isola, S; Purello-D'Ambrosio, F

    2001-01-01

    We present the case of bronchospastic reaction to clarithromycin had during a drug challenge test. Personal allergic history was negative for respiratory allergies and positive for adverse drug reactions to general and regional anesthesia and to ceftriaxone. After the administration of 1/4 of therapeutic dose of clarithromycin the patient showed dyspnea, cough and bronchospasm in all the lung fields. The positivity of the test was confirmed by the negativity to the administration of placebo. The quickness and the clinical characteristic of the adverse reaction suggest a pathogenic mechanism of immediate-type hypersensitivity. On reviewing the literature we have found no reports of bronchospastic reaction to clarithromycin. Macrolides are a class of antibiotics mainly used in the last years in place of beta-lactams because of a broad spectrum of action and a low allergic power. In fact, there are few reports on allergic reactions to these molecules. Clarithromycin is one of the latest macrolides, characterised by the presence of a 14-carbon-atom lactone ring as erythromycin, active on a wide spectrum of pathogens. PMID:11449533

  7. Find favorable reactions faster

    SciTech Connect

    Yaws, C.L.; Chiang, P.Y. )

    1988-11-01

    Now, equations are given to identify whether the reactions are thermodynamically favorable. The method uses Gibbs free energy of formation for the reactants and products. The equation for any 700 major organic compounds is given as temperature coefficients. Then the reaction can be tested at various temperature levels beyond the standard 298/sup 0/K conditions imposed by many other data tabulations. Data for the water and hydrogen chloride are also included. Gibbs free energy of formation of ideal gas (..delta..G/sub f/, jkoule/g-mol) is calculated from the tabulated coefficients (A, B, C) and the temperature (T, /sup 0/K) using the following equation: (1) ..delta..G/sub f/ = A + BT + CT/sup 2/. Chemical equilibrium for a reaction is associated with the change in Gibbs free energy (..delta..G/sub r/) calculated as follows: (2) ..delta..G/sub r/ = ..delta..G/sub f/, products - ..delta..G/sub f/, reactants. If the change in Gibbs free energy is negative, the thermodynamics for the reaction are favorable. On the other hand, if the change in Gibbs free energy is highly positive, the thermodynamics for the reaction are not favorable and may be feasible only under special circumstances.

  8. Nanoparticle Reactions on Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J. M.; Kirner, Th.; Wagner, J.; Csáki, A.; Möller, R.; Fritzsche, W.

    The handling of heterogenous systems in micro reactors is difficult due to their adhesion and transport behaviour. Therefore, the formation of precipitates and gas bubbles has to be avoided in micro reaction technology, in most cases. But, micro channels and other micro reactors offer interesting possibilities for the control of reaction conditions and transport by diffusion and convection due to the laminar flow caused by small Reynolds numbers. This can be used for the preparation and modification of objects, which are much smaller than the cross section of microchannels. The formation of colloidal solutions and the change of surface states of nano particles are two important tasks for the application of chip reactors in nanoparticle technology. Some concepts for the preparation and reaction of nanoparticles in modular chip reactor arrangements will be discussed.

  9. Hipersensitivity Reactions to Corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Berbegal, L; DeLeon, F J; Silvestre, J F

    2016-03-01

    Corticosteroids are widely used drugs in the clinical practice, especially by topic application in dermatology. These substances may act as allergens and produce immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions. Allergic contact dermatitis is the most frequent presentation of corticosteroid allergy and it should be studied by patch testing in specific units. The corticosteroids included in the Spanish standard battery are good markers but not ideal. Therefore, if those makers are positive, it is useful to apply a specific battery of corticosteroids and the drugs provided by patients. Immediate reactions are relatively rare but potentially severe, and it is important to confirm the sensitization profile and to guide the use of alternative corticosteroids, because they are often necessary in several diseases. In this article we review the main concepts regarding these two types of hypersensitivity reactions in corticosteroid allergy, as well as their approach in the clinical practice. PMID:26621334

  10. Cutaneous reactions to vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, Adena E; Stein, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinations are important for infectious disease prevention; however, there are adverse effects of vaccines, many of which are cutaneous. Some of these reactions are due to nonspecific inflammation and irritation at the injection site, whereas other reactions are directly related to the live attenuated virus. Rarely, vaccinations have been associated with generalized hypersensitivity reactions, such as erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, urticaria, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, and drug hypersensitivity syndrome. The onset of certain inflammatory dermatologic conditions, such as lichen planus, granuloma annulare, and pemphigoid, were reported to occur shortly after vaccine administration. Allergic contact dermatitis can develop at the injection site, typically due to adjuvant ingredients in the vaccine, such as thimerosal and aluminum. Vaccinations are important to promote development of both individual and herd immunity. Although most vaccinations are considered relatively safe, there may be adverse effects associated with any vaccine. Cutaneous manifestations make up a large portion of the types of reactions associated with vaccines. There are many different reasons for the development of a cutaneous reaction to a vaccination. Some are directly related to the injection of a live attenuated virus, such as varicella or vaccinia (for immunity to smallpox), whereas others cause more nonspecific erythema and swelling at the injection site, as a result of local inflammation or irritation. Vaccinations have also been associated in rare reports with generalized hypersensitivity reactions, such as erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, urticaria, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, and drug hypersensitivity syndrome. There have been case reports associating the administration of a vaccine with the new onset of a dermatologic condition, such as lichen planus, granuloma annulare, and Sweet syndrome. Finally, allergic contact

  11. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, P.A.

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  12. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1984-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  13. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1982-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  14. Quinoprotein-catalysed reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, C

    1996-01-01

    This review is concerned with the structure and function of the quinoprotein enzymes, sometimes called quinoenzymes. These have prosthetic groups containing quinones, the name thus being analogous to the flavoproteins containing flavin prosthetic groups. Pyrrolo-quinoline quinone (PQQ) is non-covalently attached, whereas tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ), topaquinone (TPQ) and lysine tyrosylquinone (LTQ) are derived from amino acid residues in the backbone of the enzymes. The mechanisms of the quinoproteins are reviewed and related to their recently determined three-dimensional structures. As expected, the quinone structures in the prosthetic groups play important roles in the mechanisms. A second common feature is the presence of a catalytic base (aspartate) at the active site which initiates the reactions by abstracting a proton from the substrate, and it is likely to be involved in multiple reactions in the mechanism. A third common feature of these enzymes is that the first part of the reaction produces a reduced prosthetic group; this part of the mechanism is fairly well understood. This is followed by an oxidative phase involving electron transfer reactions which remain poorly understood. In both types of dehydrogenase (containing PQQ and TTQ), electrons must pass from the reduced prosthetic group to redox centres in a second recipient protein (or protein domain), whereas in amine oxidases (containing TPQ or LTQ), electrons must be transferred to molecular oxygen by way of a redox-active copper ion in the protein. PMID:9003352

  15. Chain Reaction Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, James E.

    1981-01-01

    The salient features and importance of chain-reaction polymerization are discussed, including such topics as the thermodynamics of polymerization, free-radical polymerization kinetics, radical polymerization processes, copolymers, and free-radical chain, anionic, cationic, coordination, and ring-opening polymerizations. (JN)

  16. Exocharmic Reactions up Close

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramette, R. W.

    2007-01-01

    The exocharmic reactions that can be observed microscopically are discussed. The students can discover the optimal concentration of an acidic lead nitrate solution, so that a crystal of potassium iodide, nudged to the edge of a drop, results in glinting golden hexagons of lead iodide.

  17. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Henderson and Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-04-14

    Chemical reactions at surfaces underlie some of the most important processes of today, including catalysis, energy conversion, microelectronics, human health and the environment. Understanding surface chemical reactions at a fundamental level is at the core of the field of surface science. The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is one of the premiere meetings in the field. The program this year will cover a broad range of topics, including heterogeneous catalysis and surface chemistry, surfaces in environmental chemistry and energy conversion, reactions at the liquid-solid and liquid-gas interface, electronic materials growth and surface modification, biological interfaces, and electrons and photons at surfaces. An exciting program is planned, with contributions from outstanding speakers and discussion leaders from the international scientific community. The conference provides a dynamic environment with ample time for discussion and interaction. Attendees are encouraged to present posters; the poster sessions are historically well attended and stimulate additional discussions. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for junior researchers (e.g. graduate students or postdocs) to present their work and interact with established leaders in the field.

  18. Radiobiology of tissue reactions.

    PubMed

    Dörr, W

    2015-06-01

    Tissue effects of radiation exposure are observed in virtually all normal tissues, with interactions when several organs are involved. Early reactions occur in turnover tissues, where proliferative impairment results in hypoplasia; late reactions, based on combined parenchymal, vascular, and connective tissue changes, result in loss of function within the exposed volume; consequential late effects develop through interactions between early and late effects in the same organ; and very late effects are dominated by vascular sequelae. Invariably, involvement of the immune system is observed. Importantly, latent times of late effects are inversely dependent on the biologically equieffective dose. Each tissue component and--importantly--each individual symptom/endpoint displays a specific dose-effect relationship. Equieffective doses are modulated by exposure conditions: in particular, dose-rate reduction--down to chronic levels--and dose fractionation impact on late responding tissues, while overall exposure time predominantly affects early (and consequential late) reactions. Consequences of partial organ exposure are related to tissue architecture. In 'tubular' organs (gastrointestinal tract, but also vasculature), punctual exposure affects function in downstream compartments. In 'parallel' organs, such as liver or lungs, only exposure of a significant (organ-dependent) fraction of the total volume results in clinical consequences. Forthcoming studies must address biomarkers of the individual risk for tissue reactions, and strategies to prevent/mitigate tissue effects after exposure. PMID:25816259

  19. Reaction and Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armento, Beverly J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Provides a reaction by three economic educators to an article by Raymond C. Miller calling for the elimination of economics. Contends that traditional economics does not necessarily lead to the degradation of the environment. Argues that economics should not promote any set of social values. (CFR)

  20. A Principal's Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaretsky, Lindy

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a principal's reaction to Catherine Marshall and Michael Ward's article on research on social justice and training for leadership. The author applauds Marshall and Ward's efforts to address what is undoubtedly among the most fundamentally important issues facing principals today. Marshall and Ward illuminate the importance of…

  1. Reaction product imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, D.W.

    1993-12-01

    Over the past few years the author has investigated the photochemistry of small molecules using the photofragment imaging technique. Bond energies, spectroscopy of radicals, dissociation dynamics and branching ratios are examples of information obtained by this technique. Along with extending the technique to the study of bimolecular reactions, efforts to make the technique as quantitative as possible have been the focus of the research effort. To this end, the author has measured the bond energy of the C-H bond in acetylene, branching ratios in the dissociation of HI, the energetics of CH{sub 3}Br, CD{sub 3}Br, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Br and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OBr dissociation, and the alignment of the CD{sub 3} fragment from CD{sub 3}I photolysis. In an effort to extend the technique to bimolecular reactions the author has studied the reaction of H with HI and the isotopic exchange reaction between H and D{sub 2}.

  2. Reactions to Others' Intimacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeldt, David E.; Olinger, Evanelle J.

    Research using behavioral measures has indicated that men react less positively to the touch of a same sex individual than women, that both men and women react more positively to the touch of an opposite sex individual than to the touch of a same sex individual, and that men and women do not differ in their reactions to opposite sex touch. This…

  3. Polymerase chain reaction system

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.; Stratton, Paul L.; Hadley, Dean R.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Belgrader, Phil; Meyer, Peter L.

    2004-03-02

    A portable polymerase chain reaction DNA amplification and detection system includes one or more chamber modules. Each module supports a duplex assay of a biological sample. Each module has two parallel interrogation ports with a linear optical system. The system is capable of being handheld.

  4. A Superintendent's Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytle, James H.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a superintendent's reaction to Catherine Marshall and Michael Ward's article on research on social justice and training for leadership. The author states that there is a problem with Marshall and Ward's article which begins with the title, particularly with the word "training." The author contends that there is a significant…

  5. Enantioselective Vinylogous Organocascade Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, Hamish B; Dell'Amico, Luca; Melchiorre, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Cascade reactions are powerful tools for rapidly assembling complex molecular architectures from readily available starting materials in a single synthetic operation. Their marriage with asymmetric organocatalysis has led to the development of novel techniques, which are now recognized as reliable strategies for the one-pot enantioselective synthesis of stereochemically dense molecules. In recent years, even more complex synthetic challenges have been addressed by applying the principle of vinylogy to the realm of organocascade catalysis. The key to the success of vinylogous organocascade reactions is the unique ability of the chiral organocatalyst to transfer reactivity to a distal position without losing control on the stereo-determining events. This approach has greatly expanded the synthetic horizons of the field by providing the possibility of forging multiple stereocenters in remote positions from the catalyst's point of action with high selectivity, while simultaneously constructing multiple new bonds. This article critically describes the developments achieved in the field of enantioselective vinylogous organocascade reactions, charting the ideas, the conceptual advances, and the milestone reactions that have been essential for reaching highly practical levels of synthetic efficiency. PMID:27256039

  6. Reaction Formulation: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Reaction formation was studied by Sigmund Freud. This defense mechanism may be related to repression, substitution, reversal, and compensation (or over-compensation). Alfred Adler considered compensation a basic process in his individual psychology. Anna Freud discussed some defense mechanisms, and Bibring, Dwyer, Huntington, and Valenstein…

  7. Azlactone Reaction Developments.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Pedro P; Carpanez, Arthur G; Amarante, Giovanni W

    2016-07-18

    Azlactones (also known as oxazolones) are heterocycles usually employed in the stereoselective synthesis of α,α-amino acids, heterocycles and natural products. The versatility of the azlactone scaffold arises from the numerous reactive sites, allowing its application in a diversity of transformations. This review aims to cover classical and recent applications of oxazolones, especially those involving stereoselective processes. After a short introduction on their structures and intrinsic reactivities, dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) processes as well as reactions involving stereoselective formation of a new σ C-C bond, such as alkylation/allylation/arylation, aldol, ene, Michael and Mannich reactions will be exposed. Additionally, cycloadditions, Steglich rearrangement and sulfenylation reactions will also be discussed. Recent developments of the well-known Erlenmeyer azlactones will be described. For the most examples, the proposed mechanism, activation modes and/or key reaction intermediates will be exposed to rationalize both the final product and the observed stereochemistry. Finally, this review gives an overview of the synthetic utility of oxazolones. PMID:27245128

  8. Photoneutron reactions in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Varlamov, V. V. Ishkhanov, B. S.; Orlin, V. N.; Peskov, N. N.; Stopani, K. A.

    2014-12-15

    Among key problems in nuclear astrophysics, that of obtaining deeper insight into the mechanism of synthesis of chemical elements is of paramount importance. The majority of heavy elements existing in nature are produced in stars via radiative neutron capture in so-called s- and r processes, which are, respectively, slow and fast, in relation to competing β{sup −}-decay processes. At the same time, we know 35 neutron-deficient so-called bypassed p-nuclei that lie between {sup 74}Se and {sup 196}Hg and which cannot originate from the aforementioned s- and r-processes. Their production is possible in (γ, n), (γ, p), or (γ, α) photonuclear reactions. In view of this, data on photoneutron reactions play an important role in predicting and describing processes leading to the production of p-nuclei. Interest in determining cross sections for photoneutron reactions in the threshold energy region, which is of particular importance for astrophysics, has grown substantially in recent years. The use of modern sources of quasimonoenergetic photons obtained in processes of inverse Compton laser-radiation scattering on relativistic electronsmakes it possible to reveal rather interesting special features of respective cross sections, manifestations of pygmy E1 and M1 resonances, or the production of nuclei in isomeric states, on one hand, and to revisit the problem of systematic discrepancies between data on reaction cross sections from experiments of different types, on the other hand. Data obtained on the basis of our new experimental-theoretical approach to evaluating cross sections for partial photoneutron reactions are invoked in considering these problems.

  9. Water-gas shift reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    A review covers the industrial applications of the water-gas shift reaction in hydrogen manufacturing, removing CO from ammonia synthesis feeds, and detoxifying town gas; and the catalyst characteristics, reaction kinetics, and reaction mechanisms of the water-gas shift reactions catalyzed by iron-based, copper-based, or sulfided cobalt-molybdenum catalysts.

  10. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms. Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Provides a collection of data on the mechanistic aspects of inorganic chemical reactions. Wherever possible includes procedures for classroom demonstration or student project work. The material covered includes gas phase reactions, reactions in solution, mechanisms of electron transfer, the reaction between iron III and iodine, and hydrolysis. (GS)

  11. What Is a Reaction Rate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitz, Guy

    2005-01-01

    The definition of reaction rate is derived and demonstrations are made for the care to be taken while using the term. Reaction rate can be in terms of a reaction property, the extent of reaction and thus it is possible to give a definition applicable in open and closed systems.

  12. Dearomatization through Halofunctionalization Reactions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao-Wei; Zheng, Chao; You, Shu-Li

    2016-08-16

    Recent advances in dearomatization through halofunctionalization reactions are summarized in this Minireview. Two general categories of strategies are currently employed in this field. On one hand, the reaction can be initiated with electrophilic halogenation at an alkyne or alkene moiety. The resulting halonium ion intermediate is then captured by a pendant aromatic ring at the ipso position, affording the dearomatization product. On the other hand, electrophilic halogenation can directly take place at a substituted arene, and the final dearomatization product is furnished by deprotonation or intramolecular nucleophilic trap. Highly enantioselective variants have been realized in the latter case by organocatalysis or transition metal catalysis. By applying these methods, various valuable halogenated polycyclic molecular architectures have been obtained from readily available starting materials. PMID:27377184

  13. Reaction chemistry of cerium

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    It is truly ironic that a synthetic organic chemist likely has far greater knowledge of the reaction chemistry of cerium(IV) than an inorganic colleague. Cerium(IV) reagents have long since been employed as oxidants in effecting a wide variety of organic transformations. Conversely, prior to the late 1980s, the number of well characterized cerium(IV) complexes did not extend past a handful of known species. Though in many other areas, interest in the molecular chemistry of the 4f-elements has undergone an explosive growth over the last twenty years, the chemistry of cerium(IV) has for the most part been overlooked. This report describes reactions of cerium complexes and structure.

  14. Magnetically suspended reaction wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabnis, A. V.; Stocking, G. L.; Dendy, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    Magnetic suspensions offer several advantages over conventional bearings, arising because of the contactless nature of the load support. In application to spacecraft reaction wheels, the advantages are low drag torque, wearfree, unlubricated, vacuum-compatible operation, and unlimited life. By the provision of redundancy in the control electronics, single-point failures are eliminated. The rational for selection of a passive radial, active axial, dc magnetic suspension is presented, and the relative merits of 3-loop and single-loop magnetic suspensions are discussed. The design of a .678 N-m-sec (.5 ft-lb-sec) reaction wheel using the single loop magnetic suspension was developed; the design compares favorably with current ball bearing wheels in terms of weight and power.

  15. Polymerase chain displacement reaction.

    PubMed

    Harris, Claire L; Sanchez-Vargas, Irma J; Olson, Ken E; Alphey, Luke; Fu, Guoliang

    2013-02-01

    Quantitative PCR assays are now the standard method for viral diagnostics. These assays must be specific, as well as sensitive, to detect the potentially low starting copy number of viral genomic material. We describe a new technique, polymerase chain displacement reaction (PCDR), which uses multiple nested primers in a rapid, capped, one-tube reaction that increases the sensitivity of normal quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays. Sensitivity was increased by approximately 10-fold in a proof-of-principle test on dengue virus sequence. In PCDR, when extension occurs from the outer primer, it displaces the extension strand produced from the inner primer by utilizing a polymerase that has strand displacement activity. This allows a greater than 2-fold increase of amplification product for each amplification cycle and therefore increased sensitivity and speed over conventional PCR. Increased sensitivity in PCDR would be useful in nucleic acid detection for viral diagnostics. PMID:23384180

  16. Photochemical reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.C.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the program is to develop a fundamental understanding of unimolecular and bimolecular reaction dynamics with application in combustion and energy systems. The energy dependence in ketene isomerization, ketene dissociation dynamics, and carbonyl substitution on organometallic rhodium complexes in liquid xenon have been studied. Future studies concerning unimolecular processes in ketene as well as energy transfer and kinetic studies of methylene radicals are discussed.

  17. Nonhemolytic, noninfectious transfusion reactions.

    PubMed

    Barton, J C

    1981-04-01

    The delivery of optimal transfusion therapy requires that the physician first have a thorough understanding of his patient's disease and prior transfusion history. Sometimes the need for blood product administration is more apparent than real. In the selection of necessary therapy, particular blood components, their volumes, and the timing of their administration should be carefully planned. The transfusion of whole blood, particularly as single-unit transfusions, is rarely indicated. Often forgotten, autotransfusion represents a means whereby many subjects who have repeated, unusual, or severe reactions may receive safe treatment. An appreciation of the frequency and manifestations of transfusion-related problems permits effective treatment of ongoing reactions. The prophylactic measures which should be taken against future reactions in most patients are specific, and are the responsibility of the clinician, based upon his bedside observations and laboratory studies. Problems should be discussed with either a hematologist, pathologist, or blood banking expert without hesitation. These guidelines help conserve a precious resource and assure that safe, effective, and economical transfusion therapy is available for all patients in need. PMID:6164098

  18. On-surface reactions.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Robert; Kühnle, Angelika

    2015-06-01

    On-surface synthesis constitutes a rapidly growing field of research due to its promising application for creating stable molecular structures on surfaces. While self-assembled structures rely on reversible interactions, on-surface synthesis provides the potential for creating long-term stable structures with well-controlled properties, for example superior electron transport for future molecular electronic devices. On-surface synthesis holds the promise for preparing insoluble compounds that cannot be produced in solution. Another highly exciting aspect of on-surface synthesis is the chance to discover new reaction pathways due to the two-dimensional confinement of the reaction educts. In this review, we discuss the current state-of-the-art and classify the reactions that have been successfully performed so far. Special emphasis is put on electrically insulating surfaces, as these substrates pose particular challenges for on-surface synthesis while at the same time bearing high potential for future use, for example, in molecular electronics. PMID:25965579

  19. ADVERSE CUTANEOUS DRUG REACTION

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR. PMID:19967009

  20. Chemical Reactions in DSMC

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, G. A.

    2011-05-20

    DSMC simulations of chemically reacting gas flows have generally employed procedures that convert the macroscopic chemical rate equations to reaction cross-sections at the microscopic level. They therefore depend on the availability of experimental data that has been fitted to equations of the Arrhenius form. This paper presents a physical model for dissociation and recombination reactions and a phenomenological model for exchange and chain reactions. These are based on the vibrational states of the colliding molecules and do not require any experimentally-based data. The simplicity of the models allows the corresponding rate equations to be written down and, while these are not required for the implementation of the models, they facilitate their validation. The model is applied to a typical hypersonic atmospheric entry problem and the results are compared with the corresponding results from the traditional method. It is also used to investigate both spontaneous and forced ignition as well as the structure of a deflagration wave in an oxygen-hydrogen mixture.

  1. Chemical Reactions in DSMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, G. A.

    2011-05-01

    DSMC simulations of chemically reacting gas flows have generally employed procedures that convert the macroscopic chemical rate equations to reaction cross-sections at the microscopic level. They therefore depend on the availability of experimental data that has been fitted to equations of the Arrhenius form. This paper presents a physical model for dissociation and recombination reactions and a phenomenological model for exchange and chain reactions. These are based on the vibrational states of the colliding molecules and do not require any experimentally-based data. The simplicity of the models allows the corresponding rate equations to be written down and, while these are not required for the implementation of the models, they facilitate their validation. The model is applied to a typical hypersonic atmospheric entry problem and the results are compared with the corresponding results from the traditional method. It is also used to investigate both spontaneous and forced ignition as well as the structure of a deflagration wave in an oxygen-hydrogen mixture.

  2. Procedures for Decomposing a Redox Reaction into Half-Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishtik, Ilie; Berka, Ladislav H.

    2005-01-01

    A simple algorithm for a complete enumeration of the possible ways a redox reaction (RR) might be uniquely decomposed into half-reactions (HRs) using the response reactions (RERs) formalism is presented. A complete enumeration of the possible ways a RR may be decomposed into HRs is equivalent to a complete enumeration of stoichiometrically…

  3. Reaction Extrema: Extent of Reaction in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandezande, Jonathon E.; Vander Griend, Douglas A.; DeKock, Roger L.

    2013-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago de Donder introduced the term "extent of reaction", ?. We build on that work by defining the concept of reagent extrema for an arbitrary chemical reaction, aA + bB [reversible reaction] yY + zZ. The central equation is ?^[subscript i] = -n[subscript i,0]/?[subscript i]. The symbol ?^[subscript i] represents the…

  4. Insect bite reactions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjay; Mann, Baldeep Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Insects are a class of living creatures within the arthropods. Insect bite reactions are commonly seen in clinical practice. The present review touches upon the medically important insects and their places in the classification, the sparse literature on the epidemiology of insect bites in India, and different variables influencing the susceptibility of an individual to insect bites. Clinical features of mosquito bites, hypersensitivity to mosquito bites Epstein-Barr virus NK (HMB-EBV-NK) disease, eruptive pseudoangiomatosis, Skeeter syndrome, papular pruritic eruption of HIV/AIDS, and clinical features produced by bed bugs, Mexican chicken bugs, assassin bugs, kissing bugs, fleas, black flies, Blandford flies, louse flies, tsetse flies, midges, and thrips are discussed. Brief account is presented of the immunogenic components of mosquito and bed bug saliva. Papular urticaria is discussed including its epidemiology, the 5 stages of skin reaction, the SCRATCH principle as an aid in diagnosis, and the recent evidence supporting participation of types I, III, and IV hypersensitivity reactions in its causation is summarized. Recent developments in the treatment of pediculosis capitis including spinosad 0.9% suspension, benzyl alcohol 5% lotion, dimethicone 4% lotion, isopropyl myristate 50% rinse, and other suffocants are discussed within the context of evidence derived from randomized controlled trials and key findings of a recent systematic review. We also touch upon a non-chemical treatment of head lice and the ineffectiveness of egg-loosening products. Knockdown resistance (kdr) as the genetic mechanism making the lice nerves insensitive to permethrin is discussed along with the surprising contrary clinical evidence from Europe about efficacy of permethrin in children with head lice carrying kdr-like gene. The review also presents a brief account of insects as vectors of diseases and ends with discussion of prevention of insect bites and some serious adverse effects

  5. Copper mediated carbometalation reactions.

    PubMed

    Müller, D S; Marek, I

    2016-08-01

    Since the first discovery of carbocupration of alkynes in the 1970s a tremendous amount of research has been carried out in this field. The exceptionally high selectivities obtained attribute to the great synthetic value of carbocupration reactions. This tutorial review will present the most important features of carbocupration of alkynes and highlight the most relevant reviews. Then a comprehensive review of copper mediated carbometalation of cyclopropenes will follow. The latter method has received much attention over the last decade as it allows the highly selective construction of poly-substituted cyclopropanes which can be transformed into acyclic derivatives bearing one or multiple tertiary or quaternary carbon stereocenters. PMID:26808300

  6. Electronegativity and redox reactions.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Quintana, Ramón Alain; Martínez González, Marco; Ayers, Paul W

    2016-08-10

    Using the maximum hardness principle, we show that the oxidation potential of a molecule increases as its electronegativity increases and also increases as its electronegativity in its oxidized state increases. This insight can be used to construct a linear free energy relation for the oxidation potential, which we train on a set of 31 organic redox couples and test on a set of 10 different redox reactions. Better results are obtained when the electronegativity of the oxidized/reduced reagents are adjusted to account for the reagents' interaction with their chemical environment. PMID:27451962

  7. Organic chemistry: Reactions triggered electrically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Limin; Tao, N. J.

