Sample records for kola superdeep borehole

  1. The superdeep well of the Kola Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlovsky, Y.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents papers on the exploration and production of petroleum in the USSR. Topics considered include geological surveys, metamorphism, geochemistry, mineralization, hydrology, geophysical surveys, well logging, rock electrical properties, natural radioactivity, drilling parameters, choosing drilling equipment, the stability of borehole walls, drill cores, drilling fuels, and a technical and economic evaluation of well drilling.

  2. Experience in applying acoustopolarization method for rock samples from the Kola (SG-3), German (KTB) and Finnish (OKU) investigation boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatsevich, Felix F.

    2013-04-01

    The Kola Superdeep Borehole (SG-3) was drilled in the NW-part of the Kola Peninsula [1]. The borehole intersected the lower Proterozoic complex (0-6848 m) of the Pechenga Formation and an Archaean granite and metamorphic complex (6848-12261 m). Our investigations show that rocks of the Archaean complex (paragneiss, metabasite, amphibolites) have high elastic anisotropy. It correlates with breakouts from the walls of the borehole and its inclination (deviation) from the vertical during drilling. Because of this when drilling SG-3 at a depth of 7.7 km to 10.1 km accidents occurred with the loss of the drill string part. Sinking the German drill hole ?-? (9101 m) was also accompanied by complications during its drilling [2]. The drill hole was drilled in the crystalline basement of the Bohemian massif in the south of Germany. The main rocks composing the massif are paragneiss, metabasite, granite and metasedimentary rocks. Our investigations of the ?-? samples from the 4.1-7.1 km interval also showed a high level of elastic anisotropy. The investigation drill hole Outokumpu (OKU) located in SE Finland, reached a final depth of 2516 m. The drill hole has passed through mica schists, biotite gneiss, serpentinite and pegmatite granite. Excluding pegmatite granite, all rocks have a high level of elastic anisotropy. Joint analyses of rock samples from SG-3, ?-? and OKU showed that the use of the acoustopolariscopy method can reveal intervals with breakouts and inclinations of the drill hole from the vertical. Elastic anisotropy monitoring of rocks performed by the acoustopolariscopy method will prevent accidents during sinking wells. 1. Gorbatsevich, F.F. & Smirnov, Yu.P. 2000. Kola Superdeep Borehole: 3-D model of elastic anisotropy of crystalline rocks in the upper and middle crust. In: The results of the study of the deep substance and physical processes in the Kola Superdeep Borehole section down to a depth of 12261 m. (Eds. F.P. Mitrofanov, F.F. Gorbatsevich). Apatity, Poligraf Publ., pp. 131-134. 2. Emmermann R. and Lauterjing J. The German Continental Deep Drilling Program KTB: Overview and major results // Journ. of Geoph. Res.-V.102. No. B8. - P18, 179-18,201. 3. Felix F. Gorbatsevich, Mikhail V. Kovalevsky, Olga M. Trishina. Characteristics of elastic properties of the crystalline rock samples from the Outokumpu deep drill hole: results of acoustopolariscopic laboratory measurements // Special Volume. Geological Survey of Finland. Special Paper 51, 2011. P. 207-218.

  3. Electromagnetic sounding of the Earth's crust in the region of superdeep boreholes of Yamal-Nenets autonomous district using the fields of natural and controlled sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhamaletdinov, A. A.; Petrishchev, M. S.; Shevtsov, A. N.; Kolobov, V. V.; Selivanov, V. N.; Barannik, M. B.; Tereshchenko, E. D.; Grigoriev, V. F.; Sergushin, P. A.; Kopytenko, E. A.; Biryulya, M. A.; Skorokhodov, A. A.; Esipko, O. A.; Damaskin, R. V.

    2013-11-01

    Electromagnetic soundings with the fields of natural (magnetotelluric (MT), and audio magnetotelluric (AMT)) and high-power controlled sources have been carried out in the region of the SG-6 (Tyumen) and SG-7 (En-Yakhin) superdeep boreholes in the Yamal-Nenets autonomous district (YaNAD). In the controlled-source soundings, the electromagnetic field was generated by the VL Urengoi-Pangody 220-kV industrial power transmission line (PTL), which has a length of 114 km, and ultralow-frequency (ULF) Zevs radiating antenna located at a distance of 2000 km from the signal recording sites. In the soundings with the Urengoi-Pangody PTL, the Energiya-2 generator capable of supplying up to 200 kW of power and Energiya-3 portable generator with a power of 2 kW were used as the sources. These generators were designed and manufactured at the Kola Science Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The soundings with the Energiya-2 generator were conducted in the frequency range from 0.38 to 175 Hz. The external generator was connected to the PTL in upon the agreement with the Yamal-Nenets Enterprise of Main Electric Networks, a branch of OAO FSK ES of Western Siberia. The connection was carried out by the wire-ground scheme during the routine maintenance of PTL in the nighttime. The highest-quality signals were recorded in the region of the SG-7 (En-Yakhin) superdeep borehole, where the industrial noise is lowest. The results of the inversion of the soundings with PTL and Zevs ULF transmitter completely agree with each other and with the data of electric logging. The MT-AMT data provide additional information about the deep structure of the region in the low-frequency range (below 1Hz). It is established that the section of SG-6 and SG-7 boreholes contains conductive layers in the depth intervals from 0.15 to 0.3 km and from 1 to 1.5 km. These layers are associated with the variations in the lithological composition, porosity, and fluid saturation of the rocks. The top of the poorly conductive Permian-Triassic complex is identified at a depth of about 7 km. On the basis of the MT data in the lowest frequency band (hourly and longer periods) with the observations at the Novosibirsk observatory taken into account, the distribution of electric resistivity up to a depth of 800 km is reconstructed. This distribution can be used as additional information when calculating the temperature and rheology of the lithosphere and upper mantle in West Siberia. The results of our studies demonstrate the high potential of the complex electromagnetic soundings with natural and controlled sources in the study of deep structure of the lithosphere and tracing deep oil-and-gas-bearing horizons in the sedimentary cover of the West Siberian Platform within the Yamal-Nenets autonomous district.

  4. New borehole-derived results on temperatures at the base of the Fennoscandian ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Volker; Vogt, Christian; Mottaghy, Darius; Kukkonen, Ilmo; Tarasov, Lev

    2014-05-01

    During the last few years, a data base of deep boreholes (>1000 m )in the area of the Fennoscandian ice sheet has been collected, including boreholes from Russia, Poland, Finland, Sweden and Norway. All of these are supposed to have recorded local basal ice conditions during the last glacial cycle. However, at each of these sites we are confronted with particular problems of interpretation. Here, we will concentrate on two very deep boreholes, namely the Outokumpu ICDP borehole (OKU, ?2500 m) and a set of boreholes of intermediate depth (up to 1300 m) in the immediate meighborhood of the Kola superdeep borehole SG3. In the first case, OKU, we have developed a strategy combining the use of a traditional variational inversion of thye Tikhonov type, with a MCMC approach for the exploration of the associated uncertainty. A wide distribution around the result of the variational approach was chosen, with a time dependent temporal correlation length reflecting the loss of resolution back in time. The results fit very well with region independent results from different proxies, multi-proxy reconstructions, and instrumental data. They also are consistent with surface temperatures derived from recent calibrated ice sheet models. The SAT-GST offset independently derived from shallow borehole observations in the area was a crucial step to obtain theses results. The second case, SG3, has been studied a long time, and no final result was obtained regarding the question whether the observed heat flow density profile is caused by paleoclimate, fluid flow, or both. Earlier studies, as well as forward modelling using the results of the aforementioned ice sheet model indicate that paleoclimate alone can not explain the observations. We tested the model derived from the set of shallow boreholes against the temperature log from the main superdeep SG3, which, in contrast to these, transects the main high-permeability zone. The comparison led to a favorable results, and is also qualitatively consistent with other data reported in earlier Russian publications. However, for the SG3 case, which involves fluid flow processes, there are still important open questions. These are related to some of the assumptions made in the modeling and inversion process. The temperature conditions at the base of the ice sheet are surely not it's only effect: the high pressures induced but the ice load are known to drive melt water deep into the subsurface, with unknown temperature effects. Moreover, the crustal deformation related to isostatic effects probably influence large-scale permeability, in particular if older structures can be reactivated. These questions will be discussed in the light or recent modelling results obtained by groups active in nuclear waste disposal research, and which may open new research perspectives in the future.

  5. Continental drilling superdeep drilling and deep geophysical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sass, John; Barber, G. Arthur

    On August 23-29, 1988, the Ministry of Geology of the U.S.S.R., in cooperation with the Inter-Union Commission of the Lithosphere, sponsored an International Seminar on Superdeep Continental Drilling and Deep Geophysical Research. The seminar was attended by more than 250 geoscientists and engineers representing 20 nations. It was held at the Dobrynin Palace of Culture and Technology in Yaroslavl, a city of some 800,000 people, situated on the Volga River about 200 km northeast of Moscow. The goals of the seminar were to discuss “results and future perspectives of superdeep continental drilling and its relations to deep sounding in the neighborhood of deep wells and on connecting geotraverses (transects).”

  6. Tracking Crust-Mantle Recycling through Superdeep Diamonds and their Mineral Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Michael; Bulanova, Galina; Smith, Chris; Thomson, Andrew; Kohn, Simon; Burnham, Antony

    2013-04-01

    Sublithospheric, or 'superdeep' diamonds, originate in the deep upper mantle, transition zone, and at least as deep as the shallow lower mantle. When diamonds crystallize in the mantle from fluids or melts they occasionally entrap coexisting mineral phases. Because of their great physical resiliency, diamonds can potentially preserve information over long distance- and time-scales, revealing important information about the petrologic, tectonic and geodynamic environment in which the diamonds grew and were transported. Superdeep diamonds and their inclusions have proven especially powerful for probing processes related to subduction of slabs into the deep mantle [1-3]. In contrast to lithospheric diamonds that are effectively frozen-in geodynamically, mineral inclusions in superdeep diamonds often record hundreds of kilometers of uplift in the convecting mantle from their original depth of origin [3-5]. The phase equilibria of unmixing of original deep mantle phases such as Ca- and Mg-perovskite, NAL-phase, CF-phase, CAS-phase, and majorite provide a means to establish amounts of uplift. The few available age constraints indicate superdeep diamond growth from the Proterozoic to the Cretaceous, and further dating can potentially lead to constraining mantle upwelling rates [4]. Here we will provide several examples showing how superdeep diamonds and their inclusions record processes of subduction and slab foundering, and ultimately recycling of slab material from the transition zone and lower mantle into the shallow upper mantle. 1. Harte, B., Mineralogical Magazine, 2010. 74: p. 189-215. 2. Tappert, R., et al., Geology, 2005. 33: p. 565-568. 3. Walter, M.J., et al., Science, 2011. 333: p. 54-57. 4. Bulanova, G.P., et al., Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, 2010. 160: p. 489-510. 5. Harte, B. and N. Cayzer, Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, 2007.

  7. Kimberlitic sources of super-deep diamonds in the Juina area, Mato Grosso State, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminsky, Felix V.; Sablukov, Sergei M.; Belousova, Elena A.; Andreazza, Paulo; Tremblay, Mousseau; Griffin, William L.

    2010-01-01

    The Juina diamond field, in the 1970-80s, was producing up to 5-6 million carats per year from rich placer deposits, but no economic primary deposits had been found in the area. In 2006-2007, Diagem Inc. discovered a group of diamondiferous kimberlitic pipes within the Chapadão Plateau (Chapadão, or Pandrea cluster), at the head of a drainage system which has produced most of the alluvial diamonds mined in the Juina area. Diamonds from placer deposits and newly discovered kimberlites are identical; they have super-deep origins from the upper-mantle and transition zone. Field observations and petrographic studies have identified crater-facies kimberlitic material at seven separate localities. Kimberlitic material is represented by tuffs, tuffisites and various epiclastic sediments containing chrome spinel, picroilmenite, manganoan ilmenite, zircon and diamond. The diamond grade varies from 0.2-1.8 ct/m 3. Chrome spinel has 30-61 wt.% Cr 2O 3. Picroilmenite contains 6-14 wt.% MgO and 0.2-4 wt.% Cr 2O 3. Manganoan ilmenite has less than 3 wt.% MgO and 0.38-1.41 wt.% MnO. The 176Hf/ 177Hf ratio in kimberlitic zircons is 0.028288-0.28295 with ?Hf = 5.9-8.3, and lies on the average kimberlite trend between depleted mantle and CHUR. The previously known barren and weakly diamondiferous kimberlites in the Juina area have ages of 79-80 Ma. In contrast, zircons from the newly discovered Chapadão kimberlites have a mean 206Pb/ 238U age of 93.6 ± 0.4 Ma, corresponding to a time of magmatic activity related to the opening of the southern part of the Atlantic Ocean. The most likely mechanism of the origin of kimberlitic magma is super-deep subduction process that initiated partial melting of zones in lower mantle with subsequent ascent of proto-kimberlitic magma.

  8. Physical mechanism of super-deep penetration of solid microparticles into solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Chengzhi; Chen, Jianjie

    2014-05-01

    The phenomenon of super-deep penetration of solid microparticles into solid targets under shock has not been interpreted convincingly until now. The concept of highly excited states, developed by V.E. Panin and others, has opened a new path for the interpretation of this phenomenon. According to this concept, under the condition of a highly excited state, the number of allowable structure states in crystals significantly exceeds the number of atoms, i.e., in crystals, new degrees of freedom arise. Highly excited crystals become, in essence, a superposition of several structures. Therefore, in highly excited states, the material of target may be looked at as a system of weakly interacting particles. The application of the theory of a system of weakly interacting particles in this article shows that when the velocity of penetrating particles exceeds the velocity of the thermal motion of particles of the target material, the friction coefficient is inversely proportional to the third power of the relative velocity of penetrating particles. In this way, the effect of losing friction in the penetration of solid particles into solid targets is interpreted.

  9. Urban planning and construction in the kola north (part II)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. V. Makhrovskaya; M. Ye. Vaytens; L. K. Panov; A. Yu. Belinskiy

    1977-01-01

    In the second of three articles on town planning in the Kola Peninsula portion of the Soviet North (the Kola North), the location of urban centers is analyzed in terms of six clusters or groups: Murmansk, Pechenga, Monchegorsk, Khibiny, Kandalaksha and Kovdor. Clustered forms of urban places are found to have advantages in the provision of services, with service establishments

  10. Super-deep diamonds from kimberlites in the Juina area, Mato Grosso State, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminsky, Felix V.; Khachatryan, Galina K.; Andreazza, Paulo; Araujo, Debora; Griffin, William L.

    2009-11-01

    One thousand three hundred sixty-five diamonds from seven newly discovered kimberlitic pipes in the Juina area were comprehensively studied. These diamonds, like the ones from previously studied Juina placer deposits, are very homogeneous in their morphology and optical properties. Two diamond populations exist in the Pandrea pipes: the major population with a highly aggregated nitrogen impurity (% N B = 75-100%), and a secondary population with a moderately aggregated nitrogen impurity (% N B = 20-65%), while only one major population is present in the diamonds from placers. The diamonds from the pipes have a permanent, relatively high hydrogen impurity concentration. Among the mineral inclusions in diamonds from the Juina pipes, ferropericlase is predominant; chrome spinel, picroilmenite, Mn-ilmenite, MgCaSi-'perovskite' phase, rutile, sulphide, native iron, and iron-oxides were also identified. Most of the inclusions belong to the lower-mantle paragenesis; some (rutile and sulphide) are of eclogitic paragenesis. Mineral inclusions in diamonds from kimberlitic pipes are different in composition from the same minerals in placer diamonds. Both kimberlitic and placer diamonds belong to the same carbon isotopic population, but have differences in the ?13C distribution and were probably formed from different local carbon sources. These data indicate that diamonds from both groups, kimberlites and placer deposits, in the Juina area, belong to the same genetic population with most of the stones originating within the super-deep conditions. However, there are differences between these two groups, which indicate that besides the known Pandrea pipes which may have partly supplied diamonds to the placer deposits, there may be other, still unknown primary sources of diamonds in the Juina area.

  11. P wave material anisotropy of a tectono-metamorphic terrane: An active source seismic experiment at the KTB super-deep

    E-print Network

    Okaya, David

    at the KTB super-deep drill hole, southeast Germany David Okaya Department of Earth Sciences, University experiment at the KTB super- deepdrillhole,southeastGermany,Geophys.Res.Lett.,31,L24620, doi:10.1029/2004GL in situ has been identified, for example, from seismic refraction velocities and reflection travel times

  12. New VSP to 8.5 km Depth at the KTB Super-deep Drillhole - Seismic In Situ Investigation of Deformed Crystalline Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbel, W.; Beilecke, T.; Fischer, D.; Frank, A.; Hasenclever, J.; Lueschen, E.; Gebrande, H.; Borm, G.; Giese, R.; Kueck, J.; Bram, K.; Okaya, D.; Smithson, S.

    2001-12-01

    The deepest part of the superdeep borehole of the Continental Deep Drilling Program (KTB), Germany, from 6000 m to 8500 m, has been sampled for the first time by Vertical Seismic Profiling. The VSPs show P-, S- and PS-converted waves. We observed S-wave splitting over the whole depth range. The azimuth of the polarization of the faster S-wave correlates with the azimuth of rock foliation. The velocity-depth profiles are of high spatial resolution due to the narrow geophone spacing of only 12.5 m. High accuracy was achieved by using a reference geophone at 3.8 km depth in the KTB pilot hole. Amphibolite units show an average P-wave velocity of 6500 m/s with 10% variation caused by composition, fractures and anisotropy. In a Gneiss sequence at 8.5 km depth low velocity of only 5500 m/s is observed correlating with changes in the relative orientation of foliation and fractures. To quantify the effect of intrinsic anisotropy and fractures, reference velocities were computed based on laboratory measurements and on the depth function of mineral composition. By analysing the differences between real and simulated velocity depth profiles we could determine that the maximum P-wave anisotropy of the amphibolite rock matrix in situ is about 9%. Also, we could identify borehole sections with increased fracture density in particular at largest depths. The complexly faulted and folded metamorphic rocks show P-wave traveltime fluctuations with scale lengths between 140 and 220 m in terms of a random media approach. The transition from scattering to effective anisotropic media could be observed for shear waves at different frequency windows. Computer simulations show that a large part of the wavefield is affected or even generated by scattering. Wavefronts are no more circular but strongly distorted depending on the local velocity contrasts. Forward scattering occurs as conversion from P- to S-wave energy generating complex waveforms of simulated and real data which show high similarity with another. Depth profiles of the energy PS-converted waves correlate with geological structure and fracture zones. The importance of these effects for deep crustal reflection studies is illustrated by records of remote VSP shotpoints showing a pronounced coda of scattered arrivals for subhorizontal raypaths through the mid crustal brittle-ductile transition zone. The VSP-records reveal high-resolution images of a major fault zone drilled at ca. 7 km (SE1 zone). PP- and PS-reflections show that the SE1 zone is a bundle of structural elements only one of which is directed towards the previously known intersection with the borehole at ca. 7 km depth. Other reflection elements correlate with the low velocity zone found at the bottom end of the velocity-depth profile where the largest differences between computed reference and in situ velocities were found. This suggests that the strongest reflections are caused by fractures rather than by lithology.

  13. Super-Deep Seismic Reflection Profiling in the Southern Part of Hidaka Collision Zone, Hokkaido, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, K.; Kikuchi, S.; Ito, T.; Tsumura, N.; Arita, K.; Moriya, T.; Saito, H.; Kawanaka, T.; Kozawa, T.; Ikawa, T.

    2001-12-01

    The Kuril Arc has been colliding against the Northeast Japan Arc around the Hidaka mountain range, Hokkaido, Japan. Furthermore the Pacific plate is subducting north-northwestward beneath the Hidaka Collision Zone (HCZ). Recent seismic reflection experiments in this area have revealed that the delamination-wedge structure is formed by Arc-Arc Collision beneath the HCZ (Ito et.al.,1998,2000,Tsumura,1999). However the relationship between the delaminated lower portion of the lower crust and the subducting Pacific plate has remained unclear. In order to reveal the detailed 3-dimensional structure of the HCZ, super-deep seismic reflection experiments were conducted in the southern part of the HCZ, Samani-cho, Hokkido, in September, 2000. Two seismic lines were deployed: Line1 is parallel to the subducting trend of the Pacific plate (NW-SE), and Line2 is nearly parallel to the trend of the Arc-Arc Collision (NE-SW). Line1 is almost perpendicular to Line2. The length of Line1 and Line2 is about 16km and 8km, respectively. Five vibrators were operated, obtaining seismic data of the both lines simultaneously. Here we report the results from 2D seismic profiles. The main features recognized from this survey can be summarized as follows: For Line1: 1) At shallower portion, southeast-dipping reflections are truncating horizontal reflections, which are seen at 3 sec two-way travel time (TWT) in the northwestern half of the survey line. 2) A northwest-dipping strong reflection at 14 sec TWT descends down from the southeastern end of the survey line to the center, whereas gently southeastern-dipping reflection is seen at 14 sec TWT in the northwestern half. 3) Intermittent events are found at 7 sec. , 9 sec. , 12 sec. , and 16 sec TWT. For Line2: 4) Above 5 sec TWT, horizontal reflections are predominant but complicated. 5) There are gently southwest-dipping reflections at 8 to 9 sec TWT, nearly horizontal reflections at 13 sec to 16 sec TWT, but they are discontinuous and unclear. The northwest-dipping reflector at 14 sec seen in Line1 probably corresponds to the upper boundary of the Pacific plate, which is suggested by the study of seismic activity in this area and shows the subducting trend of the Pacific plate. The existence of the reflector derived from the subducting Pacific plate indicates that seismic waves generated by the vibrators passed through the delaminated lower portion of the lower crust. This provides us good prospects that the further improvement of data processing must reveal the relationship between the delaminated lower portion of the lower crust and the subducting Pacific plate.

  14. Clinical effects of Garcinia kola in knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Adegbehingbe, Olayinka O; Adesanya, Saburi A; Idowu, Thomas O; Okimi, Oluwakemi C; Oyelami, Oyesiku A; Iwalewa, Ezekiel O

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Over the past years, there has been a growing number of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) patients who are not willing to comply with long-term non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) treatment and wish to use herbal anti- rheumatic medicine. This study assessed the clinical effects of Garcinia kola (GK) in KOA patients. Patients and methods Prospective randomized, placebo controlled, double blind, clinical trial approved by the institutional medical ethics review board and written informed consent obtained from each patient. All KOA patients presenting at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital complex were recruited into the study. The patients were grouped into four (A = Placebo, B = Naproxen, C = Garcinia kola, D = Celebrex). The drugs and placebo were given twice a day per oral route. Each dose consisted of 200 mg of G. kola, Naproxen (500 mg), Celebrex (200 mg) and Ascorbic acid (100 mg). The primary outcome measure over six weeks study period was the change in mean WOMAC pain visual analogue scales (VAS). Secondary outcome measures included the mean change in joint stiffness and physical function (mobility/walking). Results 143 patients were recruited, 84 (58.7%, males – 24, females – 60) satisfied the selection criteria and completed the study. The effect of knee osteoarthritis bilateralism among the subjects was not significant on their outcome (p > 0.05). The change in the mean WOMAC pain VAS after six weeks of G. kola was significantly reduced compared to the placebo (p < 0.001). Multiple comparisons of the mean VAS pain change of G. kola group was not lowered significantly against the naproxen and celebrex groups (p > 0.05). The onset of G. kola symptomatic pain relief was faster than the placebo (p < 0.001). However, it was slower than the active comparators (p > 0.05). The duration of therapeutic effect of Garcinia kola was longer than the placebo (p > 0.001). G. kola period of effect was less than naproxen and celebrex (p < 0.001). G. kola subjects had improved mean change mobility/walking after six weeks better than the control group(p < 0.001). The mean change in mobility of the G. kola group when compared to the active comparators was not significantly better (p < 0.05). The mean change of knee joint stiffness (p < 0.001) and the change of mean WOMAC score (p < 0.001) were improved on Garcinia kola as compared to the placebo. The mid term outcome of eleven Garcinia kola subjects after cessation of use had a mean pain relief period of 17.27 +/- 5.15 days (range: 9–26 days). There was no significant cardiovascular, renal or drug induced adverse reaction to Garcinia kola. Conclusion Garcinia kola appeared to have clinically significant analgesic/anti-inflammatory effects in knee osteoarthritis patients. Garcinia kola is a potential osteoarthritis disease activity modifier with good mid term outcome. Further studies are required for standardization of dosages and to determine long-term effects. PMID:18667082

  15. Borehole induction coil transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, Gale (Livermore, CA); Wilt, Michael J. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A borehole induction coil transmitter which is a part of a cross-borehole electromagnetic field system that is used for underground imaging applications. The transmitter consists of four major parts: 1) a wound ferrite or mu-metal core, 2) an array of tuning capacitors, 3) a current driver circuit board, and 4) a flux monitor. The core is wound with several hundred turns of wire and connected in series with the capacitor array, to produce a tuned coil. This tuned coil uses internal circuitry to generate sinusoidal signals that are transmitted through the earth to a receiver coil in another borehole. The transmitter can operate at frequencies from 1-200 kHz and supplies sufficient power to permit the field system to operate in boreholes separated by up to 400 meters.

  16. Borehole seismic unit

    SciTech Connect

    Seavey, R.W.

    1982-05-01

    Fracture orientation can be measured by using a triaxial geophone package located at the fracture interval within the wellbore. Seismic signals produced by the fracture can be recorded and measured to determine the direction of the fracture. Reported herein is a description of a borehole seismic unit and procedures to accomplish this task.

  17. Borehole Geophysical Logging

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    USGS hydrologist conducts borehole geophysical logging as part of an applied research project to evaluate the use of new hydrogeophysical tools to remotely monitor and visualize bioremediation of contaminated groundwater. This research is being conducted at the Brandywine Defense Reutilization and M...

  18. Piezotube borehole seismic source

    DOEpatents

    Daley, Tom M; Solbau, Ray D; Majer, Ernest L

    2014-05-06

    A piezoelectric borehole source capable of permanent or semipermanent insertion into a well for uninterrupted well operations is described. The source itself comprises a series of piezoelectric rings mounted to an insulative mandrel internally sized to fit over a section of well tubing, the rings encased in a protective housing and electrically connected to a power source. Providing an AC voltage to the rings will cause expansion and contraction sufficient to create a sonic pulse. The piezoelectric borehole source fits into a standard well, and allows for uninterrupted pass-through of production tubing, and other tubing and electrical cables. Testing using the source may be done at any time, even concurrent with well operations, during standard production.

  19. Apparatus for forming boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, J. A.

    1985-11-26

    Drilling apparatus is disclosed adapted for drilling upwardly a deviated hole from a carriage assembly disposed in a cased vertical hole below a target zone of a hydrocarbon bearing formation. The drilling apparatus includes a drill motor assembly having a drill bit driven by a shaft of a drill bit mud pressure driven motor. A weight on bit assembly is provided below the drill bit motor for imparting ''weight-on-bit'' drilling force to the drilling bit against the face of the borehole. The weight on bit assembly includes an anti-rotation assembly for preventing rotation of the drill bit motor with respect to the borehole and an axial drive assembly for applying axial force to the drill bit. Apparatus is provided to reverse the direction of the axial force generated by the weight on bit assembly. Apparatus is also provided to limit the axial force applied to the drill bit to a predetermined level.

  20. Abandoned borehole compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Byerley, T. L.

    1981-05-12

    Compositions are described for boreholes which are to become abandoned and also a process for using the same. The compositions contain a mixture of about 89.5% to about 99.4% by weight clay gellant, about 0.5% to about 10% by weight water-soluble alkali metal salt , and about 0.1% to about 3.0% by weight salt of carboxymethylcellulose.

  1. Micro borehole drilling platform

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This study by CTES, L.C. meets two main objectives. First, evaluate the feasibility of using coiled tubing (CT) to drill 1.0 inches-2.5 inches diameter directional holes in hard rocks. Second, develop a conceptual design for a micro borehole drilling platform (MBDP) meeting specific size, weight, and performance requirements. The Statement of Work (SOW) in Appendix A contains detailed specifications for the feasibility study and conceptual design.

  2. Sulphur and heavy metal concentrations in Scots pine bark in northern Finland and the Kola peninsula

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Poikolainen

    1997-01-01

    Sulphur and heavy metal deposition in northern Finland (= in Lapland) and the Kola Peninsula were surveyed using Scots pine\\u000a bark samples. Sulphur concentrations in bark close to the Kola smelters were on an average twice as high as on the Finnish\\u000a side of the border. The Cu and Ni concentrations near the smelters were almost 100-fold the mean values

  3. MEASUREMENTS OF THE CONFINEMENT LEAKTIGHTNESS AT THE KOLA NUCLEAR POWER STATION (UNIT 2) IN RUSSIA

    SciTech Connect

    GREENE,G.A.; GUPPY,J.G.

    1998-08-01

    This is the final report on the INSP project entitled, ``Kola Confinement Leaktightness'' conducted by BNL under the authorization of Project Work Plan WBS 1.2.2.1. This project was initiated in February 1993 to assist the Russians to reduce risks associated with the continued operation of older Soviet-designed nuclear power plants, specifically the Kola VVER-440/230 Units 1 and 2, through upgrades in the confinement performance to reduce the uncontrolled leakage rate. The major technical objective of this-project was to improve the leaktightness of the Kola NPP VVER confinement boundaries, through the application of a variety of sealants to penetrations, doors and hatches, seams and surfaces, to the extent that current technology permitted. A related objective was the transfer, through training of Russian staff, of the materials application procedures to the staff of the Kola NPP. This project was part of an overall approach to minimizing uncontrolled releases from the Kola NPP VVER440/230s in the event of a serious accident, and to thereby significantly mitigate the consequences of such an accident. The US provided materials, application technology, and applications equipment for application of sealant materials, surface coatings, potting materials and gaskets, to improve the confinement leaktightness of the Kola VVER-440/23Os. The US provided for training of Russian personnel in the applications technology.

  4. Borehole radar for geothermal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, M.W.; Caffey, T.W.H.

    1991-01-01

    An initial evaluation of a continuous wave borehole radar system with steerable antennas has been completed. Candidate antennas have been identified which meet the size requirements for borehole applications. The patterns of these antennas are not dependent on the properties of the surrounding media when the antenna dimensions are less than one-tenth wavelength. The beam patterns can be steered adequately to allow the volume of earth within several meters of a borehole to be investigated. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Ice-Borehole Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto; Carsey, Frank; Lane, Arthur; Engelhardt, Herman

    2006-01-01

    An instrumentation system has been developed for studying interactions between a glacier or ice sheet and the underlying rock and/or soil. Prior borehole imaging systems have been used in well-drilling and mineral-exploration applications and for studying relatively thin valley glaciers, but have not been used for studying thick ice sheets like those of Antarctica. The system includes a cylindrical imaging probe that is lowered into a hole that has been bored through the ice to the ice/bedrock interface by use of an established hot-water-jet technique. The images acquired by the cameras yield information on the movement of the ice relative to the bedrock and on visible features of the lower structure of the ice sheet, including ice layers formed at different times, bubbles, and mineralogical inclusions. At the time of reporting the information for this article, the system was just deployed in two boreholes on the Amery ice shelf in East Antarctica and after successful 2000 2001 deployments in 4 boreholes at Ice Stream C, West Antarctica, and in 2002 at Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska. The probe is designed to operate at temperatures from 40 to +40 C and to withstand the cold, wet, high-pressure [130-atm (13.20-MPa)] environment at the bottom of a water-filled borehole in ice as deep as 1.6 km. A current version is being outfitted to service 2.4-km-deep boreholes at the Rutford Ice Stream in West Antarctica. The probe (see figure) contains a sidelooking charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera that generates both a real-time analog video signal and a sequence of still-image data, and contains a digital videotape recorder. The probe also contains a downward-looking CCD analog video camera, plus halogen lamps to illuminate the fields of view of both cameras. The analog video outputs of the cameras are converted to optical signals that are transmitted to a surface station via optical fibers in a cable. Electric power is supplied to the probe through wires in the cable at a potential of 170 VDC. A DC-to-DC converter steps the supply down to 12 VDC for the lights, cameras, and image-data-transmission circuitry. Heat generated by dissipation of electric power in the probe is removed simply by conduction through the probe housing to the visible features of the lower structure of the ice sheet, including ice layers formed at different times, bubbles, and mineralogical inclusions. At the time of reporting the information for this article, the system was just deployed in two boreholes on the Amery ice shelf in East Antarctica and after successful 2000 2001 deployments in 4 boreholes at Ice Stream C, West Antarctica, and in 2002 at Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska. The probe is designed to operate at temperatures from 40 to +40 C and to withstand the cold, wet, high-pressure [130-atm (13.20-MPa)] environment at the bottom of a water-filled borehole in ice as deep as 1.6 km. A current version is being outfitted to service 2.4-km-deep boreholes at the Rutford Ice Stream in West Antarctica. The probe (see figure) contains a sidelooking charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera that generates both a real-time analog video signal and a sequence of still-image data, and contains a digital videotape recorder. The probe also contains a downward-looking CCD analog video camera, plus halogen lamps to illuminate the fields of view of both cameras. The analog video outputs of the cameras are converted to optical signals that are transmitted to a surface station via optical fibers in a cable. Electric power is supplied to the probe through wires in the cable at a potential of 170 VDC. A DC-to-DC converter steps the supply down to 12 VDC for the lights, cameras, and image-datatransmission circuitry. Heat generated by dissipation of electric power in the probe is removed simply by conduction through the probe housing to the visible features of the lower structure of the ice sheet, including ice layers formed at different times, bubbles, and mineralogical inclusions. At thime of reporting the information for this article, the system was just deployed in two boreholes

  6. Can ice sheet models contribute to the understanding of deep borehole temperature profiles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Volker; Tarasov, Lev; Mottaghy, Darius; Kukkonen, Ilmo; Majorowicz, Jacek; Safanda, Jan; Demezhko, Dmitry

    2013-04-01

    It has been argued many times that deep boreholes in Northern America and Europe have recorded basal ice sheet conditions during the last glacial cycle. However, though most of the very deep and well documented boreholes available today belong into this group, systematic investigations of this effects have been rare, and are only now emerging (Matharoo et al., Rath et al., in prep.). Here we present some early results from a case study in Northern Europe,analyzing several well-known deep boreholes in the light of the recent ice sheet model of Tarasov et al.(2008). These boreholes include temperature profiles from the Kola SG3 (Russia, >4000 m) Outokumpu (Finland, 2500 m), Udryn (Poland, 2250 m), Torun (Poland, 2920 m), and Czeszowo (Poland, 3450 m). All of these data have been independently investigated before with forward and inverse methods. For this study, we have chosen a very simple approach. Starting from a small ensemble of ground surface temperatures derived from the data-calibrated glacial Systems Model, we employed an 1D subsurface model based on the best available knowledge on local geology and climatic conditions. The synthetic borehole temperature profiles derived are then compared to the observations, and discussed with respect to earlier interpretations. Several problems related to this approach are discussed: (1) the imperfect representation of local subsurface conditions, e.g., the assumption of 1D structure; (2) the role of the driving climate, which will determine the conditions under ice-free conditions; (3) the well-known imperfect coupling of surface air and ground temperatures. We believe that this contribution will be the base for in-depth discussions, and could be seminal for further investigations.

  7. Stability of highly inclined boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Aadnoy, B.S.; Chenevert, M.E.

    1987-12-01

    Hole inclination produces alterations in the stress state around the borehole and in the physical properties of the rock. Depending on specific conditions, such effects may lead to collapse of the borehole or a reduction in the fracture-initiation pressure. This paper shows how to determine such effects through the application of stress analysis and rock mechanics.

  8. Side hole drilling in boreholes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jr., Earl R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus for use in a borehole or other restricted space to bore a side hole into the strata surrounding the borehole, including a flexible shaft with a drill at its end, and two trains of sheathing members that can be progressively locked together into a rigid structure around the flexible shaft as it is directed sidewardly into the strata.

  9. Some physical properties of tabletted seed of Garcinia kola (HECKEL).

    PubMed

    Onunkwo, G C; Egeonu, H C; Adikwu, M U; Ojile, J E; Olowosulu, A K

    2004-06-01

    The formulation of Garcinia kola seeds into tablet dosage form and evaluation of some physical properties of the tablets are presented. A chemical assay was conducted on the dry, powdered seeds as well as the crude aqueous extract of the seeds. The dry powdered seeds contain 0.003% of flavonoids while the crude extract contained 0.007% of flavonoids based on rutin used as the standard. The powdered material (50 mg) and crude extract (10 mg) were formulated into tablets using the wet granulation method. Named binders were evaluated in these formulations. The various tablet parameters were evaluated, namely: weight variation, thickness and diameter, hardness, friability, disintegration time, dissolution profile and content uniformity. The results indicated that the tablets had good disintegration time, dissolution and hardness/friability profiles. Tablets formulated with starch had the best disintegration properties but were consequently very friable. Tablets formulated from 10 mg of the crude extract needed a larger proportion of diluents, which affected the tablet properties. PMID:15187382

  10. Good News for Borehole Climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Volker; Fidel Gonzalez-Rouco, J.; Goosse, Hugues

    2010-05-01

    Though the investigation of observed borehole temperatures has proved to be a valuable tool for the reconstruction of ground surface temperature histories, there are many open questions concerning the significance and accuracy of the reconstructions from these data. In particular, the temperature signal of the warming after the Last glacial Maximum (LGM) is still present in borehole temperature profiles. It influences the relatively shallow boreholes used in current paleoclimate inversions to estimate temperature changes in the last centuries. This is shown using Monte Carlo experiments on past surface temperature change, using plausible distributions for the most important parameters, i.e.,amplitude and timing of the glacial-interglacial transition, the prior average temperature, and petrophysical properties. It has been argued that the signature of the last glacial-interglacial transition could be responsible for the high amplitudes of millennial temperature reconstructions. However, in shallow boreholes the additional effect of past climate can reasonably approximated by a linear variation of temperature with depth, and thus be accommodated by a "biased" background heat flow. This is good news for borehole climate, but implies that the geological heat flow values have to be interpreted accordingly. Borehole climate reconstructions from these shallow are most probably underestimating past variability due to the diffusive character of the heat conduction process, and the smoothness constraints necessary for obtaining stable solutions of this ill-posed inverse problem. A simple correction based on subtracting an appropriate prior surface temperature history shows promising results reducing these errors considerably, also with deeper boreholes, where the heat flow signal can not be approximated linearly, and improves the comparisons with AOGCM modeling results.

  11. A Test of Borehole Paleoclimatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosnold, W.; Wood, S.

    2002-12-01

    New temperature-depth (T-z) measurements in boreholes previously used for heat flow and borehole paleoclimate studies between 1979 and the present provide a critical test of borehole paleoclimatology and may provide a means of determining anthropogenic forcing of surface temperature. In 2001 and 2002, we obtained new T-z profiles in boreholes in North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska and Ontario that were drilled and logged initially for heat flow research and later were used in paleoclimate analysis. Comparison of the T-z logs reveals changes in subsurface temperatures, which correlate with air temperature records at nearby meteorological stations. These repeat measurements solve a problem in comparing the borehole temperature record to the instrumental meteorological surface-air-temperature (SAT) record in that data for the same time periods are compared. In previous comparisons, the borehole T-z profile at the beginning of the SAT record was unknown and a pre-observational mean was assumed for the SAT. The results of this test can be used to compute the thermal energy stored in the ground between measurements. Comparison of these results to radiative flux measurements from meteorological and satellite instruments for the time periods represented by the data may allow determination of relative changes and differences in radiation and thermal energy storage. However, energy storage in the ground is a complex process involving a number factors that influence energy exchange including, soil moisture, ground cover, wind, precipitation, solar radiation, surface heat flow, soil temperature, and air temperature. If these factors can be accurately determined, extraction of the anthropogenic signal from the borehole data should be possible.

  12. Genesis of peat-bog soils in the northern taiga spruce forests of the Kola Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of soil formation processes in the Peat-Bog soils of waterlogged spruce phytocenoses on the Kola Peninsula are investigated. It is found that the ash composition of the peat layer is determined primarily by the composition of the buried plant residues. The effect of the chemical composition of water feeding the peat bogs is determined. (Refs. 7).

  13. In vitro antioxidant and free radical scavenging activities of Garcinia kola seeds.

    PubMed

    Okoko, Tebekeme

    2009-10-01

    Garcinia kola Heckel--a tropical plant which grows in moist forest, has found wide applications in traditional medicine especially in the West and Central African sub-region. The seeds have been demonstrated to possess numerous bioactivities but research is highly limited on the link between its fractions and the bioactivities. In this work, the methanolic extract of Garcinia kola seeds was subjected to silica gel column chromatography into five fractions ME1-ME5 and the free radical scavenging activities and antioxidant potentials were determined for each fraction using various in vitro models. The ME4 fraction possessed the greatest activities. It was also demonstrated that the ME4 fraction strongly inhibited nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide activated macrophage U937 cells. Chromatographic fractionation and spectroscopic analysis of the ME4 fraction revealed the presence of four compounds namely garcinia biflavonoids GB1 and GB2, garcinal and garcinoic acid. These findings show that these four compounds are partly responsible for the great antioxidant potential of Garcinia kola seeds. This gives further evidence to the nutraceutical and pharmaceutical potential of Garcinia kola. PMID:19635523

  14. 30 CFR 75.1318 - Loading boreholes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...f) Explosives of different brands, types or cartridge diameters shall not be loaded in the same borehole. (g) Only nonconductive, nonsparking tamping poles shall be used for loading and tamping boreholes. The use of nonsparking connecting...

  15. 30 CFR 75.1318 - Loading boreholes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...f) Explosives of different brands, types or cartridge diameters shall not be loaded in the same borehole. (g) Only nonconductive, nonsparking tamping poles shall be used for loading and tamping boreholes. The use of nonsparking connecting...

  16. Maine Geological Survey Borehole Temperature Profiles

    DOE Data Explorer

    Marvinney, Robert

    This dataset includes temperature profiles from 30 boreholes throughout Maine that were selected for their depth, location, and lithologies encountered. Depths range from about 300 feet to 2,200 feet. Most of the boreholes selected for measurement were completed in granite because this lithology can be assumed to be nearly homogeneous over the depth of the borehole. Boreholes were also selected to address gaps in existing geothermal datasets. Temperature profiles were collected in October and November, 2012.

  17. Maine Geological Survey Borehole Temperature Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Marvinney, Robert

    2013-11-06

    This dataset includes temperature profiles from 30 boreholes throughout Maine that were selected for their depth, location, and lithologies encountered. Depths range from about 300 feet to 2,200 feet. Most of the boreholes selected for measurement were completed in granite because this lithology can be assumed to be nearly homogeneous over the depth of the borehole. Boreholes were also selected to address gaps in existing geothermal datasets. Temperature profiles were collected in October and November, 2012.

  18. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant borehole data

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    Data pertaining to all the surface boreholes used at the WIPP site for site characterization hydrological testing and resource evaluation exist in numerous source documents. This project was initiated to develop a comprehensive data base that would include the data on all WIPP related surface boreholes from the Atomic Energy Commission, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Energy Research and Development Administration, Department of Energy, and Hydrologic Test Borehole Programs. The data compiled from each borehole includes: operator, permit number, location, total depth, type of well, driller, drilling record, casing record, plugging schedule, and stratigraphic summary. There are six groups of boreholes contained in this data base, they are as follows: Commercially Drilled Potash Boreholes, Energy Department Wells, Geologic Exploration Boreholes, Hydrologic Test Boreholes, Potash Boreholes, and Subsurface Exploration Boreholes. There were numerous references which contained borehole data. In some cases the data found in one document was inconsistent with data in another document. In order to ensure consistency and accuracy in the data base, the same references were used for as many of the boreholes as possible. For example, all elevations and locations were taken from Compilation and Comparison of Test-Hole Location Surveys in the Vicinity of the WIPP Site. SAND 88-1065, Table 3-5. There are some sections where a data field is left blank. In this case, the information was either not applicable or was unavailable.

  19. Downhole Imaging With Borehole Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokkema, J. T.; van den Berg, P. M.; van Dongen, K. W. A.; Luthi, S. M.

    We describe a directional borehole radar system. The antennas are positioned in a bi-static set-up. In order to obtain a focused radiation pattern, the transmitting and receiving dipoles are shielded with a curved reflector. The radiation pattern of this scattered wavefield is computed by solving the integral equation for the unknown elec- tric surface current at the conducting surface. Based on these numerical simulations, a prototype was built. The effective radiation pattern is in good agreement with the computed pattern. We also present a three-dimensional imaging method for this bore- hole radar. The computed radiation pattern is used in such a way that deconvolution for the angular radiation pattern can be applied. Data from preliminary laboratory and field tests under controlled conditions are promising. The applications of this method include the detection of unexploded ordinance from boreholes, the detection of objects and layers in tunnels, and the determination of the diameter of concrete columns in the Jetgrout Diameter System. With appropriate modifications, this system may be appli- cable in the oil- and gas industry for the detection of layers and fractures in borehole. It covers a gap between conventional logging measurements in boreholes, and seismic surface surveys.

  20. Protection against 2- acetyl aminofluorene-induced toxicity in mice by garlic (Allium sativum), bitter kola (Garcina kola seed) and honey.

    PubMed

    Odunola, O A; Adetutu, A; Olorunnisola, O S; Ola-Davis, O

    2005-06-01

    The effects of honey (Hoc) and aqueous suspensions of garlic (Allium sativum) (Ga) and bitter kola (Garcina kola seed) (Bi) on the toxicities induced by 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF) a model carcinogen, were investigated in mice. The animals were dosed for seven consecutive days with Ho, Ga and Bi as dietary supplements. They were then challenged with a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) dose of 2-AAF at 50 mg/kg bd. wt on the seventh day. The degree of clastogenicity was assessed using the mouse micronucleus assay while liver damage was monitored by measuring the level of gamma glutamyltransferase (gamma-GT) in serum and liver homogenates respectively. The results revealed that 2-AAF induced micronuclei formation in the polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) of the bone marrow by about five fold in comparison to the PCEs formed in control mice. Ho, Ga, and Bi also induced micronucleus formation on their own. However. feeding of any of Ho, Ga or Bi and the administration (i.p) of 2-AAF reduced significantly, the ability of 2-AAF to induce micronuclei formation in the order Ho>Ga>Bi. Furthermore, 2-AAF induced gamma-GT activity in the serum and liver homogenate by about two and a half and three folds respectively. A combination of 2-AAF and any of Ga or Bi or Ho significantly decreased 2-AAF-induced activity of gamma-GT in the order Ho>Bi>Ga (serum) and Bi>Ga=Ho (liver). These findings suggest that honey, garlic and bitter kola protect against 2-AAF-induced gamma-GTactivity and micronuleated PCEs formation. PMID:16749342

  1. Infrasound research at Kola Regional Seismological Centre, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asming, Vladimir; Kremenetskaya, Elena

    2013-04-01

    A small-aperture infrasound array has been installed in Kola Peninsula, Russia 17 km far from the town of Apatity in the year 2000. It comprises 3 Chaparral V microbarographs placed closely to the APA seismic array sensors and equipped with pipe wind reducing filters. The data are digitized at the array site and transmitted in real time to a processing center in Apatity. To search for infrasound events (arrivals of coherent signals) a beamforming-style detector has been developed. Now it works in near real time. We analyzed the detecting statistics for different frequency bands. Most man-made events are detected in 1-5 Hz band, microbaromes are typically detected in 0.2-1 Hz band. In lower frequencies we record mostly a wind noise. A data base of samples of infrasound signals of different natures has been collected. It contains recordings of microbaromes, industrial and military explosions, airplane shock waves, infrasound of airplanes, thunders, rocket launches and reentries, bolides etc. The most distant signals we have detected are associated with Kursk Magnetic Anomaly explosions (1700 km far from Apatity). We implemented an algorithm for association of infrasound signals and preliminary location of infrasound events by several arrays. It was tested with Apatity data together with data of Sweden - Finnish infrasound network operated by the Institute of Space Physics in Umea (Sweden). By agreement with NORSAR we have a real-time access to the data of Norwegian experimental infrasound installation situated in Karasjok (North Norway). Currently our detection and location programs work both with Apatity and Norwegian data. The results are available in Internet. Finnish militaries routinely destroy out-of-date weapon in autumns at the same compact site in North Finland. This is a great source of repeating infrasound signals of the same magnitude and origin. We recorded several hundreds of such explosions. The signals have been used for testing our location routines. Some factors were observed enabling or disabling first (tropospheric) arrivals of such signals depending on weather conditions. Systematic backazimuth deviations for stratospheric arrivals have been observed caused by strong stratospheric winds. In 2009 mobile infrasound arrays were developed in KRSC. Each array comprises 3 low-frequency microphones, GPS, digitizer and PC with data acquisition system. Aperture of such arrays is about 250 m, deployment time is less than 1 hour. These arrays are used in experimental work with Roskosmos space agency to search space debris reentering places. In 2012 a wireless version of such mobile array was created. Each acquisition point comprises a microphone, GPS and ADC chips, microcontroller and radio modem to send data to a central unit. This enabled us to increase aperture (up to 500 m) and decrease deployment time.

  2. Lake water geochemistry on the western Kola Peninsula, north-west Russia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clemens Reimann; David Banks; Igor Bogatyrev; Patrice de Caritat; Galina Kashulina; Heikki Niskavaara

    1999-01-01

    Water samples were taken from 120 lakes spread over the western half of the Kola Peninsula, NW Russia. The samples were analysed for 37 elements, pH and electrical conductivity. Lake water chemistry appears in most cases to be dominated by a Ca\\/Na–HCO3 signature, characteristic of natural carbonate\\/silicate weathering. Input of elements from marine derived salts and from the Ni industry

  3. Slant Borehole Demonstration Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    GARDNER, M.G.

    2000-07-19

    This report provides a summary of the demonstration project for development of a slant borehole to retrieve soil samples from beneath the SX-108 single-shell tank. It provides a summary of the findings from the demonstration activities and recommendations for tool selection and methods to deploy into the SX Tank Farm. Daily work activities were recorded on Drilling and Sampling Daily Work Record Reports. The work described in this document was performed during March and April 2000.

  4. High-temperature borehole instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Koczan, S. P.; Stephani, E. L.

    1985-10-01

    A new method of extracting natural heat from the Earth's crust was invented at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1970. It uses fluid pressures (hydraulic fracturing) to produce cracks that connect two boreholes drilled into hot rock formations of low initial permeability. Pressurized water is then circulated through this connected underground loop to extract heat from the rock and bring it to the surface. The creation of the fracture reservior began with drilling boreholes deep within the Precambrian basement rock at the Fenton Hill Test Site. Hydraulic fracturing, flow testing, and well-completion operations required unique wellbore measurements using downhole instrumentation systems that would survive the very high borehole temperatures, 320(0)C (610(0)F). These instruments were not available in the oil and gas industrial complex, so the Los Alamos National Laboratory initiated an intense program upgrading existing technology where applicable, subcontracting materials and equipment development to industrial manufactures, and using the Laboratory resources to develop the necessary downhole instruments to meet programmatic schedules.

  5. Borehole Stability in High-Temperature Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chuanliang; Deng, Jingen; Yu, Baohua; Li, Wenliang; Chen, Zijian; Hu, Lianbo; Li, Yang

    2014-11-01

    In oil and gas drilling or geothermal well drilling, the temperature difference between the drilling fluid and formation will lead to an apparent temperature change around the borehole, which will influence the stress state around the borehole and tend to cause borehole instability in high geothermal gradient formations. The thermal effect is usually not considered as a factor in most of the conventional borehole stability models. In this research, in order to solve the borehole instability in high-temperature formations, a calculation model of the temperature field around the borehole during drilling is established. The effects of drilling fluid circulation, drilling fluid density, and mud displacement on the temperature field are analyzed. Besides these effects, the effect of temperature change on the stress around the borehole is analyzed based on thermoelasticity theory. In addition, the relationships between temperature and strength of four types of rocks are respectively established based on experimental results, and thermal expansion coefficients are also tested. On this basis, a borehole stability model is established considering thermal effects and the effect of temperature change on borehole stability is also analyzed. The results show that the fracture pressure and collapse pressure will both increase as the temperature of borehole rises, and vice versa. The fracture pressure is more sensitive to temperature. Temperature has different effects on collapse pressures due to different lithological characters; however, the variation of fracture pressure is unrelated to lithology. The research results can provide a reference for the design of drilling fluid density in high-temperature wells.

  6. Hydraulically controlled discrete sampling from open boreholes.

    PubMed

    Harte, Philip T

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater sampling from open boreholes in fractured-rock aquifers is particularly challenging because of mixing and dilution of fluid within the borehole from multiple fractures. This note presents an alternative to traditional sampling in open boreholes with packer assemblies. The alternative system called ZONFLO (zonal flow) is based on hydraulic control of borehole flow conditions. Fluid from discrete fractures zones are hydraulically isolated allowing for the collection of representative samples. In rough-faced open boreholes and formations with less competent rock, hydraulic containment may offer an attractive alternative to physical containment with packers. Preliminary test results indicate a discrete zone can be effectively hydraulically isolated from other zones within a borehole for the purpose of groundwater sampling using this new method. PMID:24107011

  7. Borehole Summary Report for Core Hole C4998 – Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, D. BRENT; Garcia, Benjamin J.

    2006-12-15

    Seismic borehole C4998 was cored through the upper portion of the Columbia River Basalt Group and Ellensburg Formation to provide detailed lithologic information and intact rock samples that represent the geology at the Waste Treatment Plant. This report describes the drilling of borehole C4998 and documents the geologic data collected during the drilling of the cored portion of the borehole.

  8. Shear wave transducer for boreholes

    DOEpatents

    Mao, N.H.

    1984-08-23

    A technique and apparatus is provided for estimating in situ stresses by measuring stress-induced velocity anisotropy around a borehole. Two sets each of radially and tangentially polarized transducers are placed inside the hole with displacement directions either parallel or perpendicular to the principal stress directions. With this configuration, relative travel times are measured by both a pulsed phase-locked loop technique and a cross correlation of digitized waveforms. The biaxial velocity data are used to back-calculate the applied stress.

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Flavanone Glycoside 4I,5, 7-Trihydroxy Flavanone Rhamnoglucose from Garcinia kola Seed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okwu, D. E.; Morah, F. N. I.

    The ethanolic extract of Garcinia kola, Heckel (Guttiferae), which had previously been shown to have biological activity were studied. Preliminary phytochemical screening of the plants showed the presence of flavonoids, phenolic compounds, tannins and saponins. The ethanolic extract of Garcinia kola seeds resulted in the isolation and characterization of flavanone glycoside 4I, 5, 7-trihydroxyflavonone rhamnoglucose (that is naringin-7-rharmnoglucoseside) from its spectral data. IHNMR spin system analysis and acid hydrolysis were performed to characterize the higher order rhamnoglucosyl moiety comprising glucose and rhamnose linked to carbon 7 of the flavanone ring system of the isolate. It is concluded that 4I, 5, 7-trihydroxyflavanone rhamnoglucose may be a contributor to the antioxidants, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-tumor and anti-hepatotoxic properties exhibited by Garcinia kola seed.

  10. Inhibition of acute experimental colitis by a crude extract and diets containing seeds of Garcinia kola (heckel).

    PubMed

    Olaleye, S B; Ige, S F; Onasanwo, S A; Cho, C H

    2010-12-01

    The protective effect of Garcinia kola (GK) crude extract on acetic acid induced colitis in rats was investigated. Colitis, a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by inflammation of colon. The pathology in colitis includes disruption of crypt architecture, inflammation of crypts, frank crypt abscesses, and hemorrhage or inflammatory cells in the lamina propria. Since oxidative stress plays an important role in the etiology of Inflammatory Bowel diseases,and Garcinia kola (GK), have been shown to reduce oxidative stress in the rat stomach.The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Garcinia kola on ulcerative colitis (UC) induced by acetic acid. Albino rats were divided into five groups; Group one served as control, group two received Normal saline, group three received 2.5% ethanol while groups four and five were given 20mg/kg and 100mg/kg of crude extract of Garcinia kolarespectively. In another experiment, rats were fed for 2 weeks on normal rat diets but specially composed to contain 12.5%, 25% and 50% by weight of G kola. Colitis was induced by intra-rectal administration of 6% acetic acid. The colonic damage was elucidated by macroscopic damage scores; colon wet weight, stool consistency and colonic edema (thickness of the colon). Intra-luminal administration of 6% acetic acid resulted in observable clinical and macroscopic signs of colitis.Pre-orally administered of crude extract of GK significantly reduced the colonic damage score (p<0.001), colon weight (p<0.001), thickness of the colon (p<0.001) and diarrhea (p<0.001).Histological examinations also indicated a marked reduction in tissue injury and inhibition in neutrophil infiltration in rats pretreated with crude extract of Garcinia kola. Results of this investigation provide experimental evidence of Garcinia kola as an anti-colitis agent. PMID:22416650

  11. A deep borehole in the Michigan Basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norman H. Sleep; L. L. Sloss

    1978-01-01

    Heat flow, in situ stress, in situ S wave and P wave velocities, and in situ density from borehole gravity were successfully measured in a 5.3-km-deep borehole in the Michigan basin. Precambrian (?) red beds and two altered basic igneous bodies were encountered beneath the known Cambrian succession of the basin. Petrological and paleomagnetic studies were undertaken on oriented samples

  12. Interpretation and application of borehole televiewer surveys

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1983-01-01

    A borehole televiewer log is comparable to a picture of a continuous core and may yield even more information since it is a picture of the cores host environment; i.e., the inside of the borehole as it exists in the subsurface. Important relationships are preserved which can be lost when cores are brought to the surface. Fractures, bedding planes, vugs,

  13. A Pb isotope investigation of the Lovozero Agpaitic Nepheline Syenite, Kola Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zartman, R. E.; Kogarko, L. N.

    2014-01-01

    For the first time Pb isotope composition was established in Lovozero rocks and raremetal ores, which is important for identifying their sources. The world's largest layered intrusion of agpaitic nepheline syenite-the Lovozero alkaline massif—is located near the center of the Kola Peninsula in Russia. This superlarge complex plutonic body hosts the economically important loparite and eudiallyte deposits [1]. These deposits contain immense resources of REE, Nb, Ta, Zr, and constitute a world class mineral district. The Lovozero massif belongs to the Kola ultramafic alkaline and carbonatitic province (KACP) of Devonian age. Previous bulk rock studies have shown that the initial Sr and Nd isotope ratios of Lovozero rocks plot in the depleted mantle quadrant of Sr-Nd diagrams [2]. More recently, Hf isotope data obtained by Kogarko et al. (3) confirm that the Lovozero and Khibina massifs with ?Hf between 6 and 8 are derived predominantly from a depleted mantle source. It was shown that Sr, Nd, and Hf abundances are significantly elevated in the Kola alkaline rocks, and thus their isotopic compositions are relatively insensitive to minor contamination by the overlying crustal rocks. By contrast, Pb in the KACP rocks is a much more sensitive indicator of a crustal component. In this paper we investigate the lead isotopic signature of all resentative types of Lovozero rocks (Table 1) in order to further characterize their mantle sources. The Lovozero massif consists of four intrusive phases. Rocks of phase I (mostly nepheline syenites) comprise about 5% of the total volume, phase II (urtites, foyaite, lujavrites) forms the main portion of the massif comprising 77% in volume, and phase III (eudialyte lujavrites) contributes about 18%. Country rocks are represented by Devonian effusive rocks and Archean gneisses.

  14. Borehole Logging from Sample Collection to Borehole Geophysics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Richard Laton

    In January of 2003, CSUF drilled and completed a deep multiport-monitoring well on the north side of campus. This was done in order to gain a better understanding of the local subsurface geology and groundwater conditions in and around CSUF. Samples were collected from the drill hole (boring) every 5-feet. The total depth of the well is 870 feet below ground surface (grade). Borehole geophysical data (E-log) information was collected from the boring prior to the installation of the well pipe. As you describe the soil samples, compare and contrast your findings to those of the geophysical signature (gamma-ray log) found in the accompanying "E-log" for the boring.

  15. Interpretation and application of borehole televiewer surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    A borehole televiewer log is comparable to a picture of a continuous core and may yield even more information since it is a picture of the cores host environment; i.e., the inside of the borehole as it exists in the subsurface. Important relationships are preserved which can be lost when cores are brought to the surface. Fractures, bedding planes, vugs, and lithology changes are identifiable on borehole televiewer logs. The travel time of the signal from the sonde to the borehole wall and back to the sonde recently has been used to form a second log: the transit time log. Interpretation problems due to noncircular borehole and eccentered logging sondes are easily overcome using the combination of amplitude and transit time logs. Examples are given to demonstrate potential use.

  16. [Seasonal dynamics of the trematodes fauna in herring gull (Larus argentatus Pontopp.) of Kola Bay].

    PubMed

    Kuklin, V V; Kuklina, M M; Kisova, N E

    2010-01-01

    Trematode fauna of the herring gulls from Kola Bay (Barents Sea) was investigated in March, May, June, and September 2005. The data on the trematode species composition and indices of the invasion of gulls with trematodes are given for each season. It was established, that trematode species composition is increased from spring to summer, and intensity of the gulls' invasion with some trematode species is increased from summer to autumn. Ecological factors causing seasonal differences of the trematode fauna in gulls are discussed. PMID:21061591

  17. Alpine-type tectonics in the Paleoproterozoic Lapland-Kola Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudruk, S. V.; Balagansky, V. V.; Gorbunov, I. A.; Raevsky, A. B.

    2013-07-01

    The Kola region in the northeastern Baltic Shield is characterized by diverse Paleoproterozoic collision processes. The Keivy Terrane is one of the major tectonic units in the northeastern foreland of the Paleoproterozoic Lapland-Kola Collisional Orogen, which markedly differs in a number of parameters from other tectonic units of the Kola region. The study of the Keivy Terrane allowed us to unravel one more basic difference: the large Paleoproterozoic sheath synform of the Serpovidny (Crescentic) Range localized in this terrane. Its core is occupied by volcanic and sedimentary rocks, which correlate with the fill of the Imandra-Varzuga Rift; the limbs are composed of metamorphosed mature sedimentary rocks known as Keivy paraschists of Neoarchean or Paleoproterozoic age. The lower limb of the Serpovidny Synform is strongly squeezed, whereas the upper limb consists of almost undeformed rocks. The deformed rocks underwent ductile flow under conditions of simple or general shear. In the degree of its asymmetry and main parameters, the Serpovidny Synform is similar to the plunging and recumbent anticlines in the Helvetic nappes of the Alps. It is concluded that the Paleoproterozoic core of the Serpovidny Sheath Synform, or plunging anticline, is a fragment of the almost completely eroded deep Serpovidny Nappe of the Helvetic type. During the collision related to the Lapland-Kola Orogeny (1.9-2.0 Ga), this nappe was pushed out northward from the Paleoproterozoic Imandra-Varzuga Rift, which is situated 50 km south of the Serpovidny structure, and thrust over the Keivy paraschists. The latter, together with underlying the Lebyazhka Gneiss, were folded in the process of thrusting and were involved in the structure of the Serpovidny Synform. The Keivy paraschists make up a para-autochthon or a separate nappe of the Pennine type. The Archean Lebyazhka metafelsic volcanics underlie the Keivy paraschists and overlie granitoids of the Archean basement that remained undeformed during thrusting. Most likely, they also belong to the para-autochthon; however, it cannot be ruled out that, like the Keivy paraschists, they occur as a Pennine-type nappe. The large sheath folds known in the Paleoproterozoic and Phanerozoic orogens are genetically related to deep-seated nappes or channel-flow tectonics. Paleoproterozoic and Phanerozoic orogens are similar in this respect.

  18. Mesoarchean gabbroanorthosite magmatism of the Kola region: Petrochemical, geochronological, and isotope-geochemical data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. M. Kudryashov; A. V. Mokrushin

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents results of petrochemical, geochemical, and isotope-geochemical study of the Patchemvarek and Severnyi gabbroanorthosite\\u000a massifs of the Kola Peninsula. It was shown that the rocks of these massifs differ from the gabbroanorthosite massifs of the\\u000a Neoarchean Keivy-Kolmozero Complex in the more calcic composition (70–85% An) of normative plagioclase, and low contents of\\u000a TiO2, FeO, and Fe2O3. In terms

  19. Kimberly Well - Borehole Geophysics Database

    SciTech Connect

    Shervais, John

    2011-07-04

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Kimberly drill hole was selected to document continuous volcanism when analysed in conjunction with the Kimama and is located near the margin of the plain. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  20. Kimama Well - Borehole Geophysics Database

    SciTech Connect

    Shervais, John

    2011-07-04

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Kimama drill site was set up to acquire a continuous record of basaltic volcanism along the central volcanic axis and to test the extent of geothermal resources beneath the Snake River aquifer. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  1. Surveying of a borehole for position determination

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, A. W.; Russell, M. K.

    1985-04-02

    A borehole is surveyed by positioning at the mouth of the borehole a survey instrument having a casing and a three-axis rate gyroscope unit mounted within the casing, and sensing at least two components of gravity in at least two mutually transverse directions with respect to the survey instrument by means of a gravity sensor unit. The survey instrument is then moved along the borehole with the start and finish of the run being at the mouth of the borehole or at some known reference along the path of the borehole. During the run the rates of rotation about three non-coplanar axes are sensed at a series of locations along the length of the borehole by means of the rate gyroscope unit. The position of the borehole at each measuring location is then calculated by determining the initial set of direction cosines from the sensed gravity components and an assumed initial value of the azimuth angle and incrementing these values using the rates of rotation sensed by the rate gyroscope unit to obtain the sets of direction cosines at subsequent measuring locations.

  2. PBO Borehole Strain and Siesmic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mencin, D.; Jackson, M.; Anderson, G.; Hodgkinson, K.; Hasting, M.; Dittman, T.; Johnson, W.; Meertens, C.

    2007-05-01

    UNAVCO is a non-profit, community-based organization funded by the National Science Foundation to install and operate the geodetic component of EarthScope called the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO). UNAVCO will install 103 borehole tensor strainmeters/seismometers and 28 borehole tiltmeters These instruments will be used to study the three-dimensional strain field resulting from deformation across the active boundary zone between the Pacific and North American plates in the western United States in hopes of increasing our understanding of the causes and mechanisms associated with earthquakes and volcanic activity. This represents almost a tripling of all installed borehole strainmeters in North America. Since the initial deployment of strainmeters in the early 1980's, borehole strainmeters have contributed valuable data at periods ranging from minutes to weeks with sensitivities two to three orders of magnitude better than continuous GPS at periods of days to weeks. Borehole strainmeters have been used to image earthquakes, slow earthquakes, creep events and volcanic eruptions in the US, Iceland and Japan. A brief history of US BSM program is presented. Initial PBO strainmeter deployments show promising results: imaging two slow slip events in the PNW along with excellent tele-siesmic imaging. Exciting work has been done in the PBO community relating modeled strain from the GPS network to observed strain from the BSM network. PBO also plans the installation of three volcanic arrays at Mt St Helens, Yellowstone and Long Valley. In addition to strainmeters, each borehole contains a three-component geophone and a pore pressure transducer. A subset of the boreholes are also used for heat flow measurements. When completed the PBO borehole strainmeter network will be the largest network of strainmeters installed to date and one of the world's largest borehole seismic networks. These instruments will bridge the gap between seismology and space-geodetic techniques and represents the first dense, geographically distributed observations in this temporal regime in the US.

