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1

78 FR 49990 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Tennessee; Revisions to the Knox County...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC...SIP submittal revises the definition of ``Modification'' in...Management Regulation Section 13 Definitions. TDEC considers Knox County's...2012, SIP revises the definition of ``Modification''...

2013-08-16

2

Evaluation of the Knox County (Tennessee) Extended School Year Program: A Team Effort.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A voluntary quinmester plan for extending the school year was tried in five Knox County Tennessee schools. Ten University of Tennesse faculty members teamed to evaluate the program's K-12 curriculum revision, administration, public opinion, costs, student and staff morale, and student achievement. Achievement was not significantly influenced, but…

Banta, Trudy W.

3

Some Selected Clothing Construction Practices of Two Selected Home Demonstration Club Member Groups in Knox County, Tennessee. Research Summary of a Graduate Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study in Knox County, Tennessee, was done to determine how those attending Extension clothing construction workshops differed from others; which recommended clothing instruction practices were being used; and factors influencing respondents to adopt or reject practices. Forty-five participants and a random sample of 45 nonparticipants were…

Williams, Janice Hurst; Dotson, Robert S.

4

A preliminary assessment of asbestos awareness and control measures in brake and clutch repair services in Knoxville and Knox County, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The pending OSHA standard revision proposed in 1990 to lower the asbestos Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) and to mandate effective asbestos control measures (ACM) in brake and clutch assembly work may have a profound effect on industries involved in such operations. Health protection of workers will be improved and costs of improved control methods and training will increase. Considering these facts, this preliminary study was designed to assess the level of worker and management awareness of asbestos hazards associated with brake and clutch repair and to determine what ACM had been implemented by businesses in Knoxville and Knox County, Tennessee. The study, in a metropolitan area of approximately 336,000 people, revealed eight different categories of businesses conducting brake and clutch repair work with an estimated 363 potentially exposed employees. Results of the study suggest that managers and employees of the 80 businesses studied were in need of asbestos hazard awareness training and more adequate asbestos control measures.

Phillips, C.C. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Hamilton, C.B.

1994-04-01

5

Knox County Black History Archives  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Knox County, Ohio has had a significant black population for several hundred years, and historians and others have documented their activities in journal articles, books, and other printed materials. This remarkable digital collection from the Digital Resource Commons at Kenyon College provides access to photographs, documents, and other items that tell the story of this unique community. This collection was made possible, in part, by funding from the Ohio Humanities Council, along with support from the Rural Life Center. Currently the collection includes 200 items, which visitors can browse alphabetically or by performing a keyword search. Each item has a preview feature and visitors can click through to zoom in on each item. The handwritten history of Mt. Cavalry Baptist Church is particularly fascinating.

2012-06-01

6

A Study of the 4-H Organizational Leadership Development Process in Cannon, Knox, McMinn, Sullivan and Pickett Counties, Tennessee.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An attempt was made to determine the nature of the present 4-H organizational leadership in five counties, to identify organizational leader problems, and to determine methods and procedures for correcting these problems. It was proposed to solve the problems by preparing a plan that would cover the following leadership development phases: 4-H…

Donaldson, Lyle A.; And Others

7

Preliminary evaluation of the Knox Group in Tennessee for receiving injected wastes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The EPA is authorized under the Safe Drinking Water Act to protect underground sources of drinking water from contamination. However, an aquifer may be exempted from protection and used for injected wastes where the aquifer meets criteria established in the EPA 's Underground Injection Control program. The Knox Group in Middle and West Tennessee occurs primarily in the subsurface, and the top of the Knox Group ranges from about 350 to 3,000 feet below land surface. The upper part of the Knox Group (upper Knox aquifer) is an important source of drinking water in parts of the Central Basin and the Highland Rim provinces. The lower part of the Knox Group is currently being used for injected wastes at New Johnsonville on the western Highland Rim and at Mount Pleasant in the Central Basin. There is no known contamination of the upper Knox aquifer but contamination of the lower part of the Know Group is known at three waste injection well sites. (Lantz-PTT)

Bradley, M. W.

1986-01-01

8

Formation of East Tennessee, Knox Mississippi Valley-Type (MVT) deposits by hydrothermal-thermochemical sulfate reduction\\/replacement interstratal evaporite karstification  

Microsoft Academic Search

The East Tennessee Knox MVT deposits are hydrothermal-thermochemical sulfate reduction (TCSR) and replacement interstratal evaporite karst bodies. The main MVT mineralized breccias occur between 600--850 ft. below the unrelated post-Knox unconformity. Halite casts, gypsum molds, calcite pseudomorphs after evaporites, and bedded anhydrite occur in the Knox. The bedded anhydrite is correlatable with breccias filled with anhydrite, hydrocarbons, and MVT mineralization.

Furman

1993-01-01

9

Formation of East Tennessee, Knox Mississippi Valley-Type (MVT) deposits by hydrothermal-thermochemical sulfate reduction/replacement interstratal evaporite karstification  

SciTech Connect

The East Tennessee Knox MVT deposits are hydrothermal-thermochemical sulfate reduction (TCSR) and replacement interstratal evaporite karst bodies. The main MVT mineralized breccias occur between 600--850 ft. below the unrelated post-Knox unconformity. Halite casts, gypsum molds, calcite pseudomorphs after evaporites, and bedded anhydrite occur in the Knox. The bedded anhydrite is correlatable with breccias filled with anhydrite, hydrocarbons, and MVT mineralization. The breccias contain floating fragments with snow-on-roof structure. Published sulfur isotopes of anhydrite and sphalerite ([delta][sup 34]S [approx]26--35[per thousand]) have a similar range. Sphalerite mineralization occurs beneath, the Holston seal, and fluorite and barite occurs where the seal is absent. Published fluid inclusion chemistry shows that sphalerite was deposited by fluids rich in CO[sub 2], hydrocarbons, and calcium poor, whereas fluorite is the opposite. Fluid inclusion Th and Tm data for sphalerite and fluorite are interpreted as forming by hydrothermal-TCSR and replacement of Knox anhydrite respectfully. Peritidal Knox anhydrite and organic rich sediments formed on paleohighs above uplifted basement blocks. Hydrothermal metalliferous basin brines initiated simultaneous anhydrite solution-subsidence-brecciation beneath impermeable chert beds. TCSR of the anhydrite by hydrocarbons trapped beneath the Holston seal precipitating sphalerite. Ba and F replaced the anhydrite forming barite and fluorite, where there was no hydrocarbons due to the lack of a seal.

Furman, F.C. (Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

1993-03-01

10

Historic Milling Industry in the Fort Knox Military Reservation Bullitt, Hardin and Meade Counties Kentucky.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents results of documentary research on former mills on the Fort Knox Military Reservation and results of test excavations at the Garnettsville Mill. Fifty-six mills were identified from documents; of these, 21 are definitely or probably o...

N. O'Malley

1996-01-01

11

Phase I archaeological survey of the proposed timber harvest areas in the Longstreet Range Road powerline easement on the Fort Knox Military Reservation, Hardin County, Kentucky. Final report, May-June 1995  

Microsoft Academic Search

In May 1995, the Fort Knox Contract Staff Archaeologist conducted a Phase I archaeological survey of proposed timber harvest areas in a power line easement adjoining Longstreet Range Road on the Fort Knox Military Reservation, Hardin County, Kentucky. The powerline easement to be harvested is approximately 30 m (100 feet) wide and 4.4 km (4400 m or 14,436 ft) long,

Schenian

1995-01-01

12

Nutritional Practices of Selected Homemakers in Weakley County, Tennessee.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nutritional practices of home demonstration club members in Weakley County, Tennessee, are compared with those of nonmembers in this master's thesis. Marked differences appeared in the adequacy of breakfast; cooking vegetables only until tender; inclusion of Vitamin C once a day; following recommended principles of planning meals; buying…

Prince, Grace S.; And Others

13

21st Century jobs initiative - Tennessee`s Resource Valley. Progress report 1995  

SciTech Connect

Tennessee`s Resource Valley, a regional economic development organization, was asked to facilitate a two-year, $750,000 grant from the Department of Energy. The grant`s purpose is to make the East Tennessee region less dependent on federal funds for its economic well-being and to increase regional awareness of the advantages of proximity to the Department of Energy facilities in Oak Ridge. Tennessee`s Resource Valley`s mission is to market the mid-East Tennessee region`s business location advantages to corporate decision makers and to facilitate regional initiatives that impact the creation of quality job opportunities. Tennessee`s Resource Valley represents the following fifteen (15) counties in East Tennessee: Anderson, Blount, Campbell, Claiborne, Cocke, Grainger, Jefferson, Knox, Loudon, Monroe, Morgan, Scott, Sevier, and Union.

NONE

1995-12-20

14

Impact of a School-based Influenza Immunization Program on Disease Burden: Comparison of Two Tennessee Counties  

PubMed Central

Outpatient burden of laboratory-confirmed influenza among children in Knox and Davidson Counties was compared in 2006–2007 when only Knox County had a school-based influenza vaccine campaign. Of 1016 eligible children seeking outpatient care, 87% were enrolled and 20% were influenza-positive. Estimated influenza vaccination coverage was similar in Knox and Davidson for preschool-age children (36% versus 33%) but higher for school-age children (44% versus 12%). Influenza detection was higher among Knox than Davidson County preschool-age children (18% versus 10%) but similar among school-age children (28% versus 27%). These data are consistent with a direct effect of the campaign in school-age children.

Poehling, Katherine A.; Talbot, H. Keipp; Williams, John V.; Zhu, Yuwei; Lott, John; Patterson, Lori; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Griffin, Marie R.

2013-01-01

15

Provisional Forest Biomass Statistics for the 201-County Tennessee Valley Region.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Aboveground green weights of biomass (i.e., wood, bark, and foliage) by forest component (i.e., merchantable trees, cull trees, understory, logging residue, and surplus growth) are presented for each county within the 201-county Tennessee Valley Region. B...

1980-01-01

16

Provisional Forest-Biomass Statistics for the 201-County Tennessee Valley Region.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Aboveground green weights of biomass (i.e., wood, bark, and foliage) by forest component (i.e., merchantable trees, cull trees, understory, logging residue, and surplus growth) are presented for each county within the 201-county Tennessee Valley Region. B...

H. C. Hitchcock

1980-01-01

17

The People in Tennessee's Title V Counties: A Summary Report on Characteristics and Attitudes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Attitudes toward selected rural development activities and basic socioeconomic characteristics of residents of five rural Tennessee counties were examined in 1974 in a study that included interviews with household heads as well as community leaders. Claiborne, Clay, Hancock, Overton, and Pickett counties constituted the pilot area; two surveys…

Smith, George F.; Klindt, Thomas H.

18

Paleontology of Cheek Bend Cave, Maury County, Tennessee. Phase 2 Report to the Tennessee Valley Authority.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report presents an initial attempt to demonstrate the probable occurrence of paleoenvironmental change in the Tennessee valley Authority's proposed Columbia Reservoir and to assess the potential paleontological significance of materials from one cave ...

W. E. Klippel P. W. Parmalee

1982-01-01

19

Phase I archaeological survey of the proposed timber harvest areas in the Longstreet Range Road powerline easement on the Fort Knox Military Reservation, Hardin County, Kentucky. Final report, May-June 1995  

SciTech Connect

In May 1995, the Fort Knox Contract Staff Archaeologist conducted a Phase I archaeological survey of proposed timber harvest areas in a power line easement adjoining Longstreet Range Road on the Fort Knox Military Reservation, Hardin County, Kentucky. The powerline easement to be harvested is approximately 30 m (100 feet) wide and 4.4 km (4400 m or 14,436 ft) long, encompassing approximately 13 ha (33 acres). Of this, approximately 8 ha (21 acres) was wooded and comprised the area walked in the present survey. Only selected trees, which were marked by Forestry Section personnel prior to the archaeological survey, will be harvested. The survey resulted in the discovery of no archaeological materials or deposits. It is recommended that the timber harvest be conducted as proposed.

Schenian, P.A.

1995-06-01

20

Phase I Archaeological Survey of the Proposed Kentucky National Guard MATES Facility and Adjoining Areas on the Fort Knox Military Reservation, Hardin County, Kentucky.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Between November 1993 and May 1995, the Fort Knox contract cultural resource management personnel conducted a Phase I archaeological survey of approximately 126 acres (51 ha) encompassing the proposed Kentucky National Guard MATES facility, secondary acce...

P. A. Schenian

1995-01-01

21

Flood of September 12-13, 1982 in Gibson, Carroll, and Madison Counties, western Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Intense rainfall on September 12-13, 1982, caused severe local flooding along many streams in Gibson County in western Tennessee. The rainfall resulted from remnants of Hurricane Chris combining with a cool front moving across the western half of the State. A maximum 1-hr rainfall intensity of 3.3 in was recorded at Humboldt. Peak discharge exceeded the 100-yr flood on many small streams. The floods caused three deaths and about 15.3 million dollars damage to crops, roads and bridges, businesses, and residential areas. Long-time residents of Gibson County reported that stream stages have not been as high since at least 1922. (USGS)

Robbins, Clarence H.; Gamble, Charles R.; Bingham, Roy H.

1986-01-01

22

Management Practices of Soybean Producers in Marion County, Tennessee.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purposes of the study were to: (1) determine some major characteristics of Marion County soybean producers and their farms; (2) more accurately determine which recommended production practices soybean producers were using in 1968 and 1969; (3) study the relation between use of recommended production practices and yield levels; and (4) identify…

Hall, William A.; And Others

23

Appraisal of Hydrologic Information Needed in Anticipation of Lignite Mining in Lauderdale County, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Lignite in western Tennessee occurs as lenses or beds at various stratigraphic horizons in the Coastal Plain sediments of Late Cretaceous and Tertiary age. The occurrence of this lignite has been known for many decades, but not until the energy crisis was it considered an important energy resource. In recent years, several energy companies have conducted extensive exploration programs in western Tennessee, and tremendous reserves of lignite have been found. From available information, Lauderdale County was selected as one of the counties where strip-mining of lignite will most likely occur. Lignite in this county occurs in the Jackson and Cockfield Formations, undivided, of Tertiary age. The hydrology of the county is known only from regional studies and the collection of some site-specific data. Therefore, in anticipation of the future mining of lignite, a plan is needed for obtaining hydrologic and geologic information to adequately define the hydrologic system before mining begins and to monitor the effects of strip-mining once it is begun. For this planning effort, available hydrologic, geologic, land use, and associated data were located and compiled; a summary description of the surface and shallow subsurface hydrologic system was prepared: the need for additional baseline hydrologic information was outlined; and plans to monitor the effects of strip-mining were proposed. This planning approach, although limited to a county area, has transferability to other Coastal Plain areas under consideration for strip-mining of lignite.

Parks, William Scott

1981-01-01

24

Leachate migration from a pesticide waste disposal site in Hardeman County, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Between 1964 and 1972, approximately 300,000 drums (55-gallon steel barrels) of waste derived from the manufacturing of pesticides were buried on 45 acres of land in northern Hardemen County, Tennessee. Leachates from these wastes are migrating from the disposal site in surface runoff, through shallow perched water zones, and through the local water-table aquifer. Compounds identified in the leachates included: dieldrin, endrin , chlordene, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, pentachlorocyclopentadiene, and hexachloro-bicycloheptadiene. The rate of migration of some of the leachate compounds in the water-table aquifer was found to be at least 80 feet per year. (Woodard-USGS)

Sprinkle, C. L.

1978-01-01

25

Construction, lithologic, and hydrologic data for test wells in the Cedar Grove area, Carroll County, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Four test wells were drilled near Cedar Grove in Carroll County, Tennessee, in 1991 to obtain geologic and hydrologic information about the post-Cretaceous strata in the study area. Samples of cuttings and geophysical logs were used to determine the lithology and stratigraphy at the drilling sites. Specific-capacity tests and water-quality analyses were conducted at two test wells completed in the Memphis Sand. Yields of the two test wells were 275 gallons per minute and greater than 350 gallons per minute. The specific capacities for the two wells equalled 17.8 and 10.0 gallons per minute per foot of drawdown, respectively.

Johnson, S. L.; Carmichael, J. K.

1993-01-01

26

TennCare disenrollment and avoidable hospital visits in Davidson County, Tennessee.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to determine if an association existed between the mid-2005 TennCare (Medicaid) disenrollment and increases in uninsured ambulatory care sensitive condition (ACSC) non-admitted ER visits and inpatient hospitalizations in Davidson County, Tennessee (= the city of Nashville). Logistic regression modeling, using an interactive term for insurance category x year, indicated that the effect of no insurance on ACSC ER visits increased by 18% from 2003 to 2007 (p<.001), but no significant effect was found for uninsured ACSC inpatient hospitalizations. These greater odds of ACSC ER visits among uninsured patients were associated with a 60% increase in hospitals' bad debt write offs during this same time period. Therefore, the TennCare disenrollment was associated with increased likelihood of uninsured ACSC non-admitted ER visits and greater financial losses for Davidson County hospitals during this time period. PMID:22643488

Emerson, Janice S; Hull, Pamela C; Cain, Van A; Novotny, Meggan; Stanley, Rodney E; Levine, Robert S

2012-02-01

27

Effects of septic-tank effluent on ground-water quality in northern Williamson County and southern Davidson County, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An investigation of the potential contamination of ground water from septic tank systems blasted in bedrock in Williamson and Davidson Counties, Tennessee, was conducted during 1988-89. Water samples were collected from domestic and observation wells, springs, and surface-water sites in a residential subdivision in the northern part of Williamson County near Nashville. The subdivision has a high density of septic-tank field lines installed into blasted bedrock Water samples also were collected from a well located in an area of Davidson County where field lines were installed in 5 feet of soil. Samples were analyzed for major inorganic constituents, nutrients, total organic carbon, optical brighteners, and bacteria. Although results of analyses of water samples from wells indicate no effect of septic-tank effluent on ground-water quality at these sites, water from two springs located downgradient from the subdivision had slightly larger concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate (2.2 and 2.7 milligrams per liter N), and much larger concentrations of fecal coliform and fecal streptococci bacteria (2,000 to 3,200 and 700 to 900 colonies per 100 milliliters of sample, respectively), than other wells and springs sampled during 1988. Water from one of these springs contained optical brighteners, which indicates that septic-tank effluent is affecting ground-water quality.

Hanchar, D. W.

1991-01-01

28

Hydrogeologic, water-quality, streamflow, bottom-sediment analyses, and biological data near the Wayne County landfill, Wayne County, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report summarizes the data collected as part of a hydrogeologic investigation to determine the effects of the Wayne County landfill on local water quality. The investigation was conducted from 1988 through 1989 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment, Division of Superfund. The landfill was closed in November 1984 after allegations that contaminants from the landfill were affecting the quality of water from domestic wells in the Banjo Branch-Hardin Hollow valley. Test well construction data; water-quality data for selected wells, seeps, and surface-water sites: streamflow data from Banjo Branch; analyses of bottom-sediment samples: and biological data for the study area are documented in this report.

Quinones, F.; Bradfield, Arthur D.; Wescott, J. B.

1992-01-01

29

Factors Influencing Food Choices of 4-H Club Members in Williamson County, Tennessee. A Research Summary of a Graduate Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was conducted to identify some of the eating habits and factors influencing food choices of selected junior (9 to 13 years old) and senior (14 to 19 years old) 4-H club members enrolled in Williamson County, Tennessee, in 1968. Data were collected through group interviews with 200 juniors and 70 seniors--116 boys and 154 girls.…

Geary, Virginia Ruth; And Others

30

Factors Influencing Blount County, Tennessee Home Demonstration Club Members' Use of Consumer Credit. A Research Summary of a Graduate Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was made of the use of consumer credit by Home Demonstration Club (HDC) members in Blount County, Tennessee, as a basis for planning educational programs. Data were secured by group interviews from 237 Home Demonstration Club members representing 24 clubs. The data were classified according to the members use of consumer credit: those who…

Neas, Ethel Josephine; And Others

31

A Comparative Study of Small, Part-Time, Retirement and Large Farms: Three Counties in Central and West Tennessee.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Personal interviews with 344 randomly selected farm operators in three Tennessee counties revealed differences in the characteristics, aspirations, and attitudes of large, small, part time, and retired farmers. These differences are important in understanding agricultural potentials, the impact of agricultural programs, and the future structure of…

Woodworth, Roger C.; And Others

32

Alternative Certification Program: A Collaborative Effort between Hamilton County Department of Education and the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the fall semester of 1998, a committee of university faculty and local school system administrators has collaborated to design an alternative teacher certification program to meet the teacher shortage needs of the Hamilton County, Tennessee, schools. Areas of identified shortages include science, mathematics, and foreign languages at the…

2000

33

Tennessee gas field brings Eastern Overthrust new life  

SciTech Connect

The Eastern US Overthrust Belt has gained an E and P company in its southern reaches while seeing de-emphasis from a long time player in more northerly areas. A gas field discovered in the early 1980s in northeastern Tennessee is nearly ready to be placed on production. It would be the first commercial gas production in the southern portion of the belt, which extends more than 1,000 miles from Alabama to New England. Tengasco has five wells capable of producing gas from Cambro-Ordovician Knox in Swan Creek field, southwest of Sneedville in Hancock County, Tenn., about 10 miles south of Lee County, Va. It hopes to drill five more wells by year-end. It began laying a 30--35 MMcfd, 23 mile, 6 in. gas pipeline to Rogersville, Tenn., early last month. Torch Inc., Belle Chasse, La., has the contract. Tengasco plans to start production later this year. Initially a gas utility in neighboring Hawkins County will take 8--9 MMcfd and transport any excess gas to Tenneco Energy affiliate East Tennessee Natural Gas Co. The primary production to date in Swan Creek field has been in a 300 ft section some 400--450 ft from the top of Knox. No water has been found.

Petzet, G.A.

1996-09-02

34

Construction, lithologic, and water-level data for wells near the Dickson County landfill, Dickson County, Tennessee, 1995  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Organic compounds were detected in water samples collected from Sullivan Spring during several sampling events in 1994. Prior to this, the spring was the drinking-water source for two families in the Dickson, Tennessee area. An investigation was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Dickson County Solid Waste Management, to determine if Sullivan Spring is hydraulically downgradient from the Dickson County landfill. This report describes the data collected during the investigation. Five monitoring wells were installed near the northwestern corner of the landfill at points between the landfill and Sullivan Spring. Water-level measurements were made on June 1 and 2, 1995, at these wells and 13 other wells near the landfill to determine ground- water altitudes in the area. Water-level altitudes in the five new monitoring wells and three other landfill-monitoring wells were higher (750.04 to 800.17 feet) than the altitude of Sullivan Spring (approximately 725 feet). In general, wells in topographically high areas had higher water-level altitudes than Sullivan Spring and wells near streams in lowland areas.

Ladd, D. E.

1996-01-01

35

Duration and Frequency Analysis of Lowland Flooding in Western Murfreesboro, Rutherford County, Tennessee, 1998-2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Periodic flooding occurs at lowlands and sinkholes in and adjacent to the flood plain of the West Fork Stones River in the western part of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Flooding in this area commonly occurs during the winter months from December through March. The maximum water level that flood waters will reach in a lowland or sinkhole is controlled by the elevation of the land surrounding the site or the overflow outlet. Maximum water levels, independent of overflow from the river, were estimated to be reached in lowlands and sinkholes in the study area every 1 to 4 years. Minor overflow from the West Fork Stones River (less than 1 foot in depth) into the study area has been estimated to occur every 10 to 20 years. Moderate overflow from the river (1 to 2 feet in depth) occurs on average every 20 to 50 years, while major river overflow (in excess of 2 feet in depth) can be expected every 50 years. Rainfall information for the area, and streamflow and water-level measurements from the West Fork Stones River, lowlands, sinkholes, caves, and wells in the study area were used to develop a flood-prone area map, independent of overflow from the river, for the study area. Water-level duration and frequency relations, independent of overflow from the river, were estimated for several lowlands, sinkholes, and wells in the study area. These relations are used to characterize flooding in lowland areas of western Murfreesboro, Rutherford County, Tennessee.

Law, George S.

2002-01-01

36

Construction, geologic, and water-level data for observation wells near Brentwood, Williamson County, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Thirty-four observation wells were installed at 17 sites in the area of a hazardous-waste disposal site near Brentwood, in Williamson County, Tennessee. These wells were installed to supplement data collected from domestic wells in the area, to help define the geology of the study area and to determine the water levels. Both lithologic and geophysical logs were obtained for each well drilled to help define the formations encountered. Four limestone units, corresponding to the Bigby-Cannon limestone, the Hermitage Formation, the Carters Limestone (including the T-3 bentonite), and the Lebanon Limestone, were described from well cuttings and borehole geophysical logs. Water levels have been collected at both the shallow and deep wells at each site. (USGS)

Hanchar, Dorothea Withington

1989-01-01

37

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Lewisburg Dump Site, Lewisburg, Marshall County, Tennessee (First Remedial Action), Final Report, September 19, 1990.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 20-acre Lewisburg Dump site includes a 4-acre abandoned landfill developed in an abandoned 6-acre limestone quarry in Lewisburg, Marshall County, Tennessee. The municipally-owned and operated site began landfilling operations between 1963 and 1969, an...

1990-01-01

38

Survey of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) population in the Upper Little Tennessee River watershed, Macon and Swain Counties, North Carolina  

SciTech Connect

During the months May--November 1992, as part of the Western North Carolina Alliance upper Little Tennessee River watershed survey, streams in the North Carolina portion (Macon and Swain Counties) of the watershed were surveyed for the presence of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). The purposes of this survey were threefold: (1) To use this sensitive, pollution-intolerant species as an indicator organism for high quality waters. (2) To assist the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, the US Forest Service, and private landowners in managing for and protecting this popular game fish. (3) To locate possible stocks of pure ``southern Appalachian strain`` brook trout. Research is currently underway at the University of Tennessee and Auburn University to determine whether there is in fact a distinct southem subspecies or race of S. fontinalis. This author is one of those who is inclined to believe there is.

Not Available

1993-08-01

39

Hydrology of the Cave Springs area near Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The hydrology of Cave Springs, the second largest spring in East Tennessee,was investigated from July 1987 to September 1989. Wells near the spring supply about 5 million gallons per day of potable water to people in Hamilton County near Chattanooga. Discharge from the spring averaged about 13.5 cubic feet per second (8.72 million gallons per day) during the study period. Withdrawals by the Hixson Utility District from wells upgradient from the outflow averaged 8.6 cubic feet per second (5.54 million gallons per day). Aquifer tests using wells intersecting a large solution cavity supplying water to the spring showed a drawdown of less than 3 feet with a discharge of 9,000 gallons per minute or 20 cubic feet per second. Temperature and specific conductance of ground water near the spring outflow were monitored hourly. Temperatures ranged from 13.5 to 18.2 degrees celsius, and fluctuated seasonally in response to climate. Specific-conductance values ranged from 122 to 405 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius, but were generally between 163 to 185 microsiemensper centimeter. The drainage area of the basin recharging the spring system was estimated to be 1O squaremiles. A potentiometric map of the recharge basin was developed from water levels measured at domestic and test wells in August 1989. Aquifer tests at five test wells in the study area indicated that specific-capacity values for these wells ranged from 4.1 to 261 gallons per minute per foot of drawdown. Water-quality characteristics of ground water in the area were used in conjunction with potentiometric-surface maps to delineate the approximate area contributing recharge to Cave Springs.

Bradfield, Arthur D.

1992-01-01

40

Tennol, Inc. - loan-guarantee application: Marion County, Tennessee. Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

Tennol, Inc., is requesting a loan guarantee to build a fuel ethanol plant having an annual capacity of 95,000 m/sup 3/ (25 x 10/sup 6/ gal) in Jasper, Tennessee. The plant will wet-mill corn (255 Gg/year) for feedstock and will burn coal (43 Gg/year) for process heat. Marketable by-products include corn gluten feed (61 Gg/year), corn gluten meal (17 Gg/year), and carbon dioxide (71 Gg/year). Dehydration of the product alcohol will be azeotropic distillation with diethyl ether, and denaturation will be with unleaded gasoline. No degradation of local or regional air quality is anticipated. A combination of wetlands, old fields, and bottomland hardwood forest provides excellent wildlife habitat. Over 75% of the site will remain undisturbed, and construction activity will be confined to the northern end of the site. Because no wet areas will be disturbed and all liquid effluent releases will be to the Jasper wastewater treatment plant, no impact on aquatic organisms or water quality is anticipated. Impact to terrestrial organisms will be minor, and no rare or endangered species will be affected. Water will be supplied by the town of Jasper and by onsite wells. Tennol will represent about 3% of total ground water use in Marion County, but no impact is anticipated since the region has abundant groundwater resources. Although both historic and archaeological sites occur on the property, these sites lie outside the area of construction impact. Socioeconomic impact will be positive. Approximately 200 people will be employed at the peak of construction, and practically all are expected to commute. Of the 100 to 120 permanent jobs that will be created, most are expected to go to local people.

Not Available

1982-12-01

41

Evaluation of seismic damage to bridges and highway systems in Shelby County, Tennessee  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Past earthquakes have demonstrated that bridges are one of the most vulnerable components of highway transportation systems. In addition to bridges, roadways may also be subject to damage, particularly in an area prone to earthquake-induced liquefaction. As a consequence, the highway transportation systems after an earthquake might be impaired and the post-earthquake emergency response might be compromised. Furthermore, the impact on the regional economy might be very significant from the damage to highway systems. Since highway transportation systems are critical lifelines for people living in an urban area, it is important to evaluate the vulnerability of bridges and highway systems in earthquake-prone regions. Memphis and Shelby County, Tennessee are located close to the southwestern segment of the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ). This zone produced three of the largest earthquakes in North America in 1811--1812. Presently, the NMSZ is still active and is considered by engineers, seismologists, and public officials as the most hazardous seismic zone in the central and eastern United States. Bridges in the Memphis area were generally not designed for seismic resistance until 1990. Therefore, the majority of existing bridges might suffer damage from earthquakes occurring in the NMSZ. The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the expected damage to bridges and roadways on the major routes in Memphis and Shelby County resulting from New Madrid earthquakes with the aid of geographic information system (GIS) technology. The road network selected for this study includes all the Interstate highway system, all the primary and secondary routes maintained by the state, and most of the major arterial routes. There are 452 bridges on the selected roadway systems and data pertinent to these bridges and roadway systems were collected and implemented as a GIS database. The bridges in the Memphis area were classified into several types and damage states were determined by the Capacity/Demand (C/D) ratios of bridge components. The damage states considered in this study are no/minor damage, repairable damage, and significant damage. The seismic fragility analysis of each bridge classification was performed and the results were expressed as fragility curves. In this study, eight bridge classifications were defined and a fragility curve was developed for each. To estimate the seismic hazard, three scenario earthquakes located at Marked Tree, Arkansas was established for this study. The moment magnitude of the M scenario earthquake was set as 6.5, 7.0, and 7.5 to represent various sizes of earthquakes that might occur in the NMSZ. For each scenario earthquake, the intensity of ground shaking and liquefaction-induced permanent ground deformation in Shelby County were estimated, and then the expected damage to bridges and roadway systems was determined. The results from this study can be used to prioritize bridges for retrofitting, to prepare a pre-earthquake preparedness plan, and to develop a post-earthquake emergency response plan. Furthermore, the results can also be used to assess the regional economic impact from the damage to highway transportation systems.

Jernigan, John Bailey

42

Robert Knox and the anatomy of beauty.  

PubMed

Robert Knox (1791-1862) is typically remembered as the Edinburgh anatomist to whom the murderers Burke and Hare sold the bodies of their victims. This association brought Knox infamy and damaged his life and career. Before the Burke and Hare scandal, Knox was one of the most famous, original and influential anatomists in Britain. He was also something of a dandy with a sophisticated appreciation of the visual arts. His most significant writings on artistic subjects were his books A Manual of Artistic Anatomy and Great Artists and Great Anatomists: A Biographical and Philosophical Study. Knox's interesting and independently minded opinions on the central artistic questions of his day were taken seriously by his contemporaries. His demotion in the official history of anatomy following his involvement with Burke and Hare, however, also removed him from the history of art theory in 19th century Britain. Knox was such a magnetic and impressive figure, though, that he has to be brought back to his era and his era is not complete without him. This paper discusses how Knox's writings on anatomy and biology shaped his contributions to art theory. It is a first step towards returning Knox, the art theorist, to the cultural life of 19th century Britain. PMID:21593248

Neher, Allister

2011-06-01

43

Wolf River at Memphis, Tennessee: floodflow characteristics along proposed Interstate Highway 240, Shelby County  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report has been prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey at the request of Mr. Henry Derthick, Engineer of Structures of the Tennessee Department of Transportation, under the authority of a cooperative agreement between the two agencies. It supplements information contained in a report with the same title dated September 1966. The Department of Transportation proposes to construct a segment of Interstate Highway 240 and several bridges across the Wolf River on the northern side off Memphis, Shelby Count. Mt. Derthick has requested an analysis of the 50-year flood or the maximum flood of record to determine the possible effect of the proposed construction on flood profiles along the Wolf River.

Randolph, William J.; Gamble, Charles R.

1973-01-01

44

77 FR 47840 - American Drum and Pallet Company Site; Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee; Notice of settlement  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...CERCLA-04-2012-3775] American Drum and Pallet Company Site; Memphis, Shelby County...costs concerning the American Drum and Pallet Company Superfund Site located in Memphis...comments by Site name American Drum and Pallet Company Site by one of the following...

2012-08-10

45

Tellico Project - A Dam on the Little Tennessee River, Tennessee.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Tellico Project is in Blount, Loudon and Monroe Counties in East Tennessee. The major element of the project is a dam on the Little Tennessee River about one quarter mile above its confluence with the Tennessee River and about 1 mile southwest of TVA'...

1971-01-01

46

Hydrogeology, water quality, and ecology of Anderton Branch near the Quail Hollow Landfill, Bedford County, Tennessee, 1995-99  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Quail Hollow Landfill, located in southeastern Bedford County on the Highland Rim overlooking the Central Basin karst region of Tennessee, is constructed on the gravelly, clay-rich residuum of the Fort Payne Formation of Mississippian age. A conceptual hydrologic model of the landfill indicated that Anderton Branch was at risk of being affected by the landfill. Ground water flowing beneath the landfill mixes with percolating rainwater that has passed through the landfill and discharges to the surface from numerous weeps, seeps, and springs present in the area. Anderton Branch, adjacent to the landfill site on the north and east, receives most of the discharge from these weeps, seeps, and springs. Anderton Branch also receives water from the Powell Branch drainage basin to the west and south because of diverted flow of ground water through Harrison Spring Cave. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bedford County Solid Waste Authority, conducted a study to evaluate the effect of the Quail Hollow Landfill on ground- and surface-water quality. During storm runoff, specific conductance was elevated, and cadmium, iron, manganese, lead, and nickel concentrations in Anderton Branch frequently exceeded maximum contaminant levels for drinking water for the State of Tennessee. High chloride inputs to Anderton Branch were detected at two locations?a barnyard straddling the stream and a tributary draining a pond that receives water directly from the landfill. The chloride inputs probably contribute to chloride load levels that are three times higher for Anderton Branch than for the control stream Anthony Branch. Although toxic volatile organic compounds were detected in water from monitoring wells at the landfill, no organic contaminants were detected in domestic water wells adjacent to the landfill or in Anderton Branch. Sons Spring, a karst spring near the landfill, has been affected by the landfill as indicated by an increase in chloride concentrations from 4 milligrams per liter in 1974 to 59 milligrams per liter in 1996. Analysis of water samples from Sons Spring detected concentrations of nickel that exceeded primary drinking-water standards and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation fish and aquatic life chronic standards. Trichloroethene, 1,1-dichloroethene, and 1,1-dichloroethane also were detected at Sons Spring. The presence of these chlorinated solvents imply the landfill origin of the contaminants in Sons Spring. Continuous monitoring at Sons Spring indicated a pattern of decreased specific conductance and lower contaminant concentrations after a storm. Contaminant concentrations increased with specific conductance to pre-storm levels after several days. The benthic macroinvertebrate community in Anderton Branch adjacent to the landfill was not different from the communities at control sites upstream and in Anthony Branch. Sons Spring, however, has low abundance and numbers of benthic macroinvertebrate taxa. Toxicity studies using Ceriodaphnia dubia indicated no toxicity in the base flow or storm water in Anderton Branch or in a tributary draining a pond that receives water from the landfill and Sons Spring; however, water collected from Sons Spring resulted in 100 percent mortality to all organisms within 48 hours. High concentrations of nickel were detected in crayfish tissue from control sites and Anderton Branch. Analysis of sediment samples also indicates nickel concentrations are high at control sites upstream of the landfill. Increased levels of the biomarker metallothionein detected in crayfish from Anderton Branch likely are not caused by nickel or cadmium because the levels present in the tissue are not correlated with metallothionein levels. Despite the high levels of certain metals in Anderton Branch during storm flow, the lack of toxicity and the health of the benthic community imply no detectable negative effect from the landfill to the stream. Sons Spring, howe

Farmer, James J.

2004-01-01

47

The Education of Shelby Knox  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The debate over federally funded abstinence-only sex education continues to concern many across the country, and the Point of View series on PBS has recently addressed this issue through one of its thought-provoking shows. The show looks at this debate through the eyes of Shelby Knox, who when the show was produced was a teenager who became interested in this contentious subject. The site contains such compelling features as interviews with the filmmakers Marion Lipschutz and Rose Rosenblatt, some useful facts and statistics on sex education, and commentary from several policy-makers on sex education in schools. Also included on the site are a number of interviews with relevant persons about virginity pledges and the various gay-straight student alliance groups in high schools.

48

Ground-water data for the Suck Creek area of Walden Ridge, southern Cumberland Plateau, Marion County, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An investigation was made of the ground-water resources of the Suck Creek area, Marion County, Tennessee, 1990-91. Suck Creek is located on the Walden Ridge section of the Cumberland Plateau, and is about 16 miles northwest of Chattanooga. Eight wells were drilled into bedrock of Pennsylvania age. Drilling sites were chosen at or near fracture traces. Yields of the eight wells ranged from less than 1 to as much as 80 gallons of water per minute. Three wells had yields of 50 gallons per minute or more; two of these had estimated yields of 75 to 80 gallons per minute. These three wells produced water from a well- developed fracture within the Sewanee Conglomerate. Specific capacities for these three wells were 1.1, 1.3, 2.2 gallons per minute per foot of drawdown. Samples of water from six test wells and three domestic wells were analyzed for major inorganic constituents, nurients, major metals, trace elements, and bacteria. In addition, water samples from two of the test wells were analyzed for volatile organic compounds and scanned for the presence of semi-volatile organic compounds. Iron exceeded 300 micrograms per liter in five of the nine samples, and manganese exceeded 50 micrograms per liter in seven of the nine water samples. Toluene, a volatile organic compound, was detected in a concentration slightly above the reporting level; no other volatile organic compounds were detected.

Hanchar, D. W.

1995-01-01

49

Chattanooga shale (Devonian and Mississippian) from the Tennessee Division of Geology: U. S. Department of Energy cored drill holes Number 4 and 5, Hawkins County, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Tennessee Division of Geology under contract to the Morgantown Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has drilled eight NX coreholes in eastern Tennessee. The coring program was designed to retrieve continuous cores for a detailed study of the character of the Chattanooga Shale. The geophysical wire-line logging of the NX drill holes was performed by the US Geological Survey. The lithologic and wire-line log data in conjunction with two seismic surveys will be used to evaluate the hydrocarbon potential of the Chattanooga Shale in northeastern Tennessee. The purpose of this report is to present a detailed lithologic description and gamma-ray log of the Tennessee Division of Geology and US Department of Energy cored drill holes no. 4 and 5 (TDG-DOE no. 4 and no. 5). In spite of the overlap, no distinct marker beds were found to facilitate a positive correlation between the two cores. Reconstruction of the total Chattanooga section was based on detailed field mapping of the uppermost dark-gray shale below the base of the Grainger Formation and the projection of the beds. The total thickness of the Chattanooga Shale at the coring locations is estimated to be 1650 to 1700 ft.

Roen, J.B.; Wallace, L.G.; Milici, R.C.

1980-01-01

50

Knox unconformity in subsurface of northern Ohio  

SciTech Connect

In northeastern Ohio, the Wooster arch trend is the site of a valley 10-20 mi wide, in which the lower Copper Ridge Dolomite (Lee Valley Group) subcrops at the unconformity surface. The valley is bounded on the east by the cuesta of the Rose Run Sandstone Member and overlying Chepultepec Dolomite (Beekmantown Group). The valley is bounded on the west only by upper Copper Ridge Dolomite and Beekmantown dolomite, inasmuch as the Rose Run Sandstone Member is missing west of the valley, probably owing to nondeposition. In northwestern Ohio, there is a similar valley (approximately 30 mi wide) over the position of the Findlay arch in which the lower Copper Ridge Dolomite subcrops. The Huron-Lorain swale is a low, broad, synclinal area with smaller superimposed folds. These folds contribute to the development of hills and valleys on the karstic eroded carbonate rocks of the so-called B-Zone (a quartzose, glauconitic dolomite) and the lower Copper Ridge Dolomite in the north and on the B-Zone and upper Copper Ridge Dolomite farther south where the Cambrian oil fields of Morrow County are located. Smaller scale hills and valleys appear on the unconformity surface map. Large residual hills and outliers are also mapped. Major drainage patterns have a southerly trend. Secondary streams partly flowed from the east into the south-oriented anticlinal valley. Earlier work showed the unconformity surface to have 150 ft of erosional relief locally. Overall, at least 200 ft of Upper Cambrian carbonate rocks were removed in northern Ohio during the Early Ordovician. The Knox unconformity surface dipped to the south at about 2-3 ft per mile. Some of the steepest slopes are along the sides of the Wooster arch valley where they range from 8.5 to 27 ft per mile or between 0.1 and 0.5%.

Coogan, A.H.; Maki, M.U.

1987-09-01

51

Hydrogeology and simulation of ground-water flow at Arnold Air Force Base, Coffee and Franklin counties, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Air Force at Arnold Air Force Base (AAFB), in Coffee and Franklin Counties, Tennessee, is investigating ground-water contamination in selected areas of the base. This report documents the results of a comprehensive investigation of the regional hydrogeology of the AAFB area. Three aquifers within the Highland Rim aquifer system, the shallow aquifer, the Manchester aquifer, and the Fort Payne aquifer, have been identified in the study area. Of these, the Manchester aquifer is the primary source of water for domestic use. Drilling and water- quality data indicate that the Chattanooga Shale is an effective confining unit, isolating the Highland Rim aquifer system from the deeper, upper Central Basin aquifer system. A regional ground-water divide, approximately coinciding with the Duck River-Elk River drainage divide, underlies AAFB and runs from southwest to northeast. The general direction of most ground-water flow is to the north- west or to the northwest or to the southeast from the divide towards tributary streams that drain the area. Recharge estimates range from 4 to 11 inches per year. Digital computer modeling was used to simulate and provide a better understanding of the ground-water flow system. The model indicates that most of the ground-water flow occurs in the shallow and Manchester aquifers. The model was most sensitive to increases in hydraulic conductivity and changes in recharge rates. Particle-tracking analysis from selected sites of ground-water contamination indicates a potential for contami- nants to be transported beyond the boundary of AAFB.