    2016-03-01

    Single-molecule experiments have revealed that chemical reactions can be controlled using electric fields -- and that the reaction rate is sensitive to both the direction and the strength of the applied field. See Letter p.88

  8. Positive reaction to allergen (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  9. Hydrazine decomposition and other reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Warren E. (Inventor); La France, Donald S. (Inventor); Voge, Hervey H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to the catalytic decomposition of hydrazine, catalysts useful for this decomposition and other reactions, and to reactions in hydrogen atmospheres generally using carbon-containing catalysts.

  10. Demonstration of the Fenton Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luehrs, Dean C.; Roher, Alex E.

    2007-01-01

    The study demonstrates the Fenton reaction, which is carried out using the Fenton reagent that is used for groundwater and soil remediation. The Fenton reaction can be implicated in DNA damage, Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular disease and ageing in general.

  11. Allergic reactions to medication (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A true allergy to a medication is different than a simple adverse reaction to the drug. The allergic reaction occurs when the immune system, having been exposed to the drug before, creates antibodies to ...

  12. ''Subthreshold'' reactions involving nuclear fission

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, M.; Shrock, R.

    2001-02-01

    We analyze reactions of several types that are naively below threshold but can proceed because of the release of binding energy from nuclear fission and occasionally the formation of Coulombic bound states. These reactions include (i) photofission with pion production and (ii) charged current neutrino-nucleus reactions that lead to fission and/or formation of a Coulomb bound state of a {mu}{sup -} with the nucleus of a fission fragment. We comment on the possible experimental observation of these reactions.

  13. The Vitamin C Clock Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Stephen W.

    2002-01-01

    An iodine clock reaction that gives a colorless to black result similar to that of the familiar Landolt iodate-bisulfite clock reaction is described. The vitamin C clock reaction uses chemicals that are readily available on the retail market: vitamin C, tincture of iodine, 3% hydrogen peroxide, and laundry starch. Orange juice may be used as the vitamin C source to give an orange to black reaction.

  14. More on Chemical Reaction Balancing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinehart, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    A previous article stated that only the matrix method was powerful enough to balance a particular chemical equation. Shows how this equation can be balanced without using the matrix method. The approach taken involves writing partial mathematical reactions and redox half-reactions, and combining them to yield the final balanced reaction. (JN)

  15. The Vitamin C Clock Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Stephen W.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an iodine clock reaction that produces an effect similar to the Landolt clock reaction. This reaction uses supermarket chemicals and avoids iodate, bisulfite, and mercury compounds. Ascorbic acid and tincture of iodine are the main reactants with alternate procedures provided for vitamin C tablets and orange juice. (DDR)

  16. Development of detonation reaction engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, O. H.; Stein, R. J.; Tubbs, H. E.

    1968-01-01

    Reaction engine operates on the principle of a controlled condensed detonation. In this engine the gas products that are expelled from the engine to produce thrust are generated by the condensed detonation reaction. The engine is constructed of two basic sections consisting of a detonation wave generator section and a condensed detonation reaction section.

  17. Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoursey, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the organization of a graduate course dealing with mass transfer, particularly as it relates to chemical reactions. Discusses the course outline, including mathematics models of mass transfer, enhancement of mass transfer rates by homogeneous chemical reaction, and gas-liquid systems with chemical reaction. (TW)

  18. Hydrocracking reactions and catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbear, G.E.

    1995-12-31

    Hydrocracking processes convert aromatic gas oils into high quality gasoline, diesel, and turbine stocks. In doing this, they saturate aromatic rings, crack naphthenes and paraffins, and saturate olefins formed during cracking. The organic chemistry of these steps is well known. Catalysts for hydrocracking contain components for both the hydrogenation and cracking reactions. Hydrogenation activity is provided by Pd or promoted molybdenum or tungsten sulfides. Cracking takes place on strong acid sites in zeolites or amorphous silica aluminas. Specialty catalysts including narrow pore zeolites are used in dewaxing tube oil stocks. Basic nitrogen compounds such as quinoline can poison the acid sites. They are usually removed in a pretreating step, typically with a nickel/molybdenum sulfide catalyst that also removes sulfur.

  19. Laser induced nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ledingham, Ken; McCanny, Tom; Graham, Paul; Fang Xiao; Singhal, Ravi; Magill, Joe; Creswell, Alan; Sanderson, David; Allott, Ric; Neely, David; Norreys, Peter; Santala, Marko; Zepf, Matthew; Watts, Ian; Clark, Eugene; Krushelnick, Karl; Tatarakis, Michael; Dangor, Bucker; Machecek, Antonin; Wark, Justin

    1998-12-16

    Dramatic improvements in laser technology since 1984 have revolutionised high power laser technology. Application of chirped-pulse amplification techniques has resulted in laser intensities in excess of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. In the mid to late eighties, C. K. Rhodes and K. Boyer discussed the possibility of shining laser light of this intensity onto solid surfaces and to cause nuclear transitions. In particular, irradiation of a uranium target could induce electro- and photofission in the focal region of the laser. In this paper it is shown that {mu}Ci of {sup 62}Cu can be generated via the ({gamma},n) reaction by a laser with an intensity of about 10{sup 19} Wcm{sup -2}.

  20. ISMP Adverse Drug Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this feature is to heighten awareness of specific adverse drug reactions (ADRs), discuss methods of prevention, and promote reporting of ADRs to the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) MedWatch program (800-FDA-1088). If you have reported an interesting, preventable ADR to MedWatch, please consider sharing the account with our readers. Write to Dr. Mancano at ISMP, 200 Lakeside Drive, Suite 200, Horsham, PA 19044 (phone: 215-707-4936; e-mail: mmancano@temple.edu). Your report will be published anonymously unless otherwise requested. This feature is provided by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) in cooperation with the FDA’s MedWatch program and Temple University School of Pharmacy. ISMP is an FDA MedWatch partner. PMID:24421544

  1. Prebiotic photosynthetic reactions.

    PubMed

    Chittenden, G J; Schwartz, A W

    1981-01-01

    Historically, numerous attempts have been made to mimic - by means of inorganic model reactions - the photosynthetic fixation of CO2 by green plants. The literature in this field is strewn with claims and counter-claims. Two factors have led us to reexamine this subject: firstly; doubts concerning the highly reducing model for the atmosphere of the primitive Earth and secondly; recent results which demonstrate that photoreductive fixation is feasable on a suitable catalytic surface, for both CO2 and N2. The latter observation is of particular interest due to the well-known susceptibility of NH3 to photolytic destruction. Our review of the literature leads us to suggest that similar processes would have been plausible for the primitive Earth and could have been prebiotic precursors to an early development of CO2-fixing autotrophs. PMID:6791723

  2. Subdiffusion-reaction processes with A→B reactions versus subdiffusion-reaction processes with A+B→B reactions.

    PubMed

    Kosztołowicz, Tadeusz; Lewandowska, Katarzyna D

    2014-09-01

    We consider the subdiffusion-reaction process with reactions of a type A+B→B (in which particles A are assumed to be mobile, whereas B are assumed to be static) in comparison to the subdiffusion-reaction process with A→B reactions which was studied by Sokolov, Schmidt, and Sagués [Phys. Rev. E 73, 031102 (2006)]. In both processes a rule that reactions can only occur between particles which continue to exist is taken into account. Although in both processes a probability of the vanishing of particle A due to a reaction is independent of both time and space variables (assuming that in the system with the A+B→B reactions, particles B are distributed homogeneously), we show that subdiffusion-reaction equations describing these processes as well as their Green's functions are qualitatively different. The reason for this difference is as follows. In the case of the former reaction, particles A and B have to meet with some probability before the reaction occurs in contradiction with the case of the latter reaction. For the subdiffusion process with the A+B→B reactions we consider three models which differ in some details concerning a description of the reactions. We base the method considered in this paper on a random walk model in a system with both discrete time and discrete space variables. Then the system with discrete variables is transformed into a system with both continuous time and continuous space variables. Such a method seems to be convenient in analyzing subdiffusion-reaction processes with partially absorbing or partially reflecting walls. The reason is that within this method we can determine Green's functions without a necessity of solving a fractional differential subdiffusion-reaction equation with boundary conditions at the walls. As an example, we use the model to find the Green's functions for a subdiffusive reaction system (with the reactions mentioned above), which is bounded by a partially absorbing wall. This example shows how the model

  3. Nuclear Reactions on Unstable Nuclei and the Surrogate Reaction Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J

    2004-03-01

    Determining reaction cross sections on short-lived nuclear species is a major challenge for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics. Many of these nuclei are too difficult to produce with currently available experimental techniques or too short-lived to serve as targets in present-day set-ups. Some nuclear reactions will remain immeasurable even at upcoming and planned radioactive beam facilities. It is therefore important to explore alternative methods for determining reaction cross sections on unstable nuclei.

  4. Communication: Resonance reaction in diffusion-influenced bimolecular reactions.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Jakob J; Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2016-02-28

    We investigate the influence of a stochastically fluctuating step-barrier potential on bimolecular reaction rates by exact analytical theory and stochastic simulations. We demonstrate that the system exhibits a new "resonant reaction" behavior with rate enhancement if an appropriately defined fluctuation decay length is of the order of the system size. Importantly, we find that in the proximity of resonance, the standard reciprocal additivity law for diffusion and surface reaction rates is violated due to the dynamical coupling of multiple kinetic processes. Together, these findings may have important repercussions on the correct interpretation of various kinetic reaction problems in complex systems, as, e.g., in biomolecular association or catalysis. PMID:26931674

  5. Communication: Resonance reaction in diffusion-influenced bimolecular reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Jakob J.; Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the influence of a stochastically fluctuating step-barrier potential on bimolecular reaction rates by exact analytical theory and stochastic simulations. We demonstrate that the system exhibits a new "resonant reaction" behavior with rate enhancement if an appropriately defined fluctuation decay length is of the order of the system size. Importantly, we find that in the proximity of resonance, the standard reciprocal additivity law for diffusion and surface reaction rates is violated due to the dynamical coupling of multiple kinetic processes. Together, these findings may have important repercussions on the correct interpretation of various kinetic reaction problems in complex systems, as, e.g., in biomolecular association or catalysis.

  6. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is described. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 C and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  7. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  8. Reactions at Oxygen Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Ana M.

    Synthetic protocols based on carbohydrates require the differentiation of their abundant hydroxyl groups, by and large, in order to expose just one single hydroxyl group to the selected reagent. This differentiation is usually carried out with the assistance of protecting groups that block the rest of the hydroxyl groups while being compatible with the given reaction conditions. By corollary, the knowledge and apt choice of the appropriate protecting groups is a key factor in successful synthetic endeavors. In this chapter, an overview of the most commonly employed protecting groups in carbohydrate chemistry is given. Alkyl ethers, being robust protecting groups, have a long history in synthetic carbohydrate chemistry and in related structural studies of polysaccharides. Acetals and ketals, which are of fundamental importance in carbohydrate chemistry, are then discussed. Acyl and silyl protecting groups, which also play an important role in modern monosaccharide transformations, are also presented. Finally, recent blocking strategies are described, including orthogonal strategies, by which the protecting groups are harmoniously combined in modern carbohydrate chemistry.

  9. Formaldehyde reactions in dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, A. D.; Anicich, V. G.; Federman, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    The low-pressure reactions of formaldehyde (H2CO) with D(+), D2(+), D3(+), and He(+) are studied by the ion-cyclotron resonance technique. These reactions are potential loss processes for formaldehyde in cores of dark interstellar clouds. The deuterated reactants represent direct analogs for protons. Rate coefficients and branching ratios of product channels have been measured. Charge transfer is observed to be the dominant reaction of H2CO with D(+), D2(+), and He(+) ions. Only the D3(+) reaction exhibits a proton-transfer channel. All reactions proceed at rate coefficients near the collision limit. Proton-deuteron exchange reactions are found to be inefficient processes in the formaldehyde system.

  10. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data.

    PubMed

    Dönertaş, Handan Melike; Martínez Cuesta, Sergio; Rahman, Syed Asad; Thornton, Janet M

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC) number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG). Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution. PMID:26840640

  11. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Syed Asad; Thornton, Janet M.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC) number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG). Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution. PMID:26840640

  12. Speeding chemical reactions by focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasta, A. M.; Ramírez-Piscina, L.; Sancho, J. M.; Lindenberg, K.

    2013-04-01

    We present numerical results for a chemical reaction of colloidal particles which are transported by a laminar fluid and are focused by periodic obstacles in such a way that the two components are well mixed and consequently the chemical reaction is speeded up. The roles of the various system parameters (diffusion coefficients, reaction rate, and obstacles sizes) are studied. We show that focusing speeds up the reaction from the diffusion limited rate ˜t-1/2 to very close to the perfect mixing rate, ˜t-1.

  13. Anaphylactoid reactions to radiocontrast media.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Sachiko T

    2005-01-01

    Adverse reactions to contrast material are a concern because iodinated contrast materials are commonly used drugs. The risk for adverse reaction is 4% to 12% with ionic contrast materials and 1% to 3% with nonionic contrast materials. The risk for severe adverse reaction is 0.16% with ionic contrast materials and 0.03% with nonionic contrast materials. The death rate, one to three per 100,000 contrast administrations, is similar for both ionic and nonionic agents. More than 90% of adverse reactions with nonionic contrast materials are anaphylactoid. The types of severe reactions seen with nonionic contrast administration were initially predominantly anaphylactoid. With the advent of helical CT angiography, the reactions are now predominantly attributable to cardiopulmonary decompensation. With the widespread use of nonionic contrast materials, adverse reactions are now seen less frequently. Skills involved in evaluating and treating adverse reactions are not as frequently used. Periodic reviews and updates of specific treatment plans for various reactions with the physicians and staff who use contrast material are very important to ensure optimal preparedness. The key to successful treatment is preparation and early intervention. PMID:15659260

  14. Dearomatization Reactions Using Phthaloyl Peroxide.

    PubMed

    Eliasen, Anders M; Christy, Mitchell; Claussen, Karin R; Besandre, Ronald; Thedford, Randal P; Siegel, Dionicio

    2015-09-18

    A new oxidative dearomatization reaction has been developed using phthaloyl peroxide to chemoselectively install two oxygen-carbon bonds into aromatic precursors. The oxidation reaction proceeds only once; addition of superstoichiometric equivalents of phthaloyl peroxide does not react further with the newly generated 1,3-cyclohexadiene. The reaction has been challenged by the addition of different functional groups and shown to maintain chemoselectivity. Due to the broad reactivity with 1,2-methylenedioxybenzene derivatives, linear free energy correlations were determined and support a mechanism proceeding through diradicals analogous to arene-hydroxylation reactions using phthaloyl peroxide. PMID:26333308

  15. (Reaction mechanism studies of heavy ion induced nuclear reactions)

    SciTech Connect

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following research projects; decay of excited nuclei formed in La-induced reactions at E/A = 45 MeV; mass and charge distributions in Cl-induced heavy ion reactions; and mass and charge distributions in {sup 56}Fe + {sup 165}Ho at E/A = 12 MeV.

  16. Dynamic Reaction Figures: An Integrative Vehicle for Understanding Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-01-01

    A highly flexible learning tool, referred to as a dynamic reaction figure, is described. Application of these figures can (i) yield the correct chemical equation by simply following a set of menu driven directions; (ii) present the underlying "mechanism" in chemical reactions; and (iii) help to solve quantitative problems in a number of different…

  17. Entropy Effects in Chelation Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Chung-Sun

    1984-01-01

    The entropy change for a reaction in aqueous solution can be evaluated as a combination of entropy factors. Valuable insight or understanding can be obtained from a detailed examination of these factors. Several entropy effects of inorganic chemical reactions are discussed as examples. (Author/JN)

  18. Free Radical Reactions in Food.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Irwin A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses reactions of free radicals that determine the chemistry of many fresh, processed, and stored foods. Focuses on reactions involving ascorbic acid, myoglobin, and palmitate radicals as representative radicals derived from a vitamin, metallo-protein, and saturated lipid. Basic concepts related to free radical structure, formation, and…

  19. The Variance Reaction Time Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikstrom, Sverker

    2004-01-01

    The variance reaction time model (VRTM) is proposed to account for various recognition data on reaction time, the mirror effect, receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curves, etc. The model is based on simple and plausible assumptions within a neural network: VRTM is a two layer neural network where one layer represents items and one layer…

  20. Chemistry of heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1988-10-01

    The use of heavy ions to induce nuclear reactions was reported as early as 1950. Since that time it has been one of the most active areas of nuclear research. Intense beams of ions as heavy as uranium with energies high enough to overcome the Coulomb barriers of even the heaviest elements are available. The wide variety of possible reactions gives rise to a multitude of products which have been studied by many ingenious chemical and physical techniques. Chemical techniques have been of special value for the separation and unequivocal identification of low yield species from the plethora of other nuclides present. Heavy ion reactions have been essential for the production of the trans-Md elements and a host of new isotopes. The systematics of compound nucleus reactions, transfer reactions, and deeply inelastic reactions have been elucidated using chemical techniques. A review of the variety of chemical procedures and techniques which have been developed for the study of heavy ion reactions and their products is given. Determination of the chemical properties of the trans-Md elements, which are very short-lived and can only be produced an ''atom-at-a-time'' via heavy ion reactions, is discussed. 53 refs., 19 figs.

  1. Adverse Reactions to Hallucinogenic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Roger E. , Ed.

    This reports a conference of psychologists, psychiatrists, geneticists and others concerned with the biological and psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide and other hallucinogenic drugs. Clinical data are presented on adverse drug reactions. The difficulty of determining the causes of adverse reactions is discussed, as are different…

  2. Enantioselective oxidative boron Heck reactions.

    PubMed

    Lee, A-L

    2016-06-28

    This review highlights the use of the oxidative boron Heck reaction in enantioselective Heck-type couplings. The enantioselective oxidative boron Heck reaction overcomes several limitations of the traditional Pd(0)-catalysed Heck coupling and has subsequently allowed for intermolecular couplings of challenging systems such as cyclic enones, acyclic alkenes, and even site selectively on remote alkenes. PMID:26529247

  3. "Greening up" the Suzuki Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aktoudianakis, Evangelos; Chan, Elton; Edward, Amanda R.; Jarosz, Isabel; Lee, Vicki; Mui, Leo; Thatipamala, Sonya S.; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the rapid, green synthesis of a biaryl compound (4-phenylphenol) via a Pd(0)-catalyzed Suzuki cross-coupling reaction in water. Mild reaction conditions and operational simplicity makes this experiment especially amenable to both mid- and upper-level undergraduates. The methodology exposes students to purely aqueous…

  4. Isosinglet approximation for nonelastic reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Group theoretic relations are derived between different combinations of projectile and secondary particles which appear to have a broad range of application in spacecraft shielding or radiation damage studies. These relations are used to reduce the experimental effort required to obtain nuclear reaction data for transport calculations. Implications for theoretical modeling are also noted, especially for heavy-heavy reactions.

  5. Statistical Factors in Complexation Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Chung-Sun

    1985-01-01

    Four cases which illustrate statistical factors in complexation reactions (where two of the reactants are monodentate ligands) are presented. Included are tables showing statistical factors for the reactions of: (1) square-planar complexes; (2) tetrahedral complexes; and (3) octahedral complexes. (JN)

  6. Tuff reaction vessel experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bazan, F.; Rego, J.H.

    1986-06-01

    A laboratory leaching test has been performed as part of a project to evaluate the suitability of tuff rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Glass samples of the kind that will be used to store nuclear waste were placed in water inside tuff vessels, and then the tuff vessels were placed in water inside Teflon containers. Glass-component leach rates and migration through the tuff were measured for samples of the ATM-8 actinide glass, which is a PNL 76-68 based glass with low levels of {sup 99}Tc, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu to simulate wastes. Disc samples of this glass were leached at 90{sup 0}C to 30, 90, and 1983 days inside tuff vessels using a natural groundwater (J-13 well-water) as the leachant. Some samples were held by 304L stainless steel supports to evaluate the effect of this metal on the release rate of glass constituents. At the end of each leaching interval, the J-13 water present inside and outside the rock vessel was analyzed for glass components in solution. On the basis of these analyses, B, Mo, and Tc, appear to migrate through the rock at rates that depend on the porosity of each vessel and the time of reaction. U, Np, and Pu were found only in the inner leachate. Na, Si, and Sr are present in the rock as well as in the J-13 water, and the addition of these elements from the glass could not be determined. Normalized elemental mass loss values for B, Mo, and Tc were calculated using the combined concentrations of the inner and outer leachates and assuming a negligible retention on the rock. The maximum normalized release was 2.3 g/m{sup 2} for Tc. B, Mo, Tc, and Np were released linearly with respect to each other, with B and Mo released at about 85% of the Tc rate, and Np at 5-10% of the Tc rate. Plutonium was found at low levels in the inner leachate but was strongly sorbed on the steel and Teflon supports. Neptunium was sorbed to a lesser extent.

  7. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems.

  8. [Anaphylactic reaction following hair bleaching].

    PubMed

    Babilas, P; Landthaler, M; Szeimies, R-M

    2005-12-01

    Ammonium persulphate is a potent bleach and oxidizing agent that is commonly present in hair bleaches. Because bleaching is so commonly performed, hairdressers often develop allergic contact dermatitis to ammonium persulphate. In addition to this delayed reaction, asthma and rhinitis may develop as immediate reactions in those exposed to the fumes. Severe anaphylactic reactions are rare. We report a 24-year-old woman who acquired dermatitis following contact with bleaching substances while working as a hairdresser. After changing her profession, the dermatitis disappeared. Following the private use of a hairdressing bleach containing ammonium persulphate, she suffered a severe anaphylactic reaction with unconsciousness. The patient also developed an anaphylactic reaction three hours following patch testing with the hairdresser battery. The rub test with ammonium persulphate (2.5%) in a 1:100 solution was positive. PMID:15688222

  9. [Skin reactions to tattoo ink].

    PubMed

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Hermanns, J-F; Piérard, G E

    2011-01-01

    Ritual and artistic tattoos rely on the use of numerous pigments which are not all entirely inert once placed in the dermis. The compositions of some tattoo inks are identified. However, new but less well identified compounds appear on the market. Allergic reactions can be present under different aspects. They may correspond to allergic contact dermatitis or to photodermatitis. Other reactions include allergic hypersensitivity reactions as well as lichenoid, granulomatous or pseudolymphoma reactions. Pulsed light and laser are typically used for regular tattoo removal. These procedures are not indicated in inflamed tattoos. Indeed, the pigment dispersed during photolysis may perpetuate the reaction. Pseudotattoos due to the stratum corneum staining are frequently responsible for photoeczema. PMID:21942077

  10. Fundamental reaction pathways during coprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Gatsis, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the fundamental reaction pathways in coal petroleum residuum coprocessing. Once the reaction pathways are defined, further efforts can be directed at improving those aspects of the chemistry of coprocessing that are responsible for the desired results such as high oil yields, low dihydrogen consumption, and mild reaction conditions. We decided to carry out this investigation by looking at four basic aspects of coprocessing: (1) the effect of fossil fuel materials on promoting reactions essential to coprocessing such as hydrogen atom transfer, carbon-carbon bond scission, and hydrodemethylation; (2) the effect of varied mild conditions on the coprocessing reactions; (3) determination of dihydrogen uptake and utilization under severe conditions as a function of the coal or petroleum residuum employed; and (4) the effect of varied dihydrogen pressure, temperature, and residence time on the uptake and utilization of dihydrogen and on the distribution of the coprocessed products. Accomplishments are described.

  11. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments.

    PubMed

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems. PMID:27146955

  12. Effective reaction rates for diffusion-limited reaction cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nałecz-Jawecki, Paweł; Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miekisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    Biological signals in cells are transmitted with the use of reaction cycles, such as the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle, in which substrate is modified by antagonistic enzymes. An appreciable share of such reactions takes place in crowded environments of two-dimensional structures, such as plasma membrane or intracellular membranes, and is expected to be diffusion-controlled. In this work, starting from the microscopic bimolecular reaction rate constants and using estimates of the mean first-passage time for an enzyme-substrate encounter, we derive diffusion-dependent effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients (EMRRC) for a generic reaction cycle. Each EMRRC was found to be half of the harmonic average of the microscopic rate constant (phosphorylation c or dephosphorylation d), and the effective (crowding-dependent) motility divided by a slowly decreasing logarithmic function of the sum of the enzyme concentrations. This implies that when c and d differ, the two EMRRCs scale differently with the motility, rendering the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules diffusion-dependent. Analytical predictions are verified using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the two-dimensional triangular lattice at the single-molecule resolution. It is demonstrated that the proposed formulas estimate the steady-state concentrations and effective reaction rates for different sets of microscopic reaction rates and concentrations of reactants, including a non-trivial example where with increasing diffusivity the fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules changes from 10% to 90%.

  13. Allergic reactions, "spillover' reactions, and T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Bruynzeel, D P; Nieboer, C; Boorsma, D M; Scheper, R J; van Ketel, W G

    1983-01-01

    A strong positive, allergic patch-test reaction was elicited in 15 patients with an established allergy for a particular allergen. Patches with a marginally irritating concentration of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) were applied at fixed distances. The SLS patch situated adjacent to the allergic reaction was significantly enhanced in 12 of 15 patients (P less than 0.01) compared to more distant SLS reactions ("spillover'). Only quantitative differences were observed in the histologic pictures of the different types of reaction. The infiltrate consisted of lymphocytes and histiocytes, mainly located perivascular in the upper dermis. T-cell subsets were assessed with monoclonal antibodies using an immunoperoxidase technique. The distribution of the different T cells was the same for both reaction types. T cells located outside the perivascular infiltrates (e.g., in the epidermal vesicles) were OKT-8-positive (cytotoxic/suppressor T lymphocytes). Immunofluorescence examination did not show different patterns for the allergic or "enhanced toxic' reactions with regard to the presence of immunoglobulins and complement. The "spillover' phenomenon may cause false-positive patch-test reactions. PMID:6223603

  14. Integrated Microreactors for Reaction Automation: New Approaches to Reaction Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullen, Jonathan P.; Jensen, Klavs F.

    2010-07-01

    Applications of microsystems (microreactors) in continuous-flow chemistry have expanded rapidly over the past two decades, with numerous reports of higher conversions and yields compared to conventional batch benchtop equipment. Synthesis applications are enhanced by chemical information gained from integrating microreactor components with sensors, actuators, and automated fluid handling. Moreover, miniaturized systems allow experiments on well-defined samples at conditions not easily accessed by conventional means, such as reactions at high pressure and temperatures. The wealth of synthesis information that could potentially be acquired through use of microreactors integrated with physical sensors and analytical chemistry techniques for online reaction monitoring has not yet been well explored. The increased efficiency resulting from use of continuous-flow microreactor platforms to automate reaction screening and optimization encourages a shift from current batchwise chemical reaction development to this new approach. We review advances in this new area and provide application examples of online monitoring and automation.

