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Sample records for krishnan rajeshwar rob

  1. When attempts at robbing prey turn fatal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejean, Alain; Corbara, Bruno; Azémar, Frédéric; Carpenter, James M.

    2012-07-01

    Because group-hunting arboreal ants spread-eagle insect prey for a long time before retrieving them, these prey can be coveted by predatory flying insects. Yet, attempting to rob these prey is risky if the ant species is also an effective predator. Here, we show that trying to rob prey from Azteca andreae workers is a fatal error as 268 out of 276 potential cleptobionts (97.1 %) were captured in turn. The ant workers hunt in a group and use the "Velcro®" principle to cling firmly to the leaves of their host tree, permitting them to capture very large prey. Exceptions were one social wasp, plus some Trigona spp. workers and flies that landed directly on the prey and were able to take off immediately when attacked. We conclude that in this situation, previously captured prey attract potential cleptobionts that are captured in turn in most of the cases.

  2. Wasps robbing food from ants: a frequent behavior?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapierre, Louis; Hespenheide, Henry; Dejean, Alain

    2007-12-01

    Food robbing, or cleptobiosis, has been well documented throughout the animal kingdom. For insects, intrafamilial food robbing is known among ants, but social wasps (Vespidae; Polistinae) taking food from ants has, to the best of our knowledge, never been reported. In this paper, we present two cases involving social wasps robbing food from ants associated with myrmecophytes. (1) Polybioides tabida F. (Ropalidiini) rob pieces of prey from Tetraponera aethiops Smith (Formicidae; Pseudomyrmecinae) specifically associated with Barteria fistulosa Mast. (Passifloraceae). (2) Charterginus spp. (Epiponini) rob food bodies from myrmecophytic Cecropia (Cecropiaceae) exploited by their Azteca mutualists (Formicidae; Dolichoderinae) or by opportunistic ants (that also attack cleptobiotic wasps). We note here that wasps gather food bodies (1) when ants are not yet active; (2) when ants are active, but avoiding any contact with them by flying off when attacked; and (3) through the coordinated efforts of two to five wasps, wherein one of them prevents the ants from leaving their nest, while the other wasps freely gather the food bodies. We suggest that these interactions are more common than previously thought.

  3. Sugary food robbing in ants: a case of temporal cleptobiosis.

    PubMed

    Richard, Freddie-Jeanne; Dejean, Alain; Lachaud, Jean-Paul

    2004-05-01

    This study reports new information on interactions between Ectatomma tuberculatum (Ponerinae) and Crematogaster limata parabiotica (Myrmicinae). Workers of these sympatric arboreal ant species forage on the same pioneer trees. Diurnally, Ectatomma preyed on Crematogaster workers that avoided overt aggression by respecting a 'safe distance'. At night, Crematogaster initiated raids within the Ectatomma nests that they apparently left with their abdomen empty, then remained near the nest entrances where they successfully intercepted 75.2% of the returning Ectatomma foragers (N = 322). Certain intercepted workers rapidly resumed their return trip. Others (39.1%) were stopped, explored and licked during a long time by the Crematogaster. Most of them were carrying between their mandibles a droplet of liquid food that was stolen. This relationship, that appears to be a typical case of interspecific cleptobiosis, whose expression varies during the daytime, demonstrates for the first time sugary-food robbing, instead of prey robbing, in ants. PMID:15255481

  4. Floral nectar guide patterns discourage nectar robbing by bumble bees.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Anne S; Brent, Joshua; Papaj, Daniel R; Dornhaus, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Floral displays are under selection to both attract pollinators and deter antagonists. Here we show that a common floral trait, a nectar guide pattern, alters the behavior of bees that can act opportunistically as both pollinators and as antagonists. Generally, bees access nectar via the floral limb, transporting pollen through contact with the plant's reproductive structures; however bees sometimes extract nectar from a hole in the side of the flower that they or other floral visitors create. This behavior is called "nectar robbing" because bees may acquire the nectar without transporting pollen. We asked whether the presence of a symmetric floral nectar guide pattern on artificial flowers affected bumble bees' (Bombus impatiens) propensity to rob or access nectar "legitimately." We discovered that nectar guides made legitimate visits more efficient for bees than robbing, and increased the relative frequency of legitimate visits, compared to flowers lacking nectar guides. This study is the first to show that beyond speeding nectar discovery, a nectar guide pattern can influence bees' flower handling in a way that could benefit the plant. PMID:23418475

  5. Missile and aircraft field test data acquired with the rapid optical beam steering (ROBS) sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Bruce; Dunn, Murray; Herr, David W.; Hyman, Howard; Leslie, Daniel H.; Lovern, Michael G.

    1997-08-01

    The ROBS instrument has recently acquired unique imagery of a missile intercepting an airborne drone target. We present a summary of that mission. We also present imagery of three airborne targets collected while the ROBS instrument simultaneously tracked all three aircraft. The recent test data highlights the capability of the ROBS instrument for autonomous acquisition, tracking, and imaging of multiple targets under field test conditions. We also describe improvements to the optical system currently underway.

  6. Paired ROBs: A Cost-Effective Reorder Buffer Sharing Strategy for SMT Processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubal, R.; Sahuquillo, J.; Petit, S.; López, P.

    An important design issue of SMT processors is to find proper sharing strategies of resources among threads. This paper proposes a ROB sharing strategy, called paired ROB, that considers the fact that task parallelism is not always available to fully utilize resources of multithreaded processors. To this aim, an evaluation methodology is proposed and used for the experiments, which analyzes performance under different degrees of parallelism. Results show that paired ROBs are a cost-effective strategy that provides better performance than private ROBs for low task parallelism, whereas it incurs slight performance losses for high task parallelism.

  7. Spatio-temporal variation of nectar robbing in Salvia gesneriflora and its effects on nectar production and legitimate visitors.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, E; Rosas-Guerrero, V

    2016-01-01

    Nectar robbing occurs when floral visitors remove floral nectar through floral damage and usually without providing pollination in return. Even though nectar robbing may have negative, neutral or even positive effects on plant fitness, few studies have investigated temporal and spatial variation in robbing rate and their consequences, particularly in the tropics. In this study, robbing levels were estimated during 3 years in four populations of Salvia gesneriflora, a hummingbird-pollinated shrub endemic to central Mexico that is mainly robbed by birds, carpenter bees and bumblebees. The effect of robbing on nectar availability, flower longevity and on visitation rate by floral visitors was also evaluated. Our results indicate great variation in robbing levels across years and populations and a positive relationship between robbing level and flower abundance per population. Moreover, our results show that nectar availability is about eight times higher in unrobbed flowers than in robbed flowers, and that nectar robbers prefer younger flowers, although lifespan of robbed and unrobbed flowers did not differ statistically. Primary and secondary nectar robbers showed a higher visitation rate compared to legitimate visitors, and neither legitimate nor illegitimate floral visitors seem to discriminate between robbed and unrobbed flowers. These results suggest that robbers may respond to food availability and that no floral visitors apparently could differentiate between robbed and unrobbed flowers. Finally, results show that nectar robbers prefer the youngest flowers, which suggests that strong competition for access to nectar between pollinators and robbers might occur, mainly at the first stages of the flowers. PMID:25677960

  8. Floral Nectar Guide Patterns Discourage Nectar Robbing by Bumble Bees

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Anne S.; Brent, Joshua; Papaj, Daniel R.; Dornhaus, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Floral displays are under selection to both attract pollinators and deter antagonists. Here we show that a common floral trait, a nectar guide pattern, alters the behavior of bees that can act opportunistically as both pollinators and as antagonists. Generally, bees access nectar via the floral limb, transporting pollen through contact with the plant’s reproductive structures; however bees sometimes extract nectar from a hole in the side of the flower that they or other floral visitors create. This behavior is called “nectar robbing” because bees may acquire the nectar without transporting pollen. We asked whether the presence of a symmetric floral nectar guide pattern on artificial flowers affected bumble bees’ (Bombus impatiens) propensity to rob or access nectar “legitimately.” We discovered that nectar guides made legitimate visits more efficient for bees than robbing, and increased the relative frequency of legitimate visits, compared to flowers lacking nectar guides. This study is the first to show that beyond speeding nectar discovery, a nectar guide pattern can influence bees’ flower handling in a way that could benefit the plant. PMID:23418475

  9. Realized tolerance to nectar robbing: compensation to floral enemies in Ipomopsis aggregata

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Rebecca E.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Although the ecological and evolutionary consequences of foliar herbivory are well understood, how plants cope with floral damage is less well explored. Here the concept of tolerance, typically studied within the context of plant defence to foliar herbivores and pathogens, is extended to floral damage. Variation in tolerance to floral damage is examined, together with some of the mechanisms involved. Methods The study was conducted on Ipomopsis aggregata, which experiences floral damage and nectar removal by nectar-robbing bees. High levels of robbing can reduce seeds sired and produced by up to 50 %, an indirect effect mediated through pollinator avoidance of robbed plants. Using an experimental common garden with groups of I. aggregata, realized tolerance to robbing was measured. Realized tolerance included both genetic and environmental components of tolerance. It was hypothesized that both resource acquisition and storage traits, and traits involved in pollination would mitigate the negative effects of robbers. Key Results Groups of I. aggregata varied in their ability to tolerate nectar robbing. Realized tolerance was observed only through a component of male plant reproduction (pollen donation) and not through components of female plant reproduction. Some groups fully compensated for robbing while others under- or overcompensated. Evidence was found only for a pollination-related trait, flower production, associated with realized tolerance. Plants that produced more flowers and that had a higher inducibility of flower production following robbing were more able to compensate through male function. Conclusions Variation in realized tolerance to nectar robbing was found in I. aggregata, but only through an estimate of male reproduction, and traits associated with pollination may confer realized tolerance to robbing. By linking concepts and techniques from studies of plant–pollinator and plant–herbivore interactions, this work provides

  10. Impact of Striped-Squirrel Nectar-Robbing Behaviour on Gender Fitness in Alpinia roxburghii Sweet (Zingiberaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xiaobao; Mohandass, Dharmalingam; Katabuchi, Masatoshi; Hughes, Alice C.; Roubik, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Nectar-robbing has the potential to strongly affect male and female reproductive fitness of plants. One example of nectar theft is that shown by striped-squirrels (Tamiops swinhoei) on a number of ginger species, including Alpinia roxburghii and A. kwangsiensis (Zingiberaceae). In this study, we used a fluorescent dye as a pollen analogue, and measured fruit and seed output, to test the effect of squirrel nectar-robbing on A. roxburghii reproductive fitness. Pollen transfer between robbed and unrobbed flowers was assessed by comparing 60 randomly established plots containing robbed and unrobbed flowers. The frequency of squirrel robbing visits and broken styles were recorded from a number of flowers for five consecutive days. Two bee species (Bombus eximius and Apis cerana), were the primary pollinators, and their visitation frequency was recorded for six consecutive days. The results showed that fluorescent powder from unrobbed flowers was dispersed further, and to a greater number of flowers than that placed on robbed flowers. Additionally, robbing flowers caused significant damage to reproductive organs, resulting in lower fruit and seed sets in robbed than in unrobbed flowers and influencing both male and female fitness. The frequency of the primary pollinator visits (B. eximius) was significantly higher for unrobbed plants than for robbed plants. The present study clearly shows the negative impact of squirrel robbing on A. roxburghii male reproductive fitness and neutral impact on female reproductive fitness. PMID:26689684

  11. Impact of Striped-Squirrel Nectar-Robbing Behaviour on Gender Fitness in Alpinia roxburghii Sweet (Zingiberaceae).

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiaobao; Mohandass, Dharmalingam; Katabuchi, Masatoshi; Hughes, Alice C; Roubik, David W

    2015-01-01

    Nectar-robbing has the potential to strongly affect male and female reproductive fitness of plants. One example of nectar theft is that shown by striped-squirrels (Tamiops swinhoei) on a number of ginger species, including Alpinia roxburghii and A. kwangsiensis (Zingiberaceae). In this study, we used a fluorescent dye as a pollen analogue, and measured fruit and seed output, to test the effect of squirrel nectar-robbing on A. roxburghii reproductive fitness. Pollen transfer between robbed and unrobbed flowers was assessed by comparing 60 randomly established plots containing robbed and unrobbed flowers. The frequency of squirrel robbing visits and broken styles were recorded from a number of flowers for five consecutive days. Two bee species (Bombus eximius and Apis cerana), were the primary pollinators, and their visitation frequency was recorded for six consecutive days. The results showed that fluorescent powder from unrobbed flowers was dispersed further, and to a greater number of flowers than that placed on robbed flowers. Additionally, robbing flowers caused significant damage to reproductive organs, resulting in lower fruit and seed sets in robbed than in unrobbed flowers and influencing both male and female fitness. The frequency of the primary pollinator visits (B. eximius) was significantly higher for unrobbed plants than for robbed plants. The present study clearly shows the negative impact of squirrel robbing on A. roxburghii male reproductive fitness and neutral impact on female reproductive fitness. PMID:26689684

  12. Nectar robbing, forager efficiency and seed set: Bumblebees foraging on the self incompatible plant Linaria vulgaris (Scrophulariaceae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, Jane C.; Allen, John A.; Goulson, Dave

    2000-07-01

    In southern England, Linaria vulgaris (common yellow toadflax) suffers from high rates of nectar robbery by bumblebees. In a wild population of L. vulgaris we found that 96 % of open flowers were robbed. Five species of bumblebee were observed foraging on these flowers, although short-tongued species ( Bombus lapidarius, B. lucorum and B. terrestris) robbed nectar whilst longer-tongued ones behaved as legitimate pollinators ( B. hortorum and B. pascuorum). Nectar rewards were highly variable; on average there was less nectar in robbed than in unrobbed flowers, but this difference was not statistically significant. The proportion of flowers containing no nectar was significantly higher for robbed flowers compared with unrobbed flowers. Secondary robbers and legitimate pollinators had similar handling times on flowers and, assuming they select flowers at random to forage on, received approximately the same nectar profit per minute, largely because most flowers had been robbed. There was no significant difference in the number of seeds in pods of robbed flowers and in pods of flowers that were artificially protected against robbing. However, more of the robbed flowers set at least some seed than the unrobbed flowers, possibly as a consequence of the experimental manipulation. We suggest that nectar robbing has little effect on plant fecundity because legitimate foragers are present in the population, and that seed predation and seed abortion after fertilization may be more important factors in limiting seed production in this species.

  13. Nectar Robbing Positively Influences the Reproductive Success of Tecomella undulata (Bignoniaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vineet Kumar; Barman, Chandan; Tandon, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    The net consequence of nectar robbing on reproductive success of plants is usually negative and the positive effect is rarely produced. We evaluated the influence of nectar robbing on the behaviour of pollinators and the reproductive success of Tecomella undulata (Bignoniaceae) in a natural population. Experimental pollinations showed that the trees were strictly self-incompatible. The three types of floral colour morphs of the tree viz. red, orange and yellow, lacked compatibility barriers. The pollinators (Pycnonotus cafer and Pycnonotus leucotis) and the robber (Nectarinia asiatica) showed equal preference for all the morphs, as they visited each morph with nearly equal frequency and flower-handling time. The sunbirds caused up to 60% nectar robbing, mostly (99%) by piercing through the corolla tube. Although nectar is replenished at regular intervals, insufficient amount of nectar compelled the pollinators to visit additional trees in bloom. Data of manual nectar robbing from the entire tree showed that the pollinators covered lower number of flowers per tree (5 flowers/tree) and more trees per bout (7 trees/bout) than the unrobbed ones (19 flowers/tree and 2 trees bout). The robbed trees set a significantly greater amount of fruits than the unrobbed trees. However, the number of seeds in a fruit did not differ significantly. The study shows that plant-pollinator-robber interaction may benefit the self-incompatible plant species under conditions that increases the visits of pollinators among the compatible conspecifics in a population. PMID:25036554

  14. 78 FR 46598 - Notice of Availability of the Draft Rob Jaggers Camping Area Business Plan and Expanded Amenity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... comment. Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying... Expanded Amenity Fee Schedule. The Rob Jaggers Camping Area is located in the Fort Stanton/Snowy River... services at the Rob Jaggers Camping Area located at the Fort Stanton/Snowy River National Conservation...

  15. Building a Career in America's Community Colleges: Essays by Rob Jenkins from "The Chronicle of Higher Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Errico, Deanna, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This volume collects essays Rob Jenkins originally wrote for "The Two-Year Track" column in "The Chronicle of Higher Education". Drawing on his own experience, Rob has, for many years, been dispensing much-appreciated advice from the frontline--to those considering a community college career as well as those who desire to move up the ranks. This…

  16. Neuropeptide B (NPB) and neuropeptide W (NPW) system in cultured rat calvarial osteoblast-like (ROB) cells: NPW and NPB inhibit proliferative activity of ROB cells.

    PubMed

    Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Rucinski, Marcin; Tyczewska, Marianna; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2009-12-01

    Neuropeptides B (NPB) and W (NPW) have been identified as endogenous ligands of two G-protein-coupled receptors, neuropeptides B/W receptor 1 (NPBWR1, formerly known as GPR7) and neuropeptides B/W receptor 2 (NPBWR2, formerly known as GPR8). In rodents where NPBWR2 is absent, its counterpart is named the similar to neuropeptides B/W receptor 2 (similar to NPBWR2, formerly GPR8-like). Both NPB and NPW play a role in the control of feeding, neuroendocrine axis functions, memory and learning processes as well as in pain regulation. The present study aimed to investigate the expression of NPB, NPW, NPBWR1 and the similar to NPBWR2 genes in cultured rat calvarial osteoblast-like (ROB) cells and the effects of both peptides on proliferative activity and osteocalcin secretion by ROB cells. Classic RT-PCR technique revealed the presence of ppNPB mRNA, ppNPW mRNA, and NPBWR1 mRNA, but not similar to NPBWR2 mRNA in ROB cells. QPCR revealed gradual (days 7, 14 and 21 of culture) increase of the ppNPB gene expression, while expression of ppNPW gene was the highest at day 14 and was comparable to that seen in freshly isolated cells. In ROB cells, expression of NPBWR1 gene was notable at day 7 of culture, lower at day 21, and negligible at day 14. Neither NPB nor NPW changed osteocalcin secretion by cultured osteoblast-like cells while both neuropeptides inhibited their proliferative activity. Results of the present study suggest that the systems of NPW, NPB and NPBWR1 directly regulate proliferative activity of cultured rat calvaria osteoblast-like cells. The physiological significance of this osteoblastic system remains unclear, and requires further investigation. PMID:19885618

  17. Robbing Peter to pay Paul: smarter re-allocation of dollars bring relief!

    PubMed

    Ledlow, Gerald R; Cwiek, Mark

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic tension facing health care organizations today is that of lower third-party payments and higher costs. The ever-present financial squeeze results in daily stressors for health care executives attempting to provide services with diminishing resources. How can one continue to "rob Peter to pay Paul," to make ends meet and stretch every dollar? PMID:12355621

  18. RobOKoD: microbial strain design for (over)production of target compounds

    PubMed Central

    Stanford, Natalie J.; Millard, Pierre; Swainston, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable production of target compounds such as biofuels and high-value chemicals for pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and chemical industries is becoming an increasing priority given their current dependency upon diminishing petrochemical resources. Designing these strains is difficult, with current methods focusing primarily on knocking-out genes, dismissing other vital steps of strain design including the overexpression and dampening of genes. The design predictions from current methods also do not translate well-into successful strains in the laboratory. Here, we introduce RobOKoD (Robust, Overexpression, Knockout and Dampening), a method for predicting strain designs for overproduction of targets. The method uses flux variability analysis to profile each reaction within the system under differing production percentages of target-compound and biomass. Using these profiles, reactions are identified as potential knockout, overexpression, or dampening targets. The identified reactions are ranked according to their suitability, providing flexibility in strain design for users. The software was tested by designing a butanol-producing Escherichia coli strain, and was compared against the popular OptKnock and RobustKnock methods. RobOKoD shows favorable design predictions, when predictions from these methods are compared to a successful butanol-producing experimentally-validated strain. Overall RobOKoD provides users with rankings of predicted beneficial genetic interventions with which to support optimized strain design. PMID:25853130

  19. Performance of ROB's near real-time ionospheric product during normal and disturbed space weather periods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeot, Nicolas; Chevalier, Jean-Marie; Bruyninx, Carine

    2015-04-01

    Several agencies are routinely monitoring the vertical Total Electron Content (vTEC) using GNSS data. Derived maps are available with different latencies, area extents, and grid/time resolutions. However, no high-resolution maps are publically available over Europe in near real-time. In this frame, the Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB) developed the ROB-IONO software which takes advantage of the dense EUREF Permanent GNSS Network (EPN) to monitor the ionosphere. The main ROB products consist of ionospheric vTEC maps over Europe and their variability estimated in near real-time every 15 min on 0.5° x 0.5° grids using GPS observations. The maps are available online with a latency of ~3 min in the IONEX format at ftp://gnss.oma.be and as interactive web pages at www.gnss.be. During normal ionospheric activity, the ROB-TEC maps show a good agreement with widely used post-processed global products from IGS, CODE and ESA, with mean differences of 1.3 ± 0.9, 0.6 ± 0.7 and 0.4 ± 1.6 TECu respectively for the period 2012 to mid-2013. For a disturbed period, such as the 2003 Halloween ionospheric storm, the mean differences with IGS, CODE and ESA maps are respectively 0.9 ± 2.2, 0.1 ± 2.0 and 0.6 ± 6.8 TECu, with maximum differences (>38 TECu) occurring during the major phase of the storm. These differences are due to the lower resolution of global products in time and space compared to the ROB-TEC maps. A description of two recent events, on March 17, 2013 and February 27, 2014 highlights the capability of the method adopted to detect in near real-time abnormal ionospheric behaviour over Europe. The potential of the variability maps as an indicator of rapid ionospheric variations during the 15 min of observations is also highlighted. More than 30 ionospheric events associated with Space weather were detected during the period 2012-2014. The ionospheric perturbations are associated with Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs, ~70% of the time), active geomagnetic conditions

  20. Quantum accelerometer: Distinguishing inertial Bob from his accelerated twin Rob by a local measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Dragan, Andrzej; Fuentes, Ivette; Louko, Jorma

    2011-04-15

    A single quantum system, such as the Unruh-DeWitt detector, can be used to determine absolute acceleration by local measurements on a quantum field. To show this, we consider two kinematically indistinguishable scenarios: an inertial observer, Bob, measuring the field of a uniformly accelerated cavity, and his noninertial twin, Rob, accelerating and making measurements in a stationary cavity. We find that these scenarios can be distinguished in the nonrelativistic regime only by measurements on highly excited massive fields, allowing one to detect the noninertialness of the reference frame.

  1. Quantum accelerometer: Distinguishing inertial Bob from his accelerated twin Rob by a local measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragan, Andrzej; Fuentes, Ivette; Louko, Jorma

    2011-04-01

    A single quantum system, such as the Unruh-DeWitt detector, can be used to determine absolute acceleration by local measurements on a quantum field. To show this, we consider two kinematically indistinguishable scenarios: an inertial observer, Bob, measuring the field of a uniformly accelerated cavity, and his noninertial twin, Rob, accelerating and making measurements in a stationary cavity. We find that these scenarios can be distinguished in the nonrelativistic regime only by measurements on highly excited massive fields, allowing one to detect the noninertialness of the reference frame.

  2. MarRA, SoxSR, and Rob encode a signal dependent regulatory network in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jain, Kirti; Saini, Supreet

    2016-05-24

    When exposed to low concentrations of toxic chemicals, bacteria modulate the expression of a number of cellular processes. Typically, these processes include those related to porin production, dismutases, and metabolic fluxes. In Escherichia coli (E. coli), the expression of these systems is largely controlled by three homologous transcriptional regulators: MarA, SoxS, and Rob. Each of the three regulators responds to distinct chemical signals (salicylate for MarA; paraquat for SoxS; and bipyridyl for Rob) and controls the expression of an overlapping set of downstream targets. In addition, the three systems autoregulate their own expression, and cross-regulate each other's expression. Specifically, MarA is known to activate SoxS expression, and Rob is known to activate MarA expression. In addition, a number of conflicting regulatory interactions are known to exist between the three loci. Thus, the three systems encode a complex regulatory topology with multiple feedback loops, the precise nature of whose interactions or their significance in cellular physiology is not well understood currently. In this work, we focus on understanding the details of this crosstalk between the Mar-Sox-Rob systems in E. coli, and the resulting control and dynamics of the expression of cellular processes by studying gene expression at the population level and at single-cell resolution in wild type and mutants. Our results indicate that the regulatory architecture between MarA, SoxS, and Rob is dependent on the signal (inducer) present in the environment. The regulators, in response to an inducer, form a Feed Forward Loop (FFL), which leads to faster and stronger induction of target genes in the cell, consequently resulting in better cellular growth. Through the FFL, the cell is able to integrate qualitatively different signals in the network, and consequently, control cellular physiology. In addition, we present two intriguing dynamic features of the Mar-Sox-Rob regulon. First, in the

  3. Managing hydrological measurements for small and intermediate projects: RObsDat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusser, Dominik E.

    2014-05-01

    Hydrological measurements need good management for the data not to be lost. Multiple, often overlapping files from various loggers with heterogeneous formats need to be merged. Data needs to be validated and cleaned and subsequently converted to the format for the hydrological target application. Preferably, all these steps should be easily tracable. RObsDat is an R package designed to support such data management. It comes with a command line user interface to support hydrologists to enter and adjust their data in a database following the Observations Data Model (ODM) standard by QUASHI. RObsDat helps in the setup of the database within one of the free database engines MySQL, PostgreSQL or SQLite. It imports the controlled water vocabulary from the QUASHI web service and provides a smart interface between the hydrologist and the database: Already existing data entries are detected and duplicates avoided. The data import function converts different data table designes to make import simple. Cleaning and modifications of data are handled with a simple version control system. Variable and location names are treated in a user friendly way, accepting and processing multiple versions. A new development is the use of spacetime objects for subsequent processing.

  4. Rethinking the Boundaries and Burdens of Parental Authority over Education: A Response to Rob Reich's Case Study of Homeschooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glanzer, Perry L.