Haugh, C. J.; Mahoney, E. N.

1994-01-01

52

Phase I Archaeological Survey of Parcel ED-3 and Historic Assessement of the Happy Valley Worker Camp Roane County, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Parcel ED-3 was the location of a portion of 'Happy Valley', a temporary worker housing area occupied from 1943 to 1947 during the construction of the K-25 Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The project was carried out under subcontract for the Department of Energy. The survey report will be used in the preparation of an Environmental Assessment under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). New South Associates conducted a Phase I Archaeological Survey of Parcel ED-3 at the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation in Roane County, Tennessee. The survey was conducted in two parts. The first survey was carried out in 2008 and covered an area measuring approximately 110 acres. The second survey took place in 2009 and focused on 72 acres west of the first survey area. The objective of the surveys was to identify any archaeological remains associated with Happy Valley and any additional sites on the property and to assess these sites for National Register eligibility. New South Associates also conducted a historic assessment to gather information on Happy Valley. This historic assessment was used in conjunction with the archaeological survey to evaluate the significance of the Happy Valley site. Archaeological remains of Happy Valley were located throughout the parcel, but no additional sites were located. The official state site number for Happy Valley is 40RE577. During the two surveys a total of 13 artifact concentrations, 14 isolated finds, and 75 structural features were located. Due to the Happy Valley's stron gassociation with the Manhattan Project, the site is recommended eligible for the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion A.

New South Associates

2009-08-17

53

Preliminary assessment of ground-water resources of Lauderdale County, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The ground-water resource in Lauderdale County is in a rudimentary stage of development. The principal shallow aquifers are the Mississippi alluvial deposits of Quaternary age and the Cockfield Formation, Memphis Sand, and Fort Pillow Sand of Tertiary age. Water levels fluctuate seasonally. High water levels generally occur in the winter, spring, or early summer, and low water levels occur in the fall or early winter. Water from the Mississippi alluvial deposits, Cockfield Formation, and Memphis Sand is a calcium bicarbonate type and is generally of good quality. Undesirable parameters from the standpoint of use are hardness and concentrations of dissolved iron and dissolved solids. The Fort Pillow Sand, as yet untapped, has potential to yield a sodium bicarbonate type of water of somewhat better quality than is available from the shallow aquifers. Estimated values of transmissivity from single-well pumping tests are highest for the Mississippi alluvial deposits and lowest for the Cockfield. Several north-northeast and west-northwest trending faults cross the country. (USGS)

Parks, W. S.; Carmichael, J. K.; Graham, D. D.

1985-01-01

54

Effects of urbanization on flood characteristics in Nashville-Davidson County, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Streamflow data from 14 basins in Davidson County, Tenn., were extended in time by use of a digital model of the hydrologic system. The basins ranged in size from 1.58 to 64.0 square miles and ranged in extent of manmade impervious cover from 3 to 37 percent. The flood-frequency characteristics were defined by weighting frequency curves based on simulated discharges with those based on observed discharges. The average record length of the three rain gages used in simulation was 72 years, and the average record length of observed discharges was 11 years. Discharges corresponding to 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-year floods from the modeled basins were compared with discharges from regional equations for estimating peak discharge rates from rural basins. Basin lag times of the urban basins were compared with those of nearby rural basins. The analyses indicated that in a fully-developed residential area, the flood peaks and the basin lag times will not be significantly different from those expected from an undeveloped area. Data were not sufficient to determine if an increase in flood peaks would occur from extremely small basins with extremely intensive development. (Woodard-USGS)

Wibben, Herman C.

1976-01-01

55

Natural gas plays of the Knox Group in the Appalachian basin: A significant element of the U. S. Department of Energy atlas of major Appalachian gas plays  

SciTech Connect

Oil and gas have been produced from the Knox Group in the Appalachian basin since the early 1990s. However, only since the 1960s have significant volumes of hydrocarbons been produced. Porosity development along the Knox unconformity is the dominant geologic control for hydrocarbon migration and entrapment. Other important controls include stratigraphy, diagenesis, paleokarst, structure, and fractures. Cumulative production is ultimately, controlled by the reservoir conditions characteristic to each play. The two most significant Knox plays in terms of total cumulative gas production are (1) the Lower Ordovician-Upper Cambrian eroded shelf sandstones known as the Rose Run sandstone in Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, and the Theresa sandstone in New York, and (2) the Lower Ordovician-Upper Cambrian paleokarstic carbonates known as the Beekmantown dolomite in Kentucky, Ohio, and Tennessee, and the Copper Ridge (Trempealeau) dolomite in Ohio. Minor volumes of gas have been produced from fracture and paleokarstic carbonate plays in the Know dolomite of Kentucky, Tennessee, and Virginia, and from localized sandstones of the Copper Ridge (Trempealeau) in Ohio. Some individual wells in Ohio have produced more than 1 billion ft[sup 3] of gas from the Beekmantown, Rose Run, or Copper Ridge (Trempealeau). Cumulative gas production from all the Knox plays in the Appalachian basin has been in excess of 60 billion ft[sup 3] of gas. The Knox Group plays are currently the most active exploration targets in the basin.

Baranoski, M.T.; Wolfe, M.E. (Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Columbus, OH (United States))

1993-08-01

56

75 FR 58419 - Tennessee; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Tennessee have been designated as adversely affected by this major disaster: Clay, Cocke, Hardin, Jackson, Macon, Overton, Pickett, Putnam, Smith, and Wayne Counties for Public Assistance. All counties within the State of Tennessee are eligible to...

2010-09-24

57

Hydrogeology, ground-water quality, and potential for water-supply contamination near the Shelby County landfill in Memphis, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An investigation was conducted from 1989 to 1991 to collect and interpret hydrogeologic and ground-water-quality data specific to the Shelby County landfill in east Memphis, Tennessee. Eighteen wells were installed in the alluvial and Memphis aquifers at the landfill. Hydrogeologic data collected showed that the confining unit separating the alluvial aquifer from the Memphis aquifer was thin or absent just north of the landfill and elsewhere consists predominantly of fine sand and silt with lenses of clay. A water-table map of the landfill vicinity confirms the existence of a depression in the water table north and northeast of the landfill and indicates that ground water flows northeast from the Wolf River passing beneath the landfill toward the depression in the water table. A map of the potentiometric surface of the Memphis aquifer shows that water levels were anomalously high just north of the landfill, indicating downward leakage of water from the alluvial aquifer to the Memphis aquifer. An analysis of water-quality data for major and trace inorganic constituents and nutrients confirms that leachate from the landfill has migrated northeastward in the alluvial aquifer toward the depression in the water table and that contaminants in the alluvial aquifer have migrated downward into the Memphis aquifer. The leachate plume can be characterized by concentrations of certain major and trace inorganic constituents that are 2 to 20 times higher than samples from upgradient and background alluvial aquifer wells. The major and trace constituents that best characterize the leachate plume are total organic carbon, chloride, dissolved solids, iron, ammonia nitrogen, calcium, sodium, iodide, barium, strontium, boron, and cadmium. Several of these constituents (specifically dissolved solids, calcium, sodium, and possibly ammonia nitrogen, chloride, barium, and strontium) were detected in elevated concentrations in samples from certain Memphis aquifer wells. Elevated concentrations were detected in samples from the Memphis aquifer beneath the leachate plume where the confining unit is thin or absent. The distribution of halogenated alkanes (specifically dichlorodifluoromethane and trichlorofluoromethane) and halogenated alkenes (specifically 1,2-trans-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride) in samples from wells screened in both the alluvial and Memphis aquifers is similar to the distribution of major and trace inorganic constituents that characterize the leachate plume. The ground-water supply most susceptible to contamination from the Shelby County landfill is the Sheahan well field of the Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division. This well field is about 5 miles downgradient from the landfill in the direction of ground-water flow. Based on an estimated velocity of 0.5 to 1.5 feet per day, ground water would require about 50 to 150 years to travel from the Shelby County landfill to the Sheahan wellfield. Given the time and distance of transport, any contaminants in the ground water would not likely persistto reach this well field because of the effects of various physical, chemical, and biological processes, including dilution and adsorption.

Parks, W. S.; Mirecki, J. E.

1992-01-01

58

Water-quality, discharge, and biologic data for streams and springs in the Highland Rim Escarpment of southeastern Bedford County, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

From November 1994 through April 1995, streams and springs in 9 drainage basins were observed and sampled at 176 sites to obtain information on environmental quality near the Quail Hollow landfill, Bedford County, Tennessee. Reconnaissance data were collected to establish a regional pattern. Water samples from 26 seepage sites were analyzed to determine water-quality conditions. During the reconnaissance, conductivity ranged regionally from 17 to 617 microsiemens per centimeter. The greatest biologic diversity was in Bennett Branch, followed by Daniel Hollow, Prince, Powell and Renegar, County Line, and Anthony Branches, Hurricane Creek, and Anderton Branch, respectively. In general, conductivity was less than 50 microsiemens per centimeter at and upstream of the Chattanooga Shale but increased downstream to between 200 and 300 microsiemens per centimeter. Of the constituents and properties analyzed, only pH and four metals at six sites had values that were not within the limits set by the State of Tennessee for drinking water. Chloride and dissolved manganese concentrations were highest for a spring and a seep adjacent to the landfill. Scans indicated the presence of about 37 unidentified organic compounds at these same two sites.

Hollyday, E. F.; Byl, T. D.

1995-01-01

59

76 FR 33775 - Tennessee; Amendment No. 3 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Hickman, Houston, Humphreys, Jackson, Knox, Lawrence, Lewis, Lincoln, Loudon, Marshall, Montgomery, Moore, Perry, Pickett, Polk, Scott, Sequatchie, Smith, Sullivan, and Wayne Counties for Public Assistance. The following Catalog of...

2011-06-09

60

Kentucky exploration targets oil in fractured High Bridge, Knox zones  

Microsoft Academic Search

A high-yielding oil well, the Syndicated Options Ltd. of Austria 9372 Ferguson Bros., was completed in late 1990 in Clinton County, south-central Kentucky. Cumulative production for the first 8 weeks was reported to have been nearly 150,000 bbl of oil. The well produced from the Middle Ordovician High Bridge group, which is equivalent to the Stones River group of Tennessee.

Hamilton-Smith

1992-01-01

61

The Soil Conservation District Movement in Tennessee.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development of soil conservation districts in Tennessee is the subject of this graduate study. Related literature, existing records, and personal interviews are used to record progress since Tennessee adopted Public Law 46 establishing soil conservation districts in 1939. In 1959 all 95 counties of Tennessee had organized soil conservation…

Mathews, Thomas Cochran; And Others

62

Carter-Knox Gas Field, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Carter-Knox gas field is in the SE. end of the Anadarko Basin. It produces oil with associated gas from rocks of the Permian system, and from the Hoxbar, Deese, and Springer groups. A significant gas reserve was discovered in 1956 by deeper drilling which first tested the pre-Pennsylvanian formations. Gas-condensate production is from the Simpson group, and the Bromide

Reedy

1968-01-01

63

A Strawberry KNOX Gene Regulates Leaf, Flower and Meristem Architecture  

PubMed Central

The KNOTTED-LIKE HOMEODOMAIN (KNOX) genes play a central role in maintenance of the shoot apical meristem. They also contribute to the morphology of simple and compound leaves. In this report we characterize the FaKNOX1 gene from strawberry (Fragaria spp.) and demonstrate its function in trasgenic plants. The FaKNOX1 cDNA was isolated from a cultivated strawberry (F.×ananassa) flower EST library. The sequence is most similar to Class I KNOX genes, and was mapped to linkage group VI of the diploid strawberry genome. Unlike most KNOX genes studied, steady-state transcript levels were highest in flowers and fruits. Transcripts were also detected in emerging leaf primordia and the apical dome. Transgenic strawberry plants suppressing or overexpressing FaKNOX1 exhibited conspicuous changes in plant form. The FaKNOX1 RNAi plants presented a dwarfed phenotype with deeply serrated leaflets and exaggerated petiolules. They also exhibited a high level of cellular disorganization of the shoot apical meristem and leaves. Overexpression of FaKNOX1 caused dwarfed stature with wrinkled leaves. These gain- and loss-of-function assays in strawberry functionally demonstrate the contributions of a KNOX domain protein in a rosaceous species.

Chatterjee, Mithu; Bermudez-Lozano, Claudia L.; Clancy, Maureen A.; Davis, Thomas M.; Folta, Kevin M.

2011-01-01

64

Flower-specific KNOX phenotype in the orchid Dactylorhiza fuchsii.  

PubMed

The KNOTTED1-like homeobox (KNOX) genes are best known for maintaining a pluripotent stem-cell population in the shoot apical meristem that underlies indeterminate vegetative growth, allowing plants to adapt their development to suit the prevailing environmental conditions. More recently, the function of the KNOX gene family has been expanded to include additional roles in lateral organ development such as complex leaf morphogenesis, which has come to dominate the KNOX literature. Despite several reports implicating KNOX genes in the development of carpels and floral elaborations such as petal spurs, few authors have investigated the role of KNOX genes in flower development. Evidence is presented here of a flower-specific KNOX function in the development of the elaborate flowers of the orchid Dactylorhiza fuchsii, which have a three-lobed labellum petal with a prominent spur. Using degenerate PCR, four Class I KNOX genes (DfKN1-4) have been isolated, one from each of the four major Class I KNOX subclades and by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), it is demonstrated that DfKNOX transcripts are detectable in developing floral organs such as the spur-bearing labellum and inferior ovary. Although constitutive expression of the DfKN2 transcript in tobacco produces a wide range of floral abnormalities, including serrated petal margins, extra petal tissue, and fused organs, none of the vegetative phenotypes typical of constitutive KNOX expression were produced. These data are highly suggestive of a role for KNOX expression in floral development that may be especially important in taxa with elaborate flowers. PMID:22771852

Box, Mathew S; Dodsworth, Steven; Rudall, Paula J; Bateman, Richard M; Glover, Beverley J

2012-08-01

65

An archaeological reconnaissance and evaluation of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Reservation, Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

At the request of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, Tennessee, an archaeological reconnaissance and evaluation of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed areas was conducted between June I and September 2, 1993. The project was conducted by Glyn D. DuVall, Principal Investigator. ORNL project representative, Peter Souza, accompanied the principal investigator during all project evaluations. The reconnaissance to assess adverse impacts to cultural resources located within the boundaries of federally licensed, permitted, funded or assisted projects was conducted in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (Public Law 89-665; 16 USC 470; 80 Stat. 915), National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (Public Law 91-190; 91 Stat. 852; 42 USC 4321-4347) and Executive Order 11593 (May 13, 1971). Based upon the reconnaissance, a search of the site files at the Tennessee Division of Archaeology and a search of the National Register of Historic Places, the proposed construction on the site will have no impact on any property included in or eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places pursuant to 36 CFR 60.4. This judgement is based on the amount of prior disturbance associated with ORNL during the past 50 years. Construction in the vicinity of the New Bethel Baptist Church and Cemetery should allow sufficient buffer to avoid direct and visual impact to the property. The determination of sufficient buffer area, either distance or vegetative, should be coordinated with the Tennessee Historical Commission, Office of the State Historic Preservation Officer.

DuVall, G.D.

1994-01-01

66

Geochemistry of and radioactivity in ground water of the Highland Rim and Central Basin aquifer systems, Hickman and Maury counties, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A reconnaissance of the geochemistry of and radioactivity in ground water from the Highland Rim and Central Basin aquifer systems in Hickman and Maury Counties, Tennessee, was conducted in 1989. Water in both aquifer systems typically is of the calcium or calcium magnesium bicarbonate type, but concentrations of calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, and sulfate are greater in water of the Central Basin system; differences in the concentrations are statistically significant. Dissolution of calcite, magnesium-calcite, dolomite, and gypsum are the primary geochemical processes controlling ground-water chemistry in both aquifer systems. Saturation-state calculations using the computer code WATEQF indicated that ground water from the Central Basin system is more saturated with respect to calcite, dolomite, and gypsum than water from the Highland Rim system. Geochemical environments within each aquifer system are somewhat different with respect to dissolution of magnesium-bearing minerals. Water samples from the Highland Rim system had a fairly constant calcium to magnesium molar ratio, implying congruent dissolution of magnesium-bearing minerals, whereas water samples from the Central Basin system had highly variable ratios, implying either incongruent dissolution or heterogeneity in soluble constituents of the aquifer matrix. Concentrations of radionuclides in water were low and not greatly different between aquifer systems. Median gross alpha activities were 0.54 picocuries per liter in water from each system; median gross beta activities were 1.1 and 2.3 picocuries per liter in water from the Highland Rim and Central Basin systems, respectively. Radon-222 concentrations were 559 and 422 picocuries per liter, respectively. Concentrations of gross alpha and radium in all samples were substantially less than Tennessee?s maximum permissible levels for community water-supply systems. The data indicated no relations between concentrations of dissolved radionuclides (uranium, radium-226, radium-228, radon-222, gross alpha, and gross beta) and any key indicators of water chemistry, except in water from the Highland Rim system, in which radon-222 was moderately related to pH and weakly related to dissolved magnesium. The only relation among radiochemical constituents indicated by the data was between radium-226 and gross alpha activity; this relation was indicated for water from both aquifer systems.

Hileman, G. E.; Lee, R. W.

1993-01-01

67

Some Motivations of Marshall County, Tennessee Cow-Calf System Producers. A Research Summary of a Graduate Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purposes of this study were to determine the characteristic of 40 cow-calf producers randomly selected from a county population of 300 cattlemen, to find out which recommended management practices they were using, and to learn which factors had influenced them to adopt these practices. Farmers were interviewed and data were classified in terms…

Brewer, Lester Ray; And Others

68

My friend Dr Knox: a pupil writes about the anatomist.  

PubMed

Thomas Giordani Wright, a medical apprentice in Newcastle upon Tyne, attended Dr Robert Knox's anatomy classes in Edinburgh between November 1825 and April 1826, only two years before Burke and Hare began murdering people and selling the bodies of their victims to Knox's anatomy school. In March 1829, soon after the crimes came to light and Burke had been found guilty of murder and executed, Wright commented on the case in his diary, describing the practices in the dissection rooms and giving his views on Robert Knox, the teacher who had become his friend. PMID:16353861

Johnson, A

2005-12-01

69

Potential effects of dredging the South Fork Obion River on ground-water levels near Sidonia, Weakley County, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has proposed dredging an approximate 7-mile reach of the South Fork Obion River near Sidonia, Tennessee. This dredging will have an effect on ground-water levels in a wetland area near the river. The river cuts into a sandy aquifer that is confined by an overlying clay layer. Ground water in the confined aquifer flows from a ridge on the north side of the study area toward the river, Estimates of aquifer transmissivity range from 3,300 to 18,800 feet squared per day. Assuming a 3-foot decline in stream stage due to dredging, the maximum decline in ground-water levels would be about 2.4 feet at low flow. Ground-water levels in the aquifer would decline by at least 2 feet at a distance of 0.5 mile from the river within 60 days after the change in stream stage, regardless of the assumed transmissivity value. Water-level declines in the upper clay layer probably would be much smaller. The time required for a specified change in ground-water level is dependent on the aquifer properties and distance from the river.

Tucci, Patrick; Hileman, G. E.

1992-01-01

70

75 FR 27846 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00039  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Smith, Stewart, Trousdale, Wayne, Wilson. Contiguous Counties: (Economic Injury Loans Only): Tennessee: Overton, Pickett, Putnam, Warren, White. Alabama: Lauderdale. Kentucky: Calloway, Clinton, Cumberland, Logan, Monroe, Trigg....

2010-05-18

71

Atlas of Tennessee Vascular Plants  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Austin Peay State University Center for Field Biology and the University of Tennessee Herbarium have collaborated to produce the Atlas of Tennessee Vascular Plants. Species distribution maps are provided in alphabetical order (scientific name) for Pteridophytes, Gymnosperms, Monocots, and Dicots in the western, middle, and eastern parts of the state. Each map is color-coded by abundance, and highlights distribution across counties. Currently under construction, two additional sections will soon include a Database of Tennessee Vascular Plants and links to the Bryophyte Herbarium, among other features.

72

Construction, geologic, and ground-water data for observation wells near the Shelby County landfill, Memphis, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Forty-one observation wells and two stratigraphic test holes were drilled near the Shelby County landfill in east Memphis. These wells were installed as part of an investigation on possible vertical leakage of groundwater from the alluvial aquifer into the Memphis Sand aquifer. The alluvial aquifer consists of about 45 to 55 ft of alluvial silt, sand, and gravel. This is separated from the underlying Memphis Sand aquifer by about 30 to 60 ft of silt, silty sand, and clay in the confining layer. Thirty wells completed in the alluvium were generally less than 50 ft deep. The depth to the water table ranged from about 15 to more than 45 ft below land surface. Four observation wells were completed in the upper part of the Memphis Sand aquifer. Water levels in the Memphis Sand aquifer were generally 35 to 40 ft below land surface. (USGS)

Bradley, Michael W.

1988-01-01

73

Estimates of future water demand for selected water-service areas in the Upper Duck River basin, central Tennessee; with a section on Methodology used to develop population forecasts for Bedford, Marshall, and Maury counties, Tennessee, from 1993 through 2050  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Estimates of future water demand were determined for selected water-service areas in the upper Duck River basin in central Tennessee through the year 2050. The Duck River is the principal source of publicly-supplied water in the study area providing a total of 15.6 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) in 1993 to the cities of Columbia, Lewisburg, Shelbyville, part of southern Williamson County, and several smaller communities. Municipal water use increased 19 percent from 1980 to 1993 (from 14.5 to 17.2 Mgal/d). Based on certain assumptions about socioeconomic conditions and future development in the basin, water demand should continue to increase through 2050. Projections of municipal water demand for the study area from 1993 to 2015 were made using econometric and single- coefficient (unit-use) requirement models of the per capita type. The models are part of the Institute for Water Resources-Municipal and Industrial Needs System, IWR-MAIN. Socioeconomic data for 1993 were utilized to calibrate the models. Projections of water demand in the study area from 2015 to 2050 were made using a single- coefficient requirement model. A gross per capita use value (unit-requirement) was estimated for each water-service area based on the results generated by IWR-MAIN for year 2015. The gross per capita estimate for 2015 was applied to population projections for year 2050 to calculate water demand. Population was projected using the log-linear form of the Box-Cox regression model. Water demand was simulated for two scenarios. The scenarios were suggested by various planning agencies associated with the study area. The first scenario reflects a steady growth pattern based on present demographic and socioeconomic conditions in the Bedford, Marshall, and Maury/southern Williamson water-service areas. The second scenario considers steady growth in the Bedford and Marshall water-service areas and additional industrial and residential development in the Maury/southern Williamson water-service area beginning in 2000. For the study area, water demand for scenario one shows an increase of 121 percent (from 17.2 to 38 Mgal/d) from 1993 to 2050. In scenario two, simulated water demand increases 150 percent (17.2 to 43 Mgal/d) from 1993 to 2050.

Hutson, S. S.; Schwarz, G. E.

1996-01-01

74

An initial analysis of LANDSAT-4 Thematic Mapper data for the discrimination of agricultural, forested wetlands, and urban land cover. [Poinsett County, Arkansas; and Reelfoot Lake and Union City, Tennessee  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The capabilities of TM data for discriminating land covers within three particular cultural and ecological realms was assessed. The agricultural investigation in Poinsett County, Arkansas illustrates that TM data can successfully be used to discriminate a variety of crop cover types within the study area. The single-date TM classification produced results that were significantly better than those developed from multitemporal MSS data. For the Reelfoot Lake area of Tennessee TM data, processed using unsupervised signature development techniques, produced a detailed classification of forested wetlands with excellent accuracy. Even in a small city of approximately 15,000 people (Union City, Tennessee). TM data can successfully be used to spectrally distinguish specific urban classes. Furthermore, the principal components analysis evaluation of the data shows that through photointerpretation, it is possible to distinguish individual buildings and roof responses with the TM.

Quattrochi, D. A.

1985-01-01

75

Tennessee Energy Statistics Quarterly, third quarter 1984  

SciTech Connect

The Tennessee Energy Statistics Quarterly presents the most current energy statistics available which are specific to the State of Tennessee. In every instance possible, county-level energy data are also shown. The report covers three substantive areas of the energy flow - production, consumption, and pricing. The specific energy types for which data are included are coal, petroleum, natural gas and electricity.

Finley, T.F. III; Hensley, B.D.; Trotter, T.

1984-01-01

76

The Use of Genetic Algorithms as an Inverse Technique to Guide the Design and Implementation of Research at a Test Site in Shelby County, Tennessee  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Shelby Farms test site in Shelby County, Tennessee is being developed to better understand recharge hydraulics to the Memphis aquifer in areas where leakage through an overlying aquitard occurs. The site is unique in that it demonstrates many opportunities for interdisciplinary research regarding environmental tracers, anthropogenic impacts and inverse modeling. The objective of the research funding the development of the test site is to better understand the groundwater hydrology and hydraulics between a shallow alluvial aquifer and the Memphis aquifer given an area of leakage, defined as an aquitard window. The site is situated in an area on the boundary of a highly developed urban area and is currently being used by an agricultural research agency and a local recreational park authority. Also, an abandoned landfill is situated to the immediate south of the window location. Previous research by the USGS determined the location of the aquitard window subsequent to the landfill closure. Inverse modeling using a genetic algorithm approach has identified the likely extents of the area of the window given an interaquifer accretion rate. These results, coupled with additional fieldwork, have been used to guide the direction of the field studies and the overall design of the research project. This additional work has encompassed the drilling of additional monitoring wells in nested groups by rotasonic drilling methods. The core collected during the drilling will provide additional constraints to the physics of the problem that may provide additional help in redefining the conceptual model. The problem is non-unique with respect to the leakage area and accretion rate and further research is being performed to provide some idea of the advective flow paths using a combination of tritium and 3He analyses and geochemistry. The outcomes of the research will result in a set of benchmark data and physical infrastructure that can be used to evaluate other environmental tracers and modeling techniques.

Gentry, R. W.

2002-12-01

77

Channel evolution of the Hatchie River near the U.S. Highway 51 crossing in Lauderdale and Tipton counties, West Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An investigation was conducted to describe the channel cross-section evolution near the bridge crossing of the Hatchie River at U.S. Highway 51 in Lauderdale and Tipton Counties, in West Tennessee. The study also included velocity and discharge distributions near the bridge crossing, and definition of streamflow duration and flood frequencies at the bridge site and comparison of these statistics with flows prior to the bridge collapse. Cross-section measurements at the site indicated that the channel was widening at a rate of 0.8 ft/year from 1931 through about 1975. The channel bed was stable at an elevation of about 235 ft. Construction of a south bound bridge in 1974 and 1975 reduced the effective flow width from about 4,000 to about 1,000 ft. Data collected from 1975 to 1981 indicated that the channel bed degraded to an elevation of about 230 ft and the widening rate increased to about 4.5 ft/year. The channel bed returned to approximately the pre-construction elevation of 235 ft as channel width increased. The widening rate decreased to about 1.8 ft/year from 1981 through 1989. Channel-geometry data indicated that recent channel morphology changes along the toe of the right bank have resulted in continued bank undercutting and bank failure. Cross-section geometry and flow-velocity distributions from measurements made from April 6 through 10, 1989, indicate that there is a high-flow meander pattern through this river reach and that the bridges are located at the point where the current strikes the right bank. (USGS)

Bryan, B. A.

1989-01-01

78

Benchmarking East Tennessee`s economic capacity  

SciTech Connect

This presentation is comprised of viewgraphs delineating major economic factors operating in 15 counties in East Tennessee. The purpose of the information presented is to provide a benchmark analysis of economic conditions for use in guiding economic growth in the region. The emphasis of the presentation is economic infrastructure, which is classified into six categories: human resources, technology, financial resources, physical infrastructure, quality of life, and tax and regulation. Data for analysis of key indicators in each of the categories are presented. Preliminary analyses, in the form of strengths and weaknesses and comparison to reference groups, are given.

NONE

1995-04-20

79

Regional assessment of nonforestry related biomass resources: Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This document is a collection of spreadsheets detailing on a county by county basis the agricultural crop, agricultural wastes, municipal wastes, and industrial wastes of Tennessee that are potential biomass energy sources.

Not Available

1988-11-01

80

76 FR 20696 - Tennessee; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...this major disaster: Franklin, Fentress, Grainger, Hamilton, Houston, Humphreys, Jackson, Jefferson, Moore, Morgan, Pickett, Scott, and Union Counties for Public Assistance. All counties within the State of Tennessee are eligible to apply for...

2011-04-13

81

Knots in the family tree: evolutionary relationships and functions of knox homeobox genes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Knotted-like homeobox (knox) genes constitute a gene family in plants. Class I knox genes are expressed in shoot apical meristems, and (with notable exceptions) not in lateral organ primordia. Class II genes have more diverse expression patterns. Loss and gain of function mutations indicate that knox genes are important regulators of meristem function. Gene duplication has contributed to the evolution

Leonore Reiser; Patricia Sánchez-Baracaldo; Sarah Hake

2000-01-01

82

Ground-water hydrology and the effects of vertical leakage and leachate migration on ground-water quality near the Shelby County landfill, Memphis, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An investigation of potential leakage of leachate from the Shelby County landfill near Memphis, West Tennessee, was conducted during 1986-87. The migration of leachate from the landfill to the shallow alluvial aquifer system and the potential leakage to the deeper confined Memphis aquifer of Tertiary age were investigated. A network of observation wells was drilled to determine water levels and aquifer properties in the shallow and deep aquifers as well as in the confining layer. Water samples were collected to define potential leachate occurrence. A depression in the water table within the shallow alluvial aquifer was defined from the water-level data. Drawdowns within the cone of depression are as much as 14 feet lower than the adjoining Wolf River. Recharge from the river and leachate from the landfill moves toward the depression. The presence of leachate within the shallow aquifer was confirmed from determinations of dissolved solids and dissolved chloride concentrations and comparisons with areas away from the aflected zone. Leakage from the water-table aquifer to the Memphis aquifer was confirmed from chemical analyses and hydraulic-head data. Dissolved-solids concentrations in water samples from the upper Memphis aquifer near the landfill are higher than in samples from the Memphis aquifer in unaffected areas. Tritium activities in water samples from the upper Memphis aquifer were as high as 34 pico-Curies per liter indicating recent recharge to the Memphis aquifer. The presence of synthetic organic compounds and elevated concentrations of dissolved solids, chloride, and trace metals indicate the leachate has aflected water quality in the alluvial aquifer. Vertical migration of ground water could transmit leachate down to the Memphis aquifer. Although water-quality data indicate that water is leaking from the alluvial aquifer to the Memphis aquifer, most of the data do not indicate the occurrence of leachate in the Memphis aquifer. Chemical data from one well in the Memphis aquifer near the landfill indicates a slightly elevated dissolved-chloride concentration, but the data are limited.

Bradley, M. W.

1991-01-01

83

Application of the Knox-Thompson method to solar observations  

SciTech Connect

The Knox-Thompson (KT) technique is well suited for speckle imaging of an extended source, such as the sun. Other techniques require that the extent of the observed object is restricted to the field size (e.g., the Fienup technique) or even to much less than the seeing disk size (e.g., shift-and-add). The Knox-Thompson technique, as well as the speckle-masking technique, are more general in that they make no assumptions about the object size. Because of its relative simplicity, the KT technique has been applied to solar data. A KT speckle-imaging program has been dedicated to solar data analysis. The program, named KISIP, now runs on the NSO/Sacramento Peak VAX 750 under 4.3 BSD UNIX. Major features of the code are: combination of the Labeyrie (1970, for Fourier-amplitude recovery) - and Knox-Thompson (phase recovery) techniques; incorporation of the spectral-ratio technique to correct Fourier amplitudes for seeing attenuation; and incorporation of a phase consistency test to estimate the accuracy to which phases can be reconstructed from Knox-Thompson bispectra.

Luhe, O.V.D.

1987-01-01

85

Tennessee Energy Statistics Quarterly. Second quarter 1984  

SciTech Connect

The Tennessee Energy Statistics Quarterly presents the most current energy statistics available which are specific to the State of Tennessee. In every instance possible, county-level energy data are also shown. The report covers three substantive areas of the energy flow production, consumption, and pricing. The specific energy types for which data are included are coal, petroleum, natural gas and electricity. The Tennessee Energy Statistics Quarterly has been developed by the Tennessee Energy Data Base Program to serve as a supplement to the Energy Division publication - The Tennessee Energy Profiles: 1960-1980. Historical data reported in this volume cover the production and utilization of major energy supplies by fuel type and economic sectors, as well as other energy data such as prices and fuel distribution. 12 figures, 12 tables.

Finley, T.F. III; Hensley, B.D.; Trotter, T.

1985-01-01

86

Isolation and mapping of three rice mutants that showed ectopic expression of KNOX genes in leaves  

Microsoft Academic Search

Knotted1-like homeobox (KNOX) genes are essential for the formation\\/maintenance of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) in plants, and are specifically expressed in the SAM, but are repressed in lateral organs such as leaves. Ectopic expression of KNOX genes in lateral organs was shown to result in abnormal shoot development. To elucidate genetic mechanisms of the SAM-specific expression of KNOX genes,

Katsutoshi Tsuda; Yukihiro Ito; Shinichiro Yamaki; Akio Miyao; Hirohiko Hirochika; Nori Kurata

2009-01-01

87

Different subcellular localization and trafficking properties of KNOX class 1 homeodomain proteins from rice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genes of the KN1-like homeobox (KNOX) class 1 encode transcription factors involved in shoot apical meristem development and maintenance. We studied the subcellular localization of Green Fluorescent Protein-tagged rice KNOX proteins (Oskn1-3) after particle bombardment of onion and rice cells and after transformation ofArabidopsis and rice with constitutive and inducible expression constructs. In all test systems, the three rice KNOX

Suzanne J. H. Kuijt; Gerda E. M. Lamers; Saskia Rueb; Enrico Scarpella; Pieter B. F. Ouwerkerk; Herman P. Spaink; Annemarie H. Meijer

2004-01-01

88

Kentucky exploration targets oil in fractured High Bridge, Knox zones  

SciTech Connect

A high-yielding oil well, the Syndicated Options Ltd. of Austria 9372 Ferguson Bros., was completed in late 1990 in Clinton County, south-central Kentucky. Cumulative production for the first 8 weeks was reported to have been nearly 150,000 bbl of oil. The well produced from the Middle Ordovician High Bridge group, which is equivalent to the Stones River group of Tennessee. The producing zone was apparently a fractured carbonate reservoir at a depth of 1,008 ft. The discovery well was the result of deepening a previously abandoned well. The oil well, the Nelson Bishop 4A Ferguson Bros., was previously drilled to 980 ft in March 1987. The original well was logged and cased, and was successfully completed as an oil well in the upper part of the High Bridge group producing about 3 b/d of oil from 828-830 ft. This well was subsequently abandoned and the lease was allowed to expire. In 1990 the Nelson Bishop well was acquired by Syndicated Options Ltd. of Austria and renamed following the change of operator. An air rotary rig was used to clean out the deepen the well.

Hamilton-Smith, T. (Tec Group, Inc., Bloomfield, CT (United States))

1992-11-09

89

Negative regulation of KNOX expression in tomato leaves  

Microsoft Academic Search

Leaves of seed plants can be described as simple, where the leaf blade is entire, or dissected, where the blade is divided\\u000a into distinct leaflets. Both simple and dissected leaves are initiated at the flanks of a pluripotent structure termed the\\u000a shoot apical meristem (SAM). In simple-leafed species, expression of class I KNOTTED1-like homeobox (KNOX) proteins is confined\\u000a to the

Sophie Jasinski; Hardip Kaur; Alexander Tattersall; Miltos Tsiantis

2007-01-01

90

Aerial view of the entire bridge crossing the Tennessee River ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Aerial view of the entire bridge crossing the Tennessee River looking up river. The swing bridge, when open, permits river navigational traffic to ply the river. Construction of a replacement bridge, to be located 93.27 feet down river, has now started. - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

91

Sphalerite-bearing detrital ‘sand’ bodies in Mississippi Valley-type zinc deposits Mascot-Jefferson City district, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Mississippi Valley-type sphalerite mineralization in the Mascot-Jefferson City zinc district of East Tennessee occurs\\u000a as open-space fillings in breccia bodies within the upper part of the Knox Group (Lower Ordovician) which is truncated by\\u000a a regional unconformity. A lower age limit of mineralization is constrained by the formation of solution-collapse breccia\\u000a bodies, which are believed to be related to

J. F. Matlock; K. C. Misra

1993-01-01

92

Relationship between paleotopographic surface of Cambrian-Ordovician Knox Group and oil and gas entrapment in Kentucky  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cambrian-Ordovician dolostones of the Knox Group constitute one of the largest occurrences of this rock type known in the US. In Kentucky, the Knox carbonate sequence attains thicknesses of more than 3500 ft. Mudstone and wackestone are dominant in the upper Knox, with lesser amounts of packstone and grainstone. The Upper Cambrian to Lower Ordovician carbonate sequences in Kentucky resulted

Patrick J. Gooding

1987-01-01

93

Hydrocarbon potential of Cambrian-Ordovician Knox Group in south-central Kentucky  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the eastern US, the carbonate rocks of the Cambrian-Ordovician Knox Group were deposited on a broad, gently sloping continental shelf in shallow hypersaline waters. A major unconformity occurs at the top of the Knox Group. This regional unconformity developed when the Sauk Sea retreated at the close of the Early Ordovician. In south-central Kentucky, the paleotopographic surface is characterized

Gooding

1987-01-01

94

An archaeological reconnaissance of a 14 mile section of the East Fork Poplar Creek for the Environmental Restoration Project, Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the US Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District, Nashville, Tennessee, an archaeological reconnaissance of the potential impact areas of the Environmental Restoration Project (ERP) along the East Fork Poplar Creek was conducted during the period December 16, 1991, and March 3, 1992. The reconnaissance was conducted in response to environmental evaluations as a result of the accidental spillage of approximately 293,000 pounds of mercury, radionuclides, heavy metals and other compounds. The reconnaissance to assess adverse impacts to cultural resources located within the boundaries of Federally-licensed, permitted, funded or assisted projects was conducted in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and Executive Order 11593.

DuVall, G.D. [DuVall and Associates, Inc., Nashville, TN (United States)

1993-01-01

95

Relationship between Union County, Tennessee Homemakers' Practice Adoption Scores on Budgeting and Record Keeping Practices and Selected Personal and Family Characteristics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A random sample of 86 homemakers was included in this study to determine the relationship between the homemakers of Union County's use of recommended budgeting and record keeping practices and selected characteristics. The personal and family characteristics considered were the age of the homemaker, age of the homemaker's husband, and employment…

Hobt, Anne S.; And Others

96

'Tennessee' Clues  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This false-color image shows the area within 'Endurance Crater,' currently being investigated by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The rover is inspecting a hole it drilled into a flat rock (center) dubbed 'Tennessee,' which scientists believe may be made up of the same evaporite-rich materials as those found in 'Eagle Crater.'

The overall geography inside Endurance is more complex than scientists anticipated, with at least three distinct bands of rock visible in front of the rover. Scientists hope to investigate the second and third layers of rock for more clues to Mars' history. This image was taken on sol 133 (June 8, 2004) with the rover's panoramic camera, using the 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters.

2004-01-01

97

Tennessee energy statistics quarterly: third quarter 1983  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Quarterly presents the most current energy statistics available which are specific to the State of Tennessee and, wherever possible, to the counties. The report covers three areas of the energy flow: production, consumption, and pricing. The specific energy types for which data are included are coal, petroleum, natural gas, and electricity. The report shows a decrease in the production

T. F. Finley; B. D. Hensley; T. Trotter

1983-01-01

98

Creating Opportunities: Tennessee's Southeast Regional Skills Center.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rural Marion County (Tennessee), the town of Kimball, the Appalachian Regional Commission, and a local community college founded a regional skills center. The center offers a 2-year associate of science degree and classes in GED preparation, parenting, drug abuse prevention, cosmetology, and air conditioning and refrigeration. It has expanded…

Baldwin, Fred D.

2002-01-01

99

Evolution of mineralizing brines in the east Tennessee Mississippi Valley-type ore field  

SciTech Connect

The east Tennessee Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) ore field contains barite-fluorite and sphalterite deposits in a continuous paleoaquifer consisting of breccia zones in the Upper Cambrian-Lower Ordovician Knox Group. Paragenetic observations and fluid inclusion compositions in these deposits indicate that the Knox paleoaquifer was invaded first by Ca-rich brines (Ca:Na about 1) that deposited fluorite and barite, and later by Na-Ca brines (Ca:Na = 0.1 to 0.5) that deposited sphalerite. Geologic relation sindicate that these brines were derived from the southeast, in the area of the Middle Ordovician Servier foreland shale basin, and that imposed by fluorite solubility indicate further that all original connate water in the Sevier basin was required to deposit the estimated flourite reserves of the ore field.Thus, the later, sphalerite-depositing brines represent recycled meteoric water from the Sevier basin or connate brines from underlying (Cambrian) shales.

Kesler, S.E.; Gesink, J.A.; Haynes, F.M. (Univ. of Michingan, Ann Arbor (USA))

1989-05-01

100

Space-time prospective surveillance based on Knox local statistics.  

