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Sample records for kras gene amplification

  1. Ultra-sensitive biosensor for K-ras gene detection using enzyme capped gold nanoparticles conjugates for signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xian; Bai, Lijuan; Han, Xiaowei; Wang, Jiao; Shi, Anqi; Zhang, Yuzhong

    2014-09-01

    In this study, an ultra-sensitive hairpin DNA-based electrochemical DNA biosensor for K-ras gene detection is described. Gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-streptavidin capped Au-NPs (HAS) conjugates are used for signal amplification. Initially, hairpin DNA dually labeled with thiol at its 5' end and with biotin at its 3' end is immobilized on the surface of Au-NPs modified electrode, and the hairpin DNA is in a "closed" state; hence, the HAS conjugates are shielded from being approached by the biotin due to steric hindrance. However, in the presence of target DNA, the target DNA hybridizes with the loop structure of hairpin DNA and causes conformational change, resulting in biotin forced away from the electrode surface, thereby becoming accessible for the HAS conjugates. Thus, the HAS conjugates are linked to the electrode surface via the specific interaction between biotin and streptavidin. Electrochemical detection was performed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) containing tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and H2O2. Under optimal conditions, the peak current differences (ΔI) are linear with the target DNA in the range from 0.1 fM to 1 nM with a detection limit of 0.035 fM. Furthermore, this biosensor also demonstrates its excellent specificity for single-base mismatched DNA. PMID:24939462

  2. Prognostic impact of KRAS mutant type and MET amplification in metastatic and recurrent gastric cancer patients treated with first-line S-1 plus cisplatin chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Matsusaka, Satoshi; Kobunai, Takashi; Yamamoto, Noriko; Chin, Keisho; Ogura, Mariko; Tanaka, Gotaro; Matsuoka, Kazuaki; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-related genes, including HER2, EGFR, MET, FGFR2 and KRAS, are target molecules that are clinically beneficial in gastric cancer (GC). We investigated the correlation between RTK-related genes and the curative effect of first-line S-1 plus cisplatin (SP) combination chemotherapy in metastatic and recurrent GC. We enrolled 150 patients with histopathologically confirmed metastatic and recurrent GC treated with SP. KRAS mutation was detected using direct sequencing. DNA copy number was measured by real-time PCR. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens were examined immunohistochemically for HER2, EGFR, FGFR2 and MET. Among 144 patients, KRAS mutation was detected in five (3.5%) at codon 12 and one (0.7%) at codon 13. FGFR2, EGFR, HER2, MET and KRAS gene amplification was suggested in 4.4%, 5.9%, 9%, 3.7% and 10.3% of patients, respectively. KRAS mutation, but not KRAS amplification, was associated with significantly shorter overall and progression-free survival. MET membranous overexpression was associated with a significantly higher tumor response. MET amplification was associated with significantly shorter overall survival. We show for the first time that KRAS mutation and MET amplification are promising predictive markers in metastatic and recurrent GC patients treated with SP. KRAS status may be a useful prognostic marker in patients treated with SP. PMID:27014419

  3. Novel Methodology for Rapid Detection of KRAS Mutation Using PNA-LNA Mediated Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification.

    PubMed

    Itonaga, Masahiro; Matsuzaki, Ibu; Warigaya, Kenji; Tamura, Takaaki; Shimizu, Yuki; Fujimoto, Masakazu; Kojima, Fumiyoshi; Ichinose, Masao; Murata, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Detecting point mutation of human cancer cells quickly and accurately is gaining in importance for pathological diagnosis and choice of therapeutic approach. In the present study, we present novel methodology, peptide nucleic acid-locked nucleic acid mediated loop-mediated isothermal amplification (PNA-LNA mediated LAMP), for rapid detection of KRAS mutation using advantages of both artificial DNA and LAMP. PNA-LNA mediated LAMP reactions occurred under isothermal temperature conditions of with 4 primary primers set for the target regions on the KRAS gene, clamping PNA probe that was complimentary to the wild type sequence and LNA primers complementary to the mutated sequences. PNA-LNA mediated LAMP was applied for cDNA from 4 kinds of pancreatic carcinoma cell lines with or without KRAS point mutation. The amplified DNA products were verified by naked-eye as well as a real-time PCR equipment. By PNA-LNA mediated LAMP, amplification of wild type KRAS DNA was blocked by clamping PNA probe, whereas, mutant type KRAS DNA was significantly amplified within 50 min. Mutant alleles could be detected in samples which diluted until 0.1% of mutant-to-wild type ratio. On the other hand, mutant alleles could be reproducibly with a mutant-to-wild type ratio of 30% by direct sequencing and of 1% by PNA-clamping PCR. The limit of detection (LOD) of PNA-LNA mediated LAMP was much lower than the other conventional methods. Competition of LNA clamping primers complementary to two different subtypes (G12D and G12V) of mutant KRAS gene indicated different amplification time depend on subtypes of mutant cDNA. PNA-LNA mediated LAMP is a simple, rapid, specific and sensitive methodology for the detection of KRAS mutation. PMID:26999437

  4. Novel Methodology for Rapid Detection of KRAS Mutation Using PNA-LNA Mediated Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Warigaya, Kenji; Tamura, Takaaki; Shimizu, Yuki; Fujimoto, Masakazu; Kojima, Fumiyoshi; Ichinose, Masao; Murata, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Detecting point mutation of human cancer cells quickly and accurately is gaining in importance for pathological diagnosis and choice of therapeutic approach. In the present study, we present novel methodology, peptide nucleic acid—locked nucleic acid mediated loop-mediated isothermal amplification (PNA-LNA mediated LAMP), for rapid detection of KRAS mutation using advantages of both artificial DNA and LAMP. PNA-LNA mediated LAMP reactions occurred under isothermal temperature conditions of with 4 primary primers set for the target regions on the KRAS gene, clamping PNA probe that was complimentary to the wild type sequence and LNA primers complementary to the mutated sequences. PNA-LNA mediated LAMP was applied for cDNA from 4 kinds of pancreatic carcinoma cell lines with or without KRAS point mutation. The amplified DNA products were verified by naked-eye as well as a real-time PCR equipment. By PNA-LNA mediated LAMP, amplification of wild type KRAS DNA was blocked by clamping PNA probe, whereas, mutant type KRAS DNA was significantly amplified within 50 min. Mutant alleles could be detected in samples which diluted until 0.1% of mutant-to-wild type ratio. On the other hand, mutant alleles could be reproducibly with a mutant-to-wild type ratio of 30% by direct sequencing and of 1% by PNA-clamping PCR. The limit of detection (LOD) of PNA-LNA mediated LAMP was much lower than the other conventional methods. Competition of LNA clamping primers complementary to two different subtypes (G12D and G12V) of mutant KRAS gene indicated different amplification time depend on subtypes of mutant cDNA. PNA-LNA mediated LAMP is a simple, rapid, specific and sensitive methodology for the detection of KRAS mutation. PMID:26999437

  5. Whole genome amplification induced bias in the detection of KRAS-mutated cell populations during colorectal carcinoma tissue testing.

    PubMed

    Stranska, Jana; Jancik, Sylwia; Slavkovsky, Rastislav; Holinkova, Veronika; Rabcanova, Miroslava; Vojta, Petr; Hajduch, Marian; Drabek, Jiri

    2015-03-01

    Whole genome amplification replicates the entire DNA content of a sample and can thus help to circumvent material limitations when insufficient DNA is available for planned genetic analyses. However, there are conflicting data in the literature whether whole genome amplification introduces bias or reflects precisely the spectrum of starting DNA. We analyzed the origins of discrepancies in KRAS (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog gene) mutation detection in six of ten samples amplified using the GenomePlex® Tissue Whole Genome Amplification kit 5 (WGA5; Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO, USA) and KRAS StripAssay® (KRAS SA; ViennaLab Diagnostics, Vienna, Austria). We undertook reextraction, reamplification, retyping, authentication, reanalysis, and reinterpretation to determine whether the discrepancies originated during the preanalytical, analytical, and/or interpretative phase of genotyping. We conclude that a combination of glass slide/sample heterogeneity and biased amplification due to stochastic effects in the early phases of whole genome amplification (WGA) may have adversely affected the results obtained. Our findings are relevant for both forensic genetics testing and massively parallel sequencing using preamplification. PMID:25655305

  6. Gene amplification during myogenic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Ulrike; Ludwig, Nicole; Raslan, Abdulrahman; Meier, Carola; Meese, Eckart

    2016-01-01

    Gene amplifications are mostly an attribute of tumor cells and drug resistant cells. Recently, we provided evidence for gene amplifications during differentiation of human and mouse neural progenitor cells. Here, we report gene amplifications in differentiating mouse myoblasts (C2C12 cells) covering a period of 7 days including pre-fusion, fusion and post-fusion stages. After differentiation induction we found an increase in copy numbers of CDK4 gene at day 3, of NUP133 at days 4 and 7, and of MYO18B at day 4. The amplification process was accompanied by gamma-H2AX foci that are indicative of double stand breaks. Amplifications during the differentiating process were also found in primary human myoblasts with the gene CDK4 and NUP133 amplified both in human and mouse myoblasts. Amplifications of NUP133 and CDK4 were also identified in vivo on mouse transversal cryosections at stage E11.5. In the course of myoblast differentiation, we found amplifications in cytoplasm indicative of removal of amplified sequences from the nucleus. The data provide further evidence that amplification is a fundamental mechanism contributing to the differentiation process in mammalians. PMID:26760505

  7. PIK3CA Amplification Is Common in Left Side-Tubular Adenomas but Uncommon Sessile Serrated Adenomas Exclusively with KRAS Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunsu; Lee, Jae-Ho; Kim, Dae-Kwang; Choi, In-Jang; Hwang, Ilseon; Kang, Yu-Na; Kim, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disorder than arises via multiple distinct pathways, from tubular adenomas (TAs) and sessile serrated adenomas (SSAs), which are clinically, morphologically, and molecularly different. We examined PIK3CA amplification in colorectal precancerous legions, including TAs and SSAs. DNA was isolated from paired normal and tumoral tissues in 64 TAs and 32 SSAs. PIK3CA amplification, KRAS mutation, and BRAF mutation were analyzed by real-time PCR and pyrosequencing. PIK3CA amplification was found in 25% of TAs and 9.4% of SSAs, respectively. KRAS and BRAF mutations were mutually exclusive in both TAs and SSAs. In TAs, PIK3CA amplification was associated with left side and it was mutually exclusive with KRAS mutation. These results suggest that PIK3CA amplification may be early and important event in colorectal carcinogenesis and may drive the development of left-side TAs independently with KRAS mutation. PMID:26019684

  8. Chromosomal destabilization during gene amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, J C; Wahl, G M

    1990-01-01

    Acentric extrachromosomal elements, such as submicroscopic autonomously replicating circular molecules (episomes) and double minute chromosomes, are common early, and in some cases initial, intermediates of gene amplification in many drug-resistant and tumor cell lines. In order to gain a more complete understanding of the amplification process, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which such extrachromosomal elements are generated and we traced the fate of these amplification intermediates over time. The model system consists of a Chinese hamster cell line (L46) created by gene transfer in which the initial amplification product was shown previously to be an unstable extrachromosomal element containing an inverted duplication spanning more than 160 kilobases (J. C. Ruiz and G. M. Wahl, Mol. Cell. Biol. 8:4302-4313, 1988). In this study, we show that these molecules were formed by a process involving chromosomal deletion. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed at multiple time points on cells with amplified sequences. These studies reveal that the extrachromosomal molecules rapidly integrate into chromosomes, often near or at telomeres, and once integrated, the amplified sequences are themselves unstable. These data provide a molecular and cytogenetic chronology for gene amplification in this model system; an early event involves deletion to generate extrachromosomal elements, and subsequent integration of these elements precipitates a cascade of chromosome instability. Images PMID:2188107

  9. K-ras gene mutation in gall bladder carcinomas and dysplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Ajiki, T; Fujimori, T; Onoyama, H; Yamamoto, M; Kitazawa, S; Maeda, S; Saitoh, Y

    1996-01-01

    Epithelial dysplasia of gall bladder is an important precancerous lesion of gall bladder carcinogenesis. To investigate the frequency of K-ras gene mutation in gall bladder carcinoma and dysplasia, K-ras codon 12 mutations were investigated by the polymerase chain reaction/restriction enzyme based method following direct sequencing. Mutation was detected in 59% (30 of 51) of gall bladder carcinomas, in 73% (8 of 11) of gall bladder dysplasia in gall stone cases, and in 0% of the normal gall bladder epithelium. There was, however, no correlation between K-ras mutation and clinicopathological factors of gall bladder carcinoma. K-ras gene mutation occurs even in gall bladder dysplasia at an incidence similar to that in carcinomas, suggesting that testing for K-ras gene mutation may prove useful as an adjunct to bile cytological or biopsy analysis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8675098

  10. A novel combination of K-ras and myc amplification accompanied by point mutational activation of K-ras in a human lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Taya, Y; Hosogai, K; Hirohashi, S; Shimosato, Y; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuchida, N; Fushimi, M; Sekiya, T; Nishimura, S

    1984-01-01

    Amplifications of two oncogenes, c-K-ras-2 and c-myc, were found in a human lung giant cell carcinoma (LGCC) Lu-65, which is maintained in nude mice. The extent of c-K-ras-2 and myc amplifications were estimated to be 10- and 8-fold, respectively, by means of the Southern hybridization procedure. In addition, NIH3T3 cells were transformed by transfection of Lu-65 DNA and the transforming gene was identified as c-K-ras-2. c-K-ras-2 genes were cloned from a gene library of Lu-65 and a single point mutation causing a substitution of cysteine for glycine in codon 12 was found by DNA sequencing. It was concluded that the amplification of the c-myc and c-K-ras-2 genes are accompanied by point mutational activation of c-K-ras-2 in the human LGCC Lu-65. This is the first report of multiple gene amplification accompanied by a point mutation of oncogenes in human cancer cells, providing further support for the idea that co-operation of at least two activated cellular oncogenes is required for carcinogenesis. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:6098458

  11. KRAS Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Wilbur A.; Haney, Jerry; Sugita, Michio; Bemis, Lynne; Jimeno, Antonio; Messersmith, Wells A.

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of colon carcinoma with the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody Cetuximab is reported to be ineffective in KRAS-mutant tumors. Mutation testing techniques have therefore become an urgent concern. We have compared three methods for detecting KRAS mutations in 59 cases of colon carcinoma: 1) high resolution melting, 2) the amplification refractory mutation system using a bifunctional self-probing primer (ARMS/Scorpion, ARMS/S), and 3) direct sequencing. We also evaluated the effects of the methods of sectioning and coring of paraffin blocks to obtain tumor DNA on assay sensitivity and specificity. The most sensitive and specific combination of block sampling and mutational analysis was ARMS/S performed on DNA derived from 1-mm paraffin cores. This combination of tissue sampling and testing method detected KRAS mutations in 46% of colon tumors. Four samples were positive by ARMS/S, but initially negative by direct sequencing. Cloned DNA samples were retested by direct sequencing, and in all four cases KRAS mutations were identified in the DNA. In six cases, high resolution melting abnormalities could not be confirmed as specific mutations either by ARMS/S or direct sequencing. We conclude that coring of the paraffin blocks and testing by ARMS/S is a sensitive, specific, and efficient method for KRAS testing. PMID:20007845

  12. p16 and K-ras gene mutations in the intraductal precursors of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Moskaluk, C A; Hruban, R H; Kern, S E

    1997-06-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is thought to arise from a noninvasive neoplastic precursor, the pancreatic intraductal lesion (PIL). Mutations of the K-ras gene are known to occur in PILs, but their high prevalence among PILs within the general population probably limit the use of K-ras as a marker of eventual clinical risk. In search of genetic constellations that might indicate the progression of some PILs toward an invasive phenotype, mutations at both the K-ras and p16 genes were sought within PILs of 10 pancreata resected for adenocarcinoma. K-ras mutations were present in most PILs and in nearly all PILs having nuclear atypia. In half of the patients, two or more unique K-ras mutations were identified among distinct PILs, which is evidence for the separate clonal evolution of multiple pancreatic neoplasms within individual patients. p16 alterations (one homozygous deletion and three point mutations) were found in 4 of the 10 carcinomas; these four pancreata harbored p16 alterations in three of nine PILs, of which one was a "histologically early" lesion. Two patients had p16 alterations in PILs matching those of the associated carcinomas. p16 mutations were not found in PILs of pancreata having wild-type p16 in the carcinoma, nor were they found in ducts having normal histology. It is suggested that alterations of the p16 gene affect a subset of PILs that contain mutations of the K-ras gene and that these mutations might identify high-risk precursors of the invasive malignancy. PMID:9187111

  13. Alterations in the K-ras and p53 genes in rat lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Belinsky, S.A.; Swafford, D.S.; Finch, G.L.; Mitchell, C.E.

    1997-06-01

    Activation of the K-ras protooncogene and inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene are events common to many types of human cancers. Molecular epidemiology studies have associated mutational profiles in these genes with specific exposures. The purpose of this paper is to review investigations that have examined the role of the K-ras and p53 genes in lung tumors induced in the F344 rat by mutagenic and nonmutagenic exposures. Mutation profiles within the K-ras and p53 genes, if present in rat lung tumors, would help to define some of the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer induction by various environmental agents. Pulmonary adenocarcinomas or squamous cell carcinomas were induced by tetranitromethane (TNM), 4-methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), beryllium metal, plutonium-239, X-ray, diesel exhaust, or carbon black. These agents were chosen because the tumors they produced could arise via different types of DNA damage. Mutation of the K-ras gene was determined by approaches that included DNA transfection, direct sequencing, mismatch hybridization, and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The frequency for mutation of the K-ras gene was exposure dependent. The transition mutations formed could have been derived from deamination of cytosine. Alteration in the p53 gene was assessed by immunohistochemical analysis for p53 protein and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of exons 4 to 9. None of the 93 adenocarinomas examined was immunoreactive toward the anti-p53 antibody CM1. In contrast, 14 of 71 squamous cell carcinomas exhibited nuclear p53 immunoreactivity with no correlation to type of exposure. However, SSCP analysis only detected mutations in 2 of 14 squamous cell tumors that were immunoreactive, suggesting that protein stabilization did not stem from mutations within the p53 gene. Thus, the p53 gene does not appear to be involved in the genesis of most rat lung tumors. 2 figs., 2 tabs., 48 refs.

  14. Heat induces gene amplification in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Bin; Ouyang, Ruoyun; Huang, Chenghui; Liu, Franklin; Neill, Daniel; Li, Chuanyuan; Dewhirst, Mark

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study discovered that heat exposure (hyperthermia) results in gene amplification in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hyperthermia induces DNA double strand breaks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA double strand breaks are considered to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The underlying mechanism of heat-induced gene amplification is generation of DNA double strand breaks. -- Abstract: Background: Hyperthermia plays an important role in cancer therapy. However, as with radiation, it can cause DNA damage and therefore genetic instability. We studied whether hyperthermia can induce gene amplification in cancer cells and explored potential underlying molecular mechanisms. Materials and methods: (1) Hyperthermia: HCT116 colon cancer cells received water-submerged heating treatment at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min; (2) gene amplification assay using N-(phosphoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) selection of cabamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbarmylase, dihydro-orotase (cad) gene amplified cells; (3) southern blotting for confirmation of increased cad gene copies in PALA-resistant cells; (4) {gamma}H2AX immunostaining to detect {gamma}H2AX foci as an indication for DNA double strand breaks. Results: (1) Heat exposure at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces gene amplification. The frequency of cad gene amplification increased by 2.8 and 6.5 folds respectively; (2) heat exposure at both 42 and 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces DNA double strand breaks in HCT116 cells as shown by {gamma}H2AX immunostaining. Conclusion: This study shows that heat exposure can induce gene amplification in cancer cells, likely through the generation of DNA double strand breaks, which are believed to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. This process may be promoted by heat when cellular proteins that are responsible for checkpoints, DNA replication, DNA repair and

  15. Regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms at the beginning of intron 2 of the human KRAS gene.

    PubMed

    Antontseva, Elena V; Matveeva, Marina Yu; Bondar, Natalia P; Kashina, Elena V; Leberfarb, Elena Yu; Bryzgalov, Leonid O; Gervas, Polina A; Ponomareva, Anastasia A; Cherdyntseva, Nadezhda V; Orlov, Yury L; Merkulova, Tatiana I

    2015-12-01

    There are two regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (rSNPs) at the beginning of the second intron of the mouse K-ras gene that are strongly associated with lung cancer susceptibility. We performed functional analysis of three SNPs (rs12228277: T greater than A, rs12226937: G greater than A, and rs61761074: T greater than G) located in the same region of human KRAS. We found that rs12228277 and rs61761074 result in differential binding patterns of lung nuclear proteins to oligonucleotide probes corresponding two alternative alleles; in both cases, the transcription factor NF-Y is involved. G greater than A substitution (rs12226937) had no effect on the binding of lung nuclear proteins. However, all the nucleotide substitutions under study showed functional effects in a luciferase reporter assay. Among them, rs61761074 demonstrated a significant correlation with allele frequency in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Taken together, the results of our study suggest that a T greater than G substitution at nucleotide position 615 in the second intron of the KRAS gene (rs61761074) may represent a promising genetic marker of NSCLC. PMID:26648033

  16. Amplification-free In Situ KRAS Point Mutation Detection at 60 copies/mL in Urine in a Background of 1000-fold Wild Type

    PubMed Central

    KirimLi, Ceyhun E.; Shih, Wei-Heng; Shih, Wan Y.

    2016-01-01

    We have examined in situ detection of single-nucleotide KRAS mutation in urine using a (Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3)0.65(PbTiO3)0.35 (PMN-PT) piezoelectric plate sensor (PEPS) coated with a 17-nucleotide (nt) locked nucleic acid (LNA) probe DNA complementary to the KRAS mutation. To enhance in situ mutant (MT) DNA detection specificity against the wild type (WT), the detection was carried out in a flow with a flow rate of 4 mL/min and at 63°C with the PEPS vertically situated at the center of the flow in which both the temperature and the flow impingement force discriminated the wild type. Under such conditions, PEPS was shown to specifically detect KRAS MT in situ with 60 copies/mL analytical sensitivity in a background of clinically-relevant 1000-fold more WT in 30 min without DNA isolation, amplification, or labeling. For validation, the detection was followed with detection in a mixture of blue MT fluorescent reporter microspheres (FRMs) (MT FRMs) that bound to only the captured MT and orange WT FRMs that bound to only the captured WT. Microscopic examinations showed that the captured blue MT FRMs still outnumbered the orange WT FRMs by a factor of 4 to 1 even though WT was 1000-fold of MT in urine. Finally, multiplexed specific mutation detection was demonstrated using a 6-PEPS array each with a probe DNA targeting one of the 6 codon-12 KRAS mutations. PMID:26783561

  17. Amplification-free in situ KRAS point mutation detection at 60 copies per mL in urine in a background of 1000-fold wild type.

    PubMed

    Kirimli, Ceyhun E; Shih, Wei-Heng; Shih, Wan Y

    2016-02-21

    We have examined the in situ detection of a single-nucleotide KRAS mutation in urine using a (Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3)0.65(PbTiO3)0.35 (PMN-PT) piezoelectric plate sensor (PEPS) coated with a 17-nucleotide (nt) locked nucleic acid (LNA) probe DNA complementary to the KRAS mutation. To enhance the in situ mutant (MT) DNA detection specificity against the wild type (WT), detection was carried out in a flow with a flow rate of 4 mL min(-1) and at 63 °C with the PEPS vertically situated at the center of the flow in which both the temperature and the flow impingement force discriminated the wild type. Under such conditions, PEPS was shown to specifically detect KRAS MT in situ with 60 copies per mL analytical sensitivity in a background of clinically-relevant 1000-fold more WT in 30 min without DNA isolation, amplification, or labeling. For validation, this detection was followed with detection in a mixture of blue MT fluorescent reporter microspheres (FRMs) (MT FRMs) that bound to only the captured MT and orange WT FRMs that bound to only the captured WT. Microscopic examinations showed that the captured blue MT FRMs still outnumbered the orange WT FRMs by a factor of 4 to 1 even though WT was 1000-fold of MT in urine. Finally, multiplexed specific mutation detection was demonstrated using a 6-PEPS array each with a probe DNA targeting one of the 6 codon-12 KRAS mutations. PMID:26783561

  18. Three-dimensionally specific inhibition of DNA repair-related genes by activated KRAS in colon crypt model.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Takashima, Yasuo; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Koyanagi, Midori; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Doi, Keiko; Tanaka, Yoko; Kuroki, Masahide; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji

    2010-05-01

    Growth and differentiation of colonic epithelium are regulated in the three-dimensional (3D) physiological architecture, colonic crypt, and deregulation of 3D interactions is involved in tumorigenesis. Cell-based 3D culture systems provide a suitable approach bridging the gap between two-dimensional (2D) culture and animal models. KRAS mutations are found at high frequencies in human colorectal cancer (CRC); however, KRAS-targeted cancer therapy has not been developed. Here, we have established a 3D cell culture model resembling the colonic crypt by use of HKe3 cells, human CRC HCT116 cells disrupted at activated KRAS. In this 3D colonic crypt model, HKe3 cells showed the features of time course-dependent transit-amplifying and terminal-differentiated stages, which are characteristic of normal colonic crypt. On the basis of the features of HCT116 cells, activated KRAS inhibited normal cell polarity and apoptosis in 3D culture. The expression of DNA repair-related tumor suppressor genes including TP53, BRCA1, BRCA2, and EXO-1 was markedly suppressed by activated KRAS in 3D culture but not in 2D culture. These results together suggest that activated KRAS plays critical roles in the accumulation of genetic alterations through inhibition of DNA repair genes and apoptosis and that this 3D culture model will provide a useful tool for investigating the molecular mechanisms of CRC development. PMID:20454511

  19. Three-dimensionally Specific Inhibition of DNA Repair-Related Genes by Activated KRAS in Colon Crypt Model1 2

    PubMed Central

    Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Takashima, Yasuo; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Koyanagi, Midori; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Doi, Keiko; Tanaka, Yoko; Kuroki, Masahide; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji

    2010-01-01

    Growth and differentiation of colonic epithelium are regulated in the three-dimensional (3D) physiological architecture, colonic crypt, and deregulation of 3D interactions is involved in tumorigenesis. Cell-based 3D culture systems provide a suitable approach bridging the gap between two-dimensional (2D) culture and animal models. KRAS mutations are found at high frequencies in human colorectal cancer (CRC); however, KRAS-targeted cancer therapy has not been developed. Here, we have established a 3D cell culture model resembling the colonic crypt by use of HKe3 cells, human CRC HCT116 cells disrupted at activated KRAS. In this 3D colonic crypt model, HKe3 cells showed the features of time course-dependent transit-amplifying and terminal-differentiated stages, which are characteristic of normal colonic crypt. On the basis of the features of HCT116 cells, activated KRAS inhibited normal cell polarity and apoptosis in 3D culture. The expression of DNA repair-related tumor suppressor genes including TP53, BRCA1, BRCA2, and EXO-1 was markedly suppressed by activated KRAS in 3D culture but not in 2D culture. These results together suggest that activated KRAS plays critical roles in the accumulation of genetic alterations through inhibition of DNA repair genes and apoptosis and that this 3D culture model will provide a useful tool for investigating the molecular mechanisms of CRC development. PMID:20454511

  20. p53, erbB-2 and K-ras gene alterations are rare in spontaneous and plutonium-239-induced canine lung neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, L.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Lechner, J.F.

    1996-02-01

    Inhalation of high-linear energy transfer radiation in the form of radon progeny is a suspected cause of human lung cancer. To gain insight into the types of genetic derangements caused by this type of radiation, lung tumors from beagle dogs exposed to {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} and those arising in animals with no known carcinogen exposure were examined for evidence of aberrations in genes known to be altered in lung tumors. Altered expression of the p53 tumor suppressor gene and proto-oncogene erbB-2 proteins (p185{sup erbB2}) was evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis of 117 tumors representing different histological types in exposed (n = 80) and unexposed (n = 37) animals. Twenty-eight tumors were analyzed for K-ras proto-oncogene mutations by polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing. Fourteen percent (16/116) of all lung neoplasms showed elevated nuclear accumulation of p53 protein. Regardless of exposure history, adenosquamous and squamous cell cancers comprised 94% of all tumors with p53 abnormalities. Eighteen percent (21/117) of all tumors had evidence of erbB-2 protein overexpression. K-ras mutations were not detected in codons 12, 13 or 61 of tumors from unexposed (n = 9) or plutonium-exposed dogs (n = 19). These data indicate that p53 and K-ras gene abnormalities as a result of missense mutation are infrequent events in spontaneous and {sup 239}PuO{sub 2}-induced lung neoplasia in this colony of beagle dogs. Alternative mechanisms of gene alteration may be involved in canine pulmonary carcinogenesis. 45 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Evolution of gene expression after gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat-maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  2. Evolution of Gene Expression after Gene Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat–maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  3. Simultaneous gene silencing of KRAS and anti-apoptotic genes as a multitarget therapy

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Kristin; Lademann, Franziska; Thepkaysone, May-Linn; Jahnke, Beatrix; Aust, Daniela E.; Kahlert, Christoph; Weber, Georg; Weitz, Jürgen; Grützmann, Robert; Pilarsky, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal tumor types worldwide and an effective therapy is still elusive. Targeted therapy focused against a specific alteration is by definition unable to attack broad pathway signaling modification. Tumor heterogeneity will render targeted therapies ineffective based on the regrowth of cancer cell sub-clones. Therefore multimodal therapy strategies, targeting signaling pathways simultaneously should improve treatment. SiRNAs against KRAS and the apoptosis associated genes BCLXL, FLIP, MCL1L, SURVIVIN and XIAP were transfected into human and murine pancreatic cancer cell lines. Induction of apoptosis was measured by Caspase 3/7 activation, subG1 FACS analysis and PARP cleavage. The therapeutic approach was tested in a subcutaneous allograft model with a murine cancer cell line. By using siRNAs as a systematic approach to remodel signal transduction in pancreatic cancer the results showed increasing inhibition of proliferation and apoptosis induction in vitro and in vivo. Thus, siRNAs are suitable to model multimodal therapy against signaling pathways in pancreatic cancer. Improvements in in vivo delivery of siRNAs against a multitude of targets might therefore be a potential therapeutic approach. PMID:26716649

  4. Induction of gene amplification in Plasmodium falciparum

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    Human erythrocytic in vitro cultures of Honduras I strain of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum have been stressed stepwise with increasing concentrations of methotrexate (MTX), a folate antagonist. This selection has produced a strain that is 450 times more resistant to the drug than the original culture. Uptake of sublethal doses of radiolabeled MTX by infected red blood cells was 6-36 times greater in the resistant cultures than in the nonresistant controls. DNA isolated from all of the parasites was probed by hybridization with /sup 35/S-labeled DNA derived from a clone of the yeast thymidylate synthetase (TS) gene. This showed 50 to 100 times more increased hybridization of the TS probe to the DNA from the resistant parasites is direct evidence of gene amplification because DHFR and TS are actually one and the same bifunctional enzyme in P. falciparum. Hence, the evidence presented indicates that induced resistance of the malaria parasite to MTX in this case is due to overproduction of DHFR resulting from amplification of the DHFR-TS gene.

  5. Expression of c-myc and mutation of the KRAS gene in patients with ovarian mucinous tumors.

    PubMed

    Li, X S; Sun, J; He, X L

    2015-01-01

    We examined the expression of c-myc and mutations in the KRAS gene in ovarian mucinous tumors to explore the pathogenesis of these tumors and the feasibility of targeted gene therapy. Expression of c-myc protein and mutations in the KRAS gene in 24 cases of ovarian mucinous cystadenoma, 46 cases of ovarian borderline mucinous cystadenoma, and 46 cases of ovarian mucinous cystadenocarcinoma were detected using the immunohistochemistry PV-9000 2-step method and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The positive expression rates of c-myc in ovarian mucinous cystadenoma, borderline mucinous cystadenoma, and cystadenocarcinoma were 0, 39.1, and 65.2%, respectively (P < 0.01), while the mutation rates in KRAS were 0, 39.1 and 13.0%, respectively. The mutation rate of the borderline group was significantly higher, while rates in the other 2 groups were similar (P > 0.05). c-myc was not correlated with clinical stage, pathological grade, or age of patients with ovarian mucinous cystadenocarcinoma or borderline mucinous cystadenoma (P > 0.05), but was correlated with tumor size (P < 0.05). Mutations in KRAS were not correlated with clinical stage or tumor size in patients with borderline mucinous cystadenoma (P > 0.05), whereas it was correlated with age (P < 0.05). In borderline mucinous cystadenoma, c-myc expression and KRAS mutations were not correlated (P > 0.05). c-myc is involved in the formation of ovarian borderline mucinous cystadenoma and mucinous cystadenocarcinoma, and the KRAS gene may contribute to the formation of borderline mucinous cystadenoma. PMID:26400304

  6. Clinical Relevance of KRAS in Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Jančík, Sylwia; Drábek, Jiří; Radzioch, Danuta; Hajdúch, Marián

    2010-01-01

    The KRAS gene (Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) is an oncogene that encodes a small GTPase transductor protein called KRAS. KRAS is involved in the regulation of cell division as a result of its ability to relay external signals to the cell nucleus. Activating mutations in the KRAS gene impair the ability of the KRAS protein to switch between active and inactive states, leading to cell transformation and increased resistance to chemotherapy and biological therapies targeting epidermal growth factor receptors. This review highlights some of the features of the KRAS gene and the KRAS protein and summarizes current knowledge of the mechanism of KRAS gene regulation. It also underlines the importance of activating mutations in the KRAS gene in relation to carcinogenesis and their importance as diagnostic biomarkers, providing clues regarding human cancer patients' prognosis and indicating potential therapeutic approaches. PMID:20617134

  7. Differential association of STK11 and TP53 with KRAS mutation-associated gene expression, proliferation and immune surveillance in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schabath, M B; Welsh, E A; Fulp, W J; Chen, L; Teer, J K; Thompson, Z J; Engel, B E; Xie, M; Berglund, A E; Creelan, B C; Antonia, S J; Gray, J E; Eschrich, S A; Chen, D-T; Cress, W D; Haura, E B; Beg, A A

    2016-06-16

    While mutations in the KRAS oncogene are among the most prevalent in human cancer, there are few successful treatments to target these tumors. It is also likely that heterogeneity in KRAS-mutant tumor biology significantly contributes to the response to therapy. We hypothesized that the presence of commonly co-occurring mutations in STK11 and TP53 tumor suppressors may represent a significant source of heterogeneity in KRAS-mutant tumors. To address this, we utilized a large cohort of resected tumors from 442 lung adenocarcinoma patients with data including annotation of prevalent driver mutations (KRAS and EGFR) and tumor suppressor mutations (STK11 and TP53), microarray-based gene expression and clinical covariates, including overall survival (OS). Specifically, we determined impact of STK11 and TP53 mutations on a new KRAS mutation-associated gene expression signature as well as previously defined signatures of tumor cell proliferation and immune surveillance responses. Interestingly, STK11, but not TP53 mutations, were associated with highly elevated expression of KRAS mutation-associated genes. Mutations in TP53 and STK11 also impacted tumor biology regardless of KRAS status, with TP53 strongly associated with enhanced proliferation and STK11 with suppression of immune surveillance. These findings illustrate the remarkably distinct ways through which tumor suppressor mutations may contribute to heterogeneity in KRAS-mutant tumor biology. In addition, these studies point to novel associations between gene mutations and immune surveillance that could impact the response to immunotherapy. PMID:26477306

  8. KRAS as a Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Frank

    2015-01-01

    KRAS proteins play a major role in human cancer, but have not yielded to therapeutic attack. New technologies in drug discovery and insights into signaling pathways that KRAS controls have promoted renewed efforts to develop therapies, either through direct targeting of KRAS itself, new ways of blocking KRAS processing, or by identifying targets that KRAS cancers depend on for survival. While drugs that block the well-established downstream pathways, RAF-MAPK and PI 3 kinase, are being tested in the clinic, new efforts are underway to exploit previously unrecognized vulnerabilities, such as altered metabolic networks, or novel pathways identified through synthetic lethal screens. Furthermore, new ways of suppressing KRAS gene expression and of harnessing the immune system offer further hope that new ways of treating KRAS are finally coming into view. These issues are discussed in this edition of CCR Focus. PMID:25878360

  9. Mechanism of gene amplification via yeast autonomously replicating sequences.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Shelly; Kaul, Sanjana; Dhar, M K

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation was aimed at understanding the molecular mechanism of gene amplification. Interplay of fragile sites in promoting gene amplification was also elucidated. The amplification promoting sequences were chosen from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ARS, 5S rRNA regions of Plantago ovata and P. lagopus, proposed sites of replication pausing at Ste20 gene locus of S. cerevisiae, and the bend DNA sequences within fragile site FRA11A in humans. The gene amplification assays showed that plasmid bearing APS from yeast and human beings led to enhanced protein concentration as compared to the wild type. Both the in silico and in vitro analyses were pointed out at the strong bending potential of these APS. In addition, high mitotic stability and presence of TTTT repeats and SAR amongst these sequences encourage gene amplification. Phylogenetic analysis of S. cerevisiae ARS was also conducted. The combinatorial power of different aspects of APS analyzed in the present investigation was harnessed to reach a consensus about the factors which stimulate gene expression, in presence of these sequences. It was concluded that the mechanism of gene amplification was that AT rich tracts present in fragile sites of yeast serve as binding sites for MAR/SAR and DNA unwinding elements. The DNA protein interactions necessary for ORC activation are facilitated by DNA bending. These specific bindings at ORC promote repeated rounds of DNA replication leading to gene amplification. PMID:25685838

  10. Mechanism of Gene Amplification via Yeast Autonomously Replicating Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation was aimed at understanding the molecular mechanism of gene amplification. Interplay of fragile sites in promoting gene amplification was also elucidated. The amplification promoting sequences were chosen from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ARS, 5S rRNA regions of Plantago ovata and P. lagopus, proposed sites of replication pausing at Ste20 gene locus of S. cerevisiae, and the bend DNA sequences within fragile site FRA11A in humans. The gene amplification assays showed that plasmid bearing APS from yeast and human beings led to enhanced protein concentration as compared to the wild type. Both the in silico and in vitro analyses were pointed out at the strong bending potential of these APS. In addition, high mitotic stability and presence of TTTT repeats and SAR amongst these sequences encourage gene amplification. Phylogenetic analysis of S. cerevisiae ARS was also conducted. The combinatorial power of different aspects of APS analyzed in the present investigation was harnessed to reach a consensus about the factors which stimulate gene expression, in presence of these sequences. It was concluded that the mechanism of gene amplification was that AT rich tracts present in fragile sites of yeast serve as binding sites for MAR/SAR and DNA unwinding elements. The DNA protein interactions necessary for ORC activation are facilitated by DNA bending. These specific bindings at ORC promote repeated rounds of DNA replication leading to gene amplification. PMID:25685838

  11. Evaluation of KRAS Gene Expression and LCS6 Variant in Genomic and Cell-Free DNA of Iranian Women With Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Farahani, Maryam Shahrabi; Moghaddam, Soheila Amini; Mahdian, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Since the activation of KRAS results in de novo endometriosis in mice, KRAS is regarded as a crucial gene in ectopic endometrial implantation. Recently, it has been reported that 31% of women with endometriosis have KRAS let-7 complementary binding site 6 single-nucleotide polymorphism (LCS6 SNP). This study addresses the correlation between KRAS LCS6 SNP and endometriosis in a case–control study. To detect probable somatic mutation in ectopic endometrial tissue, we evaluated LCS6 SNP in cell-free DNA samples. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to determine the expression of KRAS transcripts in eutopic endometrial tissue. Our results suggest that the variant is not associated with the development of endometriosis in Iranian women. We observed higher levels of KRAS messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in eutopic endometrium of patients with endometriosis compared to controls. Although, the KRAS LCS6 is neither constitutional nor somatic biomarker for endometriosis, increased expression ratio of KRAS mRNA indicates its role in the implantation of endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity. PMID:25361550

  12. Evaluation of KRAS Gene Expression and LCS6 Variant in Genomic and Cell-Free DNA of Iranian Women With Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Maryam Shahrabi; Shahbazi, Shirin; Moghaddam, Soheila Amini; Mahdian, Reza

    2015-06-01

    Since the activation of KRAS results in de novo endometriosis in mice, KRAS is regarded as a crucial gene in ectopic endometrial implantation. Recently, it has been reported that 31% of women with endometriosis have KRAS let-7 complementary binding site 6 single-nucleotide polymorphism (LCS6 SNP). This study addresses the correlation between KRAS LCS6 SNP and endometriosis in a case-control study. To detect probable somatic mutation in ectopic endometrial tissue, we evaluated LCS6 SNP in cell-free DNA samples. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to determine the expression of KRAS transcripts in eutopic endometrial tissue. Our results suggest that the variant is not associated with the development of endometriosis in Iranian women. We observed higher levels of KRAS messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in eutopic endometrium of patients with endometriosis compared to controls. Although, the KRAS LCS6 is neither constitutional nor somatic biomarker for endometriosis, increased expression ratio of KRAS mRNA indicates its role in the implantation of endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity. PMID:25361550

  13. A mechanism of gene amplification driven by small DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Kuntal; Storici, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    DNA amplification is a molecular process that increases the copy number of a chromosomal tract and often causes elevated expression of the amplified gene(s). Although gene amplification is frequently observed in cancer and other degenerative disorders, the molecular mechanisms involved in the process of DNA copy number increase remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that small DNA fragments could be the trigger of DNA amplification events. Following our findings that small fragments of DNA in the form of DNA oligonucleotides can be highly recombinogenic, we have developed a system in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to capture events of chromosomal DNA amplification initiated by small DNA fragments. Here we demonstrate that small DNAs can amplify a chromosomal region, generating either tandem duplications or acentric extrachromosomal DNA circles. Small fragment-driven DNA amplification (SFDA) occurs with a frequency that increases with the length of homology between the small DNAs and the target chromosomal regions. SFDA events are triggered even by small single-stranded molecules with as little as 20-nt homology with the genomic target. A double-strand break (DSB) external to the chromosomal amplicon region stimulates the amplification event up to a factor of 20 and favors formation of extrachromosomal circles. SFDA is dependent on Rad52 and Rad59, partially dependent on Rad1, Rad10, and Pol32, and independent of Rad51, suggesting a single-strand annealing mechanism. Our results reveal a novel molecular model for gene amplification, in which small DNA fragments drive DNA amplification and define the boundaries of the amplicon region. As DNA fragments are frequently found both inside cells and in the extracellular environment, such as the serum of patients with cancer or other degenerative disorders, we propose that SFDA may be a common mechanism for DNA amplification in cancer cells, as well as a more general cause of DNA copy number variation in nature. PMID

  14. Loop mediated isothermal amplification: An innovative gene amplification technique for animal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Pravas Ranjan; Sethy, Kamadev; Mohapatra, Swagat; Panda, Debasis

    2016-01-01

    India being a developing country mainly depends on livestock sector for its economy. However, nowadays, there is emergence and reemergence of more transboundary animal diseases. The existing diagnostic techniques are not so quick and with less specificity. To reduce the economy loss, there should be a development of rapid, reliable, robust diagnostic technique, which can work with high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Loop mediated isothermal amplification assay is a rapid gene amplification technique that amplifies nucleic acid under an isothermal condition with a set of designed primers spanning eight distinct sequences of the target. This assay can be used as an emerging powerful, innovative gene amplification diagnostic tool against various pathogens of livestock diseases. This review is to highlight the basic concept and methodology of this assay in livestock disease. PMID:27284221

  15. Loop mediated isothermal amplification: An innovative gene amplification technique for animal diseases.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Pravas Ranjan; Sethy, Kamadev; Mohapatra, Swagat; Panda, Debasis

    2016-05-01

    India being a developing country mainly depends on livestock sector for its economy. However, nowadays, there is emergence and reemergence of more transboundary animal diseases. The existing diagnostic techniques are not so quick and with less specificity. To reduce the economy loss, there should be a development of rapid, reliable, robust diagnostic technique, which can work with high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Loop mediated isothermal amplification assay is a rapid gene amplification technique that amplifies nucleic acid under an isothermal condition with a set of designed primers spanning eight distinct sequences of the target. This assay can be used as an emerging powerful, innovative gene amplification diagnostic tool against various pathogens of livestock diseases. This review is to highlight the basic concept and methodology of this assay in livestock disease. PMID:27284221

  16. Picoliter droplet-based digital peptide nucleic acid clamp PCR and dielectric sorting for low abundant K-ras mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huidan; Sperling, Ralph; Rotem, Assaf; Shan, Lianfeng; Heyman, John; Zhang, Yizhe; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the US, and the 5-year survival of metastatic CRC (mCRC) is less than 10%. Although monoclonal antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) provide incremental improvements in survival, approximately 40% of mCRC patients with activating KRAS mutations won't benefit from this therapy. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA), a synthetic non-extendable oligonucleotides, can bind strongly to completely complementary wild-type KRAS by Watson-Crick base pairing and suppress its amplification during PCR, while any mutant allele will show unhindered amplification. The method is particularly suitable for the simultaneously detection of several adjoining mutant sites, just as mutations of codons 12 and 13 of KRAS gene where there are totally 12 possible mutation types. In this work, we describe the development and validation of this method, based on the droplet-based digital PCR. Using a microfluidic system, single target DNA molecule is compartmentalized in microdroplets together with PNA specific for wild-type KRAS, thermocycled and the fluorescence of each droplet was detected, followed by sorting and sequencing. It enables the precise determination of all possible mutant KRAS simultaneously, and the precise quantification of a single mutated KRAS in excess background unmutated KRAS.

  17. Multiple pathways of selected gene amplification during adaptive mutation.

    PubMed

    Kugelberg, Elisabeth; Kofoid, Eric; Reams, Andrew B; Andersson, Dan I; Roth, John R

    2006-11-14

    In a phenomenon referred to as "adaptive mutation," a population of bacterial cells with a mutation in the lac operon (lac-) accumulates Lac+ revertants during prolonged exposure to selective growth conditions (lactose). Evidence was provided that selective conditions do not increase the mutation rate but instead favor the growth of rare cells with a duplication of the leaky lac allele. A further increase in copy number (amplification) improves growth and increases the likelihood of a sequence change by adding more mutational targets to the clone (cells and lac copies per cell). These duplications and amplifications are described here. Before selection, cells with large (134-kb) lac duplications and long junction sequences (>1 kb) were common (0.2%). The same large repeats were found after selection in cells with a low-copy-number lac amplification. Surprisingly, smaller repeats (average, 34 kb) were found in high-copy-number amplifications. The small-repeat duplications form when deletions modify a preexisting large-repeat duplication. The shorter repeat size allowed higher lac amplification and better growth on lactose. Thus, selection favors a succession of gene-amplification types that make sequence changes more probable by adding targets. These findings are relevant to genetic adaptation in any biological systems in which fitness can be increased by adding gene copies (e.g., cancer and bacterial drug resistance). PMID:17082307

  18. Novel approach to abuse the hyperactive K-Ras pathway for adenoviral gene therapy of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Naumov, Inna; Kazanov, Dina; Lisiansky, Victoria; Starr, Alex; Aroch, Ilan; Shapira, Shiran; Kraus, Sarah; Arber, Nadir

    2012-01-15

    Background: Functional activation of oncogenic K-Ras signaling pathway plays an important role in the early events of colorectal carcinogenesis (CRC). K-Ras proto-oncogene is involved in 35-40% of CRC cases. Mutations in the Ras gene trigger the transduction of proliferative and anti-apoptotic signals, even in the absence of extra cellular stimuli. The objective of the current study was to use a gene-targeting approach to kill human CRC cells selectively harboring mutated K-Ras. Results: A recombinant adenovirus that carries a lethal gene, PUMA, under the control of a Ras responsive promoter (Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA) was used selectively to target CRC cells (HCT116, SW480, DLD1 and RIE-Ras) that possess a hyperactive Ras pathway while using HT29 and RIE cells as a control that harbors wild type Ras and exhibit very low Ras activity. Control vector, without the Ras responsive promoter elements was used to assess the specificity of our 'gene therapy' approach. Both adenoviral vectors were assed in vitro and in xenograft model in vivo. Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA showed high potency to induce {approx} 50% apoptosis in vitro, to abolish completely tumor formation by infecting cells with the Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA prior xenografting them in nude mice and high ability to suppress by {approx} 35% tumor progression in vivo in already established tumors. Conclusions: Selective targeting of CRC cells with the activated Ras pathway may be a novel and effective therapy in CRC. The high potency of this adenoviral vector may help to overcome an undetectable micro metastasis that is the major hurdle in challenging with CRC.

  19. Visualization of Drosophila melanogaster chorion genes undergoing amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Osheim, Y.N.; Miller, O.L. Jr.; Beyer, A.L.

    1988-07-01

    The authors visualized by electron microscopy the preferential amplification of Drosophila chorion genes in late-stage follicle cells. Chromatin spreads revealed large clusters of actively transcribed genes of the appropriate size, spacing, and orientation for chorion genes that were expressed with the correct temporal specificity. Occasionally the active genes were observed within or contiguous with intact replicons and replication forks. In every case, our micrographs are consistent with the hypothesis that the central region of each chorion domain contains a replication origin(s) used during the amplification event. In one case, a small replication bubble was observed precisely at the site of the essential region of the X chromosome amplification control element. The micrographs also suggest that forks at either end of a replicon frequently progress very different distances, presumably due to different times in initiation or different rates of movement. It appears that all chorion genes (even those coding for minor proteins) are transcribed in a ''fully on'' condition, albeit for varied durations, and that if replication fork passage does inactivate a promoter, it does so very transiently. Furthermore, a DNA segment containing one active gene is likely to have an additional active gene(s). Surprisingly, during the time frame of expected maximum activity, approximately half of the chorion sequences appear transciptionally inactive.

  20. Identification of genetic elements associated with EPSPS gene amplification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed populations can have high genetic plasticity and rapid responses to environmental selection pressures. For example, 100-fold amplification of the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene evolved to confer resistance to glyphosate, the world's most important herbicide, in the wee...

  1. Gene amplification confers glyphosate resistance in Amaranthus palmeri

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Todd A.; Zhang, Wenli; Wang, Dafu; Bukun, Bekir; Chisholm, Stephen T.; Shaner, Dale L.; Nissen, Scott J.; Patzoldt, William L.; Tranel, Patrick J.; Culpepper, A. Stanley; Grey, Timothy L.; Webster, Theodore M.; Vencill, William K.; Sammons, R. Douglas; Jiang, Jiming; Preston, Christopher; Leach, Jan E.; Westra, Philip

    2009-01-01

    The herbicide glyphosate became widely used in the United States and other parts of the world after the commercialization of glyphosate-resistant crops. These crops have constitutive overexpression of a glyphosate-insensitive form of the herbicide target site gene, 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). Increased use of glyphosate over multiple years imposes selective genetic pressure on weed populations. We investigated recently discovered glyphosate-resistant Amaranthus palmeri populations from Georgia, in comparison with normally sensitive populations. EPSPS enzyme activity from resistant and susceptible plants was equally inhibited by glyphosate, which led us to use quantitative PCR to measure relative copy numbers of the EPSPS gene. Genomes of resistant plants contained from 5-fold to more than 160-fold more copies of the EPSPS gene than did genomes of susceptible plants. Quantitative RT-PCR on cDNA revealed that EPSPS expression was positively correlated with genomic EPSPS relative copy number. Immunoblot analyses showed that increased EPSPS protein level also correlated with EPSPS genomic copy number. EPSPS gene amplification was heritable, correlated with resistance in pseudo-F2 populations, and is proposed to be the molecular basis of glyphosate resistance. FISH revealed that EPSPS genes were present on every chromosome and, therefore, gene amplification was likely not caused by unequal chromosome crossing over. This occurrence of gene amplification as an herbicide resistance mechanism in a naturally occurring weed population is particularly significant because it could threaten the sustainable use of glyphosate-resistant crop technology. PMID:20018685

  2. Combined point mutation in KRAS or EGFR genes and EML4-ALK translocation in lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jürgens, Jessica; Engel-Riedel, Walburga; Prickartz, Alexander; Ludwig, Corinna; Schildgen, Oliver; Tillmann, Ramona-Liza; Stoelben, Erich; Brockmann, Michael; Schildgen, Verena

    2014-03-01

    A total of three cases with novel constellations regarding mutation patterns in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are reported. The mutation patterns that are observed are novel and unexpected. First, a combined simultaneous KRAS mutation and EML4-ALK translocation, both in the main tumor and a bone metastasis, were observed, these mutations are assumed to mutually exclude each other. A further two cases include a father and a daughter, both of whom are suffering from NSCLC with different EGFR mutation patterns. A common cause was assumed; however, could not be deduced to mutations in the KRAS, BRAF and EGFR genes. The aforementioned cases are important, as it must be taken into account that mutations previously assumed to be exclusive can occur in combination, may influence the clinical outcome and may require different therapy compared with single mutated tumors. It has to be discussed whether diagnostic algorithms need to be adapted. The cases of father and daughter show that further unknown factors can influence development of NSCLC. PMID:24754584

  3. Amplification and characterization of the retinoblastoma gene VNTR by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, S J; Bowcock, A M; McClure, G; Klitz, W; Yandell, D W; Erlich, H A

    1992-01-01

    VNTR regions are informative genetic markers for linkage mapping and individual identification. Using PCR, we have developed a procedure for the enzymatic amplification of the VNTR located in the 16th intron of the human retinoblastoma (RB1) gene. We have also prepared a nonisotopically labeled oligonucleotide probe which facilitates detection of the amplification products. In examining 250 individuals from four different populations, we have detected 11 alleles ranging from 650 to 1,800 bp in size. The core repeat is approximately 50 bp in length. On the basis of the observed allele frequencies for Caucasian, African-American, and Hispanic populations from the United States and for the Mexican Hispanic population, the heterozygosities have been calculated to be 62%, 75%, 61%, and 50%, respectively. The observed genotype frequencies do not deviate from the values expected under Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The effect of varying primer sequences, annealing temperature, and cycle number on the amplification are also discussed. Amplification of this marker may also prove useful for detecting the heterozygosity loss that is associated with tumor formation in retinoblastoma. Images Figure 4 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:1734717

  4. Coamplification in tumors of KRAS2, type 2 inositol 1,4,5 triphosphate receptor gene, and a novel human gene, KRAG

    SciTech Connect

    Heighway, J.; Betticher, D.C.; Altermatt, H.J.

    1996-07-01

    Analysis of a region of DNA, coamplified in tumors with KRAS2, resulted in the identification of the human homologue of the mouse KRAG gene. The gene was widely expressed in range of cell lines, tumors, and normal tissue and demonstrated a high degree of alternate splicing. A human KRAG cDNA sequence, with a structure similar to that encoded by the amplified gene in mouse Y1 adrenal carcinoma cells, was isolated by RT-PCR. The predicted amino acid similarity between the two sequences was 91%, and hydrophobicity plots suggested a structure closely resembling that of transmembrane 4 superfamily members. Identification of a PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism allele-specific splicing differences in tumors. Northern analysis of mRNA derived from a range of tissues suggested high level expression in muscle and confirmed alternate splicing. To facilitate the analysis of exon junctions, a YAC clone encoding the genomic sequence was identified. This allowed the localization of KRAG to human chromosome 12p11.2. Isolation of one end of this nonchimeric clone demonstrated a perfect match with a 247-bp sequence within the 3{prime} untranslated region of the type 2 1,4,5-inositol triphosphate receptor gene. Multiplex PCR confirmed the inclusion of both genes. Multiplex PCR confirmed the inclusion of both genes in the KRAS2 amplicon in human malignancy, suggesting that either may contribute to the malignant phenotypes. 35 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. A PCR amplification strategy for unrestricted generation of chimeric genes.

    PubMed

    Vos, Michel J; Kampinga, Harm H

    2008-09-15

    For analyzing protein function, protein dynamics, or protein-protein interactions, the use of chimeric proteins has become an indispensable tool. The generation of DNA constructs coding for such fused proteins can, however, be a tedious process. Currently used strategies often make use of available endonuclease sites, leading to limitations in the choice of the site of fusion between two genes and problems in maintaining protein secondary structure. We have developed a cloning strategy to get around these disadvantages that is based on a single round of PCR amplification followed by antibiotic-resistant gene complementation. PMID:18555003

  6. Analysis of p53, K-ras gene mutation & Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with gastric cancer & peptic ulcer disease at a tertiary care hospital in north India

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Ashish; Shukla, Sanket Kumar; Prasad, Kashi Nath; Ghoshal, Uday Chand

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Mutations in the oncogene and tumour suppressor genes play an important role in carcinogenesis. We investigated the association of p53 and K-ras gene mutation and Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with gastric cancer (GC) and peptic ulcer disease (PUD) attending a tertiary care hospital in north India. Methods: In total, 348 adult patients [62 GC, 45 PUD and 241 non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD)] who underwent an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were enrolled. H. pylori infection was diagnosed by rapid urease test, culture, histopathology and PCR. Mutation in the exon 5-8 of p53 gene was analyzed by PCR-single stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) and confirmed by sequence analysis. K-ras gene codon 12 mutation was analyzed by PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results: Overall p53 gene mutation was found in 4.6 per cent of the study population, and its distribution in GC, PUD and NUD was 21, 4.4 and 0.4 per cent, respectively. p53 gene mutation was significantly higher in patients with GC than PUD (P<0.05) and NUD (P<0.001). No difference in p53 gene mutation was observed between H. pylori infected and non-infected individuals. K-ras gene mutation was absent in all the patients. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results show that p53 gene mutation may be associated with gastric carcinogenesis independent to H. pylori infection and absence of K-ras gene mutation questions its role in the pathogenesis of GC and PUD in Indian patients. PMID:23168708

  7. Gene amplification during differentiation of mammalian neural stem cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Ulrike; Backes, Christina; Raslan, Abdulrahman; Keller, Andreas; Meier, Carola; Meese, Eckart

    2015-03-30

    In development of amphibians and flies, gene amplification is one of mechanisms to increase gene expression. In mammalian cells, gene amplification seems to be restricted to tumorigenesis and acquiring of drug-resistance in cancer cells. Here, we report a complex gene amplification pattern in mouse neural progenitor cells during differentiation with approximately 10% of the genome involved. Half of the amplified mouse chromosome regions overlap with amplified regions previously reported in human neural progenitor cells, indicating conserved mechanisms during differentiation. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we verified the amplification in single cells of primary mouse mesencephalon E14 (embryonic stage) neurosphere cells during differentiation. In vivo we confirmed gene amplifications of the TRP53 gene in cryosections from mouse embryos at stage E11.5. Gene amplification is not only a cancer-related mechanism but is also conserved in evolution, occurring during differentiation of mammalian neural stem cells. PMID:25760141

  8. Analysis of KRAS and BRAF genes mutation in the central nervous system metastases of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Nicoś, Marcin; Krawczyk, Paweł; Jarosz, Bożena; Sawicki, Marek; Szumiłło, Justyna; Trojanowski, Tomasz; Milanowski, Janusz

    2016-05-01

    KRAS mutations are associated with tumor resistance to EGFR TKIs (erlotinib, gefitinib) and to monoclonal antibody against EGFR (cetuximab). Targeted treatment of mutated RAS patients is still considered as a challenge. Inhibitors of c-Met (onartuzumab or tiwantinib) and MEK (selumetinib-a dual inhibitor of MEK1 and MEK2) signaling pathways showed activity in patients with mutations in KRAS that can became an effective approach in carriers of such disorders. BRAF mutation is very rare in patients with NSCLC, and its presence is associated with sensitivity of tumor cells to BRAF inhibitors (vemurafenib, dabrafenib). In the present study, the frequency and type of KRAS and BRAF mutation were assessed in 145 FFPE tissue samples from CNS metastases of NSCLC. In 30 patients, material from the primary tumor was simultaneously available. Real-time PCR technique with allele-specific molecular probe (KRAS/BRAF Mutation Analysis Kit, Entrogen, USA) was used for molecular tests. KRAS mutations were detected in 21.4 % of CNS metastatic lesions and in 23.3 % of corresponding primary tumors. Five mutations were identified both in primary and in metastatic lesions, while one mutation only in primary tumor and one mutation only in the metastatic tumor. Most of mutations were observed in codon 12 of KRAS; however, an individual patient had diagnosed a rare G13D and Q61R substitutions. KRAS mutations were significantly more frequent in adenocarcinoma patients and smokers. Additional analysis indicated one patient with rare coexistence of KRAS and DDR2 mutations. BRAF mutation was not detected in the examined materials. KRAS frequency appears to be similar in primary and CNS. PMID:25902737

  9. Frequent mutations in EGFR, KRAS and TP53 genes in human lung cancer tumors detected by ion torrent DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xin; Sheng, Jianhui; Tang, Chuanning; Nandakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Ye, Hua; Ji, Hong; Tang, Haiying; Qin, Yu; Guan, Hongwei; Lou, Feng; Zhang, Dandan; Sun, Hong; Dong, Haichao; Zhang, Guangchun; Liu, Zhiyuan; Dong, Zhishou; Guo, Baishuai; Yan, He; Yan, Chaowei; Wang, Lu; Su, Ziyi; Li, Yangyang; Jones, Lindsey; Huang, Xue F; Chen, Si-Yi; Wu, Taihua; Lin, Hongli

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common malignancy and the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. While smoking is by far the leading cause of lung cancer, other environmental and genetic factors influence the development and progression of the cancer. Since unique mutations patterns have been observed in individual cancer samples, identification and characterization of the distinctive lung cancer molecular profile is essential for developing more effective, tailored therapies. Until recently, personalized DNA sequencing to identify genetic mutations in cancer was impractical and expensive. The recent technological advancements in next-generation DNA sequencing, such as the semiconductor-based Ion Torrent sequencing platform, has made DNA sequencing cost and time effective with more reliable results. Using the Ion Torrent Ampliseq Cancer Panel, we sequenced 737 loci from 45 cancer-related genes to identify genetic mutations in 76 human lung cancer samples. The sequencing analysis revealed missense mutations in KRAS, EGFR, and TP53 genes in the breast cancer samples of various histologic types. Thus, this study demonstrates the necessity of sequencing individual human cancers in order to develop personalized drugs or combination therapies to effectively target individual, breast cancer-specific mutations. PMID:24760004

  10. Frequent Mutations in EGFR, KRAS and TP53 Genes in Human Lung Cancer Tumors Detected by Ion Torrent DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xin; Sheng, Jianhui; Tang, Chuanning; Nandakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Ye, Hua; Ji, Hong; Tang, Haiying; Qin, Yu; Guan, Hongwei; Lou, Feng; Zhang, Dandan; Sun, Hong; Dong, Haichao; Zhang, Guangchun; Liu, Zhiyuan; Dong, Zhishou; Guo, Baishuai; Yan, He; Yan, Chaowei; Wang, Lu; Su, Ziyi; Li, Yangyang; Jones, Lindsey; Huang, Xue F.; Chen, Si-Yi; Wu, Taihua; Lin, Hongli

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common malignancy and the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. While smoking is by far the leading cause of lung cancer, other environmental and genetic factors influence the development and progression of the cancer. Since unique mutations patterns have been observed in individual cancer samples, identification and characterization of the distinctive lung cancer molecular profile is essential for developing more effective, tailored therapies. Until recently, personalized DNA sequencing to identify genetic mutations in cancer was impractical and expensive. The recent technological advancements in next-generation DNA sequencing, such as the semiconductor-based Ion Torrent sequencing platform, has made DNA sequencing cost and time effective with more reliable results. Using the Ion Torrent Ampliseq Cancer Panel, we sequenced 737 loci from 45 cancer-related genes to identify genetic mutations in 76 human lung cancer samples. The sequencing analysis revealed missense mutations in KRAS, EGFR, and TP53 genes in the breast cancer samples of various histologic types. Thus, this study demonstrates the necessity of sequencing individual human cancers in order to develop personalized drugs or combination therapies to effectively target individual, breast cancer-specific mutations. PMID:24760004

  11. Molecular spectrum of BRAF, NRAS and KRAS gene mutations in plasma cell dyscrasias: implication for MEK-ERK pathway activation

    PubMed Central

    Lionetti, Marta; Barbieri, Marzia; Todoerti, Katia; Agnelli, Luca; Marzorati, Simona; Fabris, Sonia; Ciceri, Gabriella; Galletti, Serena; Milesi, Giulia; Manzoni, Martina; Mazzoni, Mara; Greco, Angela; Tonon, Giovanni; Musto, Pellegrino; Baldini, Luca; Neri, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous plasma cell (PC) malignancy. Whole-exome sequencing has identified therapeutically targetable mutations such as those in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, which are the most prevalent MM mutations. We used deep sequencing to screen 167 representative patients with PC dyscrasias [132 with MM, 24 with primary PC leukemia (pPCL) and 11 with secondary PC leukemia (sPCL)] for mutations in BRAF, NRAS and KRAS, which were respectively found in 12%, 23.9% and 29.3% of cases. Overall, the MAPK pathway was affected in 57.5% of the patients (63.6% of those with sPCL, 59.8% of those with MM, and 41.7% of those with pPCL). The majority of BRAF variants were comparably expressed at transcript level. Additionally, gene expression profiling indicated the MAPK pathway is activated in mutated patients. Finally, we found that vemurafenib inhibition of BRAF activation in mutated U266 cells affected the expression of genes known to be associated with MM. Our data confirm and extend previous published evidence that MAPK pathway activation is recurrent in myeloma; the finding that it is mediated by BRAF mutations in a significant fraction of patients has potentially immediate clinical implications. PMID:26090869

  12. Molecular spectrum of BRAF, NRAS and KRAS gene mutations in plasma cell dyscrasias: implication for MEK-ERK pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Lionetti, Marta; Barbieri, Marzia; Todoerti, Katia; Agnelli, Luca; Marzorati, Simona; Fabris, Sonia; Ciceri, Gabriella; Galletti, Serena; Milesi, Giulia; Manzoni, Martina; Mazzoni, Mara; Greco, Angela; Tonon, Giovanni; Musto, Pellegrino; Baldini, Luca; Neri, Antonino

    2015-09-15

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous plasma cell (PC) malignancy. Whole-exome sequencing has identified therapeutically targetable mutations such as those in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, which are the most prevalent MM mutations. We used deep sequencing to screen 167 representative patients with PC dyscrasias [132 with MM, 24 with primary PC leukemia (pPCL) and 11 with secondary PC leukemia (sPCL)] for mutations in BRAF, NRAS and KRAS, which were respectively found in 12%, 23.9% and 29.3% of cases. Overall, the MAPK pathway was affected in 57.5% of the patients (63.6% of those with sPCL, 59.8% of those with MM, and 41.7% of those with pPCL). The majority of BRAF variants were comparably expressed at transcript level. Additionally, gene expression profiling indicated the MAPK pathway is activated in mutated patients. Finally, we found that vemurafenib inhibition of BRAF activation in mutated U266 cells affected the expression of genes known to be associated with MM. Our data confirm and extend previous published evidence that MAPK pathway activation is recurrent in myeloma; the finding that it is mediated by BRAF mutations in a significant fraction of patients has potentially immediate clinical implications. PMID:26090869

  13. Comparison of KRAS and PIK3CA gene status between primary tumors and paired metastases in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Qiong; Xu, Qi; Wu, Wei; Chen, Lei; Sun, Weijing; Ying, Jieer

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In metastatic or recurrent colorectal cancer (MRCRC), the concordance of Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) mutation status between the primary tumors and metastases is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between KRAS and PIK3CA mutational status and various clinicopathologic features, and compare their genotype in primary tumors with that of the paired metastatic tumors. Method We compared the mutation status of KRAS and PIK3CA between the primary tumors and the paired metastases of 59 MRCRC patients with available tissues (resection or biopsy). The presence of KRAS and PIK3CA mutations were determined by direct sequencing analysis. Results Seventeen patients (28.8%) had the KRAS mutation and 46 patients (80.0%) had the PIK3CA mutation when considering both the primary and metastatic sites. KRAS mutation was observed in ten primary tumors and eleven related metastases (16.9% vs 18.6%), while PIK3CA mutation was found in 26 primary tumors and 32 related metastases (44.1% vs 54.2%). KRAS status was concordant between primary and metastatic sites in 45 patients (76.3%, kappa =0.157), while the concordance of PIK3CA status was only found in 25 patients (42.4%, kappa =−0.141). The PIK3CA status discordance rate was significantly higher in 40 patients undergoing metachronous resection of primary tumor or metastasis, compared with that in 19 patients with synchronous resection of primary tumor or metastasis (67.5% [27/40] vs 36.8% [7/19]; P=0.026). Conclusion Our results demonstrate that low concordance of KRAS and high discordance of PIK3CA mutational status exist between the primary tumors and paired metastasis, and these findings remind us to have second thoughts about the need to evaluate metastatic tumors separately rather than only based on the primary tumor data when targeted therapy is considered. PMID:27143928

  14. An oligonucleotide-tagged microarray for routine diagnostics of colon cancer by genotyping KRAS mutations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuliang; Gudnason, Haukur; Li, Yi-Ping; Bang, Dang Duong; Wolff, Anders

    2014-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most prevalent types of cancer, causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. CRC is curable if diagnosed at an early stage. Mutations in the oncogene KRAS play a critical role in early development of CRC. Detection of activated KRAS is of diagnostic and therapeutic importance. In this study, KRAS gene fragments containing mutations in codon 12 were amplified by multiplex PCR using a 5'-Cy5-labeled reverse primer in combination with 3'-mutation-specific forward primers that were linked with four unique nucleotide-sequence tags at the 5'-end. The Cy5-labeled reverse primer was extended under PCR amplification to the 5'-end of the mutation-specific forward primers and thus included the complimentary sequence of the tag. PCR products were hybridized to tag-probes immobilized on various substrates and detected by a scanner. Our results indicate that all mutations at codon 12 of KRAS derived from cancer cells and clinical samples could be unambiguously detected. KRAS mutations were accurately detected when the mutant DNA was present only in 10% of the starting mixed materials including wild-type genomic DNA, which was isolated from either cancer cells or spiked fecal samples. The immobilized tag-probes were stable under multiple thermal cycling treatments, allowing re-use of the tag-microarray and further optimization to solid PCR. Our results demonstrated that a novel oligonucleotide-tagged microarray system has been developed which would be suitable to be used for detection of KRAS mutations and clinical diagnosis of CRC. PMID:25018048

  15. SPERM RNA AMPLIFICATION FOR GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING BY DNA MICROARRAY TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sperm RNA Amplification for Gene Expression Profiling by DNA Microarray Technology
    Hongzu Ren, Kary E. Thompson, Judith E. Schmid and David J. Dix, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triang...

  16. Marked heterogeneity of HER2/NEU gene amplification in endometrial serous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Buza, Natalia; Hui, Pei

    2013-12-01

    Significant heterogeneity of HER2 protein expression has been recently observed in HER2 positive endometrial serous carcinomas. Tumor cells with HER2 overexpression and/or gene amplification in a heterogeneous tumor may represent a biologically more aggressive subclone that is clinically relevant to prognosis and potential targeted therapy. To correlate with HER2 protein heterogeneity, we investigated the heterogeneity of HER2/NEU gene amplification in endometrial serous carcinoma. A total of 17 endometrial serous carcinomas with heterogeneous HER2 protein expression were selected for the study, including nine cases with a 3+ and eight cases with a 2+ immunohistochemical score. Initial reflex HER2 FISH was available for seven of the eight 2+ cases, five of which showed HER2/NEU gene amplification. All 17 cases underwent repeat FISH targeting larger tumor tissue areas. Ten cases (72%) displayed striking heterogeneity of HER2/NEU gene copy number in the form of cluster amplification. Diffuse HER2 amplification was observed in four cases, no amplification was seen in three tumors. In cases with cluster amplification, HER2 protein overexpression by immunohistochemistry closely correlated at the cellular level with HER2/NEU gene amplification. In conclusion, the significant percentage of cases with heterogeneous HER2/NEU gene amplification indicates that the existing HER2 testing guidelines designed for breast cancer may not be applicable to endometrial serous carcinoma. Clinical testing on multiple different tumor samples or large tumor tissue sections is recommended for both immunohistochemistry and FISH assessment of HER2 status. Direct comparison with the HER2 immunostaining pattern may be helpful in detecting HER2 amplified areas in a heterogeneous tumor. PMID:24123408

  17. Double-hairpin molecular-beacon-based amplification detection for gene diagnosis linked to cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huo; Zhang, Rongbo; Li, Feng; Zhou, Yingying; Peng, Ting; Wang, Xuedong; Shen, Zhifa

    2016-09-01

    A powerful double-hairpin molecular beacon (DHMB) was developed for cancer-related KRAS gene detection based on the one-to-two stoichiometry. During target DNA detection, DHMB can execute signal transduction even if no any exogenous element is involved. Unlike the conventional molecular beacon based on the one-to-one interaction, one target DNA not only hybridizes with one DHMB and opens its hairpin but also promotes the interaction between two DHMBs, causing the separation of two fluorophores from quenchers. This leads to an enhanced fluorescence signal. As a result, the target KRAS gene is able to be detected within a wide dynamic range from 0.05 to 200 nM with the detection limit of 50 pM, indicating a dramatic improvement compared with traditional molecular beacons. Moreover, the point mutations existing in target DNAs can be easily screened. The potential application for target species in real samples was indicated by the analysis of PCR amplicons of DNAs from the DNA extracted from SW620 cell. Besides becoming a promising candidate probe for molecular biology research and clinical diagnosis of genetic diseases, the DHMB is expected to provide a significant insight into the design of DNA probe-based homogenous sensing systems. Graphical Abstract A powerful double-hairpin molecular beacon (DHMB) was developed for cancer-related gene KRAS detection based on the one-to-two stoichiometry. Without the help of any exogenous probe, the point mutation is easily screened, and the target DNA can be quantified down to 50 pM, indicating a dramatic improvement compared with traditional molecular beacons. PMID:27422649

  18. Detection of gene amplification in non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH)

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, S.; Houldsworth, J.; Rao, P.H.

    1994-09-01

    Gene amplification characterized by distinct cytogenetic structures, such as homogeneously stained regions (hsrs), aberrantly banded marked chromosomes (abms), and double minutes (dmins) chromosomes is commonly found in tumor cells, and is considered as an important mechanism by which tumor cells gain increased levels of expression of critical genes. Very little is known about gene amplification in NHL. So far, no commonly amplified gene(s) have been identified in NHL. DNA in-gel renaturation assay provided evidence for the presence of amplified DNA fragments in NHL. In order to identify the gene(s) amplified in NHL we performed a modified form of CGH (hybridization and normal chromosomes with biotin labeled tumor DNA) to a panel of 10 NHL, which showed cytogenetic evidence for gene amplification in the form of hsrs and dmins. A number of chromosomal regions were found to be non-randomly amplified: 1p32-36(9/10), 1q32-44(6/10), 6p(9/10), 6q26-27(5/10), 16(8/10), 19(7/10) and 22q(7/10). Amplification of DNA from specific chromosomal bands was noted at 4p16(8/10), 11q13(10/10), and 12q24(8/10). Tumor L-10 showed specific amplification of 2p13. This study details the first CGH study performed on a panel of NHLs to identify gene amplification and chromosomal origin of hsrs and dmins identified by conventional cytogenetic analysis. The modified CGH employed in this study indicated that gene amplification is a frequent genetic alteration in NHL.

  19. A subset of herpes simplex virus replication genes induces DNA amplification within the host cell genome.

    PubMed Central

    Heilbronn, R; zur Hausen, H

    1989-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) induces DNA amplification of target genes within the host cell chromosome. To characterize the HSV genes that mediate the amplification effect, combinations of cloned DNA fragments covering the entire HSV genome were transiently transfected into simian virus 40 (SV40)-transformed hamster cells. This led to amplification of the integrated SV40 DNA sequences to a degree comparable to that observed after transfection of intact virion DNA. Transfection of combinations of subclones and of human cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter-driven expression constructs for individual open reading frames led to the identification of six HSV genes which together were necessary and sufficient for the induction of DNA amplification: UL30 (DNA polymerase), UL29 (major DNA-binding protein), UL5, UL8, UL42, and UL52. All of these genes encode proteins necessary for HSV DNA replication. However, an additional gene coding for an HSV origin-binding protein (UL9) was required for origin-dependent HSV DNA replication but was dispensible for SV40 DNA amplification. Our results show that a subset of HSV replication genes is sufficient for the induction of DNA amplification. This opens the possibility that HSV expresses functions sufficient for DNA amplification but separate from those responsible for lytic viral growth. HSV infection may thereby induce DNA amplification within the host cell genome without killing the host by lytic viral growth. This may lead to persistence of a cell with a new genetic phenotype, which would have implications for the pathogenicity of the virus in vivo. Images PMID:2547992

  20. A subset of herpes simplex virus replication genes induces DNA amplification within the host cell genome

    SciTech Connect

    Heilbronn, R.; zur Hausen, H. )

    1989-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) induces DNA amplification of target genes within the host cell chromosome. To characterize the HSV genes that mediate the amplification effect, combinations of cloned DNA fragments covering the entire HSV genome were transiently transfected into simian virus 40 (SV40)-transformed hamster cells. This led to amplification of the integrated SV40 DNA sequences to a degree comparable to that observed after transfection of intact virion DNA. Transfection of combinations of subclones and of human cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter-driven expression constructs for individual open reading frames led to the identification of sic HSV genes which together were necessary and sufficient for the induction of DNA amplification: UL30 (DNA polymerase), UL29 (major DNA-binding protein), UL5, UL8, UL42, and UL52. All of these genes encode proteins necessary for HSV DNA replication. However, an additional gene coding for an HSV origin-binding protein (UL9) was required for origin-dependent HSV DNA replication but was dispensable for SV40 DNA amplification. The results show that a subset of HSV replication genes is sufficient for the induction of DNA amplification. This opens the possibility that HSV expresses functions sufficient for DNA amplification but separate from those responsible for lytic viral growth. HSV infection may thereby induce DNA amplification within the host cell genome without killing the host by lytic viral growth. This may lead to persistence of a cell with a new genetic phenotype, which would have implications for the pathogenicity of the virus in vivo.