    2008-01-01

    Rob Reich's claim that fruitful discussions about the balance among state, parental, and children's educational interests would benefit by contemplating the widespread phenomenon of homeschooling is a welcome suggestion. His policy recommendations, however, place an unjustified burden on parents to show the adequacy of homeschooling arrangements…

  5. Using Classroom Observations to Measure Teacher Effectiveness: Q&A with Rob Ramsdell. REL Mid-Atlantic Webinar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Educational Laboratory Mid-Atlantic, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In this webinar, Mr. Rob Ramsdell, Vice President, Cambridge Education, discussed the use of classroom observations as one measure of teacher effectiveness in a comprehensive educator support system. Mr. Ramsdell presented research-based recommendations for improving the quality and rigor of classroom observations. This Q&A addressed the…

  6. Analytic Calculation of Noise Power Robbing, NPR, and Polarization Isolation Degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Robert; Woolner, Peter; Ekelman, Ernest

    2008-01-01

    Three Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) R transponders (services) required analysis and measurements to develop an accurate link budget. These are a) Search and Rescue transponder which suffers from power robbing due to thermal uplink noise, b) the Data Collection Platform Report which suffers from degradation due to NPR (Noise Power Ratio), and c) GOES Rebroadcast transponder which uses a dual circular downlink L band for which there was no depolarization data. The first two services required development of extended link budget to analytically calculate the impact of these degradations which are shown to have a significant impact on the link budget. The third service required measurements of atmospheric L band CP depolarization as there were no known previous measurements and results are reported her

  7. TEM-1 AND ROB-1 PRESENCE AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE IN HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE STRAINS, ISTANBUL, TURKEY.

    PubMed

    Kuvat, Nuray; Nazik, Hasan; Berkiten, Rahmiye; Öngen, Betigül

    2015-03-01

    Resistance of 235 Haemophilus influenzae clinical isolates from Istanbul Medical Faculty Hospital, Turkey were determined against 19 antibiotics by disc diffusion method, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of those found resistant to ampicillin, cefuroxim, chloramphenicol and meropenem were measured using E-test. Ampicillin-resistant isolates producing beta-lactamase as demonstrated by a nitrocefin assay were analyzed for the presence of TEM-1 and ROB-1 genes by PCR. Eleven percent of the isolates were resistant to ampicillin (10 µg/ml), of which 73% were beta-lactamase positive and carried TEM-1 gene, but none were positive for ROB-1 gene. All isolates susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanate (20/10 µg/ml), azithromycin (15 µg/ml), aztreonam (30 µg/ml), cefotaxime (30 µg/ml), ceftriaxone (30 µg/ml), ciprofloxacin (5 µg/ml), levofloxacin (5 µg/ml), and telithromycin (15 µg/ml) but 24%, 15%, 4%, 4%, 2%, 1%, 1%, 0.5%, 0.5% and 0.5% were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (1.25/23.75 µg/ml), tetracycline (30 µg/ml), cefaclor (30 µg/ml), clarithromycin (15 µg/ml), cefuroxime (30 µg/ml), meropenem (10 µg/ml), chloramphenicol (30 µg/ml), ampicillin-sulbactam (10/10 µg/ml), nalidixic acid (30 µg/ml), and fosfomycin (30 µg/ml), respectively. MIC values of three cefuroxime-resistant isolates was 24, 48 and > 256 µg/ml, respectively; of two meropenem-resistant strains > 256 µg/ml; and of two chloramphenicol-susceptible isolates (by disc diffusion method) 6 µg/ml (considered as intermediate susceptible). Multiple- antibiotics resistance was detected in 15% of the strains, with resistance to 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 antibiotics in 8.5%, 4%, 2%, 0.5% and 0.5% of the isolates, respectively. By identifying beta-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae, empirical therapy with beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations and second generation cephalosporins would be inappropriate for such patients (approximately 3%). Our findings will

  8. Behavioural differences between male and female carpenter bees in nectar robbing and its effect on reproductive success in Glechoma longituba (Lamiaceae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y-W; Zhao, J-M; Yang, C-F; Gituru, W R

    2011-01-01

    Male and female nectar robbers may show significantly different behaviour on host plants and thus have different impacts on reproductive fitness of the plants. A 4-year study in natural populations of Glechoma longituba has shown that male carpenter bees (Xylocopa sinensis) are responsible for most of the nectar robbing from these flowers, while female bees account for little nectar robbing, demonstrating distinct behavioural differentiation between male and female bees in visiting flowers. The smaller male bee spends less time visiting a single flower than the larger female bee, consequently, the male bee is capable of visiting more flowers per unit time and has a higher foraging efficiency. Moreover, the robbing behaviour of female carpenter bees is more destructive and affects flower structures (ovules and nectaries) and floral life-span more than that of the male bee. According to the energy trade-off hypothesis, the net energy gain for male bees during nectar robbing greatly surpasses energy payout (17.72 versus 2.43 J), while the female bee net energy gain is barely adequate to meet energy payout per unit time (3.78 versus 2.39 J). The differences in net energy gain for male and female bees per unit time in nectar robbing are the likely cause of observed behavioural differences between the sexes. The differences in food resource preference between male and female bees constitute an optimal resource allocation pattern that enables the visitors to utilise floral resources more efficiently. PMID:21134084

  9. The consequences of direct versus indirect species interactions to selection on traits: pollination and nectar robbing in Ipomopsis aggregata.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Rebecca E

    2006-03-01

    Organisms experience a complex suite of species interactions. Although the ecological consequences of direct versus indirect species interactions have received attention, their evolutionary implications are not well understood. I examined selection on floral traits through direct versus indirect pathways of species interactions using the plant Ipomopsis aggregata and its pollinators and nectar robber. Using path analysis and structural equation modeling, I tested competing hypotheses comparing the relative importance of direct (pollinator-mediated) versus indirect (robber-mediated) interactions to trait selection through female plant function in 2 years. The hypothesis that provided the best fit to the observed data included robbing and pollination, suggesting that both interactors are important in driving selection on some traits; however, the direction and intensity of selection through robbing versus pollination varied between years. I then increased my scope of inference by assessing traits and species interactions across more years. I found that the potential for temporal variation in the direction and intensity of selection was pronounced. Taken together, results suggest that assessing the broader context in which organisms evolve, including both direct and indirect interactions and across multiple years, can provide increased mechanistic understanding of the diversity of ways that animals shape floral and plant evolution. PMID:16673341

  10. AraC/XylS family stress response regulators Rob, SoxS, PliA, and OpiA in the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Pletzer, Daniel; Schweizer, Gabriel; Weingart, Helge

    2014-09-01

    Transcriptional regulators of the AraC/XylS family have been associated with multidrug resistance, organic solvent tolerance, oxidative stress, and virulence in clinically relevant enterobacteria. In the present study, we identified four homologous AraC/XylS regulators, Rob, SoxS, PliA, and OpiA, from the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora Ea1189. Previous studies have shown that the regulators MarA, Rob, and SoxS from Escherichia coli mediate multiple-antibiotic resistance, primarily by upregulating the AcrAB-TolC efflux system. However, none of the four AraC/XylS regulators from E. amylovora was able to induce a multidrug resistance phenotype in the plant pathogen. Overexpression of rob led to a 2-fold increased expression of the acrA gene. However, the rob-overexpressing strain showed increased resistance to only a limited number of antibiotics. Furthermore, Rob was able to induce tolerance to organic solvents in E. amylovora by mechanisms other than efflux. We demonstrated that SoxS from E. amylovora is involved in superoxide resistance. A soxS-deficient mutant of Ea1189 was not able to grow on agar plates supplemented with the superoxide-generating agent paraquat. Furthermore, expression of soxS was induced by redox cycling agents. We identified two novel members of the AraC/XylS family in E. amylovora. PliA was highly upregulated during the early infection phase in apple rootstock and immature pear fruits. Multiple compounds were able to induce the expression of pliA, including apple leaf extracts, phenolic compounds, redox cycling agents, heavy metals, and decanoate. OpiA was shown to play a role in the regulation of osmotic and alkaline pH stress responses. PMID:24936054

  11. Water quality of Rob Roy Reservoir and Lake Owen, Albany County, and Granite Springs and Crystal Lake Reservoirs, Laramie County, Wyoming, 1997-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ogle, Kathy Muller; Peterson, D.A.; Spillman, Bud; Padilla, Rosie

    1999-01-01

    The water quality of four reservoirs was assessed during 1997 and 1998 as a cooperative project between the Cheyenne Board of Public Utilities and the U. S. Geological Survey. The four reservoirs, Rob Roy, Lake Owen, Granite Springs, and Crystal Lake, provide approximately 75 percent of the public water supply for Cheyenne, Wyoming. Samples of water and bottom sediment were collected and analyzed for selected physical, chemical, and biological characteristics to provide data about the reservoirs. Water flows between the reservoirs through a series of pipelines and stream channels. The reservoirs differ in physical characteristics such as elevation, volume, and depth.Profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, and pH were examined. Three of the four reservoirs exhibited stratification during the summer. The profiles indicate that stratification develops in all reservoirs except Lake Owen. Stratification developed in Rob Roy, Granite Springs, and Crystal Lake Reservoirs by mid-July in 1998 and continued until September, with the thickness of the epilimnion increasing during that time. Secchi disk readings indicated Rob Roy Reservoir had the clearest water of the four reservoirs studied.The composition of the phytoplankton community was different in the upper two reservoirs from that in the lower two reservoirs. Many of the species found in Rob Roy Reservoir and Lake Owen are associated with oligotrophic, nutrient-poor conditions. In contrast, many of the species found in Granite Springs and Crystal Lake Reservoirs are associated with mesotrophic or eutrophic conditions. The total number of taxa identified also increased downstream.The chemical water type in the reservoirs was similar, but dissolved-solids concentrations were greater in the downstream reservoirs. Water in all four reservoirs was a calcium-bicarbonate type. In the fall of 1997, Rob Roy Reservoir had the lowest dissolved-solids concentration (19 milligrams per liter), whereas

  12. Inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling by dexamethasone promotes adipocyte differentiation in mesenchymal progenitor cells, ROB-C26.

    PubMed

    Naito, Masako; Omoteyama, Kazuki; Mikami, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Tomihisa; Takagi, Minoru

    2012-12-01

    Dexamethasone (Dex) stimulates the differentiation of mesenchymal progenitor cells into adipocytes and osteoblasts. However, the mechanisms underlying Dex-induced differentiation have not been clearly elucidated. We examined the effect of Dex on the expression and activity of Wnt/β-catenin signal-related molecules in a clonal mesenchymal progenitor cell line, ROB-C26 (C26). Dex induced the mRNA expression of Wnt antagonists, dickkopf-1 (Dkk-1), and Wnt inhibitory factor (WIF)-1. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that the downregulation of β-catenin protein expression by Dex occured concomitantly with the increased expression of the PPARγ protein. Dex decreased phosphorylation of Ser9-GSK3β and expression of active β-catenin protein. To examine the effects of Dex on Wnt/β-catenin activity, we used immunocytochemistry to analyze TCF/LEF-mediated transcription during Dex-induced adipogenesis in Wnt indicator (TOPEGFP) C26 cells. Our results demonstrated that Dex repressed TCF/LEF-mediated transcription, but induced adipocyte differentiation. Treatment with a GSK3β inhibitor attenuated Dex-induced inhibition of TCF/LEF-mediated transcriptional activity, but suppressed Dex-induced adipocyte differentiation, indicating that adipocyte differentiation and inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin activity by Dex are mediated by GSK3β activity. Furthermore, β-catenin knockdown not only suppressed Dex-induced ALP-positive osteoblasts differentiation but also promoted Dex-induced adipocytes differentiation. These results suggest that inhibition of β-catenin expression by Dex promotes the differentiation of mesenchymal progenitor cells into adipocytes. PMID:22886144

  13. One-step "green" preparation of graphene nanosheets and carbon nanospheres mixture by electrolyzing graphite rob and its application for glucose biosensing.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huanshun; Zhou, Yunlei; Meng, Xiaomeng; Shang, Kun; Ai, Shiyun

    2011-12-15

    The graphene nanosheets and carbon nanospheres mixture (GNS-CNS) was prepared by electrolyzing graphite rob in KNO(3) solution under constant current, which was characterized by TEM, AFM, SEM, FT-IR, XRD, XPS, TGA and UV-vis. The nano-mixture can keep stable in water for more than one month. Based on this kind of mixture material, a novel electrochemical biosensing platform for glucose determination was developed. Cyclic voltammetry of glucose oxidase (GOD) immobilized on GNS-CNS/GCE exhibited a pair of well-defined quasi-reversible redox peaks at -0.488 V (E(pa)) and -0.509 V (E(pc)) by direct electron transfer between the protein and the electrode. The charge-transfer coefficient (α) was 0.51, the electron transfer rate constant was 2.64 s(-1) and the surface coverage of HRP was 3.18×10(-10) mol cm(-2). The immobilized GOD could retain its bioactivity and catalyze the reduction of dissolved oxygen. The glucose biosensor has a linear range from 0.4 to 20 mM with detection limit of 0.1 mM. Moreover, the biosensor exhibits acceptable reproducibility and storage stability. The fabricated biosensor was further used to determine glucose in human plasma sample with the recoveries from 96.83% to 105.52%. Therefore, GOD/GNS-CNS/GCE could be promisingly applied to determine blood sugar concentration in the practical clinical analysis. PMID:21959225

  14. Novel blaROB-1-bearing plasmid conferring resistance to β-lactams in Haemophilus parasuis isolates from healthy weaning pigs.

    PubMed

    Moleres, Javier; Santos-López, Alfonso; Lázaro, Isidro; Labairu, Javier; Prat, Cristina; Ardanuy, Carmen; González-Zorn, Bruno; Aragon, Virginia; Garmendia, Junkal

    2015-05-01

    Haemophilus parasuis, the causative agent of Glässer's disease, is one of the early colonizers of the nasal mucosa of piglets. It is prevalent in swine herds, and lesions associated with disease are fibrinous polyserositis and bronchopneumonia. Antibiotics are commonly used in disease control, and resistance to several antibiotics has been described in H. parasuis. Prediction of H. parasuis virulence is currently limited by our scarce understanding of its pathogenicity. Some genes have been associated with H. parasuis virulence, such as lsgB and group 1 vtaA, while biofilm growth has been associated with nonvirulent strains. In this study, 86 H. parasuis nasal isolates from farms that had not had a case of disease for more than 10 years were obtained by sampling piglets at weaning. Isolates were studied by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR and determination of the presence of lsgB and group 1 vtaA, biofilm formation, inflammatory cell response, and resistance to antibiotics. As part of the diversity encountered, a novel 2,661-bp plasmid, named pJMA-1, bearing the blaROB-1 β-lactamase was detected in eight colonizing strains. pJMA-1 was shown to share a backbone with other small plasmids described in the Pasteurellaceae, to be 100% stable, and to have a lower biological cost than the previously described plasmid pB1000. pJMA-1 was also found in nine H. parasuis nasal strains from a separate collection, but it was not detected in isolates from the lesions of animals with Glässer's disease or in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae isolates. Altogether, we show that commensal H. parasuis isolates represent a reservoir of β-lactam resistance genes which can be transferred to pathogens or other bacteria. PMID:25747001

  15. Projeto observatórios virtuais: educação através de telescópios robóticos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, P. H. S.; Shida, R. Y.

    2003-08-01

    O principal objetivo do projeto Observatórios Virtuais é o ensino na área de ciências através de atividades práticas desenvolvidas em colaboração entre instituições de pesquisa em astronomia e escolas de ensino médio e fundamental. Este ano deverá ser concluída a implantação do programa piloto de estudos, pesquisas e observação astronômica direta, com utilização em tempo real de telescópios robóticos, que assim funcionarão como "observatórios virtuais". O objetivo pedagógico das atividades práticas baseadas nas imagens atronômicas é desenvolver as habilidades e competências dos alunos no uso do método científico. Para isso, serão realizados projetos interdisciplinares, a partir de observações astronômicas, já que a astronomia é uma área interdisciplinar por excelência. Essas atividades terão níveis diferenciados de complexidade, que podem ser adequados aos vários graus do ensino e realidades regionais. Será dada ênfase ao desenvolvimento e aplicação em São Paulo, onde atua a equipe do IAG/USP. Como resultados apresentados no presente trabalho, temos a criação de um software em português para o processamento de imagens obtidas através de CCDs e a elaboração de material para as atividades educacionais relacionadas.

  16. Novel blaROB-1-Bearing Plasmid Conferring Resistance to β-Lactams in Haemophilus parasuis Isolates from Healthy Weaning Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Moleres, Javier; Santos-López, Alfonso; Lázaro, Isidro; Labairu, Javier; Prat, Cristina; Ardanuy, Carmen; González-Zorn, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis, the causative agent of Glässer's disease, is one of the early colonizers of the nasal mucosa of piglets. It is prevalent in swine herds, and lesions associated with disease are fibrinous polyserositis and bronchopneumonia. Antibiotics are commonly used in disease control, and resistance to several antibiotics has been described in H. parasuis. Prediction of H. parasuis virulence is currently limited by our scarce understanding of its pathogenicity. Some genes have been associated with H. parasuis virulence, such as lsgB and group 1 vtaA, while biofilm growth has been associated with nonvirulent strains. In this study, 86 H. parasuis nasal isolates from farms that had not had a case of disease for more than 10 years were obtained by sampling piglets at weaning. Isolates were studied by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR and determination of the presence of lsgB and group 1 vtaA, biofilm formation, inflammatory cell response, and resistance to antibiotics. As part of the diversity encountered, a novel 2,661-bp plasmid, named pJMA-1, bearing the blaROB-1 β-lactamase was detected in eight colonizing strains. pJMA-1 was shown to share a backbone with other small plasmids described in the Pasteurellaceae, to be 100% stable, and to have a lower biological cost than the previously described plasmid pB1000. pJMA-1 was also found in nine H. parasuis nasal strains from a separate collection, but it was not detected in isolates from the lesions of animals with Glässer's disease or in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae isolates. Altogether, we show that commensal H. parasuis isolates represent a reservoir of β-lactam resistance genes which can be transferred to pathogens or other bacteria. PMID:25747001

  17. Theoretical investigation on the bond dissociation enthalpies of phenolic compounds extracted from Artocarpus altilis using ONIOM(ROB3LYP/6-311++G(2df,2p):PM6) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thong, Nguyen Minh; Duong, Tran; Pham, Linh Thuy; Nam, Pham Cam

    2014-10-01

    Theoretical calculations have been performed to predict the antioxidant property of phenolic compounds extracted from Artocarpus altilis. The Osbnd H bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE), ionization energy (IE), and proton dissociation enthalpy (PDE) of the phenolic compounds have been computed. The ONIOM(ROB3LYP/6-311++G(2df,2p):PM6) method is able to provide reliable evaluation for the BDE(Osbnd H) in phenolic compounds. An important property of antioxidants is determined via the BDE(Osbnd H) of those compounds extracted from A. altilis. Based on the BDE(Osbnd H), compound 12 is considered as a potential antioxidant with the estimated BDE value of 77.3 kcal/mol in the gas phase.

  18. A hydrostable and twofold interpenetrating three-dimensional zinc-organic framework with rob topology based on 4,4'-oxydibenzoate and 3,3'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridine ligands.

    PubMed

    Liang, Feng Lan; Ma, De Yun; Qin, Liang

    2016-05-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a new class of porous materials that have received widespread attention due to their potential applications in gas storage and/or separation, catalysis, luminescence, and so on. The title compound, poly[[(μ2-3,3'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridine-κ(2)N:N')bis(μ4-4,4'-oxydibenzoato-κ(4)O:O':O'':O''')dizinc] tetrahydrate], {[Zn2(C14H8O5)2(C12H12N2)]·4H2O}n, has been prepared by the solvothermal assembly of Zn(NO3)2·6H2O, 4,4'-oxydi(benzoic acid) and 3,3'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridine. The two Zn(II) atoms adopt the same five-coordinated distorted square-pyramidal geometry (i.e. ZnO4N), bonding to four O atoms from four different 4,4'-oxydibenzoate (oba) ligands and one N atom from a 3,3'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridine (dmbpy) ligand. The supramolecular secondary building unit (SBU) is a paddle-wheel [Zn2(COO)4] unit and these units are linked by oba ligands within the layer to form a two-dimensional net parallel to the b axis, with the dmbpy ligands pointing alternately up and down, which is further extended by dmbpy ligands to form a three-dimensional framework with rob topology. The single net leaves voids that are filled by mutual interpenetration of an independent equivalent framework in a twofold interpenetrating architecture. The title compound shows thermal stability up to 673 K and is stable in aqueous solutions in the pH range 5-9. Excitation and luminescence data observed at room temperature show that it emits a bright-blue fluorescence. PMID:27146564

  19. Mixed-Methods Study that Examines Nine Science Teachers' Perceptions of Slooh Robotic Telescope for Teaching Astronomy. (Breton Title: Métodos Mistos de Estudo que Examinam a Percepção de Nove Professores de Ciências sobre o Telescópio Robótico Slooh Para Ensino de Astronomia.) Métodos Mixtos de Estudio que Examinan la Percepcion de Nueve Profesores de Ciencias sobre EL Telescopio Robótico Slooh Para la Enseñanza de la Astronomía

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershun, Daniel C.; Slater, Timothy F.; Berryhill, Katie J.

    2014-07-01

    Although previous studies show that robotic telescopes have the potential to enhance student learning, there is comparatively little research that focuses on teacher perceptions of this technology. This study investigates: "what is the academic merit of using SLOOH robotic telescopes to teach astronomy as perceived by science teachers?" Our sample consists of nine science teachers of students aged 13-18 years. Pre- and post-tests, interviews, and surveys were collected during two weeks of a summer online course about robotic telescopes. While pre and post-tests do not reveal a statistically significant gain in astronomy content knowledge, analysis of qualitative data reveals five themes which describe the most important aspects of using SLOOH according to participants: "Images," "Interface," "Classroom Application," "Instructor Impact," and "Logistical Issues." Analysis of these themes suggests that SLOOH can provide an interactive and social learning environment with capabilities to incorporate crossdisciplinary themes. Embora estudos anteriores mostram que os telescópios robóticos têm o potencial de melhorar a aprendizagem dos alunos, há relativamente pouca investigação focada nas percepções de professores a respeito desta tecnologia. Este estudo investiga: "qual é o mérito acadêmico da utilização de telescópios robóticos Slooh para ensinar astronomia, tal como percebido pelos professores de ciências?" Nossa amostra é composta por nove professores de ciências de estudantes com idades entre 13-18 anos pré e pós-testes, entrevistas, e levantamentos foram coletados durante duas semanas de um curso on-line de verão sobre telescópios robóticos. Enquanto os testes pré e pós não revelaram um ganho estatisticamente significativo no conhecimento do conteúdo astronomia, a análise de dados qualitativos revela cinco temas que descrevem os aspectos mais importantes da utilização Slooh de acordo aos participantes: "Imagens", "Interface", "Aplica

  20. Robbing the Bank with a Theorem Prover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clulow, Jolyon

    So it's a fairly provocative title, how did we get to that? Well automated tools have been successfully applied to modelling security protocols and finding attacks, and some good examples here are Gavin Lowe's work, using FDR to model the Needham-Shroeder protocols, and Larry Paulson's work using Isabella to prove the SET protocol secure. Now we come to the observation that security protocols, and security application programming interfaces are very closely related. So just to define what we mean by a security API here. We're talking devices that offer security services, that will obviously have some interface, typically the application programming interface, and unlike a normal API it also has to enforce policy onto the user, it has to make sure that keys remain secret, that PINs aren't revealed, and that users can't generally do things that would violate the security policy.

  1. Robbing the Bank with a Theorem Prover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Paul; Adida, Ben; Bond, Mike; Clulow, Jolyon; Herzog, Jonathan; Lin, Amerson; Rivest, Ronald L.; Anderson, Ross

    In this work, we present the first automated analysis of security application programming interfaces (security APIs). In particular, we analyze the API of the IBM 4758 CCA, a hardware security module for banking networks. Adapting techniques from formal analyses of security protocols, we model the API purely according its specification and assuming ideal encryption primitives. We then use the automated theorem-prover Otter to analyze this model, combining its standard reasoning strategies with novel techniques of our own (also presented here). In this way, we derive not only all published API-level attacks against the 4758 CCA, but an extension to these attacks as well. Thus, this work represents the first step toward fully-automated, rigorous analyses of security APIs.

  2. Robbing Peter...Balancing Collection Development and Reference Responsibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Null, David G.

    1988-01-01

    Examines problems of librarians responsible for both collection development and reference services, including time demands, unclear supervisory lines, and misunderstanding of collection development. The discussion includes suggestions for improving this situation, e.g., formal reporting lines for both areas, increased communication among…

  3. Chemistry, 2nd Edition (by Rob Lewis and Wynne Evans)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conover, Wheeler

    2002-04-01

    In summary, what American course would be best served with this text? Probably not a GOB course, because it contains too much math. Probably not a general chemistry course, because it contains not enough math--although more math would then make it an ideal text for general chemistry. Maybe a course in applied chemistry for two-year-college students--but it would be a tough sell, given the availability of such books as Zumdahl's Introductory Chemistry or Stoker's Introduction to Chemical Principles for that set. Perhaps we'll develop a course called "Honors Applied Chemistry" and use it there. Until then, it will remain in my collection as a reference.

  4. Doing This At Bedtime Could Temporarily Rob Your Sight

    MedlinePlus

    ... their smartphone, said Plant, senior author of a paper on the phenomenon. Luckily, it's a temporary condition ... damage, he added. Plant said he wrote the paper because these people might think they've suffered ...

  5. Robbed of Humanity: Lives of Guatemalan Street Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, Nancy Leigh

    The situation for "street children" has degenerated over the past two decades following the economic and political transitions in much of Latin America. Drawing on scholarly materials, interviews with child rights advocates, and the words of the children themselves, this book explores the abuse, limited choices, despair, loyalty, and remarkable…

  6. Doing This At Bedtime Could Temporarily Rob Your Sight

    MedlinePlus

    ... That way, both eyes will maintain the same adaptation to light, he said. Another eye specialist agreed. " ... always thinking of something as simple" as light adaptation, said Khurana, an expert with the American Academy ...

  7. Bush's 2008 Budget: "Robbing Peter to Pay Pell"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainard, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    A few days before President Bush officially released his 2008 budget, administration officials announced that it would contain a historic increase in the maximum Pell Grant. The increase in Pell Grants would be paid for by cutting subsidies for student loans, a step that experts predicted could induce lenders to offer fewer benefits to borrowers.…

  8. Robbing Peter to Pay Paul: The Case Against "Comparability"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Kate

    2007-01-01

    Two proposals in the bill currently circulating to reauthorize No Child Left Behind seem to be shoe-ins for making their way into federal law. The impetus behind both proposals is to help poor kids by making sure that districts spend as much money on them as gets spent on rich kids. Going against the grain, the National Council on Teacher Quality…

  9. 75 FR 57664 - Airworthiness Directives; G ROB-WERKE Model G120A Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ... Executive Order 12866; (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR...-1054 have been found cracked during regular maintenance. Structural failure of the ribs may cause failure of the middle flap support which may lead to flap asymmetry due to excessive flap deformation...