PubMed

We studied a surveillance system to prospectively monitor the emergence of space-time clusters in point pattern of disease events. Its aim is to detect a cluster as soon as possible after its emergence, and it is also desired to keep the rate of false alarms at a controlled level. The method is a modification from a previous proposal based on a local version of the Knox statistic and which examined a retrospective surveillance scenario, looking for the earliest time in the past that change could have been deemed to occur. We modify this method to take into account the prospective case, being able then to fix the serious difficulties found by other authors. We evaluated the surveillance system in several scenarios, including without and with emerging clusters, checking distributional assumptions, and assessing performance impacts of different emergence times, shapes, extent, and intensity of the emerging clusters. Our conclusion is that the space-time surveillance system based on local Knox statistics is very efficient in its statistical properties, and it is appealing to epidemiologists and public health officials because it is simple to use and easily understandable. This makes it a promising candidate to practical use by public health official agencies. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24573901

Piroutek, Aline; Assunção, Renato; Paiva, Thaís

2014-07-20

101

Rank Ordovician wildcats staked in northern Mississippi counties  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports that Ordovician Knox dolomite is the objective at two rank wildcats in northern Mississippi. The wells appear to be the first modern drilling to Ordovician in the area, about 400 miles southeast of prolific Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle gas production discovered in late 1987 in Wilburton field, Latimer County, Okla. The author discusses how an oil company plans a

Petzet

1990-01-01

102

An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins: Part 1: Evaluation of Phase 2 CO{sub 2} Injection Testing in the Deep Saline Gunter Sandstone Reservoir (Cambro-Ordovician Knox Group), Marvin Blan No. 1 Hancock County, Kentucky Part 2: Time-lapse Three-Dimensional Vertical Seismic Profile (3D-VSP) of Sequestration Target Interval with Injected Fluids  

SciTech Connect

Part 1 of this report focuses on results of the western Kentucky carbon storage test, and provides a basis for evaluating injection and storage of supercritical CO{sub 2} in Cambro-Ordovician carbonate reservoirs throughout the U.S. Midcontinent. This test demonstrated that the Cambro- Ordovician Knox Group, including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite in stratigraphic succession from shallowest to deepest, had reservoir properties suitable for supercritical CO{sub 2} storage in a deep saline reservoir hosted in carbonate rocks, and that strata with properties sufficient for long-term confinement of supercritical CO{sub 2} were present in the deep subsurface. Injection testing with brine and CO{sub 2} was completed in two phases. The first phase, a joint project by the Kentucky Geological Survey and the Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation, drilled the Marvin Blan No. 1 carbon storage research well and tested the entire Knox Group section in the open borehole � including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite � at 1152�2255 m, below casing cemented at 1116 m. During Phase 1 injection testing, most of the 297 tonnes of supercritical CO{sub 2} was displaced into porous and permeable sections of the lowermost Beekmantown below 1463 m and Gunter. The wellbore was then temporarily abandoned with a retrievable bridge plug in casing at 1105 m and two downhole pressure-temperature monitoring gauges below the bridge plug pending subsequent testing. Pressure and temperature data were recorded every minute for slightly more than a year, providing a unique record of subsurface reservoir conditions in the Knox. In contrast, Phase 2 testing, this study, tested a mechanically-isolated dolomitic-sandstone interval in the Gunter. Operations in the Phase 2 testing program commenced with retrieval of the bridge plug and long-term pressure gauges, followed by mechanical isolation of the Gunter by plugging the wellbore with cement below the injection zone at 1605.7 m, then cementing a section of a 14-cm casing at 1470.4�1535.6. The resultant 70.1-m test interval at 1535.6�1605.7 m included nearly all of the Gunter sandstone facies. During the Phase 2 injection, 333 tonnes of CO{sub 2} were injected into the thick, lower sand section in the sandy member of the Gunter. Following the completion of testing, the injection zone below casing at 1116 m in the Marvin Blan No. 1 well, and wellbore below 305 m was permanently abandoned with cement plugs and the wellsite reclaimed. The range of most-likely storage capacities found in the Knox in the Marvin Blan No. 1 is 1000 tonnes per surface hectare in the Phase 2 Gunter interval to 8685 tonnes per surface hectare if the entire Knox section were available including the fractured interval near the base of the Copper Ridge. By itself the Gunter lacks sufficient reservoir volume to be considered for CO{sub 2} storage, although it may provide up to 18% of the reservoir volume available in the Knox. Regional extrapolation of CO{sub 2} storage potential based on the results of a single well test can be problematic, although indirect evidence of porosity and permeability can be demonstrated in the form of active saltwater-disposal wells injecting into the Knox. The western Kentucky region suitable for CO{sub 2} storage in the Knox is limited updip, to the east and south, by the depth at which the base of the Maquoketa shale lies above the depth required to ensure storage of CO{sub 2} in its supercritical state and the deepest a commercial well might be drilled for CO{sub 2} storage. The resulting prospective region has an area of approximately 15,600 km{sup 2}, beyond which it is unlikely that suitable Knox reservoirs may be developed. Faults in the subsurface, which serve as conduits for CO{sub 2} migration and compromise sealing strata, may mitigate the area with Knox reservoirs suitable for CO{sub 2} storage. The results of the injection tes

Richard Bowersox; John Hickman; Hannes Leetaru

2012-12-01

103

Large springs of east Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Springs constitute an important source of water in east Tennessee, and many individual springs are capable of supplying the large quantities needed for municipal and industrial supplies. Most of the springs in east Tennessee issue from solution openings and fractured and faulted zones in limestone and dolomite of the Knox Group, Chickamauga Limestone, and Conasauga Group. The ability of these rocks to yield a sustained flow of water to springs is dependent on a system of interconnected openings through which water can infiltrate from the land surface and move to points of natural discharge. Ninety springs were selected for detailed study, and 84 of these are analyzed in terms of magnitude and variability of discharge. Of the 84 springs analyzed, 4 flow at an average rate of 10 to 100 cfs (cubic feet per second), 62 at an average rate of 1 to 10 cfs, and 18 at an average rate of 1 cfs or less. Of the 90 springs, 75 are variable in their discharge; that is, the ratio of their fluctuations to their average discharges exceeds 100 percent. Mathematical analysis of the flow recession curve of Mill Spring near Jefferson City shows that the hydrologic system contributing to the flow of the spring has an effective capacity of about 70 million cubic feet of water. The rate of depletion of this volume of water, in the absence of significant precipitation, averages 0.0056 cfs per day between the time when the hydrologic system is full and the time when the spring ceases to flow. From such a curve it is possible to determine at any time the residual volume of water remaining in the system and the expected rate of decrease in discharge from that time to cessation of flow. Correlation of discharge measurements of 22 springs with those of Mill Spring shows that rough approximations of discharge can be projected for springs for which few measurements are available. Seventeen of the springs analyzed in this manner show good correlation with Mill Spring: that is, their coefficients of correlation were 0.70 or better as compared with a perfect correlation factor of 1.00.

Sun, Pao-chang P.; Criner, J. H.; Poole, J. L.

1963-01-01

104

Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 90-0249-2381, Blaw Knox Rolls, Inc., Wheeling, West Virginia.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In response to a request from the United Steelworkers of America, Local 3096, an investigation was begun into workplace exposures at the Blaw Knox facility (SIC-3321), Wheeling, West Virginia. The foundry produced rolls for both ferrous and nonferrous rol...

J. E. Burkhart D. Paek P. Jajosky

1994-01-01

105

Hydrocarbon potential of Cambrian-Ordovician Knox Group in south-central Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

In the eastern US, the carbonate rocks of the Cambrian-Ordovician Knox Group were deposited on a broad, gently sloping continental shelf in shallow hypersaline waters. A major unconformity occurs at the top of the Knox Group. This regional unconformity developed when the Sauk Sea retreated at the close of the Early Ordovician. In south-central Kentucky, the paleotopographic surface is characterized by extensive paleokarst developed on the upper Knox surface. The study area is located on the crest of the Cincinnati arch, a major structural feature that separates the Appalachian basin to the east from the Illinois basin on the west. Oil and gas are being produced from Cambrian-Ordovician rocks throughout the US, and south-central Kentucky is no exception. In south-central Kentucky, the Knox is of considerable economic importance. Hydrocarbon entrapment occurs at or near the unconformity at the top of the Knox. Approximately 3500 oil and gas wells and mineral exploration holes have penetrated the upper Knox Group in south-central Kentucky. Over 32 million bbl of oil have been recovered from 11 relatively shallow stratigraphic zones in 120 oil pools. These stratigraphic zones are generally encountered at depths of less than 2000 ft. A substantial amount of oil has been recovered from pools that produce exclusively from the Knox. Brecciated and fractured zones at the top of the Knox have also served as the host rock for sulfide mineralization, and these deposits may contain significant amounts of lead, zinc, and barium resources for future exploitation.

Gooding, P.J.

1987-09-01

106

Revelation of ancestral roles of KNOX genes by a functional analysis of Physcomitrella homologues  

Microsoft Academic Search

KNOX genes are indispensable elements of indeterminate apical growth programmes of vascular plant sporophytes. Since little\\u000a is known about the roles of such genes in non-vascular plants, functional analysis of moss KNOX homologues (MKN genes) was undertaken using the genetically amenable model plant, Physcomitrella patens. Three MKN genes were inactivated by targeted gene knockout to produce single, double and triple

S. D. Singer; N. W. Ashton

2007-01-01

107

Different subcellular localization and trafficking properties of KNOX class 1 homeodomain proteins from rice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genes of the KN1-like homeobox (KNOX) class 1 encode transcription factors involved in shoot apical meristem development and maintenance. We studied the subcellular localization of Green Fluorescent Protein-tagged rice KNOX proteins (Oskn1-3) after particle bombardment of onion and rice cells and after transformation of Arabidopsis and rice with constitutive and inducible expression constructs. In all test systems, the three rice

Suzanne J. H. Kuijt; Gerda E. M. Lamers; Saskia Rueb; Enrico Scarpella; Pieter B. F. Ouwerkerk; Herman P. Spaink; Annemarie H. Meijer

2004-01-01

108

More wells will expand knowledge of Knox group, Black Warrior basin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Cambrian-Ordovician Knox group of the Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi has attracted the interest of the oil industry because of recent significant discoveries of oil and gas in the age-equivalent Arbuckle group carbonates of the Arkoma, Ardmore, and Anadarko basins of Oklahoma. The geologic setting of these areas is described. Oil and gas potential is assessed and the Knox production history is given. Source rock potential is outlined.

Raymond, Dorothy, E.

1991-01-01

109

Host Choice and West Nile Virus Infection Rates in Blood-Fed Mosquitoes, Including Members of the Culex pipiens Complex, from Memphis and Shelby County, Tennessee, 2002-2003  

PubMed Central

The source of bloodmeals in 2,082 blood-fed mosquitoes collected from February 2002 through December 2003 in Memphis and surrounding areas of Shelby County, Tennessee were determined. Members of the genus Culex and Anopheles quadrimaculatus predominated in the collections. Members of the Cx. pipiens complex and Cx. restuans were found to feed predominately upon avian hosts, though mammalian hosts made up a substantial proportion of the bloodmeals in these species. No significant difference was seen in the host class of bloodmeals in mosquitoes identified as Cx. pipiens pipiens, Cx. p. quinquefasciatus, or hybrids between these two taxa. Anopheles quadrimaculatus and Cx. erraticus fed primarily upon mammalian hosts. Three avian species (the American Robin, the Common Grackle, and the Northern Cardinal) made up the majority of avian-derived bloodmeals, with the American Robin representing the most frequently fed upon avian host. An analysis of these host feeding data using a modification of a transmission model for Eastern Equine encephalitis virus suggested that the American Robin and Common Grackle represented the most important reservoir hosts for West Nile virus. A temporal analysis of the feeding patterns of the dominant Culex species did not support a shift in feeding behavior away from robins to mammals late in the summer. However, a significant degree of temporal variation was noted in the proportion of robin-derived bloodmeals when the data were analyzed by semi-monthly periods throughout the summers of 2002 and 2003. This pattern was consistent with the hypothesis that the mosquitoes were preferentially feeding upon nesting birds.

SAVAGE, HARRY M.; AGGARWAL, DEEPAK; APPERSON, CHARLES S.; KATHOLI, CHARLES R.; GORDON, EMILY; HASSAN, HASSAN K.; ANDERSON, MICHAEL; CHARNETZKY, DAWN; M, LARRY; MILLEN, C; UNNASCH, EMILY A.; UNNASCH, THOMAS R.

2008-01-01

110

KNOX overexpression in transgenic Kohleria (Gesneriaceae) prolongs the activity of proximal leaf blastozones and drastically alters segment fate  

Microsoft Academic Search

KNOX (knotted1-like homeobox) genes have a widely conserved role in the generation of dissected leaves. Ectopic KNOX activity in leaves in various angiosperm lineages causes leaf form changes that can elucidate how the configuration of leaf\\u000a development evolved. We present an analysis of leaf morphology and morphogenesis in transgenic Kohleria lines overexpressing a heterologous KNOX gene. Kohleria, like many members

Sina Barth; Thomas Geier; Klaus Eimert; Bernard Watillon; Rajbir S. Sangwan; Stefan Gleissberg

2009-01-01

111

A Comparison of a Traditional Music Teaching Method with Music Ace.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Elementary schools in Knox County, Tennessee employ music specialists who spend about one hour weekly instructing individual elementary classes in music. Students in those classes receive about 64 music lessons per school year. The music curriculum in Knox County includes the six major elements of music: melody, harmony, rhythm, style, expressive…

Baker, Barbara S.

112

Preliminary direct heat geothermal resource assessment of the Tennessee Valley region  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary appraisal of the direct heat geothermal energy resources of the Tennessee Valley region has been completed. This region includes Kentucky, Tennessee and parts of adjacent states. Intermediate and deep aquifers were selected for study. Basement and Top-of-Knox structure and temperature maps were compiled from oil and gas well data on file at various state geological survey offices. Results of this study indicate that the New Madrid seismic zone is the only area within the region that possesses potential for direct heat utilization. In other areas geothermal energy is either too deep for economical extraction or it will not be able to compete with other local energy resources. The only anomalously high temperature well outside the New Madrid seismic zone was located in the Rome Trough and near the central part of the eastern Kentucky coal basin. Geothermal energy in that region would face strong competition from coal, oil and natural gas.

Staub, W.P.

1980-01-01

113

Expression patterns of STM -like KNOX and Histone H4 genes in shoot development of the dissected-leaved basal eudicot plants Chelidonium majus and Eschscholzia californica (Papaveraceae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Knotted-like homeobox (KNOX) genes encode important regulators of shoot development in flowering plants. In Arabidopsis, class I KNOX genes are part of a regulatory system that contributes to indeterminacy of shoot development, delimitation of leaf primordia and internode development. In other species, class I KNOX genes have also been recruited in the control of marginal blastozone fractionation during dissected leaf

Edwin P. Groot; Neelima Sinha; Stefan Gleissberg

2005-01-01

114

Pilot study for delineation of areas contributing water to well-fields at Jackson, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment, and the Jackson Utility Division, conducted a pilot study to determine needs for data and the applicability of methods of delineation of areas contributing water to municipal wellfields. Jackson Utility Division, in Jackson, Madison County, Tennessee, pumps about 9 million gallons of groundwater daily from an

R. E. Broshears; J. F. Connell; N. C. Short

1991-01-01

115

Relationship between paleotopographic surface of Cambrian-Ordovician Knox Group and oil and gas entrapment in Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

Cambrian-Ordovician dolostones of the Knox Group constitute one of the largest occurrences of this rock type known in the US. In Kentucky, the Knox carbonate sequence attains thicknesses of more than 3500 ft. Mudstone and wackestone are dominant in the upper Knox, with lesser amounts of packstone and grainstone. The Upper Cambrian to Lower Ordovician carbonate sequences in Kentucky resulted from carbonate sedimentation on a cratonic platform in shallow, low-energy marine environments. Relative structural quiescence existed during this time. The thick sequence of shallow-water carbonates suggests that the rate of deposition generally kept pace with subsidence of the craton. Geologic environments and climatic conditions during this period were similar to those of the Bahamas today. Warm climate, sporadic rainfall, and dry trade winds probably accounted for the net loss of water by evaporation and the resulting hypersaline conditions. The paleotopographic surface that developed on top of the Knox Group is of considerable economic importance because of potential hydrocarbon entrapment at or near the unconformity. Areas where permeable and porous zones developed on the exposed Knox surface due to erosion and weathering provide reservoir conditions; also, the unconformable surface of the Knox was sealed by an overlapping impermeable formation capable of entrapping hydrocarbons. Because of pressures exerted, hydrocarbons driven by fluids or gas may migrate along the eroded Knox surface laterally and upward onto paleotopographic highs. These conditions increase the probability of finding commercial oil and gas deposits in the Cambrian-Ordovician Knox in Kentucky.

Gooding, P.J.

1987-09-01

116

Upper Strawn (Desmoinesian) carbonte and clastic depositional environments, southeastern King County, Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Pennsylvanian upper Strawn Group of southeastern King County, Texas, provides a unique setting to study interactions between coeval carbonate and clastic deposition during the Desmoinesian. One of the most perplexing problems is the relationship of massive Pennsylvanian platform carbonates to shallow-water terrigenous clastic sediments. Within the study area, carbonate facies were deposited along the northern edge of the Knox-Baylor

Todd H. Boring

1990-01-01

117

40 CFR 81.343 - Tennessee.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Overton County X Perry County X Pickett County X Polk County X Putnam...Overton County X Perry County X Pickett County X Polk County X Putnam...County Overton County Perry County Pickett County Polk County Putnam...

2009-07-01

118

Tennessee State Parks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

People might know Tennessee for its fabulous Great Smoky Mountains, but have you ever heard of the Cedars of Lebanon or Fall Creek Falls? Oh yes, those two gems are just a small part of the Tennessee State Park system. After looking at some of the beautiful images on the Tennessee State Parks homepage, visitors can explore the Popular Places People Want to Go section to get a taste of the diverse hiking trails, restaurants, camp sites, and other features that are contained throughout the park system. Visitors can also look over over a dozen topical areas, including What to do?, Park Information, and Resource Management. Policy enthusiasts will appreciate the "Estimated Economic Impacts of Tennessee State Parks" report, that is also featured on the homepage, and travelers will love the "Upcoming Events at Tennessee State Parks" area, as it provides a taste of what they might expect on a visit to the Volunteer State.

119

Apparent association between benzene and childhood leukaemia: methodological doubts concerning a report by Knox.  

PubMed Central

A recent study by Knox concludes that cases and "clusters" of two or more cases of childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma occur closer to many kinds of industrial installation than to supposedly comparable control locations. It is argued that these findings could be largely or entirely artefactual, the apparent differences arising out of the inappropriateness of the control data. Knox used randomly selected postcode units as controls, a procedure that leads to the comparison of individuals located in areas with typically quite different population densities from those for the cases. The resulting potential for bias is explored and the arguments are exemplified by analysing household data based on postcodes.

Bithell, J F; Draper, G J

1995-01-01

120

Apparent association between benzene and childhood leukaemia: methodological doubts concerning a report by Knox.  

PubMed

A recent study by Knox concludes that cases and "clusters" of two or more cases of childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma occur closer to many kinds of industrial installation than to supposedly comparable control locations. It is argued that these findings could be largely or entirely artefactual, the apparent differences arising out of the inappropriateness of the control data. Knox used randomly selected postcode units as controls, a procedure that leads to the comparison of individuals located in areas with typically quite different population densities from those for the cases. The resulting potential for bias is explored and the arguments are exemplified by analysing household data based on postcodes. PMID:7650470

Bithell, J F; Draper, G J

1995-08-01

121

Rank Ordovician wildcats staked in northern Mississippi counties  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that Ordovician Knox dolomite is the objective at two rank wildcats in northern Mississippi. The wells appear to be the first modern drilling to Ordovician in the area, about 400 miles southeast of prolific Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle gas production discovered in late 1987 in Wilburton field, Latimer County, Okla. The author discusses how an oil company plans a 12,500 ft Knox test at 1 Lay, in 27-25n-2e, in central Tallahatchie County, Miss., about 80 miles south of Memphis. This paper also reports on plans to drill 1 Jenkins 8-1, in 8-19n-15e, to 10,800 ft or Ordovician.

Petzet, G.A.

1990-10-01

122

KNOX homeobox genes potentially have similar function in both diploid unicellular and multicellular meristems, but not in haploid meristems.  

PubMed

Members of the class 1 knotted-like homeobox (KNOX) gene family are important regulators of shoot apical meristem development in angiosperms. To determine whether they function similarly in seedless plants, three KNOX genes (two class 1 genes and one class 2 gene) from the fern Ceratopteris richardii were characterized. Expression of both class 1 genes was detected in the shoot apical cell, leaf primordia, marginal part of the leaves, and vascular bundles by in situ hybridization, a pattern that closely resembles that of class 1 KNOX genes in angiosperms with compound leaves. The fern class 2 gene was expressed in all sporophyte tissues examined, which is characteristic of class 2 gene expression in angiosperms. All three CRKNOX genes were not detected in gametophyte tissues by RNA gel blot analysis. Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the fern class 1 genes resembled plants that overexpress seed plant class 1 KNOX genes in leaf morphology. Ectopic expression of the class 2 gene in Arabidopsis did not result in any unusual phenotypes. Taken together with phylogenetic analysis, our results suggest that (a) the class 1 and 2 KNOX genes diverged prior to the divergence of fern and seed plant lineages, (b) the class 1 KNOX genes function similarly in seed plant and fern sporophyte meristem development despite their differences in structure, (c) KNOX gene expression is not required for the development of the fern gametophyte, and (d) the sporophyte and gametophyte meristems of ferns are not regulated by the same developmental mechanisms at the molecular level. PMID:15642091

Sano, Ryosuke; Juárez, Cristina M; Hass, Barbara; Sakakibara, Keiko; Ito, Motomi; Banks, Jo Ann; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

2005-01-01

123

Knox Meets Cox: Adapting Epidemiological Space-Time Statistics to Demographic Studies  

PubMed Central

Many important questions and theories in demography focus on changes over time, and on how those changes differ over geographic and social space. Space-time analysis has always been important in studying fertility transitions, for example. However, demographers have seldom used formal statistical methods to describe and analyze time series of maps. One formal method, used widely in epidemiology, criminology, and public health, is Knox’s space-time interaction test. In this article, we discuss the potential of the Knox test in demographic research and note some possible pitfalls. We demonstrate how to use familiar proportional hazards models to adapt the Knox test for demographic applications. These adaptations allow for nonrepeatable events and for the incorporation of structural variables that change in space and time. We apply the modified test to data on the onset of fertility decline in Brazil over 1960–2000 and show how the modified method can produce maps indicating where and when diffusion effects seem strongest, net of covariate effects.

SCHMERTMANN, CARL P.; ASSUNCAO, RENATO M.; POTTER, JOSEPH E.

2010-01-01

124

77 FR 66743 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Crowell, Knox City, Quanah, and Rule, TX  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...255C3 at Quanah, Texas. Channel 255C3 can be allotted to Crowell, Texas at reference coordinates 34-03-58 NL and 99-43-52 WL, at a site 9.2 km (5.7 miles) north of Crowell. Channel 293A can be allotted to Knox City, Texas at reference...

2012-11-07

125

Thickness of Knox Group overburden on Central Chestnut Ridge, Oak Ridge Reservation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The thickness of residual soil overlying the Knox Group along Central Chestnut Ridge was estimated by a conventional seismic refraction survey. The purpose of this survey was to identify sites on the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation where ample overburden exists above the water table for the shallow land burial of low-level radioactive waste. The results of the survey

W. P. Staub; R. A. Hopkins

1984-01-01

126

More wells will expand knowledge of Knox group, Black Warrior basin  

SciTech Connect

The Arbuckle group of the Arkoma, Ardmore, and Anadarko basins was essentially untested in 1986. This paper reports that in these basins, shallower Pennsylvanian reservoirs were easy to reach and more economical to develop. The general consensus was that if a karstic reservoir was not present at the top of the Arbuckle group then there was no potential for oil and gas. Today the story is different; production zones are being found throughout the Arbuckle group, and drilling has been as deep as 28,000 ft. The Black Warrior basin is in a similar setting to the Arkoma, it is a foreland basin that has produced from multiple Mississippian and Pennsylvanian horizons at shallow depths. The Knox carbonate is present in a similar structural setting to that of the Arbuckle group at depths generally above 15,000 ft. In addition, Alabama is even more fortunate in that the buried Appalachian fold and thrust belt along the southern boundary of the basin also provides additional Knox targets with great promise. In this area Knox dolomites are fractured and folded and are juxtaposed by thrust faulting against Mississippian and Pennsylvanian rocks that are excellent sources of oil and gas. Therefore, the Knox is essentially untested in the Black Warrior basin.

Raymond, D.E. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (US))

1991-05-20

127

Rural Juvenile Delinquency: Problems & Needs in East Tennessee.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Juvenile delinquency problems and ways to improve youth services were explored in a survey conducted in 1975 in 15 East Tennessee counties surrounding Knoxville. The 51 persons interviewed were associated with law enforcement, judicial, and counseling services; respondents believed that juvenile delinquency was on the increase in rural areas and…

Bolton, William Dan; Brown, David W.

128

SEWAGE SLUDGE INCINERATOR FUEL REDUCTION AT NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE  

EPA Science Inventory

This is a report on the sewage sludge incineration fuel reduction program at the Nashville-Davidson County Metropolitan Government wastewater treatment plant in Nashville, Tennessee. Fuel usage was reduced over 40 percent by reprogramming the methods used for operating the incine...

129

78 FR 64265 - Notice To Rescind a Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS): State...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration Notice To Rescind a Notice...Parkway), From Governor John Sevier Highway (State Route 168) to Moody Avenue, Knox County, Tennessee AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT....

2013-10-28

130

Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

When thinking about the Volunteer State, many people's minds may immediately turn to the accomplishments of President Andrew Jackson or the far-reaching impact of the massive public works project that resulted in the formation of the Tennessee Valley Authority. Interested parties can learn about these aspects of the state's history and culture, along with many other facets of the state, at this fine site which is the digital version of The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Originally released in 1998 as a large print volume, the Encyclopedia was placed online in a searchable format in 2002. Here visitors can browse through more than 1500 entries, along with 500 additional images and some audio and video files as well. For those interested in looking at the material by themes, they will be pleased to learn that the materials are also divided into categories, such as medicine, sports, county history, and industry.

131

Geochemical Modeling of CO2, Brine, and Reservoir Rock Interactions in the Knox Group, Western Kentucky  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Regionally extensive dolostones and sandstones in the Cambrian-Ordovician Knox Group could provide commercial-scale CO2 storage capacity in the Illinois Basin of Kentucky, Illinois, and Indiana. This 1200 m thick interval of dolostone and less abundant quartz sandstone is a prospective sequestration target in the southern part of the Illinois Basin, where the Cambrian Mt. Simon Sandstone, a main sequestration target in the central part of the basin, is thin to absent, or deeply buried. The Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS) has successfully injected 690 tons of CO2 into the Knox Group through a 2477 m deep well (KGS #1 Blan well) at a test site in western Kentucky. To understand the long-term fate of CO2 stored in a saline reservoir in the Knox group, this study uses TOUGHREACT to model geochemical reactions among injected CO2, brine, and the reservoir rocks. Data collected in the KGS #1 Blan well, including rock cores, deep brine water samples, temperatures, and pressures, are the main data sources. A kinetic batch model is used first to simulate the impacts of dissolved CO2 on a mineral assemblage representing the Gunter Sandstone, a subgroup of the Knox Formation. The mineral assemblage consists of mainly quartz and dolomite with small amount of k-feldspar. The batch simulation results show precipitation of calcite, magnesite, illite, and quartz and dissolution of dolomite and k-feldspar. A 1-D radial reactive transport model is being constructed to simulate the injection test to evaluate the migration of the injected CO2, mineral dissolution and precipitation, and changes of porosity and permeability of formation rocks. The reactive model will be used to simulate hypothetical commercial scale injection scenarios to evaluate the long-term impacts of large scale CO2 injection on the Knox reservoir.

Zhu, J.; Parris, T. M.; Bowersox, J.; Harris, D. C.

2011-12-01

132

Eastern equine encephalitis in Tennessee: 2002-2008.  

PubMed

Human and equine outbreaks caused by eastern equine encephalomyelitis virus (EEEV) typically occur in North America adjacent to coastal wetlands associated with the presence of Culiseta melanura (Coquillet) mosquitoes. Eastern equine encephalomyelitis (EEE) is an emerging disease in Tennessee, as the first records of equine disease began in 2002. In 2006 we trapped and tested mosquitoes for EEEV at hardwood swamps in western Tennessee that were at the epicenter of a multi-equine outbreak in fall of 2005. Additionally, the Tennessee Valley Authority tested mosquito pools collected in Tennessee swamps from 2000 to 2007 for the presence of arboviruses. Two pools of EEEV positive Culex erraticus (Dyer and Knab) mosquitoes were found (one each in 2003 and 2004) in a county adjacent to where the 2005 outbreak occurred. In 2008, another EEE outbreak involving multiple horses occurred in West Tennessee. A brain specimen was collected from a horse during this outbreak and the first isolate of EEEV from Tennessee was obtained. In total, 74,531 mosquitoes collected from 2000 to 2008 were tested via polymerase chain reaction and VecTest for EEEV. The traditional enzootic vector, Cs. melanura, was found in low numbers at all collection sites. Cx. erraticus, however, was consistently found in high numbers and was the only mosquito species in which EEEV was detected. We suggest that EEE transmission may be maintained by Cx. erraticus in a nontraditional cycle. We discuss the importance of a nontraditional cycle from the perspective of EEEV adaptation and emergence. PMID:22679883

Mukherjee, Sudeshna; Moody, Erin E; Lewokzco, Kenneth; Huddleston, Dora B; Huang, Junjun; Rowland, Meghan E; Wilson, Ron; Dunn, John R; Jones, Timothy F; Moncayo, Abelardo C

2012-05-01

133

INDOOR 222RN IN TENNESSEE VALLEY HOUSES: SEASONAL, BUILDING, AND GEOLOGICAL FACTORS  

EPA Science Inventory

The article discusses effects of seasonal, building, and geological factors on indoor radon-222 (Rn-222) in 312 occupied Tennessee Valley houses. wo-season surveys of 226 houses in Roane County, TN were conducted in 1985-86, and of 86 houses in Madison County, AL, in 1988-89. lph...

134

Tennessee energy statistics quarterly: third quarter 1983  

SciTech Connect

The Quarterly presents the most current energy statistics available which are specific to the State of Tennessee and, wherever possible, to the counties. The report covers three areas of the energy flow: production, consumption, and pricing. The specific energy types for which data are included are coal, petroleum, natural gas, and electricity. The report shows a decrease in the production of coal and crude oil and an increase for natural gas and electricity. Consumption data show a decrease for coal and natural gas and an increase for motor fuel and electricity. Prices were up for coal and natural gas, and down for gasoline and electricity. 16 references, 12 figures, 12 tables.

Finley, T.F. III; Hensley, B.D.; Trotter, T.

1983-01-01

135

Gnarley1 is a dominant mutation in the knox4 homeobox gene affecting cell shape and identity.  

PubMed Central

Maize leaves have a stereotypical pattern of cell types organized into discrete domains. These domains are altered by mutations in knotted1 (kn1) and knox (for kn1-like homeobox) genes. Gnarley (Gn1) is a dominant maize mutant that exhibits many of the phenotypic characteristics of the kn1 family of mutants. Gn1 is unique because it changes parameters of cell growth in the basal-most region of the leaf, the sheath, resulting in dramatically altered sheath morphology. The strongly expressive allele Gn1-R also gives rise to a floral phenotype in which ectopic carpels form. Introgression studies showed that the severity of the Gn1-conferred phenotype is strongly influenced by genetic background. Gn1 maps to knox4, and knox4 is ectopically expressed in plants with the Gn1-conferred phenotype. Immunolocalization experiments showed that the KNOX protein accumulates at the base of Gn1 leaves in a pattern that is spatially and temporally correlated with appearance of the mutant phenotype. We further demonstrate that Gn1 is knox4 by correlating loss of the mutant phenotype with insertion of a Mutator transposon into knox4.

Foster, T; Yamaguchi, J; Wong, B C; Veit, B; Hake, S

1999-01-01

136

Positive Autoregulation of a KNOX Gene Is Essential for Shoot Apical Meristem Maintenance in Rice[W][OA  

PubMed Central

Self-maintenance of the shoot apical meristem (SAM), from which aerial organs are formed throughout the life cycle, is crucial in plant development. Class I Knotted1-like homeobox (KNOX) genes restrict cell differentiation and play an indispensable role in maintaining the SAM. However, the mechanism that positively regulates their expression is unknown. Here, we show that expression of a rice (Oryza sativa) KNOX gene, Oryza sativa homeobox1 (OSH1), is positively regulated by direct autoregulation. Interestingly, loss-of-function mutants of OSH1 lose the SAM just after germination but can be rescued to grow until reproductive development when they are regenerated from callus. Double mutants of osh1 and d6, a loss-of-function mutant of OSH15, fail to establish the SAM both in embryogenesis and regeneration. Expression analyses in these mutants reveal that KNOX gene expression is positively regulated by the phytohormone cytokinin and by KNOX genes themselves. We demonstrate that OSH1 directly binds to five KNOX loci, including OSH1 and OSH15, through evolutionarily conserved cis-elements and that the positive autoregulation of OSH1 is indispensable for its own expression and SAM maintenance. Thus, the maintenance of the indeterminate state mediated by positive autoregulation of a KNOX gene is an indispensable mechanism of self-maintenance of the SAM.

Tsuda, Katsutoshi; Ito, Yukihiro; Sato, Yutaka; Kurata, Nori

2011-01-01

137

75 FR 12731 - Foreign-Trade Zone 204-Tri-Cities Area, Tennessee/Virginia; Application for Expansion  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...consists of the following sites in the Tri-Cities Area of Tennessee and...1 (977 acres)--within the Tri-Cities Regional Airport complex, Blountville (Sullivan County...Business Park, adjacent to the Tri-Cities Regional Airport,...

2010-03-17

138

Northeast Tennessee Educators' Perception of STEM Education Implementation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A quantitative nonexperimental survey study was developed to investigate Northeast Tennessee K-8 educators' perceptions of STEM education. This study was an examination of current perceptions of STEM education. Perceived need, current implementation practices, access to STEM resources, definition of STEM, and the current condition of STEM in Northeast Tennessee were also examined. The participating school districts are located in the Northeast Region of Tennessee: Bristol City Schools, Hamblen County Schools, Johnson City Schools, Johnson County Schools, Kingsport City Schools, Sullivan County Schools, and Washington County Schools. Educational professionals including both administrators and teachers in the elementary and/or middle school setting were surveyed. The closed and open form survey consisted of 20 research items grouped by 5 core research questions. Quantitative data were analyzed using single sample t tests. A 4 point Likert scale was used to measure responses with a 2.5 point of neutrality rating. The open-ended question was summarized and recorded for frequency. Research indicated that Northeast Tennessee K-8 educators perceive a need for STEM education to a significant extent. However, many do not feel prepared for implementation. Lack of professional development opportunities and STEM assets were reported as areas of need. Teachers reported implementation of inquiry-based, problem solving activities in their classrooms. The majority of participants reported that the current condition of STEM education in Northeast Tennessee is not meeting the needs of 21st century learners. Challenges facing STEM instruction include: funding designated for STEM is too low, professional development for STEM teacher is insufficient, and STEM Education in K-8 is lacking or inadequate.

Turner, Kristin Beard

139

Ring the BELL and tie the KNOX: roles for TALEs in gynoecium development  

PubMed Central

Carpels are leaf-like structures that bear ovules, and thus play a crucial role in the plant life cycle. In angiosperms, carpels are the last organs produced by the floral meristem and they differentiate a specialized meristematic tissue from which ovules develop. Members of the three-amino-acid-loop-extension (TALE) class of homeoproteins constitute major regulators of meristematic activity. This family contains KNOTTED-like (KNOX) and BEL1-like (BLH or BELL) homeodomain proteins, which function as heterodimers. KNOX proteins can have different BELL partners, leading to multiple combinations with distinct activities, and thus regulate many aspects of plant morphogenesis, including gynoecium development. TALE proteins act primarily through direct regulation of hormonal pathways and key transcriptional regulators. This review focuses on the contribution of TALE proteins to gynoecium development and connects TALE transcription factors to carpel gene regulatory networks.

Arnaud, Nicolas; Pautot, Veronique

2014-01-01

140

Effects of photon noise on speckle image reconstruction with the Knox-Thompson algorithm. [in astronomy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An analysis of the effects of photon noise on astronomical speckle image reconstruction using the Knox-Thompson algorithm is presented. It is shown that the quantities resulting from the speckle average arre biased, but that the biases are easily estimated and compensated. Calculations are also made of the convergence rate for the speckle average as a function of the source brightness. An illustration of the effects of photon noise on the image recovery process is included.

Nisenson, P.; Papaliolios, C.

1983-01-01

141

Control of Arabidopsis Leaf Morphogenesis Through Regulation of the YABBY and KNOX Families of Transcription Factors  

PubMed Central

The patterning of initiating organs along specific axes of polarity is critical for the proper development of all higher organisms. Plant lateral organs, such as leaves, are derived from the shoot apical meristems located at the growing tips. After initiation, the leaf primordia of species such as Arabidopsis thaliana differentiate into a polarized structure consisting of a proximal petiole and a distal blade, but the molecular mechanisms that control proximal–distal pattern formation are poorly understood. The transcriptional activators BLADE-ON-PETIOLE1 (BOP1) and BOP2 are known to control Arabidopsis lateral organ differentiation by regulating gene expression along the adaxial–abaxial (dorsal–ventral) and proximal–distal polarity axes. Here, we demonstrate that the development of ectopic blade tissue along bop1 bop2 leaf petioles is strongly suppressed in a dosage-dependant manner by mutations in either of two closely related YABBY (YAB) genes, FILAMENTOUS FLOWER (FIL) and YAB3. Three KNOTTED-LIKE HOMEOBOX (KNOX1) genes also make lesser, and partially redundant, contributions to ectopic blade development in bop1 bop2 leaves. Mutation of these YAB and KNOX1 genes together causes nearly complete suppression of bop1 bop2 ectopic organ outgrowth at the morphological and cellular levels. Our data demonstrate that BOP1 and BOP2 regulate leaf patterning by controlling YAB and KNOX1 gene activity in the developing petiole.

Ha, Chan Man; Jun, Ji Hyung; Fletcher, Jennifer C.

2010-01-01

142

Modulation of the hormone setting by Rhodococcus fascians results in ectopic KNOX activation in Arabidopsis.  

PubMed

The biotrophic actinomycete Rhodococcus fascians has a profound impact on plant development and a common aspect of the symptomatology is the deformation of infected leaves. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the serrated leaf margins formed upon infection resemble the leaf phenotype of transgenic plants with ectopic expression of KNOTTED-like homeobox (KNOX) genes. Through transcript profiling, we demonstrate that class-I KNOX genes are transcribed in symptomatic leaves. Functional analysis revealed that BREVIPEDICELLUS/KNOTTED-LIKE1 and mainly SHOOT MERISTEMLESS were essential for the observed leaf dissection. However, these results also positioned the KNOX genes downstream in the signaling cascade triggered by R. fascians infection. The much faster activation of ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATOR5 and the establishment of homeostatic and feedback mechanisms to control cytokinin (CK) levels support the overrepresentation of this hormone in infected plants due to the secretion by the pathogen, thereby placing the CK response high up in the cascade. Hormone measurements show a net decrease of tested CKs, indicating either that secretion by the bacterium and degradation by the plant are in balance, or, as suggested by the strong reaction of 35S:CKX plants, that other CKs are at play. At early time points of the interaction, activation of gibberellin 2-oxidase presumably installs a local hormonal setting favorable for meristematic activity that provokes leaf serrations. The results are discussed in the context of symptom development, evasion of plant defense, and the establishment of a specific niche by R. fascians. PMID:18184732

Depuydt, Stephen; Dolezal, Karel; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke; Moritz, Thomas; Holsters, Marcelle; Vereecke, Danny

2008-03-01

143

Structural and stratigraphic controls on cave development in the Oak Ridge area, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) is located in the northwestern part of the Valley and Ridge province in east Tennessee. The Valley and Ridge province is the topographic expression of the southern Appalachian foreland fold-thrust belt, which formed during the late Paleozoic Alleghanian orogeny. In the Oak Ridge area, three major northwest verging thrust faults (Kingston, Whiteoak Mountain, and Copper Creek) imbricate and juxtapose carbonate and clastic stratigraphic units that range in age from the lower Cambrian to the lower Mississippian. The carbonate stratigraphic units range in thickness from 1278 to 1748 m and include the Maynardville Limestone in the Conasauga Group (hereby included as part of the Knox Group), the Knox Group, and the Chickamauga Group. Stratigraphic relationships and repetition of units by thrust faulting has produced three northeast striking and southeast dipping carbonate bands bounded to the northwest and southeast by noncarbonate units. Preliminary results indicate that within two of these carbonate bands, formations composed of mudstone and argillaceous limestone appear to further subdivide groundwater basins. Our efforts have focused on relating the stratigraphic and structural characteristics of these rock units with cave development in the region.

Rubin, P A; Lemiszki, P J

1992-01-01

144

Computing in Tennessee.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the uses and effect of computers in schools. Describes and discusses the three general categories of services and activities associated with microcomputer applications that are provided by the Tennessee State Department of Education: instructional support tools, curriculum programs and literacy activities, and technical assistance. (SB)

Ray, John R.; Malo, George E.

1983-01-01

145

77 FR 61653 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Smyrna-Rutherford County...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Smyrna-Rutherford County Airport, Smyrna, TN AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...of land at the Smyrna-Rutherford County Airport, Smyrna, Tennessee. This property,...

2012-10-10

146

Public water-supply systems and associated water use in Tennessee, 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Public water-supply systems in Tennessee provide water to for domestic, industrial, and commercial uses, and municipal services. In 2005, more than 569 public water-supply systems distributed about 920 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of non-purchased surface water and groundwater to a population of nearly 6 million in Tennessee. Surface-water sources provided 64 percent (about 591 Mgal/d) of the State's water supplies. Groundwater produced from wells and springs in Middle and East Tennessee and from wells in West Tennessee provided 36 percent (about 329 Mgal/d) of the public water supplies. Gross per capita water use for Tennessee in 2005 was about 171 gallons per day. Water withdrawals by public water-supply systems in Tennessee have increased from 250 Mgal/d in 1955 to 920 Mgal/d in 2005. Tennessee public water-supply systems withdraw less groundwater than surface water, and surface-water use has increased at a faster rate than groundwater use. However, 34 systems reported increased groundwater withdrawals during 2000–2005, and 15 of these 34 systems reported increases of 1 Mgal/d or more. The county with the largest surface-water withdrawal rate (130 Mgal/d) was Davidson County. Each of Tennessee's 95 counties was served by at least one public water-supply system in 2005. The largest groundwater withdrawal rate (about 167 Mgal/d) by a single public water-supply system was reported by Memphis Light, Gas and Water, which served 654,267 people in Shelby County in 2005.

Robinson, John A.; Brooks, Jaala M.

2010-01-01

147

Energy analysis of the coal fuel cycle: community health and resource change in an Appalachian coal county  

Microsoft Academic Search

In spite of steadily expanding US coal development in this decade, there has been little systematic assessment of occupational and public health implications of increased production in specific regions of the United States. Preliminary analysis of a prototype Applachian area is presented. Anderson County, Tennessee, the prototype area chosen for evaluation, lies in the Upper East Tennessee Coalfield. This county

1981-01-01

148

Natural gas plays of the Knox Group in the Appalachian basin: A significant element of the U. S. Department of Energy atlas of major Appalachian gas plays  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oil and gas have been produced from the Knox Group in the Appalachian basin since the early 1990s. However, only since the 1960s have significant volumes of hydrocarbons been produced. Porosity development along the Knox unconformity is the dominant geologic control for hydrocarbon migration and entrapment. Other important controls include stratigraphy, diagenesis, paleokarst, structure, and fractures. Cumulative production is ultimately,

M. T. Baranoski; M. E. Wolfe

1993-01-01

149

The Polar Auxin Transport Inhibitor N-1-Naphthylphthalamic Acid Disrupts Leaf Initiation, KNOX Protein Regulation, and Formation of Leaf Margins in Maize  

Microsoft Academic Search

Maize (Zea mays) leaves develop basipetally (tip to base); the upper blade emerges from the shoot apical meristem (SAM) before the expansion of the lower sheath. Founder cells, leaf initials located in the periphery of the SAM, are distinguished from the SAM proper by the differential accumulation of KNOX proteins. KNOX proteins accumulate in the SAM, but are excluded from

Michael J. Scanlon

2003-01-01

150

40 CFR 81.343 - Tennessee.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Overton CountyX Perry CountyX Pickett CountyX Polk CountyX Putnam...Overton CountyX Perry CountyX Pickett CountyX Polk CountyX Putnam...County Overton CountyPerry County Pickett CountyPolk County Putnam...