  3. Impact of acid and trace metals deposition on freshwater invertebrates in north-eastern Fennoscandia and Kola Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, V. [Institute of the North Industrial Ecology Problems (INEP), Murmansk (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31

    Freshwater invertebrate communities in a total 400 lakes and streams in northeastern Norway, Finnish Lapland and the Kola Peninsula, subjected to the atmospheric deposition were studied. The severe influence of toxic heavy metals, dusts from smelters and mineral enrichment factories were found in the Kola Peninsula. The negative acidification effects on benthic communities were found in the Jarfjord (Norway), Enontekio, Ranua-Posio and Kittila-Kolari (Finnish Lapland) areas and in the Kola Peninsula (Russia). Taxa groups, known to be sensitive to acidification, such as gammarids, snails, mayflies, stone flies, were represented with few species and in a low abundance. Heavy metals accumulation in biota is recorded in areas surrounding nickel smelters in the Kola Peninsula. The metal concentration invertebrates in remote areas is rather wide and depend on an air deposition, characteristics of lake catchment areas, as well as water acidity. The environmental variables, such as lake hydrological type, altitude of lakes, dominant substratum type, abundance of macrophytes and mosses in sampling area, content of pollutants in water also show significant relationships with metal concentration in invertebrates. The most severe negative effects on biota were found in waters with low pH and simultaneously contaminated by heavy metals. The biological method for estimation of simultaneously water acidification and contamination is suggested.

  4. In Vitro Antilisterial Properties of Crude Methanol Extracts of Garcinia kola (Heckel) Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Penduka, Dambudzo; Okoh, Anthony I.

    2012-01-01

    Crude methanol extracts of Garcinia kola (Heckel) seeds were screened for their antilisterial activities against 42 Listeria bacteria isolated from wastewater effluents. The extract had activity against 45% of the test bacteria and achieved minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranging between 0.157 and 0.625?mg/mL. The rate of kill of the extract was determined against four representative Listeria species in the study, and the results showed that the highest percentage of bacteria cells were killed after the maximum exposure time of 2?h at the highest concentration of 4 × MIC value, with the maximum number of bacteria cells killed being for L. ivanovii (LEL 30) 100%, L. monocytogenes (LAL 8) 94.686%, L. ivanovii (LEL 18) 60.330%, and L. grayi (LAL 15) 56.071% We therefore conclude that the nature of inhibition of the crude methanol extracts of Garcinia kola seeds can be either bactericidal or bacteriostatic depending on the target Listeria species and can also differ among same species as evidenced by L. ivanovii strains LEL 30 and LEL 18. PMID:22927786

  5. In vitro antilisterial properties of crude methanol extracts of Garcinia kola (Heckel) seeds.

    PubMed

    Penduka, Dambudzo; Okoh, Anthony I

    2012-01-01

    Crude methanol extracts of Garcinia kola (Heckel) seeds were screened for their antilisterial activities against 42 Listeria bacteria isolated from wastewater effluents. The extract had activity against 45% of the test bacteria and achieved minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranging between 0.157 and 0.625?mg/mL. The rate of kill of the extract was determined against four representative Listeria species in the study, and the results showed that the highest percentage of bacteria cells were killed after the maximum exposure time of 2?h at the highest concentration of 4 × MIC value, with the maximum number of bacteria cells killed being for L. ivanovii (LEL 30) 100%, L. monocytogenes (LAL 8) 94.686%, L. ivanovii (LEL 18) 60.330%, and L. grayi (LAL 15) 56.071% We therefore conclude that the nature of inhibition of the crude methanol extracts of Garcinia kola seeds can be either bactericidal or bacteriostatic depending on the target Listeria species and can also differ among same species as evidenced by L. ivanovii strains LEL 30 and LEL 18. PMID:22927786

  6. Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver

    DOEpatents

    Engler, Bruce P. (Sandoval County, NM); Sleefe, Gerard E. (Bernalillo County, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Bernalillo County, NM)

    1993-01-01

    A borehole seismic tool including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric meter in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

  7. Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver

    DOEpatents

    Engler, B.P.; Sleefe, G.E.; Striker, R.P.

    1993-02-23

    A borehole seismic tool is described including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric motor in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

  8. Borehole Summary Report for Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Borehole C4993

    SciTech Connect

    Rust, Colleen F.; Barnett, D. BRENT; Bowles, Nathan A.; Horner, Jake A.

    2007-02-28

    A core hole (C4998) and three boreholes (C4993, C4996, and C4997) were drilled to acquire stratigraphic and downhole seismic data to model potential seismic impacts and to refine design specifications and seismic criteria for the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction on the Hanford Site. Borehole C4993 was completed through the Saddle Mountains Basalt, the upper portion of the Wanapum Basalt, and associated sedimentary interbeds, to provide a continuous record of the rock penetrated by all four holes and to provide access to the subsurface for geophysical measure¬ment. Presented and compiled in this report are field-generated records for the deep mud rotary borehole C4993 at the WTP site. Material for C4993 includes borehole logs, lithologic summary, and record of rock chip samples collected during drilling through the months of August through early October. The borehole summary report also includes documentation of the mud rotary drilling, borehole logging, and sample collection.

  9. Trends in new particle formation in eastern Lapland, Finland: effect of decreasing sulfur emissions from Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrö, E.-M.; Väänänen, R.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Virkkula, A.; Petäjä, T.; Asmi, A.; Dal Maso, M.; Nieminen, T.; Juhola, S.; Shcherbinin, A.; Riipinen, I.; Lehtipalo, K.; Keronen, P.; Aalto, P. P.; Hari, P.; Kulmala, M.

    2014-05-01

    The smelter industry in Kola Peninsula is the largest source of anthropogenic SO2 in the Arctic part of Europe and one of the largest within the Arctic domain. Due to socio-economic changes in Russia, the emissions have been decreasing especially since the late 1990s resulting in decreased SO2 concentrations close to Kola in eastern Lapland, Finland. At the same time, the frequency of new particle formation days has been decreasing distinctively at SMEAR I station in eastern Lapland, especially during spring and autumn. We show that sulfur species, namely sulfur dioxide and sulfuric acid, have an important role in both new particle formation and subsequent growth and that the decrease in new particle formation days is a result of the reduction of sulfur emissions originating from Kola Peninsula. In addition to sulfur species, there are many other quantities, such as formation rate of aerosol particles, condensation sink and nucleation mode particle number concentration, which are related to the number of observed new particle formation (NPF) days and need to be addressed when linking sulfur emissions and NPF. We show that while most of these quantities exhibit statistically significant trends, the reduction in Kola sulfur emissions is the most obvious reason for the rapid decline in NPF days. Sulfuric acid explains approximately 20-50% of the aerosol condensational growth observed at SMEAR I, and there is a large seasonal variation with highest values obtained during spring and autumn. We found that (i) particles form earlier after sunrise during late winter and early spring due to high concentrations of SO2 and H2SO4; (ii) several events occurred during the absence of light, and they were connected to higher than average concentrations of SO2; and (iii) high SO2 concentrations could advance the onset of nucleation by several hours. Moreover, air masses coming over Kola Peninsula seemed to favour new particle formation.

  10. Trends in new particle formation in Eastern Lapland, Finland: effect of decreasing sulphur emissions from Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrö, E.-M.; Väänänen, R.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Virkkula, A.; Petäjä, T.; Asmi, A.; Dal Maso, M.; Nieminen, T.; Juhola, S.; Shcherbinin, A.; Riipinen, I.; Lehtipalo, K.; Keronen, P.; Aalto, P. P.; Hari, P.; Kulmala, M.

    2013-11-01

    The smelter industry in Kola Peninsula is the largest source of anthropogenic SO2 in the Arctic part of Eurasia and one of the largest within the Arctic domain. Due to socio-economic changes in Russia the emissions have been decreasing especially since the late 1990s resulting in decreased SO2 concentrations close to Kola in Eastern Lapland, Finland. At the same time, the frequency of new particle formation days has been decreasing distinctively at SMEAR I station in Eastern Lapland, especially during spring and autumn. We show that sulphur species, namely sulphur dioxide and sulphuric acid, have an important role in both new particle formation and subsequent growth and that the decrease in new particle formation days is a result of the reduction of sulphur emissions originating from Kola Peninsula. In addition to sulphur species, there are many other quantities, such as formation rate or aerosol particles, condensation sink and nucleation mode particle number concentration, which are related to the number of observed new particle formation (NPF) days and need to be addressed when linking sulphur emissions and NPF. We show that while most of these quantities exhibit statistically significant trends, the reduction in Kola sulphur emissions is the most obvious reason for the rapid decline in NPF days. Sulphuric acid explains approximately 20-50% of the aerosol condensational growth observed at SMEAR I and there is a large seasonal variation with highest values obtained during spring and autumn. We found that (i) particles form earlier after sunrise during late winter and early spring due to high concentrations of SO2 and H2SO4, (ii) several events occurred during the absence of light and they were connected to higher than average concentrations of SO2 and (iii) high SO2 concentrations could advance the onset of nucleation by several hours. Moreover, air masses coming over Kola Peninsula seemed to favour new particle formation.

  11. Borehole Summary Report for Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Borehole C4996

    SciTech Connect

    Adams , S. C.; Ahlquist, Stephen T.; Fetters, Jeffree R.; Garcia, Ben; Rust, Colleen F.

    2007-01-28

    This report presents the field-generated borehole log, lithologic summary, and the record of samples collected during the recent drilling and sampling of the basalt interval of borehole C4996 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) on the Hanford Site. Borehole C4996 was one of four exploratory borings, one core hole and three boreholes, drilled to investigate and acquire detailed stratigraphic and down-hole seismic data. This data will be used to define potential seismic impacts and refine design specifications for the Hanford Site WTP.

  12. MICROHOLE TECHNOLOGY -PROGRESS ON BOREHOLE INSTRUMENTATION DEVELOPMENT

    E-print Network

    indicated that by using coiled tubing and miniaturized conventional-drilling hardware, drilling microholesMICROHOLE TECHNOLOGY - PROGRESS ON BOREHOLE INSTRUMENTATION DEVELOPMENT Jim Albright j Microhole technology development is based on the premise that with advances in electronics and sensors

  13. Fracture compliance estimation using borehole tube waves

    E-print Network

    Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

    We tested two models, one for tube-wave generation and the other for tube-wave attenuation at a fracture intersecting a borehole that can be used to estimate fracture compliance, fracture aperture, and lateral extent. In ...

  14. Borehole Deformation and Failure in Anisotropic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaede, Oliver; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Lumley, David

    2010-05-01

    Borehole breakouts develop due to compressive shear failure along the borehole wall and subsequent spalling of near wellbore rock. These compressive shear failures can occur during drilling and lead to a borehole enlargement in the direction of the minimum horizontal stress. In order to investigate the initiation of borehole breakouts in anisotropic media a numerical analysis of the borehole deformation has been performed. The numerical model is based on an extensive geophysical and geomechanical dataset, provided by BHP Billiton Petroleum. This dataset was established during the development and production phase of an oil reservoir on the North West Shelf, Western Australia. The aim of this study is to estimate the severity of the influence of anisotropy on the breakout process. It is proposed that there is a hierarchy among the possible influences on the breakout process: 1. The regional stress field has a first order effect on the borehole breakout direction. 2. This is followed by a preferential fracture direction or anisotropic failure criterion of the medium. 3. And finally the elastic anisotropy of the medium affecting the local stress field around the borehole. A clear separation of these influences through methods of observation is not always trivial. Firstly, the preferential fracture direction and the elastic anisotropy, at least to some degree, are functions of the regional stress field. Secondly, most of the knowledge we have about the regional stress field in relatively aseismic regions is inferred from borehole breakout data. Therefore a numerical simulation is chosen as a method of study. Material properties like elastic anisotropy or failure criterion and even their dependency on the stress field can easily be manipulated. This geophysical and geomechanical data is used to populate the numerical model. The regional stress field is implemented as a boundary condition. The commercial Finite Element package ABAQUS is used to obtain the stress / strain field around the borehole. The resulting borehole deformation and failure are compared with data from a six-arm caliper and an acoustic Circumferential Borehole Imaging Log (SM Baker Hughes). We can show that the elastic anisotropy derived from the shear wave splitting, in our field example, is not strong enough to significantly affect the fracture process. Further parametric studies were conducted to prove the proposed hierarchy. We would like to thank the BHPB geoscientists in the Perth office for helpful discussions.

  15. Borehole stability in densely welded tuffs

    SciTech Connect

    Fuenkajorn, K.; Daemen, J.J.K. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mining and Geological Engineering

    1992-07-01

    The stability of boreholes, or more generally of underground openings (i.e. including shafts, ramps, drifts, tunnels, etc.) at locations where seals or plugs are to be placed is an important consideration in seal design for a repository (Juhlin and Sandstedt, 1989). Borehole instability or borehole breakouts induced by stress redistribution could negate the effectiveness of seals or plugs. Breakout fractures along the wall of repository excavations or exploratory holes could provide a preferential flowpath for groundwater or gaseous radionuclides to bypass the plugs. After plug installation, swelling pressures exerted by a plug could induce radial cracks or could open or widen preexisting cracks in the rock at the bottom of the breakouts where the tangential compressive stresses have been released by the breakout process. The purpose of the work reported here is to determine experimentally the stability of a circular hole in a welded tuff sample subjected to various external boundary loads. Triaxial and biaxial borehole stability tests have been performed on densely welded Apache Leap tuff samples and Topopah Spring tuff samples. The nominal diameter of the test hole is 13.3 or 14.4 mm for triaxial testing, and 25.4 mm for biaxial testing. The borehole axis is parallel to one of the principal stress axes. The boreholes are drilled through the samples prior to applying external boundary loads. The boundary loads are progressively increased until breakouts occur or until the maximum load capacity of the loading system has been reached. 74 refs.

  16. The primary circuit materials properties results analysis performed on archive material used in NPP V-1 and Kola NPP Units 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kupca, L.; Beno, P. [Nuclear Power Plants Research Institute Inc., Trnava (Slovakia)

    1997-04-01

    A very brief summary is provided of a primary circuit piping material properties analysis. The analysis was performed for the Bohunice V-1 reactor and the Kola-1 and -2 reactors. Assessment was performed on Bohunice V-1 archive materials and primary piping material cut from the Kola units after 100,000 hours of operation. Main research program tasks included analysis of mechanical properties, corrosion stability, and microstructural properties. Analysis results are not provided.

  17. ABCGheritage project - promoting geotourism in northern Finland, northern Norway and the Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihlaja, Jouni; Johansson, Peter; Lauri, Laura S.

    2014-05-01

    Nature tourism has been a growing business sector in the Barents area during the recent decades. With the purpose to develop nature tourism in a sustainable way, a cooperation project ABCGheritage - Arctic Biological, Cultural and Geological Heritage has been carried out. Project has received partial funding from the EU Kolarctic ENPI program. In the geoheritage part of the project the main activities were aimed to develop pro-environmental ways of geotourism in the area. The three main participants in the geoheritage part of the project are the Geological Survey of Finland, Northern Finland Office, the Geological Institute of the Kola Science Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Bioforsk Soil and Environment from northeastern Norway. The duration of the project is 2012-2014 and most of the work has already been completed even if most of the results are not published yet. Totally ten different tasks have been implemented in the geological part of the project. The largest task has been the preparation of a geological outdoor map and guide book of the Khibiny Tundra locating in the central part of the Kola Peninsula. In Finland already 11 such maps have been published, and the experiences gained during their production have been used in this project, too. Geological heritage trails to the Khibiny Tundra have also been created and they will be drawn on the map. The second concrete result is the Barents Tour for Geotourist -guide, which will be published as a guide book, web pages and an exhibition. The route comprises ca 35 best geological demonstration sites along the circle route from northern Finland to northeastern Norway, from there to Kola Peninsula and then back to Finland. Information of the route will be available for all interested travelers. In addition to the geological outdoor map of the Khibiny Tundra and "Barents Tour for Geotourists"-guide, the primary outputs of the project are the geological nature trails on the field, geological demonstration sites with uniform signposts and educational data packages on geological heritage. The main target groups are pupils and teachers at schools, especially on elementary stage. Tourists and locals visiting protected and recreational areas and other heritage sites will also benefit from the results. Personnel working in education and tourism will get new targets and background data for their clients. Final beneficiaries are local inhabitants, entrepreneurs and companies through positive impact to local economy and communities.

  18. Multipole method to calculate borehole thermal resistances in a borehole heat exchanger

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johan Claesson; Göran Hellström

    2011-01-01

    Ground-source heat pump systems use borehole heat exchangers to transfer heat to and from the ground. An important feature is the local thermal resistances between the heat carrier flow channels in the borehole and the surrounding ground. The counter-flow heat exchange between the pipes is also important, particularly for the axial temperature variation. These resistances can be represented by a

  19. Optimal experimental design for placement of boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padalkina, Kateryna; Bücker, H. Martin; Seidler, Ralf; Rath, Volker; Marquart, Gabriele; Niederau, Jan; Herty, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Drilling for deep resources is an expensive endeavor. Among the many problems finding the optimal drilling location for boreholes is one of the challenging questions. We contribute to this discussion by using a simulation based assessment of possible future borehole locations. We study the problem of finding a new borehole location in a given geothermal reservoir in terms of a numerical optimization problem. In a geothermal reservoir the temporal and spatial distribution of temperature and hydraulic pressure may be simulated using the coupled differential equations for heat transport and mass and momentum conservation for Darcy flow. Within this model the permeability and thermal conductivity are dependent on the geological layers present in the subsurface model of the reservoir. In general, those values involve some uncertainty making it difficult to predict actual heat source in the ground. Within optimal experimental the question is which location and to which depth to drill the borehole in order to estimate conductivity and permeability with minimal uncertainty. We introduce a measure for computing the uncertainty based on simulations of the coupled differential equations. The measure is based on the Fisher information matrix of temperature data obtained through the simulations. We assume that the temperature data is available within the full borehole. A minimization of the measure representing the uncertainty in the unknown permeability and conductivity parameters is performed to determine the optimal borehole location. We present the theoretical framework as well as numerical results for several 2d subsurface models including up to six geological layers. Also, the effect of unknown layers on the introduced measure is studied. Finally, to obtain a more realistic estimate of optimal borehole locations, we couple the optimization to a cost model for deep drilling problems.

  20. Efficiency of remediation of technogenic barrens around the Pechenganikel works in the Kola Subarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koptsik, G. N.; Koptsik, S. V.; Smirnova, I. E.

    2014-05-01

    Remediation of the technogenic barrens around the Pechenganikel works on the Kola Peninsula resulted in the improvement of the soil properties, namely, in a decrease in acidity and enrichment with nutrients, which continued for several years. However, the reaction of most of the treated soils remained strongly acid, and the concentrations of available calcium, magnesium, potassium, and phosphorus were much lower than their background levels and the demands of the plants for nutrients (especially, for magnesium and potassium). The soils were depleted in available manganese and zinc. Most of the treated soils contained the same (or higher) amounts of available nickel and copper compounds in comparison with their untreated analogues. The willow plantations on the remediated plots were in a satisfactory state, but they experienced a deficit of magnesium, manganese, and zinc; they consumed elevated amounts of nickel and copper. Recommendations on the nutrient regime of the soils aimed at decreasing the mobility and biological availability of heavy metals were made.

  1. Climatic variations on longest tree-ring chronologies for Kola Peninsula and Finnish Lapland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasatkina, E. A.; Shumilov, O. I.; Timonen, M.; Mielikainen, K.; Helama, S.; Kanatjev, A. G.; Kirtsideli, I. Yu.

    2010-05-01

    We investigated the external factor (solar activity, volcanic eruptions) influence on tree growth at high latitudes. We analysed a 561-year tree-ring record of pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and a 676-year juniper (Juniperus Sibirica Burgst.) tree-ring chronology collected nearby the northern timberline (67.77-68.63N; 33.25-36.52 E) at the Kola Peninsula, northwestern Russia. As well known the climatic impacts of solar and volcanic activity vary regionally, and major volcanic eruptions do not always result in regional cooling. A response of tree growth at the Kola Peninsula to climatic changes due to solar variability and volcanic eruptions was revealed. For example, Dalton minimum of solar activity (1801-1816 AD) and Laki (1783 AD) and Tambora (1815 AD) volcanic eruptions appeared to cause the greatest ring-width reduction and cooling. The minima of solar activity Sporer (1416-1534 AD) and Maunder (1645-1715 AD) were as well accompanied by temperature decreases. Intervals with an absence of significant volcanic eruptions correspond to intervals of increased ring-width values. A superposed epoch analysis of 19 large (Volcanic Explosivity Index, VEI>5) volcanic events revealed a significant suppression of tree growth for up to 8 years following volcanic eruptions. The similar effect (supression of tree growth after powerful volcanic eruptions) was obtained under analysis of the 7641-year supra-long pine tree-ring chronology for Finnish Lapland. Our results documenting the regional climatic impacts of solar and volcanic activity permit us to understand the dynamics of the climate system and its response to external forcing. This work is financially supported by grant from Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant No. 09-04-98801), by the Program of the Russian Academy and by the Regional Scientific Program of Murmansk region.

  2. Borehole survey system utilizing strapdown inertial navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Hulsing, R.H.

    1989-03-14

    A signal processing method is described for use in borehole surveys, consisting of: (a) transforming the acceleration signals in the first coordinate system to obtain inertial signals representative of movement of the probe in a second coordinate system that is fixed relative to the earth, the inertial signals in the second coordinate system including probe velocity signals; (b) generating a signal representative of the amount of cable being fed into the entrance opening of the borehole; (c) processing the signal representative of the amount of cable being feed into the entrance opening of the borehole; (d) transforming the inertial signals representative of movement of the probe in the second coordinate system into inertial signals representative of movement of the probe in the first coordinate system; (e) combining the signal representative of the progress of the probe along the borehole with the inertial signals representative of movement of the probe in the first coordinate system to obtain error signals; (f) transforming the error signals into the second coordinate system to obtain error correction signals; (g) combining the error correction signals with the inertial signals representative of movement of the probe in the second coordinate system to obtain corrected probe velocity signals; and (h) integrating the corrected probe velocity signals to obtain signals representative of the course of the borehole relative to the second coordinate system.

  3. Using borehole geophysics and cross-borehole flow testing to define hydraulic connections between fracture zones in bedrock aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, F.L.

    1993-01-01

    Nearly a decade of intensive geophysical logging at fractured rock hydrology research sites indicates that geophysical logs can be used to identify and characterize fractures intersecting boreholes. However, borehole-to-borehole flow tests indicate that only a few of the apparently open fractures found to intersect boreholes conduct flow under test conditions. This paper presents a systematic approach to fracture characterization designed to define the distribution of fractures along boreholes, relate the measured fracture distribution to structure and lithology of the rock mass, and define the nature of fracture flow paths across borehole arrays. Conventional electrical resistivity, gamma, and caliper logs are used to define lithology and large-scale structure. Borehole wall image logs obtained with the borehole televiewer are used to give the depth, orientation, and relative size of fractures in situ. High-resolution flowmeter measurements are used to identify fractures conducting flow in the rock mass adjacent to the boreholes. Changes in the flow field over time are used to characterize the hydraulic properties of fracture intersections between boreholes. Application of this approach to an array of 13 boreholes at the Mirror Lake, New Hamsphire site demonstrates that the transient flow analysis can be used to distinguish between fractures communicating with each other between observation boreholes, and those that are hydraulically isolated from each other in the surrounding rock mass. The Mirror Lake results also demonstrate that the method is sensitive to the effects of boreholes on the hydraulic properties of the fractured-rock aquifer. Experiments conducted before and after the drilling of additional boreholes in the array and before and after installation of packers in existing boreholes demonstrate that the presence of new boreholes or the inflation of packers in existing boreholes has a large effect on the measured hydraulic properties of the rock mass surrounding the borehole array. ?? 1993.

  4. Antispasmodic and spasmolytic effects of methanolic extract from seeds of Garcinia kola on isolated rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Udia, P M; Braide, V B; Owu, D U

    2009-12-01

    The antispasmodic and spasmolytic effects of methanolic extract of seeds of Garcinia kola Heckel were studied on smooth muscle preparations in vitro. The influence of the extract on rat duodenum, jejunum and ileum was investigated using acetylcholine and barium chloride as agonists. The extract exhibited dose-dependent antispasmodic effects on contractions induced by acetylcholine, and dose-dependent spasmolytic effects on spasms induced by cumulatively increased concentrations of acetylcholine and barium chloride. The graded log concentration-response curves for acetylcholine were non-parallel but shifted to the right in the presence of the extract. It is concluded that the Garcinia kola extract inhibits smooth muscle activity via other mechanisms but not involving neither cholinergic nor adrenergic receptor interaction. PMID:20234749

  5. Development of a geothermal acoustic borehole televiewer

    SciTech Connect

    Heard, F.E.; Bauman, T.J.

    1983-08-01

    Most geothermal wells are drilled in hard rock formations where fluid flow is through systems of open fractures. Productivity of these wells is usually determined by the extent of intersection of the wellbore with the fracture system. A need exists for fracture mapping methods and tools which can operate in a geothermal environment. In less hostile environments, the acoustic borehole televiewer has been shown to be a useful tool for determining location, orientation, and characterization of fractures as they intersect the borehole and for general wellbore and casing inspection. The development conducted at Sandia National Laboratories to adapt an acoustic borehole televiewer for operation in a geothermal environment is described. The modified instrument has been successfully tested at temperatures as high as 280/sup 0/C and pressures up to 5000 psi, and used successfully to map fractures and casing damage in geothermal wells.

  6. Excess plutonium disposition: The deep borehole option

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, K.L.

    1994-08-09

    This report reviews the current status of technologies required for the disposition of plutonium in Very Deep Holes (VDH). It is in response to a recent National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report which addressed the management of excess weapons plutonium and recommended three approaches to the ultimate disposition of excess plutonium: (1) fabrication and use as a fuel in existing or modified reactors in a once-through cycle, (2) vitrification with high-level radioactive waste for repository disposition, (3) burial in deep boreholes. As indicated in the NAS report, substantial effort would be required to address the broad range of issues related to deep bore-hole emplacement. Subjects reviewed in this report include geology and hydrology, design and engineering, safety and licensing, policy decisions that can impact the viability of the concept, and applicable international programs. Key technical areas that would require attention should decisions be made to further develop the borehole emplacement option are identified.

  7. Paleoclimate and Paleoenvironmental Reconstructions on the North Kola Peninsula during the Past 2000 Years According Pollen Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosevich, Ekaterina; Sapelko, Tatjana; Anisimov, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    Pollen data and radiocarbon data have enabled to reconstruct the periods of vegetation that depended on the climate changes. Records from different types of deposits allow to receive more information and to make paleoclimate reconstructions. Lake and bog sediments are the best sources for palaeoreconstruction. Palaeoclimatic changes, tectonic and coastline movement during Late Holocene caused vegetation changes on the North Kola Peninsula. Our data from pollen records from different sites on the north coast of the Kola Peninsula covers the Late Holocene about last 2000 years. We studied different types of sediment cores in the area between 69° N and 70° N, 31°12' E and 35° E. We have studied peat deposits, small lake sediments and archaeological site on the Bolshoy Oleniy Island in Kola fjord, Barents Sea, and peat bog deposits in the Teriberka area. All the cores are studied by different methods where the core was pollen analysis. It has allowed tracking the periods of vegetation history in the tundra zone. Pollen reconstructions are confirmed by radiocarbon data. Our data was compared with other researches and we made correlations between pollen records from different lake deposits. Modern vegetation presents south tundra type of associations. Teriberka area is unique: almost existing types of tundra landscapes are presented here in small territory, including "typical tundra" with subshrubs formations. For paleoclimate reconstructions we have studied surface samples by pollen analysis. Samples were collected in 3 regions of Kola Peninsula. Samples have been taken on the Sredniy and Rybachiy Peninsulas (Murman region) in the south tundra with rich associations and boreal species of herbs. In the Olenegorsk region we selected vegetation associations not damaged by human and we collected surface samples on the border of forest tundra and northern taiga. In Apatity region we studied pollen records in North taiga landscapes. This data characterize regional and local conditions of vegetation development, which are very important to take into account in paleoenvironmental reconstruction and regional correlation.

  8. Effect of varying oceanicity on early- to mid-Holocene palaeohydrology, Kola Peninsula, Russia: isotopic evidence from treeline lakes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brent B. Wolfe; Thomas W. D. Edwards; Hongbo Jiang; Glen M. MacDonald; Bruce R. Gervais; Jeffrey A. Snyder

    2003-01-01

    The stable-isotope stratigraphy of sedimentary organic matter and algal cellulose in cores from two lakes near treeline on the Kola Peninsula indicate changes in water and nutrient balance that correlate with inferred expansion of Pinus sylvestris during the early to mid-Holocene. Trends in cellulose-inferred lakewater ?18O values for both lakes suggest that moist conditions after deglaciation were followed by progressive

  9. Fennoscandia in the Phanerozoic: Paleogeodynamic Reconstructions Based on the New Paleomagnetic and Geochronological Data from the Kola Magmatic Province (kola Peninsula, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovskiy, R. V.; Arzamastsev, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    During last four years we studied more than 100 dolerite and alkaline dykes, which are widely spread on the Kola Peninsula and belong to the Devonian magmatic province. Within the scope of our researches some of these dykes have been dated and their precise isotopic ages (Ar/Ar, Sm-Nd, Rb-Sr) lie in the range of 390-360 Ma (Veselovskiy et al., 2013). The age of other sampled dykes can be considered as Devonian due to similarity of their paleomagnetic, geochemical and petrological characteristics to the dated ones. Paleomagnetic directions have been obtained from more than 80 dykes. Almost all dykes yielded (a) a low-temperature component that is aligned along the present-day field and is likely of viscous origin; (b) a well defined dual-polarity intermediate-temperature component with steep eastward directions that accounts for a main part of the NRM and often decays to the origin on orthogonal plots; and (c) a dual-polarity high-temperature component with shallow inclinations and ENE declinations of presumed primary origin. The presence of the primary high-temperature component makes us possible to calculate preliminary Baltica's paleomagnetic pole for the Middle-Late Devonian. In view of the obtained microprobe data we believe that intermediate component is a result of unknown hydrothermal process, which age can be estimated from the comparison of corresponding paleomagnetic pole with the Baltica's APWP as Jurassic. We believe that both mentioned episodes of endogenous activity within the large stable craton were connected with plume-lithospheric interaction in the Devonian and Jurassic. In this presentation we use the obtained paleomagnetic, petrological and geochronological data to determine the paleogeography of Baltica in the Devonian and Jurassic times and to find its position within the global paleotectonic and geodynamic reconstructions. This study was funded by grants RFBR # 12-05-00216, 13-05-12021, 13-05-12030 and grant MK-3383.2012.5.

  10. Evaluation of the protective and ameliorative properties of Garcinia kola on histamine-induced bronchoconstriction in guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Ibulubo, Mina T.; Eze, Gerald I.; Ozolua, Raymond I.; Baxter-Grillo, Doroteo; Uwaya, Dickson O.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Garcinia kola is popularly used in African traditional medicine for the relief of acute bronchoconstrictive episodes. Objective: In this study, we examined the anti-asthmatic and morphological effects of the ethanol extract of G. kola in animal model. Materials and Methods: Guinea pigs were sensitized with ovalbumin and then given doses of 200 or 400 mg/kg/day for 21 consecutive days. Theophylline (10 mg/kg/day) was used as a standard. At the end of the exposure, the animals were exposed to 0.2% histamine aerosol in a chamber. Lymphocyte count, bronchial histology and morphometry were done. Results: Compared with non-sensitized controls, 200 mg/kg/day dose of the extract significantly (P < 0.05) increased the time taken for onset of preconvulsive dyspnea while the dose of 400 mg/kg/day significantly (P < 0.01) reduced bronchial wall thickness. Lymphocytes counts were not significantly affected but the bronchi of extract-treated animals were histologically clearer of lesions visible in the sensitized. Conclusion: These protective and ameliorative properties lend credence to the use of G. kola in ethnomedicine. PMID:23225963

  11. Radiation pattern of a borehole radar antenna

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellefsen, K.J.; Wright, D.L.

    2002-01-01

    To understand better how a borehole antenna radiates radar waves into a formation, this phenomenon is simulated numerically using the finite-difference, time-domain method. The simulations are of two different antenna models that include features like a driving point fed by a coaxial cable, resistive loading of the antenna, and a water-filled borehole. For each model, traces are calculated in the far-field region, and then, from these traces, radiation patterns are calculated. The radiation patterns show that the amplitude of the radar wave is strongly affected by its frequency, its propagation direction, and the resistive loading of the antenna.

  12. Model accurately predicts directional borehole trajectory

    SciTech Connect

    Mamedbekov, O.K. (Azerbaijan State Petroleum Academy, Baku (Azerbaijan))

    1994-08-29

    Theoretical investigations and field data analyses helped develop a new method of predicting the rate of inclination change in a deviated well bore to help reduce the frequency and magnitude of doglegs. Predicting borehole dogleg severity is one of the main problems in directional drilling. Predicting the tendency and magnitude of borehole deviation and comparing them to the planned well path makes it possible to improve bottom hole assembly (BHA) design and to reduce the number of correction runs. The application of adaptation models for predicting the rate of inclination change if measurement-while-drilling systems are used results in improved accuracy of prediction, and therefore a reduction in correction runs.

  13. A borehole jack for deformability, strength, and stress measurements in a 2-inch borehole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, R. E.; Hovland, H. J.; Chirapuntu, S.

    1971-01-01

    A borehole jack devised for lunar exploration is described and results of its use in simulated lunar solids are presented. A hydraulic cylinder mounted between two stiff plates acts to spread the plates apart against the borehole walls when pressured. The spreading is measured by a displacement transducer and the load is measured hydraulically. The main improvement over previous instruments is the increased stroke, which allows large deformations of the borehole. Twenty-eight pistons are used to obtain a high hydraulic efficiency, and three return pistons are also provided. Pressure-deformation curves were obtained for each test on Lunar Soil Simulant No. 2, a light gray silty basalt powder.

  14. 30 CFR 75.1315 - Boreholes for explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...confines of a borehole; and (2) Shots fired in anthracite mines for battery starting or for blasting coal overhangs. No person shall go inside a battery to start the flow of material. (b) Each borehole in coal for explosives shall...

  15. 30 CFR 75.1315 - Boreholes for explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...confines of a borehole; and (2) Shots fired in anthracite mines for battery starting or for blasting coal overhangs. No person shall go inside a battery to start the flow of material. (b) Each borehole in coal for explosives shall...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1315 - Boreholes for explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...confines of a borehole; and (2) Shots fired in anthracite mines for battery starting or for blasting coal overhangs. No person shall go inside a battery to start the flow of material. (b) Each borehole in coal for explosives shall...

  17. 30 CFR 75.1315 - Boreholes for explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...confines of a borehole; and (2) Shots fired in anthracite mines for battery starting or for blasting coal overhangs. No person shall go inside a battery to start the flow of material. (b) Each borehole in coal for explosives shall...

  18. 30 CFR 75.1315 - Boreholes for explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...confines of a borehole; and (2) Shots fired in anthracite mines for battery starting or for blasting coal overhangs. No person shall go inside a battery to start the flow of material. (b) Each borehole in coal for explosives shall...

  19. Predicting stress-induced anisotropy around a borehole

    E-print Network

    Fang, Xinding

    2012-01-01

    Formation elastic properties near a borehole may be altered from their original state due to the stress concentration around the borehole. This could result in a biased estimation of formation properties but could provide ...

  20. Effect of borehole stress concentration on compressional wave velocity measurements

    E-print Network

    Fang, Xinding

    2013-01-01

    Formation elastic properties near a borehole may be altered from their original state due to the stress concentration around the borehole. This could lead to a biased estimation of formation elastic properties measured ...

  1. Effects of borehole stability on well log data

    E-print Network

    Grandi Karam, Samantha, 1973-

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis we analyze the effects of borehole irregularities on well logs and develop methods to obtain reliable formation properties from such logs. Data from a well in eastern Venezuela are analysed. Borehole ...

  2. Method for isolating two aquifers in a single borehole

    DOEpatents

    Burklund, Patrick W. (Livermore, CA)

    1985-10-22

    A method for isolating and individually instrumenting separate aquifers within a single borehole. A borehole is first drilled from the ground surface, through an upper aquifer, and into a separating confining bed. A casing, having upper and lower sections separated by a coupling collar, is lowered into the borehole. The borehole is grouted in the vicinity of the lower section of the casing. A borehole is then drilled through the grout plug and into a lower aquifer. After the lower aquifer is instrumented, the borehole is grouted back into the lower portion of the casing. Then the upper section of the casing is unscrewed via the coupling collar and removed from the borehole. Finally, instrumentation is added to the upper aquifer and the borehole is appropriately grouted. The coupling collar is designed to have upper right-hand screw threads and lower left-hand screw thread, whereby the sections of the casing can be readily separated.

  3. Method for isolating two aquifers in a single borehole

    DOEpatents

    Burklund, P.W.

    1984-01-20

    A method for isolating and individually instrumenting separate aquifers within a single borehole is disclosed. A borehole is first drilled from the ground surface, through an upper aquifer, and into a separating confining bed. A casing, having upper and lower sections separated by a coupling collar, is lowered into the borehole. The borehole is grouted in the vicinity of the lower section of the casing. A borehole is then drilled through the grout plug and into a lower aquifer. After the lower aquifer is instrumented, the borehole is grouted back into the lower portion of the casing. Then the upper section of the casing is unscrewed via the coupling collar and removed from the borehole. Finally, instrumentation is added to the upper aquifer and the borehole is appropriately grouted. The coupling collar is designed to have upper right-hand screw threads and lower left-hand screw thread, whereby the sections of the casing can be readily separated.

  4. Entry Boreholes Summary Report for the Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, Jake A.

    2007-02-28

    This report describes the 2006 fiscal year field activities associated with the installation of four cable-tool-drilled boreholes located within the boundary of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), DOE Hanford site, Washington. The cable-tool-drilled boreholes extend from surface to ~20 ft below the top of basalt and were utilized as cased entry holes for three deep boreholes (approximately 1400 ft) that were drilled to support the acquisition of sub-surface geophysical data, and one deep corehole (1400 ft) that was drilled to acquire continuous core samples from underlying basalt and sedimentary interbeds. The geophysical data acquired from these boreholes will be integrated into a seismic response model that will provide the basis for defining the seismic design criteria for the WTP facilities.

  5. The comparative effects of chronic consumption of kola nut (Cola nitida) and caffeine diets on locomotor behaviour and body weights in mice.

    PubMed

    Umoren, E B; Osim, E E; Udoh, P B

    2009-06-01

    The comparative effects of chronic [28 days] consumption of kola nut and its active constituent, caffeine diets on locomotor behaviour and body weights in mice were investigated. Thirty adult Swiss white mice [15-30 g body weight], were used for the study. The open field-maze was employed for the evaluation of locomotor behaviour. Mice in the control group [n=10] were fed normal rodent chow, mice in the kola nut-fed group [n=10] were fed kola diet [25 % wt/wt of rodent chow] while those in the caffeine-fed group [n=10] were fed caffeine diet [0.66% wt/wt of rodent chow] for 4 weeks. All animals were allowed free access to clean drinking water. Daily food intake, water intake and body weight change were also measured. Daily food intake in the kola nut and caffeine-fed group of mice was significantly [P<0.001 respectively] lower than the control. There was also a significant [P<0.001] decrease in daily water intake in the caffeine-fed group compared to the control whereas, the apparent decrease of water intake in the kola nut-fed group was not significantly different from the control. Body weight change was also significantly [P<0.001 and P<0.05 respectively] lower in the kola nut and caffeine-fed groups of mice when compared to the control. The frequency of rearing in the open field was significantly [P<0.01] lower in the caffeine-fed group of mice when compared to the control. The frequency of grooming was also significantly [P<0.05] lower in the caffeine-fed group of mice when compared to the control. There was also a significant [P<0.05] decrease in the frequency of light-dark transitions in the light/dark transition box for the caffeine-fed group when compared to the control. The results showed that chronic consumption of kola nut and caffeine diets caused decrease in food intake and body weight. Consumption of caffeine-diet also significantly decreased water intake and locomotor activity. The effect of kola nut-diets on water intake and locomotor activity was not significant. Hence, the effect of kola nut on locomotor behaviour and water intake may not be due to caffeine only. PMID:19826468

  6. Borehole Inspection System for large diameter holes

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, W.L.; Oliver, R.D.; Lavelle, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    A color camera developed for underwater applications has been adapted for use as a large diameter Borehole Inspection System (BIS). This video/photographic system has pan and tilt capabilities and remotely interchangeable lenses. A compass provides an azimuth for orientation. It is designed to operate in boreholes ranging in diameter from 1.2 m to 3.0 m. The system has a 180 degree ''fisheye'' lens and an inspection lens with zoom. 35 mm photographs can be taken of the same view as the video for precise location. Video tape and 35 mm film is annotated. The primary function of the BIS is geologic investigation. Various characteristics of the geologic medium can be viewed. Lithologic types and textures can be determined. Structural features such as faults, fractures, and bedding can be scrutinized. Detail descriptions of stratigraphic sequences and contacts are possible. In combination with other borehole data and sample information, many questions about hole conditions and the geologic medium can be resolved. Field operations often demand immediate resolution of borehole problems. This system offers on-the-spot visual inspection of the drill hole and associated hardware. Large eroded zones can be evaluated and casings and liners can be inspected. Other applications such as the location and configuration of hardware left in the hole and fluid entry points are possible.

  7. Experience with borehole heat exchangers in Switzerland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Rybach; R. J. Hopkirk

    1994-01-01

    Switzerland undertakes, like many other countries, great efforts to reduce its dependence from foreign fossil fuels. Indigenous sources of energy like the heat content of the subsurface are especially in focus, also due to environmental concern (greenhouse effect due to COâ emissions). The most popular and technically advanced space heating system to use ground heat is the borehole heat exchanger

  8. BOREHOLE FLOWMETERS: FIELD APPLICATION AND DATA ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reviews application of borehole flowmeters in granular and fractured rocks. asic data obtained in the field are the ambient flow log and the pumping-induced flow log. hese basic logs may then be used to calculate other quantities of interest. he paper describes the app...

  9. BOREHOLE FLOWMETERS: FIELD APPLICATION AND DATA ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reviews application of borehole flowmeters in granular and fractured rocks. Basic data obtained in the field are the ambient flow log and the pumping-induced flow log. These basic logs may then be used to calculate other quantities of interest. The paper describes the ...

  10. Cased borehole effects on downhole seismic measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chengbin Peng; Chuen Hon Cheng; M. Nafi Toksoz

    1994-01-01

    Both approximate and exact formulations for the interaction of an incident elastic wave with a cased borehole are presented. In the approximate method, simple and explicit formulae are derived for the pressure in fluid at low frequencies. In the exact method, elastic potentials in each annulus are presented as a superposition of fundamental solutions to the Helmholtz equations. Continuity of

  11. USGS Training on Borehole Geophysical Logging

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A USGS hydrologist holds an electromagnetic induction borehole logging tool while the tool is calibrated. The hydrologist was participating in a USGS class on how to use electromagnetic induction geophysical methods for groundwater investigations, conducted by the USGS Office of Groundwater Branch o...

  12. Fiber optics can improve borehole measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, Eric O.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid flow in boreholes can give scientists important information about hydrogeological processes deep beneath the surface. Most studies measure flow using heat pulse, electromagnetic, and impeller flowmeters, but these methods are time-consuming and can actually obstruct the fluid being measured.

  13. Groundwater flow dynamic investigation without drilling boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, Mahmoud

    2015-02-01

    The flow net map is a basic tool for groundwater flow dynamics investigation. In areas where there are no boreholes or piezometers are not available, constructing flow net map may be difficult. This work proposes a simple methodology to construct flow net map without drilling boreholes. The flow net map constructed using the proposed approach represents an expected flow net map, which can draw conceptual flow model of the site. The major benefit from constructing the expected flow net map is it gives guidance for locating new boreholes for site investigation, carrying out investigation of the groundwater flow directions and estimating recharge/discharge from the site boundary. An illustrative example for the proposed approach was presented to show how the data required to construct the expected flow net map can be collected. The constructed, expected flow net map using the proposed methodology was compared with actual flow net map constructed from measured water levels. Both maps give consistent hydrological information about the site. The suggested approach represents a simple and cheap way to carry out investigation of groundwater flow dynamics in areas where there are no boreholes are available.

  14. Radiation pattern of a borehole radar antenna

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellefsen, K.J.; Wright, D.L.

    2005-01-01

    The finite-difference time-domain method was used to simulate radar waves that were generated by a transmitting antenna inside a borehole. The simulations were of four different models that included features such as a water-filled borehole and an antenna with resistive loading. For each model, radiation patterns for the far-field region were calculated. The radiation patterns show that the amplitude of the radar wave was strongly affected by its frequency, the water-filled borehole, the resistive loading of the antenna, and the external metal parts of the antenna (e.g., the cable head and the battery pack). For the models with a water-filled borehole, their normalized radiation patterns were practically identical to the normalized radiation pattern of a finite-length electric dipole when the wavelength in the formation was significantly greater than the total length of the radiating elements of the model antenna. The minimum wavelength at which this criterion was satisfied depended upon the features of the antenna, especially its external metal parts. ?? 2005 Society of Exploration Geophysicists. All rights reserved.

  15. Distribution and pathways of heavy metals and sulphur in the vicinity of the copper-nickel smelters in Nikel and Zapoljarnij, Kola Peninsula, Russia, as revealed by different sample media

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Viktor Chekushin; C REIMANN

    1996-01-01

    A pilot project for a regional environmental geochemical mapping project covering 188,000 km2 of an area exposed to severe airborne deposition of heavy metals and sulphur originating from the Nismelters of the Kola Peninsula, Russia, was initiated by the Central Kola Expedition and the Geological Surveys of Finland and Norway in 1992. To select the best suited sample media as

  16. Igneous layering in the peralkaline intrusions ,Kola Peninsula :leading role of gravitational differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogarko, L. N..

    2012-04-01

    In the center of Kola Peninsula there are two large layered intrusions of agpaitic nepheline syenites - Khibina and Lovozero. . The Khibina alkaline massif (Kola Peninsula,Russia) hosts the world's largest and economically most important apatite deposit. The Khibina massif is a complex multiphase body built up from a number of ring-like and conical intrusions. The apatite bearing intrusion is ring-like and is represented by a layered body of ijolitic composition with a thickness of about 1 - 2 km. The upper zone is represented by different types of apatite ores. These rocks consist of 60-90% euhedral very small (tenths of mm)apatite crystals. The lower zone has mostly ijolitic composition. The lower zone grades into underlying massive urtite consisting of 75-90% large (several mm) euhedral nepheline. Our experimental studies of systems with apatite demonstrated the near-eutectic nature of the apatite-bearing intrusion, resulting in practically simultaneous crystallization of nepheline, apatite and pyroxene. The mathematical model of the formation of the layered apatite-bearing intrusion based on the processes of sedimentation under the conditions of steady state convection taking account of crystal sizes is proposed. Under the conditions of steady-state convection large crystals of nepheline continuously had been settling forming massive underlying urtite whereas smaller crystals of pyroxenes, nepheline and apatite had been stirred in the convecting melt. During the cooling the intensity of convection decreased causing a settling of smaller crystals of nepheline and pyroxene and later very small crystalls of apatite in the upper part of alkaline magma chamber. The Lovozero massif, the largest of the Globe layered peralkaline intrusion, comprises super-large rare-metal (Nb, Ta, REE) deposit. The main ore mineral is loparite (Na, Ce, Ca)2 (Ti, Nb)2O6 which was mined during many years. The composition of cumulus loparite changed systematically upward through the intrusion with an increase in Na, Sr, Nb, Th, Nb/Ta, U/Th and decrease in REE, Zr, V, Zn, Ba and Ti. Our investigation indicates that the formation of loparite ore was the result of several factors including the chemical evolution of highly alkaline magmatic system and mechanical accumulation of loparite at the base of convecting unit.

  17. Electrical resistance tomography from measurements inside a steel cased borehole

    DOEpatents

    Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Schenkel, Clifford (Walnut Creek, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2000-01-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) produced from measurements taken inside a steel cased borehole. A tomographic inversion of electrical resistance measurements made within a steel casing was then made for the purpose of imaging the electrical resistivity distribution in the formation remotely from the borehole. The ERT method involves combining electrical resistance measurements made inside a steel casing of a borehole to determine the electrical resistivity in the formation adjacent to the borehole; and the inversion of electrical resistance measurements made from a borehole not cased with an electrically conducting casing to determine the electrical resistivity distribution remotely from a borehole. It has been demonstrated that by using these combined techniques, highly accurate current injection and voltage measurements, made at appropriate points within the casing, can be tomographically inverted to yield useful information outside the borehole casing.

  18. Time of formation and genesis of yttrium-zirconium mineralization in the Sakharjok massif, Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrin, V. R.; Skublov, S. G.; Balashov, Yu. A.; Lyalina, L. M.; Rodionov, N. V.

    2014-12-01

    The Kola geotectonic province in the northeastern Fennoscandian Shield accommodates a significant number of alkaline rock massifs differing in age. They are of mantle and mantle-crustal origin (alkali and nepheline syenites, carbonatites) and related to crustal sources (Neoarchean alkali granites). Among them, the Neoarchean Sakharjok nepheline syenite massif is related to the oldest intrusions of this kind bearing yttrium-zirconium mineralization. The crystallization of alkali syenite pertaining to the first intrusive phase of the intrusive Sakharjok massif is dated to 2645 ± 7 Ma, and this implies that this syenite postdated alkali granites (2.66-2.67 Ga). To date the yttrium-zirconium ore, we applied the local U-Pb method to zircon crystals occurring in the mineralized block hosted in nepheline syenite. The earliest fragments of zircon crystallized 1832 ± 7 Ma ago; the age of metamorphism is estimated at 1784 ± 13 Ma. These dates indicate the Paleoproterozoic age of the yttrium-zirconium mineralization, which was formed as a product of fluid reworking of the Neoarchean nepheline syenite of the Sakharjok massif.

  19. Immunomodulatory activities of kolaviron, a mixture of three related biflavonoids of Garcinia kola Heckel.

    PubMed

    Nworu, C S; Akah, P A; Esimone, C O; Okoli, C O; Okoye, F B C

    2008-01-01

    The immunomodulatory properties of kolaviron (KV), a mixture of three related biflavonoids of Garcinia kola Heckel (Clusiaceae), were investigated. The study was conducted using in vitro and in vivo immunocompetent and immunocompromised animal models. KV (250 and 500 mg/kg) produced a dose-dependent and significant (p < 0.05) inhibition of delayed-type hypersensitivity in rats and also caused a significant (p < 0.05) increase in the primary and secondary sheep erythrocytes-specific antibody titres in rats. In vitro, KV inhibited the classical complement system at concentrations greater than 100 microg/ml. The administration of KV ameliorated the cyclophosphamide-induced leukopenia and increased the proportion of lymphocytes count in rats after 14 days of treatment. Administration of KV on alternate days after immunosuppression with cyclophospamide increased the rate of excision wound closure and reduced epithelialization period from 21.75 to 15.5 days. This study established the immunomodulatory and immunorestorative properties of KV, which could be harnessed for possible clinical benefits to immunodeficient patients. PMID:18569087

  20. Identification and antibacterial evaluation of bioactive compounds from Garcinia kola (Heckel) seeds.

    PubMed

    Seanego, Christinah T; Ndip, Roland N

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the bioactivity of G. kola seeds on Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Plesiomonas shigelloides and Salmonella typhimurium. The crude ethyl acetate, ethanol, methanol, acetone and aqueous extracts were screened by the agar-well diffusion method and their activities were further determined by Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) assays. The extracts were fractionated by Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC). Bioautography was used to assess the activity of the possible classes of compounds present in the more active extracts. Column chromatography was used to purify the active compounds from the mixture, while GC-MS was used to identify the phytocomponents of the fractions. The inhibition zone diameters of the extracts ranged from 0-24 ± 1.1 mm, while MIC and MBC values ranged between 0.04-1.25 mg/mL and 0.081-2.5 mg/mL, respectively. The chloroform/ethyl acetate/formic acid (CEF) solvent system separated more active compounds. The MIC of the fractions ranged between 0.0006-2.5 mg/mL. CEF 3 (F3), CEF 11 (F11) and CEF 12 (F12) revealed the presence of high levels of linoleic acid, 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid and 2,3-dihydro-3,5-dihydroxy-6-methyl ester, respectively. The results obtained from this study justify the use of this plant in traditional medicine and provide leads which could be further exploited for the development of new and potent antimicrobials. PMID:22728354

  1. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry characterisation of the anti-Listeria components of Garcinia kola seeds.

    PubMed

    Penduka, D; Basson, K A; Mayekiso, B; Buwa, L; Okoh, I A

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption chromatography was used to separate the bioactive constituents of the crude n-hexane extract of Garcinia kola seeds. The silica gel 60 column fractions were eluted using the solvent combination of benzene: ethanol : ammonium hydroxide (BEA) in the ratio combination of 36 : 4 : 0.4 v/v. The fractions were tested for anti-Listeria activities by determining their MIC50, MIC90 or MIC against 4 Listeria isolates. The fractions were labelled BEA1 to BEA5 and 3 out of the 5 fractions eluted were active against the test Listeria species with MIC's ranging from MIC 0.57 mg/mL to MIC50 0.625 mg/mL. The most active fractions, BEA2 and BEA3, were subjected to gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to identify their composition. Fraction BEA2 constituted of 18 compounds mostly sterols and the BEA3 fraction contained 27 compounds with the most abundant compounds being fatty acids derivatives. The BEA2 fraction's interactions with antibiotics proved to be 100% synergistic with ciprofloxacin and ampicillin whilst it exhibited 50% additivity and 50% synergism with penicillin G. However, all the interactions of the BEA2 fraction with each of the conventional antibiotics used were synergistic against the human listeriosis causative bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. PMID:25757343

  2. Characterization of HANARO neutron radiography facility in accordance with ASTM standard E545-91/E803-91 for KOLAS/ISO17025.

    PubMed

    Cheul-Muu, Sim; Ki-Yong, Nam; In-Cheol, Lim; Chang-Hee, Lee; Ha-Lim, Choi

    2004-10-01

    As neutron radiography is even more in demand for industrial applications of aircraft, turbine blade, automobile, explosive igniters, etc, it is necessary to review the standards which are the most appropriate for preparing the procedures for setting up the QA system. Recently, Korea Of Lab Accreditation Scheme (KOLAS) was originated from ISO 17025. It is widely recognized by research peer groups for conducting valid tests. The neutron radiography facility (NRF) of High Flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor (HANARO), which started ion 1996, is the preliminary stages of KOLAS. The HANARO NRF is not only characterized using ASTM standards E545-91/E803-91 to satisfy the requirements of KOLAS, but in the design phase of the tomography system. PMID:15246410

  3. BOREHOLE NEUTRON ACTIVATION: THE RARE EARTHS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mikesell, J.L.; Senftle, F.E.

    1987-01-01

    Neutron-induced borehole gamma-ray spectroscopy has been widely used as a geophysical exploration technique by the petroleum industry, but its use for mineral exploration is not as common. Nuclear methods can be applied to mineral exploration, for determining stratigraphy and bed correlations, for mapping ore deposits, and for studying mineral concentration gradients. High-resolution detectors are essential for mineral exploration, and by using them an analysis of the major element concentrations in a borehole can usually be made. A number of economically important elements can be detected at typical ore-grade concentrations using this method. Because of the application of the rare-earth elements to high-temperature superconductors, these elements are examined in detail as an example of how nuclear techniques can be applied to mineral exploration.

  4. Disposition of plutonium in deep boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, W.G.; Jardine, L.J.; Walter, C.E.

    1995-05-01

    Substantial inventories of excess plutonium are expected to result from dismantlement of U.S. and Russian nuclear weapons. Disposition of this material should be a high priority in both countries. A variety of disposition options are under consideration. One option is to place the plutonium either directly or in an immobilized form at the bottom of a deep borehole that is then sealed. Deep-borehole disposition involves placing plutonium several kilometers deep into old, stable, rock formations that have negligible free water present. Containment assurance is based on the presence of ancient groundwater indicating lack of migration and communication with the biosphere. Recovery would be extremely difficult (costly) and impossible to accomplish clandestinely.

  5. Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, James D; McClung, David W

    2006-11-06

    This report describes the preliminary design and the effort to date of Phase II of a Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer for use in networks of seismic stations for monitoring underground nuclear explosions. The design uses the latest technology of broadband seismic instrumentation. Each parameter of the seismometer is defined in terms of the known physical limits of the parameter. These limits are defined by the commercially available components, and the physical size constraints. A theoretical design is proposed, and a preliminary prototype model of the proposed instrument has been built. This prototype used the sensor module of the KS2000. The installation equipment (hole locks, etc.) has been designed and one unit has been installed in a borehole. The final design of the sensors and electronics and leveling mechanism is in process. Noise testing is scheduled for the last quarter of 2006.

  6. Efficient numerical modeling of borehole heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Khoury, R.; Kölbel, T.; Schramedei, R.

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a finite element modeling technique for double U-tube borehole heat exchangers (BHE) and the surrounding soil mass. Focus is placed on presenting numerical analyses describing the capability of a BHE model, previously reported, to simulate three-dimensional heat transfer processes in multiple borehole heat exchangers embedded in a multi-layer soil mass, in a computationally efficient manner. Geothermal problems which require very fine meshes, of the order of millions of finite elements, can be simulated using coarse meshes, of the order of a few hundred to a few thousand elements. Accordingly, significant reduction of CPU time is gained, rendering the model suitable for utilization in engineering practice. A validation example comparing computed results with measured results is presented. Parametric analyses are also presented describing the possible utilization of the model for research works and design optimization.

  7. Advances in borehole geophysics for hydrology

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, P.H.

    1982-01-01

    Borehole geophysical methods provide vital subsurface information on rock properties, fluid movement, and the condition of engineered borehole structures. Within the first category, salient advances include the continuing improvement of the borehole televiewer, refinement of the electrical conductivity dipmeter for fracture characterization, and the development of a gigahertz-frequency electromagnetic propagation tool for water saturation measurements. The exploration of the rock mass between boreholes remains a challenging problem with high potential; promising methods are now incorporating high-density spatial sampling and sophisticated data processing. Flow-rate measurement methods appear adequate for all but low-flow situations. At low rates the tagging method seems the most attractive. The current exploitation of neutron-activation techniques for tagging means that the wellbore fluid itself is tagged, thereby eliminating the mixing of an alien fluid into the wellbore. Another method uses the acoustic noise generated by flow through constrictions and in and behind casing to detect and locate flaws in the production system. With the advent of field-recorded digital data, the interpretation of logs from sedimentary sequences is now reaching a sophisticated level with the aid of computer processing and the application of statistical methods. Lagging behind are interpretive schemes for the low-porosity, fracture-controlled igneous and metamorphic rocks encountered in the geothermal reservoirs and in potential waste-storage sites. Progress is being made on the general problem of fracture detection by use of electrical and acoustical techniques, but the reliable definition of permeability continues to be an elusive goal.

  8. Effects of the deviation characteristics of nuclear waste emplacement boreholes on borehole liner stresses; Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Glowka, D.A.

    1990-09-01

    This report investigates the effects of borehole deviation on the useability of lined boreholes for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository in Nevada. Items that lead to constraints on borehole deviation include excessive stresses that could cause liner failure and possible binding of a waste container inside the liner during waste emplacement and retrieval operations. Liner stress models are developed for two general borehole configurations, one for boreholes drilled with a steerable bit and one for boreholes drilled with a non-steerable bit. Procedures are developed for calculating liner stresses that arise both during insertion of the liner into a borehole and during the thermal expansion process that follows waste emplacement. The effects of borehole curvature on the ability of the waste container to pass freely inside the liner without binding are also examined. Based on the results, specifications on borehole deviation allowances are developed for specific vertical and horizontal borehole configurations of current interest. 11 refs., 22 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Fluorbritholite-(Y) and yttrialite-(Y) from silexites of the Keivy alkali granites, Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyalina, L. M.; Zozulya, D. R.; Savchenko, Ye. E.; Tarasov, M. P.; Selivanova, E. A.; Tarasova, E.

    2014-12-01

    Investigation of the morphology, anatomy, and chemical composition of fluorbritholite-(Y) and yttrialite-(Y) from silexites of the Keivy alkali granites in Kola Peninsula has shown that these minerals are the main REE concentrators in this area and that their content reaches 10-15 vol %. Britholite and yttrialite are associated with zircon, aeschynite-(Y), chevkinite-(Ce), fergusonite-(Y), thorite, monazite-(Ce), xenotime-(Y) and bastnaesite-(Ce). Three morphological types of fluorbritholite-(Y) have been identified: (I) subhedral crystals and grains, (II) anhedral grains intergrown with yttrialite-(Y), and (III) poikilitic crystals and skeletal aggregates. These morphological types of fluorbritholite-(Y) are characterized by successive (I to III type) decreases in P content down to the pure silicate fluorbritholite-(Y). Crystals of the first type are heterogenous: the P content decreases and the HREE content increases from core to rim. The total REE content increases insignificantly from types I to II and drastically decreases in fluorbritholite-(Y) of type III. The successive prevalence of HREE over LREE indicates the hydrothermal conditions of mineral crystallization. The chemical composition of yttrialite-(Y) is distinguished by the relatively high Th content and depletion in Al. The compositional trend (from core to rim) in heterogeneous grains of yttrialite-(Y) testifies that their heterogeneity was caused by metasomatic alteration of the mineral. The interrelation of fluorbritholite-(Y) and yttrialite-(Y) indicate that fluorbritholite-(Y) of types II and III were formed later than yttrialite-(Y). Evidence for fluorbritholite-(Y) and yttrialite-(Y) formation suggests the significant role of hydrothermal processes in the genesis of silexites.

  10. Spatiotemporal relationships of dike magmatism in the Kola region, the Fennoscandian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotov, Zh. A.; Bayanova, T. B.; Serov, P. A.

    2012-11-01

    A brief geological and petrographic characterization of the Early Precambrian dike complexes of the Kola region is given along with data on new estimates of dike age and analysis of their distribution over the entire Fennoscandian Shield. The emplacement of dikes in the Archean core of the shield continued after consolidation of the sialic crust 2.74-1.76 Ga ago. After the Svecofennian Orogeny, dikes continued to form in the west in the area of newly formed crust, while the amagmatic period began in the Archean domain. The intense formation of dikes in the Svecofennian domain lasted approximately for 1 Ga (1.8-0.84 Ga). The younger igneous rocks in the crustal domains of different age are less abundant and localized at their margins. A similar distribution of dikes is characteristic of other shields in different continents. This implies that the formation of the sialic crust in the shields is not completed by its consolidation and formation of the craton. For 1 Ga after completion of this process, the crust is underplated by mantle-derived magmas. This process is reflected at the Earth's surface in the development of mantle-derived mafic and anorogenic granitoid magmatism. The process of crust formation is ended as the subcratonic lithosphere cools and the amagmatic period of the craton history is started. Beginning from this moment, the manifestations of cratonic magmatism were related either to the superposed tectonomagmatic reactivation of the cold craton under the effect of crust formation in the adjacent mobile belts or to the ascent of mantle plumes.

  11. In vivo evaluation of interaction between aqueous seed extract of Garcinia kola Heckel and ciprofloxacin hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Esimone, Charles O; Nwafor, Sunday V; Okoli, Charles O; Chah, Kennedy F; Uzuegbu, David B; Chibundu, Chinedu; Eche, Mike A; Adikwu, Micheal U

    2002-01-01

    The effect of Garcinia kola seed extract (100 mg/kg) on the pharmacokinetic and antibacterial effects of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride (40 mg/kg) was studied. The results (mean +/- SEM) indicated that concurrent administration of both agents significantly (P < 0.05) decreased average serum concentration, peak serum concentration, and elimination rate of ciprofloxacin HCl, whereas the half-life and clearance rate were increased. The decrease in clearance rate was not significant. There was no difference in time to peak plasma concentration of ciprofloxacin HCl in both groups (n = 5), which occurred at 1 hour. However, the peak plasma concentration of ciprofloxacin HCl was 46.90 +/- 9.50 microg/mL in the group that received ciprofloxacin HCl alone as against 35.80 +/- 9.30 microg/mL noted in the group that received both agents (difference of 22.24%). At 2.5 hours and longer, the values were higher in the group that received both agents, but these were not statistically significant. The reciprocal serum inhibitory titer (SIT) was 33.33 and 50.00% higher in group that received ciprofloxacin HCl alone at 1 and 2.5 hours, respectively; the highest value for both groups being at 1 hour. In contrast, at 4 hours, the value of reciprocal SIT was 66.67% higher in the group that received both agents and at 24 hours, the value was zero for both groups. The observed pharmacokinetic and antibacterial interactions at various time interval indicate biphasic interaction. The interaction was antagonistic at 1 and 2.5 hours, but exhibited potentiation at 4 hours. The precise mechanism underlying the observed biphasic interaction is not fully understood. PMID:12115015

  12. Canister, Sealing Method And Composition For Sealing A Borehole

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM); Wagh, Arun S. (Orland Park, IL)

    2005-06-28

    Method and composition for sealing a borehole. A chemically bonded phosphate ceramic sealant for sealing, stabilizing, or plugging boreholes is prepared by combining an oxide or hydroxide and a phosphate with water to form slurry. The slurry is introduced into the borehole where the seal, stabilization or plug is desired, and then allowed to set up to form the high strength, minimally porous sealant, which binds strongly to itself and to underground formations, steel and ceramics.

  13. Borehole sounding device with sealed depth and water level sensors

    DOEpatents

    Skalski, Joseph C.; Henke, Michael D.

    2005-08-02

    A borehole device having proximal and distal ends comprises an enclosure at the proximal end for accepting an aircraft cable containing a plurality of insulated conductors from a remote position. A water sensing enclosure is sealingly attached to the enclosure and contains means for detecting water, and sending a signal on the cable to the remote position indicating water has been detected. A bottom sensing enclosure is sealingly attached to the water sensing enclosure for determining when the borehole device encounters borehole bottom and sends a signal on the cable to the remote position indicating that borehole bottom has been encountered.

  14. Automated analysis of ice properties from glacier borehole images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Terry; Hubbard, Bryn; Merton-Lyn, Derek; Worthington, Paul; Zwiggelaar, Reyer

    2013-04-01

    Optical televiewing provides a continuous, true-colour, orientated 360° optical image of a borehole wall. The recent application of this technology in ice boreholes has yielded far more detail relating to the internal structure of ice masses than has been previously available using traditional borehole TV video or acoustic televiewers. From the optical televiewer logs, which are allied to true orientation, the dip and strike of each planar structure that intersects the borehole can be calculated. We present a number of methods which aid the user in the annotation and analysis of glacier borehole images by automatically detecting layers and inclusions present in borehole image logs. The techniques used include a modified version of the Canny Edge Detector to highlight edges in the image, and a number of edge processing and fitting algorithms to extract sinusoidal layers from these edges. Active Contours have also been used to provide a semi-automatic inclusion detection tool. These techniques have been implemented as part of a software tool designed to allow the manual and automatic annotation of borehole features. A Genetic Algorithm has also been developed as part of a separate tool which allows for the fine tuning of parameters in the above algorithms. Results to date have shown good correspondence with manual operators in terms of layering and inclusions present in borehole images from a number of ice masses including Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica; the NEEM deep borehole, Greenland; Midre Lovénbreen, Svalbard; and Tsanfleuron Glacier, Switzerland.

  15. Atmospheric transport of anthropogenic heavy metals from the Kola Peninsula to the surfaces of the White and Barents seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, A. A.; Maksimenkov, L. O.; Pogarskii, F. A.

    2008-12-01

    The propagation of air masses and anthropogenic aerosol pollutants from a large industrial region located above the polar circle in the north of the Kola Peninsula is analyzed. The initial data are five-day-traveltime trajectories of air mass transport from the source, which were calculated for each day of January, April, July, and October over a period of 20 years from 1981 to 2000 according to the NOAA reanalysis data on meteorological fields. Seasonal and long-term variations in the mean concentrations of arsenic and heavy metals (Ni, Cu, Pb, Cd, V) in the surface air layer and precipitation over the waters of the White and Barents seas are studied. The results are compared with the published observational data characteristic of the region under study. It is shown that, on the whole, over a year, the atmospheric flux of persistent ecotoxicants from the Kola Peninsula to the waters of the White and Barents seas is fully comparable to the contribution of their inflowing rivers and this flux is dominant for nickel and copper.