  10. Robbing Peter To Pay Paul: Resolving the Contradiction of Lifelong Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    Initial education has been the focus of policy, resulting in higher participation rates and attainment. However, adult rates of participation and qualification have received less attention and are decreasing. One solution might be to break the link between education and human capital investment and foster a vision of lifelong learning as valuable…

  11. Robbing Peter to Pay Paul: The Price of Standards-Driven Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingleby, Ewan

    2010-01-01

    This article presents research findings on mentoring within PCET ITT (Post-Compulsory Education and Training Initial Teacher Training). The research has identified that mentors and mentees consider that the role of the mentor is unclear. Moreover, mentors are unsure of the aims of PCET ITT programmes. The inconsistency of mentor training…

  12. Another Woman Gets Robbed? What Jung, Freud, Piaget, and Vygotsky Took from Sabina Spielrein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldridge, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    Certainly not as many who have heard the names of Carl Jung, Sigmund Freud, Jean Piaget, and Lev Vygotsky, have heard of Sabina Spielrein. While Spielrein had numerous face-to-face encounters, some personal and some professional, with all four men, and the accounting of her life and the interactions she had with them has been the content of…

  13. Robbing Public to Pay Private? Two Cases of Refinancing Education Infrastructure in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crump, Stephen; Slee, Roger

    2005-01-01

    This paper will explore private sector participation in public sector education in the Australian context, focusing on case studies of Queensland and New South Wales, with reference to developments in other states and territories and internationally. In Australia, most states and territories have PPP policies and key projects include the Southbank…

  14. Was Rumpelstiltskin Robbed? Using Fairy Tales to Promote Higher Level Thinking Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rycik, Mary Taylor; Rycik, James A.

    1990-01-01

    Recommends using fairy tales to help students use higher-order thinking skills. Offers reading activities designed to promote analysis, synthesis, and evaluation while preserving the magic and fun of fairy tales. (MG)

  15. Trichomes and chemical composition of the volatile oil of Trichogonia cinerea (Gardner) R. M. King & H. Rob. (Eupatorieae, Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Yanne S; Trindade, Luma M P; Rezende, Maria Helena; Paula, José R; Gonçalves, Letícia A

    2016-03-01

    Trichogonia cinerea is endemic to Brazil and occurs in areas of cerrado and campo rupestre. In this study, we characterized the glandular and non-glandular trichomes on the aerial parts of this species, determined the principal events in the development of the former, and identified the main constituents of the volatile oil produced in its aerial organs. Fully expanded leaves, internodes, florets, involucral bracts, and stem apices were used for the characterization of trichomes. Leaves, internodes, florets, and involucral bracts were examined by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, whereas stem apices were examined only by light microscopy. Branches in the reproductive phase were used for the extraction and determination of the composition of the volatile oil. The species has three types of glandular trichomes, biseriate vesicular, biseriate pedunculate, and multicellular uniseriate, which secrete volatile oils and phenolic compounds. The major components identified in the volatile oil were 3,5-muuroladiene (39.56%) and butylated hydroxytoluene (13.07%). PMID:26982621

  16. Commemorating the 20th century Darwin: Ernst Mayr's words and thoughts, five years later. Interview by Rob J. Kulathinal.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Ernst

    2010-02-01

    It has been five years since Ernst Mayr, one of the most influential evolutionary biologists of the last century, passed away. Mayr's seminal work as a naturalist and, in particular, as a bird systematist allowed him to approach the species problem in a revolutionary way. As a leading architect of the Modern Evolutionary Synthesis, Mayr helped integrate Darwinian theory with the broad fields of systematics and genetics. We pay tribute to this legend by publishing an interview taken shortly before his death. PMID:20140034

  17. An Industrial Perspective of CAM/ROB Fuzzy Integrated Postprocessing Implementation for Redundant Robotic Workcells Applicability for Big Volume Prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés, J.; Gracia, L.; Tornero, J.; García, J. A.; González, F.

    2009-11-01

    The implementation of a postprocessor for the NX™ platform (Siemens Corp.) is described in this paper. It is focused on a milling redundant robotic milling workcell consisting of one KUKA KR 15/2 manipulator (6 rotary joints, KRC2 controller) mounted on a linear axis and synchronized with a rotary table (i.e., two additional joints). For carrying out a milling task, a choice among a set of possible configurations is required, taking into account the ability to avoid singular configurations by using both additional joints. Usually, experience and knowledge of the workman allow an efficient control in these cases, but being it a tedious job. Similarly to this expert knowledge, a stand-alone fuzzy controller has been programmed with Matlab's Fuzzy Logic Toolbox (The MathWorks, Inc.). Two C++ programs complement the translation of the toolpath tracking (expressed in the Cartesian space) from the NX™-CAM module into KRL (KUKA Robot Language). In order to avoid singularities or joint limits, the location of the robot and the workpiece during the execution of the task is fit after an inverse kinematics position analysis and a fuzzy inference (i.e., fuzzy criterion in the Joint Space). Additionally, the applicability of robot arms for the manufacture of big volume prototypes with this technique is proven by means of one case studied. It consists of a big orographic model to simulate floodways, return flows and retention storage of a reservoir in the Mijares river (Puebla de Arenoso, Spain). This article deals with the problem for a constant tool orientation milling process and sets the technological basis for future research at five axis milling operations.

  18. Calculated properties of some oxoborons R-B≡) and their higher energy isomers R-O=B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Minh Tho; Groarke, Peter J.; Ha, Tae-Kyu

    Ab initio molecular orbital calculations have been employed to study four simple oxoboron molecules, XBO (X = H, F, Cl and CH3) and their isomers XOB. Several properties of oxoborons including the geometries, rotational constants, vibrational wavenumbers, thermochemical parameters and nuclear quadrupole coupling constants have been calculated and thereby predicted using appropriate correction schemes based on available experimental data. Energy barriers for the 1,2-shifts obtained at the MP4/DZP level using MP2/DZP-geometries suggest that, while HOB and CH3OB are relatively stable with respect to unimolecular rearrangement (energy barrier of about 25 kcal mol-1), FOB and ClOB are unstable in this regard. The former have bent equilibrium structures and their energy is quite high relative to their oxoboron isomers (≥ 50 kcal mol-1). An analysis based on the Boys' localized orbitals and molecular electrostatic potentials discloses that during the 1,2-shifts, the migrating group (H or CH3) behaves essentially as a cationic species moving between two electron pairs.

  19. ULTRASONIC ENHANCEMENT OF THE REMOVAL OF HEAVY METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA GRANT NUMBER: R828598C020
    Title: Ultrasonic Enhancement of the Removal of Heavy Metals
    Investigators: Dennis Truax, Krishnan Balasubramaniam
    Institution: Mississippi State University
    EPA Project Officer: S. Bala Krishnan
    ...

  20. INTEGRATED PETROLEUM ENVIRONMENTAL CONSORTIUM (IPEC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA GRANT NUMBER: R827015
    Title: Integrated Petroleum Environmental Consortium (IPEC)
    Investigator: Kerry L. Sublette
    Institution: University of Tulsa
    EPA Project Officer: S. Bala Krishnan
    Project Period: October 1, 19...

  1. Identity and generic placement of Phestinia costella Hampson (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae: Phycitinae) reared on the invasive plant Chromolaena odorata (L.) R. M. King & H. Rob (Asteraceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We provide descriptions and illustrations for identification of Phestinia costella Hampson, a stem gall producer on the invasive plant Chromolaena odorata (L.) R. M. King & H. Robinson (Asteraceae) that has been investigated for biological control measures. Specimens collected from C. odorata on Tr...

  2. Robertsonian Translocations: An Overview of 872 Robertsonian Translocations Identified in a Diagnostic Laboratory in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fan; Jiang, Shuai; Su, Hui; Liang, Jianfen; Deng, Chunhua; Hu, Chaohui; Yu, Shihui

    2015-01-01

    Robertsonian translocations (ROBs) have an estimated incidence rate of 1/1000 births, making this type of rearrangement the most common structural chromosomal abnormalities seen in the general population. In this study, we reports 872 cases of ROBs from 205,001 specimens karyotyped postnatally in a single accredited laboratory in China, including 583 balanced ROBs, 264 unbalanced ROBs, 9 mosaic ROBs, and 18 complex ROBs. Ninety-three percent of the balanced ROBs observed were adults with infertility, miscarriage, or offspring(s) with known chromosomal abnormalities. Significant excess of females were found to be carriers of balanced ROBs with an adjusted male/female ratio of 0.77. Ninety-eight percent of the unbalanced ROBs observed were children with variable referral reasons. Almost all of the unbalanced ROBs involved chromosome 21 except a single ROB with [46,XX,der(13;14),+13] identified in a newborn girl with multiple congenital anomalies. Multiple novel ROB karyotypes were reported in this report. This study represents the largest collections of ROBs in Chinese population. PMID:25932913

  3. Flexibility in Management of Modernization in Construction - Electrical Works/ Elastyczność W Zarządzaniu Modernizacją Obiektów Budowlanych Na Przykładzie Robót Elektrycznych

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowotarski, Piotr; Pasławski, Jerzy

    2015-06-01

    The article presents the general principles of flexible approach, illustrated with case study regarding flexibility in modernization. Flexibility is understood in the present case as a skilful adaptation to changes in the dynamically changing environment. The essence of flexibility approach is being staged to make decisions based on environmental and process monitoring in progress. Presented case study of upgrading the electrical system in the multi-family housing in the common area is based on step by step procedure responding to damage state of this system. Simple analysis is based on cost comparison but there are other criteria (environmental, social etc.) and conflict solving situations taken into account in presented paper. Artykuł prezentuje możliwość zastosowania elastyczności w modernizacjach istniejących obiektów budowlanych na przykładzie instalacji oświetleniowej. Elastyczność jest rozumiana w tym przypadku jako umiejętne dostosowanie się do zmian w dynamicznie zmieniającym się środowisku. Istotą podejścia elastycznego jest podejmowanie odpowiednich decyzji w odpowiednim czasie opartych na monitoringu środowiska i procesu w toku. Prezentowane studium przypadku modernizacji instalacji elektrycznej w budownictwie wielorodzinnym w częściach wspólnych obiektu (korytarze, klatki schodowe, hala garażowa) opiera się na wymianie i modernizacji tylko tych punktów, które w danym momencie ulegają awarii. Prosta analiza oby typów modernizacji opiera się na porównaniu kosztów, natomiast trzeba zaznaczyć, że możliwe są także inne kryteria (środowiskowe, konfliktu społecznego, itp.), które będą przedmiotem kolejnych publikacji. Zastąpienie tradycyjnych żarówek rozwiązaniami opartymi na technologii LED z zastosowaniem czujników ruchu może prowadzić do znacznych oszczędności, ale może też oznaczać obniżenie komfortu dla użytkowników (np. dla osób starszych, którym jeden cykl działania oświetlenia nie jest wystarczający do pokonania całej drogi na korytarzu). Osiągnięcie kompromisu w tego typu konfliktach interesów może być rozwiązane za pomocą podejścia elastycznego i zwinnego.

  4. THE USE OF FLY ASH IN THE PRODUCTION OF SIALON BASED STRUCTURAL CERAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA GRANT NUMBER: X832541C004
    Title: The Use of Fly Ash in the Production of SiAlON based Structural Ceramics
    Investigator: James R. Varner
    Institution: Alfred University
    EPA Project Officer: S. Bala Krishnan
    Project Perio...

  5. EVALUATION OF DRINKING WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR REMOVAL OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of Drinking Water Treatment Technologies for Removal of Endocrine Disruptors. Schenck, K*, Speth, T, U.S. EPA, Cincinnati, OH, USA, Rosenblum, L, Wendelken, S, Pepich, B, and Krishnan, R, Shaw Environmental, Inc., Cincinnati, OH, USA. Many of the chemicals identified...

  6. Quantum communication in the presence of a horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Daiqin; Ralph, T. C.

    2014-10-01

    Based on homodyne detection, we discuss how the presence of an event horizon affects quantum communication between an inertial partner, Alice, and a uniformly accelerated partner, Rob. We show that there exists a low frequency cutoff for Rob's homodyne detector that maximizes the signal to noise ratio and it approximately corresponds to the Unruh frequency. In addition, the low frequency cutoff which minimizes the conditional variance between Alice's input state and Rob's output state is also approximately equal to the Unruh frequency. Thus the Unruh frequency provides a natural low frequency cutoff in order to optimize quantum communication of both classical and quantum information between Alice and Rob.

  7. 76 FR 28421 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). ACTION... Service, Fisheries Statistics Division, Phone: (301) 713-2328 or Rob.Andrews@noaa.gov ....

  8. William Foster's Legacy: Learning from the Past and Reconstructing the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Gary L.

    2004-01-01

    William Foster's recent death not only robbed us of a good friend and a gentle soul but it also robbed the field of his ongoing wisdom about educational leadership. This article will attempt to pick up some threads of the thought that he left in his last manuscript, "The Decline of the Local." Foster's discussion of new technologies of thought…

  9. AN APPLIED ONTOLOGY TO THE MID-ATLANTIC CABLE: HISTORICAL TO MODERN INFORMATICS CONSIDERATION FROM A MATH PERSPECTIVE KAIEM L. FRINK ELIZABETH CITY STATE UNIVERSITY(ECSU)KAIEM_FRINK@HOTMAIL.COM, DR. DEWAYNE B. BRANCH ECSU, DR. ROB RASKIN JET PROPULSIONS LABORATORY GLENDA THOMAS ECSU,KENNETH JONES ECSU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frink, K.; Branch, B. D.; Raskin, R.

    2009-12-01

    As early as the 1600's scientists in various fields world to address a global human need of human communication on a global basis by implementing the trans-Atlantic cable. The Mid 4Trans-Atlantic cable is one of the earliest forms of global commutation. Here may be the first evidence of informatics needs where science, data, and engineering were collaborated across disciplines to advance a world standard of living. This work investigates what applied ontology may have been consisting with the thought pattern of such expertise who conducted informatics arguably without computers, ontology’s, and a cyber infrastructure. In modern context, an applied ontology may best represent the body of intentional learning, research and collaboration among scientists to achieve a human goal. Perhaps if such intentional non-partisan work can achieve a solution such as Trans-Atlantic Cable, climate change may benefit from intentional collaborative ontology’s and systems of multi user knowledgebase or expert informatics systems. 1Bruce C. Heezen 1924 -1977 American Geologist famous for mapping the Mid Atlantic Mountain Ridge in the 1950’s. Heezen died in 1977 on a submarine cruise to study the Mid-Atlantic ridge near Ice land aboard the NR-1 submarine. 7Marie Tharp academic background is Bachelors Degree in English, Master Degree in Geology University of Michigan, and Mathematics Degree at the University of Tulsa. Tharp worked at Lamont- Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University. History of the Digital Divide during the 1600’s touches on the availability of information. 3Issue of Mathematics during the 1600’s would be lack of communications and assessment. The scientific communities cannot address climate change most largely due to language barriers amongst humans. Weight per meter for the cable and the ships weight capacity in the 1600’sWeight/per meter 2w/m=X1 taking into account that maximum depths or Atlantic Ocean was unknown at that time and still is.

  10. Obligate short-arm exchange in de novo Robertsonian translocation formation influences placement of crossovers in chromosome 21 nondisjunction.

    PubMed

    Berend, Sue Ann; Page, Scott L; Atkinson, William; McCaskill, Christopher; Lamb, Neil E; Sherman, Stephanie L; Shaffer, Lisa G

    2003-02-01

    Robertsonian translocations (ROBs) involving chromosome 21 are found in approximately 5% of patients with Down syndrome (DS). The most common nonhomologous ROB in DS is rob(14q21q). Aberrant recombination is associated with nondisjunction (NDJ) leading to trisomy 21. Haplotype analysis of 23 patients with DS and de novo rob(14q21q) showed that all translocations and all nondisjoined chromosomes 21 were maternally derived. Meiosis II NDJ occurred in 21 of 23 families. For these, a ROB DS chromosome 21 genetic map was constructed and compared to a normal female map and a published trisomy 21 map derived from meiosis II NDJ. The location of exchanges differed significantly from both maps, with a significant shift to a more distal interval in the ROB DS map. The shift may perturb segregation, leading to the meiosis II NDJ in this study, and is further evidence for crossover interference. More importantly, because the event in the short arms that forms the de novo ROB influences the placement of chiasmata in the long arm, it is most likely that the translocation formation occurs through a recombination pathway in meiosis. Additionally, we have demonstrated that events that occur in meiosis I can influence events, such as chromatid segregation in meiosis II, many decades later. PMID:12506337

  11. Physical and chemical characterization of residential oil boiler emissions.

    PubMed

    Hays, Michael D; Beck, Lee; Barfield, Pamela; Lavrich, Richard J; Dong, Yuanji; Vander Wal, Randy L

    2008-04-01

    The toxicity of emissions from the combustion of home heating oil coupled with the regional proximity and seasonal use of residential oil boilers (ROB) is an important public health concern. Yet scant physical and chemical information about the emissions from this source is available for climate and air quality modeling and for improving our understanding of aerosol-related human health effects. The gas- and particle-phase emissions from an active ROB firing distillate fuel oil (commonly known as diesel fuel) were evaluated to address this deficiency. Ion chromatography of impactor samples showed that the ultrafine ROB aerosol emissions were approximately 45% (w/w) sulfate. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detected various n-alkanes at trace levels, sometimes in accumulation mode particles, and out of phase with the size distributions of aerosol mass and sulfate. The carbonaceous matter in the ROB aerosol was primarily light-adsorbing elemental carbon. Gas chromatography-atomic emission spectroscopy measured a previously unrecognized organosulfur compound group in the ROB aerosol emissions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of ROB soot indicated the presence of a highly ordered primary particle nanostructure embedded in larger aggregates. Organic gas emissions were measured using EPA Methods TO-15 and TO-11A. The ROB emitted volatile oxygenates (8 mg/(kg of oil burned)) and olefins (5 mg/(kg of oil burned)) mostly unrelated to the base fuel composition. In the final analysis, the ROB tested was a source of numerous hazardous air pollutants as defined in the Clean Air Act Amendments. Approximations conducted using emissions data from the ROB tests show relatively low contributions to a regional-level anthropogenic emissions inventory for volitile organic compounds, PM2.5, and SO2 mass. PMID:18504987

  12. Parameter estimation using NOON states over a relativistic quantum channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosler, Dominic; Kok, Pieter

    2013-11-01

    We study the effect of the acceleration of the observer on a parameter estimation protocol using NOON states. An inertial observer, Alice, prepares a NOON state in Unruh modes of the quantum field, and sends it to an accelerated observer, Rob. We calculate the quantum Fisher information of the state received by Rob. We find the counterintuitive result that the single-rail encoding outperforms the dual rail. The NOON states have an optimal N for the maximum information extractable by Rob, given his acceleration. This optimal N decreases with increasing acceleration.

  13. Disentanglement of two harmonic oscillators in relativistic motion

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.-Y.; Chou, C.-H.; Hu, B. L.

    2008-12-15

    We study the dynamics of quantum entanglement between two Unruh-DeWitt detectors, one stationary (Alice), and another uniformly accelerating (Rob), with no direct interaction but coupled to a common quantum field in (3+1)D Minkowski space. We find that for all cases studied the initial entanglement between the detectors disappears in a finite time ('sudden death'). After the moment of total disentanglement the correlations between the two detectors remain nonzero until late times. The relation between the disentanglement time and Rob's proper acceleration is observer dependent. The larger the acceleration is, the longer the disentanglement time in Alice's coordinate, but the shorter in Rob's coordinate.

  14. Risk of Bias in Systematic Reviews of Non-Randomized Studies of Adverse Cardiovascular Effects of Thiazolidinediones and Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors: Application of a New Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool

    PubMed Central

    Bilandzic, Anja; Fitzpatrick, Tiffany; Rosella, Laura; Henry, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Systematic reviews of the effects of healthcare interventions frequently include non-randomized studies. These are subject to confounding and a range of other biases that are seldom considered in detail when synthesizing and interpreting the results. Our aims were to assess the reliability and usability of a new Cochrane risk of bias (RoB) tool for non-randomized studies of interventions and to determine whether restricting analysis to studies with low or moderate RoB made a material difference to the results of the reviews. Methods and Findings We selected two systematic reviews of population-based, controlled non-randomized studies of the relationship between the use of thiazolidinediones (TZDs) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors and major cardiovascular events. Two epidemiologists applied the Cochrane RoB tool and made assessments across the seven specified domains of bias for each of 37 component studies. Inter-rater agreement was measured using the weighted Kappa statistic. We grouped studies according to overall RoB and performed statistical pooling for (a) all studies and (b) only studies with low or moderate RoB. Kappa scores across the seven bias domains ranged from 0.50 to 1.0. In the COX-2 inhibitor review, two studies had low overall RoB, 14 had moderate RoB, and five had serious RoB. In the TZD review, six studies had low RoB, four had moderate RoB, four had serious RoB, and two had critical RoB. The pooled odds ratios for myocardial infarction, heart failure, and death for rosiglitazone versus pioglitazone remained significantly elevated when analyses were confined to studies with low or moderate RoB. However, the estimate for myocardial infarction declined from 1.14 (95% CI 1.07–1.24) to 1.06 (95% CI 0.99–1.13) when analysis was confined to studies with low RoB. Estimates of pooled relative risks of cardiovascular events with COX-2 inhibitors compared with no nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug changed little when analyses were

  15. Living Well with Parkinson's Disease is an Art | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... about Parkinson's. Photo courtesy of Rob Cunningham When did you first get diagnosed with Parkinson's disease? What ... took up painting after you were diagnosed. How did you decide to do that? Does your condition ...

  16. Guidelines for growing perennial grasses for biofuel and bioproducts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guidelines for growing perennial grasses for biofuel and bioproducts Rob Mitchell Abstract: Switchgrass, big bluestem, and warm-season grass mixtures provide numerous benefits. Existing field equipment, herbicides, and cultivar improvement promote rapid establishment in the planting year. These gra...

  17. Tiny Asteroid Approaches Earth

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Oct. 15, 2010, NASA astronomer Rob Suggs captured this view of the tiny asteroid 2010 TG19 as it made its way among the stars of the constellation Pegasus. It will continue to approach during th...

  18. Asthma Inhalers

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduce the release of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) into the atmosphere when taking certain asthma medications. Until recently, most ... hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) inhalers, that do not rob the atmosphere of ozone. “The FDA [Food and Drug Administration] ...

  19. Sailing on the "Boundless and Bottomless Sea": A View from the OIA Bridge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrens, Rob

    2015-01-01

    The prevention and resolution of student complaints are critical factors in maintaining and improving the student experience. Rob Behrens looks at the wider context, drawing on lessons from beyond higher education, to examine the opportunities and possible pitfalls.

  20. ISS Update: Progress 50 Launch and Docking with Tom Erkenswick

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Rob Navias conducts an interview with Visiting Vehicle Officer Tom Erkenswick about the launch of the ISS Progress 50 resupply ship and its docking to the International ...

  1. Robert Ambrose: Principal Investigator, Game Changing Development Program

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. Rob Ambrose is currently overseeing one very large existing project and will likely be overseeing several new starts in the near future. In addition, he has three projects: Human Robotic System...

  2. ISS Update: NASA Astronaut Mike Fincke

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Rob Navias talks with NASA Astronaut Mike Fincke inside the Mission Control Center at Johnson Space Center. They discuss the current activities taking place aboard the I...

  3. 28 CFR Appendix to Subpart Q of... - Confinement of Persons in District of Columbia Correctional Institutions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... violence means murder, manslaughter, rape, kidnapping, robbery, burglary, assault with intent to kill, assault with intent to rape, assault with intent to rob or extortion involving the threat or use...

  4. 28 CFR Appendix to Subpart Q of... - Confinement of Persons in District of Columbia Correctional Institutions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... violence means murder, manslaughter, rape, kidnapping, robbery, burglary, assault with intent to kill, assault with intent to rape, assault with intent to rob or extortion involving the threat or use...

  5. Welcome Back to Earth

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA astronaut Scott Kelly is interviewed by public affairs officer Rob Navias just after returning to Earth aboard a Soyuz spacecraft on March 1, 2016 (March 2, local Kazakh time) following a 340 ...

  6. Reversing the Literacy Decline by Controlling the Electronic Demons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shenkman, Harriet

    1985-01-01

    Computer games, rock video, television, and movies are robbing teenagers of time they should be using to develop their minds. However, the electronic media do have a positive potential. A 10-item reference list is provided. (Author/DCS)

  7. NASA Now: Forces and Motion: Project Morpheus

    NASA Video Gallery

    Meet NASA engineer Rob Morehead who works on the main engines for Project Morpheus, a revolutionary new robotic lander. Morpheus is a full spacecraft and rocket-powered lander, which demonstrates n...

  8. ISS Update: Keeping Track of Station Inventory – 03.14.13

    NASA Video Gallery

    Public Affairs Officer Dan Huot interviews Rob Adams, Inventory and Stowage Officer, inside the Mission Control Center. Adams and his team keep track of the gear aboard the International Space Stat...

  9. Thermal bath of Dirac field in non-inertial frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Anwei

    2016-07-01

    The properties of inertial Dirac thermal bath viewed from the perspective of a uniformly accelerated observer is investigated. Using the single-mode approximation, we obtain the expression of the thermal reduced density matrix, which is constructed by the effective partition function in another way compared with the case of scalar field. We deduce the spectrum of particles and antiparticles seen by Rob and antiRob, respectively. It is found that the fermionic thermal bath will suppress the appearance of Unruh particles.