2010-07-01

151

Upper Strawn (Desmoinesian) carbonte and clastic depositional environments, southeastern King County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The Pennsylvanian upper Strawn Group of southeastern King County, Texas, provides a unique setting to study interactions between coeval carbonate and clastic deposition during the Desmoinesian. One of the most perplexing problems is the relationship of massive Pennsylvanian platform carbonates to shallow-water terrigenous clastic sediments. Within the study area, carbonate facies were deposited along the northern edge of the Knox-Baylor trough on the Spur platform, and terrigenous clastics were carried toward the Midland basin through the Knox-Baylor trough. Based on the analysis of subsurface cores, five carbonate lithofacies and four clastic lithofacies were recognized in southeastern King County, Texas. The distribution and geometry of these lithofacies are related to variations in the rate of subsidence in the Knox-Baylor trough, Pennsylvanian tectonics, deltaic progradation, avulsion, and compaction. The platform carbonates within the northern region of southeastern King County record environments within the carbonate platform complex, including middle platform, outer platform, algal mound, and platform margin. The quartzarenitic sandstones within the southern region of southeastern King County occur in a variety of complex depositional geometries, including distributary-bar fingers, lobate deltas, and offshore bars. Cores of these sandstones represent mainly the uppermost portion of the various sandstone bodies. The upper Strawn Group provides an attractive area for exploration geology. Both carbonates and clastics provide excellent reservoirs from a depth of approximately 5,000-6,000 ft. Total production within the area is over 100 million bbl of oil since the early 1940s. Multiple pay zones within a 600-ft interval also provide an added incentive for exploration. Areas within and around the Knox-Baylor trough deserve a detailed study due to these relatively shallow, unexplored, multiple pay zones.

Boring, T.H. (Oryx Energy Co., Oklahoma City, OK (USA))

1990-02-01

152

40 CFR 81.72 - Tennessee River Valley (Alabama)-Cumberland Mountains (Tennessee) Interstate Air Quality Control...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...County, Cumberland County, Fentress County, Franklin County, Grundy County, Marion County, Morgan County, Overton County, Pickett County, Putnam County, Scott County, Sequatchie County, Warren County, White County, Van Buren...

2009-07-01

153

76 FR 33805 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00052  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Giles, Hickman, Houston, Jackson, Knox, Lawrence, Lewis, Lincoln, Loudon, Marshall, Montgomery, Moore, Perry, Pickett, Polk, Scott, Sequatchie, Smith, Sullivan, Wayne, Blount, Campbell, Humphreys. All other information in the...

2011-06-09

154

Ground-Water Levels and Water-Quality Data for Wells in the Spring Creek Area Near Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee, April and May 2000.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Arnold Air Force Base (AAFB) occupies about 40,000 acres in Coffee and Franklin Counties, Tennessee. Numerous site-specific groundwater contamination investigations have been conducted at designated solid waste management units (SWMU's) at AAFB. Seve...

S. D. Williams R. A. Aycock

2001-01-01

155

KNOX1 genes regulate lignin deposition and composition in monocots and dicots  

PubMed Central

Plant secondary cell walls are deposited mostly in vascular tissues such as xylem vessels, tracheids, and fibers. These cell walls are composed of a complex matrix of compounds including cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Lignin functions primarily to maintain the structural and mechanical integrity of both the transport vessel and the entire plant itself. Since lignin has been identified as a major source of biomass for biofuels, regulation of secondary cell wall biosynthesis has been a topic of much recent investigation. Biosynthesis and patterning of lignin involves many developmental and environmental cues including evolutionarily conserved transcriptional regulatory modules and hormonal signals. Here, we investigate the role of the class I Knotted1-like-homeobox (KNOX) genes and gibberellic acid in the lignin biosynthetic pathway in a representative monocot and a representative eudicot. Knotted1 overexpressing mutant plants showed a reduction in lignin content in both maize and tobacco. Expression of four key lignin biosynthesis genes was analyzed and revealed that KNOX1 genes regulate at least two steps in the lignin biosynthesis pathway. The negative regulation of lignin both in a monocot and a eudicot by the maize Kn1 gene suggests that lignin biosynthesis may be preserved across large phylogenetic distances. The evolutionary implications of regulation of lignification across divergent species are discussed.

Townsley, Brad T.; Sinha, Neelima R.; Kang, Julie

2013-01-01

156

Unconformity related and deep burial diagenesis, Upper Knox carbonates, southern and central Appalachians  

SciTech Connect

Early cemented Upper Knox (pre-unconformity) carbonates appear to have escaped much subsequent diagenesis, possibly due to early loss of permeability. A regional unconfined aquifer system accompanied the Knox unconformity,from which it was sourced. Waters moving rapidly by free flow through developing cavern systems, were undersaturated with respect to both aragonite and calcite resulting in large scale dissolution of limestone interbeds and development of interstratal-karstic collapse breccias. Localized concentrations of intrastratal karst below the unconformity may relate to a paleowater table or a paleo-mixing zone. Aquifer stagnation and precipitation of Fe and Mn-rich cements probably accompanied Middle Ordovician transgression and subsequent sedimentation. Middle Ordovician uplift along the eastern basin margin generated tectonic highlands that sourced meteoric fluids which moved downdip in a confined aquifer, flushing earlier stagnant porewater depositing a second generation of nonluminescent cement. Increasing burial beneath thick foreland basin clastics resulted in aquifer stagnation and dull cement precipitation. Episodic dewatering of Appalachian basinal shales was accompanied by rapid migration of warm, saline brines. Fluids moving along earlier intrastratal karstic conduits resulted in localized dissolution of carbonates and massive brecciation of intrastratal karst fills. Major porosity reduction occurred by precipitation of Fe-poor saddle dolomite, locally interstratified with sphalerite and associated minor hydrocarbons. Latest cements are minor Fe-rich calcite and silica.

Montanez, I.P.; Read, J.F.

1985-01-01

157

33 CFR 117.949 - Tennessee River.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tennessee River. 117.949 Section 117.949 Navigation...Requirements Tennessee § 117.949 Tennessee River. The draws of the Chief John Ross Bridge over the Tennessee River, mile 464.1, at Chattanooga,...

2013-07-01

158

Developmental regulation and downstream effects of the knox class homeobox genes Oskn2 and Oskn3 from rice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plant homeobox genes of the class 1 knox (knotted1-like) type are involved in the regulation of shoot apical meris- tem formation and function. Their expression generally occurs either throughout the meristem or specifically at the lateral organ boundaries. Down-regulation in the organ primordia is tightly controlled and misexpression in leaves leads to a perturbed development. Here, the transcriptional control of

A. Dorien Postma-Haarsma; Saskia Rueb; Enrico Scarpella; Willem den Besten; J. Harry; C. Hoge; Annemarie H. Meijer

2002-01-01

159

Developmental regulation and downstream effects of the knox class homeobox genes Oskn2 and Oskn3 from rice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plant homeobox genes of the class 1 knox (knotted1-like) type are involved in the regulation of shoot apical meristem formation and function. Their expression generally occurs either throughout the meristem or specifically at the lateral organ boundaries. Down-regulation in the organ primordia is tightly controlled and misexpression in leaves leads to a perturbed development. Here, the transcriptional control of two

A. Dorien Postma-Haarsma; Saskia Rueb; Enrico Scarpella; Willem den Besten; J. Harry C. Hoge; Annemarie H. Meijer

2002-01-01

160

An economic analysis of a monitored retrievable storage site for Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy is charged with the task of identifying potential sites for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility and reporting the results of its analysis to Congress by January 1986. DOE chose three finalist sites from 11 sites DOE analysts evaluated earlier. All three are in Tennessee, including two in Oak Ridge and one in Trousdale/Smith Counties. This paper is a summary of research undertaken on the economic effects of establishing the MRS facility in Tennessee. All three locations were considered in the analysis, but on some occasions attention is focused on the site preferred by DOE. The research was undertaken by the Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER), College of Business Administration, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, under contract with the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development.

Fox, W.F.; Mayo, J.W.; Hansen, L.T.; Quindry, K.E.

1985-12-17

161

An economic analysis of a monitored retrievable storage site for Tennessee. Final report and appendices  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy is charged with the task of identifying potential sites for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility and reporting the results of its analysis to Congress by January 1986. DOE chose three finalist sites from 11 sites DOE analysts evaluated earlier. All three are in Tennessee, including two in Oak Ridge and one in Trousdale/Smith Counties. This paper is a summary of research undertaken on the economic effects of establishing the MRS facility in Tennessee. All three locations were considered in the analysis, but on some occasions attention is focused on the site preferred by DOE. The research was undertaken by the Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER), College of Business Administration, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, under contract with the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development.

Fox, W.F.; Mayo, J.W.; Hansen, L.T.; Quindry, K.E.

1985-12-17

162

Tennessee Amphibian Monitoring Program (TAMP)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation co-sponsor the Tennessee Amphibian Monitoring Program (TAMP). A volunteer-based, multi-agency effort "to assess the current status of amphibians (frogs, toads, and salamanders)" across the state, TAMP is open to all interested participants. The homepage introduces and describes the need for TAMP, and provides a brief list of related sites. Also at the TAMP site are detailed survey protocols (with accompanying color photographs of frogs and toads) and a list of selected references.

163

Barge loading facilities in conjunction with wood chipping and sawlog mill, Tennessee River Mile 145. 9R  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental consequences of approving, denying, or adopting reasonable alternatives to a request for barge loading facilities. These facilities would serve a proposed wood chipping and sawlog products operations at Tennessee River Mile (TRM) 145.9, right descending bank, (Kentucky Lake), in Perry County, Tennessee. The applicant is Southeastern Forest Products, L.P. (SFP), Box 73, Linden, Tennessee and the proposed facilities would be constructed on or adjacent to company owned land. Portions of the barge terminal would be constructed on land over which flood easement rights are held by the United States of America and administered by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The US Army Corps of Engineers (CE) and TVA have regulatory control over the proposed barge terminal facilities since the action would involve construction in the Tennessee River which is a navigable water of the United States.

Not Available

1990-08-01

164

GEE CREEK WILDERNESS, TENNESSEE.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

On the basis of geologic, geochemical, and mine and prospect surveys, it was determined that the Gee Creek Wilderness, Tennessee has little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. Iron ore was formerly mined, but the deposits are small, have a high phosphorous content, and are inaccessible. Shale, suitable for brick or lightweight aggregate, and sandstone, which could be utilized for crushed stone or sand, are found in the area, but are also found in areas closer to potential markets. The geologic setting precludes the presence of oil and gas resources in the surface rocks, but the possibility of finding natural gas at depth below the rocks exposed in the area cannot be discounted. Geophysical exploration would be necessary to define the local structure in rocks at depth to properly evaluate the potential of the area for gas.

Epstein, Jack, B.; Gazdik, Gertrude, C.

1984-01-01

165

Exotic Woody Plants of Shiloh National Military Park, Tennessee: A Population Survey of Aggressive Species.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this study was to survey the established exotic woody plants at Shiloh National Military Park, Hardin County, Tennessee. This survey was part of a recent effort to assess the flora and vegetation at Shiloh. The study sought to document the ...

T. Butler P. S. White

1981-01-01

166

Sam Houston: Tennessee's Frontier Teacher.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes early schooling of Sam Houston. Brief description of structure and curriculum of one room school in Maryville, Tennessee, where Houston taught in 1812. Notes Houston's later reflections on his teaching experience. (CS)

Akerman, Joe A., Jr.

1987-01-01

167

Subdivision Regulations, 1969, Erwin, Tennessee.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study consists of subdivision regulations for the city of Erwin, Tennessee. Included in the study are standards for submitting and receiving preliminary and final approval for all subdivisions within the planning region. (Author)

1969-01-01

168

Transportation Plan, 1969, Erwin, Tennessee.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Included in the study is an inventory and analysis of all transportation facilities in the City of Erwin, Tennessee. Recommendations are made for a systematic improvement of deficiencies which may exist in the transportation system. (Author)

1969-01-01

169

Untapped potential from Mexico to Mississsippi; Surprises of the Ellenburger-Arbuckle-Knox trend  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that recent events bring to mind how two large but different Arbuckle discoveries could cause such excitement as to spark interest along a 535 mile trend of the Arkoma basin in South-east Oklahoma, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Alabama. One was an oil discovery, the other the first commercial gas discovery in this formation in the Arkoma basin. In fact, the Arbuckle, Knox, and Ellenburger group reservoirs constitute a major play along a 1,500 mile trend extending to West Texas and Mexico. One of the richest oil and gas producing areas in the U.S. is a 200 mile wide, 850 mile long belt from the Central Kansas uplift across Oklahoma, North and West Texas, to the Central Basin platform and the Delaware basin of West Texas.

Fay, R.O. (Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States))

1992-10-19

170

Seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi in raccoons from Tennessee.  

PubMed

Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas' disease. Autochthonous human and canine transmission of T. cruzi has been documented in Tennessee, but little is known about its ecology, including the prevalence of T. cruzi among wildlife in Tennessee. Serum samples from 706 raccoons (Procyon lotor) from 10 counties in the Ridge and Valley and Blue Ridge Mountains ecoregions of eastern Tennessee were tested for antibodies reactive with T. cruzi using the indirect fluorescent antibody assay. Two hundred six (29.2%) samples were seropositive, with 9 counties yielding positive samples (range 14.6-63.6%). Significantly more raccoons from rural habitats (35.1%) were found positive for T. cruzi exposure than were those from suburban habitats (23.1%, P < 0.001). Land cover class was not associated with seropositivity status (P = 0.441), even though deciduous forest was the most common site from where raccoons were trapped and the most common site of positive raccoons in rural areas (42%). Interestingly, age was positively associated with seropositivity. Raccoons older than 1 yr (adults) were 40.1% seropositive compared to 12.2% of those less than 1 yr (juveniles; P < 0.001). Female adults were significantly more likely to be exposed to T. cruzi than were male adult raccoons (P < 0.001). No significant seroprevalence difference was seen among male and female juveniles. This study contributes to understanding the dynamics of T. cruzi exposure within raccoon populations in Tennessee. The importance of habitat (rural vs. suburban) and microhabitat (dens) in risk of exposure to these populations is also discussed. PMID:20001097

Maloney, Jenny; Newsome, Anthony; Huang, Junjun; Kirby, Jordona; Kranz, Melissa; Wateska, Angela; Dunlap, Brett; Yabsley, Michael J; Dunn, John R; Jones, Timothy F; Moncayo, Abelardo C

2010-04-01

171

Characterization of the KNOX class homeobox genes Oskn2 and Oskn3 identified in a collection of cDNA libraries covering the early stages of rice embryogenesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

For identification of genes involved in embryogenesis in the model cereal rice, we have constructed a collection of cDNA libraries of well-defined stages of embryo development before, during and after organ differentiation. Here, we focus on the possible role of KNOX (maize Knotted1-like) class homeobox genes in regulation of rice embryogenesis. Three types of KNOX clones were identified in libraries

A. Dorien Postma-Haarsma; Ira I. G. S. Verwoert; Oscar P. Stronk; Jan Koster; Gerda E. M. Lamers; J. Harry C. Hoge; Annemarie H. Meijer

1999-01-01

172

Groundwater maintenance at the vulcan materials quarry in Chattanooga, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Vulcan Materials Shallowford Road Quarry in Chattanooga, Tennessee is the largest active limestone quarry in the state. Currently it covers some 35 hectares with highwalls up to 100 m. Production is predominately from Middle Ordovician Limestone of the Stones River Group. The upper 60 m consists of medium-bedded gray limestone of the Pond Springs Formation, while the lower 40 m are in Lower Ordovician dolomites and limestones belonging to the Mascot Formation of the Knox Group. The present quarry began in 1951 and has been in continuous operation since that time. For several years the influx of groundwater into the quarry was so great that over 11,355 liters per minute had to be removed by a series of pumps. A source of much of the groundwater was thought to be from Friar Branch which flowed near the present quarry site. At low water, several sinkholes were observed in the bottom of the stream. Several attempts were made (unsuccessfully) to fill these sinks. On July 17, 1984, a 184 m trench was dug along the north side of Friar Branch and fifty-one sections of 1.2 m diameter pipe were placed in the trench. Each 4 m section was made water tight and the water from Friar branch was then diverted into the pipe. Bulldozers scraped the dry bed of Friar Branch in an attempt to locate all major cavities and sinkholes. These were filled with grout and the bed of the creek was covered with about 7 to 8 cm of crushed rock and rolled. The entire stream was sealed with grout and then the stream was returned to its original course. The results was a marked reduction in groundwater seepage into the quarry.

Wilson, R.L.

1985-01-01

173

Upper Strawn (Desmoinesian) carbonate and clastic depositional environments, SE King County, TX  

SciTech Connect

The Pennsylvanian upper Strawn Group of southeast King County, Texas, provides a unique setting to study interactions between coeval carbonate and clastic deposition during the Desmoinesian. One of the most perplexing problems is the relationship of massive Pennsylvanian platform carbonates to shallow-water marine and deltaic sediments. Within the study area carbonate facies were deposited along the northern edge of the Knox-Baylor trough on the Spur platform, and terrigenous clastics were carried toward the Midland basin through the Knox-Baylor trough. Based on the analysis of subsurface cores, five carbonate lithofacies and four clastic lithofacies were recognized in southeast King County, Texas. The distribution and geometry of these lithofacies are related to variations in the rate of subsidence in the Knox-Baylor trough, Pennsylvanian tectonics, deltaic progradation, avulsion and compaction. The platform carbonates within the northern region record environments within the carbonate platform complex, including middle platform, outer platform, algal mound, and platform margin. The quartzarenitic sandstones within the southern region occur in a variety of complex depositional geometries, including distributary bar fingers, lobate deltas, and offshore bars. The upper Strawn Group provides an attractive area for exploration geology. Both carbonates and clastics provide excellent reservoirs from a depth of approximately 5,000 to 6,000 ft. Total production since the early 1940s, within the area is over 100,000,000 bbl of oil. Multiple pay zones within a 600-ft interval also provide an added incentive for exploration. Areas within and around the Knox-Baylor trough deserve additional study due to these relatively shallow, unexplored, multiple pay zones.

Boring, T.H. (Oryx Energy Co., Oklahoma City, OK (USA))

1990-05-01

174

Safety Evaluation Report Related to the Operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2, Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391. Tennessee Valley Authority, October 1995 (Supplement 18).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Supplement No. 18 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for license to operate Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2, Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391, located in Rhea County Tennessee, has been prepared...

P. S. Tam

1995-01-01

175

Ground-Water Hydrology and Water-Quality Data for Wells, Springs, and Surface-Water Sites in the Bradley-Brumalow Creek Area Near Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee, September to December 1999.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Arnold Air Force Base (AAFB) occupies about 40,000 acres in Coffee and Franklin Counties, Tennessee. The primary mission of AAFB is to support the development of aerospace systems. This mission is accomplished through test facilities at Arnold Engineering...

R. A. Aycock C. J. Haugh

2001-01-01

176

Modulation of the Hormone Setting by Rhodococcus fascians Results in Ectopic KNOX Activation in Arabidopsis1[W][OA  

PubMed Central

The biotrophic actinomycete Rhodococcus fascians has a profound impact on plant development and a common aspect of the symptomatology is the deformation of infected leaves. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the serrated leaf margins formed upon infection resemble the leaf phenotype of transgenic plants with ectopic expression of KNOTTED-like homeobox (KNOX) genes. Through transcript profiling, we demonstrate that class-I KNOX genes are transcribed in symptomatic leaves. Functional analysis revealed that BREVIPEDICELLUS/KNOTTED-LIKE1 and mainly SHOOT MERISTEMLESS were essential for the observed leaf dissection. However, these results also positioned the KNOX genes downstream in the signaling cascade triggered by R. fascians infection. The much faster activation of ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATOR5 and the establishment of homeostatic and feedback mechanisms to control cytokinin (CK) levels support the overrepresentation of this hormone in infected plants due to the secretion by the pathogen, thereby placing the CK response high up in the cascade. Hormone measurements show a net decrease of tested CKs, indicating either that secretion by the bacterium and degradation by the plant are in balance, or, as suggested by the strong reaction of 35S:CKX plants, that other CKs are at play. At early time points of the interaction, activation of gibberellin 2-oxidase presumably installs a local hormonal setting favorable for meristematic activity that provokes leaf serrations. The results are discussed in the context of symptom development, evasion of plant defense, and the establishment of a specific niche by R. fascians.

Depuydt, Stephen; Dolezal, Karel; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke; Moritz, Thomas; Holsters, Marcelle; Vereecke, Danny

2008-01-01

177

Zero Tolerance in Tennessee Schools: An Update.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As required by Tennessee law, this report examines the state's zero-tolerance disciplinary data collected by the Tennessee Department of Education for school years 1999-00, 2000-01, and 2001-02. The first section displays statewide zero-tolerance statistics. The second section focuses on the zero-tolerance statistics of Tennessee's five major…

Potts, Kim; Njie, Bintou; Detch, Ethel R.; Walton, Jason

178

State Education Finance and Governance Profile: Tennessee  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the state education finance and governance profile of Tennessee. The 17th largest state, Tennessee is home to 2.01% of the nation's inhabitants. Funding of K-12 education in Tennessee is accomplished via a formula known as the Basic Educational Program (BEP). This plan primarily utilizes school district enrollment numbers to…

Krause, Mike

2010-01-01

179

Thickness of Knox Group overburden on Central Chestnut Ridge, Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect

The thickness of residual soil overlying the Knox Group along Central Chestnut Ridge was estimated by a conventional seismic refraction survey. The purpose of this survey was to identify sites on the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation where ample overburden exists above the water table for the shallow land burial of low-level radioactive waste. The results of the survey suggest that the upper slopes of the higher ridges in the area have a minimum of 16 to 26 m (52 to 85 ft) of overburden and that the crests of these ridges may have more than 30 m (100 ft). Therefore, it is unlikely that sound bedrock would be encountered during trench excavation (maximum of 10 m (32 ft)) along Central Chestnut Ridge. Also, the relatively low seismic wave velocities measured in the overburden suggest that the water table is generally deep. On the basis of these preliminary results, Central Chestnut Ridge appears to be suitable for further site characterization for the shallow land burial of low-level radioactive waste. 3 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

Staub, W.P.; Hopkins, R.A.

1984-05-01

180

Videographic GIS database documentation project for Ft. Knox, Kentucky: Planning and process  

SciTech Connect

The Geographic Resource Analysis Support System (GRASS), a geographic information system (GIS), has been fielded at approximately 50 US Army training installations as a land-management decision-making tool. Use of the GRASS GIS requires the compilation of numerous digital maps of environmental parameters, including elevation, soils, and hydrography. One of the uses of the GRASS GIS is to create digital graphic images that portray geographic data. A recently emerging technology called computer videographics can be used to graphically enhance GRASS-generated images, thereby creating new ways to visualize GRASS analysis results. Furthermore, videographic tools can be used to convert GRASS images into standard graphic file formats that can be displayed on low-cost personal computers, using inexpensive application software to view the images. The pilot project described in this report demonstrated the capability of videographic tools to enhance GRASS imagery through improved graphic visualization (including three-dimensional visualization) and enhanced labeling. The project also developed self-running demonstrations of GRASS imagery from Ft. Knox, Kentucky, on DOS- and Macintosh-compatible diskettes, using low-cost slide-show software to display the images.

Sullivan, R.G.; Vogt, M.C.

1992-06-01

181

Absence of Rickettsia rickettsii and Occurrence of Other Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae in Ticks from Tennessee  

PubMed Central

Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is the most common tick-borne illness in Tennessee. Little is known about the occurrence of R. rickettsii, the causative agent, in ticks in Tennessee. To better understand the prevalence and distribution of rickettsial agents in ticks, we tested 1,265 Amblyomma, Dermacentor, and Ixodes adult and nymphal ticks. Additionally, we tested 231 Amblyomma americanum larvae. Ticks were collected from 49 counties from humans, wild animals, domestic canines, and flannel drags. Spotted fever group rickettsiae (SFGR) DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 32% of adult and nymphal ticks. A total minimum infection rate of 85.63 was found in larval pools tested. Three rickettsial species, Rickettsia montana, Rickettsia amblyommii, and Rickettsia cooleyi were identified by molecular analysis. Rickettsia rickettsii was not detected. This study suggests that some RMSF cases reported in Tennessee may be caused by cross-reactivity with other SFGR antigenically related to R. rickettsii.

Moncayo, Abelardo C.; Cohen, Sara B.; Fritzen, Charissa M.; Huang, Eileen; Yabsley, Michael J.; Freye, James D.; Dunlap, Brett G.; Huang, Junjun; Mead, Daniel G.; Jones, Timothy F.; Dunn, John R.

2010-01-01

182

Water use, availability, and net demand in the Tennessee River watershed within Alabama, 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey worked in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs—Office of Water Resources to estimate water use and water availability for 2005 for the portion of the Tennessee River watershed contained within the borders of the State of Alabama. Estimates of water use and availability are an important part of planning for population and economic growth in the Tennessee River watershed in Alabama. Total water use for the region in 2005 was 5,197 million gallons per day (Mgal/d). Total surface-water withdrawals were 5,139 Mgal/d, and total groundwater withdrawals were about 58 Mgal/d. About 92 percent of the total water withdrawn was surface water used for once-through cooling for thermoelectric power generation. Self-supplied industrial and public-supply water uses accounted for the next greatest uses of water, constituting approximately 49 and 42 percent, respectively, of the total water use excluding thermoelectric power use. Summaries of water use by county and subbasin indicated the areas of greatest water withdrawals and use within the Tennessee River watershed. Limestone (2,012 Mgal/d), Jackson (1,498 Mgal/d), and Colbert (1,363 Mgal/d) Counties were the counties with the greatest total water use in 2005 and had large amounts of water withdrawn for thermoelectric power generation. When water use from thermoelectric power generation was not considered, the counties with the greatest withdrawals were Morgan (124 Mgal/d), Madison (72 Mgal/d), Colbert (69 Mgal/d), and Lawrence (67 Mgal/d). The subbasin with the greatest total water use was Wheeler Lake (2,260 Mgal/d) in the Middle Tennessee—Elk subregion. Wheeler Lake subbasin also had the greatest public-supply, irrigation, industrial, mining, and thermoelectric withdrawals of any subbasin in the Tennessee River watershed within Alabama. Total water availability for the Tennessee River watershed within Alabama was estimated to be 34,567 Mgal/d by the Geological Survey of Alabama. Net water demand for the watershed was calculated by subtracting the Tennessee Valley Authority estimates of return flow from water withdrawals. The net water demand was 136 Mgal/d, which is less than 1 percent of the estimated water available.

Gill, Amy C.; Harper, Michael J.; Littlepage, Thomas M.

2013-01-01

183

The Farragut School: A Tennessee Country-Life High School. Bulletin, 1913, No. 49. Whole Number 560  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Farragut School is an example of a successful attempt to adapt the organization, work, and ideas of a country school to the needs of country life. It is located in the open country near the village of Concord, Know County, Tennessee. Through 10 years of varied success this school has demonstrated the fact that the work of the rural school may be…

Monahan, A. C.; Phillips, Adams

1913-01-01

184

Appalachian Adolescent Health Education Project (AAHEP) Evaluation: A Study of Teen Pregnancy in East Tennessee (1982-1985).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Appalachian Adolescent Health and Education Project (AAHEP), in operation for 3 years, is a program designed to reduce adolescent pregnancy rates (prevention component) and provide care for pregnant teenagers (care component) in East Tennessee. Limitations in funding and service delivery prompted the AAHEP to modify its 15-county scope by…

Williams, Julie E.; And Others

185

76 FR 73665 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Tennessee Valley Authority and the University of Tennessee...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Authority and the University of Tennessee McClung Museum, Knoxville, TN AGENCY: National Park Service...Authority (TVA) and the University of Tennessee McClung Museum (McClung Museum) have completed an inventory of human remains...

2011-11-29

186

Inventory of karst subsidence in the Valley and Ridge Province of East Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The first regional inventory of karst activity in the Valley and Ridge Province of East Tennessee was performed as a part of ongoing studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory pertaining to environmental impact assessment of waste disposal in karst settings. More than half the land area in the Valley and Ridge Province of East Tennessee is underlain by karst-prone carbonate bedrock. The regional karst inventory was initiated to obtain current information on the extent of active karst subsidence in the region for use in decision making by the Department of Energy in planning future waste disposal facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The inventory was performed by contacting personnel of federal, state, and county agencies to obtain reports of known active karst subsidence within the region. Data from these interviews were tabulated resulting in identificaton of more than 250 karst subsidence incidents in East Tennessee, most of which have occurred since 1980. Although the infomation obtained was largely anecdotal, approximate location, date, size, and circumstances under which the collapses occurred were recorded for as many cases as could be documented. The study also included detailed reconnaissance of selected areas similar in geology and hydrology to a study area at Oak Ridge, Tennessee to identify causative factors which contribute to karst subsidence in the region and for comparison of the occurrence of visible karst features at different sites. Human activities affecting site hydrology such as large scale land clearing and earthmoving projects were related to most of the subsidence incidents inventoried.

Ketelle, R.H.; Newton, J.G.

1986-01-01

187

Geochemistry of the Chattanooga shale, Dekalb County, central Tennessee.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This Upper Devonian shale is of interest because of its unusual enrichment in trace elements, especially U; a new chemical analysis for major, minor and trace elements is presented. Stable isotopes of carbon (organic) show delta 13C approx -29per mille and for total sulphur show -21 to -27per mille delta 34S. The organic matter was found to range from dominantly marine (Dowelltown member) to dominantly terrestrial (Gassaway member) by extraction-column chromatography-GS and also by pyrolysis-GS of kerogen. Trace elements U, Mo, Co, Zn, Cu, Ni, V, As and Hg are enriched in the organic- and sulphide-rich units. This enrichment can be related to a euxinic depositional environment, to a very slow sedimentation rate (approx 2 mm/1000 years), to the type of organic matter that varied from mainly marine to terrestrial, and to the source of the metals, which shows abundance variations that originated, at least in part, from volcanic ash layers.-R.S.M.

Leventhal, J. S.; Briggs, P. H.; Baker, J. W.

1983-01-01

188

Surficial geologic map of the Germantown quadrangle, Shelby County, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The depiction of geology on this map is designed to aid in urban planning and analysis of potential damage in the event of strong earthquake motion. The geologic map by itself does not analyze potential earthquake damage, but is designed to be used by seismologists who perform such analyses. The nature of geologic materials to a degree determines the severity of damage to infrastructure sustained during a strong earthquake.

Arsdale, Roy Van

2004-01-01

189

KNOX genes influence a gradient of fruit chloroplast development through regulation of GOLDEN2-LIKE expression in tomato.  

PubMed

The chlorophyll content of unripe fleshy fruits is positively correlated with the nutrient content and flavor of ripe fruit. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit, the uniform ripening (u) locus, which encodes a GOLDEN 2-LIKE transcription factor (SlGLK2), influences a gradient of chloroplast development that extends from the stem end of the fruit surrounding the calyx to the base of the fruit. With the exception of the u locus, the factors that influence the formation of this developmental gradient are unknown. In this study, characterization and positional cloning of the uniform gray-green (ug) locus of tomato reveals a thus far unknown role for the Class I KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX (KNOX) gene, TKN4, in specifying the formation of this chloroplast gradient. The involvement of KNOX in fruit chloroplast development was confirmed through characterization of the Curl (Cu) mutant, a dominant gain-of-function mutation of TKN2, which displays ectopic fruit chloroplast development that resembles SlGLK2 over-expression. TKN2 and TKN4 act upstream of SlGLK2 and the related gene ARABIDOPSIS PSEUDO RESPONSE REGULATOR 2-LIKE (SlAPRR2-LIKE) to establish their latitudinal gradient of expression across developing fruit that leads to a gradient of chloroplast development. Class I KNOX genes typically influence plant morphology through maintenance of meristem activity, but this study identifies a role for TKN2 and TKN4 in specifically influencing chloroplast development in fruit but not leaves, suggesting that this fundamental process is differentially regulated in these two organs. PMID:24689783

Nadakuduti, Satya Swathi; Holdsworth, William L; Klein, Chelsey L; Barry, Cornelius S

2014-06-01

190

Strategy for definition and protection of east Tennessee karst groundwater basins  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes and gives suggestions for protecting the bedrock geology of eastern Tennessee which is typical of the southern Appalachian Valley and Ridge province. Carbonate beds (limestones and dolomites) of the Knox and Chickamauga Groups are bounded by non-carbonate beds, most of which strike northeast and dip steeply (10{degrees}--45{degrees}) to the southeast. The carbonate aquifers are maturely karstified and are extremely vulnerable to contaminant infiltration, thus necessitating appropriate land use planning focused on their environmental sensitivity. Urban expansion is resulting in greater land development in karst regions. Planned and existing activities produce wastes that may potentially leach into underlying karst systems. This waste may flow rapidly and untreated for many miles along strike. The potential degradation of aquifers and receiving streams due to the cumulative waste loading of numerous small enterprises may be more environmentally destructive than a few hazardous waste sites. Costs to remediate contaminated water supplies and streams can be in the millions of dollars versus the substantially lower costs of prudent land use planning.

Rubin, P.A.; Lemiszki, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Poling, R.S. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)

1992-12-31

191

Strategy for definition and protection of east Tennessee karst groundwater basins  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes and gives suggestions for protecting the bedrock geology of eastern Tennessee which is typical of the southern Appalachian Valley and Ridge province. Carbonate beds (limestones and dolomites) of the Knox and Chickamauga Groups are bounded by non-carbonate beds, most of which strike northeast and dip steeply (10[degrees]--45[degrees]) to the southeast. The carbonate aquifers are maturely karstified and are extremely vulnerable to contaminant infiltration, thus necessitating appropriate land use planning focused on their environmental sensitivity. Urban expansion is resulting in greater land development in karst regions. Planned and existing activities produce wastes that may potentially leach into underlying karst systems. This waste may flow rapidly and untreated for many miles along strike. The potential degradation of aquifers and receiving streams due to the cumulative waste loading of numerous small enterprises may be more environmentally destructive than a few hazardous waste sites. Costs to remediate contaminated water supplies and streams can be in the millions of dollars versus the substantially lower costs of prudent land use planning.

Rubin, P.A.; Lemiszki, P.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Poling, R.S. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States))

1992-01-01

192

Radiometric ages of Tennessee rocks  

SciTech Connect

This report compiles and summarizes all known radiometric age determinations based on bedrock samples from Tennessee. Data are available for 89 sites. Specimens record both igneous and metamorphic events ranging in age from 1.3 billion to 220 million years before present. Tennessee rocks have been dated by techniques that measure the results of four different kinds of radioactive decay: thorium-lead, uranium-lead, potassium-argon, and rubidium-strontium. Most determinations meet normal scientific standards for reliability. This study focuses on clarifying published data by bringing together geochemical, geological, and geographical information for each site. In addition to data on the age of bedrock samples, this study presents basic information on the ages of meteorites from Tennessee and on the ages of sediments and organic remains from Ice Age fossil sites and more recent archeological sites. While bedrock ages are the thrust of the report, other kinds of absolute age determinations are briefly discussed. 98 references, 11 figures, 3 tables.

Corgan, J.X.; Bradley, M.W.

1983-01-01

193

40 CFR 81.191 - Appalachian Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...County, Floyd County, Harlan County, Jackson County, Johnson County, Knott County, Knox County, Laurel County, Lee County, Leslie County, Letcher County, Magoffin County, Martin County, Owsley County, Perry County, Pike County, Rockcastle County,...

2010-07-01

194

40 CFR 81.191 - Appalachian Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...County, Floyd County, Harlan County, Jackson County, Johnson County, Knott County, Knox County, Laurel County, Lee County, Leslie County, Letcher County, Magoffin County, Martin County, Owsley County, Perry County, Pike County, Rockcastle County,...

2009-07-01

195

National Dam Inspection Program. Fawn Lake Dam,(ID Number PA00693). Schuylkill River Basin, Plum Creek, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Fawn Lake Dam is owned by the Lake Wynonah Property Owners Association and is located in South Mannheim Township in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The dam was designed by the original owner, American Realty Service Corporation of Memphis, Tennessee. The...

1978-01-01

196

Report of The Tennessee Reading Panel  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The mission of the Tennessee Reading Panel (TRP) is to promote lifelong literacy for all Tennessee citizens. The TRP provides literacy support through leadership, advocacy, teacher training, professional development, and the establishment of community and family partnerships. Recognizing that literacy is the basis for all learning, this document…

Tennessee Department of Education, 2005

2005-01-01

197

Tennessee and Its Children: Unmet Needs, 2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on the view that the tax structure in Tennessee is inadequate and produces chronic problems, especially for the state's children, this Kids Count report identifies unmet education, health care, and resource needs of the children in Tennessee. Following introductory remarks discussing the current tax structure and state spending, Section 1 of…

Brown, Pam; Delk, Fay L.; Petty, Steve; Wynn, Debbie; O'Neal, Linda

198

West Tennessee ACEI 2006 Fall Conference  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the West Tennessee ACEI 2006 Fall Conference held at Union University in Jackson, Tennessee on October 14, 2006. The conference theme, Turning the Pages: A Focus on Children's Literature, was emphasized throughout the day. During the conference, the early childhood classroom teachers, preservice teachers, and administrators…

Clifford, Anna; Hailey, Beth

2007-01-01

199

Targeted Merit Aid: Tennessee Education Lottery Scholarships  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research provides an overview of the Tennessee Education Lottery Scholarship program. This research reviews the development of the program and provides a description of House bill 787. The research also provides baseline data on higher education in Tennessee. Information related to enrollments, graduates, student-faculty ratios, and…

Ness, Erik C.; Noland, Brian E.

2004-01-01

200

Evaluation System Weighing down Tennessee Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A state law, which helped Tennessee win Race to the Top money, pushed schools to implement a system that had limited pilot-testing. Education officials in Tennessee are taking flak from teachers and unions for rushing the implementation of the new teacher-evaluation system that will eventually undergird tenure decisions--a move, some worry, that…

Heitin, Liana

2011-01-01

201

The Tennessee State Acid Rain (STAR) Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

As a part of the State Acid Rain (STAR) program administered by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the State of Tennessee proposed that the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) be used as a model to determine the effects of implementing acid rain controls on a large multi-State utility. Four possible strategies for implementing SOâ reductions on the TVA system were analyzed:

Bain

1986-01-01

202

Tennessee Higher Education Profiles and Trends, 2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tennessee Code Annotated (T.C.A.) Section 49-7-202 (c) (7) requires the Tennessee Higher Education Commission to "submit a biennial report to the governor and the general assembly, commenting upon major developments, trends, new policies, budgets and financial considerations which in the judgment of the commission will be useful to the governor…

Tennessee Higher Education Commission, 2010

2010-01-01

203

Tennessee Higher Education Profiles and Trends, 2008  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tennessee Code Annotated (T.C.A.) Section 49-7-202 (c) (7) requires the Tennessee Higher Education Commission to "submit a biennial report to the governor and the general assembly, commenting upon major developments, trends, new policies, budgets and financial considerations which in the judgment of the commission will be useful to the governor…

Tennessee Higher Education Commission, 2008

2008-01-01

204

Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Tennessee, 2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Tennessee for 2010. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Tennessee showed across-the-board gains--improvements in reading and math at the proficient-and-above, and advanced levels for all racial/ethnic subgroups, low-income…

Center on Education Policy, 2010

2010-01-01

205

33 CFR 334.855 - Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox...AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.855 Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S....

2010-07-01

206

33 CFR 334.855 - Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox...AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.855 Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S....

2012-07-01

207

33 CFR 334.855 - Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox...AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.855 Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S....

2011-07-01

208

SIMNET CVCC Analysis of Simulated SINCGARS Communications in the SIMNET CVCC Company-Level Experiments: Ft. Knox Close Combat Test Bed.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is a report on the Combat Vehicle Command and Control (CVCC) Company-level experiments carried out at the Developmental SIMNET site (now known as the Close Combat Test Bed (CCTB), at Ft. Knox in the winter and spring of 1990. These experiments were d...

1991-01-01

209

33 CFR 334.855 - Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox...AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.855 Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S....

2013-07-01

210

Expression of HtKNOT1, a class I KNOX gene, overlaps cell layers and development compartments of differentiating cells in stems and flowers of Helianthus tuberosus  

Microsoft Academic Search

In plant, post-embryonic development relies on the activities of indeterminate cell populations termed meristems, spatially clustered cell lineages, wherein a subset divides indeterminately. For correct growth, the plant must maintain a constant flow of cells through the meristem, where the input of dividing pluripotent cells offsets the output of differentiating cells. KNOTTED1-like homeobox (KNOX) genes are expressed in specific patterns

V. Michelotti; L. Giorgetti; C. Geri; G. Cionini; C. Pugliesi; M. Fambrini

2007-01-01

211

Indoor nitrogen dioxide in five Chattangooga, Tennessee public housing developments  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes an indoor nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) sampling study conducted during January through March of 1987 in five Chattanooga public housing developments. The origins of this study date to the summer of 1983 when the Piney Woods Community Organization (a citizens action group) expressed concern about toxic industrial air pollution and the effects it might have on their community. In response to these concerns, the Chattanooga-Hamilton County Air Pollution Control Bureau (Bureau) requested assistance from the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) in conducting a community health survey and assistance from the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in conducting a community air quality measurement program. The TDHE community health study did not find any significant differences between the mortality statistics for the Piney Woods community and a demographically similar control group. However, a health survey revealed that Piney Woods residents did not have a statistically significant higher self-reported prevalence of cough, wheezing, phlegm, breathlessness, colds, and respiratory illness.