  16. In-vitro antagonistic characteristics of crude aqueous and methanolic extracts of Garcinia kola (Heckel) seeds against some Vibrio bacteria.

    PubMed

    Penduka, Dambudzo; Okoh, Omobola O; Okoh, Anthony I

    2011-01-01

    The methanolic and aqueous extracts of Garcinia kola seeds were screened for their anti-Vibrio activities against 50 Vibrio isolates obtained from wastewater final effluents in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. The crude extracts at 10 mg/mL exhibited appreciable inhibitory activities against most of the test Vibrio isolates, with zones of inhibition ranging from 10-19 mm for methanol extract and 8-15 mm for the aqueous extracts. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the methanol extract varied from 0.313 to 2.5 mg/mL while that for the aqueous extract was 10 mg/mL for all the susceptible Vibrio isolates. Rate of kill assay of the methanolic extracts against three selected Vibrio species showed bacteriostatic activities against all of them achieving 58% and 60% (Vibrio vulnificus AL042); 68% and 69% (Vibrio parahaemolyticus AL049); and 70% and 78% (Vibrio fluvialis AL040) killing of the test bacteria at 3× and 4 ×MIC values, respectively, after 2 h exposure time. We conclude that Garcinia kola seeds hold promise as a potential source of therapeutic compounds of relevance in Vibrio infections management. PMID:21441874

  17. Biocidal activity of partially purified fractions from methanolic extract of Garcinia kola (Heckel) seeds on bacterial isolates.

    PubMed

    Akinpelu, D A; Adegboye, M F; Adeloye, O A; Okoh, A I

    2008-01-01

    The in vitro antibacterial activity of crude methanolic extract of the seeds of Garcinia kola was investigated. The extracts exhibited antibacterial activities with zones of inhibition ranging from 10 mm to 25 mm. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the diethyl ether fraction was between 0.313 and 5.0 mg/ml, while that of butanol fraction varied from 0.157 to 5.0 mg/ml. The butanol fraction killed about 77% of Bacillus anthracis and 79% of Escherichia coli cells within 120 min at a concentration of 5.0 mg/ml. Protein leakage from the B. anthracis and E. coli cells when exposed to the butanol and diethyl ether fractions was observed. We conclude that Garcinia kola seed extract has a broad spectrum antibacterial activity, with the butanol and diethyl ether fractions being bactericidal as exemplified by the killing rate and protein leakage regimes, which suggest cell membrane disruption as a mechanism of action of the extract. PMID:19399341

  18. Repeat temperature measurements in borehole GC-1, northwestern Utah - Towards isolating a climate-change signal in borehole temperature profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, D.S.; Harris, R.N. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Temperature-depth profiles in borehole GC-1, northwestern Utah, were measured in 1978, 1990, and 1992. Borehole temperatures below 80 m depth are highly reproducible over the 14 year period indicating long term thermal stability. A slowly changing temperature field above 80 m depth has similiar characteristics to synthetic temperature profiles computed from a 100 year record of air temperature changes at Park Valley weather station 50 km northeast of the borehole site. 6 refs.

  19. Differences between repeated borehole temperature logs in the southern Canadian Prairies-validating borehole climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majorowicz, J.; Skinner, W.; Safanda, J.; Gosnold, W.

    2006-11-01

    Temperature-depth (T-z) profiles from twenty-four shallow boreholes of less than 250 m in depth located in flat, semi-arid areas of the southern Canadian Prairie Provinces initially measured in the late 1980's and early 1990's and repeated between 2004 and 2006 show strong ground surface temperature (GST) warming signatures. GST changes of 0.1-0.2°C, and 0.4°C, are observed between the measurements for the shorter (decade) and longer (two decades) time spans, respectively. Borehole sites with repeated temperature logs are selected to demonstrate that multiple T-z profiles provide general agreement between GST warming and observed surface air temperature (SAT) warming measured at nearby historical climate stations. A comparison of measured changes from repeated temperature logs with those simulated from SAT forcing demonstrates the influence of SAT on the observed deviation of temperature with depth despite variations in snow cover. Repeated borehole measurements from the northern Great Plains of the USA also identify a similar positive temperature change but of lower magnitude. Temperature changes since 1900 in the southern Canadian Prairies and the adjoining northern Great Plains of the USA, as derived from the functional state inversion (FSI) of deeper borehole logs, average 2.5°C but show a strong latitudinal gradient.

  20. Mountain Home Well - Borehole Geophysics Database

    SciTech Connect

    Shervais, John

    2012-11-11

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  1. Mountain Home Well - Borehole Geophysics Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    Shervais, John

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  2. Phase Identification of Seismic Borehole Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Riley, Brian J.

    2006-11-01

    This report documents the phase identification results obtained by x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of samples taken from borehole C4998 drilled at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) on the Hanford Site (REF). XRD samples were taken from fractures and vesicles or are minerals of interest at areas of interest within the basalt formations cored. The samples were powder mounted and analyzed. Search-match software was used to select the best match from the ICDD mineral database based on peak locations and intensities.

  3. A borehole-to-surface electromagnetic survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tseng, H.-W.; Becker, A.; Wilt, M.J.; Deszcz-Pan, M.

    1998-01-01

    The results of a limited field trial confirm the usefulness of borehole-to-surface electromagnetic (EM) measurements for monitoring fluid extraction. A vertical EM profiling experiment was done at the University of California Richmond Field Station, where we simulated a brine spill plume by creating a saline water injection zone at a depth of 30 m. The data acquisition mode was analogous to the reverse vertical seismic profiling (VSP) configuration used for seismic measurements in that the EM transmitter traversed the PVC-cased borehole used for fluid injection and extraction while the receivers were deployed on the surface. The EM measurements were made at 9.6 kHz with an accuracy of 1% in signal amplitude and 1??in signal phase. Observations were taken at 5-m intervals along two intersecting profiles that were centered on the injection well and extended for 60 m on either side of it. The presence of the injected salt water, at the expected 30 m depth, was indicated clearly by differences between the pre-extraction and postextraction data. A limited amount of numerical modeling showed that the experimental data were consistent with the presence of two superposed saline plumes. The uppermost of these, located at 26 m depth, was 2 m thick and had an area of 30 m2. The lower plume, located at 30 m, is the major cause of the observed anomally, as it has an areal extent of 120 m2 and a thickness of 3 m. Surprisingly, the measurements were very sensitive to the presence of cultural surficial conductivity anomalies. These spurious effect were reduced by spatial filtering of the data prior to interpretation.The results of a limited field trial confirm the usefulness of borehole-to-surface electromagnetic (EM) measurements for monitoring fluid extraction. A brine spill plume is simulated by creating a saline water injection zone at a depth of 30 m. The data acquisition mode was analogous to the reverse vertical seismic profiling (VSP) configuration used for seismic measurements in that the EM transmitter traversed the polyvinyl chloride-cased borehole used for fluid injection and extraction while the receivers were deployed on the surface. Observations were taken at 5-m intervals along two intersecting profiles that were centered on the injection well and extended for 60 m on either side of it.

  4. Borehole survey instrumentation development for geothermal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, B.R.

    1980-01-01

    The creation and subsequent study of hot dry rock geothermal reservoirs requires sophisticated tools and instruments that can function for relatively long periods of time in the hostile downhole environment. Detection of fracture dimensions and orientation of the geothermal reservoir is critical for the successful completion of the hot dry rock energy extraction system. The development of downhole instrumentation capable of characterizing the hydraulic-fracture systems must emphasize reliability of measuring devices and electro-mechanical components to function properly at borehole temperature exceeding 275/sup 0/C and pressures of 69 MPa (10,000 psi).

  5. Modelling spatial oscillations in soil borehole bacteria.

    PubMed

    McGuinness, M J; Cribbin, L B; Winstanley, H F; Fowler, A C

    2014-12-21

    Spatial oscillations in groundwater contaminant concentrations can be successfully explained by consideration of a competitive microbial community in conditions of poor nutrient supply, in which the effects of spatial diffusion of the nutrient sources are included. In previous work we showed that the microbial competition itself allowed oscillations to occur, and, in common with other reaction-diffusion systems, the addition of spatial diffusion transforms these temporal oscillations into travelling waves, sometimes chaotic. We therefore suggest that irregular chemical profiles sometimes found in contaminant plume borehole profiles may be a consequence of this competition. PMID:25150456

  6. The Role of Active Fractures on Borehole Breakout Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahara, D.; Kohl, T.; Schoenball, M.; Müller, B.

    2013-12-01

    The properties of georeservoirs are strongly related to the stress field and their interpretation is a major target in geotechnical management. Borehole breakouts are direct indicators of the stress field as they develop due to the concentration of the highest compressional stress toward the minimum horizontal stress direction. However, the interaction with fractures might create local perturbations. Such weakened zones are often observed by localized anomalies of the borehole breakout orientation. We examined high-quality acoustic borehole televiewer (UBI) logs run in the entire granite sections at the deep well GPK4 at Soultz-sous-Forêts, France. The borehole is moderately inclined (15° - 35°) in its middle section. Detailed analysis of 1221 borehole elongation pairs in the vicinity of 1871 natural fractures observed in GPK4 well is used to infer the role of fractures on the borehole breakouts shape and orientation. Patterns of borehole breakout orientation in the vicinity of active fractures suggest that the wavelength of the borehole breakout orientation anomalies in this granite rock depend on the scale of the fracture while the rotation amplitude and direction is strongly influenced by the fracture orientation. In the upper and middle part of the well even a linear trend between fracture and breakout orientations could be established. In addition to the rotation, breakouts typically are found to be asymmetrically formed in zones of high fracture density. We find that major faults tend to create a systematic rotation of borehole breakout orientation with long spatial wavelength while abrupt changes are often observed around small fractures. The finding suggest that the borehole breakout heterogeneities are not merely governed by the principal stress heterogeneities, but that the effect of mechanical heterogeneities like elastic moduli changes, rock strength anisotropy and fracturing must be taken into account. Thus, one has to be careful to infer the principal stress orientation from borehole breakout data observed in fractured rock.

  7. Efficacy of Garcinia kola 0.5% Aqueous Eye Drops in Patients with Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma or Ocular Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Adefule-Ositelu, Adebukunola O.; Adegbehingbe, Bernice O.; Adefule, Adebayo K.; Adegbehingbe, Olayinka O.; Samaila, Elsie; Oladigbolu, Kehinde

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering efficacy of Garcinia kola 0.5% aqueous solution eye drops in patients with newly diagnosed primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension (POAG/OH). Materials and Methods: A randomized, double-masked, multicenter, active-controlled prospective study. Patients who met the inclusion criteria were randomly assigned in equal numbers to receive Timolol 0.5% eye drops as a control medication (A = Group 1 eyes) or Garcinia kola 0.5% eye drops as the study medication (B = Group 2 eyes). All drops were instilled at 6 am and 6 pm daily. Goldman applanation tonometry was performed at 9 am, 12 pm and 3 pm at baseline, week-6, week-12 and week-24 visits. Voluntary and actively elicited reports of adverse events were documented. The mean change in IOP over 24 weeks was the primary outcome measure. Both groups were compared for statistically significant differences at all visits. A P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 178 patients were randomly assigned to G. kola and Timolol groups. At baseline there were no differences in mean IOP between groups, based on age, sex, or diagnosis. At the end of the study period (24th week), the mean (± SD) reduction in IOP was 12.93 ± 2.3 mmHg (47.8% ± 0.8% reduction) in G. Kola group and 13.09 ± 2.8 mm Hg (48.2% ± 1.03% reduction) in the Timolol group (P > 0.05). Adverse events were mild in nature with no statistically significant differences between groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Garcinia kola ophthalmic solution significantly reduces IOP as compared to baseline. The IOP lowering effect of both treatments was equivalent. PMID:20543944

  8. High Temperature Borehole Televiewer software user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Duda, L.E.

    1989-11-01

    The High Temperature Borehole Televiewer is a downhole instrument which provides acoustic pictures of the borehole walls that are suitable for casing inspection and fracture detection in geothermal wells. The Geothermal Drilling Organization has funded the development of a commercial tool survivable to temperatures of 275{degree}C and pressures of 5000 psi. A real-time display on an IBM-compatible PC was included as part of the development effort. This report contains a User Manual which describes the operation of this software. The software is designed in a menu format allowing the user to change many of the parameters which control both the acquisition and the display of the Televiewer data. An internal data acquisition card digitizes the waveform from the tool at a rate of 100,000 samples per second. The data from the tool, both the range or arrival time and the amplitude of the return signal, are displayed in color on the CRT screen of the computer during the logging operation. This data may be stored on the hard disk for later display and analysis. The software incorporates many features which aid in the setup of the tool for proper operation. These features include displaying and storing the captured waveform data to check the voltage and time windows selected by the user. 17 refs., 28 figs., 15 tabs.

  9. Second ILAW Site Borehole Characterization Plan

    SciTech Connect

    SP Reidel

    2000-08-10

    The US Department of Energy's Hanford Site has the most diverse and largest amounts of radioactive tank waste in the US. High-level radioactive waste has been stored at Hanford since 1944. Approximately 209,000 m{sup 3} (54 Mgal) of waste are currently stored in 177 tanks. Vitrification and onsite disposal of low-activity tank waste (LAW) are embodied in the strategy described in the Tri-Party Agreement. The tank waste is to be retrieved, separated into low- and high-level fractions, and then immobilized. The low-activity vitrified waste will be disposed of in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. This report is a plan to drill and characterize the second borehole for the Performance Assessment. The first characterization borehole was drilled in 1998. The plan describes data collection activities for determining physical and chemical properties of the vadose zone and saturated zone on the northeast side of the proposed disposal site. These data will then be used in the 2005 Performance Assessment.

  10. Evaluation of borehole electromagnetic and seismic detection of fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, H.T.; Suhler, S.A.; Owen, T.E.

    1984-02-01

    Experiments were conducted to establish the feasibility of downhole high-frequency techniques for location of fractures in the vicinity of boreholes. An existing flame-cut slot in granite was filled with salt water to simulate a brine-filled fracture. The first method used an electromagnetic wave at 30 to 300 MHz, vhf frequencies. A transmitter consisting of a phased dual-dipole array arranged to provide a directional signal toward the fracture was installed in a borehole opposite the fracture. A receiver was also located in the same borehole. The radar returns from the simulated fracture were detectable in boreholes located at distances of up to 12 meters from the fracture. These results indicate for the first time the feasibility of a downhole vhf radar for use in a single borehole for detection of fractures located away from the borehole. Similar experiments were also conducted using seismic waves at 4.5 to 6 KHz. The transmitter and the receiver in this case were located in separate boreholes. During this experiment, reflections from the slot were obtained only with the transducers oriented for shear wave illumination and detection. These results suggest that a high-frequency shear wave can also be used to detect fractures away from a borehole.

  11. Physicochemical quality of boreholes in Densu Basin of Ghana

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Amoako; A. Y. Karikari; O. D. Ansa-Asare

    2011-01-01

    Physico-chemical characteristics of 74 boreholes from communities within Densu Basin were assessed following procedures outlined in Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater. The aim was to assess the status of the boreholes water quality for any contamination for management action to ensure the quality of health of the people in the area. The water quality parameters analyzed

  12. Improving the thermal performance of coaxial borehole heat exchangers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Zanchini; S. Lazzari; A. Priarone

    2010-01-01

    Borehole heat exchangers are the fundamental component of ground coupled heat pumps, which are now widely employed for energy saving in building heating and cooling. The improvement of the thermal efficiency of Coaxial Borehole Heat Exchangers (CBHEs) is pursued in this paper by investigating the effects of thermal short-circuiting and of flow rate, as well as of the constituent materials

  13. PBO Borehole Strainmeter Network: Data Products And Metrics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. B. Henderson; A. A. Borsa; W. Gallaher; M. H. Gottlieb; K. M. Hodgkinson; M. E. Jackson; W. Johnson; D. Mencin; E. J. Vanboskirk

    2009-01-01

    The borehole strainmeter network within the Plate Boundary Observatory consists of 74 tensor strainmeters installed in arrays distributed between southern California and Vancouver Island, Canada. Borehole strainmeters, with nanostrain sensitivity, were included in the Observatory because of their ability to detect short-lived strain transients. In the first year of the operations and maintenance phase of the Observatory, the strainmeter network

  14. ForPeerReview Reduced order borehole induction modelling

    E-print Network

    Navon, Michael

    ForPeerReview Only Reduced order borehole induction modelling Journal: Journal of Electromagnetic://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jemwa Journal of Electromagnetic Waves and Applications #12;ForPeerReview Only Reduced order borehole induction order model, numerical simulation, Maxwell equations, array induction tool URL: http

  15. Longwall dust control potentially enhanced by surface borehole water infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Campoli, A.A.; McCall, F.E.; Finfinger, G.L. [Bureau of Mines, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Zuber, M.D. [S.A. Holditch and Associates, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Injecting water under pressure to wet the coalbed in advance of mining reduces mining-generated respirable dust. Owing to economic and geological barriers, water infusion for longwall dust control in the United States is currently limited to the Pocahontas No. 3 Coalbed in Virginia. Water is pumped into the coalbed through underground boreholes drilled horizontally from the headgate toward the tailgate side of retreat longwall panels. This paper theorizes that the barriers to widespread utilization of water infusion for longwall dust control could be overcome by long-duration, low-pressure water infusion through vertical gob gas boreholes. Currently, 43% of the 72 longwall mines in the United States employ vertical gob gas boreholes. Computer coalbed reservoir simulation suggests that one vertical surface borehole could infuse the same longwall panel area as four horizontal boreholes in the current water infusion system for longwall dust control in the Pocahontas No. 3 Coalbed.

  16. Borehole hydraulic coal mining system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Floyd, E. L.

    1977-01-01

    The borehole hydraulic coal mining system accesses the coal seam through a hole drilled in the overburden. The mining device is lowered through the hole into the coal seam where it fragments the coal with high pressure water jets which pump it to the surface as a slurry by a jet pump located in the center of the mining device. The coal slurry is then injected into a pipeline for transport to the preparation plant. The system was analyzed for performance in the thick, shallow coal seams of Wyoming, and the steeply pitching seams of western Colorado. Considered were all the aspects of the mining operation for a 20-year mine life, producing 2,640,000 tons/yr. Effects on the environment and the cost of restoration, as well as concern for health and safety, were studied. Assumptions for design of the mine, the analytical method, and results of the analysis are detailed.

  17. Head assembly for multiposition borehole extensometer

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Donald N. (Livermore, CA)

    1983-01-01

    A head assembly for a borehole extensometer and an improved extensometer for measuring subsurface subsidence. A plurality of inflatable anchors provide discrete measurement points. A metering rod is fixed to each of the anchors which are displaced when subsidence occurs, thereby translating the attached rod. The head assembly includes a sprocket wheel rotatably mounted on a standpipe and engaged by a chain which is connected at one end to the metering rod and at the other end to a counterweight. A second sprocket wheel connected to the standpipe also engages the chain and drives a connected potentiometer. The head assembly converts the linear displacement of the metering rod to the rotary motion of the second sprocket wheel, which is measured by the potentiometer, producing a continuous electrical output.

  18. Multiple position borehole extensometer procedure: Final draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    The purpose of the Multiple Position Borehole Extensometer Procedure is to provide detailed information for MPBXs installed at the salt Deaf Smith County ESF. This procedure includes design of equipment, installation, instructions, instrument locations, measurement requirements, support requirements, quality assurance procedures, and data acquisition requirements. Data reduction procedures are also discussed; however, the relevance of the data is discussed elsewhere in the appropriate test plans. Sufficient detail is provided in this procedure to allow for integrating the requirements of this procedure into both the facility construction and overall underground testing programs; identifying necessary equipment for procurement; determining data acquisition requirements as input to Automatic Data Acquisition System (ADAS) design; providing step-by-step procedures for training personnel as well as for directing field operations; establishing quality assurance (QA) checkpoints and implementation methods; and defining data reduction methods and providing the anticipated accuracy of the system. 11 refs., 14 figs.

  19. Development of a hydraulic borehole seismic source

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, R.P.

    1998-04-01

    This report describes a 5 year, $10 million Sandia/Industry project to develop an advanced borehole seismic source for use in oil and gas exploration and production. The development Team included Sandia, Chevron, Amoco, Conoco, Exxon, Raytheon, Pelton, and GRI. The seismic source that was developed is a vertically oriented, axial point force, swept frequency, clamped, reaction-mass vibrator design. It was based on an early Chevron prototype, but the new tool incorporates a number of improvements which make it far superior to the original prototype. The system consists of surface control electronics, a special heavy duty fiber optic wireline and draw works, a cablehead, hydraulic motor/pump module, electronics module, clamp, and axial vibrator module. The tool has a peak output of 7,000 lbs force and a useful frequency range of 5 to 800 Hz. It can operate in fluid filled wells with 5.5-inch or larger casing to depths of 20,000 ft and operating temperatures of 170 C. The tool includes fiber optic telemetry, force and phase control, provisions to add seismic receiver arrays below the source for single well imaging, and provisions for adding other vibrator modules to the tool in the future. The project yielded four important deliverables: a complete advanced borehole seismic source system with all associated field equipment; field demonstration surveys funded by industry showing the utility of the system; industrial sources for all of the hardware; and a new service company set up by their industrial partner to provide commercial surveys.

  20. New Aspects of Structure of Earth Crust (Based on Data of Super Deep Wells Kola and Saatly)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galant, Yuri

    2013-04-01

    In order to ensure the sustainability of Planet Earth the latest information regarding the structure of the Earth is necessary. It common accepted that Earth Crust consists of 2 layers: granite and basalt. Unique depth 12 600 meter have been reached by unique drills Kola located on the Arhenian Baltic plate. But haven't passed/reached border of Conrad that expected to be on the 4 000 meters. In additions corroborate this fact Saatly super deep well haven't come out from basalt in spite of unique depth 8 600 meter in Kura rift Alpine geosynclinals belts. These facts from conversely different tectonic regions let to build new model structure of Earth Crust. Based on the seismic interpretations and the geological data analysis obtained from super deep drills Kola (12 600meters) and Saatly (8 280 meters), the comprehensive 1 layer geologic -geotectonic-geochemical model interruption-blocks structure of the Earth Crust has been created. Such model is leading to following reasoning. Geologic aspect: 1) Earth Crust on lateral. consists of separated blocks/domain of Granite and separated blocks/domain Basalt, lies directly on mantle.Tectonical aspects: 2) There is no subduction, 3) There is thrust 4) Earth Crust has separated into granite and basalts domains/blocks. Geochemical aspect: 5) Distribution of acid components in Earth Crust n prevailing on base components. 6) Power intensity degassation the depth increasing on old structure. Paleo- aspect: 7) Forming Earth crust began from forming the granites. Societal aspect: 8) Let us to build a new model of forming and development of atmosphere, hydrosphere and mineral fields.

  1. In vitro anti-listerial activities of crude n-hexane and aqueous extracts of Garcinia kola (heckel) seeds.

    PubMed

    Penduka, Dambudzo; Okoh, Anthony I

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the anti-Listerial activities of crude n-hexane and aqueous extracts of Garcinia kola seeds against a panel of 42 Listeria isolates previously isolated from wastewater effluents in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa and belonging to Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria grayi and Listeria ivanovii species. The n-hexane fraction was active against 45% of the test bacteria with zones of inhibition ranging between 8-17 mm, while the aqueous fraction was active against 29% with zones of inhibition ranging between 8-11 mm. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were within the ranges of 0.079-0.625 mg/mL for the n-hexane extract and 10 to >10 mg/mL for the aqueous extract. The rate of kill experiment carried out for the n-hexane extract only, revealed complete elimination of the initial bacterial population for L. grayi (LAL 15) at 3× and 4× MIC after 90 and 60 min; L. monocytogenes (LAL 8) at 3× and 4× MIC after 60 and 15 min; L. ivanovii (LEL 18) at 3× and 4× MIC after 120 and 15 min; L. ivanovii (LEL 30) at 2, 3 and 4× MIC values after 105, 90 and 15 min exposure time respectively. The rate of kill activities were time- and concentration-dependant and the extract proved to be bactericidal as it achieved a more than 3log(10) decrease in viable cell counts after 2 h exposure time for all of the four test organisms at 3× and 4× MIC values. The results therefore show the potential presence of anti-Listerial compounds in Garcinia kola seeds that can be exploited in effective anti-Listerial chemotherapy. PMID:22072929

  2. Crude ethanolic extracts of Garcinia kola seeds Heckel (Guttiferae) prolong the lag phase of Helicobacter pylori: inhibitory and bactericidal potential.

    PubMed

    Njume, Collise; Afolayan, Anthony J; Clarke, Anna M; Ndip, Roland N

    2011-01-01

    Problems associated with current treatment regimens have generated a considerable interest in alternative approaches for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori infections using phytochemical compounds. In an attempt to identify potential sources of such compounds, the antimicrobial activity of five solvent extracts of Garcinia kola seeds were investigated against 30 clinical strains of H. pylori and a standard control strain, NCTC 11638, using standard microbiological techniques. Metronidazole and amoxicillin were included in these experiments as positive control antibiotics. All the extracts tested exhibited anti-H. pylori activity with zone diameters of inhibition between 0 and 25 mm. The ethanol extract demonstrated considerable anti-H. pylori activity with a percentage susceptibility of 53.3% and minimum inhibitory concentration for 50% susceptibility (MIC??) values ranging from 0.63 to 5.0 mg/mL. Ranges of MIC?? values for amoxicillin and metronidazole were 0.01-0.63 mg/mL and 0.04-5.0 mg/mL, respectively. The inhibitory activity of the ethanol extract was similar to that of metronidazole (P?>?.05) as opposed to amoxicillin (P?kola may contain therapeutically useful compounds against H. pylori. PMID:21476930

  3. Sampling and Analysis Plan - Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, Steve P.

    2006-05-26

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) describes planned data collection activities for four entry boreholes through the sediment overlying the basalt, up to three new deep rotary boreholes through the basalt and sedimentary interbeds, and one corehole through the basalt and sedimentary interbeds at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The SAP will be used in concert with the quality assurance plan for the project to guide the procedure development and data collection activities needed to support borehole drilling, geophysical measurements, and sampling. This SAP identifies the American Society of Testing Materials standards, Hanford Site procedures, and other guidance to be followed for data collection activities.

  4. CALCITE AMPHIBOLE CLINOPYROXENE ROCK FROM THE AFRIKANDA COMPLEX, KOLA PENINSULA, RUSSIA: MINERALOGY AND A POSSIBLE LINK TO CARBONATITES. II. OXYSALT MINERALS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ANATOLY N. ZAITSEV; ANTON R. CHAKHMOURADIAN

    2002-01-01

    Carbonate - amphibole - clinopyroxene rocks and carbonatites from the Afrikanda complex, in the Kola Peninsula, Russia, contain a number of oxysalt minerals, including major calcite (15-95 vol.%), subordinate hydroxylapatite, ancylite-(Ce), calcio - ancylite-(Ce), and minor burbankite, khanneshite, nyerereite, shortite, bradleyite, strontianite, britholite-(Ce) and barite. T hree mineral parageneses differing in the mode of occurrence of calcite are distinguished: (1)

  5. Trace-element study and uranium-lead dating of perovskite from the Afrikanda plutonic complex, Kola Peninsula (Russia) using LA-ICP-MS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ekaterina P. Reguir; Alfredo Camacho; Panseok Yang; Anton R. Chakhmouradian; Vadim S. Kamenetsky; Norman M. Halden

    2010-01-01

    The U-Pb geochronology of perovskite is a powerful tool in constraining the emplacement age of silica-undersaturated rocks. The trace-element and U-Pb isotopic compositions of perovskite from clinopyroxenite and silicocarbonatite from the Afrikanda plutonic complex (Kola, Russia) were determined by laser-ablation inductively-coupled mass-spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). In addition, the Sr isotopic composition of perovskite was measured by isotope-dilution mass-spectrometry to better constrain the

  6. Calibrated Plate Boundary Observatory Borehole Strainmeter Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkinson, K. M.; Mencin, D.; Borsa, A. A.; Fox, O.; Gallaher, W. W.; Gottlieb, M. H.; Henderson, D. B.; Johnson, W.; Pyatt, C.; Van Boskirk, L.

    2011-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), funded by NSF as part of the Earthscope program and installed and maintained by UNAVCO, includes 75 borehole strainmeters (BSMs), which makes it one of the largest strainmeter arrays in the world. Co-located with seismometers, and embedded within the PBO continuous GPS network, the strainmeters expand the bandwidth of the Observatory enabling the capture of signals with periods of days to minutes. Six years after installation of the first strainmeter, over 70% of the network is in compression and over 85% of the instruments have a strong signal to noise ratio in the M2 tidal band. UNAVCO's BSM engineers ensure the network usually collects over 95% percent of possible data. UNAVCO makes the BSM Level 0 (raw) and Level 2 (processed) data products available to the community via the Northern California Earthquake Data Center (NCEDC), the IRIS DMC and UNAVCO's own web site. Processed BSM data includes gauge, areal, differential and tensor shear strains plus data edits and time series corrections for barometric pressure, earth tides, ocean load and borehole trends. Before strain data can be incorporated into a geophysical model with confidence, however, an instrument response must be found that relates the gauge measurements to the regional strains (i.e., an in-situ calibration is needed). In this presentation we describe the method UNAVCO will use to calibrate PBO strainmeters using earth tides as a reference signal and assuming an anisotropic instrument setting. The calibrated data will be released in a simple delimited ASCII format and will be included with the processed data set that is currently updated every 24 hours. In addition to the 5-minute Level 2 data set, UNAVCO will include the calibrated areal and shear strains at 1-sps for significant events anywhere in the world as part of its Special Event series. In order to meet Earthscope goals of data transparency and processing repeatability, the expanded processed data sets will include a summary of the calibration method, tidal observations, predictions upon which the calibrations are based and the strain matrix used to generate the areal and shear data. This presentation will also describe the new file naming convention that will allow the user to 1.) select a preferred calibration method for their data and 2.) allow UNAVCO the flexibility of including new methods of calibration in the future.

  7. SURFACE AND BOREHOLE ELECTROMAGNETIC IMAGING OF CONDUCTING CONTAMINANT PLUMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electromagnetic induction tomography is a promising new tool for imaging electrical conductivity variations in the earth. The EM source field is produced by induction coil (magnetic dipole) transmitters deployed at the surface or in boreholes. Vertical and horizontal component ma...

  8. Canister design for deep borehole disposal of nuclear waste

    E-print Network

    Hoag, Christopher Ian

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to design a canister for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level waste in deep borehole repositories using currently available and proven oil, gas, and geothermal drilling ...

  9. Method and apparatus for suppressing waves in a borehole

    DOEpatents

    West, Phillip B.

    2005-10-04

    Methods and apparatus for suppression of wave energy within a fluid-filled borehole using a low pressure acoustic barrier. In one embodiment, a flexible diaphragm type device is configured as an open bottomed tubular structure for disposition in a borehole to be filled with a gas to create a barrier to wave energy, including tube waves. In another embodiment, an expandable umbrella type device is used to define a chamber in which a gas is disposed. In yet another embodiment, a reverse acting bladder type device is suspended in the borehole. Due to its reverse acting properties, the bladder expands when internal pressure is reduced, and the reverse acting bladder device extends across the borehole to provide a low pressure wave energy barrier.

  10. A drop-in-concept for deep borehole canister emplacement

    E-print Network

    Bates, Ethan Allen

    2011-01-01

    Disposal of high-level nuclear waste in deep boreholes drilled into crystalline bedrock (i.e., "granite") is an interesting repository alternative of long standing. Work at MIT over the past two decades, and more recently ...

  11. Canister, sealing method and composition for sealing a borehole

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM); Wagh, Arun S. (Orland Park, IL)

    2003-05-13

    Canister, sealing method and composition for sealing a borehole. The canister includes a container with slurry inside the container, one or more slurry exits at one end of the container, a pump at the other end of the container, and a piston inside that pushes the slurry though the slurry exit(s), out of the container, and into a borehole. An inflatable packer outside the container provides stabilization in the borehole. A borehole sealing material is made by combining an oxide or hydroxide and a phosphate with water to form a slurry which then sets to form a high strength, minimally porous material which binds well to itself, underground formations, steel and ceramics.

  12. INSTALLATION OF A POST-ACCIDENT CONFINEMENT HIGH-LEVEL RADIATION MONITORING SYSTEM IN THE KOLA NUCLEAR POWER STATION (UNIT 2) IN RUSSIA

    SciTech Connect

    GREENE,G.A.; GUPPY,J.G.

    1998-09-01

    This is the final report on the INSP project entitled, ``Post-Accident Confinement High-Level Radiation Monitoring System'' conducted by BNL under the authorization of Project Work Plan WBS 1.2.2.6 (Attachment 1). This project was initiated in February 1993 to assist the Russians in reducing risks associated with the continued operation of older Soviet-designed nuclear power plants, specifically the Kola VVER-440/230 Unit 2, through improved accident detection capability, specifically by the installation of a dual train high-level radiation detection system in the confinement of Unit 2 of the Kola NPP. The major technical objective of this project was to provide, install and make operational the necessary hardware inside the confinement of the Kola NPP Unit 2 to provide early and reliable warning of the release of radionuclides from the reactor into the confinement air space as an indication of the occurrence of a severe accident at the plant. In addition, it was intended to provide hands-on experience and training to the Russian plant workers in the installation, operation, calibration and maintenance of the equipment in order that they may use the equipment without continued US assistance as an effective measure to improve reactor safety at the plant.

  13. Observations of joint persistence and connectivity across boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Thapa, B.B.; Karasaki, K.

    1996-01-01

    Observations of joint persistence and connectivity are made by comparison of digital borehole wall images of fractures, fluid conductivity logs and hydraulic injections test results. The fractures were found to be generally impersistent across vertical boreholes about 8 m apart. Many hydraulic connections were found in the same volume of rock. Direct connections through single fractures seem to be rare and connectivity appears to be controlled by fracture networks, even over small volumes.

  14. Physicochemical quality of boreholes in Densu Basin of Ghana

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Amoako; A. Y. Karikari; O. D. Ansa-Asare

    Physico-chemical characteristics of 74 boreholes from communities within Densu Basin were assessed following procedures outlined\\u000a in Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater. The aim was to assess the status of the boreholes water quality\\u000a for any contamination for management action to ensure the quality of health of the people in the area. The water quality parameters\\u000a analyzed

  15. Method and means for controlling the course of a borehole

    SciTech Connect

    Feenstra, R.; Kamp, A.W.

    1984-08-14

    The invention relates to a method and means for controlling the course of a borehole during drilling thereof. The means comprises a down-hole motor and two eccentric stabilizers mounted on the housing of the down-hole motor near the ends thereof. Controlling the course of a borehole that is being drilled with the down-hole motor driving the drill bit is done by successively not rotating the drill string and rotating the drill string.

  16. Bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Akgun, H.; Daemen, J.J.K. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA). Dept. of Mining and Geological Engineering

    1991-02-01

    Axial loads on plugs or seals in an underground repository due to gas, water pressures and temperature changes induced subsequent to waste and plug emplacement lead to shear stresses at the plug/rock contact. Therefore, the bond between the plug and rock is a critical element for the design and effectiveness of plugs in boreholes, shafts or tunnels. This study includes a systematic investigation of the bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff. Analytical and numerical analysis of borehole plug-rock stress transfer mechanics is performed. The interface strength and deformation are studied as a function of Young`s modulus ratio of plug and rock, plug length and rock cylinder outside-to-inside radius ratio. The tensile stresses in and near an axially loaded plug are analyzed. The frictional interface strength of an axially loaded borehole plug, the effect of axial stress and lateral external stress, and thermal effects are also analyzed. Implications for plug design are discussed. The main conclusion is a strong recommendation to design friction plugs in shafts, drifts, tunnels or boreholes with a minimum length to diameter ratio of four. Such a geometrical design will reduce tensile stresses in the plug and in the host rock to a level which should minimize the risk of long-term deterioration caused by excessive tensile stresses. Push-out tests have been used to determine the bond strength by applying an axial load to cement plugs emplaced in boreholes in welded tuff cylinders. A total of 130 push-out tests have been performed as a function of borehole size, plug length, temperature, and degree of saturation of the host tuff. The use of four different borehole radii enables evaluation of size effects. 119 refs., 42 figs., 20 tabs.

  17. Cross-Borehole Flowmeter Testing to Define Fracture-Flow Parameters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. H. Morin; F. L. Paillet; J. H. Williams

    2001-01-01

    Although conventional borehole-flow profiles routinely are used to estimate the distribution of hydraulic conductivity along boreholes in heterogeneous formations, these estimates apply only to the immediate vicinity of the borehole. Numerous studies in fractured-rock aquifers demonstrate that fracture-network connectivity is more important than local fracture permeability in determining the hydraulic conductivity of fracture rocks. Cross-borehole flow experiments, where one borehole

  18. Data Qualification Report: Borehole Straigraphic Contacts

    SciTech Connect

    R.W. Clayton; C. Lum

    2000-04-18

    The data set considered here is the borehole stratigraphic contacts data (DTN: M09811MWDGFM03.000) used as input to the Geologic Framework Model. A Technical Assessment method used to evaluate these data with a two-fold approach: (1) comparison to the geophysical logs on which the contacts were, in part, based; and (2) evaluation of the data by mapping individual units using the entire data set. Qualification of the geophysical logs is being performed in a separate activity. A representative subset of the contacts data was chosen based on importance of the contact and representativeness of that contact in the total data set. An acceptance window was established for each contact based on the needs of the data users. Data determined to be within the acceptance window were determined to be adequate for their intended use in three-dimensional spatial modeling and were recommended to be Qualified. These methods were chosen to provide a two-pronged evaluation that examines both the origin and results of the data. The result of this evaluation is a recommendation to qualify all contacts. No data were found to lie outside the pre-determined acceptance window. Where no geophysical logs are available, data were evaluated in relation to surrounding data and by impact assessment. These data are also recommended to be qualified. The stratigraphic contact data contained in this report (Attachment VII; DTN: M00004QGFMPICK.000) are intended to replace the source data, which will remain unqualified.

  19. Borehole sampling of fracture populations - compensating for borehole sampling bias in crystalline bedrock aquifers, Mirror Lake, Grafton County, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, G.D.; Paillet, F.L.; Barton, C.C.; Johnson, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    The clustering of orientations of hydraulically conductive fractures in bedrock at the Mirror Lake, New Hampshire fractured rock study site was investigated by comparing the orientations of fracture populations in two subvertical borehole arrays with those mapped on four adjacent subvertical roadcuts. In the boreholes and the roadcuts, the orientation of fracture populations appears very similar after borehole data are compensated for undersampling of steeply dipping fractures. Compensated borehole and pavement fracture data indicate a northeast-striking population of fractures with varying dips concentrated near that of the local foliation in the adjacent rock. The data show no correlation between fracture density (fractures/linear meter) and distance from lithologic contacts in both the boreholes and the roadcuts. The population of water-producing borehole fractures is too small (28 out of 610 fractures) to yield meaningful orientation comparisons. However, the orientation of large aperture fractures (which contains all the producing fractures) contains two or three subsidiary clusters in orientation frequency that are not evident in stereographic projections of the entire population containing all aperture sizes. Further, these subsidiary orientation clusters do not coincide with the dominant (subhorizontal and subvertical) regional fracture orientations.

  20. The geological processes time scale of the Ingozersky block TTG complex (Kola Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitkina, Elena

    2013-04-01

    Ingozersky block located in the Tersky Terrane of the Kola Peninsula is composed of Archean gneisses and granitoids [1; 5; 8]. The Archaean basement complexes on the regional geological maps have called tonalite-trondemit-gneisses (TTG) complexes [6]. In the previous studies [1; 3; 4; 5; 7] within Ingozersky block the following types of rocks were established: biotite, biotite-amphibole, amphibole-biotite gneisses, granites, granodiorites and pegmatites [2]. In the rocks of the complex following corresponding sequence of endogenous processes observed (based on [5]): stage 1 - the biotitic gneisses formation; 2 - the introduction of dikes of basic rocks; 3 phase - deformation and foliation; 4 stage - implementation bodies of granite and migmatization; 5 stage - implementation of large pegmatite bodies; stage 6 - the formation of differently pegmatite and granite veins of low power, with and without garnet; stage 7 - quartz veins. Previous U-Pb isotopic dating of the samples was done for biotite gneisses, amphibole-biotite gneisses and biotite-amphibole gneisses. Thus, some Sm-Nd TDM ages are 3613 Ma - biotite gnesses, 2596 Ma - amphibole-biotite gnesses and 3493 Ma biotite-amphibole gneisses.. U-Pb ages of the metamorphism processes in the TTG complex are obtained: 2697±9 Ma - for the biotite gneiss, 2725±2 and 2667±7 Ma - for the amphibole-biotite gneisses, and 2727±5 Ma for the biotite-amphibole gneisses. The age defined for the biotite gneisses by using single zircon dating to be about 3149±46 Ma corresponds to the time of the gneisses protolith formation. The purpose of these studies is the age establishing of granite and pegmatite bodies emplacement and finding a geological processes time scale of the Ingozerskom block. Preliminary U-Pb isotopic dating of zircon and other accessory minerals were held for granites - 2615±8 Ma, migmatites - 2549±30 Ma and veined granites - 1644±7 Ma. As a result of the isotope U-Pb dating of the different Ingozerskogo TTG complex rocks, the following age-formation stages are determined: protolith of the biotite gneisses - 3149±46 Ma; metamorphism, deformation of rocks, foliation - 2727±5 - 2725±2 - 2697±9 - 2667±7 Ma, granite bodies formation - 2615±8 Ma and biotite gneisses migmatization - 2549±30 Ma, formation of different pegmatite and granite veins -1644±7 Ma. Author are grateful to Akad. Mitrofanov F.P. and Bayanova T.B. for the consultations. The work is supported by RFBR 12-05-31063, 11-05-00570. 1.Batieva I.D., Belkov I.V. Granitoidnie formacii Kolskogo poluostrova. // Ocgerki po petrologiy, mineralogiy i metallogeniy Kolskogo poluostrova. L.: Nauka. 1968. p. 5-143. (in russian) 2. Belkov I.V., Zagorodny V.G., Predovsky A.A. et al. Stratigraficheskoe raschlenenie i korrelyacia dokembria severo-vostochoi chasty Baltiyskogo shita. L.: Nauka. 1971. p. 141-150. (in russian) 3. Docembriskaya tektonica severo-vostochoi chasty Baltiyskogo shita (Ob'asnitelnaya zapiska k tektonicheskoi karte severo-vostochoi chasty Baltiyskogo shita 1:500000) / ed.: F.P.Mitrofanov. Apatity: KFAN SSSR. 1992. 112 P. (in russian) 4. Zagorodny V.G., Radchenko A.T. Tectonika i glubinnoe stroenie severo-vostochoi chasty Baltiyskogo shita. Apatity: KFA SSSR. 1978. p. 3-12. (in russian) 5. Kozlov N.E., Sorohtin N.O., Glaznev V.N. et al. Geologia Arhea Baltiskogo shita. S.Pb.: Nauka. 2006. 329 p. (in russian) 6. Mitrofanov F.P. Sovremennie problemy i nekotorie resheniya dokembriskoy geologii kratonov. (2001) Litosphera.2001. V 1. P. 5-14. (in russian) 7. Ob'asnitelnaya zapiska k geologicheskoy karte severo-vostochoi chasty Baltiyskogo shita 1:500000 / ed.: F.P.Mitrofanov. Apatity: KFAN SSSR. 1994. 95 P. (in russian) 8. Haritonov L.Y. Structura i stratigraphia karelid vostoka Baltiskogo shita. M.: Nedra. 1966. 354 P. (in russian)

  1. Long-term aerosol and trace gas measurements in Eastern Lapland, Finland: the impact of Kola air pollution to new particle formation and potential CCN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrö, Ella-Maria; Väänänen, Riikka; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Virkkula, Aki; Asmi, Ari; Nieminen, Tuomo; Dal Maso, Miikka; Petäjä, Tuukka; Keronen, Petri; Aalto, Pasi; Riipinen, Ilona; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Hari, Pertti; Kulmala, Markku

    2014-05-01

    Sulphur and primary emissions have been decreasing largely all over Europe, resulting in improved air quality and decreased direct radiation forcing by aerosols. The smelter industry in Kola Peninsula is one of largest sources of anthropogenic SO2 within the Arctic domain and since late 1990s the sulphur emissions have been decreasing rapidly (Paatero et al., 2008; Prank et al., 2010). New particle formation (NPF) is tightly linked with the oxidizing product of SO2, namely sulphuric acid (H2SO4), since it is known to be the key component in atmospheric nucleation (Sipilä et al., 2010). Thus, decreasing sulphur pollution may lead to less NPF. However, low values of condensation sink (CS), which is determined by the amount of pre-existing particles, favours NPF. We used 14 years (1998-2011) of aerosol number size distribution and trace gas data from SMEAR I station in Eastern Lapland, Finland, to investigate these relationships between SO2, NPF and CS. The station is a clean background station with occasional sulphur pollution episodes when the air masses arrive over Kola Peninsula. We found that while SO2 decreased by 11.3 % / year, the number of clear NPF event days was also decreasing by 9.9 % / year. At the same time, CS was decreasing also (-8.0 % / year) leading to formation of more particles per single NPF event (J3 increased by 29.7 % / year in 2006-2011) but the low vapour concentrations of H2SO4 (proxy decreased by 6.2 % / year) did not allow them to grow into climatically relevant sizes. Over the time, concentrations of potential CCN (cloud condensing nuclei) were also decreasing with more moderate pace, -4.0 % / year. The events started on average earlier after sunrise when the SO2 concentration during the start of the event was higher and NPF occurred more frequently in air masses which were travelling over Kola. Despite the total decrease in sulphur pollution originating from Kola there is currently no evidence of cleaning of the emissions, rather the decrease is a result of socio-economic changes in the area. It is very likely that in areas with low background aerosol concentrations but close to large sources of anthropogenic sulphur emissions the trends in NPF depend on the overall human activity, general cleaning of the emissions and changes in natural biogenic emissions. This should be taken into account when estimating e.g. the effect of Arctic shipping routes to the future climate. Paatero, J., et al. (2008). Effects of Kola air pollution on the environment in the Western part of the Kola peninsula and Finnish Lapland - Final report. Finnish Meteorological Institute Reports, 6, 1-26. Prank, M., M. et al. (2010). A refinement of the emission data for Kola Peninsula based on inverse dispersion modelling. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 10849-10865. Sipilä, M., et al. (2010). The role of sulfuric acid in atmospheric nucleation. Science, 327, 1243-1246.

  2. Minerals of the gadolinite-(Y)-hingganite-(Y) series in the alkali granite pegmatites of the Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyalina, L. M.; Selivanova, E. A.; Savchenko, Ye. E.; Zozulya, D. R.; Kadyrova, G. I.

    2014-12-01

    Minerals of the gadolinite-(Y)-hingganite-(Y) series pertaining to the gadolinite-datolite group have been found in the alkali granite pegmatites of the Kola Peninsula. Gadolinite-(Y) is distinguished by its unique natural crystalline state. The unit-cell parameters of this mineral have elevated values as compared with those of gadolinite-(Y) from other deposits and occurrences: (i) a = 10.11 Å, b = 7.63 Å, c = 4.79, V = 369.30 Å3; (ii) a = 10.05 Å, b = 7.69 Å, c = 4.76, V = 367.99 Å3. The increase in unit-cell parameters is not correlated with variation in chemical composition. The variable chemical compositions of particular individuals, especially as concerns REE and Y contents, assume two gadolinite-(Y) generations being contained in the intragranite pegmatites. Gadolinite-I is characterized by a high LREE content (LREE N /HREE N = 1.6) with a prevalence of total REE over Y (REE/Y = 1.36). Gadolinite-II is significantly depleted in LREE (LREE N /HREE N = 0.3) with a prevalence of Y over REE (REE/Y = 0.29). Hingganite-(Y), which has also been found in the alkali granite pegmatites of the Kola Peninsula for the first time, is characterized by elevated unit-cell parameters as well: a = 10.05 Å, b = 7.72 Å, c = 4.76 Å, V = 369.12 Å3. The mineral is enriched in Ca (up to 5 wt % CaO); and, by contents of REE and Y, the hingganite-(Y) from inter-granite pegmatites keeps the marginal position between its Y-dominant and REE-dominant varieties. The chondrite-normalized REE patterns assume that hingganite-(Y) crystallizes between the first and the second generations of gadolinite-(Y) and that alkali intragranite pegmatites are formed at the late magmatic stage, whereas amazonite-bearing pegmatites are formed under postmagmatic hydrothermal conditions.

  3. The electrical resistivity method in cased boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, C.J.

    1991-05-01

    The use of downhole current sources in resistivity mapping can greatly enhance the detection and delineation of subsurface features. The purpose of this work is to examine the resistivity method for current sources in wells cased with steel. The resistivity method in cased boreholes with downhole current sources is investigated using the integral equation (IE) technique. The casing and other bodies are characterized as conductivity inhomogeneities in a half-space. For sources located along the casing axis, an axially symmetric Green's function is used to formulate the surface potential and electric field (E-field) volume integral equations. The situations involving off-axis current sources and three-dimensional (3-D) bodies is formulated using the surface potential IE method. The solution of the 3-D Green's function is presented in cylindrical and Cartesian coordinate systems. The methods of moments is used to solve the Fredholm integral equation of the second kind for the response due to the casing and other bodies. The numerical analysis revealed that the current in the casing can be approximated by its vertical component except near the source and the axial symmetric approximation of the casing is valid even for the 3-D problem. The E-field volume IE method is an effective and efficient technique to simulate the response of the casing in a half-space, whereas the surface potential approach is computationally better when multiple bodies are involved. Analyzing several configurations of the current source indicated that the casing response is influenced by four characteristic factors: conduction length, current source depth,casing depth, and casing length. 85 refs., 133 figs., 11 tabs.

  4. Geology of the Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, D. BRENT; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fecht, Karl R.; Lanigan, David C.; Reidel, Steve; Rust, Colleen F.

    2007-02-28

    In 2006, DOE-ORP initiated the Seismic Boreholes Project (SBP) to emplace boreholes at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site in order to obtain direct Vs measurements and other physical property measurements in Columbia River basalt and interbedded sediments of the Ellensburg Formation. The goal was to reduce the uncertainty in the response spectra and seismic design basis, and potentially recover design margin for the WTP. The characterization effort within the deep boreholes included 1) downhole measurements of the velocity properties of the suprabasalt, basalt, and sedimentary interbed sequences, 2) downhole measurements of the density of the subsurface basalt and sediments, and 3) confirmation of the geometry of the contact between the various basalt and interbedded sediments through examination of retrieved core from the corehole and data collected through geophysical logging of each borehole. This report describes the results of the geologic studies from three mud-rotary boreholes and one cored borehole at the WTP. All four boreholes penetrated the entire Saddle Mountains Basalt and the upper part of the Wanapum Basalt where thick sedimentary interbeds occur between the lava flows. The basalt flows penetrated in Saddle Mountains Basalt included the Umatilla Member, Esquatzel Member, Pomona Member and the Elephant Mountain Member. The underlying Priest Rapids Member of the Wanapum Basalt was also penetrated. The Ellensburg Formation sediments consist of the Mabton Interbed, the Cold Creek Interbed, the Selah Interbed and the Rattlesnake Ridge Interbed; the Byron Interbed occurs between two flows of the Priest Rapids Member. The Mabton Interbed marks the contact between the Wanapum and Saddle Mountains Basalts. The thicknesses of the basalts and interbedded sediments were within expected limits. However, a small reverse fault was found in the Pomona Member flow top. This fault has three periods of movement and less than 15 feet of repeated section. Most of the movement on the fault appears to have occurred before the youngest lava flow, the 10.5 million year old Elephant Mountain Member was emplaced above the Pomona Member.

  5. Benz(a)pyrene in soils and berries in an area affected by jets over the Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcan, Valery; Kovnatsky, Eugene; Shylina, Augusta

    Internal-combustion engines especially jets are known to be important industrial sources of benz(a)pyrene (BaP) to the environment. Over 30 years, jet aircraft have been operating in the vicinity of the town Monchegorsk, situated far north of Russia (Kola peninsula, 68°N and 33°E). The jet aircrafts take off from the military aerodrome located 4 km from the town. The takeoff path is over the inhabited territory of the town. It has been determined that the content of BaP in the upper organic soil layer varied from 200 to 30 ppb along the main path of the takeoff. These concentrations of BaP are 40-6 times larger than background levels and are 10-1.5 times larger than the accepted threshold concentration. The polluted zone correlates with the trajectory of the plane takeoff. The concentration of BaP in the berries of Vaccinium Vitis-idaea and Empetrum Hermaphroditum seems to be independent of B(a)P concentration in soil.

  6. Autumn migration and wintering areas of Peregrine Falcons Falco peregrinus nesting on the Kola Peninsula, northern Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ganusevich, S.A.; Maechtle, T.L.; Seegar, W.S.; Yates, M.A.; McGrady, M.J.; Fuller, M.; Schueck, L.; Dayton, J.; Henny, C.J.

    2004-01-01

    Four female Peregrine Falcons Falco peregrinus breeding on the Kola Peninsula, Russia, were fitted with satellite-received transmitters in 1994. Their breeding home ranges averaged 1175 (sd = ??714) km2, and overlapped considerably. All left their breeding grounds in September and migrated generally south-west along the Baltic Sea. The mean travel rate for three falcons was 190 km/day. Two Falcons wintered on the coasts of France and in southern Spain, which were, respectively, 2909 and 4262 km from their breeding sites. Data on migration routes suggested that Falcons took a near-direct route to the wintering areas. No prolonged stopovers were apparent. The 90% minimum convex polygon winter range of a bird that migrated to Spain encompassed 213 km2 (n = 54). The area of the 50% minimum convex polygon was 21.5 km2 (n = 29). Data from this study agree with others from North America that show that Falcons breeding in a single area do not necessarily follow the same migratory path southward and do not necessarily use the same wintering grounds.

  7. Emission of CO2 by soils in the impact zone of the Severonikel smelter in the Kola subarctic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadulin, M. S.; Koptsik, G. N.

    2013-11-01

    The intensity of the in situ soil respiration in the background northern taiga spruce forests of the Kola subarctic region reaches 120-290 mg C-CO2/m2 per h. In the impact zone of the Severonikel smelter, it decreases to 90-140, 30, and 15-30 mg C-CO2/m2 per h at the stages of spruce defoliation, spruce-birch woodland, and technogenic barrens of the technogenic succession, respectively. For the first time, the impact of the industrial pollution on root respiration has been assessed, and the dependences of the CO2 emission, the contribution of mineral soil horizons to this process, the microbial biomass, and root respiration on the concentrations of available nickel and copper compounds have been determined. The efficiency of two remediation technologies applied to technogenic barrens near the smelter has been evaluated on the basis of four parameters of the soil biological activity. The results indicate that remediation with the creation of a new filled soil layer is more efficient than chemical and phytoremediation methods.

  8. Anti-ulcerogenic and proton pump (H+, K+ ATPase) inhibitory activity of Kolaviron from Garcinia kola Heckel in rodents.

    PubMed

    Onasanwo, Samuel A; Singh, Neetu; Olaleye, Samuel B; Palit, Gautam

    2011-06-01

    Anti-ulcer potential and proton pump inhibitory activity of kolaviron (KV) isolated from Garcinia kola Heckel has been evaluated using different ulcer models. Cold-restraint (CRU), aspirin (ASP), alcohol (AL), pyloric ligation (PL) induced gastric ulcer models were used to assess anti-ulcerogenic activity of KV in rats. Effects of KV on gastric juice for free and total acidity, peptic activity and mucin secretion were also evaluated. The H+, K+-ATPase activity was assayed in gastric microsomes, spectrophotometrically. Results of this study showed that KV (200 mg/kg) reduced the incidence of ulcers in CRU (69.0%), PL (67.6%), ASP (68.6%) and AL (51.5%). Reductions were also observed in free acidity (32.6%), total acidity (56.2%) and peptic activity (35.4%) with increase in mucin secretion by 40.1%. KV inhibited the H+,K+-ATPase activity with IC50 of 43.8 microg/ml compared with omeprazole with IC50 of 32.3 microg/ml. KV showed both cytoprotective and anti-secretory potentials against peptic ulcer models, and a proton pump inhibitory activity. KV may emerge as a potent anti-ulcer compound. PMID:21702226

  9. Low-sulfide PGE ore in the Volchetundra gabbro-anorthosite pluton, Kola Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashchin, V. V.; Petrov, S. V.

    2013-09-01

    The internal structure of the Volchetundra gabbro-anorthosite massif is considered, including localization of low-sulfide PGE mineralization and its mineralogy. The Volchetundra massif 24 km long and 0.5-4.0 km wide occupies the middle part of the Main Range complex, which extends for 75 km in the nearly meridional direction. The main and marginal zones are distinguished in the massif. The marginal zone 20-400 m wide extends along the entire eastern contact of the massif and is primarily composed of mediumgrained meso- and leucocratic norite, gabbronorite, plagioclasite, and less fequent orthopyroxenite. The main zone consists of coarse-grained leucogabbro and gabbronorite with an anorthosite zone in the axial part of the massif. The PGE mineralization of the Volchetundra massif is distinctly subdivided into two types substantially differing in localization, mineralogy, geochemistry, and economic importance. Mineralization of the first type is localized in the marginal zone and characterized by the highest resource potential. Mineralization hosted in the main zone belongs to the second type. The PGE ore of marginal zone is spatially and genetically related to the pyrite-pentlandite-chalcopyrite-pyrrhotite sulfide mineralization (1-5%) in the form of fine inequigranular interstitial disseminations, and less frequent larger grains and pockets localized within two ore zones each up to 2 km in extent. The thickness of separate mineralized layers varies from 0.5 to 3.0 m and up to 45 m in bulges. The average Pt + Pd grade is 1.37 gpt at Pd/Pt = 3.1. The mineralization of the second type has been penetrated by boreholes. Separate intersections do not correlate with one another and are limited in extent both along the strike and down the dip. The PGE mineralization is related to finely dispersed pentlandite-pyrite-pyrrhotite-chalcopyrite sulfides, sulfide emulsions, and less abundant stringer-disseminated sulfide ore. The orebodies vary from 2 to 7 m in thickness. The average Pt + Pd grade is 1.61 gpt; Pd/Pt = 1.3. The PGE mineralization includes 22 mineral species. PGE sulfides (cooperite-braggite-vysotskite; laurite and erlichmanite in insignificant amounts) are predominant. Bismuthotellurides (moncheite-kotulskite-merenskyite) and arsenides (sperrylite, palladoarsenite, arsenopalladinite, atheneite) are subordinate in abundance. In addition, sulfoarsenides (platarsite, hollingworthite), tellurides (telargpalite, sopcheite, keithconnite, melonite, hessite), paolovite, and Pt-Fe alloy have been identified. An admixture of native gold and electrum occur constantly.

  10. Analysis of borehole-radar reflection logs from selected HC boreholes at the Project Shoal area, Churchill County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, J.W., Jr.; Joesten, P.K.; Pohll, G.M.; Mihevic, Todd

    2001-01-01

    Single-hole borehole-radar reflection logs were collected and interpreted in support of a study to characterize ground-water flow and transport at the Project Shoal Area (PSA) in Churchill County, Nevada. Radar logging was conducted in six boreholes using 60-MHz omni-directional electric-dipole antennas and a 60-MHz magnetic-dipole directional receiving antenna.Radar data from five boreholes were interpreted to identify the location, orientation, estimated length, and spatial continuity of planar reflectors present in the logs. The overall quality of the radar data is marginal and ranges from very poor to good. Twenty-seven reflectors were interpreted from the directional radar reflection logs. Although the range of orientation interpreted for the reflectors is large, a significant number of reflectors strike northeast-southwest and east-west to slightly northwest-southeast. Reflectors are moderate to steeply dipping and reflector length ranged from less than 7 m to more than 133 m.Qualitative scores were assigned to each reflector to provide a sense of the spatial continuity of the reflector and the characteristics of the field data relative to an ideal planar reflector (orientation score). The overall orientation scores are low, which reflects the general data quality, but also indicates that the properties of most reflectors depart from the ideal planar case. The low scores are consistent with reflections from fracture zones that contain numerous, closely spaced, sub-parallel fractures.Interpretation of borehole-radar direct-wave velocity and amplitude logs identified several characteristics of the logged boreholes: (1) low-velocity zones correlate with decreased direct-wave amplitude, indicating the presence of fracture zones; (2) direct-wave amplitude increases with depth in three of the boreholes, suggesting an increase in electrical resistivity with depth resulting from changes in mineral assemblage or from a decrease in the specific conductance of ground water; and (3) an increase in primary or secondary porosity and an associated change in mineral assemblage, or decrease in ground water specific conductance, was characterized in two of the boreholes below 300 m.The results of the radar reflection logging indicate that even where data quality is marginal, borehole-radar reflection logging can provide useful information for ground-water characterization studies in fractured rock and insights into the nature and extent of fractures and fracture zones in and near boreholes.

  11. Borehole seismic imaging: A full waveform inversion approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Pengxiang

    Site characterization for the design of deep foundations is crucial for ensuring a reliable and economic substructure design, as unanticipated site conditions can cause significant problems and disputes during construction. Traditional invasive exploration methods sample a small volume of material and insufficiently assess spatial variation in subsurface conditions. Established and emerging surface-based geophysical exploration methods may identify large-scale spatial variability, but fail to provide a detailed picture of the rock quality at depths where a socket is required for the design of a drilled shaft foundation. In order to compensate for the shortcomings of these methods, a new borehole-based characterization method has been developed, which creates images of the shear wave velocity profile along and around the borehole to provide credible socket material analyses and detect nearby anomalies. The proposed imaging technique is based on the time-domain full waveform inversion of elastic waves generated inside a borehole, which are captured by a string of sensors placed vertically along the borehole wall. This approach has the ability to simulate all possible wave types of seismic wavefields, and then compare these simulations with observed data to infer complex subsurface properties. This method formulates and solves the forward model of elastic wave propagation within a borehole using ABAQUS, a commercially available finite element package. The inversion is cast as a least-squares optimization problem solved using the regularized Gauss-Newton method. To test the proposed imaging technique, the present study performed comprehensive numerical studies. First, the accuracy of the forward model and the effectiveness of the inversion scheme was validated. Then, the capability of the proposed imaging technique was evaluated by inverting a series of three-dimensional (3-D) synthetic data sets, including a homogeneous model, a horizontally layered model with high impedance contrast, a cylindrically layered model that mimicked borehole preparation, and simplified earth models containing ring-type anomalies and isolated anomalies. Good models were recovered for each case presented herein.

  12. Deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Joshua S.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Brady, Patrick Vane; Swift, Peter N.; Rechard, Robert Paul; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2009-07-01

    Preliminary evaluation of deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel indicates the potential for excellent long-term safety performance at costs competitive with mined repositories. Significant fluid flow through basement rock is prevented, in part, by low permeabilities, poorly connected transport pathways, and overburden self-sealing. Deep fluids also resist vertical movement because they are density stratified. Thermal hydrologic calculations estimate the thermal pulse from emplaced waste to be small (less than 20 C at 10 meters from the borehole, for less than a few hundred years), and to result in maximum total vertical fluid movement of {approx}100 m. Reducing conditions will sharply limit solubilities of most dose-critical radionuclides at depth, and high ionic strengths of deep fluids will prevent colloidal transport. For the bounding analysis of this report, waste is envisioned to be emplaced as fuel assemblies stacked inside drill casing that are lowered, and emplaced using off-the-shelf oilfield and geothermal drilling techniques, into the lower 1-2 km portion of a vertical borehole {approx}45 cm in diameter and 3-5 km deep, followed by borehole sealing. Deep borehole disposal of radioactive waste in the United States would require modifications to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act and to applicable regulatory standards for long-term performance set by the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR part 191) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (10 CFR part 60). The performance analysis described here is based on the assumption that long-term standards for deep borehole disposal would be identical in the key regards to those prescribed for existing repositories (40 CFR part 197 and 10 CFR part 63).

  13. Elements of a continuous-wave borehole radar. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Caffey, T.W.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geophysical Technology Dept.

    1997-08-01

    The theory is developed for the antenna array for a proposed continuous-wave, ground-penetrating radar for use in a borehole, and field measurements are presented. Accomplishments include the underground measurement of the transmitting beam in the azimuth plane, active azimuth-steering of the transmitting beam, and the development of a range-to-target algorithm. The excellent performance of the antenna array supports the concept of a continuous-wave borehole radar. A field-prototype should be developed for use in both geothermal zones and for the exploration and recovery of oil and gas.

  14. Apparatus for generating seismic vibration energy in a borehole

    SciTech Connect

    Benzing, W.M.

    1986-12-30

    A signal generating apparatus is described for use in fluid-filled boreholes, comprising: a frame for suspension in the borehole; a tube having first and second ends and disposed in the frame a first acoustic energy source mounted in the first end to direct energy to a central point; a second acoustic energy source mounted in the second end to direct energy to the central point; an energy deflector plate disposed at 45 degrees to and along the axis of the tube central point at an equal angle to each means for energizing the first and second acoustic energy sources.

  15. Reclamation report, Basalt Waste Isolation Project, boreholes 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Cadoret, N.A.

    1991-01-01

    The restoration of areas disturbed activities of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) has been undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in fulfillment of obligations and commitments made under the National Environmental Policy Act and the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. This restoration program comprises three separate projects: borehole reclamation, Near Surface Test Facility reclamation, and Exploratory Shaft Facility reclamation. Detailed descriptions of these reclamation projects may be found in a number of previous reports. This report describes the second phase of the reclamation program for the BWIP boreholes and analyzes its success relative to the reclamation objective. 6 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs.

  16. Distributed vibration sensing on optical fibre: field testing in borehole seismic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frignet, B.; Hartog, A. H.; Mackie, D.; Kotov, O. I.; Liokumovich, L. B.

    2014-05-01

    We describe the measurement of seismic waves in a borehole using distributed vibration sensing conveyed on wireline cable. The optical measurement is compared directly with the results of a multi-level borehole seismic survey with conventional electrical accelerometers.

  17. An approach for predicting stress-induced anisotropy around a borehole

    E-print Network

    Fang, Xinding

    2012-01-01

    Formation elastic properties near a borehole may be altered from their original state due to the stress concentration around the borehole. This could result in a biased estimation of formation properties but could provide ...

  18. An approach for predicting stress-induced anisotropy around a borehole

    E-print Network

    Fang, Xinding

    Formation elastic properties near a borehole may be altered from their original state due to the stress concentration around the borehole. This could result in a biased estimation of formation properties but could provide ...

  19. Cross borehole induced polarization to detect subsurface NAPL at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    E-print Network

    Lambert, Michael B. (Michael Brian), 1980-

    2003-01-01

    Spectral induced polarization measurements were acquired in six cross-borehole panels within four boreholes at the Savannah River Site. The investigation was performed to delineate the presence of dense non-aqueous phase ...

  20. Determination of Formation Properties in Cased Boreholes Using Full Waveform Acoustic Logs

    E-print Network

    Tubman, Kenneth M.

    1984-01-01

    Wave propagation in bonded and unbonded cased boreholes is examined through the calculation cif synthetic full waveform acoustic logs. The models consist of a central fluid borehole surrounded by a number of fluid and solid ...