  10. SYRCLE’s risk of bias tool for animal studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Systematic Reviews (SRs) of experimental animal studies are not yet common practice, but awareness of the merits of conducting such SRs is steadily increasing. As animal intervention studies differ from randomized clinical trials (RCT) in many aspects, the methodology for SRs of clinical trials needs to be adapted and optimized for animal intervention studies. The Cochrane Collaboration developed a Risk of Bias (RoB) tool to establish consistency and avoid discrepancies in assessing the methodological quality of RCTs. A similar initiative is warranted in the field of animal experimentation. Methods We provide an RoB tool for animal intervention studies (SYRCLE’s RoB tool). This tool is based on the Cochrane RoB tool and has been adjusted for aspects of bias that play a specific role in animal intervention studies. To enhance transparency and applicability, we formulated signalling questions to facilitate judgment. Results The resulting RoB tool for animal studies contains 10 entries. These entries are related to selection bias, performance bias, detection bias, attrition bias, reporting bias and other biases. Half these items are in agreement with the items in the Cochrane RoB tool. Most of the variations between the two tools are due to differences in design between RCTs and animal studies. Shortcomings in, or unfamiliarity with, specific aspects of experimental design of animal studies compared to clinical studies also play a role. Conclusions SYRCLE’s RoB tool is an adapted version of the Cochrane RoB tool. Widespread adoption and implementation of this tool will facilitate and improve critical appraisal of evidence from animal studies. This may subsequently enhance the efficiency of translating animal research into clinical practice and increase awareness of the necessity of improving the methodological quality of animal studies. PMID:24667063

  11. Poor Reliability between Cochrane Reviewers and Blinded External Reviewers When Applying the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool in Physical Therapy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Armijo-Olivo, Susan; Ospina, Maria; da Costa, Bruno R.; Egger, Matthias; Saltaji, Humam; Fuentes, Jorge; Ha, Christine; Cummings, Greta G.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To test the inter-rater reliability of the RoB tool applied to Physical Therapy (PT) trials by comparing ratings from Cochrane review authors with those of blinded external reviewers. Methods Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in PT were identified by searching the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for meta-analysis of PT interventions. RoB assessments were conducted independently by 2 reviewers blinded to the RoB ratings reported in the Cochrane reviews. Data on RoB assessments from Cochrane reviews and other characteristics of reviews and trials were extracted. Consensus assessments between the two reviewers were then compared with the RoB ratings from the Cochrane reviews. Agreement between Cochrane and blinded external reviewers was assessed using weighted kappa (κ). Results In total, 109 trials included in 17 Cochrane reviews were assessed. Inter-rater reliability on the overall RoB assessment between Cochrane review authors and blinded external reviewers was poor (κ  =  0.02, 95%CI: −0.06, 0.06]). Inter-rater reliability on individual domains of the RoB tool was poor (median κ  = 0.19), ranging from κ  =  −0.04 (“Other bias”) to κ  =  0.62 (“Sequence generation”). There was also no agreement (κ  =  −0.29, 95%CI: −0.81, 0.35]) in the overall RoB assessment at the meta-analysis level. Conclusions Risk of bias assessments of RCTs using the RoB tool are not consistent across different research groups. Poor agreement was not only demonstrated at the trial level but also at the meta-analysis level. Results have implications for decision making since different recommendations can be reached depending on the group analyzing the evidence. Improved guidelines to consistently apply the RoB tool and revisions to the tool for different health areas are needed. PMID:24824199

  12. Relativistic Quantum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosler, Dominic

    In this Ph.D. thesis, I investigate the communication abilities of non-inertial observers and the precision to which they can measure parametrized states. I introduce relativistic quantum field theory with field quantisation, and the definition and transformations of mode functions in Minkowski, Schwarzschild and Rindler spaces. I introduce information theory by discussing the nature of information, defining the entropic information measures, and highlighting the differences between classical and quantum information. I review the field of relativistic quantum information. We investigate the communication abilities of an inertial observer to a relativistic observer hovering above a Schwarzschild black hole, using the Rindler approximation. We compare both classical communication and quantum entanglement generation of the state merging protocol, for both the single and dual rail encodings. We find that while classical communication remains finite right up to the horizon, the quantum entanglement generation tends to zero. We investigate the observers' abilities to precisely measure the parameter of a state that is communicated between Alice and Rob. This parameter was encoded to either the amplitudes of a single excitation state or the phase of a NOON state. With NOON states the dual rail encoding provided greater precision, which is different to the results for the other situations. The precision was maximum for a particular number of excitations in the NOON state. We calculated the bipartite communication for Alice-Rob and Alice-AntiRob beyond the single mode approximation. Rob and AntiRob are causally disconnected counter-accelerating observers. We found that Alice must choose in advance with whom, Rob or AntiRob she wants to create entanglement using a particular setup. She could communicate classically to both.

  13. Risk of Bias Tool in Systematic Reviews/Meta-Analyses of Acupuncture in Chinese Journals

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yali; Yang, Shengping; Dai, Junjie; Xu, Yongteng; Zhang, Rui; Jiang, Huaili; Yan, Xianxia; Yang, Kehu

    2011-01-01

    Background Use of a risk of bias (ROB) tool has been encouraged and advocated to reviewers writing systematic reviews (SRs) and meta-analyses (MAs). Selective outcome reporting and other sources of bias are included in the Cochrane ROB tool. It is important to know how this specific tool for assessing ROB has been applied since its release. Our objectives were to evaluate whether and to what extent the new Cochrane ROB tool has been used in Chinese journal papers of acupuncture. Methods We searched CBM, TCM database, CJFD, CSJD, and the Wanfang Database from inception to March 2011. Two reviewers independently selected SRs that primarily focused on acupuncture and moxibustion, from which the data was extracted and analyzed. Results A total of 836 SRs were identified from the search, of which, 105 were included and four are awaiting assessment. Thirty-six of the 105 SRs were published before release of the Cochrane ROB tool (up to 2009). Most used the Cochrane Handbook 4.2 or Jadad's scale for risk or quality assessment. From 2009 to March 2011 69 SRs were identified. While “risk of bias” was reported for approximately two-thirds of SRs, only two SRs mentioned use of a “risk of bias tool” in their assessment. Only 5.8% (4/69) of reviews reported information on all six domains which are involved in the ROB tool. A risk of bias graph/summary figure was provided in 2.9% (2/69) of reviews. Most SRs gave information about sequence generation, allocation concealment, blindness, and incomplete outcome data, however, few reviews (5.8%; 4/69) described selective reporting or other potential sources of bias. Conclusions The Cochrane “risk of bias” tool has not been used in all SRs/MAs of acupuncture published in Chinese Journals after 2008. When the ROB tool was used, reporting of relevant information was often incomplete. PMID:22174772

  14. Chinese Herbal Medicine and Fluorouracil-Based Chemotherapy for Colorectal Cancer: A Quality-Adjusted Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Michael; Ly, Helen; Broffman, Michael; See, Caylie; Clemons, Jen; Chang, Raymond

    2016-09-01

    Background Chinese herbal medicines reportedly increase efficacy and minimize toxicity of chemotherapy; however, little attention has been paid to how poor study quality can bias outcomes. Methods We systematically searched MEDLINE, TCMLARS, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library for randomized controlled trials of Chinese herbal medicines combined with fluorouracil-based chemotherapy compared with the same chemotherapy alone. We screened for eligibility, extracted data, and pooled data with random-effects meta-analysis. Outcome measures were survival, toxicity, tumor response, performance status, quality of life, and Cochrane Risk of Bias (ROB) criteria to critically evaluate the quality of reporting in the randomized trials included in the meta-analysis. Results We found 36 potentially eligible studies, with only 3 (those with low ROB) qualifying for meta-analysis. Two reported chemotherapy-related diarrhea reduced by 57% (relative risk [RR] = 0.43; 95% CI = 0.19-1.01; I(2) test for variation in RR due to heterogeneity = 0.0%), with nonsignificant results. Two reported white blood cell toxicity reduced by 66% (RR = 0.34; 95% CI = 0.16-0.72; I(2) test for variation in RR due to heterogeneity = 0.0%), with statistically significant results. Stratifying analysis by studies with high versus low ROB, we found substantial overestimation of benefit: Studies with high ROB overestimated by nearly 2-fold reduction of platelet toxicity by Chinese herbal medicines (RR = 0.35, 95% CI = 0.15-0.84 vs RR = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.11-3.92). Studies with high ROB overestimated by nearly 2-fold reduction of vomiting toxicity (RR = 0.45, 95% CI = 0.33-0.61 vs RR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.48-1.58). And, studies with high ROB overestimated by 21% the reduction in diarrhea toxicity (RR = 0.34, 95% CI = 0.20-0.58 vs RR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.19-1.01). Studies with high ROB also overestimated by 16% improvement in tumor response (RR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.18-1.63 vs RR = 1.20; 95% CI = 0.81-1.79). Not accounting for

  15. Unveiling quantum entanglement degradation near a Schwarzschild black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Martínez, Eduardo; Garay, Luis J.; León, Juan

    2010-09-01

    We analyze the entanglement degradation provoked by the Hawking effect in a bipartite system Alice-Rob when Rob is in the proximities of a Schwarzschild black hole while Alice is free falling into it. We will obtain the limit in which the tools imported from the Unruh entanglement degradation phenomenon can be used properly, keeping control on the approximation. As a result, we will be able to determine the degree of entanglement as a function of the distance of Rob to the event horizon, the mass of the black hole, and the frequency of Rob’s entangled modes. By means of this analysis we will show that all the interesting phenomena occur in the vicinity of the event horizon and that the presence of event horizons do not effectively degrade the entanglement when Rob is far off the black hole. The universality of the phenomenon is presented: There are not fundamental differences for different masses when working in the natural unit system adapted to each black hole. We also discuss some aspects of the localization of Alice and Rob states. All this study is done without using the single mode approximation.

  16. A Case Report of an Infant with Robertsonian Translocation (15;22)(q10;q10) and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chi Hyun; Shin, Jung-Hee; Nam, Myung Hyun; Lim, Chae Seung; Lee, Chang Kyu; Cho, Yunjung; Kim, Young Kee; Yoon, Soo Young

    2016-01-01

    Rob(15; 22) is rare and account for only 0.6% of all Robertsonian translocations. We describe a case with rob(15;22) in which the phenotype includes generalized hypotonia, respiratory distress, tent shaped upper lips, hyporeflexia and single umbilical artery. Chromosome analysis with peripheral blood was performed, while the karyotype was interpreted as 45,XX,der(15;22)(q10;q10). In Prader-Willi/Angelman Syndrome FISH studies, deletion of the SNRPN gene was not observed, but deletion of 15p11.2 was noted. Prader-Willi/Angelman Syndrome methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and chromosomal microarrays showed negative findings. Molecular studies associated with spinal muscular atrophy and progressive muscular dystrophy also showed negative findings. We suggest that rob(15;22) and deletion of 15p11.2 could be related to clinical presentation like this case. PMID:26927352

  17. Final Data Report: P- and S-Wave Velocity Logging Borings C4993, C4996, and C4997 Part A: Interval Logs

    SciTech Connect

    Steller, Robert; Diehl, John

    2007-02-01

    Insitu borehole P- and S-wave velocity measurements were collected in three borings located within the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) boundaries at the Hanford Site, southeastern Washington. Geophysical data acquisition was performed between August and October of 2006 by Rob Steller, Charles Carter, Antony Martin and John Diehl of GEOVision. Data analysis was performed by Rob Steller and John Diehl, and reviewed by Antony Martin of GEOVision, and report preparation was performed by John Diehl and reviewed by Rob Steller. The work was performed under subcontract with Battelle, Pacific Northwest Division with Marty Gardner as Battelle’s Technical Representative and Alan Rohay serving as the Technical Administrator for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This report describes the field measurements, data analysis, and results of this work.

  18. Localized detection of quantum entanglement through the event horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragan, Andrzej; Doukas, Jason; Martín-Martínez, Eduardo

    2013-05-01

    We present a localized solution to the problem of entanglement degradation in noninertial frames. A two-mode squeezed state is considered from the viewpoint of two observers, Alice (inertial) and Rob (accelerated), each observing a single localized mode of the field. We study the state of these modes to determine how much entanglement the observers can extract from the initial state. The dominant source of degradation is an inevitable mode mismatch between the mode of the squeezed state Rob is given and the mode he is able to observe from his accelerated frame. Leakage of the initial mode through Rob's horizon places a limit on his ability to fully measure the state, leading to an inevitable degradation of entanglement that even in principle cannot be fully retrieved by any measurement device.

  19. Final Data Report: P- and S-Wave Velocity Logging Borings C4993, C4996, and C4997 Part B: Overall Logs

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, John; Steller, Robert

    2007-03-20

    Insitu borehole P- and S-wave velocity measurements were collected in three borings located within the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) boundaries at the Hanford Site, southeastern Washington. Geophysical data acquisition was performed between August and October of 2006 by Rob Steller, Charles Carter, Antony Martin and John Diehl of GEOVision. Data analysis was performed by Rob Steller and John Diehl, and reviewed by Antony Martin of GEOVision, and report preparation was performed by John Diehl and reviewed by Rob Steller. The work was performed under subcontract with Battelle, Pacific Northwest Division with Marty Gardner as Battelle’s Technical Representative and Alan Rohay serving as the Technical Administrator for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This report describes the field measurements, data analysis, and results of this work.

  20. Effect of Risk of Bias on the Effect Size of Meta-Analytic Estimates in Randomized Controlled Trials in Periodontology and Implant Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Faggion, Clovis Mariano; Wu, Yun-Chun; Scheidgen, Moritz; Tu, Yu-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Background Risk of bias (ROB) may threaten the internal validity of a clinical trial by distorting the magnitude of treatment effect estimates, although some conflicting information on this assumption exists. Objective The objective of this study was evaluate the effect of ROB on the magnitude of treatment effect estimates in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in periodontology and implant dentistry. Methods A search for Cochrane systematic reviews (SRs), including meta-analyses of RCTs published in periodontology and implant dentistry fields, was performed in the Cochrane Library in September 2014. Random-effect meta-analyses were performed by grouping RCTs with different levels of ROBs in three domains (sequence generation, allocation concealment, and blinding of outcome assessment). To increase power and precision, only SRs with meta-analyses including at least 10 RCTs were included. Meta-regression was performed to investigate the association between ROB characteristics and the magnitudes of intervention effects in the meta-analyses. Results Of the 24 initially screened SRs, 21 SRs were excluded because they did not include at least 10 RCTs in the meta-analyses. Three SRs (two from periodontology field) generated information for conducting 27 meta-analyses. Meta-regression did not reveal significant differences in the relationship of the ROB level with the size of treatment effect estimates, although a trend for inflated estimates was observed in domains with unclear ROBs. Conclusion In this sample of RCTs, high and (mainly) unclear risks of selection and detection biases did not seem to influence the size of treatment effect estimates, although several confounders might have influenced the strength of the association. PMID:26422698

  1. Near real-time ionospheric monitoring over Europe at the Royal Observatory of Belgium using GNSS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeot, Nicolas; Chevalier, Jean-Marie; Bruyninx, Carine; Pottiaux, Eric; Aerts, Wim; Baire, Quentin; Legrand, Juliette; Defraigne, Pascale; Huang, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Various scientific applications and services increasingly demand real-time information on the effects of space weather on Earth's atmosphere. In this frame, the Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB) takes advantage of the dense EUREF Permanent GNSS Network (EPN) to monitor the ionosphere over Europe from the measured delays in the GNSS signals, and provides publicly several derived products. The main ROB products consist of ionospheric vertical Total Electron Content (TEC) maps over Europe and their variability estimated in near real-time every 15 min on 0.5° × 0.5° grids using GPS observations. The maps are available online with a latency of ~3 min in IONEX format at ftp://gnss.oma.be and as interactive web pages at www.gnss.be. This paper presents the method used in the ROB-IONO software to generate the maps. The ROB-TEC maps show a good agreement with widely used post-processed products such as IGS and ESA with mean differences of 1.3 ± 0.9 and 0.4 ± 1.6 TECu respectively for the period 2012 to mid-2013. In addition, we tested the reliability of the ROB-IONO software to detect abnormal ionospheric activity during the Halloween 2003 ionospheric storm. For this period, the mean differences with IGS and ESA maps are 0.9 ± 2.2 and 0.6 ± 6.8 TECu respectively with maximum differences (>38 TECu) occurring during the major phase of the storm. These differences are due to the lower resolution in time and space of both IGS and ESA maps compared to the ROB-TEC maps. A description of two recent events, one on March 17, 2013 and one on February 27, 2014 also highlights the capability of the method adopted in the ROB-IONO software to detect in near real-time abnormal ionospheric behaviour over Europe. In that frame, ROB maintains a data base publicly available with identified ionospheric

  2. Orexin B inhibits proliferation and stimulates specialized function of cultured rat calvarial osteoblast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Rucinski, Marcin; Tyczewska, Marianna; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2008-12-01

    Orexin-A (OXA) and orexin-B (OXB) are polypeptides derived from the same 130 amino acid long precursor (prepro-orexin) that bind and activate two closely related orphan G protein-coupled receptors OX1-R and OX2-R. These hypothalamic neuropeptides stimulate food intake and energy expenditure and play a significant role in sleep-wakefulness regulation. Present studies aimed to investigate the effects of orexins on proliferative activity and osteocalcin secretion by cultured rat calvarial osteoblast-like (ROB) cells. Conventional RT-PCR methods detected expression of the OX1-R gene in freshly isolated ROB cells and cells cultured for 7, 14 and 21 days. In contrast, at all time points tested, expression of prepro-OX or OX2-R genes was not demonstrated. QPCR revealed the highest expression of OX1-R gene in freshly isolated bone cells and a notably lower one in cultured ROB cells. Exposure of cultured cells to both OXA and OXB stimulated expression of the OX1-R gene. However, this effect was seen at the lowest tested concentration (1x10(-10) M). Exposure of cultured ROB cells to OXA for 48 h did not change osteocalcin concentrations in media analyzed at days 7, 14 and 21 of culture. On the contrary, OXB notably stimulated osteocalcin concentrations in media taken at days 14 and 21 of culture. In contrast, OXA exerted a notable inhibitory effect on the proliferative activity of ROB cells at day 7 of culture, while OXB exerted a similar effect at day 14. Thus, the obtained results suggest that: (i)(ROB) cells are provided with functional OX1-R gene; (ii) in ROB cells expression of this gene seems to be up-regulated by low concentrations of both OXA and OXB; (iii) OXB exerts inhibitory effects on proliferative activity and stimulating effects on osteocalcin secretion by cultured ROB cells; (iv) rat calvarial osteoblasts provided with OX receptor may be a target for circulating orexins. Thus, orexins may be included in the expanding group of neuropeptides involved in the

  3. Temperature characteristics of microfiber coil resonators embedded in teflon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ye; Ming, Yang; Guo, Wei; Xu, Fei; Lu, Yan-qing

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we investigate the temperature characteristic of an optical microfiber coil resonator (OMCR) which is wrapped on Teflon coated PMMA rob and embedded in low index polymer Teflon. The micro fiber used to fabricated the OMCR was 4 ~ 5μm in diameter and 14 mm in waist region length. The PMMA rob has a diameter of 2 mm. Our sample shows high temperature sensitivity as much as 80 pm/°C. The test result suggests OMCR could be of good value in application of temperature sensing.

  4. Shear flow behavior of a dynamically symmetric polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ning

    2005-03-01

    Soft materials with complex internal structure often exhibit fascinating rheological behavior. For example, under flow the poly (ethylethylene) (PEE)/poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS)/PEE-PDMS polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion (BμE) showed shear-induced macrophase separation.^ 1 This was tentatively attributed to the extreme dynamical asymmetry of the two homopolymers, i.e., their viscosities differed by three orders of magnitude. To understand the role of the dynamic symmetry of a BμE when subjected to shear flow, we have developed a new ternary polymer blend system poly(butylene oxide) (PBO)/ poly(ethylenepropylene) (PEP)/PEP-PBO, which is dynamically almost symmetric. We will report on the shear flow behavior of this new BμE. Reference: [1] Krishnan et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2001, 87, 098301

  5. PTP1B: a new therapeutic target for Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tautz, Lutz

    2015-08-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by successive loss of acquired cognitive, social, and motor skills and development of autistic behavior. RTT affects approximately 1 in 10,000 live female births and is the second most common cause of severe mental retardation in females, after Down syndrome. Currently, there is no cure or effective therapy for RTT. Approved treatment regimens are presently limited to supportive management of specific physical and mental disabilities. In this issue, Krishnan and colleagues reveal that the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B is upregulated in patients with RTT and in murine models and provide strong evidence that targeting PTP1B has potential as a viable therapeutic strategy for the treatment of RTT. PMID:26214520

  6. A new extra-vertebral treatment model for incomplete spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, R V

    2003-02-01

    Advances made in recent times in spinal cord injury repair research will soon take us toward a cure in paraplegics. But what are the prospects for quadriplegics? Certain fundamental issues make treatment approaches to quadriplegia different and difficult. Injury at cervical region poses additional problems for any surgical intervention with life-threatening risks of i) endangering respiratory function, ii) cavitation, cysts, and syringomyelia formation extending cephalad to the injury, and iii) mid-lower cervical injuries, lower motor neuron death, and the resultant degeneration of brachial plexus axons would still leave the upper limbs denervated and paralyzed even as treatment procedures might successfully salvage the lower limbs. With these apparently insurmountable impediments in quadriplegic cord repair, it would be wise to turn to alternative treatment strategies. Conventional treatment models since the days of Ralph Gerard (1940) have all used intra-vertebral procedures. We present here a plausible extra-vertebral repair model suitable for incomplete cord injuries at cervical, thoracic, and lumbar levels. The procedure consists of identifying the extent of viable grey-white matter in the injured area and to utilize it efficiently as a "neural tissue bridge." Next, labile state is induced by using botulinum toxin/colchicine (Krishnan, 1983, 1991; Krishnan et al., 2001 a,b) and Ca+ channel blockers in the motorsensory nerve terminals of polisegmentally innervated skeletal muscles that "bridge" the injured cord segments. This would retrogradely induce a redundant state of intra-spinal growth of nerve terminals and new synaptic connections within those viable neural tissues, as well as promote effective relinking of the injured cord ends and enhance motor-sensory recovery. PMID:12751430

  7. Second Language Vocabulary Acquisition from Language Input and from Form-Focused Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laufer, Batia

    2009-01-01

    Interest in L2 vocabulary learning and teaching started long before the nineteen-eighties (for references to earlier studies, see Rob Waring's database http://www1.harenet.ne.jp/~waring/vocab/vocrefs/vocref.html) but it declined with the advent of generative linguistics to the point of discrimination and neglect (Meara 1980). In 1986, I argued…

  8. Using Online Storybooks to Build Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacina, Jan; Mathews, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    "If we teach today as we taught yesterday, then we rob our children of tomorrow" (Dewey, 1916). Dewey's words are still relevant today as educators across the world consider how to best connect the print-based literacies of the past to the technologically based literacies of the present. Dewey's advice of re-envisioning how to best teach children…

  9. Fostering Resilience in Children Exposed to Domestic Violence: Practical Strategies EC Staff Can Put into Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Children enmeshed in violence don't experience a relaxed, predictable, or trusting home life. In fact, children exposed to home violence often experience symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) just as adults do after enduring violence. Domestic violence robs children of their childhood. And while early childhood staff can't erase the…

  10. 75 FR 68810 - Notice of Intent To Prepare One Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Northern...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... (75 FR 38822) a document entitled Notice of Intent to Prepare Four Programmatic Environmental Impact... Register notice (75 FR 38822). Next Steps This environmental analysis process is being conducted pursuant.... Rob Janson, Acting Executive Director, Facilities Management and Engineering, Office of...

  11. Gathering recognizes contributions of former Section President

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Niocaill, Conall; van der Pluijm, Ben; Torsvik, Trand

    To celebrate the sixtieth birthday of Rob Van derVoo, AGU's President and President-elect of its Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism Section, 1988-1992, a workshop was recently held in an intimate conference setting in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The purpose was to celebrate Rob's many contributions to the fields of paleomagnetism and tectonics as he reached this milestone. Some 30 people attended and were treated to 18 presentations, many of which have recently been published or are currently in review for a special issue in his honor. While great emphasis was placed on paleomagnetism as the only quantitative tool for generating paleogeographic reconstructions for pre-Mesozoic time, a recurring theme within the meeting was the integration of paleomagnetic results with those from other disciplines—a hallmark of Rob's research efforts at the University of Michigan. The meeting also provided an opportunity for students and colleagues of Rob's to indulge in more “speculative” ideas, and the presentations were accompanied by wide-ranging and “spirited” discussions during both the “formal” sessions and the highly enjoyable evening social activities.

  12. Overcoming Obstacles to Education: The Experience of Women University Students Diagnosed with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, Sonya Corbin

    2000-01-01

    A hermeneutic phenomenological methodology was used to explore the experience of eight women university students diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Two themes describing obstacles to their education - "robbed of time" and "thoughts like a rubber ball" - were identified. Discusses strategies and treatment issues and…

  13. THE PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE EMISSIONS FROM A RESIDENTIAL OIL BOILER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity of emissions from the combustion of home heating oil and the use of residential oil boilers (ROB) is an important health concern. Yet scant physical and chemical information about the emissions from this source are available for dispersion, climate, and source-recep...

  14. Bullying in Elementary School: An American Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conn, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Bullying in elementary schools is a recognized and widespread occurrence that threatens to rob children of their childhood. Part I of this commentary describes existing scientifically-based research on the nature, extent and effects of the phenomenon on children in United States schools. Part II analyzes the effectiveness of bullying prevention…

  15. Using Order of Magnitude Calculations to Extend Student Comprehension of Laboratory Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Rob L.

    2015-01-01

    Author Rob Dean previously published an Illuminations article concerning "challenge" questions that encourage students to think imaginatively with approximate quantities, reasonable assumptions, and uncertain information. This article has promoted some interesting discussion, which has prompted him to present further examples. Examples…

  16. 78 FR 69433 - Executive Order 13650 Improving Chemical Facility Safety and Security Listening Sessions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... Resource Center, Room 131; and November 15, 2013, GSA's ROB Auditorium, 301 7th Street SW., (7th and D...-0075, Technical Data Center, Room N-2625, U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Avenue NW... provide input EO related on topics such as: Improving operational coordination with Federal, state,...

  17. Fifteen Years Later: Has Positive Programming Become the Expected Technology for Addressing Problem Behavior? A Commentary on Homer et. al. (1990)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Martha E.

    2005-01-01

    The author found it very satisfying to reread "Toward a technology of 'nonaversive' behavioral support," written in 1990 by Rob Horner and seven of his colleagues. Their predictions of the critical themes for advancing positive behavior support (PBS) ring true. Fifteen years have passed since the publication of this article, and much has happened…

  18. Households Touched by Crime, 1987. Bureau of Justice Statistics Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rand, Michael R.; And Others

    For the year 1987, 24.4 % of American households were touched by crime. A household is considered touched by crime if during the year it was affected by a burglarly, auto theft, or household theft or if a household member was raped, robbed, or assaulted or was a victim of personal theft, no matter where the crime occurred. These offenses, which…

  19. Role models face class expulsion.

    PubMed

    Sprinks, Jennifer

    There are plans to drop Mary Seacole and Florence Nightingale from the curriculum taught in schools, according to leaked reports. Here, nurse leaders protest that this would rob young people of valuable role models and undermine the image of the profession. It is also suggested that a person's contribution to society is more important than their personality. PMID:23427681

  20. Polyphenol administration impairs T-cell proliferation by imprinting a distinct dendritic cell maturational profile.

    PubMed

    Delvecchio, Francesca Romana; Vadrucci, Elisa; Cavalcanti, Elisabetta; De Santis, Stefania; Kunde, Dale; Vacca, Michele; Myers, Jay; Allen, Frederick; Bianco, Giusy; Huang, Alex Y; Monsurro, Vladia; Santino, Angelo; Chieppa, Marcello

    2015-09-01

    Currently little is known as to how nutritionally derived compounds may affect dendritic cell (DC) maturation and potentially prevent inappropriate inflammatory responses that are characteristic of chronic inflammatory syndromes. Previous observations have demonstrated that two polyphenols quercetin and piperine delivered through reconstituted oil bodies (ROBs-QP) can influence DC maturation in response to LPS leading to a modulated inflammatory response. In the present study, we examined the molecular effects of ROBs-QP exposure on DC differentiation in mice and identified a unique molecular signature in response to LPS administration that potentially modulates DC maturation and activity in inflammatory conditions. Following LPS administration, ROBs-QP-exposed DCs expressed an altered molecular profile as compared with control DCs, including cytokine and chemokine production, chemokine receptor repertoire, and antigen presentation ability. In vivo ROBs-QP administration suppresses antigen-specific T-cell division in the draining lymph nodes resulting from a reduced ability to create stable immunological synapse. Our data demonstrate that polyphenols exposure can drive DCs toward a new anti-inflammatory molecular profile capable of dampening the inflammatory response, highlighting their potential as complementary nutritional approaches in the treatment of chronic inflammatory syndromes. PMID:26096294

  1. A Mean Wink at Authenticity: Chinese Images in Disney's "Mulan."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mo, Weimin; Shen, Wenju

    2000-01-01

    Offers a critique from two Chinese educators with regard to the historical, cultural, linguistic, and artistic authenticity of Disney's animated film "Mulan." Argues that the filmmakers robbed the original story of its soul and "ran over Chinese culture with the Disney bulldozer," imposing mainstream cultural beliefs and values. (SR)

  2. Innovation in the Science Curriculum: Classroom Knowledge and Curriculum Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, John, Ed.