  1. Targeting Mutant KRAS for Anticancer Therapeutics: A Review of Novel Small Molecule Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanxiang; Kaiser, Christine E.; Frett, Brendan; Li, Hong-yu

    2015-01-01

    The RAS proteins play a role in cell differentiation, proliferation, and survival. Aberrant RAS signaling has been found to play a role in 30% of all cancers. KRAS, a key member of the RAS protein family, is an attractive cancer target, as frequent point mutations in the KRAS gene render the protein constitutively active. A number of attempts have been made to target aberrant KRAS signaling by identifying small molecule compounds that (1) are synthetic lethal to mutant KRAS, (2) block KRAS/GEF interactions, (3) inhibit downstream KRAS effectors, or (4) inhibit the post-translational processing of RAS proteins. In addition, inhibition of novel targets outside the main KRAS signaling pathway, specifically the cell cycle related kinase PLK1, has been shown have an effect in cells that harbor mutant KRAS. Herein we review the use of various high-throughput screening assays utilized to identify new small-molecule compounds capable of targeting mutant KRAS-driven cancers. PMID:23566315

  2. KRAS Engages AGO2 to Enhance Cellular Transformation.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Sunita; Pitchiaya, Sethuramasundaram; Malik, Rohit; Kothari, Vishal; Hosono, Yasuyuki; Yocum, Anastasia K; Gundlapalli, Harika; White, Yasmine; Firestone, Ari; Cao, Xuhong; Dhanasekaran, Saravana M; Stuckey, Jeanne A; Bollag, Gideon; Shannon, Kevin; Walter, Nils G; Kumar-Sinha, Chandan; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2016-02-16

    Oncogenic mutations in RAS provide a compelling yet intractable therapeutic target. Using co-immunoprecipitation mass spectrometry, we uncovered an interaction between RAS and Argonaute 2 (AGO2). Endogenously, RAS and AGO2 co-sediment and co-localize in the endoplasmic reticulum. The AGO2 N-terminal domain directly binds the Switch II region of KRAS, agnostic of nucleotide (GDP/GTP) binding. Functionally, AGO2 knockdown attenuates cell proliferation in mutant KRAS-dependent cells and AGO2 overexpression enhances KRAS(G12V)-mediated transformation. Using AGO2-/- cells, we demonstrate that the RAS-AGO2 interaction is required for maximal mutant KRAS expression and cellular transformation. Mechanistically, oncogenic KRAS attenuates AGO2-mediated gene silencing. Overall, the functional interaction with AGO2 extends KRAS function beyond its canonical role in signaling. PMID:26854235

  3. KRAS Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    O’Hagan, Rónán C.; Heyer, Joerg

    2011-01-01

    KRAS is a potent oncogene and is mutated in about 30% of all human cancers. However, the biological context of KRAS-dependent oncogenesis is poorly understood. Genetically engineered mouse models of cancer provide invaluable tools to study the oncogenic process, and insights from KRAS-driven models have significantly increased our understanding of the genetic, cellular, and tissue contexts in which KRAS is competent for oncogenesis. Moreover, variation among tumors arising in mouse models can provide insight into the mechanisms underlying response or resistance to therapy in KRAS-dependent cancers. Hence, it is essential that models of KRAS-driven cancers accurately reflect the genetics of human tumors and recapitulate the complex tumor-stromal intercommunication that is manifest in human cancers. Here, we highlight the progress made in modeling KRAS-dependent cancers and the impact that these models have had on our understanding of cancer biology. In particular, the development of models that recapitulate the complex biology of human cancers enables translational insights into mechanisms of therapeutic intervention in KRAS-dependent cancers. PMID:21779503

  4. Estrogen receptor alpha gene amplification in breast cancer: 25 years of debate

    PubMed Central

    Holst, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago, Nembrot and colleagues reported amplification of the estrogen receptor alpha gene (ESR1) in breast cancer, initiating a broad and still ongoing scientific debate on the prevalence and clinical significance of this genetic aberration, which affects one of the most important genes in breast cancer. Since then, a multitude of studies on this topic has been published, covering a wide range of divergent results and arguments. The reported prevalence of this alteration in breast cancer ranges from 0% to 75%, suggesting that ESR1 copy number analysis is hampered by technical and interpreter issues. To date, two major issues related to ESR1 amplification remain to be conclusively addressed: (1) The extent to which abundant amounts of messenger RNA can mimic amplification in standard fluorescence in situ hybridization assays in the analysis of strongly expressed genes like ESR1, and (2) the clinical relevance of ESR1 amplification: Such relevance is strongly disputed, with data showing predictive value for response as well as for resistance of the cancer to anti-estrogen therapies, or for subsequent development of cancers in the case of precursor lesions that display amplification of ESR1. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the various views on ESR1 amplification, and highlights explanations for the contradictions and conflicting data that could inform future ESR1 research. PMID:27081639

  5. The adeno-associated virus rep gene suppresses herpes simplex virus-induced DNA amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Heilbronn, R; Bürkle, A; Stephan, S; zur Hausen, H

    1990-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) induces within the host cell genome DNA amplification which can be suppressed by coinfection with adeno-associated virus (AAV). To characterize the AAV functions mediating this effect, cloned AAV type 2 wild-type or mutant genomes were transfected into simian virus 40 (SV40)-transformed hamster cells together with the six HSV replication genes (encoding UL5, UL8, major DNA-binding protein, DNA polymerase, UL42, and UL52) which together are necessary and sufficient for the induction of SV40 DNA amplification (R. Heilbronn and H. zur Hausen, J. Virol. 63:3683-3692, 1989). The AAV rep gene was identified as being responsible for the complete inhibition of HSV-induced SV40 DNA amplification. Likewise, rep inhibited origin-dependent HSV replication. rep neither killed the transfected host cells nor interfered with gene expression from the cotransfected amplification genes. This points to a specific interference with HSV-induced DNA amplification. Images PMID:2159559

  6. Amplification of Distant Estrogen Response Elements Deregulates Target Genes Associated with Tamoxifen Resistance in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Pei-Yin; Hsu, Hang-Kai; Lan, Xun; Juan, Liran; Yan, Pearlly S.; Labanowska, Jadwiga; Heerema, Nyla; Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Chiu, Yu-Chiao; Chen, Yidong; Liu, Yunlong; Li, Lang; Li, Rong; Thompson, Ian M.; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Sharp, Zelton D.; Kirma, Nameer B.; Jin, Victor X.; Huang, Tim H.-M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY A causal role of gene amplification in tumorigenesis is well-known, while amplification of DNA regulatory elements as an oncogenic driver remains unclear. In this study, we integrated next-generation sequencing approaches to map distant estrogen response elements (DEREs) that remotely control transcription of target genes through chromatin proximity. Two densely mapped DERE regions located on chromosomes 17q23 and 20q13 were frequently amplified in ERα-positive luminal breast cancer. These aberrantly amplified DEREs deregulated target gene expression potentially linked to cancer development and tamoxifen resistance. Progressive accumulation of DERE copies was observed in normal breast progenitor cells chronically exposed to estrogenic chemicals. These findings may extend to other DNA regulatory elements, the amplification of which can profoundly alter target transcriptome during tumorigenesis. PMID:23948299

  7. Nonrepresentative PCR amplification of variable gene sequences in clinical specimens containing dilute, complex mixtures of microorganisms.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, C J; Jerse, A E; Cohen, M S; Cannon, J G; Seifert, H S

    1994-01-01

    PCR amplification and DNA sequencing of the expression locus from Neisseria gonorrhoeae contained in urine sediments collected from experimentally infected human subjects produced two observations. First, different pilin sequences were obtained when separate aliquots of the same sample were amplified and sequenced. In contrast, the same pilin sequence was obtained when repeated amplifications were performed on individual colonies grown from the clinical samples. Second, mixed sequences (i.e., more than one nucleotide at variable positions in the pilin gene sequence) were observed in both the direct clinical isolates and individual cultures grown from the isolates. These results suggest that when clinical samples are directly examined by PCR amplification and sequencing, multiple amplifications may be required to detect sequence variants in the sample and minority variant sequences will not always be detected. Images PMID:7908674

  8. Higher metastatic efficiency of KRas G12V than KRas G13D in a colorectal cancer model.

    PubMed

    Alamo, Patricia; Gallardo, Alberto; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Pavón, Miguel Angel; Casanova, Isolda; Trias, Manuel; Mangues, María Antonia; Lopez-Pousa, Antonio; Villaverde, Antonio; Vázquez, Esther; Bardelli, Alberto; Céspedes, María Virtudes; Mangues, Ramón

    2015-02-01

    Although all KRas (protein that in humans is encoded by the KRas gene) point mutants are considered to have a similar prognostic capacity, their transformation and tumorigenic capacities vary widely. We compared the metastatic efficiency of KRas G12V (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog with valine mutation at codon 12) and KRas G13D (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog with aspartic mutation at codon 13) oncogenes in an orthotopic colorectal cancer (CRC) model. Following subcutaneous preconditioning, recombinant clones of the SW48 CRC cell line [Kras wild-type (Kras WT)] expressing the KRas G12V or KRas G13D allele were microinjected in the mouse cecum. The percentage of animals developing lymph node metastasis was higher in KRas G12V than in KRas G13D mice. Microscopic, macroscopic, and visible lymphatic foci were 1.5- to 3.0-fold larger in KRas G12V than in KRas G13D mice (P < 0.05). In the lung, only microfoci were developed in both groups. KRas G12V primary tumors had lower apoptosis (7.0 ± 1.2 vs. 7.4 ± 1.0 per field, P = 0.02), higher tumor budding at the invasion front (1.2 ± 0.2 vs. 0.6 ± 0.1, P = 0.04), and a higher percentage of C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4)-overexpressing intravasated tumor emboli (49.8 ± 9.4% vs. 12.8 ± 4.4%, P < 0.001) than KRas G13D tumors. KRas G12V primary tumors showed Akt activation, and β5 integrin, vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), and Serpine-1 overexpression, whereas KRas G13D tumors showed integrin β1 and angiopoietin 2 (Angpt2) overexpression. The increased cell survival, invasion, intravasation, and specific molecular regulation observed in KRas G12V tumors is consistent with the higher aggressiveness observed in patients with CRC expressing this oncogene. PMID:25359494

  9. Identification of human chromosome 9 specific genes using exon amplification.

    PubMed

    Church, D M; Banks, L T; Rogers, A C; Graw, S L; Housman, D E; Gusella, J F; Buckler, A J

    1993-11-01

    We have recently developed a method, exon amplification, that is designed for isolation of exon sequences from genomic DNA. To assess the efficacy of this method we have analyzed cosmid genomic clones derived from human chromosome 9, and have cloned several products from this analysis. Approximately 63% of cosmids produced at least one product derived from functioning splice sites within the target genomic fragment, and in many cases multiple products were isolated. In addition, an easily identifiable class of false positives was produced from 56% of cosmids analyzed; these are readily eliminated from subsequent study. Sequence analysis and database searches revealed that the majority (87%) of the putative exon clones were unique, the remainder being derived from repetitive sequences. Analysis of sequence conservation by Southern blotting in addition to cDNA screening experiments suggested that most, if not all, of these unique sequences represent true exons. The results of these studies indicate that exon amplification is a rapid and reliable approach for isolation of exon sequences from mammalian genomic DNA. PMID:7506603

  10. Genomic and Transcriptional Alterations in Lung Adenocarcinoma in Relation to EGFR and KRAS Mutation Status

    PubMed Central

    Planck, Maria; Edlund, Karolina; Botling, Johan; Micke, Patrick; Isaksson, Sofi; Staaf, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In lung adenocarcinoma, the mutational spectrum is dominated by EGFR and KRAS mutations. Improved knowledge about genomic and transcriptional alterations in and between mutation-defined subgroups may identify genes involved in disease development or progression. Methods Genomic profiles from 457 adenocarcinomas, including 113 EGFR-mutated, 134 KRAS-mutated and 210 EGFR and KRAS-wild type tumors (EGFRwt/KRASwt), and gene expression profiles from 914 adenocarcinomas, including 309 EGFR-mutated, 192 KRAS-mutated, and 413 EGFRwt/KRASwt tumors, were assembled from different repositories. Genomic and transcriptional differences between the three mutational groups were analyzed by both supervised and unsupervised methods. Results EGFR-mutated adenocarcinomas displayed a larger number of copy number alterations and recurrent amplifications, a higher fraction of total loss-of-heterozygosity, higher genomic complexity, and a more distinct expression pattern than EGFR-wild type adenocarcinomas. Several of these differences were also consistent when the three mutational groups were stratified by stage, gender and smoking status. Specific copy number alterations were associated with mutation status, predominantly including regions of gain with the highest frequency in EGFR-mutated tumors. Differential regions included both large and small regions of gain on 1p, 5q34-q35.3, 7p, 7q11.21, 12p12.1, 16p, and 21q, and losses on 6q16.3-q21, 8p, and 9p, with 20-40% frequency differences between the mutational groups. Supervised gene expression analyses identified 96 consistently differentially expressed genes between the mutational groups, and together with unsupervised analyses these analyses highlighted the difficulty in broadly resolving the three mutational groups into distinct transcriptional entities. Conclusions We provide a comprehensive overview of the genomic and transcriptional landscape in lung adenocarcinoma stratified by EGFR and KRAS mutations. Our analyses

  11. Trisomy of the Dscr1 gene suppresses early progression of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia driven by oncogenic Kras

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jang Choon; Shin, Jimin; Baek, Kwan-Hyuck

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •A single extra copy of Dscr1 restrains progression of PanIN-1A to PanIN-1B lesions. •Dscr1 trisomy attenuates calcineurin–NFAT pathway in neoplastic ductal epithelium. •Dscr1 trisomy leads to upregulation of p15{sup INK4b} in neoplastic ductal epithelium. •A single extra copy of Dscr1 reduces epithelial proliferation in early PanIN lesions. •Dscr1 trisomy may protect Down syndrome individuals from pancreatic cancer. -- Abstract: Individuals with Down syndrome exhibit remarkably reduced incidence of most solid tumors including pancreatic cancer. Multiple mechanisms arising from the genetic complexity underlying Down syndrome has been suggested to contribute to such a broad cancer protection. In this study, utilizing a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic cancer, we demonstrate that trisomy of the Down syndrome critical region-1 (Dscr1), an endogenous calcineurin inhibitor localized on chromosome 21, suppresses the progression of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia-1A (PanIN-1A) to PanIN-1B lesions without affecting the initiation of PanIN lesions mediated by oncogenic Kras{sup G12D}. In addition, we show that Dscr1 trisomy attenuates nuclear localization of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) accompanied by upregulation of the p15{sup Ink4b} tumor suppressor and reduction of cell proliferation in early PanIN lesions. Our data suggest that attenuation of calcineurin–NFAT signaling in neoplastic pancreatic ductal epithelium by a single extra copy of Dscr1 is sufficient to inhibit the progression of early PanIN lesions driven by oncogenic Kras, and thus may be a potential mechanism underlying reduced incidence of pancreatic cancer in Down syndrome individuals.

  12. Lung cancers with acquired resistance to EGFR inhibitors occasionally harbor BRAF gene mutations but lack mutations in KRAS, NRAS, or MEK1.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kadoaki; Sequist, Lecia V; Arcila, Maria E; Moran, Teresa; Chmielecki, Juliann; Lin, Ya-Lun; Pan, Yumei; Wang, Lu; de Stanchina, Elisa; Shien, Kazuhiko; Aoe, Keisuke; Toyooka, Shinichi; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Fernandez-Cuesta, Lynnette; Fidias, Panos; Yang, James Chih-Hsin; Miller, Vincent A; Riely, Gregory J; Kris, Mark G; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Vnencak-Jones, Cindy L; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Ladanyi, Marc; Pao, William

    2012-07-31

    Acquired resistance to EGF receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) is inevitable in metastatic EGFR-mutant lung cancers. Here, we modeled disease progression using EGFR-mutant human tumor cell lines. Although five of six models displayed alterations already found in humans, one harbored an unexpected secondary NRAS Q61K mutation; resistant cells were sensitive to concurrent EGFR and MEK inhibition but to neither alone. Prompted by this finding and because RAS/RAF/MEK mutations are known mediators of acquired resistance in other solid tumors (colon cancers, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, and melanomas) responsive to targeted therapies, we analyzed the frequency of secondary KRAS/NRAS/BRAF/MEK1 gene mutations in the largest collection to date of lung cancers with acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs. No recurrent NRAS, KRAS, or MEK1 mutations were found in 212, 195, or 146 patient samples, respectively, but 2 of 195 (1%) were found to have mutations in BRAF (G469A and V600E). Ectopic expression of mutant NRAS or BRAF in drug-sensitive EGFR-mutant cells conferred resistance to EGFR TKIs that was overcome by addition of a MEK inhibitor. Collectively, these positive and negative results provide deeper insight into mechanisms of acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs in lung cancer and inform ongoing clinical trials designed to overcome resistance. In the context of emerging knowledge about mechanisms of acquired resistance to targeted therapies in various cancers, our data highlight the notion that, even though solid tumors share common signaling cascades, mediators of acquired resistance must be elucidated for each disease separately in the context of treatment. PMID:22773810

  13. Cross-triggered and cascaded recycling amplification for ultrasensitive electrochemical sensing of the mutant human p53 gene.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cuiyun; Dou, Baoting; Yang, Jianmei; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun

    2016-07-01

    Based on an endonuclease-assisted, cross-triggered and cascaded recycling amplification strategy, the construction of a simple electrochemical sensing platform for the ultrasensitive detection of the mutant p53 gene in human serum is described. Using this new signal amplification approach, the sub-femtomolar level of the mutant p53 gene can be selectively detected. PMID:27331773

  14. Novel bright field molecular morphology methods for detection of HER2 gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, Raymond; Pettay, James; Hicks, David; Skacel, Marek; Powell, Richard; Grogan, Tom; Hainfeld, James

    2004-08-01

    Profiling the amplification and over-expression of the HER2 gene is a key component for defining the prognosis and management of invasive breast carcinoma. Clinical laboratory testing for HER2 gene amplification and over expression has been complicated by an unacceptably high rate of false positive immunohistochemistry (IHC) results, poor reproducibility for the '2+' category of IHC scoring, and reluctant acceptance of alternative testing by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) by the diagnostic pathology community. Novel chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) assays have been developed that utilize bright field microscopy and a conventional light microscope for interpretation, but the analytical sensitivity of first generation CISH systems has been problematic. Novel second generation in situ hybridization detection methods based upon polymerized lg detection chemistry, autometallography or enzyme metallography, have been developed that routinely detect endogenous HER2 signals in normal cells (on slide hybridization control) and HER2 signals in both non-amplified and amplified patterns of HER2 genomic signatures. By combining the strength of polymerized peroxidase-labeled antibodies and metallography for gene amplification, with the detection of expression of HER2 encoded protein by IHC on the same slide, both HER2 gene amplification and protein over-expression can be simultaneously evaluated on a cell-by-cell basis in each microscopic field of carcinoma. PMID:15614612

  15. Genomic markers of panitumumab resistance including ERBB2/HER2 in a phase II study of KRAS wild-type (wt) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC)

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Garrett S.; Cheang, Maggie C.; Chang, Hector Li; Kennecke, Hagen F.

    2016-01-01

    A prospective study was conducted to identify biomarkers associated with resistance to panitumumab monotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Patients with previously treated, codon 12/13 KRAS wt, mCRC were prospectively administered panitumumab 6 mg/kg IV q2weeks. Of 34 panitumumab-treated patients, 11 (32%) had progressive disease at 8 weeks and were classified as non-responders. A Nanostring nCounter-based assay identified a 5-gene expression signature (ERBB2, MLPH, IRX3, MYRF, and KLK6) associated with panitumumab resistance (P = 0.001). Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization determined that the HER2 (ERBB2) protein was overexpressed in 4/11 non-responding and 0/21 responding cases (P = 0.035). Two non-responding tumors had ERBB2 gene amplification only, and one demonstrated both ERBB2 amplification and mutation. A non-codon 12/13 KRAS mutation occurred in one panitumumab-resistant patient and was mutually exclusive with ERBB2/HER2 abnormalities. This study identifies a 5-gene signature associated with non-response to single agent panitumumab, including a subgroup of non-responders with evidence of aberrant ERBB2/HER2 signaling. KRAS wt tumors resistant to EGFRi may be identified by gene signature analysis, and the HER2 pathway plays an important role in resistance to therapy. PMID:26980732

  16. Amplification of the murine mdr2 gene and a reconsideration of the structure of the murine mdr gene locus.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, L S

    1995-01-01

    A common feature of cells selected in vitro for the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype is the amplification and concomitant overexpression of the mdr genes. In murine macrophage-like J774.2-derived MDR cell lines, there is a good correlation between levels of amplification and expression for the mdr1b gene, but not for the other two gene family members, mdr1a and mdr2. To understand this phenomenon better, a study of the amplification and expression of the mdr2 gene was undertaken. Southern blotting of genomic DNAs from a series of six MDR cell lines revealed that five of these lines had 5'-end amplification of mdr2, whereas only three contained 3'-end amplification. The analysis also suggested the involvement of a recombination hot-spot in this phenomenon. Despite the observation that the ratio between the number of copies of the 5' and 3' ends of the gene differs among cell lines, the ratio of 5' to 3' end transcription of mdr2 was approximately 1 in all cell lines. An analysis of promoter methylation in MDR cell lines demonstrated that this mechanism may play a role in regulating the transcription of mdr2, but not of mdr1b. Long-range mapping of the mdr locus in parental and amplified cell lines suggested that the three mdr genes are oriented in the same direction, and also revealed the presence of a number of rearrangement events. Models for the murine mdr gene locus in wild-type cells and in a cell line containing a rearrangement are presented. PMID:7832992

  17. Gene amplification of the transcription factor DP1 and CTNND1 in human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Sandra D; Angulo, Barbara; Suarez-Gauthier, Ana; Melchor, Lorenzo; Medina, Pedro P; Sanchez-Verde, Lydia; Torres-Lanzas, Juan; Pita, Guillermo; Benitez, Javier; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse

    2010-09-01

    The search for novel oncogenes is important because they could be the target of future specific anticancer therapies. In the present paper we report the identification of novel amplified genes in lung cancer by means of global gene expression analysis. To screen for amplicons, we aligned the gene expression data according to the position of transcripts in the human genome and searched for clusters of over-expressed genes. We found several clusters with gene over-expression, suggesting an underlying genomic amplification. FISH and microarray analysis for DNA copy number in two clusters, at chromosomes 11q12 and 13q34, confirmed the presence of amplifications spanning about 0.4 and 1 Mb for 11q12 and 13q34, respectively. Amplification at these regions each occurred at a frequency of 3%. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR of each individual transcript within the amplicons allowed us to verify the increased in gene expression of several genes. The p120ctn and DP1 proteins, encoded by two candidate oncogenes, CTNND1 and TFDP1, at 11q12 and 13q amplicons, respectively, showed very strong immunostaining in lung tumours with gene amplification. We then focused on the 13q34 amplicon and in the TFDP1 candidate oncogene. To further determine the oncogenic properties of DP1, we searched for lung cancer cell lines carrying TFDP1 amplification. Depletion of TFDP1 expression by small interference RNA in a lung cancer cell line (HCC33) with TFDP1 amplification and protein over-expression reduced cell viability by 50%. In conclusion, we report the identification of two novel amplicons, at 13q34 and 11q12, each occurring at a frequency of 3% of non-small cell lung cancers. TFDP1, which encodes the E2F-associated transcription factor DP1 is a candidate oncogene at 13q34. The data discussed in this publication have been deposited in NCBIs Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/) and are accessible through GEO Series Accession No. GSE21168. PMID:20556744

  18. Detection of gene-anchored amplification polymorphism (GAAP) in the vicinity of plant mitochondrial genes.

    PubMed

    Loridon, K; Saumitou-Laprade, P

    2002-05-01

    A simple, semi-automatable method was established for assessing polymorphism in plant mitochondrial genome. A set of 41 mitochondrial markers based on the published Arabidopsis thaliana sequence was developed in Brassicaceae using a gene-anchored amplification polymorphism (GAAP) strategy. PCR primers were selected based on conserved coding regions of mitochondrial genes and used to amplify the corresponding 5' and/or 3' non-coding flanking regions in order to maximise sequence variability between haplotypes. The variations in fragment size were analysed on a LiCor DNA sequencer, but the methodology is compatible with various sequencing systems using denaturing polyacrylamide gels. One advantage of the method is that GAAP products can be directly sequenced (without any cloning steps) through labelled M13 consensus sequences. Mitochondrial GAAP loci gave clear and simple patterns (one or two bands) that were easy to score and highly reproducible. Nearly all mitochondrial loci examined in A. thaliana were conserved within the Brassicaceae family, and half of the primers generated products when DNA from a distant species, Beta vulgaris (Chenopodiaceae), was used as template. The GAAP markers revealed low levels of polymorphism within species but exhibited a high level of polymorphism among genera and families. Our results showed some discrepancies with respect to the published mtDNA sequence of A. thaliana. PMID:12073035

  19. KRAS Mutations in Canine and Feline Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Crozier, C; Wood, G A; Foster, R A; Stasi, S; Liu, J H W; Bartlett, J M S; Coomber, B L; Sabine, V S

    2016-07-01

    Companion animals may serve as valuable models for studying human cancers. Although KRAS is the most commonly mutated gene in human ductal pancreatic cancers (57%), with mutations frequently occurring at codons 12, 13 and 61, human pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas (ACCs) lack activating KRAS mutations. In the present study, 32 pancreatic ACC samples obtained from 14 dogs and 18 cats, including seven metastases, were analyzed for six common activating KRAS mutations located in codons 12 (n = 5) and 13 (n = 1) using Sequenom MassARRAY. No KRAS mutations were found, suggesting that, similar to human pancreatic ACC, KRAS mutations do not play a critical role in feline or canine pancreatic ACC. Due to the similarity of the clinical disease in dogs and cats to that of man, this study confirms that companion animals offer potential as a suitable model for investigating this rare subtype of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27290644

  20. Super resolution imaging of HER2 gene amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Masaya; Kubo, Takuya; Masumoto, Kanako; Iwanaga, Shigeki

    2016-02-01

    HER2 positive breast cancer is currently examined by counting HER2 genes using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-stained breast carcinoma samples. In this research, two-dimensional super resolution fluorescence microscopy based on stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), with a spatial resolution of approximately 20 nm in the lateral direction, was used to more precisely distinguish and count HER2 genes in a FISH-stained tissue section. Furthermore, by introducing double-helix point spread function (DH-PSF), an optical phase modulation technique, to super resolution microscopy, three-dimensional images were obtained of HER2 in a breast carcinoma sample approximately 4 μm thick.

  1. Prognostic and Predictive Significance of MYC and KRAS Alterations in Breast Cancer from Women Treated with Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Carolina Rosal Teixeira; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Rey, Juan Antonio; Carvalho, Antônio Alberto; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Khayat, André Salim; Pinto, Giovanny Rebouças; Demachki, Sâmia; de Arruda Cardoso Smith, Marília; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a complex disease, with heterogeneous clinical evolution. Several analyses have been performed to identify the risk factors for breast cancer progression and the patients who respond best to a specific treatment. We aimed to evaluate whether the hormone receptor expression, HER2 and MYC genes and their protein status, and KRAS codon 12 mutations may be prognostic or predictive biomarkers of breast cancer. Protein, gene and mutation status were concomitantly evaluated in 116 breast tumors from women who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy with doxorubicin plus cyclophosphamide. We observed that MYC expression was associated with luminal B and HER2 overexpression phenotypes compared to luminal A (p<0.05). The presence of MYC duplication or polysomy 8, as well as KRAS mutation, were also associated with the HER2 overexpression subtype (p<0.05). MYC expression and MYC gain were more frequently observed in early-onset compared to late-onset tumors (p<0.05). KRAS mutation was a risk factor of grade 3 tumors (p<0.05). A multivariate logistic regression demonstrated that MYC amplification defined as MYC/nucleus ratio of ≥2.5 was a protective factor for chemotherapy resistance. On the other hand, age and grade 2 tumors were a risk factor. Additionally, luminal B, HER2 overexpression, and triple-negative tumors presented increased odds of being resistant to chemotherapy relative to luminal A tumors. Thus, breast tumors with KRAS codon 12 mutations seem to present a worse prognosis. Additionally, MYC amplification may help in the identification of tumors that are sensitive to doxorubicin plus cyclophosphamide treatment. If confirmed in a large set of samples, these markers may be useful for clinical stratification and prognosis. PMID:23555992

  2. Intrinsic challenges in ancient microbiome reconstruction using 16S rRNA gene amplification

    PubMed Central

    Ziesemer, Kirsten A.; Mann, Allison E.; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Schroeder, Hannes; Ozga, Andrew T.; Brandt, Bernd W.; Zaura, Egija; Waters-Rist, Andrea; Hoogland, Menno; Salazar-García, Domingo C.; Aldenderfer, Mark; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Weston, Darlene A.; MacDonald, Sandy J.; Thomas, Gavin H.; Collins, Matthew J.; Lewis, Cecil M.; Hofman, Corinne; Warinner, Christina

    2015-01-01

    To date, characterization of ancient oral (dental calculus) and gut (coprolite) microbiota has been primarily accomplished through a metataxonomic approach involving targeted amplification of one or more variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene. Specifically, the V3 region (E. coli 341–534) of this gene has been suggested as an excellent candidate for ancient DNA amplification and microbial community reconstruction. However, in practice this metataxonomic approach often produces highly skewed taxonomic frequency data. In this study, we use non-targeted (shotgun metagenomics) sequencing methods to better understand skewed microbial profiles observed in four ancient dental calculus specimens previously analyzed by amplicon sequencing. Through comparisons of microbial taxonomic counts from paired amplicon (V3 U341F/534R) and shotgun sequencing datasets, we demonstrate that extensive length polymorphisms in the V3 region are a consistent and major cause of differential amplification leading to taxonomic bias in ancient microbiome reconstructions based on amplicon sequencing. We conclude that systematic amplification bias confounds attempts to accurately reconstruct microbiome taxonomic profiles from 16S rRNA V3 amplicon data generated using universal primers. Because in silico analysis indicates that alternative 16S rRNA hypervariable regions will present similar challenges, we advocate for the use of a shotgun metagenomics approach in ancient microbiome reconstructions. PMID:26563586

  3. Intrinsic challenges in ancient microbiome reconstruction using 16S rRNA gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Ziesemer, Kirsten A; Mann, Allison E; Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Schroeder, Hannes; Ozga, Andrew T; Brandt, Bernd W; Zaura, Egija; Waters-Rist, Andrea; Hoogland, Menno; Salazar-García, Domingo C; Aldenderfer, Mark; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Weston, Darlene A; MacDonald, Sandy J; Thomas, Gavin H; Collins, Matthew J; Lewis, Cecil M; Hofman, Corinne; Warinner, Christina

    2015-01-01

    To date, characterization of ancient oral (dental calculus) and gut (coprolite) microbiota has been primarily accomplished through a metataxonomic approach involving targeted amplification of one or more variable regions in the 16S rRNA gene. Specifically, the V3 region (E. coli 341-534) of this gene has been suggested as an excellent candidate for ancient DNA amplification and microbial community reconstruction. However, in practice this metataxonomic approach often produces highly skewed taxonomic frequency data. In this study, we use non-targeted (shotgun metagenomics) sequencing methods to better understand skewed microbial profiles observed in four ancient dental calculus specimens previously analyzed by amplicon sequencing. Through comparisons of microbial taxonomic counts from paired amplicon (V3 U341F/534R) and shotgun sequencing datasets, we demonstrate that extensive length polymorphisms in the V3 region are a consistent and major cause of differential amplification leading to taxonomic bias in ancient microbiome reconstructions based on amplicon sequencing. We conclude that systematic amplification bias confounds attempts to accurately reconstruct microbiome taxonomic profiles from 16S rRNA V3 amplicon data generated using universal primers. Because in silico analysis indicates that alternative 16S rRNA hypervariable regions will present similar challenges, we advocate for the use of a shotgun metagenomics approach in ancient microbiome reconstructions. PMID:26563586

  4. Regulation of oncogenic KRAS signaling via a novel KRAS-integrin-linked kinase-hnRNPA1 regulatory loop in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, P-C; Yang, M-C; Kulp, S K; Salunke, S B; Himmel, L E; Fang, C-S; Jadhav, A M; Shan, Y-S; Lee, C-T; Lai, M-D; Shirley, L A; Bekaii-Saab, T; Chen, C-S

    2016-07-28

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a mediator of aggressive phenotype in pancreatic cancer. On the basis of our finding that knockdown of either KRAS or ILK has a reciprocal effect on the other's expression, we hypothesized the presence of an ILK-KRAS regulatory loop that enables pancreatic cancer cells to regulate KRAS expression. This study aimed to elucidate the mechanism by which this regulatory circuitry is regulated and to investigate the translational potential of targeting ILK to suppress oncogenic KRAS signaling in pancreatic cancer. Interplay between KRAS and ILK and the roles of E2F1, c-Myc and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein as intermediary effectors in this feedback loop was interrogated by genetic manipulations through small interfering RNA/short hairpin RNA knockdown and ectopic expression, western blotting, PCR, promoter-luciferase reporter assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation and pull-down analyses. In vivo efficacy of ILK inhibition was evaluated in two murine xenograft models. Our data show that KRAS regulated the expression of ILK through E2F1-mediated transcriptional activation, which, in turn, controlled KRAS gene expression via hnRNPA1-mediated destabilization of the G-quadruplex on the KRAS promoter. Moreover, ILK inhibition blocked KRAS-driven epithelial-mesenchymal transition and growth factor-stimulated KRAS expression. The knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of ILK suppressed pancreatic tumor growth, in part, by suppressing KRAS signaling. These studies suggest that this KRAS-E2F1-ILK-hnRNPA1 regulatory loop enables pancreatic cancer cells to promote oncogenic KRAS signaling and to interact with the tumor microenvironment to promote aggressive phenotypes. This regulatory loop provides a mechanistic rationale for targeting ILK to suppress oncogenic KRAS signaling, which might foster new therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26616862

  5. Adenocarcinoma arising from intracranial recurrent mature teratoma and featuring mutated KRAS and wild-type BRAF genes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Soo; Kwon, Mi Jung; Song, Joon Ho; Kim, Dong Hoon; Park, Hye-Rim

    2015-02-01

    Malignant transformation or recurrence of intracranial mature teratoma is an extremely rare occurrence, compared to the usual ovarian counterpart. Previously, yolk sac tumor elements have been considered to be selective progenitors of enteric-type adenocarcinoma arising from intracranial germ cell tumors. However, the present case demonstrates the occurrence of enteric-type adenocarcinoma in recurrent intracranial mature cystic teratoma 12 years after gross total removal, a case of which has not previously been documented in the literature. The 11.5-cm long, dura mater-based tumor on the right fronto-temporal lobe displaced the brain; however, the patient had no neurologic symptoms or discomfort other than pus-like discharge on the scalp. Microscopic examinations revealed a small focus of adenocarcinoma and dysplastic colonic mucosa in the mature cystic teratoma. No immature elements were seen. The cystic wall was almost denuded and showed an exuberant xanthogranulomatous reaction with foreign-body type giant cells engulfing keratin materials and cholesterol clefts, suggesting that chronic inflammation due to repeated cyst wall rupture and the previous resection may contribute to malignant transformation. The adenocarcinoma showed strong immunohistochemical expression of CK20 and p53, but CK7 in patches. The molecular profile of the adenocarcinoma showed a mutation in KRAS and wild-type BRAF, which might be associated with malignant transformation of intracranial mature teratomas. In conclusion, the intracranial mature teratomas should require long-term follow-up, and clinicians, radiologists and pathologists should be aware of the potential for malignant progression of recurrent intracranial mature cystic teratoma despite gross total resection and no neurologic symptoms. PMID:25039399

  6. Microplitis demolitor Bracovirus Proviral Loci and Clustered Replication Genes Exhibit Distinct DNA Amplification Patterns during Replication

    PubMed Central

    Simmonds, Tyler J.; Thomas, Sarah A.; Strand, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polydnaviruses are large, double-stranded DNA viruses that are beneficial symbionts of parasitoid wasps. Polydnaviruses in the genus Bracovirus (BVs) persist in wasps as proviruses, and their genomes consist of two functional components referred to as proviral segments and nudivirus-like genes. Prior studies established that the DNA domains where proviral segments reside are amplified during replication and that segments within amplified loci are circularized before packaging into nucleocapsids. One DNA domain where nudivirus-like genes are located is also amplified but never packaged into virions. We recently sequenced the genome of the braconid Microplitis demolitor, which carries M. demolitor bracovirus (MdBV). Here, we took advantage of this resource to characterize the DNAs that are amplified during MdBV replication using a combination of Illumina and Pacific Biosciences sequencing approaches. The results showed that specific nucleotide sites identify the boundaries of amplification for proviral loci. Surprisingly, however, amplification of loci 3, 4, 6, and 8 produced head-to-tail concatemeric intermediates; loci 1, 2, and 5 produced head-to-head/tail-to-tail concatemers; and locus 7 yielded no identified concatemers. Sequence differences at amplification junctions correlated with the types of amplification intermediates the loci produced, while concatemer processing gave rise to the circularized DNAs that are packaged into nucleocapsids. The MdBV nudivirus-like gene cluster was also amplified, albeit more weakly than most proviral loci and with nondiscrete boundaries. Overall, the MdBV genome exhibited three patterns of DNA amplification during replication. Our data also suggest that PacBio sequencing could be useful in studying the replication intermediates produced by other DNA viruses. IMPORTANCE Polydnaviruses are of fundamental interest because they provide a novel example of viruses evolving into beneficial symbionts. All polydnaviruses are

  7. A single nucleotide polymorphism in the 3'-untranslated region of the KRAS gene disrupts the interaction with let-7a and enhances the metastatic potential of osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiqian; Hou, Chunying; Li, Guojun; Zhong, Yang; Zhang, Jie; Guo, Xinzhen; Li, Baoxin; Bi, Zhenggang; Shao, Ming

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to explore the molecular mechanism with which a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs61764370) interferes with the interaction between the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) and let-7a, and its association with the metastasis of osteosarcoma (OS). In this study, we confirmed that KRAS is a target of let-7a in OS cells, and the introduction of rs61764370 minor allele into KRAS 3'-UTR significantly compromised the microRNA (miRNA)/mRNA interaction using a luciferase reporter system. Additionally, a total of 36 OS tissue samples of three different genotypes (TT,22; TG,10; GG,4) were obtained, and the expression of let-7a and KRAS was determined. We showed that let-7a mRNA expression was similar between each group whereas the mRNA and protein expression of KRAS in the TT genotype group was significantly lower than that in the GT or GG genotype groups. Moreover, we identified a negative regulatory relationship between let-7a and KRAS. Furthermore, we demonstrated that let-7a and KRAS interfered with the viability, invasiveness and migration of OS cells genotyped as TT. In the OS cells genotyped as TG, let-7a exerted minimal effects, and the effect of KRAS siRNA remained. Taken together, the findings of the present study demonstrated that the KRAS 3'-UTR rs61764370 polymorphism interfered with miRNA/mRNA interaction, and showed that the minor allele was associated with an elevated risk of developing metastatic disease in OS. PMID:27430246

  8. Oncogenic KRAS confers chemoresistance by upregulating NRF2

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Shasha; Wang, Shue; Moghaddam, Seyed Javad; Ooi, Aikseng; Chapman, Eli; Wong, Pak K.; Zhang, Donna D.

    2014-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS mutations found in 20–30% of all non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) are associated with chemoresistance and poor prognosis. Here we demonstrate that activation of the cell protective stress response gene NRF2 by KRAS is responsible for its ability to promote drug resistance. RNAi-mediated silencing of NRF2 was sufficient to reverse resistance to cisplatin elicited by ectopic expression of oncogenic KRAS in NSCLC cells. Mechanistically, KRAS increased NRF2 gene transcription through a TPA response element (TRE) located in the NRF2 promoter. In a mouse model of mutant KrasG12D-induced lung cancer, we found that suppressing the NRF2 pathway with the chemical inhibitor brusatol enhanced the antitumor efficacy of cisplatin. Co-treatment reduced tumor burden and improved survival. Our findings illuminate the mechanistic details of KRAS-mediated drug resistance and provide a preclinical rationale to improve the management of lung tumors harboring KRAS mutations with NRF2 pathway inhibitors. PMID:25339352

  9. Macrotene chromosomes provide insights to a new mechanism of high-order gene amplification in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Thierry, Agnès; Khanna, Varun; Créno, Sophie; Lafontaine, Ingrid; Ma, Laurence; Bouchier, Christiane; Dujon, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Copy number variation of chromosomal segments is now recognized as a major source of genetic polymorphism within natural populations of eukaryotes, as well as a possible cause of genetic diseases in humans, including cancer, but its molecular bases remain incompletely understood. In the baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a variety of low-order amplifications (segmental duplications) were observed after adaptation to limiting environmental conditions or recovery from gene dosage imbalance, and interpreted in terms of replication-based mechanisms associated or not with homologous recombination. Here we show the emergence of novel high-order amplification structures, with corresponding overexpression of embedded genes, during evolution under favourable growth conditions of severely unfit yeast cells bearing genetically disabled genomes. Such events form massively extended chromosomes, which we propose to call macrotene, whose characteristics suggest the products of intrachromosomal rolling-circle type of replication structures, probably initiated by increased accidental template switches under important cellular stress conditions. PMID:25635677

  10. In vitro gene amplification for prenatal diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Rumsby, G; Honour, J W

    1990-01-01

    A simple, rapid, non-radioactive method for detecting homozygous deletions/conversions of the steroid 21-hydroxylase gene is described. In our experience this method will be useful for first trimester prenatal diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia in 17% of families of a child with the salt losing form. This test includes an internal control to monitor the success of amplification. Images PMID:2277381

  11. Patterns of HER2 Gene Amplification and Response to Anti-HER2 Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Morancho, Beatriz; Zacarias-Fluck, Mariano; Zhang, Junjie; Martínez-Barriocanal, Águeda; Navarro Jiménez, Alexandra; Aura, Claudia; Burgues, Octavio; Lluch, Ana; Cortés, Javier; Nuciforo, Paolo; Rubio, Isabel T.; Marangoni, Elisabetta; Deeds, James; Boehm, Markus; Schlegel, Robert; Tabernero, Josep; Mosher, Rebecca; Arribas, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    A chromosomal region that includes the gene encoding HER2, a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), is amplified in 20% of breast cancers. Although these tumors tend to respond to drugs directed against HER2, they frequently become resistant and resume their malignant progression. Gene amplification in double minutes (DMs), which are extrachromosomal entities whose number can be dynamically regulated, has been suggested to facilitate the acquisition of resistance to therapies targeting RTKs. Here we show that ~30% of HER2-positive tumors show amplification in DMs. However, these tumors respond to trastuzumab in a similar fashion than those with amplification of the HER2 gene within chromosomes. Furthermore, in different models of resistance to anti-HER2 therapies, the number of DMs containing HER2 is maintained, even when the acquisition of resistance is concomitant with loss of HER2 protein expression. Thus, both clinical and preclinical data show that, despite expectations, loss of HER2 protein expression due to loss of DMs containing HER2 is not a likely mechanism of resistance to anti-HER2 therapies. PMID:26075403

  12. Gene Amplification-Associated Overexpression of the RNA Editing Enzyme ADAR1 Enhances Human Lung Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Anadón, Carmen; Guil, Sonia; Simó-Riudalbas, Laia; Moutinho, Catia; Setien, Fernando; Martínez-Cardús, Anna; Moran, Sebastian; Villanueva, Alberto; Calaf, Monica; Vidal, August; Lazo, Pedro A.; Zondervan, Ilse; Savola, Suvi; Kohno, Takashi; Yokota, Jun; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluís; Esteller, Manel

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of new therapies against particular genetic mutations in non-small cell lung cancer is a promising avenue for improving patient survival, but the target population is small. There is a need to discover new potential actionable genetic lesions, to which end, non-conventional cancer pathways, such as RNA editing, are worth exploring. Herein we show that the adenosine-to-inosine editing enzyme ADAR1 undergoes gene amplification in non-small cancer cell lines and primary tumors in association with higher levels of the corresponding mRNA and protein. From a growth and invasion standpoint, the depletion of ADAR1 expression in amplified cells reduces their tumorigenic potential in cell culture and mouse models, whereas its overexpression has the opposite effects. From a functional perspective, ADAR1 overexpression enhances the editing frequencies of target transcripts such as NEIL1 and miR-381. In the clinical setting, patients with early-stage lung cancer, but harboring ADAR1 gene amplification, have poor outcomes. Overall, our results indicate a role for ADAR1 as a lung cancer oncogene undergoing gene amplification-associated activation that affects downstream RNA editing patterns and patient prognosis. PMID:26640150

  13. Gene amplification-associated overexpression of the RNA editing enzyme ADAR1 enhances human lung tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Anadón, C; Guil, S; Simó-Riudalbas, L; Moutinho, C; Setien, F; Martínez-Cardús, A; Moran, S; Villanueva, A; Calaf, M; Vidal, A; Lazo, P A; Zondervan, I; Savola, S; Kohno, T; Yokota, J; de Pouplana, L R; Esteller, M

    2016-08-18

    The introduction of new therapies against particular genetic mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer is a promising avenue for improving patient survival, but the target population is small. There is a need to discover new potential actionable genetic lesions, to which end, non-conventional cancer pathways, such as RNA editing, are worth exploring. Herein we show that the adenosine-to-inosine editing enzyme ADAR1 undergoes gene amplification in non-small cancer cell lines and primary tumors in association with higher levels of the corresponding mRNA and protein. From a growth and invasion standpoint, the depletion of ADAR1 expression in amplified cells reduces their tumorigenic potential in cell culture and mouse models, whereas its overexpression has the opposite effects. From a functional perspective, ADAR1 overexpression enhances the editing frequencies of target transcripts such as NEIL1 and miR-381. In the clinical setting, patients with early-stage lung cancer, but harboring ADAR1 gene amplification, have poor outcomes. Overall, our results indicate a role for ADAR1 as a lung cancer oncogene undergoing gene amplification-associated activation that affects downstream RNA editing patterns and patient prognosis. PMID:26640150

  14. Chromosome breakage at a major fragile site associated with P-glycoprotein gene amplification in multidrug-resistant CHO cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, M T; Vyas, R C; Jiang, L X; Hittelman, W N

    1994-01-01

    Recent studies of several drug-resistant Chinese hamster cell lines suggested that a breakage-fusion-bridge mechanism is frequently involved in the amplification of drug resistance genes. These observations underscore the importance of chromosome breakage in the initiation of DNA amplification in mammalian cells. However, the mechanism of this breakage is unknown. Here, we propose that the site of chromosome breakage consistent with the initial event of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) gene amplification via the breakage-fusion-bridge cycle in three independently established multidrug-resistant CHO cells was located at 1q31. This site is a major chromosome fragile site that can be induced by methotrexate and aphidicolin treatments. Pretreatments of CHO cells with methotrexate or aphidicolin enhanced the frequencies of resistance to vinca alkaloid and amplification of the P-gp gene. These observations suggest that chromosome fragile sites play a pivotal role in DNA amplification in mammalian cells. Our data are also consistent with the hypothesis that gene amplification can be initiated by stress-induced chromosome breakage that is independent of modes of action of cytotoxic agents. Drug-resistant variants may arise by their growth advantage due to overproduction of cellular target molecules via gene amplification. Images PMID:7913517

  15. Chromosome breakage at a major fragile site associated with P-glycoprotein gene amplification in multidrug-resistant CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Kuo, M T; Vyas, R C; Jiang, L X; Hittelman, W N

    1994-08-01

    Recent studies of several drug-resistant Chinese hamster cell lines suggested that a breakage-fusion-bridge mechanism is frequently involved in the amplification of drug resistance genes. These observations underscore the importance of chromosome breakage in the initiation of DNA amplification in mammalian cells. However, the mechanism of this breakage is unknown. Here, we propose that the site of chromosome breakage consistent with the initial event of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) gene amplification via the breakage-fusion-bridge cycle in three independently established multidrug-resistant CHO cells was located at 1q31. This site is a major chromosome fragile site that can be induced by methotrexate and aphidicolin treatments. Pretreatments of CHO cells with methotrexate or aphidicolin enhanced the frequencies of resistance to vinca alkaloid and amplification of the P-gp gene. These observations suggest that chromosome fragile sites play a pivotal role in DNA amplification in mammalian cells. Our data are also consistent with the hypothesis that gene amplification can be initiated by stress-induced chromosome breakage that is independent of modes of action of cytotoxic agents. Drug-resistant variants may arise by their growth advantage due to overproduction of cellular target molecules via gene amplification. PMID:7913517

  16. Detection of Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin gene in lambs by loop mediated isothermal amplification

    PubMed Central

    Radhika, B.; Kumar, N. Vinod; Sreenivasulu, D.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) was standardized for rapid detection of Clostridium perfringens. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 fecal samples were collected from enterotoxemia suspected lambs were used for screening of C. perfringens cpa gene by LAMP. The specificity of the LAMP amplified products was tested by digesting with restriction enzyme XmnI for alpha toxin gene. Results: Out of 120 samples screened 112 (93.3%) samples were positive by both LAMP and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of cpa gene which indicated the equal sensitivity of both the tests. The enzyme produced single cut in 162 base pair amplified product of alpha toxin gene at 81 base pair resulting in a single band in gel electrophoresis. Conclusion: Both LAMP and PCR for detection of cpa gene indicated the equal sensitivity of both the tests. Standardization of LAMP reaction for amplification of epsilon and beta toxin genes will help to identify the C. perfringens toxin types from the clinical samples. The test could be a suitable alternative to the PCR in detection of toxin types without the help of sophisticated machinery like thermal cycler. Considering its simplicity in operation and high sensitivity, there is the potential use of this technique in clinical diagnosis and surveillance of infectious diseases. PMID:27051186

  17. Amplification of thermostable lipase genes fragment from thermogenic phase of domestic waste composting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurhasanah, Nurbaiti, Santi; Madayanti, Fida; Akhmaloka

    2015-09-01

    Lipases are lipolytic enzymes, catalyze the hydrolysis of fatty acid ester bonds of triglycerides to produce free fatty acids and glycerol. The enzyme is widely used in various fields of biotechnological industry. Hence, lipases with unique properties (e.g.thermostable lipase) are still being explored by variation methods. One of the strategy is by using metagenomic approach to amplify the gene directly from environmental sample. This research was focused on amplification of lipase gene fragment directly from the thermogenic phase of domestic waste composting in aerated trenches. We used domestic waste compost from waste treatment at SABUGA, ITB for the sample. Total chromosomal DNA were directly extracted from several stages at thermogenic phase of compost. The DNA was then directly used as a template for amplification of thermostable lipase gene fragments using a set of internal primers namely Flip-1a and Rlip-1a that has been affixed with a GC clamp in reverse primer. The results showed that the primers amplified the gene from four stages of thermogenic phase with the size of lipase gene fragment of approximately 570 base pairs (bp). These results were further used for Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis to determine diversity of thermostable lipase gene fragments.

  18. Clinical implication of centrosome amplification and expression of centrosomal functional genes in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiple myeloma (MM) is a low proliferative tumor of postgerminal center plasma cell (PC). Centrosome amplification (CA) is supposed to be one of the mechanisms leading to chromosomal instability. Also, CA is associated with deregulation of cell cycle, mitosis, DNA repair and proliferation. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prognostic significance and possible role of CA in pathogenesis and analysis of mitotic genes as mitotic disruption markers. Design and methods A total of 173 patients were evaluated for this study. CD138+ cells were separated by MACS. Immunofluorescent labeling of centrin was used for evaluation of centrosome amplification in PCs. Interphase FISH with cytoplasmic immunoglobulin light chain staining (cIg FISH) and qRT-PCR were performed on PCs. Results Based on the immunofluorescent staining results, all patients were divided into two groups: CA positive (38.2%) and CA negative (61.8%). Among the newly diagnosed patients, worse overall survival was indicated in the CA negative group (44/74) in comparison to the CA positive group (30/74) (P = 0.019). Gene expression was significantly down-regulated in the CA positive group in comparison to CA negative in the following genes: AURKB, PLK4, TUBG1 (P < 0.05). Gene expression was significantly down-regulated in newly diagnosed in comparison to relapsed patients in the following genes: AURKA, AURKB, CCNB1, CCNB2, CETN2, HMMR, PLK4, PCNT, and TACC3 (P < 0.05). Conclusions Our findings indicate better prognosis for CA positive newly diagnosed patients. Considering revealed clinical and gene expression heterogeneity between CA negative and CA positive patients, there is a possibility to characterize centrosome amplification as a notable event in multiple myeloma pathogenesis. PMID:23522059

  19. Site-specific in situ amplification of the integrated polyomavirus genome: a case for a context-specific over-replication model of gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Syu, L J; Fluck, M M

    1997-08-01

    The fate of the genome of the polyoma (Py) tumor virus following integration in the chromosomes of transformed rat FR3T3 cells was re-examined. The viral sequences were integrated at a single transformant-specific chromosomal site in each of 22 transformants tested. In situ amplification of the viral sequences was observed in 24 of 34 transformants analyzed. Large T antigen, the unique viral function involved in initiating DNA replication from the viral origin, was essential for the amplification process. There was an absolute requirement for a reiteration of viral sequences and the extent of the reiteration affected the degree of amplification. The reiteration may be important for homologous recombination-mediated resolution of in situ amplified sequences. Among 11 transformants harboring a 1 to 2 kb repeat, the degree of amplification was transformant-specific and varied over a wide range. At the high end of the spectrum, the genome copy number increased 1300-fold at steady state, while at the low end, amplification was below twofold. Some aspect of the host chromatin at the site integration that affected viral gene expression, also directly or indirectly modulated the amplification. Use of high-resolution electrophoresis for the analysis of the integrated amplified sequences revealed a recurring novel pattern, consisting of a ladder with numerous bands separated by a constant distance approximately the size of the Py genome. We suggest that this pattern was generated by conversion of the amplified viral genomes to head to tail linear arrays with cell to cell variations in the number of genome repeats at single, transformant-specific, chromosomal sites. In light of the known "out of schedule" firing of the Py origin, we propose an "onion skin" structure intermediate and present a homologous recombination model for the conversion from onion skins to linear arrays. The relevance of the in situ amplification of the Py genome to cellular gene amplification is

  20. Plasmids with temperature-dependent copy number for amplification of cloned genes and their products.

    PubMed

    Uhlin, B E; Molin, S; Gustafsson, P; Nordström, K

    1979-06-01

    Miniplasmids (pKN402 and pKN410) were isolated from runaway-replication mutants of plasmid R1. At 30 degrees C these miniplasmids are present in 20--50 copies per cell of Escherichia coli, whereas at temperatures above 35 degrees C the plasmids replicate without copy number control during 2--3 h. At the end of this period plasmid DNA amounts to about 75% of the total DNA. During the gene amplification, growth and protein synthesis continue at normal rate leading to a drastic amplification of plasmid gene products. Plasmids pKN402 (4.6 Md) and pKN410 (10 Md) have single restriction sites for restriction endonucleases EcoRI and HindIII; in addition plamid pKN410 has a single BamHI site and carries ampicillin resistance. The plasmids can therefore be used as cloning vectors. Several genes were cloned into these vectors using the EcoRI sites; chromosomal as well as plasmid-coded beta-lactamase was found to be amplified up to 400-fold after thermal induction of the runaway replication. Vectors of this temperature-dependent class will be useful in the production of large quantities of genes and gene products. These plasmids have lost their mobilization capacity. Runaway replication is lethal to the host bacteria in rich media. These two properties contribute to the safe use of the plasmids as cloning vehicles. PMID:383579

  1. Gene amplification of the histone methyltransferase SETDB1 contributes to human lung tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Paredes, M; Martinez de Paz, A; Simó-Riudalbas, L; Sayols, S; Moutinho, C; Moran, S; Villanueva, A; Vázquez-Cedeira, M; Lazo, P A; Carneiro, F; Moura, C S; Vieira, J; Teixeira, M R; Esteller, M

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of the histone modification patterns is one of the most common features of human tumors. However, few genetic alterations in the histone modifier genes have been described in tumorigenesis. Herein we show that the histone methyltransferase SETDB1 undergoes gene amplification in non-small and small lung cancer cell lines and primary tumors. The existence of additional copies of the SETDB1 gene in these transformed cells is associated with higher levels of the corresponding mRNA and protein. From a functional standpoint, the depletion of SETDB1 expression in amplified cells reduces cancer growth in cell culture and nude mice models, whereas its overexpression increases the tumor invasiveness. The increased gene dosage of SETDB1 is also associated with enhanced sensitivity to the growth inhibitory effect mediated by the SETDB1-interfering drug mithramycin. Overall, the findings identify SETDB1 as a bona fide oncogene undergoing gene amplification-associated activation in lung cancer and suggest its potential for new therapeutic strategies. PMID:23770855

  2. Gene amplification in thyroid cancer: A new mechanism defined by comparative genomic hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.N.; Lai, E.; Fagin, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    More than 12,000 new cases of thyroid cancer develop each year in the USA for which scant information is available on cytogenetic abnormalities. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) now permits the detection and mapping of amplified regions in DNAs without the need for metaphase tumor preparations. Using CGH, we have analyzed the DNA copy number changes in 10 human thyroid tumors. Further, the procedure of CGH was modified by using a chromomycin and sitamycin reverse-banding technique to provide a high resolution assignment of amplified regions. The results revealed a series of copy number changes including amplifications of chromosome bands 1p36, 1q42, 2p13, 2p21, 19q13.1 and losses of chromosome bands 16q12-13 and 16q22-23. The most striking regions of amplifications, band 2p21 and 2p13 were further analyzed by constructing a 90-member chromosome 2 BAC map and using 9 members of this to analyze WRO, a thyroid follicular carcinoma cell line containing double minutes (dm). Eight BACs revealed three copies of chromosome 2; one BAC mapping at the 2p21-22 border revealed significant and variable amplification in all of the metaphase dm`s suggesting a local amplification. Interphase analyses revealed about 40-70 signals per nucleus. The variable signals seen in the WRO cell population suggest the existence of a minor population with higher copy number and smaller amplicon size. In summary, high resolution CGH has been combined with BAC contig construction for the analysis of thyroid tumor to reveal a very specific region amplification on chromosome 2p21 likely to contain a new gene involved in thyroid cancer tumorigenesis.

  3. De novo amplification within a silent human cholinesterase gene in a family subjected to prolonged exposure to organophosphorus insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Prody, C.A.; Dreyfus, P.; Soreq, H. ); Zamir, R. Tel-Aviv Univ. ); Zakut, H. )

    1989-01-01

    A 100-fold DNA amplification in the CHE gene, coding for serum butyrylcholinesterase (BtChoEase), was found in a farmer expressing silent CHE phenotype. Individuals homozygous for this gene display a defective serum BtChoEase and are particularly vulnerable to poisoning by agricultural organophosphorus insecticides, to which all members of this family had long been exposed. DNA blot hybridization with regional BtChoEase cDNA probes suggested that the amplification was most intense in regions encoding central sequences within BtChoEase cDNA, whereas distal sequences were amplified to a much lower extent. This is in agreement with the onion skin model, based on amplification of genes in cultured cells and primary tumors. The amplification was absent in the grandparents but present at the same extent in one of their sons and in a grandson, with similar DNA blot hybridization patterns. In situ hybridization experiments localized the amplified sequences to the long arm of chromosome 3, close to the site where the authors previously mapped the CHE gene. Altogether, these observations suggest that the initial amplification event occurred early in embryogenesis, spermatogenesis, or oogenesis, where the CHE gene is intensely active and where cholinergic functioning was indicated to be physiologically necessary. These findings demonstrate a de novo amplification in apparently healthy individuals within an autosomal gene producing a target protein to an inhibitor.

  4. Comparison of a PNA clamp PCR and an ARMS/Scorpion PCR assay for the detection of K-ras mutations.

    PubMed

    Nordgård, Oddmund; Oltedal, Satu; Janssen, Emiel A M; Gilje, Bjørnar; Kørner, Hartwig; Tjensvoll, Kjersti; Smaaland, Rune

    2012-03-01

    Point mutations in the K-ras gene have been shown to confer resistance against epidermal growth factor receptor-directed therapy of metastatic colorectal cancer. Accordingly, K-ras mutation testing has become mandatory in hospitals offering such treatment. We compared the performance and reagent costs of 2 sensitive methods for detection of K-ras mutations: a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) clamp polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and a commercially available amplification refractory mutation system/Scorpion (ARMS/S) PCR assay. Both methods were applied in parallel to 101 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor and metastasis samples from patients with colon cancer. The PNA clamp PCR assay detected K-ras mutations in 35% (35 of 101) of the samples, whereas the ARMS/S PCR assay detected mutations in 27% (27 of 101) of them. There was 92% (93 of 101) concordance between the 2 methods and the κ coefficient for the comparison was 0.82. The 8 discordant cases were exclusively positive by PNA clamp PCR. Finally, the reagent costs of the PNA clamp PCR assay were estimated to be at least 20 times lower than the ARMS/S assay. We concluded that the high performance and low costs associated with the PNA clamp PCR assay encourage its use in the administration of personalized epidermal growth factor receptor-directed therapy. PMID:22306670

  5. Gene amplification as a cause of inherited thyroxine-binding globulin excess in two Japanese families

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Yuichi; Miura, Yoshitaka; Saito, Hidehiko

    1995-12-01

    T{sub 4}-binding globulin (TBG) is the major thyroid hormone transport protein in man. Inherited abnormalities in the level of serum TBG have been classified as partial deficiency, complete deficiency, and excess. Sequencing analysis of the TBG gene, located on Xq21-22, has uncovered the molecular defects causing partial and complete deficiency. However, the mechanism leading to inherited TBG excess remains unknown. In this study, two Japanese families, F-A and F-T, with inherited TBG excess were analyzed. Serum TBG levels in hemizygous males were 58 and 44 {mu}g/mL, 3- and 2-fold the normal value, respectively. The molecule had normal properties in terms of heat stability and isoelectric focussing pattern. The sequence of the coding region and the promoter activity of the TBG gene were also indistinguishable between hemizygotes and normal subjects. The gene dosage of TBG relative to that of {beta}-globin, which is located on chromosome 11, and Duchenne muscular dystropy, which is located on Xp, was evaluated by coamplification of these target genes using polymerase chain reaction and subsequent quantitation by HPLC. The TBG/{beta}-globin ratios of the affected male and female of F-A were 3.13 and 4.13 times, respectively, that in the normal males. The TBG/Duchenne muscular dystrophy ratios were 2.92 and 2.09 times the normal value, respectively. These results are compatible with three copies of TBG gene on the affected X-chromosome. Similarly, a 2-fold increase in gene dosage was demonstrated in the affected hemizygote of F-T. A 3-fold tandem amplification of the TBG gene was shown by in situ hybridization of prometaphase and interphase chromosomes from the affected male with a biotinylated genomic TBG probe, confirming the gene dosage results. Gene amplification of TBG is the cause of inherited TBG excess in these two families. 35 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Mutant Kras Promotes Hyperplasia and Alters Differentiation in the Colon Epithelium But Does Not Expand the Presumptive Stem Cell Pool

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ying; Bommer, Guido T.; Zhao, Jenny; Green, Maranne; Sands, Evan; Zhai, Yali; Brown, Kelly; Burberry, Aaron; Cho, Kathleen R.; Fearon, Eric R.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Adenomatous polyps are precursors to colorectal cancer (CRC), whereas hyperplastic polyps (HPPs) have a small risk of progression to CRC. Mutations in KRAS are found in ~40% of CRCs and large adenomas and a subset of HPPs. We investigated the reasons that HPPs with KRAS mutations lack malignant potential; we compared the effects of Kras/KRAS activation to those of Adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc)/APC inactivation, which promotes adenoma formation. METHODS We activated a KrasG12D mutant allele or inactivated Apc alleles in mouse colon epithelium and analyzed phenotypes and expression of selected genes and proteins. The mouse data were validated using samples of human HPPs and adenomas. Signaling pathways and factors that contribute to Kras/KRAS-induced phenotypes were studied in intestinal epithelial cells. RESULTS Activation of Kras led to hyperplasia and serrated crypt architecture akin to that observed in human HPPs. We also observed loss of Paneth cells and increases in goblet cell numbers. Abnormalities in Kras-mediated differentiation and proliferation required mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and were linked to activation of the Hes1 transcription factor. Human HPPs also had activation of HES1. In contrast to Apc/APC inactivation, Kras/KRAS activation did not increase expression of crypt stem cell markers in colon epithelium or colony formation in vitro. Kras/KRAS activation was not associated with substantial induction of p16INK4a protein expression in mouse colon epithelium or human HPPs. CONCLUSIONS Although Kras/KRAS mutation promotes serrated and hyperplastic morphological features in colon epithelium, it is not able to initiate adenoma development, perhaps in part because activated Kras/KRAS signaling does not increase the number of presumptive stem cells in affected crypts. PMID:21699772

  7. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 gene amplification is associated with poor survival in patients with resected esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Joon; Lee, Chang-Geol; Hur, Jin; Chung, Hyunsoo; Park, Jun Chul; Jung, Da Hyun; Shin, Sung Kwan; Lee, Sang Kil; Lee, Yong Chan; Kim, Hye Ryun; Moon, Yong Wha; Kim, Joo Hang; Shim, Young Mog; Jewell, Susan S.; Kim, Hyunki; Choi, Yoon-La; Cho, Byoung Chul

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the frequency and the prognostic impact of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene amplification in 526 curatively resected esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Using fluorescent in situ hybridization, high amplification was defined by an FGFR1/centromer 8 ratio is ≥ 2.0, or average number of FGFR1 signals/tumor cell nucleus ≥ 6.0, or percentage of tumor cells containing ≥ 15 FGFR1 signals or large cluster in ≥ 10%. Low amplification was defined by ≥ 5 FGFR1 signals in ≥ 50%. FGFR2 and FGFR3 mutations were assessed by direct sequencing in 388 cases and no mutation was detected. High and low amplification were detected in 8.6% and 1.1%, respectively. High FGFR1 amplification had significantly shorter disease-free survival (34.0 vs 158.5 months P=0.019) and overall survival (52.2 vs not reached P=0.022) than low/no amplification group. After adjusting for sex, smoking, stage, histology, and adjuvant treatment, high FGFR1 amplification had a greater risk of recurrence (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 1.6; P=0.029) and death (AHR, 1.53; P=0.050). High amplification was significantly higher in current smokers than former and never-smokers (Ptrend<0.001) and increased proportional to smoking dosage. High FGFR1 amplification is a frequent oncogenic alteration and an independent poor prognostic factor in resected ESCC. PMID:25537505

  8. G48A, a New KRAS Mutation Found in Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Marabese, Mirko; Caiola, Elisa; Garassino, Marina C; Rastelli, Giulio; Settanni, Giulio; Brugnara, Sonia; Broggini, Massimo; Ganzinelli, Monica

    2016-07-01

    A new somatic mutation in the coding region of Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog gene (KRAS), G48A, has been identified in a patient with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). No other mutations were found by screening several genes known to be mutated in NSCLC. The patient responded to first-line therapy and is still under maintenance treatment 18 months after diagnosis. Normal and cancer cells were engineered to express the KRAS(G48A) mutation. KRAS(G48A) overexpression did not change the growth or the response to treatment compared with KRAS(wild type)-expressing cells. Analysis of the structure of the KRAS(G48A) mutant predicted altered interactions with other proteins. Analysis of KRAS binding to B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase showed that the KRAS(G48A) mutant behaves more like a wild-type than a classical KRAS(G12) mutant. In conclusion, this new mutation in the coding region of KRAS, found in NSCLC, does not induce phenotypic changes similar to those induced by G12 mutants but presumably affects KRAS binding to proteins other than B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase. PMID:27058911

  9. Duplication and amplification of antibiotic resistance genes enable increased resistance in isolates of multidrug-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During normal bacterial DNA replication, gene duplication and amplification (GDA) events occur randomly at a low frequency in the genome throughout a population. In the absence of selection, GDA events that increase the number of copies of a bacterial gene (or a set of genes) are lost. Antibiotic ...

  10. Typing of Clostridium perfringens by in vitro amplification of toxin genes.

    PubMed

    Daube, G; China, B; Simon, P; Hvala, K; Mainil, J

    1994-12-01

    The strains of Clostridium perfringens are classified according to major toxins produced. Classically, this determination involves the seroneutralization of their lethal effect in mice. However, this method requires specific antisera and a large number of mice. In this work, a new typing method was developed based on the amplification of toxin genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). By combination of several pairs of primers, the toxinotype of a Cl. perfringens strain was determined by looking at the pattern of bands on an agarose gel electrophoresis. This mixture contained primers amplifying simultaneously a part of alpha-toxin, beta-toxin, epsilon-toxin and enterotoxin genes. In order to distinguish between toxinotype A and E, the l-toxin gene fragment must be amplified in a separate PCR reaction. Moreover, with the primers combination, in most cases, a PCR product corresponding to the alpha-toxin gene was obtained from direct enrichments of animal intestinal contents. PMID:7822224

  11. Germline polymorphisms in genes involved in the IGF1-pathway predict efficacy of cetuximab in wild-type KRAS mCRC patients

    PubMed Central

    Winder, Thomas; Zhang, Wu; Yang, Dongyun; Ning, Yan; Bohanes, Pierre; Gerger, Armin; Wilson, Peter M.; Pohl, Alexandra; Mauro, David J.; Langer, Christiane; Rowinsky, Eric K.; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) signalling pathway is an important growth-regulatory pathway, which plays a crucial role in colorectal cancer (CRC) proliferation, differentiation, migration, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. Previous studies showed that hyperactivation of the IGF1-Receptor (IGF1R) may result in resistance to anti-EGFR targeted treatment. We tested whether germline variations within the IGF1-pathway are associated with clinical outcome in wild-type KRAS (wt KRAS) drug-refractory metastatic CRC (mCRC) patients who were treated with cetuximab monotherapy (IMC-0144). Experimental Design Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples of 130 drug-refractory mCRC patients enrolled in IMC-0144, a phase II clinical trial of cetuximab monotherapy, were analyzed. gDNA was extracted from dissected FFPE tumor tissue and KRAS mutation status and six potentially functional IGF1 and IGF1R polymorphisms were analyzed using direct DNA-sequencing or PCR-RFLP. Tumor response analysis was based on recursive partitioning and survival analyses were based on univariate and multivariate hazard regression models. Results In univariate and multivariate analyses five IGF-pathway SNPs were significantly associated with progression-free-survival (PFS) and/or overall survival (OS). In multivariate combined risk allele analysis the additive model for PFS and OS was significantly associated with the number of risk alleles in wt KRAS patients (p=0.001 and p=0.02, respectively). In addition, wt KRAS patients harbouring IGF1 rs2946834 A/A genotype had a 50 % ORR compared to 0% for A/G genotype. Conclusions These results indicate that IGF1-pathway polymorphisms are potential predictive/prognostic molecular markers for cetuximab efficacy in wt KRAS mCRC patients. Prospective biomarker embedded clinical trials are warranted to validate our findings. PMID:20935157

  12. The potential utility of re-mining results of somatic mutation testing: KRAS status in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Biernacka, Anna; Tsongalis, Peter D; Peterson, Jason D; de Abreu, Francine B; Black, Candice C; Gutmann, Edward J; Liu, Xiaoying; Tafe, Laura J; Amos, Christopher I; Tsongalis, Gregory J

    2016-05-01

    KRAS mutant non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) vary in clinical outcome depending on which specific KRAS mutation is present. Shorter progression free survival has been associated with KRAS variants G12C and G12V. Cell lines with these variants depend to a greater extent on the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK signaling pathway and become more susceptible to MEK inhibition. Because different KRAS mutations may lead to altered drug sensitivity, we aimed to determine specific KRAS mutation status in a NSCLC patient cohort at our institution. A total of 502 NSCLC samples were screened for somatic mutations using the 50 gene AmpliSeq™ Cancer Hotspot Panel v2 (CHPv2). However only samples positive for variants in the KRAS gene were included in this study. Variants identified in the KRAS genes were curated using publicly available databases. The overall mutation rate in the KRAS gene was 32.7% (164/502). The most common KRAS mutations were G12C (41%), G12V (19%), and G12D (14%) along with less frequent variants. After re-mining our sequencing data, we found that more than a half of our KRAS mutant NSCLC patients could potentially benefit from the addition of a MEK inhibitor such as selumetinib to standard chemotherapeutic agents. Due to mutated KRAS, these patients will likely fail traditional anti-EGFR therapies but be eligible for newer combination therapies. PMID:27068338

  13. mTORC1 upregulation via ERK-dependent gene expression change confers intrinsic resistance to MEK inhibitors in oncogenic KRas-mutant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, N; Fujita, Y; Matsuda, M; Aoki, K

    2015-11-01

    Cancer cells harboring oncogenic BRaf mutants, but not oncogenic KRas mutants, are sensitive to MEK inhibitors (MEKi). The mechanism underlying the intrinsic resistance to MEKi in KRas-mutant cells is under intensive investigation. Here, we pursued this mechanism by live imaging of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activities in oncogenic KRas or BRaf-mutant cancer cells. We established eight cancer cell lines expressing Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensors for ERK activity and S6K activity, which was used as a surrogate marker for mTORC1 activity. Under increasing concentrations of MEKi, ERK activity correlated linearly with the cell growth rate in BRaf-mutant cancer cells, but not KRas-mutant cancer cells. The administration of PI3K inhibitors resulted in a linear correlation between ERK activity and cell growth rate in KRas-mutant cancer cells. Intriguingly, mTORC1 activity was correlated linearly with the cell growth rate in both BRaf-mutant cancer cells and KRas-mutant cancer cells. These observations suggested that mTORC1 activity had a pivotal role in cell growth and that the mTORC1 activity was maintained primarily by the ERK pathway in BRaf-mutant cancer cells and by both the ERK and PI3K pathways in KRas-mutant cancer cells. FRET imaging revealed that MEKi inhibited mTORC1 activity with slow kinetics, implying transcriptional control of mTORC1 activity by ERK. In agreement with this observation, MEKi induced the expression of negative regulators of mTORC1, including TSC1, TSC2 and Deptor, which occurred more significantly in BRaf-mutant cells than in KRas-mutant cells. These findings suggested that the suppression of mTORC1 activity and induction of negative regulators of mTORC1 in cancer cells treated for at least 1 day could be used as surrogate markers for the MEKi sensitivity of cancer cells. PMID:25703330

  14. Prognostic Value of FGFR Gene Amplification in Patients with Different Types of Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Wu, Zheng; Zhang, Xiaowei; Li, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Background Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) gene amplification has been reported in different types of cancer. We performed an up-to-date meta-analysis to further characterize the prognostic value of FGFR gene amplification in patients with cancer. Methods A search of several databases, including MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE, Web of Science, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure, was conducted to identify studies examining the association between FGFR gene amplification and cancer. A total of 24 studies met the inclusion criteria, and overall incidence rates, hazard risk (HR), overall survival, disease-free survival, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated employing fixed- or random-effects models depending on the heterogeneity of the included studies. Results In the meta-analysis of 24 studies, the prevalence of FGFR gene amplification was FGFR1: 0.11 (95% CI: 0.08–0.13) and FGFR2: 0.04 (95% CI: 0.02–0.06). Overall survival was significantly worse among patients with FGFR gene amplification: FGFR1 [HR 1.57 (95% CI: 1.23–1.99); p = 0.0002] and FGFR2 [HR 2.27 (95% CI: 1.73–3.00); p<0.00001]. Conclusions Current evidence supports the conclusion that the outcomes of patients with FGFR gene amplified cancers is worse than for those with non-FGFR gene amplified cancers. PMID:25171497

  15. Gene transcript amplification from cell lysates in continuous-flow microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Asensio; Ciobanu, Doina; Sayers, Michael; Sirr, Noel; Dalton, Tara; Davies, Mark

    2007-10-01

    Continuous-flow analysis, where samples circulate encapsulated in a carrier fluid is an attractive alternative to batch processing for high-throughput devices that use the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Challenges of continuous-flow prototypes include the hydrodynamic and biological incompatibility of the carrier fluid, microchannel fouling, sample carryover and the integration of a nucleic acid extraction and reverse transcription step. We tested two homemade, continuous-flow thermocycler microdevices for amplification of reverse-transcribed messages from cell lysates without nucleic acid extraction. Amplification yield and specificity were assessed with state-of-the-art, real-time quantitative equipment. Carryover contamination between consecutive samples was absent. Amplification specificity and interference by genomic DNA were optimized by primer design. Robust detection of the low-copy transcript CLIC5 from 18 cells per microliter is demonstrated in cultured lymphoblasts. The results prove the concept that the development of micro-total analysis systems (micro-TAS) for continuous gene expression directly from cell suspensions is viable with current technology. PMID:17492382

  16. Progressive genomic instability in the FVB/KrasLA2 mouse model of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    To, Minh D.; Quigley, David A.; Mao, Jian-Hua; Rosario, Reyno Del; Hsu, Jeff; Hodgson, Graeme; Jacks, Tyler; Balmain, Allan

    2011-01-01

    Alterations in DNA copy number contribute to the development and progression of cancers and are common in epithelial tumors. We have used array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) to visualize DNA copy number alterations across the genomes of lung tumors in the KrasLA2 model of lung cancer. Copy number gain involving the Kras locus, as focal amplification or whole chromosome gain, is the most common alteration in these tumors, and with a prevalence that increased significantly with increasing tumor size. Furthermore, Kras amplification was the only major genomic event among the smallest lung tumors, suggesting that this alteration occurs early during the development of mutant Kras driven lung cancers. Recurring gains and deletions of other chromosomes occur progressively more frequently among larger tumors. These results are in contrast to a previous aCGH analysis of lung tumors from KrasLA2 mice on a mixed genetic background, in which relatively few DNA copy number alterations were observed regardless of tumor size. Our model features the KrasLA2 allele on the inbred FVB/N mouse strain, and in this genetic background there is a highly statistically significant increase in level of genomic instability with increasing tumor size. These data suggest that recurring DNA copy alterations are important for tumor progression in the KrasLA2 model of lung cancer, and that the requirement for these alterations may be dependent on the genetic background of the mouse strain. PMID:21807965

  17. Higher prevalence and gene amplification of HPV16 in oropharynx as compared to oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    SHIGEISHI, Hideo; SUGIYAMA, Masaru; OHTA, Kouji; RAHMAN, Mohammad Zeshaan; TAKECHI, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The objective of this study was to clarify differences regarding HPV16 infection and gene amplification between the oral cavity and oropharynx in healthy individuals. Material and Methods The subjects were 94 healthy asymptomatic individuals (41 males, 53 females; mean age 58.6 years, range 16-97 years) who visited the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Reconstructive Surgery of the Hiroshima University Hospital from 2014 to 2015. Oral epithelial cells were collected from oral rinse and pharynx gargle samples and placed in saline. The human endogenous retrovirus gene ERV3-1 was used as a reference to estimate the number of human cells in each sample. DNA samples were extracted from approximately 10,000 human cells and tested for HPV16 DNA by PCR using a type-specific primer. Similarly, we analyzed the HPV16 viral copy number in HPV16-positive cases using real-time PCR to examine genomic amplification. Results The percentage of HPV16-positive cases was higher in the gargle (28.7%) as compared to the rinse (16.0%) samples. In the oral rinse samples, males (26.8%) showed a significantly higher rate of HPV16 than females (7.5%) (P=0.021). Importantly, in older subjects (aged 60-89 years), gargle samples showed a significantly higher rate of HPV16 (33.3%) than oral rinse samples (13.7%) (P=0.034). The average number of viral copies was approximately 8 times higher in the gargle than in the oral rinse samples (0.16±0.27 vs. 1.35±1.26 copy numbers per cell), a significant difference (P<0.001). Conclusion Our findings suggest that the oropharynx is more susceptible to HPV16 infection as compared to the oral cavity, while HPV16 gene amplification is also more commonly found in the oropharynx. PMID:27556212

  18. Amplification and loss of dihydrofolate reductase genes in a Chinese hamster ovary cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, R.J.; Schimke, R.T.