  15. Thermally multiplexed polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Phaneuf, Christopher R.; Pak, Nikita; Saunders, D. Curtis; Holst, Gregory L.; Birjiniuk, Joav; Nagpal, Nikita; Culpepper, Stephen; Popler, Emily; Shane, Andi L.; Jerris, Robert; Forest, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    Amplification of multiple unique genetic targets using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is commonly required in molecular biology laboratories. Such reactions are typically performed either serially or by multiplex PCR. Serial reactions are time consuming, and multiplex PCR, while powerful and widely used, can be prone to amplification bias, PCR drift, and primer-primer interactions. We present a new thermocycling method, termed thermal multiplexing, in which a single heat source is uniformly distributed and selectively modulated for independent temperature control of an array of PCR reactions. Thermal multiplexing allows amplification of multiple targets simultaneously—each reaction segregated and performed at optimal conditions. We demonstrate the method using a microfluidic system consisting of an infrared laser thermocycler, a polymer microchip featuring 1 μl, oil-encapsulated reactions, and closed-loop pulse-width modulation control. Heat transfer modeling is used to characterize thermal performance limitations of the system. We validate the model and perform two reactions simultaneously with widely varying annealing temperatures (48 °C and 68 °C), demonstrating excellent amplification. In addition, to demonstrate microfluidic infrared PCR using clinical specimens, we successfully amplified and detected both influenza A and B from human nasopharyngeal swabs. Thermal multiplexing is scalable and applicable to challenges such as pathogen detection where patients presenting non-specific symptoms need to be efficiently screened across a viral or bacterial panel. PMID:26339317

  16. Reactions and properties of clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1992-09-01

    The elucidation from a molecular point of view of the differences and similarities in the properties and reactivity of matter in the gaseous compared to the condensed state is a subject of considerable current interest. One of the promising approaches to this problem is to utilize mass spectrometry in conjunction with laser spectroscopy and fast-flow reaction devices to investigate the changing properties, structure and reactivity of clusters as a function of the degree of solvation under well-controlled conditions. In this regard, an investigation of molecular cluster ions has provided considerable new insight into the basic mechanisms of ion reactions within a cluster, and this paper reviews some of the recent advances in cluster production, the origin of magic numbers and relationship to cluster ion stabilities, and solvation effects on reactions. There have been some notable advances in the production of large cluster ions under thermal reaction conditions, enabling a systematic study of the influence of solvation on reactions to be carried out. These and other new studies of magic numbers have traced their origin to the thermochemical stability of cluster ions. There are several classes of reaction where solvation has a notable influence on reactivity. A particularly interesting example comes from recent studies of the reactions of the hydroxyl anion with CO2 and SO2, studied as a function of the degree of hydration of OH-. Both reactions are highly exothermic, yet the differences in reactivity are dramatic. In the case of SO2, the reaction occurs at near the collision rate. By contrast, CO2 reactivity plummets dramatically for clusters having more than four water molecules. The slow rate is in accord with observations in the liquid phase.

  17. Nuclear Structure and Reaction Mechanism Studies with Multinucleon Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, P. H.; Jones, G. A.; Podolyak, Zs.; Abdullah, M.; Gelletly, W.; Langdown, S. D.; Wollel, G.; De Angelis, G.; Gadea, A.; Kroell, Th.; Marginean, N.; Martinez, T.; Napoli, D. R.; Rusu, C.; Tonev, D.; Zhang, Y. H.; Ur, C. A.; Axiotis, M.; Bazzacco, D.; Farnea, E.

    2006-08-14

    This contribution reports on the results of an experiment to study the near-yrast states in selenium- and osmium-like nuclei, following their population in thick-target, multinucleon transfer reactions between an 82Se beam and a 192Os target. The experimental results for the level scheme for 84Se are presented together with investigations into the use of multi-dimensional gamma-ray energy gating to investigate angular momentum population in such heavy-ion binary reactions.

  18. Tilting mode in nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dossing, T.; Randrup, J.

    1986-02-01

    The relation between tilting relaxation and the reaction plane dynamics is discussed, providing an intuitive understanding of the expression for the cross section close to the beam direction, which has recently been derived. Second, the tilting relaxation time and the related wriggling relaxation time are discussed, based upon nucleon exchange transport (window friction). Finally, recent experimental information on the tilting mode relaxation is discussed, and the dynamics of the tilting mode is discussed qualitatively for the three different types of nuclear reactions considered, compound nucleus fission, quasifission, and damped nuclear reactions. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Renormalized reaction and relaxation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, Yuriy E.

    2016-06-01

    Impact of the non-equilibrium on the reaction and relaxation rates (called as generalized relaxation rates - GRR), for the spatially inhomogeneous gas mixture is considered. Discarding the assumption that the 'chemical' part of the collisional integral is a small correction to non-reactive part, the expression for the zero-order GRR is derived. They are represented as a renormalization of the traditional reaction and relaxation rates, which means mixing of all corresponding processes. Thus all reactions and relaxation processes are entangled.

  20. Leukemoid Reaction in Chikungunya Fever

    PubMed Central

    Charaniya, Riyaz; Sahoo, Ratnakar; Tansir, Ghazal; Sasmal, Gargi

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya is a viral illness caused by an arbovirus which is transmitted by Aedes mosquito. Fever and polyarthralgia are hallmark of this viral illness. Viral infections are generally associated with leucopenia and bacterial infections with leukocytosis. Leukemoid Reaction (LR) is defined by reactive increase in leukocyte count of more than 50,000/cu mm with increase in mature leukocytes on peripheral blood. Leukocytosis is common in Chikungunya but leukemoid reaction has not been reported in medical literature. Our patient presented with high grade fever and symmetrical polyarthritis. Blood investigation showed Leukemoid reaction and after extensive work up a diagnosis of chikungunya was made. PMID:27437276

  1. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  2. Hypersensitivity reaction associated with phenytoin

    PubMed Central

    Indu, T. H.; Basutkar, Roopa Satyanarayan

    2015-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are generally associated with aromatic AEDs. We present a case of hypersensitivity reactions followed by administration of phenytoin with diazepam and ranitidine in a patient with generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Antigen-antibody reactions or decreased levels of epoxide hydrolase are well known with phenytoin. Increased level of serum phenytoin causing toxicities due to competitive inhibition with diazepam on co-administration was also reported in the literature. Prevention of the adverse effects with AEDs is a multi-stage process, which requires implementation of preventive measures through careful monitoring and prompts interventions. PMID:26692739

  3. Magnetically suspended reaction wheel assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocking, G.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetically suspended reaction wheel assembly (MSRWA) is the product of a development effort funded by the Air Force Materials Laboratory (AFML) at Wright Patterson AFB. The specific objective of the project was to establish the manufacturing processes for samarium cobalt magnets and demonstrate their use in a space application. The development was successful on both counts. The application portion of the program, which involves the magnetically suspended reaction wheel assembly, is emphasized. The requirements for the reaction wheel were based on the bias wheel requirements of the DSP satellite. The tasks included the design, fabrication, and test of the unit to the DSP program qualification requirements.

  4. Hypersensitivity reaction associated with phenytoin.

    PubMed

    Indu, T H; Basutkar, Roopa Satyanarayan

    2015-09-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are generally associated with aromatic AEDs. We present a case of hypersensitivity reactions followed by administration of phenytoin with diazepam and ranitidine in a patient with generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Antigen-antibody reactions or decreased levels of epoxide hydrolase are well known with phenytoin. Increased level of serum phenytoin causing toxicities due to competitive inhibition with diazepam on co-administration was also reported in the literature. Prevention of the adverse effects with AEDs is a multi-stage process, which requires implementation of preventive measures through careful monitoring and prompts interventions. PMID:26692739

  5. Nuclear reactions at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyam, Radhey

    2016-05-01

    In the domain of Nuclear reactions at intermediate energies, the QCD coupling constant αs is large enough (~ 0.3 - 0.5) to render the perturbative calculational techniques inapplicable. In this regime the quarks are confined into colorless hadrons and it is expected that effective field theories of hadron interactions via exchange of hadrons, provide useful tools to describe such reactions. In this contribution we discuss the application of one such theory, the effective Lagrangian model, in describing the hadronic reactions at intermediate energies whose measurements are the focus of a vast international experimental program.

  6. Siloxy alkynes in annulation reactions.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hui; Zhao, Wanxiang; Sun, Jianwei

    2014-12-01

    Siloxy alkynes are a family of versatile species in organic synthesis. This account reviews the annulation reactions of siloxy alkynes for the synthesis of a variety of carbo- and heterocyclic products. With various dipolarophiles or dipolarophile-like reaction partners, siloxy alkynes are capable of forming small (three- to six-membered) rings. Recently, we have expanded the scope to the synthesis of medium- and large-ring lactones, enabled by the design of new amphoteric molecules as well as a new ring-expansion strategy. These annulation reactions provide not only practically useful syntheses of cyclic molecules, but also important understanding of the fundamental reactivity of siloxy alkynes. PMID:25171137

  7. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    PubMed

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27237470

  8. Radiative capture reactions in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, Carl R.; Davids, Barry

    2015-08-07

    Here, the radiative capture reactions of greatest importance in nuclear astrophysics are identified and placed in their stellar contexts. Recent experimental efforts to estimate their thermally averaged rates are surveyed.

  9. Experimental Study of Serpentinization Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, B. A.; Brearley, A. J.; Ganguly, J.; Liermann, H.-P.; Keil, K.

    2004-01-01

    Current carbonaceous chondrite parent-body thermal models [1-3] produce scenarios that are inconsistent with constraints on aqueous alteration conditions based on meteorite mineralogical evidence, such as phase stability relationships within the meteorite matrix minerals [4] and isotope equilibration arguments [5, 6]. This discrepancy arises principally because of the thermal runaway effect produced by silicate hydration reactions (here loosely called serpentinization, as the principal products are serpentine minerals), which are so exothermic as to produce more than enough heat to melt more ice and provide a self-sustaining chain reaction. One possible way to dissipate the heat of reaction is to use a very small parent body [e.g., 2] or possibly a rubble pile model. Another possibility is to release this heat more slowly, which depends on the alteration reaction path and kinetics.

  10. Method for conducting exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-01-05

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  11. Transfer reactions in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardayan, D. W.

    2016-08-01

    To a high degree many aspects of the large-scale behavior of objects in the Universe are governed by the underlying nuclear physics. In fact the shell structure of nuclear physics is directly imprinted into the chemical abundances of the elements. The tranquility of the night sky is a direct result of the relatively slow rate of nuclear reactions that control and determines a star’s fate. Understanding the nuclear structure and reaction rates between nuclei is vital to understanding our Universe. Nuclear-transfer reactions make accessible a wealth of knowledge from which we can extract much of the required nuclear physics information. A review of transfer reactions for nuclear astrophysics is presented with an emphasis on the experimental challenges and opportunities for future development.

  12. Solar-thermal reaction processing

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, Alan W; Dahl, Jaimee K; Lewandowski, Allan A; Bingham, Carl; Raska Buechler, Karen J; Grothe, Willy

    2014-03-18

    In an embodiment, a method of conducting a high temperature chemical reaction that produces hydrogen or synthesis gas is described. The high temperature chemical reaction is conducted in a reactor having at least two reactor shells, including an inner shell and an outer shell. Heat absorbing particles are included in a gas stream flowing in the inner shell. The reactor is heated at least in part by a source of concentrated sunlight. The inner shell is heated by the concentrated sunlight. The inner shell re-radiates from the inner wall and heats the heat absorbing particles in the gas stream flowing through the inner shell, and heat transfers from the heat absorbing particles to the first gas stream, thereby heating the reactants in the gas stream to a sufficiently high temperature so that the first gas stream undergoes the desired reaction(s), thereby producing hydrogen or synthesis gas in the gas stream.

  13. The Retro-Hydroformylation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, Shuhei; Tatsuki, Toshiumi; Nozaki, Kyoko

    2015-07-13

    Hydroformylation, a reaction that adds carbon monoxide and dihydrogen across an unsaturated carbon-carbon multiple bond, has been widely employed in the chemical industry since its discovery in 1938. In contrast, the reverse reaction, retro-hydroformylation, has seldom been studied. The retro-hydroformylation reaction of an aldehyde into an alkene and synthesis gas (a mixture of carbon monoxide and dihydrogen) in the presence of a cyclopentadienyl iridium catalyst is now reported. Aliphatic aldehydes were converted into the corresponding alkenes in up to 91% yield with concomitant release of carbon monoxide and dihydrogen. Mechanistic control experiments indicated that the reaction proceeds by retro-hydroformylation and not by a sequential decarbonylation-dehydrogenation or dehydrogenation-decarbonylation process. PMID:26089259

  14. Medications and Drug Allergic Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just for Kids Library School Tools Videos Virtual Allergist Education & Training Careers in ... reaction to a medication. These include: genetics, body chemistry, frequent drug exposure or the presence of an ...

  15. Method for conducting exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence; Hearn, Dennis; Jones, Jr., Edward M.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  16. Adverse reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1986-01-01

    There are thousands of agents that are intentionally added to the food that we consume. These include preservatives, stabilizers, conditioners, thickeners, colorings, flavorings, sweeteners, antioxidants, etc. etc. Yet only a surprisingly small number have been associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Amongst all the additives, FD&C dyes have been most frequently associated with adverse reactions. Tartrazine is the most notorious of them all; however, critical review of the medical literature and current Scripps Clinic studies would indicate that tartrazine has been confirmed to be at best only occasionally associated with flares of urticaria or asthma. There is no convincing evidence in the literature of reactivity to the other azo or nonazo dyes. This can also be said of BHA/BHT, nitrites/nitrates and sorbates. Parabens have been shown to elicit IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions when used as pharmaceutical preservatives; however, as with the other additives noted above, ingested parabens have only occasionally been associated with adverse reactions. MSG, the cause of the 'Chinese restaurant syndrome' has only been linked to asthma in one report. Sulfiting agents used primarily as food fresheners and to control microbial growth in fermented beverages have been established as the cause of any where from mild to severe and even fatal reactions in at least 5% of the asthmatic population. Other reactions reported to follow sulfite ingestion include anaphylaxis, gastro intestinal complaints and dermatological eruptions. The prevalence of these non asthmatic reactions is unknown. The mechanism of sulfite sensitive asthma is also unknown but most likely involves hyperreactivity to inhale SO2 in the great majority of cases; however, there are reports of IgE mediated reactions and other sulfite sensitive asthmatics have been found with low levels of sulfite oxidase; necessary to oxidize endogenous sulfite to sulfate. PMID:3302664

  17. Expert system for predicting reaction conditions: the Michael reaction case.

    PubMed

    Marcou, G; Aires de Sousa, J; Latino, D A R S; de Luca, A; Horvath, D; Rietsch, V; Varnek, A

    2015-02-23

    A generic chemical transformation may often be achieved under various synthetic conditions. However, for any specific reagents, only one or a few among the reported synthetic protocols may be successful. For example, Michael β-addition reactions may proceed under different choices of solvent (e.g., hydrophobic, aprotic polar, protic) and catalyst (e.g., Brønsted acid, Lewis acid, Lewis base, etc.). Chemoinformatics methods could be efficiently used to establish a relationship between the reagent structures and the required reaction conditions, which would allow synthetic chemists to waste less time and resources in trying out various protocols in search for the appropriate one. In order to address this problem, a number of 2-classes classification models have been built on a set of 198 Michael reactions retrieved from literature. Trained models discriminate between processes that are compatible and respectively processes not feasible under a specific reaction condition option (feasible or not with a Lewis acid catalyst, feasible or not in hydrophobic solvent, etc.). Eight distinct models were built to decide the compatibility of a Michael addition process with each considered reaction condition option, while a ninth model was aimed to predict whether the assumed Michael addition is feasible at all. Different machine-learning methods (Support Vector Machine, Naive Bayes, and Random Forest) in combination with different types of descriptors (ISIDA fragments issued from Condensed Graphs of Reactions, MOLMAP, Electronic Effect Descriptors, and Chemistry Development Kit computed descriptors) have been used. Models have good predictive performance in 3-fold cross-validation done three times: balanced accuracy varies from 0.7 to 1. Developed models are available for the users at http://infochim.u-strasbg.fr/webserv/VSEngine.html . Eventually, these were challenged to predict feasibility conditions for ∼50 novel Michael reactions from the eNovalys database (originally

  18. Polarization phenomena in collinear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravcsik, Michael J.; Arash, Firooz

    1985-06-01

    It is shown for a collinear reaction containing four particles with arbitrary spins which amplitudes remain nonzero and how they are related to the observables. In terms of primary observables all submatrices relating products of amplitudes to observables either vanish or turn into one-by-one submatrices, except the 8i types which may turn into three-by-three submatrices, but these latter submatrices are mostly avoidable when determining amplitudes. In terms of the secondary observables the 1M and 2i submatrices are slightly larger. Specifically, it is shown that in collinear reactions all observables in which only one particle is polarized (no matter how) vanish. Since reactions at very high energies are expected to be predominantly very close to being collinear, the smallness of such observables in such reactions can be expected on general grounds but polarization effects involving observables with more than one polarized particle can very well be very large. An iterative approximation method for the polarization analysis of reactions at very high energies is suggested. The results of this paper are also applicable to all models in which helicity conservation holds, since they are, for all t values, formally identical with collinear reactions.

  19. Kinetics of actinide complexation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K.L.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1997-09-01

    Though the literature records extensive compilations of the thermodynamics of actinide complexation reactions, the kinetics of complex formation and dissociation reactions of actinide ions in aqueous solutions have not been extensively investigated. In light of the central role played by such reactions in actinide process and environmental chemistry, this situation is somewhat surprising. The authors report herein a summary of what is known about actinide complexation kinetics. The systems include actinide ions in the four principal oxidation states (III, IV, V, and VI) and complex formation and dissociation rates with both simple and complex ligands. Most of the work reported was conducted in acidic media, but a few address reactions in neutral and alkaline solutions. Complex formation reactions tend in general to be rapid, accessible only to rapid-scan and equilibrium perturbation techniques. Complex dissociation reactions exhibit a wider range of rates and are generally more accessible using standard analytical methods. Literature results are described and correlated with the known properties of the individual ions.

  20. Nuclear Reactions for Astrophysics and Other Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Scielzo, N D; Ressler, J J

    2011-03-01

    Cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions are required for many applications. The surrogate nuclear reactions method provides an indirect approach for determining cross sections for reactions on unstable isotopes, which are difficult or impossible to measure otherwise. Current implementations of the method provide useful cross sections for (n,f) reactions, but need to be improved upon for applications to capture reactions.

  1. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation

    PubMed Central

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model, and show in two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is on the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules. PMID:26871190

  2. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach, in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model and show in two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is of the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules.

  3. Study of char gasification reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ballal, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    A Texas lignite, an anthracite and two bituminous coals, Pittsburgh number8 and Illinois number6, were pyrolyzed in a nitrogen atmosphere to prepare chars. Optical microscopy, mercury porosimetry and gas adsorption techniques using nitrogen, CO/sub 2/ and CO, were employed for pore structure characterization. The lignite char exhibited the fastest rates of gaseous diffusion, followed in order of decreasing diffusivities by the Illinois number6, Pittsburgh number8 and anthracite chars. The changes in reactivities and pore structures of chars were measured experimentally during their reaction with oxygen (400-550C) and CO/sub 2/ (800-1000C). For a particular char-gas system, the normalized rate-conversion pattern was invariant with respect to temperature and gaseous concentration. In the case of lignite and Pittsburgh number8 chars, the rate-conversion pattern was similar during reaction with oxygen and CO/sub 2/. Adsorption experiments on partially reacted chars indicated that the micropores in the lignite char were accessible to both reactants. The micropores in the Illinois number6 char were, however, not accessible during its reaction with oxygen. The evolution of pore structure during reaction was modeled by using a probabilistic approach which accounts for overlapping pores with different shapes and sizes. The kinetics of gasification of the lignite and the Pittsburgh number8 chars was studied using a Langmuir-Hinshelwood type kinetic expression to correlate the experimental data. CO was found to inhibit the reaction substantially. The effect of a potassium carbonate catalyst on the reaction of these two chars was also investigated. Substantial increases in reaction rates were observed, and the enhancement was approximately proportional to the catalyst loading.

  4. Reaction pathways of propene pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yena; Su, Kehe; Wang, Xin; Liu, Yan; Zeng, Qingfeng; Cheng, Laifei; Zhang, Litong

    2010-05-01

    The gas-phase reaction pathways in preparing pyrolytic carbon with propene pyrolysis have been investigated in detail with a total number of 110 transition states and 50 intermediates. The structure of the species was determined with density functional theory at B3PW91/6-311G(d,p) level. The transition states and their linked intermediates were confirmed with frequency and the intrinsic reaction coordinates analyses. The elementary reactions were explored in the pathways of both direct and the radical attacking decompositions. The energy barriers and the reaction energies were determined with accurate model chemistry method at G3(MP2) level after an examination of the nondynamic electronic correlations. The heat capacities and entropies were obtained with statistical thermodynamics. The Gibbs free energies at 298.15 K for all the reaction steps were reported. Those at any temperature can be developed with classical thermodynamics by using the fitted (as a function of temperature) heat capacities. It was found that the most favorable paths are mainly in the radical attacking chain reactions. The chain was proposed with 26 reaction steps including two steps of the initialization of the chain to produce H and CH(3) radicals. For a typical temperature (1200 K) adopted in the experiments, the highest energy barriers were found in the production of C(3) to be 203.4 and 193.7 kJ/mol. The highest energy barriers for the production of C(2) and C were found 174.1 and 181.4 kJ/mol, respectively. These results are comparable with the most recent experimental observation of the apparent activation energy 201.9 +/- 0.6 or 137 +/- 25 kJ/mol. PMID:20082392

  5. Reactions in water: alkyl nitrile coupling reactions using Fenton's reagent.

    PubMed

    Keller, Christopher L; Dalessandro, James D; Hotz, Richard P; Pinhas, Allan R

    2008-05-01

    The coupling reaction of water-soluble alkyl nitriles using Fenton's reagent (Fe(II) and H2O2) is described. The best metal for the reaction is iron(II), and the greatest yields are obtained when the concentration of the metal is kept low. Hydrogen-atom abstraction is selective, preferentially producing the radical alpha to the nitrile. In order to increase the production of dinitrile, in situ reduction of iron(III) to iron(II), using a variety of reducing agents, was investigated. PMID:18363368

  6. Nonlocality in deuteron stripping reactions.

    PubMed

    Timofeyuk, N K; Johnson, R C

    2013-03-15

    We propose a new method for the analysis of deuteron stripping reactions, A(d,p)B, in which the nonlocality of nucleon-nucleus interactions and three-body degrees of freedom are accounted for in a consistent way. The model deals with equivalent local nucleon potentials taken at an energy shifted by ∼40  MeV from the "E(d)/2" value frequently used in the analysis of experimental data, where E(d) is the incident deuteron energy. The "E(d)/2" rule lies at the heart of all three-body analyses of (d, p) reactions performed so far with the aim of obtaining nuclear structure properties such as spectroscopic factors and asymptotic normalization coefficients that are crucial for our understanding of nuclear shell evolution in neutron- and proton-rich regions of the nuclear periodic table and for predicting the cross sections of stellar reactions. The large predicted shift arises from the large relative kinetic energy of the neutron and proton in the incident deuteron in those components of the n+p+A wave function that dominate the (d, p) reaction amplitude. The large shift reduces the effective d-A potentials and leads to a change in predicted (d, p) cross sections, thus affecting the interpretation of these reactions in terms of nuclear structure. PMID:25166525

  7. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W.

    1993-12-01

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  8. Thermal reactions of brushite cements.

    PubMed

    Bohner, M; Gbureck, U

    2008-02-01

    The thermal reactions of a brushite cement made of beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP), monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM), and an aqueous solution were followed in situ with an isothermal calorimeter at 37 degrees C. The investigated parameters were the beta-TCP/MCPM weight ratio, the liquid-to-powder ratio, the synthesis route and milling duration of the beta-TCP powder, as well as the presence of sulfate, citrate, and pyrophosphate ions in the mixing liquid. The thermograms were complex, particularly for mixtures containing an excess of MCPM or additives in the mixing solution. Results suggested that the endothermic MCPM dissolution and the highly exothermic beta-TCP dissolution occurred simultaneously, thereby leading to the formation of a large exothermic peak at early reaction time. Both reactions were followed by the exothermic crystallization of brushite and in the presence of an excess of MCPM by the endothermic crystallization of monetite. Additives generally widened the main exothermic reaction peak, or in some cases with pyrophosphate ions postponed the main exothermic peak at late reaction time. Generally, the results could be well explained and understood based on thermodynamic and solubility data. PMID:17618509

  9. [Recipients adverse reactions: guidance supports].

    PubMed

    Bazin, A

    2010-12-01

    Since 1994, adverse effects of transfusion transmitted to the French haemovigilance network are registered on "e-fit", the database of the French agency for the safety of health products (Afssaps). In order to improve their analysis, guidance supports have been made by Afssaps working groups. Each support deals with a blood transfusion side effect and is composed of five parts including pathophysiological mechanisms, diagnostic criteria, management recommendations, etiologic investigations and rules of filing the notification form on e-fit. The major characteristics of sheets published or soon-to-be published are presented: transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-transmitted bacterial infection, non-haemolytic febrile reaction, allergic reaction, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, hypotensive transfusion reaction, alloimmunization, erythrocyte incompatibility reaction and hemosiderosis. These new supports give relevant guidelines allowing a better analysis and evaluation of recipients' adverse reactions, particularly their diagnosis, gravity and accountability. They could also initiate studies in European and international haemovigilance and transfusion networks. PMID:21051267

  10. A unified diabatic description for electron transfer reactions, isomerization reactions, proton transfer reactions, and aromaticity.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; McKemmish, Laura K; McKenzie, Ross H; Hush, Noel S

    2015-10-14

    While diabatic approaches are ubiquitous for the understanding of electron-transfer reactions and have been mooted as being of general relevance, alternate applications have not been able to unify the same wide range of observed spectroscopic and kinetic properties. The cause of this is identified as the fundamentally different orbital configurations involved: charge-transfer phenomena involve typically either 1 or 3 electrons in two orbitals whereas most reactions are typically closed shell. As a result, two vibrationally coupled electronic states depict charge-transfer scenarios whereas three coupled states arise for closed-shell reactions of non-degenerate molecules and seven states for the reactions implicated in the aromaticity of benzene. Previous diabatic treatments of closed-shell processes have considered only two arbitrarily chosen states as being critical, mapping these states to those for electron transfer. We show that such effective two-state diabatic models are feasible but involve renormalized electronic coupling and vibrational coupling parameters, with this renormalization being property dependent. With this caveat, diabatic models are shown to provide excellent descriptions of the spectroscopy and kinetics of the ammonia inversion reaction, proton transfer in N2H7(+), and aromaticity in benzene. This allows for the development of a single simple theory that can semi-quantitatively describe all of these chemical phenomena, as well as of course electron-transfer reactions. It forms a basis for understanding many technologically relevant aspects of chemical reactions, condensed-matter physics, chemical quantum entanglement, nanotechnology, and natural or artificial solar energy capture and conversion. PMID:26193994

  11. Surface reactions of natural glasses

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.F.