    The way in which science teachers use innovation and the implications for curriculum policy making are addressed in five articles. In "Classroom Knowledge and Curriculum Change: An Introduction," John Olson proposes a humanistic framework for curricular change. Rob Walker's "The School, the Community, and the Outsider: Case Study of a Case Study,"…

  3. 76 FR 13970 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Black Stem Rust...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... disease is caused by a fungus that reduces the quality and yield of infected wheat, oat, barley, and rye crops by robbing host plants of food and water. In addition to infecting small grains, the fungus lives... Mahonia. The fungus is spread from host to host by wind-borne spores. The black stem rust quarantine...

  4. Stage 2--Information Seeking Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsenberg, Michael B.

    2005-01-01

    A brief overview of one Big6 stage by Mike Eisenberg, followed by articles by two exemplary Big6 teachers, Barbara Jansen and Rob Darrow, offering practical uses of the Big6 in elementary and secondary situations is presented. The two-part nature of information seeking strategies that includes brainstorming and choosing is emphasized.

  5. Beyond the Universities: The New Higher Education. Monitoring Change in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Philip, Ed.

    This book explores the expansion of higher education in the United Kingdom during the past 50 years and the coordination of university and further and distance education. The following 12 chapters are included: "Patterns of HE/FE [Higher Education/Further Education] Collaboration" (Tony Lewis, Rob Allen); "Student and Staff Perceptions of Higher…

  6. Pictures of Our Nobler Selves: A History of Native American Contributions to News Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trahant, Mark N.

    Many American Indians deeply resent distorted depictions of themselves in the media. They are convinced that false media caricatures have helped rob them of their history. This report addresses a fascinating incongruity: the contributions made by Native Americans to the U.S. news media--a media that has played a key role in creating the flawed…

  7. Asymmetrical disassortative pollination in a distylous primrose: the complementary roles of bumblebee nectar robbers and syrphid flies.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xing-Fu; Jiang, Xian-Feng; Li, Li; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Qing-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Heterostyly is a floral polymorphism characterized by reciprocal herkogamy maintained through high levels of mating between morphs, serviced by appropriate pollinators. We studied how differential efficiency and abundance of distinct pollinators affect plant female reproduction in self- and intra-morph incompatible distylous Primula secundiflora. Bumblebees and syrphid flies were found to be the most abundant floral visitors. Bumblebees frequently exhibited nectar-robbing behavior. Because the robbing holes were always situated between the high- and low-level organs on both morphs, nectar-robbing bumblebees only pollinated S-styled flowers. L-styled flowers set four times as many seeds as did S-styled flowers after being visited by pollen-collecting syrphid flies. The natural female fecundity and the magnitude of pollen limitation varied between the morphs within populations because of the mosaic distribution of nectar-robbing bumblebees and syrphid flies. L-styled flowers and S-styled flowers set the same number of seeds after supplemental hand pollination, indicating equivalent female reproductive potential. We suggest that bumblebee nectar robbers and syrphid flies play an important role in sustaining the floral dimorphism of heterostyly in P. secundiflora because of their complementary roles in the pollination system. PMID:25579323

  8. Asymmetrical disassortative pollination in a distylous primrose: the complementary roles of bumblebee nectar robbers and syrphid flies

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xing-Fu; Jiang, Xian-Feng; Li, Li; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Qing-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Heterostyly is a floral polymorphism characterized by reciprocal herkogamy maintained through high levels of mating between morphs, serviced by appropriate pollinators. We studied how differential efficiency and abundance of distinct pollinators affect plant female reproduction in self- and intra-morph incompatible distylous Primula secundiflora. Bumblebees and syrphid flies were found to be the most abundant floral visitors. Bumblebees frequently exhibited nectar-robbing behavior. Because the robbing holes were always situated between the high- and low-level organs on both morphs, nectar-robbing bumblebees only pollinated S-styled flowers. L-styled flowers set four times as many seeds as did S-styled flowers after being visited by pollen-collecting syrphid flies. The natural female fecundity and the magnitude of pollen limitation varied between the morphs within populations because of the mosaic distribution of nectar-robbing bumblebees and syrphid flies. L-styled flowers and S-styled flowers set the same number of seeds after supplemental hand pollination, indicating equivalent female reproductive potential. We suggest that bumblebee nectar robbers and syrphid flies play an important role in sustaining the floral dimorphism of heterostyly in P. secundiflora because of their complementary roles in the pollination system. PMID:25579323

  9. 77 FR 60450 - Senior Executive Service Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ..., Matthew L. Kruger, Mary Kubiak, Lev J. Langlois, Joseph E. Lederer, Calvin M. Legomsky, Stephen H. Lew..., Philip Merritt, Marianna L. Merritt, Michael P. Meyer, Jonathan E. Micone, Vincent Miller, David L... Thomas, Rob C. Tierney, MaryAnn E. Tomchek, Debra Tomsheck, James F. Torrence, Donald Triner,...

  10. Chaos on Sesame Street: Does This Carnival of Images Help Students Read?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Jane M.

    1990-01-01

    The rapid, disjointed, and vivid style of Sesame Street may impede rather than promote progress toward literacy and the development of voluntary attention. It robs children of the ability to create mental pictures. Contends that it is a failure as an instructional medium. (DM)

  11. Workplace Education: The Changing Landscape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Maurice C., Ed.

    The 23 chapters of this book are as follows: "A Framework for Developing Partnerships" (Wendy M. Doughty); "Partnership Building in Nova Scotia" (Marjorie Davison, Paul Temple); "What Makes a Successful Workplace Education Partnership?" (Rob Despins et al.); "Building Linkages in Large Organizations: The Syncrude Canada Ltd. Experience" (Lloyd…

  12. Indigenous Knowledge in the Life Sciences Classroom: Put on Your de Bono Hats!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Beer, Josef; Whitlock, Elrina

    2009-01-01

    The whole world was united in its condemnation of the pre-1994 apartheid regime in South Africa. Apartheid meant that many South Africans were robbed of their democratic voices and cultural identities. In this article, the authors pose the question: Are you guilty of "knowledge apartheid" in your biology classroom? Does every student have a voice…

  13. Don't Bother Me, I'm Reading: Graphic Nonfiction for Middle Schoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This article offers a savvy guide to the best graphic nonfiction books for middle schoolers. These include: "Ronald Reagan: A Graphic Biography" by Andrew Hefler; "Clan Apis" by Jay Hosler; and "Corpses and Skeletons: The Science of Forensic Anthropology" by Rob Shone.

  14. The Athletae Dei: Missing the Meaning of Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Shirl J.

    By making virtue of ascesis or self-discipline in their sport, the athlete evangelists (the "athletae-Dei"), unwittingly rob sport of its fundamental theological significance. These proponents of an evangelical brand of protestant theology have shifted drastically from an anti-sport stance of a century ago to a position that not only embraces…

  15. Nonverbal Effects in Memory for Dialogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narvaez, Alice; Hertel, Paula T.

    Memory for everyday conversational speech may be influenced by the nonverbally communicated emotion of the speaker. In order to investigate this premise, three videotaped scenes with bipolar emotional perspectives (joy/fear about going away to college, fear/anger about having been robbed, and disgust/interest regarding a friend's infidelity) were…

  16. The Power of Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Traver, Rob

    2016-01-01

    "Students are naturally inclined to watch one another, to make suggestions and support their peers, to avoid mistakes, to copy what works and modify what doesn't, and to learn from one another," writes Rob Traver in this article. To prove his point, Traver brings readers into three classrooms where teachers tap into students' intrinsic…

  17. Underweight Seniors May Have Added Alzheimer's Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... older adults' risk of the memory-robbing disorder Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests. The study included 280 healthy people aged 62 to 90 with normal mental function. The participants underwent physical exams, genetic testing and brain scans. According to the researchers ...

  18. Cultural practices to maintain soil quality and address climate change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For decades, farmers in Montana and the Dakotas have produced impressive yields of barley and wheat. But that bounty has come at a cost. Tilling the soil in the region’s crop-fallow production systems has robbed the soil of nutrients and organic matter and reduced crop yields. In fact, the region’s ...

  19. Multiple Metaphors for a Singular Idea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cairns, Robert B.

    1991-01-01

    Evaluates the epigenetic landscape metaphor in light of behavioral development. Cites two common errors in integrated models of behavior and biology: (1) fixing behavior as structure, thereby robbing it of dynamics and plasticity; and (2) assuming that a single optimal trajectory applies to development of organisms or systems. (BC)

  20. Influences of Television on Children's Behavior: Implications for War and Peace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Joe L.

    Television is robbing children of their childhood. Moreover, it is destroying children's developing symbolic processes, and inhibiting their creativity and play. Television has remarkable influence over children's behavior. At this point, it is plausible to hypothesize linkages between television viewing and numerous social problems involving…

  1. Development of a set of compensating Triticum aestivum-Dasypyrum villosum Robertsonian translocation lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dasypyrum villosum (L.) Candargy, a wild relative of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is the source of agronomically important genes for wheat improvement. The first step in exploiting this variation is the production of compensating Robertsonian translocations (cRobTs) consisting of D. villosum c...

  2. Use of PCR analysis for identification of species and genus of Septoria on grain crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research on methods for molecular-genetic testing of the Septoria pathogens of wheat was initiated. Two species of septoria were studied: Septoria tritici Rob. et Desm., and Stagonospora nodorum [Berk] Castellani and E.G. Germano. Different protocols for extraction of DNA were applied; the best meth...

  3. Teaching English Education and Lurching Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadiow, Linda

    2010-01-01

    This article narrates a critical classroom incident between the author, as an English teacher, and her student, Rob, and discusses how this incident reflected the flaws in her teaching practices and what she did to correct it. The author shares that one of the consequences of this incident was that she began to understand that her aspiration to be…

  4. Robert K. Clifton 1964-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterfield, J.; Halvorson, H.

    Rob Clifton, the editor of this journal, passed away on 31 July 2002, after a valiant battle with cancer over the previous 14 months, and just after his 38th birthday. He was a researcher of enormous talent and energy, an outstanding teacher and colleague.

  5. Identifying, Confronting and Disrupting Stereotypes: Role on the Wall in an Intergenerational LGBTQ Applied Theatre Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houseal, Jennifer; Ray, Kevin; Teitelbaum, Sherry

    2013-01-01

    In New York City, LGBTQ people from different generations have had few opportunities to connect. They have splintered into age-segregated micro-communities, robbing them of opportunities to weave a common history and share strategies that community members have used to survive and thrive. "Bridging the Gap" was a community-based intergenerational…

  6. What Great Coaches Do Differently: 11 Elements of Effective Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haworth, Rob; Whitaker, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Why do some athletic coaches succeed every season while others suffer loss after loss? This book describes the beliefs, behaviors, and attitudes of great athletic coaches. Where do they focus their attention? How do they spend their time and energy? And how can others gain the same advantages? Here, Rob Haworth and Todd Whitaker describe the…

  7. Regaining a Lost Heritage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Toni

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly, Blacks are turning to science and not assumptions to put "Africa" back in "African-American." The eagerness to reconnect is understandable. People robbed of their history innately want to know where they come from. Blacks are now using DNA testing to determine their African lineage. Veteran genealogists say the PBS special, "African…

  8. Pro-toxic dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloids in the traditional Andean herbal medicine "asmachilca"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Asmachilca is a Peruvian medicinal herb preparation ostensibly derived from Eupatorium gayanum Wedd. = Aristeguietia gayana (Wedd.) R.M. King & H. Rob. (Asteraceae: Eupatorieae). Decoctions of the plant have a reported bronchodilation effect that is purported to be useful in the treatment of respir...

  9. Concepts Shaping Juvenile Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Rob

    2008-01-01

    Rob White's paper explores ways in which community building can be integrated into the practices of juvenile justice work. He provides a model of what can be called "restorative social justice", one that builds upon the juvenile conferencing model by attempting to fuse social justice concerns with progressive juvenile justice practices.

  10. Sport-Based Youth and Community Development: Beyond the Ball in Chicago

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Jennifer M.; Castañeda, Amy; Castañeda, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Rob and Amy Castañeda, the co-founders of a sports/play-based youth and community development organization called Beyond the Ball (www.beyondtheball.org), cite the collaborative and dynamic nature of the TPSR Alliance as an important influence for their work. Beyond the Ball serves individuals between kindergarten and post-college, in the North…

  11. An Ethnographic Study of the Kids on the Streets of Fortaleza, Brazil: Family, School, Peer and Community Life, Self-Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campos Monteiro, Julieta M.; And Others

    Depiction of the problem of children living in the streets in third world countries emphasizes the extent to which they are victims (as statistics have shown them as numbers on the streets or killed by "death squads") or victimizers who affect an economy (e.g., by robbing tourists). Both descriptions suggest that one-dimensional portrait of the…

  12. The Historiographical Dilemma in Myrdal's American Creed: Rhetoric's Role in Rescuing a Historical Moment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, E. Culpepper; McKerrow, Raymie E.

    1987-01-01

    Reexamines Gunnar Myrdal's "An American Dilemma" (1944), which argued race relations in America would improve because the American Creed of democratic liberalism created a dilemma between existing racial prejudice and the national ideology. Describes how Myrdal's deterministic perspective robbed civil rights historiography of its drama and shows…

  13. Treatment of Neurosensory Disorders Improves Psychological Well-Being in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohlander, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Psychological well-being is the ultimate "quality of life" measure. The presence of a neurosensory disorder (NSD) in a child, such as ADD, ADHD, Asperger's syndrome, or autism, can rob the child of psychological well-being, or hamper the growth of well-being as the child develops. Fortunately, treatment of NSDs can remove obstacles to the…

  14. Humans, Sharks and the Shared Environment in the Contemporary Eco-Doc

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Focussing on the film "Sharkwater" directed by Rob Stewart (2006), this article discusses formal interpretive aspects of recent environmental documentaries which are intended to raise awareness about environmental issues. It is argued that contemporary environmental documentaries seek to persuade audiences to protect the shared physical…

  15. Building a Foundation for Success: How Authorizers Can Help Schools with the Facilities Challenge. Authorizer Issue Brief. Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halsband, Robin; Hassel, Bryan C.

    2004-01-01

    One of the single biggest challenges for a charter school is securing financing for an adequate facility. While a stellar building provides no guarantee that a school will be a success, having adequate facilities that at least meet the needs of an academic program without robbing the budget can go a long way toward creating an environment…

  16. The "New Russian Literature" and Soviet Literature in the 1990s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekic, Maria

    It is widely believed that poetry in the Soviet Union has lost its place to newspapers and periodicals that have robbed literature of its readers. Prior to glasnost, non-official literature in the Soviet Union was more than a literary event; it was often the only mode of political discourse available to the literate public. This paper suggests…

  17. Commencing the Rhizome: Towards a Minor Philosophy of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregoriou, Zelia

    2004-01-01

    In "The Postmodern Explained," a pedagogical sequel to "The Postmodern Condition," Jean Francois Lyotard reports on the domination of thought by the principle of realism. Lyotard speaks of a demand that threatens to totalize experience, to reduce language to Newspeak, to rob thinking of its childhood and pedagogy of its philosophical moment. It is…

  18. How to Fix Our Schools: It's More Complicated, and More Work, than the Klein-Rhee "Manifesto" Wants You to Believe. EPI Issue Brief #286

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Joel Klein, chancellor of the New York City public school system, and Michelle Rhee, who resigned October 13 as Washington, D.C. chancellor, published a "manifesto" in the "Washington Post" claiming that the difficulty of removing incompetent teachers "has left our school districts impotent and, worse, has robbed millions of children of a real…

  19. How to Fix Our Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Joel Klein, chancellor of the New York City public school system, and Michelle Rhee, who resigned October 13 as Washington, DC, chancellor, published a "manifesto" in the "Washington Post" claiming that the difficulty of removing incompetent teachers "has left school districts impotent and, worse, has robbed millions of children of a real future."…

  20. Grief Casualties on Skid Row.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Cornelius; Fleming, Dagmar

    1991-01-01

    Case study research in shelter for homeless men revealed small, but notable, minority suffering from unresolved grief resulting from death of spouse, child, parent, or other immediate family member, or to painful divorce. Failure to cope with grief appeared to have robbed them of will to maintain their social standing. (Author/NB)

  1. The Use of EFL Reading Strategies among High School Students in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Kate Tzu-Ching; Chen, Sabina Chia-Li

    2015-01-01

    In the traditional English l language classroom, reading is the skill that receives the most emphasis (Susser & Rob, 1990). Learners should use reading strategies to plan how to read and to enhance their reading comprehension (Poole, 2010). The purpose of this study was to explore the use of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) reading…

  2. Monitoring oak-hickory forest change during an unprecedented red oak borer outbreak in the Ozark Mountains: 1990 to 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Joshua S.; Tullis, Jason A.; Haavik, Laurel J.; Guldin, James M.; Stephen, Fred M.

    2014-01-01

    Upland oak-hickory forests in Arkansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma experienced oak decline in the late 1990s and early 2000s during an unprecedented outbreak of a native beetle, the red oak borer (ROB), Enaphalodes rufulus (Haldeman). Although remote sensing supports frequent monitoring of continuously changing forests, comparable in situ observations are critical for developing an understanding of past and potential ROB damage in the Ozark Mountains. We categorized forest change using a normalized difference water index (NDWI) applied to multitemporal Landsat TM and ETM+ imagery (1990, 2001, and 2006). Levels of decline or growth were categorized using simple statistical thresholds of change in the NDWI over time. Corresponding decline and growth areas were then observed in situ where tree diameter, age, crown condition, and species composition were measured within variable radius plots. Using a machine learning decision tree classifier, remote sensing-derived decline and growth was characterized in terms of in situ observation. Plots with tree quadratic mean diameter at breast height ≥21.5 cm were categorized remotely as in severe decline. Landsat TM/ETM+-based NDWI derivatives reveal forest decline and regrowth in post-ROB outbreak surveys. Historical and future Landsat-based canopy change detection should be incorporated with existing landscape-based prediction of ROB hazard.

  3. 75 FR 36313 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Arkansas Waterway, Pine Bluff, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Arkansas Waterway, Pine... proposes that operating procedures on the Rob Roy Drawbridge across the Arkansas Waterway at mile 67.4...

  4. It Makes You Think: Learning Together. Think Global Thinkpiece Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, Rob

    2015-01-01

    In this thinkpiece Rob Bowden argues that an East meets West project points the way for global learning to be truly transformative. The project has a simple premise--that there is much to be learned by bringing Eastern and Western perspectives and pedagogies together and that such a process not only nurtures a global learning disposition…

  5. The Case against Charter Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manno, Bruno V.

    2001-01-01

    A proponent rebuts claims that charter schools rob funds and students from regular public schools, gamble with children's lives and taxpayers' money, are not truly accountable, resemble other public schools, undermine democratic values, underserve disabled children, marginalize minorities, invite profiteering, front for vouchers; and represent…

  6. A Teaching Makeover Improves Learning for Diverse Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doubet, Kristina J.; Hockett, Jessica A.; Brighton, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    In many primary classrooms, the prospect of addressing standards threatens to rob young children of the joy of learning. Teachers who feel pressed to move students of all backgrounds toward mastery of increasingly complex standards may abandon rich curriculum and move toward isolated "skill drills." This may be counterproductive. The…

  7. Appropriating Professionalism: Restructuring the Official Knowledge Base of England's "Modernised" Teaching Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, John

    2009-01-01

    The present paper examines efforts by government and government agencies in England to prescribe and control the knowledge base of a teaching profession that has, under successive New Labour administrations since 1997, been subjected to "modernisation". A theoretical framework drawn from aspects of the work of Basil Bernstein, and of Rob Moore and…

  8. Is Interdisciplinarity Old News? A Disciplined Consideration of Interdisciplinarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper draws on the theory of Basil Bernstein and on more recent applications of it by Rob Moore, John Beck and Michael Young to respond to recent calls for the replacement of discipline-based university faculties and departments with "problem-based" curricula and programmes of study. It considers, particularly, the potential consequences of…

  9. Music in the Heart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Patience

    2011-01-01

    In this article, five highly experienced music educators tell what they love about teaching music. They are: (1) Rob Amchin, professor of music education at the University of Louisville, Kentucky (elementary general music specialist and percussionist--over 30 years of experience); (2) Susan Bechler, retired orchestra teacher for the Victor Central…

  10. Informal Learning. Symposium 27. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This document contains three papers on informal learning and human resource development. "Workplace Learning Reviewed: Confronting the Rhetoric with Empirical Research" (Rob F. Poell, Ferd J. Van der Krogt) discusses the considerable discrepancy between theory on workplace learning and actual workplace learning-related developments in…

  11. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THREE SUSTAINABLE POINT OF USE DRINKING WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR DEVELOPING NATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    More than 1 billion people in the developing world lack access to safe, reliable sources of drinking water. Unsafe water takes a toll not only on human health but also on individuals’ economic productivity. Illness from waterborne disease robs people of time and...

  12. Neuromedin U directly stimulates growth of cultured rat calvarial osteoblast-like cells acting via the NMU receptor 2 isoform.

    PubMed

    Rucinski, Marcin; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Tyczewska, Marianna; Szyszka, Marta; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2008-09-01

    The neuromedin U (NMU) system is composed of NMU, neuromedin S (NMS) and their receptors NMUR1 and NMUR2. This system is involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis, neuroendocrine functions, immune response, circadian rhythm and spermatogenesis. The present study aimed to investigate the possible role of the NMU system in regulating functions of cultured rat calvarial osteoblast-like (ROB) cells. By using QPCR, high expression of NMU mRNA was found in freshly isolated ROB cells while after 7, 14, and 21 days of culture, expression of the studied gene was very low. In contrast, NMUR2 mRNA expression in freshly isolated ROB cells was negligible and very high in cultured cells. The highest NMUR2 mRNA expression was observed at day 7, and was followed by lower levels at days 14 and 21 of culture. Neither NMS nor NMUR1 mRNA was found in studied cells. Exposure of cultured ROB cells to NMU8 at concentrations 10(-6) to 10(-10) M had no effect on expression levels of the genes. During the entire culture period, NMU8 did not affect osteocalcin production, but stimulated proliferative activity of ROB cells at days 14 and 21 of culture. Thus, we demonstrated that cultured rat calvarial osteoblast-like cells are provided with NMUR2, the receptor isoform typical for the central nervous system. Acting via this receptor NMU8 stimulates proliferation of cultured cells and has no effect on their differentiated function (osteocalcin secretion). PMID:18698496

  13. Influence of three coccidiostats on the pharmacokinetics of florfenicol in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun; Wang, Sheng-Jie; Zhang, Qian; Shao, Yi-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    In-feed Medication has been used for a long time to prevent coccidiosis, a worldwide protozoal disease in rabbits. Florfenicol (FFC) has been widely used in veterinary clinics for bacterial diseases treatment. Therefore, the use of combinations of coccidiostats with FFC in rabbits is common. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of three coccidiostats, sulfaquinoxaline (SUL), robenidine (ROB), and toltrazuril (TOL), as feed additives on the pharmacokinetic profile of FFC in rabbits. The disposition kinetics of FFC in rabbits were investigated after a single intravenous injection (25 mg/kg) in rabbits fed anticoccidial-free diets or feeds containing SUL (250 ppm), ROB (66 ppm), or TOL (2 ppm), respectively, for 20 days. Plasma FFC concentrations were determined by the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. The pharmacokinetic parameters of FFC were analyzed using a non-compartmental analysis based on the statistical moment theory. The results demonstrated that ROB feeding resulted in an obvious decrease in plasma FFC level as compared with anticoccidial-free feeding. The terminal elimination half-life (t1/2z), area under the concentration–time curve (AUC), area under the first moment curve (AUMC), and mean residence time (MRT) significantly decreased, whereas the elimination rate constant (λz) and total body clearance (CLz) obviously increased in rabbits pretreated with ROB. However, we did not find that SUL or TOL feeding had any effect on the pharmacokinetic profile of FFC. Our findings suggested that more attention should be paid to the use of FFC in rabbits supplemented with ROB. PMID:25319758

  14. Influence of three coccidiostats on the pharmacokinetics of florfenicol in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun; Wang, Sheng-Jie; Zhang, Qian; Shao, Yi-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    In-feed Medication has been used for a long time to prevent coccidiosis, a worldwide protozoal disease in rabbits. Florfenicol (FFC) has been widely used in veterinary clinics for bacterial diseases treatment. Therefore, the use of combinations of coccidiostats with FFC in rabbits is common. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of three coccidiostats, sulfaquinoxaline (SUL), robenidine (ROB), and toltrazuril (TOL), as feed additives on the pharmacokinetic profile of FFC in rabbits. The disposition kinetics of FFC in rabbits were investigated after a single intravenous injection (25 mg/kg) in rabbits fed anticoccidial-free diets or feeds containing SUL (250 ppm), ROB (66 ppm), or TOL (2 ppm), respectively, for 20 days. Plasma FFC concentrations were determined by the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. The pharmacokinetic parameters of FFC were analyzed using a non-compartmental analysis based on the statistical moment theory. The results demonstrated that ROB feeding resulted in an obvious decrease in plasma FFC level as compared with anticoccidial-free feeding. The terminal elimination half-life (t1/2z), area under the concentration-time curve (AUC), area under the first moment curve (AUMC), and mean residence time (MRT) significantly decreased, whereas the elimination rate constant (λz) and total body clearance (CLz) obviously increased in rabbits pretreated with ROB. However, we did not find that SUL or TOL feeding had any effect on the pharmacokinetic profile of FFC. Our findings suggested that more attention should be paid to the use of FFC in rabbits supplemented with ROB. PMID:25319758

  15. Expression of precerebellins in cultured rat calvaria osteoblast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Rucinski, Marcin; Zok, Agnieszka; Guidolin, Diego; De Caro, Raffaele; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2008-10-01

