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Sample records for korea tectonic significance

  1. Two ultramafic rock types in the Hongseong area, South Korea: Tectonic significance for northeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, J.; Oh, C. W.; Choi, S. G.; Rajesh, V. J.

    2013-08-01

    Several isolated lensoidal mafic and serpentinized ultramafic bodies occur in the Hongseong area, South Korea, which is the Korean extension of the Dabie-Sulu collisional belt of China and the northern margin of the South China Block. The mafic and ultramafic bodies are important in any interpretation of the Neoproterozoic tectonics of northeast Asia related to the amalgamation and break-up of the Rodinia supercontinent. The Singok, Gwangcheon, and Hongseong ultramafic rocks are significant bodies of ultramafic rock in the Hongseong area. The orthopyroxenes in the Singok harzburgite plot mostly in the forearc peridotite fields of major element classification diagrams. The Singok olivines also classify as forearc peridotite on the basis of their Fo and NiO contents. The spinels of the Singok harzburgite plot within the mantle array on an Al2O3 versus Cr2O3 diagram, and they fall in the ophiolite and supra-subduction zone peridotite (SSZ) fields on several tectonic discrimination diagrams. These data indicate that the Singok harzburgite is a segment of residual mantle that formed in a SSZ tectonic setting before the amalgamation of the Rodinia supercontinent as the Bibong and Baekdong ultramafic rocks in the Hongseong area. The spinels from the Gwangcheon harzburgite and Hongseong dunite have similar geochemical characteristics with those from ultramafic rocks formed in the Lesvos incipient rift. They plot in the mantle array on the Al2O3 versus Cr2O3 diagram and have higher Mg/(Mg + Fe2 +) than abyssal peridotites and lower Cr/(Cr + Al) than SSZ and forearc peridotites. These data together with field evidence indicate that the Gwangcheon and Hongseong ultramafic rocks formed in a continental rift tectonic setting during the break-up of the Rodinia supercontinent. These two types of ultramafic rock from the Hongseong area, which formed in different tectonic settings, are correlated well with the two periods of Neoproterozoic magmatic activity along the northern

  2. Tectonic significance of serpentinites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Stéphane; Schwartz, Stéphane; Reynard, Bruno; Agard, Philippe; Prigent, Cécile

    2015-04-01

    At plate boundaries, where deformation is localized along centimetre- to kilometre-scale shear zones, the influence of serpentinite on tectonic processes is linked to its unique rheological properties. In this paper we review the physical properties of serpentinites and their role in tectonic processes. At the ocean-continent transition, serpentinization weakens the upper mantle layer, promoting strain localization and allowing the normal faults in the distal margin to root at low angle. Similarly, at slow to ultra-slow spreading ridges, serpentinite is potentially very abundant at the seafloor and locally associated with domal structures. Extensional deformation is localized in a ~ 100 m thick shear zone at the footwall of detachment zones dominated by serpentine derived minerals. Within subduction zone, the depth of decoupling between the mantle wedge and the subducting slab corresponds to the stability depth of serpentine weak mineral. Dehydration of serpentine has also been hypothesized to play an important role in the origin of double seismic zones, however the exact mechanism through which dehydration promotes seismicity remains a matter of debate. During exhumation of high-pressure or ultrahigh-pressure rocks, the opposite trajectories of exhumation and subduction require a decoupling zone within the subducting slab. A serpentinized layer has the potential to become a decoupling zone between the oceanic crust and underlying lithosphere. The buoyancy of serpentinite also likely contributes to eclogite exhumation. Finally, along major strike-slip faults, serpentinites have been associated with fault creep, as well as low fault strength. The presence of serpentinite blocks along creeping segments of active faults worldwide is therefore likely to originate from fluids deriving from the progressive dehydration of the mantle wedge that move such bodies upward.

  3. Chunky Gal Melange and its tectonic significance

    SciTech Connect

    Lacazette, A. Jr.; Rast, N.

    1985-01-01

    Detailed mapping of the Chunky Gal Mafic/Ultramafic Complex of SW North Carolina indicates that the complex is involved in a set of ductile shear zones separating pods of less deformed material. The product is a tectonic mixture of fragments of amphibolites, granites, calc-silicates and ultramafic rocks in the Tallulah Falls Fm. Some inclusions are in different states of metamorphism. Foliation within the amphibolite, migmatite and granite lumps is truncated at their edges. The metasediments show a transposed pervasive late foliation (S/sub 2/.) although the sense of intersection of earlier fabrics is locally determinable. Linear fabric elements plunge east. In the amphibolites, the foliation is folded but not transposed. The zone, therefore, is termed the Chunky Gal Melange. Although syntectonic porphyroblasts suggest that the movement began during the metamorphism, the melange postdates the peak of the main regional metamorphism and separates superposed granulite facies rocks from those of amphibolite facies. A weaker lower amphibolite metamorphism postdates the melange. In the vicinity of Chunky Gal Mountain the melange coincides with the premetamorphic Hayesville Thrust of R. Hatcher. A tectonic model suggested here is that the eastern Blue Ridge represents a poorly to fully developed accretionary prism that was built above an east dipping subduction zone during the closure of a marginal sea. Mafic and ultramafic rocks were incorporated with the metasediments at this time. The Hayesville Thrust itself reflects an early stage of suturing of this terrane with North America.

  4. 78 FR 51802 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Silla: Korea's Golden...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Silla: Korea's Golden Kingdom... determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Silla: Korea's Golden Kingdom,'' imported...

  5. Southern extension of the Sumatra Fault and its tectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, W.; Gaedicke, C.; Djajadihardja, Y. S.; Saito, S.

    2003-12-01

    Mode of slip partitioning in a fore arc of Sunda Arc between near trench normal thrusting and trench-parallel strike-slip faulting has been postulated mainly from the study of earthquake slip vectors and slip rate of the strike slip Sumatra Fault. However, there is no dependable geomorphic data, despite great attention for the area off the Sunda Strait which represent the junction between normal subduction off Java and oblique subduction off Sumatra. New single channel and bathymetric data were obtained by R/V Yokosuka, YK01-02/YK02-07 cruises and they provide a quite different geomorphologic view to the previously knowledge. New discovery of the southern extension of the Sumatra Fault is an example. In the southern extension, Shinkai 6500 dives allow us to identify more or less a meter of vertical topographic displacement along the SSE-trending active fault. Several amount of mud diapir mounds and a few sink hole are first recognized in the area where corresponds to a significant negative Bouguer anomaly zone. A methan content anomaly is detected in the summit of the mounds and bottom floor of the sink hole, together with Calyptogena colony. On the other hand, geomorphologic feature in the junction area is quite different to those of forearc setting; the area is covered by a bundle of tectonic blocks including the Genteng Bank, that well demarcated by the SSE- and east-trending conjugate lineaments. The junction area extending toward SSE occupies between the fore arc basin and the outer arc high and is demarcated by faults. The boundary fault cuts the preexisting geomorphology including trench-parallel strike slip fault in the outer arc high; e.g. Mentaiwai Faults. Consequently these geomorphic feature, as an accumulation of crustal deformation (plastic strain), is most likely to be caused by stretching of the fore arc crust. This study suggests that strain (plastic) partitioning in a fore arc occurs within the localized (or concentrated) area such as the junction

  6. Intraplate volcanism influenced by distal subduction tectonics at Jeju Island, Republic of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenna, Marco; Cronin, Shane J.; Kereszturi, Gábor; Sohn, Young Kwan; Smith, Ian E. M.; Wijbrans, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The drivers behind the inception of, and the variable, pulsatory eruption rates at distributed intraplate volcanic fields are not well understood. Such broad areas of monogenetic volcanism cover vast areas of the world and are often heavily populated. Reliable models to unravel their behaviour require robust spatio-temporal frameworks within the fields, but an analysis of the potential proximal and distal regional volcano-tectonic processes is also needed. Jeju Island (Republic of Korea) is a volcanic field that has been extensively drilled and dated. It is also located near one of the world's best-studied tectonic plate boundaries: the subduction zone in southwestern Japan, which generates the Ryukyu and SW Japan arcs. A new set of 40Ar/39Ar ages collected from cores penetrating the entire Jeju eruptive pile, along with geochemical information, is used to construct a temporal and volumetric model for the volcano's growth. The overall pattern indicates inception of volcanism at ~1.7 Ma, with an initial 1.2 Myr of low-rate activity, followed by over an order of magnitude rise over the last 0.5 Myr. The magma flux at Jeju correlates well with increased extension rates in the arc/backarc region. In particular, we infer that the increased trenchward mantle flow, caused by the greater rollback of the Philippine Sea Plate, activated pre-existing shear weaknesses in the mantle beneath Jeju, resulting in mantle upwelling and decompression melting that caused a change in compositions and an increase in eruption rates at Jeju. Thus, the volcanic activity of an intraplate field system can be modulated by regional subduction processes occurring more than 650 km away. This model may explain the frequent observation of pulsatory behaviour seen in many monogenetic volcanic fields worldwide that lie within 1,000 km of subduction zones.

  7. Tectonic significance of Silurain magmatism in the Canadian Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, J.B.; Bevier, M.L. )

    1990-05-01

    New U-Pb ages for granites from the New Brunswick part of the Canadian Appalachians indicate that >90% of the undeformed felsic plutons are Silurian and not Devonian as previously thought. Silurian igneous and sedimentary assemblages were recently recognized throughout the Canadian Appalachians, although the petrogenetic types of magmas as well as the grades of metamorphism and deformation vary widely. Our data support proposed tectonic models that suggest relatively continuous subduction and orogenic activity in the Canadian Appalachians from Middle Ordovician to Middle Devonian time.

  8. The significance of tectonism in the glaciations of Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathrellos, George; Skilodimou, Hariklia; Maroukian, Habik

    2014-05-01

    In Greece, Middle to Late Pleistocene mountain glaciations appear to have been quite extensive, along the mountain range of Pindus, on Mt. Olympus and in the highlands of Peloponnesus. This study focuses on the Middle to Late Pleistocene glaciations based on the examination of cirque formations and their elevation changes due to vertical tectonism, in certain parts of Greece, namely Pindus, Mt. Olympus and Peloponnesus. An initial spatial database of these glacial forms was created including their location and mean elevation. Some of the glaciated sites have been taken from previous literature and others were recorded from topographic maps, air photos and field work. ArcGIS 10 software was used to process the glaciated sites. A map depicting the glaciated areas of Greek regions was compiled with over 230 cirques. A cirque's top, lip and margins of each location were mapped. So altitudes of apex and lip and mean altitude of each cirque ([apex+lip]/2), were calculated. A total number of 239 inactive cirques was recorded with limestone as the dominant lithology. As one moves to the south, in the case of Pindus range and its extension in the Peloponnesus, the number of cirques decreases. These glacial forms occur at altitudes varying from 2,770 to 1,600 m.a.s.l. Thus the preservation of ice for longer periods of time is more likely at altitudes higher than 1,600 m.a.s.l. Concerning the distribution of the mean elevations of cirques one should take into consideration the tectonic activity of the study area. Especially in the Pindus range, Mount Olympus, and Peloponnesus this process is in the form of uplift. This has increased the mean elevation of the cirques in every following ice age. So, in older times many cirques were a few hundred meters lower than the more recent glacial period.

  9. Devonian brachiopods of southwesternmost laurentia: Biogeographic affinities and tectonic significance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boucot, A.J.; Poole, F.G.; Amaya-Martinez, R.; Harris, A.G.; Sandberg, C.A.; Page, W.R.

    2008-01-01

    Three brachiopod faunas discussed herein record different depositional and tectonic settings along the southwestern margin of Laurentia (North America) during Devonian time. Depositional settings include inner continental shelf (Cerros de Los Murcielagos), medial continental shelf (Rancho Placeritos), and offshelf continental rise (Rancho Los Chinos). Ages of Devonian brachiopod faunas include middle Early (Pragian) at Rancho Placeritos in west-central Sonora, late Middle (Givetian) at Cerros de Los Murcielagos in northwestern Sonora, and late Late (Famennian) at Rancho Los Chinos in central Sonora. The brachiopods of these three faunas, as well as the gastropod Orecopia, are easily recognized in outcrop and thus are useful for local and regional correlations. Pragian brachiopods dominated by Acrospirifer and Meristella in the "San Miguel Formation" at Rancho Placeritos represent the widespread Appohimchi Subprovince of eastern and southern Laurentia. Conodonts of the early to middle Pragian sulcatus to kindlei Zones associated with the brachiopods confirm the ages indicated by the brachiopod fauna and provide additional information on the depositional setting of the Devonian strata. Biostratigraphic distribution of the Appohimchi brachiopod fauna indicates continuous Early Devonian shelf deposition along the entire southern margin of Laurentia. The largely emergent southwest-trending Transcontinental arch apparently formed a barrier preventing migration and mixing of many genera and species of brachiopods from the southern shelf of Laurentia in northern Mexico to the western shelf (Cordilleran mio-geocline) in the western United States. Middle Devonian Stringocephalus brachiopods and Late Devonian Orecopia gastropods in the "Los Murcielagos Formation" in northwest Sonora represent the southwest-ernmost occurrence of these genera in North America and date the host rocks as Givetian and Frasnian, respectively. Rhynchonelloid brachiopods (Dzieduszyckia sonora) and

  10. Tectonic significance of serpentinite from ocean to subduction (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, S.

    2013-12-01

    At plate boundaries, where deformation is localized along centimeter- to kilometer-scale shear zones, the influence of serpentinite on tectonic processes is linked to its unique rheological properties. Geophysical profiles at the Ocean-Continent Transition (OCT) indicate that the serpentinized mantle is about 5 km thick. Serpentinization weakens the upper mantle layer, promoting strain localization and allowing the normal faults in the distal margin of the OCT to root at low angle. The ongoing extension leads to buoyant flow of partially serpentinized mantle along low-angle detachment faults, leading to the horizontal stretching of the subcontinental mantle at the seafloor. At slow spreading ridges, 20 to 25% of the seafloor is composed of serpentinite associated with domal structures. Extensional deformation is localized in a ~100 to 200 m thick shear zone at the footwall of the detachment zone. Within the detachment fault, the mineralogy is complex; including talc, amphibole, and chorite indicating the addition of silica, calcium, and aluminum to serpentinites from hydrothermal fluids. Large-scale continental strike-slip faults can either slip by aseismic creep or move abruptly during earthquakes. Weak fault behavior can be caused by high fluid pressures, locally high geothermal gradients, or the presence of weak materials such as serpentinite. Along The San Andreas Fault (SAF), serpentinites have been associated with fault creep, as well as low fault strength. The SAFOD project (San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth) intersects the Great Valley Formation at 3 km depth. Microstructural observations from core samples show evidence of deformation across the damaged zone. The deforming zones contain serpentinite clasts, talc and highly sheared siltstones dispersed in a matrix of saponite (Mg-rich smectite clay), which is one of the weakest phyllosilicates. Within subduction zone, decoupling between the mantle wedge and the subducting slab is inferred from modeling

  11. Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John Dewey will complete his term as editor-in-chief of Tectonics at the end of 1984. Clark Burchfiel's term as North American Editor will also end. Tectonics is published jointly with the European Geophysical Society. This newest of AGU's journals has already established itself as an important journal bridging the concerns of geophysics and geology.James A. Van Allen, president of AGU, has appointed a committee to recommend candidates for both editor-in-chief and North American editor for the 1985-1987 term.

  12. Shallow hydraulic fracturing measurements in Korea support tectonic and seismic indicators of regional stress.

    SciTech Connect

    Haimson, Bezalel Cecil; Lee, Moo Yul; Song, I.

    2003-07-01

    We have conducted five hydraulic fracturing stress measurement campaigns in Korea, involving 13 test holes ranging in depth from 30 to 250 m, at locations from North Seoul to the southern coast of the peninsula. The measurements reveal consistent crustal stress magnitudes and directions that suggest persistence throughout western and southern Korea. The maximum horizontal stress {sigma}{sub H} is oriented between ENE-WSW and E-W, in accord with plate movement and deformation, and with directions indicated by both focal mechanism solutions from earthquakes inland and offshore as well as borehole breakouts in mainland China close to its eastern coast. With respect to magnitudes, the vertical stress is the overall minimum stress at all tested locations, suggesting a thrust faulting regime within the relatively shallow depths reached by our tests. Typically, such a stress regime becomes one favoring strike-slip at greater depths, as is also indicated by the focal mechanism solutions around Korea.

  13. Ancient wells and their geoarchaeological significance in detecting tectonics of the Israel Mediterranean coastline region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nir, Yaacov; Eldar, Iris

    1987-01-01

    Eight ancient water wells, representing the late Bronze Age to the Crusades period (ca. 3100 700 B.P.), have recently been excavated (six by the authors) and reopened at archaeological sites (tels) along the southern and central Mediterranean coast of Israel. Evidence of ancient freshwater levels directly reflects on possible neotectonics of the region and on eustatic changes of sea level. There is substantial disagreement about the tectonic stability of the Israel Mediterranean coastal region during the past 3500 yr, whether there was a large-magnitude tectonic event (one of the largest known for recent times) during the period in discussion or whether the region was tectonically quiet. We tested the instability hypothesis by using geoarchaeological data from the wells and found no evidence for significant tectonic deformation of the central and southern Israel coast in the past 3100 yr. The “ancient water-well” method can, with appropriate modifications, be used all around the Mediterranean and other coasts elsewhere in the world where ground-water-sea-level relations are alike. Now in the digging of wells we must not disdain reflection, but must devote much acuteness and skill to the consideration of the natural principles of things. Vitruvius Pollio, Architectura, Book VIII, Chapter VI (25 B.C.)

  14. Moment tensor inversion for moderate earthquakes and horizontal direction of tectonic stress in and around the south korea peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, ChangSoo

    2015-04-01

    Moment tensor inversion method using waveform is not widely used in identification of fault direction for earthquake but also in identification of explosion experiment such as north korea nuclear test. TDMT inversion code as open source was used for 1-D focal mechanism to moderate earthquake. But TDMT code caused some problems to fit waveform data of earthquake. This software was modified and improved with using the extraction bandwidth for event data and using waveform fitting of maximum cross-correlation with limit of shifting time. Improved algorithm was applied to moderate earthquakes occurred in and around the korean peninsula and showed the result of good data fitting in deriving focal mechanism. CMT centeroid locations were calculated with this algorithm. Earthquakes occurred rarely in the korean peninsula and instrumental recording started from 1990's late. But quality of measurement ground motion is very good after the beginning of instrumental recording. 61 moderate earthquakes occurred analyzed between 2000 to present were analyzed. most of all focal mechanism of earthquake showed strike slip or reverse fault as intraplate earthquake. The horizontal direction of tectonic stress of the korean peninsula is ENE-WSW derived with focal mechanisms that were calculated with 1D moment tensor inversion for moderate earthquake by Zoback(1992)'s method of tectonic stress. 3D-moment tensor inversion method was also developed with simulation code of 3-D viscoelastic finite difference method with ADE(auxiliary differential equation)-PML(perfectly matched layer) and applied to main moderate earthquakes. Forward modeling of 3D seismic wave propagation for moment tensor inversion require much time and expensive cost. Forward simulation with domain decomposition of having only thin model between source and receiver in moment tensor inversion could reduce much time, memory and computational cost in 3D moment tensor inversion even though this method was not more effective

  15. Paleomagnetism and U-Pb geochronology of the late Cretaceous Chisulryoung Volcanic Formation, Korea: tectonic evolution of the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Doohee; Yu, Yongjae; Doh, Seong-Jae; Suk, Dongwoo; Kim, Jeongmin

    2015-05-01

    Late Cretaceous Chisulryoung Volcanic Formation (CVF) in southeastern Korea contains four ash-flow ignimbrite units (A1, A2, A3, and A4) and three intervening volcano-sedimentary layers (S1, S2, and S3). Reliable U-Pb ages obtained for zircons from the base and top of the CVF were 72.8 ± 1.7 Ma and 67.7 ± 2.1 Ma, respectively. Paleomagnetic analysis on pyroclastic units yielded mean magnetic directions and virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) as D/ I = 19.1°/49.2° ( α 95 = 4.2°, k = 76.5) and VGP = 73.1°N/232.1°E ( A 95 = 3.7°, N = 3) for A1, D/ I = 24.9°/52.9° ( α 95 = 5.9°, k = 61.7) and VGP = 69.4°N/217.3°E ( A 95 = 5.6°, N = 11) for A3, and D/ I = 10.9°/50.1° ( α 95 = 5.6°, k = 38.6) and VGP = 79.8°N/242.4°E ( A 95 = 5.0°, N = 18) for A4. Our best estimates of the paleopoles for A1, A3, and A4 are in remarkable agreement with the reference apparent polar wander path of China in late Cretaceous to early Paleogene, confirming that Korea has been rigidly attached to China (by implication to Eurasia) at least since the Cretaceous. The compiled paleomagnetic data of the Korean Peninsula suggest that the mode of clockwise rotations weakened since the mid-Jurassic. Such interesting variation of vertical rotations in the Korean Peninsula might result from the strike-slip motions of major faults developed in East Asia (the Tancheng-Lujiang fault to the northwest and the Korea-Taiwan strait fault to the southeast), near-field tectonic forcing of the subducting Pacific Plate beneath the Eurasian Plate, and far-field expressions of the India-Asia collision.

  16. Source process and tectonic implication of the January 20, 2007 Odaesan earthquake, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Fattah, Ali K.; Kim, K. Y.; Fnais, M. S.; Al-Amri, A. M.

    2014-04-01

    The source process for the 20th of January 2007, Mw 4.5 Odaesan earthquake in South Korea is investigated in the low- and high-frequency bands, using velocity and acceleration waveform data recorded by the Korea Meteorological Administration Seismographic Network at distances less than 70 km from the epicenter. Synthetic Green functions are adopted for the low-frequency band of 0.1-0.3 Hz by using the wave-number integration technique and the one dimensional velocity model beneath the epicentral area. An iterative technique was performed by a grid search across the strike, dip, rake, and focal depth of rupture nucleation parameters to find the best-fit double-couple mechanism. To resolve the nodal plane ambiguity, the spatiotemporal slip distribution on the fault surface was recovered using a non-negative least-square algorithm for each set of the grid-searched parameters. The focal depth of 10 km was determined through the grid search for depths in the range of 6-14 km. The best-fit double-couple mechanism obtained from the finite-source model indicates a vertical strike-slip faulting mechanism. The NW faulting plane gives comparatively smaller root-mean-squares (RMS) error than its auxiliary plane. Slip pattern event provides simple source process due to the effect of Low-frequency that acted as a point source model. Three empirical Green functions are adopted to investigate the source process in the high-frequency band. A set of slip models was recovered on both nodal planes of the focal mechanism with various rupture velocities in the range of 2.0-4.0 km/s. Although there is a small difference between the RMS errors produced by the two orthogonal nodal planes, the SW dipping plane gives a smaller RMS error than its auxiliary plane. The slip distribution is relatively assessable by the oblique pattern recovered around the hypocenter in the high-frequency analysis; indicating a complex rupture scenario for such moderate-sized earthquake, similar to those reported

  17. Structural characteristics of the central Ogcheon Belt, South Korea: orogen-parallel tectonic transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kihm, You Hong; Kim, Jeong Hwan

    The rocks in the central Ogcheon Belt, South Korea, underwent three deformational phases (D 1, D 2 and D 3) during the Mesozoic Era. In the study area, NW- and NE-trending geological structures such as thrusts and folds are juxtaposed. The NW- and NE-trending folds deform isoclinal folds (F 1) with axial planar slaty cleavage (S 1), and have axial planar crenulation cleavage. All of these folds are overprinted by brittle faults (D 3). It is inferred from field data that the NW- and NE-trending structures are products of a single deformational phase (D 2). A very large-scale inclined NE-vergent isoclinal fold (F 1) produced an irregular boundary of Precambrian basement and a basement promontory, which acted as a structural obstacle against subsequent deformational phases. During the E-vergent phase (D 2), deformation partitioning occurred due to the irregular block boundary, and orogen-parallel and -orthogonal structures were produced. The D 3 phase is recognized as large-scale E-W trending structures including folds and faults. Thus, the structural evolution of the central Ogcheon Belt is related to the clockwise rotation of the maximum compressive stress axis from NE-SW to N-S during the Mesozoic Era. This study shows that the shape of colliding boundary is a very important factor in controlling the structural pattern and evolution in the study area.

  18. Sedimentation under influence of syndepositional tectonism and volcanism: Cretaceous Daeri Member, Wido Island, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul Hwang, In; Gihm, Yong Sik

    2015-04-01

    The Cretaceous Daeri Member is an ancient volcanic-sedimentary succession and can be classified into lower, middle and upper members, based on vertical changes in lithologic character. The lower Daeri Member is composed of the homogeneous reddish mudstones deposited on the arid to semi-arid, floodplain environment without major volcanic activities. The middle Daeri Member is represented by thick (up to 250 m) and laterally extensive andesite as well as minor epiclastic deposits. The upper Daeri Member was formed with the onset of an explosive volcanic eruption, and large amounts of fine-grained pyroclastic sediments were deposited by pyroclastic density currents during the eruption. After the eruption, the pyroclastic sediments were resedimented by episodic sediment-gravity flows, forming conformable accumulation of the resedimented pyroclastic deposits (130 m thick). Lack of major erosional surface is interpreted be due to growing accommodation space resulted from tectonic subsidence and arid to semi-arid climatic conditions with high rates of sediment supply after the volcanic eruption. In the Daeri Member, intrabasinal normal faults (Fault A to C) divided the basin into four blocks (Block 1 to 4), and spatial distribution of the Daeri Member is also largely controlled by the intrabasinal normal faults. The upper Daeri Member is developed only on hangingwall blocks (Block 2 and 3, whereas footwall blocks (Block 1 and4) are only composed of lower and middle Daeri members. The spatial stratigraphic relationships suggest a progressive increase in accommodation space on the hangingwall blocks during the deposition, indicating syndepositional tectonic subsidence. In addition, the resedimented pyroclastic deposits in Block 3 show northeastward (downcurrent) changes in depositional processes from debris flows to hyperconcentrated flow and sheetfloods with a decrease in maximum ten clasts away from Fault B, implying abrupt decrease in topographic gradient between Block 2

  19. Global tectonic significance of the Solomon Islands and Ontong Java Plateau convergent zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Paul; Taira, Asahiko

    2004-10-01

    Oceanic plateaus, areas of anomalously thick oceanic crust, cover about 3% of the Earth's seafloor and are thought to mark the surface location of mantle plume "heads". Hotspot tracks represent continuing magmatism associated with the remaining plume conduit or "tail". It is presently controversial whether voluminous and mafic oceanic plateau lithosphere is eventually accreted at subduction zones, and, therefore: (1) influences the eventual composition of continental crust and; (2) is responsible for significantly higher rates of continental growth than growth only by accretion of island arcs. The Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) of the southwestern Pacific Ocean is the largest and thickest oceanic plateau on Earth and the largest plateau currently converging on an island arc (Solomon Islands). For this reason, this convergent zone is a key area for understanding the fate of large and thick plateaus on reaching subduction zones. This volume consists of a series of four papers that summarize the results of joint US-Japan marine geophysical studies in 1995 and 1998 of the Solomon Islands-Ontong Java Plateau convergent zone. Marine geophysical data include single and multi-channel seismic reflection, ocean-bottom seismometer (OBS) refraction, gravity, magnetic, sidescan sonar, and earthquake studies. Objectives of this introductory paper include: (1) review of the significance of oceanic plateaus as potential contributors to continental crust; (2) review of the current theories on the fate of oceanic plateaus at subduction zones; (3) establish the present-day and Neogene tectonic setting of the Solomon Islands-Ontong Java Plateau convergent zone; (4) discuss the controversial sequence and timing of tectonic events surrounding Ontong Java Plateau-Solomon arc convergence; (5) present a series of tectonic reconstructions for the period 20 Ma (early Miocene) to the present-day in support of our proposed timing of major tectonic events affecting the Ontong Java Plateau

  20. Extension of the telluride erosion surface to Washington State, and its regional and tectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gresens, Randall L.

    1981-11-01

    lags. A great deal of scattered geologic evidence suggests a major global event at about 40 m.y. BP. The timing does not always precisely correlate with the timing of events in western North America, which suggests that the 40 m.y. tectonic transition was spread over several millions of years: A most impressive global impact of the 40 m.y. transition is the largest drop in eustatic sealevel at about 30 m.y. BP. The 40 m.y. tectonic transition profoundly altered geologic history, including the development of continental landscapes, global sea-level, and global climate. Classical stratigraphic studies remain the best way of documenting its effect on the continental surface. The small remnant of Oligocene rocks in central Washington, overlooked in early reconnaissance studies, is of great geologic significance. Other undiscovered remnants probably exist in western North America.

  1. Formation mechanism and tectonic significance of millipede microstructures in the NW Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Syed Zahid; Sayab, Mohammad; Aerden, Domingo; Iqbal, Qaiser

    2012-10-01

    This article focuses on the origin and tectonic significance of millipede inclusion trail microstructures preserved within garnet porphyroblasts of typical Barrovian-type schist from the Swat region of the Himalayas in Pakistan. Two possible kinematic models are assessed envisaging bulk coaxial shortening and progressive simple shear. 3D microstructural analysis of three samples hosting the millipedes reveals a poly-phase deformation history that produced three suborthogonal foliations (called Sx, Sy, Sz). Successive inclusion of Sx and Sy in garnet porphyroblasts produced two sets of millipedes with distinctive subvertical and subhorizontal orientations, respectively. This kinematic reconstruction is supported further with a numerical simulation using finite difference code of millipede formation in a spherical porphyroblast subjected to a superposition of two orthogonal shortening directions. Measurements of inclusion-trail curvature axes or FIA (Foliation Intersection/Inflexion Axes in porphyroblasts) in 61 additional samples from the study area, which contain straight, sigmoidal or spiral inclusion trails, reflect two principle orogenic episodes. During the first episode, FIAs developed with WNW-ESE (set 1) and E-W (set 2) trends associated with thrusting and collision tectonics. A younger FIA (set 3) with NNE-SSW trend developed as a result of subsequent bulk E-W crustal shortening and associated regional-scale folding. Sigmoidal or straight inclusion trails defining this FIA set can be correlated with the millipede microstructures based on their similar trends and timing relative to matrix fabrics. These results are consistent with the meso- and macro-scale structures in the region and significant in terms of establishing relative timing of formation of different structures in the region. Well developed preferred vertical and horizontal orientations of both sigmoidal and millipede inclusion trails imply that their development involved limited or no relative

  2. Formation and tectonic evolution of early Mesozoic intramontane basins in the Ogcheon belt (South Korea): A reappraisal of the Jurassic "Daebo orogeny"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cluzel, D.

    The upper Triassic to lower Jurassic(?) Daedong Supergroup of Korea has been deposited syntectonically during the late stages of "Songnim" transcurrent tectonism. In the Daedong basins, the Jurassic Daebo tectonism resulted in heterogeneous deformation due to the reactivation of pre-existing large faults during two main phases of folding and high angle thrusting. During the first phase, the bounding faults of the Daedong basins have been reactivated as high angle imbricated thrusts associated with gentle folds that display northeast-southwest axial trends and are generally southeast facing. The second tectonic phase is a result of north-south-directed convergence. The axes of gentle second phase folds strike east-west on average and are overturned to the south. Major NE-SW faults were then reactivated as south-directed sinistral wrench thrusts. This tectonic episode likely occurred in the late Jurassic to early Cretaceous period, and finally generated half-grabens or pull-apart basins located along the margins of the Ogcheon belt. The so-called "Daebo granites" have intruded from late Triassic to late Jurassic times. The Daebo granites and Funatsu granites of the same age in the Hida belt (Japan), are likely to be generated in a post-collisional setting as a consequence of the late Permian to Triassic Akiyoshi orogeny of southwest Japan.

  3. Structural analysis and evolution of the Hadong-Sancheong-Hwagae area in the Yeongnam massif, Korea: a NS-trend tectonic frame in the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deok-Seon, Lee; Ji-Hoon, Kang

    2016-04-01

    The Hadong-Sancheong-Hwagae area in the Jirisan province of the Yeongnam massif, Korea, is mainly composed of Precambrian Hadong anorthosite complex (HAC), Precambrian Jirisan metamorphic rock complex (JMRC), Jurassic˜Triassic granitoids which intrude them, and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks which unconformably cover them. Lithofacies distribution and tectonic frame of the Precambrian constituent rocks mainly show a NS trend, unlike a general NE trend of those in the Korean Peninsula. To unravel the geological structures associated with the NS-trend tectonic frame which was built in the HAC and JMRC, we researched the structural characteristics of each deformation phase based on the geometric and kinematic features and the forming sequence of rock structures of the multi-deformed HAC and JMRC. The results indicate that the pre-Late Paleozoic geological structures of this area were formed at least through the following three times of ductile deformation phases. The D1 deformation happened due to the large-scale top-to-the SE shearing, and formed sheath or A-type folds and a regional NE trend of tectonic frame in the HAC and JMRC. The D2 deformation occurred under the EW-directed tectonic compression, and formed a regional NS trend of active and passive folds and Hadong ductile shear zone over 2.3˜1.4 km width, and transposed most of D1 tectonic frame into D1-2 composite tectonic frame. The extensive Hadong shear zone, which was formed in the mylonitization process accompanying the passive folding, was persistently developed along the eastern boundary of HAC and JMRC which corresponds to a limb of passive fold on a geological map scale. It produced a very strong mylonitic structure and stretching lineation. The NE-trend D1 structural elements were mainly reoriented into NS trend by the powerful active and passive folding. The D3 deformation occurred under the NS-trend tectonic compression environment, and formed EW-trend kink or open folds, and partially rearranged

  4. Shear-wave splitting beneath southern Korea and its tectonic implication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Tae-Seob; Shin, Jin Soo

    2009-06-01

    Seismic anisotropy beneath the southern Korean Peninsula (SKP) was investigated based on the ScS waves of deep-focused earthquakes recorded at 35 broadband stations. The most striking feature of the observed splitting patterns is the preference of the fast directions (NW-SE) that are nearly parallel to the direction of the absolute plate motion in the region. However, the splitting patterns over the region show significant variation in splitting parameters indicating a complex anisotropic structure. Variations of the splitting directions and dissimilarity in the source domains of basaltic volcanisms suggest that the asthenospheric mantle flow since at least the late Cenozoic cannot explain the seismic anisotropy beneath the region. Comparison to shear-wave splitting measurements from eastern China revealed that the NW-SE fast direction of splitting measurements in the SKP is close to that in the North China block (NCB) while the NE-SW fast direction might be related to that in the South China block (SCB). The shallow mantle lithosphere beneath the SKP retains the fossil anisotropy amalgamated prior to the late Paleozoic before the collision between the NCB and SCB, and the anisotropic structure was not completely realigned by the major orogenic events during the late Paleozoic to Mesozoic eras.

  5. Tectonically controlled vent migration during maar-diatreme formation: An example from a Miocene half-graben basin in SE Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Moon; Kim, Jong Sun; Jung, Soohwan; Ki, Jin Seok; Kim, Min-Cheol; Sohn, Young Kwan

    2012-04-01

    Understanding the roles of external controls, such as hydrology and tectonics, is crucial for interpreting the evolution of a phreatomagmatic volcano and its subsurface structure called the diatreme. The Yangpori diatreme in a Miocene terrestrial half-graben basin of Korea provides an opportunity to assess the roles of synvolcanic fault movement in forming a maar-diatreme volcano. The exposed part of the diatreme fill consists of two offset-stacked sequences with contrasting lithofacies characteristics: a lower sequence (early diatreme fill) of locally stratified or bedded basaltic lapilli tuff and tuff in the northeastern part and an upper sequence (later diatreme fill) of dacite-clast-rich and disorganized tuff breccia in the southwestern part. The boundary between these sequences is abrupt, suggesting eruption of the volcano in two distinct phases. The first phase of eruption was driven by phreatomagmatic explosions mainly within the basin fill. Some of the diatreme fill was deposited in a local pond by debris flows and suspension settling of fines whereas the rest by fallout from eruption plumes and jets. The second phase of eruption was driven by phreatomagmatic explosions at a fracture aquifer within the basement, accompanying sudden lowering of the explosion locus. The later diatreme fill therefore contains abundant basement-derived dacite clasts. Its deposition was accomplished by en masse fallout of volcanic debris from dense collapsing columns. A number of faults and shear fractures were generated within and in the vicinity of the diatreme together with penecontemporaneous basaltic intrusions. Structural and geochemical analyses show that many of these structures are genetically related with the formation of the diatreme. The early diatreme fill was also tilted toward the southwest, suggesting southwestward shift of the locus of explosion and diatreme excavation. The explosion locus of the Yangpori volcano is therefore interpreted to have migrated both

  6. The geology and tectonic significance of the Big Creek Gneiss, Sierra Madre, southeastern Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Daniel S.

