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  1. Autosomal dominant rolandic epilepsy with speech dyspraxia.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, I E

    2000-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Rolandic Epilepsy with Speech Dyspraxia (ADRESD) is a rare disorder which highlights the relationship between Benign Rolandic Epilepsy (BRE) and speech and language disorders. Subtle speech and language disorders have recently been well characterised in BRE. ADRESD is associated with long term, more severe speech and language difficulties. The time course of rolandic epilepsy in ADRESD is typical of that of BRE. ADRESD is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner with anticipation. It is postulated that the anticipation may be due to an, as yet unidentified, triplet repeat expansion in a gene for rolandic epilepsy. BRE follows complex inheritance but it is possible that ADRESD may hold some valuable clues to the pathogenesis of BRE. PMID:11231219

  2. Academic Performance in Children with Rolandic Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piccinelli, P.; Borgatti, R.; Aldini, A.; Bindelli, D.; Ferri, M.; Perna, S.; Pitillo, G.; Termine, C.; Zambonin, F.; Balottin, U.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of reading, writing, and calculation disabilities in children with typical rolandic epilepsy (RE) and healthy control children. We also aimed to define the possible electroclinical markers of specific cognitive dysfunctions in RE. School abilities were evaluated and compared in 20 children…

  3. Obituary: Roland Svensson, 1950-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björnsson, Claes-Ingvar

    2003-12-01

    Roland Svensson was found dead on 8 April 2003. He succumbed to the complications arising from diabetes. His contribution to the understanding of the basic properties of relativistic plasmas remains a cornerstone when studying radiation processes in many astrophysical contexts. Roland was born on 6 May 1950 in Karlshamn, Sweden. At a young age he moved with his family to Skåne, the southernmost part of Sweden. This is where he received his early education including a BS in Physics at the University of Lund in 1973. For the rest of his life, this region was home for Roland. His mother and father are Linnea Martinsson (d. 1984) and Sune Svensson. The two younger brothers are Lennart and Peter. Lennart works as a machine engineer in Sweden while Peter has settled in California as a biology professor. Roland started graduate studies in theoretical physics in Lund before receiving a Fulbright Scholarship in 1976. He then moved to the University of California in Santa Cruz and enrolled in the astronomy and astrophysics graduate program. Although his interest in astronomy had been raised during the time in Lund, it was the stimulating environment in Santa Cruz that convinced Roland to concentrate on research in astronomy. With Roland's attitude of never accepting anything unless he understood its roots, his extended background in physics served him well throughout his astronomy career; in particular, it influenced his choice of a thesis topic. At the time, the importance of relativistic temperatures attained by accreting matter in the immediate vicinity of neutron stars and black holes was becoming clear. Roland set out to make a detailed description of the physical effects electron-positron pair production and annihilation would have on such plasmas. In 1981 Roland defended his thesis titled ``Physical Properties in Relativistic Plasmas" and completed his PhD under the supervision of Bill Mathews. Roland extended the results of his thesis during two post-docs, first at

  4. [Bifocal atypical rolandic epilepsy with speech dyspraxia].

    PubMed

    Karlov, V A; Baiarrnaa Dondovyn; Gnezditskiĭ, V V

    2004-01-01

    Clinical and neurophysiological analysis of a case of a 7 year old patient with typical benign partial seizures with rolandic spikes and speech disorder, differing from those in Landau-Kleffner syndrome and in typical benign partial epilepsy of childhood presenting as speech dyspraxia. Two independent foci (in the premotor cortex of the left front lobe (dominant hemisphere) and in the temporal lobe of the right hemisphere were found. Significant clinical improvement and electrographical positive effect in EEG were achiered after prednisolone and sodium valproate treatment. PMID:15849864

  5. Sleep and behavioral problems in rolandic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Samaitienė, Rūta; Norkūnienė, Jolita; Tumienė, Birutė; Grikinienė, Jurgita

    2013-02-01

    Although patients with benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes exhibit a benign course of the disease, some of them display sleep and behavioral problems. Sixty-one patients with rolandic epilepsy, aged 6-11 years, were included in this study. The patients were divided into two subgroups according to the presence of seizures over the preceding 6 months. The control group comprised 25 patients without epilepsy and with similar characteristics in terms of age and sex. All patients underwent evaluation of sleep (Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children) and behavior (Lithuanian version of the Child Behaviour Checklist). Only patients who had had seizures over the preceding 6 months displayed significantly higher scores for sleep problems (disorders of excessive daytime sleepiness, disorders of sleep-wake transition, and scores for total sleep problems), worse sleep quality (longer sleep-onset latency), and behavioral problems (anxiety/depression, social problems, thought problems, attention problems, and aggressive behavior) than the patients of the control group. Our data add to evidence that active epilepsy has an impact on sleep and behavior. Clinically significant sleep problems were related to the higher risk of behavioral problems. Parents' ratings for existing sleep problems were sensitive to Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children scores above normal values. PMID:23337004

  6. Roland Barthes and Decomposing/Deterritorializing the Writing Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Joan L.

    Roland Barthes points out in his pedagogical essays that, although students have been filled with horror stories of professorial expectations, at the same time they have expectations of their own. Barthes' points should be considered as a way of examining the classroom space and common writing teaching practices and opening them up to different…

  7. Superculture? Thoughts Prompted by Roland S. Persson's Essay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tebbs, Trevor J.

    2012-01-01

    The author finds Roland S. Persson's (2012a) paper to be timely, fascinating, important and powerful. At risk of mixing metaphors, it provides much food for thought and a penetrating lens through which all those vested in the optimal realisation of human potential would be prudent to review their own perceptions, boundaries of belief and…

  8. Incidental rolandic spikes: long-term outcomes and impact of treatment.

    PubMed

    McNally, Melanie A; Kossoff, Eric H

    2015-02-01

    We describe a group of 26 children with no prior history of seizures consistent with benign rolandic epilepsy who had rolandic spikes found coincidentally on EEG. A retrospective chart review as well as phone and email follow-ups with families were completed to assess long-term outcomes. A subset of this group (n=7) with reported comorbid language or learning difficulties was then given an empiric trial of levetiracetam. Seven (27%) children eventually developed seizures, with a median of 14months after the abnormal EEG. Of the 7 children ever treated with levetiracetam, 5 exhibited beneficial effects on learning, speech, or behavior. Side effects reported were mild and included irritability and headache. Incidental rolandic spikes may represent a discrete neurologic condition, with approximately one-quarter of the patients later developing epilepsy. Some of these children may experience improved intellectual functioning with levetiracetam. PMID:25623811

  9. Autosomal dominant rolandic epilepsy and speech dyspraxia: a new syndrome with anticipation.

    PubMed

    Scheffer, I E; Jones, L; Pozzebon, M; Howell, R A; Saling, M M; Berkovic, S F

    1995-10-01

    We describe a family of 9 affected individuals in three generations with nocturnal oro-facio-brachial partial seizures, secondarily generalized partial seizures, and centro-temporal epileptiform discharges, associated with oral and speech dyspraxia and cognitive impairment. The speech disorder was prominent, but differed from that of Landau-Kleffner syndrome and of epilepsy with continuous spike and wave during slow-wave sleep. The electroclinical features of this new syndrome of autosomal dominant rolandic epilepsy resemble those of benign rolandic epilepsy, a common inherited epilepsy of childhood. This family shows clinical anticipation of the seizure disorder, the oral and speech dyspraxia, and cognitive dysfunction, suggesting that the genetic mechanism could be expansion of an unstable triplet repeat. Molecular studies on this syndrome, where the inheritance pattern is clear, could also be relevant to identifying a gene for benign rolandic epilepsy where anticipation does not occur and the mode of inheritance is uncertain. PMID:7574460

  10. Harm and the Ideal of the Educated Person: Response to Jane Roland Martin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roemer, Eleanor Kallman

    1981-01-01

    This paper analyses and comments on an article by Jane Roland Martin (Educational Theory, v31 n2) concerning a masculine bias in the teaching of the intellectual disciplines. Roemer supports Martin's major arguments, including the idea that women are forced to accommodate to norms established for men. (PP)

  11. "Profound Levels of Learning" through Brain-Based Teaching: A Tribute to Roland Barth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rebecca Ann

    2012-01-01

    This article is a tribute to the writings of Dr. Roland Barth through a personal story spanning over two decades. It explores Dr. Barth's personal vision of an effective school through recent brain-based principles. It revisits Barth's axioms and uses recent implications from the neurosciences as new supporting evidence for their success in…

  12. Policy, Practice in Giftedness, and Research Methodologies: Response to Roland S. Persson's Article

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Dona J.

    2012-01-01

    The author finds the target article "Cultural Variation and Dominance in a Globalised Knowledge Economy" to be a thoughtful exploration of an important topic for all social scientists, certainly including those who study gifted development and education. Roland S. Persson (2012a) raises many questions about policy and practice in giftedness…

  13. Reduced Structural Connectivity between Sensorimotor and Language Areas in Rolandic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Besseling, René M. H.; Jansen, Jacobus F. A.; Overvliet, Geke M.; van der Kruijs, Sylvie J. M.; Ebus, Saskia C. M.; de Louw, Anton; Hofman, Paul A. M.; Vles, Johannes S. H.; Aldenkamp, Albert P.; Backes, Walter H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Rolandic epilepsy (RE) is a childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal (rolandic) spikes, that is increasingly associated with language impairment. In this study, we tested for a white matter (connectivity) correlate, employing diffusion weighted MRI and language testing. Methods Twenty-three children with RE and 23 matched controls (age: 8–14 years) underwent structural (T1-weighted) and diffusion-weighted MRI (b = 1200 s/mm2, 66 gradient directions) at 3T, as well as neuropsychological language testing. Combining tractography and a cortical segmentation derived from the T1-scan, the rolandic tract were reconstructed (pre- and postcentral gyri), and tract fractional anisotropy (FA) values were compared between patients and controls. Aberrant tracts were tested for correlations with language performance. Results Several reductions of tract FA were found in patients compared to controls, mostly in the left hemisphere; the most significant effects involved the left inferior frontal (p = 0.005) and supramarginal (p = 0.004) gyrus. In the patient group, lower tract FA values were correlated with lower language performance, among others for the connection between the left postcentral and inferior frontal gyrus (p = 0.043, R = 0.43). Conclusion In RE, structural connectivity is reduced for several connections involving the rolandic regions, from which the epileptiform activity originates. Most of these aberrant tracts involve the left (typically language mediating) hemisphere, notably the pars opercularis of the inferior frontal gyrus (Broca’s area) and the supramarginal gyrus (Wernicke’s area). For the former, reduced language performance for lower tract FA was found in the patients. These findings provide a first microstructural white matter correlate for language impairment in RE. PMID:24376719

  14. Semiology of typical and atypical Rolandic epilepsy: a video-EEG analysis.

    PubMed

    Saint-Martin, A D; Carcangiu, R; Arzimanoglou, A; Massa, R; Thomas, P; Motte, J; Marescaux, C; Metz-Lutz, M N; Hirsch, E

    2001-12-01

    Since the first descriptions of Rolandic Epilepsy or benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS), typical and atypical forms have been reported. Indeed, classical focal seizures are sometimes associated with various atypical ictal symptoms and cognitive or behavioural disorders. In an effort to define early clinical and EEG criteria allowing early distinction between typical and atypical forms, we recently conducted a prospective study in a cohort of children with Rolandic Epilepsy. The results of this study have been reported elsewhere. We now discuss the semiological characteristics, and comment on the video-EEG data collected during this study. Symptoms were classified into three major categories: "classical focal seizures"; "spike and wave related symptoms"; and "paraictal symptoms". Classical focal seizures constitute the electroclinical expression of the development and the propagation of a focal cortical neuronal discharge. "Spike and wave related symptoms" are brief neurological or neuropsychological phenomena having a relatively strict temporal relation with individual components of isolated focal or generalized spikes and waves. "Paraictal symptoms" consist of acquired progressive and fluctuating motor or cognitive deficits and are not directly correlated with Todd paralysis. We present detailed video-EEG material of selected cases and discuss the usefulness of such distinctions in terminology. We suggest that variability in clinical expression probably reflects the implication of different pathophysiological mechanisms, which in turn could explain differences in sensitivity to treatment. (Published with videosequences.) PMID:11844712

  15. Resting state Rolandic mu rhythms are related to activity of sympathetic component of autonomic nervous system in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Triggiani, Antonio Ivano; Valenzano, Anna; Del Percio, Claudio; Marzano, Nicola; Soricelli, Andrea; Petito, Annamaria; Bellomo, Antonello; Başar, Erol; Mundi, Ciro; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Babiloni, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis of a relationship between heart rate variability (HRV) and Rolandic mu rhythms in relaxed condition of resting state. Resting state eyes-closed electroencephalographic (EEG) and electrocardiographic (ECG) data were recorded (10-20 System) in 42 healthy adults. EEG rhythms of interest were high-frequency alpha (10.5-13Hz) and low-frequency beta (13-20Hz), which are supposed to form Rolandic mu rhythms. Rolandic and occipital (control) EEG sources were estimated by LORETA software. Results showed a statistically significant (p<0.05, corrected) negative correlation across all subjects between Rolandic cortical sources of low-frequency beta rhythms and the low-frequency band power (LF, 0.04-0.15Hz) of tachogram spectrum as an index of HRV. The lower the amplitude of Rolandic sources of low-frequency beta rhythms (as a putative sign of activity of somatomotor cortex), the higher the LF band power of tachogram spectrum (as a putative sign of sympathetic activity). This effect was specific as there was neither a similar correlation between these EEG rhythms and high-frequency band power of tachogram spectrum (as a putative sign of parasympathetic vagal activity) neither between occipital sources of low-frequency beta rhythms (as a putative sign of activity of visual cortex) and LF band power of tachogram spectrum. These results suggest that Rolandic low-frequency beta rhythms are related to sympathetic activity regulating heart rate, as a dynamic neurophysiologic oscillatory mechanism sub-serving the interaction between brain neural populations involved in somatomotor control and brain neural populations regulating ANS signals to heart for on-going homeostatic adaptations. PMID:25660308

  16. Modulation of Rolandic Beta-Band Oscillations during Motor Simulation of Joint Actions

    PubMed Central

    Ménoret, Mathilde; Bourguignon, Mathieu; Hari, Riitta

    2015-01-01

    Successful joint actions require precise temporal and spatial coordination between individuals who aim to achieve a common goal. A growing number of behavioral data suggest that to efficiently couple and coordinate a joint task, the actors have to represent both own and the partner’s actions. However it is unclear how the motor system is specifically recruited for joint actions. To find out how the goal and the presence of the partner’s hand can impact the motor activity during joint action, we assessed the functional state of 16 participants’ motor cortex during observation and associated motor imagery of joint actions, individual actions, and non-goal-directed actions performed with either 1 or 2 hands. As an indicator of the functional state of the motor cortex, we used the reactivity of the rolandic magnetoencephalographic (MEG) beta rhythm following median-nerve stimulation. Motor imagery combined with action observation was associated with activation of the observer’s motor cortex, mainly in the hemisphere contralateral to the viewed (and at the same time imagined) hand actions. The motor-cortex involvement was enhanced when the goal of the actions was visible but also, in the ipsilateral hemisphere, when the partner’s hand was visible in the display. During joint action, the partner’s action, in addition to the participant’s own action, thus seems to be represented in the motor cortex so that it can be triggered by the mere presence of an acting hand in the peripersonal space. PMID:26151634

  17. 16p11.2 600 kb Duplications confer risk for typical and atypical Rolandic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Reinthaler, Eva M; Lal, Dennis; Lebon, Sebastien; Hildebrand, Michael S; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M; Regan, Brigid M; Feucht, Martha; Steinböck, Hannelore; Neophytou, Birgit; Ronen, Gabriel M; Roche, Laurian; Gruber-Sedlmayr, Ursula; Geldner, Julia; Haberlandt, Edda; Hoffmann, Per; Herms, Stefan; Gieger, Christian; Waldenberger, Melanie; Franke, Andre; Wittig, Michael; Schoch, Susanne; Becker, Albert J; Hahn, Andreas; Männik, Katrin; Toliat, Mohammad R; Winterer, Georg; Lerche, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Mefford, Heather; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Berkovic, Samuel F; Beckmann, Jacques S; Sander, Thomas; Jacquemont, Sebastien; Reymond, Alexandre; Zimprich, Fritz; Neubauer, Bernd A

    2014-11-15

    Rolandic epilepsy (RE) is the most common idiopathic focal childhood epilepsy. Its molecular basis is largely unknown and a complex genetic etiology is assumed in the majority of affected individuals. The present study tested whether six large recurrent copy number variants at 1q21, 15q11.2, 15q13.3, 16p11.2, 16p13.11 and 22q11.2 previously associated with neurodevelopmental disorders also increase risk of RE. Our association analyses revealed a significant excess of the 600 kb genomic duplication at the 16p11.2 locus (chr16: 29.5-30.1 Mb) in 393 unrelated patients with typical (n = 339) and atypical (ARE; n = 54) RE compared with the prevalence in 65,046 European population controls (5/393 cases versus 32/65,046 controls; Fisher's exact test P = 2.83 × 10(-6), odds ratio = 26.2, 95% confidence interval: 7.9-68.2). In contrast, the 16p11.2 duplication was not detected in 1738 European epilepsy patients with either temporal lobe epilepsy (n = 330) and genetic generalized epilepsies (n = 1408), suggesting a selective enrichment of the 16p11.2 duplication in idiopathic focal childhood epilepsies (Fisher's exact test P = 2.1 × 10(-4)). In a subsequent screen among children carrying the 16p11.2 600 kb rearrangement we identified three patients with RE-spectrum epilepsies in 117 duplication carriers (2.6%) but none in 202 carriers of the reciprocal deletion. Our results suggest that the 16p11.2 duplication represents a significant genetic risk factor for typical and atypical RE. PMID:24939913

  18. Delayed convergence between brain network structure and function in rolandic epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Besseling, René M. H.; Jansen, Jacobus F. A.; Overvliet, Geke M.; van der Kruijs, Sylvie J. M.; Ebus, Saskia C. M.; de Louw, Anton J. A.; Hofman, Paul A. M.; Aldenkamp, Albert P.; Backes, Walter H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Rolandic epilepsy (RE) manifests during a critical phase of brain development, and has been associated with language impairments. Concordant abnormalities in structural and functional connectivity (SC and FC) have been described before. As SC and FC are under mutual influence, the current study investigates abnormalities in the SC-FC synergy in RE. Methods: Twenty-two children with RE (age, mean ± SD: 11.3 ± 2.0 y) and 22 healthy controls (age 10.5 ± 1.6 y) underwent structural, diffusion weighted, and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3T. The probabilistic anatomical landmarks atlas was used to parcellate the (sub)cortical gray matter. Constrained spherical deconvolution tractography and correlation of time series were used to assess SC and FC, respectively. The SC-FC correlation was assessed as a function of age for the non-zero structural connections over a range of sparsity values (0.01–0.75). A modularity analysis was performed on the mean SC network of the controls to localize potential global effects to subnetworks. SC and FC were also assessed separately using graph analysis. Results: The SC-FC correlation was significantly reduced in children with RE compared to healthy controls, especially for the youngest participants. This effect was most pronounced in a left and a right centro-temporal network, as well as in a medial parietal network. Graph analysis revealed no prominent abnormalities in SC or FC network organization. Conclusion: Since SC and FC converge during normal maturation, our finding of reduced SC-FC correlation illustrates impaired synergy between brain structure and function. More specifically, since this effect was most pronounced in the youngest participants, RE may represent a developmental disorder of delayed brain network maturation. The observed effects seem especially attributable to medial parietal connections, which forms an intermediate between bilateral centro-temporal modules of

  19. Revealing Additional Dimensions of Globalisation and Cultural Hegemony: A Response to Roland S. Persson's Call for Cultural Sensitivity in Gifted Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Don

    2012-01-01

    In this commentary, the author finds the interdisciplinary approach of Roland S. Persson's (2012a) target article refreshing. Persson's (2012a) additional emphases on ethnocentricity, cultural bias and strong threads of influence from the global economy also are helpful. They shed light on some strong contextual influences that shape the…

  20. Gender Anarchy as Social Justice: An Analytic Reconstruction of the Idea of Epistemic Equality in Jane Roland Martin's "Reclaiming a Conversation"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seals, Greg

    2006-01-01

    Jane Roland Martin's later work, especially as represented in "The Schoolhome: Rethinking Schools for Changing Families," has been attacked as vague, essentialistic, and a formula for the (re)feminization of education. This paper does not attempt to defend Martin against these criticisms because such a defense seems impossible for…

  1. Neuropsychological disorders related to interictal epileptic discharges during sleep in benign epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal or Rolandic spikes.

    PubMed

    Baglietto, M G; Battaglia, F M; Nobili, L; Tortorelli, S; De Negri, E; Calevo, M G; Veneselli, E; De Negri, M

    2001-06-01

    Nine children (five males, four females; age range 6 years 1 month to 11 years 1 month) affected by benign epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal or Rolandic spikes (BECRS) with EEG evidence of marked activation of interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs) during sleep, and nine unaffected control children matched for age, sex, and socioeconomic status, were enrolled in a prospective study. At the time of detection of IED activation during sleep, patients showed a mean Full-Scale IQ score within the normal range, but significantly below that of control participants; neuropsychological assessment revealed disorders in visuospatial short-term memory (Corsi's Block Tapping Test), attention, and cognitive flexibility (Trail Making Test and Stroop Color-Word Test), picture naming, and fluency (Benton's Naming Test and Word Fluency), visuoperceptual skill (Ghent-Poppelreuter and Street Gestalt Completion Tests) and visuomotor coordination (Bender Test). After detection of IED activation during sleep, children were followed up for 2 years. At the time of IED remission (T1), neuropsychological re-evaluation showed a notable increase in IQ score and a significant improvement (t-test: p<0.007) in visuomotor coordination, non-verbal short-term memory, sustained attention and mental flexibility, picture naming, and visual-perceptual performance. At T1, patients' performance did not differ from the controls (Mann-Whitney U test). PMID:11409830

  2. Reliability and Validity of Simplified Chinese Version of Roland-Morris Questionnaire in Evaluating Rural and Urban Patients with Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ziqiang; Wang, Xinhui; Zhu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Jiayu; Zhang, Diqing; Li, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Objective The causes of low back pain in China and Western countries are extremely different. We attempted to analyze the risk factors of low back pain in urban and rural patients under the dual economy with the simplified Chinese version of Roland-Morris disability questionnaire (SC-RMDQ) to demonstrate that SC-RMDQ could evaluate patients with low back pain arising from different causes. Methods Roland-Morris disability questionnaire was translated into SCRMDQ according to international guidelines for questionnaire adaptation. In this study, causes of low back pain of 187 outpatients and inpatients (99 urban patients and 88 rural patients) were analyzed. All patients underwent simplified Chinese version of Roland-Morris disability questionnaire (SC-RMDQ), simplified Chinese Oswestry disability index (SCODI) and visual analogue scale (VAS). Reliability was tested using reproducibility (intraclass coefficient of correlation – ICC) and internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha). Validity was tested using Pearson correlation analysis. Results The leading causes for low back pain were sedentariness (38.4%) and vibration (18.1%) in urban patients and waist bending (48.9%) and spraining (25%) in rural patients. Although causes of low back pain in the two groups of population were completely different, SCRMDQ had high internal consistency (Cronbach's α value of 0.874 in urban patients and 0.883 in rural patients) and good reproducibility (ICC value of .952 in urban patients and 0.949 in rural patients, P<0.01). SCRMDQ also showed significant correlation with Simplified Chinese version of Oswestry disability index (SCODI) and visual analogue scale (VAS) in rural areas (SCRMDQ-SCODI r = 0.841; SCRMDQ -VAS: r = 0.685, P<0.01) and in urban areas (SCRMDQ-SCODI: r = 0.818, P<0.01; SCRMDQ –VAS: r = 0.666, P<0.01). Conclusions Although causes of low back pain are completely different in rural and urban patients, SCRMDQ has a good reliability and validity, which

  3. Evaluation of a neurotherapy program for a child with ADHD with Benign Partial Epilepsy with Rolandic Spikes (BPERS) using event-related potentials

    PubMed Central

    Pąchalska, Maria; Kropotov, Iurii D.; Mańko, Grzegorz; Lipowska, Małgorzata; Rasmus, Anna; Łukaszewska, Beata; Bogdanowicz, Marta; Mirski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background We hypothesized that there would be a good response to relative beta training, applied to regulate the dynamics of brain function in a patient with benign partial epilepsy with Rolandic Spikes (BPERS), associated with neuropsychiatric deficits resembling the symptoms of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Case Report The patient, E.Z., age 9.3, was suffering from neuropsychiatric symptoms, cognitive dysfunction, especially attention deficits, and behavioral changes, rendering him unable to function independently in school and in many situations of everyday life. He was treated for epilepsy, but only slight progress was made. The patient took part in 20 sessions of relative beta training combined with behavioral training. We used standardized neuropsychological testing, as well as ERPs before the experiment and after the completion of the neurotherapy program. Neuropsychological testing at baseline showed multiple cognitive deficits. Over the course of neurotherapy, E.Z.’s verbal and non-verbal IQ increased significantly. His cognitive functions also improved, including immediate and delayed logical and visual recall on the WMS-III, maintaining attention on the WMS-III, and executive functions, but remained below norms. Physiologically, the patient showed substantial changes after neurotherapy, including fewer spikes and an increased P300 NOGO component. Conclusions The cognitive deficits characteristic for ADHD in a child with BPERS may be unresponsive to antiepileptic treatment, but are reversible after a carefully selected neurotherapy program, combined with antiepileptic treatment. Event Related Potentials (ERPs) in the GO/NOGO task can be used to assess functional brain changes induced by neurotherapeutical programs. PMID:23111748

  4. Identification of Reliable Sulcal Patterns of the Human Rolandic Region.

    PubMed

    Mellerio, Charles; Lapointe, Marie-Noël; Roca, Pauline; Charron, Sylvain; Legrand, Laurence; Meder, Jean-François; Oppenheim, Catherine; Cachia, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    A major feature of the human cortex is its huge morphological variability. Although a comprehensive literature about the sulco-gyral pattern of the central region is available from post-mortem data, a reliable and reproducible characterization from in vivo data is still lacking. The aim of this study is to test the reliability of morphological criteria of the central region sulci used in post-mortem data, when applied to in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Thirty right-handed healthy individuals were included in the study. Automated segmentation and three dimensional (3D) surface-based rendering were obtained from clinical 3D T1-weighted MRI. Two senior radiologists labeled the three sulci composing the central region (precentral [PreCS], central [CS] and postcentral [PostCS]) and analyzed their morphological variations using 47 standard criteria derived from Ono's atlas based on post-mortem data. For each criterion, inter-rater concordance and comparison with the occurrence frequency provided in Ono's atlas were estimated. Overall, the sulcal pattern criteria derived from MRI data were highly reproducible between the raters with a high mean inter-rater concordance in the three sulci (CS: κ = 0.92 in left hemisphere/κ = 0.91 in right hemisphere; PreCS: κ = 0.91/κ = 0.93; PostCS: κ = 0.84/0.79). Only a very limited number of sulcal criteria significantly differed between the in vivo and the post-mortem data (CS: 2 criteria in the left hemisphere/3 criteria in the right hemisphere; PreCS: 3 in the left and right hemispheres; PostCS: 3 in the left hemisphere and 5 in the right hemisphere). Our study provides a comprehensive description of qualitative sulcal patterns in the central region from in vivo clinical MRI with high agreement with previous post-mortem data. Such identification of reliable sulcal patterns of the central region visible with standard clinical MRI data paves the way for the detection of subtle variations of the central sulcation associated with variations of normal or pathological functioning. PMID:27582700

  5. The Roland Maze Project — Cosmic Ray Registration at Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feder, J.; JȨDRZEJCZAK, K.; Karczmarczyk, J.; Lewandowski, R.; Swarzyński, J.; Szabelska, B.; Szabelski, J.; Tokarski, P.; Wibig, T.

    Experimental studies of cosmic rays at the highest energies (above 1018 eV) are the main scientific goal of the projected large area network of extensive air shower detectors. Placing the detectors on the roofs of high school buildings will lower the cost by using the existing urban infrastructure (INTERNET, power supply, etc.), and can be a very efficient way of science popularisation by engaging high school students in the research program. 30 high schools in Łódź are already involved in the project. The project has recently obtained some financial support from the City Council of Łódź. The donation enabled us to start experimental work on detector construction details. A cycle of lectures and seminars devoted to different aspects of project realization (detector construction, on-line data acquisition system, C++ programming) has been organized for students at our Institute and at schools.

  6. Identification of Reliable Sulcal Patterns of the Human Rolandic Region

    PubMed Central

    Mellerio, Charles; Lapointe, Marie-Noël; Roca, Pauline; Charron, Sylvain; Legrand, Laurence; Meder, Jean-François; Oppenheim, Catherine; Cachia, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    A major feature of the human cortex is its huge morphological variability. Although a comprehensive literature about the sulco-gyral pattern of the central region is available from post-mortem data, a reliable and reproducible characterization from in vivo data is still lacking. The aim of this study is to test the reliability of morphological criteria of the central region sulci used in post-mortem data, when applied to in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Thirty right-handed healthy individuals were included in the study. Automated segmentation and three dimensional (3D) surface-based rendering were obtained from clinical 3D T1-weighted MRI. Two senior radiologists labeled the three sulci composing the central region (precentral [PreCS], central [CS] and postcentral [PostCS]) and analyzed their morphological variations using 47 standard criteria derived from Ono’s atlas based on post-mortem data. For each criterion, inter-rater concordance and comparison with the occurrence frequency provided in Ono’s atlas were estimated. Overall, the sulcal pattern criteria derived from MRI data were highly reproducible between the raters with a high mean inter-rater concordance in the three sulci (CS: κ = 0.92 in left hemisphere/κ = 0.91 in right hemisphere; PreCS: κ = 0.91/κ = 0.93; PostCS: κ = 0.84/0.79). Only a very limited number of sulcal criteria significantly differed between the in vivo and the post-mortem data (CS: 2 criteria in the left hemisphere/3 criteria in the right hemisphere; PreCS: 3 in the left and right hemispheres; PostCS: 3 in the left hemisphere and 5 in the right hemisphere). Our study provides a comprehensive description of qualitative sulcal patterns in the central region from in vivo clinical MRI with high agreement with previous post-mortem data. Such identification of reliable sulcal patterns of the central region visible with standard clinical MRI data paves the way for the detection of subtle variations of the central sulcation associated with variations of normal or pathological functioning. PMID:27582700

  7. The Roland Maze Project school-based extensive air shower network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feder, J.; Jȩdrzejczak, K.; Karczmarczyk, J.; Lewandowski, R.; Swarzyński, J.; Szabelska, B.; Szabelski, J.; Wibig, T.

    2006-01-01

    We plan to construct the large area network of extensive air shower detectors placed on the roofs of high school buildings in the city of Łódź. Detection points will be connected by INTERNET to the central server and their work will be synchronized by GPS. The main scientific goal of the project are studies of ultra high energy cosmic rays. Using existing town infrastructure (INTERNET, power supply, etc.) will significantly reduce the cost of the experiment. Engaging high school students in the research program should significantly increase their knowledge of science and modern technologies, and can be a very efficient way of science popularisation. We performed simulations of the projected network capabilities of registering Extensive Air Showers and reconstructing energies of primary particles. Results of the simulations and the current status of project realisation will be presented.

  8. Language in Benign Childhood Epilepsy with Centro-Temporal Spikes Abbreviated Form: Rolandic Epilepsy and Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monjauze, C.; Tuller, L.; Hommet, C.; Barthez, M.A.; Khomsi, A.

    2005-01-01

    Although Benign Childhood Epilepsy with Centrotemporal Spikes (BECTS) has a good prognosis, a few studies have suggested the existence of language disorders relating to the interictal dysfunction of perisylvian language areas. In this study, we focused on language assessment in 16 children aged 6-15 currently affected by BECTS or in remission. An…

  9. Atypical hemispheric asymmetries for the processing of phonological features in children with rolandic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Bedoin, Nathalie; Ferragne, Emmanuel; Lopez, Céline; Herbillon, Vania; De Bellescize, J; des Portes, Vincent

    2011-05-01

    We assessed language lateralization in 177 healthy 4- to 11-year-old children and adults and atypical asymmetries associated with unilateral epileptic foci in 18 children with benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS). Dichotic listening results revealed two indices of immature functional asymmetry when the focus was left-sided (BECTS-L). First, children with BECTS-L did not show left hemisphere dominance for the processing of place of articulation, which was recorded in children with BECTS-R and control children. On the contrary, healthy children exhibited a gradual increase in left hemisphere dominance for place processing during childhood, which is consistent with the shift from global to finer-grained acoustic analysis predicted by the Developmental Weighting Shift model. Second, children with BECTS-L showed atypical left hemisphere involvement in the processing of the voiced value (+V), associated with a long acoustic event in French stop consonants, whereas right hemisphere dominance increased with age for +V processing in healthy children. BECTS-L, therefore, interferes with the development of left hemisphere dominance for specific phonological mechanisms. PMID:21470917

  10. Eötvös, Baron Lóránd [Roland] von (1848-1919)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Hungarian physicist, born in Pest (now part of Budapest), became professor of experimental physics there. Worked on wide range of physical problems including gravitation, and invented the Eötvös balance, a torsion balance. With it, he tested (in what became known as the Eötvös experiment) the equivalence principle that gravitational mass and inertial mass are equivalent; he found that they were i...

  11. Sleep-related, low voltage Rolandic and vertex spikes: an EEG marker of benignity in infancy-onset focal epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Bureau, Michelle; Cokar, Ozlem; Maton, Bruno; Genton, Pierre; Dravet, Charlotte

    2002-03-01

    Although benign forms of epilepsies with onset in infancy have recently been recognized, the occurrence of seizures in an infant or very young child is very often an event of great significance and the prognosis concerning both epilepsy and neuropsychological development must be guarded. No reliable clinical or electroencephalographic (EEG) markers that can predict the outcome have been described. In a retrospective series of 10 patients, we found a peculiar EEG pattern seen across sleep stages, but not in the waking state in infants whose first seizures appeared before the age of 1 year, and which were mostly complex focal. In all cases, follow-up showed a favourable outcome with complete seizure remission and no cognitive impairment. The specificity of these EEG changes was 100%, but the sensitivity was lower, since they were not seen in some of the infants with the same favourable outcome. We discuss the clinical similarities between our patients and those cases reported earlier by other authors as benign, non-familial or familial focal epilepsies, in whom, however, no interictal abnormalities had been seen on the EEG. Such EEG changes are probably specific to benign, self-limited, early onset focal epilepsies. PMID:11967175

  12. The Role of Selenium in HIV Infection Cosby A Stone, Kosuke Kawai, Roland Kupka, Wafaie W Fawzi Harvard School of Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Cosby A; Kawai, Kosuke; Kupka, Roland; Fawzi, Wafaie W.

    2010-01-01

    HIV infection is a global disease that disproportionately burdens populations with nutritional vulnerabilities. Laboratory experiments have shown that selenium has an inhibitory effect on HIV in vitro through antioxidant effects of glutathione peroxidase and other selenoproteins. Numerous studies have reported low selenium status in HIV-infected individuals, and serum selenium concentration declines with disease progression. Some cohort studies have shown an association between selenium deficiency and progression to AIDS or mortality. In several randomized controlled trials, selenium supplementation has reduced hospitalizations, diarrheal morbidity, and improved CD4 cell counts, but the evidence remains mixed. Additional trials are recommended to study the effect of selenium supplementation on opportunistic infections, and other HIV disease related comorbidities in the context of highly active antiretroviral therapy in both developing and developed countries. PMID:20961297

  13. 9. GATEHOUSE, INTERIOR, COUNTERSHAFT WHICH HELD BELT ATTACHED TO ENGINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. GATEHOUSE, INTERIOR, COUNTERSHAFT WHICH HELD BELT ATTACHED TO ENGINE FOR HYPOCHLORITE MIXER, VIEW EAST - Lake Roland Dam, Gatehouse, Spanning outlet of Lake Roland near Woodbridge Road, Towson, Baltimore County, MD

  14. Acquired Language Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymer, Anastasia M.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses advances in structural and functional neuroimaging that indicate that, in general, nonfluent aphasias are associated with left pre-rolandic lesions and fluent aphasias occur with left post-rolandic lesions that spare pre-rolandic areas. However, functional neuroimaging studies have also shown that neural dysfunction often…

  15. Proceedings of the College Reading Association, Volume 10, Fall 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketcham, Clay A., Ed.

    The proceedings of the twelfth annual meeting of the College Reading Association (with a focus on "Reading: Today's Needs, Tomorrow's Challenges") consisted of the following papers: "President's Address" (J. R. Newton); "Structure, Stricture in Reading Programs" (M. J. Weiss); "Why Use Informal Reading Inventories" (J. P. Kender); "Some…

  16. Aping our ancestors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennos, Roland

    2014-08-01

    Roland Ennos argues that the abilities of the great apes to cope in the dangerous mechanical environment of the forest canopy are part of the human species' intellectual inheritance and are intimately connected with our abilities as physicists.

  17. How Exercise Can Help

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... be active. That is, they need to improve muscle tone around the joint -- it actually protects the joint. Dr. Roland Moskowitz: If you strengthen the muscles and stabilize the joint, you decrease the instability ...

  18. Oscillatory brain states interact with late cognitive components of the somatosensory evoked potential.

    PubMed

    Reinacher, Matthias; Becker, Robert; Villringer, Arno; Ritter, Petra

    2009-09-30

    The question of interaction between ongoing neuronal activity and evoked responses has been addressed for different species, sensory systems and measurement modalities. Among other findings, there is converging evidence for an interaction of occipital alpha-rhythm amplitude with the visual evoked potential. Here, we test the hypothesis that the modulatory role of an ongoing rhythm might not be confined to the visual system and the occipital alpha rhythm, but instead may be generalized to other sensory systems. Using an online EEG analysis approach, we investigated the influence of the Rolandic alpha-rhythm on the somatosensory evoked potential (SEP). We triggered vibrotactile stimulation during periods of high Rolandic alpha-rhythm amplitude. Analysis revealed significant effects of pre-stimulus Rolandic alpha amplitude on the amplitude of the N140 and P260 components of the SEP, known to be linked to cognitive processing, but not on early sensory components. The N140-P260 complex shows a different focus in topography than the early sensory components and the pre-stimulus Rolandic alpha rhythm. These results indicate an involvement of Rolandic alpha-rhythm in higher cognitive processing. In more general terms--and in the context of similar studies in the visual system--our findings suggest that modulation of late EP components by ongoing rhythms might be a characteristic and possibly universal feature of sensory systems. PMID:19589356

  19. The role of the right hemisphere in the control of speech prosody in propositional and affective contexts.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, B E; Danly, M

    1985-05-01

    Sixteen right-handed adult males with localized insult to either the right or left hemisphere and five control subjects without brain damage read aloud target sentences embedded in paragraphs, while intoning their voices in either a declarative, interrogative, happy, or sad mode. Acoustical analysis of the speech wave was performed. Right-anterior (pre-Rolandic) and right-central (pre- and post-Rolandic) brain-damaged patients spoke with less pitch variation and restricted intonational range across emotional and nonemotional domains, while patients with right posterior (post-Rolandic) damage had exaggerated pitch variation and intonational range across both domains. No such deficits were found in patients with left posterior damage, whose prosody was similar to that of normal control subjects. It is suggested that damage to the right hemisphere alone may result in a primary disturbance of speech prosody that may be independent of the disturbances in affect often noted in right-brain-damaged populations. PMID:4027566

  20. Goals and Objectives of National Science Policy. Science Policy Study--Hearings Volume 1. Hearings before the Task Force on Science Policy of the Committee on Science and Technology, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session (February 28; March 7, 21, 28; April 4, 1985). No. 46.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Science and Technology.

    These hearings, which focused on the goals and objectives of national science policy, include discussions, questions and answers for the record, and, when applicable, prepared statements. Individuals appearing during the hearings include: (1) George C. Pimentel; (2) Alex Roland; (3) John S. Foster, Jr.; (4) James B. Wyngaarden; and (5) Lewis M.…

  1. Wallace Stevens: A Collection of Critical Essays. Twentieth Century Views Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borroff, Marie, Ed.

    One of a series of works aimed at presenting contemporary critical opinion on major authors, this collection includes essays by Marie Borroff, Wallace Stevens, Joseph N. Riddle, Hi Simons, Sister M. Bernetta Quinn, C. Roland Wagner, Harold Bloom, Ralph J. Mills, Jr., Roy Harvey Pearce, Louis L. Martz, Morton Dauwen Zabel, and Northrop Frye--all…

  2. The Myth in the Discourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Myles; Corcoran, Farrel

    Reflecting the ideas of Roland Barthes, this paper examines the nature and importance of myth as a type of speech. The investigation proceeds by discussing myth from the perspectives of both traditional and contemporary disciplines, then considers the universality of myth, its religious impulse, and its functions. Using examples from television…

  3. Keys to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses how Roland G. Tharp and his colleagues from the Center for Research on Education, Diversity, & Excellence, a federal research center at the University of California, identify methods to help "nonmainstream" pupils make academic gains. Tharp has identified five standards that he says mark effective instruction in classrooms…

  4. 78 FR 23522 - Idaho Roadless Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ...Pursuant to 36 CFR 294.27 the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), is proposing to modify Idaho Roadless Area boundaries for the Big Creek, Grandmother Mountain, Pinchot Butte, Roland Point, Wonderful Peak Idaho Roadless Areas on the Idaho Panhandle National Forests to reflect lands acquired within and/or adjacent to these roadless areas. In addition, modifications to correct......

  5. Planning and Implementing Augmentative Communication Service Delivery, 2: Proceedings of the National Planners Conference on Assistive Device Service Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coston, Caroline A., Ed.

    The document consists of 30 author contributed chapters concerned with augmentative communication service delivery. Chapter titles and authors are: "Communication Options for Persons Who Cannot Speak: Planning for Service Delivery" (David Beukelman); "Planning Service Delivery Systems" (Roland Hahn II); "Planning Ohio's Augmentative Communication…

  6. On Universals, Cultural Variations and Individual Uniqueness: Throwing down the Gauntlet in Giftedness Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garces-Bacsal, Rhoda Myra

    2012-01-01

    Roland S. Persson's (2012a) piece is extremely comprehensive, timely and very relevant especially in light of a growing appreciation of cultural diversity and the emergence of a global community--which is an inevitable offshoot of globalisation that goes beyond world economy and international markets. It covers multiple themes; ranging from…

  7. The Time Is Ripe (Again)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barth, Roland S.

    2013-01-01

    "It's always been a promising time for teacher leadership. It's just never been a successful time," writes noted educator Roland Barth. Why? Barth points to five obstacles: administrator resistance, the taboo in teaching against elevating oneself higher than one's peers, the fact that teachers' plates are full, the…

  8. 76 FR 19765 - Toutant Hydropower Inc.; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Comments, Motions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-08

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Toutant Hydropower Inc.; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing... Hydropower Inc. e. Name of Project: M.S.C. (Toutant) Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: The project is..., 16 U.S.C. 791a-825r. h. Applicant Contact: Roland Toutant, Toutant Hydropower, Inc., 80 Bungay...

  9. Philosophy, Children and Liberal Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, T. M.; Hanna, Patricia

    1981-01-01

    Remarks directed to Peter Augustine Lawler and an earlier article are presented. The rationale for a program of philosophy for children developed at Montclair State College is compared with Roland Garrett's conception of philosophy. Distortions in Lawler's perception of current philosophical practice and teaching are indicated. (MLW)

  10. Constructing an Ethical Writer for the Postmodern Scene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassett, Michael J.

    The advent of postmodern criticism has brought about numerous changes in the way those in the academy read and teach the reading of texts. From Michel Foucault's "What is an Author?" to Roland Barthes'"The Death of the Author" and beyond, critics and theorists have sought to decrease the author-ity of the material that is read. In doing so, these…

  11. Comet Bennett 1970 II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Z.; Miller, F. D.

    1973-01-01

    The model for dust comets, formulated by Finson and Probstein, which had previously been tested only on Comet Arend-Roland 1957 III, has been successfully applied to three calibrated photographic plates of Comet Bennett. The size distribution, emission rate, and initial velocities of dust particles emitted from the comet's nucleus are given.

  12. A Path to Academic Excellence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grizzard, Clare; Woerner, Georgia K.

    2010-01-01

    Educators in Roland Park Elementary/Middle School in Baltimore recognize the essential role that the arts play in education. This K-8 urban public school, which serves a highly diverse population, focuses on academic excellence and high standards for students and faculty. They believe that teaching "in and through the arts" helps to achieve those…

  13. Bibliographic Annual in Speech Communication: 1974. Volume 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennicott, Patrick C., Ed.

    This annotated bibliography is an annual volume devoted to maintaining a record of graduate work in speech communication, providing abstracts of doctoral dissertations, and making subject area bibliographies available. The contents of this volume include "Studies in Mass Communication: A Selected Bibliography, 1973" by Roland C. Johnson and…

  14. 76 FR 63677 - Excepted Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Federal Register at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/ . A consolidated listing of all authorities as of June 30... MANAGEMENT Excepted Service AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... excepted service as required by 5 CFR 213.103. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roland Edwards,...

  15. 75 FR 67408 - Excepted Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-02

    ....gpoaccess.gov/fr/ . A consolidated listing of all authorities as of June 30 is also published each year. The... MANAGEMENT Excepted Service AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... excepted service as required by 5 CFR 213.103. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roland Edwards,...

  16. 76 FR 31644 - Excepted Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... MANAGEMENT Excepted Service AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... excepted service as required by 5 CFR 213.103. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roland Edwards, Senior.../2011 Secretary. Projects. Farm Service Agency... Special Assistant.... DA110042 3/24/2011 Department...

  17. 75 FR 35095 - Excepted Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ....gov/fr/ fr/. A consolidated listing of all authorities as of June 30 is also published each year. The... MANAGEMENT Excepted Service AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management (OPM). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This gives... excepted service as required by 5 CFR 213.103. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roland Edwards,...

  18. 75 FR 11206 - Excepted Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ....gpoaccess.gov/fr/ . A consolidated listing of all authorities as of June 30 is also published each year. The... MANAGEMENT Excepted Service AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... excepted service as required by 5 CFR 213.103. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roland Edwards,...

  19. 76 FR 66764 - Excepted Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ... the Federal Register at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/ fr/. A consolidated listing of all authorities as... MANAGEMENT Excepted Service AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... excepted service as required by 5 CFR 213.103. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roland Edwards,...

  20. 75 FR 28306 - Excepted Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ....gpoaccess.gov/fr/ fr/. A consolidated listing of all authorities as of June 30 is also published each year... MANAGEMENT Excepted Service AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... excepted service as required by 5 CFR 213.103. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roland Edwards,...

  1. 76 FR 38709 - Excepted Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT Excepted Service AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... excepted service as required by 5 CFR 213.103. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roland Edwards, Senior.......... DA110040 4/4/2011 Secretary Farm and Foreign Agricultural Service. Rural Utilities Senior...

  2. 76 FR 2929 - Excepted Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ....gpoaccess.gov/fr/ . A consolidated listing of all authorities as of June 30 is also published each year. The... MANAGEMENT Excepted Service AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... excepted service as required by 5 CFR 213.103. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roland Edwards,...

  3. 75 FR 14214 - Excepted Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ....gpoaccess.gov/fr/ . A consolidated listing of all authorities as of June 30 is also published each year. The... MANAGEMENT Excepted Service AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... excepted service as required by 5 CFR 213.103. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roland Edwards,...

  4. 75 FR 52376 - Excepted Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ....gov/fr/ . A consolidated listing of all authorities as of June 30 is also published each year. The... MANAGEMENT Excepted Service AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... excepted service as required by 5 CFR 213.103. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roland Edwards,...

  5. 75 FR 3947 - Excepted Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ....gpoaccess.gov/ fr/. A consolidated listing of all authorities as of June 30 is also published each year. The... MANAGEMENT Excepted Service AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... excepted service as required by 5 CFR 213.103. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roland Edwards,...

  6. 75 FR 79052 - Excepted Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ....gpoaccess.gov/fr/ gov/fr/. A consolidated listing of all authorities as of June 30 is also published each... MANAGEMENT Excepted Service AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... excepted service as required by 5 CFR 213.103. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roland Edwards,...

  7. 76 FR 53157 - Excepted Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... Federal Register at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/ fr/. A consolidated listing of all authorities as of June... MANAGEMENT Excepted Service AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... excepted service as required by 5 CFR 213.103. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roland Edwards,...

  8. 76 FR 78316 - Excepted Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... published monthly in the Federal Register at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/ fr/. A consolidated listing of all... MANAGEMENT Excepted Service AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... excepted service as required by 5 CFR 213.103. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roland Edwards,...

  9. 76 FR 76199 - Excepted Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... in the Federal Register at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/ fr/. A consolidated listing of all... MANAGEMENT Excepted Service AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... excepted service as required by 5 CFR 213.103. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roland Edwards,...

  10. 76 FR 21411 - Excepted Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ... MANAGEMENT Excepted Service AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... excepted service as required by 5 CFR 213.103. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roland Edwards, Senior...; E.O. 10577, 3 CFR 1954-1958 Comp., p. 218. John Berry, Director, U.S. Office of Personnel...

  11. 76 FR 9837 - Excepted Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ....gpoaccess.gov/fr/ . A consolidated listing of all authorities as of June 30 is also published each year. The... MANAGEMENT Excepted Service AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... excepted service as required by 5 CFR 213.103. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roland Edwards,...

  12. 75 FR 23308 - Excepted Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-03

    ....gpoaccess.gov/fr/ . A consolidated listing of all authorities as of June 30 is also published each year. The... MANAGEMENT Excepted Service AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... excepted service as required by 5 CFR 213.103. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roland Edwards,...

  13. 76 FR 13241 - Excepted Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... MANAGEMENT Excepted Service AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... excepted service as required by 5 CFR 213.103. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roland Edwards, Senior...: 5 U.S.C. 3301 and 3302; E.O. 10577, 3 CFR 1954-1958 Comp., p. 218. U.S. Office of...

  14. 75 FR 47031 - Excepted Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-04

    ....gov/fr/ fr/. A consolidated listing of all authorities as of June 30 is also published each year. The... MANAGEMENT Excepted Service AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This... excepted service as required by 5 CFR 213.103. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roland Edwards,...

  15. Discovery of the Self through the Writing Process: Autobiography as a Heuristic of Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitts, Mary Ellen

    Although the recent thrust toward writing as interaction with a text has led to de-emphasis of personal-experience writing per se, autobiography, if approached in the context of textuality (in Roland Barthes's sense), can provide a model for writing as a means of discovering one's identity--of interacting with life as text and with the written…

  16. No Such Thing as a Consensus: Olive Banks and the Sociology of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delamont, Sara

    2008-01-01

    The title of this article comes from the editorial written for this journal by Olive Banks, Len Barton, Roger Dale, David Hargreaves, Roland Meighan, Ivan Reid and Graham Vulliamy (Banks et al. 1980, 4) that appeared in its first issue, and set out its remit. The seven scholars who wrote that editorial pledged to "publish high quality work of any…

  17. The Aims of Education and the Leap of Freedom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yun, SunInn

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers the place of freedom in discussions of the aims of education. Bearing in mind remarks of R.S. Peters to the affect that the singling out of aims can "fall into the hands of rationalistically minded curriculum planners", it begins by considering the views of Roland Reichenbach regarding Bildung and his account of this…

  18. Some Thoughts on "Cultural Variation and Dominance in a Globalised Knowledge-Economy"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yang; Gentry, Marcia

    2012-01-01

    To view giftedness research in a global context is an important and desirable attempt. Roland S. Persson (2012a), in the target article entitled Cultural Variation and Dominance in a Globalised Knowledge-Economy: Towards a Cultural-Sensitive Research Paradigm in the Science of Giftedness, delivers thought-provoking views in the cultural influences…

  19. The Proper Place of Theory in Educational History?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban, Wayne J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the proper place of theory in educational history and shares his comments on the essays by Eileen Tamura, Carolyn Eick, and Roland Coloma. Eileen Tamura's positing of most educational historians as practitioners of narrative history is surely on the mark. She invites historians of education to investigate…

  20. A Catalyst for Charting a Path to Research Validity in the Field of Gifted Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisk, Dorothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Roland S. Persson's (2012a) article addresses a concern that many educators have stressed in their theoretical models, namely the importance of the interaction between the individual and the environment, and the impact of culture on not only values and beliefs, but on behaviour. As Persson (2012a) points out these models all have merit, but he…

  1. European Consciousness: Towards Defining a Complex Concept and Its Educational Significance (Europaisches Bewusstsein: Zur Definition Eines Vielschichtigen Begriffes und Seiner Bildungstheoretischen Bedeutung)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobst, Solvejg

    2005-01-01

    The present study aims at a definition of "European consciousness". In particular, it draws on Henri Tajfel's theory of social identity as well as Roland Wakenhut's and Jutta Gallenmuller's moral determination of national consciousness. European consciousness is then defined as a sense of belonging which, depending on certain identification…

  2. No Child Left Behind and the Spectacle of Failing Schools: The Mythology of Contemporary School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granger, David A.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses what David Berliner (2005) has called the perverse "spectacle of fear" (208) surrounding issues of teacher quality and accountability in contemporary school reform. Drawing principally on the critical semiotics of Roland Barthes' essay, "The World of Wrestling" (1957), it examines the way that this spectacle works to…

  3. What's Foucault Got to Do with It? History, Theory, and Becoming Subjected

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butchart, Ronald E.

    2011-01-01

    The three essays that make up this issue on theory in educational history by Eileen Tamura, Caroline Eick, and Roland Sintos Coloma constitute an indictment of the field of the history of education for its neglect of theory. Read linearly, from the Introduction through Coloma, the indictment becomes increasingly strident, moving from a gentle call…

  4. 41 CFR 50-201.2 - Administration of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 10 of the Portal-to-Portal Act of 1947 (61 Stat. 84, 29 U.S.C. 251, et seq., discussed in 29 CFR part.... (“Skidmore v. Swift & Co.”, 323 U.S. 134 (1944), “Roland Co. v. Walling”, 326 U.S. 657 (1946);...

  5. 41 CFR 50-201.2 - Administration of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 10 of the Portal-to-Portal Act of 1947 (61 Stat. 84, 29 U.S.C. 251, et seq., discussed in 29 CFR part.... (“Skidmore v. Swift & Co.”, 323 U.S. 134 (1944), “Roland Co. v. Walling”, 326 U.S. 657 (1946);...

  6. 41 CFR 50-201.2 - Administration of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 10 of the Portal-to-Portal Act of 1947 (61 Stat. 84, 29 U.S.C. 251, et seq., discussed in 29 CFR part.... (“Skidmore v. Swift & Co.”, 323 U.S. 134 (1944), “Roland Co. v. Walling”, 326 U.S. 657 (1946);...

  7. 29 CFR 4.101 - Official rulings and interpretations in this subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... incorrect. See for example, Skidmore v. Swift & Co., 323 U.S. 134 (1944); Roland Co. v. Walling, 326 U.S... responsibilities of administration and enforcement (Skidmore v. Swift & Co., 323 U.S. 134 (1944)). In order that... informed judgment to which courts and litigants may properly resort for guidance” (Skidmore v. Swift &...

  8. 41 CFR 50-201.2 - Administration of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 10 of the Portal-to-Portal Act of 1947 (61 Stat. 84, 29 U.S.C. 251, et seq., discussed in 29 CFR part.... (“Skidmore v. Swift & Co.”, 323 U.S. 134 (1944), “Roland Co. v. Walling”, 326 U.S. 657 (1946);...

  9. 29 CFR 4.101 - Official rulings and interpretations in this subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... incorrect. See for example, Skidmore v. Swift & Co., 323 U.S. 134 (1944); Roland Co. v. Walling, 326 U.S... responsibilities of administration and enforcement (Skidmore v. Swift & Co., 323 U.S. 134 (1944)). In order that... informed judgment to which courts and litigants may properly resort for guidance” (Skidmore v. Swift &...

  10. 41 CFR 50-201.2 - Administration of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 10 of the Portal-to-Portal Act of 1947 (61 Stat. 84, 29 U.S.C. 251, et seq., discussed in 29 CFR part.... (“Skidmore v. Swift & Co.”, 323 U.S. 134 (1944), “Roland Co. v. Walling”, 326 U.S. 657 (1946);...

  11. 29 CFR 4.101 - Official rulings and interpretations in this subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... incorrect. See for example, Skidmore v. Swift & Co., 323 U.S. 134 (1944); Roland Co. v. Walling, 326 U.S... responsibilities of administration and enforcement (Skidmore v. Swift & Co., 323 U.S. 134 (1944)). In order that... informed judgment to which courts and litigants may properly resort for guidance” (Skidmore v. Swift &...

  12. 29 CFR 4.101 - Official rulings and interpretations in this subpart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... incorrect. See for example, Skidmore v. Swift & Co., 323 U.S. 134 (1944); Roland Co. v. Walling, 326 U.S... responsibilities of administration and enforcement (Skidmore v. Swift & Co., 323 U.S. 134 (1944)). In order that... informed judgment to which courts and litigants may properly resort for guidance” (Skidmore v. Swift &...

  13. Literary Theory and the Notion of Difficulty. Report Series 4.7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Touponce, William

    The works of French literary theorists Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida, and Roland Barthes reflect a view of the text as the primary object of investigation for any discipline in the human sciences. Each of the three has been involved with pedagogical reforms within French cultural institutions: Derrida with the teaching of philosophy, Lacan with…

  14. Black Superintendents of Selected American Cities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Negro History Bulletin, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents photographs of 12 Black superintendents of urban school districts. They are: J. Jerome Harris, Ronald Lewis, Willie W. Herenton, Robert R. Wheeler, Alonzo A. Crim, Roland N. Patterson, Jean Franklin Emmons, Charles R. Thomas, Richard C. Hunter, Arthur Jefferson, Ulysses Byas, and Howard E. White, Sr. (GC)

  15. The Debate on Dominant Culture and Cultural Imperialism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anchan, John P.

    2012-01-01

    In this commentary, the author reviews in depth Roland S. Persson's (2012a) target article. According to him Persson (2012a) presents a convincing argument as he wove through examples and explanations. The idea of superculture connects well with the established neocolonial literature and the North-South/Centre-Periphery debate. From general to…

  16. The Role of the State and the Social Partners: Mechanisms and Spheres of Influence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vocational Training, 1992

    1992-01-01

    This serial issue is devoted to clarifying the attitudes of the various parties or "social partners" to vocational training in the Member States of the European Community. Following an editorial introducing the topic are these articles: "The Community Social Dialogue" (Roland Tavitian); "From the Market Jungle to the Social Dialogue: Vocational…

  17. Expression of Self-Concept and Adjustment against Repeated Aggressions: The Case of a Longitudinal Study on School Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houbre, Barbara; Tarquinio, Cyril; Lanfranchi, Jean-Baptiste

    2010-01-01

    Bullying between students in the school setting is an increasing problem. Bullying can be defined as any form of repeated mental or physical violence carried out by one or several individuals on a person who is not capable of defending himself (Roland and Idsoe, "Aggress Behav" 27:446-462, 2001). The aim of this paper is to observe the expression…

  18. Educational Studies of Cosmic Rays with a Telescope of Geiger-Muller Counters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wibig, T.; Kolodziejczak, K.; Pierzynski, R.; Sobczak, R.

    2006-01-01

    A group of high school students (XII Liceum) in the framework of the Roland Maze Project has built a compact telescope of three Geiger-Muller counters. The connection between the telescope and a PC computer was also created and programmed by students involved in the Project. This has allowed students to use their equipment to perform serious…

  19. Benign Childhood Focal Epilepsies: Assessment of Established and Newly Recognized Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panayiotopoulos, Chrysostomos P.; Michael, Michael; Sanders, Sue; Valeta, Thalia; Koutroumanidis, Michael

    2008-01-01

    A big advance in epileptology has been the recognition of syndromes with distinct aetiology, clinical and EEG features, treatment and prognosis. A prime and common example of this is rolandic epilepsy that is well known by the general paediatricians for over 50 years, thus allowing a precise diagnosis that predicts an excellent prognosis. However,…

  20. 1967: The Birth of "The Death of the Author"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logie, John

    2013-01-01

    Roland Barthes's "The Death of the Author" is a foundational text for scholars who are addressing questions of authorship and textual ownership in English studies and its neighboring disciplines. Barthes's essay is typically presented without significant attention to the circumstances and context surrounding its initial English publication in 1967…

  1. Empire: An Analytical Category for Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coloma, Roland Sintos

    2013-01-01

    In this article Roland Sintos Coloma argues for the relevance of empire as an analytical category in educational research. He points out the silence in mainstream studies of education on the subject of empire, the various interpretive approaches to deploying empire as an analytic, and the importance of indigeneity in research on empire and…

  2. The Scenic Route Is Not Always the Most Informative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Joan

    2012-01-01

    Roland S. Persson's (2012a) argument is that there is a dominant research culture in the field of gifts and talents, which must of necessity distort research and practice in cultures which are different. He ties this to the dominance of the global economy and points to the need for more cross-cultural studies. In this commentary, the author points…

  3. The Cenozoic Diversity of Agglutinated Foraminifera - Evidence for a late Oligocene to early Miocene diversification event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Michael; Setoyama, Eiichi; Kender, Sev; Cetean, Claudia

    2014-05-01

    The agglutinated foraminifera are among the most abundant micro-organisms in the deep marine environment and have a diversity record extending back to the late Precambrian. We present an updated diversity curve for agglutinated foraminiferal genera based on the stratigraphic ranges of all the agglutinated genera recognized as valid in the classification of Kaminski (2014). The data set for this analysis is based on the stratigraphic ranges of agglutinated genera published in Foraminiferal Genera and their Classification, which has been subsequently updated based on published studies and our new observations. The mean standing diversity of agglutinated foraminiferal genera was compiled by counting the number of boundary crossers rather than the number of genera in each stage. In this study, we report the stratigraphic and geographical occurrence of a benthic foraminiferal diversification event that has previously received little attention. In the latest Oligocene to earliest Miocene a number of trochospiral agglutinated genera with alveolar or canaliculate walls first appeared in the fossil record. Our studies of late Oligocene of the Congo fan, offshore Angola (Kender et al., 2008; Cetean and Kaminski, 2011) have revealed a diverse assemblage that includes new taxa of deep-water agglutinated foraminifera. In a biostratigraphic study of the Miocene foraminiferal assemblages Kender et al. (2008) noted steadily increasing diversity and proportions of infaunal agglutinated foraminiferal morphotypes over the lower Miocene interval. The proportion of infaunal agglutinated foraminifera assigned to the order Textularida increased dramatically in the lower mid-Miocene, suggesting expansion of the oxygen minimum zone into deeper waters. In addition to the trochospiral alveolar genera, several species of Reticulophragmium and Cyclammina display rapid diversification into numerous separate lineages that are at present not reflected in our generic diversity record owing to

  4. Session: Reservoir Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Renner, Joel L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Horne, Roland N.; Shook, G. Michael

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five papers: ''Reservoir Technology'' by Joel L. Renner; ''LBL Research on the Geysers: Conceptual Models, Simulation and Monitoring Studies'' by Gudmundur S. Bodvarsson; ''Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI'' by Philip E. Wannamaker; ''Optimizing Reinjection Strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines Based on Chloride Data'' by Roland N. Horne; ''TETRAD Reservoir Simulation'' by G. Michael Shook

  5. The Cortical Connectivity of the Prefrontal Cortex in the Monkey Brain

    PubMed Central

    Yeterian, Edward H.; Pandya, Deepak N.; Tomaiuolo, Francesco; Petrides, Michael

    2011-01-01

    One dimension of understanding the functions of the prefrontal cortex is knowledge of cortical connectivity. We have surveyed three aspects of prefrontal cortical connections: local projections (within the frontal lobe), the termination patterns of long association (post-Rolandic) projections, and the trajectories of major fiber pathways. The local connections appear to be organized in relation to dorsal (hippocampal origin) and ventral (paleocortical origin) architectonic trends. According to the proposal of a dual origin of the cerebral cortex, cortical areas can be traced as originating from archicortex (hippocampus) on the one hand, and paleocortex, on the other hand, in a stepwise manner (e.g., Sanides, 1969; Pandya and Yeterian, 1985). Prefrontal areas within each trend are connected with less architectonically differentiated areas, and, on the other hand, with more differentiated areas. Such organization may allow for the systematic exchange of information within each architectonic trend. The long connections of the prefrontal cortex with post-Rolandic regions seem to be organized preferentially in relation to dorsal and ventral prefrontal architectonic trends. Prefrontal areas are connected with post-Rolandic auditory, visual and somatosensory association areas, and with multimodal and paralimbic regions. This long connectivity likely works in conjunction with local connections to serve prefrontal cortical functions. The afferent and efferent connections of the prefrontal cortex with post-Rolandic regions are conveyed by specific long association pathways. These pathways as well appear to be organized in relation to dorsal and ventral prefrontal architectonic trends. Finally, although prefrontal areas have preferential connections in relation to dual architectonic trends, it is clear that there are interconnections between and among areas in each trend, which may provide a substrate for the overall integrative function of the prefrontal cortex. Prefrontal

  6. Atypical "benign" partial epilepsy of childhood or pseudo-lennox syndrome. Part II: family study.

    PubMed

    Doose, H; Hahn, A; Neubauer, B A; Pistohl, J; Stephani, U

    2001-02-01

    Atypical benign partial epilepsy of childhood (ABPE = Pseudo-Lennox syndrome) shows semiologic parallels to Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, however--besides the lack of tonic seizures--it has an entirely different etiology and prognosis. Recently Hahn et al [17] investigated the long-term evolution of 43 cases with ABPE. Symptomatology, EEG findings, and course were found to overlap with Rolandic epilepsy, Landau-Kleffner syndrome and ESES. The incidence of seizures in relatives was determined in the whole series investigated by Hahn et al [17]. Five of 56 siblings suffered from seizures (3 Rolandic seizures; one febrile convulsions; one unclassified). Three fathers reported grand mal. In 29 families of the series of Hahn et al EEG recordings were performed: 22 brothers, 19 sisters and 16 pairs of parents. In 29% of the siblings a sharp wave focus was demonstrable. The rate rose to 40% when only siblings investigated at the age of maximum expression (3 to 10 years) were considered. Sharp wave foci were mostly multifocal and indistinguishable from those observed in siblings of children with Rolandic epilepsy. Photoparoxysmal response and generalized spikes and waves during rest and hyperventilation were also found to be significantly elevated (26% and 13% respectively). We conclude that ABPE is a subgroup of idiopathic partial epilepsy of childhood (representing a less benign part of a spectrum) that has to be ranked in a continuum with Rolandic epilepsy. The different clinical phenotype might be caused by a higher expressivity of the identical genetic trait, possibly facilitated by other genetic or acquired factors. Genetic heterogeneity represents another possibility. PMID:11315204

  7. Fireworks under the microscope: a spectacular new species of Zodiomyces from the Thaxter collection.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Walter; Haelewaters, Danny; Pfister, Donald H

    2016-01-01

    A new species of Zodiomyces (Ascomycota, Laboulbeniales) is described, Z. rhizophorus, parasitic on a hydrophilid beetle (Coleoptera, Hydrophilidae) from Trinidad. This species was discovered during the examination of the slides of Laboulbeniales made by Roland Thaxter. It is characterized by numerous long, slender, multicellular and multiseriate outgrowths at the base of the receptacle. Thaxter's outstanding illustrations have set a standard in the field of mycology; we provide a review of the methods he employed in the preparation of these illustrations. PMID:27055574

  8. Data-Based Methods for AB Initio Protein Structure Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Dr Keith L. Frost

    2002-11-07

    OAK 270 - Per the DOE Project Officer ''Roland Hirsh'' Germantown, Md. The required final report for this award has been waived due to the fact Dr Keith Frost who was the P.I. on the research took a leave of absence at the end of March 2000, and left the university without an approval. The University adjusted their records to reflect this early termination; no further funding applied.