    1981-12-01

    During stepwise increases in the methotrexate concentration in culture medium, the authors selected Chinese hamster ovary cells that contained elevated dihydrofolate reductase levels which were proportional to the number of dihydrofolate reductase gene copies (i.e., gene amplification). The authors studied the dihydrofolate reductase levels in individual cells that underwent the initial steps of methotrexate resistance by using the fluorescence-activated cell sorter technique. Such cells constituted a heterogeneous population with differing dihydrofolate reductase levels, and they characteristically lost the elevated enzyme levels when they were grown in the absence of methotrexate. The progeny of individual cells with high enzyme levels behaved differently and could lose all or variable numbers of the amplified genes.

  19. A PCA3 gene-based transcriptional amplification system targeting primary prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Têtu, Bernard; Wu, Lily; Fradet, Yves; Pouliot, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Targeting specifically primary prostate cancer (PCa) cells for immune therapy, gene therapy or molecular imaging is of high importance. The PCA3 long non-coding RNA is a unique PCa biomarker and oncogene that has been widely studied. This gene has been mainly exploited as an accurate diagnostic urine biomarker for PCa detection. In this study, the PCA3 promoter was introduced into a new transcriptional amplification system named the 3-Step Transcriptional Amplification System (PCA3-3STA) and cloned into type 5 adenovirus. PCA3-3STA activity was highly specific for PCa cells, ranging between 98.7- and 108.0-fold higher than that for benign primary prostate epithelial or non-PCa cells, respectively. In human PCa xenografts, PCA3-3STA displayed robust bioluminescent signals at levels that are sufficient to translate to positron emission tomography (PET)-based reporter imaging. Remarkably, when freshly isolated benign or cancerous prostate biopsies were infected with PCA3-3STA, the optical signal produced from primary PCa biopsies was significantly higher than from benign prostate biopsies (4.4-fold, p < 0.0001). PCA3-3STA therefore represents a PCa-specific expression system with the potential to target, with high accuracy, primary or metastatic PCa epithelial cells for imaging, vaccines, or gene therapy. PMID:26594800

  20. Selective Amplification of the Genome Surrounding Key Placental Genes in Trophoblast Giant Cells.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Roberta L; Baker, Julie C

    2016-01-25

    While most cells maintain a diploid state, polyploid cells exist in many organisms and are particularly prevalent within the mammalian placenta [1], where they can generate more than 900 copies of the genome [2]. Polyploidy is thought to be an efficient method of increasing the content of the genome by avoiding the costly and slow process of cytokinesis [1, 3, 4]. Polyploidy can also affect gene regulation by amplifying a subset of genomic regions required for specific cellular function [1, 3, 4]. This mechanism is found in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, where polyploid ovarian follicle cells amplify genomic regions containing chorion genes, which facilitate secretion of eggshell proteins [5]. Here, we report that genomic amplification also occurs in mammals at selective regions of the genome in parietal trophoblast giant cells (p-TGCs) of the mouse placenta. Using whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) of mouse p-TGCs, we identified five amplified regions, each containing a gene family known to be involved in mammalian placentation: the prolactins (two clusters), serpins, cathepsins, and the natural killer (NK)/C-type lectin (CLEC) complex [6-12]. We report here the first description of amplification at selective genomic regions in mammals and present evidence that this is an important mode of genome regulation in placental TGCs. PMID:26774788

  1. TERT promoter mutations and gene amplification: promoting TERT expression in Merkel cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong; Liu, Tiantian; Wang, Na; Björnhagen, Viveca; Höög, Anders; Larsson, Catharina; Lui, Weng-Onn; Xu, Dawei

    2014-10-30

    Telomerase activation through the induction of its catalytic component TERT is essential in carcinogenesis. The regulatory mechanism and clinical significance underlying cancer-specific TERT expression have been extensively investigated in various human malignancies, but little is known about these in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), an aggressive neuroendocrine skin tumor. Here we addressed these issues by determining TERT promoter mutations, gene amplification, mRNA expression and association with clinical variables in MCC. TERT mRNA was expressed in 6/6 MCC cell lines and 41 of 43 tumors derived from 35 MCC patients. Telomerase activity was detectable in all 6 cell lines and 11 tumors analyzed. TERT promoter mutations were identified in 1/6 cell lines and 4/35 (11.4%) MCC cases. The mutation exhibited UV signature and occurred in sun-exposed areas. Increased TERT gene copy numbers were observed in 1/6 cell lines and 11/14 (79%) tumors, and highly correlated with its mRNA expression (r = 0.7419, P = 0.0024). Shorter overall survival was significantly associated with higher TERT mRNA levels in MCC patients (P = 0.032). Collectively, TERT expression and telomerase activity is widespread in MCC, and may be attributable to TERT promoter mutations and gene amplification. Higher TERT expression predicts poor patient outcomes. PMID:25301727

  2. Artificial gene amplification reveals an abundance of promiscuous resistance determinants in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Soo, Valerie W. C.; Hanson-Manful, Paulina; Patrick, Wayne M.

    2011-01-01

    Duplicated genes provide an important raw material for adaptive evolution. However, the relationship between gene duplication and the emergence of new biochemical functions is complicated, and it has been difficult to quantify the likelihood of evolving novelty in any systematic manner. Here, we describe a comprehensive search for artificially amplified genes that are able to impart new phenotypes on Escherichia coli, provided their expression is up-regulated. We used a high-throughput, library-on-library strategy to screen for resistance to antibiotics and toxins. Cells containing a complete E. coli ORF library were exposed to 237 toxin-containing environments. From 86 of these environments, we identified a total of 115 cases where overexpressed ORFs imparted improved growth. Of the overexpressed ORFs that we tested, most conferred small but reproducible increases in minimum inhibitory concentration (≤16-fold) for their corresponding antibiotics. In many cases, proteins were acting promiscuously to impart resistance. In the absence of toxins, most strains bore no fitness cost associated with ORF overexpression. Our results show that even the genome of a nonpathogenic bacterium harbors a substantial reservoir of resistance genes, which can be readily accessed through overexpression mutations. During the growth of a population under selection, these mutations are most likely to be gene amplifications. Therefore, our work provides validation and biochemical insight into the innovation, amplification, and divergence model of gene evolution under continuous selection [Bergthorsson U, Andersson DI, Roth JR (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104:17004–17009], and also illustrates the high frequency at which novel traits can evolve in bacterial populations. PMID:21173244

  3. Oncolytic reovirus preferentially induces apoptosis in KRAS mutant colorectal cancer cells, and synergizes with irinotecan

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Radhashree; Seetharam, Raviraja; Tesfa, Lydia; Augustine, Titto A.; Klampfer, Lidija; Coffey, Matthew C.; Mariadason, John M.; Goel, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Reovirus is a double stranded RNA virus, with an intrinsic preference for replication in KRAS mutant cells. As 45% of human colorectal cancers (CRC) harbor KRAS mutations, we sought to investigate its efficacy in KRAS mutant CRC cells, and examine its impact in combination with the topoisimerase-1 inhibitor, irinotecan. Reovirus efficacy was examined in the KRAS mutant HCT116, and the isogenic KRAS WT Hke3 cell line, and in the non-malignant rat intestinal epithelial cell line. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry and TUNEL staining. Combination treatment with reovirus and irintoecan was investigated in 15 CRC cell lines, including the HCT116 p21 isogenic cell lines. Reovirus preferentially induced apoptosis in KRAS mutant HCT116 cells compared to its isogenic KRAS WT derivative, and in KRAS mutant IEC cells. Reovirus showed a greater degree of caspase 3 activation with PARP 1 cleavage, and preferential inhibition of p21 protein expression in KRAS mutant cells. Reovirus synergistically induced growth inhibition when combined with irinotecan. This synergy was lost upon p21 gene knock out. Reovirus preferentially induces apoptosis in KRAS mutant colon cancer cells. Reovirus and irinotecan combination therapy is synergistic, p21 mediated, and represents a novel potential treatment for patients with CRC. PMID:24798549

  4. Oncolytic reovirus preferentially induces apoptosis in KRAS mutant colorectal cancer cells, and synergizes with irinotecan.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Radhashree; Seetharam, Raviraja; Tesfa, Lydia; Augustine, Titto A; Klampfer, Lidija; Coffey, Matthew C; Mariadason, John M; Goel, Sanjay

    2014-05-15

    Reovirus is a double stranded RNA virus, with an intrinsic preference for replication in KRAS mutant cells. As 45% of human colorectal cancers (CRC) harbor KRAS mutations, we sought to investigate its efficacy in KRAS mutant CRC cells, and examine its impact in combination with the topoisimerase-1 inhibitor, irinotecan. Reovirus efficacy was examined in the KRAS mutant HCT116, and the isogenic KRAS WT Hke3 cell line, and in the non-malignant rat intestinal epithelial cell line. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry and TUNEL staining. Combination treatment with reovirus and irintoecan was investigated in 15 CRC cell lines, including the HCT116 p21 isogenic cell lines. Reovirus preferentially induced apoptosis in KRAS mutant HCT116 cells compared to its isogenic KRAS WT derivative, and in KRAS mutant IEC cells. Reovirus showed a greater degree of caspase 3 activation with PARP 1 cleavage, and preferential inhibition of p21 protein expression in KRAS mutant cells. Reovirus synergistically induced growth inhibition when combined with irinotecan. This synergy was lost upon p21 gene knock out. Reovirus preferentially induces apoptosis in KRAS mutant colon cancer cells. Reovirus and irinotecan combination therapy is synergistic, p21 mediated, and represents a novel potential treatment for patients with CRC. PMID:24798549

  5. CXCR2 signaling regulates KRAS(G12D)-induced autocrine growth of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Abhilasha; Varney, Michelle; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Ouellette, Michel M.; Batra, Surinder K.; Singh, Rakesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of RAS, the master regulator of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), continues to be a challenge. Mutations in various isoforms of RAS gene, including KRAS are known to upregulate CXC chemokines; however, their precise role in KRAS-driven pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this report, we reveal a previously unidentified tumor cell-autonomous role of KRAS(G12D)-induced CXCR2 signaling in mediating growth of neoplastic PDAC cells. Progressively increasing expression of mCXCR2 and its ligands was detected in the malignant ductal cells of Pdx1-cre;LSL-Kras(G12D) mice. Knocking-down CXCR2 in KRAS(G12D)-bearing human pancreatic duct-derived cells demonstrated a significant decrease in the in vitro and in vivo tumor cell proliferation. Furthermore, CXCR2 antagonists showed selective growth inhibition of KRAS(G12D)-bearing cells in vitro. Intriguingly, both genetic and pharmacological inhibition of CXCR2 signaling in KRAS(G12D)-bearing pancreatic ductal cells reduced the levels of KRAS protein, strongly implying the presence of a KRAS-CXCR2 feed-forward loop. Together, these data demonstrate the role of CXCR2 signaling in KRAS(G12D)-induced growth transformation and progression in PDAC. PMID:26771140

  6. Cis-acting elements in its 3' UTR mediate post-transcriptional regulation of KRAS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minlee; Kogan, Nicole; Slack, Frank J

    2016-03-15

    Multiple RNA-binding proteins and non-coding RNAs, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), are involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation through recognition motifs in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of their target genes. The KRAS gene encodes a key signaling protein, and its messenger RNA (mRNA) contains an exceptionally long 3' UTR; this suggests that it may be subject to a highly complex set of regulatory processes. However, 3' UTR-dependent regulation of KRAS expression has not been explored in detail. Using extensive deletion and mutational analyses combined with luciferase reporter assays, we have identified inhibitory and stabilizing cis-acting regions within the KRAS 3' UTR that may interact with miRNAs and RNA-binding proteins, such as HuR. Particularly, we have identified an AU-rich 49-nt fragment in the KRAS 3' UTR that is required for KRAS 3' UTR reporter repression. This element contains a miR-185 complementary element, and we show that overexpression of miR-185 represses endogenous KRAS mRNA and protein in vitro. In addition, we have identified another 49-nt fragment that is required to promote KRAS 3' UTR reporter expression. These findings indicate that multiple cis-regulatory motifs in the 3' UTR of KRAS finely modulate its expression, and sequence alterations within a binding motif may disrupt the precise functions of trans-regulatory factors, potentially leading to aberrant KRAS expression. PMID:26930719

  7. Sensitive colorimetric detection of Listeria monocytogenes based on isothermal gene amplification and unmodified gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhongyu; Zhou, Xiaoming; Xing, Da

    2013-12-15

    Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes), one of most problematic food-borne bacteria, is mainly transmitted through the food chain and may cause listeriosis. Therefore, the development of rapid and sensitive L. monocytogenes detection technique has become an urgent task. In this study, we proposed a method using hyperbranching rolling circle amplification (HRCA) combined with gold nanoparticle (GNP) based colorimetric strategy to offer an isothermal, highly sensitive and specific assay for the detection of L. monocytogenes. First, a linear padlock probe targeting a specific sequence in the hly gene was designed and followed with a ligation by Taq DNA ligase. After ligation, further amplification by HRCA with a thiolated primer and an unlabeled primer is performed. The resulting thiolated HRCA products were then captured onto GNP surface and made GNP more salt-tolerant. Detection of the bacteria can be achieved by a facilitated GNP based colorimetric testing using naked eyes. Through this approach, as low as 100 aM synthetic hly gene targets and about 75 copies of L. monocytogenes can be detected. The specificity is evaluated by distinguishing target L. monocytogenes from other bacteria. The artificial contaminated food samples were also detected for its potential applications in real food detection. This method described here is ideal for bacteria detection due to its simplicity and high sensitivity. PMID:23948710

  8. A method for gene amplification and simultaneous deletion in Corynebacterium glutamicum genome without any genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianzhong; Xia, Xiuhua; Zhang, Junlan; Guo, Yanfeng; Qian, He; Zhang, Weiguo

    2014-03-01

    A method for the simultaneous replacement of a given gene by a target gene, leaving no genetic markers, has been developed. The method is based on insertional inactivation and double-crossover homologous recombination. With this method, the lysC(T311I), fbp and ddh genes were inserted into Corynebacterium glutamicum genome, and the pck, alaT and avtA genes were deleted. Mobilizable plasmids with lysC(T311I), fbp and ddh cassettes and two homologous arms on the ends of pck, alaT and avtA were constructed, and then transformed into C. glutamicum. The target-expression cassettes were inserted in the genome via the first homologous recombination, and the genetic markers were removed via the second recombination. The target-transformants were sequentially screened from kanamycin-resistance and sucrose-resistance plates. The enzyme activities of transformants were stably maintained for 30 generations under non-selective culture conditions, suggesting that the integrated cassettes in host were successfully expressed and maintained as stable chromosomal insertions in C. glutamicum. The target-transformants were used to optimize the l-lysine production, showing that the productions were strongly increased because the selected genes were closely linked to l-lysine production. In short, this method can be used to construct amino acid high-producing strains with unmarked gene amplification and simultaneous deletion in genome. PMID:24613758

  9. Directed gene copy number amplification in Pichia pastoris by vector integration into the ribosomal DNA locus.

    PubMed

    Marx, Hans; Mecklenbräuker, Astrid; Gasser, Brigitte; Sauer, Michael; Mattanovich, Diethard

    2009-12-01

    The yeast Pichia pastoris is a widely used host organism for heterologous protein production. One of the basic steps for strain improvement is to ensure a sufficient level of transcription of the heterologous gene, based on promoter strength and gene copy number. To date, high-copy-number integrants of P. pastoris are achievable only by screening of random events or by cloning of gene concatemers. Methods for rapid and reliable multicopy integration of the expression cassette are therefore desirable. Here we present such a method based on vector integration into the rDNA locus and post-transformational vector amplification by repeated selection on increased antibiotic concentrations. Data are presented for two exemplary products: human serum albumin, which is secreted into the supernatant, and human superoxide dismutase, which is accumulated in the cytoplasm of the cells. The striking picture evolving is that intracellular protein production is tightly correlated with gene copy number, while use of the secretory pathway introduces a high clonal variability and the correlation with gene copy number is valid only for low gene copy numbers. PMID:19799640

  10. Isolation of genes from the Batten candidate region using exon amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, T.J.; D`Arigo, K.L.; Haines, J.L.

    1995-06-05

    In order to identify genes originating from the Batten disease candidate region, we have used the technique of exon amplification to identify transcribed sequences. This procedure produces trapped exon clones, which can represent single exons or multiple exons spliced together and is an efficient method for obtaining probes for physical mapping and for screening cDNA libraries. The source of DNA for these experiments was a collection of chromosome 16 cosmid contigs isolated by the direct subcloning of region-specific yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) and hybridization of inter-alu PCR products from these YACs to the flow-sorted Los Alamos chromosome 16 cosmid library. We are now using the resulting exon probes to screen retina and brain cDNA libraries for candidate JNCL genes. 23 refs., 1 fig.

  11. KRAS and YAP1 converge to regulate EMT and tumor survival

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Diane D.; Xue, Wen; Krall, Elsa B.; Bhutkar, Arjun; Piccioni, Federica; Wang, Xiaoxing; Schinzel, Anna C.; Sood, Sabina; Rosenbluh, Joseph; Kim, Jong W.; Zwang, Yaara; Roberts, Thomas M.; Root, David E.; Jacks, Tyler; Hahn, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cancer cells that express oncogenic alleles of RAS typically require sustained expression of the mutant allele for survival, but the molecular basis of this oncogene dependency remains incompletely understood. To identify genes that can functionally substitute for oncogenic RAS, we systematically expressed 15,294 open reading frames in a human KRAS-dependent colon cancer cell line engineered to express an inducible KRAS-specific shRNA. We found 147 genes that promoted survival upon KRAS suppression. In particular, the transcriptional co-activator YAP1 rescued cell viability in KRAS-dependent cells upon suppression of KRAS and was required for KRAS-induced cell transformation. Acquired resistance to Kras suppression in a Kras-driven murine lung cancer model also involved increased YAP1 signaling. KRAS and YAP1 converge on the transcription factor FOS and activate a transcriptional program involved in regulating the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Together, these findings implicate transcriptional regulation of EMT by YAP1 as a significant component of oncogenic RAS signaling. PMID:24954536

  12. KRAS-dependent sorting of miRNA to exosomes.

    PubMed

    Cha, Diana J; Franklin, Jeffrey L; Dou, Yongchao; Liu, Qi; Higginbotham, James N; Demory Beckler, Michelle; Weaver, Alissa M; Vickers, Kasey; Prasad, Nirpesh; Levy, Shawn; Zhang, Bing; Coffey, Robert J; Patton, James G

    2015-01-01

    Mutant KRAS colorectal cancer (CRC) cells release protein-laden exosomes that can alter the tumor microenvironment. To test whether exosomal RNAs also contribute to changes in gene expression in recipient cells, and whether mutant KRAS might regulate the composition of secreted microRNAs (miRNAs), we compared small RNAs of cells and matched exosomes from isogenic CRC cell lines differing only in KRAS status. We show that exosomal profiles are distinct from cellular profiles, and mutant exosomes cluster separately from wild-type KRAS exosomes. miR-10b was selectively increased in wild-type exosomes, while miR-100 was increased in mutant exosomes. Neutral sphingomyelinase inhibition caused accumulation of miR-100 only in mutant cells, suggesting KRAS-dependent miRNA export. In Transwell co-culture experiments, mutant donor cells conferred miR-100-mediated target repression in wild-type-recipient cells. These findings suggest that extracellular miRNAs can function in target cells and uncover a potential new mode of action for mutant KRAS in CRC. PMID:26132860

  13. Identification of some ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes by PCR amplification of their gpd (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) genes.

    PubMed

    Kreuzinger, N; Podeu, R; Gruber, F; Göbl, F; Kubicek, C P

    1996-09-01

    Degenerated oligonucleotide primers designed to flank an approximately 1.2-kb fragment of the gene encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gpd) from ascomycetes and basidiomycetes were used to amplify the corresponding gpd fragments from several species of the ectomycorrhizal fungal taxa Boletus, Amanita, and Lactarius. Those from B. edulis, A. muscaria, and L. deterrimus were cloned and sequenced. The respective nucleotide sequences of these gene fragments showed a moderate degree of similarity (72 to 76%) in the protein-encoding regions and only a low degree of similarity in the introns (56 to 66%). Introns, where present, occurred at conserved positions, but the respective positions and numbers of introns in a given taxon varied. The amplified fragment from a given taxon could be distinguished from that of others by both restriction nuclease cleavage analysis and Southern hybridization. A procedure for labeling DNA probes with fluorescein-12-dUTP by PCR was developed. These probes were used in a nonradioactive hybridization assay, with which the gene could be detected in 2 ng of chromosomal DNA of L. deterrimus on slot blots. Taxon-specific amplification was achieved by the design of specific oligonucleotide primers. The application of the gpd gene for the identification of mycorrhizal fungi under field conditions was demonstrated, with Picea abies (spruce) mycorrhizal roots harvested from a northern alpine forest area as well as from a plant-breeding nursery. The interference by inhibitory substances, which sometimes occurred in the DNA extracted from the root-fungus mixture, could be overcome by using very diluted concentrations of template DNA for a first round of PCR amplification followed by a second round with nested oligonucleotide primers. We conclude that gpd can be used to detect ectomycorrhizal fungi during symbiotic interaction. PMID:8795234

  14. Isolation of candidate genes from the Batten Disease (JNCL) region using exon amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, T.J.; Haines, J.L.; Buckler, A. |

    1994-09-01

    Batten Disease (juvenile neuronal cercoid lipofuscinosis; JNCL) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder of childhood. Clinically, this autosomal recessive disorder is characterized by loss of vision, seizures, and progressive encephalopathy. The JNCL gene CLN3 has been genetically mapped to a 2 cM region in 16p12.1-11.2 and shows significant allelic association with alleles at five marker loci, D16S288, D16S272, D16S299, D16S298, and SPN, within this interval. Extended haplotype analysis strongly suggests that CLN3 must lie in the vicinity of D16S299/D16S298. We have used these markers as STSs to isolate YACs from the CEPH and Los Alamos flow-sorted chromosome 16 YAC libraries. These YACs, in turn, have been used to generate cosmid contigs by hybridization of inter-Alu PCR products to the gridded Los Alamos chr. 16 cosmid library and by direct sub-cloning. In order to identify genes originating from this region we have used the technique of exon amplification. This procedure produces trapped exon clones, which can represent single exons or multiple exons spliced together and is an efficient method for obtaining probes for physical mapping and for screening cDNA libraries. In all experiments, we have analyzed cosmid DNA using a modification of the original exon amplification procedure that increases both the efficiency and sensitivity of the approach. We have used the resulting exon probes to screen retina and brain cDNA libraries for candidate JNCL genes. Our preliminary studies indicate that the Batten candidate region is gene-rich.

  15. Sequencing the mouse Y chromosome reveals convergent gene acquisition and amplification on both sex chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Y.Q. Shirleen; Alföldi, Jessica; Pyntikova, Tatyana; Brown, Laura G.; Graves, Tina; Minx, Patrick J.; Fulton, Robert S.; Kremitzki, Colin; Koutseva, Natalia; Mueller, Jacob L.; Rozen, Steve; Hughes, Jennifer F.; Owens, Elaine; Womack, James E.; Murphy, William J.; Cao, Qing; de Jong, Pieter; Warren, Wesley C.; Wilson, Richard K.; Skaletsky, Helen; Page, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We sequenced the MSY (Male-Specific region of the Y chromosome) of the C57BL/6J strain of the laboratory mouse Mus musculus. In contrast to theories that Y chromosomes are heterochromatic and gene poor, the mouse MSY is 99.9% euchromatic and contains about 700 protein-coding genes. Only two percent of the MSY derives from the ancestral autosomes that gave rise to the mammalian sex chromosomes. Instead, all but 50 of the MSY's genes belong to three acquired, massively amplified gene families that have no homologs on primate MSYs, but do have acquired, amplified homologs on the mouse X chromosome. The complete mouse MSY sequence brings to light dramatic forces in sex chromosome evolution: lineage-specific convergent acquisition and amplification of X-Y gene families, possibly fueled by antagonism between acquired X-Y homologs. The mouse MSY sequence presents opportunities for experimental studies of a sex-specific chromosome in its entirety, in a genetically tractable model organism. PMID:25417157

  16. Sequencing the mouse Y chromosome reveals convergent gene acquisition and amplification on both sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Soh, Y Q Shirleen; Alföldi, Jessica; Pyntikova, Tatyana; Brown, Laura G; Graves, Tina; Minx, Patrick J; Fulton, Robert S; Kremitzki, Colin; Koutseva, Natalia; Mueller, Jacob L; Rozen, Steve; Hughes, Jennifer F; Owens, Elaine; Womack, James E; Murphy, William J; Cao, Qing; de Jong, Pieter; Warren, Wesley C; Wilson, Richard K; Skaletsky, Helen; Page, David C

    2014-11-01

    We sequenced the MSY (male-specific region of the Y chromosome) of the C57BL/6J strain of the laboratory mouse Mus musculus. In contrast to theories that Y chromosomes are heterochromatic and gene poor, the mouse MSY is 99.9% euchromatic and contains about 700 protein-coding genes. Only 2% of the MSY derives from the ancestral autosomes that gave rise to the mammalian sex chromosomes. Instead, all but 45 of the MSY's genes belong to three acquired, massively amplified gene families that have no homologs on primate MSYs but do have acquired, amplified homologs on the mouse X chromosome. The complete mouse MSY sequence brings to light dramatic forces in sex chromosome evolution: lineage-specific convergent acquisition and amplification of X-Y gene families, possibly fueled by antagonism between acquired X-Y homologs. The mouse MSY sequence presents opportunities for experimental studies of a sex-specific chromosome in its entirety, in a genetically tractable model organism. PMID:25417157

  17. [Specific features of gene amplification on the long arm of chromosome 17 in different molecular genetic subtypes of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Zavalishina, L E; Danilova, N V; Matsionis, A E; Pavlenko, I A

    2014-01-01

    The frequency of gene amplification and coamplification of HER2/neu, TOP2A and the centromeric region of chromosome 17 (CEP17) was examined in 265 breast cancer (BC) cases belonging to different molecular genetic subgroups. Luminal B breast cancer was found to be characterized by the increased probability of coamplifications (CEP17 and HER/neu, HER2/neu, and TOP2A) on chromosome 17. At the same time, the amplification of just three loci on one chromosome is a rare event and encountered in 17% of luminal B breast cancer cases (or 1.1% of all BC cases). That of HER2/neu in conjunction with elevated CEP17 count is statistically significantly more rarely accompanied by deletion of TOP2A rather than its amplification. The findings suggest that there are different amplification mechanisms in different BC molecular genetic subgroups. PMID:25051718

  18. Thymidylate synthase gene amplification in human colon cancer cell lines resistant to 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Copur, S; Aiba, K; Drake, J C; Allegra, C J; Chu, E

    1995-05-17

    A series of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-resistant human colon H630 cancer cell lines were established by continuous exposure of cells to 5-FU. The concentration of 5-FU required to inhibit cell proliferation by 50% (IC50) in the parent colon line (H630) was 5.5 microM. The 5-FU IC50 values for the resistant H630-R1, H630-R10, and H630-R cell lines were 11-, 29-, and 27-fold higher than that for the parent H630 cell line. Using both the radioenzymatic 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine-5'-monophosphate (FdUMP) binding and catalytic assays for measurement of thymidylate synthase (TS) enzyme activity, there was significantly increased TS activity in resistant H630-R1 (13- and 23-fold), H630-R10 (37- and 40-fold), and H630-R (24- and 34-fold) lines, for binding and catalytic assays, respectively, compared with the parent H630 line. The level of TS protein, as determined by western immunoblot analysis, was increased markedly in resistant H630-R1 (23-fold), H630-R10 (33-fold), and H630-R (26-fold) cells. Northern analysis revealed elevations in TS mRNA levels in H630-R1 (18-fold), H630-R10 (39-fold), and H630-R (36-fold) cells relative to parent H630 cells. Although no major rearrangements of the TS gene were noted by Southern analysis, there was significant amplification of the TS gene in 5-FU-resistant cells, which was confirmed by DNA slot blot analysis. These studies demonstrate that continuous exposure of human colon cancer cells to 5-FU leads to TS gene amplification and overexpression of TS protein with resultant development of fluoropyrimidine resistance. PMID:7763285

  19. Amplification of a Gene Related to Mammalian mdr Genes in Drug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Craig M.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Wasley, Annemarie; Bogenschutz, Michael P.; Shankar, Anuraj H.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    1989-06-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains at least two genes related to the mammalian multiple drug resistance genes, and at least one of the P. falciparum genes is expressed at a higher level and is present in higher copy number in a strain that is resistant to multiple drugs than in a strain that is sensitive to the drugs.

  20. Lable-free quadruple signal amplification strategy for sensitive electrochemical p53 gene biosensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zonghua; Xia, Jianfei; Song, Daimin; Zhang, Feifei; Yang, Min; Gui, Rijun; Xia, Lin; Bi, Sai; Xia, Yanzhi

    2016-03-15

    A versatile label-free quadruple signal amplification biosensing platform for p53 gene (target DNA) detection was proposed. The chitosan-graphene (CS-GR) modified electrode with excellent electron transfer ability could provide a large specific surface for high levels of AuNPs-DNA attachment. The large amount of AuNPs could immobilize more capture probes and enhance the electrochemical signal with the excellent electrocatalytic activity. Furthermore, with the assist of N.BstNB I (the nicking endonuclease), target DNA could be reused and more G-quadruplex-hemin DNAzyme could be formed, allowing significant signal amplification in the presence of H2O2. Such strategy can enhance the oxidation-reduction reaction of adsorbed methylene blue (MB) and efficiently improve the sensitivity of the proposed biosensor. The morphologies of materials and the stepwise biosensor were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) signals of MB provided quantitative measures of the concentrations of target DNA, with a linear calibration range of 1.0 × 10(-15)-1.0 × 10(-9)M and a detection limit of 3.0 × 10(-16)M. Moreover, the resulting biosensor also exhibited good specificity, acceptable reproducibility and stability, indicating that the present strategy was promising for broad potential application in clinic assay. PMID:26406456

  1. In silico identification of gene amplification targets based on analysis of production and growth coupling.

    PubMed

    Jian, Xingxing; Zhou, Shengguo; Zhang, Cheng; Hua, Qiang

    2016-07-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) can be utilized to better understand the genotype-phenotype relationship in microbial metabolism. Manipulation strategies based on analysis of metabolic flux distributions using constraint-based methods have been validated to be effective for designing strains. Herein, we first investigated the coupled relationship of growth and production, and subsequently proposed an algorithm, called analysis of production and growth coupling (APGC), to identify amplification targets for improving production of the desired metabolite. The logical transformation of the genome-scale metabolic models (LTM) could enable a gene-level prediction, that is, direct gene targets would be determined through APGC. This algorithm was successfully employed to simulate heterogeneous biosynthesis of the antioxidant lycopene in Escherichia coli, and target genes for the improvement of lycopene production were identified. These identified gene targets were unambiguous and were closely related to the supply of essential precursors and cofactors for lycopene production, and most of these have been validated as effective in enhancing the yield of lycopene. PMID:27157785

  2. PKS and NRPS gene clusters from microbial symbiont cells of marine sponges by whole genome amplification.

    PubMed

    Siegl, Alexander; Hentschel, Ute

    2010-08-01

    Whole genome amplification (WGA) approaches provide genomic information on single microbial cells and hold great promise for the field of environmental microbiology. Here, the microbial consortia of the marine sponge Aplysina aerophoba were sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and then subjected to WGA. A cosmid library was constructed from the WGA product of a sample containing two bacterial cells, one a member of the candidate phylum Poribacteria and one of a sponge-specific clade of Chloroflexi. Library screening led to the genomic characterization of three cosmid clones, encoding a polyketide synthase (PKS), a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) and the Chloroflexi 16S rRNA gene. PCR screening of WGA products from additional, FACS-sorted single bacterial symbiont cells supports the assignment of the Sup-PKS gene to the Poribacteria and the novel NRPS gene to the Chloroflexi. This promising single-cell genomics approach has permitted cloning of entire gene clusters from single microbial cells of known phylogenetic origin and thus provides a sought-after link between phylogeny and function. PMID:23766222

  3. Mutant KRAS Conversion of Conventional T Cells into Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Zdanov, Stephanie; Mandapathil, Magis; Abu Eid, Rasha; Adamson-Fadeyi, Saudat; Wilson, Willie; Qian, Jiahua; Carnie, Andrea; Tarasova, Nadya; Mkrtichyan, Mikayel; Berzofsky, Jay A; Whiteside, Theresa L; Khleif, Samir N

    2016-04-01

    Constitutive activation of theKRASoncogene in human malignancies is associated with aggressive tumor growth and poor prognosis. Similar to other oncogenes,KRASacts in a cell-intrinsic manner to affect tumor growth or survival. However, we describe here a different, cell-extrinsic mechanism through which mutant KRAS contributes to tumor development. Tumor cells carrying mutated KRAS induced highly suppressive T cells, and silencing KRAS reversed this effect. Overexpression of the mutantKRAS(G12V)gene in wild-type KRAS tumor cells led to regulatory T-cell (Treg) induction. We also demonstrate that mutant KRAS induces the secretion of IL10 and transforming growth factor-β1 (both required for Treg induction) by tumor cells through the activation of the MEK-ERK-AP1 pathway. Finally, we report that inhibition of KRAS reduces the infiltration of Tregs in KRAS-driven lung tumorigenesis even before tumor formation. This cell-extrinsic mechanism allows tumor cells harboring a mutantKRASoncogene to escape immune recognition. Thus, an oncogene can promote tumor progression independent of its transforming activity by increasing the number and function of Tregs. This has a significant clinical potential, in which targeting KRAS and its downstream signaling pathways could be used as powerful immune modulators in cancer immunotherapy.Cancer Immunol Res; 4(4); 354-65. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26880715

  4. Overproduction of dihydrofolate reductase and gene amplification in methotrexate-resistant Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Flintoff, W.F.; Weber, M.K.; Nagainis, C.R.; Essani, A.K.; Robertson, D.; Salser, W.

    1982-03-01

    Stable isolates of Chinese hamster ovary cells that are highly resistant to methotrexate have been selected in a multistep selection process. Quantitative immunoprecipitations have indicated that these isolates synthesize dihydrofolate reductase at an elevated rate over its synthesis in sensitive cells. Restriction enzyme and Southern blot analyses with a murine reductase cDNA probe indicate that the highly resistant isolates contain amplifications of the dihydrofolate reductase gene number. Depending upon the parental line used to select these resistant cells, they overproduce either a wild-type enzyme or a structurally altered enzyme. Karyotype analysis shows that some of these isolates contain chromosomes with homogeneously staining regions whereas others do not contain such chromosomes.

  5. Genome-wide identification of genes with amplification and/or fusion in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iwakawa, Reika; Takenaka, Masataka; Kohno, Takashi; Shimada, Yoko; Totoki, Yasushi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Tsuta, Koji; Nishikawa, Ryo; Noguchi, Masayuki; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Ogawa, Seishi; Yokota, Jun

    2013-01-01

    To obtain a landscape of gross genetic alterations in small cell lung cancer (SCLC), genome-wide copy number analysis and whole-transcriptome sequencing were performed in 58 and 42 SCLCs, respectively. Focal amplification of known oncogene loci, MYCL1 (1p34.2), MYCN (2p24.3), and MYC (8q24.21), was frequently and mutually exclusively detected. MYCL1 and MYC were co-amplified with other regions on either the same or the different chromosome in several cases. In addition, the 9p24.1 region was identified as being amplified in SCLCs without amplification of MYC family oncogenes. Notably, expression of the KIAA1432 gene in this region was significantly higher in KIAA1432 amplified cells than in non-amplified cells, and its mRNA expression showed strong correlations with the copy numbers. Thus, KIAA1432 is a novel gene activated by amplification in SCLCs. By whole-transcriptome sequencing, a total of 60 fusion transcripts, transcribed from 95 different genes, were identified as being expressed in SCLC cells. However, no in-frame fusion transcripts were recurrently detected in ≥2 SCLCs, and genes in the amplified regions, such as PVT1 neighboring MYC and RLF in MYCL1 amplicons, were recurrently fused with genes in the same amplicons or with those in different amplicons on either the same or different chromosome. Thus, it was indicated that amplification and fusion of several genes on chromosomes 1 and 8 occur simultaneously but not sequentially through chromothripsis in the development of SCLC, and amplification rather than fusion of genes plays an important role in its development. PMID:23716474

  6. Genome-wide identification of genes with amplification and/or fusion in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Iwakawa, Reika; Takenaka, Masataka; Kohno, Takashi; Shimada, Yoko; Totoki, Yasushi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Tsuta, Koji; Nishikawa, Ryo; Noguchi, Masayuki; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Ogawa, Seishi; Yokota, Jun

    2013-09-01

    To obtain a landscape of gross genetic alterations in small cell lung cancer (SCLC), genome-wide copy number analysis and whole-transcriptome sequencing were performed in 58 and 42 SCLCs, respectively. Focal amplification of known oncogene loci, MYCL1 (1p34.2), MYCN (2p24.3), and MYC (8q24.21), was frequently and mutually exclusively detected. MYCL1 and MYC were co-amplified with other regions on either the same or the different chromosome in several cases. In addition, the 9p24.1 region was identified as being amplified in SCLCs without amplification of MYC family oncogenes. Notably, expression of the KIAA1432 gene in this region was significantly higher in KIAA1432 amplified cells than in non-amplified cells, and its mRNA expression showed strong correlations with the copy numbers. Thus, KIAA1432 is a novel gene activated by amplification in SCLCs. By whole-transcriptome sequencing, a total of 60 fusion transcripts, transcribed from 95 different genes, were identified as being expressed in SCLC cells. However, no in-frame fusion transcripts were recurrently detected in ≥2 SCLCs, and genes in the amplified regions, such as PVT1 neighboring MYC and RLF in MYCL1 amplicons, were recurrently fused with genes in the same amplicons or with those in different amplicons on either the same or different chromosome. Thus, it was indicated that amplification and fusion of several genes on chromosomes 1 and 8 occur simultaneously but not sequentially through chromothripsis in the development of SCLC, and amplification rather than fusion of genes plays an important role in its development. PMID:23716474

  7. PCR-sequencing is a complementary method to amplification refractory mutation system for EGFR gene mutation analysis in FFPE samples.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junchang; Wang, Chunhua; Yu, Xiaoli; Sheng, Danli; Zuo, Chen; Ren, Minpu; Wu, Yaqin; Shen, Jie; Jin, Mei; Xu, Songxiao

    2015-12-01

    Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS) is the most popular technology for EGFR gene mutation analysis in China. Cutoff Ct or ΔCt values were used to differentiate low mutation abundance cases from no mutation cases. In this study, all of 359 NSCLC samples were tested by ARMS. Seventeen samples with larger Ct or ΔCt than cutoff values were retested by PCR-sequencing. TKI treatment responses were monitored on the cases with ARMS negative and PCR-sequencing positive results. One exon 18 G719X case, 67 exon 19 deletion cases, 2 exon 20 insertion cases, 1 exon 20 T790M case, 60 exon 21 L858R cases, 5 exon 21 L861Q cases and 201 wild type cases were identified by ARMS. Another 22 cases were evaluated as wild type but had later amplification fluorescent curves. Seventeen out of these 22 cases were retested by PCR-sequencing. It turns out that 3 out of 3 cases with exon 19 deletion later amplifications, 2 out of 2 cases with L858R later amplifications and 4 out of 12 cases with T790M later amplifications were identified as mutation positive. Two cases with exon 19 deletion and L858R respectively were treated by TKI and got responses. Our study indicated that PCR-sequencing might be a complementary way to confirm ARMS results with later amplifications. PMID:26477713

  8. AIB1 gene amplification and the instability of polyQ encoding sequence in breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Lee-Jun C; Dai, Pu; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Lou, Mary Ann; Clarke, Robert; Nazarov, Viktor

    2006-01-01

    Background The poly Q polymorphism in AIB1 (amplified in breast cancer) gene is usually assessed by fragment length analysis which does not reveal the actual sequence variation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the sequence variation of poly Q encoding region in breast cancer cell lines at single molecule level, and to determine if the sequence variation is related to AIB1 gene amplification. Methods The polymorphic poly Q encoding region of AIB1 gene was investigated at the single molecule level by PCR cloning/sequencing. The amplification of AIB1 gene in various breast cancer cell lines were studied by real-time quantitative PCR. Results Significant amplifications (5–23 folds) of AIB1 gene were found in 2 out of 9 (22%) ER positive cell lines (in BT-474 and MCF-7 but not in BT-20, ZR-75-1, T47D, BT483, MDA-MB-361, MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-330). The AIB1 gene was not amplified in any of the ER negative cell lines. Different passages of MCF-7 cell lines and their derivatives maintained the feature of AIB1 amplification. When the cells were selected for hormone independence (LCC1) and resistance to 4-hydroxy tamoxifen (4-OH TAM) (LCC2 and R27), ICI 182,780 (LCC9) or 4-OH TAM, KEO and LY 117018 (LY-2), AIB1 copy number decreased but still remained highly amplified. Sequencing analysis of poly Q encoding region of AIB1 gene did not reveal specific patterns that could be correlated with AIB1 gene amplification. However, about 72% of the breast cancer cell lines had at least one under represented (<20%) extra poly Q encoding sequence patterns that were derived from the original allele, presumably due to somatic instability. Although all MCF-7 cells and their variants had the same predominant poly Q encoding sequence pattern of (CAG)3CAA(CAG)9(CAACAG)3(CAACAGCAG)2CAA of the original cell line, a number of altered poly Q encoding sequences were found in the derivatives of MCF-7 cell lines. Conclusion These data suggest that poly Q encoding region of AIB1 gene is

  9. Association Between Amplification and Expression of C-MYC Gene and Clinicopathological Characteristics of Stomach Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Khaleghian, Malihea; Jahanzad, Issa; Shakoori, Abbas; Emami Razavi, Amirnader; Azimi, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    Background: The incidence rate of gastric cancer in western countries has shown a remarkable decline in the recent years while it is still the most common cancer among males in Iran. The proto-oncogene MYC, located at 8q24.1, regulates almost 15% of human genes and is activated in 20% of all tumors. The amplification of MYC and overexpression of its protein product are observed in 15 - 30% of gastric neoplasias. Objectives: The objective of this study was to find the preferences of Chromogenic In Situ Hybridization (CISH) and Immunohistochemistry (IHC) in diagnosis and prognosis of gastric cancer. Patients and Methods: We studied 102 samples of gastric cancer in Iran and all the patients had undergone primary surgical resection at the Cancer Institute Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The CISH and IHC techniques were applied for all our samples. All of the samples had adenocarcinoma gastric cancer and were selected randomly. Also, the type of study was cross sectional. The sample size was 100 patients. Results: Our data revealed that both diffuse and intestinal types of gastric cancer occurred significantly more in males than females. Our results showed that there was an indication of some correlation between grades and CISH, although the difference was not significant. Our data also showed that CISH positive patients (43%) were more frequent compared to IHC positive patients (14.7%). There was a correlation between CISH and IHC. These results revealed that there was a significant difference between grades and IHC. There was also no statistical difference between CISH amplification in diffuse and intestinal types. Conclusions: From the results, it could be concluded that for administration of the treatment of stomach cancer, and progress and prognosis of tumor, which is important for patients and clinicians, the CISH is a better and more feasible test than IHC, in regards to sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27175302

  10. Colorimetric TMPRSS2-ERG Gene Fusion Detection in Prostate Cancer Urinary Samples via Recombinase Polymerase Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Kevin M.; Wee, Eugene J.H.; Trau, Matt

    2016-01-01

    TMPRSS2 (Exon 1)-ERG (Exon 4) is the most frequent gene fusion event in prostate cancer (PC), and is highly PC-specific unlike the current serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) biomarker. However, TMPRSS2-ERG levels are currently measured with quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) which is time-consuming and requires costly equipment, thus limiting its use in clinical diagnostics. Herein, we report a novel rapid, cost-efficient and minimal-equipment assay named “FusBLU” for detecting TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions from urine. TMPRSS2-ERG mRNA was amplified by isothermal reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-RPA), magnetically-isolated, and detected through horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-catalyzed colorimetric reaction. FusBLU was specific for TMPRSS2-ERG mRNA with a low visual detection limit of 105 copies. We also demonstrated assay readout versatility on 3 potentially useful platforms. The colorimetric readout was detectable by naked eye for a quick yes/no evaluation of gene fusion presence. On the other hand, a more quantitative TMPRSS2-ERG detection was achievable by absorbance/electrochemical measurements. FusBLU was successfully applied to 12 urinary samples and results were validated by gold-standard RT-qPCR. We also showed that sediment RNA was likely the main source of TMPRSS2-ERG mRNA in urinary samples. We believe that our assay is a potential clinical screening tool for PC and could also have wide applications for other disease-related fusion genes. PMID:27375789

  11. Colorimetric TMPRSS2-ERG Gene Fusion Detection in Prostate Cancer Urinary Samples via Recombinase Polymerase Amplification.

    PubMed

    Koo, Kevin M; Wee, Eugene J H; Trau, Matt

    2016-01-01

    TMPRSS2 (Exon 1)-ERG (Exon 4) is the most frequent gene fusion event in prostate cancer (PC), and is highly PC-specific unlike the current serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) biomarker. However, TMPRSS2-ERG levels are currently measured with quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) which is time-consuming and requires costly equipment, thus limiting its use in clinical diagnostics. Herein, we report a novel rapid, cost-efficient and minimal-equipment assay named "FusBLU" for detecting TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions from urine. TMPRSS2-ERG mRNA was amplified by isothermal reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-RPA), magnetically-isolated, and detected through horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-catalyzed colorimetric reaction. FusBLU was specific for TMPRSS2-ERG mRNA with a low visual detection limit of 10(5) copies. We also demonstrated assay readout versatility on 3 potentially useful platforms. The colorimetric readout was detectable by naked eye for a quick yes/no evaluation of gene fusion presence. On the other hand, a more quantitative TMPRSS2-ERG detection was achievable by absorbance/electrochemical measurements. FusBLU was successfully applied to 12 urinary samples and results were validated by gold-standard RT-qPCR. We also showed that sediment RNA was likely the main source of TMPRSS2-ERG mRNA in urinary samples. We believe that our assay is a potential clinical screening tool for PC and could also have wide applications for other disease-related fusion genes. PMID:27375789

  12. Lager yeasts possess dynamic genomes that undergo rearrangements and gene amplification in response to stress.

    PubMed

    James, Tharappel C; Usher, Jane; Campbell, Susan; Bond, Ursula

    2008-03-01

    A long-term goal of the brewing industry is to identify yeast strains with increased tolerance to the stresses experienced during the brewing process. We have characterised the genomes of a number of stress-tolerant mutants, derived from the lager yeast strain CMBS-33, that were selected for tolerance to high temperatures and to growth in high specific gravity wort. Our results indicate that the heat-tolerant strains have undergone a number of gross chromosomal rearrangements when compared to the parental strain. To determine if such rearrangements can spontaneously arise in response to exposure to stress conditions experienced during the brewing process, we examined the chromosome integrity of both the stress-tolerant strains and their parent during a single round of fermentation under a variety of environmental stresses. Our results show that the lager yeast genome shows tremendous plasticity during fermentation, especially when fermentations are carried out in high specific gravity wort and at higher than normal temperatures. Many localised regions of gene amplification were observed especially at the telomeres and at the rRNA gene locus on chromosome XII, and general chromosomal instability was evident. However, gross chromosomal rearrangements were not detected, indicating that continued selection in the stress conditions are required to obtain clonal isolates with stable rearrangements. Taken together, the data suggest that lager yeasts display a high degree of genomic plasticity and undergo genomic changes in response to environmental stress. PMID:18183398

  13. Comparison of KRAS mutation status between primary tumor and metastasis in Chinese colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe-Zhen; Bai, Long; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Zi-Chen; Wang, Fang; Zeng, Zhao-Lei; Zeng, Jun-Bo; Zhang, Dong-Sheng; Wang, Feng-Hua; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Yu-Hong; Shao, Jian-Yong; Xu, Rui-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Detection of KRAS mutation status is a routine clinical procedure for predicting response to anti-EGFR therapy in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Previous studies showed high concordance of KRAS mutation status in primary lesion and corresponding metastatic sites in CRC. However, the data were mostly from Caucasians. The aim of this study is to compare KRAS mutation and other molecules mutation status between primary tumor and corresponding metastatic lesion in Chinese patients with CRC. In this retrospective study, Chinese CRC patients with paired samples of primary tumor and metastatic site were detected for KRAS codon 12 and 13 with quantitative real-time PCR, or detected for OncoCarta™ panel of 19 genes with MassARRAY(®) technique, including KRAS, BRAF, NRAS and PIK3CA et al. Forty-eight paired CRC samples were analyzed for KRAS codon 12 and 13 using quantitative real-time PCR. Ten paired samples were analyzed by 19 genes OncoCarta™ Panel with MassARRAY(®) technique. KRAS mutation was found in 15 (25.9 %) primary tumors and 18 (31.0 %) metastases. The discordance of KRAS was observed in 11 (19.0 %) patients. Alteration of mutation points in primary site with mutant KRAS was not observed. In the 10 patients with multiple gene detection, PIK3CA mutation showed concordant mutation status in primary tumor and metastatic site, whereas discordance in BRAF, NRAS and AKT1 was detected. A concordance rate of 81.0 % was detected in KRAS mutation between primary tumor and metastatic lesion in Chinese patients with CRC. Discordance of BRAF, NRAS and AKT1 mutation status in primary tumor and metastases was observed. PMID:27270901

  14. Concurrent AURKA and MYCN Gene Amplifications Are Harbingers of Lethal Treatment-Related Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer1 2

    PubMed Central

    Mosquera, Juan Miguel; Beltran, Himisha; Park, Kyung; MacDonald, Theresa Y; Robinson, Brian D; Tagawa, Scott T; Perner, Sven; Bismar, Tarek A; Erbersdobler, Andreas; Dhir, Rajiv; Nelson, Joel B; Nanus, David M; Rubin, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC), also referred to as anaplastic prostate cancer, is a lethal tumor that most commonly arises in late stages of prostate adenocarcinoma (PCA) with predilection to metastasize to visceral organs. In the current study, we explore for evidence that Aurora kinase A (AURKA) and N-myc (MYCN) gene abnormalities are harbingers of treatment-related NEPC (t-NEPC). We studied primary prostate tissue from 15 hormone naïve PCAs, 51 castration-resistant prostate cancers, and 15 metastatic tumors from 72 patients at different stages of disease progression to t-NEPC, some with multiple specimens. Histologic evaluation, immunohistochemistry, and fluorescence in situ hybridization were performed and correlated with clinical variables. AURKA amplification was identified in overall 65% of PCAs (hormone naïve and treated) from patients that developed t-NEPC and in 86% of metastases. Concurrent amplification of MYCN was present in 70% of primary PCAs, 69% of treated PCAs, and 83% of metastases. In contrast, in an unselected PCA cohort, AURKA and MYCN amplifications were identified in only 5% of 169 cases. When metastatic t-NEPC was compared to primary PCA from the same patients, there was 100% concordance of ERG rearrangement, 100% concordance of AURKA amplification, and 60% concordance of MYCN amplification. In tumors with mixed features, there was also 100% concordance of ERG rearrangement and 94% concordance of AURKA and MYCN co-amplification between areas of NEPC and adenocarcinoma. AURKA and MYCN amplifications may be prognostic and predictive biomarkers, as they are harbingers of tumors at risk of progressing to t-NEPC after hormonal therapy. PMID:23358695

  15. MET gene amplification or EGFR mutation activate MET in lung cancers untreated with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Lockwood, William W.; Valencia, Ilse; Soh, Junichi; Peyton, Michael; Jida, Masaru; Otani, Hiroki; Fujii, Tetsuya; Ouchida, Mamoru; Takigawa, Nagio; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Shimizu, Kenji; Date, Hiroshi; Minna, John D.; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Lam, Wan L.; Gazdar, Adi F.; Toyooka, Shinichi

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed MET protein and copy number in NSCLC with or without EGFR mutations untreated with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). MET copy number was examined in 28 NSCLC and 4 human bronchial epithelial cell lines (HBEC) and 100 primary tumors using quantitative real-time PCR. Positive results were confirmed by array comparative genomic hybridization and fluorescence in-situ hybridization. Total and phospho-MET protein expression was determined in 24 NSCLC and 2 HBEC cell lines using Western blot. EGFR mutations were examined for exon 19 deletions, T790M, and L858R. Knockdown of EGFR with siRNA was performed to examine the relation between EGFR and MET activation. High-level MET amplification was observed in 3 of 28 NSCLC cell lines and in 2 of 100 primary lung tumors that had not been treated with EGFR-TKIs. MET protein was highly expressed and phosphorylated in all the 3 cell lines with high MET amplification. In contrast, 6 NSCLC cell lines showed phospho-MET among 21 NSCLC cell lines without MET amplification (p = 0.042). Furthermore, those 6 cell lines harboring phospho-MET expression without MET amplification were all EGFR mutant (p = 0.0039). siRNA-mediated knockdown of EGFR abolished phospho-MET expression in examined 3 EGFR mutant cell lines of which MET gene copy number was not amplified. By contrast, phospho-MET expression in 2 cell lines with amplified MET gene was not down-regulated by knockdown of EGFR. Our results indicated that MET amplification was present in untreated NSCLC and EGFR mutation or MET amplification activated MET protein in NSCLC. PMID:19117057

  16. KRAS, HRAS and EGFR Mutations in Sporadic Sebaceous Gland Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Groesser, Leopold; Singer, Sebastian; Peterhof, Eva; Landthaler, Michael; Heigl, Ulrike; Schneider-Brachert, Wulf; Berneburg, Mark; Hafner, Christian

    2016-08-23

    Sporadic sebaceous gland hyperplasia (SGH) is a benign skin lesion, with a high prevalence in the general population. Although SGH has been attributed to both extrinsic and intrinsic factors, the underlying genetic changes have not yet been characterized. Recently, HRAS and KRAS mutations have been identified in sebaceous naevus, a hamartoma sharing histological characteristics with SGH. Therefore we screened 43 SGH for activating mutations in RAS genes and other oncogenes. We identified a wide spectrum of mutually exclusive activating HRAS (8/43), KRAS (11/43) and EGFR mutations (7/31) in altogether 60% of the lesions investigated. A RAS and EGFR wildtype status was found in 15 normal sebaceous glands in the head and neck area. Our findings indicate that activating HRAS, KRAS and EGFR mutations play a major role in the pathogenesis of sporadic SGH. These results support the concept that SGH is a true benign neoplasm rather than a reactive hyperplasia. PMID:26804118

  17. Intrachromosomal Amplification, Locus Deletion and Point Mutation in the Aquaglyceroporin AQP1 Gene in Antimony Resistant Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis

    PubMed Central

    Monte-Neto, Rubens; Laffitte, Marie-Claude N.; Leprohon, Philippe; Reis, Priscila; Frézard, Frédéric; Ouellette, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background Antimony resistance complicates the treatment of infections caused by the parasite Leishmania. Methodology/Principal Findings Using next generation sequencing, we sequenced the genome of four independent Leishmania guyanensis antimony-resistant (SbR) mutants and found different chromosomal alterations including aneuploidy, intrachromosomal gene amplification and gene deletion. A segment covering 30 genes on chromosome 19 was amplified intrachromosomally in three of the four mutants. The gene coding for the multidrug resistance associated protein A involved in antimony resistance was also amplified in the four mutants, most likely through chromosomal translocation. All mutants also displayed a reduced accumulation of antimony mainly due to genomic alterations at the level of the subtelomeric region of chromosome 31 harboring the gene coding for the aquaglyceroporin 1 (LgAQP1). Resistance involved the loss of LgAQP1 through subtelomeric deletions in three mutants. Interestingly, the fourth mutant harbored a single G133D point mutation in LgAQP1 whose role in resistance was functionality confirmed through drug sensitivity and antimony accumulation assays. In contrast to the Leishmania subspecies that resort to extrachromosomal amplification, the Viannia strains studied here used intrachromosomal amplification and locus deletion. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report of a naturally occurred point mutation in AQP1 in antimony resistant parasites. PMID:25679388

  18. Towards in vivo amplification: Overcoming hurdles in the use of hematopoietic stem cells in transplantation and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Nagree, Murtaza S; López-Vásquez, Lucía; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2015-12-26

    With the advent of safer and more efficient gene transfer methods, gene therapy has become a viable solution for many inherited and acquired disorders. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are a prime cell compartment for gene therapy aimed at correcting blood-based disorders, as well as those amenable to metabolic outcomes that can effect cross-correction. While some resounding clinical successes have recently been demonstrated, ample room remains to increase the therapeutic output from HSC-directed gene therapy. In vivo amplification of therapeutic cells is one avenue to achieve enhanced gene product delivery. To date, attempts have been made to provide HSCs with resistance to cytotoxic drugs, to include drug-inducible growth modules specific to HSCs, and to increase the engraftment potential of transduced HSCs. This review aims to summarize amplification strategies that have been developed and tested and to discuss their advantages along with barriers faced towards their clinical adaptation. In addition, next-generation strategies to circumvent current limitations of specific amplification schemas are discussed. PMID:26730268

  19. Towards in vivo amplification: Overcoming hurdles in the use of hematopoietic stem cells in transplantation and gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nagree, Murtaza S; López-Vásquez, Lucía; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of safer and more efficient gene transfer methods, gene therapy has become a viable solution for many inherited and acquired disorders. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are a prime cell compartment for gene therapy aimed at correcting blood-based disorders, as well as those amenable to metabolic outcomes that can effect cross-correction. While some resounding clinical successes have recently been demonstrated, ample room remains to increase the therapeutic output from HSC-directed gene therapy. In vivo amplification of therapeutic cells is one avenue to achieve enhanced gene product delivery. To date, attempts have been made to provide HSCs with resistance to cytotoxic drugs, to include drug-inducible growth modules specific to HSCs, and to increase the engraftment potential of transduced HSCs. This review aims to summarize amplification strategies that have been developed and tested and to discuss their advantages along with barriers faced towards their clinical adaptation. In addition, next-generation strategies to circumvent current limitations of specific amplification schemas are discussed. PMID:26730268

  20. Downstream of Mutant KRAS, the Transcription Regulator YAP Is Essential for Neoplastic Progression to Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiying; Nandakumar, Nivedita; Shi, Yuhao; Manzano, Mark; Smith, Alias; Graham, Garrett; Gupta, Swati; Vietsch, Eveline E.; Laughlin, Sean Z.; Wadhwa, Mandheer; Chetram, Mahandranauth; Joshi, Mrinmayi; Wang, Fen; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Toretsky, Jeffrey; Wellstein, Anton; Yi, Chunling

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive cancer with poor survival rates and frequently carries oncogenic KRAS mutation. However, KRAS has thus far not been a viable therapeutic target. We found that the abundance of YAP mRNA, which encodes Yes-associated protein (YAP), a protein regulated by the Hippo pathway during tissue development and homeostasis, was increased in human PDAC tissue compared with that in normal pancreatic epithelia. In genetically engineered KrasG12D and KrasG12D: Trp53R172H mouse models, pancreas-specific deletion of Yap halted the progression of early neoplastic lesions to PDAC without affecting normal pancreatic development and endocrine function. Although Yap was dispensable for acinar to ductal metaplasia (ADM), an initial step in the progression to PDAC, Yap was critically required for the proliferation of mutant Kras or Kras:Trp53 neoplastic pancreatic ductal cells in culture and for their growth and progression to invasive PDAC in mice. Yap functioned as a critical transcriptional switch downstream of the oncogenic KRAS–mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, promoting the expression of genes encoding secretory factors that cumulatively sustained neoplastic proliferation, a tumorigenic stromal response in the tumor microenvironment, and PDAC progression in Kras and Kras: Trp53 mutant pancreas tissue. Together, our findings identified Yap as a critical oncogenic KRAS effector and a promising therapeutic target for PDAC and possibly other types of KRAS-mutant cancers. PMID:24803537

  1. KRAS (but not BRAF) mutations in ovarian serous borderline tumor are associated with recurrent low-grade serous carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Yvonne T.; Deavers, Michael T.; Sun, Charlotte C.; Kwan, Suet-Yan; Kuo, Eric; Malpica, Anais; Mok, Samuel C.; Gershenson, David M.; Wong, Kwong-Kwok

    2014-01-01

    BRAF and KRAS mutations in ovarian serous borderline tumors (OSBTs) and ovarian low-grade serous carcinomas (LGSCs) have been previously described. However, whether those OSBTs would progress to LGSCs or those LGSCs were developed from OSBT precursors in previous studies is unknown. Therefore, we assessed KRAS and BRAF mutations in tumor samples from 23 recurrent LGSC patients with known initial diagnosis of OSBT. Paraffin blocks from both OSBT and LGSC samples were available for 5 patients, and either OSBT or LGSC were available for another 18 patients. Tumor cells from paraffin-embedded tissues were dissected out for mutation analysis by conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Sanger sequencing. Tumors that appeared to have wild-type KRAS by conventional PCR–Sanger sequencing were further analyzed by full COLD (coamplification at lower denaturation temperature)-PCR and deep sequencing. Full COLD-PCR was able to enrich the amplification of mutated alleles. Deep sequencing was performed with the Ion Torrent personal genome machine (PGM). By conventional PCR–Sanger sequencing, BRAF mutation was detected only in one patient and KRAS mutations were detected in 10 patients. Full COLD-PCR deep sequencing detected low-abundance KRAS mutations in eight additional patients. Three of the five patients with both OSBT and LGSC samples available had the same KRAS mutations detected in both OSBT and LGSC samples. The remaining two patients had only KRAS mutations detected in their LGSC samples. For patients with either OSBT or LGSC samples available, KRAS mutations were detected in 7 OSBT samples and 6 LGSC samples. To our surprise, patients with the KRAS G12V mutation appeared to have shorter survival times. In summary, KRAS mutations are very common in recurrent LGSC, while BRAF mutations are rare. The findings indicate that recurrent LGSC can arise from proliferation of OSBT tumor cells with or without detectable KRAS mutations. PMID:24549645

  2. KRAS-Mutant Lung Cancers in the Era of Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Jarushka; Drilon, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    KRAS-mutant lung cancers account for approximately 25% of non-small cell lung carcinomas, thus representing an enormous burden of cancer worldwide. KRAS mutations are clear drivers of tumor growth and are characterized by a complex biology involving the interaction between mutant KRAS, various growth factor pathways, and tumor suppressor genes. While KRAS mutations are classically associated with a significant smoking history, they are also identified in a substantial proportion of never-smokers. These mutations are found largely in lung adenocarcinomas with solid growth patterns and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. A variety of tools are available for diagnosis including Sanger sequencing, multiplex mutational hotspot profiling, and next-generation sequencing. The prognostic and predictive roles of KRAS status remain controversial. It has become increasingly clear, however, that KRAS mutations drive primary resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibition. Until recently, mutant KRAS was not thought of as a clinically-targetable driver in lung cancers. With the expansion of our knowledge regarding the biology of KRAS-mutant lung cancers and the role of MEK and PI3K/mTOR inhibition, the face of targeted therapeutics for this genomic subset of patients is slowly beginning to change. PMID:26667343

  3. Suppression of TET1-Dependent DNA Demethylation is Essential for KRAS-Mediated Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bo-Kuan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hypermethylation-mediated tumor suppressor gene (TSG) silencing is a central epigenetic alteration in RAS-dependent tumorigenesis. Ten-eleven translocation (TET) enzymes can depress DNA methylation by hydroxylation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) bases to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). Here we report that suppression of TET1 is required for KRAS-induced DNA hypermethylation and cellular transformation. In distinct non-malignant cell lines, oncogenic KRAS promotes transformation by inhibiting TET1 expression via the ERK signaling pathway. This reduces chromatin occupancy of TET1 at TSG promoters, lowers levels of 5hmC, and increases levels of 5mC and 5mC-dependent transcriptional silencing. Restoration of TET1 expression by ERK pathway inhibition or ectopic TET1 reintroduction in KRAS-transformed cells reactivates TSGs and inhibits colony formation. KRAS knockdown increases TET1 expression and diminishes colony-forming ability, while KRAS/TET1 double knockdown bypasses the KRAS dependence of KRAS-addicted cancer cells. Thus, suppression of TET1-dependent DNA demethylation is critical for KRAS-mediated transformation. PMID:25466250

  4. Combined mutations of ASXL1, CBL, FLT3, IDH1, IDH2, JAK2, KRAS, NPM1, NRAS, RUNX1, TET2 and WT1 genes in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemias

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene mutation is an important mechanism of myeloid leukemogenesis. However, the number and combination of gene mutated in myeloid malignancies is still a matter of investigation. Methods We searched for mutations in the ASXL1, CBL, FLT3, IDH1, IDH2, JAK2, KRAS, NPM1, NRAS, RUNX1, TET2 and WT1 genes in 65 myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) and 64 acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) without balanced translocation or complex karyotype. Results Mutations in ASXL1 and CBL were frequent in refractory anemia with excess of blasts. Mutations in TET2 occurred with similar frequency in MDSs and AMLs and associated equally with either ASXL1 or NPM1 mutations. Mutations of RUNX1 were mutually exclusive with TET2 and combined with ASXL1 but not with NPM1. Mutations in FLT3 (mutation and internal tandem duplication), IDH1, IDH2, NPM1 and WT1 occurred primarily in AMLs. Conclusion Only 14% MDSs but half AMLs had at least two mutations in the genes studied. Based on the observed combinations and exclusions we classified the 12 genes into four classes and propose a highly speculative model that at least a mutation in one of each class is necessary for developing AML with simple or normal karyotype. PMID:20678218

  5. Detection of sequences homologous to human retroviral DNA in multiple sclerosis by gene amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, S.J.; Ehrlich, G.D.; Abbott, M.A.; Hurwitz, B.J.; Waldmann, T.A.; Poiesz, B.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Twenty-one patients with multiple sclerosis, chronic progressive type, were examined for DNA sequences homologous to a human retrovirus. Genomic DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells was analyzed for the presence of homologous sequences to the human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I) long terminal repeat, 3{prime} gag, pol, and env domains by the enzymatic in vitro gene amplification technique, polymerase chain reaction. Positive identification of homologous pol sequences was made in the amplified DNA from six of these patients (29%). Three of these six patients (14%) also tested positive for the env region, but not for the other regions tested. In contrast, none of the samples from 35 normal individuals studied was positive when amplified and tested with the same primers and probes. Comparison of patterns obtained from controls and from patients with adult T-cell leukemia or tropical spastic paraparesis suggests that the DNA sequences identified are exogenous to the human genome and may correspond to a human retroviral species. The data support the detection of a human retroviral agent in some patients with multiple sclerosis.

  6. Activating HER2 mutations in HER2 gene amplification negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Ron; Kavuri, Shyam M.; Searleman, Adam C.; Shen, Wei; Shen, Dong; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Monsey, John; Goel, Nicholas; Aronson, Adam B.; Li, Shunqiang; Ma, Cynthia X.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Ellis, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    Data from eight breast cancer genome sequencing projects identified 25 patients with HER2 somatic mutations in cancers lacking HER2 gene amplification. To determine the phenotype of these mutations, we functionally characterized thirteen HER2 mutations using in vitro kinase assays, protein structure analysis, cell culture and xenograft experiments. Seven of these mutations are activating mutations, including G309A, D769H, D769Y, V777L, P780ins, V842I, and R896C. HER2 in-frame deletion 755-759, which is homologous to EGFR exon 19 in-frame deletions, had a neomorphic phenotype with increased phosphorylation of EGFR or HER3. L755S produced lapatinib resistance, but was not an activating mutation in our experimental systems. All of these mutations were sensitive to the irreversible kinase inhibitor, neratinib. These findings demonstrate that HER2 somatic mutation is an alternative mechanism to activate HER2 in breast cancer and they validate HER2 somatic mutations as drug targets for breast cancer treatment. PMID:23220880

  7. BHK cell lines with increased rates of gene amplification are hypersensitive to ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Giulotto, E.; Bertoni, L.; Attolini, C.; Rainaldi, G.; Anglana, M. )

    1991-04-15

    Four cell lines (MP1, -4, -5, -7), isolated from baby hamster kidney cells after simultaneous selection with N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate and methotrexate, have previously been shown to amplify their DNA at an increased rate. We now show that all four lines are hypersensitive to killing by UV light and mitomycin C. At high doses of UV light or mitomycin C, the MP lines survived less than 10% or less than 5% as well as parental cells, respectively. After UV irradiation, inhibition of DNA and RNA synthesis was greater in MP than in parental cells, and recovery was slower or absent. A 2- to 3.5-fold increase in the frequency of UV-induced sister chromatid exchange was also seen in the four cell lines. In MP5, unscheduled DNA replication after treatment with UV light was only approximately 70% as great as in parental cells and the other MP lines. In MP4 and MP7 cells S phase was elongated. Although their individual properties confirm that the four cell lines are independent, their common properties suggest a relationship between tolerance of DNA damage and gene amplification.

  8. Rapid detection of ermB gene in Clostridium difficile by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Lin, Minyi; Liu, Wei; Wang, Pu; Tan, Jiasheng; Zhou, Youlian; Wu, Peiqun; Zhang, Ting; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Ye

    2015-08-01

    Macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance in Clostridium difficile is mostly due to the ermB resistance determinant. Here, we describe a sensitive and rapid molecular method to detect ermB in C. difficile to contribute to the wider epidemiological study. Five sets of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) primers were designed and optimized for rapid detection of ermB. The specificity and sensitivity of the primers for ermB were detected, and the ermB LAMP assay was compared to conventional PCR with 80 clinical isolates of C. difficile. Real-time monitoring of turbidity and chromogenic reaction were used to determine negative and positive results. A total of 26 pathogenic bacterial strains of different species were found to be negative for ermB, which indicated the high specificity of the primers. ermB was detected in 78.8 % (63/80) of the clinical isolates by both LAMP and conventional PCR. The detection limit of LAMP was 36.1  pg DNA μl- 1 and its sensitivity was 10-fold greater than that of conventional PCR. This study is the first report regarding the development and application of the LAMP assay for detection of the ermB gene in C. difficile strains. The developed LAMP method is sensitive, specific and provides a user-friendly visual approach for the rapid detection of ermB-bearing C. difficile. PMID:26272634

  9. DNA sequence templates adjacent nucleosome and ORC sites at gene amplification origins in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Zimmer, Kurt; Rusch, Douglas B.; Paranjape, Neha; Podicheti, Ram; Tang, Haixu; Calvi, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic origins of DNA replication are bound by the origin recognition complex (ORC), which scaffolds assembly of a pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) that is then activated to initiate replication. Both pre-RC assembly and activation are strongly influenced by developmental changes to the epigenome, but molecular mechanisms remain incompletely defined. We have been examining the activation of origins responsible for developmental gene amplification in Drosophila. At a specific time in oogenesis, somatic follicle cells transition from genomic replication to a locus-specific replication from six amplicon origins. Previous evidence indicated that these amplicon origins are activated by nucleosome acetylation, but how this affects origin chromatin is unknown. Here, we examine nucleosome position in follicle cells using micrococcal nuclease digestion with Ilumina sequencing. The results indicate that ORC binding sites and other essential origin sequences are nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs). Nucleosome position at the amplicons was highly similar among developmental stages during which ORC is or is not bound, indicating that being an NDR is not sufficient to specify ORC binding. Importantly, the data suggest that nucleosomes and ORC have opposite preferences for DNA sequence and structure. We propose that nucleosome hyperacetylation promotes pre-RC assembly onto adjacent DNA sequences that are disfavored by nucleosomes but favored by ORC. PMID:26227968

  10. Optimization of Saanen sperm genes amplification: evaluation of standardized protocols in genetically uncharacterized rural goats reared under a subtropical environment.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Elie K; Saade, Maya F; Sleiman, Fawwak T; Hamadeh, Shady K; Mouneimne, Youssef; Kassaifi, Zeina; Kayali, Ghazi; Harakeh, Steve; Jaber, Lina S; Shaib, Houssam A

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this research is to optimize quantitatively the amplification of specific sperm genes in reference genomically characterized Saanen goat and to evaluate the standardized protocols applicability on sperms of uncharacterized genome of rural goats reared under subtropical environment for inclusion in future selection programs. The optimization of the protocols in Saanen sperms included three production genes (growth hormone (GH) exons 2, 3, and 4, αS1-casein (CSN1S1), and α-lactalbumin) and two health genes (MHC class II DRB and prion (PrP)). The optimization was based on varying the primers concentrations and the inclusion of a PCR cosolvent (Triton X). The impact of the studied variables on statistically significant increase in the yield of amplicons was noticed in four out of five (80%) optimized protocols, namely in those related to GH, CSN1S1, α-lactalbumin, and PrP genes (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the yield of amplicons related to MHC class II DRB gene, regardless of the variables used (P > 0.05). The applicability of the optimized protocols of Saanen sperm genes on amplification of uncharacterized rural goat sperms revealed a 100% success in tested individuals for amplification of GH, CSN1S1, α-lactalbumin, and MHC class II DRB genes and a 75% success for the PrP gene. The significant success in applicability of the Saanen quantitatively optimized protocols to other uncharacterized genome of rural goats allows for their inclusion in future selection, targeting the sustainability of this farming system in a subtropical environment and the improvement of the farmers livelihood. PMID:22350811

  11. The Mutant KRAS Gene Up-regulates BCL-XL Protein via STAT3 to Confer Apoptosis Resistance That Is Reversed by BIM Protein Induction and BCL-XL Antagonism.