    Cerebellin (CER), originally isolated from rat cerebellum, is a hexadecapeptide derived from the larger precursor called precerebellin 1 (Cbln1). At present 4 propeptides designated as Cbln1, Cbln2, Cbln3 and Cbln4 are recognized. They belong to precerebellin subfamily of the C1q family proteins. Precerebellins act as transneuronal regulators of synapse development and synaptic plasticity in various brain regions. Initially CER was thought to be a cerebellum specific peptide, however subsequent studies revealed its presence in other brain regions as well as in extraneuronal tissues. We investigated whether precerebellins are expressed and involved in regulation of cultured rat calvarial osteoblast-like (ROB) cells. Classic RT-PCR revealed the presence of Cbln1 and Cbln3 mRNA in fragments of rat calvaria, in freshly isolated ROB cells and in ROB cells cultured for 7, 14 and 21 days. Cbln2 and Cbln4 mRNA, on the other hand, could not be demonstrated in ROB cells but was found to be present in the brain. In freshly isolated ROB cells expression of Cbln1 gene was very low and gradually increased in relation to the duration of culture. Expression of Cbln3, on the other hand, was very low in fragments of rat calvaria, and increased notably after digestion with collagenase-I. The highest expression of this precerebellin was observed at day 14 of culture while at days 7 and 21 levels of expressions were notably lower. Neither Cbln2 nor Cbln4 was found to be expressed in the ROB cells. Neither CER nor des-Ser1-CER (10(-10)-10(-6)M) affect osteocalcin production and proliferation rate of studied cells. The above findings suggest that CER, which theoretically would be derived from Cbln1, modulate neither differentiated (osteocalcin secretion) nor basic (proliferation) functions of cultured rat osteoblast-like cells. The obtained data raise an intriguing hypothesis that precerebellins may be involved in regulating of spatial organization of osteoblastic niches in the bone

  16. Involvement of Outer Membrane Protein TolC, a Possible Member of the mar-sox Regulon, in Maintenance and Improvement of Organic Solvent Tolerance of Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Aono, Rikizo; Tsukagoshi, Norihiko; Yamamoto, Mami

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli mutants with improved organic solvent tolerance levels showed high levels of outer membrane protein TolC and inner membrane protein AcrA. The TolC level was regulated positively by MarA, Rob, or SoxS. A possible mar-rob-sox box sequence was found upstream of the tolC gene. These findings suggest that tolC is a member of the mar-sox regulon responsive to stress conditions. When a defective tolC gene was transferred to n-hexane- or cyclohexane-tolerant strains by P1 transduction, the organic solvent tolerance level was lowered dramatically to the decane-tolerant and nonane-sensitive level. The tolerance level was restored by transformation of the transductants with a wild-type tolC gene. Therefore, it is evident that TolC is essential for E. coli to maintain organic solvent tolerance. PMID:9473050

  17. In vivo titration of mitomycin C action by four Escherichia coli genomic regions on multicopy plasmids.

    PubMed

    Wei, Y; Vollmer, A C; LaRossa, R A

    2001-04-01

    Mitomycin C (MMC), a DNA-damaging agent, is a potent inducer of the bacterial SOS response; surprisingly, it has not been used to select resistant mutants from wild-type Escherichia coli. MMC resistance is caused by the presence of any of four distinct E. coli genes (mdfA, gyrl, rob, and sdiA) on high-copy-number vectors. mdfA encodes a membrane efflux pump whose overexpression results in broad-spectrum chemical resistance. The gyrI (also called sbmC) gene product inhibits DNA gyrase activity in vitro, while the rob protein appears to function in transcriptional activation of efflux pumps. SdiA is a transcriptional activator of ftsQAZ genes involved in cell division. PMID:11244065

  18. In Vivo Titration of Mitomycin C Action by Four Escherichia coli Genomic Regions on Multicopy Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yan; Vollmer, Amy C.; LaRossa, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Mitomycin C (MMC), a DNA-damaging agent, is a potent inducer of the bacterial SOS response; surprisingly, it has not been used to select resistant mutants from wild-type Escherichia coli. MMC resistance is caused by the presence of any of four distinct E. coli genes (mdfA, gyrl, rob, and sdiA) on high-copy-number vectors. mdfA encodes a membrane efflux pump whose overexpression results in broad-spectrum chemical resistance. The gyrI (also called sbmC) gene product inhibits DNA gyrase activity in vitro, while the rob protein appears to function in transcriptional activation of efflux pumps. SdiA is a transcriptional activator of ftsQAZ genes involved in cell division. PMID:11244065

  19. The GBT-based readout concept for the silicon tracking system of the CBM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Jörg; Müller, Walter F. J.; Schmidt, Christian J.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the readout concept for the Silicon Tracking System (STS) of the CBM experiment at FAIR, which is designed to handle interaction rates up to 10 MHz with hundreds of tracks in fixed target heavy ion collisions of up to 35 AGeV. For data readout from the frontend electronics located close to the silicon strip sensors, the radiation tolerant Gigabit Transceiver ASICs (GBTx) and Versatile Link optical modules developed at CERN are used. The usage of these devices in the STS readout and the readout concept from the frontend electronics to the GBT based STS readout board (ROB) are detailed. Special emphasis is put on the implementation of the interface between the frontend boards (FEBs) and the ROB layer.

  20. Electronic-Nose Technology Using Sputum Samples in Diagnosis of Patients with Tuberculosis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Kolk, Arend; Hoelscher, Michael; Maboko, Leonard; Jung, Jutta; Kuijper, Sjoukje; Cauchi, Michael; Bessant, Conrad; van Beers, Stella; Dutta, Ritaban; Gibson, Tim; Reither, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the potential of two different electronic noses (EN; code named “Rob” and “Walter”) to differentiate between sputum headspace samples from tuberculosis (TB) patients and non-TB patients. Only samples from Ziehl-Neelsen stain (ZN)- and Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture-positive (TBPOS) sputum samples and ZN- and culture-negative (TBNEG) samples were used for headspace analysis; with EN Rob, we used 284 samples from TB suspects (56 TBPOS and 228 TBNEG samples), and with EN Walter, we used 323 samples from TB suspects (80 TBPOS and 243 TBNEG samples). The best results were obtained using advanced data extraction and linear discriminant function analysis, resulting in a sensitivity of 68%, a specificity of 69%, and an accuracy of 69% for EN Rob; for EN Walter, the results were 75%, 67%, and 69%, respectively. Further research is still required to improve the sensitivity and specificity by choosing more selective sensors and type of sampling technique. PMID:20720034

  1. The levels of HDAC1 and thioredoxin1 are related to the death of mesothelioma cells by suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid.

    PubMed

    You, Bo Ra; Park, Woo Hyun

    2016-05-01

    Mesothelioma is an aggressive tumor which is mainly derived from the pleura of lung. In the present study, we evaluated the anticancer effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor on human mesothelioma cells in relation to the levels of HDAC1, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and thioredoxin (Trx). While 1 µM SAHA inhibited cell growth in Phi and ROB cells at 24 h, it did not affect the growth in ADA and Mill cells. Notably, the level of HDAC1 was relatively overexpressed among Phi, REN and ROB cells. SAHA induced necrosis and apoptosis, which was accompanied by the cleavages of PARP and caspase-3 in Phi cells. This agent also increased the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, ΔΨm) in Phi cells. All the tested caspase inhibitors attenuated apoptosis in SAHA-treated Phi cells whereas HDAC1 siRNA enhanced the apoptotic cell death. SAHA increased intracellular ROS levels including O2•- in Phi cells. N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and vitamin C (Vit.C) significantly reduced the growth inhibition and death of Phi cells caused by SAHA. This drug decreased the mRNA and protein levels of Trx1 in Phi and ROB cells. Furthermore, Trx1 siRNA increased cell death and O2•- level in SAHA-treated Phi cells. In conclusion, SAHA selectively inhibited the growth of Phi and ROB mesothelioma cells, which showed the higher basal level of HDAC1. SAHA-induced Phi cell death was related to oxidative stress and Trx1 levels. PMID:26936390

  2. Organic Solvent Tolerance of Escherichia coli Is Independent of OmpF Levels in the Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Asako, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Kei; Aono, Rikizo

    1999-01-01

    The organic solvent tolerance of Escherichia coli was measured under conditions in which OmpF levels were controlled by various means as follows: alteration of NaCl concentration in the medium, transformation with a stress-responsive gene (marA, robA, or soxS), or disruption of the ompF gene. It was shown that solvent tolerance of E. coli did not depend upon OmpF levels in the membrane. PMID:9872794

  3. A is for aphorism - the power of silence.

    PubMed

    Kreijkamp-Kaspers, Sanne; Glasziou, Paul

    2012-11-01

    'All you have to do is listen' is the title of Rob Kapilow's delightful book on classical music; but he could equally have been talking about general practice consultations. Listening requires several skills including attention, echoing and body language, but begins with silence. Well timed silences, used judiciously, can allow the patient adequate space to express symptoms and concerns, while allowing the general practitioner more time for attention, comprehension and synthesis. PMID:23145428

  4. Refinements in practical accuracy factors for resistor-array IR scene projectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, Alan P.; Venables, Mark A.; Lake, Stephen P.; Gough, David W.

    1998-07-01

    We describe incremental improvements in measurement, understanding and control of sensor-perceived scene accuracy factors for BAe resistor-array IR scene projector devices by means of system and device design, analysis and measurement methodology. Progress has been made in the areas of fill- factor measurement, aliasing effects, dead pixel statistics, image spreading, the design of non-uniformity correction (NUC) systems, busbar robbing, heatsink effects and noise sources.

  5. Vantage Theory and Linguistic Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Rob MacLaury's Vantage Theory, VT, models the way in which a cognizer constructs, recalls, uses, and modifies a category in terms of point of view or vantage. Alongside of VT, there is place for the kind of semantic specification found in the lexicon. VT2 [Allan, Keith, 2002. "Vantage theory, VT2, and number." "Language Sciences" 24(5-6), 679-703…

  6. Constructing and Experiencing Boyhoods in Research in London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pattman, Rob; Frosh, Stephen; Phoenix, Ann

    2005-01-01

    When Rob was about 14-years-old, at an all male boarding school, he was so glad that he did not have a tiny penis like another boy who was called girl. He was popular because he was good at sport, missed his mum and dog terribly but never showed it (except a little to his mum and dog) and talked a lot about girls he fancied. These memories were…

  7. Colleges Weigh When to Alert Students of Danger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric; Lipka, Sara

    2007-01-01

    At the University of Chicago, the third Monday in November began with an hour of violence. Around 12:30 a.m., an assailant fired a shot at a staff member who was walking on the campus. At 1:15 a group of men robbed two female students on a nearby street. Just before 1:30, Amadou Cisse, a doctoral student, was shot and killed while walking to his…

  8. Army Precision at Central Headquarters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Jay P.

    2005-01-01

    William "Rob" Roberts wasn't thinking about working as a professional educator, much less running a major school system, when he decided he'd had enough of formal schooling himself at age 19. Rather, he dreamed of big adventures, flying combat aircraft for the military. When he discovered the U.S. Army didn't insist on two years of college, only…

  9. New Near-Real Time Monitoring of the Ionosphere over Europe Available On-line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, J. M.; Bergeot, N.; Bruyninx, C.; Pottiaux, E.; Aerts, W.; Baire, Q.; Legrand, J.; Defraigne, P.

    2012-04-01

    With the beginning of the 24th Solar cycle, the increased Solar activity requires having a close eye on the ionosphere for better understanding Space Weather physics and its effects on radio communications. In that frame, near-real time ionospheric models over Europe are now routinely generated at the Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB). These models are made available to the public through new interactive web pages at the web site of the GNSS team (www.gnss.be) and the Solar Influences Data Analysis Center (www.sidc.be) of ROB. The models are ionospheric Vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) maps estimated every 15 minutes on a 0.5°x0.5° grid. They use the high-rate GPS observations of the real-time stations in the EUREF Permanent Network (EPN) provided by the ROB NTRIP broadcaster. The maps are published on the ROB web site with a latency of 7-15 minutes with respect to the last GPS measurement included in the 15-minute observation files. In a first step, this paper presents the processing strategy used to generate the VTEC maps: input data, parameter estimation, data cleaning and interpolation method. In addition, the tools developed to further exploit the product are introduced, e.g. on-demand animated VTEC maps. In a second step, the VTEC maps are compared with external ionospheric products and models such as Global Ionospheric Maps and IRI 2011. These new near-real time VTEC maps will allow any user within the geographical scope of the maps to estimate in near-real time the ionospheric delay induced along the signal of any observed satellite. In the future, the web site will continuously be updated in response to evolving user needs. This paper opens doors to discussions with the user community to target their needs.

  10. Teleportation of three-dimensional single particle state in noninertial frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qi-Cheng; Wen, Jing-Ji; Ji, Xin; Yeon, Kyu-Hwang

    2014-02-01

    Considering the spin degree of freedom of the Dirac field, we study the entanglement behavior of a different class of communication channel and teleportation of three-dimensional single particle state in noninertial frames. Numerical analysis shows that the communication channel in our scheme can offer enough distillable entanglement for the teleportation protocol. Moreover, the teleportation protocol could work well if Rob's acceleration is not very big, but the fidelity of the teleportation is still reduced due to the Unruh effect.

  11. Experimentation with GRACE, the Generic Model of Emotions For Computational Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Thi-Hai-Ha; Duhaut, Dominique

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we present a model of emotions that we proposed in EmotiRob project. First of all, we make a comparison of recent models of emotions and show that our model is generic in basing on the theories of emotions of Ortony et al., of Lazarus, of Scherer and then the personality theory of Meyers-Brigg and Meyers. Then, we present our experimentation with the first instance of the model and its result to validate our work.

  12. Suggestion of Raspailia (Hymeraphiopsis) septentrionalis as replacement name for Raspailia (Hymeraphiopsis) fruticosa Lehnert & Stone, 2015.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Helmut; Stone, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Shortly after publication of Raspailia (Hymeraphiopsis) fruticosa Lehnert & Stone, 2015 Rob Van Soest (pers. communication) noticed that this species name is a junior primary homonym of Raspailia fruticosa Dendy, 1887, now accepted as Endectyon fruticosa. According to the ICZN the published species name is unavailable and we now suggest to replace the name with Raspailia (Hymeraphiopsis) septentrionalis (holotype deposited at the Zoologische Staatssammlung München, ZSM 20150392, collection data published in Lehnert & Stone 2015). PMID:27394372

  13. Recovery from Trauma: A Look into the Process of Healing from Sexual Assault

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Julia

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is twofold. First, it is a narrative of the healing process and long-term effects of a sexual assault. But tied in with that is another aspect which I feel would be robbing my readers of a full understanding of my experience were I to exclude it. This involves these effects on an interpersonal level: an account of how…

  14. Significant influence of the boreal summer monsoon flow on the Indian Ocean response during dipole events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, Krishnan; Panickal, Swapna

    2010-05-01

    A majority of positive Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) events in the last 50-years were accompanied by enhanced summer-monsoon circulation and above-normal precipitation over central-north India. Given that IODs peak during boreal-autumn following the summer-monsoon season, this study examines the role of the summer-monsoon flow on the Indian Ocean (IO) response using a suite of ocean model experiments and supplementary data-diagnostics. The present results indicate that if the summer-monsoon Hadley-type circulation strengthens during positive-IOD events, then the strong off-equatorial south-easterly winds over the northern flanks of the intensified Australian High can effectively promote upwelling in the south-eastern tropical Indian Ocean and amplify the zonal-gradient of the IO heat-content response. While it is noted that a strong-monsoon cross-equatorial flow by itself may not generate a dipole-like response, a strengthening (weakening) of monsoon easterlies to the south-of-equator during positive-IOD events tends to reinforce (hinder) the zonal-gradient of the upper-ocean heat-content response. The findings show that an intensification of monsoonal-winds during positive-IOD periods produces nonlinear amplification of easterly wind-stress anomalies to the south-of-equator due to the nonlinear dependence of wind-stress on wind-speed. It is noted that such an off-equatorial intensification of easterlies over SH enhances upwelling in the eastern IO off Sumatra-Java; and the thermocline shoaling provides a zonal pressure-gradient which drives anomalous eastward equatorial under-currents (EUC) in the sub-surface. Furthermore, the combination of positive-IOD and stronger-than-normal monsoonal flow favors intensification of shallow transient meridional-overturning circulation in the eastern IO; and enhances the feed of cold subsurface off-equatorial waters to the EUC. References: P. Swapna and R. Krishnan 2008: Geophy. Res. Lett. 35, L14S04, doi: 10.1029/ 2008GL033430 R

  15. Two-stage approach for detection and reduction of motion artifacts in photoplethysmographic data.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Rajet; Natarajan, Balasubramaniam Bala; Warren, Steve

    2010-08-01

    Corruption of photopleythysmograms (PPGs) by motion artifacts has been a serious obstacle to the reliable use of pulse oximeters for real-time, continuous state-of-health monitoring. In this paper, we propose an automated, two-stage PPG data processing method to minimize the effects of motion artifacts. The technique is based on our prior work related to motion artifact detection (stage 1) [R. Krishnan, B. Natarajan, and S. Warren, "Analysis and detection of motion artifacts in photoplethysmographic data using higher order statistics,'' in Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Acoust., Speech, Signal Process. (ICASSP 2008), Las Vegas, Nevada, Apr. 2008, pp. 613-616] and motion artifact reduction (stage 2) [R. Krishnan, B. Natarajan, and S. Warren, "Motion artifact reduction in photoplethysmography using magnitude-based frequency domain independent component analysis,'' in Proc. 17th Int. Conf. Comput. Commun. Network, St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, Aug. 2008, pp. 1-5]. Regarding stage 1, we present novel and consistent techniques to detect the presence of motion artifact in PPGs given higher order statistical information present in the data. We analyze these data in the time and frequency domains (FDs) and identify metrics to distinguish between clean and motion-corrupted data. A Neyman-Pearson detection rule is formulated for each of the metrics. Furthermore, by treating each of the metrics as observations from independent sensors, we employ hard fusion and soft fusion techniques presented in [Z. Chair and P. Varshney, "Optimal data fusion in multiple sensor detection systems,'' IEEE Trans. Aerosp. Electron. Syst., AES, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 98-101, Jan. 1986] and [C. C. Lee and J. J. Chao, "Optimum local decision space partitioning for distributed detection,'' IEEE Trans. Aerosp. Electron. Syst., AES, vol. 25, no. 7, pp. 536-544, Jul. 1989], respectively, in order to fuse individual decisions into a global system decision. For stage two, we propose a motion artifact reduction method

  16. Chicken Essence for Cognitive Function Improvement: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Siew Li; Sudfangsai, Suthinee; Lumbiganon, Pisake; Laopaiboon, Malinee; Lai, Nai Ming; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2016-01-01

    Chicken essence (CE) is a popular traditional remedy in Asia, which is believed to improve cognitive functions. CE company claimed that the health benefits were proven with research studies. A systematic review was conducted to determine the cognitive-enhancing effects of CE. We systematically searched a number of databases for randomized controlled trials with human subjects consuming CE and cognitive tests involved. Cochrane's Risk of Bias (ROB) tool was used to assess the quality of trials and meta-analysis was performed. Seven trials were included, where six healthy subjects and one subject with poorer cognitive functions were recruited. One trial had unclear ROB while the rest had high ROB. For executive function tests, there was a significant difference favoring CE (pooled standardized mean difference (SMD) of -0.55 (-1.04, -0.06)) and another with no significant difference (pooled SMD of 0.70 (-0.001, 1.40)). For short-term memory tests, no significant difference was found (pooled SMD of 0.63 (-0.16, 1.42)). Currently, there is a lack of convincing evidence to show a cognitive enhancing effect of CE. PMID:26805876

  17. Fermionic entanglement that survives a black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Martinez, Eduardo; Leon, Juan

    2009-10-15

    We introduce an arbitrary number of accessible modes when analyzing bipartite entanglement degradation due to Unruh effect between two partners Alice and Rob. Under the single mode approximation (SMA) a fermion field only had a few accessible levels due to Pauli exclusion principle conversely to bosonic fields which had an infinite number of excitable levels. This was argued to justify entanglement survival in the fermionic case in the SMA infinite acceleration limit. Here we relax SMA. Hence, an infinite number of modes are excited as the observer Rob accelerates, even for a fermion field. We will prove that, despite this analogy with the bosonic case, entanglement loss is limited. We will show that this comes from fermionic statistics through the characteristic structure it imposes on the infinite dimensional density matrix for Rob. Surprisingly, the surviving entanglement is independent of the specific maximally entangled state chosen, the kind of fermionic field analyzed, and the number of accessible modes considered. We shall discuss whether this surviving entanglement goes beyond the purely statistical correlations, giving insight concerning the black hole information paradox.

  18. B-FEARS: The Belgian Felt Earthquake Alert and Report System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapagnani, G.; Lecocq, T.; Martin, H.; Devos, F.; Hendrickx, M.; van Camp, M. J.; Vanneste, K.; Camelbeeck, T.

    2009-12-01

    An automatic felt earthquake alert and report system, B-FEARS, was developed around the Belgian seismic network allowing seismologists to provide the authorities, the media and the public with information on local felt earthquakes a few minutes after their occurrence. Their magnitude is sometimes as small as ML = 0.6. This system is based on the analysis of the connection flow (see Figure) on the website of the Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB), in parallel to an automatic control of a web macroseismic inquiry based on the “Did you feel it?” of the U.S. Geological Survey (Wald et al., 1999), available on the ROB website since 2002. This information is neither as precise nor as reliable as the one supplied by the analysis of seismic signals, but is efficient thanks to the great population density in Belgium. For all events, a manual solution is provided; if the magnitude is large enough (ML>=1.4), source parameters are also automatically determined by SEISCOMP3, which has been implemented at the ROB during 2008 and fine tuned in collaboration with GFZ. 25 minutes website connection flow graphs for a ML 1.6 earthquake (2008-10-30) and a ML 2.5 (2008-12-20). For each date, the first dashed line represents the calculated t0 and the second the time B-FEARS triggered an alert.

  19. Pharmacopuncture for Cancer Care: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Soyeon; Zhang, Xiuyu; Lee, In-Seon; Cho, Seung-Hun; Chae, Younbyoung; Lee, Hyangsook

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pharmacopuncture, injection to acupoints with pharmacological medication or herbal medicine, is a new acupuncture therapy widely available in Korea and China for cancer-related symptoms. However, the evidence is yet to be clear. Objective. To determine pharmacopuncture's effectiveness on cancer-related symptoms. Methods. Eleven databases were searched for randomized controlled trials of pharmacopuncture in cancer patients. The Cochrane risk of bias (ROB) assessment tool was used for quality assessment. Results. Twenty-two studies involving 2,459 patients were included. Five trials of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) underwent meta-analysis. Pharmacopuncture significantly relieved severity of CINV compared with control group (3 trials, risk ratio (RR) 1.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.14–1.44). The frequency of CINV was also significantly reduced with pharmacopuncture (2 trials, RR 2.47, 95% CI = 2.12–2.89). Seventeen trials studied various symptoms, and in most studies, pharmacopuncture significantly relieved pain, ileus, hiccup, fever, and gastrointestinal symptoms and improved quality of life in various cancer patients. ROB was generally high. Conclusion. It may be suggested with caution that pharmacopuncture may help various symptom relief in cancer patients, but it is hard to draw a firm conclusion due to clinical heterogeneity and high ROB of the included studies, hence warranting further investigation. PMID:24899911

  20. Chicken Essence for Cognitive Function Improvement: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, Siew Li; Sudfangsai, Suthinee; Lumbiganon, Pisake; Laopaiboon, Malinee; Lai, Nai Ming; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2016-01-01

    Chicken essence (CE) is a popular traditional remedy in Asia, which is believed to improve cognitive functions. CE company claimed that the health benefits were proven with research studies. A systematic review was conducted to determine the cognitive-enhancing effects of CE. We systematically searched a number of databases for randomized controlled trials with human subjects consuming CE and cognitive tests involved. Cochrane’s Risk of Bias (ROB) tool was used to assess the quality of trials and meta-analysis was performed. Seven trials were included, where six healthy subjects and one subject with poorer cognitive functions were recruited. One trial had unclear ROB while the rest had high ROB. For executive function tests, there was a significant difference favoring CE (pooled standardized mean difference (SMD) of −0.55 (−1.04, −0.06)) and another with no significant difference (pooled SMD of 0.70 (−0.001, 1.40)). For short-term memory tests, no significant difference was found (pooled SMD of 0.63 (−0.16, 1.42)). Currently, there is a lack of convincing evidence to show a cognitive enhancing effect of CE. PMID:26805876

  1. Pharmacopuncture for cancer care: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Soyeon; Zhang, Xiuyu; Lee, In-Seon; Cho, Seung-Hun; Chae, Younbyoung; Lee, Hyangsook

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pharmacopuncture, injection to acupoints with pharmacological medication or herbal medicine, is a new acupuncture therapy widely available in Korea and China for cancer-related symptoms. However, the evidence is yet to be clear. Objective. To determine pharmacopuncture's effectiveness on cancer-related symptoms. Methods. Eleven databases were searched for randomized controlled trials of pharmacopuncture in cancer patients. The Cochrane risk of bias (ROB) assessment tool was used for quality assessment. Results. Twenty-two studies involving 2,459 patients were included. Five trials of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) underwent meta-analysis. Pharmacopuncture significantly relieved severity of CINV compared with control group (3 trials, risk ratio (RR) 1.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.14-1.44). The frequency of CINV was also significantly reduced with pharmacopuncture (2 trials, RR 2.47, 95% CI = 2.12-2.89). Seventeen trials studied various symptoms, and in most studies, pharmacopuncture significantly relieved pain, ileus, hiccup, fever, and gastrointestinal symptoms and improved quality of life in various cancer patients. ROB was generally high. Conclusion. It may be suggested with caution that pharmacopuncture may help various symptom relief in cancer patients, but it is hard to draw a firm conclusion due to clinical heterogeneity and high ROB of the included studies, hence warranting further investigation. PMID:24899911

  2. Fermionic entanglement that survives a black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Martínez, Eduardo; León, Juan

    2009-10-01

    We introduce an arbitrary number of accessible modes when analyzing bipartite entanglement degradation due to Unruh effect between two partners Alice and Rob. Under the single mode approximation (SMA) a fermion field only had a few accessible levels due to Pauli exclusion principle conversely to bosonic fields which had an infinite number of excitable levels. This was argued to justify entanglement survival in the fermionic case in the SMA infinite acceleration limit. Here we relax SMA. Hence, an infinite number of modes are excited as the observer Rob accelerates, even for a fermion field. We will prove that, despite this analogy with the bosonic case, entanglement loss is limited. We will show that this comes from fermionic statistics through the characteristic structure it imposes on the infinite dimensional density matrix for Rob. Surprisingly, the surviving entanglement is independent of the specific maximally entangled state chosen, the kind of fermionic field analyzed, and the number of accessible modes considered. We shall discuss whether this surviving entanglement goes beyond the purely statistical correlations, giving insight concerning the black hole information paradox.