    The Big Creek Gneiss, southern Sierra Madre, southeastern Wyoming, is a heterogeneous suite of upper-amphibolite-facies metamorphic rocks intruded by post-metamorphic pegmatitic granite. The metamorphic rocks consist of three individual protolith suites: (1) pre- to syn-1780-Ma supracrustal rocks including clastic metasedimentary rocks, calc-silicate paragneiss, and metavolcanic rocks; (2) a bimodal intrusive suite composed of metagabbro and granodiorite-tonalite gneiss; and (3) a younger bimodal suite composed of garnet-bearing metagabbronorite and coarse-grained granitic gneiss. Zircons U-Pb ages from the Big Creek Gneiss demonstrate that: (1) the average age of detrital zircons in the supracrustal rocks is ~1805 Ma, requiring a significant source of 1805-Ma (or older) detritus during deposition, possibly representing an older phase of arc magmatism; (2) the older bimodal igneous suite crystallized at ~1780 Ma, correlative with arc-derived rocks of the Green Mountain Formation; (3) the younger bimodal igneous suite crystallized at ~1763 Ma, coeval with the extensional(?) Horse Creek anorthosite complex in the Laramie Mountains and Sierra Madre Granite batholith in the southwestern Sierra Madre; (4) Big Creek Gneiss rocks were tectonically buried, metamorphosed, and partially melted at ~1750 Ma, coeval with the accretion of the Green Mountain arc to the Wyoming province along the Cheyenne belt; (5) the posttectonic granite and pegmatite bodies throughout the Big Creek Gneiss crystallized at ~1630 Ma and are correlative with the 'white quartz monzonite' of the south-central Sierra Madre. Geochemical analysis of the ~1780-Ma bimodal plutonic suite demonstrates a clear arc-affinity for the mafic rocks, consistent with a subduction environment origin. The granodioritic rocks of this suite were not derived by fractional crystallization from coeval mafic magmas, but are instead interpreted as melts of lower-crustal mafic material. This combination of mantle

  7. Significant Centers of Tectonic Activity as Identified by Wrinkle Ridges for the Western Hemisphere of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R.C.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Golombek, M. P.; Franklin, B. J.; Dohm, J. M.; Lias, J.

    2000-01-01

    The western hemisphere region of Mars has been the site of numerous scientific investigations regarding its tectonic evolution. For this region of Mars, the dominant tectonic region is the Tharsis province. Tharsis is characterized by an enormous system of radiating grabens and a circumferential system of wrinkle ridges. Past investigations of grabens associated with Tharsis have identified specific centers of tectonic activity. A recent structural analysis of the western hemisphere region of Mars which includes the Tharsis region, utilized 25,000 structures to determine the history of local and regional centers of tectonic activity based primarily on the spatial and temporal relationships of extensional features. This investigation revealed that Tharsis is more structurally complex (heterogeneous) than has been previously identified: it consists of numerous regional and local centers of tectonic activity (some are more dominant and/or more long lived than others). Here we use the same approach as Anderson et al. to determine whether the centers of tectonic activity that formed the extensional features also contributed to wrinkle ridge (compressional) formation.

  8. Kashmir Basin Fault and its tectonic significance in NW Himalaya, Jammu and Kashmir, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    The Kashmir Basin Fault is located in the Jammu and Kashmir region of Kashmir Basin in NW Himalaya, India. It is a classic example of an out-of-sequence thrust faulting and is tectonically active as observed from multiple geological evidences. Its geomorphology, structure and lateral extent indicate significant accommodation of stress since long, which is further supported by the absence of a large earthquake in this region. It seems this fault is actively accommodating some portion of the total India-Eurasia convergence, apart from two well-recognised active structures the Medlicott-Wadia Thrust and the Main Frontal Thrust, which are referred in Vassallo et al. (Earth Planet Sci Lett 411:241-252, 2015). This requires its quantification and inclusion into slip distribution scheme of NW Himalaya. Therefore, it should be explored extensively because this internal out-of-sequence thrust could serve major seismic hazard in KB, repeating a situation similar to Muzaffarabad earthquake of Northern Pakistan in 2005.

  9. Geochemistry and tectonic significance of amphibolites of the Ducktown mining district, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, J.S.; Misra, K.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Ducktown massive sulfide deposits have several characteristics of volcanogenic-exhalative deposits but occur in an overwhelmingly sedimentary environment. Recent isotopic studies have suggested a magmatic component to ore formation. This study is an evaluation of the geochemistry and tectonic significance of late Proterozoic amphibolite units spatially associated with the ore bodies. The amphibolites are interpreted to be igneous in origin based on Niggli trends, relict igneous textures, and bulk chemistry. The protolith was an olivine tholeiite, as judged from normative composition, the AFM diagram, and Y/Nb ratios. Discrimminant diagrams using immobile trace elements (Ti-Y-Zr, TiO/sub 2/-Zr, Zr/Y-Zr, Ti-Cr, Ti-V) indicate an affinity with mid-ocean ridge basalts, an interpretation in agreement with that suggested for amphibolites associated with the very similar Gossan Lead deposits (Virginia) in Ocoee-equivalent metasediments (Gair and Slack, 1984), but apparently inconsistent with the ensialic setting of the Ducktown deposits. However, tholeiitic magmas associated with continental breakup may show chemical affinities with MORB, despite their intrusion into continental crust. The Ducktown amphibolites are interpreted to be diabasic sills emplaced during deposition of Ocoee sediments and related to intracratonic rifting along the eastern margin of Laurentia during the incipient development of the Iapetus Ocean.

  10. Relocation of earthquakes at southwestern Indian Ocean Ridge and its tectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, W.; Zhao, M.; Haridhi, H.; Lee, C. S.; Qiu, X.; Zhang, J.

    2015-12-01

    The southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) is a typical ultra-slow spreading ridge (Dick et al., 2003) and further plate boundary where the earthquakes often occurred. Due to the lack of the seismic stations in SWIR, positioning of earthquakes and micro-earthquakes is not accurate. The Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) seismic experiment was carried out for the first time in the SWIR 49 ° 39 'E from Jan. to March, 2010 (Zhao et al., 2013). These deployed OBS also recorded the earthquakes' waveforms during the experiment. Two earthquakes occurred respectively in Feb. 7 and Feb. 9, 2010 with the same magnitude of 4.4 mb. These two earthquakes were relocated using the software HYPOSAT based on the spectrum analysis and band-pass (3-5 Hz) filtering and picking up the travel-times of Pn and Sn. Results of hypocentral determinations show that there location error is decreased significantly by joined OBS's recording data. This study do not only provide the experiences for the next step deploying long-term wide-band OBSs, but also deepen understanding of the structure of SWIR and clarify the nature of plate tectonic motivation. This research was granted by the Natural Science Foundation of China (41176053, 91028002, 91428204). Keywords: southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR), relocation of earthquakes, Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS), HYPOSAT References:[1] Dick, H. J. B., Lin J., Schouten H. 2003. An ultraslow-spreading class of ocean ridge. Nature, 426(6965): 405-412. [2] Zhao M. H., et al. 2013. Three-dimensional seismic structure of the Dragon Flag oceanic core complex at the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (49°39' E). Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems, 14(10): 4544-4563.

  11. Post-depositional tectonic modification of VMS deposits in Iberia and its economic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castroviejo, Ricardo; Quesada, Cecilio; Soler, Miguel

    2011-07-01

    The original stratigraphic relationships and structure of VMS deposits are commonly obscured by deformation. This can also affect their economic significance, as shown by several Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB, SW Iberia) examples. The contrasting rheologic properties of the different lithologies present in an orebody (massive sulphide, feeder stockwork, alteration envelope, volcanic and sedimentary rocks) play a major role in determining its overall behaviour. Variscan thin-skinned tectonics led to stacking of the massive pyrite and stockwork bodies in duplex structures, resulting in local thickening and increased tonnage of minable mineralization. Furthermore, differential mechanical behaviour of the different sulphide minerals localised the detachments along relatively ductile sulphide-rich bands. The result was a geochemical and mineralogical reorganisation of most deposits, which now consist of barren, massive pyrite horses, bounded by base metal-rich ductile shear zones. Metal redistribution was enhanced by mobilisation of the base metal sulphides from the initially impoverished massive pyrite, through pressure-solution processes, to tensional fissures within the already ductile shear zones. In NW Iberia, VMS deposits were also strongly overprinted by the Variscan deformation during emplacement of the Cabo Ortegal and Órdenes allochthonous nappe complexes, but no stacking of the orebodies was produced. Original contacts were transposed, and the orebodies, their feeder zones and the country rock acquired pronounced laminar geometry. In lower-grade rocks (greenschist facies, Cabo Ortegal Complex), solution transfer mechanisms are common in pyrite, which remains in the brittle domain, while chalcopyrite shows ductile behaviour. In higher-grade rocks (amphibolite facies, Órdenes Complex), metamorphic recrystallisation overprints earlier deformation textures. The contrasting behaviour of the IPB and NW Iberian deposits is explained by key factors that affect their

  12. International Tectonic Map of the Circumpolar Arctic and its Significance for Geodynamic Interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, O. V.; Morozov, A.; Shokalsky, S.; Leonov, Y.; Grikurov, G.; Poselov, V.; Pospelov, I.; Kashubin, S.

    2011-12-01

    In 2003 geological surveys of circum-arctic states initiated the international project "Atlas of Geological Maps of Circumpolar Arctic at 1:5 000000 scale". The project received active support of the UNESCO Commission for the Geological Map of the World (CGMW) and engaged a number of scientists from national academies of sciences and universities. Magnetic and gravity maps were prepared and printed by the Norwegian Geological Survey, and geological map was produced by the Geological Survey of Canada. Completion of these maps made possible compilation of a new Tectonic Map of the Arctic (TeMAr), and this work is now in progress with Russian Geological Research Institute (VSEGEI) in the lead of joint international activities. The map area (north of 60o N) includes three distinct roughly concentric zones. The outer onshore rim is composed of predominantly mature continental crust whose structure and history are illustrated on the map by the age of consolidation of craton basements and orogenic belts. The zone of offshore shelf basins is unique in dimensions with respect to other continental margins of the world. Its deep structure can in most cases be positively related to thinning and rifting of consolidated crust, sometimes to the extent of disruption of its upper layer, whereas the pre-rift evolution can be inferred from geophysical data and extrapolation of geological evidence from the mainland and island archipelagoes. The central Arctic core is occupied by abyssal deeps and intervening bathymetric highs. The Eurasia basin is commonly recognized as a typical oceanic opening separating the Barents-Kara and Lomonosov Ridge passive margins, but geodynamic evolution of Amerasia basin are subject to much controversy, despite significant intensification of earth science researchin the recent years. A growing support to the concept of predominance in the Amerasia basin of continental crust, particularly in the area concealed under High Arctic Large Igneous Province, is

  13. Deformation of the overriding slab during incipient subduction in centrifuge modeling and its tectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mart, Yossi; Goren, Liran; Koyi, Hemin

    2015-04-01

    Analog models of subduction-related structural deformation emphasize the significance of differences in density and friction between the adjacent plates on the distortion of the overriding slab and its possible effect on the subduction procedure. Centrifuge experiments juxtaposed miniaturized lighter and denser lithospheres, which were floating on denser but less viscous asthenosphere. The lithosphere in the tests comprised brittle and ductile strata, which showed diversified styles of deformation, while factors of equivocal tectonic significance, such as lateral push or negative buoyancy, were not introduced into the experiments. The tests show that the juxtaposition of lighter and denser lithospheres would suffice to drive the denser lithosphere as a wedge between the asthenosphere and the lighter lithosphere, and that the rate of the process would depend on the rate of friction between the slabs, as well as on differential viscosity. It seems that the reduced friction in Nature was derived from the generation of serpentinites, which could be the main agent of lubrication. The underthrusting of the denser lithosphere leads to the uplift and collapse of the edge of the lighter slab, where extension, thinning, normal faulting and rifting took place, and diapiric ascent of parts of the ductile layer of the lighter slab occurred along several rifts. The analog experiments were carried out only to the stage where the denser slab was thrust under the lighter one, but the penetration of the lithosphere into the asthenosphere was not achieved. It seems plausible therefore, that only after eclogitization, and the upward motion of serpentinites, increased the density of the underthrust slab, would it dive and penetrate into the asthenosphere. The experiments indicate the plausibility of the constraints imposed on the subduction process by the deformation of the overthrust slab. The normal faults and rifts in the overthrust block could serve as conduits for the ascent of

  14. Petrogenetic and tectonic significance of xenocrystic Precambrian zircon in Lower Cambrian tonalite, eastern Klamath Mountains, California

    SciTech Connect

    Wallin, E.T. )

    1990-11-01

    U-Pb analyses of zircon from a Lower Cambrian tonalite in the Yreka terrane, Klamath Mountains, California, reveal an inherited Precambrian zircon component within rocks that have generally been believed to be part of the ophiolitic Trinity complex. The isotopic data indicate that Lower Cambrian plutonic rocks in the eastern Klamath Mountains are probably not ophiolitic in origin. These Lower Cambrian rocks may be either tectonic blocks within a lower Paleozoic accretionary complex or part of a disrupted Lower Cambrian volcanoplutonic terrane.

  15. Petrogenetic and tectonic significance of xenocrystic Precambrian zircon in Lower Cambrian tonalite, eastern Klamath Mountains, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallin, E. T.

    1990-11-01

    U-Pb analyses of zircon from a Lower Cambrian tonalite in the Yreka terrane, Klamath Mountains, California, reveal an inherited Precambrian zircon component within rocks that have generally been believed to be part of the "ophiolitic" Trinity complex. The isotopic data indicate that Lower Cambrian plutonic rocks in the eastern Klamath Mountains are probably not ophiolitic in origin. These Lower Cambrian rocks may be either tectonic blocks within a lower Paleozoic accretionary complex or part of a disrupted Lower Cambrian volcanoplutonic terrane.

  16. Tectonic significance of Neoproterozoic magmatism of Nakora area, Malani igneous suite, Western Rajasthan, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Naresh; Vallinayagam, G.

    2014-05-01

    Three magmatic phases are distinguished in the Neoproterozoic Nakora Ring Complex (NRC) of Malani Igneous Suite (MIS), namely (a) Extrusive (b) Intrusive and (c) Dyke phase. Magmatism at NRC initiated with minor amount of (basic) basalt flows and followed by the extensive/voluminous acid (rhyolites-trachytes) flows. The ripple marks are observed at the Dadawari area of NRC in tuffaceous rhyolite flow which suggests the aqueous condition of flows deposition. The emplacement of the magma appears to have been controlled by a well defined NE-SW tectonic lineament and cut by radial pattern of dykes. These NE-SW tectonic lineaments are the linear zones of crustal weakness and high heat flow. The spheroidal and rapakivi structures in the Nakora acid volcanics indicate the relationship between genetic link and magma mixing. Basalt-trachyte-rhyolite association suggests that the large amount of heat is supplied to the crust from the magma chamber before the eruption. The field (elliptical/ring structures), mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of Nakora granites attest an alkaline character in their evolution and consistent with within plate tectonic setting. The emplacement of these granites and associated volcanics is controlled by ring structures, a manifestation of plume activity and cauldron subsidence, an evidence of extensional tectonic environment. NRC granites are the product of partial melting of rocks similar to banded gneiss from Kolar Schist Belt of India. The present investigations suggest that the magmatic suites of NRC rocks are derived from a crustal source and the required heat supplied from a mantle plume.

  17. Rotational deformation in the Jurassic Mesohellenic ophiolites, Greece, and its tectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassios, Anne E.; Dilek, Yildirim

    2009-03-01

    The Jurassic Pindos and Vourinos ophiolites in the Western Hellenides of Greece are part of the Mesohellenic mafic-ultramafic slab underlying the Eocene-Miocene sedimentary basin (Mesohellenic Trough). The tectonic incorporation of this oceanic slab into the western edge of the Pelagonian subcontinent occurred via trench - passive margin collision in the late Jurassic. Much of the tectonic architecture of these ophiolites, particularly Vourinos, was acquired during progressive inhomogeneous deformation associated with the initial displacement of the Jurassic oceanic crust from its original igneous environment of formation, and its subsequent tectonic emplacement eastward onto the Pelagonian margin. The heterogeneous deformation in the mantle and crustal sequences of the Pindos-Vourinos ophiolites occurred in ductile, ductile-brittle, and brittle fields synchronously, as the Jurassic oceanic lithosphere was translated eastward; it also resulted in differential horizontal rotations within the displaced oceanic slab. Areas retaining high-temperature (diapiric) mantle fabric appear to have been "passively" translated by lower temperature ductile shearing, commonly along mylonite zones. Individual dunite bodies in the harzburgite tectonites indicate movement distances of at least kilometer scale. Pervasively mylonitic domains within the upper mantle peridotites suggest elongation on the order of five to ten times in the direction of ophiolite emplacement. Seafloor-spreading related, high-temperature mantle structures within the Pindos and Vourinos ophiolites are sub-parallel. Imprinted ductile kinematic indicators and ductile shear zones pervasive to the mantle and lower crustal sections in both ophiolites are also sub-parallel, consistent with the direction of tectonic vergence, and appear traceable across the sedimentary overburden of the Mesohellenic Trough. These geometric relations imply that the Pindos-Vourinos ophiolites retain their relative orientations from

  18. Distribution and erosion of the Paleozoic tectonic unconformities in the Tarim Basin, Northwest China: Significance for the evolution of paleo-uplifts and tectonic geography during deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Changsong; Yang, Haijun; Liu, Jingyan; Rui, Zhifeng; Cai, Zhenzhong; Zhu, Yongfeng

    2012-03-01

    The distribution and erosional features of the Paleozoic major tectonic unconformities in the Tarim Basin, and their genetic relation to the development of paleo-uplifts as well as the evolution of geodynamic settings, are documented in this paper based on the integral analysis of seismic, drilling, and outcrop data. During the Paleozoic, the Tarim Basin underwent three major tectonic deformation stages, which resulted in three angular unconformities and in significant changes in basin geomorphology and paleogeography. The tectonic deformation at the end of the Middle Ordovician was characterized by development of the southern central paleo-uplift, the northern depression, and the southeastern Tangguzibasi depression in the basin. The thickest denudation belts of the unconformity (Tg5-2) are distributed mainly along the thrust structural highs. A stronger deformation event took place at the end of the Late Ordovician and formed a huge uplift along the southwestern and southeastern basin margins and the western part of the Tabei uplift along the northern basin margin, producing an extensive angular unconformity (Tg5) with maximum erosion thickness of 1500-2000 m. This tectonic event resulted in an abrupt change in overall geography of the basin, from a deepwater marine environment at the late stages of the Late Ordovician to a littoral and neritic basin in the Early Silurian. The deformation that occurred at the end of the Middle Devonian was the strongest in the Paleozoic. It generated the most widespread angular unconformity (Tg3) within the basin and led to extensive erosion, with maximum denudation thickness of 3000-5000 m in the northern and northeastern parts of the basin. The topography of the basin during the late Devonian was characterized by a high in the northeast and a low in the southwest, forming an embayment basin opening to the southwest during the Early Devonian to Carboniferous. The transgression in general from southwest to northeast deposited

  19. Stratigraphy and tectonic significance of Lower Paleozoic continental margin strata in northeastern Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Moira T.; Gehrels, George E.

    1992-06-01

    Lower Paleozoic eugeoclinal strata in the Kootenay Arc in northeastern Washington and southeastern British Columbia are transitional between autochthonous lower Paleozoic miogeoclinal strata and outboard volcanic arc terranes of uncertain paleogeographic affinity. They provide a record of lower Paleozoic continental margin depositional and tectonic processes oceanward of the continental shelf. The southernmost stratigraphic unit, the Covada Group, is divided into two formations, the Daisy Formation, a mid fan sequence of arkosic and subarkosic wacke and arenite, and the Early Ordovician Butcher Mountain Formation, consisting of alkalic(?) pillow basalt and tuff of within-plate affinity. Another unit, formerly part of the Covada Group, is excluded and informally named the Bradeen Hill assemblage. It contains chert, chert-quartz arenite, quartz arenite, chert pebble conglomerate, shale, and basalt, and may be Ordovician to Devonian on the basis of stratigraphic evidence and regional correlations. The Covada Group and Bradeen Hill assemblage record (1) deposition of continentally derived sediments in a submarine fan setting, (2) relatively quiescent starved basin conditions, (3) local faulting; and (4) intermittent periods of volcanism, perhaps reflecting local extension. They can be correlated with other stratigraphic units in the Kootenay Arc and resemble units as far north as the Selwyn basin in northern Canada and as far south as the Roberts Mountains allochthon in central Nevada. This unites the stratigraphic record and implies a high degree of synchroneity of tectonic events along over 2500 km of the outer continental margin during early Paleozoic time.

  20. Monitoring (7)Be and tritium in rainwater in Daejeon, Korea and its significance.

    PubMed

    Kim, K J; Choi, Y; Yoon, Y-Y

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the concentrations of beryllium-7 and tritium in rainwater along with sodium concentration in the region of Daejeon, Korea for 7 months. The results demonstrate that (7)Be in rainwater is inversely proportional to the amount of sodium present and proportional to the rainfall. Also, it was observed that tritium reaches ground level about a month later than (7)Be. This study will guide prospective geological research applications associated with cosmogenic nuclides especially in rainwater for the Korean region. PMID:26688366

  1. Rare earth element patterns in Archean high-grade metasediments and their tectonic significance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Stuart Ross; Rudnick, Roberta L.; Mclennan, Scott M.; Eriksson, Kenneth A.

    1986-01-01

    REE data on metasedimentary rocks from two different types of high-grade Archean terrains are presented and analyzed. The value of REEs as indicators of crustal evolution is explained; the three geologic settings (in North America, Southern Africa, and Australia) from which the samples were obtained are described; and the data are presented in extensive tables and graphs and discussed in terms of metamorphic effects, the role of accessory phases, provenance, and tectonic implications (recycling, the previous extent of high-grade terrains, and a model of Archean crustal growth). The diversity of REE patterns in shallow-shelf metasediments is attributed to local provenance, while the Eu-depleted post-Archean patterns are associated with K-rich plutons from small, stable early Archean terrains.

  2. Extension Mode of Liaoxi Mesozoic basin and its significance for tectonic regime transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Qin, X.; Li, X.; Zhu, M.

    2011-12-01

    The evolution history extracted from the filling sequences of Lingyuan-Jianchang Mesozoic volcanic-sedimentary basin, northeast China, behaved as alternate feature of compressure and extension, but its extension mode was neglected in previous study. The crust thickness and heat flow of Liaoxi area during Mesozoic have been estimated according to the data of La/Yb ratio of REE from Lingyuan-Jianchang volcanic-sedimentary basin and vitrain reflectance belong to Liaoxi area. It is showed that the crust thickness of T3-J1, J2-J3 and K1 are 40-45 km,35-40km and 40-45km,respectively. The crust thickness increasing mainly occurred in T3-J1 and K1-2.The crust thickness decreasing initiated in J2 and furthest in J3-K1-1. The heat flow of J1 is 60mW/m2, which is more than 90mW/m2 in J3, and lowers at K1-1 but sharped to 120 mW/m2 in K1-2. According the distinguish figure for extension mode proposed by Buck (1991) and combined with the basic reference data of crust thickness and heat flow from Rudnick and Fountain (1995),it is likely that there are tectonic attribution of three extension styles. The basin of early stage of Early Yanshan epoch was mainly developed in Mesozoic converge orogen and acted as narrow rift; the basin of later stage of Early Yanshan epoch developed at Mesozoic extension terrain and active rift regime with the extension style of wide rift and primary core complex structure; the basin of Late Yanshan epoch was developed at the tectonic regime comprised of Mesozoic orogen, active rift and rift margin with the various extension style coexistence feature, namely dispersion extension. Key words:Liaoxi(western Liaoning provinces),Mesozoic, introplate orogen,extension structure,crust thickness,heat flow.

  3. The oceanic segment of the southern Brazilian margin: Morpho-structural domains and their tectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassetto, Marcelo; Alkmim, Fernando F.; Szatmari, Peter; Mohriak, Webster U.

    A descriptive and evolutionary analysis of the main morpho-structural features of the oceanic domain of the southern portion of the Brazilian Continental Margin is supported by regional seismic profiles and potential field data from the Brazilian governmental LEPLAC (Plano de Levantamento da Plataforma Continental Brasileira) Project. The several morpho-structural elements can be differentiated, as for example: the dominant structural pattern of the acoustic basement, including extensional faulting and long-wavelength folding, crustal thickness changes, fracture zones location, distribution of volcanic centers, and development of wedges of seaward-dipping reflectors. Four broad distinct morpho-structural domains, separated by fracture zones and oceanic lineaments. Domain I is located south of the Porto Alegre Lineament; Domain II corresponds to the area between the Porto Alegre Lineament and the Rio Grande Fracture Zone; Domain III spans the area of the São Paulo Plateau; and Domain IV is located to the east of this plateau, towards the abyssal portions of the oceanic crust. These domains are defined by their distinct regional morphologic and structural characteristics. Sometimes these elements are well imaged in the seismic profiles, corroborated by gravity and magnetic anomalies, and eventually identified as prominent features at the sea bottom physiography. Using a multidisciplinary approach based on bathymetric maps, regional seismic interpretation, magnetic data analysis, and gravity models, this work attempts to characterize these elements in a descriptive and evolutionary view, identifying their role in the tectonic development of this portion of the South Atlantic.

  4. Petrochemistry and tectonic significance of Lower Cretaceous Barros Arana Formation basalts, southernmost Chilean Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, C. R.; Mohseni, P. P.; Fuenzalida, P. R.

    The Lower Cretaceous Barros Arana Formation (Albian, hornblende KAr age of 104 Ma), in the Magallanes region of Chile, consists of a sequence of spilitized clinopyroxene- and amphibole-bearing mafic dikes and lavas, and volcaniclastic breccias, occurring within the sedimentary infill of the Rocas Verdes marginal basin and its eastward extension onto the Cretaceous continental platform. Although the original alkali and alkaline earth element concentrations of the basaltic lavas and dikes have been altered by spilitization, the presence of relict pargasitic amphibole phenocrysts, the absence of orthopyroxene, and high LREE contents and LREE/HREE ratios imply mildly alkaline affinities for these basalts. Their low TiO 2 and HFSE (Zr, Nb, Ta, and Hf) contents and high LREE/HFSE ratios suggest affinities with convergent plate boundary arc magmas. The Barros Arana basalts are interpreted as mafic members of the mildly alkaline shoshonitic rock suite of subduction-related arcs. They may have formed as subduction geometry began to undergo the changes (flattening) that ultimately led to the initiation of the closure, deformation, and uplift of the Rocas Verdes basin by the late or post-Albian. The low initial 87Sr/ 86Sr (0.7031) and high initial 143Nd/ 144Nd (0.51277) of the basalts indicate that a generally extensional tectonic regime east of the main calc-alkaline arc allowed eruption of these mafic shoshonites without interaction with continental crust (in contrast to the contemporaneous plutons of the Patagonian batholith).

  5. Density structure of the lithosphere in the southwestern United States and its tectonic significance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaban, M.K.; Mooney, W.D.

    2001-01-01

    We calculate a density model of the lithosphere of the southwestern United States through an integrated analysis of gravity, seismic refraction, drill hole, and geological data. Deviations from the average upper mantle density are as much as ?? 3%. A comparison with tomographic images of seismic velocities indicates that a substantial part (>50%) of these density variations is due to changes in composition rather than temperature. Pronounced mass deficits are found in the upper mantle under the Basin and Range Province and the northern part of the California Coast Ranges and adjacent ocean. The density structure of the northern and central/southern Sierra Nevada is remarkably different. The central/southern part is anomalous and is characterized by a relatively light crust underlain by a higher-density upper mantle that may be associated with a cold, stalled subducted plate. High densities are also determined within the uppermost mantle beneath the central Transverse Ranges and adjoining continental slope. The average density of the crystalline crust under the Great Valley and western Sierra Nevada is estimated to be up to 200 kg m~3 higher than the regional average, consistent with tectonic models for the obduction of oceanic crust and uppermost mantle in this region.

  6. The Cerro Aguas Calientes caldera, NW Argentina: An example of a tectonically controlled, polygenetic collapse caldera, and its regional significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrinovic, I. A.; Martí, J.; Aguirre-Díaz, G. J.; Guzmán, S.; Geyer, A.; Paz, N. Salado

    2010-07-01

    Polygenetic, silicic collapse calderas are common in the central Andes. Here we describe in detail the Cerro Aguas Calientes caldera in NW Argentina, which comprises two caldera-forming episodes that occurred at 17.15 Ma and 10.3 Ma. We analyse the significance of its structural setting, composition, size and the subsidence style of both caldera episodes. We find that the caldera eruptions had a tectonic trigger. In both cases, an homogeneous dacitic crystal-rich (>60 vol.% of crystals) reservoir of batholithic size became unstable due to the effect of increasing regional transpression, which favoured local dilation through minor strike-slip faults from which ring faults nucleated and permitted caldera collapse. Both calderas are similar in shape, location and products. The 17.15 Ma caldera has an elliptical shape (17 × 14 km) elongated in a N30° trend; both intracaldera and extracaldera ignimbrites covered an area of around 620 km 2 with a minimum volume estimate of 140 km 3 (DRE). The 10.3 Ma episode generated another elliptical caldera (19 × 14 km), with the same orientation as the previous one, from which intracaldera and outflow ignimbrites covered a total area of about 1700 km 2, representing a minimum eruption volume of 350 km 3(DRE). In this paper we discuss the significance of the Cerro Aguas Calientes caldera in comparison with other well known examples from the central Andes in terms of tectonic setting, eruption mechanisms, and volumes of related ignimbrites. We suggest that our kinematic model is a common volcano-tectonic scenario during the Cenozoic in the Puna and Altiplano, which may be applied to explain the origin of other large calderas in the same region.

  7. The Cerro Aguas Calientes caldera, NW Argentina: an example of a tectonically controlled, polygenetic, collapse caldera, and its regional significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrinovic, Ivan A.; Martí, Joan; Aguirre-Diaz, Gerardo J.; Guzmán, Silvina R.; Geyer, Adelina; Grosse, Pablo; Salado Paz, Natalia

    2010-05-01

    Polygenetic, silicic collapse calderas such as Cerro Galán, Pastos Grandes, La Pacana, Vilama, Negra Muerta, Farallón Negro, Cerro Guacha, among others are common in the central Andes. Here we describe in detail the Cerro Aguas Calientes caldera in NW Argentina, which comprises two caldera-forming episodes occurred at 17.15 Ma and 10.3 Ma, respectively. We analyse the significance of its structural setting, composition, size and the subsidence style of both caldera episodes. Our results reveal that the caldera eruptions had a tectonic trigger. In both cases, an homogeneous dacitic crystal-rich (>60 vol. % of crystals) reservoir of batholitic size became unstable due to the effect of increasing regional transpression, favouring local dilation throughout minor strike slip faults from which ring faults nucleated and permitted caldera collapse. Both episodes are similar in shape, location and products of the resulting calderas. The 17.15 Ma caldera has an elliptical shape (17 × 14 km) and is elongated in a N30° trend; both intracaldera and extracaldera ignimbrites covered an area of around 620 km2 with a minimum volume estimate of 138 km3 (DRE). The 10.3 Ma episode generated another elliptical caldera (19 ×14 km), with the same orientation as the previous one, from which intracaldera and outflow ignimbrites covered a total area of about 1,700 km2, representing a minimum eruption volume of 341 km3 (DRE). In this work we discuss the significance of the Cerro Aguas Calientes caldera in comparison with other well known examples from the central Andes in terms of tectonic setting, eruption mechanisms, and volumes of related ignimbrites. We suggest that our kinematic model is a common volcano-tectonic scenario during the Cenozoic in the Puna and Altiplano, which may be applied to explain the origin of other large calderas in the same region.

  8. Tectonic significance of bimodal volcanism in the Archean Michipicoten greenstone belt, Ontario

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvester, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    In the lower volcanic cycle (2750 Ma old) of the Michipicoten greenstone belt, Ontario, a basal mafic unit (MV1) consisting mainly of basalt-basaltic andesite (49.4-56.4 wt.% SiO/sub 2/, 8.77-12.36 wt.% FeO/sub t/) with enriched ((La/Sm)/sub n/=1.9-2.6, Th=2.0-4.1 ppm, Sr=310-570 ppm) and depleted ((La/Sm)/sub n/=0.55-1.07, Th=0.16-0.71 ppm, Sr<250 ppm) trace element characteristics is locally overlain by a felsic unit (FV1) dominated volumetrically by rhyolite (71.9-79.6 wt.% SiO/sub 2/) and subordinate dacite (62.2-68.8 wt.% SiO/sub 2/). The mafic rocks are pillowed, massive flows and hyaloclastites suggesting subaqueous emplacement, whereas the felsic rocks are dominantly subaerial to shallow subaqueous pyroclastic deposits. The basalts of MV1 are similar chemically to modern tholeiites formed in primitive island arc/marginal basin complexes. In contrast, the rhyolites and dacites of FV1 exhibit the calc-alkaline chemical characteristics and rock associations typical of some continental inner arc volcanics. The juxtaposition of primitive island arc/marginal basin and continental inner arc tectonic settings occurs at the present time in the Tonga-Kermadec-New Zealand island arc. According to this model, MV1 is analogous to the basalt/basaltic andesite-dominated volcanism of the Tonga-kermadec island arc/Lau back-arc basin, whereas FV1 is the equivalent of the voluminous rhyolitic ignimbrites of the Taupo inner arc basin. The model suggests that the lower volcanic cycle of the Michipicoten belt formed on a basement consisting of small blocks of continental crust surrounded by oceanic crust.

  9. Tectonic significance of Synrift sediment packages across the Congo continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, J.P.; Karner, G.D.; Driscoll, N.W. ); Brumbaugh, W.D. ); Cameron, N. )

    1993-09-01

    The tectonic and stratigraphic development of the Congo continental margin reflects the timing, magnitude, and distribution of lithospheric extension responsible for its formation. Details of the lithospheric extension process are recorded in the stratigraphic successions preserved along and across the margin. By using the stratal relationships (e.g., onlap, downlap, and truncation) and lithofacies determined from seismic reflection and exploratory well data as input into our basin-modeling strategy, we have developed an integrated approach to determine the relationship between the timing, magnitude, and distribution of lithospheric extension across the margin. Two hinge zones, an eastern and Atlantic hinge formed along the Congo margin in response to discrete extensional events occurring from the Berriasian to the Aptian. The eastern hinge zone demarcates the eastern limit of the broadly distributed Berriasian extension. This extension resulted in the formation of deep anoxic, lacustrine systems. In contrast, the Atlantic hinge, located [approximately]90 km west of the eastern hinge, marks the eastern limit of a second phase of extension, which began in the Hauterivian. Consequent footwall uplift and rotation exposed the earlier synrift and prerift stratigraphy to at least wave base causing varying amounts of erosional truncation across the Atlantic hinge zone along much of the Gabon, Congo, and Angola margins. The absence of the Melania Formation across the Congo margin implies that uplift of the Atlantic hinge was relatively minor compared to that across the Angola and Gabon margins. In addition, material eroded from the adjacent and topographically higher hinge zones may in part account for the thick wedge of sediment deposited seaward of the Congo Atlantic hinge. A third phase of extension reactivated both the eastern and Atlantic hinge zones and was responsible for creating the accommodation space for Marnes Noires source rock deposition.

  10. Growth faults and salt tectonics in Houston diapir province: relative timing and exploration significance

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, T.E.