    PubMed

    Zaanan, Aziz; Okamoto, Koichi; Kawakami, Hisato; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Huang, Shengbing; Sinicrope, Frank A

    2015-09-25

    In colorectal cancers with oncogenic GTPase Kras (KRAS) mutations, inhibition of downstream MEK/ERK signaling has shown limited efficacy, in part because of failure to induce a robust apoptotic response. We studied the mechanism of apoptosis resistance in mutant KRAS cells and sought to enhance the efficacy of a KRAS-specific MEK/ERK inhibitor, GDC-0623. GDC-0623 was shown to potently up-regulate BIM expression to a greater extent versus other MEK inhibitors in isogenic KRAS HCT116 and mutant KRAS SW620 colon cancer cells. ERK silencing enhanced BIM up-regulation by GDC-0623 that was due to its loss of phosphorylation at Ser(69), confirmed by a BIM-EL phosphorylation-defective mutant (S69G) that increased protein stability and blocked BIM induction. Despite BIM and BIK induction, the isogenic KRAS mutant versus wild-type cells remained resistant to GDC-0623-induced apoptosis, in part because of up-regulation of BCL-XL. KRAS knockdown by a doxycycline-inducible shRNA attenuated BCL-XL expression. BCL-XL knockdown sensitized KRAS mutant cells to GDC-0623-mediated apoptosis, as did the BH3 mimetic ABT-263. GDC-0623 plus ABT-263 induced a synergistic apoptosis by a mechanism that includes release of BIM from its sequestration by BCL-XL. Furthermore, mutant KRAS activated p-STAT3 (Tyr(705)) in the absence of IL-6 secretion, and STAT3 knockdown reduced BCL-XL mRNA and protein expression. These data suggest that BCL-XL up-regulation by STAT3 contributes to mutant KRAS-mediated apoptosis resistance. Such resistance can be overcome by potent BIM induction and concurrent BCL-XL antagonism to enable a synergistic apoptotic response. PMID:26245900

  12. Roles of the Pas1 and Par2 genes in determination of the unique, intermediate susceptibility of BALB/cByJ mice to urethane-induction of lung carcinogenesis: differential effects on tumor multiplicity, size and Kras2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Karasaki, H; Obata, M; Ogawa, K; Lee, G H

    1997-10-01

    The C3H/HeJ (C3H), A/J and BALB/cByJ (BALB) mouse strains are respectively resistant, sensitive and intermediate regarding the induction of lung tumors by urethane. The phenotypic difference between C3H and A/J is largely determined by the Pas1 (Pulmonary adenoma susceptibility 1) gene on chromosome 6, the A/J allele of which dominantly increases the tumor burden. We recently found that BALB mice possess a unique lung tumor resistance gene on chromosome 18, designated Par2 (Pulmonary adenoma resistance 2), which partially, but dominantly suppresses the sensitive phenotype of A/J mice (Oncogene 13: 1599-1604, 1996). It has, however, remained unclear why BALB mice carrying the Par2 gene are significantly more sensitive to urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis than C3H mice that have no dominant lung tumor resistance genes. In the present study, using (C3H x BALB)F1 x C3H backcross mice treated with urethane, we demonstrated that BALB mice possess the disease allele of the Pas1 gene despite their 15-fold more resistance relative to A/J mice (LOD = 22.6). The BALB Par2 allele only significantly reduced the mean lung tumor multiplicity (LOD = 4.4) in the backcross population carrying the BALB allele of Pas1, indicating that the intermediate BALB phenotype may at least in part be the result of interactions between these two dominant genes. While the BALB Pas1 allele increased both the mean multiplicity and size of lung tumors, the BALB Par2 allele affected only the mean tumor multiplicity, implying that they are involved in different stages of multi-step lung carcinogenesis. In addition, we found that 68% of lung tumors from the BALB Pas1-positive backcross mice contained activating point mutations of the Kras2 oncogene, tightly linked to the Pas1 locus, whereas these genetic alterations were absent in tumors from BALB Pas1-negative mice. The Par2 genotype exhibited no effect on this parameter. Since the activating point mutations were observed exclusively in the BALB

  13. Regulation of Pattern Formation and Gene Amplification During Drosophila Oogenesis by the miR-318 microRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Wanzhong; Deng, Qiannan; Guo, Ting; Hong, Xin; Kugler, Jan-Michael; Yang, Xiaohang; Cohen, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Pattern formation during epithelial development requires the coordination of multiple signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the functions of an ovary-enriched miRNA, miR-318, in epithelial development during Drosophila oogenesis. mir-318 maternal loss-of-function mutants were female-sterile and laid eggs with abnormal morphology. Removal of mir-318 disrupted the dorsal–anterior follicle cell patterning, resulting in abnormal dorsal appendages. mir-318 mutant females also produced thin and fragile eggshells due to impaired chorion gene amplification. We provide evidence that the ecdysone signaling pathway activates expression of miR-318 and that miR-318 cooperates with Tramtrack69 to control the switch from endocycling to chorion gene amplification during differentiation of the follicular epithelium. The multiple functions of miR-318 in oogenesis illustrate the importance of miRNAs in maintaining cell fate and in promoting the developmental transition in the female follicular epithelium. PMID:25786856

  14. MicroRNA-206 functions as a pleiotropic modulator of cell proliferation, invasion and lymphangiogenesis in pancreatic adenocarcinoma by targeting ANXA2 and KRAS genes.

    PubMed

    Keklikoglou, I; Hosaka, K; Bender, C; Bott, A; Koerner, C; Mitra, D; Will, R; Woerner, A; Muenstermann, E; Wilhelm, H; Cao, Y; Wiemann, S

    2015-09-10

    Recent advances in cancer biology have emerged important roles for microRNAs (miRNAs) in regulating tumor responses. However, their function in mediating intercellular communication within the tumor microenvironment is thus far poorly explored. Here, we found miR-206 to be abrogated in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) specimens and cell lines. We show that miR-206 directly targets the oncogenes KRAS and annexin a2 (ANXA2), thereby acting as tumor suppressor in PDAC cells by blocking cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Importantly, we identified miR-206 as a negative regulator of oncogenic KRAS-induced nuclear factor-κB transcriptional activity, resulting in a concomitant reduction of the expression and secretion of pro-angiogenic and pro-inflammatory factors including the cytokine interleukin-8, the chemokines (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 and (C-C motif) ligand 2, and the granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor. We further show that miR-206 abrogates the expression and secretion of the potent pro-lymphangiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor C in pancreatic cancer cells through an NF-κB-independent mechanism. By using in vitro and in vivo approaches, we reveal that re-expression of miR-206 in PDAC cells is sufficient to inhibit tumor blood and lymphatic vessel formation, thus leading to a significant delay of tumor growth and progression. Taken together, our study sheds light onto the role of miR-206 as a pleiotropic modulator of different hallmarks of cancer, and as such raising the intriguing possibility that miR-206 may be an attractive candidate for miRNA-based anticancer therapies. PMID:25500542

  15. Amplification of FGFR1 gene and expression of FGFR1 protein is found in different histological types of lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Vitor; Reis, Diana; Silva, Maria; Alarcão, Ana Maria; Ladeirinha, Ana Filipa; d'Aguiar, Maria João; Ferreira, Teresa; Caramujo-Balseiro, Sandra; Carvalho, Lina

    2016-08-01

    Although lung cancer continues to be the leading cause of cancer-related death, accurate diagnosis followed by personalized treatment is expected to raise the 5-year survival rate. Targeted therapies are now in routine clinical use, in particular for lung adenocarcinoma (ADC). Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) has recently emerged as a molecular target, especially in squamous cell/epidermoid carcinoma (SQC) of the lung. This paper evaluates FGFR1 expression and gene copy number in adenocarcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, pleomorphic carcinomas (PLEOMC) and adenosquamous carcinomas (ADSQC) of the lung and also explores the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) pathway. We studied 76 lung carcinomas: 34 ADC, 24 SQC, 10 PLEOMC and 8 ADSQC. FGFR1 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Higher FGFR1 protein expression was observed in all tumour types compared to non-tumour tissue. FGFR1 expression was higher in ADC and PLEOMC than in SQC. We found a tendency to higher expression in ADC than in SQC and significantly higher expression in PLEOMC than in other histological subtypes. FISH-based amplification of FGFR1 was identified in 15 (20 %) lung carcinomas: 5 (15 %) ADC, 5 (21 %) SQC, 3 (30 %) PLEOMC and 2 (25 %) ADSQC. Amplification was more frequent in SQC without significant differences. FGFR1 protein is expressed in the majority of lung carcinomas, though it is higher in ADC and PLEOMC (the latter may reflect the importance of FGFR1 control of the EMT pathway). FGFR1 amplification was identified in all types of lung carcinoma. Although FGFR1 is most frequently amplified in SQC, other histological types merit assessment of FGFR1 amplification, in order to select patients that might benefit from targeted therapy. PMID:27194548

  16. Loss of integrin alpha1beta1 ameliorates Kras-induced lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Macias-Perez, Ines; Borza, Corina; Chen, Xiwu; Yan, Xuexian; Ibanez, Raquel; Mernaugh, Glenda; Matrisian, Lynn M; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2008-08-01

    The collagen IV binding receptor integrin alpha1beta1 has been shown to regulate lung cancer due to its proangiogenic properties; however, it is unclear whether this receptor also plays a direct role in promoting primary lung tumors. To investigate this possibility, integrin alpha1-null mice were crossed with KrasLA2 mice that carry an oncogenic mutation of the Kras gene (G12D) and develop spontaneous primary tumors with features of non-small cell lung cancer. We provide evidence that KrasLA2/alpha1-null mice have a decreased incidence of primary lung tumors and longer survival compared with KrasLA2/alpha1 wild-type controls. Tumors from KrasLA2/alpha1-null mice were also smaller, less vascularized, and exhibited reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis, as determined by proliferating cell nuclear antigen and terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end staining, respectively. Moreover, tumors from the KrasLA2/alpha1-null mice showed diminished extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) but enhanced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. Primary lung tumor epithelial cells isolated from KrasLA2/alpha1-null mice showed a significant decrease in anchorage-independent colony formation, collagen-mediated cell proliferation, ERK activation, and, most importantly, tumorigenicity when injected into nude mice compared with KrasLA2/alpha1 wild-type tumor cells. These results indicate that loss of the integrin alpha1 subunit decreases the incidence and growth of lung epithelial tumors initiated by oncogenic Kras, suggesting that both Kras and integrin alpha1beta1 cooperate to drive the growth of non-small cell lung cancer in vivo. PMID:18676835

  17. Cis-acting elements in its 3′ UTR mediate post-transcriptional regulation of KRAS

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minlee; Kogan, Nicole; Slack, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple RNA-binding proteins and non-coding RNAs, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), are involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation through recognition motifs in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of their target genes. The KRAS gene encodes a key signaling protein, and its messenger RNA (mRNA) contains an exceptionally long 3′ UTR; this suggests that it may be subject to a highly complex set of regulatory processes. However, 3′ UTR-dependent regulation of KRAS expression has not been explored in detail. Using extensive deletion and mutational analyses combined with luciferase reporter assays, we have identified inhibitory and stabilizing cis-acting regions within the KRAS 3′ UTR that may interact with miRNAs and RNA-binding proteins, such as HuR. Particularly, we have identified an AU-rich 49-nt fragment in the KRAS 3′ UTR that is required for KRAS 3′ UTR reporter repression. This element contains a miR-185 complementary element, and we show that overexpression of miR-185 represses endogenous KRAS mRNA and protein in vitro. In addition, we have identified another 49-nt fragment that is required to promote KRAS 3′ UTR reporter expression. These findings indicate that multiple cis-regulatory motifs in the 3′ UTR of KRAS finely modulate its expression, and sequence alterations within a binding motif may disrupt the precise functions of trans-regulatory factors, potentially leading to aberrant KRAS expression. PMID:26930719

  18. Reliability of differential PCR for the detection of EGFR and MDM2 gene amplification in DNA extracted from FFPE glioma tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, S.B.; Abbott, K.; Varma, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    A series of 43 human gliomas, consisting of 30 glioblastomas, 7 anaplastic astrocytomas, 3 low grade astrocytomas, 2 ependymomas, and 1 oligodendroglioma, was studied for amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) genes. DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections was analyzed by differential PCR and the results were compared with slot blot examination of DNA extracted from frozen tissue from the same neoplasms. Twelve glioblastomas (40%) showed amplification of the EGFR gene, and overexpression of EGFR was evident in each of these tumors as indicated by the immunoperoxidase technique. Two of the tumors with EGFR gene amplification also revealed amplification of the MDM2 gene, while one additional glioblastoma revealed MDM2 amplification only. A 100% concordance in the detection of amplification was observed between differential PCR and slot blot analysis; consequently these results indicate that differential PCR using DNA extracted front archival tissue sections is a reliable method of demonstrating gene amplifications in glial tumors. 29 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. KRAS-driven ROS promote malignant transformation

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Yongjoon; Lee, Su-Jae

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism underlying KRAS (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog)-driven cellular transformation remains unclear because of the complexity of its downstream effectors. Park et al. recently reported that levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are increased by KRAS and are responsible for KRAS-driven malignant transformation, and further identified the signaling cascade involved as KRAS/p38/PDPK1/PKCδ/p47phox/NOX1. These findings provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms governing KRAS-driven malignant transformation. PMID:27308397

  20. Electrochemiluminescence signal amplification combined with a conformation-switched hairpin DNA probe for determining the methylation level and position in the Hsp53 tumor suppressor gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Meixing; Fan, Mengxing; Gu, Jinxing; Wu, Ping; Cai, Chenxin

    2014-03-18

    We report a new strategy for detection of the methylation level and position in the Hsp53 tumor suppressor gene based on the electrochemiluminescence signal amplification combined with a conformation-switched hairpin DNA probe for improving selectivity. PMID:24501739

  1. EPSPS Gene Amplification in Glyphosate-Resistant Italian Ryegrass (Lolium perenne ssp. multiflorum) Populations from Arkansas (United States).

    PubMed

    Salas, Reiofeli A; Scott, Robert C; Dayan, Franck E; Burgos, Nilda R

    2015-07-01

    Glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass was detected in Arkansas (United States) in 2007. In 2014, 45 populations were confirmed resistant in eight counties across the state. The level of resistance and resistance mechanisms in six populations were studied to assess the severity of the problem and identify alternative management approaches. Dose-response bioassays, glyphosate absorption and translocation experiments, herbicide target (EPSPS) gene sequence analysis, and gene amplification assays were conducted. The dose causing 50% growth reduction (GR50) was 7-19 times higher for the resistant population than for the susceptible standard. Uptake and translocation of (14)C-glyphosate were similar in resistant and susceptible plants, and no mutation in the EPSPS gene known to be associated with resistance to glyphosate was detected. Resistant plants contained from 11- to >100-fold more copies of the EPSPS gene than the susceptible plants, whereas the susceptible plants had only one copy of EPSPS. Plants surviving the recommended dose of glyphosate contained at least 10 copies. The EPSPS copy number was positively related to glyphosate resistance level (r = 80). Therefore, resistance to glyphosate in these populations is due to multiplication of the target site. Resistance mechanisms could be location-specific. Suppressing the mechanism for gene amplification may overcome resistance. PMID:25760654

  2. Prognostic and predictive value of tumor vascular endothelial growth factor gene amplification in metastatic breast cancer treated with paclitaxel with and without bevacizumab; results from ECOG 2100 trial

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Bryan P.; Gray, Robert J.; Radovich, Milan; Shen, Fei; Vance, Gail; Li, Lang; Jiang, Guanglong; Miller, Kathy D.; Gralow, Julie R.; Dickler, Maura N.; Cobleigh, Melody A.; Perez, Edith A.; Shenkier, Tamara N.; Nielsen, Kirsten Vang; Müller, Sven; Thor, Ann; Sledge, George W.; Sparano, Joseph A.; Davidson, Nancy E.; Badve, Sunil S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Clinically validated biomarkers for anti-angiogenesis agents are not available. We have previously reported associations between candidate VEGFA SNPs and overall survival (OS) in E2100. The associations between tumor VEGFA amplification and outcome are evaluated here. Patients and Methods E2100 was a phase III trial comparing paclitaxel with or without bevacizumab for patients with metastatic breast cancer. Fluorescence in situ hybridization to assess gene amplification status for VEGFA was performed on paraffin embedded tumors from 363 patients in E2100. Evaluation for association between amplification status and outcomes was performed. Results ER+ or PR+ tumors were less likely to have VEGFA amplification compared with ER/PR-tumors (p=0.020). VEGFA amplification was associated with worse OS (20.2 vs. 25.3 months; p=0.013) in univariate analysis with a trend for worse OS in multivariate analysis (p=0.08). There was a significant interaction between VEGFA amplification, hormone-receptor status, and study arm. Patients with VEGFA amplification and triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs) or HER2 amplification had inferior OS (p=0.047); amplification did not affect OS for those who were ER+ or PR+ and HER2-. Those who received bevacizumab with VEGFA amplification had inferior PFS (p=0.010) and OS (p=0.042); no association was seen in the control arm. Test for interaction between study arm and VEGFA amplification with OS was not significant. Conclusion VEGFA amplification in univariate analysis was associated with poor outcomes; this was particularly prominent in HER2+ or TNBCs. Additional studies are necessary to confirm the trend for poor OS seen on multivariate analysis for patients treated with bevacizumab. PMID:23340303

  3. Nitrative and oxidative DNA damage caused by K-ras mutation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, Shiho; Saito, Hiromitsu; Suzuki, Noboru; Ma, Ning; Hiraku, Yusuke; Murata, Mariko; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Mutated K-ras in transgenic mice caused nitrative DNA damage, 8-nitroguanine. {yields} The mutagenic 8-nitroguanine seemed to be generated by iNOS via Ras-MAPK signal. {yields} Mutated K-ras produces additional mutagenic lesions, as a new oncogenic role. -- Abstract: Ras mutation is important for carcinogenesis. Carcinogenesis consists of multi-step process with mutations in several genes. We investigated the role of DNA damage in carcinogenesis initiated by K-ras mutation, using conditional transgenic mice. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that mutagenic 8-nitroguanine and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) were apparently formed in adenocarcinoma caused by mutated K-ras. 8-Nitroguanine was co-localized with iNOS, eNOS, NF-{kappa}B, IKK, MAPK, MEK, and mutated K-ras, suggesting that oncogenic K-ras causes additional DNA damage via signaling pathway involving these molecules. It is noteworthy that K-ras mutation mediates not only cell over-proliferation but also the accumulation of mutagenic DNA lesions, leading to carcinogenesis.

  4. Systematic RNA interference reveals that oncogenic KRAS-driven cancers require TBK1.

    PubMed

    Barbie, David A; Tamayo, Pablo; Boehm, Jesse S; Kim, So Young; Moody, Susan E; Dunn, Ian F; Schinzel, Anna C; Sandy, Peter; Meylan, Etienne; Scholl, Claudia; Fröhling, Stefan; Chan, Edmond M; Sos, Martin L; Michel, Kathrin; Mermel, Craig; Silver, Serena J; Weir, Barbara A; Reiling, Jan H; Sheng, Qing; Gupta, Piyush B; Wadlow, Raymond C; Le, Hanh; Hoersch, Sebastian; Wittner, Ben S; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Livingston, David M; Sabatini, David M; Meyerson, Matthew; Thomas, Roman K; Lander, Eric S; Mesirov, Jill P; Root, David E; Gilliland, D Gary; Jacks, Tyler; Hahn, William C

    2009-11-01

    The proto-oncogene KRAS is mutated in a wide array of human cancers, most of which are aggressive and respond poorly to standard therapies. Although the identification of specific oncogenes has led to the development of clinically effective, molecularly targeted therapies in some cases, KRAS has remained refractory to this approach. A complementary strategy for targeting KRAS is to identify gene products that, when inhibited, result in cell death only in the presence of an oncogenic allele. Here we have used systematic RNA interference to detect synthetic lethal partners of oncogenic KRAS and found that the non-canonical IkappaB kinase TBK1 was selectively essential in cells that contain mutant KRAS. Suppression of TBK1 induced apoptosis specifically in human cancer cell lines that depend on oncogenic KRAS expression. In these cells, TBK1 activated NF-kappaB anti-apoptotic signals involving c-Rel and BCL-XL (also known as BCL2L1) that were essential for survival, providing mechanistic insights into this synthetic lethal interaction. These observations indicate that TBK1 and NF-kappaB signalling are essential in KRAS mutant tumours, and establish a general approach for the rational identification of co-dependent pathways in cancer. PMID:19847166

  5. BRAF, PIK3CA, and HER2 Oncogenic Alterations According to KRAS Mutation Status in Advanced Colorectal Cancers with Distant Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Jiwon; Kwak, Yoonjin; Seo, An Na; Park, Kyoung Un; Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum; Kim, Woo Ho; Lee, Hye Seung

    2016-01-01

    Background Anti-EGFR antibody–based treatment is an important therapeutic strategy for advanced colorectal cancer (CRC); despite this, several mutations—including KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutations, and HER2 amplification—are associated with the mechanisms underlying the development of resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. The aim of our study was to investigate the frequencies and clinical implications of these genetic alterations in advanced CRC. Methods KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutations were determined by Cobas real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 191 advanced CRC patients with distant metastasis. Microsatellite instability (MSI) status was determined by a fragmentation assay and HER2 amplification was assessed by silver in situ hybridization. In addition, KRAS mutations were investigated by the Sanger sequencing method in 97 of 191 CRC cases. Results Mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA were found in 104 (54.5%), 6 (3.1%), and 25 (13.1%) cases of advanced CRC, respectively. MSI-high status and HER2 amplification were observed in 3 (1.6%) and 16 (8.4%) cases, respectively. PIK3CA mutations were more frequently found in KRAS mutant type (18.3%) than KRAS wild type (6.9%) (P = 0.020). In contrast, HER2 amplifications and BRAF mutations were associated with KRAS wild type with borderline significance (P = 0.052 and 0.094, respectively). In combined analyses with KRAS, BRAF and HER2 status, BRAF mutations or HER2 amplifications were associated with the worst prognosis in the wild type KRAS group (P = 0.004). When comparing the efficacy of detection methods, the results of real time PCR analysis revealed 56 of 97 (57.7%) CRC cases with KRAS mutations, whereas Sanger sequencing revealed 49 cases (50.5%). Conclusions KRAS mutations were found in 54.5% of advanced CRC patients. Our results support that subgrouping using PIK3CA and BRAF mutation or HER2 amplification status, in addition to KRAS mutation status, is helpful for managing advanced CRC patients. PMID

  6. K-ras mutation at codon 12 in stage I pancreatic adenocarcinoma: analysis by laser capture microdissection and direct sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chang, M C; Chang, Y T; Wu, M S; Shun, C T; Tien, Y W; Lin, J T

    2001-05-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has been reported to carry a rate mutation high in codon 12 of the K-ras oncogene. To avoid the pitfalls of conventional methods of tissue dissection that might affect the sensitivity and specificity of detecting K-ras mutation, laser capture microdissection (LCM) technique was used. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma tissues were obtained from 15 patients who underwent Whipple's procedure. Selected tissues procured by LCM were analyzed by direct sequencing after polymerase chain reaction amplification of K-ras sequences at codon 12. K-ras mutation was noted in nine patients. All mutations showed G to A substitution at codon 12. The mutational pattern (GGT to GAT) is similar in both western and eastern reports. LCM is a feasible method to effectively obtain pure tumor cells from a surgical specimen. It remains to be determined whether this low mutation rate is a result of relatively early stage of disease or different carcinogenesis in different geographic regions. PMID:11432318

  7. Ladder-Like Amplification of the Type I Interferon Gene Cluster in the Human Osteosarcoma Cell Line MG63

    PubMed Central

    Marella, Narasimha Rao V.; Zeitz, Michael J.; Malyavantham, Kishore S.; Pliss, Artem; Matsui, Sei-ichi; Goetze, Sandra; Bode, Juergen; Raska, Ivan; Berezney, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Summary The organization of the type I interferon (IFN) gene cluster (9p21.3) was studied in a human osteosarcoma cell line (MG63). Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) showed an amplification of ~six-fold which ended at both ends of the gene cluster with a deletion that extended throughout the 9p21.3 band. Spectral karyotyping (SKY) combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) identified an arrangement of the gene cluster in a ladder-like array of 5–7 “bands” spanning a single chromosome termed the “IFN chromosome”. Chromosome painting revealed that the IFN chromosome is derived from components of chromosomes 4, 8 and 9. Labeling with centromeric probes demonstrated a ladder-like amplification of centromeric 4 and 9 sequences that colocalized with each other and a similar banding pattern of chromosome 4, as well as alternating with the IFN gene clusters. In contrast, centromere 8 was not detected on the IFN chromosome. One of the amplified centromeric 9 bands was identified as the functional centromere based on its location at the chromosome constriction and immunolocalization of the CENP-C protein. A model is presented for the generation of the IFN chromosome that involves breakage- fusion- bridge (BFB) events. PMID:19005637

  8. Identification of DNA lesions using a third base pair for amplification and nanopore sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Riedl, Jan; Ding, Yun; Fleming, Aaron M.; Burrows, Cynthia J.

    2015-01-01

    Damage to the genome is implicated in the progression of cancer and stress-induced diseases. DNA lesions exist in low levels, and cannot be amplified by standard PCR because they are frequently strong blocks to polymerases. Here, we describe a method for PCR amplification of lesion-containing DNA in which the site and identity could be marked, copied and sequenced. Critical for this method is installation of either the dNaM or d5SICS nucleotides at the lesion site after processing via the base excision repair process. These marker nucleotides constitute an unnatural base pair, allowing large quantities of marked DNA to be made by PCR amplification. Sanger sequencing confirms the potential for this method to locate lesions by marking, amplifying and sequencing a lesion in the KRAS gene. Detection using the α-hemolysin nanopore is also developed to analyse the markers in individual DNA strands with the potential to identify multiple lesions per strand. PMID:26542210

  9. Quantification of Kras mutant fraction in the lung DNA of mice exposed to aerosolized particulate vanadium pentoxide by inhalation.

    PubMed

    Banda, Malathi; McKim, Karen L; Haber, Lynne T; MacGregor, Judith A; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Parsons, Barbara L

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated whether Kras mutation is an early event in the development of lung tumors induced by inhalation of particulate vanadium pentoxide (VP) aerosols. A National Toxicology Program tumor bioassay of inhaled particulate VP aerosols established that VP-induced alveolar/bronchiolar carcinomas of the B6C3F1 mouse lung carried Kras mutations at a higher frequency than observed in spontaneous mouse lung tumors. Therefore, this study sought to: (1) characterize any Kras mutational response with respect to VP exposure concentration, and (2) investigate the possibility that amplification of preexisting Kras mutation is an early event in VP-induced mouse lung tumorigenesis. Male Big Blue B6C3F1 mice (6 mice/group) were exposed to aerosolized particulate VP by inhalation, 6h/day, 5 days/week for 4 or 8 weeks, using VP exposure concentrations of 0, 0.1, and 1 mg/m(3). The levels of two different Kras codon 12 mutations [GGT → GAT (G12D) and GGT → GTT (G12V)] were measured in lung DNAs by Allele-specific Competitive Blocker PCR (ACB-PCR). For both exposure concentrations (0.1 and 1.0mg/m(3)) and both time points (4 and 8 weeks), the mutant fractions observed in VP-exposed mice were not significantly different from the concurrent controls. Given that 8 weeks of inhalation of a tumorigenic concentration of particulate aerosols of VP did not result in a significant change in levels of lung Kras mutation, the data do not support either a direct genotoxic effect of VP on Kras or early amplification of preexisting mutation as being involved in the genesis of VP-induced mouse lung tumors under the exposure conditions used. Rather, the data suggest that accumulation of Kras mutation occurs later with chronic VP exposure and is likely not an early event in VP-induced mouse lung carcinogenesis. PMID:26232258

  10. Selective Targeting of CTNNB1-, KRAS- or MYC-Driven Cell Growth by Combinations of Existing Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Uitdehaag, Joost C. M.; de Roos, Jeroen A. D. M.; van Doornmalen, Antoon M.; Prinsen, Martine B. W.; Spijkers-Hagelstein, Jill A. P.; de Vetter, Judith R. F.; de Man, Jos; Buijsman, Rogier C.; Zaman, Guido J. R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of combination drug treatment in cancer therapy is to improve response rate and to decrease the probability of the development of drug resistance. Preferably, drug combinations are synergistic rather than additive, and, ideally, drug combinations work synergistically only in cancer cells and not in non-malignant cells. We have developed a workflow to identify such targeted synergies, and applied this approach to selectively inhibit the proliferation of cell lines with mutations in genes that are difficult to modulate with small molecules. The approach is based on curve shift analysis, which we demonstrate is a more robust method of determining synergy than combination matrix screening with Bliss-scoring. We show that the MEK inhibitor trametinib is more synergistic in combination with the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib than with vemurafenib, another BRAF inhibitor. In addition, we show that the combination of MEK and BRAF inhibitors is synergistic in BRAF-mutant melanoma cells, and additive or antagonistic in, respectively, BRAF-wild type melanoma cells and non-malignant fibroblasts. This combination exemplifies that synergistic action of drugs can depend on cancer genotype. Next, we used curve shift analysis to identify new drug combinations that specifically inhibit cancer cell proliferation driven by difficult-to-drug cancer genes. Combination studies were performed with compounds that as single agents showed preference for inhibition of cancer cells with mutations in either the CTNNB1 gene (coding for β-catenin), KRAS, or cancer cells expressing increased copy numbers of MYC. We demonstrate that the Wnt-pathway inhibitor ICG-001 and trametinib acted synergistically in Wnt-pathway-mutant cell lines. The ERBB2 inhibitor TAK-165 was synergistic with trametinib in KRAS-mutant cell lines. The EGFR/ERBB2 inhibitor neratinib acted synergistically with the spindle poison docetaxel and with the Aurora kinase inhibitor GSK-1070916 in cell lines with MYC amplification

  11. Whole-genome amplification: a useful approach to characterize new genes in unculturable protozoan parasites such as Bonamia exitiosa.

    PubMed

    Prado-Alvarez, Maria; Couraleau, Yann; Chollet, Bruno; Tourbiez, Delphine; Arzul, Isabelle

    2015-10-01

    Bonamia exitiosa is an intracellular parasite (Haplosporidia) that has been associated with mass mortalities in oyster populations in the Southern hemisphere. This parasite was recently detected in the Northern hemisphere including Europe. Some representatives of the Bonamia genus have not been well categorized yet due to the lack of genomic information. In the present work, we have applied Whole-Genome Amplification (WGA) technique in order to characterize the actin gene in the unculturable protozoan B. exitiosa. This is the first protein coding gene described in this species. Molecular analysis revealed that B. exitiosa actin is more similar to Bonamia ostreae actin gene-1. Actin phylogeny placed the Bonamia sp. infected oysters in the same clade where the herein described B. exitiosa actin resolved, offering novel information about the classification of the genus. Our results showed that WGA methodology is a promising and valuable technique to be applied to unculturable protozoans whose genomic material is limited. PMID:26282916

  12. UV radiation facilitates methotrexate resistance and amplification of the dihydrofolate reductase gene in cultured 3T6 mouse cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tlsty, T.D.; Brown, P.C.; Schimke, R.T.

    1984-06-01

    Pretreatment of 3T6 murine cells with the carcinogen UV radiation or N-acetoxy-N-acetylaminofluorene increased the number of methotrexate-resistant colonies. This carcinogen-induced enhancement was seen only at low toxicities. The enhancement was transient and was observed at its maximum when cells were subjected to methotrexate selection 12 to 24 h after treatment. The addition of a tumor-promoting agent, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, during or after carcinogen treatment further enhanced this effect. A large proportion of the resistant colonies had an increase in the dihydrofolate reductase gene copy number and the relative proportions of colonies with amplified genes were similar, regardless of whether selected cells were untreated, treated with carcinogen, or treated with carcinogen plus promoter. We discuss some of the variables which both enhance the generation and improve the detection of methotrexate-resistant colonies, as well as certain implications of our results for the generation and mechanism of gene amplification.

  13. Gene amplification at a locus encoding a putative Na+/H+ antiporter confers sodium and lithium tolerance in fission yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Z P; McCullough, N; Martel, R; Hemmingsen, S; Young, P G

    1992-01-01

    We have identified a new locus, sodium 2 (sod2) based on selection for increased LiCl tolerance in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Tolerant strains have enhanced pH-dependent Na+ export capacity and sodium transport experiments suggest that the gene encodes an Na+/H+ antiport. The predicted sod2 gene product can be placed in the broad class of transporters which possess 12 hydrophobic transmembrane domains. The protein shows some sequence similarity to the human and bacterial Na+/H+ antiporters. Overexpression of sod2 increased Na+ export capacity and conferred sodium tolerance. Osmotolerance was not affected and sod2 cells were unaffected for growth in K+. In a sod2 disruption strain cells were incapable of exporting sodium. They were hypersensitive to Na+ or Li+ and could not grow under conditions that approximate pH7. The sod2 gene amplification could be selected stepwise and the degree of such amplification correlated with the level of Na+ or Li+ tolerance. Images PMID:1314171

  14. Optimization of direct whole blood PCR amplification with applications on a static thermostat chip.

    PubMed

    Qu, Bai-Yan; Wu, Zhi-Yong; Tian, Xiao-Xi; Chen, Kun; Fang, Fang

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, direct whole blood PCR amplifications on a static chip thermostat without sample purifications are demonstrated; in these amplifications, problems such as cross-interferences and contaminations could be avoided. The amplification conditions, such as the compositions of reagents and thermal programs, were investigated systematically by a GeneAmp PCR system with a native p53 gene segment (about 543 bp) of human genome and an exterior lambda DNA segment (about 500 bp) as targets. Direct amplifications of p53 and K-ras (about 157 bp) gene segments from 0.5 microL blood samples were successfully demonstrated by a static PCR chip with an indium tin oxide glass substrate. The chip thermostat has a typical size of 25 mm x 25 mm, and a polyethylene tube was used as the PCR vial on the glass surface of the chip. Fuzzy proportional integration-differentiation algorithms were adopted in temperature controls of the chip with an aid of a micro-Pt100 sensor. In the direct PCR with the thermostat chip, the whole process only involves automatic thermal programs. This work demonstrated that a chip PCR for field test without desktop facilities is possible either for a point of care test or for forensic analysis. PMID:17849104

  15. Assessment of epidermal growth factor receptor mutation/copy number and K-ras mutation in esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Kang; Wang, Wu-Ping; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Ju-Zheng; Chen, Zhao; Li, Yong; Zhou, Yong-An; Li, Xiao-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Background The molecular status of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in esophageal cancer has not been well elucidated. The purpose of the study was to investigate the prevalence of EGFR and K-ras mutation, and EGFR gene copy number status as well as its association with clinicopathologic characteristics, and also to identify the prognostic value of EGFR gene copy number in esophageal cancer. Methods EGFR mutation in exon 19/exon 21 and K-ras mutation in codon 12/codon 13 were detected by real-time PCR method, while EGFR gene copy number status was analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). EGFR gene amplification and high polysomy were defined as high EGFR gene copy number status (FISH-positive), and all else were defined as low EGFR gene copy number status (FISH-negative). The relationship between EGFR gene copy number status and clinicpathologic characteristics was analyzed. Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards regression model were employed to evaluate the effects of EGFR gene copy number status on the patients’ survival. Results A total of 57 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients and 9 esophageal adenocarcinoma (EADC) patients were enrolled in the study. EGFR mutation was identified in one patient who was diagnosed as ESCC with stage IIIC disease. K-ras mutation was identified in one patient who was diagnosed as EADC. In all, 34 of 66 (51.5%) samples were detected as FISH-positive, which includes 30 ESCC and 4 EADC tumor samples. The correlation analysis showed that FISH-positive was significantly associated with the tumor stage (P=0.019) and lymph node metastasis (P=0.005) in esophageal cancer patients, and FISH-positive was also significantly associated with the tumor stage (P=0.007) and lymph node metastasis (P=0.008) in ESCC patients. Cox regression analysis showed that high EGFR gene copy number was not a significant predictor of a poor outcome for esophageal cancer patients (P=0.251) or for ESCC patients (P=0

  16. Kras is Required for Adult Hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Damnernsawad, Alisa; Kong, Guangyao; Wen, Zhi; Liu, Yangang; Rajagopalan, Adhithi; You, Xiaona; Wang, Jinyong; Zhou, Yun; Ranheim, Erik A; Luo, Hongbo R; Chang, Qiang; Zhang, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies indicate that Kras is dispensable for fetal liver hematopoiesis, but its role in adult hematopoiesis remains unclear. Here, we generated a Kras conditional knockout allele to address this question. Deletion of Kras in adult bone marrow (BM) is mediated by Vav-Cre or inducible Mx1-Cre. We find that loss of Kras leads to greatly reduced thrombopoietin (TPO) signaling in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and multipotent progenitors (MPPs), while stem cell factor-evoked ERK1/2 activation is not affected. The compromised TPO signaling is associated with reduced long term- and intermediate-term HSC compartments and a bias toward myeloid differentiation in MPPs. Although granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-evoked ERK1/2 activation is only moderately decreased in Kras(-/-) myeloid progenitors, it is blunted in neutrophils and neutrophil survival is significantly reduced in vitro. At 9-12 months old, Kras conditional knockout mice develop profound hematopoietic defects, including splenomegaly, an expanded neutrophil compartment, and reduced B cell number. In a serial transplantation assay, the reconstitution potential of Kras(-/-) BM cells is greatly compromised, which is attributable to defects in the self-renewal of Kras(-/-) HSCs and defects in differentiated hematopoietic cells. Our results demonstrate that Kras is a major regulator of TPO and GM-CSF signaling in specific populations of hematopoietic cells and its function is required for adult hematopoiesis. Stem Cells 2016;34:1859-1871. PMID:26972179

  17. K-ras mutations in beryllium-induced mouse lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Belinsky, S.A.; Mitchell, C.E.

    1994-11-01

    Previous studies at ITRI have shown that single, nose-only exposure of F344/N rats to beryllium metal (Be) produced a 64% incidence of lung tumors over the lifetime of the rat. Long tumors induced by Be metal were subsequently analyzed for alterations in the K-ras and p53 genes. Mutation of the K-ras gene was both a rare (2 of 24 tumors) and late event in Be-induced carcinogenesis. In addition, no mutations were detected in exons 5 - 8 of the p53 gene. These results indicated that the mechanisms underlying the development of Be-induced lung cancer in rats did not involve gene dysfunction commonly associated with human non-small-cell lung cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the prevalence and specificity for mutation of the K-ras gene in lung tumors induced in the A/J mouse by Be to mutations in spontaneous tumors.

  18. Genetic Evidence for XPC-KRAS Interactions During Lung Cancer Development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoli; He, Nonggao; Gu, Dongsheng; Wickliffe, Jeff; Salazar, James; Boldogh, Istavan; Xie, Jingwu

    2015-10-20

    Lung cancer causes more deaths than breast, colorectal and prostate cancers combined. Despite major advances in targeted therapy in a subset of lung adenocarcinomas, the overall 5-year survival rate for lung cancer worldwide has not significantly changed for the last few decades. DNA repair deficiency is known to contribute to lung cancer development. In fact, human polymorphisms in DNA repair genes such as xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) are highly associated with lung cancer incidence. However, the direct genetic evidence for the role of XPC for lung cancer development is still lacking. Mutations of the Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Kras) or its downstream effector genes occur in almost all lung cancer cells, and there are a number of mouse models for lung cancer with these mutations. Using activated Kras, Kras(LA1), as a driver for lung cancer development in mice, we showed for the first time that mice with Kras(LA1) and Xpc knockout had worst outcomes in lung cancer development, and this phenotype was associated with accumulated DNA damage. Using cultured cells, we demonstrated that induced expression of oncogenic KRAS(G12V) led to increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as DNA damage, and both can be suppressed by anti-oxidants. Our results suggest that XPC may help repair DNA damage caused by KRAS-mediated production of ROS. PMID:26554912

  19. Accumulation of wild-type p53 protein in astrocytomas is not mediated by MDM2 gene amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio, M.P.; Louis, D.N. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA )

    1993-05-01

    The authors have previously described ten cases of astrocytoma (three WHO grade II, four grade III and four grade IV) with seemingly contradictory results on immunohistochemical analysis of the p53 protein and molecular genetic analysis of the p53 gene. Fixed, embedded tissues from these cases were immunohistochemically positive with the PAb 1801 antibody, which supposedly implies the presence of mutant protein. These ten cases, however, did not have mutations in exons 5 through 8 of the p53 gene, the conserved regions in which almost all human mutations have been described. The authors suggested that these cases might either represent overexpression of wild-type p53 protein (since the PAb 1801 antibody reacts with both wild-type and mutant p53 protein) or mutations in less conserved regions of the gene. To investigate these possibilities further, they performed single strand conformational polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing on p53 exons 4, 9 and 10 in the nine cases with available DNA, since rare mutations have been noted at these loci. None of the cases showed alterations, making it highly unlikely that these tumors harbor mutations in exons of the p53 gene. They also performed immunohistochemistry on frozen sections from seven available tumors, using the mutant-specific antibody PAb 240 in addition to PAb 1801. All tumors continued to show positive staining with PAb 1801, but only one tumor reacted with PAb 240. The results support the hypothesis that the accumulated p53 protein in most cases is wild-type. Because the product of the MDM2 oncogene can bind to wild-type p53 protein, and because MDM2 amplification has recently been demonstrated in human tumors, the authors evaluated MDM2 amplification in the nine astrocytomas with available DNA. Using slot blot analysis with a 96-base pair, PCR-generated probe to the first exon of the MDM2 gene, they were unable to show MDM2 gene amplification in these tumors or in other assayed astrocytomas.

  20. Cul4 and DDB1 regulate Orc2 localization, BrdU incorporation and Dup stability during gene amplification in Drosophila follicle cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiu-Chen; Wu, June-Tai; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Chien, Cheng-Ting

    2009-07-15

    In higher eukaryotes, the pre-replication complex (pre-RC) component Cdt1 is the major regulator in licensing control for DNA replication. The Cul4-DDB1-based ubiquitin ligase mediates Cdt1 ubiquitylation for subsequent proteolysis. During the initiation of chorion gene amplification, Double-parked (Dup), the Drosophila ortholog of Cdt1, is restricted to chorion gene foci. We found that Dup accumulated in nuclei in Cul4 mutant follicle cells, and the accumulation was less prominent in DDB1 mutant cells. Loss of Cul4 or DDB1 activity in follicle cells also compromised chorion gene amplification and induced ectopic genomic DNA replication. The focal localization of Orc2, a subunit of the origin recognition complex, is frequently absent in Cul4 mutant follicle cells. Therefore, Cul4 and DDB1 have differential functions during chorion gene amplification. PMID:19531585

  1. Prognostic role of KRAS mutations in Sardinian patients with colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Palomba, Grazia; Cossu, Antonio; Paliogiannis, Panagiotis; Pazzola, Antonio; Baldino, Giovanni; Scartozzi, Mario; Ionta, Maria Teresa; Ortu, Salvatore; Capelli, Francesca; Lanzillo, Annamaria; Sedda, Tito; Sanna, Giovanni; Barca, Michela; Virdis, Luciano; Budroni, Mario; Palmieri, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The presence of mutations in the KRAS gene is a predictor of a poor clinical response to EGFR-targeted agents in patients affected by colorectal cancer (CRC), but its significance as a global prognostic factor remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of the KRAS mutational status on time to first metastasis (TTM) and overall survival (OS) in a cohort of Sardinian CRC patients. A total of 551 patients with metastatic CRC at the time of enrolment were included. Clinical and pathological features of the disease, including follow-up information, were obtained from medical records and cancer registry data. For mutational analysis formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples were processed using a standard protocol. The coding sequence and splice junctions of exons 2 and 3 of the KRAS gene were screened for mutations by direct automated sequencing. Overall, 186 KRAS mutations were detected in 183/551 (33%) patients: 125 (67%) were located in codon 12, 36 (19%) in codon 13, and 18 (10%) in codon 61. The remaining mutations (7; 4%) were detected in uncommonly-affected codons. No significant correlation between KRAS mutations and gender, age, anatomical location and stage of the disease at the time of diagnosis was identified. Furthermore, no prognostic value of KRAS mutations was found considering either TTM or OS. When patients were stratified by KRAS mutational status and gender, males were significantly associated with a longer TTM. The results of the present study indicate that KRAS mutation correlated with a slower metastatic progression in males with CRC from Sardinia, irrespective of the age at diagnosis and the codon of the mutation. PMID:27446446

  2. Development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification targeting a gene within the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, the pdhA gene, for rapid detection of Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fanqing; Bao, Shijun; Yu, Shengqing; Cheng, Jinghua; Tan, Lei; Qiu, Xvsheng; Song, Cuiping; Dai, Yabin; Fei, Rongmei; Ding, Chan

    2015-05-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum infections impose a significant economic burden on the poultry industry. In the current study, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was developed and optimized to detect M. gallisepticum based on a gene within the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, the pdhA gene, which codes for the major subunit (E1α) in the complex. The reaction conditions were optimized, and the specificity was confirmed by successful amplification of several M. gallisepticum strains, while no amplification was detected with 20 other major bacterial and viral pathogens of poultry. Additionally, the LAMP assay achieved 10-fold higher sensitivity than an existing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. The LAMP assay was applied to swab samples collected from poultry farms and compared with PCR. The positive detection rate was 20.2% (37/183) by LAMP and 13.1% (24/183) by PCR. The LAMP assay could provide a cost-effective, quick, and sensitive method for the detection of M. gallisepticum. PMID:26038479

  3. Oncogenic KRAS triggers MAPK-dependent errors in mitosis and MYC-dependent sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents.

    PubMed

    Perera, David; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS induces cell proliferation and transformation, but little is known about its effects on cell division. Functional genetic screens have recently revealed that cancer cell lines expressing oncogenic KRAS are sensitive to interference with mitosis, but neither the mechanism nor the uniformity of anti-mitotic drug sensitivity connected with mutant KRAS expression are yet clear. Here, we report that acute expression of oncogenic KRAS in HeLa cells induces mitotic delay and defects in chromosome segregation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation and de-regulated expression of several mitosis-related genes. These anomalies are accompanied by increased sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents, a phenotype dependent on the transcription factor MYC and its downstream target anti-apoptotic protein BCL-XL. Unexpectedly, we find no correlation between KRAS mutational status or MYC expression levels and anti-mitotic drug sensitivity when surveying a large database of anti-cancer drug responses. However, we report that the co-existence of KRAS mutations and high MYC expression predicts anti-mitotic drug sensitivity. Our findings reveal a novel function of oncogenic KRAS in regulating accurate mitotic progression and suggest new avenues to therapeutically target KRAS-mutant tumours and stratify patients in ongoing clinical trials of anti-mitotic drugs. PMID:27412232

  4. Oncogenic KRAS triggers MAPK-dependent errors in mitosis and MYC-dependent sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents

    PubMed Central

    Perera, David; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS induces cell proliferation and transformation, but little is known about its effects on cell division. Functional genetic screens have recently revealed that cancer cell lines expressing oncogenic KRAS are sensitive to interference with mitosis, but neither the mechanism nor the uniformity of anti-mitotic drug sensitivity connected with mutant KRAS expression are yet clear. Here, we report that acute expression of oncogenic KRAS in HeLa cells induces mitotic delay and defects in chromosome segregation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation and de-regulated expression of several mitosis-related genes. These anomalies are accompanied by increased sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents, a phenotype dependent on the transcription factor MYC and its downstream target anti-apoptotic protein BCL-XL. Unexpectedly, we find no correlation between KRAS mutational status or MYC expression levels and anti-mitotic drug sensitivity when surveying a large database of anti-cancer drug responses. However, we report that the co-existence of KRAS mutations and high MYC expression predicts anti-mitotic drug sensitivity. Our findings reveal a novel function of oncogenic KRAS in regulating accurate mitotic progression and suggest new avenues to therapeutically target KRAS-mutant tumours and stratify patients in ongoing clinical trials of anti-mitotic drugs. PMID:27412232

  5. Activated Kras, but Not Hras or Nras, May Initiate Tumors of Endodermal Origin via Stem Cell Expansion▿

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, Margaret P.; Quatela, Steven E.; Philips, Mark R.; Settleman, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    The three closely related human Ras genes, Hras, Nras, and Kras, are all widely expressed, engage a common set of downstream effectors, and can each exhibit oncogenic activity. However, the vast majority of activating Ras mutations in human tumors involve Kras. Moreover, Kras mutations are most frequently seen in tumors of endodermally derived tissues (lung, pancreas, and colon), suggesting that activated Kras may affect an endodermal progenitor to initiate oncogenesis. Using a culture model of retinoic acid (RA)-induced stem cell differentiation to endoderm, we determined that while activated HrasV12 promotes differentiation and growth arrest in these endodermal progenitors, KrasV12 promotes their proliferation. Furthermore, KrasV12-expressing endodermal progenitors fail to differentiate upon RA treatment and continue to proliferate and maintain stem cell characteristics. NrasV12 neither promotes nor prevents differentiation. A structure-function analysis demonstrated that these distinct effects of the Ras isoforms involve their variable C-terminal domains, implicating compartmentalized signaling, and revealed a requirement for several established Ras effectors. These findings indicate that activated Ras isoforms exert profoundly different effects on endodermal progenitors and that mutant Kras may initiate tumorigenesis by expanding a susceptible stem/progenitor cell population. These results potentially explain the high frequency of Kras mutations in tumors of endodermal origin. PMID:18268007

  6. KRAS mutation leads to decreased expression of regulator of calcineurin 2, resulting in tumor proliferation in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Niitsu, H; Hinoi, T; Kawaguchi, Y; Sentani, K; Yuge, R; Kitadai, Y; Sotomaru, Y; Adachi, T; Saito, Y; Miguchi, M; Kochi, M; Sada, H; Shimomura, M; Oue, N; Yasui, W; Ohdan, H

    2016-01-01

    KRAS mutations occur in 30–40% of all cases of human colorectal cancer (CRC). However, to date, specific therapeutic agents against KRAS-mutated CRC have not been developed. We previously described the generation of mouse models of colon cancer with and without Kras mutations (CDX2P-G22Cre;Apcflox/flox; LSL-KrasG12D and CDX2P-G22Cre;Apcflox/flox mice, respectively). Here, the two mouse models were compared to identify candidate genes, which may represent novel therapeutic targets or predictive biomarkers. Differentially expressed genes in tumors from the two mouse models were identified using microarray analysis, and their expression was compared by quantitative reverse transcription–PCR (qRT–PCR) and immunohistochemical analyses in mouse tumors and surgical specimens of human CRC, with or without KRAS mutations, respectively. Furthermore, the functions of candidate genes were studied using human CRC cell lines. Microarray analysis of 34 000 transcripts resulted in the identification of 19 candidate genes. qRT–PCR analysis data showed that four of these candidate genes (Clps, Irx5, Bex1 and Rcan2) exhibited decreased expression in the Kras-mutated mouse model. The expression of the regulator of calcineurin 2 (RCAN2) was also observed to be lower in KRAS-mutated human CRC. Moreover, inhibitory function for cancer cell proliferation dependent on calcineurin was indicated with overexpression and short hairpin RNA knockdown of RCAN2 in human CRC cell lines. KRAS mutations in CRC lead to a decrease in RCAN2 expression, resulting in tumor proliferation due to derepression of calcineurin–nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling. Our findings suggest that calcineurin–NFAT signal may represent a novel molecular target for the treatment of KRAS-mutated CRC. PMID:27526107

  7. Gene amplification and microsatellite instability induced in tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells by alpha particles and heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piao, C. Q.; Hei, T. K.; Hall, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Gene amplification and microsatellite alteration are useful markers of genomic instability in tumor and transformed cell lines. It has been suggested that genomic instability contributes to the progression of tumorigenesis by accumulating genetic changes. In this study, amplification of the carbamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbamylase, dihydro-orotase (CAD) gene in transformed and tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cells induced by either alpha particles or (56)Fe ions was assessed by measuring resistance to N-(phosphonacetyl)-l-aspartate (PALA). In addition, alterations of microsatellite loci located on chromosomes 3p and 18q were analyzed in a series of primary and secondary tumor cell lines generated in nude mice. The frequency of PALA-resistant colonies was 1-3 x 10(-3) in tumor cell lines, 5-8 x 10(-5) in transformed cells prior to inoculation into nude mice, and less than 10(-7) in control BEP2D cells. Microsatellite alterations were detected in all 11 tumor cell lines examined at the following loci: D18S34, D18S363, D18S877, D3S1038 and D3S1607. No significant difference in either PALA resistance or microsatellite instability was found in tumor cell lines that were induced by alpha particles compared to those induced by (56)Fe ions.

  8. G-quadruplex formation within the promoter of the KRAS proto-oncogene and its effect on transcription

    PubMed Central

    Cogoi, Susanna; Xodo, Luigi E.

    2006-01-01

    In human and mouse, the promoter of the KRAS gene contains a nuclease hypersensitive polypurine–polypyrimidine element (NHPPE) that is essential for transcription. An interesting feature of the polypurine G-rich strand of NHPPE is its ability to assume an unusual DNA structure that, according to circular dichroism (CD) and DMS footprinting experiments, is attributed to an intramolecular parallel G-quadruplex, consisting of three G-tetrads and three loops. The human and mouse KRAS NHPPE G-rich strands display melting temperature of 64 and 73°C, respectively, as well as a K+-dependent capacity to arrest DNA polymerase. Photocleavage and CD experiments showed that the cationic porphyrin TMPyP4 stacks to the external G-tetrads of the KRAS quadruplexes, increasing the Tm by ∼20°C. These findings raise the intriguing question that the G-quadruplex formed within the NHPPE of KRAS may be involved in the regulation of transcription. Indeed, transfection experiments showed that the activity of the mouse KRAS promoter is reduced to 20% of control, in the presence of the quadruplex-stabilizing TMPyP4. In addition, we found that G-rich oligonucleotides mimicking the KRAS quadruplex, but not the corresponding 4-base mutant sequences or oligonucleotides forming quadruplexes with different structures, competed with the NHPPE duplex for binding to nuclear proteins. When vector pKRS-413, containing CAT driven by the mouse KRAS promoter, and KRAS quadruplex oligonucleotides were co-transfected in 293 cells, the expression of CAT was found to be downregulated to 40% of the control. On the basis of these data, we propose that the NHPPE of KRAS exists in equilibrium between a double-stranded form favouring transcription and a folded quadruplex form, which instead inhibits transcription. Such a mechanism, which is probably adopted by other growth-related genes, provides useful hints for the rational design of anticancer drugs against the KRAS oncogene. PMID:16687659

  9. Survival outcome according to KRAS mutation status in newly diagnosed patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer treated with platinum doublet chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Anna K.; McNeill, Jonathan D.; Judy, Brendan; Bauml, Joshua; Evans, Tracey L.; Cohen, Roger B.; Langer, Corey; Vachani, Anil; Aggarwal, Charu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mutations (MT) of the KRAS gene are the most common mutation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), seen in about 20–25% of all adenocarcinomas. Effect of KRAS MT on response to cytotoxic chemotherapy is unclear. Methods We undertook a single-institution retrospective analysis of 93 consecutive patients with stage IV NSCLC adenocarcinoma with known KRAS and EGFR MT status to determine the association of KRAS MT with survival. All patients were treated between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2011 with standard platinum based chemotherapy at the University of Pennsylvania. Overall and progression free survival were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazard methods. Results All patients in this series received platinum doublet chemotherapy, and 42 (45%) received bevacizumab. Overall survival and progression free survival for patients with KRAS MT was no worse than for patients with wild type KRAS. Median overall survival for patients with KRAS MT was 19 months (mo) vs. 15.6 mo for KRAS WT, p = 0.34, and progression-free survival was 6.2 mo in patients with KRAS MT vs. 7mo in patients with KRAS WT, p = 0.51. In multivariable analysis including age, race, gender, and ECOG PS, KRAS MT was not associated with overall survival (HR 1.12, 95% CI 0.58–2.16, p = 0.74) or progression free survival (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.48–1.34, p = 41). Of note, receipt of bevacizumab was associated with improved overall survival only in KRAS WT patients (HR 0.34, p = 0.01). Conclusions KRAS MT are not associated with inferior progression-free and overall survival in advanced NSCLC patients treated with standard first-line platinum-based chemotherapy. PMID:26471290

  10. Profiling of transcripts and proteins modulated by K-ras oncogene in the lung tissues of K-ras transgenic mice by omics approaches.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sojung; Kang, Jungwoo; Cho, Minchul; Seo, Eunhee; Choi, Heesook; Kim, Eunjin; Kim, Junghee; Kim, Heejong; Kang, Gum Yong; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Park, Young-Ho; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Yum, Young Na; Park, Sue-Nie; Yoon, Do-Young

    2009-01-01

    The mutated K-ras gene is involved in approximately 30% of human cancers. In order to search for K-ras oncogene-induced modulators in lung tissues of K-ras transgenic mice, we performed microarray and proteomics (LC/ESI-MS/MS) analysis. Genes (RAB27b RAS family, IL-1RA, IL-33, chemokine ligand 6, epiregulin, EGF-like domain and cathepsin) related to cancer development (Wnt signaling pathway) and inflammation (chemokine/cytokine signaling pathway, Toll receptor signaling) were up-regulated while genes (troponin, tropomodulin 2, endothelial lipase, FGFR4, integrin alpha8 and adenylate cyclase 8) related to the tumor suppression such as p53 pathway, TGF-beta signaling pathway and cadherin signaling pathway were down-regulated by K-ras oncogene. Proteomics approach revealed that up-regulated proteins in lung adenomas of K-ras mice were classified as follows: proteins related to the metabolism/catabolism (increased from 7 to 22% by K-ras gene), proteins related to translation/transcription and nucleotide (from 4 to 6%), proteins related to signal transduction (from 3 to 5%), proteins related to phosphorylation (from 1 to 2%). ATP synthase, Ras oncogene family, cytochrome c oxidase, flavoprotein, TEF 1, adipoprotein A-1 BP, glutathione oxidase, fatty acid BP 4, diaphorase 1, MAPK4 and transgelin were up-regulated by K-ras oncogene. However, integrin alpha1, Ras-interacting protein (Rain), endothelin-converting enzyme-1d and splicing factor 3b were down-regulated. These studies suggest that genes related to cancer development and inflammation were up-regulated while genes related to the tumor suppression were down-regulated by K-ras, resulting in the tumor growth. Putative biomarkers such as cell cycle related genes (Cdc37), cancer cell adhesion (Glycam 1, integrin alpha8, integrin alphaX and Clec4n), signal transduction (Tlr2, IL-33, and Ccbp2), migration (Ccr1, Ccl6, and diaphorase 1 (Cyb5r3) and cancer development (epiregulin) can be useful for diagnosis and as

  11. Overexpression of M68/DcR3 in human gastrointestinal tract tumors independent of gene amplification and its location in a four-gene cluster

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Chang; Connolly, Brett; Metzker, Michael L.; Hilliard, Catherine A.; Liu, Xiaomei; Sandig, Volker; Soderman, Avery; Galloway, Sheila M.; Liu, Qingyun; Austin, Christopher P.; Caskey, C. Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Fas-mediated apoptosis is an important regulator of cell survival, and abnormalities in this system have been shown to result in a number of human pathological conditions. A secreted member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, DcR3, was recently reported to be amplified in human lung and colon cancers as a negative regulator of Fas-mediated apoptosis. We identified this gene, which we call M68. M68 genomic DNA, mRNA, and protein levels were examined in a series of human gastrointestinal tract tumors. Using M68 immunohistochemistry and a scoring system similar to that used for HER-2/neu, we found that M68 protein was overexpressed in 30 of 68 (44%) human adenocarcinomas of the esophagus, stomach, colon, and rectum. Tumors examined by Northern blot revealed M68 mRNA highly elevated in a similar fraction of primary tumors from the same gastrointestinal tract regions, as well as in the colon adenocarcinoma cell lines SW480 and SW1116. Further, we found M68 protein to be overexpressed in a substantial number of tumors in which gene amplification could not be detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization or quantitative genomic PCR, suggesting that overexpression of M68 may precede amplification in tumors. Finally, we find that M68 lies within a four-gene cluster that includes a novel helicase-like gene (NHL) related to RAD3/ERCC2, a plasma membrane Ras-related GTPase and a member of the stathmin family, amplification or overexpression of which may also contribute to cell growth and tumor progression. PMID:10655513

  12. The clinical pathological characteristics and prognosis of FGFR1 gene amplification in non-small-cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fa-Jun; Lu, Hong-Yang; Zheng, Qiu-Qing; Qin, Jing; Gao, Yun; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Hu, Xun; Mao, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    FGFR1 amplification is recognized as a novel therapy target for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), especially in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). However, the association between FGFR1 amplification and the clinicopathological characteristics of NSCLC remains controversial. We performed a meta-analysis of 17 eligible studies to examine the correlation between FGFR1 gene amplification and clinicopathological characteristics. FGFR1 amplification was closely related to these clinicopathological features, including sex (odds ratio [OR] 2.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.50-2.80), smoking (OR 3.31, 95% CI 2.02-5.44), and histology (OR 3.60, 95% CI 2.82-4.59). FGFR1 amplification was associated with shorter overall survival, and no significant heterogeneity existed between studies (I (2)=3.8%). We should note that publication bias may partly account for these results, but our findings remained significant after the trim-and-fill method (hazard ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.06-1.40). However, no significant correlation was found with poor disease-free survival (hazard ratio 1.43, 95% CI 0.96-2.12). In conclusion, this study showed that FGFR1 amplification was significantly associated with sex, smoking, and histology. FGFR1 amplification could be a marker of poor prognosis in NSCLC patients, especially in SCC patients. PMID:26793001

  13. Development of a reliable dual-gene amplification RT-PCR assay for the detection of Turkey Meningoencephalitis virus in Turkey brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Irit; Raibstein, Israel; Al-Tori, Amira; Khinich, Yevgeny; Simanov, Michael; Yuval, Chanoch; Perk, Shimon; Lublin, Avishai

    2012-11-01

    The Turkey Meningoencephalitis virus (TMEV) causes neuroparalytic signs, paresis, in-coordination, morbidity and mortality in turkeys. In parallel to the increased worldwide scientific interest in veterinary avian flaviviruses, including the Bagaza, Tembusu and Tembusu-related BYD virus, TMEV-caused disease also reemergence in commercial turkeys during late summer of 2010. While initially TMEV was detected by NS5-gene RT-PCR, subsequently, the env-gene RT-PCR was employed. As lately several inconsistencies were observed between the clinical, serological and molecular detection of the TMEV env gene, this study evaluated whether genetic changes occurred in the recently isolated viruses, and sought to optimize and improve the direct TMEV amplification from brain tissues of affected turkeys. The main findings indicated that no changes occurred during the years in the TMEV genome, but the PCR detection sensitivities of the env and NS5 genes differed. The RT-PCR and RNA purification were optimized for direct amplification from brain tissues without pre-replication of clinical samples in tissue cultures or in embryonated eggs. The amplification sensitivity of the NS5-gene was 10-100 times more than the env-gene when separate. The new dual-gene amplification RT-PCR was similar to that of the NS5 gene, therefore the assay can be considered as a reliable diagnostic assay. Cases where one of the two amplicons would be RT-PCR negative would alert and warn on the virus identity, and possible genetic changes. In addition, the biochemical environment of the dual-gene amplification reaction seemed to contribute in deleting non-specific byproducts that occasionally appeared in the singular RT-PCR assays on RNA purified from brain tissues. PMID:22705084

  14. Concomitant Detection of HER2 Protein and Gene Alterations by Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Silver Enhanced In Situ Hybridization (SISH) Identifies HER2 Positive Breast Cancer with and without Gene Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Zsuzsanna; Tubbs, Raymond R.; Moch, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Introduction HER2 status assessment became a mandatory test assay in breast cancer, giving prognostic and predictive information including eligibility for adjuvant anti-HER2 therapy. Precise and reliable assessment of HER2 status is therefore of utmost importance. In this study we analyzed breast cancer samples by a novel technology for concomitant detection of the HER2 protein and gene copy number. Methods Tissue microarrays containing 589 invasive breast cancer samples were analyzed with a double immunohistochemistry (IHC) and silver labeled in situ hybridization (SISH) assay simultaneously detecting HER2 protein and gene copy number in the same tumor cells. This bright-field assay was analyzed using scores according to the modified ASCO guidelines and the results were correlated with patient prognosis. Results Overall concordance rate between protein expression and the presence of gene amplification was 98%. Fifty-seven of 60 tumors (95%) with IHC score 3+, 6 of 10 tumors with IHC score 2+ (60%) and only 3 of 519 tumors (0.6%) with IHC score 0/1+ were amplified by SISH. Patients with gene amplification despite IHC score 0/1+ had a tendency for worse overall survival (p = 0.088, reaching nearly statistical significance) compared to IHC score 0/1+ without amplification. In contrast, there was no difference in overall survival in IHC score 3+/2+ tumors with and without gene amplification. Conclusions The novel double IHC and SISH assay for HER2 is efficient in the identification of breast cancer with discordant HER2 protein and HER2 gene status, especially for the prognostically relevant groups of HER2 protein negative tumors with HER2 amplification and HER2 protein positive tumors without HER2 amplification. Breast cancer without HER2 amplification among IHC score 2+/3+ tumors (10% in our cohort) suggests that other mechanisms than gene amplification contribute to protein overexpression in these cells. PMID:25153153

  15. Combinatorial codon scrambling enables scalable gene synthesis and amplification of repetitive proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Nicholas C.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2016-04-01

    Most genes are synthesized using seamless assembly methods that rely on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, PCR of genes encoding repetitive proteins either fails or generates nonspecific products. Motivated by the need to efficiently generate new protein polymers through high-throughput gene synthesis, here we report a codon-scrambling algorithm that enables the PCR-based gene synthesis of repetitive proteins by exploiting the codon redundancy of amino acids and finding the least-repetitive synonymous gene sequence. We also show that the codon-scrambling problem is analogous to the well-known travelling salesman problem, and obtain an exact solution to it by using De Bruijn graphs and a modern mixed integer linear programme solver. As experimental proof of the utility of this approach, we use it to optimize the synthetic genes for 19 repetitive proteins, and show that the gene fragments are amenable to PCR-based gene assembly and recombinant expression.

  16. Rapid visual detection of phytase gene in genetically modified maize using loop-mediated isothermal amplification method.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Chen, Lili; Xu, Jiangmin; Ji, Hai-Feng; Zhu, Shuifang; Chen, Hongjun

    2014-08-01

    Transgenic maize plant expressing high phytase activity has been reported and approved by Chinese government in 2009. Here, we report a highly specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method to detect the phytase gene in the GMO maize. The LAMP reaction takes less than 20min and the amplification is visible without gel electrophoresis. The detection sensitivity of the LAMP method is about 30 copies of phytase genomic DNA, which is 33.3 times greater than the conventional PCR method with gel electrophoresis. The quantitative detection results showed that the LAMP method has a good linear correlation between the DNA copy number and the associated Tt values over a large dynamic range of template concentration from 6×10(1) to 6×10(7) copies, with a quantification limit of 60 copies. Therefore, the LAMP method is visual, faster, and more sensitive, and does not need special equipment compared to traditional PCR technique, which is very useful for field tests and fast screening of GMO feeds. PMID:24629956

  17. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assays for detection of Theileria parva infections targeting the PIM and p150 genes.

    PubMed

    Thekisoe, Oriel M M; Rambritch, Natasha E; Nakao, Ryo; Bazie, Raoul S; Mbati, Peter; Namangala, Boniface; Malele, Imna; Skilton, Robert A; Jongejan, Frans; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Kawazu, Shin-Ichiro; Inoue, Noboru

    2010-01-01

    We have developed two loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assays for the detection of Theileria parva, the causative agent of East Coast fever (ECF), an economically important cattle disease in eastern, central and southern Africa. These assays target the polymorphic immunodominant molecule (PIM) and p150 LAMP genes. The primer set for each gene target consists of six primers, and each set recognises eight distinct regions on the target gene to give highly specific detection of T. parva. The detection limit of each primer set is 1fg, which is equivalent to one copy of the PIM and p150 T. parva genes. These PIM and p150 LAMP primer sets amplify DNA of T. parva isolates from cattle and buffalo from different countries including Kenya, South Africa, Tanzania, Rwanda, Uganda and Burundi, indicating their ability to detect T. parva from different countries. With the advantages of simplicity, rapidity and cost effectiveness, these LAMP assays are good candidates for molecular epidemiology studies and for monitoring control programs in ECF-endemic, resource poor countries. PMID:19654009

  18. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for 16S rRNA methylase genes in Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Mitsuaki; Kaku, Mitsuo; Kamachi, Kazunari; Shibayama, Keigo; Arakawa, Yoshichika; Yamaguchi, Keizo; Ishii, Yoshikazu

    2014-10-01

    Using the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method, we developed a rapid assay for detection of 16S rRNA methylase genes (rmtA, rmtB, and armA), and investigated 16S rRNA methylase-producing strains among clinical isolates. Primer Explorer V3 software was used to design the LAMP primers. LAMP primers were prepared for each gene, including two outer primers (F3 and B3), two inner primers (FIP and BIP), and two loop primers (LF and LB). Detection was performed with the Loopamp DNA amplification kit. For all three genes (rmtA, rmtB, and armA), 10(2) copies/tube could be detected with a reaction time of 60 min. When nine bacterial species (65 strains saved in National Institute of Infectious Diseases) were tested, which had been confirmed to possess rmtA, rmtB, or armA by PCR and DNA sequencing, the genes were detected correctly in these bacteria with no false negative or false positive results. Among 8447 clinical isolates isolated at 36 medical institutions, the LAMP method was conducted for 191 strains that were resistant to aminoglycosides based on the results of antimicrobial susceptibility tests. Eight strains were found to produce 16S rRNA methylase (0.09%), with rmtB being identified in three strains (0.06%) of 4929 isolates of Enterobacteriaceae, rmtA in three strains (0.10%) of 3284 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and armA in two strains (0.85%) of 234 isolates of Acinetobacter spp. At present, the incidence of strains possessing 16S rRNA methylase genes is very low in Japan. However, when Gram-negative bacteria showing high resistance to aminoglycosides are isolated by clinical laboratories, it seems very important to investigate the status of 16S rRNA methylase gene-harboring bacilli and monitor their trends among Japanese clinical settings. PMID:25179393

  19. Identification of genes from pattern formation, tyrosine kinase, and potassium channel families by DNA amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Kamb, A.; Weir, M.; Rudy, B.; Varmus, H.; Kenyon, C. )

    1989-06-01

    The study of gene family members has been aided by the isolation of related genes on the basis of DNA homology. The authors have adapted the polymerase chain reaction to screen animal genomes very rapidly and reliably for likely gene family members. Using conserved amino acid sequences to design degenerate oligonucleotide primers, they have shown that the genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans contains sequences homologous to many Drosophila genes involved in pattern formation, including the segment polarity gene wingless (vertebrate int-1), and homeobox sequences characteristic of the Antennapedia, engrailed, and paired families. In addition, they have used this method to show that C. elegans contains at least five different sequences homologous to genes in the tyrosine kinase family. Lastly, they have isolated six potassium channel sequences from humans, a result that validates the utility of the method with large genomes and suggests that human potassium channel gene diversity may be extensive.

  20. Validation of a Multiplex Allele-Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for Detection of KRAS Gene Mutations in Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissues from Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Seekhuntod, Sirirat; Thavarungkul, Paninee; Chaichanawongsaroj, Nuntaree

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with KRAS mutations do not respond to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors and fail to benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. Mutation analysis of KRAS is needed before starting treatment with monoclonal anti-EGFR antibodies in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). The objective of this study is to develop a multiplex allele-specific PCR (MAS-PCR) assay to detect KRAS mutations. Methods We developed a single-tube MAS-PCR assay for the detection of seven KRAS mutations (G12D, G12A, G12R, G12C, G12S, G12V, and G13D). We performed MAS-PCR assay analysis for KRAS on DNA isolated from 270 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) colorectal cancer tissues. Sequences of all 270 samples were determined by pyrosequencing. Seven known point-mutation DNA samples diluted with wild-type DNA were assayed to determine the limitation of detection and reproducibility of the MAS-PCR assay. Results Overall, the results of MAS-PCR assay were in good concordance with pyrosequencing, and only seven discordant samples were found. The MAS-PCR assay reproducibly detected 1 to 2% mutant alleles. The most common mutations were G13D in codon 13 (49.17%), G12D (25.83%) and G12V (12.50%) in codon 12. Conclusion The MAS-PCR assay provides a rapid, cost-effective, and reliable diagnostic tool for accurate detection of KRAS mutations in routine FFPE colorectal cancer tissues. PMID:26812617

  1. Use of mitochondrial RNA genes for the differentiation of four Trichinella species by multiplex PCR amplification.

    PubMed

    Blaga, R; Fu, BaoQuan; Le Rhun, D; Le Naour, E; Heckman, A; Zocevic, A; Liu, MingYuan; Boireau, P

    2009-06-01

    Until now, four species of the Trichinella genus have been identified in Europe: Trichinella spiralis, T. nativa, T. britovi and T. pseudospiralis. The aim of this work was to establish a sound polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method to differentiate these four species using mitochondrial rDNA as a reliable genetic marker and to evaluate the sensitivity of this method. Full-length DNA sequences coding for the small and large mitochondrial rRNA (mt-rrnS and mt-rrnL) of the four species are described. A multiplex PCR was designed and successfully tested on 24 European isolates. As few as one larva, or 100 pg of genomic DNA was detected, providing equivalent sensitivity to previously described PCR methods. The PCR-based method of mitochondrial rDNA amplification was thereby established as a sensitive and reproductive diagnostic method for the four European Trichinella species. PMID:19389269

  2. Molecular detection of field isolates of Turkey Eimeria by polymerase chain reaction amplification of the cytochrome c oxidase I gene.

    PubMed

    Rathinam, T; Gadde, U; Chapman, H D

    2015-07-01

    Oocysts of Eimeria spp. were isolated from litter samples obtained from 30 commercial turkey farms. Genomic DNA was extracted from clean oocysts, and polymerase chain amplification of the species-specific cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene was performed for five species of turkey Eimeria. The species tested were Eimeria adenoeides, Eimeria meleagrimitis, Eimeria meleagridis, Eimeria dispersa, and Eimeria gallopavonis. All DNA samples were positive for E. meleagrimitis, nine were positive for E. adenoeides, two were positive for E. dispersa, and none for E. meleagridis and E. gallopavonis. E. meleagrimitis occurred as a single species in 21 (70 %) of the farms while 9 (30 %) farms had a mixed species with E. meleagrimitis and E. adenoeides and 2 (7 %) were triple positive with E. meleagrimitis, E. adenoeides, and E. dispersa. This is the first account of the field prevalence of turkey Eimeria species using molecular methods. PMID:26017345

  3. Avian malaria in captive psittacine birds: detection by microscopy and 18S rRNA gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Belo, N O; Passos, L F; Júnior, L M C; Goulart, C E; Sherlock, T M; Braga, E M

    2009-03-01

    A cross-sectional survey was conducted to estimate the occurrence of malaria infection among captive psittacine birds (n=127) from three zoological gardens in Brazil. Malaria infection was evaluated by the association of direct examination of blood smears with amplification of the 18SSU rRNA gene of the Plasmodium genus, demonstrating an overall occurrence of 36%. Most infected bird species were Amazona aestiva (28/73), Ara ararauna (6/10), and Amazona amazonica (3/10). The low parasitemias observed among the infected birds suggest a chronic infection. The sequence analyses of 10 isolates indicate a potential occurrence of four distinct Plasmodium lineages. These findings provide new data on malarial infection in captive psittacine birds, and emphasize the need for better control of importation and exportation of these birds. PMID:18937986

  4. Locally advanced rectal cancers with simultaneous occurrence of KRAS mutation and high VEGF expression show invasive characteristics.