Parkhurst, W.J.; Harper, J.P. (Tennessee Valley Authority (US)); Spengler, J.D.; Fraumeni, L.P.; Majahad, A.M. (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (US)); Cropp, J.W. (Chattanooga-Hamilton County Air Pollution Control Bureau, Chattanooga, TN (US))

1988-01-01

212

A comparison of rural high school students in Germany with rural Tennessee high school students' mathematics and science achievement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This descriptive study compared the science and mathematics aptitudes and achievement test scores for the final school year students in rural White County and Van Buren County, Tennessee with rural county students in Germany. In accordance with the previous research literature (Stevenson, 2002), German students outperformed U.S. students on The International Trends in Math and Science test (TIMSS). As reform in the U.S. education system has been underway, this study intended to compare German county student final school year performance with White County and Van Buren County (Grade 12) performance in science and mathematics. The entire populations of 176 White and Van Buren Counties senior high final school year students were compared with 120 school final year students from two rural German county high schools. The student responses to identical test and questionnaire items were compared using the t-test statistical analysis. In conclusion after t-test analyses, there was no significant difference (p>.05 level) in student attitudes on the 27 problem achievement and the 35 TIMSS questionnaire items between the sampled population of 120 German students compared with the population of 176 White and Van Buren students. Also, there was no statistically significant difference (p>.05 level) between the German, White, and Van Buren County rural science and math achievement in the TIMSS problem section of the final year test. Based on the research, recommendations to improve U.S. student scores to number one in the world include making changes in teaching methodology in mathematics and science; incorporating pamphlet lessons rather than heavily reliance on textbooks; focusing on problem solving; establishing an online clearinghouse for effective lessons; creating national standards in mathematics and science; matching students' course choices to job aspirations; tracking misbehaving students rather than mainstreaming them into the regular classroom; and designing individual educational plans for every student. Further study and future investigations are recommended from this study to compare White County and Van Buren County Students with other rural county schools in Tennessee, as well as other states. In addition, the Tennessee students' state mandated science and mathematics could be correlated to the TIMMS to identify trends and relationships. Future comparisons of White County and Van Buren County with higher scoring rural Asian students could be done in search of more effective methods of teaching science and mathematics.

Harding, R. Fredrick

213

Distribution of petroleum hydrocarbons and toluene biodegradation, Knox Street fire pits, Fort Bragg, North Carolina  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An investigation was conducted at the Knox Street fire pits, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, to monitor the distribution of toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (TEX) in soil vapor, ground water, and ground-water/vapor to evaluate if total concentrations of TEX at the site are decreasing with time, and to quantify biodegradation rates of toluene in the unsaturated and saturated zones. Soil-vapor and ground-water samples were collected around the fire pits and ground-water/vapor samples were collected along the ground-water discharge zone, Beaver Creek, on a monthly basis from June 1994 through June 1995. Concentrations of TEX compounds in these samples were determined with a field gas chro- matograph. Laboratory experiments were performed on aquifer sediment samples to measure rates of toluene biodegradation by in situ micro- organisms. Based on field gas chromatographic analytical results, contamination levels of TEX compounds in both soil vapor and ground water appear to decrease downgradient of the fire-pit source area. During the 1-year study period, the observed temporal and spatial trends in soil vapor TEX concentrations appear to reflect differences in the distribution of TEX among solid, aqueous, and gaseous phases within fuel-contaminated soils in the unsaturated zone. Soil temperature and soil moisture are two important factors which influence the distribution of TEX com- pounds among the different phases. Because of the short period of data collection, it was not possible to distinguish between seasonal fluc- tuations in soil vapor TEX concentrations and an overall net decrease in TEX concentrations at the study site. No seasonal trend was observed in total TEX concentrations for ground- water samples collected at the study site. Although the analytical results could not be used to determine if ground-water TEX concen- trations decreased during the study at a specific location, the data were used to examine rate constants of toluene biodegradation. Based on ground-water toluene concentration data, a maximum rate constant for anaerobic biodegradation of toluene in the saturated zone was estimated to be as low as 0.002 d-1 or as high as 0.026 d-1. Based on analyses of ground-water/vapor samples, toluene was the prin- cipal TEX compound identified in ground water discharging to Beaver Creek. Observed decreases in ground-water/vapor toluene concentrations during the study period may reflect a decrease in source inputs, an increase in dilution caused by higher ground-water flow, and(or) removal by biological or other physical processes. Rate constants of toluene anaerobic biodegradation determined by laboratory measurements illustrate a typical acclimation response of micro-organisms to hydrocarbon contamination in sediments collected from the site. Toluene biodegradation rate constants derived from laboratory microcosm studies ranged from 0.001 to 0.027 d-1, which is similar to the range of 0.002 to 0.026 d-1 for toluene biodegradation rate constants derived from ground-water analytical data. The close agreement of toluene biodegradation rate constants reported using both approaches offer strong evidence that toluene can be degraded at environmentally significant rates at the study site.

Harden, S. L.; Landmeyer, J. E.

1996-01-01

214

LITTLE FROG ROADLESS AREA, TENNESSEE.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

No mineral-resource potential was identified during studies of the Little Frog Roadless Area, Tennessee. Possibilities exist, however, for the occurrence of massive sulfide-bearing rocks of the type mined in the adjacent Ducktown Basin at depth beneath the roadless area. A possibility also exists for the presence of natural gas in sedimentary rocks at great depth. Insufficient data to support these concepts precludes assessing any of the roadless area as having resource potential. A limited amount of geologic mapping coupled with seismic work would be useful to test whether rocks of the Ducktown Basin are present at depth under the roadless areas. Seismic work and drilling would be necessary also to test for the presence of gas at great depths.

Force, Eric, R.; Gazdik, Gertrude, C.

1984-01-01

215

Developments in east-central states in 1967  

Microsoft Academic Search

As production from younger strata has continued to decline, exploratory activity in the 4 central states (Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, and Tennessee) has turned to the Lower Ordovician and Cambrian. Deep Knox tests and basement tests are being drilled at an increasing rate throughout the area. A discovery in the Cambrian Tomstown Dolomite at 7,598 ft in Boyd County, E. Kentucky,

J. Van Den Berg; D. H. Swann; G. L. Carpenter; H. C. Milhous; E. Nosow

1968-01-01

216

The Center School: An Alternative for the Dropout.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1989 the Knox County (Tennessee) Schools opened The Center School as an answer to the dropout problem. The Center School was to feature open entry and exit, self-paced work schedules, flexible scheduling, a school-to-work component, on-site counselors and social workers, and individually designed graduation programs through which dropouts aged…

McNeely, Sonja R.; Mertz, Norma T.

217

Well-Construction, Water-Level, Geophysical, and Water-Quality Data for Ground-Water Monitoring Wells for Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sixty-five wells were installed at 39 sites in the Arnold Air Force Base area in Coffee and Franklin Counties, Tennessee. The wells were installed to provide information on subsurface lithology, aquifer characteristics, ground- water levels, and ground-wa...

C. J. Haugh E. N. Mahoney J. A. Robinson

1992-01-01

218

Well-Construction, Water-Level, and Water-Quality Data for Ground-Water Monitoring Wells for the J4 Hydrogeologic Study, Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Between December 1993 and March 1994, 27 wells were installed at 12 sites near the J4 test cell at Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) in Coffee County, Tennessee. The wells ranged from 28 to 289 feet deep and were installed to provide informatio...

C. J. Haugh

1996-01-01

219

View of Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky border area  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A vertical view of the Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky border area, as photographed from Earth orbit by one of the six lenses of the Itek-furnished S190-A Multispectral Photographic Facility Experiment aboard the Skylab space station. The long, narrow ridge is Pine Mountain; and it is crossed by U.S. 25E as it passes through the famed Cumberland Gap which at 1,600 feet elevation crosses Cumberland Mountain. Kingsport, Tennessee is located east of Cumberland Gap near the center of the picture. Interstate 81 under construction can be seen southeast of Kingsport. Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia is further east. Greenville and Elizabethton, Tennessee can also be seen in this photograph. The clouds across the southeast edge of the picture are over the Blue Ridge Mountains.

1973-01-01

220

Historic Context Evaluation for Mills in Tennessee.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Tennessee, though not an extremely old state, possesses a rich history of settlement and technological development. Throughout its existence, the state has witnessed the genesis, operation, and demise of thousands of mills and factories, representing some...

J. Burris J. N. Lovett L. Lautzenheiser

2002-01-01

221

76 FR 19515 - Tennessee Disaster #TN-00050  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Public Assistance Only for the State of Tennessee (FEMA- 1965-DR), dated 04/01/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, and Flooding. Incident Period: 02/28/2011 through 03/01/2011. Effective Date: 04/01/2011. Physical...

2011-04-07

222

75 FR 26815 - Tennessee Disaster # TN-00039  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Tennessee (FEMA-1909-DR), dated 05/04/2010. Incident: Severe Storms, Flooding, Straight-line Winds, and Tornadoes. Incident Period: 04/30/2010 and continuing. DATES: Effective Date: 05/04/2010. Physical Loan Application...

2010-05-12

223

76 FR 29286 - Tennessee Disaster #TN-00054  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Assistance Only for the State of Tennessee (FEMA- 1978-DR), dated 05/09/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Flooding, Tornadoes, and Straight-line Winds. Incident Period: 04/04/2011. Effective Date: 05/09/2011. Physical Loan...

2011-05-20

224

Community Facilities Plan, 1969, Erwin, Tennessee.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study consists of a community facilities plan for the city of Erwin, Tennessee. Included in the study is an inventory and analysis of all public and private community facilities. Where deficiencies exist, recommendations are made for improving these f...

1969-01-01

225

Distribution of the long-horned beetle, Dectes texanus, in soybeans of Missouri, Western Tennessee, Mississippi, and Arkansas.  

PubMed

The long-horned beetle, Dectes texanus LeConte (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), is a stem-boring pest of soybeans, Glycine max (L.) Merrill (Fabales: Fabaceae). Soybean stems and stubble were collected from 131 counties in Arkansas, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee and dissected to determine D. texanus infestation rates. All states sampled had D. texanus present in soybeans. Data from Tennessee and Arkansas showed sample infestations of D. texanus averaging nearly 40%. Samples from Missouri revealed higher infestation in the twelve southeastern counties compared to the rest of the state. Data from Mississippi suggested that D. texanus is not as problematic there as in Arkansas, Missouri, and Tennessee. Infestation rates from individual fields varied greatly (0-100%) within states. In Tennessee, second crop soybeans (i.e. soybeans planted following winter wheat) had lower infestations than full season soybeans. A map of pest distribution is presented that documents the extent of the problem, provides a baseline from which changes can be measured, contributes data for emergency registration of pesticides for specific geographic regions, and provides useful information for extension personnel, crop scouts, and growers. PMID:21062147

Tindall, Kelly V; Stewart, Scott; Musser, Fred; Lorenz, Gus; Bailey, Wayne; House, Jeff; Henry, Robert; Hastings, Don; Wallace, Milus; Fothergill, Kent

2010-01-01

226

Distribution of the Long-Horned Beetle, Dectes texanus, in Soybeans of Missouri, Western Tennessee, Mississippi, and Arkansas  

PubMed Central

The long-horned beetle, Dectes texanus LeConte (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), is a stem-boring pest of soybeans, Glycine max (L.) Merrill (Fabales: Fabaceae). Soybean stems and stubble were collected from 131 counties in Arkansas, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee and dissected to determine D. texanus infestation rates. All states sampled had D. texanus present in soybeans. Data from Tennessee and Arkansas showed sample infestations of D. texanus averaging nearly 40%. Samples from Missouri revealed higher infestation in the twelve southeastern counties compared to the rest of the state. Data from Mississippi suggested that D. texanus is not as problematic there as in Arkansas, Missouri, and Tennessee. Infestation rates from individual fields varied greatly (0–100%) within states. In Tennessee, second crop soybeans (i.e. soybeans planted following winter wheat) had lower infestations than full season soybeans. A map of pest distribution is presented that documents the extent of the problem, provides a baseline from which changes can be measured, contributes data for emergency registration of pesticides for specific geographic regions, and provides useful information for extension personnel, crop scouts, and growers.

Tindall, Kelly V.; Stewart, Scott; Musser, Fred; Lorenz, Gus; Bailey, Wayne; House, Jeff; Henry, Robert; Hastings, Don; Wallace, Milus; Fothergill, Kent

2010-01-01

227

Interim action proposed plan: Mercury tank remediation in the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is located adjacent to the city of Oak Ridge in Anderson County, Tennessee. The plant was constructed in the 1940s and primarily makes nuclear weapons components. In 1953, the Y-12 Plant was involved in the first production-scale separation of lithium isotopes for the development of hydrogen bombs. The lithium separation process involved separating the ⁶Li

Van Ryn

1991-01-01

228

Borrelia burgdorferi not detected in widespread Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) collected from white-tailed deer in Tennessee.  

PubMed

Lyme disease (LD), caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and transmitted in the eastern United States by blacklegged ticks, Ixodes scapularis Say, is classified as nonendemic in Tennessee and surrounding states in the Southeast. Low incidence of LD in these states has been attributed, in part, to vector ticks being scarce or absent; however, tick survey data for many counties are incomplete or out of date. To improve our knowledge of the distribution, abundance, and Borrelia spp. prevalence of I. scapularis, we collected ticks from 1,018 hunter-harvested white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmerman)) from 71 of 95 Tennessee counties in fall 2007 and 2008. In total, 160 deer (15.7%) from 35 counties were infested with adult I. scapularis; 30 of these counties were new distributional records for this tick. The mean number of I. scapularis collected per infested deer was 5.4 +/- 0.6 SE. Of the 883 I. scapularis we removed from deer, none were positive for B. burgdorferi and one tested positive for B. miyamotoi. Deer are not reservoir hosts for B. burgdorferi; nevertheless, past surveys in northern LD-endemic states have readily detected B. burgdoreferi in ticks collected from deer. We conclude that I. scapularis is far more widespread in Tennessee than previously reported. The absence of detectable B. burgdorferi infection among these ticks suggests that the LD risk posed by I. scapularis in the surveyed areas of Tennessee is much lower than in LD-endemic areas of the Northeast and upper Midwest. PMID:23270178

Rosen, M E; Hamer, S A; Gerhardt, R R; Jones, C J; Muller, L I; Scott, M C; Hickling, G J

2012-11-01

229

Stratabound pathways of preferred groundwater flow: An example from the Copper Ridge Dolomite in East Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Copper Ridge Dolomite of the Upper Cambrian Knox Group underlies a site at Oak Ridge, Tennessee under consideration by the Department of Energy (DOE) for a below ground waste disposal facility. The Copper Ridge was studied for DOE to understand the influence of lithology on deep groundwater flow. Three facies types are distinguished which comprise laterally continuous, 1 to 4 m thick rock units interpreted to represent upward-shallowing depositional cycles having an apparently significant effect on groundwater flow at depth. Rock core observations indicate one of the recurring facies types is characterized by thin to medium-bedded, fine-grained dolostone with planar cryptalgal laminae and thin shaley partings. Distinctive fracturing in this facies type, that may have resulted from regional structural deformation, it considered to be responsible for weathering at depth and the development of stratabound pathways of preferred groundwater flow. In addition, geophysical data suggest that one occurrence of this weathered facies type coincides with an apparent geochemical interface at depth. Geophysical data also indicate the presence of several fluid invasion horizons, traceable outside the study area, which coincide with the unweathered occurrence of this fine-grained facies type. The subcropping of recurrent zones of preferred groundwater flow at the weathered/unweathered interface may define linear traces of enhanced aquifer recharge paralleling geologic strike. Vertical projection of these zones from the weathered/unweathered rock interface to the ground surface may describe areas of enhanced infiltration. Tests to determine the role of stratigraphic controls on groundwater flow are key components of future investigations on West Chestnut Ridge. 14 refs., 13 figs.

Lee, R.; Ketelle, D.

1987-07-14

230

Geological mapping of the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge K-25 Site (formerly known as the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant) is located in the southern Appalachian Valley and Ridge province of east Tennessee and overlies an area of folded and faulted Cambrian through Ordovician sedimentary rocks in the footwall of the Whiteoak Mountain fault. Environmental restoration plans for the area require that the geology of the site be well understood because various aspects of the groundwater system are directly influenced by stratigraphic and structural characteristics of the bedrock. This study involved mapping the bedrock geology of an 18-square mile area in and around the plant site. Field mapping focused on: (1) checking the accuracy of previously mapped stratigraphic and fault contacts, (2) dividing the bedrock into distinct stratigraphic units based on field criteria, (3) determining the geometry of map-scale folds and faults, and (4) documenting various aspects of the local fracture system. Besides accomplishing all of the above tasks, results from this study have led to a number of new hypotheses regarding various aspects of the site geology. First, faulting and folding within carbonates of the Chickamauga Supergroup in the plant area has repeated certain rock units, which requires that there be a thrust fault in the subsurface below them. This thrust fault may project to the surface with the Carters Limestone. Second, thrust slices of the Rome Formation that overlie the Chickamauga carbonates may be extremely thin and have a limited aerial extent. Third, part of the Knox Group on McKinney Ridge is folded into an anticline. Evaluating the above hypotheses will require information about the subsurface that can only be acquired through drilling and surface geophysical surveys. The geologic map produced from this study can be used to evaluate the location of coreholes that will more effectively intersect a combination of stratigraphic, structural, and hydrologic targets.

Lemiszki, P.J.

1994-01-01

231

Detailed structure and tectonics of the Ninetyeast Ridge near Site ODP 758 (on new geophysical data from KNOX06RR cruise of R\\/V Roger Revelle)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Detailed geophysical survey was carried out during the NSF-funded KNOX06RR cruise of R\\/V Roger Revelle in July 2007 over the ~70×70 km area near ODP Site 758, the northern Ninetyeast Ridge (NER). In addition to multibeam echo-sounder bathymetry, 3.5 kHz echo-sounder profiles, magnetic, and gravity data, high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection data were collected on eight orthogonal profiles of total length

O. Levchenko; A. E. Eisin; A. N. Ivanenko; J. G. Marinova; C. F. Paul; I. M. Sborshchikov; W. W. Sager

2008-01-01

232

Karst subsidence in East Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Waste disposal site selection and facility design in regions dominated by carbonate bedrock must carefully consider karst development and the factors which contribute to subsidence activity. The Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory has completed a three phase study of karst subsidence in East Tennessee to quantify historical subsidence activity. The purpose of the study was to determine the principal factors which cause karst subsidence in the region. Techniques used and results obtained in this study form a basis for more detailed risk assessment at the local scale within the region. As development pressures diminish available land for various uses, risk-based land use decisions must be made to site critical facilities. To fulfill the study objectives a three phase study was designed including, (1) collection of subsidence data and compilation of a database, (2) performance of detailed studies of subsidence in three, two-to-five square-mile areas, and (3) synthesis of data obtained to; quantify the predominant sinkhole collapse dimensions, and identify events prior to subsidence or collapse events which may have caused the event, and estimate the intensity of subsidence as a function of geologic unit within subregional areas of higher and lower subsidence risk. 4 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Ketelle, R.H.; Newton, J.G.; Tanner, J.M.

1988-01-01

233

Stream Quality Assessment on Military Training Grounds Near Waverly, Tennessee.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Rapid bioassessment protocols were used during February 2005 to characterize stream quality in a reach of Trace Creek located within the Tennessee Army National Guard Volunteer Training Site--Gorman Quarry near Waverly, Tennessee. The purpose of the study...

L. P. Lecher M. D. Antwine M. D. Farr

2009-01-01

234

Gravity observations and Bouguer anomaly values for eastern Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Principal facts for gravity data in eastern Tennessee are presented in computer printout format. These data were used in preparation of Watkins, J. S., 1964, Regional geologic implications of the gravity and magnetic fields of a part of eastern Tennessee.

Watkins, J. S.; Yuval, Zvi

1971-01-01

235

40 CFR 282.92 - Tennessee State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Tennessee State-Administered Program. 282...PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED...STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.92 Tennessee State-Administered Program....

2013-07-01

236

Evaluation of the Tennessee Child Restraint Law.  

PubMed Central

In Tennessee a law came into force January 1, 1978 requiring parents to use child restraints properly when transporting their children who are less than four years old. Alternatively, the law permits children to be held in arms, a practice known to be hazardous rather than protective. Before and after the law went into force, observations were made of children in cars exiting from shopping centers in Knoxville and Nashville, Tennessee, and in Lexington and Louisville, Kentucky, an adjacent state not having a child restraint law. More than 80 per cent of Tennessee children observed in the fourth month the law was in force were not using child restraints anchored by seat belts, although use rates increased in Tennessee (8 to 16 per cent) to a greater extent than in Kentucky (11 to 15 per cent). Moreover, due to a large increase in children traveling in arms in Nashville, there was an increase in such travel in the two Tennessee cities studied (23 to 28 per cent) relative to a decrease in those studied in Kentucky (19 to 14 per cent). Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4

Williams, A F

1979-01-01

237

77 FR 40265 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Tennessee River, Decatur, AL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Regulation; Tennessee River, Decatur, AL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice...Tennessee River, mile 304.4, at Decatur, AL. The deviation is necessary to install...Tennessee River, mile 304.4, at Decatur, AL. The vertical clearance of the bridge...

2012-07-09

238

Floods of February 1989 in Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Rainfall amounts of over 5 inches the night of February 13 and the morning of February 14, 1989, caused flooding in areas of Middle and West Tennessee. The towns of Lebanon in Middle Tennessee and Obion in West Tennessee were most severely affected. Most of the business district in Lebanon and many residential areas in Obion were flooded. Recurrence intervals for 24-hour rainfall totals were as high as 25 years at some sites but most peak discharges had recurrence intervals of less than 10 years. Rainfall amounts for the period February 13-20, 1989, peak stages and discharges for this flood, the peak of record, and a list of discharge measurements made during the flood are documented. (USGS)

Quinones, Ferdinand; Gamble C. R.

1990-01-01

239

Cotton KNL1, encoding a class II KNOX transcription factor, is involved in regulation of fibre development  

PubMed Central

In this study, the GhKNL1 (KNOTTED1-LIKE) gene, encoding a classical class II KNOX protein was identified in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). GhKNL1 was preferentially expressed in developing fibres at the stage of secondary cell wall (SCW) biosynthesis. GhKNL1 was localized in the cell nucleus, and could interact with GhOFP4, as well as AtOFP1, AtOFP4, and AtMYB75. However, GhKNL1 lacked transcriptional activation activity. Dominant repression of GhKNL1 affected fibre development of cotton. The expression levels of genes related to fibre elongation and SCW biosynthesis were altered in transgenic fibres of cotton. As a result, transgenic cotton plants produced aberrant, shrunken, and collapsed fibre cells. Length and cell-wall thickness of fibres of transgenic cotton plants were significantly reduced compared with the wild type. Furthermore, overexpression and dominant repression of GhKNL1 in Arabidopsis resulted in a reduction in interfascicular fibre cell-wall thickening of basal stems of transgenic plants. Complementation revealed that GhKNL1 rescued the defective phenotype of Arabidopsis knat7 mutant in some extent. These data suggest that GhKNL1, as a transcription factor, participates in regulating fibre development of cotton.

Gong, Si-Ying; Huang, Geng-Qing; Sun, Xiang; Qin, Li-Xia; Li, Yang; Zhou, Li; Li, Xue-Bao

2014-01-01

240

Cotton KNL1, encoding a class II KNOX transcription factor, is involved in regulation of fibre development.  

PubMed

In this study, the GhKNL1 (KNOTTED1-LIKE) gene, encoding a classical class II KNOX protein was identified in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). GhKNL1 was preferentially expressed in developing fibres at the stage of secondary cell wall (SCW) biosynthesis. GhKNL1 was localized in the cell nucleus, and could interact with GhOFP4, as well as AtOFP1, AtOFP4, and AtMYB75. However, GhKNL1 lacked transcriptional activation activity. Dominant repression of GhKNL1 affected fibre development of cotton. The expression levels of genes related to fibre elongation and SCW biosynthesis were altered in transgenic fibres of cotton. As a result, transgenic cotton plants produced aberrant, shrunken, and collapsed fibre cells. Length and cell-wall thickness of fibres of transgenic cotton plants were significantly reduced compared with the wild type. Furthermore, overexpression and dominant repression of GhKNL1 in Arabidopsis resulted in a reduction in interfascicular fibre cell-wall thickening of basal stems of transgenic plants. Complementation revealed that GhKNL1 rescued the defective phenotype of Arabidopsis knat7 mutant in some extent. These data suggest that GhKNL1, as a transcription factor, participates in regulating fibre development of cotton. PMID:24831118

Gong, Si-Ying; Huang, Geng-Qing; Sun, Xiang; Qin, Li-Xia; Li, Yang; Zhou, Li; Li, Xue-Bao

2014-08-01

241

Food habits of bobcats in eastern Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Food habits of bobcats (Lynx rufus) in eastern Tennessee were determined from analyzing 176 cat samples collected on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park. Remains of cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) were the most frequently occurring food item. White-tail deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and pine vole (Microtus pinetorum) remains also were found frequently in samples. Data obtained from this study indicated that food preferences for bobcats in eastern Tennessee are similar to those in other southeastern states where the habitat is similar to the Oak Ridge area and somewhat different from those with significantly different habitat.

Story, J.D.; Galbraith, W.J.; Kitchings, J.T.

1982-01-01

242

Development of hardwood seed zones for Tennessee using a geographic information system  

USGS Publications Warehouse

For species that have no or limited information on genetic variation and adaptability to nonnative sites, there is a need for seed collection guidelines based on biological, climatological, and/or geographical criteria. Twenty-eight hardwood species are currently grown for reforestation purposes at the East Tennessee State Nursery. The majority of these species have had no genetic testing to define guidelines for seed collection location and can be distributed to sites that have a very different environment than that of seed origin(s). Poor survival and/or growth may result if seedlings are not adapted to environmental conditions at the planting location. To address this problem, 30 yr of Tennessee county precipitation and minimum temperature data were analyzed and grouped using a centroid hierarchical cluster analysis. The weather data and elevational data were entered into a Geographic Information System (GIS) and separately layered over Bailey's Ecoregions to develop a seed zone system for Tennessee. The seed zones can be used as a practical guideline for collecting seeds to ensure that the resulting seedlings will be adapted to planting environments.

Post, L. S.; Schlarbaum, S. E.; Van Manen, F.; Cecich, R. A.; Saxton, A. M.; Schneider, J. F.

2003-01-01

243

7 CFR 301.45-3 - Generally infested areas.  

... Harrison County. The entire county. Henry County. The entire county. Hocking County. The entire county. Holmes County. The entire county. Huron County. The entire county. Jefferson County. The entire county. Knox...

2014-01-01

244

7 CFR 301.45-3 - Generally infested areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Harrison County. The entire county. Henry County. The entire county. Hocking County. The entire county. Holmes County. The entire county. Huron County. The entire county. Jefferson County. The entire county. Knox...

2012-01-01

245

7 CFR 301.45-3 - Generally infested areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Harrison County. The entire county. Henry County. The entire county. Hocking County. The entire county. Holmes County. The entire county. Huron County. The entire county. Jefferson County. The entire county. Knox...

2013-01-01

246

7 CFR 301.45-3 - Generally infested areas.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Harrison County. The entire county. Henry County. The entire county. Hocking County. The entire county. Holmes County. The entire county. Huron County. The entire county. Jefferson County. The entire county. Knox...

2011-01-01

247

Evaluation of the Tennessee Child Restraint Law.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on a study of the effects of a Tennessee law aimed at increasing the protection of children in cars. The law, which came into force January 1, 1978, requires parents to use child restraints properly when transporting their children who are less than 4 years old. Alternatively, the law permits children to be held in arms, a…

Williams, Allan F.

248

77 FR 51100 - Tennessee Disaster #TN-00068  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of TENNESSEE dated. 08/16/2012. Incident: Severe storms, flooding and heavy rain. Incident Period: 08/05/2012 through 08/06/2012. Effective Date: 08/16/2012. Physical Loan Application...

2012-08-23

249

75 FR 11735 - Tennessee Valley Authority Procedures  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

The Tennessee Valley Authority is amending its regulations which contain TVA's procedures for the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), the Privacy Act, and the Government in the Sunshine Act. These amendments reflect changes in position titles and addresses; for FOIA purposes, update the definitions of ``news media'' and ``news media requesters'' to reflect changes in the way news is delivered;......

2010-03-12

250

Tennessee Valley Authority and the Merit Principles.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report discusses the results of a study by the U.S. Merit Systems Protection Board (MSPB) of selected aspects of human resource management in the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Established as a Government corporation in 1933, TVA is required to ad...

1989-01-01

251

DISTRIBUTION OF PHYTOPLANKTON IN TENNESSEE LAKES  

EPA Science Inventory

This is a data report presenting the species and abundance of phytoplankton in the 16 lakes sampled by the National Eutrophication Survey in the State of Tennessee. Results from the calculation of several water quality indices are also included (Nygaard's Trophic State Index, Pal...

252

Process Control Research, Training Center for Tennessee.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Tennessee have established a measurement and controls research center and a master's-level academic engineering program. A description of this university/industry cooperative research center is provided. Indicates that a doctoral program is planned when the master's program is well…

Chemical and Engineering News, 1984

1984-01-01

253

TN State Profile. Tennessee: Gateway Examinations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper provides information about Tennessee's Gateway Examinations. The purpose of the test is to: (1) Provide schools with student academic diagnostic information; (2) Determine prospective high school graduates' mastery of the state curriculum; (3) Encourage districts and schools to identify and serve students at risk of academic failure;…

Center on Education Policy, 2010

2010-01-01

254

"Knoxville, Tennessee": Using Nikki Giovanni's Poem.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Finds that Nikki Giovanni's poem "Knoxville, Tennessee" works with students of all ages (including adults) and, because of its simplicity, needs no preparation and can be read aloud by students. Suggests students write a group poem before they write their own individual poems. Contains many examples of student poetry. (PA)

Felice, Renee-Noelle

1998-01-01

255

76 FR 27137 - Tennessee Disaster #TN-00051  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Tennessee (FEMA-1974-DR), dated 05/01/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Associated Flooding. Incident Period: 04/25/2011 through 04/28/2011. Effective...

2011-05-10

256

Peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] KNOPE1, a class 1 KNOX orthologue to Arabidopsis BREVIPEDICELLUS/KNAT1, is misexpressed during hyperplasia of leaf curl disease.  

PubMed

Class 1 KNOTTED-like (KNOX) transcription factors control cell meristematic identity. An investigation was carried out to determine whether they maintain this function in peach plants and might act in leaf curliness caused by the ascomycete Taphrina deformans. KNOPE1 function was assessed by overexpression in Arabidopsis and by yeast two-hybrid assays with Arabidopsis BELL proteins. Subsequently, KNOPE1 mRNA and zeatin localization was monitored during leaf curl disease. KNOPE1 and Arabidopsis BREVIPEDICELLUS (BP) proteins fell into the same phyletic group and recognized the same BELL factors. 35S:KNOPE1 Arabidopsis lines exhibited altered traits resembling those of BP-overexpressing lines. In peach shoot apical meristem, KNOPE1 was expressed in the peripheral and central zones but not in leaf primordia, identically to the BP expression pattern. These results strongly suggest that KNOPE1 must be down-regulated for leaf initiation and that it can control cell meristem identity equally as well as all class 1 KNOX genes. Leaves attacked by T. deformans share histological alterations with class 1 KNOX-overexpressing leaves, including cell proliferation and loss of cell differentiation. Both KNOPE1 and a cytokinin synthesis ISOPENTENYLTRANSFERASE gene were found to be up-regulated in infected curled leaves. At early disease stages, KNOPE1 was uniquely triggered in the palisade cells interacting with subepidermal mycelium, while zeatin vascular localization was unaltered compared with healthy leaves. Subsequently, when mycelium colonization and asci development occurred, both KNOPE1 and zeatin signals were scattered in sectors of cell disorders. These results suggest that KNOPE1 misexpression and de novo zeatin synthesis of host origin might participate in hyperplasia of leaf curl disease. PMID:18250078

Testone, Giulio; Bruno, Leonardo; Condello, Emiliano; Chiappetta, Adriana; Bruno, Alessandro; Mele, Giovanni; Tartarini, Andrea; Spanò, Laura; Innocenti, Anna Maria; Mariotti, Domenico; Bitonti, Maria Beatrice; Giannino, Donato

2008-01-01

257

Alluvial Bars of the Obed Wild and Scenic River, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Park Service (NPS) initiated a reconnaissance study of alluvial bars along the Obed Wild and Scenic River (Obed WSR), in Cumberland and Morgan Counties, Tennessee. The study was partly driven by concern that trapping of sand by upstream impoundments might threaten rare, threatened, or endangered plant habitat by reducing the supply of sediment to the alluvial bars. The objectives of the study were to: (1) develop a preliminary understanding of the distribution, morphology, composition, stability, and vegetation structure of alluvial bars along the Obed WSR, and (2) determine whether evidence of human alteration of sediment dynamics in the Obed WSR warrants further, more detailed examination. This report presents the results of the reconnaissance study of alluvial bars along the Obed River, Clear Creek, and Daddys Creek in the Obed WSR. The report is based on: (1) field-reconnaissance visits by boat to 56 alluvial bars along selected reaches of the Obed River and Clear Creek; (2) analysis of aerial photographs, topographic and geologic maps, and other geographic data to assess the distribution of alluvial bars in the Obed WSR; (3) surveys of topography, surface particle size, vegetation structure, and ground cover on three selected alluvial bars; and (4) analysis of hydrologic records.

Wolfe, W. J.; Fitch, K. C.; Ladd, D. E.

2007-01-01

258

The Role of Agriculture in the Social and Economic Development of the Lower Mississippi River Delta Region. Proceedings of a Regional Conference (Memphis, Tennessee, February 26-28, 1990).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The lower Mississippi River delta region comprises 214 counties in Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Illinois. The region is heavily dependent on agriculture and contains unusually high proportions of small farms, poor farmers, and black farmers. A conference planned by the region's 13 land-grant institutions and…

North Central Regional Center for Rural Development, Ames, IA.

259

Percent Uninsured by County  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a county by county visualization of the percentage of residents that are uninsured. The data are from a set available here: http://manyeyes.alphaworks.ibm.com/manyeyes/datasets/percent-uninsured-by-county/versions/1

Manyeyes

260

Construction quality assurance report for the Y-12 Construction/Demolition Landfill VII (CDL VII), Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) Report provides documentation that Bid Option 2 of the Y-12 Plant Construction Demolition Landfill 7 (CDL-7) was constructed in substantial compliance with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) approved design, as indicated and specified in the permit drawings, approved changes, and specifications. CDL-7 is located in Anderson County on the south side of Chestnut Ridge, approximately 0.5 miles south of the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This report applies specifically to the limits of excavation for Area No. 1 portions of the perimeter maintenance road and drainage channel and Sedimentation Pond No. 3. A partial ``As-Built`` survey was performed and is included.

Burton, P.M. [Burns and McConnel Waste Consultants, Inc., Overland Park, KS (United States)

1994-11-01

261

DRAFT LANDSAT DATA MOSAIC: MONTGOMERY COUNTY, TEXAS; HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS; FORT BEND COUNTY, TEXAS; BRAZORIA COUNTY, TEXAS; GALVESTON COUNTY, TEXAS  

EPA Science Inventory

This is a draft Landsat Data Mosaic, which contains remote sensing information for Montgomery County, Texas Harris County, Texas Fort Bend County, Texas Brazoria County, Texas Galveston County, and Texas Imagery dates on the following dates: October 6, 1999 and September 29, 200...

262

Qualitative Analysis of Teaching Strategies in the DARE Program (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) Taught in Fifth Grade in Knox County Schools by the Knoxville Police Department.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study evaluates and examines teaching strategies used by Project DARE (Drug Abuse Resistance Education), a program developed by the Los Angeles Police Department and the Los Angeles Unified School District. Through a planned curriculum, uniformed law enforcement officers present information to fifth- and sixth-grade students on substance…

Green, Connie Roberta; And Others

263

76 FR 18754 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Dominion Transmission, Inc.; Notice of Onsite Environmental Review  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...CP11-41-000] Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Dominion...the environmental analysis of two related projects...proposed by Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company (TGP...proposed Loop 315 pipeline route associated...1249 Tennessee Gas Road, (near...

2011-04-05

264

18 CFR 1304.11 - Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission. 1304...APPROVAL OF CONSTRUCTION IN THE TENNESSEE RIVER SYSTEM AND REGULATION OF STRUCTURES AND...Construction § 1304.11 Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission. As...

2012-04-01

265

18 CFR 1304.11 - Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission.  

...2014-04-01 false Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission. 1304...APPROVAL OF CONSTRUCTION IN THE TENNESSEE RIVER SYSTEM AND REGULATION OF STRUCTURES AND...Construction § 1304.11 Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission. As...

2014-04-01

266

18 CFR 1304.11 - Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission. 1304...APPROVAL OF CONSTRUCTION IN THE TENNESSEE RIVER SYSTEM AND REGULATION OF STRUCTURES AND...Construction § 1304.11 Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission. As...

2011-04-01

267

18 CFR 1304.11 - Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-04-01 false Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission. 1304...APPROVAL OF CONSTRUCTION IN THE TENNESSEE RIVER SYSTEM AND REGULATION OF STRUCTURES AND...Construction § 1304.11 Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission. As...

2009-04-01

268

18 CFR 1304.11 - Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission. 1304...APPROVAL OF CONSTRUCTION IN THE TENNESSEE RIVER SYSTEM AND REGULATION OF STRUCTURES AND...Construction § 1304.11 Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission. As...

2010-04-01

269

18 CFR 1304.11 - Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2012-04-01 true Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission. 1304...APPROVAL OF CONSTRUCTION IN THE TENNESSEE RIVER SYSTEM AND REGULATION OF STRUCTURES AND...Construction § 1304.11 Little Tennessee River; date of formal submission. As...

2013-04-01

270

Biomass analyses for four areas in the Tennessee Valley Authority  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analyses for four biomass procurement areas in the Tennessee Valley are presented. The Marlow and Perryville, Tennessee, sites can provide 38,000 dry tons of industrial residue annually. Mulberry Creek, Alabama, and Watts Bar, Tennessee, can annually provide 330,000 dry tons of industrial residue and\\/or forest biomass. Methanol can be produced at the Perryville and Marlow sites and ethanol at Mulberry

1985-01-01

271

Dynamic properties of Indiana, Fort Knox and Utah test range limestones and Danby Marble over the stress range 1 to 20 GPa  

SciTech Connect

The responses of the following carbonate materials to shock loading and release have been measured: Indiana limestone (18% porosity; saturated and dry), Jeffersonville/Louisville Limestones (Fort Knox limestone) (variable dolomitization, low porosity), Danby Marble (essentially pure calcite; low porosity), and a limestone from the Utah Test and Training Range (low porosity, with 22% silica). Various experimental configurations were used, some optimized to yield detailed waveform information, others to yield a clean combination of Hugoniot states and release paths. All made use of velocity interferometry as a primary diagnostic. The stress range of 0 - 20 GPa was probed (in most cases, emphasizing the stress range 0 -10 GPa). The primary physical processes observed in this stress regime were material strength, porosity, and polymorphic phase transitions between the CaCO{sub 3} phases I, II, III and VI. Hydration was also a significant reaction under certain conditions. The Indiana Limestone studies in particular represent a significant addition to the low-pressure database for porous limestone. Temperature dependence and the effect of freezing were assessed for the Fort Knox limestone. Experimental parameters and detailed results are provided for the 42 impact tests in this series.

Furnish, M.D.

1994-12-01

272

Tennessee meets the challenge of dyslexia.  

PubMed

In 1993, the Tennessee General Assembly voted funds to establish a model unit of integrated services and research to address the full scope of issues associated with dyslexia. Dyslexia is characterized as significant difficulty in reading and spelling individual words. In the Tennessee Center for the Study and Treatment of Dyslexia, these problems are presumed to be the consequence of a phonological core deficit. When compared to typical readers, matched for age or reading level, dyslexic readers evidence average listening comprehension, a relative strength in reading comprehension, deficits in word recognition and spelling, and severe deficits in word analysis as well as in awareness and manipulation of phonemes. Integration of this information yields a diagnostic profile that may be applied in the differential diagnosis of dyslexia both in clinical and school settings. This paper presents an overview of the Tennessee Center for Dyslexia and the services it provides as well as its guidelines for interpreting the results of norm-referenced tests and criterion-referenced measures to diagnose dyslexia and plan appropriate intervention. Frith's (1985, 1986) developmental framework for reading acquisition is integrated with the assessment data to outline an instructional plan that addresses mastery of skills within and across the hierarchical phases-logographic, alphabetic, and orthographic-of reading development. PMID:24234267

Padget, S Y; Knight, D F; Sawyer, D J

1996-01-01

273

Assessment of subsidence in karst terranes at selected areas in East Tennessee and comparison with a candidate site at Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Phase 2  

SciTech Connect

Work in the respective areas included assessment of conditions related to sinkhole development. Information collected and assessed involved geology, hydrogeology, land use, lineaments and linear trends, identification of karst features and zones, and inventory of historical sinkhole development and type. Karstification of the candidate, Rhea County, and Morristown study areas, in comparison to other karst areas in Tennessee, can be classified informally as youthful, submature, and mature, respectively. Historical sinkhole development in the more karstified areas is attributed to the greater degree of structural deformation by faulting and fracturing, subsequent solutioning of bedrock, thinness of residuum, and degree of development by man. Sinkhole triggering mechanisms identified are progressive solution of bedrock, water-level fluctuations, piping, and loading. 68 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

Newton, J.G.; Tanner, J.M.

1987-09-01

274

Eustatic control on early dolomitization of cyclic peritidal carbonates: Evidence from the Early Ordovician Upper Knox Group, Appalachians and Middle to Late Cambrian Bonanza King Formation, southern Great basin  

Microsoft Academic Search

The origin of massive dolomite in ancient cyclic carbonate successions remains a poorly resolved issue reflecting the lack of modern analogs of extensive dolomitization. This paper presents evidence for extensive synsedimentary dolomitization of peritidal cyclic carbonates of the Early Ordovician upper Knox Group, Appalachians, and of the Middle to Late Cambrian Bonanza King Formation, southern Great basin. Early dolomitization of

1991-01-01

275

Opinions about the Tennessee Career Ladder: A Statewide Survey of Tennessee Administrators. A Joint Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In November 1987, 1,200 Tennessee administrators out of 2,800 surveyed by mail offered their opinions about Administrator Career Ladder--a new program implemented in spring 1985 as part of the State's Comprehensive Education Reform Act. Results show that educators are split over the advisability of this undertaking. Survey responses varied…

Barnette, J. Jackson; Sattes, Beth D.

276

Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program (TCAP): Tennessee Student Test Results, 2004-2005  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Currently, the Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program (TCAP) encompasses four mandated testing programs. This document includes results from the TCAP Achievement Test in reading/language, mathematics, science, and social studies in grades 3-8; the Writing Assessment in grades 5, 8, and 11; the Gateway Assessments, administered initially to…

Tennessee State Board of Education, 2005

2005-01-01

277

The Teen Report: A Factual Assessment of Today's Tennessee Teens. A Tennessee KIDS COUNT Project Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count report focuses on the well being of Tennessee's teenagers. The statistical portrait is based on 10 indicators of well being: (1) teen pregnancy; (2) drug abuse; (3) HIV infection; (4) sexually transmitted diseases; (5) high school dropout; (6) scores on the American College Testing Program (ACT); (7) teen employment; (8) school…

Tennessee State Commission on Children and Youth, Nashville.

278

Tennessee KIDS COUNT: The State of the Child in Tennessee, 1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of Tennessee's children. The statistical portrait is based on indicators of children's well-being in four main areas: (1) child health; (2) education; (3) social indicators; and (4) economic status. The report begins with an executive summary and a lengthy listing of the major…

Tennessee State Commission on Children and Youth, Nashville.