    1983-09-01

    Oil and gas accumulation in Gulf Coast Tertiary strata is contolled mainly by regional growth faults and by salt-related structures. Salt forms the most prominent set of structures in the Houston diapir province of southeast Texas. Recent work in three study areas shows that the Tertiary growth-fault trends, so well displayed along strike to the south-west, continue through this salt basin as well, but they have been deformed by later salt movement. In the Katy area, seismic data disclose early (pre-Wilcox) salt pillows downdip of the Cretaceous reef trend. Salt stocks were injected upward from the pillows during Clayborne deposition, and were flanked by deep withdrawal basins and turtle structures. In Brazoria County, a major lower Frio growth-fault trend affecting the Houston delta system, was deformed by later salt domes, by a salt-withdrawal basin, and by a possible turtle structure at Chocolate Bayou. A productive geopressured aquifer exists in the salt-withdrawal basin bounded by the previously formed growth faults. In Jefferson County, in contrast, salt-tectonic activity and growth faulting appear to have been coeval. Early salt-cored ridges continued to rise throughout Frio deposition; growth faults occur both updip and downdip. Hydrocarbons accumulated over the salt domes in growth-fault anticlines and in stratigraphic traps. Recognition that shelf-margin growth faulting preceded the development of the present pattern of domes and basins has important implications for hydrocarbon exploration. Growth faults may be migration paths for hydrocarbons; furthermore, early formed traps, distorted by salt movement, may still be found to contain hydrocarbons.

  11. Structural geology and tectonic significance of foreland thrust belts, Tarim and Junggar basins, northwest China

    SciTech Connect

    McKnight, C.L.; Chu, J.; Corroll, A.R.; Hendrix, M.S.; Wang, X.; Graham, S.A.; Liang, Y.H.; Wang, Z.X.; Xiao, X.

    1989-03-01

    The Kalpin uplift, located on the northwestern margin of the Tarim basin is characterized by a series of thin, southeast-vergent thrust plates modified by strike-slip faults. Each thrust plate repeats a sedimentary sequence consisting of upper Proterozoic through Permian shallow marine to nonmarine carbonates and clastics. Tertiary rocks as young as Neogene are affected by the deformation. The most basinward thrust sheet abuts the Bachu uplift, an older structural feature trending almost perpendicular to the thrusts. Sedimentary rocks as old as late Proterozoic are exposed in the Bachu uplift, which apparently represents a west-vergent Late Silurian to Early Devonian thrust belt. An unconformable Silurian-Devonian contact, the presence of Devonian red beds, and another unconformable contact separating Devonian from Upper Carboniferous strata support the interpretation of a middle Paleozoic deformational event. Another unconformity, at the Carboniferous-Permian boundary, apparently coincides with the time of collision of the Tarim craton with the southern margin of central Asia. The Shihezi fold trend, located in the southern Junggar basin, consists of three lines of surface anticlines trending parallel to the axis of the Urumqi foredeep. A thick sequence of Mesozoic and Cenozoic nonmarine sedimentary rocks accumulated in the growing foredeep. Mesozoic and Paleogene strata are deformed in the southern foldbelt, with Jurassic rocks forming the cores of these thrusted anticlines. The Qigu oil field is located in this southern belt. Deformed Neogene and Quaternary strata are exposed in the thrusted anticlines of the middle and northern foldbelts. The Dushanzi oil field is located in the northern belt. The episodic development of compressional structures in northwestern China documents the accretion of a number of tectonic units to the growing southern margin of central Asia through time.

  12. Detrital modes of the Pyeongan Supergroup (Late Carboniferous Early Triassic) sandstones in the Samcheog coalfield, Korea: implications for provenance and tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong Il; Sheen, Dong-Hee

    1998-08-01

    Medium to coarse sandstones of the Carboniferous to Early Triassic Pyeongan Supergroup in the Samcheog coalfield, Korea, were studied to infer the provenance and tectonic settings of the source areas. Sandstone detrital modes change upwards stratigraphically. Sandstone types from the Manhang to Dosagog formations low to middle in the sequence are quartzarenite, and sublitharenite to litharenite, whereas sandstones of the Gohan and Donggo formations high in the sequence are feldspathic litharenite and arkose, respectively. Using various ternary diagrams, the provenance of the Manhang to Gohan formations is suggested to be a recycled orogen setting. Some Gohan Formation sandstones plot within the arc-related setting field, and the Donggo Formation sandstones plot within both continental block and recycled orogen fields. Results of quartz grain petrography are consistent with those of detrital modes. Quartz in sandstones of all units except the Donggo Formation indicates derivation from low-rank metamorphic sources. Quartz in Donggo sandstones was derived from medium- to high-rank metamorphic and plutonic source rocks. Considering the sandstone composition and palaeocurrent data, the Pyeongan Supergroup probably was deposited in a molasse foreland basin and was derived from a synbasinal orogenic belt, probably the Akiyoshi orogen located in southwest Japan.

  13. Revised stratigraphy and reinterpretation of the Miocene Pohang basinfill, SE Korea: sequence development in response to tectonism and eustasy in a back-arc basin margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Y. K.; Rhee, C. W.; Shon, H.

    2001-09-01

    The Miocene Pohang Basin is a pull-apart basin formed along the eastern continental margin of Korea (ECMK) during the back-arc opening of the East Sea (Sea of Japan). The basin is filled by more than 1 km thick, nonmarine to deep-marine strata. These strata show extreme vertical and lateral lithofacies changes and have caused decades-long controversies on their nature and stratigraphy. Previous sedimentological studies suggest that the basinfill was deposited by a series of contemporaneously developed depositional systems, including fan delta, prodelta, slope apron, and basin plain. Detailed mapping and magnetotelluric surveying show, however, that the basinfill is composed of several packages of strata (sequences) that are bounded by distinct and laterally persistent stratigraphic discontinuities (sequence boundaries). This suggests that the depositional systems in the Pohang Basin developed sequentially rather than contemporaneously. Six packages of strata are identified in the basin: a nonmarine to shallow marine (transgressive) sequence (Sequence 1), a Gilbert-type-delta conglomerate (Sequence 2), and alternations of submarine conglomerates and hemipelagic mudstones (Sequences 3-6). The conglomerates and hemipelagic mudstones of the latter four sequences are interpreted to represent lowstand depositional systems (slope apron, submarine fan, and high-gradient delta) and condensed intervals, respectively. Compilation of geochronologic, paleomagnetic, and biostratigraphic data suggests that Sequence 1 formed during the gradual subsidence of the ECMK prior to 17 Ma, whereas Sequence 2 formed in response to abrupt downfaulting of the Pohang Basin at about 17 Ma. Both sequences are interpreted to have developed in response to the early Miocene back-arc-opening tectonism of the East Sea. On the other hand, Sequences 3-6 formed between 17 and about 10.5 Ma. The Pohang Basin was subject to only minor tectonism during this period and could record global sea

  14. Age and tectonic significance of volcanic rocks in the northern Los Angeles Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCulloh, Thane H.; Fleck, Robert J.; Denison, Rodger E.; Beyer, Larry A.; Stanley, Richard G.

    2002-01-01

    Volcanic rocks, mostly basalts and some andesites, are interbedded with middle Miocene strata and are overlain by younger rocks throughout the greater part of the Los Angeles Basin, California. Roughly correlative flows, previously dated radiometrically (or paleontologically) at about 16.4 to 10.7 Ma, crop out in five separate regions around the basin perimeter. Los Angeles Basin volcanic rocks have special meaning because they offer clues to tectonomagmatic events associated with onset of clockwise transrotation of the western Transverse Ranges region and to the timing and locus of the initial basin opening. Whole-rock 40Ar/39Ar dating of near-tholeiitic olivine basalts of the Topanga Formation (Hoots, 1931) from three sites in the easternmost Santa Monica Mountains, combined with 87Sr/86Sr dating of fossil carbonates from interstratified marine beds at nine sites, establish a new age of 17.4 Ma for these oldest known Topanga-age volcanics of the Los Angeles Basin. We also record three new 40Ar/39Ar ages (15.3 Ma) from andesitic flows of the lower Glendora Volcanics at the northeast edge of the basin, 70 km east of the Santa Monica Mountains. A whole-rock determination of 17.2±0.5 Ma for nearby altered olivine basalt in the unfossiliferous Glendora volcanic sequence is questionable because of a complex 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum suggestive of 39Ar recoil, but it may indicate an older volcanic unit in this eastern area. We hypothesize that the 17.4-Ma volcanics in the eastern Santa Monica Mountains are an early expression of deep crustal magmatism accompanying the earliest extensional tectonism associated with rifting. The extremely thick younger volcanic pile in the western and central parts of the range may suggest that this early igneous activity in the eastern area was premonitory. Paleomagnetic declination data are needed to determine the pre-transrotational orientation of the eastern Santa Monica Mountains volcanic sequence. The new age determinations do not

  15. Tectonic Significance Of Structures On Ellef Ringnes Island, Queen Elizabeth Islands, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evenchick, C.

    2012-12-01

    Ellef Ringnes Island lies near the centre of the Sverdrup Basin. Bedrock consists of Jurassic and Cretaceous clastic rocks of the Sverdrup Basin that are pierced by evaporite diapirs and intruded by mafic dykes and sills. Recent bedrock mapping on the island provides new detail of structures and newly recognized magmatism that provide insight into Cretaceous tectonism of the region. The distribution of map units on the island is controlled at the largest scale by gentle southeastward dip towards the centre of the Sverdrup Basin. Two suites of folds affect all strata. Folds interpreted to be associated with Eurekan deformation trend northwest and have wavelengths of several kilometres. Smaller scale folds appear to be associated with dip-slip faults and commonly trend northeast. Strata are offset by four suites of geographically and geometrically distinct faults. Faults spatially associated with evaporite diapirs occur in radial patterns around the diapirs and offset bounding Cretaceous strata. They are interpreted to have formed during active diapirism, and their history, revealed by differences in the thickness of stratigraphic units within and outside of grabens, elucidates the Cretaceous history of evaporite diapirism. The remaining three suites of faults each have consistent strike and are geographically restricted. The most widespread suite strikes north-northeast. These faults are interpreted to be extensional. They are parallel with the majority of dykes in the same area, as well as prominent aeromagnetic anomalies interpreted to be dykes in the subsurface that fed the widespread sills of the northern island. Possible explanations for this extension and mafic magmatism include association with the Alpha Ridge, as postulated previously, or a component of sinistral movement along the Amerasia Basin margin during the late Early and early Late Cretaceous. Other suites of folds include an east-trending suite of dip-slip faults at the northern limit of the island

  16. Late Cretaceous -Early Tertiary dyke swarm of North Greenland it's age, origins and tectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manby, Geoffrey

    2014-05-01

    these rocks and it appears that the dyke rocks have enriched isotopic compositions that suggest lithosphere-mantle mixing. It is evident that some partial metasomatism of the magmas has occurred with fluid assisted alteration resulting in particular with high Ti and feldspars also suggestive of an inhomogenous mantle source. Trace-REE ratio modelling indicates that dyke melts were generated largely in the Spinel Lherzolite facies with a small contribution from garnet lherzolite melt possibly originating from the garnet-spinel transition at 50-70km depth with 17kb pressures. The shallow depth melting and homogenisation of the magmas that were emplaced over a long time would seem to exclude plume interaction as a driving force for uplift and magmatism. Magmatism and tectonism in this region ceased before opening of the Eurasian basin at CHRON 24 (56Ma), before the dextral separation of the Greenland-Svalbard blocks and it is unlikely that these rocks formed part of the so-called Large Igneous Province.

  17. Stratigraphy, geochemistry and tectonic significance of the Oligocene magmatic rocks of western Oaxaca, southern Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martiny, B.; Martinez-Serrano, R. G.; Moran-Zenteno, D. J.; MacIas-Romo, C.; Ayuso, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    the volcanic rocks, from 0.7042 to 0.7046 and 0 +2.6. The range of these isotope ratios and those reported for the basement rocks in this region suggest a relatively low degree of old crustal involvement for most of the studied rocks. The Pb isotopic compositions of the Tertiary magmatic rocks also show a narrow range [(206Pb/204Pb) = 18.67-18.75; (207Pb/204Pb) = 15.59-15.62; (208Pb/204Pb) = 38.44-38.59], suggesting a similar source region for the volcanic and plutonic rocks. Trace elements and isotopic compositions suggest a mantle source in the subcontinental lithosphere that has been enriched by a subduction component. General tectonic features in this region indicate a more active rate of transtensional deformation for the inland volcanic region than along the coastal margin during the main events of Oligocene magmatism. The lower degree of differentiation of the inland volcanic sequences, particularly the upper unit of the northern sector, compared to the plutons of the coastal margin, suggests that the differentiation of the Tertiary magmas in southern Mexico was controlled to a great extent by the characteristics of the different strain domains. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Paragenesis and tectonic significance of base and precious metal occurrences along the San Andreas fault at Point Delgada, California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, R.J.; Sorg, D.H.; Morton, J.L.; Theodore, T.G.; Meyer, C.E.; Delevaux, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The mineralogy, geochemistry and origin of sulphide veins along cross faults in the San Andreas fault system are described and cited for a natural history of local plate tectonics and for 'a detailed understanding of the role of major strike-slip faults in the formation and tectonic translation of hydrothermal ore deposits'. -G.J.N.

  19. Geochonology and Tectonic Significance of post-collisional porphyry in Qulong area, southeast segment of the Gangdese belt, Tibet, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Zeren, Z.; Du, C.; Feng, L.; Nima, C.; Zhang, L.

    2012-12-01

    With the collision of Indian plate and Eura-Asian plate, there developed complicated tectono-magmanism during Meso-Cenozoic in Gangdese belt, Xizang Tibet. Therefore, it resulted that plentiful tectonism and post-collision high-K calc-alkaline magmatism related to mineralization distrubted from east to west in the belt. And this is quite significant for us to do some rearch on large-scale metallogenetics, uplifting epoch and EW-striking extension during the post-collision in Xizang-Qinghai Plateau. Zircon samples from Cangrila Granodiorite-porphyry in Qulong area, Southeast of Gangdese porphyry copper belt, Xiangbeishan diorite-porphyrite and from Jiama Granite-porphyry give LA-ICPMS U-Pb ages of 16.3Ma, 14. 4Ma, and 15.4Ma, respectively, and all these ages represent the porphyries' forming ages. From barren Xiangbeishan diorite-porphyrite through intermediately mineralized Jiama Granite-porphyry to stongly mineralized Cangrila Granodiorite-porphyry, the LA-ICPMS U-Pb ages of zircon become younger and younger. According to the regional data and geochemical characteristics, these porphyries were mainly derived directly from the thickened mafic lower-crust formed in south Tibet during collision and epeirogeny. During post-collisional extension stage, for inter-earth thermal flowing, SN-striking normal faulting systems across the Tibetan orogen caused rapid rising and localization of porphyry magmas and adequately separating of massive ore-bearing fluids from the magmatic hydrothermal systems. All these data indicate that Gandese belt has experienced from post-collisional extrusion changed into intra-plate extension since Miocene. During Miocene, Gangdese belt undergone violent intraplate extension, post-collisional porphyry intrusion and paroxysmal massive mineralization of porphyry-type, and all these was controlled by deep dynamics. Key Words: Qulong area; Gangdese tectonic belt; Tibet;Zircon La-ICP-MS U-Pb dating; intra-plate extension; Image Information For CL

  20. Tectonic and climatic significance of a late Eocene low-relief, high-level geomorphic surface, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Kathryn M.; Chase, Clement G

    1994-01-01

    New paleobotanical data suggest that in the late Eocene the erosion surface which capped the Front Range, Colorado was 2.2-2.3 km in elevation, which is similar to the 2.5-km present elevation of surface remnants. This estimated elevation casts doubt on the conventional belief that the low-relief geomorphic surface was formed by lateral planation of streams to a base level not much higher than sea level and that the present deeply incised canyons must represent Neogene uplift of Colorado. Description of the surface, calculations of sediment volume, and isostatic balance and fluvial landsculpting models demonstrate that while the high elevation of the erosion surface was due to tectonic forces, its smoothness was mostly a result of climatic factors. A sediment balance calculated for the Front Range suggests that from 2 to 4 km of material were eroded by the late Eocene, consistent with fission track ages. This amount of erosion would remove a significant portionof the 7 km of Laramide upper crustal thickening. Isostatic modeling implies that the 2.2-3.3 km elevation was most likely created by lower crustal thickening during the Laramide. A numerical model of fluvial erosion and deposition suggests a way that a late Eocene surface could have formed at this high elevation without incision. A humid climate with a preponderance of small storm events will diffusively smooth topography and is a possible mechanism for formation oflow-relief, high-level surfaces. Paleoclimate models suggest a lack of large strom events in the late Eocene because of cool sea surface temperatures in the equatorial region. Return to a drier but stormier climate post-Eocene could have caused the incision of the surface by young canyons. By this interpretation, regional erosion surfaces may represent regional climatic rather than tectonic conditions.

  1. Tectonic significance of granitoid plutons from the Andasibe paragneiss belt, east-central Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raharimahefa, T.

    2013-12-01

    The understanding of the crustal evolution of the central Madagascar is of major significance in the study of the Precambrian basement of Madagascar and the greater Gondwana supercontinent. The study area, known as Andasibe paragneiss defines a fold belt that stretches from Ambatondrazaka to Soavina area in eastern Madagascar and is intruded by extensive granitoid intrusions. The western part of Andasibe paragneiss lies within the crustal scale Angavo shear zone, and is characterized by fine to medium-grained foliated paragneiss, which also include biotite-hornblende gneiss, migmatitic quartzofeldspathic gneiss, sillimanite-bearing gneiss, garnet-bearing gneiss, graphitic gneiss intercalates with schist, quartzite, muscovite-bearing gneiss and marble. Three samples of granitoid plutons intruding the Andasibe paragneiss yielded isotope dilution-thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) U-Pb zircon ages of 801.2×3.8Ma, 776.5×4.4Ma and 772.1×4.2Ma. These dates are interpreted to represent the crystallization ages of these rocks and are comparable to other reported U-Pb emplacement ages for granitoid plutons within and along the north-central margin of the Angavo shear zone, which are suggested to be related to ca. 820 Ma successor-arc plutonism. These granitoids pre-dates the Angavo shear zone and folds affecting the plutons foliation are believed to have formed during the East-African Orogen, which in this part of the Malagasy Precambrian basement, is considered to have associated with Neoproterozoic extensive magmatism ca. 820 Ma to 540 Ma.

  2. Provenance, Paleoaltimetry, and Tectonic Significance of the Liuqu Conglomerate, Southern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, R.; DeCelles, P. G.; Quade, J.

    2012-12-01

    The mid-Cenozoic Liuqu Conglomerate was deposited in alluvial fan and coarse-grained fluvial deposystems along the Indus-Yarlung suture zone and provides information critical for constraining the timing and nature of the India-Asia collision. The Liuqu basins formed between ophiolitic mélanges (to the south) and uplifted Cretaceous forearc deposits (to the north) along the central, 1000 km long segment of the Indus-Yarlung suture zone in southern Tibet. Sedimentological analysis shows the unit to be composed of mixed sediment-gravity flow and fluvial lithofacies assemblages, locally punctuated by mature paleosols of mainly vertic character. Paleocurrent and provenance data demonstrate predominantly northward sediment transport from source terranes in ophiolitic and oceanic rocks in the hanging wall of a north-vergent thrust system that forms the southern limit of most Liuqu outcrops. Detrital zircon U-Pb age spectra define age clusters of 80-110 Ma, 120-135 Ma, 500-600 Ma, and 1100-1200 Ma, requiring input from both Asian and Indian sources. The youngest detrital zircon U-Pb ages obtained thus far are ca. 32 Ma, providing a maximum depositional age. Analysis of paleosol carbonates yielded δ13C values between -12‰ and -8‰ which indicate deposition in a well vegetated setting; this is consistent with the intensely weathered paleosols preserved in this unit. Together these initial results indicate that (a) the India-Asia collision was well underway by the time of Liuqu deposition (no later than 32 Ma); (b) deposition occurred under paleogeographic and/or paleoclimatic conditions that promoted intense weathering on Liuqu floodplains and alluvial fan margins. The latter is significant insofar as intense weathering would be surprising at high paleoelevations predicted by the development of the Tethyan Himalayan thrust belt beginning in Eocene time.

  3. CHARACTER AND REGIONAL SIGNIFICANCE OF GREAT FALLS TECTONIC ZONE, EAST-CENTRAL IDAHO AND WEST-CENTRAL MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neill, J. Michael; Lopez, David A.

    1985-01-01

    The Great Falls tectonic zone, here named, is a belt of diverse northeast-trending geologic features that can be traced from the Idaho batholith in the Cordilleran miogeocline, across thrust-belt structures and basement rocks of west-central and southwestern Montana, through cratonic rocks of central Montana, and into southwestern-most Saskatchewan, Canada. Geologic mapping in east-central Idaho and west-central Montana has outlined a continuous zone of high-angle faults and shear zones. Recurrent fault movement in this zone and strong structural control over igneous intrusion suggest a fundamental tectonic feature that has influenced the tectonic development of the Idaho-Montana area from a least middle Proterozoic time to the present. Refs.

  4. Reconciling Invariant Topography with Significant Along-Strike Gradients in Climate and Tectonics in the Greater Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, A. M.; Whipple, K. X.; Bookhagen, B.; Rossi, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    The Greater Caucasus mountains (GC), which represent the locus of NE-SW directed convergence in the central Arabia-Eurasia collision, are an E-W striking orogen characterized by significant gradients in climate and tectonics. West of 45ºE the GC are a singly-sided, south-directed orogen with a low modern shortening rate of 1-4 mm/yr and a high mean annual precipitation (MAP) of 1-2 m/yr. Contrastingly, east of 45ºE, the GC are doubly-vergent, underlain by a subducting slab, shortening at 8-12 mm/yr and have a MAP of 0.1-0.5 m/yr. Despite these significant gradients, the topography of the GC is remarkably similar along-strike, suggesting (1) an eastward increase in erosion rate to balance the shortening gradient, (2) a westward increase in uplift rate to balance the MAP gradient, or (3) similar uplift and erosion rates along-strike independent of the MAP and shortening gradients. We utilize established relationships between catchment scale erosion rates and topography (hillslope gradients and channel steepness) developed elsewhere to assess whether an along-strike gradient in erosion rates is likely in the GC. We combine this with an analysis of the modern GC climate from satellite (TRMM and MODIS) and river discharge data. The relationship between channel steepness and mean hillslope gradient is invariant along-strike. Precipitation variability is positively correlated with elevation and constant along-strike, but runoff variability is low throughout the range and does not vary systematically along-strike. Together these results suggest no significant gradient in erosional efficiency along-strike. Invariant topography and erosional efficiency along-strike could imply similar uplift and erosion rates along-strike, but ultimately require quantitative measures of both to confirm. If erosion and uplift rates are similar along-strike, this requires an additional mechanism to explain the invariant topography despite the strong gradient in modern shortening rate.

  5. Petrogenesis and tectonic significance of the Eocene adakite-like rocks in western Yunnan, southeastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Huixia; Hou, Qingye; Zhang, Zeming

    2016-02-01

    Eocene magmatic rocks are widespread in western Yunnan, southeastern Tibetan Plateau. However, their petrogenesis and tectonic significance remain controversial. In this paper, we report geochemical and geochronological data of adakite-like rocks from the eastern part of western Yunnan. Zircon U-Pb dating reveals that they were emplaced at ca. 35 Ma. A geochemical study shows that these rocks have high SiO2 (68.97-72.44 wt.%), K2O (4.35-5.87 wt.%) and low MgO (0.61-1.16 wt.%), Y (6.65-12.6 ppm) and Yb (0.58-1.02 ppm) contents as well as high Sr/Y (74-228) and La/Yb (59-131) values, belonging to high-K calc-alkaline to shoshonitic adakite-like rocks. These rocks have high (87Sr/86Sr)i (0.70623-0.70653), low εNd(t) (- 4.5 to - 7.5) and slightly low radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions with (206Pb/204Pb)i = 18.042-18.179. Zircons of these rocks show εHf(t) values ranging from - 6.3 to + 1.2 and model ages (TDM2) of 1513-1035 Ma. The geochemical characteristics indicate that the Eocene adakite-like rocks from the eastern part of western Yunnan were derived from the partial melting of Neoproterozoic mafic rocks underplated in the lower crust of the western margin of the Yangtze Plate with input of mantle-derived potassic-ultrapotassic melt. Integration of published geochemical data clearly shows that zircon εHf(t) and whole-rock εNd(t) values of Eocene adakite-like rocks from the whole western Yunnan exhibit a trend of westward increase. We infer that the adakite-like rocks from the western part of western Yunnan were derived from the partial melting of late Paleozoic-Mesozoic mafic rocks formed as the lower crust of a continental magmatic arc during eastward subduction of the Paleo-Tethyan Ocean, and the Eocene magmatic rocks in western Yunnan were generated during the removal of thickened continental lithosphere triggered by the India and Asia collision.

  6. Distinct deformational history of two contrasting tectonic domains in the Chinese Altai: Their significance in understanding accretionary orogenic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Sun, Min; Schulmann, Karel; Zhao, Guochun; Wu, Qihang; Jiang, Yingde; Guy, Alexandra; Wang, Yuejun

    2015-04-01

    The Chinese Altai, a key component of the western Central Asian Orogenic Belt, is considered to be formed through multiple accretions of different terranes. However, the deformational histories of each terrane (tectonic domain), i.e. structural records before and after the accretion, are rarely studied, which has hindered our understanding of the accretionary processes. To fill the gap, a systematic macro- and microscopic structural analysis was carried out on two contrasting litho-tectonic units, i.e. the early Paleozoic low-grade Alegedayi Ophiolitic Complex (AOC) juxtaposed to the high grade Tarlang Granitic Massif (TGM). Selected rock samples were analyzed using zircon U-Pb isotopic dating to constrain the timing of polyphase deformation. Our structural and geochronological data suggest that the two litho-tectonic units were initially detached and located in different crustal levels and experienced distinct phases of deformation under contrasting P-T conditions. They were mutually accreted with each other in the early Devonian and jointly underwent a WNW-ESE-directed shortening deformational event (D1) at ∼390 Ma. The change of tectonic regime was further enhanced by a subsequent NNE-SSW-directed shortening deformation (D2) after ∼ 380 Ma. The shortening process ended before the crustal-scale sinistral strike-slip shearing deformation along the Erqis fault zone at 290 - 240 Ma. Results of this study provide solid field-based evidence for a model that the Chinese Altai initially underwent a nearly E-W-oriented subduction-accretional event in the middle Paleozoic, before it was reoriented to a nearly N-S-oriented convergence.

  7. Metasomatic Evolution in Tectonically Mixed Zones (Mélange) and Significance for Geochemical Evolution of the Slab-Mantle Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebout, G. E.; King, R. L.

    2012-12-01

    Fluid flow focused in highly deformed zones (shear zones), and the physical juxtaposition of chemically disparate rocks (via mechanical mixing) in such zones, can lead to extensive metasomatism, including volume strain, and result in rocks with hybridized compositions little resembling the compositions of the incorporated rock types [1-5]. In the Catalina Schist (California), lawsonite-albite, lawsonite-blueschist, and amphibolite-facies units contain shear zones at scales of meters to kilometers, each containing "blocks" (with more spherical or more tabular dimensions) co-facial in grade with the "matrix" surrounding these blocks [1-3]. Oxygen isotope data for these "mélange" units, and adjacent more "coherent" expanses, indicate enhanced fluid flow in the more strongly deforming mélange zones while fluid flow in coherent domains was dominantly fracture-controlled and episodic. The amphibolite-facies mélange unit shows evidence for km-scale equilibration of varying mineral assemblages with H2O-rich fluids with uniform O and H isotope compositions consistent with a lower-grade metasedimentary source. This unit is believed to have formed largely by mechanical mixing of mafic and ultramafic compositions, partly because of the scarcity of sedimentary blocks. However, the mélange matrix in this unit preserves a number of sedimentary chemical/isotopic characteristics (e.g., Pb isotope compositions [3]) that could reflect the incorporation of sedimentary rocks, with or without fluid-related fractionation, and possibly fluid-mediated additions. Tectonically mixed zones such as these, if volumetrically significant at the slab-mantle interface, could exert disproportionate control on the compositions of hydrous fluids or silicate melts emanating from subducting slabs and entering the forearc to backarc mantle wedge, including those contributing to arc magmatism [1-5]. Geochemical studies of arc lavas should consider the possibility that the "fluids" contributed from

  8. The reinterpretation of Leone Lake sediments as a pyroclastic surge deposit and its tectonic significance. [volcanics in Cascade Range of Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonough, W. F.; Waibel, A. F.; Gannett, M. W.

    1984-01-01

    The Leone Lake sediments, previously interpreted as being of fluvial and lacustrine origin, are reinterpreted as subaerial pyroclastic surge and palagonite tuff cone deposits. This conclusion is based on bedforms, particle morphology, the primary mineral assemblage, and the nature and mineralogy of the alteration. The principal characteristics of the pyroclastic surge units and palagonite tuffs are examined, and the tectonic significance of the reinterpretation is briefly discussed.

  9. Tectonic and flexural significance of Middle Devonian graben-fill sequence in new Albany shale, central Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, S.F.; Ettensohn, F.R.; Mellon, C. )

    1989-08-01

    The third tectonic phase of the Acadian orogeny began in the late Middle Devonian, and the sedimentary record of that event is largely restricted to the deeper, more proximal portions of the Appalachian foreland and Illinois intercratonic basins. Much of the intervening area, on and near the Cincinnati arch, was uplifted and subjected to erosion by movement on the peripheral bulge accompanying the initiation of the third tectonic phase. However, bulge movement also reactivated basement fault systems in Kentucky and created a series of grabens that were filled with eroded sediments and debris flows from adjacent horsts. Although rarely preserved, a buried Devonian graben along Carpenter Fork in Boyle County, central Kentucky, reveals such a sequence. The graben is bounded by upthrown blocks of Middle Devonian Boyle Dolomite, which also floors the graben. Within the graben a black-shale unit, apparently absent elsewhere, conformably overlies the Boyle and grades upward into debris-flow deposits represented by the Duffin breccia facies of the New Albany Shale. The Duffin contains clasts of the shale, as well as of chert, silicified fossils, and fine to boulder-size dolostone clasts eroded from the Boyle high on the flanks of the graben. The underlying shale also exhibits evidence of penecontemporaneous soft-sediment deformation related to the debris-flow emplacement of Boyle residue in the graben and due to later loading by the Duffin.

  10. Variation of palaeostress patterns along the Oriente transform wrench corridor, Cuba: significance for Neogene Quaternary tectonics of the Caribbean realm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas-Agramonte, Y.; Neubauer, F.; Handler, R.; Garcia-Delgado, D. E.; Friedl, G.; Delgado-Damas, R.

    2005-02-01

    In this study, we address the late Miocene to Recent tectonic evolution of the North Caribbean (Oriente) Transform Wrench Corridor in the southern Sierra Maestra mountain range, SE Cuba. The region has been affected by historical earthquakes and shows many features of brittle deformation in late Miocene to Pleistocene reef and other shallow water deposits as well as in pre-Neogene, late Cretaceous to Eocene basement rocks. These late Miocene to Quaternary rocks are faulted, fractured, and contain calcite- and karst-filled extension gashes. Type and orientation of the principal normal palaeostress vary along strike in accordance with observations of large-scale submarine structures at the south-eastern Cuban margin. Initial N-S extension is correlated with a transtensional regime associated with the fault, later reactivated by sinistral and/or dextral shear, mainly along E-W-oriented strike-slip faults. Sinistral shear predominated and recorded similar kinematics as historical earthquakes in the Santiago region. We correlate palaeostress changes with the kinematic evolution along the boundary between the North American and Caribbean plates. Three different tectonic regimes were distinguished for the Oriente transform wrench corridor (OTWC): compression from late Eocene-Oligocene, transtension from late Oligocene to Miocene (?) (D 1), and transpression from Pliocene to Present (D 2-D 4), when this fault became a transform system. Furthermore, present-day structures vary along strike of the Oriente transform wrench corridor (OTWC) on the south-eastern Cuban coast, with dominantly transpressional/compressional and strike-slip structures in the east and transtension in the west. The focal mechanisms of historical earthquakes are in agreement with the dominant ENE-WSW transpressional structures found on land.

  11. Two contrasting metamorphosed ultramafic-mafic complexes from greenstone belts, the northern Kaapvaal Craton and their significance in Archaen tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smit, C. A.; Vearncombe, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The character of Archaean ultramafic-mafic complexes can, given their prominance in greenstone belts, provide critical clues to help deduce the tectonic setting of these belts. Here are described two contrasting, metamorphosed, ultramafic-mafic complexes, the first a partially serpentinized dunitic body with associated chromite from Lemoenfontein, one of several peridotitic bodies occurring as discrete lenses and pods in granulite facies gneisses of the northern Kaapvaal craton. The second, the Rooiwater complex is a major layered igneous body, now metamorphosed in the amphibolite facies, but without pervasive deformation, which crops out in the northern Murchison greenstone belt. The Lemoenfontein chromites and associated ultramafic rocks are lithologically and chemically similar to their Phanerozoic equivalents of ophiolitic origin, interpreted as obducted oceanic crust. The Lemoenfontein complex is a remnant of Archaean oceanic material. In contrast, the Rooiwater complex is, despite the lack of exposed intrusive contacts, similar to layered igneous complexes such as Ushushwana or Bushveld. These complexes are intrusive in continental environments. It is concluded that contrasting ultramafic-mafic complexes represent a heterogeneity in greenstone belts with either oceanic or continental environments involved.

  12. The tectonic significance of pre-Scandian 40Ar/39Ar phengite cooling ages in the Caledonides of western Norway

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andersen, T.B.; Berry, H.N., IV; Lux, D.R.; Andresen, A.

    1998-01-01

    Ordovician (Caradoc) time. The data also suggest that the Caledonian margin of Baltica may have experienced a more protracted tectonism during the Caledonian cycle than previously models focusing on Early Caledonian and Tremadoc (or older) ophiolite obduction and the Scandian continental collision between Baltica and Laurentia.

  13. Tectonic activity as a significant source of crustal tetrafluoromethane emissions to the atmosphere: Observations in groundwaters along the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeds, Daniel A.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Mühle, Jens; Weiss, Ray F.

    2015-02-01

    Tetrafluoromethane (CF4) concentrations were measured in 14 groundwater samples from the Cuyama Valley, Mil Potrero and Cuddy Valley aquifers along the Big Bend section of the San Andreas Fault System (SAFS) in California to assess whether tectonic activity in this region is a significant source of crustal CF4 to the atmosphere. Dissolved CF4 concentrations in all groundwater samples but one were elevated with respect to estimated recharge concentrations including entrainment of excess air during recharge (Cre; ∼30 fmol kg-1 H2O), indicating subsurface addition of CF4 to these groundwaters. Groundwaters in the Cuyama Valley contain small CF4 excesses (0.1-9 times Cre), which may be attributed to an in situ release from weathering and a minor addition of deep crustal CF4 introduced to the shallow groundwater through nearby faults. CF4 excesses in groundwaters within 200 m of the SAFS are larger (10-980 times Cre) and indicate the presence of a deep crustal flux of CF4 that is likely associated with the physical alteration of silicate minerals in the shear zone of the SAFS. Extrapolating CF4 flux rates observed in this study to the full extent of the SAFS (1300 km × 20-100 km) suggests that the SAFS potentially emits (0.3- 1) ×10-1 kg CF4 yr-1 to the Earth's surface. For comparison, the chemical weathering of ∼ 7.5 ×104km2 of granitic rock in California is estimated to release (0.019- 3.2) ×10-1 kg CF4 yr-1. Tectonic activity is likely an important, and potentially the dominant, driver of natural emissions of CF4 to the atmosphere. Variations in preindustrial atmospheric CF4 as observed in paleo-archives such as ice cores may therefore represent changes in both continental weathering and tectonic activity, including changes driven by variations in continental ice cover during glacial-interglacial transitions.