    1986-12-31

    Reactions at natural glass surfaces are important in studies involving nuclear waste transport due to chemical control on ground water in host rocks such as basalt and tuff, to potential diffusion into natural hydrated glass surfaces and as natural analogs for waste glass stability. Dissolution kinetics can be described by linear surface reaction coupled with cation interdiffusion with resulting rates similar to those of synthetic silicate glasses. Rates of Cs diffusion into hydrated obsidian surfaces between 25{sup 0} and 75{sup 0}C were determined by XPS depth profiles and loss rates from aqueous solutions. Calculated diffusion coefficients were ten others of magnitude more rapid than predicted from an Arrhenius extrapolation of high temperature tracer diffusion data due to surface hydration reactions.

  12. Catalytic, enantioselective, vinylogous aldol reactions.

    PubMed

    Denmark, Scott E; Heemstra, John R; Beutner, Gregory L

    2005-07-25

    In 1935, R. C. Fuson formulated the principle of vinylogy to explain how the influence of a functional group may be felt at a distant point in the molecule when this position is connected by conjugated double-bond linkages to the group. In polar reactions, this concept allows the extension of the electrophilic or nucleophilic character of a functional group through the pi system of a carbon-carbon double bond. This vinylogous extension has been applied to the aldol reaction by employing "extended" dienol ethers derived from gamma-enolizable alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Since 1994, several methods for the catalytic, enantioselective, vinylogous aldol reaction have appeared, with which varying degrees of regio- (site), enantio-, and diastereoselectivity can be attained. In this Review, the current scope and limitations of this transformation, as well as its application in natural product synthesis, are discussed. PMID:15940727

  13. Anaphylactoid reactions to radiocontrast media.

    PubMed

    Canter, Lauren M

    2005-01-01

    As the role for diagnostic and therapeutic contrast-enhanced imaging increases, review of the epidemiology, mechanisms, risk factors, and pretreatment for radiocontrast-mediated anaphylactoid reactions becomes more and more pertinent. Ongoing research has failed to elucidate the precise mechanisms of both early and late reactions, though the current data point to a multifactorial pathogenesis. The risk of reactions has decreased over time as contrast media have evolved from ionic, high-osmolality to nonionic, low-osmolality formulations; however, the expense of the low-osmolality agents limit their universal use. Today, 1-12% of patients exhibit adverse responses ranging from mild to severe, with individual risk depending on the type of contrast administered and certain baseline patient characteristics. For those high-risk patients who must receive contrast, effective pretreatment guidelines have been established. PMID:16119034

  14. Spatial model of autocatalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Anna, Pietro; di Patti, Francesca; Fanelli, Duccio; McKane, Alan J.; Dauxois, Thierry

    2010-05-01

    Biological cells with all of their surface structure and complex interior stripped away are essentially vesicles—membranes composed of lipid bilayers which form closed sacs. Vesicles are thought to be relevant as models of primitive protocells, and they could have provided the ideal environment for prebiotic reactions to occur. In this paper, we investigate the stochastic dynamics of a set of autocatalytic reactions, within a spatially bounded domain, so as to mimic a primordial cell. The discreteness of the constituents of the autocatalytic reactions gives rise to large sustained oscillations even when the number of constituents is quite large. These oscillations are spatiotemporal in nature, unlike those found in previous studies, which consisted only of temporal oscillations. We speculate that these oscillations may have a role in seeding membrane instabilities which lead to vesicle division. In this way synchronization could be achieved between protocell growth and the reproduction rate of the constituents (the protogenetic material) in simple protocells.

  15. Reaction models in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descouvemont, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    We present different reaction models commonly used in nuclear astrophysics, in particular for the nucleosynthesis of light elements. Pioneering works were performed within the potential model, where the internal structure of the colliding nuclei is completely ignored. Significant advances in microscopic cluster models provided the first microscopic description of the 3He(α,&gamma)7 Be reaction more than thirty years ago. In this approach, the calculations are based on an effective nucleon-nucleon interaction, but the cluster approximation should be made to simplify the calculations. Nowadays, modern microscopic calculations are able to go beyond the cluster approximation, and aim at finding exact solutions of the Schrödinger equation with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions. We discuss recent examples on the d+d reactions at low energies.

  16. Photonuclear reactions on titanium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Belyshev, S. S.; Dzhilavyan, L. Z.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Kapitonov, I. M.; Kuznetsov, A. A. Orlin, V. N.; Stopani, K. A.

    2015-03-15

    The photodisintegration of titanium isotopes in the giant-dipole-resonance energy region is studied by the photon-activation method. Bremsstrahlung photons whose spectrum has the endpoint energy of 55 MeV is used. The yields and integrated cross sections are determined for photoproton reactions on the titanium isotopes {sup 47,48,49,50}Ti. The respective experimental results are compared with their counterparts calculated on the basis of the TALYS code and a combined photonucleon-reaction model. The TALYS code disregards the isospin structure of the giant dipole resonance and is therefore unable to describe the yield of photoproton reactions on the heavy titanium isotopes {sup 49,50}Ti.

  17. Unraveling reaction pathways and specifying reaction kinetics for complex systems.

    PubMed

    Vinu, R; Broadbelt, Linda J

    2012-01-01

    Many natural and industrial processes involve a complex set of competing reactions that include several different species. Detailed kinetic modeling of such systems can shed light on the important pathways involved in various transformations and therefore can be used to optimize the process conditions for the desired product composition and properties. This review focuses on elucidating the various components involved in modeling the kinetics of pyrolysis and oxidation of polymers. The elementary free radical steps that constitute the chain reaction mechanism of gas-phase/nonpolar liquid-phase processes are outlined. Specification of the rate coefficients of the various reaction families, which is central to the theme of kinetics, is described. Construction of the reaction network on the basis of the types of end groups and reactive moieties in a polymer chain is discussed. Modeling frameworks based on the method of moments and kinetic Monte Carlo are evaluated using illustrations. Finally, the prospects and challenges in modeling biomass conversion are addressed. PMID:22468596

  18. Coupled Reactions "versus" Connected Reactions: Coupling Concepts with Terms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aledo, Juan Carlos

    2007-01-01

    A hallmark of living matter is its ability to extract and transform energy from the environment. Not surprisingly, biology students are required to take thermodynamics. The necessity of coupling exergonic reactions to endergonic processes is easily grasped by most undergraduate students. However, when addressing the thermodynamic concept of…

  19. Reaction pathway for alkane dehydrocyclization

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Buchang; Davis, B.H.

    1996-08-01

    Naphtha reforming to produce high octane gasoline is an important process. Many reaction mechanisms are involved in this process. For example, the study of the fundamentals of this process led to the concept of bi- or poly-functional catalysis. The results of this study provide additional mechanistic information about the dehydrocyclization of an n-alkane to produce aromatics. The reaction coordinate diagram advanced to account for the observation of irreversible adsorption should be modified to account for the present results. 32 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Learning to predict chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Kayala, Matthew A; Azencott, Chloé-Agathe; Chen, Jonathan H; Baldi, Pierre

    2011-09-26

    Being able to predict the course of arbitrary chemical reactions is essential to the theory and applications of organic chemistry. Approaches to the reaction prediction problems can be organized around three poles corresponding to: (1) physical laws; (2) rule-based expert systems; and (3) inductive machine learning. Previous approaches at these poles, respectively, are not high throughput, are not generalizable or scalable, and lack sufficient data and structure to be implemented. We propose a new approach to reaction prediction utilizing elements from each pole. Using a physically inspired conceptualization, we describe single mechanistic reactions as interactions between coarse approximations of molecular orbitals (MOs) and use topological and physicochemical attributes as descriptors. Using an existing rule-based system (Reaction Explorer), we derive a restricted chemistry data set consisting of 1630 full multistep reactions with 2358 distinct starting materials and intermediates, associated with 2989 productive mechanistic steps and 6.14 million unproductive mechanistic steps. And from machine learning, we pose identifying productive mechanistic steps as a statistical ranking, information retrieval problem: given a set of reactants and a description of conditions, learn a ranking model over potential filled-to-unfilled MO interactions such that the top-ranked mechanistic steps yield the major products. The machine learning implementation follows a two-stage approach, in which we first train atom level reactivity filters to prune 94.00% of nonproductive reactions with a 0.01% error rate. Then, we train an ensemble of ranking models on pairs of interacting MOs to learn a relative productivity function over mechanistic steps in a given system. Without the use of explicit transformation patterns, the ensemble perfectly ranks the productive mechanism at the top 89.05% of the time, rising to 99.86% of the time when the top four are considered. Furthermore, the system

  1. Some Concepts in Reaction Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanyi, John C.

    1987-05-01

    The objective in this work has been one which I have shared with the two other 1986 Nobel lecturers in chemistry, D. R. Herschbach and Y. T. Lee, as well as with a wide group of colleagues and co-workers who have been responsible for bringing this field to its current state. That state is summarized in the title; we now have some concepts relevant to the motions of atoms and molecules in simple reactions, and some examples of the application of these concepts. We are, however, richer in vocabulary than in literature. The great epics of reaction dynamics remain to be written. I shall confine myself to some simple stories.

  2. Learning to Predict Chemical Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Kayala, Matthew A.; Azencott, Chloé-Agathe; Chen, Jonathan H.

    2011-01-01

    Being able to predict the course of arbitrary chemical reactions is essential to the theory and applications of organic chemistry. Approaches to the reaction prediction problems can be organized around three poles corresponding to: (1) physical laws; (2) rule-based expert systems; and (3) inductive machine learning. Previous approaches at these poles respectively are not high-throughput, are not generalizable or scalable, or lack sufficient data and structure to be implemented. We propose a new approach to reaction prediction utilizing elements from each pole. Using a physically inspired conceptualization, we describe single mechanistic reactions as interactions between coarse approximations of molecular orbitals (MOs) and use topological and physicochemical attributes as descriptors. Using an existing rule-based system (Reaction Explorer), we derive a restricted chemistry dataset consisting of 1630 full multi-step reactions with 2358 distinct starting materials and intermediates, associated with 2989 productive mechanistic steps and 6.14 million unproductive mechanistic steps. And from machine learning, we pose identifying productive mechanistic steps as a statistical ranking, information retrieval, problem: given a set of reactants and a description of conditions, learn a ranking model over potential filled-to-unfilled MO interactions such that the top ranked mechanistic steps yield the major products. The machine learning implementation follows a two-stage approach, in which we first train atom level reactivity filters to prune 94.00% of non-productive reactions with a 0.01% error rate. Then, we train an ensemble of ranking models on pairs of interacting MOs to learn a relative productivity function over mechanistic steps in a given system. Without the use of explicit transformation patterns, the ensemble perfectly ranks the productive mechanism at the top 89.05% of the time, rising to 99.86% of the time when the top four are considered. Furthermore, the system

  3. Vision 2020. Reaction Engineering Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Klipstein, David H.; Robinson, Sharon

    2001-01-01

    The Reaction Engineering Roadmap is a part of an industry- wide effort to create a blueprint of the research and technology milestones that are necessary to achieve longterm industry goals. This report documents the results of a workshop focused on the research needs, technology barriers, and priorities of the chemical industry as they relate to reaction engineering viewed first by industrial use (basic chemicals; specialty chemicals; pharmaceuticals; and polymers) and then by technology segment (reactor system selection, design, and scale-up; chemical mechanism development and property estimation; dealing with catalysis; and new, nonstandard reactor types).

  4. Reaction theory: Status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, A. M.; Gómez-Camacho, J.

    2016-05-01

    The current status of the reaction theory of nuclear collisions involving weakly-bound exotic nuclei is presented. The problem is addressed within the Continuum Discretized Coupled Channel (CDCC) framework, recalling its foundations and applications, as well as its connection with the Faddeev formalism. Recent developments and improvements of the method, such as core and target excitations and the extension to three-body projectiles, are presented. The use of the CDCC wave function in the calculation of inclusive breakup reactions is also introduced.

  5. Reactions and reaction intermediates on iron surfaces. III. Reactions of aldehydes and ketones on Fe(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Benziger, J.B.; Madix, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    The reactions of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acetone on Fe(100) were studied by temperature-programmed reaction spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were observed to react with adsorbed hydrogen to form adsorbed alkoxy intermediates. These reactions occurred at low temperature (ca. 200 K). In the absence of adsorbed hydrogen, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde decomposed to adsorbed CO and hydrogen. This reaction was also observed at low temperatures. On an initially clean surface the aldehydes first decomposed, forming adsorbed hydrogen which subsequently reacted with adsorbed aldehyde to form an alkoxy intermediate. The alkoxy intermediates reacted to form CO and H/sub 2/ primarily, with lesser amounts of alcohol, aldehyde, and hydrocarbon products. Acetone reacted differently from the aldehydes and did not appear to form an alkoxy intermediate. XPS results suggested that acetone and acetaldehyde did not adsorb in their keto form on the surface and it is suggested that they adsorbed as enol intermediates. The distinct reaction behavior of acetone may be due to these enol intermediates.

  6. Runaway Reaction: Solving for X.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartz, Solveig A.

    2003-01-01

    This article examines the runaway reaction as it was displayed by Barry, a 14-year-old eighth-grade boy with learning disabilities. It identifies some of the common characteristics of this response and proposes school intervention methods. Functional behavioral assessments and strength-based assessments are encouraged, along with using strategy…

  7. Teachers' Reactions to Children's Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesdale, Drew; Pickering, Kaye

    2006-01-01

    Drawing on social schema theory (Fiske & Taylor, 1991) and social identity theory (Tajfel & Turner, 1979), this study examined the impact on teachers' reactions to children's aggression of three variables, two of which were related to the aggressors and one was related to the teachers. Experienced female elementary school teachers (N=90) each read…

  8. Severe immediate reaction to nabumetone.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo-Garijo, M A; Cordobés-Duran, C; Lamilla-Yerga, A M; Moreno-Gastón, I

    2007-01-01

    Nabumetone is a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory (NSAID) prodrug that inhibits cyclooxygenase-2. It has been recommended as a safe alternative in most patients with hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs. Systemic reactions caused by nabumetone are not frequent. We report 2 cases of immediate systemic reactions due to nabumetone. The first case involved a 68-year-old woman who developed immediate generalized pruritus, erythema, morbilliform eruption, swollen tongue sensation, diarrhea, and hypotension after the ingestion of a single dose of nabumetone. In the second case, a 77-year-old woman developed generalized pruritus, palm erythema, colic abdominal pain, diarrhea, dizziness, tightness of the chest, dyspnea, and hypotension immediately after oral intake of nabumetone. Both patients had previously tolerated this drug. Since these episodes, they have avoided nabumetone. Skin prick tests with nabumetone (10 and 100 mg/mL) were negative. Oral challenge tests with other NSAIDs, even of the same group as nabumetone, were negative in both patients. The mechanisms responsible for the reaction were not established. PMID:17694703

  9. Reactions to threatening health messages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Threatening health messages that focus on severity are popular, but frequently have no effect or even a counterproductive effect on behavior change. This paradox (i.e. wide application despite low effectiveness) may be partly explained by the intuitive appeal of threatening communication: it may be hard to predict the defensive reactions occurring in response to fear appeals. We examine this hypothesis by using two studies by Brown and colleagues, which provide evidence that threatening health messages in the form of distressing imagery in anti-smoking and anti-alcohol campaigns cause defensive reactions. Methods We simulated both Brown et al. experiments, asking participants to estimate the reactions of the original study subjects to the threatening health information (n = 93). Afterwards, we presented the actual original study outcomes. One week later, we assessed whether this knowledge of the actual study outcomes helped participants to more successfully estimate the effectiveness of the threatening health information (n = 72). Results Results showed that participants were initially convinced of the effectiveness of threatening health messages and were unable to anticipate the defensive reactions that in fact occurred. Furthermore, these estimates did not improve after participants had been explained the dynamics of threatening communication as well as what the effects of the threatening communication had been in reality. Conclusions These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the effectiveness of threatening health messages is intuitively appealing. What is more, providing empirical evidence against the use of threatening health messages has very little effect on this intuitive appeal. PMID:23171445

  10. Knoevenagel Reaction of Unprotected Sugars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherrmann, Marie-Christine

    The Knoevenagel reaction of unprotected sugars was investigated in the 1950s using zinc chloride as promoter. The so-called Garcia Gonzalez reaction had been almost forgotten for 50 years, until the emergence of new water tolerant catalysts having Lewis acid behavior. The reaction was thus reinvestigated and optimal conditions have been found to prepare trihydroxylated furan derivatives from pentose or β-tetrahydrofuranylfuran from hexoses with non-cyclic β-keto ester or β-diketones. Other valuable compounds such as β-linked tetrahydrobenzofuranyl glycosides or hydroxyalkyl-3,3,6,6,-tetramethyl-3,4,5,6,7,9-hexahydro-1H-xanthene-1,8(2H)-dione can be obtained using cyclic β-dicarbonylic derivatives. Apart from one report in the 1950s, the Knoevenagel reaction of unprotected carbohydrate in basic condition has been studied only in the mid-1980s to prepare C-glycosyl barbiturates from barbituric acids and, later on, from non-cyclic β-diketones, β-C-glycosidic ketones. The efficient method exploited to prepare such compounds has found an industrial development in cosmetics.

  11. Adverse drug reactions in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Ferner, R E

    2015-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) - that is, unintended and harmful responses to medicines - are important to dermatologists because many present with cutaneous signs and because dermatological treatments can cause serious ADRs. The detection of ADRs to new drugs is often delayed because they have a long latency or are rare or unexpected. This means that ADRs to newer agents emerge only slowly after marketing. ADRs are part of the differential diagnosis of unusual rashes. A good drug history that includes details of drug dose, time-course of the reaction and factors that may make the patient more susceptible, will help. For example, Stevens-Johnson syndrome with abacavir is much commoner in patients with HLA-B*5701, and has a characteristic time course. Newer agents have brought newer reactions; for example, acneiform rashes associated with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors such as erlotinib. Older systemic agents used to treat skin disease, including corticosteroids and methotrexate, cause important ADRs. The adverse effects of newer biological agents used in dermatology are becoming clearer; for example, hypersensitivity reactions or loss of efficacy from antibody formation and progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy due to reactivation of latent JC (John Cunningham) virus infections during efalizumab treatment. Unusual or serious harm from medicines, including ADRs, medication errors and overdose, should be reported. The UK Yellow Card scheme is online, and patients can report their own ADRs. PMID:25622648

  12. Severe allergic reaction to Dermabond.

    PubMed

    Perry, Arthur W; Sosin, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The use of 2-octyl cyanoacrylate (Dermabond; Ethicon, Somerville, NJ) for wound closure is increasingly popular. Problems with Dermabond are generally related to application techniques and rarely relate to the chemical nature of the adhesive. This article describes a severe allergic reaction to Dermabond following breast augmentation/mastopexy. PMID:19717065

  13. The Pitfalls of Precipitation Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slade, Peter W.; Rayner-Canham, Geoffrey W.

    1990-01-01

    Described are some of the difficulties presented in these reactions by competing equilibria that are usually ignored. Situations involving acid-base equilibria, solubility product calculations, the use of ammonia as a complexing agent, and semiquantitative comparisons of solubility product values are discussed. (CW)

  14. Reduction of chemical reaction models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, Michael

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to reconcile the different terminologies pertaining to reduction of chemical reaction models. The approaches considered include global modeling, response modeling, detailed reduction, chemical lumping, and statistical lumping. The advantages and drawbacks of each of these methods are pointed out.

  15. Dehydrogenative Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Takuya; Kurahashi, Takuya; Matsubara, Seijiro

    2011-10-01

    The dehydrogenative cycloaddition of dieneynes, which possess a diene in the form of a styrene moiety and a dienophile in the form of an alkyne moiety, produces naphthalene derivatives when heated. It was found that a key requirement of this process is the presence of a silyl group attached to the alkyne moiety, which forces a dehydrogenation reaction to occur. PMID:21905638

  16. Interfacial Reaction Studies Using ONIOM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    2003-01-01

    In this report, we focus on the calculations of the energetics and chemical kinetics of heterogeneous reactions for Organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE). The work described in this report builds upon our own previous thermochemical and chemical kinetics studies. The first of these articles refers to the prediction of thermochemical properties, and the latter one deals with the prediction of rate constants for gaseous homolytic dissociation reactions. The calculations of this investigation are at the microscopic level. The systems chosen consisted of a gallium nitride (GaN) substrate, and molecular nitrogen (N2) and ammonia (NH3) as adsorbants. The energetics for the adsorption and the adsorbant dissociation processes were estimated, and reaction rate constants for the dissociation reactions of free and adsorbed molecules were predicted. The energetics for substrate decomposition was also computed. The ONIOM method, implemented in the Gaussian98 program, was used to perform the calculations. This approach has been selected since it allows dividing the system into two layers that can be treated at different levels of accuracy. The atoms of the substrate were modeled using molecular mechanics6 with universal force fields, whereas the adsorbed molecules were approximated using quantum mechanics, based on density functional theory methods with B3LYP functionals and 6-311G(d,p) basis sets. Calculations for the substrate were performed in slabs of several unit cells in each direction. The N2 and NH3 adsorbates were attached to a central location at the Ga-lined surface.

  17. Quasistationary distributions for autocatalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, R.W.; Pollett, P.K.

    1987-01-01

    The authors provide simple conditions for the existence of quasistationary distributions that can be used to describe the long-term behavior of open autocatalytic reaction systems. They illustrate with reference to a particular example that the quasistationary distribution is close to the usual stationary diffusion approximation.

  18. Reactions of dehydrodiferulates with ammonia.

    PubMed

    Azarpira, Ali; Lu, Fachuang; Ralph, John

    2011-10-01

    Lignocellulosic materials derived from forages and agricultural residues are potential sustainable resources for production of bioethanol or other liquid biofuels. However, the natural recalcitrance of such materials to enzymatic hydrolysis is a major obstacle in their efficient utilization. In grasses, much of the recalcitrance is associated with ferulate cross-linking in the cell wall, i.e., with polysaccharide-polysaccharide cross-linking that results from ferulate dehydrodimerization or with lignin-polysaccharide cross-linking that results from the incorporation of (polysaccharide-bound) ferulates or diferulates into lignin, mainly via free-radical coupling reactions. Many pretreatment methods have been developed to address recalcitrance, with ammonia pretreatments in general, and the AFEX (Ammonia Fiber Expansion) process in particular, among the more promising methods. In order to understand the polysaccharide liberating reactions involved in the cleavage of diferulate cell wall cross-links during AFEX pretreatment, reaction products from five esters modeling the major diferulates in grass cell walls treated under AFEX-like conditions were separated and characterized by NMR and HR-MS. Results from this study indicate that, beyond the anticipated amide products, a range of degradation products derive from an array of cleavage and substitution reactions, and reveal various pathways for incorporating ammonia-based nitrogen into biomass. PMID:21853208

  19. Nuclear excitations and reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Fallieros, S.; Levin, F.S.

    1983-07-31

    This is an interim report describing completed, continuing and proposed research activities for the period 1 August 1983-31 January 1985. These activities include studies of few-body systems, nuclear reaction models, atomic and molecular structure, nuclear electroexcitation and photon scattering from nuclei.

  20. FOREIGN BODY REACTION TO BIOMATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, James M.; Rodriguez, Analiz; Chang, David T.

    2008-01-01

    The foreign body reaction composed of macrophages and foreign body giant cells is the end-stage response of the inflammatory and wound healing responses following implantation of a medical device, prosthesis, or biomaterial. A brief, focused overview of events leading to the foreign body reaction is presented. The major focus of this review is on factors that modulate the interaction of macrophages and foreign body giant cells on synthetic surfaces where the chemical, physical, and morphological characteristics of the synthetic surface are considered to play a role in modulating cellular events. These events in the foreign body reaction include protein adsorption, monocyte/macrophage adhesion, macrophage fusion to form foreign body giant cells, consequences of the foreign body response on biomaterials, and cross-talk between macrophages/foreign body giant cells and inflammatory/wound healing cells. Biomaterial surface properties play an important role in modulating the foreign body reaction in the first two to four weeks following implantation of a medical device, even though the foreign body reaction at the tissue/material interface is present for the in vivo lifetime of the medical device. An understanding of the foreign body reaction is important as the foreign body reaction may impact the biocompatibility (safety) of the medical device, prosthesis, or implanted biomaterial and may significantly impact short- and long-term tissue responses with tissue-engineered constructs containing proteins, cells, and other biological components for use in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Our perspective has been on the inflammatory and wound healing response to implanted materials, devices, and tissue-engineered constructs. The incorporation of biological components of allogeneic or xenogeneic origin as well as stem cells into tissue-engineered or regenerative approaches opens up a myriad of other challenges. An in depth understanding of how the immune system

  1. Reactions of arsine with hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Hatlelid, K.M.; Brailsford, C.; Carter, D.E.

    1996-02-09

    The mechanism of arsine (AsH{sub 3}) induced hemolysis was studied in vitro using isolated red blood cells (RBCs) from the rat or dog. AsH{sub 3}-induced hemolysis of dog red blood cells was completely blocked by carbon monoxide (CO) preincubation and was reduced by pure oxygen (O{sub 2}) compared to incubations in air. Since CO and O{sub 2} bind to heme and also reduced hemolysis, these results suggested a reaction between AsH{sub 3} and hemoglobin in the hemeligand binding pocket or with the heme iron. Further, sodium nitrite induction of methemoglobin (metHb) to 85% and 34% of total Hb in otherwise intact RBCs resulted in 56% and 16% decreases in hemolysis, respectively, after incubation for 4 h. This provided additional evidence for the involvement of hemoglobin in the AsH{sub 3}-induced hemolysis mechanism. Reactions between AsH{sub 3} and hemoglobin were studied in solutions of purified dog hemoglobin. Spectrophotometric studies of the reaction of AsH{sub 3} with various purified hemoglobin species revealed that AsH{sub 3} reacted with HbO{sub 2} to produce metHb and, eventually, degraded Hb characterized by gross precipitation of the protein. AsH{sub 3} did not alter the spectrum of deoxyHb and did not cause degradation of metHb in oxygen, but bound to and reduced metHb in the absence of oxygen. These data indicate that a reaction of AsH{sub 3} with oxygenated hemoglobin, HbO{sub 2}, may lead to hemolysis, but there are reactions between AsH{sub 3} and metHb that may not be directly involved in the hemolytic process. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Adverse Drug Reactions in Dental Practice

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Adverse reactions may occur with any of the medications prescribed or administered in dental practice. Most of these reactions are somewhat predictable based on the pharmacodynamic properties of the drug. Others, such as allergic and pseudoallergic reactions, are less common and unrelated to normal drug action. This article will review the most common adverse reactions that are unrelated to drug allergy. PMID:24697823

  3. Experimental Demonstrations in Teaching Chemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugerat, Muhamad; Basheer, Sobhi

    2001-01-01

    Presents demonstrations of chemical reactions by employing different features of various compounds that can be altered after a chemical change occurs. Experimental activities include para- and dia-magnetism in chemical reactions, aluminum reaction with base, reaction of acid with carbonates, use of electrochemical cells for demonstrating chemical…

  4. [Gomori reactions in orthology and pathology].