279

Tennessee Higher Education Fact Book, 2009-2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Division of Policy, Planning, and Research has assembled the Tennessee Higher Education Fact Book which is a compilation of statistical information pertaining to higher education in Tennessee. The 2009-2010 Fact Book contains tables and charts with data relevant to enrollment, persistence, graduation, tuition, financial aid, lottery…

Tennessee Higher Education Commission, 2010

2010-01-01

280

30 CFR 942.700 - Tennessee Federal program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...are applicable to surface coal mining operations in Tennessee which...been adopted under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act...regulations in this chapter. The full text of a cross-referenced rule...applies to all surface coal mining operations in Tennessee...

2013-07-01

281

The Tennessee Lottery Scholarship Program: Impact on Retention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined if the Tennessee Education Lottery Scholarship (TELS), which began in 2004, was related to student retention at the six Tennessee Board of Regents four-year institutions. This study investigated the impact of the TELS on student retention at TBR universities and general knowledge regarding retention. Post-facto data were…

Puryear, Carol G.

2009-01-01

282

Tennessee's Career Ladder: How Far to Space the Rungs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In Tennessee, varied data-gathering devices have been employed in an attempt to determine whether an educator is qualified for a given level on the state's career ladder program and, thereby, should attain the meaningful financial benefits linked to that status. In its first year of operation, the Tennessee program employed several domains of…

McLarty, Joyce R.

283

Sucking lice (Anoplura) of mammals of Tennessee.  

PubMed

Twenty-five species of sucking lice are recorded from wild and domestic mammals, including humans, from Tennessee. Collections of 10 of these species (Haematopinus eurysternus, Hoplopleura captiosa, Hoplopleura hirsuta, Hoplopleura oryzomydis, Hoplopleura trispinosa, Linognathus africanus, Linognathus setosus, Linognathus vituli, Neohaematopinus sciuropteri and Polyplax auricularis) represent newly documented state records. Host specificity was exhibited by 22 species of lice with each of these species being recovered from just one mammal species. Louse infestation prevalences are included for large samples of hosts. A host-parasite list for Tennessean sucking lice is included. PMID:9221741

Durden, L A; Kollars, T M; Patton, S; Gerhardt, R R

1997-06-01

284

University of Tennessee: Hydrogeology Research Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The hydrogeology research program at the University of Tennessee developed this website to promote its investigation related primarily to groundwater flow and contaminant transport. After reading an overview of the program and its facilities, visitors can discover the endeavors and successes of the numerous researchers. Users can find information and publications discussing the three featured research projects: Chattanooga Creek, Pathogen Transport, and Saprolite Pore Structure; as well as materials on other recent projects. Students can discover the program's three excellent field teaching sites and research opportunities.

285

Safer Than Fort Knox?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides analyses of how school design solutions can have an impact on enhancing student learning and lessening school crime. Design issues cover site planning and building layout considerations and solutions, along with available communications and security technologies. (GR)

Reid, David L.

2000-01-01

286

Outcomes of Persons with Disabilities Who Receive Vocational Training at Tennessee Rehabilitation Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate the perception of Tennessee Rehabilitation Center (TRC) students' education. TRC is a vocational rehabilitation training school in Middle Tennessee for individuals with disabilities throughout the state of Tennessee that are seeking employment after graduating from their training. In Tennessee

Perdue, James M.

2011-01-01

287

Utilization of surface mine ponds in East Tennessee by breeding amphibians. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Breeding amphibians were found in 21 of 24 ponds examined on the Ollis Creek Surface Mine in Campbell County, Tennessee. Twelve species of amphibians were identified in ponds that range from 4.0 to 8.0 in pH. Although ponds with low pH values were used by breeding amphibians, significantly more amphibian species were found in ponds with higher pH values. Findings indicated high biological productivity in the surface mine ponds examined. Aquatic vegetation was present in 20 of the 24 ponds. Aquatic insects and a diverse wildlife fauna utilized the study ponds. Surface mine ponds were found to supply an important habitat component for a variety of wildlife species.

Turner, L.J.; Fowler, D.K.

1981-06-01

288

Ectoparasitic and phoretic arthropods of Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana) in central Tennessee.  

PubMed

Thirteen species of ectoparasitic (12) or phoretic (1) arthropods were collected from 26 adult Virginia opossums, Didelphis virginiana, live-trapped from April through September 1987 in Davidson County, Tennessee. The cat flea Ctenocephalides felis and the American dog tick Dermacentor variabilis were the predominant species with respect to mean intensity and prevalence. The macronyssid mite Ornithonyssus wernecki and the atopomelid mite Didelphilichus serrifer, both specific parasites of this host, showed high intensities but low prevalences. Other fleas collected were Cediopsylla simplex, Ctenophthalmus pseudagyrtes, and Orchopeas howardi. The tick Amblyomma americanum, the myobiid mite Archemyobia inexpectatus, and the trombiculid (chigger) mites Eutrombicula splendens, Leptotrombidium peromysci (first record from this host) and Neotrombicula cavicola (first record from this host), were also recorded. One phoretic species, the glycyphagid mite Marsupialichus brasiliensis, was noted. PMID:2380870

Durden, L A; Wilson, N

1990-08-01

289

Chemical analysis and geochemical associations in Devonian black shale core samples from Martin County, Kentucky; Carroll and Washington counties, Ohio; Wise County, Virginia; and Overton County, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Core samples from Devonian shales from five localities in the Appalachian Basin have been analyzed for major, minor, and trace constituents. The contents of major elements are rather similar; however, the minor constituents, organic C, S, PO4, and CO3, show variations by a factor of 10. Trace elements Mo, Ni, Cu, V, Co, U, Zn, Hg, As, and Mn show variations that can be related graphically and statistically to the minor constituents. Down-hole plots show the relationships most clearly. Mn is associated with CO3 content, the other trace elements are strongly Controlled by organic C. Amounts of organic C are generally in the range of 3-6 percent, and S is in the range of 2-5 percent. Trace-element amounts show the following general ranges (ppm, parts per million)- Co, 20-40; Cu,40-70; U, 10-40; As, 20-40, V, 150-300; Ni, 80-150; high values are as much as twice these values. The organic C was probably the concentrating agent, whereas the organic C and sulfide S created an environment for preservation or immobilization of trace elements. Closely spaced samples showing an abrupt transition in color from black to gray and gray to black shale show similar effects of trace-element changes, that is, black shale contains enhanced amounts of organic C and trace elements. Ratios of trace elements to organic C or sulfide S were relatively constant even though deposition rates varied from 10 to 300 meters in 5 million years.

Leventhal, Joel S.

1979-01-01

290

Effects of groundwater withdrawals associated with combined-cycle combustion turbine plants in west Tennessee and northern Mississippi  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study groundwater-flow model was used to simulate the potential effects on future groundwater withdrawals at five powerplant sites-Gleason, Weakley County, Tennessee; Tenaska, Haywood County, Tennessee; Jackson, Madison County, Tennessee; Southaven, DeSoto County, Mississippi; and Magnolia, Benton County, Mississippi. The scenario used in the simulation consisted of a 30-year average water-use period followed by a 30-day peak water-demand period. Effects of the powerplants on the aquifer system were evaluated by comparing the difference in simulated water levels in the aquifers at the end of the scenario (30 years plus 30 days) with and without the combined-cycle-plant withdrawals. Simulated potentiometric surface declines in source aquifers at potential combined-cycle-plant sites ranged from 56 feet in the upper Wilcox aquifer at the Magnolia site to 20 feet in the Memphis aquifer at the Tenaska site. The affected areas in the source aquifers at the sites delineated by the 4-foot potentiometric surface-decline contour ranged from 11,362 acres at Jackson to 535,143 acres at Southaven. The extent of areas affected by potentiometric surface declines was similar at the Gleason and Magnolia sites. The affected area at the Tenaska site was smaller than the affected areas at the other sites, most likely as a result of lower withdrawal rates and greater aquifer thickness. The extent of effect was smallest at the Jackson site, where the nearby Middle Fork Forked Deer River may act as a recharge boundary. Additionally, the Jackson site lies in the Memphis aquifer outcrop area where model-simulated recharge rates are higher than in areas where the Memphis aquifer underlies less permeable deposits. The potentiometric surface decline in aquifers overlying or underlying a source aquifer was generally 2 feet or less at all the sites except Gleason. At the Gleason site, withdrawals from the Memphis aquifer resulted in declines of as much as 9 feet in the underlying Fort Pillow aquifer. The simulated potentiometric surface change occurring in the Fort Pillow aquifer appears to be the result of leakage through the Flour Island Formation separating the Memphis and Fort Pillow aquifers where this confining unit is thin, sandy, or absent.

Haugh, Connor J.

2012-01-01

291

Benchmarking information needs and use in the Tennessee public health community*  

PubMed Central

Objective: The objective is to provide insight to understanding public health officials' needs and promote access to data repositories and communication tools. Methods: Survey questions were identified by a focus group with members drawn from the fields of librarianship, public health, and informatics. The resulting comprehensive information needs survey, organized in five distinct broad categories, was distributed to 775 Tennessee public health workers from ninety-five counties in 1999 as part of the National Library of Medicine–funded Partners in Information Access contract. Results: The assessment pooled responses from 571 public health workers (73% return rate) representing seventy-two of ninety-five counties (53.4% urban and 46.6% rural) about their information-seeking behaviors, frequency of resources used, computer skills, and level of Internet access. Sixty-four percent of urban and 43% of rural respondents had email access at work and more than 50% of both urban and rural respondents had email at home (N = 289). Approximately 70% of urban and 78% of rural public health officials never or seldom used or needed the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Website. Frequency data pooled from eleven job categories representing a subgroup of 232 health care professionals showed 72% never or seldom used or needed MEDLINE. Electronic resources used daily or weekly were email, Internet search engines, internal databases and mailing lists, and the Tennessee Department of Health Website. Conclusions: While, due to the small sample size, data cannot be generalized to the larger population, a clear trend of significant barriers to computer and Internet access can be identified across the public health community. This contributes to an overall limited use of existing electronic resources that inhibits evidence-based practice.

Lee, Patricia; Giuse, Nunzia B.; Sathe, Nila A.

2003-01-01

292

Regionalization of low-flow characteristics of Tennessee streams  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Procedures for estimating 3-day 2-year, 3-day 10-year, 3-day 20-year, and 7-day 10-year low flows at ungaged stream sites in Tennessee are based on surface geology and drainage area size. One set of equations applies to west Tennessee streams, and another set applies to central and east Tennessee streams. The equations do not apply to streams where flow is significantly altered by activities of man. Standard errors of estimate of equations for west Tennessee are 24 to 32% and for central and east Tennessee 31 to 35%. Streamflow recession indexes, in days/log cycle, are used to account for effects of geology of the drainage basin on low flow of streams. The indexes in Tennessee range from 32 days/log cycle for clay and shale to 350 days/log cycle for gravel and sand, indicating different aquifer characteristics of the geologic units that sustain streamflows during periods of no surface runoff. Streamflow recession rate depends primarily on transmissivity and storage characteristics of the aquifers, and the average distance from stream channels to basin divides. Geology and drainage basin size are the most significant variables affecting low flow in Tennessee streams according to regression analyses. (Author 's abstract)

Bingham, R. H.

1986-01-01

293

Regionalization of winter low-flow characteristics of Tennessee streams  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Procedures were developed for estimating winter (December-April) low flows at ungaged stream sites in Tennessee based on surface geology and drainage area size. One set of equations applies to West Tennessee streams, and another set applies to Middle and East Tennessee streams. The equations do not apply to streams where flow is significantly altered by the activities of man. Standard errors of estimate of equations for West Tennessee are 22% - 35% and for middle and East Tennessee 31% - 36%. Statistical analyses indicate that summer low-flow characteristics are the same as annual low-flow characteristics, and that winter low flows are larger than annual low flows. Streamflow-recession indexes, in days per log cycle of decrease in discharge, were used to account for effects of geology on low flow of streams. The indexes in Tennessee range from 32 days/log cycle for clay and shale to 350 days/log cycle for gravel and sand, indicating different aquifer characteristics of the geologic units that contribute to streamflows during periods of no surface runoff. Streamflow-recession rate depends primarily on transmissivity and storage characteristics of the aquifers, and the average distance from stream channels to basin divides. Geology and drainage basin size are the most significant variables affecting low flow in Tennessee streams according to regression analyses. (Author 's abstract)

Bingham, R. H.

1986-01-01

294

Sedimentological cross section of Cambro-Ordovician carbonate shelf (Knox group, Conasauga Formation) in central Alabama: facies, diagenesis, potential reservoirs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cambro-Ordovician thrust-imbricated carbonates in central Alabama are the focus of renewed exploration interest. Samples from east-west-trending core holes within the surface-most thrust plates reconstruct the carbonate shelf and shelf-edge facies before deformation. The Upper Cambrian shelf margin now is in the subsurface of Talledega County; coeval dolostones in the western part of the state represent the former shelf interior. Rock

Linda Raine Sternbach

1984-01-01

295

Percent Uninsured by County  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a county by county visualization of the percentage of residents that are uninsured. The data are from a set available here: http://www-958.ibm.com/software/data/cognos/manyeyes/datasets/percent-uninsured-by-county/versions/1

Manyeyes

296

Reviewing County Extension Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A review of the effectiveness of extension education programs in Douglas County, Kansas is presented. Data were collected through a review of program data, interviews, and questionnaires sent to county residents. The results indicate a general knowledge and acceptance of the county's extension services among the respondents. (EC)

Prawl, Warren L.; Jorns, William J.

1976-01-01

297

Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2, (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391), Tennessee Valley Authority. Supplement No. 9  

SciTech Connect

This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (SER), NUREG- 0847 (June 1982), Supplement No. 1 (September 1982), Supplement No. 2 (January 1984), Supplement No. 3 (January 1985), Supplement No. 4 (March 1985), Supplement No. 5 (November 1990), Supplement No. 6 (April 1991), Supplement No. 7 (September 1991), and Supplement No. 8 (January 1992) issued by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority, as applicant and owner, for licenses to operate the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). The facility is located in Rhea County, Tennessee near the Watts Bar Dam on the Tennessee River. This supplement provides recent information regarding resolution of some of the outstanding and confirmatory items, and proposed license conditions identified in the SER.

Not Available

1992-06-01

298

Superfund GIS - 1:250,000 Geology of Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This data set is a digital representation of the printed 1:250,000 geologic maps from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, Division of Geology. The coverage was designed primarily to provide a more detailed geologic base than the 1:2,500,000 King and Beikman (1974). 1:24,000 scale coverage of the state is available for about 40 percent of the state. Formation names and geologic unit codes used in the coverage are from the Tennessee Division of Geology published maps and may not conform to USGS nomenclature. The Tennessee Division of Geology can be contacted at (615) 532-1500

Greene, D.C.; Wolfe, W.J.

2000-01-01

299

Cigarette smoking prevalence in US counties: 1996-2012  

PubMed Central

Background Cigarette smoking is a leading risk factor for morbidity and premature mortality in the United States, yet information about smoking prevalence and trends is not routinely available below the state level, impeding local-level action. Methods We used data on 4.7 million adults age 18 and older from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) from 1996 to 2012. We derived cigarette smoking status from self-reported data in the BRFSS and applied validated small area estimation methods to generate estimates of current total cigarette smoking prevalence and current daily cigarette smoking prevalence for 3,127 counties and county equivalents annually from 1996 to 2012. We applied a novel method to correct for bias resulting from the exclusion of the wireless-only population in the BRFSS prior to 2011. Results Total cigarette smoking prevalence varies dramatically between counties, even within states, ranging from 9.9% to 41.5% for males and from 5.8% to 40.8% for females in 2012. Counties in the South, particularly in Kentucky, Tennessee, and West Virginia, as well as those with large Native American populations, have the highest rates of total cigarette smoking, while counties in Utah and other Western states have the lowest. Overall, total cigarette smoking prevalence declined between 1996 and 2012 with a median decline across counties of 0.9% per year for males and 0.6% per year for females, and rates of decline for males and females in some counties exceeded 3% per year. Statistically significant declines were concentrated in a relatively small number of counties, however, and more counties saw statistically significant declines in male cigarette smoking prevalence (39.8% of counties) than in female cigarette smoking prevalence (16.2%). Rates of decline varied by income level: counties in the top quintile in terms of income experienced noticeably faster declines than those in the bottom quintile. Conclusions County-level estimates of cigarette smoking prevalence provide a unique opportunity to assess where prevalence remains high and where progress has been slow. These estimates provide the data needed to better develop and implement strategies at a local and at a state level to further reduce the burden imposed by cigarette smoking.

2014-01-01

300

Distribution Automation at the Athens (Tennessee, USA) Utilities Board.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Athens Automation and Control Experiment (AACE), a large-scale distribution automation research project, was conducted at Athens, Tennessee, USA. The experiment involved the automation of three substations and twelve feeders (nearly the entire system)...

D. T. Rizy J. P. Stovall E. R. Broadaway G. H. Usry

1989-01-01

301

Tennessee Department of Health Influenza Pandemic Response Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Planning will be integrated with bioterrorism activities. The Tennessee Department of Health (TDH) is responsible for smallpox vaccination planning as part of its overall bioterrorism planning activities. The Department wor...

2003-01-01

302

Solar Heating System Installed at Jackson, Tennessee. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The solar energy heating system installed at the Coca-Cola Bottling Works in Jackson, Tennessee is described. The system consists of 9480 square feet of Owens-Illinois evacuated tubular solar collectors with attached specular cylindrical reflectors and wi...

1980-01-01

303

State Legislation in Tennessee: A Reaction to Social Needs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author reports on progress being made in Tennessee as a result of recent legislative mandates. He discusses the Comprehensive Vocational Education Act, the Weldon Act, and the Post Secondary Education Authorization Act. (Author/BP)

Cheek, Gerald D.

1976-01-01

304

Information Retrieval Workshop for Selected Tennessee Department of Education Personnel.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents an overview of a two-day workshop designed to introduce librarians, research assistants, and other participants in the Tennessee State Department of Education's Project Support to computer search applications and search negotiation sk...

S. Finley

1981-01-01

305

Center for Neural Engineering at Tennessee State University.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Fourth annual Report provides an overview of the research activities in the Center for Neural Engineering (CNE) comprising consortium partners: Tennessee State University (TSU), Caltech, Meharry Medical College (MMC), North East Ohio Universities Col...

M. J. Malkani M. Bodruzzamen J. Kuschewski G. Yuer S. Zein-Sabalto

1996-01-01

306

Center for Neural Engineering at Tennessee State University.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This third annual report provides an overview of the research activities carried on in the Center for Neural Engineering (CNE) comprising consortium partners: Tennessee State University (TSU), Meharry Medical College (MMC), Accurate Automation Corporation...

M. J. Malkani M. Bodruzzaman J. Kuschewski G. Yuen S. Zein-Sabatto

1995-01-01

307

Automatic Data Processing System for Surface Mining in Tennessee.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In the past Tennessee surface mining information has been collected or used by at least ten different state agencies. Much information was duplicated and little data sharing occured among the agencies. This paper discusses the computer program developed b...

1974-01-01

308

76 FR 35260 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00055  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Public Assistance Only for the State of Tennessee (FEMA-1979-DR), dated 05/09/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line, Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 04/19/2011 through 06/07/2011. Effective Date:...

2011-06-16

309

75 FR 27010 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00038  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Tennessee (FEMA-1909-DR), dated 05/04/2010. Incident: Severe Storms, Flooding, Straight-Line Winds and Tornadoes. Incident Period: 04/30/2010 and continuing. Effective Date: 05/06/2010. Physical Loan Application Deadline...

2010-05-13

310

76 FR 33806 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00053  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Tennessee (FEMA-1979-DR), dated 05/09/ 2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding. Incident Period: 04/19/2011 and continuing. Effective Date:...

2011-06-09

311

75 FR 30873 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00038  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Tennessee (FEMA-1909-DR), dated 05/04/2010 . Incident: Severe Storms, Flooding, Straight-Line Winds and Tornadoes. Incident Period: 04/30/2010 through 05/18/2010. Effective Date: 05/24/2010. Physical Loan Application...

2010-06-02

312

75 FR 27009 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00039  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Tennessee (FEMA-1909-DR), dated 05/04/ 2010. Incident: Severe Storms, Flooding, Straight-Line Winds, and Tornadoes. Incident Period: 04/30/2010 and Continuing. Effective Date: 05/05/2010. Physical Loan Application Deadline...

2010-05-13

313

Using the Mount Pinatubo Volcanic Eruption to Determine Climate Sensitivity: Comments on "Climate Forcing by the Volcanic Eruption of Mount Pinatubo" by David H. Douglass and Robert S. Knox  

SciTech Connect

[1] Douglass and Knox [2005], hereafter referred to as DK, present an analysis of the observed cooling following the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo eruption and claim that these data imply a very low value for the climate sensitivity (equivalent to 0.6 C equilibrium warming for a CO{sub 2} doubling). We show here that their analysis is flawed and their results are incorrect.

Wigley, T L; Ammann, C M; Santer, B D; Taylor, K E

2005-04-22

314

Field evaluation of all-season tactical engine oil OE\\/HDO-15\\/40 at Ft. Knox, Kentucky and Ft. Bliss, Texas. Interim report, July 1984December 1985  

Microsoft Academic Search

Requirements for a multiviscosity grade 15W-40 engine oil were developed and the lubricant introduced for military consumption. The program efforts cover a demonstration and field-validation program of the newly introduced grade 15W-40 lubricant. The test involved a wide variety of combat, tactical, and support equipment operated by the 2D Squadron, 6th Cavalry at Fort Knox, KY, and the 3D Armored

W. E. Butler; R. A. Alvarez; J. P. Buckingham; E. C. Owens; T. C. Bowen

1986-01-01

315

Let the People Speak. The Tennessee Indian Council: A History and Analysis of the Development of Native American Programs in Tennessee.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since 1976, the Tennessee Indian Council has grown from an idea into an organization staffed by 24 native Americans in 3 offices, administering $500,000 a year, and providing educational, employment, housing, health, and cultural revitalization programs for 8,500 Native American residents of Tennessee. The situation in Tennessee is a microcosm of…

White, Michael

316

The single-hospital county: is its hospital at risk?  

PubMed Central

This article focuses on a hospital group that has not received adequate attention in the literature: the sole provider of short-term, acute hospital care located in a county. In Tennessee, SPHs (single provider hospitals) are fewer in number but are present in more counties than multiprovider hospitals (MPHs). They are smaller in size, less labor and capital intensive, more likely to be a government hospital, and more likely to be in a rural area with low income and limited health care resources. SPHs operate with lower costs, charge patients less, and have lower revenue write-offs than MPHs. As a result, their cash flow is sufficient to fund their depreciation and they consistently earn modest returns. Between 1982 and 1988, a total of 16 hospitals failed in Tennessee but only 3 were SPHs. While SPHs have not been profitable enough to make them ideal candidates for takeover by major hospital systems, they are not a population that is unduly at risk.

Chang, C F; Tuckman, H P

1991-01-01

317

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR ZONE 1 OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK IN OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) conducted in-process inspections and independent verification (IV) surveys in support of DOE's remedial efforts in Zone 1 of East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Inspections concluded that the remediation contractor's soil removal and survey objectives were satisfied and the dynamic verification strategy (DVS) was implemented as designed. Independent verification (IV) activities included gamma walkover surveys and soil sample collection/analysis over multiple exposure units (EUs).

King, David A.

2012-08-16

318

40 CFR 81.201 - Mansfield-Marion Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Ohio: Ashland County, Crawford County, Holmes County, Knox County, Marion County, Morrow County, Richland County, Wayne County, Wyandot...

2011-07-01

319

40 CFR 81.201 - Mansfield-Marion Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Ohio: Ashland County, Crawford County, Holmes County, Knox County, Marion County, Morrow County, Richland County, Wayne County, Wyandot...

2012-07-01

320

40 CFR 81.201 - Mansfield-Marion Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Ohio: Ashland County, Crawford County, Holmes County, Knox County, Marion County, Morrow County, Richland County, Wayne County, Wyandot...

2010-07-01

321

40 CFR 81.201 - Mansfield-Marion Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Ohio: Ashland County, Crawford County, Holmes County, Knox County, Marion County, Morrow County, Richland County, Wayne County, Wyandot...

2013-07-01

322

Tennessee energy statistics quarterly, fourth quarter 1983  

SciTech Connect

County-level energy data are shown as well as state statistics on three substantive areas of the energy flow: production; consumption; and pricing. The specific energy types for which data are included are coal, petroleum, natural gas and electricity. Historical data in this volume cover the production and utilization of major energy supplies by fuel type and economic sectors, as well as other energy data such as prices and fuel distribution.

Finley, T.F. III; Hensley, B.D.; Trotter, T

1983-01-01

323

Collection of short papers on Beaver Creek watershed studies in West Tennessee, 1989-94  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 1989, the U.S. Geological Survey began a scientific investigation to evaluate the effect of agricultural activities on water quality and the effectiveness of agricultural best management practices in the Beaver Creek watershed, West Tennessee. The project is being conducted jointly with other Federal, State, county agencies, the farming community, and academic institutions, in support of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Hydrologic Unit Area program. The Beaver Creek project has evolved into a long-term watershed assessment and monitoring program. In 1991, a grant was received to develop and evaluate sampling strategies for higher order streams. During the summer of 1992, a reconnaissance of water-quality conditions for the shallow aquifers in Shelby, Tipton, Fayette, and Haywood Counties was conducted and included 89 domestic wells in the Beaver Creek watershed. Results from this effort lead to the development of a 1-year program to evaluate cause- and-effect relations that can explain the observed water-quality conditions for the shallow aquifers in the watershed. In 1992 the USGS, in cooperation with the Soil Conservation Service and the Shelby County Soil Conservation District, began an evaluation of in-stream processes and in-stream resource-management systems. In 1993, a biomonitoring program was established in the watershed. This collection of eight articles and abstracts was originally published in the American Water Resources Association National Symposium on Water Quality Proceedings for the national conference held in Chicago in 1994 and describes what has been learned in the study to date.

Compiled by Doyle, W. Harry.; Baker, Eva G.

1995-01-01

324

[Evaluation of the effect of Knox-Out microencapsulated V.O. 240 and K-othrine powder on rat lice in two villages in the Betafo region].  

PubMed

The effect of two different insecticides on flea control was tested from January to March 2000 in the Ivory village and the Ambatolahy village: Knox-Out, a microcapsulated formulation of diazinon, organophosphorous compound (240 gr/L) and the deltamethrin powder (2 g/kg ai), respectively. The villages are located 2.5 km apart in the Betafo region in Madagascar. Deltamethrin is a pyrethroid and is still used in the National Plague Control Program, whereas diazinon has not previously been applied in plague control in Madagascar. The flea index and the prevalence of rats carrying fleas in the two villages before and after (at one and two months follow-up, respectively) were measured to evaluate the effect of each insecticide. Flea index decreased significantly in both villages by at the first month follow-up. However, at the second month follow-up no significant differences in comparison to pre-treatment index values were observed in any of the villages. This study has demonstrated a similar immediate effect of deltamethrin and of diazinon, and confirmed the absence of remanent action of the two insecticides. PMID:12471748

Ratovonjato, J; Duchemin, J B

2001-01-01

325

75 FR 20783 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans: Tennessee; Visibility Impairment Prevention...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plans: Tennessee; Visibility Impairment Prevention for Federal Class I Areas...constituting its plan to address visibility impairment in Federal Class I areas. EPA approved...to Tennessee's plan for visibility impairment prevention for Class I areas, and...

2010-04-21

326

78 FR 55057 - Foreign-Trade Zone 134-Chattanooga, Tennessee; Authorization of Production Activity; Komatsu...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Zone 134--Chattanooga, Tennessee; Authorization of Production Activity; Komatsu America Corporation, (Construction and Forestry Equipment), Chattanooga, Tennessee On May 6, 2013, the Chattanooga Chamber Foundation, grantee of FTZ 134,...

2013-09-09

327

76 FR 39864 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Dominion Gas Transmission, Inc.; Notice of Availability of the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...CP11-41-000] Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Dominion Gas Transmission, Inc.; Notice...assessment (EA) for Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company's (TGP) proposed...and participate in the NEPA analysis. TGP's Project includes...

2011-07-07

328

Hancock County Awards Gala  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gene Goldman (left), deputy director of NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center, accepts an Award of Excellence from Jack Zink, executive director of the Hancock County Port and Harbor Commission, during the 2008 Annual Hancock County Awards Gala. The Award of Excellence was presented to recognize Stennis Space Center's contribution to NASA's 50 years of excellence in space exploration.

2008-01-01

329

County Government Employment: 1990.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report provides national statistics on county government employment and payrolls for the month of October 1990. Statistics are based on a mail canvass survey that includes a sample of 2,026 county governments. The survey measures the number of governm...

1991-01-01

330

Geographic information system index for the State of Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Recently the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) has increased within Tennessee. As a result, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Tennessee State Planning Office, and the Tennessee Comptroller of the Treasury entered into an agreement to conduct a survey of GIS users within the State. Two hundred and sixty three agencies were contacted. One hundred and thirty-nine agencies maintained one or more computer system (including personal computers). Twenty-five agencies used GIS software. The number of coverages or layers that exist upon completion of the survey as computerized digital data for Tennessee was 4,741. One hundred and twenty location-specific data bases were available. The U.S. Geological Survey, National Mapping Division map accuracy standards and digital cartographic data standards were included as minimum guidelines for GIS users. General data sharing techniques were described. The most common one was the use of magnetic tapes. A GIS index data base containing the survey data was built for inquiries. A 7.5 minute quadrangle coverage of Tennessee was created to allow for identification on a quadrangle basis of existing coverages contained in the GIS data base. (USGS)

Barron, William R.; Norris, Pamela G.

1989-01-01

331

An identification of the East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain, Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The work in this report was conducted by the US Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District, during the period November 1991 through July 1992. The purpose of this study is to identify the East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) floodplain. This information is required as part of the remedial action plans for removal or containment of contamination within the EFPC floodplain. EFPC and a portion of its floodplain have been contaminated as a result of operations and accidental releases at the Department of Energy`s Y-12 Plant. Mercury is the major contaminant found in EFPC and its floodplain.

NONE

1992-12-01

332

A Water Quality Study in Rutherford County, Tennessee: Student Group Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Undergraduate research is the most rewarding way for science students to become exposed to the process of scientific investigation. Water quality studies offer the unique advantages of being easily designed by the students and analytically approachable. This two-part, 14-month study involved several students in the delineation of ground water flow…

James, Rebecca R.; Ogden, Albert E.; DiVincenzo, John P.

2006-01-01

333

Health Assessment for Murray-Ohio, Lawrenceburg, Lawrence County, Tennessee, Region 4. CERCLIS No. TND980728836.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Murray-Ohio site is listed on the National Priorities List. The approximately 27-acre site, of which approximately six acres contain buried wastes, was an industrial landfill that accepted paint and electroplating sludges from 1963 until 1982. The env...

1988-01-01

334

Reclamation of sanitary landfills: A case study in Shelby County, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

Approximately 30,000 sanitary landfills were in operation in the United States in 1976; today, there are <7,000. The remaining 23,000 closed sites can be reclaimed to actually enhance the surrounding community; cost is the only limiting factor. Abandoned sanitary landfill sites do have problems, namely leachates, methane build-up, and subsidence. However, with modern techniques and planning, these problems can be

P. M. Riddick; S. Kirsch; Hsiang-Te Kung

1992-01-01

335

Evaluation of seismic damage to bridges and highway systems in Shelby County, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

Past earthquakes have demonstrated that bridges are one of the most vulnerable components of highway transportation systems. In addition to bridges, roadways may also be subject to damage, particularly in an area prone to earthquake-induced liquefaction. As a consequence, the highway transportation systems after an earthquake might be impaired and the post-earthquake emergency response might be compromised. Furthermore, the impact

John Bailey Jernigan

1998-01-01

336

Instream investigations in the Beaver Creek Watershed in West Tennessee, 1991-95  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Agriculture, began a long-term scientific investigation in 1989 to evaluate the effect of agricultural activities on water quality and the effectiveness of agricultural best management practices in the Beaver Creek watershed, West Tennessee. In 1993 as a part of this study, the USGS, in cooperation with the Natural Resources Conservation Service, Shelby County Soil Conservation District, and the Tennessee Soybean Promotion Board, began an evaluation of the physical, chemical, biological and hydrological factors that affect water quality in streams and wetlands, and instream resource-management systems to treat agricultural nonpoint-source runoff and improve water quality. The purpose of this report is to present the results of three studies of stream and wetland investigations and a study on the transport of aldicarb from an agricultural field in the Beaver Creek watershed. A natural bottomland hardwood wetland and an artificially constructed wetland were evaluated as instream resource-management systems. These two studies showed that wetlands are an effective way to improve the quality of agricultural nonpoint-source runoff. The wetlands reduced concentrations and loads of suspended sediments, nutrients, and pesticides in the streams. A third paper documents the influence of riparian vegetation on the biological structure and water quality of a small stream draining an agricultural field. A comparison of the upper reach lined with herbaceous plants and the lower reach with mature woody vegetation showed a more stable biological community structure and Water- quality characteristics in the woody reach than in the herbaceous reach. The water-quality characteristics monitored were pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, and specific conductance. The herbaceous reach had a greater diversity and abundance of organisms during spring and early summer, but the abundance dropped by approximately 85 percent during late summer. A fourth study describes the transport of aldicarb and its metabolites--aldicarb sulfoxide and aldicarb sulfone-in runoff at a small stream draining a cotton field. During 1991 to 1995, aldicarb and its metabolites were detected in runoff events. The highest concentrations occurred when aldicarb was applied to the field just hours before a rain storm. Aldicarb was not detectable in runoff a few weeks after application. The metabolites of aldicarb were detectable for 76 days after application. These studies demonstrate streambank vegetation and wetlands have a significant influence on stream water quality. The importance of weather conditions to herbicide application and runoff also is evident. This information can be used by resource managers to sustain and improve our Nation's streams for future generations.

Byl, T. D.; Carney, K. A.

1996-01-01

337

Public Water Supplies: The Effect of Federal and Tennessee Water Resource Law.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The water law in Tennessee was determined by a legal evaluation of Tennessee statutes and case as they affect Tennessee's water supplies. Once the existing law was determined, it was evaluated for its effect upon securing adequate water supplies for publi...

V. A. Sikora

1979-01-01

338

Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth Annual Report: Fiscal Year 1996-97.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This annual report details the 1996-97 activities of the Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth, an independent agency created by the Tennessee General Assembly with the mission of advocating for improvements in the quality of life for Tennessee children and families. Following introductory letters from the commission's chair, Phillip Boyd,…

Tennessee State Commission on Children and Youth, Nashville.

339

Testimony of Kevin Huffman, Tennessee Commissioner of Education, before the House Committee on Education and Labor  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents the testimony of Kevin Huffman, Tennessee Commissioner of Education, before the House Committee on Education and Labor. He talks about the work done by the Tennessee Department of Education to improve education for the nearly 950,000 public school students in Tennessee. He starts by providing some context about his and his…

Huffman, Kevin

2011-01-01

340

Precursors to Policy Innovation: How Tennessee Entered Race to the Top  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the education policy environment in Tennessee that preceded a comprehensive reform bill enacted to enhance the state's Race to the Top application. Through interviews with key policymakers in Tennessee, I describe how recent reform efforts undertaken at the state level positioned Tennessee as a strong contender for the Race…

Finch, Maida A.

2012-01-01

341

77 FR 26231 - State of Tennessee; Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program Primacy  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Tennessee; Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program Primacy...approval of its Underground Injection Control program; 2 the EPA...of Tennessee; Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program...of special characters, any form of encryption, and be free...of Tennessee; Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program...

2012-05-03

342

Using Spatial Analysis to Investigate Geographic Variations in Heart Failure Hospitalizations among Medicare Beneficiaries in the Tennessee Catchment Area  

PubMed Central

Introduction Although differences in heart failure hospitalization rates by race and sex are well documented, little is known about geographic variations in hospitalization rates for heart failure among Medicare beneficiaries. Methods Using exploratory spatial data analysis techniques, we examined hospitalization rates for heart failure as the first-listed discharge diagnosis among Medicare beneficiaries in a 10-state Tennessee catchment area, based on the resident states reported by Tennessee hospitals from 2000 to 2004. Results The age-adjusted heart failure hospitalization rate (per 1,000) among Medicare beneficiaries was 23.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 23.3–23.4) for the Tennessee catchment area, 21.4 (95% CI, 21.4 -21.5) for the non-catchment US area and 21.9 (95% CI, 21.9–22.0) for the overall US. The age-adjusted HF hospitalization rates were also significantly higher in the catchment area than the non catchment US area and the overall US, among men, women, and whites, whereas rates among the blacks were higher outside the catchment area. Beneficiaries in the catchment area also had higher age-specific HF hospitalization rates. Among states in the catchment area, the highest mean county-level rates were in Mississippi (30.6±7.6) and Kentucky (29.2±11.5), and the lowest were in North Carolina (21.7±5.7), closely and Virginia (21.8±6.6). Conclusions Knowledge of geographic differences in rates of hospitalization for heart failure can be useful in identifying needs of health care providers, allocating resources, developing comprehensive heart failure outreach programs, and formulating policies designed to reduce these differences.

Ogunniyi, Modele O.; Holt, James B.; Croft, Janet B.; Nwaise, Isaac A.; Okafor, Henry E.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Giles, Wayne H.; Mensah, George A.

2014-01-01

343

New Observatory at the University of Tennessee at Martin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new observatory has been completed at the University of Tennessee at Martin and is now open for student research, local teacher training, and public outreach. The telescope is a 16" Meade RCT on a Software Bisque Paramount ME mount, 10' HomeDome, and SBIG CCD camera. The project endured many delays from a necessary change in housing from roll-top roof to dome, to the shutter blowing off in a heavy windstorm. This project was funded primarily by a Tennessee Math-Science Partnership grant (PI: Dr. Michael Gibson, UT Martin) directed at secondary teacher training in sciences.

Crews, Lionel J.; Chrysler, R.; Turner, K.

2010-01-01

344

76 FR 12280 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, for Imperial County, Kern County, and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...County, and Ventura County; Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Kern County Air Pollution Control District...

2011-03-07

345

76 FR 12306 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County, Kern County, and Ventura...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...County, and Ventura County; Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Kern County Air Pollution Control District...

2011-03-07

346

The peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) genome harbours 10 KNOX genes, which are differentially expressed in stem development, and the class 1 KNOPE1 regulates elongation and lignification during primary growth  

PubMed Central

The KNOTTED-like (KNOX) genes encode homeodomain transcription factors and regulate several processes of plant organ development. The peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) genome was found to contain 10 KNOX members (KNOPE genes); six of them were experimentally located on the Prunus reference map and the class 1 KNOPE1 was found to link to a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for the internode length in the peach×Ferganensis population. All the KNOPE genes were differentially transcribed in the internodes of growing shoots; the KNOPE1 mRNA abundance decreased progressively from primary (elongation) to secondary growth (radial expansion). During primary growth, the KNOPE1 mRNA was localized in the cortex and in the procambium/metaphloem zones, whereas it was undetected in incipient phloem and xylem fibres. KNOPE1 overexpression in the Arabidopsis bp4 loss-of-function background (35S:KNOPE1/bp genotype) restored the rachis length, suggesting, together with the QTL association, a role for KNOPE1 in peach shoot elongation. Several lignin biosynthesis genes were up-regulated in the bp4 internodes but repressed in the 35S:KNOPE1/bp lines similarly to the wild type. Moreover, the lignin deposition pattern of the 35S:KNOPE1/bp and the wild-type internodes were the same. The KNOPE1 protein was found to recognize in vitro one of the typical KNOX DNA-binding sites that recurred in peach and Arabidopsis lignin genes. KNOPE1 expression was inversely correlated with that of lignin genes and lignin deposition along the peach shoot stems and was down-regulated in lignifying vascular tissues. These data strongly support that KNOPE1 prevents cell lignification by repressing lignin genes during peach stem primary growth.

Giannino, Donato

2012-01-01

347

Final report for CRADA No. Y1293-0163 with the Tennessee Technology Foundation on behalf of the State of Tennessee. April 1993--April 1994  

SciTech Connect

During the time from April 1993 through April 1994, the State of Tennessee and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., were engaged in a jointly supported economic development effort. This project was accomplished through collaboration with the Tennessee Technology Foundation (TTF) and supported a consultant to the Tennessee Commission of Economic and Community Development. This document will serve as the final report of that effort and will summarize the activities during the effective period of the subject agreement.

NONE

1994-12-31

348

KIDS COUNT, 2000: The State of the Child in Tennessee.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This KIDS COUNT report examines statewide trends in the well-being of Tennessee's children. The statistical portrait is based on indicators of children's well-being in five broad areas: (1) healthy babies, including enrollment in the TennCare insurance program, prenatal care, infant mortality and child deaths, and immunizations; (2) healthy…

Tennessee State Commission on Children and Youth, Nashville.

349

Evaluation of the Mussel Fishery in Wheeler Reservoir, Tennessee River  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluated the freshwater mussel fishery on Wheeler Reservoir, a 27,155-hectare mainstream impoundment of the Tennessee River in Alabama. During July 1991 through June 1992, we used a roving creel survey to conduct 285 interviews over 57 weekdays and 12 weekend days. Total harvest during the 12-month survey period was estimated to be 570 metric tons, and included 15 mussel

Zachary H. Bowen; Stephen P. Malvestuto; William D. Davies; Johnie H. Crance

1994-01-01

350

Initial Teacher Licensure Testing in Tennessee: Test Validation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1988 a study was conducted to determine the validity of candidate teacher licensure examinations for use in Tennessee under the 1984 Comprehensive Education Reform Act. The Department of Education conducted a study to determine the validity of 11 previously unvalidated or extensively revised tests for certification and to make recommendations…

Bowman, Harry L.; Petry, John R.

351

Cooperative Approach to Land Application of Animal Waste in Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many dairy and swine producers in Tennessee and the United States utilize liquid manure storage systems coupled with land application of liquid manure slurry. The proper management and application of liquid manure is critical to avoid adverse environmental impacts. Many producers do not own the equipment necessary to efficiently spread animal waste slurry stored in liquid manure systems over the

R. T. Burns; T. L. Cross; K. J. Stalder; R. F. Theurer

352

FISH ASSEMBLAGE GROUPS IN THE UPPER TENNESSEE RIVER BASIN  

EPA Science Inventory

A hierarchical clustering technique was used to classify sites in the upper Tennessee River basin based on relative abundance of fish species. Five site groups were identified. These groups differed mainly by the occurrence of minnow and darter species. Drainage area and ecore...

353

Mineral resources summary of the Moodyville quadrangle, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mineral resources that have been mined are coal, limestone, sand, and gravel. Oil is being produced in small amounts at present. Potential resources are clay and shale. Field work on the mineral resources was completed in Nov. 1965. Some of the earliest drilling for oil and gas in Tennessee was done in the area covered by the Moodyville Quadrangle.