  14. Geochronology and geochemistry constraints of the Early Cretaceous Taibudai porphyry Cu deposit, northeast China, and its tectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhen-Hua; Mao, Jing-Wen; Wu, Xin-Li; Ouyang, Hen-Gen

    2015-05-01

    The southern Great Xing'an Range (SGXR), located in the southeastern part of Inner Mongolia, China, shows intense Mesozoic tectono-magmatic activity and hosts economically important polymetallic (Cu-Pb-Zn-Sn-Fe-Ag-Au-Mo) mineralization. Here, we present new zircon U-Pb ages, whole-rock geochemical data, Nd-Sr-Hf isotopic data and Re-Os ages for the Taibudai deposit in the SGXR. The Taibudai granitoids show high SiO2 (70.62-72.13 wt.%) and alkali (Na2O + K2O = 7.04-8.60 wt.%) concentrations, low MgO (0.89-1.37 wt.%) and Al2O3 (∼14 wt.%), ASI ratios <1.1 (0.94-0.97), LILEs (e.g., Rb) enriched, HFSEs (e.g., Nb, Ta, Ti, and P) depleted, and have low Sr and Yb concentrations, classifying these rocks as fractionated I-type granites. The Taibudai granitoids have negative εNd (t) values ranging from -2.2 to -1.6 and relatively low initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios from 0.70536 to 0.70581. In situ Hf isotopic analyses on zircons using LA-MC-ICP-MS show variable positive εHf (t) values ranging from +0.80 to +13.55, corresponding to relatively young two-stage Hf model ages from 801 to 942 Ma (excluding one spot). These mineralogical, geochemical, and isotopic features strongly suggest that the primary magmas of the Taibudai granitoids were derived mainly from the partial remelting of Neoproterozoic juvenile crustal material, with no remarkable modification through incorporation of continental or subduction-related material. Re-Os isotope analyses of molybdenite from the deposit yield an ore-forming age of 137.1 ± 1.4 Ma. Re contents range from 4.37 to 41.77 ppm, implying ore material components have a mixed crust-mantle origin. SHRIMP analysis of zircons show that the monzogranitic porphyry and biotite granite in the Taibudai deposit were formed at 137.0 ± 0.9 Ma and 138.3 ± 0.9 Ma, respectively, indicating a temporal link between granitic magmatism and Cu mineralization. This result, combined with the regional geology, tectonic evolution, and age data from the literature

  15. Triassic post collision igneous activity and granulite facies metamorphic event in the Yangpyeong area, South Korea and its meaning to the tectonics of Northeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Oh, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Korean peninsula is tectonically positioned in the eastern margin of the Asia continent and the Gyeonggi massif is situated in the center part of Korean peninsula. Triassic (231 Ma) eclogite was first found in the Hongseong area, the southwestern part of the Gyeonggi Massif, which suggested that the Hongseong area is the extension of Triassic collision belt between the North and South China blocks, in China. The 257-226 post-collisional mangerite was also found in the Odesan area, the eastern part of Gyeonggi massif. Based on these new findings, it was proposed that the line connecting Hongseong and Odesan areas is the collision belt between the North and South China blocks. It was also reported that 247 Ma ultrahigh temperature metamorphism occurred together with the intrusion of mangerite in the Odesan area indicating that regional metamorphism occurred together with the post-collision igneous activity. The Yangpyeong area locates in the middle part of the Hongseong-Odesan collision belt. The area mainly consists of Precambrian migmatitic gneiss which was intruded by Triassic igneous complex. The igneous complex mainly consists of gabbro and porpyritic syeno-diorite and SHRIMP age dating indicates that they intruded at 227 ± 4 Ma. They are shoshonitic and high-K series and have high Ba, Sr contents. They show LREE enriched pattern and Nb, Ta, P, Ti depletion in the chondrite- and primitive-mantle-normalized trace element patterns, respectively. In the tectonic discrimination diagrams, gabbros are plotted in the within plate tectonic field and porpyritic syeno-diorites are plotted in the Post-collision field. These geochemical characters indicate that they formed in the within plate after continental collision. Two metamorphic ages (1861 ± 6 Ma, and 235 ± 6 Ma) are obtained from the migmatitic gneiss. The peak metamorphic conditions of the first Precambrian metamorphism are 750-780°C and 8-10 kbar indicating intermediate-P/T metamorphism. On the other hand

  16. Tectonic activity as a significant source of crustal tetrafluoromethane emissions to the atmosphere: observations in groundwaters along the San Andreas Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deeds, Daniel A.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Muhle, Jens; Weiss, Ray F.

    2015-01-01

    Tetrafluoromethane (CF4) concentrations were measured in 14 groundwater samples from the Cuyama Valley, Mil Potrero and Cuddy Valley aquifers along the Big Bend section of the San Andreas Fault System (SAFS) in California to assess whether tectonic activity in this region is a significant source of crustal CF4 to the atmosphere. Dissolved CF4 concentrations in all groundwater samples but one were elevated with respect to estimated recharge concentrations including entrainment of excess air during recharge (CreCre; ∼30 fmol kg−1 H2O), indicating subsurface addition of CF4 to these groundwaters. Groundwaters in the Cuyama Valley contain small CF4 excesses (0.1–9 times CreCre), which may be attributed to an in situ release from weathering and a minor addition of deep crustal CF4 introduced to the shallow groundwater through nearby faults. CF4 excesses in groundwaters within 200 m of the SAFS are larger (10–980 times CreCre) and indicate the presence of a deep crustal flux of CF4 that is likely associated with the physical alteration of silicate minerals in the shear zone of the SAFS. Extrapolating CF4 flux rates observed in this study to the full extent of the SAFS (1300 km × 20–100 km) suggests that the SAFS potentially emits (0.3–1)×10−1 kg(0.3–1)×10−1 kg CF4 yr−1 to the Earth's surface. For comparison, the chemical weathering of ∼7.5×104 km2∼7.5×104 km2 of granitic rock in California is estimated to release (0.019–3.2)×10−1 kg(0.019–3.2)×10−1 kg CF4 yr−1. Tectonic activity is likely an important, and potentially the dominant, driver of natural emissions of CF4 to the atmosphere. Variations in preindustrial atmospheric CF4 as observed in paleo-archives such as ice cores may therefore represent changes in both continental weathering and tectonic activity, including changes driven by variations in continental ice cover during glacial–interglacial transitions.

  17. Cooling history of the Upper Cretaceous Palgongsan Granite, Gyeongsang Basin, SE Korea and its tectonic implication for uplift on the active continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyoun Soo; Lee, Yong Il

    2005-07-01

    Apatite and zircon fission track analyses were carried out to reconstruct the cooling and inferred uplift history of the Cretaceous Palgongsan Granite, Gyeongsang Basin, Korea. The Palgongsan Granite is one of the Bulguksa intrusive rocks that formed by arc-related plutonism during Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary time. Fission track dating of the Palgongsan Granite yielded nearly concordant ages of 53 and 65 Ma for apatite and zircon, respectively. The Palgongsan Granite also shows a simple cooling pattern, which suggests that it has not been affected by any thermal event after emplacement. The cooling history derived from fission track data combined with other thermochronometric data indicates that the Palgongsan Granite experienced relatively rapid cooling in earlier stage (> 30 °C/Ma). The initial rapid cooling rate during the Late Cretaceous has been caused by the large thermal contrast between the granite body and the country rocks. After reaching thermal equilibrium with the surrounding country rocks, the cooling rate of the Palgongsan Granite was abruptly decreased in late stage. In this late stage, the decelerated cooling rate is interpreted to have been controlled by uplift and erosion processes, and the average exhumation rate is calculated to be ca. 50 m/my over the temperature range from 100 °C to the surface temperature. The cooling history of the Palgongsan Granite is in good agreement with that of the Ryoke Granitic Belt in Southwest Japan, as well as those of the Taebaeksan Range and other Bulguksa intrusive rocks in the Gyeongsang Basin. This suggests that such cooling was probably caused by regional uplift and exhumation processes on the East Asian active continental margin. Compared with the uplift rates of the Andes, the uplift rates on the eastern Pacific margin appear to be higher than those on the western Pacific margin.

  18. Tectonic significance of lithicwacke-polymictic conglomerate petrofacies association within Upper Cretaceous torchlight sandstone, Big Horn basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Khandaker, N.I.; Vondra, C.F.

    1987-05-01

    The Torchlight Sandstone belonging to the Upper Cretaceous Frontier Formation in the Big Horn basin, Wyoming, shows a distinctive lithicwacke-polymictic conglomerate is composed of granule-cobble-sized clasts of quartzite, chert, andesite, and argillite, and phyllite. The survival of phyllite, argillite, and neovolcanic andesite clasts indicate that the detritus underwent very little subaerial transport before it was deposited along the proximal margin of the foreland basin. A petrologically heterogeneous upland source of high to moderate relief is indicated by the clast size and composition. Hydrodynamic structures, in conjunction with textural attributes, and compositional data indicate that detritus moved southeast from its source terrane and was deposited by a high-energy distributary complex. The lithicwacke petrofacies is dominated by higher chert and quartz content with a subordinate amount of labile components including paleovolcanic clasts and fine-grained matrix. The development of phyllosilicate matrix around quartz and chert grains preserved the primary porosity and permeability of the sandstone. Absence of any noticeable quartz overgrowth apparently contributed to the preservation of good reservoir quality in this petrofacies. Considering its (Torchlight Sandstone) close proximity to the thrust belt and to the locus of andesite volcanism in the northwest and west, it is suggested that the extrabasinal detritus within the foreland basin can provide significant clues as to the timing of the thrust events and volcanicity in the adjacent region. New perspectives for hydrocarbon exploration and regional correlation may be gained by employing this petrofacies association.

  19. Tectonic significance of porosity and permeability regimes in the red beds formations of the South Georgia Rift Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akintunde, Olusoga M.; Knapp, Camelia C.; Knapp, James H.

    2014-09-01

    A simple, new porosity/permeability-depth profile was developed from available laboratory measurements on Triassic sedimentary red beds (sandstone) from parts of the South Georgia Rift (SGR) basin in order to investigate the feasibility for long-term CO2 storage. The study locations were: Sumter, Berkeley, Dunbarton, Clubhouse Crossroad-3 (CC-3) and Norris Lightsey wells. As expected, both porosity and permeability show changes with depth at the regional scale that was much greater than at local scale. The significant changes in porosity and permeability with depth suggest a highly compacted, deformed basin, and potentially, a history of uplift and erosion. The permeability is generally low both at shallow (less than 1826 ft/556.56 m) and deeper depths (greater than 1826 ft/556.56 m). Both porosity and permeability follow the normal trend, decreasing linearly with depth for most parts of the study locations with the exception of the Norris Lightsey well. A petrophysical study on a suite of well logs penetrating the Norris Lightsey red beds at depths sampled by the core-derived laboratory measurements shows an abnormal shift (by 50%) in the acoustic travel time and/or in the sonic-derived P-wave velocity that indicates possible faulting or fracturing at depth. The departure of the Norris Lightsey's porosities and permeabilities from the normal compaction trend may be a consequence of the existence of a fault/fracture controlled abnormal pressure condition at depth. The linear and non-linear behaviors of the porosity/permeability distribution throughout the basin imply the composition of the SGR red beds, and by extension analog/similar Triassic-Jurassic formations within the Eastern North American Margin have been altered by compaction, uplift, erosion and possible faulting that have shaped the evolution of these Triassic formations following the major phase of rifting.

  20. Cross-strike Discontinuities in the Moine Thrust Belt of NW Scotland; their identity, tectonic significance, and visualisation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Michael; Kearsey, Tim; Leslie, Graham; Ritchie, Calum; Krabbendam, Maarten; Williams, Graham

    2013-04-01

    ) transects the MTB, a fold-and thrust architecture can be clearly identified on the northern wall of the LMF. That architecture is in sharp contrast to classically imbricated repetitions on the southern wall of the LMF. The structural compartmentalization is thought to be a response to a significant offset of the pre-thrust template on the proto-LMF. Three-dimensional visualizations of these complexities are challenging to construct and deliver to the geological community - this presentation will include examples of British Geological Survey progress in rendering fold and thrust surfaces in 3D and making them interactively available to the end-user.

  1. Permo-Triassic changes in bulk crustal shortening direction during deformation and metamorphism of the Taebaeksan Basin, South Korea using foliation intersection/inflection axes: Implications for tectonic movement at the eastern margin of Eurasia during the Songrim (Indosinian) orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyeong Soo; Ree, Jin-Han

    2013-03-01

    The Permo-Triassic Songrim (Indosinian) orogeny in South Korea was a major tectonic event involving complicated continental collisions at the eastern margin of Eurasia. Previous studies have examined the structural and metamorphic features of the Songrim orogeny in each of the Paleozoic terranes of the orogenic belt (i.e., the Taebaeksan Basin, the Okcheon Basin, and the Imjingang Belt), but correlations of these features among the terranes remain uncertain. The aim of this paper is to reveal deformation history including bulk crustal shortening directions in the Taebaeksan Basin, and to correlate the tectono-metamorphic evolution of the Taebaeksan Basin with other Phanerozoic mobile belts in eastern Asia based on a combined analysis of foliation intersection/inflection axes (FIA) trends and metamorphic P-T and T-t (time) paths. The orientations and relative timing of FIA preserved as inclusion trails within porphyroblasts of andalusite, chloritoid, garnet, and staurolite reveal two age groups of inclusion trails in the Pyeongan Supergroup at the northeastern margin of the Taebaeksan Basin. These microstructures indicate the development of early NNW-NNE-trending structures and fabrics, followed by later E-W-trending ones. These observations suggest a change in the orientation of bulk crustal shortening from E-W to N-S during the Songrim orogeny. Based on the similar microstructures and temperature-time paths of the three Paleozoic terranes, we interpret that the E-W bulk crustal shortening influenced the eastern part of the Korean Peninsula during the early stages of the Songrim orogeny, presumably related to amalgamation between the proto-Japan terrane and the eastern margin of Eurasia, whereas the N-S bulk crustal shortening was stronger in the western part of the peninsula during the later stages of the orogeny, related to collision between the South and North China blocks.

  2. Tectonic Geomorphology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, William B.

    1984-01-01

    Summarizes representative quantitative tectonic-geomorphology studies made during the last century, focusing on fault-bounded mountain-front escarpments, marine terraces, and alluvial geomorphic surfaces (considering stream terraces, piedmont fault scarps, and soils chronosequences). Also suggests where tectonic-geomorphology courses may best fit…

  3. Clear cell carcinomas of the ovary: a multi-institutional study of 129 cases in Korea with prognostic significance of Emi1 and Galectin-3.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyueng-Whan; Park, Moon Hyang; Hong, Sung Ran; Lee, Heejung; Kwon, Sun Young; Hong, Sook Hee; Joo, Hee Jae; Park, In Ae; An, Hee Jung; Suh, Kwang Sun; Oh, Hoon Kyu; Yoo, Chong Woo; Kim, Mi Jin; Chang, Hee Kyung; Jun, Sun Young; Yoon, Hye Kyoung; Chang, Eun Deok; Kim, Dong Won; Kim, Insun

    2013-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of ovarian clear cell carcinoma (CCC) is important because of its poor prognosis with chemoresistance and a high recurrent rate. The clinicopathologic characteristics and prognostic significance of the cell cycle regulator [early mitotic inhibitor-1 (Emi1)] and galactoside-binding protein (Galectin-3) were evaluated. Among 155 CCCs from 18 hospitals in Korea between 1995 and 2006, 129 pure CCCs were selected with consensus using immunohistochemical stains for hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β, Wilms' tumor protein, and estrogen receptor. The expressions of Emi1, Galectin-3, p53, and Ki-67 labeling index were analyzed with clinicopathologic parameters and the patient's survival. The mean age of the patients was 49.6 yr; the tumors were bilateral in 10.9%, and the average size was 12 cm. Adenofibromatous component was found in 7%, and endometriosis in 48.1% of the cases. Psammoma body was seen in 16.3%. Disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 78.3% and 79.1%, respectively. The International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology (FIGO) stage was the most important prognostic indicator. Emi1 expression (>5%) was seen in 23.3% of CCCs, and associated with high FIGO grades and poor overall survival (P<0.05). High Galectin-3 (≥80%) expression was seen in 59.7% of CCCs, and associated with FIGO stages III and IV, and high Ki-67 labeling index. High Ki-67 labeling index (≥50%) and p53 expression (≥50%) were seen in 27.1% and 18.6% of CCCs, respectively, but there was no clinicopathologic and prognostic significance. On the basis of the fact that the expression of Emi1 in CCC was correlated with a high histologic grade and worse overall survival, target therapy using inhibitors of Emi1 may be tried in the management of CCC patients with Emi1 expression. PMID:23202783

  4. The distinct hydrogeological system of the forearc of the Middle America Trench: significance for long-term tectonics and updip limit of the interplate seismogenic zone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranero, C. R.; Grevemeyer, I.; Sahling, H.; Barckhausen, U.; Hensen, C.; Wallmann, K.; Weinrebe, W.

    2008-12-01

    The distribution and flow of fluid has been widely studied at accretionary prisms, but at convergent margins where tectonic erosion affects overriding plates fluid distribution and tectonics are far less understood. Observations along the erosional subduction zone of Middle America Trench indicates a hydrogeological system distinctly different from those that have been described at accretionary prisms. The hydrogeological system has been studied by: 1) compiling an inventory of focused seepage sites at the seafloor using a multiscale mapping approach, sequentially applying methods of increasing spatial resolution during successive ship cruises, 2) mapping the relative distribution of fluid at the plate boundary with seismic data, and 3) calculating the forearc fluid budget after estimating flow rates from thermal structure and pore fluid chemistry. Most fluid originally contained at the plate boundary migrates by focused flow across a fractured overriding plate, contrasting with conceptual models of accretionary margins where the decollement has been inferred to be the main fluid flow conduit. The distribution of fluid created by the hydrogeological system influences the locus of long-term tectonic erosion determining which areas of the margin are tectonically thinned. Where fluid is more abundant along the plate boundary, the overriding plate is being actively thinned, and fractures and subsides to form the continental slope. Also, the transition with depth from aseismic to the area of nucleation of earthquakes along the plate boundary appears related to fluid distribution. Earthquakes nucleate where fluid appears to be less abundant indicating a first order control on subduction zone thrust earthquakes.

  5. The significance of Tournaisian tectonism in the Dublin basin: Implications for basin evolution and zinc-lead mineralization in the Irish Midlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Morton, Simone N.; Wallace, Malcolm W.; Reed, Christopher P.; Hewson, Chad; Redmond, Patrick; Cross, Eoin; Moynihan, Conor

    2015-12-01

    Recently acquired seismic reflection data, combined with detailed subsurface stratigraphic analysis (core analysis and gamma ray logs) reveal a new view of Lower Carboniferous stratigraphy and tectonism in Ireland. Seismic stratigraphic relationships and stratal thickness variations within Tournaisian units indicates that the Ballinalack High (and associated faulting) was produced by tectonism during the mid to late Tournaisian (Moathill Event, ~ 348 Ma). A second major tectonic event, dominated by regional subsidence (rather than faulting), occurred during the Lower Viséan (Tober Colleen Event, ~ 345 Ma). Each of these tectonic events was associated with major subsidence in the basin, producing strong transgressions within the stratigraphy. We suggest that the Late Tournaisian Moathill Event was responsible for producing the structural setting of the Ballinalack and other Zn-Pb deposits in the Irish Midlands. The suggested earlier timing of fault movement in the basin has implications for arguments about the origin of Irish-type Zn-Pb deposits and the necessity (or not) for having active faulting during mineralization.

  6. Intrusion of horizontal dikes: tectonic significance of Middle Proterozoic diabase sheets widespread in the upper crust of the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Initially horizontal sheet intrusions of Middle Proterozoic diabase are abundant in a region 650 by 300 km across in Arizona and California. The diabase forms discordant sheets in basement granite and gneiss and sills in overlying shelf sedimentary sequences. Massive granite is the most common basement host for the sheets, probably because it fractured more easily than foliated hosts during sheet emplacement. Steep feeder dikes are rare compared to the sheets. The diabase in many places is exposed in fault blocks that were tilted during Tertiary tectonic extension. Structure sections restored from the map patterns of upended blocks shows that the sheets were intruded at levels throughout the upper crust, therefore it is concluded that the crust was under tectonic compression or in an isotropic state of stress at the time of diabase intrusion about 1.1 Ga. -from Author

  7. Sediment transport on macrotidal flats in Garolim Bay, west coast of Korea: significance of wind waves and asymmetry of tidal currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hee J.; Jo, Hyung R.; Chu, Yong S.; Bahk, Kyung S.

    2004-05-01

    A self-recording instrument, named Tidal Sediment Dynamics Observational System (TISDOS), was built to monitor transport characteristics of nearbed sediments on tidal flats. It was deployed on a tidal flat in the semi-enclosed Garolim Bay, west coast of Korea, over a 15-day period between 5 and 20 January 2002 to examine sediment-transport processes during winter seasons. The measurements involved brief durations of high waves allowing for observation of wave effects upon the sediment transport on the tidal flat. Time series of various hydrodynamic parameters (water depth, current velocities, wave height, suspended sediment concentration, and bed level) from point measurements show characteristic interrelationships between parameters on both temporal and spatial scales. The tidal flat is dominated by flooding currents up to 2 times stronger than ebb currents. The current speeds measured simultaneously at two stations along a cross-shore transect varied in harmony with water depth, reaching the maximum during spring tide that was steadily decreased onshore. The onshore decrease in current speed was compatible with a fining textural trend from sand on the lower flat to mud toward the upper flat. Both the maximum water depth and current speed during individual tidal cycles also show semi-diurnal asymmetry that was highlighted during spring tide. Waves were of critical importance in resuspending bed material and thus yielding higher suspended sediment concentrations. On the middle flat, the suspended sediment concentrations were highest, exceeding 400 mg/l at 0.5 m above the seabed during large waves (relative wave height, 0.33) under weakest neap currents. In this wavy climate, the suspended sediment concentration increased over time during ebb, in strong contrast with a gradual decrease through time after mid-flood peaks under tidal currents without waves. The daily vertical flux of suspended sediments trapped in a plastic bottle also indicates the significance of

  8. On the origin and tectonic significance of the intra-plate events of Grenvillian-type age in South America: A discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordani, Umberto G.; Fraga, Leda Maria; Reis, Nelson; Tassinari, Colombo C. G.; Brito-Neves, Benjamim B.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this article is to examine the available evidence of intra-plate tectonic episodes of "Grenvillian-type age", affecting the South-American continent, assessing their possible causal correlation with the tectonic processes occurring within the orogenic belts active at their margins. For the Amazonian Craton, the active margin is represented by the Rondonian-San Ignacio and Sunsas belts. However, active margins of similar age are not recognized for the São Francisco and the Rio de La Plata Cratons, and the intra-plate events over them could be reflections of the Kibaran, Irumide or Namaqua orogenic collisions in Africa. Grenvillian-type age events over the Amazonian Craton can be described in four different aspects: shearing and tectonic reactivation along zones of weakness, cratogenic granitic magmatism, alkaline ring complexes, and pervasive regional heating in some localized regions. The first of them may reflect the compressional stresses at active margins, however the others may have different origins. Within the type-region of the K'Mudku tectono thermal episode, mylonites and pseudotachylites cut across the regional granitoid and metamorphic rocks. These shear belts developed under low-to-moderate temperature conditions, that induced resetting of K-Ar and Rb-Sr mineral ages. In the São Francisco Craton, extensional and compressional events of Grenvillian-type age are well registered by the structural features exhibited by the sedimentary rocks of the Espinhaço Supergroup. For example, in Bahia state, an Appalachian-style structure is observed, with large synclines and anticlines extending along hundreds of kilometers. The major difference between the Amazonian and the Congo-São Francisco Cratons is related to heat originated from the Earth's interior. Amazonia exhibits very large areas heated up to 350-400 °C, where the K'Mudku thermo-tectonic episodes were detected. In addition, Amazonia comprises a large amount of cratogenic granitic

  9. Tree Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Peter R.

    2004-09-01

    Nature often replicates her processes at different scales of space and time in differing media. Here a tree-trunk cross section I am preparing for a dendrochronological display at the Battle Creek Cypress Swamp Nature Sanctuary (Calvert County, Maryland) dried and cracked in a way that replicates practically all the planform features found along the Mid-Oceanic Ridge (see Figure 1). The left-lateral offset of saw marks, contrasting with the right-lateral ``rift'' offset, even illustrates the distinction between transcurrent (strike-slip) and transform faults, the latter only recognized as a geologic feature, by J. Tuzo Wilson, in 1965. However, wood cracking is but one of many examples of natural processes that replicate one or several elements of lithospheric plate tectonics. Many of these examples occur in everyday venues and thus make great teaching aids, ``teachable'' from primary school to university levels. Plate tectonics, the dominant process of Earth geology, also occurs in miniature on the surface of some lava lakes, and as ``ice plate tectonics'' on our frozen seas and lakes. Ice tectonics also happens at larger spatial and temporal scales on the Jovian moons Europa and perhaps Ganymede. Tabletop plate tectonics, in which a molten-paraffin ``asthenosphere'' is surfaced by a skin of congealing wax ``plates,'' first replicated Mid-Oceanic Ridge type seafloor spreading more than three decades ago. A seismologist (J. Brune, personal communication, 2004) discovered wax plate tectonics by casually and serendipitously pulling a stick across a container of molten wax his wife and daughters had used in making candles. Brune and his student D. Oldenburg followed up and mirabile dictu published the results in Science (178, 301-304).

  10. Collision tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Coward, M.P.; Ries, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    The motions of lithospheric plates have produced most existing mountain ranges, but structures produced as a result of, and following the collision of continental plates need to be distinguished from those produced before by subduction. If subduction is normally only stopped when collision occurs, then most geologically ancient fold belts must be collisional, so it is essential to recognize and understand the effects of the collision process. This book consists of papers that review collision tectonics, covering tectonics, structure, geochemistry, paleomagnetism, metamorphism, and magmatism.

  11. Tectonic Emplacement of the Ophiolitic Mélange in the West Junggar, NW China: Comment on the Plate Boundary Significance of Ophiolitic Mélange Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Xu, Y.; Xiao, L.; Chen, C.

    2014-12-01

    Many ophiolitic mélanges distribute in the West Junggar, NW China. They are fault-contacted with Carboniferous turbidites with mostly NE trend and some NS trend with ages mostly Ordovician-Silurian and some Late Devonian. The boundary faults and the foliation inside the mélanges are of high-angle or nearly vertical. The NE trend ophiolitic mélange belts were structurally emplaced into the Carboniferous strata mainly by dextral transpressive deformation, but the NS trend ophiolitic mélange belts mainly by lateral extrusion deformation or pure shearing, suggesting a uniform stress field of nearly EW compression controlled the emplacements. The tectonic relationship between the ophiolitic mélanges and the Carboniferous turbidites imply that the ophiolitic mélanges are the main components of the basement of the Carboniferous strata. The geophysical data also reveal that high gravity, high magnetic and medium resistivity exist under the Carboniferous strata, matching well to the distribution of the ophiolitic mélanges on the surface. The neodymium model ages (TDM) of widely distributed Late Carboniferous-Permian granites are mostly between 0.352-0.923Ga and concentrate in 0.45-0.6Ga with positive eNd(t) mostly between 5~10, suggesting the Early Paleozoic rocks as the main magma source, consistent with the age of the ophiolitic mélanges, also coinciding with the conclusion of the ophiolitic mélanges as the basement of the Carboniferous strata. The Carboniferous turbidites primarily formed in residual basin. Early Permian terrestrial coarse molasses deposits unconformitily cover on the Carboniferous turbidites, suggesting the residual basin closed in Late Carboniferous. The accretionary complex or residual oceanic crust emplaced into the overlying Carboniferous turbidites through the dextral transpression or lateral extrusion due to EW convergent when the residual basin closed. The tectonic juxtaposition relationship between the ophiolitic mélanges and the

  12. Active tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This study is part of a series of Studies in Geophysics that have been undertaken for the Geophysics Research Forum by the Geophysics Study Committee. One purpose of each study is to provide assessments from the scientific community to aid policymakers in decisions on societal problems that involve geophysics. An important part of such assessments is an evaluation of the adequacy of current geophysical knowledge and the appropriateness of current research programs as a source of information required for those decisions. The study addresses our current scientific understanding of active tectonics --- particularly the patterns and rates of ongoing tectonic processes. Many of these processes cannot be described reasonably using the limited instrumental or historical records; however, most can be described adequately for practical purposes using the geologic record of the past 500,000 years. A program of fundamental research focusing especially on Quaternary tectonic geology and geomorphology, paleoseismology, neotectonics, and geodesy is recommended to better understand ongoing, active tectonic processes. This volume contains 16 papers. Individual papers are indexed separately on the Energy Database.

  13. Tectonic significance of the Dongqiao ophiolite in the north-central Tibetan plateau: Evidence from zircon dating, petrological, geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tong; Zhai, Qing-guo; Wang, Jun; Bao, Pei-sheng; Qiangba, Zhaxi; Tang, Suo-han; Tang, Yue

    2016-02-01

    The Dongqiao ophiolite occurs in the central segment of the Bangong-Nujiang suture zone, in north-central Tibet, China. It is still debated on the tectonic setting of the Dongqiao ophiolite despite after more than 30 years' studies. The Dongqiao ophiolite has a complete section of a typical ophiolite, composed of harzburgite, dunite, layered and isotropic gabbros, pillow and massive basalts, as well as radiolarian chert. Whole-rock geochemical analyses show that harzburgite displays a broad U-shaped REE pattern and has a fore-arc affinity, whereas basalts show affinities of E-MORB, OIB and IAB. The basalts were probably formed in different tectonic settings, that is, mid-ocean ridge, oceanic island and island arc. The gabbros and basalts are characterized by positive εNd(t) (+1.6 to +6.7) and εHf(t) (+8.1 to +13.9) values. Zircon U-Pb dating yielded ages of 188 ± 1 Ma for the layered gabbro and 181 ± 1 Ma for the amphibole gabbro. The new ages and the published age data of the Dingqing and Dong Co ophiolites led us to conclude that the Bangong-Nujiang Ocean existed from the Late Triassic to Early Cretaceous. The new geochemical data also suggested that the Dongqiao ophiolite was a typical SSZ-type ophiolite formed in an initial fore-arc oceanic basin. Fore-arc ophiolites are probably widely distributed along the Bangong-Nujiang suture zone. If so, the Tethys Ocean of the Bangong-Nujiang area probably existed as a fore-arc oceanic basin during the Late Triassic to Early Jurassic.

  14. Petrology and tectonic significance of gabbros, tonalites, shoshonites, and anorthosites in a late Paleozoic arc-root complex in the Wrangellia Terrane, southern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, J.S. ); Barker, F. )

    1989-11-01

    Plutonic rocks intrusive into the late Paleozoic Tetelna Formation of southern Alaska are the underpinnings of the late Paleozoic Skolai arc of the Wrangellia Terrane. There are four groups of intrusive rocks within the Skolai arc: (1) Gabbro-diorite plutons that contain gabbroic to anorthositic cumulates along with a differentiated series of gabbros and diorites of basaltic to andesitic composition; (2) Silicic intrusions including tonalite, granodiorite, and granite; (3) Monzonitic to syenitic plutonic rocks of the Ahtell complex and related dikes and sills; (4) Fault-bounded bytownite anorthosite of uncertain age and association. These anorthosites may be related to post-Skolai, Nikolai Greenstone magmatism. The silicic rocks yield discordant U-Pb zircon ages of 290-320 Ma (early to late Pennsylvanian). The monzonitic rocks of the Ahtell complex have shoshonitic chemistry. Similar shoshonitic rocks are widespread in both the Wrangellia terrane and the neighboring Alexander terrane and intrude the contact between the two. In modern oceanic arcs, shoshonitic rocks are typically associated with tectonic instability occurring during the initial stages of subduction or just prior to or during termination or flip of an established subduction zone. The nature of any tectonic instability which may have led to the cessation of subduction in the Skolai arc is unclear. Possibilities include collision of the arc with a ridge, an oceanic plateau, another arc, or a continental fragment. One possibility is that the shoshonitic magmatism marks the late Paleozoic amalgamation of Wrangellia and the Alexander terrane. The scarcity of arc rocks predating the shoshonites in the Alexander terrane supports this possibility, but structural corroboration is lacking.

  15. The geometry of the Wadati-Benioff zone under southern Central America and its tectonic significance: results from a high-resolution local seismographic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protti, Marino; Gu¨ndel, Federico; McNally, Karen

    1994-07-01

    We present here a detailed geometry of the Wadati-Benioff zone under Costa Rica, obtained from seismicity recorded by a dense local seismographic network jointly operated by the Costa Rica Volcanological and Seismological Observatory, National University, and the Charles F. Richter Seismological Laboratory, University of California, Santa Cruz. Underneath the Nicaragua-Costa Rica border the Wadati-Benioff zone smoothly contorts (from steep to shallow dip angles, NW to SE), but does not show evidence of a brittle tear, as postulated by others. However, further to the SE, NE of Puerto Caldera, Costa Rica, the Wadati-Benioff zone does show a segmentation (the Quesada Sharp Contortion) at intermediate depths ( h > 70km). NW of this sharp contortion the deepest portion of the seismically active slab dips at about 80° and reaches maximum depths ranging from 200 km, near the Nicaragua-Costa Rica border, to 135 km under Ciudad Quesada. To the SE the deeper portion of the Wadati-Benioff zone dips at about 60° and the seismicity does not extend below depths ranging from 125 km, behind the volcanic arc, to 50 km, east of Quepos. In southern Costa Rica, east of 83°55'W, we find no evidence of the Wadati-Benioff zone deeper than 50 km. The obtained geometry and other known tectonic features related to the subduction of the Cocos plate under the Caribbean plate along the southern terminus of the Middle America Trench (Nicaragua and Costa Rica) correlate well with along-trench variations in age of the subducted Cocos plate. Some of these tectonic features are: (1) the shallowing of Middle America Trench bathymetry from NW to SE; (2) variations in the energy release within the subducted slab; (3) differences in coupling between Cocos and Caribbean plates; (4) the termination of the Central America Volcanic Chain in central Costa Rica; (5) distinct stress field variations on the overriding Caribbean plate. The subduction of the Cocos Ridge under southern Costa Rica is partially

  16. South Korea.

    PubMed

    1991-04-01

    Background notes and statistics on South Korea are provided in the document. 98,500 sq. km. of diversified terrain are encompassed by the country, with a 1988 population of 43 million growing at the annual rate of 1%. The work force totals 17 million. South Korea claims a population comprised of Koreans with a small Chinese minority, 4 religious beliefs, and native Korean-speakers. 6 years of education are compulsory, with the country overall enjoying 98% literacy. The infant mortality rate is 6/1,000, while life expectancy is 67-73 years. 1990 estimated GNP was $224 billion, and was growing at the estimated rate of 9%. Per capita GNP was $5,500, while a 9% increase was reported in the consumer price index for 1990. Agriculture accounts for 9% of GNP, mining and manufacturing for 35%; 1990 international trade deficit totalled $5 billion. Additional data are provided on South Korea's people, government, economy, international affiliations, history, political conditions, principal government officials, foreign relations, and bilateral relations with the United States. South Korea has enjoyed remarkable economic growth over the past 25 years, and has grown to become a middle-ranking industrial power. Korea's bilateral trade surpluses with the United States of nearly $10 billion in 1987 and 1988 declined decisively in 1989 due to a variety of factors. Surplus remained, however, approximately $4 billion in 1990. Whether or not these declines are indicative of structural, lasting trends is not yet discernible. Long-term growth prospects remain good, Korea's ability to adapt to a more open democratic system playing an important role. PMID:12178031

  17. Tectonic significance of magnetic and gravity data across northern California (lat. 39[degree]N. to lat. 41[degree]N. )

    SciTech Connect

    Griscom, A.; Roberts, C.W.; Halvorson, P.F. )

    1993-04-01

    Aeromagnetic and isostatic residual gravity maps of an east-west transect across northern California show important tectonic features. A linear magnetic anomaly and west-sloping gradient extends over 300 km along the Franciscan-Great Valley contact (FGC) and across the Klamath Mountains province (KM) north to lat. 40[degree]45'N. The anomaly source lies at depths of 5--10 km beneath the KM and the FGC, and implies that the Franciscan complex of the Coast Ranges is thrust (and wedged) at least 80 km eastward beneath the KM to approximately long. 122[degree]40 minutes W. Calculations on a circular gravity low of [minus]50 mGal centered at the circular Bald Rock pluton (diameter about 15 km) in the Sierran foothills indicate a pluton thickness of about 15 km. The nearby Cascade and Merrimac plutons are located on the gradients of this gravity anomaly, have a relatively minor effect on it, and thus are interpreted to be thick (up to 5 km) laccolithic sills that emanate from the Bald Rock pluton, thinning away from it to a feather edge. Model studies indicate that the northeast contact of the Feather River periodotite body (FRPB) north of lat. 39[degree]40 minutes N. generally dips steeply northeast or vertical. The same contact south of this latitude dips east at angles of about 45[degree] to depths of at least 10 km. Magnetic patterns extending from the northern Sierra across the Cascades to the Klamath Mountains suggest that the FRPB may correlate with the Trinity ophiolite.