    PubMed

    Wohlrab, F

    1990-01-01

    The following four basic histochemical reactions were developed by Gomori (1904-1957): 1. Silver impregnation of reticular fibres (1937); 2. Metal salt principle for detection of hydrolytic enzyme activity (1939); 3. Silver-methenamine reaction (1946); 4. Aldehyde fuchsin reaction (1950). These reactions and their modifications have assumed growing importance to expansion of knowledge, primarily on orthological and pathobiological problems. PMID:1694055

  5. Finding reaction paths using the potential energy as reaction coordinate.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Mogas, Antoni; Giménez, Xavier; Bofill, Josep Maria

    2008-03-14

    The intrinsic reaction coordinate curve (IRC), normally proposed as a representation of a reaction path, is parametrized as a function of the potential energy rather than the arc-length. This change in the parametrization of the curve implies that the values of the energy of the potential energy surface points, where the IRC curve is located, play the role of reaction coordinate. We use Caratheodory's relation to derive in a rigorous manner the proposed parametrization of the IRC path. Since this Caratheodory's relation is the basis of the theory of calculus of variations, then this fact permits to reformulate the IRC model from this mathematical theory. In this mathematical theory, the character of the variational solution (either maximum or minimum) is given through the Weierstrass E-function. As proposed by Crehuet and Bofill [J. Chem. Phys. 122, 234105 (2005)], we use the minimization of the Weierstrass E-function, as a function of the potential energy, to locate an IRC path between two minima from an arbitrary curve on the potential energy surface, and then join these two minima. We also prove, from the analysis of the Weierstrass E-function, the mathematical bases for the algorithms proposed to locate the IRC path. The proposed algorithm is applied to a set of examples. Finally, the algorithm is used to locate a discontinuous, or broken, IRC path, namely, when the path connects two first order saddle points through a valley-ridged inflection point. PMID:18345872

  6. Finding reaction paths using the potential energy as reaction coordinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Mogas, Antoni; Giménez, Xavier; Bofill, Josep Maria

    2008-03-01

    The intrinsic reaction coordinate curve (IRC), normally proposed as a representation of a reaction path, is parametrized as a function of the potential energy rather than the arc-length. This change in the parametrization of the curve implies that the values of the energy of the potential energy surface points, where the IRC curve is located, play the role of reaction coordinate. We use Carathéodory's relation to derive in a rigorous manner the proposed parametrization of the IRC path. Since this Carathéodory's relation is the basis of the theory of calculus of variations, then this fact permits to reformulate the IRC model from this mathematical theory. In this mathematical theory, the character of the variational solution (either maximum or minimum) is given through the Weierstrass E-function. As proposed by Crehuet and Bofill [J. Chem. Phys. 122, 234105 (2005)], we use the minimization of the Weierstrass E-function, as a function of the potential energy, to locate an IRC path between two minima from an arbitrary curve on the potential energy surface, and then join these two minima. We also prove, from the analysis of the Weierstrass E-function, the mathematical bases for the algorithms proposed to locate the IRC path. The proposed algorithm is applied to a set of examples. Finally, the algorithm is used to locate a discontinuous, or broken, IRC path, namely, when the path connects two first order saddle points through a valley-ridged inflection point.

  7. Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 74 Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database (Web, free access)   The Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database contains thermodynamic data on enzyme-catalyzed reactions that have been recently published in the Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data (JPCRD). For each reaction the following information is provided: the reference for the data, the reaction studied, the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number, the method of measurement, the data and an evaluation thereof.

  8. Modelling reaction kinetics inside cells

    PubMed Central

    Grima, Ramon; Schnell, Santiago

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, advances in molecular biology such as the development of non-invasive single molecule imaging techniques have given us a window into the intricate biochemical activities that occur inside cells. In this article we review four distinct theoretical and simulation frameworks: (1) non-spatial and deterministic, (2) spatial and deterministic, (3) non-spatial and stochastic and (4) spatial and stochastic. Each framework can be suited to modelling and interpreting intracellular reaction kinetics. By estimating the fundamental length scales, one can roughly determine which models are best suited for the particular reaction pathway under study. We discuss differences in prediction between the four modelling methodologies. In particular we show that taking into account noise and space does not simply add quantitative predictive accuracy but may also lead to qualitatively different physiological predictions, unaccounted for by classical deterministic models. PMID:18793122

  9. Water-gas shift reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    Recent kinetic and mechanistic studies of the water-gas shift reaction, H/sub 2/O(g) + CO(g) reversible CO/sub 2/ + H/sub 2/(g), catalyzed by iron and copper catalysts are reviewed. Composition, structure, active sites, preparation methods, additives, and poisons are discussed relative to each catalyst. New water-gas shift reaction catalyst systems studied are Mo-magnesia, Ni - Mo, Co - Mo, sulfided Co - Mo - Cs, sulfided Co - Mo, sulfided Ni - Mo, Co - Mo - Ni with added alkaki, and Co - Mo with added alkali, Cesium carbonate - cesium acetate - potassium carbonate or potassium acetate - Co - Mo is claimed to be an especially active catalyst. These new catalyst systems are sulfur tolerant and hold promise as catalysts for hydrogenation of high-sulfur coals. (BLM)

  10. Electrochemical promotion of catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbihl, R.

    2010-05-01

    The electrochemical promotion of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions (EPOC) became feasible through the use of porous metal electrodes interfaced to a solid electrolyte. With the O 2- conducting yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ), the Na + conducting β″-Al 2O 3 (β-alumina), and several other types of solid electrolytes the EPOC effect has been demonstrated for about 100 reaction systems in studies conducted mainly in the mbar range. Surface science investigations showed that the physical basis for the EPOC effect lies in the electrochemically induced spillover of oxygen and alkali metal, respectively, onto the surface of the metal electrodes. For the catalytic promotion effect general concepts and mechanistic schemes were proposed but these concepts and schemes are largely speculative. Applying surface analytical tools to EPOC systems the proposed mechanistic schemes can be verified or invalidated. This report summarizes the progress which has been achieved in the mechanistic understanding of the EPOC effect.

  11. Investigating Reaction-Driven Cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.; Savage, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    Many metamorphic reactions lead to large volume changes, and potentially to reaction-driven cracking [1,2]. Large-scale hydration of mantle peridotite to produce serpentine or talc is invoked to explain the rheology of plate boundaries, the nature of earthquakes, and the seismic properties of slow-spread ocean crust and the 'mantle wedge' above subduction zones. Carbonation of peridotite may be an important sink in the global carbon cycle. Zones of 100% magnesite + quartz replacing peridotite, up to 200 m thick, formed where oceanic mantle was thrust over carbonate-bearing metasediments in Oman. Talc + carbonate is an important component of the matrix in subduction mélanges at Santa Catalina Island , California, and the Sanbagawa metamorphic belt, Japan. Engineered systems to emulate natural mineral carbonation could provide relatively inexpensive CO2 capture and storage [3]. More generally, engineered reaction-driven cracking could supplement or replace hydraulic fracture in geothermal systems, solution mining, and extraction of tight oil and gas. The controls on reaction-driven cracking are poorly understood. Hydration and carbonation reactions can be self-limiting, since they potentially reduce permeability and armor reactive surfaces [4]. Also, in some cases, hydration or carbonation may take place at constant volume. Small changes in volume due to precipitation of solid products increases stress, destabilizing solid reactants, until precipitation and dissolution rates become equal at a steady state stress [5]. In a third case, volume change due to precipitation of solid products causes brittle failure. This has been invoked on qualitative grounds to explain, e.g., complete serpentinization of mantle peridotite [6]. Below ~ 300°C, the available potential energy for hydration and carbonation of olivine could produce stresses of 100's of MPa [2], sufficient to fracture rocks to 10 km depth or more, causing brittle failure below the steady state stress required

  12. Propulsive Reaction Control System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Phan, Linh H.; Serricchio, Frederick; San Martin, Alejandro M.

    2011-01-01

    This software models a propulsive reaction control system (RCS) for guidance, navigation, and control simulation purposes. The model includes the drive electronics, the electromechanical valve dynamics, the combustion dynamics, and thrust. This innovation follows the Mars Science Laboratory entry reaction control system design, and has been created to meet the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry, descent, and landing simulation needs. It has been built to be plug-and-play on multiple MSL testbeds [analysis, Monte Carlo, flight software development, hardware-in-the-loop, and ATLO (assembly, test and launch operations) testbeds]. This RCS model is a C language program. It contains two main functions: the RCS electronics model function that models the RCS FPGA (field-programmable-gate-array) processing and commanding of the RCS valve, and the RCS dynamic model function that models the valve and combustion dynamics. In addition, this software provides support functions to initialize the model states, set parameters, access model telemetry, and access calculated thruster forces.

  13. Prebiotic condensation reactions using cyanamide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, E.; Nooner, D. W.; Eichberg, J.; Epps, D. E.; Oro, J.

    1978-01-01

    Condensation reactions in cyanamide, 4-amino-5-imidazole-carboxamide and cyanamide, imidazole systems under dehydrating conditions at moderate temperatures (60 to 100 deg C) were investigated. The cyanamide, imidazole system was used for synthesis of palmitoylglycerols from ammonium palmitate and glycerol. With the addition of deoxythymidine to the former system, P1, P2-dideoxythymidine 5 prime-phosphate was obtained; the same cyanamide, 4-amino-5-imidazole-carboxamide system was used to synthesize deoxythymidine oligonucleotides using deoxythymidine 5 prime-phosphate and deoxythymidine 5 prime-triphosphate, and peptides using glycine, phenylalanine or isoleucine with adenosine 5 prime-triphosphate. The pH requirements for these reactions make their prebiotic significance questionable; however, it is conceivable that they could occur in stable pockets of low interlayer acidity in a clay such as montmorillonite.

  14. Programmability of Chemical Reaction Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Matthew; Soloveichik, David; Winfree, Erik; Bruck, Jehoshua

    Motivated by the intriguing complexity of biochemical circuitry within individual cells we study Stochastic Chemical Reaction Networks (SCRNs), a formal model that considers a set of chemical reactions acting on a finite number of molecules in a well-stirred solution according to standard chemical kinetics equations. SCRNs have been widely used for describing naturally occurring (bio)chemical systems, and with the advent of synthetic biology they become a promising language for the design of artificial biochemical circuits. Our interest here is the computational power of SCRNs and how they relate to more conventional models of computation. We survey known connections and give new connections between SCRNs and Boolean Logic Circuits, Vector Addition Systems, Petri nets, Gate Implementability, Primitive Recursive Functions, Register Machines, Fractran, and Turing Machines. A theme to these investigations is the thin line between decidable and undecidable questions about SCRN behavior.

  15. Nova reaction rates and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, S.; Herlitzius, C.; Fiehl, J.

    2011-04-01

    Oxygen-neon novae form a subset of classical novae events known to freshly synthesize nuclei up to mass number A≲40. Because several gamma-ray emitters lie in this mass range, these novae are also interesting candidates for gamma-ray astronomy. The properties of excited states within those nuclei in this mass region play a critical role in determining the resonant (p,γ) reaction rates, themselves, largely unknown for the unstable nuclei. We describe herein a new Doppler shift lifetime facility at the Maier-Leibnitz tandem laboratory, Technische Universität München, with which we will map out important resonant (p,γ) nova reaction rates.

  16. MEANS FOR TERMINATING NUCLEAR REACTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, C.M.

    1959-02-17

    An apparatus is presented for use in a reactor of the heterogeneous, fluid cooled type for the purpose of quickly terminating the reaction, the coolant being circulated through coolant tubes extending through the reactor core. Several of the tubes in the critical region are connected through valves to a tank containing a poisoning fluid having a high neutron capture crosssection and to a reservoir. When it is desired to quickly terminate the reaction, the valves are operated to permit the flow of the poisoning fluid through these particular tubes and into the reservoir while normal coolant is being circulated through the remaining tubes. The apparatus is designed to prevent contamination of the primary coolant by the poisoning fluid.

  17. Anaphylactic reaction to intravenous diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranju; Bansal, Deepak; Baduni, Neha; Vajifdar, Homay

    2011-01-01

    Diclofenac sodium is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug widely used as an opioid sparing agent for postoperative analgesia. Anaphylaxis due to intravenous diclofenac sodium is very rare. We report a case of anaphylactic reaction to IV diclofenac sodium, occurring postoperatively in a 25-year-old primigravida, the clinical features of which mimicked pulmonary embolism. The rarity, clinical importance and the diagnostic dilemma associated prompted us to report this case. PMID:21633544

  18. Multicomponent reactions in nucleoside chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Buchowicz, Włodzimierz

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review covers sixty original publications dealing with the application of multicomponent reactions (MCRs) in the synthesis of novel nucleoside analogs. The reported approaches were employed for modifications of the parent nucleoside core or for de novo construction of a nucleoside scaffold from non-nucleoside substrates. The cited references are grouped according to the usually recognized types of the MCRs. Biochemical properties of the novel nucleoside analogs are also presented (if provided by the authors). PMID:25161730

  19. (Laser enhanced chemical reaction studies)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies of dynamic molecular processes are described with particular emphasis on the use of a powerful infrared diode laser probe technique developed in our laboratory. This technique allows us to determine the final states of CO{sub 2} (and other molecules) produced by collisions, photofragmentation, or chemical reactions with a spectral resolution of 0.0003 cm{sup {minus}1} and a time resolution of 10{sup {minus}7} sec. Such high spectral resolution provides a detailed picture of the vibrational and rotational states of molecules produced by these dynamic events. We have used this experimental method to probe collisions between hot hydrogen/deuterium atoms and CO{sub 2}, between O({sup 1}D) atoms and CO{sub 2}, to study the final states of DC1 molecules produced as a result of the reactions of hot Cl atoms, and to investigate the dynamics of the reaction between OH and CO molecules. Advances in our techniques over the past two years have allowed us to identify and study more than 200 final rotational states in ten different vibrational levels of CO{sub 2} encompassing all 3 normal modes, many overtones, and combination states of the molecule. We have extended the technique to probe a variety of new molecules such as OCS, N{sub 2}O, DCl, and CS{sub 2}. All of this work is aimed at providing experimental tests for polyatomic molecule potential energy surfaces, chemical transition states in complex systems, and theories of reaction dynamic in molecules with more than 3 atoms.

  20. Radiation recall reaction causing cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Masri, Sofia Carolina; Misselt, Andrew James; Dudek, Arkadiusz; Konety, Suma H

    2014-01-01

    Radiation recall phenomenon is a tissue reaction that develops within a previously irradiated area, precipitated by the subsequent administration of certain chemotherapeutic agents. It commonly affects the skin, but can also involve internal organs with functional consequences. To our best knowledge, this phenomenon has never been reported as a complication on the heart and should be consider as a potential cause of cardiotoxicity. PMID:24755097

  1. Photosynthetic reaction centers in bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, J.R. Univ. of Chicago, IL ); Schiffer, M. )

    1990-07-30

    The photochemistry of photosynthesis begins in complexes called reaction centers. These have become model systems to study the fundamental process by which plants and bacteria convert and store solar energy as chemical free energy. In green plants, photosynthesis occurs in two systems, each of which contains a different reaction center, working in series. In one, known as photosystem 1, oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP[sup +]) is reduced to NADPH for use in a series of dark reactions called the Calvin cycle, named for Nobel Laureate Melvin Calvin, by which carbon dioxide is converted into useful fuels such as carbohydrates and sugars. In the other half of the photosynthetic machinery of green plants, called photosystem 2, water is oxidized to produce molecular oxygen. A different form of photosynthesis occurs in photosynthetic bacteria, which typically live at the bottom of ponds and feed on organic debris. Two main types of photosynthetic bacteria exist: purple and green. Neither type liberates oxygen from water. Instead, the bacteria feed on organic media or inorganic materials, such as sulfides, which are easier to reduce or oxidize than carbon dioxide or water. Perhaps in consequence, their photosynthetic machinery is simpler than that of green, oxygen-evolving plants and their primary photochemistry is better understood.

  2. Primary reactions of sensory rhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, I.; Sieg, A.; Wegener, A. A.; Engelhard, M.; Boche, I.; Otsuka, M.; Oesterhelt, D.; Wachtveitl, J.; Zinth, W.

    2001-01-01

    The first steps in the photocycles of the archaeal photoreceptor proteins sensory rhodopsin (SR) I and II from Halobacterium salinarum and SRII from Natronobacterium pharaonis have been studied by ultrafast pump/probe spectroscopy and steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy. The data for both species of the blue-light receptor SRII suggests that their primary reactions are nearly analogous with a fast decay of the excited electronic state in 300–400 fs and a transition between two red-shifted product states in 4–5 ps. Thus SRII behaves similarly to bacteriorhodopsin. In contrast for SRI at pH 6.0, which absorbs in the orange part of the spectrum, a strongly increased fluorescence quantum yield and a drastically slower and biexponential decay of the excited electronic state occurring on the picosecond time scale (5 ps and 33 ps) is observed. The results suggest that the primary reactions are controlled by the charge distribution in the vicinity of the Schiff base and demonstrate that there is no direct connection between absorption properties and reaction dynamics for the retinal protein family. PMID:11158578

  3. Variable expansion ratio reaction engine

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, W.R.

    1987-11-24

    A variable expansion ratio reaction rocket engine for producing a mainstream of hot combustion gases is described comprising: a reaction chamber including a thrust nozzle portion formed by converging and diverging wall portions in which the diverging portion terminates in a gas discharge and through which the combustion gases pass; a nozzle throat section at the juncture of the convergent-divergent wall portions; rows of circumferentially and axially spaced injection ports formed within the wall portions and communicating therethrough and into the reaction chamber; fluid conduit means in communication with the injection ports; at least one high pressure pump in communication with the fluid conduit means; a fluid containing storage tank including a conduit in communication with the high pressure pump; and means for selectively controlling a flow of fluid out of the tank, through the pump and to the fluid conduit means and the injection ports for controlling a cross-sectional area of the mainstream combustion gases passing through the thrust nozzle.

  4. Transfer reactions with heavy elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1986-04-01

    Transfer reactions for several transuranium elements are studied. (/sup 248/Cm, /sup 249/Bk, /sup 249/CF, /sup 254/Es), /sup 16,18/O, /sup 20,22/Ne, and /sup 40,48/Ca projectiles are used. The production of neutron-rich heavy actinides is enhanced by the use of neutron-rich projectiles /sup 18/O and /sup 22/Ne. The maxima of the isotopic distributions occur at only 2 to 3 mass numbers larger for /sup 48/Ca than for /sup 40/Ca reactions with /sup 248/Cm. The cross sections decrease rapidly with the number of nucleons transferred. The use of neutron-rich targets favors the production of neutron-rich isotopes. ''Cold'' heavy targets are produced. Comparisons with simple calculations of the product excitation energies assuming binary transfers indicate that the maxima of the isotopic distributions occur at the lightest product isotope for which the energy exceeds the reaction barrier. The cross sections for transfer of the same nucleon clusters appear to be comparable for a wide variety of systems. 23 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Catalytic reactions in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, R

    2001-12-01

    The chemical industry is under considerable pressure to replace many of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are currently used as solvents in organic synthesis. The toxic and/or hazardous properties of many solvents, notably chlorinated hydrocarbons, combined with serious environmental issues, such as atmospheric emissions and contamination of aqueous effluents is making their use prohibitive. This is an important driving force in the quest for novel reaction media. Curzons and coworkers, for example, recently noted that rigorous management of solvent use is likely to result in the greatest improvement towards greener processes for the manufacture of pharmaceutical intermediates. The current emphasis on novel reaction media is also motivated by the need for efficient methods for recycling homogeneous catalysts. The key to waste minimisation in chemicals manufacture is the widespread substitution of classical 'stoichiometric' syntheses by atom efficient, catalytic alternatives. In the context of homogeneous catalysis, efficient recycling of the catalyst is a conditio sine qua non for economically and environmentally attractive processes. Motivated by one or both of the above issues much attention has been devoted to homogeneous catalysis in aqueous biphasic and fluorous biphasic systems as well as in supercritical carbon dioxide. Similarly, the use of ionic liquids as novel reaction media may offer a convenient solution to both the solvent emission and the catalyst recycling problem. PMID:12239988

  6. Reaction Selectivity in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2009-02-02

    The understanding of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis is of paramount importance to our society today. In this review we outline the current state of the art in research on selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis. Current in-situ surface science techniques have revealed several important features of catalytic selectivity. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy has shown us the importance of understanding the reaction intermediates and mechanism of a heterogeneous reaction, and can readily yield information as to the effect of temperature, pressure, catalyst geometry, surface promoters, and catalyst composition on the reaction mechanism. DFT calculations are quickly approaching the ability to assist in the interpretation of observed surface spectra, thereby making surface spectroscopy an even more powerful tool. HP-STM has revealed three vitally important parameters in heterogeneous selectivity: adsorbate mobility, catalyst mobility, and selective site-blocking. The development of size controlled nanoparticles from 0.8 to 10 nm, of controlled shape, and of controlled bimetallic composition has revealed several important variables for catalytic selectivity. Lastly, DFT calculations may be paving the way to guiding the composition choice for multi-metallic heterogeneous catalysis for the intelligent design of catalysts incorporating the many factors of selectivity we have learned.

  7. Electromagnetic wave propagation characteristics in unimolecular reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingpeng; Huang, Kama

    2016-01-01

    Microwave-assisted chemical reactions have attracted interests because of their benefits for enhancement of reaction rates. However, the problems, such as hot spots and thermal runaway, limit the application of microwaves in the chemical industry. To study the characteristics of electromagnetic wave propagation in a chemical reaction is critical to solve the problems. The research on the characteristics of electromagnetic wave propagation in the unimolecular reaction that is a simple model reaction, can be generalized to the research in a chemical reaction. The approximate expressions of the attenuation and dispersion characteristics of electromagnetic wave propagation in the unimolecular reaction are derived by the nonlinear propagation theory. Specially, when the reaction rate is zero, the derived approximate expressions can be reduced to the formulas in low-loss dispersive media. Moreover, a 1D mold is used to validate the feasibility of the approximate expressions. The influences of the reaction rate and initial reactant concentration on the characteristics are obtained.

  8. Microfabricated electrochemiluminescence cell for chemical reaction detection

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Hsueh, Yun-Tai; Smith, Rosemary L.

    2003-01-01

    A detector cell for a silicon-based or non-silicon-based sleeve type chemical reaction chamber that combines heaters, such as doped polysilicon for heating, and bulk silicon for convection cooling. The detector cell is an electrochemiluminescence cell constructed of layers of silicon with a cover layer of glass, with spaced electrodes located intermediate various layers forming the cell. The cell includes a cavity formed therein and fluid inlets for directing reaction fluid therein. The reaction chamber and detector cell may be utilized in any chemical reaction system for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction, which are examples of a synthetic, thermal-cycling-based reaction. The ECL cell may also be used in synthesis instruments, particularly those for DNA amplification and synthesis.

  9. [Injectable fillers: adverse reactions and their management].

    PubMed

    Rzany, B; Bachmann, F; Nast, A

    2013-02-01

    Injectable fillers are one of the corner stones of aesthetic medicine. In general they are safe to use. However, adverse reactions may occur. These reactions may be acute, subacute or delayed, e.g. after decades. It is important to know these reactions and to be prepared so that they can be adequately treated, in view of the clinical symptoms, the injected material and if applicable other diseases/treatments that might trigger these reactions. Last but not least, all reactions should be reported either to specialized registries or regulatory agencies. Only then we are able to learn more about these reactions and their best possible treatment. PMID:23407758

  10. The molecular dynamics of atmospheric reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanyi, J. C.

    1971-01-01

    Detailed information about the chemistry of the upper atmosphere took the form of quantitative data concerning the rate of reaction into specified states of product vibration, rotation and translation for exothermic reaction, as well as concerning the rate of reaction from specified states of reagent vibration, rotation and translation for endothermic reaction. The techniques used were variants on the infrared chemiluminescence method. Emphasis was placed on reactions that formed, and that removed, vibrationally-excited hydroxyl radicals. Fundamental studies were also performed on exothermic reactions involving hydrogen halides.

  11. Microfabricated sleeve devices for chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen

    2003-01-01

    A silicon-based sleeve type chemical reaction chamber that combines heaters, such as doped polysilicon for heating, and bulk silicon for convection cooling. The reaction chamber combines a critical ratio of silicon and non-silicon based materials to provide the thermal properties desired. For example, the chamber may combine a critical ratio of silicon and silicon nitride to the volume of material to be heated (e.g., a liquid) in order to provide uniform heating, yet low power requirements. The reaction chamber will also allow the introduction of a secondary tube (e.g., plastic) into the reaction sleeve that contains the reaction mixture thereby alleviating any potential materials incompatibility issues. The reaction chamber may be utilized in any chemical reaction system for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction, which are examples of a synthetic, thermal-cycling-based reaction. The reaction chamber may also be used in synthesis instruments, particularly those for DNA amplification and synthesis.

  12. Severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wen-Hung; Wang, Chuang-Wei; Dao, Ro-Lan

    2016-07-01

    The clinical manifestations of drug eruptions can range from mild maculopapular exanthema to severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (SCAR), including drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome/drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) which are rare but occasionally fatal. Some pathogens may induce skin reactions mimicking SCAR. There are several models to explain the interaction of human leukocyte antigen (HLA), drug and T-cell receptor (TCR): (i) the "hapten/prohapten" theory; (ii) the "p-i concept"; (iii) the "altered peptide repertoire"; and (iv) the "altered TCR repertoire". The checkpoints of molecular mechanisms of SCAR include specific drug antigens interacting with the specific HLA loci (e.g. HLA-B*15:02 for carbamazepine-induced SJS/TEN and HLA-B*58:01 for allopurinol-induced SCAR), involvement of specific TCR, induction of T-cell-mediated responses (e.g. granulysin, Fas ligand, perforin/granzyme B and T-helper 1/2-associated cytokines) and cell death mechanism (e.g. miR-18a-5p-induced apoptosis; annexin A1 and formyl peptide receptor 1-induced necroptosis in keratinocytes). In addition to immune mechanism, metabolism has been found to play a role in the pathogenesis of SCAR, such as recent findings of strong association of CYP2C9*3 with phenytoin-induced SCAR and impaired renal function with allopurinol SCAR. With a better understanding of the mechanisms, effective therapeutics and prevention for SCAR can be improved. PMID:27154258

  13. Pulp reaction to vital bleaching.

    PubMed

    Fugaro, Jessica O; Nordahl, Inger; Fugaro, Orlando J; Matis, Bruce A; Mjör, Ivar A

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the histological changes in dental pulp after nightguard vital bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide gel. Fifteen patients between 12 and 26 years of age with caries-free first premolars scheduled for orthodontic extraction were treated with 10% Opalescence (Ultradent Products, Inc). Tooth #5 had four days of bleaching, tooth #12 was treated for two weeks, tooth #21 was bleached for two weeks followed by two weeks without treatment and tooth #28, serving as the control, was without treatment. All teeth were extracted at the same time. Immediately after extraction, 4 mm of the most apical portion of the root was sectioned off and each specimen was placed in a vial containing 10% neutral buffered formalin. The samples were prepared for histological evaluation at the Scandinavian Institute of Dental Materials (NIOM) and microscopically examined independently at both NIOM and Indiana University School of Dentistry (IUSD). Pulp reactions were semi-quantitatively graded as none, slight, moderate and severe. Slight pulpal changes were detected in 16 of the 45 bleached teeth. Neither moderate nor severe reactions were observed. The findings indicate that the slight histological changes sometimes observed after bleaching tend to resolve within two weeks post-treatment. Statistical differences existed only between the untreated control and the four-day (p=0.0109) and two-week (p=0.0045) treatment groups. The findings from this study demonstrated that nightguard vital bleaching procedures using 10% carbamide peroxide might cause initial mild, localized pulp reactions. However, the minor histological changes observed did not affect the overall health of the pulp tissue and were reversible within two weeks post-treatment. Therefore, two weeks of treatment with 10% carbamide peroxide used for nightguard vital bleaching is considered safe for dental pulp. PMID:15279473

  14. Control Electronics For Reaction Wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, Keith

    1995-01-01

    Bidirectional operation achieved with single-polarity main power supply. Control circuitry generates pulse-width-modulated 800-Hz waveforms to drive two-phase ac motor and reaction wheel. Operates partly in response to digital magnitude-and-direction torque command generated by external control subsystem and partly in response to tachometric feedback in form of two once-per-revolution sinusoids with amplitudes proportional to speed. Operation in either of two modes called "normal" and "safehold." In normal mode, drive pulses timed so that, on average over one or few cycles, motor applies commanded torque. In safehold mode, pulses timed to keep motor running at set speed in one direction.