  9. 737 Windshear Tests, Orlando

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA researchers evaluating wind shear sensor displays in the experimental flight deck at NASA's Boeing 737 research aircraft. During this flight test program, over 75 microbursts were penetrated at altitudes from 800-1100 ft to test the performance of radar, lidar and infrared wind shear sensors. Pictured from left to right are Wind Shear Program Manager Roland Bowles, NASA research pilot Lee Person, Wind Shear Program Deputy Manager Michael Lewis, NASA research engineer David Hinton, NASA research engineer Emedio Bracalante.

  10. Language and central temporal auditory processing in childhood epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Boscariol, Mirela; Casali, Raquel L; Amaral, M Isabel R; Lunardi, Luciane L; Matas, Carla G; Collela-Santos, M Francisca; Guerreiro, Marilisa M

    2015-12-01

    Because of the relationship between rolandic, temporoparietal, and centrotemporal areas and language and auditory processing, the aim of this study was to investigate language and central temporal auditory processing of children with epilepsy (rolandic epilepsy and temporal lobe epilepsy) and compare these with those of children without epilepsy. Thirty-five children aged between eight and 14 years old were studied. Two groups of children participated in this study: a group with childhood epilepsy (n=19), and a control group without epilepsy or linguistic changes (n=16). There was a significant difference between the two groups, with the worst performance in children with epilepsy for the gaps-in-noise test, right ear (p<0.001) and left ear (p<0.001) tests, and duration pattern test--naming (p=0.002) and humming (p=0.002). In auditory P300, there was no significant difference in latency (p=0.343) and amplitude (p=0.194) between the groups. There was a significant difference between the groups, with the worst performance in children with epilepsy, for the auditory-receptive vocabulary (PPVT) (p<0.001) and phonological working memory (nonwords repetition task) tasks (p=0.001). We conclude that the impairment of central temporal auditory processing and language skills may be comorbidities in children with rolandic epilepsy and temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:26580215

  11. Effect of white matter disease on functional connections in the aging brain.

    PubMed Central

    Leuchter, A F; Dunkin, J J; Lufkin, R B; Anzai, Y; Cook, I A; Newton, T F

    1994-01-01

    Periventricular white matter hyperintensities (PVHs) seen on T2 weighted MRI studies are common in elderly people and often represent demyelination of fibres. Damage to these fibres could lead to functional disconnection between brain regions. Electroencephalographic coherence, a measure of shared electrical activity between regions, was examined to determine if there was evidence for such disconnection. Twenty two subjects with clinically diagnosed dementia of the Alzheimer's type, 16 with multi-infarct dementia, and 18 normal controls were studied. It was hypothesised that coherence between areas presumably linked by fibres that traverse the periventricular region would be decreased in subjects with PVHs, and that PVHs would have a stronger association with decreased coherence than clinical diagnosis. It was also hypothesised that coherence between areas presumably connected by long corticocortical tracts that are neuroanatomically separated from the ventricles would be low in patients with Alzheimer's disease because of pyramidal cell death in this group, but would not be affected by the presence of PVHs. Patients with PVHs in fact had lower coherence than those without PVHs in the pre-Rolandic and post-Rolandic areas, where connecting fibres traverse the periventricular region. There was no effect of PVHs, however, on coherence between areas separated by the Rolandic fissure that were connected by long corticocortical tracts; this coherence was lowest among the patients with Alzheimer's disease. These patterns of association suggest that coherence may detect different types of neurophysiological "disconnection," and may be sensitive to selective damage to different fibre pathways. Images PMID:7964810

  12. Positron computed tomography studies of cerebral metabolic responses to complex motor tasks

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, M.E.; Mazziotta, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Human motor system organization was explored in 8 right-handed male subjects using /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose and positron computed tomography to measure cerebral glucose metabolism. Five subjects had triple studies (eyes closed) including: control (hold pen in right hand without moving), normal size writing (subject repeatedly writes name) and large (10-15 X normal) name writing. In these studies normal and large size writing had a similar distribution of metabolic responses when compared to control studies. Activations (percent change from control) were in the range of 12-20% and occurred in the striatum bilaterally > contralateral Rolandic cortex > contralateral thalamus. No significant activations were observed in the ipsilateral thalamus, Rolandic cortex or cerebellum (supplementary motor cortex was not examined). The magnitude of the metabolic response in the striatum was greater with the large versus normal sized writing. This differential response may be due to an increased number and topographic distribution of neurons responding with the same average activity between tasks or an increase in the functional activity of the same neuronal population between the two tasks (present spatial resolution inadequate to differentiate). When subjects (N=3) performed novel sequential finger movements, the maximal metabolic response was in the contralateral Rolandic cortex > striatum. Such studies provide a means of exploring human motor system organization, motor learning and provide a basis for examining patients with motor system disorders.

  13. Brain activity varies with modulation of dynamic pitch variance in sentence melody.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Martin; Steinhauer, Karsten; Alter, Kai; Friederici, Angela D; von Cramon, D Yves

    2004-05-01

    Fourteen native speakers of German heard normal sentences, sentences which were either lacking dynamic pitch variation (flattened speech), or comprised of intonation contour exclusively (degraded speech). Participants were to listen carefully to the sentences and to perform a rehearsal task. Passive listening to flattened speech compared to normal speech produced strong brain responses in right cortical areas, particularly in the posterior superior temporal gyrus (pSTG). Passive listening to degraded speech compared to either normal or flattened speech particularly involved fronto-opercular and subcortical (Putamen, Caudate Nucleus) regions bilaterally. Additionally the Rolandic operculum (premotor cortex) in the right hemisphere subserved processing of neat sentence intonation. As a function of explicit rehearsing sentence intonation we found several activation foci in the left inferior frontal gyrus (Broca's area), the left inferior precentral sulcus, and the left Rolandic fissure. The data allow several suggestions: First, both flattened and degraded speech evoked differential brain responses in the pSTG, particularly in the planum temporale (PT) bilaterally indicating that this region mediates integration of slowly and rapidly changing acoustic cues during comprehension of spoken language. Second, the bilateral circuit active whilst participants receive degraded speech reflects general effort allocation. Third, the differential finding for passive perception and explicit rehearsal of intonation contour suggests a right fronto-lateral network for processing and a left fronto-lateral network for producing prosodic information. Finally, it appears that brain areas which subserve speech (frontal operculum) and premotor functions (Rolandic operculum) coincidently support the processing of intonation contour in spoken sentence comprehension. PMID:15068910

  14. Who Pioneered the Use of Antipsychotics in North America?

    PubMed Central

    Stip, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Neuroleptics were introduced into North America 60 years ago. The credit for this advance is generally accorded to Heinz Lehmann. I sought to explore whether Lehmann really was the first North American psychiatrist to study the effects of chlorpromazine (CPZ) and to provide a more balanced view of its application in a clinical context. Method: I searched for historical documents and published articles in several libraries and interviewed psychiatrists active from 1952–1970. Results: The first article in English was published in the July volume of the Archives of Neurology and Psychiatry in 1954 (n = 71). Another article, written in French by Roland Saucier and published in a journal called Le Saguenay Médical, also described the effects of CPZ on a Canadian psychiatric population in August 1954 (n > 200). However, the first prescription for CPZ was written by Roland Saucier, who brought the product back from Paris after a fellowship there. Ruth Kajander, in Ontario, was also one of the first prescribers of this drug, following her study of its use in anesthesia and a publication in the proceedings of a symposium. Conclusion: The contents of the 2 naturalistic studies were compared. Lehmann’s study started 1 month before that of Saucier. Lehmann was the first North American psychiatrist to publish an article on CPZ, but Roland Saucier nevertheless made an important contribution, being the first to prescribe this drug in North America and reporting results for a study with a sample size 3 times that of Lehmann’s study. PMID:25886681

  15. Evaluation of Clear Sky Models for Satellite-Based Irradiance Estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.

    2013-12-01

    This report describes an intercomparison of three popular broadband clear sky solar irradiance model results with measured data, as well as satellite-based model clear sky results compared to measured clear sky data. The authors conclude that one of the popular clear sky models (the Bird clear sky model developed by Richard Bird and Roland Hulstrom) could serve as a more accurate replacement for current satellite-model clear sky estimations. Additionally, the analysis of the model results with respect to model input parameters indicates that rather than climatological, annual, or monthly mean input data, higher-time-resolution input parameters improve the general clear sky model performance.

  16. On the nature of the anti-tail of Comet Kohoutek /1973f/. I - A working model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Z.

    1974-01-01

    The model derived for the anti-tail of Comet Kohoutek describes it as a flat formation, confined essentially to the comet's orbit plane and composed of relatively heavy particles (mostly in the size range 0.1-1 mm) whose motions are controlled by solar gravity and solar radiation pressure. Almost all the material was produced by the comet before perihelion at a rate about an order of magnitude higher than for Comets Arend-Roland and Bennett. The latent heat of vaporization of the particle material is estimated at 40-45 kcal/mole or higher.

  17. Galaxy Velocity Dispersions Using a Cross-Correlation Method: Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalle Ore, Cristina; Faber, S. M.; Gonzalez, J. Jesus; Stoughton, Roland; Burstein, David

    1991-07-01

    In the paper "Galaxy Velocity Dispersions Using a Cross-Correlation Method" by Cristina Dalle Ore, S. M. Faber, J. Jesus Gonzalez, Roland Stoughton, and David Burstein (ApJ, 366,38 [1991]), the following corrections should be made: 1. The full name of the third author is J. Jesus Gonzalez. 2. The last line of equation (3) should read: [(t x t)*v|d], instead of [(t x t) * v|]. 3. Line 7 of the second paragraph on page 40 should read "...matches the observed FWHM of t x g. Equation (3) is more..."

  18. A quasi-Newton acceleration for high-dimensional optimization algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, David; Lange, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    In many statistical problems, maximum likelihood estimation by an EM or MM algorithm suffers from excruciatingly slow convergence. This tendency limits the application of these algorithms to modern high-dimensional problems in data mining, genomics, and imaging. Unfortunately, most existing acceleration techniques are ill-suited to complicated models involving large numbers of parameters. The squared iterative methods (SQUAREM) recently proposed by Varadhan and Roland constitute one notable exception. This paper presents a new quasi-Newton acceleration scheme that requires only modest increments in computation per iteration and overall storage and rivals or surpasses the performance of SQUAREM on several representative test problems. PMID:21359052

  19. Molecules and Clusters in Intense Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posthumus, Jan

    2009-09-01

    Preface; 1. Ultra-high intensity based on Ti:Sapphire Philip F. Taday and Andrew J. Langley; 2. Diatomic molecules in intense laser fields Jan H. Posthumus and James F. McCann; 3. Small polyatomic molecules in intense laser fields C. Cornaggia; 4. Coherent control in intense laser fields Eric Charron and Brian Sheehy; 5. Experimental studies of laser-heated rare gas clusters M. Lezius and M. Schmidt; 6. Single cluster explosions and high harmonic generation John W. G. Tisch and Emma Springate; 7. Intense laser interaction with extended cluster media Roland A. Smith and Todd Ditmire.

  20. Molecules and Clusters in Intense Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posthumus, Jan

    2001-06-01

    Preface; 1. Ultra-high intensity based on Ti:Sapphire Philip F. Taday and Andrew J. Langley; 2. Diatomic molecules in intense laser fields Jan H. Posthumus and James F. McCann; 3. Small polyatomic molecules in intense laser fields C. Cornaggia; 4. Coherent control in intense laser fields Eric Charron and Brian Sheehy; 5. Experimental studies of laser-heated rare gas clusters M. Lezius and M. Schmidt; 6. Single cluster explosions and high harmonic generation John W. G. Tisch and Emma Springate; 7. Intense laser interaction with extended cluster media Roland A. Smith and Todd Ditmire.

  1. Air resistance measurements on actual airplane parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiselsberger, C

    1923-01-01

    For the calculation of the parasite resistance of an airplane, a knowledge of the resistance of the individual structural and accessory parts is necessary. The most reliable basis for this is given by tests with actual airplane parts at airspeeds which occur in practice. The data given here relate to the landing gear of a Siemanms-Schuckert DI airplane; the landing gear of a 'Luftfahrzeug-Gesellschaft' airplane (type Roland Dlla); landing gear of a 'Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen' G airplane; a machine gun, and the exhaust manifold of a 269 HP engine.

  2. Astronomy-Connected Scientific Works in Early Transylvania and Banat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, Ladislau

    2008-09-01

    Baron Roland von Eötvös: physicist who demonstrated the proportionality of the inertial and gravitational mass and carried out research on the spatial changes in gravitation. Some of his experiments was made on the territory of Banat and Crisana (south-easter Transylvania). Count Luigi Ferdinando Marsigli: a very complex personality: engineer, diplomat, spy, scientist (geograph, historian, biologist, astronomer), who made the first astronomical observations in Banat and published them. Maximilian Hell: a mathematician and astronomer who founded the first astronomical observatory in Cluj and made observations on a very interesting natural phenomenon: the transit of the planet Venus.

  3. The European Micropaleontological Reference Centre in Kraków

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Michael; Waskowska, Anna; Bebenek, Slawomir; Pilarz, Monika

    2016-04-01

    We are pleased to announce the establishment of the European Micropaleontological Reference Centre, housed in the offices of Micropress Europe at the AGH University of Science & Technology in Krakow, Poland. The new European Micropaleontological Reference Centre is an initiative of the Grzybowski Foundation and Micropress Europe. The centre is designed to serve the micropaleontological community by providing a permanent repository or "museum" for published microfossil collections. The centre houses a growing collection of microfossils picked into faunal slides, as well as a well-stocked library of micropaleontological books, journals, and reprints. We have the only up-to-date paper copy of the Ellis & Messina Catalogue of Foraminifera in Central Europe. Currently, the slide collections include: - Type slides of benthic foraminifera from Poland (the collection of I. Heller from the Polish oil company GEONAFTA), - Carboniferous foraminifera from Germany and Poland (collections of G. Eickhoff and Z. Alexandrowicz), - IODP sites in the Arctic, Atlantic, and Indian Oceans (collections of M. Kaminski, E. Setoyama, A. Holborn), - Exploration wells in the Boreal seas: North Sea, Norwegian Sea, Western Barents Sea, Labrador Sea, Bering Sea, Spitsbergen, Western Siberia (collections of M. Kaminski, J. Nagy, T. Van Den Akker, V. Podobina, and others), - Paratethyan Foraminifera (collections of E. Luczkowska, C. Beldean, F. Szekely), - Mesozoic-Paleogene Foraminifera from Gubbio, Italy (collections of M. Kaminski, C. Cetean, and students) and the Polish Carpathians (collection of A. Waskowska), - Caribbean (collection of M. Kaminski, R. Preece), West Africa (collection of R. Preece, S. Kender, C. Cetean), - We have a separate collection of type specimens of species (paratypes). Slides are housed in cabinet drawers together with the relevant publication. Researchers are welcome to visit the offices of Micropress Europe to view the archived microfossil collections. The center

  4. Disrupted White Matter Network and Cognitive Decline in Type 2 Diabetes Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junying; Liu, Zhen; Li, Zixiao; Wang, Yunxia; Chen, Yaojing; Li, Xin; Chen, Kewei; Shu, Ni; Zhang, Zhanjun

    2016-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is accompanied by cognitive impairment and is associated with an increased risk of dementia. Damage to brain structures such as white matter network disruption may underlie this cognitive disturbance. In the present study, 886 non-diabetic and 163 type 2 diabetic participants completed a battery of neuropsychological tests. Among them, 38 diabetic patients and 34 non-diabetic participants that matched the patients for age/sex/education received a magnetic resonance imaging-based diffusion tensor imaging. Then we calculated the topological properties of the white matter network using a graph theoretical method to investigate network efficiency differences between groups. We found that type 2 diabetic patients had inferior performances compared to the non-diabetic controls, in several cognitive domains involving executive function, spatial processing, memory, and attention. We also found that diabetic patients exhibited a disrupted topological organization of the white matter network (including the global network properties, i.e., network strength, global efficiency, local efficiency and shortest path length, and the nodal efficiency of the right rolandic operculum) in the brain. Moreover, those global network properties and the nodal efficiency of the right rolandic operculum both had positive correlations with executive function in the patient group. The results suggest that type 2 diabetes mellitus leads to an alteration in the topological organization of the cortical white matter network and this alteration may account for the observed cognitive decline. PMID:27163818

  5. Probing of structural relaxation times in the glassy state of sucrose and trehalose based on dynamical properties of two secondary relaxation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, K.; Adrjanowicz, K.; Paluch, M.; Kaminska, E.

    2011-06-15

    Time-dependent isothermal dielectric measurements were carried out deeply in the glassy state on two very important saccharides: sucrose and trehalose. In both compounds two prominent secondary relaxation processes were identified. The faster one is an inherent feature of the whole family of carbohydrates. The slower one can also be detected in oligo- and polysaccharides. It was shown earlier that the {beta} process is the Johari-Goldstein (JG) relaxation coupled to motions of the glycosidic linkage, while the {gamma} relaxation originates from motions of the exocyclic hydroxymethyl unit. Recently, it was shown that the JG relaxation process can be used to determine structural relaxation times in the glassy state [R. Casalini and C. M. Roland, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 035701 (2009)]. In this paper we present the results of an analysis of the data obtained during aging using two independent approaches. The first was proposed by Casalini and Roland, and the second one is based on the variation of the dielectric strength of the secondary relaxation process during aging [J. K. Vij and G. Power, J. Non-Cryst. Solids 357, 783 (2011)]. Surprisingly, we found that the estimated structural relaxation times in the glassy state of both saccharides are almost the same, independent of the type of secondary mode. This finding calls into question the common view that secondary modes of intramolecular origin do not provide information about the dynamics of the glassy state.

  6. Can clinical and radiological findings predict surgery for lumbar disc herniation? A systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    White, Andrew P.; Harrop, James; Dettori, Joseph R.

    2012-01-01

    Study design: Systematic review. Objective or clinical question: What clinical and radiological findings in patients with lumbar-herniated nucleus pulposus can serve as predictors of surgical intervention? Methods: Articles published between January 1975 and August 2011 were systematically reviewed using Pubmed, Cochrane, National Guideline Clearinghouse Databases, and bibliographies of key articles. Each article was subject to quality rating and was analyzed by two independent reviewers. Results: From 123 citations, 21 underwent full-text review. Four studies met inclusion criteria. Only baseline disability as measured by the Roland Disability Index (RDI) or the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was consistently associated with a greater likelihood of having discectomy surgery across multiple studies. With the current literature, we were not able to find an association between surgery and several characteristics including smoking status, body mass index, neurological deficit, positive straight leg testing, and level of herniation. Conclusions: From the limited data available, it appears that individual radiographic and clinical features are not able to predict the likelihood of surgical intervention. Higher baseline disability measurements (Oswestry and Roland) did correlate, however, with surgical treatment. PMID:23236305

  7. Epidemiological study of low back pain and occupational risk factors among taxi drivers.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Masabumi; Konno, Shunsuke; Gembun, Yoshikazu; Liu, Xinyu; Minami, Kazufumi; Ito, Hiromoto

    2008-04-01

    A survey of taxi drivers was conducted to determine the actual situation of drivers' low back pain (LBP). The survey was carried out in October 2002, the target drivers were asked to complete a questionnaire which contains questions regarding physique of drivers, demographic features, working conditions, office environment, health conditions, the presence of low back pain, the level of low back pain based on Visual Analogue Scale and Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire score. As a result, the total number of valid responses was 1,334 and the response rate was 71 percent, and the 1-wk prevalence of LBP was 20.5 percent of respondents. Regarding 275 subjects with LBP, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) averaged 4.3. There was a positive weak correlation between VAS and Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire score (R=0.41). And Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the relationship between LBP and occupational factors, the results suggested following items as risk factors; such as history of LBP, suffering from fatigue, diseases other than LBP and smoking habit. PMID:18413963

  8. An fMRI Study of Obesity, Food Reward, and Perceived Caloric Density: Does a Low-Fat Label Make Food Less Appealing?

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Janet; Stice, Eric; Yokum, Sonja; Bohon, Cara

    2011-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that obese individuals experience greater activation of the gustatory and somatosensory cortex, but weaker activation of the striatum, in response to intake and anticipated intake of high-fat chocolate milkshake versus an isocaloric milkshake labeled low-fat and a tasteless solution using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with 17 obese and 17 lean young women. Obese relative to lean women showed greater activation in somatosensory (Rolandic operculum), gustatory (frontal operculum), and reward valuation regions (amgydala, ventralmedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) in response to intake and anticipated intake of milkshake versus tasteless solution, though there was little evidence of reduced striatal activation. Obese relative to lean women also showed greater activation in the Rolandic operculum, frontal operculum, and vmPFC in response to isocaloric milkshakes labeled regular versus lowfat. Results suggest that hyper-responsivity of somatosensory, gustatory, and reward valuation regions may be related to overeating and that top-down processing influence reward encoding, which could further contribute to weight gain. PMID:21497628

  9. Cortical gamma-oscillations modulated by visuomotor tasks -Intracranial recording in patients with epilepsy-

    PubMed Central

    Nagasawa, Tetsuro; Rothermel, Robert; Juhász, Csaba; Nishida, Masaaki; Sood, Sandeep; Asano, Eishi

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY We determined how visuomotor tasks modulated gamma-oscillations on electrocorticography in epileptic patients who underwent epilepsy surgery. Each visual-cue consisted of either a sentence or hand gesture instructing the subject to press or not to press the button. Regardless of the recorded hemisphere, viewing sentence and gesture cues elicited gamma-augmentation sequentially in the lateral-polar occipital and inferior occipital-temporal areas; subsequently, button-press movement elicited gamma-augmentation in the Rolandic area. The magnitudes of gamma-augmentation in the Rolandic and inferior occipital-temporal areas were larger when the hand contralateral to the recorded hemisphere was used for motor responses. A double dissociation was found in the left inferior occipital-temporal cortex in one subject; the lateral portion had greater gamma-augmentation elicited by a sentence-cue, whereas the medial portion had greater gamma-augmentation elicited by a gesture-cue. The present study has increased our understanding of the physiology of the human visuomotor system. PMID:20580900

  10. Voxel-Wise Meta-Analysis of Gray Matter Changes in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Dongchao; Cui, Liying; Fang, Jia; Cui, Bo; Li, Dawei; Tai, Hongfei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increasing neuroimaging studies have revealed gray matter (GM) anomalies of several brain regions by voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). A voxel-wise meta-analysis was conducted to integrate the reported studies to determine the consistent GM alterations in ALS based on VBM methods. Methods: Ovid Medline, Pubmed, Emabase, and BrainMap database were searched for relevant studies.Data were extracted by two independent researchers. Voxel-wise meta-analysis was performed using the effect-size signed differential mapping (ES-SDM) software. Results: Twenty-nine VBM studies comprising 638 subjects with ALS and 622 healthy controls (HCs) met inclusion criteria.The global GM volumes of ALS patients were significantly decreased compared with those of HCs. GM reductions in patients were mainly located in the right precentral gyrus, the left Rolandic operculum, the left lenticular nucleus and the right anterior cingulate/paracingulate gyri. The right precentral gyrus and the left inferior frontal gyrus might be potential anatomical biomarkers to evaluate the severity of the disease, and longer disease duration was associated with more GM atrophy in the left frontal aslant tract and the right precentral gyrus in ALS patients. Conclusion: The results support that ALS is a complex degenerative disease involving multisystems besides the motor system.The mechanism of asymmetric atrophy of the motor cortex and the implication of Rolandic operculum involvement in ALS need to be further elucidated in future studies. PMID:27065078

  11. Dysfunction of the Heteromeric KV7.3/KV7.5 Potassium Channel is Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gilling, Mette; Rasmussen, Hanne B.; Calloe, Kirstine; Sequeira, Ana F.; Baretto, Marta; Oliveira, Guiomar; Almeida, Joana; Lauritsen, Marlene B.; Ullmann, Reinhard; Boonen, Susanne E.; Brondum-Nielsen, Karen; Kalscheuer, Vera M.; Tümer, Zeynep; Vicente, Astrid M.; Schmitt, Nicole; Tommerup, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the KCNQ3 gene on chromosome 8q24 encoding the voltage-gated potassium channel KV7.3 subunit have previously been associated with rolandic epilepsy and idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) including benign neonatal convulsions. We identified a de novo t(3;8) (q21;q24) translocation truncating KCNQ3 in a boy with childhood autism. In addition, we identified a c.1720C > T [p.P574S] nucleotide change in three unrelated individuals with childhood autism and no history of convulsions. This nucleotide change was previously reported in patients with rolandic epilepsy or IGE and has now been annotated as a very rare SNP (rs74582884) in dbSNP. The p.P574S KV7.3 variant significantly reduced potassium current amplitude in Xenopus laevis oocytes when co-expressed with KV7.5 but not with KV7.2 or KV7.4. The nucleotide change did not affect trafficking of heteromeric mutant KV7.3/2, KV7.3/4, or KV7.3/5 channels in HEK 293 cells or primary rat hippocampal neurons. Our results suggest that dysfunction of the heteromeric KV7.3/5 channel is implicated in the pathogenesis of some forms of autism spectrum disorders, epilepsy, and possibly other psychiatric disorders and therefore, KCNQ3 and KCNQ5 are suggested as candidate genes for these disorders. PMID:23596459

  12. Spatial alexia.

    PubMed

    Ardila, A; Rosselli, M

    1994-05-01

    Twenty-one patients with right hemisphere damage were studied (11 men, 10 women; average age = 41.33; range = 19-65). Patients were divided in two groups: pre-Rolandic (six patients) and retro-Rolandic (15 patients) right hemisphere damage. A special reading test was given to each patient. The observed errors included: literal errors (substitutions, additions, and omissions of letters), substitutions of syllables and pseudowords for meaningful words, left hemispatial neglect, confabulation, splitting of words, verbal errors (substitutions, additions, and omission of words), grouping of letters belonging to two different words, misuse of punctuation marks, and errors in following lines. It was proposed that spatial alexia is characterized by: (1) some difficulties in the recognition of the spatial orientation in letters; (2) left hemispatial neglect; (3) tendency to "complete" the sense of words and sentences; (4) inability to follow lines when reading texts, and sequentially explore the spatial distribution of the written material; and (5) grouping and fragmentation of words, most likely as a consequence of the inability to interpret the relative value of spaces between letters correctly. PMID:7960468

  13. Sensorimotor activation related to speaker vs. listener role during natural conversation

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Anne; Bourguignon, Mathieu; Parkkonen, Lauri; Hari, Riitta

    2016-01-01

    Although the main function of speech is communication, the brain bases of speaking and listening are typically studied in single subjects, leaving unsettled how brain function supports interactive vocal exchange. Here we used whole-scalp magnetoencephalography (MEG) to monitor modulation of sensorimotor brain rhythms related to the speaker vs. listener roles during natural conversation. Nine dyads of healthy adults were recruited. The partners of a dyad were engaged in live conversations via an audio link while their brain activity was measured simultaneously in two separate MEG laboratories. The levels of ∼10-Hz and ∼20-Hz rolandic oscillations depended on the speaker vs. listener role. In the left rolandic cortex, these oscillations were consistently (by ∼20%) weaker during speaking than listening. At the turn changes in conversation, the level of the ∼10 Hz oscillations enhanced transiently around 1.0 or 2.3 s before the end of the partner’s turn. Our findings indicate left-hemisphere-dominant involvement of the sensorimotor cortex during own speech in natural conversation. The ∼10-Hz modulations could be related to preparation for starting one’s own turn, already before the partner’s turn has finished. PMID:26742643

  14. An Apparently Classical Case Report of Sturge-Weber Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Della Marca, Giacomo; Vollono, Catello

    2015-10-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is a rare, sporadic, congenital neurocutaneous syndrome, likely due to abnormal development of the cephalic microvasculature. Symptoms and signs depend on the extent and location of the venous dysplasia. We describe a case of a 33-year-old woman presenting with drug-resistant epilepsy, chronic headache, and recurring nonepileptic seizures. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans showed severe frontoparietal right hemisphere atrophy, prevalent right frontoparietal leptomeningeal enhancement, circumscribed angioma of the left rolandic sulcus, and prominent deep venous system. We report an apparently classical Sturge-Weber syndrome and hypothesize a shared pathophysiologic mechanism for clinical symptoms. We speculate that all the main symptoms observed in our patient could be the expression of a functional imbalance between the atrophic right hemisphere and the hyperexcitable left cortex. PMID:25392004

  15. [Adélaïde Hautval (1906-1988): An exemplary medical personality].

    PubMed

    Halioua, Bruno; Hauptmann, Georges

    2015-12-01

    Adélaïde Hautval (1906-1988), psychiatrist, was arrested in April 1942 having defended a Jewish family abused by German soldiers. She was imprisoned in Bourges and in several camps in France (Pithiviers, Beaune-la-Rolande, Orléans, Romainville) before being deported as a "Friend of the Jews" at Auschwitz in the convoy of 23 January 1943, said 31,000 convoy with 229 other resistant women, Marie-Claude Vaillant-Couturier, Charlotte Delbo, Danielle Casanova. She refused to participate in the "medical" experience of Nazi doctors Clauberg, Schumann, Wirths and Mengele at Birkenau. She was then deported to Ravensbrück. During her deportation, she illustrated her dedication in the medical management of the deportees. She testified repeatedly on her experience of remote doctor. Hautval Adélaïde was the first French woman doctor named Righteous among the Nations in 1965. PMID:26411305

  16. At Home in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, John A.

    Colleague and confidant of Einstein and Bohr and pioneer of nuclear fission -- John A. Wheeler is one of our most original and profound thinkers. In engaging essays formed of reminiscence, science, and conjecture, Wheeler writes of debates and discussions with Bohr, long talks with Einstein in his study at Princeton, and the eloquence and nobility of Hermann Weyl. With simple delight in "the machinery of existence" Wheeler exudes an enthusiasm that illuminates this collection. John Wheeler is one of the 20th century's most notable nuclear physicists and relativity theorists. In addition, he has played a leading role in research on pulsars, black holes, and nuclear reactor safety. Dr. Wheeler is Jan and Roland Blumberg Professor Emeritus at the University of Texas, Austin and Joseph Henry Professor of Physics Emeritus at Princeton University.

  17. [Verbal auditory agnosia: SPECT study of the brain].

    PubMed

    Carmona, C; Casado, I; Fernández-Rojas, J; Garín, J; Rayo, J I

    1995-01-01

    Verbal auditory agnosia are rare in clinical practice. Clinically, it characterized by impairment of comprehension and repetition of speech but reading, writing, and spontaneous speech are preserved. So it is distinguished from generalized auditory agnosia by the preserved ability to recognize non verbal sounds. We present the clinical picture of a forty-years-old, right handed woman who developed verbal auditory agnosic after an bilateral temporal ischemic infarcts due to atrial fibrillation by dilated cardiomyopathie. Neurophysiological studies by pure tone threshold audiometry: brainstem auditory evoked potentials and cortical auditory evoked potentials showed sparing of peripheral hearing and intact auditory pathway in brainstem but impaired cortical responses. Cranial CT-SCAN revealed two large hypodenses area involving both cortico-subcortical temporal lobes. Cerebral SPECT using 99mTc-HMPAO as radiotracer showed hypoperfusion just posterior in both frontal lobes nect to Roland's fissure and at level of bitemporal lobes just anterior to Sylvian's fissure. PMID:8556589

  18. Hydrodynamic simulations of microjetting from shock-loaded grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Caroline; de Resseguier, Thibaut; Sollier, Arnaud; Lescoute, Emilien; Soulard, Laurent; Loison, Didier

    2015-06-01

    The interaction of a shock wave with a free surface presenting geometrical defects, such as cavities or grooves, may lead to the ejection of micrometric debris at velocities of km/s order. This process can be involved in many applications, like pyrotechnics or industrial safety. Laser shock experiments reported in this conference (T. de Resseguier, C. Roland et al., abstract ref.000066) provide insight into jet formation and peak velocities for various groove angles and shock pressures. Here, we present hydrodynamic simulations of these experiments, in both 2D and 3D geometries, using both finite element method and smoothed particles hydrodynamics. Numerical results are compared to several theoretical predictions including the Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. The role of the elastic-plastic behavior on jet formation is investigated. Finally, the possibility to simulate the late stages of jet expansion and fragmentation is explored, to evaluate the mass distribution of the ejecta and their ballistic properties, still essentially unknown in the experiments.

  19. Airborne Wind Shear Detection and Warning Systems. Fourth Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan D. (Compiler); Bowles, Roland L. (Compiler); Passman, Robert H. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The Fourth Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference was hosted jointly by NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in Williamsburg, Virginia, on April 14-16, 1992. The meeting was co-chaired by Dr. Roland Bowles of LaRC and Bob Passman of the FAA. The purpose of the meeting was to transfer significant ongoing results of the NASA/FAA Joint Airborne Wind Shear Program to the technical industry and to pose problems of current concern to the combined group. It also provided a forum for manufacturers to review forward-look technology concepts and for technologists to gain an understanding of the problems encountered by the manufacturers during the development of airborne equipment and the FAA certification requirements. The present document has been compiled to record the essence of the technology updates and discussions which follow each.

  20. Neural mechanisms underlying auditory feedback control of speech

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Kevin J.; Guenther, Frank H.

    2013-01-01

    The neural substrates underlying auditory feedback control of speech were investigated using a combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and computational modeling. Neural responses were measured while subjects spoke monosyllabic words under two conditions: (i) normal auditory feedback of their speech, and (ii) auditory feedback in which the first formant frequency of their speech was unexpectedly shifted in real time. Acoustic measurements showed compensation to the shift within approximately 135 ms of onset. Neuroimaging revealed increased activity in bilateral superior temporal cortex during shifted feedback, indicative of neurons coding mismatches between expected and actual auditory signals, as well as right prefrontal and Rolandic cortical activity. Structural equation modeling revealed increased influence of bilateral auditory cortical areas on right frontal areas during shifted speech, indicating that projections from auditory error cells in posterior superior temporal cortex to motor correction cells in right frontal cortex mediate auditory feedback control of speech. PMID:18035557

  1. Benign nocturnal alternating hemiplegia of childhood: two cases with positive evolution.

    PubMed

    Villéga, Frédéric; Picard, Fabienne; Espil-Taris, Caroline; Husson, Marie; Michel, Véronique; Pedespan, Jean-Michel

    2011-06-01

    Benign nocturnal alternating hemiplegia (BNAH) of childhood is distinct from the classic form of malignant alternating hemiplegia of childhood [1]. It is characterized by hemiplegic attacks occurring exclusively during sleep [2]. It can be misdiagnosed as migraine, nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy, benign rolandic epilepsy, Panayiotopoulos syndrome, or sleep-related movement disorder [1-4]. Only nine patients have been described to date, with typically, a normal development [1,5-7]. In order to insist about the benignity of the affection, we report two cases: a new three-year-old boy suffering from BNAH and a patient already published to show positive evolution at fourteen years of age. BNAH is a rare disorder but may be underdiagnosed. Making an early diagnosis can help to describe to the parents the good prognosis without treatment. PMID:20817433

  2. Historical photogrammetry: Bird's Paluxy River dinosaur chase sequence digitally reconstructed as it was prior to excavation 70 years ago.

    PubMed

    Falkingham, Peter L; Bates, Karl T; Farlow, James O

    2014-01-01

    It is inevitable that some important specimens will become lost or damaged over time, conservation is therefore of vital importance. The Paluxy River dinosaur tracksite is among the most famous in the world. In 1940, Roland T. Bird described and excavated a portion of the site containing associated theropod and sauropod trackways. This excavated trackway was split up and housed in different institutions, and during the process a portion was lost or destroyed. We applied photogrammetric techniques to photographs taken by Bird over 70 years ago, before the trackway was removed, to digitally reconstruct the site as it was prior to excavation. The 3D digital model offers the opportunity to corroborate maps drawn by R.T. Bird when the tracksite was first described. More broadly, this work demonstrates the exciting potential for digitally recreating palaeontological, geological, or archaeological specimens that have been lost to science, but for which photographic documentation exists. PMID:24695537

  3. Five benefits of call recording for medical practices.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Despite documentation's essential positioning in medical practices of all sizes and specialties, one aspect of patient and insurance provider interaction remains overlooked in the majority of practices: telephone-based communication. In many cases, patient and payment information exchanged via telephone is logged with little more than a note typed or written in the patient file. This leads to "he said/she said" disagreements with regard to patient service, consultations, and coding; reduced payments from insurance providers; incomplete patient records; liability exposure; and a host of other problems. In this article, call recording professional Roland Murphy explains how a call recording solution can fill the gaps in documentation, increase practice revenues, and improve patient care without excessive investment costs and while protecting patient confidentiality. PMID:20480782

  4. Historical Photogrammetry: Bird's Paluxy River Dinosaur Chase Sequence Digitally Reconstructed as It Was prior to Excavation 70 Years Ago

    PubMed Central

    Falkingham, Peter L.; Bates, Karl T.; Farlow, James O.

    2014-01-01

    It is inevitable that some important specimens will become lost or damaged over time, conservation is therefore of vital importance. The Paluxy River dinosaur tracksite is among the most famous in the world. In 1940, Roland T. Bird described and excavated a portion of the site containing associated theropod and sauropod trackways. This excavated trackway was split up and housed in different institutions, and during the process a portion was lost or destroyed. We applied photogrammetric techniques to photographs taken by Bird over 70 years ago, before the trackway was removed, to digitally reconstruct the site as it was prior to excavation. The 3D digital model offers the opportunity to corroborate maps drawn by R.T. Bird when the tracksite was first described. More broadly, this work demonstrates the exciting potential for digitally recreating palaeontological, geological, or archaeological specimens that have been lost to science, but for which photographic documentation exists. PMID:24695537

  5. International Program and Local Organizing Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-12-01

    International Program Committee Dionisio Bermejo (Spain) Roman Ciurylo (Poland) Elisabeth Dalimier (France) Alexander Devdariani (Russia) Milan S Dimitrijevic (Serbia) Robert Gamache (USA) Marco A Gigosos (Spain) Motoshi Goto (Japan) Magnus Gustafsson (Sweden) Jean-Michel Hartmann (France) Carlos Iglesias (USA) John Kielkopf (USA) John C Lewis (Canada) Valery Lisitsa (Russia) Eugene Oks (USA) Christian G Parigger (USA) Gillian Peach (UK) Adriana Predoi-Cross (Canada) Roland Stamm (Germany) Local Organizing Committee Nikolay G Skvortsov (Chair, St Petersburg State University) Evgenii B Aleksandrov (Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, St Petersburg) Vadim A Alekseev (Scientific Secretary, St Petersburg State University) Sergey F Boureiko (St.Petersburg State University) Yury N Gnedin (Pulkovo Observatory, St Petersburg) Alexander Z Devdariani (Deputy Chair, St Petersburg State University) Alexander P Kouzov (Deputy Chair, St Petersburg State University) Nikolay A Timofeev (St Petersburg State University)

  6. The acute effect of music on interictal epileptiform discharges.

    PubMed

    Turner, Robert P

    2004-10-01

    This study was a prospective, randomized, single-blinded, crossover, placebo-controlled, pilot clinical trial investigating the effect of Mozart's Sonata for Two Pianos (K448) on the frequency of interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) from the EEGs of children with benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, or "rolandic" epilepsy. The goal was to demonstrate decreased frequency of IEDs with exposure to K448. Four subjects were recruited and 4-hour awake EEG recordings performed. IED frequency per minute was averaged over each of three epochs per hour. Mean IED count per epoch, standard deviations, and variance were calculated. Only complete waking epochs were analyzed. Two subjects demonstrated sufficient waking IEDs for statistical analysis, consisting of three epochs of K448-related effects. Significant decreases in IEDs per minute (33.7, 50.6, and 33.9%) were demonstrated comparing baseline with exposure to K448, but not to control music (Beethoven's Für Elise). PMID:15380117

  7. Langevin Simulation of Microstructure in Martensitic Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Lookman, T.; Shenoy, S. R.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A. R.

    1996-03-01

    We present a dynamical model to simulate microstructure in martensitic transformations within the context of shape memory alloys. The Hamiltonian of the system includes a triple-well potential (φ^6 model) in local shear strain, (2) strain gradient terms up to second order in strain and fourth order in gradient, and (3) all symmetry allowed compositional fluctuation induced strain gradient terms. We show the formation of twinned martensite below the transformation temperature and tweed precursors above the transformation temperature, as well as indications of hierarchical structures near the habit plane. These phases result from a competition between short range attraction and long range elastic repulsive forces. The long range interaction is incorporated via Fourier spectral methods as discussed by C. Roland and R.C.Desai [Phys. Rev. B 42, 6658 (1990)].

  8. Position specificity in Chitonomyces (Ascomycota, Laboulbeniomycetes) on Laccophilus (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae): a molecular approach resolves a century-old debate.

    PubMed

    Goldmann, Lauren; Weir, Alex

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of Laboulbeniomycete species consistently on a precise portion of beetle integument was investigated in 13 species of Chitonomyces ectoparasitic on the aquatic diving beetle Laccophilus maculosus (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae). The phenomenon was called "position specificity" by Roland Thaxter in 1896, yet the mechanism has remained unknown. By using molecular analysis of the nucSSU rRNA gene and the 5.8S and partial ITS1 rRNA regions, 13 species of Chitonomyces reported to exhibit position specificity on Laccophilus maculosus were placed neatly into pairs of morphotypes, resulting in synonomies and recognition of six phylogenetic species (one species is a triplet). Each phylogenetic species was located at corresponding positions on male and female beetles that make contact during mating. In addition, ecological data and video footage of the mating behaviors of Laccophilus confirmed that sexual transmission is the mechanism behind this enigmatic phenomenon. PMID:22684291

  9. Benign idiopathic partial epilepsy and brain lesion.

    PubMed

    Stephani, U; Doose, H

    1999-03-01

    A 14-year-old girl had severe head trauma from a dog bite at the age of 9 days. This resulted in extensive brain damage, tetraplegia, mental retardation, and epilepsy. The seizures were of rolandic type, and the EEG showed multifocal sharp waves. The course was benign. The initial diagnosis of a pure symptomatic epilepsy was revised after demonstrating typical benign focal sharp waves in the EEG of the healthy sister. Thus a phenocopy of a benign partial epilepsy by the brain lesion could be excluded with sufficient certainty. This observation allows the conclusion that the genetic disposition underlying the sharp-wave trait characteristic of benign partial epilepsies can be involved also in the pathogenesis of seemingly pure symptomatic epilepsies. EEG studies on siblings of such patients are needed to exclude possible phenocopies. PMID:10080522

  10. Airborne Wind Shear Detection and Warning Systems. Second Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spady, Amos A., Jr. (Compiler); Bowles, Roland L. (Compiler); Schlickenmaier, Herbert (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    The Second Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference was hosted jointly by NASA Langley (LaRC) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in Williamsburg, Virginia, on October 18 to 20, 1988. The meeting was co-chaired by Dr. Roland Bowles of LaRC and Herbrt Schlickenmaier of the FAA. The purpose of the meeting was to transfer significant, ongoing results gained during the second year of the joint NASA/FAA Airborne Wind Shear Program to the technical industry and to pose problems of current concern to the combined group. It also provided a forum for manufacturers to review forward-look technology concepts and for technologists to gain an understanding of the problems encountered by the manufacturers during the development of airborne equipment and the FAA certification requirements.

  11. And to end on a poetic note: Galen’s authorial strategies in the pharmacological books

    PubMed Central

    Totelin, Laurence M.V.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the authorial strategies deployed by Galen in his two main pharmacological treatises devoted to compound remedies: Composition of Medicines according to Types and Composition of Medicines according to Places. Some of Galen’s methods of self assertion (use of the first person; writing of prefaces) are conventional. Others have not received much attention from scholars. Thus, here, I examine Galen’s borrowing of his sources’ ‘I’; his use of the phrase ‘in these words’; and his recourse to Damocrates’ verse to conclude pharmacological books. I argue that Galen’s authorial persona is very different from that of the modern author as defined by Roland Barthes. Galen imitates and impersonates his pharmacological sources. This re-enactment becomes a way to gain experience (peira) of remedies and guarantees their efficacy.

  12. Session: Program Review X Wrap-Up

    SciTech Connect

    1992-01-01

    This wrap-up session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of Closing Remarks by Roland R. Kessler and six NGA Industry Critique Panel presentations: ''Summary of Comments on DOE-Industry Cooperation by Geothermal Industry Panel'' by James B. Koenig, GeothermEx, Inc.; ''NGA Industry Critique of the Exploration Component'' by Joe L. Iovenitti, Weiss Associates; ''Critique of Drilling Research'' by Jerry Hamblin, UNOCAL Geothermal; ''Critique Panel Comments on Reservoir Engineering, DOE Geothermal Technology Development'' by Dennis Kaspereit, California Energy Company, Inc.; ''DOE Geothermal Program Review - Critique on Production'' by Douglas B. Jung, Two-Phase Engineering and Research; ''Comments on the DOE Hydrothermal Energy Conversion R&D Program'' by David L. Mendive, Geothermal Development Associates.

  13. Cognitive Expertise: An ALE Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Nicola; Lotze, Martin; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2016-01-01

    Expert performance constitutes the endpoint of skill acquisition and is accompanied by widespread neuroplastic changes. To reveal common mechanisms of reorganization associated with long-term expertise in a cognitive domain (mental calculation, chess, language, memory, music without motor involvement), we used activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis and compared brain activation of experts to nonexperts. Twenty-six studies matched inclusion criteria, most of which reported an increase and not a decrease of activation foci in experts. Increased activation occurred in the left rolandic operculum (OP 4) and left primary auditory cortex and in bilateral premotor cortex in studies that used auditory stimulation. In studies with visual stimulation, experts showed enhanced activation in the right inferior parietal cortex (area PGp) and the right lingual gyrus. Experts' brain activation patterns seem to be characterized by enhanced or additional activity in domain-specific primary, association, and motor structures, confirming that learning is localized and very specialized. PMID:26467981

  14. Dilatancy Strengthening As a Mechanism for Earthquake Rupture Barriers and Aseismic Creep Transients on Oceanic Transform Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; McGuire, J. J.; Behn, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Ocean bottom seismometer deployments along the Gofar, Quebrada and Discovery transform faults on the East Pacific Rise (EPR) have revealed strong along-strike variation in M6 earthquake rupture extents and earthquake swarm activity. An active-source refraction survey along the ~ 100-km-long western segment of Gofar found a ~ 10-km-long zone of ~ 10-20% P wave velocity reduction, which extends from the surface to the Moho and acted as a "barrier" to previous cycles of M6 ruptures [McGuire et al., 2012; Roland et al., 2012]. The low velocity zone is interpreted to result primarily from enhanced fault zone porosity. That this region appears to behave as a rupture barrier is interesting from a fault frictional point of view because it nucleates intense microseismicity and hence has velocity-weakening (unstable slip) characteristics. In this study, we use a 3D strike-slip fault model with rate-state friction to investigate how the presence of a high-porosity, strong dilatancy zone embedded in a velocity-weakening transform fault could lead to a persistent earthquake rupture barrier. Rate-state frictional parameters are based on experimental results on gabbro gouge under hydrothermal conditions, and constrained by the tomoDD relocation of seismicity on Gofar [Froment et al., 2014]. Our modeling results reproduce the ~ 5 year recurrence interval of M6 earthquakes on two ~ 20-km-long fault segments separated by a ~ 10 km zone with effective dilatancy strengthening. A stronger dilatancy effect leads to a lower seismic coupling coefficient in the barrier zone. The release of energy in the barrier zone is manifested in various forms of aseismic deformation, including postseismic slip and interseismic slow slip events. The modeled slow slip migration speed and equivalent stress drop are comparable to those estimated from earthquake swarms on transform faults [Roland and McGuire, 2009], and suggests that such swarm activity is primarily driven by aseismic transient slip events.

  15. The 27-item Coping Strategies Questionnaire – Revised: Confirmatory factor analysis, reliability and validity in Italian-speaking subjects with chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Monticone, Marco; Ferrante, Simona; Giorgi, Ines; Galandra, Caterina; Rocca, Barbara; Foti, Calogero

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasing attention is being devoted to cognitive-behavioural measures to improve interventions for chronic pain. OBJECTIVE: To develop an Italian version of the Coping Strategies Questionnaire – Revised (CSQ-R), and to validate it in a study involving 345 Italian subjects with chronic pain. METHODS: The questionnaire was developed following international recommendations. The psychometric analyses included confirmatory factor analysis; reliability, assessed by internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha) and test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients); and construct validity, assessed by calculating the correlations between the subscales of the CSQ-R and measures of pain (numerical rating scale), disability (Sickness Impact Profile – Roland Scale), depression (Center for Epidemiological Studies – Depression Scale) and coping (Chronic Pain Coping Inventory) (Pearson’s correlation). RESULTS: Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the CSQ-R model had an acceptable data-model fit (comparative fit index and normed fit index ≤0.90, root mean square error of approximation ≥0.08). Cronbach’s alpha was satisfactory (CSQ-R 0.914 to 0.961), and the intraclass correlation coefficients were good/excellent (CSQ-R 0.850 to 0.918). As expected, the correlations with the numerical rating scale, Sickness Impact Profile – Roland Scale, Center for Epidemiological Studies – Depression Scale and Chronic Pain Coping Inventory highlighted the adaptive and maladaptive properties of most of the CSQ-R subscales. CONCLUSION: The CSQ-R was successfully translated into Italian. The translation proved to have good factorial structure, and its psychometric properties are similar to those of the original and other adapted versions. Its use is recommended for clinical and research purposes in Italy and abroad. PMID:24761430

  16. The usefulness of ICG video angiography in the surgical treatment of superior cluneal nerve entrapment neuropathy: technical note.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyongsong; Isu, Toyohiko; Chiba, Yasuhiro; Morimoto, Daijiro; Ohtsubo, Seiji; Kusano, Mitsuo; Kobayashi, Shiro; Morita, Akio

    2013-11-01

    Superior cluneal nerve (SCN) entrapment neuropathy is a known cause of low back pain. Although surgical release at the entrapment point of the osteofibrous orifice is effective, intraoperative identification of the thin SCN in thick fat tissue and confirmation of sufficient decompression are difficult. Intraoperative indocyanine green video angiography (ICG-VA) is simple, clearly demonstrates the vascular flow dynamics, and provides real-time information on vascular patency and flow. The peripheral nerve is supplied from epineurial vessels around the nerve (vasa nervorum), and the authors now present the first ICG-VA documentation of the technique and usefulness of peripheral nerve neurolysis surgery to treat SCN entrapment neuropathy in 16 locally anesthetized patients. Clinical outcomes were assessed with the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire before surgery and at the latest follow-up after surgery. Indocyanine green video angiography was useful for identifying the SCN in fat tissue. It showed that the SCN penetrated and was entrapped by the thoracolumbar fascia through the orifice just before crossing over the iliac crest in all patients. The SCN was decompressed by dissection of the fascia from the orifice. Indocyanine green video angiography visualized the SCN and its termination at the entrapment point. After sufficient decompression, the SCN was clearly visualized on ICG-VA images. Low back pain improved significantly, from a preoperative Roland-Morris Questionnaire score of 13.8 to a postoperative score of 1.3 at the last follow-up visit (p < 0.05). The authors suggest that ICG-VA is useful for the inspection of peripheral nerves such as the SCN and helps to identify the SCN and to confirm sufficient decompression at surgery for SCN entrapment. PMID:24053371

  17. Seventeenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1992-01-31

    PREFACE The Seventeenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 29-31, 1992. There were one hundred sixteen registered participants which equaled the attendance last year. Participants were from seven foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Mexico and New Zealand. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in the papers. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Raffaele Cataldi. Dr. Cataldi gave a talk on the highlights of his geothermal career. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Cataldi. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award at the banquet. Thirty-eight papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Dr. Roland Horne opened the meeting and the key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who discussed the DOE Geothermal R. & D. Program. The talk focused on aiding long-term, cost effective private resource development. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: geochemistry, hot dry rock, injection, geysers, modeling, and reservoir mechanics. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: Sabodh Garg., Jim Lovekin, Jim Combs, Ben Barker, Marcel Lippmann, Glenn Horton, Steve Enedy, and John Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to Francois Groff who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook -vii

  18. Efficacy and safety of tanezumab in the treatment of chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Katz, Nathaniel; Borenstein, David G; Birbara, Charles; Bramson, Candace; Nemeth, Mary Anne; Smith, Mike D; Brown, Mark T

    2011-10-01

    Increased nerve growth factor levels are associated with chronic pain conditions, including chronic low back pain (LBP). This study examined safety and analgesic efficacy of tanezumab, a humanized anti-nerve growth factor antibody, in adults with chronic LBP. Patients received intravenous tanezumab 200 μg/kg plus oral placebo (n=88), intravenous placebo plus oral naproxen 500 mg twice a day (n=88), or intravenous placebo plus oral placebo (n=41). Primary outcome was average LBP intensity (aLBPI) at Week 6. Secondary outcomes were proportion of patients with ≥30% or ≥50% reduction in aLBPI, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire and Brief Pain Inventory-short form scores, Patients' Global Assessment of LBP, Patients' Global Evaluation of study medication, and rescue medication use. Mean aLBPI change from baseline to Week 6 was greater with tanezumab vs naproxen (P=0.004) and placebo (P<0.001). Greater proportions of patients reported ≥30% and ≥50% reduction in aLBPI with tanezumab vs naproxen (P≤0.013) and placebo (P<0.001), and greater improvements in Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (P<0.001) and other secondary outcomes except rescue medication use. Tanezumab was associated with adverse events (AEs) of abnormal peripheral sensation that were generally mild and resolved before study completion; however, there were no serious AEs. Nine patients (4 of whom were tanezumab-treated) discontinued due to AEs. In conclusion, tanezumab resulted in analgesic efficacy that was clinically and statistically superior to placebo and naproxen in patients with chronic LBP. Tanezumab clinical development is on regulatory hold due to AEs in osteoarthritis patients. PMID:21696889

  19. Convolution and non convolution Perfectly Matched Layer techniques optimized at grazing incidence for high-order wave propagation modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Roland; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Bruthiaux, Emilien; Gedney, Stephen D.