  3. An invasive slug exploits an ant-seed dispersal mutualism.

    PubMed

    Meadley Dunphy, Shannon A; Prior, Kirsten M; Frederickson, Megan E

    2016-05-01

    Plant-animal mutualisms, such as seed dispersal, are often vulnerable to disruption by invasive species. Here, we show for the first time how a non-ant invasive species negatively affects seed dispersal by ants. We examined the effects of several animal species that co-occur in a temperate deciduous forest-including native and invasive seed-dispersing ants (Aphaenogaster rudis and Myrmica rubra, respectively), an invasive slug (Arion subfuscus), and native rodents-on a native myrmecochorous plant, Asarum canadense. We experimentally manipulated ant, slug, and rodent access to seed depots and measured seed removal. We also video-recorded depots to determine which other taxa interact with seeds. We found that A. rudis was the main disperser of seeds and that A. subfuscus consumed elaiosomes without dispersing seeds. Rodent visitation was rare, and rodent exclusion had no significant effect on seed or elaiosome removal. We then used data obtained from laboratory and field mesocosm experiments to determine how elaiosome robbing by A. subfuscus affects seed dispersal by A. rudis and M. rubra. We found that elaiosome robbing by slugs reduced seed dispersal by ants, especially in mesocosms with A. rudis, which picks up seeds more slowly than M. rubra. Taken together, our results show that elaiosome robbing by an invasive slug reduces seed dispersal by ants, suggesting that invasive slugs can have profound negative effects on seed dispersal mutualisms. PMID:26830293

  4. Inconsistency in the items included in tools used in general health research and physical therapy to evaluate the methodological quality of randomized controlled trials: a descriptive analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Assessing the risk of bias of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) is crucial to understand how biases affect treatment effect estimates. A number of tools have been developed to evaluate risk of bias of RCTs; however, it is unknown how these tools compare to each other in the items included. The main objective of this study was to describe which individual items are included in RCT quality tools used in general health and physical therapy (PT) research, and how these items compare to those of the Cochrane Risk of Bias (RoB) tool. Methods We used comprehensive literature searches and a systematic approach to identify tools that evaluated the methodological quality or risk of bias of RCTs in general health and PT research. We extracted individual items from all quality tools. We calculated the frequency of quality items used across tools and compared them to those in the RoB tool. Comparisons were made between general health and PT quality tools using Chi-squared tests. Results In addition to the RoB tool, 26 quality tools were identified, with 19 being used in general health and seven in PT research. The total number of quality items included in general health research tools was 130, compared with 48 items across PT tools and seven items in the RoB tool. The most frequently included items in general health research tools (14/19, 74%) were inclusion and exclusion criteria, and appropriate statistical analysis. In contrast, the most frequent items included in PT tools (86%, 6/7) were: baseline comparability, blinding of investigator/assessor, and use of intention-to-treat analysis. Key items of the RoB tool (sequence generation and allocation concealment) were included in 71% (5/7) of PT tools, and 63% (12/19) and 37% (7/19) of general health research tools, respectively. Conclusions There is extensive item variation across tools that evaluate the risk of bias of RCTs in health research. Results call for an in-depth analysis of items that should be used to

  5. Utilizing Nontraditional Data Sources for Near Real-Time Estimation of Transmission Dynamics During the 2015-2016 Colombian Zika Virus Disease Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Santillana, Mauricio; Mekaru, Sumiko R; McGinnis, Denise P; Khan, Kamran; Brownstein, John S

    2016-01-01

    Background Approximately 40 countries in Central and South America have experienced local vector-born transmission of Zika virus, resulting in nearly 300,000 total reported cases of Zika virus disease to date. Of the cases that have sought care thus far in the region, more than 70,000 have been reported out of Colombia. Objective In this paper, we use nontraditional digital disease surveillance data via HealthMap and Google Trends to develop near real-time estimates for the basic (R0) and observed (Robs) reproductive numbers associated with Zika virus disease in Colombia. We then validate our results against traditional health care-based disease surveillance data. Methods Cumulative reported case counts of Zika virus disease in Colombia were acquired via the HealthMap digital disease surveillance system. Linear smoothing was conducted to adjust the shape of the HealthMap cumulative case curve using Google search data. Traditional surveillance data on Zika virus disease were obtained from weekly Instituto Nacional de Salud (INS) epidemiological bulletin publications. The Incidence Decay and Exponential Adjustment (IDEA) model was used to estimate R0 and Robs for both data sources. Results Using the digital (smoothed HealthMap) data, we estimated a mean R0 of 2.56 (range 1.42-3.83) and a mean Robs of 1.80 (range 1.42-2.30). The traditional (INS) data yielded a mean R0 of 4.82 (range 2.34-8.32) and a mean Robs of 2.34 (range 1.60-3.31). Conclusions Although modeling using the traditional (INS) data yielded higher R0 estimates than the digital (smoothed HealthMap) data, modeled ranges for Robs were comparable across both data sources. As a result, the narrow range of possible case projections generated by the traditional (INS) data was largely encompassed by the wider range produced by the digital (smoothed HealthMap) data. Thus, in the absence of traditional surveillance data, digital surveillance data can yield similar estimates for key transmission parameters and

  6. Ovarian Torsion in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy Leading to Iatrogenic Preterm Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Vlachodimitropoulou Koumoutsea, Evangelia; Gupta, Manish; Hollingworth, Antony; Gorry, Anwen

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian torsion in the third trimester of pregnancy leading to a midline laparotomy and caesarean section for the delivery of a preterm baby is an uncommon event. As the woman is likely to present with nonspecific symptoms of lower abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting, ovarian torsion can often be misdiagnosed as appendicitis or preterm labour. Treatment and the opportunity to preserve the tube and ovary may consequently be delayed. We report the case of a multiparous woman who had undergone two previous caesarean sections at term, presenting at 35 weeks of gestation with a presumptive diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Ultrasonography described a cystic lesion 6 × 3 cm in the right adnexa, potentially a degenerating fibroid or a torted right ovary. MRI of the pelvis was unable to provide further clarity. The patient was managed by midline laparotomy and simultaneous detorsion of the ovarian pedicle and ovarian cystectomy together with caesarean section of a preterm infant. This report describes that prompt recognition and ensuring intraoperative access can achieve a successful maternal and fetal outcome in this rare and difficult scenario. Furthermore, we would like to emphasise that the risk for a pregnant woman and her newborn could be reduced by earlier diagnosis and management of ovarian masses (Krishnan et al., 2011). PMID:27066282

  7. Sequence and structure-specific elements of HERG mRNA determine channel synthesis and trafficking efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sroubek, Jakub; Krishnan, Yamini; McDonald, Thomas V.

    2013-01-01

    Human ether-á-gogo-related gene (HERG) encodes a potassium channel that is highly susceptible to deleterious mutations resulting in susceptibility to fatal cardiac arrhythmias. Most mutations adversely affect HERG channel assembly and trafficking. Why the channel is so vulnerable to missense mutations is not well understood. Since nothing is known of how mRNA structural elements factor in channel processing, we synthesized a codon-modified HERG cDNA (HERG-CM) where the codons were synonymously changed to reduce GC content, secondary structure, and rare codon usage. HERG-CM produced typical IKr-like currents; however, channel synthesis and processing were markedly different. Translation efficiency was reduced for HERG-CM, as determined by heterologous expression, in vitro translation, and polysomal profiling. Trafficking efficiency to the cell surface was greatly enhanced, as assayed by immunofluorescence, subcellular fractionation, and surface labeling. Chimeras of HERG-NT/CM indicated that trafficking efficiency was largely dependent on 5′ sequences, while translation efficiency involved multiple areas. These results suggest that HERG translation and trafficking rates are independently governed by noncoding information in various regions of the mRNA molecule. Noncoding information embedded within the mRNA may play a role in the pathogenesis of hereditary arrhythmia syndromes and could provide an avenue for targeted therapeutics.—Sroubek, J., Krishnan, Y., McDonald, T V. Sequence- and structure-specific elements of HERG mRNA determine channel synthesis and trafficking efficiency. PMID:23608144

  8. Disposal of Energy by UV-B Sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordlund, Thomas; Krishnan, Rajagopal

    2008-03-01

    Ideal sunscreens absorb dangerous UV light and dispose of the energy safely. ``Safe disposal'' usually means conversion to heat. However, efficient absorption entails a high radiative rate, which implies high energy-transfer and other rates, unless some process intervenes to ``defuse'' the excited state. We studied the excited-state kinetics of three UV-B (290-320 nm) sunscreens by absorption, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence. Excited-state rate analysis suggests that some sunscreens have low radiative-rate ``dark'' states, in addition to normal excited states.* We deduce dark states when sunscreens of high extinction coefficient do not show lifetimes and total emission consistent with such high radiative rates. A high radiative rate, accompanied by efficient fluorescence emission and/or transfer, may be unfavorable for a sunscreen. In spite of its dark excited state, padimate O shows significant re-emission of light in the UV-A (320-400 nm) and energy transfer to a natural component of excised skin, probably collagen. * Krishnan, R. and T.M. Nordlund (2007) J. Fluoresc. DOI 10.1007/s10895-007-0264-3.

  9. The second Mars microprobe is unloaded

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF- 2), Chris Voorhees (left) and Satish Krishnan (right), from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, remove the second Mars microprobe from a drum. Two microprobes will hitchhike on the Mars Polar Lander, scheduled to be launched Jan. 3, 1999, aboard a Delta II rocket. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars microprobes, called Deep Space 2, are part of NASA's New Millennium Program. They will complement the climate-related scientific focus of the lander by demonstrating an advanced, rugged microlaser system for detecting subsurface water. Such data on polar subsurface water, in the form of ice, should help put limits on scientific projections for the global abundance of water on Mars.

  10. The first Mars microprobe is unloaded

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF- 2), workers from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory open the drums containing the Mars microprobes that will hitchhike on the Mars Polar Lander. From left, they are Satish Krishnan, Charles Cruzan, Chris Voorhees and Arden Acord. Scheduled to be launched Jan. 3, 1999, aboard a Delta II rocket, the solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars microprobes, called Deep Space 2, are part of NASA's New Millennium Program. They will complement the climate-related scientific focus of the lander by demonstrating an advanced, rugged microlaser system for detecting subsurface water. Such data on polar subsurface water, in the form of ice, should help put limits on scientific projections for the global abundance of water on Mars.

  11. Soot scattering measurements in the visible and near-infrared spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    ZHU,JINYU; CHOI,MUN YOUNG; MULHOLLAND,GEORGE W.; GRITZO,LOUIS A.

    2000-02-08

    Scattering to extinction cross-section ratios, {rho}{sub se} were measured using the NIST Large Agglomerate Optics Facility for soot produced from ethene and acetylene laminar diffusion flames. Measurements were performed using light sources at 543.5 nm, 632.8 nm and 856 nm. The average scattering to extinction cross-section ratios for these wavelengths are equal to 0.246, 0.196, and 0.196 for ethene and 0.316, 0.230, and 0.239 for acetylene. The 856 nm measurements represent the longest wavelength for which accurate scattering measurements have been performed for soot. The size distribution and fractal properties of the two soots were determined to assess the effects of limited acceptance angle range, finite size of the sensor, and departure from cosine response on the uncertainty in the measurement of {rho}{sub se} The expanded relative uncertainty (95% confidence level) was found to be {+-}6% at the two visible wavelengths and {+-}8% at 856 nm. Both the magnitude and wavelength dependence of {rho}{sub se} for the present experiments are significantly different from those reported by Krishnan et al. for overfire soot produced using a turbulent flame. The results are compared with the predictions of fractal optics.

  12. Intraseasonal Variability of the South Asian Summer Monsoon: Present-day Simulations with the Regional Atmospheric Model HIRHAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanf, F. S.; Rinke, A.; Dethloff, K.

    2014-12-01

    Since 1950, observations show a robust negative trend of the seasonal rainfall associated with the South Asian summer monsoon over India coinciding with a continuous decrease in surface solar radiation ("dimming") over South Asia due to an increase of local aerosol emissions. On the intraseasonal timescale the summer monsoon fluctuates between periods of enhanced and reduced rainfall. The frequency of occurrence of these active and breaks monsoon phases affects directly the seasonal monsoon rainfall. This study investigates the regional pattern and changes of the South Asian monsoon for the period 1979-2012 using the regional atmospheric model HIRHAM5 with a horizontal resolution of 0.25° forced at the lateral and lower boundaries with ERA-Interim reanalysis data. Despite the dry bias in the mean summer monsoon rainfall over the Indian landmass, the simulated temperature and atmospheric circulation patterns are in agreement with the ERA-Interim reanalysis indicating a realistic representation of important dynamical summer monsoon features. In addition, mechanisms which controls active and break phases within the summer monsoon season are analyzed using daily outgoing longwave radiation model data as an identification tool of monsoon breaks as proposed by Krishnan et al. (2000). Model results reveal an increasing trend of the cumulative monsoon break days of around 1.4 days per year during the last 30 years. The possible link between this increasing of cumulative monsoon break days and the observed decrease of seasonal South Asian monsoon rainfall will be the scope of further investigations.

  13. Relaxation and short time dynamics of bulk liquids and fluids confined in spherical cavities and slit pores.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, S H; Ayappa, K G

    2005-12-15

    The density of states for bulk and confined fluids have been modeled using a recently proposed gamma distribution (Krishnan, S. H.; Ayappa, K. G. J. Chem. Phys. 2004, 121, 3197). The gamma distribution results in a closed form analytical expression for the velocity autocorrelation function and the relaxation time of the fluid. The two parameters of the gamma distribution are related analytically to the second and fourth frequency moments of the fluid using short time expansions. The predictions by the proposed gamma model are compared with the velocity autocorrelation functions obtained using the theory of instantaneous normal modes (INMs) and from molecular dynamics simulations. The model is applied to a bulk soft sphere liquid and fluids confined in a spherical cavity and slit-shaped pores. The gamma model is able to capture the resulting changes in relaxation time due to changes in density and temperature extremely well for both the bulk liquid and confined inhomogeneous fluid situations. In all cases, the predictions by the gamma model are superior to those obtained from the INM theory. In the case of the fluid confined in a slit pore, the loadings were obtained from a grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation where the pore is equilibrated with a bulk fluid. This is similar to a confinement situation in a surface force apparatus. The predicted relaxation times vs pore widths from the gamma model are seen to accurately capture the oscillations due to formation and disruption of layers within the slit pore. PMID:16375288

  14. Electromagnetically driven, fast opening and closing gas jet valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Elliott, Kristi Wilson; Geddes, C. G. R.; van Mourik, R. A.; Leemans, W. P.; Murphy, H.; Clover, M.

    2011-03-01

    The design and performance are presented of an electromagnetically driven gas valve [M. Krishnan, J. Wright, and T. Ma, Proceedings of the 13th Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop, Santa Cruz, CA, AIP Conf. Proc. No. 1086 (AIP, New York, 2008)] that opens in <100μs, closes in <500μs, and can operate at pressures of ˜1000psia to drive supersonic nozzles. Such a valve has applications to laser-plasma accelerators, where the fast opening and closing would allow sharper edges to the flow and also allow higher rep-rate operation without loading the vacuum chamber. The valve action is effected by a flyer plate accelerated by the electromagnetic impulse of a low inductance, spiral wound, strip-line coil driven by a capacitor. Gas flows out of the valve when the seal between this flyer plate and the valve seat is broken. The electromagnetic force greatly exceeds the restoring forces provided by a spring and the gas pressure against the valve seat. Piezoresistive sensor and laser interferometer measurements of flow show that the valve opens in ˜100μs for all pressures up to 800 psia. The closing time is 500μs, set by the spring constant and mass. The prototype valve has been operated with helium at 0.5 Hz and at 500 psia for ˜1 hour at a time with no cooling.

  15. Characterization of Sleep in Aplysia californica

    PubMed Central

    Vorster, Albrecht P.A.; Krishnan, Harini C.; Cirelli, Chiara; Lyons, Lisa C.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective: To characterize sleep in the marine mollusk, Aplysia californica. Design: Animal behavior and activity were assessed using video recordings to measure activity, resting posture, resting place preference, and behavior after rest deprivation. Latencies for behavioral responses were measured for appetitive and aversive stimuli for animals in the wake and rest states. Setting: Circadian research laboratory for Aplysia. Patients or Participants: A. californica from the Pacific Ocean. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Aplysia rest almost exclusively during the night in a semi-contracted body position with preferential resting locations in the upper corners of their tank. Resting animals demonstrate longer latencies in head orientation and biting in response to a seaweed stimulus and less frequent escape response steps following an aversive salt stimulus applied to the tail compared to awake animals at the same time point. Aplysia exhibit rebound rest the day following rest deprivation during the night, but not after similar handling stimulation during the day. Conclusions: Resting behavior in Aplysia fulfills all invertebrate characteristics of sleep including: (1) a specific sleep body posture, (2) preferred resting location, (3) reversible behavioral quiescence, (4) elevated arousal thresholds for sensory stimuli during sleep, and (5) compensatory sleep rebound after sleep deprivation. Citation: Vorster AP, Krishnan HC, Cirelli C, Lyons LC. Characterization of sleep in Aplysia californica. SLEEP 2014;37(9):1453-1463. PMID:25142567

  16. Prediction of blood:air and fat:air partition coefficients of volatile organic compounds for the interpretation of data in breath gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Christian; Mochalski, Paweł; Unterkofler, Karl; Agapiou, Agapios; Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Liedl, Klaus R

    2016-03-01

    In this article, a database of blood:air and fat:air partition coefficients (λ b:a and λ f:a) is reported for estimating 1678 volatile organic compounds recently reported to appear in the volatilome of the healthy human. For this purpose, a quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) approach was applied and a novel method for Henry's law constants prediction developed. A random forest model based on Molecular Operating Environment 2D (MOE2D) descriptors based on 2619 literature-reported Henry's constant values was built. The calculated Henry's law constants correlate very well (R(2) test  =  0.967) with the available experimental data. Blood:air and fat:air partition coefficients were calculated according to the method proposed by Poulin and Krishnan using the estimated Henry's constant values. The obtained values correlate reasonably well with the experimentally determined ones for a test set of 90 VOCs (R(2)  =  0.95). The provided data aim to fill in the literature data gap and further assist the interpretation of results in studies of the human volatilome. PMID:26815030

  17. Prediction of blood:air and fat:air partition coefficients of volatile organic compounds for the interpretation of data in breath gas analysis6

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Christian; Mochalski, Paweł; Unterkofler, Karl; Agapiou, Agapios; Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Liedl, Klaus R

    2016-01-01

    In this article, a database of blood:air and fat:air partition coefficients (λb:a and λf:a) is reported for estimating 1678 volatile organic compounds recently reported to appear in the volatilome of the healthy human. For this purpose, a quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) approach was applied and a novel method for Henry’s law constants prediction developed. A random forest model based on Molecular Operating Environment 2D (MOE2D) descriptors based on 2619 literature-reported Henry’s constant values was built. The calculated Henry’s law constants correlate very well (R2test = 0.967) with the available experimental data. Blood:air and fat:air partition coefficients were calculated according to the method proposed by Poulin and Krishnan using the estimated Henry’s constant values. The obtained values correlate reasonably well with the experimentally determined ones for a test set of 90 VOCs (R2 = 0.95). The provided data aim to fill in the literature data gap and further assist the interpretation of results in studies of the human volatilome. PMID:26815030

  18. Life assessment and emissions monitoring of Indian coal-fired power plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    At the request of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), the traveler, along with Dr. R. P. Krishnan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee spent three weeks in India planning and performing emissions monitoring at the coal-fired Vijayawada Thermal Power Station (VTPS). The coordination for the Indian participants was provided by BHEL, Trichy and CPRI, Bangalore. The trip was sponsored by the PETC under the United States Agency for International Development (USAID)/Government of India (GOI)P Alternate Energy Resources Development (AERD) Project. The AERD Project is managed by PETC, and ORNL is providing the technical coordination and support for four coal projects that are being implemented with BHEL, Trichy. The traveler, after briefing the USAID mission in New Delhi visited BHEL, Trichy and CPRI, Bangalore to coordinate and plan the emissions test program. The site selection was made by BHEL, CPRI, TVA, and PETC. Monitoring was performed for 4 days on one of the 4 existing 210 MW coal-fired boilers at the VTPS, 400 km north of Madras, India.

  19. Life assessment and emissions monitoring of Indian coal-fired power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    At the request of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), the traveler, along with Dr. R. P. Krishnan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee spent three weeks in India planning and performing emissions monitoring at the coal-fired Vijayawada Thermal Power Station (VTPS). The coordination for the Indian participants was provided by BHEL, Trichy and CPRI, Bangalore. The trip was sponsored by the PETC under the United States Agency for International Development (USAID)/Government of India (GOI)P Alternate Energy Resources Development (AERD) Project. The AERD Project is managed by PETC, and ORNL is providing the technical coordination and support for four coal projects that are being implemented with BHEL, Trichy. The traveler, after briefing the USAID mission in New Delhi visited BHEL, Trichy and CPRI, Bangalore to coordinate and plan the emissions test program. The site selection was made by BHEL, CPRI, TVA, and PETC. Monitoring was performed for 4 days on one of the 4 existing 210 MW coal-fired boilers at the VTPS, 400 km north of Madras, India.

  20. Two body and multibody interaction in a cold Rydberg gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jianing; Gallagher, Tom

    2009-05-01

    Cold Rydberg atoms trapped in a Magneto Optical Trap (MOT) are not isolated and they tend to bond through dipole-dipole and multiple-multiple interactions between Rydberg atoms. The dipole-dipole interaction and van der Waals interaction between two atoms have been intensively studied. However, the fact that the dipole-dipole interaction and van der Waals interaction show the same size of broadening, studied by Raithel's group, and there is transition between two molecular states, studied by Farooqi and Overstreet, can not be explained by the two atom picture. The purpose of this paper is to show the multibody nature of a dense cold Rydberg gas by studying the molecular state microwave spectrum. Specifically, single body, two body and three body interaction regions are separated. Moreover, the multibody energy levels for selected geometries are calculated. In addition, multibody blockade will be discussed. [3pt] [1] A. Reinhard, K. C. Younge, T. Cubel Liebisch, B. Knuffman, P. R. Berman, and G. Raithel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 233201 (2008).[0pt] [2] S.M. Farooqi, D. Tong, S. Krishnan, J. Stanojevic,Y.P. Zhang, J.R. Ensher, A.S. Estrin, C. Boisseau, R. Cote, E.E. Eyler, and P.L. Gould, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 183002 (2003).[0pt] [3] K. Richard Overstreet, Arne Schwettmann, Jonathan Tallant, and James P. Shaffer, Phys. Rev. A 76, 011403 (2007).

  1. Analysis of PCR Thermocycling by Rayleigh-Bénard Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ruchi; Ugaz, Victor

    2004-03-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated a novel device employing the circulatory flow field established by Rayleigh-Bénard convection to perform amplification of a 295 base target region from a human genomic DNA template inside a 35 uL cylindrical cavity using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) [Krishnan, Ugaz & Burns, Science, Vol. 298, 2002, p. 793]. This design eliminates the need for dynamic external temperature control required in conventional thermocyclers that repeatedly heat and cool static sample volumes to denaturation, annealing, and extension temperatures. In this paper, we extend these studies by demonstrating the design and operation of a multiwell convective flow device capable of achieving amplification of a 191 base pair fragment associated with membrane channel proteins M1 and M2 of the influenza-A virus in as little as 15 minutes with performance comparable to a conventional thermocycler. We also study the effect of initial template concentration and observe no degradation in performance over four orders of magnitude of initial template loading dilution, consistent with conventional thermocycler results. These results illustrate the ability of convective flow PCR systems to achieve performance equal to or exceeding conventional thermocycling hardware, and demonstrate their suitability for use in rapid biodetection assays.

  2. A Polarized Light Microscopic Study to Comparatively evaluate Four Remineralizing Agents on Enamel viz CPP-ACPF, ReminPro, SHY-NM and Colgate Strong Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Ramesh; Bhaskaran, Bibin; Kumar, Suresh V

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: To compare and evaluate the remineralizing potential of four commercially available products namely SHY-NM, GC Tooth Mousse Plus, ReminPro and Colgate strong teeth on demineralized human teeth. Materials and methods: The study included 50 extracted premolars having 3 × 3 mm window prepared on the middle third of the tooth, which was then subjected to demineralization for 48 hours at 37°C. Teeth were randomly selected and grouped into five study groups of 10 teeth in each. Each group was treated with respective remineralizing agent and sectioned using hard-tissue microtome. Each section obtained was visualized under polarized light microscope and analyzed using Image J software. Results: The statistically evaluated results revealed that SHY-NM has the most remineralizing potential followed by ReminPro, GC Tooth Mousse Plus and fluoridated toothpaste. Conclusion: Based on the study, the SHY-NM was superior to the GC Tooth Mousse Plus, ReminPro and Colgate strong teeth on demineralized human teeth. How to cite this article: Rajan R, Krishnan R, Bhaskaran B, Kumar SV. A Polarized Light Microscopic Study to Comparatively evaluate Four Remineralizing Agents on Enamel viz CPP-ACPF, ReminPro, SHY-NM and Colgate Strong Teeth. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(1):42-47. PMID:26124580

  3. Using design methods to provide the care that people want and need.

    PubMed

    Erwin, Kim; Krishnan, Jerry A

    2016-01-01

    Kim Erwin is an Assistant Professor at IIT Institute of Design and trained in user-centered design methods, which put people at the center of any problem space so as to develop solutions that better fit their everyday lives, activities and context. Her expertise is in making complex information easier to understand and use. Her research targets communication tools and methods for collaborative knowledge construction built through shared experiences. Her book, Communicating the New: Methods to shape and accelerate innovation focuses on helping teams explore, build and diffuse critical knowledge inside organizations. Jerry Krishnan is a Professor of Medicine and Public Health, and Associate Vice President for Population Health Sciences at the University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System. He pioneered the use of Analytic Hierarchy Process to elicit the expressed needs of stakeholders for research. He previously served as Chair of the US FDA Pulmonary and Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee and is a Principal Investigator in NIH and Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)-funded research consortia. He chairs the US National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Clinical Trials review committee and the PCORI Improving Healthcare Systems merit review panel. PMID:26698828

  4. Molecular studies of free and translocation trisomy

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, W.P.; Bernasconi, F.; Lefort, G.