  15. Caustic reaction caused by cement.

    PubMed

    Rados, Jaka; Lipozencić, Jasna; Milavec-Puretić, Visnja

    2005-01-01

    A case is reported of a patient who developed full thickness chemical burns of the skin after a prolonged contact while working with wet cement. The history, course of disease, and therapy are described. Cement is an alkaline substance (pH >12) leading to colliquative necrosis. Tissue damage is due to the exothermic reaction of calcium oxide and water forming calcium hydroxide. Patch test was performed to test sensitization to chromium, chromate and cobalt, the usual cement ingredients. In our opinion, such lesions may not be rare because cement is widely used in construction, but are rarely described or under-recognized. PMID:16324425

  16. Chemical reactions at aqueous interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecitis, Chad David

    2009-12-01

    Interfaces or phase boundaries are a unique chemical environment relative to individual gas, liquid, or solid phases. Interfacial reaction mechanisms and kinetics are often at variance with homogeneous chemistry due to mass transfer, molecular orientation, and catalytic effects. Aqueous interfaces are a common subject of environmental science and engineering research, and three environmentally relevant aqueous interfaces are investigated in this thesis: 1) fluorochemical sonochemistry (bubble-water), 2) aqueous aerosol ozonation (gas-water droplet), and 3) electrolytic hydrogen production and simultaneous organic oxidation (water-metal/semiconductor). Direct interfacial analysis under environmentally relevant conditions is difficult, since most surface-specific techniques require relatively `extreme' conditions. Thus, the experimental investigations here focus on the development of chemical reactors and analytical techniques for the completion of time/concentration-dependent measurements of reactants and their products. Kinetic modeling, estimations, and/or correlations were used to extract information on interfacially relevant processes. We found that interfacial chemistry was determined to be the rate-limiting step to a subsequent series of relatively fast homogeneous reactions, for example: 1) Pyrolytic cleavage of the ionic headgroup of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) adsorbed to cavitating bubble-water interfaces during sonolysis was the rate-determining step in transformation to their inorganic constituents carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and fluoride; 2) ozone oxidation of aqueous iodide to hypoiodous acid at the aerosol-gas interface is the rate-determining step in the oxidation of bromide and chloride to dihalogens; 3) Electrolytic oxidation of anodic titanol surface groups is rate-limiting for the overall oxidation of organics by the dichloride radical. We also found chemistry unique to the interface, for example: 1

  17. Radiation reaction at ultrahigh intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Richard T.

    2010-06-15

    Intensities of 10{sup 22} W cm{sup -2} have been reached and it is expected that this will be increased by two orders of magnitude in the near future. At these intensities the radiation reaction force is important, especially in calculating the terminal velocity of an electron. The following briefly describes some of the problems of the existing most well-known equations and describes an approach based on conservation of energy. The resulting equation is compared to the Landau Lifshitz and Ford O'Connell equations, and laboratory tests are proposed.

  18. Effective radii of deuteron-induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Shintaro; Chiba, Satoshi; Yahiro, Masanobu; Ogata, Kazuyuki; Minomo, Kosho

    2011-05-15

    The continuum-discretized coupled-channels method (CDCC) for exclusive reactions and the eikonal reaction theory (ERT) as an extension of CDCC to inclusive reactions are applied to deuteron-induced reactions. The CDCC result reproduces experimental data on the reaction cross section for d+{sup 58}Ni scattering at 200 MeV/nucleon, and ERT provides data on the neutron-stripping cross section for inclusive {sup 7}Li(d,n) reaction at 40 MeV. For deuteron-induced reactions at 200 MeV/nucleon, target-dependence of the reaction, elastic-breakup, nucleon-stripping, nucleon-removal, and complete- and incomplete-fusion cross sections is clearly explained by simple formulas. Accuracy of the Glauber model is also investigated.

  19. Anomalous subdiffusion with multispecies linear reaction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Langlands, T A M; Henry, B I; Wearne, S L

    2008-02-01

    We have introduced a set of coupled fractional reaction-diffusion equations to model a multispecies system undergoing anomalous subdiffusion with linear reaction dynamics. The model equations are derived from a mesoscopic continuous time random walk formulation of anomalously diffusing species with linear mean field reaction kinetics. The effect of reactions is manifest in reaction modified spatiotemporal diffusion operators as well as in additive mean field reaction terms. One consequence of the nonseparability of reaction and subdiffusion terms is that the governing evolution equation for the concentration of one particular species may include both reactive and diffusive contributions from other species. The general solution is derived for the multispecies system and some particular special cases involving both irreversible and reversible reaction dynamics are analyzed in detail. We have carried out Monte Carlo simulations corresponding to these special cases and we find excellent agreement with theory. PMID:18351991

  20. Competing reaction channels in IR-laser-induced unimolecular reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, M.R.

    1981-01-01

    The competing reaction channels in the unimolecular decomposition of two molecules, formaldehyde and tetralin were studied. A TEA CO/sub 2/ laser was used as the excitation source in all experiments. The dissociation of D/sub 2/CO was studied by infrared multiphoton dissociation (MPD) and the small-molecule nature of formaldehyde with regard to MPD was explored. The effect of collisions in MPD were probed by the pressure dependence of the MPD yield and ir fluorescence from multiphoton excited D/sub 2/CO. MPD yield shows a near cubic dependence in pure D/sub 2/CO which is reduced to a 1.7 power dependence when 15 torr of NO is added. The peak amplitude of 5 ..mu..m ir fluorescence from D/sub 2/CO is proportional to the square of the D/sub 2/CO pressure in pure D/sub 2/CO or in the presence of 50 torr of Ar. Results are explained in terms of bottlenecks to excitation at the v = 1 level which are overcome by a combination of vibrational energy transfer and rotational relaxation. The radical/molecule branching ratio in D/sub 2/CO MPD was 0.10 +- 0.02 at a fluence of 125 J/cm/sup 2/ at 946.0 cm/sup -1/. The barrier height to molecular dissociation was calculated to be 3.6 +- 2.0 kcal/mole below the radical threshold or 85.0 +- 3.0 kcal/mole above the ground state of D/sub 2/CO. In H/sub 2/CO, this corresponds to 2.5 +- 2.0 kcal/mole below the radical threshold or 83.8 +- 3.0 kcal/mole above the ground state. Comparison with uv data indicate that RRKM theory is an acceptable description of formaldehyde dissociation in the 5 to 10 torr pressure range. The unimolecular decomposition of tetralin was studied by MPD and SiF/sub 4/ - sensitized pyrolysis. Both techniques induce decomposition without the interference of catalytic surfaces. Ethylene loss is identified as the lowest energy reaction channel. Dehydrogenation is found to result from step-wise H atom loss. Isomerization via disproportionation is also identified as a primary reaction channel.

  1. Indirect techniques for astrophysical reaction rates determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammache, F.; Oulebsir, N.; Benamara, S.; De Séréville, N.; Coc, A.; Laird, A.; Stefan, I.; Roussel, P.

    2016-05-01

    Direct measurements of nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest can be challenging. Alternative experimental techniques such as transfer reactions and inelastic scattering reactions offer the possibility to study these reactions by using stable beams. In this context, I will present recent results that were obtained in Orsay using indirect techniques. The examples will concern various astrophysical sites, from the Big-Bang nucleo synthesis to the production of radioisotopes in massive stars.

  2. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-01-13

    In this study, one of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.

  3. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-01-13

    In this study, one of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculationsmore » of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.« less

  4. Radiation Reaction and Thomson Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, James

    2007-07-11

    In recent years high power high irradiance lasers of peta-watt order have been or are under construction. In addition, in the next 10 years lasers of unprecedented powers, exa-watt, could be built If lasers such as these are focused to very small spot sizes, extremely high laser irradiances will be achieved. When electrons interact with such a laser, they become highly relativistic over very short time and spatial scales. Usually the motion of an electron under the influence of electromagnetic fields is influenced to a small extent by radiation emission from acceleration. However, under such violent acceleration the amount of radiation emitted by electrons can become so large that significant damping of the electron motion by the emission of this radiation can occur. In this lecture note we will study this problem of radiation reaction by first showing how the equations of motion are obtained. Then, we will examine the problems with such equations and what approximations are made. We will specifically examine the effects of radiation reaction on the Thomson scattering of radiation from counter-streaming laser pulses and high energy electrons through the numerical integration of the equations of motion. We will briefly address the fundamental physics, which can be addressed by using such high irradiance lasers interacting with high energy electrons.

  5. 'GREENER' CHEMICAL SYNTHESES USING ALTERNATE REACTION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave (MW) irradiation in conjunction with water as reaction media has proven to be a greener chemical approach for expeditious N-alkylation reactions of amines and hydrazines wherein the reactions under mildly basic conditions afford tertiary amines and double N-alkylation t...

  6. Emotional and Behavioral Reaction to Intrusive Thoughts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Lisa-Marie; May, Jon; Andrade, Jackie; Kavanagh, David

    2010-01-01

    A self-report measure of the emotional and behavioral reactions to intrusive thoughts was developed. The article presents data that confirm the stability, reliability, and validity of the new seven-item measure. Emotional and behavioral reactions to intrusions emerged as separate factors on the Emotional and Behavioral Reactions to Intrusions…

  7. Modified triglyceride oil through reactions with phenyltriazolinedione

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The synthesis of a modified triglyceride oil was achieved through the reactions with 4-phenyl-1,2-4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD). 1H NMR was used for structure determination and to monitor the reactions. Several reaction products were produced, and their relative yields depended on the stoichiometry ...

  8. Organocatalytic C–H activation reactions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary Organocatalytic C–H activation reactions have recently been developed besides the traditional metal-catalysed C–H activation reactions. The recent non-asymmetric and asymmetric C–H activation reactions mediated by organocatalysts are discussed in this review. PMID:23019474

  9. The Rate Laws for Reversible Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Edward L.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the rate laws for reversible reactions. Indicates that although prediction of the form of the rate law for a reverse reaction given the rate law for the forward reaction is not certain, the number of possibilities is limited because of relationships described. (JN)

  10. Reaction-Map of Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murov, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The Reaction-Map of Organic Chemistry lists all the most commonly studied reactions in organic chemistry on one page. The discussed Reaction-Map will act as another learning aide for the students, making the study of organic chemistry much easier.

  11. An Iodine Fluorescence Quenching Clock Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Richard B.; Muyskens, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Clock reactions based upon competing oxidation and reduction reactions of iodine and starch as the most popular type of chemistry example is presented to illustrate the redox phenomena, reaction kinetics, and principles of chemical titration. The examination of the photophysical principles underlying the iodine fluorescence quenching clock…

  12. New reaction tester accurate within 56 microseconds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, H.

    1972-01-01

    Testing device measures simple and disjunctive reaction time of human subject to light stimuli. Tester consists of reaction key, logic card, panel mounted neon indicators, and interconnecting wiring. Device is used for determining reaction times of patients undergoing postoperative neurological therapy.

  13. Method of controlling fusion reaction rates

    DOEpatents

    Kulsrud, Russell M.; Furth, Harold P.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Goldhaber, Maurice

    1988-03-01

    A method of controlling the reaction rates of the fuel atoms in a fusion reactor comprises the step of polarizing the nuclei of the fuel atoms in a particular direction relative to the plasma confining magnetic field. Fusion reaction rates can be increased or decreased, and the direction of emission of the reaction products can be controlled, depending on the choice of polarization direction.

  14. Method of controlling fusion reaction rates

    DOEpatents

    Kulsrud, Russell M.; Furth, Harold P.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Goldhaber, Maurice

    1988-01-01

    A method of controlling the reaction rates of the fuel atoms in a fusion reactor comprises the step of polarizing the nuclei of the fuel atoms in a particular direction relative to the plasma confining magnetic field. Fusion reaction rates can be increased or decreased, and the direction of emission of the reaction products can be controlled, depending on the choice of polarization direction.

  15. Reaction Order Ambiguity in Integrated Rate Plots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Integrated rate plots are frequently used in reaction kinetics to determine orders of reactions. It is often emphasised, when using this methodology in practice, that it is necessary to monitor the reaction to a substantial fraction of completion for these plots to yield unambiguous orders. The present article gives a theoretical and statistical…

  16. Parental Reactions to Cleft Palate Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanpoelvoorde, Leah

    This literature review examines parental reactions following the birth of a cleft lip/palate child, focusing primarily on the mother's reactions. The research studies cited have explored such influences on maternal reactions as her feelings of lack of control over external forces and her feelings of guilt that the deformity was her fault. Delays…

  17. A Generalized Selection Rule for Pericyclic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Fu-Cheng; Pfeiffer, Gary V.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a convenient procedure, the Odd-Even Rule, for predicting the allowedness of forbiddenness of ground-state, pericyclic reactions. The rule is applied to a number of specific reactions. In contrast to the Woodward-Hoffman approach, the application to each reaction is always the same. (JN)

  18. Immunohistochemical appearance of corticosteroid contact hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, S M; Andrew, S M; Maseruka, H; Beck, M H

    1994-11-01

    We have studied, immunohistochemically, hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids and compared them with allergic contact dermatitis from nickel and appropriate controls. We could find no qualitative differences between nickel and corticosteroid contact reactions, providing further evidence that hypersensitivity to corticosteroids is an immunologically mediated reaction. PMID:7532558

  19. Reactions of butadiyne. 1: The reaction with hydrogen atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwanebeck, W.; Warnatz, J.

    1984-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen (H) atoms with butadiene (C4H2) was studied at room temperature in a pressure range between w mbar and 10 mbar. The primary step was an addition of H to C4H2 which is in its high pressure range at p 1 mbar. Under these conditions the following addition of a second H atom lies in the transition region between low and high pressure range. Vibrationally excited C4H4 can be deactivated to form buten-(1)-yne-(3)(C4H4) or decomposes into two C2H2 molecules. The rate constant at room temperature for primary step is given. The second order rate constant for the consumption of buten-(1)-yne-(3) is an H atom excess at room temperature is given.

  20. Nonadiabatic reaction of energetic molecules.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Atanu; Guo, Yuanqing; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2010-12-21

    Energetic materials store a large amount of chemical energy that can be readily converted into mechanical energy via decomposition. A number of different ignition processes such as sparks, shocks, heat, or arcs can initiate the excited electronic state decomposition of energetic materials. Experiments have demonstrated the essential role of excited electronic state decomposition in the energy conversion process. A full understanding of the mechanisms for the decomposition of energetic materials from excited electronic states will require the investigation and analysis of the specific topography of the excited electronic potential energy surfaces (PESs) of these molecules. The crossing of multidimensional electronic PESs creates a funnel-like topography, known as conical intersections (CIs). CIs are well established as a controlling factor in the excited electronic state decomposition of polyatomic molecules. This Account summarizes our current understanding of the nonadiabatic unimolecular chemistry of energetic materials through CIs and presents the essential role of CIs in the determination of decomposition pathways of these energetic systems. Because of the involvement of more than one PES, a decomposition process involving CIs is an electronically nonadiabatic mechanism. Based on our experimental observations and theoretical calculations, we find that a nonadiabatic reaction through CIs dominates the initial decomposition process of energetic materials from excited electronic states. Although the nonadiabatic behavior of some polyatomic molecules has been well studied, the role of nonadiabatic reactions in the excited electronic state decomposition of energetic molecules has not been well investigated. We use both nanosecond energy-resolved and femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopic techniques to determine the decomposition mechanism and dynamics of energetic species experimentally. Subsequently, we employ multiconfigurational methodologies (such as, CASSCF

  1. Incidents of chemical reactions in cell equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, N.M.; Barlow, C.R.

    1991-12-31

    Strongly exothermic reactions can occur between equipment structural components and process gases under certain accident conditions in the diffusion enrichment cascades. This paper describes the conditions required for initiation of these reactions, and describes the range of such reactions experienced over nearly 50 years of equipment operation in the US uranium enrichment program. Factors are cited which can promote or limit the destructive extent of these reactions, and process operations are described which are designed to control the reactions to minimize equipment damage, downtime, and the possibility of material releases.

  2. Electromagnetic effects on explosive reaction and plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tasker, Douglas G; Whitley, Von H; Mace, Jonathan L; Pemberton, Steven J; Sandoval, Thomas D; Lee, Richard J

    2010-01-01

    A number of studies have reported that electric fields can have quantifiable effects on the initiation and growth of detonation, yet the mechanisms of these effects are not clear. Candidates include Joule heating of the reaction zone, perturbations to the activation energy for chemical reaction, reduction of the Peierls energy barrier that facilitates dislocation motion, and acceleration of plasma projected from the reaction zone. In this study the possible role of plasma in the initiation and growth of explosive reaction is investigated. The effects of magnetic and electric field effects on reaction growth will be reviewed and recent experiments reported.

  3. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, J.L. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  4. Heat partition in damped reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Pal, D. )

    1990-12-01

    The effect of driving force on the division of excitation energy between the asymmetric colliding partners in deep inelastic heavy-ion collisions is studied in the nucleon-exchange model. For this purpose an event-by-event analysis using Monte Carlo simulation technique is performed. It is seen that the fraction of the total excitation energy carried by the projectile-like fragment is sensitive to the mass drift. The model is also applied to analyze the correlation between fragment mass and excitation energy for a given total energy loss and significant correlation is found. The reactions induced by {sup 56}Fe at 9 MeV/nucleon and {sup 74}Ge at 8.5 MeV/nucleon on {sup 165}Ho are considered in our analysis and the calculated correlations are in good agreement with the results obtained from the kinematic coincidence experiments.

  5. Transfer Reaction Studies with JENSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, P.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Chipps, K. A.; Greife, U.; Linhardt, L. E.; Kontos, A.; Kozub, R. L.; Matos, M.; Montes, F.; Pain, S. D.; Pittman, S. T.; Sachs, A.; Schatz, H.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Jensa Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) gas jet target system was designed to provide a gas target that was pure, localized, and dense. Several commissioning experiments with the JENSA target, performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), were undertaken to demonstrate the unique capability of JENSA for transfer reaction studies. JENSA has since completed its move from ORNL to the ReA3 reaccelerated beam hall at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). An overview of the JENSA design and operation will be presented, as well as a brief discussion of the experiments performed at ORNL with JENSA, with a focus on preliminary results from the 20Ne(p,t)18Ne commissioning experiment.

  6. The OH + HBr reaction revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravishankara, A. R.; Wine, P. H.; Wells, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Variable-temperature measurements of the rate coefficient /k(1)/ for the reaction OH + HBr yield Br + H2O are presented. The measurements are verified by two techniques: one involved a 266-nm pulsed-laser photolysis of O3/H2O/HBr/He mixtures in conjunction with time-resolved resonance fluorescence detection of OH, the second comprised pulsed laser-induced fluorescence detection of OH following 248-nm pulsed-laser photolysis of H2O2/HBr/Ar mixtures. It is reported that k(1) = (11.9 + or -1.4 x 10 to the -12th (cu cm)/(molecule)(s) independent of temperature. The measurements are compared with other available results.

  7. Acute transfusion reactions: an update.

    PubMed

    Scorer, T; Doughty, H

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade the use of blood products by the United Kingdom (UK) military has increased significantly; with the increase in transfusion comes an increased incidence of transfusion-related incidents. Acute transfusion reactions (ATRs) are a common consequence of transfusion, which vary widely in their severity and are likely to be under-reported, although reporting is a regulatory requirement. This paper discusses the importance of identifying ATRs and managing them appropriately. It introduces a flowchart (due to be incorporated in the next version of Joint Service Publication (JSP) 999, Clinical Guidelines for Operations (CGOs)), which is designed to assist the military multi-disciplinary team caring for patients in the operational environment. PMID:25895413

  8. Adverse Reactions of Ferric Carboxymaltose

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Navin; Shenoy, Smita; Bairy, K L; Sarma, Yashdeep

    2014-01-01

    The author reports a 55-year-old female diagnosed of chronic kidney disease grade-5 with associated co-morbidities like type 2 diabetes mellitus, diabetic retinopathy and hypothyroidism was admitted for arteriovenous fistula construction. She was started on ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of anaemia. She was given a test dose before administering the drug intravenously and she did not develop any reaction. The drug ferric carboxymaltose was then administered over a period of one hour. About half an hour after drug administration, the patient developed breathlessness and myalgia. After half hour of the above episode of breathlessness and myalgia she also developed vomiting (one episode). Patient was managed with oxygen therapy, IV fluids and other drugs like corticosteroids, phenaramine maleate and nalbuphine which controlled the above symptoms. PMID:25478369

  9. Local reaction kinetics by imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchorski, Yuri; Rupprechter, Günther

    2016-01-01

    In the present contribution we present an overview of our recent studies using the "kinetics by imaging" approach for CO oxidation on heterogeneous model systems. The method is based on the correlation of the PEEM image intensity with catalytic activity: scaled down to the μm-sized surface regions, such correlation allows simultaneous local kinetic measurements on differently oriented individual domains of a polycrystalline metal-foil, including the construction of local kinetic phase diagrams. This allows spatially- and component-resolved kinetic studies and, e.g., a direct comparison of inherent catalytic properties of Pt(hkl)- and Pd(hkl)-domains or supported μm-sized Pd-powder agglomerates, studies of the local catalytic ignition and the role of defects and grain boundaries in the local reaction kinetics.

  10. Adverse reactions of ferric carboxymaltose.

    PubMed

    Thanusubramanian, Harish; Patil, Navin; Shenoy, Smita; Bairy, K L; Sarma, Yashdeep

    2014-10-01

    The author reports a 55-year-old female diagnosed of chronic kidney disease grade-5 with associated co-morbidities like type 2 diabetes mellitus, diabetic retinopathy and hypothyroidism was admitted for arteriovenous fistula construction. She was started on ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of anaemia. She was given a test dose before administering the drug intravenously and she did not develop any reaction. The drug ferric carboxymaltose was then administered over a period of one hour. About half an hour after drug administration, the patient developed breathlessness and myalgia. After half hour of the above episode of breathlessness and myalgia she also developed vomiting (one episode). Patient was managed with oxygen therapy, IV fluids and other drugs like corticosteroids, phenaramine maleate and nalbuphine which controlled the above symptoms. PMID:25478369

  11. Chemical reactions in endoreversible thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Katharina; Hoffmann, Karl Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Endoreversible thermodynamics is a theory for the (approximate) description of thermodynamic non-equilibrium systems, which allows us to capture the ever present irreversibilities of real processes. For instance in heat engines the dissipation due to finite heat transport capabilities, as well as the resulting limitations in the energy fluxes, can be incorporated into the theory. It has thus been very successful in closing the gap between observed and theoretically predicted efficiencies. Here an extension of the theory is provided, with which chemical reactions can be included in the formalism. This opens up a wide field of applications for endoreversible modeling and the investigation of dissipative processes, for instance in fuel cells or batteries.

  12. Local reaction kinetics by imaging☆

    PubMed Central

    Suchorski, Yuri; Rupprechter, Günther

    2016-01-01

    In the present contribution we present an overview of our recent studies using the “kinetics by imaging” approach for CO oxidation on heterogeneous model systems. The method is based on the correlation of the PEEM image intensity with catalytic activity: scaled down to the μm-sized surface regions, such correlation allows simultaneous local kinetic measurements on differently oriented individual domains of a polycrystalline metal-foil, including the construction of local kinetic phase diagrams. This allows spatially- and component-resolved kinetic studies and, e.g., a direct comparison of inherent catalytic properties of Pt(hkl)- and Pd(hkl)-domains or supported μm-sized Pd-powder agglomerates, studies of the local catalytic ignition and the role of defects and grain boundaries in the local reaction kinetics. PMID:26865736

  13. Radiation reaction of multipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinski, P. O.

    2007-08-01

    A Poincaré-invariant description is proposed for the effective dynamics of a localized system of charged particles in classical electrodynamics in terms of the intrinsic multipole moments of the system. A relativistic-invariant definition for the intrinsic multipole moments of a system of charged particles is given. A new generally covariant action functional for a relativistic perfect fluid is proposed. In the case of relativistic charged dust, it is proven that the description of the problem of radiation reaction of multipole moments by the model of particles is equivalent to the description of this problem by a hydrodynamic model. An effective model is obtained for a pointlike neutral system of charged particles that possesses an intrinsic dipole moment, and the free dynamics of this system is described. The bound momentum of a point dipole is found.

  14. Cold molecules, collisions and reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    I will report on recent experiments of my group where we have been studying the formation of ultracold diatomic molecules and their subsequent inelastic/reactive collisions. For example, in one of these experiments we investigate collisions of triplet Rb2 molecules in the rovibrational ground state. We observe fast molecular loss and compare the measured loss rates to predictions based on universality. In another set of experiments we investigate the formation of (BaRb)+ molecules after three-body recombination of a single Ba+ ion with two Rb atoms in an ultracold gas of Rb atoms. Our investigations indicate that the formed (BaRb)+ molecules are weakly bound and that several secondary processes take place ranging from photodissociation of the (BaRb)+ molecule to reactive collisions with Rb atoms. I will explain how we can experimentally distinguish these processes and what the typical reaction rates are. Support from the German Research foundation DFG and the European Community is acknowledged.

  15. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum mechanical methods have been used to compute potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions. The reactions studied were among those believed to be important to the NASP and HSR programs and included the recombination of two H atoms with several different third bodies; the reactions in the thermal Zeldovich mechanism; the reactions of H atom with O2, N2, and NO; reactions involved in the thermal De-NO(x) process; and the reaction of CH(squared Pi) with N2 (leading to 'prompt NO'). These potential energy surfaces have been used to compute reaction rate constants and rates of unimolecular decomposition. An additional application was the calculation of transport properties of gases using a semiclassical approximation (and in the case of interactions involving hydrogen inclusion of quantum mechanical effects).

  16. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective was to obtain accurate potential energy surfaces (PES's) for a number of reactions which are important in the H/N/O combustion process. The interest in this is centered around the design of the SCRAM jet engine for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), which was envisioned as an air-breathing hydrogen-burning vehicle capable of reaching velocities as large as Mach 25. Preliminary studies indicated that the supersonic flow in the combustor region of the scram jet engine required accurate reaction rate data for reactions in the H/N/O system, some of which was not readily available from experiment. The most important class of combustion reactions from the standpoint of the NASP project are radical recombinaton reactions, since these reactions result in most of the heat release in the combustion process. Theoretical characterizations of the potential energy surfaces for these reactions are presented and discussed.

  17. The Ozone-Iodine-Chlorate Clock Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Sant'Anna, Rafaela T. P.; Monteiro, Emily V.; Pereira, Juliano R. T.; Faria, Roberto B.