  18. Geochronological and geochemical constraints on the petrogenesis and tectonic significance of Paleozoic dolerite dykes in the southern margin of Alxa Block, North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jun; Li, Chusi; Qian, Zhuangzhi; Jiao, Jiangang

    2015-11-01

    Dolerite dykes are common in the southern margin of Alxa Block which is the westernmost part of North China Craton. The ages and petrogenesis of the dolerite dykes, which are important for a better understanding of tectonic-magmatic evolution in the region, are uncertain. This paper reports the results of an integrated geochronological and geochemical study of the dolerite dykes in the Jinchuan area. Previously, these dolerite dykes were considered to be coeval with the ∼831 Ma Jinchuan ultramafic intrusion by some researchers, despite a cross-cutting relationship for the dykes. Our new zircon U-Pb dating indicates that the dolerite dykes were emplaced at ∼424 Ma, >400 Ma younger than the Jinchuan intrusion. The Jinchuan dolerite dykes contain 5-9 wt.% MgO and 47-51 wt.% SiO2, and are characterized by light REE (rare earth elements) enrichments relative to heavy REE, pronounced negative Nb anomaly, elevated initial 87Sr/86Sr from 0.7056 to 0.7068, negative εNd from -2 to -5, and zircon εHf from -2 to -20. The trace element and isotope data are consistent with an asthenosphere-derived parental magma that experienced 10-25% crustal contamination prior to final emplacement. Since the Jinchuan dolerite dykes are 20-40 Ma younger than the subduction-related basaltic volcanic rocks, blueschists and eclogites in the nearby North Qilian orogenic belt to the south, we propose that the Jinchuan dolerite dykes are the products of basaltic magmatism induced by delamination of previously subducted oceanic lithosphere and the associated asthenosphere upwelling in a post-subduction setting. The occurrence of ∼424 Ma post-subduction dolerite dykes in the Jinchuan area and the ∼450 Ma arc basalts to the south indicate that the southwestern margin of North China Craton was an active plate margin in Early Paleozoic.

  19. The Deccan tholeiite lavas and dykes of Ghatkopar-Powai area, Mumbai, Panvel flexure zone: Geochemistry, stratigraphic status, and tectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Hetu C.; Zellmer, Georg F.; Demonterova, Elena I.; Ivanov, Alexei V.; Kumar, Rohit; Patel, Rakesh Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Mumbai City, situated on the western Indian coast, is well known for exposures of late-stage Deccan pillow basalts and spilites, pyroclastic rocks, rhyolite lavas, and trachyte intrusions. These rock units, and a little-studied sequence of tholeiitic flows and dykes in the eastern part of Mumbai City, constitute the west-dipping limb of a regional tectonic structure called the Panvel flexure. Here we present field, petrographic, major and trace element and Sr-Nd isotopic data on these tholeiitic flows and dykes, best exposed in the Ghatkopar-Powai area. The flows closely resemble the Mahabaleshwar Formation of the thick Western Ghats sequence to the east, in Sr-Nd isotopic ratios and multielement patterns, but have other geochemical characteristics (e.g., incompatible trace element ratios) unlike the Mahabaleshwar or any other Formation. The flows may have originated from a nearby eruptive center, possibly offshore of Mumbai. Two dykes resemble the Ambenali Formation of the Western Ghats in all geochemical characteristics, though they may not represent feeders of the Ambenali Formation lavas. Most dykes are distinct from any of the Western Ghats stratigraphic units. Some show partial (e.g., Sr-Nd isotopic) similarities to the Mahabaleshwar Formation, and these include several dykes with unusual, concave-downward REE patterns suggesting residual amphibole and thus a lithospheric source. The flows and dykes are inferred to have undergone little or no contamination, by lower continental crust. Most dykes are almost vertical, suggesting emplacement after the formation of the Panvel flexure, and indicate considerable east-west lithospheric extension during this late but magmatically vigorous stage of Deccan volcanism.

  20. Spiral tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan Asadiyan, Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    Spiral Tectonics (ST) is a new window to global tectonics introduced as alternative model for Plate Tectonics (PT). ST based upon Dahw(rolling) and Tahw(spreading) dynamics. Analogues to electric and magnetic components in the electromagnetic theory we could consider Dahw and Tahw as components of geodynamics, when one component increases the other decreases and vice versa. They are changed to each other during geological history. D-component represents continental crust and T-component represents oceanic crust. D and T are two arm of spiral-cell. T-arm 180 degree lags behind D-arm so named Retard-arm with respect to D or Forward-arm. It seems primary cell injected several billions years ago from Earth's center therefore the Earth's core was built up first then mantel and finally the crust was build up. Crust building initiate from Arabia (Mecca). As the universe extended gravitation wave swirled the earth fractaly along cycloid path from big to small scale. In global scale (order-0) ST collect continents in one side and abandoned Pacific Ocean in the other side. Recent researches also show two mantels upwelling in opposite side of the Earth: one under Africa (tectonic pose) and the other under Pacific Ocean (tectonic tail). In higher order (order-1) ST build up Africa in one side and S.America in the other side therefore left Atlantic Ocean meandered in between. In order-n e.g. Khoor Musa and Bandar-Deylam bay are seen meandered easterly in the Iranian part but Khoor Abdullah and Kuwait bay meandered westerly in the Arabian part, they are distributed symmetrically with respect to axis of Persian Gulf(PG), these two are fractal components of easterly Caspian-wing and westerly Black Sea-wing which split up from Anatoly. Caspian Sea and Black Sea make two legs of Y-like structure, this shape completely fitted with GPS-velocity map which start from PG and split up in the Catastrophic Point(Anatoly). We could consider PG as remnants of Ancient Ocean which spent up

  1. Using remote sensing and GIS techniques to determine the tectonic significance of small-scale surface water runoff in Canyonlands National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levoir, M. A.; Mueller, K. J.

    2010-12-01

    by InSAR). These data confirm the influence of surface water runoff on tectonic subsidence in at least 30% of cases, and close to 100% where high-order streams cross faults. Although our work suggests that infiltration of surface water runoff increases localized areas of subsidence by 100-200%, large-scale patterns of strain (~20-30% of the fault array) are likely driven by contributions from other processes such as groundwater influx.

  2. Crustal structure across the post-spreading magmatic ridge of the East Sub-basin in the South China Sea: Tectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Enyuan; Zhao, Minghui; Qiu, Xuelin; Sibuet, Jean-Claude; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Jiazheng

    2016-05-01

    The 140-km wide last phase of opening of the South China Sea (SCS) corresponds to a N145° direction of spreading with rift features identified on swath bathymetric data trending N055° (Sibuet et al., 2016). These N055° seafloor spreading features of the East Sub-basin are cut across by a post-spreading volcanic ridge oriented approximately E-W in its western part (Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain). The knowledge of the deep crustal structure beneath this volcanic ridge is essential to elucidate not only the formation and tectonic evolution of the SCS, but also the mechanism of emplacement of the post-spreading magmatism. We use air-gun shots recorded by ocean bottom seismometers to image the deep crustal structure along the N-S oriented G8G0 seismic profile, which is perpendicular to the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain but located in between the Zhenbei and Huangyan seamounts, where topographic changes are minimum. The velocity structure presents obvious lateral variations. The crust north and south of the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain is ca. 4-6 km in thickness and velocities are largely comparable with those of normal oceanic crust of Atlantic type. To the south, the Jixiang seamount with a 7.2-km thick crust, seems to be a tiny post-spreading volcanic seamount intruded along the former extinct spreading ridge axis. In the central part, a 1.5-km thick low velocity zone (3.3-3.7 km/s) in the uppermost crust is explained by the presence of extrusive rocks intercalated with thin sedimentary layers as those drilled at IODP Site U1431. Both the Jixiang seamount and the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain started to form by the intrusion of decompressive melt resulting from the N-S post-spreading phase of extension and intruded through the already formed oceanic crust. The Jixiang seamount probably formed before the emplacement of the E-W post-spreading seamounts chain.

  3. Tectonic Significance of Cretaceous to Tertiary Magmatic and Structural Evolution of the Northern Portion of the Xolapa Complex, Tierra Colorada-Acapulco Area, Southern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres de Leon, R.; Perez, R.; Solari, L.; Hernandez, G.; Sole, J.; Solis, G.; Hernandez, T.

    2007-05-01

    middle Cretaceous. The stable conditions during deposition of the Morelos Formation may have resulted from a combination of back-arc extension and development of a passive margin during the Middle Cretaceous, which postdated the accretion of an exotic block, either the Guerrero terrane or the Chortís block. Following the Laramide Orogeny in southern Mexico (roughly during the Late Cretaceous) the Paleocene to Miocene tectonic evolution is represented by an alternation of magmatic pulses with contractile and extensional events, which are the result of a combination of several factors such as the geometry of the subducted slab, convergence rate, stress transmission between subducting and overlying plate, as well as to the rate of subduction erosion.

  4. Behavior of Eupcheon fault Using Fault Monitoring Data in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, S.; Hwang, J.; Park, D.; Choi, W.; Chang, C.

    2013-12-01

    In the early 1960s, the Fault Monitoring System(FMS) was adopted in several countries including U.S., Japan and Taiwan, where fault movement related with tectonics have occurred frequently. In Korea, only the Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co. Ltd. - Central Research Institute (KHNP-CRI) has been managing FMS. The first FMS of South Korea had been installed to monitor the Eupcheon fault located in Gyeoungju city from 2009. The system is equipped with in-situ measuring units including strainmeter, creepmeter, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), seismometer, and groundwater level meter. This paper presents the behavior of the Eupcheon fault based on the monitored data from EFMS in 2012. These data reveal that the earthquakes near Eupcheon fault did not lead to considerable changes in underground stress and displacement as the data in 2011. The creepmeter is sensitive to the temperature so that the data from the creepmeter showed the seasonal variation. The GNSS and strainmeter data have influenced by the tides. For this reason, it is required to employ a calibration system considering the external parameters such as tides and temperature variations. The KHNP-CRI is currently developing technical systems for data correction and analysis to predict the long-term behavior characteristics of Eupcheon fault. It is expected that the enhanced monitoring system contributes significantly in geo-tectonic safety assessment of nuclear plants and other critical facilities related to the national security.

  5. Tectonic Maps of the Poles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These tectonic relief maps of the north (left, view large [540k]) and south (right, view large [411k]) poles are the result of new satellite-based technologies which are being used to analyze tectonic activity in the Earth's crust. These maps, known as Digital Tectonic Activity Maps (DTAMs), synoptically depict the architecture of the Earth's crust including current and past tectonic activity. This is significant because it permits researchers to view broad zones of activity over the entire surface of the Earth, rather than focusing on single boundary features. By looking at these 'big pictures,' scientists can possibly identify regions of activity which were not previously recognized or mapped using traditional methods. For more information, see: DTAM web site Putting Earthquakes in Their Place Images courtesy Brian Montgomery, NASA GSFC; data by Paul Lowman and Jacob Yates, NASA GSFC

  6. Alternating Wind and Fluvial Erosion during the Quaternary in the Qaidam Basin (NE Tibetan Plateau) and its tectonic and climatic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, L.; Xiao, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Qaidam Basin is located in the NE Tibetan Plateau, and trapped by the Altyn Tagh Fault system to the northwest, the Qilian Mts. to the northeast and the East Kunlun Mts. - Qiman Tagh to the south. It forms one of the driest regions on earth with severe wind erosion since ca. 3.0 Ma (Heermance et al., 2013). Whether the Qaidam Basin is one of the major sources of the Chinese Loess Plateau is still debating: study on U-Pb ages of zircon crystals favored the positive answer (Pullen et al., 2011), whereas chemical and mineralogical analysis (Sun, 2002), together with observation on dust storms over the past 50 years (Sun et al., 2001), preferred the negative one. Kapp et al. (2011) reconciled the two contrasting viewpoints by numerical modeling based on the assumption that the Qaidam Basin underwent strong wind erosion during glacial periods but weak wind erosion even fluvial deposition during interglacial periods. However, no geological evidences have been found to back up the assumption. In this contribution, we reported geological evidence indicating that alternating wind erosion and fluvial deposition do exist in the western Qaidam Basin. The evidence consists of an isolated alluvial fan overlying old yardangs forming prior to the fan. The fan, as well as the underlying old yardangs, is now tens of meters higher than adjacent area which is full of young yardangs, suggesting that the fan was deposited between the two wind erosion events. We obtained high resolution (<10cm) DEM data of the fan and adjacent area by terrestrial LiDAR scanning and the age of the fan by 10Be exposure dating (test in process). We will use the results to calculate the long-term wind erosion rate in the Qaidam Basin, which is the first wind erosion rate obtained from accurate geological evidence. We believe that the result is significant to evaluate the impact of wind erosion on folding inside the basin, and of the global glacial - interglacial cycles on surface processes in the

  7. Petrogenesis and tectonic significance of the late Triassic mafic dikes and felsic volcanic rocks in the East Kunlun Orogenic Belt, Northern Tibet Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yan; Niu, Yaoling; Li, Jiyong; Ye, Lei; Kong, Juanjuan; Chen, Shuo; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Guorui

    2016-02-01

    We present zircon U-Pb ages and geochemical data on the late Triassic mafic dikes (diabase) and felsic volcanic rocks (rhyolite and rhyolitic tuffs) in the East Kunlun Orogenic Belt (EKOB). These rocks give a small age window of 228-218 Ma. The mafic dikes represent evolved alkaline basaltic melts intruding ~ 8-9 Myrs older and volumetrically more abundant A-type granite batholith. Their rare earth element (REE) and multi-element patterns are similar to those of the present-day ocean island basalts (OIBs) except for a weak continental crustal signature (i.e., enrichment of Rb and Pb and weak depletion of Nb, Ta and Ti). Their trace element characteristics together with the high 87Sr/86Sr (0.7076-0.7104), low εNd(t) (- 2.18 to - 3.46), low εHf(t) (- 2.85 to - 4.59) and variable Pb isotopic ratios are consistent with melts derived from metasomatized subcontinental lithospheric mantle with crustal contamination. The felsic volcanic rocks are characterized by high LREE/HREE (e.g., [La/Yb]N of 5.71-17.00) with a negative Eu anomaly and strong depletion in Sr and P, resembling the model upper continental crust (UCC). Given the high 87Sr/86Sr (0.7213-0.7550) and less negative εNd(t) (- 3.83 to - 5.09) and εHf(t) (- 3.06 to - 3.83) than the UCC plus the overlapping isotopes with the mafic dikes and high Nb-Ta rhyolites, the felsic volcanic rocks are best interpreted as resulting from melting-induced mixing with 45-50% crustal materials and 50-55% mantle-derived mafic melts probably parental to the mafic dikes. Such mantle-derived melts underplated and intruded the deep crust as juvenile crustal materials. Partial melting of such juvenile crust produced felsic melts parental to the felsic volcanic rocks in the EKOB. We hypothesize that the late Triassic mafic dikes and felsic volcanic rocks are associated with post-collisional extension and related orogenic collapse. Such processes are probably significant in causing asthenospheric upwelling, decompression melting

  8. Upper-crust Tomographic Structure of the Southern Korea Peninsula from Local Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. H.; Park, J. H.; Kang, S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    We derived the three dimensional P wave velocity model for the uppermost 14 km of crust in the southern Korea peninsula using travel-time data from local earthquakes which are recorded by two nation-wide seismic networks operated by Korea Meteorological Administration and Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources. Earthquakes in the study occurred between 2001 and 2014. 19,935 P wave arrivals from 747 earthquakes observed by 184 seismic stations are selected for the 3-D tomographic inversion. In order to secure best possible data for tomography inversion, we applied a strict criteria during the selection of earthquakes and travel-times. The study area is parameterized by 10km×10km×4km grid for velocity inversion and 1km×1km×1km grid for travel time calculations. Checkerboard resolution test are used to demonstrate the ray coverage and the resolution for the given station-event configurations. The results indicate P-wave velocity model at shallow depths less than 2 km are not properly resolved mainly due to the insufficient ray coverage. The model at deeper depths greater than 14 km also suffered by lack of ray coverage. Thus, we limit our interpretations of the preliminary P wave velocity model to areas that are illuminated by enough rays. P wave velocity model indicates there are significant lateral velocity variations across the southern Korea peninsula. Most distinguished feature in the velocity model is the higher velocity anomaly beneath the southeastern Korea peninsula. The anomaly regions is distinguished by well-defined tectonic boundary. At 8 km depth, lower velocity anomaly is observed in Gyeonggi massif and high-mountain regions in the southern Korea peninsula. The 3-D velocity model is compared with geophysical and geological observations.

  9. Special Education in Korea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Byung Ha, Ed.; Yeo, Kwang Eung

    The text on special education in Korea is divided into four major sections--a brief history of special education in Korea, the present status of special education in Korea, the special education plan of the Young Kwang Educational Foundation, and directory of schools and classes for the exceptional in Korea. Topics covered include the following:…

  10. The exploration potential of offshore northwest Korea (P. D. R. K. )

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, P.; Bishopp, D. )

    1991-03-01

    Recent political changes have demonstrated that previously taboo countries are now becoming fair game for western explorationists. Numerous areas or basins that have not been the focus of high technology - Technologically Attenuated Basins (TABs) - offer a new challenge for the new venture groups of E and P companies. Most recently the USSR together with other Eastern European countries continue to be a source of technical interest and frustration. The People's Democratic Republic of Korea, North Korea, possibly the most isolated of the Communist block, contains several TABs where there has been minimal exploration. One such TAB is West Korea Bay, which covers an area of 25,000 km{sup 2} containing at least one major Tertiary basin. The tectonic evolution of the Tertiary basin is similar to the intracratonic Chinese basins with significant differences, notably the Songnim and Daebo orogenies (Middle Triassic to Upper Jurassic and Jurassic to middle Cretaceous) that resulted in extensive igneous activity, folding, and thrust faulting, followed by an extensional stress regime during the Mesozoic and Cainozoic. Very few wells have been drilled in West Korea Bay in the past decade (one per 2,500 km{sup 2}). Though commercially unsuccessful, the wells have proven the existence of oil, mature source rocks, and reservoirs (Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Oligo-Miocene). Structural plays such as rotated Jurassic and Cretaceous fault blocks predominate, but there is also potential for higher risk stratigraphic potential in the Jurassic and Tertiary, with expected field size distributions in the 20-180 MMBOR range.

  11. Tsunami Catalog in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Sobeom; Hyun, Seung Gyu; Noh, Myunghyun

    2015-04-01

    Significant tsunamis are described in historic and instrumental earthquake sources for all regions around the Korean Peninsula. According to the low seismicity near the Peninsula, there are relatively few tsunami events in Korea. Most of the tsunami events are associated with big earthquakes at the eastern margin of the East Sea. One historical event is associated with a volcanic eruption. For that reason, the eastern coast of the Korean Peninsula is the affectable area for tsunami. One historical event at the Yellow Sea area is inferred a result from a big earthquake in China. And one plate boundary earthquake between the Philippine Plate and the Eurasian Plate affected to an island located in south of the Korean Peninsula. We confirmed the historic tsunami events by review the foreign literatures. More detailed information is presented for the instrumental earthquake source events. This work was supported by the Nuclear Safety Research Program through the Korea Radiation Safety Foundation (KORSAFe) and the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC), Republic of Korea (Grant No. 1305001).

  12. Global Tectonics on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P. G.; Forni, O. P.; Masson, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    Three large basin surroundings on Ganymede located on grooved terrains, which are supposed to be intensely tectonized areas were studied. All rectilinear morphological elements such as ridges, block edges; and parts of scarps were mapped. The geometric properties (grid pattern) characteristics were determined and a history for the formation of the Ganymede basins studied is proposed. Results indicate that the grooved terrains are very surficial layers, and that their formation does not significantly affect, disturb or rotate the basement. This is in agreement with the conclusion obtained from completely different data (crosscutting relationships between groove sets and their basements).

  13. Tectonic earthquakes of anthropogenic origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adushkin, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    The enhancement of seismicity induced by industrial activity in Russia in the conditions of present-day anthropization is noted. In particular, the growth in the intensity and number of strong tectonic earthquakes with magnitudes M ≥ 3 (seismic energy 109 J) due to human activity is revealed. These man-made tectonic earthquakes have started to occur in the regions of the East European Platform which were previously aseismic. The development of such seismicity is noted in the areas of intense long-term mineral extraction due to the increasing production depth and extended mining and production. The mechanisms and generation conditions of man-made tectonic earthquakes in the anthropogenically disturbed medium with the changed geodynamical and fluid regime is discussed. The source zones of these shallow-focus tectonic earthquakes of anthropogenic origin are formed in the setting of stress state rearrangement under anthropogenic loading both near these zones and at a significant distance from them. This distance is determined by the tectonic structure of the rock mass and the character of its energy saturation, in particular, by the level of the formation pressure or pore pressure. These earthquakes occur at any time of the day, have a triggered character, and are frequently accompanied by catastrophic phenomena in the underground mines and on the surface due to the closeness to the source zones.

  14. Tectonic provinces of the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushcharovsky, Yu. M.

    2009-05-01

    The tectonic structure of the floor of the Atlantic Ocean beyond the continental margins is insufficiently studied. This is also true of its tectonic demarcation. The segmentation of the floor into regional-scale tectonic provinces of several orders proposed in this paper is primarily based on structural and historical geological features. It is shown that deep oceanic basins and fault tectonics are of particular importance in this respect. Tectonic provinces of two orders are distinguished by a set of attributes. The first-order provinces are the North, Central, South, and Antarctic domains of the Atlantic Ocean. They are separated by wide demarcation fracture zones into Transatlantic (transverse) second-order tectonic provinces. Ten such provinces are recognized (from the north southward): Greenland-Lofoten, Greenland-Scandinavia, Greenland-Ireland, Newfoundland-European, North American-African, Antilles-African, Angola-Brazil, Cape-Argentine, North Antarctic, and South Antarctic. This subdivision demonstrates significant differentiation in the geodynamic state of the oceanic lithosphere that determines nonuniform ocean formation and the tectonic features of the ocean floor. The latitudinal orientation of the second-order provinces inherits the past tectonic pattern, though newly formed structural units cannot be ruled out. The Earth rotation exerts a crucial effect on the crust and the mantle.

  15. Geomorphology, tectonics, and exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabins, F. F., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Explorationists interpret satellite images for tectonic features and patterns that may be clues to mineral and energy deposits. The tectonic features of interest range in scale from regional (sedimentary basins, fold belts) to local (faults, fractures) and are generally expressed as geomorphic features in remote sensing images. Explorationists typically employ classic concepts of geomorphology and landform analysis for their interpretations, which leads to the question - Are there new and evolving concepts in geomorphology that may be applicable to tectonic analyses of images?

  16. Micro-plate tectonics and kinematics in Northeast Asia inferred from a dense set of GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shuanggen; Park, Pil-Ho; Zhu, Wenyao

    2007-05-01

    The plate tectonics of Northeast Asia are very complex with diffuse and sparse seismicity in the broad plate deformation zones embedded by a number of micro-plates, particularly the controversial Amurian plate. Now the increasingly dense GPS networks in this area provide an important tool to investigate plate tectonic kinematics and to identify the approximate plate tectonic geometries. In this paper, we have processed GPS data (1998-2005) collected by an extensive GPS network (China and South Korea) with more than 85 continuous sites and about 1000 campaign GPS stations. The kinematics of Northeast Asia is studied by modeling GPS-derived velocities with rigid block rotations and elastic deformation. We find that the deformation in Northeast Asia can be well described by a number of rotating blocks, which are independent of the Eurasian plate motion with statistical significance above the 99% confidence level. The tectonic boundary between the North China and Amuria plates is the Yin Shan-Yan Shan Mountain belts with about 2.4 mm/yr extension. Along the boundary between North China and South China, the Qinling-Dabie fault is moving left laterally at about 3.1 mm/yr. The Amuria and South Korea blocks are extending at about 1.8 mm/yr. The Baikal Rift between the Amurian and Eurasian plates is spreading at about 3.0 mm/yr. The 9-17 mm/yr relative motion between the Amuria and Okhotsk blocks is accommodated at the East Sea-Japan trench zone. Localized deformation near the Qinling-Dabie fault and Yin Shan-Yan Shan Mountain belts may be elastic strain accumulation due to interseismic locking of faults.

  17. Tectonics on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, Steven K.

    1993-01-01

    Tectonic features on Triton have been mapped as part of a larger study of the geology of Triton. Few purely tectonic structures are found on Triton: some grabens and possibly some compressive ridges. However, most of the other structures seen (primarily cryovolcanic in origin) exhibit tectonic control. A regional tectonic network has the following dominant orientations: N-S, E-W, NE-SW, and NW-SE. Most of the orientations are consistent with tidal deformations related to Triton's decreasing orbital radius. Localized quasi-concentric patterns may be due to interior processes such as mantle plumes.

  18. Earthquakes and plate tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1977-01-01

    An explanation is to be found in plate tectonics, a concept which has revolutionized thinking in the Earth sciences in the last 10 years. The theory of plate tectonics combines many of the ideas about continental drift (originally proposed in 1912 by Alfred Wegener in Germany) and sea-floor spreading (suggested originally by Harry Hess of Princeton University). 

  19. Korea space program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryoo, Jang-Soo

    1992-11-01

    An overview of the missions, history, and organization of the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) is presented. The following three projects included in the Korean space program are presented: (1) KOREASAT procurement project to procure multipurpose satellites and have them launched through international tenders to be used for communication and broadcasting in Korea; (2) exploration rocket project, Korea's self-developed rocket project, conducted by KARI to observe the ozone concentration and ionosphere over the country, and conduct microgravity experiment; and (3) KITSAT (Korea Institute of Technology Satellite-A) minisatellite project undergoing joint development with the UK Surrey University to be launched by a ARIANE launch vehicle.

  20. The Geography of Korea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Young-Han

    1988-01-01

    Briefly surveys the geography of both North and South Korea, examining mountain ranges, rivers, soil, and climate. Also discusses the economic activities of South Korea, including industrialization, transportation, population, and the urban system. Provides a map of the Korean peninsula and a table of land area and population by province. (GEA)

  1. Plate tectonics: Metamorphic myth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenaga, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Clear evidence for subduction-induced metamorphism, and thus the operation of plate tectonics on the ancient Earth has been lacking. Theoretical calculations indicate that we may have been looking for something that cannot exist.

  2. Tectonic Plate Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landalf, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity that employs movement to enable students to understand concepts related to plate tectonics. Argues that movement brings topics to life in a concrete way and helps children retain knowledge. (DDR)

  3. Plate tectonics on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1981-04-01

    The high surface temperature of Venus implies a permanently buoyant lithosphere and a thick basaltic crust. Terrestrial-style tectonics with deep subduction and crustal recycling is not possible. Overthickened basaltic crust partially melts instead of converting to eclogite. Because mantle magmas do not have convenient access to the surface the Ar-40 abundance in the atmosphere should be low. Venus may provide an analog to Archean tectonics on the earth.

  4. Plate tectonics on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The high surface temperature of Venus implies a permanently buoyant lithosphere and a thick basaltic crust. Terrestrial-style tectonics with deep subduction and crustal recycling is not possible. Overthickened basaltic crust partially melts instead of converting to eclogite. Because mantle magmas do not have convenient access to the surface the Ar-40 abundance in the atmosphere should be low. Venus may provide an analog to Archean tectonics on the earth.

  5. Terrorism in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Soon Joo; Choi, Jin Tae; Arnold, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    South Korea has experienced > 30 suspected terrorism-related events since 1958, including attacks against South Korean citizens in foreign countries. The most common types of terrorism used have included bombings, shootings, hijackings, and kidnappings. Prior to 1990, North Korea was responsible for almost all terrorism-related events inside of South Korea, including multiple assassination attempts on its presidents, regular kidnappings of South Korean fisherman, and several high-profile bombings. Since 1990, most of the terrorist attacks against South Korean citizens have occurred abroad and have been related to the emerging worldwide pattern of terrorism by international terrorist organizations or deranged individuals. The 1988 Seoul Olympic Games provided a major stimulus for South Korea to develop a national emergency response system for terrorism-related events based on the participation of multiple ministries. The 11 September 2001 World Trade Center and Pentagon attacks and the 2001 United States of America (US) anthrax letter attacks prompted South Korea to organize a new national system of emergency response for terrorism-related events. The system is based on five divisions for the response to specific types of terrorist events, involving conventional terrorism, bioterrorism, chemical terrorism, radiological terrorism, and cyber-terrorism. No terrorism-related events occurred during the 2002 World Cup and Asian Games held in South Korea. The emergency management of terrorism-related events in South Korea is adapting to the changing risk of terrorism in the new century. PMID:15074497

  6. Preliminary publications Book 1 from Project on Mineral Resources, Metallogenesis and Tectonics of Northeast Asia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ariunbileg, Sodov; Badarch, Gombosuren; Berzin, Nikolai A.; Bulgatov, Alexander N.; Chimed, Noosoi; Deikunenko, Aleksey V.; Dejidmaa, Gunchin; Diggles, Michael F.; Distanov, Elimir G.; Dorjgotov, Dangindorjiin; Gerel, Ochir; Gordienko, Ivan V.; Gotovsuren, Ayurzana; Hwang, Duk-Hwan; Khanchuk, Alexander I.; Koch, Richard D.; Miller, Robert J.; Nokleberg, Warren J.; Obolenskiy, Alexander A.; Ogasawara, Masatsugu; Orolmaa, Demberel; Oxman, Vladimir S.; Parfenov, Leonid M.; Popeko, Ludmila I.; Prokopiev, Andrey V.; Smelov, Alexander P.; Sotnikov, Vitaliy I.; Sudo, Sadahisa; Timofeev, Vladimir F.; Tret'yakov, Felix F.; Vernikovsky, Valery A.; Ye, Mao; Zadgenizov, Alexander P.

    1999-01-01

    This report consists of preliminary data tables, maps, and interpretative articles compiled in late 1997 and early 1998 for a new project on the Mineral Resources, Metallogenesis, and Tectonics of Northeast Asia (Eastern and Southern Siberia, Mongolia, North-eastern China, South Korea, and Japan).

  7. Active tectonics and human survival strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Geoffrey; Bailey, Geoffrey; Sturdy, Derek

    1994-10-01

    Tectonic movements continuously remould the surface of Earth in response to plate motion. Yet such deformation is rarely taken into account when assessing landscape change and its impact on human land use, except perhaps as an occasional hazard to human life or a temporary disruption in the longer term patterns of human history. However, active tectonics also create and sustain landscapes that can be beneficial to human survival, forming a complex topography of potentially fertile sedimentary basins enclosed by mountain barriers that can facilitate the control and explotation of food resources, especially animal prey. We discuss the tectonic history of northwest Greece and show how the Paleolithic sites of the region are located to take advantage of tectonically created features at both a local and a regional scale. We suggest that the association of significant concentrations of early Paleolithic sites with tectonically acitve regions is not coincidental and that on the longer time spans of human biological evolution, active tectonics has been an important selective agent contributing to the development of the human species as an intelligent predator.

  8. China and Korea

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... article title:  Dust Obscures Liaoning Province, China     View Larger Image ... acquired 16 days apart, covers the Liaoning region of China and parts of northern and western Korea. They contrast a relatively clear ...

  9. Plate Tectonics: From Plate Boundary Zone Tectonics To Extensive Intraplate Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, M.

    2004-12-01

    Plates makes up earth's surface, and tectonic activity is generally concentrated on plate boundary zones. In restrict meaning, plate tectonics of the earth is regarded as mixture of plate boundary zone tectonics and extensive intraplate tectonics. For example, the Asian continent never behaves as rigid plate that was deformed extensively when the Indian continent collided with it. I infer that extensive intraplate tectonics reflects rheological weakening of wet mantle. To demonstrate effect of H2O component on plate strength, one-dimensional rheological profiles of 100 km depth were constructed by assuming 20km thick upper crust and 20km thick lower crust. Temperature-depth profiles were calculated based on one-dimensional steady-state static heat transfer at given surface heat flows. Power law creep and Byerlee_fs law were used to estimate strength in ductile regime and brittle regime respectively. Creep strength for upper crust, lower crust, dry mantle and wet mantle were calculated using creep parameters of granite, granulite, dry dunite and wet dunite. The minimum value between power law creep strength and Byerlee_fs law strength gives the strength of the lithosphere. Strength profile at surface heat flow of 55mW/m2 (continental average is 56.5mW/m2) and strain rate of 10-15/s (intraplate deformation is about 10-15/s - 10-16/s in Asia) shows a significant difference in strength for using dry mantle and wet mantle. In case of dry mantle, the uppermost mantle is quite strong. However, if wet peridotite represent the upper mantle, there is very little strength in the uppermost mantle. The cumulative lithospheric strength, i.e. integral strength from surface to 100km depth, and the cumulative mantle strength, i.e. integral strength from 40km to 100km depth were calculated with changing strain rate. For example, to deform continental lithosphere at strain rate of 10-15/s, wet mantle has a cumulative strength of about 2x1012N/m whereas the cumulative strength of dry

  10. Task 1 quarternary tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.W.

    1994-12-31

    Activities on the task of quarternary tectonics for the Yucca Mountain Site investigations are described. Technical topics include: A preliminary reveiw of Bare Mountain Trench; A preliminary detailed lineament map of the Southwestern part of the proposed repository; A discussion on the 1994 Double Spring Flat, Nevada earthquake; and evidence for temporal clustering.

  11. Transmantle flux tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, V. J.; Dolginov, A. Z.; Baker, V. R.

    1993-01-01

    Venus, Earth, and Mars have surfaces that display topographic domes and depressions with quasi-circular planimetric shapes, relief of 0 to several km, and large spatial scales (10(exp 2) to 10(exp 4) km). Our morphostructural mapping reveals hierarchical arrangements of these features. They are explained by a model of long-acting mantle convection, as a particular case of convection in a stratified and random inhomogeneous medium, which develops the form of a hierarchy of different convective pattern scales, each arising from different levels in the mantle. The hypothesis of transmantle flux tectonics parsimoniously explains a diversity of seemingly unrelated terrestrial planetary phenomena, including Earth megaplumes, global resurfacing epochs on Venus, and cyclic ocean formation and global climate change for Mars. All these phenomenon are hypothesized to be parsimoniously explained by a process of transmantle flux tectonics in which long-acting mantle convection generates stresses in blocks of planetary lithosphere to produce distinctive quasi-circular global-hierarchical morphostructure (QGM) patterns. Transmantle flux tectonics differs from plume tectonics in that individual plumes are not considered in isolation. Rather, a wholly interactive process is envisioned in which various spatial and temporal scales of convection operate contemporaneously and hierarchically within other scales. This process of continual change by hierarchical convective cells affects the surface at varying temporal and spatial scales, and its effects are discernable through their relic geological manifestations, the QGM patterns.

  12. Tectonic Evolution of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Roger J.

    1992-01-01

    The Final Technical Report on tectonic evolution of Mars is presented. Two papers and an abstract are included. Topics addressed include: scientific rationale and requirements for a global seismic network on Mars, permanent uplift in magmatic systems with application to the Tharsis Region of Mars, and the geophysical signal of the Martian global dichotomy.

  13. Plains Tectonics on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerdt, W. B.; McGill, G. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    1996-01-01

    Tectonic deformation in the plains of Venus is pervasive, with virtually every area of the planet showing evidence for faulting or fracturing. This deformation can be classified into three general categories, defined by the intensity and areal extent of the surface deformation: distributed deformation, concentrated deformation, and local fracture patterns.