    2010-05-01

    by 40% in 2D comparing to the GFPML split formulation of [4]. Examples of waves propagating in heterogeneous thin slices in presence of free surface are shown. We also applied this CPML technique to more complex models like poroelastic [5] or viscoelastic [6] media based on a fourth-order staggered finite-difference method. For the two-dimensional Biot poroelastic equations we show its efficiency for both non dissipative and dissipative Biot porous models. For the three-dimensional viscoelastic seismic wave equation, the time marching equations of the standard linear solid mechanisms used do not need to be split and only the memory variables associated with velocity derivatives are stored at each time step. In the case of more than one damping mechanism, we are able to reduce memory storage by more than 70% in the PML regions in 3D simulations compared to split PMLs optimized at grazing incidence. Benchmarks of the CPML technique have been validated in poroelastic or viscoelastic thin mesh slices. These unsplit CPMLs are usually computed based on a second-order finite-difference time scheme. However, in many situations like very long time simulations, it is of interest to increase the accuracy of the method by increasing the order of the time marching and spatial discretizations. The CPML is not able to be increased at high orders because of its convolution formulation. In [7] we study then how to build a new unsplit PML (ADE-PML/Auxiliary Differential Equations PML) that remains optimized at grazing incidence based on a high-order time scheme like the fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme. At second order in time we demonstrate that CPML and ADE-PML are equivalent. At second or high order discretization in time, explicit and semi-implicit solutions can be obtained with very good accuracy. References [1]Dimitri Komatitsch and Roland Martin. An unsplit convolutional Perfectly Matched Layer improved at grazing incidence for the differential anisotropic elastic wave equation

  20. 3D model of radionuclide dispersion in coastal areas with multifraction cohesive and non-cohesive sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovchenko, Igor; Maderich, Vladimir; Jung, Kyung Tae

    2015-04-01

    We developed new radionuclide dispersion model that may be used in coastal areas, rivers and estuaries with non-uniform distribution of suspended and bed sediments both cohesive and non-cohesive types. Model describes radionuclides concentration in dissolved phase in water column, particulated phase on suspended sediments on each sediment class types, bed sediments and pore water. The transfer of activity between the water column and the pore water in the upper layer of the bottom sediment is governed by diffusion processes. The phase exchange between dissolved and particulate radionuclides is written in terms of desorption rate a12 (s-1) and distribution coefficient Kd,iw and Kd,ib (m3/kg) for water column and for bottom deposit, respectively. Following (Periáñez et al., 1996) the dependence of distribution coefficients is inversely proportional to the sediment particle size. For simulation of 3D circulation, turbulent diffusion and wave fields a hydrostatic model SELFE (Roland et. al. 2010) that solves Reynolds-stress averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations and Wave Action transport equation on the unstructured grids was used. Simulation of suspended sediment concentration and bed sediments composition is based on (L. Pinto et. al., 2012) approach that originally was developed for non-cohesive sediments. In present study we modified this approach to include possibility of simulating mixture of cohesive and non-cohesive sediments by implementing parameterizations for erosion and deposition fluxes for cohesive sediments and by implementing flocculation model for determining settling velocity of cohesive flocs. Model of sediment transport was calibrated on measurements in the Yellow Sea which is shallow tidal basin with strongly non-uniform distribution of suspended and bed sediments. Model of radionuclide dispersion was verified on measurements of 137Cs concentration in surface water and bed sediments after Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. References Peri

  1. The SNAP trial: a double blind multi-center randomized controlled trial of a silicon nitride versus a PEEK cage in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in patients with symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disorders: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages have been widely used in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disc disorders, and show good clinical results. Still, complications such as subsidence and migration of the cage are frequently seen. A lack of osteointegration and fibrous tissues surrounding PEEK cages are held responsible. Ceramic implants made of silicon nitride show better biocompatible and osteoconductive qualities, and therefore are expected to lower complication rates and allow for better fusion. Purpose of this study is to show that fusion with the silicon nitride cage produces non-inferior results in outcome of the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire at all follow-up time points as compared to the same procedure with PEEK cages. Methods/Design This study is designed as a double blind multi-center randomized controlled trial with repeated measures analysis. 100 patients (18–75 years) presenting with symptomatic lumbar degenerative disorders unresponsive to at least 6 months of conservative treatment are included. Patients will be randomly assigned to a PEEK cage or a silicon nitride cage, and will undergo a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation. Primary outcome measure is the functional improvement measured by the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. Secondary outcome parameters are the VAS leg, VAS back, SF-36, Likert scale, neurological outcome and radiographic assessment of fusion. After 1 year the fusion rate will be measured by radiograms and CT. Follow-up will be continued for 2 years. Patients and clinical observers who will perform the follow-up visits will be blinded for type of cage used during follow-up. Analyses of radiograms and CT will be performed independently by two experienced radiologists. Discussion In this study a PEEK cage will be compared with a silicon nitride cage in the treatment of symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disorders. To our knowledge, this is the first randomized controlled

  2. Low back pain: what determines functional outcome at six months? An observational study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The rise in disability due to back pain has been exponential with escalating medical and societal costs. The relative contribution of individual prognostic indicators to the pattern of recovery remains unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the prognostic value of demographic, psychosocial, employment and clinical factors on outcome in patients with low back pain Methods A prospective cohort study with six-month follow-up was undertaken at a multidisciplinary back pain clinic in central London employing physiotherapists, osteopaths, clinical psychologists and physicians, receiving referrals from 123 general practitioners. Over a twelve-month period, 593 consecutive patients referred from general practice with simple low back pain were recruited. A baseline questionnaire was developed to elicit information on potential prognostic variables. The primary outcome measures were change in 24-item Roland Morris disability questionnaire score at six months as a measure of low back related functional disability and the physical functioning scale of the SF-36, adjusted for baseline scores. Results Roland Morris scores improved by 3.8 index points (95% confidence interval 3.23 to 4.32) at six months and SF-36 physical functioning score by 10.7 points (95% confidence interval 8.36 to 12.95). Ten factors were linked to outcome yet in a multiple regression model only two remained predictive. Those with episodic rather than continuous pain were more likely to have recovered at six months (odds ratio 2.64 confidence interval 1.25 to 5.60), while those that classified themselves as non-white were less likely to have recovered (0.41 confidence interval 0.18 to 0.96). Conclusions Analysis controlling for confounding variables, demonstrated that participants showed greater improvement if their episodes of pain during the previous year were short-lived while those with Middle Eastern, North African and Chinese ethnicity demonstrated minimal improvement. The

  3. Sixteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1991-01-25

    The Sixteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 23-25, 1991. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Mohinder Gulati of UNOCAL Geothermal. Dr. Gulati gave an inspiring talk on the impact of numerical simulation on development of geothermal energy both in The Geysers and the Philippines. Dr. Gulati was the first recipient of The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award. The registered attendance figure of one hundred fifteen participants was up slightly from last year. There were seven foreign countries represented: Iceland, Italy, Philippines, Kenya, the United Kingdom, Mexico, and Japan. As last year, papers on about a dozen geothermal fields outside the United States were presented. There were thirty-six papers presented at the Workshop, and two papers were submitted for publication only. Attendees were welcomed by Dr. Khalid Aziz, Chairman of the Petroleum Engineering Department at Stanford. Opening remarks were presented by Dr. Roland Horne, followed by a discussion of the California Energy Commission's Geothermal Activities by Barbara Crowley, Vice Chairman; and J.E. ''Ted'' Mock's presentation of the DOE Geothermal Program: New Emphasis on Industrial Participation. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: hot dry rock, geochemistry, tracer injection, field performance, modeling, and chemistry/gas. As in previous workshops, session chairpersons made major contributions to the program. Special thanks are due to Joel Renner, Jeff Tester, Jim Combs, Kathy Enedy, Elwood Baldwin, Sabodh Garg, Marcel0 Lippman, John Counsil, and Eduardo Iglesias. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Angharad Jones, Rosalee Benelli, Jeanne Mankinen, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes

  4. Estimating the number needed to treat from continuous outcomes in randomised controlled trials: methodological challenges and worked example using data from the UK Back Pain Exercise and Manipulation (BEAM) trial

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Reporting numbers needed to treat (NNT) improves interpretability of trial results. It is unusual that continuous outcomes are converted to numbers of individual responders to treatment (i.e., those who reach a particular threshold of change); and deteriorations prevented are only rarely considered. We consider how numbers needed to treat can be derived from continuous outcomes; illustrated with a worked example showing the methods and challenges. Methods We used data from the UK BEAM trial (n = 1, 334) of physical treatments for back pain; originally reported as showing, at best, small to moderate benefits. Participants were randomised to receive 'best care' in general practice, the comparator treatment, or one of three manual and/or exercise treatments: 'best care' plus manipulation, exercise, or manipulation followed by exercise. We used established consensus thresholds for improvement in Roland-Morris disability questionnaire scores at three and twelve months to derive NNTs for improvements and for benefits (improvements gained+deteriorations prevented). Results At three months, NNT estimates ranged from 5.1 (95% CI 3.4 to 10.7) to 9.0 (5.0 to 45.5) for exercise, 5.0 (3.4 to 9.8) to 5.4 (3.8 to 9.9) for manipulation, and 3.3 (2.5 to 4.9) to 4.8 (3.5 to 7.8) for manipulation followed by exercise. Corresponding between-group mean differences in the Roland-Morris disability questionnaire were 1.6 (0.8 to 2.3), 1.4 (0.6 to 2.1), and 1.9 (1.2 to 2.6) points. Conclusion In contrast to small mean differences originally reported, NNTs were small and could be attractive to clinicians, patients, and purchasers. NNTs can aid the interpretation of results of trials using continuous outcomes. Where possible, these should be reported alongside mean differences. Challenges remain in calculating NNTs for some continuous outcomes. Trial Registration UK BEAM trial registration: ISRCTN32683578. PMID:19519911

  5. Reduction in Pain and Inflammation Associated With Chronic Low Back Pain With the Use of the Medical Food Theramine.

    PubMed

    Shell, William E; Pavlik, Stephanie; Roth, Brandon; Silver, Michael; Breitstein, Mira L; May, Lawrence; Silver, David

    2014-09-18

    Management of chronic back pain is a challenge for physicians. Although standard treatments exert a modest effect, they are associated with narcotic addiction and serious side effects from nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents. Moreover, neurotransmitter depletion from both the pain syndrome and therapy may contribute to a poor treatment outcome. Neurotransmitter deficiency may be related both to increased turnover rate and inadequate neurotransmitter precursors from the diet, particularly for essential and semi-essential amino acids. Theramine, an amino acid blend 68405-1 (AAB), is a physician-prescribed only medical food. It contains neurotransmitter precursors and systems for increasing production and preventing attenuation of neurotransmitters. A double-blind controlled study of AAB, low-dose ibuprofen, and the coadministration of the 2 agents were performed. The primary end points included the Roland Morris index and Oswestry disability scale. The cohort included 122 patients aged between 18 and 75 years. The patients were randomized to 1 of 3 groups: AAB alone, ibuprofen alone, and the coadministration of the 2 agents. In addition, C-reactive protein, interleukin 6, and plasma amino acid concentrations were measured at baseline and 28 days time points. After treatment, the Oswestry Disability Index worsened by 4.52% in the ibuprofen group, improved 41.91% in the AAB group, and improved 62.15% in the combination group. The Roland Morris Index worsened by 0.73% in the ibuprofen group, improved by 50.3% in the AAB group, and improved 63.1% in the combination group. C-reactive protein in the ibuprofen group increased by 60.1%, decreased by 47.1% in the AAB group, and decreased by 36% in the combination group. Similar changes were seen in interleukin 6. Arginine, serine, histidine, and tryptophan levels were substantially reduced before treatment in the chronic pain syndrome and increased toward normal during treatment. There was a direct correlation between

  6. YOGA FOR CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN IN A PREDOMINANTLY MINORITY POPULATION: A PILOT RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Robert B.; Sherman, Karen J.; Cullum-Dugan, Diana; Davis, Roger B.; Phillips, Russell S.; Culpepper, Larry

    2009-01-01

    Background Several studies suggest yoga may be effective for chronic low back pain; however, trials targeting minorities have not been conducted. Primary Study Objectives Assess the feasibility of studying yoga in a predominantly minority population with chronic low back pain. Collect preliminary data to plan a larger powered study. Study Design Pilot randomized controlled trial. Setting Two community health centers in a racially diverse neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. Participants Thirty English-speaking adults (mean age 44 years, 83% female, 83% racial/ethnic minorities; 48% with incomes ≤$30000) with moderate-to-severe chronic low back pain. Interventions Standardized series of weekly hatha yoga classes for 12 weeks compared to a waitlist usual care control. Outcome Measures Feasibility measured by time to complete enrollment, proportion of racial/ethnic minorities enrolled, retention rates, and adverse events. Primary efficacy outcomes were changes from baseline to 12 weeks in pain score (0=no pain to 10=worst possible pain) and back-related function using the modified Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (0–23 point scale, higher scores reflect poorer function). Secondary efficacy outcomes were analgesic use, global improvement, and quality of life (SF-36). Results Recruitment took 2 months. Retention rates were 97% at 12 weeks and 77% at 26 weeks. Mean pain scores for yoga decreased from baseline to 12 weeks (6.7 to 4.4) compared to usual care, which decreased from 7.5 to 7.1 (P=.02). Mean Roland scores for yoga decreased from 14.5 to 8.2 compared to usual care, which decreased from 16.1 to 12.5 (P=.28). At 12 weeks, yoga compared to usual care participants reported less analgesic use (13% vs 73%, P=.003), less opiate use (0% vs 33%, P=.04), and greater overall improvement (73% vs 27%, P=.03). There were no differences in SF-36 scores and no serious adverse events. Conclusion A yoga study intervention in a predominantly minority population with

  7. Nineteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1994-01-20

    PREFACE The Nineteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 18-20, 1994. This workshop opened on a sad note because of the death of Prof. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. on November 19, 1993. Hank had been fighting leukemia for a long time and finally lost the battle. Many of the workshop participants were present for the celebration of his life on January 21 at Stanford's Memorial Church. Hank was one of the founders of the Stanford Geothermal Program and the Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Workshop. His energy, kindness, quick wit, and knowledge will long be missed at future workshops. Following the Preface we have included a copy of the Memorial Resolution passed by the Stanford University Senate. There were one hundred and four registered participants. Participants were from ten foreign countries: Costa Rica, England, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines and Turkey. Workshop papers described the performance of fourteen geothermal fields outside the United States. Roland N. Home opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a presentation about the future of geothermal development. The banquet speaker was Jesus Rivera and he spoke about Energy Sources of Central American Countries. Forty two papers were presented at the Workshop. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: sciences, injection, production, modeling, and adsorption. Session chairmen are an important part of the workshop and our thanks go to: John Counsil, Mark Walters, Dave Duchane, David Faulder, Gudmundur Bodvarsson, Jim Lovekin, Joel Renner, and Iraj Ershaghi. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual

  8. A voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis of regional grey and white matter volume abnormalities within the speech production network of children who stutter

    PubMed Central

    Beal, Deryk S.; Gracco, Vincent L.; Brettschneider, Jane; Kroll, Robert M.; De Nil, Luc F.

    2012-01-01

    It is well documented that neuroanatomical differences exist between adults who stutter and their fluently speaking peers. Specifically, adults who stutter have been found to have more grey matter volume (GMV) in speech relevant regions including inferior frontal gyrus, insula and superior temporal gyrus (Beal et al., 2007; Song et al., 2007). Despite stuttering having its onset in childhood only one study has investigated the neuroanatomical differences between children who do and do not stutter. Chang et al. (2008) reported children who stutter had less GMV in the bilateral inferior frontal gyri and middle temporal gyrus relative to fluently speaking children. Thus it appears that children who stutter present with unique neuroanatomical abnormalities as compared to those of adults who stutter. In order to better understand the neuroanatomical correlates of stuttering earlier in its development, near the time of onset, we used voxel-based morphometry to examine volumetric differences between 11 children who stutter and 11 fluent children. Children who stutter had less GMV in the bilateral inferior frontal gyri and left putamen but more GMV in right Rolandic operculum and superior temporal gyrus relative to fluent children. Children who stutter also had less white matter volume bilaterally in the forceps minor of the corpus callosum. We discuss our findings of widespread anatomic abnormalities throughout the cortical network for speech motor control within the context of the speech motor skill limitations identified in people who stutter (Namasivayam and van Lieshout, 2008; Smits-Bandstra et al., 2006). PMID:23140891

  9. Is v3 necessary or even informative in describing angular correlation data from RHIC and the LHC?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Lanny; Trainor, Thomas; Prindle, Duncan

    2013-10-01

    One of the more interesting observations from the heavy-ion program at RHIC and now at the LHC are long-range correlations on relative pseudorapidity at small azimuth opening angles. In 2010 Alver and Roland suggested that this so-called same-side ridge could be explained in terms of higher-order, azimuth cosine distributions generated by event-wise energy density fluctuations in the initial-state plus hydrodynamic flow. Applications of third- and higher-order harmonics in analysis of angular correlations from heavy-ion collisions have become ubiquitous in the literature. However, we question the introduction of ``higher harmonics'' to the 2D data description. Extending previous work we examine the necessity and utility of v3. We find that the net effect of v3 is to accommodate minor non-Gaussian structure in the same-side 2D peak for pt-integral correlations from RHIC. A single Gaussian hypothesis for those data is not falsified within statistics. Model ambiguities and instabilities resulting from v3 are discussed and resolved. Lastly, we demonstrate that the 0-1% angular correlation data for 2.76 TeV Pb-Pb collisions from ATLAS do not require a v3 component. Supported in part by the U.S. Dept. of Energy.

  10. Auricular Point Acupressure to Manage Chronic Low Back Pain in Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Morone, Natalia E.; Cao, Yuling; Shen, Juan; Bhatnagar, Shreya; Liang, Zhan; Glick, Ronald M.; Suen, Lorna Kwai-Ping

    2014-01-01

    This prospective, randomized clinical trial (RCT) pilot study was designed to (1) assess the feasibility and tolerability of an easily administered, auricular point acupressure (APA) intervention and (2) provide an initial assessment of effect size as compared to a sham treatment. Thirty-seven subjects were randomized to receive either the real or sham APA treatment. All participants were treated once a week for 4 weeks. Self-report measures were obtained at baseline, weekly during treatment, at end-of-intervention (EOI), and at a 1-month follow-up. A dropout rate of 26% in the real APA group and 50% in the sham group was observed. The reduction in worst pain from baseline to EOI was 41% for the real and 5% for the sham group with a Cohen's effect size of 1.22 (P < 0.00). Disability scores on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) decreased in the real group by 29% and were unchanged in the sham group (+3%) (P < 0.00). Given the high dropout rate, results must be interpreted with caution; nevertheless, our results suggest that APA may provide an inexpensive and effective complementary approach for the management of back pain in older adults, and further study is warranted. PMID:25147574

  11. Work-Related Low Back Pain Treatment: A Randomized Controlled Trial from Tehran, Iran, Comparing Multidisciplinary Educational Program versus Physiotherapy Education

    PubMed Central

    Ghadyani, Leila; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan; Wagner, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Clinical trial. Purpose To compare the multidisciplinary educational program versus physiotherapy education among Iranian nurses. Overview of Literature Low back pain (LBP) can accompany significant occupational injuries in the nursing profession. There is no agreement on the most effective educational practice. Methods This study was conducted from August 17, 2014 to September 22, 2014 in Tehran, Iran. Eligible nurses with chronic mechanical LBP (n=136) were classified into an intervention group (n=66) or the control group (n=70). The intervention group received physiotherapy education for 120-minutes followed by a 120-minute health education session based on predictive constructs of social cognitive theory (SCT). The control group received the 120-minute physiotherapy education. Disability rate, pain severity and back pain prevention behavior were measured at initially and 3 months after intervention using visual analogue scale, Roland-Morris disability questionnaire and nursing low back pain preventive behaviors questionnaire. Results The two groups were the same in terms of all studied variables at the initiation of the study. At the 3-month follow up, predictive constructs of LBP preventive behaviors of participants in the intervention were improved (p<0.001). Significant decreases were evident at 3 months in pain severity (p=0.03) and disability (p=0.003). Conclusions The designed multidisciplinary educational intervention could decrease chronic mechanical LBP in nurses. PMID:27559449

  12. Coping with sickle cell disease: a profile and perspective of a pioneer self-help group.

    PubMed

    Duncan, D E; Scott, R B

    1988-02-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a chronic, debilitating disease that is passed genetically from generation to generation. It is a disease marked by periods of well-being and crisis, and it has a profound effect on all bodily organs, shortening the lifespan of its victims. The disease also has far-reaching effects on family functioning and relationships. Support for affected families and individuals is therefore a vital component of any management regimen.In the 1960s, the idea for the Association for Sickle Cell Anemia Research (ASCAR) was implemented. The group was spearheaded by Dr. Roland B. Scott and Dr. Angella Ferguson, both of whom were members of the Department of Pediatrics at Freedmen's Hospital (now Howard University Hospital).This group was perhaps the first of its kind, and adopted as its goals education and family support as well as fund-raising to aid in the support of research. This article provides an overview of the development of this group, its organization and activities, as well as an appraisal of its accomplishments. It also offers specific suggestions for formulating similar groups. PMID:3241309

  13. Functional capacity and its associated factors in the elderly with low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Roger; de Conti, Marta Helena Souza; Quintino, Natasha Mendonça; Gatti, Marcia Aparecida Nuevo; Simeão, Sandra Fiorelli Almeida Penteado; de Vitta, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the level of functional capacity in subjects aged 60 years and older, who have lower back pain, and its association with demographic, socioeconomic, work-related, lifestyle-related and disease mentioned variables. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted with 246 elderly registered at the Family Health Strategy of Vila São Paulo, Bauru,SP, Brazil, who reported lower back pain and were sampled by a two-stage cluster technique. The subjects were interviewed at home by using a multidimensional instrument (demographic; socioeconomic aspects; life style; work characterization; disease mentioned), and also the IPAQ, the Nordic and the Roland Morris questionnaires. A bivariate and multivariate descriptive logistic regression analysis was carried out. RESULTS: The prevalence of lower back pain in men was of 25.1% and in women it was of 35.1%. The mean score in the functional capacity assessment was 10.46 ± 5.62. A fraction of 67.5% of the elderly demonstrated an inappropriate functional capacity. The age group from 70 to 80 years old, the subjects reporting three or more diseases and the sedentary group presented an independent association with inappropriate functional capacity. CONCLUSION: The older, sedentary subjects and who reported more than three diseases presented low functional capacity. Level of Evidence III, Cross Sectioning. PMID:25538473

  14. Pain intensity, disability and depression in individuals with chronic back pain1

    PubMed Central

    Garbi, Márcia de Oliveira Sakamoto Silva; Hortense, Priscilla; Gomez, Rodrigo Ramon Falconi; da Silva, Talita de Cássia Raminelli; Castanho, Ana Carolina Ferreira; Sousa, Fátima Aparecida Emm Faleiros

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to measure the pain intensity, identify the disability and depression levels in people with chronic back pain and to correlate these variables. A cross-sectional, descriptive and exploratory study was undertaken at the Pain Treatment Clinic of the University of São Paulo at Ribeirão Preto Hospital das Clínicas, between February and June 2012, after receiving approval from the Ethics Committee at the University of São Paulo at Ribeirão Preto College of Nursing. METHOD: sixty subjects with chronic back pain participated. The instruments used were: the 11-point Numerical Category Scale, the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory. To analyze the data, the arithmetic means, standard deviations and Spearman's correlation coefficient were calculated. RESULTS: the findings show that the participants presented high pain, disability and depression levels. The correlation between pain intensity and disability and between pain intensity and depression was positive and weak and, between disability and depression, positive and moderate. CONCLUSION: the study variables showed moderate and weak indices and the mutual correlations were positive. PMID:25296139

  15. Aberrant functional brain connectome in people with antisocial personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan; Long, Jun; Wang, Wei; Liao, Jian; Xie, Hua; Zhao, Guihu; Zhang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is characterised by a disregard for social obligations and callous unconcern for the feelings of others. Studies have demonstrated that ASPD is associated with abnormalities in brain regions and aberrant functional connectivity. In this paper, topological organisation was examined in resting-state fMRI data obtained from 32 ASPD patients and 32 non-ASPD controls. The frequency-dependent functional networks were constructed using wavelet-based correlations over 90 brain regions. The topology of the functional networks of ASPD subjects was analysed via graph theoretical analysis. Furthermore, the abnormal functional connectivity was determined with a network-based statistic (NBS) approach. Our results revealed that, compared with the controls, the ASPD patients exhibited altered topological configuration of the functional connectome in the frequency interval of 0.016-0.031 Hz, as indicated by the increased clustering coefficient and decreased betweenness centrality in the medial superior frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, Rolandic operculum, superior parietal gyrus, angular gyrus, and middle temporal pole. In addition, the ASPD patients showed increased functional connectivity mainly located in the default-mode network. The present study reveals an aberrant topological organisation of the functional brain network in individuals with ASPD. Our findings provide novel insight into the neuropathological mechanisms of ASPD. PMID:27257047

  16. Plasma-photocatalysis combination for air pollutant removal: identification of the synergy mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guaitella, O.; Thevenet, F.; Rousseau, A.; Guillard, C.; Stancu, G.; Roepcke, J.

    2006-10-01

    The coupling of a photocatalyst with a non thermal plasma (DBD) is studied; based on experimental results we discuss separately the contributions of (i) the chemistry involved as a function of the porosity of the material, and (ii) the influence of the photocatalytic activity on the chemistry of C2H2 oxidation. C2H2 removal is strongly increased by the presence of a porous material (SiO2 or TiO2): the destruction of C2H2 is driven by species created by the plasma and concentrated by a porous [1]. Our experiments confirm that C2H2 removal rate increases with the porosity of the material, whereas the selectivity also depends on the chemical composition of the surface. In parallel, the temporal evolution of C2H2 concentration was measured by Tuneable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) in the mid infrared region in a low pressure discharge during a single plasma pulse (one shot). The contribution of external ultraviolet radiation and plasma exposure were quantified, both with and without photocatalyst. The synergetic effect was clearly demonstrated [2]. [1] U. Roland, F. Holzer, F.-D. Kopinke 2002 Catalysis Today 73 315--323 [2] A. Rousseau, O. Guaitella, L.V. Gatilova, F. Thevenet, C. Guillard, J. Roepcke, G. D. Stancu , Appl. Phys. Let. 87, 221501 (2005).

  17. Highlights from SelectBio 2015: Academic Drug Discovery Conference, Cambridge, UK, 19-20 May 2015.

    PubMed

    Spencer, John; Coaker, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    The SelectBio 2015: Academic Drug Discovery Conference was held in Cambridge, UK, on 19-20 May 2015. Building on the success of academic drug discovery events in the USA, this conference aimed to showcase the exciting new research emerging from academic drug discovery and to help bridge the gap between basic research and commercial application. At the event the authors heard from a number of speakers on a broad array of topics, from partnering models for academia and industry to novel drug discovery approaches across various therapeutic areas, with a few talks, such as those by Susanne Muller-Knapp (Structure Genomics Consortium, Oxford University, Oxford, UK) and Julian Blagg (Institute of Cancer Research, UK), covering both remits, by highlighting a number of such partnerships and then delving into some case studies. The conference concluded with a heated debate on whether phenotypic discovery should be favored over targeted discovery in academia and pharma, in a panel discussion chaired by Roland Wolkowicz (San Diego State University, USA). PMID:26420379

  18. Can a self-administered questionnaire identify workers with chronic or recurring low back pain?

    PubMed Central

    TAKEKAWA, Karina Satiko; GONÇALVES, Josiane Sotrate; MORIGUCHI, Cristiane Shinohara; COURY, Helenice Jane Cote Gil; SATO, Tatiana de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    To verify if the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ) and physical examination of the lumbar spine can identify workers with chronic or recurring low back pain, using health history for reference. Fifty office workers of both sexes, aged between 19 and 55 yr, were evaluated using a standardized physical examination and the NMQ, VAS and RDQ. Discriminant analysis was performed to determine the discriminant properties of these instruments. A higher success rate (94%) was observed in the model including only the NMQ and in the model including the NMQ and the physical examination. The lowest success rate (82%) was observed in the model including the NMQ, RDQ and VAS. The NMQ was able to detect subjects with chronic or recurring low back pain with 100% sensitivity and 88% specificity. The NMQ appears to be the best instrument for identifying subjects with chronic or recurring low back pain. Thus, this self-reported questionnaire is suitable for screening workers for chronic or recurring low back pain in occupational settings. PMID:25810448

  19. Intact brain processing of musical emotions in autism spectrum disorder, but more cognitive load and arousal in happy vs. sad music

    PubMed Central

    Gebauer, Line; Skewes, Joshua; Westphael, Gitte; Heaton, Pamela; Vuust, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Music is a potent source for eliciting emotions, but not everybody experience emotions in the same way. Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show difficulties with social and emotional cognition. Impairments in emotion recognition are widely studied in ASD, and have been associated with atypical brain activation in response to emotional expressions in faces and speech. Whether these impairments and atypical brain responses generalize to other domains, such as emotional processing of music, is less clear. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated neural correlates of emotion recognition in music in high-functioning adults with ASD and neurotypical adults. Both groups engaged similar neural networks during processing of emotional music, and individuals with ASD rated emotional music comparable to the group of neurotypical individuals. However, in the ASD group, increased activity in response to happy compared to sad music was observed in dorsolateral prefrontal regions and in the rolandic operculum/insula, and we propose that this reflects increased cognitive processing and physiological arousal in response to emotional musical stimuli in this group. PMID:25076869

  20. Loading is more effective than posture in lumbar spinal stenosis: a study with a treadmill equipment.

    PubMed

    Oğuz, Hasan; Levendoğlu, Funda; Oğün, Tunç Cevat; Tantuğ, Aysenur

    2007-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the correlation between neurogenic intermittent claudication (NIC) in LSS and different positions as well as loading status, using the treadmill device. The study was a prospective clinical trial on lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) using a treadmill equipment. The study population comprised of 80 LSS patients with a mean age of 61. The equipment included a treadmill, unloading station and loading vests. The patients were instructed to walk in five different positions. The initiation time of symptoms and total walking time were recorded. The examination was stopped after 20 min or at the onset of severe symptoms. In order to obtain pretest demographic data on subjects, visual analog scale, Roland-Morris questionnaire, pain disability index, and Beck depression index were used. The initiation time of symptoms (ITS) and total walking time (TWT) were measured during the test. Unloading provided a longer and loading a shorter ITS and TWT. Decline or incline positions did not affect ITS or TWT. The changes in posture had no correlation with the appearance of symptoms in LSS patients with NIC on a treadmill in this study, rather ITS and TWT were determined by axial loading and unloading. PMID:17273837

  1. Magnetoencephalography in Fronto-Parietal Opercular Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kakisaka, Yosuke; Iwasaki, Masaki; Alexopoulos, Andreas V.; Enatsu, Rei; Jin, Kazutaka; Wang, Zhong I.; Mosher, John C.; Dubarry, Anne-Sophie; Nair, Dileep R.; Burgess, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To clarify the clinical and neurophysiological profiles of fronto-parietal opercular epilepsy in which epileptic spikes are detected with magnetoencephalography (MEG) but not with scalp electroencephalography (EEG). Methods Four patients presented with epileptic spikes localized to the fronto-parietal opercular cortex, which were only appreciated following MEG recordings. Results In all cases, seizure semiology suggested early activation of the operculum and lower peri-rolandic cortex consistent with the somatotopic organization of this region, i.e. tingling sensation involving the throat and hemi-face or contralateral upper limb, and spasms of the neck and throat. MEG spikes were localized in the fronto-parietal operculum. Three of the four patients underwent invasive electrocorticography and/or stereo-EEG recordings, and spikes were confirmed to arise from the estimated area of MEG dipole localization. Two patients remained seizure-free for over 1 year after resection of the epileptogenic region; the other patient declined resective surgery due to proximity to the language cortex. Conclusion This study demonstrates the usefulness of MEG in localizing spikes arising from within the fronto-parietal opercular regions, and implies that MEG may provide localizing information in patients with symptoms suggestive of opercular epilepsy, even if scalp EEG recordings fail to disclose any epileptogenic activities. PMID:22658720

  2. Nonsurgical Korean Integrative Treatments for Symptomatic Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Three-Armed Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kiok; Shin, Kyung-Min; Lee, Jun-Hwan; Seo, Bok-Nam; Jung, So-Young; Youn, Yousuk; Lee, Sang Ho; Kim, Jaehong; Qu, Wenchun

    2016-01-01

    This is a study protocol for a pilot three-armed randomized controlled trial on nonsurgical integrative Korean medicinal treatment for symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Thirty-six participants who have been diagnosed with (LSS) and recommended for spinal surgery by neurosurgeons or orthopedics and have had spinal symptoms such as severe low back pain and neurological claudication regardless of at least three months of conservative treatments will be recruited. Participants will be randomly assigned to be one of the three intervention groups, including the Mokhuri treatment program group 1 or 2 or usual care group. All treatments will be administered in inpatient units over a period of 4 weeks. The primary outcomes are 0 to 100 Visual Analogue Scales for low back pain and leg pain and the secondary outcomes are Oswestry Disability Index; EQ-5D; Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire; Oxford Claudication Score; physical function test, including treadmill test, walking duration, and distance assessment for free leg pain; radiologic testing; and adverse events which will be assessed during the 4-week treatment period as well as after 3 and 6 months of follow-up. Then, we will assess the feasibility of the clinical trial design as well as a nonsurgical integrative treatment program. This trial is registered with CRIS registration number: KCT0001218. PMID:26941823

  3. Functional Connectivity of the Caudal Anterior Cingulate Cortex Is Decreased in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuanyue; Shi, Lijuan; Cui, Xilong; Wang, Suhong; Luo, Xuerong

    2016-01-01

    The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is frequently reported to have functionally distinct sub-regions that play key roles in different intrinsic networks. However, the contribution of the ACC, which is connected to several cortical areas and the limbic system, to autism is not clearly understood, although it may be involved in dysfunctions across several distinct but related functional domains. By comparing resting-state fMRI data from persons with autism and healthy controls, we sought to identify the abnormalities in the functional connectivity (FC) of ACC sub-regions in autism. The analyses found autism-related reductions in FC between the left caudal ACC and the right rolandic operculum, insula, postcentral gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, and the middle temporal gyrus. The FC (z-scores) between the left caudal ACC and the right insula was negatively correlated with the Stereotyped Behaviors and Restricted Interests scores of the autism group. These findings suggest that the caudal ACC is recruited selectively in the pathomechanism of autism. PMID:26985666

  4. Atlas of Great Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyan, Ronald; Dunlop, Storm

    2015-01-01

    Foreword; Using this book; Part I. Introduction: Cometary beliefs and fears; Comets in art; Comets in literature and poetry; Comets in science; Cometary science today; Great comets in antiquity; Great comets of the Middle Ages; Part II. The 30 Greatest Comets of Modern Times: The Great Comet of 1471; Comet Halley 1531; The Great Comet of 1556; The Great Comet of 1577; Comet Halley, 1607; The Great Comet of 1618; The Great Comet of 1664; Comet Kirch, 1680; Comet Halley, 1682; The Great Comet of 1744; Comet Halley, 1759; Comet Messier, 1769; Comet Flaugergues, 1811; Comet Halley, 1835; The Great March Comet of 1843; Comet Donati, 1858; Comet Tebbutt, 1861; The Great September Comet of 1882; The Great January Comet of 1910; Comet Halley, 1910; Comet Arend-Roland, 1956; Comet Ikeya-Seki, 1965; Comet Bennett, 1970; Comet Kohoutek, 1973-4; Comet West, 1976; Comet Halley, 1986; Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, 1994; Comet Hyakutake, 1996; Comet Hale-Bopp, 1997; Comet McNaught, 2007; Part III. Appendices; Table of comet data; Glossary; References; Photo credits; Index.

  5. Are prognostic indicators for poor outcome different for acute and chronic low back pain consulters in primary care?

    PubMed

    Grotle, Margreth; Foster, Nadine E; Dunn, Kate M; Croft, Peter

    2010-12-01

    Few studies have investigated whether prognostic indicators, which contribute to the transition from acute to chronic low back pain (LBP), are also those which contribute to continuing persistence of chronic LBP. We compared the contribution of physical, psychological and social indicators to predicting disability after one year between consulters with LBP of less than 3 months duration and more than 3 months duration. Data from two large prospective cohort studies of consecutive patients consulting with LBP in general practices were merged, providing complete data for 258 cases with acute/subacute LBP and 668 cases with chronic LBP at 12 months follow-up. There were significant differences between the two LBP groups in baseline characteristics and clinical course of disability, assessed by Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire, during the year of follow-up. Adjusted associations between potential prognostic indicators and disability at 12months were carried out in the two LBP subgroups. The final multivariable regression models showed that being non-employed, having widespread pain, a high level of Chronic Pain Grade, and catastrophising were the strongest prognostic indicators for disability at 12 months in both LBP groups. Fear of pain was significantly associated with disability in chronic LBP. Importantly, beyond baseline disability, the effect size of the other prognostic indicators for poor outcome was rather low. These findings must continue to challenge researchers to identify useful early predictors of outcome in persons with disabling back pain, as screening and targeted treatment approaches are dependent upon prognostic indicators with clinical significance. PMID:20932646

  6. Use of conventional and alternative treatment strategies for a case of low back pain in a F/A-18 aviator

    PubMed Central

    Green, Bart N; Sims, John; Allen, Rachel

    2006-01-01

    Background Low back pain can diminish jet pilot concentration and function during flight and be severe enough to ground pilots or cause decreased flying time. The objective of this case report is to present an example of the integration of chiropractic care with conventional treatments for the management of low back pain in a F/A-18 aviator. Case presentation The patient had insidious severe low back pain without radiation or neurological deficit, resulting in 24 hours of hospitalization. Spinal degeneration was discovered upon imaging. Four months later, it still took up to 10 minutes for him to get out of bed and several minutes to exit the jet due to stiffness and pain. He had discontinued his regular Marine Corps fitness training due to pain avoidance. Pain severity ranged from 1.5–7.1 cm on a visual analog scale. His Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire score was 5 out of 24. The pilot's pain was managed with the coordinated efforts of the flight surgeon, physiatrist, physical therapist, and doctor of chiropractic. Following this regimen he had no pain and no functional disability; he was able to fly multiple training missions per week and exercise to Marine Corps standards. Conclusion A course of care integrating flight medicine, chiropractic, physical therapy, and physiatry appeared to alleviate pain and restore function to this F/A-18 aviator with low back pain. PMID:16820063

  7. Epilepsy, cognitive deficits and neuroanatomy in males with ZDHHC9 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Kate; Astle, Duncan E; Scerif, Gaia; Barnes, Jessica; Smith, Jennie; Moffat, Georgina; Gillard, Jonathan; Baldeweg, Torsten; Raymond, F Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Objective Systematic investigation of individuals with intellectual disability after genetic diagnosis can illuminate specific phenotypes and mechanisms relevant to common neurodevelopmental disorders. We report the neurological, cognitive and neuroanatomical characteristics of nine males from three families with loss-of-function mutations in ZDHHC9 (OMIM #300799). Methods All known cases of X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) due to ZDHHC9 mutation in the United Kingdom were invited to participate in a study of neurocognitive and neuroimaging phenotypes. Results Seven out of nine males with ZDHHC9 mutations had been diagnosed with epilepsy, exceeding epilepsy risk in XLID comparison subjects (P = 0.01). Seizure histories and EEG features amongst ZDHHC9 mutation cases shared characteristics with rolandic epilepsy (RE). Specific cognitive deficits differentiated males with ZDHHC9 mutations from XLID comparison subjects and converged with reported linguistic and nonlinguistic deficits in idiopathic RE: impaired oromotor control, reduced verbal fluency, and impaired inhibitory control on visual attention tasks. Consistent neuroanatomical abnormalities included thalamic and striatal volume reductions and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum. Interpretation Mutations in ZDHHC9 are associated with susceptibility to focal seizures and specific cognitive impairments intersecting with the RE spectrum. Neurocognitive deficits are accompanied by consistent abnormalities of subcortical structures and inter-hemispheric connectivity. The biochemical, cellular and network-level mechanisms responsible for the ZDHHC9-associated neurocognitive phenotype may be relevant to cognitive outcomes in RE. PMID:26000327

  8. Tuning Fragility: The Quest for Strong Polymeric Glass Formers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwin, Brian; Colby, Ralph; Lizotte, Jeremy; Long, Timothy

    2001-03-01

    Angell [1] has defined fragility m from the temperature dependence of relaxation time τ at the glass transition temperature T_g: m≡ [ dlog τ /d( T_g/T) ] _T=T_g. The strongest glass formers (e.g., silica) have m=16-20 and the most fragile glass formers are typically polymers, with m>100. Recent work [2] has reported that the fragility of polystyrene decreases as chain length is lowered, with a range 70Roland, J. Non-Cryst. Solids QTRbf275, 153 (2000). [3] R. H. Colby, Phys. Rev. E QTRbf61, 1783 (2000).

  9. The Five Factors of personality and regional cortical variability in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Sutin, Angelina; Davatzikos, Christos; Costa, Paul; Resnick, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Although personality changes have been associated with brain lesions and atrophy caused by neurodegenerative diseases and aging, neuroanatomical correlates of personality in healthy individuals and their stability over time have received relatively little investigation. In this study, we explored regional gray matter (GM) volumetric associations of the five-factor model of personality. Eighty-seven healthy older adults took the NEO Personality Inventory and had brain MRI at two time points 2 years apart. We performed GM segmentation followed by regional analysis of volumes examined in normalized space map creation and voxel based morphometry-type statistical inference in SPM8. We created a regression model including all five factors and important covariates. Next, a conjunction analysis identified associations between personality scores and GM volumes that were replicable across time, also using cluster-level Family-Wise-Error correction. Larger right orbitofrontal and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices and rolandic operculum were associated with lower Neuroticism; larger left temporal, dorsolateral prefrontal, and anterior cingulate cortices with higher Extraversion; larger right frontopolar and smaller orbitofrontal and insular cortices with higher Openness; larger right orbitofrontal cortex with higher Agreeableness; larger dorsolateral prefrontal and smaller frontopolar cortices with higher Conscientiousness. In summary, distinct personality traits were associated with stable individual differences in GM volumes. As expected for higher-order traits, regions performing a large number of cognitive and affective functions were implicated. Our findings highlight personality-related variation that may be related to individual differences in brain structure that merit additional attention in neuroimaging research. PMID:22610513

  10. Relativistic Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Bernard J. T.; Markovic, Dragoljub

    1997-06-01

    Preface; Prologue: Conference overview Bernard Carr; Part I. The Universe At Large and Very Large Redshifts: 2. The size and age of the Universe Gustav A. Tammann; 3. Active galaxies at large redshifts Malcolm S. Longair; 4. Observational cosmology with the cosmic microwave background George F. Smoot; 5. Future prospects in measuring the CMB power spectrum Philip M. Lubin; 6. Inflationary cosmology Michael S. Turner; 7. The signature of the Universe Bernard J. T. Jones; 8. Theory of large-scale structure Sergei F. Shandarin; 9. The origin of matter in the universe Lev A. Kofman; 10. New guises for cold-dark matter suspects Edward W. Kolb; Part II. Physics and Astrophysics Of Relativistic Compact Objects: 11. On the unification of gravitational and inertial forces Donald Lynden-Bell; 12. Internal structure of astrophysical black holes Werner Israel; 13. Black hole entropy: external facade and internal reality Valery Frolov; 14. Accretion disks around black holes Marek A. Abramowicz; 15. Black hole X-ray transients J. Craig Wheeler; 16. X-rays and gamma rays from active galactic nuclei Roland Svensson; 17. Gamma-ray bursts: a challenge to relativistic astrophysics Martin Rees; 18. Probing black holes and other exotic objects with gravitational waves Kip Thorne; Epilogue: the past and future of relativistic astrophysics Igor D. Novikov; I. D. Novikov's scientific papers and books.

  11. Common pediatric epilepsy syndromes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun T; Shahid, Asim M; Jammoul, Adham

    2015-02-01

    Benign rolandic epilepsy (BRE), childhood idiopathic occipital epilepsy (CIOE), childhood absence epilepsy (CAE), and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) are some of the common epilepsy syndromes in the pediatric age group. Among the four, BRE is the most commonly encountered. BRE remits by age 16 years with many children requiring no treatment. Seizures in CAE also remit at the rate of approximately 80%; whereas, JME is considered a lifelong condition even with the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Neonates and infants may also present with seizures that are self-limited with no associated psychomotor disturbances. Benign familial neonatal convulsions caused by a channelopathy, and inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, have a favorable outcome with spontaneous resolution. Benign idiopathic neonatal seizures, also referred to as "fifth-day fits," are an example of another epilepsy syndrome in infants that carries a good prognosis. BRE, CIOE, benign familial neonatal convulsions, benign idiopathic neonatal seizures, and benign myoclonic epilepsy in infancy are characterized as "benign" idiopathic age-related epilepsies as they have favorable implications, no structural brain abnormality, are sensitive to AEDs, have a high remission rate, and have no associated psychomotor disturbances. However, sometimes selected patients may have associated comorbidities such as cognitive and language delay for which the term "benign" may not be appropriate. PMID:25658216

  12. Neurobiological changes of schizotypy: evidence from both volume-based morphometric analysis and resting-state functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Yan, Chao; Yin, Da-zhi; Fan, Ming-xia; Cheung, Eric F C; Pantelis, Christos; Chan, Raymond C K

    2015-03-01

    The current study sought to examine the underlying brain changes in individuals with high schizotypy by integrating networks derived from brain structural and functional imaging. Individuals with high schizotypy (n = 35) and low schizotypy (n = 34) controls were screened using the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire and underwent brain structural and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging on a 3T scanner. Voxel-based morphometric analysis and graph theory-based functional network analysis were conducted. Individuals with high schizotypy showed reduced gray matter (GM) density in the insula and the dorsolateral prefrontal gyrus. The graph theoretical analysis showed that individuals with high schizotypy showed similar global properties in their functional networks as low schizotypy individuals. Several hubs of the functional network were identified in both groups, including the insula, the lingual gyrus, the postcentral gyrus, and the rolandic operculum. More hubs in the frontal lobe and fewer hubs in the occipital lobe were identified in individuals with high schizotypy. By comparing the functional connectivity between clusters with abnormal GM density and the whole brain, individuals with high schizotypy showed weaker functional connectivity between the left insula and the putamen, but stronger connectivity between the cerebellum and the medial frontal gyrus. Taken together, our findings suggest that individuals with high schizotypy present changes in terms of GM and resting-state functional connectivity, especially in the frontal lobe. PMID:25533270

  13. Brain Structural Alterations in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Patients with Autogenous and Reactive Obsessions

    PubMed Central

    Subirà, Marta; Alonso, Pino; Segalàs, Cinto; Real, Eva; López-Solà, Clara; Pujol, Jesús; Martínez-Zalacaín, Ignacio; Harrison, Ben J.; Menchón, José M.; Cardoner, Narcís; Soriano-Mas, Carles

    2013-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a clinically heterogeneous condition. Although structural brain alterations have been consistently reported in OCD, their interaction with particular clinical subtypes deserves further examination. Among other approaches, a two-group classification in patients with autogenous and reactive obsessions has been proposed. The purpose of the present study was to assess, by means of a voxel-based morphometry analysis, the putative brain structural correlates of this classification scheme in OCD patients. Ninety-five OCD patients and 95 healthy controls were recruited. Patients were divided into autogenous (n = 30) and reactive (n = 65) sub-groups. A structural magnetic resonance image was acquired for each participant and pre-processed with SPM8 software to obtain a volume-modulated gray matter map. Whole-brain and voxel-wise comparisons between the study groups were then performed. In comparison to the autogenous group, reactive patients showed larger gray matter volumes in the right Rolandic operculum. When compared to healthy controls, reactive patients showed larger volumes in the putamen (bilaterally), while autogenous patients showed a smaller left anterior temporal lobe. Also in comparison to healthy controls, the right middle temporal gyrus was smaller in both patient subgroups. Our results suggest that autogenous and reactive obsessions depend on partially dissimilar neural substrates. Our findings provide some neurobiological support for this classification scheme and contribute to unraveling the neurobiological basis of clinical heterogeneity in OCD. PMID:24098688

  14. The Neural Basis of Vocal Pitch Imitation in Humans.

    PubMed

    Belyk, Michel; Pfordresher, Peter Q; Liotti, Mario; Brown, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Vocal imitation is a phenotype that is unique to humans among all primate species, and so an understanding of its neural basis is critical in explaining the emergence of both speech and song in human evolution. Two principal neural models of vocal imitation have emerged from a consideration of nonhuman animals. One hypothesis suggests that putative mirror neurons in the inferior frontal gyrus pars opercularis of Broca's area may be important for imitation. An alternative hypothesis derived from the study of songbirds suggests that the corticostriate motor pathway performs sensorimotor processes that are specific to vocal imitation. Using fMRI with a sparse event-related sampling design, we investigated the neural basis of vocal imitation in humans by comparing imitative vocal production of pitch sequences with both nonimitative vocal production and pitch discrimination. The strongest difference between these tasks was found in the putamen bilaterally, providing a striking parallel to the role of the analogous region in songbirds. Other areas preferentially activated during imitation included the orofacial motor cortex, Rolandic operculum, and SMA, which together outline the corticostriate motor loop. No differences were seen in the inferior frontal gyrus. The corticostriate system thus appears to be the central pathway for vocal imitation in humans, as predicted from an analogy with songbirds. PMID:26696298

  15. Quark Matter 2011 (QM11) Quark Matter 2011 (QM11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-12-01

    International Advisory Committee Antinori, FedericoPaic, Guy Braun-Munzinger, PeterPajares, Carlos Cifarelli, LuisaPeitzmann, Thomas Erazmus, BarbaraRedlich, Krzysztof Eskola, KariRiccati, Lodovico Gaardhøje, Jens JørgenRoland, Gunther Gale, CharlesRoy, Christelle Gelis, FrancoisSchukraft, Jürgen Giubellino, PaoloSinha, Bikash Greiner, CarstenSrivastava, Dinesh Gyulassy, MiklosStachel, Johanna Harris, JohnSteinberg, Peter Hatsuda, TetsuoStroth, Joachim Heinz, UlrichSugitate, Toru Jacak, BarbaraTserruya, Itzhak Karsch, FrithjofVelkovska, Julia Kharzeev, DimaWang, Enke Kodama, TakeshiWang, Xin, Nian Lévai, PéterWessels, Johannes Manko, VladislavXu, Nu Müller, BerndtZajc, William Ollitrault, Jean-Yves Organizing Committee Arleo, FrancoisDupieux, Pascal Bastid, NicoleFurget, Christophe Bourgeois, Marie-LaureGranier de Cassagnac, Raphael Bregant, MarcoGuernane, Rachid Carminati, FedericoHervet, Carnita Castillo, JavierKuhn, Christian Cheynis, BrigitteOlivier, Nathalie Conesa, DelValle, Zaida Connor, MichelleRenshall, Lucy Crochet, PhilippeSuire, Christophe Delagrange, HuguesTihinen, Ulla Program Committee Schutz, Yves (Chair)Baldisseri, Alberto Wiedemann, Urs (co-Chair)Safarik, Karel Aurenche, Patrick

  16. Electrocorticographic amplitude predicts finger positions during slow grasping motions of the hand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Soumyadipta; Fifer, Matthew S.; Benz, Heather L.; Crone, Nathan E.; Thakor, Nitish V.

    2010-08-01

    Four human subjects undergoing subdural electrocorticography for epilepsy surgery engaged in a range of finger and hand movements. We observed that the amplitudes of the low-pass filtered electrocorticogram (ECoG), also known as the local motor potential (LMP), over specific peri-Rolandic electrodes were correlated (p < 0.001) with the position of individual fingers as the subjects engaged in slow and deliberate grasping motions. A generalized linear model (GLM) of the LMP amplitudes from those electrodes yielded predictions for positions of the fingers that had a strong congruence with the actual finger positions (correlation coefficient, r; median = 0.51, maximum = 0.91), during displacements of up to 10 cm at the fingertips. For all the subjects, decoding filters trained on data from any given session were remarkably robust in their prediction performance across multiple sessions and days, and were invariant with respect to changes in wrist angle, elbow flexion and hand placement across these sessions (median r = 0.52, maximum r = 0.86). Furthermore, a reasonable prediction accuracy for grasp aperture was achievable with as few as three electrodes in all subjects (median r = 0.49; maximum r = 0.90). These results provide further evidence for the feasibility of robust and practical ECoG-based control of finger movements in upper extremity prosthetics.

  17. The phi complex as a neuromarker of human social coordination

    PubMed Central

    Tognoli, Emmanuelle; Lagarde, Julien; DeGuzman, Gonzalo C.; Kelso, J. A. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Many social interactions rely upon mutual information exchange: one member of a pair changes in response to the other while at the same time producing actions that alter the behavior of the other. However, little is known about how such social processes are integrated in the brain. Here, we used a specially designed dual-electroencephalogram system and the conceptual framework of coordination dynamics to identify neural signatures of effective, real-time coordination between people and its breakdown or absence. High-resolution spectral analysis of electrical brain activity before and during visually mediated social coordination revealed a marked depression in occipital alpha and rolandic mu rhythms during social interaction that was independent of whether behavior was coordinated or not. In contrast, a pair of oscillatory components (phi1 and phi2) located above right centro-parietal cortex distinguished effective from ineffective coordination: increase of phi1 favored independent behavior and increase of phi2 favored coordinated behavior. The topography of the phi complex is consistent with neuroanatomical sources within the human mirror neuron system. A plausible mechanism is that the phi complex reflects the influence of the other on a person's ongoing behavior, with phi1 expressing the inhibition of the human mirror neuron system and phi2 its enhancement. PMID:17470821

  18. Learning piano melodies in visuo-motor or audio-motor training conditions and the neural correlates of their cross-modal transfer.

    PubMed

    Engel, Annerose; Bangert, Marc; Horbank, David; Hijmans, Brenda S; Wilkens, Katharina; Keller, Peter E; Keysers, Christian

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the cross-modal transfer of movement patterns necessary to perform melodies on the piano, 22 non-musicians learned to play short sequences on a piano keyboard by (1) merely listening and replaying (vision of own fingers occluded) or (2) merely observing silent finger movements and replaying (on a silent keyboard). After training, participants recognized with above chance accuracy (1) audio-motor learned sequences upon visual presentation (89±17%), and (2) visuo-motor learned sequences upon auditory presentation (77±22%). The recognition rates for visual presentation significantly exceeded those for auditory presentation (p<.05). fMRI revealed that observing finger movements corresponding to audio-motor trained melodies is associated with stronger activation in the left rolandic operculum than observing untrained sequences. This region was also involved in silent execution of sequences, suggesting that a link to motor representations may play a role in cross-modal transfer from audio-motor training condition to visual recognition. No significant differences in brain activity were found during listening to visuo-motor trained compared to untrained melodies. Cross-modal transfer was stronger from the audio-motor training condition to visual recognition and this is discussed in relation to the fact that non-musicians are familiar with how their finger movements look (motor-to-vision transformation), but not with how they sound on a piano (motor-to-sound transformation). PMID:22484310

  19. Sleep and Epilepsy: Strange Bedfellows No More

    PubMed Central

    St. Louis, Erik K.

    2012-01-01

    Ancient philosophers and theologians believed that altered consciousness freed the mind to prophesy the future, equating sleep with seizures. Only recently has the bidirectional influences of epilepsy and sleep upon one another received more substantive analysis. This article reviews the complex and increasingly recognized interrelationships between sleep and epilepsy. NREM sleep differentially activates interictal epileptiform discharges during slow wave (N3) sleep, while ictal seizure events occur more frequently during light NREM stages N1 and N2. The most commonly encountered types of sleep-related epilepsies (those with preferential occurrence during sleep or following arousal) include frontal and temporal lobe partial epilepsies in adults, and benign epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes (benign rolandic epilepsy) and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy in children and adolescents. Comorbid sleep disorders are frequent in patients with epilepsy, particularly obstructive sleep apnea in refractory epilepsy patients which may aggravate seizure burden, while treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure often improves seizure frequency. Distinguishing nocturnal events such as NREM parasomnias (confusional arousals, sleep walking, and night terrors), REM parasomnias including REM sleep behavior disorder, and nocturnal seizures if frequently difficult and benefits from careful history taking and video-EEG-polysomnography in selected cases. Differentiating nocturnal seizures from primary sleep disorders is essential for determining appropriate therapy, and recognizing co-existent sleep disorders in patients with epilepsy may improve their seizure burden and quality of life. PMID:23539488

  20. Early deficits in cortical control of swallowing in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, Ianessa A.; McLaren, Donald G.; Kosmatka, Kris; Fitzgerald, Michelle; Johnson, Sterling; Porcaro, Eva; Kays, Stephanie; Umoh, Eno-Obong; Robbins, JoAnne

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether functional changes in cortical control of swallowing are evident in early Alzheimer’s disease (AD), before dysphagia (swallowing impairment) is evident. Cortical function was compared between an early AD group and a group of age-matched controls during swallowing. Swallowing oropharyngeal biomechanics examined from videofluoroscopic recordings were also obtained to more comprehensively characterize changes in swallowing associated with early AD. Our neuroimaging results show that the AD group had significantly lower BOLD response in many cortical areas that are traditionally involved in normal swallowing (i.e. pre and postcentral gyri, Rolandic and frontal opercula). There were no regions where the AD group recruited more brain activity than the healthy controls during swallowing and only 13% of all active voxels were unique to the AD group, even at this early stage. This suggests that the AD group is not recruiting new regions, nor are they compensating within regions that are active during swallowing. In videofluoroscopic measures, the AD group had significantly reduced hyo-laryngeal elevation than the controls. Although, swallowing impairment is usually noted in the late stages of AD, changes in cortical control of swallowing may begin long before dysphagia becomes apparent. PMID:20308785

  1. Twentieth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-26

    PREFACE The Twentieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, dedicated to the memory of Professor Hank Ramey, was held at Stanford University on January 24-26, 1995. There were ninety-five registered participants. Participants came from six foreign countries: Japan, Mexico, England, Italy, New Zealand and Iceland. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Thirty-two papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into eleven sessions concerning: field development, modeling, well tesubore, injection, geoscience, geochemistry and field operations. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bob Fournier, Mark Walters, John Counsil, Marcelo Lippmann, Keshav Goyal, Joel Renner and Mike Shook. In addition to the technical sessions, a panel discussion was held on ''What have we learned in 20 years?'' Panel speakers included Patrick Muffler, George Frye, Alfred Truesdell and John Pritchett. The subject was further discussed by Subir Sanyal, who gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager

  2. Aberrant functional brain connectome in people with antisocial personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yan; Long, Jun; Wang, Wei; Liao, Jian; Xie, Hua; Zhao, Guihu; Zhang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is characterised by a disregard for social obligations and callous unconcern for the feelings of others. Studies have demonstrated that ASPD is associated with abnormalities in brain regions and aberrant functional connectivity. In this paper, topological organisation was examined in resting-state fMRI data obtained from 32 ASPD patients and 32 non-ASPD controls. The frequency-dependent functional networks were constructed using wavelet-based correlations over 90 brain regions. The topology of the functional networks of ASPD subjects was analysed via graph theoretical analysis. Furthermore, the abnormal functional connectivity was determined with a network-based statistic (NBS) approach. Our results revealed that, compared with the controls, the ASPD patients exhibited altered topological configuration of the functional connectome in the frequency interval of 0.016–0.031 Hz, as indicated by the increased clustering coefficient and decreased betweenness centrality in the medial superior frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, Rolandic operculum, superior parietal gyrus, angular gyrus, and middle temporal pole. In addition, the ASPD patients showed increased functional connectivity mainly located in the default-mode network. The present study reveals an aberrant topological organisation of the functional brain network in individuals with ASPD. Our findings provide novel insight into the neuropathological mechanisms of ASPD. PMID:27257047

  3. Map Showing Principal Coal Beds and Bedrock Geology of the Ucross-Arvada Area, Central Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Molnia, Carol L.

    2013-01-01

    The Ucross-Arvada area is part of the Powder River Basin, a large, north-trending structural depression between the Black Hills on the east and the Bighorn Mountains on the west. Almost all of the study area is within Sheridan and Johnson Counties, Wyoming. Most of the Ucross-Arvada area lies within the outcrop of the Wasatch Formation of Eocene age; the extreme northeast corner falls within the outcrop of the Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation of Paleocene age. Within the Powder River Basin, both the Wasatch Formation and the Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation contain significant coal resources. The map includes locations and elevations of coal beds at 1:50,000 scale for an area that includes ten 7½-minute quadrangles covering some 500 square miles. The Wasatch Formation coal beds shown (in descending order) are Monument Peak, Walters (also called Ulm 1), Healy (also called Ulm 2), Truman, Felix, and Arvada. The Fort Union Formation coal beds shown (in descending order) are Roland (of Baker, 1929) and Smith.

  4. Comparison between Kinesio Taping and a Traditional Physical Therapy Program in Treatment of Nonspecific Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kachanathu, Shaji John; Alenazi, Aqeel M.; Seif, Hamada Eid; Hafez, Ashraf Ramadan; Alroumim, Meshari Abdulmohsen

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Nonspecific low back pain (NSLBP) is a very common but largely self-limiting condition. Several types of tape and their associated application methods are available for different conditions. The aim of the present study was to observe the effect of Kinesio taping (KT) compared with traditional management of NSLBP. [Subjects and Methods] Forty male and female patients with a mean age of 34.8±7.54 years were randomly divided into two groups; group 1 (n=20) which underwent conventional physical therapy with KT, and group 2 (n=20), which underwent only conventional physical therapy. The intervention sessions for both groups were three times per week for four weeks. Outcomes were assessed for activities of daily living (ADL) using the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, pain severity using a visual analogue scale, and ranges of motion (ROMs) of trunk flexion and extension using the modified Schober’s test. [Results] Significant differences in measures of pain, ADL, and trunk flexion and extension ROMs were observed post intervention within each group. In comparison, there were no significant differences in measures of pain, ADL, and trunk flexion and extension ROMs post intervention between groups. [Conclusion] A physical therapy program involving strengthening exercises for abdominal muscles and stretching exercises for back, hamstring, and iliopsoas muscles with or without Kinesio taping was beneficial in the treatment of chronic low back pain. PMID:25202177

  5. Statistical design of a uranium corrosion experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wendelberger, Joanne R; Moore, Leslie M

    2009-01-01

    This work supports an experiment being conducted by Roland Schulze and Mary Ann Hill to study hydride formation, one of the most important forms of corrosion observed in uranium and uranium alloys. The study goals and objectives are described in Schulze and Hill (2008), and the work described here focuses on development of a statistical experiment plan being used for the study. The results of this study will contribute to the development of a uranium hydriding model for use in lifetime prediction models. A parametric study of the effect of hydrogen pressure, gap size and abrasion on hydride initiation and growth is being planned where results can be analyzed statistically to determine individual effects as well as multi-variable interactions. Input to ESC from this experiment will include expected hydride nucleation, size, distribution, and volume on various uranium surface situations (geometry) as a function of age. This study will also address the effect of hydrogen threshold pressure on corrosion nucleation and the effect of oxide abrasion/breach on hydriding processes. Statistical experiment plans provide for efficient collection of data that aids in understanding the impact of specific experiment factors on initiation and growth of corrosion. The experiment planning methods used here also allow for robust data collection accommodating other sources of variation such as the density of inclusions, assumed to vary linearly along the cast rods from which samples are obtained.