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a new clock reaction based on ozone, iodine, and chlorate that differs from the known chlorate-iodine clock reaction because it does not require UV light. The induction period for this new clock reaction depends inversely on the initial concentrations of ozone, chlorate, and perchloric acid but is independent of the initial iodine concentration. The proposed mechanism considers the reaction of ozone and iodide to form HOI, which is a key species for producing non-linear autocatalytic behavior. The novelty of this system lies in the presence of ozone, whose participation has never been observed in complex systems such as clock or oscillating reactions. Thus, the autocatalysis demonstrated in this new clock reaction should open the possibility for a new family of oscillating reactions. PMID:24386257

  18. A Networks Approach to Modeling Enzymatic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Imhof, P

    2016-01-01

    Modeling enzymatic reactions is a demanding task due to the complexity of the system, the many degrees of freedom involved and the complex, chemical, and conformational transitions associated with the reaction. Consequently, enzymatic reactions are not determined by precisely one reaction pathway. Hence, it is beneficial to obtain a comprehensive picture of possible reaction paths and competing mechanisms. By combining individually generated intermediate states and chemical transition steps a network of such pathways can be constructed. Transition networks are a discretized representation of a potential energy landscape consisting of a multitude of reaction pathways connecting the end states of the reaction. The graph structure of the network allows an easy identification of the energetically most favorable pathways as well as a number of alternative routes. PMID:27497170

  19. Inflammatory reaction - communication of cells.

    PubMed

    Terheyden, Hendrik; Stadlinger, Bernd; Sanz, Mariano; Garbe, Annette I; Meyle, Jörg

    2014-04-01

    This article presents scientific background information on the animated 3D film "Inflammatory Reactions - Communication of Cells" (Quintessence Publications, ISBN 978-1-85097-231-0). Gingivitis and periodontitis are understood as the result of a coordinated action of a few clearly identified cellular players who communicate with each other via cytokines. For didactic reasons, the course of a periodontal infection is described here in four phases: (1) bacterial biofilm formation and development of a host response in the marginal periodontium, (2) innate immune response leading to gingivitis, (3) role of the adaptive immune system in attachment loss and pocket formation, and (4) down-regulation of inflammation and periodontal regeneration and repair following biofilm removal. The control of the cells is discussed as a cytokine network, which can be modulated in pro- or anti-inflammatory direction depending on the control of the bacterial infection. Degradation of soft tissue structural proteins like collagen and proteoglycans by matrix metalloproteinases and degradation of hard tissue matrix by osteoclasts are explained as an interference of the immune system with the natural equilibrium of tissue remodeling. Five mechanisms of promotion of bone loss through the influence of the immune system are described. One example is bone resorption as a consequence of the shift of the RANKL/osteoprotegerin balance by soluble RANKL synthesized by CD4(+) Th 1 cells as well as the interference with the coupling of osteoclasts and osteoblasts through dedifferentiation of osteoblasts by TNFα. Finally, the signaling required for down-regulation of inflammatory reactions and the reasons for the incomplete regeneration after periodontal bone loss are discussed. PMID:23600659

  20. Subdiffusion-reaction processes with A →B reactions versus subdiffusion-reaction processes with A +B→B reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosztołowicz, Tadeusz; Lewandowska, Katarzyna D.

    2014-09-01

    We consider the subdiffusion-reaction process with reactions of a type A +B→B (in which particles A are assumed to be mobile, whereas B are assumed to be static) in comparison to the subdiffusion-reaction process with A →B reactions which was studied by Sokolov, Schmidt, and Sagués [Phys. Rev. E 73, 031102 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevE.73.031102]. In both processes a rule that reactions can only occur between particles which continue to exist is taken into account. Although in both processes a probability of the vanishing of particle A due to a reaction is independent of both time and space variables (assuming that in the system with the A +B→B reactions, particles B are distributed homogeneously), we show that subdiffusion-reaction equations describing these processes as well as their Green's functions are qualitatively different. The reason for this difference is as follows. In the case of the former reaction, particles A and B have to meet with some probability before the reaction occurs in contradiction with the case of the latter reaction. For the subdiffusion process with the A +B→B reactions we consider three models which differ in some details concerning a description of the reactions. We base the method considered in this paper on a random walk model in a system with both discrete time and discrete space variables. Then the system with discrete variables is transformed into a system with both continuous time and continuous space variables. Such a method seems to be convenient in analyzing subdiffusion-reaction processes with partially absorbing or partially reflecting walls. The reason is that within this method we can determine Green's functions without a necessity of solving a fractional differential subdiffusion-reaction equation with boundary conditions at the walls. As an example, we use the model to find the Green's functions for a subdiffusive reaction system (with the reactions mentioned above), which is bounded by a partially absorbing wall

  1. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics and a fluctuation theorem for individual reaction steps in a chemical reaction network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Krishnendu; Das, Biswajit; Banerjee, Kinshuk; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2015-09-01

    We have introduced an approach to nonequilibrium thermodynamics of an open chemical reaction network in terms of the propensities of the individual elementary reactions and the corresponding reverse reactions. The method is a microscopic formulation of the dissipation function in terms of the relative entropy or Kullback-Leibler distance which is based on the analogy of phase space trajectory with the path of elementary reactions in a network of chemical process. We have introduced here a fluctuation theorem valid for each opposite pair of elementary reactions which is useful in determining the contribution of each sub-reaction on the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of overall reaction. The methodology is applied to an oligomeric enzyme kinetics at a chemiostatic condition that leads the reaction to a nonequilibrium steady state for which we have estimated how each step of the reaction is energy driven or entropy driven to contribute to the overall reaction.

  2. Palladium-catalyzed oxidative carbonylation reactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Feng; Neumann, Helfried; Beller, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    Palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions have become a powerful tool for advanced organic synthesis. This type of reaction is of significant value for the preparation of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, as well as advanced materials. Both, academic as well as industrial laboratories continuously investigate new applications of the different methodologies. Clearly, this area constitutes one of the major topics in homogeneous catalysis and organic synthesis. Among the different palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions, several carbonylations have been developed and widely used in organic syntheses and are even applied in the pharmaceutical industry on ton-scale. Furthermore, methodologies such as the carbonylative Suzuki and Sonogashira reactions allow for the preparation of interesting building blocks, which can be easily refined further on. Although carbonylative coupling reactions of aryl halides have been well established, palladium-catalyzed oxidative carbonylation reactions are also interesting. Compared with the reactions of aryl halides, oxidative carbonylation reactions offer an interesting pathway. The oxidative addition step could be potentially avoided in oxidative reactions, but only few reviews exist in this area. In this Minireview, we summarize the recent development in the oxidative carbonylation reactions. PMID:23307763

  3. Chemical Reactions in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wai, Chien M.; Hunt, Fred; Ji, Min; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    1998-12-01

    Utilizing supercritical fluids as environmentally benign solvents for chemical synthesis is one of the new approaches in the "greening" of chemistry. Carbon dioxide is the most widely used gas for supercritical fluid studies because of its moderate critical constants, nontoxic nature, and availability in pure form. One unique property of supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) is its high solubility for fluorinated compounds. Thus sc-CO2 can be used to replace Freons that are conventionally used as solvents for synthesis of perfluoro-polymers. Another property of sc-CO2 is its miscibility with gases such as H2. Heterogeneous reactions involving these gases may become homogeneous reactions in sc-CO2. Reactions in sc-CO2 may offer several advantages including controlling phase behavior and products, increasing speed of reactions, and obtaining specific reaction channels. This paper describes the following nine types of chemical reactions reported in the literature utilizing sc-CO2 as a solvent to illustrate the unique properties of the supercritical fluid reaction systems: (i) hydrogenation and hydroformylation, (ii) synthesis of organometallic compounds, (iii) metal chelation and extraction, (iv) preparation of inorganic nanoparticles, (v) stereo-selectivity of lipase-catalyzed reactions, (vi) asymmetric catalytic hydrogenation, (vii) polymerization, (viii) Diels-Alder reaction, and (ix) free radical reactions.

  4. Charge exchange reactions and applications to astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Ha, Eunja; Kajino, T.

    2012-11-01

    Neutrino-induced reactions have been known to play important roles as the neutrino process on the nucleosynthesis in core collapsing supernovae (SNe) explosions because expected neutrino flux and energy are sufficiently high enough to excite many relevant nuclei in spite of small cross sections of the weak interaction. However, we do not have enough data for the neutrino reaction to be exploited in the network calculation. Only a sparse data in the relevant energy range is known, in specific, for 12C. Therefore we have to rely on theoretical estimation of the reaction, which has two different modes, charge current (CC) and neutral current (NC). In particular, CC reactions are closely related to charge exchange reactions (CEXRs) which are feasible in the experiment, such as, (p,n) or (n,p) reactions. These CEXRs are usually dominated by the Gamow-Teller (GT) transition in the lower energy region. In this respect, any theoretical approaches for the neutrino reaction should be investigated for the CEXR because we have and expect more useful experimental data. After confirming our models to the GT strength deduced from the CEXR, we calculated neutrino-induced reactions in the energy range below the quasielastic region for nuclei of astrophysical importance. Our calculations are carried out with the Quasi-particle Random Phase Approximation (QRPA), which successfully described the nuclear beta decays of relevant nuclei. To describe neutrino-nucleus reactions, general multipole transitions by the weak interaction are considered for CC and NC reactions. Both reactions are described in a theoretical framework. Our results are shown to well reproduce the data from CEXRs and the sparse experimental data related to the neutrino-induced reaction, and further extended for neutrino reactions on various nuclear targets. Parts of the results are reported in this talk.

  5. Trimolecular reactions of uranium hexafluoride with water.

    PubMed

    Lind, Maria C; Garrison, Stephen L; Becnel, James M

    2010-04-01

    The hydrolysis reaction of uranium hexafluoride (UF(6)) is a key step in the synthesis of uranium dioxide (UO(2)) powder for nuclear fuels. Mechanisms for the hydrolysis reactions are studied here with density functional theory and the Stuttgart small-core scalar relativistic pseudopotential and associated basis set for uranium. The reaction of a single UF(6) molecule with a water molecule in the gas phase has been previously predicted to proceed over a relatively sizable barrier of 78.2 kJ x mol(-1), indicating this reaction is only feasible at elevated temperatures. Given the observed formation of a second morphology for the UO(2) product coupled with the observations of rapid, spontaneous hydrolysis at ambient conditions, an alternate reaction pathway must exist. In the present work, two trimolecular hydrolysis mechanisms are studied with density functional theory: (1) the reaction between two UF(6) molecules and one water molecule, and (2) the reaction of two water molecules with a single UF(6) molecule. The predicted reaction of two UF(6) molecules with one water molecule displays an interesting "fluorine-shuttle" mechanism, a significant energy barrier of 69.0 kJ x mol(-1) to the formation of UF(5)OH, and an enthalpy of reaction (DeltaH(298)) of +17.9 kJ x mol(-1). The reaction of a single UF(6) molecule with two water molecules displays a "proton-shuttle" mechanism, and is more favorable, having a slightly lower computed energy barrier of 58.9 kJ x mol(-1) and an exothermic enthalpy of reaction (DeltaH(298)) of -13.9 kJ x mol(-1). The exothermic nature of the overall UF(6) + 2H(2)O trimolecular reaction and the lowering of the barrier height with respect to the bimolecular reaction are encouraging. PMID:20210345

  6. Modeling Enzymatic Reactions in Proteins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesner, Richard

    2007-03-01

    We will discuss application of our density functional (DFT)-based QM/MM methodology to modeling a variety of protein active sites, including methane monooxygenase, myoglobin, and cytochrome P450. In addition to the calculation of intermediates, transition states, and rate constants, we will discuss modeling of reactions requiring protein conformational changes. Our methodology reliably achieves small errors as a result of imposition of the QM/MM boundary. However, the accuracy of DFT methods can vary significantly with the type of system under study. We will discuss a novel approach to the reduction of errors in gradient corrected and hybrid DFT functionals, using empirical localized orbital corrections (DFT-LOC), which addresses this problem effectively. For example, the mean unsigned error in atomization energies for the G3 data set using the B3LYP-LOC model is 0.8 kcal/mole, as compared with 4.8 kcal/mole for B3LYP and 1.0 kcal/mole for G3 theory.

  7. Reaction products of chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, A A

    1982-01-01

    Inspection of the available literature reveals that a detailed investigation of the aqueous organic chemistry of chlorine dioxide and systematic identification of products formed during water disinfection has not been considered. This must be done before an informed assessment can be made of the relative safety of using chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant alternative to chlorine. Although trihalomethanes are generally not formed by the action of chlorine dioxide, the products of chlorine dioxide treatment of organic materials are oxidized species, some of which also contain chlorine. The relative amounts of species types may depend on the amount of chlorine dioxide residual maintained and the concentration and nature of the organic material present in the source water. The trend toward lower concentrations of chlorinated by-products with increasing ClO2 concentration, which was observed with phenols, has not been observed with natural humic materials as measured by the organic halogen parameter. Organic halogen concentrations have been shown to increase with increasing chlorine dioxide dose, but are much lower than those observed when chlorine is applied. Aldehydes have been detected as apparent by-products of chlorine dioxide oxidation reactions in a surface water that is a drinking water source. Some other nonchlorinated products of chlorine dioxide treatment may be quinones and epoxides. The extent of formation of these moieties within the macromolecular humic structure is also still unknown. PMID:7151750

  8. Clindamycin-induced hypersensitivity reaction.

    PubMed

    Bulloch, Marilyn N; Baccas, Jonathan T; Arnold, Scott

    2016-06-01

    Drug-induced anaphylaxis is an unpredictable adverse reaction. Although it may occur with any medication, antibiotics induce more cases of anaphylaxis than any other medication class with most cases being induced by β-lactam antibiotics. Clindamycin is an antibiotic with good gram-positive and anaerobe coverage which is often used in patients with β-lactam allergies. We report the case of a 46-year-old female who experienced anaphylaxis after a dose of intravenous (IV) clindamycin. Following treatment with methylprednisolone, epinephrine, diphenhydramine, and albuterol, the patient stabilized. The patient's score on the Naranjo's algorithm was 8 (probable); a score of 9 (definite) limited only by absence of drug re-challenge. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a clindamycin-induced anaphylaxis where the patient was not exposed to any other agent that may have triggered the response, the first case in the United States, and only the third documented case in the literature. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for drug-induced anaphylaxis in all medications. PMID:26216470

  9. Demisable Reaction-Wheel Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roder, Russell; Ahronovich, Eliezer; Davis, Milton C., III

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses the concept of a demisable motor-drive-and-flywheel assembly [reaction-wheel assembly (RWA)] used in controlling the attitude of a spacecraft. Demisable as used here does not have its traditional legal meaning; instead, it signifies susceptible to melting, vaporizing, and/or otherwise disintegrating during re-entry of the spacecraft into the atmosphere of the Earth so as not to pose a hazard to anyone or anything on the ground. Prior RWAs include parts made of metals (e.g., iron, steel, and titanium) that melt at high temperatures and include structures of generally closed character that shield some parts (e.g., magnets) against re-entry heating. In a demisable RWA, the flywheel would be made of aluminum, which melts at a lower temperature. The flywheel web would not be a solid disk but would have a more open, nearly-spoke-like structure so that it would disintegrate more rapidly; hence, the flywheel rim would separate more rapidly so that parts shielded by the rim would be exposed sooner to re-entry heating. In addition, clearances between the flywheel and other components would be made greater, imparting a more open character and thus increasing the exposure of those components.

  10. 2005 Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cynthia M. Friend

    2006-03-14

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2005 Chemical Reactions at Surfaces was held at Ventura Beach Marriott, Ventura California from February 13, 2005 through February 18, 2005. The Conference was well-attended with 124 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to these formal interactions, 'free time' was scheduled to allow informal discussions. Such discussions are fostering new collaborations and joint efforts in the field.

  11. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is disclosed. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  12. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  13. Glycation Reactions of Casein Micelles.

    PubMed

    Moeckel, Ulrike; Duerasch, Anja; Weiz, Alexander; Ruck, Michael; Henle, Thomas

    2016-04-13

    After suspensions of micellar casein or nonmicellar sodium caseinate had been heated, respectively, in the presence and absence of glucose for 0-4 h at 100 °C, glycation compounds were quantitated. The formation of Amadori products as indicators for the "early" Maillard reaction were in the same range for both micellar and nonmicellar caseins, indicating that reactive amino acid side chains within the micelles are accessible for glucose in a comparable way as in nonmicellar casein. Significant differences, however, were observed concerning the formation of the advanced glycation end products (AGEs), namely, N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine (CML), pyrraline, pentosidine, and glyoxal-lysine dimer (GOLD). CML could be observerd in higher amounts in nonmicellar casein, whereas in the micelles the pyrraline formation was increased. Pentosidine and GOLD were formed in comparable amounts. Furthermore, the extent of protein cross-linking was significantly higher in the glycated casein micelles than in the nonmicellar casein samples. Dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy showed that glycation has no influence on the size of the casein micelles, indicating that cross-linking occurs only in the interior of the micelles, but altered the surface morphology. Studies on glycation and nonenzymatic cross-linking can contribute to the understanding of the structure of casein micelles. PMID:27018258

  14. Human collective reactions to threat.

    PubMed

    Dezecache, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    A common assumption regarding mass emergency situations is that individuals in such contexts behave in a way that maximizes their likelihood to escape, at the expense, or with little concern for, the welfare and survival of their neighbors. Doing so, they might even compromise the effectiveness of group evacuation. This conception follows the views of early works on crowd psychology, a tradition born with Gustave Le Bon's The Crowd: a study of the Popular Mind, first published in 1895, and which has had a tremendous impact on scientific representations of people's behavior in mass emergency contexts. Indeed, this work has greatly contributed to the idea that, in such situations, people revert to a primitive, impulsive, irrational, and antisocial nature, causing the breakdown of social order. However, more empirically oriented studies have consistently reported little collective panic, as well as a great deal of solidarity and pro-social behavior during mass emergency situations. Because of institutional barriers, such views have remained largely unknown to cognitive psychologists. Yet these are important results in that they show that human individual and collective reactions to threat are primarily affiliative. Indeed, far from leading to the breakdown of the social fabrics, the presence of a common threat can strengthen social bonds. PMID:26263225

  15. Pyrotechnic reaction residue particle analysis.

    PubMed

    Kosanke, Kenneth L; Dujay, Richard C; Kosanke, Bonnie J

    2006-03-01

    Pyrotechnic reaction residue particle (PRRP) production, sampling and analysis are all very similar to that for primer gunshot residue. In both cases, the preferred method of analysis uses scanning electron microscopy to locate suspect particles and then uses energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to characterize the particle's constituent chemical elements. There are relatively few times when standard micro-analytical chemistry performed on pyrotechnic residues may not provide sufficient information for forensic investigators. However, on those occasions, PRRP analysis provides a greatly improved ability to discriminate between materials of pyrotechnic origin and other unrelated substances also present. The greater specificity of PRRP analysis is the result of its analyzing a large number of individual micron-sized particles, rather than producing only a single integrated result such as produced using standard micro-analytical chemistry. For example, PRRP analyses are used to demonstrate its ability to successfully (1) discriminate between pyrotechnic residues and unrelated background contamination, (2) identify that two different pyrotechnic compositions had previously been exploded within the same device, and (3) establish the chronology of an incident involving two separate and closely occurring explosions. PMID:16566762

  16. Reaction Coordinates and Mechanistic Hypothesis Tests.

    PubMed

    Peters, Baron

    2016-05-27

    Reaction coordinates are integral to several classic rate theories that can (a) predict kinetic trends across conditions and homologous reactions, (b) extract activation parameters with a clear physical interpretation from experimental rates, and (c) enable efficient calculations of free energy barriers and rates. New trajectory-based rare events methods can provide rates directly from dynamical trajectories without a reaction coordinate. Trajectory-based frameworks can also generate ideal (but abstract) reaction coordinates such as committors and eigenfunctions of the master equation. However, rates and mechanistic insights obtained from trajectory-based methods and abstract coordinates are not readily generalized across simulation conditions or reaction families. We discuss methods for identifying physically meaningful reaction coordinates, including committor analysis, variational transition state theory, Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory, and statistical inference methods that can use path sampling data to screen, mix, and optimize thousands of trial coordinates. Special focus is given to likelihood maximization and inertial likelihood maximization approaches. PMID:27090846

  17. Reaction Coordinates and Mechanistic Hypothesis Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Baron

    2016-05-01

    Reaction coordinates are integral to several classic rate theories that can (a) predict kinetic trends across conditions and homologous reactions, (b) extract activation parameters with a clear physical interpretation from experimental rates, and (c) enable efficient calculations of free energy barriers and rates. New trajectory-based rare events methods can provide rates directly from dynamical trajectories without a reaction coordinate. Trajectory-based frameworks can also generate ideal (but abstract) reaction coordinates such as committors and eigenfunctions of the master equation. However, rates and mechanistic insights obtained from trajectory-based methods and abstract coordinates are not readily generalized across simulation conditions or reaction families. We discuss methods for identifying physically meaningful reaction coordinates, including committor analysis, variational transition state theory, Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory, and statistical inference methods that can use path sampling data to screen, mix, and optimize thousands of trial coordinates. Special focus is given to likelihood maximization and inertial likelihood maximization approaches.

  18. Anatomy of an Elementary Chemical Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Andrew J.; Zare, Richard N.

    1998-09-01

    The alchemists of old sought the knowledge to transform one material to another-for example, base metals into gold-as a path to the elixir of life. As chemists have concerned themselves with the transformation from compound to compound, so they have become involved in trying to uncover the structures of molecules and the pathways that reactions follow. Classically, the study of reaction mechanisms in chemistry encompasses reaction kinetics, the study of velocities or rates of reactions, and reaction dynamics, the study of the nanoscopic motion and rearrangement of atoms during a reactive event. An essential aim of this article is to bring the reader to a favorable vantage point with a brief introduction to reactive dynamics, and from there to describe some examples of recent strategies that have been employed to promote a fundamental understanding of the anatomy of elementary chemical reactions. In the final section we ponder future directions for this rapidly evolving field of research.

  19. Delayed reactions to reusable protective gloves.

    PubMed

    Pontén, Ann; Dubnika, Inese

    2009-04-01

    The materials in plastic protective gloves are thought to cause less contact allergy than rubber gloves. Our aim was to estimate the frequency of delayed reactions to different types of reusable protective gloves among dermatitis patients. 2 x 2 cm pieces of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) gloves, nitrile gloves, and natural rubber latex (NRL) gloves were tested as is in consecutive dermatitis patients tested with the baseline series. Among 658 patients, 6 patients reacted to PVC gloves and 6 patients to the NRL gloves. None reacted to both these types of gloves. Five of six patients with reactions to rubber gloves reacted to thiuram mix in the baseline series. Delayed reactions to reusable PVC gloves may be as common as to reusable NRL gloves. In contrast to most reactions to the NRL glove, the reactions to the PVC glove had no obvious association with reactions to any allergen(s) in the baseline series. PMID:19338595

  20. Periosteal reaction in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Joong Kyong; Lee, You Sun; Chung, Hey Won; Cha, Hoon-Suk; Koh, Eun-Mi

    2007-12-01

    Musculoskeletal complaints are the most common presenting symptoms in most of the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, periosteal new bone formation is an extraordinarily rare condition in SLE. We report a case of periosteal reaction in SLE. A 31-year-old woman with SLE presented with both knee pain. Radiographs revealed periosteal reactions in both femur and tibia and around the metaphysis of the right distal tibia. Periosteal reaction can be caused by benign or malignant lesions and infection. We cannot find any other cause of periosteal reaction in our case after thorough evaluations. Periosteal reaction in SLE might be associated with inflammatory vascular changes. This is the first report of periosteal reaction in SLE after the 1990s description and the first report in Korea. PMID:17920323

  1. Antibody-mediated cofactor-driven reactions

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reactions capable of being rate-enhanced by auxiliary species which interact with the reactants but do not become chemically bound to them in the formation of the final product are performed in the presence of antibodies which promote the reactions. The antibodies contain regions within their antigen binding sites which recognize the auxiliary species in a conformation which promotes the reaction. The antigen binding site frequently recognizes a particular transition state complex or other high energy complex along the reaction coordinate, thereby promoting the progress of the reaction along the desired route as opposed to other less favorable routes. Various classes of reaction together with appropriate antigen binding site specificities tailored for each are disclosed.

  2. Studying Reaction Intermediates Formed at Graphenic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Depanjan; Sen Gupta, Soujit; Narayanan, Rahul; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2014-03-01

    We report in-situ production and detection of intermediates at graphenic surfaces, especially during alcohol oxidation. Alcohol oxidation to acid occurs on graphene oxide-coated paper surface, driven by an electrical potential, in a paper spray mass spectrometry experiment. As paper spray ionization is a fast process and the time scale matches with the reaction time scale, we were able to detect the intermediate, acetal. This is the first observation of acetal formed in surface oxidation. The process is not limited to alcohols and the reaction has been extended to aldehydes, amines, phosphenes, sugars, etc., where reaction products were detected instantaneously. By combining surface reactions with ambient ionization and mass spectrometry, we show that new insights into chemical reactions become feasible. We suggest that several other chemical transformations may be studied this way. This work opens up a new pathway for different industrially and energetically important reactions using different metal catalysts and modified substrate.

  3. Estimating the Backup Reaction Wheel Orientation Using Reaction Wheel Spin Rates Flight Telemetry from a Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizvi, Farheen

    2013-01-01

    A report describes a model that estimates the orientation of the backup reaction wheel using the reaction wheel spin rates telemetry from a spacecraft. Attitude control via the reaction wheel assembly (RWA) onboard a spacecraft uses three reaction wheels (one wheel per axis) and a backup to accommodate any wheel degradation throughout the course of the mission. The spacecraft dynamics prediction depends upon the correct knowledge of the reaction wheel orientations. Thus, it is vital to determine the actual orientation of the reaction wheels such that the correct spacecraft dynamics can be predicted. The conservation of angular momentum is used to estimate the orientation of the backup reaction wheel from the prime and backup reaction wheel spin rates data. The method is applied in estimating the orientation of the backup wheel onboard the Cassini spacecraft. The flight telemetry from the March 2011 prime and backup RWA swap activity on Cassini is used to obtain the best estimate for the backup reaction wheel orientation.

  4. Anaphylactoid reactions with gastrointestinal contrast media.

    PubMed

    Skucas, J

    1997-04-01

    Significant anaphylactoid reactions to gastrointestinal contrast media are rare. Whether a patient who is atopic or has asthma is predisposed to these reactions is speculative. The rare patient who previously had a severe allergic reaction to such a product probably should not undergo a subsequent examination with a similar agent. The American College of Radiology classification of contrast media side effects can also be applied to the gastrointestinal contrast media. PMID:9124150

  5. Reaction-diffusion waves in biology.

    PubMed

    Volpert, V; Petrovskii, S

    2009-12-01

    The theory of reaction-diffusion waves begins in the 1930s with the works in population dynamics, combustion theory and chemical kinetics. At the present time, it is a well developed area of research which includes qualitative properties of travelling waves for the scalar reaction-diffusion equation and for system of equations, complex nonlinear dynamics, numerous applications in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine. This paper reviews biological applications of reaction-diffusion waves. PMID:20416847

  6. The Science of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storms, Edmund

    2007-03-01

    The large literature describing the anomalous behavior attributed to cold fusion or low energy nuclear reactions has been critically described in a recently published book. Over 950 publications are evaluated allowing the phenomenon to be understood. A new class of nuclear reactions has been discovered that are able to generate practical energy without significant radiation or radioactivity. Edmund K Storms, The Science of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions, in press (2006). Also see: http://www.lenr-canr.org/StudentsGuide.htm .