    PubMed

    Krajnović, Milena; Marković, Bojana; Knežević-Ušaj, Slavica; Nikolić, Ivan; Stanojević, Maja; Nikolić, Valentina; Šiljić, Marina; Jovanović Ćupić, Snežana; Dimitrijević, Bogomir

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the mutation status of KRAS gene in pretherapeutic and preoperative biopsies in 63 specimens of locally advanced rectal cancers in order to evaluate its potential predictive and/or prognostic role. Regions of interest of KRAS exon 2 were amplified and visualized on 2% agarose gel. Obtained PCR products were subjected to direct sequencing. KRAS mutations were detected in 35% of patients, 91% of which were located in codon 12 and 9% in codon 13. In general, KRAS mutation status did not affect the response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). However, patients harboring mutated KRAS gene, simultaneously with high vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, exhibited a worse response to CRT (p=0.030), a more frequent appearance of local recurrences and distant metastasis (p=0.003), and shorter overall survival (p=0.001) compared to all others. On the contrary, patients with GGT>GCT KRAS mutation exhibited a significantly better response to CRT than those with any other type of KRAS mutation (p=0.017). Moreover, the presence of GGT>GCT mutation was associated with low VEGF and Ki67 expression (p=0.012 in both cases), parameters related to less aggressiveness of the disease. Our results suggest that KRAS mutation status could have some predictive and prognostic importance in rectal cancer when analyzed together with other parameters, such as VEGF and Ki67 expression. In addition, it seems that not only the presence but the type of KRAS mutation is important for examining its impact on CRT response. PMID:27184911

  5. A new rapid amplification of cDNA ends method for extremely guanine plus cytosine-rich genes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianzong; Jarvis, Donald L

    2006-09-15

    Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) is widely used to determine the 5'- and 3'-terminal nucleotide sequences of genes. Many different RACE methods have been developed to meet various requirements, but none addresses the difficult problems that arise when trying to isolate the ends of extremely guanine plus cytosine (GC)-rich genes. In this study, we found that we were unable to isolate the correct 5' or 3' end of an insect gene, which appeared to include extremely GC-rich sequences, using current RACE methods. Thus, we developed a new RACE method that can be used for this purpose. This new method entails first-strand cDNA synthesis at 70 degrees C with Thermo-X reverse transcriptase in the presence of homoectoine, followed by a polymerase chain reaction with 98 degrees C denaturation steps and Phusion DNA polymerase in the presence of 1M betaine and 5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The use of these conditions yielded 5'- and 3'-RACE products that were approximately 80% GC over 213 and 162bp, respectively, and included shorter internal regions of 82 to 89% GC. PMID:16875657

  6. Mutations in PI3K/AKT pathway genes and amplifications of PIK3CA are associated with patterns of recurrence in gastric cancers

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Wen-Liang; Huang, Kuo-Hung; Lan, Yuan-Tzu; Lin, Chien-Hsing; Chen, Ming-Huang; Chao, Yee; Lin, Wen-Chang; Lo, Su-Shun; Li, Anna Fen-Yau; Wu, Chew-Wun; Chiou, Shih-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in genes involved in the PI3K/AKT pathway and amplifications of the PIK3CA gene in gastric cancer and their associations with clinicopathological characteristics and EBV infection were analyzed in this study. A total of 431 patients with gastric adenocarcinomas were enrolled, and 39 mutation hotspots were evaluated in these patients using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry were analyzed. PIK3CA amplifications were analyzed using real-time quantitative PCR. Regarding patients with intestinal-type gastric cancer, those with mutations in PI3K/AKT pathway genes were also more likely to have tumors located in the lower-third of the stomach than were those without mutations. Regarding patients with diffuse-type gastric cancer, those with PI3K/AKT pathway mutations were more likely to have tumors located in the upper-third of the stomach and to have more hematogenous metastases, particularly in the liver and lungs, than were patients without such mutations (22.2% vs. 4.5%). No significant survival difference was observed between patients with vs. without PI3K/AKT pathway mutations. Mutations in PI3K/AKT pathway genes were associated with hematogenous metastasis in patients with diffuse-type gastric cancer. Only when the tumors were located in the middle-third of stomach, tumor with mutations of the PIK3CA gene or mutations of the PI3K/AKT pathway genes were associated with more EBV infection than those without mutations. Patients with PIK3CA amplifications were more likely to have diffuse-type and poorly differentiated gastric cancers and were more likely to experience peritoneal recurrence compared with those without PIK3CA amplifications. Even upon subgroup analysis, PI3KCA amplifications were found to not affect the patients’ outcomes. PMID:26701847

  7. Soluble normal and mutated DNA sequences from single-copy genes in human blood.

    PubMed

    Sorenson, G D; Pribish, D M; Valone, F H; Memoli, V A; Bzik, D J; Yao, S L

    1994-01-01

    Healthy individuals have soluble (extracellular) DNA in their blood, and increased amounts are present in cancer patients. Here we report the detection of specific sequences of the cystic fibrosis and K-ras genes in plasma DNA from normal donors by amplification with the polymerase chain reaction. In addition, mutated K-ras sequences are identified by polymerase chain reaction utilizing allele-specific primers in the plasma or serum from three patients with pancreatic carcinoma that contain mutated K-ras genes. The mutations are confirmed by direct sequencing. These results indicate that sequences of single-copy genes can be identified in normal plasma and that the sequences of mutated oncogenes can be detected and identified with allele-specific amplification by polymerase chain reaction in plasma or serum from patients with malignant tumors containing identical mutated genes. Mutated oncogenes in plasma and serum may represent tumor markers that could be useful for diagnosis, determining response to treatment, and predicting prognosis. PMID:8118388

  8. Mutations of KRAS/NRAS/BRAF predict cetuximab resistance in metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hung-Chih; Thiam, Tan Kien; Lu, Yen-Jung; Yeh, Chien Yuh; Tsai, Wen-Sy; You, Jeng Fu; Hung, Hsin Yuan; Tsai, Chi-Neu; Hsu, An; Chen, Hua-Chien; Chen, Shu-Jen; Yang, Tsai-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 45% of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients with wild-type KRAS exon 2 are resistant to cetuximab treatment. We set out to identify additional genetic markers that might predict the response to cetuximab treatment. Fifty-three wild-type KRAS exon 2 mCRC patients were treated with cetuximab/irinotecan-based chemotherapy as a first- or third-line therapy. The mutational statuses of 10 EGFR pathway genes were analyzed in primary tumors using next-generation sequencing. BRAF, PIK3CA, KRAS (exons 3 and 4), NRAS, PTEN, and AKT1 mutations were detected in 6, 6, 5, 4, 1, and 1 patient, respectively. Four of the BRAF mutations were non-V600 variants. Four tumors harbored multiple co-existing (complex) mutations. All patients with BRAF mutations or complex mutation patterns were cetuximab non-responders. All patients but one harboring KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF mutations were non-responders. Mutations in any one of these three genes were associated with a poor response rate (7.1%) and reduced survival (PFS = 8.0 months) compared to wild-type patients (74.4% and 11.6 months). Our data suggest that KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutations predict response to cetuximab treatment in mCRC patients. PMID:26989027

  9. Mutant K-RAS Promotes Invasion and Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer Through GTPase Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Padavano, Julianna; Henkhaus, Rebecca S; Chen, Hwudaurw; Skovan, Bethany A; Cui, Haiyan; Ignatenko, Natalia A

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive malignancies, characterized by the local invasion into surrounding tissues and early metastasis to distant organs. Oncogenic mutations of the K-RAS gene occur in more than 90% of human pancreatic cancers. The goal of this study was to investigate the functional significance and downstream effectors of mutant K-RAS oncogene in the pancreatic cancer invasion and metastasis. We applied the homologous recombination technique to stably disrupt K-RAS oncogene in the human pancreatic cell line MiaPaCa-2, which carries the mutant K-RASG12C oncogene in both alleles. Using in vitro assays, we found that clones with disrupted mutant K-RAS gene exhibited low RAS activity, reduced growth rates, increased sensitivity to the apoptosis inducing agents, and suppressed motility and invasiveness. In vivo assays showed that clones with decreased RAS activity had reduced tumor formation ability in mouse xenograft model and increased survival rates in the mouse orthotopic pancreatic cancer model. We further examined molecular pathways downstream of mutant K-RAS and identified RhoA GTP activating protein 5, caveolin-1, and RAS-like small GTPase A (RalA) as key effector molecules, which control mutant K-RAS-dependent migration and invasion in MiaPaCa-2 cells. Our study provides rational for targeting RhoA and RalA GTPase signaling pathways for inhibition of pancreatic cancer metastasis. PMID:26512205

  10. Fusion of the Dhfr/Mtx and IR/MAR Gene Amplification Methods Produces a Rapid and Efficient Method for Stable Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Daisuke; Shimizu, Noriaki

    2012-01-01

    Amplification of the dihydrofolate reductase gene (Dhfr) by methotrexate (Mtx) exposure is commonly used for recombinant protein expression in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. However, this method is both time- and labor-intensive, and the high-producing cells that are generated are frequently unstable in culture. Another gene amplification method is based on using a plasmid bearing a mammalian replication initiation region (IR) and a matrix attachment region (MAR), which result in the spontaneous initiation of gene amplification in transfected cells. The IR/MAR and Dhfr/Mtx methods of gene amplification are based on entirely different principles. In this study, we combine these two methods to yield a novel method, termed the IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion method, which was used to express three proteins, the Fc receptor, GFP, and recombinant antibody. The fusion method resulted in a dramatic increase in expression of all three proteins in two CHO sub-lines, DXB-11, and DG44. The IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion amplified the genes rapidly and efficiently, and produced larger amounts of antibody than the Dhfr/Mtx or IR/MAR methods alone. While the amplified structure produced by the Dhfr/Mtx method was highly unstable, and the antibody production rate rapidly decreased with the culture time of the cells, the IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion method resulted in stable amplification and generated clonal cells that produced large amounts of antibody protein over a long period of time. In summary, the novel IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion method enables isolation of stable cells that produce larger amounts of a target recombinant protein more rapidly and easily than either the Dhfr/Mtx or IR/MAR methods alone. PMID:23300841

  11. KRAS Testing for Anti-EGFR Therapy in Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Executive Summary In February 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on evidence-based reviews of the literature surrounding three pharmacogenomic tests. This project came about when Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) asked MAS to provide evidence-based analyses on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of three oncology pharmacogenomic tests currently in use in Ontario. Evidence-based analyses have been prepared for each of these technologies. These have been completed in conjunction with internal and external stakeholders, including a Provincial Expert Panel on Pharmacogenomics (PEPP). Within the PEPP, subgroup committees were developed for each disease area. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed by the Toronto Health Economics and Technology Assessment Collaborative (THETA) and is summarized within the reports. The following reports can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: www.health.gov.on.ca/mas or at www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/mas_about.html Gene Expression Profiling for Guiding Adjuvant Chemotherapy Decisions in Women with Early Breast Cancer: An Evidence-Based and Economic Analysis Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation (EGFR) Testing for Prediction of Response to EGFR-Targeting Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI) Drugs in Patients with Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: an Evidence-Based and Economic Analysis K-RAS testing in Treatment Decisions for Advanced Colorectal Cancer: an Evidence-Based and Economic Analysis. Objective The objective of this systematic review is to determine the predictive value of KRAS testing in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with two anti-EGFR agents, cetuximab and panitumumab. Economic analyses are also being conducted to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of KRAS testing. Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is usually defined as stage IV disease according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer

  12. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification of specific endoglucanase gene sequence for detection of the bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Lenarčič, Rok; Morisset, Dany; Pirc, Manca; Llop, Pablo; Ravnikar, Maja; Dreo, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    The increased globalization of crops production and processing industries also promotes the side-effects of more rapid and efficient spread of plant pathogens. To prevent the associated economic losses, and particularly those related to bacterial diseases where their management relies on removal of the infected material from production, simple, easy-to-perform, rapid and cost-effective tests are needed. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assays that target 16S rRNA, fliC and egl genes were compared and evaluated as on-site applications. The assay with the best performance was that targeted to the egl gene, which shows high analytical specificity for diverse strains of the betaproteobacterium Ralstonia solanacearum, including its non-European and non-race 3 biovar 2 strains. The additional melting curve analysis provides confirmation of the test results. According to our extensive assessment, the egl LAMP assay requires minimum sample preparation (a few minutes of boiling) for the identification of pure cultures and ooze from symptomatic material, and it can also be used in a high-throughput format in the laboratory. This provides sensitive and reliable detection of R. solanacearum strains of different phylotypes. PMID:24763488

  13. Focused human gene expression profiling using dual-color reverse transcriptase multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification.

    PubMed

    Haks, Mariëlle C; Goeman, Jelle J; Magis-Escurra, Cecile; Ottenhoff, Tom H M

    2015-09-29

    To investigate the human immune response to newly developed or existing vaccines, or during infection/disease on a population scale, we have recently developed a dual-color Reverse Transcriptase Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (dcRT-MLPA) assay, which can rapidly profile mRNA expression of multiple host genes. dcRT-MLPA has a dynamic range and sensitivity comparable to real-time QPCR and RNA-Sequencing. Since this assay is high-throughput, it is an exceptionally suitable technique for monitoring host biomarkers in semi-large scale human cohorts, such as cross sectional studies with multiple groups, or longitudinal studies with multiple time points. Multicomponent host biomarker signatures with excellent predictive values can easily be identified using lasso regression analysis, while exploring additional data adjustment methods like RUV-2 may further optimize the identification of informative host biomarker signatures. dcRT-MLPA also allows comparisons of gene expression patterns across different human populations to explore the impact of geographical diversity on for example vaccine induced responses. The use of dcRT-MLPA is not limited to peripheral blood but can be adapted to analyze host biomarkers derived from any tissue or body fluids, further demonstrating the versatility of the dcRT-MLPA platform. Several examples will be given and discussed. PMID:25917681

  14. Differentiation of slowly growing Mycobacterium species, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, by gene amplification and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Plikaytis, B B; Plikaytis, B D; Yakrus, M A; Butler, W R; Woodley, C L; Silcox, V A; Shinnick, T M

    1992-01-01

    A two-step assay combining a gene amplification step and a restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was developed to differentiate the Mycobacterium species that account for greater than 90% of potentially pathogenic isolates and greater than 86% of all isolates in clinical laboratories in the United States. These species are M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. avium, M. intracellulare, M. kansasii, and M. gordonae. With lysates of pure cultures as the template, two oligonucleotide primers that amplified an approximately 1,380-bp portion of the hsp65 gene from all 139 strains of 19 Mycobacterium species tested, but not from the 19 non-Mycobacterium species tested, were identified. Digestion of the amplicons from 126 strains of the six most commonly isolated Mycobacterium species with the restriction enzymes BstNI and XhoI in separate reactions generated restriction fragment patterns that were distinctive for each of these species, except for those of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis, which were not distinguishable. By including size standards in each sample, the restriction fragment profiles could be normalized to a fixed distance and the similarities of patterns could be calculated by using a computer-aided comparison program. The availability of this data base should enable the identification of an unknown Mycobacterium strain to the species level by a comparison of the restriction fragment pattern of the unknown with the data base of known patterns. Images PMID:1352786

  15. Development of reverse transcription recombinase polymerase amplification assay for avian influenza H5N1 HA gene detection.

    PubMed

    Yehia, Nahed; Arafa, Abdel-Satar; Abd El Wahed, Ahmed; El-Sanousi, Ahmed A; Weidmann, Manfred; Shalaby, Mohamed A

    2015-10-01

    The 2006 outbreaks of H5N1 avian influenza in Egypt interrupted poultry production and caused staggering economic damage. In addition, H5N1 avian influenza viruses represent a significant threat to public health. Therefore, the rapid detection of H5 viruses is very important in order to control the disease. In this study, a qualitative reverse transcription recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-RPA) assay for the detection of hemagglutinin gene of H5 subtype influenza viruses was developed. The results were compared to the real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). An in vitro transcribed RNA standard of 970 nucleotides of the hemagglutinin gene was developed and used to determine the assay sensitivity. The developed H5 RT-RPA assay was able to detect one RNA molecule within 7 min, while in real-time RT-PCR, at least 90 min was required. H5 RT-RPA assay did not detect nucleic acid extracted from H5 negative samples or from other pathogens producing respiratory manifestation in poultry. The clinical performance of the H5 RT-RPA assay was tested in 30 samples collected between 2014 and 2015; the sensitivity of H5 RT-RPA and real-time RT-PCR was 100%. In conclusion, H5 RT-RPA was faster than real-time RT-PCR and easily operable in a portable device. Moreover, it had an equivalent sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26225482

  16. Determination of True ERBB2 Gene Amplification in Breast Cancer by Quantitative PCR Using a Reference and a Novel Control Gene.

    PubMed

    Chamizo, Cristina; Rojo, Federico; Madoz-Gúrpide, Juan

    2016-03-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (ERBB2/HER2) is amplified and overexpressed in 20% to 25% of breast carcinomas, correlates with poor outcome, and is an indication for treatment with trastuzumab. Accurate assessment of ERBB2 status is crucial for proper prognosis and to offer appropriate treatment for patients. ERBB2 status is generally determined by immunohistochemistry or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and sporadically by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We developed a new algorithm, termed quantitative PCR algorithm (QPA) score, and compared its performance with the gold standard FISH assay. The QPA is a computation of the relative number of copies of the ERBB2 gene with respect to a nonstandard, short-arm centromeric sequence on chromosome 17, and referenced to a single-copy gene, RPP30. This provides a more reliable determination of ERBB2 amplification, reducing the false polysomy 17 error. A total of 69 breast carcinoma samples were tested for quantitative real-time PCR and FISH, and the degree of concordance was analyzed. Sixty-two cases were in agreement between the 2 methods, and the contingency study assigned a κ value of 0.729 for their correlation. A receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to determine the optimal cut-off point for ERBB2 amplification, which was estimated at a QPA=1.53 (sensitivity=0.863; specificity=0.944). Our data conclude that the QPA is able to determine ERBB2 gene status with high accuracy, while also overcoming the limitations of conventional techniques and providing better cost-effectiveness. PMID:25789534

  17. Accidental Amplification and Inactivation of a Methyltransferase Gene Eliminates Cytosine Methylation in Mycosphaerella Graminicola

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A de novo search for repetitive elements in the genome sequence of the wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola identified a family of repeats containing a DNA methyltransferase sequence (MgDNMT), which is a homologue of the Neurospora crassa Dim-2 gene. A total of 28 MgDNMT sequences was identifie...

  18. Gene Amplification Is A Mechanism For Rapid Weed Evolution To Herbicide Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The herbicide glyphosate became widely used in the U.S. and other parts of the world following the introduction of glyphosate-resistant crops. These crops were created by introduction of a modified 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene, the herbicide target site. Increased use of ...

  19. Potential Role of Preoperative Conventional MRI Including Diffusion Measurements in Assessing Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Gene Amplification Status in Patients with Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Young, R.J.; Gupta, A.; Shah, A.D.; Graber, J.J.; Schweitzer, A.D.; Prager, A.; Shi, W.; Zhang, Z.; Huse, J.; Omuro, A.M.P.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Epidermal growth factor receptor amplification is a common molecular event in glioblastomas. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential usefulness of morphologic and diffusion MR imaging signs in the prediction of epidermal growth factor receptor gene amplification status in patients with glioblastoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS We analyzed pretreatment MR imaging scans from 147 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma and correlated MR imaging features with tumor epidermal growth factor receptor amplification status. The following morphologic tumor MR imaging features were qualitatively assessed: 1) border sharpness, 2) cystic/necrotic change, 3) hemorrhage, 4) T2-isointense signal, 5) restricted water diffusion, 6) nodular enhancement, 7) subependymal enhancement, and 8) multifocal discontinuous enhancement. A total of 142 patients had DWI available for quantitative analysis. ADC maps were calculated, and the ADCmean, ADCmin, ADCmax, ADCROI, and ADCratio were measured. RESULTS Epidermal growth factor receptor amplification was present in 60 patients (40.8%) and absent in 87 patients (59.2%). Restricted water diffusion correlated with epidermal growth factor receptor amplification (P = .04), whereas the other 7 morphologic MR imaging signs did not (P > .12). Quantitative DWI analysis found that all ADC measurements correlated with epidermal growth factor receptor amplification, with the highest correlations found with ADCROI (P = .0003) and ADCmean (P = .0007). CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest a role for diffusion MR imaging in the determination of epidermal growth factor receptor amplification status in glioblastoma. Additional work is necessary to confirm these results and isolate new imaging biomarkers capable of noninvasively characterizing the molecular status of these tumors. PMID:23811973

  20. Optimal gene expression and amplification strategies for batch and continuous recombinant cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Seressiotis, A.; Bailey, J.E.

    1987-02-20

    Maximizing the amount of protein produced from a cloned gene in a recombinant organism requires careful consideration of the trade-offs involved between cloned gene expression and host cell growth and biosythetic activity. Numerous experimental studies of recombinant Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown that the presence of plasmids reduces host cell growth rate and, overall protein synthesis activity. Reduction host cell growth rates and biosynthetic activity in the presence of plasmid-directed macromolecular synthesis presumably occurs because of competition between plasmid-directed and host-cell-directed activity for common pools of precursors, chemical energy and electrons, activator species, repressor molecules, transport apparatus, and enzymes and other catalytic assemblies. The use of regulated promoters and plasmid replication controls amenable to environmental manipulation offers the opportunity of reconciling the opposing effects of cloned-gene content and expression level on process productivity. Several promoters are available for E. coli, S. cerevisiae, and other hosts that allow the expression level of the cloned gene to be switched from a relatively low to a relatively high level by a change in the organism environment. Similarly, in a plasmid replicon repressed by a temperature-sensitive molecule, such as the ColE1 origin of replication for E. coli plasmids with a mutant RNA I gene providing temperature-sensitive replication repressor activity, cellular plasmid content can be altered from around 25 to 700 or more copies per cell by increasing the medium temperature. Similar temperature-sensitive replication regulators are known for R1 plasmids.

  1. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification detection of an unknown large deletion of the CREB-binding protein gene in a patient with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Calì, F; Failla, P; Chiavetta, V; Ragalmuto, A; Ruggeri, G; Schinocca, P; Schepis, C; Romano, V; Romano, C

    2013-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant congenital disorder characterized by postnatal growth retardation, psychomotor developmental delay, skeletal anomalies, peculiar facial morphology, and tumorigenesis. Mutations in the gene encoding the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB, also known as CREBBP or CBP) on chromosome 16p13.3 have been identified. In addition, some patients with low intelligence quotients and autistic features bear large deletions. Based on these observations, we used multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification to search for large deletions affecting the CREBBP gene in a Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome patient. We identified a novel heterozygote deletion removing five exons (exons 17-21), encoding the histone acetyltransferase domain. We propose the use of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification as a fast, accurate and cheap test for detecting large deletions in the CREBBP gene in the sub-group of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome patients with low intelligence quotients and autistic features. PMID:23315884

  2. Selective Targeting of the KRAS G12C Mutant: Kicking KRAS When It's Down.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, G Aaron; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Der, Channing J

    2016-03-14

    Two recent studies evaluated a small molecule that specifically binds to and inactivates the KRAS G12C mutant. The new findings argue that the perception that mutant KRAS is persistently frozen in its active GTP-bound form may not be accurate. PMID:26977877

  3. Amplification of 16S ribosomal RNA genes of autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria demonstrates the ubiquity of nitrosospiras in the environment.

    PubMed

    Hiorns, W D; Hastings, R C; Head, I M; McCarthy, A J; Saunders, J R; Pickup, R W; Hall, G H

    1995-11-01

    Oligonucleotide sequences selected from the 16S rRNA genes of various species of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were evaluated as specific PCR amplification primers and probes. The specificities of primer pairs for eubacterial, Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas rRNA genes were established with sequence databases, and the primer pairs were used to amplify DNA from laboratory cultures and environmental samples. Eubacterial rRNA genes amplified from samples of soil and activated sludge hybridized with an oligonucleotide probe specific for Nitrosospira spp., but not with a Nitrosomonas-specific probe. Lakewater and sediment samples were analysed using a nested PCR technique in which eubacterial rRNA genes were subjected to a secondary amplification with Nitrosomonas or Nitrosospira specific primers. Again, the presence of Nitrosospira DNA, but not Nitrosomonas DNA, was detected and this was confirmed by hybridization of the amplified DNA with an internal oligonucleotide probe. Enrichments of lakewater and sediment samples, incubated for two weeks in the presence of ammonium, produced nitrite and were found to contain DNA from both Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas as determined by nested PCR amplification and probing of 16S rRNA genes. This demonstrates that Nitrosospira spp. are widespread in the environment. The implications of the detection of Nitrosomonas DNA only after enrichment culture are discussed. PMID:8535507

  4. Primers for low-copy nuclear genes in Metrosideros and cross-amplification in Myrtaceae1

    PubMed Central

    Pillon, Yohan; Johansen, Jennifer; Sakishima, Tomoko; Chamala, Srikar; Barbazuk, W. Brad; Stacy, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Primers were developed to amplify low-copy nuclear genes in Hawaiian Metrosideros (Myrtaceae). • Methods and Results: Data from a pooled 454 Titanium run of the partial transcriptomes of four Metrosideros taxa were used to identify the loci of interest. Ten exon-primed intron-crossing (EPIC) markers were amplified and sequenced directly with success in Metrosideros, as well as in a representative selection of Myrtaceae, including Syzygium, Psidium, and Melaleuca for most of the markers. The loci amplified ranged between 500 and 1100 bp, and up to 117 polymorphic sites were observed within an individual gene alignment. Two introns contained microsatellites in some of the species. • Conclusions: These novel primer pairs should be useful for phylogenetic analysis and population genetics of a broad range of Myrtaceae, particularly the diverse fleshy-fruited tribes Syzygieae and Myrteae. PMID:25309837

  5. Reduced cohesin destabilizes high-level gene amplification by disrupting pre-replication complex bindings in human cancers with chromosomal instability.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jiyeon; Song, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Jee-Youn; Park, Jinah; Kim, Hwang-Phill; Han, Sae-Won; Kim, Tae-You

    2016-01-29

    Gene amplification is a hallmark of cancer with chromosomal instability although the underlying mechanism by which altered copy numbers are maintained is largely unclear. Cohesin, involved in sister chromatid cohesion, DNA repair, cell cycle progression and transcriptional regulation of key developmental genes, is frequently overexpressed in human cancer. Here we show that cohesin-dependent change in DNA replication controls the copy numbers of amplified genes in cancer cells with chromosomal instability. We found that the down-regulation of elevated cohesin leads to copy number-associated gene expression changes without disturbing chromosomal segregation. Highly amplified genes form typical long-range chromatin interactions, which are stabilized by enriched cohesin. The spatial proximities among cohesin binding sites within amplified genes are decreased by RAD21-knockdown, resulting in the rapid decline of amplified gene expression. After several passages, cohesin depletion inhibits DNA replication initiation by reducing the recruitment of pre-replication complexes such as minichromosome maintenance subunits 7 (MCM7), DNA polymerase α, and CDC45 at replication origins near the amplified regions, and as a result, decreases the DNA copy numbers of highly amplified genes. Collectively, our data demonstrate that cohesin-mediated chromatin organization and DNA replication are important for stabilizing gene amplification in cancer cells with chromosomal instability. PMID:26420833

  6. Reduced cohesin destabilizes high-level gene amplification by disrupting pre-replication complex bindings in human cancers with chromosomal instability

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jiyeon; Song, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Jee-Youn; Park, Jinah; Kim, Hwang-Phill; Han, Sae-Won; Kim, Tae-You

    2016-01-01

    Gene amplification is a hallmark of cancer with chromosomal instability although the underlying mechanism by which altered copy numbers are maintained is largely unclear. Cohesin, involved in sister chromatid cohesion, DNA repair, cell cycle progression and transcriptional regulation of key developmental genes, is frequently overexpressed in human cancer. Here we show that cohesin-dependent change in DNA replication controls the copy numbers of amplified genes in cancer cells with chromosomal instability. We found that the down-regulation of elevated cohesin leads to copy number-associated gene expression changes without disturbing chromosomal segregation. Highly amplified genes form typical long-range chromatin interactions, which are stabilized by enriched cohesin. The spatial proximities among cohesin binding sites within amplified genes are decreased by RAD21-knockdown, resulting in the rapid decline of amplified gene expression. After several passages, cohesin depletion inhibits DNA replication initiation by reducing the recruitment of pre-replication complexes such as minichromosome maintenance subunits 7 (MCM7), DNA polymerase α, and CDC45 at replication origins near the amplified regions, and as a result, decreases the DNA copy numbers of highly amplified genes. Collectively, our data demonstrate that cohesin-mediated chromatin organization and DNA replication are important for stabilizing gene amplification in cancer cells with chromosomal instability. PMID:26420833

  7. EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and HER-2 molecular status in brain metastases from 77 NSCLC patients

    PubMed Central

    Villalva, Claire; Duranton-Tanneur, Valérie; Guilloteau, Karline; Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny; Wager, Michel; Doyen, Jérôme; Levillain, Pierre Marie; Fontaine, Denys; Blons, Hélène; Pedeutour, Florence; Karayan-Tapon, Lucie

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and HER-2 mutations in brain metastases from non-small cell lung carcinomas (BM-NSCLC). A total of 77 samples of BM-NSCLC were included and 19 samples of BM from breast, kidney, and colorectal tumors were also studied as controls. These samples were collected from patients followed between 2008 and 2011 at Poitiers and Nice University Hospitals in France. The frequencies of EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and HER-2 mutations in BM-NSCLC were 2.6, 38.5, 0, and 0% respectively. The incidence of KRAS mutation was significantly higher in female and younger patients (P < 0.05). No mutations of the four genes were found in BM from breast or kidney. However, among six BM from colorectal tumors, we identified KRAS mutations in three cases and BRAF mutations in two other cases. This study is the largest analysis on genetic alterations in BM-NSCLC performed to date. Our results suggest a low frequency of EGFR mutations in BM-NSCLC whereas KRAS mutations are as frequent in BM-NSCLC as in primitive NSCLC. These results raise the question of the variability of the brain metastatic potential of NSCLC cells in relation to the mutation pattern. PMID:23930206

  8. Pivotal Role of the Chromatin Protein Nupr1 in Kras-Induced Senescence and Transformation.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Daniel; Bintz, Jennifer; Lomberk, Gwen; Molejon, Maria Ines; Loncle, Celine; Garcia, Maria Noé; Lopez, Maria Belen; Urrutia, Raul; Iovanna, Juan L

    2015-01-01

    Nupr1 is a chromatin protein, which cooperates with Kras(G12D) to induce PanIN formation and pancreatic cancer development in mice, though the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect remain to be fully characterized. In the current study, we report that Nupr1 acts as a gene modifier of the effect of Kras(G12D)-induced senescence by regulating Dnmt1 expression and consequently genome-wide levels of DNA methylation. Congruently, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytydine, a general inhibitor of DNA methylation, reverses the Kras(G12D)-induced PanIN development by promoting senescence. This requirement of Nupr1 expression, however, is not restricted to the pancreas since in lung of Nupr1(-/-) mice the expression of Kras(G12D) induces senescence instead of transformation. Therefore, mechanistically this data reveals that epigenetic events, at least at the level of DNA methylation, modulate the functional outcome of common genetic mutations, such as Kras(G12D), during carcinogenesis. The biomedical relevance of these findings lies in that they support the rational for developing similar therapeutic interventions in human aimed at controlling either the initiation or progression of cancer. PMID:26617245

  9. Synthetic lethal interaction between oncogenic KRAS dependency and STK33 suppression in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Claudia; Fröhling, Stefan; Dunn, Ian F; Schinzel, Anna C; Barbie, David A; Kim, So Young; Silver, Serena J; Tamayo, Pablo; Wadlow, Raymond C; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Döhner, Konstanze; Bullinger, Lars; Sandy, Peter; Boehm, Jesse S; Root, David E; Jacks, Tyler; Hahn, William C; Gilliland, D Gary

    2009-05-29

    An alternative to therapeutic targeting of oncogenes is to perform "synthetic lethality" screens for genes that are essential only in the context of specific cancer-causing mutations. We used high-throughput RNA interference (RNAi) to identify synthetic lethal interactions in cancer cells harboring mutant KRAS, the most commonly mutated human oncogene. We find that cells that are dependent on mutant KRAS exhibit sensitivity to suppression of the serine/threonine kinase STK33 irrespective of tissue origin, whereas STK33 is not required by KRAS-independent cells. STK33 promotes cancer cell viability in a kinase activity-dependent manner by regulating the suppression of mitochondrial apoptosis mediated through S6K1-induced inactivation of the death agonist BAD selectively in mutant KRAS-dependent cells. These observations identify STK33 as a target for treatment of mutant KRAS-driven cancers and demonstrate the potential of RNAi screens for discovering functional dependencies created by oncogenic mutations that may enable therapeutic intervention for cancers with "undruggable" genetic alterations. PMID:19490892

  10. K-Ras Mutations in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Prognostic and Predictive Value

    PubMed Central

    D'Arcangelo, Manolo; Cappuzzo, Federico

    2012-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a heterogeneous disease due to the presence of different clinically relevant molecular subtypes. Until today, several biological events have been identified in lung adenocarcinoma, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocations, offering new hopes to patients with metastatic disease. Unfortunately, in approximately 50% of adenocarcinoma and for those harbouring K-RAS mutations, the most frequent mutation in Caucasian lung adenocarcinoma, so far no specific drug demonstrated efficacy. The rat sarcoma (RAS) genes, including H-RAS, K-RAS, and N-RAS, encode a family of proteins regulating cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. K-RAS mutations are present in 20–30% of NSCLC and occur most commonly, but not exclusively, in adenocarcinoma histology and life-long smokers. Although in colorectal cancer patients K-RAS mutations represent a validated negative predictive biomarker for treatment with anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies, their role in selecting specific treatment for NSCLC patients remains undefined. Aim of the present paper is to critically analyze the prognostic and predictive value of K-RAS mutations in NSCLC.

  11. Twist1 Suppresses Senescence Programs and Thereby Accelerates and Maintains Mutant Kras-Induced Lung Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Thiyagarajan, Saravanan; Das, Sandhya T.; Zabuawala, Tahera; Chen, Joy; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Luong, Richard; Tamayo, Pablo; Salih, Tarek; Aziz, Khaled; Adam, Stacey J.; Vicent, Silvestre; Nielsen, Carsten H.; Withofs, Nadia; Sweet-Cordero, Alejandro; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Rudin, Charles M.; Felsher, Dean W.

    2012-01-01

    KRAS mutant lung cancers are generally refractory to chemotherapy as well targeted agents. To date, the identification of drugs to therapeutically inhibit K-RAS have been unsuccessful, suggesting that other approaches are required. We demonstrate in both a novel transgenic mutant Kras lung cancer mouse model and in human lung tumors that the inhibition of Twist1 restores a senescence program inducing the loss of a neoplastic phenotype. The Twist1 gene encodes for a transcription factor that is essential during embryogenesis. Twist1 has been suggested to play an important role during tumor progression. However, there is no in vivo evidence that Twist1 plays a role in autochthonous tumorigenesis. Through two novel transgenic mouse models, we show that Twist1 cooperates with KrasG12D to markedly accelerate lung tumorigenesis by abrogating cellular senescence programs and promoting the progression from benign adenomas to adenocarcinomas. Moreover, the suppression of Twist1 to physiological levels is sufficient to cause Kras mutant lung tumors to undergo senescence and lose their neoplastic features. Finally, we analyzed more than 500 human tumors to demonstrate that TWIST1 is frequently overexpressed in primary human lung tumors. The suppression of TWIST1 in human lung cancer cells also induced cellular senescence. Hence, TWIST1 is a critical regulator of cellular senescence programs, and the suppression of TWIST1 in human tumors may be an effective example of pro-senescence therapy. PMID:22654667

  12. Pivotal Role of the Chromatin Protein Nupr1 in Kras-Induced Senescence and Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Daniel; Bintz, Jennifer; Lomberk, Gwen; Molejon, Maria Ines; Loncle, Celine; Garcia, Maria Noé; Lopez, Maria Belen; Urrutia, Raul; Iovanna, Juan L.

    2015-01-01

    Nupr1 is a chromatin protein, which cooperates with KrasG12D to induce PanIN formation and pancreatic cancer development in mice, though the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect remain to be fully characterized. In the current study, we report that Nupr1 acts as a gene modifier of the effect of KrasG12D-induced senescence by regulating Dnmt1 expression and consequently genome-wide levels of DNA methylation. Congruently, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytydine, a general inhibitor of DNA methylation, reverses the KrasG12D-induced PanIN development by promoting senescence. This requirement of Nupr1 expression, however, is not restricted to the pancreas since in lung of Nupr1–/– mice the expression of KrasG12D induces senescence instead of transformation. Therefore, mechanistically this data reveals that epigenetic events, at least at the level of DNA methylation, modulate the functional outcome of common genetic mutations, such as KrasG12D, during carcinogenesis. The biomedical relevance of these findings lies in that they support the rational for developing similar therapeutic interventions in human aimed at controlling either the initiation or progression of cancer. PMID:26617245

  13. Amplification of TGFβ Induced ITGB6 Gene Transcription May Promote Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tatler, Amanda L.; Goodwin, Amanda T.; Gbolahan, Olumide; Saini, Gauri; Porte, Joanne; John, Alison E.; Clifford, Rachel L.; Violette, Shelia M.; Weinreb, Paul H.; Parfrey, Helen; Wolters, Paul J.; Gauldie, Jack; Kolb, Martin; Jenkins, Gisli

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating, progressive disease with poor survival rates and limited treatment options. Upregulation of αvβ6 integrins within the alveolar epithelial cells is a characteristic feature of IPF and correlates with poor patient survival. The pro-fibrotic cytokine TGFβ1 can upregulate αvβ6 integrin expression but the molecular mechanisms driving this effect have not previously been elucidated. We confirm that stimulation with exogenous TGFβ1 increases expression of the integrin β6 subunit gene (ITGB6) and αvβ6 integrin cell surface expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 expression occurs via transcriptional activation of the ITGB6 gene, but does not result from effects on ITGB6 mRNA stability. Basal expression of ITGB6 in, and αvβ6 integrins on, lung epithelial cells occurs via homeostatic αvβ6-mediated TGFβ1 activation in the absence of exogenous stimulation, and can be amplified by TGFβ1 activation. Fundamentally, we show for the first time that TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 expression occurs via canonical Smad signalling since dominant negative constructs directed against Smad3 and 4 inhibit ITGB6 transcriptional activity. Furthermore, disruption of a Smad binding site at -798 in the ITGB6 promoter abolishes TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 transcriptional activity. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrate that TGFβ1 stimulation of lung epithelial cells results in direct binding of Smad3, and Smad4, to the ITGB6 gene promoter within this region. Finally, using an adenoviral TGFβ1 over-expression model of pulmonary fibrosis we demonstrate that Smad3 is crucial for TGFβ1-induced αvβ6 integrin expression within the alveolar epithelium in vivo. Together, these data confirm that a homeostatic, autocrine loop of αvβ6 integrin activated TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 gene expression regulates epithelial basal αvβ6 integrin expression, and demonstrates that this occurs via Smad

  14. Characterization of a novel oncogenic K-ras mutation in colon cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Akagi, Kiwamu . E-mail: akagi@cancer-c.pref.saitama.jp; Uchibori, Ryosuke; Yamaguchi, Kensei; Kurosawa, Keiko; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Kozu, Tomoko

    2007-01-19

    Activating mutations of RAS are frequently observed in subsets of human cancers, indicating that RAS activation is involved in tumorigenesis. Here, we identified and characterized a novel G to T transversion mutation of the K-ras gene at the third position of codon 19 (TTG) which substituted phenylalanine for leucine in 3 primary colon carcinomas. Biological and biochemical activity was examined using transformed NIH3T3 cells expressing mutant or wild-type K-ras. Transformants harboring the K-ras mutation at codon 19 showed proliferative capacity under serum-starved conditions, less contact inhibition, anchorage-independent growth, tumorigenicity in nude mice and elevation of active Ras-GTP levels. These results indicated that this novel mutation possesses high oncogenic activity.

  15. Elderly male smokers with right lung tumors are viable candidates for KRAS mutation screening.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Shi, Chun; Sun, Hui; Yin, Wei; Zhou, Xiao; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Gening

    2016-01-01

    Genetic aberrations in tumor driver genes provide specific molecular targets for therapeutic intervention, which can greatly improve therapeutic outcomes. Here, we analyzed the mutational frequency of EGFR and KRAS gene, as well as EML4-ALK rearrangement, and summarized the clinicopathological characters of Chinese lung cancer patients. We detected the mutation spectrum of 1033 primary lung cancer patients. The analyzed clinicopathological parameters included gender, age at diagnosis, smoking status, pathological TNM stage, tumor morphology and location, visceral pleural invasion, and histological type. A total of 618 patients had mutations in EGFR or KRAS gene as well as rearrangement of EML4-ALK. Exon 19 deletions and L858R in the EGFR gene were the most frequent mutations. Left-side lung cancer was more common in female patients carrying the KRAS mutation. Rearrangement of EML4-ALK was more common in non-tobacco-using male patients, who also exhibited a higher likelihood of visceral pleura invasion. Elderly females who never smoked and possessed 1-20 mm stage I adenocarcinomas in the right side exhibited a higher frequency of EGFR mutations. Elderly male smokers with right lung tumors were viable candidates for KRAS mutation screening. PMID:26739511

  16. Effectors and potential targets selectively upregulated in human KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinyu; Sordella, Raffaella; Powers, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Genetic and proteomic analysis of human tumor samples can provide an important compliment to information obtained from model systems. Here we examined protein and gene expression from the Cancer Genome and Proteome Atlases (TCGA and TCPA) to characterize proteins and protein-coding genes that are selectively upregulated in KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinomas. Phosphoprotein activation of several MAPK signaling components was considerably stronger in KRAS-mutants than any other group of tumors, even those with activating mutations in receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and BRAF. Co-occurring mutations in KRAS-mutants were associated with differential activation of PDK1 and PKC-alpha. Genes showing strong activation in RNA-seq data included negative regulators of RTK/RAF/MAPK signaling along with potential oncogenic effectors including activators of Rac and Rho proteins and the receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase genes PTPRM and PTPRE. These results corroborate RAF/MAPK signaling as an important therapeutic target in KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinomas and pinpoint new potential targets. PMID:27301828

  17. KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA Status in Squamous Cell Anal Carcinoma (SCAC)

    PubMed Central

    Giannini, Massimo; Freier, Eva; Tamberi, Stefano; Scarpi, Emanuela; Passardi, Alassandro; Zoli, Wainer; Ragazzini, Angela; Amadori, Dino; Frassineti, Giovanni Luca

    2014-01-01

    Anti-EGFR therapy appears to be a potential treatment option for squamous cell anal carcinoma (SCAC). KRAS mutation is a rare event in SCAC, indicating the absence of the principal mechanism of resistance to this type of therapy. However, no information is available from the literature regarding the status of BRAF or PIK3CA in this cancer type. We analysed KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA status in SCAC patients in relation to the clinical-pathological characteristics of patients and to the presence of the human papilloma virus (HPV). One hundred and three patients were treated with the Nigro scheme for anal cancer from March 2001 to August 2012. Fifty patients were considered for the study as there was insufficient paraffin-embedded tumour tissue to perform molecular analysis the remaining 53. DNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded sections. KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA gene status and HPV genotype were evaluated by pyrosequencing. KRAS and BRAF genes were wild-type in all cases. Conversely, PIK3CA gene was found to be mutated in 11 (22%) cases. In particular, 8 mutations occurred in exon 9 and 3 in exon 20 of the PIK3CA gene. These findings suggest that SCAC could potentially respond to an anti-EGFR drug. PIK3CA mutation may be involved in the process of carcinogenesis in some cases of SCAC. PMID:24642661

  18. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Ovarian Brenner Tumors and Associated Mucinous Epithelial Neoplasms: High Variant Concordance and Identification of Mutually Exclusive RAS Driver Mutations and MYC Amplification.

    PubMed

    Tafe, Laura J; Muller, Kristen E; Ananda, Guruprasad; Mitchell, Talia; Spotlow, Vanessa; Patterson, Sara E; Tsongalis, Gregory J; Mockus, Susan M

    2016-03-01

    Benign ovarian Brenner tumors often are associated with mucinous cystic neoplasms, which are hypothesized to share a histogenic origin and progression, however, supporting molecular characterization is limited. Our goal was to identify molecular mechanisms linking these tumors. DNA from six Brenner tumors with paired mucinous tumors, two Brenner tumors not associated with a mucinous neoplasm, and two atypical proliferative (borderline) Brenner tumors was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples and sequenced using a 358-gene next-generation sequencing assay. Variant calls were compared within tumor groups to assess somatic mutation profiles. There was high concordance of the variants between paired samples (40% to 75%; P < 0.0001). Four of the six tumor pairs showed KRAS hotspot driver mutations specifically in the mucinous tumor. In the two paired samples that lacked KRAS mutations, MYC amplification was detected in both of the mucinous and the Brenner components; MYC amplification also was detected in a third Brenner tumor. Five of the Brenner tumors had no reportable potential driver alterations. The two atypical proliferative (borderline) Brenner tumors both had RAS mutations. The high degree of coordinate variants between paired Brenner and mucinous tumors supports a shared origin or progression. Differences observed in affected genes and pathways, particularly involving RAS and MYC, may point to molecular drivers of a divergent phenotype and progression of these tumors. PMID:26797085

  19. Direct PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from single microbial cells isolated from an Antarctic iceberg using laser microdissection microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagihara, Katsuhiko; Niki, Hironori; Baba, Tomoya

    2011-09-01

    Here, we describe a technique that allows the genetic linage analysis of 16S rRNA genes in bacteria observed under a microscope. The technique includes the isolation of microbial cells using a laser microdissection microscope, lysis of the cells, and amplification of the 16S rRNA genes in the isolated cells without interference by bacterial DNA contamination from the experimental environment or reagents. Using this technique, we successfully determined 15 16S rRNA gene sequences in cells isolated from an Antarctic iceberg. These sequences showed 94%-100% identity to their closest strains, which included bacteria that occur in aqueous, marine, and soil environments.

  20. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Plesiomonas shigelloides by Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification of the hugA Gene

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Shuang; Xu, Jianguo; Xiong, Yanwen; Ye, Changyun

    2012-01-01

    Plesiomonas shigelloides is one of the causative agents of human gastroenteritis, with increasing number of reports describing such infections in recent years. In this study, the hugA gene was chosen as the target to design loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assays for the rapid, specific, and sensitive detection of P. shigelloides. The performance of the assay with reference plasmids and spiked human stools as samples was evaluated and compared with those of quantitative PCR (qPCR). No false-positive results were observed for the 32 non-P. shigelloides strains used to evaluate assay specificity. The limit of detection for P. shigelloides was approximately 20 copies per reaction in reference plasmids and 5×103 CFU per gram in spiked human stool, which were more sensitive than the results of qPCR. When applied in human stool samples spiked with 2 low levels of P. shigelloides, the LAMP assays achieved accurate detection after 6-h enrichment. In conclusion, the LAMP assay developed in this study is a valuable method for rapid, cost-effective, and simple detection of P. shigelloides in basic clinical and field laboratories in the rural areas of China. PMID:23077478

  1. Sequence Variation in Amplification Target Genes and Standards Influences Interlaboratory Comparison of BK Virus DNA Load Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Morgane; Meddeb, Mariam; Sueur, Charlotte; Domingo-Calap, Pilar; Soulier, Eric; Chabaud, Angeline; Perrin, Peggy; Moulin, Bruno; Bahram, Seiamak; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Caillard, Sophie; Barth, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    International guidelines define a BK virus (BKV) load of ≥4 log10 copies/ml as presumptive of BKV-associated nephropathy (BKVN) and a cutoff for therapeutic intervention. To investigate whether BKV DNA loads (BKVL) are comparable between laboratories, 2 panels of 15 and 8 clinical specimens (urine, whole blood, and plasma) harboring different BKV genotypes were distributed to 20 and 27 French hospital centers in 2013 and 2014, respectively. Although 68% of the reported results fell within the acceptable range of the expected result ±0.5 log10, the interlaboratory variation ranged from 1.32 to 5.55 log10. Polymorphisms specific to BKV genotypes II and IV, namely, the number and position of mutations in amplification target genes and/or deletion in standards, arose as major sources of interlaboratory disagreements. The diversity of DNA purification methods also contributed to the interlaboratory variability, in particular for urine samples. Our data strongly suggest that (i) commercial external quality controls for BKVL assessment should include all major BKV genotypes to allow a correct evaluation of BKV assays, and (ii) the BKV sequence of commercial standards should be provided to users to verify the absence of mismatches with the primers and probes of their BKV assays. Finally, the optimization of primer and probe design and standardization of DNA extraction methods may substantially decrease interlaboratory variability and allow interinstitutional studies to define a universal cutoff for presumptive BKVN and, ultimately, ensure adequate patient care. PMID:26468499

  2. Oncogenic KRAS sensitizes premalignant, but not malignant cells, to Noxa-dependent apoptosis through the activation of the MEK/ERK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Annalisa; Majorini, Maria Teresa; Elliott, Richard; Ashworth, Alan; Lord, Christopher J.; Cancelliere, Carlotta; Bardelli, Alberto; Seneci, Pierfausto; Walczak, Henning; Delia, Domenico; Lecis, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    KRAS is mutated in about 20-25% of all human cancers and especially in pancreatic, lung and colorectal tumors. Oncogenic KRAS stimulates several pro-survival pathways, but it also triggers the trans-activation of pro-apoptotic genes. In our work, we show that G13D mutations of KRAS activate the MAPK pathway, and ERK2, but not ERK1, up-regulates Noxa basal levels. Accordingly, premalignant epithelial cells are sensitized to various cytotoxic compounds in a Noxa-dependent manner. In contrast to these findings, colorectal cancer cell sensitivity to treatment is independent of KRAS status and Noxa levels are not up-regulated in the presence of mutated KRAS despite the fact that ERK2 still promotes Noxa expression. We therefore speculated that other survival pathways are counteracting the pro-apoptotic effect of mutated KRAS and found that the inhibition of AKT restores sensitivity to treatment, especially in presence of oncogenic KRAS. In conclusion, our work suggests that the pharmacological inhibition of the pathways triggered by mutated KRAS could also switch off its oncogene-activated pro-apoptotic stimulation. On the contrary, the combination of chemotherapy to inhibitors of specific pro-survival pathways, such as the one controlled by AKT, could enhance treatment efficacy by exploiting the pro-death stimulation derived by oncogene activation. PMID:26028667

  3. Modulation of EZH2 Expression by MEK-ERK or PI3K-AKT Signaling in Lung Cancer Is Dictated by Different KRAS Oncogene Mutations.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Erick; Behrens, Carmen; Lin, Heather Y; Simon, George; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki; Izzo, Julie; Moran, Cesar; Kalhor, Neda; Lee, J Jack; Minna, John D; Wistuba, Ignacio I

    2016-02-01

    EZH2 overexpression promotes cancer by increasing histone methylation to silence tumor suppressor genes, but how EZH2 levels become elevated in cancer is not understood. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which EZH2 expression is regulated in non-small cell lung carcinoma cells by oncogenic KRAS. In cells harboring KRAS(G12C) and KRAS(G12D) mutations, EZH2 expression was modulated by MEK-ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling, respectively. Accordingly, MEK-ERK depletion decreased EZH2 expression in cells harboring the KRAS(G12C) mutation, whereas PI3K/AKT depletion decreased EZH2 expression, EZH2 phosphorylation, and STAT3 activity in KRAS(G12D)-mutant cell lines. Combined inhibition of EZH2 and MEK-ERK or PI3K/AKT increased the sensitivity of cells with specific KRAS mutations to MEK-ERK and PI3K/AKT-targeted therapies. Our work defines EZH2 as a downstream effector of KRAS signaling and offers a rationale for combining EZH2 inhibitory strategies with MEK-ERK- or PI3K/AKT-targeted therapies to treat lung cancer patients, as stratified into distinct treatment groups based on specific KRAS mutations. PMID:26676756

  4. A protein tagging system for signal amplification in gene expression and fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tanenbaum, Marvin E.; Gilbert, Luke A.; Qi, Lei S.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Vale, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Signals in many biological processes can be amplified by recruiting multiple copies of regulatory proteins to a site of action. Harnessing this principle, we have developed a novel protein scaffold, a repeating peptide array termed SunTag, which can recruit multiple copies of an antibody-fusion protein. We show that the SunTag can recruit up to 24 copies of GFP, thereby enabling long-term imaging of single protein molecules in living cells. We also use the SunTag to create a potent synthetic transcription factor by recruiting multiple copies of a transcriptional activation domain to a nuclease-deficient CRISPR/Cas9 protein and demonstrate strong activation of endogenous gene expression and re-engineered cell behavior with this system. Thus, the SunTag provides a versatile platform for multimerizing proteins on a target protein scaffold and is likely to have many applications in imaging and in controlling biological outputs. PMID:25307933

  5. Peripheral amplification of sweating – a role for calcitonin gene-related peptide

    PubMed Central

    Schlereth, Tanja; Dittmar, Jan Oliver; Seewald, Bianca; Birklein, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Neuropeptides are the mediators of neurogenic inflammation. Some pain disorders, e.g. complex regional pain syndromes, are characterized by increased neurogenic inflammation and by exaggerated sudomotor function. The aim of this study was to explore whether neuropeptides have a peripheral effect on human sweating. We investigated the effects of different concentrations of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and substance P (SP) on acetylcholine-induced axon reflex sweating in healthy subjects (total n = 18). All substances were applied via dermal microdialysis. The experiments were done in a parallel setting: ACh alone and ACh combined with CGRP, VIP or SP in various concentrations were applied. Acetylcholine (10−2m) always elicited a sweating response, neuropeptides alone did not. However, CGRP significantly enhanced ACh-induced sweating (P < 0.01). Post hoc tests revealed that CGRP in physiological concentrations of 10−7–10−9m was most effective. VIP at any concentration had no significant effect on axon reflex sweating. The duration of the sweating response (P < 0.01), but not the amount of sweat, was reduced by SP. ACh-induced skin blood flow was significantly increased by CGRP (P < 0.01), but unaltered by VIP and SP. The results indicate that CGRP amplifies axon reflex sweating in human skin. PMID:16931551

  6. Involvement of facultative apomixis in inheritance of EPSPS gene amplification in glyphosate-resistant Amaranthus palmeri.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Daniela N; Pan, Zhiqiang; Duke, Stephen O; Nandula, Vijay K; Baldwin, Brian S; Shaw, David R; Dayan, Franck E

    2014-01-01

    The inheritance of glyphosate resistance in two Amaranthus palmeri populations (R1 and R2) was examined in reciprocal crosses (RC) and second reciprocal crosses (2RC) between glyphosate-resistant (R) and -susceptible (S) parents of this dioecious species. R populations and Female-R × Male-S crosses contain higher 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene copy numbers than the S population. EPSPS expression, EPSPS enzyme activity, EPSPS protein quantity, and level of resistance to glyphosate correlated positively with genomic EPSPS relative copy number. Transfer of resistance was more influenced by the female than the male parent in spite of the fact that the multiple copies of EPSPS are amplified in the nuclear genome. This led us to hypothesize that this perplexing pattern of inheritance may result from apomictic seed production in A. palmeri. We confirmed that reproductively isolated R and S female plants produced seeds, indicating that A. palmeri can produce seeds both sexually and apomictically (facultative apomixis). This apomictic trait accounts for the low copy number inheritance in the Female-S × Male-R offsprings. Apomixis may also enhance the stability of the glyphosate resistance trait in the R populations in the absence of reproductive partners. PMID:24142112

  7. Development of siRNA payloads to target KRAS-mutant cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Cayde D.; Thapar, Vishal; Lee, Liam C.; Hsu, Dennis J.; Grace, Danielle; Carver, Joseph O.; Zuber, Johannes; Luo, Ji; McCormick, Frank; Lowe, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool for target identification and can lead to novel therapies for pharmacologically intractable targets such as KRAS. RNAi therapy must combine potent siRNA payloads with reliable in vivo delivery for efficient target inhibition. We employed a functional “Sensor” assay to establish a library of potent siRNAs against RAS pathway genes and show they efficiently suppress their targets at low dose. This reduces off-target effects and enables combination gene knockdown. We administered Sensor siRNAs in vitro and in vivo and validated the delivery of KRAS siRNA alone and siRNA targeting the complete RAF effector node (A/B/C-RAF) as promising strategies to treat KRAS-mutant colorectal cancer. We further demonstrate that improved therapeutic efficacy is achieved by formulating siRNA payloads that combine both single-gene siRNA and node-targeted siRNAs (KRAS+PIK3C-A/B). The customizable nature of Sensor siRNA payloads offers a universal platform for combination target identification and development of RNAi therapeutics. PMID:25100204

  8. Glycoproteomic Approach Identifies KRAS as a Positive Regulator of CREG1 in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Clark, David J.; Mei, Yuping; Sun, Shisheng; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Austin J.; Mao, Li

    2016-01-01

    Protein glycosylation plays a fundamental role in a multitude of biological processes, and the associated aberrant expression of glycoproteins in cancer has made them attractive biomarkers and therapeutic targets. In this study, we examined differentially expressed glycoproteins in cell lines derived from three different states of lung tumorigenesis: an immortalized bronchial epithelial cell (HBE) line, a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line harboring a Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) activation mutation and a NSCLC cell line harboring an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation deletion. Using a Triple SILAC proteomic quantification strategy paired with hydrazide chemistry N-linked glycopeptide enrichment, we quantified 118 glycopeptides in the three cell lines derived from 82 glycoproteins. Proteomic profiling revealed 27 glycopeptides overexpressed in both NSCLC cell lines, 6 glycopeptides overexpressed only in the EGFR mutant cells and 19 glycopeptides overexpressed only in the KRAS mutant cells. Further investigation of a panel of NSCLC cell lines found that Cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes (CREG1) overexpression was closely correlated with KRAS mutation status in NSCLC cells and could be down-regulated by inhibition of KRAS expression. Our results indicate that CREG1 is a down-stream effector of KRAS in a sub-type of NSCLC cells and a novel candidate biomarker or therapeutic target for KRAS mutant NSCLC. PMID:26722374

  9. Rapid, Simple and Sensitive Detection of Q Fever by Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification of the htpAB Gene

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Lei; Zhang, Lijuan

    2013-01-01

    Background Q fever is the most widespread zoonosis, and domestic animals are the most common sources of transmission. It is not only difficult to distinguish from other febrile diseases because of the lack of specific clinical manifestations in humans, but it is also difficult to identify the disease in C. burnetii-carrying animals because of the lack of identifiable features. Conventional serodiagnosis requires sera from the acute and convalescent stages of infection, which are unavailable at early diagnosis. Nested PCR and real-time PCR require equipment. In this study, we developed a Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) assay to identify C. burnetii rapidly and sensitively. Methods A universal LAMP primer set was designed to detect the repeated sequence IS1111a of the htpAB gene of C. burnetii using PrimerExplorer V4 software. The sensitivity of the LAMP assay was evaluated using known quantities of recombined reference plasmids containing the targeted genes. The specificity of the developed LAMP assay was determined using 26 members of order Rickettsiae and 18 other common pathogens. The utility of the LAMP assay was further compared with real time PCR by the examination 24 blood samples including 6 confirmed and 18 probable Q fever cases, which diagnosed by IFA serological assessment and real time PCR. In addition, 126 animal samples from 4 provinces including 97 goats, 7 cattle, 18 horses, 3 marmots and 1 deer were compared by these two methods. Results The limits of detection of the LAMP assay for the htpAB gene were 1 copy per reaction. The specificity of the LAMP assay was 100%, and no cross-reaction was observed among the bacteria used in the study. The positive rate of unknown febrile patients was 33.3%(95%CI 30.2%–36.4%) for the LAMP assay and 8.3%(95%CI 7.4%–9.2%) for the real time PCR(P<0.05). Similarly, the total positive rate of animals was 7.9%(95%CI 7.1%–8.7%) for the LAMP assay and 0.8%(95%CI 0.7%–0.9%)for the real time PCR(P<0

  10. Implication of K-ras and p53 in colorectal cancer carcinogenesis in Tunisian population cohort.

    PubMed

    Ines, Chaar; Donia, Ounissi; Rahma, Boughriba; Ben Ammar, Azza; Sameh, Amara; Khalfallah, Taher; Abdelmajid, Ben Hmida; Sabeh, Mzabi; Saadia, Bouraoui

    2014-07-01

    According to the multistep route of genetic alterations in the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence, the complex K-ras/p53 mutation is one of the first alterations to occur and represent an important genetic event in colorectal cancer (CRC). An evaluation of the mutation spectra in K-ras and p53 gene was effected in 167 Tunisian patients with sporadic CRC to determine whether our populations have similar pattern of genetic alteration as in Maghrebin's population. Mutation patterns of codon 12-13 of K-ras and exon 5-8 of p53 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and PCR-SSCP and confirmed by sequencing. Mutations in the K-ras gene were detected in 31.13 % and affect the women more than the men (p = 0.008). Immunostaining showed that expression of p21 ras was correlated with the advanced age (p = 0.004), whereas loss of signal was associated with mucinous histotype (p = 0.003). Kaplan-Meier survival curve found that patients with the K-ras mutation had a shorter survival compared with patients without mutation (p = 0.005). Alteration in p53 was seen in 17.4 % of patients and affects three hot spot codons such as 175, 245, and 248. Overexpression of p53 was seen in 34.1 % and correlated with tumor node metastasis (TNM) advanced stage (p = 0.037) and mucinous histotype (p = 0.001). A high concordance between p53 expression and alteration (p<0.005) was shown. Concomitant mutations in K-ras and p53 gene were detected in only 4 % of tumors. K-ras and p53 undergo separate pathways in colorectal tumorogenesis. Interestingly, mutations in the K-ras gene might be considered a valuable prognostic factor correlated to poor outcome. p53 gene alterations were rather low in our set, and methylation pattern of p53 is required to elucidate the molecular basis of this protein in CRC. PMID:24763823

  11. Effects of the T4 bacteriophage gene 32 product on the efficiency and fidelity of DNA amplification using T4 DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, D K; Keohavong, P

    1994-06-24

    Two bacteriophage DNA polymerases (Pol), T4 Pol and modified T7 Pol, were used to catalyze DNA amplification in vitro by PCR, and their efficiency and fidelity in DNA amplification were examined in the presence and absence of the T4 bacteriophage gene 32-encoded protein (SSB32). The SSB32 protein significantly improved the efficiency of amplification by T4 Pol. Examination of the amplified DNA by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed that the protein also reduced the rates of error produced by T4 Pol during PCR, from 6.3 x 10(-6) to 2.0 x 10(-6) errors per base duplication after 10(11)-fold amplification. This protein also improved, but to a lesser extent, the fidelity of modified T7 Pol, from 1.80 x 10(-5) to 1.15 x 10(-5) errors per base duplication. High fidelity polymerase chain reaction (hifi-PCR) is needed for studies requiring isolation of mutant sequences present as only a small fraction of the wild type in the amplified DNA. Although several thermostable Pol are currently available for use in automated PCR, their fidelity was found to be significantly lower than that of the thermosensitive T4 Pol. Therefore, T4 Pol is useful for studies requiring hifi-PCR, although this enzyme needs to be added in the reaction mixture during every cycle of PCR. PMID:8026758

  12. Mutant Kras copy number defines metabolic reprogramming and therapeutic susceptibilities.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Emma M; Gaude, Edoardo; Turrell, Frances K; Frezza, Christian; Martins, Carla P

    2016-03-01

    The RAS/MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) signalling pathway is frequently deregulated in non-small-cell lung cancer, often through KRAS activating mutations. A single endogenous mutant Kras allele is sufficient to promote lung tumour formation in mice but malignant progression requires additional genetic alterations. We recently showed that advanced lung tumours from Kras(G12D/+);p53-null mice frequently exhibit Kras(G12D) allelic enrichment (Kras(G12D)/Kras(wild-type) > 1) (ref. 7), implying that mutant Kras copy gains are positively selected during progression. Here we show, through a comprehensive analysis of mutant Kras homozygous and heterozygous mouse embryonic fibroblasts and lung cancer cells, that these genotypes are phenotypically distinct. In particular, Kras(G12D/G12D) cells exhibit a glycolytic switch coupled to increased channelling of glucose-derived metabolites into the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glutathione biosynthesis, resulting in enhanced glutathione-mediated detoxification. This metabolic rewiring is recapitulated in mutant KRAS homozygous non-small-cell lung cancer cells and in vivo, in spontaneous advanced murine lung tumours (which display a high frequency of Kras(G12D) copy gain), but not in the corresponding early tumours (Kras(G12D) heterozygous). Finally, we demonstrate that mutant Kras copy gain creates unique metabolic dependences that can be exploited to selectively target these aggressive mutant Kras tumours. Our data demonstrate that mutant Kras lung tumours are not a single disease but rather a heterogeneous group comprising two classes of tumours with distinct metabolic profiles, prognosis and therapeutic susceptibility, which can be discriminated on the basis of their relative mutant allelic content. We also provide the first, to our knowledge, in vivo evidence of metabolic rewiring during lung cancer malignant progression. PMID:26909577

  13. KRAS mutational subtype and copy number predict in vitro response of human pancreatic cancer cell lines to MEK inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Hamidi, H; Lu, M; Chau, K; Anderson, L; Fejzo, M; Ginther, C; Linnartz, R; Zubel, A; Slamon, D J; Finn, R S

    2014-01-01

    Background: To study the molecular mechanism regulating sensitivity to MEK inhibition in pancreatic cancer cell lines. Methods: A growth inhibition assay determined sensitivity to MEK162 in a panel of 29 pancreatic cancer cell lines. For the same panel, KRAS mutational status and copy-number variation (CNV) was determine using PCR, array CGH and FISH. Two sensitive and two resistant cell lines were further interrogated for difference in baseline and MEK162-induced gene expression, as well as signal transduction using microarray and western blotting. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis was measured by flow cytometry. Results: We report a strong correlation between both specific KRAS mutational subtype and CNV, and sensitivity to MEK inhibition. Cell lines with a KRAS (V12) mutation and KRAS gains or loss (n=7) are ∼10 times more resistant than those having neither a KRAS (V12) mutation nor KRAS CNV (n=14). Significant differences in baseline and MEK162-induced gene expression exist between the sensitive and resistant lines, especially in genes involved in RAS, EGF receptor and PI3K pathways. This was further supported by difference in signal transduction. MEK 162 blocked ERK1/2, as well as inhibited PI3K and S6 and increased p27KIP1 levels in the sensitive lines. Conclusions: Given the potency of MEK162, it may be a promising new therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer and KRAS mutational subtypes, and CNV may serve as important biomarkers for selecting patients that benefit from MEK-targeting based on these preclinical data. PMID:25167228

  14. The role of antiangiogenic agents in the treatment of patients with advanced colorectal cancer according to K-RAS status.

    PubMed

    García-Alfonso, Pilar; Grande, Enrique; Polo, Eduardo; Afonso, Ruth; Reina, Juan José; Jorge, Mónica; Campos, Juan Manuel; Martínez, Virginia; Angeles, Cristina; Montagut, Clara

    2014-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide. Recently, it has been found that about 40 % of patients with CRC have mutations in the K-RAS gene. Several clinical trials have showed that patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) who present tumour-promoting mutations in signalling pathways involving the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which includes activating K-RAS mutations, do not respond to anti-EGFR drugs such as panitumumab and cetuximab. Hence, K-RAS status is now considered an important negative predictive factor for response to anti-EGFR drugs. Moreover, K-RAS status seems to have also a prognostic role in CRC, but this fact is somewhat controversial. Activity of antiangiogenic agents seems not to be influenced by K-RAS gene status. Tumour angiogenesis has attracted interest in attempts to improve the management of mCRC. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway is fundamental to the regulation of angiogenesis, and research has focused on developing agents that selectively target it. In this way, the anti-VEGF antibody bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy has provided important clinical benefits in terms of response rate, progression-free survival and overall survival to patients with mCRC. Efficacy data of bevacizumab in K-RAS wild-type patients seem to be comparable with the efficacy data observed with anti-EGFR therapies in a cross-trial comparison. Although there is a lack of prospective and randomized data in this setting, the combination of chemotherapy plus antiangiogenic agents could be considered as an effective alternative for the treatment of mCRC with independence of K-RAS gene status. Here, we review the available data we have in the literature of the use of antiangiogenic strategies in the treatment of mCRC nowadays. PMID:24793846

  15. Development of rolling circle amplification based surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy method for 35S promoter gene detection.

    PubMed

    Guven, Burcu; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki; Tamer, Ugur; Acar-Soykut, Esra; Dogan, Uzeyir

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we developed the genetically modified organism detection method by using the combination of rolling circle amplification (RCA) and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). An oligonucleotide probe which is specific for 35S DNA promoter target was immobilised onto the gold slide and a RCA reaction was performed. A self-assembled monolayer was formed on gold nanorods using 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) and the second probe of the 35S DNA promoter target was immobilised on the activated gold coated slide surfaces. Probes on the nanoparticles were hybridised with the target oligonucleotide. Quantification of the target concentration was performed via SERS spectra of DTNB on the nanorods. SERS spectra of target molecules were enhanced through the RCA reaction and the detection limit was found to be 6.3fM. The sensitivity of the developed RCA-SERS method was compared with another method which had been performed without using RCA reaction, and the detection limit was found to be 0.1pM. The correlation between the target concentration and the SERS signal was found to be linear, within the range of 1pM to 10nM for the traditional assay and 100fM to 100nM for the RCA assay. For the developed RCA-SERS assay, the specificity tests were performed using the 35S promoter of Bt-176 maize gene. It was found out that the developed RCA-SERS sandwich assay method is quite sensitive, selective and specific for target sequences in model and real systems. PMID:25702987

  16. CD274/PD-L1 gene amplification and PD-L1 protein expression are common events in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Melanie; Drecoll, Enken; Pfarr, Nicole; Weichert, Wilko; Langer, Rupert; Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Götz, Carolin; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Kolk, Andreas; Specht, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Immunomodulatory therapies, targeting the immune checkpoint receptor-ligand complex PD-1/PD-L1 have shown promising results in early phase clinical trials in solid malignancies, including carcinomas of the head and neck. In this context, PD-L1 protein expression has been proposed as a potentially valuable predictive marker. In the present study, expression of PD-L1 and PD-1 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 80 patients with predominantly HPV-negative oral squamous cell carcinomas and associated nodal metastasis. In addition, CD274/PD-L1 gene copy number status was assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. PD-L1 expression was detected in 36/80 (45%) cases and concordance of PD-L1 expression in primary tumor and corresponding nodal metastasis was present in only 20/28 (72%) cases. PD-1 expression was found in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) but not in tumor cells. CD274/PD-L1 gene amplification was detected in 19% of cases, with high level PD-L1 amplification present in 12/80 (15%), and low level amplification in 3/80 (4%). Interestingly, CD274/PD-L1 gene amplification was associated with positive PD-L1 immunostaining in only 73% of cases. PD-L1 copy number status was concordant in primary tumor and associated metastases. Clinically, PD-L1 tumor immunopositivity was associated with a higher risk for nodal metastasis at diagnosis, overall tumor related death und recurrence. Based on our findings we propose to include PD-L1 copy number status in addition to protein status in screening programs for future clinical trials with immunotherapeutic strategies targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 axis. PMID:26918453

  17. CD274/PD-L1 gene amplification and PD-L1 protein expression are common events in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Straub, Melanie; Drecoll, Enken; Pfarr, Nicole; Weichert, Wilko; Langer, Rupert; Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Götz, Carolin; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Kolk, Andreas; Specht, Katja

    2016-03-15

    Immunomodulatory therapies, targeting the immune checkpoint receptor-ligand complex PD-1/PD-L1 have shown promising results in early phase clinical trials in solid malignancies, including carcinomas of the head and neck. In this context, PD-L1 protein expression has been proposed as a potentially valuable predictive marker. In the present study, expression of PD-L1 and PD-1 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 80 patients with predominantly HPV-negative oral squamous cell carcinomas and associated nodal metastasis. In addition, CD274/PD-L1 gene copy number status was assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. PD-L1 expression was detected in 36/80 (45%) cases and concordance of PD-L1 expression in primary tumor and corresponding nodal metastasis was present in only 20/28 (72%) cases. PD-1 expression was found in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) but not in tumor cells. CD274/PD-L1 gene amplification was detected in 19% of cases, with high level PD-L1 amplification present in 12/80 (15%), and low level amplification in 3/80 (4%). Interestingly, CD274/PD-L1 gene amplification was associated with positive PD-L1 immunostaining in only 73% of cases. PD-L1 copy number status was concordant in primary tumor and associated metastases. Clinically, PD-L1 tumor immunopositivity was associated with a higher risk for nodal metastasis at diagnosis, overall tumor related death und recurrence. Based on our findings we propose to include PD-L1 copy number status in addition to protein status in screening programs for future clinical trials with immunotherapeutic strategies targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 axis. PMID:26918453

  18. Amplification and protein over-expression of the neu/HER-2/c-erbB-2 protooncogene in human breast carcinomas: relationship to loss of gene sequences on chromosome 17, family history and prognosis.

    PubMed Central

    Børresen, A. L.; Ottestad, L.; Gaustad, A.; Andersen, T. I.; Heikkilä, R.; Jahnsen, T.; Tveit, K. M.; Nesland, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    c-erbB-2 gene amplification and protein over-expression were investigated in 89 primary tumours and 24 metastases from Norwegian breast cancer patients. Amplification occurred in 22.5% of the primary tumours and 50% of the metastases. The amplification was negatively correlated to the oestrogen receptor (ER) content in both the primary tumours and the metastases. No significant differences between amplified and non-amplified tumours were observed with regard to node status, clinical stage, tumour size or menopausal status, although correlations of borderline significance were found between node status, clinical stage and high degree of gene amplification. All the amplified tumours were of the invasive ductal type. Follow-up data of patients observed for more than 1 year showed a significantly higher recurrence rate in the c-erbB-2 amplified group. Allele loss of chromosome 17p and of 7q was seen in 55% and 48% of the tumours respectively. No significant correlation was found between these losses and clinico-histological parameters. More than 50% of the tumours with a loss of 17q sequences had an amplification of c-erbB-2 which is located on 17q12-21, indicating that only one of the chromosomes may be involved in the amplification of the c-erbB-2. A trend towards a correlation between loss of 17q and high degree of amplification were found. No correlation was found between positive family history of breast cancer and c-erbB-2 gene amplification, nor loss of 17p or 17q sequences. Our data support the hypothesis that amplification correlates with aggressive tumour behaviour, and thus may be used as a prognostic factor in breast carcinomas. The allele losses on 17p and 17q points to tumour suppressor gene or genes on this chromosome, although not as predisposing genes in families. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1977466

  19. The well-accepted notion that gene amplification contributes to increased expression still remains, after all these years, a reasonable but unproven assumption

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yuping; Chen, Lichan; Jia, Qingwen; Dou, Xixi; Xu, Ningzhi; Liao, Dezhong Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Gene amplification causes overexpression” is a longstanding and well-accepted concept in cancer genetics. However, raking the whole literature, we find only statistical analyses showing a positive correlation between gene copy number and expression level, but do not find convincing experimental corroboration for this notion, for most of the amplified oncogenes in cancers. Since an association does not need to be an actual causal relation, in our opinion, this widespread notion still remains a reasonable but unproven assumption awaiting experimental verification. PMID:27298590

  20. Copy number variants and rasopathies: germline KRAS duplication in a patient with syndrome including pigmentation abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Briand-Suleau, Audrey; Laurendeau, Ingrid; Bilan, Frédéric; Cavé, Hélène; Verloes, Alain; Vidaud, Michel; Vidaud, Dominique; Pasmant, Eric

    2016-01-01

    RAS/MAPK pathway germline mutations were described in Rasopathies, a class of rare genetic syndromes combining facial abnormalities, heart defects, short stature, skin and genital abnormalities, and mental retardation. The majority of the mutations identified in the Rasopathies are point mutations which increase RAS/MAPK pathway signaling. Duplications encompassing RAS/MAPK pathway genes (PTPN11, RAF1, MEK2, or SHOC2) were more rarely described. Here we report, a syndromic familial case of a 12p duplication encompassing the dosage sensitive gene KRAS, whose phenotype overlapped with rasopathies. The patient was referred because of a history of mild learning disabilities, small size, facial dysmorphy, and pigmentation abnormalities (café-au-lait and achromic spots, and axillar lentigines). This phenotype was reminiscent of rasopathies. No mutation was identified in the most common genes associated with Noonan, cardio-facio-cutaneous, Legius, and Costello syndromes, as well as neurofibromatosis type 1. The patient constitutional DNA exhibited a ~10.5 Mb duplication at 12p, including the KRAS gene. The index case's mother carried the same chromosome abnormality and also showed development delay with short stature, and numerous café-au-lait spots. Duplication of the KRAS gene may participate in the propositus phenotype, in particular of the specific pigmentation abnormalities. Array-CGH or some other assessment of gene/exon CNVs of RAS/MAPK pathway genes should be considered in the evaluation of individuals with rasopathies. PMID:27450488

  1. Determination of synthetic lethal interactions in KRAS oncogene-dependent cancer cells reveals novel therapeutic targeting strategies

    PubMed Central

    Steckel, Michael; Molina-Arcas, Miriam; Weigelt, Britta; Marani, Michaela; Warne, Patricia H; Kuznetsov, Hanna; Kelly, Gavin; Saunders, Becky; Howell, Michael; Downward, Julian; Hancock, David C

    2012-01-01

    Oncogenic mutations in RAS genes are very common in human cancer, resulting in cells with well-characterized selective advantages, but also less well-understood vulnerabilities. We have carried out a large-scale loss-of-function screen to identify genes that are required by KRAS-transformed colon cancer cells, but not by derivatives lacking this oncogene. Top-scoring genes were then tested in a larger panel of KRAS mutant and wild-type cancer cells. Cancer cells expressing oncogenic KRAS were found to be highly dependent on the transcription factor GATA2 and the DNA replication initiation regulator CDC6. Extending this analysis using a collection of drugs with known targets, we found that cancer cells with mutant KRAS showed selective addiction to proteasome function, as well as synthetic lethality with topoisomerase inhibition. Combination targeting of these functions caused improved killing of KRAS mutant cells relative to wild-type cells. These observations suggest novel targets and new ways of combining existing therapies for optimal effect in RAS mutant cancers, which are traditionally seen as being highly refractory to therapy. PMID:22613949

  2. Kras activation in p53-deficient myoblasts results in high-grade sarcoma formation with impaired myogenic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, Timothy; Venier, Rosemarie; Dickson, Brendan C.; Kabaroff, Leah; Alkema, Manon; Chen, Li; Shern, Jack F.; Yohe, Marielle E.; Khan, Javed; Gladdy, Rebecca A.

    2015-01-01

    While genomic studies have improved our ability to classify sarcomas, the molecular mechanisms involved in the formation and progression of many sarcoma subtypes are unknown. To better understand developmental origins and genetic drivers involved in rhabdomyosarcomagenesis, we describe a novel sarcoma model system employing primary murine p53-deficient myoblasts that were isolated and lentivirally transduced with KrasG12D. Myoblast cell lines were characterized and subjected to proliferation, anchorage-independent growth and differentiation assays to assess the effects of transgenic KrasG12D expression. KrasG12D overexpression transformed p53−/− myoblasts as demonstrated by an increased anchorage-independent growth. Induction of differentiation in parental myoblasts resulted in activation of key myogenic regulators. In contrast, Kras-transduced myoblasts had impaired terminal differentiation. p53−/− myoblasts transformed by KrasG12D overexpression resulted in rapid, reproducible tumor formation following orthotopic injection into syngeneic host hindlimbs. Pathological analysis revealed high-grade sarcomas with myogenic differentiation based on the expression of muscle-specific markers, such as Myod1 and Myog. Gene expression patterns of murine sarcomas shared biological pathways with RMS gene sets as determined by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and were 61% similar to human RMS as determined by metagene analysis. Thus, our novel model system is an effective means to model high-grade sarcomas along the RMS spectrum. PMID:25992772

  3. Limitations to the development of recombinant human embryonic kidney 293E cells using glutamine synthetase-mediated gene amplification: Methionine sulfoximine resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Da Young; Noh, Soo Min; Lee, Gyun Min

    2016-08-10

    To investigate the feasibility of glutamine synthetase (GS)-mediated gene amplification in HEK293 cells for the high-level stable production of therapeutic proteins, HEK293E cells were transfected by the GS expression vector containing antibody genes and were selected at various methionine sulfoximine (MSX) concentrations in 96-well plates. For a comparison, CHOK1 cells were transfected by the same GS expression vector and selected at various MSX concentrations. Unlike CHOK1 cells, HEK293E cells producing high levels of antibodies were not selected at all. For HEK293E cells, the number of wells with the cell pool did not decrease with an increase in the concentration of MSX up to 500μM MSX. A q-RT-PCR analysis confirmed that the antibody genes in the HEK293E cells, unlike the CHOK1 cells, were not amplified after increasing the MSX concentration. It was found that the GS activity in HEK293E cells was much higher than that in CHOK1 cells (P<0.05). In a glutamine-free medium, the GS activity of HEK293E cells was approximately 4.8 times higher than that in CHOK1 cells. Accordingly, it is inferred that high GS activity of HEK293E cells results in elevated resistance to MSX and therefore hampers GS-mediated gene amplification by MSX. Thus, in order to apply the GS-mediated gene amplification system to HEK293 cells, the endogenous GS expression level in HEK293 cells needs to be minimized by knock-out or down-regulation methods. PMID:27288593

  4. Amplification of the Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Receptor Gene Is a Rare Event in Adrenocortical Adenocarcinomas: Searching for Potential Mechanisms of Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Tamaya Castro; Jorge, Alexander Augusto; Almeida, Madson Q.; Mariani, Beatriz Marinho de Paula; Nishi, Mirian Yumi; Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho; Fragoso, Maria Candida Barisson Villares

    2014-01-01

    Context. IGF1R overexpression appears to be a prognostic biomarker of metastatic pediatric adrenocortical tumors. However, the molecular mechanisms that are implicated in its upregulation remain unknown. Aim. To investigate the potential mechanisms involved in IGF1R overexpression. Patients and Methods. We studied 64 adrenocortical tumors. IGF1R copy number variation was determined in all patients using MLPA and confirmed using real time PCR. In a subgroup of 32 patients, automatic sequencing was used to identify IGF1R allelic variants and the expression of microRNAs involved in IGF1R regulation by real time PCR. Results. IGF1R amplification was detected in an adrenocortical carcinoma that was diagnosed in a 46-year-old woman with Cushing's syndrome and virilization. IGF1R overexpression was demonstrated in this case. In addition, gene amplification of other loci was identified in this adrenocortical malignant tumor, but no IGF1R copy number variation was evidenced in the remaining cases. Automatic sequencing revealed three known polymorphisms but they did not correlate with its expression. Expression of miR-100, miR-145, miR-375, and miR-126 did not correlate with IGF1R expression. Conclusion. We demonstrated amplification and overexpression of IGF1R gene in only one adrenocortical carcinoma, suggesting that these combined events are uncommon. In addition, IGF1R polymorphisms and abnormal microRNA expression did not correlate with IGF1R upregulation in adrenocortical tumors. PMID:25110710

  5. Detection and identification of phytopathogenic Xanthomonas strains by amplification of DNA sequences related to the hrp genes of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria.