  6. Density scaling of the transport properties of molecular and ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    López, Enriqueta R; Pensado, Alfonso S; Comuñas, María J P; Pádua, Agílio A H; Fernández, Josefa; Harris, Kenneth R

    2011-04-14

    Casalini and Roland [Phys. Rev. E 69, 062501 (2004); J. Non-Cryst. Solids 353, 3936 (2007)] and other authors have found that both the dielectric relaxation times and the viscosity, η, of liquids can be expressed solely as functions of the group (TV (γ)), where T is the temperature, V is the molar volume, and γ a state-independent scaling exponent. Here we report scaling exponents γ, for the viscosities of 46 compounds, including 11 ionic liquids. A generalization of this thermodynamic scaling to other transport properties, namely, the self-diffusion coefficients for ionic and molecular liquids and the electrical conductivity for ionic liquids is examined. Scaling exponents, γ, for the electrical conductivities of six ionic liquids for which viscosity data are available, are found to be quite close to those obtained from viscosities. Using the scaling exponents obtained from viscosities it was possible to correlate molar conductivity over broad ranges of temperature and pressure. However, application of the same procedures to the self-diffusion coefficients, D, of six ionic and 13 molecular liquids leads to superpositioning of poorer quality, as the scaling yields different exponents from those obtained with viscosities and, in the case of the ionic liquids, slightly different values for the anion and the cation. This situation can be improved by using the ratio (D∕T), consistent with the Stokes-Einstein relation, yielding γ values closer to those of viscosity. PMID:21495764

  7. Neural correlates of taste perception in congenital blindness.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, L; Kupers, R; Ptito, M

    2015-04-01

    Sight is undoubtedly important for the perception and the assessment of the palatability of tastants. Although many studies have addressed the consequences of visual impairment on food selection, feeding behavior, eating habits and taste perception, nothing is known about the neural correlates of gustation in blindness. In the current study we examined brain responses during gustation using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We scanned nine congenitally blind and 14 age- and sex-matched blindfolded sighted control subjects, matched in age, gender and body mass index (BMI), while they made judgments of either the intensity or the (un)pleasantness of different tastes (sweet, bitter) or artificial saliva that were delivered intra-orally. The fMRI data indicated that during gustation, congenitally blind individuals activate less strongly the primary taste cortex (right posterior insula and overlying Rolandic operculum) and the hypothalamus. In sharp contrast with results of multiple other sensory processing studies in congenitally blind subjects, including touch, audition and smell, the occipital cortex was not recruited during taste processing, suggesting the absence of taste-related compensatory crossmodal responses in the occipital cortex. These results underscore our earlier behavioral demonstration that congenitally blind subjects have a lower gustatory sensitivity compared to normal sighted individuals. We hypothesize that due to an underexposure to a variety of tastants, training-induced crossmodal sensory plasticity to gustatory stimulation does not occur in blind subjects. PMID:25708174

  8. INDIAN CASTE SYSTEM: HISTORICAL AND PSYCHOANALYTIC VIEWS.

    PubMed

    Vallabhaneni, Madhusudana Rao

    2015-12-01

    This paper elucidates the historical origins and transformations of India's caste system. Surveying the complex developments over many centuries, it points out that three positions have been taken in this regard. One suggests that the caste one is born into can be transcended within one's lifetime by performing good deeds. The other declares caste to be immutable forever. And, the third says that one can be reborn into a higher caste if one lives a virtuous life. Moving on to the sociopolitical realm, the paper notes how these positions have been used and exploited. The paper then attempts to anchor the existence and purpose of the Hindu caste system in Freud's ideas about group psychology and Klein's proposals of splitting and projective identification. The paper also deploys the large group psychology concepts of Volkan and the culturally nuanced psychoanalytic anthropology of Roland and Kakar. It concludes with delineating some ameliorative strategies for this tragic problem in the otherwise robust democratic society of India. PMID:26611129

  9. Framing the ultimatum game: the contribution of simulation.

    PubMed

    Tomasino, Barbara; Lotto, Lorella; Sarlo, Michela; Civai, Claudia; Rumiati, Rino; Rumiati, Raffaella I

    2013-01-01

    It has now become widely accepted that economic decisions are influenced by cognitive and emotional processes. In the present study, we aimed at disentangling the neural mechanisms associated with the way in which the information is formulated, i.e., framing effect, in terms of gain or loss, which influences people's decisions. Participants played a fMRI version of the Ultimatum Game (UG) where we manipulated bids through two different frames: the expression "I give you" (gain) focusing on money the respondent would receive if she/he agreed with the proponent, and the expression "I take" (loss) focusing on the money that would be removed from the respondent in the event that she/he accepted the offer. Neuroimaging data revealed a frame by response interaction, showing an increase of neural activity in the right rolandic operculum/insular cortex, the anterior cingulate, among other regions, for accepting the frame "I take" vs. rejecting, as compared to accepting the frame "I give you" vs. rejecting. In addition, the left occipito-temporal junction was activated for "I take" vs. "I give you" for offer 5, corresponding to the equal offer made unpleasant by the presence of the frame "I take," where is the proposer that takes the money. Our data extend the current understanding of the neural substrates of social decision making, by disentangling the structures sensitive to the way in which the information is formulated (i.e., framing effect), in terms of gain or loss. PMID:23847507

  10. Abnormal cortical sensorimotor activity during “Target” sound detection in subjects with acute acoustic trauma sequelae: an fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Job, Agnès; Pons, Yoann; Lamalle, Laurent; Jaillard, Assia; Buck, Karl; Segebarth, Christoph; Delon-Martin, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    The most common consequences of acute acoustic trauma (AAT) are hearing loss at frequencies above 3 kHz and tinnitus. In this study, we have used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to visualize neuronal activation patterns in military adults with AAT and various tinnitus sequelae during an auditory “oddball” attention task. AAT subjects displayed overactivities principally during reflex of target sound detection, in sensorimotor areas and in emotion-related areas such as the insula, anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortex, in premotor area, in cross-modal sensory associative areas, and, interestingly, in a region of the Rolandic operculum that has recently been shown to be involved in tympanic movements due to air pressure. We propose further investigations of this brain area and fine middle ear investigations, because our results might suggest a model in which AAT tinnitus may arise as a proprioceptive illusion caused by abnormal excitability of middle-ear muscle spindles possibly link with the acoustic reflex and associated with emotional and sensorimotor disturbances. PMID:22574285

  11. Impact of O/sub 3/ on winter wheat yield (CSRCLAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The present study was initiated to provide further biological response data suitable for evaluating ambient air quality standards and for use in the NCLAN economic assessment of the consequences of O/sub 3/ exposure to crops. Specifically, the objective was to establish exposure-response relationships between yield of two important cultivars of soft red winter wheat (both examined in 1982) grown in the Midwest and chronic exposures to a range of O/sub 3/ concentrations. The O/sub 3/ sensitivity was somewhat less in 1983 than it had been in 1982. It may be that the conditions of excess moisture and high fertility allowed the plants to overcome the O/sub 3/ stress at near ambient concentrations. Alternatively, the data on Heggestad suggest that moisture stress may potentiate O/sub 3/ effects at near ambient concentrations. Our 1982 wheat may have been under moderate moisture stress and thus was more sensitive to ambient O/sub 3/. Winter wheat (Abe and Arthur-71) is still to be considered as more sensitive than grain sorghum or field corn and less sensitive than soybean. The cultivar Roland, however, is more sensitive than Corsoy soybean. 7 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  12. Abnormal cortical sensorimotor activity during "Target" sound detection in subjects with acute acoustic trauma sequelae: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Job, Agnès; Pons, Yoann; Lamalle, Laurent; Jaillard, Assia; Buck, Karl; Segebarth, Christoph; Delon-Martin, Chantal

    2012-03-01

    The most common consequences of acute acoustic trauma (AAT) are hearing loss at frequencies above 3 kHz and tinnitus. In this study, we have used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to visualize neuronal activation patterns in military adults with AAT and various tinnitus sequelae during an auditory "oddball" attention task. AAT subjects displayed overactivities principally during reflex of target sound detection, in sensorimotor areas and in emotion-related areas such as the insula, anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortex, in premotor area, in cross-modal sensory associative areas, and, interestingly, in a region of the Rolandic operculum that has recently been shown to be involved in tympanic movements due to air pressure. We propose further investigations of this brain area and fine middle ear investigations, because our results might suggest a model in which AAT tinnitus may arise as a proprioceptive illusion caused by abnormal excitability of middle-ear muscle spindles possibly link with the acoustic reflex and associated with emotional and sensorimotor disturbances. PMID:22574285

  13. Savage poetry: torture and cruelty in Mirbeau and Barbey d'Aurevilly.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Hannah

    2010-01-01

    Octave Mirbeau's Le Jardin des supplices and Barbey d'Aurevilly's L'Ensorcelée and Les Diaboliques depict a range of cruel attacks on the human body. These examples of violence, hitherto neglected by critical readers of the texts, have much to tell us not only about the authors' approach to violence, but also about the relationships between author, reader, and text that such representations of violence foreground. The notion of readerly pleasure theorized by Roland Barthes and linked to identity formation by Emma Wilson is associated with the witnessing or experiencing of pain in these texts. The reader is problematically positioned as both sadist, vicariously enjoying the suffering he or she is forced to witness, and masochist, taking pleasure in the authors' manipulations of them. These depictions of violated bodies ask whether and by what means violence can be represented in language, and this discussion leads to an analysis of the impact that such representations of violence have on the reader's experience of a text. PMID:21114062

  14. When Is EEG Indicated in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder?

    PubMed

    Zaimoğlu, Sennur; Türkdoğan, Dilşad; Mazlum, Betül; Bekiroğlu, Nural; Tetik-Kabil, Aylin; Eyilikeder, Seda

    2015-11-01

    The authors investigated the parameters for predicting epileptiform abnormalities in a group of children diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The sample consisted of 148 subjects aged between 6 and 13 (8.76 ± 1.26; 25.7% female) years. Subtypes of ADHD and comorbid psychiatric disorders were defined according to DSM-IV criteria. The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised was applied to all patients. Most of the subjects (89.2%) had wakefulness and sleep electroencephalography examinations lasting about one hour. The authors found out that the coexistence of speech sound disorder (odds ratio [OR] 3.90, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.61-9.48) and higher Digit Span test performance (OR 1.24, 95% CI: 1.06-1.44) predicted the presence of accompanying epileptiform abnormalities. The prevalence of epileptiform abnormalities was 26.4%, and they were frequently localized in the frontal (41%) and centrotemporal (28.2%) regions. Higher percentage of speech sound disorder co-occurrence (64%) in subjects with rolandic spikes suggests that epileptiform abnormalities associated with ADHD can be determined genetically at least in some cases. Pathophysiology of epileptiform abnormalities in ADHD might have complex genetic and maturational background. PMID:25895916

  15. Comparison between Kinesio Taping and a Traditional Physical Therapy Program in Treatment of Nonspecific Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Kachanathu, Shaji John; Alenazi, Aqeel M; Seif, Hamada Eid; Hafez, Ashraf Ramadan; Alroumim, Meshari Abdulmohsen

    2014-08-01

    [Purpose] Nonspecific low back pain (NSLBP) is a very common but largely self-limiting condition. Several types of tape and their associated application methods are available for different conditions. The aim of the present study was to observe the effect of Kinesio taping (KT) compared with traditional management of NSLBP. [Subjects and Methods] Forty male and female patients with a mean age of 34.8±7.54 years were randomly divided into two groups; group 1 (n=20) which underwent conventional physical therapy with KT, and group 2 (n=20), which underwent only conventional physical therapy. The intervention sessions for both groups were three times per week for four weeks. Outcomes were assessed for activities of daily living (ADL) using the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, pain severity using a visual analogue scale, and ranges of motion (ROMs) of trunk flexion and extension using the modified Schober's test. [Results] Significant differences in measures of pain, ADL, and trunk flexion and extension ROMs were observed post intervention within each group. In comparison, there were no significant differences in measures of pain, ADL, and trunk flexion and extension ROMs post intervention between groups. [Conclusion] A physical therapy program involving strengthening exercises for abdominal muscles and stretching exercises for back, hamstring, and iliopsoas muscles with or without Kinesio taping was beneficial in the treatment of chronic low back pain. PMID:25202177

  16. Towards a functional neuroanatomy of conscious perception and its modulation by volition: implications of human auditory neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed Central

    Silbersweig, D A; Stern, E

    1998-01-01

    Conscious sensory perception and its modulation by volition are integral to human mental life. Functional neuroimaging techniques provide a direct means of identifying and characterizing in vivo the systems-level patterns of brain activity associated with such mental functions. In a series of positron emission tomography activation experiments, we and our colleagues have examined a range of normal and abnormal auditory states that, when contrasted, provide dissociations relevant to the question of the neural substrates of sensory awareness. These dissociations include sensory awareness in the presence and absence of external sensory stimuli, the transition from sensory unawareness to awareness (or vice versa) in the presence of sensory stimuli, and sensory awareness with and without volition. The auditory states studied include hallucinations, mental imagery, cortical deafness modulated by attention, and hearing modulated by sedation. The results of these studies highlight the distributed nature of the functional neuroanatomy that is sufficient, if not necessary, for sensory awareness. The probable roles of unimodal association (as compared with primary) cortices, heteromodal cortices, limbic/paralimbic regions and subcortical structures (such as the thalamus) are discussed. In addition, interactions between pre- and post-rolandic regions are examined in the context of top-down, volitional modulation of sensory awareness. PMID:9854260

  17. Extending the phenotypic spectrum of RBFOX1 deletions: Sporadic focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lal, Dennis; Pernhorst, Katharina; Klein, Karl Martin; Reif, Philipp; Tozzi, Rossana; Toliat, Mohammad R; Winterer, Georg; Neubauer, Bernd; Nürnberg, Peter; Rosenow, Felix; Becker, Felicitas; Lerche, Holger; Kunz, Wolfram S; Kurki, Mitja I; Hoffmann, Per; Becker, Albert J; Perucca, Emilio; Zara, Federico; Sander, Thomas; Weber, Yvonne G

    2015-09-01

    Partial deletions of the RBFOX1 gene encoding the neuronal splicing regulator have been reported in a range of neurodevelopmental diseases including idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsy (IGE/GGE), childhood focal epilepsy, and self-limited childhood benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS, rolandic epilepsy), and autism. The protein regulates alternative splicing of many neuronal transcripts involved in the homeostatic control of neuronal excitability. Herein, we examined whether structural deletions affecting RBFOX1 exons confer susceptibility to common forms of juvenile and adult focal epilepsy syndromes. We screened 807 unrelated patients with sporadic focal epilepsy, and we identified seven hemizygous exonic RBFOX1 deletions in patients with sporadic focal epilepsy (0.9%) in comparison to one deletion found in 1,502 controls. The phenotypes of the patients carrying RBFOX1 deletions comprise magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-negative epilepsy of unknown etiology with frontal and temporal origin (n = 5) and two patients with temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis. The epilepsies were largely pharmacoresistant but not associated with intellectual disability. Our study extends the phenotypic spectrum of RBFOX1 deletions as a risk factor for focal epilepsy and suggests that exonic RBFOX1 deletions are involved in the broad spectrum of focal and generalized epilepsies. PMID:26174448

  18. Relation of Obesity to Consummatory and Anticipatory Food Reward

    PubMed Central

    Stice, Eric; Spoor, Sonja; Ng, Janet; Zald, David H.

    2009-01-01

    This report reviews findings from studies that have investigated whether abnormalities in reward from food intake and anticipated food intake increase risk for obesity. Self-report and behavioral data suggest that obese relative to lean individuals show elevated anticipatory and consumatory food reward. Brain imaging studies suggest that obese relative to lean individuals show greater activation of the gustatory cortex (insula/frontal operculum) and oral somatosensory regions (parietal operculum and Rolandic operculum) in response to anticipated intake and consumption of palatable foods. Yet, data also suggest that obese relative to lean individuals show less activation in the dorsal striatum in response to consumption of palatable foods and reduced striatal D2 dopamine receptor density. Emerging prospective data also suggest that abnormal activation in these brain regions increases risk for future weight gain and that genotypes associated with lowered dopamine signaling amplify these predictive effects. Results imply that individuals who show greater activation in the gustatory cortex and somatosensory regions in response to anticipation and consumption of food, but who show weaker activation in the striatum during food intake, may be at risk for overeating, particularly those at genetic risk for lowered dopamine receptor signaling. PMID:19328819

  19. Neurobiological Changes of Schizotypy: Evidence From Both Volume-Based Morphometric Analysis and Resting-State Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Yan, Chao; Yin, Da-zhi; Fan, Ming-xia; Cheung, Eric F. C.; Pantelis, Christos; Chan, Raymond C. K.

    2015-01-01

    The current study sought to examine the underlying brain changes in individuals with high schizotypy by integrating networks derived from brain structural and functional imaging. Individuals with high schizotypy (n = 35) and low schizotypy (n = 34) controls were screened using the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire and underwent brain structural and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging on a 3T scanner. Voxel-based morphometric analysis and graph theory-based functional network analysis were conducted. Individuals with high schizotypy showed reduced gray matter (GM) density in the insula and the dorsolateral prefrontal gyrus. The graph theoretical analysis showed that individuals with high schizotypy showed similar global properties in their functional networks as low schizotypy individuals. Several hubs of the functional network were identified in both groups, including the insula, the lingual gyrus, the postcentral gyrus, and the rolandic operculum. More hubs in the frontal lobe and fewer hubs in the occipital lobe were identified in individuals with high schizotypy. By comparing the functional connectivity between clusters with abnormal GM density and the whole brain, individuals with high schizotypy showed weaker functional connectivity between the left insula and the putamen, but stronger connectivity between the cerebellum and the medial frontal gyrus. Taken together, our findings suggest that individuals with high schizotypy present changes in terms of GM and resting-state functional connectivity, especially in the frontal lobe. PMID:25533270

  20. A global wave parameter database for geophysical applications. Part 2: Model validation with improved source term parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rascle, Nicolas; Ardhuin, Fabrice

    2013-10-01

    A multi-scale global hindcast of ocean waves is presented that covers the years 1994-2012, based on recently published parameterizations for wind sea and swell dissipation [Ardhuin, F., Rogers, E., Babanin, A., Filipot, J.-F., Magne, R., Roland, A., van der Westhuysen, A., Queffeulou, P., Lefevre, J.-M., Aouf, L., Collard, F., 2010. Semi-empirical dissipation source functions for wind-wave models: Part I. Definition, calibration and validation. J. Phys. Oceanogr. 40 (9), 1917-1941]. Results from this hindcast include traditional wave parameters, like the significant wave height and mean periods, and we particularly consider the accuracy of the results for phenomenal sea states, with significant heights above 14 m. Using unbiased winds, there is no evidence of a bias in wave heights even for this very high range. Various spectral moments were also validated, including the surface Stokes drift and mean square slopes that are relevant for wave-current interactions modelling and remote sensing, and also spectra of seismic noise sources. The estimation of these parameters is made more accurate by the new wave growth and dissipation parameterizations. Associated air-sea fluxes of momentum and energy are significantly different from what is obtained with the WAM-Cycle 4 parameterization, with a roughness that is practically a function of wind speed only. That particular output of the model does not appear very realistic and will require future adjustments of the generation and dissipation parameterizations.

  1. Cerebral gray matter volume variation in female-to-male transsexuals: a voxel-based morphometric study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Seok-Kwun; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2015-12-16

    Several studies seem to support the hypothesis that brain anatomy is associated with transsexualism. However, these studies were still limited because few neuroanatomical findings have been obtained from female-to-male (FtM) transsexuals. This study compared the cerebral regional volumes of gray matter (GM) between FtM transsexuals and female controls using a voxel-based morphometry. Twelve FtM transsexuals who had undergone sex-reassignment surgery and 15 female controls participated in this study. Both groups were age matched and right-handed, with no history of neurological illness. Fifteen female controls were recruited to determine whether GM volumes in FtM transsexuals more closely resembled individuals who shared their biological sex. MRI data were processed using SPM 8 with the diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL). FtM transsexuals showed significantly larger volumes of the thalamus, hypothalamus, midbrain, gyrus rectus, head of caudate nucleus, precentral gyrus, and subcallosal area compared with the female controls. However, the female controls showed a significantly larger volume in the superior temporal gyrus including Heschl's gyrus and Rolandic operculum. These findings confirm that the volume difference in brain substructures in FtM transsexuals is likely to be associated with transsexualism and that transsexualism is probably associated with distinct cerebral structures, determining gender identity. PMID:26559725

  2. Motor features in posterior cortical atrophy and their imaging correlates.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Natalie S; Shakespeare, Timothy J; Lehmann, Manja; Keihaninejad, Shiva; Nicholas, Jennifer M; Leung, Kelvin K; Fox, Nick C; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2014-12-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by impaired higher visual processing skills; however, motor features more commonly associated with corticobasal syndrome may also occur. We investigated the frequency and clinical characteristics of motor features in 44 PCA patients and, with 30 controls, conducted voxel-based morphometry, cortical thickness, and subcortical volumetric analyses of their magnetic resonance imaging. Prominent limb rigidity was used to define a PCA-motor subgroup. A total of 30% (13) had PCA-motor; all demonstrating asymmetrical left upper limb rigidity. Limb apraxia was more frequent and asymmetrical in PCA-motor, as was myoclonus. Tremor and alien limb phenomena only occurred in this subgroup. The subgroups did not differ in neuropsychological test performance or apolipoprotein E4 allele frequency. Greater asymmetry of atrophy occurred in PCA-motor, particularly involving right frontoparietal and peri-rolandic cortices, putamen, and thalamus. The 9 patients (including 4 PCA-motor) with pathology or cerebrospinal fluid all showed evidence of Alzheimer's disease. Our data suggest that PCA patients with motor features have greater atrophy of contralateral sensorimotor areas but are still likely to have underlying Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25086839

  3. The Effect of Harmonic Technique vs End Range Loading Exercises on Pain and Disability in Patients With Non-Specific Chronic Low Back Pain: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Arab, Amir Massoud; Saadati, Heidar; Sheikhhoseini, Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of end range loading (ERL) vs harmonic technique (HT) on patients with chronic low back pain (LBP). Method Fourteen volunteer patients with LBP were randomly assigned to 2 groups based on a blocked randomization method with 7 patients in the HT group and 7 patients in the ERL group. The patients received 10 sessions of treatment for 5 sessions per week. Pain intensity and disability score were recorded using the numeric pain scale and Roland-Morris Disability questionnaire (RMQ), respectively, before and after the treatment period. Results Although pain intensity (P = .02) and the RMQ score (P = .03) decreased in the HT technique group, no statistically significant change was found in the ERL group for the RMQ score (P > .05). The effect size for HT was .6 and .3 for numeric pain scale and RMQ, respectively. Conclusion This preliminary study showed that pain intensity and disability improved in subjects with chronic LBP in the HT group. More investigations with larger sample size are needed to clarify these findings. PMID:27069426

  4. A practical approach to uncomplicated seizures in children.

    PubMed

    McAbee, G N; Wark, J E

    2000-09-01

    Uncomplicated seizures and epilepsy are common in infants and children. Family physicians should be aware of certain epilepsy syndromes that occur in children, such as febrile seizures, benign focal epilepsy of childhood, complex partial epilepsy, juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and video game-related epilepsy. Not all uncomplicated childhood seizures require neuroimaging or treatment. Febrile seizures, rolandic seizures and video game-related seizures are childhood epileptic syndromes that are typically not associated with brain structural lesions on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, and are often not treated with anticonvulsant drugs. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy does not require neuroimaging but does require treatment because of a high rate of recurrent seizures. Complex partial epilepsy often requires both neuroimaging and treatment. Although seizures are diagnosed primarily on clinical grounds, all children with a possible seizure (except febrile seizures) should have an electroencephalogram. Interictal EEGs may be normal. Computed tomography has demonstrated abnormalities in 7 to 19 percent of children with new-onset seizures. The yield of magnetic resonance imaging for specific childhood seizure types is not known, but it is the preferred modality of neuroimaging for many clinical presentations. Most children's seizures treated with anticonvulsants are controlled by the first drug selected. The value of "therapeutic' serum drug levels is questionable in the management of uncomplicated childhood seizures. PMID:10997534

  5. Nonsurgical Korean Integrative Treatments for Symptomatic Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Three-Armed Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial Protocol.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kiok; Shin, Kyung-Min; Lee, Jun-Hwan; Seo, Bok-Nam; Jung, So-Young; Youn, Yousuk; Lee, Sang Ho; Kim, Jaehong; Qu, Wenchun; Kim, Tae-Hun

    2016-01-01

    This is a study protocol for a pilot three-armed randomized controlled trial on nonsurgical integrative Korean medicinal treatment for symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Thirty-six participants who have been diagnosed with (LSS) and recommended for spinal surgery by neurosurgeons or orthopedics and have had spinal symptoms such as severe low back pain and neurological claudication regardless of at least three months of conservative treatments will be recruited. Participants will be randomly assigned to be one of the three intervention groups, including the Mokhuri treatment program group 1 or 2 or usual care group. All treatments will be administered in inpatient units over a period of 4 weeks. The primary outcomes are 0 to 100 Visual Analogue Scales for low back pain and leg pain and the secondary outcomes are Oswestry Disability Index; EQ-5D; Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire; Oxford Claudication Score; physical function test, including treadmill test, walking duration, and distance assessment for free leg pain; radiologic testing; and adverse events which will be assessed during the 4-week treatment period as well as after 3 and 6 months of follow-up. Then, we will assess the feasibility of the clinical trial design as well as a nonsurgical integrative treatment program. This trial is registered with CRIS registration number: KCT0001218. PMID:26941823

  6. The Effects of VR-based Wii Fit Yoga on Physical Function in Middle-aged Female LBP Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Sik; Min, Won-Kyu; Kim, Jung-Hee; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this research was to determine the effects of a virtual reality-based yoga program on middle-aged female low back pain patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty middle-aged female patients who suffered from low back pain were assigned to either a physical therapy program or a virtual reality-based yoga program for a period of four weeks. Participants could check their posture and weight bearing on a monitor as they shifted their weight or changed their postures on a Wii balance board. There were a total of seven exercise programs. A 30-minute, three times per week, virtual reality-based Wii Fit yoga program or trunk stabilizing exercise was performed, respectively. [Results] Repeated-measures analysis of covariance revealed significant differences in between pre- and post-training VAS, algometer, Oswestry low-back pain disability index (ODI), Roland Morris disability questionnaire (RMDQ), and fear avoidance beliefs questionnaire (FBQ) scores. The VAS, algometer, ODI, RMDQ, and FBQ scores showed significant differences in groups. Regarding the effect of time-by-group interaction, there were significant differences in VAS, ODI, ODI, and FBQ scores. [Conclusion] In conclusion, for middle-aged female patients who have low back pain, a virtual reality-based yoga program was shown to have positive effects on physical improvements, and this program can be employed as a therapeutic medium for prevention and cure of low back pain. PMID:24764631

  7. Development of Sampling Techniques For Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coste, P.; Eiden, M.; Gromov, V.; Ilykorpi, T.; Kochan, H.; Re, E.; Richter, L.

    During the last 15 years, the European Space Agency has initiated the development of a number of sampling techniques for planetary surfaces, in the frame of its basic Technology and Research Programme (TRP). Sampling may be performed by means of drilling, coring, milling, grain scooping or picking, and penetration. The items addressed in particular are: the Sample Acquisition System (SAS) for the late Comet Nucleus Sample and Return mission; the Small Sample Acquisition and Distribution Tool (SSA/DT): the Mole and the Sampling Mole (SM). Some of these devices have found a direct application within an ESA planetary mission, as expected; in other cases, their concept was used and modified to fulfill updated requirements. Sampling or soil probing capabilities are included to various extents in these current or near-future ESA missions: the Huygens Probe (on NASA's CASSINI spacecraft), on its way to Titan surface; the RoLand Lander (on ROSETTA s/c), onto Comet Wirtanen; the Beagle2 Lander (carried by MARS EXPRESS s/c) sampling the Martian surface and sub- surface. Future sampling missions to Mercury, the Moon and to asteroids are being studied. Even more challenging missions to Venus are considered.

  8. Efficacy of movement control exercises versus general exercises on recurrent sub-acute nonspecific low back pain in a sub-group of patients with movement control dysfunction. protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Practice guidelines recommend various types of exercise for chronic back pain but there have been few head-to-head comparisons of these interventions. General exercise seems to be an effective option for management of chronic low back pain (LBP) but very little is known about the management of a sub-acute LBP within sub-groups. Recent research has developed clinical tests to identify a subgroup of patients with chronic non-specific LBP who have movement control dysfunction (MD). Method/Design We are conducting a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to compare the effects of general exercise and specific movement control exercise (SMCE) on disability and function in patients with MD within recurrent sub-acute LBP. The main outcome measure is the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. Discussion European clinical guideline for management of chronic LBP recommends that more research is required to develop tools to improve the classification and identification of specific clinical sub-groups of chronic LBP patients. Good quality RCTs are then needed to determine the effectiveness of specific interventions aimed at these specific target groups. This RCT aims to test the hypothesis whether patients within a sub-group of MD benefit more through a specific individually tailored movement control exercise program than through general exercises. PMID:22494776

  9. Dipolar Effects in an Ultracold Gas of LiCs Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidemueller, Matthias

    2011-05-01

    Recently, there has been important progress in the investigation of ultracold polar molecules in the absolute ground state, thus opening intriguing perspectives for strongly correlated quantum systems under the influence of long-range dipolar forces. We have studied the formation of LiCs molecules via photoassociation (PA) in a double-species magneto-optical trap. The LiCs dimer is a particularly promising candidate for observing dipolar effects, as it possesses the largest dipole moment of all alkali dimers (5.5 Debye in the ground state). Ultracold LiCs molecules in the absolute rovibrational ground state are formed by a single photo-association step. The dipole moment of ground state levels is determined by Stark spectroscopy and was found to be in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions. Vibrational redistribution due to spontaneous emission and blackbody radiation is observed and compared a rate-equation model.In collaboration with Johannes Deiglmayr, Marc Repp, University of Heidelberg; Roland Wester, University of Innsbruck; and Olivier Dulieu, Laboratoire Aime Cotton. Work was supported by DFG and ESF in the framework of the Eurocores EuroQUAM as well as the Heidelberg Center for Quantum Dynamics.

  10. Sleep and Epilepsy: Strange Bedfellows No More.

    PubMed

    St Louis, Erik K

    2011-09-01

    Ancient philosophers and theologians believed that altered consciousness freed the mind to prophesy the future, equating sleep with seizures. Only recently has the bidirectional influences of epilepsy and sleep upon one another received more substantive analysis. This article reviews the complex and increasingly recognized interrelationships between sleep and epilepsy. NREM sleep differentially activates interictal epileptiform discharges during slow wave (N3) sleep, while ictal seizure events occur more frequently during light NREM stages N1 and N2. The most commonly encountered types of sleep-related epilepsies (those with preferential occurrence during sleep or following arousal) include frontal and temporal lobe partial epilepsies in adults, and benign epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes (benign rolandic epilepsy) and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy in children and adolescents. Comorbid sleep disorders are frequent in patients with epilepsy, particularly obstructive sleep apnea in refractory epilepsy patients which may aggravate seizure burden, while treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure often improves seizure frequency. Distinguishing nocturnal events such as NREM parasomnias (confusional arousals, sleep walking, and night terrors), REM parasomnias including REM sleep behavior disorder, and nocturnal seizures if frequently difficult and benefits from careful history taking and video-EEG-polysomnography in selected cases. Differentiating nocturnal seizures from primary sleep disorders is essential for determining appropriate therapy, and recognizing co-existent sleep disorders in patients with epilepsy may improve their seizure burden and quality of life. PMID:23539488

  11. On the nature of the anti-tail of Comet Kohoutek /1973f/. II - Comparison of the working model with ground-based photographic observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Z.; Miller, F. D.

    1976-01-01

    On the basis of photographic observations made at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, the radial and transverse brightness profiles and time variations in the surface brightness of the anti-tail of Comet Kohoutek were examined. In the process of photometric reduction one-dimensional radial tracings passing through the comet's nucleus and covering the entire anti-tail were used in the place of the standard two-dimensional scans. Each radial scan was defined by the position angle, and 'noise' variations were interpolated from the known field brightness outside the anti-tail. An analysis of the results provides quantitative support for a previously proposed model (Sekanina, 1974) suggesting that the dust particles in the anti-tail suffered a significant loss in radius due to evaporation near the perihelion passage. Preliminary calculations indicate that only particles initially larger than 100-150 micrometers in diameter survived. The emission rate of dust may be comparable to those derived for Comets Arend-Roland (1957 III) and Bennett (1970 II).

  12. Syndromes with very low risk of acute prolonged seizures.

    PubMed

    Bast, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    The provision of rescue medication is an important component in the treatment of epilepsy. An intervention within five to ten minutes in the case of an acute prolonged seizure may preserve the patient from status epilepticus (SE). However, the risk of convulsive SE (CSE) differs markedly between patients depending on individual factors. This report summarizes the literature on risk factors for CSE in children with epilepsy and adolescents, and discusses the hypothesis that some electroclinical syndromes engender a very low risk of CSE. The most important risk factor for SE is the history of a previous event. The longer a patient lives without SE, the lower the risk will be. CSE occurs significantly less frequently in idiopathic epilepsies compared to epilepsies with symptomatic or unknown aetiology. It is very rarely observed in patients with (non-encephalopathic) idiopathic generalised epilepsies, i.e. childhood absence epilepsy or juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. However, non-compliance or inappropriate treatment may trigger CSE in these syndromes. A very low risk can be assumed for children with Rolandic epilepsy, while CSE occurs in a considerable percentage of patients with Panayiotopoulos syndrome. Although the risk of CSE in otherwise normal children with cryptogenic focal epilepsy is uncertain, it is presumably low under successful continuous medication. In conclusion, the choice for or against the prescription of rescue medication remains an individual decision. Consequently, for several electroclinical syndromes, a per se provision of rescue medication does not appear justified. PMID:25322851

  13. Intelligence-related differences in the asymmetry of spontaneous cerebral activity.

    PubMed

    Santarnecchi, Emiliano; Tatti, Elisa; Rossi, Simone; Serino, Vinicio; Rossi, Alessandro

    2015-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests the spontaneous BOLD signal synchronization of corresponding interhemispheric, homotopic regions as a stable trait of human brain physiology, with emerging differences in such organization being also related to some pathological conditions. To understand whether such brain functional symmetries play a role into higher-order cognitive functioning, here we correlated the functional homotopy profiles of 119 healthy subjects with their intelligence level. Counterintuitively, reduced homotopic connectivity in above average-IQ versus average-IQ subjects was observed, with significant reductions in visual and somatosensory cortices, supplementary motor area, rolandic operculum, and middle temporal gyrus, possibly suggesting that a downgrading of interhemispheric talk at rest could be associated with higher cognitive functioning. These regions also showed an increased spontaneous synchrony with medial structures located in ipsi- and contralateral hemispheres, with such pattern being mostly detectable for regions placed in the left hemisphere. The interactions with age and gender have been also tested, with different patterns for subjects above and below 25 years old and less homotopic connectivity in the prefrontal cortex and posterior midline regions in female participants with higher IQ scores. These findings support prior evidence suggesting a functional role for homotopic connectivity in human cognitive expression, promoting the reduction of synchrony between primary sensory regions as a predictor of higher intelligence levels. PMID:26059228

  14. Intact brain processing of musical emotions in autism spectrum disorder, but more cognitive load and arousal in happy vs. sad music.

    PubMed

    Gebauer, Line; Skewes, Joshua; Westphael, Gitte; Heaton, Pamela; Vuust, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Music is a potent source for eliciting emotions, but not everybody experience emotions in the same way. Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show difficulties with social and emotional cognition. Impairments in emotion recognition are widely studied in ASD, and have been associated with atypical brain activation in response to emotional expressions in faces and speech. Whether these impairments and atypical brain responses generalize to other domains, such as emotional processing of music, is less clear. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated neural correlates of emotion recognition in music in high-functioning adults with ASD and neurotypical adults. Both groups engaged similar neural networks during processing of emotional music, and individuals with ASD rated emotional music comparable to the group of neurotypical individuals. However, in the ASD group, increased activity in response to happy compared to sad music was observed in dorsolateral prefrontal regions and in the rolandic operculum/insula, and we propose that this reflects increased cognitive processing and physiological arousal in response to emotional musical stimuli in this group. PMID:25076869

  15. Girl with a PRRT2 mutation and infantile focal epilepsy with bilateral spikes.

    PubMed

    Torisu, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Kyoko; Shimojima, Keiko; Sugawara, Midori; Sanefuji, Masafumi; Ishizaki, Yoshito; Sakai, Yasunari; Yamashita, Hironori; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Hara, Toshiro

    2014-04-01

    This paper documents the case of a female Japanese patient with infantile focal epilepsy, which was different from benign infantile seizures, and a family history of infantile convulsion and paroxysmal choreoathetosis. The patient developed partial seizures (e.g., psychomotor arrest) at age 14 months. At the time of onset, interictal electroencephalography (EEG) showed bilateral parietotemporal spikes, but the results of neurologic examination and brain magnetic resonance imaging were normal. Her seizures were well controlled with carbamazepine, and she had a normal developmental outcome. EEG abnormalities, however, persisted for more than 6 years, and the spikes moved transiently to the occipital area and began to resemble the rolandic spikes recognized in benign childhood epilepsy. Her father had paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia, with an onset age of 6 years, and her youngest sister had typical benign infantile seizures. Genetic analysis demonstrated that all affected members had a heterozygous mutation of c.649_650insC in the proline-rich transmembrane protein-2 (PRRT2) gene. This case indicates that the phenotypic spectrum of infantile seizures or epilepsy with PRRT2-related pathology may be larger than previously expected, and that genetic investigation of the effect of PRRT2 mutations on idiopathic seizures or epilepsy in childhood may help elucidate the pathological backgrounds of benign childhood epilepsy. PMID:23768507

  16. General Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfle, Gerhard

    Epothilone is a microbial product, and thus its history may be traced back to the discovery of the respective microbe, Sorangium cellulosum, a bacterium belonging to the taxonomic group of myxobacteria, which originally has been described by Roland Thaxter in 1892 (1). Today this group of organisms comprises around 40 species, one of which is Sorangium cellulosum. For a long time, myxobacteria were only known for their gliding motility and sophisticated life cycle, although it had been occasionally speculated that they might produce secondary metabolites like actinomycetes or bacilli (2). In 1975 Hans Reichenbach and his group at the German Centre for Biotechnology (GBF; now called the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research) set out to isolate strains of myxobacteria from soil samples collected all over the world, and to examine their secondary metabolism. In 1978, while work was already ongoing, I joined them and took over the chemistry part. In the same year the first structure of a myxobacterial metabolite, ambruticin, was published by a group from Warner-Lambert (3) making us very confident of being on the right track. Ambruticin had been isolated from a Sorangium cellulosum strain, and was identified as a unique cyclopropane polyketide structure exhibiting potentially useful antifungal properties. Ambruticin and its derivatives had been developed for medical application for some time, and recently gained new interest (4).

  17. Human annoyance and reactions to hotel room specific noises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everhard, Ian L.

    2001-05-01

    A new formula is presented where multiple annoyance sources and transmission loss values of any partition are combined to produce a new single number rating of annoyance. The explanation of the formula is based on theoretical psychoacoustics and survey testing used to create variables used to weight the results. An imaginary hotel room is processed through the new formula and is rated based on theoretical survey results that would be taken by guests of the hotel. The new single number rating compares the multiple sources of annoyance to a single imaginary unbiased source where absolute level is the only factor in stimulating a linear rise in annoyance [Fidell et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 66, 1427 (1979); D. M. Jones and D. E. Broadbent, ``Human performance and noise,'' in Handbook of Noise Control, 3rd ed., edited by C. M. Harris (ASA, New York, 1998), Chap. 24; J. P. Conroy and J. S. Roland, ``STC Field Testing and Results,'' in Sound and Vibration Magazine, Acoustical Publications, pp. 10-15 (July 2003)].

  18. Efficacy of transforaminal versus interspinous corticosteroid injectionin discal radiculalgia - a prospective, randomised, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, E; Cyteval, C; Abiad, L; Picot, M C; Taourel, P; Blotman, F

    2003-10-01

    A prospective, randomised, double-blind study was carried out to compare the respective efficacies of transforaminal and interspinous epidural corticosteroid injections in discal radiculalgia. Thirty-one patients (18 females, 13 males) with discal radicular pain of less than 3 months' duration were consecutively randomised to receive either radio-guided transforaminal or blindly performed interspinous epidural corticosteroid injections. Post-treatment outcome was evaluated clinically at 6 and 30 days, and then at 6 months, but only by mailed questionnaire. At day 6, the between-group difference was significantly in favour of the transforaminal group with respect to Schober's index, finger-to-floor distance, daily activities, and work and leisure activities on the Dallas pain scale. At day 30, pain relief was significantly better in the transforaminal group. At month 6, answers to the mailed questionnaire still showed significantly better results for transforaminal injection concerning pain, daily activities, work and leisure activities and anxiety and depression, with a decline in the Roland-Morris score. In recent discal radiculalgia, the efficacy of radio-guided transforaminal epidural corticosteroid injections was higher than that obtained with blindly-performed interspinous injections. PMID:14579160

  19. The clinical and biomechanical effects of fascial-muscular lengthening therapy on tight hip flexor patients with and without low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Avrahami, Daniel; Potvin, Jim R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Many patients have tight hip flexors with or without low back pain. Manual fascial-muscular lengthening therapy (FMLT) is one commonly used treatment for this population. Objective: Investigate the clinical and biomechanical effects of manual FMLT on tight hip flexor patients with and without low back pain. Methods: A nonrandomized trial, before-and-after experiment with multiple baselines conducted on two different patient populations: 1) Mechanical low back pain patients with tight hip flexors (n = 10) and 2) Asymptomatic group with tight hip flexors (n = 8). Four treatments of manual FMLT were performed on the hip flexor of the two groups of patients over a two-week period. Primary outcome measures over the two-week period were 1) Maximum voluntary trunk flexor and extensor moments, 2) Disability (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire) and pain (10-cm Visual Analogue Scale), 3) Passive hip extension mobility. Results: Primary outcome analysis involved within-groups comparisons. Maximum voluntary trunk extension demonstrated increases for the low back pain patients. The low back pain patients demonstrated a small, but significant, reduction in disability and pain. Both groups demonstrated an increase in passive hip extension measurements. Conclusion: This preliminary study demonstrated interesting results from manual FMLT on two tight hip flexor patient populations with and without low back pain. However, there were several significant limitations from this study, which restrict the ability to generalize the results. PMID:25550670

  20. With Weekly Astronomy Tips Against the Weekly Papers' Astrology Humbug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szécsényi-Nagy, G. A.

    2006-08-01

    The true democracy - following a long lasting monolithic political-cultural system of the so-called Peoples' Democracy -- freed the sluices in the early nineties for any absurd written idea. No really powerful newspapers or widely circulated magazines were allowed to publish any destructive astrological advice during those 40 years. Although here and there, somehow, it appeared cloaked but was unable to reach the wide public. The first signs of these unwanted changes reached our nation through the electronic media (first of all television, of course ) but very soon a whirl of everyday astrology has occupied a substantial part of almost every newspaper.This situation urges professional and amateur astronomers, astrophysicists, as well as other skeptic scientists and journalists to set their face against any ideas of pseudo-science. In our country, the most has been done by the Hungarian Astronomical Association and the Roland Eötvös Physical Society.I intend to call the attention of our colleagues from other countries and regions to these brave initiatives, and inform them on some useful steps and their first results. I also expect a vivid exchange of the opinions and strategies that can build and develop a wiser society in the over-industrialized or consuming-oriented countries

  1. Long-term safety and effectiveness of tanezumab as treatment for chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Gimbel, Joseph S; Kivitz, Alan J; Bramson, Candace; Nemeth, Mary Anne; Keller, David S; Brown, Mark T; West, Christine R; Verburg, Kenneth M

    2014-09-01

    A noncontrolled, randomized, multicenter study (NCT00924664) evaluated long-term safety and effectiveness of tanezumab in patients with chronic low back pain following a randomized placebo- and active-controlled parent study that evaluated analgesic efficacy. Patients were randomized to tanezumab 10mg (n=321) or 20mg (n=527) administered at 8-week intervals via 3 intravenous injections followed by 4 subcutaneous injections. Effectiveness analyses included change from parent study baseline in Brief Pain Inventory Short Form, Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire, and Patient's Global Assessment of low back pain. Safety assessments included adverse event documentation, physical/neurological examinations, and laboratory tests. Mean treatment duration during the extension study was 194 and 202 days with tanezumab 10 and 20mg, respectively. Both tanezumab doses provided similar and sustained improvements in all effectiveness outcomes. The most frequently reported adverse events were arthralgia, paresthesia, and hypoesthesia. Adverse events initially described as osteonecrosis were reported in 6 patients (tanezumab 10mg, n=2; tanezumab 20mg, n=4); 9 additional patients (tanezumab 10mg, n=7; tanezumab 20mg, n=2) underwent total joint replacement (TJR). A blinded, independent adjudication committee reviewed all 6 patients with reported osteonecrosis and 4 of the 9 patients undergoing TJR. Adjudication outcomes were osteonecrosis (n=0), worsening osteoarthritis (n=5; 1 rapidly progressive), and another diagnosis or indeterminate (n=5). Tanezumab 10mg had better tolerability than tanezumab 20mg, and may represent an effective long-term treatment for chronic low back pain. PMID:24937440

  2. Approach for a Global Height Reference System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihde, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    Hermann Drewes, Christoph Foerste, Thomas Gruber, Gunter Liebsch, Roland Pail, Laura Sanchez For Earth system monitoring the heights are main parameters for global changes. Physical heights are potential differences of the outer Earth gravity field at different positions. Long term monitoring of the vertical component of the Earth surface needs a standardized defined and realized global reference relating the geometry and the gravity field of the Earth. In the last two decades, in several working groups of the International Association of Geodesy were different concepts for definition and realization of global height reference system discussed. Furthermore, the satellite gravity missions have the Earth gravity field data basis general extended. So far, it is possible to develop the present local and regional height reference systems concepts to a global approach. The presented proposal has to be understood as a model that consider the present possibilities and actual needs for the realization of a global height reference system. It includes aspects for the combination of observations and products representing the geometry and the gravity field of the Earth.

  3. PREFACE: International Conference "Trends in Spintronics and Nanomagnetism" (TSN-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruccio, Giuseppe; Sanvito, Stefano; Hoffmann, Germar; Wiesendanger, Roland; Rowan, Alan

    2011-03-01

    Dublin, Ireland), Germar Hoffmann and Roland Wiesendanger (Institute for Applied Physics, University of Hamburg, Germany), and Alan Rowan (NSRIM Institute Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands). This group also acted as the Publication Committee and managed all the submitted papers that were reviewed by expert referees in order to meet the standards of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Conference photographNobel Laureate A Fert with some members of the organizing committee. The conference would not have been possible without the support from the local organizing committee at the University of Salento and NNL Institute Nanoscience-CNR, including Anna Paola Caricato, Luigi Martina and the Conference Secretaries Maria Concetta Gerardi, Adriana Amato, and Gabriella Zammillo. We are grateful for the technical assistance of Michele Linciano, Antonio Guerrieri, Carmine Mangia, Luciano Carluccio, and Tommaso Moscara e Francesco Sabetta. We also gratefully acknowledge Serena Chiriacó, Anna Grazia Mondeduro and Massimo Corrado who helped to run the conference. The conference was made possible by the financial support from the European Commission through the SpiDME project (EU-FP6-029002), the Italian Ministry for Foreign Affairs, the University of Lecce and its Department of Physics, and all of the sponsors (Lot Oriel, Attocube, Schaefer, Cryogenic Ltd, Oxford Instruments, MTI Corporation, Cantele, Monte dei Paschi di Siena). Conference Chair and Co-Chairs Giuseppe MaruccioStefano SanvitoGermar HoffmannRoland WiesendangerAlan Rowan Logos

  4. [An antinociceptive effect of chondroprotectors: a myth or a reality?].

    PubMed

    Danilov, A B; Grigorenko, N V

    2015-01-01

    Authors reviewed the literature on the efficacy of chondroprotectors in the treatment of chronic pain syndromes in comparison with placebo and other analgesics to discover the own antinociceptive effect of these drugs and mechanisms by which it occurs. Authors evaluated the results of various clinical studies on the effect of symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SYSADOA) on chronic pain syndrome in osteoarthritis and low back pain. We compared their effects with those of NSAIDs, celecoxib, or placebo. Assessment of pain and functional status was performed using WOMAC, VASandLeken's index as well as the Roland--Morrisquality of life questionnaire. The review of a number of clinical studies revealed a definite antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect of SYSADOA comparable with NSAIDs not only in the treatment of osteoarthritis, but also in chronic back pain, which is characterized by early onset and gradual development with a long-term retention of the result even after discontinuation of therapy. It has been shown that SYSADOA are able to reduce the level of inflammatory cytokines in the blood (IL-6, C-reactive protein) and to activate the production of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in the synovial membrane. It is shown that blocking of the effects of interleukin 1-beta and thereby inhibition of inflammatory enzymes like nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 is one of the points of glucosamine chondrocytes application. The data obtained in numerous studies that confirm the ability of SYSADOA to inhibit proinflammatory cytokines open the new perspectives for their use in the treatment of not only joint pain but also other chronic pain syndromes. PMID:26569010

  5. Theory of classical and quantum transport in monolayers of MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Shaffique

    From the family of new van der Waals materials, the class of layered transition metal dichalcogenides has emerged as a particularly interesting system due to the inherent spin and valley degrees of freedom. In this talk we focus on the interplay between these degrees of freedom and the different types of disorder in monolayers of molybdenum disulphide. Within the semiclassical Drude-Boltzmann formalism, treating the screening of impurities with the random phase approximation, we demonstrate that different scattering mechanisms such as charged impurity scattering, intervalley scattering, and phonons provide different signatures in electronic transport. This allows us to conclude, for example, that in CVD-grown monolayers of MoS2, intervalley scattering dominates over other mechanisms at low temperatures. Interestingly, charged impurities generate spatial inhomogeneity in the carrier density that results in a classical disorder-induced magnetoresistance that can be observed at room temperature. However, at lower temperatures, in this regime of strong intervalley scattering, we predict that the quantum phase-coherent corrections to the conductivity results in a one-parameter crossover from weak localization to weak anti-localization as a function of magnetic field, where this crossover is determined only by the spin lifetime. By comparing with available experimental data, we show that this combined framework allows for a novel way to measure the spin-relaxation in monolayers of MoS2. We find that the spin scattering arises from the Dyakonov-Perel spin-orbit scattering mechanism with a conduction band spin-splitting of about 4 meV, consistent with calculations using density functional theory. Work done in collaboration with Indra Yudhistira and the experimental groups of Goki Eda (NUS), Michael Fuhrer (Monash) and Roland Kawakami (Ohio State), and funded by Singapore National Research Foundation and Ministry of Education.

  6. Dissociated sterol-based liver X receptor agonists as therapeutics for chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shan; Li, Sijia; Henke, Adam; Muse, Evan D; Cheng, Bo; Welzel, Gustav; Chatterjee, Arnab K; Wang, Danling; Roland, Jason; Glass, Christopher K; Tremblay, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    Liver X receptor (LXR), a nuclear hormone receptor, is an essential regulator of immune responses. Activation of LXR-mediated transcription by synthetic agonists, such as T0901317 and GW3965, attenuates progression of inflammatory disease in animal models. However, the adverse effects of these conventional LXR agonists in elevating liver lipids have impeded exploitation of this intriguing mechanism for chronic therapy. Here, we explore the ability of a series of sterol-based LXR agonists to alleviate inflammatory conditions in mice without hepatotoxicity. We show that oral treatment with sterol-based LXR agonists in mice significantly reduces dextran sulfate sodium colitis-induced body weight loss, which is accompanied by reduced expression of inflammatory markers in the large intestine. The anti-inflammatory property of these agonists is recapitulated in vitro in mouse lamina propria mononuclear cells, human colonic epithelial cells, and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In addition, treatment with LXR agonists dramatically suppresses inflammatory cytokine expression in a model of traumatic brain injury. Importantly, in both disease models, the sterol-based agonists do not affect the liver, and the conventional agonist T0901317 results in significant liver lipid accumulation and injury. Overall, these results provide evidence for the development of sterol-based LXR agonists as novel therapeutics for chronic inflammatory diseases.-Yu, S., Li, S., Henke, A., Muse, E. D., Cheng, B., Welzel, G., Chatterjee, A. K., Wang, D., Roland, J., Glass, C. K., Tremblay, M. Dissociated sterol-based liver X receptor agonists as therapeutics for chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:27025962

  7. Yoga for veterans with chronic low back pain: Design and methods of a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Groessl, Erik J; Schmalzl, Laura; Maiya, Meghan; Liu, Lin; Goodman, Debora; Chang, Douglas G; Wetherell, Julie L; Bormann, Jill E; Atkinson, J Hamp; Baxi, Sunita

    2016-05-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) afflicts millions of people worldwide, with particularly high prevalence in military veterans. Many treatment options exist for CLBP, but most have limited effectiveness and some have significant side effects. In general populations with CLBP, yoga has been shown to improve health outcomes with few side effects. However, yoga has not been adequately studied in military veteran populations. In the current paper we will describe the design and methods of a randomized clinical trial aimed at examining whether yoga can effectively reduce disability and pain in US military veterans with CLBP. A total of 144 US military veterans with CLBP will be randomized to either yoga or a delayed treatment comparison group. The yoga intervention will consist of 2× weekly yoga classes for 12weeks, complemented by regular home practice guided by a manual. The delayed treatment group will receive the same intervention after six months. The primary outcome is the change in back pain-related disability measured with the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire at baseline and 12-weeks. Secondary outcomes include pain intensity, pain interference, depression, anxiety, fatigue/energy, quality of life, self-efficacy, sleep quality, and medication usage. Additional process and/or mediational factors will be measured to examine dose response and effect mechanisms. Assessments will be conducted at baseline, 6-weeks, 12-weeks, and 6-months. All randomized participants will be included in intention-to-treat analyses. Study results will provide much needed evidence on the feasibility and effectiveness of yoga as a therapeutic modality for the treatment of CLBP in US military veterans. PMID:27103548

  8. A pilot mixed methods study of patient satisfaction with chiropractic care for back pain

    PubMed Central

    Polipnick, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Objective Patient satisfaction is important to payers, clinicians, and patients. The concept of satisfaction is multifactorial and measurement is challenging. Our objective was to explore use of a mixed-methods design to examine patient satisfaction with chiropractic care for low back pain. Methods Patients were treated 3 times per week for 3 weeks. Outcomes were collected at Week 3 and Week 4. Qualitative interviews were conducted by the treating clinician and a non-treating staff member. Outcome Measures were the Roland Morris Questionnaire (RMQ), the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), and the Patient Satisfaction Scale (PSS). Interviews were recorded and transcribed, and analyzed for themes and constructs of satisfaction. We compared qualitative interview data with quantitative outcomes, and qualitative data from 2 different interviewers. Results All patients reported high levels of satisfaction. Clinical outcomes were unremarkable with little change noted on VAS and RMQ scores. We categorized patient comments into the same constructs of satisfaction as those identified for the PSS: Quality of Care, Information, Effectiveness, and Caring. An additional construct (Quality of Care) and additional subcategories were identified. Satisfaction with care is not explained by outcome alone. The qualitative data collected from 2 different interviewers had few differences. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that it is feasible to use a mixed-method design to examine patient satisfaction. We were able to refine data collection and analysis procedures for the outcome measures and qualitative interview data. We identified limitations and offer recommendations for the next step: the implementation of a larger study. PMID:18984243

  9. Plasma-Photocatalyst Interaction for VOC Removal: Origin of the Synergy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Antoine

    2007-10-01

    It is well known that the coupling of an atmospheric non-thermal plasma with catalytic materials lead to synergetic effects for the abatement of some volatiles organic compounds (VOC). We analyze, here, the mechanisms of such a synergy where the catalyst is a porous semi-conductor (TiO2). Different porous materials are compared: silica fibers possibly containing SiO2 and/or TiO2 nanoparticles. The respective influence of the porosity versus the chemical type of the catalyst is investigated and the oxidizing species are identified using two complementary approaches. 1) Efficiency of the plasma-catalyst coupling in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure, 2) Plasma-catalytic surface interaction in a pulsed low pressure discharge. It is shown that the VOC oxidation scales as a function of the specific injected energy and occurs mainly on the porous surface due to short-life species produced the plasma [1-3]; Time resolved and in-situ measurements using laser absorption spectroscopy and emission spectroscopy in a low-pressure experiment have shown that i) plasma-TiO2 synergy is also evidenced at low pressure[4], ii) O atoms are reversively adsorbed on porous nanoparticles of TiO2; their desorption occur during the first millisecond of a plasma pulse [5], iii) air-plasma pre-treatment of the porous material leads to an enhancement of VOC adsorption on porous TiO2 and has no influence on porous silica. [1] U. Roland et al. Catalysis Today 73 315--323 [2] F. Thevenet et al. Catal. Today 122 (2007) 186--194 [3] F. Thevenet et al. International Journal of Plasma Environmental Science and Technology, 1, (2007), 52-56 [4] A. Rousseau et al. Appl. Phys. Let. 87, 221501 (2005) [5] Allegraud et al. J. Phys. D. : Appl. Phys submitted.

  10. The Influence of verbalization on the pattern of cortical activation during mental arithmetic

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study at 3 T was to investigate the influence of the verbal-visual cognitive style on cerebral activation patterns during mental arithmetic. In the domain of arithmetic, a visual style might for example mean to visualize numbers and (intermediate) results, and a verbal style might mean, that numbers and (intermediate) results are verbally repeated. In this study, we investigated, first, whether verbalizers show activations in areas for language processing, and whether visualizers show activations in areas for visual processing during mental arithmetic. Some researchers have proposed that the left and right intraparietal sulcus (IPS), and the left angular gyrus (AG), two areas involved in number processing, show some domain or modality specificity. That is, verbal for the left AG, and visual for the left and right IPS. We investigated, second, whether the activation in these areas implied in number processing depended on an individual's cognitive style. Methods 42 young healthy adults participated in the fMRI study. The study comprised two functional sessions. In the first session, subtraction and multiplication problems were presented in an event-related design, and in the second functional session, multiplications were presented in two formats, as Arabic numerals and as written number words, in an event-related design. The individual's habitual use of visualization and verbalization during mental arithmetic was assessed by a short self-report assessment. Results We observed in both functional sessions that the use of verbalization predicts activation in brain areas associated with language (supramarginal gyrus) and auditory processing (Heschl's gyrus, Rolandic operculum). However, we found no modulation of activation in the left AG as a function of verbalization. Conclusions Our results confirm that strong verbalizers use mental speech as a form of mental imagination more strongly than

  11. Neuropathic Pain in Elderly Patients with Chronic Low Back Painand Effects of Pregabalin: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kenyu; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Sadayuki; Harada, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Preliminary study. Purpose To assess the association of neuropathic pain with chronic low back pain (LBP) and the effect of pregabalin on neuropathic pain in the elderly. Overview of Literature Of those with chronic LBP, 37% were predominantly presenting with neuropathic pain in young adults. Pregabalin is effective for pain in patients with diabetic neuropathy and peripheral neuralgia. No study has reported on the effects of pregabalin for chronic LBP in elderly patients yet. Methods Pregabalin was administered to 32 patients (age, ≥65 years) with chronic LBP for 4 weeks. Pain and activities of daily living were assessed using the Neuropathic Pain Screening Questionnaire (NePSQ), the pain DETECT questionnaire, visual analog scale, the Japanese Orthopedic Association score, the short form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire and the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. Modic change and spinal canal stenosis were investigated using magnetic resonance imaging. Results Altogether, 43.3% of patients had neuropathic pain according to the NePSQ and 15.6% patients had pain according to the pain DETECT. The efficacy rate of pregabalin was 73.3%. A significant effect was observed in patients with neuropathic pain after 4 weeks of administration. Conclusions Neuropathic pain was slightly less frequently associated with chronic LBP in the elderly. Pregabalin was effective in reducing pain in patients with chronic LBP accompanied with neuropathic pain. Lumbar spinal stenosis and lower limb symptoms were observed in patients with neuropathic pain. We recommend the use of pregabalin for patients after evaluating a screening score, clinical symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging studies. PMID:25901238

  12. The use of glucosamine for chronic low back pain: a systematic review of randomised control trials

    PubMed Central

    Sodha, Reena; Sivanadarajah, Naveethan; Alam, Mahbub

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To ascertain whether the use of oral glucosamine influences symptoms or functional outcomes in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP) thought to be related to spinal osteoarthritis (OA). Design Systematic review of randomised control trials. Searches were performed up to March 2011 on Medline, AMED, CINHAL, Cochrane and EMBASE with subsequent reference screening of retrieved studies. In addition, the grey literature was searched via opensigle. Included studies were required to incorporate at least one of the Cochrane Back Pain Review Group's outcome measures as part of their design. Trials with participants over 18 years with a minimum of 12 weeks of back pain, in combination with radiographic changes of OA in the spine, were included. Studies were rated for risk-of-bias and graded for quality. Results 148 studies were identified after screening and meeting eligibility requirements, and three randomised controlled trials (n=309) were included in the quantitative synthesis. The review found that there was low quality but generally no evidence of an effect from glucosamine on function, with no change in the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire score in all studies. Conflicting evidence was demonstrated with pain scores with two studies showing no difference and one study with a high risk-of-bias showing both a statistically and clinically significant improvement from taking glucosamine. Conclusions On the basis of the current research, any clinical benefit of oral glucosamine for patients with chronic LBP and radiographic changes of spinal OA can neither be demonstrated nor excluded based on insufficient data and the low quality of existing studies. PMID:23794557

  13. Double-blind, randomized, controlled, crossover trial of pregabalin for neurogenic claudication

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, Maria E.; Rast, Shirley A.; McDermott, Michael P.; Gewandter, Jennifer S.; Chowdhry, Amit K.; Czerniecka, Kate; Pilcher, Webster H.; Simon, Lee S.; Dworkin, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To test the effects of pregabalin on the induction of neurogenic claudication. Methods: This study was a randomized, double-blind, active placebo-controlled, 2-period, crossover trial. Twenty-nine subjects were randomized to receive pregabalin followed by active placebo (i.e., diphenhydramine) or active placebo followed by pregabalin. Each treatment period lasted 10 days, including a 2-step titration. Periods were separated by a 10-day washout period, including a 3-day taper phase after the first period. The primary outcome variable was the time to first moderate pain symptom (Numeric Rating Scale score ≥4) during a 15-minute treadmill test (Tfirst). Secondary outcome measures included pain intensity at rest, pain intensity at the end of the treadmill test, distance walked, and validated self-report measures of pain and functional limitation including the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, modified Brief Pain Inventory–Short Form, Oswestry Disability Index, and Swiss Spinal Stenosis Questionnaire. Results: No significant difference was found between pregabalin and active placebo for the time to first moderate pain symptom (difference in median Tfirst = −1.08 [95% confidence interval −2.25 to 0.08], p = 0.61). In addition, none of the secondary outcome measures of pain or functional limitation were significantly improved by pregabalin compared with active placebo. Conclusions: Pregabalin was not more effective than active placebo in reducing painful symptoms or functional limitations in patients with neurogenic claudication associated with lumbar spinal stenosis. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that for patients with neurogenic claudication, compared with diphenhydramine, pregabalin does not increase the time to moderate pain during a treadmill test. PMID:25503625

  14. Effect of Mild Thyrotoxicosis on Performance and Brain Activations in a Working Memory Task

    PubMed Central

    Göbel, Anna; Heldmann, Marcus; Göttlich, Martin; Dirk, Anna-Luise; Brabant, Georg; Münte, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Disturbed levels of thyroid hormones are associated with neuropsychiatric disorders, including memory impairments. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of mild induced thyrotoxicosis on working memory and its neural correlates. Methods Twenty-nine healthy, male subjects with normal thyroid state participated in the study. Functional MRI was acquired during a working memory task (n-back task) before and after ingesting 250 μg L-thyroxin per day for a period of eight weeks. In addition, neuropsychological tests were performed. Results In the hyperthyroid condition the subjects showed slower reaction times, but a higher accuracy in the 0-back version of the memory tasks. Fewer differences between euthyroid and hyperthyroid state were seen for the more difficult conditions of the n-back task. FMRI revealed effects of difficulty in the parahippocampal gyrus, supplementary motor area, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cerebellum, rolandic operculum and insula (p<0.05, FWE corrected). When comparing euthyroid and hyperthyroid condition in relation to task-induced activation, differences of activation were found in the right prefrontal cortex as well as in the right parahippocampal area. In the psychological assessment, the alerting effect in the Attention Network Task (ANT) and four out of five parameters of the auditory verbal learning test (AVLT) showed an increase from euthyroid to hyperthyroid state. Conclusions It can be concluded that even a short-term intake of thyroid hormones leads to an activation of brain areas associated with working memory and to an improvement of accuracy of working memory tasks. PMID:27536945

  15. Physiotherapy informed by Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (PACT): protocol for a randomised controlled trial of PACT versus usual physiotherapy care for adults with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, Emma; Galea Holmes, Melissa; Wileman, Vari; McCracken, Lance; Moss-Morris, Rona; Pallet, John; Sanders, Duncan; Barcellona, Massimo; Critchley, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a common condition and source of significant suffering, disability and healthcare costs. Current physiotherapy treatment is moderately effective. Combining theory-based psychological methods with physiotherapy could improve outcomes for people with CLBP. The primary aim of this randomised controlled trial (RCT) is to evaluate the efficacy of Physiotherapy informed by Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (PACT) on functioning in patients with CLBP. Methods and analysis The PACT trial is a two-armed, parallel-group, multicentre RCT to assess the efficacy of PACT in comparison with usual physiotherapy care (UC). 240 patients referred to physiotherapy with CLBP will be recruited from three National Health Service (NHS) hospitals trusts. Inclusion criteria are: age ≥18 years, CLBP ≥12-week duration, scoring ≥3 points on the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and adequate understanding of spoken and written English to participate. Patients will be randomised to PACT or UC (120 per arm stratified by centre) by an independent randomisation service and followed up at 3 and 12 months post randomisation. The sample size of 240 will provide adequate power to detect a standardised mean difference of 0.40 in the primary outcome (RMDQ; 5% significance, 80% power) assuming attrition of 20%. Analysis will be by intention to treat conducted by the trial statistician, blind to treatment group, following a prespecified analysis plan. Estimates of treatment effect at the follow-up assessments will use an intention-to-treat framework, implemented using a linear mixed-effects model. Ethics and dissemination This trial has full ethical approval (14/SC/0277). It will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. The results will enable clinicians, patients and health service managers to make informed decisions regarding the efficacy of PACT for patients with CLBP. Trial registration number ISRCTN

  16. Are tactile acuity and clinical symptoms related to differences in perceived body image in patients with chronic nonspecific lower back pain?