  7. Dinuclear systems in complete fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Zubov, A. S.

    2014-09-01

    Formation and evolution of dinuclear systems in reactions of complete fusion are considered. Based on the dinuclear system concept, the process of compound nucleus formation is studied. Arguments confirming the validity of this concept are given. The main problems of describing the complete fusion in adiabatic approximation are listed. Calculations of evaporation residue cross sections in complete fusion reactions leading to formation of superheavy nuclei are shown. Isotopic trends of the cross sections of heavy nuclei formation in complete fusion reactions are considered.

  8. Diamine Ligands in Copper-Catalyzed Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Surry, David S.

    2012-01-01

    The utility of copper-mediated cross-coupling reactions has been significantly increased by the development of mild reaction conditions and the ability to employ catalytic amounts of copper. The use of diamine-based ligands has been important in these advances and in this review we discuss these systems, including the choice of reaction conditions and applications in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, natural products and designed materials. PMID:22384310

  9. AMSD Reaction Structure Cryo Deformation Test Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, Ron; Hraba, John; Thornton, Gary; Baker, Mark; Haight, Harlan; Hadaway, James; Blackwell, Lisa; Stahl, Phil (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The method developed for measuring both in-plane & out-of-plane cryo deformations of AMSD reaction structures at the XRCF will be presented. For in-plane measurements, a theodolite is used to track the positions of several (up to ten) targets on the reaction structure. For out-of-plane measurements, the Leica ADM is used to measure the change in distance to several (up to ten) corner cubes attached to the reaction structure.

  10. Novel Reagents for Multi-Component Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanguang; Basso, Andrea; Nenajdenko, Valentine G.; Gulevich, Anton V.; Krasavin, Mikhail; Bushkova, Ekaterina; Parchinsky, Vladislav; Banfi, Luca; Basso, Andrea; Cerulli, Valentina; Guanti, Giuseppe; Riva, Renata; Rozentsveig, Igor B.; Rozentsveig, Gulnur N.; Popov, Aleksandr V.; Serykh, Valeriy J.; Levkovskaya, Galina G.; Cao, Song; Shen, Li; Liu, Nianjin; Wu, Jingjing; Li, Lina; Qian, Xuhong; Chen, Xiaopeng; Wang, Hongbo; Feng, Jinwu; Wang, Yanguang; Lu, Ping; Heravi, Majid M.; Sadjadi, Samaheh; Kazemizadeh, Ali Reza; Ramazani, Ali; Kudyakova, Yulia S.; Goryaeva, Marina V.; Burgart, Yanina V.; Saloutin, Victor I.; Mossetti, Riccardo; Pirali, Tracey; Tron, Gian Cesare; Rozhkova, Yulia S.; Mayorova, Olga A.; Shklyaev, Yuriy V.; Zhdanko, Alexander G.; Nenajdenko, Valentine G.; Stryapunina, Olga G.; Plekhanova, Irina V.; Glushkov, Vladimir A.; Shklyaev, Yurii V.

    Ketenimines are a class of versatile and highly reactive intermediates that can participate in a variety of organic reactions, such as nucleophilic additions, radical additions, [2 + 2] and [2 + 4] cycloadditions, and sigmatropic rearrangements. In this presentation, we report on a series of multi-component reactions that involve a ketenimine intermediate. These reactions could furnish diverse heterocyclic compounds, including functionalized iminocoumarin, iminodihydroqunolines, iminothiochromens, pyrrolines, isoquinolines, pyridines, β-lactams, imino-1,2-dihydrocoumarins, and benzimidazoles.

  11. Reactions of salaried physicians to hospital decline.

    PubMed Central

    Lachman, R; Noy, S

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To examine the Exit, Loyalty, Voice, and Neglect (ELVN) reactions of full-time salaried physicians to the decline of their employing hospital, and to explore factors possibly associated with the choice of reactions. DATA SOURCE. The study analyzes data collected in a larger survey of work attitudes of 703 hospital physicians, constituting a representative national sample of (every tenth) salaried hospital physicians in Israel. DATA COLLECTION. Data were collected through a self-administered mail questionnaire with return envelopes attached. STUDY DESIGN. A survey design was used. Survey questionnaires included composite measures of the ELVN reaction as well as of the main predictors of reaction choice: job satisfaction, hospital commitment, job investment, alternatives, tenure, and managerial and senior positions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. The reactions of salaried physicians to hospital decline include the whole range of ELVN reactions. The choice of each reaction was found associated with a different set of disposition, situation, and position predictors. CONCLUSIONS. The ELVN typology is relevant for examining physicians' reactions to hospital decline, which appear to extend beyond the simple stay/leave dichotomy commonly used. The reactions of Exit, Loyalty, Voice, and Neglect are different in nature, and appear to reflect the different sets of circumstances that salaried physicians may face. Implications of these results for coping with hospital decline, hospital-physician relationships, and integration strategies are discussed. PMID:8675438

  12. Allergic reactions associated with pegaspargase in adults.

    PubMed

    Chang, Abraham; Kim, Michelle; Seyer, Maggie; Patel, Samit

    2016-07-01

    One of the severe toxicities of pegaspargase (PEG) is the development of allergic reactions. This study retrospectively assessed 311 PEG doses administered to 139 acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients from May 1, 2008 to July 30, 2014 for allergic reactions based on the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4.03. Fourteen reactions were recorded in 13 patients (9.4%). The rate of reaction did not differ between patients who received pre-medications and those who did not (p = 0.939). Patients who received only IV PEG doses had a higher rate of reaction compared to only IM PEG (14.0% vs 1.6%; p = 0.010). Six of the seven patients with CTCAE grade 4 reactions received a majority of IV doses, suggesting that severity of reactions may increase with IV administration. Capped doses at 3750 units only had a reaction rate of 2.3%, while uncapped doses over 3750 units were found to have a 6.0% reaction rate (p = 0.194). PMID:26461960

  13. Automatic analysis of computation in biochemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Egri-Nagy, Attila; Nehaniv, Chrystopher L; Rhodes, John L; Schilstra, Maria J

    2008-01-01

    We propose a modeling and analysis method for biochemical reactions based on finite state automata. This is a completely different approach compared to traditional modeling of reactions by differential equations. Our method aims to explore the algebraic structure behind chemical reactions using automatically generated coordinate systems. In this paper we briefly summarize the underlying mathematical theory (the algebraic hierarchical decomposition theory of finite state automata) and describe how such automata can be derived from the description of chemical reaction networks. We also outline techniques for the flexible manipulation of existing models. As a real-world example we use the Krebs citric acid cycle. PMID:18606208

  14. Energy distribution among reaction products. V.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anlauf, K. G.; Horne, D. S.; Macdonald, R. G.; Polanyi, J. C.; Woodall, K. B.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of three reactions, one point of theoretical interest being the predicted correlation between barrier height and barrier location. The H + Br 2 reaction having a lower activation barrier than H + Cl 2, should have an earlier barrier, and hence a greater percentage attractive energy release and higher efficiency of vibrational excitation. Information is developed concerning the effect of isotopic substitution in the pair of reactions H + Cl 2 and D + Cl 2. The 'arrested relaxation' method was used. Essentially, the method involves reacting two diffuse reagent beams in a reaction vessel with background pressure less than 0.001 torr, and with walls cooled by liquid nitrogen or liquid helium.

  15. Carbon-Fixing Reactions of Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    Summaryplantcell;28/7/tpc.116.tt0716/FIG1F1fig1Photosynthesis in plants converts the energy of sunlight into chemical energy. Although photosynthesis involves many proteins and catalytic processes, it often is described as two sets of reactions, the light-dependent reactions and the carbon-fixing reactions. This lesson introduces the core biochemistry of the carbon-fixing reactions of photosynthesis, as well as its variations, C4 and CAM. Finally, it addresses how and why plants are affected by rising atmospheric CO2 levels, and research efforts to increase photosynthetic efficiency in current and future conditions. PMID:27493209

  16. EXFOR Library of Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The EXFOR library contains an extensive compilation of experimental nuclear reaction data up to 1 GeV. Neutron reactions have been compiled systematically since the discovery of the neutron, while charged particle(up to carbon) and photon reactions have been covered less extensively. Files contain nuclear reaction data such as cross sections, spectra, angular distributions, polarizations, etc, along with information on experimental technique, error analysis, and applied standards. Numerous search parameters include: target, beam, product, experimental method, and even author and publication names. The library contains data from more than 20,000 experiments. (Specialized Interface)

  17. Atmospheric pressure microwave assisted heterogeneous catalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Chemat-Djenni, Zoubida; Hamada, Boudjema; Chemat, Farid

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate microwave selective heating phenomena and their impact on heterogeneous chemical reactions. We also present a tool which will help microwave chemists to answer to such questions as "My reaction yields 90% after 7 days at reflux; is it possible to obtain the same yield after a few minutes under microwaves?" and to have an approximation of their reactions when conducted under microwaves with different heterogeneous procedures. This model predicting reaction kinetics and yields under microwave heating is based on the Arrhenius equation, in agreement with experimental data and procedures. PMID:17909495

  18. Chemical reactions in low-g

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P. G.; Facemire, B. R.

    1978-01-01

    The Apollo-Soyuz flight experiment, 'Chemical Foams' demonstrated that foams and air/liquid dispersions are much more stable in low-gravity than on the ground. It thus should be possible to conduct unique chemical reactions in space foams. The low-g results and subsequent ground work on the formaldehyde clock reaction indicate that the reaction is strongly influenced by (1) dissociated and undissociated solution species being adsorbed at solid/liquid and gas/liquid surfaces and (2) chemical reaction rates apparently being affected by long-range forces determined by the liquid mass and the extent and nature of all surface interfaces.

  19. State- and bond-selected unimolecular reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Crim, F.F. )

    1990-09-21

    Unimolecular reactions are crucial chemical events that have been the focus of increasingly sophisticated investigation in the past decade. Unraveling their details is one fundamental goal of experimental and theoretical studies of chemical dynamics. New techniques are revealing the possibilities, and challenges, of eigenstate- and bond-specific unimolecular reactions. These experiments clearly demonstrate the intimate connection between intramolecular processes and unimolecular reaction dynamics and suggest means of exploiting molecular properties to study and control reactions at the level of individual quantum states. 55 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Accelerated glass reaction under PCT conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Bradley, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    Static leach tests similar to PCT (Product Consistency Test) were performed for up to 2 years to assess long-term reaction behavior of high-level nuclear waste glasses similar to those at Defense Waste Processing Facility. These tests show the reaction rate to decrease with the reaction time from an initially high rate to a low rate, but then to accelerate to a higher rate after reaction times of about 1 year, depending on glass surface area/leachant volume ratio used. Solution concentrations of soluble glass components increase as the reaction is accelerated, while release of other glass components into solution is controlled by secondary phases. Net result is that transformation of glass to stable phases is accelerated while the solution becomes enriched in soluble components not effectively contained in secondary phases. Rate becomes linear in time after the acceleration and may be similar to the initial forward rate. A current model of glass reaction predicts that the glass reaction will be accelerated upon the formation of secondary phases which lower the silicic acid solution concentration. These tests show total Si concentration to increase upon reaction acceleration, however, which may be due to the slightly higher pH attained with the acceleration. The sudden change in the reaction rate is likely due to secondary phase formation. 17 refs, 2 tabs, 3 figs.

  1. Accelerated glass reaction under PCT conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Bradley, C.R.

    1992-12-31

    Static leach tests similar to PCT (Product Consistency Test) were performed for up to 2 years to assess long-term reaction behavior of high-level nuclear waste glasses similar to those at Defense Waste Processing Facility. These tests show the reaction rate to decrease with the reaction time from an initially high rate to a low rate, but then to accelerate to a higher rate after reaction times of about 1 year, depending on glass surface area/leachant volume ratio used. Solution concentrations of soluble glass components increase as the reaction is accelerated, while release of other glass components into solution is controlled by secondary phases. Net result is that transformation of glass to stable phases is accelerated while the solution becomes enriched in soluble components not effectively contained in secondary phases. Rate becomes linear in time after the acceleration and may be similar to the initial forward rate. A current model of glass reaction predicts that the glass reaction will be accelerated upon the formation of secondary phases which lower the silicic acid solution concentration. These tests show total Si concentration to increase upon reaction acceleration, however, which may be due to the slightly higher pH attained with the acceleration. The sudden change in the reaction rate is likely due to secondary phase formation. 17 refs, 2 tabs, 3 figs.

  2. Process for operating equilibrium controlled reactions

    DOEpatents

    Nataraj, Shankar; Carvill, Brian Thomas; Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond; Mayorga, Steven Gerard; Gaffney, Thomas Richard; Brzozowski, Jeffrey Richard

    2001-01-01

    A cyclic process for operating an equilibrium controlled reaction in a plurality of reactors containing an admixture of an adsorbent and a reaction catalyst suitable for performing the desired reaction which is operated in a predetermined timed sequence wherein the heating and cooling requirements in a moving reaction mass transfer zone within each reactor are provided by indirect heat exchange with a fluid capable of phase change at temperatures maintained in each reactor during sorpreaction, depressurization, purging and pressurization steps during each process cycle.

  3. Stability of sharp reaction fronts in porous rocks and implications for non-sharp reaction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wangen, Magnus

    2014-05-01

    The flow of reactive fluids in the subsurface, like for instance acids, may create reaction fronts. A sharp reaction front is an idealization of the narrow zone where the reaction takes place. Narrow reaction zones are studied with a one-component reaction transport model, where a first order reaction changes the porosity. The porosity field is coupled to the permeability field, where an increasing porosity leads to an increasing permeability. Therefore, the reaction has a feed-back on the flow field. We have derived 1D approximate solutions for the change in concentration and porosity across the reaction zone. These solutions are used to derive a condition for reaction fronts to be narrow. The condition gives a minimum reaction rate necessary for 90% of the reaction to be restricted to the given area. Sharp fronts are idealizations of narrow fronts that are more amendable for analytical treatment. A condition has recently been derived for the stability of sharp reaction fronts in homogeneous porous medium using linear stability analysis. The condition gives that a perturbation of a flat reaction front of any wave-length becomes unstable if the permeability behind the front increases. The front instability grows faster for short wave lengths than for long wave lengths. Similarly, the perturbations of the front will die out if the permeability behind the front decreases, and short wave length perturbations will die out faster than long wave length perturbations. It is a condition that applies for both 2D and 3D porous media. Numerical experiments are shown that demonstrate the front stability criterion, when the fronts are narrow, but not sharp. The sharp front approximation turns out to be useful for the interpretation of reactions that are not sufficiently fast to give narrow reaction zones, when the reaction alters the porosity- and the permeability fields. Dissolution is an important example of reactions that increase the porosity and therefore the permeability

  4. Time scale in quasifission reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.; Paul, P.; Nestler, J.

    1995-08-01

    The quasifission process arises from the hindrance of the complete fusion process when heavy-ion beams are used. The strong dissipation in the system tends to prevent fusion and lead the system towards reseparation into two final products of similar mass reminiscent of a fission process. This dissipation slows down the mass transfer and shape transformation and allows for the emission of high energy {gamma}-rays during the process, albeit with a low probability. Giant Dipole {gamma} rays emitted during this time have a characteristic spectral shape and may thus be discerned in the presence of a background of {gamma} rays emitted from the final fission-like fragments. Since the rate of GDR {gamma} emission is very well established, the strength of this component may therefore be used to measure the timescale of the quasifission process. In this experiment we studied the reaction between 368-MeV {sup 58}Ni and a {sup 165}Ho target, where deep inelastic scattering and quasifission processes are dominant. Coincidences between fission fragments (detected in four position-sensitive avalanche detectors) and high energy {gamma} rays (measured in a 10{close_quotes} x 10{close_quotes} actively shielded NaI detector) were registered. Beams were provided by the Stony Brook Superconducting Linac. The {gamma}-ray spectrum associated with deep inelastic scattering events is well reproduced by statistical cooling of projectile and target-like fragments with close to equal initial excitation energy sharing. The y spectrum associated with quasifission events is well described by statistical emission from the fission fragments alone, with only weak evidence for GDR emission from the mono-nucleus. A 1{sigma} limit of t{sub ss} < 11 x 10{sup -21} s is obtained for the mono-nucleus lifetime, which is consistent with the lifetime obtained from quasifission fragment angular distributions. A manuscript was accepted for publication.

  5. Some Concepts in Reaction Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polannyi, John C.

    1972-01-01

    In 1929 London 1 published a very approximate solution of the Schroedinger equation for a system of chemical interest: H3. To the extent that chemistry can be regarded as existing separately from physics, this was a landmark in the history of chemistry, comparable in importance to the landmark in the history of physics marked by the appearance of the Heitler-London equation for H2. The expression for H3, was, of necessity, even less accurate than that for H2, but chemists, like the habitual poor, were accustomed to this sort of misfortune. Together with the physicists they enjoyed the sensation of living in a renaissance. The physicists still could not calculate a great deal that was of interest to them, and the chemists could calculate less, but both could now dream. It would be too easy to say that their dreams were dreams of unlimited computer time. Their dreams were a lot more productive than that. Two years after London published his equation, H. Eyring and M. Polanyi obtained the first numerical energy surface for H3. They infused the London equation with a measure of empiricism to produce an energy surface which, whether or not it was correct in its details, provided a basis for further speculations of an important sort. The existence of a tangible energy surface in 1931 stimulated speculation along two different lines. The following year Pelzer and Wigner used this London-Eyring-Polanyi (LEP) energy surface for a thermodynamic treatment of the reaction rate in H + H2. This important development reached its full flowering a few years later. In these remarks I shall be concerned with another line of development. A second more-or-less distinct category of speculation that began with (and, indeed, in) the 1931 paper has to do with the dynamics of individual reactive encounters under the influence of specified interaction potentials.

  6. Hypersensitivity reactions associated with oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Saif, M Wasif

    2006-09-01

    The reported incidence of hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) associated with oxaliplatin in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) is approximately 12%, with 1 - 2% of patients developing grade 3 or 4 in severity. However, the recent rising incidence of HSR to oxaliplatin observed is the result of increasing clinical use. HSR to oxaliplatin may manifest as facial flushing, rash/hives, tachycardia, dyspnoea, erythema, pruritus, fever, tongue swelling, headache, chills, weakness, vomiting, burning sensations, dizziness and oedema. Anaphylactic shock is rare but serious, and must be considered in the event of hypotension. No definitive approaches to prevent and treat HSR associated with oxaliplatin are available; however, few successful strategies have been reported. Such strategies include: slowing the infusion rate, use of steroids and antagonists of type 1 and 2 histamine receptors, and desensitisation. Successful implementation of oxaliplatin desensitisation protocols based on other platinum-containing compounds have been reported, which could enable a small number of patients who experience severe HSR to further receive an effective therapy for CRC. However, reintroductions have only been reported as single case studies or small cohorts. Large-scale validation on desensitisation strategies are still missing. Recently, subcutaneous adrenaline has also been utilised as an alternative approach to manage HSR to oxaliplatin. Knowledge of this rare but real toxicity of oxaliplatin is paramount because the use of this drug continues to increase not only for the treatment of patients with stage II-IV CRC, but also other solid malignancies. In this article, the author discusses the incidence, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, risk factors and current strategies of management of HSR associated with oxaliplatin. PMID:16907658

  7. Organic syntheses employing supercritical carbon dioxide as a reaction solvent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barstow, Leon E. (Inventor); Ward, Glen D. (Inventor); Bier, Milan (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reactions are readily carried out using supercritical carbon dioxide as the reaction medium. Supercritical carbon dioxide is of special value as a reaction medium in reactions for synthesizing polypeptides, for sequencing polypeptides, or for amino acid analysis.

  8. Organic syntheses employing supercritical carbon dioxide as a reaction solvent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barstow, Leon E. (Inventor); Ward, Glen D. (Inventor); Bier, Milan (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Chemical reactions are readily carried out using supercritical carbon dioxide as the reaction medium. Supercritical carbon dioxide is of special value as a reaction medium in reactions for synthesizing polypeptides, for sequencing polypeptides, or for amino acid analysis.

  9. Astrophysical Reaction Rates Obtained By Indirect Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tribble, R. E.; Al-Abdullah, T.; Alharbi, A.; Banu, A.; Chen, X.; Clark, H. L.; Fu, C.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Hardy, J. C.; Iacob, V. E.; Lui, Y.-W.; McCleskey, M.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.; Roeder, B.; Simmons, E.; Tabacaru, G.; Tokimoto, Y.; Trache, L.

    2010-08-12

    Indirect techniques have been used to obtain information about reaction rates for several proton capture reactions that occur on short-lived nuclei. The techniques used to carry out the measurements are reviewed and the results obtained are presented. Also future prospects for further measurements with a new facility, T-REX are discussed.

  10. Organic Reaction Mechanisms at A-Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, R. O. C.; Waddington, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    Advocates teaching of organic reaction mechanisms through the methods which are used in elucidating them. This also provides a useful way of illustrating the theories and methods of physical chemistry. Describes an approach to teaching three reaction mechanisms: substitution in alkanes; addition to alkenes; and ester hydrolysis. (Author/GA)

  11. Chemical Principles Revisited: Annotating Reaction Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tykodi, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Urges chemistry teachers to have students annotate the chemical reactions in aqueous-solutions that they see in their textbooks and witness in the laboratory. Suggests this will help students recognize the reaction type more readily. Examples are given for gas formation, precipitate formation, redox interaction, acid-base interaction, and…

  12. What is a "DNA-Compatible" Reaction?

    PubMed

    Malone, Marie L; Paegel, Brian M

    2016-04-11

    DNA-encoded synthesis can generate vastly diverse screening libraries of arbitrarily complex molecules as long as chemical reaction conditions do not compromise DNA's informational integrity, a fundamental constraint that "DNA-compatible" reaction development does not presently address. We devised DNA-encoded reaction rehearsal, an integrated analysis of reaction yield and impact on DNA, to acquire these key missing data. Magnetic DNA-functionalized sensor beads quantitatively report the % DNA template molecules remaining viable for PCR amplification after exposure to test reaction conditions. Analysis of solid-phase bond forming (e.g., Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling, reductive amination) and deprotection reactions (e.g., allyl esters, silyl ethers) guided the definition and optimization of DNA-compatible reaction conditions (>90% yield, >30% viable DNA molecules), most notably in cases that involved known (H(+), Pd) and more obscure (Δ, DMF) hazards to DNA integrity. The data provide an empirical yet mechanistically consistent and predictive framework for designing successful DNA-encoded reaction sequences for combinatorial library synthesis. PMID:26971959

  13. CEMENTING REACTIONS IN THE HAZARDOUS WASTE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of chemical grout for bottom sealing waste sites requires careful consideration of interfering reactions from contaminated soil or ground water. The cementing reactions in the acrylates and urethanes are very specific. The presence of reducers, oxidizers and complexors ca...

  14. Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Bioorthogonal Cycloaddition Reactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Maiyun; Yang, Yi; Chen, Peng R

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, bioorthogonal reactions have emerged as a powerful toolbox for specific labeling and visualization of biomolecules, even within the highly complex and fragile living systems. Among them, copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction is one of the most widely studied and used biocompatible reactions. The cytotoxicity of Cu(I) ions has been greatly reduced due to the use of Cu(I) ligands, which enabled the CuAAC reaction to proceed on the cell surface, as well as within an intracellular environment. Meanwhile, other transition metals such as ruthenium, rhodium and silver are now under development as alternative sources for catalyzing bioorthogonal cycloadditions. In this review, we summarize the development of CuAAC reaction as a prominent bioorthogonal reaction, discuss various ligands used in reducing Cu(I) toxicity while promoting the reaction rate, and illustrate some of its important biological applications. The development of additional transition metals in catalyzing cycloaddition reactions will also be briefly introduced. PMID:27572985

  15. The Iodine Clock Reaction and Hypothermia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gennaro, Gene; Munson, Bruce

    1988-01-01

    Explains an activity which can be used to compare the effect of temperature on the rate of chemical reactions to the metabolic reactions that take place within the body. Outlines directions and materials needed to perform the experiment. Lists a number of the body's defenses against extremely low temperatures. (RT)

  16. Psychological Factors That Predict Reaction to Abortion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, D. T.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Investigated demographic and psychological factors related to reactions to legal abortions in 62 females in an urban southern community. Results suggest that the social context and the degree of support from a series of significant persons rather than demographic variables were most predictive of a positive reaction. (Author)

  17. Nuclear excitation and precompound nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    De, A.; Ray, S.; Ghosh, S.K.

    1988-06-01

    The angular distribution of nucleons emitted in nucleon-induced precompound nuclear reactions are calculated taking into account the effect of excitation on the kinematics of nucleon-nucleon scattering inside the target-plus-projectile system. The results are compared with quantum mechanical calculations and those of reaction models based on a pure nucleon-nucleon collision picture.

  18. Miniature reaction chamber and devices incorporating same

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, Richard A.; Woolley, Adam T.

    2000-10-17

    The present invention generally relates to miniaturized devices for carrying out and controlling chemical reactions and analyses. In particular, the present invention provides devices which have miniature temperature controlled reaction chambers for carrying out a variety of synthetic and diagnostic applications, such as PCR amplification, nucleic acid hybridization, chemical labeling, nucleic acid fragmentation and the like.

  19. Reactions to Stranger and Acquaintance Rape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetreault, Patricia A.; Barnett, Mark A.

    1987-01-01

    Investigated reactions to a woman who presumably had been raped by a stranger or an acquaintance. Undergraduates read one of two rape descriptions prior to watching a videotape of the woman who (they were led to believe) had been the victim of the rape. Females and males showed markedly different reactions to stranger and acquaintance rape and…

  20. Infliximab-Related Infusion Reactions: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ron, Yulia; Kivity, Shmuel; Ben-Horin, Shomron; Israeli, Eran; Fraser, Gerald M.; Dotan, Iris; Chowers, Yehuda; Confino-Cohen, Ronit; Weiss, Batia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Administration of infliximab is associated with a well-recognised risk of infusion reactions. Lack of a mechanism-based rationale for their prevention, and absence of adequate and well-controlled studies, has led to the use of diverse empirical administration protocols. The aim of this study is to perform a systematic review of the evidence behind the strategies for preventing infusion reactions to infliximab, and for controlling the reactions once they occur. Methods: We conducted extensive search of electronic databases of MEDLINE [PubMed] for reports that communicate various aspects of infusion reactions to infliximab in IBD patients. Results: We examined full texts of 105 potentially eligible articles. No randomised controlled trials that pre-defined infusion reaction as a primary outcome were found. Three RCTs evaluated infusion reactions as a secondary outcome; another four RCTs included infusion reactions in the safety evaluation analysis; and 62 additional studies focused on various aspects of mechanism/s, risk, primary and secondary preventive measures, and management algorithms. Seven studies were added by a manual search of reference lists of the relevant articles. A total of 76 original studies were included in quantitative analysis of the existing strategies. Conclusions: There is still paucity of systematic and controlled data on the risk, prevention, and management of infusion reactions to infliximab. We present working algorithms based on systematic and extensive review of the available data. More randomised controlled trials are needed in order to investigate the efficacy of the proposed preventive and management algorithms. PMID:26092578