    PubMed Central

    Leite, R P; Minsavage, G V; Bonas, U; Stall, R E

    1994-01-01

    Three pairs of oligonucleotide primers specific for different regions of the hrp gene (hypersensitive reaction and pathogenicity) cluster of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria were designed and tested for amplification of DNA isolated from a large number of different bacteria. DNA sequences related to the hrp genes were successfully amplified from X. fragariae and from 28 pathovars of X. campestris. No DNA amplification occurred with genomic DNA from phytopathogenic strains of X. campestris pv. secalis, X. campestris pv. translucens, and X. albilineans or from nonpathogenic opportunistic xanthomonads and phytopathogenic strains of the genera Acidovorax, Agrobacterium, Clavibacter, Erwinia, Pseudomonas, and Xylella. The DNA from those bacteria also failed to hybridize to hrp-specific fragments in Southern blot analysis. DNA fragments amplified with a particular primer pair were of identical size from each of the different phytopathogenic xanthomonads. However, restriction analysis of these fragments by using frequently cutting endonucleases revealed variation in the pattern for these hrp-related fragments amplified from the different Xanthomonas strains. The restriction patterns generated for the different fragments allowed distinction of the strains representing a pathovar or species of phytopathogenic xanthomonads. We believe that DNA amplification with hrp-specific oligonucleotide primers is a highly sensitive and specific method that can be applied for detection and identification of phytopathogenic xanthomonads. Images PMID:8017904

  6. Amplification of the gene for isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase facilitates adaptation to the fitness cost of mupirocin resistance in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Paulander, Wilhelm; Andersson, Dan I; Maisnier-Patin, Sophie

    2010-05-01

    Mutations that cause resistance to antibiotics in bacteria often reduce growth rate by impairing some essential cellular function. This growth impairment is expected to counterselect resistant organisms from natural populations following discontinuation of antibiotic therapy. Unfortunately (for disease control) bacteria adapt and improve their growth rate, often without losing antibiotic resistance. This adaptation process was studied in mupirocin-resistant (Mup(R)) strains of Salmonella enterica. Mupirocin (Mup) is an isoleucyl-adenylate analog that inhibits the essential enzyme, isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase (IleRS). Mutations causing Mup(R) alter IleRS and reduce growth rate. Fitness is restored by any of 23 secondary IleRS amino acid substitutions, 60% of which leave resistance unaffected. Evidence that increased expression of the original mutant ileS gene (Mup(R)) also improves fitness while maintaining resistance is presented. Expression can be increased by amplification of the ileS gene (more copies) or mutations that improve the ileS promoter (more transcription). Some adapted strains show both ileS amplification and an improved promoter. This suggests a process of adaptation initiated by common amplifications and followed by later acquisition of rare point mutations. Finally, a point mutation in one copy relaxes selection and allows loss of defective ileS copies. This sequence of events is demonstrated experimentally. A better understanding of adaptation can explain why antibiotic resistance persists in bacterial populations and may help identify drugs that are least subject to this problem. PMID:20176977

  7. Multiplexed real-time PCR amplification of tlh, tdh and trh genes in Vibrio parahaemolyticus and its rapid detection in shellfish and Gulf of Mexico water.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Amy V; Bej, Asim K

    2010-10-01

    In this study, we have developed a SYBR Green I-based real-time multiplexed PCR assay for the detection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Gulf of Mexico water (gulf water), artificially seeded and natural oysters targeting three hemolysin genes, tlh, tdh and trh in a single reaction. Post-amplification melt-temperature analysis confirmed the amplification of all three targeted genes with high specificity. The detection sensitivity was 10 cfu (initial inoculum) in 1 ml of gulf water or oyster tissue homogenate, following 5 h enrichment. The results showed 58% of the oysters to be positive for tlh, indicating the presence of V. parahaemolyticus; of which 21% were positive for tdh; and 0.7% for trh, signifying the presence of pathogenic strains. The C(t) values showed that oyster tissue matrix had some level of inhibition, whereas the gulf water had negligible effect on PCR amplification. The assay was rapid (approximately 8 h), specific and sensitive, meeting the ISSC guidelines. Rapid detection using real-time multiplexed PCR will help reduce V. parahaemolyticus-related disease outbreaks, thereby increasing consumer confidence and economic success of the seafood industry. PMID:20376562

  8. Wild-type KRAS inhibits oncogenic KRAS-induced T-ALL in mice.

    PubMed

    Staffas, A; Karlsson, C; Persson, M; Palmqvist, L; Bergo, M O

    2015-05-01

    The role of hyperactive RAS signaling is well established in myeloid malignancies but less clear in T-cell malignancies. The Kras2(LSL)Mx1-Cre (KM) mouse model expresses endogenous KRAS(G12D) in hematopoietic cells and is widely used to study mechanisms and treatment of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). The model displays an intriguing shift from MPN to acute T-cell leukemia (T-ALL) after transplantation to wild-type mice, but the mechanisms underlying this lineage shift is unknown. Here, we show that KRAS(G12D) increases proliferation of both myeloid and T-cell progenitors, but whereas myeloid cells differentiate, T-cell differentiation is inhibited at early stages. Secondary mutations in the expanded pool of T-cell progenitors accompany T-ALL development, and our results indicate that the shift from myeloid to T-lymphoid malignancy after transplantation is explained by the increased likelihood for secondary mutations when the tumor lifespan is increased. We demonstrate that tumor lifespan increases after transplantation because primary KM mice die rapidly, not from MPN, but from KRAS(G12D) expression in nonhematopoietic cells, which causes intestinal bleeding and severe anemia. We also identify loss of the wild-type KRAS allele as a secondary mutation in all T-ALL cells and provide evidence that wild-type KRAS acts as a tumor suppressor in the T-cell lineage in mice. PMID:25371176

  9. LYTAK1, a novel TAK1 inhibitor, suppresses KRAS mutant colorectal cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jundong; Zheng, Bing; Ji, Jiansong; Shen, Fei; Min, Han; Liu, Biao; Wu, Jinchang; Zhang, Shuyu

    2015-05-01

    KRAS mutation in colorectal cancer (CRC) activates transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) to promote tumor progression. In the current study, we explored the potential effect of LYTAK1, a novel TAK1 inhibitor, against KRAS mutant CRC cells in vitro and in vivo. We found that LYTAK1 dose-dependently inhibited KRAS mutant CRC cell (HT-29 and SW-620 lines) growth, and induced cell cycle G1-S arrest. Further, LYTAK1 activated apoptosis in HT-29 cells and SW-620 cells, and apoptosis inhibitors almost reversed LYTAK1-mediated growth inhibition. While in KRAS wild-type (WT) CRC cell lines (DLD-1 and HCT-116), LYTAK1 had almost no effect on cell growth, cell cycle progression, or cell apoptosis. In KRAS mutant HT-29 cells and SW-260 cells, LYTAK1 blocked TAK1 activation or phosphorylation at Thr-184/187. Activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) in these cells, detected by phosphorylations of p65 and IκB kinase α (IKKα) as well as expression of NF-κB-regulated gene cyclin D1, was significantly inhibited by LYTAK1. Further, LYTAK1 treatment resulted in downregulation of β-catenin and Wnt response gene Axin 2, indicating Wnt inactivation. In vivo, oral LYTAK1 significantly inhibited HT-29 xenograft growth in nude mice. Together, these results show that LYTAK1 inhibits KRAS mutant CRC cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. LYTAK1 might be investigated as a novel agent against CRC with KRAS mutation. PMID:25524577

  10. Alterations in K-ras, APC and p53-multiple genetic pathway in colorectal cancer among Indians.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Pooja; Anwar, Mumtaz; Nanda, Neha; Kochhar, Rakesh; Wig, Jai Dev; Vaiphei, Kim; Mahmood, Safrun

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasing rapidly in Asian countries during the past few decades, but no comprehensive analysis has been done to find out the exact cause of this disease. In this study, we investigated the frequencies of mutations and expression pattern of K-ras, APC (adenomatosis polyposis coli) and p53 in tumor, adjoining and distant normal mucosa and to correlate these alterations with patients clinicopathological parameters as well as with the survival. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction digestion was used to detect mutations in K-ras and PCR-SSCP (Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism) followed by DNA sequencing was used to detect mutations in APC and p53 genes. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression pattern of K-ras, APC and p53 proteins. The frequencies of mutations of K-ras, APC and p53 in 30 tumor tissues samples were 26.7 %, 46.7 % and 20 %, respectively. Only 3.3 % of tumors contained mutations in all the three genes. The most common combination of mutation was APC and p53 whereas mutation in both p53 and K-ras were extremely rare. There was no association between the mutations and expression pattern of K-ras, APC and p53 (p>0.05). In Indians, the frequency of alterations of K-ras and APC is similar as in Westerns, whereas the frequency of p53 mutation is slightly lower. The lack of multiple mutations in tumor specimens suggests that these genetic alterations might have independent influences on CRC development and there could be multiple alternative genetic pathways to CRC in our present study cohort. PMID:23526092

  11. Differential gene expression in neurospora crassa cell types: amplification of rRNA genes. Progress report, July 1979-30 June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    The significant results obtained during 1979 to 1980 of the current research program are as follows: (1) the differential rRNA gene amplification in germinated conidia of N.crassa was confirmed. N.crassa rDNAs showed differences in degrees of homology with isolated DNAs from other Neurospora species which could be due to heterogeneity in internal spacers. Studies with N.crassa rDNA clones were initiated to study their heterogeneities. The organization of the Institutional Biohazard Committee (IBC) for Recombinant DNA research was completed and necessary certifications for the laboratory and the workers were obtained in accordance with the P/sub 2/EK/sub 1/ containment regulation of N.I.H. Known 17S and 26S N.crassa rDNA probes are being used to detect differences, if any, in restriction cleavage sites in rDNAs of different cell types and developmental mutants of N.crassa. DNAs from these N.crassa cells are restricted with EcoR/sub 1/ and Hind III and cleaved fragments separated by gel electrophoresis are transferred into nitrocellulose papers. Experiments are underway now to see if there are any changes in cleavage sites by annealing with /sup 32/P or /sup 3/H-17S or 26S rDNA probes followed by autoradiography.

  12. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) for Rapid Detection and Quantification of Dehalococcoides Biomarker Genes in Commercial Reductive Dechlorinating Cultures KB-1 and SDC-9

    PubMed Central

    Kanitkar, Yogendra H.; Stedtfeld, Robert D.; Steffan, Robert J.; Hashsham, Syed A.

    2016-01-01

    Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) protocols specific to the reductive dehalogenase (RDase) genes vcrA, bvcA, and tceA are commonly used to quantify Dehalococcoides spp. in groundwater from chlorinated solvent-contaminated sites. In this study, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) was developed as an alternative approach for the quantification of these genes. LAMP does not require a real-time thermal cycler (i.e., amplification is isothermal), allowing the method to be performed using less-expensive and potentially field-deployable detection devices. Six LAMP primers were designed for each of three RDase genes (vcrA, bvcA, and tceA) using Primer Explorer V4. The LAMP assays were compared to conventional qPCR approaches using plasmid standards, two commercially available bioaugmentation cultures, KB-1 and SDC-9 (both contain Dehalococcoides species). DNA was extracted over a growth cycle from KB-1 and SDC-9 cultures amended with trichloroethene and vinyl chloride, respectively. All three genes were quantified for KB-1, whereas only vcrA was quantified for SDC-9. A comparison of LAMP and qPCR using standard plasmids indicated that quantification results were similar over a large range of gene concentrations. In addition, the quantitative increase in gene concentrations over one growth cycle of KB-1 and SDC-9 using LAMP was comparable to that of qPCR. The developed LAMP assays for vcrA and tceA genes were validated by comparing quantification on the Gene-Z handheld platform and a real-time thermal cycler using DNA isolated from eight groundwater samples obtained from an SDC-9-bioaugmented site (Tulsa, OK). These assays will be particularly useful at sites subject to bioaugmentation with these two commonly used Dehalococcoides species-containing cultures. PMID:26746711

  13. Discordance of Mutation Statuses of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and K-ras between Primary Adenocarcinoma of Lung and Brain Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Rau, Kun-Ming; Chen, Han-Ku; Shiu, Li-Yen; Chao, Tsai-Ling; Lo, Yi-Ping; Wang, Chin-Chou; Lin, Meng-Chih; Huang, Chao-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Mutations on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) of adenocarcinomas of lung have been found to be associated with increased sensitivity to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and K-ras mutations may correlate with primary resistance. We aimed to explore the discordant mutation statuses of EGFR and K-ras between primary tumors and matched brain metastases in adenocarcinomas of lung. We used a sensitive Scorpion ARMS method to analyze EGFR mutation, and Sanger sequencing followed by allele-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction to analyze K-ras mutation. Forty-nine paired tissues with both primary adenocarcinoma of lung and matched brain metastasis were collected. Thirteen patients (26.5%) were discordant for the status of EGFR between primary and metastatic sites. K-ras gene could be checked in paired specimens from 33 patients, thirteen patients (39.6%) were discordant for the status of K-ras. In primary lung adenocarcinoma, there were 14 patients of mutant EGFR had mutant K-ras synchronously. This study revealed that the status of EGFR mutation in lung adenocarcinomas is relatively consistent between primary and metastatic sites compared to K-ras mutation. However, there are still a few cases of adenocarcinoma of lung showing discordance for the status of EGFR mutation. Repeated analysis of EGFR mutation is highly recommended if tissue from metastatic or recurrent site is available for the evaluation of target therapy. PMID:27070580

  14. Discordance of Mutation Statuses of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and K-ras between Primary Adenocarcinoma of Lung and Brain Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Kun-Ming; Chen, Han-Ku; Shiu, Li-Yen; Chao, Tsai-Ling; Lo, Yi-Ping; Wang, Chin-Chou; Lin, Meng-Chih; Huang, Chao-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Mutations on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) of adenocarcinomas of lung have been found to be associated with increased sensitivity to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and K-ras mutations may correlate with primary resistance. We aimed to explore the discordant mutation statuses of EGFR and K-ras between primary tumors and matched brain metastases in adenocarcinomas of lung. We used a sensitive Scorpion ARMS method to analyze EGFR mutation, and Sanger sequencing followed by allele-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction to analyze K-ras mutation. Forty-nine paired tissues with both primary adenocarcinoma of lung and matched brain metastasis were collected. Thirteen patients (26.5%) were discordant for the status of EGFR between primary and metastatic sites. K-ras gene could be checked in paired specimens from 33 patients, thirteen patients (39.6%) were discordant for the status of K-ras. In primary lung adenocarcinoma, there were 14 patients of mutant EGFR had mutant K-ras synchronously. This study revealed that the status of EGFR mutation in lung adenocarcinomas is relatively consistent between primary and metastatic sites compared to K-ras mutation. However, there are still a few cases of adenocarcinoma of lung showing discordance for the status of EGFR mutation. Repeated analysis of EGFR mutation is highly recommended if tissue from metastatic or recurrent site is available for the evaluation of target therapy. PMID:27070580

  15. Miniature Inverted–Repeat Transposable Elements (MITEs) Have Been Accumulated through Amplification Bursts and Play Important Roles in Gene Expression and Species Diversity in Oryza sativa

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chen; Chen, Jiongjiong; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Qun; Su, Wenqing; Kuang, Hanhui

    2012-01-01

    Miniature inverted–repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are predicted to play important roles on genome evolution. We developed a BLASTN-based approach for de novo identification of MITEs and systematically analyzed MITEs in rice genome. The genome of rice cultivar Nipponbare (Oryza sativa ssp. japonica) harbors 178,533 MITE-related sequences classified into 338 families. Pairwise nucleotide diversity and phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that individual MITE families were resulted from one or multiple rounds of amplification bursts. The timing of amplification burst varied considerably between different MITE families or subfamilies. MITEs are associated with 23,623 (58.2%) genes in rice genome. At least 7,887 MITEs are transcribed and more than 3,463 were transcribed with rice genes. The MITE sequences transcribed with rice coding genes form 1,130 pairs of potential natural sense/antisense transcripts. MITEs generate 23.5% (183,837 of 781,885) of all small RNAs identified from rice. Some MITE families generated small RNAs mainly from the terminals, while other families generated small RNAs predominantly from the central region. More than half (51.8%) of the MITE-derived small RNAs were generated exclusively by MITEs located away from genes. Genome-wide analysis showed that genes associated with MITEs have significantly lower expression than genes away from MITEs. Approximately 14.8% of loci with full-length MITEs have presence/absence polymorphism between rice cultivars 93-11 (O. sativa ssp. indica) and Nipponbare. Considering that different sets of genes may be regulated by MITE-derived small RNAs in different genotypes, MITEs provide considerable diversity for O. sativa. PMID:22096216

  16. Sensitive detection of KRAS mutations using enhanced-ice-COLD-PCR mutation enrichment and direct sequence identification.

    PubMed

    How Kit, Alexandre; Mazaleyrat, Nicolas; Daunay, Antoine; Nielsen, Helene Myrtue; Terris, Benoît; Tost, Jörg

    2013-11-01

    A number of methods allowing the detection of low levels of KRAS mutations have been developed in the last years. However, although these methods have become increasingly sensitive, they can rarely identify the mutated base directly without prior knowledge on the mutated base and are often incompatible with a sequencing-based read-out desirable in clinical practice. Here, we present a modified version of the ice-COLD-PCR assay called Enhanced-ice-COLD-PCR (E-ice-COLD-PCR) for KRAS mutation detection and identification, which allows the enrichment of the six most frequent KRAS mutations. The method is based on a nonextendable chemically modified blocker sequence, complementary to the wild-type (WT) sequence leading to the enrichment of mutated sequences. This assay permits the reliable detection of down to 0.1% mutated sequences in a WT background. A single genotyping assay of the amplification product by pyrosequencing directly following the E-ice-COLD-PCR is performed to identify the mutated base. This developed two-step method is rapid and cost-effective, and requires only a small amount of starting material permitting the sensitive detection and sequence identification of KRAS mutations within 3 hr. This method is applied in the current study to clinical colorectal cancer samples and enables detection of mutations in samples, which appear as WT using standard detection technologies. PMID:24038839

  17. ATDC induces an invasive switch in KRAS-induced pancreatic tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lidong; Yang, Huibin; Abel, Ethan V.; Ney, Gina M.; Palmbos, Phillip L.; Bednar, Filip; Zhang, Yaqing; Leflein, Jacob; Waghray, Meghna; Owens, Scott; Wilkinson, John E.; Prasad, Jayendra; Ljungman, Mats; Rhim, Andrew D.; Pasca di Magliano, Marina

    2015-01-01

    The initiation of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is linked to activating mutations in KRAS. However, in PDA mouse models, expression of oncogenic mutant KRAS during development gives rise to tumors only after a prolonged latency or following induction of pancreatitis. Here we describe a novel mouse model expressing ataxia telangiectasia group D complementing gene (ATDC, also known as TRIM29 [tripartite motif 29]) that, in the presence of oncogenic KRAS, accelerates pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) formation and the development of invasive and metastatic cancers. We found that ATDC up-regulates CD44 in mouse and human PanIN lesions via activation of β-catenin signaling, leading to the induction of an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype characterized by expression of Zeb1 and Snail1. We show that ATDC is up-regulated by oncogenic Kras in a subset of PanIN cells that are capable of invading the surrounding stroma. These results delineate a novel molecular pathway for EMT in pancreatic tumorigenesis, showing that ATDC is a proximal regulator of EMT. PMID:25593307

  18. Overview on how oncogenic Kras promotes pancreatic carcinogenesis by inducing low intracellular ROS levels.

    PubMed

    Kong, Bo; Qia, Chengjia; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Jörg; Michalski, Christoph W

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a devastating disease without clearly known disease causes. Recent epidemiological and animal studies suggest that the supplementation of dietary antioxidants (e.g., vitamins C and E) decreases cancer risk, implying that increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. However, oncogenic Kras mutations (e.g., Kras(G12D)), which are present in more than 90% of PDAC, have been proven to foster low intracellular ROS levels. Here, oncogenic Kras activates expression of a series of anti-oxidant genes via Nrf2 (nuclear factor, erythroid derived 2, like 2) and also mediates an unusual metabolic pathway of glutamine to generate NADPH. This can then be used as the reducing power for ROS detoxification, leading collectively to low ROS levels in pancreatic pre-neoplastic cells and in cancer cells. In adult stem cells and cancer stem cells, low ROS levels have been associated with the formation of a proliferation-permissive intracellular environment and with perseverance of self-renewal capacities. Therefore, it is conceivable that low intracellular ROS levels may contribute significantly to oncogenic Kras-mediated PDAC formation. PMID:24062691

  19. MUC1-C confers EMT and KRAS independence in mutant KRAS lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kharbanda, Akriti; Rajabi, Hasan; Jin, Caining; Alam, Maroof; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Kufe, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) that harbor an oncogenic KRAS mutation are often associated with resistance to targeted therapies. The MUC1-C transmembrane protein is aberrantly overexpressed in NSCLCs and confers a poor outcome; however, the functional role for MUC1-C in mutant KRAS NSCLC cells has remained unclear. The present studies demonstrate that silencing MUC1-C in A549/KRAS(G12S) and H460/KRAS(Q61H) NSCLC cells is associated with downregulation of AKT signaling and inhibition of growth. Overexpression of a MUC1-C(CQC→AQA) mutant, which inhibits MUC1-C homodimerization and function, suppressed both AKT and MEK activation. Moreover, treatment with GO-203, an inhibitor of MUC1-C homodimerization, blocked AKT and MEK signaling and decreased cell survival. The results further demonstrate that targeting MUC1-C suppresses expression of the ZEB1 transcriptional repressor by an AKT-mediated mechanism, and in turn induces miR-200c. In concert with these effects on the ZEB1/miR-200c regulatory loop, targeting MUC1-C was associated with reversal of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and inhibition of self-renewal capacity. Loss of MUC1-C function also attenuated KRAS independence and inhibited growth of KRAS mutant NSCLC cells as tumors in mice. These findings support a model in which targeting MUC1-C inhibits mutant KRAS signaling in NSCLC cells and thereby reverses the EMT phenotype and decreases self-renewal. PMID:25245423

  20. The full-length E1-circumflexE4 protein of human papillomavirus type 18 modulates differentiation-dependent viral DNA amplification and late gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Regina; Ryan, Gordon B.; Knight, Gillian L.; Laimins, Laimonis A.; Roberts, Sally . E-mail: s.roberts@bham.ac.uk

    2007-06-05

    Activation of the productive phase of the human papillomavirus (HPV) life cycle in differentiated keratinocytes is coincident with high-level expression of E1-circumflexE4 protein. To determine the role of E1-circumflexE4 in the HPV replication cycle, we constructed HPV18 mutant genomes in which expression of the full-length E1-circumflexE4 protein was abrogated. Undifferentiated keratinocytes containing mutant genomes showed enhanced proliferation when compared to cells containing wildtype genomes, but there were no differences in maintenance of viral episomes. Following differentiation, cells with mutant genomes exhibited reduced levels of viral DNA amplification and late gene expression, compared to wildtype genome-containing cells. This indicates that HPV18 E1-circumflexE4 plays an important role in regulating HPV late functions, and it may also function in the early phase of the replication cycle. Our finding that full-length HPV18 E1-circumflexE4 protein plays a significant role in promoting viral genome amplification concurs with a similar report with HPV31, but is in contrast to an HPV11 study where viral DNA amplification was not dependent on full-length E1-circumflexE4 expression, and to HPV16 where only C-terminal truncations in E1-circumflexE4 abrogated vegetative genome replication. This suggests that type-specific differences exist between various E1-circumflexE4 proteins.

  1. Human p53 with a mutation in codone 273 facilitates the amplification of the gene dhfr in rat-1 and LIM1215 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Il`inskaya, G.V.; Sokova, O.I.; Kopnin, B.P.

    1995-05-01

    The effect of the expression of the exogenous human mutant p53 (Arg {yields} His in codone 273) on the amplification rate of the gene dhfr in permissive Rat-1 and LIM1215 cells was studied. It was shown that introduction of a retroviral construct with p53His273 resulted in the accumulation of methotrexate-resistant variants with an increased number of dhfr copies in populations of recipient cells. Luria-Delbruck fluctuation analysis revealed a four- to six-fold increase in the rate of appearance of new methotrexate-resistant cells. Chromosomal analysis demonstrated an extrachromosomal location of amplified DNA in cells containing p53His273, as was the case for control sublines. The data obtained indicate that modifications of p53 may induce gene amplification not only via removing the proliferation block of cells with amplified genes in selective medium, but also via some other mechanisms that seem to increase the chromosomal recombination rate. 24 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Clinical Next-Generation Sequencing Pipeline Outperforms a Combined Approach Using Sanger Sequencing and Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification in Targeted Gene Panel Analysis.

    PubMed

    Schenkel, Laila C; Kerkhof, Jennifer; Stuart, Alan; Reilly, Jack; Eng, Barry; Woodside, Crystal; Levstik, Alexander; Howlett, Christopher J; Rupar, Anthony C; Knoll, Joan H M; Ainsworth, Peter; Waye, John S; Sadikovic, Bekim

    2016-09-01

    Advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) have facilitated parallel analysis of multiple genes enabling the implementation of cost-effective, rapid, and high-throughput methods for the molecular diagnosis of multiple genetic conditions, including the identification of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in high-risk patients for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. We clinically validated a NGS pipeline designed to replace Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis and to facilitate detection of sequence and copy number alterations in a single test focusing on a BRCA1/BRCA2 gene analysis panel. Our custom capture library covers 46 exons, including BRCA1 exons 2, 3, and 5 to 24 and BRCA2 exons 2 to 27, with 20 nucleotides of intronic regions both 5' and 3' of each exon. We analyzed 402 retrospective patients, with previous Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification results, and 240 clinical prospective patients. One-hundred eighty-three unique variants, including sequence and copy number variants, were detected in the retrospective (n = 95) and prospective (n = 88) cohorts. This standardized NGS pipeline demonstrated 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity, uniformity, and high-depth nucleotide coverage per sample (approximately 7000 reads per nucleotide). Subsequently, the NGS pipeline was applied to the analysis of larger gene panels, which have shown similar uniformity, sample-to-sample reproducibility in coverage distribution, and sensitivity and specificity for detection of sequence and copy number variants. PMID:27376475

  3. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification of vanA gene enables a rapid and naked-eye detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Jin; Kim, Yu Jin; Yong, Dong Eun; Lee, Kyungwon; Park, Jeon Han; Lee, Jae Myun; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2014-09-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are one of the leading causes of nosocomial infection at intensive care unit (ICU). A rapid and sensitive detection of VRE infection is in high demand for timely and suitable antibiotic treatment. Here, we optimized a distinct DNA-based diagnostic technique, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for a rapid detection of the presence of vanA gene, a critical component of the gene cluster required for vancomycin resistance. Amplification efficiency was optimal at 62°C and with 2mM MgSO4. The detection limit of the DNA template was 80pg and LAMP amplicons were detected within 40min; thereby suggesting a potential applicability of LAMP as a sensitive and urgent diagnostic method. Furthermore, positive LAMP reaction was directly detected with the naked-eye by monitoring the formation of a white precipitate or the color change induced by hydroxy naphthol blue (HNB) dye. Finally, 56 clinical isolates were successfully tested for the presence of vanA gene by LAMP, which was determined to be more sensitive than PCR. Together, our results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of LAMP for the diagnosis of VRE infection. PMID:24925601

  4. Screening for tumor suppressors: Loss of ephrin receptor A2 cooperates with oncogenic KRas in promoting lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yeddula, Narayana; Xia, Yifeng; Ke, Eugene; Beumer, Joep; Verma, Inder M

    2015-11-24

    Lung adenocarcinoma, a major form of non-small cell lung cancer, is the leading cause of cancer deaths. The Cancer Genome Atlas analysis of lung adenocarcinoma has identified a large number of previously unknown copy number alterations and mutations, requiring experimental validation before use in therapeutics. Here, we describe an shRNA-mediated high-throughput approach to test a set of genes for their ability to function as tumor suppressors in the background of mutant KRas and WT Tp53. We identified several candidate genes from tumors originated from lentiviral delivery of shRNAs along with Cre recombinase into lungs of Loxp-stop-Loxp-KRas mice. Ephrin receptorA2 (EphA2) is among the top candidate genes and was reconfirmed by two distinct shRNAs. By generating knockdown, inducible knockdown and knockout cell lines for loss of EphA2, we showed that negating its expression activates a transcriptional program for cell proliferation. Loss of EPHA2 releases feedback inhibition of KRAS, resulting in activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinase signaling, leading to enhanced cell proliferation. Intriguingly, loss of EPHA2 induces activation of GLI1 transcription factor and hedgehog signaling that further contributes to cell proliferation. Small molecules targeting MEK1/2 and Smoothened hamper proliferation in EphA2-deficient cells. Additionally, in EphA2 WT cells, activation of EPHA2 by its ligand, EFNA1, affects KRAS-RAF interaction, leading to inhibition of the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK pathway and cell proliferation. Together, our studies have identified that (i) EphA2 acts as a KRas cooperative tumor suppressor by in vivo screen and (ii) reactivation of the EphA2 signal may serve as a potential therapeutic for KRas-induced human lung cancers. PMID:26542681

  5. EGFR, HER-2 and KRAS in canine gastric epithelial tumors: a potential human model?

    PubMed

    Terragni, Rossella; Casadei Gardini, Andrea; Sabattini, Silvia; Bettini, Giuliano; Amadori, Dino; Talamonti, Chiara; Vignoli, Massimo; Capelli, Laura; Saunders, Jimmy H; Ricci, Marianna; Ricci, Marianna; Ulivi, Paola; Ulivi, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR or HER-1) and its analog c-erbB-2 (HER-2) are protein tyrosine kinases correlated with prognosis and response to therapy in a variety of human cancers. KRAS mediates the transduction of signals between EGFR and the nucleus, and its mutation has been identified as a predictor of resistance to anti-EGFR drugs. In human oncology, the importance of the EGFR/HER-2/KRAS signalling pathway in gastric cancer is well established, and HER-2 testing is required before initiating therapy. Conversely, this pathway has never been investigated in canine gastric tumours. A total of 19 canine gastric epithelial neoplasms (5 adenomas and 14 carcinomas) were retrospectively evaluated for EGFR/HER-2 immunohistochemical expression and KRAS mutational status. Five (35.7%) carcinomas were classified as intestinal-type and 9 (64.3%) as diffuse-type. EGFR was overexpressed (≥ 1+) in 8 (42.1%) cases and HER-2 (3+) in 11 (57.9%) cases, regardless of tumour location or biological behaviour. The percentage of EGFR-positive tumours was significantly higher in the intestinal-type (80%) than in the diffuse-type (11.1%, p = 0.023). KRAS gene was wild type in 18 cases, whereas one mucinous carcinoma harboured a point mutation at codon 12 (G12R). EGFR and HER-2 may be promising prognostic and therapeutic targets in canine gastric epithelial neoplasms. The potential presence of KRAS mutation should be taken into account as a possible mechanism of drug resistance. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the role of dog as a model for human gastric cancer. PMID:24454858

  6. EGFR, HER-2 and KRAS in Canine Gastric Epithelial Tumors: A Potential Human Model?

    PubMed Central

    Bettini, Giuliano; Amadori, Dino; Talamonti, Chiara; Vignoli, Massimo; Capelli, Laura; Saunders, Jimmy H.; Ricci, Marianna; Ulivi, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR or HER-1) and its analog c-erbB-2 (HER-2) are protein tyrosine kinases correlated with prognosis and response to therapy in a variety of human cancers. KRAS mediates the transduction of signals between EGFR and the nucleus, and its mutation has been identified as a predictor of resistance to anti-EGFR drugs. In human oncology, the importance of the EGFR/HER-2/KRAS signalling pathway in gastric cancer is well established, and HER-2 testing is required before initiating therapy. Conversely, this pathway has never been investigated in canine gastric tumours. A total of 19 canine gastric epithelial neoplasms (5 adenomas and 14 carcinomas) were retrospectively evaluated for EGFR/HER-2 immunohistochemical expression and KRAS mutational status. Five (35.7%) carcinomas were classified as intestinal-type and 9 (64.3%) as diffuse-type. EGFR was overexpressed (≥1+) in 8 (42.1%) cases and HER-2 (3+) in 11 (57.9%) cases, regardless of tumour location or biological behaviour. The percentage of EGFR-positive tumours was significantly higher in the intestinal-type (80%) than in the diffuse-type (11.1%, p = 0.023). KRAS gene was wild type in 18 cases, whereas one mucinous carcinoma harboured a point mutation at codon 12 (G12R). EGFR and HER-2 may be promising prognostic and therapeutic targets in canine gastric epithelial neoplasms. The potential presence of KRAS mutation should be taken into account as a possible mechanism of drug resistance. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the role of dog as a model for human gastric cancer. PMID:24454858

  7. Clinicopathologic distribution of KRAS and BRAF mutations in a Chinese population with colorectal cancer precursor lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chenghao; Huang, Yanqing; Yu, Xing; Li, Xiaofen; Zheng, Shu; Ding, Kefeng; Xu, Jinghong

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the clinical features and corresponding histomorphologic and molecular profiles of precursor lesions of colorectal cancer in a natural population provides new insights into the nature of colorectal cancer, uncovers new screening markers and establishes new prevention strategies for colorectal cancer. In this study, 4302 patients with at least one colorectal polyp from a large colorectal cancer screening program were evaluated and genetic mutations in either KRAS or BRAF were detected in 495 patients. The population-based mutation rates of KRAS and BRAF genes in colorectal polyps within this Chinese patient population were 21.8% and 12.1% respectively. Interestingly, considerable variability in the KRAS and BRAF mutations rates were found among different types of polyps. In a multivariate analysis, presence of villous histology and high-grade dysplasia was associated with KRAS mutations (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.7-5.4 and OR, 3.5; 95% CI 1.9-6.5, respectively), while serrated adenomas and hyperplastic polyps were associated with BRAF V600E mutations (OR, 20.6; 95% CI, 8.2–51.8 and OR, 11.9; 95% CI 4.9–29.0, respectively). KRAS mutations may, in part, drive the histologic progression of adenomas toward a villous histology and higher grades of dysplasia. Mutant BRAF may, in part, drive the histologic progression of adenomas toward serrated histology. Dysplasia may arise from hyperplastic polyps, resulting in the formation of serrated adenomas and potentially the development of colorectal carcinoma. PMID:26910894

  8. Characterization of a novel origin recognition complex-like complex: implications for DNA recognition, cell cycle control, and locus-specific gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Mohammad; York, Randall D; Hommel, Jonathan; Kapler, Geoffrey M

    2003-07-01

    The origin recognition complex (ORC) plays a central role in eukaryotic DNA replication. Here we describe a unique ORC-like complex in Tetrahymena thermophila, TIF4, which bound in an ATP-dependent manner to sequences required for cell cycle-controlled replication and gene amplification (ribosomal DNA [rDNA] type I elements). TIF4's mode of DNA recognition was distinct from that of other characterized ORCs, as it bound exclusively to single-stranded DNA. In contrast to yeast ORCs, TIF4 DNA binding activity was cell cycle regulated and peaked during S phase, coincident with the redistribution of the Orc2-related subunit, p69, from the cytoplasm to the macronucleus. Origin-binding activity and nuclear p69 immunoreactivity were further regulated during development, where they distinguished replicating from nonreplicating nuclei. Both activities were lost from germ line micronuclei following the programmed arrest of micronuclear replication. Replicating macronuclei stained with Orc2 antibodies throughout development in wild-type cells but failed to do so in the amplification-defective rmm11 mutant. Collectively, these findings indicate that the regulation of TIF4 is intimately tied to the cell cycle and developmentally programmed replication cycles. They further implicate TIF4 in rDNA gene amplification. As type I elements interact with other sequence-specific single-strand breaks (in vitro and in vivo), the dynamic interplay of Orc-like (TIF4) and non-ORC-like proteins with this replication determinant may provide a novel mechanism for regulation. PMID:12832485

  9. Combined inhibition of DDR1 and Notch signaling is a therapeutic strategy for KRAS-driven lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ambrogio, Chiara; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Falcone, Mattia; Vidal, August; Nadal, Ernest; Crosetto, Nicola; Blasco, Rafael B; Fernández-Marcos, Pablo J; Sánchez-Céspedes, Montserrat; Ren, Xiaomei; Wang, Zhen; Ding, Ke; Hidalgo, Manuel; Serrano, Manuel; Villanueva, Alberto; Santamaría, David; Barbacid, Mariano

    2016-03-01

    Patients with advanced Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS)-mutant lung adenocarcinoma are currently treated with standard chemotherapy because of a lack of efficacious targeted therapies. We reasoned that the identification of mediators of Kras signaling in early mouse lung hyperplasias might bypass the difficulties that are imposed by intratumor heterogeneity in advanced tumors, and that it might unveil relevant therapeutic targets. Transcriptional profiling of Kras(G12V)-driven mouse hyperplasias revealed intertumor diversity with a subset that exhibited an aggressive transcriptional profile analogous to that of advanced human adenocarcinomas. The top-scoring gene in this profile encodes the tyrosine kinase receptor DDR1. The genetic and pharmacological inhibition of DDR1 blocked tumor initiation and tumor progression, respectively. The concomitant inhibition of both DDR1 and Notch signaling induced the regression of KRAS;TP53-mutant patient-derived lung xenografts (PDX) with a therapeutic efficacy that was at least comparable to that of standard chemotherapy. Our data indicate that the combined inhibition of DDR1 and Notch signaling could be an effective targeted therapy for patients with KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26855149

  10. Bartonella quintana Aortitis in a Man with AIDS, Diagnosed by Needle Biopsy and 16S rRNA Gene Amplification.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sulggi A; Plett, Sara K; Luetkemeyer, Anne F; Borgo, Gina M; Ohliger, Michael A; Conrad, Miles B; Cookson, Brad T; Sengupta, Dhruba J; Koehler, Jane E

    2015-08-01

    A man with newly diagnosed AIDS presented with months of back pain and fever. Computed tomography (CT) results demonstrated aortitis with periaortic tissue thickening. DNA amplification of biopsy tissue revealed Bartonella quintana, and Bartonella serologies were subsequently noted to be positive. The patient improved with prolonged doxycycline and rifabutin treatment. This case illustrates how molecular techniques are increasingly important in diagnosing Bartonella infections. PMID:26063867

  11. Bartonella quintana Aortitis in a Man with AIDS, Diagnosed by Needle Biopsy and 16S rRNA Gene Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Plett, Sara K.; Luetkemeyer, Anne F.; Borgo, Gina M.; Ohliger, Michael A.; Conrad, Miles B.; Cookson, Brad T.; Sengupta, Dhruba J.; Koehler, Jane E.

    2015-01-01

    A man with newly diagnosed AIDS presented with months of back pain and fever. Computed tomography (CT) results demonstrated aortitis with periaortic tissue thickening. DNA amplification of biopsy tissue revealed Bartonella quintana, and Bartonella serologies were subsequently noted to be positive. The patient improved with prolonged doxycycline and rifabutin treatment. This case illustrates how molecular techniques are increasingly important in diagnosing Bartonella infections. PMID:26063867

  12. Frederick National Lab and the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network Award Fellowships for KRAS Research | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) recently formed a partnership with the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN) to award a one-year fellowship to two scientists whose research will help lead to new therapies for pancreatic cancer. The scientists will focus on KRAS, a gene in the RAS family that is mutated in 95 percent of pancreatic cancers, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

  13. Consensus-Degenerate Hybrid Oligonucleotide Primers for Amplification of Priming Glycosyltransferase Genes of the Exopolysaccharide Locus in Strains of the Lactobacillus casei Group

    PubMed Central

    Provencher, Cathy; LaPointe, Gisèle; Sirois, Stéphane; Van Calsteren, Marie-Rose; Roy, Denis

    2003-01-01

    A primer design strategy named CODEHOP (consensus-degenerate hybrid oligonucleotide primer) for amplification of distantly related sequences was used to detect the priming glycosyltransferase (GT) gene in strains of the Lactobacillus casei group. Each hybrid primer consisted of a short 3′ degenerate core based on four highly conserved amino acids and a longer 5′ consensus clamp region based on six sequences of the priming GT gene products from exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing bacteria. The hybrid primers were used to detect the priming GT gene of 44 commercial isolates and reference strains of Lactobacillus rhamnosus, L. casei, Lactobacillus zeae, and Streptococcus thermophilus. The priming GT gene was detected in the genome of both non-EPS-producing (EPS−) and EPS-producing (EPS+) strains of L. rhamnosus. The sequences of the cloned PCR products were similar to those of the priming GT gene of various gram-negative and gram-positive EPS+ bacteria. Specific primers designed from the L. rhamnosus RW-9595M GT gene were used to sequence the end of the priming GT gene in selected EPS+ strains of L. rhamnosus. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Lactobacillus spp. form a distinctive group apart from other lactic acid bacteria for which GT genes have been characterized to date. Moreover, the sequences show a divergence existing among strains of L. rhamnosus with respect to the terminal region of the priming GT gene. Thus, the PCR approach with consensus-degenerate hybrid primers designed with CODEHOP is a practical approach for the detection of similar genes containing conserved motifs in different bacterial genomes. PMID:12788729

  14. Detection of β-globin Gene Mutations Among β-thalassaemia Carriers and Patients in Malaysia: Application of Multiplex Amplification Refractory Mutation System–Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Syahzuwan; Ahmad, Rahimah; Zakaria, Zubaidah; Zulkafli, Zefarina; Abdullah, Wan Zaidah

    2013-01-01

    Background: β-thalassaemia is one of the most common single-gene disorders worldwide. Each ethnic population has its own common mutations, accounting for the majority of cases, with a small number of mutations for the rarer alleles. Due to the heterogeneity of β-thalassaemia and the multi-ethnicity of Malaysians, molecular diagnostics may be expensive and time consuming. Methods: A simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach involving a multiplex amplification refractory mutation system (MARMS) and one amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS), consisting of 20 β-globin gene mutations, were designed and employed to investigate β-thalassaemia patients and carriers. Results: Out of 169 carriers tested with the MARMS, Cd 41/42 (–TTCT), Cd 26 (A–G) HbE, IVS 1–1 (G–T), and IVS 1–5 (G–C) were the most common mutations, accounting for 78.1%. Among the Malays, Cd 26 (A–G) HbE, Cd 41/42 (–TTCT), IVS 1–1 (G–T), and IVS 1–5 (G–C) were the most common mutations, accounting for 81.4%, whereas Cd 41/42 (–TTCT) and IVS 2–654 (C–T) were most common among the Chinese (79.1%). Conclusion: We propose the use of this cheap, easy to interpret, and simple system for the molecular diagnostics of β-thalassaemia among Malaysians at the Institute for Medical Research (IMR). PMID:23613656

  15. MET Gene Amplification and MET Receptor Activation Are Not Sufficient to Predict Efficacy of Combined MET and EGFR Inhibitors in EGFR TKI-Resistant NSCLC Cells.

    PubMed

    Presutti, Dario; Santini, Simonetta; Cardinali, Beatrice; Papoff, Giuliana; Lalli, Cristiana; Samperna, Simone; Fustaino, Valentina; Giannini, Giuseppe; Ruberti, Giovina

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), member of the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family, plays a critical role in regulating multiple cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, cell migration and cell survival. Deregulation of the EGFR signaling has been found to be associated with the development of a variety of human malignancies including lung, breast, and ovarian cancers, making inhibition of EGFR the most promising molecular targeted therapy developed in the past decade against cancer. Human non small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) with activating mutations in the EGFR gene frequently experience significant tumor regression when treated with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), although acquired resistance invariably develops. Resistance to TKI treatments has been associated to secondary mutations in the EGFR gene or to activation of additional bypass signaling pathways including the ones mediated by receptor tyrosine kinases, Fas receptor and NF-kB. In more than 30-40% of cases, however, the mechanisms underpinning drug-resistance are still unknown. The establishment of cellular and mouse models can facilitate the unveiling of mechanisms leading to drug-resistance and the development or validation of novel therapeutic strategies aimed at overcoming resistance and enhancing outcomes in NSCLC patients. Here we describe the establishment and characterization of EGFR TKI-resistant NSCLC cell lines and a pilot study on the effects of a combined MET and EGFR inhibitors treatment. The characterization of the erlotinib-resistant cell lines confirmed the association of EGFR TKI resistance with loss of EGFR gene amplification and/or AXL overexpression and/or MET gene amplification and MET receptor activation. These cellular models can be instrumental to further investigate the signaling pathways associated to EGFR TKI-resistance. Finally the drugs combination pilot study shows that MET gene amplification and MET receptor activation

  16. MET Gene Amplification and MET Receptor Activation Are Not Sufficient to Predict Efficacy of Combined MET and EGFR Inhibitors in EGFR TKI-Resistant NSCLC Cells

    PubMed Central

    Presutti, Dario; Santini, Simonetta; Cardinali, Beatrice; Papoff, Giuliana; Lalli, Cristiana; Samperna, Simone; Fustaino, Valentina; Giannini, Giuseppe; Ruberti, Giovina

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), member of the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family, plays a critical role in regulating multiple cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, cell migration and cell survival. Deregulation of the EGFR signaling has been found to be associated with the development of a variety of human malignancies including lung, breast, and ovarian cancers, making inhibition of EGFR the most promising molecular targeted therapy developed in the past decade against cancer. Human non small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) with activating mutations in the EGFR gene frequently experience significant tumor regression when treated with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), although acquired resistance invariably develops. Resistance to TKI treatments has been associated to secondary mutations in the EGFR gene or to activation of additional bypass signaling pathways including the ones mediated by receptor tyrosine kinases, Fas receptor and NF-kB. In more than 30–40% of cases, however, the mechanisms underpinning drug-resistance are still unknown. The establishment of cellular and mouse models can facilitate the unveiling of mechanisms leading to drug-resistance and the development or validation of novel therapeutic strategies aimed at overcoming resistance and enhancing outcomes in NSCLC patients. Here we describe the establishment and characterization of EGFR TKI-resistant NSCLC cell lines and a pilot study on the effects of a combined MET and EGFR inhibitors treatment. The characterization of the erlotinib-resistant cell lines confirmed the association of EGFR TKI resistance with loss of EGFR gene amplification and/or AXL overexpression and/or MET gene amplification and MET receptor activation. These cellular models can be instrumental to further investigate the signaling pathways associated to EGFR TKI-resistance. Finally the drugs combination pilot study shows that MET gene amplification and MET receptor activation

  17. Activated KRAS Cooperates with MLL-AF4 to Promote Extramedullary Engraftment and Migration of Cord Blood CD34+ HSPC But Is Insufficient to Initiate Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Cristina; Stam, Ronald W; Agraz-Doblas, Antonio; Ballerini, Paola; Camos, Mireia; Castaño, Julio; Marschalek, Rolf; Bursen, Aldeheid; Varela, Ignacio; Bueno, Clara; Menendez, Pablo

    2016-04-15

    The MLL-AF4 (MA4) fusion gene is the genetic hallmark of an aggressive infant pro-B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Our understanding of MA4-mediated transformation is very limited. Whole-genome sequencing studies revealed a silent mutational landscape, which contradicts the aggressive clinical outcome of this hematologic malignancy. Only RAS mutations were recurrently detected in patients and found to be associated with poorer outcome. The absence of MA4-driven B-ALL models further questions whether MA4 acts as a single oncogenic driver or requires cooperating mutations to manifest a malignant phenotype. We explored whether KRAS activation cooperates with MA4 to initiate leukemia in cord blood-derived CD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC). Clonogenic and differentiation/proliferation assays demonstrated that KRAS activation does not cooperate with MA4 to immortalize CD34(+) HSPCs. Intrabone marrow transplantation into immunodeficient mice further showed that MA4 and KRAS(G12V) alone or in combination enhanced hematopoietic repopulation without impairing myeloid-lymphoid differentiation, and that mutated KRAS did not cooperate with MA4 to initiate leukemia. However, KRAS activation enhanced extramedullary hematopoiesis of MA4-expressing cell lines and CD34(+) HSPCs that was associated with leukocytosis and central nervous system infiltration, both hallmarks of infant t(4;11)(+) B-ALL. Transcriptional profiling of MA4-expressing patients supported a cell migration gene signature underlying the mutant KRAS-mediated phenotype. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that KRAS affects the homeostasis of MA4-expressing HSPCs, suggesting that KRAS activation in MA4(+) B-ALL is important for tumor maintenance rather than initiation. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2478-89. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26837759

  18. A polymerase chain reaction method for the amplification of full-length envelope genes of HIV-1 from DNA samples containing single molecules of HIV-1 provirus.

    PubMed

    McClure, P; Curran, R; Boneham, S; Ball, J K

    2000-07-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of full-length envelope genes from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) directly from uncultured clinical samples is difficult. This paper describes a comparative assessment of the performance of three thermostable polymerases in an HIV-1 full-length envelope gene PCR. The PCR method utilising Expand HiFi polymerase was successful when using DNA samples extracted from a variety of sources including blood, semen and various tissues. This method generated high and specific yields of product from samples containing as little as one copy of HIV-1 proviral DNA. The resulting PCR products were suitable for a variety of downstream analytical methods including DNA sequence analysis. PMID:10921844

  19. Integrated biochip for PCR-based DNA amplification and detection on capacitive biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moschou, D.; Vourdas, N.; Filippidou, M. K.; Tsouti, V.; Kokkoris, G.; Tsekenis, G.; Zergioti, I.; Chatzandroulis, S.; Tserepi, A.

    2013-05-01

    Responding to an increasing demand for LoC devices to perform bioanalytical protocols for disease diagnostics, the development of an integrated LoC device consisting of a μPCR module integrated with resistive microheaters and a biosensor array for disease diagnostics is presented. The LoC is built on a Printed Circuit Board (PCB) platform, implementing both the amplification of DNA samples and DNA detection/identification on-chip. The resistive microheaters for PCR and the wirings for the sensor read-out are fabricated by means of standard PCB technology. The microfluidic network is continuous-flow, designed to perform 30 PCR cycles with heated zones at constant temperatures, and is built onto the PCB utilizing commercial photopatternable polyimide layers. Following DNA amplification, the product is driven in a chamber where a Si-based biosensor array is placed for DNA detection through hybridization. The sensor array is tested for the detection of mutations of the KRAS gene, responsible for colon cancer.

  20. Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification Analysis of GATA4 Gene Copy Number Variations in Patients with Isolated Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guida, Valentina; Lepri, Francesca; Vijzelaar, Raymon; De Zorzi, Andrea; Versacci, Paolo; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Marino, Bruno; De Luca, Alessandro; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    GATA4 mutations are found in patients with different isolated congenital heart defects (CHDs), mostly cardiac septal defects and tetralogy of Fallot. In addition, GATA4 is supposed to be the responsible gene for the CHDs in the chromosomal 8p23 deletion syndrome, which is recognized as a malformation syndrome with clinical symptoms of facial anomalies, microcephaly, mental retardation, and congenital heart defects. Thus far, no study has been carried out to investigate the role of GATA4 copy number variations (CNVs) in non-syndromic CHDs. To explore the possible occurrence of GATA4 gene CNVs in isolated CHDs, we analyzed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) a cohort of 161 non-syndromic patients with cardiac anomalies previously associated with GATA4 gene mutations. The patients were mutation-negative for GATA4, NKX2.5, and FOG2 genes after screening with denaturing high performance liquid chromatography. MLPA analysis revealed that normalized MLPA signals were all found within the normal range values for all exons in all patients, excluding a major contribution of GATA4 gene CNVs in CHD pathogenesis. PMID:20592452

  1. Experimental Evolution of Resistance to Artemisinin Combination Therapy Results in Amplification of the mdr1 Gene in a Rodent Malaria Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Louise A.; Henriques, Gisela; Borges, Sofia T.; Hunt, Paul; Sanchez, Cecília P.; Martinelli, Axel; Cravo, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Background Lacking suitable alternatives, the control of malaria increasingly depends upon Artemisinin Combination Treatments (ACT): resistance to these drugs would therefore be disastrous. For ACTs, the biology of resistance to the individual components has been investigated, but experimentally induced resistance to component drugs in combination has not been generated. Methodology/Principal Findings We have used the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi to select in vivo resistance to the artesunate (ATN) + mefloquine (MF) version of ACT, through prolonged exposure of parasites to both drugs over many generations. The selection procedure was carried out over twenty-seven consecutive sub-inoculations under increasing ATN + MF doses, after which a genetically stable resistant parasite, AS-ATNMF1, was cloned. AS-ATNMF1 showed increased resistance to ATN + MF treatment and to artesunate or mefloquine administered separately. Investigation of candidate genes revealed an mdr1 duplication in the resistant parasites and increased levels of mdr1 transcripts and protein. There were no point mutations in the atpase6 or ubp1genes. Conclusion Resistance to ACTs may evolve even when the two drugs within the combination are taken simultaneously and amplification of the mdr1 gene may contribute to this phenotype. However, we propose that other gene(s), as yet unidentified, are likely to be involved. PMID:20657645

  2. Novel deletion of the E3A ubiquitin protein ligase gene detected by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification in a patient with Angelman syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Calì, Francesco; Ragalmuto, Alda; Chiavetta, Valeria; Calabrese, Giuseppe; Fichera, Marco; Vinci, Mirella; Ruggeri, Giuseppa; Schinocca, Pietro; Sturnio, Maurizio; Romano, Salvatore; Elia, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurobehavioural disorder caused by failure of expression of the maternal copy of the imprinted domain located on 15q11-q13. There are different mechanisms leading to AS: maternal microdeletion, uniparental disomy, defects in a putative imprinting centre, mutations of the E3 ubiquitin protein ligase (UBE3A) gene. However, some of suspected cases of AS are still scored negative to all the latter mutations. Recently, it has been shown that a proportion of negative cases bear large deletions overlapping one or more exons of the UBE3A gene. These deletions are difficult to detect by conventional gene-scanning methods due to the masking effect by the non-deleted allele. In this study, we have used for the first time multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and comparative multiplex dosage analysis (CMDA) to search for large deletions affecting the UBE3A gene. Using this approach, we identified a novel causative deletion involving exon 8 in an affected sibling. Based on our results, we propose the use of MLPA as a fast, accurate and inexpensive test to detect large deletions in the UBE3A gene in a small but significant percentage of AS patients. PMID:21072004

  3. Identification and Sequencing of Candida krusei Aconitate Hydratase Gene Using Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends Method and Phylogenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fateh, Roohollah; Zaini, Farideh; Kordbacheh, Parivash; Falahati, Mehraban; Rezaie, Sasan; Daie Ghazvini, Roshanak; Borhani, Nahid; Safara, Mahin; Fattahi, Azam; Kanani, Ali; Farahyar, Shirin; Bolhassani, Manzar; Heidari, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Background: The production and development of an effective fungicidal drug requires the identification of an essential fungal protein as a drug target. Aconitase (ACO) is a mitochondrial protein that plays a vital role in tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and thus production of energy within the cell. Objectives: The current study aimed to sequence Candida krusei ACO gene and determine any amino acid residue differences between human and fungal aconitases to obtain selective inhibition. Materials and Methods: Candida krusei (ATCC: 6258) aconitase gene was determined by 5’Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) method and degenerate Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and analyzed using bioinformatics softwares. Results: One thousand-four hundred-nineteen nucleotide of C. krusei aconitase gene were clarified and submitted in Genbank as a partial sequence and then taxonomic location of C. krusei was determined by nucleotide and amino acid sequences of this gene. The comparison of nucleotide and amino acid sequences of Candida species ACO genes showed that C. krusei possessed characteristic sequences. No significant differences were observed between C. krusei and human aconitases within the active site amino acid residues. Conclusions: Results of the current study indicated that aconitase was not a suitable target to design new anti-fungal drugs that selectively block this enzyme. PMID:26855741

  4. The Internally Self-fertilizing Hermaphroditic Teleost Rivulus marmoratus (Cyprinodontiformes, Rivulidae) beta-Actin Gene: Amplification and Sequence Analysis with Conserved Primers.

    PubMed

    Lee

    2000-03-01

    To determine the ease and feasibility of amplifying the beta-actin gene in fish by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), genomic DNAs of several fish (Rivulus, Southern top mouth minnow, common fat minnow, oily bitterling, carp, Far Eastern catfish, medaka, and European flounder) were extracted and used as a template with conserved primers, designed on the basis of high amino acid homology (approximately 98% or more). Among them, the self-fertilizing hermaphroditic fish Rivulus marmoratus was chosen for further characterization. After amplification of the Rivulus beta-actin PCR product with Taq polymerase, PCR product was subcloned to pCRII vector. After restriction enzyme mapping of Rivulus beta-actin gene, the amplified insert was sequenced using ALF Express automatic DNA sequencer with conserved internal primers. The R. marmoratus beta-actin gene consists of 1763 bp encoding 375 amino acids including 5 exons and 4 introns. The splicing and acceptance sites of the exon and intron boundaries of the Rivulus beta-actin gene were highly conserved with consensus sequences (GT/AG). The amino acid homology of R. marmoratus beta-actin to other species was high: 98.93% to human; 98.93%, Atlantic salmon; 98.93%, common carp; 98.93%, grass carp; 98.93%, zebrafish; 98.67%, medaka; and 98.40%, sea bream. To determine the expression of the R. marmoratus beta-actin gene in liver and ovary, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was carried out with internal primers. In conclusion, these universal primers are successful in the rapid cloning of the fish beta-actin gene by PCR, based on a high homology of the beta-actin gene conserved through evolution. This approach will be applicable to the isolation of other beta-actin homologues in the investigation of phylogenetic comparisons of fish species, along with a possible application to cloning strategy in other conserved genes. PMID:10811955

  5. Amplification of the rat m2 muscarinic receptor gene by the polymerase chain reaction: Functional expression of the M sub 2 muscarinic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, J.; Bloom, J.W.; Yamamura, H.I.; Roeske, W.R. )

    1990-01-01

    A selective amplification of the coding sequence of the rat M{sub 2} muscarinic receptor gene was achieved by the polymerase chain reaction. The error rate of this amplification system under conditions specified was 1 nucleotide substitution in 841 base pairs. In vitro expression of this gene in murine fibroblasts (B82) via the eukaryotic expression vector, pH{beta}APr-1-neo, resulted in high level expression of specific ({sup 3}H)(-)MQNB binding in transfected B82 cell lines. One of these clones, M2LKB2-2, showed a stable expression of ({sup 3}H)(-)MQNB binding with a K{sub d} value of 265 pM and a B{sub max} value of 411{plus minus}50 fmol/10{sup 6} cells. Cardiac selective muscarinic antagonists such as himbacine and AF-DX 116 show high affinities for this binding site in the M2LKB2-2 cells. The rank order of potency of several antagonists in inhibiting ({sup 3}H)(-)MQNB binding in these cells conformed to the characteristics of an M{sub 2} type muscarinic receptor. Carbachol showed a single affinity state for the receptors in the M2LKB2-2 cells with a K{sub i} value of 2.0 {mu}M. This receptor appeared to be inversely coupled to adenylate cyclase via a pertussis toxin sensitive G-protein. Carbachol also had a slight stimulatory effect on the hydrolysis of inositol lipids. The polymerase chain reaction proves highly effective in cloning genes from genomic material, as demonstrated by the first in vitro functional expression of the rat M{sub 2} type muscarinic receptor.

  6. Improved efficiency in amplification of Escherichia coli o-antigen gene clusters using genome-wide sequence comparison

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: In many bacteria including E. coli, genes encoding O-antigens are clustered in the chromosome, with a 39-bp JUMPstart sequence and gnd gene located upstream and downstream of the cluster, respectively. For determining the DNA sequence of the E. coli O-antigen gene cluster, one set of P...

  7. Targeting cytokine networks in KRAS-driven tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Golay, Hadrien G; Barbie, David A

    2014-08-01

    KRAS is one of the most commonly mutated oncogenes in human tumors, and is typically associated with aggressive disease. Despite intensive study and years of effort, KRAS has remained refractory to targeted inhibition. Given the challenge of inhibiting KRAS directly, current approaches to KRAS targeted therapy have involved the disruption of downstream signaling pathways. However, combinations of drugs that target RAF/MEK and PI3K/AKT signaling have failed to live up to expectations in the clinic. Here we summarize the evidence that the cytokine signaling circuitry of KRAS-driven tumors represents an equally tractable drug target. Indeed, the incorporation of novel therapeutics that disrupts these cytokine signaling networks may hold the key to overcoming this seemingly impenetrable treatment barrier. PMID:24928447

  8. Induction of bovine papillomavirus E2 gene expression and early region transcription by cell growth arrest: correlation with viral DNA amplification and evidence for differential promoter induction.

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, S; Ström, A C; Jareborg, N; Alderborn, A; Dillner, J; Moreno-Lopez, J; Pettersson, U; Kiessling, U

    1990-01-01

    The bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1) genome replicates as a latent plasmid in mouse C127 cells transformed in vitro by the virus. However, we have recently shown that BPV-1 DNA amplification can be induced in a subpopulation of cells under culture conditions which suppress cell proliferation, a finding which led us to hypothesize that expression of a viral replication factor was regulated by cell growth stage. In this report, we describe the detection in these cells of abundant BPV-1 nuclear E2 antigen by immunofluorescence analysis. Expression of E2 antigen in fibropapilloma tissue was similarly localized to nonproliferating epidermal cells of the lower spinous layers--the natural site of induction of vegetative viral DNA replication. Immunoprecipitation analysis showed that the previously characterized 48-kilodalton (transactivator) and 31-kilodalton (repressor) E2 proteins were both induced in growth-arrested cell cultures. In parallel with E2 antigen synthesis under conditions of serum-deprivation in vitro, we observed a significant increase in levels of BPV-1 early region mRNAs. Furthermore, we present evidence for preferential induction of the P2443 promoter, in addition to specific induction of the P7940 promoter in response to serum deprivation. These observations indicate a central role for E2 transcription factors in the induction of viral DNA amplification in division-arrested cells in vitro and in vivo and suggest that this process is associated with a qualitative switch in the expression of viral early region genes. Images PMID:2170685

  9. The multicopy appearance of a large inverted duplication and the sequence at the inversion joint suggest a new model for gene amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Hyrien, O; Debatisse, M; Buttin, G; de Saint Vincent, B R

    1988-01-01

    The amplified DNA of HC50474, a Chinese hamster fibroblast cell line selected in three steps for high resistance to coformycin, consists chiefly of 150 copies of a large inverted duplication including the adenylate deaminase gene. Most if not all of these units are more than 2 x 120 kb long. The inverted duplication was first detected in the cells recovered from the second selection step, at the same chromosomal location as the first step amplified units. Its formation and amplification appear to be coupled since the second step cell line already contained 40 copies of this novel structure. Reamplification of the inverted duplication occurred at the third step of selection concomitant with the loss of amplified DNA acquired during the first step. The head-to-head junction has been formed by recombination within a recombinational hotspot described previously [Hyrien, O., Debatisse, M., Buttin, G. and Robert de Saint Vincent, B. (1987) EMBO J., 6, 2401-2408]. Sequences at the joint and in the corresponding wild-type region reveal that the crossover sites, one of which occurs in the putative promoter region of B2 repeat, are located at the top of significant stem-loop structures and that patchy homologies between the parental molecules on one side of the breakpoints allow alignment of these crossover sites. We present a model which explains the formation and amplification of this and other large inverted duplications by errors in DNA replication. Images PMID:3366118

  10. Real-time microfluidic recombinase polymerase amplification for the toxin B gene of Clostridium difficile on a SlipChip platform.

    PubMed

    Tsaloglou, M-N; Watson, R J; Rushworth, C M; Zhao, Y; Niu, X; Sutton, J M; Morgan, H

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is one of the key bacterial pathogens that cause infectious diarrhoea both in the developed and developing world. Isothermal nucleic acid amplification methods are increasingly used for identification of toxinogenic infection by clinical labs. For this purpose, we developed a low-cost microfluidic platform based on the SlipChip concept and implemented real-time isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA). The on-chip RPA assay targets the Clostridium difficile toxin B gene (tcdB) coding for toxin B, one of the proteins responsible for bacterial toxicity. The device was fabricated in clear acrylic using rapid prototyping methods. It has six replicate 500 nL reaction wells as well as two sets of 500 nL control wells. The reaction can be monitored in real-time using exonuclease fluorescent probes with an initial sample volume of as little as 6.4 μL. We demonstrated a limit of detection of 1000 DNA copies, corresponding to 1 fg, at a time-to-result of <20 minutes. This miniaturised platform for pathogen detection has potential for use in resource-limited environments or at the point-of-care because of its ease of use and low cost, particularly if combined with preserved reagents. PMID:25371968

  11. K-Ras mutation detection in liquid biopsy and tumor tissue as prognostic biomarker in patients with pancreatic cancer: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Zheng, Yuanting; Sun, Hong; Zhuang, Rongyuan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Tianshu; Cai, Weimin

    2016-07-01

    K-Ras gene mutations have been found in most pancreatic cancers; however, conflicting data on the prognostic value of K-Ras mutations in pancreatic cancer have been published. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess its prognostic significance. Literature searches of PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science and Google Scholar were performed through December 2015 to identify publications exploring the association of K-Ras mutation with overall survival. Forty eligible studies involving 3427 patients with pancreatic cancer were included in the present meta-analysis. Our analysis showed a hazard ratio (HR) of negative association with survival of 1.61 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.36-1.90; p < 0.01] in K-Ras mutant pancreatic cancer patients. In subgroup analyses, K-Ras mutations detected in tumor tissues and in liquid biopsies had HRs of 1.37 (95 % CI 1.20-1.57; p < 0.01) and 3.16 (95 % CI 2.1-4.71; p < 0.01), respectively. In addition, the HR was higher when K-Ras mutations were detected in fresh frozen samples (HR = 2.01, 95 % CI 1.28-3.16, p = 0.002) than in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples (HR = 1.29, 95 % CI 1.12-1.49, p < 0.01). Though K-Ras alterations are more frequent among non-East Asian individuals than East Asian individuals, there were no significant differences in HRs of survival between the two ethnic subgroups. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggests that K-Ras mutations are associated with a worse overall survival in pancreatic cancer patients, especially when mutations are detected in liquid biopsies or fresh frozen tumor tissue samples. PMID:27225938

  12. Suppression of KRas-mutant cancer through the combined inhibition of KRAS with PLK1 and ROCK

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jieqiong; Hu, Kewen; Guo, Jiawei; Cheng, Feixiong; Lv, Jing; Jiang, Wenhao; Lu, Weiqiang; Liu, Jinsong; Pang, Xiufeng; Liu, Mingyao

    2016-01-01

    No effective targeted therapies exist for cancers with somatic KRAS mutations. Here we develop a synthetic lethal chemical screen in isogenic KRAS-mutant and wild-type cells to identify clinical drug pairs. Our results show that dual inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 and RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) leads to the synergistic effects in KRAS-mutant cancers. Microarray analysis reveals that this combinatory inhibition significantly increases transcription and activity of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1, leading to specific G2/M phase blockade in KRAS-mutant cells. Overexpression of p21WAF1/CIP1, either by cDNA transfection or clinical drugs, preferentially impairs the growth of KRAS-mutant cells, suggesting a druggable synthetic lethal interaction between KRAS and p21WAF1/CIP1. Co-administration of BI-2536 and fasudil either in the LSL-KRASG12D mouse model or in a patient tumour explant mouse model of KRAS-mutant lung cancer suppresses tumour growth and significantly prolongs mouse survival, suggesting a strong synergy in vivo and a potential avenue for therapeutic treatment of KRAS-mutant cancers. PMID:27193833

  13. Targeting KRAS Oncogene in Colon Cancer Cells with 7-Carboxylate Indolo[3,2-b]quinoline Tri-Alkylamine Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Hugo; Martins, Ana Cláudia; Lavrado, João; Mendes, Eduarda; Francisco, Ana Paula; Santos, Sofia A.; Ohnmacht, Stephan A.; Kim, Nam-Soon; Rodrigues, Cecília M. P.; Moreira, Rui; Neidle, Stephen; Borralho, Pedro M.; Paulo, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Background A guanine-rich strand within the promoter of the KRAS gene can fold into an intra-molecular G-quadruplex structure (G4), which has an important role in the regulation of KRAS transcription. We have previously identified indolo[3,2-b]quinolines with a 7-carboxylate group and three alkylamine side chains (IQ3A) as effective G4 stabilizers and promising selective anticancer leads. Herein we investigated the anticancer mechanism of action of these compounds, which we hypothesized due to stabilization of the G4 sequence in the KRAS promoter and subsequent down-regulation of gene expression. Methodology/Principal Findings IQ3A compounds showed greater stabilization of G4 compared to duplex DNA structures and reduced KRAS promoter activity in a dual luciferase reporter assay. Moreover, IQ3A compounds showed high anti-proliferative activity in HCT116 and SW620 colon cancer cells (IC50 < 2.69 μM), without eliciting cell death in non-malignant HEK293T human embryonic kidney, and human colon fibroblasts CCD18co. IQ3A compounds significantly reduced KRAS mRNA and protein steady-state levels at IC50 concentrations, and increased p53 protein steady-state levels and cell death by apoptosis in HCT116 cells (mut KRAS, wt p53). Furthermore, KRAS silencing in HCT116 p53 wild-type (p53(+/+)) and null (p53(-/-)) isogenic cell lines induced a higher level of cell death, and a higher IQ3A-induced cell death in HCT116 p53(+/+) compared to HCT116 p53(-/-). Conclusions Herein we provide evidence that G4 ligands such as IQ3A compounds can target G4 motifs present in KRAS promoter, down-regulate the expression of the mutant KRAS gene through inhibition of transcription and translation, and induce cell death by apoptosis in colon cancer cell lines. Thus, targeting KRAS at the genomic level with G4 ligands may be a new anticancer therapy strategy for colon cancer. PMID:26024321

  14. Development and Application of Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assays for Rapid Visual Detection of cry2Ab and cry3A Genes in Genetically-Modified Crops

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feiwu; Yan, Wei; Long, Likun; Qi, Xing; Li, Congcong; Zhang, Shihong

    2014-01-01

    The cry2Ab and cry3A genes are two of the most important insect-resistant exogenous genes and had been widely used in genetically-modified crops. To develop more effective alternatives for the quick identification of genetically-modified organisms (GMOs) containing these genes, a rapid and visual loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method to detect the cry2Ab and cry3A genes is described in this study. The LAMP assay can be finished within 60 min at an isothermal condition of 63 °C. The derived LAMP products can be obtained by a real-time turbidimeter via monitoring the white turbidity or directly observed by the naked eye through adding SYBR Green I dye. The specificity of the LAMP assay was determined by analyzing thirteen insect-resistant genetically-modified (GM) crop events with different Bt genes. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the LAMP assay was evaluated by diluting the template genomic DNA. Results showed that the limit of detection of the established LAMP assays was approximately five copies of haploid genomic DNA, about five-fold greater than that of conventional PCR assays. All of the results indicated that this established rapid and visual LAMP assay was quick, accurate and cost effective, with high specificity and sensitivity. In addition, this method does not need specific expensive instruments or facilities, which can provide a simpler and quicker approach to detecting the cry2Ab and cry3A genes in GM crops, especially for on-site, large-scale test purposes in the field. PMID:25167136

  15. Global gene expression profiling reveals a suppressed immune response pathway associated with 3q amplification in squamous carcinoma of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jun; Zou, Yong; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Bing; Massion, Pierre P.

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome 3q26–28 is a critical region of genomic amplification in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), particularly lung squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). No molecular therapeutic target has shown clinical utility for SCC, in contrast with adenocarcinomas of the lung. To identify novel candidate drivers in this region, we performed both Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (array CGH, Agilent Human Genome CGH 244A oligo-microarrays) and Gene Expression Microarray (Agilent Human Gene Expression 4 × 44 K microarray) on 24 untreated lung SCC specimens. Using our previously published integrative genomics approach, we identified 12 top amplified driver genes within this region that are highly correlated and overexpressed in lung SCC. We further demonstrated one of the 12 top amplified driver Fragile X mental retardation-related protein 1 (FXR1) as a novel cancer gene in NSCLC and FXR1 executes its regulatory function by forming a novel complex with two other oncogenes, protein kinase C, iota ( PRKCI) and epithelial cell transforming 2 (ECT2) within the same amplicon in lung cancer cell. Here we report that immune response pathways are significantly suppressed in lung SCC and negatively associated with 3q driver gene expression, implying a potential role of 3q drivers in cancer immune-surveillance. In light of the attractive immunotherapy strategy using blockade of negative regulators of T cell function for multiple human cancer including lung SCC, our findings may provide a rationale for targeting 3q drivers in combination of immunotherapies for human tumors harboring the 3q amplicon. The data have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus and are accessible through GEO Series accession number GSE40089. PMID:26484266

  16. Development and application of loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays for rapid visual detection of cry2Ab and cry3A genes in genetically-modified crops.

    PubMed

    Li, Feiwu; Yan, Wei; Long, Likun; Qi, Xing; Li, Congcong; Zhang, Shihong

    2014-01-01

    The cry2Ab and cry3A genes are two of the most important insect-resistant exogenous genes and had been widely used in genetically-modified crops. To develop more effective alternatives for the quick identification of genetically-modified organisms (GMOs) containing these genes, a rapid and visual loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method to detect the cry2Ab and cry3A genes is described in this study. The LAMP assay can be finished within 60 min at an isothermal condition of 63 °C. The derived LAMP products can be obtained by a real-time turbidimeter via monitoring the white turbidity or directly observed by the naked eye through adding SYBR Green I dye. The specificity of the LAMP assay was determined by analyzing thirteen insect-resistant genetically-modified (GM) crop events with different Bt genes. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the LAMP assay was evaluated by diluting the template genomic DNA. Results showed that the limit of detection of the established LAMP assays was approximately five copies of haploid genomic DNA, about five-fold greater than that of conventional PCR assays. All of the results indicated that this established rapid and visual LAMP assay was quick, accurate and cost effective, with high specificity and sensitivity. In addition, this method does not need specific expensive instruments or facilities, which can provide a simpler and quicker approach to detecting the cry2Ab and cry3A genes in GM crops, especially for on-site, large-scale test purposes in the field. PMID:25167136

  17. Screening for tumor suppressors: Loss of ephrin receptor A2 cooperates with oncogenic KRas in promoting lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yeddula, Narayana; Xia, Yifeng; Ke, Eugene; Beumer, Joep; Verma, Inder M.

    2015-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma, a major form of non-small cell lung cancer, is the leading cause of cancer deaths. The Cancer Genome Atlas analysis of lung adenocarcinoma has identified a large number of previously unknown copy number alterations and mutations, requiring experimental validation before use in therapeutics. Here, we describe an shRNA-mediated high-throughput approach to test a set of genes for their ability to function as tumor suppressors in the background of mutant KRas and WT Tp53. We identified several candidate genes from tumors originated from lentiviral delivery of shRNAs along with Cre recombinase into lungs of Loxp-stop-Loxp-KRas mice. Ephrin receptorA2 (EphA2) is among the top candidate genes and was reconfirmed by two distinct shRNAs. By generating knockdown, inducible knockdown and knockout cell lines for loss of EphA2, we showed that negating its expression activates a transcriptional program for cell proliferation. Loss of EPHA2 releases feedback inhibition of KRAS, resulting in activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinase signaling, leading to enhanced cell proliferation. Intriguingly, loss of EPHA2 induces activation of GLI1 transcription factor and hedgehog signaling that further contributes to cell proliferation. Small molecules targeting MEK1/2 and Smoothened hamper proliferation in EphA2-deficient cells. Additionally, in EphA2 WT cells, activation of EPHA2 by its ligand, EFNA1, affects KRAS–RAF interaction, leading to inhibition of the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK pathway and cell proliferation. Together, our studies have identified that (i) EphA2 acts as a KRas cooperative tumor suppressor by in vivo screen and (ii) reactivation of the EphA2 signal may serve as a potential therapeutic for KRas-induced human lung cancers. PMID:26542681

  18. Matrix Metalloproteinase-10 Promotes Kras-Mediated Bronchio-Alveolar Stem Cell Expansion and Lung Cancer Formation

    PubMed Central

    Regala, Roderick P.; Justilien, Verline; Walsh, Michael P.; Weems, Capella; Khoor, Andras; Murray, Nicole R.; Fields, Alan P.