    PubMed

    Nishigami, Tomohiko; Mibu, Akira; Osumi, Michihiro; Son, Kouki; Yamamoto, Shyogo; Kajiwara, Saori; Tanaka, Katsuyoshi; Matsuya, Ayako; Tanabe, Akihito

    2015-02-01

    Clinically, perceived image of the lower back and the two-point discrimination (TPD) test are used as markers for evaluating alterations of cortical reorganization. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether TPD and selected clinical findings are different in subgroups of individuals with chronic nonspecific lower back pain (CNLBP) based on body image drawings. Forty-two patients with CNLBP and seventeen healthy individuals were recruited. Perceived body image, TPD and clinical profiles was measured. Of the patients with CNLBP, 42.8% had a normal perceived body image, 28.5% an expanded image, and 28.5% a shrunken image. The TPD distance threshold was significantly larger for the expanded subgroup (13.3 ± 6.8 mm) compared with the control (5.5 ± 3.8 mm; Difference, 7.8; 95%CI, 1.83 to 13.66; p < 0.05) and normal subgroups (4.5 ± 5.5 mm; Difference, 8.8; 95%CI, 2.90 to 14.59; p < 0.05). No significant differences in pain intensity, duration of pain, Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ), and Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) scores were found between three body image subgroups. Our results suggest that TPD is increased in patients who report an expanded perceived image of the lower back compared with healthy individuals and patients who report a normal image. The effectiveness of new rehabilitation techniques may be evaluated by assessing perceived image of the lower back and TPD values for patients with CNLBP before and after treatment. PMID:25081221

  17. Shared and distinct anatomical correlates of semantic and phonemic fluency revealed by lesion-symptom mapping in patients with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Biesbroek, J Matthijs; van Zandvoort, Martine J E; Kappelle, L Jaap; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Biessels, Geert Jan; Postma, Albert

    2016-05-01

    Semantic and phonemic fluency tasks are frequently used to test executive functioning, speed and attention, and access to the mental lexicon. In semantic fluency tasks, subjects are required to generate words belonging to a category (e.g., animals) within a limited time window, whereas in phonemic fluency tasks subjects have to generate words starting with a given letter. Anatomical correlates of semantic and phonemic fluency are currently assumed to overlap in left frontal structures, reflecting shared executive processes, and to be distinct in left temporal and right frontal structures, reflecting involvement of distinct memory processes and search strategies. Definite evidence for this assumption is lacking. To further establish the anatomical correlates of semantic and phonemic fluency, we applied assumption-free voxel-based and region-of-interest-based lesion-symptom mapping in 93 patients with ischemic stroke. Fluency was assessed by asking patients to name animals (semantic), and words starting with the letter N and A (phonemic). Our findings indicate that anatomical correlates of semantic and phonemic fluency overlap in the left inferior frontal gyrus and insula, reflecting shared underlying cognitive processes. Phonemic fluency additionally draws on the left rolandic operculum, which might reflect a search through phonological memory, and the middle frontal gyrus. Semantic fluency additionally draws on left medial temporal regions, probably reflecting a search through semantic memory, and the right inferior frontal gyrus, which might reflect the application of a visuospatial mental imagery strategy in semantic fluency. These findings establish shared and distinct anatomical correlates of semantic and phonemic fluency. PMID:25939335

  18. Validation of the Brazilian-Portuguese Version of the Gesture Behavior Test for Patients with Non-Specific Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, Ricardo; Jones, Anamaria; Furtado, Rita NV; Jennings, Fábio; Natour, Jamil

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a Brazilian version of the gesture behavior test (GBT) for patients with chronic low back pain. METHODS: Translation of GBT into Portuguese was performed by a rheumatologist fluent in the language of origin (French) and skilled in the validation of questionnaires. This translated version was back-translated into French by a native-speaking teacher of the language. The two translators then created a final consensual version in Portuguese. Cultural adaptation was carried out by two rheumatologists, one educated patient and the native-speaking French teacher. Thirty patients with chronic low back pain and fifteen healthcare professionals involved in the education of patients with low back pain through back schools (gold-standard) were evaluated. Reproducibility was initially tested by two observers (inter-observer); the procedures were also videotaped for later evaluation by one of the observers (intra-observer). For construct validation, we compared patients’ scores against the scores of the healthcare professionals. RESULTS: Modifications were made to the GBT for cultural reasons. The Spearman’s correlation coefficient and the intra-class coefficient, which was employed to measure reproducibility, ranged between 0.87 and 0.99 and 0.94 to 0.99, respectively (p < 0.01). With regard to validation, the Mann-Whitney test revealed a significant difference (p < 0.01) between the averages for healthcare professionals (26.60; SD 2.79) and patients (16.30; SD 6.39). There was a positive correlation between the GBT score and the score on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (r= 0.47). CONCLUSIONS: The Brazilian version of the GBT proved to be a reproducible and valid instrument. In addition, according to the questionnaire results, more disabled patients exhibited more protective gesture behavior related to low-back. PMID:19219312

  19. Sensorimotor cortex injury effects on recovery of contralesional dexterous movements in Macaca mulatta.

    PubMed

    Darling, Warren G; Pizzimenti, Marc A; Rotella, Diane L; Hynes, Stephanie M; Ge, Jizhi; Stilwell-Morecraft, Kimberly; Morecraft, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    The effects of primary somatosensory cortex (S1) injury on recovery of contralateral upper limb reaching and grasping were studied by comparing the consequences of isolated lesions to the arm/hand region of primary motor cortex (M1) and lateral premotor cortex (LPMC) to lesions of these same areas plus anterior parietal cortex (S1 and rostral area PE). We used multiple linear regression to assess the effects of gray and white matter lesion volumes on deficits in reaching and fine motor performance during the first month after the lesion, and during recovery of function over 3, 6 and 12months post-injury in 13 monkeys. Subjects with frontoparietal lesions exhibited larger deficits and poorer recovery as predicted, including one subject with extensive peri-Rolandic injury developing learned nonuse after showing signs of recovery. Regression analyses showed that total white matter lesion volume was strongly associated with initial post-lesion deficits in motor performance and with recovery of skill in reaching and manipulation. Multiple regression analyses using percent damage to caudal M1 (M1c), rostral S1 (S1r), LPMC and area PE as predictor variables showed that S1r lesion volumes were closely related to delayed post-lesion recovery of upper limb function, as well as lower skill level of recovery. In contrast, M1c lesion volume was related primarily to initial post-lesion deficits in hand motor performance. Overall, these findings demonstrate that frontoparietal injury impairs hand motor function more so than frontal motor injury alone, and results in slower and poorer recovery than lesions limited to frontal motor cortex. PMID:27091225

  20. The ASIBIA sea-ice facility: First results from the Atmosphere-Sea-Ice-Biogeochemistry in the Arctic chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, James L.; Thomas, Max

    2016-04-01

    Working in the natural ocean-ice-atmosphere system is very difficult, as conducting fieldwork on sea-ice presents many challenges ice including costs, safety, experimental controls and access. The new ASIBIA (Atmosphere-Sea-Ice-Biogeochemistry in the Arctic) coupled Ocean-Sea-Ice-(Snow)-Atmosphere chamber facility at the University of East Anglia, UK, we are aiming to perform controlled first-year sea-ice investigations in areas such as sea-ice physics, physicochemical and biogeochemical processes in sea-ice and quantification of the bi-directional flux of gases in various states of first-year sea-ice conditions. The facility is a medium sized chamber with programmable temperatures from -55°C to +30°C, allowing a full range of first year sea-ice growing conditions in both the Arctic and Antarctic to be simulated. The water depth can be up to 1 m (including up to 25 cm of sea-ice) and an optional 1 m tall Teflon film atmosphere on top of the sea-ice, thus creating a closed and coupled ocean-sea-ice-atmosphere mesocosm. Ice growth in the tank is well suited for studying first-year sea-ice physical properties, with in-situ ice-profile measurements of temperature, salinity, conductivity, pressure and spectral light transmission. Underwater and above ice cameras are installed to record the physical development of the sea-ice. Here, we present the data from the first suites of experiments in the ASIBIA chamber focussing on sea-ice physics and give a brief description of the capabilities of the facility going forward. The ASIBIA chamber was funded as part of an ERC consolidator grant to the late Prof. Roland von Glasow and we hope this work and further development of the facility will act as a lasting legacy.

  1. Study protocol of cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of a biopsychosocial multidisciplinary intervention in the evolution of non-specific sub-acute low back pain in the working population: cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Low back pain (LBP), with high incidence and prevalence rate, is one of the most common reasons to consult the health system and is responsible for a significant amount of sick leave, leading to high health and social costs. The objective of the study is to assess the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis of a multidisciplinary biopsychosocial educational group intervention (MBEGI) of non-specific sub-acute LBP in comparison with the usual care in the working population recruited in primary healthcare centres. Methods/design The study design is a cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis of a MBEGI in comparison with the usual care of non-specific sub-acute LBP. Measures on effectiveness and costs of both interventions will be obtained from a cluster randomised controlled clinical trial carried out in 38 Catalan primary health care centres, enrolling 932 patients between 18 and 65 years old with a diagnosis of non-specific sub-acute LBP. Effectiveness measures are: pharmaceutical treatments, work sick leave (% and duration in days), Roland Morris disability, McGill pain intensity, Fear Avoidance Beliefs (FAB) and Golberg Questionnaires. Utility measures will be calculated from the SF-12. The analysis will be performed from a social perspective. The temporal horizon is at 3 months (change to chronic LBP) and 12 months (evaluate the outcomes at long term). Assessment of outcomes will be blinded and will follow the intention-to-treat principle. Discussion We hope to demonstrate the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of MBEGI, see an improvement in the patients' quality of life, achieve a reduction in the duration of episodes and the chronicity of non-specific low back pain, and be able to report a decrease in the social costs. If the intervention is cost-effectiveness and cost-utility, it could be applied to Primary Health Care Centres. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN58719694 PMID:21859489

  2. Partly segregated cortico-subcortical pathways support phonologic and semantic verbal fluency: A lesion study.

    PubMed

    Chouiter, Leila; Holmberg, Josefina; Manuel, Aurelie L; Colombo, Françoise; Clarke, Stephanie; Annoni, Jean-Marie; Spierer, Lucas

    2016-08-01

    Verbal fluency refers to the ability to generate as many words as possible in a limited time interval, without repetition and according to either a phonologic (each word begins with a given letter) or a semantic rule (each word belongs to a given semantic category). While current literature suggests the involvement of left fronto-temporal structures in fluency tasks, whether the same or distinct brain areas are necessary for each type of fluency remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis for an involvement of partly segregated cortico-subcortical structures between phonologic and semantic fluency by examining with a voxel-based lesion symptom mapping approach the effects of brain lesions on fluency scores corrected for age and education level in a group of 191 unselected brain-damaged patients with a first left or right hemispheric lesion. There was a positive correlation between the scores to the two types of fluency, suggesting that common mechanisms underlie the word generation independent of the production rule. The lesion-symptom mapping revealed that lesions to left basal ganglia impaired both types of fluency and that left superior temporal, supramarginal and rolandic operculum lesions selectively impaired phonologic fluency and left middle temporal lesions impaired semantic fluency. Our results corroborate current neurocognitive models of word retrieval and production, and refine the role of cortical-subcortical interaction in lexical search by highlighting the common executive role of basal ganglia in both types of verbal fluency and the preferential involvement of the ventral and dorsal language pathway in semantic and phonologic fluency, respectively. PMID:27217213

  3. Deep Tissue Massage and Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs for Low Back Pain: A Prospective Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kocur, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether chronic low back pain therapy with deep tissue massage (DTM) gives similar results to combined therapy consisting of DTM and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). Design. Prospective controlled randomized single blinded trial. Settings. Ambulatory care of rehabilitation. Participants. 59 patients, age 51.8 ± 9.0 years, with chronic low back pain. Interventions. 2 weeks of DTM in the treatment group (TG) versus 2 weeks of DTM combined with NSAID in the control group (CG). Main Outcome Measures. Visual analogue scale, Oswestry disability index (ODI), and Roland-Morris questionnaire (RM). Results. In both the TG and the CG, a significant pain reduction and function improvement were observed. VAS decreased from 58.3 ± 18.2 to 42.2 ± 21.1 (TG) and from 51.8 ± 18.8 to 30.6 ± 21.9 (CG). RM value decreased from 9.8 ± 5.1 to 6.4 ± 4.4 (TG), and from 9.3 ± 5.5 to 6.1 ± 4.6 (CG). ODI value decreased from 29.2 ± 17.3 to 21.4 ± 15.1 (TG) and from 21.4 ± 9.4 to 16.6 ± 9.4 (CG). All pre-post-treatment differences were significant; however, there was no significant difference between the TG and the CG. Conclusion. DTM had a positive effect on reducing pain in patients with chronic low back pain. Concurrent use of DTM and NSAID contributed to low back pain reduction in a similar degree that the DTM did. PMID:24707200

  4. Losing it.

    PubMed

    Coutu, Diane L

    2004-04-01

    "It's worse than I thought.... She's completely lost her mind," says Harry Beecham, the CEO of blue chip management consultancy Pierce and Company. The perplexed executive was in a hotel suite with his wife in Amsterdam, the latest stop on his regular trek to dozens of Pierce offices worldwide. In his hand was a sheaf of paper--the same message sent over and over again by his star employee and protégée Katharina Waldburg. The end of the world is coming, she warned. "Someone is going to die." Harry wouldn't have expected this sort of behavior from Katharina. After graduating with distinction from Oxford, she made a name for herself by single-handedly building Pierce's organizational behavior practice. At 27, she's poised to become the youngest partner ever elected at the firm. But Harry can't ignore the faxes in his hand. Or the stream-of-consciousness e-mails Katharina's been sending to one of the directors in Pierce's Berlin office--mostly gibberish but potentially disastrous to Katharina's reputation if they ever got out. Harry also can't dismiss reports from Roland Fuoroli, manager of the Berlin office, of a vicious verbal exchange Katharina had with him, or of an "over the top" lunch date Katharina had with one of Pierce's clients in which she was explaining the alphabet's role in the creation of the universe. Harry is planning to talk to Katharina when he gets to Berlin. What should he say? And will it be too late? Four commentators offer their advice in this fictional case study. They are Kay Redfield Jamison, a professor of psychiatry and a coauthor of Manic-Depressive Illness; David E. Meen, a former director at McKinsey & Company; Norman Pearlstine, the editor in chief at Time Incorporated; and Richard Primus, an assistant law professor at the University of Michigan. PMID:15077365

  5. Significant Efficacy of Tramadol/Acetaminophen in Elderly Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain Uncontrolled by NSAIDs: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Chronic low back pain (LBP) is a common condition and is generally treated using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID); however, chronic NSAID use can decrease renal function. Tramadol, a weak opioid agonist, may improve chronic LBP and disability, while avoiding adverse effects such as gastrointestinal and renal toxicity. However, few studies have evaluated the short-term efficacy of opioids in Asian patients with chronic LBP. In this study, 24 patients with chronic LBP unresponsive to NSAIDs (10 men, 14 women; mean age, 65.1 ± 12.1 years) were prescribed tramadol/acetaminophen (37.5 mg/325 mg; four tablets daily) for 1 month. Then, the following parameters were assessed at baseline and after 1 week and 1 month of treatment: leg pain and LBP (Visual Analog Score [VAS]); activity of daily life (Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire [RDQ]); and disability (Oswestry Disability Index [ODI]). Leg pain resolved within 1 week (p = 0.00093); however, LBP was relieved only at 1 month (p = 0.00034). The mean RDQ (p = 0.015) and ODI (p = 0.0032) scores were improved at 1 month. A total 41.6% of patients reported nausea and floating sensation beginning tramadol/acetaminophen treatment, and 12.5% (four patients) discontinued treatment as a result. LBP did not improve in 25% of patients administered tramadol/acetaminophen. Because this was an observational study, rather than a comparative study, further investigation is needed to evaluate the long-term efficacy of tramadol/acetaminophen in elderly patients with chronic LBP unresponsive to NSAIDs. PMID:26157527

  6. The Intrinsic Resting State Voice Network in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    New, Anneliese B.; Robin, Donald A.; Parkinson, Amy L.; Eickhoff, Claudia R.; Reetz, Kathrin; Hoffstaedter, Felix; Mathys, Christian; Sudmeyer, Martin; Grefkes, Christian; Larson, Charles R.; Ramig, Loraine O.; Fox, Peter T.; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2016-01-01

    Over 90 percent of patients with Parkinson’s disease experience speech-motor impairment, namely, hypokinetic dysarthria characterized by reduced pitch and loudness. Resting-state functional connectivity analysis of blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging is a useful measure of intrinsic neural functioning. We utilized resting-state functional connectivity modeling to analyze the intrinsic connectivity in patients with Parkinson’s disease within a vocalization network defined by a previous meta-analysis of speech (Brown et al., 2009). Functional connectivity of this network was assessed in 56 patients with Parkinson’s disease and 56 gender-, age-, and movement-matched healthy controls. We also had item 5 and 18 of the UPDRS, and the PDQ-39 Communication subscale available for correlation with the voice network connectivity strength in patients. The within-group analyses of connectivity patterns demonstrated a lack of subcortical–cortical connectivity in patients with Parkinson’s disease. At the cortical level, we found robust (homotopic) interhemispheric connectivity but only inconsistent evidence for many intrahemispheric connections. When directly contrasted to the control group, we found a significant reduction of connections between the left thalamus and putamen, and cortical motor areas, as well as reduced right superior temporal gyrus connectivity. Furthermore, most symptom measures correlated with right putamen, left cerebellum, left superior temporal gyrus, right premotor, and left Rolandic operculum connectivity in the voice network. The results reflect the importance of (right) subcortical nodes and the superior temporal gyrus in Parkinson’s disease, enhancing our understanding of the neurobiological underpinnings of vocalization impairment in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25627959

  7. Global carbon burial in lakes, reservoirs and ponds; an alternative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, John; Hoffmann, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    It is widely stated that approximately 0.6 Pg of carbon are annually sequestered by lake, reservoir and pond sediments. The study from which this figure arises, Tranvik et al (2009), accepts: previously published values for natural lakes (0.03 to 0.07 Pg), rather higher than previously thought values for reservoirs (0.4 Pg C yr-1, based on 400,000 km2 at 1000 g C m-2, up from 0.16-0.20 Pg previously estimated), and and a previously omitted large contribution from "small eutrophic impoundments" (0.15 Pg yr-1, based on 75,000 km2 at 2000 g C m-2). As these estimates depend heavily on C burial data from 25 artificial water bodies in Iowa, we have undertaken a wider analysis to assess their global applicability. Reference: Tranvik, L.J., Downing, J.A., Cotner, J.B., Loiselle, S.A., Striegl, R.G., Ballatore, T.J., Dillon, P., Finlay, K., Fortino, K., Knoll, L.B., Kortelainen, P.L., Kutser, T., Larsen, S., Laurion, I., Leech, D.M., McCallister, S.L., McKnight, D.M., Melack, J.M., Overholt, E., Porter, J.A., Prairie, Y., Renwick, W.H., Roland, F., Sherman, B.S., Schindler, D.W., Sobek, S., Tremblay, A., Vanni, M.J., Verschoor, A.M., von Wachenfeldt, E. and Weyhenmeyer, G.A., 2009. Lakes and reservoirs as regulators of carbon cycling and climate. Limnology and Oceanography, 54(6): 2298-2314.

  8. MEG-based detection and localization of perilesional dysfunction in chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ron K.O.; Braun, Allen R.; Meltzer, Jed A.

    2015-01-01

    Post-stroke impairment is associated not only with structural lesions, but also with dysfunction in surviving perilesional tissue. Previous studies using equivalent current dipole source localization of MEG/EEG signals have demonstrated a preponderance of slow-wave activity localized to perilesional areas. Recent studies have also demonstrated the utility of nonlinear analyses such as multiscale entropy (MSE) for quantifying neuronal dysfunction in a wide range of pathologies. The current study utilized beamformer-based reconstruction of signals in source space to compare spectral and nonlinear measures of electrical activity in perilesional and healthy cortices. Data were collected from chronic stroke patients and healthy controls, both young and elderly. We assessed relative power in the delta (1–4 Hz), theta (4–7 Hz), alpha (8–12 Hz) and beta (15–30 Hz) frequency bands, and also measured the nonlinear complexity of electrical activity using MSE. Perilesional tissue exhibited a general slowing of the power spectrum (increased delta/theta, decreased beta) as well as a reduction in MSE. All measures tested were similarly sensitive to changes in the posterior perilesional regions, but anterior perilesional dysfunction was detected better by MSE and beta power. The findings also suggest that MSE is specifically sensitive to electrophysiological dysfunction in perilesional tissue, while spectral measures were additionally affected by an increase in rolandic beta power with advanced age. Furthermore, perilesional electrophysiological abnormalities in the left hemisphere were correlated with the degree of language task-induced activation in the right hemisphere. Finally, we demonstrate that single subject spectral and nonlinear analyses can identify dysfunctional perilesional regions within individual patients that may be ideal targets for interventions with noninvasive brain stimulation. PMID:26106540

  9. Surgery of highly eloquent gliomas primarily assessed as non-resectable: risks and benefits in a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Today, the treatment of choice for high- and low-grade gliomas requires primarily surgical resection to achieve the best survival and quality of life. Nevertheless, many gliomas within highly eloquent cortical regions, e.g., insula, rolandic, and left perisylvian cortex, still do not undergo surgery because of the impending risk of surgery-related deficits at some centers. However, pre and intraoperative brain mapping, intraoperative neuromonitoring (IOM), and awake surgery increase safety, which allows resection of most of these tumors with a considerably low rate of postoperatively new deficits. Methods Between 2006 and 2012, we resected 47 out of 51 supratentorial gliomas (92%), which were primarily evaluated to be non-resectable during previous presentation at another neurosurgical department. Out of these, 25 were glioblastomas WHO grade IV (53%), 14 were anaplastic astrocytomas WHO grade III (30%), 7 were diffuse astrocytomas WHO grade II (15%), and one was a pilocytic astrocytoma WHO grade I (2%). All data, including pre and intraoperative brain mapping and monitoring (IOM) by motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were reviewed and related to the postoperative outcome. Results Awake surgery was performed in 8 cases (17%). IOM was required in 38 cases (81%) and was stable in 18 cases (47%), whereas MEPs changed the surgical strategy in 10 cases (26%). Thereby, gross total resection was achieved in 35 cases (74%). Postoperatively, 17 of 47 patients (36%) had a new motor or language deficit, which remained permanent in 8.5% (4 patients). Progression-free follow-up was 11.3 months (range: 2 weeks – 64.5 months) and median survival was 14.8 months (range: 4 weeks – 20.5 months). Median Karnofsky Performance Scale was 85 before and 80 after surgery). Conclusions In specialized centers, most highly eloquent gliomas are eligible for surgical resection with an acceptable rate of surgery-related deficits; therefore, they should be referred to specialized

  10. Kinematic and Neurophysiological Consequences of an Assisted-Force-Feedback Brain-Machine Interface Training: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Silvoni, Stefano; Cavinato, Marianna; Volpato, Chiara; Cisotto, Giulia; Genna, Clara; Agostini, Michela; Turolla, Andrea; Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; Piccione, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    In a proof-of-principle prototypical demonstration we describe a new type of brain-machine interface (BMI) paradigm for upper limb motor-training. The proposed technique allows a fast contingent and proportionally modulated stimulation of afferent proprioceptive and motor output neural pathways using operant learning. Continuous and immediate assisted-feedback of force proportional to rolandic rhythm oscillations during actual movements was employed and illustrated with a single case experiment. One hemiplegic patient was trained for 2 weeks coupling somatosensory brain oscillations with force-field control during a robot-mediated center-out motor-task whose execution approaches movements of everyday life. The robot facilitated actual movements adding a modulated force directed to the target, thus providing a non-delayed proprioceptive feedback. Neuro-electric, kinematic, and motor-behavioral measures were recorded in pre- and post-assessments without force assistance. Patient’s healthy arm was used as control since neither a placebo control was possible nor other control conditions. We observed a generalized and significant kinematic improvement in the affected arm and a spatial accuracy improvement in both arms, together with an increase and focalization of the somatosensory rhythm changes used to provide assisted-force-feedback. The interpretation of the neurophysiological and kinematic evidences reported here is strictly related to the repetition of the motor-task and the presence of the assisted-force-feedback. Results are described as systematic observations only, without firm conclusions about the effectiveness of the methodology. In this prototypical view, the design of appropriate control conditions is discussed. This study presents a novel operant-learning-based BMI-application for motor-training coupling brain oscillations and force feedback during an actual movement. PMID:24223567

  11. On the Relationship Between 'Universal' and 'Particular' in Architecture.

    PubMed

    Arenghi, Alberto; Garofolo, Ilaria; Laurìa, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In 1998 Molly Follette Story, James Mueller and Roland Mace published the book The Universal Design File; that can be considered the result of a long way, started by Mace in 1985, towards a design approach based on the principles of Universal Design. In 2010 the Centre for Active Design publishes the Active Design Guidelines: Promoting Physical Activity and Health in Design. Between these two milestones, this article offers some ideas about the evolution of the universal approach to design. Assuming that Universal Design approach can present limits, this article aims to reflect on the relationship between universal and particular in developing a theoretical approach to architecture and design, supporting the idea that the wide gray area of the population who need specific access solutions can find answers to their needs only through successive adjustments, time by time plugged on universal solutions. This implies a process of requirement-based retrofitting of existing spaces and goods, to get qualities or perfecting performances otherwise inadequate. From this perspective the project for accessibility should be seen as a never ending process, and not a fix and final product, and Universal Design should be considered as a methodological approach ideally tending towards accessibility as a goal. Having this in mind, the article explores the issues related to how to blend universal and particular in a human centred design strategy, how to combine design actions and awareness by the users to allow an effective mutual adaptation between people and their living environment. The article aims to be further food for thought regarding research to be implemented in future works. PMID:27534283

  12. Minutes of the meeting of the international program committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-12-01

    The meeting of the International Program Committee occurred on 5 June 2012. The agenda consisted of the following items: - Information on conference participants, contributions and grants - Information on the financial support received by the conference - Committee membership - Organizers of the next two meeting of the ICSLS Conference participants and contributions There were about 100 registered participants for the ICSLS. They presented more than 100 contributions, namely, 19 invited talks, 20 oral contributions and more than 61 contributed papers. It was noted that only very few participants came from North America. Reasons quoted were finacial problems of laboratories and overlapping of several conferences. Finacial support received The conference received grants from St. Petersburg University, the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, and the non-profit Dynasty Foundation. About 40% of the budget was collected in the form of registration fees. Discounted fees and fee waives were provided for 40 participants. Committee membership The Committee instructed Professor A Devdariani to contact the absent members who had missed two successive conferences and ask them whether they intended to prolong their membership on the Committee, and inform other Committee members accordingly. Organizers of the next meetings of the ICSLS The 20th ICSLS held in St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada decided to hold the 22nd ICSLS at the University of Tennessee. The event will be organized by Christian Parriger. All issues regarding the next conference were discussed including budget, travel, conference site, accommodation, and proceedings. Torun, Poland was proposed for the 23d ICSLS by Roman Ciurylo. Roland Stamm proposed the Aix-Marseille University as a backup to the first proposal.

  13. Framing the ultimatum game: the contribution of simulation

    PubMed Central

    Tomasino, Barbara; Lotto, Lorella; Sarlo, Michela; Civai, Claudia; Rumiati, Rino; Rumiati, Raffaella I.

    2013-01-01

    It has now become widely accepted that economic decisions are influenced by cognitive and emotional processes. In the present study, we aimed at disentangling the neural mechanisms associated with the way in which the information is formulated, i.e., framing effect, in terms of gain or loss, which influences people's decisions. Participants played a fMRI version of the Ultimatum Game (UG) where we manipulated bids through two different frames: the expression “I give you” (gain) focusing on money the respondent would receive if she/he agreed with the proponent, and the expression “I take” (loss) focusing on the money that would be removed from the respondent in the event that she/he accepted the offer. Neuroimaging data revealed a frame by response interaction, showing an increase of neural activity in the right rolandic operculum/insular cortex, the anterior cingulate, among other regions, for accepting the frame “I take” vs. rejecting, as compared to accepting the frame “I give you” vs. rejecting. In addition, the left occipito-temporal junction was activated for “I take” vs. “I give you” for offer 5, corresponding to the equal offer made unpleasant by the presence of the frame “I take,” where is the proposer that takes the money. Our data extend the current understanding of the neural substrates of social decision making, by disentangling the structures sensitive to the way in which the information is formulated (i.e., framing effect), in terms of gain or loss. PMID:23847507

  14. Changes in the frequency of benign focal spikes accompany changes in central information processing speed: a prospective 2-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Ebus, S C M; IJff, D M; den Boer, J T; van Hall, M J H; Klinkenberg, S; van der Does, A; Boon, P J; Arends, J B A M; Aldenkamp, A P

    2015-02-01

    We prospectively examined whether changes in the frequency of benign focal spikes accompany changes in cognition. Twenty-six children with benign focal spikes (19 with Rolandic epilepsy) and learning difficulties were examined with repeated 24-hour EEG recordings, three cognitive tests on central information processing speed (CIPS), and questionnaires on cognition and behavior at baseline, 6months, and 2years. Antiepileptic drug changes were allowed when estimated necessary by the treating physician. At baseline, a lower CIPS was correlated with a higher frequency of diurnal interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) and with worse academic achievement. At follow-up, there was a significant correlation between changes in CIPS and EEG changes in wakefulness (in the same direction) when the EEG outcome was dichotomized in IED frequency "increased" or "not increased". Behavioral problems were more often observed in patients with higher frequency of IEDs in sleep at baseline and in those with ongoing IEDs compared with those with EEG remission (without or with sporadic IEDs in the recording) at the end of the study period. No changes were observed in the results of the questionnaires. A lower diurnal IED frequency at baseline, lack of serial IEDs, and occurrence of only unilateral IEDs were correlated with a higher chance of EEG remission at 2-year follow-up. Electroencephalography remission could not be predicted from other epilepsy variables except from seizure freedom in the last six months. Our results confirm the nonbenign character of 'benign' focal spikes. Whether an early and stable EEG remission can be achieved through antiepileptic treatment and whether this is of benefit for cognitive development should be examined in prospective placebo-controlled randomized trials. PMID:25546731

  15. Mesotherapy versus Systemic Therapy in the Treatment of Acute Low Back Pain: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Costantino, Cosimo; Marangio, Emilio; Coruzzi, Gabriella

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacological therapy of back pain with analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs is frequently associated with adverse effects, particularly in the elderly. Aim of this study was to compare mesotherapic versus conventional systemic administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and corticosteroids in patients with acute low back pain. Eighty-four patients were randomized to receive anti-inflammatory therapy according to the following protocols: (a) mesotherapy group received the 1st and 4th day 2% lidocaine (1 mL) + ketoprofen 160 mg (1 mL) + methylprednisolone 40 mg (1 mL), then on 7th, 10th, and 13th day, 2% lidocaine (1 mL) + ketoprofen 160 mg (1 mL) + methylprednisolone 20 mg (1 mL) (b) conventional therapy group received ketoprofen 80 mg × 2/die and esomeprazole 20 mg/die orally for 12 days, methylprednisolone 40 mg/die intramuscularly for 4 days, followed by methylprednisolone 20 mg/die for 3 days, and thereafter, methylprednisolone 20 mg/die at alternate days. Pain intensity and functional disability were assessed at baseline (T0), at the end of treatment (T1), and 6 months thereafter (T2) by using visual analogic scale (VAS) and Roland-Morris disability questionnaire (RMDQ). In both groups, VAS and RMDQ values were significantly reduced at the end of drug treatment and after 6 months, in comparison with baseline. No significant differences were found between the two groups. This suggests that mesotherapy may be a valid alternative to conventional therapy in the treatment of acute low back pain with corticosteroids and NSAIDs. PMID:20953425

  16. Neuroscience education in addition to trigger point dry needling for the management of patients with mechanical chronic low back pain: A preliminary clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Téllez-García, Mario; de-la-Llave-Rincón, Ana I; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Palacios-Ceña, Maria; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine the short-term effects of trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN) alone or combined with neuroscience education on pain, disability, kinesiophobia and widespread pressure sensitivity in patients with mechanical low back pain (LBP). Twelve patients with LBP were randomly assigned to receive either TrP-DN (TrP-DN) or TrP-DN plus neuroscience education (TrP-DN + EDU). Pain intensity (Numerical Pain Rating Scale, 0-10), disability (Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire-RMQ-, Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index-ODI), kinesiophobia (Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia-TSK), and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over the C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, transverse process of L3 vertebra, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior muscle were collected at baseline and 1-week after the intervention. Patients treated with TrP-DN + EDU experienced a significantly greater reduction of kinesiophobia (P = 0.008) and greater increases in PPT over the transverse process of L3 (P = 0.049) than those patients treated only with TrP-DN. Both groups experienced similar decreases in pain, ODI and RMQ, and similar increases in PPT over the C5/C6 joint, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior after the intervention (all, P > 0.05). The results suggest that TrP-DN was effective for improving pain, disability, kinesiophobia and widespread pressure sensitivity in patients with mechanical LBP at short-term. The inclusion of a neuroscience educational program resulted in a greater improvement in kinesiophobia. PMID:26118519

  17. Role of Epidural Injections to Prevent Surgical Intervention in Patients with Chronic Sciatica: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sunny

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the different types of epidural injections (EI) to prevent surgical intervention in patients suffering from chronic sciatica due to lumbar disc herniation (LDH). Material and Methods: Studies were identified by searching PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar to retrieve all available relevant articles. Lists of references of several systematic reviews were also used for scanning further references. Publications from the past ten years (2006-2016) were considered, and all studies selected were in the English language only. The studies employed specified the use of EI to treat sciatica caused by LDH. A total of 19 papers meeting the eligibility criteria (mentioned below) were included in this study. The pain scores, functional disability scores, and surgical rates from these studies were considered, and meta-analysis was performed. Outcome measures: Pain scores, functional disability scores, and surgical rates were assessed from the included studies. The Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) have been the most commonly used baseline scales for pain evaluation followed by the Verbal Numerical Rating Scale (VNRS) and Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA). The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) scales were used for the functional disability scoring system in the literature. Results: Significant improvement in the pain scores and functional disability scores were observed. Additionally, greater than 80% of the patients suffering from chronic sciatica caused by LDH could successfully prevent surgical intervention after EI treatment with or without steroids. Conclusion: The management of sciatica with EI treatment results in significant improvements in the pain score, functional disability score, and surgical rate. We concluded that EI provides new hope to prevent surgical intervention in patients suffering from sciatica caused by LDH. PMID

  18. The intrahemispheric functional properties of the developing sensorimotor cortex are influenced by maturation

    PubMed Central

    Berchicci, Marika; Tamburro, Gabriella; Comani, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of the functional changes in the sensorimotor cortex has important clinical implications as deviations from normal development can anticipate developmental disorders. The functional properties of the sensorimotor cortex can be characterized through the rolandic mu rhythm, already present during infancy. However, how the sensorimotor network develops from early infancy to adulthood, and how sensorimotor processing contributes to the generation of perceptual-motor coupling remains largely unknown. Here, we analyzed magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data recorded in two groups of infants (11–24 and 26–47 weeks), two groups of children (24–34 and 36–60 months), and a control group of adults (20–39 years), during intermixed conditions of rest and prehension. The MEG sensor array was positioned over the sensorimotor cortex of the contralateral hemisphere. We characterized functional connectivity and topological properties of the sensorimotor network across ages and conditions through synchronization likelihood and segregation/integration measures in an individual mu rhythm frequency range. All functional measures remained almost unchanged during the first year of life, whereas they varied afterwards through childhood to reach adult values, demonstrating an increase of both segregation and integration properties. With age, the sensorimotor network evolved from a more random (infants) to a “small-world” organization (children and adults), more efficient both locally and globally. These findings are in line with prior studies on structural and functional brain development in infants, children and adults. We could not demonstrate any significant change in the functional properties of the sensorimotor cortex in the prehension condition with respect to rest. Our results support the view that, since early infancy, the functional properties of the developing sensorimotor cortex are modulated by maturation. PMID:25741263

  19. Sensory-motor networks involved in speech production and motor control: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Behroozmand, Roozbeh; Shebek, Rachel; Hansen, Daniel R; Oya, Hiroyuki; Robin, Donald A; Howard, Matthew A; Greenlee, Jeremy D W

    2015-04-01

    Speaking is one of the most complex motor behaviors developed to facilitate human communication. The underlying neural mechanisms of speech involve sensory-motor interactions that incorporate feedback information for online monitoring and control of produced speech sounds. In the present study, we adopted an auditory feedback pitch perturbation paradigm and combined it with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) recordings in order to identify brain areas involved in speech production and motor control. Subjects underwent fMRI scanning while they produced a steady vowel sound /a/ (speaking) or listened to the playback of their own vowel production (playback). During each condition, the auditory feedback from vowel production was either normal (no perturbation) or perturbed by an upward (+600 cents) pitch-shift stimulus randomly. Analysis of BOLD responses during speaking (with and without shift) vs. rest revealed activation of a complex network including bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG), Heschl's gyrus, precentral gyrus, supplementary motor area (SMA), Rolandic operculum, postcentral gyrus and right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Performance correlation analysis showed that the subjects produced compensatory vocal responses that significantly correlated with BOLD response increases in bilateral STG and left precentral gyrus. However, during playback, the activation network was limited to cortical auditory areas including bilateral STG and Heschl's gyrus. Moreover, the contrast between speaking vs. playback highlighted a distinct functional network that included bilateral precentral gyrus, SMA, IFG, postcentral gyrus and insula. These findings suggest that speech motor control involves feedback error detection in sensory (e.g. auditory) cortices that subsequently activate motor-related areas for the adjustment of speech parameters during speaking. PMID:25623499

  20. Short-Term Effects of Kinesio Taping in Women with Pregnancy-Related Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Şeyhmus; Alpayci, Mahmut; Karaman, Erbil; Çetin, Orkun; Özkan, Yasemin; İlter, Server; Şah, Volkan; Şahin, Hanım Güler

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pregnancy-related low back pain is a common condition during pregnancy. Kinesio tape is a drug-free elastic therapeutic tape used for treating various musculoskeletal problems. The aim of this study was to investigate the short-term effects of lumbar Kinesio taping on pain intensity and disability in women with pregnancy-related low back pain. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 65 patients with pregnancy-related low back pain were randomly allocated into either Kinesio taping (n=33) or control (n=32) groups. The intervention group was treated with paracetamol plus Kinesio taping, while the control group received only paracetamol. Kinesio taping was applied in the lumbar flexion position, and four I-shaped bands were used. Two bands were attached horizontally, with space correction technique. The remaining 2 bands, 1 on each side of the lumbar spine, were placed vertically, with inhibition technique. Low back pain intensity was measured on a 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS), and the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) was used for evaluation of disability. RESULTS Pain intensity and RMDQ scores improved significantly in both groups at 5 days compared with baseline. Considering the degree of treatment effect (the change from baseline to day 5), the Kinesio taping group was significantly superior than the control group in all outcome measures (for all, P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS The results of this study indicate that Kinesio taping can be used as a complementary treatment method to achieve effective control of pregnancy-related low back pain. PMID:27088271

  1. Decadal vertical deformation of the Netherlands via the geodetic integration of gravimetry, GNSS, leveling and SAR interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanssen, R. F.; Caro Cuenca, M.; Klees, R.; van der Marel, H.

    2012-12-01

    Surface motion is important for coastal regions such as the Netherlands, situated in the Rhine-Meuse delta. As major parts of the country are very flat and below the high-water levels of the North sea and rivers, land subsidence or uplift should be regarded equally important as absolute sea level variation. Surface motion in the Netherlands covers a wide range of spatio-temporal scales, and is due to tectonics, isostatic adjustment and loading, extraction or injection of hydrocarbons, salt and water, compaction and oxidation of Holocene layers, and surface water level adjustments [Roland: is it really called surface water or do you refer to groundwater?). These scale differences necessitate observation techniques able to capture these signals adequately. Moreover, different geodetic techniques observe different parameters, different physical signals, use different reference systems, and are seldom spatially or temporally collocated. Here we report on the integration of four geodetic techniques: leveling, GNSS, absolute gravimetry and satellite radar (SAR) interferometry. Until recently, individual techniques have mainly been used to validate other techniques. This presentation is about the combination of the various data types covering a period of about two decades, their proper weighting, referencing, and mathematical modeling . The mathematical framework involves a least squares estimation approach that combines the four sets of observables to estimate absolute vertical rates. The framework includes the estimation of full variance covariance matrices and addresses the limitations of the individual techniques in both stochastic and functional models. Furthermore, since millions of observations are employed, in particular for InSAR, data reduction is applied and tuned to the main signal of interest. The framework is applied to the full territory of the Netherlands, producing the first nation-wide decadal land motion map, which combines all available and necessary

  2. The Effectiveness of Oral Corticosteroids for Management of Lumbar Radiating Pain: Randomized, Controlled Trial Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungguk; Kim, Jaejung; Oh, Taebum

    2016-01-01

    Background Although both pregabalin and gabapentin are known to be useful for treating lumbar radiating pain and reducing the incidence of surgery, the oral corticosteroids sometimes offer a dramatic effect on severe radiating pain despite the lack of scientific evidence. Methods A total of 54 patients were enrolled among 703 patients who complained of lumbar radiating pain. Twenty patients who received an oral corticosteroid was classified as group A and 20 patients who received the control drugs (pregabalin or gabapentin) as group B. Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Revised Roland Morris disability questionnaire (RMDQ), Short Form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire, lumbar radiating pain, objective patient satisfaction, and objective improvement of patients or physicians were assessed at 2, 6, and 12 weeks after medication. Results No difference in the sex ratio and age was observed between the groups (p = 0.70 and p = 0.13, respectively). Group A showed greater improvement in radiating pain after 2, 6, and 12 weeks than group B (p < 0.001, p = 0.001, and p < 0.001, respectively). No differences were observed between the groups in satisfaction at the beginning and 12 weeks after taking the medication (p = 0.062 and p = 0.061, respectively) and in objective improvement of patients and physicians (p = 0.657 and p = 0.748, respectively). Group A was less disabled and had greater physical health scores than group B (p = 0.014 and p = 0.017, respectively). Conclusions Oral corticosteroids for the treatment of lumbar radiating pain can be more effective in pain relief than gabapentin or pregabalin. The satisfaction of patients and physicians with the drug and objective improvement status were not inferior to that with gabapentin or pregabalin. PMID:27583108

  3. Neurophysiological activity underlying altered brain metabolism in epileptic encephalopathies with CSWS.

    PubMed

    De Tiège, Xavier; Trotta, Nicola; Op de Beeck, Marc; Bourguignon, Mathieu; Marty, Brice; Wens, Vincent; Nonclercq, Antoine; Goldman, Serge; Van Bogaert, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the neurophysiological correlate of altered regional cerebral glucose metabolism observed in children with epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves during sleep (CSWS) by using a multimodal approach combining time-sensitive magnetic source imaging (MSI) and positron emission tomography with [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET). Six patients (4 boys and 2 girls, age range: 4-8 years, 3 patients with Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS), 3 patients with atypical rolandic epilepsy (ARE)) were investigated by FDG-PET and MSI at the acute phase of CSWS. In all patients, the onset(s) of spike-waves discharges were associated with significant focal hypermetabolism. The propagation of epileptic discharges to other brain areas was associated with focal hypermetabolism (five patients), hypometabolism (one patient) or the absence of any significant metabolic change (one patient). Interestingly, most of the hypometabolic areas were not involved in the epileptic network per se. This study shows that focal hypermetabolism observed at the acute phase of CSWS are related to the onset or propagation sites of spike-wave discharges. Spike-wave discharges propagation can be associated to other types of metabolic changes, suggesting the occurrence of various neurophysiological mechanisms at the cellular level. Most of the hypometabolic areas are not involved in the epileptic network as such and are probably related to a mechanism of remote inhibition. These findings highlight the critical value of combining FDG-PET with time-sensitive functional neuroimaging approaches such as MSI to assess CSWS epileptic network when surgery is considered as a therapeutic approach. PMID:23561286

  4. Identification of relaxin-3/INSL7 as a ligand for GPCR142.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changlu; Chen, Jingcai; Sutton, Steven; Roland, Barbara; Kuei, Chester; Farmer, Niven; Sillard, Rannar; Lovenberg, Timothy W

    2003-12-12

    We have recently identified the insulin-like peptide relaxin-3 (aka INSL7) as the endogenous ligand for an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor, GPCR135 (aka somatostatin- and angiotensin-like peptide receptor). Analysis of possible receptors related to GPCR135 revealed a single orphan receptor, GPCR142. Thus, we tested whether GPCR142 could also respond to relaxin-3 or related insulin-like molecules. Surprisingly, GPCR142 was activated by nanomolar concentrations of relaxin-3 but was completely unresponsive to all other known insulin-like peptides. We evaluated by reverse transcriptase-PCR the expression of GPCR142 mRNA in a variety of human tissues and found expression in brain, kidney, testis, thymus, placenta, prostate, salivary gland, thyroid, and colon. In an analysis of other species, we were able to find a full-length mouse homolog of GPCR142, but were unable to detect any complete GPCR142 transcripts in rat. With respect to intracellular signaling, GPCR142 is similar to GPCR135 in that it potently inhibits adenylate cyclase and stimulates 35S-GTPgammaS incorporation in response to relaxin-3. However, whereas GPCR135 signaling could be converted to calcium mobilization using a Gqi5 or Galpha16 G-proteins, GPCR142 was only capable of functioning in the presence of Galpha16. In the accompanying article (Liu, C., Eriste, E., Sutton, S., Chen, J., Roland, B., Kuei, C., Farmer, N., Jörnvall, H., Sillard, R., and Lovenberg, T. W. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 50754-50764), we present the case that relaxin-3, which has previously been shown to bind to the relaxin receptor LGR7, is most likely the endogenous ligand for GPCR135. In this report, we show an additional receptor, GPCR142, which is also selectively activated by relaxin-3. However, the anatomical localization of GPCR142 suggests that GPCR142 may have different physiological functions. PMID:14522967

  5. Comments on the DOE Hydrothermal Energy Conversion R&D Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mendive, David L.

    1992-03-24

    In his closing remarks at last year's program review, Roland Kessler pointed out two critical questions that must be asked with regard to any program funding: (1) What specifically will be accomplished with the funds requested and why does it matter? (2) What important accomplishments have been made with the funds you have spent? These seem to be good questions, whether in times of tight budgets or not. I kept these questions in mind as I reviewed the papers summarizing this year's progress in the Energy Conversion Program. The Materials research effort appears to be accomplishing useful results, some of which are already being tested by industry. In many ways, the past and present achievements of the geothermal industry are a direct result of materials problems overcome. The future growth of this industry will be facilitated by new and improved materials. It often follows from such developments that an industry will leapfrog itself. I therefore support the continuation of this work. The Brine Chemistry research project is of great value. Plant designers and permitting agencies alike benefit from predictive modeling tools which are both accurate and easy to use. I am especially pleased with UCSDs efforts at information transfer. The tutorials and free distribution of source code are to be commended. The preliminary models dealing with H{sub 2}S gas/liquid distributions and acid-base properties should be tested and finished as soon as possible. The work in progress which will allow better prediction of gas-liquid distributions after flashing is valuable and it too should be expedited.

  6. Mesh Generation for Short-Period Seismic Wave Propagation Based Upon the Spectral- Element Method: Southern California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casarotti, E.; Magnoni, F.; Le Goff, N.; Martin, R.; Komatitsch, D.; Plesch, A.; Nissen-Meyer, T.; Luo, Y.; Tromp, J.

    2008-12-01

    The Spectral Element Method (SEM) has been successfully applied to simulate ground motion in Southern California and the Los Angeles Basin for period up to 2 sec. Nowadays, simulations at shorter period are computationally feasible, but they require both a realistic geological model and a detailed unstructured hexahedral mesh. Aiming to include the effect on the seismic propagation due to subsurface geology, topography and low- velocity sedimentary basins, we have generated a 3D unstructured hexahedral mesh of Southern California suitable for shorter period simulations. The grid honors an updated description of the Salton Sea and of the sedimentary basins of Los Angeles, San Fernando and Ventura. We discuss some criteria to determine the geological details that need to be honored, analyzing 2D cross sections of the region for simulations at 10 Hz. We have focused in particular on a profile crossing the Santa Monica Mountains, investigating a possible lensing effect due to a large overthrust. The grid is nearly automatically generated on a massively parallel machine by GEOCUBIT, a Python script collection based upon CUBIT (Sandia Laboratory, www.cubit.sandia.gov). CUBIT is an advanced 3D unstructured hexahedral mesh generator that offers tremendous opportunities in assessing the quality of a mesh both in terms of geometrical complexity and numerical accuracy. For 3D simulations, we have applied SPECFEM3D, which accommodates anisotropy attenuation, free surface topography, fluid-solid boundaries and absorbing boundary conditions. For the 2D simulations we use SPECFEM2D, developed by Roland Martin, Dimitri Komatitsch, Céline Blitz and Nicolas Le Goff (2008).

  7. Eighteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1993-01-28

    PREFACE The Eighteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 26-28, 1993. There were one hundred and seventeen registered participants which was greater than the attendance last year. Participants were from eight foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, Guatemala, and Iceland. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Dean Gary Ernst opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Mock who also spoke at the banquet. Thirty-nine papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: field operations, The Geysers, geoscience, hot-dry-rock, injection, modeling, slim hole wells, geochemistry, well test and wellbore. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: John Counsil, Kathleen Enedy, Harry Olson, Eduardo Iglesias, Marcelo Lippmann, Paul Atkinson, Jim Lovekin, Marshall Reed, Antonio Correa, and David Faulder. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to John Hornbrook who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

  8. MEG-based detection and localization of perilesional dysfunction in chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ron K O; Braun, Allen R; Meltzer, Jed A

    2015-01-01

    Post-stroke impairment is associated not only with structural lesions, but also with dysfunction in surviving perilesional tissue. Previous studies using equivalent current dipole source localization of MEG/EEG signals have demonstrated a preponderance of slow-wave activity localized to perilesional areas. Recent studies have also demonstrated the utility of nonlinear analyses such as multiscale entropy (MSE) for quantifying neuronal dysfunction in a wide range of pathologies. The current study utilized beamformer-based reconstruction of signals in source space to compare spectral and nonlinear measures of electrical activity in perilesional and healthy cortices. Data were collected from chronic stroke patients and healthy controls, both young and elderly. We assessed relative power in the delta (1-4 Hz), theta (4-7 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz) and beta (15-30 Hz) frequency bands, and also measured the nonlinear complexity of electrical activity using MSE. Perilesional tissue exhibited a general slowing of the power spectrum (increased delta/theta, decreased beta) as well as a reduction in MSE. All measures tested were similarly sensitive to changes in the posterior perilesional regions, but anterior perilesional dysfunction was detected better by MSE and beta power. The findings also suggest that MSE is specifically sensitive to electrophysiological dysfunction in perilesional tissue, while spectral measures were additionally affected by an increase in rolandic beta power with advanced age. Furthermore, perilesional electrophysiological abnormalities in the left hemisphere were correlated with the degree of language task-induced activation in the right hemisphere. Finally, we demonstrate that single subject spectral and nonlinear analyses can identify dysfunctional perilesional regions within individual patients that may be ideal targets for interventions with noninvasive brain stimulation. PMID:26106540

  9. The effects of physical therapeutic agents on serum levels of stress hormones in patients with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tönük, Şükrü Burak; Serin, Erdinc; Ayhan, Fikriye Figen; Yorgancioglu, Zeynep Rezan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the effects of physical agents on the levels of stress hormones in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, hot packs, and therapeutic ultrasound were applied to the lumbar region and knees of patients with OA. Blood samples were taken for the measurement of the serum levels of glucose, insulin (INS), growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), cortisol (COR), and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) immediately before and after the 1st session, to investigate the acute effects of those physical agents on the endocrine system. The hormone levels were also measured every 5 sessions in a total of 10 sessions. The treatment response was also evaluated by using the visual analogue scale (VAS), Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) throughout the therapy period. After the 1st session, there was a decrease in INS levels and a mild decrease in PRL levels (P = 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively). Throughout the 10-session therapy period, the INS levels increased, whereas the ACTH and COR levels decreased (P < 0.05 for all). The VAS-spine, RMDQ, VAS-knee, and WOMAC scores decreased (P = 0.001 for VAS-spine and P < 0.001 for all others). A positive correlation was detected between the changes in serum COR and WOMAC-pain score (P < 0.05). Although the combination therapy caused changes in INS level accompanied with steady glucose levels, the application of physical agents did not adversely affect the hormone levels. The decrease in ACTH and COR levels may be attributed to the analgesic effect of agents and may be an indicator of patient comfort through a central action. PMID:27583888

  10. Toward the Replacement of Animal Experiments through the Bioinformatics-driven Analysis of 'Omics' Data from Human Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Grafström, Roland C; Nymark, Penny; Hongisto, Vesa; Spjuth, Ola; Ceder, Rebecca; Willighagen, Egon; Hardy, Barry; Kaski, Samuel; Kohonen, Pekka

    2015-11-01

    This paper outlines the work for which Roland Grafström and Pekka Kohonen were awarded the 2014 Lush Science Prize. The research activities of the Grafström laboratory have, for many years, covered cancer biology studies, as well as the development and application of toxicity-predictive in vitro models to determine chemical safety. Through the integration of in silico analyses of diverse types of genomics data (transcriptomic and proteomic), their efforts have proved to fit well into the recently-developed Adverse Outcome Pathway paradigm. Genomics analysis within state-of-the-art cancer biology research and Toxicology in the 21st Century concepts share many technological tools. A key category within the Three Rs paradigm is the Replacement of animals in toxicity testing with alternative methods, such as bioinformatics-driven analyses of data obtained from human cell cultures exposed to diverse toxicants. This work was recently expanded within the pan-European SEURAT-1 project (Safety Evaluation Ultimately Replacing Animal Testing), to replace repeat-dose toxicity testing with data-rich analyses of sophisticated cell culture models. The aims and objectives of the SEURAT project have been to guide the application, analysis, interpretation and storage of 'omics' technology-derived data within the service-oriented sub-project, ToxBank. Particularly addressing the Lush Science Prize focus on the relevance of toxicity pathways, a 'data warehouse' that is under continuous expansion, coupled with the development of novel data storage and management methods for toxicology, serve to address data integration across multiple 'omics' technologies. The prize winners' guiding principles and concepts for modern knowledge management of toxicological data are summarised. The translation of basic discovery results ranged from chemical-testing and material-testing data, to information relevant to human health and environmental safety. PMID:26551289

  11. Comparative Responsiveness of Pain Outcome Measures Among Primary Care Patients With Musculoskeletal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Erin E.; Bair, Matthew J.; Damush, Teresa M.; Tu, Wanzhu; Wu, Jingwei; Kroenke, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Background Comparative responsiveness data are needed to inform choices about pain outcome measures. Objectives To compare responsiveness of pain intensity, pain-related function, and composite measures, using data from a randomized trial and observational study. Research Design Analysis of responsiveness. Subjects A total of 427 adults with persistent back, hip, or knee pain were recruited from primary care. Methods Participants completed Brief Pain Inventory, Chronic Pain Grade (CPG), Roland disability, SF-36 bodily pain, and pain global rating of change measures. We used the global rating as the anchor for standardized response mean and receiver operating characteristic curve analyses. We used the distribution-based standard error of measurement to estimate minimally important change. To assess responsiveness to the trial intervention, we evaluated standardized effect size statistics stratified by trial arm. Results All measures were responsive to global improvement and all had fair-to-good accuracy in discriminating between participants with and without improvement. SF bodily pain was less responsive than other measures in several analyses. The 3-item PEG was similarly responsive to full Brief Pain Inventory scales. CPG and SF bodily pain were less responsive to the trial intervention and did not perform well among participants with hip/knee pain. Agreement between anchor and distribution-based methods was modest. Conclusions If a brief measure is desired, the 3-item PEG is more responsive than the SF bodily pain scale. CPG and SF bodily pain scales may be relatively poor choices for trial outcome assessment. Both anchor and distribution-based methods should be considered when determining clinically important change. PMID:20856144

  12. Treatment compliance and effectiveness of a cognitive behavioural intervention for low back pain: a complier average causal effect approach to the BeST data set

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Group cognitive behavioural intervention (CBI) is effective in reducing low-back pain and disability in comparison to advice in primary care. The aim of this analysis was to investigate the impact of compliance on estimates of treatment effect and to identify factors associated with compliance. Methods In this multicentre trial, 701 adults with troublesome sub-acute or chronic low-back pain were recruited from 56 general practices. Participants were randomised to advice (control n = 233) or advice plus CBI (n = 468). Compliance was specified a priori as attending a minimum of three group sessions and the individual assessment. We estimated the complier average causal effect (CACE) of treatment. Results Comparison of the CACE estimate of the mean treatment difference to the intention-to-treat (ITT) estimate at 12 months showed a greater benefit of CBI amongst participants compliant with treatment on the Roland Morris Questionnaire (CACE: 1.6 points, 95% CI 0.51 to 2.74; ITT: 1.3 points, 95% CI 0.55 to 2.07), the Modified Von Korff disability score (CACE: 12.1 points, 95% CI 6.07 to 18.17; ITT: 8.6 points, 95% CI 4.58 to 12.64) and the Modified von Korff pain score (CACE: 10.4 points, 95% CI 4.64 to 16.10; ITT: 7.0 points, 95% CI 3.26 to 10.74). People who were non-compliant were younger and had higher pain scores at randomisation. Conclusions Treatment compliance is important in the effectiveness of group CBI. Younger people and those with more pain are at greater risk of non-compliance. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN54717854 PMID:24423146

  13. STS-93 Mission Specialist Tognini drives an M-113 during training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Under the watchful eyes of KSC Fire Department trainer Capt. George Hoggard (seated on the front), STS-93 Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France (right) drives the M-113 armored personnel carrier during emergency egress training at the launch pad. Tognini represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). At the far left is Roland Nedelkovich, with the Vehicle Integration Test Team, JSC. In preparation for their mission, the STS-93 crew are participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that also include a launch-day dress rehearsal culminating with a simulated main engine cut-off. Others in the crew participating are Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.) and Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) Collins is the first woman to serve as a Shuttle commander. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments in space to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Chandra is expected to provide unique and crucial information on the nature of objects ranging from comets in our solar system to quasars at the edge of the observable universe. Since X-rays are absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere, space-based observatories are necessary to study these phenomena and allow scientists to analyze some of the greatest mysteries of the universe. The targeted launch date for STS-93 is no earlier than July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B.

  14. Biochemical bond breaking in coal: Third quarterly report, (April through June 1987)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    Major research efforts are presently being conducted in three principal areas of focus: (1) optimization of coal biosolubilization; (2) characterization of the solubilized products resulting from microbial coal depolymerization; and (3) degradation of model compounds to assess potential interunit linkages which may be attacked by whole culture or cell-free culture supernatants containing extracellular enzymes. Initial evaluations of the various combinations of microbes, coals, and coal pretreatments indicated that CP1 and CP1 + 2 solubilized all of the coals selected for this project at substantially higher rates than S. setonii or T. versicolor. The ARC CP1 + 2 consortium was chosen as the primary culture for detailed evaluation of coal biosolubilization and model compound degradation. Studies were conducted to determine if solubilization of coal by CP1 + 2 supernatants could be enhanced by elevating the temperature. Solubilization of both untreated Leonardite and HNO3 treated Wyodak (Smith-Roland) subbituminous coal was increased when elevating the temperature from ambient to 35C. The initial solubilization rate (T0 - 1 hour) of Leonardite at 22C was 16 OD units/hour and at 35C was 18 OD units/hour. Thus, an elevation of 13C enhanced solubilization of this coal by 12.5%. The effect of temperature on solubilization of Wyodak coal appeared to be more pronounced. Solubilization of HNO3 treated coals by the CP organisms is not only relatively rapid, but is also extensive. The relatively rapid and extensive coal solubilization attainable by CP1 + 2 has enabled us to produce quantities of product sufficient for analytical methods development and for characterization of the coal products. Initial attempts have been made to characterize the depolymerized products using HPLC and GC/MS. 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Twenty-first workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-26

    PREFACE The Twenty-First Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at the Holiday Inn, Palo Alto on January 22-24, 1996. There were one-hundred fifty-five registered participants. Participants came from twenty foreign countries: Argentina, Austria, Canada, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey and the UK. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Sixty-six papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into twenty sessions concerning: reservoir assessment, modeling, geology/geochemistry, fracture modeling hot dry rock, geoscience, low enthalpy, injection, well testing, drilling, adsorption and stimulation. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bobbie Bishop-Gollan, Tom Box, Jim Combs, John Counsil, Sabodh Garg, Malcolm Grant, Marcel0 Lippmann, Jim Lovekin, John Pritchett, Marshall Reed, Joel Renner, Subir Sanyal, Mike Shook, Alfred Truesdell and Ken Williamson. Jim Lovekin gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet and highlighted the exciting developments in the geothermal field which are taking place worldwide. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager.

  16. Translation, adaptation and validation of the Moroccan version of the Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale.

    PubMed

    Bendeddouche, Imad; Rostom, Samira; Bahiri, Rachid; Boudali, Aziza; Srifi, Najlaa; Mawani, Nada; Mengat, Mariam; El Badri, Dalal; Lazrak, Noufissa; Abouqal, Redouane; Allali, Fadoua; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2012-06-01

    This study aims to translate and cross-culturally adapt the Moroccan version of the Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale (QDS) and to investigate its reliability and validity in Moroccan patients with low back pain (LBP). The translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the QDS were developed in agreement with published guidelines. The QDS was translated by use of the forward and backward translation procedure. After pretest, it was validated in 64 Moroccan patients with LBP. The QDS was recorded twice, at baseline visit and 72 h later. Reproducibility was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland and Altman method. Internal consistency was measured by Cronbach α coefficient. Ceiling and floor effects were assessed. Validity was measured by correlating the scores of the Moroccan QDS with visual analogue scale (VAS) for Pain, Disability VAS, Schober test, fingertip-floor measurement and the Moroccan version of the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) by means of the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Association with gender and education level was also studied. Reliability was excellent with an ICC (type 2.1) of 0.959 (CI 95%: 0.934-0.975). The internal consistency was high with a Cronbach α of 0.979. The Bland and Altman method showed homogenous distribution of the differences, with no systematic trend. There were no floor or ceiling effects. The correlation between QDS and RMDQ was very good (r = 0.664; p ≤ 0.001). There was no correlation between QDS and the other variables. Accordingly, the Moroccan version of QDS has good reproducibility, internal consistency and validity for the assessment of disability in Moroccan-speaking patients with LBP. PMID:22349881

  17. Reduction in the amount of crosstalk with reduced number of focal spot rows in a grating array based zonal wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Biswajit; Boruah, Bosanta R.

    2015-06-01

    The Shack Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS), named after Johannes Franz Hartmann and Roland Shack, is one of the most well-known and popularly used optical wavefront sensor that finds numerous applications in various optical technologies. SHWS samples the incident wavefront by means of a lenslet array to produce an array of regular 2D array of focal spots on the detector plane of a digital camera, in the case of an unaberrated plane wavefront. If the incident wavefront is aberrated or deviates from a plane wavefront, the respective focal spots get shifted from its reference positions corresponding to the regular grid. If the incident wavefront aberration increases or has a very large curvature, the focal spot of one lenslet may enter the detector sub-aperture of the nearby lenslet. Thus, the SHWS has a limited dynamic range that is restricted to aberrations which do not allow the sub-images to be displaced out from their own detector sub-array. It makes the SHWS sensitive to cross-talk when higher order aberrations are present thereby unavoidably a ecting the wavefront estimation process. The array of tiny lenses of the SHWS can be replaced by an array of gratings followed by a focusing lens, generating an array of focal spots which is similar to that as in the case of a SHWS. In this paper, the spatial frequency of such a grating array based zonal wavefront sensor is configured to produce lesser number of rows of focal spots. The reduction in the number of focal spot rows reduces the amount of cross talk in the vertical direction. In this paper we present preliminary experimental results to demonstrate the above stated reduction in crosstalk.