  14. The Plate Tectonics Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Annamae J.

    2011-01-01

    The Plate Tectonics Project is a multiday, inquiry-based unit that facilitates students as self-motivated learners. Reliable Web sites are offered to assist with lessons, and a summative rubric is used to facilitate the holistic nature of the project. After each topic (parts of the Earth, continental drift, etc.) is covered, the students will…

  15. Identifying active interplate and intraplate fault zones in the western Caribbean plate from seismic reflection data and the significance of the Pedro Bank fault zone in the tectonic history of the Nicaraguan Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, B.; Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The offshore Nicaraguan Rise in the western Caribbean Sea is an approximately 500,000 km2 area of Precambrian to Late Cretaceous tectonic terranes that have been assembled during the Late Cretaceous formation of the Caribbean plate and include: 1) the Chortis block, a continental fragment; 2) the Great Arc of the Caribbean, a deformed Cretaceous arc, and 3) the Caribbean large igneous province formed in late Cretaceous time. Middle Eocene to Recent eastward motion of the Caribbean plate has been largely controlled by strike-slip faulting along the northern Caribbean plate boundary zone that bounds the northern margin of the Nicaraguan Rise. These faults reactivate older rift structures near the island of Jamaica and form the transtensional basins of the Honduran Borderlands near Honduras. Recent GPS studies suggest that small amount of intraplate motion within the current margin of error of GPS measurements (1-3 mm/yr) may occur within the center of the western Caribbean plate at the Pedro Bank fault zone and Hess Escarpment. This study uses a database of over 54,000 km of modern and vintage 2D seismic data, combined with earthquake data and results from previous GPS studies to define the active areas of inter- and intraplate fault zones in the western Caribbean. Intraplate deformation occurs along the 700-km-long Pedro Bank fault zone that traverses the center of the Nicaraguan Rise and reactivates the paleo suture zone between the Great Arc of the Caribbean and the Caribbean large igneous province. The Pedro Bank fault zone also drives active extension at the 200-km-long San Andres rift along the southwest margin of the Nicaraguan Rise. Influence of the Cocos Ridge indentor may be contributing to reactivation of faulting along the southwesternmost, active segment of the Hess Escarpment.

  16. Introduction to Regional Geology, Tectonics, and Metallogenesis of Northeast Asia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parfenov, Leonid M.; Badarch, Gombosuren; Berzin, Nikolai A.; Hwang, Duk-Hwan; Khanchuk, Alexander I.; Kuzmin, Mikhail I.; Nokleberg, Warren J.; Obolenskiy, Alexander O.; Ogasawara, Masatsugu; Prokopiev, Andrei V.; Rodionov, Sergey M.; Smelov, Alexander P.; Yan, Hongquan

    2007-01-01

    This introduction presents an overview of the regional geology, tectonics, and metallogenesis of Northeast Asia. The major purposes are to provide a relatively short summary of these features for readers who are unfamiliar with Northeast Asia; a general scientific introduction for the succeeding chapters of this volume; and an overview of the methodology of metallogenic and tectonic analysis employed for Northeast Asia. The introduction also describes how a high-quality metallogenic and tectonic analysis, including synthesis of an associated metallogenic-tectonic model will greatly benefit refinement of mineral deposit models and deposit genesis; improvement of assessments of undiscovered mineral resources as part of quantitative mineral resource assessment studies; land-use and mineral exploration planning; improvement of interpretations of the origins of host rocks, mineral deposits, and metallogenic belts; and suggestions for new research. The compilation, synthesis, description, and interpretation of metallogenesis and tectonics of major regions, such as Northeast Asia (Eastern Russia, Mongolia, northern China, South Korea, and Japan) and the Circum-North Pacific (Russian Far East, Alaska, and Canadian Cordillera) requires a complex methodology. The methodology includes: (1) definitions of key terms; (2) compilation of a regional geologic base map that can be interpreted according to modern tectonic concepts and definitions; (3) compilation of a mineral deposit database that enables the determination of mineral deposit models, and relations of deposits to host rocks and tectonic origins; (4) synthesis of a series of mineral deposit models that characterize the known mineral deposits and inferred undiscovered deposits of the region; (5) compilation of a series of maps of metallogenic belts constructed on the regional geologic base map; and (6) formulation of a unified metallogenic and tectonic model. The summary of regional geology and metallogenesis in this

  17. BCG vaccine in Korea.

    PubMed

    Joung, Sun Myung; Ryoo, Sungweon

    2013-07-01

    The anti-tuberculosis Bacille de Calmette et Guérin (BCG) vaccine was developed between 1905 and 1921 at Pasteur Institutes of Lille in France, and was adopted by many countries. BCG strains comprise natural mutants of major virulence factors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and that BCG sub-strains differ markedly in virulence levels. The tuberculosis became endemic in Korea after the Korean War (1950s). The BCG strain, which was donated by Pasteur Institutes, was brought to Korea in 1955, and the first domestic BCG vaccine was produced by the National Defense Research Institute (NDRI), current Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC), in 1960. Since 1987, BCG manufacture work was handed over to the Korean Institute of Tuberculosis (KIT), the freeze-dried BCG vaccine was manufactured at a scale required to meet the whole amount of domestic consumption. However, since 2006, the manufacture of BCG vaccine suspended and the whole amount of BCG was imported at this point of time. Now KIT is planning to re-produce the BCG vaccine in Korea under the supervision of KCDC, this will be render great role to National Tuberculosis Control Program (NTP) and provide initiating step for developing new tuberculosis vaccines in Korea. PMID:23858398

  18. When Did Plate Tectonics Begin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M.

    2015-12-01

    Present-day plate tectonics on Earth is characterized by asymmetric (one-sided) subduction, but how do we recognize the imprint of subduction in the geologic record? How do we weigh global (commonly younger) vs local (commonly older) datasets or distinguish initiation from episodic from continuous subduction? How reliable are data gaps? Characteristics of the Paleozoic record of subduction include calc-alkaline magmatism, blueschist/UHP metamorphism and collisional orogenesis, and ophiolites as representatives of former ocean lithosphere. Are these characteristic rocks preserved in Proterozoic, Archean and Hadean crust? Does a hotter mantle, higher heat production and weaker lithosphere modify or eliminate these features? What preceded subduction and how do we recognize that regime? Are rock associations or geochemical fingerprints reliable? Does reworking and overprinting modify geochemical fingerprints? Proposals for the start of plate tectonics have been based on: persistence of isotope anomalies/fractionated chemical domains in the mantle; changes in chemistry of magmatic rocks, rates of crustal growth vs reworking, and sites of growth; the metamorphic record, particularly the first appearance of contrasting thermal gradients or eclogite (including evidence from mineral inclusions in diamonds) or UHP metamorphic rocks; stabilization of cratonic lithosphere and formation of supercratons, and the beginning of the Proterozoic supercontinent cycle; the end of the flat Earth, emergence of continents, development of significant topography, changes in the style of orogeny and the rise in atmospheric oxygen; and, the appearance of passive margins and changes in the style of sedimentation. Estimates of the timing have varied from the Hadean to Neoproterozoic. I will summarize evidence for a growing consensus that the late Mesoarchean to early Paleoproterozoic was a 700 Myr long period of transition to continuous (?) subduction and global (?) mobile-lid plate tectonics.

  19. Venus tectonics - Another earth or another Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgill, G. E.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reexamines the evidence on the intensity of Venusian tectonic/volcanic activity and suggests alternate hypotheses. Three major questions are discussed: (1) whether the presence of large, presumably primordial craters on Venus requires an intensity of tectonic/volcanic activity significantly less than on earth, (2) what thicknesses of lithosphere are implied for reasonable models of temperature and volatile content of the upper mantle of Venus, and (3) can the recently obtained Ar-40 content of the Venus lower atmosphere help define the relative tectonic/volcanic activities of Venus and earth. It was shown that the abundance of Ar-40 in the Venus atmosphere lies between the earth value and one-tenth of the earth value, and since erosional liberation of Ar-40 on Venus will be inefficient, this range for Ar-40 abundance indicates an active tectonic history. It is concluded that the presence of craters and possible mantle dryness does not restrict Venus tectonics to a Mars-like model, and an earth-like model is equally probable.

  20. Venusian tectonics: Convective coupling to the lithosphere?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between the dominant global heat loss mechanism and planetary size has motivated the search for tectonic style on Venus. Prior to the American and Soviet mapping missions of the past eight years, it was thought that terrestrial style plate tectonics was operative on Venus because this planet is approximately the size of the Earth and is conjectured to have about the same heat source content per unit mass. However, surface topography mapped by the altimeter of the Pioneer Venus spacecraft did not show any physiographic expression of terrestrial style spreading ridges, trenches, volcanic arcs or transform faults, although the horizontal resolution was questionable for detection of at least some of these features. The Venera 15 and 16 radar missions mapped the northern latitudes of Venus at 1 to 2 km resolution and showed that there are significant geographic areas of deformation seemingly created by large horizontal stresses. These same high resolution images show no evidence for plate tectonic features. Thus a fundamental problem for venusian tectonics is the origin of large horizontal stresses near the surface in the apparent absence of plate tectonics.

  1. Studies in geophysics: Active tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Active tectonics is defined within the study as tectonic movements that are expected to occur within a future time span of concern to society. Such movements and their associated hazards include earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and land subsidence and emergence. The entire range of geology, geophysics, and geodesy is, to some extent, pertinent to this topic. The needs for useful forecasts of tectonic activity, so that actions may be taken to mitigate hazards, call for special attention to ongoing tectonic activity. Further progress in understanding active tectonics depends on continued research. Particularly important is improvement in the accuracy of dating techniques for recent geologic materials.

  2. Plate tectonics, habitability and life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spohn, Tilman; Breuer, Doris

    2016-04-01

    The role of plate tectonics in defining habitability of terrestrial planets is being increasingly discussed (e.g., Elkins-Tanton, 2015). Plate tectonics is a significantly evolved concept with a large variety of aspects. In the present context, cycling of material between near surface and mantle reservoirs is most important. But increased heat transport through mixing of cold lithosphere with the deep interior and formation of continental crust may also matter. An alternative mechanism of material cycling between these reservoirs is hot-spot volcanism combined with crust delamination. Hot-spot volcanism will transport volatiles to the atmosphere while delamination will mix crust, possibly altered by sedimentation and chemical reactions, with the mantle. The mechanism works as long as the stagnant lithosphere plate has not grown thicker than the crust and as long as volcanic material is added onto the crust. Thermal evolution studies suggest that the mechanism could work for the first 1-2 Ga of planetary evolution. The efficiency of the mechanism is limited by the ratio of extrusive to intrusive volcanism, which is thought to be less than 0.25. Plate tectonics would certainly have an advantage by working even for more evolved planets. A simple, most-used concept of habitability requires the thermodynamic stability of liquid water on the surface of a planet. Cycling of CO2between the atmosphere, oceans and interior through subduction and surface volcanism is an important element of the carbonate-silicate cycle, a thermostat feedback cycle that will keep the atmosphere from entering into a runaway greenhouse. Calculations for a model Earth lacking plate tectonics but degassing CO2, N, and H2O to form a surface ocean and a secondary atmosphere (Tosi et al, 2016) suggest that liquid water can be maintained on the surface for 4.5Ga. The model planet would then qualify as habitable. It is conceivable that the CO2 buffering capability of its ocean together with silicate

  3. An Update on Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissman, John W.; Faccenna, Claudio; Niemi, Nathan A.

    2014-10-01

    In February 1982, the first issue of Tectonics was published. In the editorial policy statement for the journal, founding editors John Dewey, Paul Tapponier, and Clark Burchfiel wrote, "The central theme of Tectonics is the mechanical and thermal evolution of the lithospheric crust and mantle and the way that this is reflected in cratons, basins and mountains from the broad regional scale to the fine scale." The editors further stated, "We expect that papers on these and related topics would emanate from a wide variety of earth science disciplines ranging from physical modeling to geological field observation." Finally, with the confidence from this incredible team of editors, they noted, "We are aiming for a very rapid review process, allowing a maximum of about 1 month between submission and notification to the author of acceptance or rejection."

  4. Earth's Decelerating Tectonic Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, A M; Moucha, R; Rowley, D B; Quere, S; Mitrovica, J X; Simmons, N A; Grand, S P

    2008-08-22

    Space geodetic and oceanic magnetic anomaly constraints on tectonic plate motions are employed to determine a new global map of present-day rates of change of plate velocities. This map shows that Earth's largest plate, the Pacific, is presently decelerating along with several other plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres. These plate decelerations contribute to an overall, globally averaged slowdown in tectonic plate speeds. The map of plate decelerations provides new and unique constraints on the dynamics of time-dependent convection in Earth's mantle. We employ a recently developed convection model constrained by seismic, geodynamic and mineral physics data to show that time-dependent changes in mantle buoyancy forces can explain the deceleration of the major plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres.

  5. Tectonics wins AAP Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AGU's newest journal, Tectonics, won the 1983 award for excellence in journal design and production given by the Association of American Publishers, Inc. (AAP), in the eighth annual professional and scholarly publishing awards competition. Edited by John F. Dewey, the bimonthly journal is a joint publication of AGU and the European Geophysical Society. Paul E. Tapponnier is the European editor and B.C. Burchfiel is the North American editor. The journal is now in its third year of publication.

  6. Korea's School Grounds Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Joohun

    2003-01-01

    This article describes two projects which Korea has undertaken to improve its school grounds: (1) the Green School Project; and (2) the School Forest Pilot Project. The Korean Ministry of Education and Human Resources Development (MOE&HRI) recently launched the Green School Project centred on existing urban schools with poor outdoor environments.…

  7. Teaching About South Korea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schisgall, Jane

    1983-01-01

    Identifies reasons why social studies educators should improve their teaching about South Korea. Included in the list is the increasing numbers of Koreans being educated in the United States, the summer Olympics in 1988, and the use of Korean culture as a case study demonstrating the effects of cultural transmission and society in transition. (JDH)

  8. South Korea's Economic Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ihm, Chon-Sun

    1988-01-01

    Examines South Korea's economic development from being one of the poorest nations in the world in the 1950s to becoming a "rising giant" in international trade. Surveys the path to growth, the reasons for success, and problems and new challenges facing the country as it seeks developed nation status. (GEA)

  9. Divided Korea: United Future?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumings, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Korea's recorded history extends back before the birth of Christ. Through their long history, the Koreans have endured a variety of social, political, and economical crises. Confucianism has long been one of the most popular religions by which the Korean people have lived. However, Koreans also have embraced Buddhism and Christianity while…

  10. Dance Education in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byeon, Jae-Kyung

    2012-01-01

    Despite a structured physical education system and related policies, dance education in Korea largely exists as a course in name only, without achieving its unique goals. It lacks standards within the physical education curriculum, which indicates that dance education is not conducted properly. Thus, the content and level of dance education vary…

  11. Universal planetary tectonics (supertectonics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2009-04-01

    Universal planetary tectonics (supertectonics) G. Kochemasov IGEM of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia, kochem.36@mail.ru The wave planetology [1-3 & others] proceeds from the following: "planetary structures are made by orbits and rotations". A uniform reason makes uniform structures. Inertia-gravity waves arising in planetary bodies due to their movements in Keplerian elliptical orbits with periodically changing accelerations warp these bodies in such way that they acquire polyhedron shapes (after interference of standing waves of four directions). Strong Newtonian gravity makes bodies larger than ~400 to 500 km in diameter globular and polyhedra are rarely seen. Only geomorphologic, geologic and geophysical mapping can develop these hidden structures. But small bodies, normally less than ~ 300 to 400 km in diameter, often show parts of the polyhedra, rarely fully developed forms (the asteroid Steins and satellite Amalthea present rather perfect forms of "diamond"). Depending on warping wavelengths (they make harmonics) various Plato's figures superimposed on each other can be distinguished. The fundamental wave 1 produces a tetrahedron, intrinsically dichotomic figure in which a vertex (contraction) always is opposed to a face (expansion). From the recent examples the best is the saturnian northern hexagon (a face) opposed to the southern hurricane (a vertex). The first overtone wave 2 is responsible for creation of structural octahedra. Whole ‘diamonds" and their parts are known [4, 5]. Other overtones produce less developed (because of smaller wave amplitudes) planetary shapes complicating main forms. Thus, the first common structural peculiarity of planetary bodies is their polyhedron nature. Not less important is the second common structural peculiarity. As all globular or smaller more or less isometric bodies rotate, they have an angular momentum. It is inevitably different in tropic and extra-tropic belts having uneven radii or distances to

  12. Surface Wave Tomography of the Region Between Korea and Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, K.; Lee, S.

    2010-12-01

    Surface wave tomography of the region between Korea and Taiwan has been investigated by inverting the path-averaged group-velocity dispersion characteristic curves of surface waves obtained from big events and ambient noise. 219 seismograms from 19 events of magnitude greater than 6.0 that occurred in Taiwan from 1999 to 2007 have been recorded at three-component broadband seismic stations of Korea Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources-Korea Earthquake Research Center(KIGAM-KERC) and ambient noise signals during 2004 and 2005 have been recorded at three-component broadband velocity and accelerometer stations of Korea Meteorological Administration(KMA) seismic network. 1928 Green’s functions have been obtained from very long ambient noise signals by seismic interferometry. Horizontal components of big event seismograms and ambient noise Green's functions have been rotated along great circle path to obtain Rayleigh-and Love-waves. In periods between 5 and 100 sec, group velocities of Rayleigh-and Love-waves have been computed using multiple filter technique(MFT). The tomographic inversion technique used has inverted all periods simultaneously to provide a smooth dispersion curve as a function of period and a smooth spatial image. Surface wave tomography inverted from the path-averaged group velocity data provides detailed tectonic information of East China Sea.

  13. Martian plate tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, N. H.

    1994-03-01

    The northern lowlands of Mars have been produced by plate tectonics. Preexisting old thick highland crust was subducted, while seafloor spreading produced thin lowland crust during late Noachian and Early Hesperian time. In the preferred reconstruction, a breakup margin extended north of Cimmeria Terra between Daedalia Planum and Isidis Planitia where the highland-lowland transition is relatively simple. South dipping subduction occured beneath Arabia Terra and east dipping subduction beneath Tharsis Montes and Tempe Terra. Lineations associated with Gordii Dorsum are attributed to ridge-parallel structures, while Phelegra Montes and Scandia Colles are interpreted as transfer-parallel structures or ridge-fault-fault triple junction tracks. Other than for these few features, there is little topographic roughness in the lowlands. Seafloor spreading, if it occurred, must have been relatively rapid. Quantitative estimates of spreading rate are obtained by considering the physics of seafloor spreading in the lower (approx. 0.4 g) gravity of Mars, the absence of vertical scarps from age differences across fracture zones, and the smooth axial topography. Crustal thickness at a given potential temperature in the mantle source region scales inversely with gravity. Thus, the velocity of the rough-smooth transition for axial topography also scales inversely with gravity. Plate reorganizations where young crust becomes difficult to subduct are another constraint on spreading age. Plate tectonics, if it occurred, dominated the thermal and stress history of the planet. A geochemical implication is that the lower gravity of Mars allows deeper hydrothermal circulation through cracks and hence more hydration of oceanic crust so that more water is easily subducted than on the Earth. Age and structural relationships from photogeology as well as median wavelength gravity anomalies across the now dead breakup and subduction margins are the data most likely to test and modify hypotheses

  14. Retrospective salt tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.P.A.

    1996-12-31

    The conceptual breakthroughs in understanding salt tectonics can be recognized by reviewing the history of salt tectonics, which divides naturally into three parts: the pioneering era, the fluid era, and the brittle era. The pioneering era (1856-1933) featured the search for a general hypothesis of salt diapirism, initially dominated by bizarre, erroneous notions of igneous activity, residual islands, in situ crystallization, osmotic pressures, and expansive crystallization. Gradually data from oil exploration constrained speculation. The effects of buoyancy versus orogeny were debated, contact relations were characterized, salt glaciers were discovered, and the concepts of downbuilding and differential loading were proposed as diapiric mechanisms. The fluid era (1933-{approximately}1989) was dominated by the view that salt tectonics resulted from Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in which a dense fluid overburden having negligible yield strength sinks into a less dense fluid salt layer, displacing it upward. Density contrasts, viscosity contrasts, and dominant wavelengths were emphasized, whereas strength and faulting of the overburden were ignored. During this era, palinspastic reconstructions were attempted; salt upwelling below thin overburdens was recognized; internal structures of mined diapirs were discovered; peripheral sinks, turtle structures, and diapir families were comprehended; flow laws for dry salt were formulated; and contractional belts on divergent margins and allochthonous salt sheets were recognized. The 1970s revealed the basic driving force of salt allochthons, intrasalt minibasins, finite strains in diapirs, the possibility of thermal convection in salt, direct measurement of salt glacial flow stimulated by rainfall, and the internal structure of convecting evaporites and salt glaciers. The 1980`s revealed salt rollers, subtle traps, flow laws for damp salt, salt canopies, and mushroom diapirs.

  15. Complex Tectonism on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Complex tectonism is evident in these images of Ganymede's surface. The solid state imaging camera on NASA's Galileo spacecraft imaged this region as it passed Ganymede during its second orbit through the Jovian system. The 80 kilometer (50 mile) wide lens-shaped feature in the center of the image is located at 32 degrees latitude and 188 degrees longitude along the border of a region of ancient dark terrain known as Marius Regio, and is near an area of younger bright terrain named Nippur Sulcus. The tectonism that created the structures in the bright terrain nearby has strongly affected the local dark terrain to form unusual structures such as the one shown here. The lens-like appearance of this feature is probably due to shearing of the surface, where areas have slid past each other and also rotated slightly. Note that in several places in these images, especially around the border of the lens-shaped feature, bright ridges appear to turn into dark grooves. Analysis of the geologic structures in areas like this are helping scientists to understand the complex tectonic history of Ganymede.

    North is to the top-left of the image, and the sun illuminates the surface from the southeast. The image covers an area about 63 kilometers (39 miles) by 120 kilometers (75 miles) across at a resolution of 188 meters (627 feet) per picture element. The images were taken on September 6, 1996 at a range of 18,522 kilometers (11,576 miles) by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  16. Quarternary tectonics, Task 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.W.

    1993-09-30

    Activities conducted for the evaluation of the geology and seismotectonics stability of Yucca Mountain as a potential site for the underground disposal of high-level radioactive wastes continued. Tasks concerned with quaternary tectonics include: scheduling of photography of Little Skull Mountain area; the collection and dating of rock varnish samples from the 1932 Cedar Mountain earthquake area for carbon 14 AMS and cation-ratio analysis; collection of samples for thermoluminescence dating from the 1932 Cedar Mountain earthquake area; mapping of the northern area of Crater Flat; and surveying of the May 17, 1993 Eureka the Valley earthquake area.

  17. Mars tectonics and volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    1990-01-01

    The focus of this research was on three broad areas: (1) the relation between lithospheric stress in the vicinity of a growing volcano and the evolution of eruption characteristics and tectonic faulting; (2) the relation between elastic lithosphere thickness and thermal structure; and (3) a synthesis of constraints on heat flow and internal dynamics on Mars. The two reports presented are: (1) Heterogeneities in the Thickness of the Elastic Lithosphere of Mars--Constraints on Heat Flow and Internal Dynamics; and (2) State of Stress, Faulting, and Eruption Characteristics of Large Volcanoes on Mars.

  18. Tectonic discrimination diagrams revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, Pieter

    2006-06-01

    The decision boundaries of most tectonic discrimination diagrams are drawn by eye. Discriminant analysis is a statistically more rigorous way to determine the tectonic affinity of oceanic basalts based on their bulk-rock chemistry. This method was applied to a database of 756 oceanic basalts of known tectonic affinity (ocean island, mid-ocean ridge, or island arc). For each of these training data, up to 45 major, minor, and trace elements were measured. Discriminant analysis assumes multivariate normality. If the same covariance structure is shared by all the classes (i.e., tectonic affinities), the decision boundaries are linear, hence the term linear discriminant analysis (LDA). In contrast with this, quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) allows the classes to have different covariance structures. To solve the statistical problems associated with the constant-sum constraint of geochemical data, the training data must be transformed to log-ratio space before performing a discriminant analysis. The results can be mapped back to the compositional data space using the inverse log-ratio transformation. An exhaustive exploration of 14,190 possible ternary discrimination diagrams yields the Ti-Si-Sr system as the best linear discrimination diagram and the Na-Nb-Sr system as the best quadratic discrimination diagram. The best linear and quadratic discrimination diagrams using only immobile elements are Ti-V-Sc and Ti-V-Sm, respectively. As little as 5% of the training data are misclassified by these discrimination diagrams. Testing them on a second database of 182 samples that were not part of the training data yields a more reliable estimate of future performance. Although QDA misclassifies fewer training data than LDA, the opposite is generally true for the test data. Therefore LDA is a cruder but more robust classifier than QDA. Another advantage of LDA is that it provides a powerful way to reduce the dimensionality of the multivariate geochemical data in a similar

  19. Earthquakes and plate tectonics.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1982-01-01

    Earthquakes occur at the following three kinds of plate boundary: ocean ridges where the plates are pulled apart, margins where the plates scrape past one another, and margins where one plate is thrust under the other. Thus, we can predict the general regions on the earth's surface where we can expect large earthquakes in the future. We know that each year about 140 earthquakes of magnitude 6 or greater will occur within this area which is 10% of the earth's surface. But on a worldwide basis we cannot say with much accuracy when these events will occur. The reason is that the processes in plate tectonics have been going on for millions of years. Averaged over this interval, plate motions amount to several mm per year. But at any instant in geologic time, for example the year 1982, we do not know, exactly where we are in the worldwide cycle of strain build-up and strain release. Only by monitoring the stress and strain in small areas, for instance, the San Andreas fault, in great detail can we hope to predict when renewed activity in that part of the plate tectonics arena is likely to take place. -from Author

  20. PACS industry in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hee-Joung

    2002-05-01

    PACS industry in Korea has been rapidly growing, since government had supported collaborative PACS project between industry and university hospital. In the beginning, PACS industry had focused on developing peripheral PACS solutions, while the Korea PACS society was being formed. A few companies had started developing and installing domestic large-scale full-PACS system for teaching hospitals. Several years later, many hospitals have installed full-PACS system with national policy of reimbursement for PACS exams in November 1999. Both experiences of full-PACS installation and national policy generated tremendous intellectual and technological expertise about PACS at all levels, clinical, hospital management, education, and industrial sectors. There are now more than 20 domestic PACS companies. They have enough experiences which are capable of installing a truly full-PACS system for large-scale teaching hospitals. As an example, a domestic company had installed more than 40 full-PACS systems within 2-3 years. Enough experiences of full-PACS installation in Korea lead PACS industry to start exporting their full-PACS solutions. However, further understanding and timely implementation of continuously evolving international standard and integrated healthcare enterprise concepts may be necessary for international leading of PACS technologies for the future.

  1. Urologic cancers in Korea.

    PubMed

    Koo, Kyo Chul; Lee, Kwang Suk; Chung, Byung Ha

    2015-09-01

    The incidence and prevalence of prostate and kidney cancers have been increasing in Korea during the last decade, and a marked improvement in survival rates has been noted. With a substantial proportion of the cancers diagnosed at an earlier stage of the disease, the landscape of urologic cancer treatment in Korea has been characterized by an exponential increase in the number of patients receiving surgical treatment. Throughout the last decade, an increasing proportion of surgeries have been performed using minimally invasive methods, with a notable increase in robot-assisted surgery.The evaluation and management strategies of urologic cancer in Korea are primarily based on an existing evidence-based framework provided by international guidelines. The adoption and clinical application of novel surgical techniques and systemic agents targeted at advanced stage cancer are promptly adopted; accordingly, multidisciplinary treatment options are often available for various cancers at different stages. At the same time, treatment decisions are greatly influenced by the availability of healthcare resources, which may be limited due to the National Health Insurance reimbursement policy.A racial disparity in cancer features appears to exist for certain urologic cancers among Korean patients, and the optimal management strategy specific for the Korean population has yet to be confirmed. A national comprehensive cancer database is needed for better insight into risk factors, selection of sequential strategies, tumor biology and survival outcome of Korean urologic cancer patients. PMID:26117494

  2. River history and tectonics.

    PubMed

    Vita-Finzi, C

    2012-05-13

    The analysis of crustal deformation by tectonic processes has gained much from the clues offered by drainage geometry and river behaviour, while the interpretation of channel patterns and sequences benefits from information on Earth movements before or during their development. The interplay between the two strands operates at many scales: themes which have already benefited from it include the possible role of mantle plumes in the breakup of Gondwana, the Cenozoic development of drainage systems in Africa and Australia, Himalayan uplift in response to erosion, alternating episodes of uplift and subsidence in the Mississippi delta, buckling of the Indian lithospheric plate, and changes in stream pattern and sinuosity along individual alluvial channels subject to localized deformation. Developments in remote sensing, isotopic dating and numerical modelling are starting to yield quantitative analyses of such effects, to the benefit of geodymamics as well as fluvial hydrology. PMID:22474680

  3. A tectonic resurfacing model for Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    1993-01-01

    Two remarkable aspects of the population of impact craters on Venus are that craters at all sizes are indistinguishable from a random population and that the vast majority of craters have not been significantly modified by tectonic strain or by volcanic flows external to the crater rim, despite evidence from Magellan images that volcanic and tectonic features are widespread on Venus. One interpretation of these observations is that most of the surface dates from the end of a catastrophic global resurfacing event that ceased about 500 My ago, and that the small fraction of craters volcanically embayed or modified by deformation indicates that volcanic and tectonic activity subsequent to that time has been at much lower levels. An alternative model, in which resurfacing occurs episodically in patches a few hundred kilometers in extent and there is a wider spectrum of surface ages, also appears to be consistent with the characteristics of impact craters on Venus. A number of potential mechanisms for catastrophic resurfacing of Venus have been proposed, ranging from geologically sudden convective destabilization of the global lithosphere to strongly time-dependent heat flux and melt generation in the underlying mantle. In most of these geophysical models, resurfacing occurs implicitly or explicitly by volcanism. We explore the hypothesis that, at least in the geologically recent history of Venus, the primary resurfacing mechanism has been tectonic deformation rather than volcanism. We show how such a hypothesis provides at least as good an explanation of a wide range of observations as do volcanic resurfacing models. Finally, we explore the implications of tectonic resurfacing hypothesis for the controversy over the recent resurfacing history of the planet.

  4. Plate Tectonics: A Paradigm under Threat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, David

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the challenges confronting plate tectonics. Presents evidence that contradicts continental drift, seafloor spreading, and subduction. Reviews problems posed by vertical tectonic movements. (Contains 242 references.) (DDR)

  5. Archean sedimentation and tectonics in southern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidd, W. S. F.

    1984-01-01

    Sequences in the Barberton Mountain Land greenstone belt (southern Africa) were examined to determine the nature of the sedimentary rocks, their tectonic implications, and their bearing on the present large-scale structural condition of the belt. Also assessed was whether there was evidence for a significant component of shallow-water-deposited sedimentary rocks in the parent materials of the Limpopo belt. The nature of a largehigh strain zone on the southern margin of the central Limpopo belt was examined.

  6. Paleoseismological study on stone cultural sites in Gyeongju, SE Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.; Jin, K.; Kim, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The Korean peninsular, located within the Eurasian intracontinental region, is presently considered to be tectonically safe compared with neighboring countries such as Japan and Taiwan. However, historical records for the Gyeongju area, which is an old capital city with many ancient stone buildings, demonstrate that seismic events have significantly affected lives and properties in this town. For example, one reported earthquake in 779 AD had an inferred magnitude of M=6.7 and resulted in the deaths of over a hundred people and the destruction of many buildings. This study examines the affects of paleoseismological events recorded by stone constructions in Gyeongju. The study area contains mostly granite and is located near the junction between the Yangsan and Ulsan faults, which represent two of the major faults in SE Korea. In May of 2007, a statue of Buddha that was previously attached to and carved from a vertical granite cliff was discovered resting on the 45° slope of the Yeolam valley. Based on the artistic style of the granite statue, it was estimated to be during the late 8th century; it has a weight of about 70 tons and dimensions of 250x190x620 cm. Four main joint directions exist in the statue and in granite exposed in the cliff at its original location. These joint sets match if the statue were rotated 15° clockwise back from present position. Another evidence for damages also occurs at ChumSungDae astronomical observatory. One possible cause for these destructions and damages is paleoseismicity in this area.

  7. North Korea: A Geographical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palka, Eugene J., Ed.; Galgano, Francis A., Ed.

    North Korea is a country about the size of the state of New York, inhabited by about 23 million people. It came into existence after the conclusion of World War II following decades of occupation of the Korean Peninsula by the Japanese empire. Dividing the peninsula into North and South Korea was the politically expedient solution to one of the…

  8. Tectonic significance of Currant Creek formation, north-central Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Isby, J.S.; Picard, M.D.

    1984-07-01

    The Currant Creek Formation is composed of conglomerate, sandstone, and fine-grained clastic rocks that crop out along the northwestern margin of the Uinta basin in north-central Utah. Lateral gradations in grain size define proximal, medial, and distal parts of coalescing alluvial-fan deposits that prograded eastward from the active Sevier-Laramide orogenic belt during Maestrichtian through Paleocene (.) time. Paleocurrent directions indicate a dominant southerly transport direction and a minor easterly component. Strong east and southeasterly directions, measured in imbricated clasts and in sand lenses in conglomerate, indicate multiple source areas for the detritus. Source of the coarse-grained detritus in the Currant Creek Formation was the Charleston thrust sheet. Conglomeratic clasts are composed of Precambrian and Cambrian quartzite, chert derived from Cambrian and Mississippian carbonate beds, and Pennsylvanian sandstone. These rocks are exposed in the upper plate of the Charleston thrust near Deer Creek Reservoir, Mount Timpanogos, and Strawberry Reservoir. At Big and Little Cottonwood Canyons, the same rocks are exposed in the lower plate.

  9. Continental tectonics in the aftermath of plate tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Peter

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that the basic tenet of plate tectonics, rigid-body movements of large plates of lithosphere, fails to apply to continental interiors. There, buoyant continental crust can detach from the underlying mantle to form mountain ranges and broad zones of diffuse tectonic activity. The role of crustal blocks and of the detachment of crustal fragments in this process is discussed. Future areas of investigation are addressed.

  10. Jadeitites and Plate Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, George E.; Tsujimori, Tatsuki; Sorensen, Sorena S.

    2015-05-01

    Jadeitite is a relatively rare, very tough rock composed predominantly of jadeite and typically found associated with tectonic blocks of high-pressure/low-temperature metabasaltic rocks (e.g., eclogite, blueschist) in exhumed serpentinite-matrix mélanges. Studies over the past ˜20 years have interpreted jadeitite either as the direct hydrous fluid precipitate from subduction channel dewatering into the overlying mantle wedge or as the metasomatic replacement by such fluids of oceanic plagiogranite, graywacke, or metabasite along the channel margin. Thus, jadeitites directly sample and record fluid transport in the subduction factory and provide a window into this geochemical process that is critical to a major process in the Earth system. They record the remarkable transport of large ion lithophile elements, such as Li, Ba, Sr, and Pb, as well as elements generally considered more refractory, such as U, Th, Zr, and Hf. Jadeitite is also the precious form of jade, utilized since antiquity in the form of tools, adornments, and symbols of prestige.

  11. Salt tectonics on Venus

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, C.A.; Amsbury, D.

    1986-05-01

    The discovery of a surprisingly high deuterium/hydrogen ratio on Venus immediately led to the speculation that Venus may have once had a volume of surface water comparable to that of the terrestrial oceans. The authors propose that the evaporation of this putative ocean may have yielded residual salt deposits that formed various terrain features depicted in Venera 15 and 16 radar images. By analogy with models for the total evaporation of the terrestrial oceans, evaporite deposits on Venus should be at least tens to hundreds of meters thick. From photogeologic evidence and in-situ chemical analyses, it appears that the salt plains were later buried by lava flows. On Earth, salt diapirism leads to the formation of salt domes, anticlines, and elongated salt intrusions - features having dimensions of roughly 1 to 100 km. Due to the rapid erosion of salt by water, surface evaporite landforms are only common in dry regions such as the Zagros Mountains of Iran, where salt plugs and glaciers exist. Venus is far drier than Iran; extruded salt should be preserved, although the high surface temperature (470/sup 0/C) would probably stimulate rapid salt flow. Venus possesses a variety of circular landforms, tens to hundreds of kilometers wide, which could be either megasalt domes or salt intrusions colonizing impact craters. Additionally, arcurate bands seen in the Maxwell area of Venus could be salt intrusions formed in a region of tectonic stress. These large structures may not be salt features; nonetheless, salt features should exist on Venus.

  12. Tectonic Terminology: Some Proposed Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Mason L.

    1978-01-01

    Plate tectonics concepts require a definition of fault, a new term to compliment epeirogeny, and a clarification of transform fault characteristics. This article makes proposals for these changes. (Author/MA)

  13. Tectonics of the central Andes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, Arthur L.; Isacks, Bryan L.; Fielding, Eric J.; Fox, Andrew N.; Gubbels, Timothy L.

    1989-01-01

    Acquisition of nearly complete coverage of Thematic Mapper data for the central Andes between about 15 to 34 degrees S has stimulated a comprehensive and unprecedented study of the interaction of tectonics and climate in a young and actively developing major continental mountain belt. The current state of the synoptic mapping of key physiographic, tectonic, and climatic indicators of the dynamics of the mountain/climate system are briefly reviewed.