    2011-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 10 (MMP-10; stromelysin 2) is a member of a large family of structurally related matrix metalloproteinases, many of which have been implicated in tumor progression, invasion and metastasis. We recently identified Mmp10 as a gene that is highly induced in tumor-initiating lung bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs) upon activation of oncogenic Kras in a mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma. However, the potential role of Mmp10 in lung tumorigenesis has not been addressed. Here, we demonstrate that Mmp10 is overexpressed in lung tumors induced by either the smoke carcinogen urethane or oncogenic Kras. In addition, we report a significant reduction in lung tumor number and size after urethane exposure or genetic activation of oncogenic Kras in Mmp10 null (Mmp10−/−) mice. This inhibitory effect is reflected in a defect in the ability of Mmp10-deficient BASCs to expand and undergo transformation in response to urethane or oncogenic Kras in vivo and in vitro, demonstrating a role for Mmp10 in the tumor-initiating activity of Kras-transformed lung stem cells. To determine the potential relevance of MMP10 in human cancer we analyzed Mmp10 expression in publicly-available gene expression profiles of human cancers. Our analysis reveals that MMP10 is highly overexpressed in human lung tumors. Gene set enhancement analysis (GSEA) demonstrates that elevated MMP10 expression correlates with both cancer stem cell and tumor metastasis genomic signatures in human lung cancer. Finally, Mmp10 is elevated in many human tumor types suggesting a widespread role for Mmp10 in human malignancy. We conclude that Mmp10 plays an important role in lung tumor initiation via maintenance of a highly tumorigenic, cancer-initiating, stem-like cell population, and that Mmp10 expression is associated with stem-like, highly metastatic genotypes in human lung cancers. These results indicate that Mmp10 may represent a novel therapeutic approach to target lung cancer stem cells

  19. Oncogenic KRAS Regulates Tumor Cell Signaling via Stromal Reciprocation.

    PubMed

    Tape, Christopher J; Ling, Stephanie; Dimitriadi, Maria; McMahon, Kelly M; Worboys, Jonathan D; Leong, Hui Sun; Norrie, Ida C; Miller, Crispin J; Poulogiannis, George; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Jørgensen, Claus

    2016-05-01

    Oncogenic mutations regulate signaling within both tumor cells and adjacent stromal cells. Here, we show that oncogenic KRAS (KRAS(G12D)) also regulates tumor cell signaling via stromal cells. By combining cell-specific proteome labeling with multivariate phosphoproteomics, we analyzed heterocellular KRAS(G12D) signaling in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells. Tumor cell KRAS(G12D) engages heterotypic fibroblasts, which subsequently instigate reciprocal signaling in the tumor cells. Reciprocal signaling employs additional kinases and doubles the number of regulated signaling nodes from cell-autonomous KRAS(G12D). Consequently, reciprocal KRAS(G12D) produces a tumor cell phosphoproteome and total proteome that is distinct from cell-autonomous KRAS(G12D) alone. Reciprocal signaling regulates tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis and increases mitochondrial capacity via an IGF1R/AXL-AKT axis. These results demonstrate that oncogene signaling should be viewed as a heterocellular process and that our existing cell-autonomous perspective underrepresents the extent of oncogene signaling in cancer. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27087446

  20. MicroRNA Expression Signatures Associated With BRAF-Mutated Versus KRAS-Mutated Colorectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yong Won; Song, Young Soo; Lee, Hyunwoo; Yi, Kijong; Kim, Young-Bae; Suh, Kwang Wook; Lee, Dakeun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract BRAF and KRAS genes are known to play a similar role in the activation of RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway in colorectal tumorigenesis. However, BRAF-mutated colorectal cancers (CRCs) have distinct clinicopathologic characteristics different from those of the KRAS mutated ones as in comparison the BRAF-mutated CRCs are associated with a much worse prognosis for the afflicted patients. This study aimed to determine the different miRNA expression signatures associated with BRAF-mutated CRCs in comparison to KRAS-mutated ones, and to identify the specific miRNAs possibly mediating the aggressive phenotype of the BRAF-mutated CRCs. We screened 535 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded CRC tissue samples for the BRAF V600E mutation, and selected 7 BRAF-mutated and 7 KRAS-mutated CRCs that were tumor size, stage, and microsatellite status-matched. Affymetrix GeneChip® miRNA 4.0 Array was used for detection of miRNA expression differences in the selected samples. We validated the array results by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) for selected miRNAs. A total of 10 differentially expressed (DE) miRNAs associated with BRAF-mutated CRCs were obtained, including miR-31-5p, miR-877-5p, miR-362-5p, and miR-425-3p. miR-31-5p showed the highest fold change (8.3-fold) among all of the miRNAs analyzed. From the analyses of GO biological processes, the DE-miRNAs were functionally relevant to cellular proliferation such as positive regulation of gene expression (P = 1.26 × 10−10), transcription (P = 9.70 × 10−10), and RNA metabolic process (P = 1.97 × 10−9). Bioinformatics analysis showed that the DE-miRNAs were significantly enriched in cancer-associated pathways including neutrophin signaling (P = 6.84 × 10−5), pathways in cancer (P = 0.0016), Wnt signaling (P = 0.0027), and MAPK signaling pathway (P = 0.0036). Our results suggest that the DE-miRNAs in BRAF-mutated CRCs in comparison

  1. IS THE AMPLIFICATION OF c-MYC, MLL AND RUNX1 GENES IN AML AND MDS PATIENTS WITH TRISOMY 8, 11 AND 21 A FACTOR FOR A CLONAL EVOLUTION IN THEIR KARYOTYPE?

    PubMed

    Angelova, S; Spassov, B; Nikolova, V; Christov, I; Tzvetkov, N; Simeonova, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was 1) to define if the amplification of c-MYC, MLL and RUNX1 genes is related to the progressive changes of the karyotype in patients with AML and MDS with trisomy 8, 11 and 21 (+8, +11 and +21) in bone marrow and 2) can that amplification be accepted as part of the clonal evolution (CE). Karyotype analysis was performed in 179 patients with AML or MDS with the different chromosomal aberrations (CA) aged 16-81. The findings were distributed as follow: initiating balanced CA (n = 60), aneuploidia (n = 55), unbalanced CA (n = 64). Amplification of c-MYC, MLL and RUNX1 genes by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was found in 35% (7 out of 20) of AML and MDS patients with +8, +11 u +21 as single CA in their karyotype; in 63.6% of pts (7 out of 11)--with additional numerical or structural CA and in 75% (9 out of 12)--with complex karyotype. We assume that the amplification of the respective chromosomal regions in patients with +8, +11 and +21 is related to CE. Considering the amplification as a factor of CE, we established 3 patterns of karyotype development depending on the type of the initiating CA in it. Significant statistical differences were found between the three patterns regarding the karyotype distribution in the different stages of progression (p < 0.001). PMID:26214902

  2. Efficient GLP-1 gene delivery using two-step transcription amplification plasmid system with a secretion signal peptide and arginine-grafted bioreducible polymer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Il; Lee, Minhyung; Kim, Sung Wan

    2012-01-30

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) encoding dual plasmid (pDNA) system (TSTA (SP-GLP-1)) which is composed of pβ-Gal4-p65 and pUAS-SP-GLP-1 was constructed to improve the production and secretion of expressed GLP-1 by combining the advantages of signal peptide (SP) and two-step transcription amplification (TSTA) system. Its potential for GLP-1 gene delivery system was investigated with employment of arginine-grafted bioreducible polymer (ABP) as a gene carrier. Their polyplexes have about 140nm-sizes and 20mV Zeta-potential values. ABP showed no cytotoxicity contrary to PEI25k. It was found in RT-PCR experiments that TSTA-SP pDNA systems showed increased GLP-1 gene transcription level in comparison with mono pDNA system (pβ-GLP-1). It was also observed in GLP-1 ELISA that GLP-1 secretion level of TSTA (SP-GLP-1) pDNA system was 2.7-3.4 times higher than those of pβ-GLP-1 and 1.5-1.7 times than TSTA (GLP-1). Additionally, 2.5-3.5 folds increased level of GLP-1 secretion was found in ABP gene carrier system in comparison with PEI25k. When transfection medium containing secreted GLP-1 was transferred to NIT-1 insulinoma cells, the highest secretion level of insulin was induced in ABP/TSTA (SP-GLP-1) polyplex medium-treated cells. Therefore, this novel system could be utilized as a safe and efficient GLP-1 gene delivery system for type 2 diabetes therapy. PMID:21945681

  3. A combinatorial strategy for treating KRAS-mutant lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Manchado, Eusebio; Weissmueller, Susann; Morris, John P; Chen, Chi-Chao; Wullenkord, Ramona; Lujambio, Amaia; de Stanchina, Elisa; Poirier, John T; Gainor, Justin F; Corcoran, Ryan B; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Rudin, Charles M; Rosen, Neal; Lowe, Scott W

    2016-06-30

    Therapeutic targeting of KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinoma represents a major goal of clinical oncology. KRAS itself has proved difficult to inhibit, and the effectiveness of agents that target key KRAS effectors has been thwarted by activation of compensatory or parallel pathways that limit their efficacy as single agents. Here we take a systematic approach towards identifying combination targets for trametinib, a MEK inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, which acts downstream of KRAS to suppress signalling through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. Informed by a short-hairpin RNA screen, we show that trametinib provokes a compensatory response involving the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) that leads to signalling rebound and adaptive drug resistance. As a consequence, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of FGFR1 in combination with trametinib enhances tumour cell death in vitro and in vivo. This compensatory response shows distinct specificities: it is dominated by FGFR1 in KRAS-mutant lung and pancreatic cancer cells, but is not activated or involves other mechanisms in KRAS wild-type lung and KRAS-mutant colon cancer cells. Importantly, KRAS-mutant lung cancer cells and patients’ tumours treated with trametinib show an increase in FRS2 phosphorylation, a biomarker of FGFR activation; this increase is abolished by FGFR1 inhibition and correlates with sensitivity to trametinib and FGFR inhibitor combinations. These results demonstrate that FGFR1 can mediate adaptive resistance to trametinib and validate a combinatorial approach for treating KRAS-mutant lung cancer. PMID:27338794

  4. Oncogenic KRAS and BRAF Drive Metabolic Reprogramming in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Josiah E; Wang, Xiaojing; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Slebos, Robbert J C; Trenary, Irina A; Young, Jamey D; Li, Ming; Liebler, Daniel C

    2016-09-01

    Metabolic reprogramming, in which altered utilization of glucose and glutamine supports rapid growth, is a hallmark of most cancers. Mutations in the oncogenes KRAS and BRAF drive metabolic reprogramming through enhanced glucose uptake, but the broader impact of these mutations on pathways of carbon metabolism is unknown. Global shotgun proteomic analysis of isogenic DLD-1 and RKO colon cancer cell lines expressing mutant and wild type KRAS or BRAF, respectively, failed to identify significant differences (at least 2-fold) in metabolic protein abundance. However, a multiplexed parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) strategy targeting 73 metabolic proteins identified significant protein abundance increases of 1.25-twofold in glycolysis, the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway, glutamine metabolism, and the phosphoserine biosynthetic pathway in cells with KRAS G13D mutations or BRAF V600E mutations. These alterations corresponded to mutant KRAS and BRAF-dependent increases in glucose uptake and lactate production. Metabolic reprogramming and glucose conversion to lactate in RKO cells were proportional to levels of BRAF V600E protein. In DLD-1 cells, these effects were independent of the ratio of KRAS G13D to KRAS wild type protein. A study of 8 KRAS wild type and 8 KRAS mutant human colon tumors confirmed the association of increased expression of glycolytic and glutamine metabolic proteins with KRAS mutant status. Metabolic reprogramming is driven largely by modest (<2-fold) alterations in protein expression, which are not readily detected by the global profiling methods most commonly employed in proteomic studies. The results indicate the superiority of more precise, multiplexed, pathway-targeted analyses to study functional proteome systems. Data are available through MassIVE Accession MSV000079486 at ftp://MSV000079486@massive.ucsd.edu. PMID:27340238

  5. Rapid KRAS Mutation Detection via Hybridization-Induced Aggregation of Microbeads.

    PubMed

    Sloane, Hillary S; Kelly, Kimberly A; Landers, James P

    2015-10-20

    Using hybridization-induced aggregation (HIA), a unique bead-based DNA detection technology scalable for a microchip platform, we describe a simplistic, low-cost method for rapid mutation testing. HIA utilizes a pair of sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes bound to magnetic microbeads. Hybridization to a target DNA strand tethers the beads together, inducing bead aggregation. By simply using the extent of bead aggregation as a measure of the hybridization efficiency, we avoid the need for additional labels and sophisticated analytical equipment. Through strategic manipulation of the assay design and experimental parameters, we use HIA to facilitate, for the first time, the detection of single base mutations in a gene segment and, specifically, the detection of activating KRAS mutations. Following the development and optimization of the assay, we apply it for KRAS mutation analysis of four human cancer cell lines. Ultimately, we present a proof-of-principle method for detecting any of the common KRAS mutations in a single-step, 2 min assay, using only one set of oligonucleotide probes, for a total analysis time of less than 10 min post-PCR. The assay is performed at room temperature and uses simple, inexpensive instrumentation that permits multiplexed analysis. PMID:26339780

  6. Anti-tumor activity of ESX1 on cancer cells harboring oncogenic K-ras mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Junta; Ishikawa, Susumu; Hamada, Jun-Ichi; Yanagihara, Masatomo; Koike, Takao; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2008-05-23

    Human ESX1 is a 65-kilodalton (kDa) paired-like homeoprotein that is proteolytically processed into N-terminal 45-kDa and C-terminal 20-kDa fragments. The N-terminal ESX1 fragment, which contains the homeodomain, localizes to the nucleus and represses mRNA transcription from the K-ras gene. When we inoculated human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 constitutive expressing N-terminal region of ESX1 (N-ESX1) into nude mice, transfectant cells uniformly showed decreased tumor-forming activity compared with that of the parental cells. Furthermore, pretreatment of HCT116 carcinoma cells with a fusion protein consisting of N-ESX1 and the protein-transduction domain derived from the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 TAT protein gave rise to a dramatic reduction in the tumorigenicity of HCT116 cells in nude mice. Our results provide first in vivo evidence for the molecular targeting therapeutic application of the K-ras repressor ESX1, especially TAT-mediated transduction of N-ESX1, in the treatment of human cancers having oncogenic K-ras mutations.

  7. Amplification of a novel gene, sanA, abolishes a vancomycin-sensitive defect in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Rida, S; Caillet, J; Alix, J H

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated an Escherichia coli gene which, when overexpressed, is able to complement the permeability defects of a vancomycin-susceptible mutant. This gene, designated sanA, is located at min 47 of the E. coli chromosome and codes for a 20-kDa protein with a highly hydrophobic amino-terminal segment. A strain carrying a null mutation of the sanA gene, transferred to the E. coli chromosome by homologous recombination, is perfectly viable, but after two generations at high temperature (43 degrees C), the barrier function of its envelope towards vancomycin is defective. PMID:8550448

  8. The cytological manifestation of gene amplification in multidrug-resistant mouse leukemia P388 sublines is correlated with amplicon content

    SciTech Connect

    Il`inskaya, G.V.; Kopnin, B.P.; Demidova, N.S.

    1995-10-01

    Previously, we showed that development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in mouse P388 leukemia cells is often associated with the appearance of newly-formed chromosomelike structures that contain amplified copies of the mdr1 gene. In the present study, we compared amplicon content in P388 sublines showing different types of these structures. A strong correlation between the formation of specific acentric markers consisting of two identical arms and the absence of the sorcin gene coamplification was found. In all the sublines containing other types of chromosomelike structures, the sorcin gene is coamplified. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Experimental Evolution Identifies Vaccinia Virus Mutations in A24R and A35R That Antagonize the Protein Kinase R Pathway and Accompany Collapse of an Extragenic Gene Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Greg; Kitzman, Jacob O.; Shendure, Jay

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most new human infectious diseases emerge from cross-species pathogen transmissions; however, it is not clear how viruses adapt to productively infect new hosts. Host restriction factors represent one species-specific barrier that viruses may initially have little ability to inhibit in new hosts. For example, viral antagonists of protein kinase R (PKR) vary in their ability to block PKR-mediated inhibition of viral replication, in part due to PKR allelic variation between species. We previously reported that amplification of a weak PKR antagonist encoded by rhesus cytomegalovirus, rhtrs1, improved replication of a recombinant poxvirus (VVΔEΔK+RhTRS1) in several resistant primate cells. To test whether amplification increases the opportunity for mutations that improve virus replication with only a single copy of rhtrs1 to evolve, we passaged rhtrs1-amplified viruses in semipermissive primate cells. After passage, we isolated two viruses that contained only a single copy of rhtrs1 yet replicated as well as the amplified virus. Surprisingly, rhtrs1 was not mutated in these viruses; instead, we identified mutations in two vaccinia virus (VACV) genes, A24R and A35R, either of which was sufficient to improve VVΔEΔK+RhTRS1 replication. Neither of these genes has previously been implicated in PKR antagonism. Furthermore, the mutation in A24R, but not A35R, increased resistance to the antipoxviral drug isatin-β-thiosemicarbazone, suggesting that these mutations employ different mechanisms to evade PKR. This study supports our hypothesis that gene amplification may provide a “molecular foothold,” broadly improving replication to facilitate rapid adaptation, while subsequent mutations maintain this efficient replication in the new host without requiring gene amplification. IMPORTANCE Understanding how viruses adapt to a new host may help identify viruses poised to cross species barriers before an outbreak occurs. Amplification of rhtrs1, a weak viral

  10. Heterogeneity of KRAS Mutation Status in Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Peter; König, Alexander; Schirmer, Markus; Kitz, Julia; Conradi, Lena-Christin; Azizian, Azadeh; Bernhardt, Markus; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Grade, Marian; Ghadimi, Michael; Ströbel, Philipp; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Gaedcke, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anti-EGFR targeted therapy is of increasing importance in advanced colorectal cancer and prior KRAS mutation testing is mandatory for therapy. However, at which occasions this should be performed is still under debate. We aimed to assess in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer whether there is intra-specimen KRAS heterogeneity prior to and upon preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT), and if there are any changes in KRAS mutation status due to this intervention. Materials and Methods KRAS mutation status analyses were performed in 199 tumor samples from 47 patients with rectal cancer. To evaluate the heterogeneity between different tumor areas within the same tumor prior to preoperative CRT, 114 biopsies from 34 patients (mean 3 biopsies per patient) were analyzed (pre-therapeutic intratumoral heterogeneity). For the assessment of heterogeneity after CRT residual tumor tissue (85 samples) from 12 patients (mean 4.2 tissue samples per patient) were analyzed (post-therapeutic intratumoral heterogeneity) and assessment of heterogeneity before and after CRT was evaluated in corresponding patient samples (interventional heterogeneity). Primer extension method (SNaPshot™) was used for initial KRAS mutation status testing for Codon 12, 13, 61, and 146. Discordant results by this method were reevaluated by using the FDA-approved KRAS Pyro Kit 24, V1 and the RAS Extension Pyro Kit 24, V1 Kit (therascreen® KRAS test). Results For 20 (43%) out of the 47 patients, a KRAS mutation was detected. With 12 out of 20, the majority of these mutations affected codon 35. We did not obtained evidence that CRT results in changes of the KRAS mutation pattern. In addition, no intratumoral heterogeneity in the KRAS mutational status could be proven. This was true for both the biopsies prior to CRT and the resection specimens thereafter. The discrepancy observed in some samples when using the SNaPshot™ assay was due to insufficient sensitivity of this technique upon

  11. BCL11A overexpression predicts survival and relapse in non-small cell lung cancer and is modulated by microRNA-30a and gene amplification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aberrant activation of the proto-oncogene B-cell lymphoma/leukemia 11A (BCL11A) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of leukemia and lymphoma. However, the clinical significance of BCL11A in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains unknown. Results We examined BCL11A expression at the protein and mRNA levels in a cohort (n = 114) of NSCLC patients and assessed the relationship between BCL11A expression and clinicopathological parameters. Data from array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) and microRNA transfection experiments were integrated to explore the potential mechanisms of abnormal BCL11A activation in NSCLC. Compared to adjacent non-cancerous lung tissues, BCL11A expression levels were specifically upregulated in NSCLC tissues at both the mRNA (t = 9.81, P < 0.001) and protein levels. BCL11A protein levels were higher in patients with squamous histology (χ2 = 15.81, P = 0.001), smokers (χ2 = 8.92, P = 0.004), patients with no lymph node involvement (χ2 = 5.14, P = 0.029), and patients with early stage disease (χ2 = 3.91, P = 0.048). A multivariate analysis demonstrated that in early stage NSCLC (IA–IIB), BCL11A was not only an independent prognostic factor for disease-free survival (hazards ratio [HR] 0.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.12-0.50, P < 0.001), but also for overall survival (HR = 0.23, 95% CI 0.09-0.61, P = 0.003). The average BCL11A expression level was much higher in SCC samples with amplifications than in those without amplifications (t = 3.30, P = 0.023). Assessing functionality via an in vitro luciferase reporter system and western blotting, we found that the BCL11A protein was a target of miR-30a. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that proto-oncogene BCL11A activation induced by miR-30a and gene amplification may be a potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for effective management of this disease. PMID:23758992

  12. EVI1, a target gene for amplification at 3q26, antagonizes transforming growth factor-β-mediated growth inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Kohichiroh; Konishi, Chika; Gen, Yasuyuki; Endo, Mio; Dohi, Osamu; Tomie, Akira; Kitaichi, Tomoko; Yamada, Nobuhisa; Iwai, Naoto; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Yamaguchi, Kanji; Moriguchi, Michihisa; Sumida, Yoshio; Mitsuyoshi, Hironori; Tanaka, Shinji; Arii, Shigeki; Itoh, Yoshito

    2015-01-01

    EVI1 (ecotropic viral integration site 1) is one of the most aggressive oncogenes associated with myeloid leukemia. We investigated DNA copy number aberrations in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray. We found that a novel amplification at the chromosomal region 3q26 occurs in the HCC cell line JHH-1, and that MECOM (MDS1 and EVI1 complex locus), which lies within the 3q26 region, was amplified. Quantitative PCR analysis of the three transcripts transcribed from MECOM indicated that only EVI1, but not the fusion transcript MDS1–EVI1 or MDS1, was overexpressed in JHH-1 cells and was significantly upregulated in 22 (61%) of 36 primary HCC tumors when compared with their non-tumorous counterparts. A copy number gain of EVI1 was observed in 24 (36%) of 66 primary HCC tumors. High EVI1 expression was significantly associated with larger tumor size and higher level of des-γ-carboxy prothrombin, a tumor marker for HCC. Knockdown of EVI1 resulted in increased induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p15INK4B by transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and decreased expression of c-Myc, cyclin D1, and phosphorylated Rb in TGF-β-treated cells. Consequently, knockdown of EVI1 led to reduced DNA synthesis and cell viability. Collectively, our results suggest that EVI1 is a probable target gene that acts as a driving force for the amplification at 3q26 in HCC and that the oncoprotein EVI1 antagonizes TGF-β-mediated growth inhibition of HCC cells. PMID:25959919

  13. Rapid and simple method for detecting the toxin B gene of Clostridium difficile in stool specimens by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Kato, Haru; Yokoyama, Toshiyuki; Kato, Hideaki; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2005-12-01

    We applied the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay to the detection of the toxin B gene (tcdB) of Clostridium difficile for identification of toxin B (TcdB)-positive C. difficile strains and detection of tcdB in stool specimens. tcdB was detected in all toxin A (TcdA)-positive, TcdB-positive (A(+)B(+)) and TcdA-negative, TcdB-positive (A(-)B(+)) C. difficile strains but not from TcdA-negative, TcdB-negative strains. Of the 74 stool specimens examined, A(+)B(+) or A(-)B(+) C. difficile was recovered from 39 specimens, of which 38 specimens were LAMP positive and one was negative. Amplification was obtained in 10 specimens that were culture negative, indicating that LAMP is highly sensitive. The LAMP assay was applied to detection of tcdB in DNA extracted by a simple boiling method from 47 of those 74 specimens, which were cultured overnight in cooked-meat medium (CMM). Twenty-two of 24 culture-positive specimens were positive for LAMP on DNA from the culture in CMM. Four specimens were culture negative but positive by LAMP on DNA from CMM cultures. The LAMP assay is a reliable tool for identification of TcdB-positive C. difficile as well as for direct detection of tcdB in stool specimens with high sensitivity. Detection of tcdB by LAMP from overnight cultures in CMM could be an alternative method of diagnostic testing at clinical laboratories without special apparatus. PMID:16333105

  14. Serum-Based Quantification of MYCN Gene Amplification in Young Patients with Neuroblastoma: Potential Utility as a Surrogate Biomarker for Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Yagyu, Shigeki; Iehara, Tomoko; Tanaka, Shiro; Gotoh, Takahiro; Misawa-Furihata, Akiko; Sugimoto, Tohru; London, Wendy B; Hogarty, Michael D; Teramukai, Satoshi; Nakagawara, Akira; Hiyama, Eiso; Maris, John M; Hosoi, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    We previously developed a method for determining MYCN gene amplification status using cell-free DNA fragments released from cancer cells into the blood of patients with neuroblastoma (NB). Here, we analyzed the relationship between MYCN amplification (MNA) status and neuroblastoma prognosis. We screened serum samples from 151 patients with NB for MNA, using real-time quantitative PCR, and compared the results with MYCN status determined using paired tumor samples. We additionally investigated whether MNA status correlates with patient survival. When a cut-off value of 5 was used, serum-based MNA analysis was found to show good sensitivity (86%) and very high specificity (95%). The sensitivities for stage 1 and 2 might be acceptable, even though it is not as good as for stage 3 and 4 (67% for stage 1 and 2, 92% for stage 3, and 87% for stage 4). MNA status correlated with overall survival in our cohort of 82 patients, with survival data available (p < 0.01). The hazard ratio of MNA status was 4.98 in patients diagnosed at less than 18 months of age (95% confidence interval, 1.00-24.78), and 1.41 (95% confidence interval, 0.63-3.14) for those diagnosed at 18 months of age or older. Serum-based MNA analysis is rapid and non-invasive compared with tumor-based MNA analysis, and has potential to predict tumor MNA status. There is still a room to improve the sensitivity of the test for tumors of stages 1 and 2, nonetheless this assay might help to determine therapeutic strategies prior to tumor biopsy, especially for patients with a life-threatening condition, as well as for patients of less than 18 months of age whose risk-grouping and treatment allocation depends on their MNA status. PMID:27513929

  15. Hyd5 gene-based detection of the major gushing-inducing Fusarium spp. in a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay.

    PubMed

    Denschlag, Carla; Vogel, Rudi F; Niessen, Ludwig

    2012-06-01

    Fusarium graminearum and the closely related F. culmorum were found to be associated with over foaming of bottled beer (gushing) when contaminated brewing malt is used. The presence of highly surface active hydrophobins produced by these fungi upon growth on wheat or barley in the field or during malting may affect bubble formation and stability in gushing beers and other carbonated beverages. Aiming for a method for the rapid and user friendly analysis of unmalted and malted cereals during quality control in the brewing industry, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for the detection of Fusarium spp. capable of producing the gushing inducing hydrophobin Hyd5p was set up. A set of primers was designed towards a 221 bp region within the hyd5 gene of F. culmorum. The LAMP product was verified by sequencing a 150 bp portion. Testing specificity with purified DNA from 99 different fungal species as well as barley and wheat showed that DNA synthesis only occurred during LAMP when DNA of the closely related species F. graminearum, F. culmorum, F. cerealis and F. lunulosporum were used as template. In-tube indirect detection of DNA amplification was applied using manganese-quenched calcein as fluorescence indicator for pyrophosphate produced during DNA synthesis. The assay had a detection limit of 0.74 pg of purified target DNA which corresponds 20 copy numbers per reaction within 30 minutes using a simple heating block. Analysis of Fusarium infected cereals revealed that the assay was able to detect F. graminearum at a level of 0.5% of infected grains in uninfected barley by analysis of surface washings without further sample preparation. Results show that the hyd5 based LAMP assay can be a rapid, useful and sensitive tool for quality control in the brewing and malting industry. PMID:22554927

  16. Serum-Based Quantification of MYCN Gene Amplification in Young Patients with Neuroblastoma: Potential Utility as a Surrogate Biomarker for Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Yagyu, Shigeki; Iehara, Tomoko; Tanaka, Shiro; Gotoh, Takahiro; Misawa-Furihata, Akiko; Sugimoto, Tohru; London, Wendy B.; Hogarty, Michael D.; Teramukai, Satoshi; Nakagawara, Akira; Hiyama, Eiso; Maris, John M.; Hosoi, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    We previously developed a method for determining MYCN gene amplification status using cell-free DNA fragments released from cancer cells into the blood of patients with neuroblastoma (NB). Here, we analyzed the relationship between MYCN amplification (MNA) status and neuroblastoma prognosis. We screened serum samples from 151 patients with NB for MNA, using real-time quantitative PCR, and compared the results with MYCN status determined using paired tumor samples. We additionally investigated whether MNA status correlates with patient survival. When a cut-off value of 5 was used, serum-based MNA analysis was found to show good sensitivity (86%) and very high specificity (95%). The sensitivities for stage 1 and 2 might be acceptable, even though it is not as good as for stage 3 and 4 (67% for stage 1 and 2, 92% for stage 3, and 87% for stage 4). MNA status correlated with overall survival in our cohort of 82 patients, with survival data available (p < 0.01). The hazard ratio of MNA status was 4.98 in patients diagnosed at less than 18 months of age (95% confidence interval, 1.00–24.78), and 1.41 (95% confidence interval, 0.63–3.14) for those diagnosed at 18 months of age or older. Serum-based MNA analysis is rapid and non-invasive compared with tumor-based MNA analysis, and has potential to predict tumor MNA status. There is still a room to improve the sensitivity of the test for tumors of stages 1 and 2, nonetheless this assay might help to determine therapeutic strategies prior to tumor biopsy, especially for patients with a life-threatening condition, as well as for patients of less than 18 months of age whose risk-grouping and treatment allocation depends on their MNA status. PMID:27513929

  17. Massively parallel sequencing of phyllodes tumours of the breast reveals actionable mutations, and TERT promoter hotspot mutations and TERT gene amplification as likely drivers of progression.

    PubMed

    Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Ng, Charlotte Ky; Murray, Melissa; Burke, Kathleen A; Edelweiss, Marcia; Geyer, Felipe C; Macedo, Gabriel S; Inagaki, Akiko; Papanastasiou, Anastasios D; Martelotto, Luciano G; Marchio, Caterina; Lim, Raymond S; Ioris, Rafael A; Nahar, Pooja K; Bruijn, Ino De; Smyth, Lillian; Akram, Muzaffar; Ross, Dara; Petrini, John H; Norton, Larry; Solit, David B; Baselga, Jose; Brogi, Edi; Ladanyi, Marc; Weigelt, Britta; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2016-03-01

    Phyllodes tumours (PTs) are breast fibroepithelial lesions that are graded based on histological criteria as benign, borderline or malignant. PTs may recur locally. Borderline PTs and malignant PTs may metastasize to distant sites. Breast fibroepithelial lesions, including PTs and fibroadenomas, are characterized by recurrent MED12 exon 2 somatic mutations. We sought to define the repertoire of somatic genetic alterations in PTs and whether these may assist in the differential diagnosis of these lesions. We collected 100 fibroadenomas, 40 benign PTs, 14 borderline PTs and 22 malignant PTs; six, six and 13 benign, borderline and malignant PTs, respectively, and their matched normal tissue, were subjected to targeted massively parallel sequencing (MPS) using the MSK-IMPACT sequencing assay. Recurrent MED12 mutations were found in 56% of PTs; in addition, mutations affecting cancer genes (eg TP53, RB1, SETD2 and EGFR) were exclusively detected in borderline and malignant PTs. We found a novel recurrent clonal hotspot mutation in the TERT promoter (-124 C>T) in 52% and TERT gene amplification in 4% of PTs. Laser capture microdissection revealed that these mutations were restricted to the mesenchymal component of PTs. Sequencing analysis of the entire cohort revealed that the frequency of TERT alterations increased from benign (18%) to borderline (57%) and to malignant PTs (68%; p < 0.01), and TERT alterations were associated with increased levels of TERT mRNA (p < 0.001). No TERT alterations were observed in fibroadenomas. An analysis of TERT promoter sequencing and gene amplification distinguished PTs from fibroadenomas with a sensitivity and a positive predictive value of 100% (CI 95.38-100%) and 100% (CI 85.86-100%), respectively, and a sensitivity and a negative predictive value of 39% (CI 28.65-51.36%) and 68% (CI 60.21-75.78%), respectively. Our results suggest that TERT alterations may drive the progression of PTs, and may assist in the differential diagnosis

  18. An isochromosome confers drug resistance in vivo by amplification of two genes, ERG11 and TAC1.

    PubMed

    Selmecki, Anna; Gerami-Nejad, Maryam; Paulson, Carsten; Forche, Anja; Berman, Judith

    2008-05-01

    Acquired azole resistance is a serious clinical problem that is often associated with the appearance of aneuploidy and, in particular, with the formation of an isochromosome [i(5L)] in the fungal opportunist Candida albicans. Here we exploited a series of isolates from an individual patient during the rapid acquisition of fluconazole resistance (Flu(R)). Comparative genome hybridization arrays revealed that the presence of two extra copies of Chr5L, on the isochromosome, conferred increased Flu(R) and that partial truncation of Chr5L reduced Flu(R). In vitro analysis of the strains by telomere-mediated truncations and by gene deletion assessed the contribution of all Chr5L genes and of four specific genes. Importantly, ERG11 (encoding the drug target) and a hyperactive allele of TAC1 (encoding a transcriptional regulator of drug efflux pumps) made independent, additive contributions to Flu(R) in a gene copy number-dependent manner that was not different from the contributions of the entire Chr5L arm. Thus, the major mechanism by which i(5L) formation causes increased azole resistance is by amplifying two genes: ERG11 and TAC1. PMID:18363649

  19. Identification of Tunisian Leishmania spp. by PCR amplification of cysteine proteinase B (cpb) genes and phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Chaouch, Melek; Fathallah-Mili, Akila; Driss, Mehdi; Lahmadi, Ramzi; Ayari, Chiraz; Guizani, Ikram; Ben Said, Moncef; Benabderrazak, Souha

    2013-03-01

    Discrimination of the Old World Leishmania parasites is important for diagnosis and epidemiological studies of leishmaniasis. We have developed PCR assays that allow the discrimination between Leishmania major, Leishmania tropica and Leishmania infantum Tunisian species. The identification was performed by a simple PCR targeting cysteine protease B (cpb) gene copies. These PCR can be a routine molecular biology tools for discrimination of Leishmania spp. from different geographical origins and different clinical forms. Our assays can be an informative source for cpb gene studying concerning drug, diagnostics and vaccine research. The PCR products of the cpb gene and the N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate transferase (nagt) Leishmania gene were sequenced and aligned. Phylogenetic trees of Leishmania based cpb and nagt sequences are close in topology and present the classic distribution of Leishmania in the Old World. The phylogenetic analysis has enabled the characterization and identification of different strains, using both multicopy (cpb) and single copy (nagt) genes. Indeed, the cpb phylogenetic analysis allowed us to identify the Tunisian Leishmania killicki species, and a group which gathers the least evolved isolates of the Leishmania donovani complex, that was originated from East Africa. This clustering confirms the African origin for the visceralizing species of the L. donovani complex. PMID:23228525

  20. Assessment of DDR2, BRAF, EGFR and KRAS mutations as therapeutic targets in non-adenocarcinoma lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    YASHIMA, HIDEAKI; SHIMIZU, KIMIHIRO; ARAKI, TAKUYA; AOMORI, TOHRU; OHTAKI, YOICHI; NAGASHIMA, TOSHITERU; ENOKIDA, YASUAKI; ATSUMI, JUN; NAKAMURA, TOMONORI; TAKEYOSHI, IZUMI; YAMAMOTO, KOUJIROU

    2014-01-01

    Molecular-targeted therapy has not been established in non-adenocarcinoma lung cancer (non-AdLC), as no targets that affect the clinical efficacy of molecular-targeted drugs have yet been identified. In this study, we investigated the frequency of genetic variations in discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2), v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) in non-AdLC patients, in order to evaluate the possibility of genetic mutations in these genes being used as therapeutic targets for the treatment of patients with non-AdLC. For this purpose, we enrolled 150 non-AdLC patients who had undergone surgery at the Gunma University Hospital between December, 2003 and December, 2012. Genetic mutations in the EGFR, KRAS, DDR2 and BRAF genes were detected by a sequencing method or probe assay using DNA derived from cancer tissues. No somatic mutations in DDR2 or BRAF were detected in non-AdLC patients. Conversely, genetic mutations in EGFR exon 19 were found in 3 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and 3 adenosquamous carcinoma patients, whereas KRAS codon 12 mutations were also found in 3 SCC patients and 1 large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma patient. EGFR and KRAS mutations were mutually exclusive. This study indicated that, although DDR2 and BRAF mutations may only rarely be used as therapeutic targets, EGFR and KRAS mutations may represent candidate therapeutic targets, at least in the non-AdLC patients investigated. PMID:25054035

  1. Antitumoral Efficacy of the Protease Inhibitor Gabexate Mesilate in Colon Cancer Cells Harbouring KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Brandi, Giovanni; Tavolari, Simona; De Rosa, Francesco; Di Girolamo, Stefania; Agostini, Valentina; Barbera, Maria Aurelia; Frega, Giorgio; Biasco, Guido

    2012-01-01

    The employment of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies represents a backbone of the therapeutic options for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, this therapy is poorly effective or ineffective in unselected patients. Mutations in KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA genes have recently emerged as the best predictive factors of low/absent response to EGFR-targeted therapy. Due to the need for efficacious treatment options for mCRC patients bearing these mutations, in this short report we examined the antitumoral activity of the protease inhibitor gabexate mesilate, alone and in combination with the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab, in a panel of human CRC cell lines harbouring a different expression pattern of wild-type/mutated KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA genes. Results obtained showed that gabexate mesilate significantly inhibited the growth, invasive potential and tumour-induced angiogenesis in all the CRC cells employed in this study (including those ones harbouring dual KRAS/PIK3CA or BRAF/PIK3CA mutation), while cetuximab affected these parameters only in CRC cells with KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA wild-type. Notably, the antitumoral efficacy of gabexate mesilate and cetuximab in combination was found to be not superior than that observed with gabexate mesilate as single agent. Overall, these preliminary findings suggest that gabexate mesilate could represent a promising therapeutic option for mCRC patients, particularly for those harbouring KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutations, either as mono-therapy or in addition to standard chemotherapy regimens. Further studies to better elucidate gabexate mesilate mechanism of action in CRC cells are therefore warranted. PMID:22911782

  2. miR-181a shows tumor suppressive effect against oral squamous cell carcinoma cells by downregulating K-ras

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Bae, Susan D.; Hong, Hannah S.; Kim, Reuben H.; Kang, Mo K.; Park, No-Hee

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: {yields} MicroRNA-181a (miR-181a) was frequently downregulated in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). {yields} Overexpression of miR-181a suppressed OSCC growth. {yields} K-ras is a novel target of miR-181a. {yields} Decreased miR-181a expression is attributed to its lower promoter activity in OSCC. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are epigenetic regulators of gene expression, and their deregulation plays an important role in human cancer, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Recently, we found that miRNA-181a (miR-181a) was upregulated during replicative senescence of normal human oral keratinocytes. Since senescence is considered as a tumor suppressive mechanism, we thus investigated the expression and biological role of miR-181a in OSCC. We found that miR-181a was frequently downregulated in OSCC. Ectopic expression of miR-181a suppressed proliferation and anchorage independent growth ability of OSCC. Moreover, miR-181a dramatically reduces the growth of OSCC on three dimensional organotypic raft culture. We also identified K-ras as a novel target of miR-181a. miR-181a decreased K-ras protein level as well as the luciferase activity of reporter vectors containing the 3'-untranslated region of K-ras gene. Finally, we defined a minimal regulatory region of miR-181a and found a positive correlation between its promoter activity and the level of miR-181a expression. In conclusion, miR-181a may function as an OSCC suppressor by targeting on K-ras oncogene. Thus, miR-181a should be considered for therapeutic application for OSCC.

  3. Amplification of toluene dioxygenase genes in a hybrid Pseudomonas strain to enhance the biodegradation of benzene, toluene, and p-xylene mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.Y.; Jung, K.H.; Kim, H.S.

    1995-03-20

    A hybrid metabolic pathway through which benzene, toluene, and p-xylene (BTX) mixture could be simultaneously mineralized was previously constructed in Pseudomonas putida TB101. In this work, the authors improved the performance of the hybrid pathway by cloning the todC1C2BA genes in the broad-host-range multicopy vector RSF1010 and by introducing the resulting plasmid pTOL037 into P. putida mt-2 which harbors the archetypal TOL plasmid. As a result, a new hybrid strain, P. putida TB103, possessing the enhanced activity of toluene dioxygenase in the hybrid pathway was constructed. The degradation rates of benzene, toluene, and p-xylene by P. putida TB103 were increased by about 9.3-, 3.7-, and 1.4-fold, respectively, compared with those by previously constructed P. putida TB101. Apparently, this improved capability of P. putida TB103 for the degradation of BTX mixture resulted from the amplification of the todC1C2BA genes. Furthermore, a relatively long lag period for benzene degradation observed when P. putida TB101 was used for the degradation of BTX mixture at low dissolved oxygen (DO) tension disappeared when P. putida TB103 was employed.

  4. Development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for the detection of F5 fimbriae gene in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kuiyu; Zhu, Ying; Liu, Wenxin; Feng, Yufei; He, Lili; Guan, Weikun; Hu, Wenxia; Shi, Dongfang

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to establish a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for the detection of F5 fimbriae gene in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. A set of four primers were designed based on the conservative sequence of coding F5 fimbriae. Temperature and time condition, specificity test, and sensitivity test were performed with the DNA of Escherichia coli (F5+). The results showed that the optimal reaction condition for LAMP was achieved at 61 °C for 45 min in a water bath. Ladder-like products were produced with those F5-positive samples by LAMP, while no product was generated with other negative samples. The assay of LAMP had a detection limit equivalent to 72 cfu/tube, which was more sensitive than PCR (7.2 × 10(2) cfu/tube). The agreement rate between LAMP and PCR was 100 % in detecting simulation samples. Thus, the LAMP assay may be a new method for rapid detection of F5 fimbriae gene of ETEC. PMID:22890294

  5. Identification of the emerging skin pathogen Corynebacterium amycolatum using PCR-amplification of the essential divIVA gene as a target.

    PubMed

    Letek, M; Ordóñez, E; Fernández-Natal, I; Gil, J A; Mateos, L M

    2006-12-01

    The actinomycete Corynebacterium amycolatum is a saprophytic bacterium usually associated with the human skin, but it is at present considered an emergent pathogen as it is isolated from nosocomial settings from samples of immunosuppressed patients. The conventional method to distinguish C. amycolatum from closely related species is mainly based on phenotypic or chemotaxonomic studies. We developed a molecular method to identify rapidly C. amycolatum based on the use of different primers for amplification of the cell division divIVA gene using conventional or real-time PCR. This technique was used for the first time to distinguish C. amycolatum from the closely related Corynebacterium striatum, Corynebacterium minutissimum and Corynebacterium xerosis, without the requirement of further molecular analysis. The suitability of the identification method was tested on 51 clinical isolates belonging to the nonlipophilic fermentative group of corynebacteria (cluster C. striatum/C. amycolatum), which were accurately characterized by sequencing a 0.8 kb fragment of the 16S rRNA gene. PMID:17147766

  6. KRAS promoter oligonucleotide with decoy activity dimerizes into a unique topology consisting of two G-quadruplex units

    PubMed Central

    Podbevšek, Peter; Plavec, Janez

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the KRAS proto-oncogene are associated with several tumor types, which is why it is being considered as a target for anti-cancer drug development. The human KRAS promoter contains a nuclease hypersensitive element (NHE), which can bind to nuclear proteins and is believed to form G-quadruplex structures. Previous studies showed that a 32-nt oligonucleotide (32R-3n) mimicking the KRAS NHE can reduce gene transcription by sequestering MAZ, a crucial transcription factor. Here we show that 32R-3n has to dimerize in order to fold into a G-quadruplex structure. Individual 5′- and 3′-end G-quadruplex units are formed and both feature a symmetric head-to-head topology with edge-type loops. The MAZ binding sequence is located within the 3′-end unit. Nuclear magnetic resonance data complemented by CD and UV spectra show that nucleotides of the MAZ binding G-rich motif are dynamic and could be available for sequence or structure based recognition. Both stable G-quadruplex structures could protect 5′- and 3′-ends of 32R-3n and enhance its anti-cancer activity. Single stranded genomic KRAS NHE including nucleotides flanking the 32R-3n sequence could favor a different monomeric fold, which remains unknown. PMID:26656490

  7. Immunophenotype and K-RAS mutation in mucinous ovarian adenocarcinoma with mural nodule of high-grade sarcoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Desouki, Mohamed M; Fadare, Oluwole; Kanbour, Anisa; Kanbour-Shakir, Amal

    2014-03-01

    Ovarian mucinous tumors with mural nodules are rare. The mural nodules are microscopically divergent neoplasms of varying sizes that may be benign (eg, sarcoma-like and carcinosarcoma-like), or malignant (eg, anaplastic carcinoma and sarcoma). The K-RAS gene mutation in ovarian mucinous neoplasms with mural nodules has not been previously reported. This is a case report of a 25-year-old female diagnosed with ovarian invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma with mural nodule of high-grade sarcoma. The mucinous tumor component demonstrated a K-RAS codon 12/13 mutation (p.G12V, c.35 G>T), whereas the sarcomatous component demonstrated a K-RAS codon 12/13 mutation (p.G12D, c.35 G>A). Although both tumor components revealed a mutation in codon 12 of K-RAS, they were of different nucleotide substitutions, indicating that these 2 tumor components were of different clonal origins. However, the fact that the 2 mutations identified in the tumor components are the most common mutations reported in mucinous tumors of the ovary, raises the possibility that sarcomatous mural nodules simply represent a form of dedifferentiation in mucinous tumors. PMID:24487474

  8. RelA regulates CXCL1/CXCR2-dependent oncogene-induced senescence in murine Kras-driven pancreatic carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lesina, Marina; Wörmann, Sonja Maria; Morton, Jennifer; Diakopoulos, Kalliope Nina; Korneeva, Olga; Wimmer, Margit; Einwächter, Henrik; Sperveslage, Jan; Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Kehl, Timo; Saur, Dieter; Sipos, Bence; Heikenwälder, Mathias; Steiner, Jörg Manfred; Wang, Timothy Cragin; Sansom, Owen J; Schmid, Roland Michael; Algül, Hana

    2016-08-01

    Tumor suppression that is mediated by oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is considered to function as a safeguard during development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, the mechanisms that regulate OIS in PDAC are poorly understood. Here, we have determined that nuclear RelA reinforces OIS to inhibit carcinogenesis in the Kras mouse model of PDAC. Inactivation of RelA accelerated pancreatic lesion formation in Kras mice by abrogating the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) gene transcription signature. Using genetic and pharmacological tools, we determined that RelA activation promotes OIS via elevation of the SASP factor CXCL1 (also known as KC), which activates CXCR2, during pancreatic carcinogenesis. In Kras mice, pancreas-specific inactivation of CXCR2 prevented OIS and was correlated with increased tumor proliferation and decreased survival. Moreover, reductions in CXCR2 levels were associated with advanced neoplastic lesions in tissue from human pancreatic specimens. Genetically disabling OIS in Kras mice caused RelA to promote tumor proliferation, suggesting a dual role for RelA signaling in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Taken together, our data suggest a pivotal role for RelA in regulating OIS in preneoplastic lesions and implicate the RelA/CXCL1/CXCR2 axis as an essential mechanism of tumor surveillance in PDAC. PMID:27454298

  9. KRAS promoter oligonucleotide with decoy activity dimerizes into a unique topology consisting of two G-quadruplex units.

    PubMed

    Podbevšek, Peter; Plavec, Janez

    2016-01-29

    Mutations of the KRAS proto-oncogene are associated with several tumor types, which is why it is being considered as a target for anti-cancer drug development. The human KRAS promoter contains a nuclease hypersensitive element (NHE), which can bind to nuclear proteins and is believed to form G-quadruplex structures. Previous studies showed that a 32-nt oligonucleotide (32R-3n) mimicking the KRAS NHE can reduce gene transcription by sequestering MAZ, a crucial transcription factor. Here we show that 32R-3n has to dimerize in order to fold into a G-quadruplex structure. Individual 5'- and 3'-end G-quadruplex units are formed and both feature a symmetric head-to-head topology with edge-type loops. The MAZ binding sequence is located within the 3'-end unit. Nuclear magnetic resonance data complemented by CD and UV spectra show that nucleotides of the MAZ binding G-rich motif are dynamic and could be available for sequence or structure based recognition. Both stable G-quadruplex structures could protect 5'- and 3'-ends of 32R-3n and enhance its anti-cancer activity. Single stranded genomic KRAS NHE including nucleotides flanking the 32R-3n sequence could favor a different monomeric fold, which remains unknown. PMID:26656490

  10. Gene Amplification by PCR and Subcloning into a GFP-Fusion Plasmid Expression Vector as a Molecular Biology Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornhorst, Joshua A.; Deibel, Michael A.; Mulnix, Amy B.

    2004-01-01

    A novel experimental sequence for the advanced undergraduate laboratory course has been developed at Earlham College. Utilizing recent improvements in molecular techniques for a time-sensitive environment, undergraduates were able to create a chimera of a selected gene and green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a bacterial expression plasmid over the…

  11. Diagnostic application of KRAS mutation testing in uterine microglandular proliferations.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wei; Abi-Raad, Rita; Alomari, Ahmed K; Hui, Pei; Buza, Natalia

    2015-07-01

    Microglandular proliferations often pose a diagnostic challenge in small endocervical and endometrial biopsies. Microglandular hyperplasia (MGH) is one of the most common pseudoneoplastic glandular proliferations of uterine cervix, which can closely mimic endometrial adenocarcinomas (EAC) with a microglandular pattern (microglandular EAC). Although MGH is typically characterized by relatively uniform nuclei and rare to absent mitoses, atypical forms with architectural and/or cytologic deviation from the usual morphology have been previously described. Recently, a series of MGH with high mitotic activity has also been documented. Although careful morphological assessment and immunohistochemical workup can resolve the diagnostic dilemma in some cases, additional differential diagnostic tools are needed to separate both the common and atypical variants of MGH from EAC with microglandular pattern. Frequent KRAS mutation has been previously reported in endometrial complex mucinous lesions and endometrial mucinous carcinomas. However, the diagnostic utility of KRAS mutation analysis has not yet been explored in the context of cervical and endometrial microglandular lesions. Twelve mitotically active MGH cases and 15 cases of EAC with microglandular growth pattern were selected for the study. KRAS mutation analysis was performed in all cases by highly sensitive single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. Clinical history and follow-up data were retrieved from electronic medical records. KRAS mutation was absent in all MGH cases, whereas 9 (60%) of 15 microglandular EAC cases tested positive for KRAS mutation. Our data indicate that KRAS mutation analysis may offer additional discriminatory power in separating benign MGH from EAC with microglandular pattern. PMID:25997988

  12. New nitrogen-fixing microorganisms detected in oligotrophic oceans by amplification of nitrogenase (nifH) genes

    SciTech Connect

    Zehr, J.P.; Mellon, M.T.; Zani, S.

    1998-09-01

    Oligotrophic oceanic waters of the central ocean gyres typically have extremely low dissolved fixed inorganic nitrogen concentrations, but few nitrogen-fixing microorganisms from the oceanic environment have been cultivated. Nitrogenase gene (nifH) sequences amplified directly from oceanic waters showed that the open ocean contains more diverse diazotrophic microbial populations and more diverse habitats for nitrogen fixers than previously observed by classical microbiological techniques. Nitrogenase genes derived from unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria, as well as from the {alpha} and {gamma} subdivisions of the class Proteobacteria, were found in both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. nifH sequences that cluster phylogenetically with sequences from sulfate reducers or clostridia were found associated with planktonic crustaceans. Nitrogenase sequence types obtained from invertebrates represented phylotypes distinct from the phylotypes detected in the picoplankton size fraction. The results indicate that there are in the oceanic environment several distinct potentially nitrogen-fixing microbial assemblages that include representatives of diverse phylotypes.

  13. Amplification of c-MYC and MLL Genes as a Marker of Clonal Cell Progression in Patients with Myeloid Malignancy and Trisomy of Chromosomes 8 or 11.

    PubMed

    Angelova, S; Jordanova, M; Spassov, B; Shivarov, V; Simeonova, M; Christov, I; Angelova, P; Alexandrova, K; Stoimenov, A; Nikolova, V; Dimova, I; Ganeva, P; Tzvetkov, N; Hadjiev, E; Toshkov, S

    2011-12-01

    Gene amplification (amp) is one of the basic mechanisms connected with overexpression of oncogenes. The c-MYC (located in 8q24) and MLL (located in 11q23) are the most often over represented genes that lead to a rapid proliferation of the affected cell clone in patients with myeloid neoplasms. Assessment of the level of amp c-MYC or amp MLL in the cases with trisomy 8 (+8) or trisomy 11 (+11) and myeloid malignances is necessary for a more precise estimation of the disease progression. A total of 26 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) were included in the study: 18 with +8, six with +11 and two with complex karyotypes suspected of the partial trisomy. Routine cytogenetic analysis and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were applied to indicate the chromosome alterations and genes amp in the bone marrow cells. Amp c-MYC was observed in 12 from 18 (66.7%) patients with +8. All the patients with +11 demonstrated a different level of amp MLL. In most of the cases with MDS (9/10), the coincidence of the +8 or +11 with amp c-MYC or amp MLL, respectively, leads to transformation to AML and/or short overall survival. Our data suggest that amp c-MYC and amp MLL develop in conformity with +8 and +11, especially in cases with progressive deviations in the karyotype as an aggressive expansion of an aberrant cell clone and appearance of additional chromosome anomalies. PMID:24052708

  14. Herpesvirus-dependent amplification and inversion of cell-associated viral thymidine kinase gene flanked by viral a sequences and linked to an origin of viral DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Mocarski, E S; Roizman, B

    1982-01-01

    The genome of herpes simplex virus 1 or 2 consists of two components, L and S, which invert relative to each other during infection. As a result, viral DNA consists of four equimolar populations of molecules differing solely in the relative orientations of the L and S components. Previous studies have shown that the a sequences, located in the same orientation at the genomic termini and in inverted orientation at the L-S junction, play a key role in the inversion of L and S components. In this report we describe a virus-dependent system designed to allow identification of the viral genes capable of acting in trans to invert DNA flanked by inverted copies of a sequences. In this system, cells are converted to the thymidine kinase-positive phenotype with a chimeric plasmid carrying the thymidine kinase gene flanked by inverted copies of the a sequence and linked to an origin of viral DNA replication derived from the S component. The DNA introduced into the cells is retained and propagated in its original sequence arrangement as head-to-tail concatemers. Infection of these cells with herpes simplex virus 1 or 2 results in as much as 100-fold amplification of the plasmid sequences and inversion of the DNA flanked by copies of the a sequence. In infected cells, the amplified resident DNA accumulates in head-to-tail concatemers and no rearrangement other than the inversions could be detected. These results suggest that the a sequence-dependent inversions required trans-acting viral gene products. Images PMID:6291055

  15. Mutation of NRAS but not KRAS significantly reduces myeloma sensitivity to single-agent bortezomib therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lichter, David I.; Di Bacco, Alessandra; Blakemore, Stephen J.; Berger, Allison; Koenig, Erik; Bernard, Hugues; Trepicchio, William; Li, Bin; Neuwirth, Rachel; Chattopadhyay, Nibedita; Bolen, Joseph B.; Dorner, Andrew J.; van de Velde, Helgi; Ricci, Deborah; Jagannath, Sundar; Berenson, James R.; Richardson, Paul G.; Stadtmauer, Edward A.; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Lonial, Sagar; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Sonneveld, Pieter; San Miguel, Jesús F.; Esseltine, Dixie-Lee; Schu, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Various translocations and mutations have been identified in myeloma, and certain aberrations, such as t(4;14) and del17, are linked with disease prognosis. To investigate mutational prevalence in myeloma and associations between mutations and patient outcomes, we tested a panel of 41 known oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in tumor samples from 133 relapsed myeloma patients participating in phase 2 or 3 clinical trials of bortezomib. DNA mutations were identified in 14 genes. BRAF as well as RAS genes were mutated in a large proportion of cases (45.9%) and these mutations were mutually exclusive. New recurrent mutations were also identified, including in the PDGFRA and JAK3 genes. NRAS mutations were associated with a significantly lower response rate to single-agent bortezomib (7% vs 53% in patients with mutant vs wild-type NRAS, P = .00116, Bonferroni-corrected P = .016), as well as shorter time to progression in bortezomib-treated patients (P = .0058, Bonferroni-corrected P = .012). However, NRAS mutation did not impact outcome in patients treated with high-dose dexamethasone. KRAS mutation did not reduce sensitivity to bortezomib or dexamethasone. These findings identify a significant clinical impact of NRAS mutation in myeloma and demonstrate a clear example of functional differences between the KRAS and NRAS oncogenes. PMID:24335104

  16. Impact of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53 status and intraindividual mutation heterogeneity on outcome after liver resection for colorectal cancer metastases.

    PubMed

    Løes, Inger Marie; Immervoll, Heike; Sorbye, Halfdan; Angelsen, Jon-Helge; Horn, Arild; Knappskog, Stian; Lønning, Per Eystein

    2016-08-01

    We determined prognostic impact of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA and TP53 mutation status and mutation heterogeneity among 164 colorectal cancer (CRC) patients undergoing liver resections for metastatic disease. Mutation status was determined by Sanger sequencing of a total of 422 metastatic deposits. In univariate analysis, KRAS (33.5%), BRAF (6.1%) and PIK3CA (13.4%) mutations each predicted reduced median time to relapse (TTR) (7 vs. 22, 3 vs. 16 and 4 vs. 17 months; p < 0.001, 0.002 and 0.023, respectively). KRAS and BRAF mutations also predicted a reduced median disease-specific survival (DSS) (29 vs. 51 and 16 vs. 49 months; p <0.001 and 0.008, respectively). No effect of TP53 (60.4%) mutation status was observed. Postoperative, but not preoperative chemotherapy improved both TTR and DSS (p < 0.001 for both) with no interaction with gene mutation status. Among 94 patients harboring two or more metastatic deposits, 13 revealed mutation heterogeneity across metastatic deposits for at least one gene. Mutation heterogeneity predicted reduced median DSS compared to homogeneous mutations (18 vs. 37 months; p = 0.011 for all genes; 16 vs. 26 months; p < 0.001 analyzing BRAF or KRAS mutations separately). In multivariate analyses, KRAS or BRAF mutations consistently predicted poor TRR and DSS. Mutation heterogeneity robustly predicted DSS but not TTR, while postoperative chemotherapy improved both TTR and DSS. Our findings indicate that BRAF and KRAS mutations as well as mutation heterogeneity predict poor outcome in CRC patients subsequent to liver resections and might help guide treatment decisions. PMID:26991344

  17. Discrimination among thermophilic Campylobacter species by polymerase chain reaction amplification of 23S rRNA gene fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Eyers, M; Chapelle, S; Van Camp, G; Goossens, H; De Wachter, R

    1993-01-01

    By comparing nucleic acid sequences determined for one of the most variable areas of 23S rRNA genes of 23 Campylobacter strains, we were able to identify regions specific for thermophilic Campylobacter strains. Oligonucleotide primers corresponding to these unique regions were synthesized and used in the polymerase chain reaction. One primer pair selectively detected all thermophilic Campylobacter species, while four other primer pairs allowed discrimination among the thermophilic species Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni, Campylobacter lari, and Campylobacter upsaliensis. All primer sets were tested successfully on a large number of clinical isolates. Images PMID:7508460

  18. Prevalence of KRAS, BRAF, PI3K and EGFR mutations among Asian patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    PHUA, LEE CHENG; NG, HUI WEN; YEO, ANGIE HUI LING; CHEN, ELYA; LO, MICHELLE SHU MEI; CHEAH, PEH YEAN; CHAN, ERIC CHUN YONG; KOH, POH KOON; HO, HAN KIAT

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in oncogenes along the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway have been implicated in the resistance to cetuximab in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, the relative significance of these mutations based on their frequencies of occurrence in the Singaporean population remains unclear. In the present study, the prevalence of Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), v-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and EGFR somatic mutations were determined among Singaporean patients with mCRC. DNA extracted from 45 pairs of surgically resected tumor and normal mucosa samples was subjected to direct sequencing or restriction fragment length polymorphism. Associations of the genetic mutations with various clinicopathological parameters were further explored. Mutations in either codon 12 or 13 of KRAS were confirmed as prominent phenomena among the included Singaporean mCRC patients, at a prevalence comparable with that of Caucasian and patients of other Asian ethnicities [33.3% (90% confidence interval, 21.8–44.9%)]. KRAS mutation was not associated with clinicopathological features, including age, gender and ethnicity of patients, or the tumor site, differentiation and mucinous status. Conversely, the prevalence of BRAF (0%), PI3K (2.2%) and EGFR (0%) mutations were low. The results of the present study indicate that KRAS mutations are prevalent among the studied population, and confirm the low prevalence of BRAF, PI3K and EGFR mutations. KRAS should be prioritized as an investigational gene for future studies of predictive biomarkers of cetuximab response among Singaporean patients with mCRC. PMID:26622882

  19. Purification and Characterization of Cytoplasmic NADP+-Isocitrate Dehydrogenase, and Amplification of the Nadp+-IDH Gene from the Wing-Dimorphic Sand Field Cricket, Gryllus firmus

    PubMed Central

    Zera, Anthony J.; Newman, Susan; Berkheim, David; Black, Christine; Klug, Lindsay; Crone, Erica

    2011-01-01

    Cytoplasmic NADP+-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP+-IDH) has been purified and characterized, and its gene sequenced in many animal, plant, and yeast species. However, much less information is available on this enzyme-gene in insects. As a first step in investigating the biochemical and molecular mechanisms by which NADP+-IDH contributes to adaptations for flight vs. reproduction in insects, the enzyme was purified to homogeneity in the wing-dimorphic cricket, Gryllus firmus, characterized, and its corresponding gene sequenced. Using a combination of polyethylene glycol precipitation, Cibacron-Blue affinity chromatography, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography the enzyme was purified 291-fold (7% yield; specific activity = 15.8 µmol NADPH/min/mg protein). The purified enzyme exhibited a single band on SDS PAGE (46.3 kD), but consisted of two N-terminal amino acid sequences that differed in the first two amino acids. Purified enzyme exhibited standard Michaelis-Menten kinetics at pH 8.0 and 28° C (KM(NADP+) = 2.3 ± 0.4 µM; KM(Na+-Isocitrate) = 14.7 + 1.8 µM). Subunit molecular mass and KMS were similar to published values for NADP+-IDHs from a variety of vertebrate and two insect species. PCR amplification of an internal sequence using genomic DNA followed by 3′ and 5′ RACE yielded a nucleotide sequence of the mature protein and translated amino-acid sequences that exhibited high similarity (40–50% and 70–80%, respectively) to sequences from insect and vertebrate NADP+-IDHs. Two potential ATG start codons were identified. Both Nterminal amino-acid sequences matched the nucleotide sequence, consistent with both enzyme forms being transcribed from the same gene, although these variants could also be encoded by different genes. Bioinformatic analyses and differential centrifugation indicated that the majority, if not all, of the enzyme is cytoplasmic. The enzyme exhibited high specific activity in fat body, head and gut, and a single band on native PAGE

  20. [The amplification of CYP9 genes as a preadaptation of the black garden ant Lasius niger to urban conditions].

    PubMed

    Konorov, E A; Nikitin, M A

    2015-01-01

    Ants are one of the most ancient and successful groups of eusocial animals and they are spread all over the world. The nucleotide sequences of the genomes of eight ant species were determined by the year 2014. In these species, the mechanisms of ecological success, cast differentiation, and social communication were studied at genomic level. In ants, the genes of the cytochromes P450 involved in metabolism of xenobiotics and various endogenic substances are amplified. Although the substrates for several cytochrome P450 families have been identified, the functions of the ninth family, which is one of the most amplified, remain unknown. The black garden ant Lasius niger is one of the spices that have successfully adapted to urban conditions. To study the mechanisms of adaptation, we have read and annotated the nucleotide sequence of the L. niger genome; we have predicted the functions of the CYP9 genes using virtual screening. The obtained data allow us to suggest that cytochromes P450 are involved in the metabolism of various xenobiotics such as phytotoxins, mycotoxins, and insecticides. We assume that the functional divergence of the new CYP9 duplications was initially aimed at developing resistance to various mycotoxins, in particular to those produced by Fusarium fungi and, subsequently, to other xenobiotics. PMID:26107899

  1. Amplification of genome sections in mammalian somatic cells resistant to colchicine. VII. Localization of original and amplified copes of the mdr gene in the same segment of chromosome 4 of the Dzungarian hamster

    SciTech Connect

    Sokova, O.I.; Siyanova, E.Yu.; Gudkov, A.V.; Kopnin, B.P.

    1988-11-01

    Using in situ hybridization, the mdr gene was mapped in chromosomes of Dzungarian hamster embryonic cells, amplification of which accompanies development of multidrug resistance (MDR). It was shown that the mdr gene is located in chromosome segment 4q15-21, in which, according to data obtained previously, amplified copes of /open quotes/MDR genes/closed quotes/ (mdr, et al.) are distributed, as a rule. Results obtained, as well as data of other investigators, attest to the fact that integration recombination of amplified copies of DNA occurs primarily at the site of disposition of homologous sequences.

  2. Development and Diagnostic Evaluation of Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Using a New Gene Target for Rapid Detection of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiari, Somaye; Alvandi, Amirhooshang; Pajavand, Hamid; Navabi, Jafar; Najafi, Farid; Abiri, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori cause chronic gastritis and subsequent diseases like gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric adenocarcinoma. Current methods for detecting H. pylori have several disadvantages and it is of utmost importance to develop a simple, quick, accurate, and cost-effective diagnostic test. Objectives The aim of this study was to set up and evaluate a diagnostic value of loop- mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for detecting H. pylori. Patients and Methods The analytical sensitivity values (limit of detection) of LAMP and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were determined using serial dilutions of H. pylori DNA. Analytical specificity of the methods using new designed primers targeted ureC gene was also determined. Results The detection limits of the LAMP and PCR assay were similar and were 10 fg of pure DNA of H. pylori, which is equal to 6 copy numbers of H. pylori genome. Analytical specificity of the tests was 100% because the tests were positive only with H. pylori DNA. Conclusions The analytical sensitivity of LAMP and PCR methods, using the designed primers, was 8 times more than any other reported methods. The designed methods are specific and sensitive for detection of H. pylori in different clinical and environmental samples. PMID:27540449

  3. Role of the RS1 sequence of the cholera vibrio in amplification of the segment of plasmid DNA carrying the gene of resistance to tetracycline and the genes of cholera toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Fil'kova, S.L.; Il'ina, T.S.; Gintsburg, A.L.; Yanishevskii, N.V.; Smirnov, G.B.

    1988-11-01

    The hybrid plasmid pCO107, representing cointegrate 14(2)-5(2) of two plasmids, an F-derivative (pOX38) and a PBR322-derivative (pCT105) with an RS1 sequence of the cholera vibrio cloned in its makeup, contains two copes of RS1 at the sites of union of the two plasmids. Using a tetracycline resistance marker (Tc/sup R/) of the plasmid pCT105, clones were isolated which have an elevated level of resistance to tetracycline (an increase of from 4- to 30-fold). Using restriction analysis and the Southern blot method of hybridization it was shown that the increase in the level of resistance of tetracycline is associated with the amplification of pCT105 portion of the cointegrate, and that the process of amplification is governed by the presence of direct repeats of the RS1 sequence at its ends. The increase in the number of copies of the pCT105 segment, which contains in its composition the genes of cholera toxin (vct), is accompanied by an increase in toxin production.

  4. Detection and Identification of Bartonella Species Pathogenic for Humans by PCR Amplification Targeting the Riboflavin Synthase Gene (ribC)

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, G.; Ayers, M.; McClure, S. C. C.; Richardson, S. E.; Tellier, R.

    2003-01-01

    Several Bartonella species have now been implicated as human pathogens. The recovery of these fastidious organisms in the clinical microbiology laboratory remains difficult, and current methods are still relatively insensitive. Thus, the bartonellae are good candidates for detection by PCR. We have developed a PCR assay which uses a single primer pair targeting the riboflavin synthase gene (ribC) and detected six Bartonella species that have been implicated in human disease, B. henselae, B. quintana, B. bacilliformis, B. clarridgeiae, B. elizabethae, and B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii. Species identification is achieved simply by restriction enzyme digestion of the amplicon. This PCR assay appears to be specific for the Bartonella genus because it failed to amplify DNA from several other bacterial species. PMID:12624031

  5. LKB1/KRAS mutant lung cancers constitute a genetic subset of NSCLC with increased sensitivity to MAPK and mTOR signalling inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, C L; Choudhury, B; Davies, H; Edkins, S; Greenman, C; Haaften, G van; Mironenko, T; Santarius, T; Stevens, C; Stratton, M R; Futreal, P A

    2009-01-01

    LKB1/STK11 is a multitasking tumour suppressor kinase. Germline inactivating mutations of the gene are responsible for the Peutz-Jeghers hereditary cancer syndrome. It is also somatically inactivated in approximately 30% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here, we report that LKB1/KRAS mutant NSCLC cell lines are sensitive to the MEK inhibitor CI-1040 shown by a dose-dependent reduction in proliferation rate, whereas LKB1 and KRAS mutations alone do not confer similar sensitivity. We show that this subset of NSCLC is also sensitised to the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. Importantly, the data suggest that LKB1/KRAS mutant NSCLCs are a genetically and functionally distinct subset and further suggest that this subset of lung cancers might afford an opportunity for exploitation of anti-MAPK/mTOR-targeted therapies. PMID:19165201

  6. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Bartonella bacilliformis in Experimentally Infected Sand Flies by Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) of the Pap31 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Angkasekwinai, Nasikarn; Atkins, Erin H.; Johnson, Richard N.; Grieco, John P.; Ching, Wei Mei; Chao, Chien Chung

    2014-01-01

    Background Carrion' disease, caused by Bartonella bacilliformis, remains truly neglected due to its focal geographical nature. A wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, including asymptomatic bacteremia, and lack of a sensitive diagnostic test can potentially lead to a spread of the disease into non-endemic regions where competent sand fly vectors may be present. A reliable test capable of detecting B. bacilliformis is urgently needed. Our objective is to develop a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay targeting the pap31 gene to detect B. bacilliformis. Methods and Findings The sensitivity of the LAMP was evaluated in comparison to qPCR using plasmid DNA containing the target gene and genomic DNA in the absence and presence of human or sand fly DNA. The detection limit of LAMP was 1 to 10 copies/µL, depending on the sample metrics. No cross-reaction was observed when testing against a panel of various closely related bacteria. The utility of the LAMP was further compared to qPCR by the examination of 74 Lutzomyia longipalpis sand flies artificially fed on blood spiked with B. bacilliformis and harvested at days (D) 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 post feeding. Only 86% of sand flies at D1 and 63% of flies at D3 were positive by qPCR. LAMP was able to detect B. bacilliformis in all those flies confirmed positive by qPCR. However, none of the flies after D3 were positive by either LAMP or qPCR. In addition to demonstrating the sensitivity of the LAMP assay, these results suggest that B. bacilliformis cannot propagate in artificially fed L. longipalpis. Conclusions The LAMP assay is as sensitive as qPCR for the detection of B. bacilliformis and could be useful to support diagnosis of patients in low-resource settings and also to identify B. bacilliformis in the sand fly vector. PMID:25522230

  7. Development and evaluation of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for detection of Ehrlichia canis DNA in naturally infected dogs using the p30 gene.