  18. Nature and Determinants of the Course of Chronic Low Back Pain Over a 12-Month Period: A Cluster Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Christopher G.; Latimer, Jane; McAuley, James H.; Hodges, Paul W.; Rogers, W. Todd

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that low back pain (LBP) is a condition with an unpredictable pattern of exacerbation, remission, and recurrence. However, there is an incomplete understanding of the course of LBP and the determinants of the course. Objective The purposes of this study were: (1) to identify clusters of LBP patients with similar fluctuating pain patterns over time and (2) to investigate whether demographic and clinical characteristics can distinguish these clusters. Design This study was a secondary analysis of data extracted from a randomized controlled trial. Methods Pain scores were collected from 155 participants with chronic nonspecific LBP. Pain intensity was measured monthly over a 1-year period by mobile phone short message service. Cluster analysis was used to identify participants with similar fluctuating patterns of pain based on the pain measures collected over a year, and t tests were used to evaluate if the clusters differed in terms of baseline characteristics. Results The cluster analysis revealed the presence of 3 main clusters. Pain was of fluctuating nature within 2 of the clusters. Out of the 155 participants, 21 (13.5%) had fluctuating pain. Baseline disability (measured with the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire) and treatment groups (from the initial randomized controlled trial) were significantly different in the clusters of patients with fluctuating pain when compared with the cluster of patients without fluctuating pain. Limitations A limitation of this study was the fact that participants were undergoing treatment that may have been responsible for the rather positive prognosis observed. Conclusions A small number of patients with fluctuating patterns of pain over time were identified. This number could increase if individuals with episodic pain are included in this fluctuating group. PMID:24072729

  19. Cost-effectiveness of microendoscopic discectomy versus conventional open discectomy in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation: a prospective randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN51857546

    PubMed Central

    Arts, Mark P; Peul, Wilco C; Brand, Ronald; Koes, Bart W; Thomeer, Ralph TWM

    2006-01-01

    Background Open discectomy is the standard surgical procedure in the treatment of patients with long-lasting sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation. Minimally invasive approaches such as microendoscopic discectomy have gained attention in recent years. Reduced tissue trauma allows early ambulation, short hospital stay and quick resumption of daily activities. A comparative cost-effectiveness study has not been performed yet. We present the design of a randomised controlled trial on cost-effectiveness of microendoscopic discectomy versus conventional open discectomy in patients with lumbar disc herniation. Methods/Design Patients (age 18–70 years) presenting with sciatica due to lumbar disc herniation lasting more than 6–8 weeks are included. Patients with disc herniation larger than 1/3 of the spinal canal diameter, or disc herniation less than 1/3 of the spinal canal diameter with concomitant lateral recess stenosis or sequestration, are eliglible for participation. Randomisation into microendoscopic discectomy or conventional unilateral transflaval discectomy will take place in the operating room after induction of anesthesia. The length of skin incision is equal in both groups. The primary outcome measure is the functional assessment of the patient, measured by the Roland Disability Questionnaire for Sciatica, at 8 weeks and 1 year after surgery. We will also evaluate several other outcome parameters, including perceived recovery, leg and back pain, incidence of re-operations, complications, serum creatine kinase, quality of life, medical consumption, absenteeism and costs. The study is a randomised prospective multi-institutional trial, in which two surgical techniques are compared in a parallel group design. Patients and research nurses are kept blinded of the allocated treatment during the follow-up period of 2 years. Discussion Currently, open discectomy is the golden standard in the surgical treatment of lumbar disc herniation. Whether

  20. Effectiveness of percutaneous laser disc decompression versus conventional open discectomy in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation; design of a prospective randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Patrick A; Peul, Wilco C; Brand, Ronald; Arts, Mark P; Koes, Bart W; Berg, Annette A van den; van Buchem, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    Background The usual surgical treatment of refractory sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation, is open discectomy. Minimally invasive procedures, including percutaneous therapies under local anesthesia, are increasingly gaining attention. One of these treatments is Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression (PLDD). This treatment can be carried out in an outpatient setting and swift recovery and return to daily routine are suggested. Thus far, no randomized trial into cost-effectiveness of PLDD versus standard surgical procedure has been performed. We present the design of a randomized controlled trial, studying the cost-effectiveness of PLDD versus conventional open discectomy in patients with sciatica from lumbar disc herniation. Methods/design The study is a randomized prospective multi-center trial, in which two treatment strategies are compared in a parallel group design. Patients (age 18–70 years) visiting the neurosurgery department of the participating hospitals, are considered for inclusion in the trial when sciatica due to lumbar disc herniation has lasted more than 8 weeks. Patients with disc herniation smaller than 1/3 of the spinal canal diameter, without concomitant lateral recess stenosis or sequestration, are eligible for participation, and are randomized into one of two treatment arms; either Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression or conventional discectomy. The functional outcome of the patient, as assessed by the Roland Disability Questionnaire for Sciatica at 8 weeks and 1 year after treatment, is the primary outcome measure. The secondary outcome parameters are recovery as perceived by the patient, leg and back pain, incidence of re-intervention, complications, quality of life, medical consumption, absence of work and secondary costs. Discussion Open discectomy is still considered to be the golden standard in the surgical treatment of lumbar disc herniation. Whether Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression has at least as much efficacy as the

  1. The Deepwater Horizon Disaster: What Happened and Why

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, Roland N.

    2011-01-05

    The Deepwater Horizon disaster was the largest oil spill in US history, and the second largest spill in the world. 11 men lost their lives in the explosion and fire. Although the impacts of the spill were evident to large numbers of people, its causes were harder to see. This lecture will focus on the technical aspects of the events that led to the spill itself: what happened on the rig before, during and after the event, up to the time the rig sank. As with many engineering disasters, the accident was due to a sequence of failures, including both technical systems and procedural issues. Although the causes were complex and interacting, the lecture will focus on four main problems: (1) the failure of the cement and casing seal, (2) the failure to recognize and respond to hydrocarbon flow into the riser, (3) the ignition of hydrocarbons on the rig, and (4) the failure of the blow-out preventer (BOP) to seal the well. The lecture will conclude with some suggestions as to how events such as the Deepwater Horizon disaster can be avoided in the future. (Roland N. Horne is the Thomas Davies Barrow Professor of Earth Sciences at Stanford University, and was the Chairman of Petroleum Engineering from 1995 to 2006. He holds BE, PhD and DSc degrees from the University of Auckland, New Zealand, all in Engineering Science. Horne is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and is also an Honorary Member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers.)

  2. Brainwave signatures--an index reflective of the brain's functional neuroanatomy: further findings on the effect of EEG sensorimotor rhythm biofeedback training on the neurologic precursors of learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Tansey, M A

    1985-11-01

    Eight boys, ages 7 years 11 months to 15 years 3 months, were provided with long-term--symptom duration--sensorimotor rhythm biofeedback training for the remediation of their learning disabilities. Concurrently, the simultaneous recording of five frequency bands of brainwave activity (5 Hz, 7 Hz, 10 Hz, 12 Hz and 14 Hz), from one active electrode equidistant from reference and ground, was intended to provide a glimpse of the 'brainwave signature' reflective of the dynamic and synergistic processes involved in such cerebro-neural activation and the brain's global response to such an alteration in the sensorimotor subnetwork. Overall, the main effect of this procedure, for the biofeedback and subsequent conditioning of increased 14 Hz neural discharge patterns over the central Rolandic cortex in a clinical office setting, seems to be to increase bilateral sensorimotor transactions resulting in substantive remediation of the learning disabilities of the recipients of such training--by way of internally exercising of, and/or recruitment of additional neural activation within, the sensorimotor subnetwork/matrix. Observation of the changing brainwave signatures showed a tendency for decreased slow wave activity concomitant with increases in fast wave activity, for cases with a Full Scale I.Q. within the range of 76 and 85; with those cases with a Full Scale I.Q. within the range of 102 and 116 exhibiting increased amplitudes over most of the monitored bands, but with the increases being much less at the slower frequencies. It is noteworthy that those four subjects with either a significant Verbal greater than Performance, or Performance greater than Verbal, I.Q. Score discrepancy exhibited no less than a 40% greater increase in the lower of the two I.Q. scores; indicating that this SMR training procedure also resulted in an increased symmetry in the interhemispheric interactions reflective of the higher cortical functions for these no longer learning disabled boys. PMID

  3. A Randomized, Single-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study on the Efficacy of the Arthrokinematic Approach-Hakata Method in Patients with Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kogure, Akira; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Katada, Shigehiko; Takagi, Hiroshi; Kamikozuru, Masahiro; Isaji, Takashi; Hakata, Setsuo

    2015-01-01

    Study design cized, single-blind, controlled trial. Objective To investigate the efficacy of the Arthrokinematic approach (AKA)-Hakata (H) method for chronic low back pain. Summary of Background Data The AKA-H method is used to manually treat abnormalities of intra-articular movement. Methods One hundred eighty-six patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain randomly received either the AKA-H method (AKA-H group) or the sham technique (S group) monthly for 6 months. Data were collected at baseline and once a month. Outcome measures were pain intensity (visual analogue scale [VAS]) and quality of life (the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire [RDQ] and Short Form SF-36 questionnaire [SF-36]). Results At baseline, the VAS, RDQ, and SF-36 scores showed similar levels between the groups. After 6 months, the AKA-H group had more improvement in the VAS (42.8% improvement) and RDQ score (31.1% improvement) than the sham group (VAS: 10.4% improvement; RDQ: 9.8% improvement; both, P < 0.001). The respective scores for the SF-36 subscales (physical functioning, role physical, bodily pain, social functioning, general health perception, role emotional, and mental health) were also significantly more improved in the AKA-H group than in the sham group (all, P < 0.001). The scores for the physical, psychological, and social aspects of the SF-36 subscales showed similar improvement in the AKA-H group. Conclusion The AKA-H method can be effective in managing chronic low back pain. Trial Registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN-CTR) UMIN000006250. PMID:26646534

  4. Kinesio Taping® is not better than placebo in reducing pain and disability in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Maurício A.; Sousa, Manoel V.; Neves, Luciana A. F. S.; Cezar, Aline A. C.; Costa, Leonardo O. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Kinesio Taping ® has been widely used in clinical practice. However, it is unknown whether this type of tape is more effective than placebo taping in patients with chronic lower back pain. Objective: To compare the effectiveness of Kinesio Taping ® in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain against a placebo tape and a control group. Method: This is a 3-arm, randomized controlled trial with a blinded assessor. Sixty patients with chronic non-specific low back pain were randomized into one of the three groups: Kinesio Taping ® group (n=20), Micropore® (placebo) group (n=20) and control group (n=20). Patients allocated to both the Kinesio Taping ® group and the placebo group used the different types of tape for a period of 48 hours. The control group did not receive any intervention. The outcomes measured were pain intensity (measured by an 11-point numerical rating scale) and disability (measured by the 24-item Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire). A blinded assessor measured the outcomes at baseline, 48 hours and 7 days after randomization. Results: After 48 hours, there was a statistically significant difference between the Kinesio Taping ® group versus the control group (mean between-group difference = -3.1 points, 95% CI=-5.2 to -1.1, p=0.003), but no difference when compared to the placebo group (mean between-group difference= 1.9 points, 95% CI=-0.2 to 3.9, p=0.08). For the other outcomes no differences were observed. Conclusions: The Kinesio Taping ® is not better than placebo (Micropore®) in patients with chronic low back pain. PMID:26647750

  5. Auricular acupuncture for primary care treatment of low back pain and posterior pelvic pain in pregnancy: study protocol for a multicentre randomised placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background About 45% of all pregnant women suffer low back pain and/or pelvic girdle pain (LBPGP). This study seeks to evaluate the effect of auricular acupuncture on LBPGP compared with placebo auricular acupuncture and with standard obstetric care in the field of primary health care. Methods and design This study will be a four-parallel-arm, multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled trial. A total of 212 pregnant women (24 to 36 weeks’ gestation), aged at least 17 years, with LBPGP, will be randomly assigned to the verum auricular acupuncture plus standard obstetric care group (VAAc), to the non-specific auricular acupuncture plus standard obstetric care group (NSAAc), to the non-specific placebo auricular acupuncture plus standard obstetric care group (PAAc), or the standard obstetric care group (SOC). The VAAc, NSAAc, and PAAc groups will receive treatment at three auricular acupuncture points (specific points for the VAAc group or non-specific ones for the NSAAc and PAAc groups), once a week for 2 weeks; the SOC group will receive only standard obstetric care during the same period. The primary outcome will be the reduction in pain intensity, according to the visual analogue scale (iVAS), at 2 weeks after the start of treatment. The secondary outcomes will be functional status with respect to LBPGP (according to the Roland-Morris disability questionnaire), health-related quality of life (SF12) at 2 weeks after the start of treatment, and iVAS at 12 and 48 weeks postpartum. Discussion This trial will implement a high-quality methodology and may provide evidence for the efficacy, safety, and specificity of auricular acupuncture as a treatment for pregnant women with LBPGP. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN41033073 (date 20/03/2014). PMID:25027493

  6. Catalytic liquefaction by zinc chloride melts at pre-pyrolysis temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeulen, T.; Onu, C.; Joyce, P.J.; Hershkowitz, F.; Grens, E.A.

    1980-02-01

    Liquid-phase catalysts have proved effective for opening chemical linkages in subbituminous coal and capping the reactive segments with hydrogen atoms or other low-molecular-weight groups. The preferred temperature range is 275 to 325/sup 0/C (530 to 620/sup 0/F), so that the linkages are opened by controlled catalytic action rather than by thermal pyrolysis which requires appreciably higher temperatures. The best catalyst melt compositions used to date are zinc chloride with 10% water together with tetralin, and zinc chloride with 15% methanol and 3% of zinc metal. Useful residence times range from 30 minutes, or less, to as high as 90 minutes. The products of the treatment have predominately low (300) to medium (3000) molecular weights, analogous to syncrudes and solvent-refined coal. Conversions to pyridine-soluble products of 95% or better are achieved with Wyodak Roland Seam coal, and to date as much as 70% of that coal has been recovered as toluene-solubles (oils and asphaltenes). A major benefit of these conversion conditions is the almost complete absence of by-product char or gas. At these lower temperatures the hydrogen pressures used can be less than in conventional liquefaction; for example, 40 atm rather than 100 atm or more. Hydrogen consumption is significantly lower than in conventional liquefaction; the product yield is higher; and simpler procedures are foreseen for product recovery. The research performed so far clearly shows the industrial potential of homogeneous (liquid-phase) catalysts in penetrating and interacting with the mild temperature and pressure of these studies.

  7. Short-Term Effects of Kinesio Taping in Women with Pregnancy-Related Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Şeyhmus; Alpayci, Mahmut; Karaman, Erbil; Çetin, Orkun; Özkan, Yasemin; İlter, Server; Şah, Volkan; Şahin, Hanım Güler

    2016-01-01

    Background Pregnancy-related low back pain is a common condition during pregnancy. Kinesio tape is a drug-free elastic therapeutic tape used for treating various musculoskeletal problems. The aim of this study was to investigate the short-term effects of lumbar Kinesio taping on pain intensity and disability in women with pregnancy-related low back pain. Material/Methods A total of 65 patients with pregnancy-related low back pain were randomly allocated into either Kinesio taping (n=33) or control (n=32) groups. The intervention group was treated with paracetamol plus Kinesio taping, while the control group received only paracetamol. Kinesio taping was applied in the lumbar flexion position, and four I-shaped bands were used. Two bands were attached horizontally, with space correction technique. The remaining 2 bands, 1 on each side of the lumbar spine, were placed vertically, with inhibition technique. Low back pain intensity was measured on a 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS), and the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) was used for evaluation of disability. Results Pain intensity and RMDQ scores improved significantly in both groups at 5 days compared with baseline. Considering the degree of treatment effect (the change from baseline to day 5), the Kinesio taping group was significantly superior than the control group in all outcome measures (for all, P<0.001). Conclusions The results of this study indicate that Kinesio taping can be used as a complementary treatment method to achieve effective control of pregnancy-related low back pain. PMID:27088271

  8. Diffuse Decreased Gray Matter in Patients with Idiopathic Craniocervical Dystonia: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Piccinin, Camila C.; Piovesana, Luiza G.; Santos, Maria C. A.; Guimarães, Rachel P.; De Campos, Brunno M.; Rezende, Thiago J. R.; Campos, Lidiane S.; Torres, Fabio R.; Amato-Filho, Augusto C.; França, Marcondes C.; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Cendes, Fernando; D’Abreu, Anelyssa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have addressed the role of structures other than the basal ganglia in the pathophysiology of craniocervical dystonia (CCD). Neuroimaging studies have attempted to identify structural abnormalities in CCD but a clear pattern of alteration has not been established. We performed whole-brain evaluation using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to identify patterns of gray matter (GM) changes in CCD. Methods: We compared 27 patients with CCD matched in age and gender to 54 healthy controls. VBM was used to compare GM volumes. We created a two-sample t-test corrected for subjects’ age, and we tested with a level of significance of p < 0.001 and false discovery rate (FDR) correction (p < 0.05). Results: Voxel-based morphometry demonstrated significant reductions of GM using p < 0.001 in the cerebellar vermis IV/V, bilaterally in the superior frontal gyrus, precuneus, anterior cingulate and paracingulate, insular cortex, lingual gyrus, and calcarine fissure; in the left hemisphere in the supplementary motor area, inferior frontal gyrus, inferior parietal gyrus, temporal pole, supramarginal gyrus, rolandic operculum, hippocampus, middle occipital gyrus, cerebellar lobules IV/V, superior, and middle temporal gyri; in the right hemisphere, the middle cingulate and precentral gyrus. Our study did not report any significant result using the FDR correction. We also detected correlations between GM volume and age, disease duration, duration of botulinum toxin treatment, and the Marsden–Fahn dystonia scale scores. Conclusion: We detected large clusters of GM changes chiefly in structures primarily involved in sensorimotor integration, motor planning, visuospatial function, and emotional processing. PMID:25620953

  9. Distinctiveness of psychological obstacles to recovery in low back pain patients in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Nadine E.; Thomas, Elaine; Bishop, Annette; Dunn, Kate M.; Main, Chris J.

    2010-01-01

    Many psychological factors have been suggested to be important obstacles to recovery from low back pain, yet most studies focus on a limited number of factors. We compared a more comprehensive range of 20 factors in predicting outcome in primary care. Consecutive patients consulting 8 general practices were eligible to take part in a prospective cohort study; 1591 provided data at baseline and 810 at 6 months. Clinical outcome was defined using the Roland and Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ). The relative strength of the baseline psychological measures to predict outcome was investigated using adjusted multiple linear regression techniques. The sample was similar to other primary care cohorts (mean age 44 years, 59% women, mean baseline RMDQ 8.6). The 20 factors each accounted for between 0.04% and 33.3% of the variance in baseline RMDQ score. A multivariate model including all 11 scales that were associated with outcome in the univariate analysis accounted for 47.7% of the variance in 6 months RMDQ score; rising to 55.8% following adjustment. Four scales remained significantly associated with outcome in the multivariate model explaining 56.6% of the variance: perceptions of personal control, acute/chronic timeline, illness identify and pain self-efficacy. When all independent factors were included, depression, catastrophising and fear avoidance were no longer significant. Thus, a small number of psychological factors are strongly predictive of outcome in primary care low back pain patients. There is clear redundancy in the measurement of psychological factors. These findings should help to focus targeted interventions for back pain in the future. PMID:20022697

  10. Some empirical observations on sound level properties of recorded piano tones.

    PubMed

    Repp, B H

    1993-02-01

    Preliminary to an attempt at measuring the relative intensities of overlapping tones in acoustically recorded piano music, this study investigated whether the relative peak sound levels of recorded piano tones can be reliably inferred from the levels of their two lowest harmonics, measured in the spectrum near tone onset. Acoustic recordings of single tones were obtained from two computer-controlled mechanical pianos, one upright (Yamaha MX100A Disclavier) and one concert grand (Bösendorfer 290SE), at a range of pitches and hammer velocities. Electronic recordings from a digital piano (Roland RD250S), which were free of mechanical and sound transmission factors, were included for comparison. It was found that, on all three instruments, the levels of the lowest two harmonics (in dB) near tone onset generally increased linearly with the peak root-mean-square (rms) level (in dB) as hammer velocity was varied for any given pitch. The slope of this linear function was fairly constant across midrange pitches (C2 to C6) for the first harmonic (the fundamental), but increased with pitch for the second harmonic. However, there were two sources of unpredictable variability: On the two mechanical pianos, peak rms level varied considerably across pitches, even though the strings were struck at nominally equal hammer velocities; this was probably due to the combined effects of unevenness in hammer-string interaction, soundboard response, and room acoustics. Moreover, for different pitches at equal peak rms levels, the levels of the two lowest harmonics varied substantially, even on the electronic instrument.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8445121

  11. Impact of musculoskeletal pain on health-related quality of life among fishing sector workers.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Romero, Beatriz; Pita-Fernández, Salvador; Pértega-Díaz, Sonia

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to determine the impact of musculoskeletal pain (in terms of intensity of the pain, location and functional disability due to back pain) and other factors (socio-demographic, lifestyle and co-morbidity) on the health-related quality of life on a group of shellfish gatherers. This observational transversal study included 929 shellfish gatherers (18-69 years, 98.7 % women) who completed a self-administered questionnaire, including socio-demographic and lifestyle questions, co-morbidity, intensity and location of musculoskeletal pain, and Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ). Health-related quality of life was assessed using the 36-item Short Form Survey (SF-36). Physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) of the SF-36 were considered as outcome variables. The impact of the different factors on the PCS and MCS scores was evaluated using a stepwise linear regression analysis. Physical health was found to be independently associated to intensity of musculoskeletal pain (regression coefficient, B = -0.96), number of locations with musculoskeletal pain (MSP) (B = -0.77), presence of pain in the hip-knee (B = -2.26), self-reported rheumatic disorders (B = -2.79), lower back pain (B = -1.62) and age (B = -0.06). Mental health was associated with the presence of self-reported depressive syndrome (B = -1043.1) and RMDQ score (B = -42.2). The sample had significantly lower values than the reference population in all of the dimensions of the SF-36. Intensity of the pain, pain in the hip-knee, lower back pain, functional disability due to back pain and number of locations with musculoskeletal pain were found to have a detrimental impact on the physical health of the workers. Depressive syndrome and greater functional disability due to back pain, in turn, predict worse mental health. PMID:24647978

  12. Global marine gravity models from altimetry: a method to quantify the error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lequentrec-Lalancette, Marie-Françoise; Rouxel, Didier; Sarzeaud, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    Twenty years gravity models from satellite altimetry missions have widely contributed to the improvement of the knowledge over the oceans. Nevertheless, it has been shown that these models were limited in term of spatial resolution and precision at wavelengths lower than twenty kilometres ( for example, Rapp 1998, Rapp et Yi 1997, Featherstone 2002, Denker et Roland 2003, Small et Sandwell 1992, Maia, 2006, Lequentrec-Lalancette et al., 2005). More recently retracking techniques have improved altimetry and decreased limits to 15 km wavelength. Furthermore, they have moved the correct altimetric data closer to the coastal areas (Sandwell et Smith, 2009, Lillibridge et al., 2012). The aim of this study was to translate these error informations to a quantitative factor that can be included in geodetic or gravimetric computation. The model is divided into different spatial roughness areas that are then "calibrated" from differences between the model value and some marine validated data available. The roughness of the gravity global model has been computed by a method defined by Dreher (2000) from an improvement of the Fox and Hayes (1985) méthodology. The delimitation of the characteristic gravity provinces is done by thresholding of the roughness computed in the wavelengths lower than 50 km. This methodology has been validated with the EGM08 model in the North Atlantic ocean (Pavlis et al., 2008). In this case, the results can then be compared with the estimated errors of spherical harmonic model EGM08. The method has been generalized on the last version of the Sandwell and Smith (2009) gravity model.

  13. Sex differences in subjective and objective measures of pain, functional impairment, and health-related quality of life in patients with lumbar degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Gautschi, Oliver P; Corniola, Marco V; Smoll, Nicolas R; Joswig, Holger; Schaller, Karl; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Stienen, Martin N

    2016-05-01

    Sex differences in pain perception are known to exist; however, the exact pathomechanism remains unclear. This work aims to elucidate sex differences in subjective and objective measures of pain, functional impairment, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with lumbar degenerative disc disease. In a prospective 2-center study, back and leg pain (visual analogue scale [VAS]), functional disability (Oswestry Disability Index and Roland-Morris Disability Index), and HRQoL (EuroQol-5D and Short Form [SF12]) were collected for consecutive patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. Objective functional impairment (OFI) was estimated using age-adjusted and sex-adjusted cutoff values for the timed-up-and-go (TUG) test. A healthy cohort of n = 110 subjects served as the control group. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to test the association between sex and pain, subjective and OFIs, and HRQoL. The study comprised n = 305 patients (41.6% females). Female patients had more VAS back pain (P = 0.002) and leg pain (P = 0.014). They were more likely to report higher functional impairment in terms of Oswestry Disability Index (P = 0.005). Similarly, HRQoL measured with the EuroQol-5D index (P = 0.012) and SF12 physical composite score (P = 0.005) was lower in female patients. Female patients reported higher VAS back and leg pain, functional impairment, and reduced HRQoL than male patients. However, there were no sex differences with respect to the presence and degree of OFI measured by the TUG test using age-adjusted and sex-adjusted cutoff values. As such, the TUG may be a good test to overcome sex bias for the clinical assessment of patients with degenerative disc disease. PMID:26761383

  14. Cortical reorganization in recent-onset tinnitus patients by the Heidelberg Model of Music Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Krick, Christoph M.; Grapp, Miriam; Daneshvar-Talebi, Jonas; Reith, Wolfgang; Plinkert, Peter K.; Bolay, Hans Volker

    2015-01-01

    Pathophysiology and treatment of tinnitus still are fields of intensive research. The neuroscientifically motivated Heidelberg Model of Music Therapy, previously developed by the German Center for Music Therapy Research, Heidelberg, Germany, was applied to explore its effects on individual distress and on brain structures. This therapy is a compact and fast application of nine consecutive 50-min sessions of individualized therapy implemented over 1 week. Clinical improvement and long-term effects over several years have previously been published. However, the underlying neural basis of the therapy's success has not yet been explored. In the current study, the therapy was applied to acute tinnitus patients (TG) and healthy active controls (AC). Non-treated patients were also included as passive controls (PTC). As predicted, the therapeutic intervention led to a significant decrease of tinnitus-related distress in TG compared to PTC. Before and after the study week, high-resolution MRT scans were obtained for each subject. Assessment by repeated measures design for several groups (Two-Way ANOVA) revealed structural gray matter (GM) increase in TG compared to PTC, comprising clusters in precuneus, medial superior frontal areas, and in the auditory cortex. This pattern was further applied as mask for general GM changes as induced by the therapy week. The therapy-like procedure in AC also elicited similar GM increases in precuneus and frontal regions. Comparison between structural effects in TG vs. AC was calculated within the mask for general GM changes to obtain specific effects in tinnitus patients, yielding GM increase in right Heschl's gyrus, right Rolandic operculum, and medial superior frontal regions. In line with recent findings on the crucial role of the auditory cortex in maintaining tinnitus-related distress, a causative relation between the therapy-related GM alterations in auditory areas and the long-lasting therapy effects can be assumed. PMID:25745385

  15. Cortical reorganization in recent-onset tinnitus patients by the Heidelberg Model of Music Therapy.

    PubMed

    Krick, Christoph M; Grapp, Miriam; Daneshvar-Talebi, Jonas; Reith, Wolfgang; Plinkert, Peter K; Bolay, Hans Volker

    2015-01-01

    Pathophysiology and treatment of tinnitus still are fields of intensive research. The neuroscientifically motivated Heidelberg Model of Music Therapy, previously developed by the German Center for Music Therapy Research, Heidelberg, Germany, was applied to explore its effects on individual distress and on brain structures. This therapy is a compact and fast application of nine consecutive 50-min sessions of individualized therapy implemented over 1 week. Clinical improvement and long-term effects over several years have previously been published. However, the underlying neural basis of the therapy's success has not yet been explored. In the current study, the therapy was applied to acute tinnitus patients (TG) and healthy active controls (AC). Non-treated patients were also included as passive controls (PTC). As predicted, the therapeutic intervention led to a significant decrease of tinnitus-related distress in TG compared to PTC. Before and after the study week, high-resolution MRT scans were obtained for each subject. Assessment by repeated measures design for several groups (Two-Way ANOVA) revealed structural gray matter (GM) increase in TG compared to PTC, comprising clusters in precuneus, medial superior frontal areas, and in the auditory cortex. This pattern was further applied as mask for general GM changes as induced by the therapy week. The therapy-like procedure in AC also elicited similar GM increases in precuneus and frontal regions. Comparison between structural effects in TG vs. AC was calculated within the mask for general GM changes to obtain specific effects in tinnitus patients, yielding GM increase in right Heschl's gyrus, right Rolandic operculum, and medial superior frontal regions. In line with recent findings on the crucial role of the auditory cortex in maintaining tinnitus-related distress, a causative relation between the therapy-related GM alterations in auditory areas and the long-lasting therapy effects can be assumed. PMID:25745385

  16. The European Registry for Patients with Mechanical Circulatory Support (EUROMACS): first annual report.

    PubMed

    de By, Theo M M H; Mohacsi, Paul; Gummert, Jan; Bushnaq, Hasan; Krabatsch, Thomas; Gustafsson, Finn; Leprince, Pascal; Martinelli, Luigi; Meyns, Bart; Morshuis, Michiel; Netuka, Ivan; Potapov, Evgenij; Zittermann, Armin; Delmo Walter, Eva Maria; Hetzer, Roland

    2015-05-01

    The European Registry for Patients with Mechanical Circulatory Support (EUROMACS) was founded on 10 December 2009 with the initiative of Roland Hetzer (Deutsches Herzzentrum Berlin, Berlin, Germany) and Jan Gummert (Herz- und Diabeteszentrum Nordrhein-Westfalen, Bad Oeynhausen, Germany) with 15 other founding international members. It aims to promote scientific research to improve care of end-stage heart failure patients with ventricular assist device or a total artificial heart as long-term mechanical circulatory support. Likewise, the organization aims to provide and maintain a registry of device implantation data and long-term follow-up of patients with mechanical circulatory support. Hence, EUROMACS affiliated itself with Dendrite Clinical Systems Ltd to offer its members a software tool that allows input and analysis of patient clinical data on a daily basis. EUROMACS facilitates further scientific studies by offering research groups access to any available data wherein patients and centres are anonymized. Furthermore, EUROMACS aims to stimulate cooperation with clinical and research institutions and with peer associations involved to further its aims. EUROMACS is the only European-based Registry for Patients with Mechanical Circulatory Support with rapid increase in institutional and individual membership. Because of the expeditious data input, the European Association for Cardiothoracic Surgeons saw the need to optimize the data availability and the significance of the registry to improve care of patients with mechanical circulatory support and its potential contribution to scientific intents; hence, the beginning of their alliance in 2012. This first annual report is designed to provide an overview of EUROMACS' structure, its activities, a first data collection and an insight to its scientific contributions. PMID:25820161

  17. CO2 Trapping in Reservoirs with Fluvial Architecture: Sensitivity to Heterogeneity and Hysteresis in Characteristic Relationships for Different Rock Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenzon, N. I.; Ritzi, R. W., Jr.; Dominic, D. F.; Mehnert, E.; Okwen, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    Naum I. Gershenzona, Robert W. Ritzi Jr.a, David F. Dominica, Edward Mehnertb, and Roland T. OkwenbaDepartment of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Wright State University, 3640 Col. Glenn Hwy., Dayton, OH 45435, USAbIllinois State Geological Survey, Prairie Research Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 615 East Peabody Drive, Champaign, IL 61820, USA A number of important candidate CO2 reservoirs exhibit sedimentary architecture reflecting fluvial deposition. Recent studies have led to new conceptual and quantitative models for sedimentary architecture in fluvial deposits over a range of scales that are relevant to CO2 injection and storage, led to new geocellular modelling approaches for representing this architecture, and led to new computational studies of CO2 plume dynamics during and after injection. The processes of CO2 trapping depend upon a complex system of non-linear and hysteretic characteristic relationships including how relative permeability and capillary pressure vary with brine and CO2 saturation. New computational studies of capillary trapping in conglomeratic reservoirs strongly suggest that representing small-scale (decimeter to meter) textural facies among different rock types, including their organization within a hierarchy of larger-scale stratification, representing differences in characteristic relationships between rock types, and representing hysteresis in characteristic curves can all be critical to understanding trapping processes. In this context, CO2trapping was evaluated in conglomeratic reservoirs with fluvial architecture including different rock types with different and hysteretic characteristic curves and with capillary pressure defined for each rock type using two different conventional approaches, i.e. Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten. The results show that in these reservoirs the capillary trapping rates are quite sensitive to differences between the Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten approaches, and that

  18. Comparing Once- versus Twice-Weekly Yoga Classes for Chronic Low Back Pain in Predominantly Low Income Minorities: A Randomized Dosing Trial

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Robert B.; Boah, Ama R.; Keosaian, Julia; Cerrada, Christian; Weinberg, Janice; Sherman, Karen J.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Previous studies have demonstrated that once-weekly yoga classes are effective for chronic low back pain (cLBP) in white adults with high socioeconomic status. The comparative effectiveness of twice-weekly classes and generalizability to racially diverse low income populations are unknown. Methods. We conducted a 12-week randomized, parallel-group, dosing trial for 95 adults recruited from an urban safety-net hospital and five community health centers comparing once-weekly (n = 49) versus twice-weekly (n = 46) standardized yoga classes supplemented by home practice. Primary outcomes were change from baseline to 12 weeks in pain (11-point scale) and back-related function (23-point modified Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire). Results. 82% of participants were nonwhite; 77% had annual household incomes <$40,000. The sample's baseline mean pain intensity [6.9 (SD 1.6)] and function [13.7 (SD 5.0)] reflected moderate to severe back pain and impairment. Pain and back-related function improved within both groups (P < 0.001). However, there were no differences between once-weekly and twice-weekly groups for pain reduction [−2.1 (95% CI −2.9, −1.3) versus −2.4 (95% CI −3.1, −1.8), P = 0.62] or back-related function [−5.1 (95% CI −7.0, −3.2) versus −4.9 (95% CI −6.5, −3.3), P = 0.83]. Conclusions. Twelve weeks of once-weekly or twice-weekly yoga classes were similarly effective for predominantly low income minority adults with moderate to severe chronic low back pain. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01761617. PMID:23878604

  19. Altered intrinsic brain activity in patients with paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia by PRRT2 mutation: altered brain activity by PRRT2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Luo, ChunYan; Chen, Yongping; Song, Wei; Chen, Qin; Gong, QiYong; Shang, Hui-Fang

    2013-11-01

    The proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) gene has been recently identified as a causative gene of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD), with an insertion mutation c.649_650insC (p.P217fsX7) reported as the most common mutation. However, the pathogenic mechanism of the mutation of PRRT2 remains largely unknown. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging is a promising approach to assess cerebral function and reveals underlying functional changes. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 4 Chinese PKD patients with p.P217fsX7 mutation, 6 Chinese PKD patients without the mutation, and 10 healthy control subjects. Voxel-based analysis was used to characterize alterations in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF). When compared with the healthy control subjects, both groups of PKD patients showed alterations in spontaneous brain activities within cortical-basal ganglia circuitry. Besides, the group of patients with p.P217fsX7 mutation also exhibited increased ALFF in the right postcenral gyrus and right rolandic operculum area, while the alteration of ALFF in group of patients without the mutation additionally involved the middle orbitofrontal cortex. Direct comparative analysis between these two patient groups revealed significantly increased ALFF in the right postcentral gyrus in the group with p.P217fsX7 mutation. Increased spontaneous brain activity in the cortical-basal ganglia circuitry, especially in the motor preparation areas, is a common pathophysiology in PKD. Differences in the spatial patterns of increased ALFF between patients with and those without the mutation might reflect the distinct pathological mechanism resulting from PRRT2 mutation. PMID:23532549

  20. Chronic pain coping styles in patients with herniated lumbar discs and coexisting spondylotic changes treated surgically: Considering clinical pain characteristics, degenerative changes, disability, mood disturbances, and beliefs about pain control

    PubMed Central

    Misterska, Ewa; Jankowski, Roman; Głowacki, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain catastrophizing, appraisals of pain control, styles of coping, and social support have been suggested to affect functioning in patients with low back pain. We investigated the relation of chronic pain coping strategies to psychological variables and clinical data, in patients treated surgically due to lumbar disc herniation and coexisting spondylotic changes. Material/Methods The average age of study participants (n=90) was 43.47 years (SD 10.21). Patients completed the Polish versions of the Chronic Pain Coping Inventory-42 (PL-CPCI-42), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-PL), Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ-PL), Beliefs about Pain Control Questionnaire (BPCQ-PL), and Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMQ-PL). Results In the PL-CPCI-42 results, resting, guarding and coping self-statements were frequently used as coping strategies (3.96 SD 1.97; 3.72 SD 1.72; 3.47 SD 2.02, respectively). In the CSQ-PL domains, catastrophizing and praying/hoping were frequently used as coping strategies (3.62 SD 1.19). The mean score obtained from the BDI-PL was 11.86 SD 7.23, and 12.70 SD 5.49 from the RMDQ-PL. BPCQ-PL results indicate that the highest score was in the subscale measuring beliefs that powerful others can control pain (4.36 SD 0.97). Exercise correlated significantly with beliefs about internal control of pain (rs=0.22). We identified associations between radiating pain and guarding (p=0.038) and between sports recreation and guarding (p=0.013) and task persistence (p=0.041). Conclusions Back pain characteristics, depressive mood, disability, and beliefs about personal control of pain are related to chronic LBP coping styles. Most of the variables related to advancement of degenerative changes were not associated with coping efforts. PMID:24370564

  1. Association between Substance Use Disorder Status and Pain-Related Function Following 12 Months of Treatment in Primary Care Patients with Musculoskeletal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Morasco, Benjamin J.; Corson, Kathryn; Turk, Dennis C.; Dobscha, Steven K.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine relationships between substance use disorder (SUD) history and 12-month outcomes among primary care patients with chronic noncancer pain (CNCP). Patients were enrolled in a randomized trial of collaborative care intervention (CCI) versus treatment-as-usual (TAU) to improve pain-related physical and emotional function. At baseline, 72 of 362 patients (20.0%) had a history of SUD. Compared to CNCP patients without SUD, those with comorbid SUD had poorer pain-related function and were more likely to meet criteria for current major depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (all p-values<0.05). Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine whether SUD status was associated with clinically significant change over 12 months in pain-related function (30% reduction in Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire Score). The overall model was not significant in the CCI group. However, within the TAU group, participants with a SUD history were significantly less likely to show improvements in pain-related function (OR=0.30, 95% CI=0.11–0.82). CNCP patients with comorbid SUD reported greater functional impairment at baseline. Patients with SUD who received usual care were 70% less likely to have clinically significant improvements in pain-related function 12 months post-baseline, and SUD status did not impede improvement for the CCI group. Perspective Chronic non-cancer pain patients with a history of a substance use disorder (SUD) report poorer pain-related functioning and are less likely to experience clinically significant improvements from usual pain treatment. Providers should assess for SUD status and provide more intensive interventions for these patients. PMID:20851057

  2. The effects of physical therapeutic agents on serum levels of stress hormones in patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Tönük, Şükrü Burak; Serin, Erdinc; Ayhan, Fikriye Figen; Yorgancioglu, Zeynep Rezan

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the effects of physical agents on the levels of stress hormones in patients with osteoarthritis (OA).Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, hot packs, and therapeutic ultrasound were applied to the lumbar region and knees of patients with OA. Blood samples were taken for the measurement of the serum levels of glucose, insulin (INS), growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), cortisol (COR), and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) immediately before and after the 1st session, to investigate the acute effects of those physical agents on the endocrine system. The hormone levels were also measured every 5 sessions in a total of 10 sessions. The treatment response was also evaluated by using the visual analogue scale (VAS), Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) throughout the therapy period.After the 1st session, there was a decrease in INS levels and a mild decrease in PRL levels (P = 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively). Throughout the 10-session therapy period, the INS levels increased, whereas the ACTH and COR levels decreased (P < 0.05 for all). The VAS-spine, RMDQ, VAS-knee, and WOMAC scores decreased (P = 0.001 for VAS-spine and P < 0.001 for all others). A positive correlation was detected between the changes in serum COR and WOMAC-pain score (P < 0.05).Although the combination therapy caused changes in INS level accompanied with steady glucose levels, the application of physical agents did not adversely affect the hormone levels. The decrease in ACTH and COR levels may be attributed to the analgesic effect of agents and may be an indicator of patient comfort through a central action. PMID:27583888

  3. Applications of finite element simulation in orthopedic and trauma surgery.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Cegoñino, José; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Puértolas, Sergio; López, Enrique; Mateo, Jesús; Gracia, Luis

    2012-04-18

    Research in different areas of orthopedic and trauma surgery requires a methodology that allows both a more economic approach and the ability to reproduce different situations in an easy way. Simulation models have been introduced recently in bioengineering and could become an essential tool in the study of any physiological unity, regardless of its complexity. The main problem in modeling with finite elements simulation is to achieve an accurate reproduction of the anatomy and a perfect correlation of the different structures, in any region of the human body. Authors have developed a mixed technique, joining the use of a three-dimensional laser scanner Roland Picza captured together with computed tomography (CT) and 3D CT images, to achieve a perfect reproduction of the anatomy. Finite element (FE) simulation lets us know the biomechanical changes that take place after hip prostheses or osteosynthesis implantation and biological responses of bone to biomechanical changes. The simulation models are able to predict changes in bone stress distribution around the implant, so allowing preventing future pathologies. The development of a FE model of lumbar spine is another interesting application of the simulation. The model allows research on the lumbar spine, not only in physiological conditions but also simulating different load conditions, to assess the impact on biomechanics. Different degrees of disc degeneration can also be simulated to determine the impact on adjacent anatomical elements. Finally, FE models may be useful to test different fixation systems, i.e., pedicular screws, interbody devices or rigid fixations compared with the dynamic ones. We have also developed models of lumbar spine and hip joint to predict the occurrence of osteoporotic fractures, based on densitometric determinations and specific biomechanical models, including approaches from damage and fracture mechanics. FE simulations also allow us to predict the behavior of orthopedic splints

  4. A pure likelihood approach to the analysis of genetic association data: an alternative to Bayesian and frequentist analysis

    PubMed Central

    Strug, Lisa J; Hodge, Susan E; Chiang, Theodore; Pal, Deb K; Corey, Paul N; Rohde, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Investigators performing genetic association studies grapple with how to measure strength of association evidence, choose sample size, and adjust for multiple testing. We apply the evidential paradigm (EP) to genetic association studies, highlighting its strengths. The EP uses likelihood ratios (LRs), as opposed to P-values or Bayes' factors, to measure strength of association evidence. We derive EP methodology to estimate sample size, adjust for multiple testing, and provide informative graphics for drawing inferences, as illustrated with a Rolandic Epilepsy (RE) fine-mapping study. We focus on controlling the probability of observing weak evidence for or against association (W) rather than type I errors (M). For example, for LR⩾32 representing strong evidence, at one locus with n=200 cases, n=200 controls, W=0.134, whereas M=0.005. For n=300 cases and controls, W=0.039 and M=0.004. These calculations are based on detecting an OR=1.5. Despite the common misconception, one is not tied to this planning value for analysis; rather one calculates the likelihood at all possible values to assess evidence for association. We provide methodology to adjust for multiple tests across m loci, which adjusts M and W for m. We do so for (a) single-stage designs, (b) two-stage designs, and (c) simultaneously controlling family-wise error rate (FWER) and W. Method (c) chooses larger sample sizes than (a) or (b), whereas (b) has smaller bounds on the FWER than (a). The EP, using our innovative graphical display, identifies important SNPs in elongator protein complex 4 (ELP4) associated with RE that may not have been identified using standard approaches. PMID:20424645

  5. Capturing the musical brain with Lasso: Dynamic decoding of musical features from fMRI data.

    PubMed

    Toiviainen, Petri; Alluri, Vinoo; Brattico, Elvira; Wallentin, Mikkel; Vuust, Peter

    2014-03-01

    We investigated neural correlates of musical feature processing with a decoding approach. To this end, we used a method that combines computational extraction of musical features with regularized multiple regression (LASSO). Optimal model parameters were determined by maximizing the decoding accuracy using a leave-one-out cross-validation scheme. The method was applied to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data that were collected using a naturalistic paradigm, in which participants' brain responses were recorded while they were continuously listening to pieces of real music. The dependent variables comprised musical feature time series that were computationally extracted from the stimulus. We expected timbral features to obtain a higher prediction accuracy than rhythmic and tonal ones. Moreover, we expected the areas significantly contributing to the decoding models to be consistent with areas of significant activation observed in previous research using a naturalistic paradigm with fMRI. Of the six musical features considered, five could be significantly predicted for the majority of participants. The areas significantly contributing to the optimal decoding models agreed to a great extent with results obtained in previous studies. In particular, areas in the superior temporal gyrus, Heschl's gyrus, Rolandic operculum, and cerebellum contributed to the decoding of timbral features. For the decoding of the rhythmic feature, we found the bilateral superior temporal gyrus, right Heschl's gyrus, and hippocampus to contribute most. The tonal feature, however, could not be significantly predicted, suggesting a higher inter-participant variability in its neural processing. A subsequent classification experiment revealed that segments of the stimulus could be classified from the fMRI data with significant accuracy. The present findings provide compelling evidence for the involvement of the auditory cortex, the cerebellum and the hippocampus in the processing of

  6. Vacuum Phenomenon of the Sacroiliac Joint: Correlation with Sacropelvic Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Higashino, Kosaku; Morimoto, Masatoshi; Sakai, Toshinori; Yamashita, Kazuta; Abe, Mitusnobu; Nagamachi, Akihiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Study Design A radiologic study of sacropelvic morphology and vacuum phenomenon of sacroiliac joint in subjects unrelated to low back pain. Purpose The aim of this study is to describe the relationship between sacropelvic morphology and vacuum phenomenon of the sacroiliac joint. Overview of Literature Lumbopelvic alignment and sacropelvic morphology are associated with the pathomechanisms of various spinal disorders. The vacuum phenomena of the sacroiliac joint (SJVP) are often observed in clinical practice, but the relationships between these phenomena and sacropelvic morphology have not been investigated. This study examined the prevalence of SJVP in computed tomography (CT) images and the relationship between sacropelvic morphology and SJVP. Methods We analyzed multiplanar CT images of 93 subjects (59 men, 34 women). Pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope (SS), and lumbar lordosis (LL) were measured using the three-dimensional reconstruction method. The prevalence of SJVP in multiplanar CT images were reviewed. Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ) scores and the modified Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, which focuses on subjective symptoms and restriction of activities of daily living, were also obtained from all the subjects. Results Thirty-six of the 93 subjects had SJVP (39%), with marked female predominance (91% women, 8.5% men). Men with SJVP had significantly lower PI than men without SJVP (35.1° vs. 46.3°, p<0.05). There was no correlation between SJVP and the modified JOA or RDQ scores. Conclusions These data suggest that differences in sacropelvic morphology can influence the biomechanical environment and contribute to SJVP in men. Presence of SJVP did not affect JOA or RDQ scores. PMID:27559459

  7. The immediate and long-term effects of exercise and patient education on physical, functional, and quality-of-life outcome measures after single-level lumbar microdiscectomy: a randomized controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Selkowitz, David M; Kulig, Kornelia; Poppert, Elizabeth M; Flanagan, Sean P; Matthews, Ndidiamaka D; Beneck, George J; Popovich, John M; Lona, Jose R; Yamada, Kimiko A; Burke, Wendy S; Ervin, Carolyn; Powers, Christopher M

    2006-01-01

    Background Low back pain remains a costly quality-of-life-related health problem. Microdiscectomy is often the surgical procedure of choice for a symptomatic, single-level, lumbar disc herniation in younger and middle-aged adults. The question of whether a post-microdiscectomy exercise program enhances function, quality of life, and disability status has not been systematically explored. Thus, the overall purpose of this study is to assess immediate and long-term outcomes of an exercise program, developed at University of Southern California (USC), targeting the trunk and lower extremities (USC Spine Exercise Program) for persons who have undergone a single-level microdiscectomy for the first time. Methods/design One hundred individuals between the ages of 18 and 60 who consent to undergo lumbar microdiscectomy will be recruited to participate in this study. Subjects will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: 1) one session of back care education, or 2) a back care education session followed by the 12-week USC Spine Exercise Program. The outcome examiners (evaluators), as well as the data managers, will be blinded to group allocation. Education will consist of a one-hour "one-on-one" session with the intervention therapist, guided by an educational booklet specifically designed for post-microdiscectomy care. This session will occur four to six weeks after surgery. The USC Spine Exercise Program consists of two parts: back extensor strength and endurance, and mat and upright therapeutic exercises. This exercise program is goal-oriented, performance-based, and periodized. It will begin two to three days after the education session, and will occur three times a week for 12 weeks. Primary outcome measures include the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, SF-36® quality of life assessment, Subjective Quality of Life Scale, 50-foot Walk, Repeated Sit-to-Stand, and a modified Sorensen test. The outcome measures in the study will

  8. Modeling Karst Ecosystem-Atmosphere CO2 Exchange: The Importance of Ventilation for Carbonate Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, M.; Serrano-Ortiz, P.; Godderis, Y.; Kowalski, A. S.; Janssens, I.

    2011-12-01

    . Cosmochim. Acta, 70(5), 1128-1147, doi: 10.1016/j.gca.2005.11.018. [2] Serrano-Ortiz, P., M. Roland, S. Sanchez-Moral, I. A. Janssens, F. Domingo, Y. Goddéris, and A. S. Kowalski (2010), Hidden, abiotic CO2 flows and gaseous reservoirs in the terrestrial carbon cycle: Review and perspectives, Agric. For. Meteorol., 150, 321-329.

  9. Thirteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.; Cook, J.W.

    1988-01-21

    , Yasmin Gulamani, and Rosalee Benelli for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, especially Jeralyn Luetkehans. The Thirteenth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract No. DE-AS07-84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jean W. Cook

  10. The long-term fate of permafrost peatlands under rapid climate warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindles, Graeme T.; Morris, Paul J.

    2016-04-01

    High-latitude permafrost peatlands contain globally important amounts of soil organic carbon, owing to cold conditions which suppress anaerobic decomposition. However, there is much concern that climate warming and subsequent permafrost thaw threaten the stability of this carbon store. The ultimate fate of permafrost peatlands and their carbon stores is unclear because of complex feedbacks between peat accumulation, hydrology and vegetation. Unfortunately, field monitoring campaigns only span the last few decades and therefore provide an incomplete picture of permafrost peatland response to rapid warming in the twentieth century. Here we use a high-resolution palaeoecological approach to understand the longer-term response of peatlands in Subarctic Sweden in contrasting states of permafrost degradation to recent rapid warming. At all sites we identify a drying trend until the late-twentieth century; however, two sites subsequently experienced a rapid shift to wetter conditions as permafrost thawed in response to climatic warming, culminating in collapse of the peat domes. Commonalities between study sites lead us to propose a five-phase model for permafrost peatland response to climatic warming. This model suggests a shared ecohydrological trajectory towards a common end point: inundated Arctic fen. Although carbon accumulation is rapid in such sites, and thus peatland ecosystem services are resumed, saturated soil conditions are likely to cause elevated methane emissions that have implications for climate-feedback mechanisms. We outline our plans to test the model published in Swindles et al. (2015) using the same methodological approach in other high-latitude locations, including zones of continuous and discontinuous permafrost. Reference: Swindles, G.T., Morris, P.J., Mullan, D., Watson, E.J., Turner, T.E., Roland, T., Amesbury, M.J., Kokfelt, U., Schoning, K., Pratte, S., Gallego-Sala, A., Charman, D.J., Sanderson, N., Garneau, M., Carrivick, J.L., Woulds, C

  11. Knee Pain and Low Back Pain Additively Disturb Sleep in the General Population: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of the Nagahama Study

    PubMed Central

    Murase, Kimihiko; Tabara, Yasuharu; Ito, Hiromu; Kobayashi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Setoh, Kazuya; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Muro, Shigeo; Kadotani, Hiroshi; Kosugi, Shinji; Sekine, Akihiro; Yamada, Ryo; Nakayama, Takeo; Mishima, Michiaki; Matsuda, Shuichi; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Chin, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Association of knee and low back pain with sleep disturbance is poorly understood. We aimed to clarify the independent and combined effects of these orthopedic symptoms on sleep in a large-scale general population. Methods Cross-sectional data about sleep and knee/low back pain were collected for 9,611 community residents (53±14 years old) by a structured questionnaire. Sleep duration less than 6 h/d was defined as short sleep. Sleep quality and the presence of knee and low back pain were evaluated by dichotomous questions. Subjects who complained about knee or low back pains were graded by tertiles of a numerical response scale (NRS) score and a Roland-Morris disability questionnaire (RDQ) score respectively. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to determine the correlates of short sleep duration and poor sleep quality. Results Frequency of participants who complained of the orthopedic symptoms was as follows; knee pain, 29.0%; low back pain, 42.0% and both knee and low back pain 17.6%. Both knee and low back pain were significantly and independently associated with short sleep duration (knee pain: odds ratio (OR) = 1.19, p<0.01; low back pain: OR = 1.13, p = 0.01) and poor sleep quality (knee pain: OR = 1.22, p<0.01; low back pain; OR = 1.57, p<0.01). The group in the highest tertile of the NRS or RDQ score had the highest risk for short sleep duration and poor sleep quality except for the relationship between the highest tertile of the RDQ score and short sleep duration.(the highest tertile of the NRS: OR for short sleep duration = 1.31, p<0.01; OR for poor sleep quality = 1.47, p<0.01; the highest tertile of the RDQ: OR for short sleep duration = 1.11, p = 0.12; OR for poor sleep quality = 1.81, p<0.01) Further, coincident knee and low back pain raised the odds ratios for short sleep duration (either of knee or low back pain: OR = 1.10, p = 0.06; both knee and low back pain: OR = 1.40, p<0.01) and poor sleep quality (either of knee or

  12. Effectiveness of a 'Global Postural Reeducation' program for persistent Low Back Pain: a non-randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of this non-randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of a Global Postural Reeducation (GPR) program as compared to a Stabilization Exercise (SE) program in subjects with persistent low back pain (LBP) at short- and mid-term follow-up (ie. 3 and 6 months). Methods According to inclusion and exclusion criteria, 100 patients with a primary complaint of persistent LBP were enrolled in the study: 50 were allocated to the GPR group and 50 to the SE group. Primary outcome measures were Roland and Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Secondary outcome measures were lumbar Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Fingertip-to-floor test (FFT). Data were collected at baseline and at 3/6 months by health care professionals unaware of the study. An intention to treat approach was used to analyze participants according to the group to which they were originally assigned. Results Of the 100 patients initially included in the study, 78 patients completed the study: 42 in the GPR group and 36 in the SE group. At baseline, the two groups did not differ significantly with respect to gender, age, BMI and outcome measures. Comparing the differences between groups at short- and mid-term follow-up, the GPR group revealed a significant reduction (from baseline) in all outcome measures with respect to the SE group. The ordered logistic regression model showed an increased likelihood of definitive improvement (reduction from baseline of at least 30% in RMDQ and VAS scores) for the GPR group compared to the SE group (OR 3.9, 95% CI 2.7 to 5.7). Conclusions Our findings suggest that a GPR intervention in subjects with persistent LBP induces a greater improvement on pain and disability as compared to a SE program. These results must be confirmed by further studies with higher methodological standards, including randomization, larger sample size, longer follow-up and subgrouping of the LBP subjects. Trial registration NCT

  13. EMSO: European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favali, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    EMSO, a Research Infrastructure listed within ESFRI (European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures) Roadmap (Report 2006, http://cordis.europa.eu/esfri/roadmap.htm), is the European-scale network of multidisciplinary seafloor observatories from the Arctic to the Black Sea with the scientific objective of long-term real-time monitoring of processes related to geosphere/biosphere/hydrosphere interactions. EMSO will enhance our understanding of processes through long time series appropriate to the scale of the phenomena, constituting the new frontier of studying Earth interior, deep-sea biology and chemistry and ocean processes. The development of an underwater network is based on previous EU-funded projects since early '90 and is being supported by several EU initiatives, as the on-going ESONET-NoE, coordinated by IFREMER (2007-2011, http://www.esonet-emso.org/esonet-noe/), and aims at gathering together the Research Community of the Ocean Observatories. In 2006 the FP7 Capacities Programme launched a call for Preparatory Phase (PP) projects, that will provide the support to create the legal and organisational entities in charge of managing the infrastructures, and coordinating the financial effort among the countries. Under this call the EMSO-PP project was approved in 2007 with the coordination of INGV and the participation of other 11 Institutions of 11 countries. The project has started in April 2008 and will last 4 years. The EMSO is a key-infrastructure both for Ocean Sciences and for Solid Earth Sciences. In this respect it will enhance and complement profitably the capabilities of other European research infrastructures such as EPOS, ERICON-Aurora Borealis, and SIOS. The perspective of the synergy among EMSO and other ESFRI Research Infrastructures will be outlined. EMSO Partners: IFREMER-Institut Français de Recherche pour l'exploitation de la mer (France, ref. Roland Person); KDM-Konsortium Deutsche Meeresforschung e.V. (Germany, ref. Christoph

  14. EMSO: European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favali, P.; Partnership, Emso

    2009-04-01

    EMSO, a Research Infrastructure listed within ESFRI (European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures) Roadmap), is the European-scale network of multidisciplinary seafloor observatories from the Arctic to the Black Sea with the scientific objective of long-term real-time monitoring of processes related to geosphere/biosphere/hydrosphere interactions. EMSO will enhance our understanding of processes through long time series appropriate to the scale of the phenomena, constituting the new frontier of studying Earth interior, deep-sea biology and chemistry and ocean processes. EMSO will reply also to the need expressed in the frame of GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security) to develop a marine segment integrated in the in situ and satellite global monitoring system. The EMSO development relays upon the synergy between the scientific community and the industry to improve the European competitiveness with respect to countries like USA/Canada, NEPTUNE, VENUS and MARS projects, Taiwan, MACHO project, and Japan, DONET project. In Europe the development of an underwater network is based on previous EU-funded projects since early '90, and presently supported by EU initiatives. The EMSO infrastructure will constitute the extension to the sea of the land-based networks. Examples of data recorded by seafloor observatories will be presented. EMSO is presently at the stage of Preparatory Phase (PP), funded in the EC FP7 Capacities Programme. The project has started in April 2008 and will last 4 years with the participation of 12 Institutions representing 12 countries. EMSO potential will be significantly increased also with the interaction with other Research Infrastructures addressed to Earth Science. 2. IFREMER-Institut Français de Recherche pour l'exploitation de la mer (France, ref. Roland Person); KDM-Konsortium Deutsche Meeresforschung e.V. (Germany, ref. Christoph Waldmann); IMI-Irish Marine Institute (Ireland, ref. Michael Gillooly); UTM-CSIC-Unidad de

  15. Study protocol of effectiveness of a biopsychosocial multidisciplinary intervention in the evolution of non-speficic sub-acute low back pain in the working population: cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Non-specific low back pain is a common cause for consultation with the general practitioner, generating increased health and social costs. This study will analyse the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary intervention to reduce disability, severity of pain, anxiety and depression, to improve quality of life and to reduce the incidence of chronic low back pain in the working population with non-specific low back pain, compared to usual clinical care. Methods/Design A Cluster randomised clinical trial will be conducted in 38 Primary Health Care Centres located in Barcelona, Spain and its surrounding areas. The centres are randomly allocated to the multidisciplinary intervention or to usual clinical care. Patients between 18 and 65 years old (n = 932; 466 per arm) and with a diagnostic of a non-specific sub-acute low back pain are included. Patients in the intervention group are receiving the recommendations of clinical practice guidelines, in addition to a biopsychosocial multidisciplinary intervention consisting of group educational sessions lasting a total of 10 hours. The main outcome is change in the score in the Roland Morris disability questionnaire at three months after onset of pain. Other outcomes are severity of pain, quality of life, duration of current non-specific low back pain episode, work sick leave and duration, Fear Avoidance Beliefs and Goldberg Questionnaires. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. Analysis will be by intention to treat. The intervention effect will be assessed through the standard error of measurement and the effect-size. Responsiveness of each scale will be evaluated by standardised response mean and receiver-operating characteristic method. Recovery according to the patient will be used as an external criterion. A multilevel regression will be performed on repeated measures. The time until the current episode of low back pain takes to subside will be analysed by Cox regression. Discussion We hope

  16. A non-surgical approach to the management of lumbar spinal stenosis: A prospective observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Donald R; Hurwitz, Eric L; Gregory, Amy A; Clary, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    Background While it is widely held that non-surgical management should be the first line of approach in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), little is known about the efficacy of non-surgical treatments for this condition. Data are needed to determine the most efficacious and safe non-surgical treatment options for patients with LSS. The purpose of this paper is to describe the clinical outcomes of a novel approach to patients with LSS that focuses on distraction manipulation (DM) and neural mobilization (NM). Methods This is a prospective consecutive case series with long term follow up (FU) of fifty-seven consecutive patients who were diagnosed with LSS. Two were excluded because of absence of baseline data or failure to remain in treatment to FU. Disability was measured using the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RM) and pain intensity was measured using the Three Level Numerical Rating Scale (NRS). Patients were also asked to rate their perceived percentage improvement. Results The mean patient-rated percentage improvement from baseline to the end to treatment was 65.1%. The mean improvement in disability from baseline to the end of treatment was 5.1 points. This was considered to be clinically meaningful. Clinically meaningful improvement in disability from baseline to the end of treatment was seen in 66.7% of patients. The mean improvement in "on average" pain intensity was 1.6 points. This did not reach the threshold for clinical meaningfulness. The mean improvement in "at worst" pain was 3.1 points. This was considered to be clinically meaningful. The mean duration of FU was 16.5 months. The mean patient-rated percentage improvement from baseline to long term FU was 75.6%. The mean improvement in disability was 5.2 points. This was considered to be clinically meaningful. Clinically meaningful improvement in disability was seen in 73.2% of patients. The mean improvement in "on average" pain intensity from baseline to long term FU was 3.0 points

  17. An Innovative and Portable Multimodal Pain Relief Device for the Management of Neuropathic Low Back Pain - a Study from Kashmir (Southeast Asia)

    PubMed Central

    Lone, Baseer-ul-Rasool; Beigh, Mirza-Idrees-ul-Haq; Manzoor, Mushbiq

    2016-01-01

    We developed a portable multimodal system with seven different mechanisms of pain relief incorporated into a lumbar belt called the Comfort-N-Harmony Belt (C&H belt). Here, we describe the technical details of the system and also summarize the effects of this multimodal pain relieving technology as an adjuvant to analgesics versus analgesics alone, on the level of pain, improvement of psychological status, disability, and the quality of life in the patients with neuropathic low back pain (LBP). We tracked the volunteers who were following up at a tertiary health care center for the complaints of neuropathic LBP of minimum three months duration and were on analgesics alone with no relief in the severity of the pain. Study group A (n = 45) consisted of volunteers with LBP on C&H belt therapy, along with the usually prescribed analgesic intake, and group B (n = 45) with LBP volunteers on analgesics, plus a similar looking but plain leather belt (placebo). For pain, the VAS (Visual Analogue Scale); for anxiety and depression, the (HADS) Hospital Anxiety-Depression Scale; for disability, the RMDQ (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire); and for quality of life, (NHP) Nottingham-Health-Profile were used before and after the study period.  There were no significant differences in demographic variables between the groups (p < 0.05). After the study period of one month, VAS, RMDQ, NHP-pain, NHP-physical activity, and HADS scores in both groups were significantly improved compared to the pre-treatment scores (p < 0.05). Group A also showed significant improvements in the scores of NHP-energy level and NHP-social isolation (p < 0.05). The post-treatment scores did not significantly show any difference between the two groups (p > 0.05). However, in comparison of pre- and post-treatment scores, the pre-treatment score values of RMDQ, NHP-pain, NHP-physical activity, and NHP-social isolation were much higher in group A compared to the group B, but still these scores were

  18. List of Organizing Committees and Sponsors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-03-01

    Organizers DIRECTORS Maria L CalvoPresident of International Commission for Optics, Spain Aram V PapoyanDirector of Institute for Physical Research of NAS, Armenia HEADS OF PROJECT Tigran Dadalyan YSU, Armenia Artsrun MartirosyanIPR, Armenia COORDINATOR Narine GevorgyanIPR, Armenia / ICTP, Italy MANAGERS Paytsar MantashyanIPR, Armenia Karen VardanyanIPR, Armenia INTERNATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE Marcis AuzinshLatvia Roland AvagyanArmenia Tapash ChakrabortyCanada Yuri ChilingaryanArmenia Eduard KazaryanArmenia Albert KirakosyanArmenia Radik KostanyanArmenia Avinash PandeyIndia Marat SoskinUkraine INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM COMMITTEE David Sarkisyan (Chair)Armenia Roman AlaverdyanArmenia Dan ApostolRomania Levon AslanyanArmenia Aranya BhattacherjeeIndia Gagik BuniatyanArmenia Vigen ChaltykyanArmenia Roldao Da RochaBrazil Miltcho DanailovItaly Vladimir GerdtRussia Samvel GevorgyanArmenia Gayane GrigoryanArmenia Rafik HakobyanArmenia Takayuki MiyaderaJapan Levon MouradianArmenia Atom MuradyanArmenia Simon RochesterUSA Hayk SarkisyanArmenia Aleksandr VardanyanArmenia LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE Narek AghekyanArmenia Anahit GogyanArmenia Melanya GrigoryanArmenia Armen HovhannisyanArmenia Lilit HovhannisyanArmenia Tatevik KhachatryanArmenia Astghik KuzanyanArmenia Satenik KuzanyanArmenia Vladimir LazarevRussia Lilit MantashyanArmenia Hripsime MkrtchyanArmenia Pavel MuzhikyanArmenia Wahi NarsisianArmenia Sahak OrdukhanyanArmenia Anna ReymersArmenia Narine TorosyanArmenia The Symposium was organized by YSU & NAS SPIE Armenian Student Chapter Institute for Physical Research (IPR) of National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Russian-Armenian (Slavonic) University (RAU) LT-PYRKAL cjsc Yerevan State University (YSU) Official Sponsors of the Symposium LT-PYRKAlRussian ArmenianSPIE LT-PYRKAL cjscRussian-Armenian UniversityYSU & NAS SPIE Student Chapter Further sponsors NFSATICTPSCSADevout Generation National Foundation of Science and Advanced TechnologiesThe Abdus Salam International Centre

  19. Effectiveness of massage therapy for subacute low-back pain: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Preyde, M

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of massage therapy for low-back pain has not been documented. This randomized controlled trial compared comprehensive massage therapy (soft-tissue manipulation, remedial exercise and posture education), 2 components of massage therapy and placebo in the treatment of subacute (between 1 week and 8 months) low-back pain. METHODS: Subjects with subacute low-back pain were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: comprehensive massage therapy (n = 25), soft-tissue manipulation only (n = 25), remedial exercise with posture education only (n = 22) or a placebo of sham laser therapy (n = 26). Each subject received 6 treatments within approximately 1 month. Outcome measures obtained at baseline, after treatment and at 1-month follow-up consisted of the Roland Disability Questionnaire (RDQ), the McGill Pain Questionnaire (PPI and PRI), the State Anxiety Index and the Modified Schober test (lumbar range of motion). RESULTS: Of the 107 subjects who passed screening, 98 (92%) completed post-treatment tests and 91 (85%) completed follow-up tests. Statistically significant differences were noted after treatment and at follow-up. The comprehensive massage therapy group had improved function (mean RDQ score 1.54 v. 2.86-6.5, p < 0.001), less intense pain (mean PPI score 0.42 v. 1.18-1.75, p < 0.001) and a decrease in the quality of pain (mean PRI score 2.29 v. 4.55-7.71, p = 0.006) compared with the other 3 groups. Clinical significance was evident for the comprehensive massage therapy group and the soft-tissue manipulation group on the measure of function. At 1-month follow-up 63% of subjects in the comprehensive massage therapy group reported no pain as compared with 27% of the soft-tissue manipulation group, 14% of the remedial exercise group and 0% of the sham laser therapy group. INTERPRETATION: Patients with subacute low-back pain were shown to benefit from massage therapy, as regulated by the College of Massage Therapists of Ontario and delivered by

  20. A randomised controlled trial of post-operative rehabilitation after surgical decompression of the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Denzler, Raymond; Dvorak, Jiri; Müntener, Markus; Grob, Dieter

    2007-01-01

    Spinal decompression is the most common type of spinal surgery carried out in the older patient, and is being performed with increasing frequency. Physiotherapy (rehabilitation) is often prescribed after surgery, although its benefits compared with no formal rehabilitation have yet to be demonstrated in randomised control trials. The aim of this randomised controlled trial was to examine the effects on outcome up to 2 years after spinal decompression surgery of two types of postoperative physiotherapy compared with no postoperative therapy (self-management). Hundred and fifty-nine patients (100 men, 59 women; 65 ± 11 years) undergoing decompression surgery for spinal stenosis/herniated disc were randomised to one of the following programmes beginning 2 months post-op: recommended to “keep active” (CONTROL; n = 54); physiotherapy, spine stabilisation exercises (PT-StabEx; n = 56); physiotherapy, mixed techniques (PT-Mixed; n = 49). Both PT programmes involved 2 × 30 min sessions/week for up to 12 weeks, with home exercises. Pain intensity (0–10 graphic rating scale, for back and leg pain separately) and self-rated disability (Roland Morris) were assessed before surgery, before and after the rehabilitation phase (approx. 2 and 5 months post-op), and at 12 and 24 months after the operation. ‘Intention to treat’ analyses were used. At 24 months, 151 patients returned questionnaires (effective return rate, excluding 4 deaths, 97%). Significant reductions in leg and back pain and self-rated disability were recorded after surgery (P < 0.05). Pain showed no further changes in any group up to 24 months later, whereas disability declined further during the “rehabilitation” phase (P < 0.05) then stabilised, but with no significant group differences. 12 weeks of post-operative physiotherapy did not influence the course of change in pain or disability up to 24 months after decompression surgery. Advising patients to keep active by

  1. Tabulation of comet observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-04-01

    Concerning comets: C/1940 R2 (Cunningham), C/1941 B2 (de Kock-Paraskevopoulos), C/1941 K1 (van Gent), C/1942 X1 (Whipple-Fedtke-Tevzadze), C/1946 C1 (Timmers), C/1946 K1 (Pajdušáková-Rotbart-Weber), C/1946 P1 (Jones), C/1946 U1 (Bester), C/1947 S1 (Bester), C/1947 X1 (Southern comet), C/1947 Y1 (Mrkos), C/1948 E1 (Pajdušáková-Mrkos), C/1948 L1 (Honda-Bernasconi), C/1948 V1 (Eclipse comet), C/1949 N1 (Bappu-Bok-Newkirk), C/1950 K1 (Minkowski), C/1951 C1 (Pajdušáková), C/1952 H1 (Mrkos), C/1952 M1 (Peltier), C/1952 Q1 (Harrington), C/1953 G1 (Mrkos-Honda), C/1953 T1 (Abell), C/1954 O1 (Vozárová), C/1955 L1 (Mrkos), C/1955 N1 (Bakharev-Macfarlane-Krienke), C/1955 O1 (Honda), C/1956 E1 (Mrkos), C/1956 R1 (Arend-Roland), C/1957 P1 (Mrkos), C/1957 U1 (Latyshev-Wild-Burnham), C/1959 Q1 (Alcock), C/1959 Q2 (Alcock), C/1959 Y1 (Burnham), C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp), C/1996 J1 (Evans-Drinkwater), C/1996 P2 (Russell-Watson), C/1997 BA6 (Spacewatch), C/1997 D1 (Mueller), C/1997 J1 (Mueller), C/1997 J2 (Meunier-Dupouy), C/1997 N1 (Tabur), C/1997 T1 (Utsunomiya), 10P/Tempel 2, 21P/Giacobini-Zinner, 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1, 43P/Wolf-Harrington, 55P/Tempel-Tuttle, 62P/Tsuchinshan 1, 69P/Taylor, 78P/Gehrels 2, 81P/Wild 2, 88P/Howell, 95P/Chiron, 103P/Hartley 2, 104P/Kowal 2, 111P/Helin-Roman-Crockett, 118P/Shoemaker-Levy 4, 121P/Shoemaker-Holt 2, 129P/Shoemaker-Levy 3, 134P/Kowal-Vavrova, P/1997 C1 (Gehrels), P/1997 G1 (Montani).