  14. Petrologic implications of plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Yoder, H S

    1971-07-30

    Petrologists can make significant contributions to the plate tectonic concept. Fixing the stability fields of the principal rock types involved will provide the limits of pressure and temperature of the various environments. Experimental determination of the partition coefficients of the trace elements will be helpful. Studies of the partial melting behavior of possible parental materials in the absence and presence of water, especially the undersaturated region, will contribute to the understanding of magma production. Experimental observations on the rheological properties of the peridotites below and just above the solidus will lead to a better evaluation of the convective mechanism. Measurement of the fundamental properties of rocks, such as the density of solids and liquids at high pressures and temperatures, would contribute to understanding the concepts of diapiric rise, magma segregation, and the low-velocity zone. Broader rock sampling of the oceanic areas of all environments will do much to define the petrologic provinces. The field petrologist specializing in the Paleozoic regions and Precambrian shields can contribute by examining those regions for old plate boundaries and devising new criteria for their recognition. PMID:17770454

  15. Planetary Geophysics and Tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmentier, E. M.

    1997-01-01

    Research supported by grant NAGW-1928 has addressed a variety of problems related to planetary evolution. One important focus has been on questions related to the role of chemical buoyancy in planetary evolution with application to both Venus and the Moon. We have developed a model for the evolution of the Moon (Hess and Parmentier, 1995) in which dense, highly radioactive, late stage magma ocean cumulates sink forming a core. This core heats the overlying, chemically layered mantle giving rise to a heated, chemically well-mixed layer that thickens with time. This Mixed layer eventually becomes hot enough and thick enough that its top begins to melt at a pressure low enough that melt is buoyant, thus creating mare basalts from a high pressure source of the correct composition and at an appropriate time in lunar evolution. In work completed during the last year, numerical experiments on convection in a chemically stably stratified fluid layer heated from below have been completed. These results show us how to calculate the evolution of a mixed layer in the Moon, depending on the heat production in the ilmenite- cumulate core and the chemical stratification of the overlying mantle. Chemical stratification of the mantle after its initial differentiation is would trap heat in the deep interior and prevent the rapid rise of plumes with accompanying volcanism. This trapping of heat in the interior can explain the thickness of the lunar lithosphere as a function of time as well as the magmatic evolution. We show that heat transported to the base of the lithosphere at a rate determined by current estimates of radioactivity in the Moon would not satisfy constraints on elastic lithosphere thickness from tectonic feature associated with basin loading. Trapping heat at depth by a chemically stratified mantle may also explain the absence of global compressional features on the surface that previous models predict for an initially hot lunar interior. For Venus, we developed a

  16. Planetary Geophysics and Tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuber, Maria

    2005-01-01

    The broad objective of this work is to improve understanding of the internal structures and thermal and stress histories of the solid planets by combining results from analytical and computational modeling, and geophysical data analysis of gravity, topography and tectonic surface structures. During the past year we performed two quite independent studies in the attempt to explain the Mariner 10 magnetic observations of Mercury. In the first we revisited the possibility of crustal remanence by studying the conditions under which one could break symmetry inherent in Runcorn's model of a uniformly magnetized shell to produce a remanent signal with a dipolar form. In the second we applied a thin shell dynamo model to evaluate the range of intensity/structure for which such a planetary configuration can produce a dipole field consistent with Mariner 10 results. In the next full proposal cycle we will: (1) develop numerical and analytical and models of thin shell dynamos to address the possible nature of Mercury s present-day magnetic field and the demise of Mars magnetic field; (2) study the effect of degree-1 mantle convection on a core dynamo as relevant to the early magnetic field of Mars; (3) develop models of how the deep mantles of terrestrial planets are perturbed by large impacts and address the consequences for mantle evolution; (4) study the structure, compensation, state of stress, and viscous relaxation of lunar basins, and address implications for the Moon s state of stress and thermal history by modeling and gravity/topography analysis; and (5) use a three-dimensional viscous relaxation model for a planet with generalized vertical viscosity distribution to study the degree-two components of the Moon's topography and gravity fields to constrain the primordial stress state and spatial heterogeneity of the crust and mantle.

  17. Optimal Planet Properties For Plate Tectonics Through Time And Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamenkovic, Vlada; Seager, Sara

    2014-11-01

    Both the time and the location of planet formation shape a rocky planet’s mass, interior composition and structure, and hence also its tectonic mode. The tectonic mode of a planet can vary between two end-member solutions, plate tectonics and stagnant lid convection, and does significantly impact outgassing and biogeochemical cycles on any rocky planet. Therefore, estimating how the tectonic mode of a planet is affected by a planet’s age, mass, structure, and composition is a major step towards understanding habitability of exoplanets and geophysical false positives to biosignature gases. We connect geophysics to astronomy in order to understand how we could identify and where we could find planet candidates with optimal conditions for plate tectonics. To achieve this goal, we use thermal evolution models, account for the current wide range of uncertainties, and simulate various alien planets. Based on our best model estimates, we predict that the ideal targets for plate tectonics are oxygen-dominated (C/O<1) (solar system like) rocky planets of ~1 Earth mass with surface oceans, large metallic cores super-Mercury, rocky body densities of ~7000kgm-3), and with small mantle concentrations of iron 0%), water 0%), and radiogenic isotopes 10 times less than Earth). Super-Earths, undifferentiated planets, and especially hypothetical carbon planets, speculated to consist of SiC and C, are not optimal for the occurrence of plate tectonics. These results put Earth close to an ideal compositional and structural configuration for plate tectonics. Moreover, the results indicate that plate tectonics might have never existed on planets formed soon after the Big Bang—but instead is favored on planets formed from an evolved interstellar medium enriched in iron but depleted in silicon, oxygen, and especially in Th, K, and U relative to iron. This possibly sets a belated Galactic start for complex Earth-like surface life if plate tectonics significantly impacts the build up

  18. Mimas: Tectonic structure and geologic history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, Steven K.

    1991-01-01

    Mimas, the innermost of the major saturnian satellites, occupies an important place in comparative studies of icy satellites. It is the smallest icy satellite known to have a mostly spherical shape. Smaller icy objects like Hyperion and Puck are generally irregular in shape, while larger ones like Miranda and Enceladus are spherical. Thus Mimas is near the diameter where the combination of increasing surface gravity and internal heating begin to have a significant effect on global structure. The nature and extent of endogenic surface features provide important constraints on the interior structure and history of this transitional body. The major landforms on Mimas are impact craters. Mimas has one of the most heavily cratered surfaces in the solar system. The most prominent single feature on Mimas is Herschel, an unrelaxed complex crater 130 km in diameter. The only other recognized landforms on Mimas are tectonic grooves and lineaments. Groove locations were mapped by Schenk, but without analysis of groove structures or superposition relationships. Mimas' tectonic structures are remapped here in more detail than previously has been done, as part of a general study of tectonic features on icy satellites.

  19. Exploring Active Tectonics in the Dominican Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbó-Gorosabel, A.; Córdoba-Barba, D.; Martín-Dívila, J.; Granja-Bruña, J. L.; Llanes Estrada, P.; Muñoz-Martín, A.; ten Brink, U. S.

    2010-07-01

    The devastating 12 January 2010 Haiti earthquake (M = 7.0), which killed an estimated 230,000 people and caused extensive damage to homes and buildings, drew attention to the crucial need for improved knowledge of the active tectonics of the Caribbean region. But even before this disastrous event, interest in understanding the active and complex northeastern Caribbean plate boundary had been increasing, because this region has experienced significant seismic activity during the past century and has an extensively documented record of historical seismicity and tsunamis. Moreover, this is an easily accessible region in which to study the continuity of seismic faults offshore and to try to understand the transitions between strike-slip and convergent tectonic regimes. Interest in the region has led to several studies that have improved scientists' knowledge of subduction zone tectonics and earthquake and tsunami hazard assessments 005BMann et al., 2002; ten Brink et al., 2006, 2009; Grindlay et al., 2005; Manaker et al., 2008; Granja Bruña et al., 2009; Mondziel et al., 2010].

  20. Recent tectonics of the Eastern Sakhalin Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rukavishnikova, D.

    2014-12-01

    Eastern Sakhalin slope belongs to an active strike-slip boundary between Amur and Okhotsk plates, which is marked by an active tectonics and seismicity. In the east the slope joints to the Okhotsk Sea deep basins. This continental margin has a complex structural geometry formed by the strike-slip tectonics of the active plate boundary and the deep sea basins formation. Geophysical data in this region show a system of the NS, NE and NW-striking faults in the basement that is covered by sediments of 3-5 km thickness. These faults reflect structure of the strike-slip system at the time of its origin. According to focal mechanism solutions the Sakhalin region is characterized by transition from pure strike-slip motion in the north to compression motion in the south, while Okhotsk Sea deep basins had formed by regional extension. The recent tectonic activity and kinematics of those processes along this continental margin are under discussion We present results of many years research of the upper part of sedimentary cover structure. Bathymetry and seismic data was interpreted using geomorphology and structural geology approach. Based on the results of the research we distinguished recent fault system, including NS, north-east and north-west faults with significant vertical offset. According to faults kinematics we suggest that this system is formed as a surface manifestation of the recent displacement along deep-seated strike-slip faults. While some of them could be connected to reactivation of the faults originated during the deep-basins formation. Obtained data allows us make suggestions about recent tectonic conditions and lithospheric dynamics In the Eastern Sakhalin slope.

  1. Morning calm, nuclear sunset: South Korea`s atomic option

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, A.D.

    1998-09-01

    US national security strategy sets nuclear nonproliferation as a high priority. However pursuing nonproliferation without regard for important traditional security relationships might yield undesired results. The Republic of Korea (ROK) requires a high degree of confidence in the US security guarantee one that includes an extended nuclear deterrent. The nuclear weapons program that South Korea began and abandoned in the 1970s was prompted by a decrease in confidence in US security commitments. Conciliatory actions taken recently by the United States toward the Democratic Peoples` Republic of Korea (DPRK) to prevent a possible nuclear weapons program may undermine the US-ROK security arrangement that has been in place for decades. This work examines perceived threats to South Korea and the US security commitment to Korea since 1945 to reveal how US nuclear nonproliferation policy affects Seoul`s propensity to develop nuclear weapons. Recommendations are provided for policy makers regarding strengthening of ROK confidence in the US commitment on the peninsula, with particular emphasis on preventing South Korea from pursuing a nuclear arsenal.

  2. Modeling Flood Risk for South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Y.; Li, S.

    2014-12-01

    Catastrophic flood events have caused significant losses for South Korea each year. It is very important to generate high resolution flood return period map for the government and insurance company to evaluate the flood risk. This research was initiated to achieve this goal. A 2000 year spatial distributed stochastical rainfall was generated by analyzing the historical rainfall of South Korea using principle component analysis. A rainfall-runoff model and a routing model were calibrated by driving the model with historical forcing and calibrated against gauge observations. The calibrated model was used to couple with the stochastical forcing to generate 2000 year discharge and runoff. The flood maps with different return periods were generated by numerically solving the shallow water equations using finite volume method on GPUs. The results of this research showed a reasonable flood map in South Korea, compared with the observed data. Further, this research could be used as an important reference for the government and insurance companies for risk management purpose.

  3. Korea's developmental program for superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Gye-Won; Won, Dong-Yeon; Kuk, Il-Hyun; Park, Jong-Chul

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity research in Korea was firstly carried out in the late 70's by a research group in Seoul National University (SNU), who fabricated a small scale superconducting magnetic energy storage system under the financial support from Korea Electric Power Company (KEPCO). But a few researchers were involved in superconductivity research until the oxide high Tc superconductor was discovered by Bednorz and Mueller. After the discovery of YBaCuO superconductor operating above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K)(exp 2), Korean Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) sponsored a special fund for the high Tc superconductivity research to universities and national research institutes by recognizing its importance. Scientists engaged in this project organized 'High Temperature Superconductivity Research Association (HITSRA)' for effective conducting of research. Its major functions are to coordinate research activities on high Tc superconductivity and organize the workshop for active exchange of information. During last seven years the major superconductivity research has been carried out through the coordination of HITSRA. The major parts of the Korea's superconductivity research program were related to high temperature superconductor and only a few groups were carrying out research on conventional superconductor technology, and Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI) have led this research. In this talk, the current status and future plans of superconductivity research in Korea will be reviewed based on the results presented in interim meeting of HITSRA, April 1-2, 1994. Taejeon, as well as the research activity of KAERI.

  4. Tectonics of the Easter plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engeln, J. F.; Stein, S.

    1984-01-01

    A new model for the Easter plate is presented in which rift propagation has resulted in the formation of a rigid plate between the propagating and dying ridges. The distribution of earthquakes, eleven new focal mechanisms, and existing bathymetric and magnetic data are used to describe the tectonics of this area. Both the Easter-Nazca and Easter-Pacific Euler poles are sufficiently close to the Easter plate to cause rapid changes in rates and directions of motion along the boundaries. The east and west boundaries are propagating and dying ridges; the southwest boundary is a slow-spreading ridge and the northern boundary is a complex zone of convergent and transform motion. The Easter plate may reflect the tectonics of rift propagation on a large scale, where rigid plate tectonics requires boundary reorientation. Simple schematic models to illustrate the general features and processes which occur at plates resulting from large-scale rift propagation are used.

  5. Caribbean paleomagnetism and tectonic evolution

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, W.D.

    1985-01-01

    Approximately fifty papers treating diverse aspects of Caribbean paleomagnetism have appeared since Creer's pioneering work in the early 1960s. Apparently anomalous early results were initially attributed to anomalous geomagnetic field behavior, to unusual mineralogic effects in rock magnetism and to complex remagnetizations. Eventually the importance of structural and tectonic influences were recognized in paleomagnetic data of the Caribbean area, as elsewhere. Large tectonic rotation is evident from the unusual paleomagnetic declination found at many Caribbean localities. Latitudinal transport, with its plate motion implications, is more subtly expressed in the paleomagnetic inclination parameter, with its typically large relative variance. A review of Caribbean paleomagnetic data is given to form a basis for composing realistic tectonic models.

  6. Tectonic geomorphology of the northern Upper Rhine Graben, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Gwendolyn; van Balen, Ronald T.

    2007-07-01

    This paper focuses on the northern Upper Rhine Graben (URG), which experienced low tectonic deformation and multiple climate changes during Quaternary times. Recently, human modifications have been high. The paper presents the results of a study into the effects of fault activity on the landscape evolution of the area. The study aims to detect active faults and to determine the last phase of tectonic activity. Information on the long-term tectonic activity is gained from the geological record (drainage system, sediment distributions, fluvial terraces, fault mapping). Previous studies are reviewed and supplemented with new data on tectonic activity. The compilation of all data is presented as a series of paleogeographic maps from Late Miocene to present. It is demonstrated that differential uplift of the western margin of the northern URG had significant impact on the drainage system, the formation of fluvial terraces and the landscape of the western graben shoulder. In a second part of the paper, the imprint of tectonics on the present-day landscape is investigated at the regional scale in order to determine the location of fault scarps and tectonically influenced parts of the drainage system. This study uses an integrated analysis of topography, drainage patterns and fault network. The comparison of features suggests a structural control by numerous NNE- and NNW-oriented intra-graben faults on the flow directions of streams in the Rhine Valley. Several scarps in the Rhine Valley are identified and interpreted to result from intra-graben faulting activity, which in turn controlled fluvial dissection. The third part of the paper presents quantitative measurements of the present-day landscape shape. Calculations of geomorphic indices are used to determine the balance between erosional and tectonic processes and to identify active fault segments. The mountain-front sinuosity and valley shape indices measured along the border faults and in the footwall area are used to

  7. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-24

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4 billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3 billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1 billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates. PMID:24717430

  8. Venus magmatic and tectonic evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. J.; Hansen, V. L.

    1993-01-01

    Two years beyond the initial mapping by the Magellan spacecraft, hypotheses for the magmatic and tectonic evolution of Venus have become refined and focused. We present our view of these processes, attempting to synthesize aspects of a model for the tectonic and magmatic behavior of the planet. The ideas presented should be taken collectively as an hypothesis subject to further testing. The quintessence of our model is that shear and buoyancy forces in the upper boundary layer of mantle convection give rise to a spatially and temporally complex pattern of strain in a one-plate Venusian lithosphere and modulate the timing and occurrence of magmatism on a global basis.

  9. Dating tectonic structures on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, L.; Massironi, M.; Marchi, S.; Cremonese, G.

    2012-09-01

    Mercury surface appears to be interested by several tectonic structures, the most interesting ones being numerous lobate scarps formed mainly thanks to planet cooling and contraction. The Messenger cameras (MDIS WAC and NAC) allowed us to map several structures not previously detected. Among these a 250 km-long thrust has been detected crossing a peak ring basin. The region encircled within the inner ring of the basin is covered by a smooth plain with evidence of a sin-deformational emplacement. Dating this smooth plain with crater counting technique allowed us to give an age constrain of the tectonic structure.

  10. Korea Research Reactor -1 & 2 Decommissioning Project in Korea

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S. K.; Chung, U. S.; Jung, K. J.; Park, J. H.

    2003-02-24

    Korea Research Reactor 1 (KRR-1), the first research reactor in Korea, has been operated since 1962, and the second one, Korea Research Reactor 2 (KRR-2) since 1972. The operation of both of them was phased out in 1995 due to their lifetime and operation of the new and more powerful research reactor, HANARO (High-flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor; 30MW). Both are TRIGA Pool type reactors in which the cores are small self-contained units sitting in tanks filled with cooling water. The KRR-1 is a TRIGA Mark II, which could operate at a level of up to 250 kW. The second one, the KRR-2 is a TRIGA Mark III, which could operate at a level of up 2,000 kW. The decontamination and decommissioning (D & D) project of these two research reactors, the first D & D project in Korea, was started in January 1997 and will be completed to stage 3 by 2008. The aim of this decommissioning program is to decommission the KRR-1 & 2 reactors and to decontaminate the residual building structure s and the site to release them as unrestricted areas. KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) submitted the decommissioning plan and the environmental impact assessment reports to the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) for the license in December 1998, and was approved in November 2000.

  11. Occupational diseases in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seong-Kyu; Kim, Eun A

    2010-12-01

    Korea has industrialized since the 1970s. Pneumoconiosis in coal miners was the most common occupational disease in the 1970s to 1980s. With the industrialization, the use of many chemicals have increased since the 1970s. As a consequence, there were outbreaks of occupational diseases caused by poisonous chemicals, such as heavy metal poisoning, solvent poisoning and occupational asthma in the late 1980s and early 1990s with civil movement for democracy. Many actions have been taken for prevention by the government, employers and employees or unions. In the 1990s most chemical related diseases and pneumoconiosis have rapidly decreased due to improving work environment. In the late 1990s, cerebro-cardiovascular diseases related to job stress or work overloads have abruptly increased especially after the economic crisis in 1998. After the year 2000, musculoskeletal disorders became a major problem especially in assembly lines in the manufacturing industry and they were expanded to the service industry. Mental diseases related to job stress have increased. Infectious diseases increased in health care workers and afforestation workers. Occupational cancers are increasing because of their long latency, although the use of carcinogenic substances are reduced, limited, and even banned. PMID:21258589

  12. Occupational Diseases in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun A

    2010-01-01

    Korea has industrialized since the 1970s. Pneumoconiosis in coal miners was the most common occupational disease in the 1970s to 1980s. With the industrialization, the use of many chemicals have increased since the 1970s. As a consequence, there were outbreaks of occupational diseases caused by poisonous chemicals, such as heavy metal poisoning, solvent poisoning and occupational asthma in the late 1980s and early 1990s with civil movement for democracy. Many actions have been taken for prevention by the government, employers and employees or unions. In the 1990s most chemical related diseases and pneumoconiosis have rapidly decreased due to improving work environment. In the late 1990s, cerebro-cardiovascular diseases related to job stress or work overloads have abruptly increased especially after the economic crisis in 1998. After the year 2000, musculoskeletal disorders became a major problem especially in assembly lines in the manufacturing industry and they were expanded to the service industry. Mental diseases related to job stress have increased. Infectious diseases increased in health care workers and afforestation workers. Occupational cancers are increasing because of their long latency, although the use of carcinogenic substances are reduced, limited, and even banned. PMID:21258589

  13. Dust Obscures Korea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The dust cloud over eastern Asia was so thick on March 21, 2002, that the Korean Peninsula completely disappeared from view in this Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) image of the region. Parts of South Korea report that visibility at the surface is less than 50 m (165 feet). Airports throughout the region canceled flights due to the poor visibility. Eyewitnesses in China report that the dust was so thick in Beijing at times that visibility was limited to 100 m (330 feet), while in parts of the Gansu Province visibility was reported at less than 10 m (33 feet). Chinese officials say this is the worst dust storm to hit in more than 10 years. Dust from an earlier event still colors the air to the east of Japan. (The island of Honshu is just peeking out from under the cloud cover in these images.) Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  14. Development of a research-based hospital model in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ganglip

    2012-05-01

    Noting the increasing public attention on healthcare, Korean society has shown greater attention to the significance of the health technology (HT) development. In order to promote HT competitiveness, the role of research-based hospitals (RBHs), in producing new ideas as well as utilizing final outcomes, has grown increasingly significant. Despite high quality healthcare professionals, state-of-the-art equipment, and well-developed information technology, few hospitals in Korea are successful leaders in HT development. In order to understand HT research and development (R&D) programs in Korea as well as hospital-based R&D investment performance, this paper has analyzed a recent three-year R&D investment of the Korean government. In addition, a survey on how to promote RBHs in Korea has been proceeded through adopting the Delphi method. Several model cases of RBHs abroad have also been studied to understand key success factors in formulating a development model of RBHs in Korea. This paper proposes suggestions for the promotion of RBHs in Korea: systematic reform related to the hospitals, reinforcement of the infrastructure of the hospitals, empowering human resources and policy framework to support the hospitals. PMID:22661874

  15. Successful control of lymphatic filariasis in the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Cheun, Hyeng-Il; Kong, Yoon; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Lee, Jong-Soo; Chai, Jong-Yil; Lee, Joo-Shil; Lee, Jong-Koo; Kim, Tong-Soo

    2009-12-01

    A successful experience of lymphatic filariasis control in the Republic of Korea is briefly reviewed. Filariasis in the Republic of Korea was exclusively caused by infection with Brugia malayi. Over the past several decades from the 1950s to 2006, many investigators exerted their efforts to detection, treatment, and follow-up of filariasis patients in endemic areas, and to control filariasis. Mass, combined with selective, treatments with diethylcarbamazine to microfilaria positive persons had been made them free from microfilaremia and contributed to significant decrease of the microfilarial density in previously endemic areas. Significant decrease of microfilaria positive cases in an area influenced eventually to the endemicity of filariasis in the relevant locality. Together with remarkable economic growth followed by improvement of environmental and personal hygiene and living standards, the factors stated above have contributed to blocking the transmission cycle of B. malayi and led to disappearance of this mosquito-borne ancient disease in the Republic of Korea. PMID:19967079

  16. Seismology: tectonic strain in plate interiors?

    PubMed

    Calais, E; Mattioli, G; DeMets, C; Nocquet, J-M; Stein, S; Newman, A; Rydelek, P

    2005-12-15

    It is not fully understood how or why the inner areas of tectonic plates deform, leading to large, although infrequent, earthquakes. Smalley et al. offer a potential breakthrough by suggesting that surface deformation in the central United States accumulates at rates comparable to those across plate boundaries. However, we find no statistically significant deformation in three independent analyses of the data set used by Smalley et al., and conclude therefore that only the upper bounds of magnitude and repeat time for large earthquakes can be inferred at present. PMID:16355163

  17. Statistical description of tectonic motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, Duncan Carr

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes investigations regarding tectonic motions. The topics discussed include statistics of crustal deformation, Earth rotation studies, using multitaper spectrum analysis techniques applied to both space-geodetic data and conventional astrometric estimates of the Earth's polar motion, and the development, design, and installation of high-stability geodetic monuments for use with the global positioning system.

  18. Petroleum occurrences and plate tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Olenin, V.B.; Sokolov, B.A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper analyzes the mechanisms of petroleum formation and petroleum accumulation proposed in recent years by some Russian and foreign investigators from the viewpoint of the new global or plate tectonics. On the basis of discussion and the facts, the authors conclude that the mechanisms proposed are in contradiction to reality and their use in practical application is at least premature.

  19. The tectonics of icy satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murchie, S. L.

    The formation of tectonic structures on icy satellites may have resulted from one or more of several geologic processes: global volume change due to internal temperature change, H2O-ice phase changes, or ice-silicate differentiation; mantle convection driven by thermal or compositional heterogeneities; tidal deformation; and impact-related processes including formation of fracture systems, seismic disruption of areas antipodal to impact sites, basin collapse, and global reorientation. Observed tectonic structures and their associated volcanic deposits are classified herein into six basic assemblages: (1) pervasive troughs and scarps occurring at globally coherent orientations; (2) throughgoing troughs and bands of troughs, generally associated with volcanic materials; (3) linear to curvilinear ridges; (4) volcanically modified systems of concentric and radial scarps and furrows; (5) regional volcanic and tectonic centers; and (6) grooved terrain intimately associated with light-colored volcanic deposits. Comparison of these assemblages with predicted manifestations of different geologic processes may lead to some understanding of the relationship of volcanic and tectonic features to the endogenic and exogenic processes that have affected icy satellites.

  20. Plate tectonics conserves angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowin, C.

    2009-03-01

    A new combined understanding of plate tectonics, Earth internal structure, and the role of impulse in deformation of the Earth's crust is presented. Plate accelerations and decelerations have been revealed by iterative filtering of the quaternion history for the Euler poles that define absolute plate motion history for the past 68 million years, and provide an unprecedented precision for plate angular rotation variations with time at 2-million year intervals. Stage poles represent the angular rotation of a plate's motion between adjacent Euler poles, and from which the maximum velocity vector for a plate can be determined. The consistent maximum velocity variations, in turn, yield consistent estimates of plate accelerations and decelerations. The fact that the Pacific plate was shown to accelerate and decelerate, implied that conservation of plate tectonic angular momentum must be globally conserved, and that is confirmed by the results shown here (total angular momentum ~1.4 E+27 kgm2s-1). Accordingly, if a plate decelerates, other plates must increase their angular momentums to compensate. In addition, the azimuth of the maximum velocity vectors yields clues as to why the "bend" in the Emperor-Hawaiian seamount trend occurred near 46 Myr. This report summarizes processing results for 12 of the 14 major tectonic plates of the Earth (except for the Juan de Fuca and Philippine plates). Plate accelerations support the contention that plate tectonics is a product of torques that most likely are sustained by the sinking of positive density anomalies due to phase changes in subducted gabbroic lithosphere at depth in the upper lower mantle (above 1200 km depth). The tectonic plates are pulled along by the sinking of these positive mass anomalies, rather than moving at near constant velocity on the crests of convection cells driven by rising heat. These results imply that spreading centers are primarily passive reactive features, and fracture zones (and wedge-shaped sites

  1. 78 FR 66785 - Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., and Korea Electric Power Corporation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... COMMISSION Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., and Korea Electric Power Corporation AGENCY: Nuclear... APR1400 Standard Plant Design submitted by Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. (KHNP) and Korea... documents at the NRC's PDR, Room O1-F21, One White Flint North, 11555 Rockville Pike, Rockville,...

  2. Incorporation of New and Old Tectonics Concepts Into a Modern Course in Tectonics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Robert D., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a graduate-level tectonics course which includes the historical basis for modern tectonics concepts and an in-depth review of pros/cons of plate tectonics. Tectonic features discussed include: ocean basins; volcanic arcs; continental margins; continents; orogenic belts; foreland fold and thrust belts; volcanic/plutonic belts of orogens;…

  3. Special Education in South Korea: Daegu University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Byung Ha; Rhee, Kun Yong; Burns, Carol; Lerner, Janet W.

    2009-01-01

    Daegu University has enjoyed a long and remarkable history of special education. Daegu University is large University located in Daegu, South Korea, a large city in South Korea that is south of Seoul. Since the 1970's, South Korea has achieved unusual and comprehensive growth in its economy, and the field of special education continued to thrive…

  4. Health impact assessment in Korea

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Eunjeong; Lee, Youngsoo; Harris, Patrick; Koh, Kwangwook; Kim, Keonyeop

    2011-07-15

    Recently, Health Impact Assessment has gained great attention in Korea. First, the Ministry of Environment introduced HIA within existing Environment Impact Assessment. Second, the Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs began an HIA program in 2008 in alliance with Healthy Cities. In this short report, these two different efforts are introduced and their opportunities and challenges discussed. We believe these two approaches complement each other and both need to be strengthened. We also believe that both can contribute to the development of health in policy and project development and ultimately to improvements in the Korean population's health.

  5. Mobilization of evaporites in tectonically active terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiros, Stathis C.

    2015-04-01

    The role of evaporites, mostly halite, during seismic sequences is investigated using evidence from certain earthquakes with magnitude between approximately 6.0 and 7.2 which occurred in the last 60 years in the Zagros Mts. (Iran) and the Ionian Sea (Greece); i.e. two seismically active areas, characterized by evaporite-associated decollements and more shallow decollements combined with mature, along-thrusts intrusions. Studied earthquakes produced either large scale surface deformation, or were covered by high-resolution and accuracy GPS and INSAR data, permitting to fully recognize the deformation pattern. In all cases an "atypical", tectonic deformation pattern was observed, ranging from apparently "impossible" patterns (thrust and normal faults, sub-parallel and homothetic; 1953 Cephalonia earthquake, Greece) to rather diffuse tectonic patterns, even to "phantom" earthquakes (Zagros). Careful analysis and modeling of the surface deformation data, in combination with the available geological, geophysical and seismological data permits to recognize, and even to quantify differences between deformation observed, and that expected in ordinary environments. In particular, it was found that during earthquakes evaporites were mobilized, and this led either to a secondary deformation of the overburden, fully detached from the basement, or to significant aseismic (post-seismic) deformation. Anomalies in the distribution of seismic intensities due to evaporitic intrusions along faults were also observed. Apart from seismological implications (unpredictable post-seismic deformation, possibly also in the far-field), these results deriving from regions at different levels of evaporitic evolution, may prove useful to understand patterns of mobilization of evaporites during periods of tectonic activity.

  6. Planets and satellites: tectonic twins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2015-10-01

    There are only three solid planet-satellite pairs in the Solar system: Earth -Moon, Mars -Phobos, Pluto - Charon. For the first two pairs tectonic analogies were shown and explained by moving them in one circumsolar orbit. As it is known from the wave planetology [3, 4, 6], "orbits make structures". For the third pair the same was stated as a prediction based on this fundamental rule. Global tectonic forms of wave origin appear in cosmic bodies because they move in keplerian orbits with periodically changing accelerations. Warping bodies waves have a stationary character and obeying wave harmonics lengths. Starting from the fundamental 2πR-long wave 1 making the ubiquitous tectonic dichotomy (two-face appearance) warping wave lengths descend along harmonics. Very prominent along with the wave 1 are waves 2 responsible for tectonic sectoring superimposed on the wave 1 segments. Practically all bodies have traces of shorter waves making numerous polygons (rings) often confused with impact craters. Earth and the Moon moving in one circumsolar orbit both are distorted by wave 1, wave 2 and wave 4 features aligned along extent tectonic lines [4, 5]. At Earth they are: Pacific Ocean (2πR-structure) and Indian Ocean (πR-structure) from both ends with Malay Archipelago (πR/4-structure) in the middle. At Moon they are: Procellarum Ocean (2πR) and SPA Basin (πR) from ends and Mare Orientale (πR/4) in the middle. A regular disposition is surprising. Both Oceans and Basin occur on opposite hemispheres, lying in the middle both ring structures occur in the boundary between two hemispheres and are of the same relative size. These triads stretch along lines parallel to the equator (Earth) and with the angle about 30 degrees to it (Moon) indicating at a different orientation of the rotation axes in the ancient time [2]. On the whole, one could speak about a "lunar mould" of Earth [5] (Fig. 1-3). Another tectonic twin is the pair Mars -Phobos. Both bodies sharing one

  7. Sedimentation and tectonics in the southern Bida Basin, Nigeria: depositional response to varying tectonic context

    SciTech Connect

    Braide, S.P. )

    1990-05-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Bida basin of central Nigeria is sandwiched between the Precambrian schist belts of the Northern Nigerian massif and the West African craton. Of interest is the southern part of the basin, which developed in continental settings, because the facies architecture of the sedimentary fill suggests a close relation between sedimentation dynamics and basin margin tectonics. This relationship is significant to an understanding of the basin's origin, which has been controversial. A simple sag and rift origin has been suggested, and consequently dominated the negative thinking on the hydrocarbon prospects of the basin which were considered poor. This detailed study of the facies indicates rapid basin-wide changes from various alluvial fan facies through flood-basin and deltaic facies to lacustrine facies. Paleogeographic reconstruction suggests lacustrine environments were widespread and elongate. Lacustrine environments occurred at the basin's axis and close to the margins. This suggests the depocenter must have migrated during the basin's depositional history and subsided rapidly to accommodate the 3.5-km-thick sedimentary fill. Although distinguishing pull-apart basins from rift basins, based solely on sedimentologic grounds, may be difficult, the temporal migration of the depocenter, as well as the basin architecture of upward coarsening cyclicity, show a strong tectonic and structural overprint that suggests a tectonic framework for the Southern Bida basin similar in origin to a pull-apart basin.

  8. Late Palaeozoic to early Mesozoic geodynamic evolution of the Circum-Pacific orogenic belt in South Korea and Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cluzel, Dominique

    1992-02-01

    A review of the overall features of the late Palaeozoic-early Mesozoic orogen of Southwest Japan and its Korean hinterland allows a new geodynamic model for the building of the east Asian margin to be proposed. During middle Carboniferous to early Permian times, an oceanic basin formed in a passive margin environment at a moderate spreading rate as the Honshu continental block drifted away from the Sino-Korean continent. During that period, paralic platform conditions and extensional synsedimentary tectonics prevailed in Korea. In middle Permian times, the closure of the oceanic area was responsible for Yakuno ophiolite obduction and high pressure metamorphism while highly subsiding coal basins developed in the emerged Korean hinterland. Thereafter, in late Permian times, when the Honshu block collided with the Asian margin (Akiyoshi orogeny), locally derived terrestrial clastic sedimentation in Korea has succeeded coal measure deposition with local unconformity. In early Triassic times, the collision was completed and regional uplift of the thickened crust resulted in the deposition of thick distal siliciclastic rocks in rapidly subsiding hinterland troughs (Korea) and flyschoid deposition in the Tamba foreland basin (outer zone of Southwest Japan). Middle to late Triassic medium- to low-pressure metamorphism, large-scale transcurrent tectonics and associated calc-alkaline synkinematic plutonism in the Hida and Ogcheon belts represent a post-collisional feature of the Akiyoshi orogenic event. Post-tectonic intrusives and terrestrial deposits post-date intracratonic tectonics at ca. 200 Ma. Thus, the Akiyoshi orogeny of Southwest Japan is a result of continental drift and ensuing collisional rewelding of a fragment of Sino-Korea: the Honshu microcontinent.

  9. Complaining Behavior of Academic Library Users in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Dong-Geun

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the influences of the antecedent factors on the complaints and resulting behaviors of 582 university library users in South Korea. There were statistically significant relationships between personal norms and negative word of mouth and indirect voice behaviors, between service importance and negative word-of-mouth behavior,…

  10. Shock: South Korea wins Battle of nuclear titans

    SciTech Connect

    2010-03-15

    A South Korean consortium won the contract to build and operate four nuclear power plants in Abu Dhabi valued at $20.4 billion. The deal was significant since it is the first major nuclear contract of its kind awarded in the rapidly growing Persian Gulf region, and signals the rise of Korea as an exporter of nuclear know-how.

  11. Tectonic Extension and Bulging in Southern Alba Patera Region, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baioni, D.; Borraccini, F.; Lanci, L.; Wezel, F. C.