    PubMed

    Pinhanelli, V C; Costa, P N M; Silva, G; Aguiar, D M; Silva, C M L; Fachin, A L; Marins, M

    2015-01-01

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME) is a common tick-borne disease caused by the rickettsial bacterium Ehrlichia canis (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae). In view of the different stages and variable clinical signs of CME, which can overlap with those of other infections, a conclusive diagnosis can more readily be obtained by combining clinical and hematological evaluations with molecular diagnostic methods. In this study, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay targeting the p30 gene of E. canis was developed. The assay was developed using DNA extracted from E. canis-infected cultures of the macrophage cell line DH82 and samples from dogs testing positive for E. canis DNA by PCR. The LAMP assay was compared to a p30-based PCR assay, using DNA extracted from EDTA-anticoagulated blood samples of 137 dogs from an endemic region in Brazil. The LAMP assay was sensitive enough to detect a single copy of the target gene, and identified 74 (54.0%) E. canis DNA-positive samples, while the p30 PCR assay detected 50 positive samples (36.5%) among the field samples. Agreement between the two assays was observed in 42 positive and 55 negative samples. However, 32 positive samples that were not detected by the PCR assay were identified by the LAMP assay, while eight samples identified as E. canis-positive by PCR showed negative results in LAMP. The developed E. canis LAMP assay showed the potential to maximize the use of nucleic acid tests in a veterinary clinical laboratory, and to improve the diagnosis of CME. PMID:26782434

  8. Absolute Quantitation of Met Using Mass Spectrometry for Clinical Application: Assay Precision, Stability, and Correlation with MET Gene Amplification in FFPE Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Catenacci, Daniel V. T.; Liao, Wei-Li; Thyparambil, Sheeno; Henderson, Les; Xu, Peng; Zhao, Lei; Rambo, Brittany; Hart, John; Xiao, Shu-Yuan; Bengali, Kathleen; Uzzell, Jamar; Darfler, Marlene; Krizman, David B.; Cecchi, Fabiola; Bottaro, Donald P.; Karrison, Theodore; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Hembrough, Todd; Burrows, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Background Overexpression of Met tyrosine kinase receptor is associated with poor prognosis. Overexpression, and particularly MET amplification, are predictive of response to Met-specific therapy in preclinical models. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues is currently used to select for ‘high Met’ expressing tumors for Met inhibitor trials. IHC suffers from antibody non-specificity, lack of quantitative resolution, and, when quantifying multiple proteins, inefficient use of scarce tissue. Methods After describing the development of the Liquid-Tissue-Selected Reaction Monitoring-mass spectrometry (LT-SRM-MS) Met assay, we evaluated the expression level of Met in 130 FFPE gastroesophageal cancer (GEC) tissues. We assessed the correlation of SRM Met expression to IHC and mean MET gene copy number (GCN)/nucleus or MET/CEP7 ratio by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Results Proteomic mapping of recombinant Met identified 418TEFTTALQR426 as the optimal SRM peptide. Limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) for this peptide were 150 and 200 amol/µg tumor protein, respectively. The assay demonstrated excellent precision and temporal stability of measurements in serial sections analyzed one year apart. Expression levels of 130 GEC tissues ranged (<150 amol/µg to 4669.5 amol/µg. High correlation was observed between SRM Met expression and both MET GCN and MET/CEP7 ratio as determined by FISH (n = 30; R2 = 0.898). IHC did not correlate well with SRM (n = 44; R2 = 0.537) nor FISH GCN (n = 31; R2 = 0.509). A Met SRM level of ≥1500 amol/µg was 100% sensitive (95% CI 0.69–1) and 100% specific (95% CI 0.92–1) for MET amplification. Conclusions The Met SRM assay measured the absolute Met levels in clinical tissues with high precision. Compared to IHC, SRM provided a quantitative and linear measurement of Met expression, reliably distinguishing between non-amplified and amplified MET

  9. Continuous quantification of HER2 expression by microfluidic precision immunofluorescence estimates HER2 gene amplification in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dupouy, Diego G.; Ciftlik, Ata Tuna; Fiche, Maryse; Heintze, Déborah; Bisig, Bettina; de Leval, Laurence; Gijs, Martin A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Chromogenic immunohistochemistry (IHC) is omnipresent in cancer diagnosis, but has also been criticized for its technical limit in quantifying the level of protein expression on tissue sections, thus potentially masking clinically relevant data. Shifting from qualitative to quantitative, immunofluorescence (IF) has recently gained attention, yet the question of how precisely IF can quantify antigen expression remains unanswered, regarding in particular its technical limitations and applicability to multiple markers. Here we introduce microfluidic precision IF, which accurately quantifies the target expression level in a continuous scale based on microfluidic IF staining of standard tissue sections and low-complexity automated image analysis. We show that the level of HER2 protein expression, as continuously quantified using microfluidic precision IF in 25 breast cancer cases, including several cases with equivocal IHC result, can predict the number of HER2 gene copies as assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Finally, we demonstrate that the working principle of this technology is not restricted to HER2 but can be extended to other biomarkers. We anticipate that our method has the potential of providing automated, fast and high-quality quantitative in situ biomarker data using low-cost immunofluorescence assays, as increasingly required in the era of individually tailored cancer therapy. PMID:26856369

  10. Selected amplification of the cell division genes ftsQ-ftsA-ftsZ in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Vinella, D; Cashel, M; D'Ari, R

    2000-01-01

    Rapidly growing Escherichia coli is unable to divide in the presence of the antibiotic mecillinam, whose direct target is penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2), responsible for the elongation of the cylindrical portion of the cell wall. Division can be restored in the absence of PBP2 activity by increasing the concentration of the cell division proteins FtsQ, FtsA, and FtsZ. We tried to identify regulators of the ftsQ-ftsA-ftsZ operon among mecillinam-resistant mutants, which include strains overexpressing these genes. By insertional mutagenesis with mini-Tn10 elements, we selected for insertions that conferred mecillinam resistance. Among 15 such mutants, 7 suppressed the thermosensitivity of the ftsZ84(Ts) mutant, strongly suggesting that they had increased FtsZ activity. In all 7 cases, however, the mutants resulted from a duplication of the ftsQAZ region. These duplications seemed to result from multiple events, suggesting that no simple insertional inactivation can result in a mutant with sufficiently amplified ftsQAZ expression to confer mecillinam resistance. The structure of the duplications suggests a general method for constructing directed duplications of precise sequences. PMID:11102351

  11. The combination of tetraiodothyroacetic acid and cetuximab inhibits cell proliferation in colorectal cancers with different K-ras status.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yee-Shin; Chin, Yu-Tang; Yang, Yu-Chen S H; Wei, Po-Li; Wu, Han-Chung; Shih, Ai; Lu, Yueh-Tong; Pedersen, Jens Z; Incerpi, Sandra; Liu, Leroy F; Lin, Hung-Yun; Davis, Paul J

    2016-07-01

    Thyroid hormone induces cancer cell proliferation through its cell surface receptor integrin αvβ3. Acting via integrin αvβ3, the deaminated T4 analog tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac), and its nanoparticle formulation nano-diamino-tetrac (NDAT) could inhibit cell proliferation and xenograft growth. In this study, we investigated the T4 effects on proliferation in colorectal cancer cell lines based on the proliferation marker expressions at both mRNA and protein levels. The effects of tetrac/NDAT, the monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab, and their combinations on colorectal cancer cell proliferation were examined according to the relevant gene expression profiles and cell count analysis. The results showed that T4 significantly enhanced PCNA, Cyclin D1 and c-Myc levels in both K-ras wild type HT-29 and mutant HCT 116 cells. In HCT 116 cells, the combination of NDAT and cetuximab significantly suppressed the mRNA expressions of proliferative genes PCNA, Cyclin D1, c-Myc and RRM2 raised by T4 compared to cetuximab alone. In addition, T4-suppressed mRNA expressions of pro-apoptotic genes p53 and RRM2B could be significantly elevated by the combination of NDAT and cetuximab compared to cetuximab alone. In the K-ras mutant HCT 116 cells, but not in the K-ras wild type COLO 205 cells, the combinations of tetrac/NDAT and cetuximab significantly reduced cell proliferation compared to cetuximab alone. In conclusion, T4 promoted colorectal cancer cell proliferation which could be repressed by tetrac and NDAT. The combinations of tetrac/NDAT and cetuximab potentiated cetuximab actions in K-ras mutant colorectal cancer cells. PMID:26980146

  12. KRAS insertion mutations are oncogenic and exhibit distinct functional properties

    PubMed Central

    White, Yasmine; Bagchi, Aditi; Van Ziffle, Jessica; Inguva, Anagha; Bollag, Gideon; Zhang, Chao; Carias, Heidi; Dickens, David; Loh, Mignon; Shannon, Kevin; Firestone, Ari J.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS mutations introduce discrete amino acid substitutions that reduce intrinsic Ras GTPase activity and confer resistance to GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). Here we discover a partial duplication of the switch 2 domain of K-Ras encoding a tandem repeat of amino acids G60_A66dup in a child with an atypical myeloproliferative neoplasm. K-Ras proteins containing this tandem duplication or a similar five amino acid E62_A66dup mutation identified in lung and colon cancers transform the growth of primary myeloid progenitors and of Ba/F3 cells. Recombinant K-RasG60_A66dup and K-RasE62_A66dup proteins display reduced intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rates, accumulate in the GTP-bound conformation and are resistant to GAP-mediated GTP hydrolysis. Remarkably, K-Ras proteins with switch 2 insertions are impaired for PI3 kinase binding and Akt activation, and are hypersensitive to MEK inhibition. These studies illuminate a new class of oncogenic KRAS mutations and reveal unexpected plasticity in oncogenic Ras proteins that has diagnostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:26854029

  13. Coordinate direct input of both KRAS and IGF1 receptor to activation of PI 3-kinase in KRAS mutant lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Arcas, Miriam; Hancock, David C.; Sheridan, Clare; Kumar, Madhu S.; Downward, Julian

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Using a panel of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) lines, we show here that MEK and RAF inhibitors are selectively toxic for the KRAS mutant genotype, while PI 3-kinase (PI3K), AKT and mTOR inhibitors are not. IGF1 receptor (IGF1R) tyrosine kinase inhibitors also show selectivity for KRAS mutant lung cancer lines. Combinations of IGF1R and MEK inhibitors resulted in strengthened inhibition of KRAS mutant lines and also showed improved effectiveness in autochthonous mouse models of Kras induced NSCLC. PI3K pathway activity is dependent on basal IGF1R activity in KRAS mutant, but not wild-type, lung cancer cell lines. KRAS is needed for both MEK and PI3K pathway activity in KRAS mutant, but not wild-type, lung cancer cells, while acute activation of KRAS causes stimulation of PI3K dependent upon IGF1R kinase activity. Coordinate direct input of both KRAS and IGF1R is thus required to activate PI3K in KRAS mutant lung cancer cells. PMID:23454899

  14. Lunatic Fringe is a potent tumor suppressor in Kras-initiated pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Chung, W-C; Xu, K

    2016-05-12

    Notch controls pancreatic differentiation during development and is reactivated in pancreatic cancer. In recent years, the importance of Notch signaling in pancreatic tumorigenesis has become increasingly evident; however, it remains unclear how Notch activities are regulated in this context. Here we report differential regulation of Notch receptors by Lunatic Fringe (Lfng), which encodes an O-fucosylpeptide 3-β-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase known to modify epidermal growth factor repeats in the Notch extracellular domain, during pathogenesis of Kras-induced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We show that Lfng is uniquely expressed in a subset of acinar cells in the adult pancreas. Deletion of Lfng in the Kras(LSL-G12D/+);Pdx1-Cre mouse model caused increased activation of Notch3 throughout PDAC initiation and progression, and Notch1 after the onset of disease, associated with marked upregulation of Notch target gene Hes1. Deletion of Lfng also resulted in accumulation of Aldh1-positive cell population. We found that loss of Lfng significantly accelerated Kras-initiated PDAC development and shortened survival of the PDAC mice. Interestingly, Lfng-deficient tumors showed a propensity for a poorly differentiated state with features of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Likewise, knockdown of LFNG in human PDAC cell lines caused elevated Notch activation, associated with either accelerated cell proliferation or expanded Aldh1-positive cell population. Deletion of Lfng resulted in downregulation of Tgfb1, Tgfb2 and Tgfbr2 expression in the wild-type pancreas at all ages examined, and in the Kras(LSL-G12D/+);Pdx1-Cre pancreas after PDAC onset, as well as reduced phospho-Smad2 levels in pancreatic tumors. We provide evidence that Lfng regulates transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling through Notch-mediated transcriptional repression of TGF-β pathway genes. Taken together, our results reveal a potent tumor-suppressive function for Lfng and crosstalk

  15. Sponge-associated actinobacterial diversity: validation of the methods of actinobacterial DNA extraction and optimization of 16S rRNA gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi; Franco, Christopher M M; Zhang, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Experiments were designed to validate the two common DNA extraction protocols (CTAB-based method and DNeasy Blood & Tissue Kit) used to effectively recover actinobacterial DNA from sponge samples in order to study the sponge-associated actinobacterial diversity. This was done by artificially spiking sponge samples with actinobacteria (spores, mycelia and a combination of the two). Our results demonstrated that both DNA extraction methods were effective in obtaining DNA from the sponge samples as well as the sponge samples spiked with different amounts of actinobacteria. However, it was noted that in the presence of the sponge, the bacterial 16S rRNA gene could not be amplified unless the combined DNA template was diluted. To test the hypothesis that the extracted sponge DNA contained inhibitors, dilutions of the DNA extracts were tested for six sponge species representing five orders. The results suggested that the inhibitors were co-extracted with the sponge DNA, and a high dilution of this DNA was required for the successful PCR amplification for most of the samples. The optimized PCR conditions, including primer selection, PCR reaction system and program optimization, further improved the PCR performance. However, no single PCR condition was found to be suitable for the diverse sponge samples using various primer sets. These results highlight for the first time that the DNA extraction methods used are effective in obtaining actinobacterial DNA and that the presence of inhibitors in the sponge DNA requires high dilution coupled with fine tuning of the PCR conditions to achieve success in the study of sponge-associated actinobacterial diversity. PMID:26245685

  16. KRAS mutation in adenocarcinoma of the gastrointestinal type arising from a mature cystic teratoma of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Ruiguang; Pan, Danzhen; Huang, Bangxing; Weng, Mixia; Nie, Xiu

    2014-01-01

    Mature cystic teratomas (MCT) in the ovary rarely undergo malignant transformation. Moreover, adenocarcinoma of the gastrointestinal type is much rarer. We present two cases of perimenopausal female pateints with mature cystic teratoma of single ovary, while local adenocarcinoma arising in the MCT. The malignancies showed immunohistochemical features of intestinal differentiation, such as strong positivity for CDX-2, villin and CK-20, and negativity for CK-7. Furthermore, the mutation analysis of molecular alteration revealed a KRAS gene mutation in the intestinal adenocarcinoma part, extending into benign intestinal-type epithelium linings. Yet the mutation was not present in the epidermal component of the teratoma. We present these as two unique cases of mucinous adenocarcinoma of the intestinal type arising from mature cystic teratoma. Moreover, we also submit that this KRAS mutation might contribute to identify malignant transformation of a MCT and suggest possible effect on targeted treatment decisions for anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy in metastasized patients. PMID:25297496

  17. The end of KRAS, and other, cancers? A new way forward.

    PubMed

    Mallucci, Livio; Wells, Valerie

    2014-04-01

    Mutant KRAS, as well as other mutant driver genes and epidriver genes, is a dominant determinant of resistance to cancer therapeutics. The recent introduction of targeting therapies based on drugs that inhibit the kinase catalytic function of nodal points along the Ras/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt cascades is meeting with limited success. Against this background, recent evidence shows that the β-galactoside-binding protein (βGBP) molecule, a physiological PI3K inhibitor, is a potent inducer of apoptosis in KRAS-mutant cancer cells (along with other aggressive cancer cells of different genetic makeup) and that it is therapeutically effective in vivo. Absence of p53 or phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) tumor suppressor function or added activating PI3K mutations does not affect βGBP function. In contrast to the concept of one drug against one target, βGBP operates through alternative physiological routes. PMID:24291216

  18. PCR amplification of a multi-copy mitochondrial gene (cox3) improves detection of Cytauxzoon felis infection as compared to a ribosomal gene (18S).

    PubMed

    Schreeg, Megan E; Marr, Henry S; Griffith, Emily H; Tarigo, Jaime L; Bird, David M; Reichard, Mason V; Cohn, Leah A; Levy, Michael G; Birkenheuer, Adam J

    2016-07-30

    Cytauxzoon felis is a tick-transmitted protozoan parasite that infects felids. Clinical disease caused by acute C. felis infection rapidly progresses in domestic cats, leading to high morbidity and mortality. Accurately diagnosing cytauxzoonosis as soon as possible during acute infection would allow for earlier initiation of antiprotozoal therapy which could lead to higher survival rates. Molecular detection of parasite rRNA genes (18S) by PCR has previously been shown to be a sensitive method of diagnosing C. felis infections. Based on evidence from related apicomplexan species, we hypothesized that C. felis mitochondrial genes would exist at higher copy numbers than 18S and would be a more sensitive diagnostic target. In this study we have designed a PCR assay targeting the C. felis mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (cox3). Herein we demonstrate that (1) the cox3 PCR can detect as low as 1 copy of DNA target and can detect C. felis in samples with known mitochondrial sequence heterogeneity, (2) cox3 copy number is increased relative to 18S in blood and tissue samples from acutely infected cats, and (3) the cox3 PCR is more sensitive than 18S PCR for detection of C. felis during early infections. PMID:27369587

  19. Early recognition of lung cancer by integrin targeted imaging in K-ras mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ermolayev, Vladimir; Mohajerani, Pouyan; Ale, Angelique; Sarantopoulos, Athanasios; Aichler, Michaela; Kayser, Gian; Walch, Axel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2015-09-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer is characterized by slow progression and high heterogeneity of tumors. Integrins play an important role in lung cancer development and metastasis and were suggested as a tumor marker; however their role in anticancer therapy remains controversial. In this work, we demonstrate the potential of integrin-targeted imaging to recognize early lesions in transgenic mouse model of lung cancer based on spontaneous introduction of mutated human gene bearing K-ras mutation. We conducted ex vivo and fluorescence molecular tomography-X-ray computed tomography (FMT-XCT) in vivo imaging and analysis for specific targeting of early lung lesions and tumors in rodent preclinical model for lung cancer. The lesions and tumors were characterized by histology, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry using a panel of cancer markers. Ex vivo, the integrin-targeted fluorescent signal significantly differed between wild type lung tissue and K-ras pulmonary lesions (PL) at all ages studied. The panel of immunofluorescence experiments demonstrated that PL, which only partially show cancer cell features were detected by αvβ3-integrin targeted imaging. Human patient material analysis confirmed the specificity of target localization in different lung cancer types. Most importantly, small tumors in the lungs of 4-week-old animals could be noninvasively detected in vivo on the fluorescence channel of FMT-XCT. Our findings demonstrated αvβ3-integrin targeted fluorescent imaging to specifically detect premalignant pleural lesions in K-ras mice. Integrin targeted imaging may find application areas in preclinical research and clinical practice, such as early lung cancer diagnostics, intraoperative assistance or therapy monitoring. PMID:25450481

  20. Dietary acrylamide intake and the risk of colorectal cancer with specific mutations in KRAS and APC.

    PubMed

    Hogervorst, Janneke G F; de Bruijn-Geraets, Daisy; Schouten, Leo J; van Engeland, Manon; de Kok, Theo M C M; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; van den Brandt, Piet A; Weijenberg, Matty P

    2014-05-01

    Acrylamide, a probable human carcinogen, is present in heat-treated carbohydrate-rich foods. Epidemiological studies have not shown a clear association between acrylamide intake and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. This may be due to the molecular heterogeneity in colorectal tumors, which was not taken into consideration before. Since the acrylamide metabolite glycidamide induces specific DNA mutations in rodents, we investigated whether acrylamide is associated with CRC risk characterized by mutations in Kirsten-ras (KRAS) and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC); key genes in colorectal carcinogenesis. This case-cohort analysis, within the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer, was based on 7.3 years of follow-up. Acrylamide intake was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. Mutation analysis of codons 1286-1520 in exon 15 in APC and codons 12 and 13 in exon 1 in KRAS was performed on tumor tissue of 733 cases. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards analysis. Among men, acrylamide intake was statistically significantly associated with an increased risk of particularly tumors with an activating KRAS mutation {HR fourth versus first quartile: 2.12 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.16-3.87], P trend: 0.01}. Among women, acrylamide intake was statistically significantly associated with a decreased risk of particularly tumors with a truncating APC mutation (fourth versus first quartile: 0.47 (95% CI: 0.23-0.94), P trend: 0.02), but only in the highest quartile of intake. This is the first study to show that acrylamide might be associated with CRC with specific somatic mutations, differentially in men and women. More research is needed to corroborate or refute these findings. PMID:24398672

  1. Molecular and Functional Characteristics of Ovarian Surface Epithelial Cells Transformed by KrasG12D and loss of Pten in a Mouse Model in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mullany, Lisa K.; Fan, Heng-Yu; Liu, Zhilin; White, Lisa D.; Marshall, Alexandra; Gunaratne, Preethi; Anderson, Matthew L.; Creighton, Chad J.; Xin, Li; Deavers, Michael; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Richards, JoAnne S.

    2011-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a complex and deadly disease that remains difficult to detect at an early curable stage. Furthermore, although some oncogenic (Kras, Pten/PI3K and Trp53) pathways that are frequently mutated, deleted or amplified in ovarian cancer are known, how these pathways initiate and drive specific morphological phenotypes and tumor outcomes remain unclear. We recently generated Pten fl/fl; KrasG12D;Amhr2-Cre mice to disrupt the Pten gene and express a stable mutant form of KrasG12D in ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells. Based on histopathologic criteria, the mutant mice developed low-grade ovarian serous papillary adenocarcinomas at an early age and with 100% penetrance. This highly reproducible phenotype provides the first mouse model in which to study this ovarian cancer subtype. OSE cells isolated from ovaries of mutant mice at 5 and 10 weeks of age exhibit temporal changes in the expression of specific Mullerian epithelial marker genes, grow in soft agar and develop ectopic invasive tumors in recipient mice, indicating that the cells are transformed. Gene profiling identified specific mRNAs and microRNAs differentially expressed in purified OSE cells derived from tumors of the mutant mice compared to WT OSE cells. Mapping of transcripts or genes between the mouse OSE mutant datasets, the Kras signature from human cancer cell lines and the human ovarian tumor array datasets, documented significant overlap, indicating that KRAS is a key driver of OSE transformation in this context. Two key hallmarks of the mutant OSE cells in these mice are the elevated expression of the tumor suppressorsTrp53 (p53) and its microRNA target, miR-34a-c. We propose that elevated TRP53 and miR-34a-c may exert negatively regulatory effects that reduce the proliferative potential of OSE cells leading to the low-grade serous adenocarcinoma phenotype. PMID:21423204

  2. Inhibition of Acid Sphingomyelinase Depletes Cellular Phosphatidylserine and Mislocalizes K-Ras from the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwang-Jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Zhou, Yong; Maekawa, Masashi; Ma, Xiaoping; Chen, Wei; Fairn, Gregory D; Hancock, John F

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras must localize to the plasma membrane for biological activity; thus, preventing plasma membrane interaction blocks K-Ras signal output. Here we show that inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) mislocalizes both the K-Ras isoforms K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B from the plasma membrane to the endomembrane and inhibits their nanoclustering. We found that fendiline, a potent ASM inhibitor, reduces the phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) and cholesterol content of the inner plasma membrane. These lipid changes are causative because supplementation of fendiline-treated cells with exogenous PtdSer rapidly restores K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding, nanoclustering, and signal output. Conversely, supplementation with exogenous cholesterol restores K-Ras4A but not K-Ras4B nanoclustering. These experiments reveal different operational pools of PtdSer on the plasma membrane. Inhibition of ASM elevates cellular sphingomyelin and reduces cellular ceramide levels. Concordantly, delivery of recombinant ASM or exogenous ceramide to fendiline-treated cells rapidly relocalizes K-Ras4B and PtdSer to the plasma membrane. K-Ras4B mislocalization is also recapitulated in ASM-deficient Neimann-Pick type A and B fibroblasts. This study identifies sphingomyelin metabolism as an indirect regulator of K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B signaling through the control of PtdSer plasma membrane content. It also demonstrates the critical and selective importance of PtdSer to K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding and nanoscale spatial organization. PMID:26572827

  3. Inhibition of Acid Sphingomyelinase Depletes Cellular Phosphatidylserine and Mislocalizes K-Ras from the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kwang-jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Zhou, Yong; Maekawa, Masashi; Ma, Xiaoping; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras must localize to the plasma membrane for biological activity; thus, preventing plasma membrane interaction blocks K-Ras signal output. Here we show that inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) mislocalizes both the K-Ras isoforms K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B from the plasma membrane to the endomembrane and inhibits their nanoclustering. We found that fendiline, a potent ASM inhibitor, reduces the phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) and cholesterol content of the inner plasma membrane. These lipid changes are causative because supplementation of fendiline-treated cells with exogenous PtdSer rapidly restores K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding, nanoclustering, and signal output. Conversely, supplementation with exogenous cholesterol restores K-Ras4A but not K-Ras4B nanoclustering. These experiments reveal different operational pools of PtdSer on the plasma membrane. Inhibition of ASM elevates cellular sphingomyelin and reduces cellular ceramide levels. Concordantly, delivery of recombinant ASM or exogenous ceramide to fendiline-treated cells rapidly relocalizes K-Ras4B and PtdSer to the plasma membrane. K-Ras4B mislocalization is also recapitulated in ASM-deficient Neimann-Pick type A and B fibroblasts. This study identifies sphingomyelin metabolism as an indirect regulator of K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B signaling through the control of PtdSer plasma membrane content. It also demonstrates the critical and selective importance of PtdSer to K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding and nanoscale spatial organization. PMID:26572827

  4. Gene amplification is a relatively frequent event leading to ZBTB7A (Pokemon) overexpression in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Apostolopoulou, K; Pateras, I S; Evangelou, K; Tsantoulis, P K; Liontos, M; Kittas, C; Tiniakos, D G; Kotsinas, A; Cordon-Cardo, C; Gorgoulis, V G

    2007-11-01

    ZBTB7A (Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Its main function is the suppression of the p14ARF tumour suppressor gene. Although ZBTB7A expression has been found to be increased in various types of lymphoma, there are no reports dealing with its expression in solid tumours. Given that p14(ARF) inhibits MDM2, the main negative regulator of p53, we hypothesized that overexpression of ZBTB7A could lead indirectly to p53 inactivation. To this end, we examined the status of ZBTB7A and its relationship with tumour kinetics (proliferation and apoptosis) and nodal members of the p53 network in a panel of 83 non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs). We observed, in the majority of the samples, prominent expression of ZBTB7A in the cancerous areas compared to negligible presence in the adjacent normal tissue elements. Gene amplification (two- to five-fold) was found in 27.7% of the cases, denoting its significance as a mechanism driving ZBTB7A overproduction in NSCLCs. In the remaining non-amplified group of carcinomas, analysis of the mRNA and protein expression patterns suggested that deregulation at the transcriptional and post-translational level accounts for ZBTB7A overexpression. Proliferation was associated with ZBTB7A expression (p = 0.033) but not apoptosis. The association with proliferation was reflected in the positive correlation between ZBTB7A expression and tumour size (p = 0.018). The overexpression of ZBTB7A in both p53 mutant and p53 wild-type cases, implies either a synergistic effect or that ZBTB7A exerts its oncogenic properties independently of the p14(ARF)-MDM2-p53 axis. The concomitant expression of ZBTB7A with p14(ARF) (p = 0.039), instead of the anticipated inverse relation, supports the latter notion. In conclusion, regardless of the pathway followed, the distinct expression of ZBTB7A in cancerous areas and the association with proliferation and tumour size pinpoints a role for this novel cell cycle regulator in the

  5. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay targeting the blaCTX-M9 gene for detection of extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Thirapanmethee, Krit; Pothisamutyothin, Kanokporn; Nathisuwan, Surakit; Chomnawang, Mullika T; Wiwat, Chanpen

    2014-12-01

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) produced by Enterobacteriaceae are one of the resistance mechanisms to most β-lactam antibiotics. ESBLs are currently a major problem in both hospitals and community settings worldwide. Rapid and reliable means of detecting ESBL-producing bacteria is necessary for identification, prevention and treatment. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a technique that rapidly amplifies DNA with high specificity and sensitivity under isothermal conditions. This study was aimed to develop a convenient, accurate and inexpensive method for detecting ESBL-producing bacteria by a LAMP technique. ESBLs-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were isolated from a tertiary hospital in Bangkok, Thailand and reconfirmed by double-disk synergy test. A set of four specific oligonucleotide primers of LAMP for detection of bla(CTX-M9) gene was designed based on bla(CTX-M9) from E. coli (GenBank Accession No. AJ416345). The LAMP reaction was amplified under isothermal temperature at 63°C for 60 min. Ladder-like patterns of band sizes from 226 bp of the bla(CTX-M9) DNA target was observed. The LAMP product was further analyzed by restriction digestion with MboI and TaqI endonucleases. The fragments generated were approximately 168, 177 and 250 bp in size for MboI digestion and 165, 193, 229, 281 and 314 bp for TaqI digestion, which is in agreement with the predicted sizes. The sensitivity of the LAMP technique to bla(CTX-M9) was greater than that of the PCR method by at least 10,000-fold. These results showed that the LAMP primers specifically amplified only the bla(CTX-M9) gene. Moreover, the presence of LAMP amplicon was simply determined by adding SYBR Green I in the reaction. In conclusion, this technique for detection of ESBLs is convenient, reliable and easy to perform routinely in hospitals or laboratory units in developing countries. PMID:25284314

  6. Clinical and metabolic parameters in non-small cell lung carcinoma and colorectal cancer patients with and without KRAS mutations.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ahmet; Mohamed, Nehad; Patterson, Kara A; Tang, Yan; Shilo, Konstantin; Villalona-Calero, Miguel A; Davis, Michael E; Zhou, Xiao-Ping; Frankel, Wendy; Otterson, Gregory A; Zhao, Weiqiang

    2014-09-01

    Lung cancer (LC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) are the first and second deadliest types of cancer worldwide. EGFR-based therapy has been used in the treatment of these cancers with variable success. Presence of mutations in the KRAS driver oncogene, possibly induced by environmental factors such as carcinogens in diet and cigarette smoke, may confer worse prognosis and resistance to treatment for reasons not fully understood. Data on possible associations between KRAS mutational status and clinical and metabolic parameters, which may help in clinical management, as well as in identifying risk factors for developing these cancers, are limited in the current literature. We sequenced the KRAS gene and investigated the associations of variations in 108 patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), the most common form of LC, and in 116 patients with CRC. All of the mutations originated from the guanosine nucleotide and over half of all transversions in NSCLC and CRC were c.34 G>T and c.35 G>T, respectively. c.35 G>A was the most frequent type of transition in both cancers. Excluding smoking, the clinical and metabolic parameters in patients carrying mutant and wild type KRAS were similar except that the CRC patients with transversion mutations were 8.6 years younger than those carrying the transitions (P < 0.01). Dyslipidemia, hypertension, family cancer history, and age of diagnosis older than 60 years were more frequent in NSCLC than CRC (P ≤ 0.04). These results suggest that most of the clinical and metabolic parameters investigated in this study are probably not associated with the more aggressive phenotype and differences in response to EGFR-based treatment previously reported in patients with KRAS mutations. However, the increased rates of abnormal metabolic parameters in patients with NSCLC in comparison to CRC indicate that these parameters may be more important in the management of NSCLC. CRC patients carrying transition mutations are older than those

  7. The Differential Effects of Wild-Type and Mutated K-Ras on MST2 Signaling Are Determined by K-Ras Activation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Romano, David; Maccario, Helene; Doherty, Carolanne; Quinn, Niall P.

    2013-01-01

    K-Ras is frequently mutated in human cancers. Mutant (mt) K-Ras can stimulate both oncogenic transformation and apoptosis through activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and AKT pathways and the MST2 pathway, respectively. The biological outcome is determined by the balance and cross talk between these pathways. In colorectal cancer (CRC), a K-Ras mutation is negatively correlated with MST2 expression, as mt K-Ras can induce apoptosis by activating the MST2 pathway. However, wild-type (wt) K-Ras can prevent the activation of the MST2 pathway upon growth factor stimulation and enable transformation by mt K-Ras in CRC cells that express MST2. Here we have investigated the mechanism by which wt and mt K-Ras differentially regulate the MST2 pathway and MST2-dependent apoptosis. The ability of K-Ras to activate MST2 and MST2-dependent apoptosis is determined by the differential activation kinetics of mt K-Ras and wt K-Ras. Chronic activation of K-Ras by mutation or overexpression of Ras exchange factors results in the activation of MST2 and LATS1, increased MST2-LATS1 complex formation, and apoptosis. In contrast, transient K-Ras activation upon epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation prevents the formation of the MST2-LATS1 complex in an AKT-dependent manner. Our data suggest that the close relationship between Ras prosurvival and proapoptotic signaling is coordinated via the differential regulation of the MST2-LATS1 interaction by transient and chronic stimuli. PMID:23459937

  8. Development of oligonucleotide primers and probes against structural and regulatory genes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and their use for amplification of HIV-1 provirus by using polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Dawood, M R; Allan, R; Fowke, K; Embree, J; Hammond, G W

    1992-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction is a powerful technique for amplifying a few copies of double-stranded genetic material to millions of copies in a few hours. The sensitivity and specificity of the polymerase chain reaction technique depend to some extent on the nucleotide sequences of the oligonucleotide primer pair used in the amplification. We report new oligonucleotide primers and probes which can be used for the amplification and detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 provirus sequences of not only structural but also regulatory genes. These primers are very sensitive and specific and can be used for the detection of African and North American strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Images PMID:1400991

  9. Colorectal cancer-related mutant KRAS alleles function as positive regulators of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Sara; Castro, Lisandra; Fernandes, Maria Sofia; Francisco, Rita; Castro, Paula; Priault, Muriel; Chaves, Susana Rodrigues; Moyer, Mary Pat; Oliveira, Carla; Seruca, Raquel; Côrte-Real, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    The recent interest to modulate autophagy in cancer therapy has been hampered by the dual roles of this conserved catabolic process in cancer, highlighting the need for tailored approaches. Since RAS isoforms have been implicated in autophagy regulation and mutation of the KRAS oncogene is highly frequent in colorectal cancer (CRC), we questioned whether/how mutant KRAS alleles regulate autophagy in CRC and its implications. We established two original models, KRAS-humanized yeast and KRAS-non-cancer colon cells and showed that expression of mutated KRAS up-regulates starvation-induced autophagy in both. Accordingly, KRAS down-regulation inhibited autophagy in CRC-derived cells harboring KRAS mutations. We further show that KRAS-induced autophagy proceeds via up-regulation of the MEK/ERK pathway in both colon models and that KRAS and autophagy contribute to CRC cell survival during starvation. Since KRAS inhibitors have proven difficult to develop, our results suggest using autophagy inhibitors as a combined/alternative therapeutic approach in CRCs with mutant KRAS. PMID:26418750

  10. K-Ras4B proteins are expressed in the nucleolus: Interaction with nucleolin.

    PubMed

    Birchenall-Roberts, Maria C; Fu, Tao; Kim, Soo-Gyung; Huang, Ying K; Dambach, Michael; Resau, James H; Ruscetti, Francis W

    2006-09-22

    Kirsten Ras4B (K-Ras4B) is a potent onco-protein that is expressed in the majority of human cell types and is frequently mutated in carcinomas. K-Ras4B, like other members of the Ras family of proteins, is considered to be a cytoplasmic protein that must be localized to the plasma membrane for activation. Here, using confocal microscopy and biochemical analysis, we show that K-Ras4B, but not H-Ras or the closely related K-Ras4A, is also present in the nucleoli of normal and transformed cells. Subcellular fractionation and immunostaining show that K-Ras4B is located not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleolar compartment. Modification of a C-terminal hexa-lysine motif unique to K-Ras4B results in exclusively cytoplasmic forms of the protein. Nucleolin, a pleiotropic regulator of cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, is also characterized by a nucleolar-like nuclear appearance. We show that K-Ras4B and nucleolin co-localize within the nucleus and that nucleolin physically associates with K-Ras4B. Inhibition of K-Ras4B/nucleolin association blocked nucleolar localization of K-Ras4B. Using siRNA to knockdown the expression of nucleolin eliminated the nucleolar localization of K-Ras4B and significantly repressed the activation of the well-characterized K-Ras4B transcriptional target Ap-1, but stimulated Elk1. These data provide evidence of a nucleolar localization of K-Ras4B and describe a functional association between K-Ras4B and nucleolin. PMID:16889753

  11. K-Ras4B proteins are expressed in the nucleolus: Interaction with nucleolin

    SciTech Connect

    Birchenall-Roberts, Maria C. . E-mail: birchena@mail.ncifcrf.gov; Fu, Tao; Kim, Soo-Gyung; Huang, Ying K.; Dambach, Michael; Resau, James H.; Ruscetti, Francis W.

    2006-09-22

    Kirsten Ras4B (K-Ras4B) is a potent onco-protein that is expressed in the majority of human cell types and is frequently mutated in carcinomas. K-Ras4B, like other members of the Ras family of proteins, is considered to be a cytoplasmic protein that must be localized to the plasma membrane for activation. Here, using confocal microscopy and biochemical analysis, we show that K-Ras4B, but not H-Ras or the closely related K-Ras4A, is also present in the nucleoli of normal and transformed cells. Subcellular fractionation and immunostaining show that K-Ras4B is located not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleolar compartment. Modification of a C-terminal hexa-lysine motif unique to K-Ras4B results in exclusively cytoplasmic forms of the protein. Nucleolin, a pleiotropic regulator of cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, is also characterized by a nucleolar-like nuclear appearance. We show that K-Ras4B and nucleolin co-localize within the nucleus and that nucleolin physically associates with K-Ras4B. Inhibition of K-Ras4B/nucleolin association blocked nucleolar localization of K-Ras4B. Using siRNA to knockdown the expression of nucleolin eliminated the nucleolar localization of K-Ras4B and significantly repressed the activation of the well-characterized K-Ras4B transcriptional target Ap-1, but stimulated Elk1. These data provide evidence of a nucleolar localization of K-Ras4B and describe a functional association between K-Ras4B and nucleolin.

  12. Akt mediated ROS-dependent selective targeting of mutant KRAS tumors.

    PubMed

    Iskandar, Kartini; Rezlan, Majidah; Pervaiz, Shazib

    2014-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a critical role in a variety of cellular processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to cell death. Previously, we reported the ability of a small molecule compound, C1, to induce ROS dependent autophagy associated apoptosis in human cancer cell lines and primary tumor cells (Wong C. et al. 2010). Our ongoing investigations have unraveled a hitherto undefined novel signaling network involving hyper-phosphorylation of Akt and Akt-mediated ROS production in cancer cell lines. Interestingly, drug-induced Akt activation is selectively seen in cell lines that carry mutant KRAS; HCT116 cells that carry the V13D KRAS mutation respond favorably to C1 while HT29 cells expressing wild type KRAS are relatively resistant. Of note, not only does the compound target mutant KRAS expressing cells but also induces RAS activation as evidenced by the PAK pull down assay. Corroborating this, pharmacological inhibition as well as siRNA mediated silencing of KRAS or Akt, blocked C1-induced ROS production and rescued tumor colony forming ability in HCT116 cells. To further confirm the involvement of KRAS, we made use of mutant KRAS transformed RWPE-1 prostate epithelial cells. Notably, drug-induced ROS generation and death sensitivity was significantly higher in RWPE-1-KRAS cells than the RWPE-1-vector cells, thus confirming the results obtained with mutant KRAS colorectal carcinoma cell line. Lastly, we made use of HCT116 mutant KRAS knockout cells (KO) where the mutant KRAS allele had been deleted, thus expressing a single wild-type KRAS allele. Exposure of the KO cells to C1 failed to induce Akt activation and mitochondrial ROS production. Taken together, results show the involvement of activated Akt in ROS-mediated selective targeting of mutant KRAS expressing tumors, which could have therapeutic implications given the paucity of chemotherapeutic strategies specifically targeting KRAS mutant cancers. PMID:26461287

  13. Estrogen withdrawal, increased breast cancer risk and the KRAS-variant

    PubMed Central

    McVeigh, Terri P; Jung, Song-Yi; Kerin, Michael J; Salzman, David W; Nallur, Sunitha; Nemec, Antonio A; Dookwah, Michelle; Sadofsky, Jackie; Paranjape, Trupti; Kelly, Olivia; Chan, Elcie; Miller, Nicola; Sweeney, Karl J; Zelterman, Daniel; Sweasy, Joann; Pilarski, Robert; Telesca, Donatello; Slack, Frank J; Weidhaas, Joanne B

    2015-01-01

    The KRAS-variant is a biologically functional, microRNA binding site variant, which predicts increased cancer risk especially for women. Because external exposures, such as chemotherapy, differentially impact the effect of this mutation, we evaluated the association of estrogen exposures, breast cancer (BC) risk and tumor biology in women with the KRAS-variant. Women with BC (n = 1712), the subset with the KRAS-variant (n = 286) and KRAS-variant unaffected controls (n = 80) were evaluated, and hormonal exposures, KRAS-variant status, and pathology were compared. The impact of estrogen withdrawal on transformation of isogenic normal breast cell lines with or without the KRAS-variant was studied. Finally, the association and presentation characteristics of the KRAS-variant and multiple primary breast cancer (MPBC) were evaluated. KRAS-variant BC patients were more likely to have ovarian removal pre-BC diagnosis than non-variant BC patients (p = 0.033). In addition, KRAS-variant BC patients also appeared to have a lower estrogen state than KRAS-variant unaffected controls, with a lower BMI (P < 0.001). Finally, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) discontinuation in KRAS-variant patients was associated with a diagnosis of triple negative BC (P < 0.001). Biologically confirming our clinical findings, acute estrogen withdrawal led to oncogenic transformation in KRAS-variant positive isogenic cell lines. Finally, KRAS-variant BC patients had greater than an 11-fold increased risk of presenting with MPBC compared to non-variant patients (45.39% vs 6.78%, OR 11.44 [3.42–37.87], P < 0.001). Thus, estrogen withdrawal and a low estrogen state appear to increase BC risk and to predict aggressive tumor biology in women with the KRAS-variant, who are also significantly more likely to present with multiple primary breast cancer. PMID:25961464

  14. Estrogen withdrawal, increased breast cancer risk and the KRAS-variant.

    PubMed

    McVeigh, Terri P; Jung, Song-Yi; Kerin, Michael J; Salzman, David W; Nallur, Sunitha; Nemec, Antonio A; Dookwah, Michelle; Sadofsky, Jackie; Paranjape, Trupti; Kelly, Olivia; Chan, Elcie; Miller, Nicola; Sweeney, Karl J; Zelterman, Daniel; Sweasy, Joann; Pilarski, Robert; Telesca, Donatello; Slack, Frank J; Weidhaas, Joanne B

    2015-01-01

    The KRAS-variant is a biologically functional, microRNA binding site variant, which predicts increased cancer risk especially for women. Because external exposures, such as chemotherapy, differentially impact the effect of this mutation, we evaluated the association of estrogen exposures, breast cancer (BC) risk and tumor biology in women with the KRAS-variant. Women with BC (n = 1712), the subset with the KRAS-variant (n = 286) and KRAS-variant unaffected controls (n = 80) were evaluated, and hormonal exposures, KRAS-variant status, and pathology were compared. The impact of estrogen withdrawal on transformation of isogenic normal breast cell lines with or without the KRAS-variant was studied. Finally, the association and presentation characteristics of the KRAS-variant and multiple primary breast cancer (MPBC) were evaluated. KRAS-variant BC patients were more likely to have ovarian removal pre-BC diagnosis than non-variant BC patients (p = 0.033). In addition, KRAS-variant BC patients also appeared to have a lower estrogen state than KRAS-variant unaffected controls, with a lower BMI (P < 0.001). Finally, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) discontinuation in KRAS-variant patients was associated with a diagnosis of triple negative BC (P < 0.001). Biologically confirming our clinical findings, acute estrogen withdrawal led to oncogenic transformation in KRAS-variant positive isogenic cell lines. Finally, KRAS-variant BC patients had greater than an 11-fold increased risk of presenting with MPBC compared to non-variant patients (45.39% vs 6.78%, OR 11.44 [3.42-37.87], P < 0.001). Thus, estrogen withdrawal and a low estrogen state appear to increase BC risk and to predict aggressive tumor biology in women with the KRAS-variant, who are also significantly more likely to present with multiple primary breast cancer. PMID:25961464

  15. Cten Is Targeted by Kras Signalling to Regulate Cell Motility in the Colon and Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ghamdi, Saleh; Albasri, Abdulkader; Cachat, Julien; Ibrahem, Salih; Muhammad, Belal A.; Jackson, Darryl; Nateri, Abdolrahman S.; Kindle, Karin B.; Ilyas, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    CTEN/TNS4 is an oncogene in colorectal cancer (CRC) which enhances cell motility although the mechanism of Cten regulation is unknown. We found an association between high Cten expression and KRAS/BRAF mutation in a series of CRC cell lines (p = 0.03) and hypothesised that Kras may regulate Cten. To test this, Kras was knocked-down (using small interfering (si)RNA) in CRC cell lines SW620 and DLD1 (high Cten expressors and mutant for KRAS). In each cell line, Kras knockdown was mirrored by down-regulation of Cten Since Kras signals through Braf, we tested the effect of Kras knockdown in CRC cell line Colo205 (which shows high Cten expression and is mutant for BRAF but wild type for KRAS). Cten levels were unaffected by Kras knockdown whilst Braf knockdown resulted in reduced Cten expression suggesting that Kras signals via Braf to regulate Cten. Quantification of Cten mRNA and protein analysis following proteasome inhibition suggested that regulation was of Cten transcription. Kras knockdown inhibited cell motility. To test whether this could be mediated through Cten, SW620 cells were co-transfected with Kras specific siRNAs and a Cten expression vector. Restoring Cten expression was able to restore cell motility despite Kras knockdown (transwell migration and wounding assay, p<0.001 for both). Since KRAS is mutated in many cancers, we investigated whether this relationship could be demonstrated in other tumour models. The experiments were repeated in the pancreatic cancer cell lines Colo357 & PSN-1(both high Cten expressors and mutant for KRAS). In both cell lines, Kras was shown to regulate Cten and forced expression of Cten was able to rescue loss of cell motility following Kras knockdown in PSN-1 (transwell migration assay, p<0.001). We conclude that, in the colon and pancreas, Cten is a downstream target of Kras and may be a mechanism through which Kras regulates of cell motility. PMID:21698197

  16. Inflammation induced NFATc1-STAT3 Transcription Complex Promotes Pancreatic Cancer initiation by KrasG12D

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, Sandra; Chen, Nai-ming; Siveke, Jens T.; König, Alexander; Zhang, Jin-San; Singh, Shiv K.; Wolf, Elmar; Bartkuhn, Marek; Esposito, Irene; Heßmann, Elisabeth; Reinecke, Johanna; Nikorowitsch, Julius; Brunner, Marius; Singh, Garima; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.; Smyrk, Thomas; Bamlet, William R.; Eilers, Martin; Neesse, Albrecht; Gress, Thomas M.; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Tuveson, David; Urrutia, Raul; Ellenrieder, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cancer-associated inflammation is a molecular key feature in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Oncogenic KRAS in conjunction with persistent inflammation is known to accelerate carcinogenesis, although the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we outline a novel pathway whereby the transcription factors NFATc1 and STAT3 cooperate in pancreatic epithelial cells to promote KrasG12D-driven carcinogenesis. NFATc1 activation is induced by inflammation and itself accelerates inflammation-induced carcinogenesis in KrasG12D mice, whereas genetic or pharmacological ablation of NFATc1 attenuates this effect. Mechanistically, NFATc1 complexes with STAT3 for enhancer-promoter communications at jointly regulated genes involved in oncogenesis, e.g. Cyclin, EGFR and WNT family members. The NFATc1-STAT3 cooperativity is operative in pancreatitis-mediated carcinogenesis as well as in established human pancreatic cancer. Together, these studies unravel new mechanisms of inflammatory driven pancreatic carcinogenesis and suggest beneficial effects of chemopreventive strategies using drugs which are currently available for targeting these factors in clinical trials. PMID:24694735

  17. Effects of Hypoxanthine Substitution in Peptide Nucleic Acids Targeting KRAS2 Oncogenic mRNA Molecules: Theory and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Jeffrey M.; Wampole, Matthew E.; Chen, Chang-Po; Sethi, Dalip; Singh, Amrita; Dupradeau, François-Yves; Wang, Fan; Gray, Brian D.; Thakur, Mathew L.; Wickstrom, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Genetic disorders can arise from single base substitutions in a single gene. A single base substitution for wild type guanine in the twelfth codon of KRAS2 mRNA occurs frequently to initiate lung, pancreatic, and colon cancer. We have observed single base mismatch specificity in radioimaging of mutant KRAS2 mRNA in tumors in mice by in vivo hybridization with radiolabeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) dodecamers. We hypothesized that multi-mutant specificity could be achieved with a PNA dodecamer incorporating hypoxanthine, which can form Watson-Crick basepairs with adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil. Using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we show that hypoxanthine substitutions in PNAs are tolerated in KRAS2 RNA-PNA duplexes where wild type guanine is replaced by mutant uracil or adenine in RNA. To validate our predictions, we synthesized PNA dodecamers with hypoxanthine, and then measured the thermal stability of RNA-PNA duplexes. Circular dichroism thermal melting results showed that hypoxanthine-containing PNAs are more stable in duplexes where hypoxanthine-adenine and hypoxanthine-uracil base pairs are formed than single mismatch duplexes or duplexes containing hypoxanthine-guanine opposition. PMID:23972113

  18. MicroRNA-31 initiates lung tumorigenesis and promotes mutant KRAS-driven lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Mick D.; Boyd, Kelli L.; Moyo, Tamara; Mitra, Ramkrishna; Duszynski, Robert; Arrate, Maria Pia; Chen, Xi; Zhao, Zhongming; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Andl, Thomas; Eischen, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miR) are important regulators of gene expression, and aberrant miR expression has been linked to oncogenesis; however, little is understood about their contribution to lung tumorigenesis. Here, we determined that miR-31 is overexpressed in human lung adenocarcinoma and this overexpression independently correlates with decreased patient survival. We developed a transgenic mouse model that allows for lung-specific expression of miR-31 to test the oncogenic potential of miR-31 in the lung. Using this model, we observed that miR-31 induction results in lung hyperplasia, followed by adenoma formation and later adenocarcinoma development. Moreover, induced expression of miR-31 in mice cooperated with mutant KRAS to accelerate lung tumorigenesis. We determined that miR-31 regulates lung epithelial cell growth and identified 6 negative regulators of RAS/MAPK signaling as direct targets of miR-31. Our study distinguishes miR-31 as a driver of lung tumorigenesis that promotes mutant KRAS-mediated oncogenesis and reveals that miR-31 directly targets and reduces expression of negative regulators of RAS/MAPK signaling. PMID:26657862

  19. Impaired JNK signaling cooperates with KrasG12D expression to accelerate pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Clare C.; Harvey, Emma; McMahon, Raymond F.T.; Finegan, Katherine G.; Connor, Frances; Davis, Roger J.; Tuveson, David A.; Tournier, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    The c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and its two direct activators, namely the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase 4 (MKK4) and MKK7, constitute a signaling node frequently mutated in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Here we demonstrate the cooperative interaction of endogenous expression of KrasG12D with loss-of-function mutations in mkk4 or both, mkk4 and mkk7 genes in the pancreas. More specifically, impaired JNK signaling in a subpopulation of Pdx1-expressing cells dramatically accelerated the appearance of KrasG12D-induced acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias, which rapidly progressed to invasive PDAC within 10 weeks of age. Furthermore, inactivation of mkk4/mkk7 compromised acinar regeneration following acute inflammatory stress by locking damaged exocrine cells in a permanently de-differentiated state. Therefore, we propose that JNK signaling exerts its tumor suppressive function in the pancreas by antagonising the metaplastic conversion of acinar cells towards a ductal fate capable of responding to oncogenic stimulation. PMID:24713432

  20. Development and evaluation of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for rapid detection of Leishmania infantum in canine leishmaniasis based on cysteine protease B genes.

    PubMed

    Chaouch, Melek; Mhadhbi, Moez; Adams, Emily R; Schoone, Gerard J; Limam, Sassi; Gharbi, Zyneb; Darghouth, Mohamed Aziz; Guizani, Ikram; BenAbderrazak, Souha

    2013-11-15

    We developed a Leishmania infantum specific LAMP assay that was carried out using a set of, six primers targeting the cysteine protease B multi copy gene of L. infantum. Our result shows that we, successfully detect the L. infantum DNA and that amplification is specific as no cross reaction was seen, with L. major, L. tropica, L. turanica, L. aethiopica, L. tarentolae, L. gerbilii, Trypanosoma cruzi or, human genomic DNA. When compared to conventional cpb based PCR, the sensitivity of LAMP assay, was higher with a detection limit of 50 fg/μl of genomic L. infantum parasite DNA. Accurate and rapid, diagnosis of canine leishmaniasis (CanL) is an important issue that allows early treatment and, prevents transmission. Our developed LAMP assay was used to evaluate occurrences of Leishmania infantum in seventy five (75) dogs from the field. Blood samples were used to perform LAMP assay, classical PCR, IFAT and microscopy that was used as gold standard. The IFAT in addition to, microscopy, are the basic techniques used for CanL diagnosis at the School of Veterinary Medicine, where we obtained our samples. Compared to molecular methods, the serology (IFAT) test shows the, best sensitivity (88.57%) with, however, a much lower specificity (52.5%) due to a relatively high, number of false-positive results (22 animals). The PCR assay shows a low sensitivity (37.14%) and, specificity around (82.5%). Our LAMP assay shows a suitable sensitivity (54%) and a good specificity, (80%), with however, positive (70%) and negative (66%) predictive values. Furthermore, the best, positive likelihood ratio (LR+) was obtained by LAMP assay (2.7). This technique presents the highest, kappa value (with a fair agreement of 0.34). Moreover, the relative stability of the reagents indicates, that LAMP may be a good alternative to a conventional PCR, especially under field conditions. Finally in, a brief cost evaluation, the LAMP assay compares favorably with other molecular diagnostic tests. This

  1. Lack of specificity for PCR assays targeting human Bacteroides 16S rRNA gene: cross-amplification with fish feces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods focused on members of the genus Bacteroides have been increasingly utilized in microbial source tracking studies for identifying and quantifying sources of non-point fecal contamination. We present results using real-time PCR to show significant cross-amplification of a human-specific Bacter...

  2. KRAS and BRAF Mutations and PTEN Expression Do Not Predict Efficacy of Cetuximab-Based Chemoradiotherapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Erben, Philipp; Stroebel, Philipp; Horisberger, Karoline; Popa, Juliana; Bohn, Beatrice; Hanfstein, Benjamin; Kaehler, Georg; Kienle, Peter; Post, Stefan; Wenz, Frederik; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Mutations in KRAS and BRAF genes as well as the loss of expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) (deleted on chromosome 10) are associated with impaired activity of antibodies directed against epidermal growth factor receptor in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The predictive and prognostic value of the KRAS and BRAF point mutations as well as PTEN expression in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) treated with cetuximab-based neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is unknown. Methods and Materials: We have conducted phase I and II trials of the combination of weekly administration of cetuximab and irinotecan and daily doses of capecitabine in conjunction with radiotherapy (45 Gy plus 5.4 Gy) in patients with LARC (stage uT3/4 or uN+). The status of KRAS and BRAF mutations was determined with direct sequencing, and PTEN expression status was determined with immunohistochemistry testing of diagnostic tumor biopsies. Tumor regression was evaluated by using standardized regression grading, and disease-free survival (DFS) was calculated according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 57 patients were available for analyses. A total of 31.6% of patients carried mutations in the KRAS genes. No BRAF mutations were found, while the loss of PTEN expression was observed in 9.6% of patients. Six patients achieved complete remission, and the 3-year DFS rate was 73%. No correlation was seen between tumor regression or DFS rate and a single marker or a combination of all markers. Conclusions: In the present series, no BRAF mutation was detected. The presence of KRAS mutations and loss of PTEN expression were not associated with impaired response to cetuximab-based chemoradiotherapy and 3-year DFS.

  3. Gene amplification: developments, and applications for medical diagnostics. January 1985-February 1989 (Citations from the Biobusiness data base). Report for January 1985-February 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning genetic amplification, a revolutionary new DNA probe technology. Companies on the cutting edge of this technology are discussed, and mention is made of their licensing agreements. Applications in clinical diagnosis for such diseases as acquired immune deficiency syndrome and leukemia, and applications for prenatal testing, and forensic testing are examined. (Contains 55 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  4. The Role of FGFR1 Gene Amplification as a Poor Prognostic Factor in Squamous Cell Lung Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Published Data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Gao, Wen; Xu, Jiali; Chen, Xiaojun; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Yizhi; Yin, Yongmei; Guo, Renhua; Liu, Ping; Shu, Yongqian; Liu, Lingxiang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The prognostic factors of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain controversial. Methods. We conducted a meta-analysis of published studies from 1974 to February 2015. In absence of quality difference between studies of reporting significant and nonsignificant results, the relationship between FGFR1 amplification and clinicopathological parameters in NSCLC was analyzed. And also the combined hazard ratio (HR) and their corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated in terms of overall survival. Results. 3178 patients (12 studies) were included in the analysis. It was shown that FGFR1 amplification was significantly more prevalent among male patients (RR 2.03, 95% CI 1.57–2.63) with squamous cell lung cancer (SQCC) (RR 3.49, 95% CI 2.62–4.64) and current smokers (RR 2.63, 95% CI 1.92–3.60). The pooled data also showed that the FGFR1 amplification was a poor prognostic factor in SQCC (HR 1.38, 95% CI 1.07–1.78), Asian patients (HR 1.78, 95% CI 1.22–2.60), and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method (HR 1.30, 95% CI 1.06–1.58). Conclusions. This meta-analysis strongly suggests that FGFR1 amplification occurs more frequently in male, SQCC and smokers, and it is a risk factor for poor prognosis among Asian patients with SQCC. PMID:26788508

  5. Allele-specific inhibitors inactivate mutant KRAS G12C by a trapping mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lito, Piro; Solomon, Martha; Li, Lian-Sheng; Hansen, Rasmus; Rosen, Neal

    2016-02-01

    It is thought that KRAS oncoproteins are constitutively active because their guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) activity is disabled. Consequently, drugs targeting the inactive or guanosine 5'-diphosphate-bound conformation are not expected to be effective. We describe a mechanism that enables such drugs to inhibit KRAS(G12C) signaling and cancer cell growth. Inhibition requires intact GTPase activity and occurs because drug-bound KRAS(G12C) is insusceptible to nucleotide exchange factors and thus trapped in its inactive state. Indeed, mutants completely lacking GTPase activity and those promoting exchange reduced the potency of the drug. Suppressing nucleotide exchange activity downstream of various tyrosine kinases enhanced KRAS(G12C) inhibition, whereas its potentiation had the opposite effect. These findings reveal that KRAS(G12C) undergoes nucleotide cycling in cancer cells and provide a basis for developing effective therapies to treat KRAS(G12C)-driven cancers. PMID:26841430

  6. Mismatch Amplification Mutation Assay Real-Time PCR Analysis of the Leptin Gene G2548A and A19G Polymorphisms and Serum Leptin in Infancy: A Preliminary Investigation.

    PubMed

    Savino, Francesco; Rossi, Lorenza; Di Stasio, Liliana; Galliano, Ilaria; Montanari, Paola; Bergallo, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is a hormone that regulates food intake and energy metabolism. Its coding gene (LEP) is one of the most promising candidates for obesity. Although some studies have detected associations of different single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the LEP gene with serum leptin levels and obesity-related traits, the results are still conflicting. We investigated two SNPs to find relationships with leptin concentrations. Thirty healthy Caucasian infants younger than 6 months were genotyped for the SNPs G2548A and A19G with polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and amplification refractory mutation system-mismatch amplification mutation assay (ARMS- MAMA) real-time PCR, and serum leptin concentrations were measured with a radioimmunoassay method. Considering the significant linkage disequilibrium observed between the two SNPs, we divided the sample according to the number of GG haplotypes and observed that individuals homozygous for the GG haplotype had higher serum leptin levels in early infancy than the others. Although these preliminary results are based on a limited sample, they suggest that the genetic background seems to play a role in modulating leptin levels in infancy, but changes in leptin levels over infancy and their correlation with obesity need to be further explored. We describe an ARMS-MAMA real-time PCR procedure which could be profitably applied in routine genetic screening. PMID:27008407

  7. A mouse model of melanoma driven by oncogenic KRAS

    PubMed Central

    Milagre, Carla; Dhomen, Nathalie; Geyer, Felipe C; Hayward, Robert; Lambros, Maryou; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Marais, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The small G-protein NRAS is mutated in 22% of human melanomas, whereas the related proteins, KRAS and HRAS are mutated in only 2% and 1% of melanomas respectively. We have developed a mouse models of melanoma in which Cre recombinase/loxP technology is used to drive inducible expression of G12VKRAS in the melanocytic lineage. The mice develop skin hyper-pigmentation, nevi and tumors that bear many of the cardinal histopathology features and molecular characteristics of human melanoma. These tumors invade and destroy the underlying muscles and cells derived from them can grow as subcutaneous tumors and colonise the lungs of nude mice. These data establish that oncogenic KRAS can be a founder event in melanomagenesis. PMID:20516123

  8. Utility of KRAS mutation detection using circulating cell-free DNA from patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takeshi; Iwai, Takuma; Takahashi, Goro; Kan, Hayato; Koizumi, Michihiro; Matsuda, Akihisa; Shinji, Seiichi; Yamagishi, Aya; Yokoyama, Yasuyuki; Tatsuguchi, Atsushi; Kawagoe, Tatsuro; Kitano, Shiro; Nakayama, Masato; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Uchida, Eiji

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated the clinical utility of detecting KRAS mutations in circulating cell-free (ccf)DNA of metastatic colorectal cancer patients. We prospectively recruited 94 metastatic colorectal cancer patients. Circulating cell-free DNA was extracted from plasma samples and analyzed for the presence of seven KRAS point mutations. Using the Invader Plus assay with peptide nucleic acid clamping method and digital PCR, KRAS mutations were detected in the ccfDNA in 35 of 39 patients previously determined to have primary tumors containing KRAS mutations using the Luminex method, and in 5 of 55 patients with tumors containing wild-type KRAS. Curative resection was undertaken in 7 of 34 patients with primary and ccfDNA KRAS mutations, resulting in the disappearance of the mutation from the cell-free DNA in five of seven patients. Three of these patients had tumor recurrence and KRAS mutations in their ccfDNA reappeared. Epidermal growth factor receptor blockade was administered to 24 of the KRAS tumor wild-type patients. Of the 24 patients with wild-type KRAS in their primary tumors, three patients had KRAS mutations in their ccfDNA and did not respond to treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) blockade. We also detected a new KRAS mutation in five patients during chemotherapy with EGFR blockade, before disease progression was detectable with imaging. The detection of KRAS mutations in ccfDNA is an attractive approach for predicting both treatment response and acquired resistance to EGFR blockade, and for detecting disease recurrence. PMID:27116474

  9. Biomarkers that currently affect clinical practice: EGFR, ALK, MET, KRAS

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, M.D.; Kuruvilla, M.S.; Leighl, N.B.; Kamel–Reid, S.

    2012-01-01

    New drugs such as pemetrexed, the epidermal growth factor receptor (egfr) tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and the Alk inhibitor crizotinib have recently enabled progress in the management of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc). More drugs, especially Met inhibitors, will follow. However, the benefits of these agents are not uniform across the spectrum of nsclc, and optimizing their utility requires some degree of subgrouping of nsclc by the presence or absence of certain biomarkers. The biomarkers of current or imminent value are EGFR and KRAS mutational status, ALK rearrangements, and MET immunohistochemistry. As a predictor of benefit for anti-egfr monoclonal antibodies, EGFR immunohistochemistry is also of potential interest. Some of the foregoing biomarkers (EGFR, ALK, MET) are direct drivers of the malignant phenotype. As such, they are, quite rationally, the direct targets of inhibitory drugs. However, KRAS, while definitely a driver, has resisted attempts at direct pharmacologic manipulation, and its main value might lie in its role as part of an efficient testing algorithm, because KRAS mutations appear to exclude EGFR and ALK mutations. The indirect value of KRAS in determining sensitivity to other targeted agents or to pemetrexed remains controversial. The other biomarkers (EGFR, ALK, MET) may also have indirect value as predictors of sensitivity to chemotherapy in general, to pemetrexed specifically, and to radiotherapy and molecularly targeted agents. These biomarkers have all enabled the co-development of new drugs with companion diagnostics, and they illustrate the paradigm that will govern progress in oncology in the immediate future. However, in nsclc, the acquisition of sufficient biopsy material remains a stubborn obstacle to the evolution of novel targeted therapies. PMID:22787409

  10. KRAS/BRAF Analysis in Ovarian Low-Grade Serous Carcinoma Having Synchronous All Pathological Precursor Regions

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kohei; Nakayama, Kentaro; Ishibashi, Tomoka; Ishikawa, Noriyoshi; Ishikawa, Masako; Katagiri, Hiroshi; Minamoto, Toshiko; Sato, Emi; Sanuki, Kaori; Yamashita, Hitomi; Iida, Kouji; Sultana, Razia; Kyo, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian low-grade serous carcinoma is thought to begin as a serous cystadenoma or adenofibroma that progresses in a slow stepwise fashion. Among the low-grade serous carcinomas, there is a high frequency of activating mutations in the KRAS or BRAF genes; however, it remains unclear as to how these mutations contribute to tumor progression. This is the first report to track the histopathological progression of serous adenofibroma to low-grade serous carcinoma. Each stage was individually analyzed by pathological and molecular genetic methods to determine what differences occur between the distinct stages of progression. PMID:27128903

  11. Expression of KRAS in the endometrium of early pregnant mice and its effect during embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    Long, Xia; Zhang, Min; Chen, Xuemei; He, Junlin; Ding, Yubin; Zhang, Cuizhen; Liu, Xueqing; Wang, Yingxiong

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the expression pattern of Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) in the endometrium of early-stage pregnant mice and its function during embryo implantation. The expression of KRAS was measured at the mRNA level using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and at the protein level using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. The expressions of KRAS mRNA and protein were not significantly different in the endometrium of pseudopregnant and early-stage pregnant mice. However, the immunohistochemistry results showed that KRAS was highly expressed in the decidualizing stromal cells on days 5-7 of mouse pregnancy and was enhanced in the epithelial cells as pregnancy progressed. The expression of KRAS protein was higher after the stromal cell was artificially decidualized in vivo and in vitro. Stromal cell proliferation was attenuated after down-regulating KRAS expression. After silencing KRAS in the mouse uterus, the embryo implantation rate was significantly reduced (P < 0.005). We speculate that KRAS may regulate the stromal cell proliferation and differentiation progress and then affect the embryo implantation process. This study reveals that KRAS plays an important role in regulating the embryo implantation process. PMID:25999213

  12. Challenges in detecting pre-malignant pancreatic lesions during acute pancreatitis using a serum microRNA assay: a study based on KrasG12D transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xiafei; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Qiao; Wang, Wenze; Ye, Adam Yongxin; Song, Wei; Dai, Hongmei; Wang, Xianze; Wu, Fan; You, Lei; Wu, Wenming; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis accelerates the progression of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) lesions in a pancreas-specific KrasG12D mouse model. The purpose of this study was to explore whether serum microRNAs (miRNAs) can serve as sensitive biomarkers to detect occult PanIN in the setting of acute pancreatitis. Serum miRNA profiles were quantified by an array-based method and normalized by both Variance Stabilization Normalization (VSN) and invariant methods. Individual miRNAs were validated by TaqMan real-time PCR with synthetic spike-in C. elegans miRNAs as external controls. Serum miRNA profiles distinguished KrasG12D mice with pancreatitis from wild-type mice without pancreatitis, but failed to differentiate KrasG12D mice with pancreatitis from wild-type mice with pancreatitis. Most individual miRNAs that increased in KrasG12D mice with pancreatitis were not significantly different between KrasG12D mice without pancreatitis and wild-type mice without pancreatitis. Mechanistically, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) of the mRNA array data and immunohistochemical assays showed that caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis involved acinar cell loss and immune cell infiltration, which might contribute to serum miRNA profile changes. This study highlighted the challenges in using sensitive serum miRNA biomarker screening for the early detection of pancreatic malignancies during acute pancreatitis. PMID:27009811

  13. Targeting pathways downstream of KRAS in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zehua; Golay, Hadrien G; Barbie, David A

    2014-08-01

    Oncogenic KRAS activation is responsible for the most common genetic subtype of lung cancer. Although many of the major downstream signaling pathways that KRAS engages have been defined, these discoveries have yet to translate into effective targeted therapy. Much of the current focus has been directed at inhibiting the activation of RAF/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling, but clinical trials combining multiple different agents that target these pathways have failed to show significant activity. In this article, we will discuss the evidence for RAF and PI3K as key downstream RAS effectors, as well as the RAL guanine exchange factor, which is equally essential for transformation. Furthermore, we will delineate alternative pathways, including cytokine activation and autophagy, which are co-opted by oncogenic RAS signaling and also represent attractive targets for therapy. Finally, we will present strategies for combining inhibitors of these downstream KRAS signaling pathways in a rational fashion, as multitargeted therapy will be required to achieve a cure. PMID:25303301

  14. Targeting pathways downstream of KRAS in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zehua; Golay, Hadrien G; Barbie, David A

    2014-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS activation is responsible for the most common genetic subtype of lung cancer. Although many of the major downstream signaling pathways that KRAS engages have been defined, these discoveries have yet to translate into effective targeted therapy. Much of the current focus has been directed at inhibiting the activation of RAF/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling, but clinical trials combining multiple different agents that target these pathways have failed to show significant activity. In this article, we will discuss the evidence for RAF and PI3K as key downstream RAS effectors, as well as the RAL guanine exchange factor, which is equally essential for transformation. Furthermore, we will delineate alternative pathways, including cytokine activation and autophagy, which are co-opted by oncogenic RAS signaling and also represent attractive targets for therapy. Finally, we will present strategies for combining inhibitors of these downstream KRAS signaling pathways in a rational fashion, as multitargeted therapy will be required to achieve a cure. PMID:25303301

  15. Monitoring KRAS mutations in circulating DNA and tumor cells using digital droplet PCR during treatment of KRAS-mutated lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Guibert, Nicolas; Pradines, Anne; Farella, Magali; Casanova, Anne; Gouin, Sandrine; Keller, Laura; Favre, Gilles; Mazieres, Julien

    2016-10-01

    Liquid biopsies are a new non-invasive strategy to detect and monitor the biology of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the era of personalized medicine. KRAS is an oncogenic driver that is mutated in 30% of NSCLCs and is associated with a poor prognosis. 62 samples from 32 patients, treated for metastatic KRAS-mutated lung adenocarcinoma, had DNA extracted from plasma and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) prospectively tested for the presence of KRAS mutations using droplet digital PCR. A KRAS mutation was detected in 82% of patients. Sensitivity was 78% for circulating free DNA (cfDNA) and 34% for CTCs. The presence of a KRAS mutation in cfDNA was correlated with a poor response to chemotherapy or targeted therapy. When a KRAS-mutated-DNA was detected and then monitored in cfDNA, its variation during targeted or conventional therapy was correlated with response, according to RECIST criteria, in 87.5% of cases (n=14/16), whereas this correlation was observed in 37.5% of cases for CTCs (n=3/8). We report the usefulness of using digital droplet PCR on liquid biopsies to predict and monitor responses to treatment of KRAS-mutated lung adenocarcinoma. ctDNA was much more sensitive than CTCs in this context. PMID:27597273

  16. Complex karyotypes and KRAS and POT1 mutations impact outcome in CLL after chlorambucil-based chemotherapy or chemoimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Herling, Carmen Diana; Klaumünzer, Marion; Rocha, Cristiano Krings; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Bahlo, Jasmin; Kluth, Sandra; Crispatzu, Giuliano; Herling, Marco; Schiller, Joanna; Engelke, Anja; Tausch, Eugen; Döhner, Hartmut; Fischer, Kirsten; Goede, Valentin; Nürnberg, Peter; Reinhardt, Hans Christian; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Hallek, Michael; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton

    2016-07-21

    Genetic instability is a feature of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with adverse prognosis. We hypothesized that chromosomal translocations or complex karyotypes and distinct somatic mutations may impact outcome after first-line chemoimmunotherapy of CLL patients. We performed metaphase karyotyping and next-generation sequencing (NGS) of 85 genes in pretreatment blood samples obtained from 161 patients registered for CLL11, a 3-arm phase 3 trial comparing frontline chlorambucil (Clb) vs Clb plus rituximab (Clb-R) or Clb plus obinutuzumab in CLL patients with significant comorbidity. Chromosomal aberrations as assessed by karyotyping were observed in 68.8% of 154 patients, 31.2% carried translocations, and 19.5% showed complex karyotypes. NGS revealed 198 missense/nonsense mutations and 76 small indels in 76.4% of patients. The most frequently mutated genes were NOTCH1, SF3B1, ATM, TP53, BIRC3, POT1, XPO1, and KRAS Sole chemotherapy, treatment with Clb-R, or genetic lesions in TP53 (9.9% of patients) and KRAS (6.2% of patients) were significantly associated with nonresponse to study therapy. In multivariate models, complex karyotypes and POT1 mutations (8.1% of patients) represented significant prognostic factors for an unfavorable survival, independently of IGHV mutation status, Binet stage, and serum β-2-microglobuline. Patients with the copresence of complex karyotypes and deletions/mutations involving TP53 demonstrated a particularly short survival. In summary, this is the first prospective, controlled study in CLL patients that shows a role of complex karyotype aberrations as an independent prognostic factor for survival after front-line therapy. Moreover, the study identifies mutations in KRAS and POT1 as novel determinants of outcome after chemoimmunotherapy using chlorambucil and anti-CD20 treatment. PMID:27226433

  17. Multidimensional Screening Platform for Simultaneously Targeting Oncogenic KRAS and Hypoxia-Inducible Factors Pathways in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Michelle S; Ma, Jia Jia; Ratnayake, Ranjala; Havre, Pamela A; Yao, Jin; Dang, Nam H; Paul, Valerie J; Carney, Thomas J; Dang, Long H; Luesch, Hendrik

    2016-05-20

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a genetic disease, due to progressive accumulation of mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Large scale genomic sequencing projects revealed >100 mutations in any individual CRC. Many of these mutations are likely passenger mutations, and fewer are driver mutations. Of these, activating mutations in RAS proteins are essential for cancer initiation, progression, and/or resistance to therapy. There has been significant interest in developing drugs targeting mutated cancer gene products or downstream signaling pathways. Due to the number of mutations involved and inherent redundancy in intracellular signaling, drugs targeting one mutation or pathway have been either ineffective or led to rapid resistance. We have devised a strategy whereby multiple cancer pathways may be simultaneously targeted for drug discovery. For proof-of-concept, we targeted the oncogenic KRAS and HIF pathways, since oncogenic KRAS has been shown to be required for cancer initiation and progression, and HIF-1α and HIF-2α are induced by the majority of mutated oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in CRC. We have generated isogenic cell lines defective in either oncogenic KRAS or both HIF-1α and HIF-2α and subjected them to multiplex genomic, siRNA, and high-throughput small molecule screening. We have identified potential drug targets and compounds for preclinical and clinical development. Screening of our marine natural product library led to the rediscovery of the microtubule agent dolastatin 10 and the class I histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor largazole to inhibit oncogenic KRAS and HIF pathways. Largazole was further validated as an antiangiogenic agent in a HIF-dependent manner in human cells and in vivo in zebrafish using a genetic model with activated HIF. Our general strategy, coupling functional genomics with drug susceptibility or chemical-genetic interaction screens, enables the identification of potential drug targets and candidates with

  18. Functional signaling pathway analysis of lung adenocarcinomas identifies novel therapeutic targets for KRAS mutant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Baldelli, Elisa; Bellezza, Guido; Haura, Eric B.; Crinó, Lucio; Cress, W. Douglas; Deng, Jianghong; Ludovini, Vienna; Sidoni, Angelo; Schabath, Matthew B.; Puma, Francesco; Vannucci, Jacopo; Siggillino, Annamaria; Liotta, Lance A.; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Pierobon, Mariaelena

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the complex signaling architecture of KRAS and the interconnected RAS-driven protein-protein interactions, especially as it occurs in human clinical specimens. This study explored the activated and interconnected signaling network of KRAS mutant lung adenocarcinomas (AD) to identify novel therapeutic targets. Thirty-four KRAS mutant (MT) and twenty-four KRAS wild-type (WT) frozen biospecimens were obtained from surgically treated lung ADs. Samples were subjected to laser capture microdissection and reverse phase protein microarray analysis to explore the expression/activation levels of 150 signaling proteins along with co-activation concordance mapping. An independent set of 90 non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) was used to validate selected findings by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Compared to KRAS WT tumors, the signaling architecture of KRAS MT ADs revealed significant interactions between KRAS downstream substrates, the AKT/mTOR pathway, and a number of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTK). Approximately one-third of the KRAS MT tumors had ERK activation greater than the WT counterpart (p<0.01). Notably 18% of the KRAS MT tumors had elevated activation of the Estrogen Receptor alpha (ER-α) (p=0.02). This finding was verified in an independent population by IHC (p=0.03). KRAS MT lung ADs appear to have a more intricate RAS linked signaling network than WT tumors with linkage to many RTKs and to the AKT-mTOR pathway. Combination therapy targeting different nodes of this network may be necessary to treat this group of patients. In addition, for patients with KRAS MT tumors and activation of the ER-α, anti-estrogen therapy may have important clinical implications. PMID:26468985

  19. KRAS Mutation in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma and Extrapulmonary Small Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kodaz, Hilmi; Taştekin, Ebru; Erdoğan, Bülent; Hacıbekiroğlu, İlhan; Tozkır, Hilmi; Gürkan, Hakan; Türkmen, Esma; Demirkan, Bora; Uzunoğlu, Sernaz; Çiçin, İrfan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is one of the most lethal cancers. It is mainly classified into 2 groups: non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Extrapulmonary small cell carcinomas (EPSCC) are very rare. The Ras oncogene controls most of the cellular functions in the cell. Overall, 21.6% of human cancers contain a Kirsten Ras (KRAS) mutation. SCLC and EPSCC have several similar features but their clinical course is different. Aims: We investigated the KRAS mutation status in SCLC and EPSCC. Study design: Mutation research. Methods: Thirty-seven SCLC and 15 EPSCC patients were included in the study. The pathological diagnoses were confirmed by a second pathologist. KRAS analysis was performed in our medical genetic department. DNA isolation was performed with primary tumor tissue using the QIAamp DNA FFPE Tissue kit (Qiagen; Hilden, Germany) in all patients. The therascreen KRAS Pyro Kit 24 V1 (Qiagen; Hilden, Germany) was used for KRAS analyses. Results: Thirty-four (91.9%) of the SCLC patients were male, while 11 (73.3%) of the EPSCC l patients were female. SCLC was more common in males, and EPSCC in females (p=0.001). A KRAS mutation was found in 6 (16.2%) if SCLC patients. The most common mutation was Q61R (CAA>CGA). Among the 15 EPSCC patients, 2 had a KRAS mutation (13.3%). When KRAS mutant and wild type patients were compared in the SCLC group, no difference was found for overall survival (p=0.6). Conclusion: In previous studies, the incidence of KRAS mutation in SCLC was 1–3%; however, it was 16.2% in our study. Therefore, there may be ethnic and geographical differences in the KRAS mutations of SCLC. As a result, KRAS mutation should not be excluded in SCLC.

  20. Regulation of K-Ras4B Membrane Binding by Calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Sperlich, Benjamin; Kapoor, Shobhna; Waldmann, Herbert; Winter, Roland; Weise, Katrin

    2016-07-12

    K-Ras4B is a membrane-bound small GTPase with a prominent role in cancer development. It contains a polybasic farnesylated C-terminus that is required for the correct localization and clustering of K-Ras4B in distinct membrane domains. PDEδ and the Ca(2+)-binding protein calmodulin (CaM) are known to function as potential binding partners for farnesylated Ras proteins. However, they differ in the number of interaction sites with K-Ras4B, leading to different modes of interaction, and thus affect the subcellular distribution of K-Ras4B in different ways. Although it is clear that Ca(2+)-bound CaM can play a role in the dynamic spatial cycle of K-Ras4B in the cell, the exact molecular mechanism is only partially understood. In this biophysical study, we investigated the effect of Ca(2+)/CaM on the interaction of GDP- and GTP-loaded K-Ras4B with heterogeneous model biomembranes by using a combination of different spectroscopic and imaging techniques. The results show that Ca(2+)/CaM is able to extract K-Ras4B from negatively charged membranes in a nucleotide-independent manner. Moreover, the data demonstrate that the complex of Ca(2+)/CaM and K-Ras4B is stable in the presence of anionic membranes and shows no membrane binding. Finally, the influence of Ca(2+)/CaM on the interaction of K-Ras4B with membranes is compared with that of PDEδ, which was investigated in a previous study. Although both CaM and PDEδ exhibit a hydrophobic binding pocket for farnesyl, they have different effects on membrane binding of K-Ras4B and hence should be capable of regulating K-Ras4B plasma membrane localization in the cell. PMID:27410739

  1. Functional signaling pathway analysis of lung adenocarcinomas identifies novel therapeutic targets for KRAS mutant tumors.

    PubMed

    Baldelli, Elisa; Bellezza, Guido; Haura, Eric B; Crinó, Lucio; Cress, W Douglas; Deng, Jianghong; Ludovini, Vienna; Sidoni, Angelo; Schabath, Matthew B; Puma, Francesco; Vannucci, Jacopo; Siggillino, Annamaria; Liotta, Lance A; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Pierobon, Mariaelena

    2015-10-20

    Little is known about the complex signaling architecture of KRAS and the interconnected RAS-driven protein-protein interactions, especially as it occurs in human clinical specimens. This study explored the activated and interconnected signaling network of KRAS mutant lung adenocarcinomas (AD) to identify novel therapeutic targets.Thirty-four KRAS mutant (MT) and twenty-four KRAS wild-type (WT) frozen biospecimens were obtained from surgically treated lung ADs. Samples were subjected to Laser Capture Microdissection and Reverse Phase Protein Microarray analysis to explore the expression/activation levels of 150 signaling proteins along with co-activation concordance mapping. An independent set of 90 non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) was used to validate selected findings by immunohistochemistry (IHC).Compared to KRAS WT tumors, the signaling architecture of KRAS MT ADs revealed significant interactions between KRAS downstream substrates, the AKT/mTOR pathway, and a number of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTK). Approximately one-third of the KRAS MT tumors had ERK activation greater than the WT counterpart (p<0.01). Notably 18% of the KRAS MT tumors had elevated activation of the Estrogen Receptor alpha (ER-α) (p=0.02).This finding was verified in an independent population by IHC (p=0.03).KRAS MT lung ADs appear to have a more intricate RAS linked signaling network than WT tumors with linkage to many RTKs and to the AKT-mTOR pathway. Combination therapy targeting different nodes of this network may be necessary to treat this group of patients. In addition, for patients with KRAS MT tumors and activation of the ER-α, anti-estrogen therapy may have important clinical implications. PMID:26468985

  2. A rapid and sensitive loop-mediated isothermal amplification procedure (LAMP) for Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae detection based on the p36 gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, M J; Du, G M; Bai, F F; Wu, Y Z; Xiong, Q Y; Feng, Z X; Li, B; Shao, G Q

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a method for sensitive and rapid diagnosis of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in clinical specimens. To this effect, we employed three sets of primers specifically designed for amplification of nucleic acids under isothermal conditions. After optimization of reaction conditions, M. hyopneumoniae could be successfully detected at 63°C in 45 min through use of the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay. A positive reaction was identified visually as white precipitate and confirmed by gel electrophoresis. The detection limit for this assay was 10 copies/μL, as observed by electrophoretic analysis. The accuracy of the LAMP reaction was confirmed by restriction endonuclease digestion as well as by direct sequencing of the amplified product. This method can specifically detect M. hyopneumoniae; other species with high homology and other bacterial and virus strains gave negative results. To test the utility of this procedure, the LAMP assay was applied to 40 clinical samples collected from swine lung tissues experimentally challenged with M. hyopneumoniae isolates, and compared to the results from a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. A concordance of 100% was observed between the two assays. In conclusion, the results from our study demonstrated that the LAMP assay provided a rapid reaction and was inexpensive to perform, with no need of complex instruments or systems such as Geneamp PCR. The LAMP assay may therefore be applied in routine diagnosis in the clinical laboratory and for in-field detection of M. hyopneumoniae infection. PMID:25966242