  1. Detection of a Gentamicin-Resistant Burn Wound Strain of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa but Sensitive to Honey and Garcinia Kola (Heckel) Seed Extract

    PubMed Central

    Adeleke, O.E.; Coker, M.E.; Oke, O.B.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Studies on Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus intermedius from dog and cat, and also on Staphylococcus aureus from wound and pyoderma infections, have shown a correlation between the site of microbial infection and antimicrobial susceptibility. Both the methanolic extract concentrate of Garcinia kola (Heckel) seeds and natural honey have been associated with activity on bacterial isolates from respiratory tract infections. In this study, selected bacteria belonging to genera from burn wound infection sites were treated with natural honey and methanolic extract concentrate of Garcinia kola in antimicrobial susceptibility tests separately and in combined form, and also with gentamicin and methanol as controls. The two natural products were found to be active on the bacterial isolates, excluding Klebsiella pneumoniae strains, all of which showed resistance to honey. Combination forms of the two natural products were active only on the strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. At 4 and 8 µg/ml, gentamicin was ineffective on the three strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae while 8 µg/ml was moderately active on only two strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. One strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, UCH002, was resistant to gentamicin beyond 1,000 µ/ml. Gentamicin at 4 µ/ml was inhibitory to one strain of Escherichia coli and two strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Though the antimicrobial activity of the two natural products tested had been previously reported against microbial agents of respiratory tract infection, it was also recorded in this study. The lack of activity of each of the three honey types used in this study against the Klebsiella pneumoniae strains tested underscores the need to exclude this organism from burn wound infections before embarking on treatment with honey. The sensitivity of one high-level gentamicin-resistant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to honey and Garcinia kola seed extract was noteworthy considering the therapeutic failures of gentamicin and other antibiotics against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:21991206

  2. Detection of a gentamicin-resistant burn wound strain of pseudomonas aeruginosa but sensitive to honey and garcinia kola (heckel) seed extract.

    PubMed

    Adeleke, O E; Coker, M E; Oke, O B

    2010-06-30

    Studies on Staphylococcusaureus and Staphylococcusintermedius from dog and cat, and also on Staphylococcusaureus from wound and pyoderma infections, have shown a correlation between the site of microbial infection and antimicrobial susceptibility. Both the methanolic extract concentrate of Garcinia kola (Heckel) seeds and natural honey have been associated with activity on bacterial isolates from respiratory tract infections. In this study, selected bacteria belonging to genera from burn wound infection sites were treated with natural honey and methanolic extract concentrate of Garcinia kola in antimicrobial susceptibility tests separately and in combined form, and also with gentamicin and methanol as controls. The two natural products were found to be active on the bacterial isolates, excluding Klebsiellapneumoniae strains, all of which showed resistance to honey. Combination forms of the two natural products were active only on the strains of Pseudomonasaeruginosa. At 4 and 8 µg/ml, gentamicin was ineffective on the three strains of Klebsiellapneumoniae while 8 µg/ml was moderately active on only two strains of Pseudomonasaeruginosa. One strain of Pseudomonasaeruginosa, UCH002, was resistant to gentamicin beyond 1,000 µ/ml. Gentamicin at 4 µ/ml was inhibitory to one strain of Escherichiacoli and two strains of Staphylococcusaureus. Though the antimicrobial activity of the two natural products tested had been previously reported against microbial agents of respiratory tract infection, it was also recorded in this study. The lack of activity of each of the three honey types used in this study against the Klebsiellapneumoniae strains tested underscores the need to exclude this organism from burn wound infections before embarking on treatment with honey. The sensitivity of one high-level gentamicin-resistant strain of Pseudomonasaeruginosa to honey and Garcinia kola seed extract was noteworthy considering the therapeutic failures of gentamicin and other antibiotics against Pseudomonasaeruginosa. PMID:21991206

  3. Method and system for advancement of a borehole using a high power laser

    SciTech Connect

    Moxley, Joel F.; Land, Mark S.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2014-09-09

    There is provided a system, apparatus and methods for the laser drilling of a borehole in the earth. There is further provided with in the systems a means for delivering high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to advance such boreholes deep into the earth and at highly efficient advancement rates, a laser bottom hole assembly, and fluid directing techniques and assemblies for removing the displaced material from the borehole.

  4. Methods for enhancing the efficiency of creating a borehole using high power laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zediker, Mark S.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F.

    2014-06-24

    Methods for utilizing 10 kW or more laser energy transmitted deep into the earth with the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena to enhance the formation of Boreholes. Methods for the laser operations to reduce the critical path for forming a borehole in the earth. These methods can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to perform operations in such boreholes deep within the earth.

  5. Trace-element study and uranium-lead dating of perovskite from the Afrikanda plutonic complex, Kola Peninsula (Russia) using LA-ICP-MS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ekaterina P. Reguir; Alfredo Camacho; Panseok Yang; Anton R. Chakhmouradian; Vadim S. Kamenetsky; Norman M. Halden

    2010-01-01

    The U-Pb geochronology of perovskite is a powerful tool in constraining the emplacement age of silica-undersaturated rocks.\\u000a The trace-element and U-Pb isotopic compositions of perovskite from clinopyroxenite and silicocarbonatite from the Afrikanda\\u000a plutonic complex (Kola, Russia) were determined by laser-ablation inductively-coupled mass-spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). In addition,\\u000a the Sr isotopic composition of perovskite was measured by isotope-dilution mass-spectrometry to better constrain the

  6. 10 CFR 60.134 - Design of seals for shafts and boreholes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Design of seals for shafts and boreholes. 60.134...Operations Area § 60.134 Design of seals for shafts and boreholes. (a) General design criterion. Seals for shafts and boreholes shall...

  7. Methods and apparatus for removal and control of material in laser drilling of a borehole

    DOEpatents

    Rinzler, Charles C; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O; Moxley, Joel F

    2014-01-28

    The removal of material from the path of a high power laser beam during down hole laser operations including drilling of a borehole and removal of displaced laser effected borehole material from the borehole during laser operations. In particular, paths, dynamics and parameters of fluid flows for use in conjunction with a laser bottom hole assembly.

  8. Calibration facilities for borehole and surface environmental radiation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Stromswold, D.C.

    1994-04-01

    Measuring radiation from contaminated soil and buildings is important in the cleanup of land areas and facilities. It provides the means for quantifying the amount of contamination and assessing the success of efforts to restore areas to acceptable conditions for public use. Instruments that measure in situ radiation from natural or radiochemically-contaminated earth formations must be calibrated in appropriate facilities to provide quantitative assessments of concentrations of radionuclides. For instruments that are inserted into boreholes, these calibration facilities are typically special models having holes for probe insertion and having sufficient size to appear radiometrically ``infinite`` in extent. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has such models at Hanford, Washington, and Grand Junction, Colorado. They are concrete cylinders having a central borehole and containing known, enhanced amounts of K, U, and Th for spectral gamma-ray measurements. Additional models contain U for calibrating neutron probes for fissile materials and total-count gamma-ray probes. Models for calibrating neutron probes for moisture measurements in unsaturated formations exist for steel-cased boreholes at Hanford and for uncased boreholes at the DOE`s Nevada Test Site. Large surface pads are available at Grand Junction for portable, vehicle-mounted, or airplane-mounted spectral gamma-ray detectors.

  9. Recent developments in the optical televiewing of ice boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Bryn

    2014-05-01

    Developed in the past few years, the optical televiewing (OPTV) of ice boreholes has now been successfully applied to temperate and polythermal valley glaciers, to Antarctic ice shelves, to a shallow borehole on the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet, and recently to the NEEM deep ice borehole. Here, we report on several specific aspects of this work, outlining the capability of OPTV in glaciological analysis. These include: • Revealing the 3D internal structure of valley glaciers, e.g. identifying eight separate structural generations on Midre Lovénbreen, Svalbard; • Characterizing the internal ice facies forming the base of an Antarctic ice shelf rift, e.g. identifying three possible types of 'marine ice'; • Recording annual layering and allowing age-depth scales to be reconstructed for contrasting locations on both the Greenland and the Antarctic ice sheets. • Providing a proxy for snow, firn and ice density, based on calibrating an OPTV record of an Antarctic ice-shelf borehole with densities measured gravimetrically on corresponding core samples. • Reconstructing former surface melting and melt-pond formation on an Antarctic ice shelf, revealing that such melting is not a recent phenomenon. • Revealing aspects of the internal structure of the Greenland ice sheet at the NEEM deep ice drill site, e.g. the presence of ash layers and annual layering at depths of several hundreds of metres in the ice.

  10. Orienting drill core using borehole-wall image correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigematsu, Norio; Otsubo, Makoto; Fujimoto, Koichiro; Tanaka, Nobuaki

    2014-10-01

    A method for orienting drill core is proposed that correlates measurements of planar structures in drill core with those observed in spatially referenced images of borehole walls. The drill core orientation is expressed in terms of a transformation between the geographic coordinate system and the drill core coordinate system, using the Euler angles ?, ?, and ?. The angles ? and ? are the azimuth (trend) and the plunge of the inclined borehole, respectively. The angle ? is the rotation angle about the drill core axis and is determined through correlation analyses of planar structures in the drill core with those observed in the borehole wall images. Orientations of planar structures in the drill core are measured in terms of a reference line that is drawn along the length of the drill core in an arbitrary position. The proposed method is applied to drill core samples recovered from a borehole that penetrates the Median Tectonic Line (MTL) at Matsusaka-Iitaka (ITA), eastern Kii Peninsula, Japan. The results suggest that the accuracy of the determination of ? is about ±5°.

  11. Electrical resistance tomography using steel cased boreholes as electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Daily, W.D.; Ramirez, A.L.

    1999-06-22

    An electrical resistance tomography method is described which uses steel cased boreholes as electrodes. The method enables mapping the electrical resistivity distribution in the subsurface from measurements of electrical potential caused by electrical currents injected into an array of electrodes in the subsurface. By use of current injection and potential measurement electrodes to generate data about the subsurface resistivity distribution, which data is then used in an inverse calculation, a model of the electrical resistivity distribution can be obtained. The inverse model may be constrained by independent data to better define an inverse solution. The method utilizes pairs of electrically conductive (steel) borehole casings as current injection electrodes and as potential measurement electrodes. The greater the number of steel cased boreholes in an array, the greater the amount of data is obtained. The steel cased boreholes may be utilized for either current injection or potential measurement electrodes. The subsurface model produced by this method can be 2 or 3 dimensional in resistivity depending on the detail desired in the calculated resistivity distribution and the amount of data to constrain the models. 2 figs.

  12. Electrical resistance tomography using steel cased boreholes as electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1999-01-01

    An electrical resistance tomography method using steel cased boreholes as electrodes. The method enables mapping the electrical resistivity distribution in the subsurface from measurements of electrical potential caused by electrical currents injected into an array of electrodes in the subsurface. By use of current injection and potential measurement electrodes to generate data about the subsurface resistivity distribution, which data is then used in an inverse calculation, a model of the electrical resistivity distribution can be obtained. The inverse model may be constrained by independent data to better define an inverse solution. The method utilizes pairs of electrically conductive (steel) borehole casings as current injection electrodes and as potential measurement electrodes. The greater the number of steel cased boreholes in an array, the greater the amount of data is obtained. The steel cased boreholes may be utilized for either current injection or potential measurement electrodes. The subsurface model produced by this method can be 2 or 3 dimensional in resistivity depending on the detail desired in the calculated resistivity distribution and the amount of data to constain the models.

  13. Determination of subsurface geological structure with borehole gravimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, S.R.; Hearst, J.R.

    1983-07-01

    Conventional gamma-gamma and gravimetric density measurements are routinely gathered for most holes used for underground nuclear tests. The logs serve to determine the subsurface structural geology near the borehole. The gamma-gamma density log measures density of the rock within about 15 cm of the borehole wall. The difference in gravity measured at two depths in a borehole can be interpreted in terms of the density of an infinite, homogeneous, horizontal bed between those depths. When the gravimetric density matches the gamma-gamma density over a given interval it is assumed that the bed actualy exists, and that rocks far from the hole must be the same as those encountered adjacent to the borehole. Conversely, when the gravimetric density differs from the gamma-gamma density it is apparent that the gravimeter is being influenced by a rock mass of different density than that at the hole wall. This mismatch can be a powerful tool to deduce the local structural geology. The geology deduced from gravity mesurements in emplacement hole, U4al, and the associated exploratory hole, UE4al, is an excellent example of the power of the method.

  14. Apparatus for vibrating a pipe string in a borehole

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert N. Worail; Ivo P. J. M. Stulemeijer

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for vibrating a drill string having a central axis in a borehole. The apparatus comprising means for generating at a downhole location longitudinally directional vibrations along the central axis of the drill string in response to flow of fluid through the interior of the drill string and a shock absorbing element mounted in the drill

  15. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF BOREHOLE FLOWMETERS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to understand the origin of contaminant plumes and infer their future migration, one requires a knowledge of the hydraulic conductivity (K) distribution. n many aquifers, the borehole flowmeter offers the most direct technique available for developing a log of hydraulic ...

  16. Means for generating electricity during drilling of a borehole

    SciTech Connect

    Kamp, A.W.

    1985-01-01

    A generator is claimed for providing electric energy in a borehole during drilling thereof, the generator comprising an anchor which is movable in a reciprocating mode in response to pressure pulses in the drilling fluid caused by rapidly opening or closing a valve.

  17. Sampling and Analysis Plan Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project.

    SciTech Connect

    Brouns, Thomas M.

    2007-07-15

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) describes planned data collection activities for four entry boreholes through the sediment overlying the Saddle Mountains Basalt, up to three new deep rotary boreholes through the Saddle Mountains Basalt and sedimentary interbeds, and one corehole through the Saddle Mountains Basalt and sedimentary interbeds at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The SAP will be used in concert with the quality assurance plan for the project to guide the procedure development and data collection activities needed to support borehole drilling, geophysical measurements, and sampling. This SAP identifies the American Society of Testing Materials standards, Hanford Site procedures, and other guidance to be followed for data collection activities. Revision 3 incorporates all interim change notices (ICN) that were issued to Revision 2 prior to completion of sampling and analysis activities for the WTP Seismic Boreholes Project. This revision also incorporates changes to the exact number of samples submitted for dynamic testing as directed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Revision 3 represents the final version of the SAP.

  18. artesian borehole, Singhida (central Tanzania) Hydrology, weather and groundwater

    E-print Network

    Stevenson, Paul

    artesian borehole, Singhida (central Tanzania) Hydrology, weather and groundwater NERC EQUIP (scoop) wells to ater cattle in a sand river, headwater of the Great Ruaha River, Tanzania see Record from semi-arid Tanzania · longest, published record of groundwater levels in the tropics Taylor et

  19. Cavity Stress Relief Method To Stimulate Demethanation Boreholes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. Alain; G. M. Denes

    1984-01-01

    Most demethanation programs which use boreholes from the surface to access the coal, incorporate a stimulation program to enhance the well production. In most cases, the stimulation selected is a frac using nitrogen foam or other fluids. Novacorp has determined that fracing the coal may not be the best technique to apply to a well. Novacorp, whose experience includes over

  20. Intrinsic germanium detector used in borehole sonde for uranium exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Moxham, R.M.; Tanner, A.B.; Boynton, G.R.; Philbin, P.W.; Baicker, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    A borehole sonde (~1.7 m long; 7.3 cm diameter) using a 200 mm2 planar intrinsic germanium detector, mounted in a cryostat cooled by removable canisters of frozen propane, has been constructed and tested. The sonde is especially useful in measuring X- and low-energy gamma-ray spectra (40–400 keV). Laboratory tests in an artificial borehole facility indicate its potential for in-situ uranium analyses in boreholes irrespective of the state of equilibrium in the uranium series. Both natural gamma-ray and neutron-activation gamma-ray spectra have been measured with the sonde. Although the neutron-activation technique yields greater sensitivity, improvements being made in the resolution and efficiency of intrinsic germanium detectors suggest that it will soon be possible to use a similar sonde in the passive mode for measurement of uranium in a borehole down to about 0.1% with acceptable accuracy. Using a similar detector and neutron activation, the sonde can be used to measure uranium down to 0.01%.

  1. Geology of the Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, D. Brent; Fecht, Karl R.; Reidel, Stephen P.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Rust, Colleen F.

    2007-05-11

    In 2006, the U.S. Department of Energy initiated the Seismic Boreholes Project (SBP) to emplace boreholes at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site in order to obtain direct shear wave velocity (Vs) measurements and other physical property measurements in Columbia River basalt and interbedded sediments of the Ellensburg Formation. The goal was to reduce the uncertainty in the response spectra and seismic design basis, and potentially recover design margin for the WTP. The characterization effort within the deep boreholes included 1) downhole measurements of the velocity properties of the suprabasalt, basalt, and sedimentary interbed sequences, 2) downhole measurements of the density of the subsurface basalt and sediments, and 3) geologic studies to confirm the geometry of the contact between the various basalt and interbedded sediments through examination of retrieved core from the core hole and data collected through geophysical logging of each borehole. This report describes the results of the geologic studies from three mud-rotary boreholes and one cored borehole at the WTP. All four boreholes penetrated the entire Saddle Mountains Basalt and the upper part of the Wanapum Basalt where thick sedimentary interbeds occur between the lava flows. The basalt flows penetrated in Saddle Mountains Basalt included the Umatilla Member, Esquatzel Member, Pomona Member, and the Elephant Mountain Member. The underlying Priest Rapids Member of the Wanapum Basalt also was penetrated. The Ellensburg Formation sediments consist of the Mabton Interbed, the Cold Creek Interbed, the Selah Interbed, and the Rattlesnake Ridge Interbed; the Byron Interbed occurs between two flows of the Priest Rapids Member. The Mabton Interbed marks the contact between the Wanapum and Saddle Mountains Basalts. The thicknesses of the basalts and interbedded sediments were within expected limits. However, a small reverse fault was found in the Pomona Member flow top. This fault has three periods of movement and less than 15 ft of repeated section. Most of the movement on the fault appears to have occurred before the youngest lava flow, the 10.5-million-year-old Elephant Mountain Member, was emplaced above the Pomona Member.

  2. Organochlorine pesticides, chlorinated dioxins and furans, and PCBs in peregrine falcon Falco peregrinus eggs from the Kola peninsula, Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, C.J.; Ganusevich, S.A.; Ward, F.P.; Schwartz, T.R.

    1994-01-01

    Nesting of a bog-associated population of mlgfatory Peregrine Falcons, Falco peregrinus, along the Ponoy River depression, Kola Peninsula, Russia, has been studied since 1977. In 1987 91 production rates averaged 1.94 young per active nest and the number of breeding pairs increased from 4 to 10. In 1991, most eyrie sites were visited during the egg stage and a 'sample' egg was collected for contaminant analysis. Eight Peregrine Falcon eggs contained relatively low concentrations of p,p' -DOE (DOE) (geometric mean 3.5 g/g) and of other organochlorine pesticides. These DOE concentrations are similar to those reported in Peregrine Falcon eggs from an Alaskan population that had also showed a recent population increase. Eggshell thinning (11.4%) was similar to that found in Alaska. Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were higher than DOE concentrations, comparable to the contamination profile shown by Peregrine Falcon populations in Fennoscandia, and were higher than those found in Alaskan birds. Before this study, no Peregrine Falcon eggs from Russia had 'been analyzed for PCB congeners, polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxins (PCDDs), or pol ychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCD Fs). Conversions of analytical concentrations of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), other PCDDs, PCDFs and PCB congeners based on relative aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase induction potencies allowed the estimation of total 2,3,7,8- TCDD equivalents (TEQs). The TEQs are in the range that is associated with embryonic mortality in other species. Even though the Peregrine Falcon population now seems to be released from decades of a DOT problem, exposure to other contaminant continues. There is an obvious need to assess further the sources and longer-term trends of the PCBs. We also report residue concentrations from one White-tailed Eagle, Haliaeetus albicilla, egg.

  3. Repeat Temperature Measurements in Boreholes may Quantify Climate Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosnold, W.

    2012-04-01

    Repeat temperature vs. depth measurements acquired during a twenty-seven year period in three boreholes specifically drilled and completed for heat flow measurements provide a record of surface energy flux that may provide a measure of non-solar climate forcing. Because conductive diffusion of the surface temperature into the ground filters short-period temperature changes, using the air temperature record as forcing signal should yield computed temperature vs. depth profiles that agree with the observed profiles. The boreholes are located near the North Dakota- Manitoba border in the center of the North American continent. The terrain is flat and ground cover is grass and seasonal grain crops. The boreholes were drilled in a homogeneous shale (Pierre Shale, Cretaceous) which has a thermal conductivity of 1.2 W m-1K-2. We used time-series of surface air temperatures from an array of automated weather stations operated by the MidWest Regional Climate Center as a proxy for ground surface temperature for the twenty-seven year period during which the boreholes were logged. The initial borehole measurements (1984) were subtracted from each subsequent temperature profile (1995, 2002, 2007, 2009, 2011) for both the observations and the models to yield a record of changes. The results show close agreement between observation and models. The energy flux into the ground was determined to be approximately 40 mW m-2. We then used the daily TOA solar irradiance as a forcing signal (0.3 K per W) and found that solar forcing was only a fraction of the observed change. We propose that the difference between the observed temperature flux and that calculated from solar irradiance may yield a measurement of greenhouse gas forcing.

  4. Stress-induced borehole elongation: A comparison between the four-arm dipmeter and the borehole televiewer in the Auburn geothermal well

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard A. Plumb; Stephen H. Hickman

    1985-01-01

    The nature and origin of borehole elongation recorded by the four-arm dipmeter calipers is studied utilizing information obtained from hydraulic fracturing stress measurements and borehole televiewer data taken in a well located in Auburn, New York. A preferred orientation N10°W-S10°E, +- 10° and a less prominant E-W orientation of borehole elongation, was observed on two runs of the dipmeter. Comparisons

  5. Stress-induced borehole elongation: A comparison between the four-arm dipmeter and the borehole televiewer in the Auburn geothermal well

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard A. Plumb; Stephen H. Hickman

    1985-01-01

    The nature and origin of borehole elongation recorded by the four-arm dipmeter calipers is studied utilizing information obtained from hydraulic fracturing stress measurements and borehole televiewer data taken in a well located in Auburn, New York. A preferred orientation N10°W-S10°E, +\\/-10° and a less prominant E-W orientation of borehole elongation, was observed on two runs of the dipmeter. Comparisons of

  6. The Kola Alkaline Province of the CIS and Finland: Precise Rb?Sr ages define 380-360 Ma age range for all magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramm, U.; Kogarko, L. N.; Kononova, V. A.; Vartiainen, H.

    1993-04-01

    Twenty-one new Rb?Sr mineral and biotite-whole rock isochrons are presented for intrusive rock complexes of the Palaeozoic Kola Alkaline Province in the CIS and Finland. Samples from the ultrabasic-alkaline and nepheline-syenite complexes Khibina, Lovozero, Afrikanda, Turiy Mys, Ozernaya Varaka, Sokli and Iivaara all yield ages in the very narrow range from 361.7 to 377.3 Ma, i.e. late Middle Devonian to Upper Devonian. These data represent crystallization rather than intrusion ages, but are nevertheless argued as marking very closely the time of intrusion. There is no indication of bimodal age distribution. The emplacement of the alkaline magmas is related temporally to the subsidence of the Kontozero Graben of the Central Kola Peninsula. Sr initial ratios of the agpaitic nepheline-syenites of the giant Khibina and Lovozero intrusions scatter between 0.703 and 0.704. Because of high {Rb}/{Sr} ratios of the rocks, these isotope ratios exclude long-term pre-enrichment of alkalis in the sources of the magmas prior to segregation and intrusion, and thus episodic enrichment during earlier rifting events in the northern Baltic Shield. The magma formation may be related to wrench movements in the surroundings of the major Trollfjord-Komagelv Fault, which forms part of the Late Caledonian Arctic—North Atlantic Megashear System.

  7. The paleoproterozoic vurechuaivench layered Pt-bearing pluton, Kola Peninsula: New results of the U-Pb (ID-TIMS, SHRIMP) dating of baddeleytte and zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundkvist, T. V.; Bayanova, T. B.; Sergeev, S. A.; Pripachkin, P. V.; Grebnev, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    The Vurechuaivench layered PGE-bearing pluton (VP) is located in the central part of the Kola Peninsula, at the southeastern contact of the Monchegorsk layered complex with the Paleoproterozoic Imandra-Varzuga rift structure. The VP is composed of gabbronorites with a layered horizon of intercalated gabbronorites and anorthosites, containing sulfide and PGE-bearing mineralization. The U-Pb (ID-TIMS) age of baddeleytte from gabbronorite of the ore zone (sample M-42) was determined on a Finningan MAT-262 (RPQ) seven-channel mass-spectrometer in the Laboratory of Geochronology at the Geological Institute, Kola Scientific Center, Russian Academy of Sciences. Zircons from anorthosites and gabbronorites of the ore zone (samples B-1 and B-2, respectively) were studied on a SHRIMP-II secondary-ionic microprobe in the Center of Isotopic Studies of the Federal State Unitary Enterprise VSEGEI (St. Petersburg). The reliable age of formation of various VP rocks was determined by single grains of accessory baddeleytte and zircon based on additional studies of sample M-42 (2498.2 ± 6.7 Ma) and new studies of samples B-1 and B-2 (2507.9 ± 6.6 and 2504.8.4 Ma). The identical U-Pb ages of anorthosites and gabbronorites from the ore reef indicate that anorthosites are a dependent phase and were formed along with gabbronorites during the intrachamber melt differentiation and crystallization.

  8. Borehole prototype for seismic high-resolution exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, Rüdiger; Jaksch, Katrin; Krauß, Felix; Krüger, Kay; Groh, Marco; Jurczyk, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Target reservoirs for the exploitation of hydrocarbons or hot water for geothermal energy supply can comprise small layered structures, for instance thin layers or faults. The resolution of 2D and 3D surface seismic methods is often not sufficient to determine and locate these structures. Borehole seismic methods like vertical seismic profiling (VSP) and seismic while drilling (SWD) use either receivers or sources within the borehole. Thus, the distance to the target horizon is reduced and higher resolution images of the geological structures can be achieved. Even these methods are limited in their resolution capabilities with increasing target depth. To localize structures more accuracy methods with higher resolution in the range of meters are necessary. The project SPWD -- Seismic Prediction While Drilling aims at s the development of a borehole prototype which combines seismic sources and receivers in one device to improve the seismic resolution. Within SPWD such a prototype has been designed, manufactured and tested. The SPWD-wireline prototype is divided into three main parts. The upper section comprises the electronic unit. The middle section includes the upper receiver, the upper clamping unit as well as the source unit and the lower clamping unit. The lower section consists of the lower receiver unit and the hydraulic unit. The total length of the prototype is nearly seven meters and its weight is about 750 kg. For focusing the seismic waves in predefined directions of the borehole axis the method of phased array is used. The source unit is equipped with four magnetostrictive vibrators. Each can be controlled independently to get a common wave front in the desired direction of exploration. Source signal frequencies up to 5000 Hz are used, which allows resolutions up to one meter. In May and September 2013 field tests with the SPWD-wireline prototype have been carried out at the KTB Deep Crustal Lab in Windischeschenbach (Bavaria). The aim was to proof the pressure-tightness and the functionality of the hydraulic system components of the borehole device. To monitor the prototype four cameras and several moisture sensors were installed along the source and receiver units close to the extendable coupling stamps where an infiltration of fluid is most probably. The tests lasted about 48 hours each. It was possible to extend and to retract the coupling stamps of the prototype up to a depth of 2100 m. No infiltration of borehole fluids in the SPWD-tool was observed. In preparation of the acoustic calibration measurements in the research and education mine of the TU Bergakademie Freiberg seismic sources and receivers as well as the recording electronic devices were installed in the SPWD-wireline prototype at the GFZ. Afterwards, the SPWD-borehole device was transported to the GFZ-Underground-Lab and preliminary test measurements to characterize the radiation pattern characteristics have been carried out in the newly drilled vertical borehole in December 2013. Previous measurements with a laboratory borehole prototype have demonstrated a dependency of the radiated seismic energy from the predefined amplification direction, the wave type and the signal frequencies. SPWD is funded by the German Federal Environment Ministry

  9. Measuring and interpretation of three-component borehole magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgil, C.; Ehmann, S.; Hördt, A.; Leven, M.; Steveling, E.

    2012-04-01

    Three-component borehole magnetics provides important additional information compared with total field or horizontal and vertical measurements. The "Göttinger Bohrloch Magnetometer" (GBM) is capable of recording the vector of the magnetic field along with the orientation of the tool using three fluxgate magnetometers and fibre-optic gyros. The GBM was successfully applied in the Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole (OKU R2500), Finland in September 2008 and in the Louisville Seamount Trail (IODP Expedition 330) from December 2010 until February 2011, and in several shallower boreholes. With the declination of the magnetic field, the GBM provides additional information compared to conventional tools, which reduces the ambiguity for structural interpretation. The position of ferromagnetic objects in the vicinity of the borehole can be computed with higher accuracy. In the case of drilled-through structures, three-component borehole magnetics allow the computation of the vector of magnetization. Using supplementary susceptibility data, the natural remanent magnetization (NRM) vector can be derived, which yields information about the apparent polar wander curve and/or about the structural evolution of the rock units. The NRM vector can further be used to reorient core samples in regions of strong magnetization. The most important aspect in three-component borehole magnetics is the knowledge of the orientation of the probe along the drillhole. With the GBM we use three fibre-optic gyros (FOG), which are aligned orthogonal to each other. These instruments record the turning rate about the three main axes of the probe. The FOGs benefit from a high resolution (< 9 · 10-4 °) and a low drift (< 2 °/h). However, to reach optimal results, extensive data processing and calibration measurements are necessary. Properties to be taken into account are the misalignment, scaling factors and offsets of the fluxgate and FOG triplet, temperature dependent drift of the FOGs, misalignment of the fluxgate and FOG triplet in respect with each other, as well as start and end position of the probe with respect to Earth's reference frame. Using the high precision gyro data, we can compute the vector of the magnetic anomaly with respect to the Earth's reference frame North, East and Downwards. Based on the comparison of several logs, the estimated precision is 0.8 ° in azimuthal direction and 0.1 ° in inclination. Additionally, the orientation information provided by the GBM is used to compute the borehole path with a relative accuracy better than 0.35 %.

  10. Borehole Measurements of Interfacial and Co-seismic Seismoelectric Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, K. E.; Dupuis, J. C.; Kepic, A. W.; Harris, B. D.

    2006-12-01

    We have recently carried out a series of seismoelectric field experiments employing various hammer seismic sources on surface and a multi-electrode `eel' lowered into slotted PVC-cased boreholes penetrating porous sediments. Deploying grounded dipole receivers in boreholes has a number of advantages over surface-based measurements. Ambient noise levels are reduced because earth currents from power lines and other sources tend to flow horizontally, especially near the surface. The earth also provides natural shielding from higher frequency spherics and radio frequency interference while the water-filled borehole significantly decreases the electrode contact impedance which in turn reduces Johnson noise and increases resilience to capacitively- coupled noise sources. From a phenomenological point of view, the potential for measuring seismoelectric conversions from various geological or pore fluid contacts at depth can be assessed by lowering antennas directly through those interfaces. Furthermore, co-seismic seismoelectric signals that are normally considered to be noise in surface measurements are of interest for well logging in the borehole environment. At Fredericton, Canada, broadband co-seismic effects, having a dominant frequency of 350-400 Hz were measured at quarter meter intervals in a borehole penetrating glacial sediments including tills, sands, and a silt/clay aquitard. Observed signal strengths of a few microvolts/m were found to be consistent with the predictions of a simplified theoretical model for the co-seismic effect expected to accompany the regular `fast' P-wave. In Australia we have carried out similar vertical profiling experiments in hydrogeological monitoring boreholes that pass through predominantly sandy sediments containing fresh to saline water near Ayr, QLD and Perth, WA. While co-seismic effects are generally seen to accompany P-wave and other seismic arrivals, the most interesting result has been the observation, at three sites, of interfacial seismoelectric effects that appear to be caused by the arrival of the P-wave at the water table located 3 to 14 m below surface. The signals can be observed arriving simultaneously across dipoles located up to 20 m below the water table and are also detected by dipoles located at surface. Polarity reversals are observed 5 to 11 m below the water table at the three sites. These reversals may be explained by our 2 m dipole receivers passing inside a vertical electric dipole produced by seismoelectric conversion, and thereby provide compelling new evidence in support of existing models for the generation of seismoelectric effects at interfaces.

  11. Method and apparatus for conducting wireline operations in a borehole

    SciTech Connect

    Lanmon II, C. P.

    1984-11-27

    For conducting wireline operations in a deviated borehole, a dual or two-stage locomotive pulls a wireline cable through both the entire length of a drill string and the entire length of a stinger therein to dock with a tool at the bottom of the stinger. The inner or second-stage locomotive then pulls the stinger out into the borehole by pushing on the bottom end of the stinger to prevent buckling the stinger. The stinger and drill stem can be assembled to virtually any length, without requiring pre-wiring. The risk of buckling upon retracting the stinger back into the drill pipe, by pulling on the cable, is reduced by the use of the special configuration provided by the present invention.

  12. Method and apparatus for conducting wireline operations in a borehole

    SciTech Connect

    Walulik, J. J.

    1984-12-04

    For conducting wireline operations in a deviated borehole, a dual or two-stage locomotive pulls a wireline cable through both the entire length of a drill string and the entire length of a stinger therein to dock with a tool at the bottom of the stinger. The inner or second-stage locomotive then pulls the stinger out into the borehole by pushing on the bottom end of the stinger to prevent buckling the stinger. The stinger and drill stem can be assembled to virtually any length, without requiring pre-wiring. The risk of buckling upon retracting the stinger back into the drill pipe, by pulling on the cable, is reduced by the use of the special configuration provided by the present invention.

  13. Shear wave transducer for stress measurements in boreholes

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Nai-Hsien (Castro Valley, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A technique and apparatus for estimating in situ stresses by measuring stress-induced velocity anisotropy around a borehole. Two sets each of radially and tangentially polarized transducers are placed inside the hole with displacement directions either parallel or perpendicular to the principal stress directions. With this configuration, relative travel times are measured by both a pulsed phase-locked loop technique and a cross correlation of digitized waveforms. The biaxial velocity data is used to back-calculate the applied stress.

  14. ENERGY PERFORMANCE OF BOREHOLE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroshi Ohga; Kenji Mikoda; Rio de Janeiro

    This paper describes the energy performance of an underground thermal energy storage system that consists of high efficiency heat pump and Borehole- Heat-Exchangers (BHE). The energy conservation concept of this system is operation of the heat pump at higher efficiency using the Water-Source-Heat- Pump (WSHP). For this concept, the seasonal storage system using BHE under the ground is adopted as

  15. Seismic borehole tomography - Measurement system and field studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavsson, M.; Ivansson, S.; Moren, P.; Pihl, J.

    1986-02-01

    A system for seismic tomographic measurements is presented, and both hardware and software are described. The system is intended to operate in the distance range 100-1000 m. An explosive source is used to generate signals which are picked up by receivers at the surface and in boreholes. Tomographic results from two field experiments are presented. The first experiment concerns mapping of an ore body in a mine, whereas the second concerns rock quality determination.

  16. Downhole motor and method for directional drilling of boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Kamp, A. W.; Feenstra, R.

    1984-12-04

    The invention relates to a downhole motor having a housing of which the resistance against bending in a predetermined longitudinal plane is smaller than in any other longitudinal plane. Directional drilling of boreholes is carried out by rotating the drill string simultaneously with the rotation of the drill bit driven by the downhole motor over periods preceded and followed by selected periods during which the drill string is not rotated simultaneously with the rotation of the drill bit driven by the downhole motor.

  17. PBO Borehole Strainmeter Network: Data Products And Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, D. B.; Borsa, A. A.; Gallaher, W.; Gottlieb, M. H.; Hodgkinson, K. M.; Jackson, M. E.; Johnson, W.; Mencin, D.; Vanboskirk, E. J.

    2009-12-01

    The borehole strainmeter network within the Plate Boundary Observatory consists of 74 tensor strainmeters installed in arrays distributed between southern California and Vancouver Island, Canada. Borehole strainmeters, with nanostrain sensitivity, were included in the Observatory because of their ability to detect short-lived strain transients. In the first year of the operations and maintenance phase of the Observatory, the strainmeter network has recorded aseismic creep events in Parkfield, strain transients associated with ETS events in the Pacific Northwest, earthquake swarm related events in Yellowstone and deformation following the M6.9 August 3rd, 2009 Gulf of California earthquake. PBO has designed a set of metrics that can be used to both assess the overall network performance and assist researchers in deciding which strainmeters to include in the analysis of strain signals. The metrics include; state of borehole compression, number of unexplained data steps, the signal to noise ratio in tidal bands, and ability to record seismic shear. Combined, these metrics can provide an overview as to how well a strainmeter performs across the broad bandwith over which it operates. PBO strain data, plus the seismic and environmental data collected at all strainmeters sites, are archived at the NCEDC and the IRIS DMC and available from the Earthscope Portal. In addition, a processed data set consisting of tide, trend and barometric corrections is generated every ten to fourteen days by the UNAVCO Borehole Strainmeter Analysis Center, New Mexico Tech, Socorro. Information about PBO strainmeters and all other PBO instruments can be found at the UNAVCO PBO web site (http://pboweb.unavco.org).

  18. Deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joshua S. Stein; Geoffrey A. Freeze; Patrick Vane Brady; Peter N. Swift; Robert Paul Rechard; Bill Walter Arnold; Joseph F. Kanney; Stephen J. Bauer

    2009-01-01

    Preliminary evaluation of deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel indicates the potential for excellent long-term safety performance at costs competitive with mined repositories. Significant fluid flow through basement rock is prevented, in part, by low permeabilities, poorly connected transport pathways, and overburden self-sealing. Deep fluids also resist vertical movement because they are density stratified. Thermal

  19. Heat transfer analysis of boreholes in vertical ground heat exchangers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heyi Zeng; Nairen Diao; Zhaohong Fang

    2003-01-01

    A ground heat exchanger (GHE) is devised for extraction or injection of thermal energy from\\/into the ground. Bearing strong impact on GHE performance, the borehole thermal resistance is defined by the thermal properties of the construction materials and the arrangement of flow channels of the GHEs. Taking the fluid axial convective heat transfer and thermal “short-circuiting” among U-tube legs into

  20. Waterflood monitoring using borehole self-potential data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atshan, Imad O.

    A cross-hole imaging technique is developed to follow the evolution of an oil-water encroachment front over time during the water flooding of an oil reservoir. I simulate borehole electric potentials associated with a two-phase flow between two wells in a heterogeneous reservoir. The flow of the water phase generates a source (streaming) current density, which is responsible for the occurrence of an electrical field that can be measured remotely. I develop a least-squares static inversion algorithm, a time-lapse inversion algorithm and a differential inversion algorithm to invert a set of snapshots of the electrical potential distribution in a borehole in order to localize and monitor the position and shape of the oil-water encroachment front. I demonstrate through a synthetic case study that the magnitude of the electric signal can reach up to hundreds of millivolts, and that the position and the shape of the oil-water encroachment front can be successfully recovered while it is still tens to hundreds of meters away from the well where the sensors are located. Such information could be part of an intelligent feedback system between borehole monitoring and flow-control that optimizes injection and production in a producing reservoir.

  1. Chemical energy system for a borehole seismic source. [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Engelke, R.; Hedges, R.O.

    1996-03-01

    We describe a detonation system that will be useful in the seismological examination of geological structures. The explosive component of this system is produced by the mixing of two liquids; these liquids are classified as non-explosive materials by the Department of Transportation. This detonation system could be employed in a borehole tool in which many explosions are made to occur at various points in the borehole. The explosive for each explosion would be mixed within the tool immediately prior to its being fired. Such an arrangement ensures that no humans are ever in proximity to explosives. Initiation of the explosive mixture is achieved with an electrical slapper detonator whose specific parameters are described; this electrical initiation system does not contain any explosive. The complete electrical/mechanical/explosive system is shown to be able to perform correctly at temperatures {le}120{degrees}C and at depths in a water-filled borehole of {le} 4600 ft (i.e., at pressures of {le}2000 psig).

  2. Using Flow Logging Experiments to Bridge the Scale Gap in Borehole Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paillet, F. L.

    2001-12-01

    Until the recent development of high-resolution borehole flow logging equipment, geophysical well logs were indirectly related to aquifer parameters such as porosity and permeability through various interpretation equations. Heat-pulse and electro-magnetic flowmeters allow the direct measurement of aquifer permeability in situ during borehole flow experiments. An important limitation on the interpretation such flow experiments is the scale of investigation, because permeability profiles derived from flow logs apply to the immediate vicinity of the borehole. A few local samples of the permeability of heterogeneous aquifers are unlikely to apply to large-scale flow within the aquifer. The aquifer scale limitation of geophysical logging is addressed by: 1) using a borehole flow model to interpret the large scale boundary conditions driving local borehole flow; and 2) using pulsed cross-borehole flow experiments to define hydraulic connections between boreholes. Conventional geophysical logs are used to identify generalized aquifer structure, including individual bedding planes or fractures conducting flow into or out of the borehole. A flow log model is used to quantify the local-scale hydraulic conductivity of the conduits intersecting the borehole, and to estimate the hydraulic head of the large-scale aquifer or aquifers to which those conduits are connected. These estimations can be interpreted in terms of large-scale aquifer structure. In a more direct and straightforward sampling of large-scale permeability, cross-borehole flow tests consist of experiments where one borehole is stressed for a short period, and the transient flow field induced by that stress is monitored in adjacent boreholes. These experiments are used to define the flow paths between boreholes, and to identify possible hidden connections short-circuiting those flow paths. Specific examples of local flow-log data used to define large-scale aquifer properties are given for study sites in Minnesota, Massachusetts, Maine, and New York.

  3. Method and apparatus for coupling seismic sensors to a borehole wall

    DOEpatents

    West, Phillip B.

    2005-03-15

    A method and apparatus suitable for coupling seismic or other downhole sensors to a borehole wall in high temperature and pressure environments. In one embodiment, one or more metal bellows mounted to a sensor module are inflated to clamp the sensor module within the borehole and couple an associated seismic sensor to a borehole wall. Once the sensing operation is complete, the bellows are deflated and the sensor module is unclamped by deflation of the metal bellows. In a further embodiment, a magnetic drive pump in a pump module is used to supply fluid pressure for inflating the metal bellows using borehole fluid or fluid from a reservoir. The pump includes a magnetic drive motor configured with a rotor assembly to be exposed to borehole fluid pressure including a rotatable armature for driving an impeller and an associated coil under control of electronics isolated from borehole pressure.

  4. Late pleistocene and holocene history of the lakes in the Kola Peninsula, Karelia and the North-Western part of the East European plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydova, N.; Servant-Vildary, S.

    The paper reviews the work on paleolimnology in parts of the FSU over the last 40 years. It presents a short review of The History of the Lakes of the East European Plain, one of the books of the series The History of Lakes published by the Institute of Lake Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences. It describes the Late Pleistocene and Holocene history of these lakes based mainly on the study of lacustrine sediments. Amongst the samples Lake Nero near Moscow which is located near the marginal zone of the last glaciation, and includes records that go back as early as 190,000 BP. The main elements of lake evolution are shown in different territories: Byelorussia; Baltic countries; Karelia; and the Kola Peninsula. Special attention is given to palaeolimnological data because its use for Holocene and Late Pleistocene palaeoclimate reconstructions.

  5. Transformation of the chemical composition of the waters of small lakes on Kola Peninsula owing to a decrease in technogenic air pollution and to climate warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseenko, T. I.; Bazova, M. M.; Efimova, L. E.

    2014-05-01

    The emission of sulfur dioxide and metals from copper-nickel melting plants on Kola Peninsula (Russia) decreased pronouncedly over the last two decades. The decrease in the sulfate content and increase in the acid-neutralizing capability of waters were proven on the basis of the data of surveys on 75 small lakes repeated once every five years from 1990 to 2010. The variations of other parameters of the chemical composition of the waters of small lakes depend on the geological and landscape conditions of the formation of waters. The alkalinity and pH values increased in 46% of the lakes; 24% of them showed a further decrease of these parameters; and no reliable changes were traced in 31% of the lakes. The concentrations of Cu and Ni in the lacustrine water decreased 5-to 10-fold over the last two decades.

  6. Evaluation of the dust and methanol extracts of Garcinia kolae for the control of Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) and Sitophilus zeamais (Mots).

    PubMed

    Ogunleye, R F; Adefemi, S O

    2007-12-01

    Insecticidal effects of different doses of the dust and methanol extracts of Garcinia kolae on Callosobruchus maculatus and Sitophilus zeamais were tested. The dust had no significant effect on the two insects; none of them died even at 3 d after treatment. The methanol extracts, however, had rapid lethal effects on both C. maculatus and S. zeamais. The mortality of C. maculatus by the lowest concentration of methanol extracts ranged from 95%~100% whereas in S. zeamais, the mortality ranged from 87.5% to approximately 100% and 70% to approximately 100% in concentrations of 1 g extract+3 ml methanol and 1 g extract+5 ml methanol, respectively, from 24 to 48 h. The least concentration of 1 g extract+15 ml methanol had no significant lethal effect on Sitophilus zeamais. PMID:18257127

  7. Performance of open borehole thermal energy storage system under cyclic flow regime

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kun Sang Lee

    2008-01-01

    Thermal energy storage can be accomplished through the installation of an array of vertical boreholes. Coupled hydrogeological-thermal\\u000a simulation of the storage system is essential to provide an optimized configuration of boreholes and operation schedule for\\u000a the thermal storage system on the site. This paper presents numerical investigations and thermohydraulic evaluation of open\\u000a borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) system operating under

  8. A strategy to seal exploratory boreholes in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Givens, C.A.; Carney, B.C. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-04-01

    This report presents a strategy for sealing exploratory boreholes associated with the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Over 500 existing and proposed boreholes have been considered in the development of this strategy, ranging from shallow (penetrating into alluvium only) to deep (penetrating into the groundwater table). Among the comprehensive list of recommendations are the following: Those boreholes within the potential repository boundary and penetrating through the potential repository horizon are the most significant boreholes from a performance standpoint and should be sealed. Shallow boreholes are comparatively insignificant and require only nominal sealing. The primary areas in which to place seals are away from high-temperature zones at a distance from the potential repository horizon in the Paintbrush nonwelded tuff and the upper portion of the Topopah Spring Member and in the tuffaceous beds of the Calico Hills Unit. Seals should be placed prior to waste emplacement. Performance goals for borehole seals both above and below the potential repository are proposed. Detailed construction information on the boreholes that could be used for future design specifications is provided along with a description of the environmental setting, i.e., the geology, hydrology, and the in situ and thermal stress states. A borehole classification scheme based on the condition of the borehole wall in different tuffaceous units is also proposed. In addition, calculations are presented to assess the significance of the boreholes acting as preferential pathways for the release of radionuclides. Design calculations are presented to answer the concerns of when, where, and how to seal. As part of the strategy development, available technologies to seal exploratory boreholes (including casing removal, borehole wall reconditioning, and seal emplacement) are reviewed.

  9. Identification of the AntiListerial Constituents in Partially Purified Column Chromatography Fractions of Garcinia kola Seeds and Their Interactions with Standard Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Penduka, D.; Buwa, L.; Mayekiso, B.; Basson, A. K.; Okoh, A. I.

    2014-01-01

    Partially purified fractions of the n-hexane extract of Garcinia kola seeds were obtained through column chromatography and their constituents were identified through the use of gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Three fractions were obtained by elution with benzene as the mobile phase and silica gel 60 as the stationery phase and these were named Benz1, Benz2, and Benz3 in the order of their elution. The antiListerial activities of these fractions were assessed through MIC determination and only Benz2 and Benz3 were found to be active with MIC's ranging from 0.625 to 2.5?mg/mL. The results of the GC-MS analysis showed Benz2 to have 9 compounds whilst Benz3 had 7 compounds, with the major compounds in both fractions being 9,19-Cyclolanost-24-en-3-ol, (3.?.) and 9,19-Cyclolanostan-3-ol,24-methylene-, (3.?.). The Benz2 fraction was found to have mainly indifferent interactions with ampicillin and penicillin G whilst mainly additive interactions were observed with ciprofloxacin. The Benz3 fraction's interactions were found to be 50% synergistic with penicillin G and 25% synergistic with ciprofloxacin and ampicillin. A commercially available 9,19-Cyclolanost-24-en-3-ol, (3.?.) was found not to exhibit any antiListerial activities at maximum test concentrations of 5?mg/mL, suggesting that the compound could be acting in synergy with the other compounds in the eluted fractions of Garcinia kola seeds. PMID:24527056

  10. Condensed listing of surface boreholes at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Project through 31 December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, L.R.; Aguilar, R.; Mercer, J.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Newman, G. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This report contains a condensed listing of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) project surface boreholes drilled for the purpose of site selection and characterization through 31 December 1995. The US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored the drilling activities, which were conducted primarily by Sandia National Laboratories. The listing provides physical attributes such as location (township, range, section, and state-plane coordinates), elevation, and total borehole depth, as well as the purpose for the borehole, drilling dates, and information about extracted cores. The report also presents the hole status (plugged, testing, monitoring, etc.) and includes salient findings and references. Maps with borehole locations and times-of-drilling charts are included.

  11. A numerical investigation of head waves and leaky modes in fluid- filled boreholes.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, F.L.; Cheng, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    Although synthetic borehole seismograms can be computed for a wide range of borehole conditions, the physical nature of shear and compressional head waves in fluid-filled boreholes is poorly understood. Presents a series of numerical experiments designed to explain the physical mechanisms controlling head-wave propagation in boreholes. These calculations demonstrate the existence of compressional normal modes equivalent to shear normal modes, or pseudo-Rayleigh waves, with sequential cutoff frequencies spaced between the cutoff frequencies for the shear normal modes.-from Authors

  12. Multi-borehole electro-blast method for concrete monolith splitting off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, A. S.; Kuznetsova, N. S.; Lopatin, V. V.; Voitenko, N. V.

    2014-11-01

    The multi-borehole method of monolith splitting off by pulsed electrical discharge is presented. The experimental data of simultaneous and step by step discharge initiation for monolith splitting off with using of the polyethylene cartridge are given. The simultaneous initiation of discharge in two boreholes with 30 cm spacing, transferred energy in each borehole about 23 kJ as well as sequential initiation of discharge with transferred energy in one borehole about 47 kJ are investigated. The concrete splitting off with the dimensions of 300×300×650 mm by six boreholes with step-by-step initiation in each borehole and with total energy of about 280 kJ as well as the concrete splitting off with dimensions of 300×300×300 mm by the four boreholes with simultaneous initiation in each two boreholes and the total energy of about 90 kJ take place. It is shown that the simultaneous multi-borehole initiation of the electrical discharge leads to the cracks formation in predefined direction and to the directional solid splitting off. The experimental results show that the simultaneous discharge initiation in comparison with step-by-step one has advantage in consumed energy.

  13. Flow modeling and permeability estimation using borehole flow logs in heterogeneous fractured formations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, F.L.

    1998-01-01

    A numerical model of flow in the vicinity of a borehole is used to analyze flowmeter data obtained with high-resolution flowmeters. The model is designed to (1) precisely compute flow in a borehole, (2) approximate the effects of flow in surrounding aquifers on the measured borehole flow, (3) allow for an arbitrary number (N) of entry/exit points connected to M < N far-field aquifers, and (4) be consistent with the practical limitations of flowmeter measurements such as limits of resolution, typical measurement error, and finite measurement periods. The model is used in three modes: (1) a quasi-steady pumping mode where there is no ambient flow, (2) a steady flow mode where ambient differences in far-field water levels drive flow between fracture zones in the borehole, and (3) a cross-borehole test mode where pumping in an adjacent borehole drives flow in the observation borehole. The model gives estimates of transmissivity for any number of fractures in steady or quasi-steady flow experiments that agree with straddle-packer test data. Field examples show how these cross-borehole-type curves can be used to estimate the storage coefficient of fractures and bedding planes and to determine whether fractures intersecting a borehole at different locations are hydraulically connected in the surrounding rock mass.

  14. Stress-induced borehole elongation: A comparison between the four-arm dipmeter and the borehole televiewer in the Auburn Geothermal Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, Richard A.; Hickman, Stephen H.

    1985-06-01

    The nature and origin of borehole elongation recorded by the four-arm dipmeter calipers is studied utilizing information obtained from hydraulic fracturing stress measurements and borehole televiewer data taken in a well located in Auburn, New York. A preferred orientation N10°W-S10°E, ±10° and a less prominant E-W orientation of borehole elongation, was observed on two runs of the dipmeter. Comparisons of borehole geometry determined using the televiewer and the dipmeter show that both tools give the same orientation of borehole elongtion provided that the zone of elongation is longer than 30 cm. Comparisons of dipmeter caliper data with orientation of in situ stress and natural fractures, obtained from hydrofracturing tests and televiewer data show that the N10°W-S10°E borehole elongations (1) are axisymmetric, (2) are aligned with the minimum horizontal stress Sh, and (3) are not associated with natural fractures intersecting the well. These elongations are interpreted as stress-induced well bore breakouts. The E-W elongation direction is characterized by an asymmetric borehole cross section in thinly bedded rocks and is not caused by breakouts. This asymmetric geometry can be discriminated from breakouts using the oriented electric measurements provided by the dipmeter. This study demonstrates that the dipmeter can be used to determine the orientation of Sh (by mapping breakouts), confirming the results of earlier less detailed studies, and provides a firm basis for mapping regional stress patterns using existing dipmeter data.

  15. CORK-Lite: Bringing Legacy Boreholes Back to Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, K. J.; Wheat, C. G.; Pettigrew, T.; Jannasch, H. W.; Becker, K.; Davis, E. E.; Villinger, H. W.; Bach, W.

    2012-12-01

    The primary goal for Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Exp 336 to North Pond, on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 22°N, is to elucidate the microbial community structure, origin, and activity within a defined geochemical, hydrological, and geological setting (Expedition 336 Scientists, 2012). The goals are to be met by conducting downhole and well-head microbiological experiments utilizing borehole observatories. The plan to achieve this goal included the modernization of an existing borehole observatory (CORK; Davis et al., 1992) at Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Hole 395A, the deployment of two new CORKs (one shallow and one deep), and the recovery and analysis of sediment and basalt. After the deployment of two CORKs, one in DSDP Hole 395A and the other in a shallow crustal hole tens of meters away (Hole U1382A), the next operation was to drill, case, and instrument a deep borehole at Site U1383, about 5 km to the north-northeast. The planned deep hole at U1383B began as designed (Expedition 336 Scientists, 2012). The 20-inch casing and re-entry cone were deployed and an 18.5-inch hole was drilled through 52.8 m of sediment and into basement (67.8 meters below seafloor (mbsf)). The 16-inch casing was deployed and the borehole deepened with a 14.75-inch tri-cone bit. Unfortunately, the tri-cone bit failed at 89.9 mbsf. Given the uncertainty of successfully recovering the bit and continuing drilling of this hole, a new hole (U1383C), about 25 m away, was started and later instrumented. With the successful deployment of the CORK at Hole U1383C, it was critical to seal Hole U1383B so that the open borehole would not "short circuit" the natural regional hydrologic flow. While on IODP Exp. 336 the plan quickly evolved from a simple seal for Hole U1383B to a newly designed CORK that could be deployed by a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). The design and operations for this new "CORK-lite" were conceived at sea. The first step was to modify an ROV platform with strength members below the platform to guide it in place when deployed from the ship in a "free-fall" mode. The second step was to design a CORK system that could seal the borehole and in consultation with ROV pilots, make sure the design was compatible with ROV operations. Operations were successful and a new instrumented "legacy hole" are now in place in the seafloor at North Pond. The platform was built and deployed during Expedition 336; the seal and instrumentation for long-term pressure monitoring and possible fluid sampling were built later and deployed successfully with the ROV Jason four months after the expedition. The success of this program has implication for instrumentation of numerous other "legacy" holes drilled as part of DSDP/ODP/IODP for combined hydrogeological, microbiological, and geochemical experimentation.

  16. Kyanoxalite, a new cancrinite-group mineral species with extraframework oxalate anion from the Lovozero alkaline pluton, Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukanov, N. V.; Pekov, I. V.; Olysych, L. V.; Massa, W.; Yakubovich, O. V.; Zadov, A. E.; Rastsvetaeva, R. K.; Vigasina, M. F.

    2010-12-01

    Kyanoxalite, a new member of the cancrinite group, has been identified in hydrothermally altered hyperalkaline rocks and pegmatites of the Lovozero alkaline pluton, Kola Peninsula, Russia. It was found at Mount Karnasurt (holotype) in association with nepheline, aegirine, sodalite, nosean, albite, lomonosovite, murmanite, fluorapatite, loparite, and natrolite and at Mt. Alluaiv. Kyanoxalite is transparent, ranging in color from bright light blue, greenish light blue and grayish light blue to colorless. The new mineral is brittle, with a perfect cleavage parallel to (100). Mohs hardness is 5-5.5. The measured and calculated densitiesare 2.30(1) and 2.327 g/cm3, respectively. Kyanoxalite is uniaxial, negative, ? = 1.794(1), ? = 1.491(1). It is pleochroic from colorless along E to light blue along O. The IR spectrum indicates the presence of oxalate anions C2O{4/2-} and water molecules in the absence of CO{3/2-} Oxalate ions are confirmed by anion chromatography. The chemical composition (electron microprobe; water was determined by a modified Penfield method and carbon was determined by selective sorption from annealing products) is as follows, wt %: 19.70 Na2O, 1.92 K2O, 0.17 CaO, 27.41 Al2O3, 38.68 SiO2, 0.64 P2O5, 1.05 SO3, 3.23 C2O3, 8.42 H2O; the total is 101.18. The empirical formula (Z = 1) is (Na6.45K0.41Ca0.03)?6.89(Si6.53Al5.46O24)[(C2O4)0.455(SO4)0.13(PO4)0.09(OH)0.01]?0.68 · 4.74H2O. The idealized formula is Na7(Al5-6Si6-7O24)(C2O4)0.5-1 · 5H2O. Kyanoxalite is hexagonal, the space group is P63, a = 12.744(8), c = 5.213(6) -ray powder diffraction pattern are as follows, [ d, [A] ( I, %)( hkl)]: 6.39(44) (110), 4.73 (92) (101), 3.679 (72) (300), 3.264 (100) (211, 121), 2.760 (29) (400), 2.618 (36) (002), 2.216, (29) (302, 330). According to the X-ray single crystal study ( R = 0.033), two independent C2O4 groups statistically occupy the sites on the axis 63. The new mineral is the first natural silicate with an additional organic anion and is the most hydrated member of the cancrinite group. Its name reflects the color (????go?? is light blue in Greek) and the species-forming role of oxalate anions. The holotype is deposited at the Fersman Mineralogical Museum of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, registration no. 3735/1.

  17. Isotope-geochemical Sm-Nd, ENd and TDM data of the layered paleoproterozoic PGE massif Monchetundra (Kola peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunakkuzin, Evgeniy; Borisenko, Elena; Serov, Pavel

    2014-05-01

    Monchetundra massif is located in the central part of the Kola Peninsula and it is the south-eastern part of the Main Ridge Intrusion. The massif is subdivided into two up to five syngenetic zones by different researchers (Nazimova, Rayan, 2008, Nerovich et. al. 2009, Layered intrusions…p.1, 2004). According the isotope-geochronological and isotope-geochemical data it can identify at least four groups of rocks distinguishing by ages. The aim of this study is to identify the isotope-geochemical Sm-Nd (ENd and TDM) data of the mafic rocks of the massif Monchetundra. For the interpretation of these data it was selected 40 analyzes of rocks sampled during field works within Monchetundra massif in 2011-2012 and from the published data (Nerovich et. al., 2009, Bayanova et. al., 2010, Layered intrusions…p.2, 2004). The earliest group of rocks is dated by U-Pb zircon in 2521 ± 8 Ma (Bayanova et. al., 2010). It consist of metagabbroids of wide composition range from anorthosite up to gabbro, which also called «amphibole-plagioclase rocks» (Nerovich et. al., 2009) due to their strong metamorphic changes. These rocks are characterized by ENd values from -0.02 up to -2.23 (at the time of rocks formation) as well as mesoarchean and paleoarchean values of model ages. The second group of rocks is composed of medium- grained and coarse-grained mesocratic gabbronorites of trachytoid texture and their amphibolized varieties. The rocks of this group were dated in 2505 ± 6 Ma and 2501 ± 8 Ma (Layered intrusions…p.1., 2004). Values of ENd for these rocks vary from -1.70 up to +1.42, model ages correspond to the range from 2.7 up to 3.5 Ga. Leucocratic gabbronorites, gabbronorite-anorthosites of massive texture and their metamorphosed varieties with garnet and amphibole constitute the third group of Monchetundra massife rocks. The formation age of these rocks has been determined on zircon and baddeleyite by U-Pb method and it is 2471 ± 9 Ma, 2476 ± 17 Ma, 2456 ± 5 Ma and 2453 ± 4 Ma (Bayanova et. al., 2010, Mitrofanov et. al., 1993). Value of ENd for this group rocks vary from -3.38 to +2.08, and the values of the model ages range between 2.7 and 3.4 Ga. Dyke-shaped bodies of melanocratic troctolites are found within the southeastern slope of Monchetundra massif. These rocks are characterized by positive values of ENd varying from +2.01 to +3.28, and the values of model ages are close to 2.7 Ga. Gabbro-pegmatites occur at the upper part of the Monchtundra massif and are characterized by negative ENd values from -1.26 up to -0.63, and model ages of protolith range from 3.0 to 3.2 Ga. Isotope-geochemical Sm-Nd (ENd and TDM) data indicate the origining of gabbro massif from EM-1 mantle plume reservoir and this fact is confirmed by the ENd-ISr diagrams in accordance with published data (Bayanova et. al., 2009). The research is conducted with the financial support of RFBR 13-05-00493, OFI-M 13-05-12055, 14-05-93965 and 14-05-00484.

  18. Uranium-lead dating of perovskite from the Afrikanda plutonic complex (Kola Peninsula, Russia) using LA-ICP-MS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reguir, E.; Camacho, A.; Yang, P.; Chakhmouradian, A. R.; Halden, N. M.

    2009-04-01

    Perovskite (CaTiO3) is a common early crystallizing accessory phase in a variety of alkaline rocks, and has been shown to contain enough U and Th for U-Pb dating. U and Pb analysis of perovskite has been primarily carried out using the SHRIMP or ID-TIMS techniques, and the resulting U-Pb dates commonly yield the emplacement age of the host rock. To our knowledge, only one U-Pb study of perovskite has been done using the LA-ICP-MS (Cox and Wilton, 2006). Some of the advantages of this method over the SHRIMP and ID-TIMS techniques include greater speed and lower cost of analysis. In this work, the U-Pb ages of perovskite from the Afrikanda plutonic complex (Russia) were obtained in situ using the LA-ICP-MS. The measured 238U/206Pb and 207Pb/206Pb ratios were corrected for time-dependent mass-bias using the well-calibrated zircon standard GJ-1 (608.5 ± 0.4 Ma; Jackson et al., 2004). On a Tera-Wasserburg diagram (Tera and Wasserburg, 1972) the analyses of perovskite from two magmatic phases (clinopyroxenite and carbonatite) plot in separate clusters. Although the variations in the 238U/206Pb and 207Pb/206Pb ratios within each group are small, there is enough dispersion between the two clusters to obtain a reasonably precise age of 375 ± 13 Ma (2; MSWD = 0.23), which strongly suggests that the carbonatitic rocks are broadly coeval with the clinopyroxenite. The only other isotopic study on the Afrikanda Complex was done on a clinopyroxenite using the Rb-Sr method and yielded a whole rock-mineral (perovskite, biotite, augite and apatite) isochron age of 364.0 ± 3.1 Ma (2; MSWD = 0.72). This age is within error of our U-Pb date, which demonstrates that LA-ICP-MS-based U-Pb dating of perovskite can serve as a reliable geochronological tool. References Cox, R.A. and Wilton, D.H.C. (2006) U-Pb dating of perovskite by LA-ICP-MS: An example from the Oka carbonatite, Quebec, Canada. Chem. Geol., 235, 21-32. Jackson, S.E., Pearson, N.J., Griffin, W.L. and Belousova, E.A. (2004) The application of laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to in situ U-Pb zircon geochronology. Chem. Geol.,211, 47-69. Kramm, U., Kogarko, L.N., Kononova, V.A. and Vartiainen, H. (1993) The Kola alkaline province of the CIS and Finland. Lithos, 30, 33-44. Tera, F. and Wasserburg, G.J. (1972) U-Th-Pb systematics in three Apollo 14 basalts and the problem of initial Pb in lunar rocks. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 14, 281-304.

  19. An overview of CORK borehole observatory microbiology experimentation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orcutt, B. N.; Edwards, K. J.; Haddad, A.; Wheat, C. G.

    2011-12-01

    As CORK borehole observatories evolve in sophistication for measuring subseafloor hydrogeological conditions, they have also been co-opted and redesigned for investigating the microbiology of the subsurface. These observatories are critical for accessing the crustal subsurface, one of the largest habitats for life on Earth. We will provide an overview of the development of novel colonization devices and experimental techniques designed to study the form and function of the crustal deep biosphere, focusing on work conducted on the Juan de Fuca Ridge flank (warm and anoxic) and at the mid-Atlantic ridge system (cool and oxic).

  20. 24-CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Erik C. Westman

    2002-07-01

    This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multi-channel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. Especially important in the design of the array is sensor placement. One issue related to sensor placement is addressed in this report: the method for clamping the sensor once it is emplaced in the borehole. If the sensors (geophones) are not adequately coupled to the surrounding rock mass, the resulting data will be of very poor quality. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.

  1. Water inflow into boreholes during the Stripa heater experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, P.H.; Rachiele, R.; Remer, J.S.; Carlsson, H.

    1981-04-01

    During the operation of three in-situ heater experiments at Stripa, Sweden, groundwater flowed into many of the instrumentation and heater boreholes. These flows were recovered and measured routinely. The records of water inflow indicate two origins: inflow attributed to local hydrological pressure gradients, and water migration from cracks closing under the rapidly increasing, thermal-induced stress changes. The latter component appeared as a main pulse that occurred when the heaters were turned on, and lasted about 30 to 40 days, steadily declining over the next several months, and decreasing sharply when heater power was decreased or stopped. The magnitude of the total inflow per hole ranged over more than five decades, from 0.1 to over 10,000 liters over the 500 to 600 day time periods. When plotted against the logarithm of total volume, the frequency distribution displays a normal curve dependence with a mean of approximately 10 liters. Of this amount, 1 to 2 liters of flow into 38-mm-diam boreholes accompanied an increase in applied heat load. These amounts are compatible with rock porosities of a fraction of one percent. Inflow into the 3.6 and 5.0 kW heater holes peaked within 3 to 6 days after heater turn on, then declined to zero inflow, with no further inflow measured for the remainder of the experiments. In the heater holes of the time-scaled experiment, which operated at 1.125 kW or less, the initial pulse of inflow took much longer to decay, and 7 of 8 heater holes continued to flow throughout the experiment. The packing off and isolation of a borehole some 40 m distant in the ventilation drift dramatically increased the inflow into the heater holes in one of the three heater experiments. This demonstrated the existence of permeable flow paths among a number of boreholes. The records of water inflow demonstrate the need for a thorough understanding of the nature of fluid flow and storage in fractured crystalline rock.

  2. The PBO Borehole Strainmeter Network: Data Availability, Access And Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkinson, Kathleen; Mencin, David; Philips, David; Fox, Otina; Henderson, Brent; Meertens, Charles; Mattioli, Glen

    2013-04-01

    Earthscope is a U.S. NSF funded program designed to provide seismic, GPS, strainmeter, fault core, LiDAR, and InSAR data to the scientific community to research the evolution and structure of the North American continent. The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), operated by UNAVCO, is the geodetic component of the program. PBO consists of over 1100 continuous GPS sites in the western U.S. and Alaska, 6 long baseline laser strainmeters and 75 co-located borehole strainmeters and seismometers distributed in arrays along the western U.S. Pacific-North American plate boundary. In this presentation we describe how UNAVCO makes the borehole data sets available to the community and details the generation of higher-level PBO strainmeter data products. PBO borehole data flow in either real time or with a few hours delay to the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC) and the Northern California Earthquake Data Center (NCEDC) where they are immediately available in SEED format. Archiving the various data sets using the same, well-known format facilitates the integrated analysis of complementary data sets. Processed strain time-series, earth tide models, barometric pressure response coefficients, long-term borehole trends, data quality information and calibration matrices for each strainmeter are generated by UNAVCO and can accessed in XML format from the DMC and NCEDC or, as ASCII files from UNAVCO. Both formats contain the information required to regenerate the processed time-series from the raw data thus meeting an Earthscope goal of repeatability of processed data sets. UNAVCO is guided by the scientific community in determining the best data formats, archiving, access methods and data products to generate. Recommendations for future data products made in an October 2012 workshop hosted by UNAVCO include: a noise assessment of each strainmeter site, development of a physical model for long-term trends in strainmeter data and the release of high-rate processed data in a seismic data format. UNAVCO's goal is to provide researchers not only with a strain time-series but also with the data products and metadata required to meet their research goals and enable scientific discovery.