    2004-12-01

    We investigated the Alba Patera area, south of the Alba Patera Volcano, in order to obtain quantitative information on the tectonic extension affecting this area. Tectonic structures of Alba Patera area have been previously described using Viking images and interpreted as extensional structures. Digital Elevation Model made using altimetry data (MOLA) can be used to quantitatively investigate these structures with a better resolution. We proceeded by constructing E-W oriented profiles and used techniques commonly employed in Structural Geology to estimate the tectonic extension. We investigated the presence of mechanical discontinuities by calculating the maximum depths reached by the graben structures. This has been estimated using the lost-area balancing method (Groshong, 1996) and the crossing depth of the border faults assuming planar fault surfaces, which gave similar results. The extension calculated in the studied area (up to 12%) cannot be explained only with the observed doming of the topographic surface and require a significant amount of horizontal stretching.

  12. Tharsis block tectonics on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raitala, Jouko T.

    1988-01-01

    The concept of block tectonics provides a framework for understanding many aspects of Tharsis and adjoining structures. This Tharsis block tectonics on Mars is manifested partly by mantle-related doming and partly by response to loading by subsequent volcanic construction. Although the origin of the volcanism from beneath Tharsis is a subject of controversy explanations have to include inhomogeneities in Martian internal structure, energy distribution, magma accumulation and motion below the lithosphere. Thermal convection can be seen as a necessary consequence for transient initial phase of Martian cooling. This produced part of the elevated topography with tensional stresses and graben systems radial to the main bulge. The linear grabens, radial to the Tharsis center, can be interpreted to indicate rift zones that define the crustal block boundaries. The load-induced stresses may then have contributed on further graben and ridge formation over an extended period of time.

  13. Global tectonics and space geodesy.

    PubMed

    Gordon, R G; Stein, S

    1992-04-17

    Much of the success of plate tectonics can be attributed to the near rigidity of tectonic plates and the availability of data that describe the rates and directions of motion across narrow plate boundaries \\m=~\\1 to 60 kilometers wide. Nonetheless, many plate boundaries in both continental and oceanic lithosphere are not narrow but are hundreds to thousands of kilometers wide. Wide plate boundary zones cover \\m=~\\15 percent of Earth's surface area. Space geodesy, which includes very long baseline radio interferometry, satellite laser ranging, and the global positioning system, is providing the accurate long-distance measurements needed to estimate the present motion across and within wide plate boundary zones. Space geodetic data show that plate velocities averaged over years are remarkably similar to velocities averaged over millions of years. PMID:17743109

  14. Global tectonics and space geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Richard G.; Stein, Seth

    1992-01-01

    Much of the success of plate tectonics can be attributed to the near rigidity of tectonic plates and the availability of data that describe the rates and directions of motion across narrow plate boundaries of about 1 to 60 kilometers. Nonetheless, many plate boundaries in both continental and oceanic lithosphere are not narrow but are hundreds to thousands of kilometers wide. Wide plate boundary zones cover approximately 15 percent of earth's surface area. Space geodesy, which includes very long baseline radio interferometry, satellite laser ranging, and the global positioning system, provides the accurate long-distance measurements needed to estimate the present motion across and within wide plate boundary zones. Space geodetic data show that plate velocities averaged over years are remarkably similar to velocities avaraged over millions of years.

  15. Tectonics and composition of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    The uncompressed density of Venus is a few percent less than the Earth. The high upper mantle temperature of Venus deepens the eclogite stability field and inserts a partial melt field. A thick basaltic crust is therefore likely. The anomalous density of Venus relative to the progression from Mercury to Mars may therefore have a tectonic rather than a cosmo-chemical explanation. There may be no need to invoke differences in composition or oxidization state.

  16. Rural Development in South Korea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Vincent S. R.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews development in rural areas of South Korea since the late nineteenth century, with particular emphasis on rural to urban migration, governmental investment in agriculture, transportation and mass communications, development projects, social leveling processes, upgraded living standards, and cooperative village improvement projects. Journal…

  17. Yahak Movement in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Son, Sik

    2004-01-01

    "Yahak" means "night school" in Korean and its history can be traced back to the 1920s when Korea was under Japanese colonial rule. This paper will focus on the yahak movement during the years from 1960 to the 1990s. Yahak played an important role in raising workers' consciousness during this democratic movement. Yahak started as a movement trying…

  18. Democratic Citizenship Education in Korea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eoh, Myung-Ha

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the importance of democratic citizenship education in Korea. Highlights the forces enhancing democratic citizenship education especially the role of the nongovernmental organizations and the Korean Educational Developmental Institute. Considers the various forces inhibiting democratic citizenship education, such as corruption in the…

  19. Fuel Safety Activities in Korea

    SciTech Connect

    Auh, Geun-Sun; Shin, A.D.; Lee, J.S.; Woo, S.W.; Ryu, Y.H.; Kim, Jun-Hwan; Kim, S.K.; Jeong, Y.H.

    2007-07-01

    The current regulatory requirements for fuel performance were based on earlier test data of fresh or low burnup Zircaloy fuels of less than 40 GWD/MTU. Most countries have not changed the current regulatory requirements even if they are actively investigating the high burnup and new cladding alloy effects. Korea agrees with commonly accepted international consensus that although there are technical issues requiring resolutions, these issues do not constitute immediate safety concerns. The high burnup fuel reactor performance experiences of Korea do not show any major problems even if there have been some burnup related fuel failures which are described in the paper. KINS has recommended the industry to have lower fuel failure rates than 1-2 per 50,000 fuel rods. A research project of High Burnup Fuel Safety Tests and Evaluations has started in 2002 under a joint cooperation of KAERI/KNFC/KEPRI and KINS to obtain performance results of high burnup fuel and to develop evaluation technologies of high burnup fuel safety issues. From 1998, KINS has closely monitored and actively participated in international activities such as OECD/NEA CABRI Water Loop Program to reflect on regulatory requirements if needed. KINS will closely monitor the high burnup fuel performances of Korea to strength the regulatory activities if needed. The research activities in Korea including of LOCA and RIA being performed at KAERI with active supports of the industry are summarized in the paper. (authors)

  20. Inclusive Education in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yong-Wook

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the current implementation of inclusive education in South Korea and discuss its challenges. The history of special education is first described followed by an introduction to policies relevant to special and inclusive education. Next, a critical discussion of the state of inclusive education follows built…

  1. Biobank Regulation in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Bok

    2016-06-01

    Like many other countries, South Korea has recognized the importance of biobanks as a tool for medical research and has engaged in two very important tasks to foster biobanking infrastructure: funding biobanks and setting up rules to protect the integrity of biobanks that share potentially sensitive personal information. PMID:27338609

  2. Episodic plate tectonics on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, Donald

    1992-01-01

    Studies of impact craters on Venus from the Magellan images have placed important constraints on surface volcanism. Some 840 impact craters have been identified with diameters ranging from 2 to 280 km. Correlations of this impact flux with craters on the Moon, Earth, and Mars indicate a mean surface age of 0.5 +/- 0.3 Ga. Another important observation is that 52 percent of the craters are slightly fractured and only 4.5 percent are embayed by lava flows. These observations led researchers to hypothesize that a pervasive resurfacing event occurred about 500 m.y. ago and that relatively little surface volcanism has occurred since. Other researchers have pointed out that a global resurfacing event that ceased about 500 MYBP is consistent with the results given by a recent study. These authors carried out a series of numerical calculations of mantle convection in Venus yielding thermal evolution results. Their model considered crustal recycling and gave rapid planetary cooling. They, in fact, suggested that prior to 500 MYBP plate tectonics was active in Venus and since 500 MYBP the lithosphere has stabilized and only hot-spot volcanism has reached the surface. We propose an alternative hypothesis for the inferred cessation of surface volcanism on Venus. We hypothesize that plate tectonics on Venus is episodic. Periods of rapid plate tectonics result in high rates of subduction that cool the interior resulting in more sluggish mantle convection.

  3. Viscoelastic Membrane Tectonics on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuthe, M.; Rivoldini, A.

    2014-12-01

    The surface of Europa is crisscrossed by tectonic features generally attributed to time-dependent tidal deformations. For a long time, the membrane theory of elastic shells (thin shell or flattening model) has been popular to predict tidal tectonic patterns because it provides simple analytical formulas for tidal stresses. More recently, the theory of viscoelastic-gravitational deformations (or thick shell model) was applied to tidal tectonics so as to include viscoelastic effects. This method, however, is not transparent to the user and relies on numerical algorithms that are not always publicly available or fully benchmarked. As an alternative, we propose here to extend membrane theory to viscoelastic shells with depth-dependent rheology. Viscoelasticity is taken into account by replacing elastic constants with effective viscoelastic parameters that are easily computed for a given rheology. The membrane approach thus leads to simple formulas for viscoelastic tidal stresses. Because of its formulation in terms of tidal Love numbers, the membrane approach has clear relationships with both thin and thick shell models. Benchmarking with the thick-shell software SatStress leads to the discovery of an error in that code that changes stress components by up to 40%. As an application, we show that different stress-free states account for the conflicting predictions of thin and thick shell models about the magnitude of tensile stresses due to nonsynchronous rotation.

  4. Korea Earth Observation Satellite Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Myung-Jin; Kim, Zeen-Chul

    via Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) as the prime contractor in the area of Korea earth observation satellite program to enhance Korea's space program development capability. In this paper, Korea's on-going and future earth observation satellite programs are introduced: KOMPSAT- 1 (Korea Multi Purpose Satellite-1), KOMPSAT-2 and Communication, Broadcasting and Meteorological Satellite (CBMS) program. KOMPSAT-1 satellite successfully launched in December 1999 with Taurus launch vehicle. Since launch, KOMPSAT-1 is downlinking images of Korea Peninsular every day. Until now, KOMPSAT-1 has been operated more than 2 and half years without any major hardware malfunction for the mission operation. KOMPSAT-1 payload has 6.6m panchromatic spatial resolution at 685 km on-orbit and the spacecraft bus had NASA TOMS-EP (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer-Earth Probe) spacecraft bus heritage designed and built by TRW, U.S.A.KOMPSAT-1 program was international co-development program between KARI and TRW funded by Korean Government. be launched in 2004. Main mission objective is to provide geo-information products based on the multi-spectral high resolution sensor called Multi-Spectral Camera (MSC) which will provide 1m panchromatic and 4m multi-spectral high resolution images. ELOP of Israel is the prime contractor of the MSC payload system and KARI is the total system prime contractor including spacecraft bus development and ground segment. KARI also has the contract with Astrium of Europe for the purpose of technical consultation and hardware procurement. Based on the experience throughout KOMPSAT-1 and KOMPSAT-2 space system development, Korea is expecting to establish the infrastructure of developing satellite system. Currently, KOMPSAT-2 program is in the critical design stage. are scheduled to launch in 2008 and in 2014, respectively. The mission of CBMS consists of two areas. One is of space technology test for the communications mission, and the other is of a real

  5. An Early, Transient, Impact-driven Tectonic Regime in the Hadean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, C.; Marchi, S.; Zhang, S.

    2015-12-01

    The earliest preserved crust formed in a tectonic regime that different from present in several significant ways. Earth was still losing a significant fraction of its primordial heat, and heat production was declining more rapidly than in any period subsequently. Additionally, a waning impact flux provided an important thermal - and mechanical - forcing on the early Earth. These factors affect tectonics in a number of ways - internal velocities are faster, and internal viscosities lower due to hotter internal temperatures. Previous modelling of the tectonic evolution of the Earth under these conditions suggests that the early Earth may have exhibited periods of hot stagnant-lid convection - where vigorous internal convection - and volcanic activity - occurred under a tectonically quiescent lid. As the Earth cooled the planet would have transited into an episodic regime - characterised by periods of tectonic quiescence interspersed by extreme tectonic activity. Such scenarios explain a number of facets of the early Earth, including its observed slow mixing rates, inefficient cooling, and its paleomagnetic and tectonic history. Here we expand these models to incorporate the effects of major impacts. We find tectonic forcing due to impacts to be a major dynamic driver during the Hadean, with major return flow driving horizontal surface deformation, and transient subduction events. Such events may be reflected in the Hadean zircon record. Post this impact-dominated phase, models suggest an over-heated Earth may have then experienced a long phase of stagnant-lid convection, lasting till the meso-Archaean.

  6. Tectonic structure of East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leychenkov, German; Grikurov, Garrik; Golynsky, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    First overviews of tectonic structure of the Southern Continent were made by the pioneers of Antarctic earth science investigations almost 100 years ago. Despite rapidly advancing international geological studies under the Antarctic Treaty, the presentations of Antarctic tectonic structure remained largely speculative until the end of the past century when implementation of modern analytical and remote-sensing research technologies enabled compilation of more credible tectonic models of Antarctica. The East Antarctic bedrock consists mainly of the Precambrian crystalline complexes and the Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic platform units. Crystalline Shield is locally complicated by Neoproterozoic aulacogenes and Late Paleozoic to Mesozoic rifts. Shield assemblages reliably recognized in coastal outcrops indicate the predominant occurrence of Archean cratonic nuclei and Mesoproterozoic mobile belts. The undisturbed platform cover strata are exposed in East Antarctica mainly along its boundary with West Antarctica. Tectonic structure of ice-covered regions (more that 99% of the East Antarctic territory) is interpreted using mostly magnetic and bedrock topography data, but other geophysical and geological information (satellite, airborne and over-ice gravity; seismology; active seismics; erratics; detrital zircons dates; etc.) is also important. Archean cratons are geologically documented in western Dronning Maud Land, Enderby Land, Princess Elizabeth Land and in the southern Prince Charles Mts. Their distribution under the ice is marked by a specific magnetic pattern including low-amplitude mosaic and/or high-amplitude long-wavelength anomalies. The most extensive ancient craton being 1000 km across is believed to extend from the southern Prince Charles Mts. to the Gamburtsev Mts. Mesoproterozoic mobile belts are distinguished by elongated high-amplitude magnetic anomalies and are mapped along the costal area as the zone of 250-600 km wide. The Gamburtsev Mts. area is also

  7. Plate tectonics conserves angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowin, C.

    2010-03-01

    A new combined understanding of plate tectonics, Earth internal structure, and the role of impulse in deformation of the Earth's crust is presented. Plate accelerations and decelerations have been revealed by iterative filtering of the quaternion history for the Euler poles that define absolute plate motion history for the past 68 million years, and provide an unprecedented precision for plate angular rotation variations with time at 2-million year intervals. Stage poles represent the angular rotation of a plate's motion between adjacent Euler poles, and from which the maximum velocity vector for a plate can be determined. The consistent maximum velocity variations, in turn, yield consistent estimates of plate accelerations and decelerations. The fact that the Pacific plate was shown to accelerate and decelerate, implied that conservation of plate tectonic angular momentum must be globally conserved, and that is confirmed by the results shown here (total angular momentum ~1.4+27 kg m2 s-1). Accordingly, if a plate decelerates, other plates must increase their angular momentums to compensate. In addition, the azimuth of the maximum velocity vectors yields clues as to why the "bend" in the Emperor-Hawaiian seamount trend occurred near 46 Myr. This report summarizes processing results for 12 of the 14 major tectonic plates of the Earth (except for the Juan de Fuca and Philippine plates). Plate accelerations support the contention that plate tectonics is a product of torques that most likely are sustained by the sinking of positive density anomalies revealed by geoid anomalies of the degree 4-10 packet of the Earth's spherical harmonic coefficients. These linear positive geoid anomalies underlie plate subduction zones and are presumed due to phase changes in subducted gabbroic lithosphere at depth in the upper lower mantle (above 1200 km depth). The tectonic plates are pulled along by the sinking of these positive mass anomalies, rather than moving at near constant

  8. South Korea's renewed focus on space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Byung-Ho

    2011-10-01

    Nearly 1000 years before European scientists David Fabricius and Galileo Galilei made historic observations of sunspots, royal astronomers in Korea were recording their observations of blemishes on the Sun. Sunspot records appeared as early as 640 C.E. in Korea [Yang et al., 1998], and records with statistically significant populations of data have been available since 1105 C.E. during the Goryeo dynasty (918-1392). The records are quite meticulous. For example, one entry dated 1151 in the annals of the Goryeo dynasty says, "There is a black spot in the sun as large as an egg" (Goryeo-Sa, 1451). At that time, sunspots were categorized according to size: plum, egg, peach, or pear. In Goryeo-Sa, various celestial phenomena such as solar eclipses, comets, novae, meteors, etc., were also recorded. Along with sunspots, aurorae were carefully described in several Korean chronicles, including Goryeo-Sa. Descriptions of aurorae, commonly referred to as "red energy," include their color, shape, motion, and distribution. For example, a description written in 1770 reads, "It spread across the sky like a piece of silk cloth and then dispersed" [Chanjipcheong, 1908; Park, 2008]. Applying a power spectrum analysis technique to all sunspot and aurora records during the Goryeo dynasty, Yang et al. [1998] and Lee et al. [2005] have shown 10.5-year and 97-year cycles for the sunspot records and 10-year and 87-year cycles for the aurora records.

  9. Tectonic characterization of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, John W.; O'Leary, Dennis W.

    1993-01-01

    Tectonic characterization of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is needed to assess seismic and possible volcanic hazards that could affect the site during the preclosure (next 100 years) and the behavior of the hydrologic system during the postclosure (the following 10,000 years) periods. Tectonic characterization is based on assembling mapped geological structures in their chronological order of development and activity, and interpreting their dynamic interrelationships. Addition of mechanistic models and kinematic explanations for the identified tectonic processes provides one or more tectonic models having predictive power. Proper evaluation and application of tectonic models can aid in seismic design and help anticipate probable occurrence of future geologic events of significance to the repository and its design.

  10. Tectonic characterization of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, J.W.; O`Leary, D.W.

    1993-09-01

    Tectonic characterization of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is needed to assess seismic and possible volcanic hazards that could affect the site during the preclosure (next 100 years) and the behavior of the hydrologic system during the postclosure (the following 10,000 years) periods. Tectonic characterization is based on assembling mapped geological structures in their chronological order of development and activity, and interpreting their dynamic interrelationships. Addition of mechanistic models and kinematic explanations for the identified tectonic processes provides one or more tectonic models having predictive power. Proper evaluation and application of tectonic models can aid in seismic design and help anticipate probable occurrence of future geologic events of significance to the repository and its design.

  11. Wrench tectonics in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, M.; Mohamed, A.S.

    1995-08-01

    Recent studies of the geodynamics and tectonic history of the Arabian plate throughout geologic time have revealed that Wrench forces played an important role in the structural generation and deformation of Petroleum basins and reservoirs of the United Arab Emirates. The tectonic analysis of Abu Dhabi revealed that basin facies evolution were controlled by wrench tectonics, examples are the Pre-Cambrian salt basin, the Permo-Triassic and Jurassic basins. In addition, several sedimentary patterns were strongly influenced by wrench tectonics, the Lower Cretaceous Shuaiba platform margin and associated reservoirs is a good example. Wrench faults, difficult to identify by conventional methods, were examined from a regional perspective and through careful observation and assessment of many factors. Subsurface structural mapping and geoseismic cross-sections supported by outcrop studies and geomorphological features revealed a network of strike slip faults in Abu Dhabi. Structural modelling of these wench forces including the use of strain ellipses was applied both on regional and local scales. This effort has helped in reinterpreting some structural settings, some oil fields were interpreted as En Echelon buckle folds associated with NE/SW dextral wrench faults. Several flower structures were interpreted along NW/SE sinistral wrench faults which have significant hydrocarbon potential. Synthetic and Antithetic strike slip faults and associated fracture systems have played a significant role in field development and reservoir management studies. Four field examples were discussed.

  12. Archaean tectonic systems: a naive geochemist's view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyen, Jean-François

    2013-04-01

    depleted or enriched portions; that true subductions were rare; and that the distinction between oceanic plateaux and ridges may have been less significant. Modern granitic rocks are essentially metaluminous (subduction-related), plotting together with mafic "arc" rocks; or peraluminous (collision, plotting near the average continental crust), with rare "mantle-like" rocks plotting near MORBs or OIBs. Again, the Archaean granites show a different picture, with the near absence of peraluminous rocks; a group of low HFSE and HREE granites (the "high pressure" TTGs) that have no modern match; and the near-absence of "within plate" or "oceanic ridge" granites. This points to the absence of large sedimentary accumulations, and the presence of uniquely Archaean petrogenetic processes (high pressure melting of basalts). Collectively, the geochemical evidence suggests an Archaean Earth with somewhat different tectonic systems. In particular, the familiar distinction between collision, arcs, ridges and hotspots seems to blur in the Archaean, where "hybrid" tectonic sites may have existed.

  13. Origin of Small Tectonic Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallard, C.; Coltice, N.; Seton, M.; Müller, D.; Tackley, P.

    2015-12-01

    The plate tectonic theory allowed to split the Earth surface into 6 (Le Pichon 1968) to 52 tectonic plates (Bird 2003). These plates are separated into two groups: the first of 7 large plates and the second of numerous smaller plates (Morra et al 2013). Previous studies using the reconstruction of the past 200 My, suggest that the size of large plates is driven by mantle flow. But the tools employed are descriptive (Morra et al 2013, Sornette and Pisarenko 2003), hence ignoring forces and physical principles within the lithosphere and the mantle. The processes at the origin of small plates remain unknown. We developed a new approach to explain the plate sizes. We demonstrate that the physics of convection drives it. We applied plate tectonics theory on 3D spherical convection models generating plate-like motions, which give access to a complete survey of data: velocities, viscosity and heat flow. Our data show that (1) the large plates depend on the dominating scale of the convective flow due to the initiation or the shutdown of subductions; (2) the smaller plates are generated thanks to large variability of regional stresses along subduction zone by slab pull and suction influenced by the geometry of trenches. Our results are consistent with the quick reorganizations of back-arc basins occuring synchronously with the modification of subduction zones geometry around the Pacific plate (Sdrolias et al 2004). Hence, we conclude that (1) the decreasing number of small plates in the plate reconstructions back in time is an artifact induced by their short lifetime, that is why they are artificially ignored; (2) the geometry of past trenches is simplified leading to an underestimation of the length of subduction zones.

  14. Breddin's graph for tectonic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Célérier, Bernard; Séranne, Michel

    2001-05-01

    A simple graphical method is proposed to infer the tectonic regime from a fault and slip data set. An abacus is overlaid on a plot of the rake versus strike of the data. This yields the horizontal principal stress directions and a constraint on the stress tensor aspect ratio, in a manner similar to Breddin's graph for two-dimensional strain analysis. The main requirement is that one of the principal stress directions is close to the vertical. This method is illustrated on monophase synthetic and natural data, but is also expected to help sort out multiphase data sets.

  15. Continental margin tectonics - Forearc processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, N.; Reed, D.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies of convergent plate margins and the structural development of forearc terranes are summarized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the geometry of accretionary prisms (Coulomb wedge taper and vertical motion in response to tectonic processes), offscraping vs underplating or subduction, the response to oblique convergence, fluids in forearc settings, the thermal framework and the effects of fluid advection, and serpentinite seamounts. Also included is a comprehensive bibliography for the period.

  16. Tectonic deformation in southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, David D.

    1993-01-01

    Our objectives were to use modem geodetic data, especially those derived from space techniques like Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR), and the Global Positioning System (GPS) to infer crustal deformation in southern California and relate it to plate tectonics and earthquake hazard. To do this, we needed to collect some original data, write computer programs to determine positions of survey markers from geodetic observables, interpret time dependent positions in terms of velocity and earthquake caused episodic displacements, and construct a model to explain these velocities and displacements in terms of fault slip and plate movements.

  17. Occupational hepatic disorders in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung Ryoul; Kim, Tae Woo

    2010-12-01

    Occupational hepatic disorders are classified into toxic hepatitis, viral hepatitis, and chemical-induced malignancy in Korea. Toxic hepatitis cases were reported in workers who were exposed to dimethylformamide, dimethylacetamide, or trichloroethylene. Pre-placement medical examination and regular follow-up are necessary to prevent the development of toxic hepatitis. Viral hepatitis was chiefly reported among health care workers such as doctors, nurses and clinical pathology technicians who could easily be exposed to blood. Preventive measures for these groups therefore include vaccination and serum monitoring programs. Hepatic angiosarcoma caused by vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) exposure is a very well known occupational disease and it has not been officially reported in Korea yet. Some cases of hepatocellular carcinoma were legally approved for compensation as an occupational disease largely by overwork and stress, but not supported by enough scientific evidence. Effort to find the evidence of its causal relationship is needed. PMID:21258588

  18. Korea's 2015 cigarette tax increases.

    PubMed

    Cherukupalli, Rajeev

    2016-03-01

    South Korea increased tobacco taxes in 2015 after a 10-year gap. This commentary suggests two lessons for public finance practitioners. Substantive tax increases are crucial to reducing tobacco use; particularly where prices are demonstrably lower and prevalence higher in comparison to other countries ranked similarly on economic development indicators. Second, as a rule of thumb, governments cannot afford to neglect the annual increases that ensure that tobacco taxes do not lose their efficacy over time. PMID:25673328

  19. Seasonal variation in carbon monoxide poisoning in urban Korea.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y S

    1985-01-01

    Seasonal variation in carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning during 1969-78 was examined using the monthly hospital admissions and environmental weather data from Seoul, Korea. The results showed that there were nine times as many cases of CO poisoning in December as in August. CO poisoning cases were significantly correlated with temperature and domestic fires but not significantly with relative humidity. The epidemiological and clinical investigation of CO poisoning in the home needs to be studied in further detail. PMID:3989440

  20. Occupational Psychiatric Disorders in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    We searched databases and used various online resources to identify and systematically review all articles on occupational psychiatric disorders among Korean workers published in English and Korean before 2009. Three kinds of occupational psychiatric disorders were studied: disorders related to job stress and mental illness, psychiatric symptoms emerging in victims of industrial injuries, and occupational psychiatric disorders compensated by Industrial Accident Compensation Insurance (IACI). Korea does not maintain official statistical records for occupational psychiatric disorders, but several studies have estimated the number of occupational psychiatric disorders using the Korea Workers' Compensation and Welfare Service (COMWEL, formerly KLWC) database. The major compensated occupational psychiatric disorders in Korea were "personality and behavioral disorders due to brain disease, damage, and dysfunction", "other mental disorders due to brain damage and dysfunction and to physical diseases", "reactions to severe stress and adjustment disorders", and "depressive episodes". The most common work-related psychiatric disorders, excluding accidents, were "neurotic, stress-related, and somatoform disorders" followed by "mood disorders". PMID:21258596

  1. Prediction of Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Korea, 2016

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyu-Won; Won, Young-Joo; Oh, Chang-Mo; Kong, Hyun-Joo; Cho, Hyunsoon; Lee, Jong-Keun; Lee, Duk Hyoung; Lee, Kang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate of Korea’s current cancer burden, this study aimed to report on projected cancer incidence and mortality rates for the year 2016. Materials and Methods: Cancer incidence data from 1999 to 2013 were obtained from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database, and cancer mortality data from 1993 to 2014 were acquired from Statistics Korea. Cancer incidence in 2016 was projected by fitting a linear regression model to observed age-specific cancer incidence rates against observed years, then multiplying the projected age-specific rates by the age-specific population. The Joinpoint regression model was used to determine at which year the linear trend changed significantly. Results: A total of 254,962 new cancer cases and 75,172 cancer deaths are expected to occur in Korea in 2016. The five leading primary cancer incident sites in 2016 were estimated colorectal, stomach, lung, liver and thyroid cancer in men; thyroid, breast, colorectal, stomach, and lung cancer in women. Conclusion: Currently cancer is one of the foremost public health concerns in Korea. Although cancer rates are anticipated to decrease the nation’s cancer burden will continue to increase as the population ages. PMID:27034143

  2. Assessment of trace metals in four bird species from Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungsoo; Oh, Jong-Min

    2013-08-01

    In birds, heavy metal concentrations are influenced by diet intake, migratory pattern, and residence time. In the present study, heavy metal concentrations (in microgram per gram dry weight) were measured in livers of four bird species from Korea. Iron concentrations were greater in Eurasian Woodcocks (Scolopax rusticola) than in Grey Herons (Ardea cinerea), Little Egrets (Egretta garzetta), and Schrenck's Bitterns (Ixobrychus eurhythmus). Copper concentrations in Grey Herons were significantly higher than in other species. Lead concentrations were greater in Schrenck's Bitterns and Eurasian Woodcocks than in Grey Herons and Little Egrets. Eurasian Woodcocks had higher cadmium concentrations than in other species. Zinc and manganese concentrations did not differ among species. Iron, zinc, manganese, and copper concentrations from this study were within the range of other Korean bird studies, and these concentrations were far below toxic levels. Cadmium and lead accumulation trends in each species were different, and the results might be associated with their migration pattern and residence time in Korea. Grey Herons, Little Egrets, and Schrenck's Bitterns are usually summer visitors, and Eurasian Woodcocks are passage migrants. But herons and egrets were collected in spring, autumn, and winter, but not during breeding season. They might be residents, so they could more reflect Korean cadmium and lead contaminations than Schrenck's Bitterns. However, Eurasian Woodcocks could more reflect habitats outside Korea because of their short staying time in Korea. PMID:23430066

  3. Rural and urban suicide in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, B C Ben; Lester, David

    2012-10-01

    Suicide rates in 2005 in South Korea were higher in rural areas than in urban areas. Those in rural areas more often used pesticides and chemicals as a method for suicide, and there was a greater proportion of men and the elderly, both groups at higher risk for suicide in South Korea. These three factors may account for the high rural suicide rate in South Korea. PMID:23234093

  4. Seasonal variability of surface ozone in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wie, J.; Moon, B. K.; Choi, H.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone around East Asia include Korea impacts on air quality and climate, and has been increased with rapid economic growth. To better understanding, we analyzed seasonal variability of tropospheric ozone simulated by using GEOS-Chem. Surface ozone concentration in Korea has double peaks in April and September. Tropospheric ozone increases primarily associated with westerly wind anomaly in spring, with warming in summer and autumn, and with cloud depletion in winter. Surface ozone in spring elevated after mature-phase El Niño winters. Key words: surface ozone, seasonal variability, Korea, East Asia Acknowledgements This work was supported by Korea Ministry of Environment as "Climate Change Correspondence Program."

  5. Analysis of tectonic features in US southwest from Skylab photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Gawad, M. (Principal Investigator); Tubbesing, L.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Skylab photographs were utilized to study faults and tectonic lines in selected areas of the U.S. Southwest. Emphasis was on elements of the Texas Zone in the Mojave Desert and the tectonic intersection in southern Nevada. Transverse faults believed to represent the continuation of the Texas Zone were found to be anomalous in strike. This suggests that the Mojave Desert block was rotated counterclockwise as a unit with the Sierra Nevada. Left-lateral strike-slip faults in Lake Mead area are interpreted as elements of the Wasatch tectonic zone; their anomalous trend indicates that the Lake Mead area has rotated clockwise with the Colorado Plateau. A tectonic model relating major fault zones to fragmentation and rotation of crustal blocks was developed. Detailed correlation of the high resolution S190B metric camera photographs with U-2 photographs and geologic maps demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing S190B photographs for the identification of geomorphic features associated with recent and active faults and for the assessment of seismic hazards.

  6. Plains tectonism on Venus: Inferences from canali longitudinal profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komatsu, Goro; Baker, Victor R.

    1994-01-01

    Canali-type channels on Venus show inverted profile segments; that is, large portions of the channels trend uphill. The original gradients for these channels were not horizontal, but must have progressively trended downhill. Therefore, undulation patterns imposed on the profiles have to be the result of tectonism occurring since channel formation. This implies that some of the uppermost geological units of the plains, which are coincident with canali, experienced significant postemplacement tectonic deformation. The pattern of deformation is hierarchical. Within observational limits, at least two scales of deformation are indicated. The longer scale deformation (thousands of kilometers) corresponds to large-scale basins; the shorter scale deformation (hundreds of kilometers) corresponds to ridge belts or to small-scale domes/basins. The latter features, at scales up to a few hundred kilometers, extensively deform some plain areas. Although not appearing in the topographic profiles because of resolution limitations, deformation scales of tens of kilometers or less, which mostly reflect wrinkle ridges, also overlap the longer deformation scales. The channels probably formed relatively quickly in comparison to the time scale of deformation. Canali formation is closely related to the genesis of plains, and canali profile deformation reflects tectonic processes operating at multiple scales. The lower limit rates of large-scale tectonic warping are comparable to epeirogenetic deformation rates for Earth's intraplate continental interiors.

  7. Reform of medical education in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyong-Jee; Kee, Changwon

    2010-01-01

    There are 41 medical schools in South Korea with over 3500 students graduating from the medical schools annually with the appropriate qualifications to practice medicine. Korean medical educators have made significant efforts to enhance the effectiveness of medical education by preparing students for the rapidly changing global environment of medicine and healthcare. This article outlines the reform efforts made by Korean medical schools to meet such demands, which includes the adoption of student-centered and competency-based education, e-learning, and authentic assessment of clinical performance. It also discusses the recent reform of the medical education system, driven by the Government's policy to prepare Korean higher education for an increasingly knowledge-based society. PMID:20163225

  8. Plate Tectonic Cycle. K-6 Science Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blueford, J. R.; And Others

    Plate Tectonics Cycle is one of the units of a K-6 unified science curriculum program. The unit consists of four organizing sub-themes: (1) volcanoes (covering formation, distribution, and major volcanic groups); (2) earthquakes (with investigations on wave movements, seismograms and sub-suface earth currents); (3) plate tectonics (providing maps…

  9. Mapping Seafloor Tectonics from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandwell, D. T.; Smith, W. H.

    2005-12-01

    Our current understanding of the topography and tectonics of the ocean basins is largely derived from dense satellite altimeter measurements of the marine gravity field combined with sparse geophysical measurements from research vessels. First generation satellite altimetry was initiated in the 1970s by NASA with the Skylab and GEOS-3 missions, followed by the brief but highly successful Seasat mission of 1978. Seasat provided the first global view of the marine gravity field, well illustrated by Bill Haxby's maps of the early 1980s. It is difficult to express the excitement in the scientific community when the global signatures of the postulated ridges, transforms, and subduction zones were revealed. Moreover, Seasat proved that non-repeat orbit altimetry was the obvious way to map the ocean basins and the US Navy quickly developed Geosat in 1985 to finish the job. For 10 years the Geosat data remained classified until ESA's ERS-1 duplicated the secret information. The sudden availability of dense measurements from these second generation altimeters (Geosat and ERS-1) is perhaps the most important ocean science observation in the last two decades. These data provided not only a spectacular confirmation of plate tectonics but also partly revealed smaller-scale structures including thousands of seamounts, propagating rifts, ridge jumps, and global-scale variations in seafloor roughness. In addition, the dense gravity information was combined with sparse ship soundings to construct global bathymetry maps at ~10 km resolution - a great improvement over hand-drawn maps but still far worse than our current maps of Mars, Venus, and the Moon. While these data filled a huge gap in our understanding of the ocean basins, they also triggered a thirst for more. Third generation altimeters with improved range precision are on the horizon. The scientific rationale for a factor of 5 improvement in altimeter precision spans three broad areas of earth science: one, resolving the

  10. Tectonic signatures on active margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogarth, Leah Jolynn

    High-resolution Compressed High-Intensity Radar Pulse (CHIRP) surveys offshore of La Jolla in southern California and the Eel River in northern California provide the opportunity to investigate the role of tectonics in the formation of stratigraphic architecture and margin morphology. Both study sites are characterized by shore-parallel tectonic deformation, which is largely observed in the structure of the prominent angular unconformity interpreted as the transgressive surface. Based on stratal geometry and acoustic character, we identify three sedimentary sequences offshore of La Jolla: an acoustically laminated estuarine unit deposited during early transgression, an infilling or "healing-phase" unit formed during the transgression, and an upper transparent unit. The estuarine unit is confined to the canyon edges in what may have been embayments during the last sea-level rise. The healing-phase unit appears to infill rough areas on the transgressive surface that may be related to relict fault structures. The upper transparent unit is largely controlled by long-wavelength tectonic deformation due to the Rose Canyon Fault. This unit is also characterized by a mid-shelf (˜40 m water depth) thickness high, which is likely a result of hydrodynamic forces and sediment grain size. On the Eel margin, we observe three distinct facies: a seaward-thinning unit truncated by the transgressive surface, a healing-phase unit confined to the edges of a broad structural high, and a highly laminated upper unit. The seaward-thinning wedge of sediment below the transgressive surface is marked by a number of channels that we interpret as distributary channels based on their morphology. Regional divergence of the sequence boundary and transgressive surface with up to ˜8 m of sediment preserved across the interfluves suggests the formation of subaerial accommodation during the lowstand. The healing-phase, much like that in southern California, appears to infill rough areas in the