H. C. Milhous; R. H. Barnes; L. C. Taylor

1968-01-01

354

Tennessee gas field brings Eastern Overthrust new life  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Eastern US Overthrust Belt has gained an E and P company in its southern reaches while seeing de-emphasis from a long time player in more northerly areas. A gas field discovered in the early 1980s in northeastern Tennessee is nearly ready to be placed on production. It would be the first commercial gas production in the southern portion of

Petzet

1996-01-01

355

Financial Reporting for Tennessee Public Colleges and Universities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual provides a framework for accounting practices, budgeting and reporting procedures for Tennessee public higher education institutions. Emphasis is placed on principles and procedures of accounting and financial reporting; the balance sheet; statement of changes in fund balances; statement of current funds revenues, expenditures, and…

Tennessee Higher Education Commission, Nashville.

356

ACT Profile Report: State. Graduating Class 2012. Tennessee  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides information about the performance of Tennessee's 2012 graduating seniors who took the ACT as sophomores, juniors, or seniors; and self-reported at the time of testing that they were scheduled to graduate in 2012 and tested under standard time conditions. This report focuses on: (1) Performance: student test performance in the…

ACT, Inc., 2012

2012-01-01

357

An Examination of Innovation in Tennessee's Charter Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Similar to other states, charter schools in Tennessee were established to improve student learning, provide options for parents, encourage the use of innovative methods, and provide new opportunities for teachers. With the passage of the TN Public Charter School Law, the first four charter schools opened in the 2003-04 academic year. Since that…

McDonald, Aaron J.

2011-01-01

358

Potential hydrologic effects of lignite mining in West Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Paper primarily describes possible adverse hydrologic effects of lignite mining in West Tennessee. Potential effects to the land include erosion, subsidence, flooding, and faulty drainage. Possible consequences to surface streams and groundwater include diminishment of quantity, quality, and a change in flow. If enforced, the existing state law provides sufficient remedy for the avoidance of environmental hazards.

Phelan, P.L.; Olem, H.

1982-12-01

359

Archives of the Tennessee College Women's Sports Federation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide to the archives of the Tennessee College Women's Sports Federation (TCWSF), now dissolved, details the contents of the 13 cartons of materials which constitute the TCWSF collection. Materials are organized into series under particular topics. The guide describes the arrangement of documents in each series and then lists the contents of…

Hooker, Jane; And Others

360

Model Programs--Childhood Education; Foster Grandparent Program, Nashville, Tennessee.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Foster Grandparent Program was started in Nashville, Tennessee, as a demonstration program under the Office of Economic Opportunity; it was designed to help senior citizens support themselves by acting as grandparents to children who do not have their own. At Clover Bottom Hospital and School for the Retarded Child, 13 foster grandmothers work…

American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences, Silver Spring, MD.

361

Solar Heating for a Bottling Plant -- Jackson, Tennessee  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Report describes retrofit solar-heating system designed for and installed in bottle works in Tennessee. System consists of 9,480 square feet (880 Square meters) of evacuated-tube solar collectors with attached specular cylindrical reflectors. Tubular collectors are expected to supply 55 percent of total thermal load.

1982-01-01

362

Chattanooga, Tennessee: Train Town. Teaching with Historic Places.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Railroads influenced and reflected U.S. settlement and development patterns from the 1830s to the 1950s. In cities, they shaped and stimulated economic growth, planning, and architecture. Chattanooga, Tennessee's sprawling Terminal Station, is a tribute to the town's importance as a southeastern transportation hub. This lesson is based on the…

Hankins, Caneta Skelley

363

Addendum to the East Tennessee Technology Park Site-Wide Residual Contamination Remedial Investigation Work Plan Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The East Tennessee Technology Park Site-Wide Residual Contamination Remedial Investigation Work Plan (DOE 2004) describes the planned fieldwork to support the remedial investigation (RI) for residual contamination at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) not addressed in previous Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) decisions. This Addendum describes activities that will be conducted to gather additional information in Zone 1 of the ETTP for groundwater, surface water, and sediments. This Addendum has been developed from agreements reached in meetings held on June 23, 2010, August 25, 2010, October 13, 2010, November 13, 2010, December 1, 2010, and January 13, 2011, with representatives of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). Based on historical to recent groundwater data for ETTP and the previously completed Sitewide Remedial Investigation for the ETTP (DOE 2007a), the following six areas of concern have been identified that exhibit groundwater contamination downgradient of these areas above state of Tennessee and EPA drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs): (1) K-720 Fly Ash Pile, (2) K-770 Scrap Yard, (3) Duct Island, (4) K-1085 Firehouse Burn/J.A. Jones Maintenance Area, (5) Contractor's Spoil Area (CSA), and (6) Former K-1070-A Burial Ground. The paper presents a brief summary of the history of the areas, the general conceptual models for the observed groundwater contamination, and the data gaps identified.

SAIC

2011-04-01

364

Utilization of surface mine ponds in East Tennessee by breeding amphibians  

SciTech Connect

Of 24 ponds examined on Ollis Creek Surface Mine, Campbell County, Tennessee, 21 contained breeding amphibians. Twelve species of amphibians were identified in ponds that ranged from 4.0 to 8.0 in pH. Although ponds with low pH values were used by breeding amphibians, significantly more amphibian species were found in ponds with higher pH values. The average pH of ponds occupied by each amphibian species varied. Spring peepers (Hyla crucifer) occupied ponds with the lowest average pH (5.22) while upland chorus frogs (Pseudacris triseriata feriarum) utilized ponds with the highest average pH (6.33). Findings indicated high biological productivity in surface mine ponds. Aquatic vegetation was present in 20 of the 24 ponds. Aquatic insects and a diverse wildlife fauna utilized the study ponds. Large mammals (3 species), waterbirds (17 species), and snakes (2 species) were among those species observed. Surface mine ponds were found to supply an important habitat component for a variety of wildlife species and therefore improve the quality of wildlife habitat on the surface mines. In some areas, mine ponds are the only source of surface water available for wildlife use. 23 references, 9 figures, 5 tables.

Turner, L.J.; Fowler, D.K.

1981-06-01

365

Field evaluation of all-season tactical engine oil OE/HDO-15/40 at Ft. Knox, Kentucky and Ft. Bliss, Texas. Interim report, July 1984-December 1985  

SciTech Connect

Requirements for a multiviscosity grade 15W-40 engine oil were developed and the lubricant introduced for military consumption. The program efforts cover a demonstration and field-validation program of the newly introduced grade 15W-40 lubricant. The test involved a wide variety of combat, tactical, and support equipment operated by the 2D Squadron, 6th Cavalry at Fort Knox, KY, and the 3D Armored Cavalry Regiment at Fort Bliss, TX. During the test, vehicles accumulated in excess of 1,840,000 miles of operation under ambient conditions ranging from monthly low temperatures of -8 C (18 F) at Fort Knox to monthly high temperatures of 35 C (95 F) at Fort Bliss. Two-grade 15W-40, MIL-L-2104D qualified lubricants were employed in the test, one product at each of the test locations. The test lubricants were used in all equipment components, engines, transmissions, hydraulic systems, etc., that required MIL-L-2104 engine oil. Equipment within the test fleets were monitored in regard to wear performance, frequency of component replacement, and operational characteristics. Overall, the grade 15W-40 products demonstrated satisfactory and equivalent performance to single-graded oils. The oil was well received by both operators and maintenance personnel who noted that the grade 15W-40 products significantly reduced logistics burden by having only one grade product to requisition, store, and transport to the field.

Butler, W.E.; Alvarez, R.A.; Buckingham, J.P.; Owens, E.C.; Bowen, T.C.

1986-07-01

366

The Sustainability of GEAR UP Project Initiatives in East Tennessee Middle Schools: A Study of the Residual Impacts of the University of Tennessee GEAR UP Partnership.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) program was implemented in a partnership between the University of Tennessee (UT) and two rural East Tennessee school systems. The study addressed the residual impact of UT GEAR UP on middle school teachers and schools that were left behind as the cohort progressed to…

Skolits, Gary; Lashley, Terry; King, Peggy

367

County Waterford Image Archive  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Using volunteer help and a locally written image management system, the Waterford County Museum in Ireland has created this collection of close to 3,000 historical images that document Waterford County and its parishes from the late 1890s to the present. The Web interface to the collection includes a number of helpful features - for those familiar with Waterford county and its place and family names, there is a search box, but for those less familiar there are several ways to browse the collection, by selecting photographer, location, image format, or subjects from drop down lists, as well as selecting parishes from a map to see the pictures associated with each. A photo of the week is posted on the site, and visitors can sign up to receive an RSS feed or, alternatively, an email message when new images are added. There are also easy ways to submit photographs for inclusion in the archive, and for locals to contribute identifying information.

368

Pierce County Hospital Development Guide.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A hospital development guide that was developed for Pierce County, Washington is presented. Planning for communitywide hospital development in Pierce County was initiated in 1971, based on a draft report and passage of State certificate of need legislatio...

1974-01-01

369

Flood of December 25, 1987, in Millington, Tennessee and vicinity  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Intense rainfall totaling 9.2 in. in a 12-hour period on December 24-25, 1987, and 14.8 in for the period December 24-27 caused record floods in Millington, Tennessee and vicinity. The peak discharge of Big Creek at Raleigh-Millington Road was almost twice the discharge of the 100-year flood discharge and that of Loosahatchie River near Arlington was about equal to the 50-year flood discharge. The inundated area and flood elevations are depicted on a map of Millington, Tennessee and vicinity. Water surface profiles for the peak of December 25, 1987, for Loosahatchie River, Big Creek, Royster Creek, North Fork Creek, Casper Creek, and an unnamed tributary to Big Creek are shown. Flood damages and cleanup costs for this record flood have been estimated at about $9.2 million. (USGS)

Lewis, James G.; Gamble, Charles R.

1989-01-01

370

University of Tennessee Libraries-Great Smoky Mountains Regional Collection  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Great Smoky Mountains are full of history, and this set of digital collections from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville brings together photographs, letters, diaries, art, and other items in one convenient location. All told, the site contains five distinct collections, including the William Cox Cochran Photograph Collection and the Albert "Dutch" Roth Collection. Both of these collections include photographs of daily life in eastern Tennessee during the late 19th century and pioneer life in and around what is now the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. One collection here that should not be missed is the "Tales from the Woods". Here visitors will find the personal journal of Albert G. "Dutch" Roth written during his walks through the Great Smoky Mountains from the period 1924 to 1959.

371

Hybridization between Redeye Bass and Smallmouth Bass in Tennessee Streams  

Microsoft Academic Search

To enhance headwater stream fisheries, nonindigenous redeye bass Micropterus coosae were introduced into 16 north-central Tennessee streams from the mid 1950s through the early 1960s. Reassessment occurred from June 1994 to October 1995 by sampling 18.6 km of stream channel in 31 streams by backpack electrofishing. Meristic criteria identified redeye bass in 11 streams within three river drainages and hybrids

James C. Pipas; Frank J. Bulow

1998-01-01

372

Solar heating system installed at Jackson, Tennessee. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The solar energy heating system installed at the Coca-Cola Bottling Works in Jackson, Tennessee is described. The system consists of 9480 square feet of Owens-Illinois evacuated tubular solar collectors with attached specular cylindrical reflectors and will provide space heating for the 70,000 square foot production building in the winter, and hot water for the bottle washing equipment the remainder of the year. Component specifications and engineering drawings are included. (WHK)

None

1980-10-01

373

ERTS-B imagery interpretation techniques in the Tennessee Valley  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There are no author-identified significant results in this report. The proposed investigation is a continuation of an ERTS-1 project. The principal missions are to serve as the principal supporter on computer and image processing problems for the multidisciplinary ERTS effort of the University of Tennessee, and to carry out research in improved methods for the computer processing, enhancement, and recognition of ERTS imagery.

Gonzalez, R. C. (principal investigator)

1973-01-01

374

Technique for estimating depth of 100-year floods in Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Preface: A method is presented for estimating the depth of the loo-year flood in four hydrologic areas in Tennessee. Depths at 151 gaging stations on streams that were not significantly affected by man made changes were related to basin characteristics by multiple regression techniques. Equations derived from the analysis can be used to estimate the depth of the loo-year flood if the size of the drainage basin is known.

Gamble, Charles R.; Lewis, James G.

1977-01-01

375

Housing: Dutchess County.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

One of the most crucial responsibilities of any fast-growing area is that of providing housing for all segments of its population. As pressures for growth are increasingly exerted on Dutchess County, it will be all the more important for the area to know ...

1972-01-01

376

Reviewing County Extension Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An evaluation of the Douglas County (Kansas) Extension Program to determine clientele's level of awareness and acceptance of the program and program strengths and weaknesses, to establish new program directions and a base line for future evaluation efforts, and to develop methodology and materials to be used in evaluation. Procedures, findings,…

Prawl, Warren L.; Jorns, William J.

1976-01-01

377

Synthesized flood frequency for small urban streams in Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Bridge, culvert, and highway design often require knowledge of the magnitude and frequency of flood discharge from small streams where the drainage basin is urbanized. The results of a 6-year study by the U.S. Geological Survey provide methods for estimating flood magnitudes for selected frequencies on small streams draining urban areas in Tennessee. A total of 22 rainfall-runoff sites located in basins with drainage areas of 0.21 to 24.3 square miles in size and in municipalities with populations between 5,000 and 100,000 were used to derive regionalized flood-frequency equations. Impervious area, measured from recent aerial photographs, ranged between 4.7 percent and 74.0 percent of the basin. The equations were derived by multiple regression analyses of snythetic flood-frequency estimates, derived from a rainfall-runoff modeling procedure, versus physical basin characteristics and a precipitation factor. These equations can be used to estimate the magnitude of future floods with recurrence intervals of 2 to 100 years on ungaged urbanized streams in Tennessee. One equation for each recurrence interval applies statewide. Flood-frequency estimates for stations used in the analyses and example computations demonstrating applications of the regression equations to urban streams in Tennessee are given in the report. (USGS)

Robbins, C. H.

1984-01-01

378

Signatures in Lightning Activity during Tennessee Valley Severe Storms of 5-6 May 2003  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During the first week of May 2003, the Tennessee Valley experienced 14 tornadoes. Those that moved across the Tennessee Valley Region of northern Alabama and southern Tennessee provided an opportunity for study us- ing the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA). On 5 May a classic supercell trekked across southern Tennessee spawning several tornadoes producing FO-F3 damage; on 6 May a high precipitation supercell moved across northern Alabama producing several FO-F1 tornadoes. The life cycle of these supercells will be discussed by presenting their electrical and radar evolution.

Gatlin, Patrick N.; Goodman, Steven J.

2004-01-01

379

The East Tennessee Technology Park Progress Report for the Tennessee Hazardous Waste Reduction Act for Calendar Year 2000  

SciTech Connect

This report is prepared for the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) (ETTP) in compliance with the ''Tennessee Hazardous Waste Reduction Act of 1990'' (THWRA) (TDEC 1990), Tennessee Code Annotated 68-212-306. Annually, THWRA requires a review of the site waste reduction plan, completion of summary waste reduction information as part of the site's annual hazardous waste reporting, and completion of an annual progress report analyzing and quantifying progress toward THWRA-required waste stream-specific reduction goals. This THWRA-required progress report provides information about ETTP's hazardous waste streams regulated under THWRA and waste reduction progress made in calendar year (CY) 2000. This progress report also documents the annual review of the site plan, ''Oak Ridge Operations Environmental Management and Enrichment Facilities (EMEF) Pollution Prevention Program Plan'', BJC/OR-306/R1 (Bechtel Jacobs Company 2000). In 1996, ETTP established new goal year ratios that extended the goal year to CY 1999 and targeted 50 percent waste stream-specific reduction goals. In CY 2000, these goals were extended to CY 2001 for all waste streams that generated waste in 2000. Of the 70 ETTP RCRA waste streams tracked in this report from base years as early as CY 1991, 50 waste streams met or exceeded their reduction goal based on the CY 2000 data.

Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC

2001-03-01

380

The East Tennessee Technology Park Progress Report for the Tennessee Hazardous Waste Reduction Act for Calendar Year 1999  

SciTech Connect

This report is prepared for the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) (ETTP) in compliance with the ''Tennessee Hazardous Waste Reduction Act of 1990'' (THWRA) (TDEC 1990), Tennessee Code Annotated 68-212-306. Annually, THWRA requires a review of the site waste reduction plan, completion of summary waste reduction information as part of the site's annual hazardous waste reporting, and completion of an annual progress report analyzing and quantifying progress toward THWRA-required waste stream-specific reduction goals. This THWRA-required progress report provides information about ETTP's hazardous waste streams regulated under THWRA and waste reduction progress made in calendar year (CY) 1999. This progress report also documents the annual review of the site plan, ''Oak Ridge Operations Environmental Management and Enrichment Facilities (EMEF) Pollution Prevention Program Plan'', BJC/OR-306/R1 (Bechtel Jacobs Company 199a). In 1996, ETTP established new goal year ratios that extended the goal year to CY 1999 and targeted 50 percent waste stream-specific reduction goals. In CY 1999, these CY 1999 goals were extended to CY 2000 for all waste streams that generated waste in 1999. Of the 70 ETTP RCRA waste streams tracked in this report from base years as early as CY 1991, 51 waste streams met or exceeded their reduction goal based on the CY 1999 data.

Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC

2000-03-01

381

Chattanooga Shale (Devonian and Mississippian) from the Tennessee Division of Geology - US Department of Energy Cored Drill Holes Number 1 and 2, Claiborne County, Tennessee.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Chattanooga Shale of the Newman Ridge syncline lies stratigraphically above the Silurian Hancock Dolomite and below the siltstone and shale of the Mississippian Grainger Formation. Core examination indicates that the Chattanooga is predominately a bla...

J. B. Roen R. C. Milici R. C. Kepferle L. G. Wallace

1980-01-01

382

County Business Patterns 1995  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The US Census Bureau has made available the state publications for the 1995 version of its annual County Business Patterns 1995 series (Adobe Acrobat [.pdf] format only). Data available include employment, payroll, and number of establishments by Standard Industrial Code category. Establishments are further broken down by nine employment size classes ranging from 1-4 to 1,000 or more. The US volume is forthcoming. Complete 1993 and 1994 (also .pdf format) series are available at the site.

1997-01-01

383

Master Plan for Tennessee Schools, 1995: Preparing for the 21st Century.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Tennessee State Legislature passed the Education Improvement Act (EIA) in 1992, which established the Basic Education Program (BEP) as the funding formula for providing adequate, equitable, and sustainable school funding. This document presents the 1995 Master Plan for Tennessee Schools, which focuses on the priority issues that must be…

Tennessee State Board of Education, Nashville.

384

Annual Joint Report on Pre-Kindergarten through Higher Education in Tennessee, 2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This 2009 Annual Joint Report of the State Board of Education and the Tennessee Higher Education Commission identifies four joint priorities and nine associated goals addressing areas of need in both student learning and educator development for the advancement of education in Tennessee. The joint priorities and initiatives focus on points of…

Tennessee State Board of Education, 2009

2009-01-01

385

Engaging the Learner. Annual Instructional Technology Conference (12th, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, April 1-3, 2007)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The following is a collection of papers presented at the 12th annual Instructional Technology Conference at Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This conference is an opportunity for higher-education professionals from across the country to discuss opportunities and challenges presented by instructional technology. The…

Smith, Carter F.; Schneider, Gary F.; Kontos, George; Kuzat, Hanan; Janossy, James; Thurmond, Karen; Moore, Beth; Whitledge, Lynn; Speer, Priscilla; Harber, Annette; Bailey, Kathrine; Penney, Samantha

2007-01-01

386

77 FR 71568 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Tennessee; Interstate Transport Infrastructure...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is proposing to conditionally approve the State Implementation Plan (SIP) submission, submitted by the State of Tennessee through the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). This proposal pertains to the Clean Air Act (CAA) requirements pertaining to prevention of significant deterioration (PSD) (concerning the PM2.5 increments) for the for the 2008 8-hour......

2012-12-03

387

Healthcare Inspection: Alleged Delay in Diagnosis and Treatment at a Community Based Outpatient Clinic Tennessee Valley Healthcare System Nashville and Murfreesboro, Tennessee.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The VA Office of Inspector General (OIG) Office of Healthcare Inspections conducted an evaluation in response to allegations of a delay in the diagnosis of Graves disease and treatment at a community based outpatient clinic (CBOC) of the Tennessee Valley ...

2011-01-01

388

Audit of Compliance with Standards Governing Combined DNA Index System Activities at the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation Memphis Regional Crime Laboratory Memphis, Tennessee.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Department of Justice Office of the Inspector General (OIG), Audit Division, has completed an audit of compliance with standards governing Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) activities at the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, Memphis Regional Crime La...

2011-01-01

389

Identification of aggregates for Tennessee bituminous surface courses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tennessee road construction is a major venue for federal and state spending. Tax dollars each year go to the maintenance and construction of roads. One aspect of highway construction that affects the public is the safety of its state roads. There are many factors that affect the safety of a given road. One factor that was focused on in this research was the polish resistance capabilities of aggregates. Several pre-evaluation methods have been used in the laboratory to predict what will happen in a field situation. A new pre-evaluation method was invented that utilized AASHTO T 304 procedure upscaled to accommodate surface bituminous aggregates. This new method, called the Tennessee Terminal Textural Condition Method (T3CM), was approved by Tennessee Department of Transportation to be used as a pre-evaluation method on bituminous surface courses. It was proven to be operator insensitive, repeatable, and an accurate indication of particle shape and texture. Further research was needed to correlate pre-evaluation methods to the current field method, ASTM E 274-85 Locked Wheel Skid Trailer. In this research, twenty-five in-place bituminous projects and eight source evaluations were investigated. The information gathered would further validate the T3CM and find the pre-evaluation method that best predicted the field method. In addition, new sources of aggregates for bituminous surface courses were revealed. The results of this research have shown T3CM to be highly repeatable with an overall coefficient of variation of 0.26% for an eight sample repeatability test. It was the best correlated pre-evaluation method with the locked wheel skid trailer method giving an R2 value of 0.3946 and a Pearson coefficient of 0.710. Being able to predict field performance of aggregates prior to construction is a powerful tool capable of saving time, money, labor, and possibly lives.

Sauter, Heather Jean

390

Hydrology of Lake County, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Lake County includes a 1,150 square-mile area consisting of ridges, uplands, and valleys in central-peninsular Florida. About 32 percent of the county is covered by lakes, swamps, and marshes. Water requirements in 1970 averaged about 54 million gallons per day. About 85 percent of the water was obtained from wells; about 15 percent from lakes. The Floridan aquifer supplies almost all the ground water used in Lake County. Annual recharge to the Floridan aquifer averages about 7 inches over the county; runoff average 8.5 inches. The quality of ground and surface water in Lake County is in general good enough for most uses; however, the poor quality of Floridan-aquifer water in the St. John River Valley probably results from the upward movement of saline water along a fault zone. Surface water in Lake County is usually less mineralized than ground water but is more turbid and colored. (Woodard-USGS)

Knochenmus, Darwin D.; Hughes, G. H.

1976-01-01

391

Low flows and flow duration of Tennessee streams through 1981  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Estimates of low-flow characteristics and flow duration for the period of record at continuous-record streamflow gages are essential in hydrologic studies and water-resources management. This report provides estimates of low flow for 1, 3, 7, 14, 30, 60, and 90 consecutive days for recurrence intervals of 2, 5, 10 , and 20 years for continuous-record streamflow gages in Tennessee. These estimates were used in correlation methods to estimate low flow at partial-record streamflow sites for 1, 3, and 7 consecutive days for a recurrence interval of 10 years; and 3 consecutive days for a recurrence interval of 20 years. (USGS)

Bingham, R. H.

1985-01-01

392

Electrical resistivity investigations at Memphis, and Bolivar, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This geophysical investigation was undertaken upon request of Elliott M. Cushing of the Ground Water Division Office at Memphis, Tennessee. The field work was performed during the period March 13 to 28, 1947; the apparent resistivity curves were interpreted during November and December; and the report was written subsequent to the interpretation of the curves. The writer is grateful to Elliott M. Cushing and his staff for the splendid cooperation and generous assistance extended to him in obtaining the measurements. It is also a pleasure to acknowledge the assistance of George J. Edwards in obtaining the field measurements.

Spicer, H. Cecil

1948-01-01

393

Technique for estimating depth of floods in Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Estimates of flood depths are needed for design of roadways across flood plains and for other types of construction along streams. Equations for estimating flood depths in Tennessee were derived using data for 150 gaging stations. The equations are based on drainage basin size and can be used to estimate depths of the 10-year and 100-year floods for four hydrologic areas. A method also was developed for estimating depth of floods having recurrence intervals between 10 and 100 years. Standard errors range from 22 to 30 percent for the 10-year depth equations and from 23 to 30 percent for the 100-year depth equations. (USGS)

Gamble, C. R.

1983-01-01

394

Phosphorus Retention Models for Tennessee Valley Authority Reservoirs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Data for the 18 largest Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) reservoirs are compared with previously developed models for predicting steady state phosphorus concentrations in lakes. A plug flow model is presented for lakes and reservoirs which have significant longitudinal variation in phosphorus concentration. The results indicate that phosphorus sedimentation and retention coefficients developed for natural lakes are not directly applicable to TVA reservoirs. The apparent settling velocity of phosphorus in TVA reservoirs was substantially higher than previously reported values for natural lakes. Application of the plug flow model to Cherokee Reservoir showed good agreement with measured in-lake phosphorus concentrations.

Higgins, John M.; Kim, Byung R.

1981-06-01

395

76 FR 19116 - Illinois; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Douglas, DuPage, Edgar, Effingham, Fayette, Ford, Fulton, Hancock, Henderson, Henry, Jasper, Jo Daviess, Kane, Knox, Lake, LaSalle...hours for the counties of Adams, Boone, Brown, Ford, Henderson, Knox, McHenry, Menard, and...

2011-04-06

396

Study of 'Orconectes shoupi' Mill Creek Basin, Tennessee, 1985.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Fourteen sites on Mill, Sevenmile, and Indian creeks in Davidson and Williamson Counties, Tenn., were surveyed for crayfish in July 1985. Orconectes shoupi, considered for listing as Endangered by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, numerically dominated at...

A. C. Miller P. D. Hartfield

1987-01-01

397

75 FR 29591 - Tennessee Disaster Number TN-00038  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...include the following areas as adversely affected by the disaster. Primary Counties: Benton, Cannon, Giles, Marshall, Pickett, Sumner. All other information in the original declaration remains unchanged. (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance...

2010-05-26

398

77 FR 72968 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, for Imperial County, Placer County and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Placer County and Ventura County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD)...

2012-12-07

399

77 FR 73005 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County, Placer County, and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Placer County, and Ventura County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD)...

2012-12-07

400

Digital Atlas of Texas Counties  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by the Center for Geosptial Technology at Texas Tech University, this digital atlas is a fantastic find. It brings together information about all of Texas's counties, including satellite relief maps and data sets about the roads, rivers, lakes, and other features in each area. Visitors can use the interactive map to click on a county of interest, or use the drop down menu to select a region. Once users select a county, they can download information about it for future use. The site also contains a number of Featured Links to resources from the U.S. Census Bureau, the Texas Association of Counties, and several tourism agencies.

401

75 FR 49016 - County of Greenville, S.C.-Acquisition Exemption-Greenville County Economic Development Corporation  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Exemption--Greenville County Economic Development Corporation The County of...acquire from Greenville County Economic Development Corporation (GCEDC) approximately...See Greenville County Economic Development...

2010-08-12

402

Caregiver- vs infant-oriented feeding: a model of infant-feeding strategies among special supplemental nutrition program for women, infants, and children participants in rural east Tennessee.  

PubMed

The aim of this project was to collect data from focus-group participants to inform the future development of region-specific educational strategies to modify infant-feeding practices that may predispose children to obesity. Infant-feeding perceptions and practices were collected from participants of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, through recorded focus groups, in two East Tennessee counties. Focus groups replaced the participants' required, prescheduled nutrition-education classes for participants with infants younger than 6 months of age. Twenty-nine focus groups were convened and recorded, reaching a total of 109 participants. Results of this series of focus groups indicate that the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children population in rural East Tennessee was similar to populations elsewhere in terms of early solid-food introduction, frequent switching of formula, and sources of and valuation of infant-feeding advice. However, this population seemed to be different in the magnitude at which they introduce infant cereal early (primarily as an addition to the bottle). For this reason, interventions designed to reduce inappropriate infant-feeding behaviors in this population should focus on early introduction of solid food (especially infant cereal) first. In addition to these findings, a model of infant-feeding strategy development based on caregiver-orientation (framed within parenting styles) is presented and discussed. PMID:20869487

Kavanagh, Katherine F; Habibi, Mona; Anderson, Kirsten; Spence, Marsha

2010-10-01

403

A watershed survey and educational program to enhance environmental quality in the Upper Little Tennessee River Valley. Year 4, Executive summary  

SciTech Connect

Work carried out during 1992 under TVA grant No. TV-74216A, administered by the Western North Carolina Alliance, may be broken down into four categories: Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI), Macroinvertebrate Biomonitoring, Visual Reconnaissance, and Survey of Brook Trout. In 1992, we began to shift emphasis from merely studying the watershed to activities aimed at protecting, restoring, or improving water and habitat quality. The ``target`` area for this work in the upper Little Tennessee River watershed was the 10.0 square mile Rabbit Creek watershed (Holly Springs Community), and work conducted in Holly Springs is here reported separately from watershed-wide monitoring activities. Additional topics treated in this report include the relation of this project to other activities in the upper Little Tennessee watershed, significant changes in the watershed which occurred independently of this project, a list of other reports prepared to be made available through the project and a list of meetings. Work carried out under this grant in the Spring Creek and Laurel River watersheds (Madison County, North Carolina) will be reported on separately by Mark Hopey.

Not Available

1993-08-01

404

Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2, Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391, Tennessee Valley Authority. Supplement number 20  

SciTech Connect

This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (SER), NUREG-0847 (June 1982), Supplement No. 1 (September 1982), Supplement No. 2 (January 1984), Supplement No. 3 (January 1985), Supplement No. 4 (March 1985), Supplement No. 5 (November 1990), Supplement No. 6 (April 1991), Supplement No. 7 (September 1991), Supplement No. 8 (January 1992), Supplement No. 9 (June 1992), Supplement No. 10 (October 1992), Supplement No. 11 (April 1993), Supplement No. 12 (October 1993), Supplement No. 13 (April 1994), Supplement No. 14 (December 1994), Supplement No. 15 (June 1995), Supplement No. 16 (September 1995), Supplement No. 17 (October 1995), Supplement No. 18 (October 1995), and Supplement No. 19 (November 1995) issued by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority, as applicant and owner, for licenses to operate the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). The facility is located in Rhea County, Tennessee, near the Watts Bar Dam on the Tennessee River. This supplement provides recent information regarding resolution of some of the issues identified in the SER.

NONE

1996-02-01

405

Urolithiasis in Tennessee: an occupational window into a regional problem.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Urinary tract stones (stones) are believed to be unusually common in the southeastern United States but neither the incidence of nor the risk factors for stones are known. METHODS: In three well-defined occupational populations in eastern Tennessee, we assessed the prevalence, incidence, and cumulative incidence of stones and measured biochemical risk factors for lithogenesis. RESULTS: The age-adjusted prevalence of stones was 18.5 percent in Tennessee compared to 7.7 percent among White males in US NHANES (prevalence ratio 2.4, 95% CI 1.7, 3.3). The cumulative incidence (risk) was 27.8 percent by age 65, higher than in any other reported population. Risk factors were age, a family history, and urinary saturation with calcium-oxalate (COAX). Persons with a positive family history and the highest measured CAOX index had a predicted lifetime risk of 88.8 percent. Biochemical factors affecting lithogenesis were hypercalciuria, hyperoxaluria, and low urine volume. CONCLUSION: Future research should characterize the geographic boundaries of a southeastern "stone-belt" and explore genetic and dietary hypotheses that might explain it.

Thun, M J; Schober, S

1991-01-01

406

The Tennessee Mouse Genome Consortium: Identification of ocular mutants  

SciTech Connect

The Tennessee Mouse Genome Consortium (TMGC) is in its fifth year of a ethylnitrosourea (ENU)-based mutagenesis screen to detect recessive mutations that affect the eye and brain. Each pedigree is tested by various phenotyping domains including the eye, neurohistology, behavior, aging, ethanol, drug, social behavior, auditory, and epilepsy domains. The utilization of a highly efficient breeding protocol and coordination of various universities across Tennessee makes it possible for mice with ENU-induced mutations to be evaluated by nine distinct phenotyping domains within this large-scale project known as the TMGC. Our goal is to create mutant lines that model human diseases and disease syndromes and to make the mutant mice available to the scientific research community. Within the eye domain, mice are screened for anterior and posterior segment abnormalities using slit-lamp biomicroscopy, indirect ophthalmoscopy, fundus photography, eye weight, histology, and immunohistochemistry. As of January 2005, we have screened 958 pedigrees and 4800 mice, excluding those used in mapping studies. We have thus far identified seven pedigrees with primary ocular abnormalities. Six of the mutant pedigrees have retinal or subretinal aberrations, while the remaining pedigree presents with an abnormal eye size. Continued characterization of these mutant mice should in most cases lead to the identification of the mutated gene, as well as provide insight into the function of each gene. Mice from each of these pedigrees of mutant mice are available for distribution to researchers for independent study.

Jablonski, Monica M. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Wang, Xiaofei [ORNL; Lu, Lu [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Miller, Darla R [ORNL; Rinchik, Eugene M [ORNL; Williams, Robert [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Goldowitz, Daniel [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis

2005-06-01

407

Effects of Projected Transient Changes in Climate on Tennessee Forests  

SciTech Connect

This study examines transient effects of projected climate change on the structure and species composition of forests in Tennessee. The climate change scenarios for 2030 and 2080 were provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) from three General Circulation Models (GCMs) that simulate the range of potential climate conditions for the state. The precipitation and temperature projections from the three GCMs for 2030 and 2080 were related to changes in the ecoregions by using the monthly record of temperature and precipitation from 1980 to 1997 for each 1 km cell across the state as aggregated into the five ecological provinces. Temperatures are projected to increase in all ecological provinces in all months for all three GCMs for both 2030 and 2080. Precipitation patterns are more complex with one model projecting wetter summers and two models projecting drier summers. The forest ecosystem model LINKAGES was used to simulate conditions in forest stands for the five ecological provinces of Tennessee from 1989 to 2300. These model runs suggest there will be a change in tree diversity and species composition in all ecological provinces with the greatest changes occurring in the Southern Mixed Forest province. Most projections show a decline in total tree biomass followed by recovery as species replacement occurs in stands. The changes in forest biomass and composition, as simulated in this study, are likely to have implications on forest economy, tourism, understory conditions, wildlife habitat, mast provisioning, and other services provided by forest systems.

Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Tharp, M Lynn [ORNL; Lannom, Karen O. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hodges, Donald G. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2010-01-01

408

The February 21, 1993 tornadoes of East Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

A series of tornadoes struck the east Tennessee area on Sunday afternoon, February 21, 1993 around Knoxville, Lenoir City, and Oak Ridge causing millions of dollars worth of damage to both homes and businesses in the area, killing one, injuring a number of persons, and leaving a large area without power for many hours or even days due to damage to the local TVA transmission line network. One tornado touched down in the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation near the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, continued through the Union Valley business district located just east of the plant, through the adjacent University of Tennessee Arboretum and then continued into the communities of Claxton and Powell. The path length of the tornado was approximately 13 miles. Damage to the Y-12 Plant was minimal, but the Union Valley business district was seriously damaged, including the Fusion Energy Design Center (FEDC) which houses a number of DOE related projects. The preliminary cost estimate of the damage to DOE facilities (both at Y-12 and at the FEDC) was around $520,000. This paper describes the local meteorological data, the tornado that struck near the Y-12 plant, the resulting damage both to the DOE facilities and to the surrounding communities, the plant emergency response and recovery activities, and the current hazard analyses being undertaken at the plant.

Fricke, K.E.; Kornegay, F.C. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1993-08-11

409

Edgecombe County, North Carolina, Land Development Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Edgecombe County land development plan has been designed to utilize all possible areas of physical, social and economic potential within the county. The plan is essentially a long range program for the physical development of the county. (Author)

D. L. Pugh

1970-01-01

410

Equity and County College Financing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An analysis by the Commission on Financial Postsecondary Education of the system by which New Jersey supports county colleges revealed disparities and inequities among the New Jersey counties in wealth and effort per full-time equivalent student, and current state financing practices that aggravate this problem. In response, alternative state…

New Jersey State Commission on Financing Postsecondary Education, Trenton.

411

Housing Cuyahoga County: Housing Sales.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report is one of four which, together, constitute the second year work program of the Cuyahoga County Housing Study. It presents and analyzes data on sales prices of one-family houses in the county, both in aggregate and by small area, in terms of loc...

1971-01-01

412

Menominee: Wisconsin's 72nd County.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Menominee Indian Reservation became a county after the 1960 Census of Population; therefore, data for the county as a unit were distributed throughout the census publication and appeared as civil division tabulation. This 1963 report attempts to compile these data, as well as data from previous census publications, and present them in easily…

Weidemann, Wayne H.; Fuguitt, Glenn V.

413

Holocene ethnobotanical and paleoecological record of human impact on vegetation in the Little Tennessee River Valley, Tennessee  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Human occupation and utilization of plant resources have affected vegetation in the lower Little Tennessee River Valley of East Tennessee for 10,000 yr. Changes in Indian cultures and land use are documented by radiocarbon chronologies, lithic artifacts, ceramics, settlement patterns, and ethnobotanical remains from 25 stratified archaeological sites within the Holocene alluvial terrace. The ethnobotanical record consists of 31,500 fragments (13.7 kg) of wood charcoal identified to species and 7.7 kg of carbonized fruits, seeds, nutshells, and cultigens from 956 features. Pollen and plant macrofossils from small ponds both in the uplands and on lower stream terraces record local vegetational changes through the last 1500 to 3000 yr. Human impact increased after cultigens, including squash and gourd, were introduced ca. 4000 yr B.P. during the Archaic cultural period. Forest clearance and cultivation disturbed vegetation on both the floodplain and lower terraces after 2800 yr B.P., during the Woodland period. Permanent Indian settlements and maize and bean agriculture extended to higher terraces 1.5 km from the floodplain by the Mississippian period (1000 to 300 yr B.P.). After 300 yr B.P., extensive land clearance and cultivation by Historic Overhill Cherokee and Euro-Americans spread into the uplands beyond the river valley.

Delcourt, Paul A.; Delcourt, Hazel R.; Cridlebaugh, Patricia A.; Chapman, Jefferson

1986-05-01

414

Petrographic investigation of River Gem Coal, Whitley County, eastern Kentucky Coal Field  

SciTech Connect

The River Gem coal of the Breathitt Formation (Middle Pennsylvanian) was studied at three sites in a surface mine in the Holly Hill quadrangle, Whitley County, Kentucky. The River Gem coal is correlative with the Lily and Manchester coals in neighboring Knox, Laurel, and Clay Counties, Kentucky, and the Clintwood coal in Pike County, Kentucky. At the northern site, a 14-cm rider is separated from the 92.5-cm seam by 22 cm of shale. At the two southern sites, the rider is missing. At the latter sites, the 10 cm thick top bench of the seam is separated from the lower 63 cm of the seam by a 14-cm bony lithotype not found at the northern site. The lower 63 cm of the seam in the south and the main seam in the north are characterized by moderate ash and sulfur percentages (4.4-6.8% ash, 1.4-2.3% total sulfur, 0.6-1.1% pyritic sulfur, 74-81% vitrinite, 23-32% Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and 2.3-4.5% CaO). In contrast, the upper bench in the south and the rider have 18.7-27.0% ash, 8.8-11.4% total sulfur, 5.1-6.4% pyritic sulfur, 92.3-93.6% vitrinite, 45.7-57.8% Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and 0.13-0.20% CaO. The bone has over 26% ash, 5.5% total sulfur, 3.2% pyritic sulfur, and 93.1% vitrinite. The overall similarity of the seam and rider characteristics between the north and south suggests that the southern bone is the lateral equivalent of the northern shale. The sulfide in the upper bench or rider and in the bone consists of fine (generally less than 10 ..mu..m), euhedral and framboidal pyrite with common massive pyrite. Massive pyrite appears as an overgrowth of fine pyrite in some places. Massive forms of marcasite, less abundant than pyrite, exhibit some evidence of developing later than the massive pyrite. A variety of < 2-..mu..m pyrite occurs as abundant, but isolated, unidimensional to tabular grains within corpocollinite, some of which is transitional to resinite.

Pollock, J.D.; Hower, J.C.

1987-09-01

415

Hydrology of Polk County, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Local water managers usually rely on information produced at the State and regional scale to make water-resource management decisions. Current assessments of hydrologic and water-quality conditions in Polk County, Florida, commonly end at the boundaries of two water management districts (South Florida Water Management District and the Southwest Florida Water Management District), which makes it difficult for managers to determine conditions throughout the county. The last comprehensive water-resources assessment of Polk County was published almost 40 years ago. To address the need for current countywide information, the U.S. Geological Survey began a 3?-year study in 2002 to update information about hydrologic and water-quality conditions in Polk County and identify changes that have occurred. Ground-water use in Polk County has decreased substantially since 1965. In 1965, total ground-water withdrawals in the county were about 350 million gallons per day. In 2002, withdrawals totaled about 285 million gallons per day, of which nearly 95 percent was from the Floridan aquifer system. Water-conservation practices mainly related to the phosphate-mining industry as well as the decrease in the number of mines in operation in Polk County have reduced total water use by about 65 million gallons per day since 1965. Polk County is underlain by three principal hydrogeologic units. The uppermost water-bearing unit is the surficial aquifer system, which is unconfined and composed primarily of clastic deposits. The surficial aquifer system is underlain by the intermediate confining unit, which grades into the intermediate aquifer system and consists of up to two water-bearing zones composed of interbedded clastic and carbonate rocks. The lowermost hydrogeologic unit is the Floridan aquifer system. The Floridan aquifer system, a thick sequence of permeable limestone and dolostone, consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer, a middle semiconfining unit, a middle confining unit, and the Lower Floridan aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer provides most of the water required to meet demand in Polk County. Data from about 300 geophysical and geologic logs were used to construct hydrogeologic maps showing the tops and thicknesses of the aquifers and confining units within Polk County. Thickness of the surficial aquifer system ranges from several feet thick or less in the extreme northwestern part of the county and along parts of the Peace River south of Bartow to more than 200 feet along the southern part of the Lake Wales Ridge in eastern Polk County. Thickness of the intermediate aquifer system/intermediate confining unit is highly variable throughout the county because of past erosional processes and sinkhole formation. Thickness of the unit ranges from less than 25 feet in the extreme northwestern part of the county to more than 300 feet in southwestern Polk County. The altitude of the top of the Upper Floridan aquifer in the county ranges from about 50 feet above National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 (NGVD 29) in the northwestern part to more than 250 feet below NGVD 29 in the southern part. Water levels in the Upper Floridan aquifer fluctuate seasonally, increasing during the wet season (June through September) and decreasing during the rest of the year. Water levels in the Upper Floridan aquifer also can change from year to year, depending on such factors as pumpage and climatic variations. In the southwestern part of the county, fluctuations in water use related to phosphate mining have had a major impact on ground-water levels. Hydrographs of selected wells in southwestern Polk County show a general decline in water levels that ended in the mid-1970s. This water-level decline coincides with an increase in water use associated with phosphate mining. A substantial increase in water levels that began in the mid-1970s coincides with a period of decreasing water use in the county. Despite reductions in water use since 1970, howev

Spechler, Rick M.; Kroening, Sharon E.