    1994-09-01

    Twenty cases of trisomy 13 were examined with molecular markers to determine the origin of the extra chromosome. Six cases had translocation trisomy: two de novo rob(13q;14q), one paternally derived rob(13q;14q), two de novo t(13q;13q), and one mosaic de novo t(13q;14q), one paternally derived rob(13q;14q), two de novo t(13q;13q), and one mosaic de novo t(13q;13q)r(13). Eighteen of nineteen informative patients were consistant with a maternal origin of the extra chromosome. Lack of a third allele at any locus in any of the three t(13q;13q) cases indicate that all were most likely isochromosomes of post-meiotic origin. In addition, two free trisomy cases were compatible with a somatic origin. Two mosaic free trisomy-13 cases, however, were both consistent with a maternal meiotic origin. The patient with a paternal inheritance of the translocation chromosome was purely coincidental. Since there is not a significantly increased risk for unbalanced offspring of a t(13;14) carrier and most trisomies are maternal in origin, this result should not be surprising; however it illustrates that one cannot infer the origin of translocation trisomy based on parental origin of the translocation. One balanced (non-trisomic) case with a non-mosaic 45,-13,-13,+t(13;13) karyotype was also investigated and was determined to be a somatic Robertsonian translocation between the maternal and paternal homologs, as has been found for all homologous Robertsonian translocations so far investigated. It is therefore also incorrect to assume in de novo translocation cases that the two involved chromosomes are even from the same parent. We cannot therefore infer anything about the origin of the chromosomes 13 and 14 involved in the two cases with de novo t(13q;14q) plus a maternally derived trisomy 13.

  5. Gloss, colour and grip: multifunctional epidermal cell shapes in bee- and bird-pollinated flowers.

    PubMed

    Papiorek, Sarah; Junker, Robert R; Lunau, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Flowers bear the function of filters supporting the attraction of pollinators as well as the deterrence of floral antagonists. The effect of epidermal cell shape on the visual display and tactile properties of flowers has been evaluated only recently. In this study we quantitatively measured epidermal cell shape, gloss and spectral reflectance of flowers pollinated by either bees or birds testing three hypotheses: The first two hypotheses imply that bee-pollinated flowers might benefit from rough surfaces on visually-active parts produced by conical epidermal cells, as they may enhance the colour signal of flowers as well as the grip on flowers for bees. In contrast, bird-pollinated flowers might benefit from flat surfaces produced by flat epidermal cells, by avoiding frequent visitation from non-pollinating bees due to a reduced colour signal, as birds do not rely on specific colour parameters while foraging. Moreover, flat petal surfaces in bird-pollinated flowers may hamper grip for bees that do not touch anthers and stigmas while consuming nectar and thus, are considered as nectar thieves. Beside this, the third hypothesis implies that those flower parts which are vulnerable to nectar robbing of bee- as well as bird-pollinated flowers benefit from flat epidermal cells, hampering grip for nectar robbing bees. Our comparative data show in fact that conical epidermal cells are restricted to visually-active parts of bee-pollinated flowers, whereas robbing-sensitive parts of bee-pollinated as well as the entire floral surface of bird-pollinated flowers possess on average flat epidermal cells. However, direct correlations between epidermal cell shape and colour parameters have not been found. Our results together with published experimental studies show that epidermal cell shape as a largely neglected flower trait might act as an important feature in pollinator attraction and avoidance of antagonists, and thus may contribute to the partitioning of flower

  6. The Belgian National Seismic Monitoring Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Camp, M.; Lecocq, T.; Vanneste, K.; Rapagnani, G.; Martin, H.; Devos, F.; Bukasa, B.; Hendrickx, M.; Collin, F.; Camelbeeck, T.

    2009-04-01

    The Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB) is responsible for the seismic activity monitoring in Belgium. For this purpose the ROB operates a network of 24 seismic stations. In addition 18 accelerographs have been installed since 2001 in the most seismic active zones. Seismometers allow detecting and localizing any earthquake of magnitude larger than 1.0 in Belgium and surrounding regions. The location of the accelerometric stations is chosen in function of the type of sub-soil and in some places in function of the nearness of important infrastructures as well. Seven seismic stations are now sending their data in real time to the Observatory (in Uccle) using ADSL lines. This will be increased in a near future. Among them 3 broad-band stations are also sending data to the ORFEUS and IRIS data centres. IRIS also receives data from the Belgian superconducting gravimeter. In addition, in 2010, a broadband borehole seismometer is to be installed at the Princess Elizabeth Antarctic station (71°57' S - 23°20' E), on the bedrock, 180 km away from the coastline. Recently a low-cost seismic alert system was developed for the Belgian territory, based on the connection flow on the ROB website (http://www.seismology.be), in parallel to an automatic control of the "Did you feel it ?" macroseismic inquiries, implemented in 2002. The alert is then confirmed at the latest by the seismic signals from five seismic stations that appear on the website with a delay of more or less ten minutes. It was successfully tested during the earthquake sequence that has been observed in the region at the southwest of Brussels since July 2008.

  7. Nectar robbery by a hermit hummingbird: association to floral phenotype and its influence on flowers and network structure.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Pietro Kiyoshi; Vizentin-Bugoni, Jeferson; Dalsgaard, Bo; Sazima, Ivan; Sazima, Marlies

    2015-07-01

    Interactions between flowers and their visitors span the spectrum from mutualism to antagonism. The literature is rich in studies focusing on mutualism, but nectar robbery has mostly been investigated using phytocentric approaches focused on only a few plant species. To fill this gap, we studied the interactions between a nectar-robbing hermit hummingbird, Phaethornis ruber, and the array of flowers it visits. First, based on a literature review of the interactions involving P. ruber, we characterized the association of floral larceny to floral phenotype. We then experimentally examined the effects of nectar robbing on nectar standing crop and number of visits of the pollinators to the flowers of Canna paniculata. Finally, we asked whether the incorporation of illegitimate interactions into the analysis affects plant-hummingbird network structure. We identified 97 plant species visited by P. ruber and found that P. ruber engaged in floral larceny in almost 30% of these species. Nectar robbery was especially common in flowers with longer corolla. In terms of the effect on C. paniculata, the depletion of nectar due to robbery by P. ruber was associated with decreased visitation rates of legitimate pollinators. At the community level, the inclusion of the illegitimate visits of P. ruber resulted in modifications of how modules within the network were organized, notably giving rise to a new module consisting of P. ruber and mostly robbed flowers. However, although illegitimate visits constituted approximately 9% of all interactions in the network, changes in nestedness, modularity, and network-level specialization were minor. Our results indicate that although a flower robber may have a strong effect on the pollination of a particular plant species, the inclusion of its illegitimate interactions has limited capacity to change overall network structure. PMID:25740333

  8. Vertical Total Electron Content Maps Over Europe From EUREF Permanent Network GPS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeot, N.; Bruyninx, C.; Pireaux, S.; Defraigne, P.; Legrand, J.; Baire, Q.; Pottiaux, E.

    2009-04-01

    The study of the ionosphere over Europe is essential for applications in the field of geophysics and space weather research (e.g. seismic monitoring, study of the interaction between Sun and Atmosphere) and it can also provide valuable information in support of radio system transmissions. Moreover, GPS errors induced by the ionosphere will increase in the next years due to the growing solar activity since the beginning of the 24th sunspot cycle in March 2008. To better understand the physics of the ionosphere and its effects on GPS positioning, the Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB) is developing an automatic monitoring to detect rapid ionospheric changes in both time and space domains using the EUREF Permanent Network (EPN) GNSS data. In this study, we describe the method adopted by ROB to obtain 1°/1° hourly maps of the Vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) over Europe from the phase-smoothed code observations from 150 to 200 EPN stations. We focused on two characteristic ionospheric activity periods: 1) a period of rapid changes in the ionospheric state due to the Halloween geomagnetic super-storm of 29-31 October 2003; 2) a period of normal ionospheric activity in the beginning of 2008. To validate our results we compared our VTEC maps with Global Ionospheric Maps (GIM) GPS based products (e.g. from CODE, IGS). The comparisons during normal ionospheric activity show differences of 0.1±1 TECU between the ROB and GIM products. However, during rapid changes in the ionospheric state, the differences are estimated to 1±3 TECU. This is caused by the smoothing of the ionospheric signal in the GIM which are given for 2 hourly intervals on a 5°/2.5° grid. In conclusion, our TEC products are in good agreement with GIM products during normal ionospheric activity and allow to better detect rapid changes in the ionospheric state compared to global products.

  9. Effect of nursing home characteristics on residents' quality of life: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongjuan; Kane, Robert L; Shamliyan, Tatyana A

    2013-01-01

    The association between nursing home (NH) characteristics and residents' quality of life (QOL) has not been systematically reviewed. This study synthesizes published evidence about the association between NH ownership, affiliation, location, chain membership, percentage of private rooms, facility size, and staffing with residents' QOL. We searched Medline, Web of Science, CINAHL, and Scirus for primary studies published between 1960 and March 31, 2012. We critically appraised risk of bias according to study design, QOL measurements, and adjustment for residents' characteristics. We analyzed the statistical and clinical significance, direction and magnitude of the association. From 1117 citations retrieved, we found one longitudinal quasi-experimental and 10 cross-sectional eligible studies. Variability in the NH characteristics reported and QOL measurements precluded meta-analysis. Studies with low and medium risk of bias (ROB) suggested that nonprofit NHs resulted in better QOL for residents. The low ROB study indicated that in certain QOL domains, rural facilities and facilities with a higher percentage of private rooms were associated with better self-reported resident QOL. All low and medium ROB studies found that RN, LVN/LPN and total nursing staff had no significant relationship with QOL. One longitudinal quasi-experimental study indicated that the Green House with individualized care had better QOL than conventional NHs. The available evidence does not permit strong conclusions about the association between NH characteristics and residents' QOL. The evidence does, however, raise questions about whether NH structure alone can improve residents' QOL and how residents' QOL should be measured and improved. PMID:23623273

  10. Gloss, Colour and Grip: Multifunctional Epidermal Cell Shapes in Bee- and Bird-Pollinated Flowers

    PubMed Central

    Papiorek, Sarah; Junker, Robert R.; Lunau, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Flowers bear the function of filters supporting the attraction of pollinators as well as the deterrence of floral antagonists. The effect of epidermal cell shape on the visual display and tactile properties of flowers has been evaluated only recently. In this study we quantitatively measured epidermal cell shape, gloss and spectral reflectance of flowers pollinated by either bees or birds testing three hypotheses: The first two hypotheses imply that bee-pollinated flowers might benefit from rough surfaces on visually-active parts produced by conical epidermal cells, as they may enhance the colour signal of flowers as well as the grip on flowers for bees. In contrast, bird-pollinated flowers might benefit from flat surfaces produced by flat epidermal cells, by avoiding frequent visitation from non-pollinating bees due to a reduced colour signal, as birds do not rely on specific colour parameters while foraging. Moreover, flat petal surfaces in bird-pollinated flowers may hamper grip for bees that do not touch anthers and stigmas while consuming nectar and thus, are considered as nectar thieves. Beside this, the third hypothesis implies that those flower parts which are vulnerable to nectar robbing of bee- as well as bird-pollinated flowers benefit from flat epidermal cells, hampering grip for nectar robbing bees. Our comparative data show in fact that conical epidermal cells are restricted to visually-active parts of bee-pollinated flowers, whereas robbing-sensitive parts of bee-pollinated as well as the entire floral surface of bird-pollinated flowers possess on average flat epidermal cells. However, direct correlations between epidermal cell shape and colour parameters have not been found. Our results together with published experimental studies show that epidermal cell shape as a largely neglected flower trait might act as an important feature in pollinator attraction and avoidance of antagonists, and thus may contribute to the partitioning of flower

  11. Mapping the differential reddening in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonatto, C.; Campos, Fabíola; Kepler, S. O.

    2013-10-01

    We build differential-reddening maps for 66 Galactic globular clusters (GCs) with archival Hubble Space Telescope WFC/ACS F606W and F814W photometry. Because of the different GC sizes (characterized by the half-light radius Rh) and distances to the Sun, the WFC/ACS field of view (200 arcsec × 200 arcsec) coverage (Robs) lies in the range 1 ≲ Robs/Rh ≲ 15 for about 85 per cent of the sample, with about 10 per cent covering only the inner (Robs ≲ Rh) parts. We divide the WFC/ACS field of view across each cluster in a regular cell grid and extract the stellar-density Hess diagram from each cell, shifting it in colour and magnitude along the reddening vector until matching the mean diagram. Thus, the maps correspond to the internal dispersion of the reddening around the mean. Depending on the number of available stars (i.e. probable members with adequate photometric errors), the angular resolution of the maps range from ≈ 7 arcsec × 7 arcsec to ≈ 20 arcsec × 20 arcsec. We detect spatially variable extinction in the 66 GCs studied, with mean values ranging from < δE(B-V)> ≡ 0.018 (NGC 6981) up to <δE(B-V)> ≡ 0.016 (Palomar 2). Differential-reddening correction decreases the observed foreground reddening and the apparent distance modulus but, since they are related to the same value of E(B - V), the distance to the Sun is conserved. Fits to the mean-ridge lines of the highly extincted and photometrically scattered GC Palomar 2 show that age and metallicity also remain unchanged after the differential-reddening correction, but measurement uncertainties decrease because of the reduced scatter. The lack of systematic variations of <δE(B-V)> with both the foreground reddening and the sampled cluster area indicates that the main source of differential reddening is interstellar.

  12. SoxS Increases the Expression of the Zinc Uptake System ZnuACB in an Escherichia coli Murine Pyelonephritis Model

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Douglas M.

    2012-01-01

    Paralogous transcriptional regulators MarA, Rob, and SoxS act individually and together to control expression of more than 80 Escherichia coli genes. Deletion of marA, rob, and soxS from an E. coli clinical isolate prevents persistence beyond 2 days postinfection in a mouse model of pyelonephritis. We used microarray analysis to identify 242 genes differentially expressed between the triple deletion mutant and its parent strain at 2 days postinfection in the kidney. One of these, znuC of the zinc transport system ZnuACB, displayed decreased expression in the triple mutant compared to that in the parental strain, and deletion of znuC from the parental strain reduced persistence. The marA rob soxS triple deletion mutant was less viable in vitro under limited-Zn and Zn-depleted conditions, while disruption of znuC caused a reduction in the growth rates for the parental and triple mutant strains to equally low levels under limited-Zn or Zn-depleted conditions. Complementation of the triple mutant with soxS, but not marA or rob, restored the parental growth rate in Zn-depleted medium, while deletion of only soxS from the parental strain led to low growth in Zn-depleted medium. Both results suggested that SoxS is a major regulator responsible for growth under Zn-depleted conditions. Gel shift experiments failed to show direct binding of SoxS to the znuCB promoter, thus suggesting indirect control of znuCB expression by SoxS. While SoxS expression in the triple mutant fully restored persistence, increased expression of znuACB via a plasmid in this mutant only partially restored wild-type levels of persistence in the kidney. This work implicates SoxS control of znuCB expression as a key factor in persistence of E. coli in murine pyelonephritis. PMID:22210763

  13. COMMITTEES: SQM2006 Organising and International Advisory Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-12-01

    Organising Committee Kenneth Barish Huan Zhong Huang Joseph Kapusta Grazyna Odyniec Johann Rafelski Charles A Whitten Jr International Advisory Committee Jörg Aichelin Federico Antinori Tamas Biró Jean Cleymans Lazlo Csernai Tim Hallman Ulrich Heinz Sonja Kabana Rob Lacey Yu-Gang Ma Jes Madsen Yasuo Miake Berndt Mueller Grazyna Odyniec Helmut Oeschler Apostolos Panagiotou Johann Rafelski Hans Ritter Karel Safarik Jack Sandweiss Jürgen Schaffner-Bielich Wen-Qing Shen Georges Stephans Horst Stöcker Thomas Ullrich Bill Zajc

  14. The development of e-MERLIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrington, Simon; Beswick, Rob

    2016-06-01

    Deep in the heart of the Cheshire countryside lies Jodrell Bank Observatory, home to the UK's national facility for high-resolution radio astronomy: e-MERLIN, the enhanced Multi-Element Remote-Linked Interferometer Network. In this issue of A&G, the e-MERLIN team highlights some of its cutting-edge experiments, probing fundamental physical processes in our own galaxy, and reaching further out to higher redshift where radio astronomy can investigate cosmic history and evolution. In this first article, Simon Garrington and Rob Beswick explain how e-MERLIN came to be.

  15. Musical tradition, insurrection, and resurrection: the life and legacy of composer/bassist Charles Mingus.

    PubMed

    St Louis, E K

    1999-01-01

    Charles Mingus was perhaps the foremost straight-ahead jazz upright bassist and composer of his generation, blending the inspirational influences of gospel, jazz improvisation, and art music leanings into a unique style all his own. His demise from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in his fifth decade robbed the world of one of the great creative voices of American music. Aspects of Mingus' life, his career as a bassist, bandleader, and composer, and his neuromuscular illness are discussed, emphasizing his legacy for the disparate fields of jazz and neurology. PMID:10718524

  16. DIRECTOR/PRODUCER ROBERT ZEMECKIS DURING FILMING OF 'CONTACT' AT LC39 PRESS SITE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Robert Zemeckis, director/producer, and other Warner Bros. crew members oversee the filming of scenes for the movie 'Contact' at Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39 Press Site on January 30. The screenplay for 'Contact' is based on the best-selling novel by the late astronomer Carl Sagan. The cast includes Jodie Foster, Matthew McConaughey, John Hurt, James Woods, Tom Skerritt, David Morse, William Fichtner, Rob Lowe and Angela Bassett. Described by Warner Bros. as a science fiction drama, 'Contact' will depict humankind's first encounter with evidence of extraterrestrial life.

  17. FILMING OF 'CONTACT' AT LC39 PRESS SITE SEEN FROM VAB ROOF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The filming of scenes for the movie 'Contact' by Warner Bros.' cast and crew at Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39 Press Site on January 29 is captured by cameras on the roof of the Vehicle Assembly Building. The screenplay for 'Contact' is based on the best-selling novel by the late astronomer Carl Sagan. The cast includes Jodie Foster, Matthew McConaughey, John Hurt, James Woods, Tom Skerritt, David Morse, William Fichtner, Rob Lowe and Angela Bassett. Described by Warner Bros. as a science fiction drama, 'Contact' will depict humankind's first encounter with evidence of extraterrestrial life.

  18. MORIARTY, ZEMECKIS, BURGESS AND OTHERS DURING FILMING OF 'CONTACT' AT LC39 PRESS SITE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    From left, Bruce Moriarty, first assistant director; Robert Zemeckis, director/producer; Don Burgess, director of photography; and other Warner Bros. crew members oversee the filming of scenes for the movie 'Contact' at Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39 Press Site on January 29. The screenplay for 'Contact' is based on the best-selling novel by the late astronomer Carl Sagan. The cast includes Jodie Foster, Matthew McConaughey, John Hurt, James Woods, Tom Skerritt, David Morse, William Fichtner, Rob Lowe and Angela Bassett. Described by Warner Bros. as a science fiction drama, 'Contact' will depict humankind's first encounter with evidence of extraterrestrial life.

  19. FILMING OF 'CONTACT' AT LC39 PRESS SITE WITH VAB IN BACKGROUND

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    With the Vehicle Assembly Building looming in the background, Warner Bros.' cast and crew are filming scenes for the movie 'Contact' at Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39 Press Site on January 30. The screenplay for 'Contact' is based on the best- selling novel by the late astronomer Carl Sagan. The cast includes Jodie Foster, Matthew McConaughey, John Hurt, James Woods, Tom Skerritt, David Morse, William Fichtner, Rob Lowe and Angela Bassett. Described by Warner Bros. as a science fiction drama, 'Contact' will depict humankind's first encounter with evidence of extraterrestrial life.

  20. FILMING OF 'CONTACT' AT LC39 PRESS SITE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Warner Bros.' cast and crew are filming scenes for the movie 'Contact' at Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39 Press Site on January 30. The screenplay for 'Contact' is based on the best- selling novel by the late astronomer Carl Sagan. The cast includes Jodie Foster, Matthew McConaughey, John Hurt, James Woods, Tom Skerritt, David Morse, William Fichtner, Rob Lowe and Angela Bassett. Described by Warner Bros. as a science fiction drama, 'Contact' will depict humankind's first encounter with evidence of extraterrestrial life.

  1. FILMING OF 'CONTACT' AT LC39 PRESS SITE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Warner Bros.' cast and crew are filming scenes for the movie 'Contact' at Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39 Press Site on January 29. The screenplay for 'Contact' is based on the best- selling novel by the late astronomer Carl Sagan. The cast includes Jodie Foster, Matthew McConaughey, John Hurt, James Woods, Tom Skerritt, David Morse, William Fichtner, Rob Lowe and Angela Bassett. Described by Warner Bros. as a science fiction drama, 'Contact' will depict humankind's first encounter with evidence of extraterrestrial life.

  2. FILMING OF 'CONTACT' AT LC39 PRESS SITE WITH VAB IN BACKGROUND

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    With the Vehicle Assembly Building looming in the background, Warner Bros.' cast and crew are filming scenes for the movie 'Contact' at Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39 Press Site on January 29. The screenplay for 'Contact' is based on the best- selling novel by the late astronomer Carl Sagan. The cast includes Jodie Foster, Matthew McConaughey, John Hurt, James Woods, Tom Skerritt, David Morse, William Fichtner, Rob Lowe and Angela Bassett. Described by Warner Bros. as a science fiction drama, 'Contact' will depict humankind's first encounter with evidence of extraterrestrial life.

  3. Publication committee meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Publications Committee has oversight responsibility for the entire AGU publications program. It is supported in this activity by the Journals Board, the Books Board, and the Translations Board. The 1982-1984 committee is chaired by Thomas Graedel. Serving with him are David Atlas, Grant Gross, Jurate Landwehr, Peter Molnar, George Reid, and Rob Van der Voo.At its November 3-4 meeting the new committee spent much of its time acquainting its elf with the scope of the program, the current problems, and the potential opportunities. In addition to setting the background against which the work of the next two years would take place, the committee

  4. [Atopic eczema can be treated in a pre-emptive manner].

    PubMed

    Snellman, Erna

    2015-01-01

    The inflammation and itching associated with atopic eczema can rob the patient and even the whole family of their night's sleep. Cutaneous symptoms can be quickly alleviated with a glucocorticoid cream. Calcineurin inhibitors are an alternative to glucocorticoids. Regular washing of the skin must not be forgotten. In the treatment of moderate and severe atopic eczema, the frequency of applications of the medicinal cream is decreased only after the itching has ceased. Maintenance therapy does not seem to have more adverse effects than the conventional reactive mode of treatment, and can in fact be recommended especially for adults affected with moderate and severe atopic eczema. PMID:26245046

  5. Resistor array infrared projector nonuniformity correction: search for performance improvement II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świerkowski, Leszek; Joyce, Robert A.; Williams, Owen M.

    2007-04-01

    Research leading towards the continued improvement in resistor array infrared projector nonuniformity correction (NUC) is reported, particularly at low drive levels relevant to thermal imager and FLIR test and evaluation applications. Moire fringes have been successfully compensated, as has the checkerboard effect seen in earlier flood NUC measurements. With these improvements, the residual nonuniformity associated with the random spatial noise has been reduced successfully to the 0.1-0.2% rms level, equivalent to 20-60 mK noise equivalent temperature differences. The random noise is accompanied, however, by a low spatial frequency fixed pattern, currently unexplained but possibly attributable to busbar robbing in the electronic backplane.

  6. Resistor array infrared projector nonuniformity correction: search for performance improvement IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swierkowski, Leszek; Joyce, Robert A.; Williams, Owen M.

    2009-05-01

    We assess the issues that need to be addressed to ensure that a resistor array infrared projector is capable of validly simulating the real world. These include control of the additional sources of blurring and aliasing arising from the presence of the projector and its associated scene generation system, nonuniformity correction, busbar robbing, spurious back reflections and narcissus. In particular, we reconfirm that a 2 × 2 projector/unit-under-test pixel mapping ratio offers a good compromise for controlling the additional blurring and aliasing, and furthermore, we demonstrate achievement of projector nonuniformity noise equivalent temperature differences (NETDs) in the 20 mK range.

  7. Securitization of tobacco settlement payments to reduce states' conflict of interest.

    PubMed

    Sindelar, Jody; Falba, Tracy

    2004-01-01

    Securitization of the Master Settlement Agreement (MSA) payments from tobacco companies is hotly debated in states and policy circles. Securitization is issuing a bond backed by future payments in return for up-front money. Many public health advocates are strongly against securitization. However, securitization itself does not rob states of tobacco control. Rather, the issue is lack of commitment to tobacco control by states. Further, securitization can mitigate states' conflict of interest between keeping tobacco companies fiscally healthy to ensure their MSA payments and reducing tobacco sales for health reasons. States should not align with tobacco companies with the common interest of keeping tobacco companies fiscally healthy. PMID:15371384

  8. COMMITTEES: SQM2004 Organising and International Advisory Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-06-01

    Organising Committee Jean Cleymans (Chairman) Zeblon Vilakazi Roger Fearick Peter Steinberg Rory Adams Bruce Becker Sarah Blyth Gareth de Vaux Heather Gray Mark Horner Nawahl Razak Artur Szostak Spencer Wheaton International Advisory Committee Federico Antinori Tim Hallman John Harris Tetsuo Hatsuda Ulrich Heinz Huan Z Huang Sonja Kabana Volker Koch Rob Lacey Jes Madsen Yasuo Miake Maurizio Morando Berndt Mueller Grazyna Odyniec Helmut Oeschler Apostolos Panagiotou Josef Pochodzalla Johann Rafelski Karel Safarik Jack Sandweiss Jürgen Schaffner-Bielich Georges Stephans Horst Stoecker Herbert Stroebele Thomas Ullrich Orlando Villalobos-Baillie Bill Zajc Joseph Zimanyi

  9. Entanglement and discord: Accelerated observations of local and global modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doukas, Jason; Brown, Eric G.; Dragan, Andrzej; Mann, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the amount of entanglement and quantum discord extractable from a two-mode squeezed state as considered from the viewpoint of two observers, Alice (inertial) and Rob (accelerated). We find that using localized modes produces qualitatively different correlation properties for large accelerations than do Unruh modes. Specifically, the entanglement undergoes a sudden death as a function of acceleration, and the discord asymptotes to zero in the limit of infinite acceleration. We conclude that the previous Unruh mode analyses do not determine the acceleration-dependent entanglement and discord degradation of a given quantum state.

  10. Quantum communication with an accelerated partner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downes, T. G.; Ralph, T. C.; Walk, N.

    2013-01-01

    An unsolved problem in relativistic quantum information research is how to model efficient, directional quantum communication between localized parties in a fully quantum field-theoretical framework. We propose a tractable approach to this problem based on calculating expectation values of localized field observables in the Heisenberg picture. We illustrate our approach by analyzing, and obtaining approximate analytical solutions to, the problem of communicating coherent states between an inertial sender, Alice, and an accelerated receiver, Rob. We use these results to determine the efficiency with which continuous variable quantum key distribution could be carried out over such a communication channel.