  3. 24-CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Erik C. Westman

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multichannel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. Especially important in the design of the array is sensor placement. One issue related to sensor placement is addressed in this report: the method for clamping the sensor once it is emplaced in the borehole. If the sensors (geophones) are not adequately coupled to the surrounding rock mass, the resulting data will be of very poor quality. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.

  4. Cross-Borehole Flowmeter Testing to Define Fracture-Flow Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, R. H.; Paillet, F. L.; Williams, J. H.

    2001-12-01

    Although conventional borehole-flow profiles routinely are used to estimate the distribution of hydraulic conductivity along boreholes in heterogeneous formations, these estimates apply only to the immediate vicinity of the borehole. Numerous studies in fractured-rock aquifers demonstrate that fracture-network connectivity is more important than local fracture permeability in determining the hydraulic conductivity of fracture rocks. Cross-borehole flow experiments, where one borehole is stressed by pumping or injection and flow is measured at discrete depth stations in adjacent boreholes, can be used to determine the properties of fracture-flow paths. A fracture-flow model is used to define characteristic type curves for simple classes of fracture connections. One of the main problems in carrying out such experiments is the potential for non-unique solutions, where a given flow response in an observation borehole can be attributed to two different kinds of fracture connections. This ambiguity is greatly reduced by stressing a borehole that is connected to a single permeable fracture, or by pumping from a borehole where individual fractures are isolated with straddle packers. Once a measured flow response is found to match a given type curve, the interval-integrated hydraulic conductivity (transmissivity) derived from previous single-borehole-flowmeter tests is used for an initial estimate, and the value of fracture-segment storage coefficient is adjusted until model predictions match measured flow. This form of type-curve analysis can be used to identify fractures that are connected in series or parallel and to discover cross-connections between fracture zones that are not otherwise indicated by the data. Examples of the application of the cross-borehole flow logging technique in fracture zone characterization are given for study sites in Maine, New Hampshire, and New York.

  5. Characterization plan for the immobilized low-activity waste borehole

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, S.P.; Reynolds, K.D.

    1998-03-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site has the most diverse and largest amounts of radioactive tank waste in the US. High-level radioactive waste has been stored at Hanford in large underground tanks since 1944. Approximately 209,000 m{sup 3} (54 Mgal) of waste are currently stored in 177 tanks. Vitrification and onsite disposal of low activity tank waste (LAW) are embodied in the strategy described in the Tri-Party Agreement. The tank waste is to be retrieved, separated into low- and high-level fractions, and then immobilized by private vendors. The DOE will receive the vitrified waste from private vendors and dispose of the low-activity fraction in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. The Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Complex (ILAWDC) is part of the disposal complex. This report is a plan to drill the first characterization borehole and collect data at the ILAWDC. This plan updates and revises the deep borehole portion of the characterization plan for the ILAWDC by Reidel and others (1995). It describes data collection activities for determining the physical and chemical properties of the vadose zone and the saturated zone at and in the immediate vicinity of the proposed ILAWDC. These properties then will be used to develop a conceptual geohydrologic model of the ILAWDC site in support of the Hanford ILAW Performance Assessment.

  6. Interim reclamation report, Basalt Waste Isolation project: Boreholes, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.

    1990-03-01

    In 1968, a program was started to assess the feasibility of storing Hanford Site defense waste in deep caverns constructed in basalt. This program was expanded in 1976 to include investigations of the Hanford Site as a potential location for a mined commercial nuclear waste repository. An extensive site characterization program was begun to determine the feasibility of using the basalts beneath the Hanford Site for the repository. Site research focused primarily on determining the direction and speed of groundwater movement, the uniformity of basalt layers, and tectonic stability. Some 98 boreholes were sited, drilled, deepened, or modified by BWIP between 1977 and 1988 to test the geologic properties of the Site. On December 22, 1987, President Reagan signed into law the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, which effectively stopped all repository-related activities except reclamation of disturbed lands at the Hanford Site. This report describes the development of the reclamation program for the BWIP boreholes, its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation program is to return sites disturbed by the repository program as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native plant species. 48 refs., 28 figs., 14 tabs.

  7. Stability of boreholes drilled through salt formations displaying plastic behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Infante, E.F.; Chenevert, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical and laboratory analysis which provides solutions to the problem of plastic flow of salt formations into wellbores. Depending on well conditions, this paper predicts how the salt will flow and what type of mud might be used to control such flow. In the mathematical analysis it is assumed that the incipience of plasticity in the formation is regulated by the level of octahedral shear stress and that the formation is neither permeable nor porous, but homogeneous and isotropic. The stress distribution in the neighborhood of the borehole is studied, and conditions under which this distribution is elastic, elastoplastic, or plastic are determined. Equations are derived that, in terms of two constants of the formation material, yield the limit of elasticity, the radius of the plastic front, and the percent of the borehole diameter shrinkage as a function of mud weight used. This study was prompted by past failures in drilling through the Louann Salt formation at depths of 12,500 to 14,000 feet, a formation which exhibits rapid plastic flow at low mud weights and at the temperatures and pressures encountered. The techniques presented in this paper were applied to subsequent drilling of this salt section and the zone was penetrated without experiencing the problem of plastic flow.

  8. Development of a borehole directional antenna at VHF

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, H.T.; Scott, L.

    1984-03-01

    The feasibility of constructing a directional VHF (30 MH/sub z/ to 300 MH/sub z/) antenna to physically fit into a small borehole is investigated. The study was carried out in a test chamber containing a 15 cm diameter borehole surrounded by sand which can be moistened with water or brine to adjust the dielectric constant and electrical conductivity. Electric field measurements were made for an eccentrically positioned monopole, a corner reflector and a two-element array for a number of possible configurations. Using an eccentric monopole, the best beamwidth obtained was 78/sup 0/ and the front-to-back ratio was 3.5 db. The front-to-back ratio was increased to 8.5 db when two element arrays were arranged in such a way as to provide the optimum radiation pattern. However, the best results were achieved using a corner reflector: 60/sup 0/ beamwidth and 13 db front-to-back ratio. It is concluded that a directional VHF antenna can be designed for downhole application.

  9. Resolving the Younger Dryas Event Through Borehole Thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, John Francis

    One of the most striking features of the ice core records from Greenland is a sudden drop in oxygen isotope values (delta O-18) between approximately 11,500 and 10,700 years ago. This Younger Dryas event was an intense return to ice age conditions during a time of general de-glaciation. As recorded in the ice cores, temperatures in Greenland cooled by roughly seven degrees Kelvin. W. Broecker and R. Fairbanks have proposed competing explanations for the cooling and cause of this "aborted ice age." One supposes that the seven degree cooling is real and results from a shutdown in the North Atlantic ocean circulation; the other, that it is largely fictitious and records an intrusion of isotopically light glacial meltwater into the ice core records. Using optimal control methods and heat flow modelling, the author makes a valiant but ultimately futile attempt to distinguish the Younger Dryas event in the ice sheet temperatures measured at Dye 3, South Greenland. The author discusses the prospects for attempting the same in the new Summit boreholes in Central Greenland: how that will require more accurate temperature measurements, a coupled thermo-mechanical model, and a refined uncertainty analysis. He concludes by discussing how borehole temperature analysis may improve the climate histories determined from ice cores.

  10. Reversible rigid coupling apparatus and method for borehole seismic transducers

    DOEpatents

    Owen, Thomas E. (Helotes, TX); Parra, Jorge O. (Helotes, TX)

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method of high resolution reverse vertical seismic profile (VSP) measurements is shown. By encapsulating the seismic detector and heaters in a meltable substance (such as wax), the seismic detector can be removably secured in a borehole in a manner capable of measuring high resolution signals in the 100 to 1000 hertz range and higher. The meltable substance is selected to match the overall density of the detector package with the underground formation, yet still have relatively low melting point and rigid enough to transmit vibrations to accelerometers in the seismic detector. To minimize voids in the meltable substance upon solidification, the meltable substance is selected for minimum shrinkage, yet still having the other desirable characteristics. Heaters are arranged in the meltable substance in such a manner to allow the lowermost portion of the meltable substance to cool and solidify first. Solidification continues upwards from bottom-to-top until the top of the meltable substance is solidified and the seismic detector is ready for use. To remove, the heaters melt the meltable substance and the detector package is pulled from the borehole.

  11. Experimental assessment of borehole wall drilling damage in basaltic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fuenkajorn, K.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1986-06-01

    Ring tension tests, permeability tests, and microscopic fracture studies have been performed to investigate the borehole damage induced at low confining pressure by three drilling techniques (diamond, percussion and rotary). Specimens are drilled with three hole sizes (38, 76, and 102 mm diameter) in Pomona basalt and Grande basaltic andesite. The damaged zone is characterized in terms of fractures and fracture patterns around the hole, and in terms of tensile strength reduction of the rock around the holes. Experimental results show that the thickness of the damaged zone around the hole ranges from 0.0 to 1.7 mm. A larger drill bit induces more wall damage than does a smaller one. Different drilling techniques show different damage characteristics (intensity and distribution). Damage characteristics are governed not only by drilling parameters (bit size, weight on bit, rotational speed, diamond radius, and energy), but also by properties of the rock. The weaker rock tends to show more intense damage than does the stronger one. Cracks within grains or cleavage fractures are predominant in slightly coarser grained rock (larger than 0.5 mm grain size) while intergranular cracks are predominant in very fine grained rock (smaller than 0.01 mm grain size). The damaged zones play no significant role in the flow path around a borehole plug.

  12. Sealing of boreholes using natural, compatible materials: Granular salt

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.E.; Zeuch, D.H.; Stormont, J.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Daemen, J.J.K. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    1994-05-01

    Granular salt can be used to construct high performance permanent seals in boreholes which penetrate rock salt formations. These seals are described as seal systems comprised of the host rock, the seal material, and the seal rock interface. The performance of these seal systems is defined by the complex interactions between these seal system components through time. The interactions are largely driven by the creep of the host formation applying boundary stress on the seal forcing host rock permeability with time. The immediate permeability of these seals is dependent on the emplaced density. Laboratory test results suggest that careful emplacement techniques could results in immediate seal system permeability on the order of 10{sup {minus}16} m{sup 2} to 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2} (10{sup {minus}4} darcy to 10{sup {minus}6}). The visco-plastic behavior of the host rock coupled with the granular salts ability to ``heal`` or consolidate make granular salt an ideal sealing material for boreholes whose permanent sealing is required.

  13. Simple, Affordable and Sustainable Borehole Observatories for Complex Monitoring Objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, A.; Hammerschmidt, S.; Davis, E.; Saffer, D.; Wheat, G.; LaBonte, A.; Meldrum, R.; Heesemann, M.; Villinger, H.; Freudenthal, T.; Ratmeyer, V.; Renken, J.; Bergenthal, M.; Wefer, G.

    2012-04-01

    Around 20 years ago, the scientific community started to use borehole observatories, so-called CORKs or Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kits, which are installed inside submarine boreholes, and which allow the re-establishment and monitoring of in situ conditions. From the first CORKs which allowed only rudimentary fluid pressure and temperature measurements, the instruments evolved to multi-functional and multi-level subseafloor laboratories, including, for example, long-term fluid sampling devices, in situ microbiological experiments or strainmeter. Nonetheless, most boreholes are still left uninstrumented, which is a major loss for the scientific community. In-stallation of CORKs usually requires a drillship and subsequent ROV assignments for data download and instru-ment maintenance, which is a major logistic and financial effort. Moreover, the increasing complexity of the CORK systems increased not only the expenses but led also to longer installation times and a higher sensitivity of the in-struments to environmental constraints. Here, we present three types of Mini-CORKs, which evolved back to more simple systems yet providing a wide range of possible in situ measurements. As a regional example the Nankai Trough is chosen, where repeated subduction thrust earthquakes with M8+ occurred. The area has been investigated by several drilling campaigns of the DSDP, ODP and IODP, where boreholes were already instrumented by different CORKs. Unfortunately, some of the more complex systems showed incomplete functionality, and moreover, the increased ship time forced IODP to rely on third party funds for the observatories. Consequently, the need for more affordable CORKs arose, which may be satisfied by the systems presented here. The first type, the so-called SmartPlug, provides two pressure transducers and four temperature sensors, and monitors a hydrostatic reference section and an isolated zone of interest. It was already installed at the Nankai Trough accretionary prism during IODP Exp. 319 and successfully recovered during IODP Exp. 332, both cruises being part of NanTroSEIZE (Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment). The 15-months long data showed transients related to the arrival of seismic waves, storms and can further be used for detection of seismogenic strain events. Moreover, based on tidal signals in the pressure data, it was possible to make assumptions regarding the elastic properties of the surrounding formation. The SmartPlug was exchanged by an enhanced version, the GeniusPlug, which provides additional fluid sampling devices and microbiological experiments during the monitoring period. Its recovery is planned for 2013. Going one step further in simplicity, a Mini-CORK has recently developed especially designed for the portable seafloor drill rig MeBo (MARUM, Univ. Bremen, Germany), which can be installed without a drillship and which, due to its telemetric unit, makes costly recovery operations obsolete. The MeBo can be operated from any re-search vessel and allows coring to a depth of 70 m, which may be followed by instrumentation of the borehole with the MeBo-CORK. Two designs are available: the first design allows in situ measurement of pressure and temperature solely, whereas the second design consists of a seafloor unit including additional mission specific sensors (osmo-samlers for geochemistry and microbiology, etc.). A first field test for the MeBo-CORKs into mud volcanoes in the Kumano forearc basin is envisaged for summer 2012 to complement IODP project NanTroSEIZE.

  14. Climate change on the Colorado Plateau of eastern Utah inferred from borehole temperatures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert N. Harris; David S. Chapman

    1995-01-01

    Temperature profiles from boreholes on the Colorado Plateau of southeastern Utah have been examined for evidence of climate change. Because these boreholes penetrate layered sedimentary rocks with different thermal conductivities, Bullard plots (temperature versus integrated thermal resistance) are used to estimate background heat flow and surface temperature intercepts. Reduced temperatures, which represent departures from a constant heat flow condition, are

  15. Borehole Miner - Extendible Nozzle Development for Radioactive Waste Dislodging and Retrieval from Underground Storage Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    CW Enderlin; DG Alberts; JA Bamberger; M White

    1998-09-25

    This report summarizes development of borehole-miner extendible-nozzle water-jetting technology for dislodging and retrieving salt cake, sludge} and supernate to remediate underground storage tanks full of radioactive waste. The extendible-nozzle development was based on commercial borehole-miner technology.

  16. Effect of multiple and delayed jet impact and penetration on concrete target borehole diameter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M J Murphy; D W Baum; R M Kuklo; S C Simonson

    2001-01-01

    The effect of multiple and delayed jet impact and penetration on the borehole diameter in concrete targets is discussed in this paper. A first-order principle of shaped-charge jet penetration is that target hole volume is proportional to the energy deposited in the target by the jet. This principle is the basis for the relation that target borehole diameter at any

  17. Borehole Flow and Contaminant Distribution in Sedimentary-Bedrock Recharge Areas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Williams

    2005-01-01

    Borehole flow and contaminant distribution has been investigated at a series of VOC-impacted sites in New York, New Jersey, and California that are recharge areas for sandstone, mudstone, and carbonate-bedrock aquifers. At the investigated sites, downward flow occurs through open boreholes that intersect shallow and deep fracture zones having differing hydraulic heads. Detected flows span the dynamic measurement range of

  18. Strengthening borehole configuration from the retaining roadway for greenhouse gas reduction: a case study.

    PubMed

    Xue, Fei; Zhang, Nong; Feng, Xiaowei; Zheng, Xigui; Kan, Jiaguang

    2015-01-01

    A monitoring trial was carried out to investigate the effect of boreholes configuration on the stability and gas production rate. These boreholes were drilled from the retaining roadway at longwall mining panel 1111(1) of the Zhuji Coalmine, in China. A borehole camera exploration device and multiple gas parameter measuring device were adopted to monitor the stability and gas production rate. Research results show that boreholes 1~8 with low intensity and thin casing thickness were broken at the depth of 5~10 m along the casing and with a distance of 2~14 m behind the coal face, while boreholes 9~11 with a special thick-walled high-strength oil casing did not fracture during the whole extraction period. The gas extraction volume is closely related to the boreholes stability. After the stability of boreholes 9~11 being improved, the average gas flow rate increased dramatically 16-fold from 0.13 to 2.21 m3/min, and the maximum gas flow rate reached 4.9 m3/min. Strengthening boreholes configuration is demonstrated to be a good option to improve gas extraction effect. These findings can make a significant contribution to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from the coal mining industry. PMID:25633368

  19. Influence of leaky boreholes on cross-formational groundwater flow and contaminant transport

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Lacombe; E. A. Sudicky; S. K. Frape; A. J. A. Unger

    1995-01-01

    Abandoned and improperly sealed boreholes, monitoring wells, and water supply wells are common features at many contaminated sites. These features can act as conduits that transmit contaminants between aquifers separated by otherwise continuous aquitards. In this work the leaky boreholes are represented as highly conductive one-dimensional line elements superimposed onto a mesh of three-dimensional finite elements representing the porous medium.

  20. Analysis of noncircular fluid-filled boreholes in elastic formations using a perturbation model

    E-print Network

    Simsek, Ergun

    Analysis of noncircular fluid-filled boreholes in elastic formations using a perturbation model a perturbation model to obtain flexural mode dispersions of noncircular fluid-filled boreholes in homogeneous elastic formations. The perturbation model is based on Hamilton's principle with a modified procedure

  1. Immobilized low-activity waste site borehole 299-E17-21

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, S.P.; Reynolds, K.D.; Horton, D.G.

    1998-08-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is the group at the Hanford Site responsible for the safe underground storage of liquid waste from previous Hanford Site operations, the storage and disposal of immobilized tank waste, and closure of underground tanks. The current plan is to dispose of immobilized low-activity tank waste (ILAW) in new facilities in the southcentral part of 200-East Area and in four existing vaults along the east side of 200-East Area. Boreholes 299-E17-21, B8501, and B8502 were drilled at the southwest corner of the ILAW site in support of the Performance Assessment activities for the disposal options. This report summarizes the initial geologic findings, field tests conducted on those boreholes, and ongoing studies. One deep (480 feet) borehole and two shallow (50 feet) boreholes were drilled at the southwest corner of the ILAW site. The primary factor dictating the location of the boreholes was their characterization function with respect to developing the geohydrologic model for the site and satisfying associated Data Quality Objectives. The deep borehole was drilled to characterize subsurface conditions beneath the ILAW site, and two shallow boreholes were drilled to support an ongoing environmental tracer study. The tracer study will supply information to the Performance Assessment. All the boreholes provide data on the vadose zone and saturated zone in a previously uncharacterized area.

  2. Results of an accelerated borehole closure testing program at Avery Island, Louisiana

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stickney

    1987-01-01

    This report presents the results of an accelerated borehole closure testing program conducted in the test facility in the Avery Island salt mine. The accelerated borehole closure tests provided data on the thermomechanical response of domal salt when subjected to conditions similar to those expected in a high-level nuclear waste repository. The objective is to aid numerical methods used to

  3. Results of an accelerated borehole closure testing program at Avery Island: Topical report RSI-0211

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stickney

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the results of an accelerated borehole closure testing program conducted in the ONWI test facility in the Avery Island salt mine. The accelerated borehole closure tests were a part of a field testing program at Avery Island to provide data on the thermomechanical response of domal salt when subjected to conditions similar to those expected in a

  4. Seismoelectric waves in a borehole excited by an external explosive source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiu-Guang; Cui, Zhi-Wen; Lü, Wei-Guo; Zhang, Yu-Jun; Wang, Ke-Xie

    2014-01-01

    The conversion of energy between seismic and electromagnetic wave fields has been described by Pride's coupled equations in porous media. In this paper, the seismoelectric field excited by the explosive point source located at the outside of the borehole is studied. The scattering fields inside and outside a borehole are analyzed and deduced under the boundary conditions at the interface between fluid and porous media. The influences of the distance of the point source, multipole components of the eccentric explosive source, and the receiving position along the axis of vertical borehole, on the converted waves inside the borehole are all investigated. When the distance from the acoustic source to the axis of a borehole is far enough, the longitudinal and coseismic longitudinal wave packets dominate the acoustic and electric field, respectively. The three components of both electric field and magnetic field can be detected, and the radial electric field is mainly excited and converted by the dipole component. Owing to the existence of borehole, the electric fields and magnetic fields in the borehole are azimuthal. The distance from the point where the maximum amplitude of the axial components of electric field is recorded, to the origin of coordinate indicates the horizontal distance from the explosive source to the axis of vertical borehole.

  5. Strengthening Borehole Configuration from the Retaining Roadway for Greenhouse Gas Reduction: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Fei; Zhang, Nong; Feng, Xiaowei; Zheng, Xigui; Kan, Jiaguang

    2015-01-01

    A monitoring trial was carried out to investigate the effect of boreholes configuration on the stability and gas production rate. These boreholes were drilled from the retaining roadway at longwall mining panel 1111(1) of the Zhuji Coalmine, in China. A borehole camera exploration device and multiple gas parameter measuring device were adopted to monitor the stability and gas production rate. Research results show that boreholes 1~8 with low intensity and thin casing thickness were broken at the depth of 5~10 m along the casing and with a distance of 2~14 m behind the coal face, while boreholes 9~11 with a special thick-walled high-strength oil casing did not fracture during the whole extraction period. The gas extraction volume is closely related to the boreholes stability. After the stability of boreholes 9~11 being improved, the average gas flow rate increased dramatically 16-fold from 0.13 to 2.21 m3/min, and the maximum gas flow rate reached 4.9 m3/min. Strengthening boreholes configuration is demonstrated to be a good option to improve gas extraction effect. These findings can make a significant contribution to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from the coal mining industry. PMID:25633368

  6. Device and method for imaging of non-linear and linear properties of formations surrounding a borehole

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Paul A; Tencate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Guyer, Robert; Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher

    2013-10-08

    In some aspects of the disclosure, a method and an apparatus is disclosed for investigating material surrounding the borehole. The method includes generating within a borehole an intermittent low frequency vibration that propagates as a tube wave longitudinally to the borehole and induces a nonlinear response in one or more features in the material that are substantially perpendicular to a longitudinal axis of the borehole; generating within the borehole a sequence of high frequency pulses directed such that they travel longitudinally to the borehole within the surrounding material; and receiving, at one or more receivers positionable in the borehole, a signal that includes components from the low frequency vibration and the sequence of high frequency pulses during intermittent generation of the low frequency vibration, to investigate the material surrounding the borehole.

  7. Borehole Geologic Data for the 216-Z Crib Facilities, A Status of Data Assembled through the Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Last, George V.; Mackley, Rob D.; Lanigan, David C.

    2006-09-25

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is assembling existing borehole geologic information to aid in determining the distribution and potential movement of contaminants released to the environment and to aid selection of remedial alternatives. This information is being assembled via the Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS), which is being developed as part of the Characterization of Systems Project, managed by PNNL, and the Remediation Decision Support Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project, managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc. The purpose of this particular study was to assemble the existing borehole geologic data pertaining to sediments underlying the 216-Z Crib Facilities and the Plutonium Finishing Plant Closure Zone. The primary objective for Fiscal Year 2006 was to assemble the data, complete log plots, and interpret the location of major geologic contacts for each major borehole in and around the primary disposal facilities that received carbon tetrachloride. To date, 154 boreholes located within or immediately adjacent to 19 of the 216-Z crib facilities have been incorporated into HBGIS. Borehole geologic information for the remaining three Z-crib facilities is either lacking (e.g. 216-Z-13, -14, and -15), or has been identified as a lesser priority to be incorporated at a later date.

  8. Site characterization data from the Area 5 science boreholes, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Blout, D.O.; Hammermeister, P.; Zukosky, K.A.

    1995-02-01

    The Science Borehole Project consists of eight boreholes that were drilled (from 45.7 m [150 ft] to 83.8 m [275 ft] depth) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, on behalf of the US Department of Energy. These boreholes are part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program developed to meet data needs associated with regulatory requirements applicable to the disposal of low-level and mixed waste at this site. This series of boreholes was specifically designed to characterize parameters controlling near-surface gas transport and to monitor changes in these and liquid flow-related parameters over time. These boreholes are located along the four sides of the approximately 2.6-km{sup 2} (1-mi{sup 2}) Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site to provide reasonable spatial coverage for sampling and characterization. Laboratory testing results of samples taken from core and drill cuttings are reported.

  9. Low-frequency radiation from point sources in a fluid-filled borehole.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    Far-field displacement fields have been derived for an impulsive point force acting on a fluid-filled borehole wall under the assumption that the borehole diameter is small compared to the wavelength involved. The displacements due to an arbitrary source can be computed easily by combining the solutions for the impulsive sources. In general, the borehole source generates not only longitudinal and vertically polarized shear waves, but also horizontally polarized shear waves. This study also indicates that only the axisymmetric motion around the borehole due to normal stress is affected by the fluid in the borehole. In the long-wavelength limit, the presence of the fluid does not affect the radiation from tangential sources into the surrounding medium. -Author

  10. Imaging an Orebody Ahead of Mining Using Borehole Radar at the Snap Lake Diamond Mine, Northwest Territories, Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C Kemp; K Smith; A Bray; I Mason; T Sindle

    2009-01-01

    Borehole radar is a proven geophysical technology that can be used to map an orebody ahead of mining. This paper will present a case study, where borehole radar is being used within the mining cycle to map out orebody blocks, both as a strategic and tactical tool. Refined equipment and procedures now enables a slimline borehole radar tool to be

  11. Hydrogeologic Characterization of Fractured Crystalline Bedrock on the Southern Part of Manhattan, New York, Using Advanced Borehole Geophysical Methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Stumm; A. Chu; P. K. Joesten

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Advanced borehole-geophysical methods were used to assess the hydrogeology of fractured crystalline bedrock in 31 of 64 boreholes on the southern part of Manhattan Island, N.Y. The majority of boreholes penetrated gneiss, schist, and other crystalline bedrock, and had an average depth of 591 ft (180 m) below land surface (BLS). In this study we use a combination of

  12. Short time-step performances of coaxial and double U-tube borehole heat exchangers: Modeling and measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angelo Zarrella; Massimiliano Scarpa; Michele De Carli

    2011-01-01

    Several authors have investigated the long time-step performance of borehole heat exchangers. In that time scale, the borehole thermal capacitance is generally neglected, since the time span of interest is on the order of months or years. The borehole thermal capacitance consists both of grouting material and heat carrier fluid, and it mostly affects the short time-step behavior, when hourly

  13. Analysis of Borehole-Radar Reflection Data from Machiasport, Maine, December 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Carole D.; Joesten, Peter K.

    2005-01-01

    In December 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, collected borehole-radar reflection logs in two boreholes in Machiasport, Maine. These bedrock boreholes were drilled as part of a hydrogeologic investigation of the area surrounding the former Air Force Radar Tracking Station site on Howard Mountain near Bucks Harbor. The boreholes, MW09 and MW10, are located approximately 50 meters (m) from, and at the site of, respectively, the locations of former buildings where trichloroethylene was used as part of defense-site operations. These areas are thought to be potential source areas for contamination that has been detected in downgradient bedrock wells. This investigation focused on testing borehole-radar methods at this site. Single-hole radar-reflection surveys were used to identify the depth, orientation, and spatial continuity of reflectors that intersect and surround the boreholes. In addition, the methods were used to (1) identify the radial depth of penetration of the radar waves in the electrically resistive bimodal volcanic formation at the site, (2) provide information for locating additional boreholes at the site, and (3) test the potential applications of borehole-radar methods for further aquifer characterization and (or) evaluation of source-area remediation efforts. Borehole-radar reflection logging uses a pair of downhole transmitting and receiving antennas to record the reflected wave amplitude and transit time of high-frequency electromagnetic waves. For this investigation, 60- and 100-megahertz antennas were used. The electromagnetic waves emitted by the transmitter penetrate into the formation surrounding the borehole and are reflected off of a material with different electromagnetic properties, such as a fracture or change in rock type. Single-hole directional radar surveys indicate the bedrock surrounding these boreholes is highly fractured, because several reflectors were identified in the radar-reflection data. There are several steeply dipping reflectors with orientations similar to the fracture patterns observed with borehole imaging techniques and in outcrops. The radar-reflection data showed that the vitrophyre in borehole MW09 was more highly fractured than the underlying gabbroic unit. The velocities of radar waves in the bedrock surrounding the boreholes were determined using single-hole vertical radar profiling. Velocities of 114 and 125 meters per microsecond were used to determine the distance to reflectors, the radial depth of penetration, and the dip of reflectors. The bimodal volcanic units appear to be ideal for radar-wave propagation. For the radar surveys collected at this site, radar reflections were detected up to 40 m into the rock from the borehole. These results indicate that boreholes could conservatively be spaced about 15-20 m apart for hole-to-hole radar methods to be effective for imaging between the boreholes and monitoring remediation. Integrated analysis of drilling and borehole-geophysical logs indicates the vitrophyric formation is more fractured than the more mafic gabbroic units in these boreholes. There does not, however, appear to be a quantifiable difference in the radar-wave penetration in these two rock units.

  14. Fiber optic DTS in sealed and heated boreholes for active groundwater flow characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Thomas; Parker, Beth; Cherry, John; Mondanos, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, advances in technology have allowed temperature profiling to evolve to offer new insight into fractured rock hydrogeology. Temperature profiles in open boreholes within fractured rock have long been used to identify and characterize flow in the rock formation and/or in the borehole. An advance in temperature logging makes use of precision temperature profiles collected using wireline trolling methods in a heated borehole to identify fractures with active groundwater flow by creating a thermal disequilibrium and monitoring the temperature response. A second development is based on collecting wireline temperature profiles within a sealed borehole to eliminate short circuiting effects caused by the open borehole conduit. The borehole is temporarily sealed with a flexible impervious fabric liner so that the water column in the borehole is static and cross-connection is eliminated. Though highly precise temperature and spatial measurements are possible using these techniques, the temporal resolution is limited by the rate at which the wireline probe can be raised and lowered in the borehole. There is a need to measure temperature profiles continuously over time to characterize transient processes. Fibre optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) is a technique that allows for collecting temperature profiles continuously. This tool was advanced by the oil and gas industry for collecting temperature data in multi kilometer deep boreholes over relatively coarse measurement scales. In contrast, very fine spatial and temperature resolutions are needed for freshwater contaminant fractured rock hydrogeology where the scale of interest is much more acute. Recent advances in the spatial, temperature, and temporal resolution of DTS systems allow this technology to be adapted well to the shallow subsurface environment. This project demonstrates the first application of DTS used in conjunction with flexible borehole liners in a heated borehole environment. The integration of DTS, active heating, and lined boreholes was tested in the context of fractured rock site characterization. DTS heat pulse tests were carried out in two boreholes located at a well characterized research site in Guelph, ON, Canada. The capabilities for long-term and high temporal resolution site monitoring and characterization from the developed methods were assessed. The results of this technique are promising and indicate evidence for identifying active groundwater flow. Advancements to the DTS heat pulse method are possible to offer further improved insight into natural groundwater flow systems.

  15. Completion summary for borehole USGS 136 near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twining, Brian V.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Hodges, Mary K.V.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, cored and completed borehole USGS 136 for stratigraphic framework analyses and long-term groundwater monitoring of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Laboratory. The borehole was initially cored to a depth of 1,048 feet (ft) below land surface (BLS) to collect core, open-borehole water samples, and geophysical data. After these data were collected, borehole USGS 136 was cemented and backfilled between 560 and 1,048 ft BLS. The final construction of borehole USGS 136 required that the borehole be reamed to allow for installation of 6-inch (in.) diameter carbon-steel casing and 5-in. diameter stainless-steel screen; the screened monitoring interval was completed between 500 and 551 ft BLS. A dedicated pump and water-level access line were placed to allow for aquifer testing, for collecting periodic water samples, and for measuring water levels. Geophysical and borehole video logs were collected after coring and after the completion of the monitor well. Geophysical logs were examined in conjunction with the borehole core to describe borehole lithology and to identify primary flow paths for groundwater, which occur in intervals of fractured and vesicular basalt. A single-well aquifer test was used to define hydraulic characteristics for borehole USGS 136 in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. Specific-capacity, transmissivity, and hydraulic conductivity from the aquifer test were at least 975 gallons per minute per foot, 1.4 × 105 feet squared per day (ft2/d), and 254 feet per day, respectively. The amount of measureable drawdown during the aquifer test was about 0.02 ft. The transmissivity for borehole USGS 136 was in the range of values determined from previous aquifer tests conducted in other wells near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex: 9.5 × 103 to 1.9 × 105 ft2/d. Water samples were analyzed for cations, anions, metals, nutrients, total organic carbon, volatile organic compounds, stable isotopes, and radionuclides. Water samples from borehole USGS 136 indicated that concentrations of tritium, sulfate, and chromium were affected by wastewater disposal practices at the Advanced Test Reactor Complex. Depth-discrete groundwater samples were collected in the open borehole USGS 136 near 965, 710, and 573 ft BLS using a thief sampler; on the basis of selected constituents, deeper groundwater samples showed no influence from wastewater disposal at the Advanced Test Reactor Complex.

  16. Probe for temperature logging of deep cold boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangirolami, M.; Cavagnero, G.; Rossi, A.

    2003-04-01

    A new probe has been developed for measuring some physical parameters in deep cold boreholes such as those of the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica (EPICA), which is targeted to drill two holes through the ice sheet down to the bedrock at DOME C and at Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica. The probe is operative in the temperature range 0 to -60^oC and for pressures up to 35 MPa, down to 3500 m depth and in the presence of aggressive fluid filling. The probe is equipped with : 1) a set of four thermometers. Three are fitted in the expandable arms of the probe, to log the temperature of the ice-wall. The fourth thermometer is fitted into a static arm in a central position, between the previous three, and logs the temperature of the borehole fluid, for comparison. Thermistor-type sensors have been selected, with a resolution of 2 mK in the interval near 0^oC. During laboratory tests a time constant of 2.7 s was obtained for the thermal sensors fitted in their protective case. After final assemblage of the probe the sensors were calibrated in the laboratory against a standard precision thermometer, over the range 0 to -60^oC; 2) a sensor for differential measurement of the pressure of the liquid column of the drill fluid, with a resolution of a few 10-6 MPa, sufficient to detect any convective cells, induced by the dishomogeneous composition of the mixing fluids; 3) a manometer (strain gauge) for measuring the hydrostatic pressure of the fluid column in the full range 0 to 35 MPa, from the surface to bottom hole, with a resolution better than 0.001 of the full range; 4) a vertical depth meter for direct measurement of depth on the wall of the borehole, to eliminate any uncertainties caused by variations in the length of the electro-mechanical drilling wire due to the fatigue and strain of drilling operations. The progressive depths are measured by a wheel counter and encoder on the upper arms of the probe, with an expected resolution better than 10-3; 5) a caliper device, fitted into the upper arms of the probe, to measure the diameter of the bore-hole, with a resolution of 0.1 mm. The signals from these sensors are processed by a microprocessor-based electronic device set up into the probe. In order to improve the measurement accuracy, the electronics package is enclosed into a thermostatic case. The signals are amplified and A/D converted. The data are transmitted by modem through the drilling wire to the computer at wellhead. The system is fitted with an external software to communicate with the probe, on a PC platform.

  17. Numerical modeling of radionuclide migration through a borehole disposal site.

    PubMed

    Yeboah, Serwaa; Akiti, Thomas T; Fletcher, John J

    2014-01-01

    The migration of radionuclides from a borehole repository located about 20 km from the Akwapim fault line which lies in an area of high seismicity was analyzed for some selected radionuclides. In the event of a seismic activity, fractures and faults could be rejuvenated or initiated resulting in container failure leading to the release of radionuclides. A numerical model was solved using a two-dimensional finite element code (Comsol Multiphysics) by taking into account the effect of heterogeneities. Results showed that, the fractured medium created preferential pathways indicating that, fault zones generated potential paths for released radionuclides from a radioactive waste repository. The results obtained showed that variations in hydraulic conductivity as a result of the heterogeneity considered within the domain significantly affected the direction of flow. PMID:24790811

  18. Borehole-to-tunnel seismic measurements for monitoring radioactive waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manukyan, Edgar; Maurer, Hansruedi; Marelli, Stefano; Greenhalgh, Stewart A.; Green, Alan A.

    2010-05-01

    Countries worldwide are seeking solutions for the permanent removal of high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) from the environment. A critical aspect of the disposal process is the need to be confident that the deposited waste is safely isolated from the biosphere. Seismic monitoring represents a potentially powerful option for non-intrusive monitoring. We conducted a series of seismic experiments in the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory, where a 1-m-diameter microtunnel simulates a HLRW repository downsized by a factor of ~2.5. The host rock at the laboratory is Opalinus clay. We had access to two water-filled boreholes, each approximately 25 m long (diameter 85 mm), with one inclined upwards and the other downwards. Both were oriented perpendicular to the microtunnel axis. Seismic signals were generated in the down-dipping borehole with a high frequency P-wave sparker source every 25 cm and received every 25 cm in the upward-dipping borehole on a multi-channel hydrophone chain. Additionally, the seismic waves were recorded on eight (100 Hz natural frequency) vertical-component geophones, mounted and distributed around the circumference of the microtunnel wall within the plane of the boreholes. The experiment was repeated with different material filling the microtunnel and under different physical conditions. So far, six experiments have been performed when the microtunnel was: a. air-filled with a dry excavation damage zone (EDZ), b. dry sand-filled with a dry EDZ, c. 50 % water-saturated sand-filled with partially water-saturated EDZ (experiments were conducted immediately after half water-saturation), d. water-saturated sand-filled with partially water-saturated EDZ (immediately after full water-saturation), e. water-saturated sand-filled with water-saturated EDZ (water was in the microtunnel for about 9.5 months), and f. water-saturated sand-filled and pressurized to 6 bars with water-saturated EDZ. The results of our seismic experiments yield several important conclusions. 1) Travel time inversion of cross-hole data is not able to detect the microtunnel. This is due to the small size and central location of the microtunnel. Consequently, waveform inversions need to be performed. 2) The geophone recordings around the periphery of the tunnel are strongly affected by changes within the microtunnel. For example, between the individual experiments there are changes in the polarity of the first arriving waves for some of the geophones. This is because the recorded wavefield is a superposition of two waves. One wave passes directly through the microtunnel and is, therefore, influenced by the fill material. The other wave is diffracted around the microtunnel and is thus influenced primarily by the EDZ. The first wave to arrive depends on the geophone location (top, bottom, side of tunnel) as well as the state of the microtunnel and its EDZ. 3) Water infiltration changes the elastic properties of the microtunnel very rapidly. Repeated shots within 30-40 minutes intervals show significant waveform changes for some of the geophones during experiments (c) and (d). 4) Water infiltration changes the coupling conditions of the geophones significantly. For experiment (d), the frequency content on some geophone traces decreases significantly, and there is a remarkable increase of higher frequencies for experiments (e) and (f). This is due to the clay-water interaction, which first weakens the clay and thus loosens the geophone anchorage. Later, the water penetrating into the EDZ leads to swelling of the clay, which firmly fixes the geophones. 5) Analyses of the geophones installed within the microtunnel allow elastic properties of the EDZ to be delineated. A simple analysis of the first-arrival traveltimes allows us to determine a relationship between some properties of the EDZ (elasticity, radius).

  19. The stages and duration of the Kieveiskoe and Fedorovskoe Pt-Pd deposits formation: U-Pb zircon data (Kola Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitkina, Elena

    2010-05-01

    The Kola Peninsula is one of the unique geological provinces both in Russia and in the world, where Pt-Pd Kieveiskoe and Fedorovskoe deposits have been discovered (Mitrofanov, 2005). Several deposits within the Northern and Southern belts contain first hundreds of tons of estimated platinum metal resources, allowing us to ascribe the intrusions of the belts to the class of large igneous province (Schissel et al., 2002; Mitrofanov, 2005). The Kieveiskoe and Fedorovskoe deposits belong to the Pt-bearing Fedorovo-Pansky layered intrusion which is situated in the central part of the Kola Peninsula and is one of 14 major Early Proterozoic layered massifs of the Northern belt occurring at the border between Early Proterozoic volcano-sedimentary rift sequences and Archaean basement gneisses (Zagorodny, Radchenko, 1983; Bayanova, 2004). The aim of this report is to summarize all U-Pb data for Kieveiskoe and Fedorovskoe deposits including single grain dating with Pb205 tracer. At present, the following ages have been defined for the different stages of the massif evolution: 2526 - 2516 Ma - pyroxenite and gabbro of the Fedorovskoe deposit magma chamber (Nitkina, 2006), 2515 - 2518 Ma - Pt-bearing gabbro of Federovskoe stratiforme deposit; 2505 - 2496- 2485 Ma (Bayanova, 2004; Nitkina, 2006) - gabbro-norite and gabbro of the main phase of the Kieveiskoe deposit magma chamber and disseminated platinum-metal mineralization and relatively rich Cu-Ni sulphide mineralization in the basal part of the Kieveiskoe and Fedorovskoe non-stratiforme deposits; ca. 2470 Ma (Bayanova, 2004) - pegmatoid gabbro-anothosite and, probably, fluid-associated rich platinum-metal ores of the Lower Layered Horizon (Kieveiskoe deposit); ca. 2447+/-12 Ma (U-Pb zircon and baddeleyte (Bayanova, 2004)) - anorthositic injections and, probably, local lens-like rich Pt-Pd accumulations of the Upper layered Horizon (Kieveiskoe deposit). The U-Pb zircon ages of the massif evolution stages corroborate the geological-petrological conclusions made on the basis of prospecting works on the long-time and polyphase history of the Fedorov-Pana massif. The research is performed under the support of grants RFBR ? 08-05-003241, Interreg-Tacis K-0193, OFI-M 09-05-12028/ Bayanova T. // S.-Peterburg.: Nauka. 2004. P. 174 Mitrofanov F. // Smirnovskiy sbornik - 2005. Moscow. 2005. ?. 39-54. Nitkina E. // Reports of RAS. - 2006. - V. 40. ? 1 . pp. 87-91. Schissel D., Tsvetkov A. A., Mitrofanov F. P., Korchagin A. U. // Economic geology. Vol. 97. 2002. P. 1657-1677. Zagorodniy V., Radchenko A. // L.: Nauka. 1988. P. 110

  20. Processing and Visualization of Borehole data in GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrova, Lucie

    2013-04-01

    Poster deals with the advances in the research on possibilities in the field of data modelling and visualization of borehole data and derived geological data and maps in geographic information systems (GIS). Borehole data naturally contains 3D information, describing the geological structure of an area of interest. This information is very valuable for assessing the deposits of groundwater, possibilities of underground storage of CO2, for mining or civil engineering companies, or simply to better understand the geological subsurface environment. Therefore, it is strongly demanded by experts as well as the broad public to display the geological maps and models in 3D. Focus of the poster is put on the storage of data in a geodatabase, possibilities of processing the data (interpretation, classification, creation of geological cross-sections), and visualization by means of widely-used GIS software. Data model is the key aspect for an effective use of data and its visualization. The intention is to use company and international community standards as much as possible, which makes the data interoperable in community and international data infrastructures. Research works will continue further on sharing of the multidimensional data with the geological community across Europe or the whole world, which might lead to some additional modifications of the data model in terms of unification of terminology or data structure. Also, the INSPIRE directive establishing an infrastructure for spatial information in Europe will definitely change the data model a bit - when the final documents on data specifications for geological data are available (expected during the year of 2013), the current data model will have to be revised and modified.

  1. Further Analysis of Borehole Flow-Meters in Granular Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisman, S. A.; Molz, F. J.

    2001-12-01

    The borehole flow-meter has emerged as a powerful tool for identifying conductive fractures in fractured rock aquifers and intermediate-scale heterogeneities in hydraulic conductivity (K) distributions in granular aquifers [Hess, Canadian Geotechnical J., 23, 69, 1986; Molz et al., Water Resour. Res., 25, 1677, 1989]. A common analysis technique applied to flow-meter data [Molz and Young, The Log Analyst, 3, 13, 1993] is based on a numerical study of transient flow in multi-layered aquifers by Javandel and Witherspoon [Water Resour. Res., 5, 856, 1969], the purpose of which was to determine the time required for flow to a well to become horizontal in the near vicinity of the well bore and proportional to the hydraulic conductivity distribution. Ultimately, the criterion that resulted was questioned by Ruud and Kabala [Water Resour. Res., 32, 845, 1996] and shown to be potentially lacking in some respects. The Javandel and Witherspoon study did not consider the effect of specific storage (Ss) changes fully, while the Ruud and Kabala study was limited to aquifers of 2 and 5 layers. Most aquifers are not strictly layered, and there is a significant degree of correlation between K and Ss. Therefore, the present study extends the powerful analysis technique of Javandel and Witherspoon to many layered aquifers with realistic K and Ss values. Governing equations are non-dimensionalized in such a way that dimensionless drawdown versus dimensionless time curves at different positions in the aquifer approach the unique Theis curve when flow becomes horizontal in the near-well vicinity and proportional to the corresponding K distribution in the vertical. From these results, practical criteria are derived for performing borehole flow-meter tests in granular aquifers.

  2. Thermal-Mechanical Modeling of Deep Borehole Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, B. W.; Clayton, D. J.; Herrick, C. G.; Hadgu, T.

    2010-12-01

    Disposal of high-level radioactive waste, including spent nuclear fuel, in deep (3 to 5 km) boreholes is a potential option for safely isolating these wastes from the surface and near-surface environment. Existing drilling technology permits reliable and cost-effective construction of such deep boreholes. Conditions favorable for deep borehole disposal in crystalline basement rocks, including low permeability, high salinity, and geochemically reducing conditions, exist at depth in many locations, particularly in geologically stable continental regions. Isolation of waste depends, in part, on the effectiveness of borehole seals and potential alteration of permeability in the disturbed host rock surrounding the borehole. Coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrologic processes induced by heat from the radioactive waste may impact the disturbed zone near the borehole and borehole wall stability. Numerical simulations of the coupled thermal-mechanical response in the host rock surrounding the borehole were conducted with three software codes or combinations of software codes. Software codes used in the simulations were FEHM, JAS3D, Aria, and Adagio. Simulations were conducted for disposal of spent nuclear fuel assemblies and for the higher heat output of vitrified waste from the reprocessing of fuel. Simulations were also conducted for both isotropic and anisotropic ambient horizontal stress in the host rock. Physical, thermal, and mechanical properties representative of granite host rock at a depth of 4 km were used in the models. Simulation results indicate peak temperature increases at the borehole wall of about 30 °C and 180 °C for disposal of fuel assemblies and vitrified waste, respectively. Peak temperatures near the borehole occur within about 10 years and decline rapidly within a few hundred years and with distance. The host rock near the borehole is placed under additional compression. Peak mechanical stress is increased by about 15 MPa (above the assumed ambient isotropic stress of 100 MPa) at the borehole wall for the disposal of fuel assemblies and by about 90 MPa for vitrified waste. Simulated peak volumetric strain at the borehole wall is about 420 and 2600 microstrain for the disposal of fuel assemblies and vitrified waste, respectively. Stress and volumetric strain decline rapidly with distance from the borehole and with time. Simulated peak stress at and parallel to the borehole wall for the disposal of vitrified waste with anisotropic ambient horizontal stress is about 440 MPa, which likely exceeds the compressive strength of granite if unconfined by fluid pressure within the borehole. The relatively small simulated displacements and volumetric strain near the borehole suggest that software codes using a nondeforming grid provide an adequate approximation of mechanical deformation in the coupled thermal-mechanical model. Additional modeling is planned to incorporate the effects of hydrologic processes coupled to thermal transport and mechanical deformation in the host rock near the heated borehole. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Thermal-mechanical modeling of deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Bill Walter; Hadgu, Teklu

    2010-12-01

    Disposal of high-level radioactive waste, including spent nuclear fuel, in deep (3 to 5 km) boreholes is a potential option for safely isolating these wastes from the surface and near-surface environment. Existing drilling technology permits reliable and cost-effective construction of such deep boreholes. Conditions favorable for deep borehole disposal in crystalline basement rocks, including low permeability, high salinity, and geochemically reducing conditions, exist at depth in many locations, particularly in geologically stable continental regions. Isolation of waste depends, in part, on the effectiveness of borehole seals and potential alteration of permeability in the disturbed host rock surrounding the borehole. Coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrologic processes induced by heat from the radioactive waste may impact the disturbed zone near the borehole and borehole wall stability. Numerical simulations of the coupled thermal-mechanical response in the host rock surrounding the borehole were conducted with three software codes or combinations of software codes. Software codes used in the simulations were FEHM, JAS3D, Aria, and Adagio. Simulations were conducted for disposal of spent nuclear fuel assemblies and for the higher heat output of vitrified waste from the reprocessing of fuel. Simulations were also conducted for both isotropic and anisotropic ambient horizontal stress in the host rock. Physical, thermal, and mechanical properties representative of granite host rock at a depth of 4 km were used in the models. Simulation results indicate peak temperature increases at the borehole wall of about 30 C and 180 C for disposal of fuel assemblies and vitrified waste, respectively. Peak temperatures near the borehole occur within about 10 years and decline rapidly within a few hundred years and with distance. The host rock near the borehole is placed under additional compression. Peak mechanical stress is increased by about 15 MPa (above the assumed ambient isotropic stress of 100 MPa) at the borehole wall for the disposal of fuel assemblies and by about 90 MPa for vitrified waste. Simulated peak volumetric strain at the borehole wall is about 420 and 2600 microstrain for the disposal of fuel assemblies and vitrified waste, respectively. Stress and volumetric strain decline rapidly with distance from the borehole and with time. Simulated peak stress at and parallel to the borehole wall for the disposal of vitrified waste with anisotropic ambient horizontal stress is about 440 MPa, which likely exceeds the compressive strength of granite if unconfined by fluid pressure within the borehole. The relatively small simulated displacements and volumetric strain near the borehole suggest that software codes using a nondeforming grid provide an adequate approximation of mechanical deformation in the coupled thermal-mechanical model. Additional modeling is planned to incorporate the effects of hydrologic processes coupled to thermal transport and mechanical deformation in the host rock near the heated borehole.

  4. Crustal heat flow analysis in Central Anatolia from borehole equilibrium temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkan, Kamil

    2014-05-01

    In 1995-1999, borehole static temperatures and rock thermal conductivity data were collected in Turkey to quantify the crustal heat flow distribution. The dataset has never been evaluated before in detail using conventional heat flow processing and determination techniques. In this study, data from one hundred borehole sites were evaluated in Central Anatolia. First, the data were separated into different quality classes, and sites under the convective (hydrologic) thermal regime were eliminated. For data showing conductive hat transfer, geothermal gradients and thermal conductivities were determined for heat flow determinations. If necessary, geothermal gradients were corrected for effects of terrain topography and intra-borehole fluid activity. Many of the boreholes were observed to show intra-borehole fluid flow as a result of the borehole physical conditions. Interval rock thermal conductivities were determined by measurements on surface outcrops or estimated from borehole lithologic records. The region covered in this study includes a segment of North Anatolian fault, and a number of Holocene volcanoes. Previous heat flow assessment in the region is only based on a sparse dataset of bottom-hole-temperatures. This study reveals the first time the thermal regime of the crust in this region, and its connections to the active tectonic features.

  5. Summary Report of Geophysical Logging For The Seismic Boreholes Project at the Hanford Site Waste Treatment Plant.

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Martin G.; Price, Randall K.

    2007-02-01

    During the period of June through October 2006, three deep boreholes and one corehole were drilled beneath the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The boreholes were drilled to provide information on ground-motion attenuation in the basalt and interbedded sediments underlying the WTP site. This report describes the geophysical logging of the deep boreholes that was conducted in support of the Seismic Boreholes Project, defined below. The detailed drilling and geological descriptions of the boreholes and seismic data collected and analysis of that data are reported elsewhere.

  6. Super-deep reflection profiling: exploring the continental mantle lid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David N. Steer; James H. Knapp; Larry D. Brown

    1998-01-01

    Reflections from the continental mantle lithosphere have now been reported from common mid-point (CMP) profiles at numerous sites around the world. These reflections include: (1) distinct dipping events that appear to originate in the lower crust and continue some distance into the upper mantle; (2) kilometer scale, discontinuous, diffusely distributed, or isolated reflections at varying depths; (3) continuous, sub-horizontal reflections

  7. Influence of leaky boreholes on cross-formational groundwater flow and contaminant transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lacombe, S.; Sudicky, E.A.; Frape, S.K. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada)] [and others] [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); and others

    1995-08-01

    Abandoned and improperly sealed boreholes, monitoring wells, and water supply wells are common features at many contaminated sites. These features can act as conduits that transmit contaminants between aquifers separated by otherwise continuous aquitards. In this work the leaky boreholes are represented as highly conductive one-dimensional line elements superimposed onto a mesh of three-dimensional finite elements representing the porous medium. Simulation results are presented for a series of scenarios involving a simple hydrogeologic setting composed of an upper confined aquifer, a middle aquitard, and a lower confined aquifer. The simulations examine the effect of varying the borehole properties, and vertical hydraulic gradient across the aquitard, and the borehole location. The results show that a contaminant can rapidly migrate downward along a leaky borehole and create an extensive plume in the lower aquifer, even if the borehole is filled with aquifer sediments. If the borehole is an open feature across the aquitard, the entire plume, or a significant portion of it, that is migrating into the upper aquifer can be diverted into the lower one if the vertical hydraulic gradient across the aquitard can be diverted into the lower one if the vertical hydraulic gradient across the aquitard is sufficiently strong. The peak concentration arriving at a pumping well located in the lower aquifer and the time of arrival are functions of the proximity of the leaky borehole to the pumping well and its angular offset from the central flow line passing through the surficial source. Overpressurization of the lower aquifer due to injection can overcome downward preexisting hydraulic gradients across the aquitard such that contaminants can rapidly migrate upward along the leaky borehole and cause contamination of the otherwise protected upper aquifer. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Borehole Geophysical Data From Eastland Woolen Mill Superfund Site, Corinna, Maine, March 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Bruce P.; Nichols, William J.; Dudley, Robert W.

    2001-01-01

    Borehole-geophysical data were collected in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in seven bedrock wells at the Eastland Woolen Mill Superfund site, Penobscot County, Corinna, Maine, in March, 1999. The data were collected as part of a reconnaissance investigation to provide information needed to address concerns about the distribution and fate of contaminants in ground-water at the site. The borehole geophysical data were also needed to guide subsequent data collection associated with the development of a remediation workplan. The borehole geophysical logs collected included: natural gamma, caliper, fluid temperature, fluid conductivity, electromagnetic conductivity, electromagnetic resistivity, spontaneous potential, and single-point resistivity.

  9. Borehole field calibration and measurement of low-concentration manganese by decay gamma rays ( Maryland, USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mikesell, J.L.; Senftle, F.E.; Lloyd, T.A.; Tanner, A.B.; Merritt, C.T.; Force, E.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Mn concentration in the Arundel clay formation, Prince Georges County, Maryland, was determined from a borehole by using delayed neutron activation. Then neutrons were produced by a 100 mu g 252Cf source. The 847 keV gamma ray of Mn was detected continuously, and its counting rate was measured at intervals of 15 s as the measuring sonde was moved at a rate of 0.5 cm/s. The borehole measurements compared favourably with a chemical core analysis and were unaffected by water in the borehole.-from Authors

  10. Process for the manufacture of a steel body with a borehole protected against abrasion

    SciTech Connect

    Gnadig, G.; Przybylla, F.; Schneider, F.

    1985-02-05

    A process for providing abrasion and corrosion resistance in the borehole of a steel body comprising placing an alloying material of solid form within the borehole of the steel body, the alloying material having abrasion and corrosion resistance, and thereafter melting the alloying material in a gas heated protective gas oven to effect diffusion bonding of the alloying material with the steel body and the formation of an abrasion and corrosion resistant lining on the steel body. The borehole is of non-circular shape in cross-section and, particularly, of figure 8 shape.

  11. Borehole-geophysical investigation of the University of Connecticut landfill, Storrs, Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Carole D.; Haeni, F.P.; Lane, John W.; White, Eric A.

    2002-01-01

    A borehole-geophysical investigation was conducted to help characterize the hydrogeology of the fractured-rock aquifer and the distribution of unconsolidated glacial deposits near the former landfill and chemical waste-disposal pits at the University of Connecticut in Storrs, Connecticut. Eight bedrock boreholes near the landfill and three abandoned domestic wells located nearby were logged using conventional and advanced borehole-geophysical methods from June to October 1999. The conventional geophysical-logging methods included caliper, gamma, fluid temperature, fluid resistivity, and electromagnetic induction. The advanced methods included deviation, optical and acoustic imaging of the borehole wall, heat-pulse flowmeter, and directional radar reflection. Twenty-one shallow piezometers (less than 50-feet deep) were logged with gamma and electromagnetic induction tools to delineate unconsolidated glacial deposits. Five additional shallow bedrock wells were logged with conventional video camera, caliper, electromagnetic induction, and fluid resistivity and temperature tools. The rock type, foliation, and fracturing of the site were characterized from high-resolution optical-televiewer (OTV) images of rocks penetrated by the boreholes. The rocks are interpreted as fine- to medium-grained quartz-feldspar-biotite-garnet gneiss and schist with local intrusions of quartz diorite and pegmatite and minor concentrations of sulfide mineralization similar to rocks described as the Bigelow Brook Formation on regional geologic maps. Layers containing high concentrations of sulfide minerals appear as high electrical conductivity zones on electromagnetic-induction and borehole-radar logs. Foliation in the rocks generally strikes to the northeast-southwest and dips to the west, consistent with local outcrop observations. The orientation of foliation and small-scale gneissic layering in the rocks, however, varies locally and with depth in some of the boreholes. In two of the boreholes, the foliation strikes predominantly to the northwest and dips to the northeast. Although small-scale faults and lithologic discontinuities were observed in the OTV data, no large-scale faults were observed that appear on regional geologic maps. Fractures were located and characterized through the use of conventional geophysical, OTV, acoustic-televiewer (ATV), and borehole-radar logs. The orientation of fractures varies considerably across the site; some fractures are parallel to the foliation, whereas others cross-cut the foliation. Many of the transmissive fractures in the bedrock boreholes strike about N170?E and N320?E with dips of less than 45?. Other transmissive fractures strike about N60?E with dips of more than 60?. Most of the transmissive fractures in the domestic wells strike about N60?E and N22?E with dips of more than 45?. The strike of N60?E is parallel to the trend of a thrust fault that appears on regional geologic maps. Vertical flow in the boreholes was measured with the heat-pulse flowmeter under ambient and (or) pumping conditions. Results of ATV, OTV, and conventional logs were used to locate specific zones for flowmeter testing. Ambient downflow was measured in three boreholes, ambient upflow was measured in two other boreholes, and both ambient downflow and upflow were measured in a sixth borehole. The other five bedrock boreholes and domestic wells did not have measurable vertical flow. The highest rate of ambient flow was measured in the background borehole in which upflow and downflow converged and exited the borehole at a fracture zone near a depth of 62 feet. Ambient flow of about 340 gallons per day was measured. In the other five wells, ambient flow of about 20 to 35 gallons per day was measured. Under low-rate pumping (0.25 to 1 gallon per minute), one to six inflow zones were identified in each well. Usually the fractures that are active under ambient conditions contribute to the well under pumping conditions. To prevent

  12. Effect of kolaviron, a biflavonoid complex from Garcinia kola seeds, on the antioxidant, hormonal and spermatogenic indices of diabetic male rats.

    PubMed

    Adaramoye, O A; Lawal, S O

    2014-10-01

    The antihyperglycaemic effect of kolaviron (KV), a biflavonoid from Garcinia kola has been established in previous studies. In this study, we investigated the effect of KV (200 mg kg(-1) ) on the antioxidant, hormonal and spermatogenic indices of alloxan-diabetic male rats, and metformin hydrochloride (MET) (30 mg kg(-1) ) served as standard drug. The results showed that KV and MET significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the fasting blood glucose of the diabetic rats. Also, untreated and MET-treated diabetic groups had significantly (P < 0.05) lower body-weight gain and relative weights of testes. In addition, epididymal sperm abnormalities were increased, whereas sperm count, motility, testicular protein and sialic acid were decreased in untreated diabetic group. Also, antioxidant parameters, reduced glutathione, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione peroxidase were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced in the testes with a concomitant increase in lipid peroxidation in untreated diabetic group. Furthermore, untreated diabetic group had significantly (P < 0.05) lower levels of testosterone, luteinising and follicle-stimulating hormones relative to controls. Treatment with KV restored the relative weights of testes, activities of antioxidant enzymes, sperm and hormonal indices of the diabetic animals. This study demonstrated the role of KV to promote fertility in diabetic male rats by enhancing the hormonal and antioxidant status of the rats. PMID:24007369

  13. Simple, affordable and sustainable borehole observatories for complex monitoring objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, A.; Freudenthal, T.; Ratmeyer, V.; Bergenthal, M.; Lange, M.; Fleischmann, T.; Hammerschmidt, S.; Seiter, C.; Wefer, G.

    2014-12-01

    Seafloor drill rigs are remotely operated systems that provide a cost effective means to recover sedimentary records of the upper sub-seafloor deposits. Recent increases in their payload included downhole logging tools or autoclave coring systems. We here report on another milestone in using seafloor rigs: the development and installation of shallow borehole observatories. Three different systems have been developed for the MARUM-MeBo seafloor drill, which is operated by MARUM, University of Bremen, Germany. A simple design, the MeBoPLUG, separates the inner borehole from the overlying ocean by using o-ring seals at the conical threads of the drill pipe. The systems are self-contained and include data loggers, batteries, thermistors and a differential pressure sensor. A second design, the so-called MeBoCORK, is more sophisticated and also hosts an acoustic modem for data transfer and, if desired, fluid sampling capability using osmotic pumps. Of these MeBoCORKs, two systems have to be distinguished: the CORK-A (A = autonomous) can be installed by the MeBo alone and monitors pressure and temperature inside and above the borehole (the latter for reference). The CORK-B (B = bottom) has a higher payload and can additionally be equipped with geochemical, biological or other physical components. Owing to its larger size, it is installed by ROV and utilises a hotstab connection in the upper portion of the drill string. Either design relies on a hotstab connection from beneath which coiled tubing with a conical drop weight is lowered to couple to the formation. These tubes are fluid-saturated and either serve to transmit pore pressure signals or collect pore water in the osmo-sampler. The third design, the MeBoPUPPI (Pop-Up Pore Pressure Instrument), is similar to the MeBoCORK-A and monitors pore pressure and temperature in a self-contained manner. Instead of transferring data upon command using an acoustic modem, the MeBoPUPPI contains a pop-up telemetry with Iridium link. After a predefined period, the data unit with satellite link is released, ascends to the sea surface, and remains there for up to two weeks while sending the long-term data sets to shore. In summer 2012, two MeBoPLUGs, one MeBoCORK-A and one MeBoCORK-B were installed with MeBo on German RV Sonne in the Nankai Trough area, Japan. We have successfully downloaded data from the CORKs, attesting that coupling to the formation worked and pressure records were elevated relative to the seafloor reference. In the near future, we will further deploy the first two MeBoPUPPIs. Recovery of all monitoring systems by ROV is planned for 2016.

  14. Breakthroughs in Seismic and Borehole Characterization of Basalt Sequestration Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, E. C.; Hardage, Bob A.; McGrail, B. Peter; Davis, Klarissa N.

    2011-04-01

    Mafic continental flood basalts form a globally important, but under-characterized CO2 sequestration target. The Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) in the northwestern U.S. is up to 5 km thick and covers over 168,000 km2. In India, flood basalts are 3 km thick and cover greater than 500,000 km2. Laboratory experiments demonstrate that the CRBG and other basalts react with formation water and super critical (sc) CO2 to precipitate carbonates, thus adding a potential mineral trapping mechanism to the standard trapping mechanisms of most other types of CO2 sequestration reservoirs. Brecciated tops of individual basalt flows in the CRBG form regional aquifers that locally have greater than 30% porosity and three Darcies of permeability. Porous flow tops are potential sites for sequestration of gigatons of scCO2 in areas where the basalts contain unpotable water and are at depths greater than 800 m. In this paper we report on the U.S. DOE Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership surface seismic and borehole geophysical characterization that supports a field test of capacity, integrity, and geochemical reactivity of CRBG reservoirs in eastern Washington, U.S.A. Traditional surface seismic methods have had little success in imaging basalt features in on-shore areas where the basalt is thinly covered by sediment. Processing of the experimental 6.5 km, 5 line 3C seismic swath included constructing an elastic wavefield model, identifying and separating seismic wave modes, and processing the swath as a single 2D line. Important findings include: (1) a wide variety of shear wave energy modes swamp the P-wave seismic records; (2) except at very short geophone offsets, ground roll overprints P-wave signal; and (3) because of extreme velocity contrasts, P-wave events are refracted at incidence angles greater than 7-15 degrees. Subsequent removal of S-wave and other noise during processing resulted in tremendous improvement in image quality. The application of wireline logging to onshore basalts is underexploited. Full waveform sonic logs and resistivity-based image logs acquired in the 1250 m basalt pilot borehole provide powerful tools for evaluating geomechanics and lithofacies. The azimuth of the fast shear wave is parallel to SH and records the changes through time in basalt flow and tectonic stress tensors. Combined with image log data, azimuthal S-wave data provide a borehole technique for assessing basalt emplacement and cooling history that is related to the development of reservoirs and seals, as well as the orientation of tectonic stresses and fracture systems that could affect CO2 transport or containment. Reservoir and seal properties are controlled by basalt lithofacies, and rescaled P- and S- wave slowness curves, integrated with image logs, provide a tool for improved recognition of subsurface lithofacies.

  15. Surface and borehole electromagnetic imaging of conducting contaminant plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J. G., LLNL

    1998-07-01

    Electromagnetic induction tomography is a promising new tool for imaging electrical conductivity variations in the earth. The EM source field is produced by induction coil (magnetic dipole) transmitters deployed at the surface or in boreholes. Vertical and horizontal component magnetic field detectors are deployed in other boreholes or on the surface. Sources and receivers are typically deployed in a configuration surrounding the region of interest. The goal of this procedure is to image electrical conductivity variations in the earth, much as x-ray tomography is used to image density variations through cross-sections of the body. Although such EM field techniques have been developed and applied, the algorithms for inverting the magnetic field data to produce the desired images of electrical conductivity have not kept pace. One of the main reasons for the lag in the algorithm development has been the fact that the magnetic induction problem is inherently three dimensional; other imaging methods such as x-ray and seismic can make use of two-dimensional approximations that are not too far from reality, but we do not have this luxury in EM induction tomography. In addition, previous field experiments were conducted at controlled test sites that typically do not have much external noise or extensive surface clutter problems often associated with environmental sites. To use the same field techniques in environments more typical of cleanup sites requires a new set of data processing tools to remove the effects of both noise and clutter. The goal of this project is to join theory and experiment to produce enhanced images of electrically conducting fluids underground, allowing better localization of contaminants and improved planning strategies for the subsequent remediation efforts. After explaining the physical context in more detail, this report will summarize the progress made in the first 18 months of this project: (1) on code development and (2) on field tests of these methods. We conclude with a brief statement of the research directions for the remainder of this three year project.