  2. Reliability and validity of the cross-culturally adapted Italian version of the Core Outcome Measures Index.

    PubMed

    Mannion, A F; Boneschi, M; Teli, M; Luca, A; Zaina, F; Negrini, S; Schulz, P J

    2012-08-01

    Patient-orientated outcome questionnaires are essential for the assessment of treatment success in spine care. Standardisation of the instruments used is necessary for comparison across studies and in registries. The Core Outcome Measures Index (COMI) is a short, multidimensional outcome instrument validated for patients with spinal disorders and is the recommended outcome instrument in the Spine Society of Europe Spine Tango Registry; currently, no validated Italian version exists. A cross-cultural adaptation of the COMI into Italian was carried out using established guidelines. 96 outpatients with chronic back problems (>3 months) were recruited from five practices in Switzerland and Italy. They completed the newly translated COMI, the Roland Morris disability (RM), adjectival pain rating, WHO Quality of Life (WHOQoL), EuroQoL-5D, and EuroQoL-VAS scales. Reproducibility was assessed in a subgroup of 63 patients who returned a second questionnaire within 1 month and indicated no change in back status on a 5-point Likert-scale transition question. The COMI scores displayed no floor or ceiling effects. On re-test, the responses for each individual domain of the COMI were within one category in 100% patients for "function", 92% for "symptom-specific well-being", 100% for "general quality of life", 90% for "social disability", and 98% for "work disability". The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC(2,1)) for the COMI back and leg pain items were 0.78 and 0.82, respectively, and for the COMI summary index, 0.92 (95% CI 0.86-0.95); this compared well with 0.84 for RM, 0.87 for WHOQoL, 0.79 for EQ-5D, and 0.77 for EQ-VAS. The standard error of measurement (SEM) for COMI was 0.54 points, giving a ''minimum detectable change'' for the COMI of 1.5 points. The scores for most of the individual COMI domains and the COMI summary index correlated to the expected extent (0.4-0.8) with the corresponding full-length reference questionnaires (r = 0.45-0.72). The reproducibility

  3. Proceedings of the 4th Workshop of Young Researchers in Astronomy & Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgács-Dajka, E.

    2006-09-01

    , Observational Stellar Physics, Infrared and Radio Astronomy, Galactic Astronomy, Cosmology. I hope that the readers of this volume will find interesting and useful ideas for their future works. In the name of the all participants, I am grateful to the Baja Astronomical Observatory, the Konkoly Observatory of Hungarian Academy of Sciences, the Roland Eötvös Physical Society and the Doctoral Schools of the Eötvös University for their financial support. (Borkovits Tamás - LOC)

  4. An epidemiological study of low back pain in professional drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovenzi, Massimo; Rui, Francesca; Negro, Corrado; D'Agostin, Flavia; Angotzi, Giuliano; Bianchi, Sandra; Bramanti, Lucia; Festa, GianLuca; Gatti, Silvana; Pinto, Iole; Rondina, Livia; Stacchini, Nicola

    2006-12-01

    The prevalence of low back pain (LBP) was investigated in 598 Italian professional drivers exposed to whole-body vibration (WBV) and ergonomic risk factors (drivers of earth moving machines, fork-lift truck drivers, truck drivers, bus drivers). The control group consisted of a small sample of 30 fire inspectors not exposed to WBV. Personal, occupational and health histories were collected by means of a structured questionnaire. Vibration measurements were performed on representative samples of the machines and vehicles used by the driver groups. From the vibration magnitudes and exposure durations, alternative measures of vibration dose were estimated for each subject. Daily vibration exposure, expressed in terms of 8-h energy-equivalent frequency-weighted acceleration, A(8), averaged 0.28-0.61 (range 0.10-1.18) m s -2 rms in the driver groups. Duration of exposure to WBV ranged between 1 and 41 years. The 7-day and 12-month prevalence of LBP was greater in the driver groups than in the controls. In the professional drivers, the occurrence of 12-month LBP, high intensity of LBP (Von Korff pain scale score ⩾5), and LBP disability (Roland & Morris disability scale score ⩾12) significantly increased with increasing cumulative vibration exposure. Even though several alternative measures of vibration exposure were associated with LBP outcomes, nevertheless a more regular trend of association with LBP was found for vibration dose expressed as ∑ a vit i (m s -2 h), in which the frequency-weighted acceleration, a v, and lifetime exposure duration, t, were given equal weight. In multivariate data analysis, individual characteristics (e.g. age, body mass index) and a physical load index (derived from combining manual materials handling and awkward postures) were significantly associated with LBP outcomes, while psychosocial work factors (e.g. job decision, job support) showed a marginal relation to LBP. This study tends to confirm that professional driving in industry

  5. An Innovative and Portable Multimodal Pain Relief Device for the Management of Neuropathic Low Back Pain - a Study from Kashmir (Southeast Asia).

    PubMed

    Tarfarosh, Shah Faisal Ahmad; Lone, Baseer-Ul-Rasool; Beigh, Mirza-Idrees-Ul-Haq; Manzoor, Mushbiq

    2016-01-01

    We developed a portable multimodal system with seven different mechanisms of pain relief incorporated into a lumbar belt called the Comfort-N-Harmony Belt (C&H belt). Here, we describe the technical details of the system and also summarize the effects of this multimodal pain relieving technology as an adjuvant to analgesics versus analgesics alone, on the level of pain, improvement of psychological status, disability, and the quality of life in the patients with neuropathic low back pain (LBP). We tracked the volunteers who were following up at a tertiary health care center for the complaints of neuropathic LBP of minimum three months duration and were on analgesics alone with no relief in the severity of the pain. Study group A (n = 45) consisted of volunteers with LBP on C&H belt therapy, along with the usually prescribed analgesic intake, and group B (n = 45) with LBP volunteers on analgesics, plus a similar looking but plain leather belt (placebo). For pain, the VAS (Visual Analogue Scale); for anxiety and depression, the (HADS) Hospital Anxiety-Depression Scale; for disability, the RMDQ (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire); and for quality of life, (NHP) Nottingham-Health-Profile were used before and after the study period.  There were no significant differences in demographic variables between the groups (p < 0.05). After the study period of one month, VAS, RMDQ, NHP-pain, NHP-physical activity, and HADS scores in both groups were significantly improved compared to the pre-treatment scores (p < 0.05). Group A also showed significant improvements in the scores of NHP-energy level and NHP-social isolation (p < 0.05). The post-treatment scores did not significantly show any difference between the two groups (p > 0.05). However, in comparison of pre- and post-treatment scores, the pre-treatment score values of RMDQ, NHP-pain, NHP-physical activity, and NHP-social isolation were much higher in group A compared to the group B, but still these scores were

  6. Map and Data for Quaternary Faults and Fault Systems on the Island of Hawai`i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Eric C.; Burgmann, Roland; Crone, Anthony J.; Machette, Michael N.; Dart, Richard L.

    2007-01-01

    and catalog of data, both in Adobe Acrobat PDF format. The senior authors (Eric C. Cannon and Roland Burgmann) compiled the fault data as part of ongoing studies of active faulting on the Island of Hawai`i. The USGS is responsible for organizing and integrating the State or regional products under their National Seismic Hazard Mapping project, including the coordination and oversight of contributions from individuals and groups (Michael N. Machette and Anthony J. Crone), database design and management (Kathleen M. Haller), and digitization and analysis of map data (Richard L. Dart). After being released an Open-File Report, the data in this report will be available online at http://earthquake.usgs.gov/regional/qfaults/, the USGS Quaternary Fault and Fold Database of the United States.

  7. Benign childhood epilepsy with occipital paroxysms: neuropsychological findings.

    PubMed

    Germanò, Eva; Gagliano, Antonella; Magazù, Angela; Sferro, Caterina; Calarese, Tiziana; Mannarino, Erminia; Calamoneri, Filippo

    2005-05-01

    Benign childhood epilepsy with occipital paroxysms is classified among childhood benign partial epilepsies. The absence of neurological and neuropsychological deficits has long been considered as a prerequisite for a diagnosis of benign childhood partial epilepsy. Much evidence has been reported in literature in the latest years suggesting a neuropsychological impairment in this type of epilepsy, particularly in the type with Rolandic paroxysms. The present work examines the neuropsychological profiles of a sample of subjects affected by the early-onset benign childhood occipital seizures (EBOS) described by Panayotopulos. The patient group included 22 children (14 males and 8 females; mean age 10.1+/-3.3 years) diagnosed as having EBOS. The patients were examined with a set of tests investigating neuropsychological functions: memory, attention, perceptive, motor, linguistic and academic (reading, writing, arithmetic) abilities. The same instruments have been given to a homogeneous control group as regards sex, age, level of education and socio-economic background. None of the subjects affected by EBOS showed intellectual deficit (mean IQ in Wechsler Full Scale 91.7; S.D. 8.9). Results show a widespread cognitive dysfunction in the context of a focal epileptogenic process in EBOS. In particular, children with EBOS show a significant occurrence of specific learning disabilities (SLD) and other subtle neuropsychological deficits. We found selective dysfunctions relating to perceptive-visual attentional ability (p<0.05), verbal and visual-spatial memory abilities (p<0.01), visual perception and visual-motor integration global abilities (p<0.01), manual dexterity tasks (p<0.05), some language tasks (p<0.05), reading and writing abilities (p<0.01) and arithmetic ability (p<0.01). The presence of cognitive dysfunctions in subjects with EBOS supports the hypothesis that epilepsy itself plays a role in the development of neuropsychological impairment. Supported by other

  8. Analysis of the global free infra-gravity wave climate for the SWOT mission, and preliminary results of numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, A.; Aucan, J.; Ardhuin, F.

    2012-12-01

    uses the energy balance equation, used for large scale models of swells and wind-waves, extended to periods of 100 s. The source of FIGWs energy is treated like coastal reflection (Ardhuin and Roland 2012). The amount of FIGW energy at the shoreline is crudely represented as a constant fraction of the incoming bound wave energy. The spatial and temporal variability of the modeled FIGW energy is similar to that in data from DART stations. Future work will include an estimation of seismic noise sources of hum, following the method of Ardhuin et al. (2011), in order to use the global seismic network for the validation of FIGW energy levels.

  9. Analysis and numerical modeling of the global free infra-gravity wave climate for the SWOT mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Aucan, Jérome; Rawat, Arshad

    2013-04-01

    uses the energy balance equation, used for large scale models of swells and wind-waves, extended to periods of 100 s. The source of FIGWs energy is treated like coastal reflection (Ardhuin and Roland 2012). The amount of FIGW energy at the shoreline is crudely represented as a constant fraction of the incoming bound wave energy. The spatial and temporal variability of the modeled FIGW energy is similar to that in data from DART stations. Future work will include an estimation of seismic noise sources of hum, following the method of Ardhuin et al. (2011), in order to use the global seismic network for the validation of FIGW energy levels.

  10. Revisiting the influence of chain length on the α- and β-relaxations in oligomeric glass formers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, K. L.

    2013-12-01

    Dielectric relaxation measurements of a series of oligo(propylene glycol) dimethyl ethers, CH3-O-[CH2-CH(CH3)-O]N-CH3, including samples with the number of PG units N = 1, 2, 3, 7, 17, 34, and 69, were made by Mattsson et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 165701 (2005)] at ambient pressure. The objective of the study was to relate the change of properties of the glass transition dynamics to the number of monomer units N in the chain. Not examined in the previous publication is how the change of the width of the frequency dispersion of the α-relaxation with N is related to the observed change in the α-β bifurcation characterized by the ratio, τα(Tg)/τβ(Tg). In this paper, the frequency dispersion of the dimer, trimer, and heptamer are fitted by the Fourier transform of the Kohlrausch stretched exponential function, ϕ(t) = exp[-(t/τα)1-n]. Determined from experimental data, both τα(Tg)/τβ(Tg) and n increase with N. More interestingly, we find τα(Tg)/τβ(Tg) has approximately the same value as [τα(Tg)/tc]n with tc = 2 ps, in accordance with the prediction of the Coupling Model of approximate relation between τα and τβ given by τβ ≈ (tc)n(τα)1-n. Considered also are previously unpublished dielectric loss spectra of the heptamer taken at different combinations of T and P with τα(T,P) fixed by Roland et al. [Phys. Rev. B 77, 012201 (2008)]. The dielectric loss data show not only the α-loss peaks superpose but also the high frequency flank including the barely resolved JG β-relaxation superposes approximately. This is again consistent with the approximate relation between τα and τβ from the Coupling Model because n is unchanged on varying P and T with τα(T,P) kept constant, and tc is a constant. The additional advance made herein has the benefit of enhancing the impact of the earlier experimental studies of the oligo(propylene glycol) dimethyl ethers on current understanding of the dynamics of glass transition.

  11. Efficacy and safety of acupuncture for the treatment of non-specific acute low back pain: a randomised controlled multicentre trial protocol [ISRCTN65814467

    PubMed Central

    Vas, Jorge; Perea-Milla, Emilio; Mendez, Camila; Silva, Luis Carlos; Herrera Galante, Antonia; Aranda Regules, Jose Manuel; Martinez Barquin, Dulce M; Aguilar, Inmaculada; Faus, Vicente

    2006-01-01

    Background Low back pain and its associated incapacitating effects constitute an important healthcare and socioeconomic problem, as well as being one of the main causes of disability among adults of working age. The prevalence of non-specific low back pain is very high among the general population, and 60–70% of adults are believed to have suffered this problem at some time. Nevertheless, few randomised clinical trials have been made of the efficacy and efficiency of acupuncture with respect to acute low back pain. The present study is intended to assess the efficacy of acupuncture for acute low back pain in terms of the improvement reported on the Roland Morris Questionnaire (RMQ) on low back pain incapacity, to estimate the specific and non-specific effects produced by the technique, and to carry out a cost-effectiveness analysis. Methods/Design Randomised four-branch controlled multicentre prospective study made to compare semi-standardised real acupuncture, sham acupuncture (acupuncture at non-specific points), placebo acupuncture and conventional treatment. The patients are blinded to the real, sham and placebo acupuncture treatments. Patients in the sample present symptoms of non specific acute low back pain, with a case history of 2 weeks or less, and will be selected from working-age patients, whether in paid employment or not, referred by General Practitioners from Primary Healthcare Clinics to the four clinics participating in this study. In order to assess the primary and secondary result measures, the patients will be requested to fill in a questionnaire before the randomisation and again at 3, 12 and 48 weeks after starting the treatment. The primary result measure will be the clinical relevant improvement (CRI) at 3 weeks after randomisation. We define CRI as a reduction of 35% or more in the RMQ results. Discussion This study is intended to obtain further evidence on the effectiveness of acupuncture on acute low back pain and to isolate the

  12. PEGASUS - An Austrian Nanosatellite for QB50

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharlemann, Carsten; Seifert, Bernhard; Kohl, Dominik; Birschitzky, David; Gury, Lionel; Kerschbaum, Franz; Obertscheider, Christof; Ottensamer, Roland; Reissner, Alexander; Riel, Thomas; Sypniewski, Richard; Taraba, Michael; Trausmuth, Robert; Turetschek, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    PEGASUS - An Austrian Nanosatellite for QB50 C. Scharlemann* David Birschitzky* Lionel Gury*, Franz Kerschbaum~, Dominik Kohl#, Christof Obertscheider*, Roland Ottensamer~, Alexander Reissner+, Thomas Riel#, B. Seifert+, Richard Sypniewski*, Michael Taraba?, Robert Trausmuth*, Thomas Turetschek?, …. (*)University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt, Austria (+)FOTEC GmbH, Wiener Neustadt, Austria (+) Spaceteam, TU Wien, Austria (~) University Wien, Wien, Austria The QB50 project is an international project with the goal to send up to 50 Nanosatellites, a.k.a. CubeSat, into the Thermosphere. The scientific goal of this mission is to monitor over a period of up to nine months the prevailing conditions in this rather unknown part of Earth's atmosphere. Each of the 50 nanosatellites will be equipped with one of three possible scientific instruments: (i) a set of Langmuir probes, (ii) atomic oxygen measurement device, (iii) ion/neutral mass spectrometer. All satellites will be launched together and released in a string-of-pearls type fashion. It is predicted that the satellites will drift apart rather rapidly following the release. Therefore, the QB50 missions offers the possibility of a measurement grid in the thermosphere of unprecedented scope and accuracy. One of the satellites, named PEGASUS, is designed and build by a team of Austrian researches and students. PEGASUS will be equipped with the aforementioned Langmuir probes and will provide information about essential properties of the plasma in the thermosphere such as the electrontemperature and -density. In order to ensure the capability to collect and downlink the data over several months, PEGASUS requires about the same types of subsystems as one would find on large-scale satellites. This includes an attitude control system, an on-board computer, telecommunication devices, an electrical power systems allowing to harvest the solar power and either distribute or store it for later use, a thermal control system

  13. Triangularity and dipole asymmetry in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Teaney, Derek; Yan Li

    2011-06-15

    We introduce a cumulant expansion to parametrize possible initial conditions in relativistic heavy ion collisions. We show that the cumulant expansion converges and that it can systematically reproduce the results of Glauber type initial conditions. At third order in the gradient expansion the cumulants characterize the triangularity and the dipole asymmetry of the initial entropy distribution. We show that for midperipheral collisions the orientation angle of the dipole asymmetry {psi}{sub 1,3} has a 20% preference out of plane. This leads to a small net v{sub 1} out of plane. In peripheral and midcentral collisions the orientation angles {psi}{sub 1,3} and {psi}{sub 3,3} are strongly correlated, but this correlation disappears towards central collisions. We study the ideal hydrodynamic response to these cumulants and determine the associated v{sub 1}/{epsilon}{sub 1} and v{sub 3}/{epsilon}{sub 3} for a massless ideal gas equation of state. The space time development of v{sub 1} and v{sub 3} is clarified with figures. These figures show that v{sub 1} and v{sub 3} develop toward the edge of the nucleus, and consequently the final spectra are more sensitive to the viscous dynamics of freezeout. The hydrodynamic calculations for v{sub 3} are provisionally compared to Alver and Roland fit of STAR inclusive two-particle correlation functions. Finally, we propose to measure the v{sub 1} associated with the dipole asymmetry and the correlations between {psi}{sub 1,3} and {psi}{sub 3,3} by measuring a two-particle correlation with respect to the participant plane . The hydrodynamic prediction for this correlation function is several times larger than a correlation currently measured by the STAR collaboration . This experimental measurement would provide

  14. Pleiotropic effects of the 11p13 locus on developmental verbal dyspraxia and EEG centrotemporal sharp waves.

    PubMed

    Pal, D K; Li, W; Clarke, T; Lieberman, P; Strug, L J

    2010-11-01

    We recently showed genomewide linkage of centrotemporal sharp waves (CTS) in classic Rolandic epilepsy (RE) families to chromosome 11p13, and fine-mapped this locus to variants in the ELP4 gene. Speech sound disorder (SSD) is a common comorbidity in RE subjects, of unknown etiology, which co-aggregates in family members in a manner that could hypothetically be explained by shared underlying genetic risk with CTS. Furthermore, the neural mechanism of SSD is unknown, although individuals with rare, Mendelian forms of RE are described with severe verbal and oromotor apraxia. We therefore first performed genomewide linkage analysis for SSD, operationally defined as clinical history consistent with ICD-10 speech articulation disorder, in 38 families singly ascertained through a proband with RE. We tested the hypothesis of shared genetic risk with CTS at the 11p13 locus. In the second part of the study we used computerized acoustic analysis of recorded speech to test the hypothesis of dyspraxia as a mechanism for SSD in a smaller subset of RE probands and relatives. In two-point and multipoint LOD score analysis, we found that evidence for linkage to the 11p13 locus increased substantially when the phenotype was broadened from CTS to CTS/SSD. In multipoint analysis, the LOD score rose by 3.2 to HLOD 7.54 at D11S914 for CTS/SSD, the same marker at which multipoint linkage maximized for CTS alone. Non-parametric, affected-only methods in a sub-set of the data provide further confirmatory evidence for pleiotropy. In acoustic analysis there were voice-onset time abnormalities in 10/18 RE probands, 8/16 siblings and 5/15 parents, providing evidence of breakdown in the spatial/temporal properties of speech articulation consistent with a dyspraxic mechanism. The results from genetic and physiological studies suggest a pleiotropic role for the 11p13 locus in the development of both SSD and CTS, and also indicate a dyspraxic mechanism for the SSD linked to 11p13. Taken together

  15. Effectiveness of pregabalin for the treatment of chronic low back pain with accompanying lower limb pain (neuropathic component): a non-interventional study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Toshihiko; Igarashi, Ataru; Watt, Stephen; Parsons, Bruce; Sadosky, Alesia; Nozawa, Kazutaka; Hayakawa, Kazuhiro; Yoshiyama, Tamotsu; Ebata, Nozomi; Fujii, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of pregabalin on sleep, pain, function, and health status in patients with chronic low back pain with accompanying neuropathic pain (CLBP-NeP) under routine clinical practice. Methods This prospective, non-interventional, observational study enrolled Japanese adults (≥18 years) with CLBP-NeP of duration ≥3 months and severity ≥5 on a numerical rating scale (0= no pain, 10= worst possible pain). Treatment was 8 weeks with pregabalin (n=157) or usual care alone (n=174); choice of treatment was determined by the physician. The primary efficacy outcome was change from baseline to 8 weeks in pain-related interference with sleep, assessed using the Pain-Related Sleep Interference Scale (PRSIS; 0= did not interfere with sleep, 10= completely interferes with sleep). Secondary endpoints were changes in PRSIS at week 4, and changes at weeks 4 and 8 in pain (numerical rating scale), function (Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire), and quality of life (EuroQol 5D-5L); global assessments of change were evaluated from the clinician and patient perspectives at the final visit. Results Demographic characteristics were similar between cohorts, but clinical characteristics suggested greater disease severity in the pregabalin group including a higher mean (standard deviation) pain score, 6.3 (1.2) versus 5.8 (1.1) (P<0.001). For the primary endpoint, pregabalin resulted in significantly greater improvements in PRSIS at week 8, least-squares mean changes of −1.3 versus −0.4 for usual care (P<0.001); pregabalin also resulted in greater PRSIS improvement at week 4 (P=0.012). Relative to usual care at week 8, pregabalin improved pain and function (both P<0.001), and showed global improvements since beginning study medication (P<0.001). Pregabalin was well tolerated. Conclusion In clinical practice in patients with CLBP-NeP, pregabalin showed significantly greater improvements in pain-related interference with sleep relative to usual care. In

  16. Validation of a Spanish version of the Spine Functional Index

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Spine Functional Index (SFI) is a recently published, robust and clinimetrically valid patient reported outcome measure. Objectives The purpose of this study was the adaptation and validation of a Spanish-version (SFI-Sp) with cultural and linguistic equivalence. Methods A two stage observational study was conducted. The SFI was cross-culturally adapted to Spanish through double forward and backward translation then validated for its psychometric characteristics. Participants (n = 226) with various spine conditions of >12 weeks duration completed the SFI-Sp and a region specific measure: for the back, the Roland Morris Questionnaire (RMQ) and Backache Index (BADIX); for the neck, the Neck Disability Index (NDI); for general health the EQ-5D and SF-12. The full sample was employed to determine internal consistency, concurrent criterion validity by region and health, construct validity and factor structure. A subgroup (n = 51) was used to determine reliability at seven days. Results The SFI-Sp demonstrated high internal consistency (α = 0.85) and reliability (r = 0.96). The factor structure was one-dimensional and supported construct validity. Criterion specific validity for function was high with the RMQ (r = 0.79), moderate with the BADIX (r = 0.59) and low with the NDI (r = 0.46). For general health it was low with the EQ-5D and inversely correlated (r = −0.42) and fair with the Physical and Mental Components of the SF-12 and inversely correlated (r = −0.56 and r = −0.48), respectively. The study limitations included the lack of longitudinal data regarding other psychometric properties, specifically responsiveness. Conclusions The SFI-Sp was demonstrated as a valid and reliable spine-regional outcome measure. The psychometric properties were comparable to and supported those of the English-version, however further longitudinal investigations are required. PMID:24972525

  17. Early neuromuscular customized training after surgery for lumbar disc herniation: a prospective controlled study.

    PubMed

    Millisdotter, Monica; Strömqvist, Björn

    2007-01-01

    A prospective and controlled study of training after surgery for lumbar disc herniation (LDH). The objective was to determine the effect of early neuromuscular customized training after LDH surgery. No consensus exists on the type and timing of physical rehabilitation after LDH surgery. Patients aged 15-50 years, disc prolapse at L4-L5 or L5-S1. Before surgery, at 6 weeks, 4, and 12 months postoperatively, the following evaluations were performed: low back pain and leg pain estimated on a visual analog scale, disability according to the Roland-Morris questionnaire (RMQ) and disability rating index (DRI). Clinical examination, including the SLR test, was performed using a single blind method. Consumption of analgesics was registered. Twenty-five patients started neuromuscular customized training 2 weeks after surgery (early training group = ETG). Thirty-one patients formed a control group (CG) and started traditional training after 6 weeks. There was no significant difference in pain and disability between the two training groups before surgery. Median preoperative leg pain was 63 mm in ETG and 70 mm in the CG. Preoperative median disability according to RMQ was 14 in the ETG and 14.5 in the CG. Disability according to DRI (33/56 patients) was 5.3 in the ETG vs. 4.6 in the CG. At 6 weeks, 4 months, and 12 months, pain was significantly reduced in both groups, to the same extent. Disability scores were lower in the ETG at all follow-ups, and after 12 months, the difference was significant (RMQ P=.034, DRI P=.015). The results of the present study show early neuromuscular customized training to have a superior effect on disability, with a significant difference compared to traditional training at a follow-up 12 months after surgery. No adverse effects of the early training were seen. A prospective, randomized study with a larger patient sample is warranted to ultimately demonstrate that early training as described is beneficial for patients undergoing LDH surgery

  18. Physiotherapy Post Lumbar Discectomy: Prospective Feasibility and Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, Alison; Goodwin, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate: acceptability and feasibility of trial procedures; distribution of scores on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ, planned primary outcome); and efficient working of trial components. Design and Setting A feasibility and external pilot randomised controlled trial (ISRCTN33808269, assigned 10/12/2012) was conducted across 2 UK secondary care outpatient physiotherapy departments associated with regional spinal surgery centres. Participants Consecutive consenting patients aged >18 years; post primary, single level, lumbar discectomy. Interventions Participants were randomised to either 1:1 physiotherapy outpatient management including patient leaflet, or patient leaflet alone. Main Outcome Measures Blinded assessments were made at 4 weeks post surgery (baseline) and 12 weeks post baseline (proposed primary end point). Secondary outcomes included: Global Perceived Effect, back/leg pain, straight leg raise, return to work/function, quality of life, fear avoidance, range of movement, medication, re-operation. Results At discharge, 110 (44%) eligible patients gave consent to be contacted. 59 (54%) patients were recruited. Loss to follow up was 39% at 12 weeks, with one site contributing 83% losses. Mean (SD) RMDQ was 10.07 (5.58) leaflet and 10.52 (5.94) physiotherapy/leaflet at baseline; and 5.37 (4.91) leaflet and 5.53 (4.49) physiotherapy/leaflet at 12 weeks. 5.1% zero scores at 12 weeks illustrated no floor effect. Sensitivity to change was assessed at 12 weeks with mean (SD) change -4.53 (6.41), 95%CI -7.61 to -1.44 for leaflet; and -6.18 (5.59), 95%CI -9.01 to -3.30 for physiotherapy/leaflet. RMDQ mean difference (95%CI) between change from baseline to twelve weeks was 1.65(-2.46 to 5.75). Mean difference (95%CI) between groups at 12 weeks was -0.16 (-3.36 to 3.04). Participant adherence with treatment was good. No adverse events were reported. Conclusions Both interventions were acceptable, and it is promising that they both

  19. Comparison of complementary and alternative medicine with conventional mind–body therapies for chronic back pain: protocol for the Mind–body Approaches to Pain (MAP) randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The self-reported health and functional status of persons with back pain in the United States have declined in recent years, despite greatly increased medical expenditures due to this problem. Although patient psychosocial factors such as pain-related beliefs, thoughts and coping behaviors have been demonstrated to affect how well patients respond to treatments for back pain, few patients receive treatments that address these factors. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), which addresses psychosocial factors, has been found to be effective for back pain, but access to qualified therapists is limited. Another treatment option with potential for addressing psychosocial issues, mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), is increasingly available. MBSR has been found to be helpful for various mental and physical conditions, but it has not been well-studied for application with chronic back pain patients. In this trial, we will seek to determine whether MBSR is an effective and cost-effective treatment option for persons with chronic back pain, compare its effectiveness and cost-effectiveness compared with CBT and explore the psychosocial variables that may mediate the effects of MBSR and CBT on patient outcomes. Methods/Design In this trial, we will randomize 397 adults with nonspecific chronic back pain to CBT, MBSR or usual care arms (99 per group). Both interventions will consist of eight weekly 2-hour group sessions supplemented by home practice. The MBSR protocol also includes an optional 6-hour retreat. Interviewers masked to treatment assignments will assess outcomes 5, 10, 26 and 52 weeks postrandomization. The primary outcomes will be pain-related functional limitations (based on the Roland Disability Questionnaire) and symptom bothersomeness (rated on a 0 to 10 numerical rating scale) at 26 weeks. Discussion If MBSR is found to be an effective and cost-effective treatment option for patients with chronic back pain, it will become a valuable

  20. Daily functioning and self-management in patients with chronic low back pain after an intensive cognitive behavioral programme for pain management

    PubMed Central

    van der Merwe, Johannes D.; O’Dowd, John; Pavlov, Paul W.; Spruit, Maarten; de Kleuver, Marinus; van Limbeek, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is associated with persistent or recurrent disability which results in high costs for society. Cognitive behavioral treatments produce clinically relevant benefits for patients with CLBP. Nevertheless, no clear evidence for the most appropriate intervention is yet available. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the mid-term effects of treatment in a cohort of patients with CLBP participating in an intensive pain management programme. The programme provided by RealHealth-Netherlands is based on cognitive behavioral principles and executed in collaboration with orthopedic surgeons. Main outcome parameters were daily functioning (Roland and Morris Disability Questionnaire and Oswestry Disability Questionnaire), self-efficacy (Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire) and quality of life (Short Form 36 Physical Component Score). All parameters were measured at baseline, last day of residential programme and at 1 and 12 months follow-up. Repeated measures analysis was applied to examine changes over time. Clinical relevance was examined using minimal clinical important differences (MCID) estimates for main outcomes. To compare results with literature effect sizes (Cohen’s d) and Standardized Morbidity Ratios (SMR) were determined. 107 patients with CLBP participated in this programme. Mean scores on outcome measures showed a similar pattern: improvement after residential programme and maintenance of results over time. Effect sizes were 0.9 for functioning, 0.8 for self-efficacy and 1.3 for physical functioning related quality of life. Clinical relevancy: 79% reached MCID on functioning, 53% on self-efficacy and 80% on quality of life. Study results on functioning were found to be 36% better and 2% worse when related to previous research on, respectively, rehabilitation programmes and spinal surgery for similar conditions (SMR 136 and 98%, respectively). The participants of this evidence-based programme learned to manage CLBP, improved in

  1. Program and abstracts of the Second Tsunami Source Workshop; July 19-20, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, W.H.K., (compiler); Kirby, S.H.; Diggles, M.F.

    2010-01-01

    In response to a request by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for computing tsunami propagations in the western Pacific, Eric Geist asked Willie Lee for assistance in providing parameters of earthquakes which may be future tsunami sources. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Tsunami Source Working Group (TSWG) was initiated in August 2005. An ad hoc group of diverse expertise was formed, with Steve Kirby as the leader. The founding members are: Rick Blakely, Eric Geist, Steve Kirby, Willie Lee, George Plafker, Dave Scholl, Roland von Huene, and Ray Wells. Half of the founding members are USGS emeritus scientists. A report was quickly completed because of NOAA's urgent need to precalculate tsunami propagation paths for early warning purposes. It was clear to the group that much more work needed to be done to improve our knowledge about tsunami sources worldwide. The group therefore started an informal research program on tsunami sources and meets irregularly to share ideas, data, and results. Because our group activities are open to anyone, we have more participants now, including, for example, Harley Benz and George Choy (USGS, Golden, Colo.), Holly Ryan and Stephanie Ross (USGS, Menlo Park, Calif.), Hiroo Kanamori (Caltech), Emile Okal (Northwestern University), and Gerard Fryer and Barry Hirshorn (Pacific Tsunami Warning Center, Hawaii). To celebrate the fifth anniversary of the TSWG, a workshop is being held in the Auditorium of Building 3, USGS, Menlo Park, on July 19-20, 2010 (Willie Lee and Steve Kirby, Conveners). All talks (except one) will be video broadcast. The first tsunami source workshop was held in April 2006 with about 100 participants from many institutions. This second workshop (on a much smaller scale) will be devoted primarily to recent work by the USGS members. In addition, Hiroo Kanamori (Caltech) will present his recent work on the 1960 and 2010 Chile earthquakes, Barry Hirshorn and Stuart Weinstein (Pacific Tsunami

  2. Citations Prize 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Simon; Ruffle, Jon

    2014-06-01

    Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat, a Nobel Prize winner who also was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The winner of the 2013 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous five years (2008-2012) is Figure. Figure. Four of the prize winning authors. From left to right: Thomas Istel (Philips), Jens-Peter Schlomka (with medal, MorphoDetection), Ewald Roessl (Philips), and Gerhard Martens (Philips). Title: Experimental feasibility of multi-energy photon-counting K-edge imaging in pre-clinical computed tomography Authors: Jens Peter Schlomka1, Ewald Roessl1, Ralf Dorscheid2, Stefan Dill2, Gerhard Martens1, Thomas Istel1, Christian Bäumer3, Christoph Herrmann3, Roger Steadman3, Günter Zeitler3, Amir Livne4 and Roland Proksa1 Institutions: 1 Philips Research Europe, Sector Medical Imaging Systems, Hamburg, Germany 2 Philips Research Europe, Engineering & Technology, Aachen, Germany 3 Philips Research Europe, Sector Medical Imaging Systems, Aachen, Germany 4 Philips Healthcare, Global Research and Advanced Development, Haifa, Israel Reference: Schlomka et al 2008 Phys. Med. Biol. 53 4031-47 This paper becomes the first to win both this citations prize and also the PMB best paper prize (The Roberts Prize), which it won for the year 2008. Discussion of the significance of the winning paper can be found in this medicalphysicsweb article from the time of the Roberts Prize win (http://medicalphysicsweb.org/cws/article/research/39907). The author's enthusiasm for their prototype spectral CT system has certainly been reflected in the large number of citations the paper subsequently has

  3. Twelfth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Rivera, J.

    1987-01-22

    arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, specially Jim Lovekin. The Twelfth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U. S. Department of Energy through Contract Nos. DE-AS03-80SF11459 and DE-AS07- 84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1987 Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jesus Rivera

  4. Improvement in low back movement control, decreased pain and disability, resulting from specific exercise intervention

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The study was conducted to assess whether patient-specific functional impairment and experienced daily disability improved after treatment to address active movement control of the low back. Method A prospective study was carried out in two outpatient physiotherapy practices in the German-speaking part of Switzerland. 38 patients (17 males and 21 females) suffering from non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) and movement control impairment were treated. The study participants had an average age of 45 ± 13 years, an average height of 170 ± 8 cm and an average weight of 73 ± 15 kg. Patients were assessed prior and post treatment. Treatment was aimed at improving movement control of the lumbar spine, pain and disability. Six physiotherapists treated each patient on average nine times (SD 4.6). Treatment effects were evaluated using a set of six movement control tests (MCT), patient-specific functional pain scores (PSFS) and a Roland and Morris disability questionnaire (RMQ). Means, standard deviations, confidence intervals and paired t-tests were calculated. The effect size (d) was based on the change between t1 (time prior intervention) and t2 (time post intervention) using a significance level of p < 0.05, with d > 0.8 being considered a large effect. Power calculations were performed for type I & II error estimation. Results Movement control (MCT) showed a 59% improvement from 3.2 (max 6) to 1.3 positive tests (d = 1.3, p < 0.001), complaints (PSFS) decreased 41% from 5.9 points (max 10) to 3.5 (d = 1.3, p < 0.001), and disability (RMQ) decreased 43% from 8.9 to 5.1 points (d = 1.0, p < 0.001). Conclusions The results of this controlled case series study, based on prior and post intervention, showed that movement control, patient specific functional complaints and disability improved significantly following specific individual exercise programs, performed with physiotherapeutic intervention. The results obtained warrant performance of a randomized

  5. Theory and experiment in biomedical science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Roland

    2012-10-01

    A physicist might regard a person as a collection of electrons and quarks, and a biologist might regard her as an assemblage of biochemical molecules. But according to some speakers at a recent Welch conference [1] biology is a branch of physics. Then biomedical research is a branch of applied physics. Even if one adopts a more modest perspective, it is still true that physics can contribute strongly to biomedical research. An example on the experimental side is the recent studies of G protein-coupled receptors (targeted by more than 50 percent of therapeutic drugs) using synchrotron radiation and nuclear magnetic resonance. On the theory side, one might classify models as microscopic (e.g., simulations of molecules, ions, or electrons), mesoscopic (e.g., simulations of pathways within a cell), or macroscopic (e.g., calculations of processes involving the whole body). We have recently introduced a new macroscopic method for estimating the biochemical response to pharmaceuticals, surgeries, or other medical interventions, and applied it in a simple model of the response to bariatric surgeries [2]. An amazing effect is that the most widely used bariatric surgery (Roux-en-Y-gastric bypass) usually leads to remission of type 2 diabetes in days, long before there is any significant weight loss (with further beneficial effects in the subsequent months and years). Our results confirm that this effect can be largely explained by the enhanced post-meal excretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), an incretin that increases insulin secretion from the pancreas, but also suggest that other mechanisms are likely to be involved, possibly including an additional insulin-independent pathway for glucose transport into cells. [4pt] [1] Physical Biology, from Atoms to Medicine, edited by Ahmed H. Zewail (Imperial College Press, London, 2008).[0pt] [2] Roland E. Allen, Tyler D. Hughes, Jia Lerd Ng, Roberto D. Ortiz, Michel Abou Ghantous, Othmane Bouhali, Abdelilah Arredouani

  6. Back pain in seniors: the Back pain Outcomes using Longitudinal Data (BOLD) cohort baseline data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Back pain represents a substantial burden globally, ranking first in a recent assessment among causes of years lived with disability. Though back pain is widely studied among working age adults, there are gaps with respect to basic descriptive epidemiology among seniors, especially in the United States. Our goal was to describe how pain, function and health-related quality of life vary by demographic and geographic factors among seniors presenting to primary care providers with new episodes of care for back pain. Methods We examined baseline data from the Back pain Outcomes using Longitudinal Data (BOLD) registry, the largest inception cohort to date of seniors presenting to a primary care provider for back pain. The sample included 5,239 patients ≥ 65 years old with a new primary care visit for back pain at three integrated health systems (Northern California Kaiser-Permanente, Henry Ford Health System [Detroit], and Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates [Boston]). We examined differences in patient characteristics across healthcare sites and associations of patient sociodemographic and clinical characteristics with baseline patient-reported measures of pain, function, and health-related quality of life. Results Patients differed across sites in demographic and other characteristics. The Detroit site had more African-American patients (50%) compared with the other sites (7-8%). The Boston site had more college graduates (68%) compared with Detroit (20%). Female sex, lower educational status, African-American race, and older age were associated with worse functional disability as measured by the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire. Except for age, these factors were also associated with worse pain. Conclusions Baseline pain and functional impairment varied substantially with a number of factors in the BOLD cohort. Healthcare site was an important factor. After controlling for healthcare site, lower education, female sex, African-American race

  7. Yoga vs. physical therapy vs. education for chronic low back pain in predominantly minority populations: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic low back pain causes substantial morbidity and cost to society while disproportionately impacting low-income and minority adults. Several randomized controlled trials show yoga is an effective treatment. However, the comparative effectiveness of yoga and physical therapy, a common mainstream treatment for chronic low back pain, is unknown. Methods/Design This is a randomized controlled trial for 320 predominantly low-income minority adults with chronic low back pain, comparing yoga, physical therapy, and education. Inclusion criteria are adults 18–64 years old with non-specific low back pain lasting ≥12 weeks and a self-reported average pain intensity of ≥4 on a 0–10 scale. Recruitment takes place at Boston Medical Center, an urban academic safety-net hospital and seven federally qualified community health centers located in diverse neighborhoods. The 52-week study has an initial 12-week Treatment Phase where participants are randomized in a 2:2:1 ratio into i) a standardized weekly hatha yoga class supplemented by home practice; ii) a standardized evidence-based exercise therapy protocol adapted from the Treatment Based Classification method, individually delivered by a physical therapist and supplemented by home practice; and iii) education delivered through a self-care book. Co-primary outcome measures are 12-week pain intensity measured on an 11-point numerical rating scale and back-specific function measured using the modified Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. In the subsequent 40-week Maintenance Phase, yoga participants are re-randomized in a 1:1 ratio to either structured maintenance yoga classes or home practice only. Physical therapy participants are similarly re-randomized to either five booster sessions or home practice only. Education participants continue to follow recommendations of educational materials. We will also assess cost effectiveness from the perspectives of the individual, insurers, and society using

  8. Results of pulsed radiofrequency technique with two laterally placed electrodes in the annulus in patients with chronic lumbar discogenic pain.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Sei; Rohof, Olav

    2012-08-01

    Discogenic pain is an important cause of low back pain (LBP). We have developed a pulsed radiofrequency (P-RF) technique, using two electrodes placed bilaterally in the annulus, for applying radiofrequency current in the disc (bi-annular P-RF disc method). The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the bi-annular P-RF disc method, using Diskit needles (Neurotherm, Middleton, MA, USA) in patients with discogenic LBP. The subjects were 15 patients with a mean age of 37.3 ± 8.63 years with chronic discogenic lower back pain that was not responsive to aggressive nonoperative care. Two Diskit II needles (15-cm length, 20G needles with a 20-mm active tip) were placed bilaterally in the annulus in the disc. Pulsed radiofrequency was applied for 12 min at a setting of 5 × 50 ms/s and 60 V. The pain intensity scores on a 0-10 numeric rating scale (NRS) and the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) were measured pretreatment, and at 1 week and 1, 3, and 6 months post-treatment. The mean pain severity score (NRS) improved from 7.27 ± 0.58 pretreatment to 2.5 ± 0.94 at the 6-month follow-up (p < 0.01). The RMDQ showed significant (p < 0.01) improvement, from 10.70 ± 2.35 pretreatment to 2.10 ± 1.85 at the 6-month follow up (p < 0.01). The bi-annular P-RF disc method with consecutive P-RF 5/5/60 V, 12-min (with Diskit needle), appears to be a safe, minimally invasive treatment option for patients with chronic discogenic LBP. PMID:22476553

  9. Does pH influence soil hydro-mechanical properties?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplain, V.; Défossez, P.; Delarue, G.; Dexter, A. R.; Richard, G.; Tessier, D.

    2009-04-01

    Does pH influence soil hydro-mechanical properties ? V. Chaplain1, P. Défossez2, G. Delarue1, A.R. Dexter3, G. Richard3 and D. Tessier1. 1 UR INRA PESSAC RD 10, F-78026 Versailles cedex 2 UMR INRA/URCA FARE, 2 Esplanade Roland Garros, BP 224 F-51686 Reims cedex 2 3 UR INRA Sols 2163 Avenue de la Pomme de Pin - CS 40001 ARDON F-45075 Orléans Cedex 2 Corresponding author : chaplain@versailles.inra.fr Structure of soils and its dynamic, physico-chemistry of the interface are of a great importance in the fate of organic pollutants because it governs the accessibility of pollutants to micro-organisms. The soil structure of soils is related to physical parameters (texture, density, water content) but the physico-chemical properties of the interface is not considered. In this study we performed hydro-mechanical measurements on soil samples taken from the 42-plot long-term experiment in Versailles. Indeed six plots were selected to cover a large range of pH values from acid (3.5) to alkaline (8.2) due to the repeated application of fertilizers. Soils were taken in the 0-20 cm and in the 30-35 cm layer out of the ploughed zone. All soils had similar texture and composition with low organic carbon. Therefore pH changes the surface charges and hydrophobicity that are implied in aggregation process. The two layers had the same pH values. The precompression stress Pc and the compression index Cc were derived from confined compression tests performed on remoulded soil samples (density 1.45 g/cm3) at saturation. Results shows that the precompression stress increased at pH lower than 4. In acid case, precompression stress was higher in subsoil. This increase of Pc was attributed to the hydrophobicity due in part to the condensation of charges probably sensitive to the humectation/dessication processes.

  10. Identifying environmental sounds: a multimodal mapping study

    PubMed Central

    Tomasino, Barbara; Canderan, Cinzia; Marin, Dario; Maieron, Marta; Gremese, Michele; D'Agostini, Serena; Fabbro, Franco; Skrap, Miran

    2015-01-01

    Our environment is full of auditory events such as warnings or hazards, and their correct recognition is essential. We explored environmental sounds (ES) recognition in a series of studies. In study 1 we performed an Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) meta-analysis of neuroimaging experiments addressing ES processing to delineate the network of areas consistently involved in ES processing. Areas consistently activated in the ALE meta-analysis were the STG/MTG, insula/rolandic operculum, parahippocampal gyrus and inferior frontal gyrus bilaterally. Some of these areas truly reflect ES processing, whereas others are related to design choices, e.g., type of task, type of control condition, type of stimulus. In study 2 we report on 7 neurosurgical patients with lesions involving the areas which were found to be activated by the ALE meta-analysis. We tested their ES recognition abilities and found an impairment of ES recognition. These results indicate that deficits of ES recognition do not exclusively reflect lesions to the right or to the left hemisphere but both hemispheres are involved. The most frequently lesioned area is the hippocampus/insula/STG. We made sure that any impairment in ES recognition would not be related to language problems, but reflect impaired ES processing. In study 3 we carried out an fMRI study on patients (vs. healthy controls) to investigate how the areas involved in ES might be functionally deregulated because of a lesion. The fMRI evidenced that controls activated the right IFG, the STG bilaterally and the left insula. We applied a multimodal mapping approach and found that, although the meta-analysis showed that part of the left and right STG/MTG activation during ES processing might in part be related to design choices, this area was one of the most frequently lesioned areas in our patients, thus highlighting its causal role in ES processing. We found that the ROIs we drew on the two clusters of activation found in the left and in

  11. Non-specific mechanisms in orthodox and CAM management of low back pain (MOCAM): theoretical framework and protocol for a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Bradbury, Katherine; Al-Abbadey, Miznah; Carnes, Dawn; Dimitrov, Borislav D; Eardley, Susan; Fawkes, Carol; Foster, Jo; Greville-Harris, Maddy; Harvey, J Matthew; Leach, Janine; Lewith, George; Roberts, Lisa; Parry, Laura; Yardley, Lucy; Bishop, Felicity L

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Components other than the active ingredients of treatment can have substantial effects on pain and disability. Such ‘non-specific’ components include: the therapeutic relationship, the healthcare environment, incidental treatment characteristics, patients’ beliefs and practitioners’ beliefs. This study aims to: identify the most powerful non-specific treatment components for low back pain (LBP), compare their effects on patient outcomes across orthodox (physiotherapy) and complementary (osteopathy, acupuncture) therapies, test which theoretically derived mechanistic pathways explain the effects of non-specific components and identify similarities and differences between the therapies on patient–practitioner interactions. Methods and analysis This research comprises a prospective questionnaire-based cohort study with a nested mixed-methods study. A minimum of 144 practitioners will be recruited from public and private sector settings (48 physiotherapists, 48 osteopaths and 48 acupuncturists). Practitioners are asked to recruit 10–30 patients each, by handing out invitation packs to adult patients presenting with a new episode of LBP. The planned multilevel analysis requires a final sample size of 690 patients to detect correlations between predictors, hypothesised mediators and the primary outcome (self-reported back-related disability on the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire). Practitioners and patients complete questionnaires measuring non-specific treatment components, mediators and outcomes at: baseline (time 1: after the first consultation for a new episode of LBP), during treatment (time 2: 2 weeks post-baseline) and short-term outcome (time 3: 3 months post-baseline). A randomly selected subsample of participants in the questionnaire study will be invited to take part in a nested mixed-methods study of patient–practitioner interactions. In the nested study, 63 consultations (21/therapy) will be audio-recorded and analysed

  12. Tactile acuity training for patients with chronic low back pain: a pilot randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic pain can disrupt the cortical representation of a painful body part. This disruption may play a role in maintaining the individual’s pain. Tactile acuity training has been used to normalise cortical representation and reduce pain in certain pain conditions. However, there is little evidence for the effectiveness of this intervention for chronic low back pain (CLBP). The primary aim of this study was to inform the development of a fully powered randomised controlled trial (RCT) by providing preliminary data on the effect of tactile acuity training on pain and function in individuals with CLBP. The secondary aim was to obtain qualitative feedback about the intervention. Methods In this mixed-methods pilot RCT 15 individuals were randomised to either an intervention (tactile acuity training) or a placebo group (sham tactile acuity training). All participants received 3 sessions of acuity training (intervention or sham) from a physiotherapist and were requested to undertake daily acuity home training facilitated by an informal carer (friend/relative). All participants also received usual care physiotherapy. The primary outcome measures were pain (0-100visual analogue scale (VAS)) and function (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ)). Participants and their informal carers were invited to a focus group to provide feedback on the intervention. Results The placebo group improved by the greatest magnitude for both outcome measures, but there was no statistically significant difference (Mean difference (95%CI), p-value) between groups for change in pain (25.6 (-0.7 to 51.9), p = 0.056) or function (2.2 (-1.6 to 6.0), p = 0.237). Comparing the number of individuals achieving a minimally clinically significant improvement, the placebo group had better outcomes for pain with all participants achieving ≥30% improvement compared to only a third of the intervention group (6/6 vs. 3/9, p = 0.036). Qualitatively, participants reported that

  13. Frictional Behavior of Oceanic Transform Faults and Influence on Earthquake Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Behn, M. D.; McGuire, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    zone W is the largest, resulting in an extremely low coupling coefficient of order 10-5. For the long/slow case, greater earthquakes of magnitude 6 or 7 repeat every 80-120 years due to a much larger AT. The largest earthquake continues to nucleate where W is the largest, while smaller earthquakes also emerge at locations closer to the ridges. The seismic coupling coefficient is close to 0.15, the average estimate by Boettcher and Jordan [JGR, 2004]. We plan to perform earthquake cycle calculations on RTFs of various configurations to construct the scaling relations and compare to the above observations, in order to understand the mechanism(s) for seismic and aseismic slip partitioning on RTFs. A more sophisticated thermal model that incorporates realistic oceanic lithosphere rheology and effects of shear heating and hydrothermal circulation [Roland et al., Gcubed, 2010] will be used to constrain the friction parameter distribution. Specifically, we will focus on the Quebrada, Discovery and Gofar fault system on the East Pacific Rise, where abundant OBS data are available to constrain our model, to study the conditions that control the transition between aseismic and seismic slip, and the presence of a frictional barrier and its effects on earthquake rupture.

  14. Characteristics of 3-component Magnetic Fields of Equatorial Pi 2s - MAGDAS/CPMN Observations in Daytime and Nighttime -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Y.; Yumoto, K.; Uozumi, T.; Yoshikawa, A.; Group, M.

    2008-12-01

    .1 at DAV respectively. The amplitude ratio of H-component Pi 2s at DAV to CEB is found to be almost 1.5 constantly in night in all season, indicating the CA effect of equatorial Pi 2. The enhancement of the ratio of D-component to H- component at around sunrise and sunset may be explained by the meridional ionospheric current of equatorial Pi 2, but more future study is needed. Acknowledgements We appreciate the following Co-investigators for their contribution to the MAGDAS/CPMN project; Dr. Baylie Damtie(Bahir Dar University, AAB), Dr. Ronald Woodman Pollitt and Dr. Jose Ishitsuka (Instituto Geofisico del Peru, ANC), Dr. Roland Emerito S. Otadoy(University of San Carlos, CEB), Fr. Daniel McNamara(Manila Observatory, DAV), Dr. Severino L. G. Dutra(Brazilian National Space Research Institute, EUS) and Dr. Mazlan Othman and Dr. Mohd Fairos (National Space Agency, LKW). We appreciate Dr. Shinichi Watari(National Institute of Information and Communications Technology) providing the magnetic field data of YAP.