2007-01-01

416

76 FR 73618 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment for the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...and Pike Counties, Pennsylvania; and Sussex, Passaic, and Bergen Counties, New Jersey...existing meter station and construction of a new meter station in Bergen County, New Jersey; Installation of associated...

2011-11-29

417

Impact of kerosene heater usage on indoor NO/sub 2/ exposures in 50 East Tennessee homes  

SciTech Connect

As part of a study of indoor air quality in 300 houses in Roane County, Tennessee, a special study was made on kerosene heater usage and indoor pollutant levels, with emphasis on NO/sub 2/. Owners of 45 homes with kerosene heaters deployed pairs of passive NO/sub 2/ monitors on a weekly basis for ten weeks and recorded the weekly amount of heater use. Without correcting for house-specific factors, such as air exchange rate, indoor NO/sub 2/ levels were found to increase about 0.3 ppB per h/week of homeowner-reported heater use. In the absence of heater use, NO/sub 2/ levels were about 10 ppB in houses with and without kerosene heaters. In four houses with kerosene heaters and one house without, continuous measurements were made of NO, NO/sub x/, SO/sub 2/, and CO. CO and SO/sub 2/ levels increased threefold and tenfold, respectively, when the heater was operated compared to when it was off. Mean SO/sub 2/ levels during heater operation were 57, 46, and 110 ppB in three houses with radiant heaters and 13.5 ppB in one house with a convective heater. 5 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Dudney, C.S.; Hawthorne, A.R.; Monar, K.P.; Cohen, M.A.; Spengler, J.D.

1988-01-01

418

BIG FROG WILDERNESS STUDY AREA AND ADDITIONS, TENNESSEE AND GEORGIA.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A mineral-resource survey was made of the Big Frog Wilderness Study Area and additions, Tennessee-Georgia. Geochemical sampling found traces of gold, zinc, copper, and arsenic in rocks, stream sediments, and panned concentrates, but not in sufficient quantities to indicate the presence of deposits of these metals. The results of the survey indicate that there is little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral deposits within the study area. The only apparent resources are nonmetallic commodities including rock suitable for construction materials, and small amounts of sand and gravel; however, these commodities are found in abundance outside the study area. A potential may exist for oil and natural gas at great depths, but this cannot be evaluated by the present study.

Slack, John, F.; Gazdik, Gertrude, C.

1984-01-01

419

JOYCE KILMER-SLICKROCK WILDERNESS, NORTH CAROLINA AND TENNESSEE.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A mineral-resource survey of the Joyce Kilmer-Slickrock Wilderness in the western part of the Blue Ridge Mountains along the border between North Carolina and Tennessee found trace amounts of such metals as copper, gold, lead, and zinc in rock, stream-sediment, and soil samples, but little promise for the occurrence of metallic-mineral resources was identified. The only apparent mineral resources are small amounts of sand and gravel and abundant rock suitable for construction materials. Oil and natural gas may be present in younger sedimentary rocks. Further seismic work and exploratory drilling are needed to evaluate the resource potential of the whole overthrust belt in this area for oil and gas.

Lesure, Frank, G.; Hill, James, J.

1984-01-01

420

Automation of the Athens (Tennessee) electric power distribution system  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to provide electricity at a minimum cost, the electric utility industry continues to examine methods to operate generating plants, transmission lines, distribution equipment, and customer appliances more efficiently. The Athens Automation and Control Experiment (AACE) was conceived and implemented to address these needs. Located on the Athens Utilities Board system in Athens, Tennessee, the AACE is a highly instrumented system serving a closely surveyed group of 2000 consumers. AACE was designed as a test for distribution automation and control experiments. Observation of the results from the experiments will help to show which controls are worthwhile, what data and instrumentation are needed, and which monitoring and control functions for distribution systems are justified. Testing of the new automated system began in the fall of 1985, and the results may have a dramatic impact on the way electric power systems will be designed and operated in the future. Results from volt/var, system reconfiguration, and load control experiments are described.

Gnadt, P.A.

1987-01-01

421

Automation of the Athens (Tennessee) electric power distribution system  

SciTech Connect

A large scale distribution automation research and development project has been conducted at the Athens Utilities Board (AUB) in Athens, Tennessee. The project goal was to experiment with the integrated monitoring and control of an entire distribution system from a central distribution control center. The project was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Storage and Distribution, Electric Energy Systems Program and managed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The experience with the distribution substation monitoring and control, feeder monitoring, voltage and reactive power (vary) control, system (or circuit) reconfiguration for emergency and maintenance situations, and load control are described. A distribution automation applications software package for assessing system configuration, and volt/var control on automated radial distribution feeders was developed and is also described. 8 refs.

Rizy, D.T.; Stovall, J.P.; Usry, G.H.

1988-01-01

422

University of Tennessee and Oak Ridge environmental restoration education program  

SciTech Connect

A joint program of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Tennessee at Knoxville (UTK) has been initiated to provide education and research on environmental restoration and waste management. The program will provide opportunity for formal education and research for area businesses, while integrating their efforts in mixed-waste management with those of UTK and ORNL. Following successful results demonstrated at ORNL and UTK, the program will be integrated with other universities and research institutions in the country. During this presentation, the programs`s objective, scope, and goals will be described, and details of the program structure will be explained. Also, it will be demonstrated how experience gained in environmental restoration technology transfer activities could be applied in an educational program, providing a focal point for technology transfer and information exchange. Expected accomplishments and industry benefits will also be discussed.

Yalcintas, M.G.; Swindle, D.W. Jr.

1992-04-01

423

Spatiotemporal patterns of infant bronchiolitis in a Tennessee Medicaid population.  

PubMed

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality in infants, primarily through the induction of bronchiolitis. RSV epidemics are highly seasonal, occurring in the winter months in the northern hemisphere. Within the United States, RSV epidemic dynamics vary both spatially and temporally. This analysis employs a retrospective space–time scan statistic to locate spatiotemporal clustering of infant bronchiolitis in a very large Tennessee (TN) Medicaid cohort. We studied infants less than 6 months of age (N = 52,468 infants) who had an outpatient visit, emergency department visit, or hospitalization for bronchiolitis between 1995 and 2008. The scan statistic revealed distinctive and consistent patterns of deviation in epidemic timing. Eastern TN (Knoxville area) showed clustering in January and February, and Central TN (Nashville area) in November and December. This is likely due to local variation in geography-associated factors which should be taken into consideration in future modeling of RSV epidemics. PMID:23956809

Sloan, Chantel D; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Wu, Pingsheng; Carroll, Kecia N; Mitchel, Edward F; Hartert, Tina V

2013-09-01

424

Industrial response to a waste minimization survey in Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous waste minimization is becoming increasingly important as the United States struggles to safely treat and dispose of existing wastes. The extent to which hazardous wastes will be minimized-in either volume and/or toxicity-in the production process depends largely upon the response of industrial waste generators. A survey of large Tennessee waste generators was carried out in the summer of 1987. It found that industry has begun to implement a number of waste minimization practices and that the overall attitude of generators toward waste minimization was positive. There were some statistically significant differences in the survey responses from generators of differing volumes. These differences are important and indicated that among large waste generators, the larger have taken more significant steps to date than have smaller waste generators.

Barkenbus, J.N. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (USA)); Barkenbus, B.D. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

1989-07-01

425

Bayesian classifiers applied to the Tennessee Eastman process.  

PubMed

Fault diagnosis includes the main task of classification. Bayesian networks (BNs) present several advantages in the classification task, and previous works have suggested their use as classifiers. Because a classifier is often only one part of a larger decision process, this article proposes, for industrial process diagnosis, the use of a Bayesian method called dynamic Markov blanket classifier that has as its main goal the induction of accurate Bayesian classifiers having dependable probability estimates and revealing actual relationships among the most relevant variables. In addition, a new method, named variable ordering multiple offspring sampling capable of inducing a BN to be used as a classifier, is presented. The performance of these methods is assessed on the data of a benchmark problem known as the Tennessee Eastman process. The obtained results are compared with naive Bayes and tree augmented network classifiers, and confirm that both proposed algorithms can provide good classification accuracies as well as knowledge about relevant variables. PMID:24117732

Dos Santos, Edimilson Batista; Ebecken, Nelson F F; Hruschka, Estevam R; Elkamel, Ali; Madhuranthakam, Chandra M R

2014-03-01

426

Hydrologic data for the Obed River watershed, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Obed River watershed drains a 520-square-mile area of the Cumberland Plateau physiographic region in the Tennessee River basin. The watershed is underlain by conglomerate, sandstone, and shale of Pennsylvanian age, which overlie Mississippian-age limestone. The larger creeks and rivers of the Obed River system have eroded gorges through the conglomerate and sandstone into the deeper shale. The largest gorges are up to 400 feet deep and are protected by the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act as part of the Obed Wild and Scenic River, which is managed by the National Park Service. The growing communities of Crossville and Crab Orchard, Tennessee, are located upstream of the gorge areas of the Obed River watershed. The cities used about 5.8 million gallons of water per day for drinking water in 2010 from Lake Holiday and Stone Lake in the Obed River watershed and Meadow Park Lake in the Caney Fork River watershed. The city of Crossville operates a wastewater treatment plant that releases an annual average of about 2.2 million gallons per day of treated effluent to the Obed River, representing as much as 10 to 40 percent of the monthly average streamflow of the Obed River near Lancing about 35 miles downstream, during summer and fall. During the past 50 years (1960–2010), several dozen tributary impoundments and more than 2,000 small farm ponds have been constructed in the Obed River watershed. Synoptic streamflow measurements indicate a tendency towards dampened high flows and slightly increased low flows as the percentage of basin area controlled by impoundments increases.

Knight, Rodney R.; Wolfe, William J.; Law, George S.

2014-01-01

427

Implementation of Probabilistic Design Methodology at Tennessee State University  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Engineering Design is one of the most important areas in engineering education. Deterministic Design Methodology (DDM) is the only design method that is taught in most engineering schools. This method does not give a direct account of uncertainties in design parameters. Hence, it is impossible to quantify the uncertainties in the response and the actual safety margin remains unknown. The desire for a design methodology tha can identify the primitive (random) variables that affect the structural behavior has led to a growing interest on Probabilistic Design Methodology (PDM). This method is gaining more recognition in industries than in educational institutions. Some of the reasons for the limited use of the PDM at the moment are that many are unaware of its potentials, and most of the software developed for PDM are very recent. The central goal of the PDM project at Tennessee State University is to introduce engineering students to the method. The students participating in the project learn about PDM and the computer codes that are available to the design engineer. The software being used of this project is NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress) developed under NASA probabilistic structural analysis program. NESSUS has three different modules which make it a very comprehensive computer code for PDM. A research in technology transfer through course offering in PDM is in effect a Tennessee State University. The aim is to familiarize students with the problem of uncertainties in engineering design. Included in the paper are some projects on PDM carried out by some students and faculty. The areas this method is being applied at the moment include, Design of Gears (spur and worm); Design of Shafts; Design of Statistically Indeterminate Frame Structures; Design of Helical Springs; and Design of Shock Absorbers. Some of the current results of these projects are presented.

Onwubiko, Chinyere

1996-01-01

428

Mush Creek Watershed, Dallas County and Lowndes County, Alabama.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The proposal is for the development of a watershed project in Dallas and Lowndes Counties, AL. This project includes an accelerated conservation land treatment program and the installation of floodwater retarding structures. The planned combination of con...

1973-01-01

429

Description and Significance of the Gravity Field in the Reelfoot Lake Region of Northwest Tennessee.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Gravity surveys at various levels of detail have been made at approximately 1200 stations in the Reelfoot Lake region of northwest Tennessee and adjacent portions of Missouri and Arkansas. Individual features were surveyed in detail. At Reelfoot Scarp, si...

R. G. Stearns S. K. Towe V. L. Hagee S. J. Nava S. L. Wilson

1984-01-01

430

Tennessee's Youth in Juvenile Justice Facilities: Mental Health and Substance Abuse Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to assess the prevalence of mental health and substance abuse among youth in one state's juvenile justice facilities, a survey was conducted of 40 Tennessee facilities. A total of 1215 youth were being held on the \\

Louise Barnes; Deborah Bennett; Charlotte Bryson; Sita Diehl; Trish Hayes; Craig Anne; Liz Ledbetter; Pam McCain; Linda O'Neal; Patti Orten; Nancy Reed; Adriane Sheffield; Debrah Stafford; Pat Wade

2005-01-01

431

76 FR 75845 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Tennessee: Prevention of Significant...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...revision includes updates to Tennessee's PSD and NNSR permitting regulations regarding the addition of clean coal technology (CCT) requirements. Lastly, the SIP revision includes clarifying changes and corrections to portions of the...

2011-12-05

432

77 FR 6016 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Tennessee: Prevention of Significant...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...2009, SIP revision updates to Tennessee's PSD and NNSR permitting regulations regarding the addition of clean coal technology (CCT) provisions. Third, the SIP revision provides clarifying changes and corrections to portions of the...

2012-02-07

433

40 CFR 81.57 - Eastern Tennessee-Southwestern Virginia Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Eastern Tennessee-Southwestern Virginia Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.57 Section...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of...

2013-07-01

434

78 FR 23704 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Tennessee: New Source Review-Prevention of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Review (NSR) Program for Particulate Matter Less Than 2.5 Micrometers...Pollutant'' Concerning Condensable Particulate Matter, Final Rule,'' (hereafter...submission is administrative in nature to correct Tennessee's...

2013-04-22

435

77 FR 6529 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee: Chattanooga...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Georgia, and Tennessee: Chattanooga; Particulate Matter 2002 Base Year Emissions Inventory AGENCY: Environmental Protection...proposing to approve the fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) 2002 base year emissions inventory portion of the State...

2012-02-08

436

75 FR 20805 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans: Tennessee; Visibility Impairment Prevention...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...EPA-R04-OAR-2010-0150-201009(b); FRL-9138-8] Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans: Tennessee; Visibility Impairment Prevention for Federal Class I Areas; Removal of Federally Promulgated Provisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection...

2010-04-21

437

Tennessee Valley Authority: Plans to Reduce Debt While Meeting Demand for Power.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Competition in the electricity industry is expected to intensify, and restructuring legislation may dramatically change the way electric utilities do business in the future. To be competitive, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) needs to reduce fixed cos...

2006-01-01

438

77 FR 51739 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Tennessee; Regional Haze State Implementation...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Plant; (7) Inter-trade Holdings, Inc.; (8) Liberty Fibers Corporation; (9) Lucite International; (10) Owens Corning; (11) Packaging Corporation of America; (12) PCS Nitrogen; (13) Tennessee Valley Authority...

2012-08-27

439

Economic Effects of Projected Climate Change on Outdoor Recreation in Tennessee.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Climate change projections from three General Circulation Models were used to adjust the temperature and precipitation in 2030 and 2080 in each of five ecological provinces in Tennessee to estimate the direct economic effects of the projected changes on r...

D. G. Hodges J. Fogel V. H. Dale

2010-01-01

440

77 FR 71454 - Notice of Atomic Safety And Licensing Board Reconstitution, Tennessee Valley Authority (Watts Bar...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Licensing Board Reconstitution, Tennessee Valley Authority (Watts Bar, Unit 2) Pursuant to 10 CFR 2.313(c) and 2.321...and Licensing Board (Board) in the above-captioned Watts Bar, Unit 2 operating license application proceeding is...

2012-11-30

441

78 FR 33117 - Tennessee Valley Authority; Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Unit 1; Applications and Amendments to...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...50-390; NRC-2013-0109] Tennessee Valley Authority; Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Unit 1; Applications and Amendments to...Valley Authority (the licensee), for operation of the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant (WBN), Unit 1, located in...

2013-06-03

442

Ecological land classification as a basic theme for the management of wildlands in Tennessee: A start.  

PubMed

The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) owns and/or cooperatively manages nearly 247 000 ha scattered across the state. To aid the management of this diversity of soils, landforms, and plant communities, TWRA has selected a flexible, ecological land classification system developed for the Interior Uplands in southeastern United States. Landtypes are the most detailed unit of the 5-level hierarchy. To date, four wildlife management areas and one state wetland have been mapped and entered into the agency s Geographic Information System (GIS). These five tracts are in the Upper Coastal Plain of west Tennessee, in the Western and Eastern Highland Rim regions of middle Tennessee, and in the Cumberland Mountains of east Tennessee. The history, physiography, geology, soils, topography, and vegetation of each area are discussed. After forest cover type and age information is merged with the landtypes, wildlife habitat modelling will commence. PMID:24198031

Smalley, G W; Sharber, L B; Gregory, J C

1996-01-01

443

Gaps, Conflicts, Overlaps, and Inconsistencies in Tennessee's Environmental Laws and Regulations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Tennessee's environmental protection laws and regulations were studied and discussed with representatives of three major interest groups - the regulators (primarily in the Department of Health and Environment), the regulated community, and conservation gr...

E. L. Thackston G. A. Davis

1985-01-01

444

77 FR 11744 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Tennessee: Prevention of Significant...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...revision submitted on January 11, 2012. II. What is...PSD will apply as of January 2, 2011, to all stationary...rulemaking. In an August 7, 1980, rulemaking at 45 FR...approval of Tennessee's January 11, 2012, SIP...

2012-02-28

445

77 FR 60919 - Tennessee: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Tennessee's hazardous waste program revisions satisfy...Materials Processed in a Gasification 01/02/08 .02(1...1200-01- Hazardous Waste Combustors (Phase I...State RCRA hazardous waste program without altering...Significantly Affect Energy Supply,...

2012-10-05

446

Patterns of Cave Biodiversity and Endemism in the Appalachians and Interior Plateau of Tennessee, USA  

PubMed Central

Using species distribution data, we developed a georeferenced database of troglobionts (cave-obligate species) in Tennessee to examine spatial patterns of species richness and endemism, including >2000 records for 200 described species. Forty aquatic troglobionts (stygobionts) and 160 terrestrial troglobionts are known from caves in Tennessee, the latter having the greatest diversity of any state in the United States. Endemism was high, with 25% of terrestrial troglobionts (40 species) and 20% of stygobionts (eight species) known from just a single cave and nearly two-thirds of all troglobionts (130 species) known from five or fewer caves. Species richness and endemism were greatest in the Interior Plateau (IP) and Southwestern Appalachians (SWA) ecoregions, which were twice as diverse as the Ridge and Valley (RV). Troglobiont species assemblages were most similar between the IP and SWA, which shared 59 species, whereas the RV cave fauna was largely distinct. We identified a hotspot of cave biodiversity with a center along the escarpment of the Cumberland Plateau in south-central Tennessee defined by both species richness and endemism that is contiguous with a previously defined hotspot in northeastern Alabama. Nearly half (91 species) of Tennessee’s troglobiont diversity occurs in this region where several cave systems contain ten or more troglobionts, including one with 23 species. In addition, we identified distinct troglobiont communities across the state. These communities corresponded to hydrological boundaries and likely reflect past or current connectivity between subterranean habitats within and barriers between hydrological basins. Although diverse, Tennessee’s subterranean fauna remains poorly studied and many additional species await discovery and description. We identified several undersampled regions and outlined conservation and management priorities to improve our knowledge and aid in protection of the subterranean biodiversity in Tennessee.

Niemiller, Matthew L.; Zigler, Kirk S.

2013-01-01

447

TVA and restructuring: Will more competitive markets put TVA on the ropes. [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)  

SciTech Connect

This article examines the financial standing of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA),its recent restructuring and the competitive pressures that may undermine its share of the power generation market. Topics reviewed are TVA's stable rate goals, competitive position, what if TVA can not compete, be the first to bail out, two arguments for optimism, contingency planning, selling power outside the Tennessee Valley Region, and the Rural Electrification Administration model.

Pulsipher, A.G. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (USA))

1991-06-01

448

Preliminary identification of potential geothermal energy uses in the Tennessee Valley region  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study identifies potential commercial applications of low-grade geothermal energy in the Tennessee Valley region, which includes the states of Tennessee, Kentucky, and parts of adjacent states. The most promising geothermal resources within this region are located in the New Madrid seismic zone, where aquifer temperatures of 158 to 194°F are projected. Criteria for the selection of potential applications of

N. L. Treat; C. H. Levison

1980-01-01

449

Fiscal Year 1993 Well Plugging and Abandonment Program Summary Report Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This report is a synopsis of the progress of the well plugging and abandonment program at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from October 1993 through August 1994. A total of 57 wells and borings were plugged and abandoned during the period of time covered in this report. All wells and borings were plugged and abandoned in accordance with the Monitoring Well Plugging and Abandonment Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

NONE

1994-09-01

450

Fiscal year 1993 well plugging and abandonment program, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This report is a synopsis of the progress of the well plugging and abandonment program at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from December 1992 through August 20, 1993. A total of 70 wells and borings were plugged and abandoned during the period of time covered in this report. All wells and borings were plugged and abandoned in accordance with the Monitoring Well Plugging and Abandonment Plan for the US Department of Energy, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (HSW, Inc. 1991).

Not Available

1993-09-01

451

Baseline Environmental Analysis Report for the K-1251 Barge Facility at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the baseline environmental conditions of the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) K-1251 Barge Facility, which is located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). DOE is proposing to lease the facility to the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET). This report provides supporting information for the use, by a potential lessee, of government-owned facilities at ETTP. This report is based upon the requirements of Sect. 120(h) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The lease footprint is slightly over 1 acre. The majority of the lease footprint is defined by a perimeter fence that surrounds a gravel-covered area with a small concrete pad within it. Also included is a gravel drive with locked gates at each end that extends on the east side to South First Avenue, providing access to the facility. The facility is located along the Clinch River and an inlet of the river that forms its southern boundary. To the east, west, and north, the lease footprint is surrounded by DOE property. Preparation of this report included the review of government records, title documents, historic aerial photos, visual and physical inspections of the property and adjacent properties, and interviews with current and former employees involved in the operations on the real property to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products or their derivatives and acutely hazardous wastes were known to have been released or disposed. Radiological surveys were conducted and chemical samples were collected to assess the facility's condition.

Van Winkle J.E.

2007-08-24

452

Bolivar County, Mississippi: Subdivision Regulations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report creates and establishes suggested general rules and regulations for the subdivision of land in Bolivar County, MS. It sets forth transportation and thoroughfare design standards within subdivisions; and outlines administrative enforcement, pena...

1973-01-01

453

County Business Patterns, 1997: Massachusetts.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides subnational economic data by industry. The series is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark for statistical series, surv...

1999-01-01

454

County Business Patterns, 2004: Massachusetts.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides subnational economic data by industry. The series is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark for statistical series, surv...

2006-01-01

455

County Business Patterns, 1996: Massachusetts.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides subnational economic data by industry. The series is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark for statistical series, surv...

1998-01-01

456

County Business Patterns, 2003: Massachusetts.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides subnational economic data by industry. The series is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark for statistical series, surv...

2005-01-01

457

County Business Patterns: Massachusetts, 2002.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides subnational economic data by industry. The series is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark for statistical series, surv...

2004-01-01

458

VERMONT COUNTY HEALTH DATA2  

EPA Science Inventory

This datalayer contains Vermont Population and Health data describing public health (1986-2000), by county, extracted from various sources, such as; the Vermont Department of Health, the Vermont Center for Justice Research, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholis...

459

Dauphin County Opportunity Industrialization Center.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The goals of the OIC organization in Dauphin County include providing hope for impoverished and hard-core unemployed in the form of job preparation by providing adult education, pre-vocational training, skills training, counseling, job development, placem...

1968-01-01

460

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Waste Lot Profile 155.5 for K-1015-A Laundry Pit, East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

In 1989, the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), which includes the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) National Priorities List. The Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (DOE 1992), effective January 1, 1992, now governs environmental restoration activities conducted under CERCLA at the ORR. Following signing of the FFA, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the state of Tennessee signed the Oak Ridge Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement on June 18, 2003. The purpose of this agreement is to define a streamlined decision-making process to facilitate the accelerated implementation of cleanup, to resolve ORR milestone issues, and to establish future actions necessary to complete the accelerated cleanup plan by the end of fiscal year 2008. While the FFA continues to serve as the overall regulatory framework for remediation, the Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement supplements existing requirements to streamline the decision-making process. The disposal of the K-1015 Laundry Pit waste will be executed in accordance with the 'Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone, 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee' (DOB/ORAH-2161&D2) and the 'Waste Handling Plan for the Consolidated Soil and Waste Sites with Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee' (DOE/OR/01-2328&D1). This waste lot consists of a total of approximately 50 cubic yards of waste that will be disposed at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) as non-containerized waste. This material will be sent to the EMWMF in dump trucks. This profile is for the K-1015-A Laundry Pit and includes debris (e.g., concrete, metal rebar, pipe), incidental soil, plastic and wood, and secondary waste (such as plastic sheeting, hay bales and other erosion control materials, wooden pallets, contaminated equipment, decontamination materials, etc.).

Bechtel Jacobs, Raymer J.E.

2008-06-12

461

Geothermal development plan: Yuma county  

SciTech Connect

One hot spring and 33 wells drilled in the county discharge water at temperatures sufficient for direct-use geothermal applications such as process heat and space heating and cooling. Currently, one industry within the county has been identified which may be able to use geothermal energy for its process heat requirements. Also, a computer simulation model was used to predict geothermal energy on line as a function of time under both private and city-owned utility development of the resource.

White, D.H.

1981-01-01

462

Geothermal Development Plan: Pima County  

SciTech Connect

Pima County is located entirely within the Basin and Range physiographic province in which geothermal resources are known to occur. Continued growth as indicated by such factors as population growth, employment and income will require large amounts of energy. It is believed that geothermal energy could provide some of the energy that will be needed. Potential users of geothermal energy within the county are identified.

White, D.H.

1981-01-01

463

Chemical and mineralogical analysis of devonian black-shale samples from Martin County, Kentucky; Carroll and Washington counties, Ohio; Wise County, Virginia; and Overton County, Tennessee, U.S.A.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Core samples of Devonian shales from five localities in the Appalachian basin have been analyzed chemically and mineralogically. The amounts of major elements are similar; however, the minor constituents, organic C, S, phosphate and carbonate show ten-fold variations in amounts. Trace elements Mo, Ni, Cu, V, Co, U, Zn, Hg, As and Mn show variations in amounts that can be related to the minor constituents. All samples contain major amounts of quartz, illite, two types of mixed-layer clays, and chlorite in differing quantities. Pyrite, calcite, feldspar and kaolinite are also present in many samples in minor amounts. Dolomite, apatite, gypsum, barite, biotite and marcasite are present in a few samples in trace amounts. Trace elements listed above are strongly controlled by organic C with the exception of Mn which is associated with carbonate minerals. Amounts of organic C generally range from 3 to 6%, and S is in the range of 2-5%. Amounts of trace elements show the following general ranges in ppm (parts per million): Co, 20-40; Cu, 40-70; U, 10-40; As, 20-40; V, 150-300; Ni, 80-150; high values are as much as twice these values. The organic C was probably the concentrating agent, and the organic C and sulfide S together created an environment that immobilized and preserved these trace elements. Closely spaced samples showing an abrupt transition in color also show changes in organic C, S and trace-element contents. Several associations exist between mineral and chemical content. Pyrite and marcasite are the only minerals found to contain sulfide-S. In general, the illite-chlorite mixed-layer clay mineral shows covariation with organic C if calcite is not present. The enriched trace elements are not related to the clay types, although the clay and organic matter are intimately associated as the bulk fabric of the rock. ?? 1982.

Leventhal, J. S.; Hosterman, J. W.

1982-01-01

464

San Bernardino County Museum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The San Bernardino County Museum is a regional museum with exhibits and collections in cultural and natural history. Special exhibits, the Exploration Station live animal discovery center, extensive research collections, and public programs for adults, families, students, and children are all part of the museum experience. The Museum is surrounded by citrus groves, and orange blossoms perfume the air. The Zimmerman Citrus Kiosk explores citrus agricultural history in Southern California. Death Valley Alive! is a new traveling exhibit, available for rent, where visitors can explore the natural history and culture of the Death Valley region from its geologic beginnings 1.3 billion years ago. Online exhibits include The Importance of Museum Collections, The Barstow Fossil Beds, Motherlode of the Miocene, The Etiwanda Fan, and for kids, Mimicry, a study in camouflage and adaptation. Teacher Resources include professional development and workshops, and Trading Places, where 21 hours of time spent volunteering in the Museum earns a free program for your class. Sample opportunities include writing activities for study kits, developing post-visit activities, creating a museum gallery guide, translating student materials into Spanish, or developing an independent idea. There are programs for youth, Scouts, and adults, as well as various publications available in anthropology, archeology, biology, geology and history.

465

Atlas of Historical County Boundaries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

So you'd like to know the boundaries of Washington's King County in the early 20th century? Or perhaps you'd like to know more about the shape of Nassau County in New York back in the 19th century? The Atlas of Historical County Boundaries can provide you such details. The project is housed at the William M. Scholl Center for American History and Culture at The Newberry Library in Chicago and it was completed in 2010. The Atlas includes such features as all boundary changes in states and countries, non-county areas, separate map or polygon files for every different county configuration, and other helpful features. Users can get started by clicking on different states of interest and just exploring as they see fit. It's also useful to read over the Using the Atlas area for additional assistance. Finally, visitors can also look at the Publications section for more information on the source material for these county boundaries.

466

Serviceability assessment of electrical power transmission systems under probabilistically stated seismic hazards: case study for Shelby County, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scenario earthquakes are often used to evaluate seismic vulnerability of civil infrastructure systems. While the results of such a vulnerability assessment are useful in visualising and explaining the impact of earthquakes on public infrastructure, they are conditional in nature and do not capture the risk to infrastructure systems from the seismicity that may threaten them during a specified service period.

Takao Adachi; Bruce R. Ellingwood

2009-01-01

467

Steam plant ash disposal facility and industrial landfill at the Y-12 Plant, Anderson County, Tennessee. Environmental Assessment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to install a wet ash handling system to dewater bottom ash from the coal-fired steam plant at its Y-12 Plant and to construct a new landfill for disposal of industrial wastes, including the dewatered bottom a...

1992-01-01

468

Water Quality Management Plan: Campbell County, Johnson County, Sheridan County (Wyoming).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Powder River Areawide Planning Organization (PRAPO) was designated by the Governor of Wyoming to administer a federal grant for areawide waste treatment planning. The major study area covered Campbell, Johnson and Sheridan Counties in Wyoming. Primary...

1978-01-01

469

76 FR 33401 - Environmental Impact Statement: Will and Kankakee Counties, Illinois and Lake County, IN  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Will and Kankakee Counties, Illinois and Lake County...that a Tier One Environmental Impact Statement will be prepared for the Illiana Corridor Project in Will and Kankakee Counties, Illinois and Lake...

2011-06-08

470

75 FR 25308 - Environmental Impact Statement: Winnebago County, IL and Rock County, WI  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Winnebago County, IL and Rock County, WI AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA...Wisconsin Route 213 and Nye School Road northwest of Beloit, Rock County, Wisconsin to the interchange of Rockton Road and...

2010-05-07

471

System Description for the K-25/K-27 D&D Project Polyurethane Foam Delivery System, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Foam Delivery System used in the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) project for the K-25/K-27 Buildings at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) is comprised of a trailer-mounted Gusmer(reg sign) H20/35 Pro-TEC Proportioning Unit and the as...

2009-01-01

472

Mercury distribution in Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA  

SciTech Connect

As a result of the lithium-isotope separation process used in the production of thermonuclear fusion weapons during the mid-1950s and early 1960s. 150 t of mercury were released into Poplar Creek (via East Fork Poplar Creek) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. This project was performed as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial investigation to define the nature and extent of mercury contamination in Poplar Creek. Ultraclean sampling techniques and ultrasensitive analytical methods were used to determine methylmercury and inorganic mercury concentrations in surface water, sediment, and pore water from Poplar Creek. Total methylmercury and inorganic mercury concentrations in surface water from reaches downstream from the East Fork Poplar Creek confluence were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than the upstream reference reach. Concentrations in surface water increased with distance downstream from the source (East Fork Poplar Creek), which was opposite of expected results. Sediment methylmercury and inorganic mercury concentrations also increased with the distance downstream from the source and were highest near the mouth of Poplar Creek (1.0--12 ng/g and 630--140,000 ng/g, respectively). High concentrations in surface water and sediment near the mouth of Poplar Creek appear to be a result of sediment deposition and resuspension, apparently caused by the stronger Clinch River current acting as a barrier and its backflow into Poplar Creek as a result of hydropower operations.

Campbell, K.R. [SENES Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States). Center for Risk Analysis; Ford, C.J. [Highlands Soil and Water Conservation District, Sebring, FL (United States); Levine, D.A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1998-07-01

473

Reservoir monitoring---1990: Bacteriological conditions in the Tennessee Valley  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-three designated swimming beaches, two informal swimming areas, and four canoe launching sites were sampled at least ten times during a 30-day period in 1990. All 29 met the regulatory limits of a geometric mean of less than 200 colonies of fecal coliform bacteria per l00 milliliters (ml). However, four sites had one sample each with at least 1000 colonies per 100 ml, which is a violation of recreation criteria in two of the seven Tennessee Valley states. Forty-four nonrecreation sites were also sampled to provide generic bacteriological water quality data on several reservoirs and streams and to determine if the Georgia Mountain Fair was having an adverse impact on the bacteriological water quality of Chatuge Reservoir. No impact was observed. Thirty-three sites on 15 reservoirs were sampled, and all but three met recreation criteria. Eleven locations were sampled on three streams: Cotaco Creek near Huntsville, and Beaver and Bullrun Creeks near Knoxville. A comparison of 1990 sampling results at 16 sites with results from a 1974 survey was made.

Fehring, J.P.

1991-05-01

474

Tectonic deformation revealed in baldcypress trees at Reelfoot Lake, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Tree-ring analyses of baldcypress (Taxodium distichum) from Reelfoot Lake, Tennessee, support historical accounts that the lake formed during the great New Madrid earthquakes of 1811--1812. Due to ground subsidence and permanent flooding all of the bottomland hardwood trees within the impounded area were killed. However, many water tolerant baldcypress survived, and hundreds of 200 to 800 year old baldcypress outline the positions of former stream channels drowned by the subsidence. Dendrochronological analyses of multiple cores from 21 baldcypress in the lake reveal several pronounced growth responses to the 1811--1812 earthquakes. These responses include a great surge in radial growth during the decade following the earthquakes and a permanent reduction in wood density beginning in 1812. These and other growth responses to the 1811--1912 earthquakes may allow us to determine if there have been other large earthquakes in the Reelfoot basin during the late Holocene and may help date the formation of other suspected sunk lands in the New Madrid seismic zone. 14 refs., 6 figs.

VanArsdale, R.; Stahle, D.; Cleaveland, M. (Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, AR (USA))

1991-07-01

475

Seasonal movement of brown trout in the Clinch River, Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We used radiotelemetry to monitor the seasonal movements of trophy-size brown trout Salmo trutta in the Clinch River below Norris Dam, Tennessee, to determine whether establishing a special-regulation reach to reduce fishing mortality was a viable management option. Fifteen brown trout (size range, 430-573 mm total length) collected from the river were implanted with radio transmitters between November 1997 and May 1998. Forty-seven percent of these fish died or expelled their transmitters within 50 d postsurgery. The range of movement for surviving brown trout was significantly larger in fall (geometric mean range = 5,111 m) than in any other season. Four brown trout that were monitored for more than 1 year exhibited a limited range of movement (5 km) during the fall season, presumably to spawn. Brown trout also moved more during the fall than in any other season. Harvest restrictions applied to a specific reach of the Clinch River would reduce the exploitation of brown trout in that reach for most of the year but not during the fall, when many fish undertake extensive spawning migrations.

Bettinger, J. M.; Bettoli, P. W.

2004-01-01

476

Anatomy of the middle ordovician sevier shale basin, eastern Tennessee  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sevier Shale basin in eastern Tennessee comprises one of the thickest clastic sequences (nearly 2500 m) of Middle Ordovician age in North America. The lower one-half of the sequence is composed of Lenoir, Whitesburg, Blockhouse and Sevier Formations, in ascending order. The sequence ranges in age from Whiterockian to lower Wilderness in North American stages. The Middle Ordovician sequence exhibits tidal flat (Mosheim Member of Lenoir Fm.), subtidal (main body of Lenoir Fm.), slope (Whitesburg Fm.), anoxic basin (Blockhouse Fm), turbidite and contourite (Sevier Fm.) facies. The Sevier basin evolved in five stages: First, a widespread marine transgression initiated carbonate-shelf deposition in the study area. Second, a major tectonic downwarping event caused the stable shelf to break and subside rapidly at a rate of 60-65 cm 1000 yrs -1, and areas of shelf facies became areas of slope and basin facies. Third, global transgressions maintained the deep anoxic conditions for nearly 10 Ma. Fourth, turbidites began to fill the basin from a westward-prograding submarine fan system. Fifth, contour currents reworked the turbidites and progressively ventilated the Sevier basin. The basin-filling process terminated with shallow-water/subaerial clastics at the end of Middle Ordovician.

Shanmugam, Ganapathy; Walker, Kenneth R.

1983-04-01

477

Directory of forest industries in the Tennessee Valley Region, 1985  

SciTech Connect

The forest industries play an important role in supporting the Tennessee Valley region economy. In 1984, 2297 active primary and secondary wood-using industries provided employment for 92,203 persons. Gross product value totaled $2386 million for primary mills and $4160 million for secondary plants. Primary mills consumed 717 million cubic feet of wood while secondary plants used 291 million cubic feet. Fifty-two plants were under construction or began operations in 1985 and 293 mills were inactive during 1984. Sawmills are the most numerous industry, with 994 active mills employing 9775 workers. The pulp and paper industry is the next largest employer with eleven mills supporting 8406 workers. These two groups account for 92% of the workforce in the primary forest industry sector. Lumber production reached 2.1 billion board feet in 1984. The 56 mills in the 5000-9999 MBF/year size class produced the most lumber (384,809 MBF). The mid-range size classes (1000-9999 MBF/year) employed 5337 workers of 55% of the sawmill workforce. Hardwood lumber production was greatest in the 3000-4999 MBF/year and 5000-9999 MBF/year size classes with 281,224 and 315,808 MBF respectively. Softwood lumber production increased by size with the 50,000 + MBF/year size class producing the most softwood lumber (354,781 MBF).

Not Available

1986-05-01

478

Techniques for simulating flood hydrographs and estimating flood volumes for ungaged basins in east and west Tennessee  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A dimensionless hydrograph developed for a variety of basin conditions in Georgia was tested for its applicability to streams in East and West Tennessee by comparing it to a similar dimensionless hydrograph developed for streams in East and West Tennessee. Hydrographs of observed discharge at 83 streams in East Tennessee and 38 in West Tennessee were used in the study. Statistical analyses were performed by comparing simulated (or computed) hydrographs, derived by application of the Georgia dimensionless hydrograph, and dimensionless hydrographs developed from Tennessee data, with the observed hydrographs at 50 and 75% of their peak-flow widths. Results of the tests indicate that the Georgia dimensionless hydrography is virtually the same as the one developed for streams in East Tennessee, but that it is different from the dimensionless hydrograph developed for streams in West Tennessee. Because of the extensive testing of the Georgia dimensionless hydrograph, it was determined to be applicable for East Tennessee, whereas the dimensionless hydrograph developed from data on streams in West Tennessee was determined to be applicable in West Tennessee. As part of the dimensionless hydrograph development, an average lagtime in hours for each study basin, and the volume in inches of flood runoff for each flood event were computed. By use of multiple-regression analysis, equations were developed that relate basin lagtime to drainage area size, basin length, and percent impervious area. Similarly, flood volumes were related to drainage area size, peak discharge, and basin lagtime. These equations, along with the appropriate dimensionless hydrograph, can be used to estimate a typical (average) flood hydrograph and volume for recurrence-intervals up to 100 years at any ungaged site draining less than 50 sq mi in East and West Tennessee. (USGS)

Gamble, C. R.

1989-01-01

479

Distribution of anthropogenic fill material within the Y-12 plant area, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Widespread groundwater contamination in the vicinity of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has been documented through a variety of monitoring efforts since the late 1970s. Various contaminants, most notably volatile organic compounds (VOCs), have migrated through the subsurface and formed extensive contaminant plumes within the Knox Aquifer/Maynardville Limestone, the primary exit pathway for groundwater transport within the Bear Creek Valley. In 1991, an integrated, comprehensive effort (Upper East Fork Poplar Creek [UEFPC] Phase I monitoring network) was initiated in order to (1) identify contaminant source areas within the industrialized portions of the plant and (2) define contamination migration pathways existing between the source areas and the Knox Aquifer/Maynardville Limestone. Data obtained during previous studies have indicated that extensive zones of fill and buried utility trenches may serve as preferred migration pathways. In addition, portions of UEFPC were rerouted, with several of its tributaries being filled during the initial construction of the plant. These filled surface drainage features are also believed to serve as preferred migration pathways. The identification of preferred contaminant migration pathways within the Y-12 Plant area is essential and required to refine the current Bear Creek Valley groundwater conceptual model and to assist in the selection of technically feasible and cost effective remedial strategies. This report presents the results of an initial investigation of the occurrence of manmade (anthropogenic) fill and its effect upon groundwater movement within the plant area. These interpretations are subject to revision and improvement as further investigation of the effects of the fill upon contaminant migration progresses.

Sutton, G.E. Jr. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, TN (United States); Field, S.M. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, TN (United States)

1995-10-01

480

[Technical assistance to Tennessee industries]. Final CRADA report for CRADA Number Y-1294-0294  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this CRADA was to provide a mechanism whereby private sector companies within the State of Tennessee could access the vast technological resources available at the Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This assistance was focused on assisting companies within the State to become more globally competitive. The State of Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development through the University of Tennessee Center for Industrial Services and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (LMES), provided companies within the state of Tennessee up to four days of technical assistance at no charge. As a result of those interactions, there has been an economic impact of $19.2 million dollars reported over the life of the CRADA. This report contains a review of the objectives of this CRADA, and the status of each objective. It also contains information on how the work performed under this CRADA benefited the sponsor in pursuing its mission. Details of private sector impact and how it was measured and collected are discussed.

Barnes, A.A.

1997-03-14

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