  16. Feasibility of very deep borehole disposal of US nuclear defense wastes

    E-print Network

    Dozier, Frances Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This thesis analyzes the feasibility of emplacing DOE-owned defense nuclear waste from weapons production into a permanent borehole repository drilled ~4 km into granite basement rock. Two canister options were analyzed ...

  17. Novel finite-element approach applied to borehole quadrupole dispersion analysis in stress-sensitive formations

    E-print Network

    Jorgensen, Ole

    Near a borehole, stress concentration effects may cause a complex spatial variation of elastic anisotropy. Stress-induced sonic anisotropy results when moduli and velocities are stress dependent and the state of stress is ...

  18. 30 CFR 57.22241 - Advance face boreholes (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Advance face boreholes (I-C mines). 57.22241 Section 57.22241 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  19. 30 CFR 57.22241 - Advance face boreholes (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Advance face boreholes (I-C mines). 57.22241 Section 57.22241 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  20. 30 CFR 57.22241 - Advance face boreholes (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Advance face boreholes (I-C mines). 57.22241 Section 57.22241 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  1. 30 CFR 57.22241 - Advance face boreholes (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Advance face boreholes (I-C mines). 57.22241 Section 57.22241 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  2. 30 CFR 57.22241 - Advance face boreholes (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Advance face boreholes (I-C mines). 57.22241 Section 57.22241 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  3. Regional Examples of Geological Settings for Nuclear Waste Disposal in Deep Boreholes

    E-print Network

    Sapiie, B.

    This report develops and exercises broad-area site selection criteria for deep boreholes suitable for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and/or its separated constituents. Three candidates are examined: a regional site in the ...

  4. Importance of neutron energy distribution in borehole activation analysis in relatively dry, low-porosity rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Moxham, R.M.; Tanner, A.B.; Philbin, P.W.; Boynton, G.R.; Wager, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    To evaluate the importance of variations in the neutron energy distribution in borehole activation analysis, capture gamma-ray measurements were made in relatively dry, low-porosity gabbro of the Duluth Complex. Although sections of over a meter of solid rock were encountered in the borehole, there was significant fracturing with interstitial water leading to a substantial variation of water with depth in the borehole. The linear-correlation coefficients calculated for the peak intensities of several elements compared to the chemical core analyses were generally poor throughout the depth investigated. The data suggest and arguments are given which indicate that the variation of the thermal-to-intermediate-to-fast neutron flux density as a function of borehole depth is a serious source of error and is a major cause of the changes observed in the capture gamma-ray peak intensities. These variations in neutron energy may also cause a shift in the observed capture gamma-ray energy.

  5. Acoustic and optical borehole-wall imaging for fractured-rock aquifer studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, J.H.; Johnson, C.D.

    2004-01-01

    Imaging with acoustic and optical televiewers results in continuous and oriented 360?? views of the borehole wall from which the character, relation, and orientation of lithologic and structural planar features can be defined for studies of fractured-rock aquifers. Fractures are more clearly defined under a wider range of conditions on acoustic images than on optical images including dark-colored rocks, cloudy borehole water, and coated borehole walls. However, optical images allow for the direct viewing of the character of and relation between lithology, fractures, foliation, and bedding. The most powerful approach is the combined application of acoustic and optical imaging with integrated interpretation. Imaging of the borehole wall provides information useful for the collection and interpretation of flowmeter and other geophysical logs, core samples, and hydraulic and water-quality data from packer testing and monitoring. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ultrasonic Laboratory Study of Full Waveform Acoustic Logs in Boreholes with Fractures

    E-print Network

    Toksoz, M. N.

    1987-01-01

    A set of ultrasonic experiments was carried out to determine the effects of horizontal and vertical fractures on full waveform acoustic logs. Boreholes of 1 cm diameter were drilled in aluminum blocks. Measurements were ...

  7. Multi-array borehole resistivity and induced polarization method with mathematical inversion of redundant data

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Stanley H. (Salt Lake City, UT)

    1989-01-01

    Multiple arrays of electric or magnetic transmitters and receivers are used in a borehole geophysical procedure to obtain a multiplicity of redundant data suitable for processing into a resistivity or induced polarization model of a subsurface region of the earth.

  8. New developments in high resolution borehole seismology and their applications to reservoir development and management

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsson, B.N.P. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Company, La Habra, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Single-well seismology, Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSP`s) and Crosswell seismology are three new seismic techniques that we jointly refer to as borehole seismology. Borehole seismic techniques are of great interest because they can obtain much higher resolution images of oil and gas reservoirs than what is obtainable with currently used seismic techniques. The quality of oil and gas reservoir management decisions depend on the knowledge of both the large and the fine scale features in the reservoirs. Borehole seismology is capable of mapping reservoirs with an order of magnitude improvement in resolution compared with currently used technology. In borehole seismology we use a high frequency seismic source in an oil or gas well and record the signal in the same well, in other wells, or on the surface of the earth.

  9. Classification of hydraulic borehole mining technological processes during pay zone development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarchuk, I. B.; Shenderova, I. V.

    2015-02-01

    Relevance of the work is defined by the need of solid mineral deposits development by hydraulic borehole mining. The main advantage of the method is that the extraction of minerals could be carried out in difficult geological conditions, excluding tunneling of mine workings and quarries construction. The article presents a generalized and systematic classification of hydraulic borehole mining technological processes during pay zones development. According to the classification three groups of technological processes were defined: main, auxiliary and hydraulic borehole cutting head monitoring. The main technological processes are: rocks fracturing, suction and lifting of the slurry to the surface, delivery of the slurry to the slurry pump. Auxiliary processes include: cleaning of intake ports of slurry retrieval device, drilling of pilot hole and maintenance of mining chambers roof sustainability. To hydraulic borehole cutting head monitoring processes refer: operation modes control, tripping operation and rotation.

  10. Estimation of percolation flux from borehole temperature data at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Bodvarsson, G S; Kwicklis, E; Shan, C; Wu, Y S

    2003-01-01

    Temperature data from the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain are analyzed to estimate percolation-flux rates and overall heat flux. A multilayer, one-dimensional analytical solution is presented for determining percolation flux from temperature data. Case studies have shown that the analytical solution agrees very well with results from the numerical code, TOUGH2. The results of the analysis yield percolation fluxes in the range from 0 to 20 mm/year for most of the deep boreholes. This range is in good agreement with the results of infiltration studies at Yucca Mountain. Percolation flux for the shallower boreholes, however, cannot be accurately determined from temperature data alone because large gas flow in the shallow system alters the temperature profiles. Percolation-flux estimates for boreholes located near or intersecting major faults are significantly higher than those for other boreholes. These estimates may be affected by gas flow in the faults. PMID:12714282

  11. The extent of temporal smearing in surface-temperature histories derived from borehole temperature measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, G.D.

    1992-01-01

    The ability of borehole temperature data to resolve past climatic events is investigated using Backus-Gilbert inversion methods. Two experimental approaches are considered: (1) the data consist of a single borehole temperature profile, and (2) the data consist of climatically-induced temperature transients measured within a borehole during a monitoring experiment. The sensitivity of the data's resolving power to the vertical distribution of the measurements, temperature measurement errors, the inclusion of a local meteorological record, and the duration of a monitoring experiment, are investigated. The results can be used to help interpret existing surface temperature histories derived from borehole temperature data and to optimize future experiments for the detection of climatic signals. ?? 1992.

  12. The effect of error in theoretical Earth tide on calibration of borehole strainmeters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langbein, John

    2010-01-01

    Since the installation of borehole strainmeters into the ground locally distorts the strain in the rock, these strainmeters require calibration from a known source which typically is the Earth tide. Consequently, the accuracy of the observed strain changes from borehole strainmeters depends upon the calibration derived from modeling the Earth tide. Previous work from the mid-1970s, which is replicated here, demonstrate that the theoretical tide can differ by 30% from the tide observed at surface-mounted, long-baseline strainmeters. In spite of possible inaccurate tidal models, many of the 74 borehole strainmeters installed since 2005 can be “calibrated”. However, inaccurate tidal models affect the amplitude and phase of observed transient strain changes which needs to be considered along with the precision of the data from the inherent drift of these borehole instruments. In particular, the error from inaccurate tidal model dominates the error budget in the observation of impulsive, sub-daily, strain-transients.

  13. Towards an effective automated interpretation method for modern hydrocarbon borehole geophysical images 

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Angeleena

    2012-06-25

    Borehole imaging is one of the fastest and most precise methods for collecting subsurface data that provides high resolution information on layering, texture and dips, permitting a core-like description of the subsurface. ...

  14. An evaluation of the feasibility of disposal of nuclear waste in very deep boreholes

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Victoria Katherine, 1980-

    2004-01-01

    Deep boreholes, 3 to 5 km into igneous rock, such as granite, are evaluated for next- generation repository use in the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high level waste. The primary focus is on the stability and ...

  15. Thermal Hydrology Modeling of Deep Borehole Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadgu, T.; Arnold, B. W.

    2010-12-01

    Disposal of high-level radioactive waste, including spent nuclear fuel, in deep (3 to 5 km) boreholes is a potential option for safely isolating these wastes. Existing drilling technology permits reliable and cost-effective construction of such deep boreholes. Conditions favorable for deep borehole disposal in crystalline basement rocks, including low permeability, high salinity, and geochemically reducing conditions, exist at depth in many locations. Coupled thermal-hydrologic processes induced by heat from the radioactive waste may impact fluid flow and the associated migration of radionuclides. Numerical simulations of thermal hydrology in the deep borehole disposal system were carried out with waste emplaced between depths of 3 km and 5 km. The geometry of the system consisted of a disturbed zone of higher permeability within a radius of 1m from the borehole, and low permeability rock beyond the 1m radius. The simulations considered borehole spacing of 100m and 200m, and number of boreholes of 1, 9 and 25. The base case was taken to be 9 boreholes with 200m borehole spacing. Simulations were conducted for disposal of spent nuclear fuel assemblies and for the higher heat output of vitrified waste from the reprocessing of fuel. Physical, thermal, and hydrologic properties representative of granite host rock at a depth of 4 km were used in the models. The simulations studied temperature and fluid flux in the vicinity of the boreholes. The results show that for all runs single phase liquid conditions persist throughout the model area due to the large hydrostatic pressures present at the specified depths. Simulated base case temperatures for fuel assemblies and vitrified waste showed peak temperature increases of about 30 °C and 180 °C, respectively. Temperatures near the boreholes peak within about 10 years of waste emplacement. Results show minimal thermal perturbations at depths above the top of the waste, for both types of radioactive waste. Axial temperature profiles are dominated by conduction, as convection is constrained by the low permeability and porosity of the host rock. Simulations with borehole spacing of 100m, and number of boreholes of 1 and 25 gave similar temperature results as the base case. For the base case, vertical flux profiles showed similar trends as the temperature profiles, peaking within about 10 years of waste emplacement due to the thermal expansion of water, followed by much lower flow rates at later times. The magnitude of peak vertical specific discharge varies along the length of the emplaced waste. Simulated peak upward vertical specific discharge values at 4000m depth (center of waste) were 3.6 mm/year and 57.0 mm/year for fuel assemblies and vitrified waste, respectively, with fluxes of less than 1 mm/year beyond 100 years. Just as with temperature profiles, vertical upwards fluxes diminish above the depth of the top of the waste. Axial migration of fluid is constrained by the low permeability of the host rock. Simulations with borehole spacing of 100m, and number of boreholes of 1 and 25 gave similar flux results as the base case. Future simulations will model the effect of salinity on thermal hydrology of the deep borehole disposal system, as well as sensitivity studies on model geometry and rock properties.

  16. Results of an accelerated borehole closure testing program at Avery Island: Topical report RSI-0211

    SciTech Connect

    Stickney, R.G.

    1985-04-01

    This report presents the results of an accelerated borehole closure testing program conducted in the ONWI test facility in the Avery Island salt mine. The accelerated borehole closure tests were a part of a field testing program at Avery Island to provide data on the thermomechanical response of domal salt when subjected to conditions similar to those expected in a high-level nuclear waste repository. The primary objective of the accelerated borehole closure test is to provide data that can be used for validation of the numerical methods used to predict the creep behavior of salt. Two series of accelerated borehole closure tests were performed. The first of these (Phase I) was conducted during 1980, and the second (Phase II) was conducted during 1981 and 1982. 5 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. 30 CFR 57.12083 - Support of power cables in shafts and boreholes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Underground Only § 57.12083 Support of power cables in shafts and boreholes. Power cables in shafts and...

  18. 30 CFR 57.12083 - Support of power cables in shafts and boreholes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Underground Only § 57.12083 Support of power cables in shafts and boreholes. Power cables in shafts and...

  19. 30 CFR 57.12083 - Support of power cables in shafts and boreholes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity Underground Only § 57.12083 Support of power cables in shafts and boreholes. Power cables in shafts and...

  20. An analysis of the lithology to resistivity relationships using airborne EM and boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barfod, Adrian A. S.; Christiansen, Anders V.; Møller, Ingelise

    2014-05-01

    We present a study of the relationship between dense airborne SkyTEM resistivity data and sparse lithological borehole data. Understanding the geological structures of the subsurface is of great importance to hydrogeological surveys. Large scale geological information can be gathered directly from boreholes or indirectly from large geophysical surveys. Borehole data provides detailed lithological information only at the position of the borehole and, due to the sparse nature of boreholes, they rarely provide sufficient information needed for high-accuracy groundwater models. Airborne geophysical data, on the other hand, provide dense spatial coverage, but are only indirectly bearing information on lithology through the resistivity models. Hitherherto, the integration of the geophysical data into geological and hydrogeological models has been often subjective, largely un-documented and painstakingly manual. This project presents a detailed study of the relationships between resistivity data and lithological borehole data. The purpose is to objectively describe the relationships between lithology and geophysical parameters and to document these relationships. This project has focused on utilizing preexisting datasets from the Danish national borehole database (JUPITER) and national geophysical database (GERDA). The study presented here is from the Norsminde catchment area (208 sq. km), situated in the municipality of Odder, Denmark. The Norsminde area contains a total of 758 boreholes and 106,770 SkyTEM soundings. The large amounts of data make the Norsminde area ideal for studying the relationship between geophysical data and lithological data. The subsurface is discretized into 20 cm horizontal sampling intervals from the highest elevation point to the depth of the deepest borehole. For each of these intervals a resistivity value is calculated at the position of the boreholes using a kriging formulation. The lithology data from the boreholes are then used to categorize the interpolated resistivity values according to lithology. The end result of this comparison is resistivity distributions for different lithology categories. The distributions provide detailed objective information of the resistivity properties of the subsurface and are a documentation of the resistivity imaging of the geological lithologies. We show that different lithologies are mapped at distinctively different resistivities but also that the geophysical inversion strategies influences the resulting distributions significantly.

  1. Multi-scale groundwater modelling for the assessment of sustainable borehole yields under drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upton, Kirsty; Butler, Adrian; Jackson, Chris; Jones, Mike

    2014-05-01

    A new multi-scale groundwater modelling methodology is presented for simulating abstraction boreholes in regional groundwater models. This provides a robust tool for assessing the sustainable yield of supply boreholes, thus improving our understanding of groundwater availability during droughts. The yield of an abstraction well is dependent on a number of factors. These include antecedent recharge and groundwater conditions; the properties of a regional aquifer system; requirements on a groundwater system to maintain river flows or sites of ecological significance; the properties of an individual abstraction borehole; small-scale aquifer heterogeneity around a borehole; the rate of abstraction; and the way in which neighboring abstraction boreholes interact. These factors can all be represented in the multi-scale model, which couples a small-scale radial flow model of an abstraction borehole with a regional-scale groundwater model. The regional groundwater model, ZOOMQ3D, represents the large-scale groundwater system, including lateral and vertical aquifer heterogeneity, rivers, and spatially varying recharge. The 3D radial flow model, SPIDERR, represents linear and non-linear flow to a borehole, local vertical heterogeneity, well storage and pump location. The multi-scale model is applied to a supply borehole (operated by Thames Water) located in the Chalk aquifer within the catchment of the River Thames in southern England. Groundwater abstraction from the Chalk aquifer accounts for 40-70% of the total public water supply in this region. Drought is a recurring feature of the UK climate, and in particular the south and east of England. Since 1850, nine major groundwater droughts have occurred, all of which lasted longer than one year. The most recent occurred in 2010-2012, during which seven water supply companies introduced water usage restrictions, affecting over 20 million people. The radial flow model is initially calibrated against pumping test data from the supply borehole. It is then coupled with an existing regional groundwater model, which covers a significant part of the unconfined Chalk aquifer within the Thames Basin. The fully coupled model is run over the historic simulation period, 1971-2012, using operational abstraction rates at the supply borehole. Simulated heads at the borehole are compared with observed data over the period 2003-2012 allowing further calibration of the small-scale model. Several abstraction scenarios are then applied over the historic simulation period. Analysis of the pumped water levels allows us to develop an improved understanding of the sustainable yield of the source under drought conditions. The multi-scale model also provides a tool for assessing future changes to groundwater availability due to potential changes in the frequency, duration and intensity of droughts under climate change, and under scenarios of increasing demand.

  2. Towards improved 3D cross-borehole electrical resistivity imaging of discrete fracture networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, J.; Slater, L. D.; Johnson, T. J.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Lacombe, P.; Johnson, C. D.; Tiedeman, C. R.; Goode, D.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Shapiro, A. M.; Lane, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    There is a need to better characterize discrete fractures in contaminated bedrock aquifers to determine the migration of injected remediation amendments away from boreholes. A synthetic cross-borehole electrical resistivity study was conducted assuming a discrete fracture model of an existing contaminated site with known fracture locations. Four boreholes and two discrete fracture zones, assumed to be the dominant electrical and hydraulically conductive pathways, were explicitly modeled within an unstructured tetrahedral finite-element mesh. To simulate field conditions, 5% random Gaussian noise was added to all synthetic datasets. We first evaluated different regularization constraints starting with an uninformed smoothness-constrained inversion, to which a priori information was incrementally added. We found major improvements when (1) smoothness regularization constraints were relaxed (or disconnected) along boreholes and fractures, (2) a homogeneous conductivity was assumed along boreholes, and (3) borehole conductivity constraints, which could be determined from a fluid specific-conductance log, were applied. We also evaluated the effect of including borehole packers on the fracture-zone model recovery. We found the estimated fracture-zone conductivities with the inclusion of packers were comparable to similar trials excluding the use of packers regardless of electrical potential changes. The misplacement of fracture regularization disconnects easily can be misinterpreted as actual fracture locations. Conductivities within misplaced disconnects were near the starting model value and removing smoothing between boreholes and assumed fracture locations helped in identifying incorrectly located fracture regularization disconnects. Model sensitivity structure improved when regularization disconnects were (1) applied along the boreholes and fracture zones, and (2) fracture-zone regularization disconnects were placed where actual fractures existed. A field study being conducted at a contaminated fractured rock site, the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) in West Trenton, New Jersey, is being used to validate our approach. Electrical resistance measurements, borehole geophysical logs and hydraulic tests are being acquired from seven, 10 cm (4 in.) boreholes to characterize fractures in the contaminated fractured rock and monitor time-lapse amendment injections to determine the amendment transport path at the field scale. Our findings, to be validated in a field study, demonstrate that structural constraints used after careful evaluation of a priori information are critical to improving imaging of fracture electrical conductivities, locations and orientations.

  3. Neural network technology for automatic fracture detection in sonic borehole image data

    E-print Network

    Schnorrenberg, Frank Theo

    1992-01-01

    for the degree of MASTER OF SC1ENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Computer Science NEURAL NETWORK TECHNOLOGY FOR AUTOMATIC FRACTURE DETECTION IN SONIC BOREHOLE IMAGE DATA A Thesis by FRANK THEO SCHNORRENBERG Subnutted to the Office of Graduate Studies... (Head of Department) December 1992 Major Subject: Computer Science ABSTRACT Neural Network Technology for Automatic Fracture Detection in Some Borehole Image Data. (December 1992) Frank Theo Schnorrenberg, B. S. , Rheinische Friedrich Wilhelms...

  4. Distribution of borehole temperature at four high-altitude alpine glaciers in Central Asia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yaping Liu; Shugui Hou; Yetang Wang; Linlin Song

    2009-01-01

    The distribution of borehole temperature at four high-altitude alpine glaciers was investigated. The result shows that the\\u000a temperature ranges from ?13.4°C to ?1.84°C, indicating the glaciers are cold throughout the boreholes. The negative gradient\\u000a (i.e., the temperature decreasing with the increasing of depth) due to the advection of ice and climate warming, and the negative\\u000a gradient moving downwards relates to

  5. Using Flow Logging Experiments to Bridge the Scale Gap in Borehole Geophysics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. L. Paillet

    2001-01-01

    Until the recent development of high-resolution borehole flow logging equipment, geophysical well logs were indirectly related to aquifer parameters such as porosity and permeability through various interpretation equations. Heat-pulse and electro-magnetic flowmeters allow the direct measurement of aquifer permeability in situ during borehole flow experiments. An important limitation on the interpretation such flow experiments is the scale of investigation, because

  6. Current status of seismic and borehole measurements for HDR\\/HWR development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroaki Niitsuma; Michael Fehler; Robert Jones; Stephen Wilson; James Albright; Andrew Green; Roy Baria; Kazuo Hayashi; Hideshi Kaieda; Kazuhiko Tezuka; Andy Jupe; Thomas Wallroth; François Cornet; Hiroshi Asanuma; Hirokazu Moriya; Koji Nagano; W. Scott Phillips; James Rutledge; Leigh House; Alain Beauce; Doug Alde; Richard Aster

    1999-01-01

    Seismic and borehole measurements provide significant information about HDR\\/HWR reservoirs that is useful for reservoir development, reservoir characterization, and performance evaluation. Both techniques have been widely used during all HDR\\/HWR development projects. Seismic measurements have advanced from making passive surface measurements during hydraulic fracturing to making passive observations from multiple boreholes during all phases of HDR\\/HWR development, as well as

  7. Borehole logging for radium-226: recommended procedures and equipment. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. B. Olsen; V. W. Thomas

    1984-01-01

    Field investigations and a literature review were conducted to determine whether existing well-logging techniques are suitable for measuring ²²Ra at remedial action sites. These methods include passive gamma-ray measurement techniques using NaI(Tl) and, occasionally, intrinsic germanium detectors. Parameters that must be considered when logging boreholes at remedial action sites include: (1) casing material and thickness, (2) water in the borehole,

  8. Determining resistivity of a geological formation using circuitry located within a borehole casing

    DOEpatents

    Vail III, William Banning

    2006-01-17

    Geological formation resistivity is determined. Circuitry is located within the borehole casing that is adjacent to the geological formation. The circuitry can measure one or more voltages across two or more voltage measurement electrodes associated with the borehole casing. The measured voltages are used by a processor to determine the resistivity of the geological formation. A common mode signal can also be reduced using the circuitry.

  9. Challenges for Induced Polarization Measurements in Single and Cross Borehole Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L. D.; Curatola, F.; Evdokimov, K.

    2013-12-01

    Induced polarization (IP) surveys have been traditionally used for mineral exploration. These surveys involve large surface arrays, cover wide areas and target strong signals from metallic minerals (e.g. sulfides). In recent years, the IP method has increasingly been used for environmental applications where smaller arrays are employed to measure smaller signals. Due to its unique sensitivity to interfacial properties, the IP method might be used to track and identify processes associated with remediation efforts, and also characterize and delineate contaminant plumes. Recent laboratory experiments have significantly advanced the IP method, improving the detection and interpretation of relatively small signals. However, IP data acquisition from a borehole, either as a vertical profile down a string of electrodes installed in a well or in a cross borehole configuration is more challenging. This is in part due to higher noise levels associated with coupling effects between wiring and earth in the borehole. In this study, we simulated borehole conditions in the laboratory and examined sources of noise during borehole IP measurements. We simulated a vertical array of electrodes, with electrodes placed around a PVC pipe, and performed measurements in a 3D tank. While in traditional single borehole configurations (e.g. Wenner, Schlumberger) the IP data were contaminated with low frequency errors associated with electrode arrangement. Modifications on the electrode configurations and the potential electrode design, led to acquisition of high quality data comparable to that obtained in the laboratory. We show that, while borehole IP measurements can be challenging, appropriate consideration of electrode placement and design permits acquisition of high quality data that can be used to sense variations in interfacial properties around a borehole.

  10. Borehole Radar Applied to the Characterization of Hydraulically Conductive Fracture Zones in Crystalline ROCK1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olle Olsson; Lars Falk; Olof Forslund; Lars Lundmark; Eric Sandberg

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the borehole radar system, RAMAC, developed within the framework of the International Stripa Project, which can be used in three different measuring modes; single-hole reflection, cross-hole reflection and cross-hole tomography. The reflection modes basically provide geometrical data on features located at some distance from the borehole. In addition the strength of the reflections indicate the contrast in

  11. Results of an accelerated borehole closure testing program at Avery Island, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Stickney, R.G.

    1987-09-01

    This report presents the results of an accelerated borehole closure testing program conducted in the test facility in the Avery Island salt mine. The accelerated borehole closure tests provided data on the thermomechanical response of domal salt when subjected to conditions similar to those expected in a high-level nuclear waste repository. The objective is to aid numerical methods used to predict the creep behavior of salt. 5 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Tidal and non-tidal signals in groundwater boreholes in the KTB area, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeumann, Stefanie; Weise, Adelheid; Jahr, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Tides and barometric pressure variations cause pore pressure changes in the solid earth. In boreholes which are hydraulically connected to confined aquifers these pore pressure changes can be observed as water level variations. In case of confined aquifers boreholes can be regarded as volumetric strainmeters. From June 2004 until May 2005 a large scale injection experiment was realised in the pilot borehole (4000 m) at the German Continental Deep Drilling (KTB) site in Bavaria. During this test the injection induced deformation was observed by a tiltmeter array around KTB consisting of five tiltmeter stations at horizontal distances from 1.6 to 3 km from the injection borehole. At each station the local groundwater level was observed in depths between 30 and 50 m. The pore pressure was recorded in the boreholes. The time series were checked for tidal signals and injection influence. The injection was not verified presumably due to the fact that the penetration of the injected water was controlled by local geology and tectonic faults zones. Although the boreholes extending only to shallow depth tidal signals are clearly observable in at least two of five stations. On December the 26th 2004 the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake occurred which is clearly detectable in the pore pressure variations at all five stations.

  13. Permeameter studies of water flow through cement and clay borehole seals in granite, basalt and tuff

    SciTech Connect

    South, D.L.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1986-10-01

    Boreholes near a repository must be sealed to prevent rapid migration of radionuclide-contaminated water to the accessible environment. The objective of this research is to assess the performance of borehole seals under laboratory conditions, particularly with regard to varying stress fields. Flow through a sealed borehole is compared with flow through intact rock. Cement or bentonite seals have been tested in granite, basalt, and welded tuff. The main conclusion is that under laboratory conditions, existing commercial materials can form high quality seals. Triaxial stress changes about a borehole do not significantly affect seal performance if the rock is stiffer than the seal. Temperature but especially moisture variations (drying) significantly degrade the quality of cement seals. Performance partially recovers upon resaturation. A skillfully sealed borehole may be as impermeable as the host rock. Analysis of the influence of relative seal-rock permeabilities shows that a plug with permeability one order of magnitude greater than that of the rock results in a flow increase through the hole and surrounding rock of only 1-1/2 times compared to the undisturbed rock. Since a borehole is only a small part of the total rock mass, the total effect is even less pronounced. The simplest and most effective way to decrease flow through a rock-seal system is to increase the seal length, assuming it can be guaranteed that no dominant by-pass flowpath through the rock exists.

  14. Evaluation of borehole geophysical logs at the Sharon Steel Farrell Works Superfund site, Mercer County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAuley, Steven D.

    2004-01-01

    On April 14?15, 2003, geophysical logging was conducted in five open-borehole wells in and adjacent to the Sharon Steel Farrell Works Superfund Site, Mercer County, Pa. Geophysical-logging tools used included caliper, natural gamma, single-point resistance, fluid temperature, and heatpulse flowmeter. The logs were used to determine casing depth, locate subsurface fractures, identify water-bearing fractures, and identify and measure direction and rate of vertical flow within the borehole. The results of the geophysical logging were used to determine the placement of borehole screens, which allows monitoring of water levels and sampling of water-bearing zones so that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency can conduct an investigation of contaminant movement in the fractured bedrock. Water-bearing zones were identified in three of five boreholes at depths ranging from 46 to 119 feet below land surface. Borehole MR-3310 (MW03D) showed upward vertical flow from 71 to 74 feet below land surface to a receiving zone at 63-68 feet below land surface, permitting potential movement of ground water, and possibly contaminants, from deep to shallow zones. No vertical flow was measured in the other four boreholes.

  15. Borehole-inclusion stressmeter measurements in bedded salt

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, C.W.; Ames, E.S.

    1980-07-01

    Sandia purchased borehole-inclusion stressmeters from a commercial supplier to measure in situ stress changes in bedded salt. However, the supplied stressmeters were difficult to set in place and gave erratic results in bedded salt. These problems were overcome with a new extended platen design. Also a straingaged transducer was designed which can be read with a conventional data logger. Due to the nonlinear behavior of bedded salt under uniaxial loading, a new empirical calibration scheme was devised. In essence, the stressmeters are calibrated as force transducers and this calibration curve is then used to determine the relationship between uniaxial stress changes in bedded salt and the gage's output. The stressmeter and calibration procedures have been applied under mine conditions and produced viable results. Future work will involve finite element analysis to calculate the observed behavior of the stressmeters. The response of the stressmeters in bedded salt is neither that of a true stressmeter or of a true strainmeter. However, repeatable calibrations make the gages very useful.

  16. Stability of boreholes drilled through salt formations displaying plastic behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Infante, E.F.; Chenevert, M.E.

    1989-03-01

    This paper presents a mathematical and laboratory analysis that provides solutions to the problem of plastic flow of salt formations into wellbores. The paper predicts how the salt will flow and what type of mud might be used to control such flow for various well conditions. In the mathematical analysis, it is assumed that the incipience of plasticity in the formation is regulated by the level of octahedral shear stress and that the formation is neither permeable nor porous, but homogeneous and isotropic. The stress distribution in the neighborhood of the borehold is studied, and conditions under which this distribution is elastic, elastoplastic, or plastic are determined. Equations are derived that, in terms of two constants of the formation material, yield, and the limit of elasticity. Factors calculated include the radius of the plastic front and the percent of the borehole-diameter shrinkage as a function of mud weight used. This study was prompted by past failures in drilling through the Louann salt formation at depths of 12,500 to 14,000 ft (3810 to 4270 m), a formation that exhibits rapid plastic flow at low mud weights and at temperatures and pressures encountered. The techniques presented were applied to subsequent drilling of this salt section, and the zone was penetrated without the problem of plastic flow.

  17. Response of borehole extensometers to explosively generated dynamic loads

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, W.C.; Brough, W.G.

    1980-08-25

    Commercially available, hydraulically anchored, multiple-point borehole extensometers (MPBX) were evaluated with respect to response to dynamic loads produced by explosions. This study is part of the DOE-funded Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C), currently being conducted in the Climax granitic stock at the Nevada Test Site. The SFT-C is an investigation of the feasibility of short-term storage and retrieval of spent nuclear reactor fuel assemblies at a plausible repository depth in granitic rock. Eleven spent fuel assemblies are stored at a depth of 420 m for three to five years, and will then be retrieved. MPBX units are used in the SFT-C to measure both excavation-induced and thermally induced rock displacements. Long-term reliability of extensometers in this hostile environment is essential in order to obtain valid data during the course of this test. Research to date shows conclusively that extensometers of this type continue to function reliably even though subjected to accelerations of 1.8 g; research also implies that they function well though subjected to accelerations in excess of 100 g. MPBX survivability during the first four months of testing at ambient temperatures was about 90 percent.

  18. Advances in directional borehole radar data analysis and visualization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.V.G.; Brown, P.J., II

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is developing a directional borehole radar (DBOR) tool for mapping fractures, lithologic changes, and underground utility and void detection. An important part of the development of the DBOR tool is data analysis and visualization, with the aim of making the software graphical user interface (GUI) intuitive and easy to use. The DBOR software system consists of a suite of signal and image processing routines written in Research Systems' Interactive Data Language (IDL). The software also serves as a front-end to many widely accepted Colorado School of Mines Center for Wave Phenomena (CWP) Seismic UNIX (SU) algorithms (Cohen and Stockwell, 2001). Although the SU collection runs natively in a UNIX environment, our system seamlessly emulates a UNIX session within a widely used PC operating system (MicroSoft Windows) using GNU tools (Noer, 1998). Examples are presented of laboratory data acquired with the prototype tool from two different experimental settings. The first experiment imaged plastic pipes in a macro-scale sand tank. The second experiment monitored the progress of an invasion front resulting from oil injection. Finally, challenges to further development and planned future work are discussed.

  19. Tidal Amplitude Changes over Time Observed in Borehole Strainmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Wen, L.

    2013-12-01

    Global warming, by thermally expanding sea water and increasingly melting land-based ice, raises the sea level by 2-3 millimeters per year in the past few years. The solid tide, one of the most important activities of the Earth, is sensitive to the change of sea level. We carry out an analysis of tidal amplitude in the east coast of Pacific using the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) borehole strainmeter data. We extract the tidal amplitude and meteorological effects from the data using the package BAYTAP, which uses a Bayesian modeling procedure to analyze strainmeter data. In the analysis, we first interpolate the missing data, cut off bad data, and then resample the data to 2 samples per hour. We analyze the data with a one-month moving window with a 5-hour shift, and obtain variation of tidal amplitude over time. The results show two interesting phenomena. 1) Almost all stations show an annual variation in their tidal amplitude, 2) tidal amplitudes at some stations, such as B009, B011, B057, increase over time. We will discuss implications of these variations to weather and sea level change.

  20. Cavity stress relief method to stimulate demethanation boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Alain, A.K.; Denes, G.M.

    1984-05-01

    Most demethanation programs which use boreholes from the surface to access the coal, incorporate a stimulation program to enhance the well production. In most cases, the stimulation selected is a frac using nitrogen foam or other fluids. Novacorp has determined that fracing the coal may not be the best technique to apply to a well. Novacorp, whose experience includes over eighteen (18) fracs on demethanation wells, has developed and patented an alternative stimulation method, called the Cavity Stress Relief (CSR) technique, which it believes is more effective than the frac, in most cases. Through a review of the basic parameters which affect the desorbtion of gas from coal, a comparison is made between the frac and CSR stimulation techniques. A description of the conditions and results of two field tests of CSR are given. Also, the areas which need further development will be discussed. Although still not totally proven, the CSR stimulation technique promises to be a very effective method of stimulating most demethanation wells.

  1. Resolution of sea ice microstructure using cross borehole resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingham, M.; Jones, K.; Pringle, D. J.; Eicken, H.

    2009-12-01

    As an inhomogeneous mixture of pure ice, brine, air and solid salts, the physical properties of sea ice depend on its highly temperature-dependent microstructure. Understanding the microstructure and the way it responds to variations not only in temperature but also salinity, is crucial in developing an improved understanding of the role that sea ice plays in climate. However progress in this is hindered by the difficulty in obtaining meaningful measurements of sea ice physical properties without disturbing the natural state of the ice. We have recently developed an application of cross-borehole dc resistivity tomography to make in-situ measurements which resolve the anisotropic resistivity structure of first-year landfast sea ice. We present results from measurements made in 2008 at Barrow, Alaska which demonstrate the evolution of the ice microstructure over the period of spring warming. Key conclusions are that a much greater degree of vertical electrical connectivity of brine channels appears to exist even when the ice is very cold, whereas a much higher horizontal component of resistivity indicates that horizontal connectivity is only established as the ice warms and brine inclusions expand.

  2. GLADIUSITE, Fe3+2(Fe2+,Mg)4(PO4)(OH)11(H2O), A NEW HYDROTHERMAL MINERAL SPECIES FROM THE PHOSCORITE CARBONATITE UNIT, KOVDOR COMPLEX, KOLA PENINSULA, RUSSIA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RUSLAN P. LIFEROVICH; E. V. Sokolova; F. C. Hawthorne; K. V. O. Laajoki; S. Gehor; Y. A. Pakhomovsky; N. V. Sorokhtina

    2000-01-01

    Gladiusite, ideally Fe 3+2(Fe2+,Mg)4(PO4)(OH)11(H2O), monoclinic, a 16.959(2), b 11.650(3), c 6.266(6) Å, 90.00(5)°, V 1238(1) Å3, space group P21\\/n, Z = 4, is a new mineral species from hydrothermal assemblages associated with the phoscorite- carbonatite unit of the Kovdor alkaline-ultramafic complex, Kola Peninsula, Russia. It occurs in vugs within veins of mineraliz ed dolomite carbonatite. Associated minerals are dolomite, pyrochlore,

  3. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the T Tank Farm: Boreholes C4104, C4105, 299-W10-196, and RCRA Borehole 299-W11-39

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Orr, Robert D.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.8, 4.28, and 4.52. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in September 2004. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) T-TX-TY. This report is the second of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from boreholes C4104 and C4105 in the T Tank Farm, and from borehole 299-W-11-39 installed northeast of the T Tank Farm. Finally, the measurements on sediments from borehole C4104 are compared with a nearby borehole drilled in 1993, 299- W10-196, through the tank T-106 leak plume.

  4. Device and method for imaging of non-linear and linear properties of formations surrounding a borehole

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Paul A; Tencate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Guyer, Robert; Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher

    2013-11-05

    In some aspects of the disclosure, a method and an apparatus is disclosed for investigating material surrounding the borehole. The method includes generating a first low frequency acoustic wave within the borehole, wherein the first low frequency acoustic wave induces a linear and a nonlinear response in one or more features in the material that are substantially perpendicular to a radius of the borehole; directing a first sequence of high frequency pulses in a direction perpendicularly with respect to the longitudinal axis of the borehole into the material contemporaneously with the first acoustic wave; and receiving one or more second high frequency pulses at one or more receivers positionable in the borehole produced by an interaction between the first sequence of high frequency pulses and the one or more features undergoing linear and nonlinear elastic distortion due to the first low frequency acoustic wave to investigate the material surrounding the borehole.

  5. Insights into aquifer vulnerability and potential recharge zones from the borehole response to barometric pressure changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Araby, Mahmoud; Odling, Noelle; Clark, Roger; West, Jared

    2010-05-01

    Borehole water levels fluctuate in response to deformation of the surrounding aquifer caused by surface loading due to barometric pressure or strain caused by Earth and ocean tides. The magnitude and nature of this response mainly depend on the hydraulic properties of the aquifer and overlying units and borehole design. Thus water level responses reflect the effectiveness of a confining unit as a protective layer against aquifer contamination (and therefore groundwater vulnerability) and to potential aquifer recharge/discharge zones. In this study, time series of borehole water levels and barometric pressure are being investigated using time series analysis and signal processing techniques with the aim of developing a methodology for assessing recharge/discharge distribution and groundwater vulnerability in the confined/semi-confined part of the Chalk aquifer in East Yorkshire, UK. The chalk aquifer in East Yorkshire is an important source for industrial and domestic water supply. The aquifer water quality is threatened by surface pollution particularly by nitrates from agricultural fertilizers. The confined/semi-confined part of this aquifer is covered by various types of superficial deposits resulting in a wide range of the aquifer's degree of confinement. A number of boreholes have been selected for monitoring to cover all these various types of confining units. Automatic pressure transducers are installed to record water levels and barometric pressure measurements at each borehole on 15 minutes recording intervals. In strictly confined aquifers, borehole water level response to barometric pressure is an un-drained instantaneous response and is a constant fraction of the barometric pressure changes. This static confined constant is called the barometric efficiency which can be estimated simply by the slope of a regression plot of water levels versus barometric pressure. However, in the semi confined aquifer case this response is lagged due to water movement between the aquifer and the confining layer. In this case the static constant barometric efficiency is not applicable and the response is represented by a barometric response function which reflects the timing and frequency of the barometric pressure loading. In this study, the barometric response function is estimated using de-convolution techniques both in the time domain (least squares regression de-convolution) and in the frequency domain (discrete Fourier transform de-convolution). In order to estimate the barometric response function, borehole water level fluctuations due to factors other than barometric pressure should be removed (de-trended) as otherwise they will mask the response relation of interest. It is shown from the collected borehole data records that the main four factors other than barometric pressure contribute to borehole water level fluctuations. These are the rainfall recharge, Earth tides, sea tides and pumping activities close to the borehole location. Due to the highly variable nature of the UK weather, rainfall recharge shows a wide variation throughout the winter and summer seasons. This gives a complicated recharge signal over a wide range of frequencies which must be de-trended from the borehole water level data in order to estimate the barometric response function. Methods for removing this recharge signal are developed and discussed. Earth tides are calculated theoretically at each borehole location taking into account oceanic loading effects. Ocean tide effects on water levels fluctuations are clear for the boreholes located close to the coast. A Matlab code has been designed to calculate and de-trend the periodic fluctuations in borehole water levels due to Earth and ocean tides using the least squares regression technique based on a sum of sine and cosine fitting model functions. The program results have been confirmed using spectral analysis techniques.

  6. Kolaviron, a Garcinia kola Biflavonoid Complex, Protects Against Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury: Pertinent Mechanistic Insights from Biochemical and Physical Evaluations in Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Akinmoladun, Afolabi C; Akinrinola, Bolanle L; Olaleye, M Tolulope; Farombi, Ebenezer O

    2015-04-01

    The pathophysiology of stroke is characterized by biochemical and physical alterations in the brain. Modulation of such aberrations by therapeutic agents affords insights into their mechanism of action. Incontrovertible evidences that oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of neurologic disorders have brought antioxidative compounds, especially plant phytochemicals, under increasing focus as potential remedies for the prevention and management of neurodegenerative diseases. Kolaviron, a biflavonoid complex isolated from Garcinia kola Heckel (Guttiferae) was evaluated for neuroprotectivity in brains of male Wistar rats submitted to bilateral common carotid artery occlusion-induced global ischemia/reperfusion injury (I/R). Animals were divided into six groups: sham treated, vehicle (I/R), 50 mg/kg kolaviron + I/R, 100 mg/kg kolaviron + I/R, 200 mg/kg kolaviron + I/R and quercetin (20 mg/kg i.p.) + I/R. The common carotid arteries were occluded for 30 min followed by 2 h of reperfusion. Relative brain weight and brain water content were determined and oxidative stress and neurochemical markers were also evaluated. I/R caused significant decreases in glutathione level and the activities of enzymic antioxidants, the sodium pump and acetylcholinesterase while significant increases were recorded in relative brain weight, brain water content, lipid peroxidation and the activities of glutamine synthetase and myeloperoxidase. There was a remarkable ablation of I/R induced oxidative stress, neurochemical aberrations and brain edema in animals pretreated with kolaviron. The results suggested that the protection afforded by kolaviron probably involved regulation of redox and electrolyte homeostasis as well as anti-inflammatory and antiexcitotoxic mechanisms. PMID:25638229

  7. Kolaviron, a biflavonoid complex of Garcinia kola seeds modulates apoptosis by suppressing oxidative stress and inflammation in diabetes-induced nephrotoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Ayepola, Omolola R; Cerf, Marlon E; Brooks, Nicole L; Oguntibeju, Oluwafemi O

    2014-12-15

    Diabetic nephropathy is a complex disease that involves increased production of free radicals which is a strong stimulus for the release of pro-inflammatory factors. We evaluated the renal protective effect of kolaviron (KV) - a Garcinia kola seed extract containing a mixture of 5 flavonoids, in diabetes-induced nephrotoxic rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: untreated controls (C); normal rats treated with kolaviron (C+KV); untreated diabetic rats (D); kolaviron treated diabetic rats (D+KV). A single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 50mg/kg) was used for the induction of diabetes. Renal function parameters were estimated in a clinical chemistry analyzer. Markers of oxidative stress in the kidney homogenate were analyzed in a Multiskan Spectrum plate reader and Bio-plex Promagnetic bead-based assays was used for the analysis of inflammatory markers. The effect of kolaviron on diabetes-induced apoptosis was assessed by TUNEL assay. In the diabetic rats, alterations in antioxidant defenses such as an increase in lipid peroxidation, glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity and a decrease in catalase (CAT) activity, glutathione (GSH) levels and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) were observed. There was no difference in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Diabetes induction increased apoptotic cell death and the levels of interleukin (IL)-1? and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? with no effect on IL-10. Kolaviron treatment of diabetic rats restored the activities of antioxidant enzymes, reduced lipid peroxidation and increased ORAC and GSH concentration in renal tissues. Kolaviron treatment of diabetic rats also suppressed renal IL-1?. The beneficial effects of kolaviron on diabetes-induced kidney injury may be due to its inhibitory action on oxidative stress, IL-1? production and apoptosis. PMID:25481391

  8. Multiple-aquifer characterization from single borehole extensometer records.

    PubMed

    Pope, Jason P; Burbey, Thomas J

    2004-01-01

    Measurement and analysis of aquifer-system compaction have been used to characterize aquifer and confining unit properties when other techniques such as flow modeling have been ineffective at adequately quantifying storage properties or matching historical water levels in environments experiencing land subsidence. In the southeastern coastal plain of Virginia, high-sensitivity borehole pipe extensometers were used to measure 24.2 mm of total compaction at Franklin from 1979 through 1995 (1.5 mm/year) and 50.2 mm of total compaction at Suffolk from 1982 through 1995 (3.7 mm/year). Analysis of the extensometer data reveals that the small rates of aquifer-system compaction appear to be correlated with withdrawals of water from confined aquifers. One-dimensional vertical compaction modeling indicates measured compaction is the result of nonrecoverable hydrodynamic consolidation of the fine-grained confining units and interbeds, as well as recoverable compaction and expansion of coarse-grained aquifer units. The calibrated modeling results indicate that nonrecoverable specific storage values decrease with depth and range from 1.5 x 10(-5)/m for aquifer units to 1.5 x 10(-4)/m for confining units and interbeds. The aquifer and Potomac system recoverable specific storage values were all estimated to be 4.5 x 10(-6)/m, while the confining units and interbeds had values of 6.0 x 10(-6)/m. The calibrated vertical hydraulic conductivity values of the confining units and interbeds ranged from 6.6 x 10(-4) m/year to 2.0 x 10(-3) m/year. These parameter values will be useful in future management and modeling of ground water in the Virginia Coastal Plain. PMID:14763616

  9. Field Demonstration of Slim-hole Borehole Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Logging Tool for Groundwater Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, D.; Turner, P.; Frid, I.; Shelby, R.; Grunewald, E. D.; Magnuson, E.; Butler, J. J.; Johnson, C. D.; Cannia, J. C.; Woodward, D. A.; Williams, K. H.; Lane, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods provide estimates of free and bound water content and hydraulic conductivity, which are critically important for groundwater investigations. Borehole NMR tools have been available and widely used in the oil industry for decades, but only recently have been designed for small diameter boreholes typical of groundwater investigations. Field tests of an 89-mm-diameter borehole NMR logging tool are presented. This borehole NMR logging tool was developed for economical NMR logging of 100- to 200-mm-diameter boreholes, and specifically for characterizing hydraulic properties in the top 200 m of the subsurface. The tool has a vertical resolution of 0.5 m, a minimum echo spacing of 2.0 ms, and a radial depth of investigation of 178 to 203 mm, which typically is beyond the annulus of observation wells. It takes about 15 minutes to collect a data sample for each 0.5-m interval. The borehole NMR logging tool was field tested during spring 2010, in PVC-cased wells at sites in East Haddam and Storrs, Connecticut; Cape Cod, Massachusetts; Lexington, Nebraska; Lawrence, Kansas; and Rifle, Colorado. NMR logging yielded estimates of bound water, free water, and total-water content, as well as continuous distributions of water content versus transverse relaxation time (T2) at all depth levels. The derived water-content data were compared to the available ground-truth hydrogeologic data from each well, including drilling logs, neutron and other geophysical logs, and direct measurements of hydraulic conductivity. The results indicate that the borehole NMR logging tool provides information on porosity, pore-size distribution, and estimated hydraulic conductivity that cannot be duplicated by any other single geophysical logging tool.

  10. Monitoring borehole flow dynamics using heated fiber optic DTS in a fractured rock aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Thomas; Chalari, Athena; Parker, Beth; Munn, Jonathan; Mondanos, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Temperature profiles in fractured rock have long been used to identify and characterize flow in the rock formation or in the borehole. Fiber optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) is a tool that allows for continuous borehole temperature profiling in space and time. Recent technology advancements in the spatial, temperature, and temporal resolutions of DTS systems now allow temperature profiling methods to offer improved insight into fractured rock hydrogeologic processes. An innovation in shallow borehole temperature logging utilizes high resolution DTS temperature profiling in sealed and heated boreholes to identify fractures with natural gradient groundwater flow by creating a thermal disequilibrium and monitoring the temperature response. This technique can also be applied to open well conditions to monitor borehole flow distributions caused by hydraulic perturbations such as pumping or injection. A field trial was conducted in Guelph, Ontario, Canada to determine the capabilities of heated DTS for flow monitoring in both open and sealed wells. Intelligent distributed acoustic sensing (iDAS) measurements for vertical seismic profiling were carried out simultaneously with the DTS measurements to assist with characterization of the fractured aquifer system. DTS heat pulse tests were conducted in a single well under sealed conditions for natural gradient flow measurements and open conditions to monitor flow distributions during injection and pumping. The results of these tests indicate that borehole flow distributions can be monitored using DTS and that active heating allows for further information about the hydrogeologic system to be determined than from the passive measurements alone. Depth-continuous transmissivity data from the borehole correlate well with the DTS testing results. DTS based flow monitoring systems may be useful for monitoring transient production and injection processes for a variety of applications including groundwater remediation, aquifer storage and recovery, and geothermal systems. Further advancements to this method are possible to allow for quantitative flow distributions to be determined.

  11. Borehole Flow and Contaminant Distribution in Sedimentary-Bedrock Recharge Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. H.

    2005-12-01

    Borehole flow and contaminant distribution has been investigated at a series of VOC-impacted sites in New York, New Jersey, and California that are recharge areas for sandstone, mudstone, and carbonate-bedrock aquifers. At the investigated sites, downward flow occurs through open boreholes that intersect shallow and deep fracture zones having differing hydraulic heads. Detected flows span the dynamic measurement range of 0.03 to 30 liters per minute for high-resolution flowmeters that employ heat-pulse and electromagnetic technologies. Estimated head differences between shallow and deep zones from model simulation of ambient and stressed flow profiles range from one to more than 10 meters, and are in close agreement with differences measured between zones isolated by straddle packers or by multiple-depth well completions. The presence of boreholes that are open temporarily during installation or completed as open holes impacts contaminant distribution and adversely affects the results of ground-water quality sampling programs. In boreholes open to shallow contaminated zones and deep non-contaminated zones, ambient flow diverts dissolved VOCs from the shallow zones down the borehole and into the deep zones. Samples obtained from such boreholes at purge and sampling rates less than the ambient downward flow represent the water quality of the shallow zones regardless of the depths where samples are collected. This can lead to the erroneous interpretation of a deep contaminant plume. Sampling by use of straddle-packer systems with low purge and sampling rates and short-term zone isolation also may indicate deep contamination because of inadequate flushing. Even in deep zones isolated by multiple-depth completions, elevated VOC concentrations linger for many months because of contaminant diffusion into and out of the bedrock matrix. Conversely, in boreholes open to shallow non-contaminated zones and deep contaminated zones, samples collected at rates less than the downward flow represent the water quality of the shallow zones and the presence of a deep plume is masked.

  12. Reference design and operations for deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.

    SciTech Connect

    Herrick, Courtney Grant; Brady, Patrick Vane; Pye, Steven; Arnold, Bill Walter; Finger, John Travis; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2011-10-01

    A reference design and operational procedures for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in deep boreholes have been developed and documented. The design and operations are feasible with currently available technology and meet existing safety and anticipated regulatory requirements. Objectives of the reference design include providing a baseline for more detailed technical analyses of system performance and serving as a basis for comparing design alternatives. Numerous factors suggest that deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste is inherently safe. Several lines of evidence indicate that groundwater at depths of several kilometers in continental crystalline basement rocks has long residence times and low velocity. High salinity fluids have limited potential for vertical flow because of density stratification and prevent colloidal transport of radionuclides. Geochemically reducing conditions in the deep subsurface limit the solubility and enhance the retardation of key radionuclides. A non-technical advantage that the deep borehole concept may offer over a repository concept is that of facilitating incremental construction and loading at multiple perhaps regional locations. The disposal borehole would be drilled to a depth of 5,000 m using a telescoping design and would be logged and tested prior to waste emplacement. Waste canisters would be constructed of carbon steel, sealed by welds, and connected into canister strings with high-strength connections. Waste canister strings of about 200 m length would be emplaced in the lower 2,000 m of the fully cased borehole and be separated by bridge and cement plugs. Sealing of the upper part of the borehole would be done with a series of compacted bentonite seals, cement plugs, cement seals, cement plus crushed rock backfill, and bridge plugs. Elements of the reference design meet technical requirements defined in the study. Testing and operational safety assurance requirements are also defined. Overall, the results of the reference design development and the cost analysis support the technical feasibility of the deep borehole disposal concept for high-level radioactive waste.

  13. Simulation on the cyclic operation of an open borehole thermal energy storage system under regional groundwater flow

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kun Sang Lee

    2010-01-01

    Coupled hydrogeological-thermal simulation is performed to analyze the effect of the configuration of boreholes and operation\\u000a schedule on the performance of the borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) system. This paper presents numerical investigations\\u000a and thermohydraulic evaluation on the cyclic flow regime operation of open borehole thermal energy storage system under the\\u000a effects of regional groundwater flow. A three-dimensional numerical model

  14. Summary of lithologic logging of new and existing boreholes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, March 1994 to June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Geslin, J.K.; Moyer, T.C.

    1995-04-01

    This report summarizes lithologic logging of core from boreholes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, conducted from March 1994 to June 1994. Units encountered during logging include Quaternary-Tertiary alluvium and colluvium, Tertiary Rainier Mesa Tuff, all units in the Tertiary Paintbrush Group, and Tertiary Calico Hills Formation. Logging results are presented in a table of contact depths for core from unsaturated zone neutron (UZN) boreholes and graphic lithologic logs for core from north ramp geology (NRG) boreholes.

  15. Cross-borehole flow analysis to characterize fracture connections in the Melechov Granite, Bohemian-Moravian Highland, Czech Republic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Williams, John H.; Urik, Joseph; Lukes, Joseph; Kobr, Miroslav; Mares, Stanislav

    2012-01-01

    Application of the cross-borehole flow method, in which short pumping cycles in one borehole are used to induce time-transient flow in another borehole, demonstrated that a simple hydraulic model can characterize the fracture connections in the bedrock mass between the two boreholes. The analysis determines the properties of fracture connections rather than those of individual fractures intersecting a single borehole; the model contains a limited number of adjustable parameters so that any correlation between measured and simulated flow test data is significant. The test was conducted in two 200-m deep boreholes spaced 21 m apart in the Melechov Granite in the Bohemian-Moravian Highland, Czech Republic. Transient flow was measured at depth stations between the identified transmissive fractures in one of the boreholes during short-term pumping and recovery periods in the other borehole. Simulated flows, based on simple model geometries, closely matched the measured flows. The relative transmissivity and storage of the inferred fracture connections were corroborated by tracer testing. The results demonstrate that it is possible to assess the properties of a fracture flow network despite being restricted to making measurements in boreholes in which a local population of discrete fractures regulates the hydraulic communication with the larger-scale aquifer system.

  16. Physical model for the downhole orbital vibrator (DOV) - I. Acoustic and borehole seismic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, P. C.; Walter, L. A.

    2005-11-01

    The downhole orbital vibrator (DOV) applies the Vibroseis principle to borehole seismic sourcing. Accelerations by an internal rotating eccentric mass excite cylindrical pressure waves converted at the wellbore to seismic waves essentially within 20°-30° of the plane normal to the borehole. DOV pressure waves in open water are quantitatively described by a rotating point force radiating acoustic waves with displacement amplitude u(r) ~ 1/2 u0?R1/r, where R1=?2?dov/?watera2l/?2~ 1 mm is the DOV effective size for DOV radius a~ 5 cm, length l~ 1 m and acoustic radiation wavelength ?~ 10 m, and u0~ 1?m and ?x are, respectively, the frequency-independent DOV displacement amplitude and the direction cosine of the observer relative to the instantaneous point-force axis in the plane of the rotating point force. Crosswell seismic radiation amplitude, spectrum and angular dependence are quantitatively described by acoustic wave diffraction at a slit with DOV axial cross-section 2al, followed by conversion to seismic waves at the wellbore. Seismic wave displacement amplitudes u(r) ~u0?R2/r scale with effective radius R2~ 2al/?~ 1 cm. The frequency dependence of R2 is observed as linear frequency enhancement of the seismic wavelet spectrum relative to the source wavelet spectrum. DOV borehole P- and S-wave production peaks strongly in the plane of DOV rotation, with converted S waves both parallel to and transverse to the borehole axis. The small effective source sizes R1~ 1 mm and R2~ 1 cm at operational frequencies 50-350 Hz imply that DOV motion in a borehole is dynamically decoupled from the borehole wall. Dynamic decoupling allows DOV borehole seismic correlation wavelets to be quantitatively modelled in terms of a stable kinematic relation between source and sensor motion. Acoustic and seismic data rule out dipole-source action associated with claims for shear traction and primary S-wave radiation from boreholes. The stable linear kinetics of DOV acoustic action in borehole fluids produces (i) useful crosswell seismic signals at offsets to 650-800 m, (ii) negligible tube waves and (iii) stable seismic wavelets suited to in situ time-lapse seismic imaging of fluid migration fronts in crustal reservoirs.

  17. Cement technology for borehole plugging: an interim report on permeability measurements of cementitious solids

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    The permeability of borehole plug solids and plug-wall rock junctions is a property of major interest in the Borehole Plugging Program. This report describes the equipment and techniques used to determine the permeabilities of possible borehole plugging materials and presents results from tests on various cementitious solids and plug-rock combinations. The cementitious solids were made from mixtures of cement, sand, salt, fly ash, and water. Three different types of cement and four different fly ashes were used. Permeabilities ranged from a high value of 3 x 10/sup -4/ darcy for a neat cement paste to a low of 5 x 10/sup -8/ darcy for a saltcrete containing 30 wt % sodium chloride. Miniature boreholes were made in the following four different types of rock: Westerly granite, Dresser basalt, Sioux quartzite, and St. Cloud granodiorite. These small holes were plugged with a mix consisting of 23 wt % Type I Portland cement, 20 wt % bituminous fy ash, 43.2 wt % sand, and 13.8 wt % water. After curing for 91 days at ambient temperature, the permeability of the plug-wall rock junctions ranged from 3 x 10/sup -5/ to < 1 x 10/sup -8/ darcy. Three of the four miniature plugged boreholes exhibited permeabilities of < 10 microdarcys.

  18. Interpretative modelling of a geological cross section from boreholes: sources of uncertainty and their quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lark, R. M.; Thorpe, S.; Kessler, H.; Mathers, S. J.

    2014-11-01

    We conducted a designed experiment to quantify sources of uncertainty in geologists' interpretations of a geological cross section. A group of 28 geologists participated in the experiment. Each interpreted borehole record included up to three Palaeogene bedrock units, including the target unit for the experiment: the London Clay. The set of boreholes was divided into batches from which validation boreholes had been withheld; as a result, we obtained 129 point comparisons between the interpreted elevation of the base of the London Clay and its observed elevation in a borehole not used for that particular interpretation. Analysis of the results showed good general agreement between the observed and interpreted elevations, with no evidence of systematic bias. Between-site variation of the interpretation error was spatially correlated, and the variance appeared to be stationary. The between-geologist component of variance was smaller overall, and depended on the distance to the nearest borehole. There was also evidence that the between-geologist variance depends on the degree of experience of the individual. We used the statistical model of interpretation error to compute confidence intervals for any one interpretation of the base of the London Clay on the cross section, and to provide uncertainty measures for decision support in a hypothetical route-planning process. The statistical model could also be used to quantify error propagation in a full 3-D geological model produced from interpreted cross sections.

  19. In situ capture gamma-ray analysis of coal in an oversize borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikesell, Jon L.; Dotson, Danny W.; Senftle, Frank E.; Zych, Richard S.; Koger, Joseph; Goldman, Leonard

    1983-10-01

    In situ capture gamma-ray analysis in a coal seam using a high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer in a close-fitting borehole has been reported previously. In order to check the accuracy of the method under adverse conditions, similar measurements were made by means of a small-diameter sonde in an oversize borehole in the Pittsburgh seam, Greene County, Pennsylvania. The hole was 5 times the diameter of the sonde, a ratio that substantially increased the contribution of water (hydrogen) to the total spectral count and reduced the size of the sample measured by the detector. The total natural count, the 40K,count, and the intensities of capture gamma rays from Si, Ca, H, and Al were determined as a function of depth above, through, and below the coal seam. From these logs, the depth and width of the coal seam and its partings were determined. Spectra were accumulated in the seam for 1 h periods by using neutron sources of different strengths. From the spectra obtained by means of several 252Cf neutron sources of different sizes, the ultimate elemental analysis and ash content were determined. The results were not as good as those obtained previously in a close-fitting borehole. However, the results did improve with successively larger source-to-detector distances, i.e.,as the count contribution due to hydrogen in the water decreased. It was concluded that in situ borehole analyses should be made in relatively close-fitting boreholes.

  20. Expert modelling of a geological cross-section from boreholes: sources of uncertainty and their quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lark, R. M.; Thorpe, S.; Kessler, H.; Mathers, S. J.

    2014-07-01

    We conducted a designed experiment to quantify sources of uncertainty in the expert interpretation of a geological cross-section. A group of 28 geologists participated in the experiment. Each interpreted borehole records which included three Palaeogene bedrock units, including the target unit for the experiment: the London Clay. The set of boreholes was divided into batches from which validation boreholes had been withheld; as a result we obtained 129 point comparisons between the interpreted elevation of the base of the London Clay and its observed elevation in a borehole not used for that particular interpretation. Analysis of the results showed good general agreement between the observed and interpreted elevations, with no evidence of systematic bias. Between-site variation of the interpretation error was spatially correlated, and the variance appeared to be stationary. The between-geologist component of variance was smaller overall, and depended on distance to the nearest borehole. There was also evidence that the between-geologist variance depends on the degree of experience of the individual. We used the statistical model of interpretation error to compute confidence intervals for any one interpretation of the base of the London Clay on the cross-section, and to provide uncertainty measures for decision support in a hypothetical route-planning process. The statistical model could also be used to quantify error-propagation in a full 3-D geological model produced from interpreted cross sections.

  1. Phase correction of electromagnetic coupling effects in cross-borehole EIT measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Zimmermann, E.; Huisman, J. A.; Treichel, A.; Wolters, B.; van Waasen, S.; Kemna, A.

    2015-01-01

    Borehole EIT measurements in a broad frequency range (mHz to kHz) are used to study subsurface geophysical properties. However, accurate measurements have long been difficult because the required long electric cables introduce undesired inductive and capacitive coupling effects. Recently, it has been shown that such effects can successfully be corrected in the case of single-borehole measurements. The aim of this paper is to extend the previously developed correction procedure for inductive coupling during EIT measurements in a single borehole to cross-borehole EIT measurements with multiple borehole electrode chains. In order to accelerate and simplify the previously developed correction procedure for inductive coupling, a pole–pole matrix of mutual inductances is defined. This consists of the inductances of each individual chain obtained from calibration measurements and the inductances between two chains calculated from the known cable positions using numerical modelling. The new correction procedure is successfully verified with measurements in a water-filled pool under controlled conditions where the errors introduced by capacitive coupling were well-defined and could be estimated by FEM forward modelling. In addition, EIT field measurements demonstrate that the correction methods increase the phase accuracy considerably. Overall, the phase accuracy of cross-hole EIT measurements after correction of inductive and capacitive coupling is improved to better than 1?mrad up to a frequency of 1?kHz, which substantially improves our ability to characterize the frequency-dependent complex electrical resistivity of weakly polarizable soils and sediments in situ.

  2. Combined simulation-optimization of borehole heat exchanger fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Peter; Beck, Markus; Hecht-Mendez, Jozsef; de Paly, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Currently, far more than one million ground-source heat pump systems are installed in Europe for space heating of buildings. Most of these are single, closed, vertical systems, with borehole heat exchangers (BHEs) that penetrate shallow aquifers down to a depth of about 100-200 m. Multiple BHE fields that are implemented for large-scale geothermal energy supply of buildings or district heating systems are of increasing importance. In comparison to the straightforward design of single BHE systems, concerted operation of several BHEs is more challenging. Multiple adjacent BHEs can interact and affect each other. Large-scale, non-uniform thermal anomalies are potentially generated in the ground. Mutual interaction among BHEs could have an influence on the overall system's performance and therefore, should be either circumvented or integrated in the operation strategy. However, so far strategic tuning of energy extraction rates of the individual BHEs in space and time has not been considered in practice. In our presentation, a combined simulation-optimization approach is presented to regulate the individual operation of BHEs. The BHE field is simulated analytically, by temporally and spatially superimposed line source equations, as well as in more detail in numerical models. Both conditions with and without horizontal groundwater flow are studied. Groundwater flow means an additional advective energy supply, which is advantageous but also complicates apposite multiple BHE adjustment. The optimization task is formulated in an objective function to minimize the thermal impact in the ground, to avoid extreme temperature anomalies, and by this, enhance heat pump performance. We select linear programming to optimize the time-dependent loads in a computationally efficient way. Evolutionary algorithms are utilized when the BHE positions are adjusted. In different hypothetical applications with given seasonal changing load profiles and variable BHE configurations we show that either individual BHE heat extraction or position optimization is sufficient, and that only little improvement potential exists for joint optimization of both aspects. It is also demonstrated that groundwater flow direction and velocity has substantial influence on the identified ideal BHE operation patterns. Increase of groundwater flow velocity means more energy supply, and thus a better thermal recovery for given energy extraction rates. As a consequence, this mitigates the benefit from optimized BHE operation.

  3. Assessment of geophysical logs from borehole USW G-2, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, P.H. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Schimschal, U. [Bureau of Reclamation, Denver, CO (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Commercial logging contractors, Western Atlas, Schlumberger, and Edcon obtained borehole geophysical logs at the site of a potential high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Drill hole USW-G2 was picked for this test of suitable logging tools and logging technology, both representing state-of-the-art technology by these commercial companies. Experience gained by analysis of existing core data and a variety of logs obtained earlier by Birdwell and Dresser Atlas served as a guide to a choice of logs to be obtained. Logs were obtained in water-filled borehole in zeolitized tuff (saturated zone) and in air-filled borehole largely in unaltered welded tuff (unsaturated zone).

  4. Physical and chemical changes to rock near electrically heated boreholes at Spent Fuel Test-Climax

    SciTech Connect

    Beiriger, J.M.; Durham, W.B.; Ryerson, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    Sections of Climax Stock quartz monzonite taken from the vicinity of two electrically heated boreholes at Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) have been studied by scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy for signs of changes in crack structure and in mineralogy resulting from operations at SFT-C. The crack structure, as measured by density of cracks and average crack lengths was found not to have changed as a result of heating, regardless of distance from the heater hole. However, rock near the heater borehole sampled in the north heater drift was found to be more cracked than rock near the borehole sampled in the south heater drift. Mineralogically, the post-test samples are identical to the pre-test samples. No new phases have been formed as a result of the test. 10 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. A heat-pulse flowmeter for measuring minimal discharge rates in boreholes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, A.E.

    1982-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has tested a borehole-configured heat-pulse flowmeter which has good low-velocity flow-measuring sensitivity. The flowmeter was tested in the laboratory in 51-, 102-, and 152-millimeter-diameter columns using water velocities ranging from 0.35 to 250 millimeters per second. The heat-pulse flowmeter also was tested in a 15-meter-deep granite test pit with controlled water flow, and in a 58-meter-deep borehole in sedimentary materials. The flowmeter's capability to detect and measure naturally occurring, low-velocity, thermally induced convection currents in boreholes was demonstrated. Further improvements to the heat-pulse-flowmeter system are needed to increase its reliability and improve its response through four-conductor logging cable.