  15. The application of simple mass spectrometers to planetary sub-surface sampling using penetrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, Simon; Morse, Andrew; Bardwell, Max; Barber, Simeon; Wright, Ian

    2010-05-01

    (1-4), 363-387. Todd, J.F.J., Barber, S.J., Wright, I.P., Morgan, G.H., Morse, A.D., Sheridan, S., Leese, M.R., Maynard, J., Evans, S.T., Pillinger, C.T. et al. (2007). Ion trap mass spectrometry on a comet nucleus: the Ptolemy instrument and the Rosetta space mission. J. Mass Spectrom. 42,1-10. Pillinger C. T., and Wright I. P. (1993). MODULUS - Methods Of Determining and Understanding Light elements from Unequivocal Stable isotope composition. A type 2 proposal submitted to the RoLand Cometary Lander of the ESA International Rosetta Mission for the provision of Ptolemy - an evolved gas analyser. Richter L., Coste P., Grzesik A., Magnani P., Nadalini R., Neuhaus D., Re E., Romstedt J., Sims M. and Sohl F. (2005). Instrumented Moles for Planetary Subsurface Regolith Studies. Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 7, 08659 A. Smith A.,. Crawford I. A., Gowen R. A., Ball A. J., Barber S. J., Church P., Coates A. J., Gao Y., Griffiths A. D., Hagermann A.,•Joy K. H., Phipps A., Pike W. T., Scott R., Sheridan S., Sweeting M., Talboys D.,•Tong V.,•Wells N.,• Biele J., Chela-Flores J.,•Dabrowski B., Flannagan J., Grande M., Grygorczuk J., Kargl G.,. Khavroshkin O. B.,•Klingelhoefer G., Knapmeyer M.,• Marczewski W., McKenna-Lawlor S.,•Richter L., Rothery D. A., Seweryn K., Ulamec S., Wawrzaszek R., Wieczorek M., Wright I. P. and Sims M. (2009). LunarEX - a proposal to cosmic vision. Exp Astron 23:711-740: DOI 10.1007/s10686-008-9109-6

  16. National Geothermal Data System: Transforming the Discovery, Access, and Analytics of Data for Geothermal Exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, Kim

    2013-05-01

    data are insufficient for promoting geothermal exploration. Authors of this paper are Arlene Anderson, US DOE Geothermal Technologies Office, David Blackwell, Southern Methodist University (SMU), Cathy Chickering (SMU), Toni Boyd, Oregon Institute of Technology’s GeoHeat Center, Roland Horne, Stanford University, Matthew MacKenzie, Uberity, Joe Moore, University of Utah, Duane Nickull, Uberity, Stephen Richard, Arizona Geological Survey, and Lisa Shevenell, University of Nevada, Reno. “NGDS User Centered Design: Meeting the Needs of the Geothermal Community,” discusses the user- centered design approach taken in the development of a user interface solution for the NGDS. The development process is research based, highly collaborative, and incorporates state-of-the-art practices to ensure a quality user interface for the widest and greatest utility. Authors of this paper are Harold Blackman, Boise State University, Suzanne Boyd, Anthro-Tech, Kim Patten, Arizona Geological Survey, and Sam Zheng, Siemens Corporate Research. “Fueling Innovation and Adoption by Sharing Data on the DOE Geothermal Data Repository Node on the National Geothermal Data System,” describes the motivation behind the development of the Geothermal Data Repository (GDR) and its role in the NGDS. This includes the benefits of using the GDR to share geothermal data of all types and DOE’s data submission process. Authors of this paper are Jon Weers, National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Arlene Anderson, US DOE Geothermal Technologies Office. Finally, “Developing the NGDS Adoption of CKAN for Domestic & International Data Deployment,” provides an overview of the “Node-In-A-Box” software package designed to provide data consumers with a highly functional interface to access the system, and to ease the burden on data providers who wish to publish data in the system. It is important to note that this software package constitutes a reference implementation and that the NGDS architecture

  17. IN MY OPINION: Physics in the wider context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Andrew

    1999-11-01

    and progression opportunities for science specialists, whilst ensuring that the general public are scientifically literate. I think physics education has a serious contribution to make to all sections of society:The specialist, preparing for and progressing in a scientific/technological career. The skilled worker, analysing, understanding and innovating in any occupation. The citizen coping with increasing complexity in society. The individual trying to understanding the world into which they were born. To continue improving our educational systems and to assist each of these groups demands a grand alliance of people involved in physics education. Reflecting first on the wider context can help us choose appropriate points at which to intervene. Otherwise, educational improvement may be hampered, with valuable effort expended on positive reform actions rendered useless by constraints elsewhere in the system. How has the subject and its place in the curriculum evolved? What can be learned from previous curriculum innovations? What do public perceptions of physics tell us? The aim of the fifth Shaping the Future booklet is to encourage debate about where reform efforts should best be directed. Contributors will include Steve Adams, Michael Barnett, Sheila Carlton, John Berkeley, Martin Hollins, Marilyn Holyoake, Andrew Hunt, Roland Jackson, Jon Ogborn, Russell Stannard and Charles Thomas. A Discussion Meeting based on Physics in a wider context, at the ASE Annual Meeting, Leeds, promises to be lively. I hope you will come and express your views! If you would like to attend the meeting, to be held on 7 January 2000, and be sent a free copy of the manuscript for the 48 page booklet in advance, please contact: Ingrid Ebeyer, Post-16 Initiative, Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (e-mail: 16-19project@iop.org)

  18. COIN Project: Towards a zero-waste technology for concrete aggregate production in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepuritis, Rolands; Willy Danielsen, Svein

    2014-05-01

    COIN Project: Towards a zero-waste technology for concrete aggregate production in Norway Rolands Cepuritis, Norcem/NTNU and Svein Willy Danielsen, SINTEF Aggregate production is a mining operation where no purification of the "ore" is necessary. Still it is extremely rare that an aggregate production plant is operating on the basis of zero-waste concept. This is since historically the fine crushed aggregate (particles with a size of less than 2, 4 or sometimes 8 mm) has been regarded as a by-product or waste of the more valuable coarse aggregate production. The reason is that the crushed coarse aggregates can easily replace coarse rounded natural stones in almost any concrete composition; while, the situation with the sand is different. The production of coarse aggregate normally yields fine fractions with rough surface texture, flaky or elongated particles an inadequate gradation. When such a material replaces smooth and rounded natural sand grains in a concrete mix, the result is usually poor and much more water and cement has to be used to achieve adequate concrete flow. The consequences are huge stockpiles of the crushed fine fractions that can't be sold (mass balance problems) for the aggregate producers, sustainability problems for the whole industry and environmental issues for society due to dumping and storing of the fine co-generated material. There have been attempts of utilising the material in concrete before; however, they have mostly ended up in failure. There have been attempts to adjust the crushed sand to the properties of the natural sand, which would still give a lot of waste, especially if the grading would have to be adjusted and the high amounts of fines abundantly present in the crushed sand would have to be removed. Another fundamental reason for failure has been that historically such attempts have mainly ended up in a research carried out by people (both industrial and academic) with aggregate background (= parties willing to find market

  19. Neural underpinnings for model-oriented therapy of aphasic word production.

    PubMed

    Abel, Stefanie; Weiller, Cornelius; Huber, Walter; Willmes, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    /superior frontal gyrus for the phonological method. (4) Impairment-specific changes of activation were found for P-patients in left IFGoper. Patients with semantic disorders (S-patients) relied on right frontal areas involving IFG, pars triangularis. After therapy, they revealed less activation decrease in areas involving left STG, caudate, paracentral lobule, and right rolandic operculum. Regarding naming performance, the present study corroborates previous findings on training and generalisation effects and reveals differential therapy effects for P-patients. Moreover, brain imaging results confirm a predominance of (1) general effects in the left brain hemisphere. (2) Brain regions related to visual strategy, monitoring/feedback, and articulatory patterns were characteristic for the familiar trained items. (3) Distinct regions associated with strategies, monitoring capacities, and linguistic information indicate the specific therapeutic influence on word retrieval. (4) While P-patients relied more on preserved phonological functions in the left hemisphere, S-patients revealed right-sided compensation of semantic processing as well as increased strategic efforts in both hemispheres. PMID:24686092

  20. Salix polaris growth responses to active layer detachment and solifluction processes in High Arctic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siekacz, Liliana

    2015-04-01

    participation of missing and partially missing rings. Share of missing rings in shrubs growing within an active layer detachment on the valley slope reached 16,22% and 15,36%. Even higher variation is observed in partially missing rings which account for 31,07% within detachment and 23,39% on surrounding slope. Those values are more than twice higher comparing to the valley floor. There is also noticeable difference between detachment and surrounding slope indicating that wedging rings are an effect of mechanical stress that is higher within the detachment. Comparing growth patterns in aboveground and belowground plant parts different growth allocation is noticed. Years of detachment event growth rings were present only in aboveground parts. It is supposed that mechanical stress delays the onset of the growing season similarly to low temperatures (Buchwał et al., 2013), resulting in not enough time to fully allocate resources for growth in the belowground parts. Growth pattern is extremely irregular, indicating that the slope is in constant movement, which disrupts growth conditions. Analyzed shrubs showed two possible event years: 2006 and 2008, with the highest participation of missing and partially missing rings. Air and ground temperature data were also analyzed and confirmed that active layer detachment happened in 2006. REFERENCES Buchwał A, Rachlewicz G, Fonti P, Cherubini P, Gärtner H, (2013) Temperature modulates intra-plant growth of Salix Polaris from a high Arctic site (Svalbard). Polar Biol 36:1305-1318. Hagen J O, Liestøl O, Roland E, Jørgensen T, (1993) Glacier atlas of Svalbard and Jan Mayen. Norsk Polarinstitutt Meddelelser 129: 160. Rachlewicz G, (2009) Contemporary sediment fluxes and relief changes in high Arctic glacierized valley systems (Billefjorden, Central Spitsbergen). Wyd. Nauk. UAM Poznań, seria Geografia 87:204. Schweingruber FH, Poschlod P, (2005) Growth rings in herbs and shrubs: life span, age determination and stem anatomy. For Snow

  1. Assessment of coal geology, resources, and reserves in the Montana Powder River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haacke, Jon E.; Scott, David C.; Osmonson, Lee M.; Luppens, James A.; Pierce, Paul E.; Gunderson, Jay A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize geology, coal resources, and coal reserves in the Montana Powder River Basin assessment area in southeastern Montana. This report represents the fourth assessment area within the Powder River Basin to be evaluated in the continuing U.S. Geological Survey regional coal assessment program. There are four active coal mines in the Montana Powder River Basin assessment area: the Spring Creek and Decker Mines, both near Decker; the Rosebud Mine, near Colstrip; and the Absaloka Mine, west of Colstrip. During 2011, coal production from these four mines totaled approximately 36 million short tons. A fifth mine, the Big Sky, had significant production from 1969-2003; however, it is no longer in production and has since been reclaimed. Total coal production from all five mines in the Montana Powder River Basin assessment area from 1968 to 2011 was approximately 1.4 billion short tons. The Rosebud/Knobloch coal bed near Colstrip and the Anderson, Dietz 2, and Dietz 3 coal beds near Decker contain the largest deposits of surface minable, low-sulfur, subbituminous coal currently being mined in the assessment area. A total of 26 coal beds were identified during this assessment, 18 of which were modeled and evaluated to determine in-place coal resources. The total original coal resource in the Montana Powder River Basin assessment area for the 18 coal beds assessed was calculated to be 215 billion short tons. Available coal resources, which are part of the original coal resource remaining after subtracting restrictions and areas of burned coal, are about 162 billion short tons. Restrictions included railroads, Federal interstate highways, urban areas, alluvial valley floors, state parks, national forests, and mined-out areas. It was determined that 10 of the 18 coal beds had sufficient areal extent and thickness to be evaluated for recoverable surface resources ([Roland (Baker), Smith, Anderson, Dietz 2, Dietz 3, Canyon, Werner

  2. Treatment of chronic low back pain in patients with spinal deformities using a sagittal re-alignment brace

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Hans-Rudolf; Werkmann, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Background For adult scoliosis patients with chronic low back pain bracing is initially indicated before spinal surgery is considered. Until recently there has been a lack of research into the effect upon pain reductions in the mid and long-term. Promising results have been documented in short-term studies for the application of a sagittal re-alignment brace in patients with spinal deformities and along with pain; however mid-term and long-term results are not yet available. The purpose of this study is to investigate the mid-term effects of this brace with respect to pain control. Materials and methods 67 patients (58 females and 9 males) with chronic low back pain (> 24 months) and the diagnosis of scoliosis or hyperkyphosis were treated with a sagittal re-alignment brace (physio-logic brace™) between January 2006 and July 2007. The indication for this kind of brace treatment was derived from a positive sagittal re-alignment test (SRT) and the exclusion of successful conservative treatment during the last 24 months. The aim of this type of conservative intervention was to avoid surgery for chronic low back pain. Results The average pain intensity was measured on the Roland and Morris VRS (5 steps) before treatment. This was 3.3 (t1), at the time of brace adjustment it was 2.7 (t2) and after at an average observation time of 18 months it was 2.0 (t3). The differences were highly significant in the Wilcoxon test. Discussion Short-term measurements showed that a significant pain reduction is possible in chronic postural low back pain using a sagittal re-alignment brace inducing lumbar re-lordosation. In a preliminary report at adjustment (t2), highly significant improvements of pain intensity have also been demonstrated. At 6 months of treatment however, no improvement was measured. The improvement of the mid-term effects (18 months) found in this study compared to the preliminary report may be due to the changed approach to compliance: whilst the bracing standard

  3. Patterns of seismogenesis for giant plate-boundary earthquakes in island-arc-type subduction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, S. H.

    2006-12-01

    island arcs with steeper slab dips. Finally, this subduction system receives a large sediment influx from the giant Irrawadi and Ganges River delta systems to the north that drain the active collisional mountain belts further north. High sediment influx and trench sediment acumulation are factors that are present in 12 of the 14 subduction zones that have hosted the giant interplate thrust earthquakes mentioned earlier. This influx appears to be important in the development of a subduction channel of granular material in the plate boundary that may enable ruptures to run to great lengths by smoothing out barriers to earthquake slip. Several island-arc subduction systems (the Manus, SW Ryukyu, W Aleutians, and possibly the South Shetlands systems) have attributes similar to the Nicobar/Andaman segment of the SAE rupture. Moreover, arc volcanic activity is weak or absent and convergence also tends to be slow in all of these island-arc systems. Research done in collaboration with the USGS Tsunami Source Working Group (Steve Kirby and Eric Geist (Co-Chairs) David Scholl, Roland von Huene, Rick Blakely, Ray Wells, and Willie Lee (Secretary))

  4. Effects of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction vs Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Usual Care on Back Pain and Functional Limitations among Adults with Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cherkin, Daniel C.; Sherman, Karen J.; Balderson, Benjamin H.; Cook, Andrea J.; Anderson, Melissa L.; Hawkes, Rene J.; Hansen, Kelly E.; Turner, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) has not been rigorously evaluated for young and middle-aged adults with chronic low back pain. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness for chronic low back pain of MBSR versus usual care (UC) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Design, Setting, and Participants Randomized, interviewer-blind, controlled trial in integrated healthcare system in Washington State of 342 adults aged 20–70 years with CLBP enrolled between September 2012 and April 2014 and randomly assigned to MBSR (n = 116), CBT (n = 113), or UC (n = 113). Interventions CBT (training to change pain-related thoughts and behaviors) and MBSR (training in mindfulness meditation and yoga) were delivered in 8 weekly 2-hour groups. UC included whatever care participants received. Main Outcomes and Measures Co-primary outcomes were the percentages of participants with clinically meaningful (≥30%) improvement from baseline in functional limitations (modified Roland Disability Questionnaire [RDQ]; range 0 to 23) and in self-reported back pain bothersomeness (0 to 10 scale) at 26 weeks. Outcomes were also assessed at 4, 8, and 52 weeks. Results Among 342 randomized participants (mean age, 49 (range, 20–70); 225 (66%) women; mean duration of back pain, 7.3 years (range 3 months to 50 years), <60% attended 6 or more of the 8 sessions, 294 (86.0%) completed the study at 26 weeks and 290 (84.8%) completed the study 52weeks. In intent-to-treat analyses, at 26 weeks, the percentage of participants with clinically meaningful improvement on the RDQ was higher for MBSR (61%) and CBT (58%) than for UC (44%) (overall P = 0.04; MBSR versus UC: RR [95% CI] = 1.37 [1.06 to 1.77]; MBSR versus CBT: 0.95 [0.77 to 1.18]; CBT versus UC: 1.31 [1.01 to 1.69]. The percentage of participants with clinically meaningful improvement in pain bothersomeness was 44% in MBSR and 45% in CBT, versus 27% in UC (overall P = 0.01; MBSR versus UC: 1.64 [1.15 to 2.34]; MBSR versus CBT: 1

  5. 3d-modelling workflows for trans-nationally shared geological models - first approaches from the project GeoMol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupf, Isabel

    2013-04-01

    framework model are interpreted seismic lines, 3d-models can be generated either in time or in depth domain. Some partners will build their 3d-model in time domain and convert it after finishing to depth. Other participants will transform seismic information first and will model directly in depth domain. To ensure comparability between the different parts transnational velocity models for time-depth conversion are required at an early stage of the project. The exchange of model geometries, topology, and geo-scientific content will be achieved applying an appropriate cyberinfrastructure called GST. It provides functionalities to ensure semantic and technical interoperability. Within the project GeoMol a web server for the dissemination of 3d geological models will be implemented including an administrative interface for the role-based access, real-time transformation of country-specific coordinate systems and a web visualisation features. The project GeoMol is co-funded by the Alpine Space Program as part of the European Territorial Cooperation 2007-2013. The project integrates partners from Austria, France, Germany, Italy, Slovenia and Switzerland and runs from September 2012 to June 2015. Further information on www.geomol.eu. The GeoMol 3D-modelling team: Roland Baumberger (swisstopo), Magdalena Bottig (GBA), Alessandro Cagnoni (RLB), Laure Capar (BRGM), Renaud Couëffé (BRGM), Chiara D'Ambrogi (ISPRA), Chrystel Dezayes (BRGM), Gerold Diepolder (LfU BY), Charlotte Fehn (LGRB), Sunseare Gabalda (BRGM), Gregor Götzl (GBA), Andrej Lapanje (GeoZS), Fabio Carlo Molinari (RER-SGSS), Edgar Nitsch (LGRB), Robert Pamer (LfU BY), Sebastian Pfleiderer (GBA), Marco Pantaloni (ISPRA), Uta Schulz (LfU BY), Günter Sokol (LGRB), Gunther Wirsing (LGRB), Heiko Zumsprekel (LGRB)

  6. Hydration and deformation of peridotite mylonites from an oceanic transform fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deems, N. J.; Warren, J. M.; McCubbin, F. M.

    2013-12-01

    proposed. First, trapped melt formed gabbro veins and interstitial plagioclase. In the second stage, seawater penetrated into the brittle-ductile zone by microfracturing, possibly during earthquakes, resulting in reaction of seawater with the peridotite to form pargasite. This stage was coincident with strain localization and mylonitization, indicated by olivine recrystallization and the presence of an LPO in both olivine and pargasite. Deep circulation of seawater is consistent with recent OTF observations (Roland et al., 2012). In addition, McGuire et al. (2012) recorded foreshocks beneath the Gofar transform fault at depths corresponding to temperatures greater than 600oC. Our observations suggest that seawater can penetrate deeper into the deforming upper mantle beneath OTFs than previously thought. The occurrence of a strong olivine LPO at small grain size and the abundance of pargasite suggest that the addition of hydrous phases to peridotite may expand the conditions at which dislocation creep operates.

  7. EDITORIAL: Focus on Nanostructured Soft Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reineker, Peter; Schülz, Michael

    2004-01-01

    , Markus Seitz and Hermann E Gaub Nanophase separation in side chain polymers: new evidence from structure and dynamics S Hiller, O Pascui, H Budde, O Kabisch, D Reichert and M Beiner Universal properties of complexes formed by two oppositely charged flexible polyelectrolytes Roland G Winkler Mechanics of artificial microcapsules A Fery, F Dubreuil and H Möhwald Asymmetric PS-block-(PS-co-PB)-block-PS block copolymers: morphology formation and deformation behaviour Rameshwar Adhikari, Trinh An Huy, Matthias Buschnakowski, Goerg H Michler and Konrad Knoll Molecular dynamics simulation of the synthesis of protein-like copolymers via conformation-dependent design Anatoly V Berezkin, Pavel G Khalatur, Alexei R Khokhlov and Peter Reineker The confined-to-bulk dynamics transition of polymer melts in nanoscopic pores of solid matrices with varying pore diameter N Fatkullin, R Kimmich, E Fischer, C Mattea, U Beginn and M Kroutieva

  8. History of infrared optronics in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouilloy, J. P.; Siriex, Michel B.

    1995-09-01

    In France, the real start of work on the applications of infrared radiations occurred around 1947 - 1948. During many years, technological research was performed in the field of detectors, optical material, modulation techniques, and a lot of measurements were made in order to acquire a better knowledge of the propagation medium and radiation of IR sources, namely those of jet engines. The birth of industrial infrared activities in France started with the Franco-German missile guidance programs: Milan, HOT, Roland and the French air to air missile seeker programs: R530, MAGIC. At these early stages of IR technologies development, it was a great technical adventure for both the governmental agencies and industry to develop: detector technology with PbS and InSb, detector cooling for 3 - 5 micrometer wavelength range, optical material transparent in the infrared, opto mechanical design, signal processing and related electronic technologies. Etablissement Jean Turck and SAT were the pioneers associated with Aerospatiale, Matra and under contracts from the French Ministry of Defence (DGA). In the 60s, the need arose to enhance night vision capability of equipment in service with the French Army. TRT was chosen by DGA to develop the first thermal imagers: LUTHER 1, 2, and 3 with an increasing number of detectors and image frequency rate. This period was also the era in which the SAT detector made rapid advance. After basic work done in the CNRS and with the support of DGA, SAT became the world leader of MCT photovoltaic detector working in the 8 to 12 micron waveband. From 1979, TRT and SAT were given the responsibility for the joint development and production of the first generation French thermal imaging modular system so-called SMT. Now, THOMSON TTD Optronique takes over the opto-electronics activities of TRT. Laser based systems were also studied for military application using YAG type laser and CO2 laser: Laboratoire de Marcousis, CILAS, THOMSON CSF and SAT have

  9. Revisiting an interdisciplinary hydrological modelling project. A socio-hydrology (?) example from the early 2000s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Roman; Barthel, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Interdisciplinary scientific and societal knowledge plays an increasingly important role in global change research. Also, in the field of water resources interdisciplinarity as well as cooperation with stakeholders from outside academia have been recognized as important. In this contribution, we revisit an integrated regional modelling system (DANUBIA), which was developed by an interdisciplinary team of researchers and relied on stakeholder participation in the framework of the GLOWA-Danube project from 2001 to 2011 (Mauser and Prasch 2016). As the model was developed before the current increase in literature on participatory modelling and interdisciplinarity, we ask how a socio-hydrology approach would have helped and in what way it would have made the work different. The present contribution firstly presents the interdisciplinary concept of DANUBIA, mainly with focus on the integration of human behaviour in a spatially explicit, process-based numerical modelling system (Roland Barthel, Janisch, Schwarz, Trifkovic, Nickel, Schulz, and Mauser 2008; R. Barthel, Nickel, Meleg, Trifkovic, and Braun 2005). Secondly, we compare the approaches to interdisciplinarity in GLOWA-Danube with concepts and ideas presented by socio-hydrology. Thirdly, we frame DANUBIA and a review of key literature on socio-hydrology in the context of a survey among hydrologists (N = 184). This discussion is used to highlight gaps and opportunities of the socio-hydrology approach. We show that the interdisciplinary aspect of the project and the participatory process of stakeholder integration in DANUBIA were not entirely successful. However, important insights were gained and important lessons were learnt. Against the background of these experiences we feel that in its current state, socio-hydrology is still lacking a plan for knowledge integration. Moreover, we consider necessary that socio-hydrology takes into account the lessons learnt from these earlier examples of knowledge integration

  10. PREFACE: Nano- and microfluidics Nano- and microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Karin

    2011-05-01

    compressible fluids Kerstin Falk and Klaus Mecke Wetting, roughness and flow boundary conditions Olga I Vinogradova and Aleksey V Belyaev Molecular transport and flow past hard and soft surfaces: computer simulation of model systems F Léonforte, J Servantie, C Pastorino, and M Müller Simulations of slip flow on nanobubble-laden surfaces J Hyväluoma, C Kunert and J Harting Electrophoretic transport of biomolecules across liquid-liquid interfaces Thomas Hahn, Götz Münchow and Steffen Hardt Wetting morphologies and their transitions in grooved substrates Ralf Seemann, Martin Brinkmann, Stephan Herminghaus, Krishnacharya Khare, Bruce M Law, Sean McBride, Konstantina Kostourou, Evgeny Gurevich, Stefan Bommer, Carsten Herrmann and Dominik Michler Imbibition in mesoporous silica: rheological concepts and experiments on water and a liquid crystal Simon Gruener, and Patrick Huber Theory and simulations of water flow through carbon nanotubes: prospects and pitfalls Douwe Jan Bonthuis, Klaus F Rinne, Kerstin Falk, C Nadir Kaplan, Dominik Horinek, A Nihat Berker, Lydéric Bocquet, and Roland R Netz Structure and flow of droplets on solid surfaces P Müller-Buschbaum, D Magerl, R Hengstler, J-F Moulin, V Körstgens, A Diethert, J Perlich, S V Roth, M Burghammer, C Riekel, M Gross, F Varnik, P Uhlmann, M Stamm, J M Feldkamp and C G Schroer Stability and dynamics of droplets on patterned substrates: insights from experiments and lattice Boltzmann simulations F Varnik, M Gross, N Moradi, G Zikos, P Uhlmann, P Müller-Buschbaum, D Magerl, D Raabe, I Steinbach and M Stamm Micro-capsules in shear flow R Finken, S Kessler and U Seifert Micro-rheology on (polymer-grafted) colloids using optical tweezers C Gutsche, M M Elmahdy, K Kegler, I Semenov, T Stangner, O Otto, O Ueberschär, U F Keyser, M Krueger, M Rauscher, R Weeber, J Harting, Y W Kim, V Lobaskin, R R Netz, and F Kremer Dynamics of colloids in confined geometries L Almenar and M Rauscher Dynamics of red blood cells and vesicles in

  11. Preface: Proceedings of the ESF Exploratory Workshop on Glassy Liquids under Pressure: Fundamentals and Applications (Ustroń, Poland, 10-12 October 2007) Proceedings of the ESF Exploratory Workshop on Glassy Liquids under Pressure: Fundamentals and Applications (Ustroń, Poland, 10-12 October 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozd-Rzoska, Aleksandra; Rzoska, Sylwester J.; Tamarit, Josep Ll

    2008-06-01

    and the glass transition temperature J. Non-Cryst. Solids 353 3915 [3]Donth E 1998 The Glass Transition. Relaxation Dynamics in Liquids and Disordered Materials(Springer Series in Materials Science II vol 48) (Berlin: Springer) [4] Johari G P and Goldstein M 1971 Viscous liquids and the glass transition in aliphatic alcohols and other norigid molecules J. Chem. Phys. 55 4245 [5] Roland C M and Casalini R 2004 Viscosity crossover in 0-therphenyl and salol under high pressure Phys. Rev. Lett.92 245702 [6] Novikov V N and Sokolov A P 2003 Universality of the dynamic crossover in glass-forming liquids: A 'magic' relaxation time Phys. Rev. E 67 031507 [7] Stanley H E 1971/1987 Introduction to Critical Phenomena (New York: Oxford University Press) [8] Anisimov M A 1993 Critical Phenomena in Liquids and in Liquid Crystals (Reading: Gordon and Breach) [9] McMillan P F 2003 New materials from high pressure experiments: challenges and opportunities High Press. Res. 67 031507 [10] Craig D Q M, Royall P G, Kett V L and Hopton M L 1999 The relevance of the amorphous state to pharmaceutical dosage forms: glass drugs and freeze dried systems Int. J. Pharm. 179 179 [11] Poirier J P 2000 Introduction to the physics of the earth's interior (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) [12] Mezzega E, Shurtenberger P, Burbridge A and Michel M 2005 Understanding food as soft materials Nature Mater. 4 729 [13] Jones R A L 2002 Soft Condensed Matter Physics (New York: Oxford University Press) [14] Angell C A 1985 Strong and fragile liquids Relaxations in Complex Systems Ngai K L and Wright (ed) (Springfield: National Technical Information Service, US Department of Commerce) 1 [15] Böhmer R, Ngai K L, Angell C A and Plazek D J 1993 Nonexponential relaxations in strong and fragile glass formers J. Chem. Phys. 99 4201 [16] Floudas G 2004 Effects of pressure on systems with intristic orientational order Prog. Polym. Sci. 29 1143 [17] Roland C M, Hensel-Bielowka S, Paluch M and Casalini R 2005

  12. Report about the Solar Eclipse on August 11, 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-08-01

    sec) and took images in a complete automated way, allowing us to observe the eclipse by naked eye or with binoculars. To get as many images as possible during totality, we use binning 2x2 to reduce the readout time to 19 sec. Afterward, one of the best image was flat-fielded and processed with a special algorithm that modelled a fit the continuous component of the corona and then subtracted from the original image. The remaining details were enhanced by unsharp masking and added to the original image. Finally, gaussian histogram equalization was applied". Eclipse Photo by Eddy Pomaroli Second "Diamond Ring" [JPEG: 400 x 438 pix - 129k] [JPEG: 731 x 800 pix - 277k] [JPEG: 1940 x 2123 pix - 2.3M] Diamond Ring at ESO HQ (Eddy Pomaroli) "Despite the clouds, we saw the second "diamond ring" from the ESO HQ. In a sense, we were quite lucky, since the clouds were very heavy during the total phase and we might easily have missed it all!". "I used an old Minolta SRT-101 camera and a teleobjective (450 mm; f/8). The exposure was 1/125 sec on Kodak Elite 100 (pushed to 200 ASA). I had the feeling that the Sun would become visible and had the camera pointed, by good luck in the correct direction, as soon as the cloud moved away". Eclipse Photo by Roland Reiss First Partial Phase [JPEG: 400 x 330 pix - 94k] [JPEG: 800 x 660 pix - 492k] [JPEG: 3000 x 2475 pix - 4.5M] End of First Partial Phase (Roland Reiss) "I observed the eclipse from my home in Garching. The clouds kept moving and this was the last photo I was able to obtain during the first partial phase, before they blocked everything". "The photo is interesting, because it shows two more images of the eclipsed Sun, below the overexposed central part. In one of them, the remaining, narrow crescent is particularly well visible. They are caused by reflections in the camera. I used a Minolta camera and a Fuji colour slide film". Eclipse Spectra Some ESO people went a step further and obtained spectra of the Sun at the time of the

  13. ESA's Integral discovers hidden black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-10-01

    discovered so far? Astronomers, who have been observing the object regularly, guess that it had remained invisible because there must be a very thick shell of obscuring material surrounding it. If that was the case, only the most energetic radiation from the object could get through the shell; less-energetic radiation would be blocked. That could explain why space telescopes that are sensitive only to low-energy radiation had overlooked the object, while Integral, specialised in detecting very energetic emissions, did see it. To test their theory, astronomers turned to ESA's XMM-Newton space observatory, which observes the sky in the X-ray wavelengths. As well as being sensitive to high-energy radiation, XMM-Newton is also able to check for the presence of obscuring material. Indeed, XMM-Newton detected this object last February, as well as the existence of a dense 'cocoon' of cold gas with a diameter of similar size to that of the Earth's orbit around the Sun. This obscuring material forming the cocoon is probably 'stellar wind', namely gas ejected by the supermassive companion star. Astronomers think that this gas may be accreted by the compact black hole, forming a dense shell around it. This obscuring cloud traps most of the energy produced inside it. The main author of these results, Roland Walter of the Integral Science Data Centre, Switzerland, explained: "Only photons with the highest energies [above 10 keV] could escape from that cocoon. IGR J16318-4848 has therefore not been detected by surveys performed at lower energies, nor by previous gamma-ray missions that were much less sensitive than Integral." The question now is to find out how many of these objects lurk in the Galaxy. XMM-Newton and Integral together are the perfect tools to do the job. They have already discovered two more new sources embedded in obscuring material. Future observations are planned. Christoph Winkler, ESA Project Scientist for Integral, said: "These early examples of using two

  14. Contribution of seismic processing to put up the scaffolding for the 3-dimensional study of deep sedimentary basins: the fundaments of trans-national 3D modelling in the project GeoMol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capar, Laure

    2013-04-01

    European Territorial Cooperation 2007-2013. The project integrates partners from Austria, France, Germany, Italy, Slovenia and Switzerland and runs from September 2012 to June 2015. Further information on www.geomol.eu The GeoMol seismic interpretation team: Roland Baumberger (swisstopo), Agnès BRENOT (BRGM), Alessandro CAGNONI (RLB), Renaud COUËFFE (BRGM), Gabriel COURRIOUX (BRGM), Chiara D'Ambrogi (ISPRA), Chrystel Dezayes (BRGM), Charlotte Fehn (LGRB), Sunseare GABALDA (BRGM), Gregor Götzl (GBA), Andrej Lapanje (GeoZS), Stéphane MARC (BRGM), Alberto MARTINI (RER-SGSS), Fabio Carlo Molinari (RER-SGSS), Edgar Nitsch (LGRB), Robert Pamer (LfU BY), Marco PANTALONI (ISPRA), Sebastian Pfleiderer (GBA), Andrea PICCIN (RLB), (Nils Oesterling (swisstopo), Isabel Rupf (LGRB), Uta Schulz (LfU BY), Yves SIMEON (BRGM), Günter SÖKOL (LGRB), Heiko Zumsprekel (LGRB)

  15. Seasonal and spatial contrasts of sedimentary organic carbon in floodplain lakes of the central Amazon basin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobrinho, Rodrigo; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Abril, Gwenaël; Zell, Claudia; Moreira-Turcq, Patricia; Mortillaro, Jean-Michel; Meziane, Tarik; Damsté, Jaap; Bernardes, Marcelo

    2014-05-01

    .e. from upstream to downstream. We also identify the OC contribution from the seasonally flooded forests, i.e. temporary wetlands as the most important source of sedimentary OC in floodplain lakes. Accordingly, we attribute temporal and spatial difference in sedimentary OC composition to the hydrological connectivity between the Amazon River and its floodplain lakes and thus between the surrounding forests and the floodplain lakes. References: Abril, G., J.-M.Martinez, Artigas, L.F., Moreira-Turcq, P., Benedetti, M.P., Vidal, L., Meziane, T., Kim, J.-H., Bernardes, M.C., Savoye, N., Deborde, J., Albéric, P., Souza, M.F.L., Souza, E.L., Roland, F. Amazon River carbon dioxide outgassing fuelled by wetlands. Nature accepted (2013). Battin, T.J., Luyssaert, S., Kaplan, L.A., Aufdenkampe, A.K., Richter, A., Tranvik, L.J., 2009. The boundless carbon cycle. Nature Geoscience 2, 598 - 600 (2009). Cole, J.J., Prairie, Y.T., Caraco, N.F., McDowell, W.H., Tranvik, L.J., Striegl, R.G., Duarte, C.M., Kortelainen, P., Downing, J.A., Middelburg, J.J., Melack, J. Plumbing the Global Carbon Cycle: Integrating Inland Waters into the Terrestrial Carbon Budget. Ecosystems 10, 171 - 184 (2007). Downing, J. A. Global limnology: up-scaling aquatic services and processes to planet Earth. Verh Internat Verein Limnol 30, 1149.-1166 (2009). Einsele, G., Yan, J., Hinderer, M. Atmospheric carbon burial in modern lake basins and its significance for the global carbon budget. Global and Planetary Change 30, 167 - 195 (2001). Hedges, J.I., Ertel, J.R. Characterization of Lignin by Gas Capillary Chromatography of Cupric Oxide Oxidation Products. Analitical Chemistry 54, 174-178 (1982). Hopmans, E.C., Weijers, J.W.H., Schefu, E., Herfort, L., Damste, J.S.S., Schouten, S.,. A novel proxy for terrestrial organic matter in sediments based on branched and isoprenoid tetraether lipids. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 224, 107 - 116 (2004). Martinelli, L.A., Victoria, R.L., Camargo, P.B.d., Piccolo, M

  16. Competitive spirit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    been published previously. Any kind of reference may be consulted; textbooks and journal articles can be cited. The problems can be downloaded from the webpage of the Ortvay contest (mafihe.elte.hu/ortvay ) in Hungarian and English; on preliminary request the problems can be sent via e-mail. If an institute is represented by several contestants, then a teacher or student acting as local organizer collects the solutions and posts them to the referees. Solutions can be sent by mail, fax or e-mail to the address given on the webpage. The contest is evaluated separately for each university year and the referees reserve the right to withhold or to divide some prizes. Beyond the money prizes for the first, second and third places, honourable mentions and special prizes for outstanding solutions of individual problems can be awarded. The sponsors of the contest are the Students' Foundation of the Faculty of Sciences of Eötvös University and the Roland Eötvös Physical Society. The results are announced in December and the organizers are hoping for even more participants in future contests. Among the winners of the European Union Young Scientists competition which took place in Thessaloniki, Greece in September was Sarah Flannery from Ireland. Sarah had used advanced mathematics to compare two cryptographic systems and proved that a new system for encrypting information on the Internet is as secure and considerably faster than the one currently in use. Three students from Iceland also gained a prize for their work on a distant cluster of hundreds of galaxies, demonstrating the capacities of modern data processing tools and the Internet in the project. The winning entries were selected from 57 projects presented from over 30 countries, and the aim of the contest was to encourage and highlight young people's interest in science by inviting them to play a part in actual research projects. Some of the winners will be able to work on projects at the Joint Research Centre

  17. Comments on Reservoir Technology, DOE PR VII, San Francisco, March 23, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, B.J.

    1989-03-21

    technology, developing the linkages of people needed to make developments have an impact on costs, and targeting those areas of greatest impact on product cost. We have seen a lot of fine DOE-sponsored work in the past which has not been effectively utilized, and I think the DOE is working to do a better job of this. The talks on Tuesday impressed me with a number of examples, I'll mention four which represent types of activities which should be encouraged. Dennis Nielson described good, basic science work on tracers, followed by relevant field testing at Dixie. This type of work is fundamental to improving our tools, and injection is a critical area of concern for both pollution control and energy recovery. Also in the area of tracers, Roland Horne described adaptation of existing technology from the transportation field. This is a particularly effective technique because borrowed methods are readily accessible to operators who lack the technical resources of the larger operators. A lot of DOE money in the past has gone into numerical modeling, including the great Reservoir Simulator Derby years ago at Stanford. Marcello Lippmann described an absolutely crucial next step which needs to be repeated to establish confidence in performance predictions. That project was the retrospective look at East Olkaria using a model which had been updated, and showed reasonable forecasting ability. Finally, the project Ernie Majer discussed, looking at microseismic signals accompanying injection, is an example of DOE/Industry cost-shared work which needs to be encouraged. This type of work will simultaneously stretch research budgets and give scientists more immediate and useful feedback from the industrial market place than we can give in annual meetings such as this. The point in these four examples is that they represent DOE research moving closer to the market. This interaction is vital to a continued DOE program which is justified by results. These trends need to be encouraged

  18. Idiopathic focal epilepsies: the "lost tribe".

    PubMed

    Pal, Deb K; Ferrie, Colin; Addis, Laura; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Caraballo, Roberto; de Saint-Martin, Anne; Fejerman, Natalio; Guerrini, Renzo; Hamandi, Khalid; Helbig, Ingo; Ioannides, Andreas A; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Lal, Dennis; Lesca, Gaetan; Muhle, Hiltrud; Neubauer, Bernd A; Pisano, Tiziana; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Seegmuller, Caroline; Shibata, Takashi; Smith, Anna; Striano, Pasquale; Strug, Lisa J; Szepetowski, Pierre; Valeta, Thalia; Yoshinaga, Harumi; Koutroumanidis, Michalis

    2016-09-01

    The term idiopathic focal epilepsies of childhood (IFE) is not formally recognised by the ILAE in its 2010 revision (Berg et al., 2010), nor are its members and boundaries precisely delineated. The IFEs are amongst the most commonly encountered epilepsy syndromes affecting children. They are fascinating disorders that hold many "treats" for both clinicians and researchers. For example, the IFEs pose many of the most interesting questions central to epileptology: how are functional brain networks involved in the manifestation of epilepsy? What are the shared mechanisms of comorbidity between epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders? How do focal EEG discharges impact cognitive functioning? What explains the age-related expression of these syndromes? Why are EEG discharges and seizures so tightly locked to slow-wave sleep? In the last few decades, the clinical symptomatology and the respective courses of many IFEs have been described, although they are still not widely appreciated beyond the specialist community. Most neurologists would recognise the core syndromes of IFE to comprise: benign epilepsy of childhood with centro-temporal spikes or Rolandic epilepsy (BECTS/RE); Panayiotopoulos syndrome; and the idiopathic occipital epilepsies (Gastaut and photosensitive types). The Landau-Kleffner syndrome and the related (idiopathic) epilepsy with continuous spikes and waves in sleep (CSWS or ESES) are also often included, both as a consequence of the shared morphology of the interictal discharges and their potential evolution from core syndromes, for example, CSWS from BECTS. Atypical benign focal epilepsy of childhood also has shared electro-clinical features warranting inclusion. In addition, a number of less well-defined syndromes of IFE have been proposed, including benign childhood seizures with affective symptoms, benign childhood epilepsy with parietal spikes, benign childhood seizures with frontal or midline spikes, and benign focal seizures of adolescence. The

  19. 10 years of mapping the icy saturnian satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roatsch, Thomas; Kersten, Elke; Matz, Klaus-Dieter; Porco, Carolyn

    2014-05-01

    synoptic map for making planet-wide maps on a single sheet was used for Phoebe [2]. • A quadrangle scheme with 15 tiles for Mercury-sized bodies and high-resolution imaging was used for Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, and Rhea. • A quadrangle scheme with 3 tiles, a subdivision of the synoptic map was used for Mimas and Iapetus. The individual maps and tiles were extracted from global mosaics and reprojected into the defined map projections. We added resolution maps and index maps for every individual tile of the atlas, showing the image resolution, the image numbers and the location of the images for every map, respectively. The entire atlases are available to the public through the Imaging Team's website: http://ciclops.org/maps. The map tiles are also archived as standard products in the Planetary Data System (PDS): http://pds.jpl.nasa.gov/. Nomenclature: The nomenclature proposed by the Cassini-ISS team was approved by the IAU (http://planetarynames.wr.usgs.gov/). By international agreement, the features must be named after people or locations in • "Le Morte d'Arthur" for Mimas • "The Thousand Nights and a Night" for Enceladus • "The Odyssey of Homer" for Tethys • "The Aeneid of Virgil" for Dione • Creation myths (with Asian emphasis) for Rhea • "The Song of Roland" for Iapetus • "The Argonautica" for Phoebe Future work: The Cassini Equinox mission ended in 2010. Cassini is now operating in the Solstice mission hopefully until September 2017. Several additional close satellite flybys are scheduled for this time frame e.g. for Enceladus in October 2015 and for Mimas in January 2017. These upcoming flybys will help to replace the low-resolution parts of these atlases with higher resolu-tion images. The northern polar regions will be illumi-nated during the extended mission providing an oppor-tunity to obtain high-resolution Cassini coverage of high northern latitudes. References: [1] Porco et al., 2004, Cassini imaging science: instrument characteristics and

  20. Sixth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.

    1980-12-18

    researchers, engineers and managers involved in geothermal reservoir study and development and the provision of a forum for the prompt and open reporting of progress and for the exchange of ideas, continue to be met . Active discussion by the majority of the participants is apparent both in and outside the workshop arena. The Workshop Proceedings now contain some of the most highly cited geothermal literature. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Workshop for the presentation and exchange of ideas does have some less welcome side effects. The major one is the developing necessity for a limitation of the number of papers that are actually presented. We will continue to include all offered papers in the Summaries and Proceedings. As in the recent past, this sixth Workshop was supported by a grant from the Department of Energy. This grant is now made directly to Stanford as part of the support for the Stanford Geothermal Program (Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459). We are certain that all participants join us in our appreciation of this continuing support. Thanks are also due to all those individuals who helped in so many ways: The members of the program committee who had to work so hard to keep the program to a manageable size - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Paul G. Atkinson (Union Oil Company). Michael L. Sorey (U.S.G.S.), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program), and Roland N. Horne (Stanford Geothermal Program). The session chairmen who contributed so much to the organization and operation of the technical sessions - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Phillip H. Messer (Union Oil Company), Leland L. Mink (Department of Energy), Manuel Nathenson (U.S.G.S.), Gunnar Bodvarsson (Oregon State University), Mohindar S. Gulati (Union Oil Company), George F. Pinder (Princeton University), Paul A. Witherspoon (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program) and Michael J. O'Sullivan (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory). The many people who assisted behind the scenes

  1. Grain-size based sea-level reconstruction in the south Bohai Sea during the past 135 kyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Liang; Chen, Yanping

    2013-04-01

    and sea level. Nature 324, 137-140. Charman, D.J., Roe, H.M., Roland Gehrels, W., 2002. Modern dis

  2. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    puzzlement. The apparent absence of hints in the LHC experimental data of new phenomena that could relate to dark matter, dark energy, the dominance of matter over antimatter in the Universe, the unification of the strong and the electroweak interactions and their further unification with gravity left the Symposium with no guidance as to how to answer the question: what next? And in experimental fundamental science it is not the confirmation of already established theories that thrills the most; it is the appearance of the unexpected that creates the greatest excitement. However, the LHC is only at the beginning of its voyage into the uncharted territories of higher energies and smaller dimensions that it was built for, so the possibilities for unexpected discoveries are only starting to be explored. The LHC will start up again in 2015 with nearly twice its previous energy and with increased luminosity—new discoveries might then appear sooner than we even dare hope for! The LHC Nobel Symposium was attended by about 60 invited participants and lasted four days. The program was divided into seven sessions; QCD and Heavy Ion Physics, B Physics, Electroweak Physics, The Higgs Boson, Connections to Neutrino Physics and Astroparticle Physics, Beyond the Standard Model and Forward Look. There were 27 plenary invited talks given by participants, each followed by lively discussions. All but one of the speakers have submitted write-ups of their talks for these proceedings. We are hopeful that the remaining talk will be published in a forthcoming issue of Physica Scripta . I am gratified that Professor Roland Allen has agreed to write a paper on the essence of the Higgs boson discovery to be published in Physica Scripta , intended for undergraduate students and educated physicists, regardless of their field of research. I wish to express my deep gratitude to all Speakers and Participants in the Symposium, to the Members of the Local and International Organizing Committees, to the

  3. Cosmic Forensics Confirms Gamma-Ray Burst And Supernova Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-03-01

    between the supernova and the gamma ray burst. The supra-nova model involves a two-step process: the first step is the collapse of the core of an extremely massive star accompanied by the ejection of the outer layers of the star. The collapsed core forms a rapidly rotating black hole surrounded by a swirling disk of matter. In the second step this black hole-disk system produces a jet of high-energy particles. Shock waves within the jet produce the burst of X-rays and gamma rays that is observed to last only a few minutes. Interaction of the jet with the ejected supernova shell produces the X-ray afterglow, which can last for days or even months. The reason for the delay between the formation of the black hole and the production of the jet is not understood. Earlier observations with Japan's ASCA, the Italian-Netherlands Beppo-SAX, and the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton satellites, as well as Chandra had given some indication of the presence of elements expected in a shell ejected by a supernova. However, the number of X-rays detected in those observations was small, and the possibility remained that the reported lines were an instrumental effect or statistical fluctuation. Since Chandra was able to observe X-ray lines from GRB 020813 for almost an entire day, the number of X-rays detected was five times larger than for previous observations. This enabled the team to make a definitive identification of the silicon and sulfur lines. Chandra observed GRB 020813 for about 77,000 seconds, approximately 21 hours after the initial burst. Other members of the research team included Herman Marshall, George Ricker, Roland Vanderspek, Peter Ford, Geoffrey Crew (MIT), and Donald Lamb (University of Chicago). The High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer was built by MIT. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program, and TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, Calif., is the prime contractor for the spacecraft. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center

  4. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    puzzlement. The apparent absence of hints in the LHC experimental data of new phenomena that could relate to dark matter, dark energy, the dominance of matter over antimatter in the Universe, the unification of the strong and the electroweak interactions and their further unification with gravity left the Symposium with no guidance as to how to answer the question: what next? And in experimental fundamental science it is not the confirmation of already established theories that thrills the most; it is the appearance of the unexpected that creates the greatest excitement. However, the LHC is only at the beginning of its voyage into the uncharted territories of higher energies and smaller dimensions that it was built for, so the possibilities for unexpected discoveries are only starting to be explored. The LHC will start up again in 2015 with nearly twice its previous energy and with increased luminosity—new discoveries might then appear sooner than we even dare hope for! The LHC Nobel Symposium was attended by about 60 invited participants and lasted four days. The program was divided into seven sessions; QCD and Heavy Ion Physics, B Physics, Electroweak Physics, The Higgs Boson, Connections to Neutrino Physics and Astroparticle Physics, Beyond the Standard Model and Forward Look. There were 27 plenary invited talks given by participants, each followed by lively discussions. All but one of the speakers have submitted write-ups of their talks for these proceedings. We are hopeful that the remaining talk will be published in a forthcoming issue of Physica Scripta . I am gratified that Professor Roland Allen has agreed to write a paper on the essence of the Higgs boson discovery to be published in Physica Scripta , intended for undergraduate students and educated physicists, regardless of their field of research. I wish to express my deep gratitude to all Speakers and Participants in the Symposium, to the Members of the Local and International Organizing Committees, to the

  5. Predictive engineering tools for injection-molded long-carbon-fiber thermoplastic composites - FY 2015 third quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Fifield, Leonard S.; Mori, Steven; Gandhi, Umesh N.; Wang, Jin; Costa, Franco; Wollan, Eric J.; Tucker, III, Charles L.

    2015-07-01

    During the third quarter of FY 2015, the following technical progress has been made toward project milestones: 1) Magna oversaw the tool build and prepared the molding plan for the complex part of Phase II. 2) PlastiComp hosted a visit by Magna and Toyota on April 23rd to finalize the molding scope and schedule. The plan for molding trials including selection of molding parameters for both LFT and D-LFT for the U-shape complex part was established. 3) Toyota shipped the U-shape complex part tool to Magna on May 28th, 2015. 4) Plasticomp provided 30wt% LCF/PP and 30wt% LCF/PA66 compounded pellets to Magna for molding the complex part. 5) Magna performed preliminary molding trials on June 2nd, 2015 to validate wall thickness, fill profile, tool temperature and shot size requirements for the complex part. 6) Magna performed the first complex part run on June 16th and 17th, 2015 at Magna’s Composite Centre of Excellence in Concord, ON, Canada. Dale Roland of Plasticomp, and Umesh Gandhi of Toyota also attended the molding. 7) Magna discussed and finalized the plan with PNNL and the team for cutting samples from molded parts at selected locations for fiber orientation and length measurements. 8) Magna provided the computer-aided design (CAD) files of the complex parts with and without ribs to PNNL and Autodesk to build the corresponding ASMI models for injection molding simulations. Magna also provided the actual parameters used. 9) Plasticomp’s provided knowledge and experience of molding LCF materials essential to the successful molding of the parts including optimization of fill speed, tool temperatures, and plasticizing conditions for the 30wt% LCF/PP and 30wt% LCF/PA66 materials in both rib and non-rib versions. 10) Magna molded additional parts for evaluation of mechanical property testing including torsional stiffness on June 29th and 30th, 2015 at Magna’s Composite Center of Excellence. 11) Toyota began preparation for the torsion test of the specimens

  6. PREFACE: International Conference on the Applications of the Mössbauer Effect (ICAME 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Herbert; Reissner, Michael; Steiner, Walter; Wiesinger, Günter

    2010-04-01

    . The positive atmosphere, the high attendance in the sessions and the lively discussions made the conference a great success and a memorable event. It was pointed out, that Mössbauer spectroscopy is still an interesting and powerful method with great opportunities in the future. Herbert Müller (Secretary) Michael Reissner (Chairman) This book is dedicated to our colleagues Nicol Malcom, who could not come, because he suddenly died a few weeks in advance to the conference and Hercilio Rechenberg, who died on his way home from Vienna. Conference photograph Conference Organisation Local Organizing Committee Reissner Michael (Chairman)Müller Herbert (Conference Secretary) Amthauer Georg Lottermoser WernerSteiner Walter Bauer Ernst Michor Herwig Vogl Gero Bühler-Paschen Silke Müller Martin Waas Monika Grodzicki Michael Redhammer Günther Wiesinger Günter Grössinger Roland Sassik Herbert Hilscher Gerfried Sepiol Bogdan International Programme Committee Amthauer Georg Gütlich Philipp Steiner Walter Baggio-Saitovich Elisa Litterst Fred Jochen Trautwein Alfred Xaver Berry Frank Long Gary Vogl Gero Felner Israel Nagy Denes Lajos Yoshida Yutaka Greneche Jean-Marc Rüffer Rudolf International Advisory Board Alp E ErcanGénin Jean-Marie Baggio-Saitovitch Elisa Greneche Jean-Marc Miglierini Marcel Balogh Judit Grodzicki Michael Musić Svetozar Bender Koch Christian Gütlich Philipp Nagy Dénes Lajos Berry Frank Häggström Lennart Nishida Tetsuaki Brown Dennis Hanzel Darko Pérez Alcázar German Campbell Stewart Hassaan Mohamed Yousri Rüffer Rudolf Carbucicchio Massimo Jumas Jean-Claude Ryan Dominic H Croci Simonetta Kadyrzhanov Kariat Sanchez Francisco Di Naili Katila Toivo Schünemann Volker Elzain Mohamed Kim Chul Sung Stanek Jan Fabris José Domingos Klingelhöfer Göstar Stevens John Felner Israel Langouche Guido Suzdalev Igor P Fern George R Lyubutin Igor S Szymanski Krzysztof Forder Sue D Marco Jose F Waanders Frans Gajbhiye Nandeo Mašlaň Miroslav Yoshida Yutaka

  7. Space Shuttle Radar Images of Terrestrial Impact Structures: SIR-C/X-SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHone, J. F.; Blumberg, D. G.; Greeley, R.; Underwood, J. R., Jr.

    1995-09-01

    ; 133 degrees 09'E; largest ca.150 m dia) Although quite small, Henbury crater field [8] appears distinctly radar bright on survey -qualilty imagery. Strong radar backscatter may be due to a combination of impact-disrupted sedimentary horizons and of soil dielectrical properties altered by a significant meteoritic iron content [9]. References: [1] Garvin J. B. and Schnetzler C. C. (1994) GSA Spec. Pap. 293, 249-257. [2] Dietz R. S. and McHone J. F. (1979) Apollo Soyuz Test Proj. Summary Sci. Rept. (2) NASA SP-412, 183-192. [3] Roland N. W. (1976) Geol. Jahrb., Reihe A, 33, 117-131. [4] Becq-Giraudon J. F. et al. (1992) Comptes Rendus de l'Academ. des Sciences, Ser.2, 315, 83-88. [5] Grieve R. A. F. and Therriault A. M. (1995) LPS XXVI, 515-516. [6] Lambert P. et al. (1980) Meteoritics, 15, 157-159. [7] Harms et al. (1980) Nature, 286, 704-706. [8] Milton D. J. (1968) Geol. Surv. Prof. Pap. 599-C, C1-C16. [9] Hodge P. W. and Wright F. W. (1971) JGR, 76, 3880-3895.

  8. European Plate Observing System - the Arctic dimension and the Nordic collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atakan, K.; Heikkinen, P.; Juhlin, C.; Thybo, H.; Vogfjord, K.

    2012-04-01

    Dehls (NGU), Øystein Nordgulen (NGU), Roland Roberts (UU), Reynir Bødvarsson (UU), Ólafur Guðmundsson (UU), Steinunn Jacobsdottir (IMO), Freysteinn Sigmundsson (IES), Benedikt Halldórsson (EERC), Gudmundur Valsson (LMI), Irina Artemieva (KU), Peter Voss (GEUS), Trine Dahl-Jensen (GEUS), Tine B. Larsen (GEUS), Jens Jørgen Møller (GEUS), Martin Hansen (GEUS), Jørgen Tulstrup (GEUS), Johnny Fredericia (GEUS), Niels Andersen (DTU-Space), Jurgen Matzka (DTU-Space), Shfaqat Abbas Khan (DTU-Space), Niels Balling (AU), Markku Poutanen (FGI), Elena Kozlovskaya (SGO).

  9. Competitive spirit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    been published previously. Any kind of reference may be consulted; textbooks and journal articles can be cited. The problems can be downloaded from the webpage of the Ortvay contest (mafihe.elte.hu/ortvay ) in Hungarian and English; on preliminary request the problems can be sent via e-mail. If an institute is represented by several contestants, then a teacher or student acting as local organizer collects the solutions and posts them to the referees. Solutions can be sent by mail, fax or e-mail to the address given on the webpage. The contest is evaluated separately for each university year and the referees reserve the right to withhold or to divide some prizes. Beyond the money prizes for the first, second and third places, honourable mentions and special prizes for outstanding solutions of individual problems can be awarded. The sponsors of the contest are the Students' Foundation of the Faculty of Sciences of Eötvös University and the Roland Eötvös Physical Society. The results are announced in December and the organizers are hoping for even more participants in future contests. Among the winners of the European Union Young Scientists competition which took place in Thessaloniki, Greece in September was Sarah Flannery from Ireland. Sarah had used advanced mathematics to compare two cryptographic systems and proved that a new system for encrypting information on the Internet is as secure and considerably faster than the one currently in use. Three students from Iceland also gained a prize for their work on a distant cluster of hundreds of galaxies, demonstrating the capacities of modern data processing tools and the Internet in the project. The winning entries were selected from 57 projects presented from over 30 countries, and the aim of the contest was to encourage and highlight young people's interest in science by inviting them to play a part in actual research projects. Some of the winners will be able to work on projects at the Joint Research Centre

  10. PREFACE: Introduction to the proceedings of Dynamics Days South America 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macau, Elbert E. N.; Pereira, Tiago; Prado, Antonio F. B. A.; Turci, Luiz F. R.; Winter, Othon C.

    2011-03-01

    number of attendees ever. Finally, we would like to express our gratitude to all the participants for their presentations, discussions, and remarkable interactions with one another. The tireless work undertaken by all the members of the International Advisory Committee and the Organizing Committee must also be recognized. We also wish to express our deep appreciation for the Scientific Societies and Research Support Agencies which supported the conference and provided all the resources which were necessary to make this idea of a South American Dynamics Days come true. Elbert E N Macau, Tiago Pereira, Antonio F B A Prado, Luiz F R Turci, and Othon C WinterEditors Conference photograph Conference photograph Conference photograph Conference photograph International Advisory Committee Adilson E MotterNorthwestern UniversityEvanston - IL - USA Alfredo OzorioCentro Brasileiro de Pesquisas FísicasRio de Janeiro - RJ - Brazil Celso Grebogi (Chair)University of AberdeenAberdeen - UK Ed OttUniversity of MarylandCollege Park - MD - USA Epaminondas Rosa JrIllinois State UniversityNormal - IL - USA Hans Ingo WeberPontifícia Universidade CatólicaRio de Janeiro - RJ - Brazil Holger KantzMax Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex SystemsDresden - Germany Jason Gallas (Co-chair)Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do SulPorto Alegre - RS - Brazil José Roberto Rios LeiteUniv. Federal de PernanbucoRecife - PE - Brazil Jürgen KurthsPotsdam Institute for climate Impact ResearchHumboldt University, Berlin - Germany Kenneth ShowalterWest Virginia UniversityMorgantown - WV - USA Lou PecoraNaval Research LabWashington - DC - USA Luis Antonio AguirreUniversidade Federal de Minas GeraisBelo Horizonte - MG - Brazil Marcelo VianaIMPA - Instituto Nacional de Matemática Pura e AplicadaRio de Janeiro - RJ - Brazil Miguel A F SanjuánUniversidad Rey Juan CarlosMadrid - Spain Paulo Roberto de Souza MendesPontifícia Universidade CatólicaRio de Janeiro - RJ - Brazil Roland KorbeleUniversidade de

  11. ESA's high-energy observatories spot doughnut-shaped cloud with a black-hole filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-07-01

    -energy X-rays seen by XMM-Newton appear to come from a diffuse emission, far away from the black hole, the higher-energy X-rays detected by Integral are directly related to the black hole activity. The team could infer the doughnut’s structure and its distance from the black hole by virtue of light that was either reflected or completely absorbed. The torus itself appears to be several hundred light years from the black hole, although the observation could not gauge its diameter, from inside to outside. The result marks the clearest observation of an obscured black hole in X-ray and gamma-ray `colours’, a span of energy nearly a million times wider than the window of visible light, from red to violet. Multi-wavelength studies are increasingly important to understanding black holes, as already demonstrated earlier this year. In May 2004, the European project known as the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory, in which ESA plays a major role, found 30 supermassive black holes that had previously escaped detection behind masking dust clouds. Note for editors This result will appear on The Astrophysical Journal. Besides Volker Beckmann, the author list includes Neil Gehrels, Pascal Favre, Roland Walter, Thierry Courvoisier, Pierre-Olivier Petrucci and Julien Malzac. For more information about the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory programme and how it has allowed European scientists to discover a number of previously hidden black holes, see: http://www.spacetelescope.org/news/html/heic0409.html More about Integral The International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (Integral) is the first space observatory that can simultaneously observe celestial objects in gamma rays, X-rays and visible light. Integral was launched on a Russian Proton rocket on 17 October 2002 into a highly elliptical orbit around Earth. Its principal targets include regions of the galaxy where chemical elements are being produced and compact objects, such as black holes. More information on Integral can be

  12. Editorial: Current status and perspective on drug targets in tubercle bacilli and drug design of antituberculous agents based on structure-activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Tomioka, Haruaki

    2014-01-01

    promoting the elucidation of the molecular structures of drug targets in MTB, and are consequently markedly useful for the design of new, promising antituberculous drugs using QSAR techniques. In this issue, we review the following areas. Firstly, Dr. Li M. Fu reviews the perspective that combines machine learning and genomics for drug discovery in tuberculosis, in relation to the problem that the exhaustive search for useful drug targets over the entire MTB genome would not be as productive as expected in practice [1]. Secondly, the review article by Drs. R. S. Chauhan. S. K. Chanumolu, C. Rout, and R. Shrivastava focuses on analysis of the current state of MTB genomic resources, host-pathogen interaction studies in the context of mycobacterial persistence, and drug target discovery based on the utilization of computational tools and metabolic network analyses [2]. Thirdly, Drs. Daria Bottai, Agnese Serafini, Alessandro Cascioferro, Roland Brosch, and Riccardo Manganelli review the current knowledge on MTB T7SS/ESX secretion systems and their impact on MTB physiology and virulence, and the possible approaches to develop T7SS/ESX inhibitors [3]. Fourthly, Drs. E. Jeffrey North, Mary Jackson, and Richard E. Lee review and analyze new and emerging inhibitors of the mycolic acid biosynthetic pathway, including mycobacterial enzymes for fatty acid synthesis, mycolic acid-modifying enzymes, fatty acid-activating and -condensing enzymes, transporters, and transferases, that have been discovered in the post-genomic era of tuberculosis drug discovery [4]. Fifthly, Drs. Katarina Mikusova, Vadim Makarov, and Joao Neres review the mycobacterial enzyme DprE1, which catalyzes a unique epimerization reaction in the biosynthesis of decaprenylphosphoryl arabinose, a single donor of the arabinosyl residue for the build-up of arabinans, one of the mycobacterial cell wall components, as an important drug target especially for the development of benzothiazinones [5]. Sixthly, I review the

  13. Enacs Survey of Southern Galaxies Indicates Open Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-02-01

    first time. This may imply that the formation of at least a good fraction of the nearby, rich clusters is still going on. If the mean density of the Universe is indeed much smaller than the critical density, as indicated by the cluster masses determined during this survey, then this is a quite unexpected result. One explanation may be that many clusters have only started to form fairly recently. Notes: [1] The team is headed by Peter Katgert (Leiden Observatory, The Netherlands) and Alain Mazure (Laboratoire d'Astronomie Spatiale, Marseille, France); other members are Andrea Biviano and Roland den Hartog (Leiden Observatory, The Netherlands), Pierre Dubath (Observatoire de Geneve, Switzerland), Eric Escalera (SISSA, Trieste, Italy), Paola Focardi (Bologna University, Italy), Daniel Gerbal (Institut d'Astrophysique, Paris, France), Guilano Giuricin (SISSA, Trieste, Italy), Bernard Jones (Theoretical Astrophysics Centre, Copenhagen, Denmark), Olivier Le Fevre (Meudon Observatory, Paris, France), Mariano Moles and Jaime Perea (Astrophysics Institute of Andalucia, Granada, Spain), and George Rhee (University of Nevada, Las Vegas, U.S.A.). [2] The detailed results will soon be published in two comprehensive articles to appear in the European journal Astronomy & Astrophysics. [3] This Press Release is accompanied by ESO Press Photo 07/96, (click here to get the image [GIF,45k] and caption ) showing one of the rich clusters, as observed with the ESO 1-metre Schmidt telescope. [4] The masses of the planets in the solar system are determined in a similar way from the motions of their moons. The faster the moon moves around the planet at a given distance, the heavier is the planet.

  14. EDITORIAL: Colloidal dispersions in external fields Colloidal dispersions in external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwen, Hartmut

    2012-11-01

    , Ojeda-Lopez M A and Arauz-Lara J L 2012 J. Phys. Condens. Matter 24 464126 [31]Leferink op Reinink A B G M, van den Pol E, Byelov D V, Petukhov A V and Vroege G J 2012 J. Phys. Condens. Matter 24 464127 [32]Taylor S L, Evans R and Royall C P 2012 J. Phys. Condens. Matter 24 464128 [33]Toner J, Tu Y H and Ramaswamy S 2012 J. Phys. Condens. Matter 24 464110 [34]Schmitz R and Dünweg B 2005 J. Phys. Condens. Matter 318 170 [35]Cates M E 2012 Rep. Prog. Phys. 75 042601 [36]Tarama M and Ohta T 2012 J. Phys. Condens. Matter 24 464129 [37]Wensink H H and Löwen H 2012 J. Phys. Condens. Matter 24 464130 Colloidal dispersions in external fields contents Colloidal dispersions in external fieldsHartmut Löwen Depletion induced clustering in mixtures of colloidal spheres and fd-virusD Guu, J K G Dhont, G A Vliegenthart and M P Lettinga Advanced rheological characterization of soft colloidal model systemsS Gupta, S K Kundu, J Stellbrink, L Willner, J Allgaier and D Richter Conformational and dynamical properties of ultra-soft colloids in semi-dilute solutions under shear flowSunil P Singh, Dmitry A Fedosov, Apratim Chatterji, Roland G Winkler and Gerhard Gompper Transient dynamics in dense colloidal suspensions under shear: shear rate dependenceM Laurati, K J Mutch, N Koumakis, J Zausch, C P Amann, A B Schofield, G Petekidis, J F Brady, J Horbach, M Fuchs and S U Egelhaaf Force-induced diffusion in microrheologyCh J Harrer, D Winter, J Horbach, M Fuchs and Th Voigtmann Micro-macro-discrepancies in nonlinear microrheology: I. Quantifying mechanisms in a suspension of Brownian ellipsoidsRyan J DePuit and Todd M Squires Micro-macro discrepancies in nonlinear microrheology: II. Effect of probe shapeRyan J DePuit and Todd M Squires Viscosity of electrolyte solutions: a mode-coupling theoryClaudio Contreras-Aburto and Gerhard Nägele Electro-kinetics of charged-sphere suspensions explored by integral low-angle super-heterodyne laser Doppler velocimetryThomas Palberg, Tetyana K