  6. Origin of elevated water levels encountered in Pahute Mesa emplacement boreholes: Preliminary investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Brikowski, T.; Chapman, J.; Lyles, B.; Hokett, S.

    1993-11-01

    The presence of standing water well above the predicted water table in emplacement boreholes on Pahute Mesa has been a recurring phenomenon at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). If these levels represent naturally perched aquifers, they may indicate a radionuclide migration hazard. In any case, they can pose engineering problems in the performance of underground nuclear tests. The origin of these elevated waters is uncertain. Large volumes of water are introduced during emplacement drilling, providing ample source for artificially perched water, yet elevated water levels can remain constant for years, suggesting a natural origin instead. In an effort to address the issue of unexpected standing water in emplacement boreholes, three different sites were investigated in Area 19 on Pahute Mesa by Desert Research Institute (DRI) staff from 1990-93. These sites were U-19az, U-19ba, and U-19bh. As of this writing, U-19bh remains available for access; however, nuclear tests were conducted at the former two locations subsequent to this investigations. The experiments are discussed in chronological order. Taken together, the experiments indicate that standing water in Pahute Mesa emplacement holes originates from the drainage of small-volume naturally perched zones. In the final study, the fluids used during drilling of the bottom 100 m of emplacement borehole U-19bh were labeled with a chemical tracer. After hole completion, water level rose in the borehole, while tracer concentration decreased. In fact, total mass of tracer in the borehole remained constant, while water levels rose. After water levels stabilized in this hole, no change in tracer mass was observed over two years, indicating that no movement of water out of the borehole is taking place (as at U- 19ba). Continued labeling tests of standing water are recommended to confirm the conclusions made here, and to establish their validity throughout Pahute Mesa.

  7. Analysis of aquifer tests conducted in borehole USW G-2, 1996, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, G.M.

    1998-08-01

    Borehole USW G-2 is located north of Yucca Mountain in a large-hydraulic-gradient area. Two single-borehole aquifer tests were conducted in the borehole during 1996. A 54.9-hour pumping period was conducted February 6--8, 1996, and a 408-hour pumping period was conducted April 8--25, 1996. The purpose of testing was to obtain estimates of the aquifer-system transmissivity and to determine if perched water was affecting the observed water level in borehole USW G-2. This report presents and analyzes data collected between February 6 and December 17, 1996. Analysis of the aquifer-test data indicated that fracture flow, dual-porosity flow, and boundary-affected flow conditions were observed in the drawdown and recovery data. Transmissivity estimates ranged from 2.3 to 12 meters squared per day. The most representative transmissivity estimate for the interval tested is the early-time mean transmissivity of 9.4 meters squared per day. The Calico Hills Formation was the primary formation tested, but the top 3 meters of the nonpumping water column was within the overlying Topopah Spring Tuff. Persistent residual drawdown following pumping more than 6 million liters of water during aquifer testing may indicate that the bore-hole intersected a perched water body. After 236 days of recovery, residual drawdown was 0.5 meter. The quantitative effect of the perched water on the observed water level in borehole USW G-2, however, cannot be determined with the available data.

  8. Superposition of borehole-to-surface voltage residuals for Vadose Zone plume delineation.

    PubMed

    Osiensky, James L; Belknap, Willard J; Donaldson, Paul R

    2006-01-10

    An injected tracer field experiment was conducted at the University of Idaho Ground Water Field Laboratory to evaluate the application of borehole-to-surface voltage measurements for delineation of the tracer distribution in partially saturated, fractured basalt. A tap water tracer was injected into a fracture-dominated, salt-water plume formed during a previous salt-water injection experiment. The tap water tracer was injected into a central injection well under constant hydraulic head for 34 days. The injection well was surrounded by seven test boreholes. Each borehole contained several copper wire electrodes for borehole-to-surface potential measurements between a surface grid of 224 copper sulfate, porous pot electrodes. Eight pole-pole, borehole-to-surface voltage data sets were acquired during each measurement period by energization of a selected electrode in each of the eight boreholes. Predicted voltages for a uniform earth (homogeneous and isotropic) potential model (finite difference) were subtracted from each data set (for its respective current source location), and the voltage residuals superposed to create new data sets with greater measurement sensitivity and coverage, to aid in interpretation. These data sets were collected over four measurement periods during tap water injection and four measurement periods during the subsequent 64-day drainage phase. The data were interpreted with the use of three-dimensional models and by comparisons with other electrical and hydrological observations. Results indicate that superposition of multiple data sets of voltage residuals significantly improved the lateral resolution of subsurface bulk resistivity changes that occurred over time. PMID:16298016

  9. Borehole radar investigations for locating ice ring formed by cryogenic condition in an underground cavern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Ho; Park, Sam-Gyu; Yi, Myeong-Jong; Son, Jeong-Sul; Cho, Seong-Jun

    2007-07-01

    A small underground pilot plant was constructed and operated at Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources for investigating the feasibility of a new concept of storing liquefied natural gas (LNG) in a lined hard rock cavern. In the real operation of the pilot plant, liquid nitrogen (LN2) was stored instead of LNG for safety purpose. A drainage system controls the development of an impervious ring of ice formed due to storage of LN2 in extremely low temperature. The ice ring formed around the storage cavern is very important because this can act as the final barrier to secure the LNG storage. We carried out borehole radar surveys to study the applicability of the borehole radar reflection method to locating the ice ring formation. Prior to conducting the fieldwork, we performed numerical experiments of borehole radar reflection survey; through the analysis of the numerical modeled data we obtained the most appropriate interpretation strategies for locating the ice rings. Before and after storing the LN2 in the underground cavern, we conducted borehole radar reflection and crosshole level scanning surveys. The data obtained at the two stages of the surveys were compared in order to identify changes occurring in basement rock after storing the LN2. The interpretation of the borehole radar data clearly showed that the ice rings only developed under and in front of the LNG storage cavern of the pilot plant, but not over it. Through the numerical modeling experiments and field monitoring exercises, we were able to know that borehole radar reflection technique is an effective method for locating ice rings formed in basement rock for storing material of extremely low temperature in an underground cavern.

  10. High energy gas fracture experiments in liquid-filled boreholes: potential geothermal application

    SciTech Connect

    Cuderman, J.F.; Chu, T.Y.; Jung, J.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1986-07-01

    High Energy Gas Fracturing is a tailored pulse fracturing technique which uses propellants to obtain controlled fracture initiation and extension. Borehole pressurization rates can be tailored, by suitable choice of propellants, to produce four or eight fractures radiating from the wellbore. High Energy Gas Fracture (HEGF) research is conducted at DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS) in a tunnel complex where experiments can be done under realistic in situ stress conditions (1400 psi (9.7 MPa) overburden stress). Pressure measurements are made in the test borehole during all fracturing experiments. Experiments are mined back to provide direct observation of fracturing obtained. The initial objective of HEGF research was to develop multiple fracturing technology for application in gas well stimulation. HEGF research at NTS and in Devonian shale demonstration tests has resulted in a completed technology for multiple fracturing in uncased, liquid-free wellbores. Current resarch is directed toward extending the technique to liquid-filled boreholes for application in geothermal in addition to gas and oil wells. For liquid-free boreholes, multiple fracturing is specified in terms of pressure risetime required for a given borehole diameter. Propellants are mixed to achieve the desired risetime using a semiempirical mixing equation. The same techniques were successfully applied to fracturing in liquid-filled wellbores. However, the addition of liquid in the borehole results in a significantly more complicated fracturing behavior. Hydrodynamic effects are significant. Multiple fractures are initiated but only some propagated. Multiple- and hydraulic-type fracturing and wellbore crushing have been observed in the same experiment. The potential of using HEGB for geothermal well stimulation has been demonstrated through the present experiments. 18 refs., 40 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Impact of Groundwater Flow and Energy Load on Multiple Borehole Heat Exchangers.

    PubMed

    Emad Dehkordi, S; Schincariol, Robert A; Olofsson, Bo

    2014-09-16

    The effect of array configuration, that is, number, layout, and spacing, on the performance of multiple borehole heat exchangers (BHEs) is generally known under the assumption of fully conductive transport. The effect of groundwater flow on BHE performance is also well established, but most commonly for single BHEs. In multiple-BHE systems the effect of groundwater advection can be more complicated due to the induced thermal interference between the boreholes. To ascertain the influence of groundwater flow and borehole arrangement, this study investigates single- and multi-BHE systems of various configurations. Moreover, the influence of energy load balance is also examined. The results from corresponding cases with and without groundwater flow as well as balanced and unbalanced energy loads are cross-compared. The groundwater flux value, 10(-7) m/s, is chosen based on the findings of previous studies on groundwater flow interaction with BHEs and thermal response tests. It is observed that multi-BHE systems with balanced loads are less sensitive to array configuration attributes and groundwater flow, in the long-term. Conversely, multi-BHE systems with unbalanced loads are influenced by borehole array configuration as well as groundwater flow; these effects become more pronounced with time, unlike when the load is balanced. Groundwater flow has more influence on stabilizing loop temperatures, compared to array characteristics. Although borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) systems have a balanced energy load function, preliminary investigation on their efficiency shows a negative impact by groundwater which is due to their dependency on high temperature gradients between the boreholes and surroundings. PMID:25227154

  12. Mathematical model of gamma-ray spectrometry borehole logging for quantitative analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schimschal, Ulrich

    1981-01-01

    A technique for analyzing gamma-ray spectral-logging data has been developed, in which a digital computer is used to calculate the effects of gamma-ray attentuation in a borehole environment. The computer model allows for the calculation of the effects of lithology, porosity, density, and the thickness of a horizontal layer of uniformly distributed radioactive material surrounding a centralized probe in a cylindrical borehole. The computer program also contains parameters for the calculation of the effects of well casing, drilling fluid, probe housing, and losses through the sodium-iodide crystal. Errors associated with the commonly used mathematical assumption of a point detector are eliminated in this model. (USGS)

  13. Project HOTSPOT: Borehole geophysics log interpretation from the Snake River Plain, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. D.; Schmitt, D. R.; Chen, X.; Shervais, J. W.; Liberty, L. M.; Potter, K. E.; Kessler, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberely, and (3) Mountain Home. The most eastern drill hole is Kimama located along the central volcanic axis of the SRP and documents basaltic volcanism. The Kimberely drill hole was selected to document continuous volcanism when analysed in conjunction with the Kimama drill hole and is located near the margin of the plain. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. A suite of ground and borehole geophysical surveys were carried out within the SRP between 2010 and 2012. The borehole geophysics logs included gamma ray (spectral and natural), neutron hydrogen index, electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, ultrasonic borehole televiewer imaging, full waveform sonic, and vertical seismic profile. The borehole geophysics logs were qualitatively assessed through visual interpretation of lithological horizons and quantitatively through physical property specialized software and digital signal processing automated filtering process to identify step functions and high frequency anomalies. Preliminary results were published by Schmitt et al. (2012), Potter et al. (2012), and Shervais et al. (2013). The results are continuously being enhanced as more information is qualitatively and quantitatively delineated from the borehole geophysics logs. Each drill hole encounters three principal units: massive basalt flows, rhyolite, and sediments. Basalt has a low to moderate porosity and is low in the natural gamma ray isotopes uranium, thorium, and potassium, while rhyolites produce high total gamma ray responses. Sediment interbeds become apparent as the radioactivity associated with fine grained minerals is significantly higher than that of the host rock (e.g. basalt) due to high hydrogen concentration within the crystal structure of clays. Basalt lacks conductive minerals and results in high resistivity but moderate magnetic susceptibility. The sediments on the other hand are highly conductive and have a low magnetic susceptibility. The basalt and rhyolite units are relatively massive except for fractures which become apparent in the ultrasonic borehole televiewer. Signal is lost in soft sediments resulting in dark regions when full amplitude is displayed for the ultrasonic borehole televiewer. The massive basalt shows short P- and S-wave travel times and therefore a high sonic velocity, while the sediments display only P-wave first arrivals.

  14. Disposition of excess weapon plutonium in deep boreholes - site selection handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Heiken, G.; Woldegabriel, G.; Morley, R.; Plannerer, H.; Rowley, J.

    1996-09-01

    One of the options for disposing of excess weapons plutonium is to place it near the base of deep boreholes in stable crystalline rocks. The technology needed to begin designing this means of disposition already exists, and there are many attractive sites available within the conterminous United States. There are even more potential sites for this option within Russia. The successful design of a borehole system must address two criteria: (1) how to dispose of 50 metric tons of weapons plutonium while making it inaccessible for unauthorized retrieval, and (2) how to prevent contamination of the accessible biosphere, defined here as the Earth`s surface and usable groundwaters.

  15. A code to compute borehole fluid conductivity profiles with multiple feed points

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, F.V.; Tsang, C.F.

    1988-03-01

    Investigators wish to determine the flow characteristics of fractures intersecting a wellbore to understand the hydrologic behavior of fractured rocks. Often inflow from these fractures into the wellbore is at very low rates. A new procedure has been proposed and a corresponding method of analysis developed to obtain fracture inflow parameters from a time sequence of electric conductivity logs of the borehole fluid. The present report gives the details of equations and computer code used to compute borehole fluid conductivity distributions. Verification of the code used and a listing of the code are also given. 9 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Deep Drilling Into the Chicxulub Impact Crater: Pemex Oil Exploration Boreholes Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.; Perez-Cruz, L.

    2007-05-01

    The Chicxulub structure was recognized in the 1940´s from gravity anomalies in oil exploration surveys by Pemex. Geophysical anomalies occur over the carbonate platform in NW Yucatan, where density and magnetic susceptibility contrasts with the carbonates suggested a buried igneous complex or basement uplift. The exploration program developed afterwards included several boreholes, starting with the Chicxulub-1 in 1952 and eventually comprising eight deep boreholes completed through the 1970s. The investigations showing Chicxulub as a large impact crater formed at the K/T boundary have relayed on the Pemex decades-long exploration program. Despite frequent reference to Pemex information, original data have not been openly available for detailed evaluation and incorporation with results from recent efforts. Logging data and core samples remain to be analyzed, reevaluated and integrated in the context of recent marine, aerial and terrestrial geophysical surveys and the drilling/coring projects of UNAM and ICDP. In this presentation we discuss the paleontological data, stratigraphic columns and geophysical logs for the Chicxulub-1 (1582m), Sacapuc-1 (1530m), Yucatan-6 (1631m) and Ticul-1 (3575m) boreholes. These boreholes remain the deepest ones drilled in Chicxulub and the only ones providing samples of the melt-rich breccias and melt sheet. Other boreholes include the Y1 (3221m), Y2 (3474m), Y4 (2398m) and Y5A (3003m), which give information on pre-impact stratigraphy and crystalline basement. We concentrate on log and microfossil data, stratigraphic columns, lateral correlation, integration with UNAM and ICDP borehole data, and analyses of sections of melt, impact breccias and basal Paleocene carbonates. Current plans for deep drilling in Chicxulub crater focus in the peak ring zone and central sector, with proposed marine and on-land boreholes to the IODP and ICDP programs. Future ICDP borehole will be located close to Chicxulub-1 and Sacapuc-1, which intersected the impact breccias at about 1 km and the melt and melt- rich breccias at some 1.3-1.4 km.

  17. Visualization of hydraulic connections using Borehole Array around LPG Underground Storage Cavern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimo, M.; Mashimo, H.; Maejima, T.; Aoki, K.

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents a systematic approach to visualize the hydraulic connections within the fractured rock mass around the underground LPG storage caverns using array of water injection boreholes. By taking advantage that water injection boreholes are located so as to cover the storage caverns, a complete sketch of hydraulic conditions around the caverns, such as locations of water conducting fractures, hydraulic conductivity and groundwater pressure can be obtained. Applicability of the proposed techniques have been tested in an on-going construction project operated by JOGMEC, Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation, at Namikata, Western part of Japan. Three 26m x 30m x 485m caverns, located at 150 - 200 m below the ground surface in a granitic rock, are under construction. By systematically monitoring the pressure responses between the neighboring boreholes during drilling of total 387 boreholes around the two propane caverns, a spatial profile of the hydraulic connections and hydraulic conductivity around the caverns has been successfully obtained. Locations of localized depressurized zones created during an arch excavation have been detected by monitoring pressure in each borehole after stopping water supply to that borehole temporarily. Measurement has been conducted using each one of the 302 boreholes, one at a time. Observation shows that there is a clear correlation between total pressure drop and pressure gradient versus time curve on semi-logarithmic plot, dH/log10t, as expected by the numerical prediction. Regions where dH/log10t is larger than a certain criteria, determined by a numerical simulation for flow around a cavern in a rock with uniform hydraulic conductivity, have been evaluated as a depressurized zone caused by insufficient water supply, possibly due to existence of the high permeable zones. Separate pore pressure measurement around the caverns also supports this interpretation that a low pressure is prevailing near the borehole where a large value of dH/log10t is obtained. As a countermeasure to avoid further depressurization, installation of additional water injection hole was conducted. The same observation was then repeated. It is recognized that dH/log10t has recovered above the criteria, showing that the local water balance has been improved. Finally it is concluded that the proposed rather simple but space encompassing observation is applicable to groundwater management during construction and also provides useful information for creating a hydrogeological model, considering a fracture network system, that will be used for the evaluation of the cavern performance as a storage tank.

  18. Accuracy and borehole influences in pulsed neutron gamma density logging while drilling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huawei; Sun, Jianmeng; Wang, Jiaxin; Gardner, Robin P

    2011-09-01

    A new pulsed neutron gamma density (NGD) logging has been developed to replace radioactive chemical sources in oil logging tools. The present paper describes studies of near and far density measurement accuracy of NGD logging at two spacings and the borehole influences using Monte-Carlo simulation. The results show that the accuracy of near density is not as good as far density. It is difficult to correct this for borehole effects by using conventional methods because both near and far density measurement is significantly sensitive to standoffs and mud properties. PMID:21550259

  19. Reconstruction of Past Climatic Changes in Polar Regions using Borehole Paleothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clow, G. D.

    2008-12-01

    In what is becoming a classic climate-reconstruction method, the temperature-history on the upper boundary of an ice-sheet can be inferred from the present-day temperature field observed within the ice; temperature measurements from one or more boreholes are generally used to ascertain the present-day temperature field. This process is known as borehole paleothermometry. The method can be applied equally well to terrestrial areas where groundwater flow is quite limited or does not occur at all, such as areas dominated by thick permafrost. A number of factors influencing the temperature field in the vicinity of the borehole(s) must be taken into account during the analysis, including: the environmental setting of the hole, the thermal disturbance caused by drilling, possible convection of the borehole fluid, thermal conductivity variations, ice advection, and heat sources due to shear strain and other affects. Once these factors are taken into account, the subsurface temperature measurements can be used to reconstruct the temperature history on the surface using any number of geophysical inverse methods (e.g. Monte Carlo, spectral expansion). With all these methods, the amount of detail available in the solutions (climate histories) is determined by the number and location of the temperature measurements, the measurement uncertainties, and characteristically diminishes for older times. Different inner-product spaces can be used when formulating the inverse problem. An investigation of these spaces using the spectral expansion (SE) and true-norm-minimizing (TNM) inverse methods show that for borehole paleothermometry: 1) Solution errors are greatly reduced for inner-product spaces based on log(?) instead of ?, where ? is time-before-present. This is partly because the basis functions are better balanced. 2) Inner-product spaces that include a temporal weighting function can be effectively used to reduce the magnitude of false oscillations ("ringing") in the solutions, particularly for recent times. The investigation also revealed deficiencies in the SE method when applied to borehole paleothermometry that are associated with the limited number of basis functions that can be effectively used with SE for this inverse problem. The TNM solutions are superior in the context of borehole paleothermometry.

  20. Intermediate scale borehole (Room C): In situ data report (January 1989--June 1993)

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Repository Isolation Systems Dept.; Christian-Frear, T.L.; Baird, G.T.; Labreche, D.A.; Ball, J.R. [RE/SPEC Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, R.L.; Northrop-Salazar, C.L. [Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-11-01

    Data are presented from the intermediate scale borehole test, an in situ test fielded in the pillar separating Rooms C1 and C2 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The test was to provide data on the influence of scale, if any, on the structural behavior of underground openings in salt. These data include selected fielding information, test configuration, instrumentation activities, and comprehensive results from a large number of gages. Construction of the test began in December 1989, with the drilling of the intermediate scale borehole in December 1990. Gage data in this report cover the period from January 1989 through June 1993.

  1. Vertical borehole design and completion practices used to remove methane gas from mineable coalbeds

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, S.W.; Trevits, M.A.; Steidl, P.F.

    1980-08-01

    Coalbed gas drainage from the surface in advance of mining has long been the goal of researchers in mine safety. Bureau of Mines efforts to achieve this goal started about 1965 with the initiation of an applied research program designed to test drilling, completion, and production techniques for vertical boreholes. Under this program, over 100 boreholes were completed in 16 different coalbeds. The field methods derived from these tests, together with a basic understanding of the coalbed reservoir, represent an available technology applicable to any gas drainage program whether designed primarily for mine safety or for gas recovery, or both.

  2. Recent warming trends inferred from borehole temperature data in Figuig area (Eastern Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouzzaouit, Lalla Amina; Bakraoui, Alae; Benalioulhaj, Nouredine; Carneiro, Julio; Correia, Antonio; Jilali, Abdelhakim; Rimi, Abdelkrim; Zarhloule, Yassine

    2014-08-01

    Ground surface temperature history (GSTH) reflecting the past climate conditions in eastern Morocco was evaluated by analyzing the temperature-depth profiles measured in four boreholes at the Figuig Oasis. The temperature-depth data were inverted using the functional space inversion method in order to reconstruct the surface temperature past changes. The results reveal a recent warming in the last century with an amplitude of 1-3 °C for the four boreholes and a comparison with surface air temperature (SAT) variation from the Bouarfa and Bechar meteorological stations confirms this result. This warming trend is confirmed by other climate proxies.

  3. The effect of Lithophaga (Bivalvia: Mytilidae) boreholes on the strength of the coral Porites lobata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, P. J. B.; Risk, Michael J.

    1988-12-01

    At Isla del Caño, Costa Rica, the main reef bioeroders are species of the boring bivalve, Lithophaga. These mussels are abundant in virtually all colonies of the main framework builder, Porites lobata. The bivalves have a significant effect on the strength of the colonies which, at a maximum compressive and bending strength of 20 and 5 MN/m2, respectively, are already the lowest ever measured for corals. Presence of bivalve boreholes is inversely logarithmically associated with coral strength, with the greatest decrease in strength occurring with the first boreholes.

  4. System and method to estimate compressional to shear velocity (VP/VS) ratio in a region remote from a borehole

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2012-10-16

    In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

  5. Borehole deviation surveys are necessary for hydraulic fracture monitoring Leo Eisner, Schlumberger Cambridge Research, Petr Bulant, Charles University in Prague, Jol H. Le Calvez*,

    E-print Network

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Borehole deviation surveys are necessary for hydraulic fracture monitoring Leo Eisner, Schlumberger Not performing accurate borehole deviation surveys for hydraulic fracture monitoring (HFM) and neglecting fracture parameters. Introduction Recently a large number of hydraulic fracture treatments have been

  6. Some logistical considerations in designing a system of deep boreholes for disposal of high-level radioactive waste.

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Genetha Anne; Brady, Patrick Vane [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Arnold, Bill Walter [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM

    2012-09-01

    Deep boreholes could be a relatively inexpensive, safe, and rapidly deployable strategy for disposing Americas nuclear waste. To study this approach, Sandia invested in a three year LDRD project entitled %E2%80%9CRadionuclide Transport from Deep Boreholes.%E2%80%9D In the first two years, the borehole reference design and backfill analysis were completed and the supporting modeling of borehole temperature and fluid transport profiles were done. In the third year, some of the logistics of implementing a deep borehole waste disposal system were considered. This report describes what was learned in the third year of the study and draws some conclusions about the potential bottlenecks of system implementation.

  7. GPR borehole reflection experiments constrain fracture geometry in a crystalline rock aquifer, Ploemeur, Brittany, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, Caroline; Linde, Niklas; Doetsch, Joseph; Le Borgne, Tanguy; Bour, Olivier

    2010-05-01

    Fluid flow in fractured crystalline aquifers is mainly controlled by the geometry and connectivity of permeable fractures. Deterministic imaging of individual 3D flow paths between boreholes in fractured rock is so far not possible using either geophysical or hydrological data. At a hydrogeological research site in Ploemeur, France, we explore the utility of combining Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) data collected within boreholes with single- and crosshole flowmeter data to stochastically invert for possible fracture distributions. Previous hydrological and borehole logging indicate that the water flow at the site is mainly focussed in a few fractures. Here we focus on the analysis of single- and crosshole GPR reflection data and to what extent interpreted reflectors can be correlated with available hydrologic and borehole logging data. GPR data were acquired using 100 and 250 MHz antennas along 4 neighbouring wells (70-100 m deep). The surrounding rock matrix in the depth range of interest (40-100 m) consists of intact granite with a high electrical resistivity. Consequently, GPR signal attenuation is weak and large reflection coefficients are expected to occur mainly at rock-fracture interfaces. Multifold singlehole GPR data were collected in common offset gathers every 0.25 m using 16 (4) different offsets for the 100 (250) MHz antennas. To separate the reflected energy from direct waves and source-generated noise, we subjected the data to a processing scheme that included bandpass and eigenvector filtering, muting, prestack Kirchhoff time migration and stacking. The signal-to-noise-ratios were much improved compared to a traditional single-offset section. The final stacked and migrated sections clearly image several fracture zones and individual fractures (dipping 40-90°) located at 2-20 m radial distance away from the boreholes. We can correlate GPR reflections with most hydrologically important fractures that intersect a borehole at steep angles. Reflections originating from adjacent boreholes allowed us to redefine the well geometry that was originally obtained from borehole deviation logging. This new geometry was then used for crosshole GPR reflection data processing and traveltime inversion for which these new constraints were absolutely vital. The crosshole GPR data were collected in common source gathers. Transmitted and reflected signals were enhanced using the same prestack processing scheme as applied for the singlehole data. The final stacked and non-migrated sections image reflections and diffractions that originate from subvertical to subhorizontal dipping reflectors. Traveltime tomography revealed similar velocity ranges as those observed for the direct waves of the singlehole data, thereby supporting the borehole geometry used. By comparing the interpreted single- and crosshole GPR sections we construct a distribution of reflectors that correspond to fractures with certain possible geometries (distance to the borehole, dip, minimal length, dip direction). This allows us to significantly reduce the model space of possible fracture geometries. The resulting probabilistic distribution will be used to invert hydrological data (flowmeter and tracer test data). The static GPR experiments will be complemented with time-lapse GPR measurements to be carried out during saline tracer injection tests in hydrologically conductive fractures. These data will provide additional constraints on the geometry of preferential flow paths between the boreholes.

  8. DEFORMATION AND FRACTURE OF POORLY CONSOLIDATED MEDIA - Borehole Failure Mechanisms in High-Porosity Sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Bezalel c. Haimson

    2005-06-10

    We investigated failure mechanisms around boreholes and the formation of borehole breakouts in high-porosity sandstone, with particular interest to grain-scale micromechanics of failure leading to the hitherto unrecognized fracture-like borehole breakouts and apparent compaction band formation in poorly consolidated granular materials. We also looked at a variety of drilling-related factors that contribute to the type, size and shape of borehole breakouts. The objective was to assess their effect on the ability to establish correlations between breakout geometry and in situ stress magnitudes, as well as on borehole stability prediction, and hydrocarbon/water extraction in general. We identified two classes of medium to high porosity (12-30%) sandstones, arkosic, consisting of 50-70% quartz and 15 to 50% feldspar, and quartz-rich sandstones, in which quartz grain contents varied from 90 to 100%. In arkose sandstones critical far-field stress magnitudes induced compressive failure around boreholes in the form of V-shaped (dog-eared) breakouts, the result of dilatant intra-and trans-granular microcracking subparallel to both the maximum horizontal far-field stress and to the borehole wall. On the other hand, boreholes in quartz-rich sandstones failed by developing fracture-like breakouts. These are long and very narrow (several grain diameters) tabular failure zones perpendicular to the maximum stress. Evidence provided mainly by SEM observations suggests a failure process initiated by localized grain-bond loosening along the least horizontal far-field stress springline, the packing of these grains into a lower porosity compaction band resembling those discovered in Navajo and Aztec sandstones, and the emptying of the loosened grains by the circulating drilling fluid starting from the borehole wall. Although the immediate several grain layers at the breakout tip often contain some cracked or even crushed grains, the failure mechanism enabled by the formation of the compaction band is largely non-dilatant, a major departure from the dilatant mechanism observed in Tablerock sandstone. The experimental results suggest that unlike our previous assertion, the strength of grain bonding and the mineral composition, rather than the porosity, are major factors in the formation of compaction bands and the ensuing fracture-like breakouts. Some breakout dimensions in all rocks were correlatable to the far-field principal stresses, and could potentially be used (in conjunction with other information) as indicators of their magnitudes. However, we found that several factors can significantly influence breakout geometry. Larger boreholes and increased drilling-fluid flow rates produce longer fracture-like breakouts, suggesting that breakouts in field-scale wellbores could reach considerable lengths. On the other hand, increased drilling-fluid weight and increased drill-bit penetration rate resulted in a decrease in breakout length. These results indicate that breakout growth can be controlled to some degree by manipulating drilling variables. Realizing how drilling variables impact borehole breakout formation is important in understanding the process by which breakouts form and their potential use as indicators of the far-field in situ stress magnitudes and as sources of sand production. As our research indicates, the final breakout size and mechanism of formation can be a function of several variables and conditions, meaning there is still much to be understood about this phenomenon.

  9. Borehole Strain Measurements on Volcanoes: Insights from Montserrat and Hekla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linde, A. T.; Sacks, S. I.

    2010-12-01

    In Fall 2000 we reported that data from Sacks-Evertson borehole strainmeters allowed a short term (~20 minutes) warning of an eruption of Hekla, Iceland, in 2000 and showed clear changes before an eruption of Izu-Oshima, Japan, in 1986. In 2002-2003 (CALIPSO program) we installed a small net of strainmeters near Montserrat’s Soufriere Hills Volcano, an active andesitic dome building volcano. We have sites in Long Valley and Hawaii (with USGS); at Vesuvius, Campi Flegrei area, Stromboli and (planned) Etna (with Italian colleagues). Gladwin strainmeters have been installed at Yellowstone and Mt. St. Helens (PBO). Our recent volcano research efforts have been on Montserrat and Hekla. Analyses of a very large dome collapse (Montserrat) in July 2003 (Voight et al, 2006) and an explosion in March 2004 (Linde et al., 2010) reveal a reservoir at about 5 km with a NW-SE trending dike extending from the reservoir to about 1.5 km from the surface. A number of explosions require only a narrow conduit (15 m radius) that extends from the top of the dike to the surface (Voight et al. 2010); others have a different strain signature and require deeper sources. A 1 month long clear strain excursion required an additional contribution from a reservoir at about 11 km (Hautmann et al. in prep). Many small signals with similar strain change patterns take place over much shorter time scales (2 - 20 mins) are presumably due to gas transfer. We now realize, from the 2000 eruption of Hekla, that the magma geometry is quite different from that in all earlier models. The reservoir is about 11 km deep but the dike that breaks the surface in Hekla's characteristic fissure eruption does not extend to the reservoir as had been thought; but to no more than about 1 km. Although undetectable by any available surface measurements, there must be a conduit to connect the reservoir to the dike. In Sturkell et al. (in prep) we propose that this conduit is now sufficiently large in diameter to remain fluid during the 10 years between eruptions, explaining the dramatic change in eruption interval of about 60-80 years up till 1947 to the current 10 years. For both the 2000 eruption of Hekla and the small March 2004 explosion at Montserrat our strainmeters record clear strain changes before any surface activity, due to mass movement from the reservoir into the shallower dike. This allows an estimate of the bulk modulus of the reservoir for each volcano. For Montserrat we get 7 GPa, implying a few percent of free gas, consistent with other estimates. For Hekla the estimate is surprisingly high, more than 40 GPa, implying no free gas in the reservoir of this volcano whose eruption initiates with a >10 km high plume. This is consistent with the fluid conduit. The expansion during the last 10 years of strainmeter monitoring on volcanoes has been less extensive than we would like but nevertheless we have seen some progress in that direction. We remain strong advocates for an expanded strainmeter role in the future.

  10. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the C Tank Farm: Borehole C4297 and RCRA Borehole 299-E27-22

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. JEFFREY; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Parker, Kent E.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2006-10-18

    The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) C. This report is the first of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from borehole C4297, installed adjacent to Tank C-105, and from borehole 299-E27-22, installed directly north of the C Tank Farm. Sediments from borehole 299-E27-22 were considered to be background uncontaminated sediments against which to compare contaminated sediments for the C Tank Farm characterization effort. This report also presents our interpretation of the data in the context of sediment types, the vertical extent of contamination, the migration potential of the contaminants, and the likely source of the contamination in the vadose zone and groundwater below the C Tank Farm. The information presented in this report supports the A-AX, C and U Waste Management Area field investigation report(a) in preparation by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. A core log was generated for both boreholes and a geologic evaluation of all core samples was performed at the time of opening. Aliquots of sediment from the borehole core samples were analyzed and characterized in the laboratory for the following parameters: moisture content, gamma-emitting radionuclides, one-to-one water extracts (which provide soil pH, electrical conductivity, cation, trace metal, and anion data), total carbon and inorganic carbon content, and 8 M nitric acid extracts (which provide a measure of the total leachable sediment content of contaminants). Two key radiocontaminants, technetium-99 and uranium-238, along with other trace metals were determined in acid and water extracts by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

  11. Geochronological U-PB zircon dating of two ore-bearing magma pulses: stratifrom and non-stratiform bodies in the Fedorov deposit (Kola Peninsula).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitkina, E.

    2009-04-01

    The Kola Peninsula is one of the unique geological provinces both in Russia and in the world, where platinum and palladium deposits have been discovered. The highest level of noble metal concentration has been found in the ore of the Fedorov-Pana massif. Presently, the several deposits within the Fedorov block contain first hundreds of tons of estimated platinum metal resources, allowing us to ascribe the intrusion to the class of large deposits (Mitrofanov, 2005). The Fedorov-Pana massif is situated in the central part of the Kola Peninsula and is one of 14 major Early Proterozoic layered massifs of the Northern belt occurring at the border between Early Proterozoic volcano-sedimentary rift sequences and Achean basement gneisses (Zagorodny, Radchenko, 1983; Bayanova, 2004). The isotope-geochronological data corroborate the geological-petrological conclusions made on the basis of prospecting works on the polyphase history of the Fedorov-Pana massif. At present, the following ages have been defined for the different stages of the massif evolution: 2526 - 2516 Ma (Nitkina, 2006) - pyroxenite and gabbro of the Fedorov magma chamber; 2501 - 2496- 2485 Ma (Bayanova, 2004; Nitkina, 2006) - gabbro-norite and gabbro of the main phase of the West-Pana block magma chamber and early disseminated platinum-metal mineralization and relatively rich Cu-Ni sulphide mineralization in the basal part of the massif; ca. 2470 Ma (Bayanova, 2004) - pegmatoid gabbro-anothosite and, probably, fluid-associated rich platinum-metal ores of the Lower Layered Horizon (Malaya Pana deposit); ca. 2450 Ma (Bayanova, 2004) - anorthositic injections and, probably, local lens-like rich Pt-Pd accumulations of the Upper layered Horizon. The Fedorov deposit represents the western part of the massif with the exposed area of about 45 km2 and occurs as a lopolith-like body (Shissel et al., 2002; Mitrofanov, 2005; Mitrofanov et al., 2005). The stratigraphy of the deposit consists of the following zones: 50-100-m-thick marginal zone composed of schists after mafic rocks; the zone of ore-bearing taxitic gabbronorite typical of the deposit and will be discussed below; 50-200-m-thick norite zone with norites and plagiopyroxenites; 200-800-m-thick gabbronorite zone, and the uppermost gabbro zone with the thickness of over 1000 m. The latter contains rare thin layers of leucocratic rock varieties and anorthosites (Shissel et al., 2002; Mitrofanov et al., 2005). The Fedorov deposit is characterized by the presence of mineralized taxitic gabbronorite zone with the thickness of 150 - 300 m. The zone contains great amounts of orthopyroxenite and norite xenoliths (Shissel et al., 2002; Mitrofanov et al., 2005). Besides, the stratigraphy of the Fedorov deposit includes the second-phase rocks, gabbronorites cementing the xenoliths with sulphide mineralization (Shissel et al., 2002; Mitrofanov et al., 2005). This is the non-stratiform type of ore-bearing bodies, and the previously defined age for this ore-forming stage was 2485+/-9 Ma (Nitkina, 2006). The basement of the Fedorov deposit, where sulphides (2-5 vol.per.) are spread widely, but irregularly includes several low-sulphide PGE-bearing horizons occurring conformably to the massif layering. This is the stratiform type of ore-bearing bodies. The thickness of the sulphide mineralization interval varies from 10-20 to 100 m. This zone is divided into the lower and upper ore bodies with the total PGE content of about 1 ppm (Shissel et al., 2002; Mitrofanov et al., 2005; Mitrofanov, 2005). The isotope U-Pb zircon dating was made on the core samples from the upper ore body (gabbro F10-B weighing 7,35 kg), and from the lower ore body (gabbro with olivine F10-D weighing 20,5 kg). Four zircon populations from gabbro F10-B were separated from electromagnetic and non-electromagnetic fractions for isotope U-Pb dating that yielded an age of 2518+/-9 Ma. The isotope U-Pb dating of olivine gabbro F10-D was carried out on five zircon populations separated from fractions of different size; the age of the ore-bearing rocks has been estimat

  12. On a possible source of error in extracting equilibrium formation temperatures from borehole BHT data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M DRURY

    1984-01-01

    The estimation of equilibrium formation temperatures from observation of temperatures during breaks in drilling of a borehole is often achieved by assuming a constant axial line heat source, and by making some mathematical simplifications. It is shown that use of such simplifications can, in some cases of particular relevance to oil and gas wells, lead to significant errors in the

  13. Annual Logging Symposium, June 3-6, 2007 RAPID SIMULATION OF BOREHOLE NUCLEAR MEASUREMENTS

    E-print Network

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    -Verdín, The University of Texas at Austin, W. Preeg, Private Consultant Copyright 2007, held jointly by the Society recent advances in computer technology have considerably reduced the computer time required by Monte of nuclear measurements has been widely used to quantify environmental and petrophysical effects on borehole

  14. Climate change inferred from analysis of borehole temperatures: An example from western Utah

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy J. Chisholm; David S. Chapman

    1992-01-01

    Temperature-depth profiles measured in a suite of boreholes in western Utah are used to infer climate change in the region over the past century and to document how effectively the solid earth records secular changes in surface air temperature. The data for this analysis consist of (1) high-resolution temperature logs from six sites where terrain, hydrologic, and cultural disturbances to

  15. Fast modeling of borehole neutron porosity measurements with a new spatial transport-diffusion approximation

    E-print Network

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    Fast modeling of borehole neutron porosity measurements with a new spatial transport)-derived spatial flux sensitivity functions (FSFs) and diffusion flux-difference (DFD) approximations. The method calculates spatial sensitivity flux perturbations using flux- difference approximations of one-group neutron

  16. Linear iterative refinement method for the rapid simulation of borehole nuclear measurements: Part I --Vertical wells

    E-print Network

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    spatial distribu- tions of material properties, the Monte Carlo method is the fore- most numerical N-particle MCNP code to calculate the associated detector response function and the particle flux from borehole envi- ronmental effects and spatial variations of formation properties. Simulations

  17. HIGH RESOLUTION GEOPHYSICAL MONITORING IN CHALLENGING CONDITIONS Far offshore, deep boreholes, volcanoes, mountains, landslides...

    E-print Network

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    hydrostatic titlmeter LINES project: Development of high-resolution opto-mechanical geophysical sensors, F. Boudin borehole and long base tiltmeter IPGP (Paris) ­ P. Bernard, A. Nercessian, C. Brunet) + long fiber insensitive to EM perturbations (lightning, telluric currents, industrial environment, high

  18. Borehole water level response to barometric pressure as an indicator of aquifer vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Mahmoud E. A.; Odling, Noelle E.; Clark, Roger A.

    2013-10-01

    The response of borehole water levels to barometric pressure changes in semiconfined aquifers can be used to determine barometric response functions from which aquifer and confining layer properties can be obtained. Following earlier work on barometric response functions and aquifer confinement, we explore the barometric response function as a tool to improve the assessment of groundwater vulnerability in semiconfined aquifers, illustrated through records from two contrasting boreholes in the semiconfined Chalk Aquifer, East Yorkshire, UK. After removal of recharge and Earth tide influences on the water level signal, barometric response functions were estimated and aquifer and confining layer properties determined through an analytical model of borehole water level response to barometric pressure. A link between the thickness and vertical diffusivity of the confining layer determined from the barometric response function, and groundwater vulnerability is proposed. The amplitude spectrum for barometric pressure and instrument resolution favor determination of the barometric response function at frequencies to which confining layer diffusivities are most sensitive. Numerical modeling indicates that while the high frequency response reflects confining layer properties in the immediate vicinity of the borehole, the low frequency response reflects vertical, high diffusivity pathways though the confining layer some hundreds of meters distant. A characteristic time scale parameter, based on vertical diffusivities and thicknesses of the saturated and unsaturated confining layer, is introduced as a measure of semiconfined aquifer vulnerability. The study demonstrates that the barometric response function has potential as a tool for quantitative aquifer vulnerability assessment in semiconfined aquifers.

  19. Preliminary Characterization of a NAPL-Contaminated Site using Borehole Geophysical Techniques

    E-print Network

    Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    Preliminary Characterization of a NAPL-Contaminated Site using Borehole Geophysical Techniques with confirmed non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contamination. Our eventual goal is the effective use a combination of seismic and radar information to understand site ge- ology and possible contaminant signatures

  20. Sacks-Evertson Borehole Strainmeters: New Designs, Volcanic Activity and Slow Earthquakes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. T. Linde; S. Sacks

    2008-01-01

    The quality of borehole strain data depends on a variety of factors, perhaps the most important being the character of rock in the immediate vicinity of the instrument. In tectonically active areas it is often difficult to find sites that provide suitable geometry for studying the activity and also have strong competent rock with few or no fractures. We have

  1. Novel Chemically-Bonded Phosphate Ceramic Borehole Sealants (Ceramicretes) for Arctic Environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shirish Patil; Godwin A. Chukwu; Gang Chen; Santanu Khataniar

    2008-01-01

    Novel chemically bonded phosphate ceramic borehole sealant, i.e. Ceramicrete, has many advantages over conventionally used permafrost cement at Alaska North Slope (ANS). However, in normal field practices when Ceramicrete is mixed with water in blenders, it has a chance of being contaminated with leftover Portland cement. In order to identify the effect of Portland cement contamination, recent tests have been

  2. Petrophysical inversion of borehole array-induction logs: Part II --Field data examples

    E-print Network

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    Petrophysical inversion of borehole array-induction logs: Part II -- Field data examples Carlos on rock-core samples. In addition to estimating porosity and per- meability, the petrophysical inversion- tremely salty connate water George et al., 2004 . The objective of this paper is to use the petrophysical

  3. Factors Affecting the Performance of Open Borehole Thermal Energy Storage System under Continuous Flow Regime

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. S. Lee

    2009-01-01

    This article presents coupled hydrogeological-thermal simulation of open borehole thermal energy storage system operating under continuous flow regime. A three-dimensional numerical model for groundwater flow and heat transport is used to analyze the thermal energy storage in the ground. The operation scenario consists of continuous injection and recovery and four periods per year to simulate the seasonal temperature conditions. For

  4. Simultaneous PIXE and PIGME Analysis of a Nigerian Tar Sand Sample from a Deep Borehole

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. I. Obiajunwa; J. I. Nwachukwu

    2000-01-01

    Tar sands from a deep borehole in southwestern Nigeria were subjected to elemental analysis by simultaneous proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and proton induced gamma-ray emission (PIGME) techniques. The concentration of 22 major, minor and trace elements, namely Al, Ca, Cr, Cu, F, Fe, Ga, Ge, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Pb, Rb, S, Si, Sr, Ti, Zn and

  5. Limitations of Using Uniform Heat Flux Assumptions in Sizing Vertical Borehole Heat Exchanger Fields

    E-print Network

    of the heat flow in the ground is used to predict the temperature rise and fall over time of the fluidLimitations of Using Uniform Heat Flux Assumptions in Sizing Vertical Borehole Heat Exchanger heat exchangers and the surrounding ground are essential for design, optimization and energy analysis

  6. A Web-Based Borehole Strong-motion Data Dissemination Portal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. Steidl; S. Seale; H. Ratzesberger; F. Civilini; N. Vaughan

    2009-01-01

    Accelerometric and pore pressure data from instrumented boreholes in southern California are producing very interesting observations from a large data set that includes 100's of earthquake observations each month. While the majority of these are very small events, they provide the control data that represents the linear behavior of the site. In addition, the largest motions recorded to date, ~10%g,

  7. Large-scale 3-D modeling by integration of resistivity models and borehole data through inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foged, N.; Marker, P. A.; Christansen, A. V.; Bauer-Gottwein, P.; Jørgensen, F.; Høyer, A.-S.; Auken, E.

    2014-11-01

    We present an automatic method for parameterization of a 3-D model of the subsurface, integrating lithological information from boreholes with resistivity models through an inverse optimization, with the objective of further detailing of geological models, or as direct input into groundwater models. The parameter of interest is the clay fraction, expressed as the relative length of clay units in a depth interval. The clay fraction is obtained from lithological logs and the clay fraction from the resistivity is obtained by establishing a simple petrophysical relationship, a translator function, between resistivity and the clay fraction. Through inversion we use the lithological data and the resistivity data to determine the optimum spatially distributed translator function. Applying the translator function we get a 3-D clay fraction model, which holds information from the resistivity data set and the borehole data set in one variable. Finally, we use k-means clustering to generate a 3-D model of the subsurface structures. We apply the procedure to the Norsminde survey in Denmark, integrating approximately 700 boreholes and more than 100 000 resistivity models from an airborne survey in the parameterization of the 3-D model covering 156 km2. The final five-cluster 3-D model differentiates between clay materials and different high-resistivity materials from information held in the resistivity model and borehole observations, respectively.

  8. Nonrotating, self-centering anchor assembly for anchoring a bolt in a borehole

    DOEpatents

    Bevan, J.E.; King, G.W.

    1998-12-08

    An expandable anchor assembly is provided for anchoring the threaded end portion of an elongated roof bolt in a borehole. The anchoring assembly includes a hollow outer sleeve in the form of a plurality of symmetrically arranged, longitudinal segmented wall portions with exterior gripping teeth and an inner expander sleeve in the form of a corresponding plurality of longitudinal wall portions symmetrically arranged about a central axis to define an inner threaded cylindrical section. The inner sleeve is captured within and moveable axially relative to the outer sleeve. As the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt is inserted into the inner threaded cylindrical section of the inner sleeve from the trailing end to the leading end thereof, the inner sleeve expands over and clamps around the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt. Thereafter, partial withdrawal of the elongated bolt from the borehole causes the inner sleeve to axially move relative to the outer sleeve from the leading end toward the trailing end of the outer sleeve in a wedging action to cause the outer sleeve to radially expand and force engagement of the gripping teeth against the sidewall of the borehole to thereby secure the expandable anchor assembly and therewith the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt within the borehole. 8 figs.

  9. Borehole GPR measurement of soil water content during an infiltration experiment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Redman; Gary Parkin; A. P. Annan

    2000-01-01

    Borehole ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements of water content within the unsaturated zone were performed during infiltration experiments using both a uniform and point source of water at the soil surface. Horizontal GPR antenna access tubes were installed at a depth of 1 m to measure the water content within the horizontal plane underlying the surface water sources. The zero

  10. GPR borehole reflection experiments constrain fracture geometry in a crystalline rock aquifer, Ploemeur, Brittany, France

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Caroline Dorn; Niklas Linde; Joseph Doetsch; Tanguy Le Borgne; Olivier Bour

    2010-01-01

    Fluid flow in fractured crystalline aquifers is mainly controlled by the geometry and connectivity of permeable fractures. Deterministic imaging of individual 3D flow paths between boreholes in fractured rock is so far not possible using either geophysical or hydrological data. At a hydrogeological research site in Ploemeur, France, we explore the utility of combining Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) data collected

  11. Understanding the Chena Hot Springs, Alaska, geothermal system using temperature and pressure data from exploration boreholes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kamil Erkan; Gwen Holdmann; Walter Benoit; David Blackwell

    2008-01-01

    Chena Hot Springs is a small, moderate temperature, deep circulating geothermal system, apparently typical of those associated to hot springs of interior Alaska. Multi-stage drilling was used in some exploration boreholes and was found to be useful for understanding subsurface flow characteristics and developing a conceptual model of the system. The results illustrate how temperature profiles illuminate varying pressure versus

  12. Nonrotating, self-centering anchor assembly for anchoring a bolt in a borehole

    SciTech Connect

    Bevan, John E.; King, Grant W.

    1997-12-01

    An expandable anchor assembly is provided for anchoring the threaded end portion of an elongated roof bolt in a borehole. The anchoring assembly includes a hollow outer sleeve in the form of a plurality of symmetrically arranged, longitudinal segmented wall portions with exterior gripping teeth and an inner expander sleeve in the form of a corresponding plurality of longitudinal wall portions symmetrically arranged about a central axis to define an inner threaded cylindrical section. The inner sleeve is captured within and moveable axially relative to the outer sleeve. As the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt is inserted into the inner threaded cylindrical section of the inner sleeve from the trailing end to the leading end thereof, the inner sleeve expands over and clamps around the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt. Thereafter, partial withdrawal of the elongated bolt from the borehole causes the inner sleeve to axially move relative to the outer sleeve from the leading end toward the trailing end of the outer sleeve in a wedging action to cause the outer sleeve to radially expand and force engagement of the gripping teeth against the sidewall of the borehole to thereby secure the expandable anchor assembly and therewith the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt within the borehole.

  13. Multi-array borehole resistivity and induced polarization method with mathematical inversion of redundant data

    DOEpatents

    Ward, S.H.

    1989-10-17

    Multiple arrays of electric or magnetic transmitters and receivers are used in a borehole geophysical procedure to obtain a multiplicity of redundant data suitable for processing into a resistivity or induced polarization model of a subsurface region of the earth. 30 figs.

  14. Large scale 3-D modeling by integration of resistivity models and borehole data through inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foged, N.; Marker, P. A.; Christansen, A. V.; Bauer-Gottwein, P.; Jørgensen, F.; Høyer, A.-S.; Auken, E.

    2014-02-01

    We present an automatic method for parameterization of a 3-D model of the subsurface, integrating lithological information from boreholes with resistivity models through an inverse optimization, with the objective of further detailing for geological models or as direct input to groundwater models. The parameter of interest is the clay fraction, expressed as the relative length of clay-units in a depth interval. The clay fraction is obtained from lithological logs and the clay fraction from the resistivity is obtained by establishing a simple petrophysical relationship, a translator function, between resistivity and the clay fraction. Through inversion we use the lithological data and the resistivity data to determine the optimum spatially distributed translator function. Applying the translator function we get a 3-D clay fraction model, which holds information from the resistivity dataset and the borehole dataset in one variable. Finally, we use k means clustering to generate a 3-D model of the subsurface structures. We apply the concept to the Norsminde survey in Denmark integrating approximately 700 boreholes and more than 100 000 resistivity models from an airborne survey in the parameterization of the 3-D model covering 156 km2. The final five-cluster 3-D model differentiates between clay materials and different high resistive materials from information held in resistivity model and borehole observations respectively.

  15. GONAF: A borehole-based Geophysical Observatory at the North Anatolian Fault zone in NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnhoff, Marco; Dresen, Georg; Bulut, Fatih; Raub, Christina; Malin, Peter E.; Ito, Hisao

    2013-04-01

    The North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) below the Sea of Marmara represents a 'seismic gap' where a major earthquake is expected to occur in the near future. The Marmara segment of the NAFZ is located between the 1912 Ganos and 1999 Izmit ruptures and is the only segment that has not ruptured since 1766. The GONAF project (Geophysical Observatory at the North Anatolian Fault; www.gonaf.de) involves the installation of a high-resolution borehole seismic observatory at the NAFZ consisting of up to eight 300m deep vertical boreholes around the eastern Sea of Marmara to monitor the NAFZ segment at the transition to the recent 1999 Izmit rupture. GONAF is an international collaboration and co-funded by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Programme (ICDP), GFZ Potsdam and the Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency in Ankara/Turkey (AFAD). Further principal partners are MIT and UNAVCO/both US, IESE/New Zealand and JAMSTEC/Japan. The principal scientific objective of GONAF is to study physical processes acting before, during and after the expected M>7 earthquake along the Princes Islands segment of the NAFZ by monitoring microseismic activity at significantly reduced magnitude detection threshold and improved hypocentral resolution. In October 2012 the first GONAF borehole was successfully drilled in Istanbul on the Tuzla peninsula and an array of borehole seismometers was installed for permanent operation. In addition a surface station at the same site was installed consisting of short period, broadband and strong motions sensors.

  16. A model for heat flow in deep borehole disposals of high-level nuclear waste

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fergus G. F. Gibb; Karl P. Travis; Neil A. McTaggart; David Burley

    2008-01-01

    Deep borehole disposal (DBD) is emerging as a viable alternative to mined repositories for many forms of highly radioactive waste. It is geologically safer, more secure, less environmentally disruptive and potentially more cost-effective. All high-level wastes generate heat leading to elevated temperatures in and around the disposal. In some versions of DBD this heat is an essential part of the

  17. IDENTIFYING HYDRAULICALLY CONDUCTIVE FRACTURES WITH A SLOW-VELOCITY BOREHOLE FLOWMETER.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, Alfred E.

    1986-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey used a recently developed heat-pulse flowmeter to measure very slow borehole axial water velocities in granitic rock at a site near Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba, Canada. The flowmeter was used with other geophysical measurements to locate and identify hydraulically conducting fractures contributing to the very slow vertical water flow in the two boreholes selected for study. The heat-pulse flowmeter has a flow-measuring range in water of 0. 06-6m/min, and can resolve velocity differences as slow as 0. 01 m/min. This is an order of magnitude slower than the stall speed of spinner flowmeters. The flowmeter is 1. 16 m long and 44 mm in diameter. It was calibrated in columns of 76 and 152 mm diameter, to correspond to the boreholes studied. The heat-pulse flowmeter system is evaluated, and problems peculiar to the measurement of very slow axial water velocities in boreholes are discussed.

  18. Initial seismic observations from a deep borehole drilled into the Canadian Shield in northeast Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Judith; Schmitt, Douglas R.

    2014-12-01

    The availability of a deep borehole in northeastern Alberta provides an unprecedented opportunity to study the in situ metamorphic craton rocks. This borehole reaches a depth of 2.4 km, with 1.8 km in the crystalline rocks, and is the only known borehole allowing access into the deeper rocks of the metamorphic Canadian Shield. In 2011, a zero-offset vertical seismic profile (VSP) was acquired to assist in the interpretation of seismic reflection data and geophysical logs. Three sets of upgoing tube waves interpreted from the raw profile correspond to the small-scale fluctuations in the borehole diameters and fracture zone in the crystalline rocks. A comparison between sonic log velocities and VSP velocities reveals a zone with increased velocity that could be due to the change in rock composition and texture in the basement rocks. The final processed profile is used to generate corridor stacks for differentiating between primary reflections and multiples in the seismic reflection profile. Analysis of the zero-offset VSP verifies existing log interpretation on the presence of fractures and the possible lithological changes in the metamorphic rocks of the Canadian Shield.

  19. Simulation of borehole-eccentered triaxial induction measurements using a Fourier hp finite-element method

    E-print Network

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    Simulation of borehole-eccentered triaxial induction measurements using a Fourier hp finite-element with a 2D, goal-oriented, high-order, and self- adaptive hp finite-element refinement strategy method Myung Jin Nam1 , David Pardo2 , and Carlos Torres-Verdín3 ABSTRACT We developed a numerical method

  20. Hydraulic Fracture Stimulation in a Fluid-filled Borehole via a TBEM Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadeu, A.; Antonio, J.; Mendes, P. A.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.

    2006-12-01

    In this paper, the Traction Boundary Element Method (TBEM) and the Boundary Element Method (BEM) are combined so as to evaluate the 3D wave field generated by 2D fluid-filled boreholes with a connecting hydraulic fracture. The problem is formulated in the frequency domain. The hydraulic fracture may exhibit arbitrary orientation and may present a very small thickness. The proposed formulation avoids the thin-body difficulty posed by the classical BEM formulation. All singular and hypersingular integrals are evaluated analytically, which overcomes one of the drawbacks of this formulation. Different source types such as 3D monopoles and dipoles loads may excite the borehole. The proposed model is first verified using a cylindrical circular fluid-filled borehole, for which analytical responses are known. Complex frequencies are used to avoid the aliasing phenomena in the time domain. The numerical results are analysed and a selection of spectra and animation plots from different hydraulic fracture configurations are presented. This allows the illustration of the significant scattered wave field modifications generated by a hydraulic fracture connected to the borehole.

  1. Treatment of a hard borehole water containing low levels of pesticide by nanofiltration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Wittmann; P. Cöté; C. Medici; J. Leech; A. G. Turner

    1998-01-01

    Intermittent, low levels of pesticide in the borehole water at Debden Road water works, Saffron Walden, England, required an appropriate treatment for its removal. A second treatment goal was a reduction of the calcium hardness by about 50%. Nanofiltration utilising DOW NF 200 was the chosen process allowing to achieve both requirements. During the first year of operation, no significant

  2. Enhanced dispersion analysis of borehole array sonic measurements with amplitude and phase estimation method

    E-print Network

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    estimation method Wei Li* , Rui Guo, Guo Tao, and Hua Wang, State Key Lab of Petroleum Resource, The University of Texas at Austin Summary We introduce a new non-parametric matched-filterbank spectral estimator, referred to as Amplitude and Phase Estimation (APES), to perform dispersion analysis of borehole array

  3. Interpretation of geothermal profiles perturbed by topography: the alpine permafrost boreholes at Stockhorn Plateau, Switzerland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephan Gruber; Lorenz King; Thomas Kohl; Thomas Herz; Wilfried Haeberli; Martin Hoelzle

    2004-01-01

    The temperature regime of alpine permafrost is altered by the generally warmer atmospheric temperatures of recent decades. Eight boreholes, with depths between 100 and 130 m, have recently been drilled in European mountain permafrost as part of the Permafrost and Climate in Europe (PACE) project. They have been equipped with temperature sensors in order to better understand and quantify the

  4. Moving to Google Cloud: Renovation of Global Borehole Temperature Database for Climate Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Y.; Huang, S.

    2013-12-01

    Borehole temperature comprises an independent archive of information on climate change which is complementary to the instrumental and other proxy climate records. With support from the international geothermal community, a global database of borehole temperatures has been constructed for the specific purpose of the study on climate change. Although this database has become an important data source in climate research, there are certain limitations partially because the framework of the existing borehole temperature database was hand-coded some twenty years ago. A database renovation work is now underway to take the advantages of the contemporary online database technologies. The major intended improvements include 1) dynamically linking a borehole site to Google Earth to allow for inspection of site specific geographical information; 2) dynamically linking an original key reference of a given borehole site to Google Scholar to allow for a complete list of related publications; and 3) enabling site selection and data download based on country, coordinate range, and contributor. There appears to be a good match between the enhancement requirements for this database and the functionalities of the newly released Google Fusion Tables application. Google Fusion Tables is a cloud-based service for data management, integration, and visualization. This experimental application can consolidate related online resources such as Google Earth, Google Scholar, and Google Drive for sharing and enriching an online database. It is user friendly, allowing users to apply filters and to further explore the internet for additional information regarding the selected data. The users also have ways to map, to chart, and to calculate on the selected data, and to download just the subset needed. The figure below is a snapshot of the database currently under Google Fusion Tables renovation. We invite contribution and feedback from the geothermal and climate research community to make the global database of borehole temperatures an even better resource in climate research. Acknowledgement: This work is supported by NSF Grant 1202673. Google Fusion Tables Interface of the Global Database of Borehole Temperatures and Climate Reconstructions

  5. Effective Stress and Permeability Redistributions Induced by Successive Roadway and Borehole Excavations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shengyong; Zhou, Fubao; Liu, Yingke; Xia, Tongqiang

    2015-01-01

    Methane extraction from in-seam boreholes is the main approach for recovering methane in China. However, the methane concentration for this method is generally lower than 30 %, which incurs a risk of methane outbursts during pipeline transportation. To increase the methane concentration, we first conducted permeability experiments to investigate the relationships between the permeability and the effective stress at different stages in the complete effective stress-strain process. We then adopted FLAC3D software to calculate the stress distributions around roadways and boreholes after their consecutive excavations and thereby divided the coal mass around the roadway and borehole according to different effective stress stages to understand the gas flow characteristics. The results show that the coal mass along the radial direction of the roadway and borehole can be sequentially divided into four zones, including the full flow zone (FFZ), the transitive flow zone (TFZ), the flow-shielding zone (FSZ), and the in situ rock flow zone (IRFZ), which have been proven correct by field experiments. The methane in the IRFZ was difficult to extract because of the low permeability of coal mass in this zone. The permeability of the FSZ was lower than that of the IRFZ. The permeability along the interface between the FSZ and TFZ was nearly one time as low as that of the IRFZ, while the permeability of the FFZ was two orders of magnitude higher than that of the IRFZ. This four-zone division demonstrates the decaying mechanism of methane extraction concentration and flow in the in-seam borehole and can provide theoretical guidance for improvement of methane extraction.

  6. Basic data report: borehole WIPP-12 deepening. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project, southeastern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S.R.

    1982-12-01

    Borehole WIPP-12 was originally drilled in 1978 as an exploratory borehole to characterize the geology of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in Eddy County, New Mexico. WIPP-12 was reentered and deepened in late 1981. WIPP-12 is located in Section 17, T22S, R31E, just outside the limit of Zone II, approximately one mile north of the exploratory shaft site. The deepening of WIPP-12 was undertaken for several reasons: to investigate the presence of an anticlinal or domal structure and thickening of halite indicated by surface seismic reflection surveys conducted in the area; to determine the nature and extent of deformation in the Castile Formation, in a location adjacent to the zone of anomalous seismic reflections found north of the well location (''Disturbed Zone''); and to characterize any fluid-bearing zones encountered in the Castile Formation while drilling. Field operations related to deepening of the borehole began November 16, 1981 and were completed January 1, 1982. The borehole was deepened through the Castile Formation to a total depth of 3927.5 ft by coring. Pressurized brine was encountered on November 22, 1981 at a depth of about 3016 ft. The brine reservoir is apparently related to a system of near-vertical fractures of unknown extent observed in Anhydrite III. The Halite I member is about 200 ft thicker than observed in undisturbed areas in the vicinity of WIPP (for example, Borehole DOE-1). Small-scale lithologic features such as folding of anhydrite stringers in halite and halite lineation appear to confirm the presence of a structural disturbance at this location. This Basic Data Report includes geologic information gathered during WIPP-12 deepening.

  7. Impact of Groundwater Flow on Thermal Energy Storage and Borehole Thermal Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emad Dehkordi, S.; Schincariol, Robert A.

    2013-04-01

    Borehole heat exchanger (BHE) systems are drawing increasing attention and popularity due to their potential energy efficiency and environmental sustainability, as well as their worldwide applicability. Consequently the concern for sustainable designs and proper implementation is rising too. Furthermore an improperly planned and executed system can be economically unjustifiable. To address these issues related design software and to some extent regulatory guidelines have been developed. Thermal input load function and interaction with the subsurface significantly affect thermal performance and sustainability of geothermal heat pump (GHP) systems. Of particular interest is the interaction of such systems with groundwater flow and its impacts. However the related guidelines and the design software do not seem to properly address this growing concern. Typically regulations do not distinguish between high and no groundwater flow conditions, nor do they specify a groundwater velocity threshold at which it becomes important. A further limitation is that most BHE design software used by industry assume a closed box approach discounting the heat transport in/out by the groundwater flow. To efficiently model grids of multiple BHEs, FEFLOW® 6 and the integrated BHE solution is used. Single and multiple borehole grids with U-tube heat exchanger are modeled and compared here. All boreholes are assigned equal heat extraction and flow rates; loop temperatures are then calculated over the system lifetime to compare the thermal efficiency and evaluate the thermal interference between boreholes. For the purpose of assessing the effect of groundwater flow on thermal storage as well as interference, multiple heat loads (balanced and unbalanced) are simulated. Groundwater velocity and borehole spacing are also varied to identify possible thresholds for each case. The study confirms the significance of groundwater flow in certain conditions. The results can be applied to improve the regulatory guidelines and design methods in regards with hydrogeological aspect of thermal and economical sustainability.

  8. A pseudo-spectral method for simulating poro-elastic wave propagation in complex borehole environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidler, Rolf; Carcione, José; Holliger, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    We present a novel approach for the comprehensive, flexible, and accurate simulation of poro-elastic wave propagation in 3D cylindrical coordinates. An important application of this method is the realistic modeling of complex seismic wave phenomena in fluid-filled boreholes, which represents a major, and as of yet largely unresolved, computational problem in exploration geophysics. To this end, we use numerical mesh consisting of three concentric domains representing the borehole fluid in the center followed by the casing and/or mudcake, and the surrounding porous formation. The spatial discretization is based on a Chebyshev expansion in the radial direction and Fourier expansions in the vertical and azimuthal directions as well as a Runge-Kutta integration scheme for the time evolution. A domain decomposition method based on the method of characteristics and trigonometric interpolation is used to match the boundary conditions at the fluid/porous-solid and porous-solid/porous-solid interfaces as well as to reduce the number of grid points in the innermost domain for computational efficiency. We apply this novel poro-elastic modeling approach to assess the sensitivity of Stoneley waves to formation permeability in the presence of a casing as well as to evaluate the effects of various kinds of heterogeneity in the porous formation on the recorded signals. Our results indicate that Stoneley waves are indeed remarkably sensitive to the average permeability of the heterogeneous porous formation behind a perforated PVC casing. Our results do, however, also indicate that the amplitudes of the Stoneley decay very rapidly from the borehole wall towards the center of the borehole and hence are correspondingly difficult to measure with conventional centered borehole logging tools.

  9. A vibrational spectroscopic study of the phosphate mineral rimkorolgite (Mg,Mn2+)5(Ba, Sr)(PO4)4·8H2O from Kovdor massif, Kola Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; López, Andrés; Theiss, Federick L.; Aarão, Guilherme Marcos; Scholz, Ricardo

    2014-11-01

    We have studied aspect of the molecular structure of the phosphate mineral rimkorolgite from Zheleznyi iron mine, Kovdor massif, Kola Peninsula, Russia, using SEM with EDX and vibrational spectroscopy. Qualitative chemical analysis shows a homogeneous phase, composed by P, Mg, Ba, Mn and Ca. Small amounts of Si were also observed. An intense Raman peak at 975 cm-1 is assigned to the PO43- ?1 symmetric stretching mode. The Raman band at 964 cm-1 is attributed to the HPO42- ?1 symmetric stretching vibration. Raman bands observed at 1016, 1035, 1052, 1073, 1105 and 1135 cm-1 are attributed to the ?3 antisymmetric stretching vibrations of the HPO42- and PO43- units. Complexity in the spectra of the phosphate bending region is observed. The broad Raman band at 3272 cm-1 is assigned to the water stretching vibration. Vibrational spectroscopy enables aspects on the molecular structure of rimkorolgite to be undertaken.

  10. Hydrogeologic Characterization of Fractured Crystalline Bedrock on the Southern Part of Manhattan, New York, Using Advanced Borehole Geophysical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumm, F.; Chu, A.; Joesten, P. K.; Lane, J. W.

    2007-12-01

    ABSTRACT. Advanced borehole-geophysical methods were used to assess the hydrogeology of fractured crystalline bedrock in 31 of 64 boreholes on the southern part of Manhattan Island, N.Y. The majority of boreholes penetrated gneiss, schist, and other crystalline bedrock, and had an average depth of 591 ft (180 m) below land surface (BLS). In this study we use a combination of advanced and conventional borehole geophysical logs, and hydraulic measurements to characterize the fractured-rock ground-water flow system in southern Manhattan, N.Y. Borehole-geophysical logs collected in this study included natural gamma, single-point-resistance (SPR), short-normal resistivity (R), mechanical and acoustic caliper, magnetic susceptibility, borehole-fluid temperature and resistivity, specific conductance (SpC), dissolved oxygen (DO), pH, redox, heat-pulse flowmeter (at eight selected boreholes), borehole deviation, acoustic and optical televiewer (ATV and OTV), and directional borehole radar (at 23 selected boreholes). A new geophysical probe that collects multiple fluid parameters, included fluid- temperature, SpC, DO, pH, and redox logs; these were used to help delineate transmissive fractures in the boreholes. All boreholes penetrated moderately fractured bedrock that contained medium and large fractures. A total of 208 large fractures were delineated in the 31 boreholes logged with the OTV. Stereonet analysis of the large fractures indicates most are part of a subhorizontal population cluster with a mean orientation of N43 degrees E, 07 degrees SE and a smaller secondary population cluster dipping toward the northwest. A total of 53 faults were delineated with two major population clusters--one with a mean orientation of N12 degrees W, 66 degrees W and the other with a mean orientation of N11 degrees W, 70 degrees E. Foliation was fairly consistent throughout the study area with dip azimuths ranging from northwest to southwest and dip angles ranging from 30 to 70 degrees. A total of 59 bedrock boreholes had specific-capacity test data analyzed for total borehole transmissivity. The bedrock transmissivity ranged from 0.7 to 870 feet squared per day (0.07 to 81 meters squared per day) in the study area. The majority of boreholes (69 percent) had transmissivities less than 100 feet squared per day (9.3 meters squared per day). Heat-pulse flowmeter logging was completed at eight boreholes. A total of 77 transmissive fractures were delineated at the 8 boreholes. Stereonet analysis of these transmissive fractures indicates two population clusters of fractures--one with a mean orientation of N11 degrees E, 14 degrees SE and the other with a mean orientation of N23 degrees E, 57 degrees NW. These data suggest that the fractured-rock ground-water-flow system in southern Manhattan is interconnected, dominated by subhorizontal fractures, and fractures that dip moderately to the northwest.

  11. Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS) Updated User’s Guide for Web-based Data Access and Export

    SciTech Connect

    Mackley, Rob D.; Last, George V.; Allwardt, Craig H.

    2008-09-24

    The Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS) is a prototype web-based graphical user interface (GUI) for viewing and downloading borehole geologic data. The HBGIS is being developed as part of the Remediation Decision Support function of the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project, managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland, Washington. Recent efforts have focused on improving the functionality of the HBGIS website in order to allow more efficient access and exportation of available data in HBGIS. Users will benefit from enhancements such as a dynamic browsing, user-driven forms, and multi-select options for selecting borehole geologic data for export. The need for translating borehole geologic data into electronic form within the HBGIS continues to increase, and efforts to populate the database continue at an increasing rate. These new web-based tools should help the end user quickly visualize what data are available in HBGIS, select from among these data, and download the borehole geologic data into a consistent and reproducible tabular form. This revised user’s guide supersedes the previous user’s guide (PNNL-15362) for viewing and downloading data from HBGIS. It contains an updated data dictionary for tables and fields containing borehole geologic data as well as instructions for viewing and downloading borehole geologic data.

  12. Analysis of the results of hydraulic-fracture stimulation of two crystalline bedrock boreholes, Grand Portage, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Fredrick L.; Olson, James D.

    1994-01-01

    Hydraulic fracture-stimulation procedures typical of those provided by contractors in the water-well industry were applied to two boreholes in basaltic and gabbroic rocks near Grand Portage, Minnesota.These boreholes were considered incapable of supplying adequate ground water for even a single household although geophysical logs showed both boreholes were intersected by many apparently permeable fractures. Tests made before and after stimulation indicated that the two boreholes would produce about 0.05 and 0.25 gallon per minute before stimulation, and about 1.5 and 1.2 gallons per minute after stimulation. These increases would be enough to obtain adequate domestic water supplies from the two boreholes but would not furnish enough water for more than a single household from either borehole. Profiles of high-resolution flow made during pumping after stimulation indicated that the stimulation enhanced previously small inflows or stimulated new inflow from seven fractures or fracture zones in one borehole and from six fractures or fracture zones in the other.Geophysical logs obtained after stimulation showed no specific changes in these 13 fractures that could be related to stimulation other than the increases in flow indicated by the flowmeter logs. The results indicate that the stimulation has increased inflow to the two boreholes by improving the connectivity of favorably orientated fractures with larger scale flow zones in the surrounding rocks. Three of four possible diagnostics related to measured pressure and flow during the stimulation treatments were weakly correlated with the increases in production associated with each treatment interval. These correlations are not statistically significant on the basis of the limited sample of 16 treatment intervals in two boreholes, but the results indicate that significant correlations might be established from a much larger data set.

  13. Electromagnetic Fields Due to a Loop Current in a CasedBorehole Surrounded by Uniform Whole Space

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.H.; Song, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Precise evaluation of electromagnetic (EM) response in steel-cased borehole is an essential first step towards developing techniques for casing parameter evaluation, which would ultimately help evaluating the formation response. In this report we demonstrate a numerical scheme for accurately computing EM responses in cased borehole environment. For improved numerical accuracy we use explicit representations of the electromagnetic spectra inside the borehole, in the casing, and in the formation. Instead of conventional Hankel transform, FFT is used to improve the numerical accuracy. The FFT approach allows us to compute fields at positions very close to the source loop, including the center of the transmitter loop.

  14. The rare-metal ore potential of the Proterozoic alkaline ultramafic massifs from eastern part of the Baltic Shield in the Kola alkaline province.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokhtina, Natalia; Kogarko, Lia

    2014-05-01

    The Kola Alkaline Province consists of intrusions of two main stages of the intraplate alkaline magmatism. The early stage of igneous activity occurred in Proterozoic 1.9 billion years ago, the next in Paleozoic at 380 million years. The Proterozoic alkaline magmatism produced Gremyakha-Vyrmes and Elet'ozero large alkaline-ultrabasic massifs, Tiksheozero carbonatite massif and numerous small syenite complexes. Paleozoic magmatism on Baltic Shield exhibited more widely, than Proterozoic. The world largest Khibiny and Lovozero alkaline intrusions, numerous alkaline-ultrabasic massifs with carbonanites, alkaline dike swarms and diatremes were formed. It is well known that carbonatites of Paleozoic alkaline-ultrabasic massifs contain large-scale deposits of rare-metal ores (Afanasiev et al., 1998). The metasomatic rocks on foidolites and carbonatites of Gremyakha-Vyrmes are final products of differentiation of Proterozoic alkaline-ultrabasic magma enriched in incompatible elements, including Nb and Zr similar to Paleozoic carbonatites. The massif Gremyakha-Vyrmes is one of the largest titanomagnetite-ilmenite deposits in Russia associated with ultrabasites. Our investigation showed that albite-microcline and aegirine-albite metasomatites formed rich rare-metal ores consisting of 3.2 wt. % Nb2O5 and 0.7 ZrO2. Zircon and pyrochlore-group minerals represent the main minerals of rare-metal ores. The following evolutionary sequences of pyrochlore group minerals has been observed: betafite or U pyrochlore - Na-Ca pyrochlore - Ba-Sr pyrochlore - "silicified" pyrochlore - Fe-Nb, Al-Nb silicates. Such evolution from primary Nb oxides to secondary silicates under low temperature hydrothermal conditions is similar to the evolution of rare metal phases in Paleozoic alkaline massifs analogous to Lovozero syenites and in carbonatites. The rare metal minerals of Gremyakha-Vyrmes crystallized in high alkaline hydrothermal environment at increased activity of Nb, Ta, Zr, U, Th and at temperature near 600-650°C (according to isotopic graphite-calcite, biotite-pyroxene and zircon-rutile thermometers). The minerals of latest stages occurred under low-temperature, decrease of pH and high activity of Si, REE, Sr, Ba, Fe and Al. Isotope data obtained for carbonatites and metasomatites of the Gremiakha-Vyrmes massif linked to a mantle source. We suggest that carbonatites were the source of Nb, U, Th, Zr and REE. Metasomatic rocks accumulate rare metals and could be formed during the metasomatism triggered by intrusion of carbonatites into the alkaline and basic-ultrabasic complexes of the massif. The nepheline-feldspathoid-aegirine pegmatoids, carbonatite veins and breccia of Elet'ozero Proterozoic alkaline-ultrabasic massif formed rare-metal ores and showed genetic similarity to final products of differentiation of the Gremyakha-Vyrmes. Research covered by RFBR grant 13-05-12021.

  15. Mantle sources and origin of the Middle Paleoproterozoic Jatulian Large Igneous Province of the Fennoscandian shield: evidence from isotope geochemical data on the Kuetsjarvi volcanics, Kola Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogina, Maria; Zlobin, Valeriy; Chistyakov, Alexeii; Evgenii, Sharkov

    2014-05-01

    Paleoproterozoic is one of the most important stages in the Earth's evolution as marking a cardinal change in a style of tectonomagmatic processes at 2.2-2.0 Ga, which corresponds to the formation of the Jatulian Large Igneous Province at the Fennoscandian Shield. The fragment of this province is represented by the volcanics of the Kuetsjarvi Group in the Kola Craton. These rocks differ in the extremely wide rock diversity and prominent role of alkaline rocks, the extremely rare rocks in the Precambrian. The rocks of the group are subdivided into the alkaline and tholeiitic basaltic series. The tholeiites are highly fractionated (mg# 38) high-Ti rocks enriched in HFSE. The alkaline series show wider mg# variations (32-52), which is inconsistent with a single fractionation sequence of these series. All rocks have high HFSE, at extremely wide LILE variations. Tholeiites show moderate LREE fractionation pattern at practically flat HREE: La/YbN = 3.6-4.5; La/SmN = 2.2-2.4, Gd/YbN = 1.5-1.7 and slight Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu* = 0.80-0.85). The alkaline rocks display much more fractionated LREE and fractionated HREE (La/YbN = 43.9-5.8; La/SmN = 2.2-2.4, Gd/YbN = 2.04-3.92) patterns at Eu anomaly varying from 0.53 to 1. The spidergrams of both series reveal negative Nb and Sr anomalies at sign-variable Ti anomaly. The alkaline rocks are enriched relative to tholeiites in U, Th, and Nb. Examination of behavior of incompatible trace elements offers an opportunity to compare the conditions of generation of parental mantle magmas of the studied series. In particular, the tholeiitic basalts have higher Zr/Nb ratios than the alkaline rocks, which in combination with their lower La/Yb ratios indicates their formation under the higher melting degree of mantle source as compared to the alkaline rocks. Simultaneous increase in Ce/Y ratio in the alkaline rocks may indicate their formation at greater depths. Tholeiitic basalts have lower Nb/U ratio, which testifies some crustal contamination of the melts. In addition, they have low Ti/Y (323-449) ratios and high Lu/Hf (0.11-0.16), which is typical of the rocks formed by melting of spinel peridotites. The alkaline basalts were derived from a deeper garnet-bearing mantle source (Ti/Y = 640-1140, Lu/Hf = 0.03-0.05). Isotope-geochemical study showed that these rocks have very similar Nd isotope composition ((eNd (2200) = +1.5 in the alkaline basalt and +1.9 in the tholeiites). It was found that the studied alkaline rocks are similar in composition to the OIB-type Tristan da Kunha basalts, while tholeiites are closer to the high-Ti rocks of the Parana plateau, which experienced significant lithospheric contribution. Obtained data confirm the within-plate setting at the Jatulian stage of the Fennoscandian Shield. The Kutesjarvi Group consists of two rock types: OIB-type alkaline and E-MORB-type tholeiitic, which is typical of most Phanerozoic large igneous provinces. However, unlike the latters, the rocks of this area were too much tectonized and eroded to compile a systematic sequence. But, the Kuetsjarvi Group may be considered as the fragment of the oldest large igneous province.

  16. Yegorovite, Na4[Si4O8(OH)4]·7H2O, a new mineral from the Lovozero alkaline pluton, Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekov, I. V.; Zubkova, N. V.; Chukanov, N. V.; Zadov, A. E.; Grishin, V. G.; Pushcharovsky, D. Yu.

    2010-12-01

    A new mineral, yegorovite, has been identified in the late hydrothermal, low-temperature assemblage of the Palitra hyperalkaline pegmatite at Mt. Kedykverpakhk, Lovozero alkaline pluton, Kola Peninsula, Russia. The mineral is intimately associated with revdite and megacyclite, earlier natrosilite, microcline, and villiaumite. Yegorovite occurs as coarse, usually split prismatic (up to 0.05 × 0.15 × 1 mm) or lamellar (up to 0.05 × 0.7 × 0.8 mm) crystals. Polysynthetic twins and parallel intergrowths are typical. Mineral individuals are combined in bunches or chaotic groups (up to 2 mm); radial-lamellar clusters are less frequent. Yegorovite is colorless, transparent with vitreous luster. Cleavage is perfect parallel to (010) and (001). Fracture is splintery; crystals are readily split into acicular fragments. The Mohs hardness is ˜2. Density is 1.90(2) g/cm3 (meas) and 1.92 g/cm3 (calc). Yegorovite is biaxial (-), with ? = 1.474(2), ? = 1.479(2), and ? = 1.482(2), 2 V meas > 70°, 2 V calc = 75°. The optical orientation is X ? a ˜ 15°, Y = c, Z = b. The IR spectrum is given. The chemical composition determined using an electron microprobe (H2O determined from total deficiency) is (wt %): 23.28 Na2O, 45.45 SiO2, 31.27 H2Ocalc; the total is 100.00. The empirical formula is Na3.98Si4.01O8.02(OH)3.98 · 7.205H2O. The idealized formula is Na4[Si4O8(OH)4] · 7H2O. Yegorovite is monoclinic, space group P21/ c. The unit-cell dimensions are a = 9.874, b= 12.398, c = 14.897 Å, ? = 104.68°, V = 1764.3 Å3, Z = 4. The strongest reflections in the X-ray powder pattern ( d, Å ( I, %)([ hkl]) are 7.21(70)[002], 6.21(72)[012, 020], 4.696(44)[022], 4.003(49)[211], 3.734(46)[ bar 2 13], 3.116(100)[024, 040], 2.463(38)[ bar 4 02, bar 2 43]. The crystal structure was studied by single-crystal method, R hkl = 0.0745. Yegorovite is a representative of a new structural type. Its structure consists of single chains of Si tetrahedrons [Si4O8(OH)4]? and sixfold polyhedrons of two types: [NaO(OH)2(H2O)3] and [NaO(OH)(H2O)4] centered by Na. The mineral was named in memory of Yu. K. Yegorov-Tismenko (1938-2007), outstanding Russian crystallographer and crystallochemist. The type material of yegorovite has been deposited at the Fersman Mineralogical Museum of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow.

  17. Middendorfite, K3Na2Mn5Si12(O,OH)36 · 2H2O, a new mineral species from the Khibiny pluton, Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekov, I. V.; Chukanov, N. V.; Dubinchuk, V. T.; Zadov, A. E.

    2007-12-01

    Middendorfite, a new mineral species, has been found in a hydrothermal assemblage in Hilairite hyperperalkaline pegmatite at the Kirovsky Mine, Mount Kukisvumchorr apatite deposit, Khibiny alkaline pluton, Kola Peninsula, Russia. Microcline, sodalite, cancrisilite, aegirine, calcite, natrolite, fluorite, narsarsukite, labuntsovite-Mn, mangan-neptunite, and donnayite are associated minerals. Middendorfite occurs as rhombshaped lamellar and tabular crystals up to 0.1 × 0.2 × 0.4 mm in size, which are combined in worm-and fanlike segregations up to 1 mm in size. The color is dark to bright orange, with a yellowish streak and vitreous luster. The mineral is transparent. The cleavage (001) is perfect, micalike; the fracture is scaly; flakes are flexible but not elastic. The Mohs hardness is 3 to 3.5. Density is 2.60 g/cm3 (meas.) and 2.65 g/cm3 (calc.). Middendorfite is biaxial (-), ? = 1.534, ? = 1.562, and ? = 1.563; 2 V (meas.) = 10°. The mineral is pleochroic strongly from yellowish to colorless on X through brown on Y and to deep brown on Z. Optical orientation: X = c. The chemical composition (electron microprobe, H2O determined with Penfield method) is as follows (wt %): 4.55 Na2O, 10.16 K2O, 0.11 CaO, 0.18 MgO, 24.88 MnO, 0.68 FeO, 0.15 ZnO, 0.20 Al2O3, 50.87 SiO2, 0.17 TiO2, 0.23 F, 7.73 H2O; -O=F2-0.10, total is 99.81. The empirical formula calculated on the basis of (Si,Al)12(O,OH,F)36 is K3.04(Na2.07Ca0.03)?2.10(Mn4.95Fe0.13Mg0.06Ti0.03Zn0.03)?5.20(Si11.94Al0.06)?12O27.57(OH)8.26F0.17 · 1.92H2O. The simplified formula is K3Na2Mn5Si12(O,OH)36 · 2H2O. Middenforite is monoclinic, space group: P21/ m or P21. The unit cell dimensions are a = 12.55, b = 5.721, c = 26.86 Å; ? = 114.04°, V = 1761 Å3, Z = 2. The strongest lines in the X-ray powder pattern [ d, Å, ( I)( hkl)] are: 12.28(100)(002), 4.31(81)(11overline 4 ), 3.555(62)(301, 212), 3.063(52)(008, 31overline 6 ), 2.840(90)(312, 021, 30overline 9 ), 2.634(88)(21overline 9 , 1.0.overline 1 0, 12overline 4 ), 2.366(76)(22overline 6 , 3.1.overline 1 0, 32overline 3 ), 2.109(54)(42 33, 42 44, 51overline 9 , 414), 1.669(64)(2.2.overline 1 3, 3.2.overline 1 3, 62overline 3 , 6.1.overline 1 3), 1.614(56)(5.0.overline 1 6, 137, 333, 71overline 1 ). The infrared spectrum is given. Middendorfite is a phyllosilicate related to bannisterite, parsenttensite, and the minerals of the ganophyllite and stilpnomelane groups. The new mineral is named in memory of A.F. von Middendorff (1815 1894), an outstanding scientist, who carried out the first mineralogical investigations in the Khibiny pluton. The type material of middenforite has been deposited at the Fersman Mineralogical Museum, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow.

  18. Vigrishinite, Zn2Ti4 - x Si4O14(OH,H2O,?)8, a new mineral from the Lovozero alkaline complex, Kola Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekov, I. V.; Britvin, S. N.; Zubkova, N. V.; Chukanov, N. V.; Bryzgalov, I. A.; Lykova, I. S.; Belakovskiy, D. I.; Pushcharovsky, D. Yu.

    2013-12-01

    A new mineral vigrishinite, epistolite-group member and first layer titanosilicate with species-defining Zn, was found at Mt. Malyi Punkaruaiv, in the Lovozero alkaline complex, Kola Peninsula, Russia. It occurs in a hydrothermally altered peralkaline pegmatite and is associated with microcline, ussingite, aegirine, analcime, gmelinite-Na, and chabazite-Ca. Vigrishinite forms rectangular or irregularly shaped lamellae up to 0.05 × 2 × 3 cm flattened on [001]. They are typically slightly split and show blocky character. The mineral is translucent to transparent and pale pink, yellowish-pinkish or colorless. The luster is vitreous. The Mohs' hardness is 2.5-3. Vigrishinite is brittle. Cleavage is {001} perfect. D meas = 3.03(2), D calc = 2.97 g/cm3. The mineral is optically biaxial (-), ? = 1.755(5), ? = 1.82(1), ? = 1.835(8), 2 V meas = 45(10)°, 2 V calc = 50°. IR spectrum is given. The chemical composition (wt %; average of 9 point analyses, H2O is determined by modified Penfield method) is as follows: 0.98 Na2O, 0.30 K2O, 0.56 CaO, 0.05 SrO, 0.44 BaO, 0.36 MgO, 2.09 MnO, 14.39 ZnO, 2.00 Fe2O3, 0.36 Al2O3, 32.29 SiO2, 29.14 TiO2, 2.08 ZrO2, 7.34 Nb2O5, 0.46 F, 9.1 H2O, -0.19 O=F2, total is 101.75. The empirical formula calculated on the basis of Si + Al = 4 is: H7.42(Zn1.30Na0.23Mn0.22Ca0.07Mg0.07K0.05Ba0.02)?1.96(Ti2.68Nb0.41Fe{0.18/3+}Zr0.12)?3.39(Si3.95Al0.05)?4 20.31F0.18. The simplified formula is: Zn2Ti4- x Si4O14(OH,H2O,?)8 ( x < 1). Vigrishinite is triclinic, space group P , a = 8.743(9), b = 8.698(9), c = 11.581(11)Å, ? = 91.54(8)°, ? = 98.29(8)°, ? = 105.65(8)°, V = 837.2(1.5) Å3, Z = 2. The strongest reflections in the X-ray powder pattern ( d, Å, - I[ hkl]) are: 11.7-67[001], 8.27-50[100], 6.94-43[01, 10], 5.73-54[11, 002], 4.17-65[020, 2, 200], and 2.861-100[30, 22, 004, 11]. The crystal structure model was obtained on a single crystal, R = 0.171. Vigrishinite and murmanite are close in the structure of the TiSiO motif, but strongly differ from each other in part of large cations and H-bearing groups. Vigrishinite is named in honor of Viktor G. Grishin (b. 1953), a Russian amateur mineralogist and mineral collector, to pay tribute to his contribution to the mineralogy of the Lovozero Complex. The type specimen is deposited in the Fersman Mineralogical Museum of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow.

  19. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the T Tank Farm: Boreholes C4104, C4105, 299-W10-196 and RCRA Borehole 299-W11-39

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R JEFFREY.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; LeGore, Virginia L.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Orr, Robert D.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2004-09-01

    This report contains geologic, geochemical, and physical characterization data collected on sediment recovered from boreholes C4104 and C4105 in the T Tank Farm, and 299-W-11-39 installed northeast of the T Tank Farm. The measurements on sediments from borehole C4104 are compared to a nearby borehole 299-W10-196 placed through the plume from the 1973 T-106 tank leak. This report also presents the data in the context of sediment types, the vertical extent of contamination, the migration potential of the contaminants, and the likely source of the contamination in the vadose zone and groundwater below the T Tank Farm. Sediment samples were characterized for: moisture content, gamma-emission radionuclides, one-to-one water extracts (which provide soil pH, electrical conductivity, cation, trace metal, radionuclide and anion data), total carbon and inorganic carbon content, and 8 M nitric acid extracts (which provide a measure of the total leachable sediment content of contaminants). Overall, our analyses showed that common ion exchange is a key mechanism that influences the distribution of contaminants within that portion of the vadose zone affected by tank liquor. We observed slight elevated pH values in samples from borehole C4104. The sediments from the three boreholes, C4104, C4105, and 299-W10-196 do show that sodium-, nitrate-, and sulfate-dominated fluids are present below tank T-106 and have formed a salt plume. The fluids are more dilute than tank fluids observed below tanks at the SX and BX Tank Farms and slightly less than those from the most saline porewater found in contaminated TX tank farm sediments. The boreholes could not penetrate below the gravel-rich strata of the Ringold Formation Wooded Island member (Rwi) (refusal was met at about 130 ft bgs); therefore, we could not identify the maximum vertical penetration of the tank related plumes. The moisture content, pH, electrical conductivity, nitrate, and technetium-99 profiles versus depth in the three contaminated boreholes around T-106 do not clearly identify the leading edge of the plume. However, the profiles do collectively suggest that bulk of tank-related fluids (center of mass) still resides in Ringold Formation Taylor Flats member fine-grained sediments. Most of the chemical data, especially the nitrate and technetium-99 distributions with depth, support a flow conceptual model that suggests vertical percolation through the Hanford formation H2 unit near T-106 and then a strong horizontal spreading within the CCUu unit followed by more slow vertical percolation, perhaps via diffusion, into the deeper strata. Slow flushing by enhanced recharge and rapid snow melt events (Feb. 1979) appear to lead to more horizontal movement of the tank fluids downgradient towards C4105. The inventories as a function of depth of potential contaminants of concern, nitrate, technetium, uranium, and chromium, are provided. In-situ Kd values were calculated from water and acid extract measurements. For conservative modeling purposes we recommend using Kd values of 0 mL/g for nitrate, Co-60, and technetium-99, a value of 0.1 mL/g for uranium near borehole C4104 and 10 mL/g for U near borehole C4105, and 1 mL/g for chromium to represent the entire vadose zone profile from the bottoms of the tanks to the water table. A technetium-99 groundwater plume exists northeast and east of T WMA. The highest technetium-99 concentration in fiscal year 2003 was 9,200 pCi/L in well 299-W11-39. The most probable source for the technetium-99 is the T waste management area. Groundwater from wells in the west (upgradient) and north of WMA T appear to be highly influenced by wastes disposed to the cribs and trenches on the west side of the WMA. Groundwater from wells at the northeast corner and the east side of the WMA appears to be evolving towards tank waste that has leaked from T-101 or T-106.

  20. Uranium in Hanford Site 300 Area: Extraction Data on Borehole Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guohui; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Lindberg, Michael J.; Um, Wooyong; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Williams, Benjamin D.; Kutynakov, I. V.; Wang, Zheming; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2012-11-26

    In this study, sediments collected from boreholes drilled in 2010 and 2011 as part of a remedial investigation/feasibility study were characterized. The wells, located within or around two process ponds and one process trench waste site, were characterized in terms of total uranium concentration, mobile fraction of uranium, particle size, and moisture content along the borehole depth. In general, the gravel-dominated sediments of the vadose zone Hanford formation in all investigated boreholes had low moisture contents. Based on total uranium content, a total of 48 vadose zone and periodically rewetted zone sediment samples were selected for more detailed characterization, including measuring the concentration of uranium extracted with 8 M nitric acid, and leached using bicarbonate mixed solutions to determine the liable uranium (U(VI)) contents. In addition, water extraction was conducted on 17 selected sediments. Results from the sediment acid and bicarbonate extractions indicated the total concentrations of anthropogenic labile uranium in the sediments varied among the investigated boreholes. The peak uranium concentration (114.84 µg/g, acid extract) in <2-mm size fractions was found in borehole 399 1-55, which was drilled directly in the southwest corner of the North Process Pond. Lower uranium concentrations (~0.3–2.5 µg/g, acid extract) in <2-mm size fractions were found in boreholes 399-1-57, 399-1-58, and 399-1-59, which were drilled either near the Columbia River or inland and upgradient of any waste process ponds or trenches. A general trend of “total” uranium concentrations was observed that increased as the particle size decreased when relating the sediment particle size and acid extractable uranium concentrations in two selected sediment samples. The labile uranium bicarbonate leaching kinetic experiments on three selected sediments indicated a two-step leaching rate: an initial rapid release, followed by a slow continual release of uranium from the sediment. Based on the uranium leaching kinetic results, quasi equilibrium can be assumed after 1000-h batch reaction time in this study.

  1. Application of an iterative analytical model for determining formation permeability from temperature data in subseafloor boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, D. M.; Fisher, A. T.; Becker, K.

    2010-12-01

    We have developed a computer program that links three separate analytical calculations used to determine bulk formation properties from thermal data collected in subseafloor boreholes. The three analytical calculations are based on (1) the thermal influence of transient downhole or uphole flow resulting from a combination of natural formation pressure and excess borehole pressure induced by drilling and other operations; (2) pressure differences between the borehole and ambient formation associated with observed and inferred thermal conditions; and (3) rates of flow into or out of the borehole at depth as a result of radial flow to or from the formation, based on the transient pressure response. These three calculations have generally been made separately in the past, and linking them allows the results of the calculation (3) to be applied as input for calculation (1), leading to iterative convergence on a single set of self-consistent formation properties and flow rates. This linked approach will also facilitate a more rigorous assessment of uncertainty in formation properties. The new program, written in a common scientific programming environment, improves on earlier approximations for fluid properties and accounts for changes in gravitational potential energy arising from rapid movement of fluids up or down the borehole. We have applied this analytical tool to a new temperature record from IODP Hole 1301A, in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Data were recorded by an autonomous temperature probe and logger deployed for four years in a subseafloor borehole observatory. Analysis of the thermal record from the first five months following observatory installation, when there was sustained downflow through annular gaps between concentric casing strings at the seafloor, indicates a flow rate of ~3 L/s into the formation surrounding the open hole. This downhole flow rate is consistent with a bulk formation permeability of 10^-12 m^2, a value that is (a) somewhat lower than inferred within a deeper crustal section tested with a drillstring packer in Hole 1301B, 36 m away, and (b) similar to a value determined on the basis of the pressure response in Hole 1027C, 2.4 km from Holes 1301A and 1301B, resulting from 13 months of sustained downflow of cold bottom water into Hole 1301B.

  2. High-Resolution Fault Zone Monitoring and Imaging Using Long Borehole Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsson, B. N.; Karrenbach, M.; Goertz, A. V.; Milligan, P.

    2004-12-01

    Long borehole seismic receiver arrays are increasingly used in the petroleum industry as a tool for high--resolution seismic reservoir characterization. Placing receivers in a borehole avoids the distortion of reflected seismic waves by the near-surface weathering layer which leads to greatly improved vector fidelity and a much higher frequency content of 3-component recordings. In addition, a borehole offers a favorable geometry to image near-vertically dipping or overturned structure such as, e.g., salt flanks or faults. When used for passive seismic monitoring, long borehole receiver arrays help reducing depth uncertainties of event locations. We investigate the use of long borehole seismic arrays for high-resolution fault zone characterization in the vicinity of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD). We present modeling scenarios to show how an image of the vertically dipping fault zone down to the penetration point of the SAFOD well can be obtained by recording surface sources in a long array within the deviated main hole. We assess the ability to invert fault zone reflections for rock physical parameters by means of amplitude versus offset or angle (AVO/AVA) analyzes. The quality of AVO/AVA studies depends on the ability to illuminate the fault zone over a wide range of incidence angles. We show how the length of the receiver array and the receiver spacing within the borehole influence the size of the volume over which reliable AVO/AVA information could be obtained. By means of AVO/AVA studies one can deduce hydraulic properties of the fault zone such as the type of fluids that might be present, the porosity, and the fluid saturation. Images of the fault zone obtained from a favorable geometry with a sufficient illumination will enable us to map fault zone properties in the surrounding of the main hole penetration point. One of the targets of SAFOD is to drill into an active rupture patch of an earthquake cluster. The question of whether or not this goal has indeed been achieved at the time the fault zone is penetrated can only be answered if the rock properties found at the penetration point can be compared to the surrounding volume. This task will require mapping of rock properties inverted from AVO/AVA analyzes of fault zone reflections. We will also show real data examples of a test deployment of a 4000 ft, 80-level clamped 3-component receiver array in the SAFOD main hole in 2004.

  3. Microbial diversity within Juan de Fuca ridge basement fluids sampled from oceanic borehole observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungbluth, S.; Bowers, R.; Lin, H.; Hsieh, C.; Cowen, J. P.; Rappé, M.

    2012-12-01

    Three generations of sampling and instrumentation platforms known as Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit (CORK) observatories affixed to Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) boreholes are providing unrivaled access to fluids originating from 1.2-3.5 million-years (Myr) old basaltic crust of the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca ridge. Borehole fluid samples obtained via a custom seafloor fluid pumping and sampling system coupled to CORK continuous fluid delivery lines are yielding critical insights into the biogeochemistry and nature of microbial life inhabiting the sediment-covered basement environment. Direct microscopic enumeration revealed microbial cell abundances that are 2-41% of overlying bottom seawater. Snapshots of basement fluid microbial diversity and community structure have been obtained through small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene cloning and sequencing from five boreholes that access a range of basement ages and temperatures at the sediment-basement interface. SSU rRNA gene clones were derived from four different CORK installations (1026B, 1301A, 1362A, and 1362B) accessing relatively warmer (65°C) and older (3.5 Myr) ridge flank, and one location (1025C) accessing relatively cooler (39°C) and younger (1.2 Myr) ridge flank, revealing that warmer basement fluids had higher microbial diversity. A sampling time-series collected from borehole 1301A has revealed a microbial community that is temporally variable, with the dominant lineages changing between years. Each of the five boreholes sampled contained a unique microbial assemblage, however, common members are found from both cultivated and uncultivated lineages within the archaeal and bacterial domains, including meso- and thermophilic microbial lineages involved with sulfur cycling (e.g Thiomicrospira, Sulfurimonas, Desulfocapsa, Desulfobulbus). In addition, borehole fluid environmental gene clones were also closely related to uncultivated lineages recovered from both terrestrial and marine hydrothermal systems (e.g. Candidatus Desulforudis, Candidate Phylum OP8) as well as globally distributed marine sediments (e.g. Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group, JTB35). This analysis provides a framework for future research investigating the evolutionary and functional diversity, population genetics, and activity of the poorly understood habitat. These ongoing sampling expeditions greatly benefit from improvements to both CORK observatories and evolving sampling equipment including microbiologically-friendly materials and dependable access to pristine fluids from the ocean crust.

  4. Water borne transport of high level nuclear waste in very deep borehole disposal of high level nuclear waste

    E-print Network

    Cabeche, Dion Tunick

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to examine the feasibility of the very deep borehole experiment and to determine if it is a reasonable method of storing high level nuclear waste for an extended period of time. The objective ...

  5. Information on stress conditions in the oceanic crust from oval fractures in a deep borehole

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    Oval images etched into the wall of a deep borehole were detected in DSDP Hole 504B, eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, from analysis of an acoustic televiewer log. A systematic inspection of these ovals has identified intriguing consistencies in appearance that cannot be explained satisfactorily by a random, coincidental distribution of pillow lavas. As an alternative hypothesis, Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion is used to account for the generation and orientation of similarly curved, stress-induced fractures. Consequently, these oval features can be interpreted as fractures and related directly to stress conditions in the oceanic crust at this site. The azimuth of the oval center corresponds to the orientation of maximum horizontal principal stress (SH), and the oval width, which spans approximately 180?? of the borehole, is aligned with the azimuth of minimum horizontal principal stress (Sh). The oval height is controlled by the fracture angle and thus is a function of the coefficient of internal friction of the rock. -from Author

  6. Method of measuring material properties of rock in the wall of a borehole

    DOEpatents

    Overmier, D.K.

    1984-01-01

    To measure the modulus of elasticity of the rock in the wall of a borehole, a plug is cut in the borehole wall. The plug, its base attached to the surrounding rock, acts as a short column in response to applied forces. A loading piston is applied to the top of the plug and compression of the plug is measured as load is increased. Measurements of piston load and plug longitudinal deformation are made to determine the elastic modulus of the plug material. Poisson's ratio can be determined by simultaneous measurements of longitudinal and lateral deformation of the plug in response to loading. To determine shear modulus, the top of the plug is twisted while measurements are taken of torsional deformation.

  7. Method of measuring material properties of rock in the wall of a borehole

    DOEpatents

    Overmier, David K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    To measure the modulus of elasticity of the rock in the wall of a borehole, a plug is cut in the borehole wall. The plug, its base attached to the surrounding rock, acts as a short column in response to applied forces. A loading piston is applied to the top of the plug and compression of the plug is measured as load is increased. Measurement of piston load and plug longitudinal deformation are made to determine the elastic modulus of the plug material. Poisson's ratio can be determined by simultaneous measurements of longitudinal and lateral deformation of the plug in response to loading. To determine shear modulus, the top of the plug is twisted while measurements are taken of torsional deformation.

  8. Study of Ice Sheet Basal Processes With Visible Light Images Acquired from a Borehole Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carsey, F. D.; Behar, A.; Engelhardt, H.; Craven, M.; Vogel, S.; Christoffersen, P.

    2004-12-01

    We have developed and deployed the JPL Ice Borehole Camera system into boreholes in two sites in Antarctica (and are deploying it in a third at the time of this meeting), and we have analyzed the image data to improve our understanding of processes at the bed of ice streams and the at basal surface of ice shelves. Though quite simple, the image data sets permitted interpretation of basal freeze-on associated with "binge and purge" processes of the Kamb Ice Stream as well as ice accretion processes, marine ice character and the marine ice-meteoric ice interface of the Amery Ice Shelf. In many ways the hot-water drilled hole is an excellent photographic environment for study of ice sheet phenomena; we are now examining means of augmenting simple digital imagery with additional optical, noninvasive interrogation strategies in order to obtain data on included particle properties, clathrate content, biological materials and phenomena, and on-going dynamic processes.

  9. Device and method for generating a beam of acoustic energy from a borehole, and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian; Nihei, Kurt T.; Schmitt, Denis P.; Skelt, Chirstopher

    2013-10-15

    In some aspects of the invention, a method of generating a beam of acoustic energy in a borehole is disclosed. The method includes generating a first acoustic wave at a first frequency; generating a second acoustic wave at a second frequency different than the first frequency, wherein the first acoustic wave and second acoustic wave are generated by at least one transducer carried by a tool located within the borehole; transmitting the first and the second acoustic waves into an acoustically non-linear medium, wherein the composition of the non-linear medium produces a collimated beam by a non-linear mixing of the first and second acoustic waves, wherein the collimated beam has a frequency based upon a difference between the first frequency range and the second frequency, and wherein the non-linear medium has a velocity of sound between 100 m/s and 800 m/s.

  10. Methods and apparatus for measurement of the resistivity of geological formations from within cased boreholes

    DOEpatents

    Vail, W.B. III.

    1989-04-11

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the resistivity of a geological formation through borehole casing which may be surrounded by brine saturated cement. A.C. current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. The A.C. voltage difference is measured between two additional vertically disposed electrodes on the interior of the casing which provides a measure of the resistivity of the geological formation. A calibration and nulling procedure is presented which minimizes the influence of variations in the thickness of the casing. The procedure also minimizes the influence of inaccurate placements of the additional vertically disposed electrodes. 3 figs.

  11. Methods and apparatus for measurement of the resistivity of geological formations from within cased boreholes

    DOEpatents

    Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

    1989-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the resistivity of a geological formation through borehole casing which may be surrounded by brine saturated cement. A.C. current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. The A.C. voltage difference is measured between two additional vertically disposed electrodes on the interior of the casing which provides a measure of the resistivity of the geological formation. A calibration and nulling procedure is presented which minimizes the influence of variations in the thickness of the casing. The procedure also minimizes the influence of inaccurate placements of the additional vertically disposed electrodes.

  12. Portable apparatus and method for assisting in the removal and emplacement of pipe strings in boreholes

    DOEpatents

    Mitchell, Brian R.

    2005-03-22

    A portable pipe installation/removal support apparatus for assisting in the installation/removal of a series of connectable pipe strings from a ground-level borehole. The support apparatus has a base, an upright extending from the base, and, in an exemplary embodiment, a pair of catch arms extending from the upright to define a catch platform. The pair of catch arms serves to hold an upper connector end of a pipe string at an operator-convenient standing elevation by releasably catching an underside of a pipe coupler connecting two pipe strings of the series of connectable pipe strings. This enables an operator to stand upright while coupling/uncoupling the series of connectable pipe strings during the installation/removal thereof from the ground-level borehole. Additionally, a process for installing and a process for removing a series of connectable pipe strings is disclosed utilizing such a support apparatus.

  13. Use of an acoustic borehole televiewer to investigate casing corrosion in geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, C.C.; Bauman, T.

    1986-03-01

    Corrosion of well and surface equipment due to the presence of hot, corrosive brines is one of the major problems facing geothermal operators. For wellbore casing, this problem is complicated by the fact that in-place inspection is difficult at best. In an attempt to improve this situation, a prototype acoustic borehole televiewer designed to operate in geothermal wells was used to study the corrosion damage to casing in three commercial wells. The results of this experiment were promising. The televiewer returns helped to define areas of major corrosion damage and to indicate the extent of the damage. This paper briefly discusses the corrosion problem, describes the acoustic borehole televiewer, and then summarizes the results of the field test of the televiewer's capability for investigating corrosion.

  14. Laboratory and numerical evaluation of borehole methods for subsurface horizontal flow characterization.

    SciTech Connect

    Pedler, William H. (Radon Abatement Systems, Inc., Golden, CO); Jepsen, Richard Alan (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM)

    2003-08-01

    The requirement to accurately measure subsurface groundwater flow at contaminated sites, as part of a time and cost effective remediation program, has spawned a variety of flow evaluation technologies. Validation of the accuracy and knowledge regarding the limitations of these technologies are critical for data quality and application confidence. Leading the way in the effort to validate and better understand these methodologies, the US Army Environmental Center has funded a multi-year program to compare and evaluate all viable horizontal flow measurement technologies. This multi-year program has included a field comparison phase, an application of selected methods as part of an integrated site characterization program phase, and most recently, a laboratory and numerical simulator phase. As part of this most recent phase, numerical modeling predictions and laboratory measurements were made in a simulated fracture borehole set-up within a controlled flow simulator. The scanning colloidal borescope flowmeter (SCBFM) and advanced hydrophysical logging (NxHpL{trademark}) tool were used to measure velocities and flow rate in a simulated fractured borehole in the flow simulator. Particle tracking and mass flux measurements were observed and recorded under a range of flow conditions in the simulator. Numerical models were developed to aid in the design of the flow simulator and predict the flow conditions inside the borehole. Results demonstrated that the flow simulator allowed for predictable, easily controlled, and stable flow rates both inside and outside the well. The measurement tools agreed well with each other over a wide range of flow conditions. The model results demonstrate that the Scanning Colloidal Borescope did not interfere with the flow in the borehole in any of the tests. The model is capable of predicting flow conditions and agreed well with the measurements and observations in the flow simulator and borehole. Both laboratory and model results showed a lower limit of fracture velocity in which inflow occurs, but horizontal flow does not establish itself in the center of the borehole. In addition, both laboratory and model results showed circulation cells in the borehole above and below the fracture horizon. The length of the interval over which the circulating cells occurred was much larger than the interval of actual horizontal flow. These results suggest that for the simple fracture geometry simulated in this study, horizontal flow can be predictable and measurable, and that this flow is representative of the larger, near- field flow system. Additional numerical refinements and laboratory simulations of more robust, life- like fracture geometries should be considered. The preliminary conclusions of this work suggest the following: (1) horizontal flow in the fractured medium which is representative of the near- field flow conditions can be established in a wellbore; (2) this horizontal flow can be accurately measured and numerically predicted; (3) the establishment of directionally quantifiable horizontal flow is dependent on four parameters: borehole diameter, structure, permeability and the hydraulic gradient of the flowing feature; and, (4) by measuring three of these four parameters, the fourth parameter can be numerically derived through computer simulations.

  15. Borehole GPR measurement of soil water content during an infiltration experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, David; Parkin, Gary W.; Annan, A. P.

    2000-04-01

    Borehole ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements of water content within the unsaturated zone were performed during infiltration experiments using both a uniform and point source of water at the soil surface. Horizontal GPR antenna access tubes were installed at a depth of 1 m to measure the water content within the horizontal plane underlying the surface water sources. The zero offset profile and multiple offset gather modes of data collection were used to produce velocity profiles and tomograms that were converted to water content. Time domain reflectometry (TDR) probes provided near-surface measurements of water content to complement the deeper borehole GPR data. For the point source, the water content tomograms and profiles showed that the zone of increased water content was restricted to a 1 m diameter zone, centered below the point source. For the uniform source, significant variability in water content within the studied area was observed possible due to preferential flow of water through the soil profile.

  16. The Research on Borehole Stability in Depleted Reservoir and Caprock: Using the Geophysics Logging Data

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jingen; Luo, Yong; Guo, Shisheng; Zhang, Haishan; Tan, Qiang; Zhao, Kai; Hu, Lianbo

    2013-01-01

    Long-term oil and gas exploitation in reservoir will lead to pore pressure depletion. The pore pressure depletion will result in changes of horizontal in-situ stresses both in reservoirs and caprock formations. Using the geophysics logging data, the magnitude and orientation changes of horizontal stresses in caprock and reservoir are studied. Furthermore, the borehole stability can be affected by in-situ stresses changes. To address this issue, the dehydration from caprock to reservoir and roof effect of caprock are performed. Based on that, the influence scope and magnitude of horizontal stresses reduction in caprock above the depleted reservoirs are estimated. The effects of development on borehole stability in both reservoir and caprock are studied step by step with the above geomechanical model. PMID:24228021

  17. Canister cryogenic system for cooling germanium semiconductor detectors in borehole and marine probes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boynton, G.R.

    1975-01-01

    High resolution intrinsic and lithium-drifted germanium gamma-ray detectors operate at about 77-90 K. A cryostat for borehole and marine applications has been designed that makes use of prefrozen propane canisters. Uses of such canisters simplifies cryostat construction, and the rapid exchange of canisters greatly reduces the time required to restore the detector to full holding-time capability and enhances the safety of a field operation where high-intensity 252Cf or other isotopic sources are used. A holding time of 6 h at 86 K was achieved in the laboratory in a simulated borehole probe in which a canister 3.7 cm diameter by 57 cm long was used. Longer holding times can be achieved by larger volume canisters in marine probes. ?? 1975.

  18. Borehole data package for well 699-37-47A, PUREX Plant Cribs, CY 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, J.W.; Williams, B.A.; Spane, F.A.

    1997-02-01

    A new groundwater monitoring well (699-37-47A) was installed in 1996 as a downgradient well near the PUREX Plant Cribs Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facility at Hanford. This document provides data from the well drilling and construction operations, as well as data from subsequent characterization of groundwater and sediment samples collected during the drilling process. The data include: well construction documentation, geologist`s borehole logs, results of laboratory analysis of groundwater samples collected during drilling and of physical tests conducted on sediment samples collected during drilling, borehole geophysics, and results of aquifer testing including slug tests and flowmeter analysis. This well (699-37-47A) was constructed in support of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-24-00H and interim milestone M-24-35 (Ecology et al. 1994), and was funded under Project W-152.

  19. Site Characterization Data from the U3ax/bl Exploratory Boreholes at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2005-08-01

    This report provides qualitative analyses and preliminary interpretations of hydrogeologic data obtained from two 45-degree, slanted exploratory boreholes drilled within the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site. Borehole UE-3bl-D1 was drilled beneath the U3ax/bl mixed waste disposal unit, and Borehole UE-3bl-U1 was drilled in undisturbed alluvium adjacent to the disposal unit. The U3ax/bl disposal unit is located within two conjoined subsidence craters, U3ax and U3bl, which were created by underground nuclear testing. Data from these boreholes were collected to support site characterization activities for the U3ax/bl disposal unit and the entire Area 3 RWMS. Site characterization at disposal units within the Area 3 RWMS must address the possibility that subsidence craters and associated disturbed alluvium of the chimneys beneath the craters might serve as pathways for contaminant migration. The two boreholes were drilled and sampled to compare hydrogeologic properties of alluvium below the waste disposal unit with those of adjacent undisturbed alluvium. Whether Borehole UE-3bl-D1 actually penetrated the chimney of the U3bl crater is uncertain. Analyses of core samples showed little difference in hydrogeologic properties between the two boreholes. Important findings of this study include the following: No hazardous or radioactive constituents of waste disposal concern were found in the samples obtained from either borehole. No significant differences in physical and hydrogeologic properties between boreholes is evident, and no evidence of significant trends with depth for any of these properties was observed. The values observed are typical of sandy materials. The alluvium is dry, with volumetric water content ranging from 5.6 to 16.2 percent. Both boreholes exhibit a slight increase in water content with depth, the only such trend observed. Water potential measurements on core samples from both boreholes show a large positive potential gradient (water moves upward, via evapotranspiration) for the entire vertical depth. Very little liquid flow occurs through the vadose zone. The direction of flow in the upper vadose zone (approximately the upper 35 meters) is upward, based on unsaturated hydraulic conductivity data, water potential data, and environmental tracer data.

  20. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the C Tank Farm: Borehole C4297 and RCRA Borehole 299-E27-22

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Parker, Kent E.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.7 and 4.25. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in September 2006. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at the Hanford Site. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) C. This report is the first of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physiochemical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from borehole C4297, installed adjacent to tank C-105, and from borehole 299-E27-22, installed directly north of the C Tank Farm. This report also presents the interpretation of data in the context of sediment types, the vertical extent of contamination, the migration potential of the contaminants, and the likely source of the contamination in the vadose zone below the C Tank Farm. The information presented in this report supports the WMA A-AX, C, and U field investigation report in preparation by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc.

  1. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the TX Tank Farm: Boreholes C3830, C3831, C3832 and RCRA Borehole 299-W10-27

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; Orr, Robert D.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.8, 4.28,4.43, and 4.59. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in April 2004. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) T-TX-TY. This report is the first of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from boreholes C3830, C3831, and C3832 in the TX Tank Farm, and from borehole 299-W-10-27 installed northeast of the TY Tank Farm.

  2. Use of generator produced neutrons in coal analysis: Quarterly report, December 16, 1985March 15, 1986. [Around a borehole

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. N. Thorpe; F. E. Senftle

    1986-01-01

    As discussed in the last report, we are investigating the use of a neutron generator for borehole coal analyses. The neutron borehole probe uses a D-T (deuterium-tritium) accelerator tube called a Zetatron. The D-T accelerator tube emits bursts of 14 MeV neutrons due to the fusion reaction of deuterium with tritium. The Zetatron is a small D-T accelerator tube package

  3. Upper Triassic reef facies in the Asher-Atlit-1 borehole, Northern Israel: Microfacies, cement stratigraphy and paleogeographic implications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dorit Korngreen; Chaim Benjamini

    2001-01-01

    Summary  The late Triassic succession of the Asher-Atlit 1 borehole is over 1000 m thick, and is composed of reefal and associated\\u000a facies interbedded with volcanics of Norian age. Only borehole cuttings are available. Microfacies classification and cement\\u000a stratigraphy determined by optical and CL microscopy, allowed discrimination of six episodes of reef establishment, progradation,\\u000a shallowing, and termination. Organic buildups are constructed

  4. Detecting urbanization effect on the subsurface thermal environment from borehole temperature measurements in Xi'an, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, C.; Huang, S.; Ren, Y.; Wang, H.; Peng, F.; Wang, X.; Du, M.

    2012-12-01

    With increasing evidence of the dual impacts of global warming and urbanization, urban heat island effects have attracted tremendous attentions from scientific community and the general public. However, most of the existing research efforts so far have been given to the above-surface aspects of urban heat islands. The prospective thermal environmental changes beneath the urban ground surface remain largely unnoted. In a fast expanding campus of the Xi'an Jiaotong University in Xi'an, China, we have established a comprehensive environmental monitoring system consisting of a typical ground surface meteorological station, two rooftop meteorological masts, and a 510 m deep borehole observatory. The borehole is dedicated for the detection of changes in ground temperature at various depths with respect to urbanization and other environmental changes. Underground temperature of this borehole has been repeatedly logged more than 25 times to date. Systematic temperature differences between two consecutive logs due to the thermal recovery from drilling perturbation were notable for about 1 month after the completion of drilling in March 2012. The differences has felled below observation error since then, except for the most upper 10 m which is possibly influenced by diurnal and seasonal temperature fluctuations at the ground surface. Analysis of the temperature measurements from this scientific borehole observatory shows a ground surface warming of 2 degree-C over the past 20 years which can be attributed in part to the land cover and land use change from farm land to urban settings of the borehole site. Additionally, we have systematically measured 15 hydrological observation boreholes within the limit of the Xi'an Municipal City; 6 of the boreholes are located in urban areas and 9 in suburban/rural areas. Several boreholes are apparently perturbed by ground water pumping. Nevertheless, conductive temperature profiles show that temperatures within the upper 100 to 150 m depths are on average about 0.7 degree-C higher in the urban areas than in the suburban/rural areas.

  5. Analysis of in-situ rock joint strength using digital borehole scanner images

    SciTech Connect

    Thapa, B.B.

    1994-09-01

    The availability of high resolution digital images of borehole walls using the Borehole Scanner System has made it possible to develop new methods of in-situ rock characterization. This thesis addresses particularly new approaches to the characterization of in-situ joint strength arising from surface roughness. An image processing technique is used to extract the roughness profile from joints in the unrolled image of the borehole wall. A method for estimating in-situ Rengers envelopes using this data is presented along with results from using the method on joints in a borehole in porphyritic granite. Next, an analysis of the joint dilation angle anisotropy is described and applied to the porphyritic granite joints. The results indicate that the dilation angle of the joints studied are anisotropic at small scales and tend to reflect joint waviness as scale increases. A procedure to unroll the opposing roughness profiles to obtain a two dimensional sample is presented. The measurement of apertures during this process is shown to produce an error which increases with the dip of the joint. The two dimensional sample of opposing profiles is used in a new kinematic analysis of the joint shear stress-shear deformation behavior. Examples of applying these methods on the porphyritic granite joints are presented. The unrolled opposing profiles were used in a numerical simulation of a direct shear test using Discontinuous Deformation Analysis. Results were compared to laboratory test results using core samples containing the same joints. The simulated dilatancy and shear stress-shear deformation curves were close to the laboratory curves in the case of a joint in porphyritic granite.

  6. Geophysical surveys for proposed boreholes 299-W15-25, 26 and 27, 200 West Area

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T.H.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the survey was to locate subsurface obstructions that may affect the drilling of the proposed boreholes 299-W15-25, 299-w15-26, and 299-W15-27, north of the 321-Z building. The possible drill sites within the zone with the least likelihood of encountering identified obstructions were identified based on the results of the survey. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) was the geophysical method chosen for the shallow characterization of this site.

  7. Petrophysical inversion of borehole array-induction logs: Part I — Numerical examples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Faruk O. Alpak; Carlos Torres-Verdi?n; Tarek M. Habashy

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a new methodology for the quantitative petrophysical evaluation of borehole array-induction measure- ments. The methodology is based on the time evolution of the spatial distributions of fluid saturation and salt concentration at- tributed to mud-filtrate invasion. We use a rigorous formulation to account for the physics of fluid displacement in porous media resulting from water-base mud filtrate

  8. Authigenic layer silicate minerals in borehole Elmore 1, Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Douglas McDowell; Wilfred A. Elders

    1980-01-01

    A combined petrographic\\/X-ray\\/electron microprobe and energy dispersive system investigation of sandstone cuttings from borehole Elmore # 1 near the center of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field has revealed numerous regular variations in the composition, texture, mineralogy and proportions of the authigenic layer silicate minerals in the temperature interval 185° C (411.5 m depth) to 361° C (2,169 m). At temperatures

  9. A finite line-source model for boreholes in geothermal heat exchangers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Y. Zeng; N. R. Diao; Z. H. Fang

    2002-01-01

    An analytical solution of the transient temperature response in a semi-infinite medium with a line source of finite length has been derived, which is a more appropriate model for boreholes in geothermal heat exchangers, especially for their long-duration operation. The steady-state temperature distribution has also been obtained as a limit of this solution. An erratic approach to this problem that

  10. Nondestructive testing using borehole and surface seismic techniques to evaluate rock mass damage zones

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, P.P.; Stokoe, K.H. II [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1991-12-31

    A suite of seismic tests was performed at the U12g tunnel at the Nevada Test Site. The methods include borehole (crosshole and downhole) and surface (Rayleigh wave and refraction) tests. Results indicate that the different methods should be considered complimentary, and that seismic methods can sensitively evaluate magnitudes and variations of in situ rock mass stiffness. In particular, near-surface low velocity (damage) zones are delineated quite well with Rayleigh wave and downhole methods.

  11. Analysis of borehole televiewer measurements in the Vorotilov drillhole, Russia - First results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber, K.; Fuchs, K.; Palmer, J.; Roth, F.; Khakhaev, B.N.; Van-Kin, L. E.; Pevzner, L.A.; Hickman, S.; Moos, D.; Zoback, M.D.; Schmitt, D.

    1997-01-01

    In the Eurasian part of the World Stress Map almost the whole region east of the Tornquist-Teisseyre line is terra incognita. The closure of this information gap is of fundamental importance to the understanding of the geodynamics of the Eurasian continent. A detailed analysis of stress-induced wellbore breakouts has been performed over a 4.1-km-long depth interval in the Vorotilov drillhole (VGS). The borehole is located in the central part of the Russian platform, right in the center of the Vorotilov meteorite impact crater 60 km to the NNE of the city of Nizni Novgorod. An ultrasonic borehole televiewer (BHTV) was used to obtain high-resolution acoustical images from the borehole wall. With an interactive system for analyzing BHTV data the azimuth and shape of borehole breakouts occurring in the depth range of 1.3-4.8 km were analyzed. A statistical analysis of the resulting orientation profile of the breakout azimuths yields an overall direction of the maximum horizontal principal stress SH of N 137??E ?? 15??. Variations of breakout orientation with depth ranging from a few degrees up to more than 90?? are seen on various depth scales. The observed stress direction of N 137??E agrees very well with the average SH orientation of N 145??E in Central Europe. If this measurement is taken as representative for the Russian platform, the stress field in Russia is only slightly rotated in comparison to Central Europe. This can possibly be interpreted as indicative for the stress field to be governed by broad scale tectonic forces, such as a strong contribution from the forces exerted by the collision zone in the Alpine-Himalayan belt and by the Mid-Atlantic ridge.

  12. Evidence for a little ice age and recent warming from a borehole temperature data inversion procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Fivez, J.; Thoen, J. [Laboratorium voor Akoestiek en Thermische Fysica, Department Natuurkunde, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2004-11-15

    In this article, we apply our analytical theory, published earlier in this journal, to obtain information on the earth surface temperature history from some borehole temperature data. Compared to the results of the five different methods applied to the same temperature data, our method seems to be easier, assumption-free, and yields internally consistent results. The results suggest a cooling a few centuries ago, followed by a continuing warming up to these days, in agreement with a little ice age scenario.

  13. Pneumatic testing in 45-degree-inclined boreholes in ash-flow tuff near Superior, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    LeCain, G.D.

    1995-11-01

    Matrix permeability values determined by single-hole pneumatic testing in nonfractured ash-flow tuff ranged from 5.1 to 20.3*10{sup -16} m{sup 2} (meters squared), depending on the gas-injection rate and analysis method used. Results from the single-hole tests showed several significant correlations between permeability and injection rate and between permeability and test order. Fracture permeability values determined by cross-hole pneumatic testing in fractured ash-flow tuff ranged from 0.81 to 3.49 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}, depending on injection rate and analysis method used. Results from the cross-hole tests monitor intervals showed no significant correlation between permeability and injection rate; however, results from the injection interval showed a significant correlation between injection rate and permeability. Porosity estimates from the cross-hole testing range from 0.8 to 2.0 percent. The maximum temperature change associated with the pneumatic testing was 1.2{degrees}C measured in the injection interval during cross-hole testing. The maximum temperature change in the guard and monitor intervals was 0.1{degrees}C. The maximum error introduced into the permeability values due to temperature fluctuations is approximately 4 percent. Data from temperature monitoring in the borehole indicated a positive correlation between the temperature decrease in the injection interval during recovery testing and the gas-injection rate. The thermocouple psychrometers indicated that water vapor was condensing in the boreholes during testing. The psychrometers in the guard and monitor intervals detected the drier injected gas as an increase in the dry bulb reading. The relative humidity in the test intervals was always higher than the upper measurement limit of the psychrometers. Although the installation of the packer system may have altered the water balance of the borehole, the gas-injection testing resulted in minimal or no changes in the borehole relative humidity.

  14. Microearthquake Observations in a 7-level Vertical Seismic Array in the TCDP Borehole, Taiwan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Lin; H. Wu; K. Ma; V. Oye; H. Tanaka

    2007-01-01

    In order to obtain in-situ information on slip zones of the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake, the Taiwan Chelungpu-fault drilling project (TCDP) drilled two vertical boreholes (A, B) and a branch hole (C) through the fault where a displacement of 12 m had occurred. The TCDP hole A is 2 km deep, and a slip zone was identified at a depth of

  15. The Effect of Borehole Flow on Salinity Profiles From Deep Monitor Wells in Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotzoll, K.; Hunt, C. D.; El-Kadi, A. I.

    2008-12-01

    Ground-water resource management in Hawaii is based partly on salinity profiles from deep wells that are used to monitor the thickness of freshwater lenses and the transition zone between freshwater and saltwater. Vertical borehole flow in these wells may confound understanding of the actual salinity-depth profiles in the basaltic aquifers and lead to misinterpretations that hamper effective water-resource management. Causes and effects of borehole flow on salinity profiles are being evaluated at 40 deep monitor wells in Hawaii. Step- like changes in fluid electrical conductivity with respect to depth are indicative of borehole flow and are evident in almost all available salinity profiles. A regional trend in borehole flow direction, expected from basin-wide ground-water flow dynamics, is evident as major downward flow components in inland recharge areas and major upward flow components in discharge areas near the coast. The midpoint of the transition zone in one deep monitor well showed inconsequential depth displacements in response to barometric pressure and tidal fluctuations and to pumping from nearby wellfields. Commonly, the 1 mS/cm conductivity value is used to indicate the top of the transition zone. Contrary to the more stable midpoint, the depth of the 1 mS/cm conductivity value may be displaced by as much as 200 m in deep monitor wells near pumping wellfields. The displacement is complemented with an increase in conductivity at a particular depth in the upper part of the profile. The observed increase in conductivity is linear with increase in nearby pumpage. The largest deviations from expected aquifer-salinity profiles occur in deep monitor wells located in the area extending from east Pearl Harbor to Kalihi on Oahu, which coincides with the most heavily pumped part of the aquifer.

  16. Nonlinear Site Response: PGA Distribution From Observed And Simulated Borehole Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, L. F.; Cotton, F.; Berge-Thierry, C.

    In the last years, the deployment of the Kiknet borehole network in Japan has allowed to record valuable data for different magnitudes and distances. The earthquake engi- neering community, on the other hand, is interested in knowing the PGA distribution at surface for different ground motion intensity levels and different site conditions. The possible feedback between the incident wavefield and the soil medium may lead to nonlinear site effects. For this reason in the last thirty years there has been a great effort to compile strong motion data from boreholes worldwide in order to have a statistical relation between the PGA downhole and the PGA at the surface. These re- lationships may indicate the acceleration level at which nonlinear effects begin. In addition, they may be used to take into account nonlinear effects in probabilistic seis- mic hazard scenarios. Moreover, borehole data are also useful to develop attenuation laws for the incident ground motion, which may be used for nonlinear site response scenarios as well. We have compiled the last 2 years borehole data from the Kiknet network in Japan, which include the Tottori M7.1 earthquake. These data show that nonlinear effects begin around 0.1g (decrease of the surface PGA with increasing downhole PGA). Nonetheless, these effects are not so strong as predicted by previous relationships (e.g. Idriss, 1990). Accelerations recorded on soils are still higher than the ones recorded on rock even at high levels of motion. In addition, from strong ground motion scenarios in Southern California (Archuleta et al., 2000) where synthetized downhole motions were propagated through soil columns with nonlinear properties, we obtain synthetic PGA distributions at the surface as well. Finally, strong nonlinear effects due to dila- tancy in sandy materials may produce a high PGA at the surface compared to what is expected from the statistical relations mentioned previously.

  17. Log Data and Borehole Image Analysis of Hole-B, Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, E.; Gaillot, P.; Moe, K.; Lin, W.; Wu, Y.; Song, S.

    2012-12-01

    Log data and digital borehole images collected from Hole-B of the Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project are analyzed to establish the relationships between lithology, deformation structures, in-situ stress and fluid flow and to identify the rupture zone of the Chi-Chi earthquake. Based on standard scalar logs, three log units and five subunits are recognized and are consistent with core-derived lithologic units. Permeability indicator derived from automatic characterization of electrical borehole image data suggests that permeability is fracture-controlled within the Chinshui Shale. Visual analysis and characterization of fracture recognized on the borehole images shows two pairs of conjugated conductive fractures in the strike of N030° and N110°. Three major fault zones, FZB1133, FZB1191, and FZB1240, are recognized at wireline logging depth of 1133, 1191, and 1240m, respectively. FZB1133 shows the lowest electrical resistivity, relatively lower sonic velocity, and higher permeability within the black fault gouge as well as an asymmetric resistivity pattern, and thus it is believed to be the activated rupture zone related to the Chi-Chi earthquake and the fault gouge could be characterized as a fluid conduit. The azimuth of the maximum horizontal stress (SHmax) inferred from borehole breakouts is regionally oriented at N130°, in agreement with the direction of plate convergence. Local variations of SHmax correlate well with lithology changes. The integration of log data, deformation structures, and in-situ stress suggests that all fractures are conductive but might not all have being activated by the Chi-Chi event.

  18. A Robust MEMS Based Multi-Component Sensor for 3D Borehole Seismic Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsson Geophysical Services

    2008-03-31

    The objective of this project was to develop, prototype and test a robust multi-component sensor that combines both Fiber Optic and MEMS technology for use in a borehole seismic array. The use such FOMEMS based sensors allows a dramatic increase in the number of sensors that can be deployed simultaneously in a borehole seismic array. Therefore, denser sampling of the seismic wave field can be afforded, which in turn allows us to efficiently and adequately sample P-wave as well as S-wave for high-resolution imaging purposes. Design, packaging and integration of the multi-component sensors and deployment system will target maximum operating temperature of 350-400 F and a maximum pressure of 15000-25000 psi, thus allowing operation under conditions encountered in deep gas reservoirs. This project aimed at using existing pieces of deployment technology as well as MEMS and fiber-optic technology. A sensor design and analysis study has been carried out and a laboratory prototype of an interrogator for a robust borehole seismic array system has been assembled and validated.

  19. The U-tube: A new paradigm in borehole fluid sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Freifeld, B. M.

    2009-10-01

    Fluid samples from deep boreholes can provide insights into subsurface physical, chemical, and biological conditions. Recovery of intact, minimally altered aliquots of subsurface fluids is required for analysis of aqueous chemistry, isotopic composition, and dissolved gases, and for microbial community characterization. Unfortunately, for many reasons, collecting geofluids poses a number of challenges, from formation contamination by drilling to maintaining integrity during recovery from depths. Not only are there substantial engineering issues in retrieval of a representative sample, but there is often the practical reality that fluid sampling is just one of many activities planned for deep boreholes. The U-tube geochemical sampling system presents a new paradigm for deep borehole fluid sampling. Because the system is small, its ability to integrate with other measurement systems and technologies opens up numerous possibilities for multifunctional integrated wellbore completions. To date, the U-tube has been successfully deployed at four different field sites, each with a different deployment modality, at depths from 260 m to 2 km. While the U-tube has proven to be highly versatile, these installations have resulted in data that provide additional insights for improving future U-tube deployments.

  20. Comparing shear-wave velocity profiles inverted from multichannel surface wave with borehole measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.; Hunter, J.A.; Harris, J.B.; Ivanov, J.

    2002-01-01

    Recent field tests illustrate the accuracy and consistency of calculating near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities using multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW). S-wave velocity profiles (S-wave velocity vs. depth) derived from MASW compared favorably to direct borehole measurements at sites in Kansas, British Columbia, and Wyoming. Effects of changing the total number of recording channels, sampling interval, source offset, and receiver spacing on the inverted S-wave velocity were studied at a test site in Lawrence, Kansas. On the average, the difference between MASW calculated Vs and borehole measured Vs in eight wells along the Fraser River in Vancouver, Canada was less than 15%. One of the eight wells was a blind test well with the calculated overall difference between MASW and borehole measurements less than 9%. No systematic differences were observed in derived Vs values from any of the eight test sites. Surface wave analysis performed on surface data from Wyoming provided S-wave velocities in near-surface materials. Velocity profiles from MASW were confirmed by measurements based on suspension log analysis. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.